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Sample records for active comparator trials

  1. Comparative Effectiveness Research Using Observational Data: Active Comparators to Emulate Target Trials with Inactive Comparators

    PubMed Central

    Huitfeldt, Anders; Hernan, Miguel A.; Kalager, Mette; Robins, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Because a comparison of noninitiators and initiators of treatment may be hopelessly confounded, guidelines for the conduct of observational research often recommend using an “active” comparator group consisting of people who initiate a treatment other than the medication of interest. In this paper, we discuss the conditions under which this approach is valid if the goal is to emulate a trial with an inactive comparator. Identification of Effects: We provide conditions under which a target trial in a subpopulation can be validly emulated from observational data, using an active comparator that is known or believed to be inactive for the outcome of interest. The average treatment effect in the population as a whole is not identified, but under certain conditions this approach can be used to emulate a trial in the subset of individuals who were treated with the treatment of interest, in the subset of individuals who were treated with the treatment of interest but not with the comparator, or in the subset of individuals who were treated with both the treatment of interest and the active comparator. The Plausibility of the Comparability Conditions: We discuss whether the required conditions can be expected to hold in pharmacoepidemiologic research, with a particular focus on whether the conditions are plausible in situations where the standard analysis fails due to unmeasured confounding by access to health care or health seeking behaviors. Discussion: The conditions discussed in this paper may at best be approximately true. Investigators using active comparator designs to emulate trials with inactive comparators should exercise caution. PMID:27891526

  2. Informing hot flash treatment decisions for breast cancer survivors: a systematic review of randomized trials comparing active interventions.

    PubMed

    Johns, Claire; Seav, Susan M; Dominick, Sally A; Gorman, Jessica R; Li, Hongying; Natarajan, Loki; Mao, Jun James; Su, H Irene

    2016-04-01

    Patient-centered decision making about hot flash treatments often incorporates a balance of efficacy and side effects in addition to patient preference. This systematic review examines randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing at least two non-hormonal hot flash treatments in breast cancer survivors. In July 2015, PubMed, SCOPUS, CINAHL, Cochrane, and Web of Science databases were searched for RCTs comparing active, non-hormonal hot flash treatments in female breast cancer survivors. Thirteen trials were included after identifying 906 potential studies. Four trials were dose comparison studies of pharmacologic treatments citalopram, venlafaxine, gabapentin, and paroxetine. Hot flash reduction did not differ by tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitor use. Citalopram 10, 20, and 30 mg daily had comparable outcomes. Venlafaxine 75 mg daily improved hot flashes without additional side effects from higher dosing. Gabapentin 900 mg daily improved hot flashes more than 300 mg. Paroxetine 10 mg daily had fewer side effects than 20 mg. Among four trials comparing different pharmacologic treatments, venlafaxine alleviated hot flash symptoms faster than clonidine; participants preferred venlafaxine over gabapentin. Five trials compared pharmacologic to non-pharmacologic treatments. Acupuncture had similar efficacy to venlafaxine and gabapentin but may have longer durability after completing treatment and fewer side effects. We could not perform a pooled meta-analysis because outcomes were not reported in comparable formats. Clinical trial data on non-hormonal hot flash treatments provide comparisons of hot flash efficacy and other patient important outcomes to guide clinical management. Clinicians can use the information to help patients select hot flash interventions.

  3. The ACTIVATE study: results from a group-randomized controlled trial comparing a traditional worksite health promotion program with an activated consumer program.

    PubMed

    Terry, Paul E; Fowles, Jinnet Briggs; Xi, Min; Harvey, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE. This study compares a traditional worksite-based health promotion program with an activated consumer program and a control program DESIGN. Group randomized controlled trial with 18-month intervention. SETTING. Two large Midwestern companies. SUBJECTS. Three hundred and twenty employees (51% response). INTERVENTION. The traditional health promotion intervention offered population-level campaigns on physical activity, nutrition, and stress management. The activated consumer intervention included population-level campaigns for evaluating health information, choosing a health benefits plan, and understanding the risks of not taking medications as prescribed. The personal development intervention (control group) offered information on hobbies. The interventions also offered individual-level coaching for high risk individuals in both active intervention groups. MEASURES. Health risk status, general health status, consumer activation, productivity, and the ability to evaluate health information. ANALYSIS. Multivariate analyses controlled for baseline differences among the study groups. RESULTS. At the population level, compared with baseline performance, the traditional health promotion intervention improved health risk status, consumer activation, and the ability to recognize reliable health websites. Compared with baseline performance, the activated consumer intervention improved consumer activation, productivity, and the ability to recognize reliable health websites. At the population level, however, only the activated consumer intervention improved any outcome more than the control group did; that outcome was consumer activation. At the individual level for high risk individuals, both traditional health coaching and activated consumer coaching positively affected health risk status and consumer activation. In addition, both coaching interventions improved participant ability to recognize a reliable health website. Consumer activation coaching also

  4. A randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of yoga with an active control on ambulatory blood pressure in individuals with prehypertension and stage 1 hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hagins, Marshall; Rundle, Andrew; Consedine, Nathan S; Khalsa, Sat Bir S

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of yoga with an active control (nonaerobic exercise) in individuals with prehypertension and stage 1 hypertension. A randomized clinical trial was performed using two arms: (1) yoga and (2) active control. Primary outcomes were 24-hour day and night ambulatory systolic and diastolic blood pressures. Within-group and between-group analyses were performed using paired t tests and repeated-measures analysis of variance (time × group), respectively. Eighty-four participants enrolled, with 68 participants completing the trial. Within-group analyses found 24-hour diastolic, night diastolic, and mean arterial pressure all significantly reduced in the yoga group (-3.93, -4.7, -4.23 mm Hg, respectively) but no significant within-group changes in the active control group. Direct comparisons of the yoga intervention with the control group found a single blood pressure variable (diastolic night) to be significantly different (P=.038). This study has demonstrated that a yoga intervention can lower blood pressure in patients with mild hypertension. Although this study was not adequately powered to show between-group differences, the size of the yoga-induced blood pressure reduction appears to justify performing a definitive trial of this intervention to test whether it can provide meaningful therapeutic value for the management of hypertension.

  5. A randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of yoga to an active control on ambulatory blood pressure in individuals with Pre- and Stage 1 Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hagins, Marshall; Rundle, Andrew; Consedine, Nathan S.; Khalsa, Sat Bir S.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of yoga to an active control (non-aerobic exercise) in individuals with pre- and Stage 1 hypertension. A randomized clinical trial was performed using two arms: 1) yoga and 2) active control. Primary outcomes were 24-hour, day and night ambulatory systolic and diastolic blood pressures. Within-group and between-group analyses were performed using paired t-tests and repeated measures ANOVAs (time x group), respectively. Eighty-four participants enrolled with 68 participants completing the trial. Within-group analyses found 24-hour diastolic, night diastolic, and mean arterial pressure all significantly reduced in the yoga group (−3.93, −4.7, −4.23 mmHg, respectively) but no significant within-group changes in the active control group. Direct comparisons of the yoga intervention to the control group found a single blood pressure variable (diastolic night) to be significantly different (p =.038). This study has demonstrated that a yoga intervention can lower blood pressure in patients with mild hypertension. Although this study was not adequately powered to show between-group differences, the size of the yoga-induced blood pressure reduction we observed appears to justify performing a definitive trial of this intervention to test whether it can provide meaningful therapeutic value for the management of hypertension. PMID:24387700

  6. A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial of Classroom-Based Mindfulness Meditation Compared to an Active Control Condition in 6th Grade Children

    PubMed Central

    Britton, Willoughby B.; Lepp, Nathaniel E.; Niles, Halsey F.; Rocha, Tomas; Fisher, Nathan; Gold, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Children in the United States are at risk for numerous psychological problems, such as anxiety, attention problems, and mood disorders, and are underserved by current mental health provisions. The current study is a pilot trial to examine the effects of a nonelective, classroom-based, teacher-implemented, mindfulness meditation intervention on standard clinical measures of mental health and affect in middle school children. A total of 101 healthy sixth-grade students (55 boys and 46 girls) were randomized to either an Asian history course with daily mindfulness meditation practice (intervention group) or an African history course with a matched experiential activity (active control group). Self-reported data was collected by administering the Youth Self Report (YSR), a modified Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Cognitive and Affective Mindfulness Measure -Revised before and after 6 weeks of meditation or active control condition. Both meditators and active controls decreased significantly on the YSR Internalizing Problems, Externalizing Problems, and Attention Problems subscales but did not differ in the extent of their improvements. Both groups also showed comparable improvements on measures in affect. Meditators were significantly less likely to develop suicidal ideation or thoughts of self-harm than controls. Improvements in affect were correlated with increases in mindfulness in meditators but not controls. These results suggest that mindfulness training may yield both unique and nonspecific benefits that are shared by other novel activities. PMID:24930819

  7. Grand average ERP-image plotting and statistics: A method for comparing variability in event-related single-trial EEG activities across subjects and conditions

    PubMed Central

    Delorme, Arnaud; Miyakoshi, Makoto; Jung, Tzyy-Ping; Makeig, Scott

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of modern computing methods, modeling trial-to-trial variability in biophysical recordings including electroencephalography (EEG) has become of increasingly interest. Yet no widely used method exists for comparing variability in ordered collections of single-trial data epochs across conditions and subjects. We have developed a method based on an ERP-image visualization tool in which potential, spectral power, or some other measure at each time point in a set of event-related single-trial data epochs are represented as color coded horizontal lines that are then stacked to form a 2-D colored image. Moving-window smoothing across trial epochs can make otherwise hidden event-related features in the data more perceptible. Stacking trials in different orders, for example ordered by subject reaction time, by context-related information such as inter-stimulus interval, or some other characteristic of the data (e.g., latency-window mean power or phase of some EEG source) can reveal aspects of the multifold complexities of trial-to-trial EEG data variability. This study demonstrates new methods for computing and visualizing grand ERP-image plots across subjects and for performing robust statistical testing on the resulting images. These methods have been implemented and made freely available in the EEGLAB signal-processing environment that we maintain and distribute. PMID:25447029

  8. Effect of a 24-month physical activity intervention compared to health education on cognitive outcomes in sedentary older adults: the LIFE Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sink, Kaycee M.; Espeland, Mark A.; Castro, Cynthia M.; Church, Timothy; Cohen, Ron; Dodson, John A.; Guralnik, Jack; Hendrie, Hugh C.; Jennings, Janine; Katula, Jeffery; Lopez, Oscar L.; McDermott, Mary M.; Pahor, Marco; Reid, Kieran F.; Rushing, Julia; Verghese, Joe; Rapp, Stephen; Williamson, Jeff D.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Epidemiologic evidence suggests that physical activity benefits cognition, but results from randomized trials are limited and mixed. Objective To determine whether a 24-month physical activity program results in better cognitive function and/or lower risk of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or dementia compared to a health education program. Design, Setting, and Participants The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) study was a multicenter, randomized clinical trial that enrolled 1635 community-living participants at 8 centers in the U.S. from February 2010 until December 2011. Participants were sedentary adults aged 70–89 years at risk for mobility disability, but able to walk 400m. Intervention Participants were randomized to a structured, moderate-intensity physical activity program (n=818) that included walking, resistance training, and flexibility exercises or to a health education program (n=817) of educational workshops and upper extremity stretching. Outcomes and Measures Pre-specified secondary outcomes of the LIFE study included cognitive function measured by the Digit Symbol Coding task (0–133 scale, higher=better) and Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised (12-word list recall) assessed in 1,476 (90.3%) participants. Tertiary outcomes included global and executive cognitive function and incident MCI or dementia at 24 months. Pre-specified subgroups analyses were performed based on age, sex, baseline physical performance, and baseline Modified Mini-Mental State Examination score. Results At 24 months, DSC and HVLT-R scores (adjusted for clinic site, gender, and baseline values) were not different between groups. Mean DSC scores were 46.26 points for physical activity vs. 46.28 for health education; mean difference −0.014 points, 95% CI −0.80 to 0.77, p= 0.97. Mean HVLT-R delayed recall scores were 7.22 for physical activity vs. 7.25 for health education; mean difference −0.03 words, 95% CI −0.29 to 0.24, p= 0

  9. The effects of industry sponsorship on comparator selection in trial registrations for neuropsychiatric conditions in children.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Adam G; Mandl, Kenneth D; Coiera, Enrico; Bourgeois, Florence T

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric populations continue to be understudied in clinical drug trials despite the increasing use of pharmacotherapy in children, particularly with psychotropic drugs. Most pertinent to the clinical selection of drug interventions are trials directly comparing drugs against other drugs. The aim was to measure the prevalence of active drug comparators in neuropsychiatric drug trials in children and identify the effects of funding source on comparator selection. We analyzed the selection of drugs and drug comparisons in clinical trials registered between January 2006 and May 2012. Completed and ongoing interventional trials examining treatments for six neuropsychiatric conditions in children were included. Networks of drug comparisons for each condition were constructed using information about the trial study arms. Of 421 eligible trial registrations, 228 (63,699 participants) were drug trials addressing ADHD (106 trials), autism spectrum disorders (47), unipolar depression (16), seizure disorders (38), migraines and other headaches (15), or schizophrenia (11). Active drug comparators were used in only 11.0% of drug trials while 44.7% used a placebo control and 44.3% no drug or placebo comparator. Even among conditions with well-established pharmacotherapeutic options, almost all drug interventions were compared to a placebo. Active comparisons were more common among trials without industry funding (17% vs. 8%, p=0.04). Trials with industry funding differed from non-industry trials in terms of the drugs studied and the comparators selected. For 73% (61/84) of drugs and 90% (19/21) of unique comparisons, trials were funded exclusively by either industry or non-industry. We found that industry and non-industry differed when choosing comparators and active drug comparators were rare for both groups. This gap in pediatric research activity limits the evidence available to clinicians treating children and suggests a need to reassess the design and funding of pediatric

  10. A randomized controlled pilot trial of classroom-based mindfulness meditation compared to an active control condition in sixth-grade children.

    PubMed

    Britton, Willoughby B; Lepp, Nathaniel E; Niles, Halsey F; Rocha, Tomas; Fisher, Nathan E; Gold, Jonathan S

    2014-06-01

    The current study is a pilot trial to examine the effects of a nonelective, classroom-based, teacher-implemented, mindfulness meditation intervention on standard clinical measures of mental health and affect in middle school children. A total of 101 healthy sixth-grade students (55 boys, 46 girls) were randomized to either an Asian history course with daily mindfulness meditation practice (intervention group) or an African history course with a matched experiential activity (active control group). Self-reported measures included the Youth Self Report (YSR), a modified Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Cognitive and Affective Mindfulness Measure -Revised. Both groups decreased significantly on clinical syndrome subscales and affect but did not differ in the extent of their improvements. Meditators were significantly less likely to develop suicidal ideation or thoughts of self-harm than controls. These results suggest that mindfulness training may yield both unique and non-specific benefits that are shared by other novel activities.

  11. EMG activity of selected rotator cuff musculature during grade III distraction and posterior glide glenohumeral mobilization: results of a pilot trial comparing painful and non-painful shoulders

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Brian T.; Holst, Brian; Infante, John; Poenitzsch, James; Ortiz, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this pilot study were to investigate rotator cuff activity that may be present during grade III distraction and posterior glide mobilization of the glenohumeral (GH) joint, as well as to examine any differences in response between painful and non-painful shoulders utilizing these techniques. Methods EMG data were collected using Delsys EMGworks® software and Trigno® mini-wireless electrodes for the supraspinatus, infraspinatus and upper trapezius musculature during grade III GH distraction and posterior glide mobilization. A total of 20 shoulders (10 painful, 10 non-painful) were recruited from a sample of convenience. Submaximal voluntary dynamic contraction against gravity was used as reference for each of the three selected muscles. Participants underwent two trials of each mobilization, and the mean results for each group were assessed using descriptive statistics (mean, standard deviation) and effect size. Results Both the painful and non-painful groups exhibited considerable levels of rotator cuff activity during each test parameter, with the painful group consistently generating higher supraspinatus and infraspinatus RMS and peak force activity. Analysis of the peak combined rotator cuff activity during distraction (d = 0.58) and posterior glides (d = 0.64) suggests moderate-to-high practical significance of the results. Discussion GH distraction and posterior glide mobilizations have traditionally been thought of as passive treatment procedures. The results of this pilot study indicate that the supraspinatus and infraspinatus are significantly active during these techniques. Findings suggest that during these techniques, the total infra/supraspinatus EMG activity approaches the level produced while raising the arm against gravity. Level of evidence: 2b PMID:27252577

  12. Hard to heal pressure ulcers (stage III-IV): efficacy of injected activated macrophage suspension (AMS) as compared with standard of care (SOC) treatment controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Zuloff-Shani, Adi; Adunsky, Abraham; Even-Zahav, Aviva; Semo, Haim; Orenstein, Arie; Tamir, Jeremy; Regev, Eli; Shinar, Eilat; Danon, David

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare local injections of AMS with SOC treatments for stage III and IV pressure ulcers in elderly patients. It was designed as historically prospective 2-arms non-parallel open controlled trial, and conducted in a department of geriatric medicine and rehabilitation of a university affiliated tertiary hospital. We studied 100 consecutive elderly patients with a total of 216 stage III or IV pressure ulcers, 66 patients were assigned to the AMS group and had their wounds injected, while 38 patients were assigned to the SOC group. Primary outcome was rate of complete wound closure. Time to complete wound closure and 1-year mortality served as secondary outcomes. Statistical analyses were performed at both patient and wound levels. Percentage of completely closed wounds (wound level and patient level) were significantly better (p<0.001/p<0.001, respectively) in all patients in favor of AMS, as well as in the subset of diabetic patients (p<0.001/p<0.001). Similarly, AMS proved significantly better for the subset of those with leg ulcers and with baseline wounds ≤15 cm(2), compared with SOC. There were no statistically significant differences with regard to time to complete closure or 1-year mortality rates in the two groups. It is concluded that there is a significant difference in favor of stage III and IV wound closure rates by AMS, as compared with SOC treatments.

  13. PIPELINEs: Creating Comparable Clinical Knowledge Efficiently by Linking Trial Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Shrier, AA; Antonijevic, Z; Beckman, RA; Campbell, RK; Chen, C; Flaherty, KT; Loewy, J; Lacombe, D; Madhavan, S; Selker, HP; Esserman, LJ

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive, seamless, multisponsor, multitherapy clinical trial designs executed as large scale platforms, could create superior evidence more efficiently than single‐sponsor, single‐drug trials. These trial PIPELINEs also could diminish barriers to trial participation, increase the representation of real‐world populations, and create systematic evidence development for learning throughout a therapeutic life cycle, to continually refine its use. Comparable evidence could arise from multiarm design, shared comparator arms, and standardized endpoints—aiding sponsors in demonstrating the distinct value of their innovative medicines; facilitating providers and patients in selecting the most appropriate treatments; assisting regulators in efficacy and safety determinations; helping payers make coverage and reimbursement decisions; and spurring scientists with translational insights. Reduced trial times and costs could enable more indications, reduced development cycle times, and improved system financial sustainability. Challenges to overcome range from statistical to operational to collaborative governance and data exchange. PMID:27643536

  14. Cabergoline compared to levodopa in the treatment of patients with severe restless legs syndrome: results from a multi-center, randomized, active controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Trenkwalder, Claudia; Benes, Heike; Grote, Ludger; Happe, Svenja; Högl, Birgit; Mathis, Johannes; Saletu-Zyhlarz, Gerda M; Kohnen, Ralf

    2007-04-15

    We report the first large-scale double-blind, randomly assigned study to compare two active dopaminergic therapies for Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS), the dopamine agonist cabergoline (CAB) and levodopa/benserazide (levodopa). Patients with idiopathic RLS were treated with fixed daily doses of 2 or 3 mg CAB or 200 or 300 mg levodopa for 30 weeks. Efficacy was assessed by changes in the IRLS (International RLS Severity Scale) and by time to discontinuation of treatment due to loss of efficacy or augmentation. 361 of 418 screened patients (age 58 +/- 12 years, 71% females) were randomly assigned and treated (CAB: n = 178; levodopa: n = 183) in 51 centers of four European countries. Baseline IRLS total score was 25.7 +/- 6.8. The baseline-adjusted mean change from baseline to week 6 in IRLS sum score was d = -16.1 in the CAB group and d = -9.5 in the levodopa group (d = -6.6, P < 0.0001). More patients in the levodopa group (24.0%) than in the CAB group (11.9%, P = 0.0029, log-rank test) discontinued because of loss of efficacy (14.2% vs. 7.9%, P = 0.0290) or augmentation (9.8% vs. 4.0%, P = 0.0412). Adverse events (AEs) occurred in 83.1% of the CAB group and in 77.6% of the levodopa group. In both groups, most frequent AEs were gastrointestinal symptoms (CAB: 55.6%, levodopa: 30.6%, P < 0.0001). This first large-scale active controlled study in RLS showed superior efficacy of cabergoline versus levodopa after a 30-week long-term therapy. Tolerability was found more favorable with levodopa than with cabergoline.

  15. Clinical trials: active control vs placebo--what is ethical?

    PubMed

    Spławiński, Jacek; Kuźniar, Jerzy

    2004-01-01

    The quest for effective medicines is very old. In modern times two important tools have been developed to evaluate efficacy of drugs, superiority and non-inferiority types of clinical trials. The former tests the null hypothesis of micro (the difference between a tested drug and comparator) < or = 0 against micro > 0; the latter tests the null hypothesis of micro < or = - delta against, micro > - delta, where delta is the clinical difference from the comparator. In a superiority trial, a new drug is tested against a placebo; in a non-inferiority trial, a new drug is tested against active treatment. In this paper, arguments are presented to show that a superiority trial against a placebo is scientifically sound but ethically unacceptable, whereas a non-inferiority trial against active treatment is ethically sound but scientifically not reliable. Switching from a superiority type of trial with placebo to a non-inferiority trial with an active-control--following the latest revision of Declaration of Helsinki--is in practice switching from the violation of the uncertainty principle to uncertainty of results. Given human and financial resources, it appears an academic question as to which is more unethical: to violate patients' rights or to produce results without scientific value. All presented considerations lead to the conclusion that the use of a superiority trial of design with an active control instead of placebo will satisfy scientific needs, expectation of patients, and the ancient quest for effective medicines. In the era of Good (Clinical, Laboratory, Manufacture) Practice, the attention of those performing clinical trials is focused on the procedure, not always on its essence. However even the excellent performance of a trial which is not worth doing is fruitless.

  16. Active Clinical Trials for Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Minsker, Stanislav; Zhao, Ying-Qi; Cheng, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Individualized treatment rules (ITRs) tailor treatments according to individual patient characteristics. They can significantly improve patient care and are thus becoming increasingly popular. The data collected during randomized clinical trials are often used to estimate the optimal ITRs. However, these trials are generally expensive to run, and, moreover, they are not designed to efficiently estimate ITRs. In this article, we propose a cost-effective estimation method from an active learning perspective. In particular, our method recruits only the “most informative” patients (in terms of learning the optimal ITRs) from an ongoing clinical trial. Simulation studies and real-data examples show that our active clinical trial method significantly improves on competing methods. We derive risk bounds and show that they support these observed empirical advantages. Supplementary materials for this article are available online. PMID:28018014

  17. Health Activities Project (HAP), Trial Edition II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buller, Dave; And Others

    Contained within this Health Activities Project (HAP) trial edition (set II) are a teacher information folio and numerous student activity folios which center around the idea that students in grades 5-8 can control their own health and safety. Each student folio is organized into a Synopsis, Health Background, Materials, Setting Up, and Activities…

  18. Constructing Common Cohorts From Trials with Overlapping Eligibility Criteria: Implications for Comparing Effect Sizes Between Trials

    PubMed Central

    Mount, David L.; Feeney, Patricia; Fabricatore, Anthony N.; Coday, Mace; Bahnson, Judy; Byington, Robert; Phelan, Suzanne; Wilmoth, Sharon; Knowler, William C.; Hramiak, Irene; Osei, Kwame; Sweeney, Mary Ellen; Espeland, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Comparing findings from separate trials is necessary to choose among treatment options, however differences among study cohorts may impede these comparisons. Purpose As a case study, to examine the overlap of study cohorts in two large randomized controlled clinical trials that assess interventions to reduce risk of major cardiovascular disease events in adults with type 2 diabetes in order to explore the feasibility of cross-trial comparisons Methods The Action for Health in Diabetes (Look AHEAD) and The Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) trials enrolled 5,145 and 10,251 adults with type 2 diabetes, respectively. Look AHEAD assesses the efficacy of an intensive lifestyle intervention designed to produce weight loss; ACCORD tests pharmacological therapies for control of glycemia, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension. Incidence of major cardiovascular disease events is the primary outcome for both trials. A sample was constructed to include participants from each trial who appeared to meet eligibility criteria and be appropriate candidates for the other trial’s interventions. Demographic characteristics, health status, and outcomes of members and non-members of this constructed sample were compared. Results Nearly 80% of Look AHEAD participants were projected to be ineligible for ACCORD; ineligibility was primarily due to better glycemic control or no early history of cardiovascular disease. Approximately 30% of ACCORD participants were projected to be ineligible for Look AHEAD, often for reasons linked to poorer health. The characteristics of participants projected to be jointly eligible for both trials continued to reflect differences between trials according to factors likely linked to retention, adherence, and study outcomes. Limitations Accurate ascertainment of cross-trial eligibility was hampered by differences between protocols. Conclusions Despite several similarities, the Look AHEAD and ACCORD cohorts represent distinct

  19. Changes in the Healthy Beverage Index in Response to an Intervention Targeting a Reduction in Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption as Compared to an Intervention Targeting Improvements in Physical Activity: Results from the Talking Health Trial.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, Valisa E; Davy, Brenda M; Myers, Emily A; You, Wen; Zoellner, Jamie M

    2015-12-04

    The recently developed Healthy Beverage Index (HBI) was designed to evaluate overall beverage intake quality (including total fluid consumption and beverage calories), yet no known intervention studies have assessed longitudinal changes to the HBI. The objective of this investigation was to assess changes in HBI scores in response to a sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) reduction trial as compared to a physical activity comparison group. Participants were enrolled into a six-month, community-based, controlled behavioral trial and randomized into either a SSB reduction group (SIPsmartER) or a physical activity group (MoveMore). Correlations and multilevel mixed-effects linear regression with intention-to-treat analyses are presented. Total HBI score significantly increased for SIPsmartER (n = 149) (mean increase = 7.5 points (5.4, 9.7), p ≤ 0.001) and MoveMore (n = 143) (mean increase = 3.4 points (1.6, 5.2), p ≤ 0.001) participants, with a significant between group effect (p ≤ 0.05), over the six-month intervention. Other significant changes in HBI components for SIPsmartER included increased SSB and total beverage calorie scores, and decreased low-fat milk and diet soda scores. Changes in total HBI scores were significantly correlated with changes in total Healthy Eating Index-2010 scores (r = 0.15, p ≤ 0.01). Our findings suggest that individual HBI component scores, beyond the SSB component, are influenced by intervention strategies that primarily focus on SSB reduction.

  20. Comparative trials of antimonial drugs in urinary schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Davis, A.

    1968-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic trials in urinary schistosomiasis are described and discussed. Their design and conduct were based on recommended statistical techniques, now generally accepted as the most appropriate approach to the assessment of antischistosomal drugs. Randomization produced comparable host groups in whom multiple parasitic infection and radiological urinary tract damage were common. Treatment was with one of three antimonial compounds given at equivalent metallic dosage daily. Antimony sodium tartrate (AST) and antimony dimercaptosuccinate (TWSb) were equally efficient curatively but both produced many side-effects. Sodium antimonylgluconate (TSAG) was four-fifths as effective but tolerance was superior. Estimations of urinary antimony excretion showed that tissue retention of the metal was related to cure-rates and side-effects. It was concluded that none of the drugs were suitable for mass chemotherapy. More new non-toxic schistosomicides are urgently needed and for their assessment, the setting-up of multicentre trials, following international agreement on technical methods, is suggested. PMID:5302298

  1. Medication Adherence in a Comparative Effectiveness Trial for Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sylvia, Louisa G.; Reilly-Harrington, Noreen A.; Leon, Andrew C.; Kansky, Christine I.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Bowden, Charles L.; Ketter, Terence A.; Friedman, Edward S.; Iosifescu, Dan V.; Thase, Michael E.; Ostacher, Michael J.; Keyes, Michelle; Rabideau, Dustin; Nierenberg, Andrew A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Psychopharmacology remains the foundation of treatment for bipolar disorder, but medication adherence in this population is low (Range = 20% to 64%). We examined medication adherence in a multi-site, comparative effectiveness study of lithium. Method The Lithium Moderate Dose Use Study (LiTMUS) was a six-month, six-site, randomized effectiveness trial of adjunctive moderate dose lithium therapy compared to optimized treatment in adult outpatients with bipolar I or II disorder (N=283). Medication adherence was measured at each study visit with the Tablet Routine Questionnaire. Results We found that 4.50% of participants reported missing at least 30% of their medications in the past week at baseline and non-adherence remained low throughout the trial (< 7%). Poor medication adherence was associated with more manic symptoms and side effects as well as lower lithium serum levels at mid- and post-treatment, but not with poor quality of life, overall severity of illness, or depressive symptoms. Conclusion Participants in LiTMUS were highly adherent with taking their medications. The lack of association with possible predictors of adherence, such as depression and quality of life, could be explained by the limited variance or other factors as well as by not using an objective measure of adherence. PMID:24117232

  2. Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial of a Web-Based Intervention to Promote Healthy Eating, Physical Activity and Meaningful Social Connections Compared with Usual Care Control in People of Retirement Age Recruited from Workplaces

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Jose; O’Brien, Nicola; Godfrey, Alan; Heaven, Ben; Evans, Elizabeth H.; Lloyd, Scott; Moffatt, Suzanne; Moynihan, Paula J.; Meyer, Thomas D.; Rochester, Lynn; Sniehotta, Falko F.; White, Martin; Mathers, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Lifestyle interventions delivered during the retirement transition might promote healthier ageing. We report a pilot randomised controlled trial (RCT) of a web-based platform (Living, Eating, Activity and Planning through retirement; LEAP) promoting healthy eating (based on a Mediterranean diet (MD)), physical activity (PA) and meaningful social roles. Methods A single blinded, two-arm RCT with individual allocation. Seventy-five adult regular internet users living in Northeast England, within two years of retirement, were recruited via employers and randomised in a 2:1 ratio to receive LEAP or a ‘usual care’ control. Intervention arm participants were provided with a pedometer to encourage self-monitoring of PA goals. Feasibility of the trial design and procedures was established by estimating recruitment and retention rates, and of LEAP from usage data. At baseline and 8-week follow-up, adherence to a MD derived from three 24-hour dietary recalls and seven-day PA by accelerometry were assessed. Healthy ageing outcomes (including measures of physiological function, physical capability, cognition, psychological and social wellbeing) were assessed and acceptability established by compliance with measurement protocols and completion rates. Thematically analysed, semi-structured, qualitative interviews assessed acceptability of the intervention, trial design, procedures and outcome measures. Results Seventy participants completed the trial; 48 (96%) participants in the intervention and 22 (88%) in the control arm. Participants had considerable scope for improvement in diet as assessed by MD score. LEAP was visited a median of 11 times (range 1–80) for a mean total time of 2.5 hours (range 5.5 min– 8.3 hours). ‘Moving more‘, ‘eating well’ and ‘being social’ were the most visited modules. At interview, participants reported that diet and PA modules were important and acceptable within the context of healthy ageing. Participants found both

  3. Private manufacturers' thresholds to invest in comparative effectiveness trials.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anirban; Meltzer, David

    2012-10-01

    The recent rush of enthusiasm for public investment in comparative effectiveness research (CER) in the US has focussed attention on these public investments. However, little attention has been given to how changing public investment in CER may affect private manufacturers' incentives for CER, which has long been a major source of CER. In this work, based on a simple revenue maximizing economic framework, we generate predictions on thresholds to invest in CER for a private manufacturer that compares its own product to a competitor's product in head-to-head trials. Our analysis shows that private incentives to invest in CER are determined by how the results of CER may affect the price and quantity of the product sold and the duration over which resulting changes in revenue would accrue, given the time required to complete CER and the time from the completion of CER to the time of patent expiration. We highlight the result that private incentives may often be less than public incentives to invest in CER and may even be negative if the likelihood of adverse findings is sufficient. We find that these incentives imply a number of predictions about patterns of CER and how they will be affected by changes in public financing of CER and CER methods. For example, these incentives imply that incumbent patent holders may be less likely to invest in CER than entrants and that public investments in CER may crowd out similar private investments. In contrast, newer designs and methods for CER, such as Bayesian adaptive trials, which can reduce ex post risk of unfavourable results and shorten the time for the production of CER, may increase the expected benefits of CER and may tend to increase private investment in CER as long as the costs of such innovative designs are not excessive. Bayesian approaches to design also naturally highlight the dynamic aspects of CER, allowing less expensive initial studies to guide decisions about future investments and thereby encouraging greater

  4. Comparing Effectiveness of Active and Passive Client Follow-Up Approaches in Sustaining the Continued Use of Long Acting Reversible Contraceptives (LARC) in Rural Punjab: A Multicentre, Non-Inferiority Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hameed, Waqas; Azmat, Syed Khurram; Ali, Moazzam; Ishaque, Muhammad; Abbas, Ghazunfer; Munroe, Erik; Harrison, Rebecca; Shamsi, Wajahat Hussain; Mustafa, Ghulam; Khan, Omar Farooq; Ali, Safdar; Ahmed, Aftab

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods is very low in Pakistan with high discontinuation rates mainly attributed to method-related side effects. Mixed evidence is available on the effectiveness of different client follow-up approaches used to ensure method continuation. We compared the effectiveness of active and passive follow-up approaches in sustaining the use of LARC—and within ‘active’ follow-up, we further compared a telephone versus home-based approach in rural Punjab, Pakistan. Methods This was a 12-month multicentre non-inferiority trial conducted in twenty-two (16 rural- and 6 urban-based) franchised reproductive healthcare facilities in district Chakwal of Punjab province, between November 2013 and December 2014. The study comprised of three groups of LARC clients: a) home-based follow-up, b) telephone-based follow-up, and c) passive or needs-based follow-up. Participants in the first two study groups received counselling on scheduled follow-up from the field workers at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 month post-insertion whereas participants in the third group were asked to contact the health facility if in need of medical assistance relating to LARC method use. Study participants were recruited with equal allocation to each study group, but participants were not randomized. The analyses are based on 1,246 LARC (intra-uterine contraceptive device and implant) users that completed approximately 12-months of follow-up. The non-inferiority margin was kept at five percentage points for the comparison of active and passive follow-up and six percentage points for telephone and home-based approach. The primary outcome was cumulative probability of method continuation at 12-month among LARC users. Results Women recruited in home-based, telephone-based, and passive groups were 400, 419 and 427, respectively. The cumulative probability of LARC continuation at 12 month was 87.6% (95% CI 83.8 to 90.6) among women who received home

  5. A Pooled Analysis Evaluating Renal Safety in Placebo- and Active Comparator-Controlled Phase III Trials of Multiple-Dose Injectable HPβCD-Diclofenac in Subjects with Acute Postoperative Pain.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Stephen E; Gan, Tong J Tj; Hamilton, Douglas A; Singla, Neil; Lacouture, Peter G; Johnson, Olufunmibi; Min, Lauren H; Reyes, Christian R D; Carr, Daniel B

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE : While injectable nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a key component of postoperative multimodal analgesia, renal safety concerns may limit use in some patients. This study examined the renal safety of injectable HPβCD-diclofenac when given for ≤ 5 days following orthopedic or abdominal/pelvic surgery. METHODS : Pooled analysis of data from two randomized, placebo- and active comparator-controlled phase III trials in 608 total patients was conducted. Renal safety was assessed by examining treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs) and postoperative blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine shifts. RESULTS : There were three renal AEs each in the HPβCD-diclofenac (n = 318 patients) and placebo (n = 148 patients) groups, and two renal AEs in the ketorolac group (n = 142 patients). No significant difference in renal AE risk was detected for patients receiving HPβCD-diclofenac (RR: 1.40 [0.15,13.3]; P = 0.75) or ketorolac (RR: 2.08 [0.19,22.7]; P = 0.56) versus placebo. All renal AEs were mild or moderate in severity, and a single renal AE (acute renal failure in a patient receiving HPβCD-diclofenac) was treatment-related. One incidence of postoperative shift to high (> upper limit of normal) serum creatinine occurred in the HPβCD-diclofenac group (n = 2 in the ketorolac group). Mean changes in serum creatinine or BUN did not differ significantly between patients receiving HPβCD-diclofenac and placebo. CONCLUSIONS : While this analysis examined relatively brief exposure typical for parenterally administered analgesics in the postoperative setting in patients with largely normal renal function, the results suggest that HPβCD-diclofenac use for acute postoperative pain may not be associated with added renal safety risks over placebo in this patient population.

  6. A Pooled Analysis Evaluating Renal Safety in Placebo- and Active Comparator-Controlled Phase III Trials of Multiple-Dose Injectable HPβCD-Diclofenac in Subjects with Acute Postoperative Pain.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Stephen E; Gan, Tong J Tj; Hamilton, Douglas A; Singla, Neil; Lacouture, Peter G; Johnson, Olufunmibi; Min, Lauren H; Reyes, Christian R D; Carr, Daniel B

    2016-07-17

    OBJECTIVE : While injectable nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a key component of postoperative multimodal analgesia, renal safety concerns may limit use in some patients. This study examined the renal safety of injectable HPβCD-diclofenac when given for ≤ 5 days following orthopedic or abdominal/pelvic surgery. METHODS : Pooled analysis of data from two randomized, placebo- and active comparator-controlled phase III trials in 608 total patients was conducted. Renal safety was assessed by examining treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs) and postoperative blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine shifts. RESULTS : There were three renal AEs each in the HPβCD-diclofenac (n = 318 patients) and placebo (n = 148 patients) groups, and two renal AEs in the ketorolac group (n = 142 patients). No significant difference in renal AE risk was detected for patients receiving HPβCD-diclofenac (RR: 1.40 [0.15,13.3]; P = 0.75) or ketorolac (RR: 2.08 [0.19,22.7]; P = 0.56) versus placebo. All renal AEs were mild or moderate in severity, and a single renal AE (acute renal failure in a patient receiving HPβCD-diclofenac) was treatment-related. One incidence of postoperative shift to high (> upper limit of normal) serum creatinine occurred in the HPβCD-diclofenac group (n = 2 in the ketorolac group). Mean changes in serum creatinine or BUN did not differ significantly between patients receiving HPβCD-diclofenac and placebo. CONCLUSIONS : While this analysis examined relatively brief exposure typical for parenterally administered analgesics in the postoperative setting in patients with largely normal renal function, the results suggest that HPβCD-diclofenac use for acute postoperative pain may not be associated with added renal safety risks over placebo in this patient population.

  7. Accelerometer Use in a Physical Activity Intervention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Borradaile, Kelley E.; Lewis, Beth A.; Whiteley, Jessica A.; Longval, Jaime L.; Parisi, Alfred F.; Albrecht, Anna E.; Sciamanna, Christopher N.; Jakicic, John M.; Papandonatos, George D.; Marcus, Bess H.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the application of best practice recommendations for using accelerometers in a physical activity (PA) intervention trial, and the concordance of different methods for measuring PA. A subsample (n=63; 26%) of the 239 healthy, sedentary adults participating in a PA trial (mean age=47.5; 82% women) wore the ActiGraph monitor at all 3 assessment time points. ActiGraph data were compared with self-report (i.e., PA weekly recall and monthly log) and fitness variables. Correlations between the PA recall and ActiGraph for moderate intensity activity ranged from 0.16–0.48 and from 0.28–0.42 for vigorous intensity activity. ActiGraph and fitness [estimated VO2(ml/kg/min)] had correlations of 0.15–0.45. The ActiGraph and weekly self-report were significantly correlated at all time points (correlations ranged from 0.23–0.44). In terms of detecting intervention effects, intervention groups recorded more minutes of at least moderate-intensity PA on the ActiGraph than the control group at 6 months (min=46.47, 95% CI=14.36–78.58), but not at 12 months. Limitations of the study include a small sample size and only 3 days of ActiGraph monitoring. To obtain optimal results with accelerometers in clinical trials, the authors recommend following best practice recommendations: detailed protocols for monitor use, calibration of monitors and validation of data quality, and use of validated equations for analysis. The ActiGraph has modest concordance with other assessment tools and is sensitive to change over time. However, until more information validating the use of accelerometry in clinical trials becomes available, properly administered self-report measures of PA should remain part of the assessment battery. PMID:20723619

  8. Accelerometer use in a physical activity intervention trial.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Melissa A; Borradaile, Kelley E; Lewis, Beth A; Whiteley, Jessica A; Longval, Jaime L; Parisi, Alfred F; Albrecht, Anna E; Sciamanna, Christopher N; Jakicic, John M; Papandonatos, George D; Marcus, Bess H

    2010-11-01

    This paper describes the application of best practice recommendations for using accelerometers in a physical activity (PA) intervention trial, and the concordance of different methods for measuring PA. A subsample (n = 63; 26%) of the 239 healthy, sedentary adults participating in a PA trial (mean age = 47.5; 82% women) wore the ActiGraph monitor at all 3 assessment time points. ActiGraph data were compared with self-report (i.e., PA weekly recall and monthly log) and fitness variables. Correlations between the PA recall and ActiGraph for moderate intensity activity ranged from 0.16-0.48 and from 0.28-0.42 for vigorous intensity activity. ActiGraph and fitness [estimated VO(2)(ml/kg/min)] had correlations of 0.15-0.45. The ActiGraph and weekly self-report were significantly correlated at all time points (correlations ranged from 0.23 to 0.44). In terms of detecting intervention effects, intervention groups recorded more minutes of at least moderate-intensity PA on the ActiGraph than the control group at 6 months (min = 46.47, 95% CI = 14.36-78.58), but not at 12 months. Limitations of the study include a small sample size and only 3 days of ActiGraph monitoring. To obtain optimal results with accelerometers in clinical trials, the authors recommend following best practice recommendations: detailed protocols for monitor use, calibration of monitors and validation of data quality, and use of validated equations for analysis. The ActiGraph has modest concordance with other assessment tools and is sensitive to change over time. However, until more information validating the use of accelerometry in clinical trials becomes available, properly administered self-report measures of PA should remain part of the assessment battery.

  9. Population activity changes during a trial-to-trial adaptation of bullfrog retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wei; Xiao, Lei; Jing, Wei; Zhang, Pu-Ming; Liang, Pei-Ji

    2014-07-09

    A 'trial-to-trial adaptation' of bullfrog retinal ganglion cells in response to a repetitive light stimulus was investigated in the present study. Using the multielectrode recording technique, we studied the trial-to-trial adaptive properties of ganglion cells and explored the activity of population neurons during this adaptation process. It was found that the ganglion cells adapted with different degrees: their firing rates were decreased in different extents from early-adaptation to late-adaptation stage, and this was accompanied by a decrease in cross-correlation strength. In addition, adaptation behavior was different for ON-response and OFF-response, which implied that the mechanism of the trial-to-trial adaptation might involve bipolar cells and/or their synapses with other neurons and the stronger adaptation in the ganglion cells' OFF-responses might reflect the requirement to avoid possible saturation in the OFF circuit.

  10. Optimizing Educational Video through Comparative Trials in Clinical Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Ian David; Plass, Jan L.; Bania, Theodore C.

    2012-01-01

    Although video is increasingly used in public health education, studies generally do not implement randomized trials of multiple video segments in clinical environments. Therefore, the specific configurations of educational videos that will have the greatest impact on outcome measures ranging from increased knowledge of important public health…

  11. Metrics Survey of Industry-Sponsored Clinical Trials in Canada and Comparator Jurisdictions between 2005 and 2010

    PubMed Central

    Leclerc, Jean-Marie; Laberge, Normand; Marion, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Industry-sponsored clinical trials play a key role in the development of therapies. This survey suggests that between 2005 and 2010, research-based pharmaceutical firms worldwide initiated fewer trials and recruited fewer subjects annually. In contrast, at the country level, the clinical trial activity of such firms increased in emerging countries and in Japan. Canada's trend in the number of new trials followed that of the global industry, but the trend in new sites and newly recruited subjects fell below the global rate. Informal comparisons point to potential issues for Canada in such areas as site capacity, cost per subject and time to first subject-in. When compared to certain Western European countries and the United States, Canada remained well positioned on a number of metrics. Nonetheless, Canada faces mounting challenges from both traditional locations and emerging countries and may require coordinated efforts to remain a place of choice to conduct trials. PMID:23968618

  12. Metrics survey of industry-sponsored clinical trials in Canada and comparator jurisdictions between 2005 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Jean-Marie; Laberge, Normand; Marion, Jean

    2012-11-01

    Industry-sponsored clinical trials play a key role in the development of therapies. This survey suggests that between 2005 and 2010, research-based pharmaceutical firms worldwide initiated fewer trials and recruited fewer subjects annually. In contrast, at the country level, the clinical trial activity of such firms increased in emerging countries and in Japan. Canada's trend in the number of new trials followed that of the global industry, but the trend in new sites and newly recruited subjects fell below the global rate. Informal comparisons point to potential issues for Canada in such areas as site capacity, cost per subject and time to first subject-in. When compared to certain Western European countries and the United States, Canada remained well positioned on a number of metrics. Nonetheless, Canada faces mounting challenges from both traditional locations and emerging countries and may require coordinated efforts to remain a place of choice to conduct trials.

  13. The creation of the Comparative Oncology Trials Consortium Pharmacodynamic Core: Infrastructure for a virtual laboratory.

    PubMed

    Paoloni, Melissa; Lana, Susan; Thamm, Douglas; Mazcko, Christina; Withrow, Stephen

    2010-07-01

    The National Cancer Institute-Comparative Oncology Trials Consortium (NCI-COTC) aims to inform the development path of novel drugs and biologicals for human cancer patients through their evaluation in dogs with neoplasia. The advent of sophisticated clinical trials in veterinary medicine requires additional infrastructure to evaluate tissue and fluid end-points vital to questions relating to drug activity, targeting and toxicity. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic end-points necessitate a centralized laboratory for quality controlled assay development and execution. Establishing the COTC Pharmacodynamic Core (PD Core) has addressed the need for uniform end-point analysis by serving as a virtual laboratory that capitalizes on the expertise of the COTC community of investigators. Veterinary biomarker validation is a secondary benefit of these efforts. The PD Core exemplifies the construction of a successful infrastructure within the veterinary research community in line with advances in technology and focused on improving the health and quality of life of both human and animal cancer patients.

  14. A prospective randomized trial comparing open versus laparoscopic appendectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Frazee, R C; Roberts, J W; Symmonds, R E; Snyder, S K; Hendricks, J C; Smith, R W; Custer, M D; Harrison, J B

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors determined whether there was an advantage to laparoscopic appendectomy when compared with open appendectomy. SUMMARY/BACKGROUND DATA: The advantages of laparoscopic appendectomy versus open appendectomy were questioned because the recovery from open appendectomy is brief. METHODS: From January 15, 1992 through January 15, 1993, 75 patients older than 9 years were entered into a study randomizing the choice of operation to either the open or the laparoscopic technique. Statistical comparisons were performed using the Wilcoxon test. RESULTS: Thirty-seven patients were assigned to the open appendectomy group and 38 patients were assigned to the laparoscopic appendectomy group. Two patients were converted intraoperatively from laparoscopic appendectomies to open procedures. Thirty-one patients (81%) in the open group had acute appendicitis, as did 32 patients (84%) in the laparoscopic group. Mean duration of surgery was 65 minutes for open appendectomy and 87 minutes for laparoscopic appendectomy (p < 0.001). There were no statistically significant differences in length of hospitalization, interval until resumption of a regular diet, or morbidity. Duration of both parenteral and oral analgesic use favored laparoscopic appendectomy (2.0 days versus 1.2 days, and 8.0 days versus 5.4 days, p < 0.05). All patients were instructed to return to full activities by 2 weeks postoperatively. This occurred at an average of 25 days for the open appendectomy group versus 14 days for the laparoscopic appendectomy group (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Patients who underwent laparoscopic appendectomies have a shorter duration of analgesic use and return to full activities sooner postoperatively when compared with patients who underwent open appendectomies. The authors consider laparoscopic appendectomy to be the procedure of choice in patients with acute appendicitis. PMID:8203983

  15. Rosemary oil vs minoxidil 2% for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia: a randomized comparative trial.

    PubMed

    Panahi, Yunes; Taghizadeh, Mohsen; Marzony, Eisa Tahmasbpour; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2015-01-01

    Rosmarinus officinalis L. is a medicinal plant with diverse activities including enhancement microcapillary perfusion. The present study aimed to investigate the clinical efficacy of rosemary oil in the treatment of androgenetic alopecia (AGA) and compare its effects with minoxidil 2%. Patients with AGA were randomly assigned to rosemary oil (n = 50) or minoxidil 2% (n = 50) for a period of 6 months. After a baseline visit, patients returned to the clinic for efficacy and safety evaluations every 3 months. A standardized professional microphotographic assessment of each volunteer was taken at the initial interview and after 3 and 6 months of the trial. No significant change was observed in the mean hair count at the 3-month endpoint, neither in the rosemary nor in the minoxidil group (P > .05). In contrast, both groups experienced a significant increase in hair count at the 6-month endpoint compared with the baseline and 3-month endpoint (P < .05). No significant difference was found between the study groups regarding hair count either at month 3 or month 6 (> .05). The frequencies of dry hair, greasy hair, and dandruff were not found to be significantly different from baseline at either month 3 or month 6 trial in the groups (P > .05). The frequency of scalp itching at the 3- and 6-month trial points was significantly higher compared with baseline in both groups (P < .05). Scalp itching, however, was more frequent in the minoxidil group at both assessed endpoints (P < .05). The findings of the present trial provided evidence with respect to the efficacy of rosemary oil in the treatment of AGA.

  16. An ex vivo, assessor blind, randomised, parallel group, comparative efficacy trial of the ovicidal activity of three pediculicides after a single application - melaleuca oil and lavender oil, eucalyptus oil and lemon tea tree oil, and a "suffocation" pediculicide

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There are two components to the clinical efficacy of pediculicides: (i) efficacy against the crawling-stages (lousicidal efficacy); and (ii) efficacy against the eggs (ovicidal efficacy). Lousicidal efficacy and ovicidal efficacy are confounded in clinical trials. Here we report on a trial that was specially designed to rank the clinical ovicidal efficacy of pediculicides. Eggs were collected, pre-treatment and post-treatment, from subjects with different types of hair, different coloured hair and hair of different length. Method Subjects with at least 20 live eggs of Pediculus capitis (head lice) were randomised to one of three treatment-groups: a melaleuca oil (commonly called tea tree oil) and lavender oil pediculicide (TTO/LO); a eucalyptus oil and lemon tea tree oil pediculicide (EO/LTTO); or a "suffocation" pediculicide. Pre-treatment: 10 to 22 live eggs were taken from the head by cutting the single hair with the live egg attached, before the treatment (total of 1,062 eggs). Treatment: The subjects then received a single treatment of one of the three pediculicides, according to the manufacturers' instructions. Post-treatment: 10 to 41 treated live eggs were taken from the head by cutting the single hair with the egg attached (total of 1,183 eggs). Eggs were incubated for 14 days. The proportion of eggs that had hatched after 14 days in the pre-treatment group was compared with the proportion of eggs that hatched in the post-treatment group. The primary outcome measure was % ovicidal efficacy for each of the three pediculicides. Results 722 subjects were examined for the presence of eggs of head lice. 92 of these subjects were recruited and randomly assigned to: the "suffocation" pediculicide (n = 31); the melaleuca oil and lavender oil pediculicide (n = 31); and the eucalyptus oil and lemon tea tree oil pediculicide (n = 30 subjects). The group treated with eucalyptus oil and lemon tea tree oil had an ovicidal efficacy of 3.3% (SD 16%) whereas the

  17. Randomized cluster crossover trials for reliable, efficient, comparative effectiveness testing: design of the Prevention of Arrhythmia Device Infection Trial (PADIT).

    PubMed

    Connolly, Stuart J; Philippon, Francois; Longtin, Yves; Casanova, Amparo; Birnie, David H; Exner, Derek V; Dorian, Paul; Prakash, Ratika; Alings, Marco; Krahn, Andrew D

    2013-06-01

    Randomized clinical trials are a major advance in clinical research methodology. However, there are myriad important questions about the effectiveness of treatments used in daily practice that are not informed by the results of randomized trials. This is in part because of important limitations inherent in the methodology of randomized efficacy trials which are performed with tight control of inclusion, exclusion, treatment, and follow-up. This approach enhances evaluation of clinical efficacy (performance in controlled situations) but increases complexity and is not well suited to test clinical effectiveness (performance under conditions of actual use). The cluster crossover trial is a new concept for efficient comparative effectiveness testing. Deep tissue infection occurs in 2% of patients after arrhythmia device implantation, usually requires system extraction, and increases mortality. There is variation in antibiotic prophylaxis used to reduce implanted device infections. To efficiently evaluate the comparative effectiveness of antibiotic strategies now in use, we designed a cluster crossover clinical trial, which randomized implanting centres to 1 of 2 prophylactic antibiotic strategies, which became the standard care at the centre for 6 months, followed by crossover to the other strategy, rerandomization, and second crossover. This method greatly reduces trial complexity because it aligns study procedures with usual clinical care and increases generalizability. Pilot studies have tested the feasibility and an 10,800-patient trial, funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, is now under way. The cluster crossover randomized trial design is well suited to efficiently test comparative effectiveness of existing treatments where there is variability of practice, clinical equipoise, and minimal risk.

  18. Invasion of the Zebra Mussels: A Mock Trial Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Judy A.; Czerniak, Charlene M.

    2005-01-01

    In this activity, students learn about the important topic of invasive species, specifically Zebra Mussels. Students role-play different characters in a real-life situation: the trial of the Zebra Mussel for unlawful disruption of the Great Lakes ecosystem. Students will also learn about jurisprudential inquiry by examining the trial process. This…

  19. [Comparative clinical trial of vaccines against avian influenza].

    PubMed

    Zverev, V V; Katlinskiĭ, A V; Kostinov, M P; Zhirova, S N; Erofeeva, M K; Stukova, M A; Korovkin, S A; Mel'nikov, S Ia; Semchenko, A V; Mironov, A N

    2007-01-01

    Scientic-production association "Microgen" has finished 1st phase of clinical trials of candidate vaccines against avian influenza in order to assess their reactogenicity, safety, and immunogenicity. Two vaccines constructed from NIBRG-14 vaccine strain [A/Vietnam/1 194/2004 (H5N1)], obtained from World Health Organization, were studied: "OrniFlu" (inactivated subunit influenza vaccine adsorbed on aluminium hydroxide) and inactivated polymer-subunit influenza vaccine with polyoxydonium (IPSIV). Clinical trial of the vaccines with different quantity of antigen (15, 30, and 45 mcg of H5N1 virus hemagglutinin) was carried out in Influenza Research Institute (St. Petersburg) and in Mechnikov Research Institute of Vaccines and Sera (Moscow). Analysis of results allowed to conclude that both vaccines were safe, well tolerated and characterized by low reactogenicity. Two-doses vaccination schedule was needed to meet required seroconversion and seroprotection rates (> or =1:40 in > or =70% of vaccinated volunteers). "Orni-Flu" vaccine containing 15 mcg of hemagglutinin and optimal quantity of aluminium hydroxide (0.5 mg) in one dose as well as IPSIV containing 45 mcg of hemagglutinin and 0.75 mg of polyoxydonium in one dose were most immunogenic after 2 doses - seroprotection rates in microneutralization assay were 72.2% and 77.0% respectively. Marked influence of aluminium hydroxide content on immunogenicity of the "OrniFlu" vaccine was confirmed in the study. Optimal quantity of adjuvant was 0.5 mg per dose. According to basic concept of vaccine development, preference is given to vaccine that under minimal quantity of antigen induces sufficient specific immune response and is safe in volunteers. "OrniFlu" vaccine containing 15 mcg of H5N1 virus hemagglutinin and optimal quantity of aluminium hydroxide (0.5 mg) corresponded to these requirements that allowed researchers to recommend it for clinical trials of 2nd phase.

  20. Challenges in the Design and Implementation of The Multicenter Uveitis Steroid Treatment (MUST) Trial – Lessons for Comparative Effectiveness Trials

    PubMed Central

    Holbrook, Janet T.; Kempen, John H.; Prusakowski, Nancy A.; Altaweel, Michael M.; Jabs, Douglas A

    2013-01-01

    Background Randomized clinical trials are an important component of comparative effectiveness (CE) research because they are the optimal design for head-to-head comparisons of different treatment options. Purpose To describe decisions made in the design of the Multicenter Uveitis Steroid Treatment (MUST) Trial to ensure that the results would be widely generalizable. Methods Review of design and implementation decisions and their rationale for the trial. Results The MUST Trial is a multicenter randomized controlled comparative effectiveness trial evaluating a novel local therapy (intraocular fluocinolone acetonide implant) versus the systemic therapy standard of care for noninfectious uveitis. Decisions made in protocol design in order to broaden enrollment included allowing patients with very poor vision and media opacity to enroll and including clinical sites outside the US. The treatment protocol was designed to follow standard care. The primary outcome, visual acuity, is important to patients and can be evaluated in all eyes with uveitis. Other outcomes include patient-reported visual function, quality of life, and disease and treatment related complications. Limitations The trial population is too small for subgroup analyses that are of interest and the trial is being conducted at tertiary medical centers. Conclusion CE trials require greater emphasis on generalizability than many RCTs but otherwise face similar challenges for design choices as any RCT. The increase in heterogeneity in patients and treatment required to ensure generalizability can be balanced with a rigorous approach to implementation, outcome assessment and statistical design. This approach requires significant resources that may limit implementation in many RCTs, especially in clinical practice settings. PMID:21994128

  1. Gestational Weight Gain: Results from the Delta Healthy Sprouts Comparative Impact Trial

    PubMed Central

    Olender, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Delta Healthy Sprouts trial was designed to test the comparative impact of two home visiting programs on weight status, dietary intake, and health behaviors of Southern African American women and their infants. Results pertaining to the primary outcome, gestational weight gain, are reported. Methods. Participants (n = 82), enrolled early in their second trimester of pregnancy, were randomly assigned to one of two treatment arms. Gestational weight gain, measured at six monthly home visits, was calculated by subtracting measured weight at each visit from self-reported prepregnancy weight. Weight gain was classified as under, within, or exceeding the Institute of Medicine recommendations based on prepregnancy body mass index. Chi-square tests and generalized linear mixed models were used to test for significant differences in percentages of participants within recommended weight gain ranges. Results. Differences in percentages of participants within the gestational weight gain guidelines were not significant between treatment arms across all visits. Conclusions. Enhancing the gestational nutrition and physical activity components of an existing home visiting program is feasible in a high risk population of primarily low income African American women. The impact of these enhancements on appropriate gestational weight gain is questionable given the more basic living needs of such women. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01746394, registered 4 December 2012. PMID:27595023

  2. EEG activity represents the correctness of perceptual decisions trial-by-trial

    PubMed Central

    Pardo-Vazquez, Jose L.; Padrón, Isabel; Fernández-Rey, José; Acuña, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Performance monitoring is an executive function, which we depend on for detecting and evaluating the consequences of our behavior. Although event related potentials (ERPs) have revealed the existence of differences after correct and incorrect decisions, it is not known whether there is a trial-by-trial representation of the accuracy of the decision. We recorded the electroencephalographic activity (EEG) while participants performed a perceptual discrimination task, with two levels of difficulty, in which they received immediate feedback. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analyses were used to reveal two components that convey trial-by-trial representations of the correctness of the decisions. Firstly, the performance monitoring-related negativity (PM-N), a negative deflection whose amplitude is higher (more negative) after incorrect trials. Secondly, the performance monitoring-related positivity (PM-P), a positive deflection whose amplitude is higher after incorrect trials. During the time periods corresponding to these components, trials can be accurately categorized as correct or incorrect by looking at the EEG activity; this categorization is more accurate when based on the PM-P. We further show that the difficulty of the discrimination task has a different effect on each component: after easy trials the latency of the PM-N is shorter and the amplitude of the PM-P is higher than after difficult trials. Consistent with previous interpretations of performance-related ERPs, these results suggest a functional differentiation between these components. The PM-N could be related to an automatic error detection system, responsible for fast behavioral corrections of ongoing actions, while the PM-P could reflect the difference between expected and actual outcomes and be related to long-term changes in the decision process. PMID:24734012

  3. A Randomized Trial Comparing Skin Antiseptic Agents at Cesarean Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Tuuli, Methodius G.; Liu, Jingxia; Stout, Molly J.; Martin, Shannon; Cahill, Alison G.; Odibo, Anthony O.; Colditz, Graham A.; Macones, George A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Preoperative skin antisepsis has the potential to decrease the risk of surgical-site infection. However, evidence is limited to guide the choice of antiseptic agent at cesarean delivery, which is the most common major surgical procedure among women in the United States. METHODS In this single-center, randomized, controlled trial, we evaluated whether the use of chlorhexidine–alcohol for preoperative skin antisepsis was superior to the use of iodine–alcohol for the prevention of surgical-site infection after cesarean delivery. We randomly assigned patients undergoing cesarean delivery to skin preparation with either chlorhexidine–alcohol or iodine–alcohol. The primary outcome was superficial or deep surgical-site infection within 30 days after cesarean delivery, on the basis of definitions from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. RESULTS From September 2011 through June 2015, a total of 1147 patients were enrolled; 572 patients were assigned to chlorhexidine–alcohol and 575 to iodine–alcohol. In an intention-to-treat analysis, surgical-site infection was diagnosed in 23 patients (4.0%) in the chlorhexidine–alcohol group and in 42 (7.3%) in the iodine–alcohol group (relative risk, 0.55; 95% confidence interval, 0.34 to 0.90; P = 0.02). The rate of superficial surgical-site infection was 3.0% in the chlorhexidine–alcohol group and 4.9% in the iodine–alcohol group (P = 0.10); the rate of deep infection was 1.0% and 2.4%, respectively (P = 0.07). The frequency of adverse skin reactions was similar in the two groups. CONCLUSIONS The use of chlorhexidine–alcohol for preoperative skin antisepsis resulted in a significantly lower risk of surgical-site infection after cesarean delivery than did the use of iodine–alcohol. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01472549.) PMID:26844840

  4. A written self-help intervention for depressed adults comparing behavioural activation combined with physical activity promotion with a self-help intervention based upon behavioural activation alone: study protocol for a parallel group pilot randomised controlled trial (BAcPAc)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Challenges remain to find ways to support patients with depression who have low levels of physical activity (PA) to overcome perceived barriers and enhance the perceived value of PA for preventing future relapse. There is an evidence-base for behavioural activation (BA) for depression, which focuses on supporting patients to restore activities that have been avoided, but practitioners have no specific training in promoting PA. We aimed to design and evaluate an integrated BA and PA (BAcPAc) practitioner-led, written, self-help intervention to enhance both physical and mental health. Methods/design This study is informed by the Medical Research Council Complex Intervention Framework and describes a protocol for a pilot phase II randomised controlled trial (RCT) to test the feasibility and acceptability of the trial methods to inform a definitive phase III RCT. Following development of the augmented written self-help intervention (BAcPAc) incorporating behavioural activation with physical activity promotion, depressed adults are randomised to receive up to 12 sessions over a maximum of 4 months of either BAcPAc or behavioural activation alone within a written self-help format, which represents treatment as usual. The study is located within two ‘Improving Access to Psychological Therapies’ services in South West England, with both written self-help interventions supported by mental health paraprofessionals. Measures assessed at 4, 9, and 12 month follow-up include the following: CIS-R, PHQ-9, accelerometer recorded (4 months only) and self-reported PA, body mass index, blood pressure, Insomnia Severity Index, quality of life, and health and social care service use. Process evaluation will include analysis of recorded support sessions and patient and practitioner interviews. At the time of writing the study has recruited 60 patients. Discussion The feasibility outcomes will inform a definitive RCT to assess the clinical and cost-effectiveness of the

  5. Designing Comparative Effectiveness Trials of Surgical Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation: Experience of the Cardiothoracic Surgical Trials Network

    PubMed Central

    Gillinov, A. Marc; Argenziano, Michael; Blackstone, Eugene H.; Iribarne, Alexander; DeRose, Joseph J.; Ailawadi, Gorav; Russo, Mark J.; Ascheim, Deborah D.; Parides, Michael K.; Rodriguez, Evelio; Bouchard, Denis; Taddei-Peters, Wendy C.; Geller, Nancy L.; Acker, Michael A.; Gelijns, Annetine C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Since the introduction of the cut-and-sew Cox-Maze procedure for atrial fibrillation (AF) there has been substantial innovation in techniques for ablation. Use of alternate energy sources for ablation simplified the procedure and has resulted in dramatic increase in the number of AF patients treated by surgical ablation. Despite its increasingly widespread adoption, there is lack of rigorous clinical evidence to establish this as an effective clinical therapy. Methods and Results This paper describes a comparative effectiveness randomized trial, supported by the Cardiothoracic Surgical Trials Network, of surgical ablation with left atrial appendage (LAA) closure versus LAA closure alone in patients with persistent and longstanding persistent AF undergoing mitral valve surgery. Nested within this trial, is a further randomized comparison of 2 different lesions sets: pulmonary vein isolation and full Maze lesion set. This paper addresses trial design challenges, including how to best characterize the target population, operationalize freedom from AF as a primary endpoint, account for the impact of anti-arrhythmic drugs, and measure and analyze secondary endpoints, such as post-operative AF load. Conclusions This paper concludes by discussing how insights that emerge from this trial may affect surgical practice and guide future research in this area. PMID:21616507

  6. Prioritizing comparative effectiveness research: are drug and implementation trials equally worth funding?

    PubMed

    Gandjour, Afschin

    2011-07-01

    Comparative effectiveness research (CER) is the generation and synthesis of evidence that compares the benefits and harms of alternative methods to prevent, diagnose, treat and monitor a clinical condition, or to improve the delivery of care. The purpose of this article is to compare--within the scope of CER--the value of implementation and drug trials. Implementation trials have limitations similar to drug trials in terms of generalizability of results outside the trial setting and ability to identify best practice. However, in contrast to drug trials, implementation trials do not provide value in terms of ruling out harm, as implementation strategies are unlikely to cause harm in the first place. Still, implementation trials may provide good value when there is a high error probability in deciding whether implementation will be cost effective or if costs associated with making an erroneous decision are high. Yet the low risk of implementation programmes to cause harm may also allow for alternative approaches to identify best implementation practice, perhaps outside the scope of rigorous trials and testing. One such approach that requires further investigation is a competitive market for quality of care, where implementation programmes may be introduced without prior evaluation.

  7. Robotic Compared With Laparoscopic Sacrocolpopexy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Anger, Jennifer T.; Mueller, Elizabeth R.; Tarnay, Christopher; Smith, Bridget; Stroupe, Kevin; Rosenman, Amy; Brubaker, Linda; Bresee, Catherine; Kenton, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Laparoscopic and robotic sacrocolpopexy are widely used for pelvic organ prolapse (POP) treatment. Evidence comparing outcomes and costs is lacking. We compared costs and clinically relevant outcomes in women randomized to laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy compared with robotic sacrocolpopexy. Methods: Participants with symptomatic stage POP II or greater, including significant apical support loss, were randomized to either laparoscopic or robotic sacrocolpopexy. We compared surgical costs (including costs for robot, initial hospitalization) and re-hospitalization within 6 weeks. Secondary outcomes included postoperative pain, POP quantification, symptom severity and quality of life, and adverse events. Results: We randomized 78 women [mean age 59 years]: laparoscopic (n=38), robotic (n=40). The robotic sacrocolpopexy group had higher initial hospital costs ($19,616 vs. $11,573, p < 0.001) and over 6 weeks, hospital costs remained higher for robotic sacrocolpopexy ($20,898 vs. $12,170, p < 0.001). When we excluded costs of robot purchase and maintenance, we did not detect a statistical difference in initial day of surgery costs of robotic vs. laparoscopic ($12,586 vs. $11,573; p = 0.160) or hospital costs over 6 weeks ($13,867 vs. $12,170; p = 0.060). The robotic group had longer operating room times (202.8 min vs. 178.4 min, p = 0.030) and higher pain scores 1-week after surgery (3.5 ± 2.1 vs. 2.6 ± 2.2; p = 0.044). There were no group differences in symptom bother by Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory, POP stage, or rate of adverse events. Conclusion: Costs of robotic sacrocolpopexy are higher than laparoscopic, while short-term outcomes and complications are similar. Primary cost differences resulted from robot maintenance and purchase costs. PMID:24463657

  8. The Nordic Aortic Valve Intervention (NOTION) trial comparing transcatheter versus surgical valve implantation: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Degenerative aortic valve (AV) stenosis is the most prevalent heart valve disease in the western world. Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) has until recently been the standard of treatment for patients with severe AV stenosis. Whether transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) can be offered with improved safety and similar effectiveness in a population including low-risk patients has yet to be examined in a randomised setting. Methods/Design This randomised clinical trial will evaluate the benefits and risks of TAVI using the transarterial CoreValve System (Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA) (intervention group) compared with SAVR (control group) in patients with severe degenerative AV stenosis. Randomisation ratio is 1:1, enrolling a total of 280 patients aged 70 years or older without significant coronary artery disease and with a low, moderate, or high surgical risk profile. Trial outcomes include a primary composite outcome of myocardial infarction, stroke, or all-cause mortality within the first year after intervention (expected rates 5% for TAVI, 15% for SAVR). Exploratory safety outcomes include procedure complications, valve re-intervention, and cardiovascular death, as well as cardiac, cerebral, pulmonary, renal, and vascular complications. Exploratory efficacy outcomes include New York Heart Association functional status, quality of life, and valve prosthesis and cardiac performance. Enrolment began in December 2009, and 269 patients have been enrolled up to December 2012. Discussion The trial is designed to evaluate the performance of TAVI in comparison with SAVR. The trial results may influence the choice of treatment modality for patients with severe degenerative AV stenosis. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01057173 PMID:23302232

  9. Inferences drawn from a risk assessment compared directly with a randomized trial of a home drinking water intervention.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Joseph N S; Hubbard, Alan; Wade, Timothy J; Sylvester, Matthew D; LeChevallier, Mark W; Levy, Deborah A; Colford, John M

    2006-08-01

    Risk assessments and intervention trials have been used by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to estimate drinking water health risks. Seldom are both methods used concurrently. Between 2001 and 2003, illness data from a trial were collected simultaneously with exposure data, providing a unique opportunity to compare direct risk estimates of waterborne disease from the intervention trial with indirect estimates from a risk assessment. Comparing the group with water treatment (active) with that without water treatment (sham), the estimated annual attributable disease rate (cases per 10,000 persons per year) from the trial provided no evidence of a significantly elevated drinking water risk [attributable risk=-365 cases/year, sham minus active; 95% confidence interval (CI) , -2,555 to 1,825]. The predicted mean rate of disease per 10,000 persons per person-year from the risk assessment was 13.9 (2.5, 97.5 percentiles: 1.6, 37.7) assuming 4 log removal due to viral disinfection and 5.5 (2.5, 97.5 percentiles: 1.4, 19.2) assuming 6 log removal. Risk assessments are important under conditions of low risk when estimates are difficult to attain from trials. In particular, this assessment pointed toward the importance of attaining site-specific treatment data and the clear need for a better understanding of viral removal by disinfection. Trials provide direct risk estimates, and the upper confidence limit estimates, even if not statistically significant, are informative about possible upper estimates of likely risk. These differences suggest that conclusions about waterborne disease risk may be strengthened by the joint use of these two approaches. Key words: drinking water, gastrointestinal, intervention trial, microbial risk assessment, waterborne pathogens.

