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Sample records for active comparator trials

  1. Informing hot flash treatment decisions for breast cancer survivors: a systematic review of randomized trials comparing active interventions.

    PubMed

    Johns, Claire; Seav, Susan M; Dominick, Sally A; Gorman, Jessica R; Li, Hongying; Natarajan, Loki; Mao, Jun James; Su, H Irene

    2016-04-01

    Patient-centered decision making about hot flash treatments often incorporates a balance of efficacy and side effects in addition to patient preference. This systematic review examines randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing at least two non-hormonal hot flash treatments in breast cancer survivors. In July 2015, PubMed, SCOPUS, CINAHL, Cochrane, and Web of Science databases were searched for RCTs comparing active, non-hormonal hot flash treatments in female breast cancer survivors. Thirteen trials were included after identifying 906 potential studies. Four trials were dose comparison studies of pharmacologic treatments citalopram, venlafaxine, gabapentin, and paroxetine. Hot flash reduction did not differ by tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitor use. Citalopram 10, 20, and 30 mg daily had comparable outcomes. Venlafaxine 75 mg daily improved hot flashes without additional side effects from higher dosing. Gabapentin 900 mg daily improved hot flashes more than 300 mg. Paroxetine 10 mg daily had fewer side effects than 20 mg. Among four trials comparing different pharmacologic treatments, venlafaxine alleviated hot flash symptoms faster than clonidine; participants preferred venlafaxine over gabapentin. Five trials compared pharmacologic to non-pharmacologic treatments. Acupuncture had similar efficacy to venlafaxine and gabapentin but may have longer durability after completing treatment and fewer side effects. We could not perform a pooled meta-analysis because outcomes were not reported in comparable formats. Clinical trial data on non-hormonal hot flash treatments provide comparisons of hot flash efficacy and other patient important outcomes to guide clinical management. Clinicians can use the information to help patients select hot flash interventions.

  2. Informing hot flash treatment decisions for breast cancer survivors: a systematic review of randomized trials comparing active interventions.

    PubMed

    Johns, Claire; Seav, Susan M; Dominick, Sally A; Gorman, Jessica R; Li, Hongying; Natarajan, Loki; Mao, Jun James; Su, H Irene

    2016-04-01

    Patient-centered decision making about hot flash treatments often incorporates a balance of efficacy and side effects in addition to patient preference. This systematic review examines randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing at least two non-hormonal hot flash treatments in breast cancer survivors. In July 2015, PubMed, SCOPUS, CINAHL, Cochrane, and Web of Science databases were searched for RCTs comparing active, non-hormonal hot flash treatments in female breast cancer survivors. Thirteen trials were included after identifying 906 potential studies. Four trials were dose comparison studies of pharmacologic treatments citalopram, venlafaxine, gabapentin, and paroxetine. Hot flash reduction did not differ by tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitor use. Citalopram 10, 20, and 30 mg daily had comparable outcomes. Venlafaxine 75 mg daily improved hot flashes without additional side effects from higher dosing. Gabapentin 900 mg daily improved hot flashes more than 300 mg. Paroxetine 10 mg daily had fewer side effects than 20 mg. Among four trials comparing different pharmacologic treatments, venlafaxine alleviated hot flash symptoms faster than clonidine; participants preferred venlafaxine over gabapentin. Five trials compared pharmacologic to non-pharmacologic treatments. Acupuncture had similar efficacy to venlafaxine and gabapentin but may have longer durability after completing treatment and fewer side effects. We could not perform a pooled meta-analysis because outcomes were not reported in comparable formats. Clinical trial data on non-hormonal hot flash treatments provide comparisons of hot flash efficacy and other patient important outcomes to guide clinical management. Clinicians can use the information to help patients select hot flash interventions. PMID:27015968

  3. No Sustained Attention Differences in a Longitudinal Randomized Trial Comparing Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction versus Active Control

    PubMed Central

    MacCoon, Donal G.; MacLean, Katherine A.; Davidson, Richard J.; Saron, Clifford D.; Lutz, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Background Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is a secular form of meditation training. The vast majority of the extant literature investigating the health effects of mindfulness interventions relies on wait-list control comparisons. Previous studies have found that meditation training over several months is associated with improvements in cognitive control and attention. Methodology/Principal Findings We used a visual continuous performance task (CPT) to test the effects of eight weeks of mindfulness training on sustained attention by comparing MBSR to the Health Enhancement Program (HEP), a structurally equivalent, active control condition in a randomized, longitudinal design (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01301105) focusing on a non-clinical population typical of MBSR participants. Researchers were blind to group assignment. 63 community participants were randomized to either MBSR (n = 31) or HEP (n = 32). CPT analyses were conducted on 29 MBSR participants and 25 HEP participants. We predicted that MBSR would improve visual discrimination ability and sustained attention over time on the CPT compared to HEP, with more home practice associated with greater improvements. Our hypotheses were not confirmed but we did find some evidence for improved visual discrimination similar to effects in partial replication of other research. Our study had sufficient power to demonstrate that intervention groups do not differ in their improvement over time in sustained attention performance. One of our primary predictions concerning the effects of intervention on attentional fatigue was significant but not interpretable. Conclusions Attentional sensitivity is not affected by mindfulness practice as taught in MBSR, but it is unclear whether mindfulness might positively affect another aspect of attention, vigilance. These results also highlight the relevant procedural modifications required by future research to correctly investigate the role of sustained attention in

  4. Discontinuation of Contact Precautions for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Passive and Active Screening With Culture and Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Erica S.; Kim, JiYeon; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Cotter, Jessica A.; Lee, Hang; Walensky, Rochelle P.; Hooper, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Background. There have been no randomized controlled trials comparing active and passive screening for documenting clearance of colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). We compared the efficacy of active and passive screening using both culture and commercial polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for documentation of MRSA clearance and discontinuation of MRSA contact precautions (CPs). Methods. Inpatients with a history of MRSA infection or colonization enrolled between December 2010 and September 2011 were randomized to either passive (nonintervention arm; n = 202; observation with local standard of care) or active screening (intervention arm; n = 405; study staff screened using culture and commercial PCR). The primary outcome was discontinuation of CPs by trial arm based on 3 negative cultures. In the intervention arm, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the first PCR were compared to cultures. Results. CPs were discontinued significantly more often (rate ratio [RR], 4.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.3%–7.1%) in the intervention arm, including in an intent-to-screen analysis (RR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.5%–4.7%). The first PCR, compared to 3 cultures, detected MRSA with a sensitivity of 93.9% (95% CI, 85.4%–97.6%), a specificity of 92.0% (95% CI, 85.9%–95.6%), a positive predictive value of 86.1% (95% CI, 75.9%–93.1%), and a negative predictive value of 96.6% (95% CI, 91.6%–99.1%). Conclusions. Compared to passive screening using culture methods, active screening resulted in discontinuation of MRSA CPs at a significantly higher frequency. Active screening with a single PCR would significantly increase the completion of the screening process. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT01234831. PMID:23572482

  5. Lessons from randomised direct comparative trials.

    PubMed

    Achiron, Anat; Fredrikson, Sten

    2009-02-01

    For over a decade, four immunomodulatory therapies have been available for the treatment of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis. However, few direct comparative data were available to facilitate the choice of treatment. This choice has been influenced by the perception that interferon-beta preparations have greater efficacy than glatiramer acetate, due to apparently more rapid and robust reduction of gadolinium-enhancing lesions seen on magnetic resonance imaging in the pivotal trials of these agents. This situation has changed in the last year, with the outcomes of three randomised clinical trials comparing the efficacy and safety of glatiramer acetate with that of a high-dose interferon-beta in relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis. These are the REGARD, BEYOND and BECOME trials. In the REGARD trial, 764 patients were randomised to treatment with either interferon-beta 1a sc 44 microg or glatiramer acetate for 96 weeks; no significant difference in the time to first relapse was observed. The largest of the three comparative studies, the BEYOND trial, compared treatment with interferon-beta 1b sc 500 microg, interferon-beta 1b sc 250 microg or glatiramer acetate for two years in 2,244 patients. The hazard ratio for multiple relapses was close to unity for comparisons between all groups, indicating equivalent efficacy in all three treatment arms. Relapse rates (around 0.3 relapses/year) in all these studies were much lower than anticipated and lower than those reported a decade previously in the pivotal trials of beta-interferons and glatiramer acetate. No unexpected safety issues were identified in any of these studies. The completion of these direct comparative studies has considerably enriched the clinical evidence database by contributing large numbers of patients. This provides an invaluable contribution for helping the physician make an informed choice about treatment. The results of the direct comparative studies provide evidence that glatiramer acetate

  6. [Comparative trials on sultopride and fluanisone].

    PubMed

    Robert, G

    1978-01-01

    A therapeutic trial has been carried out on 50 patients, most of them being hospitalized, in order to compare the characteristics of a new benzamide, Sultopride, to those of a butyrophenone, Fluanisone, for the treatment of important and chronic agitation states. Clinically, they were essentially psychotic states, with dissociation. From this trial it appeared that sultopride is superior to fluanizone with regard to their sedative effects and that it has specific characteristics: a very powerful antipsychotic action, an increasing efficiency over time, as well as an improvement of incoercible agitation in children. Thus, the present trial has checked out the well-known sedative action of Fluanisone, and has revealed a new major antipsychotic drug, Sultopride, the superiority of which lies on a much wider therapeutic field.

  7. Promoting physical activity in low back pain patients: six months follow-up of a randomised controlled trial comparing a multicomponent intervention with a low intensity intervention

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, Andrea; Dintsios, Charalabos-Markos; Icks, Andrea; Reibling, Nadine; Froboese, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess a comprehensive multicomponent intervention against a low intensity intervention for promoting physical activity in chronic low back pain patients. Design: Randomised controlled trial. Setting: Inpatient rehabilitation and aftercare. Subjects: A total of 412 patients with chronic low back pain. Interventions: A multicomponent intervention (Movement Coaching) comprising of small group intervention (twice during inpatient rehabilitation), tailored telephone aftercare (twice after rehabilitation) and internet-based aftercare (web 2.0 platform) versus a low level intensity intervention (two general presentations on physical activity, download of the presentations). Main measures: Physical activity was measured using a questionnaire. Primary outcome was total physical activity; secondary outcomes were setting specific physical activity (transport, workplace, leisure time) and pain. Comparative group differences were evaluated six months after inpatient rehabilitation. Results: At six months follow-up, 92 participants in Movement Coaching (46 %) and 100 participants in the control group (47 %) completed the postal follow-up questionnaire. No significant differences between the two groups could be shown in total physical activity (P = 0.30). In addition to this, workplace (P = 0.53), transport (P = 0.68) and leisure time physical activity (P = 0.21) and pain (P = 0.43) did not differ significantly between the two groups. In both groups, physical activity decreased during the six months follow-up. Conclusions: The multicomponent intervention was no more effective than the low intensity intervention in promoting physical activity at six months follow-up. The decrease in physical activity in both groups is an unexpected outcome of the study and indicates the need for further research. PMID:27496696

  8. A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial of Classroom-Based Mindfulness Meditation Compared to an Active Control Condition in 6th Grade Children

    PubMed Central

    Britton, Willoughby B.; Lepp, Nathaniel E.; Niles, Halsey F.; Rocha, Tomas; Fisher, Nathan; Gold, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Children in the United States are at risk for numerous psychological problems, such as anxiety, attention problems, and mood disorders, and are underserved by current mental health provisions. The current study is a pilot trial to examine the effects of a nonelective, classroom-based, teacher-implemented, mindfulness meditation intervention on standard clinical measures of mental health and affect in middle school children. A total of 101 healthy sixth-grade students (55 boys and 46 girls) were randomized to either an Asian history course with daily mindfulness meditation practice (intervention group) or an African history course with a matched experiential activity (active control group). Self-reported data was collected by administering the Youth Self Report (YSR), a modified Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Cognitive and Affective Mindfulness Measure -Revised before and after 6 weeks of meditation or active control condition. Both meditators and active controls decreased significantly on the YSR Internalizing Problems, Externalizing Problems, and Attention Problems subscales but did not differ in the extent of their improvements. Both groups also showed comparable improvements on measures in affect. Meditators were significantly less likely to develop suicidal ideation or thoughts of self-harm than controls. Improvements in affect were correlated with increases in mindfulness in meditators but not controls. These results suggest that mindfulness training may yield both unique and nonspecific benefits that are shared by other novel activities. PMID:24930819

  9. Grand average ERP-image plotting and statistics: A method for comparing variability in event-related single-trial EEG activities across subjects and conditions

    PubMed Central

    Delorme, Arnaud; Miyakoshi, Makoto; Jung, Tzyy-Ping; Makeig, Scott

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of modern computing methods, modeling trial-to-trial variability in biophysical recordings including electroencephalography (EEG) has become of increasingly interest. Yet no widely used method exists for comparing variability in ordered collections of single-trial data epochs across conditions and subjects. We have developed a method based on an ERP-image visualization tool in which potential, spectral power, or some other measure at each time point in a set of event-related single-trial data epochs are represented as color coded horizontal lines that are then stacked to form a 2-D colored image. Moving-window smoothing across trial epochs can make otherwise hidden event-related features in the data more perceptible. Stacking trials in different orders, for example ordered by subject reaction time, by context-related information such as inter-stimulus interval, or some other characteristic of the data (e.g., latency-window mean power or phase of some EEG source) can reveal aspects of the multifold complexities of trial-to-trial EEG data variability. This study demonstrates new methods for computing and visualizing grand ERP-image plots across subjects and for performing robust statistical testing on the resulting images. These methods have been implemented and made freely available in the EEGLAB signal-processing environment that we maintain and distribute. PMID:25447029

  10. Optimal sampling ratios in comparative diagnostic trials

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ting; Tang, Liansheng Larry; Rosenberger, William F.

    2014-01-01

    Summary A subjective sampling ratio between the case and the control groups is not always an efficient choice to maximize the power or to minimize the total required sample size in comparative diagnostic trials.We derive explicit expressions for an optimal sampling ratio based on a common variance structure shared by several existing summary statistics of the receiver operating characteristic curve. We propose a two-stage procedure to estimate adaptively the optimal ratio without pilot data. We investigate the properties of the proposed method through theoretical proofs, extensive simulation studies and a real example in cancer diagnostic studies. PMID:24948841

  11. Effect of a 24-month physical activity intervention compared to health education on cognitive outcomes in sedentary older adults: the LIFE Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sink, Kaycee M.; Espeland, Mark A.; Castro, Cynthia M.; Church, Timothy; Cohen, Ron; Dodson, John A.; Guralnik, Jack; Hendrie, Hugh C.; Jennings, Janine; Katula, Jeffery; Lopez, Oscar L.; McDermott, Mary M.; Pahor, Marco; Reid, Kieran F.; Rushing, Julia; Verghese, Joe; Rapp, Stephen; Williamson, Jeff D.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Epidemiologic evidence suggests that physical activity benefits cognition, but results from randomized trials are limited and mixed. Objective To determine whether a 24-month physical activity program results in better cognitive function and/or lower risk of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or dementia compared to a health education program. Design, Setting, and Participants The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) study was a multicenter, randomized clinical trial that enrolled 1635 community-living participants at 8 centers in the U.S. from February 2010 until December 2011. Participants were sedentary adults aged 70–89 years at risk for mobility disability, but able to walk 400m. Intervention Participants were randomized to a structured, moderate-intensity physical activity program (n=818) that included walking, resistance training, and flexibility exercises or to a health education program (n=817) of educational workshops and upper extremity stretching. Outcomes and Measures Pre-specified secondary outcomes of the LIFE study included cognitive function measured by the Digit Symbol Coding task (0–133 scale, higher=better) and Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised (12-word list recall) assessed in 1,476 (90.3%) participants. Tertiary outcomes included global and executive cognitive function and incident MCI or dementia at 24 months. Pre-specified subgroups analyses were performed based on age, sex, baseline physical performance, and baseline Modified Mini-Mental State Examination score. Results At 24 months, DSC and HVLT-R scores (adjusted for clinic site, gender, and baseline values) were not different between groups. Mean DSC scores were 46.26 points for physical activity vs. 46.28 for health education; mean difference −0.014 points, 95% CI −0.80 to 0.77, p= 0.97. Mean HVLT-R delayed recall scores were 7.22 for physical activity vs. 7.25 for health education; mean difference −0.03 words, 95% CI −0.29 to 0.24, p= 0

  12. A Randomized Trial Comparing Disease Activity Measures for the Assessment and Prediction of Response in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Initiating Certolizumab Pegol

    PubMed Central

    Churchill, Melvin; Kivitz, Alan; Samad, Ahmed; Gauer, Laura; Gervitz, Leon; Koetse, Willem; Melin, Jeffrey; Yazici, Yusuf

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of the Patient/Physician Reported Efficacy Determination In Clinical Practice Trial (PREDICT; ClinicalTrials identifier NCT01255761) was to compare the patient‐reported Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data 3 (RAPID‐3) instrument with the investigator‐based Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI) for assessing certolizumab pegol (CZP) treatment response in rheumatoid arthritis patients at 12 weeks and to predict the treatment response at week 52 using the data from week 12 (coprimary end points). Methods Patients received 400 mg of CZP at weeks 0, 2, and 4 (loading dose), followed by 200 mg every 2 weeks thereafter. Patients were randomized 1:1 to assessment with the RAPID‐3 or the CDAI. Responder classification was performed at week 12; treatment response was defined as a score of ≤6 or a 20% improvement over baseline on the RAPID‐3 or a score of ≤10 or a 20% improvement over baseline on the CDAI. Long‐term treatment success was defined as a Disease Activity Score in 28 joints using the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (DAS28‐ESR) of ≤3.2 at week 52. Comparisons were made for the coprimary end points using noninferiority methods. Patients with improvement of <1 on the CDAI score or with no improvement on the RAPID‐3 score at week 12 or patients with high levels of disease activity (CDAI score >22 or RAPID‐3 score >12) at 2 consecutive visits were withdrawn from the study. Results Patients had longstanding disease (mean 8.9 years) and high levels of disease activity (mean scores of 6.3 on the DAS28‐ESR, 16.1 on the RAPID‐3, and 40.2 on the CDAI). Previous anti–tumor necrosis factor therapy had failed in 55.5% of them. At week 12, a total of 64.7% (by RAPID‐3) and 76.4% (by CDAI) of the patients were classified as responders (difference of −11.9% [95% confidence interval −18.4%, −5.3%]). At week 52, a total of 31.5% (by RAPID‐3) and 32.3% (by CDAI) of the responders achieved a low level of disease activity on

  13. Ethical pitfalls in neonatal comparative effectiveness trials.

    PubMed

    Modi, Neena

    2014-01-01

    oxygen that are too low or too high. Investigators in the UK, Australia, New Zealand and the USA designed randomized controlled trials to provide more precise guidance, by determining whether targeting the lower end of the accepted range (85-89%) resulted in reduced retinopathy of prematurity when compared with the upper end of the accepted range (91-95%). Between 2004 and 2009, the US SUPPORT trial (Surfactant, Positive Pressure and Oxygenation Randomized Trial) recruited approximately 1,300 infants and showed that babies at the higher end of the recommended oxygen saturation range had a greater incidence of retinopathy of prematurity, but that, unexpectedly, babies at the lower end had a higher risk of death [1]. The data monitoring committees of the BOOST II (Oxygen Saturation and Outcomes in Preterm Infants) trials in the UK, Australia and New Zealand reviewed their interim data, confirmed the higher risk of death in babies randomized to the lower saturation range, and halted further recruitment [2]. Without the trials, the lower saturation target would have continued to be applied to many babies, and many would have died as a result. Though many uncertainties remain, the trials facilitated advances in care. However, in March 2013, the lead investigators for the SUPPORT trial were informed by the US 'Office for Human Research Protections' that they were 'in violation of the regulatory requirements for informed consent, stemming from the failure to describe the reasonably foreseeable risks of blindness, neurological damage and death' [3]. This extraordinary conclusion indicates that the US regulators considered the researchers to be at fault for failing to foresee an unexpected trial result, and for randomizing babies to receive oxygen within the accepted standard-of-care limits. The ruling further implies that the regulators consider that clinicians are acting ethically when they deliver an accepted but non-evidence-based treatment based upon their personal bias, but

  14. Comparative trial of sclerotherapy for hydroceles.

    PubMed

    Rencken, R K; Bornman, M S; Reif, S; Olivier, I

    1990-04-01

    We present a prospective single-blind trial of sclerotherapy for hydroceles with tetradecyl sulphate and rolitetracycline as sclerosants. Twenty-seven hydroceles were treated with tetradecyl sulphate and 28 with rolitetracycline. The median follow-up was 13 months. There were no statistically significant differences between the 2 drugs in respect of cure rate and complications. The overall cure rate for both drugs was 96%. Complications were rare and common to both drugs. Tetradecyl sulphate and rolitetracycline were found to be equally effective as sclerosants.

  15. Comparing diagnostic tests: trials in people with discordant test results.

    PubMed

    Hooper, R; Díaz-Ordaz, K; Takeda, A; Khan, K

    2013-06-30

    Diagnostic tests are traditionally compared for accuracy against a gold standard but can also be compared prospectively in a trial. A conventional trial comparing two tests would randomize each participant to a testing strategy, but a more efficient alternative is to give both tests to all participants and follow up those with discordant results. Participants could be randomized before or after testing. The statistical analysis of such a trial has not previously been described. We investigated two estimates of the risk difference for a binary outcome: one based on analysing outcomes as if from a conventional trial and one combining estimates of different parameters in the manner of a decision analysis. We show that the trial estimate and decision analysis estimate are both unbiased and derive approximate formulae for their standard errors. By using the decision analysis estimate (but not the trial estimate), the same precision can be achieved by randomizing before testing as by randomizing after. To avoid destroying equipoise, and to allow consenting and randomizing to be carried out at the same visit, we recommend randomizing before testing. Giving both tests to all participants means fewer need to be recruited: in one example from the literature, the proposed design was nearly four times more efficient in this sense than a conventional trial design. PMID:23172716

  16. Promoting physical activity in low back pain patients: six months follow-up of a randomised controlled trial comparing a multicomponent intervention with a low intensity intervention

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, Andrea; Dintsios, Charalabos-Markos; Icks, Andrea; Reibling, Nadine; Froboese, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess a comprehensive multicomponent intervention against a low intensity intervention for promoting physical activity in chronic low back pain patients. Design: Randomised controlled trial. Setting: Inpatient rehabilitation and aftercare. Subjects: A total of 412 patients with chronic low back pain. Interventions: A multicomponent intervention (Movement Coaching) comprising of small group intervention (twice during inpatient rehabilitation), tailored telephone aftercare (twice after rehabilitation) and internet-based aftercare (web 2.0 platform) versus a low level intensity intervention (two general presentations on physical activity, download of the presentations). Main measures: Physical activity was measured using a questionnaire. Primary outcome was total physical activity; secondary outcomes were setting specific physical activity (transport, workplace, leisure time) and pain. Comparative group differences were evaluated six months after inpatient rehabilitation. Results: At six months follow-up, 92 participants in Movement Coaching (46 %) and 100 participants in the control group (47 %) completed the postal follow-up questionnaire. No significant differences between the two groups could be shown in total physical activity (P = 0.30). In addition to this, workplace (P = 0.53), transport (P = 0.68) and leisure time physical activity (P = 0.21) and pain (P = 0.43) did not differ significantly between the two groups. In both groups, physical activity decreased during the six months follow-up. Conclusions: The multicomponent intervention was no more effective than the low intensity intervention in promoting physical activity at six months follow-up. The decrease in physical activity in both groups is an unexpected outcome of the study and indicates the need for further research. PMID:27496696

  17. Constructing Common Cohorts From Trials with Overlapping Eligibility Criteria: Implications for Comparing Effect Sizes Between Trials

    PubMed Central

    Mount, David L.; Feeney, Patricia; Fabricatore, Anthony N.; Coday, Mace; Bahnson, Judy; Byington, Robert; Phelan, Suzanne; Wilmoth, Sharon; Knowler, William C.; Hramiak, Irene; Osei, Kwame; Sweeney, Mary Ellen; Espeland, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Comparing findings from separate trials is necessary to choose among treatment options, however differences among study cohorts may impede these comparisons. Purpose As a case study, to examine the overlap of study cohorts in two large randomized controlled clinical trials that assess interventions to reduce risk of major cardiovascular disease events in adults with type 2 diabetes in order to explore the feasibility of cross-trial comparisons Methods The Action for Health in Diabetes (Look AHEAD) and The Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) trials enrolled 5,145 and 10,251 adults with type 2 diabetes, respectively. Look AHEAD assesses the efficacy of an intensive lifestyle intervention designed to produce weight loss; ACCORD tests pharmacological therapies for control of glycemia, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension. Incidence of major cardiovascular disease events is the primary outcome for both trials. A sample was constructed to include participants from each trial who appeared to meet eligibility criteria and be appropriate candidates for the other trial’s interventions. Demographic characteristics, health status, and outcomes of members and non-members of this constructed sample were compared. Results Nearly 80% of Look AHEAD participants were projected to be ineligible for ACCORD; ineligibility was primarily due to better glycemic control or no early history of cardiovascular disease. Approximately 30% of ACCORD participants were projected to be ineligible for Look AHEAD, often for reasons linked to poorer health. The characteristics of participants projected to be jointly eligible for both trials continued to reflect differences between trials according to factors likely linked to retention, adherence, and study outcomes. Limitations Accurate ascertainment of cross-trial eligibility was hampered by differences between protocols. Conclusions Despite several similarities, the Look AHEAD and ACCORD cohorts represent distinct

  18. Changes in the Healthy Beverage Index in Response to an Intervention Targeting a Reduction in Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption as Compared to an Intervention Targeting Improvements in Physical Activity: Results from the Talking Health Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hedrick, Valisa E.; Davy, Brenda M.; Myers, Emily A.; You, Wen; Zoellner, Jamie M.

    2015-01-01

    The recently developed Healthy Beverage Index (HBI) was designed to evaluate overall beverage intake quality (including total fluid consumption and beverage calories), yet no known intervention studies have assessed longitudinal changes to the HBI. The objective of this investigation was to assess changes in HBI scores in response to a sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) reduction trial as compared to a physical activity comparison group. Participants were enrolled into a six-month, community-based, controlled behavioral trial and randomized into either a SSB reduction group (SIPsmartER) or a physical activity group (MoveMore). Correlations and multilevel mixed-effects linear regression with intention-to-treat analyses are presented. Total HBI score significantly increased for SIPsmartER (n = 149) (mean increase = 7.5 points (5.4, 9.7), p ≤ 0.001) and MoveMore (n = 143) (mean increase = 3.4 points (1.6, 5.2), p ≤ 0.001) participants, with a significant between group effect (p ≤ 0.05), over the six-month intervention. Other significant changes in HBI components for SIPsmartER included increased SSB and total beverage calorie scores, and decreased low-fat milk and diet soda scores. Changes in total HBI scores were significantly correlated with changes in total Healthy Eating Index-2010 scores (r = 0.15, p ≤ 0.01). Our findings suggest that individual HBI component scores, beyond the SSB component, are influenced by intervention strategies that primarily focus on SSB reduction. PMID:26690208

  19. Changes in the Healthy Beverage Index in Response to an Intervention Targeting a Reduction in Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption as Compared to an Intervention Targeting Improvements in Physical Activity: Results from the Talking Health Trial.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, Valisa E; Davy, Brenda M; Myers, Emily A; You, Wen; Zoellner, Jamie M

    2015-12-04

    The recently developed Healthy Beverage Index (HBI) was designed to evaluate overall beverage intake quality (including total fluid consumption and beverage calories), yet no known intervention studies have assessed longitudinal changes to the HBI. The objective of this investigation was to assess changes in HBI scores in response to a sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) reduction trial as compared to a physical activity comparison group. Participants were enrolled into a six-month, community-based, controlled behavioral trial and randomized into either a SSB reduction group (SIPsmartER) or a physical activity group (MoveMore). Correlations and multilevel mixed-effects linear regression with intention-to-treat analyses are presented. Total HBI score significantly increased for SIPsmartER (n = 149) (mean increase = 7.5 points (5.4, 9.7), p ≤ 0.001) and MoveMore (n = 143) (mean increase = 3.4 points (1.6, 5.2), p ≤ 0.001) participants, with a significant between group effect (p ≤ 0.05), over the six-month intervention. Other significant changes in HBI components for SIPsmartER included increased SSB and total beverage calorie scores, and decreased low-fat milk and diet soda scores. Changes in total HBI scores were significantly correlated with changes in total Healthy Eating Index-2010 scores (r = 0.15, p ≤ 0.01). Our findings suggest that individual HBI component scores, beyond the SSB component, are influenced by intervention strategies that primarily focus on SSB reduction.

  20. Changes in the Healthy Beverage Index in Response to an Intervention Targeting a Reduction in Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption as Compared to an Intervention Targeting Improvements in Physical Activity: Results from the Talking Health Trial.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, Valisa E; Davy, Brenda M; Myers, Emily A; You, Wen; Zoellner, Jamie M

    2015-12-01

    The recently developed Healthy Beverage Index (HBI) was designed to evaluate overall beverage intake quality (including total fluid consumption and beverage calories), yet no known intervention studies have assessed longitudinal changes to the HBI. The objective of this investigation was to assess changes in HBI scores in response to a sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) reduction trial as compared to a physical activity comparison group. Participants were enrolled into a six-month, community-based, controlled behavioral trial and randomized into either a SSB reduction group (SIPsmartER) or a physical activity group (MoveMore). Correlations and multilevel mixed-effects linear regression with intention-to-treat analyses are presented. Total HBI score significantly increased for SIPsmartER (n = 149) (mean increase = 7.5 points (5.4, 9.7), p ≤ 0.001) and MoveMore (n = 143) (mean increase = 3.4 points (1.6, 5.2), p ≤ 0.001) participants, with a significant between group effect (p ≤ 0.05), over the six-month intervention. Other significant changes in HBI components for SIPsmartER included increased SSB and total beverage calorie scores, and decreased low-fat milk and diet soda scores. Changes in total HBI scores were significantly correlated with changes in total Healthy Eating Index-2010 scores (r = 0.15, p ≤ 0.01). Our findings suggest that individual HBI component scores, beyond the SSB component, are influenced by intervention strategies that primarily focus on SSB reduction. PMID:26690208

  1. Comparative trials of antimonial drugs in urinary schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Davis, A.

    1968-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic trials in urinary schistosomiasis are described and discussed. Their design and conduct were based on recommended statistical techniques, now generally accepted as the most appropriate approach to the assessment of antischistosomal drugs. Randomization produced comparable host groups in whom multiple parasitic infection and radiological urinary tract damage were common. Treatment was with one of three antimonial compounds given at equivalent metallic dosage daily. Antimony sodium tartrate (AST) and antimony dimercaptosuccinate (TWSb) were equally efficient curatively but both produced many side-effects. Sodium antimonylgluconate (TSAG) was four-fifths as effective but tolerance was superior. Estimations of urinary antimony excretion showed that tissue retention of the metal was related to cure-rates and side-effects. It was concluded that none of the drugs were suitable for mass chemotherapy. More new non-toxic schistosomicides are urgently needed and for their assessment, the setting-up of multicentre trials, following international agreement on technical methods, is suggested. PMID:5302298

  2. Medication Adherence in a Comparative Effectiveness Trial for Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sylvia, Louisa G.; Reilly-Harrington, Noreen A.; Leon, Andrew C.; Kansky, Christine I.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Bowden, Charles L.; Ketter, Terence A.; Friedman, Edward S.; Iosifescu, Dan V.; Thase, Michael E.; Ostacher, Michael J.; Keyes, Michelle; Rabideau, Dustin; Nierenberg, Andrew A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Psychopharmacology remains the foundation of treatment for bipolar disorder, but medication adherence in this population is low (Range = 20% to 64%). We examined medication adherence in a multi-site, comparative effectiveness study of lithium. Method The Lithium Moderate Dose Use Study (LiTMUS) was a six-month, six-site, randomized effectiveness trial of adjunctive moderate dose lithium therapy compared to optimized treatment in adult outpatients with bipolar I or II disorder (N=283). Medication adherence was measured at each study visit with the Tablet Routine Questionnaire. Results We found that 4.50% of participants reported missing at least 30% of their medications in the past week at baseline and non-adherence remained low throughout the trial (< 7%). Poor medication adherence was associated with more manic symptoms and side effects as well as lower lithium serum levels at mid- and post-treatment, but not with poor quality of life, overall severity of illness, or depressive symptoms. Conclusion Participants in LiTMUS were highly adherent with taking their medications. The lack of association with possible predictors of adherence, such as depression and quality of life, could be explained by the limited variance or other factors as well as by not using an objective measure of adherence. PMID:24117232

  3. Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial of a Web-Based Intervention to Promote Healthy Eating, Physical Activity and Meaningful Social Connections Compared with Usual Care Control in People of Retirement Age Recruited from Workplaces

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Jose; O’Brien, Nicola; Godfrey, Alan; Heaven, Ben; Evans, Elizabeth H.; Lloyd, Scott; Moffatt, Suzanne; Moynihan, Paula J.; Meyer, Thomas D.; Rochester, Lynn; Sniehotta, Falko F.; White, Martin; Mathers, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Lifestyle interventions delivered during the retirement transition might promote healthier ageing. We report a pilot randomised controlled trial (RCT) of a web-based platform (Living, Eating, Activity and Planning through retirement; LEAP) promoting healthy eating (based on a Mediterranean diet (MD)), physical activity (PA) and meaningful social roles. Methods A single blinded, two-arm RCT with individual allocation. Seventy-five adult regular internet users living in Northeast England, within two years of retirement, were recruited via employers and randomised in a 2:1 ratio to receive LEAP or a ‘usual care’ control. Intervention arm participants were provided with a pedometer to encourage self-monitoring of PA goals. Feasibility of the trial design and procedures was established by estimating recruitment and retention rates, and of LEAP from usage data. At baseline and 8-week follow-up, adherence to a MD derived from three 24-hour dietary recalls and seven-day PA by accelerometry were assessed. Healthy ageing outcomes (including measures of physiological function, physical capability, cognition, psychological and social wellbeing) were assessed and acceptability established by compliance with measurement protocols and completion rates. Thematically analysed, semi-structured, qualitative interviews assessed acceptability of the intervention, trial design, procedures and outcome measures. Results Seventy participants completed the trial; 48 (96%) participants in the intervention and 22 (88%) in the control arm. Participants had considerable scope for improvement in diet as assessed by MD score. LEAP was visited a median of 11 times (range 1–80) for a mean total time of 2.5 hours (range 5.5 min– 8.3 hours). ‘Moving more‘, ‘eating well’ and ‘being social’ were the most visited modules. At interview, participants reported that diet and PA modules were important and acceptable within the context of healthy ageing. Participants found both

  4. A Randomized Comparative Effectiveness Trial for Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the weight loss effectiveness of a ‘YMCA Model’ for the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) lifestyle intervention METHODS 509 overweight/obese, low-income, non-diabetic, adult primary care patients with elevated blood glucose were individually randomized to (1) standard care plus brief lifestyle counseling (SC); or (2) being offered a group-based adaption of the DPP offered free-of-charge by the YMCA (YDPP). Primary outcome was mean difference in weight loss at 12 months. Intention-to-treat (ITT) analyses used longitudinal linear or logistic regression, with missing observations multiply imputed. Instrumental variables (IV) regression estimated weight loss effectiveness among participants completing ≥9 intervention lessons. RESULTS In the YDPP arm, 161 (62.6%) participants attended ≥1 lesson and 103 (40.0%) completed ≥9 lessons. In ITT analysis, mean 12-month weight loss was 2.3 kg (95% CI 1.1 to 3.4 kg) more for YDPP arm participants, compared to SC. In IV analyses, persons attending ≥9 lessons had a 5.3 kg (95% CI, 2.8 to 7.9 kg) greater weight loss than with standard care alone. CONCLUSIONS The YMCA model for DPP delivery achieves meaningful weight losses at 12 months among low income adults. TRIAL REGISTRATION National Clinical Trials Registry (NCT00656682) PMID:26378828

  5. Phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase by one-trial and multi-trial classical conditioning.

    PubMed

    Crow, T; Xue-Bian, J J; Siddiqi, V; Kang, Y; Neary, J T

    1998-05-01

    The pathway supporting the conditioned stimulus (CS) is one site of plasticity that has been studied extensively in conditioned Hermissenda. Several signal transduction pathways have been implicated in classical conditioning of this preparation, although the major emphasis has been on protein kinase C. Here we provide evidence for the activation and phosphorylation of a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway by one-trial and multi-trial conditioning. A one-trial in vitro conditioning procedure consisting of light (CS) paired with the application of 5-HT results in the increased incorporation of 32PO4 into proteins detected with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Two of the phosphoproteins have molecular weights of 44 and 42 kDa, consistent with extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERK1 and ERK2). Phosphorylation of the 44 and 42 kDa proteins by one-trial conditioning was inhibited by pretreatment with PD098059, A MEK1 (ERK-Activating kinase) inhibitor. Assays of ERK activity with brain myelin basic protein as a substrate revealed greater ERK activity for the group that received one-trial conditioning compared with an unpaired control group. Western blot analysis of phosphorylated ERK using antibodies recognizing the dually phosphorylated forms of ERK1 and ERK2 showed an increase in phosphorylation after one-trial conditioning compared with unpaired controls. The increased phosphorylation of ERK after one-trial conditioning was blocked by pretreatment with PD098059. Hermissenda that received 10 or 15 conditioning trials showed significant behavioral suppression compared with pseudo-random controls. After conditioning and behavioral testing, the conditioned animals showed significantly greater phosphorylation of ERK compared with the pseudo-random controls. These results show that the ERK-MAPK signaling pathway is activated in Pavlovian conditioning of Hermissenda.

  6. Challenges and lessons learned in conducting comparative-effectiveness trials.

    PubMed

    Herrick, Linda M; Locke, G Richard; Zinsmeister, Alan R; Talley, Nicholas J

    2012-05-01

    The current health-care environment is demanding evidence-based medicine that relies on clinical trials as the basis for decisions. Clinician investigators are more often finding that they are personally responsible for coordinating large, multisite trials. We present strategies for successful implementation and management of multisite clinical trials and knowledge gained through an international, multisite randomized clinical trial. Topics include team composition, regulatory requirements, study organization and governance, communication strategies, recruitment and retention efforts, budget, technology transfer, and publication.

  7. Challenges and Lessons Learned in Conducting Comparative-Effectiveness Trials

    PubMed Central

    Herrick, Linda M.; Locke, G. Richard; Zinsmeister, Alan R.; Talley, Nicholas J.

    2014-01-01

    The current health-care environment is demanding evidence-based medicine that relies on clinical trials as the basis for decisions. Clinician investigators are more often finding that they are personally responsible for coordinating large, multisite trials. We present strategies for successful implementation and management of multisite clinical trials and knowledge gained through an international, multisite randomized clinical trial. Topics include team composition, regulatory requirements, study organization and governance, communication strategies, recruitment and retention efforts, budget, technology transfer, and publication. PMID:22552235

  8. Private manufacturers' thresholds to invest in comparative effectiveness trials.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anirban; Meltzer, David

    2012-10-01

    The recent rush of enthusiasm for public investment in comparative effectiveness research (CER) in the US has focussed attention on these public investments. However, little attention has been given to how changing public investment in CER may affect private manufacturers' incentives for CER, which has long been a major source of CER. In this work, based on a simple revenue maximizing economic framework, we generate predictions on thresholds to invest in CER for a private manufacturer that compares its own product to a competitor's product in head-to-head trials. Our analysis shows that private incentives to invest in CER are determined by how the results of CER may affect the price and quantity of the product sold and the duration over which resulting changes in revenue would accrue, given the time required to complete CER and the time from the completion of CER to the time of patent expiration. We highlight the result that private incentives may often be less than public incentives to invest in CER and may even be negative if the likelihood of adverse findings is sufficient. We find that these incentives imply a number of predictions about patterns of CER and how they will be affected by changes in public financing of CER and CER methods. For example, these incentives imply that incumbent patent holders may be less likely to invest in CER than entrants and that public investments in CER may crowd out similar private investments. In contrast, newer designs and methods for CER, such as Bayesian adaptive trials, which can reduce ex post risk of unfavourable results and shorten the time for the production of CER, may increase the expected benefits of CER and may tend to increase private investment in CER as long as the costs of such innovative designs are not excessive. Bayesian approaches to design also naturally highlight the dynamic aspects of CER, allowing less expensive initial studies to guide decisions about future investments and thereby encouraging greater

  9. Comparing Effectiveness of Active and Passive Client Follow-Up Approaches in Sustaining the Continued Use of Long Acting Reversible Contraceptives (LARC) in Rural Punjab: A Multicentre, Non-Inferiority Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hameed, Waqas; Azmat, Syed Khurram; Ali, Moazzam; Ishaque, Muhammad; Abbas, Ghazunfer; Munroe, Erik; Harrison, Rebecca; Shamsi, Wajahat Hussain; Mustafa, Ghulam; Khan, Omar Farooq; Ali, Safdar; Ahmed, Aftab

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods is very low in Pakistan with high discontinuation rates mainly attributed to method-related side effects. Mixed evidence is available on the effectiveness of different client follow-up approaches used to ensure method continuation. We compared the effectiveness of active and passive follow-up approaches in sustaining the use of LARC—and within ‘active’ follow-up, we further compared a telephone versus home-based approach in rural Punjab, Pakistan. Methods This was a 12-month multicentre non-inferiority trial conducted in twenty-two (16 rural- and 6 urban-based) franchised reproductive healthcare facilities in district Chakwal of Punjab province, between November 2013 and December 2014. The study comprised of three groups of LARC clients: a) home-based follow-up, b) telephone-based follow-up, and c) passive or needs-based follow-up. Participants in the first two study groups received counselling on scheduled follow-up from the field workers at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 month post-insertion whereas participants in the third group were asked to contact the health facility if in need of medical assistance relating to LARC method use. Study participants were recruited with equal allocation to each study group, but participants were not randomized. The analyses are based on 1,246 LARC (intra-uterine contraceptive device and implant) users that completed approximately 12-months of follow-up. The non-inferiority margin was kept at five percentage points for the comparison of active and passive follow-up and six percentage points for telephone and home-based approach. The primary outcome was cumulative probability of method continuation at 12-month among LARC users. Results Women recruited in home-based, telephone-based, and passive groups were 400, 419 and 427, respectively. The cumulative probability of LARC continuation at 12 month was 87.6% (95% CI 83.8 to 90.6) among women who received home

  10. A comparative trial of a MAOI, iproniazide, and a polycyclic agent, mianserine, for the search of the most rapidly and frequently active treatment of depressive syndromes in an oncology service.

    PubMed

    Mathé, G; Lopez, M D; Fréchet, M; de Vassal, F; Brienza, S; Gastiaburu, J

    1987-01-01

    Many cancer patients of the "Service des Maladies Sanguines et Tumorales" of Hôpital Paul-Brousse, Villejuif, are psychologically studied by: the objective and quantified Szondi test, and in the case a depressive syndrome clinical diagnosis is confirmed, this state is quantified by a quintile questionnaire requiring 25 "yes or no" answers (determined by five grades and five stages), in case an inhibition or/and hysteric component is found, the subjects are submitted to the care of a psychoanalyst. A comparative trial of the MAOI, iproniazide, and the tetracyclic analog, mianserine, has been conducted for the search of the most frequently and rapidly active antidepressant agent among them both. The hypothesis that mianserine is less frequently and rapidly active than iproniazide was drawn from our previous experience of 20 years: thus patients presenting a score less than or equal to 12/25 were given mianserine (20 up to 30 mg/day to be possibly increased according to medical decision), while those presenting a score greater than or equal to 13/25 received iproniazide (50 up to 75 mg/day). The patients who failed with mianserine received iproniazide, while those who failed with iproniazide were supposed to receive mianserine. The registered results are the following: a) out of the 25 patients with major depressive syndromes (score greater than or equal to 13) submitted to iproniazide, 16 (61%) were in complete remission (score at 0/25) and five in partial regression (score decreased by more than half); this makes 21 responses in all, i.e. 80%, obtained between the 10th and the 30th days, which is superior to all placebo responses which have varied in the reliable literature from 13 to 70%; b) out of 18 depressive patients submitted to mianserine, only one had benefited of a complete remission and four of a partial regression at the 30th day, which makes 28% responses. Among the side effects of iproniazide, they were two colon meteorism syndromes, easily corrected

  11. Accelerometer Use in a Physical Activity Intervention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Borradaile, Kelley E.; Lewis, Beth A.; Whiteley, Jessica A.; Longval, Jaime L.; Parisi, Alfred F.; Albrecht, Anna E.; Sciamanna, Christopher N.; Jakicic, John M.; Papandonatos, George D.; Marcus, Bess H.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the application of best practice recommendations for using accelerometers in a physical activity (PA) intervention trial, and the concordance of different methods for measuring PA. A subsample (n=63; 26%) of the 239 healthy, sedentary adults participating in a PA trial (mean age=47.5; 82% women) wore the ActiGraph monitor at all 3 assessment time points. ActiGraph data were compared with self-report (i.e., PA weekly recall and monthly log) and fitness variables. Correlations between the PA recall and ActiGraph for moderate intensity activity ranged from 0.16–0.48 and from 0.28–0.42 for vigorous intensity activity. ActiGraph and fitness [estimated VO2(ml/kg/min)] had correlations of 0.15–0.45. The ActiGraph and weekly self-report were significantly correlated at all time points (correlations ranged from 0.23–0.44). In terms of detecting intervention effects, intervention groups recorded more minutes of at least moderate-intensity PA on the ActiGraph than the control group at 6 months (min=46.47, 95% CI=14.36–78.58), but not at 12 months. Limitations of the study include a small sample size and only 3 days of ActiGraph monitoring. To obtain optimal results with accelerometers in clinical trials, the authors recommend following best practice recommendations: detailed protocols for monitor use, calibration of monitors and validation of data quality, and use of validated equations for analysis. The ActiGraph has modest concordance with other assessment tools and is sensitive to change over time. However, until more information validating the use of accelerometry in clinical trials becomes available, properly administered self-report measures of PA should remain part of the assessment battery. PMID:20723619

  12. Accelerometer use in a physical activity intervention trial.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Melissa A; Borradaile, Kelley E; Lewis, Beth A; Whiteley, Jessica A; Longval, Jaime L; Parisi, Alfred F; Albrecht, Anna E; Sciamanna, Christopher N; Jakicic, John M; Papandonatos, George D; Marcus, Bess H

    2010-11-01

    This paper describes the application of best practice recommendations for using accelerometers in a physical activity (PA) intervention trial, and the concordance of different methods for measuring PA. A subsample (n = 63; 26%) of the 239 healthy, sedentary adults participating in a PA trial (mean age = 47.5; 82% women) wore the ActiGraph monitor at all 3 assessment time points. ActiGraph data were compared with self-report (i.e., PA weekly recall and monthly log) and fitness variables. Correlations between the PA recall and ActiGraph for moderate intensity activity ranged from 0.16-0.48 and from 0.28-0.42 for vigorous intensity activity. ActiGraph and fitness [estimated VO(2)(ml/kg/min)] had correlations of 0.15-0.45. The ActiGraph and weekly self-report were significantly correlated at all time points (correlations ranged from 0.23 to 0.44). In terms of detecting intervention effects, intervention groups recorded more minutes of at least moderate-intensity PA on the ActiGraph than the control group at 6 months (min = 46.47, 95% CI = 14.36-78.58), but not at 12 months. Limitations of the study include a small sample size and only 3 days of ActiGraph monitoring. To obtain optimal results with accelerometers in clinical trials, the authors recommend following best practice recommendations: detailed protocols for monitor use, calibration of monitors and validation of data quality, and use of validated equations for analysis. The ActiGraph has modest concordance with other assessment tools and is sensitive to change over time. However, until more information validating the use of accelerometry in clinical trials becomes available, properly administered self-report measures of PA should remain part of the assessment battery.

  13. Trial spacing and trial distribution effects in Pavlovian conditioning: contributions of a comparator mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yin, H; Barnet, R C; Miller, R R

    1994-04-01

    A potential basis for trial spacing and trial distribution effects was investigated in rats. In Experiment 1, a conditioned stimulus (e.g., CS A) was trained with either massed (e.g., A---->A---->A) or spaced (e.g., A-->A-->A) trials. When trials were massed, brief exposure to the training context (a condition typical of massed training) impaired responding, whereas more extensive exposure to the context during or after training reduced this apparent massed trials deficit. In Experiment 2, different CSs were trained in either a massed (e.g., A-->A-->A--> B-->B-->B-->C-->C-->C) or a distributed (e.g., A-->B-->C-->A-->B-->C, etc.) manner. Trials massed in this sense resulted in impaired responding to the CS, and this impairment was attenuated by posttraining extinction of the context cues. Thus, trial distribution and apparent trial spacing effects are at least in part reversible deficits in performance rather than failures of learning. PMID:8189183

  14. Optimizing Educational Video through Comparative Trials in Clinical Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Ian David; Plass, Jan L.; Bania, Theodore C.

    2012-01-01

    Although video is increasingly used in public health education, studies generally do not implement randomized trials of multiple video segments in clinical environments. Therefore, the specific configurations of educational videos that will have the greatest impact on outcome measures ranging from increased knowledge of important public health…

  15. Metrics survey of industry-sponsored clinical trials in Canada and comparator jurisdictions between 2005 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Jean-Marie; Laberge, Normand; Marion, Jean

    2012-11-01

    Industry-sponsored clinical trials play a key role in the development of therapies. This survey suggests that between 2005 and 2010, research-based pharmaceutical firms worldwide initiated fewer trials and recruited fewer subjects annually. In contrast, at the country level, the clinical trial activity of such firms increased in emerging countries and in Japan. Canada's trend in the number of new trials followed that of the global industry, but the trend in new sites and newly recruited subjects fell below the global rate. Informal comparisons point to potential issues for Canada in such areas as site capacity, cost per subject and time to first subject-in. When compared to certain Western European countries and the United States, Canada remained well positioned on a number of metrics. Nonetheless, Canada faces mounting challenges from both traditional locations and emerging countries and may require coordinated efforts to remain a place of choice to conduct trials. PMID:23968618

  16. Rosemary oil vs minoxidil 2% for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia: a randomized comparative trial.

    PubMed

    Panahi, Yunes; Taghizadeh, Mohsen; Marzony, Eisa Tahmasbpour; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2015-01-01

    Rosmarinus officinalis L. is a medicinal plant with diverse activities including enhancement microcapillary perfusion. The present study aimed to investigate the clinical efficacy of rosemary oil in the treatment of androgenetic alopecia (AGA) and compare its effects with minoxidil 2%. Patients with AGA were randomly assigned to rosemary oil (n = 50) or minoxidil 2% (n = 50) for a period of 6 months. After a baseline visit, patients returned to the clinic for efficacy and safety evaluations every 3 months. A standardized professional microphotographic assessment of each volunteer was taken at the initial interview and after 3 and 6 months of the trial. No significant change was observed in the mean hair count at the 3-month endpoint, neither in the rosemary nor in the minoxidil group (P > .05). In contrast, both groups experienced a significant increase in hair count at the 6-month endpoint compared with the baseline and 3-month endpoint (P < .05). No significant difference was found between the study groups regarding hair count either at month 3 or month 6 (> .05). The frequencies of dry hair, greasy hair, and dandruff were not found to be significantly different from baseline at either month 3 or month 6 trial in the groups (P > .05). The frequency of scalp itching at the 3- and 6-month trial points was significantly higher compared with baseline in both groups (P < .05). Scalp itching, however, was more frequent in the minoxidil group at both assessed endpoints (P < .05). The findings of the present trial provided evidence with respect to the efficacy of rosemary oil in the treatment of AGA.

  17. Rosemary oil vs minoxidil 2% for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia: a randomized comparative trial.

    PubMed

    Panahi, Yunes; Taghizadeh, Mohsen; Marzony, Eisa Tahmasbpour; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2015-01-01

    Rosmarinus officinalis L. is a medicinal plant with diverse activities including enhancement microcapillary perfusion. The present study aimed to investigate the clinical efficacy of rosemary oil in the treatment of androgenetic alopecia (AGA) and compare its effects with minoxidil 2%. Patients with AGA were randomly assigned to rosemary oil (n = 50) or minoxidil 2% (n = 50) for a period of 6 months. After a baseline visit, patients returned to the clinic for efficacy and safety evaluations every 3 months. A standardized professional microphotographic assessment of each volunteer was taken at the initial interview and after 3 and 6 months of the trial. No significant change was observed in the mean hair count at the 3-month endpoint, neither in the rosemary nor in the minoxidil group (P > .05). In contrast, both groups experienced a significant increase in hair count at the 6-month endpoint compared with the baseline and 3-month endpoint (P < .05). No significant difference was found between the study groups regarding hair count either at month 3 or month 6 (> .05). The frequencies of dry hair, greasy hair, and dandruff were not found to be significantly different from baseline at either month 3 or month 6 trial in the groups (P > .05). The frequency of scalp itching at the 3- and 6-month trial points was significantly higher compared with baseline in both groups (P < .05). Scalp itching, however, was more frequent in the minoxidil group at both assessed endpoints (P < .05). The findings of the present trial provided evidence with respect to the efficacy of rosemary oil in the treatment of AGA. PMID:25842469

  18. Invasion of the Zebra Mussels: A Mock Trial Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Judy A.; Czerniak, Charlene M.

    2005-01-01

    In this activity, students learn about the important topic of invasive species, specifically Zebra Mussels. Students role-play different characters in a real-life situation: the trial of the Zebra Mussel for unlawful disruption of the Great Lakes ecosystem. Students will also learn about jurisprudential inquiry by examining the trial process. This…

  19. Protocol for the saMS trial (supportive adjustment for multiple sclerosis): a randomized controlled trial comparing cognitive behavioral therapy to supportive listening for adjustment to multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an incurable, chronic, potentially progressive and unpredictable disease of the central nervous system. The disease produces a range of unpleasant and debilitating symptoms, which can have a profound impact including disrupting activities of daily living, employment, income, relationships, social and leisure activities, and life goals. Adjusting to the illness is therefore particularly challenging. This trial tests the effectiveness of a Cognitive Behavioural intervention compared to Supportive Listening to assist adjustment in the early stages of MS. Methods/Design This is a two arm randomized multi-centre parallel group controlled trial. 122 consenting participants who meet eligibility criteria will be randomly allocated to receive either Cognitive Behavioral Therapy or Supportive Listening. Eight one hour sessions of therapy (delivered over a period of 10 weeks) will be delivered by general nurses trained in both treatments. Self-report questionnaire data will be collected at baseline (0 weeks), mid-therapy (week 5 of therapy), post-therapy (15 weeks) and at six months (26 weeks) and twelve months (52 weeks) follow-up. Primary outcomes are distress and MS-related social and role impairment at twelve month follow-up. Analysis will also consider predictors and mechanisms of change during therapy. In-depth interviews to examine participants' experiences of the interventions will be conducted with a purposively sampled sub-set of the trial participants. An economic analysis will also take place. Discussion This trial is distinctive in its aims in that it aids adjustment to MS in a broad sense. It is not a treatment specifically for depression. Use of nurses as therapists makes the interventions potentially viable in terms of being rolled out in the NHS. The trial benefits from incorporating patient input in the development and evaluation stages. The trial will provide important information about the efficacy, cost

  20. Experimentation in organ transplants compared with clinical trials: ethical problems.

    PubMed

    Petrini, C

    2013-01-01

    The origins of new techniques in transplant surgery vary widely. Frequently, new procedures are the result of small step-by-step departures from protocols already established in clinical practice; or they may be the result of radical innovation. Whatever their origin, experimental techniques in transplant surgery do not follow the route of randomised clinical trials; nor are they subject to the same procedures of review by an ethics committee. The present paper discusses some of the ethical implications of this situation. PMID:24045525

  1. Gestational Weight Gain: Results from the Delta Healthy Sprouts Comparative Impact Trial

    PubMed Central

    Olender, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Delta Healthy Sprouts trial was designed to test the comparative impact of two home visiting programs on weight status, dietary intake, and health behaviors of Southern African American women and their infants. Results pertaining to the primary outcome, gestational weight gain, are reported. Methods. Participants (n = 82), enrolled early in their second trimester of pregnancy, were randomly assigned to one of two treatment arms. Gestational weight gain, measured at six monthly home visits, was calculated by subtracting measured weight at each visit from self-reported prepregnancy weight. Weight gain was classified as under, within, or exceeding the Institute of Medicine recommendations based on prepregnancy body mass index. Chi-square tests and generalized linear mixed models were used to test for significant differences in percentages of participants within recommended weight gain ranges. Results. Differences in percentages of participants within the gestational weight gain guidelines were not significant between treatment arms across all visits. Conclusions. Enhancing the gestational nutrition and physical activity components of an existing home visiting program is feasible in a high risk population of primarily low income African American women. The impact of these enhancements on appropriate gestational weight gain is questionable given the more basic living needs of such women. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01746394, registered 4 December 2012.

  2. Gestational Weight Gain: Results from the Delta Healthy Sprouts Comparative Impact Trial.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Jessica L; Tussing-Humphreys, Lisa M; Goodman, Melissa H; Olender, Sarah E

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Delta Healthy Sprouts trial was designed to test the comparative impact of two home visiting programs on weight status, dietary intake, and health behaviors of Southern African American women and their infants. Results pertaining to the primary outcome, gestational weight gain, are reported. Methods. Participants (n = 82), enrolled early in their second trimester of pregnancy, were randomly assigned to one of two treatment arms. Gestational weight gain, measured at six monthly home visits, was calculated by subtracting measured weight at each visit from self-reported prepregnancy weight. Weight gain was classified as under, within, or exceeding the Institute of Medicine recommendations based on prepregnancy body mass index. Chi-square tests and generalized linear mixed models were used to test for significant differences in percentages of participants within recommended weight gain ranges. Results. Differences in percentages of participants within the gestational weight gain guidelines were not significant between treatment arms across all visits. Conclusions. Enhancing the gestational nutrition and physical activity components of an existing home visiting program is feasible in a high risk population of primarily low income African American women. The impact of these enhancements on appropriate gestational weight gain is questionable given the more basic living needs of such women. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01746394, registered 4 December 2012. PMID:27595023

  3. Gestational Weight Gain: Results from the Delta Healthy Sprouts Comparative Impact Trial

    PubMed Central

    Olender, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Delta Healthy Sprouts trial was designed to test the comparative impact of two home visiting programs on weight status, dietary intake, and health behaviors of Southern African American women and their infants. Results pertaining to the primary outcome, gestational weight gain, are reported. Methods. Participants (n = 82), enrolled early in their second trimester of pregnancy, were randomly assigned to one of two treatment arms. Gestational weight gain, measured at six monthly home visits, was calculated by subtracting measured weight at each visit from self-reported prepregnancy weight. Weight gain was classified as under, within, or exceeding the Institute of Medicine recommendations based on prepregnancy body mass index. Chi-square tests and generalized linear mixed models were used to test for significant differences in percentages of participants within recommended weight gain ranges. Results. Differences in percentages of participants within the gestational weight gain guidelines were not significant between treatment arms across all visits. Conclusions. Enhancing the gestational nutrition and physical activity components of an existing home visiting program is feasible in a high risk population of primarily low income African American women. The impact of these enhancements on appropriate gestational weight gain is questionable given the more basic living needs of such women. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01746394, registered 4 December 2012. PMID:27595023

  4. EEG activity represents the correctness of perceptual decisions trial-by-trial

    PubMed Central

    Pardo-Vazquez, Jose L.; Padrón, Isabel; Fernández-Rey, José; Acuña, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Performance monitoring is an executive function, which we depend on for detecting and evaluating the consequences of our behavior. Although event related potentials (ERPs) have revealed the existence of differences after correct and incorrect decisions, it is not known whether there is a trial-by-trial representation of the accuracy of the decision. We recorded the electroencephalographic activity (EEG) while participants performed a perceptual discrimination task, with two levels of difficulty, in which they received immediate feedback. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analyses were used to reveal two components that convey trial-by-trial representations of the correctness of the decisions. Firstly, the performance monitoring-related negativity (PM-N), a negative deflection whose amplitude is higher (more negative) after incorrect trials. Secondly, the performance monitoring-related positivity (PM-P), a positive deflection whose amplitude is higher after incorrect trials. During the time periods corresponding to these components, trials can be accurately categorized as correct or incorrect by looking at the EEG activity; this categorization is more accurate when based on the PM-P. We further show that the difficulty of the discrimination task has a different effect on each component: after easy trials the latency of the PM-N is shorter and the amplitude of the PM-P is higher than after difficult trials. Consistent with previous interpretations of performance-related ERPs, these results suggest a functional differentiation between these components. The PM-N could be related to an automatic error detection system, responsible for fast behavioral corrections of ongoing actions, while the PM-P could reflect the difference between expected and actual outcomes and be related to long-term changes in the decision process. PMID:24734012

  5. A Randomized Trial Comparing Skin Antiseptic Agents at Cesarean Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Tuuli, Methodius G.; Liu, Jingxia; Stout, Molly J.; Martin, Shannon; Cahill, Alison G.; Odibo, Anthony O.; Colditz, Graham A.; Macones, George A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Preoperative skin antisepsis has the potential to decrease the risk of surgical-site infection. However, evidence is limited to guide the choice of antiseptic agent at cesarean delivery, which is the most common major surgical procedure among women in the United States. METHODS In this single-center, randomized, controlled trial, we evaluated whether the use of chlorhexidine–alcohol for preoperative skin antisepsis was superior to the use of iodine–alcohol for the prevention of surgical-site infection after cesarean delivery. We randomly assigned patients undergoing cesarean delivery to skin preparation with either chlorhexidine–alcohol or iodine–alcohol. The primary outcome was superficial or deep surgical-site infection within 30 days after cesarean delivery, on the basis of definitions from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. RESULTS From September 2011 through June 2015, a total of 1147 patients were enrolled; 572 patients were assigned to chlorhexidine–alcohol and 575 to iodine–alcohol. In an intention-to-treat analysis, surgical-site infection was diagnosed in 23 patients (4.0%) in the chlorhexidine–alcohol group and in 42 (7.3%) in the iodine–alcohol group (relative risk, 0.55; 95% confidence interval, 0.34 to 0.90; P = 0.02). The rate of superficial surgical-site infection was 3.0% in the chlorhexidine–alcohol group and 4.9% in the iodine–alcohol group (P = 0.10); the rate of deep infection was 1.0% and 2.4%, respectively (P = 0.07). The frequency of adverse skin reactions was similar in the two groups. CONCLUSIONS The use of chlorhexidine–alcohol for preoperative skin antisepsis resulted in a significantly lower risk of surgical-site infection after cesarean delivery than did the use of iodine–alcohol. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01472549.) PMID:26844840

  6. A written self-help intervention for depressed adults comparing behavioural activation combined with physical activity promotion with a self-help intervention based upon behavioural activation alone: study protocol for a parallel group pilot randomised controlled trial (BAcPAc)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Challenges remain to find ways to support patients with depression who have low levels of physical activity (PA) to overcome perceived barriers and enhance the perceived value of PA for preventing future relapse. There is an evidence-base for behavioural activation (BA) for depression, which focuses on supporting patients to restore activities that have been avoided, but practitioners have no specific training in promoting PA. We aimed to design and evaluate an integrated BA and PA (BAcPAc) practitioner-led, written, self-help intervention to enhance both physical and mental health. Methods/design This study is informed by the Medical Research Council Complex Intervention Framework and describes a protocol for a pilot phase II randomised controlled trial (RCT) to test the feasibility and acceptability of the trial methods to inform a definitive phase III RCT. Following development of the augmented written self-help intervention (BAcPAc) incorporating behavioural activation with physical activity promotion, depressed adults are randomised to receive up to 12 sessions over a maximum of 4 months of either BAcPAc or behavioural activation alone within a written self-help format, which represents treatment as usual. The study is located within two ‘Improving Access to Psychological Therapies’ services in South West England, with both written self-help interventions supported by mental health paraprofessionals. Measures assessed at 4, 9, and 12 month follow-up include the following: CIS-R, PHQ-9, accelerometer recorded (4 months only) and self-reported PA, body mass index, blood pressure, Insomnia Severity Index, quality of life, and health and social care service use. Process evaluation will include analysis of recorded support sessions and patient and practitioner interviews. At the time of writing the study has recruited 60 patients. Discussion The feasibility outcomes will inform a definitive RCT to assess the clinical and cost-effectiveness of the

  7. Designing Comparative Effectiveness Trials of Surgical Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation: Experience of the Cardiothoracic Surgical Trials Network

    PubMed Central

    Gillinov, A. Marc; Argenziano, Michael; Blackstone, Eugene H.; Iribarne, Alexander; DeRose, Joseph J.; Ailawadi, Gorav; Russo, Mark J.; Ascheim, Deborah D.; Parides, Michael K.; Rodriguez, Evelio; Bouchard, Denis; Taddei-Peters, Wendy C.; Geller, Nancy L.; Acker, Michael A.; Gelijns, Annetine C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Since the introduction of the cut-and-sew Cox-Maze procedure for atrial fibrillation (AF) there has been substantial innovation in techniques for ablation. Use of alternate energy sources for ablation simplified the procedure and has resulted in dramatic increase in the number of AF patients treated by surgical ablation. Despite its increasingly widespread adoption, there is lack of rigorous clinical evidence to establish this as an effective clinical therapy. Methods and Results This paper describes a comparative effectiveness randomized trial, supported by the Cardiothoracic Surgical Trials Network, of surgical ablation with left atrial appendage (LAA) closure versus LAA closure alone in patients with persistent and longstanding persistent AF undergoing mitral valve surgery. Nested within this trial, is a further randomized comparison of 2 different lesions sets: pulmonary vein isolation and full Maze lesion set. This paper addresses trial design challenges, including how to best characterize the target population, operationalize freedom from AF as a primary endpoint, account for the impact of anti-arrhythmic drugs, and measure and analyze secondary endpoints, such as post-operative AF load. Conclusions This paper concludes by discussing how insights that emerge from this trial may affect surgical practice and guide future research in this area. PMID:21616507

  8. Resampling the N9741 Trial to Compare Tumor Dynamic Versus Conventional End Points in Randomized Phase II Trials

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Manish R.; Gray, Elizabeth; Goldberg, Richard M.; Sargent, Daniel J.; Karrison, Theodore G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The optimal end point for randomized phase II trials of anticancer therapies remains controversial. We simulated phase II trials by resampling patients from N9741, a randomized phase III trial of chemotherapy regimens for metastatic colorectal cancer, and compared the power of various end points to detect the superior therapy (FOLFOX [infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin] had longer overall survival than both IROX [irinotecan plus oxaliplatin] and IFL [irinotecan and bolus fluorouracil plus leucovorin]). Methods Tumor measurements and progression-free survival (PFS) data were obtained for 1,471 patients; 1,002 had consistently measured tumors and were resampled (5,000 replicates) to simulate two-arm, randomized phase II trials with α = 0.10 (one sided) and 20 to 80 patients per arm. End points included log ratio of tumor size at 6, 12, and 18 weeks relative to baseline; time to tumor growth (TTG), estimated using a nonlinear mixed-effects model; and PFS. Arms were compared using rank sum tests for log ratio and TTG and a log-rank test for PFS. Results For FOLFOX versus IFL, TTG and PFS had similar power, with both exceeding the power of log ratio at 18 weeks; for FOLFOX versus IROX, TTG and log ratio at 18 weeks had similar power, with both exceeding the power of PFS. The best end points exhibited > 80% power with 60 to 80 patients per arm. Conclusion TTG is a powerful end point for randomized phase II trials of cytotoxic therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer; it was either comparable or superior to PFS and log ratio at 18 weeks. Additional studies will be needed to clarify the potential of TTG as a phase II end point. PMID:25349295

  9. Comparing the Effectiveness of Error-Correction Strategies in Discrete Trial Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turan, Michelle K.; Moroz, Lianne; Croteau, Natalie Paquet

    2012-01-01

    Error-correction strategies are essential considerations for behavior analysts implementing discrete trial training with children with autism. The research literature, however, is still lacking in the number of studies that compare and evaluate error-correction procedures. The purpose of this study was to compare two error-correction strategies:…

  10. Comparative trial of treatment with Prioderm lotion and Kwellada shampoo in children with head lice.

    PubMed

    Mathias, R G; Huggins, D R; Leroux, S J; Proctor, E M

    1984-02-15

    The safety and efficacy of treatment with a new pediculicide lotion, Prioderm (0.5% malathion in isopropanol), were compared with those of treatment with Kwellada (1% lindane) shampoo in a randomized trial of children with head lice. The children's scalps were examined for live lice immediately, 7 days and 4 to 6 weeks following treatment. To determine the in-vitro ovicidal effect of treatment, samples of hair with nits were removed before and immediately following treatment; the subsequent rates of hatching were compared. No live lice were present immediately following either treatment. At 7 days after treatment 2 of the 29 children treated with Prioderm lotion and 4 of the 33 children treated with Kwellada shampoo were infested with live lice, whereas at 4 to 6 weeks after treatment 5 and 3 children respectively were infested. The initial effectiveness of treatment was 93% in the children treated with Prioderm lotion and 88% in those treated with Kwellada shampoo; however, a large difference in efficacy could have been missed owing to the small number of children in the study. Both preparations demonstrated in-vitro ovicidal activity, but neither totally abolished post-treatment hatching. No side effects were reported from either preparation. Because ovicidal activity was incomplete two treatments with the same pediculicides should be given about 7 days apart.

  11. Interruption pf physcial activity due to illness in the Lifestyle Interventions and Indepencence for Elders Pilot (LIFE-P) trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders Pilot (LIFE-P) was a trial to examine the effects of physical activity (PA) compared to a health education control on measures of disability in sedentary older adults. Medical suspensions were examined for the first 12 months of the trial in th...

  12. Average Is Optimal: An Inverted-U Relationship between Trial-to-Trial Brain Activity and Behavioral Performance

    PubMed Central

    He, Biyu J.; Zempel, John M.

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that even under identical task conditions, there is a tremendous amount of trial-to-trial variability in both brain activity and behavioral output. Thus far the vast majority of event-related potential (ERP) studies investigating the relationship between trial-to-trial fluctuations in brain activity and behavioral performance have only tested a monotonic relationship between them. However, it was recently found that across-trial variability can correlate with behavioral performance independent of trial-averaged activity. This finding predicts a U- or inverted-U- shaped relationship between trial-to-trial brain activity and behavioral output, depending on whether larger brain variability is associated with better or worse behavior, respectively. Using a visual stimulus detection task, we provide evidence from human electrocorticography (ECoG) for an inverted-U brain-behavior relationship: When the raw fluctuation in broadband ECoG activity is closer to the across-trial mean, hit rate is higher and reaction times faster. Importantly, we show that this relationship is present not only in the post-stimulus task-evoked brain activity, but also in the pre-stimulus spontaneous brain activity, suggesting anticipatory brain dynamics. Our findings are consistent with the presence of stochastic noise in the brain. They further support attractor network theories, which postulate that the brain settles into a more confined state space under task performance, and proximity to the targeted trajectory is associated with better performance. PMID:24244146

  13. Flexible designs for phase II comparative clinical trials involving two response variables.

    PubMed

    Bersimis, S; Sachlas, A; Papaioannou, T

    2015-01-30

    The aim of phase II clinical trials is to determine whether an experimental treatment is sufficiently promising and safe to justify further testing. The need for reduced sample size arises naturally in phase II clinical trials owing to both technical and ethical reasons, motivating a significant part of research in the field during recent years, while another significant part of the research effort is aimed at more complex therapeutic schemes that demand the consideration of multiple endpoints to make decisions. In this paper, our attention is restricted to phase II clinical trials in which two treatments are compared with respect to two dependent dichotomous responses proposing some flexible designs. These designs permit the researcher to terminate the clinical trial when high rates of favorable or unfavorable outcomes are observed early enough requiring in this way a small number of patients. From the mathematical point of view, the proposed designs are defined on bivariate sequences of multi-state trials, and the corresponding stopping rules are based on various distributions related to the waiting time until a certain number of events appear in these sequences. The exact distributions of interest, under a unified framework, are studied using the Markov chain embedding technique, which appears to be very useful in clinical trials for the sample size determination. Tables of expected sample size and power are presented. The numerical illustration showed a very good performance for these new designs.

  14. Contamination by an Active Control Condition in a Randomized Exercise Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Arthur F.; McAuley, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Contamination is commonly overlooked in randomized trials. The present study examined contamination (minutes of aerobic activity outside of exercise sessions) within an active control condition in a 6-month randomized exercise trial for older adults. We hypothesized that outside aerobic activity would be greater in the control condition compared to the intervention conditions. Participants (mean age = 65.06 years, 66.2% female) were randomly assigned to: Dance (n = 50), Walking, (n = 108), or Strength/Stretching/Stability (SSS; n = 48). Dance and Walking represented the experimental conditions and SSS the control condition. Participants attended exercise sessions three times weekly for 24 weeks. Participants recorded their physical activity outside of class on a weekly home log. Group assignment and covariates (age, gender, body mass index, exercise session intensity and enjoyment, and program adherence) were examined as predictors of weekly aerobic activity outside of exercise sessions. Participants who returned zero home logs were removed from the dataset (final N = 195). Out-of-class aerobic activity was lowest in the Walking group. Significant effects of gender, group, enjoyment, and intensity on out-of-class weekly aerobic activity were observed, all p<0.003. Higher perceived enjoyment of exercise sessions was associated with more out-of-class aerobic activity, while higher perceived intensity was associated with less out-of-class aerobic activity. A group x intensity interaction, p = 0.002, indicated that group differences in out-of-class aerobic activity were evident only among those with lower intensity perceptions. Walkers may have perceived exercise sessions as sufficient weekly exercise, while the Dance and SSS groups may have perceived the sessions as necessary, but insufficient. The lower aerobic intensity Dancers attributed to exercise sessions and non-aerobic nature of SSS may partially explain contamination observed in this study. Further

  15. Light on Trial: Using a Courtroom Drama to Compare Competing Scientific Hypotheses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Frank A.

    2006-01-01

    A narrative in the form of a courtroom trial is used to compare evidence on the nature of light as part of an introductory college physics course. Prosecuting and defense attorneys present evidence for and against competing wave and particle hypotheses for light behavior while students play the roles of jurors. (Contains 5 figures.)

