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Sample records for active colloidal suspensions

  1. Universal Hydrodynamic Mechanisms for Crystallization in Active Colloidal Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rajesh; Adhikari, R.

    2016-11-01

    The lack of detailed balance in active colloidal suspensions allows dissipation to determine stationary states. Here we show that slow viscous flow produced by polar or apolar active colloids near plane walls mediates attractive hydrodynamic forces that drive crystallization. Hydrodynamically mediated torques tend to destabilize the crystal but stability can be regained through critical amounts of bottom heaviness or chiral activity. Numerical simulations show that crystallization is not nucleational, as in equilibrium, but is preceded by a spinodal-like instability. Harmonic excitations of the active crystal relax diffusively but the normal modes are distinct from an equilibrium colloidal crystal. The hydrodynamic mechanisms presented here are universal and rationalize recent experiments on the crystallization of active colloids.

  2. Nonequilibrium Equation of State in Suspensions of Active Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginot, Félix; Theurkauff, Isaac; Levis, Demian; Ybert, Christophe; Bocquet, Lydéric; Berthier, Ludovic; Cottin-Bizonne, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Active colloids constitute a novel class of materials composed of colloidal-scale particles locally converting chemical energy into motility, mimicking micro-organisms. Evolving far from equilibrium, these systems display structural organizations and dynamical properties distinct from thermalized colloidal assemblies. Harvesting the potential of this new class of systems requires the development of a conceptual framework to describe these intrinsically nonequilibrium systems. We use sedimentation experiments to probe the nonequilibrium equation of state of a bidimensional assembly of active Janus microspheres and conduct computer simulations of a model of self-propelled hard disks. Self-propulsion profoundly affects the equation of state, but these changes can be rationalized using equilibrium concepts. We show that active colloids behave, in the dilute limit, as an ideal gas with an activity-dependent effective temperature. At finite density, increasing the activity is similar to increasing adhesion between equilibrium particles. We quantify this effective adhesion and obtain a unique scaling law relating activity and effective adhesion in both experiments and simulations. Our results provide a new and efficient way to understand the emergence of novel phases of matter in active colloidal suspensions.

  3. EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    Special issue in honour of Henk Lekkerkerker's 65th birthday Professor Henk N W Lekkerkerker is a world-leading authority in the field of experimental and theoretical soft condensed matter. On the occasion of his 65th birthday in the summer of 2011, this special issue celebrates his many contributions to science. Henk Lekkerkerker obtained his undergraduate degree in chemistry at the University of Utrecht (1968) and moved to Calgary where he received his PhD in 1971. He moved to Brussels as a NATO fellow at the Université Libre de Bruxelles and was appointed to an assistant professorship (1974), an associate professorship (1977) and a full professorship (1980) in physical chemistry at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. In 1985 he returned to The Netherlands to take up a professorship at the Van 't Hoff Laboratory, where he has been ever since. He has received a series of awards during his career, including the Onsager Medal (1999) of the University of Trondheim, the Bakhuys Roozeboom Gold Medal (2003) of the Royal Dutch Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW), the ECIS-Rhodia European Colloid and Interface Prize (2003), and the Liquid Matter Prize of the European Physical Society (2008). He was elected a member of KNAW in 1996, was awarded an Academy Chair position in 2005, and has held several visiting lectureships. Henk's work focuses on phase transitions in soft condensed matter, and he has made seminal contributions to both the theoretical and experimental aspects of this field. Here we highlight three major themes running through his work, and a few selected publications. So-called depletion interactions may lead to phase separation in colloid-polymer mixtures, and Henk realised that the partitioning of polymer needs to be taken into account to describe the phase behaviour correctly [1]. Colloidal suspensions can be used as model fluids, with the time- and length-scales involved leading to novel opportunities, notably the direct observation of capillary waves at a

  4. Gold enrichment in active geothermal systems by accumulating colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannington, Mark; Harðardóttir, Vigdis; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter; Brown, Kevin L.

    2016-04-01

    The origins of high-grade hydrothermal ore deposits are debated, but active geothermal systems provide important clues to their formation. The highest concentrations of gold are found in geothermal systems with direct links to island arc magmatism. Yet, similar concentrations have also been found in the absence of any input from arc magmas, for example, in the Reykjanes geothermal field, Iceland. Here we analyse brine samples taken from deep wells at Reykjanes and find that gold concentrations in the reservoir zone have increased over the past seven years from an average of 3 ppb to 14 ppb. The metal concentrations greatly exceed the maximum solubility of gold in the reservoir under saturated conditions and are now nearly two orders of magnitude higher than in mid-ocean ridge black smoker fluids--the direct analogues of Reykjanes deep liquids. We suggest that ongoing extraction of brine, the resulting pressure drop, and increased boiling have caused gold to drop out of solution and become trapped in the reservoir as a colloidal suspension. This process may explain how the stock of metal in the reservoirs of fossil geothermal systems could have increased over time and thus become available for the formation of gold-rich ore deposits.

  5. Active colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranson, Igor S.

    2013-01-01

    A colloidal suspension is a heterogeneous fluid containing solid microscopic particles. Colloids play an important role in our everyday life, from food and pharmaceutical industries to medicine and nanotechnology. It is useful to distinguish two major classes of colloidal suspensions: equilibrium and active, i.e., maintained out of thermodynamic equilibrium by external electric or magnetic fields, light, chemical reactions, or hydrodynamic shear flow. While the properties of equilibrium colloidal suspensions are fairly well understood, active colloids pose a formidable challenge, and the research is in its early exploratory stage. One of the most remarkable properties of active colloids is the possibility of dynamic self-assembly, a natural tendency of simple building blocks to organize into complex functional architectures. Examples range from tunable, self-healing colloidal crystals and membranes to self-assembled microswimmers and robots. Active colloidal suspensions may exhibit material properties not present in their equilibrium counterparts, e.g., reduced viscosity and enhanced self-diffusivity, etc. This study surveys the most recent developments in the physics of active colloids, both in synthetic and living systems, with the aim of elucidation of the fundamental physical mechanisms governing self-assembly and collective behavior.

  6. Viscosity of colloidal suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, E.G.D.; Schepper, I.M. de

    1995-12-31

    Simple expressions are given for the effective Newtonian viscosity as a function of concentration as well as for the effective visco-elastic response as a function of concentration and imposed frequency, of monodisperse neutral colloidal suspensions over the entire fluid range. The basic physical mechanisms underlying these formulae are discussed. The agreement with existing experiments is very good.

  7. Physics of colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jiping

    Colloidal suspensions are complex fluids that consist of mesoscopic particles suspended in a solvent, e.g. water, oil, etc. In this thesis, the objective is to investigate the four aspects of colloidal suspensions: electrorotation, dielectrophoresis, dielectric dispersion spectrum, and nonlinear alternating current (AC) response. The traditional theories failed to fit the recent experimental data, and hence, for the purpose of a better fitting, we aim to develop new theories. In addition, our theories also predicted some new phenomena which are expected to be verified in experiments. Electrorotation has been increasingly employed as a sensitive tool for non-invasive studies of a broad variety of microparticles, ranging from living cells to spores and seeds, as well as synthetic materials. In order to analyze the abundant experimental data, we extend here the existing theory by taking into account crucial elements, such as inhomogeneities, multipolar interactions, nonspherical shapes as well as many-body (local-field) effects. Good agreement is shown between our theoretical results and the experimental data. Dielectrophoresis is typically used for micromanipulation and separation of biological cellular size particles, and it has recently been successfully applied to submicron size particles as well. Specific applications include diverse problems in medicine, colloidal science and nanotechnology. To analyze the recent experimental observations, we present a theory which includes the effects of both charging and multipolar interactions. Our theoretical results are favorably compared with the recent experimental observations. Recent experiments revealed that the dielectric dispersion spectrum of fission yeast cells in a suspension was mainly composed of two sub-dispersions. The low-frequency sub-dispersion depended on the cell length, while the high-frequency one was independent of it. However, the existing theory does not fit the experimental data. Hence, we here put

  8. Living Clusters and Crystals from Low-Density Suspensions of Active Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mognetti, B. M.; Šarić, A.; Angioletti-Uberti, S.; Cacciuto, A.; Valeriani, C.; Frenkel, D.

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies aimed at investigating artificial analogs of bacterial colonies have shown that low-density suspensions of self-propelled particles confined in two dimensions can assemble into finite aggregates that merge and split, but have a typical size that remains constant (living clusters). In this Letter, we address the problem of the formation of living clusters and crystals of active particles in three dimensions. We study two systems: self-propelled particles interacting via a generic attractive potential and colloids that can move toward each other as a result of active agents (e.g., by molecular motors). In both cases, fluidlike “living” clusters form. We explain this general feature in terms of the balance between active forces and regression to thermodynamic equilibrium. This balance can be quantified in terms of a dimensionless number that allows us to collapse the observed clustering behavior onto a universal curve. We also discuss how active motion affects the kinetics of crystal formation.

  9. Collective behavior in out-of-equilibrium colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranson, Igor S.

    2013-06-01

    Colloidal suspensions, heterogeneous fluids containing solid microscopic particles, play an important role in our everyday life, from food and pharmaceutical industries to medicine and nanotechnology. Colloidal suspensions can be divided in two major classes: equilibrium, and active, i.e. maintained out of thermodynamic equilibrium by external electric or magnetic fields, light, chemical reactions, or hydrodynamic shear flow. While the properties of equilibrium colloidal suspensions are fairly well understood, out-of-equilibrium colloids pose a formidable challenge and the research is in its early exploratory stage. The possibility of dynamic self-assembly, a natural tendency of simple building blocks to organize into complex functional architectures, is one of the most remarkable properties of out-of-equilibrium colloids. Examples range from tunable, self-healing colloidal crystals and membranes to self-assembled microswimmers and robots. In contrast to their equilibrium counterparts, out-of-equilibrium colloidal suspensions may exhibit novel material properties, e.g. reduced viscosity, enhanced self-diffusivity, etc. This work reviews recent developments in the field of self-assembly and collective behavior of out-of-equilibrium colloids, with the focus on the fundamental physical mechanisms.

  10. Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulation of colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamali, Safa; Boromand, Arman; Maia, Joao

    2014-03-01

    DPD as a mesoscale method was firstly proposed to study dynamics of suspensions under flow condition. However the proposed method failed to capture shear properties of suspensions because it lacked: first a potential to reproduce lubrication forces and second a clear definition for the colloid surface. Recently we reported a modified DPD method which defines colloidal particles as particles with hard core and a dissipative coat. An additional lubrication force was introduced to include the short-range hydrodynamics that are not captured in original DPD. The model was found to be able to reproduce shear properties of suspensions for a wide range of different systems, from monodisperse to bimodal with different volume fractions, compositions and size ratios. In present work our modified DPD method is employed to study both equilibrium and flow properties of colloidal suspension. Zero shear viscosity of suspension is measured using Green-Kubo expressions and the results are compared to theoretical predictions. Furthermore, structure formation in suspensions is studied in respect to energy landscape of the fluid both at rest and under flow.

  11. Rheological properties of Cubic colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boromand, Arman; Maia, Joao

    2016-11-01

    Colloidal and non-colloidal suspensions are ubiquitous in many industrial application. There are numerous studies on these systems to understand and relate their complex rheological properties to their microstructural evolution under deformation. Although most of the experimental and simulation studies are centered on spherical particles, in most of the industrial applications the geometry of the colloidal particles deviate from the simple hard sphere and more complex geometries exist. Recent advances in microfabrication paved the way to fabricate colloidal particles with complex geometries for applications in different areas such as drug delivery where the fundamental understanding of their dynamics has remained unexplored. In this study, using dissipative particle dynamics, we investigate the rheological properties of cubic (superball) particles which are modeled as the cluster of core-modified DPD particles. Explicit representation of solvent particles in the DPD scheme will conserve the full hydrodynamic interactions between colloidal particles. Rheological properties of these cubic suspensions are investigated in the dilute and semi-dilute regimes. The Einstein and Huggins coefficients for these particles with different superball exponent will be calculate which represent the effect of single particle's geometry and multibody interactions on viscosity, respectively. The response of these suspensions is investigated under simple shear and oscillatory shear where it is shown that under oscillation these particles tend to form crystalline structure giving rise to stronger shear-thinning behavior recently measured experimentally.

  12. Electroneutrality and phase behavior of colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, A. R.

    2007-11-01

    Several statistical mechanical theories predict that colloidal suspensions of highly charged macroions and monovalent microions can exhibit unusual thermodynamic phase behavior when strongly deionized. Density-functional, extended Debye-Hückel, and response theories, within mean-field and linearization approximations, predict a spinodal phase instability of charged colloids below a critical salt concentration. Poisson-Boltzmann cell model studies of suspensions in Donnan equilibrium with a salt reservoir demonstrate that effective interactions and osmotic pressures predicted by such theories can be sensitive to the choice of reference system, e.g., whether the microion density profiles are expanded about the average potential of the suspension or about the reservoir potential. By unifying Poisson-Boltzmann and response theories within a common perturbative framework, it is shown here that the choice of reference system is dictated by the constraint of global electroneutrality. On this basis, bulk suspensions are best modeled by density-dependent effective interactions derived from a closed reference system in which the counterions are confined to the same volume as the macroions. Lower-dimensional systems (e.g., monolayers, clusters), depending on the strength of macroion-counterion correlations, may be governed instead by density-independent effective interactions tied to an open reference system with counterions dispersed throughout the reservoir, possibly explaining the observed structural crossover in colloidal monolayers and anomalous metastability of colloidal crystallites.

  13. CGEL-2: Structural Studies of Colloidal Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    These are images of CGEL-2 samples taken during STS-95. They show binary colloidal suspensions that have formed ordered crystalline structures in microgravity. In sample 5, there are more particles therefore, many, many crystallites (small crystals) form. In sample 6, there are less particles therefore, the particles are far apart and few, much larger crystallites form. The white object in the right corner of sample 5 is the stir bar used to mix the sample at the begirning of the mission.

  14. Convection of a stratified colloidal suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepanov, I. N.; Smorodin, B. L.

    2013-11-15

    The convection of a colloidal suspension, which is a binary mixture of a carrier medium with an admixture of nanoparticles having a large positive thermal diffusion parameter, has been studied for the case of the heating of a horizontal cell from below and periodic conditions at the vertical boundaries corresponding to the experimental situation of ring channels. Bifurcation diagrams have been constructed for vibrational and monotonic regimes of the convection of the colloidal mixture. The time dependences of the maximum stream function and the stream function at a fixed point of the cell, as well as the spatial distributions of the concentration field of the colloid admixture, have been obtained. It has been shown that a stable regime of traveling waves exists in a certain region of the parameters of the problem (Boltzmann and Rayleigh numbers characterizing the gravitational stratification and intensity of the thermal effect, respectively)

  15. Armoring confined bubbles in concentrated colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yingxian; Khodaparast, Sepideh; Stone, Howard

    2016-11-01

    Encapsulation of a bubble with microparticles is known to significantly improve the stability of the bubble. This phenomenon has recently gained increasing attention due to its application in a variety of technologies such as foam stabilization, drug encapsulation and colloidosomes. Nevertheless, the production of such colloidal armored bubble with controlled size and particle coverage ratio is still a great challenge industrially. We study the coating process of a long air bubble by microparticles in a circular tube filled with a concentrated microparticles colloidal suspension. As the bubble proceeds in the suspension of particles, a monolayer of micro-particles forms on the interface of the bubble, which eventually results in a fully armored bubble. We investigate the phenomenon that triggers and controls the evolution of the particle accumulation on the bubble interface. Moreover, we examine the effects of the mean flow velocity, the size of the colloids and concentration of the suspension on the dynamics of the armored bubble. The results of this study can potentially be applied to production of particle-encapsulated bubbles, surface-cleaning techniques, and gas-assisted injection molding.

  16. Anomalous electrical conductivity of nanoscale colloidal suspensions.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Suman; Padhy, Sourav

    2008-10-28

    The electrical conductivity of colloidal suspensions containing nanoscale conducting particles is nontrivially related to the particle volume fraction and the electrical double layer thickness. Classical electrochemical models, however, tend to grossly overpredict the pertinent effective electrical conductivity values, as compared to those obtained under experimental conditions. We attempt to address this discrepancy by appealing to the complex interconnection between the aggregation kinetics of the nanoscale particles and the electrodynamics within the double layer. In particular, we model the consequent alterations in the effective electrophoretic mobility values of the suspension by addressing the fundamentals of agglomeration-deagglomeration mechanisms through the pertinent variations in the effective particulate dimensions, solid fractions, as well as the equivalent suspension viscosity. The consequent alterations in the electrical conductivity values provide a substantially improved prediction of the corresponding experimental findings and explain the apparent anomalous behavior predicted by the classical theoretical postulates.

  17. Theory of activated penetrant diffusion in viscous fluids and colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Schweizer, Kenneth S.

    2015-10-01

    We heuristically formulate a microscopic, force level, self-consistent nonlinear Langevin equation theory for activated barrier hopping and non-hydrodynamic diffusion of a hard sphere penetrant in very dense hard sphere fluid matrices. Penetrant dynamics is controlled by a rich competition between force relaxation due to penetrant self-motion and collective matrix structural (alpha) relaxation. In the absence of penetrant-matrix attraction, three activated dynamical regimes are predicted as a function of penetrant-matrix size ratio which are physically distinguished by penetrant jump distance and the nature of matrix motion required to facilitate its hopping. The penetrant diffusion constant decreases the fastest with size ratio for relatively small penetrants where the matrix effectively acts as a vibrating amorphous solid. Increasing penetrant-matrix attraction strength reduces penetrant diffusivity due to physical bonding. For size ratios approaching unity, a distinct dynamical regime emerges associated with strong slaving of penetrant hopping to matrix structural relaxation. A crossover regime at intermediate penetrant-matrix size ratio connects the two limiting behaviors for hard penetrants, but essentially disappears if there are strong attractions with the matrix. Activated penetrant diffusivity decreases strongly with matrix volume fraction in a manner that intensifies as the size ratio increases. We propose and implement a quasi-universal approach for activated diffusion of a rigid atomic/molecular penetrant in a supercooled liquid based on a mapping between the hard sphere system and thermal liquids. Calculations for specific systems agree reasonably well with experiments over a wide range of temperature, covering more than 10 orders of magnitude of variation of the penetrant diffusion constant.

  18. Theory of activated penetrant diffusion in viscous fluids and colloidal suspensions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Schweizer, Kenneth S

    2015-10-14

    We heuristically formulate a microscopic, force level, self-consistent nonlinear Langevin equation theory for activated barrier hopping and non-hydrodynamic diffusion of a hard sphere penetrant in very dense hard sphere fluid matrices. Penetrant dynamics is controlled by a rich competition between force relaxation due to penetrant self-motion and collective matrix structural (alpha) relaxation. In the absence of penetrant-matrix attraction, three activated dynamical regimes are predicted as a function of penetrant-matrix size ratio which are physically distinguished by penetrant jump distance and the nature of matrix motion required to facilitate its hopping. The penetrant diffusion constant decreases the fastest with size ratio for relatively small penetrants where the matrix effectively acts as a vibrating amorphous solid. Increasing penetrant-matrix attraction strength reduces penetrant diffusivity due to physical bonding. For size ratios approaching unity, a distinct dynamical regime emerges associated with strong slaving of penetrant hopping to matrix structural relaxation. A crossover regime at intermediate penetrant-matrix size ratio connects the two limiting behaviors for hard penetrants, but essentially disappears if there are strong attractions with the matrix. Activated penetrant diffusivity decreases strongly with matrix volume fraction in a manner that intensifies as the size ratio increases. We propose and implement a quasi-universal approach for activated diffusion of a rigid atomic/molecular penetrant in a supercooled liquid based on a mapping between the hard sphere system and thermal liquids. Calculations for specific systems agree reasonably well with experiments over a wide range of temperature, covering more than 10 orders of magnitude of variation of the penetrant diffusion constant.

  19. Theory of activated penetrant diffusion in viscous fluids and colloidal suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rui; Schweizer, Kenneth S.

    2015-10-14

    We heuristically formulate a microscopic, force level, self-consistent nonlinear Langevin equation theory for activated barrier hopping and non-hydrodynamic diffusion of a hard sphere penetrant in very dense hard sphere fluid matrices. Penetrant dynamics is controlled by a rich competition between force relaxation due to penetrant self-motion and collective matrix structural (alpha) relaxation. In the absence of penetrant-matrix attraction, three activated dynamical regimes are predicted as a function of penetrant-matrix size ratio which are physically distinguished by penetrant jump distance and the nature of matrix motion required to facilitate its hopping. The penetrant diffusion constant decreases the fastest with size ratio for relatively small penetrants where the matrix effectively acts as a vibrating amorphous solid. Increasing penetrant-matrix attraction strength reduces penetrant diffusivity due to physical bonding. For size ratios approaching unity, a distinct dynamical regime emerges associated with strong slaving of penetrant hopping to matrix structural relaxation. A crossover regime at intermediate penetrant-matrix size ratio connects the two limiting behaviors for hard penetrants, but essentially disappears if there are strong attractions with the matrix. Activated penetrant diffusivity decreases strongly with matrix volume fraction in a manner that intensifies as the size ratio increases. We propose and implement a quasi-universal approach for activated diffusion of a rigid atomic/molecular penetrant in a supercooled liquid based on a mapping between the hard sphere system and thermal liquids. Calculations for specific systems agree reasonably well with experiments over a wide range of temperature, covering more than 10 orders of magnitude of variation of the penetrant diffusion constant.

  20. Source of cytotoxicity in a colloidal silver nanoparticle suspension.

    PubMed

    Hatipoglu, Manolya Kukut; Keleştemur, Seda; Altunbek, Mine; Culha, Mustafa

    2015-05-15

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are increasingly used in a variety of applications because of their potential antimicrobial activity and their plasmonic and conductivity properties. In this study, we investigated the source of cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production on human dermal fibroblast and human lung cancer (A549) cell lines upon exposure to AgNP colloidal suspensions prepared with the simplest and most commonly used Lee–Meisel method with a variety of reaction times and the concentrations of the reducing agent. The AgNPs synthesized with shorter reaction times were more cytotoxic and genotoxic due to the presence of a few nanometer-sized AgNP seeds. The suspensions prepared with an increased citrate concentration were not cytotoxic, but they induced more ROS generation on A549 cells due to the high citrate concentration. The genotoxicity of the suspension decreased significantly at the higher citrate concentrations. The analysis of both transmission electron microscopy images from the dried droplet areas of the colloidal suspensions and toxicity data indicated that the AgNP seeds were the major source of toxicity. The completion of the nucleation step and the formation of larger AgNPs effectively decreased the toxicity.

  1. Source of cytotoxicity in a colloidal silver nanoparticle suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukut Hatipoglu, Manolya; Keleştemur, Seda; Altunbek, Mine; Culha, Mustafa

    2015-05-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are increasingly used in a variety of applications because of their potential antimicrobial activity and their plasmonic and conductivity properties. In this study, we investigated the source of cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production on human dermal fibroblast and human lung cancer (A549) cell lines upon exposure to AgNP colloidal suspensions prepared with the simplest and most commonly used Lee-Meisel method with a variety of reaction times and the concentrations of the reducing agent. The AgNPs synthesized with shorter reaction times were more cytotoxic and genotoxic due to the presence of a few nanometer-sized AgNP seeds. The suspensions prepared with an increased citrate concentration were not cytotoxic, but they induced more ROS generation on A549 cells due to the high citrate concentration. The genotoxicity of the suspension decreased significantly at the higher citrate concentrations. The analysis of both transmission electron microscopy images from the dried droplet areas of the colloidal suspensions and toxicity data indicated that the AgNP seeds were the major source of toxicity. The completion of the nucleation step and the formation of larger AgNPs effectively decreased the toxicity.

  2. Colloid suspension stability and transport through unsaturated porous media

    SciTech Connect

    McGraw, M.A.; Kaplan, D.I.

    1997-04-01

    Contaminant transport is traditionally modeled in a two-phase system: a mobile aqueous phase and an immobile solid phase. Over the last 15 years, there has been an increasing awareness of a third, mobile solid phase. This mobile solid phase, or mobile colloids, are organic or inorganic submicron-sized particles that move with groundwater flow. When colloids are present, the net effect on radionuclide transport is that radionuclides can move faster through the system. It is not known whether mobile colloids exist in the subsurface environment of the Hanford Site. Furthermore, it is not known if mobile colloids would likely exist in a plume emanating from a Low Level Waste (LLW) disposal site. No attempt was made in this study to ascertain whether colloids would form. Instead, experiments and calculations were conducted to evaluate the likelihood that colloids, if formed, would remain in suspension and move through saturated and unsaturated sediments. The objectives of this study were to evaluate three aspects of colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides as they specifically relate to the LLW Performance Assessment. These objectives were: (1) determine if the chemical conditions likely to exist in the near and far field of the proposed disposal site are prone to induce flocculation (settling of colloids from suspension) or dispersion of naturally occurring Hanford colloids, (2) identify the important mechanisms likely involved in the removal of colloids from a Hanford sediment, and (3) determine if colloids can move through unsaturated porous media.

  3. Measuring colloidal osmotic compressibility of a polymer-crowded colloidal suspension by optical trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jinxin; Kara, Vural; Ou-Yang, H. Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Particle interactions determine the stability of nanoparticle suspensions and the phase separation of particle-polymer mixtures. However, due to the small sizes of the dispersed nanoparticles, it is not easy to directly measure interaction forces between particles in a colloidal suspension. In this paper, we propose an ``Optical Bottle'' approach to quantify these particle interactions in a suspension by measuring the colloidal osmotic compressibility of the nanoparticles. Virial expansion of the colloidal osmotic compressibility yields virial coefficients of different orders. The second order virial coefficient of aqueous suspensions of colloidal polystyrene nanospheres in the presence of high-salt (KCl) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) is found to decrease with increasing PEG concentration, suggesting an attractive depletion interaction between the PEG-crowed polystyrene particles.

  4. Coarsening mechanics of a colloidal suspension in toggled fields.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Jonathan L; Liu, Yifei; Kurian, Martin J; Swan, James W; Furst, Eric M

    2015-08-21

    Suspensions of paramagnetic colloids are driven to phase separate and self-assemble in toggled magnetic fields. At field strengths above 575 A/m and toggle frequencies between 0.66 and 2 Hz, an initial gel-like, arrested network collapses into condensed, ellipsoidal aggregates. The evolution to this equilibrium structure occurs via a Rayleigh-Plateau instability. The toggle frequency ν determines the fluidity of the breakup process. At frequencies between 0.66 and 1.5 Hz, the suspension breaks up similar to a viscous, Newtonian fluid. At frequencies ν > 1.5 Hz, the network ruptures like a viscoplastic material. The field strength alters the onset time of the instability. A power law relationship emerges as the scaled frequency and field strength can be used to predict the onset of breakup. These results further aid in understanding the mechanics and dynamics of the phase separation process of suspensions of polarizable colloids in toggled external fields.

  5. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Acoustic Properties of Colloidal Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguez, Cecilia; Esquivel-Sirvent, Raul; Ramírez-Santiago, Guillermo

    1998-03-01

    Recent experiments of ultrasound waves in colloidal suspensions [1] have found that the acoustic velocity and attenuation exhibit an anomalous behavior close to the solid volume concentration of 40%. Currently, there appears that there is no clear understanding of these results. Motivated by these observations we have carried out extensive non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to study the propagation of pressure waves through a colloidal suspension. The simulations consider the far from equilibrium corrections and calculate the viscosity and attenuation of sound waves traveling in the suspension. These quantities are studied as functions of frecuency and volume fraction. The possible relation between the results from the simulations and the experimental observatios is briefly discussed. [1] R. Esquivel-Sirvent and D. H. Green, Appl. Phys. Lett. 67, 3087 (1995); ibid, Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. 407, p. 99 (1996).

  6. Evaporation induced ordering in polymer-colloid suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senses, Erkan; Black, Matthew; Cunningham, Thomas; Akcora, Pinar

    2013-03-01

    When evaporated from aqueous solutions, colloidal particles tend to deposit non-uniformly on hydrophilic substrates due to capillary flow from the center of droplet to the pinned contact line. The so called ``coffee-ring'' deposition has been extensively studied in polymer solutions and colloidal suspensions; however, the behavior of the mixtures of polymer-colloid suspensions under evaporation remains unexplored. The competition between the homogenous fluid phase and the depletion induced phase separation offers rich phase behavior to these three component systems over a wide range of size ratios and concentrations. In this work, we present the formation of long-range, ordered colloid-rich and polymer-rich phases with a well-defined periodicity from homogenous mixture of colloids and polymer via solvent evaporation. The kinetics of the phase separation, studied by video microscopy and Fourier transform analysis of the images obtained at different times, suggests that the early growth of the phases can be quantitatively described by spinodal decomposition kinetics. The effect of particle and polymer concentrations, polymer and particle size ratios, interparticle bridging and substrate on microscopic phase separation will be discussed.

  7. Quantitatively mimicking wet colloidal suspensions with dry granular media.

    PubMed

    Messina, René; Aljawhari, Sarah; Bécu, Lydiane; Schockmel, Julien; Lumay, Geoffroy; Vandewalle, Nicolas

    2015-06-01

    Athermal two-dimensional granular systems are exposed to external mechanical noise leading to Brownian-like motion. Using tunable repulsive interparticle interaction, it is shown that the same microstructure as that observed in colloidal suspensions can be quantitatively recovered at a macroscopic scale. To that end, experiments on granular and colloidal systems made up of magnetized particles as well as computer simulations are performed and compared. Excellent agreement throughout the range of the magnetic coupling parameter is found for the pair distribution as well as the bond-orientational correlation functions. This finding opens new ways to efficiently and very conveniently explore phase transitions, crystallization, nucleation, etc in confined geometries.

  8. Quantitatively mimicking wet colloidal suspensions with dry granular media

    PubMed Central

    Messina, René; Aljawhari, Sarah; Bécu, Lydiane; Schockmel, Julien; Lumay, Geoffroy; Vandewalle, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Athermal two-dimensional granular systems are exposed to external mechanical noise leading to Brownian-like motion. Using tunable repulsive interparticle interaction, it is shown that the same microstructure as that observed in colloidal suspensions can be quantitatively recovered at a macroscopic scale. To that end, experiments on granular and colloidal systems made up of magnetized particles as well as computer simulations are performed and compared. Excellent agreement throughout the range of the magnetic coupling parameter is found for the pair distribution as well as the bond-orientational correlation functions. This finding opens new ways to efficiently and very conveniently explore phase transitions, crystallization, nucleation, etc in confined geometries. PMID:26030718

  9. Flow of colloidal suspensions and gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zia, Roseanna

    Our recent studies of yield of colloidal gels under shear show that yield in such gels occurs in distinct stages. Under fixed stress, yield follows a finite delay period of slow solid-like creep. Post yield, the gel fluidizes and may undergo long-time viscous flow or, in some cases, may re-solidify. Under imposed strain rate, the transition from equilibrium to long-time flow is characterized by one or more stress overshoots, signifying a yield process here as well. These rheological changes are accompanied by evolution in morphology and dynamics of the gel network. Similar regimes have been observed in gels subjected to gravitational forcing; the gel initially supports its own weight, or perhaps undergoes slow, weak compaction. This may be followed by a sudden transition to rapid compaction or sedimentation. Various models have been put forth to explain these behaviors based on structural evolution, but this detail is difficult to observe in experiment. Here we examine the detailed microstructural evolution and rheology of reversible colloidal gels as they deform under gravity, identifying the critical buoyant force at which yield occurs, the role played by ongoing gel coarsening, and similarities and differences compared to yield under shear. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the NSF XSEDE Computational Resource, the NSF Early CAREER Program, and the Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Program.

  10. Depletion-induced structure and dynamics in bimodal colloidal suspensions.

    SciTech Connect

    Sikorski, M.; Sandy, A. R.; Narayanan, S.

    2011-05-03

    Combined small angle x-ray scattering and x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy studies of moderately concentrated bimodal hard-sphere colloidal suspensions in the fluid phase show that depletion-induced demixing introduces spatially heterogeneous dynamics with two distinct time scales. The adhesive nature, as well as the mobility, of the large particles is determined by the level of interaction within the monomodal domains. This interaction is driven by osmotic forces, which are governed by the relative concentration of the constituents.

  11. Forced spreading of films and droplets of colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espin, Leonardo; Kumar, Satish

    2014-11-01

    When a thin film of a colloidal suspension flows over a substrate, uneven distribution of the suspended particles can lead to an uneven coating. Motivated by this phenomenon, we analyse the flow of perfectly wetting films and droplets of colloidal suspensions down an inclined plane. Lubrication theory and the rapid-vertical-diffusion approximation are used to derive a coupled pair of one-dimensional partial differential equations describing the evolution of the interface height and particle concentration. Precursor films are assumed to be present, the colloidal particles are taken to be hard spheres, and particle and liquid dynamics are coupled through a concentration-dependent viscosity and diffusivity. We find that for sufficiently high Péclet numbers, even small initial concentration inhomogeneities produce viscosity gradients that cause the film or droplet front to evolve continuously in time instead of travelling without changing shape as happens in the absence of colloidal particles. Our results suggest that particle concentration gradients can have a dramatic influence on interface evolution in flowing films and droplets, a finding which may be relevant for understanding the onset of patterns that are observed experimentally.

  12. Sagging of evaporating droplets of colloidal suspensions on inclined substrates.

    PubMed

    Espín, Leonardo; Kumar, Satish

    2014-10-14

    A droplet of a colloidal suspension placed on an inclined substrate may sag under the action of gravity. Solvent evaporation raises the concentration of the colloidal particles, and the resulting viscosity changes may influence the sag of the droplet. To investigate this phenomenon, we have developed a mathematical model for perfectly wetting droplets based on lubrication theory and the rapid-vertical-diffusion approximation. Precursor films are assumed to be present, the colloidal particles are taken to be hard spheres, and particle and liquid dynamics are coupled through a concentration-dependent viscosity and diffusivity. Evaporation is assumed to be limited by how rapidly solvent molecules can transfer from the liquid to the vapor phase. The resulting one-dimensional system of nonlinear partial differential equations describing the evolution of the droplet height and particle concentration is solved numerically for a range of initial particle concentrations and substrate temperatures. The solutions reveal that the interaction between evaporation and non-Newtonian suspension rheology gives rise to several distinct regimes of droplet shapes and particle concentration distributions. The results provide insight into how evaporation and suspension rheology can be tuned to minimize sagging as well as the well-known coffee-ring effect, an outcome which is important for industrial coating processes.

  13. On Determination of the Equation of State of Colloidal Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirorattanakul, Krittanon; Huang, Hao; Uhl, Christopher; Ou-Yang, Daniel

    Colloidal suspensions are the main ingredients for a variety of materials in our daily life, e.g., milk, salad dressing, skin lotions and paint for wall coatings. Material properties of these systems require an understanding of the equation of state of these materials. Our project aims to experimentally determine the equation of state of colloidal suspensions by microfluidics, dielectrophoresis (DEP) and optical imaging. We use fluorescent polystyrene latexes as a model system for this study. Placing semi-permeable membranes between microfluidics channels, which made from PDMS, we control the particle concentration and ionic strengths of the suspension. We use osmotic equilibrium equation to analyze the particle concentration distribution in a potential force field created by DEP. We use confocal optical imaging to measure the spatial distribution of the particle concentration. We compare the results of our experimental study with data obtained by computer simulation of osmotic equilibrium of interacting colloids. NSF DMR-0923299, Emulsion Polymer Institute, Department of Physics, Bioengineering Program of Lehigh University.

  14. Magnetoresponsive conductive colloidal suspensions with magnetized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, Ahmed M.; Abdel Fattah, Abdel Rahman; Ghosh, Suvojit; Puri, Ishwar K.

    2017-01-01

    We synthesize a novel and hitherto unreported class of colloidal suspensions for which the dispersed phase, which consists of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) decorated with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), is both magnetoresponsive and electrically conductive. Synthesis of the dispersed phase merges processes for producing ferrofluids and magnetic MWNTs (mMWNTs). We explore means to tune the properties of these magnetic conductive colloids (MCCs) by varying the (1) MNP material composition, and (2) MNP:MWNT (w/w) magnetization weight ratio (γ). The mMWNTs are examined using XRD, TEM, EDX and SQUID and MCCs are by measuring their zeta potential and electric conductivity. Magnetite (Fe3O4) MNPs, which possess a high Curie temperature, produce mMWNTs with high saturation magnetization that respond relatively weakly to temperature variations. Mn0.2Cu0.2Zn0.6Fe2O4 and Cu0.4Zn0.6Fe2O4 MNPs with lower Curie temperatures are more sensitive to changing temperature. Increasing the MNP Cu content improves the electric conductivity of the corresponding MCC while increasing γ enhances its magnetic response. After γ is raised above a threshold value, mMWNT decoration on the CNT surface becomes nonuniform since the MNPs now agglomerate perpendicular to the nanotube surface. These colloidal suspensions are a promising new class of material that can be manipulated with a magnetic field to tune their electrical conductivity.

  15. Efficient nematode swimming in a shear thinning colloidal suspension.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Sung; Kim, Daeyeon; Shin, Jennifer H; Weitz, David A

    2016-02-14

    The swimming behavior of a nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) is investigated in a non-Newtonian shear thinning colloidal suspension. At the onset value (ϕ∼ 8%), the suspension begins to exhibit shear thinning behavior, and the average swimming speed of worms jumps by approximately 12% more than that measured in a Newtonian solution exhibiting no shear dependent viscosity. In the shear thinning regime, we observe a gradual yet significant improvement in swimming efficiency with an increase in ϕ while the swimming speed remains nearly constant. We postulate that this enhanced swimming can be explained by the temporal change in the stroke form of the nematode that is uniquely observed in a shear thinning colloidal suspension: the nematode features a fast and large stroke in its head to overcome the temporally high drag imposed by the viscous medium, whose effective viscosity (ηs) is shown to drop drastically, inversely proportional to the strength of its stroke. Our results suggest new insights into how nematodes efficiently maneuver through the complex fluid environment in their natural habitat.

  16. Laser-induced breakdown system for colloid characterization in dilute aqueous suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Brachman, A; Mihardja, S; Palmer, C A; Wruck, D

    1999-08-11

    Detection and sizing of colloids by acoustic detection of laser-induced breakdown and elemental analysis of colloids by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy are investigated in dilute aqueous suspensions. Development and testing of the methods are performed with standard polystyrene suspensions and prepared suspensions of defined composition and particle size. Application of the methods to analysis of field and laboratory samples is discussed. Am atomic emission lines are observed by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of an Am hydroxycarbonate suspension.

  17. Convection in colloidal suspensions with particle-concentration-dependent viscosity.

    PubMed

    Glässl, M; Hilt, M; Zimmermann, W

    2010-07-01

    The onset of thermal convection in a horizontal layer of a colloidal suspension is investigated in terms of a continuum model for binary-fluid mixtures where the viscosity depends on the local concentration of colloidal particles. With an increasing difference between the viscosity at the warmer and the colder boundary the threshold of convection is reduced in the range of positive values of the separation ratio psi with the onset of stationary convection as well as in the range of negative values of psi with an oscillatory Hopf bifurcation. Additionally the convection rolls are shifted downwards with respect to the center of the horizontal layer for stationary convection psi>0 and upwards for the Hopf bifurcation (psi<0.

  18. The renormalized Jellium model of colloidal suspensions with multivalent counterions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colla, Thiago E.; Levin, Yan

    2010-12-01

    An extension of the renormalized Jellium model which allows to study colloidal suspensions containing trivalent counterions is proposed. The theory is based on a modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation which incorporates the effects of counterion correlations near the colloidal surfaces using a new boundary condition. The renormalized charges, the counterion density profiles, and osmotic pressures can be easily calculated using the modified renormalized Jellium model. The results are compared with the ones obtained using the traditional Wigner-Seitz (WS) cell approximation also with a new boundary condition. We find that while the thermodynamic functions obtained within the renormalized Jellium model are in a good agreement with their WS counterpart, the effective charges predicted by the two theories can be significantly different.

  19. Dilatancy in the flow and fracture of stretched colloidal suspensions.

    PubMed

    Smith, M I; Besseling, R; Cates, M E; Bertola, V

    2010-11-16

    Concentrated particulate suspensions, commonplace in the pharmaceutical, cosmetic and food industries, display intriguing rheology. In particular, the dramatic increase in viscosity with strain rate (shear thickening and jamming), which is often observed at high-volume fractions, is of practical and fundamental importance. Yet, manufacture of these products and their subsequent dispensing often involves flow geometries substantially different from that of simple shear flow experiments. In this study, we show that the elongation and breakage of a filament of a colloidal fluid under tensile loading is closely related to the jamming transition seen in its shear rheology. However, the modified flow geometry reveals important additional effects. Using a model system with nearly hard-core interactions, we provide evidence of surprisingly strong viscoelasticity in such a colloidal fluid under tension. With high-speed photography, we also directly observe dilatancy and granulation effects, which lead to fracture above a critical elongation rate.

  20. Thermophoresis in colloidal suspensions driven by Marangoni forces.

    PubMed

    Würger, Alois

    2007-03-30

    In a hydrodynamic approach to thermophoretic transport in colloidal suspensions, the solute velocity u and the solvent flow v(r) are derived from Stokes' equation, with slip boundary conditions imposed by thermal Marangoni forces. The resulting fluid velocity field v(r) significantly differs from that induced by an externally driven particle. We find, in particular, that thermophoresis due to surface forces is insensitive to hydrodynamic interactions. As a consequence, the thermal diffusion coefficient D(T) of polymer solutions is independent of molecular weight and concentration.

  1. Polymeric dispersants delay sedimentation in colloidal asphaltene suspensions.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Sara M; Quintiliano, Leah A; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2010-06-01

    Asphaltenes, among the heaviest components of crude oil, can become unstable under a variety of conditions and precipitate and sediment out of solution. In this report, we present sedimentation measurements for a system of colloidal scale asphaltene particles suspended in heptane. Adding dispersants to the suspension can improve the stability of the system and can mediate the transition from a power-law collapse in the sedimentation front to a rising front. Additional dispersant beyond a crossover concentration can cause a significant delay in the dynamics. Dynamic light scattering measurements suggest that the stabilization provided by the dispersants may occur through a reduction of both the size and polydispersity of the asphaltene particles in suspension.

  2. Two spheres translating in tandem through a colloidal suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriram, Indira; Furst, Eric M.

    2015-04-01

    Using laser tweezers, two colloidal particles are held parallel to a uniformly flowing suspension of similarly sized bath particles at an effective volume fraction ϕeff=0.41 . The local deformation in the bath suspension is imaged by confocal microscopy, and, concurrently, the drag forces exerted on both the leading and the trailing probe particles are measured as a function of probe separation and velocity. The bath structure changes in response to the velocity and separation of the probes. A depleted region between probes is observed at sufficiently high velocities. Both probes experience the same drag force and the drag force increases with probe separation. The results indicate that bath-probe and probe-probe hydrodynamic interactions contribute microstructure and drag force and that drag exerted by direct bath-probe collisions is reduced compared to an isolated probe.

  3. Sonochromic effect in WO{sup 3} colloidal suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Kamat, P.V.; Vinodgopal, K.

    1996-11-13

    In recent years there has been a burst of activities in investigating sonolytic reactions. The usefulness of this technique in synthesizing colloidal semiconductors and metals and dissolution of MnO{sup 2} colloids has also been demonstrated. We have now employed semiconductor colloids to investigate the radical reactions in sonolytic processes. In this study we present our preliminary results from the reaction of WO{sup 3} colloids with sonolytically generated H atoms. Sodium tungstate, oxalic acid, and Acid Orange 7 were obtained from Aldrich. Acid Orange 7 was purified by column chromatography. All other chemicals were analytical reagents of highest available purity. The analysis experiments were carried out with a 640 kHz sonolysis setup of Ultrasonic Energy Systems (Panama City, FL). 24 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Characteristics of the secondary relaxation process in soft colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Debasish; Joshi, Yogesh M.; Bandyopadhyay, Ranjini

    2015-11-01

    A universal secondary relaxation process, known as the Johari-Goldstein (J-G) β-relaxation process, appears in glass formers. It involves all parts of the molecule and is particularly important in glassy systems because of its very close relationship with the α-relaxation process. However, the absence of a J-G β-relaxation mode in colloidal glasses raises questions regarding its universality. In the present work, we study the microscopic relaxation processes in Laponite suspensions, a model soft glassy material, by dynamic light scattering (DLS) experiments. α- and β-relaxation timescales are estimated from the autocorrelation functions obtained by DLS measurements for Laponite suspensions with different concentrations, salt concentrations and temperatures. Our experimental results suggest that the β-relaxation process in Laponite suspensions involves all parts of the constituent Laponite particle. The ergodicity breaking time is also seen to be correlated with the characteristic time of the β-relaxation process for all Laponite concentrations, salt concentrations and temperatures. The width of the primary relaxation process is observed to be correlated with the secondary relaxation time. The secondary relaxation time is also very sensitive to the concentration of Laponite. We measure primitive relaxation timescales from the α-relaxation time and the stretching exponent (β) by applying the coupling model for highly correlated systems. The order of magnitude of the primitive relaxation time is very close to the secondary relaxation time. These observations indicate the presence of a J-G β-relaxation mode for soft colloidal suspensions of Laponite.

  5. Probing Dynamical Heterogeneity in Dense Colloidal Suspensions with Depletion Attraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Zachery; Hogan, Gregory; Gratale, Matthew; Yodh, Arjun G.; Habdas, Piotr

    We directly observe the particle dynamics in dense colloidal suspensions. Using depletion attraction, we vary inter particle potential to study the reentrant glass transition. Confocal microscopy and particle tracking allow us to follow particle trajectories over time. By varying inter particle attraction strength for a fixed volume fraction of colloidal suspensions, we observe three qualitatively different states. Mean square displacement and long time diffusion constant vary with the depletant concentration and indicate a glass state for low attraction strengths, ergodic liquid state for moderate attraction strengths, and attractive arrested state for the highest attraction strengths. Variance in the self overlap function gives the four point susceptibility, a measure of dynamical heterogeneity over a range of length scales and lag times. Results show that the lag times corresponding to the most heterogeneous dynamics are longer for arrested states than for fluid states. The length scale that maximizes four point susceptibility across a range of attraction strengths exhibits a reentrant glass behavior similar to that of the long time diffusion constant. Z.B., G.H., and P.H. acknowledge financial support of the NSF RUI-1306990. M.G. and A.G.Y. acknowledge financial support of the NSF Grant DMR-1205463, NSF MRSEC Grant DMR-1120901, and NASA Grant NNX08AO0G.

  6. Fast Evaporation of Spreading Droplets of Colloidal Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maki, Kara; Kumar, Satish

    2011-11-01

    When a coffee droplet dries on a countertop, a dark ring of coffee solute is left behind, a phenomenon often referred to as ``the coffee-ring effect.'' A closely related yet less-well-explored phenomenon is the formation of a layer of particles, or skin, at the surface of the droplet. In this work, we explore the behavior of a mathematical model that can qualitatively describe both phenomena. We consider a thin axisymmetric droplet of a colloidal suspension on a horizontal substrate undergoing spreading and rapid evaporation. The lubrication approximation is applied to simplify the mass and momentum conservation equations, and the colloidal particles are allowed to influence droplet rheology through their effect on the viscosity. By describing the transport of the colloidal particles with the full convection-diffusion equation, we are able to capture depthwise gradients in particle concentration and thus describe skin formation, a feature neglected in prior models of droplet evaporation. Whereas capillarity creates a flow that drives particles to the contact line to produce a coffee-ring, Marangoni flows can compete with this and promote skin formation. Increases in viscosity due to particle concentration slow down droplet dynamics, and can lead to a significant reduction in the spreading rate.

  7. Colloidal Brazil-nut effect in sediments of binary charged suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esztermann, A.; Löwen, H.

    2004-10-01

    Equilibrium sedimentation density profiles of charged binary colloidal suspensions are calculated by computer simulations and density-functional theory. For deionized samples, we predict a colloidal "Brazil nut" effect: heavy colloidal particles sediment on top of the lighter ones provided that their mass per charge is smaller than that of the lighter ones. This effect is verifiable in settling experiments.

  8. Formation and stabilisation of triclosan colloidal suspensions using supersaturated systems.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, S L; Schuessel, K; Davis, A; Hadgraft, J

    2003-08-11

    The aim of this paper is to prepare and stabilise, in situ, colloidal microsuspensions of triclosan using the polymer, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC). The suspensions were prepared from supersaturated solutions of triclosan. The cosolvent technique was used to create supersaturation. Propylene glycol and water were used as the cosolvents. The triclosan particles had a large needle-shaped morphology, when grown in the absence of the polymer. Moreover, the particles grew rapidly to sizes greater than 5 micrometer over a period of 7h. When HPMC was added, the particle sizes were in the range 90-250 nm depending on the amount of polymer present in the solutions. The stability of the solutions was evaluated over a period of 40 days during which the particle sizes did not vary. The results were consistent with the mechanism proposed by Raghavan et al. [Int. J. Pharm. 212 (2001b) 213].

  9. Convective flows of colloidal suspension in an inclined closed cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smorodin, Boris; Cherepanov, Ivan; Ishutov, Sergey

    2016-12-01

    The nonlinear spatiotemporal evolution of convective flows is numerically investigated in the case of colloidal suspension filling an inclined closed cell heated from below. The bifurcation diagram (the dependency of the Nusselt number on the Rayleigh number) is obtained. The characteristics of the wave and steady patterns are investigated depending on heat intensity. The travelling wave changing travel direction and the non-regular oscillatory flow are found to be stable solutions within a certain interval of the Rayleigh number. Temporal Fourier decomposition is used together with other diagnostic tools to analyse the complex bifurcation and spatiotemporal properties caused by the interplay of the gravity-induced gradient of concentration and convective mixing of the fluid. It is shown that a more complex flow structure exists at a lower heating intensity (Rayleigh number).

  10. Modified Mason number for charged paramagnetic colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Di; Hilou, Elaa; Biswal, Sibani Lisa

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of magnetorheological fluids have typically been described by the Mason number, a governing parameter defined as the ratio between viscous and magnetic forces in the fluid. For most experimental suspensions of magnetic particles, surface forces, such as steric and electrostatic interactions, can significantly influence the dynamics. Here we propose a theory of a modified Mason number that accounts for surface forces and show that this modified Mason number is a function of interparticle distance. We demonstrate that this modified Mason number is accurate in describing the dynamics of a rotating pair of paramagnetic colloids of identical or mismatched sizes in either high or low salt solutions. The modified Mason number is confirmed to be pseudoconstant for particle pairs and particle chains undergoing a stable-metastable transition during rotation. The interparticle distance term can be calculated using theory or can be measured experimentally. This modified Mason number is more applicable to magnetorheological systems where surface forces are not negligible.

  11. Computation of shear viscosity of colloidal suspensions by SRD-MD.

    PubMed

    Laganapan, A M K; Videcoq, A; Bienia, M; Ala-Nissila, T; Bochicchio, D; Ferrando, R

    2015-04-14

    The behaviour of sheared colloidal suspensions with full hydrodynamic interactions (HIs) is numerically studied. To this end, we use the hybrid stochastic rotation dynamics-molecular dynamics (SRD-MD) method. The shear viscosity of colloidal suspensions is computed for different volume fractions, both for dilute and concentrated cases. We verify that HIs help in the collisions and the streaming of colloidal particles, thereby increasing the overall shear viscosity of the suspension. Our results show a good agreement with known experimental, theoretical, and numerical studies. This work demonstrates the ability of SRD-MD to successfully simulate transport coefficients that require correct modelling of HIs.

  12. Computation of shear viscosity of colloidal suspensions by SRD-MD

    SciTech Connect

    Laganapan, A. M. K.; Videcoq, A. Bienia, M.; Ala-Nissila, T.; Bochicchio, D.; Ferrando, R.

    2015-04-14

    The behaviour of sheared colloidal suspensions with full hydrodynamic interactions (HIs) is numerically studied. To this end, we use the hybrid stochastic rotation dynamics-molecular dynamics (SRD-MD) method. The shear viscosity of colloidal suspensions is computed for different volume fractions, both for dilute and concentrated cases. We verify that HIs help in the collisions and the streaming of colloidal particles, thereby increasing the overall shear viscosity of the suspension. Our results show a good agreement with known experimental, theoretical, and numerical studies. This work demonstrates the ability of SRD-MD to successfully simulate transport coefficients that require correct modelling of HIs.

  13. Dipolar colloids in apolar media: direct microscopy of two-dimensional suspensions

    PubMed Central

    Janai, Erez; Cohen, Avner P.; Butenko, Alexander V.; Schofield, Andrew B.; Schultz, Moty; Sloutskin, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Spherical colloids, in an absence of external fields, are commonly assumed to interact solely through rotationally-invariant potentials, u(r). While the presence of permanent dipoles in aqueous suspensions has been previously suggested by some experiments, the rotational degrees of freedom of spherical colloids are typically neglected. We prove, by direct experiments, the presence of permanent dipoles in commonly used spherical poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) colloids, suspended in an apolar organic medium. We study, by a combination of direct confocal microscopy, computer simulations, and theory, the structure and other thermodynamical properties of organic suspensions of colloidal spheres, confined to a two-dimensional (2D) monolayer. Our studies reveal the effects of the dipolar interactions on the structure and the osmotic pressure of these fluids. These observations have far-reaching consequences for the fundamental colloidal science, opening new directions in self-assembly of complex colloidal clusters. PMID:27346611

  14. Dipolar colloids in apolar media: direct microscopy of two-dimensional suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janai, Erez; Cohen, Avner P.; Butenko, Alexander V.; Schofield, Andrew B.; Schultz, Moty; Sloutskin, Eli

    2016-06-01

    Spherical colloids, in an absence of external fields, are commonly assumed to interact solely through rotationally-invariant potentials, u(r). While the presence of permanent dipoles in aqueous suspensions has been previously suggested by some experiments, the rotational degrees of freedom of spherical colloids are typically neglected. We prove, by direct experiments, the presence of permanent dipoles in commonly used spherical poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) colloids, suspended in an apolar organic medium. We study, by a combination of direct confocal microscopy, computer simulations, and theory, the structure and other thermodynamical properties of organic suspensions of colloidal spheres, confined to a two-dimensional (2D) monolayer. Our studies reveal the effects of the dipolar interactions on the structure and the osmotic pressure of these fluids. These observations have far-reaching consequences for the fundamental colloidal science, opening new directions in self-assembly of complex colloidal clusters.

  15. How colloid-colloid interactions and hydrodynamic effects influence the percolation threshold: A simulation study in alumina suspensions.

    PubMed

    Laganapan, Aleena Maria; Mouas, Mohamed; Videcoq, Arnaud; Cerbelaud, Manuella; Bienia, Marguerite; Bowen, Paul; Ferrando, Riccardo

    2015-11-15

    The percolation behavior of alumina suspensions is studied by computer simulations. The percolation threshold ϕc is calculated, determining the key factors that affect its magnitude: the strength of colloid-colloid attraction and the presence of hydrodynamic interactions (HIs). To isolate the effects of HIs, we compare the results of Brownian Dynamics, which do not include hydrodynamics, with those of Stochastic Rotation Dynamics-Molecular Dynamics, which include hydrodynamics. Our results show that ϕc decreases with the increase of the attraction between the colloids. The inclusion of HIs always leads to more elongated structures during the aggregation process, producing a sizable decrease of ϕc when the colloid-colloid attraction is not too strong. On the other hand, the effects of HIs on ϕc tend to become negligible with increasing attraction strength. Our ϕc values are in good agreement with those estimated by the yield stress model by Flatt and Bowen.

  16. Kinetics of the glass transition of fragile soft colloidal suspensions.

    PubMed

    Saha, Debasish; Joshi, Yogesh M; Bandyopadhyay, Ranjini

    2015-12-07

    Microscopic relaxation time scales are estimated from the autocorrelation functions obtained by dynamic light scattering experiments for Laponite suspensions with different concentrations (CL), added salt concentrations (CS), and temperatures (T). It has been shown in an earlier work [D. Saha, Y. M. Joshi, and R. Bandyopadhyay, Soft Matter 10, 3292 (2014)] that the evolutions of relaxation time scales of colloidal glasses can be compared with molecular glass formers by mapping the waiting time (tw) of the former with the inverse of thermodynamic temperature (1/T) of the latter. In this work, the fragility parameter D, which signifies the deviation from Arrhenius behavior, is obtained from fits to the time evolutions of the structural relaxation time scales. For the Laponite suspensions studied in this work, D is seen to be independent of CL and CS but is weakly dependent on T. Interestingly, the behavior of D corroborates the behavior of fragility in molecular glass formers with respect to equivalent variables. Furthermore, the stretching exponent β, which quantifies the width w of the spectrum of structural relaxation time scales, is seen to depend on tw. A hypothetical Kauzmann time tk, analogous to the Kauzmann temperature for molecular glasses, is defined as the time scale at which w diverges. Corresponding to the Vogel temperature defined for molecular glasses, a hypothetical Vogel time tα (∞) is also defined as the time at which the structural relaxation time diverges. Interestingly, a correlation is observed between tk and tα (∞), which is remarkably similar to that known for fragile molecular glass formers. A coupling model that accounts for the tw-dependence of the stretching exponent is used to analyse and explain the observed correlation between tk and tα (∞).

  17. Kinetics of the glass transition of fragile soft colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Debasish; Joshi, Yogesh M.; Bandyopadhyay, Ranjini

    2015-12-01

    Microscopic relaxation time scales are estimated from the autocorrelation functions obtained by dynamic light scattering experiments for Laponite suspensions with different concentrations (CL), added salt concentrations (CS), and temperatures (T). It has been shown in an earlier work [D. Saha, Y. M. Joshi, and R. Bandyopadhyay, Soft Matter 10, 3292 (2014)] that the evolutions of relaxation time scales of colloidal glasses can be compared with molecular glass formers by mapping the waiting time (tw) of the former with the inverse of thermodynamic temperature (1/T) of the latter. In this work, the fragility parameter D, which signifies the deviation from Arrhenius behavior, is obtained from fits to the time evolutions of the structural relaxation time scales. For the Laponite suspensions studied in this work, D is seen to be independent of CL and CS but is weakly dependent on T. Interestingly, the behavior of D corroborates the behavior of fragility in molecular glass formers with respect to equivalent variables. Furthermore, the stretching exponent β, which quantifies the width w of the spectrum of structural relaxation time scales, is seen to depend on tw. A hypothetical Kauzmann time tk, analogous to the Kauzmann temperature for molecular glasses, is defined as the time scale at which w diverges. Corresponding to the Vogel temperature defined for molecular glasses, a hypothetical Vogel time tα ∞ is also defined as the time at which the structural relaxation time diverges. Interestingly, a correlation is observed between tk and tα ∞ , which is remarkably similar to that known for fragile molecular glass formers. A coupling model that accounts for the tw-dependence of the stretching exponent is used to analyse and explain the observed correlation between tk and tα ∞ .

  18. Sedimentation and multiphase equilibria in suspensions of colloidal hard rods.

    PubMed

    Savenko, S V; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2004-11-01

    Sedimentation and multiphase equilibria in a suspension of hard colloidal rods are explored by analyzing the (macroscopic) osmotic equilibrium conditions. We observe that gravity enables the system to explore a whole range of phases varying from the most dilute phase to the densest phase, i.e., from the isotropic (I), to the nematic (N), to the smectic (Sm), to the crystal (K) phase. We determine the phase diagrams for hard spherocylinders with a length-to-diameter ratio of 5 for a semi-infinite system and a system with fixed container height using a bulk equation of state obtained from simulations. Our results show that gravity leads to multiphase coexistence for the semi-infinite system, as we observe I, I+N, I+N+Sm , or I+N+Sm+K coexistence, while the finite system shows I, N, Sm, K, I+N, N+Sm, Sm+K, I+N+Sm, N+Sm+K , and I+N+Sm+K phase coexistence. In addition, we compare our theoretical predictions for the phase behavior and the density profiles with Monte Carlo simulations for the semi-infinite system and we find good agreement with our theoretical predictions.

  19. Coupling between bulk- and surface chemistry in suspensions of charged colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinen, M.; Palberg, T.; Löwen, H.

    2014-03-01

    The ionic composition and pair correlations in fluid phases of realistically salt-free charged colloidal sphere suspensions are calculated in the primitive model. We obtain the number densities of all ionic species in suspension, including low-molecular weight microions, and colloidal macroions with acidic surface groups, from a self-consistent solution of a coupled physicochemical set of nonlinear algebraic equations and non-mean-field liquid integral equations. Here, we study suspensions of colloidal spheres with sulfonate or silanol surface groups, suspended in demineralized water that is saturated with carbon dioxide under standard atmosphere. The only input required for our theoretical scheme are the acidic dissociation constants pKa, and effective sphere diameters of all involved ions. Our method allows for an ab initio calculation of colloidal bare and effective charges, at high numerical efficiency.

  20. Biocompatible Colloidal Suspensions Based on Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Synthesis, Characterization and Toxicological Profile

    PubMed Central

    Coricovac, Dorina-Elena; Moacă, Elena-Alina; Pinzaru, Iulia; Cîtu, Cosmin; Soica, Codruta; Mihali, Ciprian-Valentin; Păcurariu, Cornelia; Tutelyan, Victor A.; Tsatsakis, Aristidis; Dehelean, Cristina-Adriana

    2017-01-01

    The use of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in biomedicine has evolved intensely in the recent years due to the multiple applications of these nanomaterials, mainly in domains like cancer. The aim of the present study was: (i) to develop biocompatible colloidal suspensions based on magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as future theranostic tools for skin pathology and (ii) to test their effects in vitro on human keratinocytes (HaCat cells) and in vivo by employing an animal model of acute dermal toxicity. Biocompatible colloidal suspensions were obtained by coating the magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles resulted during the solution combustion synthesis with a double layer of oleic acid, as innovative procedure in increasing bioavailability. The colloidal suspensions were characterized in terms of dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The in vitro effects of these suspensions were tested by means of Alamar blue assay and the noxious effects at skin level were measured using non-invasive methods. The in vitro results indicated a lack of toxicity on normal human cells induced by the iron oxide nanoparticles colloidal suspensions after an exposure of 24 h to different concentrations (5, 10, and 25 μg·mL−1). The dermal acute toxicity test showed that the topical applications of the colloidal suspensions on female and male SKH-1 hairless mice were not associated with significant changes in the quality of barrier skin function.

  1. A self-consistent renormalized jellium approach for calculating structural and thermodynamic properties of charge stabilized colloidal suspensions.

    PubMed

    Colla, Thiago E; Levin, Yan; Trizac, Emmanuel

    2009-08-21

    An approach is proposed which allows to self-consistently calculate the structural and the thermodynamic properties of highly charged aqueous colloidal suspensions. The method is based on the renormalized jellium model with the background charge distribution related to the colloid-colloid correlation function. The theory is used to calculate the correlation functions and the effective colloidal charges for suspensions containing additional monovalent electrolyte. The predictions of the theory are in excellent agreement with Monte Carlo simulations.

  2. Generic behavior of the hydrodynamic function of charged colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gapinski, Jacek; Patkowski, Adam; Nägele, Gerhard

    2010-02-01

    We discuss the generic behavior of the hydrodynamic function H(q ) and diffusion function D(q ) characterizing the short-time diffusion in suspensions of charge-stabilized colloidal spheres, by covering the whole fluid regime. Special focus is given to the behavior of these functions at the freezing transition specified by the Hansen-Verlet freezing rule. Results are presented in dependence on scattering wavenumber q, effective particle charge, volume fraction, salt concentration, and particle size, by considering both the low-charge and high-charge branch solutions of static structure factors. The existence of two charge branches leads to the prediction of a re-entrant melting-freezing-melting transition for increasing particle concentration at very low salinity. A universal limiting contour line is derived for the principal peak height value of H(q ), independent of particle charge and diameter, and concentration and salinity, which separates the fluid from the fluid-solid coexistence region. This line is only weakly dependent on the value of the structure factor peak height entering the Hansen-Verlet rule. A dynamic freezing criterion is derived in terms of the short-time cage diffusion coefficient, a quantity easily measurable in a scattering experiment. The higher-dimensional parameter scans underlying this study make use of the fast and highly efficient δγ-scheme in conjunction with the analytic rescaled mean spherical approximation input for the static structure factor. Our results constitute a comprehensive database useful to researchers performing dynamic scattering experiments on charge-stabilized dispersions.

  3. Interface instability modes in freezing colloidal suspensions: revealed from onset of planar instability

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lilin; You, Jiaxue; Wang, Zhijun; Wang, Jincheng; Lin, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Freezing colloidal suspensions widely exists in nature and industry. Interface instability has attracted much attention for the understandings of the pattern formation in freezing colloidal suspensions. However, the interface instability modes, the origin of the ice banding or ice lamellae, are still unclear. In-situ experimental observation of the onset of interface instability remains absent up to now. Here, by directly imaging the initial transient stage of planar interface instability in directional freezing colloidal suspensions, we proposed three interface instability modes, Mullins-Sekerka instability, global split instability and local split instability. The intrinsic mechanism of the instability modes comes from the competition of the solute boundary layer and the particle boundary layer, which only can be revealed from the initial transient stage of planar instability in directional freezing. PMID:26996630

  4. Onsager’s reciprocal relations for electroacoustic and sedimentation: Application to (concentrated) colloidal suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Gourdin-Bertin, S.; Chassagne, C.

    2015-05-21

    In this article, the relations for electroacoustic phenomena, such as sedimentation potential, sedimentation intensity, colloid vibration potential, colloid vibration intensity/current, or electric sonic amplitude, are given, on the basis of irreversible thermodynamics. This formalism allows in particular to discuss the different expressions for concentrated suspensions found by various authors, which are of great practical interest. It was found that some existing expressions have to be corrected. Relations between the electrophoretic mobilities assessed by the different experiments are derived.

  5. A new way to apply ultrasound in cross-flow ultrafiltration: application to colloidal suspensions.

    PubMed

    Hengl, N; Jin, Y; Pignon, F; Baup, S; Mollard, R; Gondrexon, N; Magnin, A; Michot, L; Paineau, E

    2014-05-01

    A new coupling of ultrasound device with membrane process has been developed in order to enhance cross-flow ultrafiltration of colloidal suspensions usually involved in several industrial applications included bio and agro industries, water and sludge treatment. In order to reduce mass transfer resistances induced by fouling and concentration polarization, which both are main limitations in membrane separation process continuous ultrasound is applied with the help of a vibrating blade (20 kHz) located in the feed channel all over the membrane surface (8mm between membrane surface and the blade). Hydrodynamic aspects were also taking into account by the control of the rectangular geometry of the feed channel. Three colloidal suspensions with different kinds of colloidal interaction (attractive, repulsive) were chosen to evaluate the effect of their physico-chemical properties on the filtration. For a 90 W power (20.5 W cm(-2)) and a continuous flow rate, permeation fluxes are increased for each studied colloidal suspension, without damaging the membrane. The results show that the flux increase depends on the initial structural properties of filtered dispersion in terms of colloidal interaction and spatial organizations. For instance, a Montmorillonite Wyoming-Na clay suspension was filtered at 1.5 × 10(5)Pa transmembrane pressure. Its permeation flux is increased by a factor 7.1, from 13.6 L m(-2)h(-1) without ultrasound to 97 L m(-2)h(-1) with ultrasound.