  10. Rationale and design of the randomised clinical trial comparing early medication change (EMC) strategy with treatment as usual (TAU) in patients with Major Depressive Disorder - the EMC trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), the traditional belief of a delayed onset of antidepressants' effects has lead to the concept of current guidelines that treatment durations should be between 3-8 weeks before medication change in case of insufficient outcome. Post hoc analyses of clinical trials, however, have shown that improvement usually occurs within the first 10-14 days of treatment and that such early improvement (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale [HAMD] decrease ≥20%) has a substantial predictive value for final treatment outcome. Even more important, non-improvement (HAMD decrease <20%) after 14 days of treatment was found to be highly predictive for a poor final treatment outcome. Methods/Design The EMC trial is a phase IV, multi-centre, multi-step, randomized, observer-blinded, actively controlled parallel-group clinical trial to investigate for the first time prospectively, whether non-improvers after 14 days of antidepressant treatment with an early medication change (EMC) are more likely to attain remission (HAMD-17 ≤7) on treatment day 56 compared to patients treated according to current guideline recommendation (treatment as usual; TAU). In level 1 of the EMC trial, non-improvers after 14 days of antidepressant treatment will be randomised to an EMC strategy or TAU. The EMC strategy for this study schedules a first medication change on day 15; in case of non-improvement between days 15-28, a second medication change will be performed. TAU schedules the first medication change after 28 days in case of non-response (HAMD-17 decrease <50%). Both interventions will last 42 days. In levels 2 and 3, EMC strategies will be compared with TAU strategies in improvers on day 14, who experience a stagnation of improvement during the course of treatment. The trial is supported by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and will be conducted in cooperation with the BMBF funded Interdisciplinary Centre Clinical Trials (IZKS) at

  11. Comparing the Effectiveness of Error-Correction Strategies in Discrete Trial Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turan, Michelle K.; Moroz, Lianne; Croteau, Natalie Paquet

    2012-01-01

    Error-correction strategies are essential considerations for behavior analysts implementing discrete trial training with children with autism. The research literature, however, is still lacking in the number of studies that compare and evaluate error-correction procedures. The purpose of this study was to compare two error-correction strategies:…

  12. Interruption pf physcial activity due to illness in the Lifestyle Interventions and Indepencence for Elders Pilot (LIFE-P) trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders Pilot (LIFE-P) was a trial to examine the effects of physical activity (PA) compared to a health education control on measures of disability in sedentary older adults. Medical suspensions were examined for the first 12 months of the trial in th...

  13. High and dry? Comparing active dry EEG electrodes to active and passive wet electrodes.

    PubMed

    Mathewson, Kyle E; Harrison, Tyler J L; Kizuk, Sayeed A D

    2017-01-01

    Dry electrodes are becoming popular for both lab-based and consumer-level electrophysiological-recording technologies because they better afford the ability to move traditional lab-based research into the real world. It is unclear, however, how dry electrodes compare in data quality to traditional electrodes. The current study compared three EEG electrode types: (a) passive-wet electrodes with no onboard amplification, (b) actively amplified, wet electrodes with moderate impedance levels, and low impedance levels, and (c) active-dry electrodes with very high impedance. Participants completed a classic P3 auditory oddball task to elicit characteristic EEG signatures and event-related potentials (ERPs). Across the three electrode types, we compared single-trial noise, average ERPs, scalp topographies, ERP noise, and ERP statistical power as a function of number of trials. We extended past work showing active electrodes' insensitivity to moderate levels of interelectrode impedance when compared to passive electrodes in the same amplifier. Importantly, the new dry electrode system could reliably measure EEG spectra and ERP components comparable to traditional electrode types. As expected, however, dry active electrodes with very high interelectrode impedance exhibited marked increases in single-trial and average noise levels, which decreased statistical power, requiring more trials to detect significant effects. This power decrease must be considered as a trade-off with the ease of application and long-term use. The current results help set constraints on experimental design with novel dry electrodes, and provide important evidence needed to measure brain activity in novel settings and situations.

  14. Flexible designs for phase II comparative clinical trials involving two response variables.

    PubMed

    Bersimis, S; Sachlas, A; Papaioannou, T

    2015-01-30

    The aim of phase II clinical trials is to determine whether an experimental treatment is sufficiently promising and safe to justify further testing. The need for reduced sample size arises naturally in phase II clinical trials owing to both technical and ethical reasons, motivating a significant part of research in the field during recent years, while another significant part of the research effort is aimed at more complex therapeutic schemes that demand the consideration of multiple endpoints to make decisions. In this paper, our attention is restricted to phase II clinical trials in which two treatments are compared with respect to two dependent dichotomous responses proposing some flexible designs. These designs permit the researcher to terminate the clinical trial when high rates of favorable or unfavorable outcomes are observed early enough requiring in this way a small number of patients. From the mathematical point of view, the proposed designs are defined on bivariate sequences of multi-state trials, and the corresponding stopping rules are based on various distributions related to the waiting time until a certain number of events appear in these sequences. The exact distributions of interest, under a unified framework, are studied using the Markov chain embedding technique, which appears to be very useful in clinical trials for the sample size determination. Tables of expected sample size and power are presented. The numerical illustration showed a very good performance for these new designs.

  15. Comparative Effectiveness of Goal Setting in Diabetes Mellitus Group Clinics:Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Aanand D.; Palmer, Nynikka; Petersen, Nancy J.; Street, Richard L.; Rao, Radha; Suarez-Almazor, Maria; Haidet, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Background Diabetes group clinics can effectively control hypertension, but data to support glycemic control is equivocal. This study evaluated the comparative effectiveness of two diabetes group clinic interventions on glycosolated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in primary care. Methods Participants (n = 87) were recruited from a diabetes registry of a single regional VA medical center to participate in an open, randomized comparative effectiveness study. Two primary care based diabetes group interventions of three months duration were compared. Empowering Patients in Care (EPIC) was a clinician-led, patient-centered group clinic consisting of four sessions on setting self-management action plans (diet, exercise, home monitoring, medications, etc.) and communicating about progress with action plans. The comparison intervention consisted of group education sessions with a diabetes educator and dietician followed by an additional visit with one’s primary care provider. HbA1c levels were compared post-intervention and at one-year follow-up. Results Participants in the EPIC intervention had significantly greater improvements in HbA1c levels immediately following the active intervention (8.86 to 8.04 vs. 8.74 to 8.70, mean [SD] between-group difference 0.67±1.3, P=.03) and these differences persisted at 1 year follow-up (.59±1.4, P=.05). A repeated measures analysis using all study time points found a significant time-by-treatment interaction effect on HbA1c levels favoring the EPIC intervention (F(2,85) =3.55, P= .03). The effect of the time-by-treatment interaction appears to be partially mediated by diabetes self-efficacy (F(1,85) =10.39, P= .002). Conclusions Primary care based diabetes group clinics that include structured goal-setting approaches to self-management can significantly improve HbA1c levels post-intervention and maintain improvements for 1-year. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00481286 PMID:21403042

  16. Subacromial triamcinolone mexacetonide and methylprednisolone injections in treatment of supra spinam tendinitis. A comparative trial.

    PubMed

    Valtonen, E J

    1976-01-01

    This statistical report describes a clinical trial on 60 patients with supraspinal tendinitis for the comparison of triamcinolone hexacetonide (in a 20 mg/cc suspension in 1 cc ampoules) with methylprednisolone acetate (in a 40 mg/cc suspension in 1 cc ampoules). The objective of the study was to determine the therapeutic activity, including onset and duration of relief, of triamcinolone hexacetonide as a subacromial injection, and to compare these results with those obtained with similar injections of methylprednisolone acetate. The following results were obtained. Triamcinolone hexacetonide reduced pain, local tenderness and functional impairment to a greater degree than did methylprednisolone acetate. A significantly smaller proportion of patients needed a second injection of triamcinolone hexacetonide (33%) than needed a second injection of methylprednisolone acetate (63%). Triamcinolone hexacetonide appears to have longer duration of activity than does methyl-prednisolone acetate, judging by the percentage of patients still getting relief from their first injection at the end of the study period. The drugs were similar as regards side effect incidence rates and time to onset of action.

  17. A clinical trial to compare the effect of two antiseptic mouthwashes on gingival inflammation.

    PubMed

    Fine, P D

    1985-03-01

    A trial was made comparing the effects of efficient and thorough removal of plaque and debris alone, and with a daily antiseptic mouthwash. The results showed considerable variation but no significant difference in gingival inflammation between hygienic treatment and a daily mouthwash with chlorhexidine-gluconate or povidone-iodine. Povidone-iodine caused less staining of the teeth than chlorhexidine-gluconate.

  18. Light on Trial: Using a Courtroom Drama to Compare Competing Scientific Hypotheses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Frank A.

    2006-01-01

    A narrative in the form of a courtroom trial is used to compare evidence on the nature of light as part of an introductory college physics course. Prosecuting and defense attorneys present evidence for and against competing wave and particle hypotheses for light behavior while students play the roles of jurors. (Contains 5 figures.)

  19. Contamination by an Active Control Condition in a Randomized Exercise Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Arthur F.; McAuley, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Contamination is commonly overlooked in randomized trials. The present study examined contamination (minutes of aerobic activity outside of exercise sessions) within an active control condition in a 6-month randomized exercise trial for older adults. We hypothesized that outside aerobic activity would be greater in the control condition compared to the intervention conditions. Participants (mean age = 65.06 years, 66.2% female) were randomly assigned to: Dance (n = 50), Walking, (n = 108), or Strength/Stretching/Stability (SSS; n = 48). Dance and Walking represented the experimental conditions and SSS the control condition. Participants attended exercise sessions three times weekly for 24 weeks. Participants recorded their physical activity outside of class on a weekly home log. Group assignment and covariates (age, gender, body mass index, exercise session intensity and enjoyment, and program adherence) were examined as predictors of weekly aerobic activity outside of exercise sessions. Participants who returned zero home logs were removed from the dataset (final N = 195). Out-of-class aerobic activity was lowest in the Walking group. Significant effects of gender, group, enjoyment, and intensity on out-of-class weekly aerobic activity were observed, all p<0.003. Higher perceived enjoyment of exercise sessions was associated with more out-of-class aerobic activity, while higher perceived intensity was associated with less out-of-class aerobic activity. A group x intensity interaction, p = 0.002, indicated that group differences in out-of-class aerobic activity were evident only among those with lower intensity perceptions. Walkers may have perceived exercise sessions as sufficient weekly exercise, while the Dance and SSS groups may have perceived the sessions as necessary, but insufficient. The lower aerobic intensity Dancers attributed to exercise sessions and non-aerobic nature of SSS may partially explain contamination observed in this study. Further

  20. Large-scale field trials of active immunizing agents

    PubMed Central

    Cockburn, W. Charles

    1955-01-01

    In this discussion of the methods to be used in large-scale field trials of active immunizing agents and of the results to be expected from such trials, special emphasis is laid on pertussis vaccine trials in Great Britain. After a review of the criteria for strictly controlled field studies and of the investigation of typhoid vaccines conducted in 1904-08 by the Antityphoid Committee of the British Army, the author describes the pertussis vaccine studies which have been and are now being carried by the Whooping-Cough Immunization Committee of the Medical Research Council of Great Britain. The original strictly controlled trials have been completed and the results published. Studies are now being made of vaccines prepared by different methods and evaluated both in the field and in the laboratory. Each vaccine is given to some 2000-3000 children of 4-6 months to 4 years of age. By the end of the studies 30 000-40 000 children will have been followed up for a period of two years. Since in the current studies all the children are vaccinated and none are left as unvaccinated controls, the relative and not the absolute protective value of the vaccines will be measured. PMID:13270079

  1. Comparing the effectiveness of error-correction strategies in discrete trial training.

    PubMed

    Turan, Michelle K; Moroz, Lianne; Croteau, Natalie Paquet

    2012-03-01

    Error-correction strategies are essential considerations for behavior analysts implementing discrete trial training with children with autism. The research literature, however, is still lacking in the number of studies that compare and evaluate error-correction procedures. The purpose of this study was to compare two error-correction strategies: Independent Probe and Delay across learners with autism in an intensive intervention program. Two studies were conducted. The first study compared the two procedures across receptive tasks for 3 individuals, and differential effects were seen across learners. The second study compared the two procedures across tact trials with two of the same learners and found that individual differences were noted, but in addition, the more effective error-correction strategy was consistent across the two verbal operants (i.e., receptive in Study 1, tacts in Study 2). These combined studies suggest the effectiveness of error-correction strategies may be individualized to the learner but may generalize across operants.

  2. Comparative requirements for exploratory clinical trials -- eIND, eCTA and microdosing.

    PubMed

    Muller, Patrick Y

    2011-06-19

    Exploratory clinical trials provide a strategy for rapid human entry of investigational drugs. Such clinical studies are typically conducted during early clinical development in phase I as first-in-human studies, have no therapeutic intent, are not intended to examine clinical tolerability and involve a small number of human subjects at limited dose/exposure. Early decision data derived from such clinical studies may include PK, PD and/or biomarker-based translational medicine endpoints as well as PK/PD modeling approaches. This review critically discusses the various exploratory clinical trial strategies, their advantages and disadvantages as well as the regulatory safety requirements. In this respect, strategies for exploratory Investigational New Drugs (eIND), exploratory Clinical Trial Applications (eCTA) and microdosing are highlighted and compared in view of the new ICH M3(R2) guideline including options for biotechnology-derived pharmaceuticals such as monoclonal antibodies.

  3. Activities in dementia care: A comparative assessment of activity types.

    PubMed

    Lokon, Elizabeth; Sauer, Philip E; Li, Yue

    2016-12-05

    This exploratory study compares the impact of five activity types on the well-being of institutionalized people with dementia: the intergenerational art program Opening Minds through Art, art and music therapies, creative activities, non-creative activities, and no activities at all. We validated the Scripps Modified Greater Cincinnati Chapter Well-Being Observational Tool, and used that instrument to systematically observe N = 67 people with dementia as they participated in different activity types. People with dementia showed the highest well-being scores during Opening Minds through Art compared to all other activities. No significant well-being differences were found between creative activities led by licensed art/music therapist versus regular activity staff. Furthermore, no significant well-being differences were found between creative and non-creative activities that were both led by regular activity staff. Overall, people with dementia benefit from participating in activities, regardless of the type (creative or non-creative), or who conducts them (licensed therapists or activity staff). However, in order for people with dementia to reach significantly high levels of overall well-being, we recommend that activities are specifically designed for people with dementia and incorporate a 1:1 ratio between people with dementia and well-trained volunteers/staff members.

  4. A Trial by Trial Analysis Reveals More Intense Physical Activity is Associated with Better Cognitive Control Performance in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hartanto, T.A.; Krafft, C.E.; Iosif, A.M.; Schweitzer, J.B.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperactivity is a key symptom and the most observable manifestation of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The over-activity associated with ADHD can cause specific challenges in academic settings, extracurricular activities and social relationships. Cognitive control challenges are also well-established in ADHD. The current study included 44 children between the ages of 10 and 17 diagnosed with ADHD or who were typically developing (TD), all of whom had no psychiatric co-morbidity or significant learning disorders. Participants wore an actometer on their ankle while performing a flanker paradigm in order to objectively measure their rates of activity in association with cognitive control. Analyses assessed the relationship between frequency and intensity of activity to task accuracy on trial by trial basis. A significant interaction effect between group and performance revealed that more intense movement was associated with better performance in the ADHD, but not TD group. The ADHD group demonstrated more intense activity than the TD group during correct (but not error) trials. Within-group, children with ADHD generated higher intensity movements in their correct trials compared to their error trials, whereas the TD group did not demonstrate any within-group differences. These findings suggest that excessive motoric activity associated with clinically significant ADHD symptoms may reflect compensatory efforts to modulate attention and alertness. Future research should systematically explore the relationship between motion in ADHD and how it might be used to improve cognitive performance. PMID:26059476

  5. A phase 3 randomized trial comparing inolimomab vs usual care in steroid-resistant acute GVHD.

    PubMed

    Socié, Gérard; Vigouroux, Stéphane; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Fürst, Sabine; Bilger, Karin; Suarez, Felipe; Michallet, Mauricette; Bron, Dominique; Gard, Philippe; Medeghri, Zakaria; Lehert, Philippe; Lai, Chinglin; Corn, Tim; Vernant, Jean-Paul

    2017-02-02

    Treatment of steroid-resistant acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) remains an unmet clinical need. Inolimomab, a monoclonal antibody to CD25, has shown encouraging results in phase 2 trials. This phase 3 randomized, open-label, multicenter trial compared inolimomab vs usual care in adult patients with steroid-refractory acute GVHD. Patients were randomly selected to receive treatment with inolimomab or usual care (the control group was treated with antithymocyte globulin [ATG]). The primary objective was to evaluate overall survival at 1 year without changing baseline allocated therapy. A total of 100 patients were randomly placed: 49 patients in the inolimomab arm and 51 patients in the ATG arm. The primary criteria were reached by 14 patients (28.5%) in the inolimomab and 11 patients (21.5%) in the ATG arms, with a hazard ratio of 0.874 (P = .28). With a minimum follow-up of 1 year, 26 (53%) and 31 (60%) patients died in the inolimomab and ATG arms, respectively. Adverse events were similar in the 2 arms, with fewer viral infections in the inolimomab arm compared with the ATG arm. The primary end point of this randomized phase 3 trial was not achieved. The lack of a statistically significant effect confirms the need for development of more effective treatments for acute GVHD. This trial is registered to https://www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu/ctr-search/search as EUDRACT 2007-005009-24.

  6. A randomized crossover trial of tenoxicam compared with rofecoxib for postoperative dental pain control.

    PubMed

    Zacharias, M; De Silva, R K; Herbison, P; Templer, P

    2004-12-01

    Two non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, tenoxicam and rofecoxib, were compared for the control of postoperative pain following surgical extraction of bilaterally and symmetrically impacted wisdom teeth performed under intravenous sedation and local anaesthesia. Thirty-five young fit adult patients received each analgesic treatment for four days in a randomized, crossover design. The results suggest statistically better pain relief for the selective COX-2 inhibitor rofecoxib compared to tenoxicam, a traditional NSAID. There were side-effects with both treatments. Abdominal discomfort was significantly more common following rofecoxib compared to tenoxicam. Both analgesics were acceptable to most participants in the trial.

  7. A double-blind comparative trial with mianserin and amitriptyline in outpatients with major depressive disorders

    PubMed Central

    Feighner, John P.; Jacobs, Robert S.; Jackson, Ronald E.; Hendrickson, Gordon; Merideth, Charles H.; O'Meara, Patrick D.

    1983-01-01

    1 A double-blind trial with parallel treatment groups was conducted to compare the safety and efficacy of mianserin with amitriptyline. 2 This was a six week trial with weekly visits. Measurements at each visit included: 21 item Hamilton Depression (HAMD) Scale, Clinical Global Impression (CGI) Scale and Treatment Emergent Symptom Scale (TESS). 3 Mianserin and amitriptyline were comparable with respect to efficacy. 4 More adverse experiences were reported by amitriptyline patients. The predominant amitriptyline adverse experiences were of the anticholinergic type; the predominant mianserin adverse experience was drowsiness/fatigue. 5 The Efficacy Index (EI), a scale combining efficacy and adverse experiences, clearly demonstrated the superiority of mianserin over amitriptyline. PMID:6337610

  8. The Devon Active Villages Evaluation (DAVE) trial of a community-level physical activity intervention in rural south-west England: a stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of adults are not meeting the guidelines for physical activity despite activity being linked with numerous improvements to long-term health. In light of this, researchers have called for more community-level interventions. The main objective of the present study was to evaluate whether a community-level physical activity intervention increased the activity levels of rural communities. Methods 128 rural villages (clusters) were randomised to receive the intervention in one of four time periods between April 2011 and December 2012. The Devon Active Villages intervention provided villages with 12 weeks of physical activity opportunities for all age groups, including at least three different types of activities per village. Each village received an individually tailored intervention, incorporating a local needs-led approach. Support was provided for a further 12 months following the intervention. The evaluation study used a stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trial design. All 128 villages were measured at each of five data collection periods using a postal survey. The primary outcome of interest was the proportion of adults reporting sufficient physical activity to meet internationally recognised guidelines. Minutes spent in moderate-and-vigorous activity per week was analysed as a secondary outcome. To compare between intervention and control modes, random effects linear regression and marginal logistic regression models were implemented for continuous and binary outcomes respectively. Results 10,412 adults (4693 intervention, 5719 control) completed the postal survey (response rate 32.2%). The intervention did not increase the odds of adults meeting the physical activity guideline (adjusted OR 1.02, 95% CI: 0.88 to 1.17; P = 0.80), although there was weak evidence of an increase in minutes of moderate-and-vigorous-intensity activity per week (adjusted mean difference = 171, 95% CI: -16 to 358; P = 0.07). The

  9. Comparing community and specialty provider-based recruitment in a randomized clinical trial: clinical trial in fecal incontinence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recruitment of participants to clinical trials remains a significant challenge, especially for research addressing topics of a sensitive nature such as fecal incontinence (FI). The Fiber Study, a randomized controlled trial on symptom management for FI, successfully enrolled 189 community-living adu...

  10. Comparative Sensitivity Analysis of Muscle Activation Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rockenfeller, Robert; Günther, Michael; Schmitt, Syn; Götz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We mathematically compared two models of mammalian striated muscle activation dynamics proposed by Hatze and Zajac. Both models are representative for a broad variety of biomechanical models formulated as ordinary differential equations (ODEs). These models incorporate parameters that directly represent known physiological properties. Other parameters have been introduced to reproduce empirical observations. We used sensitivity analysis to investigate the influence of model parameters on the ODE solutions. In addition, we expanded an existing approach to treating initial conditions as parameters and to calculating second-order sensitivities. Furthermore, we used a global sensitivity analysis approach to include finite ranges of parameter values. Hence, a theoretician striving for model reduction could use the method for identifying particularly low sensitivities to detect superfluous parameters. An experimenter could use it for identifying particularly high sensitivities to improve parameter estimation. Hatze's nonlinear model incorporates some parameters to which activation dynamics is clearly more sensitive than to any parameter in Zajac's linear model. Other than Zajac's model, Hatze's model can, however, reproduce measured shifts in optimal muscle length with varied muscle activity. Accordingly we extracted a specific parameter set for Hatze's model that combines best with a particular muscle force-length relation. PMID:26417379

  11. A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Meditation Compared to Exposure Therapy and Education Control on PTSD in Veterans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    Meditation Compared to Exposure Therapy and Education Control on PTSD in Veterans PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Thomas Rutledge, Ph.D...Controlled Trial of Meditation Compared to Exposure 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Therapy and Education Control on PTSD in Veterans 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This study consists of a comparative effectiveness trial of Transcendental Meditation (TM) compared to

  12. Comparing multiple competing interventions in the absence of randomized trials using clinical risk-benefit analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To demonstrate the use of risk-benefit analysis for comparing multiple competing interventions in the absence of randomized trials, we applied this approach to the evaluation of five anticoagulants to prevent thrombosis in patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. Methods Using a cost-effectiveness approach from a clinical perspective (i.e. risk benefit analysis) we compared thromboprophylaxis with warfarin, low molecular weight heparin, unfractionated heparin, fondaparinux or ximelagatran in patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery, with sub-analyses according to surgery type. Proportions and variances of events defining risk (major bleeding) and benefit (thrombosis averted) were obtained through a meta-analysis and used to define beta distributions. Monte Carlo simulations were conducted and used to calculate incremental risks, benefits, and risk-benefit ratios. Finally, net clinical benefit was calculated for all replications across a range of risk-benefit acceptability thresholds, with a reference range obtained by estimating the case fatality rate - ratio of thrombosis to bleeding. Results The analysis showed that compared to placebo ximelagatran was superior to other options but final results were influenced by type of surgery, since ximelagatran was superior in total knee replacement but not in total hip replacement. Conclusions Using simulation and economic techniques we demonstrate a method that allows comparing multiple competing interventions in the absence of randomized trials with multiple arms by determining the option with the best risk-benefit profile. It can be helpful in clinical decision making since it incorporates risk, benefit, and personal risk acceptance. PMID:22233221

  13. Comparing the Score Distribution of a Trial Computer-Based Examination Cohort with That of the Standard Paper-Based Examination Cohort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zoanetti, Nathan; Les, Magdalena; Leigh-Lancaster, David

    2014-01-01

    From 2011-2013 the VCAA conducted a trial aligning the use of computers in curriculum, pedagogy and assessment culminating in a group of 62 volunteer students sitting their end of Year 12 technology-active Mathematical Methods (CAS) Examination 2 as a computer-based examination. This paper reports on statistical modelling undertaken to compare the…

  14. Comparative efficacy trial of cupping and serkangabin versus conventional therapy of migraine headaches: A randomized, open-label, comparative efficacy trial

    PubMed Central

    Firoozabadi, Mohammad Dehghani; Navabzadeh, Maryam; Roudsari, Mohammad Khodashenas; Zahmatkash, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Migraine headaches are the most common acute and recurrent headaches. Current treatment of a migraine headache consists of multiple medications for control and prevention of recurrent attacks. Global emergence of alternative medicine led us to examine the efficacy of cupping therapy plus serkangabin syrup in the treatment of migraine headaches. Materials and Methods: This study was a randomized, controlled, open-label, comparative efficacy trial. We randomly assigned patients with migraine into cupping therapy plus serkangabin group (30 patients) and conventional treatment group (30 patients). An investigator assessed the severity of headache, frequency of attacks in a week and duration of attacks per hour in 5 visits (at the end of 2 weeks, 1, 3 and 6 months). Generalized estimating equations approach was used to analyze repeated measures data to compare outcomes in both groups. Results: Average age for cupping therapy group and conventional treatment group were 31.7 (±7.6) and 32.6 (±12.7) years, respectively (P = 0.45). After treatment for 2 weeks; and 1, 3 and 6 months, severity of headache (P = 0.80), frequency of migraine attacks (P = 0.63) and duration of attacks per hours (P = 0.48) were similar in conventional and cupping groups but these symptoms were decreased in each group during the study (P < 0.001). Conclusion: There was no significant difference between cupping plus serkangabin therapy and conventional treatment in the treatment and prophylaxis of migraine. The alternative therapy may be used in cases of drug intolerance, no medication response, and in primary care. PMID:25709653

  15. A comparative trial of garlic, its extract and ammonium-potassium tartrate as anthelmintics in carp.

    PubMed

    Peña, N; Auró, A; Sumano, H

    1988-12-01

    While fish chemotherapy is not a common practice in México, folk medicine is usually well accepted by fish farmers. Empirical knowledge suggested that garlic should have anthelmintic properties. Various trials were carried out in Cyprinus carpio infested with Capillaria sp., using minced garlic and its extracts. An empirical concentration of 200 mg/l of minced garlic showed the greatest activity against the above mentioned worms (100%). The hexane extract in equivalent amounts showed a 75% effectiveness while the aqueous extract showed no anthelmintic effect. The addition of ammonium-potassium tartrate to the tanks (1.5 mg/l) gave a 86% anthelmintic effectiveness.

  16. Tocopheryl acetate 20% spray for elimination of head louse infestation: a randomised controlled trial comparing with 1% permethrin creme rinse

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tocopheryl acetate is viscous oily fluid used in a range of preparations for skin and scalp care in Italy. Observational and in vitro data have suggested a high level of efficacy against head louse infestation. The purpose of this investigation was to confirm the activity of tocopheryl acetate in a clinical setting in comparison with a standard widely used preparation. Methods A spray formulation containing tocopheryl acetate 20% in cyclomethicone was compared with permethrin 1% creme rinse for treatment of head louse infestation in a randomised, assessor blind, trial. Forty-five people were treated on two occasions 7 days apart. The spray was applied to dry hair for 20 minutes then washed. Participants treated with permethrin washed their hair and towel dried it before treatment for 10 minutes. Assessments were made by dry detection combing 1, 6, 9, and 14 days after first treatment. Results The tocopheryl acetate 20% spray was significantly (p = 0.033) more effective than permethrin 1%, using intention to treat worst case analysis, in which there were 13/23 (56.5%) successful treatments for tocopheryl acetate compared with 5/22 (22.7%) for permethrin. After unprecedented issues of re-infestation within households had been taken into account the underlying cure rate was 17/23 (73.9%) for tocopheryl acetate compared with 5/22 (22.7%), Odds Ratio 9.63 (95% CI, 2.46 to 37.68) (p < 0.001). Conclusions The tocopheryl acetate spray was significantly more effective than the permethrin product, was cosmetically acceptable, and not affected by current problems with resistance. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN45553737. PMID:24004959

  17. A comparative clinical trial of the contraceptive sponge and Neo Sampoon tablets.

    PubMed

    Borko, E; McIntyre, S L; Feldblum, P J

    1985-04-01

    Neo Sampoon, a foaming vaginal tablet containing 60 mg of the spermicide menfegol, and the Collatex sponge (now marketed in the United States as the Today sponge), a dome-shaped polyurethane device that contains 1 g of nonoxynol-9, were compared in terms of effectiveness, safety, and acceptability. Both methods were new to the Maribor General Hospital, Yugoslavia, where the trial was conducted among 450 volunteers randomly assigned to one of the two methods. At 12 months, the life-table pregnancy rate per 100 women for the Neo Sampoon group was 12.8, compared with a rate of 10.4 among the sponge users (P greater than .10). After pregnancy, the second most frequent reason for termination was discomfort, with a 12-month termination rate due to this cause of 6.9 per 100 women in the Neo Sampoon group and 6.2 in the sponge group. Although fewer than a quarter of the volunteers had any experience with barrier methods before this trial, the life-table continuation rate was high in both groups, with more than 70% using their assigned method for the full 12 months. Also, upon conclusion of the study, 41% of the volunteers chose another barrier contraceptive method. Although the effectiveness of the sponge and Neo Sampoon is not comparable to that of the pill or IUD, both vaginal methods appear to be safe and acceptable additions to the range of contraceptive choices.

  18. Comparative effectiveness of atypical antipsychotics in schizophrenia: what have real-world trials taught us?

    PubMed

    Attard, Azizah; Taylor, David M

    2012-06-01

    Real-world, effectiveness studies add an important new dimension to the evaluation of the benefits of individual antipsychotics. Efficacy studies have already shown the unique effectiveness of clozapine, and suggested improved outcomes for olanzapine compared with some atypical antipsychotics and a reduced tendency to produce acute and chronic movement disorders for atypical compared with typical drugs. Recent effectiveness studies largely confirm these prior observations. The CATIE (Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness), CUtLASS (Cost Utility of the Latest Antipsychotic Drugs in Schizophrenia Study) and SOHO (Schizophrenia Outpatient Health Outcomes) programmes confirmed the superiority of clozapine over other antipsychotics; CATIE and SOHO also confirmed olanzapine as probably the second most effective antipsychotic. Effectiveness studies have confirmed the high incidence of adverse metabolic effects with clozapine, olanzapine and (with less certainty) quetiapine but the ZODIAC (Ziprasidone Observational Study of Cardiac Outcomes) study found no excess cardiovascular events or deaths for olanzapine compared with ziprasidone. Prior observations on reduced frequency of movement disorders for second-generation versus first-generation antipsychotics were also largely (but not uniformly) supported. Overall, recent real-world studies have done much to confirm prior observations from efficacy-based randomized, controlled trials.

  19. The effects of Red Bull energy drink compared with caffeine on cycling time-trial performance.

    PubMed

    Quinlivan, Alannah; Irwin, Christopher; Grant, Gary D; Anoopkumar-Dukie, Sheilandra; Skinner, Tina; Leveritt, Michael; Desbrow, Ben

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the ergogenic effects of a commercial energy drink (Red Bull) or an equivalent dose of anhydrous caffeine in comparison with a noncaffeinated control beverage on cycling performance. Eleven trained male cyclists (31.7 ± 5.9 y 82.3 ± 6.1 kg, VO2max = 60.3 ± 7.8 mL · kg-1 · min-1) participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover-design study involving 3 experimental conditions. Participants were randomly administered Red Bull (9.4 mL/kg body mass [BM] containing 3 mg/kg BM caffeine), anhydrous caffeine (3 mg/kg BM given in capsule form), or a placebo 90 min before commencing a time trial equivalent to 1 h cycling at 75% peak power output. Carbohydrate and fluid volumes were matched across all trials. Performance improved by 109 ± 153 s (2.8%, P = .039) after Red Bull compared with placebo and by 120 ± 172 s (3.1%, P = .043) after caffeine compared with placebo. No significant difference (P > .05) in performance time was detected between Red Bull and caffeine treatments. There was no significant difference (P > .05) in mean heart rate or rating of perceived exertion among the 3 treatments. This study demonstrated that a moderate dose of caffeine consumed as either Red Bull or in anhydrous form enhanced cycling time-trial performance. The ergogenic benefits of Red Bull energy drink are therefore most likely due to the effects of caffeine, with the other ingredients not likely to offer additional benefit.

  20. Comparing community and specialty provider-based recruitment in a randomized clinical trial: clinical trial in fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Whitebird, Robin R; Bliss, Donna Zimmaro; Savik, Kay; Lowry, Ann; Jung, Hans-Joachim G

    2010-12-01

    Recruitment of participants to clinical trials remains a significant challenge, especially for research addressing topics of a sensitive nature such as fecal incontinence (FI). In the Fiber Study, a randomized controlled trial on symptom management for FI, we successfully enrolled 189 community-living adults through collaborations with specialty-based and community-based settings, each employing methods tailored to the organizational characteristics of their site. Results show that using the two settings increased racial and ethnic diversity of the sample and inclusion of informal caregivers. There were no differential effects on enrollment, final eligibility, or completion of protocol by site. Strategic collaborations with complementary sites can achieve sample recruitment goals for clinical trials on topics that are sensitive or known to be underreported.

  1. Promoting Activity in Geriatric Rehabilitation: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Accelerometry

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Sanjoy K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Low activity levels in inpatient rehabilitation are associated with adverse outcomes. The study aimed to test whether activity levels can be increased by the provision of monitored activity data to patients and clinicians in the context of explicit goal setting. Methods A randomized controlled trial in three sites in Australia included 255 inpatients aged 60 and older who had a rehabilitation goal to become ambulant. The primary outcome was patients’ walking time measured by accelerometers during the rehabilitation admission. Walking times from accelerometry were made available daily to treating therapists and intervention participants to motivate patients to improve incidental activity levels and reach set goals. For the control group, ‘usual care’ was followed, including the setting of mobility goals; however, for this group, neither staff nor patients received data on walking times to aid the setting of daily walking time targets. Results The median daily walking time in the intervention group increased from 10.3 minutes at baseline to 32.1 minutes at day 28, compared with an increase from 9.5 to 26.5 minutes per day in the control group. Subjects in the intervention group had significantly higher non-therapy walking time by about 7 minutes [mean (95% CI): 24.6 (21.7, 27.4)] compared to those in the control group [mean(95% CI): 17.3 (14.4, 20.3)] (p = 0.001). Conclusions Daily feedback to patients and therapists using an accelerometer increased walking times during rehabilitation admissions. The results of this study suggest objective monitoring of activity levels could provide clinicians with information on clinically important, mobility-related activities to assist goal setting. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12611000034932 http://www.ANZCTR.org.au/ PMID:27564857

  2. A multicentre randomised trial comparing octreotide and injection sclerotherapy in the management and outcome of acute variceal haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, S; Shields, R; Davies, M; Elias, E; Turnbull, A; Bassendine, M; James, O; Iredale, J; Vyas, S; Arthur, M; Kingsnorth, A; Sutton, R

    1997-01-01

    Background—Few studies have compared vasoactive drugs with endoscopic sclerotherapy in the control of acute variceal haemorrhage. Octreotide is widely used for this purpose, but its value remains undetermined. 
Aims—To compare octreotide with endoscopic sclerotherapy for acute variceal haemorrhage. 
Patients—Consecutive patients with acute variceal haemorrhage. 
Methods—Patients were randomised at endoscopy to receive either a 48 hour intravenous infusion of 50 µg/h octreotide (n=73), or emergency sclerotherapy (n=77). 
Results—Overall control of bleeding and mortality was not significantly different between octreotide (85%, 62 patients) and sclerotherapy (82%, 63 patients) over the 48 hour trial period (relative risk of rebleeding 0.83; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.38 to 1.82), irrespective of Child's grading or active bleeding at endoscopy. One major complication was observed in the sclerotherapy group (aspiration) and two in the octreotide group (pulmonary oedema, severe paralytic ileus). During 60 days of follow up there was an overall trend towards an increased mortality in the octreotide group which was not statistically significant (relative risk of dying at 60 days 1.91, 95% CI 0.97 to 3.78, p=0.06). 
Conclusions—The results of this study indicate that intravenous octreotide is as effective as injection sclerotherapy in the control of acute variceal bleeding, but further controlled trials are necessary to evaluate the safety of this treatment. 

 Keywords: variceal haemorrhage; octreotide; injection sclerotherapy PMID:9391254

  3. Comparative trial of sulphasalazine and oral sodium cromoglycate in the maintenance of remission in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Dronfield, M W; Langman, M J

    1978-01-01

    Patients with ulcerative colitis in remission were randomly allocated to treatment with sulphasalazine (2 g/day) or oral sodium cromoglycate (160 mg/day or 2 g/day), and the relapse rates in these treatment groups were compared during continued treatment for one year. The percentage cumulative relapse rate after 12 months' treatment was 30% in the 33 patients treated with sulphasalazine compared with 71% in the 25 treated with high dose sodium cromoglycate, a highly significant difference (P less than 0.01). Patients allocated low dose sodium cromoglycate were only treated for a maximum of six months, and the relapse rate in these 12 patients was similar to that in patients on the high dose. These results suggest that oral sodium cromoglycate is considerably less effective than sulphasalazine in maintaining remission, and by analogy with results in other trials may be no more effective than placebo tablets. PMID:33875

  4. A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Meditation Compared to Exposure Therapy and Education Control on PTSD in Veterans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0576 TITLE: A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Meditation Compared to Exposure Therapy and...COVERED 30 Sep 2013 - 29 Sep 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Meditation Compared to Exposure Therapy and Education... Meditation (TM) vs. Prolonged Exposure (PE) and PTSD health education control (EC), using the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) (primary

  5. A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Meditation Compared to Exposure Therapy and Education Control on PTSD in Veterans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0576 TITLE: A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Meditation Compared to Exposure...SUBTITLE A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Meditation Compared to Exposure Therapy and Education Control on PTSD in Veterans 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...will: 1) evaluate effects of Transcendental Meditation (TM) vs. Prolonged Exposure (PE) and PTSD health education control (EC), using the Clinician

  6. The protocol for a randomised controlled trial comparing intermittent and graded exercise to usual care for chronic fatigue syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic Fatigue Syndrome is a debilitating disorder with an unknown aetiology but suspected multifactorial origins. Common “triggers” include severe viral infections and emotional stress. Recent studies have also found evidence of immune dysfunction and elevated inflammatory cytokines in CFS patients, but there has been considerable variation in the outcome measures and magnitude of these studies. Currently, there is no cure for CFS but treatments include rest, specialist medical care, cognitive behavioural therapy, and graded (self-paced) exercise. To date, several studies have examined the efficacy of graded exercise with or without Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, with some success for patients. However, improvements in functional capacity have not necessarily correlated with improvements in immune function, fatigue or other symptoms. This 12-week pilot trial compares graded and intermittent exercise to normal care, measuring physiological outcomes, fatigue levels, immune function and wellness. Methods/design 90 patients aged between 16 to 60 years, who meet the diagnostic criteria for CFS and have been diagnosed by their medical practitioner, will be randomly recruited into groups consisting of Intermittent exercise, Graded exercise and usual care (Control). The outcomes will be measured pre-study (Week 0) and post-study (Week 13). Primary outcomes are VO2peak, anaerobic threshold, peak power, levels of fatigue, immune cell (CD3+CD4+, CD3+CD8+, CD19+, CD 16+CD56+) concentrations and activation. Secondary outcomes include onset of secondary CFS symptoms (e.g. fever, swollen lymph nodes), wellness, mood and sleep patterns. Primary analysis will be based on intention to treat using logistic regression models to compare treatments. Quantitative data will be analysed using repeated measures ANOVA with a linear model, and Cohen’s effect size. Qualitative data such as participants’ responses (e.g. changes in mood and other reactions) following the

  7. Prospective Randomized Trial Comparing Hepatic Venous Outflow and Renal Function after Conventional versus Piggyback Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Brescia, Marília D’Elboux Guimarães; Massarollo, Paulo Celso Bosco; Imakuma, Ernesto Sasaki; Mies, Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    Background This randomized prospective clinical trial compared the hepatic venous outflow drainage and renal function after conventional with venovenous bypass (n = 15) or piggyback (n = 17) liver transplantation. Methods Free hepatic vein pressure (FHVP) and central venous pressure (CVP) measurements were performed after graft reperfusion. Postoperative serum creatinine (Cr) was measured daily on the first week and on the 14th, 21st and 28th postoperative days (PO). The prevalence of acute renal failure (ARF) up to the 28th PO was analyzed by RIFLE-AKIN criteria. A Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) approach was used for comparison of longitudinal measurements of renal function. Results FHVP-CVP gradient > 3 mm Hg was observed in 26.7% (4/15) of the patients in the conventional group and in 17.6% (3/17) in the piggyback group (p = 0.68). Median FHVP-CVP gradient was 2 mm Hg (0–8 mmHg) vs. 3 mm Hg (0–7 mm Hg) in conventional and piggyback groups, respectively (p = 0.73). There is no statistically significant difference between the conventional (1/15) and the piggyback (2/17) groups regarding massive ascites development (p = 1.00). GEE estimated marginal mean for Cr was significantly higher in conventional than in piggyback group (2.14 ± 0.26 vs. 1.47 ± 0.15 mg/dL; p = 0.02). The conventional method presented a higher prevalence of severe ARF during the first 28 PO days (OR = 3.207; 95% CI, 1.010 to 10.179; p = 0.048). Conclusion Patients submitted to liver transplantation using conventional or piggyback methods present similar results regarding venous outflow drainage of the graft. Conventional with venovenous bypass technique significantly increases the harm of postoperative renal dysfunction. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01707810 PMID:26115520

  8. Randomized controlled trial versus comparative cohort study in verifying the therapeutic role of lymphadenectomy in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Todo, Yukiharu; Sakuragi, Noriaki

    2013-04-01

    A consensus regarding the therapeutic role of lymphadenectomy in endometrial cancer has not been reached because of conflicting negative results of randomized controlled trials and positive results of a cohort study. Since the effects of new treatments tend to be overestimated in observational studies, positive results of an observational study should be validated by a future trial. However, special difficulties are presented in randomized controlled trials in surgery. External validity is important for guaranteeing the reliability of a result of the trial. Physicians' recruitment of eligible patients into a trial depends on the confidence of those physicians for a surgical procedure, workplace environment and feelings of personal responsibility relevant to patients' risk of recurrence. When two surgical procedures are compared in a randomized controlled trial, technical quality control may be reduced in the complicated surgery group due to experienced surgeons' non-participation. It is highly possible that the recruitment issue is a threat to external validity. Therefore, a randomized controlled trial may not be the best format for demonstrating the full benefits of complicated surgery. Multiple studies have demonstrated that the results of well-designed observational studies can be reliable and are comparable with those of randomized controlled trials. Journal editors and funding sources are requested to become more generous with observational studies, especially prospective cohort studies.

  9. A prospective randomised trial comparing mesh types and fixation in totally extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repairs.

    PubMed

    Cristaudo, Adam; Nayak, Arun; Martin, Sarah; Adib, Reza; Martin, Ian

    2015-05-01

    The totally extraperitoneal (TEP) approach for surgical repair of inguinal hernias has emerged as a popular technique. We conducted a prospective randomised trial to compare patient comfort scores using different mesh types and fixation using this technique. Over a 14 month period, 146 patients underwent 232 TEP inguinal hernia repairs. We compared the comfort scores of patients who underwent these procedures using different types of mesh and fixation. A non-absorbable 15 × 10 cm anatomical mesh fixed with absorbable tacks (Control group) was compared with either a non-absorbable 15 × 10 cm folding slit mesh with absorbable tacks (Group 2), a partially-absorbable 15 × 10 cm mesh with absorbable tacks (Group 3) or a non-absorbable 15 × 10 cm anatomical mesh fixed with 2 ml fibrin sealant (Group 4). Outcomes were compared at 1, 2, 4 and 12 weeks using the Carolina Comfort Scale (CCS) scores. At 1, 2, 4 and 12 weeks, the median global CCS scores were low for all treatment groups. Statistically significant differences were seen only for median CCS scores and subscores with the use of partially-absorbable mesh with absorbable tacks (Group 3) at weeks 2 and 4. However, these were no longer significant at week 12. In this study, the TEP inguinal hernia repair with minimal fixation results in low CCS scores. There were no statistical differences in CCS scores when comparing types of mesh, configuration of the mesh or fixation methods.

  10. Bayesian sample sizes for exploratory clinical trials comparing multiple experimental treatments with a control.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, John; Cleary, Faye; Turner, Amanda

    2015-05-30

    In this paper, a Bayesian approach is developed for simultaneously comparing multiple experimental treatments with a common control treatment in an exploratory clinical trial. The sample size is set to ensure that, at the end of the study, there will be at least one treatment for which the investigators have a strong belief that it is better than control, or else they have a strong belief that none of the experimental treatments are substantially better than control. This criterion bears a direct relationship with conventional frequentist power requirements, while allowing prior opinion to feature in the analysis with a consequent reduction in sample size. If it is concluded that at least one of the experimental treatments shows promise, then it is envisaged that one or more of these promising treatments will be developed further in a definitive phase III trial. The approach is developed in the context of normally distributed responses sharing a common standard deviation regardless of treatment. To begin with, the standard deviation will be assumed known when the sample size is calculated. The final analysis will not rely upon this assumption, although the intended properties of the design may not be achieved if the anticipated standard deviation turns out to be inappropriate. Methods that formally allow for uncertainty about the standard deviation, expressed in the form of a Bayesian prior, are then explored. Illustrations of the sample sizes computed from the new method are presented, and comparisons are made with frequentist methods devised for the same situation.

  11. COSMOS: COmparing Standard Maternity care with One-to-one midwifery Support: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    McLachlan, Helen L; Forster, Della A; Davey, Mary-Ann; Lumley, Judith; Farrell, Tanya; Oats, Jeremy; Gold, Lisa; Waldenström, Ulla; Albers, Leah; Biro, Mary Anne

    2008-01-01

    Background In Australia and internationally, there is concern about the growing proportion of women giving birth by caesarean section. There is evidence of increased risk of placenta accreta and percreta in subsequent pregnancies as well as decreased fertility; and significant resource implications. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of continuity of midwifery care have reported reduced caesareans and other interventions in labour, as well as increased maternal satisfaction, with no statistically significant differences in perinatal morbidity or mortality. RCTs conducted in the UK and in Australia have largely measured the effect of teams of care providers (commonly 6–12 midwives) with very few testing caseload (one-to-one) midwifery care. This study aims to determine whether caseload (one-to-one) midwifery care for women at low risk of medical complications decreases the proportion of women delivering by caesarean section compared with women receiving 'standard' care. This paper presents the trial protocol in detail. Methods/design A two-arm RCT design will be used. Women who are identified at low medical risk will be recruited from the antenatal booking clinics of a tertiary women's hospital in Melbourne, Australia. Baseline data will be collected, then women randomised to caseload midwifery or standard low risk care. Women allocated to the caseload intervention will receive antenatal, intrapartum and postpartum care from a designated primary midwife with one or two antenatal visits conducted by a 'back-up' midwife. The midwives will collaborate with obstetricians and other health professionals as necessary. If the woman has an extended labour, or if the primary midwife is unavailable, care will be provided by the back-up midwife. For women allocated to standard care, options include midwifery-led care with varying levels of continuity, junior obstetric care and community based general medical practitioner care. Data will be collected at recruitment (self

  12. Reductions in disease activity in the AMPLE trial: clinical response by baseline disease duration

    PubMed Central

    Schiff, Michael; Weinblatt, Michael E; Valente, Robert; Citera, Gustavo; Maldonado, Michael; Massarotti, Elena; Yazici, Yusuf; Fleischmann, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate clinical response by baseline disease duration using 2-year data from the AMPLE trial. Methods Patients were randomised to subcutaneous abatacept 125 mg weekly or adalimumab 40 mg bi-weekly, with background methotrexate. As part of a post hoc analysis, the achievement of validated definitions of remission (Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI) ≤2.8, Simplified Disease Activity Index (SDAI) ≤3.3, Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data 3 (RAPID3) ≤3.0, Boolean score ≤1), low disease activity (CDAI <10, SDAI <11, RAPID3 ≤6.0), Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index response and American College of Rheumatology responses were evaluated by baseline disease duration (≤6 vs >6 months). Disease Activity Score 28 (C-reactive protein) <2.6 or ≤3.2 and radiographic non-progression in patients achieving remission were also evaluated. Results A total of 646 patients were randomised and treated (abatacept, n=318; adalimumab, n=328). In both treatment groups, comparable responses were achieved in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (≤6 months) and in those with later disease (>6 months) across multiple clinical measures. Conclusions Abatacept or adalimumab with background methotrexate were associated with similar onset and sustainability of response over 2 years. Patients treated early or later in the disease course achieved comparable clinical responses. Trial registration number NCT00929864, Post-results. PMID:27110385

  13. Comparing Judicial Institutions: Using an Inquisitorial Trial Simulation to Facilitate Student Understanding of International Legal Traditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiden, David L.

    2009-01-01

    This article proposes a new role-playing exercise for public law courses: a mock-trial simulation using the European inquisitorial system of trial procedure. By exposing students to an alternative method of conducting a trial, numerous pedagogical benefits can be obtained, including stimulating critical thinking regarding the potential…

  14. Adherence to a Smartphone Application for Weight Loss Compared to Website and Paper Diary: Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Burley, Victoria Jane; Nykjaer, Camilla; Cade, Janet Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Background There is growing interest in the use of information communication technologies to treat obesity. An intervention delivered by smartphone could be a convenient, potentially cost-effective, and wide-reaching weight management strategy. Although there have been studies of texting-based interventions and smartphone applications (apps) used as adjuncts to other treatments, there are currently no randomized controlled trials (RCT) of a stand-alone smartphone application for weight loss that focuses primarily on self-monitoring of diet and physical activity. Objective The aim of this pilot study was to collect acceptability and feasibility outcomes of a self-monitoring weight management intervention delivered by a smartphone app, compared to a website and paper diary. Methods A sample of 128 overweight volunteers were randomized to receive a weight management intervention delivered by smartphone app, website, or paper diary. The smartphone app intervention, My Meal Mate (MMM), was developed by the research team using an evidence-based behavioral approach. The app incorporates goal setting, self-monitoring of diet and activity, and feedback via weekly text message. The website group used an existing commercially available slimming website from a company called Weight Loss Resources who also provided the paper diaries. The comparator groups delivered a similar self-monitoring intervention to the app, but by different modes of delivery. Participants were recruited by email, intranet, newsletters, and posters from large local employers. Trial duration was 6 months. The intervention and comparator groups were self-directed with no ongoing human input from the research team. The only face-to-face components were at baseline enrollment and brief follow-up sessions at 6 weeks and 6 months to take anthropometric measures and administer questionnaires. Results Trial retention was 40/43 (93%) in the smartphone group, 19/42 (55%) in the website group, and 20/43 (53%) in

  15. Randomized Trial of Behavioral Activation, Cognitive Therapy, and Antidepressant Medication in the Prevention of Relapse and Recurrence in Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobson, Keith S.; Hollon, Steven D.; Dimidjian, Sona; Schmaling, Karen B.; Kohlenberg, Robert J.; Gallop, Robert J.; Rizvi, Shireen L.; Gollan, Jackie K.; Dunner, David L.; Jacobson, Neil S.

    2008-01-01

    This study followed treatment responders from a randomized controlled trial of adults with major depression. Patients treated with medication but withdrawn onto pill-placebo had more relapse through 1 year of follow-up compared to patients who received prior behavioral activation, prior cognitive therapy, or continued medication. Prior…

  16. The Clinical Trial of Women On the Move through Activity and Nutrition (WOMAN Study)

    PubMed Central

    Kuller, Lewis H.; Kriska, Andrea M.; Kinzel, Laura S.; Simkin-Silverman, Laurey R.; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim; Johnson, B. Delia; Conroy, Molly B.

    2007-01-01

    The Women On the Move through Activity and Nutrition (WOMAN) Study is the first randomized clinical trial of nonpharmacological intervention designed to modify lipoproteins, weight loss and exercise among postmenopausal women using noninvasive measures of atherosclerosis as the primary endpoint. The trial was initially designed to test whether intervention as compared to health education would be more effective in slowing progression of subclinical atherosclerosis among women on hormone therapy (HT), estrogen or estrogen+progestin. It was designed and implemented prior to the results of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI). The trial was since modified to include women who had been on HT but went off after the results of the WHI were reported. Eligible women were between the ages of 52-62, had waist circumference ≥80 cm, low density lipoprotein cholesterol between 100-160 mg% and controlled blood pressure. The intervention is low in total and saturated fat, trans fats, higher in fiber and promotes loss of 7-10% of body weight and includes at least 150 minutes of physical activity per week. The study has recruited 508 women. The primary endpoints are change in extent of carotid intima media wall thickness as measured by carotid ultrasound, pulse wave velocity as a measure of vascular stiffness and coronary artery calcium using electron beam computed tomography. Body composition is measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. PMID:17113831

  17. Spirulina platensis versus silymarin in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection. A pilot randomized, comparative clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Spirulina platensis, a cynobacterium used frequently as a dietary supplement had been found to exhibit many immune-stimulating and antiviral activities. It had been found to activate macrophages, NK cells, T cells, B cells, and to stimulate the production of Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and other cytokines. Natural substances isolated from Spirulina platensis had been found to be potent inhibitors against several enveloped viruses by blocking viral absorption/penetration and some replication stages of progeny viruses after penetration into cells. We aimed to study whether this dietary supplement possesses any therapeutically feasible activity worthy of further larger controlled clinical evaluation. Methods Sixty six patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection and eligible for inclusion had been randomized to either Spirulina or Silymarin treated groups for a period of six months treatment. The two groups were followed up and blindly compared for early (after 3 months) and end of 6 months treatment virological response. The effects of both treatments on each of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), Chronic Liver Disease Questionnaire scores (CLDQ), Arizona Sexual Experience Scale scores (ASEX) and the occurrence of any attributable adverse events were also compared. Results Among the 30 patients who had been treated with Spirulina and completed the 6 months protocol, 4 patients (13.3%) had a complete end of treatment virological response and 2 patients (6.7%) had a partial end of treatment response defined as significant decrease of virus load of at least 2-logs10. Though the proportion of responders in Spirulina group was greater than in the Silymarin group, the difference was not statistically significant at the end of both 6 months (p = 0.12) and 3 months treatment (p = 0.22) by Exact test. Alanine aminotransferase as well as CLDQ and ASEX scores were found to be more significantly improved in Spirulina than in Silymarin treated group. Conclusions Our

  18. Effect of wrist-worn activity monitor feedback on physical activity behavior: A randomized controlled trial in Finnish young men

    PubMed Central

    Jauho, Anna-Maiju; Pyky, Riitta; Ahola, Riikka; Kangas, Maarit; Virtanen, Paula; Korpelainen, Raija; Jämsä, Timo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether the use of an activity monitor providing feedback has an effect on physical activity (PA) in young men. A population-based sample of 276 conscription-aged (mean = 17.9, SD = 0.7 years) men participated in a 3-month randomized controlled trial in Oulu in 2012. Participants were randomized to an intervention group (INT, N = 137) and a control group (CON, N = 139). INT received a wrist-worn monitor (Polar Active) showing daily activity, and CON received identical monitors without feedback. Main outcome was the change from baseline in objectively measured weekly time spent in moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) and sedentary activity (SED), as assessed by generalized estimation equations (GEE). Other lifestyle factors were assessed by a questionnaire at baseline and at 3 months. Weekly physical activity data (≥ 4 days with ≥ 8 h each) were obtained from 72 (53%) and 90 (65%) men in the INT and CON, respectively. Based on GEE, time spent in MVPA increased (p = 0.012) and SED decreased (p = 0.032) in the INT compared with the CON. During the first 7 weeks, the INT spent on average 1 h less sedentary than the CON (t-test, p < 0.05). During the first week, the INT showed 12 minutes more MVPA compared to the CON (t-test, p = 0.034). Based on questionnaire data, the proportion of the most sedentary men decreased in the INT (Wilcoxon test, 28% vs. 10%, p = 0.029), with no change in the CON (20% vs. 19%, p = 0.546). To conclude, a wrist-worn activity monitor providing feedback had a short-term positive effect on PA and SED in young men. Trial registration This is a pilot study for a larger randomized controlled trial registered to the clinical trials register NCT01376986. PMID:26844128

  19. Randomised trial comparing hand expression with breast pumping for mothers of term newborns feeding poorly

    PubMed Central

    Flaherman, Valerie J; Gay, Barbara; Scott, Cheryl; Avins, Andrew; Lee, Kathryn A; Newman, Thomas B

    2016-01-01

    Objective Breast pumping or hand expression may be recommended when newborns latch or suck poorly. A recent trial found worse outcomes among mothers who used a breast pump in the early postpartum period. The objective of this study was to compare bilateral electric breast pumping to hand expression among mothers of healthy term infants feeding poorly at 12–36 h after birth. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting Well-baby nursery and postpartum unit. Patients 68 mothers of newborns 12–36 h old who were latching or sucking poorly were randomly assigned to either 15 min of bilateral electric pumping or 15 min of hand expression. Mainoutcome measures Milk transfer, maternal pain, breastfeeding confidence and breast milk expression experience (BMEE) immediately after the intervention, and breastfeeding rates at 2 months after birth. Results The median volume of expressed milk (range) was 0.5 (0–5) ml for hand expressing mothers and 1 (0–40) ml for pumping mothers (p=0.07). Maternal pain, breastfeeding confidence and BMEE did not differ by intervention. At 2 months, mothers assigned to hand expression were more likely to be breastfeeding (96.1%) than mothers assigned to breast pumping (72.7%) (p=0.02). Conclusions Hand expression in the early postpartum period appears to improve eventual breastfeeding rates at 2 months after birth compared with breast pumping, but further research is needed to confirm this. However, in circumstances where either pumping or hand expression would be appropriate for healthy term infants 12–36 h old feeding poorly, providers should consider recommending hand expression. PMID:21747129

  20. Randomized clinical trial to comparing efficacy of daily, weekly and monthly administration of vitamin D3.

    PubMed

    Takács, István; Tóth, Béla E; Szekeres, László; Szabó, Boglárka; Bakos, Bence; Lakatos, Péter

    2017-01-01

    The comparative efficacy and safety profiles of selected daily 1000 IU, weekly 7000 IU and monthly 30,000 IU vitamin D 3-not previously investigated-will be evaluated. Here, a prospective, randomized clinical trial, comparing efficacy and safety of a daily single dose of 1000 IU (group A) to a once-weekly 7000 IU dose (group B), or monthly 30,000 IU dose (group C) of vitamin D3. The present study is a controlled, randomized, open-label, multicenter clinical trial, 3  months in duration. Sixty-four adult subjects with vitamin D deficiency (25OHD<20 ng/ml), were included according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Dose-responses for increases in serum vitamin 25OHD were statistically equivalent for each of the three groups: A, B and C. Outcomes were 13.0 ± 1.5; 12.6 ± 1.1 and 12.9 ± 0.9 ng/ml increases in serum 25OHD per 1000 IU, daily, weekly and monthly, respectively. The treatment of subjects with selected doses restored 25OHD values to levels above 20 ng/ml in all groups. Treatment with distinct administration frequency of vitamin D3 did not exhibit any differences in safety parameters. The daily, weekly and monthly administrations of daily equivalent of 1000 IU of vitamin D3 provide equal efficacy and safety profiles.

  1. A comparative analysis of symptom and medication scoring methods used in clinical trials of sublingual immunotherapy for seasonal allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Calderon, M A; Bernstein, D I; Blaiss, M; Andersen, J S; Nolte, H

    2014-10-01

    Symptom and medication use are the key outcomes for assessing the efficacy of subcutaneous (SCIT) and sublingual allergen immunotherapy (SLIT). Our objective was to explore the similarities and differences between existing scoring mechanisms used in clinical trials of SLIT for seasonal allergens and characterize the impact that such differences may have on efficacy reporting. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials investigating the efficacy of SLIT for seasonal allergic rhinitis (2009-2013) were selected for review. Simulated and published data were used to demonstrate differences in scoring methods. Symptom and medication scoring methods across trials, although all designed to achieve the same objective, included important differences. The maximum daily symptom score (DSS) can vary widely depending on the number of symptoms assessed, and terminology of symptoms is not consistent. Similarly, daily medication scoring (DMS) methods differ greatly among studies and are dependent on medications allowed and weighting of scores assigned to each medication. When published DSS and DMS scores were used to calculate simulated daily combined scores (DCSs) based on various published methods, changes from placebo ranged from 19% to 29% when assuming all variables other than the DSS and DMS methods were equal. Variations in trial design, analysis, and seasonal characteristics also have effects on symptom and medication scoring outcomes. We identified multiple differences in trial scoring methods and design that make comparison among trials difficult. Symptom, medication, or combined scores cannot be indirectly compared among trials without taking the methods of scoring and other trial differences into account.

  2. Active Inference, epistemic value, and vicarious trial and error

    PubMed Central

    Cartoni, Emilio; Rigoli, Francesco; Pio-Lopez, Léo; Friston, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Balancing habitual and deliberate forms of choice entails a comparison of their respective merits—the former being faster but inflexible, and the latter slower but more versatile. Here, we show that arbitration between these two forms of control can be derived from first principles within an Active Inference scheme. We illustrate our arguments with simulations that reproduce rodent spatial decisions in T-mazes. In this context, deliberation has been associated with vicarious trial and error (VTE) behavior (i.e., the fact that rodents sometimes stop at decision points as if deliberating between choice alternatives), whose neurophysiological correlates are “forward sweeps” of hippocampal place cells in the arms of the maze under consideration. Crucially, forward sweeps arise early in learning and disappear shortly after, marking a transition from deliberative to habitual choice. Our simulations show that this transition emerges as the optimal solution to the trade-off between policies that maximize reward or extrinsic value (habitual policies) and those that also consider the epistemic value of exploratory behavior (deliberative or epistemic policies)—the latter requiring VTE and the retrieval of episodic information via forward sweeps. We thus offer a novel perspective on the optimality principles that engender forward sweeps and VTE, and on their role on deliberate choice. PMID:27317193

  3. Experience of the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program on Community-Based Cancer Clinical Trials Activity

    PubMed Central

    Locke, Susan C.; Abernethy, Amy P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A goal of the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP) was to improve cancer research capacity in community settings. We examined research capacity development during the pilot phase of the NCCCP within the context of national trends in clinical trial activity with respect to the number and phase of trials, total accrual, and accrual of underserved populations. Materials and Methods: We examined self-reported data from NCCCP sites during 2007 to 2010, supplemented with data from the National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program. Results: Trial availability and accrual improved more quickly at NCCCP sites compared with national trends. Phase III trial availability increased 8% nationally versus 16% across NCCCP sites, and accrual increased 30% nationally versus 133% across NCCCP sites. Accrual of racial and ethnic minorities rose 82%, from 83 to 151 patients, and accrual of patients age ≥ 65 years rose by 221%, from 200 to 641 patients. Change in trial portfolio and accrual differed by sophistication of the site and by prior experience in conducting clinical trials at the site. Conclusion: Despite the short duration, the NCCCP pilot resulted in an increase in the number of open trials as well as patient accrual at a faster rate than that observed nationally. These results, coupled with insights into the relative success of sites with varying sophistication at the outset, provide promise that lessons learned can be applied more broadly to increase research participation. PMID:27026649

  4. A randomised trial comparing the i-gel (TM) with the LMA Classic (TM) in children.

    PubMed

    Lee, J-R; Kim, M-S; Kim, J-T; Byon, H-J; Park, Y-H; Kim, H-S; Kim, C-S

    2012-06-01

    We performed a prospective, randomised trial comparing the i-gel(TM) with the LMA Classic(TM) in children undergoing general anaesthesia. Ninety-nine healthy patients were randomly assigned to either the i-gel or the LMA Classic. The outcomes measured were airway leak pressure, ease of insertion, time taken for insertion, fibreoptic examination and complications. Median (IQR [range]) time to successful device placement was shorter with the i-gel (17.0 (13.8-20.0 [10.0-20.0]) s) compared with the LMA Classic (21.0 (17.5-25.0 [15.0-70.0]) s, p = 0.002). There was no significant difference in oropharyngeal leak pressure between the two devices. A good fibreoptic view of the glottis was obtained in 74% of the i-gel group and in 43% of the LMA Classic group (p < 0.001). There were no significant complications. In conclusion, the i-gel provided a similar leak pressure, but a shorter insertion time and improved glottic view compared with the LMA Classic in children.

  5. Clinical trial comparing plasma arc and conventional halogen curing lights for orthodontic bonding.

    PubMed

    Manzo, Bruno; Liistro, Giuseppe; De Clerck, Hugo

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this clinical trial was to evaluate the reliability and time saved with a plasma arc curing unit (Apollo 95E, Dental/Medical Diagnostic Systems, Woodland Hills, Calif) compared with a conventional curing unit (Ortholux XL 3000, 3M Unitek, St Paul, Minn) for direct bracket bonding with resin adhesive. Forty-five patients were involved in the study, and 608 brackets were bonded in a contralateral quadrant pattern. The patients were followed for a mean (+/- standard deviation) period of 11 +/- 3.2 months. Survival analysis was carried out to compare the failure rate for the 2 techniques. The time required for bonding with each technique was also recorded. The mean survival time was 399 days, and there were no significant differences in survival time between the 2 bonding methods. Twelve bonding failures were reported with each technique. The curing time per bracket was significantly reduced with the plasma curing light compared with a conventional curing unit (65 +/- 19 vs 82 +/- 31 seconds). The plasma arc curing light can save chair-time without affecting the bonding failure rate.

  6. Comparing the Effectiveness of a Clinical Registry and a Clinical Data Warehouse for Supporting Clinical Trial Recruitment: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Chunhua; Bigger, J Thomas; Busacca, Linda; Wilcox, Adam; Getaneh, Asqual

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports a case study comparing the relative efficiency of using a Diabetes Registry or a Clinical Data Warehouse to recruit participants for a diabetes clinical trial, TECOS. The Clinical Data Warehouse generated higher positive predictive accuracy (31% vs. 6.6%) and higher participant recruitment than the Registry (30 vs. 14 participants) in a shorter time period (59 vs. 74 working days). We identify important factors that increase clinical trial recruitment efficiency and lower cost. PMID:21347102

  7. Comparing the effectiveness of a clinical registry and a clinical data warehouse for supporting clinical trial recruitment: a case study.

    PubMed

    Weng, Chunhua; Bigger, J Thomas; Busacca, Linda; Wilcox, Adam; Getaneh, Asqual

    2010-11-13

    This paper reports a case study comparing the relative efficiency of using a Diabetes Registry or a Clinical Data Warehouse to recruit participants for a diabetes clinical trial, TECOS. The Clinical Data Warehouse generated higher positive predictive accuracy (31% vs. 6.6%) and higher participant recruitment than the Registry (30 vs. 14 participants) in a shorter time period (59 vs. 74 working days). We identify important factors that increase clinical trial recruitment efficiency and lower cost.

  8. Barriers to Clinical Trial Participation: Comparing Perceptions and Knowledge of African American and White South Carolinians.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sei-Hill; Tanner, Andrea; Friedman, Daniela B; Foster, Caroline; Bergeron, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Analyzing data from a survey of African American and White residents in South Carolina, this study attempts to understand how to better promote clinical trial participation specifically within the African American population. To explore why participation is lower in the African American population, the authors examined two sets of potential barriers: structural/procedural (limited accessibility, lack of awareness, doctors not discussing clinical trial options, lack of health insurance) and cognitive/psychological (lack of subjective and factual knowledge, misperceptions, distrust, fear, perceived risk). Findings revealed that African Americans were significantly less willing than Whites to participate in a clinical trial. African Americans also had lower subjective and factual knowledge about clinical trials and perceived greater risk involved in participating in a clinical trial. The authors found that lack of subjective knowledge and perceived risk were significant predictors of African Americans' willingness to participate in a clinical trial. Implications of the findings are discussed in detail.