  16. Large-scale field trials of active immunizing agents

    PubMed Central

    Cockburn, W. Charles

    1955-01-01

    In this discussion of the methods to be used in large-scale field trials of active immunizing agents and of the results to be expected from such trials, special emphasis is laid on pertussis vaccine trials in Great Britain. After a review of the criteria for strictly controlled field studies and of the investigation of typhoid vaccines conducted in 1904-08 by the Antityphoid Committee of the British Army, the author describes the pertussis vaccine studies which have been and are now being carried by the Whooping-Cough Immunization Committee of the Medical Research Council of Great Britain. The original strictly controlled trials have been completed and the results published. Studies are now being made of vaccines prepared by different methods and evaluated both in the field and in the laboratory. Each vaccine is given to some 2000-3000 children of 4-6 months to 4 years of age. By the end of the studies 30 000-40 000 children will have been followed up for a period of two years. Since in the current studies all the children are vaccinated and none are left as unvaccinated controls, the relative and not the absolute protective value of the vaccines will be measured. PMID:13270079

  17. Comparing socially disadvantaged smokers who agree and decline to participate in a randomised smoking cessation trial

    PubMed Central

    Bonevski, Billie; Twyman, Laura; Paul, Chris; D'Este, Catherine; West, Robert; Siahpush, Mohammad; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Palazzi, Kerrin; Bryant, Jamie; Guillaumier, Ashleigh

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study examined sociodemographic, smoking and psychosocial characteristics associated with consent to participate in a smoking cessation trial for socially disadvantaged smokers. Design Baseline data were collected prior to seeking consent for the Call it Quits, a randomised controlled trial. Setting An Australian social and community service organisation. Sociodemographic, smoking and psychosocial characteristics were compared between smokers who agreed or declined to participate. Participants Of the 584 smokers invited to participate, 431 (74%) consented and 153 (26%) declined. Results Logistic regression modelling indicates the ORs of participation were twice as high for those reporting ‘high’ motivation to quit compared to the ‘moderate’ motivation group, and five times higher than the ‘low’ motivation group (p=0.007). The ORs of consenting were higher for those with a preference for gradual reduction in cigarettes in quit attempts compared with ‘no preference’. The ORs were lower for those reporting ‘don't know’ regarding their enjoyment of smoking compared to ‘not at all’ enjoying smoking, and reporting that fewer of their family or friends smoked compared to ‘most or all’. Conclusions This study is the first to examine the characteristics of socially disadvantaged smokers who consent or decline to participate in a smoking cessation trial. Low-income smokers who are motivated to quit, are not enjoying smoking, had family or friends who smoked, and who are interested in gradual cessation approaches may be more likely to participate in a smoking cessation trial. Trial registration number ISRCTN85202510. PMID:26369799

  18. Physical Activity, Weight Control, and Breast Cancer Risk and Survival: Clinical Trial Rationale and Design Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Hunsberger, Sally; Alciati, Marianne H.; Blair, Steven N.; Goodwin, Pamela J.; McTiernan, Anne; Wing, Rena; Schatzkin, Arthur

    2009-01-01

    Substantial observational epidemiological evidence exists that physical activity and weight control are associated with decreased risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. Uncertainty remains regarding several aspects of these associations, including the effect of possible confounding factors on these associations. We present the rationale and design for two randomized controlled trials that can help resolve this uncertainty. In a 5-year prevention trial conducted among women at high risk of breast cancer, the primary endpoint would be breast cancer incidence. For a comparable survivorship trial, the primary endpoint would be the disease-free interval and secondary endpoints would be breast cancer recurrence–free interval, second primary breast cancer, and total invasive plus in situ breast cancer. A set of inclusion and exclusion criteria is proposed for both trials. Intervention goals are the same for both trials. Goals for the weight control intervention would be, for women whose body mass index (BMI) is greater than 25 kg/m2, to lose 10% of body weight and, for women whose BMI is less than or equal to 25 kg/m2, to avoid weight gain. The goal for the physical activity intervention would be to achieve and maintain regular participation in a moderate-intensity physical activity program for a total of 150–225 minutes over at least 5 days per week. Sample size calculations are based on alternative assumptions about hazard ratio, adherence, follow-up duration, and power and are presented for the primary prevention and survivorship trials. Although both studies could enhance our understanding of breast cancer etiology and benefit public health, practical considerations, including smaller sample size, ease of recruitment, and reduced likelihood of early termination, favor the survivorship trial at this time. PMID:19401543

  19. A trial-by-trial analysis reveals more intense physical activity is associated with better cognitive control performance in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Hartanto, T A; Krafft, C E; Iosif, A M; Schweitzer, J B

    2016-01-01

    Hyperactivity is a key symptom and the most observable manifestation of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The over-activity associated with ADHD can cause specific challenges in academic settings, extracurricular activities and social relationships. Cognitive control challenges are also well established in ADHD. The current study included 44 children between the ages of 10 and 17 diagnosed with ADHD or who were typically developing (TD), all of whom had no psychiatric co-morbidity or significant learning disorders. Participants wore an actometer on their ankle while performing a flanker paradigm in order to objectively measure their rates of activity in association with cognitive control. Analyses assessed the relationship between frequency and intensity of activity to task accuracy on a trial-by-trial basis. A significant interaction effect between group and performance revealed that more intense movement was associated with better performance in the ADHD group but not in the TD group. The ADHD group demonstrated more intense activity than the TD group during correct (but not error) trials. Within-group, children with ADHD generated higher intensity movements in their correct trials compared to their error trials, whereas the TD group did not demonstrate any within-group differences. These findings suggest that excessive motoric activity associated with clinically significant ADHD symptoms may reflect compensatory efforts to modulate attention and alertness. Future research should systematically explore the relationship between motion in ADHD and how it might be used to improve cognitive performance.

  20. A Trial by Trial Analysis Reveals More Intense Physical Activity is Associated with Better Cognitive Control Performance in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hartanto, T.A.; Krafft, C.E.; Iosif, A.M.; Schweitzer, J.B.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperactivity is a key symptom and the most observable manifestation of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The over-activity associated with ADHD can cause specific challenges in academic settings, extracurricular activities and social relationships. Cognitive control challenges are also well-established in ADHD. The current study included 44 children between the ages of 10 and 17 diagnosed with ADHD or who were typically developing (TD), all of whom had no psychiatric co-morbidity or significant learning disorders. Participants wore an actometer on their ankle while performing a flanker paradigm in order to objectively measure their rates of activity in association with cognitive control. Analyses assessed the relationship between frequency and intensity of activity to task accuracy on trial by trial basis. A significant interaction effect between group and performance revealed that more intense movement was associated with better performance in the ADHD, but not TD group. The ADHD group demonstrated more intense activity than the TD group during correct (but not error) trials. Within-group, children with ADHD generated higher intensity movements in their correct trials compared to their error trials, whereas the TD group did not demonstrate any within-group differences. These findings suggest that excessive motoric activity associated with clinically significant ADHD symptoms may reflect compensatory efforts to modulate attention and alertness. Future research should systematically explore the relationship between motion in ADHD and how it might be used to improve cognitive performance. PMID:26059476

  1. Comparing Massed-Trial Instruction, Distributed-Trial Instruction, and Task Interspersal to Teach Tacts to Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majdalany, Lina M.; Wilder, David A.; Greif, Abigail; Mathisen, David; Saini, Valdeep

    2014-01-01

    Although massed-trial instruction, distributed-trial instruction, and task interspersal have been shown to be effective methods of teaching skills to children with autism spectrum disorders, they have not been directly compared. In the current study, we taught 6 children to tact shapes of countries using these methods to determine which would…

  2. Randomized Comparative Trial of a Social Cognitive Skills Group for Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Soorya, Latha V.; Weinger, Paige M.; Beck, Todd; Soffes, Sarah; Halpern, Danielle; Gorenstein, Michelle; Kolevzon, Alexander; Buxbaum, Joseph; Wang, A. Ting

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the efficacy of a targeted social skills training group in school-aged children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The intervention, NETT (Nonverbal communication, Emotion recognition, and Theory of mind Training), is a 12-session cognitive-behavioral intervention (CBI) for verbal, school-aged children targeting ASD-specific social behavioral impairments. Method Sixty-nine children with ASD, 8 to 11 years of age with verbal IQs greater than 70, participated in a randomized comparative trial to examine the efficacy of NETT relative to a facilitated play group. Treatment outcomes included caregiver reports of social behavior and neuropsychological assessments of social cognition conducted by blinded raters. Outcomes were collected at baseline, endpoint, and three months posttreatment. Results Significant improvements were found on social behavior outcomes such as nonverbal communication, empathic responding, and social relations in the NETT condition relative to the active control at endpoint. Verbal IQ and age moderated the interaction effect on social behavior with higher verbal IQ and older age associated with improvements in the CBI condition. No significant improvements were found on social cognitive outcomes. No significant group differences were found at three-month follow-up conducted with approximately half the sample (n=34). Conclusion These data indicate that targeted CBI social skills groups such as NETT improve social communication deficits in verbal, school-aged children with ASD. The moderating effects of high verbal IQ suggest a need to consider participant and treatment characteristics associated with outcomes in future studies. PMID:25721186

  3. A comparative controlled trial comparing the effects of yoga and walking for overweight and obese adults

    PubMed Central

    Telles, Shirley; Sharma, Sachin Kr.; Yadav, Arti; Singh, Nilkamal; Balkrishna, Acharya

    2014-01-01

    Background Walking and yoga have been independently evaluated for weight control; however, there are very few studies comparing the 2 with randomization. Material/Methods The present study compared the effects of 90 minutes/day for 15 days of supervised yoga or supervised walking on: (i) related biochemistry, (ii) anthropometric variables, (iii) body composition, (iv) postural stability, and (v) bilateral hand grip strength in overweight and obese persons. Sixty-eight participants, of whom 5 were overweight (BMI ≥25 kg/m2) and 63 were obese (BMI ≥30 kg/m2; group mean age ±S.D., 36.4±11.2 years; 35 females), were randomized as 2 groups – (i) a yoga group and (ii) a walking group – given the same diet. Results All differences were pre-post changes within each group. Both groups showed a significant (p<0.05; repeated measures ANOVA, post-hoc analyses) decrease in: BMI, waist circumference, hip circumference, lean mass, body water, and total cholesterol. The yoga group increased serum leptin (p<0.01) and decreased LDL cholesterol (p<0.05). The walking group decreased serum adiponectin (p<0.05) and triglycerides (p<0.05). Conclusions Both yoga and walking improved anthropometric variables and serum lipid profile in overweight and obese persons. The possible implications are discussed. PMID:24878827

  4. Efficient and robust method for comparing the immunogenicity of candidate vaccines in randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Peter B; Sato, Alicia; Sun, Xiao; Mehrotra, Devan V

    2009-01-14

    In randomized clinical trials designed to compare the magnitude of vaccine-induced immune responses between vaccination regimens, the statistical method used for the analysis typically does not account for baseline participant characteristics. This article shows that incorporating baseline variables predictive of the immunogenicity study endpoint can provide large gains in precision and power for estimation and testing of the group mean difference (requiring fewer subjects for the same scientific output) compared to conventional methods, and recommends the "semiparametric efficient" method described in Tsiatis et al. [Tsiatis AA, Davidian M, Zhang M, Lu X. Covariate adjustment for two-sample treatment comparisons in randomized clinical trials: a principled yet flexible approach. Stat Med 2007. doi:10.1002/sim.3113] for practical use. As such, vaccine clinical trial programs can be improved (1) by investigating baseline predictors (e.g., readouts from laboratory assays) of vaccine-induced immune responses, and (2) by implementing the proposed semiparametric efficient method in trials where baseline predictors are available. PMID:19022314

  5. A novel, efficient, randomized selection trial comparing combinations of drug therapy for ALS.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Paul H; Cheung, Ying-Kuen; Levin, Bruce; Andrews, Howard; Doorish, Carolyn; Macarthur, Robert B; Montes, Jacqueline; Bednarz, Kate; Florence, Julaine; Rowin, Julie; Boylan, Kevin; Mozaffar, Tahseen; Tandan, Rup; Mitsumoto, Hiroshi; Kelvin, Elizabeth A; Chapin, John; Bedlack, Richard; Rivner, Michael; McCluskey, Leo F; Pestronk, Alan; Graves, Michael; Sorenson, Eric J; Barohn, Richard J; Belsh, Jerry M; Lou, Jau-Shin; Levine, Todd; Saperstein, David; Miller, Robert G; Scelsa, Stephen N

    2008-08-01

    Combining agents with different mechanisms of action may be necessary for meaningful results in treating ALS. The combinations of minocycline-creatine and celecoxib-creatine have additive effects in the murine model. New trial designs are needed to efficiently screen the growing number of potential neuroprotective agents. Our objective was to assess two drug combinations in ALS using a novel phase II trial design. We conducted a randomized, double-blind selection trial in sequential pools of 60 patients. Participants received minocycline (100 mg)-creatine (10 g) twice daily or celecoxib (400 mg)-creatine (10 g) twice daily for six months. The primary objective was treatment selection based on which combination best slowed deterioration in the ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised (ALSFRS-R); the trial could be stopped after one pool if the difference between the two arms was adequately large. At trial conclusion, each arm was compared to a historical control group in a futility analysis. Safety measures were also examined. After the first patient pool, the mean six-month decline in ALSFRS-R was 5.27 (SD=5.54) in the celecoxib-creatine group and 6.47 (SD=9.14) in the minocycline-creatine group. The corresponding decline was 5.82 (SD=6.77) in the historical controls. The difference between the two sample means exceeded the stopping criterion. The null hypothesis of superiority was not rejected in the futility analysis. Skin rash occurred more frequently in the celecoxib-creatine group. In conclusion, the celecoxib-creatine combination was selected as preferable to the minocycline-creatine combination for further evaluation. This phase II design was efficient, leading to treatment selection after just 60 patients, and can be used in other phase II trials to assess different agents.

  6. A novel, efficient, randomized selection trial comparing combinations of drug therapy for ALS

    PubMed Central

    GORDON, PAUL H.; CHEUNG, YING-KUEN; LEVIN, BRUCE; ANDREWS, HOWARD; DOORISH, CAROLYN; MACARTHUR, ROBERT B.; MONTES, JACQUELINE; BEDNARZ, KATE; FLORENCE, JULAINE; ROWIN, JULIE; BOYLAN, KEVIN; MOZAFFAR, TAHSEEN; TANDAN, RUP; MITSUMOTO, HIROSHI; KELVIN, ELIZABETH A.; CHAPIN, JOHN; BEDLACK, RICHARD; RIVNER, MICHAEL; MCCLUSKEY, LEO F.; PESTRONK, ALAN; GRAVES, MICHAEL; SORENSON, ERIC J.; BAROHN, RICHARD J.; BELSH, JERRY M.; LOU, JAU-SHIN; LEVINE, TODD; SAPERSTEIN, DAVID; MILLER, ROBERT G.; SCELSA, STEPHEN N.

    2015-01-01

    Combining agents with different mechanisms of action may be necessary for meaningful results in treating ALS. The combinations of minocycline-creatine and celecoxib-creatine have additive effects in the murine model. New trial designs are needed to efficiently screen the growing number of potential neuroprotective agents. Our objective was to assess two drug combinations in ALS using a novel phase II trial design. We conducted a randomized, double-blind selection trial in sequential pools of 60 patients. Participants received minocycline (100 mg)-creatine (10 g) twice daily or celecoxib (400 mg)-creatine (10 g) twice daily for six months. The primary objective was treatment selection based on which combination best slowed deterioration in the ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised (ALSFRS-R); the trial could be stopped after one pool if the difference between the two arms was adequately large. At trial conclusion, each arm was compared to a historical control group in a futility analysis. Safety measures were also examined. After the first patient pool, the mean six-month decline in ALSFRS-R was 5.27 (SD=5.54) in the celecoxib-creatine group and 6.47 (SD=9.14) in the minocycline-creatine group. The corresponding decline was 5.82 (SD=6.77) in the historical controls. The difference between the two sample means exceeded the stopping criterion. The null hypothesis of superiority was not rejected in the futility analysis. Skin rash occurred more frequently in the celecoxib-creatine group. In conclusion, the celecoxib-creatine combination was selected as preferable to the minocycline-creatine combination for further evaluation. This phase II design was efficient, leading to treatment selection after just 60 patients, and can be used in other phase II trials to assess different agents. PMID:18608093

  7. A Randomised Trial Comparing Genotypic and Virtual Phenotypic Interpretation of HIV Drug Resistance: The CREST Study

    PubMed Central

    Hales, Gillian; Birch, Chris; Crowe, Suzanne; Workman, Cassy; Hoy, Jennifer F; Law, Matthew G; Kelleher, Anthony D; Lincoln, Douglas; Emery, Sean

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of different HIV drug resistance test reports (genotype and virtual phenotype) in patients who were changing their antiretroviral therapy (ART). Design: Randomised, open-label trial with 48-week followup. Setting: The study was conducted in a network of primary healthcare sites in Australia and New Zealand. Participants: Patients failing current ART with plasma HIV RNA > 2000 copies/mL who wished to change their current ART were eligible. Subjects were required to be > 18 years of age, previously treated with ART, have no intercurrent illnesses requiring active therapy, and to have provided written informed consent. Interventions: Eligible subjects were randomly assigned to receive a genotype (group A) or genotype plus virtual phenotype (group B) prior to selection of their new antiretroviral regimen. Outcome Measures: Patient groups were compared for patterns of ART selection and surrogate outcomes (plasma viral load and CD4 counts) on an intention-to-treat basis over a 48-week period. Results: Three hundred and twenty seven patients completing > one month of followup were included in these analyses. Resistance tests were the primary means by which ART regimens were selected (group A: 64%, group B: 62%; p = 0.32). At 48 weeks, there were no significant differences between the groups for mean change from baseline plasma HIV RNA (group A: 0.68 log copies/mL, group B: 0.58 log copies/mL; p = 0.23) and mean change from baseline CD4+ cell count (group A: 37 cells/mm3, group B: 50 cells/mm3; p = 0.28). Conclusions: In the absence of clear demonstrated benefits arising from the use of the virtual phenotype interpretation, this study suggests resistance testing using genotyping linked to a reliable interpretive algorithm is adequate for the management of HIV infection. PMID:16878178

  8. CATCH: physical activity process evaluation in a multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, T L; Strikmiller, P K; Stone, E J; Woods, S E; Ehlinger, S S; Romero, K A; Budman, S T

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the process evaluation model for the physical activity intervention component of the Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health (CATCH) and describes the major procedures used to monitor CATCH PE, the physical education intervention. The paper focuses on CATCH PE teacher training and in-service support as well as on the curriculum implementation. Monitoring training and support included assessing the in-service training workshops and the follow-up on-site assistance provided by staff. Monitoring the implementation included assessing the quantity and quality of CATCH PE instruction in terms of student physical activity engagement and lesson context, the fidelity of the curricular implementation, and the opportunities for other physical activity by children throughout the school day.

  9. The Devon Active Villages Evaluation (DAVE) trial of a community-level physical activity intervention in rural south-west England: a stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of adults are not meeting the guidelines for physical activity despite activity being linked with numerous improvements to long-term health. In light of this, researchers have called for more community-level interventions. The main objective of the present study was to evaluate whether a community-level physical activity intervention increased the activity levels of rural communities. Methods 128 rural villages (clusters) were randomised to receive the intervention in one of four time periods between April 2011 and December 2012. The Devon Active Villages intervention provided villages with 12 weeks of physical activity opportunities for all age groups, including at least three different types of activities per village. Each village received an individually tailored intervention, incorporating a local needs-led approach. Support was provided for a further 12 months following the intervention. The evaluation study used a stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trial design. All 128 villages were measured at each of five data collection periods using a postal survey. The primary outcome of interest was the proportion of adults reporting sufficient physical activity to meet internationally recognised guidelines. Minutes spent in moderate-and-vigorous activity per week was analysed as a secondary outcome. To compare between intervention and control modes, random effects linear regression and marginal logistic regression models were implemented for continuous and binary outcomes respectively. Results 10,412 adults (4693 intervention, 5719 control) completed the postal survey (response rate 32.2%). The intervention did not increase the odds of adults meeting the physical activity guideline (adjusted OR 1.02, 95% CI: 0.88 to 1.17; P = 0.80), although there was weak evidence of an increase in minutes of moderate-and-vigorous-intensity activity per week (adjusted mean difference = 171, 95% CI: -16 to 358; P = 0.07). The

  10. The efficacy of maggot debridement therapy--a review of comparative clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Zarchi, Kian; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2012-10-01

    Over the last decade, maggot debridement therapy (MDT) has been recognized by many clinicians as a potential adjunct to conventional therapy, and many patients with non healing, chronic ulcers have been treated. Numerous case reports and case series have described the successful use of MDT in a variety of ulcers. However, comparative clinical trials and in particular randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of MDT are sparse. A systematic search in the literature showed three randomized clinical trials and five non randomized studies evaluating the efficacy of sterile Lucilia sericata applied on ulcers with various aetiologies. Of these, seven studies had debridement and/or healing as an outcome variable. When evaluating maggots as debriding agents, the studies report MDT as being significantly more effective than hydrogel or a mixture of conventional therapy modalities, including hydrocolloid, hydrogel and saline moistened gauze. However, the design of the studies was suboptimal, with important differences in the use of other therapies, such as compression, that may influence both debridement and healing between the compared groups, as well as inappropriately short follow-up times. The quality of the studies therefore makes it difficult to conclude that MDT shortens healing time. The poor quality of the data used for evaluating the efficacy of MDT highlights the need for more and better designed investigations.

  11. Using the Internet to search for cancer clinical trials: a comparative audit of clinical trial search tools.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Nancy L; Saperstein, Sandra L; Massett, Holly A; Leonard, Colleen Ryan; Grama, Lakshmi; Manrow, Rick

    2008-07-01

    Advancing the clinical trial research process to improve cancer treatment necessitates helping people with cancer identify and enroll in studies, and researchers are using the power of the Internet to facilitate this process. This study used a content analysis of online cancer clinical trial search tools to understand what people with cancer might encounter. The content analysis revealed that clinical trial search tools were easy to identify using a popular search engine, but their functionality and content varied greatly. Most required that users be fairly knowledgeable about their medical condition and sophisticated in their web navigation skills. The ability to search by a specific health condition or type of cancer was the most common search strategy. The more complex tools required that users input detailed information about their personal medical history and have knowledge of specific clinical trial terminology. Search tools, however, only occasionally advised users to consult their doctors regarding clinical trial decision-making. This, along with the complexity of the tools suggests that online search tools may not adequately facilitate the clinical trial recruitment process. Findings from this analysis can be used as a framework from which to systematically examine actual consumer experience with online clinical trial search tools.

  12. Comparative Sensitivity Analysis of Muscle Activation Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rockenfeller, Robert; Günther, Michael; Schmitt, Syn; Götz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We mathematically compared two models of mammalian striated muscle activation dynamics proposed by Hatze and Zajac. Both models are representative for a broad variety of biomechanical models formulated as ordinary differential equations (ODEs). These models incorporate parameters that directly represent known physiological properties. Other parameters have been introduced to reproduce empirical observations. We used sensitivity analysis to investigate the influence of model parameters on the ODE solutions. In addition, we expanded an existing approach to treating initial conditions as parameters and to calculating second-order sensitivities. Furthermore, we used a global sensitivity analysis approach to include finite ranges of parameter values. Hence, a theoretician striving for model reduction could use the method for identifying particularly low sensitivities to detect superfluous parameters. An experimenter could use it for identifying particularly high sensitivities to improve parameter estimation. Hatze's nonlinear model incorporates some parameters to which activation dynamics is clearly more sensitive than to any parameter in Zajac's linear model. Other than Zajac's model, Hatze's model can, however, reproduce measured shifts in optimal muscle length with varied muscle activity. Accordingly we extracted a specific parameter set for Hatze's model that combines best with a particular muscle force-length relation. PMID:26417379

  13. Increasing girls’ physical activity during an organised youth sport basketball program: a randomised controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Participation in organised youth sports (OYS) has been recommended as an opportunity to increase young peoples’ moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) levels. Participants, however, spend a considerable proportion of time during OYS inactive. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to investigate whether coaches who attended coach education sessions (where education on increasing MVPA and decreasing inactivity during training was delivered) can increase players’ MVPA during training sessions over a 5-day basketball program compared to coaches who did not receive coach education sessions. Methods/design A convenience sample of 80 female players and 8 coaches were recruited into the UWS School Holiday Basketball Program in Greater Western Sydney, Australia. A two-arm, parallel-group randomised controlled trial was employed to investigate whether coaches who attended 2 coach education sessions (compared with a no-treatment control) can increase their players’ MVPA during training sessions over a 5-day basketball program. Objectively measured physical activity, directly observed lesson context and leader behaviour, player motivation, players’ perceived autonomy support, and coaching information (regarding training session planning, estimations on player physical activity and lesson context during training, perceived ability to modify training sessions, perceived importance of physical activity during training, intention to increase physical activity/reduce inactivity, and likelihood of increasing physical activity/reducing inactivity) were assessed at baseline (day 1) and at follow-up (day 5). Linear mixed models will be used to analyse between arm differences in changes from baseline to follow-up on all outcomes. Discussion The current trial protocol describes, to our knowledge, the first trial conducted in an OYS context to investigate the efficacy of an intervention, relative to a control, in increasing MVPA. This study’s findings will

  14. Optimal design of clinical trials comparing several treatments with a control.

    PubMed

    Marschner, Ian C

    2007-01-01

    Clinical trials are often designed to compare several treatments with a common control arm in pairwise fashion. In this paper we study optimal designs for such studies, based on minimizing the total number of patients required to achieve a given level of power. A common approach when designing studies to compare several treatments with a control is to achieve the desired power for each individual pairwise treatment comparison. However, it is often more appropriate to characterize power in terms of the family of null hypotheses being tested, and to control the probability of rejecting all, or alternatively any, of these individual hypotheses. While all approaches lead to unbalanced designs with more patients allocated to the control arm, it is found that the optimal design and required number of patients can vary substantially depending on the chosen characterization of power. The methods make allowance for both continuous and binary outcomes and are illustrated with reference to two clinical trials, one involving multiple doses compared to placebo and the other involving combination therapy compared to mono-therapies. In one example a 55% reduction in sample size is achieved through an optimal design combined with the appropriate characterization of power. PMID:17323312

  15. From efficacy to effectiveness: comparing outcomes for youth with anorexia nervosa treated in research trials versus clinical care.

    PubMed

    Accurso, Erin C; Fitzsimmons-Craft, Ellen E; Ciao, Anna C; Le Grange, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    This study examined outcomes for 84 youth with anorexia nervosa (AN) who received family-based treatment (FBT) in a research trial (randomized trial care [RTC]: n = 32) compared to fee-for-service care (specialty clinical care [SCC]: n = 52) at an outpatient eating disorder clinic. Weight was collected up to 12 months post-baseline. Survival curves were used to examine time to weight restoration as predicted by type of care, baseline demographic and clinical characteristics, and their interaction. There was not a significant main effect for type of care, but its interaction with initial %EBW was significant (p = .005), indicating that weight restoration was achieved faster in RTC compared to SCC for youth with a lower initial %EBW (i.e., ≤81), while rates of weight restoration were comparable for those with a higher initial %EBW (i.e., >81). These data suggest that FBT is as effective as it is efficacious, except for youth with lower initial body weights. Therefore, clinicians may need to be particularly active in encouraging early weight gain for this subset of patients. Nevertheless, this study suggests that FBT is appropriate as a first-line treatment for youth with AN who present for clinical care.

  16. From Efficacy to Effectiveness: Comparing Outcomes for Youth with Anorexia Nervosa Treated in Research Trials Versus Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Accurso, Erin C.; Fitzsimmons-Craft, Ellen E.; Ciao, Anna C.; Le Grange, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    This study examined outcomes for 84 youth with anorexia nervosa (AN) who received family-based treatment (FBT) in a research trial (randomized trial care [RTC]: n = 32) compared to fee-for-service care (specialty clinical care [SCC]: n = 52) at an outpatient eating disorder clinic. Weight was collected up to 12 months post-baseline. Survival curves were used to examine time to weight restoration as predicted by type of care, baseline demographic and clinical characteristics, and their interaction. There was not a significant main effect for type of care, but its interaction with initial %EBW was significant (p = .005), indicating that weight restoration was achieved faster in RTC compared to SCC for youth with a lower initial %EBW (i.e., ≤ 81), while rates of weight restoration were comparable for those with a higher initial %EBW (i.e., > 81). These data suggest that FBT is as effective as it is efficacious, except for youth with lower initial body weights. Therefore, clinicians may need to be particularly active in encouraging early weight gain for this subset of patients. Nevertheless, this study suggests that FBT is appropriate as a first-line treatment for youth with AN who present for clinical care. PMID:25557396

  17. A highly efficacious pediculicide based on dimeticone: Randomized observer blinded comparative trial

    PubMed Central

    Heukelbach, Jorg; Pilger, Daniel; Oliveira, Fabíola A; Khakban, Adak; Ariza, Liana; Feldmeier, Hermann

    2008-01-01

    Background Infestation with the human head louse (Pediculus humanus capitis) occurs worldwide. Existing treatment options are limited, and reports of resistance to commonly used pediculicides have been increasing. In this trial we assessed the efficacy of a product containing a high (92%) concentration of the silicone oil dimeticone (identical in composition to NYDA®), as compared to a 1% permethrin lotion. Methods Randomized, controlled, observer blinded clinical trial. Participants were recruited from a poor urban neighbourhood in Brazil where pediculosis capitis was highly prevalent. To minimize reinfestation during the trial, participants (145 children aged 5–15 years with head lice infestations) were transferred to a holiday resort outside the endemic area for a period of 9 days. Two applications of dimeticone or 1% permethrin were done, seven days apart. Outcome measures were defined as cure (absence of vital head lice) after first application and before and after second applications, degree of itching, cosmetic acceptability, and clinical pathology. Results Overall cure rates were: day 2 – dimeticone 94.5% (95% CI: 86.6% – 98.5%) and permethrin 66.7% (95% CI: 54.6% – 77.3%; p < 0.0001); day 7 – dimeticone 64.4% (95% CI: 53.3% – 75.3%) and permethrin 59.7% (95% CI: 47.5% – 71.1%; p = 0.5); day 9 – dimeticone 97.2% (95% CI: 90.3% – 99.7%) and permethrin 67.6% (95% CI: 55.4%-78.2%); p < 0.0001). Itching was reduced similarly in both groups. Cosmetic acceptability was significantly better in the dimeticone group as compared to the permethrin group (p = 0.01). Two mild product-related incidents occurred in the dimeticone group. Conclusion The dimeticone product is a safe and highly efficacious pediculicide. Due to its physical mode of action (interruption of the lice's oxygen supply of the central nervous system), development of resistance is unlikely. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN15117709. PMID:18783606

  18. Comparative efficacy trial of cupping and serkangabin versus conventional therapy of migraine headaches: A randomized, open-label, comparative efficacy trial

    PubMed Central

    Firoozabadi, Mohammad Dehghani; Navabzadeh, Maryam; Roudsari, Mohammad Khodashenas; Zahmatkash, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Migraine headaches are the most common acute and recurrent headaches. Current treatment of a migraine headache consists of multiple medications for control and prevention of recurrent attacks. Global emergence of alternative medicine led us to examine the efficacy of cupping therapy plus serkangabin syrup in the treatment of migraine headaches. Materials and Methods: This study was a randomized, controlled, open-label, comparative efficacy trial. We randomly assigned patients with migraine into cupping therapy plus serkangabin group (30 patients) and conventional treatment group (30 patients). An investigator assessed the severity of headache, frequency of attacks in a week and duration of attacks per hour in 5 visits (at the end of 2 weeks, 1, 3 and 6 months). Generalized estimating equations approach was used to analyze repeated measures data to compare outcomes in both groups. Results: Average age for cupping therapy group and conventional treatment group were 31.7 (±7.6) and 32.6 (±12.7) years, respectively (P = 0.45). After treatment for 2 weeks; and 1, 3 and 6 months, severity of headache (P = 0.80), frequency of migraine attacks (P = 0.63) and duration of attacks per hours (P = 0.48) were similar in conventional and cupping groups but these symptoms were decreased in each group during the study (P < 0.001). Conclusion: There was no significant difference between cupping plus serkangabin therapy and conventional treatment in the treatment and prophylaxis of migraine. The alternative therapy may be used in cases of drug intolerance, no medication response, and in primary care. PMID:25709653

  19. A randomised clinical trial comparing 2% econazole and 5% natamycin for the treatment of fungal keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Prajna, N V; John, R K; Nirmalan, P K; Lalitha, P; Srinivasan, M

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To compare 2% econazole and 5% natamycin in the management of fungal keratitis. Methods: A randomised clinical trial was performed using 2% econazole or 5% natamycin as the two treatment arms on patients presenting with culture positive fungal keratitis to the cornea service at Aravind Eye Care System, Madurai, India. Results: 116 patients were recruited, and 112 continued in the study. There were no significant differences between the two arms at baseline or for success (defined as a healed or healing ulcer) at final visit (p = 0.79). Conclusions: 2% Econazole appears to be as effective as 5% natamycin for the management of fungal keratitis. PMID:14507756

  20. Randomised single blind trial to compare the toxicity of subconjunctival gentamicin and cefuroxime in cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, C D; McDonnell, P J; Spalton, D J

    1990-12-01

    Comparatively little attention has been paid to the conjunctival toxicity of antibiotics administered at the time of cataract surgery. We have observed the effect of subconjunctival gentamicin and cefuroxime injection, using colour photography in a randomised single blind trial of 121 patients undergoing routine cataract surgery. Our results suggest that a hyperaemic eye is likely to occur about twice as often in patients injected with gentamicin (p less than 0.001). Gentamicin is associated with more pain postoperatively (p less than 0.05). Significant manifestations of gentamicin toxicity are conjunctival oedema and capillary closure. Cefuroxime has some theoretical advantages over gentamicin in its antibacterial spectrum.

  1. Comparative effectiveness of atypical antipsychotics in schizophrenia: what have real-world trials taught us?

    PubMed

    Attard, Azizah; Taylor, David M

    2012-06-01

    Real-world, effectiveness studies add an important new dimension to the evaluation of the benefits of individual antipsychotics. Efficacy studies have already shown the unique effectiveness of clozapine, and suggested improved outcomes for olanzapine compared with some atypical antipsychotics and a reduced tendency to produce acute and chronic movement disorders for atypical compared with typical drugs. Recent effectiveness studies largely confirm these prior observations. The CATIE (Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness), CUtLASS (Cost Utility of the Latest Antipsychotic Drugs in Schizophrenia Study) and SOHO (Schizophrenia Outpatient Health Outcomes) programmes confirmed the superiority of clozapine over other antipsychotics; CATIE and SOHO also confirmed olanzapine as probably the second most effective antipsychotic. Effectiveness studies have confirmed the high incidence of adverse metabolic effects with clozapine, olanzapine and (with less certainty) quetiapine but the ZODIAC (Ziprasidone Observational Study of Cardiac Outcomes) study found no excess cardiovascular events or deaths for olanzapine compared with ziprasidone. Prior observations on reduced frequency of movement disorders for second-generation versus first-generation antipsychotics were also largely (but not uniformly) supported. Overall, recent real-world studies have done much to confirm prior observations from efficacy-based randomized, controlled trials.

  2. Comparative effectiveness of atypical antipsychotics in schizophrenia: what have real-world trials taught us?

    PubMed

    Attard, Azizah; Taylor, David M

    2012-06-01

    Real-world, effectiveness studies add an important new dimension to the evaluation of the benefits of individual antipsychotics. Efficacy studies have already shown the unique effectiveness of clozapine, and suggested improved outcomes for olanzapine compared with some atypical antipsychotics and a reduced tendency to produce acute and chronic movement disorders for atypical compared with typical drugs. Recent effectiveness studies largely confirm these prior observations. The CATIE (Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness), CUtLASS (Cost Utility of the Latest Antipsychotic Drugs in Schizophrenia Study) and SOHO (Schizophrenia Outpatient Health Outcomes) programmes confirmed the superiority of clozapine over other antipsychotics; CATIE and SOHO also confirmed olanzapine as probably the second most effective antipsychotic. Effectiveness studies have confirmed the high incidence of adverse metabolic effects with clozapine, olanzapine and (with less certainty) quetiapine but the ZODIAC (Ziprasidone Observational Study of Cardiac Outcomes) study found no excess cardiovascular events or deaths for olanzapine compared with ziprasidone. Prior observations on reduced frequency of movement disorders for second-generation versus first-generation antipsychotics were also largely (but not uniformly) supported. Overall, recent real-world studies have done much to confirm prior observations from efficacy-based randomized, controlled trials. PMID:22668246

  3. Single-patient (n-of-1) trials: a pragmatic clinical decision methodology for patient-centered comparative effectiveness research

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Naihua; Kravitz, Richard L.; Schmid, Christopher H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To raise awareness among clinicians and epidemiologists that single-patient (n-of-1) trials are potentially useful for informing personalized treatment decisions for patients with chronic conditions. Study Design and Setting We reviewed the clinical and statistical literature on methods and applications of single-patient trials and then critically evaluated the needs for further methodological developments. Results Existing literature reports application of 2,154 single-patient trials in 108 studies for diverse clinical conditions; various recent commentaries advocate for wider application of such trials in clinical decision making. Preliminary evidence from several recent pilot acceptability studies suggests that single-patient trials have the potential for widespread acceptance by patients and clinicians as an effective modality for increasing the therapeutic precision. Bayesian and adaptive statistical methods hold promise for increasing the informational yield of single-patient trials while reducing participant burden, but are not widely used. Personalized applications of single-patient trials can be enhanced through further development and application of methodologies on adaptive trial design, stopping rules, network meta-analysis, washout methods, and methods for communicating trial findings to patients and clinicians. Conclusions Single-patient trials may be poised to emerge as an important part of the methodological armamentarium for comparative effectiveness research and patient-centered outcomes research. By permitting direct estimation of individual treatment effects, they can facilitate finely graded individualized care, enhance therapeutic precision, improve patient outcomes, and reduce costs. PMID:23849149

  4. The interpretation of long-term trials of biologic treatments for psoriasis: trial designs and the choices of statistical analyses affect ability to compare outcomes across trials.

    PubMed

    Langley, R G; Reich, K

    2013-12-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic disease requiring long-term therapy, which makes finding treatments with favourable long-term safety and efficacy profiles crucial. The goal of this review is to provide the background needed to evaluate properly long-term studies of biologic treatments for psoriasis. Firstly, important elements of design and analysis strategies are described. Secondly, data from published trials of biologic therapies for psoriasis are reviewed in light of the design and analysis choices implemented in the studies. Published reports of clinical trials of biologic treatments (adalimumab, alefacept, etanercept, infliximab or ustekinumab) that lasted 33 weeks or longer and included efficacy results and statistical analysis were reviewed. Study designs and statistical analyses were evaluated and summarized, emphasizing patient follow-up methods and handling of missing data. Various trial designs and data handling methods are used in long-term studies of biologic psoriasis treatments. Responder analyses in long-term trials can be conducted in responder enrichment, re-treated nonresponder or intent-to-treat trials. Missing data can be handled in four ways, including, from most to least conservative, nonresponder imputation, last-observation-carried-forward, as-observed analysis and anytime analysis. Long-term clinical trials have shown that adalimumab, alefacept, etanercept, infliximab and ustekinumab are efficacious for psoriasis treatment; however, without common standards for these trials, direct comparisons of these agents are difficult. Understanding differences in trial design and data handling is essential to make informed treatment decisions.

  5. The interpretation of long-term trials of biologic treatments for psoriasis: trial designs and the choices of statistical analyses affect ability to compare outcomes across trials.

    PubMed

    Langley, R G; Reich, K

    2013-12-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic disease requiring long-term therapy, which makes finding treatments with favourable long-term safety and efficacy profiles crucial. The goal of this review is to provide the background needed to evaluate properly long-term studies of biologic treatments for psoriasis. Firstly, important elements of design and analysis strategies are described. Secondly, data from published trials of biologic therapies for psoriasis are reviewed in light of the design and analysis choices implemented in the studies. Published reports of clinical trials of biologic treatments (adalimumab, alefacept, etanercept, infliximab or ustekinumab) that lasted 33 weeks or longer and included efficacy results and statistical analysis were reviewed. Study designs and statistical analyses were evaluated and summarized, emphasizing patient follow-up methods and handling of missing data. Various trial designs and data handling methods are used in long-term studies of biologic psoriasis treatments. Responder analyses in long-term trials can be conducted in responder enrichment, re-treated nonresponder or intent-to-treat trials. Missing data can be handled in four ways, including, from most to least conservative, nonresponder imputation, last-observation-carried-forward, as-observed analysis and anytime analysis. Long-term clinical trials have shown that adalimumab, alefacept, etanercept, infliximab and ustekinumab are efficacious for psoriasis treatment; however, without common standards for these trials, direct comparisons of these agents are difficult. Understanding differences in trial design and data handling is essential to make informed treatment decisions. PMID:23937204

  6. The effects of Red Bull energy drink compared with caffeine on cycling time-trial performance.

    PubMed

    Quinlivan, Alannah; Irwin, Christopher; Grant, Gary D; Anoopkumar-Dukie, Sheilandra; Skinner, Tina; Leveritt, Michael; Desbrow, Ben

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the ergogenic effects of a commercial energy drink (Red Bull) or an equivalent dose of anhydrous caffeine in comparison with a noncaffeinated control beverage on cycling performance. Eleven trained male cyclists (31.7 ± 5.9 y 82.3 ± 6.1 kg, VO2max = 60.3 ± 7.8 mL · kg-1 · min-1) participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover-design study involving 3 experimental conditions. Participants were randomly administered Red Bull (9.4 mL/kg body mass [BM] containing 3 mg/kg BM caffeine), anhydrous caffeine (3 mg/kg BM given in capsule form), or a placebo 90 min before commencing a time trial equivalent to 1 h cycling at 75% peak power output. Carbohydrate and fluid volumes were matched across all trials. Performance improved by 109 ± 153 s (2.8%, P = .039) after Red Bull compared with placebo and by 120 ± 172 s (3.1%, P = .043) after caffeine compared with placebo. No significant difference (P > .05) in performance time was detected between Red Bull and caffeine treatments. There was no significant difference (P > .05) in mean heart rate or rating of perceived exertion among the 3 treatments. This study demonstrated that a moderate dose of caffeine consumed as either Red Bull or in anhydrous form enhanced cycling time-trial performance. The ergogenic benefits of Red Bull energy drink are therefore most likely due to the effects of caffeine, with the other ingredients not likely to offer additional benefit.

  7. The effects of Red Bull energy drink compared with caffeine on cycling time-trial performance.

    PubMed

    Quinlivan, Alannah; Irwin, Christopher; Grant, Gary D; Anoopkumar-Dukie, Sheilandra; Skinner, Tina; Leveritt, Michael; Desbrow, Ben

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the ergogenic effects of a commercial energy drink (Red Bull) or an equivalent dose of anhydrous caffeine in comparison with a noncaffeinated control beverage on cycling performance. Eleven trained male cyclists (31.7 ± 5.9 y 82.3 ± 6.1 kg, VO2max = 60.3 ± 7.8 mL · kg-1 · min-1) participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover-design study involving 3 experimental conditions. Participants were randomly administered Red Bull (9.4 mL/kg body mass [BM] containing 3 mg/kg BM caffeine), anhydrous caffeine (3 mg/kg BM given in capsule form), or a placebo 90 min before commencing a time trial equivalent to 1 h cycling at 75% peak power output. Carbohydrate and fluid volumes were matched across all trials. Performance improved by 109 ± 153 s (2.8%, P = .039) after Red Bull compared with placebo and by 120 ± 172 s (3.1%, P = .043) after caffeine compared with placebo. No significant difference (P > .05) in performance time was detected between Red Bull and caffeine treatments. There was no significant difference (P > .05) in mean heart rate or rating of perceived exertion among the 3 treatments. This study demonstrated that a moderate dose of caffeine consumed as either Red Bull or in anhydrous form enhanced cycling time-trial performance. The ergogenic benefits of Red Bull energy drink are therefore most likely due to the effects of caffeine, with the other ingredients not likely to offer additional benefit. PMID:25710190

  8. Analysis of dietary interventions. A simple payoff matrix for display of comparative dietary trials

    PubMed Central

    Feinman, Richard D; Fine, Eugene J; Volek, Jeff S

    2008-01-01

    Objective To provide a simple method for presentation of data in comparative dietary trials. Methods Individual data from each diet are ranked and all possible paired comparisons are made and displayed in a pay-off matrix which can be color-coded according to the magnitude of the differences between the two diets. Probability of outcome can be calculated from the fraction of matrix elements corresponding to specified conditions. The method has the advantage of emphasizing differences and providing the maximum amount of information. Results The method was tested with values from the literature and allows intuitive sense of the comparative effectiveness of the two diets. In a test case in which a cross-over study had been performed the matrix derived from theoretical paired comparisons (treating the data as two parallel studies) was consistent with the results from the actual pairing in the cross-over. Conclusion The matrix method is a simple way of providing access to the differences between dietary trials. It exaggerates differences but can be used in combination with group statistics that, conversely, provide reliability at the expense of detailed information. PMID:18759982

  9. Promoting Activity in Geriatric Rehabilitation: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Accelerometry

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Sanjoy K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Low activity levels in inpatient rehabilitation are associated with adverse outcomes. The study aimed to test whether activity levels can be increased by the provision of monitored activity data to patients and clinicians in the context of explicit goal setting. Methods A randomized controlled trial in three sites in Australia included 255 inpatients aged 60 and older who had a rehabilitation goal to become ambulant. The primary outcome was patients’ walking time measured by accelerometers during the rehabilitation admission. Walking times from accelerometry were made available daily to treating therapists and intervention participants to motivate patients to improve incidental activity levels and reach set goals. For the control group, ‘usual care’ was followed, including the setting of mobility goals; however, for this group, neither staff nor patients received data on walking times to aid the setting of daily walking time targets. Results The median daily walking time in the intervention group increased from 10.3 minutes at baseline to 32.1 minutes at day 28, compared with an increase from 9.5 to 26.5 minutes per day in the control group. Subjects in the intervention group had significantly higher non-therapy walking time by about 7 minutes [mean (95% CI): 24.6 (21.7, 27.4)] compared to those in the control group [mean(95% CI): 17.3 (14.4, 20.3)] (p = 0.001). Conclusions Daily feedback to patients and therapists using an accelerometer increased walking times during rehabilitation admissions. The results of this study suggest objective monitoring of activity levels could provide clinicians with information on clinically important, mobility-related activities to assist goal setting. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12611000034932 http://www.ANZCTR.org.au/ PMID:27564857

  10. Summary of product trials for 10, 164 patients: comparing an intravenous stabilizing device to tape.

    PubMed

    Schears, Gregory J

    2006-01-01

    Inadequate catheter securement is an underrecognized patient safety issue that contributes significantly to catheter-related complications, including dislodgment, occlusion, infiltration, and infection. Pooled data from prospective product trials at 83 hospitals compared tape to a standard peripheral intravenous (PIV) securement method with a PIV-specific catheter-stabilizing device (StatLock). A 67% reduction (P<.001) in total patient complications was observed in the stabilizing device group, as compared with the tape group. Also, the need for unscheduled PIV restarts was reduced by 76% with the stabilizing device (P<.001). An annual cost savings of $18,000 per hospital on PIV materials and a combined savings of $277,000 on materials, complication costs, and nursing time were estimated on the basis of these reduced complications. Newer catheter-stabilizing technologies can help to reduce patient complications, for an overall cost savings, and consequently reduce needlestick exposures for healthcare providers by reducing restarts and prolonging dwell times.

  11. Changes in CVD risk factors in the activity counseling trial

    PubMed Central

    Baruth, Meghan; Wilcox, Sara; Sallis, James F; King, Abby C; Marcus, Bess H; Blair, Steven N

    2011-01-01

    Primary care facilities may be a natural setting for delivering interventions that focus on behaviors that improve cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. The purpose of this study was to examine the 24-month effects of the Activity Counseling Trial (ACT) on CVD risk factors, to examine whether changes in CVD risk factors differed according to baseline risk factor status, and to examine whether changes in fitness were associated with changes in CVD risk factors. ACT was a 24-month multicenter randomized controlled trial to increase physical activity. Participants were 874 inactive men and women aged 35–74 years. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three arms that varied by level of counseling, intensity, and resource requirements. Because there were no significant differences in change over time between arms on any of the CVD risk factors examined, all arms were combined, and the effects of time, independent of arm, were examined separately for men and women. Time × Baseline risk factor status interactions examined whether changes in CVD risk factors differed according to baseline risk factor status. Significant improvements in total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, the ratio of total cholesterol to HDL-C, and triglycerides were seen in both men and women who had high (or low for HDL-C) baseline levels of risk factors, whereas significant improvements in diastolic blood pressure were seen only in those men with high baseline levels. There were no improvements in any risk factors among participants with normal baseline levels. Changes in fitness were associated with changes in a number of CVD risk factors. However, most relationships disappeared after controlling for changes in body weight. Improvements in lipids from the ACT interventions could reduce the risk of coronary heart disease in people with already high levels of lipids by 16%–26% in men and 11%–16% in women

  12. Stereotactically-navigated percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation (IRE) compared to conventional IRE: a prospective trial.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Lukas P; Pregler, Benedikt; Nießen, Christoph; Schicho, Andreas; Haimerl, Michael; Jung, Ernst Michael; Stroszczynski, Christian; Wiggermann, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to compare CT-navigated stereotactic IRE (SIRE) needle placement to non-navigated conventional IRE (CIRE) for percutaneous ablation of liver malignancies. Materials and Methods. A prospective trial including a total of 20 patients was conducted with 10 patients in each arm of the study. IRE procedures were guided using either CT fluoroscopy (CIRE) or a stereotactic planning and navigation system (SIRE). Primary endpoint was procedure time. Secondary endpoints were accuracy of needle placement, technical success rate, complication rate and dose-length product (DLP). Results. A total of 20 IRE procedures were performed to ablate hepatic malignancies (16 HCC, 4 liver metastases), 10 procedures in each arm. Mean time for placement of IRE electrodes in SIRE was significantly shorter with 27 ± 8 min compared to 87 ± 30 min for CIRE (p < 0.001). Accuracy of needle placement for SIRE was higher than CIRE (2.2 mm vs. 3.3 mm mean deviation, p < 0.001). The total DLP and the fluoroscopy DLP were significantly lower in SIRE compared to CIRE. Technical success rate and complication rates were equal in both arms. Conclusion. SIRE demonstrated a significant reduction of procedure length and higher accuracy compared to CIRE. Stereotactic navigation has the potential to reduce radiation dose for the patient and the radiologist without increasing the risk of complications or impaired technical success compared to CIRE.

  13. Stereotactically-navigated percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation (IRE) compared to conventional IRE: a prospective trial

    PubMed Central

    Pregler, Benedikt; Nießen, Christoph; Schicho, Andreas; Haimerl, Michael; Jung, Ernst Michael; Stroszczynski, Christian; Wiggermann, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to compare CT-navigated stereotactic IRE (SIRE) needle placement to non-navigated conventional IRE (CIRE) for percutaneous ablation of liver malignancies. Materials and Methods. A prospective trial including a total of 20 patients was conducted with 10 patients in each arm of the study. IRE procedures were guided using either CT fluoroscopy (CIRE) or a stereotactic planning and navigation system (SIRE). Primary endpoint was procedure time. Secondary endpoints were accuracy of needle placement, technical success rate, complication rate and dose-length product (DLP). Results. A total of 20 IRE procedures were performed to ablate hepatic malignancies (16 HCC, 4 liver metastases), 10 procedures in each arm. Mean time for placement of IRE electrodes in SIRE was significantly shorter with 27 ± 8 min compared to 87 ± 30 min for CIRE (p < 0.001). Accuracy of needle placement for SIRE was higher than CIRE (2.2 mm vs. 3.3 mm mean deviation, p < 0.001). The total DLP and the fluoroscopy DLP were significantly lower in SIRE compared to CIRE. Technical success rate and complication rates were equal in both arms. Conclusion. SIRE demonstrated a significant reduction of procedure length and higher accuracy compared to CIRE. Stereotactic navigation has the potential to reduce radiation dose for the patient and the radiologist without increasing the risk of complications or impaired technical success compared to CIRE. PMID:27602266

  14. Stereotactically-navigated percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation (IRE) compared to conventional IRE: a prospective trial.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Lukas P; Pregler, Benedikt; Nießen, Christoph; Schicho, Andreas; Haimerl, Michael; Jung, Ernst Michael; Stroszczynski, Christian; Wiggermann, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to compare CT-navigated stereotactic IRE (SIRE) needle placement to non-navigated conventional IRE (CIRE) for percutaneous ablation of liver malignancies. Materials and Methods. A prospective trial including a total of 20 patients was conducted with 10 patients in each arm of the study. IRE procedures were guided using either CT fluoroscopy (CIRE) or a stereotactic planning and navigation system (SIRE). Primary endpoint was procedure time. Secondary endpoints were accuracy of needle placement, technical success rate, complication rate and dose-length product (DLP). Results. A total of 20 IRE procedures were performed to ablate hepatic malignancies (16 HCC, 4 liver metastases), 10 procedures in each arm. Mean time for placement of IRE electrodes in SIRE was significantly shorter with 27 ± 8 min compared to 87 ± 30 min for CIRE (p < 0.001). Accuracy of needle placement for SIRE was higher than CIRE (2.2 mm vs. 3.3 mm mean deviation, p < 0.001). The total DLP and the fluoroscopy DLP were significantly lower in SIRE compared to CIRE. Technical success rate and complication rates were equal in both arms. Conclusion. SIRE demonstrated a significant reduction of procedure length and higher accuracy compared to CIRE. Stereotactic navigation has the potential to reduce radiation dose for the patient and the radiologist without increasing the risk of complications or impaired technical success compared to CIRE. PMID:27602266

  15. Stereotactically-navigated percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation (IRE) compared to conventional IRE: a prospective trial

    PubMed Central

    Pregler, Benedikt; Nießen, Christoph; Schicho, Andreas; Haimerl, Michael; Jung, Ernst Michael; Stroszczynski, Christian; Wiggermann, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to compare CT-navigated stereotactic IRE (SIRE) needle placement to non-navigated conventional IRE (CIRE) for percutaneous ablation of liver malignancies. Materials and Methods. A prospective trial including a total of 20 patients was conducted with 10 patients in each arm of the study. IRE procedures were guided using either CT fluoroscopy (CIRE) or a stereotactic planning and navigation system (SIRE). Primary endpoint was procedure time. Secondary endpoints were accuracy of needle placement, technical success rate, complication rate and dose-length product (DLP). Results. A total of 20 IRE procedures were performed to ablate hepatic malignancies (16 HCC, 4 liver metastases), 10 procedures in each arm. Mean time for placement of IRE electrodes in SIRE was significantly shorter with 27 ± 8 min compared to 87 ± 30 min for CIRE (p < 0.001). Accuracy of needle placement for SIRE was higher than CIRE (2.2 mm vs. 3.3 mm mean deviation, p < 0.001). The total DLP and the fluoroscopy DLP were significantly lower in SIRE compared to CIRE. Technical success rate and complication rates were equal in both arms. Conclusion. SIRE demonstrated a significant reduction of procedure length and higher accuracy compared to CIRE. Stereotactic navigation has the potential to reduce radiation dose for the patient and the radiologist without increasing the risk of complications or impaired technical success compared to CIRE.

  16. Reductions in disease activity in the AMPLE trial: clinical response by baseline disease duration

    PubMed Central

    Schiff, Michael; Weinblatt, Michael E; Valente, Robert; Citera, Gustavo; Maldonado, Michael; Massarotti, Elena; Yazici, Yusuf; Fleischmann, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate clinical response by baseline disease duration using 2-year data from the AMPLE trial. Methods Patients were randomised to subcutaneous abatacept 125 mg weekly or adalimumab 40 mg bi-weekly, with background methotrexate. As part of a post hoc analysis, the achievement of validated definitions of remission (Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI) ≤2.8, Simplified Disease Activity Index (SDAI) ≤3.3, Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data 3 (RAPID3) ≤3.0, Boolean score ≤1), low disease activity (CDAI <10, SDAI <11, RAPID3 ≤6.0), Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index response and American College of Rheumatology responses were evaluated by baseline disease duration (≤6 vs >6 months). Disease Activity Score 28 (C-reactive protein) <2.6 or ≤3.2 and radiographic non-progression in patients achieving remission were also evaluated. Results A total of 646 patients were randomised and treated (abatacept, n=318; adalimumab, n=328). In both treatment groups, comparable responses were achieved in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (≤6 months) and in those with later disease (>6 months) across multiple clinical measures. Conclusions Abatacept or adalimumab with background methotrexate were associated with similar onset and sustainability of response over 2 years. Patients treated early or later in the disease course achieved comparable clinical responses. Trial registration number NCT00929864, Post-results. PMID:27110385

  17. Comparing Judicial Institutions: Using an Inquisitorial Trial Simulation to Facilitate Student Understanding of International Legal Traditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiden, David L.

    2009-01-01

    This article proposes a new role-playing exercise for public law courses: a mock-trial simulation using the European inquisitorial system of trial procedure. By exposing students to an alternative method of conducting a trial, numerous pedagogical benefits can be obtained, including stimulating critical thinking regarding the potential…

  18. Randomized Trial of Behavioral Activation, Cognitive Therapy, and Antidepressant Medication in the Prevention of Relapse and Recurrence in Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobson, Keith S.; Hollon, Steven D.; Dimidjian, Sona; Schmaling, Karen B.; Kohlenberg, Robert J.; Gallop, Robert J.; Rizvi, Shireen L.; Gollan, Jackie K.; Dunner, David L.; Jacobson, Neil S.

    2008-01-01

    This study followed treatment responders from a randomized controlled trial of adults with major depression. Patients treated with medication but withdrawn onto pill-placebo had more relapse through 1 year of follow-up compared to patients who received prior behavioral activation, prior cognitive therapy, or continued medication. Prior…

  19. Comparative trial of rectal indomethacin and cryoanalgesia for control of early postthoracotomy pain.

    PubMed

    Keenan, D J; Cave, K; Langdon, L; Lea, R E

    1983-11-01

    A randomised double blind trial was carried out over the first two days after thoracotomy to compare the analgesic effects of rectal indomethacin 100 mg administered eight hourly, cryoanalgesia, and a combination of both of these with the effects of conventional intramuscular opiate analgesia. Pain scores were significantly reduced with both rectal indomethacin alone and cryoanalgesia alone; these treatments had an additive effect when used in combination. Pain on movement was significantly increased, and indomethacin was more effective in reducing this than cryoanalgesia. Groups receiving either indomethacin alone or the combination treatment required significantly less opiate on the first day and exhibited improved peak flow values over the first two days. It is concluded that rectal indomethacin, in this dosage, can provide good, safe analgesia after thoracotomy with minimum administrative difficulty. When used as an adjunct to cryoanalgesia it has an additive effect. There are many potential uses for this drug in other branches of surgery. PMID:6416399

  20. Comparative trial of rectal indomethacin and cryoanalgesia for control of early postthoracotomy pain.

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, D J; Cave, K; Langdon, L; Lea, R E

    1983-01-01

    A randomised double blind trial was carried out over the first two days after thoracotomy to compare the analgesic effects of rectal indomethacin 100 mg administered eight hourly, cryoanalgesia, and a combination of both of these with the effects of conventional intramuscular opiate analgesia. Pain scores were significantly reduced with both rectal indomethacin alone and cryoanalgesia alone; these treatments had an additive effect when used in combination. Pain on movement was significantly increased, and indomethacin was more effective in reducing this than cryoanalgesia. Groups receiving either indomethacin alone or the combination treatment required significantly less opiate on the first day and exhibited improved peak flow values over the first two days. It is concluded that rectal indomethacin, in this dosage, can provide good, safe analgesia after thoracotomy with minimum administrative difficulty. When used as an adjunct to cryoanalgesia it has an additive effect. There are many potential uses for this drug in other branches of surgery. PMID:6416399

  1. Efficacy of tianeptine in comparative trials versus reference antidepressants. An overview.

    PubMed

    Guelfi, J D

    1992-02-01

    The clinical properties of tianeptine have been assessed in double-blind controlled studies, which involved depressed patients fulfilling DSM-III criteria for either major depression--single episode or recurrent (without melancholia and psychotic features)--or dysthymic disorder--with or without an additional diagnosis of alcohol abuse or dependence. Five studies have compared tianeptine with reference antidepressants: its efficacy has been found to be similar to that of amitriptyline in depressed out-patients. However, these data need to be confirmed by other controlled trials v. reference drugs and by at least two placebo-controlled studies. Tianeptine does not induce sleep disorders, anticholinergic effects, or modifications of cardiovascular variables or biological parameters (renal, haematological, or hepatic). After the end of treatment, the only signs of withdrawal have been some disturbances of sleep.

  2. Single-blind clinical trial comparing use of fentiazac and paracetamol in postendodontic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Leguen, M A

    1985-01-01

    The efficacy of oral fentiazac (100 mg QID) was compared with that of paracetamol (500 mg QID) in a single-blind trial in 30 patients suffering from post-endodontic periodontitis secondary to infiltrative or abscessed pulpitis. Patients were allocated at random to two treatment groups and treated for four days. Over each of the four days, patients scored the severity of spontaneous pain and induced pain. The same symptoms were assessed by the investigator at 0, 48, and 96 hours. Special attention was paid to the occurrence of adverse reactions. A statistically significant difference favoring fentiazac was seen in the patients' assessments of induced pain (while eating) but not in the investigator's assessment of induced pain (percussion). There was no significant difference in the analgesic effects of fentiazac and paracetamol with respect to spontaneous pain scored by patients or the investigator. No side effects were seen. Fentiazac was shown to be an effective analgesic for use in this painful inflammatory condition.

  3. Spirulina platensis versus silymarin in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection. A pilot randomized, comparative clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Spirulina platensis, a cynobacterium used frequently as a dietary supplement had been found to exhibit many immune-stimulating and antiviral activities. It had been found to activate macrophages, NK cells, T cells, B cells, and to stimulate the production of Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and other cytokines. Natural substances isolated from Spirulina platensis had been found to be potent inhibitors against several enveloped viruses by blocking viral absorption/penetration and some replication stages of progeny viruses after penetration into cells. We aimed to study whether this dietary supplement possesses any therapeutically feasible activity worthy of further larger controlled clinical evaluation. Methods Sixty six patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection and eligible for inclusion had been randomized to either Spirulina or Silymarin treated groups for a period of six months treatment. The two groups were followed up and blindly compared for early (after 3 months) and end of 6 months treatment virological response. The effects of both treatments on each of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), Chronic Liver Disease Questionnaire scores (CLDQ), Arizona Sexual Experience Scale scores (ASEX) and the occurrence of any attributable adverse events were also compared. Results Among the 30 patients who had been treated with Spirulina and completed the 6 months protocol, 4 patients (13.3%) had a complete end of treatment virological response and 2 patients (6.7%) had a partial end of treatment response defined as significant decrease of virus load of at least 2-logs10. Though the proportion of responders in Spirulina group was greater than in the Silymarin group, the difference was not statistically significant at the end of both 6 months (p = 0.12) and 3 months treatment (p = 0.22) by Exact test. Alanine aminotransferase as well as CLDQ and ASEX scores were found to be more significantly improved in Spirulina than in Silymarin treated group. Conclusions Our

  4. Active Inference, epistemic value, and vicarious trial and error

    PubMed Central

    Cartoni, Emilio; Rigoli, Francesco; Pio-Lopez, Léo; Friston, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Balancing habitual and deliberate forms of choice entails a comparison of their respective merits—the former being faster but inflexible, and the latter slower but more versatile. Here, we show that arbitration between these two forms of control can be derived from first principles within an Active Inference scheme. We illustrate our arguments with simulations that reproduce rodent spatial decisions in T-mazes. In this context, deliberation has been associated with vicarious trial and error (VTE) behavior (i.e., the fact that rodents sometimes stop at decision points as if deliberating between choice alternatives), whose neurophysiological correlates are “forward sweeps” of hippocampal place cells in the arms of the maze under consideration. Crucially, forward sweeps arise early in learning and disappear shortly after, marking a transition from deliberative to habitual choice. Our simulations show that this transition emerges as the optimal solution to the trade-off between policies that maximize reward or extrinsic value (habitual policies) and those that also consider the epistemic value of exploratory behavior (deliberative or epistemic policies)—the latter requiring VTE and the retrieval of episodic information via forward sweeps. We thus offer a novel perspective on the optimality principles that engender forward sweeps and VTE, and on their role on deliberate choice. PMID:27317193

  5. Active Inference, epistemic value, and vicarious trial and error.

    PubMed

    Pezzulo, Giovanni; Cartoni, Emilio; Rigoli, Francesco; Pio-Lopez, Léo; Friston, Karl

    2016-07-01

    Balancing habitual and deliberate forms of choice entails a comparison of their respective merits-the former being faster but inflexible, and the latter slower but more versatile. Here, we show that arbitration between these two forms of control can be derived from first principles within an Active Inference scheme. We illustrate our arguments with simulations that reproduce rodent spatial decisions in T-mazes. In this context, deliberation has been associated with vicarious trial and error (VTE) behavior (i.e., the fact that rodents sometimes stop at decision points as if deliberating between choice alternatives), whose neurophysiological correlates are "forward sweeps" of hippocampal place cells in the arms of the maze under consideration. Crucially, forward sweeps arise early in learning and disappear shortly after, marking a transition from deliberative to habitual choice. Our simulations show that this transition emerges as the optimal solution to the trade-off between policies that maximize reward or extrinsic value (habitual policies) and those that also consider the epistemic value of exploratory behavior (deliberative or epistemic policies)-the latter requiring VTE and the retrieval of episodic information via forward sweeps. We thus offer a novel perspective on the optimality principles that engender forward sweeps and VTE, and on their role on deliberate choice. PMID:27317193

  6. Inter-trial analysis of post-movement Beta activities in EEG signals using multivariate empirical mode decomposition.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsiang-Chih; Lee, Po-Lei; Lo, Men-Tzung; Wu, Yu-Te; Wang, Kuo-Wei; Lan, Gong-Yau

    2013-07-01

    Event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS) is a technique to quantify subject's nonphase-locked neural activities underlying specific frequency bands, reactive to external/internal stimulus. However, conventional ERD/ERS studies usually utilize fixed frequency band determined from one or few channels to filter whole-head EEG/MEG data, which may inevitably include task-unrelated signals and result in underestimation of reactive oscillatory activities in multichannel studies. In this study, we adopted multivariate empirical mode decomposition (MEMD) to extract beta-related oscillatory activities in performing self-paced right and left index-finger lifting tasks. The MEMD extracts common modes from all channels in same-index intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) which allows the temporal-frequency features among different channels can be compared in each subband. The beta-band oscillatory activities were further bandpass filtered within trial-specific beta bands determined from sensorimotor-related channels (C3 and C4), and then rectified using amplitude modulation method to detect trial-by-trial beta rebound (BR) values in ERS time courses. The validity of the MEMD approach in BR values extraction has been demonstrated in multichannel EEG study which showed larger BR values than conventional ERS technique. The MEMD-based method enables the trial-by-trial extraction of sensorimotor oscillatory activities which might allow the exploration of subtle brain dynamics in future studies. PMID:23661320

  7. A win ratio approach to comparing continuous non-normal outcomes in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Duolao; Pocock, Stuart

    2016-05-01

    Clinical trials are often designed to compare continuous non-normal outcomes. The conventional statistical method for such a comparison is a non-parametric Mann-Whitney test, which provides a P-value for testing the hypothesis that the distributions of both treatment groups are identical, but does not provide a simple and straightforward estimate of treatment effect. For that, Hodges and Lehmann proposed estimating the shift parameter between two populations and its confidence interval (CI). However, such a shift parameter does not have a straightforward interpretation, and its CI contains zero in some cases when Mann-Whitney test produces a significant result. To overcome the aforementioned problems, we introduce the use of the win ratio for analysing such data. Patients in the new and control treatment are formed into all possible pairs. For each pair, the new treatment patient is labelled a 'winner' or a 'loser' if it is known who had the more favourable outcome. The win ratio is the total number of winners divided by the total numbers of losers. A 95% CI for the win ratio can be obtained using the bootstrap method. Statistical properties of the win ratio statistic are investigated using two real trial data sets and six simulation studies. Results show that the win ratio method has about the same power as the Mann-Whitney method. We recommend the use of the win ratio method for estimating the treatment effect (and CI) and the Mann-Whitney method for calculating the P-value for comparing continuous non-Normal outcomes when the amount of tied pairs is small. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Comparing Open Radical Cystectomy and Robot-assisted Laparoscopic Radical Cystectomy: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bochner, Bernard H.; Dalbagni, Guido; Sjoberg, Daniel D.; Silberstein, Jonathan; Keren Paz, Gal E.; Donat, S. Machele; Coleman, Jonathan A.; Mathew, Sheila; Vickers, Andrew; Schnorr, Geoffrey C.; Feuerstein, Michael A.; Rapkin, Bruce; Parra, Raul O.; Herr, Harry W.; Laudone, Vincent P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Open radical cystectomy (ORC) and urinary diversion in patients with bladder cancer (BCa) are associated with significant perioperative complication risk. Objective To compare perioperative complications between robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) and ORC techniques. Design, setting, and participants A prospective randomized controlled trial was conducted during 2010 and 2013 in BCa patients scheduled for definitive treatment by radical cystectomy (RC), pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND), and urinary diversion. Patients were randomized to ORC/PLND or RARC/PLND, both with open urinary diversion. Patients were followed for 90 d postoperatively. Intervention Standard ORC or RARC with PLND; all urinary diversions were performed via an open approach. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis Primary outcomes were overall 90-d grade 2–5 complications defined by a modified Clavien system. Secondary outcomes included comparison of high-grade complications, estimated blood loss, operative time, pathologic outcomes, 3- and 6-mo patient-reported quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes, and total operative room and inpatient costs. Differences in binary outcomes were assessed with the chi-square test, with differences in continuous outcomes assessed by analysis of covariance with randomization group as covariate and, for QOL end points, baseline score. Results and limitations The trial enrolled 124 patients, of whom 118 were randomized and underwent RC/PLND. Sixty were randomized to RARC and 58 to ORC. At 90 d, grade 2–5 complications were observed in 62% and 66% of RARC and ORC patients, respectively (95% confidence interval for difference, −21% to −13%; p = 0.7). The similar rates of grade 2–5 complications at our mandated interim analysis met futility criteria; thus, early closure of the trial occurred. The RARC group had lower mean intraoperative blood loss (p = 0.027) but significantly longer operative time than the ORC group (p < 0.001). Pathologic

  9. A cluster randomised trial of cloth masks compared with medical masks in healthcare workers

    PubMed Central

    MacIntyre, C Raina; Seale, Holly; Dung, Tham Chi; Hien, Nguyen Tran; Nga, Phan Thi; Chughtai, Abrar Ahmad; Rahman, Bayzidur; Dwyer, Dominic E; Wang, Quanyi

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of cloth masks to medical masks in hospital healthcare workers (HCWs). The null hypothesis is that there is no difference between medical masks and cloth masks. Setting 14 secondary-level/tertiary-level hospitals in Hanoi, Vietnam. Participants 1607 hospital HCWs aged ≥18 years working full-time in selected high-risk wards. Intervention Hospital wards were randomised to: medical masks, cloth masks or a control group (usual practice, which included mask wearing). Participants used the mask on every shift for 4 consecutive weeks. Main outcome measure Clinical respiratory illness (CRI), influenza-like illness (ILI) and laboratory-confirmed respiratory virus infection. Results The rates of all infection outcomes were highest in the cloth mask arm, with the rate of ILI statistically significantly higher in the cloth mask arm (relative risk (RR)=13.00, 95% CI 1.69 to 100.07) compared with the medical mask arm. Cloth masks also had significantly higher rates of ILI compared with the control arm. An analysis by mask use showed ILI (RR=6.64, 95% CI 1.45 to 28.65) and laboratory-confirmed virus (RR=1.72, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.94) were significantly higher in the cloth masks group compared with the medical masks group. Penetration of cloth masks by particles was almost 97% and medical masks 44%. Conclusions This study is the first RCT of cloth masks, and the results caution against the use of cloth masks. This is an important finding to inform occupational health and safety. Moisture retention, reuse of cloth masks and poor filtration may result in increased risk of infection. Further research is needed to inform the widespread use of cloth masks globally. However, as a precautionary measure, cloth masks should not be recommended for HCWs, particularly in high-risk situations, and guidelines need to be updated. Trial registration number Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12610000887077. PMID

  10. Comparing the effectiveness of a clinical registry and a clinical data warehouse for supporting clinical trial recruitment: a case study.

    PubMed

    Weng, Chunhua; Bigger, J Thomas; Busacca, Linda; Wilcox, Adam; Getaneh, Asqual

    2010-11-13

    This paper reports a case study comparing the relative efficiency of using a Diabetes Registry or a Clinical Data Warehouse to recruit participants for a diabetes clinical trial, TECOS. The Clinical Data Warehouse generated higher positive predictive accuracy (31% vs. 6.6%) and higher participant recruitment than the Registry (30 vs. 14 participants) in a shorter time period (59 vs. 74 working days). We identify important factors that increase clinical trial recruitment efficiency and lower cost.

  11. Barriers to Clinical Trial Participation: Comparing Perceptions and Knowledge of African American and White South Carolinians.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sei-Hill; Tanner, Andrea; Friedman, Daniela B; Foster, Caroline; Bergeron, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Analyzing data from a survey of African American and White residents in South Carolina, this study attempts to understand how to better promote clinical trial participation specifically within the African American population. To explore why participation is lower in the African American population, the authors examined two sets of potential barriers: structural/procedural (limited accessibility, lack of awareness, doctors not discussing clinical trial options, lack of health insurance) and cognitive/psychological (lack of subjective and factual knowledge, misperceptions, distrust, fear, perceived risk). Findings revealed that African Americans were significantly less willing than Whites to participate in a clinical trial. African Americans also had lower subjective and factual knowledge about clinical trials and perceived greater risk involved in participating in a clinical trial. The authors found that lack of subjective knowledge and perceived risk were significant predictors of African Americans' willingness to participate in a clinical trial. Implications of the findings are discussed in detail. PMID:26042496

  12. Pancreatitis, very early compared with normal start of enteral feeding (PYTHON trial): design and rationale of a randomised controlled multicenter trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In predicted severe acute pancreatitis, infections have a negative effect on clinical outcome. A start of enteral nutrition (EN) within 24 hours of onset may reduce the number of infections as compared to the current practice of starting an oral diet and EN if necessary at 3-4 days after admission. Methods/Design The PYTHON trial is a randomised controlled, parallel-group, superiority multicenter trial. Patients with predicted severe acute pancreatitis (Imrie-score ≥ 3 or APACHE-II score ≥ 8 or CRP > 150 mg/L) will be randomised to EN within 24 hours or an oral diet and EN if necessary, after 72 hours after hospital admission. During a 3-year period, 208 patients will be enrolled from 20 hospitals of the Dutch Pancreatitis Study Group. The primary endpoint is a composite of mortality or infections (bacteraemia, infected pancreatic or peripancreatic necrosis, pneumonia) during hospital stay or within 6 months following randomisation. Secondary endpoints include other major morbidity (e.g. new onset organ failure, need for intervention), intolerance of enteral feeding and total costs from a societal perspective. Discussion The PYTHON trial is designed to show that a very early (< 24 h) start of EN reduces the combined endpoint of mortality or infections as compared to the current practice of an oral diet and EN if necessary at around 72 hours after admission for predicted severe acute pancreatitis. Trial Registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN18170985 PMID:21392395

  13. Probiotic Compared with Standard Milk for High-caries Children: A Cluster Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, G; Ruiz, B; Faleiros, S; Vistoso, A; Marró, M L; Sánchez, J; Urzúa, I; Cabello, R

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare milk supplemented with probiotic lactobacilli with standard milk for the increment of caries in preschool children after 10 mo of intervention. The study was a triple-blind, placebo-controlled randomized trial. Participants were children aged 2 and 3 y (n = 261) attending 16 nursery schools in a metropolitan region in Chile. Nursery schools were randomly assigned to 2 parallel groups: children in the intervention group were given 150 mL of milk supplemented with Lactobacillus rhamnosus SP1 (10(7) CFU/mL), while children in the control group were given standard milk. Interventions took place on weekdays for 10 mo. Data were collected through a clinical examination of participants. The primary outcome measure was the increment of caries in preschool children. This was assessed using the International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS). The dropout rate was 21%. No differences in caries prevalence were detected between the groups at baseline (P = 0.68). After 10 mo of probiotic intake, the caries prevalence was 54.4% in the probiotic group and 65.8% in the control group. The percentage of new individuals who developed cavitated lesions (ICDAS 5-6) in the control group (24.3%) was significantly higher than that in the probiotic group (9.7%). The increment of dental caries showed an odds ratio of 0.35 (P < 0.05) in favor of the probiotic group. At the cavitated lesion level, the increment of new caries lesions within the groups showed 1.13 new lesions per child in the probiotic group compared with 1.75 lesions in the control group (P < 0.05). The probiotic group showed an increment of 0.58 ± 1.17 new lesions compared with 1.08 ± 1.70 new lesions observed in the control group. The difference in caries increment was significant at the cavitated lesion level (P < 0.01). In conclusion, the regular long-term intake of probiotic-supplemented milk may reduce caries development in high-caries preschool children (ClinicalTrials

  14. Comparative Effectiveness of Initial Antiretroviral Therapy Regimens: ACTG 5095 and 5142 Clinical Trials Relative to ART-CC Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Mugavero, Michael J.; May, Margaret; Ribaudo, Heather J.; Gulick, Roy M.; Riddler, Sharon A.; Haubrich, Richard; Napravnik, Sonia; Abgrall, Sophie; Phillips, Andrew; Harris, Ross; Gill, M. John; de Wolf, Frank; Hogg, Robert; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Chêne, Geneviève; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Guest, Jodie L.; Smith, Colette; Murillas, Javier; Berenguer, Juan; Wyen, Christoph; Domingo, Pere; Kitahata, Mari M.; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.; Saag, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Background The generalizability of antiretroviral therapy (ART) clinical trial efficacy findings to routine care settings is not well studied. We compared the relative effectiveness of initial ART regimens estimated in AIDS Clinical Trial Group (ACTG) randomized controlled trials with that among patients receiving ART at Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC) study sites. Methods Treatment-naive HIV-infected patients initiating identical ART regimens in ACTG trials (A5095 and A5142) and at 15 ART-CC cohort study sites were included. Virological failure (HIV-1 RNA >200 copies/ml) at 24- and 48-weeks, incident AIDS-defining events and mortality were measured according to study design (ART-CC cohort vs. ACTG trial) and stratified by 3rd drug [Abacavir (ABC), Efavirenz (EFV), and Lopinavir/r (LPV/r)]. We used logistic regression to estimate and compare odds ratios for virological failure between different regimens and study designs, and used Cox models to estimate and compare hazard ratios for AIDS and death. Results Compared with patients receiving ABC, those receiving EFV had roughly half the odds of 24-week virologic failure (>200 copies/mL) in both ACTG 5095 (OR=0.53, 95% CI 0.36–0.79) and ART-CC (0.46, 0.37–0.57). Virologic superiority of EFV (vs. ABC) appeared comparable in ART-CC and ACTG 5095 (ratio of ORs 0.86, 95% CI 0.54–1.35). Odds ratios for 48-week virologic failure, comparing EFV with LPV/r, were also comparable in ACTG 5142 and ART-CC (ratio of ORs 0.87, 0.45–1.69). Conclusions Between ART regimen virologic efficacy of 3rd drugs ABC, EFV, and LPV/r observed in the ACTG 5095 and 5142 trials appear generalizable to the routine care setting of ART-CC clinical cohorts. PMID:21857357

  15. INCITE: A randomised trial comparing constraint induced movement therapy and bimanual training in children with congenital hemiplegia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    sensation), activity limitations (upper limb unimanual capacity and bimanual motor coordination), participation restrictions (in home, school and recreation), environmental (barriers and facilitators to participation) and quality of life. Discussion This paper outlines the theoretical basis, study hypotheses and outcome measures for a matched pairs randomised trial comparing CIMT and BIM training to improve outcomes across the ICF. Trial Registration ACTRN12609000912280 PMID:20064275

  16. No antidepressant effect of biperiden compared with placebo in depression: a double-blind 6-week clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Gillin, J C; Lauriello, J; Kelsoe, J R; Rapaport, M; Golshan, S; Kenny, W M; Sutton, L

    1995-09-29

    Depression may result from an increased ratio of cholinergic to aminergic central neurotransmission. The effect of centrally active anticholinergic agents on depressive ratings in depressed patients, however, has not been well studied. In a previous open label 4-week clinical trial, Kasper et al. (1981) reported that biperiden (Akineton) had antidepressant effects in depressed patients. We compared the effects of placebo and biperiden in a randomized, double-blind, parallel-design 6-week study. All patients received placebo for the first week and then received either biperiden (< or = 12 mg/day) or a peripherally acting anticholinergic agent, glycopyrrolate (Robinul, 1 mg/day) for 4 weeks. All patients received placebo during week 6. Both groups significantly improved, but biperiden did not demonstrate any significant benefit compared with glycopyrrolate. In a subgroup of patients receiving biperiden, the percentage of rapid eye movement sleep was significantly decreased only in the first week of biperiden compared with the initial placebo week, suggesting that tolerance to the central effects of biperiden developed. Further studies would be needed to determine whether anticholinergic agents possess antidepressant properties.