  6. Interfacial undercooling in solidification of colloidal suspensions: analyses with quantitative measurements

    PubMed Central

    You, Jiaxue; Wang, Lilin; Wang, Zhijun; Li, Junjie; Wang, Jincheng; Lin, Xin; Huang, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Interfacial undercooling in the complex solidification of colloidal suspensions is of significance and remains a puzzling problem. Two types of interfacial undercooling are supposed to be involved in the freezing of colloidal suspensions, i.e., solute constitutional supercooling (SCS) caused by additives in the solvent and particulate constitutional supercooling (PCS) caused by particles. However, quantitative identification of the interfacial undercooling in the solidification of colloidal suspensions, is still absent; thus, the question of which type of undercooling is dominant in this complex system remains unanswered. Here, we quantitatively measured the static and dynamic interface undercoolings of SCS and PCS in ideal and practical colloidal systems. We show that the interfacial undercooling primarily comes from SCS caused by the additives in the solvent, while PCS is minor. This finding implies that the thermodynamic effect of particles from the PCS is not the fundamental physical mechanism for pattern formation of cellular growth and lamellar structure in the solidification of colloidal suspensions, a general case of ice-templating method. Instead, the patterns in the ice-templating method can be controlled effectively by adjusting the additives. PMID:27329394

  7. Eulerian flow modeling of suspensions containing interacting nano-particles: application to colloidal film drying.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gergianakis, I.; Meireles, M.; Bacchin, P.; Hallez, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Nano-particles in suspension often experience strong non-hydrodynamic interactions (NHIs) such as electrostatic repulsions. In this work, we present and justify a flow modeling strategy adapted to such systems. Earlier works on colloidal transport in simple flows, were based on the solution of a transport equation for the colloidal volume fraction with a known fluid velocity field and a volume-fraction-dependent diffusion coefficient accounting for mass fluxes due to NHIs. Extension of this modelling to complex flows requires the coupled resolution of a momentum transport equation for the suspension velocity field. We use the framework of the Suspension Balance Model to show that in the Pe << 1 regime relevant here, the average suspension velocity field is independent of NHIs between nanoparticles , while the average fluid phase and solid phase velocity fields both always depend of the NHIs. Lastly, we apply this modelling strategy to the problem of the drying of a colloidal suspension in a micro-evaporator [Merlin et al., 2012, Soft Matter]. The influence of the effective Peclet number on the 1D/2D character of the flow is evaluated and the possible colloidal film patterning due to defaults of substrate topography is commented.

  8. Thermal vitrification in suspensions of soft colloids: molecular dynamics simulations and comparison with experiments.

    PubMed

    Rissanou, A N; Vlassopoulos, D; Bitsanis, I A

    2005-01-01

    Dense suspensions of multiarm star polymers are known to develop liquidlike microstructure, which has been attributed to the similarities between high functionality stars and colloidal particles interacting via soft, long ranged potentials. Recent experimental studies reported a counterintuitive solidification of suspensions with f=128 , upon increase of the temperature in marginal solvents. We present our results from molecular dynamics simulations of dense suspensions of multiarm star polymers. Star polymers are modeled as "soft spheres" interacting via a theoretically developed potential of mean field. Our results show a transition towards a "glassy" state at a temperature very close to the one reported experimentally. The features of the transition are consistent with those of ideal glass transitions, as described by ideal mode coupling theory. Furthermore, our findings illustrate the road to vitrification for these soft-colloidal suspensions. Higher temperatures result in arm expansion that causes jamming and more than compensates for faster short time, temperature induced kinetics.

  9. Investigation of particles size effects in Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) modelling of colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai-Duy, N.; Phan-Thien, N.; Khoo, B. C.

    2015-04-01

    In the Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) simulation of suspension, the fluid (solvent) and colloidal particles are replaced by a set of DPD particles and therefore their relative sizes (as measured by their exclusion zones) can affect the maximal packing fraction of the colloidal particles. In this study, we investigate roles of the conservative, dissipative and random forces in this relative size ratio (colloidal/solvent). We propose a mechanism of adjusting the DPD parameters to properly model the solvent phase (the solvent here is supposed to have the same isothermal compressibility to that of water).

  10. A Navier-Stokes phase-field crystal model for colloidal suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Praetorius, Simon Voigt, Axel

    2015-04-21

    We develop a fully continuous model for colloidal suspensions with hydrodynamic interactions. The Navier-Stokes Phase-Field Crystal model combines ideas of dynamic density functional theory with particulate flow approaches and is derived in detail and related to other dynamic density functional theory approaches with hydrodynamic interactions. The derived system is numerically solved using adaptive finite elements and is used to analyze colloidal crystallization in flowing environments demonstrating a strong coupling in both directions between the crystal shape and the flow field. We further validate the model against other computational approaches for particulate flow systems for various colloidal sedimentation problems.

  11. Extensional rheology of active suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saintillan, David

    2010-05-01

    A simple model is presented for the effective extensional rheology of a dilute suspension of active particles, such as self-propelled microswimmers, extending previous classical studies on suspensions of passive rodlike particles. Neglecting particle-particle hydrodynamic interactions, we characterize the configuration of the suspension by an orientation distribution, which satisfies a Fokker-Planck equation including the effects of an external flow field and of rotary diffusion. Knowledge of this orientation distribution then allows the determination of the particle extra stress as a configurational average of the force dipoles exerted by the particles on the fluid, which involve contributions from the imposed flow, rotary diffusion, and the permanent dipoles resulting from activity. Analytical expressions are obtained for the stress tensor in uniaxial extensional and compressional flows, as well as in planar extensional flow. In all types of flows, the effective viscosity is found to increase as a result of activity in suspensions of head-actuated swimmers (pullers) and to decrease in suspensions of tail-actuated swimmers (pushers). In the latter case, a negative particle viscosity is found to occur in weak flows. In planar extensional flow, we also characterize normal stresses, which are enhanced by activity in suspensions of pullers but reduced in suspensions of pushers. Finally, an energetic interpretation of the seemingly unphysical decrease in viscosity predicted in suspensions of pushers is proposed, where the decrease is explained as a consequence of the active power input generated by the swimming particles and is shown not to be directly related to viscous dissipative processes.

  12. Extensional rheology of active suspensions.

    PubMed

    Saintillan, David

    2010-05-01

    A simple model is presented for the effective extensional rheology of a dilute suspension of active particles, such as self-propelled microswimmers, extending previous classical studies on suspensions of passive rodlike particles. Neglecting particle-particle hydrodynamic interactions, we characterize the configuration of the suspension by an orientation distribution, which satisfies a Fokker-Planck equation including the effects of an external flow field and of rotary diffusion. Knowledge of this orientation distribution then allows the determination of the particle extra stress as a configurational average of the force dipoles exerted by the particles on the fluid, which involve contributions from the imposed flow, rotary diffusion, and the permanent dipoles resulting from activity. Analytical expressions are obtained for the stress tensor in uniaxial extensional and compressional flows, as well as in planar extensional flow. In all types of flows, the effective viscosity is found to increase as a result of activity in suspensions of head-actuated swimmers (pullers) and to decrease in suspensions of tail-actuated swimmers (pushers). In the latter case, a negative particle viscosity is found to occur in weak flows. In planar extensional flow, we also characterize normal stresses, which are enhanced by activity in suspensions of pullers but reduced in suspensions of pushers. Finally, an energetic interpretation of the seemingly unphysical decrease in viscosity predicted in suspensions of pushers is proposed, where the decrease is explained as a consequence of the active power input generated by the swimming particles and is shown not to be directly related to viscous dissipative processes.

  13. Brownian-dynamics simulation studies of a charge-stabilized colloidal suspension under shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, J. ); Sood, A.K.; Krishnamurthy, H.R. Jawaharlal Nehru Center for Advanced Scientific Research, Indian Institute of Science campus, Bangalore 560012 )

    1994-11-01

    We have carried out Brownian-dynamics simulations of a charged colloidal suspension under oscillatory shear flow with both Couette and Poiseuille velocity profiles. We show that in the steady-shear'' limit, for both of the velocity profiles, the enhancement of the self-diffusion coefficient in directions transverse to the flow shows a crossover from a [dot [gamma

  14. Shear effects on crystal nucleation in colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdà, Juan J.; Sintes, Tomás; Holm, C.; Sorensen, C. M.; Chakrabarti, A.

    2008-09-01

    Extensive two-dimensional Langevin dynamics simulations are used to determine the effect of steady shear flows on the crystal nucleation kinetics of charge stabilized colloids and colloids whose pair potential possess an attractive shallow well of a few kBT ’s (attractive colloids). Results show that in both types of systems small amounts of shear speeds up the crystallization process and enhances the quality of the growing crystal significantly. Moderate shear rates, on the other hand, destroy the ordering in the system. The very high shear rate regime where a reentering transition to the ordered state could exist is not considered in this work. In addition to the crystal nucleation phenomena, the analysis of the transport properties and the characterization of the steady state regime under shear are performed.

  15. Critical Casimir forces in colloidal suspensions on chemically patterned surfaces.

    PubMed

    Soyka, Florian; Zvyagolskaya, Olga; Hertlein, Christopher; Helden, Laurent; Bechinger, Clemens

    2008-11-14

    We investigate the behavior of colloidal particles immersed in a binary liquid mixture of water and 2,6-lutidine in the presence of a chemically patterned substrate. Close to the critical point of the mixture, the particles are subjected to critical Casimir interactions with force components normal and parallel to the surface. Because the strength and sign of these interactions can be tuned by variations in the surface properties and the mixtures temperature, critical Casimir forces allow the formation of highly ordered monolayers but also extend the use of colloids as model systems.

  16. Critical Casimir Forces in Colloidal Suspensions on Chemically Patterned Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soyka, Florian; Zvyagolskaya, Olga; Hertlein, Christopher; Helden, Laurent; Bechinger, Clemens

    2008-11-01

    We investigate the behavior of colloidal particles immersed in a binary liquid mixture of water and 2,6-lutidine in the presence of a chemically patterned substrate. Close to the critical point of the mixture, the particles are subjected to critical Casimir interactions with force components normal and parallel to the surface. Because the strength and sign of these interactions can be tuned by variations in the surface properties and the mixtures temperature, critical Casimir forces allow the formation of highly ordered monolayers but also extend the use of colloids as model systems.

  17. An Automatic Phase-Change Detection Technique for Colloidal Hard Sphere Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark; Gray, Elizabeth; Rogers, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    Colloidal suspensions of monodisperse spheres are used as physical models of thermodynamic phase transitions and as precursors to photonic band gap materials. However, current image analysis techniques are not able to distinguish between densely packed phases within conventional microscope images, which are mainly characterized by degrees of randomness or order with similar grayscale value properties. Current techniques for identifying the phase boundaries involve manually identifying the phase transitions, which is very tedious and time consuming. We have developed an intelligent machine vision technique that automatically identifies colloidal phase boundaries. The algorithm utilizes intelligent image processing techniques that accurately identify and track phase changes vertically or horizontally for a sequence of colloidal hard sphere suspension images. This technique is readily adaptable to any imaging application where regions of interest are distinguished from the background by differing patterns of motion over time.

  18. Re-entrant kinetic arrest and elasticity of concentrated suspensions of spherical and nonspherical repulsive and attractive colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramb, Ryan C.; Zhang, Rui; Schweizer, Kenneth S.; Zukoski, Charles F.

    2011-01-01

    We have designed and studied a new experimental colloidal system to probe how the weak shape anisotropy of uniaxial particles and variable repulsive (Coulombic) and attractive (van der Waals) forces influence slow dynamics, shear elasticity, and kinetic vitrification in dense suspensions. The introduction of shape anisotropy dramatically delays kinetic vitrification and reduces the shear elastic modulus of colloidal diatomics relative to their chemically identical spherical analogs. Tuning the interparticle interaction from repulsive, to nearly hard, to attractive by increasing suspension ionic strength reveals a nonmonotonic re-entrant dynamical phase behavior (glass-fluid-gel) and a rich variation of the shear modulus. The experimental results are quantitatively confronted with recent predictions of ideal mode coupling and activated barrier hopping theories of kinetic arrest and elasticity, and good agreement is generally found with a couple of exceptions. The systems created may have interesting materials science applications such as flowable ultrahigh volume fraction suspensions, or responsive fluids that can be reversibly switched between a flowing liquid and a solid nonequilibrium state based on in situ modification of suspension ionic strength.

  19. Photoluminescence quantum yield of PbS nanocrystals in colloidal suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Greben, M.; Fucikova, A.; Valenta, J.

    2015-04-14

    The absolute photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY) of oleic acid-capped colloidal PbS quantum dots (QDs) in toluene is thoroughly investigated as function of QD size, concentration, excitation photon energy, and conditions of storage. We observed anomalous decrease of QY with decreasing concentration for highly diluted suspensions. The ligand desorption and QD-oxidation are demonstrated to be responsible for this phenomenon. Excess of oleic acid in suspensions makes the QY values concentration-independent over the entire reabsorption-free range. The PL emission is shown to be dominated by surface-related recombinations with some contribution from QD-core transitions. We demonstrate that QD colloidal suspension stability improves with increasing the concentration and size of PbS QDs.

  20. Effective diffusivity in active Brownian suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkholder, Eric; Brady, John

    2016-11-01

    We study the single-particle diffusion of a Brownian probe of size R in a suspension comprised of a Newtonian solvent and a dilute dispersion of active Brownian particles (ABPs) with size a, characteristic swim velocity U0, and a reorientation time τR. These ABPs, or "swimmers," have a run length l =U0τR , and a mechanical activity ksTs =ζaU02τR / 6 , where ζa is the Stokes drag coefficient of a swimmer. When the swimmers are inactive, collisions between the probe and the swimmers sterically hinder the probe's diffusive motion. When the activity of the swimmers is greater than the Boltzmann energy, ksTs >kB T , rather than being sterically hindered, the probe diffusivity is actually greater than its Stokes-Einstein-Sutherland diffusivity due to the mechanical energy imparted to the probe upon collisions with the swimmers. The active contribution to the effective diffusivity is a non-monotonic function of the swimmers' run length compared to the contact length between the probe and a swimmer: l / (R + a) . Comparisons are made to previous theoretical and experimental investigations of the hydrodynamic diffusion of a colloidal particle in a dilute suspension of swimming bacteria. NSF Grant No. CBET 1437570.

  1. Long-range attraction in aqueous colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qing; Coult, Jason; Pollack, Gerald H.

    2010-11-01

    Long-range attractions in aqueous suspensions were observed between polymeric microspheres and also between microspheres and a gel bead. Attractive displacements were consistently seen even between like-charged entities, and they were observed over spans as large as 2 mm. Such behaviors are unexpected, and may reside in a long-range attraction mechanism.

  2. Characterization of fullerene colloidal suspension in a cell culture medium for in vitro toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Kato, Haruhisa; Shinohara, Naohide; Nakamura, Ayako; Horie, Masanori; Fujita, Katsuhide; Takahashi, Kayori; Iwahashi, Hitoshi; Endoh, Shigehisa; Kinugasa, Shinichi

    2010-07-01

    To elucidate important parameters for in vitro toxicity assessment of C(60) and C(70) fullerene colloidal particles, experiments were carried out in culture medium using pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR), asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AFFFF), and dynamic light scattering (DLS) methods. First, the amounts of total and bulk bovine serum albumin (BSA) molecules in C(60) and C(70) fullerene colloidal suspensions were determined using the PFG-NMR and AFFFF methods. Because the amount of bulk BSA molecules in the cell culture medium is a significant factor in inducing cell growth and because BSA can strongly adsorb onto the fullerene particles, this value is an important parameter for toxicological assessment. It was found that most of the BSA molecules are freely diffusing for both fullerene colloidal suspensions, at least in the range of fullerene concentration from 0.0025-0.15 mg mL(-1). Second, structural analysis of the fullerene colloidal nanoparticles was successfully performed using AFFFF-multi angle light scattering (MALS) and DLS methods. Based on the observed light scattering profiles obtained from a narrow size distribution of colloidal particles collected after AFFFF separation, it was estimated that the fullerene colloidal nanoparticles of both C(60) and C(70) did not adopt a hard spherical structure in the culture medium. The results from combined analysis using the AFFFF-MALS and DLS methods also supported this conclusion and indicated that the fullerene colloidal particles adopted a more flexible structure in culture medium. Since carbon nanomaterials with different geometric structures exhibit quite different cytotoxicity and bioactivity, these results are important for in vitro toxicity assessment.

  3. Optical extinction, refractive index, and multiple scattering for suspensions of interacting colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parola, Alberto; Piazza, Roberto; Degiorgio, Vittorio

    2014-09-01

    We provide a general microscopic theory of the scattering cross-section and of the refractive index for a system of interacting colloidal particles, exact at second order in the molecular polarizabilities. In particular: (a) we show that the structural features of the suspension are encoded into the forward scattered field by multiple scattering effects, whose contribution is essential for the so-called "optical theorem" to hold in the presence of interactions; (b) we investigate the role of radiation reaction on light extinction; (c) we discuss our results in the framework of effective medium theories, presenting a general result for the effective refractive index valid, whatever the structural properties of the suspension, in the limit of particles much larger than the wavelength; (d) by discussing strongly-interacting suspensions, we unravel subtle anomalous dispersion effects for the suspension refractive index.

  4. Startup of electrophoresis in a suspension of colloidal spheres.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chia C; Keh, Huan J

    2015-12-01

    The transient electrophoretic response of a homogeneous suspension of spherical particles to the step application of an electric field is analyzed. The electric double layer encompassing each particle is assumed to be thin but finite, and the effect of dynamic electroosmosis within it is incorporated. The momentum equation for the fluid outside the double layers is solved through the use of a unit cell model. Closed-form formulas for the time-evolving electrophoretic and settling velocities of the particles in the Laplace transform are obtained in terms of the electrokinetic radius, relative mass density, and volume fraction of the particles. The time scale for the development of electrophoresis and sedimentation is significantly smaller for a suspension with a higher particle volume fraction or a smaller particle-to-fluid density ratio, and the electrophoretic mobility at any instant increases with an increase in the electrokinetic particle radius. The transient electrophoretic mobility is a decreasing function of the particle volume fraction if the particle-to-fluid density ratio is relatively small, but it may increase with an increase in the particle volume fraction if this density ratio is relatively large. The particle interaction effect in a suspension on the transient electrophoresis is much weaker than that on the transient sedimentation of the particles.

  5. A Coarse-Grained Simulation of Rheology of Colloidal Suspensions and Polymer Nano-Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryamitsyn, Victor

    2005-03-01

    We extend DPD model to address dynamical properties of suspensions of solid particles in complex fluids. In this approach, the solvent particles (polymer segments) are represented as DPD particles. In contrast, the solute particles are represented as spherical hard particles of appropriate size. To provide proper shear friction and grip of the colloids and solvent we utilize Espanol's extensions over standard DPD model by adding rotational degree of freedom and rotational friction and non-central dissipative and random forces. For non-polymeric fluids, our results focus on the equilibrium dynamics and the steady state shear rheological behavior for a range of volume fractions of the suspension, and demonstrate excellent agreement with many published experimental and theoretical results. Moreover, we are also able to track the glass transition of our suspension and associated dynamical signatures in both the diffusivities and the rheological properties of our suspension. For polymeric fluid, we have studied influence of polymer-particle friction and particle concentration on polymer matrix relaxation dynamics, particle diffusion and rheology of the composite. Our results suggest that the simulation approach can be used as a mesoscale model to examine quantitatively the rheological properties of colloidal suspensions in complex fluid solvents such as polymeric melts and solutions, as well as allied dynamical phenomena such as phase ordering in mixtures of block copolymers and particles.

  6. A Generalized Frictional and Hydrodynamic Model of the Dynamics and Structure of Dense Colloidal Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maia, Joao; Boromand, Arman; Grove, Brandy; Jamali, Safa

    2016-11-01

    We perform mesoscopic DPD simulations incorporating both hydrodynamic and frictional interparticle interactions to study the effect of interaction potential on the rheology and structure of dense frictional colloidal suspensions. In particular, we performed a series of viscosity and normal stress measurements in suspensions with different volume fractions and obtained, for the first time, a complete picture of the dynamic state and of the microstructure. We confirmed that N1 for semi-dense suspensions stays negative and grows with shear rate, which is consistent with hydrocluster-induced shear-thickening. We show that CST in colloidal suspensions can be explained solely via hydrodynamics, frictional bonds being transient and negligible to the rheological response. In dense suspensions and close to the jamming transition however, friction is required to obtain DST and replicate the recently experimental findings of a transition from negative to positive N1. We prove that hydroclusters form first at low stresses; this brings the particles together, thus allowing frictional contacts to develop, eventually leading to DST. In addition, when each particle is subject to an average of one frictional contact, N1 reverses its increase but remains negative; at approximately two frictional contacts, a percolating network forms and N1 becomes positive.

  7. Connecting nanoscale motion and rheology of gel-forming colloidal suspensions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongyu; Ramakrishnan, S; Harden, James L; Leheny, Robert L

    2010-05-01

    We report a combined x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and rheometry study of moderately concentrated suspensions of silica colloids that form a gel on cooling. During gel formation, the suspensions acquire a shear modulus that increases with time, while the thermal motion of the colloids becomes localized over an increasingly restricted range. The nanometer-scale localization length characterizing this motion obeys an exact relationship with the shear modulus predicted theoretically from mode coupling calculations [K. S. Schweizer and G. Yatsenko, J. Chem. Phys. 127, 164505 (2007)]. This scaling thus demonstrates a direct quantitative connection between the microscopic dynamics and macroscopic rheology. It further indicates the importance of local structure over longer-range correlations in dictating the dynamical and mechanical properties of such gels.

  8. Synthesis of silicon carbide at room temperature from colloidal suspensions of silicon dioxide and carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukalin, D. A.; Tuchin, A. V.; Kulikova, T. V.; Bityutskaya, L. A.

    2015-11-01

    Experimental and theoretical approaches were used for the investigation of mechanisms and conditions of self-organized nanostructures formation in the drying drop of the mixture of colloidal suspensions of nanoscale amorphous silicon dioxide and carbon nanotubes. The formation of rodlike structures with diameter 250-300nm and length ∼4pm was revealed. The diffraction analysis of the obtained nanostructures showed the formation of the silicon carbide phase at room temperature.

  9. Elasticity and yielding of a calcite paste: scaling laws in a dense colloidal suspension.

    PubMed

    Liberto, Teresa; Le Merrer, Marie; Barentin, Catherine; Bellotto, Maurizio; Colombani, Jean

    2017-03-08

    We address the mechanical characterization of a calcite paste as a model system to investigate the relation between the microstructure and macroscopic behavior of colloidal suspensions. The ultimate goal is to achieve control of the elastic and yielding properties of calcite which will prove valuable in several domains, from paper coating to paint manufacture and eventually in the comprehension and control of the mechanical properties of carbonate rocks. Rheological measurements have been performed on calcite suspensions over a wide range of particle concentrations. The calcite paste exhibits a typical colloidal gel behavior, with an elastic regime and a clear yield strain above which it enters a plastic regime. The yield strain shows a minimum when increasing the solid concentration, connected to a change in the power law scaling of the storage modulus. In the framework of the classical fractal elasticity model for colloidal suspensions proposed by Shih et al. [Phys. Rev. A, 1990, 42, 4772], we interpret this behavior as a switch with the concentration from the strong-link regime to the weak-link regime, which had never been observed so far in one well-defined system without external or chemical forcing.

  10. Poisson-Boltzmann theory of charged colloids: limits of the cell model for salty suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, A. R.

    2010-09-01

    Thermodynamic properties of charge-stabilized colloidal suspensions and polyelectrolyte solutions are commonly modelled by implementing the mean-field Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) theory within a cell model. This approach models a bulk system by a single macroion, together with counterions and salt ions, confined to a symmetrically shaped, electroneutral cell. While easing numerical solution of the nonlinear PB equation, the cell model neglects microion-induced interactions and correlations between macroions, precluding modelling of macroion ordering phenomena. An alternative approach, which avoids the artificial constraints of cell geometry, exploits the mapping of a macroion-microion mixture onto a one-component model of pseudo-macroions governed by effective interparticle interactions. In practice, effective-interaction models are usually based on linear-screening approximations, which can accurately describe strong nonlinear screening only by incorporating an effective (renormalized) macroion charge. Combining charge renormalization and linearized PB theories, in both the cell model and an effective-interaction (cell-free) model, we compute osmotic pressures of highly charged colloids and monovalent microions, in Donnan equilibrium with a salt reservoir, over a range of concentrations. By comparing predictions with primitive model simulation data for salt-free suspensions, and with predictions from nonlinear PB theory for salty suspensions, we chart the limits of both the cell model and linear-screening approximations in modelling bulk thermodynamic properties. Up to moderately strong electrostatic couplings, the cell model proves accurate for predicting osmotic pressures of deionized (counterion-dominated) suspensions. With increasing salt concentration, however, the relative contribution of macroion interactions to the osmotic pressure grows, leading predictions from the cell and effective-interaction models to deviate. No evidence is found for a liquid

  11. Self-similarity in active colloid motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constant, Colin; Sukhov, Sergey; Dogariu, Aristide

    The self-similarity of displacements among randomly evolving systems has been used to describe the foraging patterns of animals and predict the growth of financial systems. At micron scales, the motion of colloidal particles can be analyzed by sampling their spatial displacement in time. For self-similar systems in equilibrium, the mean squared displacement increases linearly in time. However, external forces can take the system out of equilibrium, creating active colloidal systems, and making this evolution more complex. A moment scaling spectrum of the distribution of particle displacements quantifies the degree of self-similarity in the colloid motion. We will demonstrate that, by varying the temporal and spatial characteristics of the external forces, one can control the degree of self-similarity in active colloid motion.

  12. A fullerene colloidal suspension stimulates the growth and denitrification ability of wastewater treatment sludge-derived bacteria.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fei; Ge, Ling; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Yun; Tian, Hao; Zhao, Liping; He, Yiliang; Zhang, Xiaojun

    2014-08-01

    Fullerene (C60) is a nanoparticle that has been widely studied and applied in numerous commodities. However, there are concerns regarding its potential negative impact on the environment. A fullerene colloidal suspension (nC60) is known for its property of selectively inhibiting the growth of microorganisms. In this study, using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting technology, we found that fullerene altered the structure of a sludge-derived microbial community. Specifically, the bacteria from Bacillus, Acidovorax and Cloacibacterium genera were enriched in abundance when supplemented with nC60 at pH 6.5 under aerobic conditions. The effects of the fullerene colloidal suspension on a strain of Bacillus isolated from the same microbial community were evaluated to further characterize the growth-stimulating effect of nC60. The biomass of cultures of this strain incubated with nC60 concentrations ranging from 3 mg L(-1) to 7 mg L(-1) was approximately twice that of the control during the stationary phase. The fullerene also induced higher superoxide dismutase activity in Bacillus cereus. Furthermore, the nitrate removal rate of B. cereus increased to nearly 55% in the presence of 5 mg L(-1) nC60, compared to 35% for the control. Meanwhile, the cumulative loading amount of nitrite was reduced from 33 μg mL(-1) to 25 μg mL(-1) by the addition of 5 mg L(-1) nC60. Our results demonstrate that the fullerene colloidal suspension is conditionally capable of promoting the growth and denitrification metabolism of certain bacteria, such as B. cereus. Fullerene might have both inhibitory and stimulatory effects on microorganisms in various environments.

  13. Colloidal stability of coal-simulated suspensions in selective agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Schurger, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    A coal suspension was simulated by using graphite to simulate the carbonaceous fraction and kaolinite clay to simulate the ash fraction. Separate studies on each material established their response to additions of oxidized pyrite (ferrous sulfate) and a humic acid simulate (salicylic acid) in terms of zeta potentials profiles with pH and Ionic strength. Concentrations of iron and salicylic acid evaluated were 4.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} M and 2.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} M, respectively. The zeta potentials profiles of graphite, clay and hexadecane were negative throughout the pH ranges studied. The addition of iron lowered the zeta potentials all of the suspensions under all pH and ionic strength conditions. Salicylic acid decreased the graphite and hexadecane zeta potentials but had no effect on the clay zeta potential profiles. Agglomeration of graphite with bridging liquid shows distinct time dependent rate mechanisms, a initial growth of graphite agglomerates followed by consolidation phase. Graphite agglomeration was rapid with the maximum amount of agglomerate volume growth occurring in under 2-4 minutes. Agglomeration in the first two minutes was characterized by a 1st order rate mechanism. The presence of either Iron and salicylic acid generally improved the first order rates. The addition of clay also improved the first order rates except in the presence of salicylic acid. Heteroagglomeration of graphite with clay was found by hydrodynamic arguments to be unfavored. A multicomponent population balance model which had been developed for evaluating collision efficiencies of coal, ash and pyrite selective agglomeration was evaluated to explain these results. The growth and consolidation characteristics of graphite agglomeration for the experimental conditions examined herein revealed the limitations of such as model for this application.

  14. The reciprocal effect of lubrication and contact forces in shear-thickening of colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamali, Safa; Boromand, Arman; Maia, Joao

    2015-03-01

    Recently, the shear-thickening of colloidal suspensions at high shear rates in general, and the so-called discontinuous shear-thickening (DST) in particular, has been attributed to frictional contact forces at high shear rates. This emerging understanding of the contact forces in a suspension has brought back the well-known dilatancy theory which was rather dormant in the past two decades. Here, we study the necessity of short-range hydrodynamics and the correlation between the contact and lubrication forces in shear-thickening suspensions. We use a modified Dissipative Particle Dynamics method that includes squeeze mode lubrication potentials based on the pair drag between two interacting colloids. The effect of simulation parameters and contact potentials on the rheological response of a suspension is studied. Our results show that although the quality of the shear-thickening behavior (whether DST can be obtained or not) is dominated by the contact potentials, the lubrication force is a prerequisite for any type of shear-thickening to be recovered. Needless to mention that this argument is valid for the high Péclet numbers, as opposed to shear-thinning regime which can be fully reproduced without the need to lubrication or contact potentials.

  15. Multiscale modeling of the thixotropic behavior of aggregating soft colloidal particle suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mwasame, Paul; Wagner, Norman; Beris, Antony

    A multiscale model is presented that incorporates microscopic information at the soft, aggregating, colloidal particle level to a macroscopic description of a thixotropic suspension with a yield stress. This is accomplished by incorporating the relevant physics describing aggregation and breakage at the particle level into a population balance microscopic framework. A moment approach is followed to allow for model coarsening and its incorporation into a macroscopic description. Furthermore, to describe the aggregate dynamics under flow, it is necessary to include an additional description of the aggregate deformation. The yielding behavior of gel networks observed in thixotropic suspensions is modeled by adapting micromechanical models of emulsions and pastes to describe aggregate deformation under flow. A key outcome of this work is the recognition of the important role of competition between orthokinetic and perikinetic aggregation on polydispersity and dynamical behavior. Comparison to rheological experiments on a model thixotropic suspension will also be presented to validate the model developed. NSF CBET 312146.

  16. Transport coefficients and mechanical response in hard-disk colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo-Kai; Li, Jian; Chen, Kang; Tian, Wen-De; Ma, Yu-Qiang

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the transport properties and mechanical response of glassy hard disks using nonlinear Langevin equation theory. We derive expressions for the elastic shear modulus and viscosity in two dimensions on the basis of thermal-activated barrier-hopping dynamics and mechanically accelerated motion. Dense hard disks exhibit phenomena such as softening elasticity, shear-thinning of viscosity, and yielding upon deformation, which are qualitatively similar to dense hard-sphere colloidal suspensions in three dimensions. These phenomena can be ascribed to stress-induced “landscape tilting”. Quantitative comparisons of these phenomena between hard disks and hard spheres are presented. Interestingly, we find that the density dependence of yield stress in hard disks is much more significant than in hard spheres. Our work provides a foundation for further generalizing the nonlinear Langevin equation theory to address slow dynamics and rheological behavior in binary or polydisperse mixtures of hard or soft disks. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB821500) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21374073 and, 21574096).

  17. Manipulating colloidal assemblies with active dopants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramananarivo, Sophie; Palacci, Jeremie

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics of a densely packed 2D layer of colloids can be significantly altered upon introducing a small amount of active microparticles. Those motile intruders drive the system out-of-equilibrium, which produces a variety of new complex phenomena such as the accentuation of density heterogeneities or the reorganization of crystalline colloidal structures. We investigate the altered dynamics of the passive spheres, as well as the behavior of micro-swimmers propelling in such crowded environment where interactions with passive obstacles or other active units become important. Ultimately, understanding and controlling such mixed systems could open new routes toward activity-assisted manipulation of colloids, potentially guiding the design of materials able to self-anneal their defects.

  18. Rheological and Solid-Liquid Separation Properties of Bimodal Suspensions of Colloidal Gibbsite and Boehmite

    PubMed

    Bruinsma; Wang; Li; Liu; Smith; Bunker

    1997-08-01

    Bimodal suspensions of nanometer-sized boehmite particles and micron-sized gibbsite particles in 0.10 M NaNO3 are used as models to gain insight into the physical properties of agglomerating colloidal suspensions containing bimodal distributions of primary particles. Results on the gibbsite-boehmite mixtures show that the presences of small particles in a suspension can have a dramatic impact on the rheological, sedimentation, and filtration characteristics of suspensions of larger particles. Transmission electron micrographs show that boehmite forms a coating on the larger gibbsite particles. The coating provides steric repulsion and reduces the attractive interactions between the larger particles, leading to viscosity decreases and greater densification of sediments and filter cakes. A model has been developed to rationalize observed property changes based on the range of agglomerate structures that can form in mixtures of large and small particles. Results are discussed in the content of the processing of nuclear waste sludges, but are applicable to a wide range of bimodal suspensions.

  19. Effects of the rate of evaporation and film thickness on nonuniform drying of film-forming concentrated colloidal suspensions.

    PubMed

    Narita, T; Hébraud, P; Lequeux, F

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, we report on nonuniform distribution of film-forming waterborne colloidal suspensions above the critical concentration phi(c) of the colloidal glass transition during drying. We found that colloidal suspension films dry nonuniformly when the initial rate of evaporation E and/or the initial thickness l(0) are high. We found that a Peclet number Pe, defined as Pe = El(0)/D, where D is the diffusion coefficient of the colloids in the diluted suspensions, does not predict uniformity of drying of the concentrated suspensions, contrary to the reported work on drying of diluted suspensions. Since the colloidal particles are crowded and their diffusive motion is restricted in concentrated suspensions, we assumed that above phi(c) water is transported to the drying surface by hydrodynamic flow along the osmotic pressure gradient. The permeability of water through channels between deforming particles is estimated by adapting the theory of foam drainage. We defined a new Peclet number Pe' by substituting the transport coefficient of flow (defined as the permeability divided by the viscosity, multiplied by the osmotic pressure gradient) for the diffusion coefficient. This extended Peclet number predicted the nonuniform drying with a criterion of Pe' > 1. These results indicate that the mechanism of water transport to the drying surface in concentrated suspensions is water permeation by osmotic pressure, which is faster than mutual diffusion between water and particles --that has been observed in diluted suspensions and discussed by Routh and Russel. The theory fits well the experimental drying curves for various thicknesses and rates of evaporation. The particle distribution in the drying films is also estimated and it is indicated that the latex distribution is nonuniform when Pe' > 1.

  20. Inclined layer convection in a colloidal suspension with negative Soret coefficient at large solutal Rayleigh numbers.

    PubMed

    Italia, Matteo; Croccolo, Fabrizio; Scheffold, Frank; Vailati, Alberto

    2014-10-01

    Convection in an inclined layer of fluid is affected by the presence of a component of the acceleration of gravity perpendicular to the density gradient that drives the convective motion. In this work we investigate the solutal convection of a colloidal suspension characterized by a negative Soret coefficient. Convection is induced by heating the suspension from above, and at large solutal Rayleigh numbers (of the order of 10(7)-10(8)) convective spoke patterns form. We show that in the presence of a marginal inclination of the cell as small as 19 mrad the isotropy of the spoke pattern is broken and the convective patterns tend to align in the direction of the inclination. At intermediate inclinations of the order of 33 mrad ordered square patterns are obtained, while at inclination of the order of 67 mrad the strong shear flow determined by the inclination gives rise to ascending and descending sheets of fluid aligned parallel to the direction of inclination.

  1. Coffee ring effect resulted conductive nanowire patterns by evaporating colloidal suspension droplets without sintering process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Seong, Baekhoon; Yudistira, Hadi Teguh; Byun, Doyoung

    2015-11-01

    Drying colloidal suspensions containing non-volatile solute will form a ring like pattern, which is called ``coffee ring effect.'' Here, we present the coffee ring effect with silver nanowires dispersing into DI water, resulting in a highly dense-packed nanowire ring patterns. The effect of nanowire length, concentration, droplet size, and substrate temperature were investigated. With shorter nanowires, a distinct ring could be obtained. Meanwhile, the concentration of the colloidal suspension was found to affect the ring width. The droplet size and nanowire length played a significant role in affecting the occurrence of the coffee ring effect. When smaller droplets (i.e., less than 150 μm) containing long nanowires (~ 20 μm), the coffee ring effect was suppressed. While smaller droplets containing short nanowires (~ 1 μm), the coffee ring effect was not affected. By increasing the temperature of the substrate, multi-ring pattern was formed inside the original ring. The resistivity of the semi-circle of the nanowire ring was measured, and had a minimum value of 1.32 × 10-6 Ωm without any sintering process. These findings could be exploited to basic study of ring stain effect as well as the practical use, such as evaporative lithography and ink-jet printing for conductive film and display. This research was supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) (Grant number: 2014-023284).

  2. Direct Observation of Phase Transition Dynamics in Suspensions of Soft Colloidal Hydrogel Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jae Kyu; Meng, Zhiyong; Lyon, L. Andrew; Breedveld, Victor

    2008-07-01

    Due to the tunability of their softness and volume as a function of temperature, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAm) hydrogel particles have emerged as a model system for soft colloidal spheres. By introducing AAc as comonomer, one can also tune the particle volume via pH. We report on the phase behavior of these stimuli-responsive colloids as measured with a microdialysis cell. This device, which integrates microfluidics with Particle Tracking Video-microscopy allows for simple and quick investigation of the phase behavior of suspensions the soft colloidal hydrogel as a function of pH as well as its packing density. In particular, we demonstrate the existence of an unusually broad liquid/crystal coexistence region as a function of effective particle volume fraction. Additionally, we reveal that nonequilibrium jammed states can be created in the coexistence region upon sudden large changes of pH. The phase diagram is indicative of complex interparticle interactions with weakly attractive components.

  3. Nonlinear oscillatory rheology and structure of wormlike micellar solutions and colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnon, Amanda Kate

    The complex, nonlinear flow behavior of soft materials transcends industrial applications, smart material design and non-equilibrium thermodynamics. A long-standing, fundamental challenge in soft-matter science is establishing a quantitative connection between the deformation field, local microstructure and macroscopic dynamic flow properties i.e., the rheology. Soft materials are widely used in consumer products and industrial processes including energy recovery, surfactants for personal healthcare (e.g. soap and shampoo), coatings, plastics, drug delivery, medical devices and therapeutics. Oftentimes, these materials are processed by, used during, or exposed to non-equilibrium conditions for which the transient response of the complex fluid is critical. As such, designing new dynamic experiments is imperative to testing these materials and further developing micromechanical models to predict their transient response. Two of the most common classes of these soft materials stand as the focus of the present research; they are: solutions of polymer-like micelles (PLM or also known as wormlike micelles, WLM) and concentrated colloidal suspensions. In addition to their varied applications these two different classes of soft materials are also governed by different physics. In contrast, to the shear thinning behavior of the WLMs at high shear rates, the near hard-sphere colloidal suspensions are known to display increases, sometimes quite substantial, in viscosity (known as shear thickening). The stress response of these complex fluids derive from the shear-induced microstructure, thus measurements of the microstructure under flow are critical for understanding the mechanisms underlying the complex, nonlinear rheology of these complex fluids. A popular micromechanical model is reframed from its original derivation for predicting steady shear rheology of polymers and WLMs to be applicable to weakly nonlinear oscillatory shear flow. The validity, utility and limits of

  4. Simulation of the injection of colloidal suspensions for the remediation of contaminated aquifer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosco, Tiziana; Gastone, Francesca; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2014-05-01

    Concentrated suspensions of microscale and nanoscale zerovalent iron particles (MZVI and NZVI) have been studied in recent years for the remediation of contaminated aquifers. The suspensions are injected into the subsurface to generate a reactive zone, and consequently the prediction of the particles distribution during the injection is a key aspect in the design of a field-scale injection. Colloidal dispersions of MZVI and NZVI are not stable in pure water, and shear thinning, environmentally friendly fluids (guar gum and xanthan gum solutions) were found to be effective in improving colloidal stability, thus greatly improving handling and injectability (1 - 3). Shear thinning fluids exhibit high viscosity in static conditions, improving the colloidal stability, and lower viscosity at high flow rates enabling the injection at limited pressures. Shear thinning fluids exhibit high viscosity in static conditions, improving the colloidal stability, and lower viscosity at high flow rates enabling the injection at limited pressures. In this work, co-funded by European Union project AQUAREHAB (FP7 - Grant Agreement Nr. 226565), laboratory and pilot field tests for MZVI injection in saturated porous media are reported. MZVI was dispersed in guar gum solutions, and the transport behaviour under several polymer concentrations and injection rates was assessed in column tests (4). Based on the experimental results, a modelling approach is proposed to simulate the transport in porous media of nanoscale iron slurries, implemented in E-MNM1D (www.polito.it/groundwater/software). Colloid transport mechanisms are controlled by particle-collector and particle-particle interactions, usually modelled by a non equilibrium kinetic model accounting for deposition and release processes. The key aspects included in the E-MNM1D are clogging phenomena (i.e. reduction of porosity and permeability due to particles deposition), and the rheological properties of the carrier fluid (in this

  5. Colloidal properties and stability of aqueous suspensions of few-layer graphene: Importance of graphene concentration.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu; Yang, Guoqing; Lu, Kun; Petersen, Elijah J; Mao, Liang

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the colloidal stability of graphene is essential for predicting its transport and ecological risks in aquatic environments. We investigated the agglomeration of (14)C-labeled few-layer graphene (FLG) at concentrations spanning nearly four orders of magnitude (2 μg/L to 10 mg/L) using dynamic light scattering and sedimentation measurements. FLG agglomerates formed rapidly in deionized water at concentrations >3 mg/L. From 1 mg/L to 3 mg/L, salt-induced agglomeration was decreased with dilution of FLG suspensions; the critical coagulation concentration of the more concentrated suspension (3 mg/L) was significantly lower than the dilute suspension (1 mg/L) in the presence of NaCl (1.6 mmol/L and 10 mmol/L, respectively). In contrast, FLG underwent slow agglomeration and settling at concentrations ≤0.1 mg/L in NaCl solutions and ambient waters with low ionic strength (<10 mmol/L). FLG nanoparticles with smaller lateral sizes (25 nm-75 nm) were shown to agglomerate more slowly than larger FLG, and these small FLG particles exhibited greater bioaccumulation in zebrafish embryo and stronger chorion penetration ability than larger FLG particles. These findings suggest that FLG at more environmentally relevant concentration is relatively stable and may have implications for exposure of small FLG to ecological receptors.

  6. A scalable parallel Stokesian Dynamics method for the simulation of colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bülow, F.; Hamberger, P.; Nirschl, H.; Dörfler, W.

    2016-07-01

    We have developed a new method for the efficient numerical simulation of colloidal suspensions. This method is designed and especially well-suited for parallel code execution, but it can also be applied to single-core programs. It combines the Stokesian Dynamics method with a variant of the widely used Barnes-Hut algorithm in order to reduce computational costs. This combination and the inherent parallelization of the method make simulations of large numbers of particles within days possible. The level of accuracy can be determined by the user and is limited by the truncation of the used multipole expansion. Compared to the original Stokesian Dynamics method the complexity can be reduced from O(N2) to linear complexity for dilute suspensions of strongly clustered particles, N being the number of particles. In case of non-clustered particles in a dense suspension, the complexity depends on the particle configuration and is between O(N) and O(Pnp,max2) , where P is the number of used processes and np,max = ⌈ N / P ⌉ , respectively.

  7. Light-activated self-propelled colloids

    PubMed Central

    Palacci, J.; Sacanna, S.; Kim, S.-H.; Yi, G.-R.; Pine, D. J.; Chaikin, P. M.

    2014-01-01

    Light-activated self-propelled colloids are synthesized and their active motion is studied using optical microscopy. We propose a versatile route using different photoactive materials, and demonstrate a multiwavelength activation and propulsion. Thanks to the photoelectrochemical properties of two semiconductor materials (α-Fe2O3 and TiO2), a light with an energy higher than the bandgap triggers the reaction of decomposition of hydrogen peroxide and produces a chemical cloud around the particle. It induces a phoretic attraction with neighbouring colloids as well as an osmotic self-propulsion of the particle on the substrate. We use these mechanisms to form colloidal cargos as well as self-propelled particles where the light-activated component is embedded into a dielectric sphere. The particles are self-propelled along a direction otherwise randomized by thermal fluctuations, and exhibit a persistent random walk. For sufficient surface density, the particles spontaneously form ‘living crystals’ which are mobile, break apart and reform. Steering the particle with an external magnetic field, we show that the formation of the dense phase results from the collisions heads-on of the particles. This effect is intrinsically non-equilibrium and a novel principle of organization for systems without detailed balance. Engineering families of particles self-propelled by different wavelength demonstrate a good understanding of both the physics and the chemistry behind the system and points to a general route for designing new families of self-propelled particles. PMID:25332383

  8. Rheological signatures of gelation and effect of shear melting on aging colloidal suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Jatav, Shweta; Joshi, Yogesh M

    2014-09-01

    Colloidal suspensions that are out of thermodynamic equilibrium undergo physical aging wherein their structure evolves to lower the free energy. In aqueous suspension of Laponite, physical aging accompanies increases of elastic and viscous moduli as a function of time. In this work, we study temporal evolution of elastic and viscous moduli at different frequencies and observe that freshly prepared aqueous suspension of Laponite demonstrates identical rheological behavior reported for the crosslinking polymeric materials undergoing chemical gelation. Consequently at a certain time, tan δ is observed to be independent of frequency. However, for samples preserved under rest condition for longer duration before applying the shear melting, the liquid to solid transition subsequent to shear melting shows greater deviation from classical gelation. We also obtain continuous relaxation time spectra from the frequency dependence of viscous modulus. We observe that, with an increase in the rest time, continuous relaxation time spectrum shows gradual variation from negative slope, describing dominance of fast relaxation modes to positive slope representing dominance of slow relaxation modes. We propose that the deviation from gelation behavior for the shear melted suspensions originates from inability of shear melting to completely break the percolated structure thereby creating unbroken aggregates. The volume fraction of such unbroken aggregates increases with the rest time. For small rest times presence of fewer number of unbroken aggregates cause deviation from the classical gelation. On the other hand, at high rest times presence of greater fraction of unbroken aggregates subsequent to shear melting demonstrate dynamic arrest leading to inversion of relaxation time spectra.

  9. Freezing transition and correlated motion in a quasi-two-dimensional colloid suspension.

    PubMed

    Zangi, Ronen; Rice, Stuart A

    2003-12-01

    Recent experiments have demonstrated that the deviation of the single-particle displacement distribution from Gaussian form in a dense quasi-two-dimensional colloid suspension is a result of heterogenous dynamics that involves cooperative motions of neighboring colloid particles [J. Chem. Phys. 47, 9142 (2001)]. In this paper, we report the results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a quasi-two-dimensional assembly of nearly hard-sphere colloid particles. The colloid-colloid interaction we use is short ranged and everywhere repulsive; it is related to the Marcus-Rice (MR) and modified MR interactions used in a previous study [Phys. Rev. E 58, 7529 (1998)]. As is the case for those systems, the one we study supports liquid, hexatic, and solid phases. Our calculations show that the deviation of the single-particle displacement distribution from Gaussian form is present in the liquid phase, and that a sharp increase in its magnitude occurs at the liquidus density and extends into the crystalline phase. For densities greater than the liquidus density we find three dynamical relaxation processes that include, at intermediate times, a slowing down in the rate of growth of the diffusive displacement of a particle due to the cage effect. As the density increases toward the solidus density, the dependence of the mean squared displacement on time, at intermediate times, changes from sublinear to zero. The onset of the long-time relaxation mode corresponds to the time at which the deviation of the particle displacement distribution from Gaussian form is a maximum. At this time, which increases exponentially with the density, the self-part of the van Hove function exhibits multiple maxima with respect to r while the distinct part of the van Hove function is a maximum at the origin, thereby signaling jump dynamics. At long times the particle mean square displacement has diffusive character at all densities including solid phase densities. A remarkable feature of our

  10. Cluster formation in binary charge-stabilized colloidal suspensions confined to a two-dimensional plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanat; Mukherjee, Manjori; Mishra, Pankaj

    2016-09-01

    Hypernetted chain (HNC) integral equation theory has been used to study the structural features of binary charged stabilized colloidal suspensions confined to a two-dimensional plane. The particles interact via purely repulsive Yukawa intermolecular potential, the inverse screening length scaled by the average distance between strongly interacting components of the mixture (dimensionless screening parameter) being 1, 3 and 5. Results of HNC theory for one-component systems are found to be in very good agreement with that of simulation, in the parameter range of our study. Binary Yukawa systems with dimensionless screening parameters 1 and 3 are found to exhibit diffuse clusters of the weakly interacting particles, marked by the emergence of a cluster peak in the corresponding partial structure factor curves. No cluster peak is found in the system with the screening parameter 5. For the entire range of mixture parameters, the strongly interacting particles remain homogeneously distributed.

  11. Renormalized charge in a two-dimensional model of colloidal suspension from hypernetted chain approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camargo, Manuel; Téllez, Gabriel

    2008-04-01

    The renormalized charge of a simple two-dimensional model of colloidal suspension was determined by solving the hypernetted chain approximation and Ornstein-Zernike equations. At the infinite dilution limit, the asymptotic behavior of the correlation functions is used to define the effective interactions between the components of the system and these effective interactions were compared to those derived from the Poisson-Boltzmann theory. The results we obtained show that, in contrast to the mean-field theory, the renormalized charge does not saturate, but exhibits a maximum value and then decays monotonically as the bare charge increases. The results also suggest that beyond the counterion layer near to the macroion surface, the ionic cloud is not a diffuse layer which can be handled by means of the linearized theory, as the two-state model claims, but a more complex structure is settled by the correlations between microions.

  12. Effects of colloidal silica suspension mixing on porosity of phosphate-bonded investments after setting and heating processes.

    PubMed

    Bae, Ji-Young; Asaoka, Kenzo

    2013-01-01

    A numerical simulation model, which was based on the setting and heating reactions of the binder phase of phosphate-bonded investment compacts, was developed to compute the porosities of set and burnout compacts. Densities and concentrations of microsilica particles in dilute suspension were measured and input into the simulation model. Validity of the model was confirmed by experimental results, that is, colloidal silica suspensions were prepared using different silica concentrations and mixed with investment powders. Porosities of these set and burnout compacts were experimentally measured. Effects of these factors on the porosity of compacts were examined using the developed simulation model: liquid/powder (L/P) ratio, concentration of microsilica particles in colloidal silica suspension, and ratio of binder component (NH₄H₂PO₄) in investment powder. It was concluded that numerical simulation is a viable tool for dental materials research.

  13. Fluorometric estimation of amino acids interaction with colloidal suspension of FITC functionalized graphene oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dave, Kashyap; Dhayal, Marshal

    2017-02-01

    A hydrosol approach developed to synthesize fluorescence quenched fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) functionalized colloidal suspension of graphene oxide nanoparticles (GONP). UV-vis spectroscopic measurements showed characteristic peak at 236 nm and 300 nm due to pi-pi* interaction in Cdbnd C and n-pi* transition in Cdbnd O bond of GONP, respectively. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectra showed reduced intensity of 1429 cm-1 IR band of GONP due to the electrostatic and pi-pi interactions of FITC with GONP in FITC-GONP. ATR-FTIR spectra of different amino acid co-functionalised FITC-GONP showed an increase in the FTIR band intensity at 1429 cm-1 which was significantly reduced due to electrostatic/pi-pi interactions of FITC with GONP in the absence of the amino acids. A peak at 1084 cm-1 in ATR-FTIR spectra appears which confirms the interaction between amine group of amino acids and sbnd COO- groups at GONP surface. The FITC interaction with GONP lead to fluorescence resonance energy transfers (FRET) and resulted in a liner decrease in the FITC fluorescence with an increase of GONP concentration. An increase in the reappearance of FITC fluorescence observed while the amino acid concentration was increased in co-functionalised FITC-GONP. The quantified amount of reappeared fluorescence of FITC in amino acid co-functionalised FITC-GONP depends on the concentration, polar and non-polar nature of amino acids. The reappearance of FITC from the surface of FITC-GONP with the addition of amino acid was found to be consistent with the organic substitute, size of amino acids and their functionalities. Therefore, FRET based method using FITC-GONP colloidal suspension may have potential application in determining the binding nature of biomolecules with GONP for biomedical applications.

  14. 1D and 2D NMR of nanocellulose in aqueous colloidal suspensions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Feng; Dallas, Jerry L; Ahn, B Kollbe; Hsieh, You-Lo

    2014-09-22

    This is the first report on surface structural elucidation of individual nanocellulose as colloidal suspensions by 1D 1H, 2D heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) as well as 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). 1H NMR of rice straw CNCs (4.7 nm thick, 143 nm long, 0.04 sulfate per AG or 19.0% surface hydroxyl to sulfate conversion) resembled that of homogeneous cellulose solution. Conventional 2D HSQC NMR of CNC, CNF 1.5 (2-14 nm thick, several micrometers long, 0.10 COOH per AG) and CNF10 (2.0 nm thick, up to 1 μm long, 0.28 COOH per AG) gave H1:H2 ratios of 1.08:1, 0.97:1 and 0.94:1, respectively, all close to the theoretical 1:1 value for cellulose. The H1:H6 ratios determined from 2D HSQC NMR for CNCs, CNF1.5 and CNF10 were 1:1.47, 1:0.88 and 1:0.14, respectively, and corresponded to 26%, 56% and 93% C6 primary hydroxyl conversion to sulfate and carboxyl groups, consistent with, but more sensitive than those by conductometric titration and X-ray diffraction. Both 1H and 2D HSQC NMR data confirm that solution-state NMR detects nanocellulose surface carbons and protons primarily, validating this technique for direct surface characterization of nanocellulose in aqueous colloidal suspensions, presenting a sensitive and meaningful NMR tool for direct characterizing individual nanocellulose surfaces in never-dried state.

  15. Particle Deposition in Drying Drops of Colloidal Suspensions Containing Different Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Still, Tim; Yunker, Peter J.; Yodh, A. G.

    2012-02-01

    When a drop of water containing small solid particles dries, most of the solid material is deposited in a ring-shape stain after evaporation (the so-called coffee ring), driven by initial contact line pinning and a subsequent outward-flow. The fluid dynamics and, hence, the deposition mechanism in such suspensions can be dramatically changed when surfactants are introduced into the system. In a colloidal model-system, the ionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) produces a concentration-driven Marangoni flow counteracting the outward-flow of the coffee ring effect. SDS locally concentrates at the air/water interface next to the contact line, leading to a reduced local surface tension. Thus, a circulating flow (`Marangoni eddy') is introduced that prevents particles from deposition. This flow is visualized by the movements of the dragged particles using video microscopy. Other surfactants can influence this highly non-equilibrium systems in completely other ways. E.g., the non-ionic Polaxamer block-copolymer surfactants lead to a uniform particle deposition, which we explain by hydrophilization of the colloidal particles. Controlling the solid deposition in drying drops is of major importance for many technical applications.

  16. Microstructure, local dynamics, and flow behavior of colloidal suspensions with weak attractive interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, Clara; Oelschlaeger, Claude; Dijkstra, Dick; Ranft, Meik; Willenbacher, Norbert

    2016-09-01

    We present a comprehensive micro- and macrorheological study of the effect of weak depletion attraction (Ψdep ≈ 1–10 kBT) on dense colloidal suspensions stabilized by short-range repulsive interactions. We used aqueous polymer dispersions as model system and demonstrated the unique capabilities of multiple particle tracking (MPT) to disclose structural changes in such technically important systems exhibiting many characteristic features of hard sphere systems. Below the hard sphere freezing point ϕc, viscosity increases monotonically with increasing Ψdep due to the transition from a fluid to a fluid/crystalline and finally to a gel state. Above ϕc, increasing attraction strength first results in a viscosity reduction corresponding to the formation of large, permeable crystals and then in a viscosity increase when a network of dense, small crystals forms. The fraction of the fluid and crystal phase, particle concentration in each phase as well as the modulus of the micro-crystals are obtained, the latter decreases with Ψdep. Above the colloidal glass transition strong heterogeneities and different local particle mobility in the repulsive and attractive arrested states are found. Particles are trapped in the cage of neighboring particles rather than in an attractive potential well. The intermediate ergodic state exhibits uniform tracer diffusivity.

  17. Translational and rotational dynamics of colloidal particles in suspension: Effect of shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Contreras, M.

    2013-08-01

    We report a generalization of a nonequilibrium thermodynamic theory for the mesoscopic dynamics of radially symmetric interacting particles to anisotropic pairwise interactions and attain the one- and two-particle Fokker-Planck kinetics equations at a low-density limit that provides the translational-rotational coupling of their motion due to hydrodynamic interactions, from which we derived the balance equations of linear, angular momentum, and energy dissipation due to particle interactions and energy interchange with heat bath. In this low-density approximation, an already-known virial expression for the long-time translational collective diffusion coefficient of an orientational isotropic suspension in terms of the fluid equilibrium microstructure is recovered. An external shear flow induces, in the diffusive regime, vorticity effects into the rotational diffusion property of the colloidal particles. They manifest in the appearance of the particle's rotational viscosity due to vortex flow. The Smoluchowski equation that governs the dynamical relaxation of colloid microstructure due to particle's Brownian motion under stationary flow is provided.

  18. Microstructure, local dynamics, and flow behavior of colloidal suspensions with weak attractive interactions

    PubMed Central

    Weis, Clara; Oelschlaeger, Claude; Dijkstra, Dick; Ranft, Meik; Willenbacher, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    We present a comprehensive micro- and macrorheological study of the effect of weak depletion attraction (Ψdep ≈ 1–10 kBT) on dense colloidal suspensions stabilized by short-range repulsive interactions. We used aqueous polymer dispersions as model system and demonstrated the unique capabilities of multiple particle tracking (MPT) to disclose structural changes in such technically important systems exhibiting many characteristic features of hard sphere systems. Below the hard sphere freezing point ϕc, viscosity increases monotonically with increasing Ψdep due to the transition from a fluid to a fluid/crystalline and finally to a gel state. Above ϕc, increasing attraction strength first results in a viscosity reduction corresponding to the formation of large, permeable crystals and then in a viscosity increase when a network of dense, small crystals forms. The fraction of the fluid and crystal phase, particle concentration in each phase as well as the modulus of the micro-crystals are obtained, the latter decreases with Ψdep. Above the colloidal glass transition strong heterogeneities and different local particle mobility in the repulsive and attractive arrested states are found. Particles are trapped in the cage of neighboring particles rather than in an attractive potential well. The intermediate ergodic state exhibits uniform tracer diffusivity. PMID:27653975

  19. Self-diffusiophoresis of chemically active colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Mihail N.; Uspal, William E.; Dietrich, Siegfried

    2016-11-01

    Chemically active colloids locally change the chemical composition of their solvent via catalytic reactions which occur on parts of their surface. They achieve motility by converting the released chemical free energy into mechanical work through various mechanisms, such as phoresis. Here we discuss the theoretical aspects of self-diffusiophoresis, which - despite being one of the simplest motility mechanisms - captures many of the general features characterizing self-phoresis, such as self-generated and maintained hydrodynamic flows "driven" by surface activity induced inhomogeneities in solution. By studying simple examples, which provide physical insight, we highlight the complex phenomenology which can emerge from self-diffusiophoresis.

  20. Can secondary nucleation exist in ice banding of freezing colloidal suspensions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Jia-Xue; Wang, Jin-Cheng; Wang, Li-Lin; Wang, Zhi-Jun; Li, Jun-Jie; Lin, Xin

    2016-12-01

    The formation mechanism of ice banding in the system of freezing colloidal suspensions, which is of significance in frost heaving, ice-templating porous materials and biological materials, is still a mystery. Recently, the theory of secondary nucleation and growth of ice has been proposed to explain the emergence of a new ice lens. However, this theory has not been quantitatively examined. Here, we quantitatively measure the initial interfacial undercooling of a new ice lens and the nucleation undercoolings of suspensions. We find that the interfacial undercooling cannot satisfy the nucleation undercooling of ice and hence disprove the secondary nucleation mechanism for ice banding. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51371151 and 51571165), the Free Research Fund of State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, China (Grant No. 100-QP-2014), the Fund of State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing in Northwestern Polytechnical University (NWPU), China (Grant No. 13-BZ-2014), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. 3102015ZY020).

  1. Systematic modification of the rheological properties of colloidal suspensions with polyelectrolyte multilayers.

    PubMed

    Hess, Andreas; Pretzl, Melanie; Heymann, Lutz; Fery, Andreas; Aksel, Nuri

    2011-09-01

    Tailoring rheological properties of colloidal suspensions with the adsorption of polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) is based on the idea of controlling macroscopic mechanical properties by modifying the particle surface in a reproducible and well-understood manner. With layer-by-layer self-assembly, monodisperse polystyrene particles are coated with up to ten layers of the oppositely charged strong polyelectrolytes: poly(diallyl dimethyl ammonium chloride) and poly(styrene sulfonate). The conformation of the adsorbed polyelectrolyte is controlled by the ionic strength of the used aqueous polyelectrolyte solution. For 1M NaCl solution, a brushlike adsorption of the polyelectrolyte is expected. The ability of PEMs to serve on a nanoscale level as surface modifiers and influence macroscopic rheological properties like viscoelasticity, yield stress, and shear banding is discussed. The mechanical behavior of these suspensions is qualitatively described by the theory of Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek with short-range repulsion and long-range attraction. A scaling rule is proposed which distinguishes between the precusor and the multilayer regime.

  2. Diffusion and rheology in a suspension of hydrodynamically interacting colloids enclosed by a spherical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aponte-Rivera, Christian; Zia, Roseanna

    2014-11-01

    We study diffusion and rheology of a suspension of hydrodynamically interacting colloidal spheres enclosed by a spherical cavity, utilizing the Stokesian Dynamics framework to account for long-range many-body and pairwise lubrication interactions between the particles and between particle and enclosure. Previous studies of 1D- and 2D-confined suspensions have revealed that boundaries exert a pronounced qualitative influence on microstructure, dynamics, and rheology. While studies of the motion of a point particle in a cavity have been reported, the neglect of finite size sacrifices significant qualitative information, resulting in an incorrect coupling between torque and velocity, among others. We have derived new hydrodynamic mobility functions for finite-size particles confined by a spherical boundary that faithfully capture the physics of the boundary and its influence on particle dynamics. We obtain the full grand-mobility matrix and, from these, the position-dependent short-time self-diffusivity for an isolated particle and the dynamics of a hydrodynamically interacting pair suspended in the cavity. Both of these are studied over a range of particle-to-cavity size ratios. This material is based upon work supported by the NSF GRFP under Grant No. DGE-0707428. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the NSF.

  3. Active colloids that slosh through passive matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Granick, Steve

    Studies of natural and artificial active matter have focused on systems with a large mismatch of the time and length scales for active and passive elements, but in a variety of non-equilibrium condensed matter systems, including numerous biological processes, actively driven elements have a crowded environment of surrounding passive ``solvent'' elements of comparable size. Here we study self-propelled colloidal particles in a passive matrix of comparable size. Particles with high activity take straight lines and sharp turns through the soft 2-D crystal matrix to ensure rapid healing of the crystal structure. Effective attraction between active particles arises when the concentration of active particles or the hardness of the matrix increases; active particles tend to segregate in the grain boundaries of the crystal matrix.

  4. [Bactericidal activity of colloidal silver against grampositive and gramnegative bacteria].

    PubMed

    Afonina, I A; Kraeva, L A; Tseneva, G Ia

    2010-01-01

    It was shown that colloidal silver solution prepared in cooperation with the A. F. Ioffe Physical Technical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, had significant bactericidal activity. Stable bactericidal effect on gramnegative microorganisms was observed after their 2-hour exposition in the solution of colloidal silver at a concentration of 10 ppm. Grampositive capsule-forming microorganisms were less susceptible to the colloidal silver solution: their death was observed after the 4-hour exposition in the solution.

  5. Communication: Dynamical density functional theory for dense suspensions of colloidal hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stopper, Daniel; Roth, Roland; Hansen-Goos, Hendrik

    2015-11-01

    We study structural relaxation of colloidal hard spheres undergoing Brownian motion using dynamical density functional theory. Contrary to the partial linearization route [D. Stopper et al., Phys. Rev. E 92, 022151 (2015)] which amounts to using different free energy functionals for the self and distinct part of the van Hove function G(r, t), we put forward a unified description employing a single functional for both components. To this end, interactions within the self part are removed via the zero-dimensional limit of the functional with a quenched self component. In addition, we make use of a theoretical result for the long-time mobility in hard-sphere suspensions, which we adapt to the inhomogeneous fluid. Our results for G(r, t) are in excellent agreement with numerical simulations even in the dense liquid phase. In particular, our theory accurately yields the crossover from free diffusion at short times to the slower long-time diffusion in a crowded environment.

  6. Exploration and characterization of new synthesis methods for C60 colloidal suspensions in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilburn, Martha E.

    Buckminsterfullerene, C60, has been used in the production of several commercial products from badminton racquets and lubricants for their mechanical properties to cosmetics and even dietary supplements for their "antioxidant" properties. Multi-ton production of C60 began in 2003 encouraging serious consideration of its fate in the environment in the case of an accidental release or improper disposal. Although C60 is practically insoluble in water, it readily forms stable aqueous colloidal suspensions (termed nC60) through solvent exchange methods or long-term vigorous stirring in water. Two new solvent exchange methods for synthesizing nC60 are presented. These methods combine key advantages of multiple existing synthesis methods including high yield, narrow particle size distribution, short synthesis time, and an absence of solvents such as tetrahydrofuran that have historically caused problems in laboratory synthesized aggregates. The resulting samples are attractive candidates for use in controlled environmental impact, biological, and toxicity studies. An improved method for quantifying residual solvents in nC60 samples utilizing solid phase micro extraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS) is also discussed.

  7. Lightning-rod-effect-directed photo assembly of gold nanorods and spheres in a colloidal suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abtahi, Seyyed Mohammad Hossein; Guo, Xi; Santos, Webster L.; Robinson, Hans D.; Davis, Richey M.

    2014-03-01

    We describe a method for making colloidally stable gold nanorods that can be photo-functionalized at their ends--the plasmon hot spots--while dispersed in a fluid. Such particles could be used in supramolecular self-assembly and in developing chemical sensors. Gold nanorods--approximately 60 nm long and 20 nm in diameter--were functionalized with combination of mono-thiol PEG and a photophotocleavable o-nitrobenzyl ligand. The PEG serves to help stabilize the gold nanorods suspended in a mixture of water and alcohols so that the assembly can stably be done in suspension. The functionalized gold nanorods were then exposed to UV light that triggered photocleavage, resulting in the formation of positively charged amine groups. When these rods were mixed with negatively charged gold nanospheres, there was a red-shift in the wavelength of the longitudinal plasmon peak of more than 20-30 nm, indicating the preferential binding of gold nanospheres to the ends of the gold nanorods, which we attribute to the lightning rod effect. This work was supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation (DMR-106753).