  9. A randomized, comparative trial: does pillow type alter cervico-thoracic spinal posture when side lying?

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Susan J; Grimmer-Somers, Karen A; Trott, Patricia H

    2011-01-01

    Background Many patients ask for advice about choosing a pillow. This research was undertaken to determine if pillow type alters cervico-thoracic spine position when resting in the side-lying position. Aim To investigate the effect of different pillow shape and content on the slope of cervico-thoracic spine segments when side lying. Materials and methods The study was a randomized blinded comparative trial set in a laboratory that replicated a bedroom. The subjects were side sleepers aged over 18 years. Exclusion criteria were history of surgery to the cervico-thoracic spine, an injury or accident to the cervico-thoracic spine in the preceding year, or currently receiving treatment for neck symptoms. Each participant rested in a standardized side-lying position for 10 minutes on each of the trial pillows: regular shaped polyester, foam, feather, and latex pillows, and a contour shaped foam pillow. Reflective markers were placed on external occipital protuberance (EOP), C2, C4, C7, and T3, and digital images were recorded of subjects at 0 and 10 minutes on each pillow. Images were digitized using each reflective marker and the slope of each spinal segment calculated. Univariate analysis of variance models were used to investigate slope differences between pillows at 0 and 10 minutes. Significance was established at P < 0.01 to take account of chance effects from repeated measures and multiple comparisons. Results At 0 and 10 minutes, the EOP-C2, C2-C4, and C4-C7 segmental slopes were significantly different across all pillows. Significant differences were identified when comparing the feather pillow with the latex, regular and contour foam pillows, and when comparing the polyester and foam contour pillows. The regular and contour foam pillows produced similar slopes at all spinal segments. Conclusion Cervico-thoracic spinal segment slope alters significantly when people change from a foam, latex, or polyester pillow to a feather pillow and vice versa. The shape of a

  10. Comparing the effects of Calendula officinalis and clotrimazole on vaginal Candidiasis: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Saffari, Elnaz; Mohammad-Alizadeh-Charandabi, Sakineh; Adibpour, Mohammad; Mirghafourvand, Mojgan; Javadzadeh, Yousef

    2016-11-23

    This triple-blind trial examined the effects of Calendula officinalis vaginal cream on the treatment of vaginal Candidiasis (primary outcome) and sexual function (secondary outcome). Married women aged 18-45 years with vaginal Candidiasis (n = 150) were recruited from April to October 2014 and randomized into Calendula and clotrimazole groups, using 5-g vaginal cream every night for seven nights. Clinical and laboratory assessments were conducted at 10-15 and 30-35 days after intervention and the female sexual function index was assessed at 30-35 days. Six women were lost to follow-up. The frequency of testing negative for Candidiasis in the Calendula group was significantly lower at the first (49% vs. 74%; odds ratio (OR) 0.32; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.16-0.67) but higher at the second (77% vs. 34%; OR 3.1; 95% CI 1.5-6.2) follow-up compared to the clotrimazole group. The frequency of most signs and symptoms were almost equal in the two groups at the first follow-up, but were significantly lower in the Calendula group at the second follow-up. Sexual function had almost equal significant improvement in both groups. Calendula vaginal cream appears to have been effective in the treatment of vaginal Candidiasis and to have a delayed but greater long-term effect compared to clotrimazole.

  11. Comparative Effectiveness of Chewing Stick and Toothbrush: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Aeeza S; Shaukat, Malik S; Qureshi, Ambrina A; Abdur, Rasheed

    2014-01-01

    Background: With the increasing rate of oral diseases, the global necessity of effective and economical products for its prevention and treatment has intensified. Aim: This study was to compare the effectiveness of two oral hygiene aids: Chewing stick and manual toothbrush, for plaque removal and gingival health after one month of a randomized clinical trial. Materials and Methods: Dental students (age 18-22 years) of a public sector dental hospital were recruited. Sample size was determined using the American Dental Association guidelines. Participants were randomized into two interventional groups and provided with either chewing sticks or toothbrushes. Pre- and post-intervention examinations were executed by two blind and calibrated examiners using plaque and gingival dental indices. Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics, paired t-test, and two sample independent t-tests. Results: Fifty subjects were recruited with mean age 20 ± 0.66 years (80% were females and 20% were males). Except for the mean plaque scores of toothbrush users (which increased at post-intervention examination), all other scores showed reduction. In contrast to the final mean gingival scores, a significant difference (P = < 0.0001) in the final mean plaque score was observed for the two respective interventional groups. Conclusion: Chewing stick has revealed parallel and at times greater mechanical and chemical cleansing of oral tissues as compared to a toothbrush. PMID:25077082

  12. Comparing hand-held computers and paper diaries for haemophilia home therapy: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Walker, I; Sigouin, C; Sek, J; Almonte, T; Carruthers, J; Chan, A; Pai, M; Heddle, N

    2004-11-01

    Treatment of severe haemophilia with factor concentrates is by self-infusion in the home. Adherence to record keeping on paper diaries is poor. A randomized-controlled trial compared adherence with record keeping of paper diaries with hand-held computers. Forty-one individuals with severe haemophilia, were randomized to hand-held computers (n = 22) or paper diaries (n = 19) and followed for 6 months. About 86.2% (679 of 788) of infusions by patients in the computer group were in compliance with the data submission schedule compared with only 48.3% (358 of 741) of infusions by patients using paper diaries (P < 0.0001). The time intervals between infusions and the receipt of data were shorter in the computer group (median 0.25 vs. 25 days respectively, P < 0.0001). Reminder phone calls by the clinic were made less frequently to users of hand-held computers than to users of paper diaries (median one vs. five times, P < 0.0001). Accuracy of data was similar for both methods. Compliance with hand-held computers was superior to paper diaries. The clinic received data from hand-held computers mostly on the same day, and nurses could thereby provide clinical advice more effectively. Although hand-held computers did not result in increased accuracy, errors could be detected and corrected more rapidly. Electronic data can more easily be verified, analysed and summarized than that from paper diaries.

  13. Laparoscopic Gastric Bypass for Morbid Obesity–a Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Two Gastrojejunal Anastomosis Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Llopis, Salvador Navarrete; Isaac, Jose; Aulestia, Salvador Navarrete; Bravo, Carlos; Obregon, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: We present a randomized controlled trial of laparoscopic gastric bypass comparing 2 techniques of gastrojejunostomy in patients with morbid obesity. Methods: Eighty consecutive patients underwent laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass between September 2005 and August 2006. Patients were randomly assigned to 2 groups by the use of sealed envelopes. In group A, the gastrojejunal anastomosis was performed with a 21-mm circular-stapler, and in group B, this anastomosis was performed with a 45-mm linear-stapler. The rest of the procedure was identical in both groups. Variables evaluated were complications involving the gastrojejunostomy, operative time, length of stay, and percentage of excess weight loss. Results: Both groups were similar in age and body mass index. No patients experienced leakage or gastrojejunal anastomosis fistula, but group A patients had a more frequent stricture rate (P<0.05). Operative time and hospital stay were comparable in both groups (P>0.05). Percentage excess weight loss at one year following surgery was satisfactory in both groups, without a statistically significant difference (P>0.05). Conclusion: Gastrojejunal anastomosis does not seem to be a critical factor in excess weight loss for morbidly obese patients who underwent laparoscopic gastric bypass. The 2 techniques used in this experience are safe and effective; however, the 45-mm liner-stapler is preferable because it has a lower stricture rate. PMID:19275854

  14. Focus Harmonic Scalpel Compared to Conventional Haemostasis in Open Total Thyroidectomy: A Prospective Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Emanuele; Armato, Enrico; Spinato, Giacomo; Spinato, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this prospective randomized trial was to compare operative factors, postoperative outcomes and surgical complications of open total thyroidectomy when using the Harmonic Scalpel (HS) versus Conventional Haemostasis (CH). Methods. 100 consecutive patients underwent open total thyroidectomy were randomized into two groups: group CH (Conventional Haemostasis) and group HS (Harmonic Scalpel). We recorded the following: age, sex, pathology, thyroid volume, haemostatic technique, operative time, drainage volume, thyroid weight, postoperative pain, postoperative complications, and hospital stay. The results were analyzed using the Student's t test and χ2 test. Results. No significant difference was found between the two groups concerning mean thyroid weight and mean hospital stay. The mean operative time was significantly shorter in the HS group. The total drainage fluid volume was lower in HS group. Two (4%) transient recurrent laryngeal nerve palsies were observed in CH group and no one (0%) in the HS group. Postoperative transient hypocalcemia occurred more frequently in the CH group. HS group experienced significantly less postoperative pain at 24 and 48 hours. Conclusions. In patients undergoing thyroidectomy, HS is a reliable and safe tool. Comparing with CH techniques, its use reduces operative times, postoperative pain, drainage volume and transient hypocalcemia. PMID:22187563

  15. Comparative molecular modelling of biologically active sterols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Mariusz; Mazerski, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Membrane sterols are targets for a clinically important antifungal agent - amphotericin B. The relatively specific antifungal action of the drug is based on a stronger interaction of amphotericin B with fungal ergosterol than with mammalian cholesterol. Conformational space occupied by six sterols has been defined using the molecular dynamics method to establish if the conformational features correspond to the preferential interaction of amphotericin B with ergosterol as compared with cholesterol. The compounds studied were chosen on the basis of structural features characteristic for cholesterol and ergosterol and on available experimental data on the ability to form complexes with the antibiotic. Statistical analysis of the data obtained has been performed. The results show similarity of the conformational spaces occupied by all the sterols tested. This suggests that the conformational differences of sterol molecules are not the major feature responsible for the differential sterol - drug affinity.

  16. Randomized crossover trial comparing the eZ.on plastic condom and a latex condom.

    PubMed

    Cook, L; Nanda, K; Taylor, D

    2001-01-01

    This randomized crossover trial compared the breakage and slippage rates, safety, and acceptability of the recently developed polyurethane bi-directional eZ.on condom with a marketed latex condom. Three hundred sixty couples were asked to use 4 eZ.on condoms and 4 latex condoms. Like several other non-latex condoms tested to date, the eZ.on condom had a higher clinical breakage rate than its latex comparator, while the slippage rates were similar. The clinical breakage rate for the eZ.on condom was 5.6%, compared with 0.9% for the latex condom (difference = 4.76%, with upper 95% confidence bound on the difference = 6.26%). Thus, based on an a priori definition of a 2% clinically acceptable difference, the study failed to conclude equivalence relative to clinical breakage. The complete slippage rate for eZ.on was 1.6%; compared to 0.7% for latex (difference = 0.87%, with upper 95% confidence bound = 1.55%). Thus, based on an a priori definition of a 2% difference we concluded equivalence relative to complete slippage. The safety profile of the eZ.on condom was good and similar to the latex condom. The eZ.on was also found to be easier to don and remove than the latex condom. Although no overall preference existed for either condom, nearly 30%women and men strongly preferred the eZ.on condom to the latex condom. The eZ.on condom may be an acceptable alternative for couples unable or unwilling to use latex condoms.

  17. Principal stratification with predictors of compliance for randomized trials with 2 active treatments.

    PubMed

    Roy, Jason; Hogan, Joseph W; Marcus, Bess H

    2008-04-01

    In behavioral medicine trials, such as smoking cessation trials, 2 or more active treatments are often compared. Noncompliance by some subjects with their assigned treatment poses a challenge to the data analyst. The principal stratification framework permits inference about causal effects among subpopulations characterized by potential compliance. However, in the absence of prior information, there are 2 significant limitations: (1) the causal effects cannot be point identified for some strata and (2) individuals in the subpopulations (strata) cannot be identified. We propose to use additional information-compliance-predictive covariates-to help identify the causal effects and to help describe characteristics of the subpopulations. The probability of membership in each principal stratum is modeled as a function of these covariates. The model is constructed using marginal compliance models (which are identified) and a sensitivity parameter that captures the association between the 2 marginal distributions. We illustrate our methods in both a simulation study and an analysis of data from a smoking cessation trial.

  18. INCITE: A randomised trial comparing constraint induced movement therapy and bimanual training in children with congenital hemiplegia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    sensation), activity limitations (upper limb unimanual capacity and bimanual motor coordination), participation restrictions (in home, school and recreation), environmental (barriers and facilitators to participation) and quality of life. Discussion This paper outlines the theoretical basis, study hypotheses and outcome measures for a matched pairs randomised trial comparing CIMT and BIM training to improve outcomes across the ICF. Trial Registration ACTRN12609000912280 PMID:20064275

  19. No antidepressant effect of biperiden compared with placebo in depression: a double-blind 6-week clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Gillin, J C; Lauriello, J; Kelsoe, J R; Rapaport, M; Golshan, S; Kenny, W M; Sutton, L

    1995-09-29

    Depression may result from an increased ratio of cholinergic to aminergic central neurotransmission. The effect of centrally active anticholinergic agents on depressive ratings in depressed patients, however, has not been well studied. In a previous open label 4-week clinical trial, Kasper et al. (1981) reported that biperiden (Akineton) had antidepressant effects in depressed patients. We compared the effects of placebo and biperiden in a randomized, double-blind, parallel-design 6-week study. All patients received placebo for the first week and then received either biperiden (< or = 12 mg/day) or a peripherally acting anticholinergic agent, glycopyrrolate (Robinul, 1 mg/day) for 4 weeks. All patients received placebo during week 6. Both groups significantly improved, but biperiden did not demonstrate any significant benefit compared with glycopyrrolate. In a subgroup of patients receiving biperiden, the percentage of rapid eye movement sleep was significantly decreased only in the first week of biperiden compared with the initial placebo week, suggesting that tolerance to the central effects of biperiden developed. Further studies would be needed to determine whether anticholinergic agents possess antidepressant properties.

  20. Oral anticancer drugs: how limited dosing options and dose reductions may affect outcomes in comparative trials and efficacy in patients.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Vinay; Massey, Paul R; Fojo, Tito

    2014-05-20

    Historically, cancer medicine has avoided the problem of unequal dosing by comparing maximum-tolerated doses of intravenous regimens with proportionate dose reductions for toxicity. However, in recent years, with the development of numerous oral anticancer agents, dosing options are arbitrarily and increasingly limited by the size of pills. We contend that an underappreciated consequence of pill size is unequal dosing in comparative clinical trials and that this can have an impact on outcomes. We discuss how comparative effectiveness trials can be unbalanced and how the use of doses that are not sustainable might affect outcomes, especially marginal ones. We further argue that because of their poor tolerability and their limited dosing options, which often result in large dose adjustments in response to toxicity, the real-world clinical effectiveness of oral anticancer agents may be diminished and may not emulate results achieved in registration trials.

  1. Oral Anticancer Drugs: How Limited Dosing Options and Dose Reductions May Affect Outcomes in Comparative Trials and Efficacy in Patients

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Vinay; Massey, Paul R.; Fojo, Tito

    2014-01-01

    Historically, cancer medicine has avoided the problem of unequal dosing by comparing maximum-tolerated doses of intravenous regimens with proportionate dose reductions for toxicity. However, in recent years, with the development of numerous oral anticancer agents, dosing options are arbitrarily and increasingly limited by the size of pills. We contend that an underappreciated consequence of pill size is unequal dosing in comparative clinical trials and that this can have an impact on outcomes. We discuss how comparative effectiveness trials can be unbalanced and how the use of doses that are not sustainable might affect outcomes, especially marginal ones. We further argue that because of their poor tolerability and their limited dosing options, which often result in large dose adjustments in response to toxicity, the real-world clinical effectiveness of oral anticancer agents may be diminished and may not emulate results achieved in registration trials. PMID:24711558

  2. The Randomized Comparative Pediatric Critical Illness Stress-Induced Immune Suppression (CRISIS) Prevention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Carcillo, Joseph A.; Dean, J. Michael; Holubkov, Richard; Berger, John; Meert, Kathleen L.; Anand, K. J. S.; Zimmerman, Jerry; Newth, Christopher J. L.; Harrison, Rick; Burr, Jeri; Willson, Douglas F.; Nicholson, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Objective Nosocomial infection / sepsis occurs in up to 40% of children requiring long stay intensive care. Zinc, selenium, glutamine, metoclopramide (a prolactin secretalogue), and or whey protein supplementation have been effective in reducing infection and sepsis in other populations. We evaluated whether daily nutriceutical supplementation with zinc, selenium, glutamine, and metoclopramide, compared to whey protein would reduce the occurrence of nosocomial infection / sepsis in this at-risk population. Design Randomized double blinded comparative effectiveness trial. Setting Eight pediatric intensive care units in the NICHD Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network. Patients Two hundred and ninety three long stay intensive care patients (age 1–17 years) expected to require more than 72 hours of invasive care. Interventions Patients were stratified according to immunocompromised status and center and then randomly assigned to receive daily enteral zinc, selenium, glutamine and IV metoclopramide (n = 149 ZSGM), or daily enteral whey protein (n = 144 WHEY) and IV saline, for up to 28 days of intensive care unit stay. The primary endpoint was time to development of nosocomial sepsis / infection. The analysis was intention to treat. Measurements and Main Results There were no differences by assigned treatment in the overall population with respect to time until the first episode of nosocomial infection / sepsis (median WHEY 13.2 days vs ZSGM 12.1 days, p=0.29 by log rank test) or the rate of nosocomial infection / sepsis (4.83/100 days WHEY vs. 4.99/100 days ZSGM, p = 0.81). Only 9% of the 293 subjects were immunocompromised and there was a reduction in rate of nosocomial infection / sepsis with ZSGM in this immunocompromised group (6.09/100 days WHEY vs 1.57/100 days ZSGM, p value = 0.011). Conclusions Compared with WHEY supplementation, ZSGM conferred no advantage in the immunecompetent population. Further evaluation of ZSGM supplementation is

  3. Adjunctive clindamycin for cellulitis: a clinical trial comparing flucloxacillin with or without clindamycin for the treatment of limb cellulitis

    PubMed Central

    Brindle, Richard; Williams, O Martin; Davies, Paul; Harris, Tim; Jarman, Heather; Hay, Alastair D; Featherstone, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Objective To compare flucloxacillin with clindamycin to flucloxacillin alone for the treatment of limb cellulitis. Design Parallel, double-blinded, randomised controlled trial. Setting Emergency department attendances and general practice referrals within 20 hospitals in England. Interventions Flucloxacillin, at a minimum of 500 mg 4 times per day for 5 days, with clindamycin 300 mg 4 times per day for 2 days given orally versus flucloxacillin given alone. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was improvement at day 5. This was defined as being afebrile with either a reduction in affected skin surface temperature or a reduction in the circumference of the affected area. Secondary outcomes included resolution of systemic features, resolution of inflammatory markers, recovery of renal function, reduction in the affected area, decrease in pain, return to work or normal activities and the absence of increased side effects. Results 410 patients were included in the trial. No significant difference was seen in improvement at day 5 for flucloxacillin with clindamycin (136/156, 87%) versus flucloxacillin alone (140/172, 81%)—OR 1.55 (95% CI 0.81 to 3.01), p=0.174. There was a significant difference in the number of patients with diarrhoea at day 5 in the flucloxacillin with clindamycin allocation (34/160, 22%) versus flucloxacillin alone (16/176, 9%)—OR 2.7 (95% CI 1.41 to 5.07), p=0.002. There was no clinically significant difference in any secondary outcome measures. There was no significant difference in the number of patients stating that they had returned to normal activities at the day 30 interview in the flucloxacillin with clindamycin allocation (99/121, 82%) versus flucloxacillin alone (104/129, 81%)—adjusted OR 0.90 (95% CI 0.44 to 1.84). Conclusions The addition of a short course of clindamycin to flucloxacillin early on in limb cellulitis does not improve outcome. The addition of clindamycin doubles the likelihood of diarrhoea within the first

  4. The protocol for the Families First Edmonton trial (FFE): a randomized community-based trial to compare four service integration approaches for families with low-income

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    of their standardization, the presence of published norming data, and their utility as comparators to other studies of low-income families. As an effectiveness trial, community and government partners participated in all committees through a mutually agreed upon governance model and helped manage and problem solve with researchers. Discussion Modifications were made to the FFE trial based on the pragmatics of community-based trials. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00705328 PMID:24885729

  5. Trial Burn Activities for a Mixed Waste Incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Birk, M.B.

    1998-05-01

    The Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) is located on the Savannah River Site (SRS), owned by the U. S. Department of Energy and managed by BNFL, Inc. for the Westinghouse Savannah River Company. SRS received permits from the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) and the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region IV to construct and operate the CIF, a hazardous, radioactive mixed waste incinerator. This paper presents the results of the trial burn conducted on the CIF in April 1997 which is the initial demonstration of compliance with the permits. The incinerator is currently operating under approved post-trial burn conditions while the trial burn results are being evaluated. A final operating permit is expected the fall of 1998.

  6. Translating comparative effectiveness of depression medications into practice by comparing the depression medication choice decision aid to usual care: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Comparative effectiveness research (CER) documents important differences in antidepressants in terms of efficacy, safety, cost, and burden to the patient. Decision aids can adapt this evidence to help patients participate in making informed choices. In turn, antidepressant therapy will more likely reflect patients’ values and context, leading to improved adherence and mood outcomes. Methods/Design The objective of this study is to develop the Depression Medication Choice decision aid for use during primary care encounters, and to test its efficacy by conducting a clustered practical randomized trial comparing the decision aid to usual depression care in primary care practices. We will use a novel practice-based, patient-centered approach based on participatory action research that involves a multidisciplinary team of designers, investigators, clinicians, patient representatives, and other stakeholders for the development of the decision aid. We will then conduct a clustered practical randomized trial enrolling clinicians and their patients (n = 300) with moderate to severe depression from rural, suburban and inner city primary care practices (n = 10). The intervention will consist of the use of the depression medication choice decision aid during the clinical encounter. This trial will generate preliminary evidence of the relative impact of the decision aid on patient involvement in decision making, decision making quality, patient knowledge, and 6-month measures of medication adherence and mental health compared to usual depression care. Discussion Upon completion of the proposed research, we will have developed and evaluated the efficacy of the decision aid depression medication choice as a novel translational tool for CER in depression treatment, engaged patients with depression in their care, and refined the process by which we conduct practice-based trials with limited research footprint. Trial registration Clinical Trials.gov: NCT01502891 PMID

  7. Physical Activity Program Delivery by Professionals versus Volunteers: the TEAM Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Cynthia M.; Pruitt, Leslie A.; Buman, Matthew P.; King, Abby C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Older adults have low rates of physical activity participation but respond positively to telephone-mediated support programs. Programs are often limited by reliance on professional staff. This study tested telephone-based physical activity advice delivered by professional staff versus trained volunteer peer mentors. Design A 12-month, randomized, controlled clinical trial was executed from 2003–2008. Setting/participants: Twelve volunteer peer mentors and 181 initially inactive adults ages 50 years and older were recruited from the San Francisco Bay Area. Intervention Participants were randomized to: (1) telephone-based physical activity advice delivered by professional staff, (2) telephone-based physical activity advice delivered by trained volunteer peers, or (3) an attention-control arm of staff-delivered telephone support for nutrition. Main Outcome Measures: Moderate-intensity or more vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was assessed at baseline, 6, and 12 months with the CHAMPS Questionnaire, with accelerometry validation (Actigraph) in a randomly selected subsample. Treatment fidelity was examined through analysis of quantity and quality of intervention delivery. Results At 6 and 12 months, both physical activity arms significantly increased MVPA relative to the control arm. Both physical activity arms were comparable in quantity of intervention delivery, but peers demonstrated more versatility and comprehensiveness in quality of intervention content. Conclusions This study demonstrates that trained peer volunteers can effectively promote physical activity increases through telephone-based advice. The results support a program delivery model with good dissemination potential for a variety of community settings. PMID:21553972

  8. Comparing Sanitation Delivery Modalities in Urban Informal Settlement Schools: A Randomized Trial in Nairobi, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Bohnert, Kate; Chard, Anna N; Mwaki, Alex; Kirby, Amy E; Muga, Richard; Nagel, Corey L; Thomas, Evan A; Freeman, Matthew C

    2016-11-30

    The provision of safely managed sanitation in informal settlements is a challenge, especially in schools that require durable, clean, sex-segregated facilities for a large number of children. In informal settlements in Nairobi, school sanitation facilities demand considerable capital costs, yet are prone to breakage and often unhygienic. The private sector may be able to provide quality facilities and services to schools at lower costs as an alternative to the sanitation that is traditionally provided by the government. We conducted a randomized trial comparing private sector service delivery (PSSD) of urine-diverting dry latrines with routine waste collection and maintenance and government standard delivery (GSD) of cistern-flush toilets or ventilated improved pit latrines. The primary outcomes were facility maintenance, use, exposure to fecal contamination, and cost. Schools were followed for one school year. There were few differences in maintenance and pathogen exposure between PSSD and GSD toilets. Use of the PSSD toilets was 128% higher than GSD toilets, as measured with electronic motion detectors. The initial cost of private sector service delivery was USD 2053 (KES 210,000) per school, which was lower than the average cost of rehabilitating the government standard flush-type toilets (USD 9306 (KES 922,638)) and constructing new facilities (USD 114,889 (KES 1,169,668)). The private sector delivery of dry sanitation provided a feasible alternative to the delivery of sewage sanitation in Nairobi informal settlements and might elsewhere in sub-Saharan Africa.

  9. A randomized comparative effectiveness trial of using cable television to deliver diabetes prevention programming

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Ronald T; Sandy, Lewis G; Beauregard, Tom; Coblitz, Mark; Norton, Kristi L; Vojta, Deneen

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the use and effectiveness of two “in-home” strategies for delivering diabetes prevention programming using cable television. Methods An individually randomized, two-arm intervention trial including adults with diabetes risk factors living in two US cities. Interventions involved a 16-session lifestyle intervention delivered via “video-on-demand” cable television, offered alone versus in combination with web-based lifestyle support tools. Repeated measures longitudinal linear regression with imputation of missing observations was used to compare changes in body weight. Results A total of 306 individuals were randomized and offered the interventions. After 5 months, 265 (87%) participants viewed at least 1, and 110 (36%) viewed ≥9 of the video episodes. A total of 262 (86%) participants completed a 5-month weight measurement. In intention-to-treat analysis with imputation of missing observations, mean weight loss at 5 months for both treatment groups combined was 3.3% (95% CI 0.7-5.0%), regardless of intervention participation (with no differences between randomized groups (P = 0.19)), and was 4.9% (95% CI 2.1-6.5%) for participants who viewed ≥9 episodes. Conclusions In-home delivery of evidence-based diabetes prevention programming in a reality television format, offered with or without online behavioral support tools, can achieve modest weight losses consistent with past implementation studies of face-to-face programs using similar content. PMID:24740868

  10. Comparative efficacy of aloe vera mouthwash and chlorhexidine on periodontal health: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Abhishek; Bhashyam, Mamtha

    2016-01-01

    Background With introduction of many herbal medicines, dentistry has recently evidenced shift of approach for treating many inflammatory oral diseases by using such modalities. Aloe vera is one such product exhibiting multiple benefits and has gained considerable importance in clinical research recently. Aim To compare the efficacy of Aloevera and Chlorhexidine mouthwash on Periodontal Health. Material and Methods Thirty days randomized controlled trial was conducted among 390 dental students. The students were randomized into two intervention groups namely Aloe Vera (AV) chlorhexidine group (CHX) and one control (placebo) group. Plaque index and gingival index was recorded for each participant at baseline, 15 days and 30 days. The findings were than statistically analyzed, ANOVA and Post Hoc test were used. Results There was significant reduction (p<0.05) in the mean scores of all the parameters with Aloe Vera (AV) and chlorhexidine group. Post hoc test showed significant difference (p<0.000) in mean plaque and gingival index scores of aloe Vera and placebo and chlorhexidine and placebo group. No significant difference (p<0.05) was observed between AloeVera and chlorhexidine group. Conclusions Being an herbal product AloeVera has shown equal effectiveness as Chlorhexidine. Hence can be used as an alternative product for curing and preventing gingivitis. Key words:Aloe vera, chlorhexidine, dental plaque, gingivitis. PMID:27703614

  11. Explaining feast or famine in randomized field trials. Medical science and criminology compared.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Jonathan P

    2003-06-01

    A feast of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in medical science and comparative famine in criminology can be explained in terms of cultural and structural factors. Of central importance is the context in which the evaluation of interventions is done and the difference in status of situational research in the two disciplines. Evaluation of medical interventions has traditionally been led by practitioner (clinical) academics. This is not the case in criminal justice, where theory has had higher status than intervention research. Medical science has advanced in, or closely associated with, university teaching hospitals, but links between criminology and criminal justice services are far more tenuous. The late development of situational crime prevention seems extraordinary from a medical perspective, as does the absence of university police schools in the United Kingdom and elsewhere. These structural and cultural factors explain concentration of expectation, resource, and RCT productivity in medical science. The Campbell Collaboration and the Academy of Experimental Criminology are forces which are reducing this polarization of feast and famine in RCTs. But unless scientific criminology is embedded in university schools which are responsible for the education and training of law, probation, and police practitioners, convergence in terms of RCTs and implementation of findings in practice seems unlikely.

  12. Randomized trial comparing ceftriaxone with cefonicid for treatment of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Jiménez, J; Ribera, E; Gasser, I; Artaza, M A; Del Valle, O; Pahissa, A; Martínez-Vázquez, J M

    1993-01-01

    We compared cefonicid (2 g every 12 h) and ceftriaxone (2 g every 24 h) for their efficacy and safety in treating spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in cirrhotic patients in an open randomized clinical trial (30 patients in each group). Clinical, laboratory, and bacteriologic characteristics were similar in both groups. Ceftriaxone-susceptible strains were isolated on 44 occasions (94%), and cefonicid-susceptible strains were isolated on 43 occasions (91.5%). The antibiotic concentration in ascitic fluid/MIC ratio for ceftriaxone was > 100 throughout the dose interval (24 h), while it was lower for cefonicid (between 1 and 18). A total of 100% of patients treated with ceftriaxone, and 94% of those treated with cefonicid were cured of their infections (P was not significant). Hospitalization mortality was 37% in the cefonicid group and 30% in the ceftriaxone group (P was not significant). The time that elapsed between the initiation of treatment and the patient's death was shorter in the cefonicid group patients (5.3 +/- 3.90 days) than in the ceftriaxone group patients (11.8 +/- 9.15 days) (P < 0.05). None of the patients presented with superinfections, and only two patients treated with cefonicid and three patients treated with ceftriaxone developed colonizations with Enterococcus faecalis or Candida albicans. Ceftriaxone and cefonicid are safe and useful agents for treating cirrhotic spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, although the pharmacokinetic characteristics of ceftriaxone seem to be more advantageous than those of cefonicid. PMID:8215267

  13. Randomized trial comparing mindfulness training for smokers to a matched control

    PubMed Central

    Davis, James M.; Manley, Alison R.; Goldberg, Simon B.; Smith, Stevens S.; Jorenby, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    Smoking continues to take an enormous toll on society, and although most smokers would like to quit, most are unsuccessful using existing therapies. These findings call on researchers to develop and test therapies that provide higher rates of long-term smoking abstinence. We report results of a randomized controlled trial comparing a novel smoking cessation treatment using mindfulness training to a matched control based on the American Lung Association's Freedom From Smoking program. Data were collected on 175 low socioeconomic status smokers in 2011-2012 in a medium sized Midwestern city. A significant difference was not found in the primary outcome; intent-to-treat biochemically confirmed 6-month smoking abstinence rates were Mindfulness = 25.0%, Control= 17.9% (p = 0.35). Differences favoring the mindfulness condition were found on measures of urges and changes in mindfulness, perceived stress, and experiential avoidance. While no significant differences were found in quit rates, the mindfulness intervention resulted in positive outcomes. PMID:24957302

  14. Comparing Sanitation Delivery Modalities in Urban Informal Settlement Schools: A Randomized Trial in Nairobi, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Bohnert, Kate; Chard, Anna N.; Mwaki, Alex; Kirby, Amy E.; Muga, Richard; Nagel, Corey L.; Thomas, Evan A.; Freeman, Matthew C.

    2016-01-01

    The provision of safely managed sanitation in informal settlements is a challenge, especially in schools that require durable, clean, sex-segregated facilities for a large number of children. In informal settlements in Nairobi, school sanitation facilities demand considerable capital costs, yet are prone to breakage and often unhygienic. The private sector may be able to provide quality facilities and services to schools at lower costs as an alternative to the sanitation that is traditionally provided by the government. We conducted a randomized trial comparing private sector service delivery (PSSD) of urine-diverting dry latrines with routine waste collection and maintenance and government standard delivery (GSD) of cistern-flush toilets or ventilated improved pit latrines. The primary outcomes were facility maintenance, use, exposure to fecal contamination, and cost. Schools were followed for one school year. There were few differences in maintenance and pathogen exposure between PSSD and GSD toilets. Use of the PSSD toilets was 128% higher than GSD toilets, as measured with electronic motion detectors. The initial cost of private sector service delivery was USD 2053 (KES 210,000) per school, which was lower than the average cost of rehabilitating the government standard flush-type toilets (USD 9306 (KES 922,638)) and constructing new facilities (USD 114,889 (KES 1,169,668)). The private sector delivery of dry sanitation provided a feasible alternative to the delivery of sewage sanitation in Nairobi informal settlements and might elsewhere in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:27916914

  15. Prospective, comparative effectiveness trial of cow's milk elimination and swallowed fluticasone for pediatric eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Kruszewski, P G; Russo, J M; Franciosi, J P; Varni, J W; Platts-Mills, T A E; Erwin, E A

    2016-05-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic, immune-mediated disease in which food antigens play a key role. Current therapeutic options are limited to long-term steroid medication and dietary elimination of multiple foods, each of which is challenging. Our objective was to compare single food elimination of cow's milk to swallowed fluticasone in pediatric EoE patients. This is a prospective, comparative effectiveness trial of newly diagnosed EoE patients (ages 2-18 years) treated with swallowed fluticasone (n = 24) or elimination of cow's milk (n = 20). The dual outcome measures of repeat esophageal biopsy (6-8 weeks) and change in Pediatric Quality of Life Inventor (PedsQL) EoE Module and Symptoms Scales were used to assess response to treatment. After 6-8 weeks of treatment, peak esophageal eosinophil counts decreased to below the threshold of 15 eosinophils/high-power field in 64% of patients treated with cow's milk elimination and 80% of patients treated with swallowed fluticasone (P = 0.4). Mean PedsQL EoE Module total scores (69 vs. 82; P < 0.005) and Total Symptoms scores (58 vs. 75; P = 0.001) showed significant improvement with cow's milk elimination. Among children treated with swallowed fluticasone, mean PedsQL EoE Module total scores (64 vs. 75; P < 0.05) and Total Symptoms scores (58 vs. 69; P < 0.01) were also significantly improved after 6-8 weeks of therapy. Removal of cow's milk from the diet is an effective single food elimination treatment for pediatric patients with EoE as assessed by statistically significant histologic and symptomatic improvement. Cow's milk elimination may be more desirable for EoE patients who do not want to take chronic, long-term steroid medications.

  16. Comparing Adrenaline with Tranexamic Acid to Control Acute Endobronchial Bleeding: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Fekri, Mitra Samareh; Hashemi-Bajgani, Seyed Mehdy; Shafahi, Ahmad; Zarshenas, Rozita

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hemoptysis occurs due to either pulmonary diseases or bronchoscopy interventions. The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of the endobronchial instillation of adrenaline with that of tranexamic acid. Methods: Fifty patients were randomly selected as 2 double-blinded sample groups (n=25). In these patients, bleeding could not be controlled with cold saline lavage during bronchoscopy and they, therefore, required prescription of another medicine. Adrenaline (1 mg) in one group and tranexamic acid (500 mg) in the other group were diluted in 20 mL of normal saline and instilled through the bronchoscope. This technique was repeated 3 times at 90-second intervals, if necessary. In the case of persistent bleeding, 90 seconds after the last dose, a second medicine was given for bleeding control. Observation of clot through the bronchoscope meant that the bleeding had stopped. The efficacy of tranexamic acid and adrenaline was evaluated and then compared using the Mann–Whitney test. Results: The time of bleeding control had no significant difference between tranexamic acid and adrenaline (P=0.908). Another analysis was done to evaluate bleeding control with a second medicine; the results showed that 1 (4%) patient in the tranexamic acid and 8 (32%) in the adrenaline group needed the second medicine and there was no significant difference between the 2 groups (P=0.609). Conclusion: Our results suggested that tranexamic acid by endobronchial instillation was as efficient as adrenaline in controlling hemoptysis and required less frequent use of a second medicine. Trial Registration Number: IRCT2014120220188 PMID:28360438

  17. Randomized trial comparing natural and synthetic surfactant: increased infection rate after natural surfactant?

    PubMed

    Kukkonen, A K; Virtanen, M; Järvenpää, A L; Pokela, M L; Ikonen, S; Fellman, V

    2000-05-01

    The efficacy of a natural porcine surfactant and a synthetic surfactant were compared in a randomized trial. In three neonatal intensive care units, 228 neonates with respiratory distress and a ratio of arterial to alveolar partial pressure of oxygen <0.22 were randomly assigned to receive either Curosurf 100 mgkg-1 or Exosurf Neonatal 5 ml.kg-1. After Curosurf, the fraction of inspired oxygen was lower from 15 min (0.45 +/- 0.22 vs 0.70 +/- 0.22, p = 0.0001) to 6 h (0.48 +/- 0.26 vs 0.64 +/- 0.23, p = 0.0001) and the mean airway pressure was lower at 1 h (8.3 +/- 3.2 mm H20 vs 9.4 +/- 3.1 mm H20, p = 0.01). Thereafter the respiratory parameters were similar. The duration of mechanical ventilation (median 6 vs 5 d) and the duration of oxygen supplementation (median 5 vs 4 d) were similar for Curosurf and Exosurf. After Curosurf, C-reactive protein value over 40 mg l-1 occurred in 45% (vs 12%; RR 3.62, 95%CI 2.12-6.17, p = 0.001), leukopenia in 52% (vs 28%; RR 1.85, 95% CI 1.31-2.61, p = 0.001) and bacteraemia in 11% (vs 4%; RR 3.17, 95% CI 1.05-9.52, p < 0.05). We conclude that when given as rescue therapy Curosurf had no advantage compared with Exosurf in addition to the more effective initial response. Curosurf may increase the risk of infection.

  18. The effects of honey compared to silver sulfadiazine for the treatment of burns: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Zoriah; Abdul Rasool Hassan, Bassam

    2017-02-01

    Evidence from animal studies and trials suggests that honey may accelerate wound healing. The objective of this review was to assess the effects of honey compared with silver dressings on the healing of burn wounds. Relevant databases for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of honey compared with silver sulfadiazine (SSD) were searched. The quality of the selected trials was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Assessment Tool. The primary endpoints considered were wound healing time and the number of infected wounds rendered sterile. Nine RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Based on moderate quality evidence there was a statistically significant difference between the two groups, favoring honey in healing time (MD -5.76days, 95% CI -8.14 to -3.39) and the proportions of infected wounds rendered sterile (RR 2.59; 95% CI 1.58-2.88). The available evidence suggests that honey dressings promote better wound healing than silver sulfadiazine for burns.

  19. Result of two randomized trials comparing nolatrexed (Thymitaq) versus methotrexate in patients with recurrent head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Pivot, X; Wadler, S; Kelly, C; Ruxer, R; Tortochaux, J; Stern, J; Belpomme, D; Humblet, Y; Domenge, C; Clendeninn, N; Johnston, A; Penning, C; Schneider, M

    2001-11-01

    We report on two randomized trials performed in the USA and Europe, which compared methotrexate and nolatrexed as treatment for patients with recurrent head and neck cancer. Eligibility criteria included: histologically confirmed squamous-cell carcinoma, measurable disease, adequate hematological, renal and hepatic functions, failure of a first-line chemotherapy, and informed consent. Methotrexate 40 mg/m2 was weekly given by short infusion, and nolatrexed 725 mg/m2 per day was administered as a five-day continuous infusion, every three weeks. A total of 139 patients (63 in the USA. 76 in Europe) were randomized based on a ratio of 2/1: 93 and 46 received nolatrexed and methotrexate, respectively. Patient characteristics included 115 males and 24 females; median age 60 years. In the nolatrexed arm, the following grade 3-4 toxicities occurred: neutropenia (29.9%) with 3.1% of febrile neutropenia, mucositis (33.3%), and vomiting (10.3%). In the MTX arm, the grade 3-4 toxicities were neutropenia (7.1%) and mucositis (6.9%). There was no difference in activity between the nolatrexed and the methotrexate treatment: 3.3% and 10.8% of objective responses, 1.9 versus 1.5 months of disease-free progression and 3.5 versus 3.7 months of overall survival, respectively. Nolatrexed has demonstrated a similar activity to methotrexate.

  20. A randomized clinical trial comparing general exercise, McKenzie treatment and a control group in patients with neck pain.

    PubMed

    Kjellman, Görel; Oberg, Birgitta

    2002-07-01

    Seventy-seven patients with neck pain in the primary health care were included in a prospective, randomized clinical trial and randomly assigned to general exercise, McKenzie treatment, or a control group. Seventy patients completed the treatment; response rate 93% at 12-month follow-up. All three groups showed significant improvement regarding the main outcomes, pain intensity and Neck Disability Index, even at 12-month follow-up, but there was no significant difference between the groups. In all, 79% reported that they were better or completely restored after treatment, although 51% reported constant/daily pain. In the McKenzie group compared with the control group, a tendency toward greater improvement was noted for pain intensity at 3 weeks and at 6-month follow-up, and for post-treatment Neck Disability Index. Significant improvement in Distress and Risk Assessment Method scores was shown in the McKenzie group only. The three groups had similar recurrence rates, although after 12 months the McKenzie group showed a tendency toward fewer visits for additional health care. The study did not provide a definite evidence of treatment efficacy in patients with neck pain, however, there was a tendency toward a better outcome with the two active alternatives compared with the control group.

  1. Pre-trial quality assurance processes for an intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) trial: PARSPORT, a UK multicentre Phase III trial comparing conventional radiotherapy and parotid-sparing IMRT for locally advanced head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Clark, C H; Miles, E A; Urbano, M T Guerrero; Bhide, S A; Bidmead, A M; Harrington, K J; Nutting, C M

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare conventional radiotherapy with parotid gland-sparing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using the PARSPORT trial. The validity of such a trial depends on the radiotherapy planning and delivery meeting a defined standard across all centres. At the outset, many of the centres had little or no experience of delivering IMRT; therefore, quality assurance processes were devised to ensure consistency and standardisation of all processes for comparison within the trial. The pre-trial quality assurance (QA) programme and results are described. Each centre undertook exercises in target volume definition and treatment planning, completed a resource questionnaire and produced a process document. Additionally, the QA team visited each participating centre. Each exercise had to be accepted before patients could be recruited into the trial. 10 centres successfully completed the quality assurance exercises. A range of treatment planning systems, linear accelerators and delivery methods were used for the planning exercises, and all the plans created reached the standard required for participation in this multicentre trial. All 10 participating centres achieved implementation of a comprehensive and robust IMRT programme for treatment of head and neck cancer.

  2. ACTIVE: A Cognitive Intervention Trial to Promote Independence in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Jobe, Jared B.; Smith, David M.; Ball, Karlene; Tennstedt, Sharon L.; Marsiske, Michael; Willis, Sherry L.; Rebok, George W.; Morris, John N.; Helmers, Karin F.; Leveck, Mary D.; Kleinman, Ken

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly (ACTIVE) trial is a randomized, controlled, single-masked trial designed to determine whether cognitive training interventions (memory, reasoning, and speed of information processing), which have previously been found to be successful at improving mental abilities under laboratory or small-scale field conditions, can affect cognitively based measures of daily functioning. Enrollment began during 1998; 2-year follow-up will be completed by January 2002. Primary outcomes focus on measures of cognitively demanding everyday functioning, including financial management, food preparation, medication use, and driving. Secondary outcomes include health-related quality of life, mobility, and health-service utilization. Trial participants (n = 2832) are aged 65 and over, and at entry into the trial, did not have significant cognitive, physical, or functional decline. Because of its size and the carefully developed rigor, ACTIVE may serve as a guide for future behavioral medicine trials of this nature. PMID:11514044

  3. Further results from a trial comparing a hidden speed camera programme with visible camera operation.

    PubMed

    Keall, Michael D; Povey, Lynley J; Frith, William J

    2002-11-01

    As described in a previous paper [Accident Anal. Prev., 33 (2001) 277], the hidden camera programme was found to be associated with significant net falls in speeds, crashes and casualties both in 'speed camera areas' (specific signed sites to which camera operation is restricted) and on 100 km/h speed limit roads generally. These changes in speeds, crashes and casualties were identified in the trial area in comparison with a control area where generally highly visible speed camera enforcement continued to be used (and was used in the trial area prior to the commencement of the trial). There were initial changes in public attitudes associated with the trial that later largely reverted to pre-trial levels. Analysis of 2 years' data of the trial showed that falls in crash and casualty rates and speeds associated with the hidden camera programme were being sustained. It is not possible to separate out the effects of the concealment of the cameras from other aspects of the hidden speed camera programme, such as the four-fold increase in ticketing. This increase in speed camera tickets issued was an expected consequence of hiding the cameras and as such, an integral part of the hidden camera programme being evaluated.

  4. Managed Activity Graded Exercise iN Teenagers and pre-Adolescents (MAGENTA) feasibility randomised controlled trial: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Brigden, Amberly; Beasant, Lucy; Hollingworth, William; Metcalfe, Chris; Gaunt, Daisy; Mills, Nicola; Jago, Russell; Crawley, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Paediatric chronic fatigue syndrome or myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) is a relatively common and disabling condition, yet there is a limited evidence base for treatment. There is good evidence that graded exercise therapy is moderately effective in adults with CFS/ME, but there is little evidence for the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, acceptability or best method of delivery for paediatric CFS/ME. This study aims to investigate the acceptability and feasibility of carrying out a multicentre randomised controlled trial investigating the effectiveness of graded exercise therapy compared with activity management for children/teenagers who are mildly or moderately affected with CFS/ME. Methods and analysis 100 paediatric patients (8–17 years) with CFS/ME will be recruited from 3 specialist UK National Health Service (NHS) CFS/ME services (Bath, Cambridge and Newcastle). Patients will be randomised (1:1) to receive either graded exercise therapy or activity management. Feasibility analysis will include the number of young people eligible, approached and consented to the trial; attrition rate and treatment adherence; questionnaire and accelerometer completion rates. Integrated qualitative methods will ascertain perceptions of feasibility and acceptability of recruitment, randomisation and the interventions. All adverse events will be monitored to assess the safety of the trial. Ethics and dissemination The trial has received ethical approval from the National Research Ethics Service (South West—Frenchay 15/SW/0124). Trial registration number ISRCTN23962803; Pre-results. PMID:27377634

  5. A Short-Term Physical Activity Randomized Trial in the Lower Mississippi Delta

    PubMed Central

    Katzmarzyk, Peter T.; Champagne, Catherine M.; Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Broyles, Stephanie T.; Harsha, David; Kennedy, Betty M.; Johnson, William D.

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine if a short-term pedometer-based intervention results in immediate increases in time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) compared to a minimal educational intervention. Methods A sample of 43 overweight adults 35 to 64 years of age participated in a one week pedometer-based feasibility trial monitored by accelerometry. Participants were randomized into a one-week education-only group or a group that also wore a pedometer. Accelerometer-measured MVPA was measured over 7 days at baseline and again for 7 days immediately post-intervention. Results Minutes of MVPA increased significantly in the overall sample (p = 0.02); however, the effect of adding the pedometer to the education program was not significant (p = 0.89). Mean (±SE) MVPA increased from 12.7±2.4 min/day to 16.2±3.6 min/day in the education-only group and from 13.2±3.3 min/day to 16.3±3.9 min/day in the education+pedometer group. The correlation between change in steps/day and change in MVPA was 0.69 (p<0.0001). Conclusions The results of this study suggest that the addition of a pedometer to a short-term education program does not produce added benefits with respect to increasing physical activity in the Lower Mississippi Delta. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01264757 PMID:22046325

  6. Examination of Individual Differences in Outcomes from a Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial Comparing Formal and Informal Individual Auditory Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sherri L.; Saunders, Gabrielle H.; Chisolm, Theresa H.; Frederick, Melissa; Bailey, Beth A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine if patient characteristics or clinical variables could predict who benefits from individual auditory training. Method: A retrospective series of analyses were performed using a data set from a large, multisite, randomized controlled clinical trial that compared the treatment effects of at-home…

  7. Couple and Individual Adjustment for 2 Years Following a Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Traditional versus Integrative Behavioral Couple Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Andrew; Atkins, David C.; Yi, Jean; Baucom, Donald H.; George, William H.

    2006-01-01

    Follow-up data across 2 years were obtained on 130 of 134 couples who were originally part of a randomized clinical trial comparing traditional versus integrative behavioral couple therapy (TBCT vs. IBCT; A. Christensen et al., 2004). Both treatments produced similar levels of clinically significant improvement at 2 years posttreatment (69% of…

  8. Comparative trial of rifampin-doxycycline versus tetracycline-streptomycin in the therapy of human brucellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Ariza, J; Gudiol, F; Pallarés, R; Rufí, G; Fernández-Viladrich, P

    1985-01-01

    In an attempt to compare the efficacy of rifampin-doxycycline with tetracycline-streptomycin for the treatment of human brucellosis, we administered both combinations for a 30-day period, similar to the period recommended by the World Health Organization in a prospective, randomized trial. Forty-six patients were included in the final study (36 men and 10 women); 41 had blood cultures positive for Brucella melitensis. The 28 patients in group A received tetracycline hydrochloride at doses of 0.5 g every 6 h or doxycycline at 100 mg every 12 h for 30 days plus 1 g of streptomycin a day for 21 days. The 18 patients in group B received rifampin at 15 mg/kg per day in a single morning dose plus 100 mg of doxycycline every 12 h for 30 days. For patients with focal disease from both groups, therapy was prolonged to 45 days. All patients underwent rigorous clinical and bacteriological long-term follow-up. There were no therapeutic failures in either group, and the defervescence period was similar for both groups (3.1 days for group A, 2.6 days for group B). Two patients (7.1%) from group A had relapses, as did seven (38.8%) from group B (P = 0.024), and blood cultures again became positive for B. melitensis in all of them. In both groups treatment was generally well tolerated. The results strongly suggest that the rifampin-doxycycline combination is a less efficacious mode of therapy for brucellosis to prevent relapses than is the classical tetracycline-streptomycin combination when both are administered for 30 days. A more prolonged period of administration of the rifampin-doxycycline combination may be required to obtain the same low relapse rate as that achieved with the classical tetracycline-streptomycin treatment. PMID:4073878

  9. Comparing nurses' knowledge retention following electronic continuous education and educational booklet: a controlled trial study

    PubMed Central

    Badiei, Mahmud; Gharib, Mitra; Zolfaghari, Mitra; Mojtahedzadeh, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Background: Training methods that enhance nurses’ learning and retention will increase the quality of patient care. This study aimed to compare the effectiveness of electronic learning and educational booklet on the nurses’ retention of diabetes updates. Methods: In this controlled trial study, convenience sampling was used to select 123 nurses from the endocrinology and internal medicine wards of three hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences (Tehran, Iran). The participants were allocated to three groups of manual, electronic learning, and control. The booklet and electronic learning groups were trained using educational booklet and electronic continuous medical education (CME) website, respectively. The control group did not receive any intervention. In all the three groups, the nurses' knowledge was measured before the intervention, and one and four weeks after the intervention. Data were collected by a questionnaire. Results: Significant differences were observed between the mean scores of the three groups one and four weeks after the intervention (F=26.17, p=0.001 and F=4.07, p=0.020, respectively), and post hoc test showed that this difference was due to the higher score in e-learning group. Both e-learning and booklet methods could effectively improve nurses' knowledge (χ²=23.03, p=0.001 and χ²=51.71, p=0.001, respectively). Conclusion: According to the results of this study, electronic learning was more effective than booklet in enhancing the learning and retention of knowledge. Electronic learning is suggested as a more suitable method as it provides appropriate interactions and attractive virtual environments to motivate the learners and promote retention. PMID:27493908

  10. Comparative Efficacy of Oil Pulling and Chlorhexidine on Oral Malodor: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Devi M, Aruna; Narang, Ridhi; V, Swathi; Makkar, Diljot Kaur

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oral malodor affects a large section of population. Traditional Indian folk remedy, oil pulling not only reduces it but can also bring down the cost of treatment. Aims: To compare the efficacy of oil pulling and chlorhexidine in reducing oral malodor and microbes. Materials and Methods: Three week randomized controlled trial was conducted among 60 students of three hostels of Maharani College of science and arts and commerce and Smt V.H.D.College of Home Science. The hostels were randomized into two intervention groups namely chlorhexidine group, sesame oil and one control (placebo) group. Twenty girls were selected from each hostel based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. Informed consent was obtained. The parameters recorded at the baseline (day 0) and post intervention on day 22 were plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), objective (ORG1) and subjective (ORG2) organoleptic scores and anaerobic bacterial colony (ABC) count. Intra and inter group comparisons were made using Kruskal Wallis test, Wilcoxan sign rank test, ANOVA and student t-test. Results: There was significant reduction (p<0.05) in the mean scores of all the parameters within sesame oil and chlorhexidine group. Among the groups significant difference was observed in objective and subjective organoleptic scores. Post hoc test showed significant difference (p<0.000) in mean organoleptic scores of sesame oil and placebo and chlorhexidine and placebo group. No significant difference (p<0.05) was observed between sesame oil and chlorhexidine group. Conclusion: Oil pulling with sesame oil is equally efficacious as chlorhexidine in reducing oral malodor and microbes causing it. It should be promoted as a preventive home care therapy. PMID:25584309

  11. Contura Multi-Lumen Balloon Breast Brachytherapy Catheter: Comparative Dosimetric Findings of a Phase 4 Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, Douglas W.; Vicini, Frank A.; Julian, Thomas B.; Cuttino, Laurie W.; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai D.

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Final dosimetric findings of a completed, multi-institutional phase 4 registry trial using the Contura Multi-Lumen Balloon (MLB) breast brachytherapy catheter to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in patients with early-stage breast cancer are presented. Methods and Materials: Three dosimetric plans with identical target coverage were generated for each patient for comparison: multilumen multidwell (MLMD); central-lumen multidwell (CLMD); and central-lumen single-dwell (CLSD) loading of the Contura catheter. For this study, a successful treatment plan achieved ideal dosimetric goals and included the following: ≥95% of the prescribed dose (PD) covering ≥95% of the target volume (TV); maximum skin dose ≤125% of the PD; maximum rib dose ≤145% of the PD; and V150 ≤50 cc and V200 ≤10 cc. Results: Between January 2008 and February 2011, 23 institutions participated. A total of 318 patients were available for dosimetric review. Using the Contura MLB, all dosimetric criteria were met in 78.93% of cases planned with MLMD versus 55.38% with the CLMD versus 37.66% with the CLSD (P≤.0001). Evaluating all patients with the full range of skin to balloon distance represented, median maximum skin dose was reduced by 12% and median maximum rib dose by 13.9% when using MLMD-based dosimetric plans compared to CLSD. The dosimetric benefit of MLMD was further demonstrated in the subgroup of patients where skin thickness was <5 mm, where MLMD use allowed a 38% reduction in median maximum skin dose over CLSD. For patients with rib distance <5 mm, the median maximum rib dose reduction was 27%. Conclusions: Use of the Contura MLB catheter produced statistically significant improvements in dosimetric capabilities between CLSD and CLMD treatments. This device approach demonstrates the ability not only to overcome the barriers of limited skin thickness and close rib proximity, but to consistently achieve a higher standard of dosimetric planning goals.

  12. Nurse Family Partnership: Comparing Costs per Family in Randomized Trials Versus Scale-Up.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ted R; Hendrie, Delia

    2015-12-01

    The literature that addresses cost differences between randomized trials and full-scale replications is quite sparse. This paper examines how costs differed among three randomized trials and six statewide scale-ups of nurse family partnership (NFP) intensive home visitation to low income first-time mothers. A literature review provided data on pertinent trials. At our request, six well-established programs reported their total expenditures. We adjusted the costs to national prices based on mean hourly wages for registered nurses and then inflated them to 2010 dollars. A centralized data system provided utilization. Replications had fewer home visits per family than trials (25 vs. 31, p = .05), lower costs per client ($8860 vs. $12,398, p = .01), and lower costs per visit ($354 vs. $400, p = .30). Sample size limited the significance of these differences. In this type of labor intensive program, costs probably were lower in scale-up than in randomized trials. Key cost drivers were attrition and the stable caseload size possible in an ongoing program. Our estimates reveal a wide variation in cost per visit across six state programs, which suggests that those planning replications should not expect a simple rule to guide cost estimations for scale-ups. Nevertheless, NFP replications probably achieved some economies of scale.

  13. Nurse Family Partnership: Comparing Costs per Family in Randomized Trials versus Scale-up

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Ted R.; Hendrie, Delia

    2015-01-01

    The literature that addresses cost differences between randomized trials and full-scale replications is quite sparse. This paper examines how costs differed among three randomized trials and six statewide scale-ups of Nurse Family Partnership (NFP) intensive home visitation to low income first-time mothers. A literature review provided data on pertinent trials. At our request, six well-established programs reported their total expenditures. We adjusted the costs to national prices based on mean hourly wages for registered nurses and then inflated them to 2010 dollars. A centralized data system provided utilization. Replications had fewer home visits per family than trials (25 vs. 31, p = .05), lower costs per client ($8,860 vs. $12,398, p = .01), and lower costs per visit ($354 vs. $400, p = .30). Sample size limited the significance of these differences. In this type of labor intensive program, costs probably were lower in scale-up than in randomized trials. Key cost drivers were attrition and the stable caseload size possible in an ongoing program. Our estimates reveal a wide variation in cost per visit across six state programs, which suggests that those planning replications should not expect a simple rule to guide cost estimations for scale-ups. Nevertheless, NFP replications probably achieved some economies of scale. PMID:26507844

  14. Acute effects of massage or active exercise in relieving muscle soreness: randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Lars L; Jay, Kenneth; Andersen, Christoffer H; Jakobsen, Markus D; Sundstrup, Emil; Topp, Robert; Behm, David G

    2013-12-01

    Massage is commonly believed to be the best modality for relieving muscle soreness. However, actively warming up the muscles with exercise may be an effective alternative. The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effect of massage with active exercise for relieving muscle soreness. Twenty healthy female volunteers (mean age 32 years) participated in this examiner-blind randomized controlled trial (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01478451). The participants performed eccentric contractions for the upper trapezius muscle on a Biodex dynamometer. Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) presented 48 hours later, at which the participants (a) received 10 minutes of massage of the trapezius muscle or (b) performed 10 minutes of active exercise (shoulder shrugs 10 × 10 reps) with increasing elastic resistance (Thera-Band). First, 1 treatment was randomly applied to 1 shoulder while the contralateral shoulder served as a passive control. Two hours later, the contralateral resting shoulder received the other treatment. The participants rated the intensity of soreness (scale 0-10), and a blinded examiner took measures of pressure pain threshold (PPT) of the upper trapezius immediately before treatment and 0, 10, 20, and 60 minutes after treatment 48 hours posteccentric exercise. Immediately before treatment, the intensity of soreness was 5.0 (SD 2.2) and PPT was 138 (SD 78) kPa. In response to treatment, a significant treatment by time interaction was found for the intensity of soreness (p < 0.001) and PPT (p < 0.05). Compared with control, both active exercise and massage significantly reduced the intensity of soreness and increased PPT (i.e., reduced pain sensitivity). For both types of treatment, the greatest effect on perceived soreness occurred immediately after treatment, whereas the effect on PPT peaked 20 minutes after treatment. In conclusion, active exercise using elastic resistance provides similar acute relief of muscle soreness as compared with that using massage

  15. ACCESS HD pilot: A randomised feasibility trial Comparing Catheters with fistulas in Elderly patientS Starting haemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Robert; Ravani, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The selection of the type of vascular access for haemodialysis is an important intervention question. However, only observational studies are available to inform decision-making in this area, and they are at high risk of selection bias. While a clinical trial comparing the effects of the 2 most frequently chosen strategies for haemodialysis access (fistulas and catheters) on patient important and ‘hard’ clinical end points is needed, the feasibility of such a trial is uncertain. Methods and analysis This open-label pilot randomised controlled trial will test the feasibility and safety of randomising elderly people (≥65 years) who start haemodialysis with a central venous catheter (the most common initial type of haemodialysis access), and are eligible to receive a fistula, to a catheter-based strategy (comparator) or to a fistula-based strategy (intervention). We will enrol 100 patients at 10 centres across Canada. Participants assigned to the catheter-strategy arm will continue to use catheters; participants assigned to the fistula-strategy arm will receive a surgical attempt at fistula creation. The inclusion criteria are designed to minimise the risk of protocol violation and attrition. The primary outcome is feasibility, which we will assess by measuring: (1) the proportion of participants deemed eligible for the trial who consent to randomisation; and (2) the proportion of participants randomised to the intervention who receive the fistula surgery within 90 days of randomisation. Secondary outcomes will include safety outcomes, the reasons people and healthcare providers may not accept randomisation, and the reasons sites may not adhere to the trial protocol. Ethics and dissemination The Conjoint Health Research Ethics Board at the University of Calgary approved the study protocol. We will submit the results of this feasibility study in a peer-reviewed journal. Trial registration number NCT02675569, Pre-results. PMID:27884849

  16. HIV Vaccine Trials Network: activities and achievements of the first decade and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Kublin, James G; Morgan, Cecilia A; Day, Tracey A; Gilbert, Peter B; Self, Steve G; McElrath, M Juliana; Corey, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    The HIV Vaccine Trials Network (HVTN) is an international collaboration of scientists and educators facilitating the development of HIV/AIDS preventive vaccines. The HVTN conducts all phases of clinical trials, from evaluating experimental vaccines for safety and immunogenicity, to testing vaccine efficacy. Over the past decade, the HVTN has aimed to improve the process of designing, implementing and analyzing vaccine trials. Several major achievements include streamlining protocol development while maintaining input from diverse stakeholders, establishing a laboratory program with standardized assays and systems allowing for reliable immunogenicity assessments across trials, setting statistical standards for the field and actively engaging with site communities. These achievements have allowed the HVTN to conduct over 50 clinical trials and make numerous scientific contributions to the field. PMID:23243491

  17. A randomized phase II trial comparing chemoimmunotherapy with or without bevacizumab in previously untreated patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Neil E.; Strati, Paolo; LaPlant, Betsy R.; Leis, Jose F.; Nikcevich, Daniel; Call, Timothy G.; Pettinger, Adam M.; Lesnick, Connie E.; Hanson, Curtis A.; Shanafelt, Tait D.

    2016-01-01

    Bevacizumab is a monoclonal antibody targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) with in vitro pro-apoptotic and antiangiogenic effects on chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells. As monotherapy in patients with CLL, it has no clinical activity. Here we report the results of an open-label, randomized phase II trial comparing the combination of pentostatin, cyclophosphamide and rituximab (PCR) either without or with bevacizumab (PCR-B) in previously untreated CLL patients. A total of 65 evaluable patients were enrolled, 32 receiving PCR and 33 PCR-B. A higher rate of grade 3-4 cardiovascular toxicity was observed with PCR-B (33% vs. 3%, p < 0.003). Patients treated with PCR-B had a trend for a higher complete remission (CR) rate (54.5% vs 31.3%; p = 0.08), longer progression-free survival (PFS)(p = 0.06) and treatment-free survival (TFS)(p = 0.09). No differences in PFS and TFS by IGHV mutational status were observed with the addition of bevacizumab. A significant post-treatment increase in VEGF levels was observed in the PCR-B arm (29.77 to 57.05 pg/mL); in the PCR-B arm, lower baseline CCL-3 levels were significantly associated with achievement of CR (p = 0.01). In conclusion, the addition of bevacizumab to chemoimmunotherapy in CLL is generally well-tolerated and appears to prolong PFS and TFS. PMID:27861157

  18. The HIKCUPS trial: a multi-site randomized controlled trial of a combined physical activity skill-development and dietary modification program in overweight and obese children

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Rachel A; Okely, Anthony D; Collins, Clare E; Morgan, Philip J; Steele, Julie R; Warren, Janet M; Baur, Louise A; Cliff, Dylan P; Burrows, Tracy; Cleary, Jane

    2007-01-01

    Background Childhood obesity is one of the most pressing health issues of our time. Key health organizations have recommended research be conducted on the effectiveness of well-designed interventions to combat childhood obesity that can be translated into a variety of settings. This paper describes the design and methods used in the Hunter Illawarra Kids Challenge Using Parent Support (HIKCUPS) trial, an ongoing multi-site randomized controlled trial, in overweight/obese children comparing the efficacy of three interventions: 1) a parent-centered dietary modification program; 2) a child-centered physical activity skill-development program; and 3) a program combining both 1 and 2 above. Methods/Design Each intervention consists of three components: i) 10-weekly face-to-face group sessions; ii) a weekly homework component, completed between each face-to-face session and iii) three telephone calls at monthly intervals following completion of the 10-week program. Details of the programs' methodological aspects of recruitment, randomization and statistical analyses are described here a priori. Discussion Importantly this paper describes how HIKCUPS addresses some of the short falls in the current literature pertaining to the efficacy of child obesity interventions. The HIKCUPS trial is funded by the National Medical Research Council, Australia. PMID:17263896

  19. Publication Bias in Antipsychotic Trials: An Analysis of Efficacy Comparing the Published Literature to the US Food and Drug Administration Database

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Erick H.; Knoepflmacher, Daniel; Shapley, Lee

    2012-01-01

    Background Publication bias compromises the validity of evidence-based medicine, yet a growing body of research shows that this problem is widespread. Efficacy data from drug regulatory agencies, e.g., the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), can serve as a benchmark or control against which data in journal articles can be checked. Thus one may determine whether publication bias is present and quantify the extent to which it inflates apparent drug efficacy. Methods and Findings FDA Drug Approval Packages for eight second-generation antipsychotics—aripiprazole, iloperidone, olanzapine, paliperidone, quetiapine, risperidone, risperidone long-acting injection (risperidone LAI), and ziprasidone—were used to identify a cohort of 24 FDA-registered premarketing trials. The results of these trials according to the FDA were compared with the results conveyed in corresponding journal articles. The relationship between study outcome and publication status was examined, and effect sizes derived from the two data sources were compared. Among the 24 FDA-registered trials, four (17%) were unpublished. Of these, three failed to show that the study drug had a statistical advantage over placebo, and one showed the study drug was statistically inferior to the active comparator. Among the 20 published trials, the five that were not positive, according to the FDA, showed some evidence of outcome reporting bias. However, the association between trial outcome and publication status did not reach statistical significance. Further, the apparent increase in the effect size point estimate due to publication bias was modest (8%) and not statistically significant. On the other hand, the effect size for unpublished trials (0.23, 95% confidence interval 0.07 to 0.39) was less than half that for the published trials (0.47, 95% confidence interval 0.40 to 0.54), a difference that was significant. Conclusions The magnitude of publication bias found for antipsychotics was less than that found

  20. Monotherapy with Levetiracetam Versus Older AEDs: A Randomized Comparative Trial of Effects on Bone Health.

    PubMed

    Hakami, Tahir; O'Brien, Terence J; Petty, Sandra J; Sakellarides, Mary; Christie, Jemma; Kantor, Susan; Todaro, Marian; Gorelik, Alexandra; Seibel, Markus J; Yerra, Raju; Wark, John D

    2016-06-01

    Long-term anti-epileptic drug (AED) therapy is associated with increased fracture risk. This study tested whether substituting the newer AED levetiracetam has less adverse effects on bone than older AEDs. An open-label randomized comparative trial. Participants had "failed" initial monotherapy for partial epilepsy and were randomized to substitution monotherapy with levetiracetam or an older AED (carbamazepine or valproate sodium). Bone health assessments, performed at 3 and 15 months, included areal bone mineral density (aBMD) and content at lumbar spine (LS), total hip (TH), forearm (FA), and femoral neck (FN), radial and tibial peripheral quantitative computed tomography and serum bone turnover markers. Main outcomes were changes by treatment group in aBMD at LS, TH, and FA, radial and tibial trabecular BMD and cortical thickness. 70/84 patients completed assessments (40 in levetiracetam- and 30 in older AED group). Within-group analyses showed decreases in both groups in LS (-9.0 %; p < 0.001 in levetiracetam vs. -9.8 %; p < 0.001 in older AED group), FA (-1.46 %; p < 0.001 vs. -0.96 %; p < 0.001, respectively) and radial trabecular BMD (-1.46 %; p = 0.048 and -2.31 %; p = 0.013, respectively). C-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen (βCTX; bone resorption marker) decreased in both groups (-16.1 %; p = 0.021 vs. -15.2 %; p = 0.028, respectively) whereas procollagen Ι N-terminal peptide (PΙNP; bone formation marker) decreased in older AED group (-27.3 %; p = 0.008). The treatment groups did not differ in any of these measures. In conclusion, use of both levetiracetam and older AEDs was associated with bone loss over 1 year at clinically relevant fracture sites and a reduction in bone turnover.

  1. Explaining Feast or Famine in Randomized Field Trials: Medical Science and Criminology Compared.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepherd, Jonathan P.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the contrast between the frequency of randomized clinical trials in the health sciences and the relative famine of such studies in criminology. Attributes this difference to the contexts in which research is done and the difference in the status of situational research in the two disciplines. (SLD)

  2. Brief Report: Comparative ABA and DIR Trials in Twin Brothers with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Jane C.; Seal, Brenda C.

    2007-01-01

    Trial interventions in DIR and ABA with twin brothers with autism were offered to help the parents choose one of the programs for their sons. Pre- and post-test scores on the Communication and Symbolic Behavior Scales (CSBS) revealed a slight gain in the composite score of the ABA child and a slight loss in the score of the DIR child. Contrasted…

  3. Enhancing Cognitive Abilities with Comprehensive Training: A Large, Online, Randomized, Active-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Joseph L.; Nelson, Rolf A.; Thomason, Moriah E.; Sternberg, Daniel A.; Katovich, Kiefer; Farzin, Faraz; Scanlon, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background A variety of studies have demonstrated gains in cognitive ability following cognitive training interventions. However, other studies have not shown such gains, and questions remain regarding the efficacy of specific cognitive training interventions. Cognitive training research often involves programs made up of just one or a few exercises, targeting limited and specific cognitive endpoints. In addition, cognitive training studies typically involve small samples that may be insufficient for reliable measurement of change. Other studies have utilized training periods that were too short to generate reliable gains in cognitive performance. Methods The present study evaluated an online cognitive training program comprised of 49 exercises targeting a variety of cognitive capacities. The cognitive training program was compared to an active control condition in which participants completed crossword puzzles. All participants were recruited, trained, and tested online (N = 4,715 fully evaluable participants). Participants in both groups were instructed to complete one approximately 15-minute session at least 5 days per week for 10 weeks. Results Participants randomly assigned to the treatment group improved significantly more on the primary outcome measure, an aggregate measure of neuropsychological performance, than did the active control group (Cohen’s d effect size = 0.255; 95% confidence interval = [0.198, 0.312]). Treatment participants showed greater improvements than controls on speed of processing, short-term memory, working memory, problem solving, and fluid reasoning assessments. Participants in the treatment group also showed greater improvements on self-reported measures of cognitive functioning, particularly on those items related to concentration compared to the control group (Cohen’s d = 0.249; 95% confidence interval = [0.191, 0.306]). Conclusion Taken together, these results indicate that a varied training program composed of a number of

  4. The active comparator, new user study design in pharmacoepidemiology: historical foundations and contemporary application.