  17. Trial Burn Activities for a Mixed Waste Incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Birk, M.B.

    1998-05-01

    The Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) is located on the Savannah River Site (SRS), owned by the U. S. Department of Energy and managed by BNFL, Inc. for the Westinghouse Savannah River Company. SRS received permits from the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) and the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region IV to construct and operate the CIF, a hazardous, radioactive mixed waste incinerator. This paper presents the results of the trial burn conducted on the CIF in April 1997 which is the initial demonstration of compliance with the permits. The incinerator is currently operating under approved post-trial burn conditions while the trial burn results are being evaluated. A final operating permit is expected the fall of 1998.

  18. The protocol for the Families First Edmonton trial (FFE): a randomized community-based trial to compare four service integration approaches for families with low-income

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    of their standardization, the presence of published norming data, and their utility as comparators to other studies of low-income families. As an effectiveness trial, community and government partners participated in all committees through a mutually agreed upon governance model and helped manage and problem solve with researchers. Discussion Modifications were made to the FFE trial based on the pragmatics of community-based trials. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00705328 PMID:24885729

  19. Ongoing activity in the optic tectum is correlated on a trial-by-trial basis with the pupil dilation response.

    PubMed

    Netser, Shai; Dutta, Arkadeb; Gutfreund, Yoram

    2014-03-01

    The selection of the appropriate stimulus to induce an orienting response is a basic task thought to be partly achieved by tectal circuitry. Here we addressed the relationship between neural activity in the optic tectum (OT) and orienting behavioral responses. We recorded multiunit activity in the intermediate/deep layers of the OT of the barn owl simultaneously with pupil dilation responses (PDR, a well-known orienting response common to birds and mammals). A trial-by-trial analysis of the responses revealed that the PDR generally did not correlate with the evoked neural responses but significantly correlated with the rate of ongoing neural activity measured shortly before the stimulus. Following this finding, we characterized ongoing activity in the OT and showed that in the intermediate/deep layers it tended to fluctuate spontaneously. It is characterized by short periods of high ongoing activity during which the probability of a PDR to an auditory stimulus inside the receptive field is increased. These high-ongoing activity periods were correlated with increase in the power of gamma band local field potential oscillations. Through dual recordings, we showed that the correlation coefficients of ongoing activity decreased as a function of distance between recording sites in the tectal map. Significant correlations were also found between recording sites in the OT and the forebrain entopallium. Our results suggest that an increase of ongoing activity in the OT reflects an internal state during which coupling between sensory stimulation and behavioral responses increases.

  20. Ongoing activity in the optic tectum is correlated on a trial-by-trial basis with the pupil dilation response.

    PubMed

    Netser, Shai; Dutta, Arkadeb; Gutfreund, Yoram

    2014-03-01

    The selection of the appropriate stimulus to induce an orienting response is a basic task thought to be partly achieved by tectal circuitry. Here we addressed the relationship between neural activity in the optic tectum (OT) and orienting behavioral responses. We recorded multiunit activity in the intermediate/deep layers of the OT of the barn owl simultaneously with pupil dilation responses (PDR, a well-known orienting response common to birds and mammals). A trial-by-trial analysis of the responses revealed that the PDR generally did not correlate with the evoked neural responses but significantly correlated with the rate of ongoing neural activity measured shortly before the stimulus. Following this finding, we characterized ongoing activity in the OT and showed that in the intermediate/deep layers it tended to fluctuate spontaneously. It is characterized by short periods of high ongoing activity during which the probability of a PDR to an auditory stimulus inside the receptive field is increased. These high-ongoing activity periods were correlated with increase in the power of gamma band local field potential oscillations. Through dual recordings, we showed that the correlation coefficients of ongoing activity decreased as a function of distance between recording sites in the tectal map. Significant correlations were also found between recording sites in the OT and the forebrain entopallium. Our results suggest that an increase of ongoing activity in the OT reflects an internal state during which coupling between sensory stimulation and behavioral responses increases. PMID:24304859

  1. Comparing the effect of clopidogrel versus ticagrelor on coronary microvascular dysfunction in acute coronary syndrome patients (TIME trial): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although prompt reperfusion treatment restores normal epicardial flow, microvascular dysfunction may persist in some patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Impaired myocardial perfusion is caused by intraluminal platelets, fibrin thrombi and neutrophil plugging; antiplatelet agents play a significant role in terms of protecting against thrombus microembolization. A novel antiplatelet agent, ticagrelor, is a non-thienopyridine, direct P2Y12 blocker that has shown greater, more rapid and more consistent platelet inhibition than clopidogrel. However, the effects of ticagrelor on the prevention of microvascular dysfunction are uncertain. The present study is a comparison between clopidogrel and ticagrelor use for preventing microvascular dysfunction in patients with ST elevation or non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI or NSTEMI, respectively). Methods/design The TIME trial is a single-center, randomized, open-label, parallel-arm study designed to demonstrate the superiority of ticagrelor over clopidogrel. A total of 152 patients with a spectrum of STEMI or NSTEMI will undergo prospective random assignment to clopidogrel or ticagrelor (1:1 ratio). The primary endpoint is an index of microcirculatory resistance (IMR) measured after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI); the secondary endpoint is wall motion score index assessed at 3 months by using echocardiography. Discussion The TIME trial is the first study designed to compare the protective effect of clopidogrel and ticagrelor on coronary microvascular dysfunction in patients with STEMI and NSTEMI. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02026219. Registration date: 24 December 2013. PMID:24885437

  2. Randomized trial comparing ceftriaxone with cefonicid for treatment of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Jiménez, J; Ribera, E; Gasser, I; Artaza, M A; Del Valle, O; Pahissa, A; Martínez-Vázquez, J M

    1993-01-01

    We compared cefonicid (2 g every 12 h) and ceftriaxone (2 g every 24 h) for their efficacy and safety in treating spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in cirrhotic patients in an open randomized clinical trial (30 patients in each group). Clinical, laboratory, and bacteriologic characteristics were similar in both groups. Ceftriaxone-susceptible strains were isolated on 44 occasions (94%), and cefonicid-susceptible strains were isolated on 43 occasions (91.5%). The antibiotic concentration in ascitic fluid/MIC ratio for ceftriaxone was > 100 throughout the dose interval (24 h), while it was lower for cefonicid (between 1 and 18). A total of 100% of patients treated with ceftriaxone, and 94% of those treated with cefonicid were cured of their infections (P was not significant). Hospitalization mortality was 37% in the cefonicid group and 30% in the ceftriaxone group (P was not significant). The time that elapsed between the initiation of treatment and the patient's death was shorter in the cefonicid group patients (5.3 +/- 3.90 days) than in the ceftriaxone group patients (11.8 +/- 9.15 days) (P < 0.05). None of the patients presented with superinfections, and only two patients treated with cefonicid and three patients treated with ceftriaxone developed colonizations with Enterococcus faecalis or Candida albicans. Ceftriaxone and cefonicid are safe and useful agents for treating cirrhotic spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, although the pharmacokinetic characteristics of ceftriaxone seem to be more advantageous than those of cefonicid. PMID:8215267

  3. Explaining feast or famine in randomized field trials. Medical science and criminology compared.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Jonathan P

    2003-06-01

    A feast of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in medical science and comparative famine in criminology can be explained in terms of cultural and structural factors. Of central importance is the context in which the evaluation of interventions is done and the difference in status of situational research in the two disciplines. Evaluation of medical interventions has traditionally been led by practitioner (clinical) academics. This is not the case in criminal justice, where theory has had higher status than intervention research. Medical science has advanced in, or closely associated with, university teaching hospitals, but links between criminology and criminal justice services are far more tenuous. The late development of situational crime prevention seems extraordinary from a medical perspective, as does the absence of university police schools in the United Kingdom and elsewhere. These structural and cultural factors explain concentration of expectation, resource, and RCT productivity in medical science. The Campbell Collaboration and the Academy of Experimental Criminology are forces which are reducing this polarization of feast and famine in RCTs. But unless scientific criminology is embedded in university schools which are responsible for the education and training of law, probation, and police practitioners, convergence in terms of RCTs and implementation of findings in practice seems unlikely.

  4. Comparative efficacy of aloe vera mouthwash and chlorhexidine on periodontal health: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Abhishek; Bhashyam, Mamtha

    2016-01-01

    Background With introduction of many herbal medicines, dentistry has recently evidenced shift of approach for treating many inflammatory oral diseases by using such modalities. Aloe vera is one such product exhibiting multiple benefits and has gained considerable importance in clinical research recently. Aim To compare the efficacy of Aloevera and Chlorhexidine mouthwash on Periodontal Health. Material and Methods Thirty days randomized controlled trial was conducted among 390 dental students. The students were randomized into two intervention groups namely Aloe Vera (AV) chlorhexidine group (CHX) and one control (placebo) group. Plaque index and gingival index was recorded for each participant at baseline, 15 days and 30 days. The findings were than statistically analyzed, ANOVA and Post Hoc test were used. Results There was significant reduction (p<0.05) in the mean scores of all the parameters with Aloe Vera (AV) and chlorhexidine group. Post hoc test showed significant difference (p<0.000) in mean plaque and gingival index scores of aloe Vera and placebo and chlorhexidine and placebo group. No significant difference (p<0.05) was observed between AloeVera and chlorhexidine group. Conclusions Being an herbal product AloeVera has shown equal effectiveness as Chlorhexidine. Hence can be used as an alternative product for curing and preventing gingivitis. Key words:Aloe vera, chlorhexidine, dental plaque, gingivitis. PMID:27703614

  5. Effect of Two Desensitizing Agents in Reducing Dentin Hypersensitivity: An in-vivo Comparative Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Torwane, Nilesh Arjun; Hongal, Sudhir; Goel, Pankaj; B.R, Chandrashekhar; Jain, Manish; Saxena, Eshani; Gouraha, Abhishek; Yadav, Sourabh

    2013-01-01

    Objective: A randomized, double blind, split mouth, controlled clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the effect of two desensitizing agents on reduction of Dentin Hypersensitivity (DH). Material and Methodology: A sample of 73 teeth from 13 patients, among which at least 3 teeth had dentin hypersensitivity, was randomly allocated into 3 treatment groups: Group A: treated with 30% ethenolic extract of Indian Propolis, Group B: treated with GC tooth mousse, and Group C: treated with sterile water. A Verbal Rating Scale (VRS) was used to record the degree of hypersensitivity, based on patient’s response to tactile and air blast stimuli. The baseline scores were obtained. Each intervention group received applications of their respective agents consecutively on 1st, 7th, 14th and 21st days. After each application, the scores were recorded. Results: Both the 30% Indian Propolis and GC tooth mousse showed significant reductions in dentin hypersensitivity. Conclusion: GC tooth mousse was found to be significantly better in reducing the dentinal hypersensitivity as compared to Propolis and sterile water (p< 0.01). PMID:24179939

  6. Tobacco Assessment in Actively Accruing National Cancer Institute Cooperative Group Program Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Erica N.; Torres, Essie; Toll, Benjamin A.; Cummings, K. Michael; Gritz, Ellen R.; Hyland, Andrew; Herbst, Roy S.; Marshall, James R.; Warren, Graham W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Substantial evidence suggests that tobacco use has adverse effects on cancer treatment outcomes; however, routine assessment of tobacco use has not been fully incorporated into standard clinical oncology practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate tobacco use assessment in patients enrolled onto actively accruing cancer clinical trials. Methods Protocols and forms for 155 actively accruing trials in the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Clinical Trials Cooperative Group Program were evaluated for tobacco use assessment at enrollment and follow-up by using a structured coding instrument. Results Of the 155 clinical trials reviewed, 45 (29%) assessed any form of tobacco use at enrollment, but only 34 (21.9%) assessed current cigarette use. Only seven trials (4.5%) assessed any form of tobacco use during follow-up. Secondhand smoke exposure was captured in 2.6% of trials at enrollment and 0.6% during follow-up. None of the trials assessed nicotine dependence or interest in quitting at any point during enrollment or treatment. Tobacco status assessment was higher in lung/head and neck trials as well as phase III trials, but there was no difference according to year of starting accrual or cooperative group. Conclusion Most actively accruing cooperative group clinical trials do not assess tobacco use, and there is no observable trend in improvement over the past 8 years. Failure to incorporate standardized tobacco assessments into NCI-funded Cooperative Group Clinical Trials will limit the ability to provide evidence-based cessation support and will limit the ability to accurately understand the precise effect of tobacco use on cancer treatment outcomes. PMID:22689794

  7. Activity Increase Despite Arthritis (AÏDA): design of a Phase II randomised controlled trial evaluating an active management booklet for hip and knee osteoarthritis [ISRCTN24554946

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Nefyn H; Amoakwa, Elvis; Burton, Kim; Hendry, Maggie; Belcher, John; Lewis, Ruth; Hood, Kerenza; Jones, Jeremy; Bennett, Paul; Edwards, Rhiannon T; Neal, Richard D; Andrew, Glynne; Wilkinson, Clare

    2009-01-01

    Background Hip and knee osteoarthritis is a common cause of pain and disability, which can be improved by exercise interventions. However, regular exercise is uncommon in this group because the low physical activity level in the general population is probably reduced even further by pain related fear of movement. The best method of encouraging increased activity in this patient group is not known. A booklet has been developed for patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis. It focuses on changing disadvantageous beliefs and encouraging increased physical activity. Methods/Design This paper describes the design of a Phase II randomised controlled trial (RCT) to test the effectiveness of this new booklet for patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis in influencing illness and treatment beliefs, and to assess the feasibility of conducting a larger definitive RCT in terms of health status and exercise behaviour. A computerised search of four general medical practice patients' record databases will identify patients older than 50 years of age who have consulted with hip or knee pain in the previous twelve months. A random sample of 120 will be invited to participate in the RCT comparing the new booklet with a control booklet, and we expect 100 to return final questionnaires. This trial will assess the feasibility of recruitment and randomisation, the suitability of the control intervention and outcome measurement tools, and will provide an estimate of effect size. Outcomes will include beliefs about hip and knee pain, beliefs about exercise, fear avoidance, level of physical activity, health status and health service costs. They will be measured at baseline, one month and three months. Discussion We discuss the merits of testing effectiveness in a phase II trial, in terms of intermediate outcome measures, whilst testing the processes for a larger definitive trial. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of testing the psychometric properties of the primary outcome

  8. Managed Activity Graded Exercise iN Teenagers and pre-Adolescents (MAGENTA) feasibility randomised controlled trial: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Brigden, Amberly; Beasant, Lucy; Hollingworth, William; Metcalfe, Chris; Gaunt, Daisy; Mills, Nicola; Jago, Russell; Crawley, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Paediatric chronic fatigue syndrome or myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) is a relatively common and disabling condition, yet there is a limited evidence base for treatment. There is good evidence that graded exercise therapy is moderately effective in adults with CFS/ME, but there is little evidence for the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, acceptability or best method of delivery for paediatric CFS/ME. This study aims to investigate the acceptability and feasibility of carrying out a multicentre randomised controlled trial investigating the effectiveness of graded exercise therapy compared with activity management for children/teenagers who are mildly or moderately affected with CFS/ME. Methods and analysis 100 paediatric patients (8–17 years) with CFS/ME will be recruited from 3 specialist UK National Health Service (NHS) CFS/ME services (Bath, Cambridge and Newcastle). Patients will be randomised (1:1) to receive either graded exercise therapy or activity management. Feasibility analysis will include the number of young people eligible, approached and consented to the trial; attrition rate and treatment adherence; questionnaire and accelerometer completion rates. Integrated qualitative methods will ascertain perceptions of feasibility and acceptability of recruitment, randomisation and the interventions. All adverse events will be monitored to assess the safety of the trial. Ethics and dissemination The trial has received ethical approval from the National Research Ethics Service (South West—Frenchay 15/SW/0124). Trial registration number ISRCTN23962803; Pre-results. PMID:27377634

  9. Smartphone-Supported versus Full Behavioural Activation for Depression: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Kien Hoa; Topooco, Naira; Cederlund, Hanna; Wallin, Anna; Bergström, Jan; Molander, Olof; Carlbring, Per; Andersson, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Background There is need for more cost and time effective treatments for depression. This is the first randomised controlled trial in which a blended treatment - including four face-to-face sessions and a smartphone application - was compared against a full behavioural treatment. Hence, the aim of the current paper was to examine whether a blended smartphone treatment was non-inferior to a full behavioural activation treatment for depression. Methods This was a randomised controlled non-inferiority trial (NCT01819025) comparing a blended treatment (n=46) against a full ten-session treatment (n=47) for people suffering from major depression. Primary outcome measure was the BDI-II, that was administered at pre- and post-treatment, as well as six months after the treatment. Results Results showed significant improvements in both groups across time on the primary outcome measure (within-group Cohen’s d=1.35; CI [−0.82, 3.52] to d=1.47; CI [−0.41, 3.35]; between group d=−0.13 CI [−2.37, 2.09] and d=−0.10 CI [−2.53, 2.33]). At the same time, the blended treatment reduced the therapist time with an average of 47%. Conclusions We could not establish whether the blended treatment was non-inferior to a full BA treatment. Nevertheless, this study points to that the blended treatment approach could possibly treat nearly twice as many patients suffering from depression by using a smartphone applica¬tion as add-on. More studies are needed before we can suggest that the blended treatment method is a promising cost-effective alternative to regular face-to-face treatment for depression. Trial Registration Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Treatment of Depression With Smartphone Support NCT01819025 PMID:26010890

  10. Further results from a trial comparing a hidden speed camera programme with visible camera operation.

    PubMed

    Keall, Michael D; Povey, Lynley J; Frith, William J

    2002-11-01

    As described in a previous paper [Accident Anal. Prev., 33 (2001) 277], the hidden camera programme was found to be associated with significant net falls in speeds, crashes and casualties both in 'speed camera areas' (specific signed sites to which camera operation is restricted) and on 100 km/h speed limit roads generally. These changes in speeds, crashes and casualties were identified in the trial area in comparison with a control area where generally highly visible speed camera enforcement continued to be used (and was used in the trial area prior to the commencement of the trial). There were initial changes in public attitudes associated with the trial that later largely reverted to pre-trial levels. Analysis of 2 years' data of the trial showed that falls in crash and casualty rates and speeds associated with the hidden camera programme were being sustained. It is not possible to separate out the effects of the concealment of the cameras from other aspects of the hidden speed camera programme, such as the four-fold increase in ticketing. This increase in speed camera tickets issued was an expected consequence of hiding the cameras and as such, an integral part of the hidden camera programme being evaluated.

  11. Comparing patients' and clinicians' assessment of outcomes in a randomised trial of sentinel node biopsy for breast cancer (the RACS SNAC trial).

    PubMed

    Smith, Michaella J; Gill, P Grantley; Wetzig, Neil; Sourjina, Tatiana; Gebski, Val; Ung, Owen; Campbell, Ian; Kollias, James; Coskinas, Xanthi; Macphee, Avis; Young, Leonie; Simes, R John; Stockler, Martin R

    2009-09-01

    The RACS sentinel node biopsy versus axillary clearance (SNAC) trial compared sentinel-node-based management (SNBM) and axillary lymph-node dissection (ALND) for breast cancer. In this sub study, we sought to determine whether patient ratings of arm swelling, symptoms, function and disability or clinicians' measurements were most efficient at detecting differences between randomized groups, and therefore, which of these outcome measures would minimise the required sample sizes in future clinical trials. 324 women randomised to SNBM and 319 randomised to ALND were included. The primary endpoint of the trial was percentage increase in arm volume calculated from clinicians' measurements of arm circumference at 10 cm intervals. Secondary endpoints included reductions in range of motion and sensation (both measured by clinicians); and, patients' ratings of arm swelling, symptoms and quality of life, using the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Breast Cancer Module (EORTC QLM-BR23), the body image after breast cancer questionnaire (BIBC) and the SNAC study specific scales (SSSS). The relative efficiency (RE, the squared ratio of the test statistics, with 95% confidence intervals calculated by bootstrapping) was used to compare these measures in detecting differences between the treatment groups. Patients' self-ratings of arm swelling were generally more efficient than clinicians' measurements of arm volume in detecting differences between treatment groups. The SSSS arm symptoms scale was the most efficient (RE = 7.1) The entire SSSS was slightly less so (RE = 4.6). Patients' ratings on single items were 3-5 times more efficient than clinicians' measurements. Primary endpoints based on patient-rated outcome measures could reduce the required sample size in future surgical trials.

  12. Examination of Individual Differences in Outcomes from a Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial Comparing Formal and Informal Individual Auditory Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sherri L.; Saunders, Gabrielle H.; Chisolm, Theresa H.; Frederick, Melissa; Bailey, Beth A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine if patient characteristics or clinical variables could predict who benefits from individual auditory training. Method: A retrospective series of analyses were performed using a data set from a large, multisite, randomized controlled clinical trial that compared the treatment effects of at-home…

  13. Couple and Individual Adjustment for 2 Years Following a Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Traditional versus Integrative Behavioral Couple Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Andrew; Atkins, David C.; Yi, Jean; Baucom, Donald H.; George, William H.

    2006-01-01

    Follow-up data across 2 years were obtained on 130 of 134 couples who were originally part of a randomized clinical trial comparing traditional versus integrative behavioral couple therapy (TBCT vs. IBCT; A. Christensen et al., 2004). Both treatments produced similar levels of clinically significant improvement at 2 years posttreatment (69% of…

  14. The Infant Feeding Activity and Nutrition Trial (INFANT) an early intervention to prevent childhood obesity: Cluster-randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Karen; Hesketh, Kylie; Crawford, David; Salmon, Jo; Ball, Kylie; McCallum, Zoë

    2008-01-01

    Background Multiple factors combine to support a compelling case for interventions that target the development of obesity-promoting behaviours (poor diet, low physical activity and high sedentary behaviour) from their inception. These factors include the rapidly increasing prevalence of fatness throughout childhood, the instigation of obesity-promoting behaviours in infancy, and the tracking of these behaviours from childhood through to adolescence and adulthood. The Infant Feeding Activity and Nutrition Trial (INFANT) aims to determine the effectiveness of an early childhood obesity prevention intervention delivered to first-time parents. The intervention, conducted with parents over the infant's first 18 months of life, will use existing social networks (first-time parent's groups) and an anticipatory guidance framework focusing on parenting skills which support the development of positive diet and physical activity behaviours, and reduced sedentary behaviours in infancy. Methods/Design This cluster-randomised controlled trial, with first-time parent groups as the unit of randomisation, will be conducted with a sample of 600 first-time parents and their newborn children who attend the first-time parents' group at Maternal and Child Health Centres. Using a two-stage sampling process, local government areas in Victoria, Australia will be randomly selected at the first stage. At the second stage, a proportional sample of first-time parent groups within selected local government areas will be randomly selected and invited to participate. Informed consent will be obtained and groups will then be randomly allocated to the intervention or control group. Discussion The early years hold promise as a time in which obesity prevention may be most effective. To our knowledge this will be the first randomised trial internationally to demonstrate whether an early health promotion program delivered to first-time parents in their existing social groups promotes healthy eating

  15. Maintained physical activity and physiotherapy in the management of distal upper limb pain – a protocol for a randomised controlled trial (the arm pain trial)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Distal upper limb pain (pain affecting the elbow, forearm, wrist, or hand) can be non-specific, or can arise from specific musculoskeletal disorders. It is clinically important and costly, the best approach to clinical management is unclear. Physiotherapy is the standard treatment and, while awaiting treatment, advice is often given to rest and avoid strenuous activities, but there is no evidence base to support these strategies. This paper describes the protocol of a randomised controlled trial to determine, among patients awaiting physiotherapy for distal arm pain, (a) whether advice to remain active and maintain usual activities results in a long-term reduction in arm pain and disability, compared with advice to rest; and (b) whether immediate physiotherapy results in a long-term reduction in arm pain and disability, compared with physiotherapy delivered after a seven week waiting list period. Methods/Design Between January 2012 and January 2014, new referrals to 14 out-patient physiotherapy departments were screened for potential eligibility. Eligible and consenting patients were randomly allocated to one of the following three groups in equal numbers: 1) advice to remain active, 2) advice to rest, 3) immediate physiotherapy. Patients were and followed up at 6, 13, and 26 weeks post-randomisation by self-complete postal questionnaire and, at six weeks, patients who had not received physiotherapy were offered it at this time. The primary outcome is the proportion of patients free of disability at 26 weeks, as determined by the modified DASH (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand) questionnaire. We hypothesise (a) that advice to maintain usual activities while awaiting physiotherapy will be superior than advice to rest the arm; and (b) that fast-track physiotherapy will be superior to normal (waiting list) physiotherapy. These hypotheses will be examined using an intention-to-treat analysis. Discussion Results from this trial will contribute to

  16. Comparative trial of rifampin-doxycycline versus tetracycline-streptomycin in the therapy of human brucellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Ariza, J; Gudiol, F; Pallarés, R; Rufí, G; Fernández-Viladrich, P

    1985-01-01

    In an attempt to compare the efficacy of rifampin-doxycycline with tetracycline-streptomycin for the treatment of human brucellosis, we administered both combinations for a 30-day period, similar to the period recommended by the World Health Organization in a prospective, randomized trial. Forty-six patients were included in the final study (36 men and 10 women); 41 had blood cultures positive for Brucella melitensis. The 28 patients in group A received tetracycline hydrochloride at doses of 0.5 g every 6 h or doxycycline at 100 mg every 12 h for 30 days plus 1 g of streptomycin a day for 21 days. The 18 patients in group B received rifampin at 15 mg/kg per day in a single morning dose plus 100 mg of doxycycline every 12 h for 30 days. For patients with focal disease from both groups, therapy was prolonged to 45 days. All patients underwent rigorous clinical and bacteriological long-term follow-up. There were no therapeutic failures in either group, and the defervescence period was similar for both groups (3.1 days for group A, 2.6 days for group B). Two patients (7.1%) from group A had relapses, as did seven (38.8%) from group B (P = 0.024), and blood cultures again became positive for B. melitensis in all of them. In both groups treatment was generally well tolerated. The results strongly suggest that the rifampin-doxycycline combination is a less efficacious mode of therapy for brucellosis to prevent relapses than is the classical tetracycline-streptomycin combination when both are administered for 30 days. A more prolonged period of administration of the rifampin-doxycycline combination may be required to obtain the same low relapse rate as that achieved with the classical tetracycline-streptomycin treatment. PMID:4073878

  17. Comparing nurses' knowledge retention following electronic continuous education and educational booklet: a controlled trial study

    PubMed Central

    Badiei, Mahmud; Gharib, Mitra; Zolfaghari, Mitra; Mojtahedzadeh, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Background: Training methods that enhance nurses’ learning and retention will increase the quality of patient care. This study aimed to compare the effectiveness of electronic learning and educational booklet on the nurses’ retention of diabetes updates. Methods: In this controlled trial study, convenience sampling was used to select 123 nurses from the endocrinology and internal medicine wards of three hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences (Tehran, Iran). The participants were allocated to three groups of manual, electronic learning, and control. The booklet and electronic learning groups were trained using educational booklet and electronic continuous medical education (CME) website, respectively. The control group did not receive any intervention. In all the three groups, the nurses' knowledge was measured before the intervention, and one and four weeks after the intervention. Data were collected by a questionnaire. Results: Significant differences were observed between the mean scores of the three groups one and four weeks after the intervention (F=26.17, p=0.001 and F=4.07, p=0.020, respectively), and post hoc test showed that this difference was due to the higher score in e-learning group. Both e-learning and booklet methods could effectively improve nurses' knowledge (χ²=23.03, p=0.001 and χ²=51.71, p=0.001, respectively). Conclusion: According to the results of this study, electronic learning was more effective than booklet in enhancing the learning and retention of knowledge. Electronic learning is suggested as a more suitable method as it provides appropriate interactions and attractive virtual environments to motivate the learners and promote retention. PMID:27493908

  18. Contura Multi-Lumen Balloon Breast Brachytherapy Catheter: Comparative Dosimetric Findings of a Phase 4 Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, Douglas W.; Vicini, Frank A.; Julian, Thomas B.; Cuttino, Laurie W.; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai D.

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Final dosimetric findings of a completed, multi-institutional phase 4 registry trial using the Contura Multi-Lumen Balloon (MLB) breast brachytherapy catheter to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in patients with early-stage breast cancer are presented. Methods and Materials: Three dosimetric plans with identical target coverage were generated for each patient for comparison: multilumen multidwell (MLMD); central-lumen multidwell (CLMD); and central-lumen single-dwell (CLSD) loading of the Contura catheter. For this study, a successful treatment plan achieved ideal dosimetric goals and included the following: ≥95% of the prescribed dose (PD) covering ≥95% of the target volume (TV); maximum skin dose ≤125% of the PD; maximum rib dose ≤145% of the PD; and V150 ≤50 cc and V200 ≤10 cc. Results: Between January 2008 and February 2011, 23 institutions participated. A total of 318 patients were available for dosimetric review. Using the Contura MLB, all dosimetric criteria were met in 78.93% of cases planned with MLMD versus 55.38% with the CLMD versus 37.66% with the CLSD (P≤.0001). Evaluating all patients with the full range of skin to balloon distance represented, median maximum skin dose was reduced by 12% and median maximum rib dose by 13.9% when using MLMD-based dosimetric plans compared to CLSD. The dosimetric benefit of MLMD was further demonstrated in the subgroup of patients where skin thickness was <5 mm, where MLMD use allowed a 38% reduction in median maximum skin dose over CLSD. For patients with rib distance <5 mm, the median maximum rib dose reduction was 27%. Conclusions: Use of the Contura MLB catheter produced statistically significant improvements in dosimetric capabilities between CLSD and CLMD treatments. This device approach demonstrates the ability not only to overcome the barriers of limited skin thickness and close rib proximity, but to consistently achieve a higher standard of dosimetric planning goals.

  19. Randomized Trial of a Smartphone Mobile Application Compared to Text Messaging to Support Smoking Cessation

    PubMed Central

    Borland, Ron; Bettinghaus, Erwin P.; Shane, James H.; Zimmerman, Donald E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Text messaging has successfully supported smoking cessation. This study compares a mobile application with text messaging to support smoking cessation. Materials and Methods: Young adult smokers 18–30 years old (n=102) participated in a randomized pretest–posttest trial. Smokers received a smartphone application (REQ-Mobile) with short messages and interactive tools or a text messaging system (onQ), managed by an expert system. Self-reported usability of REQ-Mobile and quitting behavior (quit attempts, point-prevalence, 30-day point-prevalence, and continued abstinence) were assessed in posttests. Results: Overall, 60% of smokers used mobile services (REQ-Mobile, 61%, mean of 128.5 messages received; onQ, 59%, mean of 107.8 messages), and 75% evaluated REQ-Mobile as user-friendly. A majority of smokers reported being abstinent at posttest (6 weeks, 53% of completers; 12 weeks, 66% of completers [44% of all cases]). Also, 37% (25%of all cases) reported 30-day point-prevalence abstinence, and 32% (22% of all cases) reported continuous abstinence at 12 weeks. OnQ produced more abstinence (p<0.05) than REQ-Mobile. Use of both services predicted increased 30-day abstinence at 12 weeks (used, 47%; not used, 20%; p=0.03). Conclusions: REQ-Mobile was feasible for delivering cessation support but appeared to not move smokers to quit as quickly as text messaging. Text messaging may work better because it is simple, well known, and delivered to a primary inbox. These advantages may disappear as smokers become more experienced with new handsets. Mobile phones may be promising delivery platforms for cessation services using either smartphone applications or text messaging. PMID:24350804

  20. Comparative Efficacy of Oil Pulling and Chlorhexidine on Oral Malodor: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Devi M, Aruna; Narang, Ridhi; V, Swathi; Makkar, Diljot Kaur

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oral malodor affects a large section of population. Traditional Indian folk remedy, oil pulling not only reduces it but can also bring down the cost of treatment. Aims: To compare the efficacy of oil pulling and chlorhexidine in reducing oral malodor and microbes. Materials and Methods: Three week randomized controlled trial was conducted among 60 students of three hostels of Maharani College of science and arts and commerce and Smt V.H.D.College of Home Science. The hostels were randomized into two intervention groups namely chlorhexidine group, sesame oil and one control (placebo) group. Twenty girls were selected from each hostel based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. Informed consent was obtained. The parameters recorded at the baseline (day 0) and post intervention on day 22 were plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), objective (ORG1) and subjective (ORG2) organoleptic scores and anaerobic bacterial colony (ABC) count. Intra and inter group comparisons were made using Kruskal Wallis test, Wilcoxan sign rank test, ANOVA and student t-test. Results: There was significant reduction (p<0.05) in the mean scores of all the parameters within sesame oil and chlorhexidine group. Among the groups significant difference was observed in objective and subjective organoleptic scores. Post hoc test showed significant difference (p<0.000) in mean organoleptic scores of sesame oil and placebo and chlorhexidine and placebo group. No significant difference (p<0.05) was observed between sesame oil and chlorhexidine group. Conclusion: Oil pulling with sesame oil is equally efficacious as chlorhexidine in reducing oral malodor and microbes causing it. It should be promoted as a preventive home care therapy. PMID:25584309

  1. The INCH-Trial: a multicentre randomized controlled trial comparing the efficacy of conventional open surgery and laparoscopic surgery for incisional hernia repair

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Annually approximately 100.000 patients undergo a laparotomy in the Netherlands. About 15,000 of these patients will develop an incisional hernia. Both open and laparoscopic surgical repair have been proven to be safe. However, the most effective treatment of incisional hernias remains unclear. This study, the ‘INCH-trial’, comparing cost-effectiveness of open and laparoscopic incisional hernia repair, is therefore needed. Methods/Design A randomized multi-center clinical trial comparing cost-effectiveness of open and laparoscopic repair of incisional hernias. Patients with a symptomatic incisional hernia, eligible for laparoscopic and open incisional hernia repair. Only surgeons, experienced in both open and laparoscopic incisional hernia repair, will participate in the INCH trial. During incisional hernia repair, a mesh is placed under or on top of the fascia, with a minimal overlap of 5 cm. Primary endpoint is length of hospital stay after an incisional hernia repair. Secondary endpoints are time to full recovery within three months after index surgery, post-operative complications, recurrences, mortality and quality of life. Our hypothesis is that laparoscopic incisional hernia repair comes with a significant shorter hospital stay compared to open incisional hernia repair. A difference of two days is considered significant. One-hunderd-and-thirty-five patients are enrolled in each treatment arm. The economic evaluation will be performed from a societal perspective. Primary outcomes are costs per patient related to time-to-recovery and quality of life. The main goal of the trial is to establish whether laparoscopic incisional hernia repair is superior to conventional open incisional hernia repair in terms of cost-effectiveness. This is measured through length of hospital stay and quality of life. Secondary endpoints are re-operation rate due to post-operative complications or recurrences, mortality and quality of life. Discussion The difference

  2. A Randomized Trial to Compare Surgical and Medical Treatments for Type 2 Diabetes: The Triabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Courcoulas, Anita P.; Goodpaster, Bret H.; Eagleton, Jessie K; Belle, Steven H.; Kalarchian, Melissa A.; Lang, Wei; Toledo, Frederico G. S.; Jakicic, John M.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Address unanswered questions about the role of bariatric surgery for people with diabetes. OBJECTIVE Determine feasibility of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) and compare initial outcomes of bariatric surgery and a structured weight loss program for treating type 2 diabetes mellitus in grade 1 and 2 obese participants. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS A 12-month, 3-arm RCT at a single center including 69 participants age 25–55 years, BMI 30–40 with type 2 diabetes. INTERVENTIONS Two surgical procedures; Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), laparoscopic adjustable gastric band (LAGB) and an intensive lifestyle weight loss intervention (LWLI). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Primary outcomes in the intention to treat (ITT) cohort were feasibility and effectiveness measured by weight loss and improvements in glycemic control. RESULTS 667 potential participants were screened of whom 69 (10.3%) were randomized, 30 (43.5%) with grade 1 obesity. Mean age was 47.3±6.4 years, 81% were women, and mean glycated hemoglobin was 7.9±2.0. After randomization, 7 (10%) participants refused to undergo their allocated intervention (3 RYGB, 1 LAGB, 3 LWLI) and 1 RYGB was excluded for current smoking. Twenty subjects underwent RYGB, 21 LAGB, and 20 LWLI with retention at 12 months of 90%, 86%, and 70%, respectively. In the ITT cohort with multiple imputation for missing data, RYGB participants had the greatest weight loss compared to LAGB and LWLI with average weight loss of 27%, 17%, 10% from baseline, respectively (p<.0001). Partial/complete remission of diabetes was 50%/17% in RYGB, 27%/23% in LAGB and 0%/0% in LWLI (p=.0005/.047, partial/complete) and there were significant reductions in medication usage in both surgical groups. There were no deaths and 3 serious adverse events; 1 RYGB ulcer was treated medically and 2 LAGB were re-hospitalized for dehydration. CONCLUSIONS This study highlights several potential challenges to successfully completing a larger RCT for

  3. Nurse Family Partnership: Comparing Costs per Family in Randomized Trials Versus Scale-Up.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ted R; Hendrie, Delia

    2015-12-01

    The literature that addresses cost differences between randomized trials and full-scale replications is quite sparse. This paper examines how costs differed among three randomized trials and six statewide scale-ups of nurse family partnership (NFP) intensive home visitation to low income first-time mothers. A literature review provided data on pertinent trials. At our request, six well-established programs reported their total expenditures. We adjusted the costs to national prices based on mean hourly wages for registered nurses and then inflated them to 2010 dollars. A centralized data system provided utilization. Replications had fewer home visits per family than trials (25 vs. 31, p = .05), lower costs per client ($8860 vs. $12,398, p = .01), and lower costs per visit ($354 vs. $400, p = .30). Sample size limited the significance of these differences. In this type of labor intensive program, costs probably were lower in scale-up than in randomized trials. Key cost drivers were attrition and the stable caseload size possible in an ongoing program. Our estimates reveal a wide variation in cost per visit across six state programs, which suggests that those planning replications should not expect a simple rule to guide cost estimations for scale-ups. Nevertheless, NFP replications probably achieved some economies of scale.

  4. Nurse Family Partnership: Comparing Costs per Family in Randomized Trials Versus Scale-Up.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ted R; Hendrie, Delia

    2015-12-01

    The literature that addresses cost differences between randomized trials and full-scale replications is quite sparse. This paper examines how costs differed among three randomized trials and six statewide scale-ups of nurse family partnership (NFP) intensive home visitation to low income first-time mothers. A literature review provided data on pertinent trials. At our request, six well-established programs reported their total expenditures. We adjusted the costs to national prices based on mean hourly wages for registered nurses and then inflated them to 2010 dollars. A centralized data system provided utilization. Replications had fewer home visits per family than trials (25 vs. 31, p = .05), lower costs per client ($8860 vs. $12,398, p = .01), and lower costs per visit ($354 vs. $400, p = .30). Sample size limited the significance of these differences. In this type of labor intensive program, costs probably were lower in scale-up than in randomized trials. Key cost drivers were attrition and the stable caseload size possible in an ongoing program. Our estimates reveal a wide variation in cost per visit across six state programs, which suggests that those planning replications should not expect a simple rule to guide cost estimations for scale-ups. Nevertheless, NFP replications probably achieved some economies of scale. PMID:26507844

  5. Comparing ICD9-encoded diagnoses and NLP-processed discharge summaries for clinical trials pre-screening: a case study.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Chase, Herbert S; Patel, Chintan O; Friedman, Carol; Weng, Chunhua

    2008-11-06

    The prevalence of electronic medical record (EMR) systems has made mass-screening for clinical trials viable through secondary uses of clinical data, which often exist in both structured and free text formats. The tradeoffs of using information in either data format for clinical trials screening are understudied. This paper compares the results of clinical trial eligibility queries over ICD9-encoded diagnoses and NLP-processed textual discharge summaries. The strengths and weaknesses of both data sources are summarized along the following dimensions: information completeness, expressiveness, code granularity, and accuracy of temporal information. We conclude that NLP-processed patient reports supplement important information for eligibility screening and should be used in combination with structured data.

  6. Behavioural activation: a pilot trial of transdiagnostic treatment for excessive worry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junwen; Liu, Xi; Rapee, Ronald M; Pillay, Pallavi

    2013-09-01

    Transdiagnostic interventions present pragmatic benefits in treatment dissemination and training of mental health professionals when faced with emotional disorders such as anxiety and depression. Excessive worry is a common feature across emotional disorders and represents an ideal candidate target for transdiagnostic intervention. The current pilot trial examined the efficacy of a behavioural activation treatment for worry (BAW) in a community population. 49 individuals experiencing excessive worry were randomised to waitlist or BAW receiving an 8 week group based intervention. Results demonstrated that BAW was successful in reducing excessive worry, depressive symptoms, cognitive avoidance, Intolerance of Uncertainty and improving problem solving orientation. Twice as many individuals showed clinically significant reductions in excessive worry after treatment compared to the waitlist control. Despite limitations to sample size and power, this study presents promising support for BAW as a practical transdiagnostic treatment for worry.

  7. Publication Bias in Antipsychotic Trials: An Analysis of Efficacy Comparing the Published Literature to the US Food and Drug Administration Database

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Erick H.; Knoepflmacher, Daniel; Shapley, Lee

    2012-01-01

    Background Publication bias compromises the validity of evidence-based medicine, yet a growing body of research shows that this problem is widespread. Efficacy data from drug regulatory agencies, e.g., the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), can serve as a benchmark or control against which data in journal articles can be checked. Thus one may determine whether publication bias is present and quantify the extent to which it inflates apparent drug efficacy. Methods and Findings FDA Drug Approval Packages for eight second-generation antipsychotics—aripiprazole, iloperidone, olanzapine, paliperidone, quetiapine, risperidone, risperidone long-acting injection (risperidone LAI), and ziprasidone—were used to identify a cohort of 24 FDA-registered premarketing trials. The results of these trials according to the FDA were compared with the results conveyed in corresponding journal articles. The relationship between study outcome and publication status was examined, and effect sizes derived from the two data sources were compared. Among the 24 FDA-registered trials, four (17%) were unpublished. Of these, three failed to show that the study drug had a statistical advantage over placebo, and one showed the study drug was statistically inferior to the active comparator. Among the 20 published trials, the five that were not positive, according to the FDA, showed some evidence of outcome reporting bias. However, the association between trial outcome and publication status did not reach statistical significance. Further, the apparent increase in the effect size point estimate due to publication bias was modest (8%) and not statistically significant. On the other hand, the effect size for unpublished trials (0.23, 95% confidence interval 0.07 to 0.39) was less than half that for the published trials (0.47, 95% confidence interval 0.40 to 0.54), a difference that was significant. Conclusions The magnitude of publication bias found for antipsychotics was less than that found

  8. Enhancing Cognitive Abilities with Comprehensive Training: A Large, Online, Randomized, Active-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Joseph L.; Nelson, Rolf A.; Thomason, Moriah E.; Sternberg, Daniel A.; Katovich, Kiefer; Farzin, Faraz; Scanlon, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background A variety of studies have demonstrated gains in cognitive ability following cognitive training interventions. However, other studies have not shown such gains, and questions remain regarding the efficacy of specific cognitive training interventions. Cognitive training research often involves programs made up of just one or a few exercises, targeting limited and specific cognitive endpoints. In addition, cognitive training studies typically involve small samples that may be insufficient for reliable measurement of change. Other studies have utilized training periods that were too short to generate reliable gains in cognitive performance. Methods The present study evaluated an online cognitive training program comprised of 49 exercises targeting a variety of cognitive capacities. The cognitive training program was compared to an active control condition in which participants completed crossword puzzles. All participants were recruited, trained, and tested online (N = 4,715 fully evaluable participants). Participants in both groups were instructed to complete one approximately 15-minute session at least 5 days per week for 10 weeks. Results Participants randomly assigned to the treatment group improved significantly more on the primary outcome measure, an aggregate measure of neuropsychological performance, than did the active control group (Cohen’s d effect size = 0.255; 95% confidence interval = [0.198, 0.312]). Treatment participants showed greater improvements than controls on speed of processing, short-term memory, working memory, problem solving, and fluid reasoning assessments. Participants in the treatment group also showed greater improvements on self-reported measures of cognitive functioning, particularly on those items related to concentration compared to the control group (Cohen’s d = 0.249; 95% confidence interval = [0.191, 0.306]). Conclusion Taken together, these results indicate that a varied training program composed of a number of

  9. Imipenem and meropenem: Comparison of in vitro activity, pharmacokinetics, clinical trials and adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Zhanel, George G; Simor, Andrew E; Vercaigne, Lavern; Mandell, Lionell

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare and contrast imipenem and meropenem in terms of in vitro activity, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy and adverse effects. DATA SELECTION: MEDLINE search from 1975 to 1997 and follow-up of references. DATA EXTRACTION: Clinical trials comparing imipenem with meropenem, or either imipenem or meropenem with standard therapy in the treatment of serious infections were selected. DATA SYNTHESIS: Imipenem, the first carbapenem, was first marketed in 1987; meropenem was introduced to the market in 1996. In general, imipenem is more active against Gram-positive cocci while meropenem is more active against Gram-negative bacilli. The agents display similar pharmacokinetics. Clinical studies in patients with serious infections (intra-abdominal infection, respiratory infection, septicemia, febrile neutropenia) report similar bacteriological and clinical cure rates with imipenem and meropenem. Meropenem is approved for the treatment of bacterial meningitis, whereas imipenem is not. Adverse effects are similar. CONCLUSIONS: Current literature supports the use of imipenem at a dose of 500 mg every 6 h and meropenem at 1 g every 8 h for the treatment of severe infections. For the treatment of serious infections, imipenem (500 mg every 6 h or 2 g/day [$98/day]) is more economical than meropenem (1 g every 8 h or 3 g/day [$142/day]) based on acquisition cost. PMID:22346545

  10. Monotherapy with Levetiracetam Versus Older AEDs: A Randomized Comparative Trial of Effects on Bone Health.

    PubMed

    Hakami, Tahir; O'Brien, Terence J; Petty, Sandra J; Sakellarides, Mary; Christie, Jemma; Kantor, Susan; Todaro, Marian; Gorelik, Alexandra; Seibel, Markus J; Yerra, Raju; Wark, John D

    2016-06-01

    Long-term anti-epileptic drug (AED) therapy is associated with increased fracture risk. This study tested whether substituting the newer AED levetiracetam has less adverse effects on bone than older AEDs. An open-label randomized comparative trial. Participants had "failed" initial monotherapy for partial epilepsy and were randomized to substitution monotherapy with levetiracetam or an older AED (carbamazepine or valproate sodium). Bone health assessments, performed at 3 and 15 months, included areal bone mineral density (aBMD) and content at lumbar spine (LS), total hip (TH), forearm (FA), and femoral neck (FN), radial and tibial peripheral quantitative computed tomography and serum bone turnover markers. Main outcomes were changes by treatment group in aBMD at LS, TH, and FA, radial and tibial trabecular BMD and cortical thickness. 70/84 patients completed assessments (40 in levetiracetam- and 30 in older AED group). Within-group analyses showed decreases in both groups in LS (-9.0 %; p < 0.001 in levetiracetam vs. -9.8 %; p < 0.001 in older AED group), FA (-1.46 %; p < 0.001 vs. -0.96 %; p < 0.001, respectively) and radial trabecular BMD (-1.46 %; p = 0.048 and -2.31 %; p = 0.013, respectively). C-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen (βCTX; bone resorption marker) decreased in both groups (-16.1 %; p = 0.021 vs. -15.2 %; p = 0.028, respectively) whereas procollagen Ι N-terminal peptide (PΙNP; bone formation marker) decreased in older AED group (-27.3 %; p = 0.008). The treatment groups did not differ in any of these measures. In conclusion, use of both levetiracetam and older AEDs was associated with bone loss over 1 year at clinically relevant fracture sites and a reduction in bone turnover. PMID:26842957

  11. Explaining Feast or Famine in Randomized Field Trials: Medical Science and Criminology Compared.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepherd, Jonathan P.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the contrast between the frequency of randomized clinical trials in the health sciences and the relative famine of such studies in criminology. Attributes this difference to the contexts in which research is done and the difference in the status of situational research in the two disciplines. (SLD)

  12. "Right from the Start": Randomized Trial Comparing an Attachment Group Intervention to Supportive Home Visiting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niccols, Alison

    2008-01-01

    Background: Infant attachment security is a protective factor for future mental health, and may be promoted by individual interventions. Given service demands, it is important to determine if a group-based intervention for parents could be used to enhance infant attachment security. Methods: In a randomized trial involving 76 mothers, an 8-session…

  13. Comparing the Effects of Multisensory Stimulation and Individualized Music Sessions on Elderly People with Severe Dementia: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Alba; Maseda, Ana; Marante-Moar, M Pilar; de Labra, Carmen; Lorenzo-López, Laura; Millán-Calenti, José Carlos

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of a multisensory stimulation environment (MSSE) and individualized music sessions on agitation, emotional and cognitive status, and dementia severity in a sample of institutionalized patients with severe dementia. Twenty-two participants with a diagnosis of severe or very severe dementia were randomly assigned to two groups: MSSE and individualized music sessions. Both groups participated in two 30-min weekly sessions over 16 weeks. Outcomes were agitation (Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory, CMAI), mood (Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia, CSDD), anxiety (Rating Anxiety in Dementia, RAID), cognitive function (Severe Mini-Mental State Examination, SMMSE), and the overall severity of dementia (Bedford Alzheimer Nursing Severity Scale, BANS-S). They were assessed at baseline (pre-trial), in the middle (mid-trial), at the end of the intervention (post-trial), and 8 weeks after the intervention (follow-up). Patients in the MSSE group showed significant improvement in their RAID and BANS-S scores compared with the individualized music group post- versus pre-trial. With regard to agitation, there was improvement during the intervention in both the MSSE and individualized music groups in the CMAI total score after 16 weeks of intervention, with no significant differences between the groups. The results suggest that MSSE could have better effects on anxiety symptoms and dementia severity in comparison with individualized music sessions in elderly patients with severe dementia.

  14. Do Bayesian adaptive trials offer advantages for comparative effectiveness research? Protocol for the RE-ADAPT study

    PubMed Central

    Luce, Bryan R; Broglio, Kristine R; Ishak, K Jack; Mullins, C Daniel; Vanness, David J; Fleurence, Rachael; Saunders, Elijah; Davis, Barry R

    2013-01-01

    Background Randomized clinical trials, particularly for comparative effectiveness research (CER), are frequently criticized for being overly restrictive or untimely for health-care decision making. Purpose Our prospectively designed REsearch in ADAptive methods for Pragmatic Trials (RE-ADAPT) study is a ‘proof of concept’ to stimulate investment in Bayesian adaptive designs for future CER trials. Methods We will assess whether Bayesian adaptive designs offer potential efficiencies in CER by simulating a re-execution of the Antihypertensive and Lipid Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT) study using actual data from ALLHAT. Results We prospectively define seven alternate designs consisting of various combinations of arm dropping, adaptive randomization, and early stopping and describe how these designs will be compared to the original ALLHAT design. We identify the one particular design that would have been executed, which incorporates early stopping and information-based adaptive randomization. Limitations While the simulation realistically emulates patient enrollment, interim analyses, and adaptive changes to design, it cannot incorporate key features like the involvement of data monitoring committee in making decisions about adaptive changes. Conclusion This article describes our analytic approach for RE-ADAPT. The next stage of the project is to conduct the re-execution analyses using the seven prespecified designs and the original ALLHAT data. PMID:23983160

  15. Promoting Physical Activity in Middle School Girls: Trial of Activity for Adolescent Girls

    PubMed Central

    Webber, Larry S.; Catellier, Diane J.; Lytle, Leslie A.; Murray, David M.; Pratt, Charlotte A.; Young, Deborah R.; Elder, John P.; Lohman, Timothy G.; Stevens, June; Jobe, Jared B.; Pate, Russell R.

    2008-01-01

    Background Physical activity is important for weight control and good health; however, activity levels decline in the adolescent years, particularly in girls. Design Group randomized controlled trial Setting/participants Middle school girls with English-speaking skills and no conditions to prevent participation in physical activity in 36 schools in six geographically diverse areas of the United States. Random, cross-sectional samples were drawn within schools: 6th graders in 2003 (n=1721) and 8th graders in 2005 (n=3504) and 2006 (n=3502). Intervention A 2-year study-directed intervention (fall 2003 to spring 2005) targeted schools, community agencies, and girls to increase opportunities, support, and incentives for increased physical activity. Components included programs linking schools and community agencies, physical education, health education, and social marketing. A third-year intervention used school and community personnel to direct intervention activities. Main outcome measures The primary outcome, daily MET-weighted minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MET-weighted MVPA), was assessed using accelerometry. Percent body fat was assessed using anthropometry. Results After the staff-directed intervention (pre-stated primary outcome), there were no differences (mean= −0.4, 95% CI= CI= −8.2 to 7.4) in adjusted MET-weighted MVPA between 8th-grade girls in schools assigned to intervention or control. Following the Program Champion–directed intervention, girls in intervention schools were more physically active than girls in control schools (mean difference 10.9 MET-weighted minutes of MVPA, 95% CI=0.52–21.2). This difference is about 1.6 minutes of daily MVPA or 80 kcal per week. There were no differences in fitness or percent body fat at either 8th-grade timepoint. Conclusion A school-based, community-linked intervention modestly improved physical activity in girls. PMID:18312804

  16. Comparative Study of Outcome Measures and Analysis Methods for Traumatic Brain Injury Trials

    PubMed Central

    Alali, Aziz S.; Vavrek, Darcy; Barber, Jason; Dikmen, Sureyya; Nathens, Avery B.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Batteries of functional and cognitive measures have been proposed as alternatives to the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE) as the primary outcome for traumatic brain injury (TBI) trials. We evaluated several approaches to analyzing GOSE and a battery of four functional and cognitive measures. Using data from a randomized trial, we created a “super” dataset of 16,550 subjects from patients with complete data (n=331) and then simulated multiple treatment effects across multiple outcome measures. Patients were sampled with replacement (bootstrapping) to generate 10,000 samples for each treatment effect (n=400 patients/group). The percentage of samples where the null hypothesis was rejected estimates the power. All analytic techniques had appropriate rates of type I error (≤5%). Accounting for baseline prognosis either by using sliding dichotomy for GOSE or using regression-based methods substantially increased the power over the corresponding analysis without accounting for prognosis. Analyzing GOSE using multivariate proportional odds regression or analyzing the four-outcome battery with regression-based adjustments had the highest power, assuming equal treatment effect across all components. Analyzing GOSE using a fixed dichotomy provided the lowest power for both unadjusted and regression-adjusted analyses. We assumed an equal treatment effect for all measures. This may not be true in an actual clinical trial. Accounting for baseline prognosis is critical to attaining high power in Phase III TBI trials. The choice of primary outcome for future trials should be guided by power, the domain of brain function that an intervention is likely to impact, and the feasibility of collecting outcome data. PMID:25317951

  17. Feedback about more accurate versus less accurate trials: differential effects on self-confidence and activation.

    PubMed

    Badami, Rokhsareh; VaezMousavi, Mohammad; Wulf, Gabriele; Namazizadeh, Mahdi

    2012-06-01

    One purpose of the present study was to examine whether self-confidence or anxiety would be differentially affected byfeedback from more accurate rather than less accurate trials. The second purpose was to determine whether arousal variations (activation) would predict performance. On day 1, participants performed a golf putting task under one of two conditions: one group received feedback on the most accurate trials, whereas another group received feedback on the least accurate trials. On day 2, participants completed an anxiety questionnaire and performed a retention test. Shin conductance level, as a measure of arousal, was determined. The results indicated that feedback about more accurate trials resulted in more effective learning as well as increased self-confidence. Also, activation was a predictor of performance. PMID:22808705

  18. Launching a Novel Preclinical Infrastructure: Comparative Oncology Trials Consortium Directed Therapeutic Targeting of TNFα to Cancer Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Mazcko, Christina; Hanna, Engy; Kachala, Stefan; LeBlanc, Amy; Newman, Shelley; Vail, David; Henry, Carolyn; Thamm, Douglas; Sorenmo, Karin; Hajitou, Amin; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2009-01-01

    Background Under the direction and sponsorship of the National Cancer Institute, we report on the first pre-clinical trial of the Comparative Oncology Trials Consortium (COTC). The COTC is a novel infrastructure to integrate cancers that naturally develop in pet dogs into the development path of new human drugs. Trials are designed to address questions challenging in conventional preclinical models and early phase human trials. Large animal spontaneous cancer models can be a valuable addition to successful studies of cancer biology and novel therapeutic drug, imaging and device development. Methodology/Principal Findings Through this established infrastructure, the first trial of the COTC (COTC001) evaluated a targeted AAV-phage vector delivering tumor necrosis factor (RGD-A-TNF) to αV integrins on tumor endothelium. Trial progress and data was reviewed contemporaneously using a web-enabled electronic reporting system developed for the consortium. Dose-escalation in cohorts of 3 dogs (n = 24) determined an optimal safe dose (5×1012 transducing units intravenous) of RGD-A-TNF. This demonstrated selective targeting of tumor-associated vasculature and sparing of normal tissues assessed via serial biopsy of both tumor and normal tissue. Repetitive dosing in a cohort of 14 dogs, at the defined optimal dose, was well tolerated and led to objective tumor regression in two dogs (14%), stable disease in six (43%), and disease progression in six (43%) via Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST). Conclusions/Significance The first study of the COTC has demonstrated the utility and efficiency of the established infrastructure to inform the development of new cancer drugs within large animal naturally occurring cancer models. The preclinical evaluation of RGD-A-TNF within this network provided valuable and necessary data to complete the design of first-in-man studies. PMID:19330034

  19. Activities of Tannins--From In Vitro Studies to Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Sieniawska, Elwira

    2015-11-01

    Tannins are considered as valuable plant secondary metabolites providing many benefits for human health. In this review information was gathered about bioactivity in vitro and in vivo, as well as about conducted clinical trials. The literature research was based on ScienceDirect, Scopus, and Cochrane databases and presents a wide range of tested activities of tannins. The described clinical trials verify laboratory tests and show the effective health benefits taken from supplementation with tannins.

  20. A Meta-analysis of Randomized Trials Comparing Surgery versus Endovascular Therapy for Thrombosed Arteriovenous Fistulas and Grafts in Hemodialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhan, G. Antoniou, G. A.; Nikam, M.; Mitra, S.; Farquharson, F.; Brittenden, J.; Chalmers, N.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To carry out a systematic review of randomized trials comparing surgery vs. endovascular therapy for occluded fistulas and grafts. Methods. All randomized trials which compared surgery and endovascular therapy for occluded fistulas and grafts were retrieved from 1990 onwards. The following search terms were used: 'haemodialysis,' 'thrombosis,' 'arteriovenous fistula,' 'arteriovenous shunt,' 'end stage renal failure' on Medline and PubMed. The results of the pooled data were analysed by a fixed-effect model. Results. There were no randomized trials comparing surgery vs. endovascular therapy for native fistulas and vein grafts. Six randomized studies reporting on 573 occluded grafts were identified. Technical success, need for access line and primary patency at 30 days were similar between the two groups (odds ratio [OR] 1.40, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.91-2.14; OR 0.77, 95 % CI 0.44-1.34; and OR 1.15, 95 % CI 0.79-1.68, respectively). There was no significant difference in morbidity at 30 days between groups (OR 1.12, 95 % CI 0.67-1.86). There were no statistical difference between the two groups for 1 year primary patency (OR 2.08, 95 % CI 0.97-4.45). Primary assisted patency at 1 year was better with surgery (OR 3.03, 95 % CI 1.12-8.18) in a single study. Conclusion. Comparable results to surgery have been achieved with endovascular techniques for occluded prosthetic grafts for dialysis access. Long-term data comparing the two groups were lacking. Further trials designed to encompass variation in methods are warranted in order to obtain the best available evidence particularly for native fistulas.

  1. Clinical Trial of Tailored Activity and Eating Newsletters with Older Rural Women

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Susan Noble; Pullen, Carol H.; Boeckner, Linda; Hageman, Patricia A.; Hertzog, Melody; Oberdorfer, Maureen K.; Rutledge, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Unhealthy diet and lack of physical activity increase rural midlife and older women’s risk for chronic diseases and premature death, and they are behind urban residents in meeting Healthy People 2010 objectives. Objectives To compare a tailored intervention based on the Health Promotion Model (HPM) and a generic intervention to increase physical activity and healthy eating among rural women. Methods In a randomized by site community-based controlled clinical trial, Wellness for Women, 225 women aged 50 to 69 years were recruited in two similar rural areas. Over 12 months, women received by mail either 18 generic newsletters or 18 newsletters computer-tailored on HPM behavior-specific cognitions (benefits, barriers, self-efficacy, and interpersonal support), activity, and eating. Outcomes at 6 and 12 months included behavioral markers and biomarkers of physical activity and eating. Data were analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA and χ2 tests (α < .05). Results Both groups significantly increased stretching and strengthening exercise and fruit and vegetable servings and decreased % calories from fat, while only the tailored group increased ≥ moderate intensity activity and decreased % calories from saturated fat from baseline to 6 months. Both groups increased stretching and strengthening exercise, while only the tailored group increased ≥ moderate activity and fruit and vegetable servings and decreased % calories from fat from baseline to 12 months. Both groups had several changes in biomarkers over the study. A higher proportion of women receiving tailored newsletters met Healthy People 2010 criteria for ≥ moderate activity, fruit and vegetable servings, and % calories from fat at 12 months. Discussion Mailed computer-tailored and generic print newsletters facilitated the adoption of change in both activity and eating over 6 months. Tailored newsletters were more efficacious in facilitating change over 12 months. PMID:19289928

  2. Linagliptin monotherapy compared with voglibose monotherapy in patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing hemodialysis: a 12-week randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Katsuhito; Emoto, Masanori; Shoji, Tetsuo; Inaba, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    Objective Focusing on efficacy and tolerability, we compared linagliptin monotherapy with voglibose monotherapy in patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing hemodialysis (HD). Research design and methods In this multicenter, randomized, open-label, parallel-group, active-controlled study, 78 patients were randomized (1:1) to receive a 12-week treatment with 5 mg linagliptin once daily or 0.2 mg voglibose three times a day. To assess whether linagliptin was superior to voglibose, the primary efficacy end point was the change in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level between baseline and week 12. Secondary efficacy end points included changes between baseline and week 12 in glycated albumin (GA) and casual plasma glucose (PG) levels. Results At week 12, the adjusted mean HbA1c levels had decreased by −0.60% after treatment with linagliptin and by −0.20% after treatment with voglibose (treatment difference: −0.40%, 95% CI −0.74% to −0.06%, p=0.022). A significant reduction in casual PG level was also observed after treatment with linagliptin compared with treatment with voglibose. Relative to voglibose, linagliptin tended to elicit reductions in GA, although without statistical significance. No hypoglycemic symptoms or severe hypoglycemia occurred during the study. Conclusions In patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing HD, linagliptin monotherapy provided significantly better glycemic control without severe hypoglycemia than voglibose monotherapy. Linagliptin represents a promising agent for glycemic management in patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing HD. Trial registration number UMIN000007635; results. PMID:27547421

  3. The Prostate Cancer Intervention Versus Observation Trial: VA/NCI/AHRQ Cooperative Studies Program #407 (PIVOT): design and baseline results of a randomized controlled trial comparing radical prostatectomy with watchful waiting for men with clinically localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilt, Timothy J

    2012-12-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer death in men. In the United States, 90% of men with prostate cancer are more than age 60 years, diagnosed by early detection with the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test, and have disease believed confined to the prostate gland (clinically localized). Common treatments for clinically localized prostate cancer include watchful waiting (WW), surgery to remove the prostate gland (radical prostatectomy), external-beam radiation therapy and interstitial radiation therapy (brachytherapy), and androgen deprivation. Little is known about the relative effectiveness and harms of treatments because of the paucity of randomized controlled trials. The Department of Veterans Affairs/National Cancer Institute/Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Cooperative Studies Program Study #407:Prostate Cancer Intervention Versus Observation Trial (PIVOT), initiated in 1994, is a multicenter randomized controlled trial comparing radical prostatectomy with WW in men with clinically localized prostate cancer. We describe the study rationale, design, recruitment methods, and baseline characteristics of PIVOT enrollees. We provide comparisons with eligible men declining enrollment and men participating in another recently reported randomized trial of radical prostatectomy vs WW conducted in Scandinavia. We screened 13 022 men with prostate cancer at 52 US medical centers for potential enrollment. From these, 5023 met initial age, comorbidity, and disease eligibility criteria, and a total of 731 men agreed to participate and were randomized. The mean age of enrollees was 67 years. Nearly one-third were African American. Approximately 85% reported that they were fully active. The median PSA was 7.8ng/mL (mean 10.2ng/mL). In three-fourths of men, the primary reason for biopsy leading to a diagnosis of prostate cancer was a PSA elevation or rise. Using previously developed tumor risk

  4. The Prostate Cancer Intervention Versus Observation Trial: VA/NCI/AHRQ Cooperative Studies Program #407 (PIVOT): design and baseline results of a randomized controlled trial comparing radical prostatectomy with watchful waiting for men with clinically localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilt, Timothy J

    2012-12-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer death in men. In the United States, 90% of men with prostate cancer are more than age 60 years, diagnosed by early detection with the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test, and have disease believed confined to the prostate gland (clinically localized). Common treatments for clinically localized prostate cancer include watchful waiting (WW), surgery to remove the prostate gland (radical prostatectomy), external-beam radiation therapy and interstitial radiation therapy (brachytherapy), and androgen deprivation. Little is known about the relative effectiveness and harms of treatments because of the paucity of randomized controlled trials. The Department of Veterans Affairs/National Cancer Institute/Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Cooperative Studies Program Study #407:Prostate Cancer Intervention Versus Observation Trial (PIVOT), initiated in 1994, is a multicenter randomized controlled trial comparing radical prostatectomy with WW in men with clinically localized prostate cancer. We describe the study rationale, design, recruitment methods, and baseline characteristics of PIVOT enrollees. We provide comparisons with eligible men declining enrollment and men participating in another recently reported randomized trial of radical prostatectomy vs WW conducted in Scandinavia. We screened 13 022 men with prostate cancer at 52 US medical centers for potential enrollment. From these, 5023 met initial age, comorbidity, and disease eligibility criteria, and a total of 731 men agreed to participate and were randomized. The mean age of enrollees was 67 years. Nearly one-third were African American. Approximately 85% reported that they were fully active. The median PSA was 7.8ng/mL (mean 10.2ng/mL). In three-fourths of men, the primary reason for biopsy leading to a diagnosis of prostate cancer was a PSA elevation or rise. Using previously developed tumor risk

  5. Characteristics and outcome of patients with primary CNS lymphoma in a "real-life" setting compared to a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Zeremski, Vanja; Koehler, Michael; Fischer, Thomas; Schalk, Enrico

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to compare the characteristics and outcome of patients treated within the multi-centre German Primary CNS Lymphoma Study Group 1 trial (G-PCNSL-SG-1; TRIAL group) and patients treated outside this clinical trial ("real-life" setting, R-LIFE group). Therefore, we conducted a retrospective single-centre study in order to analyse all patients with newly diagnosed primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL) treated consecutively in our institution between November 2000 and June 2015. Altogether, 86 patients were analysed (median 68 years). Twenty patients were treated within (TRIAL) and 66 patients outside the clinical trial (R-LIFE), respectively. The majority (n = 75; 87 %) received high-dose methotrexate as the first-line treatment. Thirty-eight of 66 patients (57.6 %) responded to the first-line therapy. The R-LIFE patients were older (median age 70 vs. 62 years; p = 0.005) and had more frequently a worse performance status (ECOG score 2-4: 59.1 vs. 20.0 %; p = 0.004; median Karnofsky index 70 vs. 80 %; p = 0.003) and less frequently a low prognostic score (IELSG score 0-1: 19.7 vs. 45.0 %; p = 0.038), than the TRIAL patients. Median overall survial (OS) was shorter for the R-LIFE patients (9.3 months [95 % CI 1.9-16.7] vs. 33.4 months [95 % CI 17.6-49.2]; p = 0.065). Median progression-free survival (PFS) was significantly inferior for the R-LIFE patients (3.4 months [95 % CI 2.4-4.4] vs. 24.8 months [95 % CI 4.6-45.0]; p = 0.037). Our data indicate that the outcome of PCNSL patients treated outside, but about analogous to the G-PCNSL-SG-1 trial, was poor. This is likely explained by more unfavourable prognostic factors in patients being treated off trial.

  6. Pain exposure physical therapy (PEPT) compared to conventional treatment in complex regional pain syndrome type 1: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Barnhoorn, Karlijn J; van de Meent, Henk; van Dongen, Robert T M; Klomp, Frank P; Groenewoud, Hans; Samwel, Han; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; Frölke, Jan Paul M; Staal, J Bart

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the effectiveness of pain exposure physical therapy (PEPT) with conventional treatment in patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1) in a randomised controlled trial with a blinded assessor. Setting The study was conducted at a level 1 trauma centre in the Netherlands. Participants 56 adult patients with CRPS-1 participated. Three patients were lost to follow-up. Interventions Patients received either PEPT in a maximum of five treatment sessions, or conventional treatment following the Dutch multidisciplinary guideline. Measurements Outcomes were assessed at baseline and at 3, 6 and 9 months after randomisation. The primary outcome measure was the Impairment level Sum Score—Restricted Version (ISS-RV), consisting of visual analogue scale for pain (VAS-pain), McGill Pain Questionnaire, active range of motion (AROM) and skin temperature. Secondary outcome measures included Pain Disability Index (PDI); muscle strength; Short Form 36 (SF-36); disability of arm, shoulder and hand; Lower Limb Tasks Questionnaire (LLTQ); 10 m walk test; timed up-and-go test (TUG) and EuroQol-5D. Results The intention-to-treat analysis showed a clinically relevant decrease in ISS-RV (6.7 points for PEPT and 6.2 points for conventional treatment), but the between-group difference was not significant (0.96, 95% CI −1.56 to 3.48). Participants allocated to PEPT experienced a greater improvement in AROM (between-group difference 0.51, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.94; p=0.02). The per protocol analysis showed larger and significant between-group effects on ISS-RV, VAS-pain, AROM, PDI, SF-36, LLTQ and TUG. Conclusions We cannot conclude that PEPT is superior to conventional treatment for patients with CRPS-1. Further high-quality research on the effects of PEPT is warranted given the potential effects as indicated by the per protocol analysis. Trial registration numbers NCT00817128 and NTR 2090. PMID:26628523

  7. Factors affecting the comparability of meta-analyses and largest trials results in perinatology.

    PubMed

    Villar, J; Piaggio, G; Carroli, G; Donner, A

    1997-09-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a new methodology for evaluating the performance of meta-analysis (MA) in corroborating results of large trials (LT) and to identify factors that could explain lack of similarity in the results. We used two criteria to judge the degree of similarity between a MA and the LT: (a) the ratio of the relative risk of the MA to the relative risk of the LT; and (b) the 95% confidence interval about this ratio. Furthermore, this degree of similarity was cross-tabulated with the presence or not of evidence of selective inclusion of positive studies (e.g., publication bias) as judged from "funnel plots" and statistical indicators. Depending on which of our two criteria was used, we found that between 20% and 53% of the 30 MAs studied have high or very high degree of similarity with the LT. We also found strong evidence that factors influencing asymmetrical funnel plots of MA, such as publication bias, may play an important role in this degree of similarity. There was a sizeable proportion of meta-analyses that did not agree with large trial results. We recommend that funnel plots be used as a tool for identifying which MAs can mislead. However, the statistical indicators at hand are unlikely to be of use in many area of medicine considering the regrettably small number of randomized controlled trials per topic available. PMID:9363033

  8. Trimethopim-sulfamethoxazole compared with benzathine penicillin for treatment of impetigo in Aboriginal children: a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tong, Steven Y C; Andrews, Ross M; Kearns, Therese; Gundjirryirr, Rosalyn; McDonald, Malcolm I; Currie, Bart J; Carapetis, Jonathan R

    2010-03-01

    We conducted a pilot randomized controlled trial comparing trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole to benzathine penicillin for treatment of impetigo in Aboriginal children. Treatment was successful in 7 of 7 children treated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and 5 of 6 treated with benzathine penicillin. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole achieved microbiological clearance and healing of sores from which beta-hemolytic streptococci and community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were initially cultured.