  8. Transient Networks and Dense Colloidal Suspensions: From Viscous Flow to Elastic Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchaud, Elisabeth

    2013-03-01

    In order to analyze the mechanical response of viscoelastic materials in highly non-linear regimes, we have designed a new kind of Hele-Shaw cell where both viscous liquids and soft elastic solids can be tested at a controlled loading rate. We first consider model Maxwell liquids - characterized by a single relaxation time - with the project of benchmarking the response of complex, glassy systems. We use several solutions of microemulsions connected by telechelic polymers. We show that these materials undergo instability in a broad range of loading rates. At low rates, this instability is shown to be of the viscous Saffman-Taylor type. At high rates, we observe a purely elastic bulk instability discovered recently in the context of soft elastomers. A microfluidic version of our cell makes it possible to study the response of colloidal suspensions. We use more or less concentrated PNIPA aqueous solutions for which temperature controls the volume fraction. Observations are interpreted in the light of our understanding of their viscoelastic properties. This work was done in collaboration with Maxime Lefranc, Baudouin Saintyves, Olivier Dauchot and Serge Mora. It was funded by ANR, France.

  9. Rearrangements and Yielding in Concentrated Suspensions of Hard and Soft Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petekidis, Georgios; Carrier, Vincent; Vlassoppoulos, Dimitris; Pusey, Peter; Ballauff, Matthias

    2004-03-01

    The rheology and microscopic particle rearrangements of concentrated colloidal suspensions were studied by a combination of conventional rheology and Light Scattering under shear (LS Echo). In particular we studied the rheological response and the microscopic particle dynamics under shear near and above the glass transitions concentration. Measurements were done in model hard and soft sphere particles (sterically stabilized PMMA and PS-PNIPA microgels respectively) to assess the effect of inter-particle interactions. Creep and recovery measurements and dynamic strain sweeps showed that glasses of hard particles can tolerate surprisingly large strains, up to at least 15probes the extent of irreversible particle rearrangement under oscillatory shear, verified that within their cage particles move reversibly at least up to such a strain. Such a behavior was attributed to 'cage elasticity', the ability of a particle and its neighbors to retain their relative positions within the cage under quite large distortion [1]. The onset of irreversible rearrangements measured by LS echo decreased with decreasing frequency revealing an interplay between shear and Brownian forces. The effects of interparticle interactions were studied using soft thermoreversible migrogel particles where a glass state may be reached either increasing the particle concentration or decreasing the temperature. Here, although particle rearrangements appear to be reversible up to strains as high as 100sweep is observed at much lower strains. [1] G. Petekidis, D. Vlassopoulos and P.N. Pusey, Faraday Discuss., 123, 287 (2003)

  10. Bio-inactivation of human malignant cells through highly responsive diluted colloidal suspension of functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Roberta V.; Silva-Caldeira, Priscila P.; Pereira-Maia, Elene C.; Fabris, José D.; Cavalcante, Luis Carlos D.; Ardisson, José D.; Domingues, Rosana Z.

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic fluids, more specifically aqueous colloidal suspensions containing certain magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), have recently been gaining special interest due to their potential use in clinical treatments of cancerous formations in mammalians. The technological application arises mainly from their hyperthermic behavior, which means that the nanoparticles dissipate heat upon being exposed to an alternating magnetic field (AMF). If the temperature is raised to slightly above 43 °C, cancer cells are functionally inactivated or killed; however, normal cells tend to survive under those same conditions, entirely maintaining their bioactivity. Recent in vitro studies have revealed that under simultaneous exposure to an AMF and magnetic nanoparticles, certain lines of cancer cells are bio-inactivated even without experiencing a significant temperature increase. This non-thermal effect is cell specific, indicating that MNPs, under alternating magnetic fields, may effectively kill cancer cells under conditions that were previously thought to be implausible, considering that the temperature does not increase more than 5 °C, which is also true in cases for which the concentration of MNPs is too low. To experimentally test for this effect, this study focused on the feasibility of inducing K562 cell death using an AMF and aqueous suspensions containing very low concentrations of MNPs. The assay was designed for a ferrofluid containing magnetite nanoparticles, which were obtained through the co-precipitation method and were functionalized with citric acid; the particles had an average diameter of 10 ± 2 nm and a mean hydrodynamic diameter of approximately 40 nm. Experiments were first performed to test for the ability of the ferrofluid to release heat under an AMF. The results show that for concentrations ranging from 2.5 to 1.0 × 103 mg L-1, the maximum temperature increase was actually less than 2 °C. However, the in vitro test results from K562 cells and suspensions

  11. Chemically active colloids near osmotic-responsive walls with surface-chemistry gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, M. N.; Uspal, W. E.; Dietrich, S.

    2017-04-01

    Chemically active colloids move by creating gradients in the composition of the surrounding solution and by exploiting the differences in their interactions with the various molecular species in solution. If such particles move near boundaries, e.g. the walls of the container confining the suspension, gradients in the composition of the solution are also created along the wall. This give rise to chemi-osmosis (via the interactions of the wall with the molecular species forming the solution), which drives flows coupling back to the colloid and thus influences its motility. Employing an approximate ‘point-particle’ analysis, we show analytically that—owing to this kind of induced active response (chemi-osmosis) of the wall—such chemically active colloids can align with, and follow, gradients in the surface chemistry of the wall. In this sense, these artificial ‘swimmers’ exhibit a primitive form of thigmotaxis with the meaning of sensing the proximity of a (not necessarily discontinuous) physical change in the environment. We show that the alignment with the surface-chemistry gradient is generic for chemically active colloids as long as they exhibit motility in an unbounded fluid, i.e. this phenomenon does not depend on the exact details of the propulsion mechanism. The results are discussed in the context of simple models of chemical activity, corresponding to Janus particles with ‘source’ chemical reactions on one half of the surface and either ‘inert’ or ‘sink’ reactions over the other half.

  12. Self-powered suspension criterion and energy regeneration implementation scheme of motor-driven active suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shuai; Sun, Weichao

    2017-09-01

    Active suspension systems have advantages on mitigating the effects of vehicle vibration caused by road roughness, which are one of the most important component parts in influencing the performances of vehicles. However, high amount of energy consumption restricts the application of active suspension systems. From the point of energy saving, this paper presents a self-powered criterion of the active suspension system to judge whether a motor-driven suspension can be self-powered or not, and then a motor parameter condition is developed as a reference to design a self-powered suspension. An energy regeneration implementation scheme is subsequently proposed to make the active suspension which has the potential to be self-powered achieve energy-saving target in the real application. In this implementation scheme, operating electric circuits are designed based on different working status of the actuator and power source and it is realizable to accumulate energy from road vibration and supply energy to the actuator by switching corresponding electric circuits. To apply the self-powered suspension criterion and energy regeneration implementation scheme, an active suspension system is designed with a constrained H∞ controller and calculation results indicate that it has the capability to be self-powered. Simulation results show that the performances of the self-powered active suspension are nearly the same as those of the active suspension with an external energy source and can achieve energy regeneration at the same time.

  13. Active colloids in the context of chemical kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshanin, G.; Popescu, M. N.; Dietrich, S.

    2017-03-01

    We study a mesoscopic model of a chemically active colloidal particle which on certain parts of its surface promotes chemical reactions in the surrounding solution. For reasons of simplicity and conceptual clarity, we focus on the case in which only electrically neutral species are present in the solution and on chemical reactions which are described by first order kinetics. Within a self-consistent approach we explicitly determine the steady state product and reactant number density fields around the colloid as functionals of the interaction potentials of the various molecular species in solution with the colloid. By using a reciprocal theorem, this allows us to compute and to interpret—in a transparent way in terms of the classical Smoluchowski theory of chemical kinetics—the external force needed to keep such a catalytically active colloid at rest (stall force) or, equivalently, the corresponding velocity of the colloid if it is free to move. We use the particular case of triangular-well interaction potentials as a benchmark example for applying the general theoretical framework developed here. For this latter case, we derive explicit expressions for the dependences of the quantities of interest on the diffusion coefficients of the chemical species, the reaction rate constant, the coverage by catalyst, the size of the colloid, as well as on the parameters of the interaction potentials. These expressions provide a detailed picture of the phenomenology associated with catalytically-active colloids and self-diffusiophoresis.

  14. Diffusion in active suspension of microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Climent, Eric; Delmotte, Blaise; Plouraboue, Franck; Keaveny, Eric; Martin, Matthieu; Rafai, Salima; Peyla, Philippe; Bertin, Eric; IMFT Team; IC Team; LiPhy Team

    2015-11-01

    The presence of microswimmers in a fluid generates flow agitation due to multi-body hydrodynamic interactions. This agitation of the fluid leads to random trajectories of passive tracers particles and the swimmers themselves, and from a macroscopic point view, it can be interpreted as a diffusive mechanism. By means of experiments (videomicroscopy of suspensions of chlamydomonas reinhardtii)and numerical simulations (Stokesian fluid populated with squirmers), we investigate the evolution of the effective diffusion coefficient when the volumetric concentration of the active suspension varies. By comparing the experimental and numerical results, we quantify the role of active swimming on the measured diffusion and identify the physical mechanisms that lead to diffusion enhancement. Our results aim to provide a better understanding of how swimming organisms affect micron-scale transport in the environment.

  15. Magneto-induced stress enhancing effect in a colloidal suspension of paramagnetic and superparamagnetic particles dispersed in a ferrofluid medium.

    PubMed

    Liu, Taixiang; Gong, Xinglong; Xu, Yangguang; Xuan, Shouhu

    2014-02-14

    The magneto-induced stress and relative microstructure in a colloidal suspension of paramagnetic and superparamagnetic particles dispersed in a ferrofluid medium is studied using particle-level dynamics simulation. It shows that the stress perpendicular to the direction of an external uniaxial magnetic field can be strongly enhanced by increasing the ratio of paramagnetic particles to approaching that of superparamagnetic particles. The magnetic field-induced net-like or embedded chain-like microstructures formed by paramagnetic and superparamagnetic particles contribute to this stress enhancing effect.

  16. Probing droplets with biological colloidal suspensions on smart surfaces by synchrotron radiation micro- and nano-beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinaro, G.; Accardo, A.; Benseny-Cases, N.; Burghammer, M.; Castillo-Michel, H.; Cotte, M.; Dante, S.; De Angelis, F.; Di Cola, E.; Di Fabrizio, E.; Hauser, C.; Riekel, C.

    2016-01-01

    Droplets with colloidal biological suspensions evaporating on substrates with defined wetting properties generate confined environments for initiating aggregation and self-assembly processes. We describe smart micro- and nanostructured surfaces, optimized for probing single droplets and residues by synchrotron radiation micro- and nanobeam diffraction techniques. Applications are presented for Ac-IVD and β-amyloid (1-42) peptides capable of forming cross-β sheet structures. Complementary synchrotron radiation FTIR microspectroscopy addresses secondary structure formation. The high synchrotron radiation source brilliance enables fast raster-scan experiments.

  17. Self-assembly of active colloidal molecules with dynamic function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Rodrigo; Golestanian, Ramin

    Catalytically active colloids maintain non-equilibrium conditions in which they produce and deplete chemicals at their surface. While individual colloids that are symmetrically coated do not exhibit dynamical activity, the concentration fields resulting from their chemical activity decay as 1/r and produce gradients that attract or repel other colloids depending on their surface chemistry and ambient variables. This results in a non-equilibrium analogue of ionic systems, but with the remarkable novel feature of action-reaction symmetry breaking. In dilute conditions these active colloids join up to form molecules via generalized ionic bonds. Colloids are found to join up to form self-assembled molecules that could be inert or have spontaneous activity in the form of net translational velocity and spin depending on their symmetry properties and their constituents. As the interactions do not satisfy detailed-balance, it is possible to achieve structures with time dependent functionality. We study a molecule that adopts spontaneous oscillations and another that exhibits a run-and-tumble dynamics similar to bacteria. Our study shows that catalytically active colloids could be used for designing self-assembled structures that posses dynamical functionalities.

  18. Diffusion of passive particles in active suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mussler, Matthias; Rafai, Salima; John, Thomas; Peyla, Philippe; Wagner, Christian

    2013-11-01

    We study how an active suspension consisting of a definite volume fraction of the microswimmer Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii modifies the Brownian movement of small to medium size microspheres. We present measurements and simulations of trajectories of microspheres with a diameter of 20 μm in suspensions of Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii, a so called ``puller,'' and show that the mean squared displacement of such trajectories consist of parabolic and a linear part. The linear part is due to the hydrodynamic noise of the microswimmers while the parabolic part is a consequence of directed motion events that occur randomly, when a microsphere is transported by a microswimmer on a timescale that is in higher order of magnitude than the Brownian like hydrodynamic interaction. In addition, we theoretically describe this effect with a dimensional analysis that takes the force dipole model used to describe ``puller'' like Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii into account.

  19. Divergence of the Long Wavelength Collective Diffusion Coefficient in Quasi-one and Quasi-two Dimensional Colloid Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Binhua; Cui, Bianxiao; Xu, Xinliang; Zangi, Ronen; Diamant, Haim; Rice, Stuart A.

    2015-03-01

    We report the results of experimental studies of the short time-long wavelength behavior of collective particle displacements in q1D and q2D colloid suspensions. Our results are reported via the q->0 behavior of the hydrodynamic function H (q) that relates the effective collective diffusion coefficient, De (q) , with the static structure factor S (q) and the self-diffusion coefficient of isolated particles Do: H (q) De (q) S (q) /Do. We find an apparent divergence of H (q) as q->0 with the form H(q)q-(1.7 < γ<1.9), for both q1D and q2D colloid suspensions. Given that S (q) does not diverge as we infer that De (q) does. This behavior is qualitatively different from that of the three-dimensional H (q) and De (q) as q->0, and the divergence is of a different functional form from that predicted for the diffusion coefficient in one component 1D and 2D fluids not subject to boundary conditions that define the dimensionality of the system. The research was supported by the NSF MRSEC at the U of Chicago (NSF/DMR-MRSEC 0820054), NSF/CHE 0822838 (ChemMatCARS), and Israel Science Foundation (Grant No. 8/10).

  20. Population-balance description of shear-induced clustering, gelation and suspension viscosity in sheared DLVO colloids.

    PubMed

    Lattuada, Marco; Zaccone, Alessio; Wu, Hua; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-06-28

    Application of shear flow to charge-stabilized aqueous colloidal suspensions is ubiquitous in industrial applications and as a means to achieve controlled field-induced assembly of nanoparticles. Yet, applying shear flow to a charge-stabilized colloidal suspension, which is initially monodisperse and in quasi-equilibrium leads to non-trivial clustering phenomena (and sometimes to a gelation transition), dominated by the complex interplay between DLVO interactions and shear flow. The quantitative understanding of these strongly nonequilibrium phenomena is still far from being complete. By taking advantage of a recent shear-induced aggregation rate theory developed in our group, we present here a systematic numerical study, based on the governing master kinetic equation (population-balance) for the shear-induced clustering and breakup of colloids exposed to shear flow. In the presence of sufficiently stable particles, the clustering kinetics is characterized by an initial very slow growth, controlled by repulsion. During this regime, particles are slowly aggregating to form clusters, the reactivity of which increases along with their size growth. When their size reaches a critical threshold, a very rapid, explosive-like growth follows, where shear forces are able to overcome the energy barrier between particles. This stage terminates when a dynamic balance between shear-induced aggregation and cluster breakage is reached. It is also observed that these systems are characterized by a cluster mass distribution that for a long time presents a well-defined bimodality. The model predictions are quantitatively in excellent agreement with available experimental data, showing how the theoretical picture is able to quantitatively account for the underlying nonequilibrum physics.

  1. Population-balance description of shear-induced clustering, gelation and suspension viscosity in sheared DLVO colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattuada, Marco; Zaccone, Alessio; Wu, Hua; Morbidelli, Massimo

    Application of shear flow to charge-stabilized aqueous colloidal suspensions is ubiquitous in industrial applications and as a means to achieve controlled field-induced assembly of nanoparticles. Yet, applying shear flow to a charge-stabilized colloidal suspension, which is initially monodisperse and in quasi-equilibrium leads to non-trivial clustering phenomena (and sometimes to a gelation transition), dominated by the complex interplay between DLVO interactions and shear flow. The quantitative understanding of these strongly nonequilibrium phenomena is still far from being complete. By taking advantage of a recent shear-induced aggregation rate theory developed in our group, we present here a systematic numerical study, based on the governing master kinetic equation (population-balance) for the shear-induced clustering and breakup of colloids exposed to shear flow. In the presence of sufficiently stable particles, the clustering kinetics is characterized by an initial very slow growth, controlled by repulsion. During this regime, particles are slowly aggregating to form clusters, the reactivity of which increases along with their size growth. When their size reaches a critical threshold, a very rapid, explosive-like growth follows, where shear forces are able to overcome the energy barrier between particles. This stage terminates when a dynamic balance between shear-induced aggregation and cluster breakage is reached. It is also observed that these systems are characterized by a cluster mass distribution that for a long time presents a well-defined bimodality. The model predictions are quantitatively in excellent agreement with available experimental data, showing how the theoretical picture is able to quantitatively account for the underlying nonequilibrum physics.

  2. Myosin II Activity Softens Cells in Suspension

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chii J.; Ekpenyong, Andrew E.; Golfier, Stefan; Li, Wenhong; Chalut, Kevin J.; Otto, Oliver; Elgeti, Jens; Guck, Jochen; Lautenschläger, Franziska

    2015-01-01

    The cellular cytoskeleton is crucial for many cellular functions such as cell motility and wound healing, as well as other processes that require shape change or force generation. Actin is one cytoskeleton component that regulates cell mechanics. Important properties driving this regulation include the amount of actin, its level of cross-linking, and its coordination with the activity of specific molecular motors like myosin. While studies investigating the contribution of myosin activity to cell mechanics have been performed on cells attached to a substrate, we investigated mechanical properties of cells in suspension. To do this, we used multiple probes for cell mechanics including a microfluidic optical stretcher, a microfluidic microcirculation mimetic, and real-time deformability cytometry. We found that nonadherent blood cells, cells arrested in mitosis, and naturally adherent cells brought into suspension, stiffen and become more solidlike upon myosin inhibition across multiple timescales (milliseconds to minutes). Our results hold across several pharmacological and genetic perturbations targeting myosin. Our findings suggest that myosin II activity contributes to increased whole-cell compliance and fluidity. This finding is contrary to what has been reported for cells attached to a substrate, which stiffen via active myosin driven prestress. Our results establish the importance of myosin II as an active component in modulating suspended cell mechanics, with a functional role distinctly different from that for substrate-adhered cells. PMID:25902426

  3. Self-assembly of active colloidal molecules with dynamic function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Rodrigo; Golestanian, Ramin

    2015-05-01

    Catalytically active colloids maintain nonequilibrium conditions in which they produce and deplete chemicals and hence effectively act as sources and sinks of molecules. While individual colloids that are symmetrically coated do not exhibit any form of dynamical activity, the concentration fields resulting from their chemical activity decay as 1 /r and produce gradients that attract or repel other colloids depending on their surface chemistry and ambient variables. This results in a nonequilibrium analog of ionic systems, but with the remarkable novel feature of action-reaction symmetry breaking. We study solutions of such chemically active colloids in dilute conditions when they join up to form molecules via generalized ionic bonds and discuss how we can achieve structures with time-dependent functionality. In particular, we study a molecule that adopts a spontaneous oscillatory pattern of conformations and another that exhibits a run-and-tumble dynamics similar to bacteria. Our study shows that catalytically active colloids could be used for designing self-assembled structures that possess dynamical functionalities that are determined by their prescribed three-dimensional structures, a strategy that follows the design principle of proteins.

  4. Enhanced diffusion self-stimulated by micro-algae in an active, aerotactic bacterial suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peaudecerf, François; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2014-11-01

    Suspensions of swimming bacteria form a new class of active fluids that generate complex phenomena. An ``active bath'' of bacteria for instance produces fluid flows which move passive colloids in a random-like walk, associated with an effective diffusion coefficient higher than for Brownian motion. The value of this enhanced diffusion coefficient depends on the local density of bacteria and their swimming behavior. However, with aerotactic, obligate aerobic bacteria such as B. subtilis, the local oxygen concentration impacts on the distribution of cells and their swimming behavior. We consider the specific case in which non-motile photosynthetic algal cells interacting with a B. subtilis suspension not only play the role of passive colloids, but also produce oxygen under light. We demonstrate that this new kind of active suspension, under heterogeneous illumination, can induce an effective negative phototaxis of the passive algal cells. We explain the origin of this novel phenomenon as the combination of algal oxygen production, diffusion, chemotaxis and motility switching in bacteria resulting in an heterogeneous enhanced diffusion. Finally, we present potential applications for algal cell mixing and sorting, that can inspire new methods for bioengineering. Supported by ERC, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Foundation, and Mines ParisTech.

  5. Shape control and compartmentalization in active colloidal cells

    PubMed Central

    Spellings, Matthew; Engel, Michael; Klotsa, Daphne; Sabrina, Syeda; Drews, Aaron M.; Nguyen, Nguyen H. P.; Bishop, Kyle J. M.; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2015-01-01

    Small autonomous machines like biological cells or soft robots can convert energy input into control of function and form. It is desired that this behavior emerges spontaneously and can be easily switched over time. For this purpose we introduce an active matter system that is loosely inspired by biology and which we term an active colloidal cell. The active colloidal cell consists of a boundary and a fluid interior, both of which are built from identical rotating spinners whose activity creates convective flows. Similarly to biological cell motility, which is driven by cytoskeletal components spread throughout the entire volume of the cell, active colloidal cells are characterized by highly distributed energy conversion. We demonstrate that we can control the shape of the active colloidal cell and drive compartmentalization by varying the details of the boundary (hard vs. flexible) and the character of the spinners (passive vs. active). We report buckling of the boundary controlled by the pattern of boundary activity, as well as formation of core–shell and inverted Janus phase-separated configurations within the active cell interior. As the cell size is increased, the inverted Janus configuration spontaneously breaks its mirror symmetry. The result is a bubble–crescent configuration, which alternates between two degenerate states over time and exhibits collective migration of the fluid along the boundary. Our results are obtained using microscopic, non–momentum-conserving Langevin dynamics simulations and verified via a phase-field continuum model coupled to a Navier–Stokes equation. PMID:26253763

  6. Shape control and compartmentalization in active colloidal cells.

    PubMed

    Spellings, Matthew; Engel, Michael; Klotsa, Daphne; Sabrina, Syeda; Drews, Aaron M; Nguyen, Nguyen H P; Bishop, Kyle J M; Glotzer, Sharon C

    2015-08-25

    Small autonomous machines like biological cells or soft robots can convert energy input into control of function and form. It is desired that this behavior emerges spontaneously and can be easily switched over time. For this purpose we introduce an active matter system that is loosely inspired by biology and which we term an active colloidal cell. The active colloidal cell consists of a boundary and a fluid interior, both of which are built from identical rotating spinners whose activity creates convective flows. Similarly to biological cell motility, which is driven by cytoskeletal components spread throughout the entire volume of the cell, active colloidal cells are characterized by highly distributed energy conversion. We demonstrate that we can control the shape of the active colloidal cell and drive compartmentalization by varying the details of the boundary (hard vs. flexible) and the character of the spinners (passive vs. active). We report buckling of the boundary controlled by the pattern of boundary activity, as well as formation of core-shell and inverted Janus phase-separated configurations within the active cell interior. As the cell size is increased, the inverted Janus configuration spontaneously breaks its mirror symmetry. The result is a bubble-crescent configuration, which alternates between two degenerate states over time and exhibits collective migration of the fluid along the boundary. Our results are obtained using microscopic, non-momentum-conserving Langevin dynamics simulations and verified via a phase-field continuum model coupled to a Navier-Stokes equation.

  7. Photocatalytic approach for the reductive decolorization of textile azo dyes in colloidal semiconductor suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Vinodgopal, K. ); Bedja, I.; Hotchandani, S. ); Kamat, P.V. )

    1994-06-01

    Two representative commercially used textile azo dyes, Acid Orange 7 and Direct Blue 1, have been decolorized using colloidal TiO[sub 2] and WO[sub 3] photocatalytic systems. Under UV irradiation, these dyes undergo rapid decolorization as they are reduced at the semiconductor surface by the trapped electrons. The trapping of electrons in irradiated semiconductor colloids and their participation in the dye reduction process have been probed by steady-state and laser flash photolysis techniques. The quantum efficiency for such a reductive process has been determined to be 4.7%. The rate constant for the electron transfer between the excited semiconductor colloid and the dye is of the order of 10[sup 8] M[sup [minus]1] s[sup [minus]1]. This photocatalytic decolorization approach has potential applications in the treatment of textile dye wastes. 28 refs., 8 figs.

  8. Surviving structure in colloidal suspensions squeezed from 3D to 2D.

    PubMed

    Klapp, Sabine H L; Zeng, Yan; Qu, Dan; von Klitzing, Regine

    2008-03-21

    Combining colloidal-probe experiments and computer simulations, we analyze the solvation forces F of charged silica colloids confined in films of various thicknesses h. We show that the oscillations characterizing F(h), for sufficiently large h, are determined by the dominant wavelength of the bulk radial distribution function. As a consequence, both quantities display the same power-law density dependence. This is the first direct evidence, in a system treatable both by experiment and by simulation, that the structural wavelength in bulk and confinement coincide, in agreement with predictions from density functional theory. Moreover, theoretical and experimental data are in excellent quantitative agreement.

  9. The "macromolecular tourist": universal temperature dependence of thermal diffusion in aqueous colloidal suspensions.

    PubMed

    Iacopini, S; Rusconi, R; Piazza, R

    2006-01-01

    By performing measurements on a large class of macromolecular and colloidal systems, we show that thermophoresis (particle drift induced by thermal gradients) in aqueous solvents displays a distinctive universal dependence on temperature. For systems of particles interacting via temperature-independent forces, this behavior is strictly related to the solvent thermal expansivity, while an additional, T-independent term is needed to account for the behavior of "thermophilic" (migrating to the warmth) particles. The former relation between thermophoresis and thermal expansion may be exploited to envisage other fruitful studies of colloidal diffusion in inhomogeneous fluids.

  10. Chains, Rings, and Dendrites of Active Colloidal Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Granick, Steve

    2015-03-01

    In order to better understand active polymeric matter, colloidal polymers are imaged, in situ in real time, obtaining not only temporal and spatial information about each ``monomer'' in these living polymers but also about the time-dependent and orientation-dependent correlations between them. Our reversible colloidal polymer system is assembled from self-propelled monomeric Janus particles with dynamic ``plug and play'' self-assembly and programmed direction-specific interactions between the particles. Enabling this, AC voltage induces dipoles on the monomeric Janus particles that link them into chains while also generating active phoretic motility. Unique features of this system relative to conventional Brownian polymers are emphasized.

  11. Microstructure of sheared monosized colloidal suspensions resulting from hydrodynamic and electrostatic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Bu; Gilchrist, James F.

    2014-05-28

    Hydrodynamic and near-particle interactions in sheared suspensions are communicated through suspension microstructure to produce a wide variety of rheological behaviors. To characterize this microstructure, the individual positions of monosized silica particles flowing through a microchannel are obtained with near simulation-level detail. The pair distribution functions of the microstructure at moderate to high Péclet number shear rates are very similar to previous numerical studies. Viscometric functions calculated based on the detailed microstructure obtained through this technique show qualitative agreement with computational results. These results elucidate the origins of shear-thickening of suspensions at high shear rates. While efforts are taken to screen electrostatic interactions to study hydrodynamic and Brownian interactions, the role of electrostatic interaction between particles is also investigated by reducing suspension ionic strength. These non-hydrodynamic electrostatic interactions result in a loss of anisotropy that generally agrees with previous findings of “soft” particle systems.

  12. Microstructure of sheared monosized colloidal suspensions resulting from hydrodynamic and electrostatic interactions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bu; Gilchrist, James F

    2014-05-28

    Hydrodynamic and near-particle interactions in sheared suspensions are communicated through suspension microstructure to produce a wide variety of rheological behaviors. To characterize this microstructure, the individual positions of monosized silica particles flowing through a microchannel are obtained with near simulation-level detail. The pair distribution functions of the microstructure at moderate to high Péclet number shear rates are very similar to previous numerical studies. Viscometric functions calculated based on the detailed microstructure obtained through this technique show qualitative agreement with computational results. These results elucidate the origins of shear-thickening of suspensions at high shear rates. While efforts are taken to screen electrostatic interactions to study hydrodynamic and Brownian interactions, the role of electrostatic interaction between particles is also investigated by reducing suspension ionic strength. These non-hydrodynamic electrostatic interactions result in a loss of anisotropy that generally agrees with previous findings of "soft" particle systems.

  13. Characterization and Correlation of Particle-Level Interactions to the Macroscopic Rheology of Powders, Granular Slurries, and Colloidal Suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    A.P. Poloski; R.C. Daniel; D.R. Rector; P.R. Bredt; E.C. Buck; Berg, J.C.; Saez, A.E.

    2006-09-29

    This project had two primary objectives. The first was to understand the physical properties and behavior of select Hanford tank sludges under conditions that might exist during retrieval, treatment, packaging, and transportation for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The second objective was to develop a fundamental understanding of these sludge suspensions by correlating the macroscopic properties with particle interactions occurring at the colloidal scale. The specific tank wastes considered herein are contained in thirteen Hanford tanks including three double-shell tanks (DSTs) (AW-103, AW-105, and SY-102) and ten single-shell tanks (SSTs) (B-201 through B-204, T-201 through T-204, T-110, and T-111). At the outset of the project, these tanks were designated as potentially containing transuranic (TRU) process wastes that would be treated and disposed of in a manner different from the majority of the tank wastes.

  14. Femtosecond laser pulse driven melting in gold nanorod aqueous colloidal suspension: Identification of a transition from stretched to exponential kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuelin; Jiang, Zhang; Lin, Xiao -Min; Wen, Haidan; Walko, Donald A.; Deshmukh, Sanket A.; Subbaraman, Ram; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K. R. S.; Gray, Stephen K.; Ho, Phay

    2015-01-30

    Many potential industrial, medical, and environmental applications of metal nanorods rely on the physics and resultant kinetics and dynamics of the interaction of these particles with light. We report a surprising kinetics transition in the global melting of femtosecond laser-driven gold nanorod aqueous colloidal suspension. At low laser intensity, the melting exhibits a stretched exponential kinetics, which abruptly transforms into a compressed exponential kinetics when the laser intensity is raised. It is found the relative formation and reduction rate of intermediate shapes play a key role in the transition. Supported by both molecular dynamics simulations and a kinetic model, the behavior is traced back to the persistent heterogeneous nature of the shape dependence of the energy uptake, dissipation and melting of individual nanoparticles. These results could have significant implications for various applications such as water purification and electrolytes for energy storage that involve heat transport between metal nanorod ensembles and surrounding solvents.

  15. Modeling of water-borne coating: stress relaxation of suspensions of colloids linked by telechelic HEUR polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shihu; Larson, Ronald G.

    In water-borne coatings, the rheology of colloidal suspensions is modified by the presence of rheological modifiers, such as Hydrophobic Ethoxylated Urethane (HEUR) polymers. HEUR is a telechelic polymer with two hydrophobic tails (hydrophobes) and a long hydrophilic interblock consisting of poly(ethylene oxide), and its thickening effect is largely determined by the self-association of hydrophobes as well as their adsorption onto latex particles. Here we describe a model that simulates the complex interactions among latex particles due to the formation of bridges or superbridges via model HEURs. We calculate the stress relaxation of the system and identify different relaxation modes. We explore the relaxation time at different latex volume fractions, HEUR concentrations and energies of association between hydrophobes and latex particles, and discuss its relationship with the bridge or latex cluster formation. These results provide important insights for HEUR adsorption and water-borne coating rheology. We acknowledge the financial support from The Dow Chemical Company.

  16. Femtosecond laser pulse driven melting in gold nanorod aqueous colloidal suspension: Identification of a transition from stretched to exponential kinetics

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Yuelin; Jiang, Zhang; Lin, Xiao -Min; ...

    2015-01-30

    Many potential industrial, medical, and environmental applications of metal nanorods rely on the physics and resultant kinetics and dynamics of the interaction of these particles with light. We report a surprising kinetics transition in the global melting of femtosecond laser-driven gold nanorod aqueous colloidal suspension. At low laser intensity, the melting exhibits a stretched exponential kinetics, which abruptly transforms into a compressed exponential kinetics when the laser intensity is raised. It is found the relative formation and reduction rate of intermediate shapes play a key role in the transition. Supported by both molecular dynamics simulations and a kinetic model, themore » behavior is traced back to the persistent heterogeneous nature of the shape dependence of the energy uptake, dissipation and melting of individual nanoparticles. These results could have significant implications for various applications such as water purification and electrolytes for energy storage that involve heat transport between metal nanorod ensembles and surrounding solvents.« less

  17. Pattern matching based active optical sorting of colloids/cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, R. S.; Dasgupta, R.; Ahlawat, S.; Kumar, N.; Uppal, A.; Gupta, P. K.

    2013-08-01

    We report active optical sorting of colloids/cells by employing a cross correlation based pattern matching technique for selection of the desired objects and thereafter sorting using dynamically controllable holographic optical traps. The problem of possible collision between the different sets of objects during sorting was avoided by raising one set of particles to a different plane. We also present the results obtained on using this approach for some representative applications such as sorting of silica particles of two different sizes, of closely packed colloids and of white blood cells and red blood cells from a mixture of the two.

  18. Interactions and Collective Behaviour of Chemotactic Active Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Suropriya; Hablani, Surbhi; Golestanian, Ramin; Ramaswamy, Sriram

    2015-03-01

    Artificial realizations of motility point in the direction of a new paradigm in engineering, through the design of emergent behavior by manipulating properties at the scale of the individual components. Catalytic colloidal swimmers are a particularly promising example of such systems. Here we present a comprehensive theoretical description of gradient-sensing of an individual swimmer, leading controllably to chemotactic or anti-chemotactic behavior. We use it to study the scattering of such a swimmer off a reactant source and construct a framework for studying their two body interactions and finally their collective behavior. We find that both the positional and the orientational degrees of freedom of the active colloids can exhibit condensation, signalling formation of clusters and asters. We present prescriptions for how to tune the surface properties of the colloids during fabrication to achieve each type of behavior. We further study the athermal fluctuations of a pointed tracer particle in a bath of such swimmers.

  19. Brownian dynamics simulations of colloidal suspensions containing polymers as precursors of composite electrodes for lithium batteries.

    PubMed

    Cerbelaud, Manuella; Lestriez, Bernard; Guyomard, Dominique; Videcoq, Arnaud; Ferrando, Riccardo

    2012-07-24

    Dilute aqueous suspensions of silicon nanoparticles and sodium carboxymethylcellulose salt (CMC) are studied experimentally and numerically by brownian dynamics simulations. The study focuses on the adsorption of CMC on silicon and on the aggregation state as a function of the suspension composition. To perform simulations, a coarse-grained model has first been developed for the CMC molecules. Then, this model has been applied to study numerically the behavior of suspensions of silicon and CMC. Simulation parameters have been fixed on the basis of experimental characterizations. Results of brownian dynamics simulations performed with our model are found in qualitative good agreement with experiments and allow a good description of the main features of the experimental behavior.

  20. Liquid-Gel-Liquid Transition and Shear-Thickening in Mixed Suspensions of Silica Colloid and Hyperbranched Polyethyleneimine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Guangcui; Zhang, Huan; Han, Charles C.

    2014-03-01

    The rheological property of mixed suspensions of silica colloid and hyperbranched polylethyleneimine was studied as functions of particle volume fraction, ratio of polymer to particle, and pH value. A mechanism of liquid-gel-liquid transition for this mixed system was proposed based on the amount and the conformation of polyelectrolyte bridges which were able to self-arrange with solution environments. The equilibrium adsorbed amount (Cp*) for a given volume fraction of particles is an important concentration ratio of polymer to particle denoting the transition of irreversible and reversible bridging. For mixed suspensions at equilibrium adsorbed state (Cp ~Cp *), the adsorption-desorption of polymer bridges on the particles can reversibly take place, and shear thickening is observed under a steady shear flow as a result of rapid extension of bridges when the relaxation time scale of extension is shorter than that of desorption. This work is supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program, 2012CB821503).

  1. Physico-chemical properties of giant colloidal single crystals in deionized suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Okubo, T.

    1995-12-01

    Very large single crystals (8 mm in maximum) of monodispersed polystyrene and silica spheres have been observed. Close-up and microscopic photographs, video-tapes, reflection spectra, elastic moduli, viscosities and dynamic light scattering and others have been made. Crystal growing processes are studied from the direct observation and reflection spectroscopy. Crystal size decreases sharply as sphere concentration increases. Block-like crystals and the pillar-like crystals from the homogeneous- and heterogeneous-nucleation mechanisms are observed in the bulk phase and along the cell wall, respectively. Phase diagram, melting temperature, rigidity, viscosity and diffusion properties of colloidal crystals have been studied. These characteristic properties of colloidal crystals are explained by the intersphere repulsive interactions and the expanded electrical double layers around the particles.

  2. Role of particle shape anisotropy on crack formation in drying of colloidal suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugyala, Venkateshwar Rao; Lama, Hisay; Satapathy, Dillip K.; Basavaraj, Madivala G.

    2016-08-01

    Cracks in a colloidal film formed by evaporation induced drying can be controlled by changing drying conditions. We show, for the first time that the crack morphologies in colloidal films are dependent on shape of constituting particles apart from the microstructure and particle assembly. In order to investigate the particle shape effect on crack patterns, monodispered spherical and ellipsoidal particles are used in sessile drop experiments. On observing the dried sessile drop we found cracks along the radial direction for spherical particle dispersions and circular crack patterns for ellipsoidal particle dispersions. The change in crack pattern is a result of self assembly of shape anisotropic particles and their ordering. The ordering of particles dictate the crack direction and the cracks follow the path of least resistance to release the excess stress stored in the particle film. Ellipsoids having different aspect ratio (~3 to 7) are used and circular crack patterns are repeatedly observed in all experiments.

  3. Role of particle shape anisotropy on crack formation in drying of colloidal suspension

    PubMed Central

    Dugyala, Venkateshwar Rao; Lama, Hisay; Satapathy, Dillip K.; Basavaraj, Madivala G.

    2016-01-01

    Cracks in a colloidal film formed by evaporation induced drying can be controlled by changing drying conditions. We show, for the first time that the crack morphologies in colloidal films are dependent on shape of constituting particles apart from the microstructure and particle assembly. In order to investigate the particle shape effect on crack patterns, monodispered spherical and ellipsoidal particles are used in sessile drop experiments. On observing the dried sessile drop we found cracks along the radial direction for spherical particle dispersions and circular crack patterns for ellipsoidal particle dispersions. The change in crack pattern is a result of self assembly of shape anisotropic particles and their ordering. The ordering of particles dictate the crack direction and the cracks follow the path of least resistance to release the excess stress stored in the particle film. Ellipsoids having different aspect ratio (~3 to 7) are used and circular crack patterns are repeatedly observed in all experiments. PMID:27477261

  4. Size-Controlled 3D Colloidal Crystals Formed in an Aqueous Suspension of Polystyrene/Polyglycidol Microspheres with Covalently Bound l-DOPA.

    PubMed

    Gosecka, Monika; Slomkowski, Stanislaw; Basinska, Teresa; Chehimi, Mohamed M

    2016-12-06

    Stable three-dimensional colloidal crystals were fabricated in an aqueous suspension of Tris buffer at pH > 8. The basic building blocks of the crystals were submicron-sized polystyrene-polyglycidol core-shell particles (Dn(SEM) = 270 ± 18 nm) with covalently bound 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA). The growth of the crystals was triggered by a thermodynamically favorable arrangement of particles leading to their close packing and by the formation of covalent cross-links between the individual particles. Under alkaline conditions, molecules of l-DOPA are oxidized, which allows their participation in cross-linking, necessary for the stabilization of the formed colloidal crystals. The average size of the fabricated colloidal crystals is determined by their weight, density of the suspending medium, and the energy of their Brownian motion. Crystals generated during the suspension of particles fall down after reaching the critical weight. Therefore, crystals of similar dimensions are deposited at the bottom of the vessel. The described system is the first example of the formation of stable colloidal crystals in a suspension.

  5. Colloidal behavior of aqueous montmorillonite suspensions in the presence of non-ionic polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gareche, M.; Azri, N.; Allal, A.; Zeraibi, N.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we characterized at first, the rheological behavior of the bentonite suspensions and the aqueous solutions of polyethylene oxide (PEO), then we were investigated the influence of this polymer in a water-based drilling fluid model (6% of bentonite suspension). The objective is to exhibit how the non ionic polymer with molecular weight 6×103 g/mol. of varying concentration mass (0.7%, 1%, 2% et 3%) significantly alter the rheological properties (yield stress, viscosity, loss and elastic modulus) of the bentonite suspensions. The rheological measurements made in simple shear and in dynamic on the mixture (water-bentonite-PEO), showed rheological properties of bentonite suspensions both in the presence and absence of non-ionic polymer. The PEO presents an affinity for the bentonite particles slowing down their kinetic aggregation. The analysis by X-rays diffraction also allowed understanding the structure of this mixture. It had revealed the intercalation between of the clay platelets on one hand, and the links bridges assured by the chains of polymer between bentonite particles beyond a critical concentration in PEO on the other hand. The Herschel- Bulkley rheological model is used for the correlation of our experimental results.

  6. Filament actuation by an active colloid at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskar, Abhrajit; Adhikari, R.

    2017-03-01

    Active colloids and externally actuated semi-flexible filaments provide basic building blocks for designing autonomously motile micro-machines. Here, we show that a passive semi-flexible filament can be actuated and transported by attaching an active colloid to its terminus. We study the dynamics of this assembly when it is free, tethered, or clamped using overdamped equations of motion that explicitly account for active fluid flow and the forces it mediates. Linear states are destabilised by buckling instabilities to produce stable states of non-zero curvature and writhe. We demarcate boundaries of these states in the two-dimensional parameter space representing dimensionless measures of polar and apolar activity. Our proposed assembly can be used as a novel component in the design of micro-machines at low Reynolds number and to study elastic instabilities driven by ‘follower’ forces.

  7. Probing titanate nanowire surface acidity through methylene blue adsorption in colloidal suspension and on thin films.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Endre; Szilágyi, István; Forró, László; Magrez, Arnaud

    2014-02-15

    The interaction of the cationic dye methylene blue (MB) with titanate nanowires (TiONWs) was investigated in different pH environments using visible spectroscopy and electrophoresis on thin films as well as in aqueous suspension. The surface charge of the TiONWs depends on the pH and ionic strength leading to positive charge under acidic and negative under alkaline conditions. The TiONWs have the same adsorption capacity on films and in suspensions at neutral pH while under alkaline conditions they are able to adsorb significantly more MB in suspension due to their higher surface area. Detailed adsorption studies in water revealed that dye cations form monomers, dimers and larger aggregates of H-type (face-to-face) on the TiONW films. The results indicate that below pH = 4.0 the TiONWs' external surface consists of Brøntsted acid sites capable of protonating MB. It was suggested that reversible indicator role of MB molecule dimers probes the TiONW surface acidity (Brøntsted sites).

  8. Driving self-assembly and emergent dynamics in colloidal suspensions by time-dependent magnetic fields

    DOE PAGES

    Martin, James E.; Snezhko, Alexey

    2013-11-05

    In this review we discuss recent research on driving self assembly of magnetic particle suspensions subjected to alternating magnetic fields. The variety of structures and effects that can be induced in such systems is remarkably broad due to the large number of variables involved. The alternating field can be uniaxial, biaxial or triaxial, the particles can be spherical or anisometric, and the suspension can be dispersed throughout a volume or confined to a soft interface. In the simplest case the field drives the static or quasi-static assembly of unusual particle structures, such as sheets, networks and open-cell foams. More complex,more » emergent collective behaviors evolve in systems that can follow the time-dependent field vector. In these cases energy is continuously injected into the system and striking °ow patterns and structures can arise. In fluid volumes these include the formation of advection and vortex lattices. At air-liquid and liquid-liquid interfaces striking dynamic particle assemblies emerge due to the particle-mediated coupling of the applied field to surface excitations. These out-of-equilibrium interface assemblies exhibit a number of remarkable phenomena, including self-propulsion and surface mixing. In addition to discussing various methods of driven self assembly in magnetic suspensions, some of the remarkable properties of these novel materials are described.« less

  9. Driving self-assembly and emergent dynamics in colloidal suspensions by time-dependent magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, James E.; Snezhko, Alexey

    2013-12-01

    In this review we discuss recent research on driving self-assembly of magnetic particle suspensions subjected to alternating magnetic fields. The variety of structures and effects that can be induced in such systems is remarkably broad due to the large number of variables involved. The alternating field can be uniaxial, biaxial or triaxial, the particles can be spherical or anisometric, and the suspension can be dispersed throughout a volume or confined to a soft interface. In the simplest case the field drives the static or quasistatic assembly of unusual particle structures, such as sheets, networks and open-cell foams. More complex, emergent collective behaviors evolve in systems that can follow the time-dependent field vector. In these cases energy is continuously injected into the system and striking flow patterns and structures can arise. In fluid volumes these include the formation of advection and vortex lattices. At air-liquid and liquid-liquid interfaces striking dynamic particle assemblies emerge due to the particle-mediated coupling of the applied field to surface excitations. These out-of-equilibrium interface assemblies exhibit a number of remarkable phenomena, including self-propulsion and surface mixing. In addition to discussing various methods of driven self-assembly in magnetic suspensions, some of the remarkable properties of these novel materials are described.

  10. Driving self-assembly and emergent dynamics in colloidal suspensions by time-dependent magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, James E.; Snezhko, Alexey

    2013-11-05

    In this review we discuss recent research on driving self assembly of magnetic particle suspensions subjected to alternating magnetic fields. The variety of structures and effects that can be induced in such systems is remarkably broad due to the large number of variables involved. The alternating field can be uniaxial, biaxial or triaxial, the particles can be spherical or anisometric, and the suspension can be dispersed throughout a volume or confined to a soft interface. In the simplest case the field drives the static or quasi-static assembly of unusual particle structures, such as sheets, networks and open-cell foams. More complex, emergent collective behaviors evolve in systems that can follow the time-dependent field vector. In these cases energy is continuously injected into the system and striking °ow patterns and structures can arise. In fluid volumes these include the formation of advection and vortex lattices. At air-liquid and liquid-liquid interfaces striking dynamic particle assemblies emerge due to the particle-mediated coupling of the applied field to surface excitations. These out-of-equilibrium interface assemblies exhibit a number of remarkable phenomena, including self-propulsion and surface mixing. In addition to discussing various methods of driven self assembly in magnetic suspensions, some of the remarkable properties of these novel materials are described.

  11. THE ENTRY AND DISTRIBUTION OF HERPES VIRUS AND COLLOIDAL GOLD IN HELA CELLS AFTER CONTACT IN SUSPENSION

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, M. A.; Hummeler, K.; Berkaloff, A.

    1964-01-01

    The way in which herpes virus of a well adapted strain penetrates susceptible HeLa cells has been investigated using thin sectioning techniques for electron microscopy. Mature virus particles and cells were mixed together in suspension cultures for 15, 30, 60, or 120 minutes so that the stages in virus uptake could be followed in sequence. The ingestion of particles of colloidal gold by HeLa cells under similar conditions was studied for comparison in parallel experiments. After 15 minutes' contact, the mature virus was found adsorbed on the surface of the cells but separated from them by a narrow gap in which phosphotungstic acid staining was sometimes able to reveal an extraneous coat which appeared as an amorphous layer on the outer aspect of the plasma membrane. When mixing continued for longer the particles were present in deep invaginations or actual cytoplasmic vacuoles, with their outer layers in various stages of stripping and digestion. The stripped, naked, central portion of the virus was occasionally found in these vacuoles but was more commonly free in the cytoplasmic matrix; the mode of transition between these sites could not be determined. Where contact continued for 2 hours these phenomena were much less frequently observed. The larger particles of colloidal gold were ingested in the same way as the virus, but smaller ones were taken up in micropinocytosis vesicles. The gold passed through membrane-bounded cytoplasmic spaces to accumulate in vacuoles from which, in contrast to herpes particles, it did not escape. These findings are discussed, and considered with particular reference to their bearing on the initiation of infection, the uptake and disposal of particles by cells, and the influence on the latter of virus morphology. PMID:14164483

  12. MUSCLE ACTIVATION PATTERNS DURING SUSPENSION TRAINING EXERCISES

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Sean; Ruffin, Elise; Brewer, Wayne

    2017-01-01

    Background Suspension training (ST) has been utilized over exercises performed on a stable surface to train multiple muscle groups simultaneously to increase muscle activation and joint stability. Hypothesis/Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine whether ST augments muscle activation compared to similar exercises performed on a stable surface. Study Design Cross-sectional study Methods Twenty-five healthy adults (male: 16; women: 9; BMI: 23.50 ± 2.48 kg/m2) had 16 pre-amplified wireless surface EMG electrodes placed bilaterally on: the pectoralis major (PM), middle deltoid (MD), serratus anterior (SA), obliques (OB), rectus abdominis (RA), gluteus maximus (GM), erector spinae (ES), and middle trapezius/rhomboids (MT). Each participant performed reference isometric exercises (Sorensen test, push-up, sit-up, and inverted row) to establish a baseline muscle contraction. Muscle activation was assessed during the following exercises: ST bridge, ST push-up, ST inverted row, ST plank, floor bridge, floor push-up, floor row, and floor plank. The root mean square (RMS) of each side for every muscle was averaged for data analysis. Multivariate analyses of variance (MANOVA) for each exercise with post-hoc comparisons were performed to compare muscle activation between each ST exercise and its stable surface counterpart. Results MANOVAs for all exercise comparisons showed statistically significant greater muscle activation in at least one muscle group during the ST condition. Post-hoc analyses revealed a statistically significant increase in muscle activation for the following muscles during the plank: OB (p = 0.021); Push-up: PM (p = 0.002), RA (p<0.0001), OB (p = 0.019), MT (p<0.0001), and ES (p = 0.006); Row: MD (p = 0.016), RA (p = 0.059), and OB (p = 0.027); and Bridge: RA (p = 0.013) and ES (p<0.0001). Conclusions Performing ST exercises increases muscle activation of selected muscles when compared to exercises performed on a stable surface. Level of

  13. Colloidal activated carbon for in-situ groundwater remediation--Transport characteristics and adsorption of organic compounds in water-saturated sediment columns.

    PubMed

    Georgi, Anett; Schierz, Ariette; Mackenzie, Katrin; Kopinke, Frank-Dieter

    2015-08-01

    Colloidal activated carbon can be considered as a versatile adsorbent and carrier material for in-situ groundwater remediation. In analogy to other nanoremediation approaches, activated carbon colloids (ACC) can be injected into the subsurface as aqueous suspensions. Deposition of ACC on the sediment creates a sorption barrier against further spreading of hydrophobic pollutants. This study deals with the optimization of ACC and their suspensions with a focus on suspension stability, ACC mobility in saturated porous media and sorption efficiency towards organic contaminants. ACC with an appropriate particle size range (d50=0.8μm) were obtained from a commercial powdered activated carbon product by means of wet-grinding. Among the various methods tested for stabilization of ACC suspensions, addition of humic acid (HA) and carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) showed the best results. Due to electrosteric stabilization by adsorption of CMC, suspensions remained stable even at high ACC concentrations (11gL(-1)) and conditions typical of very hard water (5mM divalent cations). Furthermore, CMC-stabilized ACC showed high mobility in a water-saturated sandy sediment column (filter coefficient λ=0.2m(-1)). Such mobility is a pre-requisite for in-situ installation of sorption or reaction barriers by simple injection-well or direct-push application of ACC suspensions. Column experiments with organic model compounds proved the efficacy of ACC deposits on sediment for contaminant adsorption and retardation under flow-through conditions.

  14. Hydrodynamic and Contact Contributions to Continuous Shear Thickening in Colloidal Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Neil Y. C.; Guy, Ben M.; Hermes, Michiel; Ness, Chris; Sun, Jin; Poon, Wilson C. K.; Cohen, Itai

    2015-11-01

    Shear thickening is a widespread phenomenon in suspension flow that, despite sustained study, is still the subject of much debate. The longstanding view that shear thickening is due to hydrodynamic clusters has been challenged by recent theory and simulations suggesting that contact forces dominate, not only in discontinuous, but also in continuous shear thickening. Here, we settle this dispute using shear reversal experiments on micron-sized silica and latex particles to measure directly the hydrodynamic and contact force contributions to shear thickening. We find that contact forces dominate even continuous shear thickening. Computer simulations show that these forces most likely arise from frictional interactions.

  15. Correlation between dynamical and structural heterogeneities in colloidal hard-sphere suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golde, Sebastian; Palberg, Thomas; Schöpe, Hans Joachim

    2016-07-01

    Dynamical and structural heterogeneities have long been thought to play a key role in a unified picture of solidification in view of the two competitive processes of crystallization and vitrification. Here, we study these heterogeneities by means of a combination of dynamic and static light-scattering techniques applied to the simplest model system exhibiting crystallization and vitrification: the colloidal hard-sphere system. Our method enables us to quantify and correlate the temporal evolution of the amount of ordered clusters (precursors) and the amount of slow particles. Our analysis shows that their temporal evolutions are closely related and that there is an intimate link between structural and dynamic heterogeneities, crystal nucleation and the non-crystallization transition.

  16. Interfacial and colloidal aspects of aqueous suspensions containing oxidic powders. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bleier, Alan

    1984-01-01

    This program addressed ceramics and colloid science research needs that underscore the physicochemical principles which govern the processing of oxide ceramic powders. Materials systems emphasized silica, alumina, zirconia, and mullite. The surface charge characteristics of the cited solids were determined using potentiometric techniques. Interfacial chemical reactions were thermodynamically evaluated. Zeta potential trends and values for silica and alumina systems were predicted reasonably well. Some surface behavior of mullite could be predicted from those of the constituent, silicon and aluminum oxides. Guidelines were generated for these problems and for a more complete description of the electrical double layers surrounding oxide ceramic powders in aqueous media. These efforts ultimately indicated that charge regulation is important to the processing of ceramics. A charge regulation model suggests that the electrostatic stabilizing effect of surface charge may critically depend on the volume concentration of powder.

  17. Facile and highly efficient removal of trace Gd(III) by adsorption of colloidal graphene oxide suspensions sealed in dialysis bag.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weifan; Wang, Linlin; Zhuo, Mingpeng; Liu, Yue; Wang, Yiping; Li, Yongxiu

    2014-08-30

    A facile, highly efficient and second-pollution-free strategy to remove trace Gd(III) from aqueous solutions by adsorption of colloidal graphene oxide (GO) suspensions in dialysis bag has been developed. The effects of pH, ionic strength and temperature on Gd(III) adsorption, and the pH-dependent desorption were investigated. The maximum adsorption capacity of Gd(III)on GO at pH=5.9±0.1 and T=303K was 286.86mgg(-1), higher than any other currently reported. The Gd(III)-saturated GO suspension could resume colloidal state in 0.1M HNO3 with desorption rate of 85.00% in the fifth adsorption-desorption cycle. Gd(III) adsorption rate on GO was dependent more on pH and ionic strength than on temperature. The abundant oxygen-containing functional groups such as carboxyl and hydroxyl played a vital role on adsorption. The thermodynamics and kinetics investigations revealed that the adsorption of Gd(III) on GO was an endothermic, spontaneous and monolayer absorption process, which well fitted the pseudo-second-order model. GO could be a promising adsorbent applied in the enrichment and removal of lanthanides from aqueous solutions. More significantly, the combination of colloidal GO suspension with dialysis membrane facilely solves the re-pollution of the treated solutions due to the great difficulties in separation and recovery of GO.

  18. Influence of pH condition on colloidal suspension of exfoliated graphene oxide by electrostatic repulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Long-Yue; Park, Soo-Jin

    2012-02-15

    A facile chemical process is described to produce graphene oxide utilizing a zwitterions amino acid intermediate from graphite oxide sheets. 11-aminoundecanoic acid molecules were protonated to intercalate molecules into the graphite oxide sheets to achieve ion exchange, and the carboxyl groups were then ionized in a NaOH solution to exfoliate the graphite oxide sheets. In this way, the produced graphene oxide nanosheets were stably dispersed in water. The delaminated graphene nanosheets were confirmed by XRD, AFM, and TEM. XRD patterns indicated the d{sub 002}-spacing of the graphite greatly increased from 0.380 nm and 0.870 nm. AFM and TEM images showed that the ordered graphite crystal structure of graphene nanosheets was effectively exfoliated by this method. The prepared graphene nanosheets films showed 87.1% transmittance and a sheet resistance of 2.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} {Omega}/square. - Graphical abstract: A stable graphene oxide suspension could be quickly prepared by exfoliating a graphite oxide suspension by a host-guest electrostatic repulsion in aqueous solution. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Graphene nanosheets were prepared by a zwitterions amino acid intermediate from graphite oxide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 11-aminoundecanoic acid was protonated to intercalate molecules into the graphene oxide to achieve ion exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The d{sub 002}-spacing of the graphite oxide greatly increased from 0.330 nm to 0.415 nm after 11-aminoundecanoic acid treatment.

  19. Measurement of thermal diffusivities of silver nanoparticle colloidal suspensions by means of a frequency-resolved thermal lensing approach.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Luis; Cárdenas-García, Jaime F; Vera, César Costa

    2014-06-15

    A frequency-resolved thermal lensing (TL) approach to measure thermal diffusivity properties of both diluted liquid solutions and silver nanoparticle colloidal suspensions is demonstrated. The experiment is based on a classical two-color pump-probe TL configuration, which is adapted to measure the induced TL signal as a function of the chopping frequency of the pump beam. Because of the thermal diffusivity lengths in the samples, the TL signal decreases exponentially with the increment of the frequency. The exponential decay factor can be associated with the thermal diffusivity of the medium. Measurements are performed on diluted liquid solutions and silver nanoparticles suspended in a PVP solution. A suitable fitting to a theoretical model based on the Fresnel diffraction approximation of the experimental data is obtained. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using this approach for the thermal characterization of nanoparticles in liquid solutions. Thermal diffusivity as low as 0.094×10(-7)  m2  s(-1) can be estimated by using this approach.

  20. Structural explanation of the rheology of a colloidal suspension under high dc electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espín, Manuel J.; Delgado, Ángel V.; González-Caballero, Fernando

    2006-04-01

    In this work we describe the electrorheology of suspensions consisting of hematite (α-Fe2O3) particles dispersed in silicone oil in the presence of large dc electric fields. If an electric field pulse is applied to the systems, it is possible to estimate the time that the electrorheological (ER) fluid takes to reach its final microstructure in the presence of the field. Our results indicate that response times of several seconds are typical, and that this time decreases with the field strength. Conventional shear-rate sweeps indicate the existence of a well-defined dynamic yield stress and a shear-thinning behavior. Interestingly, both the yield stress and the shear-thinning slope a [relating the viscosity, η , and the shear rate, γ˙ , as η=aγ˙-b+η(∞) ] show a linear dependence on the field strength, E , in disagreement with the E2 dependence often reported. This deviation is associated with changes in the conductivity of the dispersion medium with the field strength. A simple calculation of the interactions present in our ER fluid demonstrates that the ER behavior is entirely controlled by hydrodynamic (∝γ˙) and electrical forces (∝E) . This is confirmed by the collapse of all experimental results in a single master curve when the relative viscosity is plotted against the ratio γ˙/E . Careful attention has been paid in this work to the microstructure of the suspensions in the presence of both shear and electric fields simultaneously: the particles gather themselves on the walls of the electrorheological measurement cell, forming aggregates with cylindrical symmetry, shaped as rings or lamellas of solids. The electric field induced increase in viscosity is the consequence of the balance between two actions: that of the electric field, tending to keep particles together, and that of the shear field, forcing the flow of the liquid phase in the regions between rings or between rings and walls.

  1. Structural explanation of the rheology of a colloidal suspension under high dc electric fields.

    PubMed

    Espín, Manuel J; Delgado, Angel V; González-Caballero, Fernando

    2006-04-01

    In this work we describe the electrorheology of suspensions consisting of hematite (alpha-Fe2O3) particles dispersed in silicone oil in the presence of large dc electric fields. If an electric field pulse is applied to the systems, it is possible to estimate the time that the electrorheological (ER) fluid takes to reach its final microstructure in the presence of the field. Our results indicate that response times of several seconds are typical, and that this time decreases with the field strength. Conventional shear-rate sweeps indicate the existence of a well-defined dynamic yield stress and a shear-thinning behavior. Interestingly, both the yield stress and the shear-thinning slope alpha [relating the viscosity, eta, and the shear rate, .gamma, as eta=alphagamma(.-b) + eta (infinity)] show a linear dependence on the field strength, E, in disagreement with the E2 dependence often reported. This deviation is associated with changes in the conductivity of the dispersion medium with the field strength. A simple calculation of the interactions present in our ER fluid demonstrates that the ER behavior is entirely controlled by hydrodynamic (proportional to .gamma) and electrical forces (proportional to E). This is confirmed by the collapse of all experimental results in a single master curve when the relative viscosity is plotted against the ratio .gamma/E. Careful attention has been paid in this work to the microstructure of the suspensions in the presence of both shear and electric fields simultaneously: the particles gather themselves on the walls of the electrorheological measurement cell, forming aggregates with cylindrical symmetry, shaped as rings or lamellas of solids. The electric field induced increase in viscosity is the consequence of the balance between two actions: that of the electric field, tending to keep particles together, and that of the shear field, forcing the flow of the liquid phase in the regions between rings or between rings and walls.

  2. Electrorheology of suspensions containing interfacially active constituents.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Carl; Yang, Hengxi; Green, Peter F

    2013-09-25

    We recently showed that a suspension of micrometer-sized polystyrene (PS) particles in a PDMS liquid, mixed with small (1 wt %) amounts of a nanocage, sulfonated polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (s-POSS), exhibited significant electrorheological (ER) behavior. This behavior was associated with the formation of a thin adsorbed layer of s-POSS onto the surfaces of PS and the subsequent formation of polarization-induced aggregates, or structures, responsible for the ER effect in an applied electric, E, field. Current theory suggests that the ER effect would largely be determined by the dielectric and conductive properties of the conductive layer of core/shell particles in ER suspensions. We show here that sulfonated-PS (s-PS)/PDMS suspensions exhibit further increases in the yield stress of over 200%, with the addition of s-POSS. The yield stress of this system, moreover, scales as τy [proportionality] E(2). The dielectric relaxation studies reveal the existence of a new relaxation peak in the s-POSS/s-PS/PDMS system that is absent in the s-POSS/PS/PDMS suspension. The relative sizes of these peaks are sensitive to the concentration of s-POSS and are associated with changes in the ER behavior. The properties of this class of ER fluids are not appropriately rationalized in terms of current theories.

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of evaporation-driven self-assembly in suspensions of colloidal rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebovka, Nikolai I.; Vygornitskii, Nikolai V.; Gigiberiya, Volodymyr A.; Tarasevich, Yuri Yu.

    2016-12-01

    The vertical drying of a colloidal film containing rodlike particles was studied by means of kinetic Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. The problem was approached using a two-dimensional square lattice, and the rods were represented as linear k -mers (i.e., particles occupying k adjacent sites). The initial state before drying was produced using a model of random sequential adsorption (RSA) with isotropic orientations of the k -mers (orientation of the k -mers along horizontal x and vertical y directions are equiprobable). In the RSA model, overlapping of the k -mers is forbidden. During the evaporation, an upper interface falls with a linear velocity of u in the vertical direction and the k -mers undergo translation Brownian motion. The MC simulations were run at different initial concentrations, pi, (pi∈[0 ,pj] , where pj is the jamming concentration), lengths of k -mers (k ∈[1 ,12 ] ), and solvent evaporation rates, u . For completely dried films, the spatial distributions of k -mers and their electrical conductivities in both x and y directions were examined. Significant evaporation-driven self-assembly and orientation stratification of the k -mers oriented along the x and y directions were observed. The extent of stratification increased with increasing value of k . The anisotropy of the electrical conductivity of the film can be finely regulated by changes in the values of pi, k , and u .

  4. Application of colloidal gas aphron suspensions produced from Sapindus mukorossi for arsenic removal from contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Soumyadeep; Mukherjee, Sumona; Hashim, Mohd Ali; Sen Gupta, Bhaskar

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal gas aphron dispersions (CGAs) can be described as a system of microbubbles suspended homogenously in a liquid matrix. This work examines the performance of CGAs in comparison to surfactant solutions for washing low levels of arsenic from an iron rich soil. Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) and saponin, a biodegradable surfactant, obtained from Sapindus mukorossi or soapnut fruit were used for generating CGAs and solutions for soil washing. Column washing experiments were performed in down-flow and up flow modes at a soil pH of 5 and 6 using varying concentration of SDS and soapnut solutions as well as CGAs. Soapnut CGAs removed more than 70% arsenic while SDS CGAs removed up to 55% arsenic from the soil columns in the soil pH range of 5-6. CGAs and solutions showed comparable performances in all the cases. CGAs were more economical since it contains 35% of air by volume, thereby requiring less surfactant. Micellar solubilization and low pH of soapnut facilitated arsenic desorption from soil column. FT-IR analysis of effluent suggested that soapnut solution did not interact chemically with arsenic thereby facilitating the recovery of soapnut solution by precipitating the arsenic. Damage to soil was minimal arsenic confirmed by metal dissolution from soil surface and SEM micrograph.

  5. Temperature (de)activated patchy colloidal particles.

    PubMed

    de Las Heras, Daniel; da Gama, Margarida M Telo

    2016-06-22

    We present a new model of patchy particles in which the interaction sites can be activated or deactivated by varying the temperature of the system. We study the thermodynamics of the system by means of Wertheim's first order perturbation theory, and use Flory-Stockmayer theory of polymerization to analyse the percolation threshold. We find a very rich phase behaviour including lower critical points and reentrant percolation.

  6. Antiorthostatic suspension stimulates profiles of macrophage activation in mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. S.; Bates, R. A.; Koebel, D. A.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1999-01-01

    The antiorthostatic suspension model simulates certain physiological effects of spaceflight. We have previously reported BDF1 mice suspended by the tail in the antiorthostatic orientation for 4 days express high levels of resistance to virulent Listeria monocytogenesinfection. In the present study, we examined whether the increased resistance to this organism correlates with profiles of macrophage activation, given the role of the macrophage in killing this pathogen in vivo. We infected BDF1 mice with a lethal dose of virulent L. monocytogenes on day 4 of antiorthostatic suspension and 24 h later constructed profiles of macrophage activation. Viable listeria could not be detected in mice suspended in the antiorthostatic orientation 24 h after infection. Flow cytometric analysis revealed the numbers of granulocytes and mononuclear phagocytes in the spleen of infected mice were not significantly altered as a result of antiorthostatic suspension. Splenocytes from antiorthostatically suspended infected mice produced increased titers of IL-1. Serum levels of neopterin, a nucleotide metabolite secreted by activated macrophages, were enhanced in mice infected during antiorthostatic suspension, but not in antiorthostatically suspended naive mice. Splenic macrophages from mice infected on day 4 of suspension produced enhanced levels of lysozyme. In contrast to the results from antiorthostatically suspended infected mice, macrophages from antiorthostatically suspended uninfected mice did not express enhanced bactericidal activities. The collective results indicate that antiorthostatic suspension can stimulate profiles of macrophage activation which correlate with increased resistance to infection by certain classes of pathogenic bacteria.