    PubMed

    Lund, Jennifer L; Richardson, David B; Stürmer, Til

    2015-12-01

    Better understanding of biases related to selective prescribing of, and adherence to, preventive treatments has led to improvements in the design and analysis of pharmacoepidemiologic studies. One influential development has been the "active comparator, new user" study design, which seeks to emulate the design of a head-to-head randomized controlled trial. In this review, we first discuss biases that may affect pharmacoepidemiologic studies and describe their direction and magnitude in a variety of settings. We then present the historical foundations of the active comparator, new user study design and explain how this design conceptually mitigates biases leading to a paradigm shift in pharmacoepidemiology. We offer practical guidance on the implementation of the study design using administrative databases. Finally, we provide an empirical example in which the active comparator, new user study design addresses biases that have previously impeded pharmacoepidemiologic studies.

  5. Comparing the Effects of Multisensory Stimulation and Individualized Music Sessions on Elderly People with Severe Dementia: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Alba; Maseda, Ana; Marante-Moar, M Pilar; de Labra, Carmen; Lorenzo-López, Laura; Millán-Calenti, José Carlos

    2016-03-08

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of a multisensory stimulation environment (MSSE) and individualized music sessions on agitation, emotional and cognitive status, and dementia severity in a sample of institutionalized patients with severe dementia. Twenty-two participants with a diagnosis of severe or very severe dementia were randomly assigned to two groups: MSSE and individualized music sessions. Both groups participated in two 30-min weekly sessions over 16 weeks. Outcomes were agitation (Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory, CMAI), mood (Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia, CSDD), anxiety (Rating Anxiety in Dementia, RAID), cognitive function (Severe Mini-Mental State Examination, SMMSE), and the overall severity of dementia (Bedford Alzheimer Nursing Severity Scale, BANS-S). They were assessed at baseline (pre-trial), in the middle (mid-trial), at the end of the intervention (post-trial), and 8 weeks after the intervention (follow-up). Patients in the MSSE group showed significant improvement in their RAID and BANS-S scores compared with the individualized music group post- versus pre-trial. With regard to agitation, there was improvement during the intervention in both the MSSE and individualized music groups in the CMAI total score after 16 weeks of intervention, with no significant differences between the groups. The results suggest that MSSE could have better effects on anxiety symptoms and dementia severity in comparison with individualized music sessions in elderly patients with severe dementia.

  6. Comparative efficacy versus effectiveness of initial antiretroviral therapy in clinical trials versus routine care

    PubMed Central

    Routman, Justin S.; Willig, James H.; Westfall, Andrew O.; Abroms, Sarah R.; Varshney, Mohit; Adusumilli, Sunil; Allison, Jeroan J.; Savage, Karen G.; Saag, Michael S.; Mugavero, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The generalizability of clinical trial findings (efficacy) to routine care (effectiveness) may be limited. The present study found similar first year virologic and CD4 outcomes among antiretroviral-naïve patients treated through routine care vs. those participating in clinical trials. Background The generalizability of clinical trial findings (efficacy) to routine care (effectiveness) may be limited due to study eligibility criteria and volunteer bias. While well chronicled in many conditions, the efficacy vs. effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy (ART) remains understudied. Methods A retrospective study of the UAB 1917 Clinic Cohort evaluated naïve patients starting ART between 1/1/00–12/31/06. Patients received ART through clinical trials or routine care. Multivariable logistic and linear regression models were fit to evaluate factors associated with virologic failure (VF=VL>50 copies/mL) and change from baseline CD4 count 6 and 12 months after ART initiation. Sensitivity analyses evaluated the impact of missing data on outcomes. Results Among 570 patients starting ART during the study period, 121 (21%) enrolled in clinical trials vs. 449 (79%) receiving ART via routine care. ART receipt through routine care was not associated with VF at either 6 (OR=1.00;95%CI=0.54–1.86) or 12 (OR=1.56;95%CI=0.80–3.05) months in primary analyses. No significant differences in CD4 count responses at 6 and 12 months were observed. Conclusions Though marked differences in efficacy vs. effectiveness have been observed in the therapeutic outcomes of other conditions, our analyses found no evidence of such divergence among our patients initiating antiretroviral therapy for HIV. PMID:20067423

  7. Promoting Physical Activity in Middle School Girls: Trial of Activity for Adolescent Girls

    PubMed Central

    Webber, Larry S.; Catellier, Diane J.; Lytle, Leslie A.; Murray, David M.; Pratt, Charlotte A.; Young, Deborah R.; Elder, John P.; Lohman, Timothy G.; Stevens, June; Jobe, Jared B.; Pate, Russell R.

    2008-01-01

    Background Physical activity is important for weight control and good health; however, activity levels decline in the adolescent years, particularly in girls. Design Group randomized controlled trial Setting/participants Middle school girls with English-speaking skills and no conditions to prevent participation in physical activity in 36 schools in six geographically diverse areas of the United States. Random, cross-sectional samples were drawn within schools: 6th graders in 2003 (n=1721) and 8th graders in 2005 (n=3504) and 2006 (n=3502). Intervention A 2-year study-directed intervention (fall 2003 to spring 2005) targeted schools, community agencies, and girls to increase opportunities, support, and incentives for increased physical activity. Components included programs linking schools and community agencies, physical education, health education, and social marketing. A third-year intervention used school and community personnel to direct intervention activities. Main outcome measures The primary outcome, daily MET-weighted minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MET-weighted MVPA), was assessed using accelerometry. Percent body fat was assessed using anthropometry. Results After the staff-directed intervention (pre-stated primary outcome), there were no differences (mean= −0.4, 95% CI= CI= −8.2 to 7.4) in adjusted MET-weighted MVPA between 8th-grade girls in schools assigned to intervention or control. Following the Program Champion–directed intervention, girls in intervention schools were more physically active than girls in control schools (mean difference 10.9 MET-weighted minutes of MVPA, 95% CI=0.52–21.2). This difference is about 1.6 minutes of daily MVPA or 80 kcal per week. There were no differences in fitness or percent body fat at either 8th-grade timepoint. Conclusion A school-based, community-linked intervention modestly improved physical activity in girls. PMID:18312804

  8. Randomised controlled trials of physical activity promotion in free living populations: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Hillsdon, M; Thorogood, M; Anstiss, T; Morris, J

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To review evidence on the effectiveness of trials of physical activity promotion in healthy, free living adults. To identify the more effective intervention programmes. METHODS--Computerised databases and references were searched. Experts were contacted and asked for information about existing work. INCLUSION CRITERIA--Randomised controlled trials of healthy, free living adult subjects, where exercise behaviour was the dependent variable were included. CONCLUSIONS--Ten trials were identified. The small number of trials limits the strength of any conclusions and highlights the need for more research. No UK based studies were found. Previously sedentary adults can increase activity levels and sustain them. Promotion of these changes requires personal instruction, continued support, and exercise of moderate intensity which does not depend on attendance at a facility. The exercise should be easily included into an existing lifestyle and should be enjoyable. Walking is the exercise most likely to fulfil these criteria. PMID:7499985

  9. A Meta-analysis of Randomized Trials Comparing Surgery versus Endovascular Therapy for Thrombosed Arteriovenous Fistulas and Grafts in Hemodialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhan, G. Antoniou, G. A.; Nikam, M.; Mitra, S.; Farquharson, F.; Brittenden, J.; Chalmers, N.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To carry out a systematic review of randomized trials comparing surgery vs. endovascular therapy for occluded fistulas and grafts. Methods. All randomized trials which compared surgery and endovascular therapy for occluded fistulas and grafts were retrieved from 1990 onwards. The following search terms were used: 'haemodialysis,' 'thrombosis,' 'arteriovenous fistula,' 'arteriovenous shunt,' 'end stage renal failure' on Medline and PubMed. The results of the pooled data were analysed by a fixed-effect model. Results. There were no randomized trials comparing surgery vs. endovascular therapy for native fistulas and vein grafts. Six randomized studies reporting on 573 occluded grafts were identified. Technical success, need for access line and primary patency at 30 days were similar between the two groups (odds ratio [OR] 1.40, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.91-2.14; OR 0.77, 95 % CI 0.44-1.34; and OR 1.15, 95 % CI 0.79-1.68, respectively). There was no significant difference in morbidity at 30 days between groups (OR 1.12, 95 % CI 0.67-1.86). There were no statistical difference between the two groups for 1 year primary patency (OR 2.08, 95 % CI 0.97-4.45). Primary assisted patency at 1 year was better with surgery (OR 3.03, 95 % CI 1.12-8.18) in a single study. Conclusion. Comparable results to surgery have been achieved with endovascular techniques for occluded prosthetic grafts for dialysis access. Long-term data comparing the two groups were lacking. Further trials designed to encompass variation in methods are warranted in order to obtain the best available evidence particularly for native fistulas.

  10. Activities of Tannins--From In Vitro Studies to Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Sieniawska, Elwira

    2015-11-01

    Tannins are considered as valuable plant secondary metabolites providing many benefits for human health. In this review information was gathered about bioactivity in vitro and in vivo, as well as about conducted clinical trials. The literature research was based on ScienceDirect, Scopus, and Cochrane databases and presents a wide range of tested activities of tannins. The described clinical trials verify laboratory tests and show the effective health benefits taken from supplementation with tannins.

  11. Linagliptin monotherapy compared with voglibose monotherapy in patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing hemodialysis: a 12-week randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Katsuhito; Emoto, Masanori; Shoji, Tetsuo; Inaba, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    Objective Focusing on efficacy and tolerability, we compared linagliptin monotherapy with voglibose monotherapy in patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing hemodialysis (HD). Research design and methods In this multicenter, randomized, open-label, parallel-group, active-controlled study, 78 patients were randomized (1:1) to receive a 12-week treatment with 5 mg linagliptin once daily or 0.2 mg voglibose three times a day. To assess whether linagliptin was superior to voglibose, the primary efficacy end point was the change in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level between baseline and week 12. Secondary efficacy end points included changes between baseline and week 12 in glycated albumin (GA) and casual plasma glucose (PG) levels. Results At week 12, the adjusted mean HbA1c levels had decreased by −0.60% after treatment with linagliptin and by −0.20% after treatment with voglibose (treatment difference: −0.40%, 95% CI −0.74% to −0.06%, p=0.022). A significant reduction in casual PG level was also observed after treatment with linagliptin compared with treatment with voglibose. Relative to voglibose, linagliptin tended to elicit reductions in GA, although without statistical significance. No hypoglycemic symptoms or severe hypoglycemia occurred during the study. Conclusions In patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing HD, linagliptin monotherapy provided significantly better glycemic control without severe hypoglycemia than voglibose monotherapy. Linagliptin represents a promising agent for glycemic management in patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing HD. Trial registration number UMIN000007635; results. PMID:27547421

  12. Challenges in Conducting A Multi-Site Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Treatments for Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Harry; Woodside, Blake; Agras, Stewart; Halmi, Katherine; Johnson, Craig; Kaye, Walter; Wilfley, Denise

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe obstacles in the implementation of a controlled treatment trial of adolescent anorexia nervosa (AN). Method The original aim was to enter 240 participants with AN to one of 4 cells: Behavioral family therapy (BFT) plus fluoxetine; BFT plus placebo; systems family therapy (SFT) plus fluoxetine; SFT plus placebo. Results Recruitment was delayed pending a satisfactory resolution concerning participant safety. After 6 months of recruitment it became clear that the medication was associated with poor recruitment leading to a study redesign resulting in a comparison of two types of family therapy with a projected sample size of 160. One site was unable to recruit and was replaced. Discussion Problems with the delineation of safety procedures, recruitment, re-design of the study, and replacement of a site, were the main elements resulting in a 1-year delay. Suggestions are made for overcoming such problems in future AN trials. PMID:21495052

  13. The Prostate Cancer Intervention Versus Observation Trial: VA/NCI/AHRQ Cooperative Studies Program #407 (PIVOT): design and baseline results of a randomized controlled trial comparing radical prostatectomy with watchful waiting for men with clinically localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilt, Timothy J

    2012-12-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer death in men. In the United States, 90% of men with prostate cancer are more than age 60 years, diagnosed by early detection with the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test, and have disease believed confined to the prostate gland (clinically localized). Common treatments for clinically localized prostate cancer include watchful waiting (WW), surgery to remove the prostate gland (radical prostatectomy), external-beam radiation therapy and interstitial radiation therapy (brachytherapy), and androgen deprivation. Little is known about the relative effectiveness and harms of treatments because of the paucity of randomized controlled trials. The Department of Veterans Affairs/National Cancer Institute/Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Cooperative Studies Program Study #407:Prostate Cancer Intervention Versus Observation Trial (PIVOT), initiated in 1994, is a multicenter randomized controlled trial comparing radical prostatectomy with WW in men with clinically localized prostate cancer. We describe the study rationale, design, recruitment methods, and baseline characteristics of PIVOT enrollees. We provide comparisons with eligible men declining enrollment and men participating in another recently reported randomized trial of radical prostatectomy vs WW conducted in Scandinavia. We screened 13 022 men with prostate cancer at 52 US medical centers for potential enrollment. From these, 5023 met initial age, comorbidity, and disease eligibility criteria, and a total of 731 men agreed to participate and were randomized. The mean age of enrollees was 67 years. Nearly one-third were African American. Approximately 85% reported that they were fully active. The median PSA was 7.8ng/mL (mean 10.2ng/mL). In three-fourths of men, the primary reason for biopsy leading to a diagnosis of prostate cancer was a PSA elevation or rise. Using previously developed tumor risk

  14. Pain exposure physical therapy (PEPT) compared to conventional treatment in complex regional pain syndrome type 1: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Barnhoorn, Karlijn J; van de Meent, Henk; van Dongen, Robert T M; Klomp, Frank P; Groenewoud, Hans; Samwel, Han; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; Frölke, Jan Paul M; Staal, J Bart

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the effectiveness of pain exposure physical therapy (PEPT) with conventional treatment in patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1) in a randomised controlled trial with a blinded assessor. Setting The study was conducted at a level 1 trauma centre in the Netherlands. Participants 56 adult patients with CRPS-1 participated. Three patients were lost to follow-up. Interventions Patients received either PEPT in a maximum of five treatment sessions, or conventional treatment following the Dutch multidisciplinary guideline. Measurements Outcomes were assessed at baseline and at 3, 6 and 9 months after randomisation. The primary outcome measure was the Impairment level Sum Score—Restricted Version (ISS-RV), consisting of visual analogue scale for pain (VAS-pain), McGill Pain Questionnaire, active range of motion (AROM) and skin temperature. Secondary outcome measures included Pain Disability Index (PDI); muscle strength; Short Form 36 (SF-36); disability of arm, shoulder and hand; Lower Limb Tasks Questionnaire (LLTQ); 10 m walk test; timed up-and-go test (TUG) and EuroQol-5D. Results The intention-to-treat analysis showed a clinically relevant decrease in ISS-RV (6.7 points for PEPT and 6.2 points for conventional treatment), but the between-group difference was not significant (0.96, 95% CI −1.56 to 3.48). Participants allocated to PEPT experienced a greater improvement in AROM (between-group difference 0.51, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.94; p=0.02). The per protocol analysis showed larger and significant between-group effects on ISS-RV, VAS-pain, AROM, PDI, SF-36, LLTQ and TUG. Conclusions We cannot conclude that PEPT is superior to conventional treatment for patients with CRPS-1. Further high-quality research on the effects of PEPT is warranted given the potential effects as indicated by the per protocol analysis. Trial registration numbers NCT00817128 and NTR 2090. PMID:26628523

  15. Characteristics and outcome of patients with primary CNS lymphoma in a "real-life" setting compared to a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Zeremski, Vanja; Koehler, Michael; Fischer, Thomas; Schalk, Enrico

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to compare the characteristics and outcome of patients treated within the multi-centre German Primary CNS Lymphoma Study Group 1 trial (G-PCNSL-SG-1; TRIAL group) and patients treated outside this clinical trial ("real-life" setting, R-LIFE group). Therefore, we conducted a retrospective single-centre study in order to analyse all patients with newly diagnosed primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL) treated consecutively in our institution between November 2000 and June 2015. Altogether, 86 patients were analysed (median 68 years). Twenty patients were treated within (TRIAL) and 66 patients outside the clinical trial (R-LIFE), respectively. The majority (n = 75; 87 %) received high-dose methotrexate as the first-line treatment. Thirty-eight of 66 patients (57.6 %) responded to the first-line therapy. The R-LIFE patients were older (median age 70 vs. 62 years; p = 0.005) and had more frequently a worse performance status (ECOG score 2-4: 59.1 vs. 20.0 %; p = 0.004; median Karnofsky index 70 vs. 80 %; p = 0.003) and less frequently a low prognostic score (IELSG score 0-1: 19.7 vs. 45.0 %; p = 0.038), than the TRIAL patients. Median overall survial (OS) was shorter for the R-LIFE patients (9.3 months [95 % CI 1.9-16.7] vs. 33.4 months [95 % CI 17.6-49.2]; p = 0.065). Median progression-free survival (PFS) was significantly inferior for the R-LIFE patients (3.4 months [95 % CI 2.4-4.4] vs. 24.8 months [95 % CI 4.6-45.0]; p = 0.037). Our data indicate that the outcome of PCNSL patients treated outside, but about analogous to the G-PCNSL-SG-1 trial, was poor. This is likely explained by more unfavourable prognostic factors in patients being treated off trial.

  16. Increasing Recreational Physical Activity in Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain: A Pragmatic Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ami, Noa; Chodick, Gabriel; Mirovsky, Yigal; Pincus, Tamar; Shapiro, Yair

    2017-02-01

    Study Design Prospective, pragmatic, nonrandomized controlled clinical trial. Background Clinical guidelines recommend physical activity for the treatment of chronic low back pain. But engaging patients in physical activity has proven difficult. Known obstacles to physical activity include low self-efficacy and fear avoidance. Objectives This study tested the effectiveness of an enhanced transtheoretical model intervention (ETMI) aimed at increasing recreational physical activity in patients with chronic low back pain, in comparison to usual physical therapy. Methods Patients (n = 220) referred to physical therapy for chronic low back pain were allocated to ETMI or to a control group. The ETMI was delivered by physical therapists and based on behavior-change principles, combined with increased reassurance, therapeutic alliance, and exposure to reduce fear avoidance. The primary outcome was back pain-related disability (Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire). Secondary outcomes included pain intensity, mental and physical health, and levels of physical activity. Results Intention-to-treat analysis in 189 patients at 12 months indicated that patients in the ETMI group had significantly lower disability compared to usual physical therapy. The difference in mean change from baseline between the interventions was 2.7 points (95% confidence interval: 0.9, 4.5) on the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire. At 12 months, worst pain, physical activity, and physical health were all significantly better in patients receiving ETMI. The average number of sessions was 3.5 for the ETMI group and 5.1 for controls. Conclusion Targeting obstacles to physical activity with an intervention that includes components to address self-efficacy and fear avoidance appears to be more effective than usual physical therapy care in reducing long-term disability. Further research is needed to explore the mechanisms that impact outcomes in this intervention package. Level of Evidence Therapy

  17. Is the large simple trial design used for comparative, post-approval safety research? A review of a clinical trials registry and the published literature.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Robert F; Lem, Joanna A; Gatto, Nicolle M; Eng, Sybil M

    2011-10-01

    Post-approval, observational drug safety studies face well known difficulties in controlling for confounding, particularly confounding by indication for drug use. A study design that addresses confounding by indication is the large simple trial (LST). LSTs are characterized by large sample sizes, often in the thousands; broad entry criteria consistent with the approved medication label; randomization based on equipoise, i.e. neither physician nor patient believes that one treatment option is superior; minimal, streamlined data collection requirements; objectively-measured endpoints (e.g. death, hospitalization); and follow-up that minimizes interventions or interference with normal clinical practice. In theory then, the LST is a preferred study design for drug and vaccine safety research because it controls for biases inherent to observational research while still providing results that are generalizable to 'real-world' use. To evaluate whether LSTs are used for comparative safety evaluation and if the design is, in fact, advantageous compared with other designs, we conducted a review of the published literature (1949 through 31 December 2010) and the ClinicalTrials.gov registry (2000 through 31 December 2010). Thirteen ongoing or completed safety LSTs were identified. The design has rarely been used in comparative drug safety research, which is due to the operational, financial and scientific hurdles of implementing the design. The studies that have been completed addressed important clinical questions and, in some cases, led to re-evaluation of medical practice. We conclude the design has demonstrated utility for comparative safety research of medicines and vaccines if the necessary scientific and operational conditions for its use are met.

  18. Trimethopim-sulfamethoxazole compared with benzathine penicillin for treatment of impetigo in Aboriginal children: a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tong, Steven Y C; Andrews, Ross M; Kearns, Therese; Gundjirryirr, Rosalyn; McDonald, Malcolm I; Currie, Bart J; Carapetis, Jonathan R

    2010-03-01

    We conducted a pilot randomized controlled trial comparing trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole to benzathine penicillin for treatment of impetigo in Aboriginal children. Treatment was successful in 7 of 7 children treated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and 5 of 6 treated with benzathine penicillin. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole achieved microbiological clearance and healing of sores from which beta-hemolytic streptococci and community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were initially cultured.

  19. A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Botulinum Toxin A Dosage in the Upper Extremity of Children with Spasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kawamura, Anne; Campbell, Kent; Lam-Damji, Sophie; Fehlings, Darcy

    2007-01-01

    This study compared the effects of low and high doses of botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) to improve upper extremity function. Thirty-nine children (22 males, 17 females) with a mean age of 6 years 2 months (SD 2y 9mo) diagnosed with spastic hemiplegia or triplegia were enrolled into this double-blind, randomized controlled trial. The high-dose group…

  20. A randomized comparative study of patients undergoing myocardial revascularization with or without cardiopulmonary bypass surgery: The MASS III Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hueb, Whady; Lopes, Neuza HM; Gersh, Bernard J; Castro, Cláudio C; Paulitsch, Felipe S; Oliveira, Sergio A; Dallan, Luis A; Hueb, Alexandre C; Stolf, Noedir A; Ramires, José AF

    2008-01-01

    The MASS III Trial is a large project from a single institution, The Heart Institute of the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil (InCor), enrolling patients with coronary artery disease and preserved ventricular function. The aim of the MASS III Trial is to compare medical effectiveness, cerebral injury, quality of life, and the cost-effectiveness of coronary surgery with and without of cardiopulmonary bypass in patients with multivessel coronary disease referred for both strategies. The primary endpoint should be a composite of cardiovascular mortality, cerebrovascular accident, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and refractory angina requiring revascularization. The secondary end points in this trial include noncardiac mortality, presence and severity of angina, quality of life based on the SF-36 Questionnaire, and cost-effectiveness at discharge and at 5-year follow-up. In this scenario, we will analyze the cost of the initial procedure, hospital length of stay, resource utilization, repeat hospitalization, and repeat revascularization events during the follow-up. Exercise capacity will be assessed at 6-months, 12-months, and the end of follow-up. A neurocognitive evaluation will be assessed in a subset of subjects using the Brain Resource Center computerized neurocognitive battery. Furthermore, magnetic resonance imaging will be made to detect any cerebral injury before and after procedures in patients who undergo coronary artery surgery with and without cardiopulmonary bypass. Clinical Trial registration information ISRCTN59539154 Off-pump vs. on-pump surgery in patients with Stable CAD MASS III PMID:18755039

  1. Individual (N-of-1) trials can be combined to give population comparative treatment effect estimates: Methodologic considerations

    PubMed Central

    Zucker, Deborah R.; Ruthazer, Robin; Schmid, Christopher H.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract/Summary Objective To compare different statistical models for combining N-of-1 trials to estimate a population treatment effect. Study Design and Setting Data from a published series of N-of-1 trials comparing amitriptyline therapy and combination treatment (amitriptyline + fluoxetine ) were analyzed to compare summary and individual participant data meta-analysis, repeated measures models, Bayesian hierarchical models, single-period, single-pair and averaged outcome crossover models. Results The best fitting model included a random intercept (response on amitriptyline) and fixed treatment effect (added fluoxetine). Results supported a common, uncorrelated within-patient covariance structure that is equal between-treatments and across patients. Assuming unequal within-patient variances, a random effects model was favored. Bayesian hierarchical models improved precision and were highly sensitive to within-patient variance priors. Conclusion Optimal models for combining N-of-1 trials need to consider goals, data sources, and relative within and between patient variances. Without sufficient patients, between-patient variation will be hard to explain with covariates. N-of-1 data with few observations per patients may not support models with heterogeneous within-patient variation. With common variances, models appear robust. Bayesian models may improve parameter estimation but are sensitive to prior assumptions about variance components. With limited resources, improving within-patient precision must be balanced by increased participants to explain population variation. PMID:20863658

  2. The Walking School Bus and children's physical activity: A pilot cluster randomized controlled trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To evaluate the impact of a "walking school bus" program on children's rates of active commuting to school and physical activity. We conducted a pilot cluster randomized controlled trial among 4th-graders from 8 schools in Houston, Texas (N = 149). Random allocation to treatment or control condition...

  3. Increasing activity in older adults: A review of the Look AHEAD trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The importance of physical activity for healthy aging has been clearly shown. Evidence from the Look AHEAD trial, a lifestyle intervention for overweight individuals who have type 2 diabetes, provides further evidence for the importance of physical activity. Overall, this intervention provides a pot...

  4. TREC-SAVE: a randomised trial comparing mechanical restraints with use of seclusion for aggressive or violent seriously mentally ill people: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Thousands of people whose aggression is thought due to serious mental illness are secluded or restrained every day. Without fair testing these techniques will continue to be used outside of a rigorous evidence base. With such coercive treatment this leaves all concerned vulnerable to abuse and criticism. This paper presents the protocol for a randomised trial comparing seclusion with restraints for people with serious mental illnesses. Methods/Design Setting-General psychiatric wards of a large psychiatric hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Participants-Anyone aggressive or violent suspected or known to have serious mental illness for whom restriction is felt to be indicated by nursing and medical staff, but also for whom they are unsure whether seclusion or restraint would be indicated. Interventions-The standard care of either strong cotton banding to edge of bed with medications as indicated and close observation or the other standard care of use of a minimally furnished seclusion room but with open but barred windows onto the nursing station. Outcomes-time to restrictions lifted, early change of treatment, additional episodes, adverse effects/events, satisfaction with care during episode. Duration-2 weeks. Identifier: ISRCTN 49454276 http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN49454276 PMID:21774823

  5. Rationale for a randomized controlled trial comparing two prophylaxis regimens in adults with severe hemophilia A: the Hemophilia Adult Prophylaxis Trial.

    PubMed

    Ragni, Margaret V

    2011-10-01

    A major goal of comprehensive hemophilia care is to prevent occurrence of bleeds by prophylaxis or regular preventive factor, one or more times weekly. Although prophylaxis is effective in reducing bleeding and joint damage in children, whether it is necessary to continue into adulthood is not known. The purpose of this article is to describe a Phase III randomized controlled trial to evaluate prophylaxis comparing two dose regimens in adults with severe hemophilia A. I hypothesize that adults with mature cartilage and joints are less susceptible to joint bleeds and joint damage, and that once-weekly recombinant factor VIII prophylaxis, with up to two rescue doses per week, is as effective as thrice-weekly prophylaxis in reducing bleeding frequency, but less costly and more acceptable, with higher quality of life. The ultimate goal of this project is to determine whether once-weekly prophylaxis is any worse than thrice-weekly prophylaxis in reducing joint bleeding frequency, while potentially utilizing less factor, at lower cost, leading to a better quality of life. This is an innovative concept, as it challenges the current paradigm of thrice-weekly prophylaxis in adults, which is based on dosing in children. Furthermore, this trial will assess interdose thrombin generation, a novel tissue factor-based assay of hemostasis, to determine if individualized thrombin generation can predict more individualized prophylaxis dosing, which would be practice changing.

  6. The design and rationale of a multi-center clinical trial comparing two strategies for control of systolic blood pressure: The Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High blood pressure is an important public health concern because it is highly prevalent and a risk factor for adverse health outcomes, including coronary heart disease, stroke, decompensated heart failure, chronic kidney disease, and decline in cognitive function. Observational studies show a progressive increase in risk associated with blood pressure above 115/75 mm Hg. Prior research has shown that reducing elevated systolic blood pressure lowers the risk of subsequent clinical complications from cardiovascular disease. However, the optimal systolic blood pressure to reduce blood pressure-related adverse outcomes is unclear, and the benefit of treating to a level of systolic blood pressure well below 140 mm Hg has not been proven in a large, definitive clinical trial. Purpose To describe the design considerations of the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) and the baseline characteristics of trial participants. Methods SPRINT is a multi-center, randomized, controlled trial that compares two strategies for treating systolic blood pressure: one targets the standard target of <140 mm Hg, and the other targets a more intensive target of <120 mm Hg. Enrollment focused on volunteers of age ≥50 years (no upper limit) with an average baseline systolic blood pressure ≥130 mm Hg and evidence of cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, 10-year Framingham cardiovascular disease risk score ≥15%, or age ≥75 years. SPRINT recruitment also targeted three pre-specified subgroups: participants with chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 ml/min/1.73m2), participants with a history of cardiovascular disease, and participants 75 years of age or older. The primary outcome is first occurrence of a myocardial infarction, acute coronary syndrome, stroke, heart failure, or cardiovascular disease death. Secondary outcomes include all-cause mortality, decline in kidney function or development of end-stage renal disease

  7. The Head Injury Retrieval Trial (HIRT): a single-centre randomised controlled trial of physician prehospital management of severe blunt head injury compared with management by paramedics only

    PubMed Central

    Garner, Alan A; Mann, Kristy P; Fearnside, Michael; Poynter, Elwyn; Gebski, Val

    2015-01-01

    Background Advanced prehospital interventions for severe brain injury remains controversial. No previous randomised trial has been conducted to evaluate additional physician intervention compared with paramedic only care. Methods Participants in this prospective, randomised controlled trial were adult patients with blunt trauma with either a scene GCS score <9 (original definition), or GCS<13 and an Abbreviated Injury Scale score for the head region ≥3 (modified definition). Patients were randomised to either standard ground paramedic treatment or standard treatment plus a physician arriving by helicopter. Patients were evaluated by 30-day mortality and 6-month Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores. Due to high non-compliance rates, both intention-to-treat and as-treated analyses were preplanned. Results 375 patients met the original definition, of which 197 was allocated to physician care. Differences in the 6-month GOS scores were not significant on intention-to-treat analysis (OR 1.11, 95% CI 0.74 to 1.66, p=0.62) nor was the 30-day mortality (OR 0.91, 95% CI 0.60 to 1.38, p=0.66). As-treated analysis showed a 16% reduction in 30-day mortality in those receiving additional physician care; 60/195 (29%) versus 81/180 (45%), p<0.01, Number needed to treat =6. 338 patients met the modified definition, of which 182 were allocated to physician care. The 6-month GOS scores were not significantly different on intention-to-treat analysis (OR 1.14, 95% CI 0.73 to 1.75, p=0.56) nor was the 30-day mortality (OR 1.05, 95% CI 0.66 to 1.66, p=0.84). As-treated analyses were also not significantly different. Conclusions This trial suggests a potential mortality reduction in patients with blunt trauma with GCS<9 receiving additional physician care (original definition only). Confirmatory studies which also address non-compliance issues are needed. Trial registration number NCT00112398. PMID:25795741

  8. Physical activity changes during pregnancy in a comparative impact trail

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Delta Healthy Sprouts was designed to test the comparative impact of two home visiting programs on weight status, dietary intake, physical activity, and other health behaviors of rural, Southern African American women and their infants. Results pertaining to physical activity outcomes in the gestat...

  9. A double blind randomized controlled trial comparing primary suture closure with mesh augmented closure to reduce incisional hernia incidence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Incisional hernia is the most frequently seen long term complication after laparotomy causing much morbidity and even mortality. The overall incidence remains 11-20%, despite studies attempting to optimize closing techniques. Two patient groups, patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and obese patients, have a risk for incisional hernia after laparotomy of more than 30%. These patients might benefit from mesh augmented midline closure as a means to reduce incisional hernia incidence. Methods/design The PRImary Mesh Closure of Abdominal Midline Wound (PRIMA) trial is a double-blinded international multicenter randomized controlled trial comparing running slowly absorbable suture closure with the same closure augmented with a sublay or onlay mesh. Primary endpoint will be incisional hernia incidence 2 years postoperatively. Secondary outcomes will be postoperative complications, pain, quality of life and cost effectiveness. A total of 460 patients will be included in three arms of the study and randomized between running suture closure, onlay mesh closure or sublay mesh closure. Follow-up will be at 1, 3, 12 and 24 months with ultrasound imaging performed at 6 and 24 months to objectify the presence of incisional hernia. Patients, investigators and radiologists will be blinded throughout the whole follow up. Disccusion The use of prosthetic mesh has proven effective and safe in incisional hernia surgery however its use in a prophylactic manner has yet to be properly investigated. The PRIMA trial will provide level 1b evidence whether mesh augmented midline abdominal closure reduces incisional hernia incidence in high risk groups. Trial registration Clinical trial.gov NCT00761475. PMID:24499111

  10. Treatment of superficial thrombophlebitis. A comparative trial between placebo, Hirudoid cream and piroxicam gel.

    PubMed

    Bergqvist, D; Brunkwall, J; Jensen, N; Persson, N H

    1990-01-01

    A prospective randomized trial on the treatment of superficial thrombophlebitis has been performed in 68 patients randomized to either Hirudoid cream, piroxicam gel or placebo. Both spontaneous and infusion thrombophlebitis were included. Treatment effect was evaluated using the status of thrombophlebitis, the thrombophlebitic area, pain intensity with a visual analogue scale, and side effects were registered. Both in the treatment groups and the placebo group there was a significant decrease of signs and symptoms during the treatment period. There was no statistical difference between the treatment groups and no difference between spontaneous and infusion thrombophlebitis.

  11. Voice Quality After Treatment of Early Vocal Cord Cancer: A Randomized Trial Comparing Laser Surgery With Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, Leena-Maija; Rautiainen, Noora; Sellman, Jaana; Saarilahti, Kauko; Mäkitie, Antti; Rihkanen, Heikki; Laranne, Jussi; Kleemola, Leenamaija; Wigren, Tuija; Sala, Eeva; Lindholm, Paula; Grenman, Reidar; Joensuu, Heikki

    2014-10-01

    Objective: Early laryngeal cancer is usually treated with either transoral laser surgery or radiation therapy. The quality of voice achieved with these treatments has not been compared in a randomized trial. Methods and Materials: Male patients with carcinoma limited to 1 mobile vocal cord (T1aN0M0) were randomly assigned to receive either laser surgery (n=32) or external beam radiation therapy (n=28). Surgery consisted of tumor excision with a CO{sub 2} laser with the patient under general anaesthesia. External beam radiation therapy to the larynx was delivered to a cumulative dose of 66 Gy in 2-Gy daily fractions over 6.5 weeks. Voice quality was assessed at baseline and 6 and 24 months after treatment. The main outcome measures were expert-rated voice quality on a grade, roughness, breathiness, asthenia, and strain (GRBAS) scale, videolaryngostroboscopic findings, and the patients' self-rated voice quality and its impact on activities of daily living. Results: Overall voice quality between the groups was rated similar, but voice was more breathy and the glottal gap was wider in patients treated with laser surgery than in those who received radiation therapy. Patients treated with radiation therapy reported less hoarseness-related inconvenience in daily living 2 years after treatment. Three patients in each group had local cancer recurrence within 2 years from randomization. Conclusions: Radiation therapy may be the treatment of choice for patients whose requirements for voice quality are demanding. Overall voice quality was similar in both treatment groups, however, indicating a need for careful consideration of patient-related factors in the choice of a treatment option.

  12. Relative Effectiveness of Letrozole Compared With Tamoxifen for Patients With Lobular Carcinoma in the BIG 1-98 Trial

    PubMed Central

    Metzger Filho, Otto; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Mallon, Elizabeth; Gusterson, Barry; Viale, Giuseppe; Winer, Eric P.; Thürlimann, Beat; Gelber, Richard D.; Colleoni, Marco; Ejlertsen, Bent; Debled, Marc; Price, Karen N.; Regan, Meredith M.; Coates, Alan S.; Goldhirsch, Aron

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the relative effectiveness of letrozole compared with tamoxifen for patients with invasive ductal or lobular carcinoma. Patients and Methods Patients diagnosed with early-stage invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) or classic invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) who were randomly assigned onto the Breast International Group (BIG) 1-98 trial and who had centrally reviewed pathology data were included (N = 2,923). HER2-negative IDC and ILC were additionally classified as hormone receptor–positive with high (luminal B [LB] –like) or low (luminal A [LA] –like) proliferative activity by Ki-67 labeling index. Survival analyses were performed with weighted Cox models that used inverse probability of censoring weighted modeling. Results The median follow-up time was 8.1 years. In multivariable models for disease-free survival (DFS), significant interactions between treatment and histology (ILC or IDC; P = .006) and treatment and subgroup (LB like or LA like; P = .01) were observed. In the ILC subset, there was a 66% reduction in the hazard of a DFS event with letrozole for LB (hazard ratio [HR], 0.34; 95% CI, 0.21 to 0.55) and a 50% reduction for LA subtypes (HR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.32 to 0.78). In the IDC subset, there was a significant 35% reduction in the hazard of a DFS event with letrozole for the LB subtype (HR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.53 to 0.79), but no difference between treatments was noted for IDC and the LA subtype (HR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.76 to 1.20). Conclusion The magnitude of benefit of adjuvant letrozole is greater for patients diagnosed with lobular carcinoma versus ductal carcinoma. PMID:26215945

  13. Adaptation and dissemination of an evidence-based obesity prevention intervention: design of a comparative effectiveness trial.

    PubMed

    Buscemi, Joanna; Odoms-Young, Angela; Stolley, Melinda L; Blumstein, Lara; Schiffer, Linda; Berbaum, Michael L; McCaffrey, Jennifer; Montoya, Anastasia McGee; Braunschweig, Carol; Fitzgibbon, Marian L

    2014-07-01

    Low-income youth are at increased risk for excess weight gain. Although evidence-based prevention programs exist, successful adaptation to provide wide dissemination presents a challenge. Hip-Hop to Health (HH) is a school-based obesity prevention intervention that targets primarily preschool children of low-income families. In a large randomized controlled trial, HH was found to be efficacious for prevention of excessive weight gain. The Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education (SNAP-Ed) are USDA-funded nutrition education programs offered to low-income families, and may provide an ideal platform for the wide dissemination of evidence-based obesity prevention programs. A research-practice partnership was established in order to conduct formative research to guide the adaptation and implementation of HH through EFNEP and SNAP-Ed. We present the design and method of a comparative effectiveness trial that will determine the efficacy of HH when delivered by peer educators through these programs compared to the standard EFNEP and SNAP-Ed nutrition education (NE) curriculum. Results from this trial will inform larger scale dissemination. The dissemination of HH through government programs has the potential to increase the reach of efficacious obesity prevention programs that target low-income children and families.

  14. Phase II dose-response trials: A simulation study to compare analysis method performance under design considerations.

    PubMed

    Rekowski, Jan; Köllmann, Claudia; Bornkamp, Björn; Ickstadt, Katja; Scherag, André

    2017-02-21

    Phase II trials are intended to provide information about the dose-response relationship and to support the choice of doses for a pivotal phase III trial. Recently, new analysis methods have been proposed to address these objectives, and guidance is needed to select the most appropriate analysis method in specific situations. We set up a simulation study to evaluate multiple performance measures of one traditional and three more recent dose-finding approaches under four design options and illustrate the investigated analysis methods with an example from clinical practice. Our results reveal no general recommendation for a particular analysis method across all design options and performance measures. However, we also demonstrate that the new analysis methods are worth the effort compared to the traditional ANOVA-based approach.

  15. A randomized double blind control trial comparing filgrastim and pegfilgrastim in cyclophosphamide peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell mobilization.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Jew-Win; Su, Anselm-Ting; Wong, Shu-Ping; Sim, Xavier Yoon-Han; Toh, See-Guan; Ong, Tee-Chuan; Rajasuriarr, Jay-Suria; Lim, Su-Hong; Guan, Yong-Khee; Liew, Hong-Keng; Liew, Pek-Kuen; Tan, Jerome Tsen-Chuen; Kori, Ahlam-Naila; Cheng, Yuin-Yin; Tan, Sen-Mui; Chang, Kian-Meng

    2015-10-01

    There are few randomized trials comparing filgrastim and pegfilgrastim in peripheral blood stem cell mobilization (PBSCM). None of the trials studied the effects of the timing of pegfilgrastim administration on the outcomes of mobilization. We conducted a randomized triple blind control trial comparing the outcomes of filgrastim 5 µg/kg daily from day 3 onwards, 'early' pegfilgrastim 6 mg on day 3 and 'delayed' pegfilgrastim 6 mg on day 7 in cyclophosphamide PBSCM in patients with no previous history of mobilization. Peripheral blood (PB) CD34+ cell count was checked on day 8 and day 11 onward. Apheresis was started when PB CD34+ ≥ 10/µl from day 11 onward. The primary outcome was the successful mobilization rate, defined as cumulative collection of ≥ 2 × 10(6)/kg CD34+ cells in three or less apheresis. The secondary outcomes were the day of neutrophil and platelet engraftment post transplantation. There were 156 patients randomized and 134 patients' data analyzed. Pegfilgrastim 6 mg day 7 produced highest percentage of successful mobilization, 34 out of 48 (70.8%) analyzed patients, followed by daily filgrastim, 28 out of 44 (63.6%) and day 3 pegfilgrastim, 20 out of 42 (47.6%) (p = 0.075). Pegfilgrastim day 7 and daily filgrastim reported 1.48 (p = 0.014) and 1.49 (p = 0.013) times higher successful mobilization rate respectively as compared to pegfilgrastim day 3 after adjusting for disease, gender and exposure to myelotoxic agent. Multiple myeloma patients were three times more likely to achieve successful mobilization as compared to acute leukemia or lymphoma patients. Pegfilgrastim avoided the overshoot of white cells compared to filgrastim. There was no difference in the duration of both white cells and platelet recovery post transplantation between the three interventional arms.

  16. Joint protection and hand exercises for hand osteoarthritis: an economic evaluation comparing methods for the analysis of factorial trials

    PubMed Central

    Oppong, Raymond; Nicholls, Elaine; Whitehurst, David G. T.; Hill, Susan; Hammond, Alison; Hay, Elaine M.; Dziedzic, Krysia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Evidence regarding the cost-effectiveness of joint protection and hand exercises for the management of hand OA is not well established. The primary aim of this study is to assess the cost-effectiveness (cost-utility) of these management options. In addition, given the absence of consensus regarding the conduct of economic evaluation alongside factorial trials, we compare different analytical methodologies. Methods. A trial-based economic evaluation to assess the cost-utility of joint protection only, hand exercises only and joint protection plus hand exercises compared with leaflet and advice was undertaken over a 12 month period from a UK National Health Service perspective. Patient-level mean costs and mean quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were calculated for each trial arm. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were estimated and cost-effectiveness acceptability curves were constructed. The base case analysis used a within-the-table analysis methodology. Two further methods were explored: the at-the-margins approach and a regression-based approach with or without an interaction term. Results. Mean costs (QALYs) were £58.46 (s.d. 0.662) for leaflet and advice, £92.12 (s.d. 0.659) for joint protection, £64.51 (s.d. 0.681) for hand exercises and £112.38 (s.d. 0.658) for joint protection plus hand exercises. In the base case, hand exercises were the cost-effective option, with an ICER of £318 per QALY gained. Hand exercises remained the most cost-effective management strategy when adopting alternative methodological approaches. Conclusion. This is the first trial evaluating the cost-effectiveness of occupational therapy-supported approaches to self-management for hand OA. Our findings showed that hand exercises were the most cost-effective option. PMID:25339642

  17. Active Inference, Epistemic Value, and Vicarious Trial and Error

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pezzulo, Giovanni; Cartoni, Emilio; Rigoli, Francesco; io-Lopez, Léo; Friston, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Balancing habitual and deliberate forms of choice entails a comparison of their respective merits--the former being faster but inflexible, and the latter slower but more versatile. Here, we show that arbitration between these two forms of control can be derived from first principles within an Active Inference scheme. We illustrate our arguments…

  18. Behavioral Activation for Moderately Depressed University Students: Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gawrysiak, Michael; Nicholas, Christopher; Hopko, Derek R.

    2009-01-01

    Although depression is prevalent among university students, limited and dated research has examined the efficacy of behavioral interventions in treating this population (C. Lee, 2005). On the basis of a modified version of the Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression (BATD; D. R. Hopko & C. W. Lejuez, 2007; C. W. Lejuez, D. R. Hopko, & S. D.…

  19. Autologous platelet-rich plasma compared with whole blood for the treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis; a comparative clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Vahdatpour, Babak; Kianimehr, Lida; Ahrar, Mohmmad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intralesional injection of autologous blood-derived products has recently gained attention as a potential treatment for plantar fasciitis (PF). We compared platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and whole blood (WB) for the treatment of chronic PF. Materials and Methods: Patients with chronic PF received either an intralesional injection of 3 cc PRP prepared by double centrifuge technique or WB (n = 17 in each group). Overall, morning and walking pain severity were assessed by 11-point numerical rating scale, and function was assessed by the Roles and Maudsley score (RMS) at baseline and 1-month and 3 months after treatment. Ultrasonography was performed to measure plantar fascia thickness at baseline and 3 months after treatment. Results: Pain scores were reduced over the study in the PRP (mean change = −5.00 ± 1.17 to −5.47 ± 1.46) and WB groups (mean change = −5.29 ± 2.56 to −6.47 ± 2.83), with no difference between groups (P > 0.05). One month and 3 months after treatment, successful treatment (RMS of ≤ 2) was respectively observed in 29.4% and 82.3% of the PRP and in 47.1% and 76.4% of the WB groups (P > 0.05). Also, fascia thickness was decreased in both the PRP and WB groups (mean change = −1.74 ± 1.11 vs. −1.21 ± 0.73 mm, respectively, P = 0.115). Conclusions: Significant improvement in pain and function, as well as decrease in plantar fascia thickness, was observed by intralesional injection of the PRP and WB in patients with chronic PF. The study results indicate similar effectiveness between PRP and WB for the treatment of chronic PF in short-term. PMID:27274499

  20. Comparative research on activation technique for GaAs photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang; Qian, Yunsheng; Chang, Benkang; Chen, Xinlong; Yang, Rui

    2012-03-01

    The properties of GaAs photocathodes mainly depend on the material design and activation technique. In early researches, high-low temperature two-step activation has been proved to get more quantum efficiency than high-temperature single-step activation. But the variations of surface barriers for two activation techniques have not been well studied, thus the best activation temperature, best Cs-O ratio and best activation time for two-step activation technique have not been well found. Because the surface photovoltage spectroscopy (SPS) before activation is only in connection with the body parameters for GaAs photocathode such as electron diffusion length and the spectral response current (SRC) after activation is in connection with not only body parameters but also surface barriers, thus the surface escape probability (SEP) can be well fitted through the comparative research between SPS before activation and SEP after activation. Through deduction for the tunneling process of surface barriers by Schrödinger equation, the width and height for surface barrier I and II can be well fitted through the curves of SEP. The fitting results were well proved and analyzed by quantitative analysis of angle-dependent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ADXPS) which can also study the surface chemical compositions, atomic concentration percentage and layer thickness for GaAs photocathodes. This comparative research method for fitting parameters of surface barriers through SPS before activation and SRC after activation shows a better real-time in system method for the researches of activation techniques.

  1. Putting Brain Training to the Test in the Workplace: A Randomized, Blinded, Multisite, Active-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Borness, Catherine; Proudfoot, Judith; Crawford, John; Valenzuela, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background Cognitive training (CT) is effective at improving cognitive outcomes in children with and without clinical impairment as well as older individuals. Yet whether CT is of any preventative health benefit to working age adults is controversial. Our objective was therefore to investigate the real-world efficacy of CT in the workplace, involving employees from across the working-age spectrum and addressing many of the design issues that have limited trials to date. Methods and Findings 135 white collar employees of a large Australian public sector organization were randomised to either 16 weeks (20 minutes three times per week) of online CT or an active control (AC) program of equal length and structure. Cognitive, wellbeing and productivity outcome measures were analysed across three timepoints: baseline, immediately after training and 6 months post-training. CT effects on cognitive outcomes were limited, even after planned subgroup analyses of cognitive capacity and age. Unexpectedly, we found that our AC condition, which comprised viewing short documentaries about the natural world, had more impact. Compared to the CT group, 6 months after the end of training, those in the AC group experienced a significant increase in their self-reported Quality of Life (Effect Size g = .34 vs −.15; TIME×GROUP p = .003), decrease in stress levels (g = .22 vs −.19; TIME x GROUP p = .03), and overall improvement in Psychological Wellbeing (g = .32 vs −.06; TIME×GROUP p = .02). Conclusions CT does not appear to positively impact cognition or wellbeing amongst white collar office workers; however, short time-out respite activities may have value in the promotion of psychological wellbeing. Given looming challenges to workplace productivity, further work-based interventional research targeting employee mental health is recommended. Trial Registration This trial was registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN

  2. Physical activity, mindfulness meditation, or heart rate variability biofeedback for stress reduction: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    van der Zwan, Judith Esi; de Vente, Wieke; Huizink, Anja C; Bögels, Susan M; de Bruin, Esther I

    2015-12-01

    In contemporary western societies stress is highly prevalent, therefore the need for stress-reducing methods is great. This randomized controlled trial compared the efficacy of self-help physical activity (PA), mindfulness meditation (MM), and heart rate variability biofeedback (HRV-BF) in reducing stress and its related symptoms. We randomly allocated 126 participants to PA, MM, or HRV-BF upon enrollment, of whom 76 agreed to participate. The interventions consisted of psycho-education and an introduction to the specific intervention techniques and 5 weeks of daily exercises at home. The PA exercises consisted of a vigorous-intensity activity of free choice. The MM exercises consisted of guided mindfulness meditation. The HRV-BF exercises consisted of slow breathing with a heart rate variability biofeedback device. Participants received daily reminders for their exercises and were contacted weekly to monitor their progress. They completed questionnaires prior to, directly after, and 6 weeks after the intervention. Results indicated an overall beneficial effect consisting of reduced stress, anxiety and depressive symptoms, and improved psychological well-being and sleep quality. No significant between-intervention effect was found, suggesting that PA, MM, and HRV-BF are equally effective in reducing stress and its related symptoms. These self-help interventions provide easily accessible help for people with stress complaints.

  3. fMRI single trial discovery of spatio-temporal brain activity patterns.

    PubMed

    Allegra, Michele; Seyed-Allaei, Shima; Pizzagalli, Fabrizio; Baftizadeh, Fahimeh; Maieron, Marta; Reverberi, Carlo; Laio, Alessandro; Amati, Daniele

    2017-03-01

    There is growing interest in the description of short-lived patterns in the spatiotemporal cortical activity monitored via neuroimaging. Most traditional analysis methods, designed to estimate relatively long-term brain dynamics, are not always appropriate to capture these patterns. Here we introduce a novel data-driven approach for detecting short-lived fMRI brain activity patterns. Exploiting Density Peak Clustering (Rodriguez and Laio [2014]), our approach reveals well localized clusters by identifying and grouping together voxels whose time-series are similar, irrespective of their brain location, even when very short time windows (∼10 volumes) are used. The method, which we call Coherence Density Peak Clustering (CDPC), is first tested on simulated data and compared with a standard unsupervised approach for fMRI analysis, independent component analysis (ICA). CDPC identifies activated voxels with essentially no false-positives and proves more reliable than ICA, which is troubled by a number of false positives comparable to that of true positives. The reliability of the method is demonstrated on real fMRI data from a simple motor task, containing brief iterations of the same movement. The clusters identified are found in regions expected to be involved in the task, and repeat synchronously with the paradigm. The methodology proposed is especially suitable for the study of short-time brain dynamics and single trial experiments, where the event or task of interest cannot be repeated for the same subject, as happens, for instance, in problem-solving, learning and decision-making. A GUI implementation of our method is available for download at https://github.com/micheleallegra/CDPC. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1421-1437, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Clinical Health Outcomes Initiative in Comparative Effectiveness for Bipolar Disorder (Bipolar CHOICE): A Pragmatic Trial of Complex Treatment for a Complex Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Sylvia, Louisa G.; Leon, Andrew C.; Reilly-Harrington, Noreen; Shesler, Leah W.; McElroy, Susan L.; Friedman, Edward S.; Thase, Michael E.; Shelton, Richard C.; Bowden, Charles; Tohen, Mauricio; Singh, Vivek; Deckersbach, Thilo; Ketter, Terence; Kocsis, James; McInnis, Melvin G.; Schoenfeld, David; Bobo, William V.; Calabrese, Joseph R.

    2015-01-01

    . Conclusion We expect that this study will inform our understanding of the benefits and harms of lithium, a classic mood stabilizer, compared to quetiapine, a second generation antipsychotic with broad-spectrum activity in bipolar disorder and will provide an example of a well-designed and well-conducted randomized comparative effectiveness clinical trial. PMID:24346608

  5. Active video games to promote physical activity in children with cancer: a randomized clinical trial with follow-up

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Low levels of physical activity, musculoskeletal morbidity and weight gain are commonly reported problems in children with cancer. Intensive medical treatment and a decline in physical activity may also result in reduced motor performance. Therefore, simple and inexpensive ways to promote physical activity and exercise are becoming an increasingly important part of children’s cancer treatment. Methods The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of active video games in promotion of physical activity in children with cancer. The research is conducted as a parallel randomized clinical trial with follow-up. Patients between 3 and 16 years old, diagnosed with cancer and treated with vincristine in two specialized medical centers are asked to participate. Based on statistical estimates, the target enrollment is 40 patients. The intervention includes playing elective active video games and, in addition, education and consultations for the family. The control group will receive a general recommendation for physical activity for 30 minutes per day. The main outcomes are the amount of physical activity and sedentary behavior. Other outcomes include motor performance, fatigue and metabolic risk factors. The outcomes are examined with questionnaires, diaries, physical examinations and blood tests at baseline and at 2, 6, 12 and 30 months after the baseline. Additionally, the children’s perceptions of the most enjoyable activation methods are explored through an interview at 2 months. Discussion This trial will help to answer the question of whether playing active video games is beneficial for children with cancer. It will also provide further reasoning for physical activity promotion and training of motor skills during treatment. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01748058 (October 15, 2012). PMID:24708773

  6. Fast immunosensing technique to detect Legionella pneumophila in different natural and anthropogenic environments: comparative and collaborative trials

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Legionellosis is an uncommon form of pneumonia. After a clinical encounter, the necessary antibiotic treatment is available if the diagnosis is made early in the illness. Before the clinical encounter, early detection of the main pathogen involved, Legionella pneumophila, in hazardous environments is important in preventing infectious levels of this bacterium. In this study a qualitative test based on combined magnetic immunocapture and enzyme-immunoassay for the fast detection of Legionella pneumophila in water samples was compared with the standard method, in both comparative and collaborative trials. The test was based on the use of anti-Legionella pneumophila antibodies immobilized on magnetic microspheres. The final protocol included concentration by filtration, resuspension and immunomagnetic capture. The whole assay took less than 1 hour to complete. Results A comparative trial was performed against the standard culture method (ISO 11731) on both artificially and naturally contaminated water samples, for two matrices: chlorinated tap water and cooling tower water. Performance characteristics of the test used as screening with culture confirmation resulted in sensitivity, specificity, false positive, false negative, and efficiency of 96.6%, 100%, 0%, 3.4%, and 97.8%, respectively. The detection limit at the level under which the false negative rate increases to 50% (LOD50) was 93 colony forming units (CFU) in the volume examined for both tested matrices. The collaborative trial included twelve laboratories. Water samples spiked with certified reference materials were tested. In this study the coincidence level between the two methods was 95.8%. Conclusion Results demonstrate the applicability of this immunosensing technique to the rapid, simple, and efficient detection of Legionella pneumophila in water samples. This test is not based on microbial growth, so it could be used as a rapid screening technique for the detection of L. pneumophila in

  7. Initial Open Trial of a Computerized Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spates, C. Richard; Kalata, Alyssa H.; Ozeki, Satoshi; Stanton, Cory E.; Peters, Sofia

    2013-01-01

    This article presents preliminary findings from use of a novel computer program that implements an evidence-based psychological intervention to treat depression based on behavioral activation (BA) therapy. The program is titled “Building a Meaningful Life Through Behavioral Activation”. The findings derive from an open trial with moderate to…

  8. Feedback about More Accurate versus Less Accurate Trials: Differential Effects on Self-Confidence and Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badami, Rokhsareh; VaezMousavi, Mohammad; Wulf, Gabriele; Namazizadeh, Mahdi

    2012-01-01

    One purpose of the present study was to examine whether self-confidence or anxiety would be differentially affected by feedback from more accurate rather than less accurate trials. The second purpose was to determine whether arousal variations (activation) would predict performance. On Day 1, participants performed a golf putting task under one of…

  9. Effectiveness of individualized physiotherapy on pain and functioning compared to a standard exercise protocol in patients presenting with clinical signs of subacromial impingement syndrome. A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Shoulder impingement syndrome is a common musculoskeletal complaint leading to significant reduction of health and disability. Physiotherapy is often the first choice of treatment although its effectiveness is still under debate. Systematic reviews in this field highlight the need for more high quality trials to investigate the effectiveness of physiotherapy interventions in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome. Methods/Design This randomized controlled trial will investigate the effectiveness of individualized physiotherapy in patients presenting with clinical signs and symptoms of subacromial impingement, involving 90 participants aged 18-75. Participants are recruited from outpatient physiotherapy clinics, general practitioners, and orthopaedic surgeons in Germany. Eligible participants will be randomly allocated to either individualized physiotherapy or to a standard exercise protocol using central randomization. The control group will perform the standard exercise protocol aiming to restore muscular deficits in strength, mobility, and coordination of the rotator cuff and the shoulder girdle muscles to unload the subacromial space during active movements. Participants of the intervention group will perform the standard exercise protocol as a home program, and will additionally be treated with individualized physiotherapy based on clinical examination results, and guided by a decision tree. After the intervention phase both groups will continue their home program for another 7 weeks. Outcome will be measured at 5 weeks and at 3 and 12 months after inclusion using the shoulder pain and disability index and patients' global impression of change, the generic patient-specific scale, the average weekly pain score, and patient satisfaction with treatment. Additionally, the fear avoidance beliefs questionnaire, the pain catastrophizing scale, and patients' expectancies of treatment effect are assessed. Participants' adherence to the protocol, use

  10. Comparative trial of succinylcholine vs low dose atracurium-lidocaine combination for intubation in short outpatient procedures.

    PubMed Central

    Luyk, N. H.; Weaver, J. M.; Quinn, C.; Wilson, S.; Beck, F. M.

    1990-01-01

    Despite its many disadvantages, succinylcholine is the most commonly used drug for intubation of patients for short out-patient procedure. This double blind trial compared a low dose atracurium/lidocaine combination to succinylcholine for intubation in 40 ASA1 adult patients. Low dose atracurium/lidocaine provided clinical intubating conditions at two minutes and cardiovascular stability equivalent to succinylcholine with significantly less myalgia. Spontaneous respiration was slower after low dose atracurium/lidocaine relative to succinylcholine. Low dose atracurium/lidocaine may provide an acceptable alternative to succinylcholine for intubation in short outpatient procedures. PMID:2096747

  11. Impact of weighted composite compared to traditional composite endpoints for the design of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Bakal, Jeffrey A; Westerhout, Cynthia M; Armstrong, Paul W

    2015-12-01

    Composite endpoints are commonly used in cardiovascular clinical trials. When using a composite endpoint a subject is considered to have an event when the first component endpoint has occurred. The use of composite endpoints offers the ability to incorporate several clinically important endpoint events thereby augmenting the event rate and increasing statistical power for a given sample size. One assumption of the composite is that all component events are of equal clinical importance. This assumption is rarely achieved given the diversity of component endpoints included. One means of adjusting for this diversity is to adjust the outcomes using severity weights determined a priori. The use of a weighted endpoint also allows for the incorporation of multiple endpoints per patient. Although weighting the outcomes lowers the effective number of events, it offers additional information that reduces the variance of the estimate. We created a series of simulation studies to examine the effect on power as the individual components of a typical composite were changed. In one study, we noted that the weighted composite was able to offer discriminative power when the component outcomes were altered, while the traditional method was not. In the other study, we noted that the weighted composite offered a similar level of power to the traditional composite when the change was driven by the more severe endpoints.

  12. General Medical Burden in Bipolar Disorder: Findings from the LiTMUS Comparative Effectiveness Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, David E.; Sylvia, Louisa G.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Thase, Michael E.; Reilly-Harrington, Noreen A.; Ostacher, Michael J.; Leon, Andrew C.; Ketter, Terence A.; Friedman, Edward S.; Bowden, Charles L.; Pencina, Michael; Iosifescu, Dan V.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study examined general medical illnesses and their association with clinical features of bipolar disorder. Methods Data were cross-sectional and derived from the Lithium Treatment – Moderate Dose Use Study (LiTMUS), which randomized symptomatic adults (n=264 with available medical comorbidity scores) with bipolar disorder to moderate doses of lithium plus optimized treatment (OPT) or to OPT alone. Clinically significant high and low medical comorbidity burden were defined as a Cumulative Illness Rating Scale (CIRS) score ≥ 4 and < 4, respectively. Results The baseline prevalence of significant medical comorbidity was 53% (n=139). Patients with high medical burden were more likely to present in a major depressive episode (P=.04), meet criteria for obsessive-compulsive disorder (P=.02), and experience a greater number of lifetime mood episodes (P=0.02). They were also more likely to be prescribed a greater number of psychotropic medications (P=.002). Sixty-nine percent of the sample was overweight or obese as defined by body mass index (BMI), with African-Americans representing the racial group with the highest proportion of stage II obesity (BMI ≥ 35; 31%, n=14). Conclusions The burden of comorbid medical illnesses was high in this generalizable sample of treatment-seeking patients and appears associated with worsened course of illness and psychotropic medication patterns. (Funded by NIMH Contract N01MH80001; ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00667745). PMID:23465084

  13. A multicentre, pragmatic, parallel group, randomised controlled trial to compare the clinical and cost-effectiveness of three physiotherapy-led exercise interventions for knee osteoarthritis in older adults: the BEEP trial protocol (ISRCTN: 93634563)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Exercise is consistently recommended for older adults with knee pain related to osteoarthritis. However, the effects from exercise are typically small and short-term, likely linked to insufficient individualisation of the exercise programme and limited attention to supporting exercise adherence over time. The BEEP randomised trial aims to improve patients’ short and long-term outcomes from exercise. It will test the overall effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of two physiotherapy-led exercise interventions (Individually Tailored Exercise and Targeted Exercise Adherence) to improve the individual tailoring of, and adherence to exercise, compared with usual physiotherapy care. Methods/design Based on the learning from a pilot study (ISRCTN 23294263), the BEEP trial is a multi-centre, pragmatic, parallel group, individually randomised controlled trial, with embedded longitudinal qualitative interviews. 500 adults in primary care, aged 45 years and over with knee pain will be randomised to 1 of 3 treatment groups delivered by fully trained physiotherapists in up to 6 NHS services. These are: Usual Physiotherapy Care (control group consisting of up to 4 treatment sessions of advice and exercise), Individually Tailored Exercise (an individualised, supervised and progressed lower-limb exercise programme) or Targeted Exercise Adherence (supporting patients to adhere to exercise and to engage in general physical activity over the longer-term). The primary outcomes are pain and function as measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis index. A comprehensive range of secondary outcomes are also included. Outcomes are measured at 3, 6 (primary outcome time-point), 9, 18 and 36 months. Data on adverse events will also be collected. Semi-structured, qualitative interviews with a subsample of 30 participants (10 from each treatment group) will be undertaken at two time-points (end of treatment and 12 to 18 months later) and analysed thematically

  14. A multicentre randomised, 1-year comparative effectiveness, parallel-group trial protocol of a physical therapy approach compared to corticosteroid injections

    PubMed Central

    Deyle, Gail D; Gill, Norman W; Rhon, Daniel I; Allen, Chris S; Allison, Stephen C; Hando, Ben R; Petersen, Evan J; Dusenberry, Douglas I; Bellamy, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Corticosteroid injections (CSIs) are commonly used as an initial or a primary intervention for knee osteoarthritis (OA). Consistent evidence indicates CSIs offer symptom relief with conflicting reports regarding long-term efficacy. Physical therapy (PT) offers a non-invasive alternative. There is moderate evidence suggesting short-term and long-term symptom relief and functional improvement with PT interventions. Patients with knee OA are more commonly prescribed CSI than PT prior to total joint replacement. UnitedHealthcare and Military Health System data show substantially more total knee replacement patients receive preoperative CSI than PT. There are no studies comparing CSI to a PT approach in individuals with knee OA. The primary objective of this study is to compare the effectiveness of CSI to PT in individuals with knee OA at 1, 2 and 12 months. Methods and analysis We plan to recruit 156 participants meeting established knee OA criteria. Following informed consent, participants will be randomised to receive either CSI or PT. All participants will receive instruction on recommended exercise and weight control strategies plus usual medical care. The CSI intervention consisting of 3 injections and the PT intervention consisting of 8–12 sessions will be spaced over 12 months. Measures of the dependent variables (DVs) will occur at baseline, 4 weeks, 8 weeks, 6 months and 12 months post enrolment. This pragmatic, randomised clinical trial will be a mixed-model 2×5 factorial design. The independent variables are treatment (CSI and PT) and time with five levels from baseline to 1 year. The primary DV is the Western Ontario & McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC). We will also compare healthcare utilisation between the 2 groups. Ethics and Dissemination The protocol was approved by the Madigan Army Medical Center Institutional Review Board. The authors intend to publish the results in a peer-reviewed source. Trial Registration

  15. Cost-Effectiveness of a Long-Term Internet-Delivered Worksite Health Promotion Programme on Physical Activity and Nutrition: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robroek, Suzan J. W.; Polinder, Suzanne; Bredt, Folef J.; Burdorf, Alex

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a long-term workplace health promotion programme on physical activity (PA) and nutrition. In total, 924 participants enrolled in a 2-year cluster randomized controlled trial, with departments (n = 74) within companies (n = 6) as the unit of randomization. The intervention was compared with a…

  16. Comparing Participation in Activities among Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masse, Louise C.; Miller, Anton R.; Shen, Jane; Schiariti, Veronica; Roxborough, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Compared to typically developing peers, children with disabilities due to neurodevelopmental disorders and disabilities (NDD/D) and to chronic medical conditions (CMC) have reduced participation in activities. The extent to which these two groups of children have different levels of participation is unknown and was examined in this…

  17. Randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effects of progressive resistance training compared to progressive muscle relaxation in breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy: the BEST study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is one of the most common and distressing side effects of cancer and its treatment. During and after radiotherapy breast cancer patients often suffer from CRF which frequently impairs quality of life (QoL). Despite the high prevalence of CRF in breast cancer patients and the severe impact on the physical and emotional well-being, effective treatment methods are scarce. Physical activity for breast cancer patients has been reported to decrease fatigue, to improve emotional well-being and to increase physical strength. The pathophysiological and molecular mechanisms of CRF and the molecular-biologic changes induced by exercise, however, are poorly understood. In the BEST trial we aim to assess the effects of resistance training on fatigue, QoL and physical fitness as well as on molecular, immunological and inflammatory changes in breast cancer patients during adjuvant radiotherapy. Methods/design The BEST study is a prospective randomized, controlled intervention trial investigating the effects of a 12-week supervised progressive resistance training compared to a 12-week supervised muscle relaxation training in 160 patients with breast cancer undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy. To determine the effect of exercise itself beyond potential psychosocial group effects, patients in the control group perform a group-based progressive muscle relaxation training. Main inclusion criterion is histologically confirmed breast cancer stage I-III after lumpectomy or mastectomy with indication for adjuvant radiotherapy. Main exclusion criteria are acute infectious diseases, severe neurological, musculosceletal or cardiorespiratory disorders. The primary endpoint is cancer-related fatigue; secondary endpoints include immunological and inflammatory parameters analyzed in peripheral blood, saliva and urine. In addition, QoL, depression, physical performance and cognitive capacity will be assessed. Discussion The BEST study is the first randomized

  18. Streamlining the design of promising clinical trials: in-vitro testing of antithrombotic regimens and multiple agonists of platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Schneider, David J; Sobel, Burton E

    2009-03-01

    Platelets are activated in vivo by multiple agonists; however, platelet function testing in vitro has been performed predominantly with only one or two agonists of platelet activation. Greater insight into anticipated effects of antithrombotic regimens should enhance the design of successful clinical trials. To test this concept, we assessed platelet activation induced by multiple agonists and two antithrombotic regimens, unfractionated heparin (UFH) and eptifibatide compared with bivalirudin and cangrelor. Blood samples from 10 patients with coronary artery disease were spiked with pharmacologic concentrations achieved in vivo of either UFH (1.2 U/ml) and eptifibatide (1.7 microg/ml), or with bivalirudin (8 microg/ml) and cangrelor (500 nmol/l). Platelet function was assessed with the use of flow cytometry. Agonists included thrombin (50 nmol/l), adenosine diphosphate (1 micromol/l), the collagen-mimetic convulxin (5 ng/ml), and platelet-activating factor (10 nmol/l). When platelet activation was identified by the surface expression of P-selectin in response to multiple agonists, the combination of bivalirudin and cangrelor suppressed activation more than UFH and eptifibatide. When platelet activation was identified by the activation of glycoprotein IIb-IIIa (PAC-1 binding), the combination of bivalirudin and cangrelor was more effective in suppressing activation in response to thrombin and adenosine diphosphate, whereas UFH and eptifibatide more effectively prevented binding of PAC-1 when platelets were activated with the collagen-mimetic convulxin. In conclusion, bivalirudin and cangrelor suppressed platelet activation in response to diverse agonists in vitro more than UFH and eptifibatide. These results and this approach to selection of promising interventions should be helpful in streamlining the design of clinical trials.