  9. A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Botulinum Toxin A Dosage in the Upper Extremity of Children with Spasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kawamura, Anne; Campbell, Kent; Lam-Damji, Sophie; Fehlings, Darcy

    2007-01-01

    This study compared the effects of low and high doses of botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) to improve upper extremity function. Thirty-nine children (22 males, 17 females) with a mean age of 6 years 2 months (SD 2y 9mo) diagnosed with spastic hemiplegia or triplegia were enrolled into this double-blind, randomized controlled trial. The high-dose group…

  10. Treatment of metastatic and recurrent cervix cancer with chemotherapy: a randomised trial comparing hydroxyurea with cisdiamminedichloro-platinum plus methotrexate.

    PubMed

    Bezwoda, W R; Nissenbaum, M; Derman, D P

    1986-01-01

    In a randomised trial comparing single-agent chemotherapy (hydroxyurea) to combination chemotherapy in advanced cervix cancer, response was seen in 57% (including 13% CR) of patients receiving the combination (DDP + MTX) regimen. Responding patients survived significantly longer (11 months) than either those receiving hydroxyurea or those not responding to combination chemotherapy (4 months). Two patients remain in complete remission for 14+ and 17+ months.

  11. Trial participants’ experiences of early enhanced speech and language therapy after stroke compared with employed visitor support: a qualitative study nested within a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Gomersall, Timothy; Bowen, Audrey

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To explore trial participants’ experiences of the process and outcomes of early, enhanced speech and language therapy after stroke with support from an employed visitor. Design: Qualitative study nested within a randomized controlled trial. Participants: Twney-two people who, after stroke, had a diagnosis of aphasia (12), dysarthria (5) or both (5) and who participated in the ACT NoW study. Setting: Eight English NHS usual care settings. Method: Individual interviews. Thematic content analysis assisted by a bespoke data transformation protocol for incorporating non-verbal and semantically ambiguous data. Results: Participants highly regarded regular and sustained contact with someone outside of immediate family/friends who engaged them in deliberate activities/communication in the early months after stroke. Participants identified differences in the process of intervention between speech and language therapists and employed visitors. But no major discriminations were made between the impact or value of this contact according to whether provided by a speech and language therapist or employed visitor. Participant-defined criteria for effectiveness of contact included: impact on mood and confidence, self-recognition of progress and the meeting of individual needs. Conclusions: As in the randomized controlled trial, participants reported no evidence of added benefit of early communication therapy beyond that from attention control. The findings do not imply that regular contact with any non-professional can have beneficial effects for someone with aphasia or dysarthria in the early weeks following a stroke. The study points to specific conditions that would have to be met for contact to have a positive effect. PMID:22837542

  12. Weekend Schoolyard Accessibility, Physical Activity, and Obesity: The Trial of Activity in Adolescent Girls (TAAG) Study

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Molly M; Cohen, Deborah A; Evenson, Kelly R; Elder, John; Catellier, Diane; Ashwood, J. Scott; Overton, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To assess the accessibility and suitability of schools as recreational sites and to determine whether they are associated with young adolescent girls’ weekend metabolic equivalent-weighted moderate-to-vigorous (MW-MVPA) physical activity and body mass index (BMI). Methods We drew a half-mile (0.805 km) radius around the residences of participants in Trial of Activity for Adolescent Girls (n=1556) in Maryland, South Carolina, Minnesota, Louisiana, California, and Arizona. We visited all schools and parks within the defined distance and documented their amenities and accessibility on Saturdays in Spring 2003. Staff gathered data on each girls’ height and weight and used accelerometers to record weekend MW-MVPA. Results Schools represented 44% of potential neighborhood sites for physical activity. However, a third of schools were inaccessible on the Saturday we visited. Neighborhoods with locked schools were primarily non-white, older, more densely populated, and of lower socioeconomic status. Though there was no relationship between school accessibility on Saturdays and weekend MW-MVPA, the number of locked schools was associated with significantly higher BMI. Conclusions The lack of relationship between MW-MVPA and school accessibility may imply that young adolescent girls do not identify schools as recreational resources. However, due to the association between BMI and locked schools, efforts to stem the obesity epidemic should include making schools more accessible. PMID:17292958

  13. 21 CFR 312.87 - Active monitoring of conduct and evaluation of clinical trials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Active monitoring of conduct and evaluation of clinical trials. 312.87 Section 312.87 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... to Treat Life-threatening and Severely-debilitating Illnesses § 312.87 Active monitoring of...

  14. 21 CFR 312.87 - Active monitoring of conduct and evaluation of clinical trials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Active monitoring of conduct and evaluation of clinical trials. 312.87 Section 312.87 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... to Treat Life-threatening and Severely-debilitating Illnesses § 312.87 Active monitoring of...

  15. 21 CFR 312.87 - Active monitoring of conduct and evaluation of clinical trials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Active monitoring of conduct and evaluation of clinical trials. 312.87 Section 312.87 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... to Treat Life-threatening and Severely-debilitating Illnesses § 312.87 Active monitoring of...

  16. 21 CFR 312.87 - Active monitoring of conduct and evaluation of clinical trials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Active monitoring of conduct and evaluation of clinical trials. 312.87 Section 312.87 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... to Treat Life-threatening and Severely-debilitating Illnesses § 312.87 Active monitoring of...

  17. Recruiting a Diverse Group of Middle School Girls into the Trial of Activity for Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elder, John P.; Shuler, LaVerne; Moe, Stacey G.; Grieser, Mira; Pratt, Charlotte; Cameron, Sandra; Hingle, Melanie; Pickrel, Julie L.; Saksvig, Brit I.; Schachter, Kenneth; Greer, Susan; Bothwell, Elizabeth K. Guth

    2008-01-01

    Background: School-based study recruitment efforts are both time consuming and challenging. This paper highlights the recruitment strategies employed by the national, multisite Trial of Activity for Adolescent Girls (TAAG), a study designed to measure the effectiveness of an intervention to reduce the decline of physical activity levels among…

  18. The Value of Comparative Effectiveness Research: Projected Return on Investment of the RxPONDER Trial (SWOG S1007)

    PubMed Central

    Wong, William; Ramsey, Scott D.; Barlow, William E.; Garrison, Louis P.; Veenstra, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to assess the value of research of the RxPONDER study, an ongoing comparative effectiveness RCT designed to evaluate a 21-gene profile in early stage, node-positive breast cancer. Methods We developed a disease-based decision-analytic model to compare use of the 21-gene profile versus standard care. Key clinical data were derived from SWOG-8814, an RCT of chemotherapy in lymph node-positive breast cancer. Other model parameters were obtained from published sources. Probabilistic simulations and value of information calculations were used to assess the expected value of sample information (EVSI) and the expected value of sample parameter information (EVSPI). Results The cost of the RxPONDER trial is expected to be at least $27 million. The expected value of research of the RxPONDER trial ranged from $450 million to $1. billion, representing a return of 17 to 39 times the projected cost of the trial. The primary objective of RxPONDER, to assess survival, had the largest estimated value relative to other model inputs. The value of RxPONDER increased by $50 million to $100 million after stakeholder input on additional data collection. Conclusion The RxPONDER study appears to represent a good investment of public research funds. Stakeholder engagement and assessment of the return on investment should be considered to optimize and quantify the value of comparative effectiveness studies. PMID:22981891

  19. Building Efficient Comparative Effectiveness Trials through Adaptive Designs, Utility Functions, and Accrual Rate Optimization: Finding the Sweet Spot

    PubMed Central

    Gajewski, Byron J.; Berry, Scott M.; Quintana, Melanie; Pasnoor, Mamatha; Dimachkie, Mazen; Herbelin, Laura; Barohn, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The time is right for the use of Bayesian Adaptive Designs (BAD) in comparative effectiveness trials. For example, PCORI has joined the FDA and NIH in adopting policies/guidelines encouraging their use. There are multiple aspects to BAD that need to be considered when designing a comparative effectiveness design. First, the adaptation rules can determine the expected size of the trial. Second, a utility function can be used to combine extremely important co-endpoints (e.g. efficacy and tolerability), and is a valuable tool for incorporating clinical expertise and potentially patient preference. Third, accrual rate is also very, very important. Specifically, there is a juxtaposition related to accrual and BAD. If accrual rate is too fast we never gain efficient information for adapting. If accrual rate is too slow we never finish the clinical trial. We propose methodology for finding the “sweet spot” for BAD that addresses these as design parameters. We demonstrate the methodology on a comparative effectiveness BAD of pharmaceutical agents in cryptogenic sensory polyneuropathy (CSPN). The study has five arms with two endpoints that are combined with a utility function. The accrual rate is assumed to stem from multiple sites. We perform simulations from which the composite accrual rates across sites results in various piecewise Poisson distributions as parameter inputs. We balance both average number of patients needed and average length of time to finish the study. PMID:25640114

  20. Building efficient comparative effectiveness trials through adaptive designs, utility functions, and accrual rate optimization: finding the sweet spot.

    PubMed

    Gajewski, Byron J; Berry, Scott M; Quintana, Melanie; Pasnoor, Mamatha; Dimachkie, Mazen; Herbelin, Laura; Barohn, Richard

    2015-03-30

    The time is right for the use of Bayesian Adaptive Designs (BAD) in comparative effectiveness trials. For example, Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute has joined the Food and Drug Administration and National Intitutes of Health in adopting policies/guidelines encouraging their use. There are multiple aspects to BAD that need to be considered when designing a comparative effectiveness design. First, the adaptation rules can determine the expected size of the trial. Second, a utility function can be used to combine extremely important co-endpoints (e.g., efficacy and tolerability) and is a valuable tool for incorporating clinical expertise and potentially patient preference. Third, accrual rate is also very, very important. Specifically, there is a juxtaposition related to accrual and BAD. If accrual rate is too fast we never gain efficient information for adapting. If accrual rate is too slow we never finish the clinical trial. We propose methodology for finding the 'sweet spot' for BAD that addresses these as design parameters. We demonstrate the methodology on a comparative effectiveness BAD of pharmaceutical agents in cryptogenic sensory polyneuropathy. The study has five arms with two endpoints that are combined with a utility function. The accrual rate is assumed to stem from multiple sites. We perform simulations from which the composite accrual rates across sites result in various piecewise Poisson distributions as parameter inputs. We balance both average number of patients needed and average length of time to finish the study.

  1. Comparing specialist medical care with specialist medical care plus the Lightning Process® for chronic fatigue syndrome or myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial (SMILE Trial)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic fatigue syndrome or myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) is a relatively common and potentially serious condition with a limited evidence base for treatment. Specialist treatment for paediatric CFS/ME uses interventions recommended by National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) including cognitive behavioural therapy, graded exercise therapy and activity management. The Lightning Process® (LP) is a trademarked intervention derived from osteopathy, life-coaching and neuro-linguistic programming, delivered over three consecutive days as group sessions. Although over 250 children with CFS/ME attend LP courses each year, there are no reported studies on the effectiveness or cost-effectiveness. Methods This pragmatic randomised controlled trial is set within a specialist paediatric CFS/ME service in the south west of England. Children and young people with CFS/ME (n = 80 to 112), aged 12 to 18 years old will be randomised to specialist medical care (SMC) or SMC plus the LP. The primary outcome will be physical function (SF-36 physical function short form) and fatigue (Chalder Fatigue Scale). Discussion This study will tell us whether adding the LP to SMC is effective and cost-effective compared to SMC alone. This study will also provide detailed information on the implementation of the LP and SMC. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN81456207 (31 July 2012). PMID:24370208

  2. Healing Touch with Guided Imagery for PTSD in returning active duty military: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jain, Shamini; McMahon, George F; Hasen, Patricia; Kozub, Madelyn P; Porter, Valencia; King, Rauni; Guarneri, Erminia M

    2012-09-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) remains a significant problem in returning military and warrants swift and effective treatment. We conducted a randomized controlled trial to determine whether a complementary medicine intervention (Healing Touch with Guided Imagery [HT+GI]) reduced PTSD symptoms as compared to treatment as usual (TAU) returning combat-exposed active duty military with significant PTSD symptoms. Active duty military (n = 123) were randomized to 6 sessions (within 3 weeks) of HT+GI vs. TAU. The primary outcome was PTSD symptoms; secondary outcomes were depression, quality of life, and hostility. Repeated measures analysis of covariance with intent-to-treat analyses revealed statistically and clinically significant reduction in PTSD symptoms (p < 0.0005, Cohen's d = 0.85) as well as depression (p < 0.0005, Cohen's d = 0.70) for HT+GI vs. TAU. HT+GI also showed significant improvements in mental quality of life (p = 0.002, Cohen's d = 0.58) and cynicism (p = 0.001, Cohen's d = 0.49) vs. TAU. Participation in a complementary medicine intervention resulted in a clinically significant reduction in PTSD and related symptoms in a returning, combat-exposed active duty military population. Further investigation of GT and biofield therapy approaches for mitigating PTSD in military populations is warranted.

  3. Comparative in vitro activity of faropenem against staphylococci.

    PubMed

    von Eiff, Christof; Schepers, Sven; Peters, Georg

    2002-08-01

    The anti-staphylococcal activity of faropenem, a novel beta-lactam, was examined and compared with that of amoxicillin, cefuroxime, clindamycin and vancomycin using the agar dilution method. A total of 234 staphylococci, including a large number of clonally different methicillin-resistant strains and a representative number of Staphylococcus aureus small colony variants, were tested. While the activity of faropenem was independent of the staphylococcal phenotype, the novel penem was up to eight times more active against methicillin-susceptible strains compared with the other agents tested. In addition, faropenem was active against many methicillin-resistant strains of S. aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci. PMID:12161412

  4. TREC-SAVE: a randomised trial comparing mechanical restraints with use of seclusion for aggressive or violent seriously mentally ill people: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Thousands of people whose aggression is thought due to serious mental illness are secluded or restrained every day. Without fair testing these techniques will continue to be used outside of a rigorous evidence base. With such coercive treatment this leaves all concerned vulnerable to abuse and criticism. This paper presents the protocol for a randomised trial comparing seclusion with restraints for people with serious mental illnesses. Methods/Design Setting-General psychiatric wards of a large psychiatric hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Participants-Anyone aggressive or violent suspected or known to have serious mental illness for whom restriction is felt to be indicated by nursing and medical staff, but also for whom they are unsure whether seclusion or restraint would be indicated. Interventions-The standard care of either strong cotton banding to edge of bed with medications as indicated and close observation or the other standard care of use of a minimally furnished seclusion room but with open but barred windows onto the nursing station. Outcomes-time to restrictions lifted, early change of treatment, additional episodes, adverse effects/events, satisfaction with care during episode. Duration-2 weeks. Identifier: ISRCTN 49454276 http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN49454276 PMID:21774823

  5. The design and rationale of a multi-center clinical trial comparing two strategies for control of systolic blood pressure: The Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High blood pressure is an important public health concern because it is highly prevalent and a risk factor for adverse health outcomes, including coronary heart disease, stroke, decompensated heart failure, chronic kidney disease, and decline in cognitive function. Observational studies show a progressive increase in risk associated with blood pressure above 115/75 mm Hg. Prior research has shown that reducing elevated systolic blood pressure lowers the risk of subsequent clinical complications from cardiovascular disease. However, the optimal systolic blood pressure to reduce blood pressure-related adverse outcomes is unclear, and the benefit of treating to a level of systolic blood pressure well below 140 mm Hg has not been proven in a large, definitive clinical trial. Purpose To describe the design considerations of the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) and the baseline characteristics of trial participants. Methods SPRINT is a multi-center, randomized, controlled trial that compares two strategies for treating systolic blood pressure: one targets the standard target of <140 mm Hg, and the other targets a more intensive target of <120 mm Hg. Enrollment focused on volunteers of age ≥50 years (no upper limit) with an average baseline systolic blood pressure ≥130 mm Hg and evidence of cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, 10-year Framingham cardiovascular disease risk score ≥15%, or age ≥75 years. SPRINT recruitment also targeted three pre-specified subgroups: participants with chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 ml/min/1.73m2), participants with a history of cardiovascular disease, and participants 75 years of age or older. The primary outcome is first occurrence of a myocardial infarction, acute coronary syndrome, stroke, heart failure, or cardiovascular disease death. Secondary outcomes include all-cause mortality, decline in kidney function or development of end-stage renal disease

  6. How Well Do Randomized Trials Inform Decision Making: Systematic Review Using Comparative Effectiveness Research Measures on Acupuncture for Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Witt, Claudia M.; Manheimer, Eric; Hammerschlag, Richard; Lüdtke, Rainer; Lao, Lixing; Tunis, Sean R.; Berman, Brian M.

    2012-01-01

    Background For Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER) there is a need to develop scales for appraisal of available clinical research. Aims were to 1) test the feasibility of applying the pragmatic-explanatory continuum indicator summary tool and the six CER defining characteristics of the Institute of Medicine to RCTs of acupuncture for treatment of low back pain, and 2) evaluate the extent to which the evidence from these RCTs is relevant to clinical and health policy decision making. Methods We searched Medline, the AcuTrials™ Database to February 2011 and reference lists and included full-report randomized trials in English that compared needle acupuncture with a conventional treatment in adults with non-specific acute and/or chronic low back pain and restricted to those with ≥30 patients in the acupuncture group. Papers were evaluated by 5 raters. Principal Findings From 119 abstracts, 44 full-text publications were screened and 10 trials (4,901 patients) were evaluated. Due to missing information and initial difficulties in operationalizing the scoring items, the first scoring revealed inter-rater and inter-item variance (intraclass correlations 0.02–0.60), which improved after consensus discussions to 0.20–1.00. The 10 trials were found to cover the efficacy-effectiveness continuum; those with more flexible acupuncture and no placebo control scored closer to effectiveness. Conclusion Both instruments proved useful, but need further development. In addition, CONSORT guidelines for reporting pragmatic trials should be expanded. Most studies in this review already reflect the movement towards CER and similar approaches can be taken to evaluate comparative effectiveness relevance of RCTs for other treatments. PMID:22389699

  7. Protocol of the Australasian Malignant Pleural Effusion (AMPLE) trial: a multicentre randomised study comparing indwelling pleural catheter versus talc pleurodesis

    PubMed Central

    Fysh, Edward T H; Thomas, Rajesh; Read, Catherine A; Lam, Ben C H; Yap, Elaine; Horwood, Fiona C; Lee, Pyng; Piccolo, Francesco; Shrestha, Ranjan; Garske, Luke A; Lam, David C L; Rosenstengel, Andrew; Bint, Michael; Murray, Kevin; Smith, Nicola A; Lee, Y C Gary

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Malignant pleural effusion can complicate most cancers. It causes breathlessness and requires hospitalisation for invasive pleural drainages. Malignant effusions often herald advanced cancers and limited prognosis. Minimising time spent in hospital is of high priority to patients and their families. Various treatment strategies exist for the management of malignant effusions, though there is no consensus governing the best choice. Talc pleurodesis is the conventional management but requires hospitalisation (and substantial healthcare resources), can cause significant side effects, and has a suboptimal success rate. Indwelling pleural catheters (IPCs) allow ambulatory fluid drainage without hospitalisation, and are increasingly employed for management of malignant effusions. Previous studies have only investigated the length of hospital care immediately related to IPC insertion. Whether IPC management reduces time spent in hospital in the patients’ remaining lifespan is unknown. A strategy of malignant effusion management that reduces hospital admission days will allow patients to spend more time outside hospital, reduce costs and save healthcare resources. Methods and analysis The Australasian Malignant Pleural Effusion (AMPLE) trial is a multicentred, randomised trial designed to compare IPC with talc pleurodesis for the management of malignant pleural effusion. This study will randomise 146 adults with malignant pleural effusions (1:1) to IPC management or talc slurry pleurodesis. The primary end point is the total number of days spent in hospital (for any admissions) from treatment procedure to death or end of study follow-up. Secondary end points include hospital days specific to pleural effusion management, adverse events, self-reported symptom and quality-of-life scores. Ethics and dissemination The Sir Charles Gairdner Group Human Research Ethics Committee has approved the study as have the ethics boards of all the participating hospitals. The

  8. Treatment of superficial thrombophlebitis. A comparative trial between placebo, Hirudoid cream and piroxicam gel.

    PubMed

    Bergqvist, D; Brunkwall, J; Jensen, N; Persson, N H

    1990-01-01

    A prospective randomized trial on the treatment of superficial thrombophlebitis has been performed in 68 patients randomized to either Hirudoid cream, piroxicam gel or placebo. Both spontaneous and infusion thrombophlebitis were included. Treatment effect was evaluated using the status of thrombophlebitis, the thrombophlebitic area, pain intensity with a visual analogue scale, and side effects were registered. Both in the treatment groups and the placebo group there was a significant decrease of signs and symptoms during the treatment period. There was no statistical difference between the treatment groups and no difference between spontaneous and infusion thrombophlebitis. PMID:1696799

  9. Relative Effectiveness of Letrozole Compared With Tamoxifen for Patients With Lobular Carcinoma in the BIG 1-98 Trial

    PubMed Central

    Metzger Filho, Otto; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Mallon, Elizabeth; Gusterson, Barry; Viale, Giuseppe; Winer, Eric P.; Thürlimann, Beat; Gelber, Richard D.; Colleoni, Marco; Ejlertsen, Bent; Debled, Marc; Price, Karen N.; Regan, Meredith M.; Coates, Alan S.; Goldhirsch, Aron

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the relative effectiveness of letrozole compared with tamoxifen for patients with invasive ductal or lobular carcinoma. Patients and Methods Patients diagnosed with early-stage invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) or classic invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) who were randomly assigned onto the Breast International Group (BIG) 1-98 trial and who had centrally reviewed pathology data were included (N = 2,923). HER2-negative IDC and ILC were additionally classified as hormone receptor–positive with high (luminal B [LB] –like) or low (luminal A [LA] –like) proliferative activity by Ki-67 labeling index. Survival analyses were performed with weighted Cox models that used inverse probability of censoring weighted modeling. Results The median follow-up time was 8.1 years. In multivariable models for disease-free survival (DFS), significant interactions between treatment and histology (ILC or IDC; P = .006) and treatment and subgroup (LB like or LA like; P = .01) were observed. In the ILC subset, there was a 66% reduction in the hazard of a DFS event with letrozole for LB (hazard ratio [HR], 0.34; 95% CI, 0.21 to 0.55) and a 50% reduction for LA subtypes (HR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.32 to 0.78). In the IDC subset, there was a significant 35% reduction in the hazard of a DFS event with letrozole for the LB subtype (HR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.53 to 0.79), but no difference between treatments was noted for IDC and the LA subtype (HR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.76 to 1.20). Conclusion The magnitude of benefit of adjuvant letrozole is greater for patients diagnosed with lobular carcinoma versus ductal carcinoma. PMID:26215945

  10. Voice Quality After Treatment of Early Vocal Cord Cancer: A Randomized Trial Comparing Laser Surgery With Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, Leena-Maija; Rautiainen, Noora; Sellman, Jaana; Saarilahti, Kauko; Mäkitie, Antti; Rihkanen, Heikki; Laranne, Jussi; Kleemola, Leenamaija; Wigren, Tuija; Sala, Eeva; Lindholm, Paula; Grenman, Reidar; Joensuu, Heikki

    2014-10-01

    Objective: Early laryngeal cancer is usually treated with either transoral laser surgery or radiation therapy. The quality of voice achieved with these treatments has not been compared in a randomized trial. Methods and Materials: Male patients with carcinoma limited to 1 mobile vocal cord (T1aN0M0) were randomly assigned to receive either laser surgery (n=32) or external beam radiation therapy (n=28). Surgery consisted of tumor excision with a CO{sub 2} laser with the patient under general anaesthesia. External beam radiation therapy to the larynx was delivered to a cumulative dose of 66 Gy in 2-Gy daily fractions over 6.5 weeks. Voice quality was assessed at baseline and 6 and 24 months after treatment. The main outcome measures were expert-rated voice quality on a grade, roughness, breathiness, asthenia, and strain (GRBAS) scale, videolaryngostroboscopic findings, and the patients' self-rated voice quality and its impact on activities of daily living. Results: Overall voice quality between the groups was rated similar, but voice was more breathy and the glottal gap was wider in patients treated with laser surgery than in those who received radiation therapy. Patients treated with radiation therapy reported less hoarseness-related inconvenience in daily living 2 years after treatment. Three patients in each group had local cancer recurrence within 2 years from randomization. Conclusions: Radiation therapy may be the treatment of choice for patients whose requirements for voice quality are demanding. Overall voice quality was similar in both treatment groups, however, indicating a need for careful consideration of patient-related factors in the choice of a treatment option.

  11. Adaptation and Dissemination of an Evidence-Based Obesity Prevention Intervention: Design of a Comparative Effectiveness Trial

    PubMed Central

    Buscemi, Joanna; Odoms-Young, Angela; Stolley, Melinda L.; Blumstein, Lara; Schiffer, Linda; Berbaum, Michael L.; McCaffrey, Jennifer; Montoya, Anastasia McGee; Braunschweig, Carol; Fitzgibbon, Marian L.

    2014-01-01

    Low-income youth are at increased risk for excess weight gain. Although evidence-based prevention programs exist, successful adaptation to provide wide dissemination presents a challenge. Hip-Hop to Health (HH) is a school-based obesity prevention intervention that targets primarily preschool children of low-income families. In a large randomized controlled trial, HH was found to be efficacious for prevention of excessive weight gain. The Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program--Education (SNAP-Ed) are USDA-funded nutrition education programs offered to low-income families, and may provide an ideal platform for the wide dissemination of evidence-based obesity prevention programs. A research-practice partnership was established in order to conduct formative research to guide the adaptation and implementation of HH through EFNEP and SNAP-Ed. We present the design and method of a comparative effectiveness trial that will determine the efficacy of HH when delivered by peer educators through these programs compared to the standard EFNEP and SNAP-Ed nutrition education (NE) curriculum. Results from this trial will inform larger scale dissemination. The dissemination of HH through government programs has the potential to increase the reach of efficacious obesity prevention programs that target low-income children and families. PMID:24952282

  12. A Randomized Comparative Trial on the Therapeutic Efficacy of Topical Aloe vera and Calendula officinalis on Diaper Dermatitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Panahi, Yunes; Sharif, Mohamad Reza; Sharif, Alireza; Beiraghdar, Fatemeh; Zahiri, Zahra; Amirchoopani, Golnoush; Marzony, Eisa Tahmasbpour; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Diaper dermatitis (DD) is a common inflammatory disorder among children and infants. The objective of the present randomized and double-blind trial was to compare the therapeutic efficacies of Aloe vera cream and Calendula officinalis ointment on the frequency and severity of DD in children. Methods. Sixty-six infants with DD (aged < 3 years) were randomized to receive either Aloe cream (n = 32) or Calendula ointment (n = 34). Infants were treated with these drugs 3 times a day for 10 days. The severity of dermatitis was graded at baseline as well as at the end of trial using a 5-point scale. The adverse effects of study medications were assessed during the trial. Results. Although improvement in the severity of DD was observed in both treatment groups (P < 0.001), patients receiving Calendula ointment had significantly fewer rash sites compared to Aloe group (P = 0.001). No adverse effect was reported from either of the medications. Discussion. The evidence from this study suggests that topical Aloe and in particular Calendula could serve as safe and effective treatment for the treatment of diaper dermatitis in infants. PMID:22606064

  13. Adaptation and dissemination of an evidence-based obesity prevention intervention: design of a comparative effectiveness trial.

    PubMed

    Buscemi, Joanna; Odoms-Young, Angela; Stolley, Melinda L; Blumstein, Lara; Schiffer, Linda; Berbaum, Michael L; McCaffrey, Jennifer; Montoya, Anastasia McGee; Braunschweig, Carol; Fitzgibbon, Marian L

    2014-07-01

    Low-income youth are at increased risk for excess weight gain. Although evidence-based prevention programs exist, successful adaptation to provide wide dissemination presents a challenge. Hip-Hop to Health (HH) is a school-based obesity prevention intervention that targets primarily preschool children of low-income families. In a large randomized controlled trial, HH was found to be efficacious for prevention of excessive weight gain. The Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education (SNAP-Ed) are USDA-funded nutrition education programs offered to low-income families, and may provide an ideal platform for the wide dissemination of evidence-based obesity prevention programs. A research-practice partnership was established in order to conduct formative research to guide the adaptation and implementation of HH through EFNEP and SNAP-Ed. We present the design and method of a comparative effectiveness trial that will determine the efficacy of HH when delivered by peer educators through these programs compared to the standard EFNEP and SNAP-Ed nutrition education (NE) curriculum. Results from this trial will inform larger scale dissemination. The dissemination of HH through government programs has the potential to increase the reach of efficacious obesity prevention programs that target low-income children and families. PMID:24952282

  14. Gamified physical activation of young men – a Multidisciplinary Population-Based Randomized Controlled Trial (MOPO study)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Inactive and unhealthy lifestyles are common among adolescent men. The planned intervention examines the effectiveness of an interactive, gamified activation method, based on tailored health information, peer networks and participation, on physical activity, health and wellbeing in young men. We hypothesize that following the intervention the physical activation group will have an improved physical activity, as well as self-determined and measured health compared with the controls. Methods/design Conscription-aged men (18 years) attending compulsory annual call-ups for military service in the city of Oulu in Finland (n = 1500) will be randomized to a 6-months intervention (n = 640) or a control group (n = 640) during the fall 2013. A questionnaire on health, health behaviour, diet and wellbeing is administered in the beginning and end of the intervention. In addition, anthropometric measures (height, weight and waist circumference), body composition, grip strength, heart rate variability and aerobic fitness will be measured. The activation group utilizes an online gamified activation method in combination with communal youth services, objective physical activity measurement, social networking, tailored health information and exercise programs according to baseline activity level and the readiness of changes of each individual. Daily physical activity of the participants is monitored in both the activation and control groups. The activation service rewards improvements in physical activity or reductions in sedentary behaviour. The performance and completion of the military service of the participants will also be followed. Discussion The study will provide new information of physical activity, health and health behaviour of young men. Furthermore, a novel model including methods for increasing physical activity among young people is developed and its effects tested through an intervention. This unique gamified service for activating young men

  15. A comparative clinical trial of Chincha kshara and Kadali kshara on Amlapitta

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, S.; Panda, P. K.; Acharya, G.; Mohanty, N.; Nathsharma, P. K.; Dash, S. C.

    2011-01-01

    A clinical trial was carried out on 30 patients of Amlapitta aged between 20 to 35 years with complaints of Avipaka, hrit-kanthadaha, tikta-amlodgara, utklesa, udarasula, adhmana and aruchi, who were registered from OPD and IPD of Gopabandhu Ayurveda Mahavidyalaya, Puri. They were equally divided into three groups Chincha kshara, Kadali kshara and placebo (who were administered with fresh wheat powder) for 30 days in a dose of 500 mg thrice daily with water. Investigations was done in order to exclude upper gastrointestinal tract ulcer, carcinoma in stomach, cholecystitis, carcinoma gall bladder, and heart diseases. The clinical assessments were carried out on the 30th day by subjective and objective parameters and it was inferred that both Chincha kshara and Kadali kshara were effective and reduced the symptoms of amlapitta. Chincha kshara was found to be more effective than Kadali kshara. The study shows the effect of Chincha and Kadali kshara which led to cure in 4(40%) and 3(30%) patients respectively, and maximum improvement in 4(40%) and 5(50%) patients affected with amlapitta disease, respectively. No untoward effect was noticed due to administration of ksharas during the clinical trial period. PMID:22661843

  16. Physical activity changes during pregnancy in a comparative impact trail

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Delta Healthy Sprouts was designed to test the comparative impact of two home visiting programs on weight status, dietary intake, physical activity, and other health behaviors of rural, Southern African American women and their infants. Results pertaining to physical activity outcomes in the gestat...

  17. Active Inference, Epistemic Value, and Vicarious Trial and Error

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pezzulo, Giovanni; Cartoni, Emilio; Rigoli, Francesco; io-Lopez, Léo; Friston, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Balancing habitual and deliberate forms of choice entails a comparison of their respective merits--the former being faster but inflexible, and the latter slower but more versatile. Here, we show that arbitration between these two forms of control can be derived from first principles within an Active Inference scheme. We illustrate our arguments…

  18. Effects of Long-Term Acupuncture Treatment on Resting-State Brain Activity in Migraine Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial on Active Acupoints and Inactive Acupoints

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ling; Liu, Jixin; Zhang, Fuwen; Dong, Xilin; Peng, Yulin; Qin, Wei; Wu, Fumei; Li, Ying; Yuan, Kai; von Deneen, Karen M.; Gong, Qiyong; Tang, Zili; Liang, Fanrong

    2014-01-01

    Background Acupuncture has been commonly used for preventing migraine attacks and relieving pain during a migraine, although there is limited knowledge on the physiological mechanism behind this method. The objectives of this study were to compare the differences in brain activities evoked by active acupoints and inactive acupoints and to investigate the possible correlation between clinical variables and brain responses. Methods and Results A randomized controlled trial and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) were conducted. A total of eighty migraineurs without aura were enrolled to receive either active acupoint acupuncture or inactive acupoint acupuncture treatment for 8 weeks, and twenty patients in each group were randomly selected for the fMRI scan at the end of baseline and at the end of treatment. The neuroimaging data indicated that long-term active acupoint therapy elicited a more extensive and remarkable cerebral response compared with acupuncture at inactive acupoints. Most of the regions were involved in the pain matrix, lateral pain system, medial pain system, default mode network, and cognitive components of pain processing. Correlation analysis showed that the decrease in the visual analogue scale (VAS) was significantly related to the increased average Regional homogeneity (ReHo) values in the anterior cingulate cortex in the two groups. Moreover, the decrease in the VAS was associated with increased average ReHo values in the insula which could be detected in the active acupoint group. Conclusions Long-term active acupoint therapy and inactive acupoint therapy have different brain activities. We postulate that acupuncture at the active acupoint might have the potential effect of regulating some disease-affected key regions and the pain circuitry for migraine, and promote establishing psychophysical pain homeostasis. Trial Registration Chinese Clinical Trial Registry ChiCTR-TRC-13003635 PMID:24915066

  19. Design of DEVOTE (Trial Comparing Cardiovascular Safety of Insulin Degludec vs Insulin Glargine in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes at High Risk of Cardiovascular Events) - DEVOTE 1.

    PubMed

    Marso, Steven P; McGuire, Darren K; Zinman, Bernard; Poulter, Neil R; Emerson, Scott S; Pieber, Thomas R; Pratley, Richard E; Haahr, Poul-Martin; Lange, Martin; Frandsen, Kirstine Brown; Rabøl, Rasmus; Buse, John B

    2016-09-01

    DEVOTE was designed to evaluate the cardiovascular safety of insulin degludec (IDeg) vs insulin glargine U100 (IGlar) in patients with T2D at high risk of cardiovascular events. DEVOTE is a phase 3b, multicenter, international, randomized, double-blind, active comparator-controlled trial, designed as an event-driven trial that would continue until 633 positively adjudicated primary events were accrued. The primary end point was the time from randomization to a composite outcome consisting of the first occurrence of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke. Patients with T2D at high risk of cardiovascular complications were randomized 1:1 to receive either IDeg or IGlar, each added to background therapies. This trial was designed to demonstrate statistical noninferiority of IDeg vs IGlar for the primary end point. DEVOTE enrolled 7,637 patients between October 2013 and November 2014 at 436 sites in 20 countries. Of these, 6,506 patients had prior cardiovascular disease or chronic kidney disease, and the remainder had multiple cardiovascular risk factors. DEVOTE was designed to provide conclusive evidence regarding the cardiovascular safety of IDeg relative to IGlar in a high-risk population of patients with T2D. PMID:27595693

  20. Recruitment and Enrollment of Caregivers for a Lifestyle Physical Activity Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Etkin, Caryn D.; Farran, Carol J.; Barnes, Lisa L.; Shah, Raj C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the efficacy of the recruitment framework used for a clinical trial with sedentary family caregivers of persons with Alzheimer’s disease. An integrated social marketing approach with principles of community-based participatory research provided the theoretical framework for organizing recruitment activities. This multi-pronged approach meant that caregivers were identified from a range of geographic locations and numerous sources including a federally funded Alzheimer’s disease center, health care providers, community based and senior organizations, and broad-based media. Study enrollment projections were exceeded by 11% and resulted in enrolling N = 211 caregivers into this clinical trial. We conclude that social marketing and community-based approaches provide a solid foundation for organizing recruitment activities for clinical trials with older adults. PMID:22083931

  1. Recruitment and enrollment of caregivers for a lifestyle physical activity clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Etkin, Caryn D; Farran, Carol J; Barnes, Lisa L; Shah, Raj C

    2012-02-01

    This article presents the efficacy of the recruitment framework used for a clinical trial with sedentary family caregivers of persons with Alzheimer's disease. An integrated social marketing approach with principles of community-based participatory research provided the theoretical framework for organizing recruitment activities. This multi-pronged approach meant that caregivers were identified from a range of geographic locations and numerous sources including a federally funded Alzheimer's disease center, health care providers, community based and senior organizations, and broad-based media. Study enrollment projections were exceeded by 11% and resulted in enrolling n = 211 caregivers into this clinical trial. We conclude that social marketing and community-based approaches provide a solid foundation for organizing recruitment activities for clinical trials with older adults. PMID:22083931

  2. Autologous platelet-rich plasma compared with whole blood for the treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis; a comparative clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Vahdatpour, Babak; Kianimehr, Lida; Ahrar, Mohmmad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intralesional injection of autologous blood-derived products has recently gained attention as a potential treatment for plantar fasciitis (PF). We compared platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and whole blood (WB) for the treatment of chronic PF. Materials and Methods: Patients with chronic PF received either an intralesional injection of 3 cc PRP prepared by double centrifuge technique or WB (n = 17 in each group). Overall, morning and walking pain severity were assessed by 11-point numerical rating scale, and function was assessed by the Roles and Maudsley score (RMS) at baseline and 1-month and 3 months after treatment. Ultrasonography was performed to measure plantar fascia thickness at baseline and 3 months after treatment. Results: Pain scores were reduced over the study in the PRP (mean change = −5.00 ± 1.17 to −5.47 ± 1.46) and WB groups (mean change = −5.29 ± 2.56 to −6.47 ± 2.83), with no difference between groups (P > 0.05). One month and 3 months after treatment, successful treatment (RMS of ≤ 2) was respectively observed in 29.4% and 82.3% of the PRP and in 47.1% and 76.4% of the WB groups (P > 0.05). Also, fascia thickness was decreased in both the PRP and WB groups (mean change = −1.74 ± 1.11 vs. −1.21 ± 0.73 mm, respectively, P = 0.115). Conclusions: Significant improvement in pain and function, as well as decrease in plantar fascia thickness, was observed by intralesional injection of the PRP and WB in patients with chronic PF. The study results indicate similar effectiveness between PRP and WB for the treatment of chronic PF in short-term. PMID:27274499

  3. Physical activity, mindfulness meditation, or heart rate variability biofeedback for stress reduction: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    van der Zwan, Judith Esi; de Vente, Wieke; Huizink, Anja C; Bögels, Susan M; de Bruin, Esther I

    2015-12-01

    In contemporary western societies stress is highly prevalent, therefore the need for stress-reducing methods is great. This randomized controlled trial compared the efficacy of self-help physical activity (PA), mindfulness meditation (MM), and heart rate variability biofeedback (HRV-BF) in reducing stress and its related symptoms. We randomly allocated 126 participants to PA, MM, or HRV-BF upon enrollment, of whom 76 agreed to participate. The interventions consisted of psycho-education and an introduction to the specific intervention techniques and 5 weeks of daily exercises at home. The PA exercises consisted of a vigorous-intensity activity of free choice. The MM exercises consisted of guided mindfulness meditation. The HRV-BF exercises consisted of slow breathing with a heart rate variability biofeedback device. Participants received daily reminders for their exercises and were contacted weekly to monitor their progress. They completed questionnaires prior to, directly after, and 6 weeks after the intervention. Results indicated an overall beneficial effect consisting of reduced stress, anxiety and depressive symptoms, and improved psychological well-being and sleep quality. No significant between-intervention effect was found, suggesting that PA, MM, and HRV-BF are equally effective in reducing stress and its related symptoms. These self-help interventions provide easily accessible help for people with stress complaints. PMID:26111942

  4. Physical activity, mindfulness meditation, or heart rate variability biofeedback for stress reduction: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    van der Zwan, Judith Esi; de Vente, Wieke; Huizink, Anja C; Bögels, Susan M; de Bruin, Esther I

    2015-12-01

    In contemporary western societies stress is highly prevalent, therefore the need for stress-reducing methods is great. This randomized controlled trial compared the efficacy of self-help physical activity (PA), mindfulness meditation (MM), and heart rate variability biofeedback (HRV-BF) in reducing stress and its related symptoms. We randomly allocated 126 participants to PA, MM, or HRV-BF upon enrollment, of whom 76 agreed to participate. The interventions consisted of psycho-education and an introduction to the specific intervention techniques and 5 weeks of daily exercises at home. The PA exercises consisted of a vigorous-intensity activity of free choice. The MM exercises consisted of guided mindfulness meditation. The HRV-BF exercises consisted of slow breathing with a heart rate variability biofeedback device. Participants received daily reminders for their exercises and were contacted weekly to monitor their progress. They completed questionnaires prior to, directly after, and 6 weeks after the intervention. Results indicated an overall beneficial effect consisting of reduced stress, anxiety and depressive symptoms, and improved psychological well-being and sleep quality. No significant between-intervention effect was found, suggesting that PA, MM, and HRV-BF are equally effective in reducing stress and its related symptoms. These self-help interventions provide easily accessible help for people with stress complaints.

  5. A 5-year randomized trial to compare 1 or 2 implants for implant overdentures.

    PubMed

    Bryant, S R; Walton, J N; MacEntee, M I

    2015-01-01

    The hypothesis of this 5-y randomized clinical trial was that there would be no significant difference in the satisfaction of edentulous participants with removable complete overdentures attached to 1 or 2 mandibular implants. Secondary aims were to test changes in satisfaction between and within the groups from baseline to 5 y and differences between the groups in implant survival and prosthodontic maintenance over 5 y. Each of the 86 participants (mean age, 67 y) was randomly allocated to receive either 1 implant in the midline (group 1) or 2 implants in the canine areas (group 2) attached to a mandibular overdenture opposing a maxillary complete denture. Satisfaction was self-assessed by participants on a visual analog scale at baseline prior to implants, as well as at 2 mo and 1, 3, and 5 y with implant overdentures, whereas implant survival and prosthodontic maintenance were assessed by clinical examination. After 5 y, 29 participants in group 1 and 33 in group 2 were available, with most dropouts due to death. Satisfaction with the implant denture after 5 y was significantly (P < 0.001) higher than at baseline in both groups and remained with no significant difference (P = 0.32) between the groups. No implants failed in group 1 but 5 failed before loading in 4 participants in group 2. Most participants required maintenance or occasionally denture replacement, and although differences between the groups were not statistically significant, group 1 experienced almost twice as many fractured dentures usually adjacent to the implant attachment. We conclude that there were no significant differences after 5 y in satisfaction or survival of implants with mandibular overdentures retained by 1 implant or 2 implants. Additional research is required to confirm long-term treatment effectiveness of single-implant dentures and the implications of prosthetic maintenance with implant overdentures (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02117856).

  6. A comparative analysis of recruitment methods used in a randomized trial of diabetes education interventions.

    PubMed

    Beaton, Sarah J; Sperl-Hillen, JoAnn M; Worley, Ann Von; Fernandes, Omar D; Baumer, Dorothy; Hanson, Ann M; Parker, Emily D; Busch, Maureen E; Davis, Herbert T; Spain, C Victor

    2010-11-01

    Recruitment methods heavily impact budget and outcomes in clinical trials. We conducted a post-hoc examination of the efficiency and cost of three different recruitment methods used in Journey for Control of Diabetes: the IDEA Study, a randomized controlled trial evaluating outcomes of group and individual diabetes education in New Mexico and Minnesota. Electronic databases were used to identify health plan members with diabetes and then one of the following three methods was used to recruit study participants: 1. Minnesota Method 1--Mail only (first half of recruitment period). Mailed invitations with return-response forms. 2. Minnesota Method 2--Mail and selective phone calls (second half of recruitment period). Mailed invitations with return-response forms and subsequent phone calls to nonresponders. 3. New Mexico Method 3--Mail and non-selective phone calls (full recruitment period): Mailed invitations with subsequent phone calls to all. The combined methods succeeded in meeting the recruitment goal of 623 subjects. There were 147 subjects recruited using Minnesota's Method 1, 190 using Minnesota's Method 2, and 286 using New Mexico's Method 3. Efficiency rates (percentage of invited patients who enrolled) were 4.2% for Method 1, 8.4% for Method 2, and 7.9% for Method 3. Calculated costs per enrolled subject were $71.58 (Method 1), $85.47 (Method 2), and $92.09 (Method 3). A mail-only method to assess study interest was relatively inexpensive but not efficient enough to sustain recruitment targets. Phone call follow-up after mailed invitations added to recruitment efficiency. Use of return-response forms with selective phone follow-up to non-responders was cost effective.

  7. The TOPSHOCK study: Effectiveness of radial shockwave therapy compared to focused shockwave therapy for treating patellar tendinopath - design of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Patellar tendinopathy is a chronic overuse injury of the patellar tendon that is especially prevalent in people who are involved in jumping activities. Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy is a relatively new treatment modality for tendinopathies. It seems to be a safe and promising part of the rehabilitation program for patellar tendinopathy. Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy originally used focused shockwaves. Several years ago a new kind of shockwave therapy was introduced: radial shockwave therapy. Studies that investigate the effectiveness of radial shockwave therapy as treatment for patellar tendinopathy are scarce. Therefore the aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of focussed shockwave therapy and radial shockwave therapy as treatments for patellar tendinopathy. Methods/design The TOPSHOCK study (Tendinopathy Of Patella SHOCKwave) is a two-armed randomised controlled trial in which the effectiveness of focussed shockwave therapy and radial shockwave therapy are directly compared. Outcome assessors and patients are blinded as to which treatment is given. Patients undergo three sessions of either focused shockwave therapy or radial shockwave therapy at 1-week intervals, both in combination with eccentric decline squat training. Follow-up measurements are scheduled just before treatments 2 and 3, and 1, 4, 7 and 12 weeks after the final treatment. The main outcome measure is the Dutch VISA-P questionnaire, which asks for pain, function and sports participation in subjects with patellar tendinopathy. Secondary outcome measures are pain determined with a VAS during ADL, sports and decline squats, rating of subjective improvement and overall satisfaction with the treatment. Patients will also record their sports activities, pain during and after these activities, and concurrent medical treatment on a weekly basis in a web-based diary. Results will be analysed according to the intention-to-treat principle. Discussion The TOPSHOCK study is the

  8. Clinical Health Outcomes Initiative in Comparative Effectiveness for Bipolar Disorder (Bipolar CHOICE): A Pragmatic Trial of Complex Treatment for a Complex Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Sylvia, Louisa G.; Leon, Andrew C.; Reilly-Harrington, Noreen; Shesler, Leah W.; McElroy, Susan L.; Friedman, Edward S.; Thase, Michael E.; Shelton, Richard C.; Bowden, Charles; Tohen, Mauricio; Singh, Vivek; Deckersbach, Thilo; Ketter, Terence; Kocsis, James; McInnis, Melvin G.; Schoenfeld, David; Bobo, William V.; Calabrese, Joseph R.

    2015-01-01

    . Conclusion We expect that this study will inform our understanding of the benefits and harms of lithium, a classic mood stabilizer, compared to quetiapine, a second generation antipsychotic with broad-spectrum activity in bipolar disorder and will provide an example of a well-designed and well-conducted randomized comparative effectiveness clinical trial. PMID:24346608

  9. Active video games to promote physical activity in children with cancer: a randomized clinical trial with follow-up

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Low levels of physical activity, musculoskeletal morbidity and weight gain are commonly reported problems in children with cancer. Intensive medical treatment and a decline in physical activity may also result in reduced motor performance. Therefore, simple and inexpensive ways to promote physical activity and exercise are becoming an increasingly important part of children’s cancer treatment. Methods The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of active video games in promotion of physical activity in children with cancer. The research is conducted as a parallel randomized clinical trial with follow-up. Patients between 3 and 16 years old, diagnosed with cancer and treated with vincristine in two specialized medical centers are asked to participate. Based on statistical estimates, the target enrollment is 40 patients. The intervention includes playing elective active video games and, in addition, education and consultations for the family. The control group will receive a general recommendation for physical activity for 30 minutes per day. The main outcomes are the amount of physical activity and sedentary behavior. Other outcomes include motor performance, fatigue and metabolic risk factors. The outcomes are examined with questionnaires, diaries, physical examinations and blood tests at baseline and at 2, 6, 12 and 30 months after the baseline. Additionally, the children’s perceptions of the most enjoyable activation methods are explored through an interview at 2 months. Discussion This trial will help to answer the question of whether playing active video games is beneficial for children with cancer. It will also provide further reasoning for physical activity promotion and training of motor skills during treatment. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01748058 (October 15, 2012). PMID:24708773

  10. An assessment of methods of treating viral warts by comparative treatment trials based on a standard design.

    PubMed

    Bunney, M H; Nolan, M W; Williams, D A

    1976-06-01

    A series of eleven comparative wart treatment trials undertaken between 1969 and 1975 and involving 1802 patients is described. A method of coding provided groups of patients matched for age, type, number and duration of warts, within which treatments could be randomized. The variation in response to treatment was shown to be influenced significantly by these factors and the level of cure to depend on the proportions of the various response groups within the population under consideration. These proportions were found to vary geographically and at different periods. In all the trials the results were assessed at 12 weeks. In the treatment of hand warts, the percentage cure of patients treated with liquid nitrogen fell significantly from 75 to 40% when the interval between freezings was increased from 3 to 4 weeks. The average number of freezings required for a cure was 3-1 amongst all patients cured by 6 or less freezings at intervals of 2 or 3 weeks. In a two-centre trial there was no significant difference between the percentage cure of patients with hand warts treated with liquid nitrogen (69%) and of those applying a paint containing salicylic and lactic acids (SAL) (67%). Patients receiving both treatments concurrently did better (78%) but the difference was not found to be statistically significant. In the treatment of simple plantar warts the percentage cure for the SAL paint (84%) was found to compare favourably with that for a podophyllin treatment (81%). Only one of the patients cured by the paint in that trial was found to have had a recurrence after 6 months. The paint was found to be satisfactory for use under general practice conditions. Additions to the formula did not alter its effectiveness. In the treatment of mosaic plantar warts the overall percentage cure for the SAL paint in a series of comparative trials (1969-75) was 45%. In these trials it was compared directly with one or more other preparations. No differences were found between its

  11. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy vs. Tai Chi for Late Life Insomnia and Inflammatory Risk: A Randomized Controlled Comparative Efficacy Trial

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Michael R.; Olmstead, Richard; Carrillo, Carmen; Sadeghi, Nina; Breen, Elizabeth C.; Witarama, Tuff; Yokomizo, Megumi; Lavretsky, Helen; Carroll, Judith E.; Motivala, Sarosh J.; Bootzin, Richard; Nicassio, Perry

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the comparative efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), Tai Chi Chih (TCC), and sleep seminar education control (SS) on the primary outcome of insomnia diagnosis, and secondary outcomes of sleep quality, fatigue, depressive symptoms, and inflammation in older adults with insomnia. Design: Randomized controlled, comparative efficacy trial. Setting: Los Angeles community. Patients: 123 older adults with chronic and primary insomnia. Interventions: Random assignment to CBT, TCC, or SS for 2-hour group sessions weekly over 4 months with follow-up at 7 and 16 months. Measurements: Insomnia diagnosis, patient-reported outcomes, polysomnography (PSG), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Results: CBT performed better than TCC and SS in remission of clinical insomnia as ascertained by a clinician (P < 0.01), and also showed greater and more sustained improvement in sleep quality, sleep parameters, fatigue, and depressive symptoms than TCC and SS (all P values < 0.01). As compared to SS, CBT was associated with a reduced risk of high CRP levels (> 3.0 mg/L) at 16 months (odds ratio [OR], 0.26 [95% CI, 0.07–0.97] P < 0.05). Remission of insomnia was associated with lower levels of CRP (P < 0.05) at 16 months. TCC was associated with improvements in sleep quality, fatigue, and depressive symptoms as compared to SS (all P's < 0.05), but not insomnia remission. PSG measures did not change. Conclusions: Treatment of late-life insomnia is better achieved and sustained by cognitive behavioral therapies. Insomnia treatment and remission reduces a marker of inflammatory risk, which has implications for cardiovascular morbidity and diabetes observed with sleep disturbance in epidemiologic surveys. Clinical Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00280020 Citation: Irwin MR, Olmstead R, Carrillo C, Sadeghi N, Breen EC, Witarama T, Yokomizo M, Lavretsky H, Carroll JE, Motivala SJ, Bootzin R, Nicassio P. Cognitive behavioral

  12. Care in specialist medical and mental health unit compared with standard care for older people with cognitive impairment admitted to general hospital: randomised controlled trial (NIHR TEAM trial)

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Sarah E; Bradshaw, Lucy E; Kearney, Fiona C; Russell, Catherine; Whittamore, Kathy H; Foster, Pippa E R; Mamza, Jil; Gladman, John R F; Jones, Rob G; Lewis, Sarah A; Porock, Davina

    2013-01-01

    Objective To develop and evaluate a best practice model of general hospital acute medical care for older people with cognitive impairment. Design Randomised controlled trial, adapted to take account of constraints imposed by a busy acute medical admission system. Setting Large acute general hospital in the United Kingdom. Participants 600 patients aged over 65 admitted for acute medical care, identified as “confused” on admission. Interventions Participants were randomised to a specialist medical and mental health unit, designed to deliver best practice care for people with delirium or dementia, or to standard care (acute geriatric or general medical wards). Features of the specialist unit included joint staffing by medical and mental health professionals; enhanced staff training in delirium, dementia, and person centred dementia care; provision of organised purposeful activity; environmental modification to meet the needs of those with cognitive impairment; delirium prevention; and a proactive and inclusive approach to family carers. Main outcome measures Primary outcome: number of days spent at home over the 90 days after randomisation. Secondary outcomes: structured non-participant observations to ascertain patients’ experiences; satisfaction of family carers with hospital care. When possible, outcome assessment was blind to allocation. Results There was no significant difference in days spent at home between the specialist unit and standard care groups (median 51 v 45 days, 95% confidence interval for difference −12 to 24; P=0.3). Median index hospital stay was 11 versus 11 days, mortality 22% versus 25% (−9% to 4%), readmission 32% versus 35% (−10% to 5%), and new admission to care home 20% versus 28% (−16% to 0) for the specialist unit and standard care groups, respectively. Patients returning home spent a median of 70.5 versus 71.0 days at home (−6.0 to 6.5). Patients on the specialist unit spent significantly more time with positive mood or

  13. Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    Clinical trials are research studies that test how well new medical approaches work in people. Each study answers ... prevent, screen for, diagnose, or treat a disease. Clinical trials may also compare a new treatment to a ...

  14. Initial Open Trial of a Computerized Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spates, C. Richard; Kalata, Alyssa H.; Ozeki, Satoshi; Stanton, Cory E.; Peters, Sofia

    2013-01-01

    This article presents preliminary findings from use of a novel computer program that implements an evidence-based psychological intervention to treat depression based on behavioral activation (BA) therapy. The program is titled “Building a Meaningful Life Through Behavioral Activation”. The findings derive from an open trial with moderate to…

  15. Feedback about More Accurate versus Less Accurate Trials: Differential Effects on Self-Confidence and Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badami, Rokhsareh; VaezMousavi, Mohammad; Wulf, Gabriele; Namazizadeh, Mahdi

    2012-01-01

    One purpose of the present study was to examine whether self-confidence or anxiety would be differentially affected by feedback from more accurate rather than less accurate trials. The second purpose was to determine whether arousal variations (activation) would predict performance. On Day 1, participants performed a golf putting task under one of…

  16. Promotion of physical activity and fitness in sedentary patients with Parkinson’s disease: randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    van Nimwegen, Marlies; Speelman, Arlène D; Overeem, Sebastiaan; van de Warrenburg, Bart P; Smulders, Katrijn; Dontje, Manon L; Borm, George F; Backx, Frank J G; Munneke, Marten

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether a multifaceted behavioural change programme increases physical activities in patients with Parkinson’s disease. Design Multicentre randomised controlled trial. Setting 32 community hospitals in the Netherlands, collaborating in a nationwide network (ParkinsonNet). Participants 586 sedentary patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease aged between 40 and 75 years with mild to moderate disease severity (Hoehn and Yahr stage ≤3). Intervention Patients were randomly assigned to the ParkFit programme or a matched general physiotherapy intervention. ParkFit is a multifaceted behavioural change programme, designed specifically to achieve an enduring increase in the level of physical activity (coaches using motivational strategies; ambulatory feedback). Main outcome measures The primary endpoint was the level of physical activity, measured every six months with a standardised seven day recall (LASA physical activity questionnaire—LAPAQ). Secondary endpoints included two other measures of physical activity (activity diary and ambulatory activity monitor), quality of life (Parkinson’s disease questionnaire—PDQ-39), and fitness (six minute walk test). Results 540 (92.2%) patients completed the primary outcome. During follow-up, overall time spent on physical activities (LAPAQ) was comparable between the groups (adjusted group difference 7%, 95% confidence interval −3 to 17%; P=0.19). Analyses of three secondary outcomes indicated increased physical activity in ParkFit patients, as suggested by the activity diary (difference 30%; P<0.001), the activity monitor (difference 12%; P<0.001), and the six minute walk test (difference 4.8 m; P=0.05). PDQ-39 did not differ between ParkFit patients and controls (difference −0.9 points; P=0.14). The number of fallers was comparable between ParkFit patients (184/299; 62%) and controls (191/287; 67%). Conclusions The ParkFit behavioural change programme did not increase overall physical

  17. Fast immunosensing technique to detect Legionella pneumophila in different natural and anthropogenic environments: comparative and collaborative trials

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Legionellosis is an uncommon form of pneumonia. After a clinical encounter, the necessary antibiotic treatment is available if the diagnosis is made early in the illness. Before the clinical encounter, early detection of the main pathogen involved, Legionella pneumophila, in hazardous environments is important in preventing infectious levels of this bacterium. In this study a qualitative test based on combined magnetic immunocapture and enzyme-immunoassay for the fast detection of Legionella pneumophila in water samples was compared with the standard method, in both comparative and collaborative trials. The test was based on the use of anti-Legionella pneumophila antibodies immobilized on magnetic microspheres. The final protocol included concentration by filtration, resuspension and immunomagnetic capture. The whole assay took less than 1 hour to complete. Results A comparative trial was performed against the standard culture method (ISO 11731) on both artificially and naturally contaminated water samples, for two matrices: chlorinated tap water and cooling tower water. Performance characteristics of the test used as screening with culture confirmation resulted in sensitivity, specificity, false positive, false negative, and efficiency of 96.6%, 100%, 0%, 3.4%, and 97.8%, respectively. The detection limit at the level under which the false negative rate increases to 50% (LOD50) was 93 colony forming units (CFU) in the volume examined for both tested matrices. The collaborative trial included twelve laboratories. Water samples spiked with certified reference materials were tested. In this study the coincidence level between the two methods was 95.8%. Conclusion Results demonstrate the applicability of this immunosensing technique to the rapid, simple, and efficient detection of Legionella pneumophila in water samples. This test is not based on microbial growth, so it could be used as a rapid screening technique for the detection of L. pneumophila in

  18. Adverse Event Recording and Reporting in Clinical Trials Comparing Lumbar Disk Replacement with Lumbar Fusion: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Hiratzka, Jayme; Rastegar, Farbod; Contag, Alec G; Norvell, Daniel C; Anderson, Paul A; Hart, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Objectives (1) To compare the quality of adverse event (AE) methodology and reporting among randomized trials comparing lumbar fusion with lumbar total disk replacement (TDR) using established AE reporting systems; (2) to compare the AEs and reoperations of lumbar spinal fusion with those from lumbar TDR; (3) to make recommendations on how to report AEs in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) so that surgeons and patients have more-detailed and comprehensive information when making treatment decisions. Methods A systematic search of PubMed, the Cochrane collaboration database, and the National Guideline Clearinghouse through May 2015 was conducted. Randomized controlled trials with at least 2 years of follow-up comparing lumbar artificial disk replacement with lumbar fusion were included. Patients were required to have axial or mechanical low back pain of ≥3 months' duration due to degenerative joint disease defined as degenerative disk disease, facet joint disease, or spondylosis. Outcomes included the quality of AE acquisition methodology and results reporting, and AEs were defined as those secondary to the procedure and reoperations. Individual and pooled relative risks and their 95% confidence intervals comparing lumbar TDR with fusion were calculated. Results RCTs demonstrated a generally poor description of methods for assessing AEs. There was a consistent lack of clear definition or grading for these events. Furthermore, there was a high degree of variation in reporting of surgery-related AEs. Most studies lacked adequate reporting of the timing of AEs, and there were no clear distinctions between acute or chronic AEs. Meta-analysis of the pooled data demonstrated a twofold increased risk of AEs in patients having lumbar fusion compared with patients having lumbar TDR at 2-year follow-up, and this relative risk was maintained at 5 years. Furthermore, the pooled data demonstrated a 1.7 times greater relative risk of

  19. A noninferiority clinical trial comparing fluconazole and ketoconazole in combination with cephalexin for the treatment of dogs with Malassezia dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Sickafoose, L; Hosgood, G; Snook, T; Westermeyer, R; Merchant, S

    2010-01-01

    This double-blinded noninferiority clinical trial evaluated the use of oral fluconazole for the treatment of Malassezia dermatitis in dogs by comparing it with use of an accepted therapeutic agent, ketoconazole. Dogs presenting with Malassezia dermatitis were treated with either fluconazole or ketoconazole in addition to cephalexin for concurrent bacterial dermatitis. Statistically significant improvements in cytologic yeast count, clinical signs associated with Malassezia dermatitis, and pruritus were seen with both antifungal treatments. There was no statistical difference between the treatments with regard to the magnitude of reduction in these parameters. These results suggest that fluconazole is at least as effective as ketoconazole for the treatment of dogs with Malassezia dermatitis. PMID:20957617

  20. Comparative trials using albendazole and mebendazole in the treatment of soil-transmitted helminths in schoolchildren on Penang, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Rahman, W A

    1996-12-01

    Trials using albendazole and mebendazole, as single 400 mg dose treatments, against soil-transmitted helminths, were carried out in 7-9 and 10-12 years-old schoolchildren living in urban and rural environments in Penang, Malaysia. Both drugs were equally effective in treating trichuriasis and ascariasis in both age groups and environments. However, mebendazole is not so effective in the treatment for hookworms when compared to albendazole. It is suggested that albendazole should be considered the drug of choice for mass chemotherapy for Penang.

  1. Rationale and design of the Randomized Evaluation of patients with Stable angina Comparing Utilization of noninvasive Examinations (RESCUE) trial.

    PubMed

    Stillman, Arthur E; Gatsonis, Constantine; Lima, João A C; Black, William C; Cormack, Jean; Gareen, Ilana; Hoffmann, Udo; Liu, Tao; Mavromatis, Kreton; Schnall, Mitchell D; Udelson, James E; Woodard, Pamela K

    2016-09-01

    RESCUE is a phase III, randomized, controlled, multicenter, comparative efficacy study, designed to compare two diagnostic imaging/treatment paradigms that use coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) or single photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT MPI) for assisting in the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease in patients with stable angina symptoms, and guiding subsequent treatment. The study is based on the hypothesis that CCTA as a diagnostic tool is associated with no increase in cardiac risk, decreased cost, and reduced radiation exposure compared with SPECT MPI. The RESCUE trial was funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN) Fund for Imaging Innovation, began in 2011, and completed in 2014. PMID:27595676

  2. Effectiveness of an Activity Tracker- and Internet-Based Adaptive Walking Program for Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Poirier, Josée; Bennett, Wendy L; Jerome, Gerald J; Shah, Nina G; Lazo, Mariana; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh; Clark, Jeanne M

    2016-01-01

    Background The benefits of physical activity are well documented, but scalable programs to promote activity are needed. Interventions that assign tailored and dynamically adjusting goals could effect significant increases in physical activity but have not yet been implemented at scale. Objective Our aim was to examine the effectiveness of an open access, Internet-based walking program that assigns daily step goals tailored to each participant. Methods A two-arm, pragmatic randomized controlled trial compared the intervention to no treatment. Participants were recruited from a workplace setting and randomized to a no-treatment control (n=133) or to treatment (n=132). Treatment participants received a free wireless activity tracker and enrolled in the walking program, Walkadoo. Assessments were fully automated: activity tracker recorded primary outcomes (steps) without intervention by the participant or investigators. The two arms were compared on change in steps per day from baseline to follow-up (after 6 weeks of treatment) using a two-tailed independent samples t test. Results Participants (N=265) were 66.0% (175/265) female with an average age of 39.9 years. Over half of the participants (142/265, 53.6%) were sedentary (<5000 steps/day) and 44.9% (119/265) were low to somewhat active (5000-9999 steps/day). The intervention group significantly increased their steps by 970 steps/day over control (P<.001), with treatment effects observed in sedentary (P=.04) and low-to-somewhat active (P=.004) participants alike. Conclusions The program is effective in increasing daily steps. Participants benefited from the program regardless of their initial activity level. A tailored, adaptive approach using wireless activity trackers is realistically implementable and scalable. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02229409, https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02229409 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6eiWCvBYe) PMID:26860434

  3. Working memory training for adult hearing aid users: study protocol for a double-blind randomized active controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background One in ten people aged between 55 to 74 years have a significant hearing impairment in their better hearing ear (as defined by audiometric hearing thresholds). However, it is becoming increasingly clear that the challenges faced by older listeners cannot be explained by the audiogram alone. The ability for people with hearing loss to use cognition to support speech perception allows for compensation of the degraded auditory input. This in turn offers promise for new cognitive-based rehabilitative interventions. Working memory is known to be highly associated with language comprehension and recent evidence has shown significant generalization of learning from trained working memory tasks to improvements in sentence-repetition skills of children with severe to profound hearing loss. This evidence offers support for further investigation into the potential benefits of working memory training to improve speech perception abilities in other hearing impaired populations. Methods/Design This is a double-blind randomized active controlled trial aiming to assess whether a program of working memory training results in improvements in untrained measures of cognition, speech perception and self-reported hearing abilities in adult hearing aid users (aged 50 to 74 years) with mild-to-moderate hearing loss, compared with an active control group who receive a placebo version of the working memory training program. Discussion The present study aims to generate high-quality preliminary evidence for the efficacy of working memory training for adults with mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss who are existing hearing aid users. This trial addresses a number of gaps in the published literature assessing training interventions for people with hearing loss, and in the general literature surrounding working memory training, such as the inclusion of an active control group, participant and tester blinding, and increased transparency in reporting. Trial registration

  4. Impact of weighted composite compared to traditional composite endpoints for the design of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Bakal, Jeffrey A; Westerhout, Cynthia M; Armstrong, Paul W

    2015-12-01

    Composite endpoints are commonly used in cardiovascular clinical trials. When using a composite endpoint a subject is considered to have an event when the first component endpoint has occurred. The use of composite endpoints offers the ability to incorporate several clinically important endpoint events thereby augmenting the event rate and increasing statistical power for a given sample size. One assumption of the composite is that all component events are of equal clinical importance. This assumption is rarely achieved given the diversity of component endpoints included. One means of adjusting for this diversity is to adjust the outcomes using severity weights determined a priori. The use of a weighted endpoint also allows for the incorporation of multiple endpoints per patient. Although weighting the outcomes lowers the effective number of events, it offers additional information that reduces the variance of the estimate. We created a series of simulation studies to examine the effect on power as the individual components of a typical composite were changed. In one study, we noted that the weighted composite was able to offer discriminative power when the component outcomes were altered, while the traditional method was not. In the other study, we noted that the weighted composite offered a similar level of power to the traditional composite when the change was driven by the more severe endpoints.

  5. A comparative trial of three treatment schedules for the eradication of scabies.

    PubMed

    Taplin, D; Rivera, A; Walker, J G; Roth, W I; Reno, D; Meinking, T

    1983-10-01

    A trial of three treatment schedules, consisting of 1% gamma benzene hexachloride (GBH) lotion applied head to toe and left on the body for 2, 6, or 12 to 24 hours was conducted on an island of 2,076 persons, approximately 70% of whom had clinical evidence of scabies. The island is situated off the north coast of the Republic of Panama. Examination at 1 month after therapy showed that both the 6-hour and 12- to 24-hour cure rate was high (96% and 98%). There was a significantly lower cure rate in the 2-hour group, in which only 82% were cured. Eleven to twelve percent of the subjects became infested in all groups, presumably due to contact with untreated persons with scabies on the island. A single 6-hour application of 1% GBH lotion appears to be adequate therapy for scabies if properly applied. The entire population at risk should be treated at the same time if possible to reduce or eliminate the risk of infestation. No adverse reactions to 1% GBH lotion were observed.