  7. Aspects of achievable performance for quarter-car active suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Türkay, Semiha; Akçay, Hüseyin

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, constraints on the transfer functions from the road disturbance to the vertical acceleration, the suspension travel, and the tire deflection are derived for a quarter-car active suspension system using the vertical acceleration and/or the suspension travel measurements for feedback. The derived constraints complement the similar constraints in the literature. By using the factorization approach to feedback stability, it is shown that tire damping couples the motions of the sprung and unsprung masses; and eliminates a constraint at the wheel-hop frequency. The influence of tire damping on the design of an active suspension system for a quarter-car model by a mixture of the LQG methodology and the interpolation approach is also illustrated.

  8. Flow of active suspensions and biased swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafai, Salima; Peyla, Philippe; Garcia, Xabel; Kitenbergs, Guntars; Garcia, Michaël; LIPhy Team

    2012-11-01

    It is a challenge to understand the hydrodynamics associated with individual or collective motion of microswimmers through their fluid-mediated interactions in order for instance to manipulate the cells efficiently for some applications purposes. The motion of these micro-organisms can be often affected by the presence of gradients leading to a biased random walk (chemotaxis in the presence of chemicals, gyrotaxis in a gravity field, phototaxis under light exposure). In this study, we present our experimental results concerning the coupling of a Poiseuille flow with the biased random walk of Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii, a green unicellular micro-alga. This is done by illuminating the microswimmer suspension while flowing in a microchannel device. We show that one can obtain a spontaneous and reversible migration and separation of the microalgae suspension from the rest of the suspending medium under illumination and then dynamically control the concentration of the suspension with light. We present a simple model that accounts for the observed phenomenon. We thank the ANR MOSICOB and MICMACSWIM.

  9. Effect of repulsive and attractive interactions on depletion forces in colloidal suspensions: a density functional theory treatment.

    PubMed

    Egorov, S A

    2004-09-01

    The author employs density functional theory to study colloidal interactions in solution. Hardcore Yukawa potentials with soft tails, either repulsive or attractive, are used to model colloid-solvent and solvent-solvent interactions. We analyze the effect of these interactions on the solvent-mediated potential of mean force between two colloids in solution. Overall, theory is shown to be in good agreement with recent simulation data. We use the theory to study the density dependence of the colloid-colloid second virial coefficient.

  10. Out-of-equilibrium processes in suspensions of oppositely charged colloids: liquid-to-crystal nucleation and gel formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, Eduardo

    2009-03-01

    We study the kinetics of the liquid-to-crystal transformation and of gel formation in colloidal suspensions of oppositely charged particles. We analyse, by means of both computer simulations and experiments, the evolution of a fluid quenched to a state point of the phase diagram where the most stable state is either a homogeneous crystalline solid or a solid phase in contact with a dilute gas. On the one hand, at high temperatures and high packing fractions, close to an ordered-solid/disordered-solid coexistence line, we find that the fluid-to-crystal pathway does not follow the minimum free energy route. On the other hand, a quench to a state point far from the ordered-crystal/disordered-crystal coexistence border is followed by a fluid-to-solid transition through the minimum free energy pathway. At low temperatures and packing fractions we observe that the system undergoes a gas-liquid spinodal decomposition that, at some point, arrests giving rise to a gel-like structure. Both our simulations and experiments suggest that increasing the interaction range favors crystallization over vitrification in gel-like structures. [4pt] In collaboration with Chantal Valeriani, Soft Condensed Matter, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University, Princetonplein 5, 3584 CC Utrecht, The Netherlands and SUPA, School of Physics, University of Edinburgh, JCMB King's Buildings, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ, UK; Teun Vissers, Andrea Fortini, Mirjam E. Leunissen, and Alfons van Blaaderen, Soft Condensed Matter, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University; Daan Frenke, FOM Institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Kruislaan 407, 1098 SJ Amsterdam, The Netherlands and Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, CB2 1EW, Cambridge, UK; and Marjolein Dijkstra, Soft Condensed Matter, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University.

  11. Correlated two-particle diffusion in dense colloidal suspensions at early times: Theory and comparison to experiment.

    PubMed

    Dell, Zachary E; Tsang, Boyce; Jiang, Lingxiang; Granick, Steve; Schweizer, Kenneth S

    2015-11-01

    The spatially resolved diffusive dynamic cross correlations of a pair of colloids in dense quasi-two-dimensional monolayers of identical particles are studied experimentally and theoretically at early times where motion is Fickian. In very dense systems where strong oscillatory equilibrium packing correlations are present, we find an exponential decay of the dynamic cross correlations on small and intermediate length scales. At large separations where structure becomes random, an apparent power law decay with an exponent of approximately -2.2 is observed. For a moderately dense suspension where local structural correlations are essentially absent, this same apparent power law decay is observed over all probed interparticle separations. A microscopic nonhydrodynamic theory is constructed for the dynamic cross correlations which is based on interparticle frictional effects and effective structural forces. Hydrodynamics enters only via setting the very short-time single-particle self-diffusion constant. No-adjustable-parameter quantitative predictions of the theory for the dynamic cross correlations are in good agreement with experiment over all length scales. The origin of the long-range apparent power law is the influence of the constraint of fixed interparticle separation on the amplitude of the mean square force exerted on the two tagged particles by the surrounding fluid. The theory is extended to study high-packing-fraction 3D hard sphere fluids. The same pattern of an oscillatory exponential form of the dynamic cross correlation function is predicted in the structural regime, but the long-range tail decays faster than in monolayers with an exponent of -3.

  12. Correlated two-particle diffusion in dense colloidal suspensions at early times: Theory and comparison to experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell, Zachary E.; Tsang, Boyce; Jiang, Lingxiang; Granick, Steve; Schweizer, Kenneth S.

    2015-11-01

    The spatially resolved diffusive dynamic cross correlations of a pair of colloids in dense quasi-two-dimensional monolayers of identical particles are studied experimentally and theoretically at early times where motion is Fickian. In very dense systems where strong oscillatory equilibrium packing correlations are present, we find an exponential decay of the dynamic cross correlations on small and intermediate length scales. At large separations where structure becomes random, an apparent power law decay with an exponent of approximately -2.2 is observed. For a moderately dense suspension where local structural correlations are essentially absent, this same apparent power law decay is observed over all probed interparticle separations. A microscopic nonhydrodynamic theory is constructed for the dynamic cross correlations which is based on interparticle frictional effects and effective structural forces. Hydrodynamics enters only via setting the very short-time single-particle self-diffusion constant. No-adjustable-parameter quantitative predictions of the theory for the dynamic cross correlations are in good agreement with experiment over all length scales. The origin of the long-range apparent power law is the influence of the constraint of fixed interparticle separation on the amplitude of the mean square force exerted on the two tagged particles by the surrounding fluid. The theory is extended to study high-packing-fraction 3D hard sphere fluids. The same pattern of an oscillatory exponential form of the dynamic cross correlation function is predicted in the structural regime, but the long-range tail decays faster than in monolayers with an exponent of -3.

  13. Zero-valent iron colloid emplacement in sand columns

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, K.J.; Kaplan, D.I.

    1997-05-01

    Application of chemically reactive barriers to mitigate contaminant migration is an active area of research and development. Studies were conducted to evaluate a novel approach of emplacing chemically reactive barriers composed of zero-valent iron (Fe{sup 0}) by injecting suspensions of colloidal-size Fe{sup 0} particles into porous media. The specific objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of influent colloid concentration, rate, and volume of colloidal suspensions on Fe{sup 0} colloid emplacement in sand columns. Relatively even distributions of Fe{sup 0} throughout a sand column were obtained at low influent colloid concentrations and high injection rates. As the concentration of influent suspensions was increased, a point was reached beyond which a significant increase in the filtration of Fe{sup 0} particles near the front of the column was observed. This point was also found to occur at lower influent colloid concentrations as the injection rate was decreased, i.e., there was an interactive effect of influent colloid concentration and injection rate on the extent of filtration that occurred near the front of the column. As the volume of the colloidal suspension injected into the column was increased, the distribution of Fe{sup 0} colloids within the column became increasingly even.

  14. Measuring Mechanical Properties by Staring: Using Stress Assessment from Local Structural Anisotropy (SALSA) to Probe Viscosity and Visualize Stress Networks in Colloidal Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Itai; Bierbaum, Matthew; Sethna, James; Lin, Neil

    2014-11-01

    Measurement of stress induced thermal fluctuations in materials can be used to determine macroscopic mechanical properties including viscosity in fluids, as well as bulk and shear moduli in solids. When extended to the single particle scale, such measurements also reveal underlying spatially inhomogeneous response mechanisms in systems such as glasses, gels, and polycrystals. Unfortunately, it is not possible to experimentally measure these temporal and spatial stress fluctuations in a colloidal suspension using conventional rheometers. Here however, we show that using fast confocal microscopy it is possible conduct a Stress Assessment from Local Structural Anisotropy (SALSA) to measure such spatio-temporal stress fluctuations. We directly image the microstructure of a nearly hard-sphere suspension using a high-speed confocal microscope and determine particle positions. We compute the structure anisotropy of the suspension and building on the Brady formalism, calculate particle-level stresses. In conjunction with the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, we then determine the bulk viscosity of a colloidal liquid. Furthermore, we show our local measurements allow direct visualization of the complex stress networks in a 3D supercooled liquid under compression. Our method provides an experimental approach that applies to a broad range of processes arising in sheared glasses, compressed gels, and even indented crystals.

  15. Brownian aggregation rate of colloid particles with several active sites

    SciTech Connect

    Nekrasov, Vyacheslav M.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Polshchitsin, Alexey A.; Yakovleva, Galina E.; Maltsev, Valeri P.

    2014-08-14

    We theoretically analyze the aggregation kinetics of colloid particles with several active sites. Such particles (so-called “patchy particles”) are well known as chemically anisotropic reactants, but the corresponding rate constant of their aggregation has not yet been established in a convenient analytical form. Using kinematic approximation for the diffusion problem, we derived an analytical formula for the diffusion-controlled reaction rate constant between two colloid particles (or clusters) with several small active sites under the following assumptions: the relative translational motion is Brownian diffusion, and the isotropic stochastic reorientation of each particle is Markovian and arbitrarily correlated. This formula was shown to produce accurate results in comparison with more sophisticated approaches. Also, to account for the case of a low number of active sites per particle we used Monte Carlo stochastic algorithm based on Gillespie method. Simulations showed that such discrete model is required when this number is less than 10. Finally, we applied the developed approach to the simulation of immunoagglutination, assuming that the formed clusters have fractal structure.

  16. Superfluid Behavior of Active Suspensions from Diffusive Stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takatori, S. C.; Brady, J. F.

    2017-01-01

    The current understanding is that the non-Newtonian rheology of active matter suspensions is governed by fluid-mediated hydrodynamic interactions associated with active self-propulsion. Here we discover an additional contribution to the suspension shear stress that predicts both thickening and thinning behavior, even when there is no nematic ordering of the microswimmers with the imposed flow. A simple micromechanical model of active Brownian particles in homogeneous shear flow reveals the existence of off-diagonal shear components in the swim stress tensor, which are independent of hydrodynamic interactions and fluid disturbances. Theoretical predictions from our model are consistent with existing experimental measurements of the shear viscosity of active suspensions, but also suggest new behavior not predicted by conventional models.

  17. Redox Active Colloids as Discrete Energy Storage Carriers.

    PubMed

    Montoto, Elena C; Nagarjuna, Gavvalapalli; Hui, Jingshu; Burgess, Mark; Sekerak, Nina M; Hernández-Burgos, Kenneth; Wei, Teng-Sing; Kneer, Marissa; Grolman, Joshua; Cheng, Kevin J; Lewis, Jennifer A; Moore, Jeffrey S; Rodríguez-López, Joaquín

    2016-10-12

    Versatile and readily available battery materials compatible with a range of electrode configurations and cell designs are desirable for renewable energy storage. Here we report a promising class of materials based on redox active colloids (RACs) that are inherently modular in their design and overcome challenges faced by small-molecule organic materials for battery applications, such as crossover and chemical/morphological stability. RACs are cross-linked polymer spheres, synthesized with uniform diameters between 80 and 800 nm, and exhibit reversible redox activity as single particles, as monolayer films, and in the form of flowable dispersions. Viologen-based RACs display reversible cycling, accessing up to 99% of their capacity and 99 ± 1% Coulombic efficiency over 50 cycles by bulk electrolysis owing to efficient, long-distance intraparticle charge transfer. Ferrocene-based RACs paired with viologen-based RACs cycled efficiently in a nonaqueous redox flow battery employing a simple size-selective separator, thus demonstrating a possible application that benefits from their colloidal dimensions. The unprecedented versatility in RAC synthetic and electrochemical design opens new avenues for energy storage.

  18. A hybrid electromagnetic shock absorber for active vehicle suspension systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Babak; Bolandhemmat, Hamidreza; Behrad Khamesee, Mir; Golnaraghi, Farid

    2011-02-01

    The use of electromagnetic dampers (ED) in vehicle active suspension systems has drawn considerable attention in the past few years, attributed to the fact that active suspension systems have shown superior performance in improving ride comfort and road handling of terrain vehicles, compared with their passive and semi-active counterparts. Although demonstrating superb performance, active suspensions still have some shortcomings that must be overcome. They have high energy consumption, weight, and cost and are not fail-safe in case of a power breakdown. The novel hybrid ED, which is proposed in this paper, is a potential solution to the above-mentioned drawbacks of conventional active suspension systems. The proposed hybrid ED is designed to inherit the high-performance characteristics of an active ED with the reliability of a passive damper in a single package. The eddy current damping effect is utilised as a source of the passive damping. First, a prototype ED is designed and fabricated. The prototype ED is then utilised to experimentally establish the design requirements for a real-size active ED. This is accomplished by comparing its vibration isolation performance in a 1-DOF quarter-car test rig with that of a same-class semi-active damper. Then, after a real-size active ED is designed, the concept of hybrid damper is introduced to the damper design to address the drawbacks of the active ED. Finally, the finite-element method is used to accurately model and analyse the designed hybrid damper. It is demonstrated that by introducing the eddy current damping effect to the active part, a passive damping of approximately 1570 Ns/m is achieved. This amount of passive damping guarantees that the damper is fail-safe and reduces the power consumption more than 70%, compared with an active ED in an automotive active suspension system.

  19. Active structuring of colloidal armour on liquid drops

    PubMed Central

    Dommersnes, Paul; Rozynek, Zbigniew; Mikkelsen, Alexander; Castberg, Rene; Kjerstad, Knut; Hersvik, Kjetil; Otto Fossum, Jon

    2013-01-01

    Adsorption and assembly of colloidal particles at the surface of liquid droplets are at the base of particle-stabilized emulsions and templating. Here we report that electrohydrodynamic and electro-rheological effects in leaky-dielectric liquid drops can be used to structure and dynamically control colloidal particle assemblies at drop surfaces, including electric-field-assisted convective assembly of jammed colloidal ‘ribbons’, electro-rheological colloidal chains confined to a two-dimensional surface and spinning colloidal domains on that surface. In addition, we demonstrate the size control of ‘pupil’-like openings in colloidal shells. We anticipate that electric field manipulation of colloids in leaky dielectrics can lead to new routes of colloidosome assembly and design for ‘smart armoured’ droplets. PMID:23811716

  20. Magnetorheological effect in a suspension with an active carrier fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Kashevskii, B.E.; Kordonskii, V.I.; Prokhorov, I.V.

    1988-07-01

    The main quantitative laws governing the magnetorheological effect in a magnetorheological suspension with an active carrier liquid were established. The family of flow curves obtained for several samples of suspensions of one type of nonmagnetic particle was analyzed. Particles were suspended in a magnetic fluid of the magnetite-kerosite type. The main goal was to establish the law governing rheological similarity by generalizing experimental data with a universal relation while employing a small amount of initial data on the system. The data included the law of magnetization of the magnetic carrier fluid, the law of change in its viscosity in the field, and the law of change in the viscosity of the magnetorheological suspension/active carrier liquid system with an increase in the concentration of nonmagnetic particles in a zero field.

  1. Phase equilibrium of colloidal suspensions with particle size dispersity: a Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Yiannourakou, Marianna; Economou, Ioannis G; Bitsanis, Ioannis A

    2009-05-21

    We have studied the crystalline-amorphous coexistence for systems of polydisperse soft spheres that interact via a purely repulsive power law potential. Potential softness quantified by the exponent of the potential was a primary input in our simulations. Simulations were performed in the isobaric semigrand statistical ensemble, i.e., the composition of the parent distribution was not fixed in our systems. Gibbs-Duhem integration was used to trace the coexistence pressure as a function of potential softness for monodisperse systems. A second Gibbs-Duhem integration, initiated from the monodisperse coexistence curve, was employed to determine coexistence pressure versus imposed variance of the activity distribution. Amorphous-crystalline coexistence densities and volume fractions were determined to be monotonically increasing functions of the breadth of particle size dispersity. Semigrand ensemble simulations testified to the existence of a terminal diameter dispersity, i.e., a dispersity above which no amorphous-crystalline phase coexistence was observed. At the terminus size dispersity increases from 5.8% to 6.1% to 6.4% and to 6.7% and 6.5% for the crystalline phase as the steepness parameter n, takes on smaller values: from 100 to 50 to 12 to 10 and 8, respectively. In sharp contrast to the crystalline phases' enhanced, by potential softness, allowable size dispersity the amorphous phase exhibits an opposite trend, as potential interactions soften. Furthermore, amorphous phases accommodate, on average, smaller particles than those of the ordered (fcc) phase. Contrary to widely accepted intuition crystalline phases composed of size-disperse particulates exhibit a higher degree of local order than their monodisperse counterparts, admittedly at differing thermodynamic conditions.

  2. [Factors affecting activation and transference of soil colloidal phosphorus and related analysis technologies].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Liang, Xin-qiang; Fu, Chao-dong; Zhu, Si-rui; Zhang, Yi-xiang; Ji, Yuan-jing

    2015-04-01

    Colloids play a key role in the transference process of phosphorus (P) in soil. Activation and transference of soil colloidal phosphorus have great effect on soil P pool and the surrounding water quality. This paper summarized the current studies on soil colloidal P, discussing the effects of the various factors (e. g., soil physical and chemical properties, fertilization, rainfall and soil amendments) on the transference of soil colloidal P. Some advanced analysis technologies (e.g., flow field-flow fractionation, transmission electron microscope-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, X-ray absorption near-edge structure and nuclear magnetic resonance) and methods of reducing soil colloidal P were also involved. This review would provide important information on the mechanism of soil colloidal P transference.

  3. 41 CFR 105-55.027 - Suspension of collection activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Suspension of collection activity. 105-55.027 Section 105-55.027 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION Regional Offices-General...

  4. Actively controlled vehicle suspension with energy regeneration capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar David, Sagiv; Zion Bobrovsky, Ben

    2011-06-01

    The paper presents an innovative dual purpose automotive suspension topology, combining for the first time the active damping qualities with mechanical vibrations power regeneration capabilities. The new configuration consists of a linear generator as an actuator, a power processing stage based on a gyrator operating under sliding mode control and dynamics controllers. The researched design is simple and energetically efficient, enables an accurate force-velocity suspension characteristic control as well as energy regeneration control, with no practical implementation constraints imposed over the theoretical design. Active damping is based on Skyhook suspension control scheme, which enables overcoming the passive damping tradeoff between high- and low-frequency performance, improving both body isolation and the tire's road grip. The system-level design includes configuration of three system operation modes: passive, semi-active or fully active damping, all using the same electro-mechanical infrastructure, and each focusing on different objective: dynamics improvement or power regeneration. Conclusively, the innovative hybrid suspension is theoretically researched, practically designed and analysed, and proven to be feasible as well as profitable in the aspects of power regeneration, vehicle dynamics improvement and human health risks reduction.

  5. Self-diffusiophoresis of catalytically active patchy colloids near a solid boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldarelli, Charles; Mozaffari, Ali; Sharifi-Mood, Nima; Koplik, Joel

    2014-11-01

    Active colloidal swimmers designed to move along an envisioned path to ascertain various applications in nanotechnology. In diffusiophoresis, gradients in the solute concentration across the colloid create an imbalance force due to the interactions of the solute with the particle. These forces can also be integrated into a self-propulsion by choosing a reactant as a solute which undergoes a surface reaction only on one face of a colloid. The effect of boundaries in self-diffusiophoresis is not purely to retard the motion, because the boundaries also alter the solutal gradient. We developed an analytical approach to investigate the dynamics of swimming colloid near an infinite planar wall assuming constant flux production and a repulsive interaction between product solute and the colloid. The motion of the colloid was decomposed into translational motions perpendicular and parallel to the wall and a rigid body rotation around the third axis. Our analysis indicates when a patchy colloid approaches the boundary with an inclination angle with respect to the unit normal of the wall, the asymmetric distribution of product around the colloid compels it to rotate and redirects its reaction section towards the wall and thereby the colloid will be moved away from the wall.

  6. Continuum Level Results from Particle Simulations of Active Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmotte, Blaise; Climent, Eric; Plouraboue, Franck; Keaveny, Eric

    2014-11-01

    Accurately simulating active suspensions on the lab scale is a technical challenge. It requires considering large numbers of interacting swimmers with well described hydrodynamics in order to obtain representative and reliable statistics of suspension properties. We have developed a computationally scalable model based on an extension of the Force Coupling Method (FCM) to active particles. This tool can handle the many-body hydrodynamic interactions between O (105) swimmers while also accounting for finite-size effects, steady or time-dependent strokes, or variable swimmer aspect ratio. Results from our simulations of steady-stroke microswimmer suspensions coincide with those given by continuum models, but, in certain cases, we observe collective dynamics that these models do not predict. We provide robust statistics of resulting distributions and accurately characterize the growth rates of these instabilities. In addition, we explore the effect of the time-dependent stroke on the suspension properties, comparing with those from the steady-stroke simulations. Authors acknowledge the ANR project Motimo for funding and the Calmip computing centre for technical support.

  7. Study of adsorption process of iron colloid substances on activated carbon by ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machekhina, K. I.; Shiyan, L. N.; Yurmazova, T. A.; Voyno, D. A.

    2015-04-01

    The paper reports on the adsorption of iron colloid substances on activated carbon (PAC) Norit SA UF with using ultrasound. It is found that time of adsorption is equal to three hours. High-frequency electrical oscillation is 35 kHz. The adsorption capacity of activated carbon was determined and it is equal to about 0.25 mg iron colloid substances /mg PAC. The iron colloid substances size ranging from 30 to 360 nm was determined. The zeta potential of iron colloid substances which consists of iron (III) hydroxide, silicon compounds and natural organic substances is about (-38mV). The process of destruction iron colloid substances occurs with subsequent formation of a precipitate in the form of Fe(OH)3 as a result of the removal of organic substances from the model solution.

  8. Characterizing Fullerene Nanoparticles in Aqueous Suspensions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies have indicated that fullerenes can form stable colloidal suspensions in water when introduced to the aqueous phase through solvent exchange, sonication, or extended mixing. The colloidal suspensions created using these techniques have effective aqueous phase concentratio...

  9. Silver colloid nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, and their antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Panacek, Ales; Kvítek, Libor; Prucek, Robert; Kolar, Milan; Vecerova, Renata; Pizúrova, Nadezda; Sharma, Virender K; Nevecna, Tat'jana; Zboril, Radek

    2006-08-24

    A one-step simple synthesis of silver colloid nanoparticles with controllable sizes is presented. In this synthesis, reduction of [Ag(NH(3))(2)](+) complex cation by four saccharides was performed. Four saccharides were used: two monosaccharides (glucose and galactose) and two disaccharides (maltose and lactose). The syntheses performed at various ammonia concentrations (0.005-0.20 mol L(-1)) and pH conditions (11.5-13.0) produced a wide range of particle sizes (25-450 nm) with narrow size distributions, especially at the lowest ammonia concentrations. The average size, size distribution, morphology, and structure of particles were determined by dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and UV/Visible absorption spectrophotometry. The influence of the saccharide structure (monosacharides versus disaccharides) on the size of silver particles is briefly discussed. The reduction of [Ag(NH(3))(2)](+) by maltose produced silver particles with a narrow size distribution with an average size of 25 nm, which showed high antimicrobial and bactericidal activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including highly multiresistant strains such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles was found to be dependent on the size of silver particles. A very low concentration of silver (as low as 1.69 mug/mL Ag) gave antibacterial performance.

  10. Multidisciplinary design optimization of mechatronic vehicles with active suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yuping; McPhee, John

    2005-05-01

    A multidisciplinary optimization method is applied to the design of mechatronic vehicles with active suspensions. The method is implemented in a GA-A'GEM-MATLAB simulation environment in such a way that the linear mechanical vehicle model is designed in a multibody dynamics software package, i.e. A'GEM, the controllers and estimators are constructed using linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) method, and Kalman filter algorithm in Matlab, then the combined mechanical and control model is optimized simultaneously using a genetic algorithm (GA). The design variables include passive parameters and control parameters. In the numerical optimizations, both random and deterministic road inputs and both perfect measurement of full state variables and estimated limited state variables are considered. Optimization results show that the active suspension systems based on the multidisciplinary optimization method have better overall performance than those derived using conventional design methods with the LQG algorithm.

  11. Theory of activated dynamics and glass transition of hard colloids in two dimensions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo-kai; Li, Hui-shu; Tian, Wen-de; Chen, Kang; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2014-03-07

    The microscopic nonlinear Langevin equation theory is applied to study the localization and activated hopping of two-dimensional hard disks in the deeply supercooled and glass states. Quantitative comparisons of dynamic characteristic length scales, barrier, and their dependence on the reduced packing fraction are presented between hard-disk and hard-sphere suspensions. The dynamic barrier of hard disks emerges at higher absolute and reduced packing fractions and correspondingly, the crossover size of the dynamic cage which correlates to the Lindemann length for melting is smaller. The localization lengths of both hard disks and spheres decrease exponentially with packing fraction. Larger localization length of hard disks than that of hard spheres is found at the same reduced packing fraction. The relaxation time of hard disks rises dramatically above the reduced packing fraction of 0.88, which leads to lower reduced packing fraction at the kinetic glass transition than that of hard spheres. The present work provides a foundation for the subsequent study of the glass transition of binary or polydisperse mixtures of hard disks, normally adopted in experiments and simulations to avoid crystallization, and further, the rheology and mechanical response of the two-dimensional glassy colloidal systems.

  12. Experimental studies on semi active suspension systems with various dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, B. Anil; Bharath Raj, Ch; Rajendar, K.

    2015-12-01

    Some results of an experimental probe on semi Active suspension systems with various Dampers have been studied in the present paper. Dampers with different configurations were studied by using Magneto Rheological gel Damper. A comparison have been done for different configurations of Dampers viz.MR gel Damper with Magnetic field, MR gel Damper without magnetic field, Damper with conventional oil, Natural vibration without damper.

  13. Shape of dynamical heterogeneities and fractional Stokes-Einstein and Stokes-Einstein-Debye relations in quasi-two-dimensional suspensions of colloidal ellipsoids.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Chandan K; Ganapathy, Rajesh

    2015-05-15

    We examine the influence of the shape of dynamical heterogeneities on the Stokes-Einstein (SE) and Stokes-Einstein-Debye (SED) relations in quasi-two-dimensional suspensions of colloidal ellipsoids. For ellipsoids with repulsive interactions, both SE and SED relations are violated at all area fractions. On approaching the glass transition, however, the extent to which this violation occurs changes beyond a crossover area fraction. Quite remarkably, we find that it is not just the presence of dynamical heterogeneities but their change in the shape from stringlike to compact that coincides with this crossover. On introducing a suitable short-range depletion attraction between the ellipsoids, associated with the lack of morphological evolution of dynamical heterogeneities, the extent to which the SE and SED relations are violated remains unchanged even for deep supercooling.

  14. Increasing surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy effect of RNA and DNA components by changing the pH of silver colloidal suspensions.

    PubMed

    Primera-Pedrozo, Oliva M; Rodríguez, Gabriela Del Mar; Castellanos, Jorge; Felix-Rivera, Hilsamar; Resto, Oscar; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P

    2012-02-15

    This work focused on establishing the parameters for enhancing the Raman signals of DNA and RNA constituents: nitrogenous bases, nucleosides and nucleotides, using metallic nanoparticles as surface enhanced Raman scattering substrates. Silver nanospheres were synthesized using sodium borohydride as a reducing agent and sodium citrate as a capping agent. The prepared nanoparticles had a surface plasmon band at ∼384nm and an average size of 12±3nm. The nanoparticles' surface charge was manipulated by changing the pH of the Ag colloidal suspensions in the range of 1-13. Low concentrations as 0.7μM were detected under the experimental conditions. The optimum pH values were: 7 for adenine, 9 for AMP, 5 for adenosine, 7 for dAMP and 11 for deoxyadenosine.

  15. Development of a topical suspension containing three active ingredients.

    PubMed

    Chang, H C; Li, L C; Toongsuwan, S; Stephens, D; Liu, R M; Plichta-Mahmoud, H

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a topical suspension that contains sarafloxacin hydrochloride (1 mg/mL), triamcinolone acetonide (1 mg/mL), and clotrimazole (10 mg/mL), and is stable at room temperature (15-28 degrees C) for clinical usage. Due to the difference in the physicochemical properties and chemical stability profiles of these three active ingredients, it is a challenge to develop a stable suspension formulation containing these three drugs. In this study, the stability of these drugs in different buffer solutions was determined under different accelerated isothermal conditions. The Arrhenius equation was subsequently utilized to predict the room-temperature stability of these three drugs in these buffer solutions. By knowing the room-temperature solubility of the drugs in the buffer solution, the stability of the drugs in suspension was predicted. As a result, a 0.02 M phosphate buffer (pH 7.0) containing 0.02% (w/v)polysorbate 20, 1% (w/v) NaCl, and 0.1% (w/v) EDTA was determined to be an acceptable medium. In addition, 0.35% (w/v) high-viscosity carboxymethylcellulose (HV-CMC) was first selected as the suspending agent to enhance the redispersibility of the suspension. Stability data further supported that all three drugs were stable in the suspension containing HV-CMC with less than 5% potency loss for at least 6 months at 40 degrees C and 12 months at 25 degrees C. However, the viscosity drop of this HV-CMC formulation at 25 degrees C and 40 degrees C became a product stability concern. To improve the viscosity stability of the suspension, the medium-viscosity carboxymethylcellulose (MV-CMC) was selected to replace the HV-CMC as the suspending agent. The optimal combination of MV-CMC and sodium chloride in achieving the most desirable dispersion properties for the formulation was determined through the use of a 32 factorial design. The optimal formulation containing 1% MV-CMC and 1% sodium chloride has shown improved viscosity stability

  16. Experimental investigation on the dissipative and elastic characteristics of a yaw colloidal damper destined to carbody suspension of a bullet train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suciu, B.; Tomioka, T.

    2016-09-01

    Yaw damper represents a major source of excitation for flexural vibration of the railway carbody. In order to reduce transmissibility of such undesired excitation, yaw damper should allow for large force transmission at low working frequencies, but should behave as vibration isolator at high working frequencies. Unfortunately, the yaw oil damper (OD), which is nowadays in service, has poor intrinsic elastic capabilities and provides damping forces varying as a power function versus the piston speed. Since colloidal damper (CD) has intrinsic elastic capabilities and larger damping forces at lower excitation frequencies, it occurs as an attractive alternative solution to traditional yaw dampers. In this work, a yaw CD destined to carbody suspension of a bullet train was designed and manufactured; then, its dynamic characteristics, produced by both the frictional and colloidal effects, were evaluated from the experimental results, obtained during horizontal vibration tests, performed on a ball-screw shaker. Compared to the corresponding classical yaw OD, the trial yaw CD allowed for: weight reduction of 31.6%; large damping force, dissipated energy and spring constant at long piston stroke under low excitation frequency; low damping force, dissipated energy and spring constant at short piston stroke under high excitation frequency. Elastic properties were justified by introducing a model for the spring constant that included the effect of pore size distribution.

  17. Optimization of Semi-active Seat Suspension with Magnetorheological Damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segla, Stefan; Kajaste, J.; Keski-Honkola, P.

    The paper deals with modeling, control and optimization of semiactive seat suspension with pneumatic spring and magnetorheological damper. The main focus is on isolating vertical excitation from the cabin of a bucket-wheel excavator in order to protect the excavator driver against harmful vibration. Three different control algorithms are used to determine the desired semi-active damping force: skyhook control, balance control and combination of balance and skyhook controls. The dynamic behavior of the semi-active system is optimized using genetic algorithms. As the objective function the effective value of the seat (sprung mass) acceleration is used.

  18. Activity-assisted self-assembly of colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallory, S. A.; Cacciuto, A.

    2016-08-01

    We outline a basic strategy of how self-propulsion can be used to improve the yield of a typical colloidal self-assembly process. The success of this approach is predicated on the thoughtful design of the colloidal building block as well as how self-propulsion is endowed to the particle. As long as a set of criteria are satisfied, it is possible to significantly increase the rate of self-assembly, and greatly expand the window in parameter space where self-assembly can occur. In addition, we show that by tuning the relative on-off time of the self-propelling force it is possible to modulate the effective speed of the colloids allowing for further optimization of the self-assembly process.

  19. Clustering and Pattern Formation in Chemorepulsive Active Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebchen, Benno; Marenduzzo, Davide; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Cates, Michael E.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate that migration away from self-produced chemicals (chemorepulsion) generates a generic route to clustering and pattern formation among self-propelled colloids. The clustering instability can be caused either by anisotropic chemical production, or by a delayed orientational response to changes of the chemical environment. In each case, chemorepulsion creates clusters of a self-limiting area which grows linearly with self-propulsion speed. This agrees with recent observations of dynamic clusters in Janus colloids (albeit not yet known to be chemorepulsive). More generally, our results could inform design principles for the self-assembly of chemorepulsive synthetic swimmers and/or bacteria into nonequilibrium patterns.

  20. Emergent Cometlike Swarming of Optically Driven Thermally Active Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Jack A.; Golestanian, Ramin

    2014-02-01

    We propose a simple system of optically driven colloids that convert light into heat and move in response to self-generated and collectively generated thermal gradients. We show that the system exhibits self-organization into a moving cometlike swarm and characterize the structure and response of the swarm to a light-intensity-dependent external tuning parameter. We observe many interesting features in this nonequilibrium system including circulation and evaporation, intensity-dependent shape, density and temperature fluctuations, and ejection of hot colloids from the swarm tip.

  1. Gold and silver nanoparticle monomers are non-SERS-active: a negative experimental study with silica-encapsulated Raman-reporter-coated metal colloids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuying; Walkenfort, Bernd; Yoon, Jun Hee; Schlücker, Sebastian; Xie, Wei

    2015-09-07

    Noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) are the most commonly employed plasmonic substrates in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) experiments. Computer simulations show that monomers of Ag and Au nanocrystals ("spherical" NPs) do not exhibit a notable plasmonic enhancement, i.e., they are essentially non-SERS-active. However, in experiments, SERS enhanced by spherical NP colloids has been frequently reported. This implies that the monomers do not have strong SERS activity, but detectable enhancement should more or less be there. Because of the gap between theory and practice, it is important to demonstrate experimentally how SERS-active the metal colloid actually is and, in case a SERS signal is observed, where it originates from. In particular the aggregation of the colloid, induced by high centrifugal forces in washing steps or due to a harsh ionic environment of the suspension medium, should be controlled since it is the very high SERS activity of NP clusters which dominates the overall SERS signal of the colloid. We report here the experimental evaluation of the SERS activity of 80 nm Au and Ag NP monomers. Instead of showing fancy nanostructures and super SERS enhancement, we present the method on how to obtain negative experimental data. In this approach, no SERS signal was obtained from the colloid with a Raman reporter on the metal surface when the NPs were encapsulated carefully within a thick silica shell. Without silica encapsulation, if a very low centrifugation speed is used for the washing steps, only a negligible SERS signal can be detected even at very high NP concentrations. In contrast, strong SERS signals can be detected when the NPs are suspended in acidic solutions. These results indicate that Au and Ag NP monomers essentially exhibit no SERS activity of practical relevance.

  2. Improving crosswind stability of fast rail vehicles using active secondary suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Dirk; Berg, Mats; Persson, Rickard; Stichel, Sebastian

    2014-07-01

    Rail vehicles are today increasingly equipped with active suspension systems for ride comfort purposes. In this paper, it is studied whether these often powerful systems also can be used to improve crosswind stability. A fast rail vehicle equipped with active secondary suspension for ride comfort purposes is exposed to crosswind loads during curve negotiation. For high crosswind loads, the active secondary suspension is used to reduce the impact of crosswind on the vehicle. The control input is taken from the primary vertical suspension deflection. Three different control cases are studied and compared with the only comfort-oriented active secondary suspension and a passive secondary suspension. The application of active secondary suspension resulted in significantly improved crosswind stability.

  3. Characterization and Correlation of Particle-Level Interactions to the Macroscopic Rheology of Powders, Granular Slurries, and Colloidal Suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Poloski, Adam P.; Daniel, Richard C.; Rector, David R.; Bredt, Paul R.; Buck, Edgar C.; Berg, John C.; Saez, Avelino E.

    2006-09-29

    Hanford TRU tank sludges are complex mixtures of undissolved minerals and salt solids in an aqueous phase of high ionic strength. They show complex rheological behavior resulting from interactions at the macroscopic level, such as interparticle friction between grains in the coarse fraction, as well as from interactions at the nano-scale level, such as the agglomeration of colloidal particles. An understanding of how phenomena such as interparticle friction and aggregate stability under shear will allow better control of Hanford TRU tank sludges being processed for disposal. The project described in this report had two objectives. The first was to understand the physical properties and behavior of the Hanford transuranic (TRU) tank sludges under conditions that might exist during retrieval, treatment, packaging, and transportation for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The second objective was to develop a fundamental understanding of sludge physical properties by correlating the macroscopic behavior with interactions occurring at the particle/colloidal scale. These objectives were accomplished by: 1) developing continuum models for coarse granular slurries and 2) studying the behavior of colloidal agglomerates under shear and under irradiation.

  4. THE INFLUENCE OF OXIDANT TYPE ON THE PROPERTIES OF IRON COLLOIDS AND SUSPENSIONS FORMED FROM FERROUS IRON

    EPA Science Inventory

    "Red water" describes the appearance of drinking water that contains suspended particulate iron although the actual suspension color may be light yellow to brown depending on water chemistry and particle properties. Iron can originate from the source water and from distribution ...

  5. Design and analysis of an intelligent controller for active geometry suspension systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodarzi, Avesta; Oloomi, Ehsan; Esmailzadeh, Ebrahim

    2011-02-01

    An active geometry suspension (AGS) system is a device to optimise suspension-related factors such as toe angle and roll centre height by controlling vehicle's suspension geometry. The suspension geometry could be changed through control of suspension mounting point's position. In this paper, analysis and control of an AGS system is addressed. First, the effects of suspension geometry change on roll centre height and toe angle are studied. Then, based on an analytical approach, the improvement of the vehicle's stability and handling due to the control of suspension geometry is investigated. In the next section, an eight-degree-of-freedom handling model of a sport utility vehicle equipped with an AGS system is introduced. Finally, a self-tuning proportional-integral controller has been designed, using the fuzzy control theory, to control the actuator that changes the geometry of the suspension system. The simulation results show that an AGS system can improve the handling and stability of the vehicle.

  6. The behavior of active diffusiophoretic suspensions: An accelerated Laplacian dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wen; Brady, John F.

    2016-10-01

    Diffusiophoresis is the process by which a colloidal particle moves in response to the concentration gradient of a chemical solute. Chemically active particles generate solute concentration gradients via surface chemical reactions which can result in their own motion — the self-diffusiophoresis of Janus particles — and in the motion of other nearby particles — normal down-gradient diffusiophoresis. The long-range nature of the concentration disturbance created by a reactive particle results in strong interactions among particles and can lead to the formation of clusters and even coexisting dense and dilute regions often seen in active matter systems. In this work, we present a general method to determine the many-particle solute concentration field allowing the dynamic simulation of the motion of thousands of reactive particles. With the simulation method, we first clarify and demonstrate the notion of "chemical screening," whereby the long-ranged interactions become exponentially screened, which is essential for otherwise diffusiophoretic suspensions would be unconditionally unstable. Simulations show that uniformly reactive particles, which do not self-propel, form loosely packed clusters but no coexistence is observed. The simulations also reveal that there is a stability threshold — when the "chemical fuel" concentration is low enough, thermal Brownian motion is able to overcome diffusiophoretic attraction. Janus particles that self-propel show coexistence, but, interestingly, the stability threshold for clustering is not affected by the self-motion.

  7. Non-Gaussian limit fluctuations in active swimmer suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurihara, Takashi; Aridome, Msato; Ayade, Heev; Zaid, Irwin; Mizuno, Daisuke

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the hydrodynamic fluctuations in suspensions of swimming microorganisms (Chlamydomonas) by observing the probe particles dispersed in the media. Short-term fluctuations of probe particles were superdiffusive and displayed heavily tailed non-Gaussian distributions. The analytical theory that explains the observed distribution was derived by summing the power-law-decaying hydrodynamic interactions from spatially distributed field sources (here, swimming microorganisms). The summing procedure, which we refer to as the physical limit operation, is applicable to a variety of physical fluctuations to which the classical central limiting theory does not apply. Extending the analytical formula to compare to experiments in active swimmer suspensions, we show that the non-Gaussian shape of the observed distribution obeys the analytic theory concomitantly with independently determined parameters such as the strength of force generations and the concentration of Chlamydomonas. Time evolution of the distributions collapsed to a single master curve, except for their extreme tails, for which our theory presents a qualitative explanation. Investigations thereof and the complete agreement with theoretical predictions revealed broad applicability of the formula to dispersions of active sources of fluctuations.

  8. Influence of ionic strength and polyelectrolyte concentration on the electrical conductivity of suspensions of soft colloidal polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Sagou, Jean-Pierre S; Ahualli, Silvia; Thomas, Fabien; Duval, Jérôme

    2015-12-01

    The electrokinetic properties of carboxymethyldextran, a soft and anionic polysaccharide, were analysed in aqueous NaNO3 solutions through measurements of the electrical conductivity of the suspensions. The results, which furnish new experimental support for the structure of soft polysaccharides in electrolyte solution show that the polyion concentration governs the conductance behavior of the suspension as the ionic strength decreases. This is particularly evident for large polymer concentrations, for which electrical double layer overlap is more likely. In contrast, the electrical conductivity of the suspension at high ionic strength reduces to the contribution of the ions in solution, as screening of the polyion charges is more efficient in such conditions. The applicability of Ohshima's general conductivity expression to these electrical conductivity measurements was examined, and a major discrepancy against the theory was observed. The calculated values of the electrical conductivity deduced on the basis of this theory were found to be lower than the experimental ones. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed and a numerical model, based on the use of a cell approach to account for hydrodynamic and electrical interactions between particles, has shown to be a good description of the experimental electrokinetic data.

  9. Active stress driven convection in a suspension of chemotactic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasyap, T. V.; Koch, Donald

    2011-11-01

    We examine the linear stability of a suspension of swimming bacteria producing dipolar hydrodynamic disturbances confined in a channel subjected to a linear chemo-attractant gradient across the channel. At the continuum level swimming bacteria exert an ``active'' stress on the fluid which is a function of the bacterial concentration and orientation fields. In the base-state without any fluid flow, the fluxes from the chemotactic and diffusive motion of the bacteria balance to yield exponential number density and active stress profiles across the channel. We show that such a base-state is unstable to perturbations in the number density parallel to the channel walls if the bacterial concentration exceeds a critical value determined by a Peclet number measuring the strength of chemotaxis relative to diffusion. Active stress gradients resulting from the perturbation in the number density drive convective fluid flow, which transports bacteria into the regions of highest perturbed bacteria concentration reinforcing the original perturbation. We examine the linear stability of a suspension of swimming bacteria producing dipolar hydrodynamic disturbances confined in a channel subjected to a linear chemo-attractant gradient across the channel. At the continuum level swimming bacteria exert an ``active'' stress on the fluid which is a function of the bacterial concentration and orientation fields. In the base-state without any fluid flow, the fluxes from the chemotactic and diffusive motion of the bacteria balance to yield exponential number density and active stress profiles across the channel. We show that such a base-state is unstable to perturbations in the number density parallel to the channel walls if the bacterial concentration exceeds a critical value determined by a Peclet number measuring the strength of chemotaxis relative to diffusion. Active stress gradients resulting from the perturbation in the number density drive convective fluid flow, which transports

  10. Non-equilibrium dynamics of an active colloidal ``chucker''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valeriani, C.; Allen, R. J.; Marenduzzo, D.

    2010-05-01

    We report Monte Carlo simulations of the dynamics of a "chucker," a colloidal particle that emits smaller solute particles from its surface, isotropically and at a constant rate kc. We find that the diffusion constant of the chucker increases for small kc, as recently predicted theoretically. At large kc, the chucker diffuses more slowly due to crowding effects. We compare our simulation results to those of a "point particle" Langevin dynamics scheme in which the solute concentration field is calculated analytically, and in which hydrodynamic effects arising from colloid-solvent surface interactions can be accounted for in a coarse-grained way. By simulating the dragging of a chucker, we obtain an estimate of its apparent mobility coefficient which violates the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. We also characterize the probability density profile for a chucker which sediments onto a surface which either repels or absorbs the solute particles, and find that the steady state distributions are very different in the two cases. Our simulations are inspired by the biological example of exopolysaccharide-producing bacteria, as well as by recent experimental, simulation and theoretical work on phoretic colloidal "swimmers."

  11. Active magnetic suspension in main magnetic field of electric motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urusov, I. D.; Galkin, V. I.; Likhoshvay, I. P.

    1985-10-01

    An active magnetic suspension for the rotor of an electric motor is considered, especially in small or miniature high-speed devices such as gyros, microturbomachines, and machine-tool spindle drives where it would eliminate the need for extra bearings and contribute to size and weight reduction. A disk-type rotor made of a ferromagnetic material is located horizontally inside the bore of a vertical stator so that weight and external loads compensate the magnetic pull upward. This pull is generated by the magnetic field in the air gap and can be automatically controlled by an electronic feedback circuit which regulates the stator input voltage depending on the rotor position along the stator bore, with a displacement transducer on the rotor indicating the position. The performance of such a suspension with automatic control in a 3-phase induction motor is analyzed on the basis of the system of differential equations describing the behavior of the electromechanical system during axial oscillations of the rotor, assuming a constant rotor speed during the transient periods.

  12. Probing effects of polymer adsorption in colloidal particle suspensions by light scattering as relevant for the aquatic environment: An overview.

    PubMed

    Tiraferri, Alberto; Borkovec, Michal

    2015-12-01

    Modification of particle surfaces by adsorption of polymers is a process that governs particle behavior in aqueous environmental systems. The present article briefly reviews the current understanding of the adsorption mechanisms and the properties of the resulting layers, and it discusses two environmentally relevant cases of particle modification by polymers. In particular, the discussion focuses on the usefulness of methods based on light scattering to probe such adsorbed layers together with the resulting properties of the particle suspensions, and it highlights advantages and disadvantages of these techniques. Measurement of the electrophoretic mobility allows to follow the development of the adsorption layer and to characterize the charge of the modified particles. At saturation, the surface charge is governed by the charge of the adsorbed film. Dynamic light scattering provides information on the film thickness and on the behavior of the modified suspensions. The charge and the structure of the adsorbed layer influence the stability of the particles, as well as the applicability of the classical theory of Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek (DLVO). This fundamental knowledge is presented in the light of environmental systems and its significance for applied systems is underlined. In particular, the article discusses two examples of environmental processes involving adsorption of polymers, namely, the modification of particles by natural adsorption of humic substances and the tailoring of surface properties of iron-based particles used to remediate contaminated aquifers.

  13. Escherichia coli as a model active colloid: A practical introduction.

    PubMed

    Schwarz-Linek, Jana; Arlt, Jochen; Jepson, Alys; Dawson, Angela; Vissers, Teun; Miroli, Dario; Pilizota, Teuta; Martinez, Vincent A; Poon, Wilson C K

    2016-01-01

    The flagellated bacterium Escherichia coli is increasingly used experimentally as a self-propelled swimmer. To obtain meaningful, quantitative results that are comparable between different laboratories, reproducible protocols are needed to control, 'tune' and monitor the swimming behaviour of these motile cells. We critically review the knowledge needed to do so, explain methods for characterising the colloidal and motile properties of E. coli cells, and propose a protocol for keeping them swimming at constant speed at finite bulk concentrations. In the process of establishing this protocol, we use motility as a high-throughput probe of aspects of cellular physiology via the coupling between swimming speed and the proton motive force.

  14. Modeling and Control for an Asymmetric Hydraulic Active Suspension System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Wanil; Won, Sangchul

    In this paper we present a model for an automotive active suspension system which includes the dynamics of an asymmetric hydraulic actuator. In this model the force exerted by a single-rod cylinder is regarded as an internal state, and the sum of the oil flow rates through the orifice of a servo valve as the control input. We obtain a linear time-invariant (LTI) state state equation and propose a force-tracking-free one-step control method which can accept various linear control techniques. An optimal state-feedback control is applied as an example. Quarter car test rig experiment results show the effectiveness of the proposed approach in modeling and control.

  15. Collective motion in an active suspension of Escherichia coli bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gachelin, J.; Rousselet, A.; Lindner, A.; Clement, E.

    2014-02-01

    We investigate experimentally the emergence of collective motion in the bulk of an active suspension of Escherichia coli bacteria. When increasing the concentration from a dilute to a semi-dilute regime, we observe a continuous crossover from a dynamical cluster regime to a regime of ‘bio-turbulence’ convection patterns. We measure a length scale characterizing the collective motion as a function of the bacteria concentration. For bacteria fully supplied with oxygen, the increase of the correlation length is almost linear with concentration and at the largest concentrations tested, the correlation length could be as large as 24 bacterial body sizes (or 7-8 when including the flagella bundle). In contrast, under conditions of oxygen shortage the correlation length saturates at a value of around 7 body lengths.

  16. Active control of an innovative seat suspension system with acceleration measurement based friction estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Donghong; Sun, Shuaishuai; Li, Hongyi; Du, Haiping; Li, Weihua

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, an innovative active seat suspension system for vehicles is presented. This seat suspension prototype is built with two low cost actuators each of which has one rotary motor and one gear reducer. A H∞ controller with friction compensation is designed for the seat suspension control system where the friction is estimated and compensated based on the measurement of seat acceleration. This principal aim of this research was to control the low frequency vibration transferred or amplified by the vehicle (chassis) suspension, and to maintain the passivity of the seat suspension at high frequency (isolation vibration) while taking into consideration the trade-off between the active seat suspension cost and its high frequency performance. Sinusoidal excitations of 1-4.5 Hz were applied to test the active seat suspension both when controlled and when uncontrolled and this is compared with a well-tuned passive heavy duty vehicle seat suspension. The results indicate the effectiveness of the proposed control algorithm within the tested frequencies. Further tests were conducted using the excitations generated from a quarter-car model under bump and random road profiles. The bump road tests indicate the controlled active seat suspension has good transient response performance. The Power Spectral Density (PSD) method and ISO 2631-1 standards were applied to analyse the seat suspension's acceleration under random road conditions. Although some low magnitude and high frequency noise will inevitably be introduced by the active system, the weighted-frequency Root Mean Square (RMS) acceleration shows that this may not have a large effect on ride comfort. In fact, the ride comfort is improved from being an 'a little uncomfortable' to a 'not uncomfortable' level when compared with the well-tuned passive seat suspension. This low cost active seat suspension design and the proposed controller with the easily measured feedback signals are very practical for real

  17. Inertia Wheel on Low-Noise Active Magnetic Suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carabelli, S.; Genta, G.; Silvagni, M.; Tonoli, A.

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic bearings are particularly suited for space applications for a number of reasons: - they are ideally suited for vacuum applications; - the lack of lubrication and wear enhances the reliability and guaranties a long maintenance-free operation - the low drag torque decreases power consumption and reduces the torque exerted on the stator of the machine. - the possibility of insulating actively the spacecraft from the excitation due to unbalance of the rotating system In the case of reaction wheels, a well designed magnetic suspension allows high speed operation with a very low power consumption and vibration level. Conversely, microgravity (and possibly vacuum) operation is an advantage for magnetic bearings. The absence of static forces allows to operate with low current levels, thus reducing electrical noise and allowing to reach even lower vibration levels than in Earth applications of magnetic bearings. Active magnetic bearings (AMB) allow to adapt the working characteristics of the system to the operating needs: it is possible to use the actuators to lock the system during launch (absence of grabbers) and to stiffen the suspension when the spacecraft is accelerated (impulsive phases), while working in conditions optimised for microgravity when this is needed. Magnetic suspension systems designed for microgravity environment cannot be correctly tested on the ground. Testing in ground conditions results in the need of grossly overdesigning the levitation device; furthermore, in some cases ground testing is completely impossible, if not by introducing devices which compensate for the Earth gravitational field. If the compensation for the gravitational force is supplied by the same actuators used for microgravity operation, the actuators and the power amplifiers must be overdesigned and in some cases the suspension can be altogether impossible. They work in conditions which are much different from nominal ones and, above all, it is impossible to reach the

  18. Colloidal Suspensions of Rodlike Nanocrystals and Magnetic Spheres under an External Magnetic Stimulus: Experiment and Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    May, Kathrin; Eremin, Alexey; Stannarius, Ralf; Peroukidis, Stavros D; Klapp, Sabine H L; Klein, Susanne

    2016-05-24

    Using experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, we explore magnetic field-induced phase transformations in suspensions of nonmagnetic rodlike and magnetic sphere-shaped particles. We experimentally demonstrate that an external uniform magnetic field causes the formation of small, stable clusters of magnetic particles that, in turn, induce and control the orientational order of the nonmagnetic subphase. Optical birefringence was studied as a function of the magnetic field and the volume fractions of each particle type. Steric transfer of the orientational order was investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations; the results are in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations. By reproducing the general experimental trends, the MD simulation offers a cohesive bottom-up interpretation of the physical behavior of such systems, and it can also be regarded as a guide for further experimental research.

  19. Auto Mechanics I. Learning Activity Packets (LAPs). Section D--Suspension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains six learning activity packets (LAPs) that outline the study activities for the "suspension" instructional area for an Auto Mechanics I course. The six LAPs cover the following topics: wheel bearings, tires and wheels, wheel balancing, suspension system, steering system, and wheel alignment. Each LAP contains a…

  20. Flocking ferromagnetic colloids

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Andreas; Snezhko, Alexey; Aranson, Igor S.

    2017-01-01

    Assemblages of microscopic colloidal particles exhibit fascinating collective motion when energized by electric or magnetic fields. The behaviors range from coherent vortical motion to phase separation and dynamic self-assembly. Although colloidal systems are relatively simple, understanding their collective response, especially under out-of-equilibrium conditions, remains elusive. We report on the emergence of flocking and global rotation in the system of rolling ferromagnetic microparticles energized by a vertical alternating magnetic field. By combing experiments and discrete particle simulations, we have identified primary physical mechanisms, leading to the emergence of large-scale collective motion: spontaneous symmetry breaking of the clockwise/counterclockwise particle rotation, collisional alignment of particle velocities, and random particle reorientations due to shape imperfections. We have also shown that hydrodynamic interactions between the particles do not have a qualitative effect on the collective dynamics. Our findings shed light on the onset of spatial and temporal coherence in a large class of active systems, both synthetic (colloids, swarms of robots, and biopolymers) and living (suspensions of bacteria, cell colonies, and bird flocks). PMID:28246633

  1. Layered Double Hydroxide Nanoclusters: Aqueous, Concentrated, Stable, and Catalytically Active Colloids toward Green Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Tokudome, Yasuaki; Morimoto, Tsuyoshi; Tarutani, Naoki; Vaz, Pedro D; Nunes, Carla D; Prevot, Vanessa; Stenning, Gavin B G; Takahashi, Masahide

    2016-05-24

    Increasing attention has been dedicated to the development of nanomaterials rendering green and sustainable processes, which occur in benign aqueous reaction media. Herein, we demonstrate the synthesis of another family of green nanomaterials, layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoclusters, which are concentrated (98.7 g/L in aqueous solvent), stably dispersed (transparent sol for >2 weeks), and catalytically active colloids of nano LDHs (isotropic shape with the size of 7.8 nm as determined by small-angle X-ray scattering). LDH nanoclusters are available as colloidal building blocks to give access to meso- and macroporous LDH materials. Proof-of-concept applications revealed that the LDH nanocluster works as a solid basic catalyst and is separable from solvents of catalytic reactions, confirming the nature of nanocatalysts. The present work closely investigates the unique physical and chemical features of this colloid, the formation mechanism, and the ability to act as basic nanocatalysts in benign aqueous reaction systems.

  2. Estimation of the critical behavior in an active colloidal system with Vicsek-like interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trefz, Benjamin; Siebert, Jonathan Tammo; Speck, Thomas; Binder, Kurt; Virnau, Peter

    2017-02-01

    We study numerically the critical behavior of a modified, active Asakura-Oosawa model for colloid-polymer mixtures. The colloids are modeled as self-propelled particles with Vicsek-like interactions. This system undergoes phase separation between a colloid-rich and a polymer-rich phase, whereby the phase diagram depends on the strength of the Vicsek-like interactions. Employing a subsystem-block-density distribution analysis, we determine the critical point and make an attempt to estimate the critical exponents. In contrast to the passive model, we find that the critical point is not located on the rectilinear diameter. A first estimate of the critical exponents β and ν is consistent with the underlying 3d-Ising universality class observed for the passive model.

  3. Electrochemical analysis in a liposome suspension using lapachol as a hydrophobic electro active species.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Noriko; Wakamatsu, Shiori; Uno, Bunji

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrated that the electro-chemical analysis of hydrophobic quinones can be performed in liposome suspension systems. We prepared and analyzed liposome suspensions containing lapachol, which is a quinone-based anti-tumor activity compound. In this suspension system, a simple one redox couple of lapachol is observed. These results are quite different from those obtained in organic solvents. In addition, the pH dependence of redox behaviors of lapachol could be observed in multilamellar vesicle (MLV) suspension system. This MLV suspension system method may approximate the electrochemical behavior of hydrophobic compounds in aqueous conditions. A benefit of this liposome suspension system for electrochemical analysis is that it enables to observe water-insoluble compounds without using organic solvents.

  4. Reading a Suspenseful Literary Text Activates Brain Areas Related to Social Cognition and Predictive Inference

    PubMed Central

    Lehne, Moritz; Engel, Philipp; Rohrmeier, Martin; Menninghaus, Winfried; Jacobs, Arthur M.; Koelsch, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Stories can elicit powerful emotions. A key emotional response to narrative plots (e.g., novels, movies, etc.) is suspense. Suspense appears to build on basic aspects of human cognition such as processes of expectation, anticipation, and prediction. However, the neural processes underlying emotional experiences of suspense have not been previously investigated. We acquired functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data while participants read a suspenseful literary text (E.T.A. Hoffmann's “The Sandman”) subdivided into short text passages. Individual ratings of experienced suspense obtained after each text passage were found to be related to activation in the medial frontal cortex, bilateral frontal regions (along the inferior frontal sulcus), lateral premotor cortex, as well as posterior temporal and temporo-parietal areas. The results indicate that the emotional experience of suspense depends on brain areas associated with social cognition and predictive inference. PMID:25946306

  5. Antibacterial Activity of Electrochemically Synthesized Colloidal Silver Nanoparticles Against Hospital-Acquired Infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuc, Dao Tri; Huy, Tran Quang; Hoang, Luc Huy; Hoang, Tran Huy; Le, Anh-Tuan; Anh, Dang Duc

    2017-02-01

    This study evaluated the antibacterial activity of electrochemically synthesized colloidal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) against hospital-acquired infections. Colloidal AgNPs were synthesized via a single process using bulk silver bars, bi-distilled water, trisodium citrate, and direct current voltage at room temperature. Colloidal AgNPs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray analyses. The antibacterial activity of colloidal AgNPs against four bacterial strains isolated from clinical samples, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli O157:H7, multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumonia, was evaluated by disc diffusion, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), and ultrathin sectioning electron microscopy. The results showed that the prepared AgNPs were 19.7 ± 4.3 nm in size, quasi-spherical, and of high purity. Zones of inhibition approximately 6-10 mm in diameter were found, corresponding to AgNPs concentrations of 50 μg/mL to 100 μg/mL. The MIC results revealed that the antibacterial activity of the prepared AgNPs was strongly dependent on the concentration and strain of the tested bacteria.

  6. Template-activated strategy toward one-step coating silica colloidal microspheres with sliver.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Zhang, Xiaoli; Niu, Chunyu; Wang, Yongqiang

    2014-01-22

    Template-activated strategy was developed to coat silica (SiO2) colloidal microspheres with silver in one step, based on one-pot hydrothermal treatment of silver nitrate, PVP (poly(vinyl pyrrolidone)), and SiO2 colloidal microspheres in ammonia solution. In our reaction system, the surface of SiO2 colloidal microspheres was continually activated with negative-charged SiO(-) groups in ammonia solution, which accumulated [Ag(NH3)2](+) or Ag(+) ions around the SiO2 colloidal microspheres through electrostatic attraction; thereafter these ions could be reduced into Ag nanoparticles in situ by the weak reducer PVP in the solution, and then acted as seeds for the subsequent complete silver coating with the reaction proceeding. Therefore, the traditional three steps for complete silver coating, including prior surface modification, seeding, and subsequent growing, were effectively integrated into one step. The experimental results exhibited that perfect SiO2/Ag core/shell composite microspheres were successfully synthesized through optimizing the reaction parameters like the solvent ingredient, reducer, and the reaction temperature. Additionally, these obtained uniform composite microspheres were further used as SERS substrate by using R6G and thiram as probe molecules, and showed excellent trace detection of these organic chemicals in solution.

  7. Preparation, characterisation and antibacterial activity of a florfenicol-loaded solid lipid nanoparticle suspension.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Chen, Xiaojin; Lu, Mengmeng; Li, Xihe; Zhou, WenZhong

    2015-12-01

    A florfenicol-loaded solid lipid nanoparticle (FFC-SLN) suspension was prepared by hot homogenisation and ultrasonic technique. The suspension was characterised for its release profile, stability, toxicity, and the physicochemical properties of the nanoparticles. Antibacterial activity of the suspension was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that the mean diameter, polydispersity index and zeta potential of the nanoparticles were 253 ± 3 nm, 0.409 ± 0.022 and 47.5 ± 0.21 mV, respectively. In vitro release profile showed the FFC-SLN suspension had sustained release effect. The minimum inhibition concentration values of the FFC-SLN suspension were 6 and 3 µg/mL against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli respectively, compared with 3.5 and 2 µg/mL of native florfenicol. The suspension was relatively stable at 4°C and less stable at room temperature during 9 months storage. Although the nanoparticle carriers exhibited cytotoxicity in cell cultures, the LD50 of the lyophilised dry power of the suspension was higher than 5 g/kg body weight. Mortality protection against E. coli lethal infection in mice showed that the nanoparticle suspension had much better efficacy (6/10) than native drug (1/10). These results indicate that FFC-SLN suspension could be a promising formulation in veterinary medicine.

  8. The study of the antimicrobial activity of colloidal solutions of silver nanoparticles prepared using food stabilizers.

    PubMed

    Balandin, G V; Suvorov, O A; Shaburova, L N; Podkopaev, D O; Frolova, Yu V; Ermolaeva, G A

    2015-06-01

    The bactericidal effect of colloidal solutions of silver nanoparticles based on food stabilizers, gum arabic and chitosan, against bacterial cultures of microorganisms in food production is described. The antibacterial activity of nanotechnology products containing different amounts of stabilizing additives when applied to solid pH-neutral substrates is studied. For its evaluation a method making it possible to take into account the capability of nanoparticles to diffuse in solid media was applied. Minimal inhibitory concentrations of nanoparticles used against Erwinia herbicola, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Bacillus subtilis, Sarcina flava were found. A suggestion was made concerning the influence of the spatial structure of bacteria on the antibacterial activity of colloidal solutions of silver nanoparticles. The data concerning the antibacterial activity and minimal inhibiting concentrations of nanoparticles may be used for development of products suppressing activity of microorganisms hazardous for food production.

  9. On-track tests of active vertical suspension on a passenger train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qazizadeh, Alireza; Persson, Rickard; Stichel, Sebastian

    2015-06-01

    The classic way to design the suspension of a rail vehicle is to use passive elements such as dampers and springs; however, as sensors and actuators are getting more affordable and reliable, their potential benefit in the suspension system is increasingly studied. Active suspension can be used to keep ride comfort at an acceptable level or even improve it, while allowing tougher operation conditions or usage of lighter carbodies. Tougher conditions could be interpreted as higher speed or lower track quality, and lighter carbody means higher level of elastic vibrations. This paper is focused on the implementation and tests of active vertical suspension on the secondary suspension of a high-speed passenger electric multiple unit using hydraulic actuators and the skyhook method as the controller. Results from on-track tests indicate large ride comfort improvements.

  10. Frequency analysis of a semi-active suspension with magneto-rheological dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronic, Florin; Mihai, Ioan; Suciu, Cornel; Beniuga, Marius

    2015-02-01

    Suspension systems for motor vehicles are constantly evolving in order to ensure vehicle stability and traffic safety under all driving conditions. The present work aims to highlight the influence factors in the case of a quarter car model for semi-active suspensions. The functions that must be met by such suspension systems are first presented. Mathematical models for passive systems are first illustrated and then customized for the semi-active case. A simulation diagram was conceived for Matlab Simulink. The obtained simulation results allow conducting a frequency analysis of the passive and semi-active cases of the quarter car model. Various charts for Passive Suspension Transmissibility and for the Effect of Damping on Vertical Acceleration Response were obtained for both passive and semi-active situations. Analysis of obtained results allowed evaluating of the suspension systems behavior and their frequency dependence. Significant differences were found between the behaviors of passive and semi-active suspensions. It was found that semi-active suspensions ensure damping in accordance to the chosen control method, and are much more efficient than passive ones.

  11. Semi-active sliding mode control of vehicle suspension with magneto-rheological damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hailong; Wang, Enrong; Zhang, Ning; Min, Fuhong; Subash, Rakheja; Su, Chunyi

    2015-01-01

    The vehicle semi-active suspension with magneto-rheological damper(MRD) has been a hot topic since this decade, in which the robust control synthesis considering load variation is a challenging task. In this paper, a new semi-active controller based upon the inverse model and sliding mode control (SMC) strategies is proposed for the quarter-vehicle suspension with the magneto-rheological (MR) damper, wherein an ideal skyhook suspension is employed as the control reference model and the vehicle sprung mass is considered as an uncertain parameter. According to the asymptotical stability of SMC, the dynamic errors between the plant and reference systems are used to derive the control damping force acquired by the MR quarter-vehicle suspension system. The proposed modified Bouc-wen hysteretic force-velocity ( F- v) model and its inverse model of MR damper, as well as the proposed continuous modulation (CM) filtering algorithm without phase shift are employed to convert the control damping force into the direct drive current of the MR damper. Moreover, the proposed semi-active sliding mode controller (SSMC)-based MR quarter-vehicle suspension is systematically evaluated through comparing the time and frequency domain responses of the sprung and unsprung mass displacement accelerations, suspension travel and the tire dynamic force with those of the passive quarter-vehicle suspension, under three kinds of varied amplitude harmonic, rounded pulse and real-road measured random excitations. The evaluation results illustrate that the proposed SSMC can greatly suppress the vehicle suspension vibration due to uncertainty of the load, and thus improve the ride comfort and handling safety. The study establishes a solid theoretical foundation as the universal control scheme for the adaptive semi-active control of the MR full-vehicle suspension decoupled into four MR quarter-vehicle sub-suspension systems.