  19. Efficacy and causal mechanism of an online social media intervention to increase physical activity: Results of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingwen; Brackbill, Devon; Yang, Sijia; Centola, Damon

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify what features of social media – promotional messaging or peer networks – can increase physical activity. Method: A 13-week social media-based exercise program was conducted at a large Northeastern university in Philadelphia, PA. In a randomized controlled trial, 217 graduate students from the University were randomized to three conditions: a control condition with a basic online program for enrolling in weekly exercise classes led by instructors of the University for 13 weeks, a media condition that supplemented the basic program with weekly online promotional media messages that encourage physical activity, and a social condition that replaced the media content with an online network of four to six anonymous peers composed of other participants of the program, in which each participant was able to see their peers' progress in enrolling in classes. The primary outcome was the number of enrollments in exercise classes, and the secondary outcomes were self-reported physical activities. Data were collected in 2014. Results: Participants enrolled in 5.5 classes on average. Compared with enrollment in the control condition (mean = 4.5), promotional messages moderately increased enrollment (mean = 5.7, p = 0.08), while anonymous social networks significantly increased enrollment (mean = 6.3, p = 0.02). By the end of the program, participants in the social condition reported exercising moderately for an additional 1.6 days each week compared with the baseline, which was significantly more than an additional 0.8 days in the control condition. Conclusion: Social influence from anonymous online peers was more successful than promotional messages for improving physical activity. Clinical Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02267369. PMID:26844132

  20. A Randomized Trial Comparing Bangerter Filters and Patching for the Treatment of Moderate Amblyopia in Children

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine whether visual acuity improvement with Bangerter filters is similar to improvement with patching as initial therapy for children with moderate amblyopia. Design Randomized clinical trial. Participants 186 children, 3 to <10 years old, with moderate amblyopia (20/40 to 20/80). Methods Children were randomly assigned to receive either daily patching or to use a Bangerter filter on the spectacle lens in front of the fellow eye. Study visits were scheduled at 6, 12, 18 and 24 weeks. Main outcome measure Visual acuity in amblyopic eye at 24 weeks. Results At 24 weeks, amblyopic eye improvement averaged 1.9 lines in the Bangerter group and 2.3 lines in the patching group (difference in mean visual acuities between groups adjusted for baseline acuity = 0.38 line). The upper limit of a 1-sided 95% confidence interval was 0.76 line, which slightly exceeded a pre-specified non-inferiority limit of < 0.75 line. Similar percentages of subjects in each group improved ≥3 lines (Bangerter group 38% versus patching group 35%, P=0.61) or had 20/25 or better amblyopic eye acuity (36% versus 31%, respectively, P=0.86). There was a lower treatment burden in the Bangerter group as measured with the Amblyopia Treatment Index. With Bangerter filters, neither a fixation switch to the amblyopic eye nor induced blurring in the fellow eye to worse than that of the amblyopic eye was required for visual acuity improvement. Conclusion Because the average difference in visual acuity improvement between Bangerter filters and patching was less than half a line, and there was lower burden of treatment on the child and family, Bangerter filter treatment is a reasonable option to consider for initial treatment of moderate amblyopia. PMID:20163869

  1. Physical activity counseling in overweight and obese primary care patients: Outcomes of the VA-STRIDE randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shasha; Stone, Roslyn A.; Hough, Linda J.; Haibach, Jeffrey P.; Marcus, Bess H.; Ciccolo, Joseph T.; Kriska, Andrea M.; Burkitt, Kelly H.; Steenkiste, Ann R.; Berger, Marie A.; Sevick, Mary A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this 2-arm randomized clinical trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of a 12-month, expert system-based, print-delivered physical activity intervention in a primary care Veteran population in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Participants were not excluded for many health conditions that typically are exclusionary criteria in physical activity trials. The primary outcome measures were physical activity reported using the Community Healthy Activities Model Program for Seniors (CHAMPS) questionnaire and an accelerometer-based activity assessment at baseline, 6, and 12 months. Of the 232 Veterans enrolled in the study, 208 (89.7%) were retained at the 6-month follow-up and 203 (87.5%) were retained at 12 months. Compared to the attention control, intervention participants had significantly increased odds of meeting the U.S. recommended guideline of ≥ 150 min/week of at least moderate-intensity physical activity at 12 months for the modified CHAMPS (odds ratio [OR] = 2.86; 95% CI: 1.03–7.96; p = 0.04) but not at 6 months (OR = 1.54; 95% CI: 0.56–4.23; p = 0.40). Based on accelerometer data, intervention participants had significantly increased odds of meeting ≥ 150 min/week of moderate-equivalent physical activity at 6 months (OR = 6.26; 95% CI: 1.26–31.22; p = 0.03) and borderline significantly increased odds at 12 months (OR = 4.73; 95% CI: 0.98–22.76; p = 0.053). An expert system physical activity counseling intervention can increase or sustain the proportion of Veterans in primary care meeting current recommendations for moderate-intensity physical activity. Trial Registration Clinical trials.gov identifier: NCT00731094 URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00731094. PMID:26844197

  2. Comparative anthelmintic activity investigation of selected ethno-medicinal weeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pueblos, Kirstin Rhys S.; Bajalla, Mark; Pacheco, Dixie; Ganot, Sheila; Paig, Daisy; Tapales, Radyn; Lagare, Jeanne; Quimque, Mark Tristan J.

    2017-01-01

    Helminth infections are one of the seriously neglected potent diseases in many parts of the world. The problems of parasitic helminthes becoming resistant to currently available anthelmintic drugs pose a challenge for the search - relying on natural products - for new and better anthelmintics. In this paper, four abundant Philippine weeds: Chrysopogon aciculatus Trin. Cyperus brevifolius Rottb., Ruellia tuberosa Linn. and Saccharum spontaneum Linn. were investigated for their anthelmintic activities to establish basis of their folkloric claim. The hexane-soluble and chloroform-soluble extracts were obtained through sequential solvent partitioning of the crude ethanolic extract of the air-dried aerial part of each plant sample. Meanwhile, the decoction was obtained from fresh aerial part of the plant samples. All extracts were then subjected to in vitro anthelmintic screening at different concentration as per method of Ghosh, et al. against African nightcrawler earthworms (Eudrillus euginiae) in which the activity of the extracts was determined by correlation with time. The anthelmintic bioassay results revealed a dose-dependent toxicity relationship. It indicated relatively low anthelmintic activities of the decoction of the four plant samples as compared to their corresponding crude ethanol extracts. Among the crude ethanol extracts, C. brevifolius (CBE) gave fastest time to bring about paralysis and death to the test organisms at all concentrations tested. For the hexane extracts, R. tuberosa (RTH) gave better activity among other plant samples. Lastly, among the chloroform-soluble extracts, both that of C. brevifolius (CBC) and R. tuberosa (RTC) comparably showed strongest anthelmintic activities at all tested concentrations, thus, exhibited best anthelmintic activity that is remarkably comparable to the positive control, Mebendazole at the highest concentration tested. In fact, CBC and RTC showed highest anthelmintic potential compared to all extracts tested in

  3. Feasibility study and pilot cluster-randomised controlled trial of the GoActive intervention aiming to promote physical activity among adolescents: outcomes and lessons learnt

    PubMed Central

    Corder, Kirsten; Brown, Helen E; Schiff, Annie; van Sluijs, Esther M F

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Assess the feasibility of implementing the GoActive intervention in secondary schools, to identify improvements, test study procedures, determine preliminary effectiveness to increase moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and inform power calculations to establish programme effectiveness. Setting Feasibility study (1 school) and pilot cluster-randomised controlled trial (CRCT; 2 intervention; 1 control school(s)). Participants 460 participants (46.6% female; 13.2 (0.4) years old). Interventions 8-week intervention (2013) involved: classes choosing weekly activities encouraged by mentors (older adolescents) and in-class peer leaders. Students gain points for trying activities which are entered into an intramural competition. Primary and secondary outcome measures Planned quantitative (questionnaire) and qualitative (focus groups) process evaluation addressed enjoyment, confidence, participation, suggested improvements. Outcomes were assessed at baseline and follow-up (week 8) in pilot CRCT and included accelerometer-assessed MVPA; adolescent-reported activity type, well-being, peer support, shyness, sociability. Analysis of covariance was used to assess preliminary effectiveness as change in MVPA adjusted for baseline. Results All year 9 students in intervention schools were exposed to the intervention; over all schools 77% of eligible students were measured. 71% boys and 74% girls found GoActive ‘fun’; 38% boys and 32% girls said it increased confidence, and 64% boys and 59% girls said they would continue with a GoActive activity. Suggested improvements included more mentorship; improved training; streamlined points recording. Pilot results indicated potential effectiveness ((adjusted mean difference (95% CI) p value; MVPA mins; 5.1 (1.1 to 9.2) p=0.014)) and suggest recruitment of 16 schools (2400 adolescents) for a full trial. Compared with control, intervention students reported greater peer support 0.5 (0.1 to 0.9) p=0.03, well-being 1

  4. The Magpie Trial: a randomised trial comparing magnesium sulphate with placebo for pre-eclampsia. Outcome for children at 18 months

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Objective To assess the long-term effects of in utero exposure to magnesium sulphate for children whose mothers had pre-eclampsia. Design Assessment at 18 months of age for children whose mothers were recruited to the Magpie Trial (recruitment 1998–2001 ISRCTN 86938761), which compared magnesium sulphate with placebo. Setting Follow-up of children born at 125 centres in 19 countries across five continents. Population A total of 6922 children were born to women randomised before delivery at follow-up centres. Of these, 2271 were not included for logistic reasons and 168 were excluded (101 at a centre where <20% were contacted, 40 whose death or disability was due to a problem at conception or embryogenesis and 27 whose parent/s opted out). Therefore, 4483 children were included in follow-up, of whom 3283 (73%) were contacted. Methods Assessment by questionnaire, with interview and neurodevelopmental testing of selected children. Main outcome measures Death or neurosensory disability at age of 18 months. Results Of those allocated magnesium sulphate, 245/1635 (15.0%) were dead or had neurosensory disability at 18 months compared with 233/1648 (14.1%) allocated placebo (relative risk [RR] 1.06, 95% CI 0.90–1.25), and of survivors, 19/1409 (1.3%) had neurosensory disability at 18 months compared with 27/1442 (1.9%) (RR 0.72, 95% CI 0.40–1.29). There were no substantial differences in causes of death or in the risk of individual impairments or disabilities. Conclusions The lower risk of eclampsia following prophylaxis with magnesium sulphate was not associated with a clear difference in the risk of death or disability for children at 18 months. PMID:17166221

  5. Comparison of Trial Participants and Open Access Users of a Web-Based Physical Activity Intervention Regarding Adherence, Attrition, and Repeated Participation

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Diener, Eva; Bauer, Georg; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; Martin, Brian W

    2010-01-01

    Background Web-based interventions are popular for promoting healthy lifestyles such as physical activity. However, little is known about user characteristics, adherence, attrition, and predictors of repeated participation on open access physical activity websites. Objective The focus of this study was Active-online, a Web-based individually tailored physical activity intervention. The aims were (1) to assess and compare user characteristics and adherence to the website (a) in the open access context over time from 2003 to 2009, and (b) between trial participants and open access users; and (2) to analyze attrition and predictors of repeated use among participants in a randomized controlled trial compared with registered open access users. Methods Data routinely recorded in the Active-online user database were used. Adherence was defined as: the number of pages viewed, the proportion of visits during which a tailored module was begun, the proportion of visits during which tailored feedback was received, and the time spent in the tailored modules. Adherence was analyzed according to six one-year periods (2003-2009) and according to the context (trial or open access) based on first visits and longest visits. Attrition and predictors of repeated participation were compared between trial participants and open access users. Results The number of recorded visits per year on Active-online decreased from 42,626 in 2003-2004 to 8343 in 2008-2009 (each of six one-year time periods ran from April 23 to April 22 of the following year). The mean age of users was between 38.4 and 43.1 years in all time periods and both contexts. The proportion of women increased from 49.5% in 2003-2004 to 61.3% in 2008-2009 (P< .001). There were differences but no consistent time trends in adherence to Active-online. The mean age of trial participants was 43.1 years, and 74.9% were women. Comparing contexts, adherence was highest for registered open access users. For open access users, adherence

  6. Pulsed electromagnetic fields on postmenopausal osteoporosis in Southwest China: a randomized, active-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui-Fang; Yang, Lin; He, Hong-Chen; Zhou, Jun; Liu, Ying; Wang, Chun-Yan; Wu, Yuan-Chao; He, Cheng-Qi

    2013-05-01

    A randomized, active-controlled clinical trial was conducted to examine the effect of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) on women with postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO) in southwest China. Forty-four participants were randomly assigned to receive alendronate or one course of PEMFs treatment. The primary endpoint was the mean percentage change in bone mineral density of the lumbar spine (BMDL), and secondary endpoints were the mean percentage changes in left proximal femur bone mineral density (BMDF), serum 25OH vitamin D3 (25(OH)D) concentrations, total lower-extremity manual muscle test (LE MMT) score, and Berg Balance Scale (BBS) score. The BMDL, BMDF, total LE MMT score and BBS score were recorded at baseline, 5, 12, and 24 weeks. Serum concentrations of 25(OH)D were measured at baseline and 5 weeks. Using a mixed linear model, there was no significant treatment difference between the two groups in the BMDL, BMDF, total LE MMT score, and BBS score (P ≥ 0.05). For 25(OH)D concentrations, the effects were also comparable between the two groups (P ≥ 0.05) with the Mann-Whitney's U-test. These results suggested that a course of PEMFs treatment with specific parameters was as effective as alendronate in treating PMO within 24 weeks.

  7. Effect of Darapladib Treatment on Endarterectomy Carotid Plaque Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 Activity: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Joel L.; Shi, Yi; Snipes, Rose; Janmohamed, Salim; Rolfe, Timothy E.; Davis, Bill; Postle, Anthony; Macphee, Colin H.

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the effects of darapladib, a selective oral investigational lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 inhibitor, on both plasma and plaque lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 activity. Methods Patients undergoing elective carotid endarterectomy were randomized to darapladib 40 mg (n = 34), 80 mg (n = 34), or placebo (n = 34) for 14 days, followed by carotid endarterectomy 24 hours after the last dose of study medication. Results Darapladib 40 mg and 80 mg reduced plasma lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 activity by 52% and 81%, respectively, versus placebo (both P<0.001). Significant reductions in plaque lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 activity were also observed compared with placebo (P<0.0001), which equated to a 52% and 80% decrease compared with placebo. No significant differences were observed between groups in plaque lysophosphatidylcholine content or other biomarkers, although a dose-dependent decrease in plaque matrix metalloproteinase-9 mRNA expression was observed with darapladib 80 mg (P = 0.053 vs placebo). In a post-hoc analysis, plaque caspase-3 (P<0.001) and caspase-8 (P<0.05) activity were found to be significantly lower in the darapladib 80-mg group versus placebo. No major safety concerns were identified in the study. Conclusions Short-term treatment (14±4 days) with darapladib produced a robust, dose-dependent reduction in plasma lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 activity. More importantly, darapladib demonstrated placebo-corrected reductions in carotid plaque lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 activity of similar magnitude. Darapladib was generally well tolerated and no safety concerns were identified. Additional studies of longer duration are needed to explore whether these pharmacodynamic effects are associated with improved clinical outcomes, as might be hypothesized. Trial Registration Information Name of Registry 1: ClinicalTrials.gov Registry Number

  8. Phase 3 Randomized Trial on Larynx Preservation Comparing Sequential vs Alternating Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Rolland, F.; Tesselaar, M.; Bardet, E.; Leemans, C. R.; Geoffrois, L.; Hupperets, P.; Barzan, L.; de Raucourt, D.; Chevalier, D.; Licitra, L.; Lunghi, F.; Stupp, R.; Lacombe, D.; Bogaerts, J.; Horiot, J. C.; Bernier, J.; Vermorken, J. B.

    2009-01-01

    Background Both induction chemotherapy followed by irradiation and concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy have been reported as valuable alternatives to total laryngectomy in patients with advanced larynx or hypopharynx cancer. We report results of the randomized phase 3 trial 24954 from the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer. Methods Patients with resectable advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx (tumor stage T3–T4) or hypopharynx (T2–T4), with regional lymph nodes in the neck staged as N0–N2 and with no metastasis, were randomly assigned to treatment in the sequential (or control) or the alternating (or experimental) arm. In the sequential arm, patients with a 50% or more reduction in primary tumor size after two cycles of cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil received another two cycles, followed by radiotherapy (70 Gy total). In the alternating arm, a total of four cycles of cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (in weeks 1, 4, 7, and 10) were alternated with radiotherapy with 20 Gy during the three 2-week intervals between chemotherapy cycles (60 Gy total). All nonresponders underwent salvage surgery and postoperative radiotherapy. The Kaplan–Meier method was used to obtain time-to-event data. Results The 450 patients were randomly assigned to treatment (224 to the sequential arm and 226 to the alternating arm). Median follow-up was 6.5 years. Survival with a functional larynx was similar in sequential and alternating arms (hazard ratio of death and/or event = 0.85, 95% confidence interval = 0.68 to 1.06), as were median overall survival (4.4 and 5.1 years, respectively) and median progression-free interval (3.0 and 3.1 years, respectively). Grade 3 or 4 mucositis occurred in 64 (32%) of the 200 patients in the sequential arm who received radiotherapy and in 47 (21%) of the 220 patients in the alternating arm. Late severe edema and/or fibrosis was observed in 32 (16%) patients in the sequential arm and in 25 (11%) in the

  9. Randomised controlled trial comparing the effectiveness of electroacupuncture and TENS for low back pain: a preliminary study for a pragmatic trial.

    PubMed

    Tsukayama, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Hitoshi; Amagai, Hitoshi; Tanno, Yasuo

    2002-12-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of electroacupuncture and TENS for low back pain when the electroacupuncture is applied in a clinically realistic manner. The study was designed as an evaluator-blinded randomised controlled trial (RCT). The study was performed at the Tsukuba College of Technology Clinic in Japan. Twenty subjects, who suffered from low back pain (LBP) without sciatica, were recruited, using leaflets in Tsukuba city. Subjects were allocated to either an electroacupuncture (EA) group (10 patients) or a transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) group (10 patients). The procedure for EA was in accordance with standard practice at our clinic. The main outcome measures were a pain relief scale (100 mm visual analogue scale: VAS) and a LBP score recommended by the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA Score). Mean VAS value during the 2-weeks experimental period of the EA group was significantly smaller than that of the TENS group (65 mm vs 86 mm; 95% CI, 4.126 - 37.953). JOA Score in the EA group improved significantly while that in the TENS group showed no change. Although some placebo effect may be included, EA appeared more useful than TENS in the short-term effect on low back pain. We suggest that more realistic acupuncture interventions based on standard practice should be employed in pragmatic RCTs.

  10. Improvdent: Improving dentures for patient benefit. A crossover randomised clinical trial comparing impression materials for complete dentures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background According to the UK Adult Dental Health Survey (2009) 15% of adults aged 65–74, 30% aged 75–84 and 47% aged >85 years are edentulous and require complete dentures. Patients’ quality of life and nutrition status are affected by poor dentures. The quality of the dental impression is the most important issue for improving the fit and comfort of new dentures. There is paucity of RCT evidence for which impression material is best for complete dentures construction. This study aims to compare two impression materials for effectiveness and cost effectiveness. Methods/Design IMPROVDENT is a double-blind crossover trial comparing the use of alginate and silicone, two commonly used denture impression materials, in terms of patient preference and cost-effectiveness. Eighty five edentulous patients will be recruited and provided with two sets of dentures, similar in all aspects except for the impression material used (alginate or silicone). Patients will try both sets of dentures for a two-week period, unadjusted, to become accustomed to the feel of the new dentures (habituation period). Patients will then wear each set of dentures for a period of 8 weeks (in random order) during which time the dentures will be adjusted for optimum comfort. Finally, patients will be given both sets of dentures for a further two weeks to wear whichever denture they prefer (confirmation period). Patients will be asked about quality of life and to rate dentures on function and comfort at the end of each trial period and asked which set they prefer at the end of the habituation period (unadjusted denture preference) and confirmation period (adjusted denture preference). A health economic evaluation will estimate incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of producing dentures from the two materials. A qualitative study will investigate the impact of dentures on behaviour and quality of life. Funding: IMPROVDENT is funded by NIHR RfPB (PB-PG-0408-16300). Discussion This trial aims to

  11. Defining Plasmodium falciparum Treatment in South West Asia: A Randomized Trial Comparing Artesunate or Primaquine Combined with Chloroquine or SP

    PubMed Central

    Kolaczinski, Kate; Leslie, Toby; Ali, Iftikhar; Durrani, Naeem; Lee, Sue; Barends, Marion; Beshir, Khalid; Ord, Rosalynn; Hallett, Rachel; Rowland, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Antimalarial resistance has led to a global policy of artemisinin-based combination therapy. Despite growing resistance chloroquine (CQ) remained until recently the official first-line treatment for falciparum malaria in Pakistan, with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) second-line. Co-treatment with the gametocytocidal primaquine (PQ) is recommended for transmission control in South Asia. The relative effect of artesunate (AS) or primaquine, as partner drugs, on clinical outcomes and gametocyte carriage in this setting were unknown. Methods A single-blinded, randomized trial among Afghan refugees in Pakistan compared six treatment arms: CQ; CQ+(single-dose)PQ; CQ+(3 d)AS; SP; SP+(single-dose)PQ, and SP+(3 d)AS. The objectives were to compare treatment failure rates and effect on gametocyte carriage, of CQ or SP monotherapy against the respective combinations (PQ or AS). Outcomes included trophozoite and gametocyte clearance (read by light microscopy), and clinical and parasitological failure. Findings A total of 308 (87%) patients completed the trial. Failure rates by day 28 were: CQ 55/68 (81%); CQ+AS 19/67 (28%), SP 4/41 (9.8%), SP+AS 1/41 (2.4%). The addition of PQ to CQ or SP did not affect failure rates (CQ+PQ 49/67 (73%) failed; SP+PQ 5/33 (16%) failed). AS was superior to PQ at clearing gametocytes; gametocytes were seen on d7 in 85% of CQ, 40% of CQ+PQ, 21% of CQ+AS, 91% of SP, 76% of SP+PQ and 23% of SP+AS treated patients. PQ was more effective at clearing older gametocyte infections whereas AS was more effective at preventing emergence of mature gametocytes, except in cases that recrudesced. Conclusions CQ is no longer appropriate by itself or in combination. These findings influenced the replacement of CQ with SP+AS for first-line treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria in the WHO Eastern Mediterranean Region. The threat of SP resistance remains as SP monotherapy is still common. Three day AS was superior to single-dose PQ for reducing

  12. An Internet-Based Physical Activity Intervention to Improve Quality of Life of Inactive Older Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Broekhuizen, Karen; de Gelder, Jelle; Wijsman, Carolien A; Wijsman, Liselotte W; Westendorp, Rudi GJ; Verhagen, Evert; Slagboom, Pieternella E; van Mechelen, Willem; van Heemst, Diana; van der Ouderaa, Frans

    2016-01-01

    Background Increasing physical activity is a viable strategy for improving both the health and quality of life of older adults. Objective The aim of this study was to assess if an Internet-based intervention aimed to increase physical activity was effective in improving quality of life of inactive older adults. In addition, we analyzed the effect of the intervention on quality of life among those participants who successfully reached their individually targeted increase in daily physical activity as indicated by the intervention program, as well as the dose-response effect of increasing physical activity on quality of life. Methods The intervention was tested in a randomized controlled trial and was comprised of an Internet program—DirectLife (Philips)—aimed at increasing physical activity using monitoring and feedback by accelerometry and feedback by digital coaching (n=119). The control group received no intervention (n=116). Participants were inactive 60-70-year-olds and were recruited from the general population. Quality of life and physical activity were measured at baseline and after 3 months using the Research ANd Development 36-item health survey (RAND-36) and wrist-worn triaxial accelerometer, respectively. Results After 3 months, a significant improvement in quality of life was seen in the intervention group compared to the control group for RAND-36 subscales on emotional and mental health (2.52 vs -0.72, respectively; P=.03) and health change (8.99 vs 2.03, respectively; P=.01). A total of 50 of the 119 participants (42.0%) in the intervention group successfully reached their physical activity target and showed a significant improvement in quality of life compared to the control group for subscales on emotional and mental health (4.31 vs -0.72, respectively; P=.009) and health change (11.06 vs 2.03, respectively; P=.004). The dose-response analysis showed that there was a significant association between increase in minutes spent in moderate

  13. Gestational weight gain: results from the Delta Healthy Sprouts comparative impact trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction. Delta Healthy Sprouts was designed to test the comparative impact of two home visiting programs on weight status, dietary intake, and health behaviors of Southern African American women and their infants. Results pertaining to the primary outcome, gestational weight gain, are reporte...

  14. Outpatient Myelography: A Prospective Trial Comparing Complications after Myelography between Outpatients and Inpatients in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Inoue, Hidenori; Aoki, Takaaki; Ishiguro, Naoki; Osawa, Yoshimitsu

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective comparative study. Purpose To compare the incidence and severity of adverse reactions associated with myelography performed in outpatients vs. in inpatients and report the safety and usefulness of outpatient myelography in Japanese patients. Overview of Literature Myelography is normally performed as an inpatient procedure in most hospitals in Japan. No studies have reported the usefulness and adverse effects of outpatient myelography in Japanese patients. Methods We performed 221 myelography procedures. Eighty-five of the 221 patients underwent outpatient myelography using our new protocol. The incidence and severity of adverse reactions were compared with the other 136 patients, who underwent conventional inpatient myelography. We further compared the cost of outpatient and inpatient myelography. Results The overall rate of adverse effects was 9.4% in outpatients, as compared with 7.4% in inpatients. Overall, 1.2% of outpatients and 0.74% inpatients experienced "severe" adverse effects (requiring hospitalization). There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in either the overall rate of adverse effects or the rate of "severe" adverse effects. Moreover, the average outpatient procedure cost was only one-third to one-half that of the inpatient procedure. Conclusions This was the first study to address the safety and usefulness of outpatient myelography in Japanese patients. If selected according to proper inclusion criteria for outpatient procedure, no significant differences were observed in the adverse effects between inpatients and outpatients. The outpatient procedure is more economical and has the added benefit of being more convenient and time-efficient for the patient. PMID:26713127

  15. Comparative insecticide susceptibility and detoxification enzyme activities among pestiferous blattodea.

    PubMed

    Valles, S M; Koehler, P G; Brenner, R J

    1999-11-01

    Topical bioassays using propoxur, chlorpyrifos, and lambda-cyhalothrin were conducted on eight cockroach species. Based on lethal dose values, the relative toxicities of the insecticide classes were generally pyrethroid > carbamate > organophosphorous. Lambda-Cyhalothrin and propoxur were more toxic toward the Blattidae as compared with the Blattellidae. The order of lambda-cyhalothrin toxicity was Periplaneta americana > Periplaneta brunnea = Periplaneta australasiae = Periplaneta fuliginosa = Blatta orientalis > Blattella asahinai = Blattella germanica > Blattella vaga. The order of propoxur toxicity was B. orientalis > P. americana > P. brunnea = P. australasiae > B. asahinai > P. fuliginosa = B. germanica > B. vaga. The order of chlorpyrifos toxicity was P. americana > B. asahinai = B. vaga > B. orientalis = P. australasiae = P. brunnea > B. germanica = P. fuliginosa. Detoxification enzyme activities for each species also were measured and compared with insecticide toxicity. Propoxur LD50 was significantly (P = 0.01; r = 0.81) correlated with glutathione S-transferase activity. Lambda-Cyhalothrin LD50 correlated with methoxyresorufin O-demethylase activity (P = 0.01; r = 0.81), carboxylesterase activity (P = 0.03; r = - 0.75), general esterase activity (P = 0.02; r = - 0.79), and cockroach weight (P = 0.01; r = -0.95).

  16. A non-inferiority trial of an attenuated combination strategy (‘COBRA-light’) compared to the original COBRA strategy: clinical results after 26 weeks

    PubMed Central

    den Uyl, Debby; ter Wee, Marieke; Boers, Maarten; Kerstens, Pit; Voskuyl, Alexandre; Nurmohamed, Mike; Raterman, Hennie; van Schaardenburg, Dirkjan; van Dillen, Nancy; Dijkmans, Ben; Lems, Willem

    2014-01-01

    Background Early, intensive treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with the combination of (initially high dose) prednisolone, methotrexate and sulfasalazine (COBRA therapy) considerably lowers disease activity and suppresses radiological progression, but is infrequently prescribed in daily practice. Attenuating the COBRA regimen might lessen concerns about side effects, but the efficacy of such strategies is unknown. Objective To compare the ‘COBRA-light’ strategy with only two drugs, comprising a lower dose of prednisolone (starting at 30 mg/day, tapered to 7.5 mg/day in 9 weeks) and methotrexate (escalated to 25 mg/week in 9 weeks) to COBRA therapy (prednisolone 60 mg/day, tapered to 7.5 mg/day in 6 weeks, methotrexate 7.5 mg/week and sulfasalazine 2 g/day). Method An open, randomised controlled, non-inferiority trial in 164 patients with early active RA, all treated according to a treat to target strategy. Results At baseline patients had moderately active disease: mean (SD) 44-joint disease activity score (DAS44) 4.13 (0.81) for COBRA and 3.95 (0.9) for COBRA-light. After 6 months, DAS44 significantly decreased in both groups (–2.50 (1.21) for COBRA and –2.18 (1.10) for COBRA-light). The adjusted difference in DAS44 improvement between the groups, 0.21 (95% CI –0.11 to 0.53), was smaller than the predefined clinically relevant difference of 0.5. Minimal disease activity (DAS44 <1.6) was reached in almost half of patients in both groups (49% and 41% in COBRA and COBRA-light, respectively). Conclusions At 6 months COBRA-light therapy is most likely non-inferior to COBRA therapy. Clinical Trial Registration Number 55552928. PMID:23606682

  17. The impact of physical activity on fatigue and quality of life in lung cancer patients: a randomised controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background People with lung cancer have substantial symptom burden and more unmet needs than the general cancer population. Physical activity (PA) has been shown to positively influence quality of life (QOL), fatigue and daily functioning in the curative treatment of people with breast and colorectal cancers and lung diseases, as well as in palliative settings. A randomised controlled trial (RCT) is needed to determine if lung cancer patients benefit from structured PA intervention. The Physical Activity in Lung Cancer (PAL) trial is designed to evaluate the impact of a 2-month PA intervention on fatigue and QOL in patients with non-resectable lung cancer. Biological mechanisms will also be studied. Methods/design A multi-centre RCT with patients randomised to usual care or a 2-month PA programme, involving supervised PA sessions including a behavioural change component and home-based PA. QOL questionnaires, disease and functional status and body composition will be assessed at baseline, 2, 4 and 6 months follow-up. The primary endpoint is comparative levels of fatigue between the 2 arms. Secondary endpoints include: QOL, functional abilities and physical function. Exploratory endpoints include: anxiety, depression, distress, dyspnoea, PA behaviour, fitness, hospitalisations, survival, cytokines and insulin-like growth factor levels. Discussion This study will provide high-level evidence of the effect of PA programmes on cancer-related fatigue and QOL in patients with advanced lung cancer. If positive, the study has the potential to change care for people with cancer using a simple, inexpensive intervention to improve their QOL and help them maintain independent function for as long as possible. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry No. ACTRN12609000971235 PMID:23216897

  18. Exploring equity in uptake of the NHS Health Check and a nested physical activity intervention trial

    PubMed Central

    Attwood, S.; Morton, K.; Sutton, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Socio-demographic factors characterizing disadvantage may influence uptake of preventative health interventions such as the NHS Health Check and research trials informing their content. Methods A cross-sectional study examining socio-demographic characteristics of participants and non-participants to the NHS Health Check and a nested trial of very brief physical activity interventions within this context. Age, gender, Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD) and ethnicity were extracted from patient records of four General Practices (GP) in England. Results In multivariate analyses controlling for GP surgery, the odds of participation in the Health Check were higher for older patients (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.04–1.07) and lower from areas of greater deprivation (IMD Quintiles 4 versus 1, OR 0.37, 95% CI 0.18–0.76, 5 versus 1 OR 0.42, 95% CI 0.20–0.88). Older patients were more likely to participate in the physical activity trial (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.02–1.06). Conclusions Younger patients and those living in areas of greater deprivation may be at risk of non-participation in the NHS Health Check, while younger age also predicted non-participation in a nested research trial. The role that GP-surgery-specific factors play in influencing participation across different socio-demographic groups requires further exploration. PMID:26036701

  19. Improving diet, activity and wellness in adults at risk of diabetes: randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Block, G; Azar, K M J; Romanelli, R J; Block, T J; Palaniappan, L P; Dolginsky, M; Block, C H

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this analysis is to examine the effect of an algorithm-driven online diabetes prevention program on changes in eating habits, physical activity and wellness/productivity factors. Methods: The intervention, Alive-PD, used small-step individually tailored goal setting and other features to promote changes in diet and physical activity. A 6-month randomized controlled trial was conducted among patients from a healthcare delivery system who had confirmed prediabetes (n =339). Change in weight and glycemic markers were measured in the clinic. Changes in physical activity, diet and wellness/productivity factors were self-reported. Mean age was 55 (s.d. 8.9) years, mean body mass index was 31 (s.d. 4.4) kg m−2, 68% were white and 69% were male. Results: The intervention group increased fruit/vegetable consumption by 3.71 (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.73, 4.70) times per week (effect size 0.62), and decreased refined carbohydrates by 3.77 (95% CI 3.10, 4.44) times per week both significantly (P<0.001) greater changes than in the control group. The intervention group also reported a significantly greater increase in physical activity than in the control group, effect size 0.49, P<0.001. In addition, the intervention group reported a significant increase in self-rated health, in confidence in ability to make dietary changes and in ability to accomplish tasks, and a decrease in fatigue, compared with the control group. These changes paralleled the significant treatment effects on glycemic markers and weight. Conclusions: In addition to promoting improvements in weight and glycemic markers, the Alive-PD program appears to improve eating habits and physical activity, behaviors important not just for diabetes prevention but for those with diagnosed diabetes or obesity. The improvements in wellness/productivity may derive from the diet and activity improvements, and from the satisfaction and self-efficacy of achieving goals. PMID:27643726

  20. The Magpie Trial: a randomised trial comparing magnesium sulphate with placebo for pre-eclampsia. Outcome for women at 2 years

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess long-term effects for women following the use of magnesium sulphate for pre-eclampsia. Design Assessment at 2–3 years after delivery for women recruited to the Magpie Trial (recruitment in 1998–2001, ISRCTN 86938761), which compared magnesium sulphate with placebo for pre-eclampsia. Setting Follow up after discharge from hospital at 125 centres in 19 countries across five continents. Population A total of 7927 women were randomised at the follow-up centres. Of these women, 2544 were not included for logistic reasons and 601 excluded (109 at a centre where <20% of women were contacted, 466 discharged without a surviving child and 26 opted out). Therefore, 4782 women were selected for follow-up, of whom 3375 (71%) were traced. Methods Questionnaire assessment was administered largely by post or in a dedicated clinic. Interview assessment of selected women was performed. Main outcome measures Death or serious morbidity potentially related to pre-eclampsia at follow up, other morbidity and use of health service resources. Results Median time from delivery to follow up was 26 months (interquartile range 19–36). Fifty-eight of 1650 (3.5%) women allocated magnesium sulphate died or had serious morbidity potentially related to pre-eclampsia compared with 72 of 1725 (4.2%) women allocated placebo (relative risk 0.84, 95% CI 0.60–1.18). Conclusions The reduction in the risk of eclampsia following prophylaxis with magnesium sulphate was not associated with an excess of death or disability for the women after 2 years. PMID:17166220

  1. Direction to an Internet Support Group Compared With Online Expressive Writing for People With Depression And Anxiety: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Jeremy; Potts, Henry WW

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression and anxiety are common, often comorbid, conditions, and Internet support groups for them are well used. However, little rigorous research has been conducted on the outcome of these groups. Objective This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of an Internet support group in reducing depression and anxiety, and increasing social support and life satisfaction. Methods A randomized trial compared direction to an existing Internet support group for depression and anxiety with an online expressive writing condition. A total of 863 (628 female) United Kingdom, United States, and Canadian volunteers were recruited via the Internet. Online, self-report measures of depression, anxiety, social support, and satisfaction with life were administered at baseline, 3, and 6 months. Results All four outcomes – depression, anxiety, social support, and satisfaction with life – improved over the 6 months of the study (all P<.001). There was no difference in outcome between the two conditions: participants responded similarly to the expressive writing and the Internet support group. Engagement with the Internet support group was low, it had high 6-month attrition (692/795, 87%) and low adherence, and it received mixed and often negative feedback. The main problems reported were a lack of comfort and connection with others, negative social comparisons, and the potential for receiving bad advice. Expressive writing had lower attrition (194/295, 65%) and participants reported that it was more acceptable. Conclusions Until further evidence accumulates, directing people with depression and anxiety to Internet support groups cannot be recommended. On the other hand, online expressive writing seems to have potential, and its use for people with depression and anxiety warrants further investigation. Trial Registration Trial Registration: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01149265; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01149265 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6h

  2. High Platelet Reactivity in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndromes Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: Randomised Controlled Trial Comparing Prasugrel and Clopidogrel

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Tobias; Booth, Jean; Tavlaki, Elli; Karathanos, Athanasios; Müller, Karin; Droppa, Michal; Gawaz, Meinrad; Yanez-Lopez, Monica; Davidson, Simon J.; Stables, Rod H.; Banya, Winston; Zaman, Azfar; Flather, Marcus; Dalby, Miles

    2015-01-01

    Background Prasugrel is more effective than clopidogrel in reducing platelet aggregation in acute coronary syndromes. Data available on prasugrel reloading in clopidogrel treated patients with high residual platelet reactivity (HRPR) i.e. poor responders, is limited. Objectives To determine the effects of prasugrel loading on platelet function in patients on clopidogrel and high platelet reactivity undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention for acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Patients Patients with ACS on clopidogrel who were scheduled for PCI found to have a platelet reactivity ≥40 AUC with the Multiplate Analyzer, i.e. “poor responders” were randomised to prasugrel (60 mg loading and 10 mg maintenance dose) or clopidogrel (600 mg reloading and 150 mg maintenance dose). The primary outcome measure was proportion of patients with platelet reactivity <40 AUC 4 hours after loading with study medication, and also at one hour (secondary outcome). 44 patients were enrolled and the study was terminated early as clopidogrel use decreased sharply due to introduction of newer P2Y12 inhibitors. Results At 4 hours after study medication 100% of patients treated with prasugrel compared to 91% of those treated with clopidogrel had platelet reactivity <40 AUC (p = 0.49), while at 1 hour the proportions were 95% and 64% respectively (p = 0.02). Mean platelet reactivity at 4 and 1 hours after study medication in prasugrel and clopidogrel groups respectively were 12 versus 22 (p = 0.005) and 19 versus 34 (p = 0.01) respectively. Conclusions Routine platelet function testing identifies patients with high residual platelet reactivity (“poor responders”) on clopidogrel. A strategy of prasugrel rather than clopidogrel reloading results in earlier and more sustained suppression of platelet reactivity. Future trials need to identify if this translates into clinical benefit. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01339026 PMID:26317618

  3. Accuracy Evaluation of Five Blood Glucose Monitoring Systems: The North American Comparator Trial

    PubMed Central

    Halldorsdottir, Solveig; Warchal-Windham, Mary Ellen; Wallace, Jane F.; Pardo, Scott; Parkes, Joan Lee; Simmons, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Background This study evaluated differences in accuracy between the CONTOUR® NEXT EZ (EZ) blood glucose monitoring system (BGMS) and four other BGMSs [ACCU-CHEK® Aviva (ACAP), FreeStyle Freedom Lite® (FFL), ONE TOUCH® Ultra®2 (OTU2), and TRUEtrack® (TT)]. Methods Up to three capillary blood samples (N = 393) were collected from 146 subjects with and without diabetes. One sample per subject was tested with fresh (natural) blood; the other samples were glycolyzed to lower blood glucose to <70 mg/dl. Meter results were compared with results from plasma from the same sample tested on a Yellow Springs Instruments (YSI) 2300 STAT Plus™ glucose analyzer. Blood glucose monitoring system accuracy was compared using mean absolute relative difference (MARD; from laboratory reference method results) and other analyses. Separate analyses on fresh (natural) samples only were conducted to determine potential effects of glycolysis on MARD values of systems utilizing glucose-oxidase-based test strip chemistry. Results Across the tested glucose range, the EZ had the lowest MARD of 4.7%; the ACAP, FFL, OTU2, and TT had MARD values of 6.3%, 18.3%, 23.4%, and 26.2%, respectively. For samples with glucose concentrations <70 mg/dl, the EZ had the lowest MARD (0.65%), compared with the ACAP (2.5%), FFL (18.3%), OTU2 (22.4%), and TT (33.2%) systems. Conclusions The EZ had the lowest MARD across the tested glucose ranges when compared with four other BGMSs when all samples were analyzed as well as when natural samples only were analyzed. PMID:24124957

  4. A randomised trial comparing the antibacterial effects of dentine primers against bacteria in natural root caries.

    PubMed

    Rolland, S L; McCabe, J F; Imazato, S; Walls, A W G

    2011-01-01

    As people are living longer and retaining their teeth into old age, root caries is an increasingly significant problem. A minimally invasive treatment strategy, involving sealing the root caries lesion with an antibacterial resin sealant, could be highly beneficial. The aim of this study was to compare the antibacterial properties of the primers of two proprietary dentine bonding agents, Clearfil SE Bond (SE; Kuraray Medical, Japan) and Clearfil Protect Bond (PB; Kuraray Medical), which contains the antibacterial monomer methacryloyloxydodecylpyridinium bromide. Fifty-two root caries lesions were identified and randomly assigned to a primer. The lesion was cleaned, isolated, sampled with a sharp spoon excavator, a primer applied and a second sample taken. Samples were transported in fastidious anaerobe broth, vortex-dispersed and serial dilutions inoculated onto selective agars. Reduction in colony-forming units (CFU, %) after primer application was calculated for both primers for bacterial growth on each selective agar and compared to a hypothesised mean of 100% (one-sample t test, p < 0.05). No significant differences between primers were seen, indicating efficient bacterial elimination by both materials. Comparing percent reduction between SE and PB for each agar (Mann-Whitney test, p < 0.05), a significantly greater CFU reduction by PB was seen for streptococci but not other bacteria. More lesions exhibited bacterial growth and several lesions demonstrated marked bacterial growth after treatment with SE compared with PB. Therefore, PB appears to exhibit superior antimicrobial properties, particularly against streptococci. Both primers are highly antibacterial towards root caries bacteria and may therefore be suitable for minimally invasive treatment.

  5. Comparative clinical trials and the changing marketplace for oral care: innovation, evidence and implications.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Robert W; Biesbrock, Aaron R

    2002-09-01

    The development of a trayless bleaching system (Crest Whitestrips) and a novel battery-powered toothbrush (Crest SpinBrush) has fueled growth in the bleaching and power toothbrush markets. Beyond offering convenient, low-cost options for patients, the effectiveness of each product is supported by a robust clinical program. New comparative research involving these products expands evidence on the clinical meaningfulness of the benefits of this whitening system and powered toothbrush for patient care.

  6. Comparative efficacy of two daily use mouthrinses: randomized clinical trial using an experimental gingivitis model.

    PubMed

    Charles, Christine Ann; McGuire, James Anthony; Sharma, Naresh Chandra; Qaqish, James

    2011-01-01

    Two antimicrobial agents, a fixed combination of essential oils (EOs) and 0.07% cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) are found in commercially available mouthrinses, Listerine® Antiseptic and Crest® Pro HealthTM, respectively. Both mouthrinses have been shown to control dental plaque and gingivitis in short and longer term studies. The aim of this study was to determine the comparative effectiveness of these two mouthrinses using a 2-week experimental gingivitis model. Qualified subjects were randomly assigned to one of three mouthrinse groups: a fixed combination of EOs, 0.07% CPC, or negative control (C) rinse. Following baseline clinical assessments and a dental prophylaxis, subjects began a two-week period in which they rinsed twice daily with their assigned rinse and abstained from any mechanical oral hygiene procedures or other oral care products. Subjects were reassessed at the end of the two-week period. One hundred and forty-seven subjects were randomized and 142 completed this study. After two weeks use, the EOs rinse was superior (p < 0.011) to the CPC rinse in inhibiting the development of gingivitis, plaque, and bleeding, with 9.4% and 6.6% reductions compared to CPC for gingivitis and plaque, respectively. Both rinses were superior to the negative control rinse (p < 0.001). This study demonstrates that the essential oil-containing mouthrinse has superior antiplaque/antigingivitis effectiveness compared to the 0.07% CPC-containing mouthrinse without mechanical oral hygiene influence.

  7. A randomised controlled trial comparing a dilating vaginal speculum with a conventional bivalve speculum.

    PubMed

    Thomas, A; Weisberg, E; Lieberman, D; Fraser, I S

    2001-11-01

    Cervical smears are traditionally taken with the aid of a metal or disposable plastic bivalve speculum. Many women complain of discomfort with these specula. This study compares the efficacy and women's experiences of a new 'dilating speculum' called the Veda-scope, with a conventional metal bivalve speculum (Pederson). The aims of this study were: to determine whether the Veda-scope provides adequate visualisation of the cervix and vaginal walls and an adequate cervical cytology specimen; and to compare user acceptability and women's levels of comfort between the Veda-scope and the bivalve speculum. Sixty-four women were randomised to be examined with the Veda-scope and 60 with the bivalve speculum, by one of two operators. Each woman completed a questionnaire that included subjective views of their previous cervical smear experiences, and acceptability of the examination at the study consultation. Cytologists were blinded as to which speculum was used for cervical sampling. Of women examined, 7-83% of women found Veda-scope examinations comfortable, compared to 38-62% of women who found examinations with the bivalve comfortable; 94% of the women preferred the 'comfort' of the Veda-scope. The Veda-scope was as good as the bivalve speculum in providing samples for cytological analysis following the initial learning curve, and also provided markedly superior magnified views of the cervix and vaginal fornices.

  8. Open Clinical Trial on Using Nifuroxazide Compared to Probiotics in Treating Acute Diarrhoeas in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Begovic, Begler; Ahmedtagic, Sead; Calkic, Lejla; Vehabović, Midhat; Kovacevic, Sanela Bakić; Catic, Tarik; Mehic, Meliha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nifuroxazide is well known and often used anti-diarrhoeal medicine which has been pushed back from routine practice in recent years and often replaced with probiotics. Even probiotics are accepted and placed in some therapeutic guidelines for diarrhoea treatment, there are no enough evidence for its effectiveness and no comparative efficacy data with nifuroxazide in treatment of acute diarrhea. Patients and Methods: In open, prospective observational study, the efficacy and safety of nifuroxazide were compared with a probiotic containing lactic acid bacteria in the treatment of acute diarrhoea. A total number of 169 adult patients were included in this study, who administered nifuroxazide in the dose of 200 mg/4 times a day, while they took preparation containing lactic acid bacteria (1,2 x 107 live lyophilised lactic-acid bacteria) three times a day for three days. Results: Mean time to last unformed stool (TLUS) in a group which was treated with nifuroxazide was two days, while it took five days for the stool normalisation in the group using probiotic (p=0.0001). Conclusions: Orally administered nifuroxazide has demonstrated better efficiency as compared to probiotic in treating acute diarrhoea, and both medicines have shown the same safety and tolerance in this study. PMID:28144199

  9. In vitro activity of tigecycline against patient isolates collected during phase 3 clinical trials for diabetic foot infections.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Peter J; Ruzin, Alexey; Tuckman, Margareta; Jones, C Hal

    2010-04-01

    The in vitro activity of tigecycline and comparative antimicrobial agents was evaluated against 1828 primary baseline pathogens isolated from 844 patients enrolled in the phase 3 clinical trials investigating the efficacy of tigecycline in diabetic foot infection (DFI). The trials were global, enrolling patients in 30 countries. Tigecycline was active against the most prevalent pathogens in DFI, including Gram-positive and Gram-negative isolates of both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria with 95% of MICs < or =2 microg/mL for the entire collection. The spectrum of activity of tigecycline included important pathogens for DFI, such as Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus agalactiae, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Bacteroides fragilis. As reported previously, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and several pathogens in the Proteeae group were generally less susceptible to tigecycline by comparison to other Gram-negative pathogens. The excellent in vitro expanded broad-spectrum activity of tigecycline in the clinical isolates confirmed the potential utility of tigecycline for pathogens associated with DFIs.

  10. A Method for Utilizing Bivariate Efficacy Outcome Measures to Screen Regimens for Activity in 2-Stage Phase II Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Larry; Litwin, Samuel; Yothers, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Background Most phase II clinical trials utilize a single primary endpoint to determine the promise of a regimen for future study. However, many disorders manifest themselves in complex ways. For example, migraine headaches can cause pain, auras, photophobia, and emesis. Investigators may believe a drug is effective at reducing migraine pain and the severity of emesis during an attack. Nevertheless, they could still be interested in proceeding with development of the drug if it is effective against only one of these symptoms. Such a study would be a candidate for a clinical trial with co-primary endpoints. Purpose The purpose of the article is to provide a method for designing a 2-stage clinical trial with dichotomous co-primary endpoints of efficacy that has the ability to detect activity on either response measure with high probability when the drug is active on one or both measures, while at the same time rejecting the drug with high probability when there is little activity on both dimensions. The design enables early closure for futility and is flexible with regard to attained accrual. Methods The design is proposed in the context of cancer clinical trials where tumor response is used to assess a drug's ability to kill tumor cells and progression-free survival (PFS) status after a certain period is used to evaluate the drug's ability to stabilize tumor growth. Both endpoints are assumed to be distributed as binomial random variables, and uninteresting probabilities of success are determined from historical controls. Given the necessity of accrual flexibility, exhaustive searching algorithms to find optimum designs do not seem feasible at this time. Instead, critical values are determined for realized sample sizes using specific procedures. Then accrual windows are found to achieve a design's desired level of significance, probability of early termination (PET), and power. Results The design is illustrated with a clinical trial that examined bevacizumab in

  11. Scientific writing: a randomized controlled trial comparing standard and on-line instruction

    PubMed Central

    Phadtare, Amruta; Bahmani, Anu; Shah, Anand; Pietrobon, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    Background Writing plays a central role in the communication of scientific ideas and is therefore a key aspect in researcher education, ultimately determining the success and long-term sustainability of their careers. Despite the growing popularity of e-learning, we are not aware of any existing study comparing on-line vs. traditional classroom-based methods for teaching scientific writing. Methods Forty eight participants from a medical, nursing and physiotherapy background from US and Brazil were randomly assigned to two groups (n = 24 per group): An on-line writing workshop group (on-line group), in which participants used virtual communication, google docs and standard writing templates, and a standard writing guidance training (standard group) where participants received standard instruction without the aid of virtual communication and writing templates. Two outcomes, manuscript quality was assessed using the scores obtained in Six subgroup analysis scale as the primary outcome measure, and satisfaction scores with Likert scale were evaluated. To control for observer variability, inter-observer reliability was assessed using Fleiss's kappa. A post-hoc analysis comparing rates of communication between mentors and participants was performed. Nonparametric tests were used to assess intervention efficacy. Results Excellent inter-observer reliability among three reviewers was found, with an Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) agreement = 0.931882 and ICC consistency = 0.932485. On-line group had better overall manuscript quality (p = 0.0017, SSQSavg score 75.3 ± 14.21, ranging from 37 to 94) compared to the standard group (47.27 ± 14.64, ranging from 20 to 72). Participant satisfaction was higher in the on-line group (4.3 ± 0.73) compared to the standard group (3.09 ± 1.11) (p = 0.001). The standard group also had fewer communication events compared to the on-line group (0.91 ± 0.81 vs. 2.05 ± 1.23; p = 0.0219). Conclusion Our protocol for on

  12. Early biomarker activity in severe sepsis and septic shock and a contemporary review of immunotherapy trials: not a time to give up, but to give it earlier.

    PubMed

    Rivers, Emanuel P; Jaehne, Anja Kathrin; Nguyen, H Bryant; Papamatheakis, Demosthenes G; Singer, Daniel; Yang, James J; Brown, Samantha; Klausner, Howard

    2013-02-01

    Improving time to diagnosis and intervention has positively impacted outcomes in acute myocardial infarction, stroke, and trauma through elucidating the early pathogenesis of those diseases. This insight may partly explain the futility of time-insensitive immunotherapy trials for severe sepsis and septic shock. The aim of this study was to examine the early natural history of circulatory biomarker activity in sepsis, relative to previous animal and human outcome trials. We conducted a literature search using PubMed, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar to identify outcome trials targeting biomarkers with emphasis on the timing of therapy. These findings were compared with the biomarker activity observed over the first 72 h of hospital presentation in a cohort of severe sepsis and septic shock patients. Biomarker levels in animal and human research models are elevated within 30 min after exposure to an inflammatory septic stimulus. Consistent with these findings, the biomarker cascade is activated at the most proximal point of hospital presentation in our patient cohort. These circulatory biomarkers overlap; some have bimodal patterns and generally peak between 3 and 36 h while diminishing over the subsequent 72 h of observation. When this is taken into account, prior outcome immunotherapy trials have generally enrolled patients after peak circulatory biomarker concentrations. In previous immunotherapy sepsis trials, intervention was delayed after the optimal window of peak biomarker activity. As a result, future studies need to recalibrate the timing of enrollment and administration of immunotherapy agents that still may hold great promise for this deadly disease.

  13. Behavioral Weight Loss and Physical Activity Intervention in Obese Adults with Asthma. A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Strub, Peg; Xiao, Lan; Lavori, Philip W.; Camargo, Carlos A.; Wilson, Sandra R.; Gardner, Christopher D.; Buist, A. Sonia; Haskell, William L.; Lv, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: The effect of weight loss on asthma in obese adults warrants rigorous investigation. Objectives: To examine an evidence-based, practical, and comprehensive lifestyle intervention targeting modest weight loss and increased physical activity for asthma control. Methods: The trial randomized 330 obese adults with uncontrolled asthma to receive usual care enhanced with a pedometer, a weight scale, information about existing weight management services at the participating clinics, and an asthma education DVD, or with these tools plus the 12-month intervention. Measurements and Main Results: The primary outcome was change in Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) scores from baseline to 12 months. Participants (mean [SD] age, 47.6 [12.4] yr) were 70.6% women, 20.0% non-Hispanic black, 20.3% Hispanic/Latino, and 8.2% Asian/Pacific Islander. At baseline, they were obese (mean [SD] body mass index, 37.5 [5.9] kg/m2) and had uncontrolled asthma (Asthma Control Test score, 15.1 [3.8]). Compared with control subjects, intervention participants achieved significantly greater mean weight loss (±SE) (intervention, −4.0 ± 0.8 kg vs. control, −2.1 ± 0.8 kg; P = 0.01) and increased leisure-time activity (intervention, 418.2 ± 110.6 metabolic equivalent task–min/wk vs. control, 178.8 ± 109.1 metabolic equivalent task–min/wk; P = 0.05) at 12 months. But between-treatment mean (±SE) differences were not significant for ACQ changes (intervention, –0.3 ± 0.1 vs. control, –0.2 ± 0.1; P = 0.92) from baseline (mean [SD], 1.4 [0.8]), nor for any other clinical asthma outcomes (e.g., spirometric results and asthma exacerbations). Among all participants regardless of treatment assignment, weight loss of 10% or greater was associated with a Cohen d effect of 0.76 and with 3.78 (95% confidence interval, 1.72–8.31) times the odds of achieving clinically significant reductions (i.e., ≥0.5) on ACQ as stable weight (<3% loss or gain from

  14. Effects of the Web Behavior Change Program for Activity and Multimodal Pain Rehabilitation: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Michaelson, Peter; Gard, Gunvor; Eriksson, Margareta K

    2016-01-01

    Background Web-based interventions with a focus on behavior change have been used for pain management, but studies of Web-based interventions integrated in clinical practice are lacking. To emphasize the development of cognitive skills and behavior, and to increase activity and self-care in rehabilitation, the Web Behavior Change Program for Activity (Web-BCPA) was developed and added to multimodal pain rehabilitation (MMR). Objective The objective of our study was to evaluate the effects of MMR in combination with the Web-BCPA compared with MMR among persons with persistent musculoskeletal pain in primary health care on pain intensity, self-efficacy, and copying, as part of a larger collection of data. Web-BCPA adherence and feasibility, as well as treatment satisfaction, were also investigated. Methods A total of 109 participants, mean age 43 (SD 11) years, with persistent pain in the back, neck, shoulder, and/or generalized pain were recruited to a randomized controlled trial with two intervention arms: (1) MMR+WEB (n=60) and (2) MMR (n=49). Participants in the MMR+WEB group self-guided through the eight modules of the Web-BCPA: pain, activity, behavior, stress and thoughts, sleep and negative thoughts, communication and self-esteem, solutions, and maintenance and progress. Data were collected with a questionnaire at baseline and at 4 and 12 months. Outcome measures were pain intensity (Visual Analog Scale), self-efficacy to control pain and to control other symptoms (Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale), general self-efficacy (General Self-Efficacy Scale), and coping (two-item Coping Strategies Questionnaire; CSQ). Web-BCPA adherence was measured as minutes spent in the program. Satisfaction and Web-BCPA feasibility were assessed by a set of items. Results Of 109 participants, 99 received the allocated intervention (MMR+WEB: n=55; MMR: n=44); 88 of 99 (82%) completed the baseline and follow-up questionnaires. Intention-to-treat analyses were performed with a sample

  15. Enhanced Exercise Therapy in Parkinson’s disease: A comparative effectiveness trial

    PubMed Central

    Ridgel, Angela L.; Walter, Benjamin L.; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Walter, Ellen M.; Colón-Zimmermann, Kari; Welter, Elisabeth; Sajatovic, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Exercise can improve motor function in people with Parkinson’s disease but depression reduces the motivation to participate in regular exercise. The aim of this study was to develop a novel Enhanced Exercise Therapy program that uses manual-driven guided exercise and peer-facilitated psychoeducation for individuals with Parkinson’s disease and depression. Design 24 week randomized controlled design. Methods Thirty individuals were randomized to Enhanced Exercise Therapy or self-guided therapy, and evaluated at baseline, 12-weeks and at 24-weeks. Enhanced Exercise Therapy included group exercise and group psychoeducation for 12 weeks. Between 13–24 weeks, individuals had access to the fitness facility but group sessions were not held. Self-guided therapy included written guidelines for a self-paced exercise program and psychoeducation. Primary outcome measures included the number of exercise sessions and International Physical Activity Questionnaire score. Secondary measures included resting heart rate, supine blood pressure, estimated VO2max and incidence of orthostatic hypotension. Results Twenty four individuals completed the study (80% retention) and both groups attended similar number of exercise sessions. There were no significant changes in cardiovascular fitness measures but there was a significant increase in the amount of physical activity in the Enhanced Exercise Therapy group and a decrease in the self-guided therapy group during the post-intervention period. Conclusions Enhanced exercise therapy appears to promote engagement in an exercise program and more physical activity, even after group sessions were concluded in individuals with Parkinson’s disease and depression. PMID:25709055

  16. Palacos compared to Palamed bone cement in total hip replacement: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Meinardi, Joris E; Valstar, Edward R; Van Der Voort, Paul; Kaptein, Bart L; Fiocco, Marta; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Stability and survival of cemented total hip prostheses is dependent on a multitude of factors, including the type of cement that is used. Bone cements vary in viscosity, from low to medium and high. There have been few clinical RSA studies comparing the performance of low- and high-viscosity bone cements. We compared the migration behavior of the Stanmore hip stem cemented using novel low-viscosity Palamed bone cement with that of the same stem cemented with conventional high-viscosity Palacos bone cement. Patients and methods We performed a randomized controlled study involving 39 patients (40 hips) undergoing primary total hip replacement for primary or secondary osteoarthritis. 22 patients (22 hips) were randomized to Palacos and 17 patients (18 hips) were randomized to Palamed. Migration was determined by RSA. Results None of these 40 hips had been revised at the 10-year follow-up mark. To our knowledge, the patients who died before they reached the 10-year endpoint still had the implant in situ. No statistically significant or clinically significant differences were found between the 2 groups for mean translations, rotations, and maximum total-point motion (MTPM). Interpretation We found similar migration of the Stanmore stem in the high-viscosity Palacos cement group and the low-viscosity Palamed cement group. We therefore expect that the risk of aseptic loosening with the new Palamed cement would be comparable to that with the conventional Palacos cement. The choice of which type of bone cement to use is therefore up to the surgeon’s preference. PMID:27329869

  17. The comparative efficacy of antecedent exercise and methylphenidate: a single-case randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, J M; Allison, D B

    1994-01-01

    This study evaluated the comparative efficacy of antecedent exercise, methylphenidate (Ritalin), and placebo in the reduction of hyperactive behaviour in a pre-school boy. A single-case alternating treatments experimental design was employed for a total of 82 days. The dependent variable was the Conners' Abbreviated Symptom Questionnaire. Antecedent exercise failed to reduce hyperactive behaviour. Methylphenidate produced significantly less hyperactive behaviour than both placebo and antecedent exercise (P = 0.0238). Neither methylphenidate nor antecedent exercise produced notable side-effects as measured by the Monitoring of Side-Effects Scale. These data add to a sparse literature on the effects of antecedent exercise and methylphenidate amongst pre-school children.

  18. Support or competition? How online social networks increase physical activity: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingwen; Brackbill, Devon; Yang, Sijia; Becker, Joshua; Herbert, Natalie; Centola, Damon

    2016-12-01

    To identify what features of online social networks can increase physical activity, we conducted a 4-arm randomized controlled trial in 2014 in Philadelphia, PA. Students (n = 790, mean age = 25.2) at an university were randomly assigned to one of four conditions composed of either supportive or competitive relationships and either with individual or team incentives for attending exercise classes. The social comparison condition placed participants into 6-person competitive networks with individual incentives. The social support condition placed participants into 6-person teams with team incentives. The combined condition with both supportive and competitive relationships placed participants into 6-person teams, where participants could compare their team's performance to 5 other teams' performances. The control condition only allowed participants to attend classes with individual incentives. Rewards were based on the total number of classes attended by an individual, or the average number of classes attended by the members of a team. The outcome was the number of classes that participants attended. Data were analyzed using multilevel models in 2014. The mean attendance numbers per week were 35.7, 38.5, 20.3, and 16.8 in the social comparison, the combined, the control, and the social support conditions. Attendance numbers were 90% higher in the social comparison and the combined conditions (mean = 1.9, SE = 0.2) in contrast to the two conditions without comparison (mean = 1.0, SE = 0.2) (p = 0.003). Social comparison was more effective for increasing physical activity than social support and its effects did not depend on individual or team incentives.

  19. Brief cognitive behavioral therapy compared to general practitioners care for depression in primary care: a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Depressive disorders are highly prevalent in primary care (PC) and are associated with considerable functional impairment and increased health care use. Research has shown that many patients prefer psychological treatments to pharmacotherapy, however, it remains unclear which treatment is most optimal for depressive patients in primary care. Methods/Design A randomized, multi-centre trial involving two intervention groups: one receiving brief cognitive behavioral therapy and the other receiving general practitioner care. General practitioners from 109 General Practices in Nijmegen and Amsterdam (The Netherlands) will be asked to include patients aged between 18-70 years presenting with depressive symptomatology, who do not receive an active treatment for their depressive complaints. Patients will be telephonically assessed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-I) to ascertain study eligibility. Eligible patients will be randomized to one of two treatment conditions: either 8 sessions of cognitive behavioral therapy by a first line psychologist or general practitioner's care according to The Dutch College of General Practitioners Practice Guideline (NHG- standaard). Baseline and follow-up assessments are scheduled at 0, 6, 12 and 52 weeks following the start of the intervention. Primary outcome will be measured with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-17 (HDRS-17) and the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). Outcomes will be analyzed on an intention to treat basis. Trial Registration ISRCTN65811640 PMID:20939917

  20. Utilization trends of cervical artificial disc replacement during the FDA investigational device exemption clinical trials compared to anterior cervical fusion.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Koehler, Steven M; Lu, Young; Cho, Samuel; Hecht, Andrew C

    2013-12-01

    While anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is the gold standard surgical treatment for cervical disc disease, concerns regarding adjacent segment degeneration lead to the development of cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA). This study compares the utilization trends of CDA versus ACDF during the period of the Food and Drug Administration Investigational Device Exemption clinical trials from 2004 to 2007. The Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample database was used to identify CDA and ACDF procedures performed in the USA between 2004 and 2007. The prevalence of CDA and ACDF procedures was estimated and stratified by age, sex, diagnosis, census region, payor class, and hospital characteristics. The average length of hospital stay, total charges, and costs were also estimated. The number of CDA surgeries significantly increased annually from 2004 to 2007 and mostly took place at urban non-teaching hospitals. There were no regional differences between CDA and ACDF utilization. There was no difference between sex or admission type between CDA and ACDF patients. ACDF patients were older and had more diabetes, hypertension, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. CDA patients were more likely to be discharged home and had shorter hospital stays but had a higher rate of deep venous thrombosis than ACDF patients. Significantly more CDA patients had private insurance while more ACDF patients had Medicare. The average cost was higher for ACDF than CDA. While ACDF dominated surgical intervention for cervical disc disease during the trial period, CDA utilization increased at a significantly greater rate suggesting rapid early adoption.

  1. Randomized clinical trial of multimodal physiotherapy treatment compared to overnight lidocaine ointment in women with provoked vestibulodynia: Design and methods.

    PubMed

    Morin, Mélanie; Dumoulin, Chantale; Bergeron, Sophie; Mayrand, Marie-Hélène; Khalifé, Samir; Waddell, Guy; Dubois, Marie-France

    2016-01-01

    Provoked vestibulodynia (PVD) is a highly prevalent and debilitating condition yet its management relies mainly on non-empirically validated interventions. Among the many causes of PVD, there is growing evidence that pelvic floor muscle (PFM) dysfunctions play an important role in its pathophysiology. Multimodal physiotherapy, which addresses these dysfunctions, is judged by experts to be highly effective and is recommended as a first-line treatment. However, the effectiveness of this promising intervention has been evaluated through only two small uncontrolled trials. The proposed bi-center, single-blind, parallel group, randomized controlled trial (RCT) aims to evaluate the efficacy of multimodal physiotherapy and compare it to a frequently used first-line treatment, topical overnight application of lidocaine, in women with PVD. A total of 212 women diagnosed with PVD according to a standardized protocol were eligible for the study and were randomly assigned to either multimodal physiotherapy or lidocaine treatment for 10weeks. The primary outcome measure is pain during intercourse (assessed with a numerical rating scale). Secondary measures include sexual function, pain quality, psychological factors (including pain catastrophizing, anxiety, depression and fear of pain), PFM morphology and function, and patients' global impression of change. Assessments are made at baseline, post-treatment and at the 6-month follow-up. This manuscript presents and discusses the rationale, design and methodology of the first RCT investigating physiotherapy in comparison to a commonly prescribed first-line treatment, overnight topical lidocaine, for women with PVD.

  2. A Randomized Control Trial Comparing the Efficacy of Antiandrogen Monotherapy: Flutamide vs. Bicalutamide.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Yasushi; Tanaka, Nobumichi; Anai, Satoshi; Miyake, Makito; Tatsumi, Yoshihiro; Fujimoto, Kiyohide

    2015-08-01

    The study aims to compare serial changes in prostate-specific antigen (PSA), testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), and androstenedione in patients treated with either of the antiandrogen agents, bicalutamide or flutamide, using a randomized controlled study. Patients had to meet the following inclusion criteria: (1) presence of histopathologically confirmed prostate cancer, (2) prostate cancer treatment naive, (3) no current treatment with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) agonist for sexual interest and physical capacity, (4) clinical stage T1-cT3N0M0, (5) Gleason score ≤ 7, and (6) Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0-1. Patients were randomly allocated to two groups: flutamide and bicalutamide monotherapy group 1:1. PSA levels were significantly decreased in both groups at 4 weeks. PSA levels were significantly lower in the bicalutamide group compared with the flutamide group at 4 and 8 weeks. Testosterone levels in the bicalutamide group were significantly higher than the baseline levels between 4 and 24 weeks of treatment. Testosterone levels in the flutamide group were significantly increased at 4 and 12 weeks and returned to baseline levels at 16 and 24 weeks. DHEA levels in the bicalutamide group were unchanged from baseline at 4 and 24 weeks. However, DHEA levels in the flutamide group were decreased at 24 weeks. Androstenedione levels increased slightly in both groups, but the increase did not reach statistical significance. PSA, testosterone, and DHEA levels significantly differed between bicalutamide and flutamide monotherapy.

  3. The role of adjuvant chemotherapy following cystectomy for invasive bladder cancer: a prospective comparative trial.

    PubMed

    Skinner, D G; Daniels, J R; Russell, C A; Lieskovsky, G; Boyd, S D; Nichols, P; Kern, W; Sakamoto, J; Krailo, M; Groshen, S

    1991-03-01

    We assigned 91 patients with deeply invasive, pathological stage P3, P4 or N+ and Mo transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder (with or without squamous or glandular differentiation) to adjuvant chemotherapy or to observation after radical cystectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection. For most patients chemotherapy was planned as 4 courses at 28-day intervals of 100 mg./M.2 cisplatin, 60 mg./M.2 doxorubicin and 600 mg./M.2 cyclophosphamide. A significant delay was shown in the time to progression (p = 0.0010) with 70% of the patients assigned to chemotherapy free of disease at 3 years compared to 46% in the observation group. Median survival time for patients in the chemotherapy group was 4.3 years compared to 2.4 years in the observation group (p = 0.0062). In addition to treatment groups, important prognostic factors included age, gender and lymph node status. The number of involved lymph nodes was the single most important variable. We recommend adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with invasive transitional cell carcinoma after definitive surgical resection.

  4. Comparative clinical trial of castor oil and diclofenac sodium in patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Medhi, B; Kishore, K; Singh, U; Seth, S D

    2009-10-01

    A randomized, double-blind, comparative clinical study was conducted to compare the safety and efficacy of castor oil with diclofenac sodium in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Subjects with symptoms of knee osteoarthritis were given a castor oil capsule 0.9 mL (n = 50) thrice daily for 4 weeks or a capsule of diclofenac sodium (n = 50), 50 mg thrice daily for 4 weeks. The subjects completed an overall evaluation of symptom relief at 2 weeks and 4 weeks of completed treatment. The subjects were evaluated by clinical, routine laboratory and radiographic investigations for improvement of disease conditions and also for adverse drug reaction. On completion of 4 weeks treatment it was observed that both drugs were significantly effective in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis (p < 0.001) and adverse drug reactions were high with diclofenac sodium, whereas with castor oil there were no adverse effects reported. The present study indicates that castor oil can be used as an effective therapy in primary knee osteoarthritis.