  6. Cost-Effectiveness of a Long-Term Internet-Delivered Worksite Health Promotion Programme on Physical Activity and Nutrition: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robroek, Suzan J. W.; Polinder, Suzanne; Bredt, Folef J.; Burdorf, Alex

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a long-term workplace health promotion programme on physical activity (PA) and nutrition. In total, 924 participants enrolled in a 2-year cluster randomized controlled trial, with departments (n = 74) within companies (n = 6) as the unit of randomization. The intervention was compared with a…

  7. A multicentre, pragmatic, parallel group, randomised controlled trial to compare the clinical and cost-effectiveness of three physiotherapy-led exercise interventions for knee osteoarthritis in older adults: the BEEP trial protocol (ISRCTN: 93634563)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Exercise is consistently recommended for older adults with knee pain related to osteoarthritis. However, the effects from exercise are typically small and short-term, likely linked to insufficient individualisation of the exercise programme and limited attention to supporting exercise adherence over time. The BEEP randomised trial aims to improve patients’ short and long-term outcomes from exercise. It will test the overall effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of two physiotherapy-led exercise interventions (Individually Tailored Exercise and Targeted Exercise Adherence) to improve the individual tailoring of, and adherence to exercise, compared with usual physiotherapy care. Methods/design Based on the learning from a pilot study (ISRCTN 23294263), the BEEP trial is a multi-centre, pragmatic, parallel group, individually randomised controlled trial, with embedded longitudinal qualitative interviews. 500 adults in primary care, aged 45 years and over with knee pain will be randomised to 1 of 3 treatment groups delivered by fully trained physiotherapists in up to 6 NHS services. These are: Usual Physiotherapy Care (control group consisting of up to 4 treatment sessions of advice and exercise), Individually Tailored Exercise (an individualised, supervised and progressed lower-limb exercise programme) or Targeted Exercise Adherence (supporting patients to adhere to exercise and to engage in general physical activity over the longer-term). The primary outcomes are pain and function as measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis index. A comprehensive range of secondary outcomes are also included. Outcomes are measured at 3, 6 (primary outcome time-point), 9, 18 and 36 months. Data on adverse events will also be collected. Semi-structured, qualitative interviews with a subsample of 30 participants (10 from each treatment group) will be undertaken at two time-points (end of treatment and 12 to 18 months later) and analysed thematically

  8. Multi-centre cluster randomised trial comparing a community group exercise programme with home based exercise with usual care for people aged 65 and over in primary care: protocol of the ProAct 65+ trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Regular physical activity reduces the risk of mortality from all causes, with a powerful beneficial effect on risk of falls and hip fractures. However, physical activity levels are low in the older population and previous studies have demonstrated only modest, short-term improvements in activity levels with intervention. Design/Methods Pragmatic 3 arm parallel design cluster controlled trial of class-based exercise (FAME), home-based exercise (OEP) and usual care amongst older people (aged 65 years and over) in primary care. The primary outcome is the achievement of recommended physical activity targets 12 months after cessation of intervention. Secondary outcomes include functional assessments, predictors of exercise adherence, the incidence of falls, fear of falling, quality of life and continuation of physical activity after intervention, over a two-year follow up. An economic evaluation including participant and NHS costs will be embedded in the clinical trial. Discussion The ProAct65 trial will explore and evaluate the potential for increasing physical activity among older people recruited through general practice. The trial will be conducted in a relatively unselected population, and will address problems of selective recruitment, potentially low retention rates, variable quality of interventions and falls risk. Trial Registration Trial Registration: ISRCTN43453770 PMID:20082696

  9. Efficacy and causal mechanism of an online social media intervention to increase physical activity: Results of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingwen; Brackbill, Devon; Yang, Sijia; Centola, Damon

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify what features of social media – promotional messaging or peer networks – can increase physical activity. Method: A 13-week social media-based exercise program was conducted at a large Northeastern university in Philadelphia, PA. In a randomized controlled trial, 217 graduate students from the University were randomized to three conditions: a control condition with a basic online program for enrolling in weekly exercise classes led by instructors of the University for 13 weeks, a media condition that supplemented the basic program with weekly online promotional media messages that encourage physical activity, and a social condition that replaced the media content with an online network of four to six anonymous peers composed of other participants of the program, in which each participant was able to see their peers' progress in enrolling in classes. The primary outcome was the number of enrollments in exercise classes, and the secondary outcomes were self-reported physical activities. Data were collected in 2014. Results: Participants enrolled in 5.5 classes on average. Compared with enrollment in the control condition (mean = 4.5), promotional messages moderately increased enrollment (mean = 5.7, p = 0.08), while anonymous social networks significantly increased enrollment (mean = 6.3, p = 0.02). By the end of the program, participants in the social condition reported exercising moderately for an additional 1.6 days each week compared with the baseline, which was significantly more than an additional 0.8 days in the control condition. Conclusion: Social influence from anonymous online peers was more successful than promotional messages for improving physical activity. Clinical Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02267369. PMID:26844132

  10. A multicentre randomised, 1-year comparative effectiveness, parallel-group trial protocol of a physical therapy approach compared to corticosteroid injections

    PubMed Central

    Deyle, Gail D; Gill, Norman W; Rhon, Daniel I; Allen, Chris S; Allison, Stephen C; Hando, Ben R; Petersen, Evan J; Dusenberry, Douglas I; Bellamy, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Corticosteroid injections (CSIs) are commonly used as an initial or a primary intervention for knee osteoarthritis (OA). Consistent evidence indicates CSIs offer symptom relief with conflicting reports regarding long-term efficacy. Physical therapy (PT) offers a non-invasive alternative. There is moderate evidence suggesting short-term and long-term symptom relief and functional improvement with PT interventions. Patients with knee OA are more commonly prescribed CSI than PT prior to total joint replacement. UnitedHealthcare and Military Health System data show substantially more total knee replacement patients receive preoperative CSI than PT. There are no studies comparing CSI to a PT approach in individuals with knee OA. The primary objective of this study is to compare the effectiveness of CSI to PT in individuals with knee OA at 1, 2 and 12 months. Methods and analysis We plan to recruit 156 participants meeting established knee OA criteria. Following informed consent, participants will be randomised to receive either CSI or PT. All participants will receive instruction on recommended exercise and weight control strategies plus usual medical care. The CSI intervention consisting of 3 injections and the PT intervention consisting of 8–12 sessions will be spaced over 12 months. Measures of the dependent variables (DVs) will occur at baseline, 4 weeks, 8 weeks, 6 months and 12 months post enrolment. This pragmatic, randomised clinical trial will be a mixed-model 2×5 factorial design. The independent variables are treatment (CSI and PT) and time with five levels from baseline to 1 year. The primary DV is the Western Ontario & McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC). We will also compare healthcare utilisation between the 2 groups. Ethics and Dissemination The protocol was approved by the Madigan Army Medical Center Institutional Review Board. The authors intend to publish the results in a peer-reviewed source. Trial Registration

  11. Randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effects of progressive resistance training compared to progressive muscle relaxation in breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy: the BEST study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is one of the most common and distressing side effects of cancer and its treatment. During and after radiotherapy breast cancer patients often suffer from CRF which frequently impairs quality of life (QoL). Despite the high prevalence of CRF in breast cancer patients and the severe impact on the physical and emotional well-being, effective treatment methods are scarce. Physical activity for breast cancer patients has been reported to decrease fatigue, to improve emotional well-being and to increase physical strength. The pathophysiological and molecular mechanisms of CRF and the molecular-biologic changes induced by exercise, however, are poorly understood. In the BEST trial we aim to assess the effects of resistance training on fatigue, QoL and physical fitness as well as on molecular, immunological and inflammatory changes in breast cancer patients during adjuvant radiotherapy. Methods/design The BEST study is a prospective randomized, controlled intervention trial investigating the effects of a 12-week supervised progressive resistance training compared to a 12-week supervised muscle relaxation training in 160 patients with breast cancer undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy. To determine the effect of exercise itself beyond potential psychosocial group effects, patients in the control group perform a group-based progressive muscle relaxation training. Main inclusion criterion is histologically confirmed breast cancer stage I-III after lumpectomy or mastectomy with indication for adjuvant radiotherapy. Main exclusion criteria are acute infectious diseases, severe neurological, musculosceletal or cardiorespiratory disorders. The primary endpoint is cancer-related fatigue; secondary endpoints include immunological and inflammatory parameters analyzed in peripheral blood, saliva and urine. In addition, QoL, depression, physical performance and cognitive capacity will be assessed. Discussion The BEST study is the first randomized

  12. Physical activity counseling in overweight and obese primary care patients: Outcomes of the VA-STRIDE randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shasha; Stone, Roslyn A; Hough, Linda J; Haibach, Jeffrey P; Marcus, Bess H; Ciccolo, Joseph T; Kriska, Andrea M; Burkitt, Kelly H; Steenkiste, Ann R; Berger, Marie A; Sevick, Mary A

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this 2-arm randomized clinical trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of a 12-month, expert system-based, print-delivered physical activity intervention in a primary care Veteran population in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Participants were not excluded for many health conditions that typically are exclusionary criteria in physical activity trials. The primary outcome measures were physical activity reported using the Community Healthy Activities Model Program for Seniors (CHAMPS) questionnaire and an accelerometer-based activity assessment at baseline, 6, and 12 months. Of the 232 Veterans enrolled in the study, 208 (89.7%) were retained at the 6-month follow-up and 203 (87.5%) were retained at 12 months. Compared to the attention control, intervention participants had significantly increased odds of meeting the U.S. recommended guideline of ≥ 150 min/week of at least moderate-intensity physical activity at 12 months for the modified CHAMPS (odds ratio [OR] = 2.86; 95% CI: 1.03-7.96; p = 0.04) but not at 6 months (OR = 1.54; 95% CI: 0.56-4.23; p = 0.40). Based on accelerometer data, intervention participants had significantly increased odds of meeting ≥ 150 min/week of moderate-equivalent physical activity at 6 months (OR = 6.26; 95% CI: 1.26-31.22; p = 0.03) and borderline significantly increased odds at 12 months (OR = 4.73; 95% CI: 0.98-22.76; p = 0.053). An expert system physical activity counseling intervention can increase or sustain the proportion of Veterans in primary care meeting current recommendations for moderate-intensity physical activity. Trial Registration Clinical trials.gov identifier: NCT00731094 URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00731094. PMID:26844197

  13. Physical activity counseling in overweight and obese primary care patients: Outcomes of the VA-STRIDE randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shasha; Stone, Roslyn A.; Hough, Linda J.; Haibach, Jeffrey P.; Marcus, Bess H.; Ciccolo, Joseph T.; Kriska, Andrea M.; Burkitt, Kelly H.; Steenkiste, Ann R.; Berger, Marie A.; Sevick, Mary A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this 2-arm randomized clinical trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of a 12-month, expert system-based, print-delivered physical activity intervention in a primary care Veteran population in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Participants were not excluded for many health conditions that typically are exclusionary criteria in physical activity trials. The primary outcome measures were physical activity reported using the Community Healthy Activities Model Program for Seniors (CHAMPS) questionnaire and an accelerometer-based activity assessment at baseline, 6, and 12 months. Of the 232 Veterans enrolled in the study, 208 (89.7%) were retained at the 6-month follow-up and 203 (87.5%) were retained at 12 months. Compared to the attention control, intervention participants had significantly increased odds of meeting the U.S. recommended guideline of ≥ 150 min/week of at least moderate-intensity physical activity at 12 months for the modified CHAMPS (odds ratio [OR] = 2.86; 95% CI: 1.03–7.96; p = 0.04) but not at 6 months (OR = 1.54; 95% CI: 0.56–4.23; p = 0.40). Based on accelerometer data, intervention participants had significantly increased odds of meeting ≥ 150 min/week of moderate-equivalent physical activity at 6 months (OR = 6.26; 95% CI: 1.26–31.22; p = 0.03) and borderline significantly increased odds at 12 months (OR = 4.73; 95% CI: 0.98–22.76; p = 0.053). An expert system physical activity counseling intervention can increase or sustain the proportion of Veterans in primary care meeting current recommendations for moderate-intensity physical activity. Trial Registration Clinical trials.gov identifier: NCT00731094 URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00731094. PMID:26844197

  14. Prevention of Intraoperative Awareness with Explicit Recall in an Unselected Surgical Population: A Randomized Comparative Effectiveness Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mashour, George A.; Shanks, Amy; Tremper, Kevin K.; Kheterpal, Sachin; Turner, Christopher R.; Ramachandran, Satya Krishna; Picton, Paul; Schueller, Christa; Morris, Michelle; Vandervest, John C.; Lin, Nan; Avidan, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Intraoperative awareness with explicit recall occurs in approximately 0.15% of all surgical cases. Efficacy trials based on the Bispectral Index™ (BIS) monitor and anesthetic concentrations have focused on high-risk patients, but there are no effectiveness data applicable to an unselected surgical population. Methods We conducted a randomized controlled trial of unselected surgical patients at three hospitals of a tertiary academic medical center. Surgical cases were randomized to alerting algorithms based on either BIS values or anesthetic concentrations. The primary outcome was the incidence of definite intraoperative awareness; prespecified secondary outcomes included postanesthetic recovery variables. Results The study was terminated due to futility. At interim analysis the incidence of definite awareness was 0.12% (11/9376) (95% CI 0.07 to 0.21%) in the anesthetic concentration group and 0.08% (8/9460) (95% CI 0.04 to 0.16%) in the BIS group (p = 0.48). There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of meeting criteria for recovery room discharge or incidence of nausea and vomiting. By post hoc secondary analysis, the BIS protocol was associated with a 4.7-fold reduction in definite or possible awareness events compared to a cohort receiving no intervention (p = 0.001; 95% CI 1.7 to 13.1). Conclusion This negative trial could not detect a difference in the incidence of definite awareness or recovery variables between monitoring protocols based on either BIS values or anesthetic concentration. By post hoc analysis, a protocol based on BIS monitoring reduced the incidence of definite or possible intraoperative awareness compared to routine care. PMID:22990178

  15. Single port/incision laparoscopic surgery compared with standard three-port laparoscopic surgery for appendicectomy - a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Laparoscopic surgery has become the preferred approach for many procedures because of reduced post-operative pain, better recovery, shorter hospital stay and improved cosmesis. Single incision laparoscopic surgery is one of the many recent variants where either standard ports or a specially designed single multi-channel port is introduced through a single skin incision. While the cosmetic advantage of this is obvious, the evidence base for claims of reduced morbidity and better post-operative recovery is weak. This study aims to compare the effectiveness of single port/incision laparoscopic appendicectomy with standard three-port laparoscopic appendicectomy in adult patients at six weeks post-surgery. We also wish to assess the feasibility of a multicentre randomised controlled trial comparing single port/incision laparoscopic surgery with standard three-port laparoscopic surgery for other surgical techniques. Methods and design Patients diagnosed with suspected appendicitis and requiring surgical treatment will be randomised to receive either standard three-port or single incision laparoscopic surgery. Data will be collected from clinical notes, operation notes and patient reported questionnaires. The following outcomes will be considered: 1. Effectiveness of the surgical procedure in terms of: •patient reported outcomes •clinical outcomes •resource use 2. Feasibility of conducting a randomised controlled trial (RCT) in the emergency surgical setting by quantifying: •patient eligibility •randomisation acceptability •feasibility of blinding participants to the intervention received •completion rates of case report forms and patient reported questionnaires Trial registration ISRCTN66443895 (assigned 10 March 2011, first patient randomised 09 January 2011) PMID:23111090

  16. Comparing Breast Screening Protocols: Inserting Catch Trials Does Not Improve Sensitivity over Double Screening

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Piers D. L.

    2016-01-01

    Breast screening is an important tool for the early detection of breast cancers. However, tumours are typically present in less than 1% of mammograms. This low prevalence could cause radiologists to detect fewer tumours than they otherwise would, an issue known as the prevalence effect. The aim of our study was to investigate a novel breast screening protocol, designed to decrease the number of tumours missed by radiologists, without increasing their workload. We ran two laboratory-based experiments to assess the degree to which the novel protocol, called the catch trial (CT) protocol, resulted in greater sensitivity (d’) than the double screener protocol (DS), currently utilised in Australia. In our first experiment we found evidence that the CT protocol resulted in a criterion shift relative to the DS protocol but the evidence that sensitivity was greater in the CT protocol relative to the DS protocol was less clear. A second experiment, using more realistic stimuli that were more representative of actual tumours, also failed to find convincing evidence that sensitivity was greater in the CT protocol than in the DS protocol. This experiment instead found that both the hit rate and the false alarm rate increased in the CT protocol relative to the DS protocol. So while there was again evidence that the CT protocol induced a criterion shift, the sensitivity appeared to be approximately the same in both protocols. Our results suggest the CT protocol is unlikely to result in an improvement in sensitivity over the DS protocol, so we cannot recommend that it be trialled in a clinical setting. PMID:27723788

  17. A randomized controlled clinical trial of SPA -- the Seattle Protocol for Activity in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Teri, Linda; McCurry, Susan M.; Logsdon, Rebecca G.; Gibbons, Laura E.; Buchner, David M.; Larson, Eric B.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Evaluate the efficacy of a physical activity program (Seattle Protocol for Activity: SPA) for low-exercising older adults, compared to educational health promotion program (HP), combination treatment (SPA+HP), and routine medical care control conditions (RMC). DESIGN Single-blinded, randomized controlled trial with 2 × 2 factorial design. SETTING: November 2001 to September 2004, in community centers in King County, Washington. PARTICIPANTS 273 community-residing, cognitively intact older adults (mean age, 79.2 y; 62% women). INTERVENTIONS SPA (in-class exercises with assistance setting weekly home exercise goals), and HP (information about age-appropriate topics relevant to enhancing health), with randomization to four conditions: SPA only (n = 69), HP only (n = 73), SPA+HP (n = 67), and RMC control (n = 64). Active treatment participants attended nine group classes over three months, followed by five booster sessions over one year. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Self-rated health (SF-36) and depression (GDS). Secondary ratings of physical performance, treatment adherence, and self-rated health and affective function were also collected. RESULTS At 3-months, participants in SPA exercised more and had significantly better self-reported health, strength, and general well-being (p<.05) than participants in HP or RMC. Over 18 months, SPA participants maintained health and physical function benefits, and had continued to exercise more than non-SPA participants. SPA+HP was not significantly better than SPA alone. Better adherence was associated with better outcomes. CONCLUSION Older adults participating in low levels of regular exercise can establish and maintain a home-based exercise program that yields immediate and long-term physical and affective benefits. PMID:21718259

  18. Pulsed electromagnetic fields on postmenopausal osteoporosis in Southwest China: a randomized, active-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui-Fang; Yang, Lin; He, Hong-Chen; Zhou, Jun; Liu, Ying; Wang, Chun-Yan; Wu, Yuan-Chao; He, Cheng-Qi

    2013-05-01

    A randomized, active-controlled clinical trial was conducted to examine the effect of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) on women with postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO) in southwest China. Forty-four participants were randomly assigned to receive alendronate or one course of PEMFs treatment. The primary endpoint was the mean percentage change in bone mineral density of the lumbar spine (BMDL), and secondary endpoints were the mean percentage changes in left proximal femur bone mineral density (BMDF), serum 25OH vitamin D3 (25(OH)D) concentrations, total lower-extremity manual muscle test (LE MMT) score, and Berg Balance Scale (BBS) score. The BMDL, BMDF, total LE MMT score and BBS score were recorded at baseline, 5, 12, and 24 weeks. Serum concentrations of 25(OH)D were measured at baseline and 5 weeks. Using a mixed linear model, there was no significant treatment difference between the two groups in the BMDL, BMDF, total LE MMT score, and BBS score (P ≥ 0.05). For 25(OH)D concentrations, the effects were also comparable between the two groups (P ≥ 0.05) with the Mann-Whitney's U-test. These results suggested that a course of PEMFs treatment with specific parameters was as effective as alendronate in treating PMO within 24 weeks.

  19. Human macrophage polarization in vitro: maturation and activation methods compared.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Daphne Y S; Glim, Judith E; Stavenuiter, Andrea W D; Breur, Marjolein; Heijnen, Priscilla; Amor, Sandra; Dijkstra, Christine D; Beelen, Robert H J

    2014-09-01

    Macrophages form a heterogeneous cell population displaying multiple functions, and can be polarized into pro- (M1) or anti-inflammatory (M2) macrophages, by environmental factors. Their activation status reflects a beneficial or detrimental role in various diseases. Currently several in vitro maturation and activation protocols are used to induce an M1 or M2 phenotype. Here, the impact of different maturation factors (NHS, M-CSF, or GM-CSF) and activation methods (IFN-γ/LPS, IL-4, dexamethason, IL-10) on the macrophage phenotype was determined. Regarding macrophage morphology, pro-inflammatory (M1) activation stimulated cell elongation, and anti-inflammatory (M2) activation induced a circular appearance. Activation with pro-inflammatory mediators led to increased CD40 and CD64 expression, whereas activation with anti-inflammatory factors resulted in increased levels of MR and CD163. Production of pro-inflammatory cytokines was induced by activation with IFN-γ/LPS, and TGF-β production was enhanced by the maturation factors M-CSF and GM-CSF. Our data demonstrate that macrophage marker expression and cytokine production in vitro is highly dependent on both maturation and activation methods. In vivo macrophage activation is far more complex, since a plethora of stimuli are present. Hence, defining the macrophage activation status ex vivo on a limited number of markers could be indecisive. From this study we conclude that maturation with M-CSF or GM-CSF induces a moderate anti- or pro-inflammatory state respectively, compared to maturation with NHS. CD40 and CD64 are the most distinctive makers for human M1 and CD163 and MR for M2 macrophage activation and therefore can be helpful in determining the activation status of human macrophages ex vivo.

  20. APCAP - activated protein C in acute pancreatitis: a double-blind randomized human pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    .3, 95% CI -0.7 to +5.3). Treatment with APC was associated with an increase in serum levels of both total and conjugated bilirubin. No differences in ventilator-free days, in renal replacement therapy-free days, in vasopressor-free days, or in days alive outside the hospital were detected. Conclusions No serious bleeding or differences in the evolution of MOD were detected between APC and the placebo. Instead we found an increase in serum bilirubin in the APC group compared to the placebo group in patients with SAP. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01017107. PMID:20663207

  1. Comparing Theoretical Perspectives in Describing Mathematics Departments: Complexity and Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beswick, Kim; Watson, Anne; De Geest, Els

    2010-01-01

    We draw on two studies of mathematics departments in 11-18 comprehensive maintained schools in England to compare and contrast the insights provided by differing theoretical perspectives. In one study, activity theory was used to describe common features of the work of three departments. In the other, a mathematics department was viewed and…

  2. Comparing Participation in Activities among Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masse, Louise C.; Miller, Anton R.; Shen, Jane; Schiariti, Veronica; Roxborough, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Compared to typically developing peers, children with disabilities due to neurodevelopmental disorders and disabilities (NDD/D) and to chronic medical conditions (CMC) have reduced participation in activities. The extent to which these two groups of children have different levels of participation is unknown and was examined in this…

  3. Lifestyle intervention in general practice for physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption and diet in elderly: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Vrdoljak, Davorka; Marković, Biserka Bergman; Puljak, Livia; Lalić, Dragica Ivezić; Kranjčević, Ksenija; Vučak, Jasna

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the effectiveness of programmed and intensified intervention on lifestyle changes, including physical activity, cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption and diet, in patients aged ≥ 65 with the usual care of general practitioners (GP). In this multicenter randomized controlled trial, 738 patients aged ≥ 65 were randomly assigned to receive intensified intervention (N = 371) or usual care (N = 367) of a GP for lifestyle changes, with 18-month follow-up. The main outcome measures were physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption and diet. The study was conducted in 59 general practices in Croatia between May 2008 and May 2010. The patients' mean age was 72.3 ± 5.2 years. Significant diet correction was achieved after 18-month follow-up in the intervention group, comparing to controls. More patients followed strictly Mediterranean diet and consumed healthy foods more frequently. There was no significant difference between the groups in physical activity, tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption or diet after the intervention. In conclusion, an 18-month intensified GP's intervention had limited effect on lifestyle habits. GP intervention managed to change dietary habits in elderly population, which is encouraging since elderly population is very resistant regarding lifestyle habit changes. Clinical trial registration number. ISRCTN31857696.

  4. Variability of single trial brain activation predicts fluctuations in reaction time.

    PubMed

    Bender, Stephan; Banaschewski, Tobias; Roessner, Veit; Klein, Christoph; Rietschel, Marcella; Feige, Bernd; Brandeis, Daniel; Laucht, Manfred

    2015-03-01

    Brain activation stability is crucial to understanding attention lapses. EEG methods could provide excellent markers to assess neuronal response variability with respect to temporal (intertrial coherence) and spatial variability (topographic consistency) as well as variations in activation intensity (low frequency variability of single trial global field power). We calculated intertrial coherence, topographic consistency and low frequency amplitude variability during target P300 in a continuous performance test in 263 15-year-olds from a cohort with psychosocial and biological risk factors. Topographic consistency and low frequency amplitude variability predicted reaction time fluctuations (RTSD) in a linear model. Higher RTSD was only associated with higher psychosocial adversity in the presence of the homozygous 6R-10R dopamine transporter haplotype. We propose that topographic variability of single trial P300 reflects noise as well as variability in evoked cortical activation patterns. Dopaminergic neuromodulation interacted with environmental and biological risk factors to predict behavioural reaction time variability.

  5. An Internet-Based Physical Activity Intervention to Improve Quality of Life of Inactive Older Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Broekhuizen, Karen; de Gelder, Jelle; Wijsman, Carolien A; Wijsman, Liselotte W; Westendorp, Rudi GJ; Verhagen, Evert; Slagboom, Pieternella E; van Mechelen, Willem; van Heemst, Diana; van der Ouderaa, Frans

    2016-01-01

    Background Increasing physical activity is a viable strategy for improving both the health and quality of life of older adults. Objective The aim of this study was to assess if an Internet-based intervention aimed to increase physical activity was effective in improving quality of life of inactive older adults. In addition, we analyzed the effect of the intervention on quality of life among those participants who successfully reached their individually targeted increase in daily physical activity as indicated by the intervention program, as well as the dose-response effect of increasing physical activity on quality of life. Methods The intervention was tested in a randomized controlled trial and was comprised of an Internet program—DirectLife (Philips)—aimed at increasing physical activity using monitoring and feedback by accelerometry and feedback by digital coaching (n=119). The control group received no intervention (n=116). Participants were inactive 60-70-year-olds and were recruited from the general population. Quality of life and physical activity were measured at baseline and after 3 months using the Research ANd Development 36-item health survey (RAND-36) and wrist-worn triaxial accelerometer, respectively. Results After 3 months, a significant improvement in quality of life was seen in the intervention group compared to the control group for RAND-36 subscales on emotional and mental health (2.52 vs -0.72, respectively; P=.03) and health change (8.99 vs 2.03, respectively; P=.01). A total of 50 of the 119 participants (42.0%) in the intervention group successfully reached their physical activity target and showed a significant improvement in quality of life compared to the control group for subscales on emotional and mental health (4.31 vs -0.72, respectively; P=.009) and health change (11.06 vs 2.03, respectively; P=.004). The dose-response analysis showed that there was a significant association between increase in minutes spent in moderate

  6. Defining Plasmodium falciparum Treatment in South West Asia: A Randomized Trial Comparing Artesunate or Primaquine Combined with Chloroquine or SP

    PubMed Central

    Kolaczinski, Kate; Leslie, Toby; Ali, Iftikhar; Durrani, Naeem; Lee, Sue; Barends, Marion; Beshir, Khalid; Ord, Rosalynn; Hallett, Rachel; Rowland, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Antimalarial resistance has led to a global policy of artemisinin-based combination therapy. Despite growing resistance chloroquine (CQ) remained until recently the official first-line treatment for falciparum malaria in Pakistan, with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) second-line. Co-treatment with the gametocytocidal primaquine (PQ) is recommended for transmission control in South Asia. The relative effect of artesunate (AS) or primaquine, as partner drugs, on clinical outcomes and gametocyte carriage in this setting were unknown. Methods A single-blinded, randomized trial among Afghan refugees in Pakistan compared six treatment arms: CQ; CQ+(single-dose)PQ; CQ+(3 d)AS; SP; SP+(single-dose)PQ, and SP+(3 d)AS. The objectives were to compare treatment failure rates and effect on gametocyte carriage, of CQ or SP monotherapy against the respective combinations (PQ or AS). Outcomes included trophozoite and gametocyte clearance (read by light microscopy), and clinical and parasitological failure. Findings A total of 308 (87%) patients completed the trial. Failure rates by day 28 were: CQ 55/68 (81%); CQ+AS 19/67 (28%), SP 4/41 (9.8%), SP+AS 1/41 (2.4%). The addition of PQ to CQ or SP did not affect failure rates (CQ+PQ 49/67 (73%) failed; SP+PQ 5/33 (16%) failed). AS was superior to PQ at clearing gametocytes; gametocytes were seen on d7 in 85% of CQ, 40% of CQ+PQ, 21% of CQ+AS, 91% of SP, 76% of SP+PQ and 23% of SP+AS treated patients. PQ was more effective at clearing older gametocyte infections whereas AS was more effective at preventing emergence of mature gametocytes, except in cases that recrudesced. Conclusions CQ is no longer appropriate by itself or in combination. These findings influenced the replacement of CQ with SP+AS for first-line treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria in the WHO Eastern Mediterranean Region. The threat of SP resistance remains as SP monotherapy is still common. Three day AS was superior to single-dose PQ for reducing

  7. A comparative study of adaptive dose-finding designs for phase I oncology trials of combination therapies.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Akihiro; Wages, Nolan A; Sato, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Shigeyuki

    2015-10-30

    Little is known about the relative performance of competing model-based dose-finding methods for combination phase I trials. In this study, we focused on five model-based dose-finding methods that have been recently developed. We compared the recommendation rates for true maximum-tolerated dose combinations (MTDCs) and over-dose combinations among these methods under 16 scenarios for 3 × 3, 4 × 4, 2 × 4, and 3 × 5 dose combination matrices. We found that performance of the model-based dose-finding methods varied depending on (1) whether the dose combination matrix is square or not; (2) whether the true MTDCs exist within the same group along the diagonals of the dose combination matrix; and (3) the number of true MTDCs. We discuss the details of the operating characteristics and the advantages and disadvantages of the five methods compared.

  8. Exploring equity in uptake of the NHS Health Check and a nested physical activity intervention trial

    PubMed Central

    Attwood, S.; Morton, K.; Sutton, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Socio-demographic factors characterizing disadvantage may influence uptake of preventative health interventions such as the NHS Health Check and research trials informing their content. Methods A cross-sectional study examining socio-demographic characteristics of participants and non-participants to the NHS Health Check and a nested trial of very brief physical activity interventions within this context. Age, gender, Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD) and ethnicity were extracted from patient records of four General Practices (GP) in England. Results In multivariate analyses controlling for GP surgery, the odds of participation in the Health Check were higher for older patients (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.04–1.07) and lower from areas of greater deprivation (IMD Quintiles 4 versus 1, OR 0.37, 95% CI 0.18–0.76, 5 versus 1 OR 0.42, 95% CI 0.20–0.88). Older patients were more likely to participate in the physical activity trial (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.02–1.06). Conclusions Younger patients and those living in areas of greater deprivation may be at risk of non-participation in the NHS Health Check, while younger age also predicted non-participation in a nested research trial. The role that GP-surgery-specific factors play in influencing participation across different socio-demographic groups requires further exploration. PMID:26036701

  9. Gestational weight gain: results from the Delta Healthy Sprouts comparative impact trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction. Delta Healthy Sprouts was designed to test the comparative impact of two home visiting programs on weight status, dietary intake, and health behaviors of Southern African American women and their infants. Results pertaining to the primary outcome, gestational weight gain, are reporte...

  10. A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Two Vocational Models for Persons with Severe Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Gary R.; Salyers, Michelle P.; Dincin, Jerry; Drake, Robert; Becker, Deborah R.; Fraser, Virginia V.; Haines, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The authors compared 2 approaches to vocational rehabilitation for individuals with severe mental illness: the individual placement and support (IPS) model of supported employment and the diversified placement approach (DPA), which emphasizes work readiness and offers a range of vocational options, including agency-run businesses and…

  11. Outpatient Myelography: A Prospective Trial Comparing Complications after Myelography between Outpatients and Inpatients in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Inoue, Hidenori; Aoki, Takaaki; Ishiguro, Naoki; Osawa, Yoshimitsu

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective comparative study. Purpose To compare the incidence and severity of adverse reactions associated with myelography performed in outpatients vs. in inpatients and report the safety and usefulness of outpatient myelography in Japanese patients. Overview of Literature Myelography is normally performed as an inpatient procedure in most hospitals in Japan. No studies have reported the usefulness and adverse effects of outpatient myelography in Japanese patients. Methods We performed 221 myelography procedures. Eighty-five of the 221 patients underwent outpatient myelography using our new protocol. The incidence and severity of adverse reactions were compared with the other 136 patients, who underwent conventional inpatient myelography. We further compared the cost of outpatient and inpatient myelography. Results The overall rate of adverse effects was 9.4% in outpatients, as compared with 7.4% in inpatients. Overall, 1.2% of outpatients and 0.74% inpatients experienced "severe" adverse effects (requiring hospitalization). There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in either the overall rate of adverse effects or the rate of "severe" adverse effects. Moreover, the average outpatient procedure cost was only one-third to one-half that of the inpatient procedure. Conclusions This was the first study to address the safety and usefulness of outpatient myelography in Japanese patients. If selected according to proper inclusion criteria for outpatient procedure, no significant differences were observed in the adverse effects between inpatients and outpatients. The outpatient procedure is more economical and has the added benefit of being more convenient and time-efficient for the patient. PMID:26713127

  12. Improving diet, activity and wellness in adults at risk of diabetes: randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Block, G; Azar, K M J; Romanelli, R J; Block, T J; Palaniappan, L P; Dolginsky, M; Block, C H

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this analysis is to examine the effect of an algorithm-driven online diabetes prevention program on changes in eating habits, physical activity and wellness/productivity factors. Methods: The intervention, Alive-PD, used small-step individually tailored goal setting and other features to promote changes in diet and physical activity. A 6-month randomized controlled trial was conducted among patients from a healthcare delivery system who had confirmed prediabetes (n =339). Change in weight and glycemic markers were measured in the clinic. Changes in physical activity, diet and wellness/productivity factors were self-reported. Mean age was 55 (s.d. 8.9) years, mean body mass index was 31 (s.d. 4.4) kg m−2, 68% were white and 69% were male. Results: The intervention group increased fruit/vegetable consumption by 3.71 (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.73, 4.70) times per week (effect size 0.62), and decreased refined carbohydrates by 3.77 (95% CI 3.10, 4.44) times per week both significantly (P<0.001) greater changes than in the control group. The intervention group also reported a significantly greater increase in physical activity than in the control group, effect size 0.49, P<0.001. In addition, the intervention group reported a significant increase in self-rated health, in confidence in ability to make dietary changes and in ability to accomplish tasks, and a decrease in fatigue, compared with the control group. These changes paralleled the significant treatment effects on glycemic markers and weight. Conclusions: In addition to promoting improvements in weight and glycemic markers, the Alive-PD program appears to improve eating habits and physical activity, behaviors important not just for diabetes prevention but for those with diagnosed diabetes or obesity. The improvements in wellness/productivity may derive from the diet and activity improvements, and from the satisfaction and self-efficacy of achieving goals. PMID:27643726

  13. Multicentre randomised trial comparing high and low dose surfactant regimens for the treatment of respiratory distress syndrome (the Curosurf 4 trial).

    PubMed Central

    Halliday, H L; Tarnow-Mordi, W O; Corcoran, J D; Patterson, C C

    1993-01-01

    A randomised trial was conducted in 82 centres using the porcine surfactant extract, Curosurf, to compare two regimens of multiple doses to treat infants with respiratory distress syndrome and arterial to alveolar oxygen tension ratio < 0.22. Infants were randomly allocated to a low dosage group (100 mg/kg initially, with two further doses at 12 and 24 hours to a maximum cumulative total of 300 mg/kg; n = 1069) or a high dosage group (200 mg/kg initially with up to four further doses of 100 mg/kg to a maximum cumulative total of 600 mg/kg; n = 1099). There was no difference between those allocated low and high dosage in the rates of death or oxygen dependency at 28 days (51.1% v 50.8%; difference -0.3%, 95% confidence interval (CI) -4.6% to 3.9%), death before discharge (25.0% v 23.5%; difference -1.5%, 95% CI -5.1% to 2.2%), and death or oxygen dependency at the expected date of delivery (32.2% v 31.0%; difference -1.2%, 95% CI -5.2% to 2.7%). For 14 predefined secondary measures of clinical outcome there were no significant differences between the groups but the comparison of duration of supplemental oxygen > 40% did attain significance; 48.4% of babies in the low dose group needed > 40% oxygen after three days compared with 42.6% of those in the high dose group. The total amount of surfactant administered in the low dose regimen (mean 242 mg phospholipid/kg) was probably enough to replace the entire pulmonary surfactant pool. Adopting the low dose regimen would lead to considerable cost savings, with no clinically significant loss in efficacy. PMID:8215564

  14. A non-inferiority trial of an attenuated combination strategy (‘COBRA-light’) compared to the original COBRA strategy: clinical results after 26 weeks

    PubMed Central

    den Uyl, Debby; ter Wee, Marieke; Boers, Maarten; Kerstens, Pit; Voskuyl, Alexandre; Nurmohamed, Mike; Raterman, Hennie; van Schaardenburg, Dirkjan; van Dillen, Nancy; Dijkmans, Ben; Lems, Willem

    2014-01-01

    Background Early, intensive treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with the combination of (initially high dose) prednisolone, methotrexate and sulfasalazine (COBRA therapy) considerably lowers disease activity and suppresses radiological progression, but is infrequently prescribed in daily practice. Attenuating the COBRA regimen might lessen concerns about side effects, but the efficacy of such strategies is unknown. Objective To compare the ‘COBRA-light’ strategy with only two drugs, comprising a lower dose of prednisolone (starting at 30 mg/day, tapered to 7.5 mg/day in 9 weeks) and methotrexate (escalated to 25 mg/week in 9 weeks) to COBRA therapy (prednisolone 60 mg/day, tapered to 7.5 mg/day in 6 weeks, methotrexate 7.5 mg/week and sulfasalazine 2 g/day). Method An open, randomised controlled, non-inferiority trial in 164 patients with early active RA, all treated according to a treat to target strategy. Results At baseline patients had moderately active disease: mean (SD) 44-joint disease activity score (DAS44) 4.13 (0.81) for COBRA and 3.95 (0.9) for COBRA-light. After 6 months, DAS44 significantly decreased in both groups (–2.50 (1.21) for COBRA and –2.18 (1.10) for COBRA-light). The adjusted difference in DAS44 improvement between the groups, 0.21 (95% CI –0.11 to 0.53), was smaller than the predefined clinically relevant difference of 0.5. Minimal disease activity (DAS44 <1.6) was reached in almost half of patients in both groups (49% and 41% in COBRA and COBRA-light, respectively). Conclusions At 6 months COBRA-light therapy is most likely non-inferior to COBRA therapy. Clinical Trial Registration Number 55552928. PMID:23606682

  15. A Method for Utilizing Bivariate Efficacy Outcome Measures to Screen Regimens for Activity in 2-Stage Phase II Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Larry; Litwin, Samuel; Yothers, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Background Most phase II clinical trials utilize a single primary endpoint to determine the promise of a regimen for future study. However, many disorders manifest themselves in complex ways. For example, migraine headaches can cause pain, auras, photophobia, and emesis. Investigators may believe a drug is effective at reducing migraine pain and the severity of emesis during an attack. Nevertheless, they could still be interested in proceeding with development of the drug if it is effective against only one of these symptoms. Such a study would be a candidate for a clinical trial with co-primary endpoints. Purpose The purpose of the article is to provide a method for designing a 2-stage clinical trial with dichotomous co-primary endpoints of efficacy that has the ability to detect activity on either response measure with high probability when the drug is active on one or both measures, while at the same time rejecting the drug with high probability when there is little activity on both dimensions. The design enables early closure for futility and is flexible with regard to attained accrual. Methods The design is proposed in the context of cancer clinical trials where tumor response is used to assess a drug's ability to kill tumor cells and progression-free survival (PFS) status after a certain period is used to evaluate the drug's ability to stabilize tumor growth. Both endpoints are assumed to be distributed as binomial random variables, and uninteresting probabilities of success are determined from historical controls. Given the necessity of accrual flexibility, exhaustive searching algorithms to find optimum designs do not seem feasible at this time. Instead, critical values are determined for realized sample sizes using specific procedures. Then accrual windows are found to achieve a design's desired level of significance, probability of early termination (PET), and power. Results The design is illustrated with a clinical trial that examined bevacizumab in

  16. Physical Activity Counselling during Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Patients with COPD: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Burtin, Chris; Langer, Daniel; van Remoortel, Hans; Demeyer, Heleen; Gosselink, Rik; Decramer, Marc; Dobbels, Fabienne; Janssens, Wim; Troosters, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Background Pulmonary rehabilitation programs only modestly enhance daily physical activity levels in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This randomised controlled trial investigates the additional effect of an individual activity counselling program during pulmonary rehabilitation on physical activity levels in patients with moderate to very severe COPD. Methods Eighty patients (66±7 years, 81% male, forced expiratory volume in 1 second 45±16% of predicted) referred for a six‐month multidisciplinary pulmonary rehabilitation program were randomised. The intervention group was offered an additional eight-session activity counselling program. The primary outcomes were daily walking time and time spent in at least moderate intense activities. Results Baseline daily walking time was similar in the intervention and control group (median 33 [interquartile range 16–47] vs 29 [17–44]) whereas daily time spent in at least moderate intensity was somewhat higher in the intervention group (17[4–50] vs 12[2–26] min). No significant intervention*time interaction effects were observed in daily physical activity levels. In the whole group, daily walking time and time spent in at least moderate intense activities did not significantly change over time. Conclusions The present study identified no additional effect of eight individual activity counselling sessions during pulmonary rehabilitation to enhance physical activity levels in patients with COPD. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT00948623 PMID:26697853

  17. Efficacy and safety of cinnarizine in the prophylaxis of migraine headaches in children: an open, randomized comparative trial with propranolol.

    PubMed

    Togha, Mansoureh; Malamiri, Reza Azizi; Rashidi-Ranjbar, Neda; Asa, Solmaz; Mahvelati, Farhad; Ashrafi, Mahmoud Reza

    2012-03-01

    Migraine headaches are common in children. Early diagnosis and appropriate interventions are mandatory to prevent decades of suffering and diminished quality of life. There is need for data regarding the efficacy and safety of prophylactic agents in children with migraine; therefore, we designed a randomized clinical trial to compare the efficacy and safety of cinnarizine with that of a well-known prophylactic agent (propranolol) in the prophylaxis of pediatric migraine headache. A total of 120 patients aged between 6 and 17 years were recruited and 113 patients succeeded in completing all phases of the trial. Of them, 57 patients were given cinnarizine, and propranolol was administered in 56 patients. Reduction in headache frequency was the main response to treatment. Cinnarizine reduced the baseline headache frequency by more than 50% in 74.6% of patients and the mean headache frequency per month was reduced from 11.851 ± 0.739 (mean ± SEM) to 3.358 ± 0.739 (mean ± SEM) attacks per month (P < 0.001). In the propranolol group, more than 50% reduction of the baseline headache frequency was seen in 72.5% of patients and the mean headache frequency per month was reduced from 10.264 ± 0.830 (mean ± SEM) to 2.774 ± 0.830 (mean ± SEM) attacks per month (P < 0.001). No significant difference was seen in 50% reduction of the baseline headache frequency between treatment groups (P = 0.358). No significant adverse effects were reported. In this open study, cinnarizine appeared thus as effective as propranolol and safe for the prophylaxis of migraine in children, but this remains to be confirmed in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial. PMID:22427290

  18. Direction to an Internet Support Group Compared With Online Expressive Writing for People With Depression And Anxiety: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Jeremy; Potts, Henry WW

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression and anxiety are common, often comorbid, conditions, and Internet support groups for them are well used. However, little rigorous research has been conducted on the outcome of these groups. Objective This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of an Internet support group in reducing depression and anxiety, and increasing social support and life satisfaction. Methods A randomized trial compared direction to an existing Internet support group for depression and anxiety with an online expressive writing condition. A total of 863 (628 female) United Kingdom, United States, and Canadian volunteers were recruited via the Internet. Online, self-report measures of depression, anxiety, social support, and satisfaction with life were administered at baseline, 3, and 6 months. Results All four outcomes – depression, anxiety, social support, and satisfaction with life – improved over the 6 months of the study (all P<.001). There was no difference in outcome between the two conditions: participants responded similarly to the expressive writing and the Internet support group. Engagement with the Internet support group was low, it had high 6-month attrition (692/795, 87%) and low adherence, and it received mixed and often negative feedback. The main problems reported were a lack of comfort and connection with others, negative social comparisons, and the potential for receiving bad advice. Expressive writing had lower attrition (194/295, 65%) and participants reported that it was more acceptable. Conclusions Until further evidence accumulates, directing people with depression and anxiety to Internet support groups cannot be recommended. On the other hand, online expressive writing seems to have potential, and its use for people with depression and anxiety warrants further investigation. Trial Registration Trial Registration: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01149265; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01149265 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6h

  19. Early biomarker activity in severe sepsis and septic shock and a contemporary review of immunotherapy trials: not a time to give up, but to give it earlier.

    PubMed

    Rivers, Emanuel P; Jaehne, Anja Kathrin; Nguyen, H Bryant; Papamatheakis, Demosthenes G; Singer, Daniel; Yang, James J; Brown, Samantha; Klausner, Howard

    2013-02-01

    Improving time to diagnosis and intervention has positively impacted outcomes in acute myocardial infarction, stroke, and trauma through elucidating the early pathogenesis of those diseases. This insight may partly explain the futility of time-insensitive immunotherapy trials for severe sepsis and septic shock. The aim of this study was to examine the early natural history of circulatory biomarker activity in sepsis, relative to previous animal and human outcome trials. We conducted a literature search using PubMed, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar to identify outcome trials targeting biomarkers with emphasis on the timing of therapy. These findings were compared with the biomarker activity observed over the first 72 h of hospital presentation in a cohort of severe sepsis and septic shock patients. Biomarker levels in animal and human research models are elevated within 30 min after exposure to an inflammatory septic stimulus. Consistent with these findings, the biomarker cascade is activated at the most proximal point of hospital presentation in our patient cohort. These circulatory biomarkers overlap; some have bimodal patterns and generally peak between 3 and 36 h while diminishing over the subsequent 72 h of observation. When this is taken into account, prior outcome immunotherapy trials have generally enrolled patients after peak circulatory biomarker concentrations. In previous immunotherapy sepsis trials, intervention was delayed after the optimal window of peak biomarker activity. As a result, future studies need to recalibrate the timing of enrollment and administration of immunotherapy agents that still may hold great promise for this deadly disease.

  20. Comparative clinical trials and the changing marketplace for oral care: innovation, evidence and implications.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Robert W; Biesbrock, Aaron R

    2002-09-01

    The development of a trayless bleaching system (Crest Whitestrips) and a novel battery-powered toothbrush (Crest SpinBrush) has fueled growth in the bleaching and power toothbrush markets. Beyond offering convenient, low-cost options for patients, the effectiveness of each product is supported by a robust clinical program. New comparative research involving these products expands evidence on the clinical meaningfulness of the benefits of this whitening system and powered toothbrush for patient care. PMID:12512984

  1. Effects of the Web Behavior Change Program for Activity and Multimodal Pain Rehabilitation: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Michaelson, Peter; Gard, Gunvor; Eriksson, Margareta K

    2016-01-01

    Background Web-based interventions with a focus on behavior change have been used for pain management, but studies of Web-based interventions integrated in clinical practice are lacking. To emphasize the development of cognitive skills and behavior, and to increase activity and self-care in rehabilitation, the Web Behavior Change Program for Activity (Web-BCPA) was developed and added to multimodal pain rehabilitation (MMR). Objective The objective of our study was to evaluate the effects of MMR in combination with the Web-BCPA compared with MMR among persons with persistent musculoskeletal pain in primary health care on pain intensity, self-efficacy, and copying, as part of a larger collection of data. Web-BCPA adherence and feasibility, as well as treatment satisfaction, were also investigated. Methods A total of 109 participants, mean age 43 (SD 11) years, with persistent pain in the back, neck, shoulder, and/or generalized pain were recruited to a randomized controlled trial with two intervention arms: (1) MMR+WEB (n=60) and (2) MMR (n=49). Participants in the MMR+WEB group self-guided through the eight modules of the Web-BCPA: pain, activity, behavior, stress and thoughts, sleep and negative thoughts, communication and self-esteem, solutions, and maintenance and progress. Data were collected with a questionnaire at baseline and at 4 and 12 months. Outcome measures were pain intensity (Visual Analog Scale), self-efficacy to control pain and to control other symptoms (Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale), general self-efficacy (General Self-Efficacy Scale), and coping (two-item Coping Strategies Questionnaire; CSQ). Web-BCPA adherence was measured as minutes spent in the program. Satisfaction and Web-BCPA feasibility were assessed by a set of items. Results Of 109 participants, 99 received the allocated intervention (MMR+WEB: n=55; MMR: n=44); 88 of 99 (82%) completed the baseline and follow-up questionnaires. Intention-to-treat analyses were performed with a sample

  2. Response to commentary on a trial comparing krill oil versus fish oil.

    PubMed

    Ramprasath, Vanu R; Eyal, Inbal; Zchut, Sigalit; Jones, Peter J H

    2014-01-22

    Nichols et al. (Lipids Health Dis13:2, 2014) raised concern about the higher n-6 concentration in fish oil used in our recent study which is different from typical commercial fish oils (Ramprasath et al. Lipids Health Dis12:178, 2013). The aim of our study was to compare the effect of consumption of similar amount of n-3 PUFA from krill and fish oil with placebo on plasma and RBC fatty acids. As the concentration of n-3 PUFA in the fish oil utilised was higher than that in krill oil, we deemed it important to keep consistent the concentration of n-3 PUFA and volumes to be administered to participants between krill versus fish oils. As such, the fish oil used in the study was diluted with corn oil. Although the n-6 PUFA concentration in fish oil was higher compared to traditionally used fish oil, consumption of the fish oil used in our study actually reduced the total n-6 PUFA in plasma and RBC to a similar extent as did krill oil. Overall, our conclusion was that the increases in plasma and RBC concentrations of EPA and DHA along with improvement in the omega-3 index observed with consumption of krill oil compared with fish oil are due to differences in absorption and bioavailability based on the structural difference of the two oils rather than their n-6 PUFA content.

  3. Support or competition? How online social networks increase physical activity: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingwen; Brackbill, Devon; Yang, Sijia; Becker, Joshua; Herbert, Natalie; Centola, Damon

    2016-12-01

    To identify what features of online social networks can increase physical activity, we conducted a 4-arm randomized controlled trial in 2014 in Philadelphia, PA. Students (n = 790, mean age = 25.2) at an university were randomly assigned to one of four conditions composed of either supportive or competitive relationships and either with individual or team incentives for attending exercise classes. The social comparison condition placed participants into 6-person competitive networks with individual incentives. The social support condition placed participants into 6-person teams with team incentives. The combined condition with both supportive and competitive relationships placed participants into 6-person teams, where participants could compare their team's performance to 5 other teams' performances. The control condition only allowed participants to attend classes with individual incentives. Rewards were based on the total number of classes attended by an individual, or the average number of classes attended by the members of a team. The outcome was the number of classes that participants attended. Data were analyzed using multilevel models in 2014. The mean attendance numbers per week were 35.7, 38.5, 20.3, and 16.8 in the social comparison, the combined, the control, and the social support conditions. Attendance numbers were 90% higher in the social comparison and the combined conditions (mean = 1.9, SE = 0.2) in contrast to the two conditions without comparison (mean = 1.0, SE = 0.2) (p = 0.003). Social comparison was more effective for increasing physical activity than social support and its effects did not depend on individual or team incentives.

  4. Support or competition? How online social networks increase physical activity: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingwen; Brackbill, Devon; Yang, Sijia; Becker, Joshua; Herbert, Natalie; Centola, Damon

    2016-12-01

    To identify what features of online social networks can increase physical activity, we conducted a 4-arm randomized controlled trial in 2014 in Philadelphia, PA. Students (n = 790, mean age = 25.2) at an university were randomly assigned to one of four conditions composed of either supportive or competitive relationships and either with individual or team incentives for attending exercise classes. The social comparison condition placed participants into 6-person competitive networks with individual incentives. The social support condition placed participants into 6-person teams with team incentives. The combined condition with both supportive and competitive relationships placed participants into 6-person teams, where participants could compare their team's performance to 5 other teams' performances. The control condition only allowed participants to attend classes with individual incentives. Rewards were based on the total number of classes attended by an individual, or the average number of classes attended by the members of a team. The outcome was the number of classes that participants attended. Data were analyzed using multilevel models in 2014. The mean attendance numbers per week were 35.7, 38.5, 20.3, and 16.8 in the social comparison, the combined, the control, and the social support conditions. Attendance numbers were 90% higher in the social comparison and the combined conditions (mean = 1.9, SE = 0.2) in contrast to the two conditions without comparison (mean = 1.0, SE = 0.2) (p = 0.003). Social comparison was more effective for increasing physical activity than social support and its effects did not depend on individual or team incentives. PMID:27617191

  5. Surgical Staples Compared With Subcuticular Suture for Skin Closure After Cesarean Delivery: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Dana; Jauk, Victoria Chapman; Szychowski, Jeff M.; Garner, Rachel; Biggio, Joseph R.; Andrews, William W.; Hauth, John; Tita, Alan T. N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the risk of cesarean wound disruption or infection after closure with surgical staples compared with subcuticular suture. Methods Women with viable pregnancies at 24 weeks of gestation or greater undergoing scheduled or unscheduled cesarean delivery were randomized to wound closure with surgical staples or absorbable suture. Staples were removed at postoperative days 3-4 for low transverse incisions and days 7-10 for vertical incisions. Standardized wound evaluations were performed at discharge (days 3-4) and 4-6 weeks post-operatively. The primary outcome was a composite of wound disruption or infection within 4-6 weeks. Secondary outcomes included operative time, highest pain score on analog scale, cosmesis score and patient scar satisfaction score. Analyses were by intent-to-treat. Results Of 398 patients, 198 were randomized to staples and 200 to suture (but four received staples). Baseline characteristics including body mass index, prior cesarean, labor, and type of skin incision were similar by group. The primary outcome incidence at hospital discharge was 7.1% for staples and 0.5% for suture; P <0.001 (RR 14.1; 95% CI 1.9-106). Of 350 (87.9%) with follow up at 4-6 weeks, the cumulative risk of the primary outcome at 4-6 weeks was 14.5% for staples and 5.9% for suture; P=0.008 (RR 2.5; 95% CI 1.2-5.0). Operative time, pain scores at 72-96 hours and at 6 weeks, cosmesis score, and patient satisfaction score did not differ by group. Conclusion Staples closure compared with suture is associated with significantly increased composite wound morbidity after cesarean delivery. PMID:23262925

  6. Palacos compared to Palamed bone cement in total hip replacement: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Meinardi, Joris E; Valstar, Edward R; Van Der Voort, Paul; Kaptein, Bart L; Fiocco, Marta; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    2016-10-01

    Background and purpose - Stability and survival of cemented total hip prostheses is dependent on a multitude of factors, including the type of cement that is used. Bone cements vary in viscosity, from low to medium and high. There have been few clinical RSA studies comparing the performance of low- and high-viscosity bone cements. We compared the migration behavior of the Stanmore hip stem cemented using novel low-viscosity Palamed bone cement with that of the same stem cemented with conventional high-viscosity Palacos bone cement. Patients and methods - We performed a randomized controlled study involving 39 patients (40 hips) undergoing primary total hip replacement for primary or secondary osteoarthritis. 22 patients (22 hips) were randomized to Palacos and 17 patients (18 hips) were randomized to Palamed. Migration was determined by RSA. Results - None of these 40 hips had been revised at the 10-year follow-up mark. To our knowledge, the patients who died before they reached the 10-year endpoint still had the implant in situ. No statistically significant or clinically significant differences were found between the 2 groups for mean translations, rotations, and maximum total-point motion (MTPM). Interpretation - We found similar migration of the Stanmore stem in the high-viscosity Palacos cement group and the low-viscosity Palamed cement group. We therefore expect that the risk of aseptic loosening with the new Palamed cement would be comparable to that with the conventional Palacos cement. The choice of which type of bone cement to use is therefore up to the surgeon's preference. PMID:27329869

  7. Palacos compared to Palamed bone cement in total hip replacement: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Meinardi, Joris E; Valstar, Edward R; Van Der Voort, Paul; Kaptein, Bart L; Fiocco, Marta; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Stability and survival of cemented total hip prostheses is dependent on a multitude of factors, including the type of cement that is used. Bone cements vary in viscosity, from low to medium and high. There have been few clinical RSA studies comparing the performance of low- and high-viscosity bone cements. We compared the migration behavior of the Stanmore hip stem cemented using novel low-viscosity Palamed bone cement with that of the same stem cemented with conventional high-viscosity Palacos bone cement. Patients and methods We performed a randomized controlled study involving 39 patients (40 hips) undergoing primary total hip replacement for primary or secondary osteoarthritis. 22 patients (22 hips) were randomized to Palacos and 17 patients (18 hips) were randomized to Palamed. Migration was determined by RSA. Results None of these 40 hips had been revised at the 10-year follow-up mark. To our knowledge, the patients who died before they reached the 10-year endpoint still had the implant in situ. No statistically significant or clinically significant differences were found between the 2 groups for mean translations, rotations, and maximum total-point motion (MTPM). Interpretation We found similar migration of the Stanmore stem in the high-viscosity Palacos cement group and the low-viscosity Palamed cement group. We therefore expect that the risk of aseptic loosening with the new Palamed cement would be comparable to that with the conventional Palacos cement. The choice of which type of bone cement to use is therefore up to the surgeon’s preference. PMID:27329869

  8. Sample Size Considerations in Clinical Trials when Comparing Two Interventions using Multiple Co-Primary Binary Relative Risk Contrasts

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Yuki; Hamasaki, Toshimitsu; Evans, Scott R.; Asakura, Koko; Sugimoto, Tomoyuki; Sozu, Takashi; Ohno, Yuko

    2015-01-01

    The effects of interventions are multi-dimensional. Use of more than one primary endpoint offers an attractive design feature in clinical trials as they capture more complete characterization of the effects of an intervention and provide more informative intervention comparisons. For these reasons, multiple primary endpoints have become a common design feature in many disease areas such as oncology, infectious disease, and cardiovascular disease. More specifically in medical product development, multiple endpoints are utilized as co-primary to evaluate the effect of the new interventions. Although methodologies to address continuous co-primary endpoints are well-developed, methodologies for binary endpoints are limited. In this paper, we describe power and sample size determination for clinical trials with multiple correlated binary endpoints, when relative risks are evaluated as co-primary. We consider a scenario where the objective is to evaluate evidence for superiority of a test intervention compared with a control intervention, for all of the relative risks. We discuss the normal approximation methods for power and sample size calculations and evaluate how the required sample size, power and Type I error vary as a function of the correlations among the endpoints. Also we discuss a simple, but conservative procedure for appropriate sample size calculation. We then extend the methods allowing for interim monitoring using group-sequential methods. PMID:26167243

  9. Randomized clinical trial of multimodal physiotherapy treatment compared to overnight lidocaine ointment in women with provoked vestibulodynia: Design and methods.

    PubMed

    Morin, Mélanie; Dumoulin, Chantale; Bergeron, Sophie; Mayrand, Marie-Hélène; Khalifé, Samir; Waddell, Guy; Dubois, Marie-France

    2016-01-01

    Provoked vestibulodynia (PVD) is a highly prevalent and debilitating condition yet its management relies mainly on non-empirically validated interventions. Among the many causes of PVD, there is growing evidence that pelvic floor muscle (PFM) dysfunctions play an important role in its pathophysiology. Multimodal physiotherapy, which addresses these dysfunctions, is judged by experts to be highly effective and is recommended as a first-line treatment. However, the effectiveness of this promising intervention has been evaluated through only two small uncontrolled trials. The proposed bi-center, single-blind, parallel group, randomized controlled trial (RCT) aims to evaluate the efficacy of multimodal physiotherapy and compare it to a frequently used first-line treatment, topical overnight application of lidocaine, in women with PVD. A total of 212 women diagnosed with PVD according to a standardized protocol were eligible for the study and were randomly assigned to either multimodal physiotherapy or lidocaine treatment for 10weeks. The primary outcome measure is pain during intercourse (assessed with a numerical rating scale). Secondary measures include sexual function, pain quality, psychological factors (including pain catastrophizing, anxiety, depression and fear of pain), PFM morphology and function, and patients' global impression of change. Assessments are made at baseline, post-treatment and at the 6-month follow-up. This manuscript presents and discusses the rationale, design and methodology of the first RCT investigating physiotherapy in comparison to a commonly prescribed first-line treatment, overnight topical lidocaine, for women with PVD.

  10. Increased error-related thalamic activity during early compared to late cocaine abstinence

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chiang-shan R.; Luo, Xi; Sinha, Rajita; Rounsaville, Bruce J.; Carroll, Kathleen M.; Malison, Robert T.; Ding, Yu-Shin; Zhang, Sheng; Ide, Jaime S.

    2010-01-01

    Altered cognitive control is implicated in the shaping of cocaine dependence. One of the key component processes of cognitive control is error monitoring. Our previous imaging work highlighted greater activity in distinct cortical and subcortical regions including the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC), thalamus and insula when participants committed an error during the stop signal task (Li et al., 2008b). Importantly, dACC, thalamic and insular activity has been associated with drug craving. One hypothesis is that the intense interoceptive activity during craving prevents these cerebral structures from adequately registering error and/or monitoring performance. Alternatively, the dACC, thalamus and insula show abnormally heightened responses to performance errors, suggesting that excessive responses to salient stimuli such as drug cues could precipitate craving. The two hypotheses would each predict decreased and increased activity during stop error (SE) as compared to stop success (SS) trials in the SST. Here we showed that cocaine dependent patients (PCD) experienced greater subjective feeling of loss of control and cocaine craving during early (average of day 6) compared to late (average of day 18) abstinence. Furthermore, compared to PCD during late abstinence, PCD scanned during early abstinence showed increased thalamic as well as insular but not dACC responses to errors (SE>SS). These findings support the hypothesis that heightened thalamic reactivity to salient stimuli co-occur with cocaine craving and loss of self control. PMID:20163923

  11. A phase III, randomized, double-blind, matched-pairs, active-controlled clinical trial and preclinical animal study to compare the durability, efficacy and safety between polynucleotide filler and hyaluronic acid filler in the correction of crow's feet: a new concept of regenerative filler.

    PubMed

    Pak, Chang Sik; Lee, Jongho; Lee, Hobin; Jeong, Jaehoon; Kim, Eun-Hee; Jeong, Jinwook; Choi, Hyeyeon; Kim, Byunghwi; Oh, Sujin; Kim, Iksoo; Heo, Chan Yeong

    2014-11-01

    The Rejuran® is a new filler product made from purified polynucleotides. Here we present data from an animal study and a clinical trial to examine the durability, efficacy and safety of the Rejuran® on crow's feet. For the animal study, 25 mice were divided into three groups: Group 1 received phosphate buffered saline (PBS); Group 2 were treated with Yvoire®; and Group 3 were treated with Rejuran®. The durability and efficacy of each treatment were assessed by microscopy and staining. In the clinical trial, 72 patients were randomized to receive Rejuran® treatment for crow's feet on one side and Yvoire-Hydro® on the contralateral side, at a ratio of 1:1. Repeated treatments were performed every two weeks for a total of three times, over a total of 12 weeks' observation. All injections and observations of efficacy and safety were performed by the same two investigators. In the animal study, the Rejuran® group showed similar durability and inflammatory response to the Yvoire® group. Upon efficacy assessment, the Rejuran® group showed the greatest elasticity and collagen composition, and a significant difference in skin surface roughness and wrinkle depth. In the clinical trial, the primary and secondary objective efficacy outcome measure showed no statistical significance between the two groups, and in safety outcomes there were no unexpected adverse effects. Our data suggest that the Rejuran®, as a new regenerative filler, can be useful to reduce wrinkles, by showing evidence for its efficacy and safety.

  12. Comparative clinical trial of castor oil and diclofenac sodium in patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Medhi, B; Kishore, K; Singh, U; Seth, S D

    2009-10-01

    A randomized, double-blind, comparative clinical study was conducted to compare the safety and efficacy of castor oil with diclofenac sodium in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Subjects with symptoms of knee osteoarthritis were given a castor oil capsule 0.9 mL (n = 50) thrice daily for 4 weeks or a capsule of diclofenac sodium (n = 50), 50 mg thrice daily for 4 weeks. The subjects completed an overall evaluation of symptom relief at 2 weeks and 4 weeks of completed treatment. The subjects were evaluated by clinical, routine laboratory and radiographic investigations for improvement of disease conditions and also for adverse drug reaction. On completion of 4 weeks treatment it was observed that both drugs were significantly effective in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis (p < 0.001) and adverse drug reactions were high with diclofenac sodium, whereas with castor oil there were no adverse effects reported. The present study indicates that castor oil can be used as an effective therapy in primary knee osteoarthritis.

  13. Randomised comparative trial of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system and norethisterone for treatment of idiopathic menorrhagia.

    PubMed

    Irvine, G A; Campbell-Brown, M B; Lumsden, M A; Heikkilä, A; Walker, J J; Cameron, I T

    1998-06-01

    The efficacy and acceptability of two new approaches to the treatment of idiopathic menorrhagia--the levonorgestrel intrauterine system and norethisterone--were compared in 45 women recruited from a gynecology outpatient clinic at a UK teaching hospital. All study participants had heavy regular periods and a measured menstrual blood loss exceeding 80 ml. 22 women were randomly assigned to have a levonorgestrel intrauterine system inserted within the first 7 days of menses and 22 women received 5 mg of norethisterone 3 times daily from day 5 to day 26 of their cycle for 3 cycles. Compared to baseline, the levonorgestrel intrauterine system reduced menstrual blood loss by 94% (median reduction, 103 ml) and oral norethisterone reduced it by 87% (median reduction, 95 ml). Recorded in both treatment groups were significant decreases in breast tenderness, mood swings, intermenstrual bleeding, and interferences in daily life caused by menstruation. After 3 treatment cycles, 64% of women in the levonorgestrel group indicated they liked the treatment "well" or "very well" and 77% elected to continue the regimen. In the norethisterone group, these rates were only 44% and 22%, respectively. Although both regimens reduced menstrual blood loss to within normal limits, the levonorgestrel intrauterine system was associated with higher satisfaction and thus offers an effective alternative to currently available medical and surgical treatments for menorrhagia.

  14. A double-blind placebo-controlled trial of methylprednisolone pulse therapy in active rheumatoid disease.

    PubMed

    Williams, I A; Baylis, E M; Shipley, M E

    1982-07-31

    To confirm the findings of uncontrolled trials that methylprednisolone pulse therapy (MPPT) is a safe treatment for active rheumatoid disease, a double-blind trial was conducted in which 20 patients with active rheumatoid disease were randomly allocated to receive an infusion of either 1 g methylprednisolone or placebo. Methylprednisolone produced significant improvement in all clinical variables measured, a benefit which was sustained for at least 6 weeks. The placebo produced only transient improvement in some of the clinical variables measured. when the 10 placebo groups patients were later given an infusion of 1 g methylprednisolone, they too showed significant clinical benefit. The methylprednisolone also gave rise to improvements in some haematological and biochemical variables. PMID:6124671

  15. School Playground Surfacing and Arm Fractures in Children: A Cluster Randomized Trial Comparing Sand to Wood Chip Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Andrew W.; Macarthur, Colin; Rothman, Linda; Willan, Andrew; Macpherson, Alison K.

    2009-01-01

    Background The risk of playground injuries, especially fractures, is prevalent in children, and can result in emergency room treatment and hospital admissions. Fall height and surface area are major determinants of playground fall injury risk. The primary objective was to determine if there was a difference in playground upper extremity fracture rates in school playgrounds with wood fibre surfacing versus granite sand surfacing. Secondary objectives were to determine if there were differences in overall playground injury rates or in head injury rates in school playgrounds with wood fibre surfacing compared to school playgrounds with granite sand surfacing. Methods and Findings The cluster randomized trial comprised 37 elementary schools in the Toronto District School Board in Toronto, Canada with a total of 15,074 students. Each school received qualified funding for installation of new playground equipment and surfacing. The risk of arm fracture from playground falls onto granitic sand versus onto engineered wood fibre surfaces was compared, with an outcome measure of estimated arm fracture rate per 100,000 student-months. Schools were randomly assigned by computer generated list to receive either a granitic sand or an engineered wood fibre playground surface (Fibar), and were not blinded. Schools were visited to ascertain details of the playground and surface actually installed and to observe the exposure to play and to periodically monitor the depth of the surfacing material. Injury data, including details of circumstance and diagnosis, were collected at each school by a prospective surveillance system with confirmation of injury details through a validated telephone interview with parents and also through collection (with consent) of medical reports regarding treated injuries. All schools were recruited together at the beginning of the trial, which is now closed after 2.5 years of injury data collection. Compliant schools included 12 schools randomized to Fibar

  16. Comparative blanching activities of proprietary diflucortolone valerate topical preparations.

    PubMed

    Coleman, G L; Kanfer, I; Haigh, J M

    1978-01-01

    The blanching activities and hence bioavailabilities of the cream, ointment and fatty ointment preparations of Nerisone and Temetex (diflucortolone valerate 0.1%) were evaluated using an occluded and unoccluded blanching assay. These products were compared to Synalar ointment and cream (fluocinolone acetonide 0.025%), established topical corticosteroid preparations. Statistical analysis showed no significant differences between similar formulations of diflucortolone valerate. Significant differences were noted between diflucortolone valerate and fluocinolone acetonide preparations. PMID:342295

  17. A randomized trial comparing two approaches to weight loss: Differences in weight loss maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Carels, Robert A; Burmeister, Jacob M; Koball, Afton M; Oehlhof, Marissa W; Hinman, Nova; LeRoy, Michelle; Bannon, Erin; Ashrafioun, Lee; Storfer-Isser, Amy; Darby, Lynn A; Gumble, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    This study compared treatment outcomes for a new weight loss program that emphasized reducing unhealthy relationships with food, body image dissatisfaction, and internalized weight bias (New Perspectives) to a weight loss program that emphasizes environmental modification and habit formation and disruption (Transforming Your Life). Fifty-nine overweight and obese adults (body mass index ≥ 27 kg/m2) were randomly assigned to either a 12-week New Perspectives or Transforming Your Life intervention. Despite equivalent outcomes at the end of treatment, the Transforming Your Life participants were significantly more effective at maintaining their weight loss than New Perspectives participants during the 6-month no-treatment follow-up period. PMID:23349402

  18. A randomized trial comparing mebendazole and secnidazole for the treatment of giardiasis.

    PubMed

    Escobedo, A A; Cañete, R; Gonzalez, M E; Pareja, A; Cimerman, S; Almirall, P

    2003-07-01

    To compare the efficacy of the two drugs in the treatment of giardiasis, 146 children (aged 5-15 years) with confirmed Giardia lamblia infection were randomly allotted to treatment with mebendazole (200 mg three times daily for 3 days) or secnidazole (30 mg/kg, in a single dose). Parasitological response to treatment was evaluated in each child by the microscopical examination of faecal samples collected 3, 5 and 7 days after he or she had completed treatment. Although the frequency of cure was higher for secnidazole (79.4%) than for mebendazole (78.1%), the difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Both treatment regimens were well tolerated, with only mild, transient and self-limiting side-effects reported. Mebendazole may be preferable to secnidazole in the treatment of giardiasis cases who have an history of intolerance to 5-nitromidazoles, and where infections with Giardia and soil-transmitted helminths frequently co-occur.

  19. A randomized trial comparing mebendazole and secnidazole for the treatment of giardiasis.

    PubMed

    Escobedo, A A; Cañete, R; Gonzalez, M E; Pareja, A; Cimerman, S; Almirall, P

    2003-07-01

    To compare the efficacy of the two drugs in the treatment of giardiasis, 146 children (aged 5-15 years) with confirmed Giardia lamblia infection were randomly allotted to treatment with mebendazole (200 mg three times daily for 3 days) or secnidazole (30 mg/kg, in a single dose). Parasitological response to treatment was evaluated in each child by the microscopical examination of faecal samples collected 3, 5 and 7 days after he or she had completed treatment. Although the frequency of cure was higher for secnidazole (79.4%) than for mebendazole (78.1%), the difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Both treatment regimens were well tolerated, with only mild, transient and self-limiting side-effects reported. Mebendazole may be preferable to secnidazole in the treatment of giardiasis cases who have an history of intolerance to 5-nitromidazoles, and where infections with Giardia and soil-transmitted helminths frequently co-occur. PMID:12930613

  20. How to compare the social foundations of science culture: A trial with five cities in Korea.

    PubMed

    Song, Jinwoong; Chung, Minkyung; Choi, Eunjeong; Kim, Leekyoung; Cho, Sook-Kyoung

    2013-01-01

    Though there have been several indicator systems to monitor the status quo of science and technology and of scientific literacy, few are especially designed for science culture, especially for its social dimension. Furthermore there is little agreement on how to measure it. In a previous study, an indicator system, SCI (Science Culture Indicators), had been developed to monitor the status quo of the science culture of a nation at both individual and social dimensions. The purpose of this study was to explore a practical way to measure and compare local cities' social foundation of science culture by revising and standardizing the social dimension of SCI and by applying it to five metropolitan cities in Korea. Despite some limits, the results of this study appear not only to reflect the cities' current situations but also to show the strength and weakness of their social foundation of science culture.

  1. Reasons for non-participation in a primary care-based physical activity trial: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Attwood, S; Morton, K L; Mitchell, J; Van Emmenis, M; Sutton, S

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore reasons for non-participation in a primary care-based physical activity trial and understand how these may contribute to recruitment of non-representative research samples. We also aimed to elicit non-participants’ own recommendations for enhancing trial uptake in primary care. Design Semistructured telephone interviews with non-participants to a randomised controlled trial of a very brief intervention for promoting physical activity conducted in primary care (the Very Brief Interventions trial), with thematic analysis of interview transcripts. Setting 5 general practice (GP) surgeries in the East of England, UK. Participants Interviews were completed with 10 female and 6 male non-participants of white ethnicity and aged between 40 and 71 years. 13 of the 16 interviewees were either active or moderately active according to the GP Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPPAQ). Results Interviewees discussed a range of reasons for non-participation. These included beliefs surrounding the personal relevance of the trial based on preconceptions of intervention content. Many interviewees considered themselves either sufficiently active or too functionally limited to increase activity levels further, so rendering participation pointless in their view. Other identified barriers included a lack of free time, for trial participation and for increasing physical activity, and dissatisfaction with appointment scheduling systems in place at GP surgeries. Interviewees questioned the appropriateness of primary care as a context for delivering interventions to promote physical activity. In general, interviewees were positively disposed towards the idea of trial participation, especially if personal benefits are made salient, but suggested that interventions could be delivered in a different setting such as the internet. Conclusions To increase participation in physical activity promotion trials conducted in primary care, the content of invitation materials and

  2. Effect of different aerodynamic time trial cycling positions on muscle activation and crank torque.

    PubMed

    Fintelman, D M; Sterling, M; Hemida, H; Li, F-X

    2016-05-01

    To reduce air resistance, time trial cyclists and triathletes lower their torso angle. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of lowering time trial torso angle positions on muscle activation patterns and crank torque coordination. It was hypothesized that small torso angles yield a forward shift of the muscle activation timing and crank torque. Twenty-one trained cyclists performed three exercise bouts at 70% maximal aerobic power in a time trial position at three different torso angles (0°, 8°, and 16°) at a fixed cadence of 85 rpm. Measurements included surface electromyography, crank torques and gas exchange. A significant increase in crank torque range and forward shift in peak torque timing was found at smaller torso angles. This relates closely with the later onset and duration of the muscle activation found in the gluteus maximus muscle. Torso angle effects were only observed in proximal monoarticular muscles. Moreover, all measured physiological variables (oxygen consumption, breathing frequency, minute ventilation) were significantly increased with lowering torso angle and hence decreased the gross efficiency. The findings provide support for the notion that at a cycling intensity of 70% maximal aerobic power, the aerodynamic gains outweigh the physiological/biomechanical disadvantages in trained cyclists.

  3. Subconjunctival Sirolimus for the Treatment of Chronic Active Anterior Uveitis: Results of a Pilot Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sen, H. Nida; Larson, Theresa A.; Meleth, Annal D.; Smith, Wendy M.; Nussenblatt, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the safety and possible efficacy of subconjunctival sirolimus for the treatment of chronic active anterior uveitis Design Prospective, non-randomized, open-label clinical trial. Methods This single-center pilot trial enrolled 5 patients with chronic active anterior uveitis. The study drug was administered as single subconjunctival injection of 30μL (1,320μg) sirolimus in the study eye at the baseline visit. Study visits were performed at baseline, 2 weeks, 4 weeks and monthly until 4 months, and included a complete ophthalmic exam, review of systems, adverse event assessment at each visit, physical exam and ancillary ophthalmic testing at some visits. The primary outcome measure was a 2-step reduction in the anterior chamber inflammation within 4 weeks of injection of the study drug. Results There were 3 females and 2 males; 4 patients had idiopathic anterior uveitis and one had psoriatic arthritis-associated anterior uveitis. Three of the five patients met the primary outcome criteria by showing at least a 2-step decrease in inflammation within 4 weeks, 2 patients showed a 1-step decrease in inflammation within the same time frame. No recurrence was encountered during a 4 month follow-up. There were no serious adverse events. Conclusions Subconjunctival sirolimus appears to be well tolerated in this pilot trial and shows promise as a treatment for active inflammation in patients with chronic anterior uveitis. Larger studies are needed to assess its usefulness in uveitis. PMID:22465364

  4. Comparing Mindfulness-Based Group Therapy With Treatment as Usual for Opioid Dependents: A Pilot Randomized Clinical Trial Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Imani, Saeed; Atef Vahid, Mohammad Kazem; Gharraee, Banafsheh; Habibi, Mojtaba; Bowen, Sarah; Noroozi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background: In response to high burden of opioid abuse in Iran, Ministry of Health has launched a large-scale opioid maintenance treatment program, delivered through a network of certified drug treatment centers. To promote opioid pharmacotherapies, there is an urgent need to develop and introduce evidence-based psychosocial interventions into the network. Patients and Methods: This is a randomized clinical trial (RCT) to investigate feasibility and effectiveness of adding mindfulness-based group therapy to opioid pharmacotherapies as compared to opioid pharmacotherapies alone. The primary outcomes were treatment retention and percentage of weekly morphine, methamphetamine, and benzodiazepine negative tests. Discussion: This is the first RCT that explores the effectiveness of mindfulness-based relapse prevention group therapy among opioid dependent clients in Iran. The feasibility of group therapy and comparison of outcomes in intervention and control groups should be discussed in the outcome article. PMID:26251659

  5. Influence of preoperative showers on staphylococcal skin colonization: a comparative trial of antiseptic skin cleansers.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, A B; Kernodle, D S; Barg, N L; Petracek, M R

    1988-01-01

    We undertook a prospective randomized observer-blinded study comparing the ability of preoperative showers with chlorhexidine gluconate (Hibiclens), povidone-iodine (Betadine), and a lotion soap (Safe 'N Sure) to diminish the staphylococcal skin flora of patients. By block randomization, patients scheduled for an elective cardiac operation or coronary artery angioplasty were assigned to shower with one of the study skin cleansers either once (evening only) or twice (both evening and morning) before the procedure. Semiquantitative samples for culture were obtained from the subclavian and inguinal sites on the evening before the procedure (baseline culture) and again the next morning before the operation. The chlorhexidine skin cleanser consistently reduced staphylococcal colony counts at both the subclavian and inguinal sites before the procedure. This reduction was significant for patients showering both evening and morning (p less than 0.05). The use of the povidone-iodine skin cleanser inconsistently affected skin flora. Patients using lotion soap either experienced no change or had an increase in colony counts. Chlorhexidine is more effective than povidone-iodine in diminishing skin colonization with staphylococci in patients before operation. Repeated applications of chlorhexidine are superior to a single shower with this agent.

  6. Comparative trial of permethrin 5% versus lindane 1% for the treatment of scabies.

    PubMed

    Goldust, Mohamad; Babae Nejad, Shahla; Rezaee, Elham; Raghifar, Ramin

    2013-01-20

    Objective: Treatment of scabies is an important issue in infectious dermatology. The aim of this study was to specify whether permethrin is effective for the treatment of human scabies and to compare its effectiveness with that of 1% lindane by topical application. Methods: 220 patients with scabies with the mean age of 44 ± 12/24 attended the study. Patients were divided into two groups randomly. The first group and their family contacts received 5% permethrin cream and the other received 1% lindane lotion. Treatment was evaluated at intervals of 2 and 4 weeks. Results: Of 254 patients, 220 completed the study. 110 in the group treated with lindane and 110 in the group treated with permethrin. Permethrin provided an improvement rate of 92 (83.6%) after 2 weeks, whereas lindane was effective only in 54 (49%) of patients. After 4 weeks improvement rate was 96.3% (106 of 110) in permethrin group since it was only 69.1% (76 of 110) in lindane group. Conclusion: Permethrin (5%) cream was found to be significantly more effective in the treatment of scabies in comparison with lindane in this study. There were no adverse effects with either permethrin or lindane.

  7. Colonoscopy sedation: clinical trial comparing propofol and fentanyl with or without midazolam.

    PubMed

    das Neves, Jose Francisco Nunes Pereira; das Neves Araújo, Mariana Moraes Pereira; de Paiva Araújo, Fernando; Ferreira, Clarice Martins; Duarte, Fabiana Baeta Neves; Pace, Fabio Heleno; Ornellas, Laura Cotta; Baron, Todd H; Ferreira, Lincoln Eduardo Villela Vieira de Castro

    2016-01-01

    Colonoscopy is one of the most common procedures. Sedation and analgesia decrease anxiety and discomfort and minimize risks. Therefore, patients prefer to be sedated when undergoing examination, although the best combination of drugs has not been determined. The combination of opioids and benzodiazepines is used to relieve the patient's pain and discomfort. More recently, propofol has assumed a prominent position. This randomized prospective study is unique in medical literature that specifically compared the use of propofol and fentanyl with or without midazolam for colonoscopy sedation performed by anesthesiologists. The aim of this study was to evaluate the side effects of sedation, discharge conditions, quality of sedation, and propofol consumption during colonoscopy, with or without midazolam as preanesthetic. The study involved 140 patients who underwent colonoscopy at the University Hospital of the Federal University of Juiz de Fora. Patients were divided into two groups: Group I received intravenous midazolam as preanesthetic 5min before sedation, followed by fentanyl and propofol; Group II received intravenous anesthesia with fentanyl and propofol. Patients in Group II had a higher incidence of reaction (motor or verbal) to the colonoscope introduction, bradycardia, hypotension, and increased propofol consumption. Patient satisfaction was higher in Group I. According to the methodology used, the combination of midazolam, fentanyl, and propofol for colonoscopy sedation reduces propofol consumption and provides greater patient satisfaction.