  12. Nucleation and crystal growth in a suspension of charged colloidal silica spheres with bi-modal size distribution studied by time-resolved ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Hornfeck, Wolfgang; Menke, Dirk; Forthaus, Martin; Subatzus, Sebastian; Franke, Markus; Schöpe, Hans-Joachim; Palberg, Thomas; Perlich, Jan; Herlach, Dieter

    2014-12-07

    A suspension of charged colloidal silica spheres exhibiting a bi-modal size distribution of particles, thereby mimicking a binary mixture, was studied using time-resolved ultra-small-angle synchrotron X-ray scattering (USAXS). The sample, consisting of particles of diameters d(A) = (104.7 ± 9.0) nm and d(B) = (88.1 ± 7.8) nm (d(A)/d(B) ≈ 1.2), and with an estimated composition A(0.6(1))B(0.4(1)), was studied with respect to its phase behaviour in dependance of particle number density and interaction, of which the latter was modulated by varying amounts of added base (NaOH). Moreover, its short-range order in the fluid state and its eventual solidification into a long-range ordered colloidal crystal were observed in situ, allowing the measurement of the associated kinetics of nucleation and crystal growth. Key parameters of the nucleation kinetics such as crystallinity, crystallite number density, and nucleation rate density were extracted from the time-resolved scattering curves. By this means an estimate on the interfacial energy for the interface between the icosahedral short-range ordered fluid and a body-centered cubic colloidal crystal was obtained, comparable to previously determined values for single-component colloidal systems.

  13. Mycobactericidal activity of selected disinfectants using a quantitative suspension test.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, P A; Babb, J R; Fraise, A P

    1999-02-01

    In this study, a quantitative suspension test carried out under both clean and dirty conditions was used to assess the activity of various instrument and environmental disinfectants against the type strain NCTC 946 and an endoscope washer disinfector isolate of Mycobacterium chelonae, Mycobacterium fortuitum NCTC 10,394, Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37 Rv NCTC 7416 and a clinical isolate of Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI). The disinfectants tested were; a chlorine releasing agent, sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC) at 1000 ppm and 10,000 ppm av Cl; chlorine dioxide at 1100 ppm av ClO2 (Tristel, MediChem International Limited); 70% industrial methylated spirits (IMS); 2% alkaline glutaraldehyde (Asep, Galan); 10% succinedialdehyde and formaldehyde mixture (Gigasept, Schulke & Mayr); 0.35% peracetic acid (NuCidex, Johnson & Johnson); and a peroxygen compound at 1% and 3% (Virkon, Antec International). Results showed that the clinical isolate of MAI was much more resistant than M. tuberculosis to all the disinfectants, while the type strains of M. chelonae and M. fortuitum were far more sensitive. The washer disinfector isolate of M. chelonae was extremely resistant to 2% alkaline activated glutaraldehyde and appeared to be slightly more resistant than the type strain to Nu-Cidex, Gigasept, Virkon and the lower concentration of NaDCC. This study has shown peracetic acid (Nu-Cidex), chlorine dioxide (Tristel), alcohol (IMS) and high concentrations of a chlorine releasing agent (NaDCC) are rapidly mycobactericidal. Glutaraldehyde, although effective, is a slow mycobactericide. Gigasept and Virkon are poor mycobactericidal agents and are not therefore recommended for instruments or spillage if mycobacteria are likely to be present.

  14. Analysis of Semi-Active and Passive Suspensions System for Off-Road Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BenLahcene, Zohir; Faris, Waleed F.; Khan, M. D. Raisuddin

    2009-03-01

    The speed of off-road vehicles over rough terrain is generally determined by the ride quality not by the engine power. For this reason, researches are currently being undertaking to improve the ride dynamics of these vehicles using an advanced suspension system. This study intends to provide a preliminary evaluation of whether semi-active suspensions are beneficial to improving ride and handling in off-road vehicles. One of the greatest challenges in designing off-road vehicle suspension system is maintaining a good balance between vehicle ride and handling. Three configurations of these vehicles; 2-axle, 3-xle and 4-axles have been studied and their performances are compared. The application of several control policies of semi-active suspension system, namely skyhook; ground-hook and hybrid controls have been analyzed and compared with passive systems. The results show that the hybrid control policy yields better comfort than a passive suspension, without reducing the road-holding quality or increasing the suspension displacement. The hybrid control policy is also shown to be a better compromise between comfort, road-holding and suspension displacement than the skyhook and ground-hook control policies. Results show an improvement in ride comfort and vehicle handling using 4-axle over 3-axle and 2-axle when emphasis is placed on the response of the vehicle body acceleration, suspension and tyre deflection.

  15. Disturbance observer based sliding mode control of active suspension systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Vaijayanti S.; Mohan, B.; Shendge, P. D.; Phadke, S. B.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, a novel scheme to reduce the acceleration of the sprung mass, used in combination with sliding mode control, is proposed. The proposed scheme estimates the effects of the uncertain, nonlinear spring and damper, load variation and the unknown road disturbance. The controller needs the states of sprung mass only, obviating the need to measure the states of the unsprung mass. The ultimate boundedness of the overall suspension system is proved. The efficacy of the method is verified through simulations for three different types of road profiles and load variation and the scheme is validated on an experimental setup. The results are compared with passive suspension system.

  16. Using active colloids as machines to weave and braid on the micrometer scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodrich, Carl P.; Brenner, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    Controlling motion at the microscopic scale is a fundamental goal in the development of biologically inspired systems. We show that the motion of active, self-propelled colloids can be sufficiently controlled for use as a tool to assemble complex structures such as braids and weaves out of microscopic filaments. Unlike typical self-assembly paradigms, these structures are held together by geometric constraints rather than adhesive bonds. The out-of-equilibrium assembly that we propose involves precisely controlling the 2D motion of active colloids so that their path has a nontrivial topology. We demonstrate with proof-of-principle Brownian dynamics simulations that, when the colloids are attached to long semiflexible filaments, this motion causes the filaments to braid. The ability of the active particles to provide sufficient force necessary to bend the filaments into a braid depends on a number of factors, including the self-propulsion mechanism, the properties of the filament, and the maximum curvature in the braid. Our work demonstrates that nonequilibrium assembly pathways can be designed using active particles.

  17. UV-shielding property, photocatalytic activity and photocytotoxicity of ceria colloid solutions.

    PubMed

    Zholobak, N M; Ivanov, V K; Shcherbakov, A B; Shaporev, A S; Polezhaeva, O S; Baranchikov, A Ye; Spivak, N Ya; Tretyakov, Yu D

    2011-01-10

    UV-shielding property, photocatalytic activity and cytotoxicity (including photocytotoxicity) of citrate-stabilized ceria colloid solutions were studied. It was established that UV-shielding property (namely, the sun protection factor, the critical absorption wavelength and the UVA/UVB-ratio) of ceria nanoparticles are as good as those of titanium dioxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles. It was further demonstrated that ceria nanoparticles possesses substantially lower photocatalytic activity, which additionally decreases upon decrease in ceria particle size. It was found that colloid ceria solutions are non-toxic to mouse fibroblasts (L929) and fibroblast-like cells of African Green monkey (VERO). Moreover, ceria nanoparticles are capable to protect these cells from UV-irradiation-induced damage. It was proposed that nanocrystalline ceria could be used not only as UV-blocking material, but also as prophylactic and even therapeutic compound for sunburns treatment.

  18. The liquidlike ordering of lipid A-diphosphate colloidal crystals: the influence of Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, and K+ on the ordering of colloidal suspensions of lipid A-diphosphate in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Faunce, C A; Reichelt, H; Paradies, H H; Quitschau, P; Zimmermann, K

    2005-06-01

    microM) influenced the structure much more than Na+ (0.1-10.0-mM NaCl) or Mg2+ (50 microM). By comparing the heights and positions of the structure factor peaks S(Q) for lipid A-diphosphate-Na+ and lipid A-diphosphate-Ca2+, it was concluded that the structure factor does not depend simply on ionic strength but more importantly on the internal structural arrangements of the lipid A-diphosphate assembly in the presence of the bound cations. The liquidlike interactions revealed a considerable degree of ordering in solution accounting for the primary S(Q) peak and also the secondary minimum at large particle separation. The ordering of lipid A-diphosphate-Ca2+ colloidal crystals in suspension showed six to seven discrete diffraction peaks and revealed a face-centered-cubic (fcc) lattice type (a=56.3 nm) at a volume fraction of 3.2 x 10(-4)< or =phi< or =3.9 x 10(-4). The K+ salt also exhibited a fcc lattice (a=55.92 nm) at the same volume fractions, but reveals a different peak intensity distribution, as seen for the lipid A-diphosphate-Ca2+ salt. However, the Mg2+ and the Na+ salts of lipid A-diphosphate showed body-centered-cubic (bcc) lattices with a=45.50 nm and a=41.50 nm, respectively (3.2 x 10(-4)< or =phi< or =3.9 x 10(-4)), displaying the same intensity distribution with the exception of the (220) diffraction peaks, which differ in intensity for both salts of lipid A-diphosphate.

  19. Physics of Colloids in Space: Microgravity Experiment Launched, Installed, and Activated on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, Michael P.

    2002-01-01

    The Physics of Colloids in Space (PCS) experiment is a Microgravity Fluids Physics investigation that is presently located in an Expedite the Process of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) Rack on the International Space Station. PCS was launched to the International Space Station on April 19, 2001, activated on May 31, 2001, and will continue to operate about 90 hr per week through May 2002.

  20. Impact-activated solidification of cornstarch and water suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waitukaitis, Scott Russell

    Liquids typically offer little resistance to impacting objects . Surprisingly, dense suspensions of liquids mixed with micron-sized particles can provide tremendous impact resistance, even though they appear liquid like when left at rest or perturbed lightly. The most well-known example is a dense mixture of cornstarch and water, which can easily provide enough impact resistance to allow a full-grown person to run across its surface. Previous studies have linked this so-called ``shear thickening'' to experiments carried out under steady state shear and attributed it to hydrodynamic interactions or granular dilation. However, neither of these explanations alone can account for the stress scales required to keep a running person above the free surface. This thesis investigates the mechanism for this impact resistance in dense suspensions. We begin by studying impact directly and watching a rod as it strikes the surface of a dense suspension of cornstarch and water. Using high-speed video and embedded force and acceleration sensing, we show that the rod motion leads to the rapid growth of a solid-like object below the impact site. With X-ray videography to see the dynamics of the suspension interior and laser sheet measurements of the surface profile, we show how this solid drags on the surrounding suspension, creating substantial peripheral flow and leading to the rapid extraction of the impactor's momentum. Suspecting that the solidification below the rod may be related to jamming of the particle sub-phase, we carry out 2D experiments with macroscopic disks to show how uniaxial compression of an initially unjammed system can lead to dynamic jamming fronts. In doing so, we show how these fronts are sensitive to the system's initial packing fraction relative to the point at which it jams and also discover that the widths of these fronts are related to a diverging correlation length. Finally, we take these results back to the suspension, where we perform careful, speed

  1. UV and visible light active aqueous titanium dioxide colloids stabilized by surfactants.

    PubMed

    Pacia, Michał; Warszyński, Piotr; Macyk, Wojciech

    2014-09-07

    Attempts to increase the stability of photocatalytically active nanodispersions of titanium dioxide over a wide range of pH (3-10) were undertaken. Polyethylene glycols (PEGs) with different molecular weights and polyoxyethylenesorbitan monooleate (Tween® 80) were tested as stabilizing agents of TiO2 nanoparticles. The results of DLS measurements proved the stabilizing effect of Tween® 80 while the systems involving PEGs, independently of the polymer concentration, showed a tendency to form aggregates in neutral solutions. The colloids stabilized with Tween® 80 were photosensitized with 2,3-naphthalenediol (nd) or 2-hydroxy-3-naphthoic acid (hn) or catechol (cat). The photocatalytic activity of such colloids has been assessed in an azure B degradation reaction using both UV and visible light. The nd@TiO2 + Tween colloid appeared particularly photoactive upon visible light irradiation. Moreover, the comparison of activities of nd@TiO2 + Tween and TiO2 + Tween revealed a significantly better performance of the former nanodispersion, independently of the irradiation conditions (UV or visible light). This effect has been explained by different structures of micelles formed in the case of TiO2 and nd@TiO2 stabilized with Tween® 80.

  2. Vibration control of a nonlinear quarter-car active suspension system by reinforcement learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucak, İ. Ö.; Öz, H. R.

    2012-06-01

    This article presents the investigation of performance of a nonlinear quarter-car active suspension system with a stochastic real-valued reinforcement learning control strategy. As an example, a model of a quarter car with a nonlinear suspension spring subjected to excitation from a road profile is considered. The excitation is realised by the roughness of the road. The quarter-car model to be considered here can be approximately described as a nonlinear two degrees of freedom system. The experimental results indicate that the proposed active suspension system suppresses the vibrations greatly. A simulation of a nonlinear quarter-car active suspension system is presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and examine the performance of the learning control algorithm.

  3. Transport of Intrinsic Plutonium Colloids in Saturated Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, D.; Abdel-Fattah, A.; Boukhalfa, H.; Ware, S. D.; Tarimala, S.; Keller, A. A.

    2011-12-01

    Actinide contaminants were introduced to the subsurface environment as a result of nuclear weapons development and testing, as well as for nuclear power generation and related research activities for defense and civilian applications. Even though most actinide species were believed to be fairly immobile once in the subsurface, recent studies have shown the transport of actinides kilometers away from their disposal sites. For example, the treated liquid wastes released into Mortandad Canyon at the Los Alamos National Laboratory were predicted to travel less than a few meters; however, plutonium and americium have been detected 3.4 km away from the waste outfall. A colloid-facilitated mechanism has been suggested to account for this unexpected transport of these radioactive wastes. Clays, oxides, organic matters, and actinide hydroxides have all been proposed as the possible mobile phase. Pu ions associated with natural colloids are often referred to as pseudo-Pu colloids, in contrast with the intrinsic Pu colloids that consist of Pu oxides. Significant efforts have been made to investigate the role of pseudo-Pu colloids, while few studies have evaluated the environmental behavior of the intrinsic Pu colloids. Given the fact that Pu (IV) has extremely low solubility product constant, it can be inferred that the transport of Pu in the intrinsic form is highly likely at suitable environmental conditions. This study investigates the transport of intrinsic Pu colloids in a saturated alluvium material packed in a cylindrical column (2.5-cm Dia. x 30-cm high) and compares the results to previous data on the transport of pseudo Pu colloids in the same material. A procedure to prepare a stable intrinsic Pu colloid suspension that produced consistent and reproducible electrokinetic and stability data was developed. Electrokinetic properties and aggregation stability were characterized. The Pu colloids, together with trillium as a conservative tracer, were injected into the

  4. Active colloids at liquid-liquid interfaces: dynamic self-assembly and functionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snezhko, Alexey; Aranson, Igor

    2012-02-01

    Self-assembled materials must actively consume energy and remain out of equilibrium in order to support structural complexity and functional diversity. Colloids of interacting particles suspended at liquid-liquid interfaces and maintained out of equilibrium by external alternating electromagnetic fields develop nontrivial collective dynamics and self-assembly. We use ferromagnetic colloidal micro-particles (so the magnetic moment is fixed in each particle and interactions between colloids is highly anisotropic and directional) suspended over an interface of two immiscible liquids and energized by vertical alternating magnetic fields to demonstrate novel dynamic and active self-assembled structures (``asters'') which are not accessible through thermodynamic assembly. Structures are attributed to the interplay between surface waves, generated at the liquid/liquid interface by the collective response of magnetic microparticles to the alternating magnetic field, and hydrodynamic fields induced in the boundary layers of both liquids forming the interface. Two types of magnetic order are reported. We demonstrate that asters develop self-propulsion in the presence of a small in-plane dc magnetic field. We show that asters can capture, transport, and position target microparticles.

  5. Tuning the morphology, stability and photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2} nanocrystal colloids by tungsten doping

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Haiping; Liao, Jianhua; Yuan, Shuai; Zhao, Yin; Zhang, Meihong; Wang, Zhuyi; Shi, Liyi

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • W{sup 6+}-doped TiO{sub 2} nanocrystal colloids were prepared by hydrothermal methods. • The properties of TiO{sub 2} nanocrystal colloids can be tuned by tungsten doping. • W{sup 6+}-doped TiO{sub 2} nanocrystal colloids show higher stability and dispersity. • W{sup 6+}-doped TiO{sub 2} nanocrystal colloids show higher photocatalytic activity. - Abstract: The effects of tungsten doping on the morphology, stability and photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2} nanocrystal colloids were investigated. The nanostructure, chemical state of Ti, W, O, and the properties of tungsten doped TiO{sub 2} samples were investigated carefully by TEM, XRD, XPS, UV–vis, PL and photocatalytic degradation experiments. And the structure–activity relationship was discussed according to the analysis and measurement results. The analysis results reveal that the morphology, zeta potential and photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals can be easily tuned by changing the tungsten doping concentration. The tungsten doped TiO{sub 2} colloid combines the characters of high dispersity and high photocatalytic activity.

  6. Modeling of Semi-Active Vehicle Suspension with Magnetorhological Damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasa, Richard; Danko, Ján; Milesich, Tomáš; Magdolen, Ľuboš

    2014-12-01

    Modeling of suspension is a current topic. Vehicle users require both greater driving comfort and safety. There is a space to invent new technologies like magnetorheological dampers and their control systems to increase these conflicting requirements. Magnetorheological dampers are reliably mathematically described by parametric and nonparametric models. Therefore they are able to reliably simulate the driving mode of the vehicle. These simulations are important for automotive engineers to increase vehicle safety and passenger comfort.

  7. Influence of iron solubility and charged surface-active compounds on lipid oxidation in fatty acid ethyl esters containing association colloids.

    PubMed

    Homma, Rika; Johnson, David R; McClements, D Julian; Decker, Eric A

    2016-05-15

    The impact of iron compounds with different solubilities on lipid oxidation was studied in the presence and absence of association colloids. Iron (III) sulfate only accelerated lipid oxidation in the presence of association colloids while iron (III) oleate accelerated oxidation in the presence and absence of association colloids. Further, iron (III) oxide retarded lipid oxidation both with and without association colloids. The impact of charged association colloids on lipid oxidation in ethyl oleate was also investigated. Association colloids consisting of the anionic surface-active compound dodecyl sulphosuccinate sodium salt (AOT), cationic surface-active compound hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), and nonionic surface-active compound 4-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl)phenyl-polyethylene glycol (Triton X-100) retarded, promoted, and had no effect on lipid oxidation rates, respectively. These results indicate that the polarity of metal compounds and the charge of association colloids play a big role in lipid oxidation.

  8. Active dynamics of colloidal particles in time-varying laser speckle patterns

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Silvio; Pruner, Riccardo; Vizsnyiczai, Gaszton; Maggi, Claudio; Di Leonardo, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Colloidal particles immersed in a dynamic speckle pattern experience an optical force that fluctuates both in space and time. The resulting dynamics presents many interesting analogies with a broad class of non-equilibrium systems like: active colloids, self propelled microorganisms, transport in dynamical intracellular environments. Here we show that the use of a spatial light modulator allows to generate light fields that fluctuate with controllable space and time correlations and a prescribed average intensity profile. In particular we generate ring-shaped random patterns that can confine a colloidal particle over a quasi one-dimensional random energy landscape. We find a mean square displacement that is diffusive at both short and long times, while a superdiffusive or subdiffusive behavior is observed at intermediate times depending on the value of the speckles correlation time. We propose two alternative models for the mean square displacement in the two limiting cases of a short or long speckles correlation time. A simple interpolation formula is shown to account for the full phenomenology observed in the mean square displacement across the entire range from fast to slow fluctuating speckles. PMID:27279540

  9. Wall-induced self-diffusiophoresis of active isotropic colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yariv, Ehud

    2016-07-01

    While chemically active homogeneous spherical particles do not undergo self-diffusiophoresis in free solution, they may do so when suspended in the vicinity of a solid boundary. We explore this possibility using a first-order kinetic model of solute absorption, where the relative magnitude of reaction to diffusion is characterized by the Damköhler number Da . When the particle is remote from the wall, it is repelled from it with a velocity that scales inversely with the square of distance. The opposite extreme, when the ratio δ of separation distance to particle size is small, results in the anomalous scaling δ√{1/+2 Da }-1 2 of the solute concentration in the narrow gap separating the particle and wall. This irrational power may only be obtained by asymptotic matching with solute transport outside the gap. For Da <4 the self-propulsion speed possesses the same scaling, being set by the large pressures forming in the gap through a lubrication-type mechanism. For Da >4 the particle velocity is O (δ ) , set by the flow in the region outside the gap. Solute advection is subdominant to diffusion in both the remote and near-contact limits and accordingly affects neither the above scaling nor the resulting approximations.

  10. Wall-induced self-diffusiophoresis of active isotropic colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yariv, Ehud

    2016-11-01

    While chemically-active homogeneous spherical particles do not undergo self-diffusiophoresis in free solution, they may do so when suspended in the vicinity of a solid boundary. We explore this possibility using a first-order kinetic model of solute absorption, where the relative magnitude of reaction to diffusion is characterized by the Damkohler number Da. When the particle is remote from the wall, it is repelled from it with a velocity that scales inversely with the square of distance. The opposite extreme, when the ratio δ of separation distance to particle size is small, results in the anomalous scaling δ √{/1 + 2 Da } - 1 2 of the solute concentration in the narrow gap separating the particle and wall. This irrational power may only be obtained by asymptotic matching with solute transport outside the gap. For Da < 4 the self-propulsion speed possesses the same scaling, being set by the large pressures forming in the gap through a lubrication-type mechanism. For Da > 4 the particle velocity is O (δ) , set by the flow in the region outside outside the gap. Solute advection is subdominant to diffusion in both the remote and near-contact limits, and accordingly affects neither the above scaling nor the resulting approximations.

  11. [Hydro-colloidal dressings which release hydro-active silver].

    PubMed

    Serra, N; Torres, O G; Romo, M I; Llovera, J M; Vigil-Escalera, L J; Soto, M A; González-Parra, S

    2005-02-01

    The study presented is a multicentric, prospective, open and comparative study designed with the objective of evaluating the performance of an antibacterial hydrocolloid dressing with hydroactivated silver (Comfeel Plata), when used to activate the healing process in wounds with high bacterial load, clinical signs of infection or malodour. Additionally, once the wound bed was appropriately prepared, a comparison in terms of efficacy was made between, on the one hand, continued treatment with the antibacterial hydrocolloid dressing, and, on the other hand, continued treatment with other dressings specifically designed for the proliferative phase of healing. Included into this study were 43 patients with chronic ulcers who were divided into two parallel treatment groups: In one group, Comfeel Plata (Coloplast AIS) was used until complete wound healing or for a maximum of 10-12 weeks, and in the second group Comfeel Plata (Coloplast A/S) was used until a clean wound bed was obtained and until the wound showed signs of positive evolution, at which moment the treatment was continued until complete healing or for a maximum of 10-12 weeks with dressings without silver designed especially for the proliferative phase of healing [Alione, Comfeel or Biatain (Coloplast AIS)]. The results obtained from the various study parameters indicate that the use of Comfeel Plata in the treatment of infected or colonized wounds prepares the wound bed and facilitates more rapid healing, and that the use of Comfeel Plata effectively reduces pain and malodour. The results indicate that once a clean wound bed is obtained, the use of a dressing without silver specifically for the proliferative phase will facilitate healing.

  12. Irreversible shear-activated aggregation in non-Brownian suspensions.

    PubMed

    Guery, J; Bertrand, E; Rouzeau, C; Levitz, P; Weitz, D A; Bibette, J

    2006-05-19

    We have studied the effect of shear on the stability of suspensions made of non-Brownian solid particles. We demonstrate the existence of an irreversible transition where the solid particles aggregate at remarkably low volume fractions (phi approximately 0.1). This shear-induced aggregation is dramatic and exhibits a very sudden change in the viscosity, which increases sharply after a shear-dependent induction time. We show that this induction time is related exponentially to the shear rate, reflecting the importance of the hydrodynamic forces in reducing the repulsive energy barrier that prevents the particles from aggregating.

  13. Vehicle active suspension system using skyhook adaptive neuro active force control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyandoko, G.; Mailah, M.; Jamaluddin, H.

    2009-04-01

    This paper aims to highlight the practical viability of a new and novel hybrid control technique applied to a vehicle active suspension system of a quarter car model using skyhook and adaptive neuro active force control (SANAFC). The overall control system essentially comprises four feedback control loops, namely the innermost proportional-integral (PI) control loop for the force tracking of the pneumatic actuator, the intermediate skyhook and active force control (AFC) control loops for the compensation of the disturbances and the outermost proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control loop for the computation of the optimum target/commanded force. A neural network (NN) with a modified adaptive Levenberg-Marquardt learning algorithm was used to approximate the estimated mass and inverse dynamics of the pneumatic actuator in the AFC loop. A number of experiments were carried out on a physical test rig using a hardware-in-the-loop configuration that fully incorporates the theoretical elements. The performance of the proposed control method was evaluated and compared to examine the effectiveness of the system in suppressing the vibration effect on the suspension system. It was found that the simulation and experimental results were in good agreement, particularly for the sprung mass displacement and acceleration behaviours in which the proposed SANAFC scheme is found to outperform the PID and passive counterparts.

  14. Hydraulic actuation technology for full- and semi-active railway suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodall, Roger; Freudenthaler, Gerhard; Dixon, Roger

    2014-12-01

    The paper describes a simulation study that provides a comprehensive comparison between full-active and semi-active suspensions for improving the vertical ride quality of railway vehicles. It includes an assessment of the ride quality benefits that can theoretically be achieved with idealised devices, and also examines the impact of real devices based upon hydraulic actuation technology.

  15. A semi-active control suspension system for railway vehicles with magnetorheological fluid dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiukun; Zhu, Ming; Jia, Limin

    2016-07-01

    The high-speed train has achieved great progress in the last decades. It is one of the most important modes of transportation between cities. With the rapid development of the high-speed train, its safety issue is paid much more attention than ever before. To improve the stability of the vehicle with high speed, extra dampers (i.e. anti-hunting damper) are used in the traditional bogies with passive suspension system. However, the curving performance of the vehicle is undermined due to the extra lateral force generated by the dampers. The active suspension systems proposed in the last decades attempt to solve the vehicle steering issue. However, the active suspension systems need extra actuators driven by electrical power or hydraulic power. There are some implementation and even safety issues which are not easy to be overcome. In this paper, an innovative semi-active controlled lateral suspension system for railway vehicles is proposed. Four magnetorheological fluid dampers are fixed to the primary suspension system of each bogie. They are controlled by online controllers for enhancing the running stability on the straight track line on the one hand and further improving the curving performance by controlling the damper force on the other hand. Two control strategies are proposed in the light of the pure rolling concept. The effectiveness of the proposed strategies is demonstrated by SIMPACK and Matlab co-simulation for a full railway vehicle with two conventional bogies.

  16. Influence of naturally occurring dissolved organic matter, colloids, and cations on nanofiltration of pharmaceutically active and endocrine disrupting compounds.

    PubMed

    Sadmani, A H M Anwar; Andrews, Robert C; Bagley, David M

    2014-12-01

    This study examined the rejection of selected pharmaceutically active (PhAC) and endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) when using nanofiltration as a function of naturally occurring dissolved organic matter (DOM), colloidal particles, cations and their interactions. Lake Ontario water served as a source of natural DOM and colloidal particles. PhAC/EDC rejection experiments were conducted using raw Lake Ontario water and Lake Ontario water that was pre-treated with either ultrafiltration to remove colloidal particles, or fluidized ion exchange resins to remove DOM. Additionally, the concentration of cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and Na(+)) in the raw and pre-treated water matrices was varied. While ionic PhACs and EDCs exhibited high rejections from all the water matrices examined, neutral compounds were most effectively rejected in water containing DOM and no colloids, and least effectively rejected from colloid-containing water with increased cations but no DOM. The presence of DOM significantly improved compound rejection and the increase in cation concentration significantly decreased rejection. The presence of colloids had comparatively little effect except to mitigate the impact of increased cation concentration, apparently providing some cation-buffering capacity. The sequence in which constituents are removed from waters during treatment may significantly impact PhAC and EDC removal, especially of neutral compounds.

  17. Magnetic manipulation of self-assembled colloidal asters.

    SciTech Connect

    Snezhko, A.; Aranson, I. S.

    2011-09-01

    Self-assembled materials must actively consume energy and remain out of equilibrium to support structural complexity and functional diversity. Here we show that a magnetic colloidal suspension confined at the interface between two immiscible liquids and energized by an alternating magnetic field dynamically self-assembles into localized asters and arrays of asters, which exhibit locomotion and shape change. By controlling a small external magnetic field applied parallel to the interface, we show that asters can capture, transport, and position target microparticles. The ability to manipulate colloidal structures is crucial for the further development of self-assembled microrobots

  18. Magnetic manipulation of self-assembled colloidal asters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snezhko, Alexey; Aranson, Igor S.

    2011-09-01

    Self-assembled materials must actively consume energy and remain out of equilibrium to support structural complexity and functional diversity. Here we show that a magnetic colloidal suspension confined at the interface between two immiscible liquids and energized by an alternating magnetic field dynamically self-assembles into localized asters and arrays of asters, which exhibit locomotion and shape change. By controlling a small external magnetic field applied parallel to the interface, we show that asters can capture, transport, and position target microparticles. The ability to manipulate colloidal structures is crucial for the further development of self-assembled microrobots.

  19. Magnetic manipulation of self-assembled colloidal asters.

    PubMed

    Snezhko, Alexey; Aranson, Igor S

    2011-08-07

    Self-assembled materials must actively consume energy and remain out of equilibrium to support structural complexity and functional diversity. Here we show that a magnetic colloidal suspension confined at the interface between two immiscible liquids and energized by an alternating magnetic field dynamically self-assembles into localized asters and arrays of asters, which exhibit locomotion and shape change. By controlling a small external magnetic field applied parallel to the interface, we show that asters can capture, transport, and position target microparticles. The ability to manipulate colloidal structures is crucial for the further development of self-assembled microrobots.

  20. Increasing entropy for colloidal stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Songping; Shao, Xuefeng; Chen, Ying; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2016-01-01

    Stability is of paramount importance in colloidal applications. Attraction between colloidal particles is believed to lead to particle aggregation and phase separation; hence, stability improvement can be achieved through either increasing repulsion or reducing attraction by modifying the fluid medium or by using additives. Two traditional mechanisms for colloidal stability are electrostatic stabilization and steric stabilization. However, stability improvement by mixing attractive and unstable particles has rarely been considered. Here, we emphasize the function of mixing entropy in colloidal stabilization. Dispersion stability improvement is demonstrated by mixing suspensions of attractive nanosized titania spheres and platelets. A three-dimensional phase diagram is proposed to illustrate the collaborative effects of particle mixing and particle attraction on colloidal stability. This discovery provides a novel method for enhancing colloidal stability and opens a novel opportunity for engineering applications. PMID:27872473

  1. Increasing entropy for colloidal stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Songping; Shao, Xuefeng; Chen, Ying; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2016-11-01

    Stability is of paramount importance in colloidal applications. Attraction between colloidal particles is believed to lead to particle aggregation and phase separation; hence, stability improvement can be achieved through either increasing repulsion or reducing attraction by modifying the fluid medium or by using additives. Two traditional mechanisms for colloidal stability are electrostatic stabilization and steric stabilization. However, stability improvement by mixing attractive and unstable particles has rarely been considered. Here, we emphasize the function of mixing entropy in colloidal stabilization. Dispersion stability improvement is demonstrated by mixing suspensions of attractive nanosized titania spheres and platelets. A three-dimensional phase diagram is proposed to illustrate the collaborative effects of particle mixing and particle attraction on colloidal stability. This discovery provides a novel method for enhancing colloidal stability and opens a novel opportunity for engineering applications.

  2. Development of a simulation model of semi-active suspension for monorail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasnan, K.; Didane, D. H.; Kamarudin, M. A.; Bakhsh, Qadir; Abdulmalik, R. E.

    2016-11-01

    The new Kuala Lumpur Monorail Fleet Expansion Project (KLMFEP) uses semiactive technology in its suspension system. It is recognized that the suspension system influences the ride quality. Thus, among the way to further improve the ride quality is by fine- tuning the semi-active suspension system on the new KL Monorail. The semi-active suspension for the monorail specifically in terms of improving ride quality could be exploited further. Hence a simulation model which will act as a platform to test the design of a complete suspension system particularly to investigate the ride comfort performance is required. MSC Adams software was considered as the tool to develop the simulation platform, where all parameters and data are represented by mathematical equations; whereas the new KL Monorail being the reference model. In the simulation, the model went through step disturbance on the guideway for stability and ride comfort analysis. The model has shown positive results where the monorail is in stable condition as an outcome from stability analysis. The model also scores a Rating 1 classification in ISO 2631 Ride Comfort performance which is very comfortable as an overall outcome from ride comfort analysis. The model is also adjustable, flexibile and understandable by the engineers within the field for the purpose of further development.

  3. Field dependence of the dynamic properties of colloidal suspensions of Mn 0.66Zn 0.34Fe 2O 4 and Ni 0.5Zn 0.5Fe 2O 4 particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fannin, P. C.; Charles, S. W.; Dormann, J. L.

    1999-07-01

    Results of the magnetic field dependence of the complex susceptibility, of colloidal suspensions of Mn 0.66Zn 0.34Fe 2O 4 and Ni 0.5Zn 0.5Fe 2O 4 particles in a polarising magnetic field, H, covering the range 0-116 kA m -1 are presented. Ferromagnetic resonance is observed for both samples and from plots of the dependence of the resonant frequency fres on polarising field, average values of anisotropy field, H¯A, and anisotropy constant, K¯, are determined. In the case of the Ni 0.5Zn 0.5Fe 20 4 sample the variation in the ferromagnetic linewidth as a function of increasing polarising field shows a steady monotonic increase in contrast to that of the manganese zinc ferrite sample. This effect is attributed to the influence of the polarising field on the local canted structure.

  4. Kinetic arrest, dynamical transitions, and activated relaxation in dense fluids of attractive nonspherical colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Schweizer, Kenneth S.

    2011-06-01

    The coupled translation-rotation activated dynamics in dense suspensions of attractive homogeneous and Janus uniaxial dicolloids are studied using microscopic statistical mechanical theory. Multiple kinetic arrest transitions and reentrant phenomena are predicted that are associated with fluid, gel, repulsive glass, attractive glass, plastic glass, and novel glass-gel states. The activated relaxation rate is a nonuniversal nonmonotonic function of attraction strength at high volume fractions due to the consequences of a change of the transient localization mechanism from caging to physical bonding.

  5. Enhanced photocatalytic activity and stability of alumina supported hematite for azo-dye degradation in aerated aqueous suspension.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Sheng, Jiayi; Wang, Yan; Xu, Yiming

    2013-06-15

    Silica supported hematite (Fe2O3/silica) that is more active but less stable than the supported hematite for organic photodegradation in aqueous solution has been reported. In this work, we report on alumina supported hematite (Fe2O3/alumina) with significantly improved activity and stability. The catalysts were prepared by mixing alumina with a pre-made colloidal iron oxide at various loading (0-100 wt %), followed by sintering at different temperatures (200-900 °C). Solid characterization with X-ray diffraction and N2 adsorption showed that hematite particles were small in size, and large in surface area, as compared with the unsupported hematite prepared in parallel. The catalyst activity was evaluated with anionic Orange II as a model substrate, and the reaction was carried out in aerated aqueous suspension under light irradiation at wavelengths longer than 320 nm. As the Fe2O3 loading on alumina or the catalyst sintering temperature increased, the apparent rate constant of dye degradation increased, and then decreased. The maximum rate of dye degradation was obtained with 25 wt % Fe2O3/alumina, sintered at 400 °C. Moreover, five consecutive experiments for dye photodegradation showed that Fe2O3/alumina was much more stable than Fe2O3/silica, due to alumina that has a positively charged surface and thus facilitates the dissolved iron species back onto iron oxide. The higher activity of Fe2O3/alumina than Fe2O3/silica and bare hematite is ascribed to the combined effect between the reduced particle size of hematite and the enhanced surface adsorption of dye on the catalyst.

  6. A 2D suspension of active agents: the role of fluid mediated interactions.

    PubMed

    Behmadi, Hojjat; Fazli, Zahra; Najafi, Ali

    2017-03-22

    Taking into account both the Vicsek short-range ordering and the far-field hydrodynamic interactions mediated by the ambient fluid, we investigate the role of long-range interactions in the ordering phenomena in a quasi 2-dimensional active suspension. By studying the number fluctuations, the velocity correlation functions and cluster size distribution function, we show that depending on the number density of swimmers and the strength of noise, the hydrodynamic interactions can have significant effects in a suspension. For a fixed value of noise, at larger density of particles, long-range interactions enhance the particle pairing and cluster formation in the system.

  7. Nonlinear rheology of active particle suspensions: insights from an analytical approach.

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, Sebastian; Hess, Siegfried; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2011-01-01

    We consider active suspensions in the isotropic phase subjected to a shear flow. Using a set of extended hydrodynamic equations we derive a variety of analytical expressions for rheological quantities such as shear viscosity and normal stress differences. In agreement to full-blown numerical calculations and experiments we find a shear-thickening or -thinning behavior depending on whether the particles are contractile or extensile. Moreover, our analytical approach predicts that the normal stress differences can change their sign in contrast to passive suspensions.

  8. A 2D suspension of active agents: the role of fluid mediated interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behmadi, Hojjat; Fazli, Zahra; Najafi, Ali

    2017-03-01

    Taking into account both the Vicsek short-range ordering and the far-field hydrodynamic interactions mediated by the ambient fluid, we investigate the role of long-range interactions in the ordering phenomena in a quasi 2-dimensional active suspension. By studying the number fluctuations, the velocity correlation functions and cluster size distribution function, we show that depending on the number density of swimmers and the strength of noise, the hydrodynamic interactions can have significant effects in a suspension. For a fixed value of noise, at larger density of particles, long-range interactions enhance the particle pairing and cluster formation in the system.

  9. Fe-Impregnated Mineral Colloids for Peroxide Activation: Effects of Mineral Substrate and Fe Precursor.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Machala, Libor; Yan, Weile

    2016-02-02

    Heterogeneous iron species at the mineral/water interface are important catalysts for the generation of reactive oxygen species at circumneutral pH. One significant pathway leading to the formation of such species arises from deposition of dissolved iron onto mineral colloids due to changes in redox conditions. This study investigates the catalytic properties of Fe impregnated on silica, alumina, and titania nanoparticles (as prototypical mineral colloids). Fe impregnation was carried out by immersing the mineral nanoparticles in dilute Fe(II) or Fe(III) solutions at pH 6 and 3, respectively, in an aerobic environment. The uptake of iron per unit surface area follows the order of nTiO2 > nAl2O3 > nSiO2 for both types of Fe precursors. Impregnation of mineral particles in Fe(II) solutions results in predominantly Fe(III) species due to efficient surface-mediated oxidation. The catalytic activity of the impregnated solids to produce hydroxyl radical (·OH) from H2O2 decomposition was evaluated using benzoic acid as a probe compound under dark conditions. Invariably, the rates of benzoic acid oxidation with different Fe-laden particles increase with the surface density of Fe until a critical density above which the catalytic activity approaches a plateau, suggesting active Fe species are formed predominantly at low surface loadings. The critical surface density of Fe varies with the mineral substrate as well as the aqueous Fe precursor. Fe impregnated on TiO2 exhibits markedly higher activity than its Al2O3 and SiO2 counterparts. The speciation of interfacial Fe is analyzed with diffuse reflectance UV-vis analysis and interpretation of the data in the context of benzoic oxidation rates suggests that the surface activity of the solids for ·OH generation correlates strongly with the isolated (i.e., mononuclear) Fe species. Therefore, iron dispersed on mineral colloids is a significant form of reactive iron surfaces in the aquatic environment.

  10. Sliding-mode control for semi-active suspension with actuator dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bo-Chiuan; Shiu, Yu-Hua; Hsieh, Feng-Chi

    2011-02-01

    A sliding-mode controller (SMC) is proposed for semi-active suspensions to achieve ride comfort and handling performance simultaneously. First, a nonlinear quarter-car model of Macpherson strut suspension is established in Matlab/Simulink. Constrained damper force and actuator dynamics are considered for the damper model. System identification is applied to the nonlinear model for obtaining the linear model parameters. Kalman filter is designed based on the linear model and the actuator dynamics to estimate the state responses required for SMC. The sliding surface consists of tyre deflection and sprung mass acceleration. The proposed SMC is evaluated using the nonlinear model for both time and frequency domain responses. Robustness due to the increased sprung mass and deteriorated suspension is also investigated in this paper. Preliminary simulation results show improved ride comfort without sacrificing the road holding performance.

  11. Optical activity of membrane suspensions: calculation of artifacts by Mie scattering theory.

    PubMed

    Gordon, D J; Holzwarth, G

    1971-10-01

    The circular dichroism, optical rotatory dispersion, and optical density of a suspension of erythrocyte ghosts are calculated from the measured optical properties of solubilized ghosts by classical general scattering theory (Mie theory). The ghost is represented by a solvent-filled spherical shell 7 nm (70 A) thick and 3.5 mum in radius. The 3- to 5-nm red shifts and unusual band shapes observed in the circular dichroism and optical rotary dispersion of suspensions of the intact ghosts, but not in the solubilized membranes, are reproduced by these calculations. Both differential absorption and differential scattering of left-and right-circularly polarized light contribute significantly to the calculated circular dichroism spectra. The artifacts of small membrane vesicles are shown to be less than those of intact ghosts. It is concluded that the characteristic anomalies in the optical activity of membrane suspensions are artifactual.

  12. Active photonic devices based on colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals and organometallic halide perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez Alvarez, Isaac

    2016-10-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals have arisen as outstanding materials to develop a new generation of optoelectronic devices. Their fabrication under simple and low cost colloidal chemistry methods results in cheap nanostructures able to provide a wide range of optical functionalities. Their attractive optical properties include a high absorption cross section below the band gap, a high quantum yield emission at room temperature, or the capability of tuning the band-gap with the size or the base material. In addition, their solution process nature enables an easy integration on several substrates and photonic structures. As a consequence, these nanoparticles have been extensively proposed to develop several photonic applications, such as detection of light, optical gain, generation of light or sensing. This manuscript reviews the great effort undertaken by the scientific community to construct active photonic devices based on these nanoparticles. The conditions to demonstrate stimulated emission are carefully studied by comparing the dependence of the optical properties of the nanocrystals with their size, shape and composition. In addition, this paper describes the design of different photonic architectures (waveguides and cavities) to enhance the generation of photoluminescence, and hence to reduce the threshold of optical gain. Finally, semiconductor nanocrystals are compared to organometallic halide perovskites, as this novel material has emerged as an alternative to colloidal nanoparticles.

  13. Design and experiment study of a semi-active energy-regenerative suspension system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Dehua; Chen, Long; Wang, Ruochen; Jiang, Haobin; Shen, Yujie

    2015-01-01

    A new kind of semi-active energy-regenerative suspension system is proposed to recover suspension vibration energy, as well as to reduce the suspension cost and demands for the motor-rated capacity. The system consists of an energy-regenerative damper and a DC-DC converter-based energy-regenerative circuit. The energy-regenerative damper is composed of an electromagnetic linear motor and an adjustable shock absorber with three regulating levels. The linear motor just works as the generator to harvest the suspension vibration energy. The circuit can be used to improve the system’s energy-regenerative performance and to continuously regulate the motor’s electromagnetic damping force. Therefore, although the motor works as a generator and damps the isolation without an external power source, the motor damping force is controllable. The damping characteristics of the system are studied based on a two degrees of freedom vehicle vibration model. By further analyzing the circuit operation characteristics under different working modes, the double-loop controller is designed to track the desired damping force. The external-loop is a fuzzy controller that offers the desired equivalent damping. The inner-loop controller, on one hand, is used to generate the pulse number and the frequency to control the angle and the rotational speed of the step motor; on the other hand, the inner-loop is used to offer the duty cycle of the energy-regenerative circuit. Simulations and experiments are conducted to validate such a new suspension system. The results show that the semi-active energy-regenerative suspension can improve vehicle ride comfort with the controllable damping characteristics of the linear motor. Meanwhile, it also ensures energy regeneration.

  14. EDITORIAL: Colloidal dispersions in external fields Colloidal dispersions in external fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löwen, Hartmut

    2012-11-01

    third conference in a series that began in 2004 [2] and was continued in 2008 [3]. The CODEF meeting series is held in conjunction with the German Dutch Transregional Collaborative Research Centre SFB TR6 with the title Physics of Colloidal Dispersions in External Fields. Papers from scientists working within this network as well as those from further invited contributors are summarized in this issue. They are organized according to the type of field applied, namely: shear flow electric field laser-optical and magnetic field confinement other fields and active particles To summarize the highlights of this special issue as regards shear fields, the response of depletion-induced colloidal clusters to shear is explored in [4]. Soft particles deform under shear and their structural and dynamical behaviour is studied both by experiment [5] and theory [6]. Transient dynamics after switching on shear is described by a joint venture of theory, simulation and experiment in [7]. Colloids provide the fascinating possibility to drag single particles through the suspension, which gives access to microrheology (as opposed to macrorheology, where macroscopic boundaries are moved). Several theoretical aspects of microrheology are discussed in this issue [8-10]. Moreover, a microscopic theory for shear viscosity is presented [11]. Various aspects of colloids in electric fields are also included in this issue. Electrokinetic phenomena for charged suspensions couple flow and electric phenomena in an intricate way and are intensely discussed both by experiment and simulation in contributions [12-14]. Dielectric phenomena are also influenced by electric fields [15]. Electric fields can induce effective dipolar forces between colloids leading to string formation [16]. Finally, binary mixtures in an electric driving field exhibit laning [17]. Simulation [18] and theoretical [19] studies of this nonequilibrium phenomenon are also discussed in this issue. Laser-optical fields can be used to

  15. SERS-active silver colloids prepared by reduction of silver nitrate with short-chain polyethylene glycol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiufiuc, Rares; Iacovita, Cristian; Lucaciu, Constantin M.; Stiufiuc, Gabriela; Dutu, Alina G.; Braescu, Cristiana; Leopold, Nicolae

    2013-01-01

    We report a fast, one-step, facile, and green preparation method that yields very stable and biocompatible silver colloids that are highly active as surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) platforms that has a possible application in biomedicine. Reduction of silver nitrate has been carried out using polyethylene glycol (PEG) which acts as both reducing agent and stabilizer. It turned out that the -OH groups provided by the addition of NaOH represent a key element in the successful synthesis of PEG-coated silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The as-obtained silver colloids have been characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron spectroscopy, and SERS using 532- and 633-nm laser lines on a dispersive Raman spectrometer. Several analytes as methylene blue, p-aminothiophenol, amoxicillin, and Cu(PAR)2 were used to prove SERS enhancement of the obtained silver colloid. It has been found that the PEGylated AgNPs provide SERS signals comparable to those achieved using classical hydroxylamine and citrate-reduced silver colloids, thus demonstrating the ability of this new method to prepare biocompatible silver colloids.

  16. Theory of activated-rate processes under shear with application to shear-induced aggregation of colloids.

    PubMed

    Zaccone, Alessio; Wu, Hua; Gentili, Daniele; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2009-11-01

    Using an approximation scheme within the convective diffusion (two-body Smoluchowski) equation framework, we unveil the shear-driven aggregation mechanism at the origin of structure formation in sheared colloidal systems. The theory, verified against numerics and experiments, explains the induction time followed by explosive (irreversible) rise of viscosity observed in charge-stabilized colloidal and protein systems under steady shear. The Arrhenius-type equation with shear derived here, extending Kramers' theory in the presence of shear, clearly demonstrates the important role of shear drive in activated-rate processes as they are encountered in soft condensed matter.

  17. State observer-based sliding mode control for semi-active hydro-pneumatic suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hongbin; Chen, Sizhong; Zhao, Yuzhuang; Liu, Gang; Yang, Lin

    2016-02-01

    This paper proposes an improved virtual reference model for semi-active suspension to coordinate the vehicle ride comfort and handling stability. The reference model combines the virtues of sky-hook with ground-hook control logic, and the hybrid coefficient is tuned according to the longitudinal and lateral acceleration so as to improve the vehicle stability especially in high-speed condition. Suspension state observer based on unscented Kalman filter is designed. A sliding mode controller (SMC) is developed to track the states of the reference model. The stability of the SMC strategy is proven by means of Lyapunov function taking into account the nonlinear damper characteristics and sprung mass variation of the vehicle. Finally, the performance of the controller is demonstrated under three typical working conditions: the random road excitation, speed bump road and sharp acceleration and braking. The simulation results indicated that, compared with the traditional passive suspension, the proposed control algorithm can offer a better coordination between vehicle ride comfort and handling stability. This approach provides a viable alternative to costlier active suspension control systems for commercial vehicles.

  18. Integrating an electrically active colloidal quantum dot photodiode with a graphene phototransistor

    PubMed Central

    Nikitskiy, Ivan; Goossens, Stijn; Kufer, Dominik; Lasanta, Tania; Navickaite, Gabriele; Koppens, Frank H. L.; Konstantatos, Gerasimos

    2016-01-01

    The realization of low-cost photodetectors with high sensitivity, high quantum efficiency, high gain and fast photoresponse in the visible and short-wave infrared remains one of the challenges in optoelectronics. Two classes of photodetectors that have been developed are photodiodes and phototransistors, each of them with specific drawbacks. Here we merge both types into a hybrid photodetector device by integrating a colloidal quantum dot photodiode atop a graphene phototransistor. Our hybrid detector overcomes the limitations of a phototransistor in terms of speed, quantum efficiency and linear dynamic range. We report quantum efficiencies in excess of 70%, gain of 105 and linear dynamic range of 110 dB and 3 dB bandwidth of 1.5 kHz. This constitutes a demonstration of an optoelectronically active device integrated directly atop graphene and paves the way towards a generation of flexible highly performing hybrid two-dimensional (2D)/0D optoelectronics. PMID:27311710

  19. Direct visualization of free-volume-triggered activation of β relaxation in colloidal glass.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yunzhuo; Lu, Xing; Qin, Zuoxiang; Shen, Jun

    2016-07-01

    β relaxation, which is predicted by mode coupling theory and involves the localized motions of particles, initiates in a supercooled liquid and continues into glassy state. It correlates essentially with many fundamental properties of amorphous materials. Despite its importance, the underlying mechanisms leading to the β relaxation have remained elusive. As natural heterogeneity, the original distributed free volume has been supposed to be associated with the activation of β relaxation in amorphous solids. However, there has been no direct experimental proof for this hypothesis. Here we used a colloidal glass to directly observe the β relaxation and free-volume distribution. We found a spatial correlation between the β relaxation and free volume. The large free volume regions were observed to possess a low-energy cost of relaxation-induced strain, indicating that the large free volume region presenting a low-energy barrier for structural relaxation benefits the β relaxation.

  20. Development and optimization of the activated charcoal suspension composition based on a mixture design approach.

    PubMed

    Ronowicz, Joanna; Kupcewicz, Bogumiła; Pałkowski, Łukasz; Krysiński, Jerzy

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a new drug product containing activated charcoal was designed and developed. The excipient levels in the pharmaceutical formulation were optimized using a mixture design approach. The adsorption power of the activated charcoal suspension was selected as the critical quality attribute influencing the efficacy of medical treatment. Significant prognostic models (p<0.05) were obtained to describe in detail the interrelations between excipient levels and the adsorption power of the formulation. Liquid flavour had a critical impact on the adsorption power of the suspension. Formulations containing the largest amount of liquid flavour showed the lowest adsorption power. Sorbitol was not adsorbed onto activated charcoal so strongly as liquid flavour. A slight increase in the content of carboxymethylcellulose sodium led to a marked decrease in adsorption power. The obtained mathematical models and response surface allowed selection of the optimal composition of excipients in a final drug product.

  1. Discontinuous fluidization transition in dense suspensions of actively deforming particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjhung, Elsen; Berthier, Ludovic

    Collective dynamics of self-propelled particles at high density have been shown to display a glass-like transition with a critical slowing down of 2 to 4 orders of magnitude. In this talk, we propose a new mechanism of injecting energy or activity via volume fluctuations. We show that the behaviour of actively deforming particles is strikingly different from that of self-propelled particles. In particular, we find a discontinuous non-equilibrium phase transition from a flowing state to an arrested state. Our minimal model might also explain the collective dynamics in epithelial tissues. In particular, without needing self-propulsion or cell-cell adhesion, volume fluctuations of individual cells alone might be sufficient to give rise to an active fluidization and collective dynamics in densely packed tissues.

  2. Evaluation of Colloids and Activation Agents for Determination of Melamine Using UV-SERS

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    UV-SERS measurements offer a great potential for environmental or food (detection of food contaminats) analytics. Here, the UV-SERS enhancement potential of various kinds of metal colloids, such as Pd, Pt, Au, Ag, Au–Ag core–shell, and Ag–Au core–shell with different shapes and sizes, were studied using melamine as a test molecule. The influence of different activation (KF, KCl, KBr, K2SO4) agents onto the SERS activity of the nanomaterials was investigated, showing that the combination of a particular nanoparticle with a special activation agent is extremely crucial for the observed SERS enhancement. In particular, the size dependence of spherical nanoparticles of one particular metal on the activator has been exploited. By doing so, it could be shown that the SERS enhancement increases or decreases for increasing or decreasing size of a nanoparticle, respectively. Overall, the presented results demonstrate the necessity to adjust the nanoparticle size and the activation agent for different experiments in order to achieve the best possible UV-SERS results. PMID:22428076

  3. Biopolymer-stabilized Pt nanoparticles colloid: a highly active and recyclable catalyst for biphasic catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yujia; Shen, Yueyue; Qiu, Yunfei; Zhang, Ting; Liao, Yang; Zhao, Shilin; Ma, Jun; Mao, Hui

    2016-10-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles are promising candidates to replace conventional bulk counterparts owing to their high activity and selectivity. To enable catalyst recovery, noble metal nanoparticles are often supported onto solid matrices to prepare heterogeneous catalyst. Although recycle of noble metal nanoparticles is realized by heterogenization, a loss of activity is usually encountered. In the present investigation, Pt nanoparticles with tunable particle size (1.85-2.80 nm) were facilely prepared by using polyphenols as amphiphilic stabilizers. The as-prepared Pt nanoparticles colloid solution could be used as highly active catalyst in aqueous-organic biphasic catalysis. The phenolic hydroxyls of polyphenols could constrain Pt nanoparticles in aqueous phase, and simultaneously, the aromatic scaffold of polyphenols ensured effective interactions between substrates and Pt nanoparticles. As a consequence, the obtained polyphenols-stabilized Pt nanoparticles exhibited high activity and cycling stability in biphasic hydrogenation of a series of unsaturated compounds. Compared with conventional heterogeneous Pt-C and Pt-Al2O3 catalysts, polyphenols-stabilized Pt nanoparticles showed obvious advantage both in activity and cycling stability.

  4. Colloidal Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russel, William B.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Described is a graduate level engineering course offered at Princeton University in colloidal phenomena stressing the physical and dynamical side of colloid science. The course outline, reading list, and requirements are presented. (BT)

  5. Utilisation of optimisation solutions to control active suspension for decreased braking distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edrén, Johannes; Jonasson, Mats; Jerrelind, Jenny; Stensson Trigell, Annika; Drugge, Lars

    2015-02-01

    This work deals with how to utilise active suspension on individual vehicle wheels in order to improve the vehicle performance during straight-line braking. Through numerical optimisation, solutions have been found as regards how active suspension should be controlled and coordinated with friction brakes to shorten the braking distance. The results show that, for the studied vehicle, the braking distance can be shortened by more than 1 m when braking from 100 km/h. The applicability of these results is studied by investigating the approach for different vehicle speeds and actuator stroke limitations. It is shown that substantial improvements in the braking distance can also be found for lower velocities, and that the actuator strokes are an important parameter. To investigate the potential of implementing these findings in a real vehicle, a validated detailed vehicle model equipped with active struts is analysed. Simplified control laws, appropriate for on-board implementation and based on knowledge of the optimised solution, are proposed and evaluated. The results show that substantial improvements of the braking ability, and thus safety, can be made using this simplified approach. Particle model simulations have been made to explain the underlying physical mechanisms and limitations of the approach. These results provide valuable guidance on how active suspension can be used to achieve significant improvements in vehicle performance with reasonable complexity and energy consumption.

  6. Stability and phase transfer of catalytically active platinum nanoparticle suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriram, Indira; Curtin, Alexandra E.; Chiaramonti, Ann N.; Cuchiaro, J. Hunter; Weidner, Andrew R.; Tingley, Tegan M.; Greenlee, Lauren F.; Jeerage, Kavita M.

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we present a robust synthesis protocol for platinum nanoparticles that yields a monomodal dispersion of particles that are approximately 100 nm in diameter. We determine that these particles are actually agglomerates of much smaller particles, creating a "raspberry" morphology. We demonstrate that these agglomerates are stable at room temperature for at least 8 weeks by dynamic light scattering. Furthermore, we demonstrate consistent electrocatalytic activity for methanol oxidation. Finally, we quantitatively explore the relationship between dispersion solvent and particle agglomeration; specifically, particles are found to agglomerate abruptly as solvent polarity decreases.

  7. Tunable long range forces mediated by self-propelled colloidal hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Ran; Cohen Stuart, Martien; Bolhuis, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Most colloidal interactions can be tuned by changing properties of the medium. Here we show that activating colloidal particles with random self-propulsion can induce giant effective interactions between large objects immersed in such a suspension. Using Brownian dynamics simulations we find that the effective force between two hard walls in a 2D suspension of self-propelled (active) colloidal hard spheres can be tuned from a long range repulsion into a long range attraction by changing the active particle density. At relatively high densities, the active hard spheres can form a dynamic crystalline bridge, which induces a strong oscillating long range dynamic wetting repulsion between the walls. With decreasing density, the dynamic bridge gradually breaks, and an intriguing long range dynamic depletion attraction arises. A similar effect occurs in a quasi-2D suspension of self-propelled colloidal hard spheres by changing the height of the confinement. Our results open up new possibilities to manipulate the motion and assembly of microscopic objects by using active matter.

  8. Active vibration attenuating seat suspension for an armored helicopter crew seat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sztein, Pablo Javier

    An Active Vibration Attenuating Seat Suspension (AVASS) for an MH-60S helicopter crew seat is designed to protect the occupants from harmful whole-body vibration (WBV). Magnetorheological (MR) suspension units are designed, fabricated and installed in a helicopter crew seat. These MR isolators are built to work in series with existing Variable Load Energy Absorbers (VLEAs), have minimal increase in weight, and maintain crashworthiness for the seat system. Refinements are discussed, based on testing, to minimize friction observed in the system. These refinements include the addition of roller bearings to replace friction bearings in the existing seat. Additionally, semi-active control of the MR dampers is achieved using special purpose built custom electronics integrated into the seat system. Experimental testing shows that an MH-60S retrofitted with AVASS provides up to 70.65% more vibration attenuation than the existing seat configuration as well as up to 81.1% reduction in vibration from the floor.

  9. Semi-active magnetorheological seat suspensions for enhanced crashworthiness and vibration isolation of rotorcraft seats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiemenz, Gregory J.

    current state-of-the-art rotorcraft seat suspensions which can provide no better than 20% risk of occupant injury. Finally, an MR-based seat suspension designed solely for the purposes of vibration isolation was designed, analyzed, and experimentally demonstrated. MR dampers were integrated into the current crashworthy SH-60 crew seat with minimal weight impact such that the original crashworthy capabilities were maintained. Then, utilizing semi-active control, experimental vibration testing demonstrated that the system reduced vertical cockpit vibrations transmitted to the occupant by 76%. This is a significant advance over current state-of-the-art rotorcraft seats which provide no attenuation of cockpit vibrations.

  10. Non-dimensionalised closed-form parametric analysis of semi-active vehicle suspensions using a quarter-car model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadian, Mehdi; Blanchard, Emmanuel

    2011-02-01

    This article provides a non-dimensionalised closed-form analysis of semi-active vehicle suspensions, using a quarter-car model. The derivation of the closed-form solutions for three indices that can be used for ride comfort, vehicle handling, and stability are presented based on non-dimensionalised suspension parameters. The behaviour of semi-active vehicle suspensions is evaluated using skyhook, groundhook, and hybrid control policies, and compared with passive suspensions. The relationship between vibration isolation, suspension deflection, and road holding is studied, using three performance indices based on the mean square of the sprung mass acceleration, rattle space, and tyre deflection, respectively. The results of the study indicate that the hybrid control policy yields significantly better comfort than a passive suspension, without reducing the road-holding quality or increasing the suspension displacement for typical passenger cars. The results also indicate that for typical passenger cars, the hybrid control policy results in a better compromise between comfort, road holding and suspension travel requirements than both the skyhook and groundhook control methods.

  11. Electrocatalytically Active Nickel-Based Electrode Coatings Formed by Atmospheric and Suspension Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghasibeig, M.; Mousavi, M.; Ben Ettouill, F.; Moreau, C.; Wuthrich, R.; Dolatabadi, A.

    2014-01-01

    Ni-based electrode coatings with enhanced surface areas, for hydrogen production, were developed using atmospheric plasma spray (APS) and suspension plasma spray (SPS) processes. The results revealed a larger electrochemical active surface area for the coatings produced by SPS compared to those produced by APS process. SEM micrographs showed that the surface microstructure of the sample with the largest surface area was composed of a large number of small cauliflower-like aggregates with an average diameter of 10 μm.

  12. Using the lead vehicle as preview sensor in convoy vehicle active suspension control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mustafizur; Rideout, Geoff

    2012-12-01

    Both ride quality and roadholding of actively suspended vehicles can be improved by sensing the road ahead of the vehicle and using this information in a preview controller. Previous applications have used look-ahead sensors mounted on the front bumper to measure terrain beneath. Such sensors are vulnerable, potentially confused by water, snow, or other soft obstacles and offer a fixed preview time. For convoy vehicle applications, this paper proposes using the overall response of the preceding vehicle(s) to generate preview controller information for follower vehicles. A robust observer is used to estimate the states of a quarter-car vehicle model, from which road profile is estimated and passed on to the follower vehicle(s) to generate a preview function. The preview-active suspension, implemented in discrete time using a shift register approach to improve simulation time, reduces sprung mass acceleration and dynamic tyre deflection peaks by more than 50% and 40%, respectively. Terrain can change from one vehicle to the next if a loose obstacle is dislodged, or if the vehicle paths are sufficiently different so that one vehicle misses a discrete road event. The resulting spurious preview information can give suspension performance worse than that of a passive or conventional active system. In this paper, each vehicle can effectively estimate the road profile based on its own state trajectory. By comparing its own road estimate with the preview information, preview errors can be detected and suspension control quickly switched from preview to conventional active control to preserve performance improvements compared to passive suspensions.

  13. Linear colloidal crystal arrays by electrohydrodynamic printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, H. F.; Saville, D. A.; Aksay, I. A.

    2008-09-01

    We use electrohydrodynamic jets of colloidal suspensions to produce arrays of colloidal crystalline stripes on surfaces. A critical factor in maintaining a stable jet is the distance of separation between the nozzle and the surface. Colloidal crystalline stripes are produced as two wetting lines of the deployed suspension merge during drying. To ensure that the two wetting lines merge, the "deployed-line-width" to "particle size" ratio is kept below a critical value so that the capillary forces overcome the frictional forces between the particles and the substrate.

  14. Off-road motorbike performance analysis using a rear semi-active suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozoya-Santos, Jorge de J.; Cervantes-Muñoz, Damián.; Ramírez Mendoza, Ricardo

    2015-04-01

    The topic of this paper is the analysis of a control system for a semi active rear suspension in an off-road 2-wheel vehicle. Several control methods are studied, as well as the recently proposed Frequency Estimation Based (FEB) algorithm. The test motorcycle dynamics, as well as the passive, semi active, and the algorithm controlled shock absorber models are loaded into BikeSim, a professional two-wheeled vehicle simulation software, and tested in several road conditions. The results show a detailed comparison of the theoretical performance of the different control approaches in a novel environment for semi active dampers.

  15. Muscle Activation during Push-Ups with Different Suspension Training Systems

    PubMed Central

    Calatayud, Joaquin; Borreani, Sebastien; Colado, Juan C.; Martín, Fernando F; Rogers, Michael E.; Behm, David G.; Andersen, Lars L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze upper extremity and core muscle activation when performing push-ups with different suspension devices. Young fit male university students (n = 29) performed 3 push-ups each with 4 different suspension systems. Push-up speed was controlled using a metronome and testing order was randomized. Average amplitude of the electromyographic root mean square of Triceps Brachii, Upper Trapezius, Anterior Deltoid, Clavicular Pectoralis, Rectus Abdominis, Rectus Femoris, and Lumbar Erector Spinae was recorded. Electromyographic signals were normalized to the maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). Electromyographic data were analyzed with repeated-measures analysis of variance with a Bonferroni post hoc. Based upon global arithmetic mean of all muscles analyzed, the suspended push-up with a pulley system provided the greatest activity (37.76% of MVIC; p < 0.001). Individually, the suspended push-up with a pulley system also provided the greatest triceps brachii, upper trapezius, rectus femoris and erector lumbar spinae muscle activation. In contrast, more stable conditions seem more appropriate for pectoralis major and anterior deltoid muscles. Independent of the type of design, all suspension systems were especially effective training tools for reaching high levels of rectus abdominis activation. Key Points Compared with standard push-ups on the floor, suspended push-ups increase core muscle activation. A one-anchor system with a pulley is the best option to increase TRICEP, TRAPS, LUMB and FEM muscle activity. More stable conditions such as the standard push-up or a parallel band system provide greater increases in DELT and PEC muscle activation. A suspended push-up is an effective method to achieve high muscle activity levels in the ABS. PMID:25177174

  16. Muscle Activation during Push-Ups with Different Suspension Training Systems.

    PubMed

    Calatayud, Joaquin; Borreani, Sebastien; Colado, Juan C; Martín, Fernando F; Rogers, Michael E; Behm, David G; Andersen, Lars L

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze upper extremity and core muscle activation when performing push-ups with different suspension devices. Young fit male university students (n = 29) performed 3 push-ups each with 4 different suspension systems. Push-up speed was controlled using a metronome and testing order was randomized. Average amplitude of the electromyographic root mean square of Triceps Brachii, Upper Trapezius, Anterior Deltoid, Clavicular Pectoralis, Rectus Abdominis, Rectus Femoris, and Lumbar Erector Spinae was recorded. Electromyographic signals were normalized to the maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). Electromyographic data were analyzed with repeated-measures analysis of variance with a Bonferroni post hoc. Based upon global arithmetic mean of all muscles analyzed, the suspended push-up with a pulley system provided the greatest activity (37.76% of MVIC; p < 0.001). Individually, the suspended push-up with a pulley system also provided the greatest triceps brachii, upper trapezius, rectus femoris and erector lumbar spinae muscle activation. In contrast, more stable conditions seem more appropriate for pectoralis major and anterior deltoid muscles. Independent of the type of design, all suspension systems were especially effective training tools for reaching high levels of rectus abdominis activation. Key PointsCompared with standard push-ups on the floor, suspended push-ups increase core muscle activation.A one-anchor system with a pulley is the best option to increase TRICEP, TRAPS, LUMB and FEM muscle activity.More stable conditions such as the standard push-up or a parallel band system provide greater increases in DELT and PEC muscle activation.A suspended push-up is an effective method to achieve high muscle activity levels in the ABS.