  5. Microbicidal activity of monochloramine and chloramine T compared.

    PubMed

    Arnitz, R; Nagl, M; Gottardi, W

    2009-10-01

    Chloramine T (CAT) and monochloramine (NH2Cl) are active chlorine compounds and well-known biocides. CAT has stronger oxidative activity than NH(2)Cl, which is a smaller, more lipophilic molecule. The question arises whether lower oxidative activity can be compensated by higher lipophilicity. To address this problem, we investigated the bactericidal and fungicidal activity of pure NH(2)Cl compared to CAT. Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Aspergillus fumigatus, A. flavus, and Candida albicans were subjected to quantitative killing assays at 20 degrees C and pH 7.1 in equimolar solutions of CAT or NH2Cl. NH2Cl was superior to CAT against all test strains at all test concentrations. At a concentration of 0.036 mM, NH2Cl reduced the count of E. coli (S. aureus) by 3log10 within 1 min (5 min), whereas CAT needed 120 min (30 min) for the same effect. At 0.107 mM NH2Cl, a 3log10 reduction of P. aeruginosa was achieved after 5 min compared to 20 min using CAT. NH2Cl (0.355 mM) caused a 2log10 reduction of C. albicans within 30 s, whereas 60 min were necessary for the same reduction with 0.355 mM CAT. The difference between the antiseptics was even more pronounced when tested on aspergilli. NH2Cl had a significantly stronger bactericidal and fungicidal activity than CAT despite its lower oxidative activity. This phenomenon can be attributed to its lipophilicity and smaller bulk, and it should be taken into account when developing and using chloramine antiseptics.

  6. School Playground Surfacing and Arm Fractures in Children: A Cluster Randomized Trial Comparing Sand to Wood Chip Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Andrew W.; Macarthur, Colin; Rothman, Linda; Willan, Andrew; Macpherson, Alison K.

    2009-01-01

    Background The risk of playground injuries, especially fractures, is prevalent in children, and can result in emergency room treatment and hospital admissions. Fall height and surface area are major determinants of playground fall injury risk. The primary objective was to determine if there was a difference in playground upper extremity fracture rates in school playgrounds with wood fibre surfacing versus granite sand surfacing. Secondary objectives were to determine if there were differences in overall playground injury rates or in head injury rates in school playgrounds with wood fibre surfacing compared to school playgrounds with granite sand surfacing. Methods and Findings The cluster randomized trial comprised 37 elementary schools in the Toronto District School Board in Toronto, Canada with a total of 15,074 students. Each school received qualified funding for installation of new playground equipment and surfacing. The risk of arm fracture from playground falls onto granitic sand versus onto engineered wood fibre surfaces was compared, with an outcome measure of estimated arm fracture rate per 100,000 student-months. Schools were randomly assigned by computer generated list to receive either a granitic sand or an engineered wood fibre playground surface (Fibar), and were not blinded. Schools were visited to ascertain details of the playground and surface actually installed and to observe the exposure to play and to periodically monitor the depth of the surfacing material. Injury data, including details of circumstance and diagnosis, were collected at each school by a prospective surveillance system with confirmation of injury details through a validated telephone interview with parents and also through collection (with consent) of medical reports regarding treated injuries. All schools were recruited together at the beginning of the trial, which is now closed after 2.5 years of injury data collection. Compliant schools included 12 schools randomized to Fibar

  7. International multicenter comparative trial of transluminal EUS-guided biliary drainage via hepatogastrostomy vs. choledochoduodenostomy approaches

    PubMed Central

    Khashab, Mouen A.; Messallam, Ahmed A.; Penas, Irene; Nakai, Yousuke; Modayil, Rani J.; De la Serna, Carlos; Hara, Kazuo; El Zein, Mohamad; Stavropoulos, Stavros N.; Perez-Miranda, Manuel; Kumbhari, Vivek; Ngamruengphong, Saowanee; Dhir, Vinay K.; Park, Do Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) can be performed entirely transgastrically (hepatogastrostomy/EUS-HG) or transduodenally (choledochoduodenostomy/EUS-CDS). It is unknown how both techniques compare. The aims of this study were to compare efficacy and safety of both techniques and identify predictors of adverse events. Patients and methods: Consecutive jaundiced patients with distal malignant biliary obstruction who underwent EUS-BD at multiple international centers were included. Technical/clinical success, adverse events, stent complications, and survival were assessed. Results: A total of 121 patients underwent EUS-BD (CDS 60, HG 61). Technical success was achieved in 112 (92.56 %) patients (EUS-CDS 93.3 %, EUS-HG 91.8 %, P = 0.75). Clinical success was attained in 85.5 % of patients who underwent EUS-CDS group as compared to 82.1 % of patients who underwent EUS-HG (P = 0.64). Adverse events occurred more commonly in the EUS-HG group (19.67 % vs. 13.3 %, P = 0.37). Both plastic stenting (OR 4.95, 95 %CI 1.41 – 17.38, P = 0.01) and use of non-coaxial electrocautery (OR 3.95, 95 %CI 1.16 – 13.40, P = 0.03) were independently associated with adverse events. Length of hospital stay was significantly shorter in the CDS group (5.6 days vs. 12.7 days, P < 0.001). Mean follow-up duration was 151 ± 159 days. The 1-year stent patency probability was greater in the EUS-CDS group [0.98 (95 %CI 0.76 – 0.96) vs 0.60 (95 %CI 0.35 – 0.78)] but overall patency was not significantly different. There was no difference in median survival times between the groups (P = 0.36) Conclusions: Both EUS-CDS and EUS-HG are effective and safe techniques for the treatment of distal biliary obstruction after failed ERCP. However, CDS is associated with shorter hospital stay, improved stent patency, and fewer procedure- and stent-related complications. Metallic stents

  8. How to compare the social foundations of science culture: A trial with five cities in Korea.

    PubMed

    Song, Jinwoong; Chung, Minkyung; Choi, Eunjeong; Kim, Leekyoung; Cho, Sook-Kyoung

    2013-01-01

    Though there have been several indicator systems to monitor the status quo of science and technology and of scientific literacy, few are especially designed for science culture, especially for its social dimension. Furthermore there is little agreement on how to measure it. In a previous study, an indicator system, SCI (Science Culture Indicators), had been developed to monitor the status quo of the science culture of a nation at both individual and social dimensions. The purpose of this study was to explore a practical way to measure and compare local cities' social foundation of science culture by revising and standardizing the social dimension of SCI and by applying it to five metropolitan cities in Korea. Despite some limits, the results of this study appear not only to reflect the cities' current situations but also to show the strength and weakness of their social foundation of science culture.

  9. A randomized trial comparing two approaches to weight loss: Differences in weight loss maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Carels, Robert A; Burmeister, Jacob M; Koball, Afton M; Oehlhof, Marissa W; Hinman, Nova; LeRoy, Michelle; Bannon, Erin; Ashrafioun, Lee; Storfer-Isser, Amy; Darby, Lynn A; Gumble, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    This study compared treatment outcomes for a new weight loss program that emphasized reducing unhealthy relationships with food, body image dissatisfaction, and internalized weight bias (New Perspectives) to a weight loss program that emphasizes environmental modification and habit formation and disruption (Transforming Your Life). Fifty-nine overweight and obese adults (body mass index ≥ 27 kg/m2) were randomly assigned to either a 12-week New Perspectives or Transforming Your Life intervention. Despite equivalent outcomes at the end of treatment, the Transforming Your Life participants were significantly more effective at maintaining their weight loss than New Perspectives participants during the 6-month no-treatment follow-up period. PMID:23349402

  10. Thalassotherapy for fibromyalgia: a randomized controlled trial comparing aquatic exercises in sea water and water pool.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Sandra Cristina; de Carvalho, Ranulfo Fiel Pereira Pessoa; Soares, Aluízio Silvio; de Abreu Freitas, Rodrigo Pegado; de Medeiros Guerra, Luís Marcos; Vilar, Maria José

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of aerobic exercise in water pool compared with aerobic exercise performed in sea by women with fibromyalgia (FM). A total of 46 patients were randomly allocated into two groups: pool group (23 patients) and sea group (23 patients) that performed the same aerobic exercise program. Patients were evaluated baseline and after 12 weeks using: VAS, number of tender points, FIQ, SF-36, PSQI, and BDI. Both groups improved significantly in post-treatment for all the evaluated variables. There were no significant differences between two groups, except for BDI (F=2.418, P<0.0001). Aerobic exercise program performed in water (pool or sea) was effective for patients with FM. However, sea water exercises have been shown to bring more advantages related to emotional aspects. Then, exercise performed sea water (thalassotherapy) is an option for effective treatment with low cost for patients with FM.

  11. Analysis of "Accuracy evaluation of five blood glucose monitoring systems: the North American comparator trial".

    PubMed

    Fournier, Paul A

    2013-09-01

    In an article in Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, Halldorsdottir and coauthors examined the accuracy of five blood glucose monitoring systems (BGMSs) in a study sponsored by the manufacturer of the BGMS CONTOUR NEXT EZ (EZ) and found that this BGMS was the most accurate one. However, their findings must be viewed critically given that one of the BGMSs (ACCU-CHEK Aviva) was not compared against the reference measurement specified by its manufacturer, thus making it likely that it performed suboptimally. Also, the accuracy of the glucose-oxidase-based ONE TOUCH Ultra2 and TRUEtrack BGMS is likely to have been underestimated because of the expected low oxygen level in the glycolysed blood samples used to test the performance of these BGMSs under hypoglycemic conditions. In conclusion, although this study shows that EZ is an accurate BGMS, comparisons between this and other BGMSs should be interpreted with caution.

  12. Standard Compared With Mnemonic Counseling for Fecal Incontinence: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Cichowski, Sara B; Dunivan, Gena C; Rogers, Rebecca G; Murrietta, Ambroshia M; Komesu, Yuko M

    2015-01-01

    Objective To estimate whether women who underwent mnemonic counseling had better recall of fecal incontinence therapies at 2 months and if mnemonic counseling resulted in greater satisfaction with physician counseling and improvement in quality of life when compared to a group who underwent standard counseling. Methods Counseling naive women with fecal incontinence were recruited from an academic Urogynecology clinic. Women underwent physical examinations, completed the Quality of the Physician-Patient Interaction, recorded fecal incontinence treatment options they recalled, and completed the Fecal Incontinence Severity Index and Manchester Health Questionnaire immediately after counseling and again at 2 months. Results Ninety women consented to participate, were randomized and completed baseline questionnaires. At baseline women did not differ in age, ethnicity, education, fecal incontinence severity index or Manchester Health Questionnaire scores. After counseling the mnemonic group reported higher satisfaction on Quality of the Physician-Patient Interaction (66.4± 6.5 vs 62.2 ± 10.7, p=0.03). Ninety percent (81/90) of women followed-up at 2 months. Our primary endpoint, two month recall of fecal incontinence treatments was not different between groups (2.3 ± 1.6 mnemonic counseling vs 1.8 ± 1.0 standard counseling; p=0.08). Secondary endpoints the mnemonic group reported greater improvement on total Manchester Health Questionnaire (p=0.02), emotional (p=0.03), sleep (0.045), role limitations (<0.01), and physical limitations (p=0.04) when compared to the standard group. Conclusions Fecal incontinence counseling with a mnemonic aid did not improve recall at 2 months but improved patient satisfaction and quality of life at 2 months. PMID:25932833

  13. Comparative pharmacological activity of optical isomers of phenibut.

    PubMed

    Dambrova, Maija; Zvejniece, Liga; Liepinsh, Edgars; Cirule, Helena; Zharkova, Olga; Veinberg, Grigory; Kalvinsh, Ivars

    2008-03-31

    Phenibut (3-phenyl-4-aminobutyric acid) is a GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid)-mimetic psychotropic drug which is clinically used in its racemic form. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of racemic phenibut and its optical isomers in pharmacological tests and GABAB receptor binding studies. In pharmacological tests of locomotor activity, antidepressant and pain effects, S-phenibut was inactive in doses up to 500 mg/kg. In contrast, R-phenibut turned out to be two times more potent than racemic phenibut in most of the tests. In the forced swimming test, at a dose of 100 mg/kg only R-phenibut significantly decreased immobility time. Both R-phenibut and racemic phenibut showed analgesic activity in the tail-flick test with R-phenibut being slightly more active. An GABAB receptor-selective antagonist (3-aminopropyl)(diethoxymethyl)phosphinic acid (CGP35348) inhibited the antidepressant and antinociceptive effects of R-phenibut, as well as locomotor depressing activity of R-phenibut in open field test in vivo. The radioligand binding experiments using a selective GABAB receptor antagonist [3H]CGP54626 revealed that affinity constants for racemic phenibut, R-phenibut and reference GABA-mimetic baclofen were 177+/-2, 92+/-3, 6.0+/-1 microM, respectively. We conclude that the pharmacological activity of racemic phenibut relies on R-phenibut and this correlates to the binding affinity of enantiomers of phenibut to the GABAB receptor.

  14. A randomized trial comparing ceftazidime alone with combination antibiotic therapy in cancer patients with fever and neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Pizzo, P A; Hathorn, J W; Hiemenz, J; Browne, M; Commers, J; Cotton, D; Gress, J; Longo, D; Marshall, D; McKnight, J

    1986-08-28

    To assess the efficacy of single-agent therapy relative to standard combination antibiotic therapy for the initial management of fever and neutropenia in cancer patients, we conducted a randomized trial comparing ceftazidime alone with a combination of cephalothin, gentamicin, and carbenicillin. Of 550 evaluable episodes of fever and neutropenia, 282 were treated with ceftazidime alone and 268 with the combination. All episodes were evaluated for responses at 72 hours after the start of treatment and at resolution of the neutropenia. Of the patients with unexplained fever who were given ceftazidime alone, 99 percent were alive at 72 hours and 98 percent were alive when the neutropenia resolved, as compared with 100 percent and 98 percent, respectively, of those given combination therapy. Of the patients with documented infection who were given ceftazidime alone, 98 percent were alive at 72 hours and 89 percent when the neutropenia resolved, as compared with 98 percent and 91 percent, respectively, of those given combination therapy. The majority of episodes of documented infection in both treatment groups necessitated additional antimicrobial treatment or other modifications of the initial regimen, as compared with only 22 percent of the episodes of unexplained fever. We conclude that initial single-agent therapy with certain beta-lactam antibiotics is a safe alternative to standard combination antibiotic therapy, although patients with documented infection or protracted neutropenia are likely to require additional or modified treatment.

  15. Reasons for non-participation in a primary care-based physical activity trial: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Attwood, S; Morton, K L; Mitchell, J; Van Emmenis, M; Sutton, S

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore reasons for non-participation in a primary care-based physical activity trial and understand how these may contribute to recruitment of non-representative research samples. We also aimed to elicit non-participants’ own recommendations for enhancing trial uptake in primary care. Design Semistructured telephone interviews with non-participants to a randomised controlled trial of a very brief intervention for promoting physical activity conducted in primary care (the Very Brief Interventions trial), with thematic analysis of interview transcripts. Setting 5 general practice (GP) surgeries in the East of England, UK. Participants Interviews were completed with 10 female and 6 male non-participants of white ethnicity and aged between 40 and 71 years. 13 of the 16 interviewees were either active or moderately active according to the GP Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPPAQ). Results Interviewees discussed a range of reasons for non-participation. These included beliefs surrounding the personal relevance of the trial based on preconceptions of intervention content. Many interviewees considered themselves either sufficiently active or too functionally limited to increase activity levels further, so rendering participation pointless in their view. Other identified barriers included a lack of free time, for trial participation and for increasing physical activity, and dissatisfaction with appointment scheduling systems in place at GP surgeries. Interviewees questioned the appropriateness of primary care as a context for delivering interventions to promote physical activity. In general, interviewees were positively disposed towards the idea of trial participation, especially if personal benefits are made salient, but suggested that interventions could be delivered in a different setting such as the internet. Conclusions To increase participation in physical activity promotion trials conducted in primary care, the content of invitation materials and

  16. The use of combined spinal-epidural technique to compare intrathecal ziconotide and epidural opioids for trialing intrathecal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Amitabh; Loh, Jeffrey; Puttanniah, Vinay; Malhotra, Vivek

    2013-03-01

    SUMMARY Choosing the initial medications for intrathecal delivery is often confusing and not standardized. We describe a novel way for using a combined spinal-epidural technique to compare two first-line medications for intrathecal delivery; ziconotide and morphine (or hydromorphone). Five patients with intractable chronic or cancer pain were elected to have an intrathecal drug delivery system implanted for pain management. Each patient was given a 3-day inpatient trial with the combined spinal-epidural technique. The Visual Analog Scale, Numerical Rating Scale, short-term McGill questionnaire and opioid consumption were monitored daily. The results were used to develop a paradigm to describe how ziconotide can be used in practice.

  17. A double blind comparative trial of nomifensin and desimipramine in depression. Relationship between treatment and phenylethylamine excretion.

    PubMed

    Acébal, E; Subirá, S; Spatz, J; Faleni, R; Merzbacher, B; Gales, A; Moizeszowicz, J

    1976-06-15

    The effect of nomifensin (Hoechst 36984), a synthetic psychotropic drug whose structure differs from MAO inhibitors and tricyclics, was studied in a double blind comparative trial with desimipramine in patients with various depressive syndromes. Forty-three patients (23 in the nomifensin group and 20 in the desimipramine group) were studied for 6 weeks. Clinical follow-up was done with the Wittenborn scale (WPRS), Hamilton's rating scale for depression (HRS), Zung's scale (SDS), and the PEN inventory. The average daily dose was nomifensin 84 mg and desimipramine 76 mg. Changes in HRS, WPRS and SDS showed statistically significant improvement with both treatments. A moderate anxiolytic effect was found in the nomifensin group, whereas medication had to be discontinued in two desimipramine-treated patients because of its drive-enhancing effect. Urinary phenylethylamine excretion rose in 2 out of 8 patients after 5 weeks of treatment with nomifensin.

  18. Methods and outcomes of engaging stakeholders to design a comparative effectiveness trial in children with uncontrolled asthma

    PubMed Central

    Erwin, Kim; Martin, Molly A.; Flippin, Tara; Norell, Sarah; Shadlyn, Ariana; Yang, Jie; Falco, Paula; Rivera, Jaime; Ignoffo, Stacy; Kumar, Rajesh; Margellos-Anast, Helen; McDermott, Michael; McMahon, Kate; Mosnaim, Giselle; Nyenhuis, Sharmilee M.; Press, Valerie G.; Ramsay, Jessica E.; Soyemi, Kenneth; Thompson, Trevonne M.; Krishnan, Jerry A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim To present the methods and outcomes of stakeholder engagement in the development of interventions for children presenting to the emergency department (ED) for uncontrolled asthma. Methods We engaged stakeholders (caregivers, physicians, nurses, administrators) from six EDs in a three-phase process to: 1) Define design requirements; 2) Prototype and Refine; and 3) Evaluate. Results Interviews among 28 stakeholders yielded themes regarding in-home asthma management practices and ED discharge experiences. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation showed strong preference for the new discharge tool (CHICAGO Action Plan after ED discharge, CAPE) over current tools. Conclusions Engaging end-users in contextual inquiry resulted in CAPE, a new stakeholder-balanced discharge tool, which is being tested in a multi-center comparative effectiveness trial. PMID:26690579

  19. Effectiveness of manual therapy compared to usual care by the general practitioner for chronic tension-type headache: design of a randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Castien, René F; van der Windt, Daniëlle AWM; Dekker, Joost; Mutsaers, Bert; Grooten, Anneke

    2009-01-01

    Background Patients with Chronic Tension Type Headache (CTTH) report functional and emotional impairments (loss of workdays, sleep disturbances, emotional well-being) and are at risk for overuse of medication. Manual therapy may improve symptoms through mobilisation of the spine, correction of posture, and training of cervical muscles. We present the design of a randomised clinical trial (RCT) evaluating the effectiveness of manual therapy (MT) compared to usual care by the general practitioner (GP) in patients with CTTH. Methods and design Patients are eligible for participation if they present in general practice with CTTH according to the classification of the International Headache Society (IHS). Participants are randomised to either usual GP care according to the national Dutch general practice guidelines for headache, or manual therapy, consisting of mobilisations (high- and low velocity techniques), exercise therapy for the cervical and thoracic spine and postural correction. The primary outcome measures are the number of headache days and use of medication. Secondary outcome measures are severity of headache, functional status, sickness absence, use of other healthcare resources, active cervical range of motion, algometry, endurance of the neckflexor muscles and head posture. Follow-up assessments are conducted after 8 and 26 weeks. Discussion This is a pragmatic trial in which interventions are offered as they are carried out in everyday practice. This increases generalisability of results, but blinding of patients, GPs and therapists is not possible. The results of this trial will contribute to clinical decision making of the GP regarding referral to manual therapy in patients with chronic tension headache. PMID:19216763

  20. Comparative trial of sodium cromoglycate enemas with prednisolone enemas in the treatment of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Grace, R H; Gent, A E; Hellier, M D

    1987-01-01

    A double blind multicentre study comparing sodium cromoglycate (600 mg/100 ml) by enema with prednisolone (20 mg/100 ml) by enema is reported. The study was conducted over a nine week period in the treatment of 70 patients with ulcerative colitis. Analysis of symptoms showed significant decreases in scores for patients in both groups, both at four and eight weeks; the only difference between the two groups was a significantly greater improvement in the reduction of rectal bleeding after four weeks in the prednisolone group. On sigmoidoscopy, both treatment groups showed a highly significant improvement after four and eight weeks with no significant differences being seen between the groups. Histology of the rectal biopsies showed a significant improvement in the inflammation of the mucosa for both treatment groups after four and eight weeks with no differences being observed between the groups. There were no significant changes in eosinophils from baseline and no difference between the groups at four and eight weeks. PMID:3102323

  1. Randomised controlled trial comparing oral and intravenous paracetamol (acetaminophen) plasma levels when given as preoperative analgesia.

    PubMed

    van der Westhuizen, J; Kuo, P Y; Reed, P W; Holder, K

    2011-03-01

    Gastric absorption of oral paracetamol (acetaminophen) may be unreliable perioperatively in the starved and stressed patient. We compared plasma concentrations of parenteral paracetamol given preoperatively and oral paracetamol when given as premedication. Patients scheduled for elective ear; nose and throat surgery or orthopaedic surgery were randomised to receive either oral or intravenous paracetamol as preoperative medication. The oral dose was given 30 minutes before induction of anaesthesia and the intravenous dose given pre-induction. All patients were given a standardised anaesthetic by the same specialist anaesthetist who took blood for paracetamol concentrations 30 minutes after the first dose and then at 30 minute intervals for 240 minutes. Therapeutic concentrations of paracetamol were reached in 96% of patients who had received the drug parenterally, and 67% of patients who had received it orally. Maximum median plasma concentrations were 19 mg.l(-1) (interquartile range 15 to 23 mg.l(-1)) and 13 mg.l(-1) (interquartile range 0 to 18 mg.l(-1)) for the intravenous and oral group respectively. The difference between intravenous and oral groups was less marked after 150 minutes but the intravenous preparation gave higher plasma concentrations throughout the study period. It can be concluded that paracetamol gives more reliable therapeutic plasma concentrations when given intravenously.

  2. Influence of preoperative showers on staphylococcal skin colonization: a comparative trial of antiseptic skin cleansers.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, A B; Kernodle, D S; Barg, N L; Petracek, M R

    1988-01-01

    We undertook a prospective randomized observer-blinded study comparing the ability of preoperative showers with chlorhexidine gluconate (Hibiclens), povidone-iodine (Betadine), and a lotion soap (Safe 'N Sure) to diminish the staphylococcal skin flora of patients. By block randomization, patients scheduled for an elective cardiac operation or coronary artery angioplasty were assigned to shower with one of the study skin cleansers either once (evening only) or twice (both evening and morning) before the procedure. Semiquantitative samples for culture were obtained from the subclavian and inguinal sites on the evening before the procedure (baseline culture) and again the next morning before the operation. The chlorhexidine skin cleanser consistently reduced staphylococcal colony counts at both the subclavian and inguinal sites before the procedure. This reduction was significant for patients showering both evening and morning (p less than 0.05). The use of the povidone-iodine skin cleanser inconsistently affected skin flora. Patients using lotion soap either experienced no change or had an increase in colony counts. Chlorhexidine is more effective than povidone-iodine in diminishing skin colonization with staphylococci in patients before operation. Repeated applications of chlorhexidine are superior to a single shower with this agent.

  3. Comparative trial between the use of amoxicillin and amoxicillin clavulanate in the removal of third molars

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias-Martín, Fernando; García-Perla-García, Alberto; Yañez-Vico, Rosa; Rosa, Elena; Arjona-Gerveno, Esther; González-Padilla, Juan D.; Gutierrez-Pérez, Jose L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the use of amoxicillin (1g) vs amoxicillin and clavulanate (875/125mg) after extraction of retained third molars for prevention of infectious complications. Study Design: The study involved 546 patients attending for removal a retained third molar and divided in to two groups: Group 1 - amoxicillin and clavunate (875/125mg) group (n=257) and Group 2 - amoxicillin (1g) group (n=289). All patients were recalled for investigating the possibility of infection, presence of diarrhea and further analgesic intake. Results: From a total of 546 patients, the frequency of infection was 1.4%, without no statistically differences between the two groups. Group 1 showed statistically higher presence of patients with gastrointestinal complications (p>0.05). In 546 patients, 2.7% of patients reported severe pain that would not relieve with medication. Conclusions: The results of our study show that the use of amoxicillin (1g) and amoxicillin and clavunate (875/125mg) is similar efficacious in preventing infection after retained third molar extraction but amoxicillin and clavunate (875/125mg) produces more gastrointestinal discomfort. Key words:Amoxicillin, clavulanate, third molars, complications. PMID:24880449

  4. Comparative Efficacy of Topical Curcumin and Triamcinolone for Oral Lichen Planus: A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kia, Seid Javad; Shirazian, Shiva; Mansourian, Arash; Khodadadi Fard, Leila; Ashnagar, Sajjad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Lichen planus (LP) is a chronic inflammatory mucocutaneous disease. Its treatment is often symptomatic and includes topical and systemic corticosteroids. Although corticosteroid therapy is usually successful, it has side effects and thus, an alternative treatment is favorable. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of topical curcumin and triamcinolone for treatment of oral lichen planus (OLP). Materials and Methods: In this study, 50 patients (36 women and 14 men) in the age range of 38 to 73 years with OLP were randomly divided into two groups. Each group received 0.1% triamcinolone or 5% curcumin oral paste three times a day for four weeks. Assessment of the appearance score and severity of pain was done at baseline and at the end of two and four weeks and recorded in the patients’ questionnaires. The data were analyzed by SPSS 17 software, using the Mann-Whitney and Spearman's tests. Results: With respect to pain reduction, nine patients (36%) in the curcumin group and eight patients (32%) in the triamcinolone group showed complete remission. With respect to the appearance score, one patient (4%) in each group showed complete remission. No statistically significant difference was noted between the two groups. Conclusion: Application of curcumin is suggested for treatment of OLP because of its desirable anti-inflammatory effects and insignificant side effects. PMID:27507989

  5. Forskolin compared with beclomethasone for prevention of asthma attacks: a single-blind clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Huerta, M; Urzúa, Z; Trujillo, X; González-Sánchez, R; Trujillo-Hernández, B

    2010-01-01

    This single-blind study compared the efficacy of oral forskolin versus inhaled beclomethasone for mild or moderately persistent adult asthma. Patients were randomly assigned to receive forskolin (one 10-mg capsule orally per day; n = 30) or beclomethasone (two 50 microg inhalations every 12 h; n = 30) for 2 months. No statistically significant improvement occurred in any lung function parameter in the forskolin-treated patients. Subjects in the beclomethasone-treated group presented a slight but statistically significant improvement in percentage forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)), percentage forced expiratory flow in the middle (25 - 75%) expiratory phase (FEF(25 - 75%)) and percentage forced vital capacity (FVC) after 2 months of treatment, though the improvement in absolute values for FEV(1), FEF(25 - 75%), FVC and FEV(1):FVC did not reach statistical significance. There was no statistically significant difference between the forskolin and beclomethasone treatment groups for any lung function parameter at baseline or after treatment. None of the beclomethasone-treated patients had an asthma attack and one forskolin-treated patient had a mild asthma attack during the 2-month study period. More studies are needed in adult asthma patients to confirm whether forskolin may be a useful preventive treatment for mild or moderately persistent adult asthma.

  6. Comparative trial of permethrin 5% versus lindane 1% for the treatment of scabies.

    PubMed

    Goldust, Mohamad; Babae Nejad, Shahla; Rezaee, Elham; Raghifar, Ramin

    2013-01-20

    Objective: Treatment of scabies is an important issue in infectious dermatology. The aim of this study was to specify whether permethrin is effective for the treatment of human scabies and to compare its effectiveness with that of 1% lindane by topical application. Methods: 220 patients with scabies with the mean age of 44 ± 12/24 attended the study. Patients were divided into two groups randomly. The first group and their family contacts received 5% permethrin cream and the other received 1% lindane lotion. Treatment was evaluated at intervals of 2 and 4 weeks. Results: Of 254 patients, 220 completed the study. 110 in the group treated with lindane and 110 in the group treated with permethrin. Permethrin provided an improvement rate of 92 (83.6%) after 2 weeks, whereas lindane was effective only in 54 (49%) of patients. After 4 weeks improvement rate was 96.3% (106 of 110) in permethrin group since it was only 69.1% (76 of 110) in lindane group. Conclusion: Permethrin (5%) cream was found to be significantly more effective in the treatment of scabies in comparison with lindane in this study. There were no adverse effects with either permethrin or lindane.

  7. Dose-Effect Relationship in Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Randomized Trial Comparing Two Radiation Doses

    SciTech Connect

    Jakobsen, Anders; Ploen, John; Vuong, Te; Appelt, Ane; Lindebjerg, Jan; Rafaelsen, Soren R.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Locally advanced rectal cancer represents a major therapeutic challenge. Preoperative chemoradiation therapy is considered standard, but little is known about the dose-effect relationship. The present study represents a dose-escalation phase III trial comparing 2 doses of radiation. Methods and Materials: The inclusion criteria were resectable T3 and T4 tumors with a circumferential margin of {<=}5 mm on magnetic resonance imaging. The patients were randomized to receive 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions to the tumor and pelvic lymph nodes (arm A) or the same treatment supplemented with an endorectal boost given as high-dose-rate brachytherapy (10 Gy in 2 fractions; arm B). Concomitant chemotherapy, uftoral 300 mg/m{sup 2} and L-leucovorin 22.5 mg/d, was added to both arms on treatment days. The primary endpoint was complete pathologic remission. The secondary endpoints included tumor response and rate of complete resection (R0). Results: The study included 248 patients. No significant difference was found in toxicity or surgical complications between the 2 groups. Based on intention to treat, no significant difference was found in the complete pathologic remission rate between the 2 arms (18% and 18%). The rate of R0 resection was different in T3 tumors (90% and 99%; P=.03). The same applied to the rate of major response (tumor regression grade, 1+2), 29% and 44%, respectively (P=.04). Conclusions: This first randomized trial comparing 2 radiation doses indicated that the higher dose increased the rate of major response by 50% in T3 tumors. The endorectal boost is feasible, with no significant increase in toxicity or surgical complications.

  8. Comparative Effectiveness of Three Doses of Weight Loss Counseling: Two-Year Findings from the Rural LITE Trial

    PubMed Central

    Perri, Michael G.; Limacher, Marian C.; von Castel-Roberts, Kristina; Daniels, Michael J.; Durning, Patricia E.; Janicke, David M.; Bobroff, Linda B.; Radcliff, Tiffany A.; Milsom, Vanessa A.; Kim, Chanmin; Martin, A. Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects and costs of three doses of behavioral weight-loss treatment delivered via Cooperative Extension Offices in rural communities. Design and Methods Obese adults (N=612) were randomly assigned to low, moderate or high doses of behavioral treatment (i.e., 16, 32 or 48 sessions over two years) or to a control condition that received nutrition education without instruction in behavior modification strategies. Results Two-year mean reductions in initial body weight were 2.9% (95% Credible Interval=1.7–4.3), 3.5% (2.0–4.8), 6.7% (5.3–7.9), and 6.8% (5.5–8.1) for the control, low, moderate, and high-dose conditions, respectively. The moderate-dose treatment produced weight losses similar to the high-dose condition and significantly larger than the low-dose and control conditions (posterior probability > .996). The percentages of participants who achieved weight reductions ≥ 5% at two years were significantly higher in the moderate-dose (58%) and high-dose (58%) conditions compared with low-dose (43%) and control (40%) conditions (posterior probability > .996). Cost-effectiveness analyses favored the moderate-dose treatment over all other conditions. Conclusion A moderate dose of behavioral treatment produced two-year weight reductions comparable to high-dose treatment but at a lower cost. These findings have important policy implications for the dissemination of weight-loss interventions into communities with limited resources. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00912652. PMID:25376396

  9. Comparative Trial of Effectiveness of Pyrethroid Insecticides Against Peridomestic Populations of Triatoma infestans in Northwestern Argentina

    PubMed Central

    CECERE, MARÍA CARLA; VÁZQUEZ-PROKOPEC, GONZALO M.; CEBALLOS, LEONARDO A.; GUREVITZ, JUAN M.; ZÁRATE, JOAQUÍN E.; ZAIDENBERG, MARIO; KITRON, URIEL; GÜRTLER, RICARDO E.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of different pyrethroid insecticides, formulations, and doses on peridomestic populations of Triatoma infestans (Klug) were evaluated in 128 houses with 148 identified infested peridomestic sites in northwestern Argentina between October 2003 and March 2005. Four treatments were randomly assigned within each community: two doses of 5% suspension concentrate β-cypermethrin in water applied with manual compression sprayers, the standard dose (S) at 50 mg and a double dose (2S) at 100 mg active ingredient (AI)/m2; and two emulsifiable concentrates diluted in diesel fuel and applied with power sprayers, 25% cypermethrin (100 mg [AI]m2) (CF) and 10% permethrin (170 mg [AI]m2) (DF). Infestation was assessed by timed manual collections with a dislodging agent at baseline, 5, 12, and 17 mo postspraying, and the sites found to be reinfested at 5 mo postspraying were selectively resprayed. Only 2S eliminated T. infestans from all peridomestic sites up to 12 mo postspraying, and it was significantly more effective than all other treatments. At 5 mo postspraying, more sites treated with CF or DF rather than S had bug colonies that probably represented residual foci, which they also failed in eliminating after a second spray. At 17 mo postspraying, the prevalence of reinfested peridomestic sites was 5% for 2S, 29% for S, 43% for CF, and 54% for DF. The application of suspension concentrate pyrethroids in dose twice as large as that currently in use in the attack phase produces a greater initial impact and may eliminate peridomestic populations of T. infestans. PMID:17017227

  10. Comparative trial of effectiveness of pyrethroid insecticides against peridomestic populations of Triatoma infestans in northwestern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Cecere, María Carla; Vázquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo M; Ceballos, Leonardo A; Gurevitz, Juan M; Zárate, Joaquín E; Zaidenberg, Mario; Kitron, Uriel; Gürtler, Ricardo E

    2006-09-01

    The effects of different pyrethroid insecticides, formulations, and doses on peridomestic populations of Triatoma infestans (Klug) were evaluated in 128 houses with 148 identified infested peridomestic sites in northwestern Argentina between October 2003 and March 2005. Four treatments were randomly assigned within each community: two doses of 5% suspension concentrate beta-cypermethrin in water applied with manual compression sprayers, the standard dose (S) at 50 mg and a double dose (2S) at 100 mg active ingredient (AI)/m2; and two emulsifiable concentrates diluted in diesel fuel and applied with power sprayers, 25% cypermethrin (100 mg [AI] /m2) (CF) and 10% permethrin (170 mg [AI]/m2) (DF). Infestation was assessed by timed manual collections with a dislodging agent at baseline, 5, 12, and 17 mo postspraying, and the sites found to be reinfested at 5 mo postspraying were selectively resprayed. Only 2S eliminated T. infestans from all peridomestic sites up to 12 mo postspraying, and it was significantly more effective than all other treatments. At 5 mo postspraying, more sites treated with CF or DF rather than S had bug colonies that probably represented residual foci, which they also failed in eliminating after a second spray. At 17 mo postspraying, the prevalence of reinfested peridomestic sites was 5% for 2S, 29% for S, 43% for CF, and 54% for DF. The application of suspension concentrate pyrethroids in dose twice as large as that currently in use in the attack phase produces a greater initial impact and may eliminate peridomestic populations of T. infestans.

  11. Prevention of seroma formation after axillary dissection--a comparative randomized clinical trial of three methods.

    PubMed

    Kottayasamy Seenivasagam, Rajkumar; Gupta, Vikas; Singh, Gurpreet

    2013-01-01

    Seroma is a frequent complication after breast cancer surgery. Closed suction drainage for several days is the standard procedure to reduce seroma formation. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of external compression dressing, suture flap fixation, and the conventional method of closed suction drains in the prevention of seroma formation. A total of 161 patients were prospectively randomized in a three groups × two subgroups design into control (n = 48), compression dressing (n = 53) and suturing groups (n = 49), and two subgroups, conventional drain removal (n = 75) and early drain removal (n = 75). All patients underwent ALND as part of MRM or BCT. The primary end point was the incidence of seroma. Suture flap fixation significantly reduced the incidence of seroma (p = 0.003), total drain output (p = 0.005), and duration of drainage (p = 0.001) without increase in wound complications. Compression dressing reduced duration of drainage significantly (p = 0.03), but not the total drain output (p = 0.15) or seromas (p = 0.58). Early drain removal on postoperative day 7 irrespective of drain output does not significantly increase seroma formation (p = 0.34) or wound complications. On multivariate analysis, BMI ≥ 30 (p = 0.02) and longer duration of drainage (p = 0.04) were identified as independent predictors for seroma formation. Obliteration of the dead space after breast cancer surgery by suture flap fixation is a safe and easy procedure, which significantly reduces postoperative seroma formation and duration of drainage. Compression dressing offers no advantage over normal dressing. Drains can be removed safely on postoperative day 7 irrespective of output without significant increase in complications.

  12. Randomized trial comparing rabeprazole- versus lansoprazole-based Helicobacter pylori eradication regimens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng-Kwan; Wu, I-Chen; Lu, Chien-Yu; Kuo, Chao-Hung; Yu, Fang-Jung; Liu, Chung-Jung; Hsu, Ping-I; Hsu, Wen-Hung; Su, Yu-Chung; Chen, Angela; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Kuo, Fu-Chen; Chen, Jyh-Jou

    2013-07-01

    Different types of proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-based triple therapies could result in different Helicobacter pylori eradication rates. This study aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of rabeprazole- and lansoprazole-based triple therapies in primary treatment of H. pylori infection. From September 2005 to July 2008, 426 H. pylori-infected patients were randomly assigned to receive a 7-day eradication therapy with either rabeprazole 20mgbid (RAC group, n=222) or lansoprazole 30mgbid (LAC group, n=228) in combination with amoxicillin 1gbid and clarithromycin 500mgbid. The patients received follow-up esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) and/or (13)C-urea breath test 12-16 weeks later to define H. pylori status. Their personal and medical history, compliance and side effects were obtained by using a standardized questionnaire. Intention-to-treat analysis revealed that the eradication rate was 87.84% in the RAC group and 85.96% in the LAC group (p=0.56). All patients returned for assessment of compliance (100% in the LAC group vs. 99.50% in the RAC group; p=0.32) and adverse events (7.20% in the RAC group vs. 5.70% in the LAC group, p=0.51). Univariate analysis suggested that patients with nonsteroid anti-inflammatory agent (NSAID) use had lower eradication rates than those without (76.71% vs. 88.74%; p=0.006). Our results showed that efficacy and safety were similar in rabeprazole- and lansoprazole-based primary therapies. The influence of NSAID usage on H. pylori eradication needs to be further investigated.

  13. Pesticide residue dynamics in passion fruits: comparing field trial and modelling results.

    PubMed

    Juraske, Ronnie; Fantke, Peter; Ramírez, Ana Cecilia Romero; González, Alonso

    2012-10-01

    We evaluated the exposure to pesticides from the consumption of passion fruits and subsequent human health risks by combining several methods: (i) experimental field studies including the determination of pesticide residues in/on passion fruits, (ii) dynamic plant uptake modelling, and (iii) human health risk assessment concepts. Eight commonly used pesticides were applied onto passion fruits cultivated in Colombia. Pesticide concentrations were measured periodically (between application and harvest) in whole fruits and fruit pulp. Measured concentrations were compared with predicted residues calculated with a dynamic and crop-specific pesticide uptake model, namely dynamiCROP. The model accounts for the time between pesticide application and harvest, the time between harvest and consumption, the amount of spray deposition on plant surfaces, uptake processes, dilution due to crop growth, degradation in plant components, and reduction due to food processing (peeling). Measured and modelled residues correspond well (r(2)=0.88-0.99), with all predictions falling within the 90% confidence interval of the measured values. A mean error of 43% over all studied pesticides was observed between model estimates and measurements. The fraction of pesticide applied during cultivation that is eventually ingested by humans is on average 10(-4)-10(-6), depending on the time period between application and ingestion and the processing step considered. Model calculations and intake fractions via fruit consumption based on experimental data corresponded well for all pesticides with a deviation of less than a factor of 2. Pesticide residues in fruits measured at recommended harvest dates were all below European Maximum Residue Limits (MRLs) and therefore do not indicate any violation of international regulatory thresholds.

  14. Genomic Array as Compared to Karyotyping in Myelodysplastic Syndromes in a Prospective Clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Stevens-Kroef, Marian J; Olde Weghuis, Daniel; ElIdrissi-Zaynoun, Najat; van der Reijden, Bert; Cremers, Eline M P; Alhan, Canan; Westers, Theresia M; Visser-Wisselaar, Heleen A; Chitu, Dana A; Cunha, Sonia M; Vellenga, Edo; Klein, Saskia K; Wijermans, Pierre; de Greef, Georgine E; Schaafsma, M R; Muus, Petra; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A; Jansen, Joop H

    2017-02-25

    Karyotyping is considered as the gold standard in the genetic subclassification of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Oligo/SNP-based genomic array profiling is a high-resolution tool that also enables genome wide analysis. We compared karyotyping with oligo/SNP-based array profiling in 104 MDS patients from the HOVON-89 study. Oligo/SNP-array identified all cytogenetically defined genomic lesions, except for subclones in two cases and balanced translocations in three cases. On the other hand oligo/SNP-based genomic array profiling had a higher success rate, showing 55 abnormal cases, while an abnormal karyotype was found in only 35 patients. In 9 patients whose karyotyping was unsuccessful because of insufficient metaphases or failure, oligo/SNP-based array analysis was successful. Based on cytogenetic visible abnormalities as identified by oligo/SNP-based genomic array prognostic scores based on IPSS/-R were assigned. These prognostic scores were identical to the IPSS/-R scores as obtained with karyotyping in 95-96% of the patients. In addition to the detection of cytogenetically defined lesions, oligo/SNP-based genomic profiling identified focal copy number abnormalities or regions of copy neutral loss of heterozygosity that were out of the scope of karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Of interest, in 26 patients we demonstrated such cytogenetic invisible abnormalities. These abnormalities often involved regions that are recurrently affected in hematological malignancies, and may therefore be of clinical relevance. Our findings indicate that oligo/SNP-based genomic array can be used to identify the vast majority of recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities in MDS. Furthermore, oligo/SNP-based array profiling yields additional genetic abnormalities that may be of clinical importance. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Multicenter, Phase 3 Trial Comparing Selenium Supplementation With Observation in Gynecologic Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Muecke, Ralph; Schomburg, Lutz; Glatzel, Michael; Berndt-Skorka, Regina; Baaske, Dieter; Reichl, Berthold; Buentzel, Jens; Kundt, Guenter; Prott, Franz J.; Vries, Alexander de; Stoll, Guenther; Kisters, Klaus; Bruns, Frank; Schaefer, Ulrich; Willich, Norman; Micke, Oliver

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: We assessed whether adjuvant supplementation with selenium improves the selenium status and reduces side effects of patients treated by radiotherapy (RT) for cervical and uterine cancer. Methods and Materials: Whole-blood selenium concentrations were measured in patients with cervical cancer (n = 11) and uterine cancer (n = 70) after surgical treatment, during RT, at the end of RT, and 6 weeks after RT. Patients with initial selenium concentrations of less than 84{mu}g/L were randomized before RT either to receive 500 {mu}g of selenium (in the form of sodium selenite [selenase (registered) , biosyn Arzneimittel GmbH, Fellbach, Germany]) by mouth on the days of RT and 300 {mu}g of selenium on the days without RT or to receive no supplement during RT. The primary endpoint of this multicenter Phase 3 study was to assess the efficiency of selenium supplementation during RT; the secondary endpoint was to decrease radiation-induced diarrhea and other RT-dependent side effects. Results: A total of 81 patients were randomized. We enrolled 39 in the selenium group (SG) and 42 in the control group (CG). Selenium levels did not differ between the SG and CG upon study initiation but were significantly higher in the SG at the end of RT. The actuarial incidence of diarrhea of Grade 2 or higher according to Common Toxicity Criteria (version 2) in the SG was 20.5% compared with 44.5% in the CG (p = 0.04). Other blood parameters, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, and self-reported quality of life were not different between the groups. Conclusions: Selenium supplementation during RT is effective in improving blood selenium status in selenium-deficient cervical and uterine cancer patients and reduces the number of episodes and severity of RT-induced diarrhea.

  16. Functional changes in adipose tissue in a randomised controlled trial of physical activity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A sedentary lifestyle predisposes to cardiometabolic diseases. Lifestyle changes such as increased physical activity improve a range of cardiometabolic risk factors. The objective of this study was to examine whether functional changes in adipose tissue were related to these improvements. Methods Seventy-three sedentary, overweight (mean BMI 29.9 ± 3.2 kg/m2) and abdominally obese, but otherwise healthy men and women (67.6 ± 0.5 years) from a randomised controlled trial of physical activity on prescription over a 6-month period were included (control n = 43, intervention n = 30). Detailed examinations were carried out at baseline and at follow-up, including fasting blood samples, a comprehensive questionnaire and subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies for fatty acid composition analysis (n = 73) and quantification of mRNA expression levels of 13 candidate genes (n = 51), including adiponectin, leptin and inflammatory cytokines. Results At follow-up, the intervention group had a greater increase in exercise time (+137 min/week) and a greater decrease in body fat mass (−1.5 kg) compared to the control subjects (changes of 0 min/week and −0.5 kg respectively). Circulating concentrations of adiponectin were unchanged, but those of leptin decreased significantly more in the intervention group (−1.8 vs −1.1 ng/mL for intervention vs control, P < 0.05). The w6-polyunsaturated fatty acid content, in particular linoleic acid (18:2w6), of adipose tissue increased significantly more in the intervention group, but the magnitude of the change was small (+0.17 vs +0.02 percentage points for intervention vs control, P < 0.05). Surprisingly leptin mRNA levels in adipose tissue increased in the intervention group (+107% intervention vs −20% control, P < 0.05), but changes in expression of the remaining genes did not differ between the groups. Conclusions After a 6-month period of increased physical activity in

  17. Acute Effects of Caffeine on Heart Rate Variability, Blood Pressure and Tidal Volume in Paraplegic and Tetraplegic Compared to Able-Bodied Individuals: A Randomized, Blinded Trial

    PubMed Central

    Flueck, Joelle Leonie; Schaufelberger, Fabienne; Lienert, Martina; Schäfer Olstad, Daniela; Wilhelm, Matthias; Perret, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine increases sympathetic nerve activity in healthy individuals. Such modulation of nervous system activity can be tracked by assessing the heart rate variability. This study aimed to investigate the influence of caffeine on time- and frequency-domain heart rate variability parameters, blood pressure and tidal volume in paraplegic and tetraplegic compared to able-bodied participants. Heart rate variability was measured in supine and sitting position pre and post ingestion of either placebo or 6 mg caffeine in 12 able-bodied, 9 paraplegic and 7 tetraplegic participants in a placebo-controlled, randomized and double-blind study design. Metronomic breathing was applied (0.25 Hz) and tidal volume was recorded during heart rate variability assessment. Blood pressure, plasma caffeine and epinephrine concentrations were analyzed pre and post ingestion. Most parameters of heart rate variability did not significantly change post caffeine ingestion compared to placebo. Tidal volume significantly increased post caffeine ingestion in able-bodied (p = 0.021) and paraplegic (p = 0.036) but not in tetraplegic participants (p = 0.34). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure increased significantly post caffeine in able-bodied (systolic: p = 0.003; diastolic: p = 0.021) and tetraplegic (systolic: p = 0.043; diastolic: p = 0.042) but not in paraplegic participants (systolic: p = 0.09; diastolic: p = 0.33). Plasma caffeine concentrations were significantly increased post caffeine ingestion in all three groups of participants (p<0.05). Plasma epinephrine concentrations increased significantly in able-bodied (p = 0.002) and paraplegic (p = 0.032) but not in tetraplegic participants (p = 0.63). The influence of caffeine on the autonomic nervous system seems to depend on the level of lesion and the extent of the impairment. Therefore, tetraplegic participants may be less influenced by caffeine ingestion. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02083328 PMID:27776149

  18. Skipping breakfast reduces energy intake and physical activity in healthy women who are habitual breakfast eaters: A randomized crossover trial.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Eiichi; Hatamoto, Yoichi; Yonekura, Satomi; Tanaka, Hiroaki

    2017-03-09

    Many epidemiological studies indicate a positive relationship between skipping breakfast (SB) and obesity. However, it is unclear whether SB affects energy intake and physical activity during the day. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the acute effects of SB on energy intake and physical activity under free-living conditions. The present study used a randomized, crossover trial design comparing eating breakfast (EB) and SB days. Twenty lean, healthy women 21-25years old who were habitual breakfast eaters (≥5daysperweek) took part in this study. On EB days, participants were provided a standard breakfast (542kcal). The meals and physical activity after breakfast were under free-living conditions. The meals consisted of foods available at supermarkets, restaurants, and convenience stores. Dietary intake was evaluated by adding values from food labels. Physical activity was assessed using a tri-axial accelerometer. Energy intake at lunch was significantly increased after SB compared with EB (+131±188kcal; p=0.0057). Total energy intake per day was significantly lower after SB compared with EB (-262±428kcal, p=0.013). Physical activity energy expenditure was slightly lower after SB compared with EB (-41±75kcal in the morning, p=0.024; -56±129kcalperday, p=0.064). Step counts and time spent physically active over the whole day were not significantly different between conditions. Skipping breakfast reduced energy intake during the day and morning physical activity in healthy women who were habitual breakfast eaters. The decreased energy expenditure related to physical activity after SB did not exceed the decreased energy intake.

  19. Prioritizing HIV Comparative Effectiveness Trials based on Value of Information: Generic vs. Brand-Name ART in the US

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Pamela P.; Weinstein, Milton C.; Li, X. Cynthia; Hughes, Michael D.; Paltiel, A. David; Hou, Taige; Parker, Robert A.; Gaynes, Melanie R.; Sax, Paul E.; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Schackman, Bruce R.; Walensky, Rochelle P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Value of Information (VOI) analysis examines whether to acquire information before making a decision. We introduced VOI to the HIV audience, using the example of generic antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the US. Methods and Findings We used a mathematical model and probabilistic sensitivity analysis to generate probability distributions of survival (in quality-adjusted life years, QALYs) and cost for three potential first-line ART regimens: 3-pill generic, 2-pill generic, and 1-pill branded. These served as input for a comparison of two hypothetical two-arm trials: 3-pill generic vs. 1-pill branded; and 2-pill generic vs.1-pill branded. We modeled pre-trial uncertainty by defining probability distributions around key inputs, including 24-week HIV-RNA suppression and subsequent ART failure. We assumed that, without a trial, patients received the 1-pill branded strategy. Post-trial, we assumed that patients received the most cost-effective strategy. For both trials, we quantified the probability of changing to a generic-based regimen upon trial completion and the expected VOI in terms of improved health outcomes and costs. Assuming a willingness to pay threshold of $100,000/QALY, the 3-pill trial led to more treatment changes (84%) than the 2-pill trial (78%). Estimated VOI was $48,000 (3-pill trial) and $35,700 (2-pill trial) per future patient initiating ART. Conclusions A 3-pill trial of generic ART is more likely to lead to post-trial treatment changes and to provide more value than a 2-pill trial if policy decisions are based on cost-effectiveness. Value of Information analysis can identify trials likely to confer the greatest impact and value for HIV care. PMID:26651525

  20. Spinal Motion and Muscle Activity during Active Trunk Movements – Comparing Sheep and Humans Adopting Upright and Quadrupedal Postures

    PubMed Central

    Valentin, Stephanie; Licka, Theresia F.

    2016-01-01

    Sheep are used as models for the human spine, yet comparative in vivo data necessary for validation is limited. The purpose of this study was therefore to compare spinal motion and trunk muscle activity during active trunk movements in sheep and humans. Three-dimensional kinematic data as well as surface electromyography (sEMG) of spinal flexion and extension was compared in twenty-four humans in upright (UR) and 4-point kneeling (KN) postures and in 17 Austrian mountain sheep. Kinematic markers were attached over the sacrum, posterior iliac spines, and spinous and transverse processes of T5, T8, T11, L2 and L5 in humans and over the sacrum, tuber sacrale, T5, T8, T12, L3 and L7 in sheep. The activity of erector spinae (ES), rectus abdominis (RA), obliquus externus (OE), and obliquus internus (OI) were collected. Maximum sEMG (MOE) was identified for each muscle and trial, and reported as a percentage (MOE%) of the overall maximally observed sEMG from all trials. Spinal range of motion was significantly smaller in sheep compared to humans (UR / KN) during flexion (sheep: 6–11°; humans 12–34°) and extension (sheep: 4°; humans: 11–17°). During extension, MOE% of ES was greater in sheep (median: 77.37%) than UR humans (24.89%), and MOE% of OE and OI was greater in sheep (OE 76.20%; OI 67.31%) than KN humans (OE 21.45%; OI 19.34%), while MOE% of RA was lower in sheep (21.71%) than UR humans (82.69%). During flexion, MOE% of RA was greater in sheep (83.09%) than humans (KN 47.42%; UR 41.38%), and MOE% of ES in sheep (45.73%) was greater than KN humans (14.45%), but smaller than UR humans (72.36%). The differences in human and sheep spinal motion and muscle activity suggest that caution is warranted when ovine data are used to infer human spine biomechanics. PMID:26741136

  1. Comparative antimycobacterial activities of ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and grepafloxacin.

    PubMed

    Vacher, S; Pellegrin, J L; Leblanc, F; Fourche, J; Maugein, J

    1999-11-01

    Infections caused by non-tuberculous mycobacteria and multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis are difficult to treat. New compounds potentially active against these bacteria are therefore constantly being sought. Among them is grepafloxacin, a new C5 fluoroquinolone. A panel of 130 isolates of mycobacteria including 33 M. tuberculosis isolates and 97 isolates of different species of atypical mycobacteria were analysed for susceptibility to grepafloxacin, ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin. The MICs of these fluoroquinolones were determined using the agar-dilution method. Different mycobacterial species showed different degrees of susceptibility to grepafloxacin, ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin but little difference was observed between the MICs of the three antibiotics against strains of the same mycobacterial species. In addition, to evaluate the intracellular activity of these drugs, six strains of mycobacteria were studied using a human-macrophage infection model. Preliminary results of macrophage experiments showed that grepafloxacin was more active than ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin, particularly against Mycobacterium kansasii and, to a lesser degree, against Mycobacterium avium complex and Mycobacterium marinum. However, the three fluoroquinolones had comparable activities against M. tuberculosis.

  2. Antianaerobic activity of sulopenem compared to six other agents.

    PubMed

    Ednie, Lois M; Appelbaum, Peter C

    2009-05-01

    Agar dilution MIC methodology was used to compare the activity of sulopenem with those of amoxicillin/clavulanate, ampicillin/sulbactam, piperacillin-tazobactam, imipenem, clindamycin, and metronidazole against 431 anaerobes. Overall, MIC(50)/(90) values were as follows: sulopenem, 0.25/1.0 microg/ml; amoxicillin/clavulanate, 0.5/2.0 microg/ml; ampicillin/sulbactam, 0.5/4.0 microg/ml; piperacillin/tazobactam, 0.25/8.0 microg/ml; imipenem, 0.06/1.0 microg/ml; clindamycin, 0.25/16.0 microg/ml; and metronidazole, 1.0/4.0 microg/ml.

  3. Comparative studies of brain activation with MEG and functional MRI

    SciTech Connect

    George, J.S.; Aine, C.J.; Sanders, J.A.; Lewine, J.D.; Caprihan, A.

    1993-12-31

    The past two years have witnessed the emergence of MRI as a functional imaging methodology. Initial demonstrations involved the injection of a paramagnetic contrast agent and required ultrafast echo planar imaging capability to adequately resolve the passage of the injected bolus. By measuring the local reduction in image intensity due to magnetic susceptibility, it was possible to calculate blood volume, which changes as a function of neural activation. Later developments have exploited endogenous contrast mechanisms to monitor changes in blood volume or in venous blood oxygen content. Recently, we and others have demonstrated that it is possible to make such measurements in a clinical imager, suggesting that the large installed base of such machines might be utilized for functional imaging. Although it is likely that functional MRI (fMRI) will subsume some of the clinical and basic neuroscience applications now touted for MEG, it is also clear that these techniques offer different largely complementary, capabilities. At the very least, it is useful to compare and cross-validate the activation maps produced by these techniques. Such studies will be valuable as a check on results of neuromagnetic distributed current reconstructions and will allow better characterization of the relationship between neurophysiological activation and associated hemodynamic changes. A more exciting prospect is the development of analyses that combine information from the two modalities to produce a better description of underlying neural activity than is possible with either technique in isolation. In this paper we describe some results from initial comparative studies and outline several techniques that can be used to treat MEG and fMRI data within a unified computational framework.

  4. A Web-Based, Social Networking Physical Activity Intervention for Insufficiently Active Adults Delivered via Facebook App: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Monika; Vandelanotte, Corneel; Plotnikoff, Ron; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Thomas, Samantha; Nelson-Field, Karen; Olds, Tim

    2015-01-01

    pedometers can produce sizable short-term physical activity changes. Future work is needed to determine how to maintain behavior change in the longer term, how to reach at-need populations, and how to disseminate such interventions on a mass scale. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR): ACTRN12614000488606; https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=366239 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6ZVtu6TMz). PMID:26169067

  5. A randomised controlled trial to compare the clinical and cost-effectiveness of prism glasses, visual search training and standard care in patients with hemianopia following stroke: a protocol

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, F J; Barton, P G; Bedson, E; Breen, R; Conroy, E J; Cwiklinski, E; Dodridge, C; Drummond, A; Garcia-Finana, M; Howard, C; Johnson, S; MacIntosh, C; Noonan, C P; Pollock, A; Rockliffe, J; Sackley, C; Shipman, T

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Homonymous hemianopia is a common and disabling visual problem after stroke. Currently, prism glasses and visual scanning training are proposed to improve it. The aim of this trial is to determine the effectiveness of these interventions compared to standard care. Methods and analysis The trial will be a multicentre three arm individually randomised controlled trial with independent assessment at 6 week, 12 week and 26 week post-randomisation. Recruitment will occur in hospital, outpatient and primary care settings in UK hospital trusts. A total of 105 patients with homonymous hemianopia and without ocular motility impairment, visual inattention or pre-existent visual field impairment will be randomised to one of three balanced groups. Randomisation lists will be stratified by site and hemianopia level (partial or complete) and created using simple block randomisation by an independent statistician. Allocations will be disclosed to patients by the treating clinician, maintaining blinding for outcome assessment. The primary outcome will be change in visual field assessment from baseline to 26 weeks. Secondary measures will include the Rivermead Mobility Index, Visual Function Questionnaire 25/10, Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living, Euro Qual-5D and Short Form-12 questionnaires. Analysis will be by intention to treat. Ethics and dissemination This study has been developed and supported by the UK Stroke Research Network Clinical Studies Group working with service users. Multicentre ethical approval was obtained through the North West 6 Research ethics committee (Reference 10/H1003/119). The trial is funded by the UK Stroke Association. Trial Registration: Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN05956042. Dissemination will consider usual scholarly options of conference presentation and journal publication in addition to patient and public dissemination with lay summaries and articles. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN05956042

  6. BCG vaccination induces HIV target cell activation in HIV-exposed infants in a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Gasper, Melanie A.; Hesseling, Anneke C.; Mohar, Isaac; Myer, Landon; Azenkot, Tali; Passmore, Jo-Ann S.; Hanekom, Willem; Cotton, Mark F.; Crispe, I. Nicholas; Sodora, Donald L.; Jaspan, Heather B.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine is administered at birth to protect infants against tuberculosis throughout Africa, where most perinatal HIV-1 transmission occurs. We examined whether BCG vaccination alters the levels of activated HIV target T cells in HIV-exposed South African infants. METHODS. HIV-exposed infants were randomized to receive routine (at birth) or delayed (at 8 weeks) BCG vaccination. Activated and CCR5-expressing peripheral blood CD4+ T cell, monocyte, and NK cell frequencies were evaluated by flow cytometry and immune gene expression via PCR using Biomark (Fluidigm). RESULTS. Of 149 infants randomized, 92% (n = 137) were retained at 6 weeks: 71 in the routine BCG arm and 66 in the delayed arm. Routine BCG vaccination led to a 3-fold increase in systemic activation of HIV target CD4+CCR5+ T cells (HLA-DR+CD38+) at 6 weeks (0.25% at birth versus 0.08% in delayed vaccination groups; P = 0.029), which persisted until 8 weeks of age when the delayed arm was vaccinated. Vaccination of the infants in the delayed arm at 8 weeks resulted in a similar increase in activated CD4+CCR5+ T cells. The increase in activated T cells was associated with increased levels of MHC class II transactivator (CIITA), IL12RB1, and IFN-α1 transcripts within peripheral blood mononuclear cells but minimal changes in innate cells. CONCLUSION. BCG vaccination induces immune changes in HIV-exposed infants, including an increase in the proportion of activated CCR5+CD4+ HIV target cells. These findings provide insight into optimal BCG vaccine timing to minimize the risks of HIV transmissions to exposed infants while preserving potential benefits conferred by BCG vaccination. TRIAL REGISTRATION. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02062580. FUNDING. This trial was sponsored by the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation (MV-00-9-900-01871-0-00) and the Thrasher Foundation (NR-0095); for details, see Acknowledgments.

  7. A randomized single blind crossover trial comparing leather and commercial wrist splints for treating chronic wrist pain in adults

    PubMed Central

    Thiele, Jill; Nimmo, Rachel; Rowell, Wendy; Quinn, Stephen; Jones, Graeme

    2009-01-01

    Background To compare the effectiveness of a custom-made leather wrist splint (LS) with a commercially available fabric splint (FS) in adults with chronic wrist pain. Methods Participants (N = 25, mean age = 54) were randomly assigned to treatment order in a 2-phase crossover trial. Splints were worn for 2 weeks, separated by a one-week washout period. Outcomes were assessed at baseline and after each splint phase using the Australian/Canadian Osteoarthritis Hand Index (AUSCAN), the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) and Jamar dynamometer by an observer blinded to treatment allocation. Results Both styles of wrist splint significantly reduced pain (effect size LS 0.79, FS 0.43), improved hand function and increased grip strength compared to baseline (all p < 0.05) with no increase in wrist stiffness. There was a consistent trend for the LS to be superior to the FS but this was statistically significant only for patient perceived occupational performance (p = 0.008) and satisfaction (p = 0.015). Lastly, 72% of patients preferred the custom-made leather splint compared to the commercially available splint. Conclusion Leather wrist splints were superior to a commercially available fabric splint for the short-term relief of pain and dysfunction. PMID:19843345

  8. A randomised controlled trial comparing Mediwrap heat retention and forced air warming for maintaining normothermia in thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Rathinam, Sridhar; Annam, Venkatesh; Steyn, Richard; Raghuraman, Govindan

    2009-07-01

    Hypothermia is one of the common complications in the perioperative period. Currently, normothermia is maintained with forced air warming (FAW) or passive heat retention methods. We compared the efficacy of the Mediwrap blanket with FAW in maintaining normothermia during intra-operative period in thoracic surgery in a prospective randomised controlled trial on 30 patients. Core temperature was measured at 30-min intervals in the perioperative period and the time taken to attain baseline in the postoperative periods in the two groups was compared. There was no difference in core temperatures between the groups during pre- and intra-operative period, with mean+/-S.D. final core temperatures of 36.2+/-0.6 degrees C with Mediwrap and 36+/-0.9 degrees C with the FAW blanket. However, the postoperative core temperatures were significantly higher in the Mediwrap group. The time required to reach baseline temperature was lower in the Mediwrap group with a mean+/-S.D. of 66+/-66 min as compared to 161+/-108 min in the FAW group. The Mediwrap blanket is as effective as the FAW blanket in maintaining core body temperature during thoracotomy when applied thirty minutes before the surgery.

  9. Psychomotor performance after intake of zopiclone compared with intake of ethanol: a randomized, controlled, double-blinded trial.

    PubMed

    Gustavsen, Ingebjørg; Hjelmeland, Knut; Bernard, Jean Paul; Mørland, Jørg

    2011-08-01

    The sleep medicine zopiclone (eszopiclone) is commonly used in most Western countries. The focus on legislation for possible traffic-impairing nonalcohol drugs have caused a need for comparing traffic relevant behavior after intake of commonly used psychoactive drugs to blood alcohol concentrations (BACs). We aimed to compare psychomotor effects at 3 levels of behavior at different blood zopiclone concentrations to effects seen at different BACs. We performed a randomized double-blinded trial on 16 healthy volunteers who received either 10 or 5 mg zopiclone, 50 g ethanol or placebo in a crossover design. The volunteers performed computerized tests at baseline, 1, 3.5, and 6.5 hours after intake, accompanied by blood sampling. Impairment was found at all 3 behavior levels. For zopiclone, impairment was most pronounced at behavior level 1 (automotive behavior); a mean blood zopiclone concentration at 39 μg/L achieved 1 hour after intake of 10 mg zopiclone was accompanied by more impairment than BAC 0.074 %. At behavior levels 2 (control behavior) and 3 (executive planning), the psychomotor impairment accompanying approximately 39 μg/L zopiclone seemed comparable to a BAC of approximately 0.074%. No test components were impaired at 6.5 hours after intake.

  10. An Interactive Computer Session to Initiate Physical Activity in Sedentary Cardiac Patients: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Smith-Ray, Renae L; Dzewaltowski, David A; Glasgow, Russell E; Lee, Rebecca E; Thomas, Deborah SK; Xu, Stanley; Estabrooks, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Background Physical activity (PA) improves many facets of health. Despite this, the majority of American adults are insufficiently active. Adults who visit a physician complaining of chest pain and related cardiovascular symptoms are often referred for further testing. However, when this testing does not reveal an underlying disease or pathology, patients typically receive no additional standard care services. A PA intervention delivered within the clinic setting may be an effective strategy for improving the health of this population at a time when they may be motivated to take preventive action. Objective Our aim was to determine the effectiveness of a tailored, computer-based, interactive personal action planning session to initiate PA among a group of sedentary cardiac patients following exercise treadmill testing (ETT). Methods This study was part of a larger 2x2 randomized controlled trial to determine the impact of environmental and social-cognitive intervention approaches on the initiation and maintenance of weekly PA for patients post ETT. Participants who were referred to an ETT center but had a negative-test (ie, stress tests results indicated no apparent cardiac issues) were randomized to one of four treatment arms: (1) increased environmental accessibility to PA resources via the provision of a free voucher to a fitness facility in close proximity to their home or workplace (ENV), (2) a tailored social cognitive intervention (SC) using a “5 As”-based (ask, advise, assess, assist, and arrange) personal action planning tool, (3) combined intervention of both ENV and SC approaches (COMBO), or (4) a matched contact nutrition control (CON). Each intervention was delivered using a computer-based interactive session. A general linear model for repeated measures was conducted with change in PA behavior from baseline to 1-month post interactive computer session as the primary outcome. Results Sedentary participants (n=452; 34.7% participation rate) without

  11. Peers Promoting Physical Activity among Breast Cancer Survivors: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Bernardine M.; Stein, Kevin; Dunsiger, Shira

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although studies have shown that physical activity (PA) can reduce some treatment-related side-effects of breast cancer, there is a need to offer PA programs outside of research settings to reach more cancer survivors. We partnered with the American Cancer Society's Reach to Recovery program (RTR) to train their volunteers (breast cancer survivors) to deliver a 12-week PA intervention to other breast cancer survivors. Methods We conducted a randomized controlled trial to compare the PA intervention delivered by RTR volunteers (PA plus RTR) with contact control (RTR Control). Eighteen RTR volunteers/coaches (mean age=54.9 years, mean years since diagnosis=7.0) delivered the contact control condition or the PA intervention. Seventy-six breast cancer survivors in New England (mean age=55.6 years, mean years since diagnosis=1.1) were randomized to one of the two groups. At baseline, 12 weeks (post-intervention) and at 24 weeks, participants wore an accelerometer for seven days, were interviewed about their PA and reported their motivational readiness for PA. Results Adjusted mixed effects longitudinal regression models showed significant group differences favoring the PA plus RTR group in minutes of moderate to vigorous PA at 12 weeks (mean difference=103 minutes/ week, p<.001) and 24 weeks (mean difference=34.7 minutes/week, p=.03). Results were corroborated with significant group differences in accelerometer data favoring the PA plus RTR group at both time-points. Conclusions Peer volunteers were able to significantly increase PA among cancer survivors relative to contact control. Partnerships with existing volunteer programs can help to widen the reach of behavioral interventions among cancer survivors. PMID:25110844

  12. Magnitude of placebo response and response variance in antidepressant clinical trials using structured, taped and appraised rater interviews compared to traditional rating interviews.

    PubMed

    Khan, Arif; Faucett, James; Brown, Walter A

    2014-04-01

    The high failure rate of antidepressant clinical trials is due in part to a high magnitude of placebo response and considerable variance in placebo response. In some recent trials enhanced patient interview techniques consisting of Structured Interview Guide for the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (SIGMA) interviews, audiotaping of patient interviews and 'central' appraisal with Rater Applied Performance Scale (RAPS) criteria have been implemented in the hope of increasing reliability and thus reducing the placebo response. However, the data supporting this rationale for a change in patient interview technique are sparse. We analyzed data from depressed patients assigned to placebo in antidepressant clinical trials conducted at a single research site between 2008 and 2012. Three trials included 34 depressed patients undergoing SIGMA depression interviews with taping and RAPS appraisal and 4 trials included 128 depressed patients using traditional interview methods. Using patient level data we assessed the mean decrease in total MADRS scores and the variability of the decrease in MADRS scores in trials using SIGMA interviews versus trials using traditional interviews. Mean decrease in total MADRS score was significantly higher in the 3 trials that used SIGMA interviews compared to the 4 trials using traditional interviews (M = 13.0 versus 8.3, t(df = 160) = 2.04, p = 0.047). Furthermore, trials using SIGMA had a larger magnitude of response variance based on Levene's test for equality of variance (SD = 12.3 versus 9.4, F = 7.3, p = 0.008). The results of our study suggest that enhanced patient interview techniques such as SIGMA interviews, audiotaping and RAPS appraisal may not result in the intended effect of reducing the magnitude of placebo response and placebo variance.