  8. [Colonoscopy sedation: clinical trial comparing propofol and fentanyl with or without midazolam].

    PubMed

    Neves, Jose Francisco Nunes Pereira das; Araújo, Mariana Moraes Pereira das Neves; Araújo, Fernando de Paiva; Ferreira, Clarice Martins; Duarte, Fabiana Baeta Neves; Pace, Fabio Heleno; Ornellas, Laura Cotta; Baron, Todd H; Ferreira, Lincoln Eduardo Villela Vieira de Castro

    2016-01-01

    Colonoscopy is one of the most common procedures. Sedation and analgesia decrease anxiety and discomfort and minimize risks. Therefore, patients prefer to be sedated when undergoing examination, although the best combination of drugs has not been determined. The combination of opioids and benzodiazepines is used to relieve the patient's pain and discomfort. More recently, propofol has assumed a prominent position. This randomized prospective study is unique in medical literature that specifically compared the use of propofol and fentanyl with or without midazolam for colonoscopy sedation performed by anesthesiologists. The aim of this study was to evaluate the side effects of sedation, discharge conditions, quality of sedation, and propofol consumption during colonoscopy, with or without midazolam as preanesthetic. The study involved 140 patients who underwent colonoscopy at the University Hospital of the Federal University of Juiz de Fora. Patients were divided into two groups: Group I received intravenous midazolam as preanesthetic five minutes before sedation, followed by fentanyl and propofol; Group II received intravenous anesthesia with fentanyl and propofol. Patients in Group II had a higher incidence of reaction (motor or verbal) to the colonoscope introduction, bradycardia, hypotension, and increased propofol consumption. Patient satisfaction was higher in Group I. According to the methodology used, the combination of midazolam, fentanyl, and propofol for colonoscopy sedation reduces propofol consumption and provides greater patient satisfaction.

  9. Comparative trial between the use of amoxicillin and amoxicillin clavulanate in the removal of third molars

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias-Martín, Fernando; García-Perla-García, Alberto; Yañez-Vico, Rosa; Rosa, Elena; Arjona-Gerveno, Esther; González-Padilla, Juan D.; Gutierrez-Pérez, Jose L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the use of amoxicillin (1g) vs amoxicillin and clavulanate (875/125mg) after extraction of retained third molars for prevention of infectious complications. Study Design: The study involved 546 patients attending for removal a retained third molar and divided in to two groups: Group 1 - amoxicillin and clavunate (875/125mg) group (n=257) and Group 2 - amoxicillin (1g) group (n=289). All patients were recalled for investigating the possibility of infection, presence of diarrhea and further analgesic intake. Results: From a total of 546 patients, the frequency of infection was 1.4%, without no statistically differences between the two groups. Group 1 showed statistically higher presence of patients with gastrointestinal complications (p>0.05). In 546 patients, 2.7% of patients reported severe pain that would not relieve with medication. Conclusions: The results of our study show that the use of amoxicillin (1g) and amoxicillin and clavunate (875/125mg) is similar efficacious in preventing infection after retained third molar extraction but amoxicillin and clavunate (875/125mg) produces more gastrointestinal discomfort. Key words:Amoxicillin, clavulanate, third molars, complications. PMID:24880449

  10. Dose-Effect Relationship in Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Randomized Trial Comparing Two Radiation Doses

    SciTech Connect

    Jakobsen, Anders; Ploen, John; Vuong, Te; Appelt, Ane; Lindebjerg, Jan; Rafaelsen, Soren R.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Locally advanced rectal cancer represents a major therapeutic challenge. Preoperative chemoradiation therapy is considered standard, but little is known about the dose-effect relationship. The present study represents a dose-escalation phase III trial comparing 2 doses of radiation. Methods and Materials: The inclusion criteria were resectable T3 and T4 tumors with a circumferential margin of {<=}5 mm on magnetic resonance imaging. The patients were randomized to receive 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions to the tumor and pelvic lymph nodes (arm A) or the same treatment supplemented with an endorectal boost given as high-dose-rate brachytherapy (10 Gy in 2 fractions; arm B). Concomitant chemotherapy, uftoral 300 mg/m{sup 2} and L-leucovorin 22.5 mg/d, was added to both arms on treatment days. The primary endpoint was complete pathologic remission. The secondary endpoints included tumor response and rate of complete resection (R0). Results: The study included 248 patients. No significant difference was found in toxicity or surgical complications between the 2 groups. Based on intention to treat, no significant difference was found in the complete pathologic remission rate between the 2 arms (18% and 18%). The rate of R0 resection was different in T3 tumors (90% and 99%; P=.03). The same applied to the rate of major response (tumor regression grade, 1+2), 29% and 44%, respectively (P=.04). Conclusions: This first randomized trial comparing 2 radiation doses indicated that the higher dose increased the rate of major response by 50% in T3 tumors. The endorectal boost is feasible, with no significant increase in toxicity or surgical complications.

  11. Prospective Molecular Profiling of Canine Cancers Provides a Clinically Relevant Comparative Model for Evaluating Personalized Medicine (PMed) Trials

    PubMed Central

    Mazcko, Christina; Cherba, David; Hendricks, William; Lana, Susan; Ehrhart, E. J.; Charles, Brad; Fehling, Heather; Kumar, Leena; Vail, David; Henson, Michael; Childress, Michael; Kitchell, Barbara; Kingsley, Christopher; Kim, Seungchan; Neff, Mark; Davis, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecularly-guided trials (i.e. PMed) now seek to aid clinical decision-making by matching cancer targets with therapeutic options. Progress has been hampered by the lack of cancer models that account for individual-to-individual heterogeneity within and across cancer types. Naturally occurring cancers in pet animals are heterogeneous and thus provide an opportunity to answer questions about these PMed strategies and optimize translation to human patients. In order to realize this opportunity, it is now necessary to demonstrate the feasibility of conducting molecularly-guided analysis of tumors from dogs with naturally occurring cancer in a clinically relevant setting. Methodology A proof-of-concept study was conducted by the Comparative Oncology Trials Consortium (COTC) to determine if tumor collection, prospective molecular profiling, and PMed report generation within 1 week was feasible in dogs. Thirty-one dogs with cancers of varying histologies were enrolled. Twenty-four of 31 samples (77%) successfully met all predefined QA/QC criteria and were analyzed via Affymetrix gene expression profiling. A subsequent bioinformatics workflow transformed genomic data into a personalized drug report. Average turnaround from biopsy to report generation was 116 hours (4.8 days). Unsupervised clustering of canine tumor expression data clustered by cancer type, but supervised clustering of tumors based on the personalized drug report clustered by drug class rather than cancer type. Conclusions Collection and turnaround of high quality canine tumor samples, centralized pathology, analyte generation, array hybridization, and bioinformatic analyses matching gene expression to therapeutic options is achievable in a practical clinical window (<1 week). Clustering data show robust signatures by cancer type but also showed patient-to-patient heterogeneity in drug predictions. This lends further support to the inclusion of a heterogeneous population of dogs with cancer

  12. Multicenter, Phase 3 Trial Comparing Selenium Supplementation With Observation in Gynecologic Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Muecke, Ralph; Schomburg, Lutz; Glatzel, Michael; Berndt-Skorka, Regina; Baaske, Dieter; Reichl, Berthold; Buentzel, Jens; Kundt, Guenter; Prott, Franz J.; Vries, Alexander de; Stoll, Guenther; Kisters, Klaus; Bruns, Frank; Schaefer, Ulrich; Willich, Norman; Micke, Oliver

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: We assessed whether adjuvant supplementation with selenium improves the selenium status and reduces side effects of patients treated by radiotherapy (RT) for cervical and uterine cancer. Methods and Materials: Whole-blood selenium concentrations were measured in patients with cervical cancer (n = 11) and uterine cancer (n = 70) after surgical treatment, during RT, at the end of RT, and 6 weeks after RT. Patients with initial selenium concentrations of less than 84{mu}g/L were randomized before RT either to receive 500 {mu}g of selenium (in the form of sodium selenite [selenase (registered) , biosyn Arzneimittel GmbH, Fellbach, Germany]) by mouth on the days of RT and 300 {mu}g of selenium on the days without RT or to receive no supplement during RT. The primary endpoint of this multicenter Phase 3 study was to assess the efficiency of selenium supplementation during RT; the secondary endpoint was to decrease radiation-induced diarrhea and other RT-dependent side effects. Results: A total of 81 patients were randomized. We enrolled 39 in the selenium group (SG) and 42 in the control group (CG). Selenium levels did not differ between the SG and CG upon study initiation but were significantly higher in the SG at the end of RT. The actuarial incidence of diarrhea of Grade 2 or higher according to Common Toxicity Criteria (version 2) in the SG was 20.5% compared with 44.5% in the CG (p = 0.04). Other blood parameters, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, and self-reported quality of life were not different between the groups. Conclusions: Selenium supplementation during RT is effective in improving blood selenium status in selenium-deficient cervical and uterine cancer patients and reduces the number of episodes and severity of RT-induced diarrhea.

  13. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) Spacers for Anterior Cervical Fusion: A Retrospective Comparative Effectiveness Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lemcke, Johannes; Al-Zain, Ferass; Meier, Ullrich; Suess, Olaf

    2011-01-01

    Background: Anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) is the standard surgical treatment for radiculopathy and myelopathy. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has an elasticity similar to bone and thus appears well suited for use as the implant in ACDF procedures. The aim of this study is to examine the clinical and radiographic outcome of patients treated with standing alone PEEK spacers without bone morphogenic protein (BMP) or plating and to examine the influence of the different design of the two spacers on the rate of subsidence and dislocation. Methods: This retrospective comparative study reviewed 335 patients treated by ACDF in a specialized urban hospital for radiculopathy or myelopathy due to degenerative pathologies. The Intromed PEEK spacer was used in 181 patients from 3/2002 to 11/2004, and the AMT SHELL spacer was implanted in 154 patients from 4/2004 to 12/2007. The follow-up rate was 100% at three months post-op and 82.7% (277 patients) at one year. The patients were assessed with the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) questionnaire and radiographically. Results: At the one-year follow-up there were 118/277 patients with an excellent clinical outcome on the JOA, 112/277 with a good outcome, 20/277 with a fair outcome, and 27/277 with a poor outcome. Subsidence was observed in 13.3% of patients with the Intromed spacer vs 8.4% of the patients with the AMT SHELL. Dislocation of the spacer was observed in 10 of the 181 patients with Intromed spacers but in none of the 154 patients with Shell spacers. Conclusion: The study demonstrates that ACDF with standing alone PEEK cages leads to excellent and good clinical outcomes. The differences we observed in the subsidence rate between the two spacers were not significant and cannot be related to a single design feature of the spacers. PMID:22016753

  14. Comparative Trial of Effectiveness of Pyrethroid Insecticides Against Peridomestic Populations of Triatoma infestans in Northwestern Argentina

    PubMed Central

    CECERE, MARÍA CARLA; VÁZQUEZ-PROKOPEC, GONZALO M.; CEBALLOS, LEONARDO A.; GUREVITZ, JUAN M.; ZÁRATE, JOAQUÍN E.; ZAIDENBERG, MARIO; KITRON, URIEL; GÜRTLER, RICARDO E.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of different pyrethroid insecticides, formulations, and doses on peridomestic populations of Triatoma infestans (Klug) were evaluated in 128 houses with 148 identified infested peridomestic sites in northwestern Argentina between October 2003 and March 2005. Four treatments were randomly assigned within each community: two doses of 5% suspension concentrate β-cypermethrin in water applied with manual compression sprayers, the standard dose (S) at 50 mg and a double dose (2S) at 100 mg active ingredient (AI)/m2; and two emulsifiable concentrates diluted in diesel fuel and applied with power sprayers, 25% cypermethrin (100 mg [AI]m2) (CF) and 10% permethrin (170 mg [AI]m2) (DF). Infestation was assessed by timed manual collections with a dislodging agent at baseline, 5, 12, and 17 mo postspraying, and the sites found to be reinfested at 5 mo postspraying were selectively resprayed. Only 2S eliminated T. infestans from all peridomestic sites up to 12 mo postspraying, and it was significantly more effective than all other treatments. At 5 mo postspraying, more sites treated with CF or DF rather than S had bug colonies that probably represented residual foci, which they also failed in eliminating after a second spray. At 17 mo postspraying, the prevalence of reinfested peridomestic sites was 5% for 2S, 29% for S, 43% for CF, and 54% for DF. The application of suspension concentrate pyrethroids in dose twice as large as that currently in use in the attack phase produces a greater initial impact and may eliminate peridomestic populations of T. infestans. PMID:17017227

  15. Acute Effects of Caffeine on Heart Rate Variability, Blood Pressure and Tidal Volume in Paraplegic and Tetraplegic Compared to Able-Bodied Individuals: A Randomized, Blinded Trial

    PubMed Central

    Flueck, Joelle Leonie; Schaufelberger, Fabienne; Lienert, Martina; Schäfer Olstad, Daniela; Wilhelm, Matthias; Perret, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine increases sympathetic nerve activity in healthy individuals. Such modulation of nervous system activity can be tracked by assessing the heart rate variability. This study aimed to investigate the influence of caffeine on time- and frequency-domain heart rate variability parameters, blood pressure and tidal volume in paraplegic and tetraplegic compared to able-bodied participants. Heart rate variability was measured in supine and sitting position pre and post ingestion of either placebo or 6 mg caffeine in 12 able-bodied, 9 paraplegic and 7 tetraplegic participants in a placebo-controlled, randomized and double-blind study design. Metronomic breathing was applied (0.25 Hz) and tidal volume was recorded during heart rate variability assessment. Blood pressure, plasma caffeine and epinephrine concentrations were analyzed pre and post ingestion. Most parameters of heart rate variability did not significantly change post caffeine ingestion compared to placebo. Tidal volume significantly increased post caffeine ingestion in able-bodied (p = 0.021) and paraplegic (p = 0.036) but not in tetraplegic participants (p = 0.34). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure increased significantly post caffeine in able-bodied (systolic: p = 0.003; diastolic: p = 0.021) and tetraplegic (systolic: p = 0.043; diastolic: p = 0.042) but not in paraplegic participants (systolic: p = 0.09; diastolic: p = 0.33). Plasma caffeine concentrations were significantly increased post caffeine ingestion in all three groups of participants (p<0.05). Plasma epinephrine concentrations increased significantly in able-bodied (p = 0.002) and paraplegic (p = 0.032) but not in tetraplegic participants (p = 0.63). The influence of caffeine on the autonomic nervous system seems to depend on the level of lesion and the extent of the impairment. Therefore, tetraplegic participants may be less influenced by caffeine ingestion. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02083328 PMID:27776149

  16. Randomized trial comparing liposomal daunorubicin with idarubicin as induction for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia: results from Study AML-BFM 2004.

    PubMed

    Creutzig, Ursula; Zimmermann, Martin; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Dworzak, Michael N; Fleischhack, Gudrun; Graf, Norbert; Klingebiel, Thomas; Kremens, Bernhard; Lehrnbecher, Thomas; von Neuhoff, Christine; Ritter, Jörg; Sander, Annette; Schrauder, André; von Stackelberg, Arend; Starý, Jan; Reinhardt, Dirk

    2013-07-01

    Outcomes of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) improve significantly by intensification of induction. To further intensify anthracycline dosage without increasing cardiotoxicity, we compared potentially less cardiotoxic liposomal daunorubicin (L-DNR) to idarubicin at a higher-than-equivalent dose (80 vs 12 mg/m(2) per day for 3 days) during induction. In the multicenter therapy-optimization trial AML-BFM 2004, 521 of 611 pediatric patients (85%) were randomly assigned to L-DNR or idarubicin induction. Five-year results in both treatment arms were similar (overall survival 76% ± 3% [L-DNR] vs 75% ± 3% [idarubicin], Plogrank = .65; event-free survival [EFS] 59% ± 3% vs 53% ± 3%, Plogrank = .25; cumulative incidence of relapse 29% ± 3% vs 31% ± 3%, P(Gray) = .75), as were EFS results for standard (72% ± 5% vs 68% ± 5%, Plogrank = .47) and high-risk (51% ± 4% vs 46% ± 4%, Plogrank = .45) patients. L-DNR resulted in significantly better probability of EFS in patients with t(8;21). Overall, treatment-related mortality was lower with L-DNR than idarubicin (2/257 vs 10/264 patients, P = .04). Grade 3/4 cardiotoxicity was rare after induction (4 L-DNR vs 5 idarubicin). Only 1 L-DNR and 3 idarubicin patients presented with subclinical or mild cardiomyopathy during follow-up. In conclusion, at the given dose, L-DNR has overall antileukemic activity comparable to idarubicin, promises to be more active in subgroups, and causes less treatment-related mortality. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00111345. PMID:23704089

  17. Prioritizing HIV Comparative Effectiveness Trials based on Value of Information: Generic vs. Brand-Name ART in the US

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Pamela P.; Weinstein, Milton C.; Li, X. Cynthia; Hughes, Michael D.; Paltiel, A. David; Hou, Taige; Parker, Robert A.; Gaynes, Melanie R.; Sax, Paul E.; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Schackman, Bruce R.; Walensky, Rochelle P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Value of Information (VOI) analysis examines whether to acquire information before making a decision. We introduced VOI to the HIV audience, using the example of generic antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the US. Methods and Findings We used a mathematical model and probabilistic sensitivity analysis to generate probability distributions of survival (in quality-adjusted life years, QALYs) and cost for three potential first-line ART regimens: 3-pill generic, 2-pill generic, and 1-pill branded. These served as input for a comparison of two hypothetical two-arm trials: 3-pill generic vs. 1-pill branded; and 2-pill generic vs.1-pill branded. We modeled pre-trial uncertainty by defining probability distributions around key inputs, including 24-week HIV-RNA suppression and subsequent ART failure. We assumed that, without a trial, patients received the 1-pill branded strategy. Post-trial, we assumed that patients received the most cost-effective strategy. For both trials, we quantified the probability of changing to a generic-based regimen upon trial completion and the expected VOI in terms of improved health outcomes and costs. Assuming a willingness to pay threshold of $100,000/QALY, the 3-pill trial led to more treatment changes (84%) than the 2-pill trial (78%). Estimated VOI was $48,000 (3-pill trial) and $35,700 (2-pill trial) per future patient initiating ART. Conclusions A 3-pill trial of generic ART is more likely to lead to post-trial treatment changes and to provide more value than a 2-pill trial if policy decisions are based on cost-effectiveness. Value of Information analysis can identify trials likely to confer the greatest impact and value for HIV care. PMID:26651525

  18. A Web-Based, Social Networking Physical Activity Intervention for Insufficiently Active Adults Delivered via Facebook App: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Monika; Vandelanotte, Corneel; Plotnikoff, Ron; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Thomas, Samantha; Nelson-Field, Karen; Olds, Tim

    2015-01-01

    pedometers can produce sizable short-term physical activity changes. Future work is needed to determine how to maintain behavior change in the longer term, how to reach at-need populations, and how to disseminate such interventions on a mass scale. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR): ACTRN12614000488606; https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=366239 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6ZVtu6TMz). PMID:26169067

  19. An Interactive Computer Session to Initiate Physical Activity in Sedentary Cardiac Patients: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Smith-Ray, Renae L; Dzewaltowski, David A; Glasgow, Russell E; Lee, Rebecca E; Thomas, Deborah SK; Xu, Stanley; Estabrooks, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Background Physical activity (PA) improves many facets of health. Despite this, the majority of American adults are insufficiently active. Adults who visit a physician complaining of chest pain and related cardiovascular symptoms are often referred for further testing. However, when this testing does not reveal an underlying disease or pathology, patients typically receive no additional standard care services. A PA intervention delivered within the clinic setting may be an effective strategy for improving the health of this population at a time when they may be motivated to take preventive action. Objective Our aim was to determine the effectiveness of a tailored, computer-based, interactive personal action planning session to initiate PA among a group of sedentary cardiac patients following exercise treadmill testing (ETT). Methods This study was part of a larger 2x2 randomized controlled trial to determine the impact of environmental and social-cognitive intervention approaches on the initiation and maintenance of weekly PA for patients post ETT. Participants who were referred to an ETT center but had a negative-test (ie, stress tests results indicated no apparent cardiac issues) were randomized to one of four treatment arms: (1) increased environmental accessibility to PA resources via the provision of a free voucher to a fitness facility in close proximity to their home or workplace (ENV), (2) a tailored social cognitive intervention (SC) using a “5 As”-based (ask, advise, assess, assist, and arrange) personal action planning tool, (3) combined intervention of both ENV and SC approaches (COMBO), or (4) a matched contact nutrition control (CON). Each intervention was delivered using a computer-based interactive session. A general linear model for repeated measures was conducted with change in PA behavior from baseline to 1-month post interactive computer session as the primary outcome. Results Sedentary participants (n=452; 34.7% participation rate) without

  20. Physical activity and health-related quality of life during pregnancy: a secondary analysis of a cluster-randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Kolu, Päivi; Raitanen, Jani; Luoto, Riitta

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of physical activity before and during pregnancy on health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Data from the cluster-randomised gestational diabetes mellitus primary prevention trial conducted in maternity clinics were utilised in a secondary analysis. The cases considered were pregnant women who reported engaging in at least 150 min of moderate-intensity leisure-time physical activity per week (active women) (N = 80), and the controls were women below these recommendations (less active) (N = 258). All participants had at least one risk factor for gestational diabetes mellitus. Their HRQoL was evaluated via the validated generic instrument 15D, with HRQoL at the end of pregnancy examined in relation to changes in physical activity during pregnancy. Logistic regression models addressed age, parity, education, and pre-pregnancy body mass index. At the end of pregnancy, the expected HRQoL was higher (tobit regression coefficient 0.022, 95 % CI 0.003-0.042) among active women than less active women. Active women also had greater mobility (OR 1.98, 95 % CI 1.04-3.78), ability to handle their usual activities (OR 2.22, 95 % CI 1.29-3.81), and vitality (OR 2.08, 95 % CI 1.22-3.54) than did less active women. Active women reported higher-quality sleep (OR 2.11, 95 % CI 1.03-4.30) throughout pregnancy as compared to less active women. Meeting of the physical activity guidelines before pregnancy was associated with better overall HRQoL and components thereof related to physical activity.

  1. A randomised, double masked, multicentre clinical trial comparing bimatoprost and timolol for the treatment of glaucoma and ocular hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Whitcup, S M; Cantor, L B; VanDenburgh, A M; Chen, K

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of bimatoprost 0.03% once daily or twice daily compared with timolol 0.5% twice daily in patients with glaucoma or ocular hypertension. Methods: Multicentre, double masked, randomised, parallel group, 3 month trial comparing bimatoprost once daily (n=240), bimatoprost twice daily (n=240), and timolol twice daily (n=122). The primary efficacy end point was diurnal intraocular pressure (IOP) (8 am, 10 am, 4 pm). Safety measures included adverse events, ocular parameters, and systemic variables. Results: Bimatoprost once daily provided significantly lower mean IOP than timolol twice daily at all times and follow up visits (p<0.001). At month 3, mean IOP reductions from baseline at 10 am (peak timolol effect) were bimatoprost once daily, 8.0 mm Hg (32.4%); bimatoprost twice daily, 6.3 mm Hg (25.2%); timolol, 5.5 mm Hg (22.7%). Bimatoprost twice daily was also more effective than timolol, but was not as effective as bimatoprost once daily. A higher percentage of patients achieved low target pressures with bimatoprost once daily than with timolol. The most frequent side effects with bimatoprost were eyelash growth and mild conjunctival hyperaemia. Systemic safety parameters were not affected by bimatoprost. Conclusions: Bimatoprost 0.03% once daily demonstrated superior efficacy compared with timolol 0.5% twice daily in patients with elevated IOP. Bimatoprost once daily was more effective than twice daily dosing. PMID:12488264

  2. Montelukast and fluticasone compared with salmeterol and fluticasone in protecting against asthma exacerbation in adults: one year, double blind, randomised, comparative trial

    PubMed Central

    Bjermer, Leif; Bisgaard, Hans; Bousquet, Jean; Fabbri, Leonardo M; Greening, Andrew P; Haahtela, Tari; Holgate, Stephen T; Picado, Cesar; Menten, Joris; Dass, S Balachandra; Leff, Jonathan A; Polos, Peter G

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To assess the effect of montelukast versus salmeterol added to inhaled fluticasone propionate on asthma exacerbation in patients whose symptoms are inadequately controlled with fluticasone alone. Design and setting A 52 week, two period, double blind, multicentre trial during which patients whose symptoms remained uncontrolled by inhaled corticosteroids were randomised to add montelukast or salmeterol. Participants Patients (15-72 years; n = 1490) had a clinical history of chronic asthma for ≥ 1 year, a baseline forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) value 50-90% predicted, and a β agonist improvement of ≥ 12% in FEV1. Main outcome measures The primary end point was the percentage of patients with at least one asthma exacerbation. Results 20.1% of the patients in the group receiving montelukast and fluticasone had an asthma exacerbation compared with 19.1% in the group receiving salmeterol and fluticasone; the difference was 1% (95% confidence interval -3.1% to 5.0%). With a risk ratio (montelukast-fluticasone/salmeterol-fluticasone) of 1.05 (0.86 to 1.29), treatment with montelukast and fluticasone was shown to be non-inferior to treatment with salmeterol and fluticasone. Salmeterol and fluticasone significantly increased FEV1 before a β agonist was used and morning peak expiratory flow compared with montelukast and fluticasone (P ≤ 0.001), whereas FEV1 after a β agonist was used and improvements in asthma specific quality of life and nocturnal awakenings were similar between the groups. Montelukast and fluticasone significantly (P = 0.011) reduced peripheral blood eosinophil counts compared with salmeterol and fluticasone. Both treatments were generally well tolerated. Conclusion The addition of montelukast in patients whose symptoms remain uncontrolled by inhaled fluticasone could provide equivalent clinical control to salmeterol. PMID:14563743

  3. Spinal Motion and Muscle Activity during Active Trunk Movements - Comparing Sheep and Humans Adopting Upright and Quadrupedal Postures.

    PubMed

    Valentin, Stephanie; Licka, Theresia F

    2016-01-01

    Sheep are used as models for the human spine, yet comparative in vivo data necessary for validation is limited. The purpose of this study was therefore to compare spinal motion and trunk muscle activity during active trunk movements in sheep and humans. Three-dimensional kinematic data as well as surface electromyography (sEMG) of spinal flexion and extension was compared in twenty-four humans in upright (UR) and 4-point kneeling (KN) postures and in 17 Austrian mountain sheep. Kinematic markers were attached over the sacrum, posterior iliac spines, and spinous and transverse processes of T5, T8, T11, L2 and L5 in humans and over the sacrum, tuber sacrale, T5, T8, T12, L3 and L7 in sheep. The activity of erector spinae (ES), rectus abdominis (RA), obliquus externus (OE), and obliquus internus (OI) were collected. Maximum sEMG (MOE) was identified for each muscle and trial, and reported as a percentage (MOE%) of the overall maximally observed sEMG from all trials. Spinal range of motion was significantly smaller in sheep compared to humans (UR / KN) during flexion (sheep: 6-11°; humans 12-34°) and extension (sheep: 4°; humans: 11-17°). During extension, MOE% of ES was greater in sheep (median: 77.37%) than UR humans (24.89%), and MOE% of OE and OI was greater in sheep (OE 76.20%; OI 67.31%) than KN humans (OE 21.45%; OI 19.34%), while MOE% of RA was lower in sheep (21.71%) than UR humans (82.69%). During flexion, MOE% of RA was greater in sheep (83.09%) than humans (KN 47.42%; UR 41.38%), and MOE% of ES in sheep (45.73%) was greater than KN humans (14.45%), but smaller than UR humans (72.36%). The differences in human and sheep spinal motion and muscle activity suggest that caution is warranted when ovine data are used to infer human spine biomechanics.

  4. Spinal Motion and Muscle Activity during Active Trunk Movements – Comparing Sheep and Humans Adopting Upright and Quadrupedal Postures

    PubMed Central

    Valentin, Stephanie; Licka, Theresia F.

    2016-01-01

    Sheep are used as models for the human spine, yet comparative in vivo data necessary for validation is limited. The purpose of this study was therefore to compare spinal motion and trunk muscle activity during active trunk movements in sheep and humans. Three-dimensional kinematic data as well as surface electromyography (sEMG) of spinal flexion and extension was compared in twenty-four humans in upright (UR) and 4-point kneeling (KN) postures and in 17 Austrian mountain sheep. Kinematic markers were attached over the sacrum, posterior iliac spines, and spinous and transverse processes of T5, T8, T11, L2 and L5 in humans and over the sacrum, tuber sacrale, T5, T8, T12, L3 and L7 in sheep. The activity of erector spinae (ES), rectus abdominis (RA), obliquus externus (OE), and obliquus internus (OI) were collected. Maximum sEMG (MOE) was identified for each muscle and trial, and reported as a percentage (MOE%) of the overall maximally observed sEMG from all trials. Spinal range of motion was significantly smaller in sheep compared to humans (UR / KN) during flexion (sheep: 6–11°; humans 12–34°) and extension (sheep: 4°; humans: 11–17°). During extension, MOE% of ES was greater in sheep (median: 77.37%) than UR humans (24.89%), and MOE% of OE and OI was greater in sheep (OE 76.20%; OI 67.31%) than KN humans (OE 21.45%; OI 19.34%), while MOE% of RA was lower in sheep (21.71%) than UR humans (82.69%). During flexion, MOE% of RA was greater in sheep (83.09%) than humans (KN 47.42%; UR 41.38%), and MOE% of ES in sheep (45.73%) was greater than KN humans (14.45%), but smaller than UR humans (72.36%). The differences in human and sheep spinal motion and muscle activity suggest that caution is warranted when ovine data are used to infer human spine biomechanics. PMID:26741136

  5. Measurement of neutron spectra in varied environments by the foil-activation method with arbitrary trials

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.G.; Vehar, D.W.

    1987-12-01

    Neutron spectra have been measured by the foil-activation method in 13 different environments in and around the Sandia Pulsed Reactor, the White Sands Missile Range Fast Burst Reactor, and the Sandia Annular Core Research Reactor. The spectra were obtained by using the SANDII code in a manner that was not dependent on the initial trial. This altered technique is better suited for the determination of spectra in environments that are difficult to predict by calculation, and it tends to reveal features that may be biased out by the use of standard trial-dependent methods. For some of the configurations, studies have also been made of how well the solution is determined in each energy region. The experimental methods and the techniques used in the analyses are thoroughly explained. 34 refs., 51 figs., 40 tabs.

  6. Parent-Targeted Mobile Phone Intervention to Increase Physical Activity in Sedentary Children: Randomized Pilot Trial

    PubMed Central

    Marker, Arwen M; Allen, H Raymond; Machtmes, Ryan; Han, Hongmei; Johnson, William D; Schuna Jr, John M; Broyles, Stephanie T; Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Church, Timothy S

    2014-01-01

    Background Low levels of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity are associated with adverse health consequences. Objective The intent of the study was to determine the feasibility and efficacy of a 12-week physical activity promotion program targeting children, which was delivered to parents through mobile phones. Methods Potential participants were recruited through advertisements placed in the newspaper, local hospitals and schools, and an email listserv. Sedentary children aged 6-10 years were randomly assigned to a minimal (MIG) or intensive (IIG) intervention group. Parents in the MIG were given a goal to increase (within 1 month) and maintain their child’s activity at 6000 pedometer steps/day above their baseline levels and to monitor their child’s steps daily. Parents in the IIG were given the same steps/day and monitoring goals, in addition to text messages and articles containing additional behavioral strategies (based on the Social Cognitive Theory) designed to promote their child’s physical activity. The intervention components were delivered via mobile phone. Anthropometrics, body composition, and questionnaires were administered in a clinic. Children wore a New Lifestyles pedometer (NL-1000) each day throughout the intervention and parents were to monitor their child’s step counts daily. Results Out of 59 children who screened for the study, a total of 27 children (mean age 8.7, SD 1.4 years; 56%, 15/27 female; 59%, 16/27 African American) were enrolled and completed the study. Overall, 97.90% (2220/2268; 98.20%, 1072/1092 for MIG; 97.60%, 1148/1176 for IIG) of expected step data were successfully entered by the parent or study coordinator. Parents in the MIG and IIG were sent approximately 7 and 13 text messages per week, respectively, averaged over the course of the study. IIG parents accessed an average of 6.1 (SD 4.4) articles over the course of the intervention and accessed a fewer number of articles in the last month compared to the first

  7. Comparative studies of brain activation with MEG and functional MRI

    SciTech Connect

    George, J.S.; Aine, C.J.; Sanders, J.A.; Lewine, J.D.; Caprihan, A.

    1993-12-31

    The past two years have witnessed the emergence of MRI as a functional imaging methodology. Initial demonstrations involved the injection of a paramagnetic contrast agent and required ultrafast echo planar imaging capability to adequately resolve the passage of the injected bolus. By measuring the local reduction in image intensity due to magnetic susceptibility, it was possible to calculate blood volume, which changes as a function of neural activation. Later developments have exploited endogenous contrast mechanisms to monitor changes in blood volume or in venous blood oxygen content. Recently, we and others have demonstrated that it is possible to make such measurements in a clinical imager, suggesting that the large installed base of such machines might be utilized for functional imaging. Although it is likely that functional MRI (fMRI) will subsume some of the clinical and basic neuroscience applications now touted for MEG, it is also clear that these techniques offer different largely complementary, capabilities. At the very least, it is useful to compare and cross-validate the activation maps produced by these techniques. Such studies will be valuable as a check on results of neuromagnetic distributed current reconstructions and will allow better characterization of the relationship between neurophysiological activation and associated hemodynamic changes. A more exciting prospect is the development of analyses that combine information from the two modalities to produce a better description of underlying neural activity than is possible with either technique in isolation. In this paper we describe some results from initial comparative studies and outline several techniques that can be used to treat MEG and fMRI data within a unified computational framework.

  8. Differences in reporting of acute rejections between American and European publications of large immunosuppressive trials impair comparability of study results.

    PubMed

    Fleiner, F; Budde, K; Dragun, D; Hartmann, M; Neumayer, H H; Fritsche, L

    2005-06-01

    This study examined the use of different definitions for acute rejection in recent large multicenter trials performed in America and Europe in order to assess whether systematic differences exist between both scientific cultures. We systematically selected recent publications on multicenter randomized controlled trials, investigating immunosuppressive regimens in de novo kidney transplant recipients. Publications included were classified according to the type of acute rejection reported: group 1 reported no or only one type of rejection rate (biopsy-proven or treated); group 2 reported information on both treated and biopsy-proven rates. Other potential factors (journal's impact-factor, study size) were compared within the subgroups. To determine the rates of treated but not biopsy-proven acute rejections, additional analyses were performed within subgroup 2. The reviewed publications were 24/44 (54.5%) European (E) and 20/44 (45.5%) American (A) origin. Eighteen of 44 publications reported no or only one type of rejection rate (group 1); 26 publications reported treated as well as biopsy-proven rates (group 2). Significantly more European publications reported both treated and biopsy-proven rates (E: 18/24 [75.0%] vs A: 8/20 [40.0%]; P = .019). Group 1 American papers were published in higher-ranked journals than European ones. The rate of blindly treated rejections did not differ significantly (A: 6.13% [range 0% to 12.8%] vs E: 8.43% [range 0% to 16.9%]) and the proportion of blindly treated rejections was slightly lower in American studies (A: 18.5% vs E: 26.5%). Our systematic review showed large discrepancies with a trend to report biopsy-proven rejection rates only in recent years.

  9. Cost-Effectiveness of a Biodegradable Compared to a Titanium Fixation System in Maxillofacial Surgery: A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    van Bakelen, N. B.; Vermeulen, K. M.; Buijs, G. J.; Jansma, J.; de Visscher, J. G. A. M.; Hoppenreijs, Th. J. M.; Bergsma, J. E.; Stegenga, B.; Bos, R. R. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Biodegradable fixation systems could reduce/delete the problems associated with titanium plate removal. This means less surgical discomfort, and a reduction in costs. Aim The aim of the present study was to compare the cost-effectiveness between a biodegradable and a titanium system in Maxillofacial surgery. Materials and Methods This multicenter RCT was performed in the Netherlands from December 2006 to July 2009. Included were 230 patients who underwent a bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO), a Le Fort-I osteotomy, or a bi-maxillary osteotomy and those treated for fractures of the mandible, maxilla, or zygoma. The patients were randomly assigned to a titanium group (KLS Martin) or to a biodegradable group (Inion CPS). Costs were assessed from a societal perspective. Health outcomes in the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) were bone healing (8 weeks) and plate removal (2 years). Results In 25 out of the 117 patients who were randomized to the biodegradable group, the maxillofacial surgeon made the decision to switch to the titanium system intra-operatively. This resulted in an Intention-To-Treat (ITT-)analysis and a Treatment-Received (TR-) analysis. Both analyses indicated that operations performed with titanium plates and screws had better health outcomes. In the TR-analysis the costs were lower in the biodegradable group, in the ITT-analysis costs were lower in the titanium group. Conclusion and Discussion The difference in costs between the ITT and the TR analyses can be explained by the intra-operative switches: In the TR-analysis the switches were analysed in the titanium group. In the ITT-analysis they were analysed in the biodegradable group. Considering the cost-effectiveness the titanium system is preferable to the biodegradable system in the regular treatment spectrum of mandibular, Le Fort-I, and zygomatic fractures, and BSSO’s, Le Fort-I osteotomies and bimaxillary osteotomies. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials

  10. Comparative trial of the WHO ASSIST-linked brief intervention and simple advice for substance abuse in primary care.

    PubMed

    Assanangkornchai, Sawitri; Nima, Patimoh; McNeil, Edward B; Edwards, J Guy

    2015-12-01

    To help decrease the burden of substance-related problems, the World Health Organization developed the Alcohol, Smoking, Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST) - a sensitive screening questionnaire to help identify misuse of alcohol and other substances - linked to Brief Intervention (BI). This paper compares the effectiveness of the ASSIST followed either by its linked BI or by simple advice (SA). The trial was conducted in southern Thailand. The ASSIST was used to screen patients attending primary care units and categorise them into 'low-risk', 'moderate-risk' and 'high-risk' groups. Patients at 'moderate-risk' were randomised to receive ASSIST-linked BI (n=120) or SA (n=116). The outcome measures were changes in the ASSIST-Specific Substance Involvement Scores (ASSIST-SSIS), ASSIST-Total Substance Involvement Scores (ASSIST-TSIS) and proportions of patients whose scores at three and six months had decreased from the 'moderate-risk' to 'low-risk' category. 147 patients (72 BI; 75 SA) completed the six-month trial. There were significant reductions in both ASSIST-SSIS and ASSIST-TSIS, with no significant difference between groups. The percentages of patients converted to the 'low-risk' category were 36.7% and 38.8% at month 3, and 53.3% and 53.4% at month 6, for the BI and SA groups, respectively. In conclusion, in primary care administering the ASSIST and telling patients their score, followed either by formal brief intervention or simple advice, are equally effective in decreasing substance use for up to six months.

  11. A randomized, controlled trial of osteopathic manipulative treatment for acute low back pain in active duty military personnel

    PubMed Central

    Cruser, des Anges; Maurer, Douglas; Hensel, Kendi; Brown, Sarah K; White, Kathryn; Stoll, Scott T

    2012-01-01

    Objective Acute low back pain (ALBP) may limit mobility and impose functional limitations in active duty military personnel. Although some manual therapies have been reported effective for ALBP in military personnel, there have been no published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) in the military. Furthermore, current military ALBP guidelines do not specifically include OMT. Methods This RCT examined the efficacy of OMT in relieving ALBP and improving functioning in military personnel at Fort Lewis, Washington. Sixty-three male and female soldiers ages 18 to 35 were randomly assigned to a group receiving OMT plus usual care or a group receiving usual care only (UCO). Results The primary outcome measures were pain on the quadruple visual analog scale, and functioning on the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire. Outcomes were measured immediately preceding each of four treatment sessions and at four weeks post-trial. Intention to treat analysis found significantly greater post-trial improvement in ‘Pain Now’ for OMT compared to UCO (P = 0·026). Furthermore, the OMT group reported less ‘Pain Now’ and ‘Pain Typical’ at all visits (P = 0·025 and P = 0·020 respectively). Osteopathic manipulative treatment subjects also tended to achieve a clinically meaningful improvement from baseline on ‘Pain at Best’ sooner than the UCO subjects. With similar baseline expectations, OMT subjects reported significantly greater satisfaction with treatment and overall self-reported improvement (P<0·01). Conclusion This study supports the effectiveness of OMT in reducing ALBP pain in active duty military personnel. PMID:23372389

  12. Apnea after awake-regional and general anesthesia in infants: The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study: comparing apnea and neurodevelopmental outcomes, a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Andrew J.; Morton, Neil S.; Arnup, Sarah J.; de Graaff, Jurgen C.; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E.; Frawley, Geoff; Hunt, Rodney W.; Hardy, Pollyanna; Khotcholava, Magda; von Ungern Sternberg, Britta S.; Wilton, Niall; Tuo, Pietro; Salvo, Ida; Ormond, Gillian; Stargatt, Robyn; Locatelli, Bruno Guido; McCann, Mary Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Background Post-operative apnea is a complication in young infants. Awake-regional anesthesia (RA) may reduce the risk; however the evidence is weak. The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study is a randomized, controlled, trial designed to assess the influence of general anesthesia (GA) on neurodevelopment. A secondary aim is to compare rates of apnea after anesthesia. Methods Infants ≤ 60 weeks postmenstrual age scheduled for inguinal herniorraphy were randomized to RA or GA. Exclusion criteria included risk factors for adverse neurodevelopmental outcome and infants born < 26 weeks’ gestation. The primary outcome of this analysis was any observed apnea up to 12 hours post-operatively. Apnea assessment was unblinded. Results 363 patients were assigned to RA and 359 to GA. Overall the incidence of apnea (0 to 12 hours) was similar between arms (3% in RA and 4% in GA arms, Odds Ratio (OR) 0.63, 95% Confidence Intervals (CI): 0.31 to 1.30, P=0.2133), however the incidence of early apnea (0 to 30 minutes) was lower in the RA arm (1% versus 3%, OR 0.20, 95%CI: 0.05 to 0.91, P=0.0367). The incidence of late apnea (30 minutes to 12 hours) was 2% in both RA and GA arms (OR 1.17, 95%CI: 0.41 to 3.33, P=0.7688). The strongest predictor of apnea was prematurity (OR 21.87, 95% CI 4.38 to 109.24) and 96% of infants with apnea were premature. Conclusions RA in infants undergoing inguinal herniorraphy reduces apnea in the early post-operative period. Cardio-respiratory monitoring should be used for all ex-premature infants. PMID:26001033

  13. Comparing Benefits from Many Possible Computed Tomography Lung Cancer Screening Programs: Extrapolating from the National Lung Screening Trial Using Comparative Modeling

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Pamela M.; Meza, Rafael; Plevritis, Sylvia K.; Black, William C.; Tammemagi, C. Martin; Erdogan, Ayca; ten Haaf, Kevin; Hazelton, William; Holford, Theodore R.; Jeon, Jihyoun; Clarke, Lauren; Kong, Chung Yin; Choi, Sung Eun; Munshi, Vidit N.; Han, Summer S.; van Rosmalen, Joost; Pinsky, Paul F.; Moolgavkar, Suresh

    2014-01-01

    Background The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) demonstrated that in current and former smokers aged 55 to 74 years, with at least 30 pack-years of cigarette smoking history and who had quit smoking no more than 15 years ago, 3 annual computed tomography (CT) screens reduced lung cancer-specific mortality by 20% relative to 3 annual chest X-ray screens. We compared the benefits achievable with 576 lung cancer screening programs that varied CT screen number and frequency, ages of screening, and eligibility based on smoking. Methods and Findings We used five independent microsimulation models with lung cancer natural history parameters previously calibrated to the NLST to simulate life histories of the US cohort born in 1950 under all 576 programs. ‘Efficient’ (within model) programs prevented the greatest number of lung cancer deaths, compared to no screening, for a given number of CT screens. Among 120 ‘consensus efficient’ (identified as efficient across models) programs, the average starting age was 55 years, the stopping age was 80 or 85 years, the average minimum pack-years was 27, and the maximum years since quitting was 20. Among consensus efficient programs, 11% to 40% of the cohort was screened, and 153 to 846 lung cancer deaths were averted per 100,000 people. In all models, annual screening based on age and smoking eligibility in NLST was not efficient; continuing screening to age 80 or 85 years was more efficient. Conclusions Consensus results from five models identified a set of efficient screening programs that include annual CT lung cancer screening using criteria like NLST eligibility but extended to older ages. Guidelines for screening should also consider harms of screening and individual patient characteristics. PMID:24979231

  14. Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment versus an Active Control for Children and Adolescents with Anxiety Disorders: A Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Jennifer L.; Rapee, Ronald M.; Deveney, Charise; Schniering, Carolyn A.; Lyneham, Heidi J.; Bavopoulos, Nataly

    2009-01-01

    Specific delivery of cognitive-behavioral skills is more effective in treating childhood anxiety compared to treatment that contains only nonspecific therapy factors. The findings are based on a randomized trial involving 112 children aged 7-16 years.

  15. A Randomized Trial Comparing Mail versus In-Office Distribution of the CAHPS Clinician and Group Survey

    PubMed Central

    Anastario, Michael P; Rodriguez, Hector P; Gallagher, Patricia M; Cleary, Paul D; Shaller, Dale; Rogers, William H; Bogen, Karen; Safran, Dana Gelb

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of survey distribution protocol (mail versus handout) on data quality and measurement of patient care experiences. Data Sources/Study Setting Multisite randomized trial of survey distribution protocols. Analytic sample included 2,477 patients of 15 clinicians at three practice sites in New York State. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Mail and handout distribution modes were alternated weekly at each site for 6 weeks. Principal Findings Handout protocols yielded an incomplete distribution rate (74 percent) and lower overall response rates (40 percent versus 58 percent) compared with mail. Handout distribution rates decreased over time and resulted in more favorable survey scores compared with mailed surveys. There were significant mode–physician interaction effects, indicating that data cannot simply be pooled and adjusted for mode. Conclusions In-office survey distribution has the potential to bias measurement and comparison of physicians and sites on patient care experiences. Incomplete distribution rates observed in-office, together with between-office differences in distribution rates and declining rates over time suggest staff may be burdened by the process and selective in their choice of patients. Further testing with a larger physician and site sample is important to definitively establish the potential role for in-office distribution in obtaining reliable, valid assessment of patient care experiences. PMID:20579126

  16. Applying technology to the treatment of cannabis use disorder: comparing telephone versus Internet delivery using data from two completed trials.

    PubMed

    Rooke, Sally E; Gates, Peter J; Norberg, Melissa M; Copeland, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Technology-based interventions such as those delivered by telephone or online may assist in removing significant barriers to treatment seeking for cannabis use disorder. Little research, however, has addressed differing technology-based treatments regarding their comparative effectiveness, and how user profiles may affect compliance and treatment satisfaction. This study addressed this issue by examining these factors in online (N=225) versus telephone (N=160) delivered interventions for cannabis use, using data obtained from two previously published randomized controlled trials conducted by the current authors. Several differences emerged including stronger treatment effects (medium to large effect sizes in the telephone study versus small effect sizes in the Web study) and lower dropout in the telephone intervention (38% vs. 46%). Additionally, around half of the telephone study participants sought concurrent treatment, compared with 2% of participants in the Web study. Demographics and predictors of treatment engagement, retention and satisfaction also varied between the studies. Findings indicate that both telephone and Web-based treatments can be effective in assisting cannabis users to quit or reduce their use; however, participant characteristics may have important implications for treatment preference and outcome, with those who elect telephone-based treatment experiencing stronger outcomes. Thus, participant preference may shape study populations, adherence, and outcome. PMID:24051076

  17. Iodixanol vs iopamidol in intravenous DSA of the abdominal aorta and lower extremity arteries: a comparative phase-III trial.

    PubMed

    Fischbach, R; Landwehr, P; Lackner, K; Nossen, J O; Heindel, W; Berg, K J; Eichhorn, G; Jacobsen, T F

    1996-01-01

    Iodixanol (Visipaque, 320 mgI/ml) was compared with iopamidol (Solutrast, 370 mgI/ml) in a double-blind, randomized, parallel group, intravenous DSA phase-III trial for evaluation of safety and efficacy. A total of 117 patients received iodixanol (n = 60) or iopamidol (n = 57). Diagnostic efficacy was evaluated using categoric and visual analogue scales. Discomfort and adverse events were recorded. A total of 39 patients collected urine up to 72 h after the examination for analysis. Diagnostic efficacy and radiographic density were similar in both groups. Discomfort was milder with iodixanol. The difference between the frequency of adverse events between both groups (iodixanol = 7, iopamidol = 2) was without statistical significance. Creatinine clearance was slightly more affected by iodixanol, whereas the increase in renal excretion of N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase (NAG) in the first 24-h collection period after the examination was significantly higher (p < 0.01) with iopamidol. Iodixanol was of equal diagnostic efficacy compared with iopamidol despite its reduced iodine content. Both contrast media are well suited for IV DSA.

  18. Maintenance of Activity and Eating Change Following a Clinical Trial of Tailored Newsletters with Older Rural Women

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Susan Noble; Pullen, Carol H.; Hageman, Patricia A.; Boeckner, Linda S.; Hertzog, Melody; Oberdorfer, Maureen K.; Rutledge, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    Background In the Wellness for Women Project, a randomized-by-site 1-year controlled clinical trial, the efficacy of generic newsletters and tailored newsletters on Health Promotion Model behavior-specific cognitions, eating change, and activity change were compared among 225 women aged 50 to 69 years. Objectives To compare the maintenance of change in healthy eating and physical activity over 12 months following the tailored versus generic mailed newsletter intervention. Method Outcomes at 18 and 24 months included behavioral markers and biomarkers of physical activity and eating. Data were analyzed using the multivariate approach to repeated measures analysis of variance and generalized estimating equations (α < .05). Results At 18 months, the tailored group maintained levels of all eating and activity behaviors, while the generic group maintained levels of fruit and vegetable servings and moderate or greater activity, stretching exercise, lower body strength, and flexibility, but increased saturated fat intake and declined in weekly strength exercise and cardiorespiratory fitness. At 24 months, both groups maintained or returned to 12-month levels of all eating behaviors and moderate or greater activity, stretching exercise, and flexibility, but declined in cardiorespiratory fitness; the tailored group maintained levels of strength exercise and lower body strength, while the generic group decreased in both. A greater proportion of women who received tailored newsletters continued to achieve most Healthy People 2010 criteria for eating and activity. Discussion Mailed tailored print newsletters were more effective than generic newsletters in facilitating maintenance of change in eating and activity for 6 months postintervention. Both tailored and generic newsletters facilitated the maintenance of change in eating behaviors and in moderate or greater physical activity and stretching exercise, while tailored newsletters were more effective in maintaining change in

  19. Design of a randomized clinical trial of concurrent treatment with vitamin K2 and risedronate compared to risedronate alone in osteoporotic patients: Japanese Osteoporosis Intervention Trial-03 (JOINT-03).

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shiro; Miyazaki, Teruhiko; Uemura, Yukari; Kuroda, Tatsuhiko; Miyakawa, Nobuaki; Nakamura, Toshitaka; Fukunaga, Masao; Ohashi, Yasuo; Ohta, Hiroaki; Mori, Satoshi; Hagino, Hiroshi; Hosoi, Takayuki; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu; Itoi, Eiji; Orimo, Hajime; Shiraki, Masataka

    2014-05-01

    Concurrent treatments with bisphosphonates and vitamin K are promising given that bisphosphonates possibly interfere with vitamin K activation. This is a prospective, multi-center, open-labeled, randomized trial of the efficacy of concurrent treatment with vitamin K2 and risedronate compared with risedronate alone and to explore subsets of patients for which concurrent treatment is particularly efficacious (trial identification number UMIN000000991). Inclusion criteria are women who meet the criteria for pharmacological therapy for osteoporosis, aged ≥65 years, have any of pre-specified risk factors, can walk unassisted, and are able to answer questionnaires. Exclusion criteria are prior warfarin use, secondary osteoporosis or non-osteoporotic metabolic bone diseases, contraindication for vitamin K2 and risedronate, hyper- or hypoparathyroidism, mental disorders, prevalent vertebral fracture at ≥6 sites, severe degenerative spinal deformation between T4 and L4, serious heart, liver, or kidney disease, or bisphosphonate use within the previous 6 months. Patients were recruited from 123 institutes between January 2008 and February 2010, and allocated to vitamin K2 (45 mg/day) and risedronate (2.5 mg/day or 17.5 mg/week) or risedronate alone (2.5 mg/day or 17.5 mg/week) groups. Primary endpoint is a vertebral or non-vertebral fracture. Secondary endpoints are bone mineral density, height, undercarboxylated osteocalcin, JOQOL, EQ-5D and safety. A sample size of 910 subjects per group and 2-year follow-up will provide 80 % power to detect 35 % risk reduction for fracture, with a two-sided significance level of 5 %. Subgroup analysis stratified to adjustment factors for random allocation, body mass index, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, estimated glomerular filtration rate, grade of vertebral fracture, JOQOL, EQ-5D, and co-morbidity is pre-specified.

  20. Delavirdine in Combination with Zidovudine in Treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Infected Patients: Evaluation of Efficacy and Emergence of Viral Resistance in a Randomized, Comparative Phase III Trial

    PubMed Central

    Joly, Véronique; Moroni, Mauro; Concia, Ercole; Lazzarin, Adriano; Hirschel, Bernard; Jost, Josef; Chiodo, Francesco; Bentwich, Zvi; Love, W. Campbell; Hawkins, David A.; Wilkins, Edmund G. L.; Gatell, Aritigas J.; Vetter, Norbert; Greenwald, Cynthia; Freimuth, William W.; de Cian, Wanda

    2000-01-01

    We compared the activity of delavirdine (DLV) plus zidovudine (AZT) (n = 300) with that of AZT (n = 297) against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. DLV exerted a transient antiviral effect, and mutations for resistance to DLV were found in more than 90% of subjects at week 12. The K103N mutation, which confers nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor cross-resistance, was found in 85% of the patients. PMID:11036040

  1. Improving diet, physical activity and other lifestyle behaviours using computer-tailored advice in general practice: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The adoption and maintenance of healthy behaviours is essential in the primary prevention of chronic non-communicable diseases. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a minimal intervention on multiple lifestyle factors such as diet, physical activity, smoking and alcohol, delivered through general practice, using computer-tailored feedback. Methods Adult patients visiting 21 general practitioners in Brisbane, Australia, were surveyed about ten health behaviours that are risk factors for chronic, non-communicable diseases. Those who completed the self-administered baseline questionnaire entered a randomised controlled trial, with the intervention group receiving computer-tailored printed advice, targeting those health behaviours for which respondents were not meeting current recommendations. The primary outcome was change in summary lifestyle score (Prudence Score) and individual health behaviours at three months. A repeated measures analysis compared change in these outcomes in intervention and control groups after adjusting for age and education. Results 2306 patients were randomised into the trial. 1711 (76%) returned the follow-up questionnaire at 3 months. The Prudence Score (10 items) in the intervention group at baseline was 5.88, improving to 6.25 at 3 months (improvement = 0.37), compared with 5.84 to 5.96 (improvement = 0.12) in the control group (F = 13.3, p = 0.01). The intervention group showed improvement in meeting recommendations for all individual health behaviours compared with the control group. However, these differences were significant only for fish intake (OR 1.37, 95% CI 1.11-1.68), salt intake (OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.05-1.38), and type of spread used (OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.06-1.51). Conclusion A minimal intervention using computer-tailored feedback to address multiple lifestyle behaviours can facilitate change and improve unhealthy behaviours. Although individual behaviour changes were modest, when implemented on a

  2. Single-trial prediction of reaction time variability from MEG brain activity.

    PubMed

    Ohata, Ryu; Ogawa, Kenji; Imamizu, Hiroshi

    2016-06-02

    Neural activity prior to movement onset contains essential information for predictive assistance for humans using brain-machine-interfaces (BMIs). Even though previous studies successfully predicted different goals for upcoming movements, it is unclear whether non-invasive recording signals contain the information to predict trial-by-trial behavioral variability under the same movement. In this paper, we examined the predictability of subsequent short or long reaction times (RTs) from magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals in a delayed-reach task. The difference in RTs was classified significantly above chance from 550 ms before the go-signal onset using the cortical currents in the premotor cortex. Significantly above-chance classification was performed in the lateral prefrontal and the right inferior parietal cortices at the late stage of the delay period. Thus, inter-trial variability in RTs is predictable information. Our study provides a proof-of-concept of the future development of non-invasive BMIs to prevent delayed movements.

  3. Single-trial prediction of reaction time variability from MEG brain activity

    PubMed Central

    Ohata, Ryu; Ogawa, Kenji; Imamizu, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Neural activity prior to movement onset contains essential information for predictive assistance for humans using brain-machine-interfaces (BMIs). Even though previous studies successfully predicted different goals for upcoming movements, it is unclear whether non-invasive recording signals contain the information to predict trial-by-trial behavioral variability under the same movement. In this paper, we examined the predictability of subsequent short or long reaction times (RTs) from magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals in a delayed-reach task. The difference in RTs was classified significantly above chance from 550 ms before the go-signal onset using the cortical currents in the premotor cortex. Significantly above-chance classification was performed in the lateral prefrontal and the right inferior parietal cortices at the late stage of the delay period. Thus, inter-trial variability in RTs is predictable information. Our study provides a proof-of-concept of the future development of non-invasive BMIs to prevent delayed movements. PMID:27250872

  4. Single-trial prediction of reaction time variability from MEG brain activity.

    PubMed

    Ohata, Ryu; Ogawa, Kenji; Imamizu, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Neural activity prior to movement onset contains essential information for predictive assistance for humans using brain-machine-interfaces (BMIs). Even though previous studies successfully predicted different goals for upcoming movements, it is unclear whether non-invasive recording signals contain the information to predict trial-by-trial behavioral variability under the same movement. In this paper, we examined the predictability of subsequent short or long reaction times (RTs) from magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals in a delayed-reach task. The difference in RTs was classified significantly above chance from 550 ms before the go-signal onset using the cortical currents in the premotor cortex. Significantly above-chance classification was performed in the lateral prefrontal and the right inferior parietal cortices at the late stage of the delay period. Thus, inter-trial variability in RTs is predictable information. Our study provides a proof-of-concept of the future development of non-invasive BMIs to prevent delayed movements. PMID:27250872

  5. Time-Based Physical Activity Interventions for Weight Loss: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jakicic, John M.; Rickman, Amy D.; Lang, Wei; Davis, Kelliann K.; Gibbs, Bethany Barone; Neiberg, Rebecca; Marcus, Marsha D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine whether enhancing standard behavior weight loss interventions (SBWP) with additional strategies at the initiation of the intervention (ADOPT) or providing the additional strategies at predetermined times over the intervention period (MAINTAIN) enhances 18 month weight loss. Methods This was a clinical trial with participants (n=195; age= 43.2±8.6 yrs; BMI= 33.0±3.4 kg/m2) randomized to SBWP, ADOPT, or MAINTAIN. All were prescribed an energy restricted diet and physical activity, with group intervention sessions delivered over 18 months. ADOPT received additional phone contact (months 1–3), supervised exercise (months 1–6), and behavior campaigns (months 4–9). MAINTAIN received additional phone contact (months 4–6), supervised exercise (months 7–12), and behavior campaigns (months 13–18). Results There was a significant Group X Time interaction for weight loss (p=0.0032). SBWP lost 9.3±0.9, 7.8±1.1, and 5.9±1.2 kg at 6, 12, and 18 months, respectively. ADOPT lost 8.9±0.9, 7.6±1.2, and 5.8±1.2 kg, and MAINTAIN lost 9.7±0.9, 11.0±1.2, and 9.0±1.2 kg at 6, 12, and 18 months, respectively. The Group X Time interaction for SBWP vs. MAINTAIN (p=0.0033) and ADOPT vs. MAINTAIN (p=0.0075) was significant. There was a significant Group X Time interaction for change in fitness (p=0.0060). The Group X Time interaction for MAINTAIN vs. ADOPT (p=0.0018) was significant with a trend for MAINTAIN vs. SBWP (p=0.0525). Conclusions MAINTAIN improved 18-month weight loss compared to SBWP and ADOPT, with statistical trends that MAINTAIN resulted in greater improvements in fitness. These results suggest that time-based strategies emphasizing physical activity conferred greater benefits when delivered later and over the full course of intervention. This provides valuable information for the implementation of time-based strategies to improve long-term weight loss and fitness in overweight and obese adults. PMID:25160843

  6. Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Flexible and Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Delivery: Effects on Compliance, Objective and Subjective Sleepiness and Vigilance

    PubMed Central

    Bakker, Jessie; Campbell, Angela; Neill, Alister

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: Positive airway pressure (PAP) treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can be limited by suboptimal compliance. C-Flex technology (Philips Respironics, PA, USA) reduces pressure during expiration, aiming to improve comfort and therefore compliance. This may be of particular relevance to patients requiring high pressures. Many studies thus far have suffered from design limitations and small sample sizes. This study aimed to compare compliance with C-Flex and CPAP, as well as analyzing objective and subjective sleepiness and vigilance. Design: Three-month, double-blinded, parallel-arm randomized controlled trial. Setting: A university-based sleep laboratory. Patients: 76 consecutive patients with severe OSA (mean ± SD AHI 60.2 ± 32.9 events/hour, ESS 13.6 ± 4.5/24, BMI 35.6 ± 7.8 kg/m2), without significant cardiac, respiratory, psychiatric, or sleep comorbidities. Interventions: Patients were randomized to C-Flex (dip level 2) or CPAP. Measurements and Results: Patients underwent titration with C-Flex/CPAP (mean pressure 11.6 cm H2O). Modified maintenance of wakefulness tests (mod-MWT), psychomotor vigilance tasks (PVT) and questionnaires were administered at baseline and after one and 3 months. Median compliance was 5.51 and 5.89 h/ night in the C-Flex and CPAP groups respectively (P = 0.82). There were no significant differences between groups in terms of PVT reaction time, subjective sleepiness, sleep quality, health-related quality of life, or treatment comfort. There was no significant difference between the groups regarding the change in mod-MWT sleep latency values. Conclusions: In patients with severe OSA both CPAP and C-Flex resulted in substantial improvements in sleepiness, vigilance, and quality of life. The use of C-Flex did not result in greater compliance, and neither treatment appeared superior. Citation: Bakker J; Campbell A; Neill A. Randomized controlled trial comparing flexible and continuous positive airway pressure

  7. Promoting Physical Activity in Low-Active Adolescents via Facebook: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial to Test Feasibility

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The World Wide Web is an effective method for delivering health behavior programs, yet major limitations remain (eg, cost of development, time and resource requirements, limited interactivity). Social media, however, has the potential to deliver highly customizable and socially interactive behavioral interventions with fewer constraints. Thus, the evaluation of social media as a means to influence health behaviors is warranted. Objective The objective of this trial was to examine and demonstrate the feasibility of using an established social networking platform (ie, Facebook) to deliver an 8 week physical activity intervention to a sample of low-active adolescents (N=21; estimated marginal mean age 13.48 years). Methods Participants were randomized to either an experimental (ie, Behavioral) or attentional control (ie, Informational) condition. Both conditions received access to a restricted-access, study-specific Facebook group where the group’s administrator made two daily wall posts containing youth-based physical activity information and resources. Primary outcomes included physical activity as assessed by accelerometry and self-report. Interactions and main effects were examined, as well as mean differences in effect sizes. Results Analyses revealed significant improvements over time on subjectively reported weekly leisure-time physical activity (F 1,18=8.426, P=.009, η2 = .319). However, there was no interaction between time and condition (F 1,18=0.002, P=.968, η2 = .000). There were no significant time or interaction effects among the objectively measured physical activity variables. Examination of effect sizes revealed moderate-to-large changes in physical activity outcomes. Conclusions Results provide initial support for the feasibility of delivery of a physical activity intervention to low-active adolescents via social media. Whether by employing behavioral interventions via social media can result in statistically meaningful changes in

  8. Project Zero Delay: a process for accelerating the activation of cancer clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Kurzrock, Razelle; Pilat, Susan; Bartolazzi, Marcel; Sanders, Dwana; Van Wart Hood, Jill; Tucker, Stanley D; Webster, Kevin; Mallamaci, Michael A; Strand, Steven; Babcock, Eileen; Bast, Robert C

    2009-09-10

    Drug development in cancer research is lengthy and expensive. One of the rate-limiting steps is the initiation of first-in-human (phase I) trials. Three to 6 months can elapse between investigational new drug (IND) approval by the US Food and Drug Administration and the entry of a first patient. Issues related to patient participation have been well analyzed, but the administrative processes relevant to implementing clinical trials have received less attention. While industry and academia often partner for the performance of phase I studies, their administrative processes are generally performed independently, and their timelines driven by different priorities: safety reviews, clinical operations, regulatory submissions, and contracting of clinical delivery vendors for industry; contracts, budgets, and institutional review board approval for academia. Both processes converge on US Food and Drug Administration approval of an IND. In the context of a strategic alliance between M. D. Anderson Cancer Center and AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, a concerted effort has been made to eliminate delays in implementing clinical trials. These efforts focused on close communications, identifying and matching key timelines, alignment of priorities, and tackling administrative processes in parallel, rather than sequentially. In a recent, first-in-human trial, the study was activated and the first patient identified in 46 days from completion of the final study protocol and about 48 hours after final US Food and Drug Administration IND approval, reducing the overall timeline by about 3 months, while meeting all clinical good practice guidelines. Eliminating administrative delays can accelerate the evaluation of new drugs without compromising patient safety or the quality of clinical research. PMID:19652061

  9. INFERENCES DRAWN FROM A RISK ASSESSMENT COMPARED DIRECTLY TO A RANDOMIZED TRIAL OF A HOME DRINKING WATER INTERVENTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risk assessments and intervention trials have been used to inform the EPA on drinking water risks. Seldom are both methods used concurrently. Between 2001 and 2003, illness data from a trial were collected simultaneously with exposure data, providing a unique opportunity to com...

  10. Comparing the efficacy of Emu oil with clotrimazole and hydrocortisone in the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis: A clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Attarzadeh, Yalda; Asilian, Ali; Shahmoradi, Zabihollah; Adibi, Neda

    2013-01-01

    Background: Seborrheic dermatitis (SD) is a common, chronic inflammatory disease. Inflammatory reaction and oxidative stress are thought to be effective in the pathogenesis of SD. Based on anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties of emu oil, this study was designed to evaluate effects of emu oil on patients suffering from SD, and to compare it with routine treatments of SD with topical steroids and antifungal agents. Materials and Methods: This clinical trial was conducted on126 patients who were randomly allocated to 2 groups: 62 in the clotrimazole vs. emu oil (group-1) and 64 in the hydrocortisone vs. emu oil (group-2). The right side of the face in both groups was treated with topical emu oil. The left side was treated with topical clotrimazole in the first group and with topical hydrocortisone in the second group. One month after the treatment, pre and post treatment symptom severity scores of pruritus, erythema and scales were compared. Results: All 3 medications significantly improved pruritus, erythema and scales (P < 0. 01). However, topical clotrimazole and hydrocortisone were significantly more effective than emu oil in improving scales (P < 0.01), and hydrocortisone was significantly more effective than emu oil in reducing pruritus (P < 0. 01). Comparing with topical clotrimazole, emu oil resulted in significantly more improvement of erythema (p:0.01). Conclusion: Emu oil is a potentially useful agent that significantly improves itching, erythema and scales associated with SD; however, it was less effective than hydrocortisone and clotrimazole which are routinely prescribed to treat SD. PMID:24250695

  11. Randomized comparative trial of efficacy of paracetamol, ibuprofen and paracetamol-ibuprofen combination for treatment of febrile children

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Falgun Indravadan; Rana, Devang Ashwinkumar; Patel, Piyush M.; Patel, Varsha Jitendra; Bhavsar, Rekha H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Paracetamol and ibuprofen are widely used for fever in children as monotherapy and as combined therapy. None of the treatments is proven clearly superior to others. Hence, the study was planned to compare the efficacy of paracetamol, ibuprofen and paracetamol-ibuprofen combination for treatment of febrile children. Materials and Methods: This was an investigator blind, randomized, comparative, parallel clinical trial conducted in 99 febrile children, 6 months to 12 years of age, allocated to three groups. First group received paracetamol 15 mg/kg, second group received ibuprofen 10 mg/kg and third group received both paracetamol and ibuprofen, all as a single dose by the oral route. Patients were followed-up at intervals of 1, 2, 3 and 4 h post dose by tympanic thermometry. Results: Mean tympanic temperature after 4 h of drug administration was significantly lower in the combination group compared with paracetamol group (P < 0.05); however, the difference was not clinically significant (<1°C). The rate of fall of temperature was highest in the combination group. Number of afebrile children any time post dose until 4 h was highest in the combination group. Difference between combination and paracetamol was significant for the 1st h (P = 0.04). Highest fall of temperature was noted in the 1st h of drug administration in all the groups. No serious adverse events were observed in any of the groups. Conclusion: Paracetamol and ibuprofen combination caused quicker temperature reduction than either paracetamol or ibuprofen alone. If quicker reduction of body temperature is the desired goal of therapy, the use of combination of paracetamol + ibuprofen may be advocated. PMID:24551584

  12. Comparative Effect of Cinnamon and Ibuprofen for Treatment of Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Randomized Double-Blind Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jaafarpour, Molouk; Hatefi, Masoud; Khajavikhan, Javaher

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Primary dysmenorrheal has a negative impact on women's quality of life. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of Cinnamon and Ibuprofen for treatment of primary dysmenorrheal in a sample of Iranian female college students from Ilam University of Medical Sciences (western Iran). Materials and Methods In a randomized, double-blind trial, out of 114, control group received placebo (empty capsules contain starch, TDS, n= 38) a test group received Ibuprofen (capsule containing 400mg Ibuprofen, TDS, n=38), or another test group received Cinnamon (capsule containing 420 mg Cinnamon, TDS, n= 38) in 24 h. To determine severity of pain, we used the VAS scale. Pain intensity and duration of pain were monitored in the group during first 72 h of cycle. Results The mean pain severity score and mean duration of pain in Ibuprofen and Cinnamon were less than placebo group respectively (p< 0.001). Of 4 hours after the intervention there were no statistically significant differences between the Cinnamon and placebo group (p> 0.05). Of eight hours after the intervention, the mean pain severity in the cinnamon group was significantly lower than placebo group (p< 0.001). At various time intervals the mean pain severity in the Ibuprofen group were significantly less than Cinnamon and placebo groups (p< 0.001). Conclusion Cinnamon compared with placebo significantly reduced the severity and duration of pain during menstruation, but this effect was lower compared with Ibuprofen. Cinnamon can be regarded as a safe and effective treatment for primary dysmenorrhea. More researches are recommended to study the efficacy of Cinnamon on reducing menstrual bleeding. PMID:26023601

  13. Comparing energy sources for surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation: a Bayesian network meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Phan, Kevin; Xie, Ashleigh; Kumar, Narendra; Wong, Sophia; Medi, Caroline; La Meir, Mark; Yan, Tristan D

    2015-08-01

    Simplified maze procedures involving radiofrequency, cryoenergy and microwave energy sources have been increasingly utilized for surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation as an alternative to the traditional cut-and-sew approach. In the absence of direct comparisons, a Bayesian network meta-analysis is another alternative to assess the relative effect of different treatments, using indirect evidence. A Bayesian meta-analysis of indirect evidence was performed using 16 published randomized trials identified from 6 databases. Rank probability analysis was used to rank each intervention in terms of their probability of having the best outcome. Sinus rhythm prevalence beyond the 12-month follow-up was similar between the cut-and-sew, microwave and radiofrequency approaches, which were all ranked better than cryoablation (respectively, 39, 36, and 25 vs 1%). The cut-and-sew maze was ranked worst in terms of mortality outcomes compared with microwave, radiofrequency and cryoenergy (2 vs 19, 34, and 24%, respectively). The cut-and-sew maze procedure was associated with significantly lower stroke rates compared with microwave ablation [odds ratio <0.01; 95% confidence interval 0.00, 0.82], and ranked the best in terms of pacemaker requirements compared with microwave, radiofrequency and cryoenergy (81 vs 14, and 1, <0.01% respectively). Bayesian rank probability analysis shows that the cut-and-sew approach is associated with the best outcomes in terms of sinus rhythm prevalence and stroke outcomes, and remains the gold standard approach for AF treatment. Given the limitations of indirect comparison analysis, these results should be viewed with caution and not over-interpreted.