  17. Solid colloidal optical wavelength filter

    DOEpatents

    Alvarez, Joseph L.

    1992-01-01

    A solid colloidal optical wavelength filter includes a suspension of spheal particles dispersed in a coagulable medium such as a setting plastic. The filter is formed by suspending spherical particles in a coagulable medium; agitating the particles and coagulable medium to produce an emulsion of particles suspended in the coagulable medium; and allowing the coagulable medium and suspended emulsion of particles to cool.

  18. New ammonium surfactant-stabilized rhodium(0) colloidal suspensions: influence of novel counter-anions on physico-chemical and catalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Bilé, Elodie Guyonnet; Sassine, Rita; Denicourt-Nowicki, Audrey; Launay, Franck; Roucoux, Alain

    2011-06-28

    Novel anionic species, such as hydrogen carbonate (HCO(3)(−)), fluoride (F(−)), triflate (CF(3)SO(3)(−)), tetrafluoroborate (BF(4)(−)) and chloride (Cl(−)) were investigated as new partners of water soluble N,N-dimethyl-N-cetyl-N-(2-hydroxyethyl) ammonium salts, used as a protective agent of rhodium colloids. The effect of the surfactant polar head on the micellar behavior, size and morphology of the nanospecies was studied by adapted physico-chemical experiments (surface tension measurements, dynamic light scattering, thermogravimetric and TEM analyses) and discussed in terms of strong or weak stabilization of the growing nanoparticles surface. Finally, the influence of the nanoenvironment generated by the surfactant with various counter-anions was evaluated via the hydrogenation of aromatics.

  19. Rapid method for identification of macrophages in suspension by acid alpha-naphthyl acetate esterase activity.

    PubMed

    Ennist, D L; Jones, K H

    1983-07-01

    A supravital staining procedure for the identification of macrophages in cell suspension using a modification of a standard cytochemical assay for alpha-naphthyl acetate esterase (ANAE) activity is described. Macrophages are stained an intense red-brown after 5 min incubation in a buffer using ANAE as the substrate and hexazonium pararosaniline as the coupler for the azo dye. There is close agreement in the number of ANAE-positive cells found and the number of macrophages identified in smears by morphological criteria, by phagocytosis, and by the presence of Fc receptors. Therefore, this stain provides a quick, inexpensive method to estimate the number of macrophages present in suspensions of lymphocytic tissues from rats and mice.

  20. Skyhook-based semi-active control of full-vehicle suspension with magneto-rheological dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hailong; Wang, Enrong; Min, Fuhong; Subash, Rakheja; Su, Chunyi

    2013-05-01

    The control study of vehicle semi-active suspension with magneto-rheological (MR) dampers has been attracted much attention internationally. However, a simple, real time and easy implementing semi-active controller has not been proposed for the MR full-vehicle suspension system, and a systematic analysis method has not been established for evaluating the multi-objective suspension performances of MR full-vehicle vertical, pitch and roll motions. For this purpose, according to the 7-degree of freedom (DOF) full-vehicle dynamic system, a generalized 7-DOF MR and passive full-vehicle dynamic model is set up by employing the modified Bouc-wen hysteretic force-velocity ( F-v) model of the MR damper. A semi-active controller is synthesized to realize independent control of the four MR quarter-vehicle sub-suspension systems in the full-vehicle, which is on the basis of the proposed modified skyhook damping scheme of MR quarter-vehicle sub-suspension system. The proposed controller can greatly simplify the controller design complexity of MR full-vehicle suspension and has merits of easy implementation in real application, wherein only absolute velocities of sprung and unsprung masses with reference to the road surface are required to measure in real time when the vehicle is moving. Furthermore, a systematic analysis method is established for evaluating the vertical, pitch and roll motion properties of both MR and passive full-vehicle suspensions in a more realistic road excitation manner, in which the harmonic, rounded pulse and real road measured random signals with delay time are employed as different road excitations inserted on the front and rear two wheels, by considering the distance between front and rear wheels in full-vehicle. The above excitations with different amplitudes are further employed as the road excitations inserted on left and right two wheels for evaluating the roll motion property. The multi-objective suspension performances of ride comfort and

  1. Engineering of Novel Biocolloid Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, D. A.; Rodges, S.; Hiddessen, A.; Weitz, D. A.

    1999-01-01

    Colloidal suspensions are materials with a variety of uses from cleaners and lubricants to food, cosmetics, and coatings. In addition, they can be used as a tool for testing the fundamental tenets of statistical physics. Colloidal suspensions can be synthesized from a wide variety of materials, and in the form of monodisperse particles, which can self-assemble into highly ordered colloidal crystal structures. As such they can also be used as templates for the construction of highly ordered materials. Materials design of colloids has, to date, relied on entropic self-assembly, where crystals form as result of lower free energy due to a transition to order. Here, our goal is to develop a completely new method for materials fabrication using colloidal precursors, in which the self-assembly of the ordered colloidal structures is driven by a highly controllable, attractive interaction. This will greatly increase the range of potential structures that can be fabricated with colloidal particles. In this work, we demonstrate that colloidal suspensions can be crosslinked through highly specific biological crosslinking reactions. In particular, the molecules we use are protein-carbohydrate interactions derived from the immune system. This different driving force for self-assembly will yield different and novel suspensions structures. Because the biological interactions are heterotypic (A binding to B), this chemical system can be used to make binary alloys in which the two colloid subpopulations vary in some property - size, density, volume fraction, magnetic susceptibility, etc. An additional feature of these molecules which is unique - even within the realm of biological recognition - is that the molecules bind reversibly on reasonable time-scales, which will enable the suspension to sample different configurations, and allow us to manipulate and measure the size of the suspension dynamically. Because of the wide variety of structures that can be made from these novel

  2. Chain Dynamics in Magnetorheological Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gast, A. P.; Furst, E. M.

    1999-01-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) suspensions are composed of colloidal particles which acquire dipole moments when subjected to an external magnetic field. At sufficient field strengths and concentrations, the dipolar particles rapidly aggregate to form long chains. Subsequent lateral cross-linking of the dipolar chains is responsible for a rapid liquid-to-solid-like rheological transition. The unique, magnetically-activated rheological properties of MR suspensions make them ideal for interfacing mechanical systems to electronic controls. Additionally, the ability to experimentally probe colloidal suspensions interacting through tunable anisotropic potentials is of fundamental interest. Our current experimental work has focused on understanding the fluctuations of dipolar chains. It has been proposed by Halsey and Toor (HT) that the strong Landau-Peierls thermal fluctuations of dipolar chains could be responsible for long-range attractions between chains. Such interactions will govern the long-time relaxation of MR suspensions. We have synthesized monodisperse neutrally buoyant MR suspensions by density matching stabilized ferrofluid emulsion droplets with D2O. This allows us to probe the dynamics of the dipolar chains using light scattering without gravitational, interfacial, and polydispersity effects to resolve the short-wavelength dynamics of the dipolar chains. We used diffusing wave spectroscopy to measure these dynamics. The particle displacements at short times that show an independence to the field strength, but at long times exhibit a constrained, sub-diffusive motion that slows as the dipole strength is increased. The experiments are in good qualitative agreement with Brownian dynamics simulations of dipolar chains. Although there have been several important and detailed studies of the structure and interactions in MR suspensions, there has not been conclusive evidence that supports or contradicts the HT model prediction that long-range interactions exist between

  3. 234U /238U and 230Th /234U activity ratios in the colloidal phases of aquifers in lateritic weathered zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, Stephen A.; Lowson, Richard T.; Ellis, John

    1988-11-01

    A procedure was developed for comparing solute and colloid phases of groundwaters in contact with uranium ore bodies at Nabarlek and Koongarra in the Alligator Rivers region, Northern Territory, Australia. Single-pass ultrafiltration of large volumes with cut-offs of 18 nm and 1 μm was used. Colloids were composed of Fe and Si species with sorbed U and U daughters. Uranium isotopes were mostly present as soluble species. Thorium was significantly associated with the colloids. The 234U /238U activity ratios (ARs) were similar in solute and colloid phases close to the ore bodies but further down-gradient colloids were generally more depleted of 234U than the solute. The 230Th /234U ARs rose from very low values for both solute and colloid phases close to the ore bodies through several orders of magnitude to much higher values further down-gradient. Colloid 230Th /234U ARs were always significantly greater than solute ARs. Results were consistent with a systematic leaching of U from colloids going down-gradient and very little mobilization of ore-body 230Th relative to U. Ubiquitous complexed 232Th appeared to suppress the solubility of 230Th.

  4. Synthesis, photocatalytic activity, and photogenerated hydroxyl radicals of monodisperse colloidal ZnO nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chong; Li, Qingsong; Tang, Limei; Xin, Kun; Bai, Ailing; Yu, Yingmin

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, monodisperse colloidal zinc oxide (ZnO) nanospheres were successfully synthesized via a newly developed two-stage solution method followed by facile calcination at various temperatures. The effects of calcination temperature on the structure, morphology, and optical properties as well as the photocatalytic activity of the as-made ZnO samples were investigated systematically by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms, diffuse reflectance UV-visible spectroscopy (DRS), photoluminescence, and related photocatalytic activity tests. The thermal decomposition was analyzed by thermogravimetric analysis. The crystallinity was found to gradually increase with increasing calcination temperature, whereas the decrease in the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller specific surface area of the samples with calcination may be ascribed to the increased particle size. The DRS results provided clear evidence for the decrease in band gap energy of ZnO samples with an increase in calcination temperature. The photoluminescence spectra demonstrated the calcination-dependent emission features, especially the UV emission intensity. In particular, the ZnO product calcined at 400 °C exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity, degrading methylene blue by almost 99.1% in 70 min, which is ascribed to the large specific surface area and pore volume, high electron-hole pair separation efficient, and great redox potential of the obtained ZnO nanoparticles. In addition, the production of photogenerated hydroxyl radicals (•OH) was consistent with the methylene blue degradation efficiency over the as-made ZnO nanoparticles. Using isopropanol as a hydroxyl radical scavenger, •OH was determined to be the main active oxygen species in the photocatalytic process. A possible mechanism of photodegradation under UV light irradiation also is proposed.

  5. Optimisation of active suspension control inputs for improved vehicle handling performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čorić, Mirko; Deur, Joško; Kasać, Josip; Tseng, H. Eric; Hrovat, Davor

    2016-11-01

    Active suspension is commonly considered under the framework of vertical vehicle dynamics control aimed at improvements in ride comfort. This paper uses a collocation-type control variable optimisation tool to investigate to which extent the fully active suspension (FAS) application can be broaden to the task of vehicle handling/cornering control. The optimisation approach is firstly applied to solely FAS actuator configurations and three types of double lane-change manoeuvres. The obtained optimisation results are used to gain insights into different control mechanisms that are used by FAS to improve the handling performance in terms of path following error reduction. For the same manoeuvres the FAS performance is compared with the performance of different active steering and active differential actuators. The optimisation study is finally extended to combined FAS and active front- and/or rear-steering configurations to investigate if they can use their complementary control authorities (over the vertical and lateral vehicle dynamics, respectively) to further improve the handling performance.

  6. Pectin-zinc-chitosan-polyethylene glycol colloidal nano-suspension as a food grade carrier for colon targeted delivery of resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Andishmand, Hashem; Tabibiazar, Mahnaz; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin; Hamishehkar, Hamed

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop chitosan-zinc-pectinate-polyethylene glycol (PEG) nanoparticles (NPs) for colon-targeted delivery of resveratrol. The effects of pectin:ZnCl2:chitosan (PZnC) % w/v, pH and ionic strength of media, and addition of PEG on the colloidal stability and release behavior of resveratrol from NPs were examined by Zeta potential, particle size analyzer, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Fourier transform-infrared (FTIR) methods. The particle size and Zeta potential of PZnC NPs in the ratio of 10:1:3% w/v were 399±18nm and +25±1mV, respectively. The addition of PEG to PZnC as a solvent for resveratrol (10% w/v) noticeably decreased the size of NPs to approximately 83±4nm. More than 63% of the resveratrol was encapsulated into the developed NPs; furthermore, a low amount of resveratrol was released during one month, using simulated juice model (pH=4) as investigated by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) analysis of resveratrol.The remaining resveratrol in NPs (∼49%) was released in simulated colon fluid in the presence of pectinase. These NPs can be introduced as a novel platform for successful colon delivery of resveratrol in fruit juice matrix.

  7. Tunable long range forces mediated by self-propelled colloidal hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Ni, Ran; Cohen Stuart, Martien A; Bolhuis, Peter G

    2015-01-09

    Using Brownian dynamics simulations, we systematically study the effective interaction between two parallel hard walls in a 2D suspension of self-propelled (active) colloidal hard spheres, and we find that the effective force between two hard walls can be tuned from a long range repulsion into a long range attraction by changing the density of active particles. At relatively high densities, the active hard spheres can form a dynamic crystalline bridge, which induces a strong oscillating long range dynamic wetting repulsion between the walls. With decreasing density, the dynamic bridge gradually breaks, and an intriguing long range dynamic depletion attraction arises. A similar effect occurs in a quasi-2D suspension of self-propelled colloidal hard spheres by changing the height of the confinement. Our results open up new possibilities to manipulate the motion and assembly of microscopic objects by using active matter.

  8. Tunable Long Range Forces Mediated by Self-Propelled Colloidal Hard Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Ran; Cohen Stuart, Martien A.; Bolhuis, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Using Brownian dynamics simulations, we systematically study the effective interaction between two parallel hard walls in a 2D suspension of self-propelled (active) colloidal hard spheres, and we find that the effective force between two hard walls can be tuned from a long range repulsion into a long range attraction by changing the density of active particles. At relatively high densities, the active hard spheres can form a dynamic crystalline bridge, which induces a strong oscillating long range dynamic wetting repulsion between the walls. With decreasing density, the dynamic bridge gradually breaks, and an intriguing long range dynamic depletion attraction arises. A similar effect occurs in a quasi-2D suspension of self-propelled colloidal hard spheres by changing the height of the confinement. Our results open up new possibilities to manipulate the motion and assembly of microscopic objects by using active matter.

  9. Formation of Aqueous Suspensions of Fullerenes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Colloidal suspensions of C60, C70 and a derivative of C60, PCBM ([6,6]-Phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester) were produced by extended mixing in water. We examined the contribution of background solution chemistry (pH, ionic strength) on the formation kinetics of colloidal suspe...

  10. Glycerol etherification over highly active CaO-based materials: new mechanistic aspects and related colloidal particle formation.

    PubMed

    Ruppert, Agnieszka M; Meeldijk, Johannes D; Kuipers, Bonny W M; Erné, Ben H; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2008-01-01

    Glycerol is an attractive renewable building block for the synthesis of di- and triglycerols, which have numerous applications in the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. In this work, the selective etherification of glycerol to di- and triglycerol was studied in the presence of alkaline earth metal oxides and the data are compared with those obtained with Na2CO3 as a homogeneous catalyst. It was found that glycerol conversion increased with increasing catalyst basicity; that is, the conversion increases in the order: MgO90 % at 60 % conversion) are obtained over CaO, SrO, and BaO. For these catalysts no substantial acrolein formation was observed. Furthermore, at the start of the reaction mainly linear diglycerol was produced, whereas at higher conversion degrees branched diglycerol started to form. In another series of experiments different types of CaO materials were prepared. It was found that these CaO-based materials not only differed in their surface area and number of basic sites, but also in their Lewis acid strength. Within this series the CaO material possessing the strongest Lewis acid sites had the highest catalytic activity, comparable to that of BaO, pointing towards the important role of Lewis acidity for this etherification reaction. Based on these observations a plausible alternative reaction scheme for glycerol etherification is presented, which considers the facilitation of the hydroxyl leaving process. Finally, the stability of the catalytic solids under study was investigated and it was found that colloidal CaO particles of about 50-100 nm can be spontaneously generated during reaction. Catalytic testing of these CaO colloids, after isolation from the reaction medium, revealed a very high etherification activity. Understanding the nature of these Ca-based colloids opens new opportunities for investigating supported colloidal particle catalysts to take advantage of both

  11. Encapsulation, protection, and release of hydrophilic active components: potential and limitations of colloidal delivery systems.

    PubMed

    McClements, David Julian

    2015-05-01

    There have been major advances in the development of edible colloidal delivery systems for hydrophobic bioactives in recent years. However, there are still many challenges associated with the development of effective delivery systems for hydrophilic bioactives. This review highlights the major challenges associated with developing colloidal delivery systems for hydrophilic bioactive components that can be utilized in foods, pharmaceuticals, and other products intended for oral ingestion. Special emphasis is given to the fundamental physicochemical phenomena associated with encapsulation, stabilization, and release of these bioactive components, such as solubility, partitioning, barriers, and mass transport processes. Delivery systems suitable for encapsulating hydrophilic bioactive components are then reviewed, including liposomes, multiple emulsions, solid fat particles, multiple emulsions, biopolymer particles, cubosomes, and biologically-derived systems. The advantages and limitations of each of these delivery systems are highlighted. This information should facilitate the rational selection of the most appropriate colloidal delivery systems for particular applications in the food and other industries.

  12. Tunable shear thickening: from understanding suspension thickening to controlling viscosity on the fly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Itai; Lin, Neil; Ness, Chris; Sun, Jin; Cates, Mike; Guy, Ben; Hermes, Michiel; Poon, Wilson

    2016-11-01

    Whether contact forces play a role in shear thickening of colloidal systems where hydrodynamic contributions are thought to dominate remains highly controversial. By performing shear reversal experiments on silica and latex colloidal particles, we directly measure the hydrodynamic and contact force contributions to the suspension viscosity. We find that contact forces are not only present, but dominate the shear thickening response. More importantly, this finding directly suggests a strategy for active controlling the thickening viscosities of dense suspensions. We demonstrate that by strategic imposition of a high-frequency and low-amplitude shear perturbation orthogonal to the primary shearing flow, we can largely eradicate thickening. The orthogonal shear effectively becomes a regulator for controlling thickening in the suspension, allowing the viscosity to be reduced by up to two decades on demand.

  13. Active suspension design for a Large Space Structure ground test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, Thomas J. H.; Schlegel, Clemens

    1993-01-01

    The expected future high performance requirements for Large Space Structures (LSS) enforce technology innovations such as active vibration damping techniques e.g., by means of structure sensors and actuators. The implementation of new technologies like that requires an interactive and integrated structural and control design with an increased effort in hardware validation by ground testing. During the technology development phase generic system tests will be most important covering verification and validation aspects up to the preparation and definition of relevant space experiments. For many applications using advanced designs it is deemed necessary to improve existing testing technology by further reducing disturbances and gravity coupling effects while maintaining high performance reliability. A key issue in this context is the improvement of suspension techniques. The ideal ground test facility satisfying these requirements completely will never be found. The highest degree of reliability will always be obtained by passive suspension methods taking into account severe performance limitations such as non-zero rigid body modes, restriction of degrees of freedom of motion and frequency response limitations. Passive compensation mechanisms, e.g., zero-spring-rate mechanisms, either require large moving masses or they are limited with respect to low-frequency performance by friction, stiction or other non-linear effects. With active suspensions these limitations can be removed to a large extent thereby increasing the range of applications. Despite an additional complexity which is associated with a potential risk in reliability their development is considered promising due to the amazing improvement of real-time control technology which is still continuing.

  14. Hydrodynamic length-scale selection in microswimmer suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidenreich, Sebastian; Dunkel, Jörn; Klapp, Sabine H. L.; Bär, Markus

    2016-08-01

    A universal characteristic of mesoscale turbulence in active suspensions is the emergence of a typical vortex length scale, distinctly different from the scale invariance of turbulent high-Reynolds number flows. Collective length-scale selection has been observed in bacterial fluids, endothelial tissue, and active colloids, yet the physical origins of this phenomenon remain elusive. Here, we systematically derive an effective fourth-order field theory from a generic microscopic model that allows us to predict the typical vortex size in microswimmer suspensions. Building on a self-consistent closure condition, the derivation shows that the vortex length scale is determined by the competition between local alignment forces, rotational diffusion, and intermediate-range hydrodynamic interactions. Vortex structures found in simulations of the theory agree with recent measurements in Bacillus subtilis suspensions. Moreover, our approach yields an effective viscosity enhancement (reduction), as reported experimentally for puller (pusher) microorganisms.

  15. Hydrodynamic length-scale selection in microswimmer suspensions.

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, Sebastian; Dunkel, Jörn; Klapp, Sabine H L; Bär, Markus

    2016-08-01

    A universal characteristic of mesoscale turbulence in active suspensions is the emergence of a typical vortex length scale, distinctly different from the scale invariance of turbulent high-Reynolds number flows. Collective length-scale selection has been observed in bacterial fluids, endothelial tissue, and active colloids, yet the physical origins of this phenomenon remain elusive. Here, we systematically derive an effective fourth-order field theory from a generic microscopic model that allows us to predict the typical vortex size in microswimmer suspensions. Building on a self-consistent closure condition, the derivation shows that the vortex length scale is determined by the competition between local alignment forces, rotational diffusion, and intermediate-range hydrodynamic interactions. Vortex structures found in simulations of the theory agree with recent measurements in Bacillus subtilis suspensions. Moreover, our approach yields an effective viscosity enhancement (reduction), as reported experimentally for puller (pusher) microorganisms.

  16. Effective Interactions between Colloidal Particles Suspended in a Bath of Swimming Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelani, L.; Maggi, C.; Bernardini, M. L.; Rizzo, A.; di Leonardo, R.

    2011-09-01

    The dynamics of passive colloidal tracers in a bath of self-propelled particles is receiving a lot of attention in the context of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. Here we demonstrate that active baths are also capable of mediating effective interactions between suspended bodies. In particular we observe that a bath of swimming bacteria gives rise to a short range attraction similar to depletion forces in equilibrium colloidal suspensions. Using numerical simulations and experiments we show how the features of this interaction arise from the combination of nonequilibrium dynamics (peculiar of bacterial baths) and excluded volume effects.

  17. Xyloglucan Endotransglycosylase Activity in Carrot Cell Suspensions during cell Elongation and Somatic Embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hetherington, P. R.; Fry, S. C.

    1993-11-01

    Xyloglucan endotransglycosylase (XET) has been proposed to contribute to cell elongation through wall loosening. To explore this relationship further, we assayed this enzyme activity in suspensions of carrot (Daucus carota L.) cells exhibiting various rates of cell elongation. In one cell line, elongation was induced by dilution into dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)-free medium. During this elongation, 93% of the XET activity was found in the culture medium; in nonelongating controls, by contrast, 68% was found in the cell extracts even though the specific activity of these extracts was lower than in the elongating cells. By far the highest rates of XET secretion per cell were in the elongating cells. A second cell line was induced to undergo somatic embryogenesis by dilution into 2,4-D-free medium. During the first 6 d, numerous globular embryoids composed of small, isodiametric cells were formed in the absence of cell elongation; extracellular XET activity was almost undetectable, and intracellular specific activity markedly declined. After 6 d, heart, torpedo, and cotyledonary embryoids began to appear (i.e. cell elongation resumed); the intracellular specific activity of XET rose rapidly and >80% of the XET activity accumulated in the medium. Thus, nonexpanding cell suspensions (whether or not they were rapidly dividing) produced and secreted less XET activity than did expanding cells. We propose that a XET molecule has an ephemeral wall-loosening role while it passes through the load-bearing layer of the wall on its way from the protoplast into the culture medium.

  18. Xyloglucan Endotransglycosylase Activity in Carrot Cell Suspensions during cell Elongation and Somatic Embryogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Hetherington, P. R.; Fry, S. C.

    1993-01-01

    Xyloglucan endotransglycosylase (XET) has been proposed to contribute to cell elongation through wall loosening. To explore this relationship further, we assayed this enzyme activity in suspensions of carrot (Daucus carota L.) cells exhibiting various rates of cell elongation. In one cell line, elongation was induced by dilution into dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)-free medium. During this elongation, 93% of the XET activity was found in the culture medium; in nonelongating controls, by contrast, 68% was found in the cell extracts even though the specific activity of these extracts was lower than in the elongating cells. By far the highest rates of XET secretion per cell were in the elongating cells. A second cell line was induced to undergo somatic embryogenesis by dilution into 2,4-D-free medium. During the first 6 d, numerous globular embryoids composed of small, isodiametric cells were formed in the absence of cell elongation; extracellular XET activity was almost undetectable, and intracellular specific activity markedly declined. After 6 d, heart, torpedo, and cotyledonary embryoids began to appear (i.e. cell elongation resumed); the intracellular specific activity of XET rose rapidly and >80% of the XET activity accumulated in the medium. Thus, nonexpanding cell suspensions (whether or not they were rapidly dividing) produced and secreted less XET activity than did expanding cells. We propose that a XET molecule has an ephemeral wall-loosening role while it passes through the load-bearing layer of the wall on its way from the protoplast into the culture medium. PMID:12231995

  19. Nanostructured colloidal crystals from forced hydrolysis methods.

    PubMed

    Otal, Eugenio H; Granada, Mara; Troiani, Horacio E; Cánepa, Horacio; Walsöe de Reca, Noemí E

    2009-08-18

    In this work, an original route for ZnO nanostructured spherical colloids and their assembly into colloidal crystals are presented. The temporal evolution of crystal size and shape was followed by X-ray diffraction and the colloids size distribution by scanning electron microscopy. These spherical colloids showed a change in their size dispersion with aging time. Early stage suspensions, with a narrow size distribution, were settled to the bottom and dried with a slow evaporation rate to obtain colloidal crystals. This original route provides a new material for future applications in opalline photonic crystals, with a dielectric constant higher than that of classical materials (silica and latex). Moreover, this route means an improvement of previously reported data from the literature since it involves a one-pot strategy and room-temperature colloid assembly.

  20. Reliable fuzzy H∞ control for active suspension of in-wheel motor driven electric vehicles with dynamic damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xinxin; Naghdy, Fazel; Du, Haiping

    2017-03-01

    A fault-tolerant fuzzy H∞ control design approach for active suspension of in-wheel motor driven electric vehicles in the presence of sprung mass variation, actuator faults and control input constraints is proposed. The controller is designed based on the quarter-car active suspension model with a dynamic-damping-in-wheel-motor-driven-system, in which the suspended motor is operated as a dynamic absorber. The Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy model is used to model this suspension with possible sprung mass variation. The parallel-distributed compensation (PDC) scheme is deployed to derive a fault-tolerant fuzzy controller for the T-S fuzzy suspension model. In order to reduce the motor wear caused by the dynamic force transmitted to the in-wheel motor, the dynamic force is taken as an additional controlled output besides the traditional optimization objectives such as sprung mass acceleration, suspension deflection and actuator saturation. The H∞ performance of the proposed controller is derived as linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) comprising three equality constraints which are solved efficiently by means of MATLAB LMI Toolbox. The proposed controller is applied to an electric vehicle suspension and its effectiveness is demonstrated through computer simulation.

  1. Fuzzy chaos control for vehicle lateral dynamics based on active suspension system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chen; Chen, Long; Jiang, Haobin; Yuan, Chaochun; Xia, Tian

    2014-07-01

    The existing research of the active suspension system (ASS) mainly focuses on the different evaluation indexes and control strategies. Among the different components, the nonlinear characteristics of practical systems and control are usually not considered for vehicle lateral dynamics. But the vehicle model has some shortages on tyre model with side-slip angle, road adhesion coefficient, vertical load and velocity. In this paper, the nonlinear dynamic model of lateral system is considered and also the adaptive neural network of tire is introduced. By nonlinear analysis methods, such as the bifurcation diagram and Lyapunov exponent, it has shown that the lateral dynamics exhibits complicated motions with the forward speed. Then, a fuzzy control method is applied to the lateral system aiming to convert chaos into periodic motion using the linear-state feedback of an available lateral force with changing tire load. Finally, the rapid control prototyping is built to conduct the real vehicle test. By comparison of time response diagram, phase portraits and Lyapunov exponents at different work conditions, the results on step input and S-shaped road indicate that the slip angle and yaw velocity of lateral dynamics enter into stable domain and the results of test are consistent to the simulation and verified the correctness of simulation. And the Lyapunov exponents of the closed-loop system are becoming from positive to negative. This research proposes a fuzzy control method which has sufficient suppress chaotic motions as an effective active suspension system.

  2. Parameters Influencing the Photocatalytic Activity of Suspension-Sprayed TiO2 Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toma, Filofteia-Laura; Berger, Lutz-Michael; Shakhverdova, Irina; Leupolt, Beate; Potthoff, Annegret; Oelschlägel, Kathrin; Meissner, Tobias; Gomez, José Antonio Ibáñez; de Miguel, Yolanda

    2014-10-01

    Photocatalytic properties of titania have been studied very intensively for a variety of applications, including air and water purification. In order to clarify the influence of the phase composition and other parameters, thermal spraying with suspensions was applied to produce photocatalytically active titania coatings starting from two commercially available anatase and rutile submicron powders. Aqueous suspensions containing 40% solids by weight were sprayed with an HVOF process using ethylene as the fuel gas. The spray parameters were chosen in order to produce mechanically stable coatings and to preserve a high content of the initial crystalline phases of the powders. The coating microstructures, phase compositions, and surface properties were characterized. The photocatalytic performance was evaluated by degradation of the pink dye Rhodamine B (RB) using two techniques: degradation of an aqueous solution of RB and discoloration of impregnated RB. All the coatings exhibited photocatalytic activity to varying degrees, depending on the phase composition as well as other factors, namely, the coating microstructure, surface morphology, surface hydroxylation, light absorption, and interaction with the pollutant.

  3. Multiphysics modelling of multibody systems: application to car semi-active suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Docquier, N.; Poncelet, A.; Delannoy, M.; Fisette, P.

    2010-12-01

    The goal of the present article is to analyse the performances of a modern vehicle equipped with a novel suspension system linking front, rear, right and left cylinders via a semi-active hydraulic circuit, developed by the Tenneco Automotive company. In addition to improving the vehicle's vertical performances (in terms of comfort), both the stiff roll motion of the carbody and the soft wrap motion of the rear/front wheel-axle units can be obtained and tuned via eight electrovalves. The proposed system avoids the use of classical anti-roll bars, which would be incompatible with the wrap performance. A major problem of the project is to produce a realistic and efficient 3D multibody dynamic model of an Audi A6 coupled, at the equational level, with an hydraulic model of the suspension including cylinders, accumulators, valve characteristics, oil compressibility and pipe dynamics. As regards the hydraulic submodel, a particular attention is paid to assemble resistive components properly without resorting to the use of artificial volumes, as proposed by some software dealing with the dynamics of hydraulic systems. According to Tenneco Automotive requirements, this model must be produced in a Matlab/Simulink form, in particular for control purposes. Thanks to the symbolic approach underlying our multibody program; a unified hybrid model can be obtained as a unique plant dynamic block to be real-time integrated in the Simulink environment on a standard computer. Simulation results highlight the advantages of this new suspension system, in particular regarding the behaviour of the car which can remain stiff in roll for curve negotiation, while maintaining a soft wrap behaviour on uneven surfaces.

  4. Pneumatic active suspension system for a one-wheel car model using fuzzy reasoning and a disturbance observer.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Toshio; Takagi, Atsushi

    2004-09-01

    This paper presents the construction of a pneumatic active suspension system for a one-wheel car model using fuzzy reasoning and a disturbance observer. The one-wheel car model can be approximately described as a nonlinear two degrees of freedom system subject to excitation from a road profile. The active control is composed of fuzzy and disturbance controls, and functions by actuating a pneumatic actuator. A phase lead-lag compensator is inserted to counter the performance degradation due to the delay of the pneumatic actuator. The experimental result indicates that the proposed active suspension improves much the vibration suppression of the car model.

  5. Combined control effects of brake and active suspension control on the global safety of a full-car nonlinear model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchamna, Rodrigue; Youn, Edward; Youn, Iljoong

    2014-05-01

    This paper focuses on the active safety of a full-vehicle nonlinear model during cornering. At first, a previously developed electronic stability controller (ESC) based on vehicle simplified model is applied to the full-car nonlinear model in order to control the vehicle yaw rate and side-slip angle. The ESC system was shown beneficial not only in tracking the vehicle path as close as possible, but it also helped in reducing the vehicle roll angle and influences ride comfort and road-holding capability; to tackle that issue and also to have better attitude motion, making use of optimal control theory the active suspension control gain is developed from a vehicle linear model and used to compute the active suspension control force of the vehicle nonlinear model. The active suspension control algorithm used in this paper includes the integral action of the suspension deflection in order to make zero the suspension deflection steady state and keep the vehicle chassis flat. Keeping the chassis flat reduces the vehicle load transfer and that is helpful for road holding and yaw rate tracking. The effects of the two controllers when they work together are analysed using various computer simulations with different steering wheel manoeuvres.

  6. Colloidal polypyrrole

    DOEpatents

    Armes, Steven P.; Aldissi, Mahmoud

    1990-01-01

    Processable electrically conductive latex polymer compositions including colloidal particles of an oxidized, polymerized aromatic heterocyclic monomer, a stabilizing effective amount of a vinyl pyridine-containing polymer and dopant anions and a method of preparing such polymer compositions are disclosed.

  7. Hexadecapolar colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Puls, Owen; Tovkach, Oleh M.; Chernyshuk, Stanislav B.; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2016-02-01

    Outermost occupied electron shells of chemical elements can have symmetries resembling that of monopoles, dipoles, quadrupoles and octupoles corresponding to filled s-, p-, d- and f-orbitals. Theoretically, elements with hexadecapolar outer shells could also exist, but none of the known elements have filled g-orbitals. On the other hand, the research paradigm of `colloidal atoms' displays complexity of particle behaviour exceeding that of atomic counterparts, which is driven by DNA functionalization, geometric shape and topology and weak external stimuli. Here we describe elastic hexadecapoles formed by polymer microspheres dispersed in a liquid crystal, a nematic fluid of orientationally ordered molecular rods. Because of conically degenerate boundary conditions, the solid microspheres locally perturb the alignment of the nematic host, inducing hexadecapolar distortions that drive anisotropic colloidal interactions. We uncover physical underpinnings of formation of colloidal elastic hexadecapoles and describe the ensuing bonding inaccessible to elastic dipoles, quadrupoles and other nematic colloids studied previously.

  8. Hexadecapolar colloids

    PubMed Central

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Puls, Owen; Tovkach, Oleh M.; Chernyshuk, Stanislav B.; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2016-01-01

    Outermost occupied electron shells of chemical elements can have symmetries resembling that of monopoles, dipoles, quadrupoles and octupoles corresponding to filled s-, p-, d- and f-orbitals. Theoretically, elements with hexadecapolar outer shells could also exist, but none of the known elements have filled g-orbitals. On the other hand, the research paradigm of ‘colloidal atoms' displays complexity of particle behaviour exceeding that of atomic counterparts, which is driven by DNA functionalization, geometric shape and topology and weak external stimuli. Here we describe elastic hexadecapoles formed by polymer microspheres dispersed in a liquid crystal, a nematic fluid of orientationally ordered molecular rods. Because of conically degenerate boundary conditions, the solid microspheres locally perturb the alignment of the nematic host, inducing hexadecapolar distortions that drive anisotropic colloidal interactions. We uncover physical underpinnings of formation of colloidal elastic hexadecapoles and describe the ensuing bonding inaccessible to elastic dipoles, quadrupoles and other nematic colloids studied previously. PMID:26864184

  9. Hexadecapolar Colloids

    DOE PAGES

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Puls, Owen; Tovkach, Oleh M.; ...

    2016-02-11

    Outermost occupied electron shells of chemical elements can have symmetries resembling that of monopoles, dipoles, quadrupoles and octupoles corresponding to filled s-, p-, d- and forbitals. Theoretically, elements with hexadecapolar outer shells could also exist, but none of the known elements have filled g-orbitals. On the other hand, the research paradigm of ‘colloidal atoms’ displays complexity of particle behaviour exceeding that of atomic counterparts, which is driven by DNA functionalization, geometric shape and topology and weak external stimuli. We describe elastic hexadecapoles formed by polymer microspheres dispersed in a liquid crystal, a nematic fluid of orientationally ordered molecular rods. Becausemore » of conically degenerate boundary conditions, the solid microspheres locally perturb the alignment of the nematic host, inducing hexadecapolar distortions that drive anisotropic colloidal interactions. We uncover physical underpinnings of formation of colloidal elastic hexadecapoles and report the ensuing bonding inaccessible to elastic dipoles, quadrupoles and other nematic colloids studied previously.« less

  10. Hexadecapolar Colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Senyuk, Bohdan; Puls, Owen; Tovkach, Oleh M.; Chernyshuk, Stanislav B.; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2016-02-11

    Outermost occupied electron shells of chemical elements can have symmetries resembling that of monopoles, dipoles, quadrupoles and octupoles corresponding to filled s-, p-, d- and forbitals. Theoretically, elements with hexadecapolar outer shells could also exist, but none of the known elements have filled g-orbitals. On the other hand, the research paradigm of ‘colloidal atoms’ displays complexity of particle behaviour exceeding that of atomic counterparts, which is driven by DNA functionalization, geometric shape and topology and weak external stimuli. We describe elastic hexadecapoles formed by polymer microspheres dispersed in a liquid crystal, a nematic fluid of orientationally ordered molecular rods. Because of conically degenerate boundary conditions, the solid microspheres locally perturb the alignment of the nematic host, inducing hexadecapolar distortions that drive anisotropic colloidal interactions. We uncover physical underpinnings of formation of colloidal elastic hexadecapoles and report the ensuing bonding inaccessible to elastic dipoles, quadrupoles and other nematic colloids studied previously.

  11. Size determinations of plutonium colloids using autocorrelation photon spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Triay, I.R.; Rundberg, R.S.; Mitchell, A.J.; Ott, M.A.; Hobart, D.E.; Palmer, P.D.; Newton, T.W.; Thompson, J.L.

    1989-12-01

    Autocorrelation Photon Spectroscopy (APS) is a light-scattering technique utilized to determine the size distribution of colloidal suspensions. The capabilities of the APS methodology have been assessed by analyzing colloids of known sizes. Plutonium(IV) colloid samples were prepared by a variety of methods including: dilution; peptization; and alpha-induced auto-oxidation of Pu(III). The size of theses Pu colloids was analyzed using APS. The sizes determined for the Pu colloids studied varied from 1 to 370 nanometers. 7 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Jasmonic and salicylic acids enhanced phytochemical production and biological activities in cell suspension cultures of spine gourd (Momordica dioica Roxb).

    PubMed

    Chung, Ill-Min; Rekha, Kaliyaperumal; Rajakumar, Govindasamy; Thiruvengadam, Muthu

    2017-03-01

    In vitro cell suspension culture was established for the production of commercially valuable phytochemicals in Momordica dioica. The influence of elicitors in jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) increased their effect on phytochemical production and biomass accumulation in M. dioica. The results indicate that compared with non-elicited cultures, JA- and SA-elicited cell suspension cultures had significantly enhanced phenolic, flavonoid, and carotenoid production, as well as antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antiproliferative activities. Furthermore, elicited cultures produced 22 phenolic compounds, such as flavonols, hydroxycinnamic acids, and hydroxybenzoic acids. Greater biomass production, phytochemical accumulation, and biological activity occurred in JA- than in SA-elicited cell cultures. This study is the first to successfully establish M. dioica cell suspension cultures for the production of phenolic compounds and carotenoids, as well as for biomass accumulation.

  13. Structural features and biological activity of xyloglucans from suspension-cultured plant cells.

    PubMed

    Joseleau, J P; Cartier, N; Chambat, G; Faik, A; Ruel, K

    1992-01-01

    Different xyloglucan (XG) fractions were isolated from Rubus fruticosus cells cultured in suspension. Sequential extraction showed that two distinct xyloglucans existed in the primary walls. The first could be easily extracted in alkali and the second was tightly associated to cellulose. A third fraction was isolated from the extracellular polysaccharides of the culture medium. The alkali-soluble XG and the extracellular XG showed many structural features in common. By use of an anti-XG polyclonal antibody, electron microscopy examination suggests that the extracellular hemicellulose is progressively released from the wall by a sloughing mechanism. Oligosaccharides prepared from the extracellular XG were purified and their structure examined by FAB-ms technique. When the nonasaccharide was added at low concentrations (10(-5) mg/ml) to the culture medium it was able to elicit several different glycanohydrolase activities associated to the cell wall.

  14. VFC - Variational Feedback Controller and its application to semi-active suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepe, G.; Carcaterra, A.

    2016-08-01

    Active and semi-active control of oscillating devices and structures is a challenging field and this paper proposes an original investigation based on variational controls that can be successfully applied to mechanical systems. The method produces a general class of new controllers, named VFC - Variational Feedback Controllers, that is the main theoretical contribution of the paper. The value of the theory relies on using a reformulation of the Variational Optimal Control Theory, that has in general the limit of producing control program strategies and not directly feedback control methods. The difficulties are in fact related to the intrinsic nature of the variational optimal control, that must solve initial and final boundary conditions. A special definition of the class of the considered objective functions, permits to skip this difficulty, producing a pure feedback control. The presented theory goes beyond with respect to the most acknowledged LQR variational-based techniques, in that VFC can be applied to more general nonlinear dynamical systems, even with finite time horizon. To test the effectiveness of the novel approach in real engineering problems, a deep investigation on nonlinear suspension systems treated by VFC is proposed in this paper. To this aim, VFC is systematically compared with the most recent methods available in this field and suitable to deal with nonlinear system control of car suspensions. In particular, the comparative analysis is made in terms of both comfort and handling key performance indexes, that permits to easily and significantly compare different control logics, such as the Sky-hook and Ground-hook control families, the Acceleration and Power Driven Dampers. The results of this comparison are collected in a performance plane, having comfort and handling indexes as coordinate axes, showing that VFC controllers completely cover the regions reached by the other mentioned control logics in this plane, but reveal to have access to

  15. Thermophoresis of charged colloidal particles.

    PubMed

    Fayolle, Sébastien; Bickel, Thomas; Würger, Alois

    2008-04-01

    Thermally induced particle flow in a charged colloidal suspension is studied in a fluid-mechanical approach. The force density acting on the charged boundary layer is derived in detail. From Stokes' equation with no-slip boundary conditions at the particle surface, we obtain the particle drift velocity and the thermophoretic transport coefficients. The results are discussed in view of previous work and available experimental data.

  16. Colloid-based multiplexed method for screening plant biomass-degrading glycoside hydrolase activities in microbial communities

    SciTech Connect

    Reindl, W.; Deng, K.; Gladden, J.M.; Cheng, G.; Wong, A.; Singer, S.W.; Singh, S.; Lee, J.-C.; Yao, J.-S.; Hazen, T.C.; Singh, A.K; Simmons, B.A.; Adams, P.D.; Northen, T.R.

    2011-05-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis of long-chain polysaccharides is a crucial step in the conversion of biomass to lignocellulosic biofuels. The identification and characterization of optimal glycoside hydrolases is dependent on enzyme activity assays, however existing methods are limited in terms of compatibility with a broad range of reaction conditions, sample complexity, and especially multiplexity. The method we present is a multiplexed approach based on Nanostructure-Initiator Mass Spectrometry (NIMS) that allowed studying several glycolytic activities in parallel under diverse assay conditions. Although the substrate analogs carried a highly hydrophobic perfluorinated tag, assays could be performed in aqueous solutions due colloid formation of the substrate molecules. We first validated our method by analyzing known {beta}-glucosidase and {beta}-xylosidase activities in single and parallel assay setups, followed by the identification and characterization of yet unknown glycoside hydrolase activities in microbial communities.

  17. Enhanced Production of Anthraquinones and Phenolic Compounds and Biological Activities in the Cell Suspension Cultures of Polygonum multiflorum.

    PubMed

    Thiruvengadam, Muthu; Rekha, Kaliyaperumal; Rajakumar, Govindasamy; Lee, Taek-Jun; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Chung, Ill-Min

    2016-11-16

    Anthraquinones (AQs) and phenolic compounds are important phytochemicals that are biosynthesized in cell suspension cultures of Polygonum multiflorum. We wanted to optimize the effects of plant growth regulators (PGRs), media, sucrose, l-glutamine, jasmonic acid (JA), and salicylic acid (SA) for the production of phytochemicals and biomass accumulation in a cell suspension culture of P. multiflorum. The medium containing Murashige and Skoog (MS) salts and 4% sucrose supplemented with 1 mg/L 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 0.5 mg/L thidiazuron, and 100 µM l-glutamine at 28 days of cell suspension culture was suitable for biomass accumulation and AQ production. Maximum biomass accumulation (12.5 and 12.35 g fresh mass (FM); 3 and 2.93 g dry mass (DM)) and AQ production (emodin 295.20 and 282 mg/g DM; physcion 421.55 and 410.25 mg/g DM) were observed using 100 µM JA and SA, respectively. JA- and SA-elicited cell cultures showed several-fold higher biomass accumulation and AQ production than the control cell cultures. Furthermore, the cell suspension cultures effectively produced 23 phenolic compounds, such as flavonols and hydroxycinnamic and hydroxybenzoic acid derivatives. PGR-, JA-, and SA-elicited cell cultures produced a higher amount of AQs and phenolic compounds. Because of these metabolic changes, the antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer activities were high in the PGR-, JA-, and SA-elicited cell cultures. The results showed that the elicitors (JA and SA) induced the enhancement of biomass accumulation and phytochemical (AQs and phenolic compounds) production as well as biological activities in the cell suspension cultures of P. multiflorum. This optimized protocol can be developed for large-scale biomass accumulation and production of phytochemicals (AQs and phenolic compounds) from cell suspension cultures, and the phytochemicals can be used for various biological activities.

  18. Enhanced Production of Anthraquinones and Phenolic Compounds and Biological Activities in the Cell Suspension Cultures of Polygonum multiflorum

    PubMed Central

    Thiruvengadam, Muthu; Rekha, Kaliyaperumal; Rajakumar, Govindasamy; Lee, Taek-Jun; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Chung, Ill-Min

    2016-01-01

    Anthraquinones (AQs) and phenolic compounds are important phytochemicals that are biosynthesized in cell suspension cultures of Polygonum multiflorum. We wanted to optimize the effects of plant growth regulators (PGRs), media, sucrose, l-glutamine, jasmonic acid (JA), and salicylic acid (SA) for the production of phytochemicals and biomass accumulation in a cell suspension culture of P. multiflorum. The medium containing Murashige and Skoog (MS) salts and 4% sucrose supplemented with 1 mg/L 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 0.5 mg/L thidiazuron, and 100 µM l-glutamine at 28 days of cell suspension culture was suitable for biomass accumulation and AQ production. Maximum biomass accumulation (12.5 and 12.35 g fresh mass (FM); 3 and 2.93 g dry mass (DM)) and AQ production (emodin 295.20 and 282 mg/g DM; physcion 421.55 and 410.25 mg/g DM) were observed using 100 µM JA and SA, respectively. JA- and SA-elicited cell cultures showed several-fold higher biomass accumulation and AQ production than the control cell cultures. Furthermore, the cell suspension cultures effectively produced 23 phenolic compounds, such as flavonols and hydroxycinnamic and hydroxybenzoic acid derivatives. PGR-, JA-, and SA-elicited cell cultures produced a higher amount of AQs and phenolic compounds. Because of these metabolic changes, the antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer activities were high in the PGR-, JA-, and SA-elicited cell cultures. The results showed that the elicitors (JA and SA) induced the enhancement of biomass accumulation and phytochemical (AQs and phenolic compounds) production as well as biological activities in the cell suspension cultures of P. multiflorum. This optimized protocol can be developed for large-scale biomass accumulation and production of phytochemicals (AQs and phenolic compounds) from cell suspension cultures, and the phytochemicals can be used for various biological activities. PMID:27854330

  19. Dynamics of evaporative colloidal patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, C. Nadir; Wu, Ning; Mandre, Shreyas; Aizenberg, Joanna; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-09-01

    Drying suspensions often leave behind complex patterns of particulates, as might be seen in the coffee stains on a table. Here, we consider the dynamics of periodic band or uniform solid film formation on a vertical plate suspended partially in a drying colloidal solution. Direct observations allow us to visualize the dynamics of band and film deposition, where both are made of multiple layers of close packed particles. We further see that there is a transition between banding and filming when the colloidal concentration is varied. A minimal theory of the liquid meniscus motion along the plate reveals the dynamics of the banding and its transition to the filming as a function of the ratio of deposition and evaporation rates. We also provide a complementary multiphase model of colloids dissolved in the liquid, which couples the inhomogeneous evaporation at the evolving meniscus to the fluid and particulate flows and the transition from a dilute suspension to a porous plug. This allows us to determine the concentration dependence of the bandwidth and the deposition rate. Together, our findings allow for the control of drying-induced patterning as a function of the colloidal concentration and evaporation rate.

  20. Transport in charged colloids driven by thermoelectricity.

    PubMed

    Würger, Alois

    2008-09-05

    We study the thermal diffusion coefficient D{T} of a charged colloid in a temperature gradient, and find that it is to a large extent determined by the thermoelectric response of the electrolyte solution. The thermally induced salinity gradient leads in general to a strong increase with temperature. The difference of the heat of transport of coions and counterions gives rise to a thermoelectric field that drives the colloid to the cold or to the warm, depending on the sign of its charge. Our results provide an explanation for recent experimental findings on thermophoresis in colloidal suspensions.

  1. Aggregation and Gelation of Anisometric Colloidal Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohraz, Ali; Solomon, Michael J.

    2002-11-01

    The quiescent and flow-induced structure and dynamics of colloidal aggregates and gels of anisometric particles are studied by means of static and dynamic light scattering. Ground-based studies of weak gels are possible due to the submicron size of the boehmite rod suspensions investigated; however, microgravity conditions would be required for more general studies. The properties of colloidal rod suspensions are compared to typical properties of spherical particle gels to understand the role of anisotropic excluded volume on gel structure and dynamics. The structure and dynamics of colloidal aggregates and gels have long been of scientific and technological interest; however, most research has focused on suspensions of spherical particles. Yet, aggregates and gels of anisometric particles - colloidal rods and platelets - may exhibit structure and dynamics that are quite different from spherical colloids. For example, suspensions of colloidal rods gel at extremely low volume fractions and form birefringent sediments. The rheology of solutions and gels of colloidal rods and platelets differs dramatically from that of colloidal spheres. Scientifically, studies with anisometric particles offer the opportunity to assess the role of anisotropic excluded volume and particle orientation in aggregates and gels. Technologically, anisometric colloids find use in a wide range of materials such as ceramics, polymer nanocomposites, well-bore drilling fluids and magnetic storage media. Model colloidal boehmite rods of approximately monodisperse dimension and aspect ratio have been synthesized according to the method of Philipse and coworkers. In aqueous solution, these materials undergo gelation upon the addition of divalent salt. By means of a novel grafting reaction and procedure for solvent refractive index matching, the rods have also been dispersed in mixed organic solvents. In this case, gelation is induced by means of depletion interaction. We report the effect of

  2. Study of the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of residual impurities in hydroxylamine-reduced silver colloid and the effects of anions on the colloid activity.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiao; Gu, Huaimin; Liu, Fangfang

    2012-03-01

    The paper investigated the residual ions in hydroxylamine-reduced silver colloid (HRSC) and the relationship between the condition of HRSC and the enhanced mechanisms of this colloid. We also detected the SERS of MB and studied the effects of anions on the Raman signal. In the case of HRSC, the bands of residual ions diminish while the bands of Ag-anions increase gradually with increasing the concentrations of Cl(-) and NO(3)(-). It means the affinity of residual ions on the silver surface is weaker than that of Cl(-) and NO(3)(-) and the residual ions are replaced gradually by the added Cl(-) or NO(3)(-). The Raman signal of residual ions can be detected by treatment with anions that do not bind strongly to the silver surface, such as SO(4)(2-). The most intense band of Ag-anions bonds can be also observed when adding weakly binding anions to the colloid. However, the anions which make up the Ag-anions bonds are residual Cl(-) and the effect of weakly binding anions is only to aggregate the silver particles. Residual Cl(-) can be replaced by I(-) which has the highest affinity. From the detection of methylene blue (MB), the effects of anions on the enhancement of Raman signal are discussed in detail, and these findings could make the conditions suitable for detecting analytes in high efficiency. This study will have a profound implication to SERS users about their interpretation of SERS spectra when obtaining these anomalous bands.

  3. Colloidal Covalent Organic Frameworks

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Covalent organic frameworks (COFs) are two- or three-dimensional (2D or 3D) polymer networks with designed topology and chemical functionality, permanent porosity, and high surface areas. These features are potentially useful for a broad range of applications, including catalysis, optoelectronics, and energy storage devices. But current COF syntheses offer poor control over the material’s morphology and final form, generally providing insoluble and unprocessable microcrystalline powder aggregates. COF polymerizations are often performed under conditions in which the monomers are only partially soluble in the reaction solvent, and this heterogeneity has hindered understanding of their polymerization or crystallization processes. Here we report homogeneous polymerization conditions for boronate ester-linked, 2D COFs that inhibit crystallite precipitation, resulting in stable colloidal suspensions of 2D COF nanoparticles. The hexagonal, layered structures of the colloids are confirmed by small-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering, and kinetic characterization provides insight into the growth process. The colloid size is modulated by solvent conditions, and the technique is demonstrated for four 2D boronate ester-linked COFs. The diameter of individual COF nanoparticles in solution is monitored and quantified during COF growth and stabilization at elevated temperature using in situ variable-temperature liquid cell transmission electron microscopy imaging, a new characterization technique that complements conventional bulk scattering techniques. Solution casting of the colloids yields a free-standing transparent COF film with retained crystallinity and porosity, as well as preferential crystallite orientation. Collectively this structural control provides new opportunities for understanding COF formation and designing morphologies for device applications. PMID:28149954

  4. Feasibility of colloidal silver SERS for rapid bacterial screening

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrate-reduced silver colloids have been used extensively for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) study and are commonly characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy. In this work, relative standard deviation (RSD) of SERS spectra from silver colloidal suspensions and ratios of SERS peaks from sma...

  5. Investigation of influence of NaOH and NaCl activating solutions on bentonite stabilization in suspension fertilizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Krystyna; Hoffmann, Józef; Mikła, Daniel; Huculak-Mä Czka, Marta; Skut, Jakub

    2010-05-01

    1. INTRODUCTION Regular plants growth and their metabolic activity are determined by the macro- (C, H, O, N, P, S, K, Ca, Mg) and micronutrients (Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, B, Mo, Cl, Ni). The role of these elements is very important, the excess as well as the deficiency have the negative influence on their development [1]. In order to increase yields and quality of crops a mineral, organic and mineral-organic fertilizers are applied. In the last years suspension fertilizers have been of great significance, taking the agricultural benefits into consideration. Suspension fertilizers are products of a new generation on account of higher nutrients concentrations than in the majority of other fertilizers, what makes them more efficient. Suspension fertilizers differ from solid fertilizers in more regular distribution on field. Nutrients are more concentrated what is economically relevant on account of the facilitated transportation. Examinations indicated, that nutrients from suspension fertilizers are more available than from solid fertilizers. The high concentration of nutrients in fertilizer is obtained by introducing a substance which holds them regularly in the suspension. Bentonites are the substances used for stabilization of suspension fertilizers most often [2,3]. Bentonites belong to ore of clay minerals, primarily made from minerals of smectite group, montmorillonite especially [4]. Bentonite loams were formulated as a result of Aluminium Silicate-bearing Rocks weathering and subsequent sedimentation in the aqueous environment. Characteristic features of rocks of the smectite group are their ability to absorb water (swelling), to form thixotrophic suspensions which aren't undergoing sedimentation process for a long time; as well as susceptibility to absorb cations and organic substances [4,5]. Therefore investigations have been carried out in order to evaluate the possibility of application of diverse loamy raw materials as suspension stabilizers for fertilizer

  6. Self-Consistent Ornstein-Zernike Approximation (SCOZA) and exact second virial coefficients and their relationship with critical temperature for colloidal or protein suspensions with short-ranged attractive interactions.

    PubMed

    Gazzillo, Domenico; Pini, Davide

    2013-10-28

    We focus on the second virial coefficient B2 of fluids with molecules interacting through hard-sphere potentials plus very short-ranged attractions, namely, with a range of attraction smaller than half hard-sphere diameter. This kind of interactions is found in colloidal or protein suspensions, while the interest in B2 stems from the relation between this quantity and some other properties of these fluid systems. Since the SCOZA (Self-Consistent Ornstein-Zernike Approximation) integral equation is known to yield accurate thermodynamic and structural predictions even near phase transitions and in the critical region, we investigate B2(SCOZA) and compare it with B2(exact), for some typical potential models. The aim of the paper is however twofold. First, by expanding in powers of density the condition of thermodynamic consistency included in the SCOZA integral equation, a general analytic expression for B2(SCOZA) is derived. For a given potential model, a comparison between B2(SCOZA) and B2(exact) may help to estimate the regimes where the SCOZA closure is reliable. Second, following the Vliegenthart-Lekkerkerker (VL) and Noro-Frenkel suggestions, the relationship between the critical B2 and the critical temperature Tc is discussed in detail for two prototype models: the square-well (SW) potential and the hard-sphere attractive Yukawa (HSY) one. The known simulation data for the SW model are revisited, while for the HSY model new SCOZA results have been generated. Although B2(HSY) at the critical temperature is found to be a slowly varying function of the range of Yukawa attraction ΔY over a wide interval of ΔY, it turns out to diverge as ΔY vanishes. For fluids with very short-ranged attractions, such a behavior contrasts with the VL assumption that B2 at the critical temperature should be nearly independent of the range of attraction. A very simple analytic representation is found for the available Monte Carlo data for Tc(HSY) and B2(HSY) as functions of the

  7. Pore water colloid properties in argillaceous sedimentary rocks.

    PubMed

    Degueldre, Claude; Cloet, Veerle

    2016-11-01

    The focus of this work is to evaluate the colloid nature, concentration and size distribution in the pore water of Opalinus Clay and other sedimentary host rocks identified for a potential radioactive waste repository in Switzerland. Because colloids could not be measured in representative undisturbed porewater of these host rocks, predictive modelling based on data from field and laboratory studies is applied. This approach allowed estimating the nature, concentration and size distributions of the colloids in the pore water of these host rocks. As a result of field campaigns, groundwater colloid concentrations are investigated on the basis of their size distribution quantified experimentally using single particle counting techniques. The colloid properties are estimated considering data gained from analogue hydrogeochemical systems ranging from mylonite features in crystalline fissures to sedimentary formations. The colloid concentrations were analysed as a function of the alkaline and alkaline earth element concentrations. Laboratory batch results on clay colloid generation from compacted pellets in quasi-stagnant water are also reported. Experiments with colloids in batch containers indicate that the size distribution of a colloidal suspension evolves toward a common particle size distribution independently of initial conditions. The final suspension size distribution was found to be a function of the attachment factor of the colloids. Finally, calculations were performed using a novel colloid distribution model based on colloid generation, aggregation and sedimentation rates to predict under in-situ conditions what makes colloid concentrations and size distributions batch- or fracture-size dependent. The data presented so far are compared with the field and laboratory data. The colloid occurrence, stability and mobility have been evaluated for the water of the considered potential host rocks. In the pore water of the considered sedimentary host rocks, the clay

  8. Influence of heteroaggregation processes between intrinsic colloids and carrier colloids on cerium(III) mobility through fractured carbonate rocks.

    PubMed

    Tran, Emily; Klein Ben-David, Ofra; Teutch, Nadya; Weisbrod, Noam

    2016-09-01

    Colloid facilitated transport of radionuclides has been implicated as a major transport vector for leaked nuclear waste in the subsurface. Sorption of radionuclides onto mobile carrier colloids such as bentonite and humic acid often accelerates their transport through saturated rock fractures. Here, we employ column studies to investigate the impact of intrinsic, bentonite and humic acid colloids on the transport and recovery of Ce(III) through a fractured chalk core. Ce(III) recovery where either bentonite or humic colloids were added was 7.7-26.9% Ce for all experiments. Greater Ce(III) recovery was observed when both types of carrier colloids were present (25.4-37.4%). When only bentonite colloids were present, Ce(III) appeared to be fractionated between chemical sorption to the bentonite colloid surfaces and heteroaggregation of bentonite colloids with intrinsic carbonate colloids, precipitated naturally in solution. However, scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and colloid stability experiments reveal that in suspensions of humic acid colloids, colloid-facilitated Ce(III) migration results only from the latter attachment mechanism rather than from chemical sorption. This observed heteroaggregation of different colloid types may be an important factor to consider when predicting potential mobility of leaked radionuclides from geological repositories for spent fuel located in carbonate rocks.

  9. Programmed cell death activated by Rose Bengal in Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension cultures requires functional chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Jorge; González-Pérez, Sergio; García-García, Francisco; Daly, Cara T.; Lorenzo, Óscar; Revuelta, José L.; McCabe, Paul F.; Arellano, Juan B.

    2014-01-01

    Light-grown Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture (ACSC) were subjected to mild photooxidative damage with Rose Bengal (RB) with the aim of gaining a better understanding of singlet oxygen-mediated defence responses in plants. Additionally, ACSC were treated with H2O2 at concentrations that induced comparable levels of protein oxidation damage. Under low to medium light conditions, both RB and H2O2 treatments activated transcriptional defence responses and inhibited photosynthetic activity, but they differed in that programmed cell death (PCD) was only observed in cells treated with RB. When dark-grown ACSC were subjected to RB in the light, PCD was suppressed, indicating that the singlet oxygen-mediated signalling pathway in ACSC requires functional chloroplasts. Analysis of up-regulated transcripts in light-grown ACSC, treated with RB in the light, showed that both singlet oxygen-responsive transcripts and transcripts with a key role in hormone-activated PCD (i.e. ethylene and jasmonic acid) were present. A co-regulation analysis proved that ACSC treated with RB exhibited higher correlation with the conditional fluorescence (flu) mutant than with other singlet oxygen-producing mutants or wild-type plants subjected to high light. However, there was no evidence for the up-regulation of EDS1, suggesting that activation of PCD was not associated with the EXECUTER- and EDS1-dependent signalling pathway described in the flu mutant. Indigo Carmine and Methylene Violet, two photosensitizers unable to enter chloroplasts, did not activate transcriptional defence responses in ACSC; however, whether this was due to their location or to their inherently low singlet oxygen quantum efficiencies was not determined. PMID:24723397

  10. Nanodiamond in Colloidal Suspension: Electrophoresis; Other Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meshik, A. P.; Pravdivtseva, O. V.; Hohenberg, C. M.

    2002-01-01

    Selective laser extraction has demonstrated that meteoritic diamonds may consist of subpopulations with different optical absorption properties, but it is not clear what makes them optically different. More work is needed to understand the mechanism for selective laser extraction. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  11. Colloidal polyaniline

    DOEpatents

    Armes, Steven P.; Aldissi, Mahmoud

    1990-01-01

    Processable electrically conductive latex polymer compositions including colloidal particles of an oxidized, polymerized amino-substituted aromatic monomer, a stabilizing effective amount of a random copolymer containing amino-benzene type moieties as side chain constituents, and dopant anions, and a method of preparing such polymer compositions are provided.

  12. Effective Forces Between Colloidal Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tehver, Riina; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Koplik, Joel

    1999-01-01

    Colloidal suspensions have proven to be excellent model systems for the study of condensed matter and its phase behavior. Many of the properties of colloidal suspensions can be investigated with a systematic variation of the characteristics of the systems and, in addition, the energy, length and time scales associated with them allow for experimental probing of otherwise inaccessible regimes. The latter property also makes colloidal systems vulnerable to external influences such as gravity. Experiments performed in micro-ravity by Chaikin and Russell have been invaluable in extracting the true behavior of the systems without an external field. Weitz and Pusey intend to use mixtures of colloidal particles with additives such as polymers to induce aggregation and form weak, tenuous, highly disordered fractal structures that would be stable in the absence of gravitational forces. When dispersed in a polarizable medium, colloidal particles can ionize, emitting counterions into the solution. The standard interaction potential in these charged colloidal suspensions was first obtained by Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey and Overbeek. The DLVO potential is obtained in the mean-field linearized Poisson-Boltzmann approximation and thus has limited applicability. For more precise calculations, we have used ab initio density functional theory. In our model, colloidal particles are charged hard spheres, the counterions are described by a continuum density field and the solvent is treated as a homogeneous medium with a specified dielectric constant. We calculate the effective forces between charged colloidal particles by integrating over the solvent and counterion degrees of freedom, taking into account the direct interactions between the particles as well as particle-counterion, counterion-counterion Coulomb, counterion entropic and correlation contributions. We obtain the effective interaction potential between charged colloidal particles in different configurations. We evaluate two

  13. SERS active colloidal nanoparticles for the detection of small blood biomarkers using aptamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Haley; Mabbott, Samuel; Jackson, George W.; Graham, Duncan; Cote, Gerard L.

    2015-03-01

    Functionalized colloidal nanoparticles for SERS serve as a promising multifunctional assay component for blood biomarker detection. Proper design of these nanoprobes through conjugation to spectral tags, protective polymers, and sensing ligands can provide experimental control over the sensitivity, range, reproducibility, particle stability, and integration with biorecognition assays. Additionally, the optical properties and degree of electromagnetic SERS signal enhancement can be altered and monitored through tuning the nanoparticle shape, size, material and the colloid's local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). Aptamers, synthetic affinity ligands derived from nucleic acids, provide a number of advantages for biorecognition of small molecules and toxins with low immunogenicity. DNA aptamers are simpler and more economical to produce at large scale, are capable of greater specificity and affinity than antibodies, are easily tailored to specific functional groups, can be used to tune inter-particle distance and shift the LSPR, and their intrinsic negative charge can be utilized for additional particle stability.1,2 Herein, a "turn-off" competitive binding assay platform involving two different plasmonic nanoparticles for the detection of the toxin bisphenol A (BPA) using SERS is presented. A derivative of the toxin is immobilized onto a silver coated magnetic nanoparticle (Ag@MNP), and a second solid silver nanoparticle (AgNP) is functionalized with the BPA aptamer and a Raman reporter molecule (RRM). The capture (Ag@MNP) and probe (AgNP) particles are mixed and the aptamer binding interaction draws the nanoparticles closer together, forming an assembly that results in an increased SERS signal intensity. This aptamer mediated assembly of the two nanoparticles results in a 100x enhancement of the SERS signal intensity from the RRM. These pre-bound aptamer/nanoparticle conjugates were then exposed to BPA in free solution and the competitive binding event was monitored

  14. Rheology and dynamics of colloidal superballs.

    PubMed

    Royer, John R; Burton, George L; Blair, Daniel L; Hudson, Steven D

    2015-07-28

    Recent advances in colloidal synthesis make it possible to generate a wide array of precisely controlled, non-spherical particles. This provides a unique opportunity to probe the role that particle shape plays in the dynamics of colloidal suspensions, particularly at higher volume fractions, where particle interactions are important. We examine the role of particle shape by characterizing both the bulk rheology and micro-scale diffusion in a suspension of pseudo-cubic silica superballs. Working with these well-characterized shaped colloids, we can disentangle shape effects in the hydrodynamics of isolated particles from shape-mediated particle interactions. We find that the hydrodynamic properties of isolated superballs are marginally different from comparably sized hard spheres. However, shape-mediated interactions modify the suspension microstructure, leading to significant differences in the self-diffusion of the superballs. While this excluded volume interaction can be captured with a rescaling of the superball volume fraction, we observe qualitative differences in the shear thickening behavior of moderately concentrated superball suspensions that defy simple rescaling onto hard sphere results. This study helps to define the unknowns associated with the effects of shape on the rheology and dynamics of colloidal solutions.