  13. Treatment of Acute Coronary Syndrome by Telemedically Supported Paramedics Compared With Physician-Based Treatment: A Prospective, Interventional, Multicenter Trial

    PubMed Central

    Brokmann, Jörg C; Conrad, Clemens; Rossaint, Rolf; Bergrath, Sebastian; Beckers, Stefan K; Tamm, Miriam; Czaplik, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Prehospital treatment of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in German emergency medical services (EMSs) is reserved for EMS physicians due to legal issues. Objective The objective of this prospective, interventional, multicenter trial was to evaluate the quality of telemedically-delegated therapy and the possible complications in patients with ACS. Methods After approval by the ethics committee and trial registration, a one-year study phase was started in August 2012 with 5 ambulances, telemedically equipped and staffed with paramedics, in 4 German EMS districts. The paramedics could contact an EMS-physician–staffed telemedicine center. After initiation of an audio connection, real-time data transmission was automatically established. If required, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and still pictures could be sent. Video was streamed from inside each ambulance. All drugs, including opioids, were delegated to the paramedics based on standardized, predefined algorithms. To compare telemedically-delegated medication and treatment in ACS cases with regular EMS missions, a matched pair analysis with historical controls was performed. Results Teleconsultation was performed on 150 patients having a cardiovascular emergency. In 39 cases, teleconsultation was started due to suspected ACS. No case had a medical complication. Correct handling of 12-lead ECG was performed equally between the groups (study group, n=38 vs control group, n=39, P>.99). There were no differences in correct handling of intravenous administration of acetylsalicylic acid, heparin, or morphine between both the groups (study group vs control group): acetylsalicylic acid, n=31 vs n=33, P=.73; unfractionated heparin, n=34 vs n=33, P>.99; morphine, n=29 vs n=27, P=.50. The correct handling of oxygen administration was significantly higher in the study group (n=29 vs n=18, P=.007). Conclusions Telemedical delegation of guideline conform medication and therapy by paramedics in patients with ACS and was

  14. Parent-Targeted Mobile Phone Intervention to Increase Physical Activity in Sedentary Children: Randomized Pilot Trial

    PubMed Central

    Marker, Arwen M; Allen, H Raymond; Machtmes, Ryan; Han, Hongmei; Johnson, William D; Schuna Jr, John M; Broyles, Stephanie T; Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Church, Timothy S

    2014-01-01

    Background Low levels of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity are associated with adverse health consequences. Objective The intent of the study was to determine the feasibility and efficacy of a 12-week physical activity promotion program targeting children, which was delivered to parents through mobile phones. Methods Potential participants were recruited through advertisements placed in the newspaper, local hospitals and schools, and an email listserv. Sedentary children aged 6-10 years were randomly assigned to a minimal (MIG) or intensive (IIG) intervention group. Parents in the MIG were given a goal to increase (within 1 month) and maintain their child’s activity at 6000 pedometer steps/day above their baseline levels and to monitor their child’s steps daily. Parents in the IIG were given the same steps/day and monitoring goals, in addition to text messages and articles containing additional behavioral strategies (based on the Social Cognitive Theory) designed to promote their child’s physical activity. The intervention components were delivered via mobile phone. Anthropometrics, body composition, and questionnaires were administered in a clinic. Children wore a New Lifestyles pedometer (NL-1000) each day throughout the intervention and parents were to monitor their child’s step counts daily. Results Out of 59 children who screened for the study, a total of 27 children (mean age 8.7, SD 1.4 years; 56%, 15/27 female; 59%, 16/27 African American) were enrolled and completed the study. Overall, 97.90% (2220/2268; 98.20%, 1072/1092 for MIG; 97.60%, 1148/1176 for IIG) of expected step data were successfully entered by the parent or study coordinator. Parents in the MIG and IIG were sent approximately 7 and 13 text messages per week, respectively, averaged over the course of the study. IIG parents accessed an average of 6.1 (SD 4.4) articles over the course of the intervention and accessed a fewer number of articles in the last month compared to the first

  15. Comparative trial of the WHO ASSIST-linked brief intervention and simple advice for substance abuse in primary care.

    PubMed

    Assanangkornchai, Sawitri; Nima, Patimoh; McNeil, Edward B; Edwards, J Guy

    2015-12-01

    To help decrease the burden of substance-related problems, the World Health Organization developed the Alcohol, Smoking, Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST) - a sensitive screening questionnaire to help identify misuse of alcohol and other substances - linked to Brief Intervention (BI). This paper compares the effectiveness of the ASSIST followed either by its linked BI or by simple advice (SA). The trial was conducted in southern Thailand. The ASSIST was used to screen patients attending primary care units and categorise them into 'low-risk', 'moderate-risk' and 'high-risk' groups. Patients at 'moderate-risk' were randomised to receive ASSIST-linked BI (n=120) or SA (n=116). The outcome measures were changes in the ASSIST-Specific Substance Involvement Scores (ASSIST-SSIS), ASSIST-Total Substance Involvement Scores (ASSIST-TSIS) and proportions of patients whose scores at three and six months had decreased from the 'moderate-risk' to 'low-risk' category. 147 patients (72 BI; 75 SA) completed the six-month trial. There were significant reductions in both ASSIST-SSIS and ASSIST-TSIS, with no significant difference between groups. The percentages of patients converted to the 'low-risk' category were 36.7% and 38.8% at month 3, and 53.3% and 53.4% at month 6, for the BI and SA groups, respectively. In conclusion, in primary care administering the ASSIST and telling patients their score, followed either by formal brief intervention or simple advice, are equally effective in decreasing substance use for up to six months.

  16. Meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials comparing particular doses of griseofulvin and terbinafine for the treatment of tinea capitis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aditya K; Drummond-Main, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Two oral antifungal agents, griseofulvin and terbinafine, have regulatory approval in the United States, but it is unknown whether one has superior overall efficacy. Genus-specific differences in efficacy are believed to exist for the two agents. It is not clear at what doses and durations of treatment these differences apply. The goals of this meta-analysis were to determine whether a statistically significant difference in efficacy exists between these agents at a given dose and duration of each in tinea capitis infections overall and to determine whether a genus-specific difference in efficacy exists for these two treatments at a given dose and duration of each. We performed a literature search for clinically and methodologically similar randomized controlled trials comparing 8 weeks of griseofulvin (6.25-12.5 mg/kg/day) to 4 weeks of terbinafine (3.125-6.25 mg/kg/day) in the treatment of tinea capitis. A meta-analysis was performed using the Mantel-Haenszel method and random effects model; results were expressed as odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals. Meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials did not show a significant difference in the overall efficacy of the two drugs at the doses specified, but specific efficacy differences were observed based on the infectious species. For tinea capitis caused by Microsporum spp., griseofulvin is superior (p = 0.04), whereas terbinafine is superior for Trichophyton spp. infection (p = 0.04). Our results support species-specific differences in treatment efficacy between griseofulvin and terbinafine and provide a clinical context in which this knowledge may be applied.

  17. Laser Hemorrhoidoplasty Procedure vs Open Surgical Hemorrhoidectomy: a Trial Comparing 2 Treatments for Hemorrhoids of Third and Fourth Degree

    PubMed Central

    Maloku, Halit; Gashi, Zaim; Lazovic, Ranko; Islami, Hilmi; Juniku-Shkololli, Argjira

    2014-01-01

    Objective: According to the ‘‘vascular’’ theory, arterial overflow in the superior hemorrhoidal arteries would lead to dilatation of the hemorrhoidal venous plexus. Hemorrhoid laser procedure (LHP) is a new laser procedure for outpatient treatment of hemorrhoids in which hemorrhoidal arterial flow feeding the hemorrhoidal plexus is stopped by laser coagulation. Aim: Our aim was to compare the hemorrhoid laser procedure with open surgical procedure for outpatient treatment of symptomatic hemorrhoids. Material and method: A comparison trial between hemorrhoid laser procedure or open surgical hemorrhoidectomy was made. This study was conducted at Aloka hospital in Kosovo. Patients with symptomatic grade III or grade IV hemorrhoids with minimal or complete mucosal prolapse were eligible for the study: 20 patients treated with the laser hemorrhoidoplasty, and 20 patients–with open surgery hemorrhoidectomy. Operative time and postoperative pain with visual analog scale, were evaluated. Results: A total number of 40 patients (23 men and 17 women, mean age, 46 years) entered the trial. Significant differences between laser hemorrhoidoplasty and open surgical procedure were observed in operative time and early postoperative pain. There was a statistically significant difference between the two groups regarding the early postoperative period: 1 week, 2 weeks, 3 weeks and 1 month after respective procedure (p<0.01). The procedure time for LHP was 15.94 min vs. 26.76 min for open surgery (p<0.01). Conclusion: The laser hemorrhoidoplasty procedure was more effective than open surgical hemorrhoidectomy. Postoperative pain and duration time are only two indicators for this difference between there procedures. PMID:25684841

  18. Which older people decline participation in a primary care trial of physical activity and why: insights from a mixed methods approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Physical activity is of vital importance to older peoples’ health. Physical activity intervention studies with older people often have low recruitment, yet little is known about non-participants. Methods Patients aged 60–74 years from three UK general practices were invited to participate in a nurse-supported pedometer-based walking intervention. Demographic characteristics of 298 participants and 690 non-participants were compared. Health status and physical activity of 298 participants and 183 non-participants who completed a survey were compared using age, sex adjusted odds ratios (OR) (95% confidence intervals). 15 non-participants were interviewed to explore perceived barriers to participation. Results Recruitment was 30% (298/988). Participants were more likely than non-participants to be female (54% v 47%; p = 0.04) and to live in affluent postcodes (73% v 62% in top quintile; p < 0.001). Participants were more likely than non-participants who completed the survey to have an occupational pension OR 2.06 (1.35-3.13), a limiting longstanding illness OR 1.72 (1.05-2.79) and less likely to report being active OR 0.55 (0.33-0.93) or walking fast OR 0.56 (0.37-0.84). Interviewees supported general practice-based physical activity studies, particularly walking, but barriers to participation included: already sufficiently active, reluctance to walk alone or at night, physical symptoms, depression, time constraints, trial equipment and duration. Conclusion Gender and deprivation differences suggest some selection bias. However, trial participants reported more health problems and lower activity than non-participants who completed the survey, suggesting appropriate trial selection in a general practice population. Non-participant interviewees indicated that shorter interventions, addressing physical symptoms and promoting confidence in pursuing physical activity, might increase trial recruitment and uptake of practice-based physical activity

  19. Comparing a Video and Text Version of a Web-Based Computer-Tailored Intervention for Obesity Prevention: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Oenema, Anke; Lechner, Lilian; de Vries, Hein

    2015-01-01

    Background Web-based computer-tailored interventions often suffer from small effect sizes and high drop-out rates, particularly among people with a low level of education. Using videos as a delivery format can possibly improve the effects and attractiveness of these interventions Objective The main aim of this study was to examine the effects of a video and text version of a Web-based computer-tailored obesity prevention intervention on dietary intake, physical activity, and body mass index (BMI) among Dutch adults. A second study aim was to examine differences in appreciation between the video and text version. The final study aim was to examine possible differences in intervention effects and appreciation per educational level. Methods A three-armed randomized controlled trial was conducted with a baseline and 6 months follow-up measurement. The intervention consisted of six sessions, lasting about 15 minutes each. In the video version, the core tailored information was provided by means of videos. In the text version, the same tailored information was provided in text format. Outcome variables were self-reported and included BMI, physical activity, energy intake, and appreciation of the intervention. Multiple imputation was used to replace missing values. The effect analyses were carried out with multiple linear regression analyses and adjusted for confounders. The process evaluation data were analyzed with independent samples t tests. Results The baseline questionnaire was completed by 1419 participants and the 6 months follow-up measurement by 1015 participants (71.53%). No significant interaction effects of educational level were found on any of the outcome variables. Compared to the control condition, the video version resulted in lower BMI (B=-0.25, P=.049) and lower average daily energy intake from energy-dense food products (B=-175.58, P<.001), while the text version had an effect only on energy intake (B=-163.05, P=.001). No effects on physical activity

  20. Comparing Benefits from Many Possible Computed Tomography Lung Cancer Screening Programs: Extrapolating from the National Lung Screening Trial Using Comparative Modeling

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Pamela M.; Meza, Rafael; Plevritis, Sylvia K.; Black, William C.; Tammemagi, C. Martin; Erdogan, Ayca; ten Haaf, Kevin; Hazelton, William; Holford, Theodore R.; Jeon, Jihyoun; Clarke, Lauren; Kong, Chung Yin; Choi, Sung Eun; Munshi, Vidit N.; Han, Summer S.; van Rosmalen, Joost; Pinsky, Paul F.; Moolgavkar, Suresh

    2014-01-01

    Background The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) demonstrated that in current and former smokers aged 55 to 74 years, with at least 30 pack-years of cigarette smoking history and who had quit smoking no more than 15 years ago, 3 annual computed tomography (CT) screens reduced lung cancer-specific mortality by 20% relative to 3 annual chest X-ray screens. We compared the benefits achievable with 576 lung cancer screening programs that varied CT screen number and frequency, ages of screening, and eligibility based on smoking. Methods and Findings We used five independent microsimulation models with lung cancer natural history parameters previously calibrated to the NLST to simulate life histories of the US cohort born in 1950 under all 576 programs. ‘Efficient’ (within model) programs prevented the greatest number of lung cancer deaths, compared to no screening, for a given number of CT screens. Among 120 ‘consensus efficient’ (identified as efficient across models) programs, the average starting age was 55 years, the stopping age was 80 or 85 years, the average minimum pack-years was 27, and the maximum years since quitting was 20. Among consensus efficient programs, 11% to 40% of the cohort was screened, and 153 to 846 lung cancer deaths were averted per 100,000 people. In all models, annual screening based on age and smoking eligibility in NLST was not efficient; continuing screening to age 80 or 85 years was more efficient. Conclusions Consensus results from five models identified a set of efficient screening programs that include annual CT lung cancer screening using criteria like NLST eligibility but extended to older ages. Guidelines for screening should also consider harms of screening and individual patient characteristics. PMID:24979231

  1. Apnea after awake-regional and general anesthesia in infants: The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study: comparing apnea and neurodevelopmental outcomes, a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Andrew J.; Morton, Neil S.; Arnup, Sarah J.; de Graaff, Jurgen C.; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E.; Frawley, Geoff; Hunt, Rodney W.; Hardy, Pollyanna; Khotcholava, Magda; von Ungern Sternberg, Britta S.; Wilton, Niall; Tuo, Pietro; Salvo, Ida; Ormond, Gillian; Stargatt, Robyn; Locatelli, Bruno Guido; McCann, Mary Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Background Post-operative apnea is a complication in young infants. Awake-regional anesthesia (RA) may reduce the risk; however the evidence is weak. The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study is a randomized, controlled, trial designed to assess the influence of general anesthesia (GA) on neurodevelopment. A secondary aim is to compare rates of apnea after anesthesia. Methods Infants ≤ 60 weeks postmenstrual age scheduled for inguinal herniorraphy were randomized to RA or GA. Exclusion criteria included risk factors for adverse neurodevelopmental outcome and infants born < 26 weeks’ gestation. The primary outcome of this analysis was any observed apnea up to 12 hours post-operatively. Apnea assessment was unblinded. Results 363 patients were assigned to RA and 359 to GA. Overall the incidence of apnea (0 to 12 hours) was similar between arms (3% in RA and 4% in GA arms, Odds Ratio (OR) 0.63, 95% Confidence Intervals (CI): 0.31 to 1.30, P=0.2133), however the incidence of early apnea (0 to 30 minutes) was lower in the RA arm (1% versus 3%, OR 0.20, 95%CI: 0.05 to 0.91, P=0.0367). The incidence of late apnea (30 minutes to 12 hours) was 2% in both RA and GA arms (OR 1.17, 95%CI: 0.41 to 3.33, P=0.7688). The strongest predictor of apnea was prematurity (OR 21.87, 95% CI 4.38 to 109.24) and 96% of infants with apnea were premature. Conclusions RA in infants undergoing inguinal herniorraphy reduces apnea in the early post-operative period. Cardio-respiratory monitoring should be used for all ex-premature infants. PMID:26001033

  2. Comparative Effectiveness of Web-Based vs. Educator-Delivered HIV Prevention for Adolescent Substance Users: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Marsch, Lisa A.; Guarino, Honoria; Grabinski, Michael J.; Syckes, Cassandra; Dillingham, Elaine T.; Xie, Haiyi; Crosier, Benjamin S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Young people who engage in substance use are at risk for becoming infected with HIV and diseases with similar transmission dynamics. Effective disease prevention programs delivered by prevention specialists exist but are rarely provided in systems of care due to staffing/resource constraints and operational barriers - and are thus of limited reach. Web-based prevention interventions could possibly offer an effective alternative to prevention specialist-delivered interventions and may enable widespread, cost-effective access to evidence-based prevention programming. Previous research has shown the HIV/disease prevention program within the web-based Therapeutic Education System (TES) to be an effective adjunct to a prevention specialist-delivered intervention. The present study was the first randomized, clinical trial to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of this web-based intervention as a standalone intervention relative to a traditional, prevention specialist-delivered intervention. Methods Adolescents entering outpatient treatment for substance use participated in this multi-site trial. Participants were randomly assigned to either a traditional intervention delivered by a prevention specialist (n = 72) or the web-delivered TES intervention (n = 69). Intervention effectiveness was assessed by evaluating changes in participants’ knowledge about HIV, hepatitis, and sexually transmitted infections, intentions to engage in safer sex, sex-related risk behavior, self-efficacy to use condoms, and condom use skills. Findings Participants in the TES intervention achieved significant and comparable increases in HIV/disease-related knowledge, condom use self-efficacy, and condom use skills and comparable decreases in HIV risk behavior relative to participants who received the intervention delivered by a prevention specialist. Participants rated TES as easier to understand. Conclusion This study indicates that TES is as effective as HIV/disease prevention

  3. The cameroon mobile phone sms (CAMPS) trial: a protocol for a randomized controlled trial of mobile phone text messaging versus usual care for improving adherence to highly active anti-retroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This trial aims at testing the efficacy of weekly reminder and motivational text messages, compared to usual care in improving adherence to Highly Active Antiretroviral Treatment in patients attending a clinic in Yaoundé, Cameroon. Methods and Design This is a single-centered randomized controlled single-blinded trial. A central computer generated randomization list will be generated using random block sizes. Allocation will be determined by sequentially numbered sealed opaque envelopes. 198 participants will either receive the mobile phone text message or usual care. Our hypothesis is that weekly motivational text messages can improve adherence to Highly Active Antiretroviral Treatment and other clinical outcomes in the control group by acting as a reminder, a cue to action and opening communication channels. Data will be collected at baseline, three months and six months. A blinded program secretary will send out text messages and record delivery. Our primary outcomes are adherence measured by the visual analogue scale, self report, and pharmacy refill data. Our secondary outcomes are clinical: weight, body mass index, opportunistic infections, all cause mortality and retention; biological: Cluster Designation 4 count and viral load; and quality of life. Analysis will be by intention-to-treat. Covariates and subgroups will be taken into account. Discussion This trial investigates the potential of SMS motivational reminders to improve adherence to Highly Active Antiretroviral Treatment in Cameroon. The intervention targets non-adherence due to forgetfulness and other forms of non-adherence. Trial Registration Pan-African Clinical Trials Registry PACTR201011000261458 http://clinicaltrials.gov/ NCT01247181 PMID:21211064

  4. Multisystemic Therapy Compared to Telephone Support for Youth with Poorly Controlled Diabetes: Findings From A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Deborah A.; Naar-King, Sylvie; Chen, Xinguang; Moltz, Kathleen; Cunningham, Phillippe B.; Idalski-Carcone, April

    2012-01-01

    Background Few interventions have effectively improved health outcomes among youth with diabetes in chronic poor metabolic control. Purpose To determine whether Multisystemic Therapy (MST), an intensive, home-based, tailored family treatment, was superior to weekly telephone support for improving regimen adherence and metabolic control among adolescents with chronic poor metabolic control. Methods A randomized controlled trial was conducted with 146 adolescents with type 1 or 2 diabetes. Data were collected at baseline, seven months (treatment termination) and twelve months (six month follow-up). Results Adolescents receiving MST had significantly improved metabolic control at seven (1.01% decrease) and twelve months (0.74% decrease) compared to adolescents in telephone support. Parents of adolescents receiving MST reported significant improvements in adolescent adherence. However, adolescent-reported adherence was unchanged. Conclusions MST improved health outcomes among adolescents with chronic poor metabolic control when compared to telephone support. Home-based approaches may provide a viable means to improve access to behavioral interventions for such youth. PMID:22644587

  5. Peripheral Nerve Stimulation Compared to Usual Care for Pain Relief of Hemiplegic Shoulder Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Richard D.; Gunzler, Douglas D.; Bennett, Maria E.; Chae, John

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study seeks to establish the efficacy of single-lead, 3-week peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) therapy for pain reduction in stroke survivors with chronic hemiplegic shoulder pain. Design Single-site, pilot, randomized controlled trial for adults with chronic shoulder pain after stroke. Participants were randomized to receive a 3-week treatment of single-lead PNS or usual care (UC). The primary outcome was the worst pain in the last week (Brief Pain Inventory, Short Form question 3) measured at baseline, and weeks 1,4, 12, and 16. Secondary outcomes included pain interference (Brief Pain Inventory, Short Form question 9), pain measured by the ShoulderQ Visual Graphic Rating Scales; and health-related quality of life (SF-36v2). Results Twenty-five participants were recruited, 13 to PNS and 12 to UC. There was a significantly greater reduction in pain for the PNS group compared to controls, with significant differences at 6 and 12 weeks after treatment. Both PNS and UC were associated with significant improvements in pain interference and physical health related quality of life. Conclusions Short-term PNS is a safe and efficacious treatment for shoulder pain. Pain reduction is greater than compared to UC and is maintained for at least 12 weeks after treatment. PMID:24355994

  6. Online assessment of ALS functional rating scale compares well to in-clinic evaluation: A prospective trial

    PubMed Central

    Maier, André; Holm, Teresa; Wicks, Paul; Steinfurth, Laura; Linke, Peter; Münch, Christoph; Meyer, Robert; Meyer, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Self-assessment of symptom progression in chronic diseases is of increasing importance in clinical research, patient management and specialized outpatient care. Against this background, we developed a secure internet platform (ALShome.de) that allows online assessment of the revised ALS Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS-R) and other established self-assessment questionnaires. We developed a secure and closed internet portal to assess patient reported outcomes. In a prospective, controlled and stratified study, patients conducted a web-based self-assessment of ALSFRS-R compared to on-site assessment. On-site and online assessments were compared at baseline (n = 127) and after 3.5 months (n = 81, 64%). Results showed that correlation between on-site evaluation and online testing of ALSFRS-R was highly significant (r = 0.96; p < 0.001). The agreement of both capturing methods (online vs. on-site) was excellent (mean interval, 8.8 days). The adherence to online rating was high; 75% of patients tested on-site completed a follow-up online visit (mean 3.5 months, SD 1.7). We conclude that online self-assessment of ALS severity complements the well-established face-to-face application of the ALSFRS-R during on-site visits. The results of our study support the use of online administration of ALSFRS-R within clinical trials and for managing the care of ALS patients. PMID:22292842

  7. A Small Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial Comparing Mobile and Traditional Pain Coping Skills Training Protocols for Cancer Patients with Pain

    PubMed Central

    Westbrook, Kelly W.; Kimmick, Gretchen G.; Shelby, Rebecca A.; Abernethy, Amy P.; Keefe, Francis J.

    2016-01-01

    Psychosocial pain management interventions are efficacious for cancer pain but are underutilized. Recent advances in mobile health (mHealth) technologies provide new opportunities to decrease barriers to access psychosocial pain management interventions. The objective of this study was to gain information about the accessibility and efficacy of mobile pain coping skills training (mPCST) intervention delivered to cancer patients with pain compared to traditional in-person pain coping skills training intervention. This study randomly assigned participants (N = 30) to receive either mobile health pain coping skills training intervention delivered via Skype or traditional pain coping skills training delivered face-to-face (PCST-trad). This pilot trial suggests that mPCST is feasible, presents low burden to patients, may lead to high patient engagement, and appears to be acceptable to patients. Cancer patients with pain in the mPCST group reported decreases in pain severity and physical symptoms as well as increases in self-efficacy for pain management that were comparable to changes in the PCST-trad group (p's < 0.05). These findings suggest that mPCST, which is a highly accessible intervention, may provide benefits similar to an in-person intervention and shows promise for being feasible, acceptable, and engaging to cancer patients with pain. PMID:27891252

  8. A multicenter randomized trial comparing rabeprazole and itopride in patients with functional dyspepsia in Japan: the NAGOYA study

    PubMed Central

    Kamiya, Takeshi; Shikano, Michiko; Kubota, Eiji; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Wada, Tsuneya; Tanida, Satoshi; Kataoka, Hiromi; Adachi, Hiroshi; Hirako, Makoto; Okuda, Noriaki; Joh, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were to compare the therapeutic effects of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI), rabeprazole (RPZ), and a prokinetic agent, itopride (ITO), and to investigate the role of PPI in the treatment strategy for Japanese functional dyspepsia (FD) patients. We randomly assigned 134 patients diagnosed by Rome III criteria to 4 weeks treatment with RPZ 10 mg/day (n = 69) or ITO 150 mg/day (n = 65). Dyspeptic symptoms were evaluated using FD scores at baseline and after 1, 2 and 4 weeks of treatment. We also divided subjects into predominantly epigastric pain syndrome (EPS) or postprandial distress syndrome (PDS), and evaluated the efficacy of RPZ and ITO respectively. RPZ showed a significant decrease in the Rate of Change (RC) in FD score within 1 week, which was maintained until after 4 weeks, with RPZ a significant effect compared with ITO at all evaluation points. In addition, RPZ showed a significant decrease in FD score in subjects with both EPS and PDS, whereas a significant decrease in the RC with ITO was only shown in those with predominant PDS. Acid-suppressive therapy with RPZ is useful for PDS as well EPS in Japanese FD patients (UMIN Clinical Trials Registry number: UMIN 000013962). PMID:28366993

  9. Eight-year results of the Spiesser study, a randomized trial comparing de novo sirolimus and cyclosporine in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gatault, Philippe; Bertrand, Dominique; Büchler, Matthias; Colosio, Charlotte; Hurault de Ligny, Bruno; Weestel, Pierre-François; Rerolle, Jean-Philippe; Thierry, Antoine; Sayegh, Johnny; Moulin, Bruno; Snanoudj, Renaud; Rivalan, Joseph; Heng, Anne-Elisabeth; Sautenet, Bénédicte; Lebranchu, Yvon

    2016-01-01

    We present the results at 8 years of the Spiesser study, a randomized trial comparing de novo sirolimus and cyclosporine in kidney transplant recipients at low immunologic risk. We assessed estimated glomerular filtration (eGFR), graft, patient, and death-censored graft survival (log-rank compared), de novo DSA appearance, risk of malignancy, post-transplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM), and anemia. Intent-to-treat and on-treatment analyses were performed. Graft survival was similar in both groups (sirolimus: 73.3%, cyclosporine: 77.7, P = 0.574). No difference was observed between treatment groups concerning patient survival (P = 0.508) and death-censored graft survival (P = 0.858). In conditional intent-to-treat analysis, mean eGFR was greater in sirolimus than in cyclosporine group (62.5 ± 27.3 ml/min vs. 47.8 ± 17.1 ml/min, P = 0.004), in particular because graft function was excellent in patients maintained under sirolimus (eGFR = 74.0 ml/min). Importantly, no detrimental impact was observed in patients in whom sirolimus has been withdrawn (eGFR = 49.5 ml/min). Overall, 17 patients showed de novo DSAs, with no difference between the two groups (P = 0.520). Malignancy did not differ by treatment. An initial maintenance regimen based on sirolimus provides a long-term improvement in renal function for kidney transplant patients, especially for those maintained on sirolimus.

  10. Efficacy and safety profiles of manidipine compared with amlodipine: A meta-analysis of head-to-head trials

    PubMed Central

    RICHY, FLORENT F; LAURENT, STEPHANE

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to compare the efficacy and safety profile of manidipine 20 mg with that of amlodipine 10 mg. A systematic research of quantitative data produced or published between 1995 and 2009 was performed. Head-to-head randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of 12 months minimum duration reporting comparative efficacy (changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressure) and safety (total adverse events and ankle oedema), were included. Four high-quality RCTs, accounting for 838 patients (436 received manidipine and 402 received amlodipine) were included. The effi cacy of manidipine and amlodipine was statistically equivalent: effect size for DBP =−0.08 (p = 0.22) and SBP =−0.01 (p =0.83).The global safety of manidipine was signifi cantly better than amlodipine: the relative risk (RR) for adverse event was 0.69 (0.56 – 0.85), and particularly for ankle oedema RR was 0.35 (0.22 – 0.54). Publication bias was not signifi cant and the robustness of the analyses was good. These data suggest a better efficacy/safety ratio of manidipine over amlodipine. PMID:20945994

  11. Exercise training alone or with the addition of activity counseling improves physical activity levels in COPD: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Lahham, Aroub; McDonald, Christine F; Holland, Anne E

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical inactivity is associated with poor outcomes in COPD, and as a result, interventions to improve physical activity (PA) are a current research focus. However, many trials have been small and inconclusive. Objective The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to study the effects of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) targeting PA in COPD. Methods Databases (Physiotherapy Evidence Database [PEDro], Embase, MEDLINE, CINAHL and the Cochrane Central Register for Controlled Trials) were searched using the following keywords: “COPD”, “intervention” and “physical activity” from inception to May 20, 2016; published RCTs that aimed to increase PA in individuals with COPD were included. The PEDro scale was used to rate study quality. Standardized mean differences (effect sizes, ESs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were determined. Effects of included interventions were also measured according to the minimal important difference (MID) in daily steps for COPD (599 daily steps). Results A total of 37 RCTs with 4,314 participants (mean forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) % predicted 50.5 [SD=10.4]) were identified. Interventions including exercise training (ET; n=3 studies, 103 participants) significantly increased PA levels in COPD compared to standard care (ES [95% CI]; 0.84 [0.44–1.25]). The addition of activity counseling to pulmonary rehabilitation (PR; n=4 studies, 140 participants) showed important effects on PA levels compared to PR alone (0.47 [0.02–0.92]), achieving significant increases that exceeded the MID for daily steps in COPD (mean difference [95% CI], 1,452 daily steps [549–2,356]). Reporting of methodological quality was poor in most included RCTs. Conclusion Interventions that included ET and PA counseling during PR were effective strategies to improve PA in COPD. PMID:27994451

  12. Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment versus an Active Control for Children and Adolescents with Anxiety Disorders: A Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Jennifer L.; Rapee, Ronald M.; Deveney, Charise; Schniering, Carolyn A.; Lyneham, Heidi J.; Bavopoulos, Nataly

    2009-01-01

    Specific delivery of cognitive-behavioral skills is more effective in treating childhood anxiety compared to treatment that contains only nonspecific therapy factors. The findings are based on a randomized trial involving 112 children aged 7-16 years.

  13. Study Protocol: A randomized controlled trial of patient navigation-activation to reduce cancer health disparities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cancer health disparities affecting low-income and minority patients are well documented. Root-causes are multifactorial, including diagnostic and treatment delays, social and financial barriers, and poor communication. Patient navigation and communication coaching (activation) are potential interventions to address disparities in cancer treatment. The purpose of this clinical trial is to test the effectiveness of an intervention combining patient navigation and activation to improve cancer treatment. Methods/Design The Rochester Patient Navigation Research Program (PNRP) is a National Cancer Institute-sponsored, patient-level randomized trial (RCT) of patient navigation and activation, targeting newly-diagnosed breast and colorectal cancer patients in Rochester, NY. The goal of the program is to decrease cancer health disparities by addressing barriers to receipt of cancer care and promoting patient self-efficacy. The intervention uses trained, paraprofessional patient navigators recruited from the target community, and a detailed training and supervisory program. Recruited patients are randomly assigned to receive either usual care (except for baseline and follow-up questionnaires and interviews) or intervention. The intervention patients receive tailored assistance from their patient navigators, including phone calls, in-person meetings, and behind-the-scenes coordination of care. A total of 344 patients have been recruited. Outcomes measured at three month intervals include timeliness of care, patient adherence, patient satisfaction, quality of life, self-efficacy, health literacy, and cancer knowledge. Discussion This unique intervention combining patient navigation and patient activation is designed to address the multifactorial problem of cancer health disparities. If successful, this study will affect the design and implementation of patient navigation programs. Trials Registration clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00496678 PMID:20939928

  14. A prospective randomized controlled multicentre trial comparing intravesical DMSO and chondroïtin sulphate 2% for painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Tutolo, Manuela; Ammirati, Enrico; Castagna, Giulia; Klockaerts, Katrien; Plancke, Hendrik; Ost, Dieter; der Aa, Frank Van; Ridder, Dirk De

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To compare effectiveness of intravesical chondroïtin sulphate (CS) 2% and dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) 50% in patients with painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis (PBS/IC). Materials and methods Patients were randomized to receive either 6 weekly instillations of CS 2% or 50% DMSO. Primary endpoint was difference in proportion of patients achieving score 6 (moderately improved) or 7 (markedly improved) in both groups using the Global Response Assessment (GRA) scale. Secondary parameters were mean 24-hours frequency and nocturia on a 3-day micturition dairy, changes from baseline in O’Leary-Sant questionnaire score and visual analog scale (VAS) for suprapubic pain. Results Thirty-six patients were the intention to treat population (22 in CS and 14 in DMSO group). In DMSO group, 57% withdrew consent and only 6 concluded the trial. Major reasons were pain during and after instillation, intolerable garlic odor and lack of efficacy. In CS group, 27% withdrew consent. Compared with DMSO group, more patients in CS group (72.7% vs. 14%) reported moderate or marked improvement (P=0.002, 95% CI 0.05-0.72) and achieved a reduction in VAS scores (20% vs. 8.3%). CS group performed significantly better in pain reduction (-1.2 vs. -0.6) and nocturia (-2.4 vs. -0.7) and better in total O’Leary reduction (-9.8 vs. -7.2). CS was better tolerated. The trial was stopped due to high number of drop-outs with DMSO. Conclusions Intravesical CS 2% is viable treatment for PBS/IC with minimal side effects. DMSO should be used with caution and with active monitoring of side effects. More randomized controlled studies on intravesical treatments are needed. PMID:28124536

  15. Antianaerobic Activity of Sulopenem Compared to Six Other Agents ▿

    PubMed Central

    Ednie, Lois M.; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    2009-01-01

    Agar dilution MIC methodology was used to compare the activity of sulopenem with those of amoxicillin/clavulanate, ampicillin/sulbactam, piperacillin-tazobactam, imipenem, clindamycin, and metronidazole against 431 anaerobes. Overall, MIC50/90 values were as follows: sulopenem, 0.25/1.0 μg/ml; amoxicillin/clavulanate, 0.5/2.0 μg/ml; ampicillin/sulbactam, 0.5/4.0 μg/ml; piperacillin/tazobactam, 0.25/8.0 μg/ml; imipenem, 0.06/1.0 μg/ml; clindamycin, 0.25/16.0 μg/ml; and metronidazole, 1.0/4.0 μg/ml. PMID:19223615

  16. Mediators Affecting Girls’ Levels of Physical Activity Outside of School: Findings from the Trial of Activity in Adolescent Girls

    PubMed Central

    Lytle, Leslie A.; Murray, David M.; Evenson, Kelly R.; Moody, Jamie; Pratt, Charlotte A.; Metcalfe, Lauve; Parra-Medina, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    Background Providing after school activities is a community level approach for reducing the decline in physical activity of girls as they reach early adolescence. Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine psychosocial, environmental, and behavioral factors as potential mediators of after school physical activity in adolescent girls. Methods We assessed objectively measured levels of physical activity occurring outside of school and potential predictors and mediators of activity in girls participating in the Trial of Activity in Adolescent Girls (TAAG). Results We found that the TAAG intervention had a statistically significant and positive effect on out of school activity in the 2006 cohort. Self-efficacy, friends’ social support, total social support, and difficulty getting to and from community activities mediated the level of moderate to vigorous physical activity in girls. Conclusions Parents, communities, and schools should provide and enhance opportunities outside of the school day for adolescents to be active. Reducing transportation barriers and enlisting social support appear to be key. PMID:20012810

  17. A French multicenter randomised trial comparing two dose-regimens of prothrombin complex concentrates in urgent anticoagulation reversal

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Prothrombin complex concentrates (PCC) are haemostatic blood preparations indicated for urgent anticoagulation reversal, though the optimal dose for effective reversal is still under debate. The latest generation of PCCs include four coagulation factors, the so-called 4-factor PCC. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of two doses, 25 and 40 IU/kg, of 4-factor PCC in vitamin K antagonist (VKA) associated intracranial haemorrhage. Methods We performed a phase III, prospective, randomised, open-label study including patients with objectively diagnosed VKA-associated intracranial haemorrhage between November 2008 and April 2011 in 22 centres in France. Patients were randomised to receive 25 or 40 IU/kg of 4-factor PCC. The primary endpoint was the international normalised ratio (INR) 10 minutes after the end of 4-factor PCC infusion. Secondary endpoints were changes in coagulation factors, global clinical outcomes and incidence of adverse events (AEs). Results A total of 59 patients were randomised: 29 in the 25 IU/kg and 30 in the 40 IU/kg group. Baseline demographics and clinical characteristics were comparable between the groups. The mean INR was significantly reduced to 1.2 - and ≤1.5 in all patients of both groups - 10 minutes after 4-factor PCC infusion. The INR in the 40 IU/kg group was significantly lower than in the 25 IU/kg group 10 minutes (P = 0.001), 1 hour (P = 0.001) and 3 hours (P = 0.02) after infusion. The 40 IU/kg dose was also effective in replacing coagulation factors such as PT (P = 0.038), FII (P = 0.001), FX (P <0.001), protein C (P = 0.002) and protein S (0.043), 10 minutes after infusion. However, no differences were found in haematoma volume or global clinical outcomes between the groups. Incidence of death and thrombotic events was similar between the groups. Conclusions Rapid infusion of both doses of 4-factor PCC achieved an INR of 1.5 or less in all patients with a lower INR observed in the 40 IU

  18. Single-trial prediction of reaction time variability from MEG brain activity

    PubMed Central

    Ohata, Ryu; Ogawa, Kenji; Imamizu, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Neural activity prior to movement onset contains essential information for predictive assistance for humans using brain-machine-interfaces (BMIs). Even though previous studies successfully predicted different goals for upcoming movements, it is unclear whether non-invasive recording signals contain the information to predict trial-by-trial behavioral variability under the same movement. In this paper, we examined the predictability of subsequent short or long reaction times (RTs) from magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals in a delayed-reach task. The difference in RTs was classified significantly above chance from 550 ms before the go-signal onset using the cortical currents in the premotor cortex. Significantly above-chance classification was performed in the lateral prefrontal and the right inferior parietal cortices at the late stage of the delay period. Thus, inter-trial variability in RTs is predictable information. Our study provides a proof-of-concept of the future development of non-invasive BMIs to prevent delayed movements. PMID:27250872

  19. Promoting Physical Activity in Low-Active Adolescents via Facebook: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial to Test Feasibility

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The World Wide Web is an effective method for delivering health behavior programs, yet major limitations remain (eg, cost of development, time and resource requirements, limited interactivity). Social media, however, has the potential to deliver highly customizable and socially interactive behavioral interventions with fewer constraints. Thus, the evaluation of social media as a means to influence health behaviors is warranted. Objective The objective of this trial was to examine and demonstrate the feasibility of using an established social networking platform (ie, Facebook) to deliver an 8 week physical activity intervention to a sample of low-active adolescents (N=21; estimated marginal mean age 13.48 years). Methods Participants were randomized to either an experimental (ie, Behavioral) or attentional control (ie, Informational) condition. Both conditions received access to a restricted-access, study-specific Facebook group where the group’s administrator made two daily wall posts containing youth-based physical activity information and resources. Primary outcomes included physical activity as assessed by accelerometry and self-report. Interactions and main effects were examined, as well as mean differences in effect sizes. Results Analyses revealed significant improvements over time on subjectively reported weekly leisure-time physical activity (F 1,18=8.426, P=.009, η2 = .319). However, there was no interaction between time and condition (F 1,18=0.002, P=.968, η2 = .000). There were no significant time or interaction effects among the objectively measured physical activity variables. Examination of effect sizes revealed moderate-to-large changes in physical activity outcomes. Conclusions Results provide initial support for the feasibility of delivery of a physical activity intervention to low-active adolescents via social media. Whether by employing behavioral interventions via social media can result in statistically meaningful changes in

  20. Comparing GPS, Log, Survey, and Accelerometry to Measure Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    James, Peter; Weissman, Jennifer; Wolf, Jean; Mumford, Karen; Contant, Cheryl K.; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Taylor, Lynne; Glanz, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Both self-report and objective measures have strengths and limitations for studying physical activity (PA) and travel. We explored how objectively measured global positioning system (GPS) and accelerometer data matches with travel logs and questionnaires in predicting trip duration and PA. Methods In a study of PA and travel among residents in Atlanta, GA conducted in 2008–2009, 99 participants wore GPS devices and accelerometers, and recorded all trips in a log for 5 consecutive days. Participants also completed a self-administered questionnaire on PA and travel behaviors. Results There was good agreement between GPS and log for assessment of trip duration, although log measures overestimated trip duration (concordance correlation coefficient 0.53 [0.47, 0.59]; Bland-Altman estimate 0.76 [0.16, 3.71] comparing GPS to log). Log measures underestimated light PA and overestimated moderate PA compared to accelerometry when greater than zero moderate PA was reported. Conclusions It is often not feasible to deploy accelerometry or GPS devices in population research because these devices are expensive and require technical expertise and data processing. Questionnaires and logs provide inexpensive tools to assess PA and travel with reasonable concordance with objective measures. However, they have shortcomings in evaluating the presence and amount of light and moderate PA. Future questionnaires and logs should be developed to evaluate sensitivity to light and moderate PA. PMID:26685821

  1. Comparative Effect of Cinnamon and Ibuprofen for Treatment of Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Randomized Double-Blind Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jaafarpour, Molouk; Hatefi, Masoud; Khajavikhan, Javaher

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Primary dysmenorrheal has a negative impact on women's quality of life. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of Cinnamon and Ibuprofen for treatment of primary dysmenorrheal in a sample of Iranian female college students from Ilam University of Medical Sciences (western Iran). Materials and Methods In a randomized, double-blind trial, out of 114, control group received placebo (empty capsules contain starch, TDS, n= 38) a test group received Ibuprofen (capsule containing 400mg Ibuprofen, TDS, n=38), or another test group received Cinnamon (capsule containing 420 mg Cinnamon, TDS, n= 38) in 24 h. To determine severity of pain, we used the VAS scale. Pain intensity and duration of pain were monitored in the group during first 72 h of cycle. Results The mean pain severity score and mean duration of pain in Ibuprofen and Cinnamon were less than placebo group respectively (p< 0.001). Of 4 hours after the intervention there were no statistically significant differences between the Cinnamon and placebo group (p> 0.05). Of eight hours after the intervention, the mean pain severity in the cinnamon group was significantly lower than placebo group (p< 0.001). At various time intervals the mean pain severity in the Ibuprofen group were significantly less than Cinnamon and placebo groups (p< 0.001). Conclusion Cinnamon compared with placebo significantly reduced the severity and duration of pain during menstruation, but this effect was lower compared with Ibuprofen. Cinnamon can be regarded as a safe and effective treatment for primary dysmenorrhea. More researches are recommended to study the efficacy of Cinnamon on reducing menstrual bleeding. PMID:26023601

  2. Comparing energy sources for surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation: a Bayesian network meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Phan, Kevin; Xie, Ashleigh; Kumar, Narendra; Wong, Sophia; Medi, Caroline; La Meir, Mark; Yan, Tristan D

    2015-08-01

    Simplified maze procedures involving radiofrequency, cryoenergy and microwave energy sources have been increasingly utilized for surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation as an alternative to the traditional cut-and-sew approach. In the absence of direct comparisons, a Bayesian network meta-analysis is another alternative to assess the relative effect of different treatments, using indirect evidence. A Bayesian meta-analysis of indirect evidence was performed using 16 published randomized trials identified from 6 databases. Rank probability analysis was used to rank each intervention in terms of their probability of having the best outcome. Sinus rhythm prevalence beyond the 12-month follow-up was similar between the cut-and-sew, microwave and radiofrequency approaches, which were all ranked better than cryoablation (respectively, 39, 36, and 25 vs 1%). The cut-and-sew maze was ranked worst in terms of mortality outcomes compared with microwave, radiofrequency and cryoenergy (2 vs 19, 34, and 24%, respectively). The cut-and-sew maze procedure was associated with significantly lower stroke rates compared with microwave ablation [odds ratio <0.01; 95% confidence interval 0.00, 0.82], and ranked the best in terms of pacemaker requirements compared with microwave, radiofrequency and cryoenergy (81 vs 14, and 1, <0.01% respectively). Bayesian rank probability analysis shows that the cut-and-sew approach is associated with the best outcomes in terms of sinus rhythm prevalence and stroke outcomes, and remains the gold standard approach for AF treatment. Given the limitations of indirect comparison analysis, these results should be viewed with caution and not over-interpreted.

  3. Comparing the Effects of Reflexology and Footbath on Sleep Quality in the Elderly: A Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Valizadeh, Leila; Seyyedrasooli, Alehe; Zamanazadeh, Vahid; Nasiri, Khadijeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sleep disorders are common mental disorders reported among the elderly in all countries, and with nonpharmacological interventions, they could be helped to improve their sleep quality. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of two interventions, foot reflexology and foot bath, on sleep quality in elderly people. Patients and Methods: This three-group randomized clinical trial (two experimental groups and a control group) was conducted on 69 elderly men. The two experimental groups had reflexology (n = 23) and foot bath (n = 23) interventions for 6 weeks. The reflexology intervention was done in the mornings, once a week for ten minutes on each foot. The participants in the foot bath group were asked to soak their feet in 41°C to 42°C water one hour before sleeping. The pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI) was completed before and after the intervention through an interview process. Results: The results showed that the PSQI scores after intervention compared to before it in the reflexology and foot bath groups were statistically significant (P = 0.01 , P = 0.001); however, in the control group did not show a statistically significant difference (P = 0.14). In addition, the total score changes among the three groups were statistically significant (P = 0.01). Comparing the score changes of quality of sleep between the reflexology and foot bath groups showed that there was no significant difference in none of the components and the total score (P = 0.09). The two interventions had the same impact on the quality of sleep. Conclusions: It is suggested that the training of nonpharmacological methods to improve sleep quality such as reflexology and foot bath be included in the elderly health programs. In addition, it is recommended that the impact of these interventions on subjective sleep quality using polysomnographic recordings be explored in future research. PMID:26734475

  4. Comparing the efficacy of Emu oil with clotrimazole and hydrocortisone in the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis: A clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Attarzadeh, Yalda; Asilian, Ali; Shahmoradi, Zabihollah; Adibi, Neda

    2013-01-01

    Background: Seborrheic dermatitis (SD) is a common, chronic inflammatory disease. Inflammatory reaction and oxidative stress are thought to be effective in the pathogenesis of SD. Based on anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties of emu oil, this study was designed to evaluate effects of emu oil on patients suffering from SD, and to compare it with routine treatments of SD with topical steroids and antifungal agents. Materials and Methods: This clinical trial was conducted on126 patients who were randomly allocated to 2 groups: 62 in the clotrimazole vs. emu oil (group-1) and 64 in the hydrocortisone vs. emu oil (group-2). The right side of the face in both groups was treated with topical emu oil. The left side was treated with topical clotrimazole in the first group and with topical hydrocortisone in the second group. One month after the treatment, pre and post treatment symptom severity scores of pruritus, erythema and scales were compared. Results: All 3 medications significantly improved pruritus, erythema and scales (P < 0. 01). However, topical clotrimazole and hydrocortisone were significantly more effective than emu oil in improving scales (P < 0.01), and hydrocortisone was significantly more effective than emu oil in reducing pruritus (P < 0. 01). Comparing with topical clotrimazole, emu oil resulted in significantly more improvement of erythema (p:0.01). Conclusion: Emu oil is a potentially useful agent that significantly improves itching, erythema and scales associated with SD; however, it was less effective than hydrocortisone and clotrimazole which are routinely prescribed to treat SD. PMID:24250695

  5. The effect of a comprehensive lifestyle intervention on cardiovascular risk factors in pharmacologically treated patients with stable cardiovascular disease compared to usual care: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The additional benefit of lifestyle interventions in patients receiving cardioprotective drug treatment to improve cardiovascular risk profile is not fully established. The objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of a target-driven multidisciplinary structured lifestyle intervention programme of 6 months duration aimed at maximum reduction of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared with usual care. Methods A single centre, two arm, parallel group randomised controlled trial was performed. Patients with stable established CVD and at least one lifestyle-related risk factor were recruited from the vascular and cardiology outpatient departments of the university hospital. Blocked randomisation was used to allocate patients to the intervention (n = 71) or control group (n = 75) using an on-site computer system combined with allocations in computer-generated tables of random numbers kept in a locked computer file. The intervention group received the comprehensive lifestyle intervention offered in a specialised outpatient clinic in addition to usual care. The control group continued to receive usual care. Outcome measures were the lifestyle-related cardiovascular risk factors: smoking, physical activity, physical fitness, diet, blood pressure, plasma total/HDL/LDL cholesterol concentrations, BMI, waist circumference, and changes in medication. Results The intervention led to increased physical activity/fitness levels and an improved cardiovascular risk factor profile (reduced BMI and waist circumference). In this setting, cardiovascular risk management for blood pressure and lipid levels by prophylactic treatment for CVD in usual care was already close to optimal as reflected in baseline levels. There was no significant improvement in any other risk factor. Conclusions Even in CVD patients receiving good clinical care and using cardioprotective drug treatment, a comprehensive lifestyle intervention had a

  6. Effect of affordable technology on physical activity levels and mobility outcomes in rehabilitation: a protocol for the Activity and MObility UsiNg Technology (AMOUNT) rehabilitation trial

    PubMed Central

    Hassett, Leanne; van den Berg, Maayken; Lindley, Richard I; Crotty, Maria; McCluskey, Annie; van der Ploeg, Hidde P; Smith, Stuart T; Schurr, Karl; Killington, Maggie; Bongers, Bert; Howard, Kirsten; Heritier, Stephane; Togher, Leanne; Hackett, Maree; Treacy, Daniel; Dorsch, Simone; Wong, Siobhan; Scrivener, Katharine; Chagpar, Sakina; Weber, Heather; Pearson, Ross; Sherrington, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction People with mobility limitations can benefit from rehabilitation programmes that provide a high dose of exercise. However, since providing a high dose of exercise is logistically challenging and resource-intensive, people in rehabilitation spend most of the day inactive. This trial aims to evaluate the effect of the addition of affordable technology to usual care on physical activity and mobility in people with mobility limitations admitted to inpatient aged and neurological rehabilitation units compared to usual care alone. Methods and analysis A pragmatic, assessor blinded, parallel-group randomised trial recruiting 300 consenting rehabilitation patients with reduced mobility will be conducted. Participants will be individually randomised to intervention or control groups. The intervention group will receive technology-based exercise to target mobility and physical activity problems for 6 months. The technology will include the use of video and computer games/exercises and tablet applications as well as activity monitors. The control group will not receive any additional intervention and both groups will receive usual inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation care over the 6-month study period. The coprimary outcomes will be objectively assessed physical activity (proportion of the day spent upright) and mobility (Short Physical Performance Battery) at 6 months after randomisation. Secondary outcomes will include: self-reported and objectively assessed physical activity, mobility, cognition, activity performance and participation, utility-based quality of life, balance confidence, technology self-efficacy, falls and service utilisation. Linear models will assess the effect of group allocation for each continuously scored outcome measure with baseline scores entered as a covariate. Fall rates between groups will be compared using negative binomial regression. Primary analyses will be preplanned, conducted while masked to group allocation and use an

  7. An open randomized active-controlled clinical trial with low-dose SKA cytokines versus DMARDs evaluating low disease activity maintenance in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Martin, LS; Giovannangeli, F; Bizzi, E; Massafra, U; Ballanti, E; Cassol, M; Migliore, A

    2017-01-01

    Background Biologic agents are currently the strongest immunosuppressive drugs able to induce remission in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). One of the objectives of the medical scientific community now is how to maintain remission or low disease activity (LDA). The aim of this trial is to evaluate the contribution of low-dose sequential kinetic activation (SKA) IL-4, IL-10, and anti-IL-1 antibodies (10 fg/mL) in patients affected by RA in maintaining LDA or remission obtained after biological therapy. Method This is a randomized, open, active-controlled, prospective, Phase IV trial. Disease activity score (DAS28), clinical disease activity index, simplified disease activity index, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein levels, global health assessment, and pain visual analog scale were evaluated at baseline visit and then every 3 months together with an assessment of side effects till 12 months. Thirty-nine RA patients were enrolled and randomized to continue disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) therapy or to receive a combination of SKA low-dose cytokines formulated in concentration of 10 fg/mL orally administered at a dose of 20 drops/d for 12 consecutive months. Results The rate of maintenance of LDA at 12 months was superior in the group treated with low-dose cytokines compared with patients treated with DMARDs, 66.7% and 42.1%, respectively; however, the difference between the groups was not statistically significant. No side effects were reported in both groups. Conclusion This is the first study using a combination of three low-dose cytokines in RA, after data published on psoriasis. These data suggest that the use of a combination of low-dose SKA cytokines may be an opportunity to explore in the management of RA.

  8. A randomized clinical trial comparing the effect of different haemostatic agents for haemostasis of the liver after hepatic resection.

    PubMed

    Kakaei, Farzad; Seyyed Sadeghi, Mir Salim; Sanei, Behnam; Hashemzadeh, Shahryar; Habibzadeh, Afshin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Operative blood loss is still a great obstacle to liver resection, and various topical hemostatic agents were introduced to reduce it. The aim of the current study is to evaluate effects of 3 different types of these agents. Methods. In this randomized clinical trial, 45 patients undergoing liver resection were assigned to receive TachoSil, Surgicel, and Glubran 2 for controlling bleeding. Intraoperative and postoperative findings were compared between groups. Results. Postoperative bleeding (0 versus 33.3%, P = 0.04) and drainage volume first day after surgery (281.33 ± 103.98 versus 150.00 ± 60.82 mL, P = 0.02) were significantly higher in Surgicel than in TachoSil group. Postoperative complications included bile leak (3 cases in Surgicel, 1 case in TachoSil and Glubran 2), noninfectious collection (2 cases in TachoSil and Surgicel and 1 case in Glubran 2), perihepatic abscess, and massive hematoma around hepatectomy site both in Surgicel group. There was no death during the study period. Conclusion. Due to higher complications in Surgicel group, its application as hemostatic agent after liver resection is not recommended. Better results in TachoSil in comparison to the other two are indicative of its better efficacy and superiority in controlling hemostasis.

  9. A prospective randomised trial to compare the efficacy of povidone-iodine 10% and chlorhexidine 2% for skin disinfection

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Atul P; Awode, Rishikesh M

    2013-01-01

    Context: Infectious complications of invasive procedures affect patient outcomes adversely. Choice of antiseptic solution at the time of insertion is one of the major factors affecting their incidence. Aims: This study was undertaken to compare efficacy of chlorhexidine 2% and povidone iodine 10% for skin disinfection prior to placement of epidural and central venous catheters (CVCs). Settings and Design: A prospective randomised trial in the operating rooms of a tertiary referral cancer centre. Methods: Sixty consecutive adult patients undergoing elective oncosurgery requiring placement of epidural and CVCs were enrolled. Paired skin swabs were collected before and after application of the antiseptic solution. The samples were incubated in McConkey's media and blood agar at 35°C for up to 24 h. Any bacterial growth was graded as: <10 colonies - poor growth, 10-50 colonies - moderate growth and >50 colonies as heavy growth. Data on demographics and antibiotic prophylaxis and costs was collected for all patients. Statistical Analysis: Student's t-test and Mann-Whitney tests were used to analyse data, P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: Demographics and antibiotic prophylaxis use was similar in both groups. Before application of antiseptic solution, a variety of micro-organisms were grown from most patients with growth ranging from none-heavy. No organism was grown after application of either antiseptic solution from any patient. Conclusions: We found no differences between 2% chlorhexidine and 10% povidone-iodine for skin disinfection in regard to costs, efficacy or side-effects. PMID:23983286

  10. A randomised controlled trial comparing Triadcortyl with 10% glycerine-ichthammol in the initial treatment of severe acute otitis externa.

    PubMed

    Masood, Ajmal; Moumoulidis, Ioannis; Ray, Shalina; Chawla, Om; Panesar, Jaan

    2008-08-01

    Acute otitis externa is a common clinical condition accounting for a large proportion of patients attending the otolaryngology department, although milder cases are often managed in primary care. Treatment of the most severe forms of otitis externa involves aural toilet, followed by the application of a topical preparation, commonly in the form of an ear canal dressing. A prospective single-blind randomized controlled trial was performed to compare the efficacy of 10% glycerine-ichthammol (GI) solution and Triadcortyl (TAC) ointment, both applied as ear canal dressings, in the initial management of severe acute otitis externa. A total of 64 patients were studied. Both treatment modalities were proven efficacious in the treatment of severe acute otitis externa. Although there was a statistically significant improvement of pain parameters in the TAC group, we found no significant differences in clinical findings between the two groups. Therefore, it is recommended that GI dressing can be used instead of an antibiotic dressing as an initial treatment of severe acute otitis externa on the basis of cost, avoidance of resistance and toxicity.

  11. Comparing the effects of Bentonite & Calendula on the improvement of infantile diaper dermatitis: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudi, Mansoreh; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Mashaiekhi, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Infantile diaper dermatitis is a common, acute inflammatory reaction of the skin around diaper among infants. This study was undertaken to compare the effect of topical application of Bentonite and Calendula creams on the improvement of infantile diaper dermatitis. Methods: This double blind randomized controlled trial was undertaken on 100 patients of infantile diaper dermatitis. The 100 participants were randomly assigned into two groups of 50 each, and were prescribed the coded medicine. The mothers were trained to apply the cream and level of improvement was judged by observing the affected area on the first visit and then after three days of receiving treatment. Results: The mean age of infants was 6.45±5.53 months in Calendula group and 7.35±6.28 months in Bentonite group. Overall, 88 per cent of lesions in the Bentonite group started improving in the first six hours while this rate was 54 per cent in Calendula group (P<0.001). The risk ratio for the improvement in the first six hours was 2.99 folds in the Bentonite group. Also, lesions in 86 per cent infants in the Bentonite group and 52 per cent in the Calendula group were completely improved in the first three days after treatment (P<0.001). Interpretation & conclusions: Our results showed that in comparison with Calendula, Bentonite had faster healing effect and was more effective on the improvement of infantile diaper dermatitis (IRCT ID: IRCT 2012112811593N1). PMID:26831423

  12. Randomized double-blind clinical trial comparing two anesthetic techniques for ultrasound-guided transvaginal follicular puncture

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Gilvandro Lins; Serralheiro, Fernando Cesar; Fonseca, Fernando Luiz Affonso; Ribeiro, Onésimo Duarte; Adami, Fernando; Christofolini, Denise Maria; Bianco, Bianca; Barbosa, Caio Parente

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To compare the anesthetic techniques using propofol and fentanyl versus midazolam and remifentanil associated with a paracervical block with lidocaine in performing ultrasound-guided transvaginal oocyte aspiration. Methods: A randomized double-blind clinical trial (#RBR-8kqqxh) performed in 61 women submitted to assisted reproductive treatment. The patients were divided into two groups: anesthetic induction with 1mcg/kg of fentanyl associated with 1.5mg/kg of propofol (FP Group, n=32), in comparison with anesthetic induction using 0.075mg/kg of midazolam associated with 0.25mcg/kg/min of remifentanil, and paracervical block with 3mL of 2% lidocaine (MRPB Group, n=29). Main outcome measures: human reproduction outcomes, modified Aldrete-Kroulik index, hemodynamic parameters, and salivary cortisol. Results: The results revealed a higher number of embryos formed in the FP Group (p50=2 versus 1; p=0.025), gestation rate two times higher in the FP Group (44.4% versus 22.2%; p=0.127), less time to reach AK=10 in the MRPB Group (p50=10 versus 2; p<0.001), and lower mean of hemodynamic parameters in the MRPB Group (p<0.05). Conclusion: Anesthesia with fentanyl and propofol as well as with midazolam, remifentanil, and paracervical block offered satisfactory anesthetic conditions when performing assisted reproduction procedures, providing comfort for the patient and physician. PMID:27759816

  13. A prospective randomized trial comparing Foley catheter, oxytocin, and combination Foley catheter-oxytocin for labour induction with unfavourable cervix.

    PubMed

    El Khouly, Nabih I

    2016-12-06

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of transcervical Foley catheter with and without oxytocin versus oxytocin alone for labour induction with unfavourable cervix. This trial enrolled 108 women with singleton pregnancies presented for labour induction with unfavourable cervix. Patients were randomly assigned to receive Foley catheter alone (I), Foley catheter plus oxytocin (II) or oxytocin alone (III). Outcomes were analysed in terms of success of induction, induction delivery interval, route of delivery, dose and duration of oxytocin, and complications. Successful normal vaginal delivery was more common in group I (p = .02) compared to group III. Induction delivery time was statistically shorter in group II and group III (p < .001). Patients in group I required significantly less oxytocin dose and duration (p < .001). This led to our conclusion that induction of labour with Foley catheter without oxytocin increases success rate of normal vaginal delivery; however, it has a longer induction delivery interval with similar complications.

  14. A randomized trial comparing perinatal outcomes using insulin detemir or neutral protamine Hagedorn in type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Jovanovič, Lois; McCance, David R; Ivanisevic, Marina; Durán-Garcia, Santiago; Brøndsted, Lise; Nazeri, Avideh; Damm, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Objective This randomized controlled trial aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of insulin detemir (IDet) with neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH), both with insulin aspart, in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes. The perinatal and obstetric pregnancy outcomes are presented. Methods Subjects were randomized to IDet (n = 152) or NPH (n = 158) ≤12 months before pregnancy or at 8–12 gestational weeks. Results For IDet and NPH, there were 128 and 136 live births, 11 and 9 early fetal losses, and two and one perinatal deaths, respectively. Gestational age at delivery was greater for children from the IDet arm than the NPH arm (treatment difference: 0.49 weeks [95% CI 0.11;0.88], p = 0.012, linear regression). Sixteen children had a malformation (IDet: n = 8/142, 5.6%; NPH: n = 8/145, 5.5%). The incidence of adverse events was similar between treatments. Conclusion IDet is as well tolerated as NPH as regards perinatal outcomes in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes and no safety issues were identified. PMID:23617228

  15. A randomised controlled trial to compare local with general anaesthesia for short-stay inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed Central

    Teasdale, C.; McCrum, A. M.; Williams, N. B.; Horton, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    A series of 117 consecutive unselected patients with clinically reducible unilateral inguinal herniae were admitted for short-stay repair. Seven expressed a strong preference for one form of anaesthesia (6 general (GA)) local (LA) and 7 were unfit for GA; these were excluded from the trial. The remaining 103 patients were allocated at random to receive either LA or GA in order to compare the two methods of anaesthesia. The resulting groups (53 LA, 50 GA) were well matched for age and obesity. Perand postoperative symptoms were assessed with linear analogues self-assessment questionnaires. Statistically significant differences were demonstrated between the groups; those patients having LA were able to walk, eat, and pass urine earlier than those having GA, who experienced more nausea, vomiting, sore throat, and headache. The postoperative course and additional symptoms were otherwise similar. Forty-five LA patients experienced mild pain during the operation, but nevertheless 85% of the total group said they would consent to its use again. Ninety-three patients (90%) were discharged at 24 h. LA was applicable to all types of clinically reducible inguinal hernia and was an acceptable, safe, and satisfactory alternative to GA. PMID:7046604

  16. Comparing tailored and narrative worksite interventions at increasing colonoscopy adherence in adults 50-75: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jakob D; King, Andy J; Carcioppolo, Nick; Krakow, Melinda; Samadder, N Jewel; Morgan, Susan

    2014-03-01

    Research has identified several communication strategies that could increase adherence to colorectal cancer screening recommendations. Two promising strategies are tailoring and narrative-based approaches. Tailoring is the personalization of information based on individual characteristics. Narrative-based approaches use stories about similar others to counter perceived barriers and cultivate self-efficacy. To compare these two approaches, a randomized controlled trial was carried out at 8 worksites in Indiana. Adults 50-75 (N = 209) received one of four messages about colorectal cancer screening: stock, narrative, tailored, tailored narrative. The primary outcome was whether participants filed a colonoscopy claim in the 18 months following the intervention. Individuals receiving narrative messages were 4 times more likely to screen than those not receiving narrative messages. Tailoring did not increase screening behavior overall. However, individuals with higher cancer information overload were 8 times more likely to screen if they received tailored messages. The results suggest that narrative-based approaches are more effective than tailoring at increasing colorectal cancer screening in worksite interventions. Tailoring may be valuable as a strategy for reaching individuals with high overload, perhaps as a follow-up effort to a larger communication campaign.

  17. ReCAP: Impact of the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program on Clinical Trial and Related Activities at a Community Cancer Center in Rural Nebraska

    PubMed Central

    Ramaekers, Ryan; Gönen, Mithat; Gulzow, Mary; Hadenfeldt, Rebecca; Fuller, Courtney; Scott, Jenifer; Einspahr, Sarah; Benzel, Heather; Mickey, Mary; Norvell, Max; Clark, Douglas; Gauchan, Dron; Kurbegov, Dax

    2016-01-01

    QUESTION ASKED: What is the impact of participating in the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP) on the number of clinical trials available, number of patients enrolled in trials, and trial-related services provided to patients at a rural community-based cancer program? SUMMARY ANSWER: Significant increases in the number and percentage of patients enrolled in clinical trials, in the number of available treatment and non-treatment (eg, prevention, biospecimen, cancer control) trials, in clinical trial staffing, and in the number of tissue samples collected and/or stored were observed during the 5-year period of NCCCP. Biospecimen trials helped promote standardization of collection and storage processes in our community cancer program. Employment and utilization of a genetic counselor, smoking cessation counselor, outreach project coordinator, and two nurse navigators enabled delivery of improved cancer care continuum services to our rural patient population. METHODS: SFCTC clinical trial activities data from July 2002 to June 2007, the 5 years before participation in the NCCCP, and from July 2007 to June 2012, the 5 years during the program, were gathered and compared. Data capture included information on the number and percentage of patients on clinical trials, number and type of available clinical trials, percentage of underserved patients in clinical trials, clinical trial staffing, collection and storage of tissue samples, organizational infrastructure, linkage to NCI-designated cancer centers, and availability of new cancer care services. Percentages of patients in clinical trials were calculated as the ratio of the number of patients enrolled onto clinical trials over the number of analytic new patient cases of cancer through our tumor registry per year. Percentages of tissue samples collected and/or stored were similarly measured as the number of biospecimens collected over the number of analytic new patient cases of cancer per

  18. A cluster-randomised clinical trial comparing two cardiovascular health education strategies in a child population: the Savinghearts project

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This paper describes a methodology for comparing the effects of an eduentertainment strategy involving a music concert, and a participatory class experience involving the description and making of a healthy breakfast, as educational vehicles for delivering obesity-preventing/cardiovascular health messages to children aged 7–8 years. Methods/design This study will involve a cluster-randomised trial with blinded assessment. The study subjects will be children aged 7–8 years of both sexes attending public primary schools in the Madrid Region. The participating schools (n=30) will be randomly assigned to one of two groups: 1) Group MC, in which the children will attend a music concert that delivers obesity-preventing/cardiovascular health messages, or 2) Group HB, in which the children will attend a participatory class providing the same information but involving the description and making of a healthy breakfast. The main outcome measured will be the increase in the number of correct answers scored on a knowledge questionnaire and in an attitudes test administered before and after the above interventions. The secondary outcome recorded will be the reduction in BMI percentile among children deemed overweight/obese prior to the interventions. The required sample size (number of children) was calculated for a comparison of proportions with an α of 0.05 and a β of 0.20, assuming that the Group MC subjects would show values for the measured variables at least 10% higher than those recorded for the subjects of Group HB. Corrections were made for the design effect and assuming a loss to follow-up of 10%. The maximum sample size required will be 2107 children. Data will be analysed using summary measurements for each cluster, both for making estimates and for hypothesis testing. All analyses will be made on an intention-to-treat basis. Discussion The intervention providing the best results could be recommended as part of health education for young

  19. Validity of Electronic Diet Recording Nutrient Estimates Compared to Dietitian Analysis of Diet Records: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Scheett, Angela J; Johnson, LuAnn K; Jahns, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Background Dietary intake assessment with diet records (DR) is a standard research and practice tool in nutrition. Manual entry and analysis of DR is time-consuming and expensive. New electronic tools for diet entry by clients and research participants may reduce the cost and effort of nutrient intake estimation. Objective To determine the validity of electronic diet recording, we compared responses to 3-day DR kept by Tap & Track software for the Apple iPod Touch and records kept on the Nutrihand website to DR coded and analyzed by a research dietitian into a customized US Department of Agriculture (USDA) nutrient analysis program, entitled GRAND (Grand Forks Research Analysis of Nutrient Data). Methods Adult participants (n=19) enrolled in a crossover-designed clinical trial. During each of two washout periods, participants kept a written 3-day DR. In addition, they were randomly assigned to enter their DR in a Web-based dietary analysis program (Nutrihand) or a handheld electronic device (Tap & Track). They completed an additional 3-day DR and the alternate electronic diet recording methods during the second washout. Entries resulted in 228 daily diet records or 12 for each of 19 participants. Means of nutrient intake were calculated for each method. Concordance of the intake estimates were determined by Bland-Altman plots. Coefficients of determination (R 2) were calculated for each comparison to assess the strength of the linear relationship between methods. Results No significant differences were observed between the mean nutrient values for energy, carbohydrate, protein, fat, saturated fatty acids, total fiber, or sodium between the recorded DR analyzed in GRAND and either Nutrihand or Tap & Track, or for total sugars comparing GRAND and Tap & Track. Reported values for total sugars were significantly reduced (P<.05) comparing Nutrihand to GRAND. Coefficients of determination (R 2) for Nutrihand and Tap & Track compared to DR entries into GRAND, respectively

  20. The effect of flexible acrylic resin on masticatory muscle activity in implant-supported mandibular overdentures: a controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Ibraheem, Eman Mostafa Ahmed; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2016-01-01

    Background It is not yet clear from the current literature to what extent masticatory muscle activity is affected by the use of flexible acrylic resin in the construction of implant-supported mandibular overdentures. Objective To compare masticatory muscle activity between patients who were provided with implant-supported mandibular overdentures constructed from flexible acrylic resin and those who were provided with implant-supported mandibular overdentures constructed from heat-cured conventional acrylic resin. Methods In this clinical trial, 12 completely edentulous patients were selected and randomly allocated into two equal treatment groups. Each patient in Group 1 received two implants to support a mandibular overdenture made of conventional acrylic resin. In Group 2, the patients received two implants to support mandibular overdentures constructed from “Versacryl” flexible acrylic resin. The maxillary edentulous arch for patients in both groups was restored by conventional complete dentures. For all patients, masseter and temporalis muscle activity was evaluated using surface electromyography (sEMG). Results The results showed a significant decrease in masticatory muscle activity among patients with implant-supported mandibular overdentures constructed from flexible acrylic resin. Conclusion The use of “Versacryl” flexible acrylic resin in the construction of implant-supported mandibular overdentures resulted in decreased masticatory muscle activity. PMID:26955445

  1. A Trial-Based Economic Evaluation Comparing Spinal Cord Stimulation With Best Medical Treatment in Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Slangen, Rachel; Faber, Catharina G; Schaper, Nicolaas C; Joosten, Elbert A; van Dongen, Robert T; Kessels, Alfons G; van Kleef, Maarten; Dirksen, Carmen D

    2017-04-01

    The objective was to perform an economic evaluation comparing spinal cord stimulation (SCS) in combination with best medical treatment (BMT) with BMT in painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients. Alongside a prospective 2-center randomized controlled trial, involving 36 painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients with severe lower limb pain not responding to conventional therapy, an economic evaluation was performed. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were based on: 1) societal costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and 2) direct health care costs and the number of successfully treated patients, respectively, both with a time horizon of 12 months. Bootstrap and secondary analyses were performed to address uncertainty. Total societal cost amounted to €26,539.18 versus €5,313.45 per patient in the SCS and BMT group, respectively. QALYs were .58 versus .36 and the number of successfully treated patients was 55% versus 7% for the SCS and BMT group, respectively. This resulted in incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of €94,159.56 per QALY and €34,518.85 per successfully treated patient, respectively. Bootstrap analyses showed that the probability of SCS being cost-effective ranges from 0 to 46% with willingness to pay threshold values ranging between €20,000 and €80,000 for a QALY. Secondary analyses showed that cost-effectiveness of SCS became more favorable after correcting for baseline cost imbalance between the 2 groups, extending the depreciation period of SCS material to 4 years, and extrapolation of the data up to 4 years. Although SCS was considerably more effective compared with BMT, the substantial initial investment that is required resulted in SCS not being cost-effective in the short term. Cost-effectiveness results were sensitive to baseline cost imbalances between the groups and the depreciation period of the SCS material.