  14. Comparing the Effects of Reflexology and Footbath on Sleep Quality in the Elderly: A Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Valizadeh, Leila; Seyyedrasooli, Alehe; Zamanazadeh, Vahid; Nasiri, Khadijeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sleep disorders are common mental disorders reported among the elderly in all countries, and with nonpharmacological interventions, they could be helped to improve their sleep quality. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of two interventions, foot reflexology and foot bath, on sleep quality in elderly people. Patients and Methods: This three-group randomized clinical trial (two experimental groups and a control group) was conducted on 69 elderly men. The two experimental groups had reflexology (n = 23) and foot bath (n = 23) interventions for 6 weeks. The reflexology intervention was done in the mornings, once a week for ten minutes on each foot. The participants in the foot bath group were asked to soak their feet in 41°C to 42°C water one hour before sleeping. The pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI) was completed before and after the intervention through an interview process. Results: The results showed that the PSQI scores after intervention compared to before it in the reflexology and foot bath groups were statistically significant (P = 0.01 , P = 0.001); however, in the control group did not show a statistically significant difference (P = 0.14). In addition, the total score changes among the three groups were statistically significant (P = 0.01). Comparing the score changes of quality of sleep between the reflexology and foot bath groups showed that there was no significant difference in none of the components and the total score (P = 0.09). The two interventions had the same impact on the quality of sleep. Conclusions: It is suggested that the training of nonpharmacological methods to improve sleep quality such as reflexology and foot bath be included in the elderly health programs. In addition, it is recommended that the impact of these interventions on subjective sleep quality using polysomnographic recordings be explored in future research. PMID:26734475

  15. Crotaline snake bite in the Ecuadorian Amazon: randomised double blind comparative trial of three South American polyspecific antivenoms

    PubMed Central

    Smalligan, Roger; Cole, Judy; Brito, Narcissa; Laing, Gavin D; Mertz, Bruce L; Manock, Steven; Maudlin, Jeffrey; Quist, Brad; Holland, Gary; Nelson, Stephen; Lalloo, David G; Rivadeneira, Gonzalo; Barragan, Maria Elena; Dolley, Daniel; Eddleston, Michael; Warrell, David A; Theakston, R David G

    2004-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficacy and safety of three polyspecific antivenoms for bites by pit vipers. Design Randomised double blind comparative trial of three antivenoms. Setting Shell, Pastaza, southeastern Ecuador. Participants 210 patients with incoagulable blood were recruited from 221 consecutive patients admitted with snake bite between January 1997 and December 2001. Intervention One of three antivenoms manufactured in Brazil, Colombia, and Ecuador, chosen for their preclinical potency against Ecuadorian venoms. Main outcome measures Permanent restoration of blood coagulability after 6 and 24 hours. Results The snakes responsible for the bites were identified in 187 cases: 109 patients (58%) were bitten by Bothrops atrox, 68 (36%) by B bilineatus, and 10 (5%) by B taeniatus, B brazili, or Lachesis muta. Eighty seven patients (41%) received Colombian antivenom, 82 (39%) received Brazilian antivenom, but only 41 (20%) received Ecuadorian antivenom because the supply was exhausted. Two patients died, and 10 developed local necrosis. All antivenoms achieved the primary end point of permanently restoring blood coagulability by 6 or 24 hours after the start of treatment in > 40% of patients. Colombian antivenom, however, was the most effective after initial doses of 20 ml (two vials), < 70 ml, and any initial dose at both 6 and 24 hours. An initial dose of 20 ml of Colombian antivenom permanently restored blood coagulability in 64% (46/72) of patients after 6 hours (P = 0.054 compared with the other two antivenoms) and an initial dose of < 70 ml was effective at 6 hours (65%, P = 0.045) and 24 hours (99%, P = 0.06). Early anaphylactoid reactions were common (53%, 73%, and 19%, respectively, for Brazilian, Colombian, and Ecuadorian antivenoms, P < 0.0001) but only three reactions were severe and none was fatal. Conclusions All three antivenoms can be recommended for the treatment of snakebites in this region, though the reactogenicity of Brazilian and Colombian

  16. Effect of affordable technology on physical activity levels and mobility outcomes in rehabilitation: a protocol for the Activity and MObility UsiNg Technology (AMOUNT) rehabilitation trial

    PubMed Central

    Hassett, Leanne; van den Berg, Maayken; Lindley, Richard I; Crotty, Maria; McCluskey, Annie; van der Ploeg, Hidde P; Smith, Stuart T; Schurr, Karl; Killington, Maggie; Bongers, Bert; Howard, Kirsten; Heritier, Stephane; Togher, Leanne; Hackett, Maree; Treacy, Daniel; Dorsch, Simone; Wong, Siobhan; Scrivener, Katharine; Chagpar, Sakina; Weber, Heather; Pearson, Ross; Sherrington, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction People with mobility limitations can benefit from rehabilitation programmes that provide a high dose of exercise. However, since providing a high dose of exercise is logistically challenging and resource-intensive, people in rehabilitation spend most of the day inactive. This trial aims to evaluate the effect of the addition of affordable technology to usual care on physical activity and mobility in people with mobility limitations admitted to inpatient aged and neurological rehabilitation units compared to usual care alone. Methods and analysis A pragmatic, assessor blinded, parallel-group randomised trial recruiting 300 consenting rehabilitation patients with reduced mobility will be conducted. Participants will be individually randomised to intervention or control groups. The intervention group will receive technology-based exercise to target mobility and physical activity problems for 6 months. The technology will include the use of video and computer games/exercises and tablet applications as well as activity monitors. The control group will not receive any additional intervention and both groups will receive usual inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation care over the 6-month study period. The coprimary outcomes will be objectively assessed physical activity (proportion of the day spent upright) and mobility (Short Physical Performance Battery) at 6 months after randomisation. Secondary outcomes will include: self-reported and objectively assessed physical activity, mobility, cognition, activity performance and participation, utility-based quality of life, balance confidence, technology self-efficacy, falls and service utilisation. Linear models will assess the effect of group allocation for each continuously scored outcome measure with baseline scores entered as a covariate. Fall rates between groups will be compared using negative binomial regression. Primary analyses will be preplanned, conducted while masked to group allocation and use an

  17. Developing a complex intervention for diet and activity behaviour change in obese pregnant women (the UPBEAT trial); assessment of behavioural change and process evaluation in a pilot randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Complex interventions in obese pregnant women should be theoretically based, feasible and shown to demonstrate anticipated behavioural change prior to inception of large randomised controlled trials (RCTs). The aim was to determine if a) a complex intervention in obese pregnant women leads to anticipated changes in diet and physical activity behaviours, and b) to refine the intervention protocol through process evaluation of intervention fidelity. Methods We undertook a pilot RCT of a complex intervention in obese pregnant women, comparing routine antenatal care with an intervention to reduce dietary glycaemic load and saturated fat intake, and increase physical activity. Subjects included 183 obese pregnant women (mean BMI 36.3 kg/m2). Diet was assessed by repeated triple pass 24-hour dietary recall and physical activity by accelerometry and questionnaire, at 16+0 to 18+6 and at 27+0 to 28+6 weeks’ gestation in women in control and intervention arms. Attitudes to behaviour change and quality of life were assessed and a process evaluation undertaken. The full RCT protocol was undertaken to assess feasibility. Results Compared to women in the control arm, women in the intervention arm had a significant reduction in dietary glycaemic load (33 points, 95% CI −47 to −20), (p < 0.001) and saturated fat intake (−1.6% energy, 95% CI −2.8 to −0. 3) at 28 weeks’ gestation. Objectively measured physical activity did not change. Physical discomfort and sustained barriers to physical activity were common at 28 weeks’ gestation. Process evaluation identified barriers to recruitment, group attendance and compliance, leading to modification of intervention delivery. Conclusions This pilot trial of a complex intervention in obese pregnant women suggests greater potential for change in dietary intake than for change in physical activity, and through process evaluation illustrates the considerable advantage of performing an exploratory trial of a

  18. Physical Activity during Cancer Treatment (PACT) Study: design of a randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Fatigue is a major problem of cancer patients. Thirty percent of cancer survivors report serious fatigue three years after finishing treatment. There is evidence that physical exercise during cancer treatment reduces fatigue. This may also lead to an improvement of quality of life. Such findings may result in a decrease of healthcare related expenditures and societal costs due to sick leave. However, no studies are known that investigated these hypotheses. Therefore, the primary aim of our study is to assess the effect of exercise during cancer treatment on reducing complaints of fatigue and on reducing health service utilisation and sick leave. Methods/Design The Physical Activity during Cancer Treatment study is a multicentre randomised controlled trial in 150 breast and 150 colon cancer patients undergoing cancer treatment. Participants will be randomised to an exercise or a control group. In addition to the usual care, the exercise group will participate in an 18-week supervised group exercise programme. The control group will be asked to maintain their habitual physical activity pattern. Study endpoints will be assessed after 18 weeks (short term) and after 9 months (long term). Validated questionnaires will be used. Primary outcome: fatigue (Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory and Fatigue Quality List) and cost-effectiveness, health service utilisation and sick leave. Secondary outcome: health related quality of life (European Organisation Research and Treatment of Cancer-Quality of Life questionnaire-C30, Short Form 36 healthy survey), impact on functioning and autonomy (Impact on functioning and autonomy questionnaire), anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), physical fitness (aerobic peak capacity, muscle strength), body composition and cognitive-behavioural aspects. To register health service utilisation and sick leave, participants will keep diaries including the EuroQuol-5D. Physical activity level will be measured

  19. Comparative Effectivenesses of Pulsed Radiofrequency and Transforaminal Steroid Injection for Radicular Pain due to Disc Herniation: a Prospective Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Gyu; Ahn, Sang-Ho; Lee, Jungwon

    2016-08-01

    Transforaminal Epidural steroid injections (TFESI) have been widely adopted to alleviate and control radicular pain in accord with current guidelines. However, sometimes repeated steroid injections have adverse effects, and thus, this prospective randomized trial was undertaken to compare the effectivenesses of pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) administered to a targeted dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and TFESI for the treatment of radicular pain due to disc herniation. Subjects were recruited when first proved unsuccessful (defined as a score of > 4 on a visual analogue scale (VAS; 0-10 mm) and of > 30% according to the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) or the Neck Disability Index (NDI)). Forty-four patients that met the inclusion criteria were enrolled. The 38 subjects were randomly assigned to receive either PRF (PRF group; n = 19) or additional TFESI (TFESI group; n = 19) and were then followed for 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks. To evaluate pain intensity were assessed by VAS. ODI and NDI were applied to evaluate functional disability. Mean VAS scores for cervical and lumbar radicular pain were significantly lower 12 weeks after treatment in both study groups. NDI and ODI scores also declined after treatment. However, no statistically significant difference was observed between the PRF and TFESI groups in terms of VAS, ODI, or NDI scores at any time during follow-up. PRF administered to a DRG might be as effective as TFESI in terms of attenuating radicular pain caused by disc herniation, and its use would avoid the adverse effects of steroid. PMID:27478346

  20. A randomized trial comparing the effects of self-help materials and proactive telephone counseling on teen smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Lipkus, Isaac M; McBride, Colleen M; Pollak, Kathryn I; Schwartz-Bloom, Rochelle D; Tilson, Elizabeth; Bloom, Paul N

    2004-07-01

    We conducted a 2-arm randomized trial to test the efficacy of self-help materials with or without proactive telephone counseling to increase cessation among teen smokers. Teen smokers (N = 402) recruited from 11 shopping malls and 1 amusement park in the southeastern United States were randomized to 1 of 2 groups: written self-help material plus video; or written self-help material, video, and telephone counseling. Cessation rates based on 7-day point-prevalent abstinence for the self-help and counseling arms were 11% and 16%, respectively (p = .25), at 4 months postbaseline and 19% and 21%, respectively (p = .80), at 8 months postbaseline. Sustained abstinence, reflecting 7-day abstinence at both time points, in the self-help and counseling arms was 7% and 9% (p = .59). Results suggest that minimal self-help cessation approaches that target youth have comparable success to that shown among adult smokers. However, refinements in telephone-counseling approaches may be needed to achieve the success observed in adult populations.

  1. Comparing the effects of Bentonite & Calendula on the improvement of infantile diaper dermatitis: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudi, Mansoreh; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Mashaiekhi, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Infantile diaper dermatitis is a common, acute inflammatory reaction of the skin around diaper among infants. This study was undertaken to compare the effect of topical application of Bentonite and Calendula creams on the improvement of infantile diaper dermatitis. Methods: This double blind randomized controlled trial was undertaken on 100 patients of infantile diaper dermatitis. The 100 participants were randomly assigned into two groups of 50 each, and were prescribed the coded medicine. The mothers were trained to apply the cream and level of improvement was judged by observing the affected area on the first visit and then after three days of receiving treatment. Results: The mean age of infants was 6.45±5.53 months in Calendula group and 7.35±6.28 months in Bentonite group. Overall, 88 per cent of lesions in the Bentonite group started improving in the first six hours while this rate was 54 per cent in Calendula group (P<0.001). The risk ratio for the improvement in the first six hours was 2.99 folds in the Bentonite group. Also, lesions in 86 per cent infants in the Bentonite group and 52 per cent in the Calendula group were completely improved in the first three days after treatment (P<0.001). Interpretation & conclusions: Our results showed that in comparison with Calendula, Bentonite had faster healing effect and was more effective on the improvement of infantile diaper dermatitis (IRCT ID: IRCT 2012112811593N1). PMID:26831423

  2. Comparing tailored and narrative worksite interventions at increasing colonoscopy adherence in adults 50-75: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jakob D; King, Andy J; Carcioppolo, Nick; Krakow, Melinda; Samadder, N Jewel; Morgan, Susan

    2014-03-01

    Research has identified several communication strategies that could increase adherence to colorectal cancer screening recommendations. Two promising strategies are tailoring and narrative-based approaches. Tailoring is the personalization of information based on individual characteristics. Narrative-based approaches use stories about similar others to counter perceived barriers and cultivate self-efficacy. To compare these two approaches, a randomized controlled trial was carried out at 8 worksites in Indiana. Adults 50-75 (N = 209) received one of four messages about colorectal cancer screening: stock, narrative, tailored, tailored narrative. The primary outcome was whether participants filed a colonoscopy claim in the 18 months following the intervention. Individuals receiving narrative messages were 4 times more likely to screen than those not receiving narrative messages. Tailoring did not increase screening behavior overall. However, individuals with higher cancer information overload were 8 times more likely to screen if they received tailored messages. The results suggest that narrative-based approaches are more effective than tailoring at increasing colorectal cancer screening in worksite interventions. Tailoring may be valuable as a strategy for reaching individuals with high overload, perhaps as a follow-up effort to a larger communication campaign.

  3. Oral rehydration therapy: a community trial comparing the acceptability of homemade sucrose and cereal-based solutions.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, A M; Karim, F; Rohde, J E; Ahmed, J; Abed, F H

    1991-01-01

    Sugar-based oral rehydration therapy (ORT) for diarrhoea is promoted in many countries of the world. One programme in Bangladesh has instructed more than 13 million mothers in the preparation of a sugar-salt solution in the home; despite very high rates of correct mixing and knowledge, subsequent application was found in only some 20% of all diarrhoea episodes. Since rice is far more available in rural homes (95%) than any type of sugar (30%) and rice gruel is a widely accepted food during illness, a field trial was conducted in three areas (total population, 68,345) to compare the acceptability and use of rice-based ORT with that of sugar-based ORT. Although the mothers unanimously agreed that the rice-based solutions "stopped" the diarrhoea more quickly, they used the sugar-based solutions twice as often (in 40% of severe watery episodes) as the rice-based solutions (in 18%), because the rice-ORT was much more time-consuming and difficult to prepare. The observed reduced utilization of home-made rice-ORT makes it a poor substitute for sugar-ORT at the community level in rural Bangladesh.

  4. Couple and individual adjustment for 2 years following a randomized clinical trial comparing traditional versus integrative behavioral couple therapy.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Andrew; Atkins, David C; Yi, Jean; Baucom, Donald H; George, William H

    2006-12-01

    Follow-up data across 2 years were obtained on 130 of 134 couples who were originally part of a randomized clinical trial comparing traditional versus integrative behavioral couple therapy (TBCT vs. IBCT; A. Christensen et al., 2004). Both treatments produced similar levels of clinically significant improvement at 2 years posttreatment (69% of IBCT couples and 60% of TBCT couples). Both treatments showed a "hockey-stick" pattern of change in which satisfaction dropped immediately after treatment termination but then increased for most of follow-up. The break point when couples reversed courses and gained in satisfaction occurred sooner for IBCT than TBCT couples, and those couples who stayed together generally fared better in IBCT than in TBCT. Finally, there was evidence of greater stability during follow-up in IBCT than in TBCT couples. There was little change in individual functioning over follow-up, but when change occurred it was strongly related to change in marital satisfaction. Given that this sample was selected for its significant and chronic distress, the data are encouraging about the long-term impact of behavioral couple therapy.

  5. Mebendazole Compared with Secnidazole in the Treatment of Adult Giardiasis: A Randomised, No-Inferiority, Open Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Almirall, Pedro; Escobedo, Angel A.; Ayala, Idalia; Alfonso, Maydel; Salazar, Yohana; Cañete, Roberto; Cimerman, Sergio; Galloso, Martha; Olivero, Ilmaems; Robaina, Maytee; Tornés, Karen

    2011-01-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of mebendazole and secnidazole in the treatment of giardiasis in adult patients, a single-centre, parallel group, open-label, randomized non-inferiority trial was carried out. One-hundred and 26 participants who had symptomatic Giardia mono-infection took part in the study. Direct wet mount and/or Ritchie concentration techniques and physical examinations were conducted at the time of enrolment and at the follow-up visit. The primary outcome measure was parasitological cure, performed at 3, 5, 10 days post-treatment. Negative faecal specimens for Giardia were ensured by the same parasitological techniques. At follow up (day 10) the parasitological cure rate for the per protocol populations was 88.7% (55/62) for MBZ and 91.8% (56/61) for SNZ. For the intention to treat populations the cure rate at the end of treatment was 85.9% (55/64) for MBZ and 90.3% (56/62) for SNZ. Both analyzes showed there was not significant statistical difference between MBZ and SNZ treatment efficacy. Both drugs were well tolerated, only mild, transient and self-limited side effects were reported and did not require discontinuation of treatment. A 3-day course of mebendazole seems to be as efficacious and safe for treatment of giardiasis as a single dose of secnidazole in adults. PMID:22174992

  6. Mebendazole compared with secnidazole in the treatment of adult giardiasis: a randomised, no-inferiority, open clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Almirall, Pedro; Escobedo, Angel A; Ayala, Idalia; Alfonso, Maydel; Salazar, Yohana; Cañete, Roberto; Cimerman, Sergio; Galloso, Martha; Olivero, Ilmaems; Robaina, Maytee; Tornés, Karen

    2011-01-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of mebendazole and secnidazole in the treatment of giardiasis in adult patients, a single-centre, parallel group, open-label, randomized non-inferiority trial was carried out. One-hundred and 26 participants who had symptomatic Giardia mono-infection took part in the study. Direct wet mount and/or Ritchie concentration techniques and physical examinations were conducted at the time of enrolment and at the follow-up visit. The primary outcome measure was parasitological cure, performed at 3, 5, 10 days post-treatment. Negative faecal specimens for Giardia were ensured by the same parasitological techniques. At follow up (day 10) the parasitological cure rate for the per protocol populations was 88.7% (55/62) for MBZ and 91.8% (56/61) for SNZ. For the intention to treat populations the cure rate at the end of treatment was 85.9% (55/64) for MBZ and 90.3% (56/62) for SNZ. Both analyzes showed there was not significant statistical difference between MBZ and SNZ treatment efficacy. Both drugs were well tolerated, only mild, transient and self-limited side effects were reported and did not require discontinuation of treatment. A 3-day course of mebendazole seems to be as efficacious and safe for treatment of giardiasis as a single dose of secnidazole in adults. PMID:22174992

  7. Incidence of weak opioids adverse events in the management of cancer pain: a double-blind comparative trial.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Rene Fernando; Bravo, Luis Eduardo; Castro, Fernando; Montoya, Olga; Castillo, Javier Mauricio; Castillo, María Pilar; Daza, Paola; Restrepo, José Manuel; Rodriguez, Mario Fernando

    2007-02-01

    With the objective of comparing incidence of adverse events of the opioids codeine, hydrocodone, and tramadol in the relief of cancer pain, we conducted a randomized controlled trial in which patients with cancer were randomly assigned according to a computer-generated schedule to receive one of the three opioids. Of the 177 patients who participated, 62 patients received hydrocodone, 59 patients received codeine, and 56 patients received tramadol. The pain experienced by the participants originated most frequently from the stomach, breast, or prostate gland and was classified as either somatic (33%), visceral (52%), mixed (6%), or neuropathic (9%). At the first visit, 60% of the patients described their pain intensity as moderate (4-6/10), with the remaining 40% of the patients describing their pain as severe (7-10/10). The symptoms most associated with pain were weakness, insomnia. and anorexia. In 77% of the total number of cases, the patient was aware of his/her diagnosis prior to admittance to the palliative care unit. Of the total number of cases, 57% fell in the age range of 60-89 years old and 50% of the participants were female. No significant statistical difference in the analgesic efficacy of the three opioids was found (p: 0.69; chi(2): 0.73). Use of tramadol produced higher rates of adverse events than codeine and hydrocodone: vomiting, dizziness, loss of appetite, and weakness (p < 0.05).

  8. Coronally Advanced Flap with Different Designs in the Treatment of Gingival Recession: A Comparative Controlled Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Zucchelli, Giovanni; Stefanini, M; Ganz, S; Mazzotti, Claudio; Mounssif, Ilham; Marzadori, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this parallel double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial was to describe a modified approach using the coronally advanced flap (CAF) with triangular design and to compare its efficacy, in terms of root coverage and esthetics, with a trapezoidal type of CAF. A sample of 50 isolated Miller Class I and II gingival recessions with at least 1 mm of keratinized tissue apical to the defects were treated with CAF. Of these recessions, 25 were randomly treated with trapezoidal CAF (control group) while the other 25 (test group) were treated with a modified triangular CAF. The clinical and esthetic evaluations, made by the patient and an independent periodontist, were performed 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year after the surgery. No statistically significant difference was demonstrated between the two CAF groups in terms of recession reduction, complete root coverage, or 6-month and 1-year patient esthetic scores. Better 3-month patient esthetic evaluations and better periodontist root coverage, color match, and contiguity assessments were reported after triangular CAF. Trapezoidal CAF was associated with greater incidence of keloid formation. Single-type gingival recessions can be successfully covered with both types of CAF. The triangular CAF should be preferred for esthetically demanding patients. PMID:27100801

  9. A Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing the Effect of Different Haemostatic Agents for Haemostasis of the Liver after Hepatic Resection

    PubMed Central

    Seyyed Sadeghi, Mir Salim; Sanei, Behnam; Hashemzadeh, Shahryar

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Operative blood loss is still a great obstacle to liver resection, and various topical hemostatic agents were introduced to reduce it. The aim of the current study is to evaluate effects of 3 different types of these agents. Methods. In this randomized clinical trial, 45 patients undergoing liver resection were assigned to receive TachoSil, Surgicel, and Glubran 2 for controlling bleeding. Intraoperative and postoperative findings were compared between groups. Results. Postoperative bleeding (0 versus 33.3%, P = 0.04) and drainage volume first day after surgery (281.33 ± 103.98 versus 150.00 ± 60.82 mL, P = 0.02) were significantly higher in Surgicel than in TachoSil group. Postoperative complications included bile leak (3 cases in Surgicel, 1 case in TachoSil and Glubran 2), noninfectious collection (2 cases in TachoSil and Surgicel and 1 case in Glubran 2), perihepatic abscess, and massive hematoma around hepatectomy site both in Surgicel group. There was no death during the study period. Conclusion. Due to higher complications in Surgicel group, its application as hemostatic agent after liver resection is not recommended. Better results in TachoSil in comparison to the other two are indicative of its better efficacy and superiority in controlling hemostasis. PMID:24159254

  10. A randomized trial comparing perinatal outcomes using insulin detemir or neutral protamine Hagedorn in type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Jovanovič, Lois; McCance, David R; Ivanisevic, Marina; Durán-Garcia, Santiago; Brøndsted, Lise; Nazeri, Avideh; Damm, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Objective This randomized controlled trial aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of insulin detemir (IDet) with neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH), both with insulin aspart, in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes. The perinatal and obstetric pregnancy outcomes are presented. Methods Subjects were randomized to IDet (n = 152) or NPH (n = 158) ≤12 months before pregnancy or at 8–12 gestational weeks. Results For IDet and NPH, there were 128 and 136 live births, 11 and 9 early fetal losses, and two and one perinatal deaths, respectively. Gestational age at delivery was greater for children from the IDet arm than the NPH arm (treatment difference: 0.49 weeks [95% CI 0.11;0.88], p = 0.012, linear regression). Sixteen children had a malformation (IDet: n = 8/142, 5.6%; NPH: n = 8/145, 5.5%). The incidence of adverse events was similar between treatments. Conclusion IDet is as well tolerated as NPH as regards perinatal outcomes in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes and no safety issues were identified. PMID:23617228

  11. Comparative Effectivenesses of Pulsed Radiofrequency and Transforaminal Steroid Injection for Radicular Pain due to Disc Herniation: a Prospective Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Transforaminal Epidural steroid injections (TFESI) have been widely adopted to alleviate and control radicular pain in accord with current guidelines. However, sometimes repeated steroid injections have adverse effects, and thus, this prospective randomized trial was undertaken to compare the effectivenesses of pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) administered to a targeted dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and TFESI for the treatment of radicular pain due to disc herniation. Subjects were recruited when first proved unsuccessful (defined as a score of > 4 on a visual analogue scale (VAS; 0-10 mm) and of > 30% according to the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) or the Neck Disability Index (NDI)). Forty-four patients that met the inclusion criteria were enrolled. The 38 subjects were randomly assigned to receive either PRF (PRF group; n = 19) or additional TFESI (TFESI group; n = 19) and were then followed for 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks. To evaluate pain intensity were assessed by VAS. ODI and NDI were applied to evaluate functional disability. Mean VAS scores for cervical and lumbar radicular pain were significantly lower 12 weeks after treatment in both study groups. NDI and ODI scores also declined after treatment. However, no statistically significant difference was observed between the PRF and TFESI groups in terms of VAS, ODI, or NDI scores at any time during follow-up. PRF administered to a DRG might be as effective as TFESI in terms of attenuating radicular pain caused by disc herniation, and its use would avoid the adverse effects of steroid. PMID:27478346

  12. Comparative activities of milk components in reversing chronic colitis.

    PubMed

    Kanwar, J R; Kanwar, R K; Stathopoulos, S; Haggarty, N W; MacGibbon, A K H; Palmano, K P; Roy, K; Rowan, A; Krissansen, G W

    2016-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a poorly understood chronic immune disorder for which there is no medical cure. Milk and colostrum are rich sources of bioactives with immunomodulatory properties. Here we compared the therapeutic effects of oral delivery of bovine milk-derived iron-saturated lactoferrin (Fe-bLF), angiogenin, osteopontin (OPN), colostrum whey protein, Modulen IBD (Nestle Healthsciences, Rhodes, Australia), and cis-9,trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA)-enriched milk fat in a mouse model of dextran sulfate-induced colitis. The CLA-enriched milk fat significantly increased mouse body weights after 24d of treatment, reduced epithelium damage, and downregulated the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and nitrous oxide. Modulen IBD most effectively decreased the clinical score at d 12, and Modulen IBD and OPN most effectively lowered the inflammatory score. Myeloperoxidase activity that denotes neutrophil infiltration was significantly lower in mice fed Modulen IBD, OPN, angiogenin, and Fe-bLF. A significant decrease in the numbers of T cells, natural killer cells, dendritic cells, and a significant decrease in cytokine expression were observed in mice fed the treatment diets compared with dextran sulfate administered mice. The Fe-bLF, CLA-enriched milk fat, and Modulen IBD inhibited intestinal angiogenesis. In summary, each of the milk components attenuated IBD in mice, but with differing effectiveness against specific disease parameters. PMID:26805965

  13. Comparative antioxidant activities and synergism of resveratrol and oxyresveratrol.

    PubMed

    Aftab, Nan; Likhitwitayawuid, Kittisak; Vieira, Amandio

    2010-11-01

    Resveratrol (1) and oxyresveratrol (2) are phytoalexins with antioxidant activities (AAs) and proposed effects against several pathological processes. The main objective of this study was to provide a novel, comparative assessment of their AAs, and to test for potential synergism in their combined activities, or in combination with another phytochemical antioxidant, curcumin (3). The phytochemicals were tested at 10 µM total concentrations in a heme-based assay that involved, as the final step, quantification of tetramethyl-phenylene-diamine oxidation. Significant AAs were observed for both 1 and 2, 27-33% inhibition of oxidation (p < 0.05 relative to non-phytochemical control). The combination of 1 and 2 in the same assay (5 µM each) suggested a moderate synergistic effect of about 10% (41% inhibition of oxidation by 1/2 under the same conditions as for 1 and 2 separately). Combinations of 1/3 and 2/3 were also synergistic, but 1/3 had a two-fold greater AA (p < 0.05) than 2/3 (or 1/2). Our results indicate that (i) 1 and 2 are effective antioxidants in the assay, (ii) in combination, their AAs can synergise, and (iii) in relation to 2, 1 has a much greater synergistic potential with 3. The latter suggests different synergy mechanisms of the curcuminoid with each of the two stilbene phytoalexins.

  14. Cost and outcome of behavioural activation versus cognitive behaviour therapy for depression (COBRA): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment for depression. However, CBT is a complex therapy that requires highly trained and qualified practitioners, and its scalability is therefore limited by the costs of training and employing sufficient therapists to meet demand. Behavioural activation (BA) is a psychological treatment for depression that may be an effective alternative to CBT and, because it is simpler, might also be delivered by less highly trained and specialised mental health workers. Methods/Design COBRA is a two-arm, non-inferiority, patient-level randomised controlled trial, including clinical, economic, and process evaluations comparing CBT delivered by highly trained professional therapists to BA delivered by junior professional or para-professional mental health workers to establish whether the clinical effectiveness of BA is non-inferior to CBT and if BA is cost effective compared to CBT. Four hundred and forty patients with major depressive disorder will be recruited through screening in primary care. We will analyse for non-inferiority in per-protocol and intention-to-treat populations. Our primary outcome will be severity of depression symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-9) at 12 months follow-up. Secondary outcomes will be clinically significant change and severity of depression at 18 months, and anxiety (General Anxiety Disorder-7 questionnaire) and health-related quality of life (Short-Form Health Survey-36) at 12 and 18 months. Our economic evaluation will take the United Kingdom National Health Service/Personal Social Services perspective to include costs of the interventions, health and social care services used, plus productivity losses. Cost-effectiveness will explored in terms of quality-adjusted life years using the EuroQol-5D measure of health-related quality of life. Discussion The clinical and economic outcomes of this trial will provide the evidence to help policy makers, clinicians and guideline

  15. The effect of flexible acrylic resin on masticatory muscle activity in implant-supported mandibular overdentures: a controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Ibraheem, Eman Mostafa Ahmed; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2016-01-01

    Background It is not yet clear from the current literature to what extent masticatory muscle activity is affected by the use of flexible acrylic resin in the construction of implant-supported mandibular overdentures. Objective To compare masticatory muscle activity between patients who were provided with implant-supported mandibular overdentures constructed from flexible acrylic resin and those who were provided with implant-supported mandibular overdentures constructed from heat-cured conventional acrylic resin. Methods In this clinical trial, 12 completely edentulous patients were selected and randomly allocated into two equal treatment groups. Each patient in Group 1 received two implants to support a mandibular overdenture made of conventional acrylic resin. In Group 2, the patients received two implants to support mandibular overdentures constructed from “Versacryl” flexible acrylic resin. The maxillary edentulous arch for patients in both groups was restored by conventional complete dentures. For all patients, masseter and temporalis muscle activity was evaluated using surface electromyography (sEMG). Results The results showed a significant decrease in masticatory muscle activity among patients with implant-supported mandibular overdentures constructed from flexible acrylic resin. Conclusion The use of “Versacryl” flexible acrylic resin in the construction of implant-supported mandibular overdentures resulted in decreased masticatory muscle activity. PMID:26955445

  16. A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing interventions for peristomal skin care.

    PubMed

    Tam, Ka-Wai; Lai, Jun-Hung; Chen, Hung-Chou; Hou, Wen-Hsuan; Ko, Wang-Sheng; Chen, Shu-Ling; Huang, Tsai-Wei

    2014-10-01

    Standard skin care procedures for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tubes and peristomal skin care for colostomy and ileostomy patients are not always sufficient to prevent peristomal skin problems. A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was conducted to compare the effectiveness of standard peristomal skin care to adjunctive techniques or barriers (including glycogel dressings, gelatin- and pectin-based skin barriers, glycerin hydrogel wound dressing, Acacia senegal fiber pockets, hydrocolloid powder crusting, and German chamomile) to manage or treat patients with a stoma. Using systematic literature search techniques, all healthcare databases were searched up through September 2014. No language restrictions were applied. Studies were included if they met criteria for published RCTs or quasi-RCTs that evaluated the outcome of standardized peristomal skin care and other adjunctive techniques or barriers used among patients with a stoma or PEG tube. A meta-analysis was performed to calculate a pooled effect size by using random-effect models for the primary (skin irritation/reaction) and secondary (length of pouch wear time) outcomes. Six RCTs comprising 418 total patients were identified. Four evaluated the outcome of colostomy or ileostomy peristomal skin care, and no significant differences were detected in the incidence of skin problems (RR 0.67; 95% CI: 0.31-1.41). In the two studies that included length of pouch wear time, no significant differences were observed (RR 0.48; 95% CI: 0.03-7.97). No significant differences were seen in the rate of skin irritations of gastrostomy patients (RR 0.56; 95% CI: 0.20-1.59), but the difference in treatment outcomes of peristomal damage in patients with a colostomy was significant (P = 0.01). The limited number of studies, study quality, heterogeneity of variability in peristomal care strategies and techniques, clinical factors, and nonuniform reporting of clinical parameters

  17. A cluster-randomised clinical trial comparing two cardiovascular health education strategies in a child population: the Savinghearts project

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This paper describes a methodology for comparing the effects of an eduentertainment strategy involving a music concert, and a participatory class experience involving the description and making of a healthy breakfast, as educational vehicles for delivering obesity-preventing/cardiovascular health messages to children aged 7–8 years. Methods/design This study will involve a cluster-randomised trial with blinded assessment. The study subjects will be children aged 7–8 years of both sexes attending public primary schools in the Madrid Region. The participating schools (n=30) will be randomly assigned to one of two groups: 1) Group MC, in which the children will attend a music concert that delivers obesity-preventing/cardiovascular health messages, or 2) Group HB, in which the children will attend a participatory class providing the same information but involving the description and making of a healthy breakfast. The main outcome measured will be the increase in the number of correct answers scored on a knowledge questionnaire and in an attitudes test administered before and after the above interventions. The secondary outcome recorded will be the reduction in BMI percentile among children deemed overweight/obese prior to the interventions. The required sample size (number of children) was calculated for a comparison of proportions with an α of 0.05 and a β of 0.20, assuming that the Group MC subjects would show values for the measured variables at least 10% higher than those recorded for the subjects of Group HB. Corrections were made for the design effect and assuming a loss to follow-up of 10%. The maximum sample size required will be 2107 children. Data will be analysed using summary measurements for each cluster, both for making estimates and for hypothesis testing. All analyses will be made on an intention-to-treat basis. Discussion The intervention providing the best results could be recommended as part of health education for young

  18. Relationship Between Time in Therapeutic Range and Comparative Treatment Effect of Rivaroxaban and Warfarin: Results From the ROCKET AF Trial

    PubMed Central

    Piccini, Jonathan P.; Hellkamp, Anne S.; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Patel, Manesh R.; Harrell, Frank E.; Singer, Daniel E.; Becker, Richard C.; Breithardt, Günter; Halperin, Jonathan L.; Hankey, Graeme J.; Berkowitz, Scott D.; Nessel, Christopher C.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Fox, Keith A. A.; Califf, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Time in therapeutic range (TTR) is a standard quality measure of the use of warfarin. We assessed the relative effects of rivaroxaban versus warfarin at the level of trial center TTR (cTTR) since such analysis preserves randomized comparisons. Methods and Results TTR was calculated using the Rosendaal method, without exclusion of international normalized ratio (INR) values performed during warfarin initiation. Measurements during warfarin interruptions >7 days were excluded. INRs were performed via standardized finger‐stick point‐of‐care devices at least every 4 weeks. The primary efficacy endpoint (stroke or non‐central nervous system embolism) was examined by quartiles of cTTR and by cTTR as a continuous function. Centers with the highest cTTRs by quartile had lower‐risk patients as reflected by lower CHADS2 scores (P<0.0001) and a lower prevalence of prior stroke or transient ischemic attack (P<0.0001). Sites with higher cTTR were predominantly from North America and Western Europe. The treatment effect of rivaroxaban versus warfarin on the primary endpoint was consistent across a wide range of cTTRs (P value for interaction=0.71). The hazard of major and non‐major clinically relevant bleeding increased with cTTR (P for interaction=0.001), however, the estimated reduction by rivaroxaban compared with warfarin in the hazard of intracranial hemorrhage was preserved across a wide range of threshold cTTR values. Conclusions The treatment effect of rivaroxaban compared with warfarin for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism is consistent regardless of cTTR. PMID:24755148

  19. Population-Based Versus Practice-Based Recall for Childhood Immunizations: A Randomized Controlled Comparative Effectiveness Trial

    PubMed Central

    Saville, Alison; Dickinson, L. Miriam; Eisert, Sheri; Reynolds, Joni; Herrero, Diana; Beaty, Brenda; Albright, Karen; Dibert, Eva; Koehler, Vicky; Lockhart, Steven; Calonge, Ned

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We compared the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of population-based recall (Pop-recall) versus practice-based recall (PCP-recall) at increasing immunizations among preschool children. Methods. This cluster-randomized trial involved children aged 19 to 35 months needing immunizations in 8 rural and 6 urban Colorado counties. In Pop-recall counties, recall was conducted centrally using the Colorado Immunization Information System (CIIS). In PCP-recall counties, practices were invited to attend webinar training using CIIS and offered financial support for mailings. The percentage of up-to-date (UTD) and vaccine documentation were compared 6 months after recall. A mixed-effects model assessed the association between intervention and whether a child became UTD. Results. Ten of 195 practices (5%) implemented recall in PCP-recall counties. Among children needing immunizations, 18.7% became UTD in Pop-recall versus 12.8% in PCP-recall counties (P < .001); 31.8% had documented receipt of 1 or more vaccines in Pop-recall versus 22.6% in PCP-recall counties (P < .001). Relative risk estimates from multivariable modeling were 1.23 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.10, 1.37) for becoming UTD and 1.26 (95% CI = 1.15, 1.38) for receipt of any vaccine. Costs for Pop-recall versus PCP-recall were $215 versus $1981 per practice and $17 versus $62 per child brought UTD. Conclusions. Population-based recall conducted centrally was more effective and cost-effective at increasing immunization rates in preschool children. PMID:23237154

  20. Cavity disinfection in minimally invasive dentistry - comparative evaluation of Aloe vera and propolis: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakar, A. R.; Karuna, Y. M.; Yavagal, C.; Deepak, B. M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The survival of atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) restorations would probably increase if near total elimination of cariogenic microorganisms could be done in the process of cavity cleaning before going ahead with the restoration. Thus, use of naturally occurring disinfecting agents for achieving this goal could herald a new beginning in the field of contemporary minimum intervention dentistry. Aims: To evaluate the efficacy of hand instruments in excavating dental caries and comparatively evaluate the roles of Aloe vera and propolis as potential cavity disinfecting agents after minimally invasive hand excavation of dental caries. Settings and Designs: Experimental, in vivo intergroup split mouth, randomized clinical trial. Subjects and Methods: The study included Group I (Control), Group II (A. vera) and Group III (propolis). Ten patients with three teeth each have occlusal/occlusoproximal lesions suitable for ART were selected. Dentinal samples were collected three times from each tooth viz., preexcavation, postexcavation and postdisinfection of the cavities. These dentinal samples were subjected to microbiological analyses for total viable count. Statistical Analysis Used: Repeated measures of analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Bonferroni post-hoc test and one-way ANOVA with Tukey post-hoc test. Results: In all the three groups, significant amount of bacteria were left behind after hand excavation. Group II and Group III, in which cavities were treated with A. vera and propolis extracts respectively, showed a significant reduction in the bacterial counts when compared to control the group. Conclusions: Hand excavation alone does not completely eliminate bacteria, which may predispose treated teeth to secondary caries. Both propolis and A. vera extracts can be used as potential natural disinfecting agents, thereby embracing the concept of phytotherapy in minimum intervention dentistry. PMID:25821369

  1. Efficacy of Oseltamivir-Zanamivir Combination Compared to Each Monotherapy for Seasonal Influenza: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Xavier; van der Werf, Sylvie; Blanchon, Thierry; Mosnier, Anne; Bouscambert-Duchamp, Maude; Tibi, Annick; Enouf, Vincent; Charlois-Ou, Cécile; Vincent, Corine; Andreoletti, Laurent; Tubach, Florence; Lina, Bruno; Mentré, France; Leport, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Background Neuraminidase inhibitors are thought to be efficacious in reducing the time to alleviation of symptoms in outpatients with seasonal influenza. The objective of this study was to compare the short-term virological efficacy of oseltamivir-zanamivir combination versus each monotherapy plus placebo. Methods and Findings We conducted a randomized placebo-controlled trial with 145 general practitioners throughout France during the 2008–2009 seasonal influenza epidemic. Patients, general practitioners, and outcome assessors were all blinded to treatment assignment. Adult outpatients presenting influenza-like illness for less than 36 hours and a positive influenza A rapid test diagnosis were randomized to oseltamivir 75 mg orally twice daily plus zanamivir 10 mg by inhalation twice daily (OZ), oseltamivir plus inhaled placebo (O), or zanamivir plus oral placebo (Z). Treatment efficacy was assessed virologically according to the proportion of patients with nasal influenza reverse transcription (RT)-PCR below 200 copies genome equivalent (cgeq)/µl at day 2 (primary outcome), and clinically to the time to alleviation of symptoms until day 14. Overall 541 patients (of the 900 planned) were included (OZ, n = 192; O, n = 176; Z, n = 173), 49% male, mean age 39 years. In the intention-to-treat analysis conducted in the 447 patients with RT-PCR-confirmed influenza A, 46%, 59%, and 34% in OZ (n = 157), O (n = 141), and Z (n = 149) arms had RT-PCR<200 cgeq/µl (−13.0%, 95% confidence interval [CI] −23.1 to −2.9, p = 0.025; +12.3%, 95% CI 2.39–22.2, p = 0.028 for OZ/O and OZ/Z comparisons). Mean day 0 to day 2 viral load decrease was 2.14, 2.49, and 1.68 log10 cgeq/µl (p = 0.060, p = 0.016 for OZ/O and OZ/Z). Median time to alleviation of symptoms was 4.0, 3.0, and 4.0 days (+1.0, 95% CI 0.0–4.0, p = 0.018; +0.0, 95% CI −3.0 to 3.0, p = 0.960 for OZ/O and OZ/Z). Four severe adverse events were observed. Nausea

  2. Comparing In-Person to Videoconference-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Mood and Anxiety Disorders: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Stubbings, Daniel R; Roberts, Lynne D; Kane, Robert T

    2013-01-01

    Background Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) has demonstrated efficacy and effectiveness for treating mood and anxiety disorders. Dissemination of CBT via videoconference may help improve access to treatment. Objective The present study aimed to compare the effectiveness of CBT administered via videoconference to in-person therapy for a mixed diagnostic cohort. Methods A total of 26 primarily Caucasian clients (mean age 30 years, SD 11) who had a primary Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition text revision (DSM-IV-TR) diagnosis of a mood or anxiety disorder were randomly assigned to receive 12 sessions of CBT either in-person or via videoconference. Treatment involved individualized CBT formulations specific to the presenting diagnosis; all sessions were provided by the same therapist. Participants were recruited through a university clinic. Symptoms of depression, anxiety, stress, and quality of life were assessed using questionnaires before, after, and 6 weeks following treatment. Secondary outcomes at posttreatment included working alliance and client satisfaction. Results Retention was similar across treatment conditions; there was one more client in the videoconferencing condition at posttreatment and at follow-up. Statistical analysis using multilevel mixed effects linear regression indicated a significant reduction in client symptoms across time for symptoms of depression (P<.001, d=1.41), anxiety (P<.001, d=1.14), stress (P<.001, d=1.81), and quality of life (P<.001, d=1.17). There were no significant differences between treatment conditions regarding symptoms of depression (P=.165, d=0.37), anxiety (P=.41, d=0.22), stress (P=.15, d=0.38), or quality of life (P=.62, d=0.13). There were no significant differences in client rating of the working alliance (P=.53, one-tailed, d=–0.26), therapist ratings of the working alliance (P=.60, one-tailed, d=0.23), or client ratings of satisfaction (P=.77, one-tailed, d=–0.12). Fisher

  3. A Mobile Health Intervention Supporting Heart Failure Patients and Their Informal Caregivers: A Randomized Comparative Effectiveness Trial

    PubMed Central

    Striplin, Dana; Marinec, Nicolle; Chen, Jenny; Trivedi, Ranak B; Aron, David C; Fisher, Lawrence; Aikens, James E

    2015-01-01

    ). mHealth+CP patients were less likely to report negative emotions during those interactions at both endpoints (both P<.05), were consistently more likely to report taking medications as prescribed during weekly IVR assessments, and also were less likely to report breathing problems or weight gains (all P<.05). Among patients with more depressive symptoms at enrollment, those randomized to mHealth+CP were more likely than standard mHealth patients to report excellent or very good general health during weekly IVR calls. Conclusions Compared to a relatively intensive model of IVR monitoring, self-management assistance, and clinician alerts, a model including automated feedback to an informal caregiver outside the household improved HF patients’ medication adherence and caregiver communication. mHealth+CP may also decrease patients’ risk of HF exacerbations related to shortness of breath and sudden weight gains. mHealth+CP may improve quality of life among patients with greater depressive symptoms. Weekly health and self-care monitoring via mHealth tools may identify intervention effects in mHealth trials that go undetected using typical, infrequent retrospective surveys. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00555360; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00555360 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6Z4Tsk78B). PMID:26063161

  4. Healthy for Life: A Randomized Trial Examining Physical Activity Outcomes and Psychosocial Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Williams, David M.; Martinson, Brian C.; Dunsiger, Shira; Marcus, Bess H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Researchers theorize that interventions increase physical activity by influencing key theory-based mediators (e.g., behavioral processes). However, few studies have been adequately powered to examine the importance of mediators. Purpose This study examined both physical activity behavior and psychosocial mediators in a randomized trial specifically powered to detect mediation. Methods Healthy, sedentary adults (n=448; 70% Caucasian, 87% women, mean age was 43) were randomly assigned to either a six-month print-based theory tailored physical activity intervention (n=224) or a six-month health/wellness contact control arm (n=224). Results The print intervention arm exhibited greater increases in physical activity than the control arm at six and 12 months (p<.05). Additionally, behavioral processes were found to be an important mediator of physical activity behavior. Conclusions It is important for researchers and practitioners to focus on increasing behavioral strategies for physical activity adoption. Future studies should examine other potential mediators of physical activity. PMID:23229158

  5. Can Pacing Be Regulated by Post-Activation Potentiation? Insights from a Self-Paced 30 km Trial in Half-Marathon Runners

    PubMed Central

    Del Rosso, Sebastián; Barros, Edilberto; Tonello, Laís; Oliveira-Silva, Iransé; Behm, David G.; Foster, Carl; Boullosa, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Given the co-existence of post-activation potentiation (PAP) and fatigue within muscle, it is not known whether PAP could influence performance and pacing during distance running by moderating fatigue. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of PAP on pacing, jumping and other physiological measures during a self-paced 30 km trial. Methods Eleven male endurance-trained runners (half-marathon runners) volunteered to participate in this study. Runners participated in a multi-stage 30 km trial. Before the trial started, determination of baseline blood lactate (bLa) and countermovement jump (CMJ) height was performed. The self-paced 30 km trial consisted of 6 × 5 km splits. At the end of each 5 km split (60 s break), data on time to complete the split, CMJ height, Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) and blood lactate were collected while heart rate was continuously monitored. Results There was a significant decrease in speed (e.g. positive pacing strategy after the 4th split, p<0.05) with a progressive increase in RPE throughout the trial. Compared with baseline, CMJ height was significantly (p<0.05) greater than baseline and was maintained until the end of the trial with an increase after the 5th split, concomitant with a significant reduction in speed and an increase in RPE. Significant correlations were found between ΔCMJ and ΔSPEED (r = 0.77 to 0.87, p<0.05) at different time points as well as between RPE and speed (r = -0.61 to -0.82, p<0.05). Conclusion Our results indicates that fatigue and potentiation co-exist during long lasting endurance events, and that the observed increase in jump performance towards the end of the trial could be reflecting a greater potentiation potentially perhaps counteracting the effects of fatigue and preventing further reductions in speed. PMID:26934357

  6. Comparing group-based acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) with enhanced usual care for adolescents with functional somatic syndromes: a study protocol for a randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Kallesøe, Karen Hansen; Schröder, Andreas; Wicksell, Rikard K; Fink, Per; Ørnbøl, Eva; Rask, Charlotte Ulrikka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Functional somatic syndromes (FSS) are common in adolescents, characterised by severe disability and reduced quality of life. Behavioural treatments such as acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) has shown promising results in children and adolescents with FSS, but has focused on specific syndromes such as functional pain. The current study will compare the efficacy of group-based ACT with that of enhanced usual care (EUC) in adolescents with a range of FSS operationalised by the unifying construct of multiorgan bodily distress syndrome (BDS). Methods and analysis A total of 120 adolescents aged 15–19 and diagnosed with multiorgan BDS, of at least 12 months duration, will be assessed and randomised to either: (1) EUC: a manualised consultation with a child and adolescent psychiatrist and individualised treatment plan or (2) manualised ACT-based group therapy plus EUC. The ACT programme consists of 9 modules (ie, 27 hours) and 1 follow-up meeting (3 hours). The primary outcome is physical health, assessed by an Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) aggregate score 12 months after randomisation. Secondary outcomes include self-reported symptom severity, symptom interference, depression and anxiety, illness worry, perceived stress and global improvement; as well as objective physical activity and bodily stress response measured by heart rate variability, hair cortisol and inflammatory biomarkers. Process measures are illness perception, illness-related behaviour and psychological flexibility. Ethics and dissemination The study is conducted in accordance with Helsinki Declaration II. Approval has been obtained from the Science Ethics Committee of the Central Denmark Region and the Danish Data Protection. The results will be sought to be published according to the CONSORT statement in peer-reviewed journals. Discussion This is one of the first larger randomised clinical trials evaluating the effect of a group-based intervention for adolescents with a

  7. A Randomized Trial to Assess Anti-HIV Activity in Female Genital Tract Secretions and Soluble Mucosal Immunity Following Application of 1% Tenofovir Gel

    PubMed Central

    Torres, N. Merna; Fazzari, Melissa J.; Cho, Sylvia; Kalyoussef, Sabah; Shust, Gail; Mesquita, Pedro M. M.; Louissaint, Nicolette; Chen, Jianmeng; Cohen, Hillel W.; Diament, Erin C.; Lee, Anna C.; Soto-Torres, Lydia; Hendrix, Craig W.; Herold, Betsy C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Preclinical and early phase clinical microbicide studies have not consistently predicted the outcome of efficacy trials. To address this gap, candidate biomarkers of microbicide pharmacodynamics and safety were evaluated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of tenofovir gel, the first microbicide to demonstrate significant protection against HIV acquisition. Methods 30 women were randomized to apply a single daily dose of tenofovir or placebo gel for 14 consecutive days. Anti-HIV activity was measured in cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) on Days 0, 3, 7, 14 and 21 by luciferase assay as a surrogate marker of pharmacodynamics. Endogenous activity against E. coli and HSV-2 and concentrations of immune mediators were quantified in CVL as candidate biomarkers of safety. Tenofovir levels were measured in CVL and blood. Results A significant increase in anti-HIV activity was detected in CVL from women who applied tenofovir gel compared to their endogenous anti-HIV activity in genital tract secretions on Day 0 and compared to activity in CVL from women in the placebo group. The activity correlated significantly with CVL concentration of tenofovir (r = 0.6, p<0.001) and fit a sigmoid Emax pharmacodynamic model. Anti-HIV activity in CVL from women who applied tenofovir persisted when virus was introduced in semen, whereas endogenous anti-HIV activity decreased. Tenofovir did not trigger an inflammatory response or induce sustained loss in endogenous antimicrobial activity or immune mediators. Conclusions Tenofovir gel had no deleterious impact on soluble mucosal immunity. The increased anti-HIV activity in CVL, which persisted in the presence of semen and correlated with tenofovir concentration, is consistent with the efficacy observed in a recent clinical trial. These results promote quantified CVL anti-HIV activity as a surrogate of tissue pharmacodynamics and as a potential biomarker of adherence to product. This simple, feasible and inexpensive bioassay

  8. Active Video Game Exercise Training Improves the Clinical Control of Asthma in Children: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Evelim L. F. D.; Carvalho, Celso R. F.; Peixoto-Souza, Fabiana Sobral; Teixeira-Carvalho, Etiene Farah; Mendonça, Juliana Fernandes Barreto; Stirbulov, Roberto; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá; Costa, Dirceu

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to determine whether aerobic exercise involving an active video game system improved asthma control, airway inflammation and exercise capacity in children with moderate to severe asthma. Design A randomized, controlled, single-blinded clinical trial was carried out. Thirty-six children with moderate to severe asthma were randomly allocated to either a video game group (VGG; N = 20) or a treadmill group (TG; n = 16). Both groups completed an eight-week supervised program with two weekly 40-minute sessions. Pre-training and post-training evaluations involved the Asthma Control Questionnaire, exhaled nitric oxide levels (FeNO), maximum exercise testing (Bruce protocol) and lung function. Results No differences between the VGG and TG were found at the baseline. Improvements occurred in both groups with regard to asthma control and exercise capacity. Moreover, a significant reduction in FeNO was found in the VGG (p < 0.05). Although the mean energy expenditure at rest and during exercise training was similar for both groups, the maximum energy expenditure was higher in the VGG. Conclusion The present findings strongly suggest that aerobic training promoted by an active video game had a positive impact on children with asthma in terms of clinical control, improvementin their exercise capacity and a reductionin pulmonary inflammation. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01438294 PMID:26301706

  9. Patient choice in opt-in, active choice, and opt-out HIV screening: randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Dow, William H; Kaplan, Beth C

    2016-01-01

    Study question What is the effect of default test offers—opt-in, opt-out, and active choice—on the likelihood of acceptance of an HIV test among patients receiving care in an emergency department? Methods This was a randomized clinical trial conducted in the emergency department of an urban teaching hospital and regional trauma center. Patients aged 13-64 years were randomized to opt-in, opt-out, and active choice HIV test offers. The primary outcome was HIV test acceptance percentage. The Denver Risk Score was used to categorize patients as being at low, intermediate, or high risk of HIV infection. Study answer and limitations 38.0% (611/1607) of patients in the opt-in testing group accepted an HIV test, compared with 51.3% (815/1628) in the active choice arm (difference 13.3%, 95% confidence interval 9.8% to 16.7%) and 65.9% (1031/1565) in the opt-out arm (difference 27.9%, 24.4% to 31.3%). Compared with active choice testing, opt-out testing led to a 14.6 (11.1 to 18.1) percentage point increase in test acceptance. Patients identified as being at intermediate and high risk were more likely to accept testing than were those at low risk in all arms (difference 6.4% (3.4% to 9.3%) for intermediate and 8.3% (3.3% to 13.4%) for high risk). The opt-out effect was significantly smaller among those reporting high risk behaviors, but the active choice effect did not significantly vary by level of reported risk behavior. Patients consented to inclusion in the study after being offered an HIV test, and inclusion varied slightly by treatment assignment. The study took place at a single county hospital in a city that is somewhat unique with respect to HIV testing; although the test acceptance percentages themselves might vary, a different pattern for opt-in versus active choice versus opt-out test schemes would not be expected. What this paper adds Active choice is a distinct test regimen, with test acceptance patterns that may best approximate patients’ true

  10. Sedentary Activity and Body Composition of Middle School Girls: The Trial of Activity for Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Charlotte; Webber, Larry S.; Baggett, Chris D.; Ward, Dianne; Pate, Russell R.; Murray, David; Lohman, Timothy; Lytle, Leslie; Elder, John P.

    2008-01-01

    This study describes the relationships between sedentary activity and body composition in 1,458 sixth-grade girls from 36 middle schools across the United States. Multivariate associations between sedentary activity and body composition were examined with regression analyses using general linear mixed models. Mean age, body mass index, and…

  11. Intervention Effects on Adolescent Physical Activity in the Multicomponent SPACE Study: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Toftager, Mette; Christiansen, Lars B.; Ersbøll, Annette K.; Kristensen, Peter L.; Due, Pernille; Troelsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Background Multicomponent school-based interventions have the potential to reduce the age-related decline in adolescents' physical activity (PA), yet there is not consistent evidence to guide non-curricular and school environment interventions. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a multicomponent environmental school-based intervention, designed to reduce the age-related decline in PA among adolescents. Methods A cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted with 7 intervention and 7 control schools. Baseline measurements were carried out in spring 2010 with 2 years of follow-up. A total of 1,348 students (11–13 years, in grade 5 and 6) enrolled in the study at baseline. The 14 schools included in the study were located in the Region of Southern Denmark. The intervention consisted of organizational and physical changes in the school environment with a total of 11 intervention components. The primary outcome measure was overall PA (cpm, counts per minute) and was supported by analyses of time spent in MVPA, and time spent sedentary. Furthermore, a secondary outcome measure was PA in school time and during recess. PA was measured using accelerometer (Actigraph GT3X). Results A total of 797 students completed the trial and had valid accelerometer data. No significant difference was found for overall PA with an adjusted difference of −19.1 cpm (95% CI: −93, 53) or for school time activity with an adjusted difference of 6 cpm (95% CI: −73, 85). A sensitivity analysis revealed a positive significant intervention effect of PA in recess with an adjusted difference of 95 cpm. Conclusions No evidence was found of the overall effect of a non-curricular multicomponent school-based intervention on PA among Danish adolescents. The intervention was positively associated with PA during school time and recess, however, with small estimates. Lack of effect on overall PA could be due to both program theory and different degrees of implementation

  12. Two preclinical tests to evaluate anticancer activity and to help validate drug candidates for clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    López-Lázaro, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Current approaches to assessing preclinical anticancer activity do not reliably predict drug efficacy in cancer patients. Most of the compounds that show remarkable anticancer effects in preclinical models actually fail when tested in clinical trials. We blame these failures on the complexity of the disease and on the limitations of the preclinical tools we require for our research. This manuscript argues that this lack of clinical response may also be caused by poor in vitro and in vivo preclinical designs, in which cancer patients' needs are not fully considered. Then, it proposes two patient-oriented tests to assess in vitro and in vivo anticancer activity and to help validate drug candidates for clinical evaluation. PMID:25859551

  13. The efficacy of a behavioral activation intervention among depressed US Latinos with limited English language proficiency: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    . The study is also among the first to examine the effect of the proposed mechanisms of change of behavioral activation treatment for depression (that is, activity level and environmental reward) on depression over time. To our knowledge, this is the first randomized controlled trial to compare an empirical-supported treatment to a control supportive counseling condition in a sample of depressed, Spanish-speaking Latinos in the United States. Trial registration Clinical Trials Register: NCT01958840; registered 8 October 2013. PMID:24938081

  14. Establishing nurse-led active surveillance for men with localised prostate cancer: development and formative evaluation of a model of care in the ProtecT trial

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Julia; Holding, Peter N; Bonnington, Susan; Rooshenas, Leila; Lane, J Athene; Salter, C Elizabeth; Tilling, Kate; Speakman, Mark J; Brewster, Simon F; Evans, Simon; Neal, David E; Hamdy, Freddie C; Donovan, Jenny L

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To develop a nurse-led, urologist-supported model of care for men managed by active surveillance or active monitoring (AS/AM) for localised prostate cancer and provide a formative evaluation of its acceptability to patients, clinicians and nurses. Nurse-led care, comprising an explicit nurse-led protocol with support from urologists, was developed as part of the AM arm of the Prostate testing for cancer and Treatment (ProtecT) trial. Design Interviews and questionnaire surveys of clinicians, nurses and patients assessed acceptability. Setting Nurse-led clinics were established in 9 centres in the ProtecT trial and compared with 3 non-ProtecT urology centres elsewhere in UK. Participants Within ProtecT, 22 men receiving AM nurse-led care were interviewed about experiences of care; 11 urologists and 23 research nurses delivering ProtecT trial care completed a questionnaire about its acceptability; 20 men managed in urology clinics elsewhere in the UK were interviewed about models of AS/AM care; 12 urologists and three specialist nurses working in these clinics were also interviewed about management of AS/AM. Results Nurse-led care was commended by ProtecT trial participants, who valued the flexibility, accessibility and continuity of the service and felt confident about the quality of care. ProtecT consultant urologists and nurses also rated it highly, identifying continuity of care and resource savings as key attributes. Clinicians and patients outside the ProtecT trial believed that nurse-led care could relieve pressure on urology clinics without compromising patient care. Conclusions The ProtecT AM nurse-led model of care was acceptable to men with localised prostate cancer and clinical specialists in urology. The protocol is available for implementation; we aim to evaluate its impact on routine clinical practice. Trial registration numbers NCT02044172; ISRCTN20141297. PMID:26384727

  15. Improving physical activity in arthritis clinical trial (IMPAACT): study design, rationale, recruitment, and baseline data.

    PubMed

    Chang, Rowland W; Semanik, Pamela A; Lee, Jungwha; Feinglass, Joseph; Ehrlich-Jones, Linda; Dunlop, Dorothy D

    2014-11-01

    Over 21 million Americans report an arthritis-attributable activity limitation. Knee osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are two of the most common/disabling forms of arthritis. Various forms of physical activity (PA) can improve a variety of health outcomes and reduce health care costs, but the proportion of the US population engaging in the recommended amount of PA is low and even lower among those with arthritis. The Improving Motivation for Physical Activity in Arthritis Clinical Trial (IMPAACT) is a randomized clinical trial that studied the effects of a lifestyle PA promotion intervention on pain and physical function outcomes. The IMPAACT intervention was based on a chronic care/disease management model in which allied health professionals promote patient self-management activities outside of traditional physician office encounters. The program was a motivational interviewing-based, individualized counseling and referral intervention, directed by a comprehensive assessment of individual patient barriers and strengths related to PA performance. The specific aims of IMPAACT were to test the efficacy of the IMPAACT intervention for persons with arthritis (N=185 persons with RA and 155 persons with knee OA) in improving arthritis-specific and generic self-reported pain and Physical Function outcomes, observed measures of function, and objectively measured and self-reported PA levels. Details of the stratified-randomized study design, subject recruitment, and data collection are described. The results from IMPAACT will generate empiric evidence pertaining to increasing PA levels in persons with arthritis and result in widely applicable strategies for health behavior change.

  16. IMPROVING PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN ARTHRITIS CLINICAL TRIAL (IMPAACT): STUDY DESIGN, RATIONALE, RECRUITMENT, AND BASELINE DATA

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Rowland W.; Semanik, Pamela A.; Lee, Jungwha; Feinglass, Joseph; Ehrlich-Jones, Linda; Dunlop, Dorothy D.

    2014-01-01

    Over 21 million Americans report an arthritis-attributable activity limitation. Knee osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are two of the most common/disabling forms of arthritis. Various forms of physical activity (PA) can improve a variety of health outcomes and reduce health care costs, but the proportion of the US population engaging in the recommended amount of PA is low and even lower among those with arthritis. The Improving Motivation for Physical Activity in Arthritis Clinical Trial (IMPAACT) is a randomized clinical trial that studied the effects of a lifestyle PA promotion intervention on pain and physical function outcomes. The IMPAACT intervention was based on a chronic care/disease management model in which allied health professionals promote patient self-management activities outside of traditional physician office encounters. The program was a motivational interviewing-based, individualized counseling and referral intervention, directed by a comprehensive assessment of individual patient barriers and strengths related to PA performance. The specific aims of IMPAACT were to test the efficacy of the IMPAACT intervention for persons with arthritis (N=185 persons with RA and 155 persons with knee OA) in improving arthritis-specific and generic self-reported pain and physical function outcomes, observed measures of function, and objectively measured and self-reported PA levels. Details of the stratified-randomized study design, subject recruitment, and data collection are described. The results from IMPAACT will generate empiric evidence pertaining to increasing PA levels in persons with arthritis and result in widely applicable strategies for health behavior change. PMID:25183043

  17. A Comparative Study of Postoperative Pulmonary Complications Using Fast Track Regimen and Conservative Analgesic Treatment: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Aghdam, Babak Abri; Golzari, Samad Eslam Jamal; Moghadaszadeh, Majid

    2011-01-01

    Background Postoperative pulmonary complications and pain are important causes of postoperative morbidity following thoracotomy. This study aimed to compare the effects of fast track and conservative treatment regimens on patients undergoing thoracotomy. Materials and Methods In this randomized controlled clinical trial, we recruited 60 patients admitted to the thoracic ICU of Imam Reza Hospital in two matched groups of 30 patients each. Group 1 patients received fast track regimen randomly; whereas, group 2 cases randomly received conservative analgesic regimen after thoracotomy and pulmonary resection. The outcome was determined based on the incidence of pulmonary complications and reduction of post-thoracotomy pain in all patients with forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) <75% predicted value which was measured while the patients were in ICU. The length of ICU stay, thoracotomy pain, morbidity, pulmonary complications and mortality were compared in two groups. Results A total of 60 patients, 45 (75%) males and 15(25%) females with ASA class I-III were recruited in this study. Postoperative pulmonary complications were observed in 5 (16.7%) patients in group 1 versus 17 (56.7%) patients in group 2. There were statistically significant differences in development of postoperative pulmonary complications such as atelectasis and prolonged air leak between both groups (P< 0.001 and P = 0.003). There was also a statistically significant difference in the rate of preoperative FEV1 (p = 0.001) and ASA scoring (p = 0.01) and value of FEV1 < 75% predicted in the two groups. The difference in length of ICU stay in two groups was statistically significant (P= 0.003 and P = 0.017 in FEV1 < 75% group). Four patients in group 1 and 9 patients in group 2 had FEV1reduced to less than 75% of predicted value (p = 0.03). Conclusion Using fast track regimen reduced postoperative pain and incidence of some pulmonary complications significantly when compared to the

  18. Adjunctive Aripiprazole Treatment for Risperidone-Induced Hyperprolactinemia: An 8-Week Randomized, Open-Label, Comparative Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jingyuan; Song, Xueqin; Ai, Xiaoqing; Gu, Xiaojing; Huang, Guangbiao; Li, Xue; Pang, Lijuan; Ding, Minli; Ding, Shuang; Lv, Luxian

    2015-01-01

    Objective The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of adjunctive aripiprazole treatment in schizophrenia patients with risperidone-induced hyperprolactinemia. Methods One hundred and thirteen patients who were receiving a stable dose of risperidone were randomly assigned to either adjunctive aripiprazole treatment (10 mg/day) (aripiprazole group) or no additional treatment (control group) at a 1:1 ratio for 8 weeks. Schizophrenia symptoms were measured using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Rating scales and safety assessments (RSESE, BARS, UKU) were performed at baseline and at weeks 4 and 8. Serum levels of prolactin were determined at baseline and at weeks 2, 4, 6 and 8. Metabolic parameters were determined at baseline and again at weeks 4 and 8. Results One hundred and thirteen patients were enrolled in this study, and 107 patients completed the study (54 in the aripiprazole group, and 53 in the control group). PANSS-total scores in the aripiprazole group decreased significantly at week 4 (P = 0.003) and week 8 (P = 0.007) compared with the control group. PANSS-negative scores in the aripiprazole group also decreased significantly at week 4 (P = 0.005) and week 8 (P< 0.001) compared with the control group. Serum levels of prolactin in the aripiprazole group decreased significantly at week 2 (P< 0.001), week 4 (P< 0.001), week 6 (P< 0.001) and week 8 (P< 0.001) compared with the control group. There were no significant differences in changes of Fasting Plasma Glucose, Total cholesterol, Triglycerides and High Density Lipoprotein within each group at week 4 and 8 execpt low density lipoproteins. There was no significant difference in the incidence of adverse reactions between the two groups. Conclusions Adjunctive aripiprazole treatment may be beneficial in reducing serum levels of prolactin and improving negative symptoms in schizophrenia patients with risperidone-induced hyperprolactinemia. Trial Registration chictr.org Chi

  19. Maintenance of Physical Activity and Exercise Capacity After Rehabilitation in Coronary Heart Disease: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Aliabad, Hassan Okati; Vafaeinasab, Mohammadreza; Morowatisharifabad, Mohammad Ali; Afshani, Seyed Alireza; Firoozabadi, Mahdieh Ghanbari; Forouzannia, Seyed Khalil

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Physical activity is one of the core components in cardiac rehabilitation and secondary prevention programs. This study investigated the effect of an intervention based on the health action process approach (HAPA) together with family support in the maintenance of physical activity and exercise capacity in coronary heart disease after discharge from rehabilitation. Method and Materials: In this randomized controlled trial, 96 patients with coronary heart disease were randomly assigned to control and intervention groups at the end of a rehabilitation program at Afshar Hospital, Yazd, Iran. HAPA Constructs and family support using a self-reported questionnaire and maximal oxygen uptake through a treadmill exercise test were measured prior to and 4 months after the intervention. Results: HAPA-based intervention together with family support increased scores of HAPA constructs and family support in the intervention group compared with the control group. The results showed that physical activity and exercise capacity in the intervention group was significantly higher than the control group after the intervention. Conclusion: HAPA-based intervention together with family support can be a useful tool for maintenance of physical activity and exercise capacity in coronary heart disease. PMID:25363124

  20. A Randomized Controlled Trial for Children with Childhood Apraxia of Speech Comparing Rapid Syllable Transition Treatment and the Nuffield Dyspraxia Programme-Third Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Elizabeth; McCabe, Patricia; Ballard, Kirrie J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This randomized controlled trial compared the experimental Rapid Syllable Transition (ReST) treatment to the Nuffield Dyspraxia Programme-Third Edition (NDP3; Williams & Stephens, 2004), used widely in clinical practice in Australia and the United Kingdom. Both programs aim to improve speech motor planning/programming for children…

  1. Randomized clinical trial comparing lumbar percutaneous hydrodiscectomy with lumbar open microdiscectomy for the treatment of lumbar disc protrusions and herniations

    PubMed Central

    Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; Rocha, Ivan Diasda; Marcon, Raphael Martus; de Barros Filho, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Hydrodiscectomy is a new technique used for percutaneous spinal discectomy that employs a high-intensity stream of water for herniated disc ablation and tissue aspiration. No previous clinical study has examined the effects of percutaneous hydrodiscectomy. The aim of this study is to evaluate the outcomes of hydrodiscectomy compared to open microdiscectomy regarding pain, function, satisfaction, complications and recurrence rates. METHODS: In this randomized clinical trial, patients referred to our tertiary hospital for lumbar back pain were recruited and included in the study if they had disc protrusion or small herniation in only one level, without neurological deficits and with no resolution after six weeks of conservative treatment. One group underwent open microdiscectomy, and the other group underwent percutaneous microdiscectomy via hydrosurgery. Function was evaluated using the Oswestry Disability Index and pain was assessed using a visual analog scale. Evaluations were performed preoperatively, and then during the first week and at one, three, six and twelve months postoperatively. Personal satisfaction was verified. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01367860. RESULTS: During the study period, 20 patients were included in each arm and 39 completed one-year of follow-up (one patient died of unrelated causes). Both groups exhibited equal improvement on the visual analog scale and Oswestry evaluations after treatment, without any significant differences. The improvement in the lumbar visual analog scale score was not significant in the hydrodiscectomy group (p=0.138). The rates of infection, pain, recurrence and satisfaction were similar between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Percutaneous hydrodiscectomy was demonstrated to be as effective as open microdiscectomy for reducing pain. The rates of complications and recurrence of herniation were similar between groups. Patient satisfaction with the treatment was also similar between groups. PMID:27276397

  2. A Randomized Depression Prevention Trial Comparing Interpersonal Psychotherapy--Adolescent Skills Training to Group Counseling in Schools.

    PubMed

    Young, Jami F; Benas, Jessica S; Schueler, Christie M; Gallop, Robert; Gillham, Jane E; Mufson, Laura

    2016-04-01

    Given the rise in depression disorders in adolescence, it is important to develop and study depression prevention programs for this age group. The current study examined the efficacy of Interpersonal Psychotherapy-Adolescent Skills Training (IPT-AST), a group prevention program for adolescent depression, in comparison to group programs that are typically delivered in school settings. In this indicated prevention trial, 186 adolescents with elevated depression symptoms were randomized to receive IPT-AST delivered by research staff or group counseling (GC) delivered by school counselors. Hierarchical linear modeling examined differences in rates of change in depressive symptoms and overall functioning from baseline to the 6-month follow-up assessment. Cox regression compared rates of depression diagnoses. Adolescents in IPT-AST showed significantly greater improvements in self-reported depressive symptoms and evaluator-rated overall functioning than GC adolescents from baseline to the 6-month follow-up. However, there were no significant differences between the two conditions in onset of depression diagnoses. Although both intervention conditions demonstrated significant improvements in depressive symptoms and overall functioning, results indicate that IPT-AST has modest benefits over groups run by school counselors which were matched on frequency and duration of sessions. In particular, IPT-AST outperformed GC in reduction of depressive symptoms and improvements in overall functioning. These findings point to the clinical utility of this depression prevention program, at least in the short-term. Additional follow-up is needed to determine the long-term effects of IPT-AST, relative to GC, particularly in preventing depression onset.

  3. Randomized trial comparing the velocities of the antihypertensive effects on home blood pressure of candesartan and candesartan with hydrochlorothiazide.

    PubMed

    Hosaka, Miki; Metoki, Hirohito; Satoh, Michihiro; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Asayama, Kei; Kikuya, Masahiro; Inoue, Ryusuke; Obara, Taku; Hirose, Takuo; Imai, Yutaka

    2015-10-01

    We aimed to evaluate the hypotensive effect and the time to attain the maximal antihypertensive effect (stabilization time) of 8 mg candesartan/6.25 mg hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) combination therapy (combination regimen) and therapy with an increased candesartan dose (12 mg; maximum dose regimen) using home blood pressure (BP) measurements. A prospective, multicenter, open-label, randomized, comparative trial was conducted. Essential hypertensive patients who failed to achieve adequate BP control (systolic BP (SBP) ⩽ 135 mm Hg) on 8 mg candesartan alone were randomized to two groups: the combination regimen (n=103) and the maximum dose regimen (n=103). Home morning SBP reduction at 8 weeks after randomization was 11.4 ± 1.3 mm Hg in the combination regimen and 7.8 ± 1 .2 mm Hg in the maximum dose regimen. The combination regimen provided additional reduction of 4.0 mm Hg (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.8-7.2 mm Hg, P=0.01) in home morning SBP over the maximum dose regimen at 8 weeks after randomization. The maximal antihypertensive effect and stabilization time for home SBP were 9.4 mm Hg and 37.1 days (P<0.0001), respectively, with the combination regimen. The maximum dose regimen decreased home SBP with a very gentle slope, and estimated maximal effect and estimated stabilization time were not significant (P>0.2). The rate of achieving target BP (home morning SBP <135 mm Hg) was significantly higher with the combination regimen than with the maximum dose regimen (52.4 vs. 30.1%, P=0.002). In conclusion, changing from 8 mg candesartan to combination therapy was more effective in reducing home SBP and achieving goal BP more rapidly than increasing the candesartan dose.