  15. Suspension and Debarment: DOD Has Active Referral Processes, but Action Needed to Promote Transparency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    investigation and any ensuing legal proceedings .1 You requested that we review the use of suspensions and debarments by DOD to protect the government from...should be finalized, modified, or terminated; or (3) if another tool could be utilized to resolve the suspension or debarment proceeding , such as an...investigation and any ensuing legal proceedings and generally not exceed 12 months unless legal proceeding are initiated. If legal proceedings are not

  16. Yes, pair correlations alone do determine sedimentation profiles of highly charged colloids.

    PubMed

    Belloni, Luc

    2005-11-22

    Recent analyses of sedimentation profiles in charged colloidal suspensions are examined in view of general, somewhat underestimated, concepts. It is recalled that the standard equation for osmotic pressure equilibrium, which involves pair correlations between colloids only, remains valid in the presence of long-range Coulombic interactions. The entropy of the counterions and the electric field generated by the spatial inhomogeneity are implicitly taken into account in the colloid structure factor through the compressibility equation and local electroneutrality conditions. Limiting the macroscopic analysis to the pure electric-field contribution or, equivalently, to the ideal ionic pressure, corresponds to the incorrect, bare Debye-Huckel approximation for the colloid-colloid correlations. A one-component description with reasonable Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek-type ion-averaged effective pair potential between colloids is sufficient to derive the sedimentation profile of highly charged, weakly screened colloidal suspensions. The macroscopic electric field is directly related to the microscopic electrostatic potential around the colloids.

  17. Polymer-Induced Depletion Interaction and Its Effect on Colloidal Sedimentation in Colloid-Polymer Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, Penger

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we focus on the polymer-induced depletion attraction and its effect on colloidal sedimentation in colloid-polymer mixtures. We first report a small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of the depletion effect in a mixture of hard-sphere-like colloid and non-adsorbing polymer. Then we present results of our recent sedimentation measurements in the same colloid-polymer mixture. A key parameter in controlling the sedimentation of heavy colloidal particles is the interparticle potential U(tau), which is the work required to bring two colloidal particles from infinity to a distance tau under a give solvent condition. This potential is known to affect the average settling velocity of the particles and experimentally one needs to have a way to continuously vary U(tau) in order to test the theory. The interaction potential U(tau) can be altered by adding polymer molecules into the colloidal suspension. In a mixture of colloid and non-adsorbing polymer, the potential U(tau) can develop an attractive well because of the depletion effect, in that the polymer chains are expelled from the region between two colloidal particles when their surface separation becomes smaller than the size of the polymer chains. The exclusion of polymer molecules from the space between the colloidal particles leads to an unbalanced osmotic pressure difference pushing the colloidal particles together, which results in an effective attraction between the two colloidal particles. The polymer-induced depletion attraction controls the phase stability of many colloid-polymer mixtures, which are directly of interest to industry.

  18. Non-linear modelling and control of semi-active suspensions with variable damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huang; Long, Chen; Yuan, Chao-Chun; Jiang, Hao-Bin

    2013-10-01

    Electro-hydraulic dampers can provide variable damping force that is modulated by varying the command current; furthermore, they offer advantages such as lower power, rapid response, lower cost, and simple hardware. However, accurate characterisation of non-linear f-v properties in pre-yield and force saturation in post-yield is still required. Meanwhile, traditional linear or quarter vehicle models contain various non-linearities. The development of a multi-body dynamics model is very complex, and therefore, SIMPACK was used with suitable improvements for model development and numerical simulations. A semi-active suspension was built based on a belief-desire-intention (BDI)-agent model framework. Vehicle handling dynamics were analysed, and a co-simulation analysis was conducted in SIMPACK and MATLAB to evaluate the BDI-agent controller. The design effectively improved ride comfort, handling stability, and driving safety. A rapid control prototype was built based on dSPACE to conduct a real vehicle test. The test and simulation results were consistent, which verified the simulation.

  19. Factors influencing a suspension test method for antimicrobial activity of disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Langsrud, S; Sundheim, G

    1998-12-01

    Factors influencing the numbers of Escherichia coli DSM 682 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538 surviving exposure to disinfectants were evaluated by factorial design. Aerobic conditions during pre-cultivation rendered E. coli more resistant to the lethal activity of benzalkonium chloride (BC) and a disinfectant containing grape fruit extract (GSE), whereas Staph. aureus became more sensitive. The degree of shaking and the pre-growth medium (tryptone soy broth or Mueller-Hinton broth) did not influence the result of the bactericidal test. The number of E. coli surviving BC treatment was significantly lower if the neutralizing broth contained thiosulphate, plate pouring was used instead of plate spreading, or the plates were incubated at 37 instead of 30 degrees C. The negative effect of plate pouring was also found with Staph. aureus. The use of filtration without prior neutralization of the disinfectant decreased the numbers of chlorine-treated, but not BC-treated, E. coli. The results showed that rigorous standardization is necessary to obtain good reproducibility of bactericidal suspension tests.

  20. Rosmarinic acid and antioxidant enzyme activities in Lavandula vera MM cell suspension culture: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, Milen; Abrashev, Radoslav; Krumova, Ekaterina; Demirevska, Klimentina; Ilieva, Mladenka; Angelova, Maria

    2009-11-01

    The growth and intracellular protein content of lavender (Lavandula vera MM) cell suspension culture was followed along with some antioxidant defense system members-non-enzymatic (rosmarinic acid) and enzymatic [superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1) and catalase (EC 1.11.1.6)]. It was found that the media content and the cultivation mode strongly influenced the production of plant defense compounds as well as the ratio between non-enzymatic and enzymatic ones. The bioreactor culture contains about two times more rosmarinic acid, superoxide dismutase, and catalase compared to the shake-flask cultivation. These findings are discussed with respect to the relative stress levels and plant antioxidant orchestra system. It was concluded that investigated defense system components (enzymatic and non-enzymatic) were closely associated in a complex balance. The three isoenzyme forms of SOD (Cu/ZnSOD, FeSOD, and MnSOD) in the cells of Lavandula vera were revealed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis, and the FeSOD isoform exhibited highest activity.

  1. Secretion of active recombinant phytase from soybean cell-suspension cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Li, J; Hegeman, C E; Hanlon, R W; Lacy, G H; Denbow, M D; Grabau, E A

    1997-01-01

    Phytase, an enzyme that degrades the phosphorus storage compound phytate, has the potential to enhance phosphorus availability in animal diets when engineered into soybean (Glycine max) seeds. The phytase gene from Aspergillus niger was inserted into soybean transformation plasmids under control of constitutive and seed-specific promoters, with and without a plant signal sequence. Suspension cultures were used to confirm phytase expression in soybean cells. Phytase mRNA was observed in cultures containing constitutively expressed constructs. Phytase activity was detected in the culture medium from transformants that received constructs containing the plant signal sequence, confirming expectations that the protein would follow the default secretory pathway. Secretion also facilitated characterization of the biochemical properties of recombinant phytase. Soybean-synthesized phytase had a lower molecular mass than did the fungal enzyme. However, deglycosylation of the recombinant and fungal phytase yielded polypeptides of identical molecular mass (49 kD). Temperature and pH optima of the recombinant phytase were indistinguishable from the commercially available fungal phytase. Thermal inactivation studies of the recombinant phytase suggested that the additional protein stability would be required to withstand the elevated temperatures involved in soybean processing. PMID:9232886

  2. Optimisation of active suspension control inputs for improved vehicle ride performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čorić, Mirko; Deur, Joško; Xu, Li; Tseng, H. Eric; Hrovat, Davor

    2016-07-01

    A collocation-type control variable optimisation method is used in the paper to analyse to which extent the fully active suspension (FAS) can improve the vehicle ride comfort while preserving the wheel holding ability. The method is first applied for a cosine-shaped bump road disturbance of different heights, and for both quarter-car and full 10 degree-of-freedom vehicle models. A nonlinear anti-wheel hop constraint is considered, and the influence of bump preview time period is analysed. The analysis is then extended to the case of square- or cosine-shaped pothole with different lengths, and the quarter-car model. In this case, the cost function is extended with FAS energy consumption and wheel damage resilience costs. The FAS action is found to be such to provide a wheel hop over the pothole, in order to avoid or minimise the damage at the pothole trailing edge. In the case of long pothole, when the FAS cannot provide the wheel hop, the wheel is travelling over the pothole bottom and then hops over the pothole trailing edge. The numerical optimisation results are accompanied by a simplified algebraic analysis.

  3. Formation Kinetics of Aqueous Suspensions of Fullerenes:Meeting in New Orleans.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable colloidal suspension of C60 is commonly achieved through various solvent exchange techniques. Nevertheless, the additives such as tetrahydrofuran may be retained in the C60 aggregates, which may influence the surface properties of the suspension. In this study, colloidal...

  4. Physics of Colloids in Space: Flight Hardware Operations on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, Michael P.; Bailey, Arthur E.; Jankovsky, Amy L.; Lorik, Tibor

    2002-01-01

    The Physics of Colloids in Space (PCS) experiment was launched on Space Shuttle STS-100 in April 2001 and integrated into EXpedite the PRocess of Experiments to Space Station Rack 2 on the International Space Station (ISS). This microgravity fluid physics investigation is being conducted in the ISS U.S. Lab 'Destiny' Module over a period of approximately thirteen months during the ISS assembly period from flight 6A through flight 9A. PCS is gathering data on the basic physical properties of simple colloidal suspensions by studying the structures that form. A colloid is a micron or submicron particle, be it solid, liquid, or gas. A colloidal suspension consists of these fine particles suspended in another medium. Common colloidal suspensions include paints, milk, salad dressings, cosmetics, and aerosols. Though these products are routinely produced and used, we still have much to learn about their behavior as well as the underlying properties of colloids in general. The long-term goal of the PCS investigation is to learn how to steer the growth of colloidal structures to create new materials. This experiment is the first part of a two-stage investigation conceived by Professor David Weitz of Harvard University (the Principal Investigator) along with Professor Peter Pusey of the University of Edinburgh (the Co-Investigator). This paper describes the flight hardware, experiment operations, and initial science findings of the first fluid physics payload to be conducted on ISS: The Physics of Colloids in Space.

  5. Dynamics of evaporative colloidal patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, L.; Kaplan, C. Nadir; Wu, Ning; Mandre, Shreyas; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2014-11-01

    Evaporating suspensions of colloidal particles lead to the formation of a variety of patterns, ranging from rings left behind a coffee drop to periodic bands or uniform solid films deposited on a substrate suspended vertically in a container of the colloidal solution. To characterize the transition between different types of patterns, we develop minimal models of the liquid meniscus deformation due to the evaporation and colloidal deposition. A complementary multiphase model allows us to investigate the detailed dynamics of patterning in a drying solvent. This approach couples the inhomogeneous evaporation at the evolving liquid-air interface to the dynamics inside the suspension, i.e. the liquid flow, local variations of the particle concentration, and the propagation of the deposition front where the solute forms a wet, incompressible porous medium at high concentrations. The results of our theory are in good agreement with direct observations. This research was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) under Award FA9550-09-1-0669-DOD35CAP and the Kavli Institute for Bionano Science and Technology at Harvard University.

  6. Influence of the active mass particle suspension in electrolyte upon corrosion of negative electrode of a lead-acid battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenev, Yu.; Shtompel, G.; Ostapenko, E.; Leonov, V.

    2014-07-01

    The influence of the suspension of positive active mass particles in the electrolyte on the performance of the negative electrode in a lead-acid battery is studied. A significant increase in the rate of corrosion of the lead electrode is shown when slime particles get in contact with its surface, which may result in the rise of macro-defects on the lugs of the negative electrodes.

  7. Effect of using a suspension training system on muscle activation during the performance of a front plank exercise.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Jeannette M; Bishop, Nicole S; Caines, Andrew M; Crane, Kalynn A; Feaver, Ashley M; Pearcey, Gregory E P

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the effect of suspension training on muscle activation during performance of variations of the plank exercise. Twenty-one participants took part. All individuals completed 2 repetitions each of 4 different plank exercises that consisted of a floor based plank, or planks with arms suspended, feet suspended, or feet and arms suspended using a TRX Suspension System. During plank performance, muscle activation was recorded from rectus abdominis, external oblique, rectus femoris, and serratus anterior (SA) muscles using electromyography. All planks were performed for a total of 3 seconds. Resulting muscle activation data were amplitude normalized, and root mean square activation was then determined over the full 3 second duration of the exercise. A significant main effect of plank type was found for all muscles. Post hoc analysis and effect size examination indicated that abdominal muscle activation was higher in all suspended conditions compared to the floor based plank. The highest level of abdominal muscle activation occurred in the arms suspended and arms/feet suspended conditions, which did not differ from one another. Rectus femoris activation was greatest during the arms suspended condition, whereas SA activity peaked during normal and feet suspended planks. These results indicate that suspension training as performed in this study seems to be an effective means of increasing muscle activation during the plank exercise. Contrary to expectations, the additional instability created by suspending both the arms and feet did not result in any additional abdominal muscle activation. These findings have implications in prescription and progression of core muscle training programs.

  8. In situ electrochemical activation of Ni-based colloids from an NiCl2 electrode and their advanced energy storage performance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kunfeng; Xue, Dongfeng

    2016-10-06

    The formation of electrochemical activated cations in electrode materials to induce multiple-electron transfer reactions is a challenge for high-energy storage systems. Herein, highly electroactive Ni-based colloidal electrode materials have been synthesized by in situ electrochemical activation of a NiCl2 electrode. The highest specific capacitance of the activated Ni-based electrodes was 10 286 F g(-1) at a current density of 3 A g(-1), indicating that a three-electron Faradaic redox reaction (Ni(3+) ↔ Ni) occurred. Upon potential cycling and constant potential activation, a decrease in the charge transfer resistance can be found. Activation and utilization of multiple-electron reactions is an efficient route to increase the energy density of supercapacitors. This newly designed colloidal pseudocapacitor is compatible with inorganic pseudocapacitor chemistry, which enables us to use metal cations directly via their commercial salts rather than their oxide/hydroxide compounds.

  9. Non-fragile multi-objective static output feedback control of vehicle active suspension with time-delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Yongsu; Zhao, Dingxuan; Yang, Bin; Han, Chenghao; Han, Kyongwon

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents an approach to design a delay-dependent non-fragile H∞/L2-L∞ static output feedback (SOF) controller for active suspension with input time-delay. The control problem of quarter-car active suspension with actuator time-delay is formulated to a H∞/L2-L∞ control problem. By employing a delay-dependent Lyapunov function, new existence conditions of delay-dependent non-fragile SOF H∞ controller and L2-L∞ controller are derived, respectively, in terms of the feasibility of bilinear matrix inequalities (BMIs). Then, a procedure based on linear matrix inequality optimisation and a hybrid algorithm of the particle swarm optimisation and differential evolution is used to solve an optimisation problem with BMI constraints. Design and simulation results of non-fragile H∞/L2-L∞ controller for active suspension show that the designed controller not only can achieve the optimal performance and stability of the closed-loop system in spite of the existence of the actuator time-delay, but also has significantly improved the non-fragility characteristics over controller perturbations.

  10. Enhanced colloidal stability of hydroxyapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borum, La Rhonda Terese

    Hydroxyapatite, Ca10(PO4)6(OH) 2 is the most thermodynamically stable calcium phosphate in physiological environments. Hence, it is the main inorganic mineral found in bone and teeth. Its colloidal stability, however, is poor because hydroxyapatite (HAp) particles exhibit sediment formation upon standing at short time periods, where agglomerates form and lead to non-homogeneous suspensions. Surface modification is a promising method to tailor the colloidal stability of hydroxyapatite for biomaterial applications. Three techniques to modify the HAp surface and enhance the colloidal stability of HAp were investigated. Modified particles were characterized by methods sensitive to surface chemistry changes, such as sedimentation studies, diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFT), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, and electrophoresis. Sedimentation studies demonstrated how effective each technique was in improving the colloidal stability of hydroxyapatite particles. Electrophoresis provided information on electrostatic interactions within each system. The first technique entailed an esterification reaction of the HAp surface with dodecyl alcohol at elevated temperatures. DRIFT results showed that dodecyl groups from the alcohol replaced acidic hydroxyl and phosphate sites on the HAp surface, giving rise to enhanced colloidal stability through steric interactions in ethanol suspensions. TGA curves gave insight to the degree of esterification for the esterified particles. Higher reaction temperatures give rise to a higher degree of esterification resulting in better colloidal stability. The second technique applied a silica coating on the HAp surface by the hydrolysis of tetraethyl orthosilicate in ethanol. Silica was coated onto the HAp surface at 5--75 wt% loading amounts. A combination of acid dissolution and x-ray diffraction (XRD), along with BET showed that the silica coating is complete at 50 wt% silica loading. The silica coating

  11. Colloidal titania-silica-iron oxide nanocomposites and the effect from silica thickness on the photocatalytic and bactericidal activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanhom, Padtaraporn; Charoenlap, Nisanart; Tomapatanaget, Boosayarat; Insin, Numpon

    2017-04-01

    New types of colloidal multifunctional nanocomposites that combine superparamagnetic character and high photocatalytic activity were synthesized and investigated. The superparamagnetic nanocomposites composed of anatase titania, silica, and iron oxide nanoparticles (TSI) were synthesized using thermal decomposition method followed by microemulsion method, without calcination at high temperature. Different techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) were used to characterize and confirm the structure of the nanocomposites. These nanocomposites showed high photocatalytic activity when used in the photodegradation of methylene blue under irradiation with a black light lamp. Moreover, the nanocomposites exhibited high antibacterial properties. From our study, the nanocomposites can be useful in various applications such as removal of pollutants with readily separation from the environment using an external magnetic field. These composites could effectively photo-degrade the dye at least three cycles without regeneration. The effects of silica shell thickness on the photocatalytic activity was investigated, and the thickness of 6 nm of the silica interlayer is enough for the inhibition of electron translocation between titania and iron oxide nanoparticles and maintaining the efficiency of photocatalytic activity of titania nanoparticles.

  12. Micro-mechanics of electrostatically stabilized suspensions of cellulose nanofibrils under steady state shear flow.

    PubMed

    Martoïa, F; Dumont, P J J; Orgéas, L; Belgacem, M N; Putaux, J-L

    2016-02-14

    In this study, we characterized and modeled the rheology of TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibril (NFC) aqueous suspensions with electrostatically stabilized and unflocculated nanofibrous structures. These colloidal suspensions of slender and wavy nanofibers exhibited a yield stress and a shear thinning behavior at low and high shear rates, respectively. Both the shear yield stress and the consistency of these suspensions were power-law functions of the NFC volume fraction. We developed an original multiscale model for the prediction of the rheology of these suspensions. At the nanoscale, the suspensions were described as concentrated systems where NFCs interacted with the Newtonian suspending fluid through Brownian motion and long range fluid-NFC hydrodynamic interactions, as well as with each other through short range hydrodynamic and repulsive colloidal interaction forces. These forces were estimated using both the experimental results and 3D networks of NFCs that were numerically generated to mimic the nanostructures of NFC suspensions under shear flow. They were in good agreement with theoretical and measured forces for model colloidal systems. The model showed the primary role played by short range hydrodynamic and colloidal interactions on the rheology of NFC suspensions. At low shear rates, the origin of the yield stress of NFC suspensions was attributed to the combined contribution of repulsive colloidal interactions and the topology of the entangled NFC networks in the suspensions. At high shear rates, both concurrent colloidal and short (in some cases long) range hydrodynamic interactions could be at the origin of the shear thinning behavior of NFC suspensions.

  13. Soil colloidal behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent understanding that organic and inorganic contaminants are often transported via colloidal particles has increased interest in colloid science. The primary importance of colloids in soil science stems from their surface reactivity and charge characteristics. Characterizations of size, shape,...

  14. A control performance analysis for MacPherson active suspension system under bounce sine sweep road profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, M. Fahezal; Sam, Yahaya Md.; Sudin, Shahdan; Aripin, M. Khairi

    2016-10-01

    This paper studies a control performance analysis for MacPherson active suspension system. The ride comfort quality is a very important specification for modern automotive suspension system. The Proportional Integral Sliding Mode Control-Evolutionary Strategy-Composite Nonlinear Feedback (PISMC-ES-CNF) controller is designed to solve the transient problem occurred in vertical acceleration of sprung mass. The control performance is tested by using PISMC-ES-CNF and compared with Sliding Mode Controller (SMC) and Composite Nonlinear Feedback (CNF) under Bounce Sine Sweep road profile. The ISO 2631-1, 1997 is a standard for vertical acceleration of sprung mass level and degree of comfort. The one way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and standard deviation have showed that the PISMC- ES-CNF controller compared with others controllers achieved the best control performance.

  15. Light-structured colloidal assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubret, Antoine; Mena, Youssef; Ramananarivo, Sophie; Sacanna, Stefano; Palacci, Jeremie; Palacci lab Team; Sacanna lab Team

    2016-11-01

    Self-propelled particles (SPP) are a key tool since they are of relative simplicity as compared to biological micro-entities and provide a higher level of control. They can convert an energy source into motion and work, and exhibit surprising non-equilibrium behavior. In our work, we focus on the manipulation of colloids using light. We exploit osmotic and phoretic effects to act on single and ensemble of colloids. The key mechanism relies on the photocatalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide using hematite, which triggers the motion of colloids around it when illuminated. We use hematite particles and particles with photocatalytic inclusions (i.e. SPP). We first show that the interactions between hematite and colloidal tracers can be tuned by adjusting the chemical environment. Furthermore, we report a phototaxic behavior (migration in light gradient) of the particles. From this, we explore the effect of spatio-temporal modulation of the light to control the motion of colloids at the single particle level, and to generate self-assembled colloidal structures through time and space. The so-formed structures are maintained by phoretic and hydrodynamic forces resulting from the motion of each particles. Ultimately, a dynamic light modulation may be a route for the creation of active colloidal motion on a collective scale through the synchronization of the individual motions of SPP. This work is supported by NSF CAREER DMR 1554724.

  16. Carbon starvation increases endoglycosidase activities and production of "unconjugated N-glycans" in Silene alba cell-suspension cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Lhernould, S; Karamanos, Y; Priem, B; Morvan, H

    1994-01-01

    We previously reported the occurrence of oligomannosides and xylomannosides corresponding to unconjugated N-glycans (UNGs) in the medium of a white campion (Silene alba) cell suspension. Attention has been focused on these oligosaccharides since it was shown that they confer biological activities in plants. In an attempt to elucidate the origin of these oligosaccharides, we studied two endoglycosidase activities, putative enzymes involved in their formation. The previously described peptide-N4-(N-acetyl-glucosaminyl) asparagine amidase activity and the endo-N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase activity described in this paper were both quantified in white campion cells during the culture cycle with variable initial concentrations of sucrose. The lower the sucrose supply, the higher the two activities. Furthermore, endoglycosidase activities were greatly enhanced after the disappearance of sugar from the medium. The production of UNGs in the culture medium rose correlatively. These data strongly suggest that the production of UNGs in our white campion cell-suspension system is due to the increase of these endoglycosidase activities, which reach their highest levels of activity during conditions of carbon starvation. PMID:7991689

  17. Influence of rare earth elements on metabolism and related enzyme activity and isozyme expression in Tetrastigma hemsleyanum cell suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Xin, Peng; Shuang-Lin, Zhou; Jun-Yao, He; Li, Ding

    2013-04-01

    The effects of rare earth elements (REEs) not only on cell growth and flavonoid accumulation of Tetrastigma hemsleyanum suspension cells but also on the isoenzyme patterns and activities of related enzymes were studied in this paper. There were no significant differences in enhancement of flavonoid accumulation in T. hemsleyanum suspension cells among La(3+), Ce(3+), and Nd(3+). Whereas their inductive effects on cell proliferation varied greatly. The most significant effects were achieved with 100 μM Ce(3+)and Nd(3+). Under treatment over a 25-day culture period, the maximal biomass levels reached 1.92- and 1.74-fold and the total flavonoid contents are 1.45- and 1.49-fold, than that of control, respectively. Catalase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), and peroxidase (POD) activity was activated significantly when the REE concentration range from 0 to 300 μM, whereas no significant changes were found in superoxide dismutase activity. Differences of esterase isozymes under REE treatment only laid in expression level, and there were no specific bands. The expression level of some POD isozymes strengthened with increasing concentration of REEs within the range of 50-200 μM. When REE concentration was higher than 300 μM, the expression of some POD isozymes was inhibited; meanwhile, some other new POD isozymes were induced. Our results also showed REEs did not directly influence PAL activity. So, we speculated that 50-200 μM REEs could activate some of antioxidant enzymes, adjust some isozymes expression, trigger the defense responses of T. hemsleyanum suspension cells, and stimulate flavonoid accumulation by inducing PAL activity.

  18. Structural evolution of Colloidal Gels under Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boromand, Arman; Maia, Joao; Jamali, Safa

    Colloidal suspensions are ubiquitous in different industrial applications ranging from cosmetic and food industries to soft robotics and aerospace. Owing to the fact that mechanical properties of colloidal gels are controlled by its microstructure and network topology, we trace the particles in the networks formed under different attraction potentials and try to find a universal behavior in yielding of colloidal gels. Many authors have implemented different simulation techniques such as molecular dynamics (MD) and Brownian dynamics (BD) to capture better picture during phase separation and yielding mechanism in colloidal system with short-ranged attractive force. However, BD neglects multi-body hydrodynamic interactions (HI) which are believed to be responsible for the second yielding of colloidal gels. We envision using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) with modified depletion potential and hydrodynamic interactions, as a coarse-grain model, can provide a robust simulation package to address the gel formation process and yielding in short ranged-attractive colloidal systems. The behavior of colloidal gels with different attraction potentials under flow is examined and structural fingerprints of yielding in these systems will be discussed.

  19. A Photosynthesis Lab. Response of Algal Suspensions to a Gradient of Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zee, Delmar Vander

    1995-01-01

    This photosynthesis exercise is intended for introductory college biology or botany courses. It is based on the principle that a closed suspension of algal cells may be expected to produce more dissolved oxygen with a greater photon fluence rate, but within limits of the photosynthetic capacity of the system. Describes materials and methods. (LZ)

  20. Regulation of thyroid peroxidase activity by thyrotropin, epidermal growth factor and phorbol ester in porcine thyroid follicles cultured in suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Kasai, Kikuo; Hiraiwa, Masaki; Emoto, Tatsushi; Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Shimoda, Shin-Ichi ); Ohmori, Takeshi; Koizumi, Narumi; Hosoya, Toichiro )

    1989-01-01

    The activity of thyroid peroxidase (TPO) in porcine follicles cultured for 96 h in suspension with five hormones (5H) still attained over 50% of that in the freshly isolated follicles. On the other hand, the activity in those cultured with 5H + TSH (6H) was several times higher than that cultured with 5H after 96 h, although an initial decrease of TPO activity during the first 24 h of culture was observed in both conditions. The ability of follicles to metabolize iodide when cultured with 6H for 96 h was also several times higher than that of those cultured with 5H. The half-maximal dose of TSH for stimulation of TPO activity and iodide metabolism was 0.03 - 0.04 mU/ml and the effect was mediated by cAMP. These results indicate that in porcine thyroid follicles in primary suspension culture, TPO activity as well as the ability of iodide metabolism is induced by chronic TSH stimulation. In addition, epidermal growth factor and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate completely inhibited TSH stimulation on both activities and also basal (5H) activity of iodide metabolism.

  1. X-ray Mapping of Dynamic Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholami, Mohammad; Lenoir, Nicolas; Ovarlez, Guillaume; Hormozi, Sarah

    2016-11-01

    Dense non-colloidal suspensions are materials with broad application both in industrial processes and natural phenomena. In most of these applications, the suspensions are either far from equilibrium or strongly non-Newtonian (i.e., non-colloidal particles are suspended in non-Newtonian fluid) meaning that the flow kinetics are not only strain-dependent but also strain-rate dependent. Therefore, experimental techniques must be developed to analyze the flows of these complex suspensions over a wide range of steady and transient shear rates. Techniques such as Nuclear Magnetic Resonance/Imaging (NMR/I) are inapplicable due to low sampling frequency and low image resolution (typically 10 minutes per averaged NMR image of 1x1cm). We introduce a new technique using an X-ray/CT-scan system to study dynamic suspensions. We show our recent results on the application of this technique for the study of shear induced migration of particles in a yield stress matrix fluid in a wide-gap cylindrical Couette cell. This work opens new avenues to study dynamic non-colloidal suspensions and the suspensions with other types of nonlinear suspending fluids such as viscoelastic and shear thickening fluids. NFS(CBET-1554044-CAREER).

  2. Effective SERS-active substrates composed of hierarchical micro/nanostructured arrays based on reactive ion etching and colloidal masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Honghua; Liu, Dilong; Hang, Lifeng; Li, Xinyang; Liu, Guangqiang; Cai, Weiping; Li, Yue

    2016-09-01

    A facile route has been proposed for the fabrication of morphology-controlled periodic SiO2 hierarchical micro/nanostructured arrays by reactive ion etching (RIE) using monolayer colloidal crystals as masks. By effectively controlling the experimental conditions of RIE, the morphology of a periodic SiO2 hierarchical micro/nanostructured array could be tuned from a dome-shaped one to a circular truncated cone, and finally to a circular cone. After coating a silver thin layer, these periodic micro/nanostructured arrays were used as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-active substrates and demonstrated obvious SERS signals of 4-Aminothiophenol (4-ATP). In addition, the circular cone arrays displayed better SERS enhancement than those of the dome-shaped and circular truncated cone arrays due to the rougher surface caused by physical bombardment. After optimization of the circular cone arrays with different periodicities, an array with the periodicity of 350 nm exhibits much stronger SERS enhancement and possesses a low detection limit of 10-10 M 4-ATP. This offers a practical platform to conveniently prepare SERS-active substrates.

  3. Local elastic response measured near the colloidal glass transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D.; Schaar, D.; Hentschel, H. G. E.; Hay, J.; Habdas, Piotr; Weeks, Eric R.

    2013-03-01

    We examine the response of a dense colloidal suspension to a local force applied by a small magnetic bead. For small forces, we find a linear relationship between the force and the displacement, suggesting the medium is elastic, even though our colloidal samples macroscopically behave as fluids. We interpret this as a measure of the strength of colloidal caging, reflecting the proximity of the samples' volume fractions to the colloidal glass transition. The strain field of the colloidal particles surrounding the magnetic probe appears similar to that of an isotropic homogeneous elastic medium. When the applied force is removed, the strain relaxes as a stretched exponential in time. We introduce a model that suggests this behavior is due to the diffusive relaxation of strain in the colloidal sample.

  4. Analysis and testing of an integrated semi-active seat suspension for both longitudinal and vertical vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xian-Xu; Jiang, Peng; Pan, Hui; Qian, Li-Jun

    2016-04-01

    An integrated semi-active seat suspension for both longitudinal and vertical vibration control is analyzed and tested in this paper. The seat suspension consists of a switching mechanism transforming both longitudinal and vertical motions into a rotary motion and a real-time damping-controllable system-a rotary magnetorheological (MR) damper working in pure shear mode and its corresponding control system. The switching mechanism employs the parallelogram frames as a motion guide which keeps the seat moving longitudinally and vertically. At the same time, both longitudinal and vertical motions are transformed into a reciprocating rotary motion that is transmitted to the rotary MR damper after an amplification by a gear mechanism. Both the longitudinal and vertical vibrations can be attenuated in real time through controlling the damping force (or torque) of the rotary MR damper. The mathematical model of the seat suspension system is established, simulated, and analyzed. The experimental test based on the test rig in Hefei University of Technology is implemented, and the results of simulation and experimental test are compared and analyzed.

  5. Neural network compensation of semi-active control for magneto-rheological suspension with time delay uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xiao Min; Yu, Miao; Li, Zushu; Liao, Changrong; Chen, Weimin

    2009-01-01

    This study presents a new intelligent control method, human-simulated intelligent control (HSIC) based on the sensory motor intelligent schema (SMIS), for a magneto-rheological (MR) suspension system considering the time delay uncertainty of MR dampers. After formulating the full car dynamic model featuring four MR dampers, the HSIC based on eight SMIS is derived. A neural network model is proposed to compensate for the uncertain time delay of the MR dampers. The HSIC based on SMIS is then experimentally realized for the manufactured full vehicle MR suspension system on the basis of the dSPACE platform. Its performance is evaluated and compared under various road conditions and presented in both time and frequency domains. The results show that significant gains are made in the improvement of vehicle performance. Results include a reduction of over 35% in the acceleration peak-to-peak value of a sprung mass over a bumpy road and a reduction of over 24% in the root-mean-square (RMS) sprung mass acceleration over a random road as compared to passive suspension with typical original equipment (OE) shock absorbers. In addition, the semi-active full vehicle system via HSIC based on SMIS provides better isolation than that via the original HSIC, which can avoid the effect of the time delay uncertainty of the MR dampers.

  6. The synthesis of citrate-modified silver nanoparticles in an aqueous suspension of graphene oxide nanosheets and their antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Das, Manash R; Sarma, Rupak K; Borah, Sarat Ch; Kumari, Roopa; Saikia, Ratul; Deshmukh, Ashvini B; Shelke, Manjusha V; Sengupta, Pinaki; Szunerits, Sabine; Boukherroub, Rabah

    2013-05-01

    A composite material consisting of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) deposited on graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets is prepared by chemical reduction of Ag metal ions by sodium borohydride (NaBH4) in the presence of trisodium citrate acting as a stabilizing agent to prevent agglomeration of the nanoparticles. The synthesized GO/Ag NPs composite was characterized by UV/vis spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM analysis confirmed a high density of Ag NPs on the GO nanosheets with a particle size range of 2-25 nm. The activity of the GO/Ag NPs suspension as an antibacterial agent against Gram positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis was investigated. The percentage of the killing bacterial colonies by Ag NPs (without GO) is found to be 96-97% while 100% of killing bacterial colonies is only obtained using GO/Ag NPs suspension. Moreover, it was also observed that leakage of sugars and proteins from the cell wall of both S. aureus and B. subtilis in interaction with GO/Ag NPs suspension is higher compared to Ag NPs (without GO) and GO nanosheets.

  7. Automated video-microscopic imaging and data acquisition system for colloid deposition measurements

    DOEpatents

    Abdel-Fattah, Amr I.; Reimus, Paul W.

    2004-12-28

    A video microscopic visualization system and image processing and data extraction and processing method for in situ detailed quantification of the deposition of sub-micrometer particles onto an arbitrary surface and determination of their concentration across the bulk suspension. The extracted data includes (a) surface concentration and flux of deposited, attached and detached colloids, (b) surface concentration and flux of arriving and departing colloids, (c) distribution of colloids in the bulk suspension in the direction perpendicular to the deposition surface, and (d) spatial and temporal distributions of deposited colloids.

  8. The tail suspension test as a model for assessing antidepressant activity: review of pharmacological and genetic studies in mice.

    PubMed

    Cryan, John F; Mombereau, Cedric; Vassout, Annick

    2005-01-01

    Since its introduction almost 20 years ago, the tail suspension test has become one of the most widely used models for assessing antidepressant-like activity in mice. The test is based on the fact that animals subjected to the short-term, inescapable stress of being suspended by their tail, will develop an immobile posture. Various antidepressant medications reverse the immobility and promote the occurrence of escape-related behaviour. This review focuses on the utility this test as part of a research program aimed at understanding the mechanism of action of antidepressants. We discuss the inherent difficulties in modeling depression in rodents. We describe how the tail suspension differs from the closely related forced swim test. Further, we address some key issues associated with using the TST as a model of antidepressant action. We discuss issues regarding whether it satisfies criteria to be a valid model for assessing depression-related behavioural traits. We elaborate on the tests' ease of use, strain differences observed in the test and gender effects in the test. We focus on the utility of the test for genetic analysis. Furthermore, we discuss the concept of whether immobility maybe a behavioural trait relevant to depression. All of the available pharmacological data using the test in genetically modified mice is collated. Special attention is given to selective breeding programs such as the Rouen 'depressed' mice which have been bred for high and low immobility in the tail suspension test. We provide an extensive pooling of the pharmacological studies published to date using the test. Finally, we provide novel pharmacological validation of an automated system (Bioseb) for assessing immobility. Taken together, we conclude that the tail suspension test is a useful test for assessing the behavioural effects of antidepressant compounds and other pharmacological and genetic manipulations relevant to depression.

  9. Differences in the activities of eight enzymes from ten soil fungi and their possible influences on the surface structure, functional groups, and element composition of soil colloids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenjie; Li, Yanhong; Wang, Huimei; Zu, Yuangang

    2014-01-01

    How soil fungi function in soil carbon and nutrient cycling is not well understood by using fungal enzymatic differences and their interactions with soil colloids. Eight extracellular enzymes, EEAs (chitinase, carboxymethyl cellulase, β-glucosidase, protease, acid phosphatase, polyphenol oxidase, laccase, and guaiacol oxidase) secreted by ten fungi were compared, and then the fungi that showed low and high enzymatic activity were co-cultured with soil colloids for the purpose of finding fungi-soil interactions. Some fungi (Gomphidius rutilus, Russula integra, Pholiota adiposa, and Geastrum mammosum) secreted 3-4 enzymes with weak activities, while others (Cyathus striatus, Suillus granulate, Phallus impudicus, Collybia dryophila, Agaricus sylvicola, and Lactarius deliciosus) could secret over 5 enzymes with high activities. The differences in these fungi contributed to the alterations of functional groups (stretching bands of O-H, N-H, C-H, C = O, COO- decreased by 11-60%, while P = O, C-O stretching, O-H bending and Si-O-Si stretching increased 9-22%), surface appearance (disappearance of adhesive organic materials), and elemental compositions (11-49% decreases in C1s) in soil colloids. Moreover, more evident changes were generally in high enzymatic fungi (C. striatus) compared with low enzymatic fungi (G. rutilus). Our findings indicate that inter-fungi differences in EEA types and activities might be responsible for physical and chemical changes in soil colloids (the most active component of soil matrix), highlighting the important roles of soil fungi in soil nutrient cycling and functional maintenance.

  10. Differences in the Activities of Eight Enzymes from Ten Soil Fungi and Their Possible Influences on the Surface Structure, Functional Groups, and Element Composition of Soil Colloids

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenjie; Li, Yanhong; Wang, Huimei; Zu, Yuangang

    2014-01-01

    How soil fungi function in soil carbon and nutrient cycling is not well understood by using fungal enzymatic differences and their interactions with soil colloids. Eight extracellular enzymes, EEAs (chitinase, carboxymethyl cellulase, β-glucosidase, protease, acid phosphatase, polyphenol oxidase, laccase, and guaiacol oxidase) secreted by ten fungi were compared, and then the fungi that showed low and high enzymatic activity were co-cultured with soil colloids for the purpose of finding fungi-soil interactions. Some fungi (Gomphidius rutilus, Russula integra, Pholiota adiposa, and Geastrum mammosum) secreted 3–4 enzymes with weak activities, while others (Cyathus striatus, Suillus granulate, Phallus impudicus, Collybia dryophila, Agaricus sylvicola, and Lactarius deliciosus) could secret over 5 enzymes with high activities. The differences in these fungi contributed to the alterations of functional groups (stretching bands of O-H, N-H, C-H, C = O, COO- decreased by 11–60%, while P = O, C-O stretching, O-H bending and Si-O-Si stretching increased 9–22%), surface appearance (disappearance of adhesive organic materials), and elemental compositions (11–49% decreases in C1s) in soil colloids. Moreover, more evident changes were generally in high enzymatic fungi (C. striatus) compared with low enzymatic fungi (G. rutilus). Our findings indicate that inter-fungi differences in EEA types and activities might be responsible for physical and chemical changes in soil colloids (the most active component of soil matrix), highlighting the important roles of soil fungi in soil nutrient cycling and functional maintenance. PMID:25398013

  11. Production of Bacillus subtilis-fermented red alga Porphyra dentata suspension with fibrinolytic and immune-enhancing activities.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong-Ting Victor; Hwang, Pai-An; Lin, Tzu-Chun; Tsai, Guo-Jane

    2014-01-01

    The fermented marine alga Porphyra dentata suspension was tested for its fibrinolytic and immune-enhancing activities. An isolated Bacillus subtilis N2 strain was selected for its fibrinolytic activity on fibrin plates. After investigating the effects of biomass amounts of P. dentata powder in water, various additives including sugars, nitrogen-containing substances, lipids and minerals, and cultural conditions of temperature and agitation in flask, the highest fibrinolytic activity in the cultural filtrate was obtained by cultivating N2 strain in 3% (w/v) P. dentata powder suspension containing 1% peanut oil at 37 °C, 150 rpm for 48 h. A fermentor system was further established using the same medium with controlled pH value of 7.0 at 37 °C, 150 rpm, 2.0 vvm for 48 h for the best fibrinolytic activity. The fermented product also showed its immune-enhancing activity by increasing cell proliferation and stimulating the secretion of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α in J774.1 cells.

  12. Collective motion in populations of colloidal bots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolo, Denis

    One of the origins of active matter physics was the idea that flocks, herds, swarms and shoals could be quantitatively described as emergent ordered phases in self-driven materials. From a somehow dual perspective, I will show how to engineer active materials our of colloidal flocks. I will show how to motorize colloidal particles capable of sensing the orientation of their neighbors and how to handle them in microfluidic chips. These populations of colloidal bots display a non-equilibrium transition toward collective motion. A special attention will be paid to the robustness of the resulting colloidal flocks with respect to geometrical frustration and to quenched disorder.

  13. Chancellor Water Colloids: Characterization and Radionuclide Association

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Fattah, Amr I.

    2012-06-18

    Concluding remarks about this paper are: (1) Gravitational settling, zeta potential, and ultrafiltration data indicate the existence of a colloidal phase of both the alpha and beta emitters in the Chancellor water; (2) The low activity combined with high dispersion homogeneity of the Chancellor water indicate that both alpha and beta emitters are not intrinsic colloids; (3) Radionuclides in the Chancellor water, particularly Pu, coexist as dissolved aqueous and sorbed phases - in other words the radionuclides are partitioned between the aqueous phase and the colloidal phase; (4) The presence of Pu as a dissolved species in the aqueous phase, suggests the possibility of Pu in the (V) oxidation state - this conclusion is supported by the similarity of the k{sub d} value of Pu determined in the current study to that determined for Pu(V) sorbed onto smectite colloids, and the similar electrokinetic behavior of the Chancellor water colloids to smectite colloids; (5) About 50% of the Pu(V) is in the aqueous phase and 50% is sorbed on colloids (mass concentration of colloids in the Chancellor water is 0.12 g/L); (6) The k{sub d} of the Pu and the beta emitters (fission products) between aqueous and colloidal phases in the Chancellor water is {approx}8.0 x 10{sup 3} mL/g using two different activity measurement techniques (LSC and alpha spectroscopy); (7) The gravitational settling and size distributions of the association colloids indicate that the properties (at least the physical ones) of the colloids to which the alpha emitters are associated with seem to be different that the properties of the colloids to which the beta emitters are associated with - the beta emitters are associated with very small particles ({approx}50 - 120 nm), while the alpha emitters are associated with relatively larger particles; and (8) The Chancellor water colloids are extremely stable under the natural pH and ionic strength conditions, indicating high potential for transport in the

  14. A dynamic-reliable multiple model adaptive controller for active vehicle suspension under uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, X.; Ichchou, M.; Gillot, F.; Saidi, A.

    2010-04-01

    The inherent uncertainties of vehicle suspension systems challenge not only the capability of ride comfort and handling performance, but also the reliability requirement. In this research, a dynamic-reliable multiple model adaptive (MMA) controller is developed to overcome the difficulty of suspension uncertainties while considering performance and reliability at the same time. The MMA system consists of a finite number of optimal sub-controllers and employs a continuous-time based Markov chain to guide the jumping among the sub-controllers. The failure mode considered is the bottoming and topping of suspension components. A limitation on the failure probability is imposed to penalize the performance of the sub-controllers and a gradient-based genetic algorithm yields their optimal feedback gains. Finally, the dynamic reliability of the MMA controller is approximated by using the integration of state covariances and a judging condition is induced to assert that the MMA system is dynamic-reliable. In numerical simulation, a long scheme with piecewise time-invariant parameters is employed to examine the performance and reliability under the uncertainties of sprung mass, road condition and driving velocity. It is shown that the dynamic-reliable MMA controller is able to trade a small amount of model performance for extra reliability.

  15. Controls of maglev suspension systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Zhu, S.; Chen, S.S.; Rote, D.M.

    1993-06-01

    This study investigates alternative control designs of maglev vehicle suspension systems. Active and semi-active control law designs are introduced into primary and secondary suspensions of maglev vehicles. A one-dimensional vehicle with two degrees of freedom, to simulate the German Transrapid Maglev System, is used for suspension control designs. The transient and frequency responses of suspension systems and PSDs of vehicle accelerations are calculated to evaluate different control designs. The results show that active and semi-active control designs indeed improve the response of vehicle and provide an acceptable ride comfort for maglev systems.

  16. What happens when pharmaceuticals meet colloids.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yingna; Chen, Xijuan; Zhuang, Jie; Chen, Xin

    2015-12-01

    Pharmaceuticals (PCs) have been widely detected in natural environment due to agricultural application of reclaimed water, sludge and animal wastes. Their potential risks to various ecosystems and even to human health have caused great concern; however, little was known about their environmental behaviors. Colloids (such as clays, metal oxides, and particulate organics) are kind of substances that are active and widespread in the environment. When PCs meet colloids, their interaction may influence the fate, transport, and toxicity of PCs. This review summarizes the progress of studies on the role of colloids in mediating the environmental behaviors of PCs. Synthesized results showed that colloids can adsorb PCs mainly through ion exchange, complexation and non-electrostatic interactions. During this process the structure of colloids and the stability of PCs may be changed. The adsorbed PCs may have higher risks to induce antibiotic resistance; besides, their transport may also be altered considering they have great chance to move with colloids. Solution conditions (such as pH, ionic strength, and cations) could influence these interactions between PCs and colloids, as they can change the forms of PCs and alter the primary forces between PCs and colloids in the solution. It could be concluded that PCs in natural soils could bind with colloids and then co-transport during the processes of irrigation, leaching, and erosion. Therefore, colloid-PC interactions need to be understood for risk assessment of PCs and the best management practices of various ecosystems (such as agricultural and wetland systems).

  17. Rethinking Suspensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stetson, Frank H.; Collins, Betty J.

    2010-01-01

    The overrepresentation of the Black and Hispanic subgroups in suspension data is a national problem and a troubling issue for schools and school systems across the United States. In Maryland, an analysis of student suspensions by school districts for the 2006-2007 school year revealed disproportionality issues. In 23 of the 24 jurisdictions,…

  18. The mycorrhizal fungus Amanita muscaria induces chitinase activity in roots and in suspension-cultured cells of its host Picea abies.

    PubMed

    Sauter, M; Hager, A

    1989-08-01

    A cell-wall fraction of the mycorrhizal fungus Amanita muscaria increased the chitinase activity in suspension-cultured cells of spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) which is a frequent host of Amanita muscaria in nature. Chitinase activity was also increased in roots of spruce trees upon incubation with the fungal elicitor. Non-induced levels of chitinase activity in spruce were higher in suspension cells than in roots whereas the elicitorinduced increase of chitinase activity was higher in roots. Treatment of cells with hormones (auxins and cytokinin) resulted in a severalfold depression of enzyme activity. However, the chitinase activity of hormone-treated as well as hormone-free cells showed an elicitor-induced increase. Suspension cells of spruce secreted a large amount of enzyme into the medium. It is postulated that chitinases released from the host cells in an ectomycorrhizal system partly degrade the fungal cell walls, thus possibly facilitating the exchange of metabolites between the symbionts.

  19. Colloid Mobilization in Two Atlantic Coastal Plain Aquifers: Field Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Joseph N.; Gschwend, Philip M.

    1990-02-01

    The geochemical mechanisms leading to the mobilization of colloids in groundwater were investigated in the Pine Barrens of New Jersey and in rural central Delaware by sampling pairs of wells screened in oxic and anoxic groundwaters in the same geologic formations. Samples were carefully taken at very low flow rates (˜100 mL min-1) to avoid suspending immobilized particles. The colloidal matter was characterized by light-scattering photometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X ray analysis, microelectrophoresis, and Fe, Al, Si, and organic carbon analyses. The colloids, composed primarily of clays, were observed at high concentrations (up to 60 mg colloids/L) in the anoxic groundwaters, while the oxic groundwaters exhibited ≤1 mg colloids/L. Colloidal organic carbon was present in all groundwaters; but under anoxic conditions, one-third to one-half of the total organic carbon was associated with the inorganic colloids. The field evidence indicates that anoxic conditions cause the mobilization of soil colloids by dissolving the ferric oxyhydroxide coatings cementing the clay particles to the aquifer solids. The depletion of oxidized iron on the surfaces of immobile particles and the addition of organic carbon coatings on the soil particles and colloids apparently stabilizes the colloidal suspension in the anoxic groundwaters.

  20. Quantifying colloid retention in partially saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zevi, Yuniati; Dathe, Annette; Gao, Bin; Richards, Brian K.; Steenhuis, Tammo S.

    2006-12-01

    The transport of colloid-contaminant complexes and colloid-sized pathogens through soil to groundwater is of concern. Visualization and quantification of pore-scale colloid behavior will enable better description and simulation of retention mechanisms at individual surfaces, in contrast to breakthrough curves which only provide an integrated signal. We tested two procedures for quantifying colloid movement and retention as observed in pore-scale image sequences. After initial testing with static images, three series of images of synthetic microbead suspensions passing through unsaturated sand were examined. The region procedure (implemented in ImageJ) and the Boolean procedure (implemented in KS400) yielded nearly identical results for initial test images and for total colloid-covered areas in three image series. Because of electronic noise resulting in pixel-level brightness fluctuations the Boolean procedure tended to underestimate attached colloid counts and conversely overestimate mobile colloid counts. The region procedure had a smaller overestimation error of attached colloids. Reliable quantification of colloid retention at pore scale can be used to improve current understanding on the transport mechanisms of colloids in unsaturated porous media. For example, attachment counts at individual air/water meniscus/solid interface were well described by Langmuir isotherms.

  1. Functionalized graphene sheet colloids for enhanced fuel/propellant combustion.

    PubMed

    Sabourin, Justin L; Dabbs, Daniel M; Yetter, Richard A; Dryer, Frederick L; Aksay, Ilhan A

    2009-12-22

    We have compared the combustion of the monopropellant nitromethane with that of nitromethane containing colloidal particles of functionalized graphene sheets or metal hydroxides. The linear steady-state burning rates of the monopropellant and colloidal suspensions were determined at room temperature, under a range of pressures (3.35-14.4 MPa) using argon as a pressurizing fluid. The ignition temperatures were lowered and burning rates increased for the colloidal suspensions compared to those of the liquid monopropellant alone, with the graphene sheet suspension having significantly greater burning rates (i.e., greater than 175%). The relative change in burning rate from neat nitromethane increased with increasing concentrations of fuel additives and decreased with increasing pressure until at high pressures no enhancement was found.

  2. Immobilization of enzymes using non-ionic colloidal liquid aphrons (CLAs): Activity kinetics, conformation, and energetics.

    PubMed

    Ward, Keeran; Xi, Jingshu; Stuckey, David C

    2016-05-01

    This study seeks to examine the ability of non-ionic/non-polar Colloidial Liquid Aphrons (CLAs) to preserve enzyme functionality upon immobilization and release. CLAs consisting of micron-sized oil droplets surrounded by a thin aqueous layer stabilized by a mixture of surfactants, were formulated by direct addition (pre-manufacture addition) using 1% Tween 80/mineral oil and 1% Tween 20 and the enzymes lipase, aprotinin and α-chymotrypsin. The results of activity assays for both lipase and α-chymotrypsin showed that kinetic activity increased upon immobilization by factors of 7 and 5.5, respectively, while aprotinin retained approximately 85% of its native activity. The conformation of the enzymes released through desorption showed no significant alterations compared to their native state. Changes in pH and temperature showed that optimum conditions did not change after immobilization, while analysis of activation energy for the immobilized enzyme showed an increase in activity at higher temperatures. Furthermore, the effect of bound water within the aphron structure allowed for some degree of enzyme hydration, and this hydration was needed for an active conformation with results showing a decrease in ΔH* for the immobilized system compared to its native counterpart.

  3. Overview: Experimental studies of crystal nucleation: Metals and colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlach, Dieter M.; Palberg, Thomas; Klassen, Ina; Klein, Stefan; Kobold, Raphael

    2016-12-01

    Crystallization is one of the most important phase transformations of first order. In the case of metals and alloys, the liquid phase is the parent phase of materials production. The conditions of the crystallization process control the as-solidified material in its chemical and physical properties. Nucleation initiates the crystallization of a liquid. It selects the crystallographic phase, stable or meta-stable. Its detailed knowledge is therefore mandatory for the design of materials. We present techniques of containerless processing for nucleation studies of metals and alloys. Experimental results demonstrate the power of these methods not only for crystal nucleation of stable solids but in particular also for investigations of crystal nucleation of metastable solids at extreme undercooling. This concerns the physical nature of heterogeneous versus homogeneous nucleation and nucleation of phases nucleated under non-equilibrium conditions. The results are analyzed within classical nucleation theory that defines the activation energy of homogeneous nucleation in terms of the interfacial energy and the difference of Gibbs free energies of solid and liquid. The interfacial energy acts as barrier for the nucleation process. Its experimental determination is difficult in the case of metals. In the second part of this work we therefore explore the potential of colloidal suspensions as model systems for the crystallization process. The nucleation process of colloids is observed in situ by optical observation and ultra-small angle X-ray diffraction using high intensity synchrotron radiation. It allows an unambiguous discrimination of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation as well as the determination of the interfacial free energy of the solid-liquid interface. Our results are used to construct Turnbull plots of colloids, which are discussed in relation to Turnbull plots of metals and support the hypothesis that colloids are useful model systems to investigate crystal

  4. Inventions Utilizing Microfluidics and Colloidal Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marr, David W.; Gong, Tieying; Oakey, John; Terray, Alexander V.; Wu, David T.

    2009-01-01

    Several related inventions pertain to families of devices that utilize microfluidics and/or colloidal particles to obtain useful physical effects. The families of devices can be summarized as follows: (1) Microfluidic pumps and/or valves wherein colloidal-size particles driven by electrical, magnetic, or optical fields serve as the principal moving parts that propel and/or direct the affected flows. (2) Devices that are similar to the aforementioned pumps and/or valves except that they are used to manipulate light instead of fluids. The colloidal particles in these devices are substantially constrained to move in a plane and are driven to spatially order them into arrays that function, variously, as waveguides, filters, or switches for optical signals. (3) Devices wherein the ultra-laminar nature of microfluidic flows is exploited to effect separation, sorting, or filtering of colloidal particles or biological cells in suspension. (4) Devices wherein a combination of confinement and applied electrical and/or optical fields forces the colloidal particles to become arranged into three-dimensional crystal lattices. Control of the colloidal crystalline structures could be exploited to control diffraction of light. (5) Microfluidic devices, incorporating fluid waveguides, wherein switching of flows among different paths would be accompanied by switching of optical signals.

  5. Viscosity of Sheared Helical filament Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartucci, Matthew; Urbach, Jeff; Blair, Dan; Schwenger, Walter

    The viscosity of suspensions can be dramatically affected by high aspect ratio particles. Understanding these systems provides insight into key biological functions and can be manipulated for many technological applications. In this talk, the viscosity as a function of shear rate of suspensions of helical filaments is compared to that of suspensions of straight rod-like filaments. Our goal is to determine the impact of filament geometry on low volume fraction colloidal suspensions in order to identify strategies for altering viscosity with minimal volume fraction. In this research, the detached flagella of the bacteria Salmonella Typhimurium are used as a model system of helical filaments and compared to mutated straight flagella of the Salmonella. We compare rheological measurements of the suspension viscosity in response to shear flow and use a combination of the rheology and fluorescence microscopy to identify the microstructural changes responsible for the observed rheological response.

  6. Differentiation of colloidal and dissolved silica: Analytical separation using spectrophotometry and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis-Russ, A.; Ranville, J.; Kashuba, A.T.

    1991-01-01

    A method is described that differentiates between solutions containing silica-dominated colloids and solutions that are essentially free of colloids. Suspensions of tuff particles were treated to remove colloids by centrifugation, filtration or both. Agreement of silica concentrations determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and by a spectrophotometric method was taken as an indication of colloid-free solutions. For two tuffs, centrifugation was effective for removing colloids. For the third, highly altered tuff, filtration was more effective for removing colloids.

  7. Dead-end flow filtration of solid suspension in polymer fluid through an active kaolin dynamic membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.Y.; Chou, K.S.; Lee, C.J.

    1998-12-01

    In this study an active kaolin dynamic membrane formed on a SS-316 porous support was used to investigate the microfiltration of a solid suspension in polymer fluid. It was found that a homogeneous sodium acetate suspension in polymer can be completely removed by the active kaolin dynamic membrane to yield a very clear polymer product. The filtration rate as a function of operating temperature and pressure were experimentally determined. When the operating temperature was increased, the decreasing polymer viscosity resulted in an increase of filtration rate but was counteracted by the swelling effect of the membrane layer. Similarly, when the pressure was increased, the increase in driving force for filtration was counteracted by a simultaneous increase in particle packing. The filtration behavior of this dynamic membrane system was also simulated by the general blocking model d{sup 2}t/dV{sup 2} = k(dt/dV){sup q}, where q was found to have negative values. Negative q values mean that the system reached a maximum blocking rate during the initial period of filtration and then decreased gradually. When the blocking rate became small enough, the system behaved like cake filtration. A satisfactory fit between experimental data and theoretical calculations was demonstrated.

  8. Controlling the Transient Interface Shape and Deposition Profile Left by Desiccation of Colloidal Droplets on Multiple Polymer Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunning, Peter David

    . Implementation of this technique requires that the colloidal droplet be separated from the active electrode by a dielectric layer to prevent electrolysis. A variety of polymer layers have been used in EWOD devices for a variety of applications. In applications that involve desiccation of colloidal suspensions, the material for this layer should be chosen carefully as it can play an important role in the resulting deposition pattern. An experimental method to monitor the transient evolution of the shape of an evaporating colloidal droplet and optically quantify the resultant deposition pattern is presented. Unactuated colloidal suspensions will be desiccated on a variety of substrates commonly used in EWOD applications. Transient image profiles and particle deposition patterns are examined for droplets containing fluorescent micro-particles. Qualitative and quantitative comparisons of these results will be used to compare multiple different cases in an effort to provide insight into the effects of polymer selection on the drying dynamics and resultant deposition patterns of desiccated colloidal materials. It was found that the equilibrium and receding contact angles between the surface and the droplet play a key role in the evaporation dynamics and the resulting deposition patterns left by a desiccated colloidal suspension. The equilibrium contact angle controls the initial contact diameter for a droplet of a given volume. As a droplet on a surface evaporates, the evolution of the interface shape and the contact diameter can generally be described by three different regimes. The Constant Contact Radius (CCR) regime occurs when the contact line is pinned while the contact angle decreases. The Constant Contact Angle (CCA) regime occurs when the contact line recedes while the contact angle remains constant. The Mixed regime occurs when the contact radius and angle both reduce over time. The presence of the CCA regime allows the contact line to recede creating a more uniform

  9. Effect of soil sorption and aquatic natural organic matter on the antibacterial activity of a fullerene water suspension.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Lyon, Delina Y; Li, Qilin; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2008-09-01

    The present study investigated the association of a C60 water suspension (nC6) with natural organic matter, present as a soil constituent or dissolved in the water column, and its effect on the antibacterial activity of nC60. Sorption of nC60 to soil reduced its bioavailability and antibacterial activity, and the sorption capacity strongly depended on the organic content of the soil. Adsorption of aquatic dissolved humic substances onto nC60 and possible subsequent reactions also were found to eliminate nC60 toxicity at humic acid concentrations as low as 0.05 mg/L. These findings indicate that natural organic matter in the environment can mitigate significantly the potential impacts of nC60 on microbial activities that are important to ecosystem health.

  10. Experimental evidence of colloids and nanoparticles presence from 25 waste leachates

    SciTech Connect

    Hennebert, Pierre; Avellan, Astrid; Yan, Junfang; Aguerre-Chariol, Olivier

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • This work is the first assessment of colloids in waste leachates. • Analytical methods are proposed and discussed. • All the waste have at least one element in colloidal form, and some elements are always colloidal. • Man-made nanoparticles are observed. • It can change the interpretation of leachate elemental concentration. - Abstract: The potential colloids release from a large panel of 25 solid industrial and municipal waste leachates, contaminated soil, contaminated sediments and landfill leachates was studied. Standardized leaching, cascade filtrations and measurement of element concentrations in the microfiltrate (MF) and ultrafiltrate (UF) fraction were used to easily detect colloids potentially released by waste. Precautions against CO{sub 2} capture by alkaline leachates, or bacterial re-growth in leachates from wastes containing organic matter should be taken. Most of the colloidal particles were visible by transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersion spectrometry (TEM–EDS) if their elemental MF concentration is greater than 200 μg l{sup −1}. If the samples are dried during the preparation for microscopy, neoformation of particles can occur from the soluble part of the element. Size distribution analysis measured by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) were frequently unvalid, particularly due to polydispersity and/or too low concentrations in the leachates. A low sensitivity device is required, and further improvement is desirable in that field. For some waste leachates, particles had a zeta potential strong enough to remain in suspension. Mn, As, Co, Pb, Sn, Zn had always a colloidal form (MF concentration/UF concentration > 1.5) and total organic carbon (TOC), Fe, P, Ba, Cr, Cu, Ni are partly colloidal for more than half of the samples). Nearly all the micro-pollutants (As, Ba, Co, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Sn, V and Zn) were found at least once in colloidal form greater than 100 μg l{sup −1}. In particular

  11. Photochemical manipulation of colloidal structures in liquid-crystal colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Tabe, Y.; Yokoyama, H.

    2007-05-01

    We investigated photochemical manipulation of physical properties and colloidal structures in liquid-crystal (LC) colloids containing azobenzene compounds. In a LC suspension where polymeric particles were dispersed in a host LC, we achieved photochemical control of light-scattering properties of the suspension. In a nematic phase, when the suspension was sandwiched with two glass plates, the film became opaque. This would be attributable to an appearance of both multidomain structures of LC alignment and mismatches of refractive indices between the materials. The opaque state turned into a transparent one when a nematic-to-isotropic phase transition was induced by the trans-to-cis photoisomerization of the azo-dye. This will result from a disappearance of both the multidomain structures and the refractive-index mismatches in the isotropic phase. The transparent film went back into the initial opaque film when the nematic phase was obtained by the cis-to-trans photoisomerization. In a LC emulsion in which glycerol or water droplets were dispersed in liquid crystals, we examined photochemical change of defect structures and inter-droplet distances by the photochemical manner. At the initial state, Saturn ring and hedgehog defects were formed around the droplets. For the glycerol droplets, we observed structural transformations between Saturn ring and boojums on irradiation with ultra-violet and visible light. For the water droplets, the inter-droplet distances varied by changing defect size on the irradiation. These phenomena would result from modulation of anchoring conditions of the droplets by the photoisomerization of the azo-dyes.

  12. Temperature dependence of the colloidal agglomeration inhibition: computer simulation study.

    PubMed

    Barcenas, Mariana; Douda, Janna; Duda, Yurko

    2007-09-21

    There exist experimental evidences that the structure and extension of colloidal aggregates in suspensions change dramatically with temperature. This results in an associated change in the suspension rheology. Experimental studies of the inhibitor applications to control the particle clustering have revealed some unexpected tendencies. Namely, the heating of colloidal suspensions has provoked either extension or reduction of the colloidal aggregates. To elucidate the origin of this behavior, we investigate the influence of temperature on the stabilizing effect of the inhibitor, applying an associative two-component fluid model. Our results of the canonical Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the anomalous effect of the temperature may not be necessarily explained by the temperature dependent changes in the inhibitor tail conformation, as has been suggested recently by Won et al. [Langmuir 21, 924 (2005)]. We show that the competition between colloid-colloid and colloid-inhibitor associations, which, in turn, depends on the temperature and the relative concentrations, may be one of the main reasons for the unexpected temperature dependence of inhibitor efficacy.

  13. Effect of hydrogen peroxide on contractility and citrate synthase activity of the rabbit urinary bladder in the presence and absence of resveratrol and a whole-grape suspension.

    PubMed

    Francis, Johdi-Ann; Leggett, Robert E; Schuler, Catherine; Levin, Robert M

    2014-06-01

    One etiology related directly to obstructive urinary bladder dysfunction is ischemia/reperfusion resulting in significant oxidative stress to the bladder. Grapes, a natural source of antioxidants, have been proven effective in preventing obstructive and ischemic bladder dysfunction. Many investigators believe that resveratrol is the primary active antioxidant ingredient in grapes. We compared the ability of a whole-grape suspension with pure resveratrol in their ability to protect the bladder from in vitro oxidative stress mediated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Four male rabbit bladders were used. Two strips from each bladder were incubated in the presence of 1 mg/mL grape suspension for 30 min, another two strips were incubated in the presence of 1 mg/mL resveratrol solution, and the last two strips were incubated in the presence of 1 mg/mL sucrose/and fructose as controls. The rest of the bladder was separated into muscle and mucosa, frozen and stored for biochemical evaluation. (1) Chemically, resveratrol has about 20 times the antioxidant capacity of the grape suspension. (2) The grape suspension had significant protective effects when the rate of tension was quantitated at all concentrations of H2O2, while the resveratrol had no effect. (3) Citrate synthase activities of the muscle and mucosa were significantly protected by the grape suspension but not by resveratrol. These data demonstrate that the grape suspension protects the mitochondria to a significantly greater degree than resveratrol, which suggests that the antioxidant activities are due to the combination of active components found in the grape suspension and not just resveratrol.

  14. Stabilization of Colloidal Silica Using Small Polyols

    SciTech Connect

    GULLEY, GERALD L.; MARTIN, JAMES E.

    1999-09-07

    We have discovered that small polyols are reasonably effective at stabilizing colloidal silica against aggregation, even under the conditions of high pH and salt concentration. Both quasielastic and elastic light scattering were used to show that these polyols dramatically decrease the aggregation rate of the suspension, changing the growth kinetics from diffusion-limited cluster-cluster aggregation to reaction-limited cluster-cluster aggregation. These polyols maybe useful in the treatment of tank wastes at the Hanford site.

  15. Physics in ordered and disordered colloidal matter composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) microgel particles.