  4. Multicenter, Randomized Clinical Trial To Compare the Safety and Efficacy of LFF571 and Vancomycin for Clostridium difficile Infections

    PubMed Central

    Mullane, Kathleen; Lee, Christine; Bressler, Adam; Buitrago, Martha; Weiss, Karl; Dabovic, Kristina; Praestgaard, Jens; Leeds, Jennifer A.; Blais, Johanne

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection causes serious diarrheal disease. Although several drugs are available for treatment, including vancomycin, recurrences remain a problem. LFF571 is a semisynthetic thiopeptide with potency against C. difficile in vitro. In this phase 2 exploratory study, we compared the safety and efficacy (based on a noninferiority analysis) of LFF571 to those of vancomycin used in adults with primary episodes or first recurrences of moderate C. difficile infection. Patients were randomized to receive 200 mg of LFF571 or 125 mg of vancomycin four times daily for 10 days. The primary endpoint was the proportion of clinical cures at the end of therapy in the per-protocol population. Secondary endpoints included clinical cures at the end of therapy in the modified intent-to-treat (mITT) population, the time to diarrhea resolution, and the recurrence rate. Seventy-two patients were randomized, with 46 assigned to receive LFF571. Based on the protocol-specified definition, the rate of clinical cure for LFF571 (90.6%) was noninferior to that of vancomycin (78.3%). The 30-day sustained cure rates for LFF571 and vancomycin were 56.7% and 65.0%, respectively, in the per-protocol population and 58.7% and 60.0%, respectively, in the modified intent-to-treat population. Using toxin-confirmed cases only, the recurrence rates were lower for LFF571 (19% versus 25% for vancomycin in the per-protocol population). LFF571 was generally safe and well tolerated. The incidence of adverse events (AEs) was higher for LFF571 (76.1% versus 69.2% for vancomycin), although more AEs in the vancomycin group were suspected to be related to the study drug (38.5% versus 32.6% for LFF571). One patient receiving LFF571 discontinued the study due to an AE. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01232595.) PMID:25534727

  5. A Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing an Acceptance Based Behavior Therapy to Applied Relaxation for Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hayes-Skelton, Sarah A.; Roemer, Lizabeth; Orsillo, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine whether an empirically and theoretically derived treatment combining mindfulness- and acceptance-based strategies with behavioral approaches would improve outcomes in GAD over an empirically-supported treatment. Method This trial randomized 81 individuals (65.4% female, 80.2% identified as White, average age 32.92) diagnosed with GAD to receive 16 sessions of either an Acceptance Based Behavior Therapy (ABBT) or Applied Relaxation (AR). Assessments at pre-treatment, post-treatment, and 6-month follow-up included the following primary outcome measures: GAD Clinician Severity Rating, Structured Interview Guide for the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, Penn State Worry Questionnaire, Depression Anxiety Stress Scale, and the State Trait Anxiety Inventory. Secondary outcomes included the Beck Depression Inventory-II, Quality of Life Inventory, and number of comorbid diagnoses. Results Mixed Effect Regression Models showed significant large effects for Time for all primary outcome measures (d’s 1.36 to 1.61) but non-significant, small effects for Condition and Condition X Time (d’s 0.002 to 0.24), indicating clients in both treatments improved comparably over treatment. For secondary outcomes, Time was significant (d’s 0.74 to 1.38) but Condition and Condition X Time effects were not (d’s 0.11 to 0.31). No significant differences emerged over follow-up (d’s 0.02 to 0.16) indicating maintenance of gains. Between 63.3 and 80.0% of clients in ABBT and 60.6 and 78.8% of clients in AR experienced clinically significant change across 5 calculations of change at post-treatment and follow-up. Conclusions ABBT is a viable alternative for treating GAD. PMID:23647281

  6. Comparing the Therapeutic Effects of Garlic Tablet and Oral Metronidazole on Bacterial Vaginosis: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadzadeh, Farnaz; Dolatian, Mahrokh; Jorjani, Masoome; Alavi Majd, Hamid; Borumandnia, Nasrin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is one of the most common gynecological infections during reproductive age. Although metronidazole is one of the most effective medications recommended as the first-line treatment, it has various side effects. Because of the side effects and contraindications of some chemical medicines, using herbs has been investigated in treating BV. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the effect of garlic tablet (Garsin) and oral metronidazole in clinical treatment of the BV in women referred to Resalat Health Center, affiliated with Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, in 2013. Patients and Methods: This randomized clinical trial was conducted on 120 married women aged 18 to 44 years who were diagnosed with BV by Amsel’s clinical criteria and Gram staining. Enrolled women were randomly allocated to two groups of 60 patients and were treated with either garlic tablet or oral metronidazole for seven days. Amsel’s criteria and Gram stain were assessed seven to ten days after beginning the treatment period and side effects were registered. Results: Amsel’s criteria were significantly decreased after treatment with garlic or metronidazole (70% and 48.3%, respectively; P < 0.001). Therapeutic effects of garlic on BV were similar to that of metronidazole (63.3% and 48.3%, respectively; P = 0.141). There were significant differences between the two treatment groups in terms of side effects; metronidazole was associated with more complications (P = 0.032). Conclusions: This study reveals that garlic could be a suitable alternative for metronidazole in treatment of BV in those interested in herbal medicines or those affected by side effects of metronidazole. PMID:25237588

  7. The first clinical experience on efficacy of topical flutamide on melasma compared with topical hydroquinone: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Adalatkhah, Hassan; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment of melasma is unsatisfactory most of the times. Hormonal role is shown to exist in pathogenesis of the melasma, and sex-hormone related drugs may have an effect on melasma. Aim To investigate efficacy of 1% flutamide cream versus 4% hydroquinone cream on melasma. Methods In a parallel randomized clinical trial, 74 women with melasma were allocated to receive a sunscreen along with 4% hydroquinone cream or 1% flutamide cream. Melasma Area and Severity Index (MASI), mexameter melanin assay, and patient satisfaction were investigated. Results Mean age of the participants was 33.8 years. Mean length of time suffering from Melasma was 96.3 months. The subjects reported in average 1.1 hours per day of exposure to sunlight. Mean standardized total patient satisfaction score was 28.8 (standard deviation [SD] 17.2) in flutamide group patients versus 18 (SD 15.5) in control group (P<0.01). Regardless of treatment group, the skin darkness assessed upon MASI scales was reduced over the treatment course (P<0.001). Using mixed effects, longitudinal modeling showed better treatment efficacy based on MASI scale for flutamide group compared to the hydroquinone group (P<0.05). However, longitudinal analysis of mexameter scores did not reveal any significant difference in melanin measurements between flutamide and hydroquinone. Conclusion Topical flutamide appeared as effective as topical hydroquinone in treating melasma using mexameter assessment but with a better MASI improvement trend and higher patient satisfaction in flutamide treatment versus topical hydroquinone. As the present study is possibly the first clinical experience on efficacy of topical flutamide on melasma, it would be quite unreasonable to recommend clinical use of it before future studies replicate the results on its efficacy and safety. PMID:26345129

  8. Randomized clinical trial comparing abluminal biodegradable polymer sirolimus-eluting stents with durable polymer sirolimus-eluting stents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haijun; Wang, Xiangfei; Deng, Wei; Wang, Shenguo; Ge, Junbo; Toft, Egon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The biodegradable polymer drug-eluting stents (DES) were developed to improve vascular healing. However, further data and longer-term follow-up are needed to confirm safety and efficacy of these stents. This randomized clinical trial aimed to compare safety and efficacy of 2 sirolimus-eluting stents (SES): Cordimax—a novel abluminal biodegradable polymer SES and Cypher Select—a durable polymer SES, at 9 months angiographic and 5-year clinical follow-up. Methods: We randomized 402 patients with coronary artery disease to percutaneous coronary intervention with Cordimax (n = 202) or Cypher select (n = 200). Angiographic follow-up was performed at 9 months after the index procedure and clinical follow-up annually up to 5 years. The primary endpoint was angiographic in-stent late luminal loss (LLL). Secondary endpoints included angiographic restenosis rate, target vessel revascularization (TVR), and major adverse cardiac events (MACEs; defined as cardiac death, myocardial infarction, or TVR) at 5-year follow-up. Results: Cordimax was noninferior to Cypher select for in-stent LLL (0.25 ± 0.47 vs 0.18 ± 0.49 mm; P = 0.587) and in-stent mean diameter stenosis (22.19 ± 12.21% vs 19.89 ± 10.79%; P = 0.064) at 9 months angiographic follow-up. The MACE rates were not different at 1 year (5.9% vs 4.0%, P = 0.376); however, MACE rates from 2 to 5 years were lower in the Cordimax group (6.8% vs 13.1%; P = 0.039). Conclusion: Abluminal biodegradable polymer SES is noninferior to durable polymer SES at 9-month angiographic and 1-year clinical follow-up. However, MACE rates from 2 to 5 years were less in the abluminal biodegradable polymer group. PMID:27661023

  9. Twenty-four hours or 10 days? A prospective randomised controlled trial in children comparing head bandages following pinnaplasty.

    PubMed

    Ramkumar, S; Narayanan, V; Laing, J H E

    2006-01-01

    The perceived benefits of bandaging for 10 days following pinnaplasty have been questioned by previous studies. The problems arising from these dressings are many [Powell BWEM. The value of head dressings in the postoperative management of the prominent ear. Br J Plast Surg 1989;42:692-4. Bartley J. How long should ears be bandaged after otoplasty? J Laryngol Otol 1998;112:531-2. Wong MC, Sylaidis P. Head dressings for pinnaplasty: a tradition not supported by evidence. Br J Plast Surg 2001;54:81-2], including their slippage [Powell BWEM. The value of head dressings in the postoperative management of the prominent ear. Br J Plast Surg 1989;42:692-4. Bradbury ET, Hewison J, Timmons MJ. Psychological and social outcome of prominent ear correction in children. Br J Plast Surg 1992;45:97-100. Jeffery SLA. Complications following correction of prominent ears: an audit review of 122 cases. Br J Plast Surg 1999;52:588-90]. Eighty children were recruited into a prospective randomised controlled trial comparing the use of a head bandage for only 24 h with a standard practise of a 10-day head bandage. A preoperative measurement of the lateral ear projection (LEP) was made. The outcome measures recorded during the two planned postoperative visits at 10 days (visit 1) and 2 months (visit 2) were: patient satisfaction score, LEP, complications and any unscheduled hospital visits associated with the surgery. There was no significant difference in LEP and patient satisfaction between the two groups at both the scheduled postoperative visits. Differences between the groups in the number of unscheduled visits (p=0.21) did not reach statistical significance. The findings indicate that it is safe and effective to use head bandage for only 24 h following surgical correction of prominent ears. This study shows no benefit from the application of a formal head bandage for any longer than 1 day.

  10. Multicenter, randomized clinical trial to compare the safety and efficacy of LFF571 and vancomycin for Clostridium difficile infections.

    PubMed

    Mullane, Kathleen; Lee, Christine; Bressler, Adam; Buitrago, Martha; Weiss, Karl; Dabovic, Kristina; Praestgaard, Jens; Leeds, Jennifer A; Blais, Johanne; Pertel, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Clostridium difficile infection causes serious diarrheal disease. Although several drugs are available for treatment, including vancomycin, recurrences remain a problem. LFF571 is a semisynthetic thiopeptide with potency against C. difficile in vitro. In this phase 2 exploratory study, we compared the safety and efficacy (based on a noninferiority analysis) of LFF571 to those of vancomycin used in adults with primary episodes or first recurrences of moderate C. difficile infection. Patients were randomized to receive 200 mg of LFF571 or 125 mg of vancomycin four times daily for 10 days. The primary endpoint was the proportion of clinical cures at the end of therapy in the per-protocol population. Secondary endpoints included clinical cures at the end of therapy in the modified intent-to-treat (mITT) population, the time to diarrhea resolution, and the recurrence rate. Seventy-two patients were randomized, with 46 assigned to receive LFF571. Based on the protocol-specified definition, the rate of clinical cure for LFF571 (90.6%) was noninferior to that of vancomycin (78.3%). The 30-day sustained cure rates for LFF571 and vancomycin were 56.7% and 65.0%, respectively, in the per-protocol population and 58.7% and 60.0%, respectively, in the modified intent-to-treat population. Using toxin-confirmed cases only, the recurrence rates were lower for LFF571 (19% versus 25% for vancomycin in the per-protocol population). LFF571 was generally safe and well tolerated. The incidence of adverse events (AEs) was higher for LFF571 (76.1% versus 69.2% for vancomycin), although more AEs in the vancomycin group were suspected to be related to the study drug (38.5% versus 32.6% for LFF571). One patient receiving LFF571 discontinued the study due to an AE. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01232595.).

  11. Comparing the effect of ketamine and benzydamine gargling with placebo on post-operative sore throat: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Faiz, Seyed Hamid Reza; Rahimzadeh, Poupak; Poornajafian, Alireza; Nikzad, Naghme

    2014-01-01

    Background: Air way intubation for general anesthesia usually leads to sore throat after surgery. Ketamine plays an important role to block a number of receptors related to pain. Benzydamine hydrochloride is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that has been used to improve oropharyngeal disorders. In this study, it was intended to compare the effect of gargling different solutions before the surgery on post-operative sore throat (POST) in patients who underwent general anesthesia for hysterectomy. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 patients who underwent the elective hysterectomy were entered to the randomized controlled trial regarding to the eligibility criteria. Patients were simply randomly allocated to three groups and received one code. Every code was representative for a specific drug: 20 cc normal saline (control group) or 1.5 mg benzydamine in 20 cc solution or 20 mg ketamine in 20 cc solutions. All the research teams were blinded to the received solutions. POST was evaluated with numerical rating scale. The data were entered to SPSS software and analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance test, were performed. Results: The mean ages of ketamine, benzydamine, and normal saline recipients were not significantly different. The trend of the severity of sore throat during the first 24 h after the operation in ketamine recipients was significantly lower than the other two groups (P < 0.001). Conclusion: The pain scale after surgery was reduced by using both ketamine and benzydamine, but the ketamine effect was more noticeable. PMID:25371873

  12. Comparative analysis of telomere length, telomerase and reverse transcriptase activity in human dental stem cells.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Byeong-Gyun; Kang, Eun-Ju; Kumar, B Mohana; Maeng, Geun-Ho; Ock, Sun-A; Kwack, Dae-Oh; Park, Bong-Wook; Rho, Gyu-Jin

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells from dental tissues have been isolated and established for tooth regenerative applications. However, basic characterization on their biological properties still needs to be investigated before employing them for effective clinical trials. In this study, we compared the telomere length, relative telomerase activity (RTA), and relative reverse transcriptase activity (RRA) as well as the surface antigen profile and mesenchymal differentiation ability in human dental papilla stem cells (DPaSCs), dental pulp stem cells (DPuSCs), and dental follicle stem cells (DFSCs) with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from bone marrow. Dental stem cells (DSCs) were strongly positive for cell surface markers, such as CD44 and CD90. However, slightly lower expression of CD105 was observed in DPaSCs and DPuSCs compared to DFSCs and MSCs. Following specific induction, DPaSCs, DFSCs, and MSCs were successfully differentiated into adipocytes and osteocytes. However, DPuSCS, in particular, were able to differentiate into adipocytes but failed to induce into osteogenic differentiation. Further, all DSCs, MSCs, and MRC-5 fibroblasts as control were investigated for telomere length by nonradioactive chemiluminescent assay, RTA by relative-quantitative telomerase repeat amplification protocol (RQ-TRAP), and RRA by PCR-based assay. Mean telomere lengths in DPaSCs, DPuSCs, DFSCs, and MSCs was ∼11 kb, and the values did not differ significantly (p < 0.05) among the cells analyzed. RTA levels in DPaSCs were significantly (p < 0.05) higher than in MSCs, DPuSCs, DFSCs, and MRC-5 fibroblasts and among DSCs, DFSCs showed a significantly (p < 0.05) lower RTA. Moreover, RRA levels were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in DPaSCs, DPuSCs, and MSCs than in DFSCs. Based on these observations, we conclude that among DSCs, DPaSCs possessed ideal characteristics on telomere length, telomerase activity and reverse transcriptase (RTase) activity, and may serve as suitable alternative candidates

  13. Are American College of Rheumatology 50% response criteria superior to 20% criteria in distinguishing active aggressive treatment in rheumatoid arthritis clinical trials reported since 1997? A meta‐analysis of discriminant capacities

    PubMed Central

    Chung, C P; Thompson, J L; Koch, G G; Amara, I; Strand, V; Pincus, T

    2006-01-01

    Objective To carry out a meta‐analysis designed to compare the discriminant capacities of American College of Rheumatology 50% (ACR50) with 20% (ACR20) responses in clinical trials on rheumatoid arthritis reported after 1997 and to analyse whether ACR50 can be as informative as ACR20 in distinguishing active from control treatments in more recent trials. Methods Clinical trials on rheumatoid arthritis reported since 1997 were identified, which included aggressive combinations of disease‐modifying antirheumatic drugs and glucocorticoids, as well as powerful new agents—leflunomide, etanercept, infliximab, anakinra, adalimumab, abatacept, tacrolimus and rituximab. A meta‐analysis of ACR20 compared with ACR50 responses for 21 clinical trials was carried out on differences in proportions of responders for active and control treatments and corresponding odds ratios (ORs). Results In all but one clinical trial on rheumatoid arthritis published since 1997 with data available on ACR20 and ACR50, more than 50% of patients who were ACR20 responders among those randomised to active treatment were also ACR50 responders. This phenomenon was seen for control groups in 38% of trials, many of which included treatment with methotrexate. A meta‐analysis of the clinical trials indicated a slight advantage to ACR50 for quantifying treatment comparisons, not significant for differences in proportions but significant for ORs. Conclusion ACR20 and ACR50 seem to be similar in distinguishing active from control treatments in clinical trials on rheumatoid arthritis reported since 1997. As ACR50 represents a considerably stronger clinical response, ACR50 may be a preferred end point for contemporary clinical trials on rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:16504992

  14. Use of pedometer-driven walking to promote physical activity and improve health-related quality of life among meat processing workers: a feasibility trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Current evidence supports the use of pedometers as effective motivational tools to promote physical activity and improve health-related quality of life in the general population. The aims of this study are to examine whether a pedometer-driven walking programme can improve health-related quality of life, and increase ambulatory activity in a population of meat processing workers when compared to a control group receiving educational material alone. Methods/design A feasibility study employing a randomized controlled trial (RCT) design will collect data at three time points. A sample of up to 60 meat workers will be recruited and randomly assigned to either an intervention group N = 30 (12-week pedometer-driven walking program, brief intervention, and educational material), or control group N = 30 (educational material only). The primary outcomes of ambulatory activity, health-related quality of life, and functional capacity, will be evaluated at baseline, immediately following the 12-week intervention and then at three month post-intervention. Discussion This paper describes the design of a feasibility randomized controlled trial, which aims to assess the effectiveness of the introduction of a workplace pedometer-driven walking program compared to normal lifestyle advice in meat processing workers. Trial Registration Number (ANZCTR): 12613000087752. PMID:24175980

  15. A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Uninstrumented Posterolateral Fusion in the Degenerative Lumbar Spine.

    PubMed

    Jalalpour, Kourosh; Neumann, Pavel; Johansson, Christer; Hedlund, Rune

    2015-08-01

    Study Design Randomized controlled trial. Objective Despite a large number of publications of outcomes after spinal fusion surgery, there is still no consensus on the efficacy of the several different fusion methods. The aim of this study was to determine whether transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) results in an improved clinical outcome compared with uninstrumented posterolateral fusion (PLF) in the surgical treatment for chronic low back pain. Methods This study included 135 patients with degenerative disk disease (n = 96) or postdiskectomy syndrome (n = 39). Inclusion criteria were at least 1 year of back pain with or without leg pain in patients aged 20 to 65 with one- or two-level disease. Exclusion criteria were sequestration of disk hernia, psychosocial instability, isthmic spondylolisthesis, drug abuse, and previous spine surgery other than diskectomy. Pain was assessed by visual analog scale (pain index). Functional disability was quantified by the disability rating index and Oswestry Disability Index. The global outcome was assessed by the patient and classified as much better, better, unchanged, or worse. The patients were randomized to conventional uninstrumented PLF (n = 67) or TLIF (n = 68). PLF was performed in a standardized fashion using autograft. TLIF was performed with pedicle titanium screw fixation and a porous tantalum interbody spacer with interbody and posterolateral autograft. The clinical outcome measurements were obtained preoperatively and at 12 and 24 months postoperatively. The 2-year follow-up rate was 98%. Results The two treatment groups improved significantly from preoperatively to 2 years' follow-up. At final follow-up, the results in the TLIF group were significantly superior to those in the PLF group in pain index (2.0 versus 3.9, p = 0.007) and in disability rating index (22 versus 36, p = 0.003). The Oswestry Disability Index was better in the TLIF group (20 versus 28, p = 0

  16. RTOG 9804: A Prospective Randomized Trial for Good-Risk Ductal Carcinoma In Situ Comparing Radiotherapy With Observation

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Beryl; Winter, Kathryn; Hudis, Clifford; Kuerer, Henry Mark; Rakovitch, Eileen; Smith, Barbara L.; Sneige, Nour; Moughan, Jennifer; Shah, Amit; Germain, Isabelle; Hartford, Alan C.; Rashtian, Afshin; Walker, Eleanor M.; Yuen, Albert; Strom, Eric A.; Wilcox, Jeannette L.; Vallow, Laura A.; Small, William; Pu, Anthony T.; Kerlin, Kevin; White, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9804 study identified good-risk patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), a breast cancer diagnosis found frequently in mammographically detected cancers, to test the benefit of radiotherapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery compared with observation. Patients and Methods This prospective randomized trial (1998 to 2006) in women with mammographically detected low- or intermediate-grade DCIS, measuring less than 2.5 cm with margins ≥ 3 mm, compared RT with observation after surgery. The study was designed for 1,790 patients but was closed early because of lower than projected accrual. Six hundred thirty-six patients from the United States and Canada were entered; tamoxifen use (62%) was optional. Ipsilateral local failure (LF) was the primary end point; LF and contralateral failure were estimated using cumulative incidence, and overall and disease-free survival were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results Median follow-up time was 7.17 years (range, 0.01 to 11.33 years). Two LFs occurred in the RT arm, and 19 occurred in the observation arm. At 7 years, the LF rate was 0.9% (95% CI, 0.0% to 2.2%) in the RT arm versus 6.7% (95% CI, 3.2% to 9.6%) in the observation arm (hazard ratio, 0.11; 95% CI, 0.03 to 0.47; P < .001). Grade 1 to 2 acute toxicities occurred in 30% and 76% of patients in the observation and RT arms, respectively; grade 3 or 4 toxicities occurred in 4.0% and 4.2% of patients, respectively. Late RT toxicity was grade 1 in 30%, grade 2 in 4.6%, and grade 3 in 0.7% of patients. Conclusion In this good-risk subset of patients with DCIS, with a median follow-up of 7 years, the LF rate was low with observation but was decreased significantly with the addition of RT. Longer follow-up is planned because the timeline for LF in this setting seems protracted. PMID:25605856

  17. Apps for IMproving FITness and Increasing Physical Activity Among Young People: The AIMFIT Pragmatic Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yannan; Whittaker, Robyn; Maddison, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    app intervention (n=16), or the control group (n=18). The mean age of participants was 15.7 (SD 1.2) years; participants were mostly NZ Europeans (61%, 31/51) and 57% (29/51) were female. Overall retention rate was 96% (49/51). There was no significant intervention effect on the primary outcome using either of the apps. Compared to the control, time to complete the fitness test was –28.4 seconds shorter (95% CI –66.5 to 9.82, P=.20) for the immersive app group and –24.7 seconds (95% CI –63.5 to 14.2, P=.32) for the nonimmersive app group. No significant intervention effects were found for secondary outcomes. Conclusions Although apps have the ability to increase reach at a low cost, our pragmatic approach using readily available commercial apps as a stand-alone instrument did not have a significant effect on fitness. However, interest in future use of PA apps is promising and highlights a potentially important role of these tools in a multifaceted approach to increase fitness, promote PA, and consequently reduce the adverse health outcomes associated with insufficient activity. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12613001030763; https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?ACTRN=12613001030763 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6aasfJVTJ). PMID:26316499

  18. Using self-determination theory to promote physical activity and weight control: a randomized controlled trial in women.

    PubMed

    Silva, Marlene N; Vieira, Paulo N; Coutinho, Sílvia R; Minderico, Cláudia S; Matos, Margarida G; Sardinha, Luís B; Teixeira, Pedro J

    2010-04-01

    Behavior change interventions are effective to the extent that they affect appropriately-measured outcomes, especially in experimental controlled trials. The primary goal of this study was to analyze the impact of a 1-year weight management intervention based on self-determination theory (SDT) on theory-based psychosocial mediators, physical activity/exercise, and body weight and composition. Participants were 239 women (37.6 +/- 7.1 years; 31.5 +/- 4.1 kg/m(2)) who received either an intervention focused on promoting autonomous forms of exercise regulation and intrinsic motivation, or a general health education program (controls). At 12 months, the intervention group showed increased weight loss (-7.29%,) and higher levels of physical activity/exercise (+138 +/- 26 min/day of moderate plus vigorous exercise; +2,049 +/- 571 steps/day), compared to controls (P < 0.001). Main intervention targets such as more autonomous self-regulation (for treatment and for exercise) and a more autonomous perceived treatment climate revealed large effect sizes (between 0.80 and .96), favoring intervention (P < 0.001). Results suggest that interventions grounded in SDT can be successfully implemented in the context of weight management, enhancing the internalization of more autonomous forms of behavioral regulation, and facilitating exercise adherence, while producing clinically-significant weight reduction, when compared to a control condition. Findings are fully consistent with previous studies conducted within this theoretical framework in other areas of health behavior change.

  19. Anesthetic Activity of Alfaxalone Compared with Ketamine in Mice.

    PubMed

    Siriarchavatana, Parkpoom; Ayers, Jessica D; Kendall, Lon V

    2016-01-01

    Alfaxalone encased in hydroxypropyl-β -cyclodextrin is a neuroactive steroid compound that has recently been approved in the United States for use as an anesthetic in dogs and cats. We evaluated the use of alfaxalone compared with ketamine, both alone and in combination with xylazine, for anesthesia of C57BL/6 mice. We assessed time to onset of anesthesia, duration of action, reflex responses, respiratory rate, and clinical signs. Alfaxalone (80 mg/kg IP) induced a light surgical plane of anesthesia in all mice, with a time to onset of 2.2 ± 0.2 min and duration of 57.1 ± 3.8 min, whereas ketamine (80 mg/kg IP) provided only sedative effects (time to onset, 5.4 ± 0.4 min; duration, 6.9 ± 0.8 min). Clinically, alfaxalone caused a spectrum of activities, including popcorn-like jumping movements after injection, intense scratching of the face, hyperresponsiveness to noise or touch, and marked limb jerking during recovery. Adding xylazine to the single-agent protocols achieved deep surgical anesthesia (duration: alfaxalone + xylazine, 80.3 ± 17.8 min; ketamine + xylazine, 37.4 ± 8.2 min) and ameliorated the adverse clinical signs. Our preliminary analysis suggests that, because of its side effects, alfaxalone alone is not a viable anesthetic option for mice. Although alfaxalone combined with xylazine appeared to be a more viable option, some mice still experienced mild adverse reactions, and the long duration of action might be problematic regarding the maintenance of body temperature and monitoring of recovery. Further studies evaluating different routes of administration and drug combinations are warranted. PMID:27423149

  20. Employee physical activity: how does it compare to the nation?

    PubMed

    Aldana, S G; Stone, W J

    1992-04-01

    1. Working adults exercise as much as the rest of society. 2. The amount of physical activity declines with age until 55, at which point increases were observed. 3. Marriage appears to have the largest effect on reducing the amount of physical activity a person gets. 4. Males are 1 1/2 times more likely than females to be vigorously active.

  1. An iontophoretic fentanyl patient-activated analgesic delivery system for postoperative pain: a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Viscusi, Eugene R; Reynolds, Lowell; Tait, Stacy; Melson, Timothy; Atkinson, Linda E

    2006-01-01

    An iontophoretic fentanyl HCl patient-activated transdermal system (fentanyl HCl PATS) is under development for the treatment of acute postoperative pain. The fentanyl HCl PATS is a needle-free, credit card-sized, preprogrammed system that is applied to the patient's upper outer arm or chest. The fentanyl HCl PATS was demonstrated to be superior to placebo in a previous trial; however, the randomization scheme used and the lack of control of entry pain level may have contributed to the lack of robust findings. We compared the fentanyl HCl PATS with placebo for acute postoperative pain management in a larger trial that addressed the limitations of the previous study. Adult patients admitted to the postanesthesia care unit after major surgery were titrated to comfort with opioids and randomized 1:1 to receive the fentanyl HCl PATS 40 microg or placebo for 24 hours. Supplemental IV fentanyl was available to patients upon request in both treatment groups for the first 3 hours after enrollment. The primary efficacy end-point was the percentage of patients who discontinued participation in the study because of inadequate analgesia. Pain intensity scores, patient global assessments (PGA), and investigator global assessments (IGA) were collected. Four-hundred-eighty-four patients (PATS, n = 244; placebo, n = 240) were enrolled. Fewer patients receiving the fentanyl HCl PATS discontinued because of inadequate analgesia compared with placebo (28.7% versus 60.0%; P < 0.0001). Mean last pain intensity scores were 3.5 and 5.4 for the fentanyl HCl PATS and placebo groups, respectively. Patients (73.4%, PGA) and investigators (72.1%, IGA) considered the fentanyl HCl PATS a good or excellent method of pain control. Treatment-related adverse events were similar between groups. This study demonstrated the superiority of the iontophoretic fentanyl HCl PATS over placebo for acute postoperative pain management. PMID:16368828

  2. 21 CFR 312.87 - Active monitoring of conduct and evaluation of clinical trials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... clinical trials. 312.87 Section 312.87 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... and evaluation of clinical trials. For drugs covered under this section, the Commissioner and other agency officials will monitor the progress of the conduct and evaluation of clinical trials and...

  3. Protocol for a randomised controlled trial comparing aqueous with alcoholic chlorhexidine antisepsis for the prevention of superficial surgical site infection after minor surgery in general practice: the AVALANCHE trial

    PubMed Central

    Heal, C F; Charles, D; Hardy, A; Delpachitra, M; Banks, J; Wohlfahrt, M; Saednia, Sabine; Buettner, P

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Surgical site infection (SSI) after minor skin excisions has a significant impact on patient morbidity and healthcare resources. Skin antisepsis prior to surgical incision is used to prevent SSI, and is performed routinely worldwide. However, in spite of the routine use of skin antisepsis, there is no consensus regarding which antiseptic agents are most effective. The AVALANCHE trial will compare Aqueous Versus Alcoholic Antisepsis with Chlorhexidine for Skin Excisions. Methods and analysis The study design is a prospective, randomised controlled trial (RCT) with the aim of investigating the impact of two different antiseptic preparations on the incidence of superficial SSI in patients undergoing minor skin excisions. The intervention of 0.5% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) in 70% alcohol will be compared with that of 0.5% CHG in aqueous solution. The trial will be conducted in four Australian general practices over a 9-month period, with 920 participants to be recruited. Consecutive patients presenting for minor skin excisions will be eligible to participate. Randomisation will be on the level of the patient. The primary outcome is superficial SSI in the first 30 days following the excision. Secondary outcomes will be adverse effects, including anaphylaxis, skin irritation, contact dermatitis and rash and patterns of antibiotic resistance. Ethics and dissemination The study has been approved by the James Cook University Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC). Findings will be disseminated in conference presentations and journals and through online electronic media. Discussion RCTs conducted in general practice differ from hospital-based projects in terms of feasibility, pragmatism and funding. The success of this trial will be cemented in the fact that the research question was established by a group of general practitioners who identified an interesting question which is relevant to their clinical practice and not answered by current evidence. Trial

  4. Does hydrotherapy improve strength and physical function in patients with osteoarthritis—a randomised controlled trial comparing a gym based and a hydrotherapy based strengthening programme

    PubMed Central

    Foley, A; Halbert, J; Hewitt, T; Crotty, M

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effects of a hydrotherapy resistance exercise programme with a gym based resistance exercise programme on strength and function in the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA). Design: Single blind, three arm, randomised controlled trial. Subjects: 105 community living participants aged 50 years and over with clinical OA of the hip or knee. Methods: Participants were randomised into one of three groups: hydrotherapy (n = 35), gym (n = 35), or control (n = 35). The two exercising groups had three exercise sessions a week for six weeks. At six weeks an independent physiotherapist unaware of the treatment allocation performed all outcome assessments (muscle strength dynamometry, six minute walk test, WOMAC OA Index, total drugs, SF-12 quality of life, Adelaide Activities Profile, and the Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale). Results: In the gym group both left and right quadriceps significantly increased in strength compared with the control group, and right quadriceps strength was also significantly better than in the hydrotherapy group. The hydrotherapy group increased left quadriceps strength only at follow up, and this was significantly different from the control group. The hydrotherapy group was significantly different from the control group for distance walked and the physical component of the SF-12. The gym group was significantly different from the control group for walk speed and self efficacy satisfaction. Compliance rates were similar for both exercise groups, with 84% of hydrotherapy and 75% of gym sessions attended. There were no differences in drug use between groups over the study period. Conclusion: Functional gains were achieved with both exercise programmes compared with the control group. PMID:14644853

  5. Domestic Rhodnius ecuadoriensis (Hemiptera, Reduviidae) infestation in Northern Peru: a comparative trial of detection methods during a six-month follow-up.

    PubMed

    Cuba Cuba, César Augusto; Vargas, Franklin; Roldan, Judith; Ampuero, Cynthia

    2003-01-01

    Two passive methods in the assessment of intradomiciliary infestation by Rhodnius ecuadoriensis were tested: (i) the Gomes Nu ez sensor box (GN), (ii) sheets of white typing paper and (iii) one active timed manual method. The study was carried out in the Alto Chicama River Valley, Province of Gran Chim , Department of La Libertad. The study design consisted of an initial searching of triatomines inside of the domestic environment by the manual capture active procedure (man/hour) covering all the studied houses. Then, matched pairs of GN boxes and paper sheets were simultaneously installed in the bedrooms of 207 households distributed in 19 localities. A comparative prospective trial of these passive detection devices were monitored at 2, 4 and, finally 6 months follow-up. Parasitological Trypanosoma rangeli and/or T. cruzi infections were investigated in two houses with high level of infestation by R. ecuadoriensis. 16.9% of the 207 households investigated by an initial active manual method were infested with R. ecuadoriensis. The proportion of infested houses fluctuated from 6.2 to 55.5% amongst the 19 localities investigated. T. rangeli natural infection was detected in R. ecuadoriensis specimens collected in two households. Parasite rates in the bugs ranged from 16.6 to 21.7% respectively. The most striking fact was an average rate of salivary gland infection ranging from 7.4 to 8.3%. At the end of the sixth month period, a cumulative incidence of 31.4% of positive GN boxes against 15.9% for paper sheets was recorded. All three methods combined detected domestic infestation in 129 (62.3%) of the 207 houses studied in the 19 localities. The range of houses infested varies from 6.7% to 92.9%. In areas with low bug density infestation rates, the methodology experienced in our studies, seems to be the best choice for investigations on domestic R. ecuadoriensis populations.

  6. The effects on depression of Internet-administered behavioural activation and physical exercise with treatment rationale and relapse prevention: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite their potential as low-threshold, low-cost and high-flexibility treatments of depression, behavioural activation and physical exercise have not yet been directly compared. This study will examine the effects of these interventions, administered via the Internet. The added effect of providing a treatment rationale will also be studied, as well as a relapse prevention program featuring cognitive behavioural therapy components. Methods/Design This randomised controlled trial will include 500 participants meeting the diagnostic criteria for major depression, recruited in multiple cycles and randomised to either a waiting list control group with delayed treatment, or one of the four treatment groups: (1) physical exercise without a clear treatment rationale; (2) physical exercise with treatment rationale; (3) behavioural activation with treatment rationale; or (4) behavioural activation without a clear treatment rationale. Post treatment, half of the participants will be offered a relapse prevention program. Primary outcome measure will be the Patient Health Questionnaire 9-item. Secondary measures include diagnostic criteria for depression, as well as self-reported anxiety, physical activity and quality of life. Measurements - done via telephone and the Internet - will be collected pre-treatment, weekly during treatment period, immediately post treatment and then monthly during a 24-month follow-up period. Discussion The results of this study will constitute an important contribution to the body of knowledge of the respective interventions. Limitations are discussed. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01619930 PMID:23374879

  7. In vitro activity of azithromycin compared with that of erythromycin against Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Pajukanta, R; Asikainen, S; Saarela, M; Alaluusua, S; Jousimies-Somer, H

    1992-01-01

    The in vitro susceptibility of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans to azithromycin, a new macrolide antibiotic of a new class known as azalides, was compared with that of erythromycin by the agar dilution method on Mueller-Hinton Haemophilus test medium. Eighty-two A. actinomycetemcomitans strains, 79 recent clinical isolates obtained from 40 periodontally healthy or diseased subjects, and 3 type strains were included in the study. Erythromycin showed poor in vitro activity against A. actinomycetemcomitans. Azithromycin, however, was highly effective against A. actinomycetemcomitans: all strains were inhibited at 2.0 micrograms/ml. Azithromycin exhibited the best in vitro activity against the serotype a subpopulation of A. actinomycetemcomitans: 100% of the strains were inhibited at 1.0 micrograms/ml. The lowest MICs were, however, recorded by serotype b strains. Since azithromycin has favorable pharmacokinetic properties, including excellent distribution into tissues, it could be expected to pass into gingival crevicular fluid at levels sufficient to inhibit A. actinomycetemcomitans in vivo. Therefore, it is a good candidate for future clinical trials in A. actinomycetemcomitans-associated periodontitis. PMID:1329617

  8. Comparative study of amrutbhallataka and glucosamine sulphate in osteoarthritis: Six months open label randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Raut, Ashwinikumar; Bichile, Lata; Chopra, Arvind; Patwardhan, Bhushan; Vaidya, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Background: AmrutBhallatak (ABFN02), a ‘rasayana’ drug from Ayurveda is indicated in degenerative diseases and arthritis. Objective: To evaluate safety and efficacy of ABFN02 in osteoarthritis (OA) and compare it with Glucosamine sulphate (GS) Materials and Methods: This was a randomized open comparative study. Ambulant OPD patients of OA knees (n = 112) were enrolled for 24 weeks. Tablets (750mg each) of GS and ABFN02 were matched. Three groups of patients: (A) GS, one tablet × twice/day × 24 weeks. (B) ABFN02, incremental pulse dosage (one tablet x twice/day × two weeks, two tablets × twice/day × two weeks, three tablets × twice/day × two weeks), two such cycles of drug and non-drug phases alternately for six weeks each (C) ABFN02 continuous dosage akin to GS. Pain visual analogue score (Pain-VAS) and Western Ontario and Mc-Master University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) were the primary outcome measures. Secondary outcome measures were Health assessment questionnaire (HAQ), paracetamol consumption, 50 feet walking, physician and patient global assessment, knee stiffness, knee status, urinary CTX II, serum TNFa-SRI, SRII and MRI knee in randomly selected patients. Results: ABFNO2 and GS demonstrated, adherence to treatment 87.75% and 74.3%, reduction in Pain-VAS at rest 61.05% and 57.1%, reduction in pain-VAS on activity 57.4% and 59.8%, WOMAC score drop 62.8% and 59.1% respectively. Secondary outcome measures were comparable in all groups. Safety measures were also comparable. No serious adverse events reported. However, asymptomatic reversible rise in liver enzymes was noted in the ABFNO2 group. Conclusions: ABFN02 has significant activity in OA; the formulation needs further investigation. PMID:24459390

  9. Prospective randomized clinical trial comparing hemiarthroplasty to total hip arthroplasty in the treatment of displaced femoral neck fractures: winner of the Dorr Award.

    PubMed

    Macaulay, William; Nellans, Kate W; Garvin, Kevin L; Iorio, Richard; Healy, William L; Rosenwasser, Melvin P

    2008-09-01

    The Displaced Femoral (neck fracture) Arthroplasty Consortium for Treatment and Outcomes study is a prospective, multicenter randomized clinical trial comparing hemiarthroplasty to total hip arthroplasty (THA) in the treatment of displaced femoral neck fractures in previously independent patients. Primary outcomes were measured at 6, 12, and 24 months with the Short Form-36 (SF-36), Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), and the Harris Hip Score and the Timed "Up & Go" Test. Forty subjects were enrolled. At 24 months, THA patients had significantly less pain on the SF-36 subscale than hemiarthroplasty patients (54.8 +/- 7.9 vs 44.7 +/- 10.5, P = .04) and scored significantly better on the SF-36 mental health subscale (54.9 +/- 9.4 vs 40.9 +/- 10.3, P = .006). Total hip arthroplasty patients also had superior WOMAC function scores (81.8 +/- 10.2 vs 65.1 +/- 18.1, P = .03). Significant differences in outcomes, without a significantly greater incidence of complications, suggest THA is a valuable treatment option for the active elderly hip fracture population.

  10. Prevention of deep vein thrombosis in potential neurosurgical patients. A randomized trial comparing graduated compression stockings alone or graduated compression stockings plus intermittent pneumatic compression with control

    SciTech Connect

    Turpie, A.G.; Hirsh, J.; Gent, M.; Julian, D.; Johnson, J.

    1989-03-01

    In a randomized trial of neurosurgical patients, groups wearing graduated compression stockings alone (group 1) or graduated compression stockings plus intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) (group 2) were compared with an untreated control group in the prevention of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). In both active treatment groups, the graduated compression stockings were continued for 14 days or until hospital discharge, if earlier. In group 2, IPC was continued for seven days. All patients underwent DVT surveillance with iodine 125-labeled fibrinogen leg scanning and impedance plethysmography. Venography was carried out if either test became abnormal. Deep vein thrombosis occurred in seven (8.8%) of 80 patients in group 1, in seven (9.0%) of 78 patients in group 2, and in 16 (19.8%) of 81 patients in the control group. The observed differences among these rates are statistically significant. The results of this study indicate that graduated compression stockings alone or in combination with IPC are effective methods of preventing DVT in neurosurgical patients.

  11. A Prospective Multi-Center Clinical Trial to Compare Efficiency, Accuracy and Safety Of the VisionScope Imaging System Compared to MRI and Diagnostic Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Xerogeanes, John W.; Safran, Marc R.; Huber, Bryan; Mandelbaum, Bert R.; Robertson, William; Gambardella, Ralph A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Until now, arthroscopic surgery has been the gold standard for the diagnosis of intra-articular pathology. When a patient presents with ongoing pain and/or disability despite non-operative care, MRI is commonly used as a diagnostic modality. To date, there is not a minimally-invasive option that can provide detailed information about the intra-articular pathology of a joint. VisionScope Imaging (VSI) is an office-based diagnostic modality that provides comprehensive real-time images and video of a joint with higher accuracy and reliability compared to static MR images. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy, accuracy and safety of VSI compared to MRI and surgical diagnostic arthroscopy. Methods: A prospective, blinded, multi-centered study was performed of all patients who had a routine surgical arthroscopy at one of the six participating clinical sites between July 2012 and May 2013. Patients were consented by the physician investigator at each site. Study inclusion criteria consisted of: suspected meniscal tears or articular cartilage damage. Patients were excluded from the study if they had (1) acute traumatic hemarthoses, (2) concomitant ligament injury, (3) active systemic infection, (4) allergy to silicone or any medication used during the procedure,. All patients had a MRI and a comprehensive physical exam prior to their surgical arthroscopy. Each patient underwent a MRI, VSI exam and surgical diagnostic arthroscopy. The attending physician completed standard forms comparing the VSI exam findings to the diagnostic arthroscopy findings on each patient. Two blinded experts unaffiliated with the study reviewed the VSI and MRI images. The arthroscopy served as the “control” comparison between the VSI and MRI findings. Results: There were 110 patients included in this study. The accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of VSI was equivalent to surgical diagnostic arthroscopy and more accurate than MRI (Table 1). When comparing VSI to

  12. A participatory parent-focused intervention promoting physical activity in preschools: design of a cluster-randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background With rates of childhood obesity increasing, physical activity (PA) promotion especially in young children has assumed greater importance. Given the limited effectiveness of most interventions to date, new approaches are needed. The General Systems theory suggests that involving parents as intervention targets may be effective in fostering healthier life styles in children. We describe the development of a parent-focused participatory intervention and the procedures used to evaluate its effectiveness in increasing daily PA in preschoolers. Methods/Design Thirty-seven South German preschools were identified for this study and agreed to participate. Using a two-armed, controlled cluster-randomized trial design we test a participatory intervention with parents as the primary target group and potential agents of behavioural change. Specifically, the intervention is designed to engage parents in the development, refinement and selection of project ideas to promote PA and in incorporating these ideas into daily routines within the preschool community, consisting of children, teachers and parents. Our study is embedded within an existing state-sponsored programme providing structured gym lessons to preschool children. Thus, child-based PA outcomes from the study arm with the parent-focused intervention and the state-sponsored programme are compared with those from the study arm with the state-sponsored programme alone. The evaluation entails baseline measurements of study outcomes as well as follow-up measurements at 6 and 12 months. Accelerometry measures PA intensity over a period of six days, with the mean over six days used as the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcomes include childrens' BMI, a sum of averaged skin fold thickness measurements across multiple sites, and PA behaviour. Longitudinal multilevel models are used to assess within-subject change and between-group differences in study outcomes, adjusted for covariates at the preschool and

  13. Cortical activities of single-trial P300 amplitudes modulated by memory load using simultaneous EEG-fMRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiushi; Zhao, Xiaojie; Zhu, Chaozhe; Yang, Xueqian; Yao, Li

    2015-03-01

    The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) researches on working memory have found that activation of cortical areas appeared dependent on memory load, and event-related potentials (ERP) studies have demonstrated that amplitudes of P300 decreased significantly when working memory load increased. However, the cortical activities related with P300 amplitudes under different memory loads remains unclear. Joint fMRI and EEG analysis which fusions the time and spatial information in simultaneous EEG-fMRI recording can reveal the regional activation at each ERP time point. In this paper, we first used wavelet transform to obtain the single-trial amplitudes of P300 caused by a digital N-back task in the simultaneous EEG-fMRI recording as the ERP feature sequences. Then the feature sequences in 1-back condition and 3-back condition were introduced into general linear model (GLM) separately as parametric modulations to compare the cortical activation under different memory loads. The results showed that the average amplitudes of P300 in 3-back significantly decreased than that in 1-back, and the activities induced by ERP feature sequences in 3-back also significantly decreased than that in the 1-back, including the insular, anterior cingulate cortex, right inferior frontal gyrus, and medial frontal gyrus, which were relevant to the storage, monitoring, and manipulation of information in working memory task. Moreover, the difference in the activation caused by ERP feature showed a positive correlation with the difference in behavioral performance. These findings demonstrated the locations of P300 amplitudes differences modulated by the memory load and its relationship with the behavioral performance.

  14. Randomized comparative trial of cervical block protocols for pain management during hysteroscopic removal of polyps and myomas

    PubMed Central

    Lukes, Andrea S; Roy, Kelly H; Presthus, James B; Diamond, Michael P; Berman, Jay M; Konsker, Kenneth A

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of two cervical block protocols for pain management during hysteroscopic removal of intrauterine polyps and myomas using the MyoSure® device. Patients and methods This was a randomized, comparative treatment trial conducted by five private Obstetrics and Gynecology practices in the USA. Forty premenopausal women aged 18 years and older were randomized to receive either a combination para/intracervical block protocol of 37 cc local anesthetic administered at six injections sites in association with the application of topic 1% lidocaine gel, or an intracervical block protocol of 22 cc local anesthetic administered at three injections sites without topical anesthetic, for pain management during hysteroscopic removal of intrauterine polyps and/or a single type 0 or type 1 submucosal myoma ≤3 cm. The main outcomes were a composite measure of procedure-related pain and pain during the postoperative recovery period, assessed by the Wong-Baker Faces Rating Scale (0= no pain to 10= maximum pain). The lesion characteristics, procedure time, and adverse events were summarized. Results A total of 17 polyps and eight myomas were removed in the para/intracervical block group, with diameters of 1.3±0.5 cm and 1.8±0.8 cm, respectively. In the intracervical block group, 25 polyps with a mean diameter of 1.2±0.7 cm and 7 myomas with a mean diameter of 1.9±0.9 cm were removed. The mean tissue resection time was 1.2±2.0 minutes and 1.2±1.4 minutes for the para/intracervical and intracervical block groups, respectively. The mean composite procedure-related pain score was low for both cervical block protocols, 1.3±1.4 in the para/intracervical block group vs 2.1±1.5 in the intracervical block group. During the postoperative recovery period, the mean pain scores were 0.3±0.7 vs 1.2±1.7 for the para/intracervical and intracervical block groups, respectively. There were no serious adverse events. Conclusion The MyoSure procedure for removal of

  15. Increased platelet aggregation and in vivo platelet activation after granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration. A randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Spiel, Alexander O; Bartko, Johann; Schwameis, Michael; Firbas, Christa; Siller-Matula, Jolanta; Schuetz, Matthias; Weigl, Manuela; Jilma, Bernd

    2011-04-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) stimulates the bone marrow to produce granulocytes and stem cells and is widely used to accelerate neutrophil recovery after chemotherapy. Interestingly, specific G-CSF receptors have been demonstrated not only on myeloid cells, but also on platelets. Data on the effects of G-CSF on platelet function are limited and partly conflicting. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of G-CSF on platelet aggregation and in vivo platelet activation. Seventy-eight, healthy volunteers were enrolled into this randomised, placebo-controlled trial. Subjects received 5 μg/kg methionyl human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (r-metHuG-CSF, filgrastim) or placebo subcutaneously for four days. We determined platelet aggregation with a whole blood impedance aggregometer with various, clinically relevant platelet agonists (adenosine diphosphate [ADP], collagen, arachidonic acid [AA], ristocetin and thrombin receptor activating peptide 6 [TRAP]). Filgrastim injection significantly enhanced ADP (+40%), collagen (+60%) and AA (+75%)-induced platelet aggregation (all p<0.01 as compared to placebo and p<0.001 as compared to baseline). In addition, G-CSF enhanced ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (+18%) whereas TRAP-induced platelet aggregation decreased slightly (-14%) in response to filgrastim. While baseline aggregation with all agonists was only slightly but insignificantly higher in women than in men, this sex difference was enhanced by G-CSF treatment, and became most pronounced for ADP after five days (p<0.001). Enhanced platelet aggregation translated into a 75% increase in platelet activation as measured by circulating soluble P-selectin. G-CSF enhances platelet aggregation and activation in humans. This may put patients suffering from cardiovascular disease and cancer at risk for thrombotic events. PMID:21301783

  16. Effectiveness of a School-Based Physical Activity Intervention on Cognitive Performance in Danish Adolescents: LCoMotion—Learning, Cognition and Motion – A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Domazet, Sidsel Louise; Froberg, Karsten; Hillman, Charles H.; Andersen, Lars Bo; Bugge, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical activity is associated not only with health-related parameters, but also with cognitive and academic performance. However, no large scale school-based physical activity interventions have investigated effects on cognitive performance in adolescents. The aim of this study was to describe the effectiveness of a school-based physical activity intervention in enhancing cognitive performance in 12–14 years old adolescents. Methods A 20 week cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted including seven intervention and seven control schools. A total of 632 students (mean (SD) age: 12.9 (0.6) years) completed the trial with baseline and follow-up data on primary or secondary outcomes (74% of randomized subjects). The intervention targeted physical activity during academic subjects, recess, school transportation and leisure-time. Cognitive performance was assessed using an executive functions test of inhibition (flanker task) with the primary outcomes being accuracy and reaction time on congruent and incongruent trials. Secondary outcomes included mathematics performance, physical activity levels, body-mass index, waist-circumference and cardiorespiratory fitness. Results No significant difference in change, comparing the intervention group to the control group, was observed on the primary outcomes (p’s>0.05) or mathematics skills (p>0.05). An intervention effect was found for cardiorespiratory fitness in girls (21 meters (95% CI: 4.4–38.6) and body-mass index in boys (-0.22 kg/m2 (95% CI: -0.39–0.05). Contrary to our predictions, a significantly larger change in interference control for reaction time was found in favor of the control group (5.0 milliseconds (95% CI: 0–9). Baseline to mid-intervention changes in physical activity levels did not differ significantly between groups (all p’s>0.05). Conclusions No evidence was found for effectiveness of a 20-week multi-faceted school-based physical activity intervention for enhancing

  17. The effectiveness of salicylic acid plasters compared with ‘usual’ scalpel debridement of corns: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Corns are a common foot problem and surveys have indicated that between 14-48% of people suffer from them. Many of these will seek podiatry treatment, however there is little evidence to indicate which current treatments provide long term resolution. This study compared ‘usual’ treatment (enucleation with a scalpel) with the application of 40% salicylic acid plasters to corns to investigate which is the most effective in terms of clinical, economic and patient-centred outcomes. Methods A parallel-group randomised controlled trial was carried out in two centres where adults who presented with one or more corns and who met the inclusion criteria were allocated to either ‘usual’ scalpel debridement or corn plaster treatment. All participants had measurements of corn size, pain using a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS) and health-related quality of life (EQ-5D) measures by an independent podiatrist, blind to treatment allocation at baseline, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. Results 202 participants were randomised to receive scalpel debridement or corn plaster treatment (101 in each group). At 3 months 34% (32/95) of corns had completely resolved in the corn plaster group compared with 21% (20/94) in the scalpel group (p = 0.044), and 83% (79/95) had reduced in size in the corn plaster group compared with 56% (53/94) in the scalpel group (p < 0.001). At 12 months, time to corn recurrence was longer in the corn plaster group (p < 0.001). Pain from the corns was significantly lower in the corn plaster group at 3 months (p < 0.001) and EQ-5D scores changed (improved), from baseline, by 0.09 (SD ±0.31) and 0.01 (SD ±0.25) points in the corn plaster and scalpel groups respectively (p = 0.056). By month 12, EQ-5D scores had changed by 0.12 and −0.05 in the corn plaster and scalpel groups respectively (p = 0.005). The EQ-5D, VAS scores and the four domains of the Foot Disability Scale were similar in both groups at 3 and 12

  18. Marital Status and Satisfaction Five Years Following a Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Traditional versus Integrative Behavioral Couple Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Andrew; Atkins, David C.; Baucom, Brian; Yi, Jean

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To follow distressed married couples for 5 years after their participation in a randomized clinical trial. Method: A total of 134 chronically and seriously distressed married couples were randomly assigned to approximately 8 months of either traditional behavioral couple therapy (TBCT; Jacobson & Margolin, 1979) or integrative…

  19. Meta‐analysis of randomised controlled trials comparing latanoprost with brimonidine in the treatment of open‐angle glaucoma, ocular hypertension or normal‐tension glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Fung, A T; Reid, S E; Jones, M P; Healey, P R; McCluskey, P J; Craig, J C

    2007-01-01

    Aim To compare the efficacy and tolerability of latanoprost versus brimonidine in the treatment of open‐angle glaucoma, ocular hypertension or normal‐tension glaucoma. Method Systematic review of randomised controlled trials comparing latanoprost and brimondine, identified by searches including Medline, Embase and Cochrane Controlled Trials Register. Two reviewers independently assessed trials for eligibility and quality and extracted data. Data were synthesised (random effects model) and expressed as the absolute mean intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction difference from baseline to end point for efficacy and relative risk for adverse events. Subgroup analysis and regression were used to explore heterogeneity according to patient characteristics, trial design and quality. Results 15 publications reporting on 14 trials (1784 participants) were included for meta‐analysis. IOP reduction favoured latanoprost (weighted mean difference (WMD) = 1.10 mm Hg (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.57 to 1.63)). Significant heterogeneity was present (χ213 = 38.29, p = 0.001, I2 = 66.0%). Subgroup analysis showed greater WMD for studies where data were analysed from end points >6 months duration, cross‐over design, open‐angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension and monotherapy. Multiple regression showed no significant association of WMD with trial duration (t9 = 1.92, p = 0.09), trial design (t9 = 1.79, p = 0.11), trial quality (t9 = −0.46, p = 0.66), or monotherapy or adjunctive therapy (t9 = −2.14, p = 0.06). Fatigue was less commonly associated with latanoprost (RR = 0.27, 95% CI 0.08 to 0.88). Publication bias was not evident on visual inspection of a funnel plot. Conclusion Latanoprost is more effective than brimonidine as monotherapy in lowering IOP. Brimonidine is associated with a higher rate of fatigue. PMID:16956912

  20. Decreased physical activity in Pima Indian compared with Caucasian children.

    PubMed

    Fontvieille, A M; Kriska, A; Ravussin, E

    1993-08-01

    Since reduced physical activity might be a risk factor for body weight gain, we studied the relationship between physical activity and body composition in 43 Pima Indian children (22 male/21 female, mean +/- s.d.: 9.9 +/- 1.1 years) and 42 Caucasian children (21 male/21 female, 9.7 +/- 1.2 years). A list of usual sport leisure activities was established (e.g. bicycling, swimming, basketball) and the subjects were asked how much time they had devoted to each activity over the past week and the last year. Data on time spent playing outside (excluding sport leisure activities for the estimation of physical activity) and watching television/videos were also collected. Pima Indians were taller (143 +/- 9 vs. 137 +/- 8 cm, P < 0.001), heavier (48.6 +/- 15.8 vs. 32.9 +/- 7.8 kg, P < 0.0001) and fatter (39 +/- 16 vs. 24 +/- 7% fat, P < 0.001) than Caucasians. Pima Indian girls showed significantly lower past year and past week sport leisure activity than Caucasian girls (P < 0.01) and spent significantly more time watching television/videos (P < 0.05). Pima boys also showed significantly lower past week sport leisure activity than Caucasian boys (P < 0.05). In Pima Indian boys, past year sport leisure activity correlated negatively (P < 0.05) with body mass index (r = -0.49) and percentage body fat (r = -0.56). However, such correlations were not found in Pima Indian girls, possibly due their very low levels of activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Comparative studies of the quantification of genetically modified organisms in foods processed from maize and soy using trial producing.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Tomoaki; Kuribara, Hideo; Kodama, Takashi; Yamata, Seiko; Futo, Satoshi; Watanabe, Satoshi; Aoki, Nobutaro; Iizuka, Tayoshi; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Maitani, Tamio; Naito, Shigehiro; Hino, Akihiro

    2005-03-23

    Seven types of processed foods, namely, cornstarch, cornmeal, corn puffs, corn chips, tofu, soy milk, and boiled beans, were trial produced from 1 and 5% (w/w) genetically modified (GM) mixed raw materials. In this report, insect resistant maize (MON810) and herbicide tolerant soy (Roundup Ready soy, 40-3-2) were used as representatives of GM maize and soy, respectively. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was extracted from the raw materials and the trial-produced processed food using two types of methods, i.e., the silica membrane method and the anion exchange method. The GM% values of these samples were quantified, and the significant differences between the raw materials and the trial-produced processed foods were statistically confirmed. There were some significant differences in the comparisons of all processed foods. However, our quantitative methods could be applied as a screening assay to tofu and soy milk because the differences in GM% between the trial-produced processed foods and their raw materials were lower than 13 and 23%, respectively. In addition, when quantitating with two primer pairs (SSIIb 3, 114 bp; SSIIb 4, 83 bp for maize and Le1n02, 118 bp; Le1n03, 89 bp for soy), which were targeted within the same taxon specific DNA sequence with different amplicon sizes, the ratios of the copy numbers of the two primer pairs (SSIIb 3/4 and Le1n02/03) decreased with time in a heat-treated processing model using an autoclave. In this report, we suggest that the degradation level of DNA in processed foods could be estimated from these ratios, and the probability of GM quantification could be experimentally predicted from the results of the trial producing. PMID:15769136

  2. Effects Of Recombinant Human Erythropoietin On Platelet Activation In Acute Myocardial Infarction: Results Of A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yi-Da; Hasan, Faisal; Giordano, Frank J.; Pfau, Stephen; Rinder, Henry M.; Katz, Stuart D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Erythropoietin mitigates myocardial damage and improves ventricular performance after experimental ischemic injury. This study assessed safety and efficacy markers relevant to the biological activity of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEpo) in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Methods We conducted a prospective, placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind trial to determine the effects of intravenous rHuEpo (200 U/kg daily for 3 consecutive days) on measures of platelet and endothelial cell activation, soluble Fas ligand, and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) expression of angiogenesis signaling proteins in 44 subjects with acute myocardial infarction (MI) treated with aspirin and clopidogrel after successful percutaneous coronary intervention. Results rHuEpo did not alter bleeding time, platelet function assay closure time, von Willebrand factor levels, soluble P-selectin, or soluble Fas ligand levels when compared with placebo. By contrast, rHuEpo significantly increased expression of erythropoietin receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor Flt-1, and phosphorylated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in PBMC’s when compared with placebo (all p<0.05). Conclusions In acute MI patients treated with aspirin and clopidogrel, short-term administration of rHuEpo did not alter markers of platelet and endothelial cell activation associated with thrombosis, yet did increase expression of angiogenesis signaling proteins in PBMC’s when compared with placebo. These data provide preliminary evidence of safety and biologic activity of rHuEpo at this dosing and support continued enrollment in ongoing efficacy trials. PMID:19958860

  3. Variations of high frequency parameter of heart rate variability following osteopathic manipulative treatment in healthy subjects compared to control group and sham therapy: randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ruffini, Nuria; D'Alessandro, Giandomenico; Mariani, Nicolò; Pollastrelli, Alberto; Cardinali, Lucia; Cerritelli, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Context: Heart Rate Variability (HRV) indicates how heart rate changes in response to inner and external stimuli. HRV is linked to health status and it is an indirect marker of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) function. Objective: To investigate the influence of osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) on cardiac autonomic modulation in healthy subjects, compared with sham therapy and control group. Methods: Sixty-six healthy subjects, both male and female, were included in the present 3-armed randomized placebo controlled within subject cross-over single blinded study. Participants were asymptomatic adults (26.7 ± 8.4 y, 51% male, BMI 18.5 ± 4.8), both smokers and non-smokers and not on medications. At enrollment subjects were randomized in three groups: A, B, C. Standardized structural evaluation followed by a patient need-based osteopathic treatment was performed in the first session of group A and in the second session of group B. Standardized evaluation followed by a protocoled sham treatment was provided in the second session of group A and in the first session of group B. No intervention was performed in the two sessions of group C, acting as a time-control. The trial was registered on clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01908920. Main Outcomes Measures: HRV was calculated from electrocardiography before, during and after the intervention, for a total amount time of 25 min and considering frequency domain as well as linear and non-linear methods as outcome measures. Results: OMT engendered a statistically significant increase of parasympathetic activity, as shown by High Frequency power (p < 0.001), expressed in normalized and absolute unit, and possibly decrease of sympathetic activity, as revealed by Low Frequency power (p < 0.01); results also showed a reduction of Low Frequency/High Frequency ratio (p < 0.001) and Detrended fluctuation scaling exponent (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Findings suggested that OMT can influence ANS activity increasing

  4. Hemostasis during low molecular weight heparin anticoagulation for continuous venovenous hemofiltration: a randomized cross-over trial comparing two hemofiltration rates

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Renal insufficiency increases the half-life of low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs). Whether continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH) removes LMWHs is unsettled. We studied hemostasis during nadroparin anticoagulation for CVVH, and explored the implication of the endogenous thrombin potential (ETP). Methods This cross-over study, performed in a 20-bed teaching hospital ICU, randomized non-surgical patients with acute kidney injury requiring nadroparin for CVVH to compare hemostasis between two doses of CVVH: filtrate flow was initiated at 4 L/h and converted to 2 L/h after 60 min in group 1, and vice versa in group 2. Patients received nadroparin 2850 IU i.v., followed by 380 IU/h continuously in the extracorporeal circuit. After baseline sampling, ultrafiltrate, arterial (art) and postfilter (PF) blood was taken for hemostatic markers after 1 h, and 15 min, 6 h, 12 h and 24 h after converting filtrate flow. We compared randomized groups, and 'early circuit clotting' to 'normal circuit life' groups. Results Fourteen patients were randomized, seven to each group. Despite randomization, group 1 had higher SOFA scores (median 14 (IQR 11-15) versus 9 (IQR 5-9), p = 0.004). Anti-Xa art activity peaked upon nadroparin bolus and declined thereafter (p = 0.05). Anti-Xa PF did not change in time. Anti-Xa activity was not detected in ultrafiltrate. Medians of all anti-Xa samples were lower in group 1 (anti-Xa art 0.19 (0.12-0.37) vs. 0.31 (0.23-0.52), p = 0.02; anti-Xa PF 0.34 (0.25-0.44) vs. 0.51 (0.41-0.76), p = 0.005). After a steep decline, arterial ETPAUC tended to increase (p = 0.06), opposite to anti-Xa, while postfilter ETPAUC increased (p = 0.001). Median circuit life was 24.5 h (IQR 12-37 h). Patients with 'short circuit life' had longer baseline prothrombin time (PTT), activated thromboplastin time (aPTT), lower ETP, higher thrombin-antithrombin complexes (TAT) and higher SOFA scores; during CVVH, anti-Xa, and platelets were lower; PTT, aPTT, TAT

  5. Anger expression and natural killer cell activity in family caregivers participating in a physical activity trial.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, S; King, A C; Vitaliano, P P; Brassington, G S

    2000-07-01

    Associations between psychological functioning and natural killer cell activity (NKA) were examined in 23 older (62.2 ± 7.5 years) family caregivers randomized to a moderate intensity four-month exercise program or to a wait-list control condition. At baseline, although NKA was related to anger-control (r = -.42; trend p < .06) and anger-out (r = .50; p < .03), it was not related to depression, anxiety, perceived stress, or caregiver burden. After controlling for baseline NKA, changes in anger-control explained 14 percent of the variance in NKA four months later. Decreases in anger-control predicted increases in NKA. Group assignment (exercise vs control) was unrelated to changes in NKA over the four-month period; however, the study was not powered to detect this effect. These results are consistent with reported relationships of anger expression with other physiological measures, and extend the importance of anger expression to immune functioning in older family caregivers.

  6. Comparing histone deacetylase inhibitor responses in genetically engineered mouse lung cancer models and a window of opportunity trial in patients with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tian; Galimberti, Fabrizio; Erkmen, Cherie P; Memoli, Vincent; Chinyengetere, Fadzai; Sempere, Lorenzo; Beumer, Jan H; Anyang, Bean N; Nugent, William; Johnstone, David; Tsongalis, Gregory J; Kurie, Jonathan M; Li, Hua; Direnzo, James; Guo, Yongli; Freemantle, Sarah J; Dragnev, Konstantin H; Dmitrovsky, Ethan

    2013-08-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi; vorinostat) responses were studied in murine and human lung cancer cell lines and genetically engineered mouse lung cancer models. Findings were compared with a window of opportunity trial in aerodigestive tract cancers. In human (HOP62, H522, and H23) and murine transgenic (ED-1, ED-2, LKR-13, and 393P, driven, respectively, by cyclin E, degradation-resistant cyclin E, KRAS, or KRAS/p53) lung cancer cell lines, vorinostat reduced growth, cyclin D1, and cyclin E levels, but induced p27, histone acetylation, and apoptosis. Other biomarkers also changed. Findings from transgenic murine lung cancer models were integrated with those from a window of opportunity trial that measured vorinostat pharmacodynamic responses in pre- versus posttreatment tumor biopsies. Vorinostat repressed cyclin D1 and cyclin E expression in murine transgenic lung cancers and significantly reduced lung cancers in syngeneic mice. Vorinostat also reduced cyclin D1 and cyclin E expression, but increased p27 levels in post- versus pretreatment human lung cancer biopsies. Notably, necrotic and inflammatory responses appeared in posttreatment biopsies. These depended on intratumoral HDACi levels. Therefore, HDACi treatments of murine genetically engineered lung cancer models exert similar responses (growth inhibition and changes in gene expression) as observed in lung cancer cell lines. Moreover, enhanced pharmacodynamic responses occurred in the window of opportunity trial, providing additional markers of response that can be evaluated in subsequent HDACi trials. Thus, combining murine and human HDACi trials is a strategy to translate preclinical HDACi treatment outcomes into the clinic. This study uncovered clinically tractable mechanisms to engage in future HDACi trials.

  7. Comparing the efficacy of the monocular trial treatment paradigm with multiple measurements of intraocular pressure before and after treatment initiation in primary open-angle glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Rohit; Debry, Peter W; Waldman, Corey W; Koulen, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The monocular trial has been proposed as a test to help control for diurnal fluctuations in eye pressure when assessing medication effectiveness. We undertook a prospective study to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the monocular trial as a test for determining the effectiveness of a glaucoma medication. The efficacy of the monocular trial was compared to the diagnostic paradigm of repeated pre- and post-treatment measurements in determining whether an intraocular pressure (IOP)-lowering drug is effective. Forty-two patients with newly diagnosed open-angle glaucoma completed five visits: visit 1 for determining eligibility, obtaining consent, and measuring IOP, visit 2 for a second pressure measurement, and visit 3 for a third pressure reading. The new medication was then started in one eye. IOP measurements were made at weeks 4 and 6. The gold standard IOP change was defined as the difference in mean between the pre- and post-medication visits. A medication was deemed effective if this difference was at least 15%. The monocular trial pressure change was defined as the IOP change in the treated eye between the visit immediately before and immediately after the medication addition, corrected by subtracting the pressure change in the untreated eye. All 42 patients completed the full protocol with good compliance. Twenty-five of 42 (60%) medication additions were considered effective by the gold standard method, and 25/42 (60%) by the monocular trial method. However, the two methods agreed in only 26 patients (17 Yes/Yes, 9 No/No). The calculated sensitivity was low (0.68), with a specificity of 0.53. The monocular trial can give useful clues as to whether a medication is effective, but should not be the only information used in making this determination. To obtain the most valid results, multiple pressure checks should be done before and after starting a new medication.

  8. Nausea and Vomiting following Balanced Xenon Anesthesia Compared to Sevoflurane: A Post-Hoc Explorative Analysis of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Fahlenkamp, Astrid V.; Stoppe, Christian; Cremer, Jan; Biener, Ingeborg A.; Peters, Dirk; Leuchter, Ricarda; Eisert, Albrecht; Apfel, Christian C.; Rossaint, Rolf; Coburn, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Objective Like other inhalational anesthetics xenon seems to be associated with post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV). We assessed nausea incidence following balanced xenon anesthesia compared to sevoflurane, and dexamethasone for its prophylaxis in a randomized controlled trial with post-hoc explorative analysis. Methods 220 subjects with elevated PONV risk (Apfel score ≥2) undergoing elective abdominal surgery were randomized to receive xenon or sevoflurane anesthesia and dexamethasone or placebo after written informed consent. 93 subjects in the xenon group and 94 subjects in the sevoflurane group completed the trial. General anesthesia was maintained with 60% xenon or 2.0% sevoflurane. Dexamethasone 4mg or placebo was administered in the first hour. Subjects were analyzed for nausea and vomiting in predefined intervals during a 24h post-anesthesia follow-up. Results Logistic regression, controlled for dexamethasone and anesthesia/dexamethasone interaction, showed a significant risk to develop nausea following xenon anesthesia (OR 2.30, 95% CI 1.02–5.19, p = 0.044). Early-onset nausea incidence was 46% after xenon and 35% after sevoflurane anesthesia (p = 0.138). After xenon, nausea occurred significantly earlier (p = 0.014), was more frequent and rated worse in the beginning. Dexamethasone did not markedly reduce nausea occurrence in both groups. Late-onset nausea showed no considerable difference between the groups. Conclusion In our study setting, xenon anesthesia was associated with an elevated risk to develop nausea in sensitive subjects. Dexamethasone 4mg was not effective preventing nausea in our study. Group size or dosage might have been too small, and change of statistical analysis parameters in the post-hoc evaluation might have further contributed to a limitation of our results. Further trials will be needed to address prophylaxis of xenon-induced nausea. Trial Registration EU Clinical Trials EudraCT-2008-004132-20 ClinicalTrials.gov NCT

  9. The cost-effectiveness of the MobileMums intervention to increase physical activity among mothers with young children: a Markov model informed by a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Burn, Edward; Barnett, Adrian G; Fjeldsoe, Brianna S; Graves, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the cost-effectiveness of the MobileMums intervention. MobileMums is a 12-week programme which assists mothers with young children to be more physically active, primarily through the use of personalised SMS text-messages. Design A cost-effectiveness analysis using a Markov model to estimate and compare the costs and consequences of MobileMums and usual care. Setting This study considers the cost-effectiveness of MobileMums in Queensland, Australia. Participants A hypothetical cohort of over 36 000 women with a child under 1 year old is considered. These women are expected to be eligible and willing to participate in the intervention in Queensland, Australia. Data sources The model was informed by the effectiveness results from a 9-month two-arm community-based randomised controlled trial undertaken in 2011 and registered retrospectively with the Australian Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12611000481976). Baseline characteristics for the model cohort, treatment effects and resource utilisation were all informed by this trial. Main outcome measures The incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) of MobileMums compared with usual care. Results The intervention is estimated to lead to an increase of 131 QALYs for an additional cost to the health system of 1.1 million Australian dollars (AUD). The expected incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for MobileMums is 8608 AUD per QALY gained. MobileMums has a 98% probability of being cost-effective at a cost-effectiveness threshold of 64 000 AUD. Varying modelling assumptions has little effect on this result. Conclusions At a cost-effectiveness threshold of 64 000 AUD, MobileMums would likely be a cost-effective use of healthcare resources in Queensland, Australia. Trial registration number Australian Clinical Trials Registry; ACTRN12611000481976. PMID:25926145

  10. Brief Report: Enhancement of Patient Recruitment in Rheumatoid Arthritis Clinical Trials Using a Multi‐Biomarker Disease Activity Score as an Inclusion Criterion

    PubMed Central

    Bolce, Rebecca; Hambardzumyan, Karen; Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Forslind, Kristina; Petersson, Ingemar F.; Sasso, Eric H.; Hwang, C. C.; Segurado, Oscar G.; Geborek, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Objective Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) clinical trials often exclude patients who have low C‐reactive protein (CRP) levels, which slows enrollment into the trial. The purpose of this study was to determine whether high Multi‐Biomarker Disease Activity (MBDA) scores (>44) in RA patients with low CRP levels (≤10 mg/liter) could be used as a complement to CRP levels >10 mg/liter to enhance patient recruitment without affecting clinical trial outcomes. Methods We evaluated patients from the Swedish Pharmacotherapy (SWEFOT) trial, which did not include any selection criteria for CRP levels. Clinical outcomes were assessed after 3 months of methotrexate (MTX) monotherapy in MTX‐naive RA patients (n = 220) and after 3–10 months of add‐on therapy in patients who were incomplete responders to MTX alone (MTX‐IR) (n = 127). Radiographic outcomes were assessed at 1 year in all patients. Within each cohort, the outcomes were compared between patients with a CRP level of ≤10 mg/liter and an MBDA score of >44 at the start of the respective treatment interval versus those with a CRP level of >10 mg/liter. Results Patients with both a CRP level of ≤10 mg/liter and an MBDA score of >44 at baseline had clinical and radiographic outcomes that were comparable to those in patients with a CRP level of >10 mg/liter at baseline. This broadened definition of the inclusion criteria identified an additional 24% of patients in the MTX‐naive cohort and 47% in the MTX‐IR cohort. Conclusion Patient recruitment into RA clinical trials may be substantially enhanced, without any decrease in clinical and radiographic outcomes, by using as an inclusion criterion “a CRP level of >10 mg/liter and/or an MBDA score of >44.” PMID:26213309

  11. A Phase 1c Trial Comparing the Efficacy and Safety of a New Aqueous Formulation of Alphaxalone with Propofol

    PubMed Central

    Monagle, John; Siu, Lyndon; Worrell, Jodie; Serrao, Juliet M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phaxan™ (PHAX, Chemic Labs, Canton, MA) is an aqueous solution of 10 mg/mL alphaxalone and 13% 7-sulfobutylether β-cyclodextrin (betadex). In preclinical studies, PHAX is a fast onset–offset IV anesthetic like propofol, but causes less cardiovascular depression. This first-in-man study was designed to find the anesthetic dose of PHAX and to compare it with an equivalent dose of propofol for safety, efficacy, and quality of recovery from anesthesia and sedation. METHODS: The study adhered to compliance with Good Clinical Practices regulations (clinical trials registry number, ACTRN12611000343909). This randomized, double-blind study compared PHAX and propofol using a Bayesian algorithm to determine dose equivalence for effects on the bispectral index (BIS). Male volunteers, ASA physical status I, gave written informed consent (n = 12 per group; PHAX or propofol). Parameters assessed for 80 minutes after drug injection (single bolus dose) were pain on injection, involuntary movement, BIS, blood pressure, need for airway support, and, as measures of recovery from sedation, the Richmond Agitation and Sedation Scale and the Digit Symbol Substitution Test. Arterial blood was withdrawn for biochemistry, hematology, and complement levels. RESULTS: No subject complained of pain on injection with PHAX, whereas 8 of the 12 subjects given propofol did. Nine PHAX and 8 propofol subjects reached BIS values of ≤50: median (interquartile range [IQR]) mg/kg dose = 0.5 (0.5–0.6) for PHAX and 2.9 (2.4–3.0) for propofol. The lowest median BIS reached was 27 to 28 for both agents with no significant differences between them for timing of onset and recovery of BIS. The concomitant median changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressures were −11% vs −19% for systolic and −25% vs −37% for diastolic in PHAX- and propofol-treated subjects, respectively. Nine of the 12 propofol-treated subjects and none of 12 PHAX-treated subjects required airway support. For

  12. Effectiveness of Facebook-Delivered Lifestyle Counselling and Physical Activity Self-Monitoring on Physical Activity and Body Mass Index in Overweight and Obese Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Ruotsalainen, Heidi; Kyngäs, Helvi; Tammelin, Tuija; Heikkinen, Hanna; Kääriäinen, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background. The aim was to evaluate the effects of a 12-week, Facebook-delivered lifestyle counselling intervention, with or without physical activity self-monitoring, on physical activity and body mass index (BMI) in overweight and obese 13-16-year-old adolescents. Methods. Three-arm randomized controlled trial. Participants (n = 46) were randomly assigned to intervention and control groups: one group received Facebook-delivered lifestyle counselling and monitoring of their physical activity (Fb + Act, n = 15), whereas a second experimental group received the same Facebook-delivered lifestyle counselling without self-monitoring (Fb, n = 16) and a third group served as the control group (n = 15). Objective and self-reported physical activity assessment were used. Nonparametric statistical tests were used. Results. There were no significant intervention effects in terms of changes in physical activity levels or BMI from baseline to the 12-week postintervention measurements between the intervention and control groups. The Fb + Act group had lower sedentary time on weekdays compared to the control group during postintervention measurements (p = 0.021), but there was no interaction between time and group. Conclusions. Interventions were not effective at increasing physical activity in overweight and obese adolescents. Before implementing such interventions, more evaluations on their effectiveness are needed. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02295761 (2014-11-17). PMID:26697218

  13. Effectiveness of Facebook-Delivered Lifestyle Counselling and Physical Activity Self-Monitoring on Physical Activity and Body Mass Index in Overweight and Obese Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ruotsalainen, Heidi; Kyngäs, Helvi; Tammelin, Tuija; Heikkinen, Hanna; Kääriäinen, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background. The aim was to evaluate the effects of a 12-week, Facebook-delivered lifestyle counselling intervention, with or without physical activity self-monitoring, on physical activity and body mass index (BMI) in overweight and obese 13–16-year-old adolescents