    PubMed

    Yunker, Peter J; Chen, Ke; Gratale, Matthew D; Lohr, Matthew A; Still, Tim; Yodh, A G

    2014-05-01

    This review collects and describes experiments that employ colloidal suspensions to probe physics in ordered and disordered solids and related complex fluids. The unifying feature of this body of work is its clever usage of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) microgel particles. These temperature-sensitive colloidal particles provide experimenters with a 'knob' for in situ control of particle size, particle interaction and particle packing fraction that, in turn, influence the structural and dynamical behavior of the complex fluids and solids. A brief summary of PNIPAM particle synthesis and properties is given, followed by a synopsis of current activity in the field. The latter discussion describes a variety of soft matter investigations including those that explore formation and melting of crystals and clusters, and those that probe structure, rearrangement and rheology of disordered (jammed/glassy) and partially ordered matter. The review, therefore, provides a snapshot of a broad range of physics phenomenology which benefits from the unique properties of responsive microgel particles.

  16. Manipulating semiconductor colloidal stability through doping.

    PubMed

    Fleharty, Mark E; van Swol, Frank; Petsev, Dimiter N

    2014-10-10

    The interface between a doped semiconductor material and electrolyte solution is of considerable fundamental interest, and is relevant to systems of practical importance. Both adjacent domains contain mobile charges, which respond to potential variations. This is exploited to design electronic and optoelectronic sensors, and other enabling semiconductor colloidal materials. We show that the charge mobility in both phases leads to a new type of interaction between semiconductor colloids suspended in aqueous electrolyte solutions. This interaction is due to the electrostatic response of the semiconductor interior to disturbances in the external field upon the approach of two particles. The electrostatic repulsion between two charged colloids is reduced from the one governed by the charged groups present at the particles surfaces. This type of interaction is unique to semiconductor particles and may have a substantial effect on the suspension dynamics and stability.

  17. Colloidally stable surface-modified iron oxide nanoparticles: Preparation, characterization and anti-tumor activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macková, Hana; Horák, Daniel; Donchenko, Georgiy Viktorovich; Andriyaka, Vadim Ivanovich; Palyvoda, Olga Mikhailovna; Chernishov, Vladimir Ivanovich; Chekhun, Vasyl Fedorovich; Todor, Igor Nikolaevich; Kuzmenko, Oleksandr Ivanovich

    2015-04-01

    Maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles were obtained by co-precipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) chlorides and subsequent oxidation with sodium hypochlorite and coated with poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) [P(DMAAm-AA)]. They were characterized by a range of methods including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), elemental analysis, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and zeta potential measurements. The effect of superparamagnetic P(DMAAm-AA)-γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles on oxidation of blood lipids, glutathione and proteins in blood serum was detected using 2-thiobarbituric acid and the ThioGlo fluorophore. Finally, mice received magnetic nanoparticles administered per os and the antitumor activity of the particles was tested on Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) in male mice line C57BL/6 as an experimental in vivo metastatic tumor model; the tumor size was measured and the number of metastases in lungs was determined. Surface-modified γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles showed higher antitumor and antimetastatic activities than commercial CuFe2O4 particles and the conventional antitumor agent cisplatin.

  18. From crystal chemistry to colloid stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, B.; Burrows, N.; Penn, R. L.

    2008-12-01

    Aqueous suspensions of ferrihydrite nanoparticles form a colloid with properties that can be understood using classical theories but which additionally exhibit the distinctive phenomenon of nanocluster formation. While use of in situ light and x-ray scattering methods permit the quantitative determination of colloid stability, interparticle interactions, and cluster or aggregate geometry, there are currently few approaches to predict the colloidal behavior of mineral nanoparticles. A longstanding goal of aqueous geochemistry is the rationalization and prediction of the chemical properties of hydrated mineral interfaces from knowledge of interface structure at the molecular scale. Because interfacial acid-base reactions typically lead to the formation of a net electrostatic charge at the surfaces of oxide, hydroxide, and oxyhydroxide mineral surfaces, quantitative descriptions of this behavior have the potential to permit the prediction of long-range interactions between mineral particles. We will evaluate the feasibility of this effort by constructing a model for surface charge formation for ferrihydrite that combines recent insights into the crystal structure of this phase and proposed methods for estimating the pKa of acidic surface groups. We will test the ability of this model to predict the colloidal stability of ferrihydrite suspensions as a function of solution chemistry.

  19. Effect of Solar Particle Event Radiation and Hindlimb Suspension on Gastrointestinal Tract Bacterial Translocation and Immune Activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yu; Ni, Houping; Li, Minghong; Sanzari, Jenine K.; Diffenderfer, Eric S.; Lin, Liyong; Kennedy, Ann R.; Weissman, Drew

    2012-01-01

    The environmental conditions that could lead to an increased risk for the development of an infection during prolonged space flight include: microgravity, stress, radiation, disturbance of circadian rhythms, and altered nutritional intake. A large body of literature exists on the impairment of the immune system by space flight. With the advent of missions outside the Earth's magnetic field, the increased risk of adverse effects due to exposure to radiation from a solar particle event (SPE) needs to be considered. Using models of reduced gravity and SPE radiation, we identify that either 2 Gy of radiation or hindlimb suspension alone leads to activation of the innate immune system and the two together are synergistic. The mechanism for the transient systemic immune activation is a reduced ability of the GI tract to contain bacterial products. The identification of mechanisms responsible for immune dysfunction during extended space missions will allow the development of specific countermeasures. PMID:23028522

  20. Maize black Mexican sweet suspension cultured cells are a convenient tool for studying aquaporin activity and regulation.

    PubMed

    Cavez, Damien; Hachez, Charles; Chaumont, François

    2009-09-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are channel proteins that facilitate and regulate the permeation of water across biological membranes. Black Mexican sweet suspension cultured cells are a convenient model for studying the regulation of maize AQP expression and activity. Among other advantages, a single cell system allows the contribution of plasma membrane AQPs (PIPs, plasma membrane intrinsic proteins) to the membrane water permeability coefficient (P(f)) to be determined using biophysical measurement methods, such as the cell pressure probe or protoplast swelling assay. We generated a transgenic cell culture line expressing a tagged version of ZmPIP2;6 and used this material to demonstrate that the ZmPIP2;6 and ZmPIP2;1 isoforms physically interact. This kind of interaction could be an additional mechanism for regulating membrane water permeability by acting on the activity and/or trafficking of PIP hetero-oligomers.

  1. Effect of phenylalanine on Taxol production and antioxidant activity of extracts of suspension-cultured hazel (Corylus avellana L.) cells.

    PubMed

    Bemani, Ebrahim; Ghanati, Faezeh; Rezaei, Ayatollah; Jamshidi, Mitra

    2013-07-01

    Taxol is produced by a few microorganisms and plants such as yew (Taxus sp.). Recent researches have shown that hazel (Corylus avellana L.) is also able to produce Taxol. In the present study, effects of different concentrations of phenylalanine (Phe) on the production of Taxol, antioxidant activity, and cytotoxic effects of extracts of suspension-cultured hazel cells were investigated. The cells were treated with different concentrations of Phe on day 7 of subculture and were harvested on day 14. The results showed that the amounts of Taxol and antioxidant activity were increased by increasing the phenylalanine supply. Interestingly, the cytotoxic effects of hazel cell extract were even stronger than that of pure Taxol (standard), suggesting hazel cell extract as a novel and suitable probe for treating human cancer. Application of phenylalanine to hazel cells exaggerates their effects.

  2. Surface active stabilizer Tyloxapol in colloidal dispersions exerts cytostatic effects and apoptotic dismissal of cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kristl, Julijana; Teskac, Karmen; Milek, Miha; Mlinaric-Rascan, Irena

    2008-10-15

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) have been praised for their advantageous drug delivery properties such as biocompatibility, controlled release and passive drug targeting. However, the cytotoxicity of SLN and their ingredients, especially over a longer time period, has not been investigated in detail. We examined the critical issues regarding the use of a surface active stabilizer Tyloxapol (Tyl) for the preparation of solid lipid particles (SLP) and their effects on cellular functions and viability. SLP composed of behenate, phospholipids and a stabilizer, Tyloxapol or Lutrol (Lut), were prepared by the lipid melt method, labeled with a fluorescent dye and tested on Jurkat or HEK293 cells. The nano-sized particles were rapidly internalized and exhibited cytoplasmic localization. Incubation of cells with SLP-Tyl resulted in a dose- and time-dependent cytostatic effect, and also caused moderate and delayed cytotoxicity. Tyloxapol solution or SLP-Tyl dispersion caused the detachment of HEK293 cells, a decrease in cell proliferation and alterations in cellular morphology. Cell cycle analysis revealed that, while the unfavourable effects of SLP-Tyl and Tyloxapol solution are similar initially, longer incubation results in partial recovery of cells incubated with the dispersion of SLP-Tyl, whereas the presence of Tyloxapol solution induces apoptotic cell death. These findings indicate that Tyloxapol is an unfavourable stabilizer of SLP used for intracellular delivery and reinforce the role of stabilizers in a design of SLP with minimal cytotoxic properties.

  3. Bacterial suspensions under flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, Eric; Lindner, Anke; Douarche, Carine; Auradou, Harold

    2016-11-01

    Fluids laden with motile bacteria enter in the category of active matter, a new field currently developing at the convergence of biology, hydrodynamics and statistical physics. Such suspensions were shown recently to exhibit singular macroscopic transport properties. In this paper we review some recent results, either theoretical or experimental, on the active fluid rheology. We focus principally on bacteria suspensions and the objective is to provide the basis for understanding the emergence of the singular constitutive relations characterizing the macroscopic transport properties of such an active fluid under flow.

  4. Antidepressant-like activity of liposomal formulation containing nimodipine treatment in the tail suspension test, forced swim test and MAOB activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Lina Clara Gayoso E Almendra Ibiapina; Rolim, Hercília Maria Lins; Freitas, Rivelilson Mendes; Santos-Magalhães, Nereide Stela

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that intracellular calcium ion dysfunction may be an etiological factor in affective illness. Nimodipine (NMD) is a Ca(2+) channel blocker that has been extensively investigated for therapy of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. In this work, we have evaluated the antidepressant-like activity of nimodipine encapsulated into liposomes (NMD-Lipo) in mice through tail suspension and forced swim assays, as well as MAOB activity. During the tail suspension test, the administration of NMD-Lipo at 0.1, 1 and 10mg/kg was able to promote a reduction in the immobility time of animals greater than the positive control (imipramine). In the forced swim test, the immobility time of mice treated with NMD-Lipo was reduced. This reduction was significantly greater than that found in the animals treated with imipramine and paroxetine. This may suggest that NMD-Lipo provides more antidepressant-like activity than in positive controls. The groups that received a combination of liposomal NMD and antidepressant drugs showed lower immobility time than the groups, which were treated only with imipramine or paroxetine. The mice treated with the combination of NMD-Lipo and reserpine presented an increase in the time of immobility compared with animals treated only with NMD-Lipo. There was a significant decrease in MAOB activity in animals treated with NMD-Lipo compared with untreated animals. The results of the tail suspension test, forced swim test and MAOB activity suggested that the antidepressant activity of NMD-Lipo may be related to an increase in the cerebral monoamine concentrations.

  5. Effect of dispersant on asphaltene suspension dynamics: aggregation and sedimentation.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Sara M; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2010-12-09

    When oil is mixed with light alkanes, asphaltenes can precipitate out of oil solutions in a multistep process that involves the formation of nano and colloidal scale particles, the aggregation of asphaltene colloids, and their eventual sedimentation. Amphiphilic dispersants can greatly affect this process. The mechanism of the dispersant action in colloidal asphaltene suspensions in heptane has been shown through previous work to be due in part to a reduction in the size of the colloidal asphaltene particles with the addition of dispersant. However, previous studies of the sedimentation behavior revealed evidence of aggregation processes in the colloidal asphaltenes in heptane that has yet to be investigated fully. We investigate the effect of dispersants on this aggregation behavior through the use of dynamic light scattering, showing that both the amount of dispersant and the amount of heptane dilution can slow the onset of aggregation in colloidal asphaltene suspensions. An effective dispersant acts by suppressing colloidal aggregation in asphaltene suspensions, as shown by light scattering, and therefore also slows separation from the bulk, as revealed through macroscopic sedimentation experiments.

  6. Colloidal sorting in dynamic optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Ryan L.; Spalding, G. C.; Dholakia, K.; MacDonald, M. P.

    2007-08-01

    Passive microfluidic sorting techniques based upon the interaction of particles with an optically defined potential energy landscape have possible advantages over active sorting techniques such as microfluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), including ease of integration into lab-on-a-chip systems, reconfigurability, and scalability. Rather than analysing and deflecting a single-file stream of particles one by one, a passive approach intrinsically aimed at parallel processing may, ultimately, offer greater potential for high throughput. However attempts to sort many particles simultaneously in high density suspensions are inevitably limited by particle particle interactions, which lead to a reduction in the efficiency of the sorting. In this paper we describe two different approaches aimed at reducing colloidal traffic flow problems. We find that continuous translation of the sorting lattice helps to reduce nearest neighbour particle spacing, providing promise for efficiency improvements in future high throughput applications, and that a flashing lattice yields a reduction in unwanted pile-up and spillover effects which otherwise limit the efficiency of sorting.

  7. Magnetic Assisted Colloidal Pattern Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ye

    Pattern formation is a mysterious phenomenon occurring at all scales in nature. The beauty of the resulting structures and myriad of resulting properties occurring in naturally forming patterns have attracted great interest from scientists and engineers. One of the most convenient experimental models for studying pattern formation are colloidal particle suspensions, which can be used both to explore condensed matter phenomena and as a powerful fabrication technique for forming advanced materials. In my thesis, I have focused on the study of colloidal patterns, which can be conveniently tracked in an optical microscope yet can also be thermally equilibrated on experimentally relevant time scales, allowing for ground states and transitions between them to be studied with optical tracking algorithms. In particular, I have focused on systems that spontaneously organize due to particle-surface and particle-particle interactions, paying close attention to systems that can be dynamically adjusted with an externally applied magnetic or acoustic field. In the early stages of my doctoral studies, I developed a magnetic field manipulation technique to quantify the adhesion force between particles and surfaces. This manipulation technique is based on the magnetic dipolar interactions between colloidal particles and their "image dipoles" that appear within planar substrate. Since the particles interact with their own images, this system enables massively parallel surface force measurements (>100 measurements) in a single experiment, and allows statistical properties of particle-surface adhesion energies to be extracted as a function of loading rate. With this approach, I was able to probe sub-picoNewton surface interactions between colloidal particles and several substrates at the lowest force loading rates ever achieved. In the later stages of my doctoral studies, I focused on studying patterns formed from particle-particle interaction, which serve as an experimental model of

  8. Materials for suspension (semi-solid) electrodes for energy and water technologies.

    PubMed

    Hatzell, Kelsey B; Boota, Muhammad; Gogotsi, Yury

    2015-12-07

    Suspension or semi-solid electrodes have recently gained increased attention for large-scale applications such as grid energy storage, capacitive water deionization, and wastewater treatment. A suspension electrode is a multiphase material system comprised of an active (charge storing) material suspended in ionic solution (electrolyte). Gravimetrically, the electrolyte is the majority component and aids in physical transport of the active material. This principle enables, for the first time, scalability of electrochemical energy storage devices (supercapacitors and batteries) previously limited to small and medium scale applications. This critical review describes the ongoing material challenges encompassing suspension-based systems. The research described here combines classical aspects of electrochemistry, colloidal science, material science, fluid mechanics, and rheology to describe ion and charge percolation, adsorption of ions, and redox charge storage processes in suspension electrodes. This review summarizes the growing inventory of material systems, methods and practices used to characterize suspension electrodes, and describes universal material system properties (rheological, electrical, and electrochemical) that are pivotal in the design of high performing systems. A discussion of the primary challenges and future research directions is included.

  9. Materials for suspension (semi-solid) electrodes for energy and water technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Hatzell, Kelsey B.; Boota, Muhammad; Gogotsi, Yury

    2015-01-01

    Suspension or semi-solid electrodes have recently gained increased attention for large-scale applications such as grid energy storage, capacitive water deionization, and wastewater treatment. A suspension electrode is a multiphase material system comprised of an active (charge storing) material suspended in ionic solution (electrolyte). Gravimetrically, the electrolyte is the majority component and aids in physical transport of the active material. For the first time, this principle enables, scalability of electrochemical energy storage devices (supercapacitors and batteries) previously limited to small and medium scale applications. This critical review describes the ongoing material challenges encompassing suspension-based systems. The research described here combines classical aspects of electrochemistry, colloidal science, material science, fluid mechanics, and rheology to describe ion and charge percolation, adsorption of ions, and redox charge storage processes in suspension electrodes. Our review summarizes the growing inventory of material systems, methods and practices used to characterize suspension electrodes, and describes universal material system properties (rheological, electrical, and electrochemical) that are pivotal in the design of high performing systems. We include a discussion of the primary challenges and future research directions.

  10. [Impact of SDBS/Na+ on red soil colloidal stability].

    PubMed

    Tang, Ying; Li, Hang; Zhu, Hua-Ling; Tian, Rui; Gao, Xiao-Dan

    2014-04-01

    The interactions between soil colloidal-sized particles and organic contaminants or inorganic ions profoundly affect numerous soil physical, chemical and biological processes. The coupling effect of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS) and Na+ on the aggregation process of red soil colloid was studied using the dynamic light scattering method, and the mechanism of interactions between soil colloidal-sized particles and SDBS/Na+ was analyzed according to the pH and Zeta potential of suspension during the aggregation process. Results show that, (1) under a given concentration of Na+, the soil colloidal suspension becomes more stable with increasing SDBS concentrations. For example, under 120 mmol x L(-1) Na+, as the concentrations of SDBS increase from 0 mmol x L(-1) to 10 mmol x L(-1), the effective diameters of aggregates decrease from 702 nm to 193 nm, and the total average aggregation rates of aggregates decrease from 28.6 nm x min(-1) to 3.36 nm x min(-1). (2) Under a given concentration of SDBS, as the concentrations of Na+ increase, the Zeta potential of suspension sharply decreases, while the effective diameters and the total average aggregation rates of aggregates gradually increase. (3) The absolute values of Zeta potential for suspensions without adding NaNO3 solution increase from 47.6 mV to 62.2 mV as the SDBS concentrations increase, and the pH of the suspensions increase from 6.17 to 6.76, although these pH values are lower than that of initial soil colloidal suspension (6.89). Therefore, the adsorption of SDBS onto soil colloidal-sized particles, which is attributed to the hydrophobic effect and electrostatic effect, results in the increment of surface charge number, as well as the decrease in effective concentration of Na+ around colloidal-sized particles' surface (resulting from the steric hindrance of long hydrophobic chain of adsorbed SDBS and adsorption of Na+ by SDBS micelle). As a result, soil colloidal suspension becomes more stable and

  11. Shear thinning of nanoparticle suspensions.

    SciTech Connect

    Grest, Gary Stephen; Petersen, Matthew K.; in't Veld, Pieter J.

    2008-08-01

    Results of large scale non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations are presented for nanoparticles in an explicit solvent. The nanoparticles are modeled as a uniform distribution of Lennard-Jones particles, while the solvent is represented by standard Lennard-Jones particles. Here we present results for the shear rheology of spherical nanoparticles of size 5 to 20 times that of the solvent for a range of nanoparticle volume fractions and interactions. Results from NEMD simulations suggest that for strongly interacting nanoparticle that form a colloidal gel, the shear rheology of the suspension depends only weakly on the size of the nanoparticle, even for nanoparticles as small as 5 times that of the solvent. However for hard sphere-like colloids the size of the nanoparticles strongly affects the shear rheology. The shear rheology for dumbbell nanoparticles made of two fused spheres is also compared to spherical nanoparticles and found to be similar except at very high volume fractions.

  12. A mass-balance model to separate and quantify colloidal and solute redistributions in soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bern, C.R.; Chadwick, O.A.; Hartshorn, A.S.; Khomo, L.M.; Chorover, J.

    2011-01-01

    Studies of weathering and pedogenesis have long used calculations based upon low solubility index elements to determine mass gains and losses in open systems. One of the questions currently unanswered in these settings is the degree to which mass is transferred in solution (solutes) versus suspension (colloids). Here we show that differential mobility of the low solubility, high field strength (HFS) elements Ti and Zr can trace colloidal redistribution, and we present a model for distinguishing between mass transfer in suspension and solution. The model is tested on a well-differentiated granitic catena located in Kruger National Park, South Africa. Ti and Zr ratios from parent material, soil and colloidal material are substituted into a mixing equation to quantify colloidal movement. The results show zones of both colloid removal and augmentation along the catena. Colloidal losses of 110kgm-2 (-5% relative to parent material) are calculated for one eluviated soil profile. A downslope illuviated profile has gained 169kgm-2 (10%) colloidal material. Elemental losses by mobilization in true solution are ubiquitous across the catena, even in zones of colloidal accumulation, and range from 1418kgm-2 (-46%) for an eluviated profile to 195kgm-2 (-23%) at the bottom of the catena. Quantification of simultaneous mass transfers in solution and suspension provide greater specificity on processes within soils and across hillslopes. Additionally, because colloids include both HFS and other elements, the ability to quantify their redistribution has implications for standard calculations of soil mass balances using such index elements. ?? 2011.

  13. What Is a Colloid?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, William G.

    1985-01-01

    Describes the properties of colloids, listing those commonly encountered (such as whipped cream, mayonnaise, and fog). Also presents several experiments using colloids and discusses "Silly Putty," a colloid with viscoelastic properties whose counterintuitive properties result from its mixture of polymers. (DH)

  14. Effective Viscosity of Microswimmer Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafaï, Salima; Jibuti, Levan; Peyla, Philippe

    2010-03-01

    The measurement of a quantitative and macroscopic parameter to estimate the global motility of a large population of swimming biological cells is a challenge. Experiments on the rheology of active suspensions have been performed. Effective viscosity of sheared suspensions of live unicellular motile microalgae (Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii) is far greater than for suspensions containing the same volume fraction of dead cells. In addition, suspensions show shear thinning behavior. We relate these macroscopic measurements to the orientation of individual swimming cells under flow and discuss our results in the light of several existing models.

  15. Effective viscosity of microswimmer suspensions.

    PubMed

    Rafaï, Salima; Jibuti, Levan; Peyla, Philippe

    2010-03-05

    The measurement of a quantitative and macroscopic parameter to estimate the global motility of a large population of swimming biological cells is a challenge. Experiments on the rheology of active suspensions have been performed. Effective viscosity of sheared suspensions of live unicellular motile microalgae (Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii) is far greater than for suspensions containing the same volume fraction of dead cells. In addition, suspensions show shear thinning behavior. We relate these macroscopic measurements to the orientation of individual swimming cells under flow and discuss our results in the light of several existing models.

  16. Electrohydrodynamically patterned colloidal crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayward, Ryan C. (Inventor); Poon, Hak F. (Inventor); Xiao, Yi (Inventor); Saville, Dudley A. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method for assembling patterned crystalline arrays of colloidal particles using ultraviolet illumination of an optically-sensitive semiconducting anode while using the anode to apply an electronic field to the colloidal particles. The ultraviolet illumination increases current density, and consequently, the flow of the colloidal particles. As a result, colloidal particles can be caused to migrate from non-illuminated areas of the anode to illuminated areas of the anode. Selective illumination of the anode can also be used to permanently affix colloidal crystals to illuminated areas of the anode while not affixing them to non-illuminated areas of the anode.

  17. In Vitro Evaluation of the Link Between Cell Activation State and Its Rheological Impact on the Microscale Flow of Neutrophil Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Akenhead, Michael L; Horrall, Nolan M; Rowe, Dylan; Sethu, Palaniappan; Shin, Hainsworth Y

    2015-09-01

    Activated neutrophils have been reported to affect peripheral resistance, for example, by plugging capillaries or adhering to the microvasculature. In vivo and ex vivo data indicate that activated neutrophils circulating in the blood also influence peripheral resistance. We used viscometry and microvascular mimics for in vitro corroboration. The rheological impact of differentiated neutrophil-like HL-60 promyelocytes (dHL60s) or human neutrophil suspensions stimulated with 10 nM fMet-Leu-Phe (fMLP) was quantified using a cone-plate rheometer (450 s(-1) shear rate). To evaluate their impact on microscale flow resistance, we used 10-μm Isopore® membranes to model capillaries as well as single 200 × 50 μm microchannels and networks of twenty 20 × 50 μm microfluidic channels to mimic noncapillary microvasculature. Stimulation of dHL60 and neutrophil populations significantly altered their flow behavior as evidenced by their impact on suspension viscosity. Notably, hematocrit abrogated the impact of leukocyte activation on blood cell suspension viscosity. In micropore filters, activated cell suspensions enhanced flow resistance. This effect was further enhanced by the presence of erythrocytes. The resistance of our noncapillary microvascular mimics to flow of activated neutrophil suspensions was significantly increased only with hematocrit. Notably, it was elevated to a higher extent within the micronetwork chambers compared to the single-channel chambers. Collectively, our findings provide supportive evidence that activated neutrophils passing through the microcirculation may alter hemodynamic resistance due to their altered rheology in the noncapillary microvasculature. This effect is another way neutrophil activation due to chronic inflammation may, at least in part, contribute to the elevated hemodynamic resistance associated with cardiovascular diseases (e.g., hypertension and hypercholesterolemia).

  18. In Vitro Evaluation of the Link Between Cell Activation State and Its Rheological Impact on the Microscale Flow of Neutrophil Suspensions

    PubMed Central

    Akenhead, Michael L.; Horrall, Nolan M.; Rowe, Dylan; Sethu, Palaniappan; Shin, Hainsworth Y.

    2015-01-01

    Activated neutrophils have been reported to affect peripheral resistance, for example, by plugging capillaries or adhering to the microvasculature. In vivo and ex vivo data indicate that activated neutrophils circulating in the blood also influence peripheral resistance. We used viscometry and microvascular mimics for in vitro corroboration. The rheological impact of differentiated neutrophil-like HL-60 promyelocytes (dHL60s) or human neutrophil suspensions stimulated with 10 nM fMet-Leu-Phe (fMLP) was quantified using a cone-plate rheometer (450 s−1 shear rate). To evaluate their impact on microscale flow resistance, we used 10-μm Isopore® membranes to model capillaries as well as single 200 × 50 μm microchannels and networks of twenty 20 × 50 μm microfluidic channels to mimic noncapillary microvasculature. Stimulation of dHL60 and neutrophil populations significantly altered their flow behavior as evidenced by their impact on suspension viscosity. Notably, hematocrit abrogated the impact of leukocyte activation on blood cell suspension viscosity. In micropore filters, activated cell suspensions enhanced flow resistance. This effect was further enhanced by the presence of erythrocytes. The resistance of our noncapillary microvascular mimics to flow of activated neutrophil suspensions was significantly increased only with hematocrit. Notably, it was elevated to a higher extent within the micronetwork chambers compared to the single-channel chambers. Collectively, our findings provide supportive evidence that activated neutrophils passing through the microcirculation may alter hemodynamic resistance due to their altered rheology in the noncapillary microvasculature. This effect is another way neutrophil activation due to chronic inflammation may, at least in part, contribute to the elevated hemodynamic resistance associated with cardiovascular diseases (e.g., hypertension and hypercholesterolemia). PMID:26065495

  19. Ordering, dynamics and phase transitions in charged colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tata, B. V. R.; Jena, Sidhartha S.

    2006-09-01

    Among the various soft matter systems, charge stabilized colloidal dispersions have gained recognition as tremendously useful model condensed matter systems because of their structural ordering and the rich phase behavior. This paper is a review of the work done in the last few years related to structural ordering and phase transitions brought about by parameters such as pressure, surface charge density and salt concentration. The dynamics in colloidal crystals and dense suspensions is influenced by hydrodynamic interactions arising due to the intervening viscous fluid. Lattice dynamics of colloidal crystals presents a nice testing ground for theories of hydrodynamic interaction. Apart from reviewing the measurements of phonon dispersion curves in thin colloidal crystals, we present here recent dynamic light scattering results on bulk colloidal crystals. The dynamics in colloidal liquids and colloidal glasses are also covered. Though colloidal liquids of low charge density particles freeze into a homogenous crystalline or a glassy state, they remain inhomogeneous when the charge density is beyond a critical value. Recently, this inhomogeneous state is confirmed to be a gas-solid coexistence. This observation of gas-solid coexistence in highly charged colloids along with the earlier observations of vapor-liquid condensation and a reentrant transition have created a debate on the existence of long-range attraction in the effective pair potential U(r) of like-charged colloidal particles. U(r) was measured directly using optical microscopy. However, the limitations in using the optical microscopy technique for determining U(r) in dilute suspensions are discussed. These limitations can be circumvented by employing confocal microscopy. We present our recent observation of stable bound pairs in very dilute and highly charged colloidal suspensions using confocal microscopy and the existence of an attractive minimum in the measured U(r) of like-charged particles. These

  20. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    SciTech Connect

    H. Viswanathan; P. Reimus

    2003-09-05

    Colloid retardation is influenced by the attachment and detachment of colloids from immobile surfaces. This analysis demonstrates the development of parameters necessary to estimate attachment and detachment of colloids and, hence, retardation in both fractured tuff and porous alluvium. Field and experimental data specific to fractured tuff are used for the analysis of colloid retardation in fractured tuff. Experimental data specific to colloid transport in alluvial material from Yucca Mountain as well as bacteriophage field studies in alluvial material, which are thought to be good analogs for colloid transport, are used to estimate attachment and detachment of colloids in the alluvial material. There are no alternative scientific approaches or technical methods for calculating these retardation factors.

  1. Microfluidic colloid filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkhorst, John; Beckmann, Torsten; Go, Dennis; Kuehne, Alexander J. C.; Wessling, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    Filtration of natural and colloidal matter is an essential process in today’s water treatment processes. The colloidal matter is retained with the help of micro- and nanoporous synthetic membranes. Colloids are retained in a “cake layer” – often coined fouling layer. Membrane fouling is the most substantial problem in membrane filtration: colloidal and natural matter build-up leads to an increasing resistance and thus decreasing water transport rate through the membrane. Theoretical models exist to describe macroscopically the hydrodynamic resistance of such transport and rejection phenomena; however, visualization of the various phenomena occurring during colloid retention is extremely demanding. Here we present a microfluidics based methodology to follow filter cake build up as well as transport phenomena occuring inside of the fouling layer. The microfluidic colloidal filtration methodology enables the study of complex colloidal jamming, crystallization and melting processes as well as translocation at the single particle level.

  2. Statistical thermodynamics of charge-stabilized colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres Valderrama, A.

    2008-06-01

    This thesis is a theoretical study of equilibrium statistical thermodynamic properties of colloidal systems in which electrostatic interactions play a dominant role, namely, charge-stabilized colloidal suspensions. Such systems are fluids consisting of a mixture of a large number of mesoscopic particles and microscopic ions which interact via the Coulomb force, suspended in a molecular fluid. Quantum statistical mechanics is essential to fully understand the properties and stability of such systems. A less fundamental but for many purposes, sufficient description, is provided by classical statistical mechanics. In such approximation the system is considered as composed of a great number of charged classical particles with additional hard-core repulsions. The kinetic energy or momentum integrals become independent Gaussians, and hence their contribution to the free energy can be trivially evaluated. The contribution of the potential energy to the free energy on the other hand, depends upon the configuration of all the particles and becomes highly non-trivial due to the long-range character of the Coulomb force and the extremely different length scales involved in the problem. Using the microscopic model described above, we focus on the calculation of equilibrium thermodynamic properties (response functions), correlations (structure factors), and mechanical properties (forces and stresses), which can be measured in experiments and computed by Monte Carlo simulations. This thesis is divided into three parts. In part I, comprising chapters 2 and 3, we focus on finite-thickness effects in colloidal platelets and rigid planar membranes. In chapter 2 we study electrolyte-mediated interactions between two of such colloidal objects. Several aspects of these interactions are considered including the nature (attractive or repulsive) of the force between the objects, the osmotic properties for different types of surfaces and image charge effects. In part II, which includes

  3. Topological lifetimes of polydisperse colloidal hard spheres at a wall.

    PubMed

    Dullens, Roel P A; Kegel, Willem K

    2005-01-01

    Confocal scanning laser microscopy was used to study the behavior of dense suspensions of model colloidal hard spheres at a single wall. Due to the slight polydispersity, our system shows a reentrant melting transition at high densities involving a hexatic structure [Phys. Rev. Lett 92, 195702 (2004)

  4. Scattering from correlations in colloidal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hayter, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    Colloidal suspensions typically exhibit spatial correlations over distances of order 10-10/sup 4/ A, corresponding either to the size of individual particles (e.g., polymer chains, surfactant micelles) or to the range of interaction between particles (e.g., charged polymer lattices at low ionic strength). Apart from having fundamental intrinsic interest, such systems are also extremely useful as model systems with which to study, for example, non-Newtonian hydrodynamics, since temporal correlations are generally much longer lived (10/sup -8/-10/sup -3/ sec) than those found in simple atomic or small molecular systems (10/sup -13/-10/sup -10/ sec). Colloids have long been the subject of macroscopic phenomenological research (on rheological properties, for example), but it is only recently that microscopic light, x-ray and neutron scattering techniques have been applied to their study, in large part because of theoretical difficulties in understanding the scattering from dense liquid-like systems of interacting particles. For spherical colloids, such theoretical problems have now been largely overcome, and for anisotropic colloids experimental techniques are being developed which circumvent the intractable theoretical areas. This paper will first review some static light and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) results on colloidal suspensions, both at equilibrium and in steady-state non-equilibrium situations, and will then discuss some dynamic measurements on polymer solutions and melts made using the neutron spin-echo (NSE) technique. Emphasis is placed on experiments which have a possible counterpart in synchrotron radiation studies. In particular, NSE extends the results of photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) to larger momentum transfers and shorter time-scales than are available with visible light, and the extension of PCS to short wavelength on a synchrotron source would be of similar fundamental interest.

  5. Size-dependent Turbidimatric Quantification of Mobile Colloids in Field Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, J.; Meng, X.; Jin, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Natural colloids, often defined as entities with sizes < 1.0 μm, have attracted much research attention because of their ability to facilitate the transport of contaminants in the subsurface environment. However, due to their small size and generally low concentrations in field samples, quantification of mobile colloids, especially the smaller fractions (< 0.45 µm), which are operationally defined as dissolved, is largely impeded and hence the natural colloidal pool is greatly overlooked and underestimated. The main objectives of this study are to: (1) develop an experimentally and economically efficient methodology to quantify natural colloids in different size fractions (0.1-0.45 and 0.45-1 µm); (2) quantify mobile colloids including small colloids, < 0.45 µm particularly, in different natural aquatic samples. We measured and generated correlations between mass concentration and turbidity of colloid suspensions, made by extracting and fractionating water dispersible colloids in 37 soils from different areas in the U.S. and Denmark, for colloid size fractions 0.1-0.45 and 0.45-1 µm. Results show that the correlation between turbidity and colloid mass concentration is largely affected by colloid size and iron content, indicating the need to generate different correlations for colloids with constrained size range and iron content. This method enabled quick quantification of colloid concentrations in a large number of field samples collected from freshwater, wetland and estuaries in different size fractions. As a general trend, we observed high concentrations of colloids in the < 0.45 µm fraction, which constitutes a significant percentage of the total mobile colloidal pool (< 1 µm). This observation suggests that the operationally defined cut-off size for "dissolved" phase can greatly underestimate colloid concentration therefore the role that colloids play in the transport of associated contaminants or other elements.

  6. Phosphate binding by natural iron-rich colloids in streams.

    PubMed

    Baken, Stijn; Moens, Claudia; van der Grift, Bas; Smolders, Erik

    2016-07-01

    Phosphorus (P) in natural waters may be bound to iron (Fe) bearing colloids. However, the natural variation in composition and P binding strength of these colloids remain unclear. We related the composition of "coarse colloids" (colloids in the 0.1-1.2 μm size range) in 47 Belgian streams to the chemical properties of the streamwater. On average, 29% of the P in filtered (<1.2 μm) samples of these streams is present in coarse colloids. The concentration of Fe-rich colloids in streams decreases with increasing water hardness and pH. The P bearing colloids in these streams mostly consist of Fe hydroxyphosphates and of Fe oxyhydroxides with surface adsorbed P, which is underpinned by geochemical speciation calculations. In waters with molar P:Fe ratios above 0.5, only a minor part of the P is bound to coarse colloids. In such waters, the colloids have molar P:Fe ratios between 0.2 and 1 and are, therefore, nearly saturated with P. Conversely, in streams with molar P:Fe ratios below 0.1, most of the P is bound to Fe-rich colloids. Equilibration of synthetic and natural Fe and P bearing colloids with a zero sink reveals that colloids with low molar P:Fe ratios contain mostly nonlabile P, whereas P-saturated colloids contain mostly labile P which can be released within 7 days. Equilibration at a fixed free orthophosphate activity shows that the Fe-rich colloids may bind only limited P through surface adsorption, in the range of 0.02-0.04 mol P (mol Fe)(-1). The P:Fe ratios measured in naturally occurring Fe and P bearing colloids is clearly higher (between 0.05 and 1). These colloids are therefore likely formed by coprecipitation of P during oxidation of Fe(II), which leads to the formation of Fe hydroxyphosphate minerals.

  7. Critical Casimir interactions and colloidal self-assembly in near-critical solvents.

    PubMed

    Tasios, Nikos; Edison, John R; van Roij, René; Evans, Robert; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2016-08-28

    A binary solvent mixture close to critical demixing experiences fluctuations whose correlation length, ξ, diverges as the critical point is approached. The solvent-mediated (SM) interaction that arises between a pair of colloids immersed in such a near-critical solvent can be long-ranged and this so-called critical Casimir interaction is well-studied. How a (dense) suspension of colloids will self-assemble under these conditions is poorly understood. Using a two-dimensional lattice model for the solvent and hard disks to represent the colloids, we perform extensive Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the phase behaviour of this model colloidal suspension as a function of colloid size and wettability under conditions where the solvent reservoir is supercritical. Unlike most other approaches, where the solvent is modelled as an implicit background, our model employs an explicit solvent and treats the suspension as a ternary mixture. This enables us to capture important features, including the pronounced fractionation of the solvent in the coexisting colloidal phases, of this complex system. We also present results for the partial structure factors; these shed light on the critical behaviour in the ternary mixture. The degree to which an effective two-body pair potential description can describe the phase behaviour and structure of the colloidal suspension is discussed briefly.

  8. Shear Thinning of Noncolloidal Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Quesada, Adolfo; Tanner, Roger I.; Ellero, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Shear thinning—a reduction in suspension viscosity with increasing shear rates—is understood to arise in colloidal systems from a decrease in the relative contribution of entropic forces. The shear-thinning phenomenon has also been often reported in experiments with noncolloidal systems at high volume fractions. However its origin is an open theoretical question and the behavior is difficult to reproduce in numerical simulations where shear thickening is typically observed instead. In this letter we propose a non-Newtonian model of interparticle lubrication forces to explain shear thinning in noncolloidal suspensions. We show that hidden shear-thinning effects of the suspending medium, which occur at shear rates orders of magnitude larger than the range investigated experimentally, lead to significant shear thinning of the overall suspension at much smaller shear rates. At high particle volume fractions the local shear rates experienced by the fluid situated in the narrow gaps between particles are much larger than the averaged shear rate of the whole suspension. This allows the suspending medium to probe its high-shear non-Newtonian regime and it means that the matrix fluid rheology must be considered over a wide range of shear rates.

  9. Unfolding of collapsed polymers in shear flow: effects of colloid banding structures in confining channels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsieh; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2014-03-01

    Using hydrodynamic simulations, we demonstrate that confined colloidal suspensions can greatly enhance the unfolding of collapsed single polymers in flow. When colloids come in direct contact with the polymers due to the flow, the collapsed chains become flattened or elongated on the surface of the colloids, increasing the probability of forming large chain protrusions that the flow can pull out to unfold the polymers. This phenomenon may be suppressed if the colloid size is commensurate with the confining channels, where the colloids form well-defined banding structures. Here, we analyze the colloid banding structures in detail and their relation to the chain unfolding. We find that for colloid volume fractions up to 30%, the confined colloids form simple cubic (sc), hexagonal (hex), or a mixture of sc + hex structures. By directly changing the heights of the confining channels, we show that the collapsed polymers unfold the most in the mixed sc + hex structures. The diffuse (not well-defined) bands in the mixed sc + hex structures provide the highest collision probability for the colloids and the polymers, thus enhancing unfolding the most. Without colloidal suspensions, we show that the confining channels alone do not have an observable effect on the unfolding of collapsed polymers. The well-defined colloid bands also suppress the unfolding of noncollapsed polymers. In fact, the average size for noncollapsed chains is even smaller in the well-defined bands than in a channel without any colloids. The appearance of well-defined bands in this case also indicates that lift forces experienced by the polymers in confinement are negligible compared to those exerted by the colloidal band structures. Our results may be important for understanding the dynamics of mixed colloid polymer solutions.

  10. Fast microbial reduction of ferrihydrite colloids from a soil effluent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsche, Andreas; Bosch, Julian; Rennert, Thilo; Heister, Katja; Braunschweig, Juliane; Meckenstock, Rainer U.; Totsche, Kai U.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies on the microbial reduction of synthetic iron oxide colloids showed their superior electron accepting property in comparison to bulk iron oxides. However, natural colloidal iron oxides differ in composition from their synthetic counterparts. Besides a potential effect of colloid size, microbial iron reduction may be accelerated by electron-shuttling dissolved organic matter (DOM) as well as slowed down by inhibitors such as arsenic. We examined the microbial reduction of OM- and arsenic-containing ferrihydrite colloids. Four effluent fractions were collected from a soil column experiment run under water-saturated conditions. Ferrihydrite colloids precipitated from the soil effluent and exhibited stable hydrodynamic diameters ranging from 281 (±146) nm in the effluent fraction that was collected first and 100 (±43) nm in a subsequently obtained effluent fraction. Aliquots of these oxic effluent fractions were added to anoxic low salt medium containing diluted suspensions of Geobacter sulfurreducens. Independent of the initial colloid size, the soil effluent ferrihydrite colloids were quickly and completely reduced. The rates of Fe2+ formation ranged between 1.9 and 3.3 fmol h-1 cell-1, and are in the range of or slightly exceeding previously reported rates of synthetic ferrihydrite colloids (1.3 fmol h-1 cell-1), but greatly exceeding previously known rates of macroaggregate-ferrihydrite reduction (0.07 fmol h-1 cell-1). The inhibition of microbial Fe(III) reduction by arsenic is unlikely or overridden by the concurrent enhancement induced by soil effluent DOM. These organic species may have increased the already high intrinsic reducibility of colloidal ferrihydrite owing to quinone-mediated electron shuttling. Additionally, OM, which is structurally associated with the soil effluent ferrihydrite colloids, may also contribute to the higher reactivity due to increasing solubility and specific surface area of ferrihydrite. In conclusion, ferrihydrite

  11. The Rheology of Concentrated Suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas Acrivos

    2004-09-07

    Research program on the rheological properties of flowing suspensions. The primary purpose of the research supported by this grant was to study the flow characteristics of concentrated suspensions of non-colloidal solid particles and thereby construct a comprehensive and robust theoretical framework for modeling such systems quantitatively. At first glance, this seemed like a modest goal, not difficult to achieve, given that such suspensions were viewed simply as Newtonian fluids with an effective viscosity equal to the product of the viscosity of the suspending fluid times a function of the particle volume fraction. But thanks to the research findings of the Principal Investigator and of his Associates, made possible by the steady and continuous support which the PI received from the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, the subject is now seen to be more complicated and therefore much more interesting in that concentrated suspensions have been shown to exhibit fascinating and unique rheological properties of their own that have no counterpart in flowing Newtonian or even non-Newtonian (polymeric) fluids. In fact, it is generally acknowledged that, as the result of these investigations for which the PI received the 2001 National Medal of Science, our understanding of how suspensions behave under flow is far more detailed and comprehensive than was the case even as recently as a decade ago. Thus, given that the flow of suspensions plays a crucial role in many diverse physical processes, our work has had a major and lasting impact in a subject having both fundamental as well as practical importance.

  12. Non-equilibrium phenomena in disordered colloidal solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunker, Peter

    Colloidal particles are a convenient tool for studying a variety of non-equilibrium phenomena. I will discuss experiments that investigate the aging and non-equilibrium growth of disordered solids. In the first set of experiments, colloidal glasses are rapidly formed to study aging in jammed packings. A colloidal fluid, composed of micron-sized temperature-sensitive pNIPAM particles, is rapidly quenched into a colloidal glass. After the glass is formed, collective rearrangements occur as the glass ages. Particles that undergo irreversible rearrangements, which break nearest-neighbor pairings and allow the glass to relax, are identified. These irreversible rearrangements are accompanied by large clusters of fast moving particles; the number of particles involved in these clusters increases as the glass ages, leading to the slowing of dynamics that is characteristic of aging. In the second set of experiments, we study the role particle shape, and thus, interparticle interaction, plays in the formation of disordered solids with different structural and mechanical properties. Aqueous suspensions of colloidal particles with different shapes evaporate on glass slides. Convective flows during evaporation carry particles from drop center to drop edge, where they accumulate. The resulting particle deposits grow heterogeneously from the edge on the air-water interface. Three distinct growth processes were discovered in the evaporating colloidal suspensions by tuning particle shape-dependent capillary interactions and thus varying the microscopic rules of deposition. Mechanical testing of these particulate deposits reveals that the deposit bending rigidity increases as particles become more anisotropic in shape.

  13. Antifungal activity against Candida albicans of starch Pickering emulsion with thymol or amphotericin B in suspension and calcium alginate films.

    PubMed

    Cossu, Andrea; Wang, Min S; Chaudhari, Amol; Nitin, Nitin

    2015-09-30

    Conventional antifungal treatments against Candida albicans in the oral cavity often result in increased cytotoxicity. The goal of this study was to determine the potential of starch Pickering emulsion as a delivery vehicle for an antifungal natural phenolic compound such as thymol in simulated saliva fluid (SSF) compared to amphotericin B. An oil-in-water (o/w) emulsion was stabilized using starch particles. Physical stability of the emulsion and disruption induced by α-amylase activity in SSF was evaluated. Encapsulated thymol in o/w emulsion was compared to encapsulated amphotericin B for antifungal activity against C. albicans in suspension using emulsions or zone inhibition assay on agar plates using emulsions dispersed in alginate films. Results showed that the emulsions were stable for at least three weeks. Digestion of the emulsion by α-amylase led to coalescence of emulsion droplets. The antifungal activity of thymol and amphotericin B in emulsion formulation was enhanced upon incubation with α-amylase. Results from the zone inhibition assay demonstrated efficacy of the emulsions dispersed in alginate films. Interestingly, addition of α-amylase to the alginate films resulted in a decreased inhibitory effect. Overall, this study showed that starch Pickering emulsions have a potential to deliver hydrophobic antifungal compounds to treat oral candidiasis.

  14. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    SciTech Connect

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-10-07

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R{sub col} is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R{sub col} that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k{sub att}, and detachment rate constants, k{sub det}, of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R{sub col} uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant retardation

  15. Characterization of the Colloidal Properties, In vitro Antifungal Activity, Antileishmanial Activity and Toxicity in Mice of a Distigmasterylhemisuccinoyl-glycerophosphocholine Liposome-Intercalated Amphotericin B

    PubMed Central

    Iman, Maryam; Huang, Zhaohua; Szoka, Francis C.; Jaafari, Mahmoud R.

    2011-01-01

    1,2-Distigmasterylhemisuccinoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSHemsPC) is a new lipid in which two molecules of stigmasterol (an inexpensive plant sterol) are covalently linked via a succinic acid to glycerophosphocholine. Since amphotericin B (AmB) interacts with sterols, we postulated that DSHemsPC could be used in AmB liposome formulations. Thirty-two DSHemsPC-AmB formulations were prepared using various mole ratios of DSHemsPC, phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol at different pH. Most formulations had physical properties similar to AmBisome™: a particle diameter of about 100 nm, a monomodal distribution and a negative zeta potential. The red blood cell potassium release (RBCPR) IC50s for formulations spanned a range, with some being comparable to or greater than the IC50 observed using AmBisome™. A number of formulations had superior in vitro antifungal activity compared to AmBisome™. against all of the tested pathogenic yeasts and molds. The IC50s of formulations against L. major promastigotes and amastigotes for certain formulations were comparable with AmBisome™ and Fungizone™. Most formulations had maximum tolerated intravenous doses (MTD) of less than 10 mg/kg. However the formulation consisting of DSHemsPC/DMPC/DMPG/AmB mole ratio 1.25/5.0/1.5/1.0 (prepared at pH 5.5) had excellent colloidal properties, a high IC50 for RBCPR, antifungal and antileishmanial activity similar to AmBisome™ and an MTD of 60 mg/kg. The characteristics of this DSHemsPC/DMPC/DMPG/AmB formulation make it suitable for further investigation to treat AmB-responsive pathogens. PMID:21277963

  16. Gel trapping of dense colloids.

    PubMed

    Laxton, Peter B; Berg, John C

    2005-05-01

    Phase density differences in sols, foams, or emulsions often lead to sedimentation or creaming, causing problems for materials where spatial uniformity over extended periods of time is essential. The problem may be addressed through the use of rheology modifiers in the continuous phase. Weak polymer gels have found use for this purpose in the food industry where they appear to be capable of trapping dispersoid particles in a three-dimensional matrix while displaying water-like viscosities at low shear. Attempts to predict sedimentation stability in terms of particle properties (size, shape, density difference) and gel yield stress have led to qualitative success for suspensions of large particles. The effect of particle size, however, in particular the case in which colloidal dimensions are approached, has not been investigated. The present work seeks to determine useful stability criteria for colloidal dispersions in terms of readily accessible viscoelastic descriptors. Results are reported for systems consisting of 12 microm poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) spheres dispersed in aqueous gellan gum. Monovalent salt concentration is varied to control rheological properties, and sedimentation/centrifugation experiments are performed to determine dispersion stability. Necessary conditions for stability consist of a minimum yield stress together with a value of tan delta less than unity.

  17. Design and synthesis of model transparent aqueous colloids with optimal scattering properties.

    PubMed

    Perro, Adeline; Meng, Guangnan; Fung, Jerome; Manoharan, Vinothan N

    2009-10-06

    We demonstrate the synthesis and self-assembly of colloidal particles with independently controlled diameter and scattering cross section. We show that it is possible to prepare bulk colloidal suspensions that are nearly transparent in water, while the particles themselves can be individually resolved using optical microscopy. These particles may be ideal model colloids for real-space studies of self-assembly in aqueous media. Moreover, they illustrate the degree to which the optical properties of colloids can be engineered through straightforward chemistry.

  18. Colloidal titanium dioxide separation from water by foam flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Y.H.

    1998-12-01

    Colloidal titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) was separated from an aqueous suspension (1,000 ppm) by foam flotation using cationic or anionic surfactants. The effects of surfactant dosage, suspension pH value, suspension ionic strength, and gas flow rate on the dispersed-air flotation of colloidal TiO{sub 2} were investigated. TiO{sub 2} separation was almost complete in optimum conditions. It was found that the coulombic interaction between charged TiO{sub 2} particle surfaces and ionic collectors plays a dominant role in this system. Both flotation rate and foamate volume are dependent upon the gas flow rate. Foam flotation may find application in the separation of submicron TiO{sub 2} particles in suspend-photocatalyst systems.

  19. Considerable Variation of Antibacterial Activity of Cu Nanoparticles Suspensions Depending on the Storage Time, Dispersive Medium, and Particle Sizes.

    PubMed

    Zakharova, Olga V; Godymchuk, Anna Yu; Gusev, Alexander A; Gulchenko, Svyatoslav I; Vasyukova, Inna A; Kuznetsov, Denis V

    2015-01-01

    Suspensions of Cu nanoparticles are promising for creating the new class of alternative antimicrobial products. In this study we examined copper nanoparticles of various sizes obtained by the method of wire electric explosion: nanopowder average size 50 nm (Cu 50) and 100 nm (Cu 100). The paper presents the complex study of the influence of physicochemical properties such as particle size and concentration of the freshly prepared and 24-hour suspensions of Cu nanoparticles in distilled water and physiological solution upon their toxicity to bacteria E. coli M-17. Ionic solution of Cu(2+) and sodium dichloroisocyanurate was used for comparison study. It has been shown that decrease in the nanoparticle size leads to changes in the correlation between toxicity and concentration as toxicity peaks are observed at low concentrations (0.0001⋯0.01 mg/L). It has been observed that antibacterial properties of Cu 50 nanoparticle suspensions are ceased after 24-hour storage, while for Cu 100 suspensions no correlation between antibacterial properties and storage time has been noted. Cu 100 nanoparticle suspensions at 10 mg/L concentration display higher toxicity at substituting physiological solution for water than Cu 50 suspensions. Dependence of the toxicity on the mean particle aggregates size in suspension was not revealed.

  20. Antidepressant-like activity of anthocyanidins from Hibiscus rosa-sinensis flowers in tail suspension test and forced swim test

    PubMed Central

    Shewale, Pallavi B.; Patil, Rupali A.; Hiray, Yogesh A.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Flowers of Hibiscus rosa-sinensis Linn (Malvaceae) popularly known as “China-rose flowers” contain flavonoids. Flavonoids have been found to have antidepressant activity. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the antidepressant activity of flavonoids in H. rosa-sinensis flowers with possible involvement of monoamines. Materials and Methods: Anti-depressant activity of methanol extract containing anthocyanins (MHR) (30 and 100 mg/kg) and anthocyanidins (AHR) (30 and 100 mg/ kg) of H. rosa-sinensis flowers were evaluated in mice using behavioral tests such as tail suspension test (TST) and forced swim test (FST). The mechanism of action involved in antidepressant activity was investigated by observing the effect of extract after pre-treatment with low dose haloperidol, prazosin and para-chlorophenylalanine (p-CPA). Results: Present study exhibited significant decrease in immobility time in TST and FST, similar to that of imipramine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) which served as a positive control. The extract significantly attenuated the duration of immobility induced by Haloperidol (50 μg/ kg, i.p., a classical D2-like dopamine receptor antagonist), Prazosin (62.5 μg/kg, i.p., an α1-adrenoceptor antagonist) and p-chlorophenylalanine (100 mg/kg, i.p., × 3 days; an inhibitor of serotonin synthesis) in both TST and FST. Conclusion: It can be concluded that MHR and AHR possess potential antidepressant activity (through dopaminergic, noradrenergic and serotonergic mechanisms) and has therapeutic potential in the treatment of CNS disorders and provides evidence at least at preclinical levels. PMID:23087504

  1. Colloid transport in porous media: impact of hyper-saline solutions.

    PubMed

    Magal, Einat; Weisbrod, Noam; Yechieli, Yoseph; Walker, Sharon L; Yakirevich, Alexander

    2011-05-01

    The transport of colloids suspended in natural saline solutions with a wide range of ionic strengths, up to that of Dead Sea brines (10(0.9) M) was explored. Migration of microspheres through saturated sand columns of different sizes was studied in laboratory experiments and simulated with mathematical models. Colloid transport was found to be related to the solution salinity as expected. The relative concentration of colloids at the columns outlet decreased (after 2-3 pore volumes) as the solution ionic strength increased until a critical value was reached (ionic strength > 10(-1.8) M) and then remained constant above this level of salinity. The colloids were found to be mobile even in the extremely saline brines of the Dead Sea. At such high ionic strength no energetic barrier to colloid attachment was presumed to exist and colloid deposition was expected to be a favorable process. However, even at these salinity levels, colloid attachment was not complete and the transport of ∼ 30% of the colloids through the 30-cm long columns was detected. To further explore the deposition of colloids on sand surfaces in Dead Sea brines, transport was studied using 7-cm long columns through which hundreds of pore volumes were introduced. The resulting breakthrough curves exhibited a bimodal shape whereby the relative concentration (C/C(0)) of colloids at the outlet rose to a value of 0.8, and it remained relatively constant (for the ∼ 18 pore volumes during which the colloid suspension was flushed through the column) and then the relative concentration increased to a value of one. The bimodal nature of the breakthrough suggests different rates of colloid attachment. Colloid transport processes were successfully modeled using the limited entrapment model, which assumes that the colloid attachment rate is dependent on the concentration of the attached colloids. Application of this model provided confirmation of the colloid aggregation and their accelerated attachment during

  2. Ring around the colloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallaro, Marcello, Jr.; Gharbi, Mohamed A.; Beller, Daniel A.; Čopar, Simon; Shi, Zheng; Kamien, Randall D.; Yang, Shu; Baumgart, Tobias; Stebe, Kathleen J.

    In this work, we show that Janus washers, genus-one colloids with hybrid anchoring conditions, form topologically required defects in nematic liquid crystals. Experiments under crossed polarizers reveal the defect structure to be a rigid disclination loop confined within the colloid, with an accompanying defect in the liquid crystal. When confined to a homeotropic cell, the resulting colloid-defect ring pair tilts relative to the far field director, in contrast to the behavior of toroidal colloids with purely homeotropic anchoring. We show that this tilting behavior can be reversibly suppressed by the introduction of a spherical colloid into the center of the toroid, creating a new kind of multi-shape colloidal assemblage.

  3. Colloidal stability of iron oxide nanoparticles with multivalent polymer surfactants.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young-Wook; Lee, Hoik; Song, Youngjun; Sohn, Daewon

    2015-04-01

    This paper introduces a new approach for preparing magnetic colloidal suspensions with electrostatic repulsion between particles and polyelectrolyte surfactants. The surface charge of the iron oxide particles was positive in acidic aqueous conditions; however the surface charge of the colloid was negative in basic aqueous conditions due to the amphoteric property of Fe2O3. The long-term colloidal stability and particle distribution of the multivalent charged polymers, Poly(4-vinylbenzenesulfonate sodium salt) (PSS), Poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), and Poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) were compared with the monovalent surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Both mono- and multivalent surfactant molecules showed good colloidal stability for extended periods of time. However, the particle distribution was dependent on the hydrophobicity of the surfactants' functional groups. Polyelectrolytes with a negatively charged functional group showed good long-term stability of particles and a narrow particle distribution regardless of the acid dissociation constant (pKa) of the polymer.

  4. Toxicity of aqueous C70-gallic acid suspension in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Seda, Brandon C; Ke, Pu-Chun; Mount, Andrew S; Klaine, Stephen J

    2012-01-01

    The present study assessed the toxic effects of stable aqueous colloidal suspensions of gallic-acid-stabilized C(70) fullerene on Daphnia magna. The suspensions were stabilized through noncovalent surface modification with gallic acid. In addition to whole-organism responses, changes in antioxidative processes in D. magna were quantified. Acute toxicity was observed with 96LC50 for C(70) -gallic acid of 0.4 ± 0.1 mg/L C(70) . Daphnia magna fecundity was significantly reduced in 21-d bioassays at C(70) -gallic aqcid concentrations below quantifiable limits. Antioxidant enzyme activities of glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase as well as lipid peroxidation suggested that exposed organisms experienced oxidative stress. Microscopic techniques used to determine cellular toxicity via apoptosis proved unsuccessful.

  5. Spatial and Temporal Variability in Colloid Dispersion as a Function of Groundwater Injection Rate within Atlantic Coastal Plain Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Seaman, J.C., P.M. Bertsch and D.I. Kaplan

    2007-01-01

    A subsurface injection experiment was conducted on the USDOE's Savannah River Site (SRS) to determine the influence of pump-and-treat remediation activities on the generation and transport of groundwater colloids. The impact of colloid generation on formation permeability at injection rates ranging from 19 to 132 L min{sup -1} was monitored using a set of six sampling wells radially spaced at approximate distances of 2.0, 3.0, and 4.5 m from a central injection well. Each sampling well was further divided into three discrete sampling depths that were pumped continuously at a rate of {approx}0.1 L min{sup -1} throughout the course of the injection experiment. Discrete samples were collected for turbidity and chemical analysis. Turbidity varied greatly between sampling wells and zones within a given well, ranging from <1 to 740 NTU. The two sampling wells closest to the injection well displayed the greatest response in terms of turbidity to increases in injection rate. Transient spikes in turbidity generally corresponded to incremental increases in the injection rate that were followed by a decrease in turbidity to a stable injection rate-dependent level. Mineralogical analysis of the resulting suspensions confirmed the presence of kaolinite, goethite, and to a much lesser degree, quartz and illite, with many of the particles too large (>1 {micro}m) to be readily mobile within the formation. Turbidity measurements taken during this study indicate that colloid mobilization induced by water injection was both spatially and temporally heterogeneous. Furthermore, colloid release did not follow simple predictions based on shear force, presumably due to the complexities encountered in real heterogeneous systems. These findings have important implications to our understanding of how colloids and the co-contaminants are mobilized in the subsurface environment, as well as for the development of monitoring practices that minimize the creation of colloidal artifacts. Technical

  6. Capillary suspensions: Particle networks formed through the capillary force

    PubMed Central

    Koos, Erin

    2014-01-01

    The addition of small amounts of a secondary fluid to a suspension can, through the attractive capillary force, lead to particle bridging and network formation. The capillary bridging phenomenon can be used to stabilize particle suspensions and precisely tune their rheological properties. This effect can even occur when the secondary fluid wets the particles less well than the bulk fluid. These materials, so-called capillary suspensions, have been the subject of recent research studying the mechanism for network formation, the properties of these suspensions, and how the material properties can be modified. Recent work in colloidal clusters is summarized and the relationship to capillary suspensions is discussed. Capillary suspensions can also be used as a pathway for new material design and some of these applications are highlighted. Results obtained to date are summarized and central questions that remain to be answered are proposed in this review. PMID:25729316

  7. UZ Colloid Transport Model

    SciTech Connect

    M. McGraw

    2000-04-13

    The UZ Colloid Transport model development plan states that the objective of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the development of a model for simulating unsaturated colloid transport. This objective includes the following: (1) use of a process level model to evaluate the potential mechanisms for colloid transport at Yucca Mountain; (2) Provide ranges of parameters for significant colloid transport processes to Performance Assessment (PA) for the unsaturated zone (UZ); (3) Provide a basis for development of an abstracted model for use in PA calculations.

  8. Pituitary Colloid Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Guduk, Mustafa; Sun, Halil Ibrahim; Sav, Murat Aydin; Berkman, Zafer

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Colloid cysts appear most commonly in the third ventricle, their occurrence in the sellar region is uncommon. The authors report a female patient with a pituitary colloid cyst. She was diagnosed incidentally with a sellar lesion by a routine paranasal computed tomography examination performed for planning of a dental implant surgery. Radiologic examinations revealed a pituitary lesion that was removed by transnasal transsphenoidal route. Her pathologic examination revealed that the lesion was a colloid cyst. Although rare, colloid cysts should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pituitary lesions PMID:27792102

  9. Analysis of colloid transport

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, B.J.; Nuttall, H.E.

    1985-12-31

    The population balance methodology is described and applied to the transport and capture of polydispersed colloids in packed columns. The transient model includes particle growth, capture, convective transport, and dispersion. We also follow the dynamic accumulation of captured colloids on the solids. The multidimensional parabolic partial differential equation was solved by a recently enhanced method of characteristics technique. This computational technique minimized numerical dispersion and is computationally very fast. The FORTRAN 77 code ran on a VAX-780 in less than a minute and also runs on an IBM-AT using the Professional FORTRAN compiler. The code was extensively tested against various simplified cases and against analytical models. The packed column experiments by Saltelli et al. were re-analyzed incorporating the experimentally reported size distribution of the colloid feed material. Colloid capture was modeled using a linear size dependent filtration function. The effects of a colloid size dependent filtration factor and various initial colloid size distributions on colloid migration and capture were investigated. Also, we followed the changing colloid size distribution as a function of position in the column. Some simple arguments are made to assess the likelihood of colloid migration at a potential NTS Yucca Mountain waste disposal site. 10 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Assessment of the antibacterial activity of tea tree oil using the European EN 1276 and EN 12054 standard suspension tests.

    PubMed

    Messager, S; Hammer, K A; Carson, C F; Riley, T V

    2005-02-01

    The activity of tea tree oil (TTO) and TTO-containing products was investigated according to the EN 1276 and EN 12054 European suspension methods. The activity of different concentrations of TTO, a hygienic skin wash (HSW), an alcoholic hygienic skin wash (AHSW) and an alcoholic hand rub (AHR) was investigated. These formulations were assessed in perfect conditions with the EN 12054 test, and in perfect conditions as well as in the presence of interfering substances with the EN 1276 test, against Staphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. With the latter test, the activity of the same formulations without TTO was also assessed as a control. With the EN 1276 test, the AHR achieved a >10(5)-fold reduction against all four test organisms within a 1-min contact time. The AHSW achieved a >or=10(5)-fold reduction against A. baumannii after a 1-min contact time and against S. aureus, E. coli and P. aeruginosa after a 5-min contact time. The efficacy of TTO appeared to be dependent on the formulation and the concentration tested, the concentration of interfering substances and, lastly, the organism tested. Nevertheless, 5% TTO achieved a >10(4)-fold reduction in P. aeruginosa cell numbers after a 5-min contact time in perfect conditions. TTO (5%) in 0.001% Tween 80 was significantly more active against E. coli and P. aeruginosa than against S. aureus and A. baumannii. With the EN 12054 test, after a 1-min contact time, 5% TTO in 0.001% Tween 80 and the AHSW achieved a >10(4)-fold reduction in E. coli and A. baumannii cell numbers, respectively, and the AHR achieved a >4 log10 reduction against all organisms tested. The formulations used in this study are now being tested using a novel ex vivo method as well as the in vivo European standard handwashing method EN 1499.

  11. Suspension of Registrations under FIFRA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Under FIFRA Section 3(c)(2)(B), this generally halts further distribution and sale of the suspended pesticide product by the registrant. Find suspension listings by product name, active ingredient, registrant name, date, and contact information.

  12. Generation of colloidal granules and capsules from double emulsion drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Kathryn S.

    Assemblies of colloidal particles are extensively used in ceramic processing, pharmaceuticals, inks and coatings. In this project, the aim was to develop a new technique to fabricate monodispersed colloidal assemblies. The use of microfluidic devices and emulsion processing allows for the fabrication of complex materials that can be used in a variety of applications. A microfluidic device is used to create monodispersed water/oil/water (w/o/w) double emulsions with interior droplets of colloidal silica suspension ranging in size from tens to hundreds of microns. By tailoring the osmotic pressure using glycerol as a solute in the continuous and inner phases of the emulsion, we can control the final volume size of the monodispersed silica colloidal crystals that form in the inner droplets of the double emulsion. Modifying the ionic strength in the colloidal dispersion can be used to affect the particle-particle interactions and crystal formation of the final colloidal particle. This w/o/w technique has been used with other systems of metal oxide colloids and cellulose nanocrystals. Encapsulation of the colloidal suspension in a polymer shell for the generation of ceramic-polymer core-shell particles has also been developed. These core-shell particles have spawned new research in the field of locally resonant acoustic metamaterials. Systems and chemistries for creating cellulose hydrogels within the double emulsions have also been researched. Water in oil single emulsions and double emulsions have been used to create cellulose hydrogel spheres in the sub-100 micron diameter range. Oil/water/oil double emulsions allow us to create stable cellulose capsules. The addition of a second hydrogel polymer, such as acrylate or alginate, further strengthens the cellulose gel network and can also be processed into capsules and particles using the microfluidic device. This work could have promising applications in acoustic metamaterials, personal care products, pharmaceuticals

  13. Catalytic oxidation ofS(IV) on activated carbon in aqueous suspension: kinetics and mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Brodzinsky, R.

    1981-02-01

    Activated carbon and combustion produced soot particles have been studied for their catalytic effect on the oxidation of aqueous sulfur(IV) species. Detailed kinetic studies of the reaction were performed on three different