  2. Comparative double blind clinical trial of phenytoin and sodium valproate as anticonvulsant prophylaxis after craniotomy: efficacy, tolerability, and cognitive effects

    PubMed Central

    Beenen, L; Lindeboom, J; Trenite, D; Heimans, J; Snoek, F; Touw, D; Ader, H; van Alphen, H A M

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine the efficacy, tolerability, and impact on quality of life and cognitive functioning of anticonvulsant prophylaxis with phenytoin or sodium valproate in patients after craniotomy.
METHODS—A prospective, stratified, randomised, double blind single centre clinical trial was performed, comparing two groups of 50patients each, who underwent craniotomy for different pathological conditions and who were treated for 1 year after surgery with either 300 mg phenytoin/day or 1500 mg sodium valproate/day. During the study period patients were seen in the outpatient clinic at 1.5, 3, 6, and 12 months, when medical history, adverse events, and drug plasma concentrations were evaluated. Neuropsychological functioning and quality of life were assessed on the last three visits. In cases of a seizure an EEG was performed, drug plasma concentration assessed, and medication subsequently increased.
RESULTS—Of the 100 included patients 14 (seven in each group) experienced one or more postoperative seizures. Severity of the seizures was comparable in the two groups. In all patients, drug plasma concentrations were in the low or subtherapeutic ranges at the time of the first postoperative seizure. Five patients in the phenytoin group and two in the valproate group had to stop their treatment due to drug related adverse events. Sixty patients completed the 12 month period. Analysis of neuropsychological and quality of life data showed no significant differences.
CONCLUSION—For efficacy, tolerability, impact on cognitive functioning, and quality of life, no major differences were found between phenytoin and valproate prophylaxis. Valproate is an alternative for anticonvulsant prophylaxis in patients after craniotomy.

 PMID:10486394

  3. Cavity disinfection in minimally invasive dentistry - comparative evaluation of Aloe vera and propolis: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakar, A. R.; Karuna, Y. M.; Yavagal, C.; Deepak, B. M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The survival of atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) restorations would probably increase if near total elimination of cariogenic microorganisms could be done in the process of cavity cleaning before going ahead with the restoration. Thus, use of naturally occurring disinfecting agents for achieving this goal could herald a new beginning in the field of contemporary minimum intervention dentistry. Aims: To evaluate the efficacy of hand instruments in excavating dental caries and comparatively evaluate the roles of Aloe vera and propolis as potential cavity disinfecting agents after minimally invasive hand excavation of dental caries. Settings and Designs: Experimental, in vivo intergroup split mouth, randomized clinical trial. Subjects and Methods: The study included Group I (Control), Group II (A. vera) and Group III (propolis). Ten patients with three teeth each have occlusal/occlusoproximal lesions suitable for ART were selected. Dentinal samples were collected three times from each tooth viz., preexcavation, postexcavation and postdisinfection of the cavities. These dentinal samples were subjected to microbiological analyses for total viable count. Statistical Analysis Used: Repeated measures of analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Bonferroni post-hoc test and one-way ANOVA with Tukey post-hoc test. Results: In all the three groups, significant amount of bacteria were left behind after hand excavation. Group II and Group III, in which cavities were treated with A. vera and propolis extracts respectively, showed a significant reduction in the bacterial counts when compared to control the group. Conclusions: Hand excavation alone does not completely eliminate bacteria, which may predispose treated teeth to secondary caries. Both propolis and A. vera extracts can be used as potential natural disinfecting agents, thereby embracing the concept of phytotherapy in minimum intervention dentistry. PMID:25821369

  4. A Randomized Control Trial Comparing 2 Levofloxacin-Containing Second-Line Therapies for Helicobacter pylori Eradication.

    PubMed

    Chuah, Seng-Kee; Liang, Chih-Ming; Lee, Chen-Hsiang; Chiou, Shue-Shian; Chiu, Yi-Chun; Hu, Ming-Luen; Wu, Keng-Liang; Lu, Lung-Sheng; Chou, Yeh-Pin; Chang, Kuo-Chin; Kuo, Chung-Huang; Kuo, Chung-Mou; Hu, Tsung-Hui; Tai, Wei-Chen

    2016-05-01

    Summary of Trial Design.Lengthy exposure to quinolone-containing triple therapy in Helicobacter pylori eradication leads to the development of drug resistance. Sequential therapy with a quinolone and metronidazole -containing regimen appears to be an effective treatment option. This randomized controlled trial aimed to compare the efficacy of 5-plus 5 days' levofloxacin and metronidazole-containing sequential therapy (EALM) with that of 10-day levofloxacin-containing triple therapy (EAL) in second-line H pylori eradication treatment.One hundred and sixty-four patients who had failed the H pylori eradication attempts using the standard triple therapy (proton pump inhibitor bid, clarithromycin 500 mg bid, amoxicillin 1 g bid × 7 days) were randomly assigned to either an EALM therapy group (n = 82; esomeprazole 40 mg bid and amoxicillin 1 g bid for 5 days, followed by esomeprazole 40 mg bid, levofloxacin 500 mg qd, and metronidazole 500 mg tid, for 5 days) or a 10-day EAL therapy group (n = 82; levofloxacin 500 mg qd, amoxicillin 1 g bid, and esomeprazole 40 mg bid). One patient was lost to follow-up in each group. Follow-up for H pylori status was performed 4 to 8 weeks later.Eradication rates for the EALM and EAL groups were 90.2% (74/82, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 83.7%-96.8%) and 80.5% (66/82, 95% CI = 71.7%-89.2%, P = 0.077) in the intention-to-treat analysis; and 91.4% (74/81, 95% CI = 85.1%-97.6%) and 81.5% (66/81, 95% CI = 72.8%-90.1%, P = 0.067) in the per-protocol analysis. The adverse events for the EALM and EAL groups were 23.5% versus 11.1%, P = 0.038 but were all very mild and were well tolerated except for 1 patient with poor compliance. The compliances were 98.8% and 100%, respectively, between the 2 groups. An antibiotic resistance to levofloxacin was the clinical factor influencing the efficacy of H. pylori eradication therapy in the EAL group, and dual resistance to levofloxacin and

  5. Comparing modelled predictions of neonatal mortality impacts using LiST with observed results of community-based intervention trials in South Asia

    PubMed Central

    Friberg, Ingrid K; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Darmstadt, Gary L; Bang, Abhay; Cousens, Simon; Baqui, Abdullah H; Kumar, Vishwajeet; Walker, Neff; Lawn, Joy E

    2010-01-01

    Background There is an increasing body of evidence from trials suggesting that major reductions in neonatal mortality are possible through community-based interventions. Since these trials involve packages of varying content, determining how much of the observed mortality reduction is due to specific interventions is problematic. The Lives Saved Tool (LiST) is designed to facilitate programmatic prioritization by modelling mortality reductions related to increasing coverage of specific interventions which may be combined into packages. Methods To assess the validity of LiST outputs, we compared predictions generated by LiST with observed neonatal mortality reductions in trials of packages which met inclusion criteria but were not used as evidence inputs for LiST. Results Four trials, all from South Asia, met the inclusion criteria. The neonatal mortality rate (NMR) predicted by LiST matched the observed rate very closely in two effectiveness-type trials. LiST predicted NMR reduction was close (absolute difference <5/1000 live births) in a third study. The NMR at the end of the fourth study (Shivgarh, India) was overestimated by 39% or 16/1000 live births. Conclusions These results suggest that LiST is a reasonably reliable tool for use by policymakers to prioritize interventions to reduce neonatal deaths, at least in South Asia and where empirical data are unavailable. Reasons for the underestimated reduction in one trial likely include the inability of LiST to model all effective interventions. PMID:20348113

  6. Exploiting the intra-subject latency variability from single-trial event-related potentials in the P3 time range: A review and comparative evaluation of methods.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Guang; Hildebrandt, Andrea; Sommer, Werner; Zhou, Changsong

    2017-04-01

    The intra-subject variability (ISV) in brain responses during cognitive processing across experimental trials has been recognised as an important facet of neural functionality reflecting an intrinsic neurophysiological characteristic of the brain. In recent decades, ISV in behaviour has been found to be significantly associated with cognitive functioning varying across individuals, development, ages, and pathological conditions. Event-related potentials (ERPs) measured in single trials are important tools for characterizing ISV at the neural level. However, due to the overlapping spectra of noise and signals, the retrieval of information from single-trial ERPs related to cognitive processing has been a challenge. We review the major problems that researchers face in the estimation of ISV in single-trial ERPs. Then, we present an extensive evaluation of several methods of single-trial latency estimation based on both simulated and real data. The relationships of ISV in ERPs and reaction times are compared between the different single-trial methods to assess their relative efficiency in predicting task performance from neural signals. The pros and cons of the methods are discussed.

  7. Comparing group-based acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) with enhanced usual care for adolescents with functional somatic syndromes: a study protocol for a randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Kallesøe, Karen Hansen; Schröder, Andreas; Wicksell, Rikard K; Fink, Per; Ørnbøl, Eva; Rask, Charlotte Ulrikka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Functional somatic syndromes (FSS) are common in adolescents, characterised by severe disability and reduced quality of life. Behavioural treatments such as acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) has shown promising results in children and adolescents with FSS, but has focused on specific syndromes such as functional pain. The current study will compare the efficacy of group-based ACT with that of enhanced usual care (EUC) in adolescents with a range of FSS operationalised by the unifying construct of multiorgan bodily distress syndrome (BDS). Methods and analysis A total of 120 adolescents aged 15–19 and diagnosed with multiorgan BDS, of at least 12 months duration, will be assessed and randomised to either: (1) EUC: a manualised consultation with a child and adolescent psychiatrist and individualised treatment plan or (2) manualised ACT-based group therapy plus EUC. The ACT programme consists of 9 modules (ie, 27 hours) and 1 follow-up meeting (3 hours). The primary outcome is physical health, assessed by an Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) aggregate score 12 months after randomisation. Secondary outcomes include self-reported symptom severity, symptom interference, depression and anxiety, illness worry, perceived stress and global improvement; as well as objective physical activity and bodily stress response measured by heart rate variability, hair cortisol and inflammatory biomarkers. Process measures are illness perception, illness-related behaviour and psychological flexibility. Ethics and dissemination The study is conducted in accordance with Helsinki Declaration II. Approval has been obtained from the Science Ethics Committee of the Central Denmark Region and the Danish Data Protection. The results will be sought to be published according to the CONSORT statement in peer-reviewed journals. Discussion This is one of the first larger randomised clinical trials evaluating the effect of a group-based intervention for adolescents with a

  8. Early results of a randomised trial comparing Prolene and VyproII-mesh in endoscopic extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair (TEP) of recurrent unilateral hernias.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, T; Wollert, S; Osterberg, J; Smedberg, S; Bringman, S

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare a lightweight mesh to a standard polypropylene hernia mesh in endoscopic extraperitoneal hernioplasty in recurrent hernias. A total of 140 men with recurrent unilateral inguinal hernias were randomised to a totally extraperitoneal endoscopic hernioplasty (TEP) with Prolene or VyproII in a single-blinded multi-center trial. The randomisation and all data handling were performed through the Internet. 137 patients were operated as allocated. Follow-up was completed in 88% of the patients. The median operation times were 55 (24-125) min and 53.5 (21-123) min for the Prolene and VyproII groups, respectively. The meshes had comparable results in the surgeon's assessment of the handling of the mesh, return to work, return to daily activities, complications, postoperative pain and quality of life during the first 8 weeks of rehabilitation, except in General Health (GH) SF-36, where the VyproII-group had a significantly better score (P=0.045). The use of Prolene and VyproII-meshes in endoscopic repair of recurrent inguinal hernia seems to result in similar short-term outcomes and quality of life.

  9. Can Pacing Be Regulated by Post-Activation Potentiation? Insights from a Self-Paced 30 km Trial in Half-Marathon Runners

    PubMed Central

    Del Rosso, Sebastián; Barros, Edilberto; Tonello, Laís; Oliveira-Silva, Iransé; Behm, David G.; Foster, Carl; Boullosa, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Given the co-existence of post-activation potentiation (PAP) and fatigue within muscle, it is not known whether PAP could influence performance and pacing during distance running by moderating fatigue. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of PAP on pacing, jumping and other physiological measures during a self-paced 30 km trial. Methods Eleven male endurance-trained runners (half-marathon runners) volunteered to participate in this study. Runners participated in a multi-stage 30 km trial. Before the trial started, determination of baseline blood lactate (bLa) and countermovement jump (CMJ) height was performed. The self-paced 30 km trial consisted of 6 × 5 km splits. At the end of each 5 km split (60 s break), data on time to complete the split, CMJ height, Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) and blood lactate were collected while heart rate was continuously monitored. Results There was a significant decrease in speed (e.g. positive pacing strategy after the 4th split, p<0.05) with a progressive increase in RPE throughout the trial. Compared with baseline, CMJ height was significantly (p<0.05) greater than baseline and was maintained until the end of the trial with an increase after the 5th split, concomitant with a significant reduction in speed and an increase in RPE. Significant correlations were found between ΔCMJ and ΔSPEED (r = 0.77 to 0.87, p<0.05) at different time points as well as between RPE and speed (r = -0.61 to -0.82, p<0.05). Conclusion Our results indicates that fatigue and potentiation co-exist during long lasting endurance events, and that the observed increase in jump performance towards the end of the trial could be reflecting a greater potentiation potentially perhaps counteracting the effects of fatigue and preventing further reductions in speed. PMID:26934357

  10. Active Video Game Exercise Training Improves the Clinical Control of Asthma in Children: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Evelim L. F. D.; Carvalho, Celso R. F.; Peixoto-Souza, Fabiana Sobral; Teixeira-Carvalho, Etiene Farah; Mendonça, Juliana Fernandes Barreto; Stirbulov, Roberto; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá; Costa, Dirceu

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to determine whether aerobic exercise involving an active video game system improved asthma control, airway inflammation and exercise capacity in children with moderate to severe asthma. Design A randomized, controlled, single-blinded clinical trial was carried out. Thirty-six children with moderate to severe asthma were randomly allocated to either a video game group (VGG; N = 20) or a treadmill group (TG; n = 16). Both groups completed an eight-week supervised program with two weekly 40-minute sessions. Pre-training and post-training evaluations involved the Asthma Control Questionnaire, exhaled nitric oxide levels (FeNO), maximum exercise testing (Bruce protocol) and lung function. Results No differences between the VGG and TG were found at the baseline. Improvements occurred in both groups with regard to asthma control and exercise capacity. Moreover, a significant reduction in FeNO was found in the VGG (p < 0.05). Although the mean energy expenditure at rest and during exercise training was similar for both groups, the maximum energy expenditure was higher in the VGG. Conclusion The present findings strongly suggest that aerobic training promoted by an active video game had a positive impact on children with asthma in terms of clinical control, improvementin their exercise capacity and a reductionin pulmonary inflammation. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01438294 PMID:26301706

  11. Post-gemcitabine therapy for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer - A comparative review of randomized trials evaluating oxaliplatin- and/or irinotecan-containing regimens.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Arndt; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Hubner, Richard A; Blanc, Jean-Frédéric; Carrato, Alfredo; Yang, Yoojung; Patel, Dipen A; Ektare, Varun; de Jong, Floris A; Gill, Sharlene

    2016-11-01

    A systematic review and critical evaluation of randomized trial evidence for oxaliplatin- or irinotecan-containing regimens in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer previously treated with gemcitabine has not yet been published. We conducted a comparative systematic review of randomized trials evaluating oxaliplatin- or irinotecan-based therapies in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer previously treated with gemcitabine to assess trial similarity and the feasibility of performing an indirect treatment comparison (ITC). Studies were identified through PubMed and key oncology conference abstracts. The following trials met our criteria: NAPOLI-1 (nanoliposomal irinotecan [nal-IRI] or nal-IRI+5-fluorouracil [5-FU]/leucovorin [LV] vs 5-FU/LV), CONKO-003 (oxaliplatin+5-FU/LV [OFF] vs 5-FU/LV), PANCREOX (oxaliplatin+5-FU/LV [mFOLFOX6] vs 5-FU/LV), and Yoo et al. (2009) (irinotecan+5-FU/LV [mFOLFIRI3] vs mFOLFOX). Fundamental differences were identified in study design (i.e., number of study sites, number of countries), patient (i.e., locally advanced vs metastatic disease, stratification variables, prior and subsequent treatments) and treatment (i.e., regimens, dose intensity) characteristics, and primary and secondary outcomes (i.e., primary vs secondary outcomes, overall survival [OS], progression-free survival [PFS]) among the 4 included trials. Our comparative review demonstrated significant dissimilarity across trials, which precluded conducting an ITC. In the absence of head-to-head nal-IRI- and/or oxaliplatin-based therapy trials, clinicians are advised to interpret these studies separately within the context of their individual patient population.

  12. Sedentary Activity and Body Composition of Middle School Girls: The Trial of Activity for Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Charlotte; Webber, Larry S.; Baggett, Chris D.; Ward, Dianne; Pate, Russell R.; Murray, David; Lohman, Timothy; Lytle, Leslie; Elder, John P.

    2008-01-01

    This study describes the relationships between sedentary activity and body composition in 1,458 sixth-grade girls from 36 middle schools across the United States. Multivariate associations between sedentary activity and body composition were examined with regression analyses using general linear mixed models. Mean age, body mass index, and…

  13. Obsessive Compulsive Treatment Efficacy Trial (OCTET) comparing the clinical and cost effectiveness of self-managed therapies: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background UK National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines for obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) specify recommendations for the treatment and management of OCD using a stepped care approach. Steps three to six of this model recommend treatment options for people with OCD that range from low-intensity guided self-help (GSH) to more intensive psychological and pharmacological interventions. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), including exposure and response prevention, is the recommended psychological treatment. However, whilst there is some preliminary evidence that self-managed therapy packages for OCD can be effective, a more robust evidence base of their clinical and cost effectiveness and acceptability is required. Methods/Design Our proposed study will test two different self-help treatments for OCD: 1) computerised CBT (cCBT) using OCFighter, an internet-delivered OCD treatment package; and 2) GSH using a book. Both treatments will be accompanied by email or telephone support from a mental health professional. We will evaluate the effectiveness, cost and patient and health professional acceptability of the treatments. Discussion This study will provide more robust evidence of efficacy, cost effectiveness and acceptability of self-help treatments for OCD. If cCBT and/or GSH prove effective, it will provide additional, more accessible treatment options for people with OCD. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN73535163. Date of registration: 5 April 2011 PMID:25011730

  14. 1,2-Octanediol, a Novel Surfactant, for Treating Head Louse Infestation: Identification of Activity, Formulation, and Randomised, Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Ian F.; Lee, Peter N.; Kay, Katrina; Jones, Ruth; Brunton, Elizabeth R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Interest in developing physically active pediculicides has identified new active substances. The objective was to evaluate a new treatment for clinical efficacy. Methods and Findings We describe the selection of 1,2-octanediol as a potential pediculicide. Clinical studies were community based. The main outcome measure was no live lice, after two treatments, with follow up visits over 14 days. Study 1 was a proof of concept with 18/20 (90%) participants cured. Study 2 was a multicentre, parallel, randomised, observer-blind study (520 participants) that compared 0.5% malathion liquid with 1,2-octanediol lotion (20% alcohol) applied 2–2.5 hours or 8 hours/overnight. 1,2-octanediol lotion was significantly (p<0.0005) more effective with success for 124/175 (70.9%) RR = 1.50 (97.5% CI, 1.22 to 1.85) for 2–2.5 hours, and 153/174 (87.9%) RR = 1.86 (97.5% CI, 1.54 to 2.26) for 8 hours/overnight compared with 81/171 (47.4%) for malathion. Study 3, a two centre, parallel, randomised, observer-blind study (121 participants), compared 1,2-octanediol lotion, 2–2.5 hours with 1,2-octanediol alcohol free mousse applied for 2–2.5 hours or 8 hours/overnight. The mousse applied for 8 hours/overnight cured 31/40 (77.5%), compared with 24/40 (60.0%) for lotion (RR = 1.29, 95% CI, 0.95 to 1.75; NNT = 5.7) but mousse applied for 2–2.5 hours 17/41 (41.5%) was less effective than lotion (RR = 0.69, 95% CI, 0.44 to 1.08). Adverse events were more common using 1,2-octanediol lotion at both 2–2.5 hours (12.0%, p = 0.001) and 8 hours/overnight (14.9%, p<0.0005), compared with 0.5% malathion (2.3%). Similar reactions were more frequent (p<0.045) using lotion compared with mousse. Conclusions 1,2-octanediol was found to eliminate head louse infestation. It is believed to disrupt the insect's cuticular lipid, resulting in dehydration. The alcohol free mousse is more acceptable exhibiting significantly fewer adverse reactions. Trial registrations

  15. The efficacy of a behavioral activation intervention among depressed US Latinos with limited English language proficiency: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    . The study is also among the first to examine the effect of the proposed mechanisms of change of behavioral activation treatment for depression (that is, activity level and environmental reward) on depression over time. To our knowledge, this is the first randomized controlled trial to compare an empirical-supported treatment to a control supportive counseling condition in a sample of depressed, Spanish-speaking Latinos in the United States. Trial registration Clinical Trials Register: NCT01958840; registered 8 October 2013. PMID:24938081

  16. A Comparative Study of Postoperative Pulmonary Complications Using Fast Track Regimen and Conservative Analgesic Treatment: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Aghdam, Babak Abri; Golzari, Samad Eslam Jamal; Moghadaszadeh, Majid

    2011-01-01

    Background Postoperative pulmonary complications and pain are important causes of postoperative morbidity following thoracotomy. This study aimed to compare the effects of fast track and conservative treatment regimens on patients undergoing thoracotomy. Materials and Methods In this randomized controlled clinical trial, we recruited 60 patients admitted to the thoracic ICU of Imam Reza Hospital in two matched groups of 30 patients each. Group 1 patients received fast track regimen randomly; whereas, group 2 cases randomly received conservative analgesic regimen after thoracotomy and pulmonary resection. The outcome was determined based on the incidence of pulmonary complications and reduction of post-thoracotomy pain in all patients with forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) <75% predicted value which was measured while the patients were in ICU. The length of ICU stay, thoracotomy pain, morbidity, pulmonary complications and mortality were compared in two groups. Results A total of 60 patients, 45 (75%) males and 15(25%) females with ASA class I-III were recruited in this study. Postoperative pulmonary complications were observed in 5 (16.7%) patients in group 1 versus 17 (56.7%) patients in group 2. There were statistically significant differences in development of postoperative pulmonary complications such as atelectasis and prolonged air leak between both groups (P< 0.001 and P = 0.003). There was also a statistically significant difference in the rate of preoperative FEV1 (p = 0.001) and ASA scoring (p = 0.01) and value of FEV1 < 75% predicted in the two groups. The difference in length of ICU stay in two groups was statistically significant (P= 0.003 and P = 0.017 in FEV1 < 75% group). Four patients in group 1 and 9 patients in group 2 had FEV1reduced to less than 75% of predicted value (p = 0.03). Conclusion Using fast track regimen reduced postoperative pain and incidence of some pulmonary complications significantly when compared to the

  17. Comparative Effects of Different Balance-Training–Progression Styles on Postural Control and Ankle Force Production: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Cuğ, Mutlu; Duncan, Ashley; Wikstrom, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Context:  Despite the effectiveness of balance training, the exact parameters needed to maximize the benefits of such programs remain unknown. One such factor is how individuals should progress to higher levels of task difficulty within a balance-training program. Yet no investigators have directly compared different balance-training–progression styles. Objective:  To compare an error-based progression (ie, advance when proficient at a task) with a repetition-based progression (ie, advance after a set amount of repetitions) style during a balance-training program in healthy individuals. Design:  Randomized controlled trial. Setting:  Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants:  A total of 28 (16 women, 12 men) physically healthy young adults (age = 21.57 ± 3.95 years, height = 171.60 ± 11.03 cm, weight = 72.96 ± 16.18 kg, body mass index = 24.53 ± 3.7). Intervention(s):  All participants completed 12 supervised balance-training sessions over 4 weeks. Each session consisted of a combination of dynamic unstable-surface tasks that incorporated a BOSU ball and lasted about 30 minutes. Main Outcome Measure(s):  Static balance from an instrumented force plate, dynamic balance as measured via the Star Excursion Balance Test, and ankle force production in all 4 cardinal planes of motion as measured with a handheld dynamometer before and after the intervention. Results:  Selected static postural-control outcomes, dynamic postural control, and ankle force production in all planes of motion improved (P < .05). However, no differences between the progression styles were observed (P > .05) for any of the outcome measures. Conclusions:  A 4-week balance-training program consisting of dynamic unstable-surface exercises on a BOSU ball improved dynamic postural control and ankle force production in healthy young adults. These results suggest that an error-based balance-training program is comparable with but not superior to a repetition

  18. A randomised controlled trial comparing skin closure in total knee arthroplasty in the same knee: nylon sutures versus skin staples

    PubMed Central

    Iamthanaporn, K.; Hongnaparak, T.; Tangtrakulwanich, B.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Nylon sutures and skin staples are used commonly in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) surgical wound closure. However, there is no study that compares the wound healing efficacy and patient satisfaction scores of both techniques in the same knee. Methods We randomised 70 patients who underwent primary TKA into two groups. In one group of 34 patients, the skin at the upper half of the wound was closed with skin staples and the lower half of the wound was closed with simple interrupted nylon sutures. In the other group of 36 patients, the skin at the upper half of the wound was closed with nylon stitches and the lower half of the wound was closed with skin staples. We recorded the wound closure time, pain score at the time of stitch removal, wound complication rate, patient satisfaction score, and the Hollander wound evaluation score at the post-operative periods of five days, 14 days, six weeks, three months, and six months. Each half wound was analysed separately. Results The mean patient body mass index was 26.8 kg/m2 (standard deviation 6.3). A total of 70 nylon stitched wounds and 70 skin stapled wounds were analysed. There were no significant differences in wound complication rates, patient satisfaction score, and the Hollander wound evaluation score between both types of wounds (p > 0.05). The wound closure time for skin stapled wounds was significantly lower than the nylon stitched wounds (p < 0.001). However, the skin stapled wounds had a significantly higher pain score at the time of stitch removal (p < 0.001). Conclusion Skin staples and nylon stitches had comparable results with respect to wound healing and patient satisfaction in TKA wound closure in non-obese patients. The benefit of skin staples over nylon stitches was a decrease in operative time, but was more painful upon removal. Cite this article: V. Yuenyongviwat. A randomised controlled trial comparing skin closure in total knee arthroplasty in the same knee: nylon sutures versus skin

  19. Calcium Mass Balance during Citrate Hemodialysis: A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Normal and Low Ionized Calcium Target Ranges

    PubMed Central

    Orsag, Alesa; Ponikvar, Rafael; Buturovic-Ponikvar, Jadranka

    2016-01-01

    Background Regional citrate anticoagulation (RCA) during hemodialysis interferes with calcium homeostasis. Optimal ionized calcium (iCa) target range during RCA and consequent calcium balance are unknown. Methods In a randomized controlled trial (ACTRN12613001029785) 30 chronic hemodialysis patients were assigned to normal (1.1–1.2 mmol/) or low (0.95–1.05 mmol/l) iCa target range during a single hemodialysis with RCA. The primary outcome was calcium mass balance during the procedure, using a partial spent dialysate collection method; magnesium mass balance was also measured. Intact parathormone (iPTH), total calcium (tCa) and magnesium were measured before and after procedures. Results Mean iCa during procedures was significantly different in the two groups (1.12±0.06 in normal and 1.06±0.07 mmol/l in low iCa group, p <0.001), resulting in different tCa (2.18±0.22 vs. 1.95±0.17, p = 0.003) after the procedure. Mean delivered calcium during the procedure was 58.3±4.8 mmol in the normal and 51.5±8.2 mmol in the low iCa group (p = 0.010), which resulted in a significantly higher mean positive calcium mass balance of 14.6±8.3 mmol (584±333 mg) per procedure in normal as compared to 7.2±8.5 mmol (290±341 mg) in low iCa group (p = 0.024). Linear mixed effects model showed a significant interaction effect of time and iCa target range group on iPTH, i.e. a significant increase in iPTH in the low as compared to normal iCa target group (p = 0.008). Magnesium mass balance was mildly negative and comparable in both groups. Conclusions Low iCa target range resulted in a significantly less positive calcium mass balance, but in a significant increase in iPTH. To achieve a more neutral calcium balance, we recommend allowing a mild hypocalcemia during hemodialysis with RCA, especially when it is used for prolonged periods. PMID:28030601

  20. Promotion of Physical Activity Among High-School Girls: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pate, Russell R.; Ward, Dianne S.; Saunders, Ruth P.; Felton, Gwen; Dishman, Rod K.; Dowda, Marsha

    2005-01-01

    Objectives. Many adolescent girls fail to meet national guidelines for physical activity, and the prevalence of obesity is increasing among this group. Our study examined the effects of a comprehensive school-based intervention on physical activity among high-school girls. Methods. A group-randomized controlled field trial was conducted at 24 high schools. A school-based sample of 2744 girls (48.7% African American, 46.7% White) participated in a measurement protocol when they were in eighth and then ninth grade. A comprehensive physical activity intervention was designed to change the instructional program and the school environment to increase support for physical activity among girls. Results. At follow-up, 45% of girls in the intervention schools and 36% of girls in the control schools reported vigorous physical activity during an average of 1 or more 30-minute time blocks per day over a 3-day period. Conclusions. A comprehensive school-based intervention can increase regular participation in vigorous physical activity among high-school girls. PMID:16118370

  1. Establishing nurse-led active surveillance for men with localised prostate cancer: development and formative evaluation of a model of care in the ProtecT trial

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Julia; Holding, Peter N; Bonnington, Susan; Rooshenas, Leila; Lane, J Athene; Salter, C Elizabeth; Tilling, Kate; Speakman, Mark J; Brewster, Simon F; Evans, Simon; Neal, David E; Hamdy, Freddie C; Donovan, Jenny L

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To develop a nurse-led, urologist-supported model of care for men managed by active surveillance or active monitoring (AS/AM) for localised prostate cancer and provide a formative evaluation of its acceptability to patients, clinicians and nurses. Nurse-led care, comprising an explicit nurse-led protocol with support from urologists, was developed as part of the AM arm of the Prostate testing for cancer and Treatment (ProtecT) trial. Design Interviews and questionnaire surveys of clinicians, nurses and patients assessed acceptability. Setting Nurse-led clinics were established in 9 centres in the ProtecT trial and compared with 3 non-ProtecT urology centres elsewhere in UK. Participants Within ProtecT, 22 men receiving AM nurse-led care were interviewed about experiences of care; 11 urologists and 23 research nurses delivering ProtecT trial care completed a questionnaire about its acceptability; 20 men managed in urology clinics elsewhere in the UK were interviewed about models of AS/AM care; 12 urologists and three specialist nurses working in these clinics were also interviewed about management of AS/AM. Results Nurse-led care was commended by ProtecT trial participants, who valued the flexibility, accessibility and continuity of the service and felt confident about the quality of care. ProtecT consultant urologists and nurses also rated it highly, identifying continuity of care and resource savings as key attributes. Clinicians and patients outside the ProtecT trial believed that nurse-led care could relieve pressure on urology clinics without compromising patient care. Conclusions The ProtecT AM nurse-led model of care was acceptable to men with localised prostate cancer and clinical specialists in urology. The protocol is available for implementation; we aim to evaluate its impact on routine clinical practice. Trial registration numbers NCT02044172; ISRCTN20141297. PMID:26384727

  2. A Randomized Controlled Trial for Children with Childhood Apraxia of Speech Comparing Rapid Syllable Transition Treatment and the Nuffield Dyspraxia Programme-Third Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Elizabeth; McCabe, Patricia; Ballard, Kirrie J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This randomized controlled trial compared the experimental Rapid Syllable Transition (ReST) treatment to the Nuffield Dyspraxia Programme-Third Edition (NDP3; Williams & Stephens, 2004), used widely in clinical practice in Australia and the United Kingdom. Both programs aim to improve speech motor planning/programming for children…

  3. A randomized controlled trial of 1% aqueous chlorhexidine gluconate compared with 10% povidone-iodine for topical antiseptic in neonates: effects on blood culture contamination rates.

    PubMed

    Nuntnarumit, Pracha; Sangsuksawang, Nartsiri

    2013-04-01

    We conducted a randomized controlled trial in neonates with birth weight greater than or equal to 1,500 g that compared 1% aqueous chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) with 10% povidone-iodine (PI) as a topical antiseptic. We found 1% CHG to be more effective than 1% PI in reducing blood culture contamination rates, and no contact dermatitis was observed.

  4. [An open randomized comparative trial of efficacy and safety of selective alpha-adrenoblocker setegis (terazosin) in therapy of patients with chronic bacterial prostatitis].

    PubMed

    Trapeznikova, M F; Morozov, A P; Dutov, V V; Urenkov, S B; Pozdniakov, K V; Bychkova, N V

    2007-01-01

    An open randomized comparative trial of setegis (terazosine) has shown good subjective and objective results in patients with chronic bacterial prostatitis. The drug is well tolerated and produces insignificant side effects. It is also demonstrated that combined therapy with alpha-adrenoblockers is more effective that monotherapy with antibacterial drugs in patients with bacterial prostatitis.

  5. A new method of infrared thermography for quantification of brown adipose tissue activation in healthy adults (TACTICAL): a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Ang, Qi Yan; Goh, Hui Jen; Cao, Yanpeng; Li, Yiqun; Chan, Siew-Pang; Swain, Judith L; Henry, Christiani Jeyakumar; Leow, Melvin Khee-Shing

    2017-05-01

    The ability to alter the amount and activity of brown adipose tissue (BAT) in human adults is a potential strategy to manage obesity and related metabolic disorders associated with food, drug, and environmental stimuli with BAT activating/recruiting capacity. Infrared thermography (IRT) provides a non-invasive and inexpensive alternative to the current methods (e.g. (18)F-FDG PET) used to assess BAT. We have quantified BAT activation in the cervical-supraclavicular (C-SCV) region using IRT video imaging and a novel image computational algorithm by studying C-SCV heat production in healthy young men after cold stimulation and the ingestion of capsinoids in a prospective double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trial. Subjects were divided into low-BAT and high-BAT groups based on changes in IR emissions in the C-SCV region induced by cold. The high-BAT group showed significant increases in energy expenditure, fat oxidation, and heat output in the C-SCV region post-capsinoid ingestion compared to post-placebo ingestion, but the low-BAT group did not. Based on these results, we conclude that IRT is a promising tool for quantifying BAT activity.

  6. A prospective randomised trial comparing nasogastric with intravenous hydration in children with bronchiolitis (protocol) The comparative rehydration in bronchiolitis study (CRIB)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Bronchiolitis is the most common reason for admission of infants to hospital in developed countries. Fluid replacement therapy is required in about 30% of children admitted with bronchiolitis. There are currently two techniques of fluid replacement therapy that are used with the same frequency-intravenous (IV) or nasogastric (NG). The evidence to determine the optimum route of hydration therapy for infants with bronchiolitis is inadequate. This randomised trial will be the first to provide good quality evidence of whether nasogastric rehydration (NGR) offers benefits over intravenous rehydration (IVR) using the clinically relevant continuous outcome measure of duration of hospital admission. Methods/Design A prospective randomised multi-centre trial in Australia and New Zealand where children between 2 and 12 months of age with bronchiolitis, needing non oral fluid replacement, are randomised to receive either intravenous (IV) or nasogastric (NG) rehydration. 750 patients admitted to participating hospitals will be recruited, and will be followed daily during the admission and by telephone 1 week after discharge. Patients with chronic respiratory, cardiac, or neurological disease; choanal atresia; needing IV fluid resuscitation; needing an IV for other reasons, and those requiring CPAP or ventilation are excluded. The primary endpoint is duration of hospital admission. Secondary outcomes are complications, need for ICU admission, parental satisfaction, and an economic evaluation. Results will be analysed using t-test for continuous data, and chi squared for categorical data. Non parametric data will be log transformed. Discussion This trial will define the role of NGR and IVR in bronchiolitis Trail registration The trial is registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry - ACTRN12605000033640 PMID:20515467

  7. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial comparing pethidine to metamizol for treatment of post-anaesthetic shivering

    PubMed Central

    MONSÓ, A.; RIUDEUBAS, J.; BARBAL, F.; LAPORTE, J-R.; ARNAU, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    1Shivering is frequent during the post-anaesthetic recovery period, and there is no clear consensus about the best strategy for its treatment. We tested the efficacy of two commonly used analgesic drugs, pethidine and metamizol. 2A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was performed, including 104 adult patients who presented with post-anaesthetic shivering during the recovery from general anaesthesia. They were randomized to receive placebo (n=32), metamizol 25 mg kg−1 (n=37), or pethidine 0.4 mg kg−1 (n=35). The response to treatment was assessed 5, 15 and 45 min after drug administration, and the main outcome variable was complete suppression of shivering. 3The efficacy at 5, 15 and 45 min was as follows: placebo 6%, 16% and 37%; metamizol 13.5%, 32% and 76%, and pethidine 89%, 91% and 89%. With both active drugs the efficacy at all three time intervals was significantly higher than that with placebo (P<0.05). The differences (at 5 and 15, but not at 45 min) between pethidine and metamizol were statistically significant (P<0.05). Both drugs were well tolerated. 4The persistence of shivering at 45 min in two thirds of placebo-treated patients indicates that drug treatment is worthwhile; metamizol produces a better post-anaesthetic shivering response than placebo, especially 15 and 45 min after drug administration; the efficacy of pethidine was the highest and the response to it appeared more quickly; however, at 45 min it was similar to that observed with metamizol. 5Both metamizol and pethidine suppress postanaesthetic shivering, but the latter induces a quicker and more reliable response. PMID:8877020

  8. A multicentre comparative trial of sodium valproate and carbamazepine in adult onset epilepsy. Adult EPITEG Collaborative Group.

    PubMed Central

    Richens, A; Davidson, D L; Cartlidge, N E; Easter, D J

    1994-01-01

    The long-term efficacy and safety of sodium valproate and carbamazepine in adult outpatients with newly diagnosed primary generalised or partial and secondarily generalised seizures were compared in a randomised, open, multicentre study at 22 neurology outpatient clinics. Patients were randomised to oral sodium valproate (Epilim EC enteric coated 200 mg tablets twice daily, n = 149) or oral carbamazepine (100 mg twice daily increasing to 200 mg twice daily in week 2, n = 151) and followed up for three years. If clinically necessary, dosages were regularly increased until seizures were controlled or toxicity developed. Sodium valproate and carbamazepine controlled both primary generalised and partial seizures equally effectively overall. Significantly more patients on sodium valproate than carbamazepine (126/140 (90%) v 105/141 (75%), p = 0.001) remained on randomised treatment for at least six months. Skin rashes occurred significantly more often in carbamazepine recipients than in sodium valproate recipients (11.2% v 1.7%, p < 0.05) and carbamazepine was associated with a higher withdrawal rate because of adverse events (15% v 5% on sodium valproate) in the first six months of treatment. There was no difference between the drugs in the rate of withdrawal because of poor seizure control at any stage, regardless of seizure type. At the end of the three year trial period, over 70% of the available patients were still on randomised treatment or had recently stopped treatment after achieving full seizure control. Sodium valproate and carbamazepine were both associated with a high degree of overall seizure control regardless of seizure type and both have good long-term tolerability in adult patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy. Recommendations are made for a higher initial dosage regime for sodium valproate in partial seizures. PMID:8006647

  9. Comparing Acceptance and Commitment Group Therapy and 12-Steps Narcotics Anonymous in Addict's Rehabilitation Process: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Azkhosh, Manoochehr; Farhoudianm, Ali; Saadati, Hemn; Shoaee, Fateme; Lashani, Leila

    2016-10-01

    Objective: Substance abuse is a socio-psychological disorder. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy with 12-steps Narcotics Anonymous on psychological well-being of opiate dependent individuals in addiction treatment centers in Shiraz, Iran. Method: This was a randomized controlled trial. Data were collected at entry into the study and at post-test and follow-up visits. The participants were selected from opiate addicted individuals who referred to addiction treatment centers in Shiraz. Sixty individuals were evaluated according to inclusion/ exclusion criteria and were divided into three equal groups randomly (20 participants per group). One group received acceptance and commitment group therapy (Twelve 90-minute sessions) and the other group was provided with the 12-steps Narcotics Anonymous program and the control group received the usual methadone maintenance treatment. During the treatment process, seven participants dropped out. Data were collected using the psychological well-being questionnaire and AAQ questionnaire in the three groups at pre-test, post-test and follow-up visits. Data were analyzed using repeated measure analysis of variance. Results: Repeated measure analysis of variance revealed that the mean difference between the three groups was significant (P<0.05) and that acceptance and commitment therapy group showed improvement relative to the NA and control groups on psychological well-being and psychological flexibility. Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that acceptance and commitment therapy can be helpful in enhancing positive emotions and increasing psychological well-being of addicts who seek treatment.

  10. Comparing the effect of ketamine and benzydamine gargling with placebo on post-operative sore throat: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Faiz, Seyed Hamid Reza; Rahimzadeh, Poupak; Poornajafian, Alireza; Nikzad, Naghme

    2014-01-01

    Background: Air way intubation for general anesthesia usually leads to sore throat after surgery. Ketamine plays an important role to block a number of receptors related to pain. Benzydamine hydrochloride is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that has been used to improve oropharyngeal disorders. In this study, it was intended to compare the effect of gargling different solutions before the surgery on post-operative sore throat (POST) in patients who underwent general anesthesia for hysterectomy. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 patients who underwent the elective hysterectomy were entered to the randomized controlled trial regarding to the eligibility criteria. Patients were simply randomly allocated to three groups and received one code. Every code was representative for a specific drug: 20 cc normal saline (control group) or 1.5 mg benzydamine in 20 cc solution or 20 mg ketamine in 20 cc solutions. All the research teams were blinded to the received solutions. POST was evaluated with numerical rating scale. The data were entered to SPSS software and analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance test, were performed. Results: The mean ages of ketamine, benzydamine, and normal saline recipients were not significantly different. The trend of the severity of sore throat during the first 24 h after the operation in ketamine recipients was significantly lower than the other two groups (P < 0.001). Conclusion: The pain scale after surgery was reduced by using both ketamine and benzydamine, but the ketamine effect was more noticeable. PMID:25371873

  11. The first clinical experience on efficacy of topical flutamide on melasma compared with topical hydroquinone: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Adalatkhah, Hassan; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment of melasma is unsatisfactory most of the times. Hormonal role is shown to exist in pathogenesis of the melasma, and sex-hormone related drugs may have an effect on melasma. Aim To investigate efficacy of 1% flutamide cream versus 4% hydroquinone cream on melasma. Methods In a parallel randomized clinical trial, 74 women with melasma were allocated to receive a sunscreen along with 4% hydroquinone cream or 1% flutamide cream. Melasma Area and Severity Index (MASI), mexameter melanin assay, and patient satisfaction were investigated. Results Mean age of the participants was 33.8 years. Mean length of time suffering from Melasma was 96.3 months. The subjects reported in average 1.1 hours per day of exposure to sunlight. Mean standardized total patient satisfaction score was 28.8 (standard deviation [SD] 17.2) in flutamide group patients versus 18 (SD 15.5) in control group (P<0.01). Regardless of treatment group, the skin darkness assessed upon MASI scales was reduced over the treatment course (P<0.001). Using mixed effects, longitudinal modeling showed better treatment efficacy based on MASI scale for flutamide group compared to the hydroquinone group (P<0.05). However, longitudinal analysis of mexameter scores did not reveal any significant difference in melanin measurements between flutamide and hydroquinone. Conclusion Topical flutamide appeared as effective as topical hydroquinone in treating melasma using mexameter assessment but with a better MASI improvement trend and higher patient satisfaction in flutamide treatment versus topical hydroquinone. As the present study is possibly the first clinical experience on efficacy of topical flutamide on melasma, it would be quite unreasonable to recommend clinical use of it before future studies replicate the results on its efficacy and safety. PMID:26345129

  12. Randomized controlled trial comparing four strategies for delivering e-curriculum to health care professionals [ISRCTN88148532

    PubMed Central

    Kemper, Kathi J; Gardiner, Paula; Gobble, Jessica; Mitra, Ananda; Woods, Charles

    2006-01-01

    Background Internet education is increasingly provided to health professionals, but little is known about the most effective strategies for delivering the content. The purpose of this study is to compare four strategies for delivering an Internet-based (e-) curriculum on clinicians' knowledge (K), confidence (CONF), and communication (COMM) about herbs and other dietary supplements (HDS). Methods This national randomized 2 × 2 factorial trial included physicians, pharmacists, nurses, nutritionists and trainees in these fields. Participants were randomly assigned to one of four curriculum delivery strategies for 40 brief modules about HDS: a) delivering four (4) modules weekly over ten (10) weeks by email (drip-push); b) modules accessible on web site with 4 reminders weekly for 10 weeks (drip-pull); c) 40 modules delivered within 4 days by email (bolus-push); and d) 40 modules available on the Internet with one email informing participants of availability (bolus-pull). Results Of the 1,267 enrollees, 25% were male; the average age was 40 years. The completion rate was 62%, without significant differences between delivery groups. There were statistically significant improvements in K, CONF and COMM scores after the course (P<0.001 for all), although the difference in COMM was small. There were no significant differences in any of the three outcomes by delivery strategy, but outcomes were better for those who paid for continuing education credit. Conclusion All delivery strategies tested similarly improved K, CONF, COMM scores about HDS. Educators can use the strategy that is most convenient without diminishing effectiveness. Additional curricula may be necessary to make substantial changes in clinicians' communication practices. PMID:16405734

  13. Biosimilars clinical development program: confirmatory clinical trials: a virtual/simulated case study comparing equivalence and non-inferiority approaches.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Mark P

    2011-09-01

    As part of long term commitment of the Biologicals and Vaccines Committee (B&V) of the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Association (IFPMA) to provide expert input to the WHO on their recently finalized GUIDELINES ON EVALUATION OF SIMILAR BIOTHERAPEUTIC PRODUCTS (SBPs), and in response to WHO's request, the IFPMA B&V prepared a clinical case study at a recent WHO workshop in Seoul, Korea. The case study, presented by Mark Fletcher on behalf of B&V, involved a model scenario for a clinical efficacy trial to support the approval of a Similar Biotherapeutic Product (SBP) as part of the required comparative clinical program against a Reference Biotherapeutic Product (RBP). A key goal was to understand and illustrate key clinical and statistical principles, and considerations described in the WHO Guidance for regulatory authorities when designing and implementing WHO guidelines and post-approval regulatory oversight for SBPs. Using this model SBP/RBP pair, an interactive discussion was carried out among the workshop participants on the pros and cons of using equivalence vs. non-inferiority designs to assess the two products' similarity. Through discussion of the case, the complexity of demonstrating similar efficacy and safety of a SBP vs. RBP for biotherapeutic products is outlined and discussed in the context of the key principles laid out in the recently published WHO GUIDELINES ON EVALUATION OF SIMILAR BIOTHERAPEUTIC PRODUCTS (SBPs). The exercise illustrates the need for a case-by-case approach when interpreting clinical data from SBP dossiers to adequately assure similar efficacy and safety of SBPs for any studied indication.

  14. Randomized clinical trial comparing lumbar percutaneous hydrodiscectomy with lumbar open microdiscectomy for the treatment of lumbar disc protrusions and herniations

    PubMed Central

    Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; Rocha, Ivan Diasda; Marcon, Raphael Martus; de Barros Filho, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Hydrodiscectomy is a new technique used for percutaneous spinal discectomy that employs a high-intensity stream of water for herniated disc ablation and tissue aspiration. No previous clinical study has examined the effects of percutaneous hydrodiscectomy. The aim of this study is to evaluate the outcomes of hydrodiscectomy compared to open microdiscectomy regarding pain, function, satisfaction, complications and recurrence rates. METHODS: In this randomized clinical trial, patients referred to our tertiary hospital for lumbar back pain were recruited and included in the study if they had disc protrusion or small herniation in only one level, without neurological deficits and with no resolution after six weeks of conservative treatment. One group underwent open microdiscectomy, and the other group underwent percutaneous microdiscectomy via hydrosurgery. Function was evaluated using the Oswestry Disability Index and pain was assessed using a visual analog scale. Evaluations were performed preoperatively, and then during the first week and at one, three, six and twelve months postoperatively. Personal satisfaction was verified. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01367860. RESULTS: During the study period, 20 patients were included in each arm and 39 completed one-year of follow-up (one patient died of unrelated causes). Both groups exhibited equal improvement on the visual analog scale and Oswestry evaluations after treatment, without any significant differences. The improvement in the lumbar visual analog scale score was not significant in the hydrodiscectomy group (p=0.138). The rates of infection, pain, recurrence and satisfaction were similar between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Percutaneous hydrodiscectomy was demonstrated to be as effective as open microdiscectomy for reducing pain. The rates of complications and recurrence of herniation were similar between groups. Patient satisfaction with the treatment was also similar between groups. PMID:27276397

  15. The Effect of Oxygen Inhalation Plus Oxytocin Compared with Oxytocin Only on Postpartum Haemorrhage: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Suhrabi, Zainab; Taghinejad, Hamid; Direkvand-Moghadam, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Post Partum Haemorrhage (PPH) is the leading cause of maternal mortality across the world, mainly in the developing countries. Aim The present study was conducted with the aim to investigate effect of oxygen inhalation plus oxytocin compared with oxytocin only on PPH. Materials and Methods This study was a clinical trial which was performed in Shahid Mustafa Khomieni Teaching Hospital of Ilam (western Iran) from April 2012 to Nov 2013. One hundred and twenty pregnant women who were referred to delivery ward for normal vaginal delivery were selected with convenience sampling method and they were randomly assigned into two groups. For both groups management of the third stage of labour was done using 1000CC Ringer and 20 units of Oxytocin. In the intervention group, in addition to the routine administration, 8 liters of oxygen via face mask was used continuously until 2 hours after delivery. Blood loss was determined by regular weighing of the buttocks that were previously weighted. The difference was calculated before and after weighing (1 gram increasing of weight was considered to be equivalent to 1CC blood loss). Data were analysed by SPSS 16 version using Student- t and Chi-square tests. Results The two groups were homogenous in regard to all the base line variables. The study results indicated that the mean of blood loss were (256.16±97) ml at two hours after delivery in the control group and (149.5±46.49) ml in the intervention group. There was a significant difference between PPH of the two groups (p<0.006). Conclusion Research findings showed that the use of inspired oxygen during the third stage of labour and oxytocin infusion during 2hours later resulted in a significant decreasing in the amount of bleeding after normal vaginal delivery. PMID:27790522

  16. Multicenter, Randomized Clinical Trial To Compare the Safety and Efficacy of LFF571 and Vancomycin for Clostridium difficile Infections

    PubMed Central

    Mullane, Kathleen; Lee, Christine; Bressler, Adam; Buitrago, Martha; Weiss, Karl; Dabovic, Kristina; Praestgaard, Jens; Leeds, Jennifer A.; Blais, Johanne

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection causes serious diarrheal disease. Although several drugs are available for treatment, including vancomycin, recurrences remain a problem. LFF571 is a semisynthetic thiopeptide with potency against C. difficile in vitro. In this phase 2 exploratory study, we compared the safety and efficacy (based on a noninferiority analysis) of LFF571 to those of vancomycin used in adults with primary episodes or first recurrences of moderate C. difficile infection. Patients were randomized to receive 200 mg of LFF571 or 125 mg of vancomycin four times daily for 10 days. The primary endpoint was the proportion of clinical cures at the end of therapy in the per-protocol population. Secondary endpoints included clinical cures at the end of therapy in the modified intent-to-treat (mITT) population, the time to diarrhea resolution, and the recurrence rate. Seventy-two patients were randomized, with 46 assigned to receive LFF571. Based on the protocol-specified definition, the rate of clinical cure for LFF571 (90.6%) was noninferior to that of vancomycin (78.3%). The 30-day sustained cure rates for LFF571 and vancomycin were 56.7% and 65.0%, respectively, in the per-protocol population and 58.7% and 60.0%, respectively, in the modified intent-to-treat population. Using toxin-confirmed cases only, the recurrence rates were lower for LFF571 (19% versus 25% for vancomycin in the per-protocol population). LFF571 was generally safe and well tolerated. The incidence of adverse events (AEs) was higher for LFF571 (76.1% versus 69.2% for vancomycin), although more AEs in the vancomycin group were suspected to be related to the study drug (38.5% versus 32.6% for LFF571). One patient receiving LFF571 discontinued the study due to an AE. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01232595.) PMID:25534727

  17. A randomized controlled trial comparing foster care and institutional care for children with signs of reactive attachment disorder

    PubMed Central

    Smyke, Anna T.; Zeanah, Charles H.; Gleason, Mary Margaret; Drury, Stacy S.; Fox, Nathan A.; Nelson, Charles A.; Guthrie, Donald

    2014-01-01

    Objective The authors examined signs of emotionally withdrawn (inhibited type) and indiscriminately social (disinhibited type) reactive attachment disorder in Romanian children enrolled in a randomized trial of foster care compared with institutional care and in a comparison group of never-institutionalized children. Method At baseline and when children were ages 30, 42, and 54 months and 8 years, caregivers were interviewed with the Disturbances of Attachment Interview to assess changed in signs of reactive attachment disorder in three groups of children: those receiving care as usual (including continued institutional care) (N=68); those placed in foster care after institutional care (N=68), and those who were never institutionalized (N=72). The impact of gender, ethnicity, and baseline cognitive ability was also examined. Results On the Disturbances of Attachment Interview, signs of the inhibited type of reactive attachment disorder decreased after placement in foster care, and scores were indistinguishable from those of never-institutionalized children after 30 months. Signs of the disinhibited type were highest in the usual care group, lower in the foster care group, and lowest in the never-institutionalized group. Early placement in foster care (before age 24 months) was associated with fewer signs of the disinhibited type. Lower baseline cognitive ability was associated with more signs of the inhibited type in the usual care group and more signs of the disinhibited type in both groups. Conclusions Signs of the inhibited type of reactive attachment disorder responded quickly to placement in foster care; signs of the disinhibited type showed less robust resolution with foster placement. Lower baseline cognitive ability was linked to signs of reactive attachment disorder. PMID:22764361

  18. A Randomized Depression Prevention Trial Comparing Interpersonal Psychotherapy--Adolescent Skills Training to Group Counseling in Schools.

    PubMed

    Young, Jami F; Benas, Jessica S; Schueler, Christie M; Gallop, Robert; Gillham, Jane E; Mufson, Laura

    2016-04-01

    Given the rise in depression disorders in adolescence, it is important to develop and study depression prevention programs for this age group. The current study examined the efficacy of Interpersonal Psychotherapy-Adolescent Skills Training (IPT-AST), a group prevention program for adolescent depression, in comparison to group programs that are typically delivered in school settings. In this indicated prevention trial, 186 adolescents with elevated depression symptoms were randomized to receive IPT-AST delivered by research staff or group counseling (GC) delivered by school counselors. Hierarchical linear modeling examined differences in rates of change in depressive symptoms and overall functioning from baseline to the 6-month follow-up assessment. Cox regression compared rates of depression diagnoses. Adolescents in IPT-AST showed significantly greater improvements in self-reported depressive symptoms and evaluator-rated overall functioning than GC adolescents from baseline to the 6-month follow-up. However, there were no significant differences between the two conditions in onset of depression diagnoses. Although both intervention conditions demonstrated significant improvements in depressive symptoms and overall functioning, results indicate that IPT-AST has modest benefits over groups run by school counselors which were matched on frequency and duration of sessions. In particular, IPT-AST outperformed GC in reduction of depressive symptoms and improvements in overall functioning. These findings point to the clinical utility of this depression prevention program, at least in the short-term. Additional follow-up is needed to determine the long-term effects of IPT-AST, relative to GC, particularly in preventing depression onset.

  19. Comparing the Effects of Agnugol and Metformin on Oligomenorrhea in Patients with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shayan, Arezoo; Masoumi, Seyedeh Zahra; Tohidi, Shahin; Khalili, Arash

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrinopathy and cause of oligomenorrhea in women. Aim The present study was conducted with the aim to compare the effect of Agnugol and Metformin drugs on oligomenorrhea in patients with PCOS. Materials and Methods This study was a clinical trial on 120 women with PCOS and had oligomenorrhea, referring to a gynaecology clinic Fatemieh, Hamadan city, Iran, 2015. Women were randomly divided into 2 groups using permutation blocks (getting the medications Agnugol and Metformin) and were treated with drugs Agnugol and Metformin for 3 months. Data collection included demographic questionnaire and check list was designed and completed before and at the end of interventions, by both groups. To analyse the data, descriptive statistics, chi-square tests, t-test, ANOVA with repeated measures was used. Results The mean and SD of age was 39.45±4.60 for women taking Agnugol and 38.466±0.84 for those taking Metformin. Based on the results between the subjects, the two groups were not significantly different in terms of menstruation length, cycle intervals, or the number of pads, meaning that the two drugs had similar effects on menstrual cycle regulation, menstruation length and the number of pads. More side effects were reported in the group using Metformin. Conclusion Agnugol and Metformin drugs in the treatment of oligomenorrhea patients with PCOS have the same effect. Since Metformin is a chemical drug with side effects, Agnugol can be presented as its herbal alternative to treat oligomenorrhea. PMID:28208942

  20. Randomized clinical trial comparing abluminal biodegradable polymer sirolimus-eluting stents with durable polymer sirolimus-eluting stents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haijun; Wang, Xiangfei; Deng, Wei; Wang, Shenguo; Ge, Junbo; Toft, Egon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The biodegradable polymer drug-eluting stents (DES) were developed to improve vascular healing. However, further data and longer-term follow-up are needed to confirm safety and efficacy of these stents. This randomized clinical trial aimed to compare safety and efficacy of 2 sirolimus-eluting stents (SES): Cordimax—a novel abluminal biodegradable polymer SES and Cypher Select—a durable polymer SES, at 9 months angiographic and 5-year clinical follow-up. Methods: We randomized 402 patients with coronary artery disease to percutaneous coronary intervention with Cordimax (n = 202) or Cypher select (n = 200). Angiographic follow-up was performed at 9 months after the index procedure and clinical follow-up annually up to 5 years. The primary endpoint was angiographic in-stent late luminal loss (LLL). Secondary endpoints included angiographic restenosis rate, target vessel revascularization (TVR), and major adverse cardiac events (MACEs; defined as cardiac death, myocardial infarction, or TVR) at 5-year follow-up. Results: Cordimax was noninferior to Cypher select for in-stent LLL (0.25 ± 0.47 vs 0.18 ± 0.49 mm; P = 0.587) and in-stent mean diameter stenosis (22.19 ± 12.21% vs 19.89 ± 10.79%; P = 0.064) at 9 months angiographic follow-up. The MACE rates were not different at 1 year (5.9% vs 4.0%, P = 0.376); however, MACE rates from 2 to 5 years were lower in the Cordimax group (6.8% vs 13.1%; P = 0.039). Conclusion: Abluminal biodegradable polymer SES is noninferior to durable polymer SES at 9-month angiographic and 1-year clinical follow-up. However, MACE rates from 2 to 5 years were less in the abluminal biodegradable polymer group. PMID:27661023

  1. Definition of efficiency in vacuum therapy--a randomised controlled trial comparing with V.A.C. Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wild, Thomas; Stremitzer, Stefan; Budzanowski, Annita; Hoelzenbein, Thomas; Ludwig, Claudia; Ohrenberger, Gerald

    2008-12-01

    Redon drains are still used to suction wounds for vacuum sealing. Vacuum-assisted closure (V.A.C.((R)); Kinetic Concepts Inc, San Antonio, TX) is a computer-controlled therapy system for delivering topical negative pressure therapy. The efficiency of V.A.C. in the treatment of pressure ulcers was prospectively studied in a randomised controlled trial in which patients with pressure ulcers were randomly assigned to negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) using either V.A.C. or Redon bottles. The target parameters were absolute and relative proportion of wound area consists of granulation tissue, fibrin and necrosis. Other outcome measures were the number of dressing changes and time invested using each system. The study was terminated after a post hoc analysis after inclusion of ten patients because of the significantly better results when using V.A.C., and the substantially larger care effort needed in the Redon group compared with the V.A.C. group. An increase in surface granulation tissue of 54% was observed in the V.A.C. group, and a reduction in the Redon group (P = 0.001). The Redon group showed an increase in fibrin tissue at the wound base of 21.8%, whereas in the V.A.C group, a 27% reduction was observed (P = 0.035). Necrosis was reduced in the V.A.C. group, but this difference did not reach significance. Redon bottles are not a good alternative for V.A.C. therapy for delivering NPWT.

  2. Anesthetic Activity of Alfaxalone Compared with Ketamine in Mice.

    PubMed

    Siriarchavatana, Parkpoom; Ayers, Jessica D; Kendall, Lon V

    2016-01-01

    Alfaxalone encased in hydroxypropyl-β -cyclodextrin is a neuroactive steroid compound that has recently been approved in the United States for use as an anesthetic in dogs and cats. We evaluated the use of alfaxalone compared with ketamine, both alone and in combination with xylazine, for anesthesia of C57BL/6 mice. We assessed time to onset of anesthesia, duration of action, reflex responses, respiratory rate, and clinical signs. Alfaxalone (80 mg/kg IP) induced a light surgical plane of anesthesia in all mice, with a time to onset of 2.2 ± 0.2 min and duration of 57.1 ± 3.8 min, whereas ketamine (80 mg/kg IP) provided only sedative effects (time to onset, 5.4 ± 0.4 min; duration, 6.9 ± 0.8 min). Clinically, alfaxalone caused a spectrum of activities, including popcorn-like jumping movements after injection, intense scratching of the face, hyperresponsiveness to noise or touch, and marked limb jerking during recovery. Adding xylazine to the single-agent protocols achieved deep surgical anesthesia (duration: alfaxalone + xylazine, 80.3 ± 17.8 min; ketamine + xylazine, 37.4 ± 8.2 min) and ameliorated the adverse clinical signs. Our preliminary analysis suggests that, because of its side effects, alfaxalone alone is not a viable anesthetic option for mice. Although alfaxalone combined with xylazine appeared to be a more viable option, some mice still experienced mild adverse reactions, and the long duration of action might be problematic regarding the maintenance of body temperature and monitoring of recovery. Further studies evaluating different routes of administration and drug combinations are warranted.

  3. Seven-day activity and self-report compared to a direct measure of physical activity.

    PubMed

    Taylor, C B; Coffey, T; Berra, K; Iaffaldano, R; Casey, K; Haskell, W L

    1984-12-01

    To determine how well a seven-day interview-administered activity recall used in a large epidemiologic study at Stanford University reflected seven days of self-reported activity and directly measured physical activity, 30 white males, mean age 52 years, recorded daily physical activity for a week, and half of these wore an ambulatory solid-state minicomputer (Vitalog) which measures continuous heart rate and motion. Total hours of moderate, hard, and hard plus very hard activity were not significantly different for weekdays and weekends for self-report and recall and were significantly correlated. Total energy expenditure for subjects wearing the Vitalog averaged 38.5 +/- 6.7 kcal/kg/day compared to an average of 37.7 +/- 4.5 kcal/kg/day for recall or 39.6 +/- 7.2 kcal/kg/day for self-report. Conditioning activities are best remembered followed by home or leisure and job activities. Mean hours of sleep per week night were significantly greater reported by self-report than reported by recall, but the two were significantly correlated. It is concluded that a seven-day activity recall accurately reflects mean kcal/day expenditure, with conditioning activities being the best recalled. A self-report log used in conjunction with an interview-based seven-day recall might maximize accuracy of recall.

  4. The Walking School Bus and Children's Physical Activity: A Pilot Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Kathy; Baranowski, Tom; Nicklas, Theresa A.; Uscanga, Doris K.; Hanfling, Marcus J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of a “walking school bus” program on children's rates of active commuting to school and physical activity. METHODS: We conducted a pilot cluster randomized controlled trial among 4th-graders from 8 schools in Houston, Texas (N = 149). Random allocation to treatment or control conditions was at the school level. Study staff walked with children to and from school up to 5 days/week. Outcomes were measured the week before (time 1) and during weeks 4 and 5 of the intervention (time 2). The main outcome was the weekly rate of active commuting, and a secondary outcome was moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Covariates included sociodemographics, distance from home to school, neighborhood safety, child BMI z score, parent self-efficacy/outcome expectations, and child self-efficacy for active commuting. A mixed-model repeated measures regression accounted for clustering by school, and stepwise procedures with backward elimination of nonsignificant covariates were used to identify significant predictors. RESULTS: Intervention children increased active commuting (mean ± SD) from 23.8% ± 9.2% (time 1) to 54% ± 9.2% (time 2), whereas control subjects decreased from 40.2% ± 8.9% (time 1) to 32.6% ± 8.9% (time 2) (P < .0001). Intervention children increased their minutes of daily moderate-to-vigorous physical activity from 46.6 ± 4.5 (time 1) to 48.8 ± 4.5 (time 2), whereas control children decreased from 46.1 ± 4.3 (time 1) to 41.3 ± 4.3 (time 2) (P = .029). CONCLUSIONS: The program improved children's active commuting to school and daily moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. PMID:21859920

  5. Are American College of Rheumatology 50% response criteria superior to 20% criteria in distinguishing active aggressive treatment in rheumatoid arthritis clinical trials reported since 1997? A meta‐analysis of discriminant capacities

    PubMed Central

    Chung, C P; Thompson, J L; Koch, G G; Amara, I; Strand, V; Pincus, T

    2006-01-01

    Objective To carry out a meta‐analysis designed to compare the discriminant capacities of American College of Rheumatology 50% (ACR50) with 20% (ACR20) responses in clinical trials on rheumatoid arthritis reported after 1997 and to analyse whether ACR50 can be as informative as ACR20 in distinguishing active from control treatments in more recent trials. Methods Clinical trials on rheumatoid arthritis reported since 1997 were identified, which included aggressive combinations of disease‐modifying antirheumatic drugs and glucocorticoids, as well as powerful new agents—leflunomide, etanercept, infliximab, anakinra, adalimumab, abatacept, tacrolimus and rituximab. A meta‐analysis of ACR20 compared with ACR50 responses for 21 clinical trials was carried out on differences in proportions of responders for active and control treatments and corresponding odds ratios (ORs). Results In all but one clinical trial on rheumatoid arthritis published since 1997 with data available on ACR20 and ACR50, more than 50% of patients who were ACR20 responders among those randomised to active treatment were also ACR50 responders. This phenomenon was seen for control groups in 38% of trials, many of which included treatment with methotrexate. A meta‐analysis of the clinical trials indicated a slight advantage to ACR50 for quantifying treatment comparisons, not significant for differences in proportions but significant for ORs. Conclusion ACR20 and ACR50 seem to be similar in distinguishing active from control treatments in clinical trials on rheumatoid arthritis reported since 1997. As ACR50 represents a considerably stronger clinical response, ACR50 may be a preferred end point for contemporary clinical trials on rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:16504992

  6. Use of pedometer-driven walking to promote physical activity and improve health-related quality of life among meat processing workers: a feasibility trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Current evidence supports the use of pedometers as effective motivational tools to promote physical activity and improve health-related quality of life in the general population. The aims of this study are to examine whether a pedometer-driven walking programme can improve health-related quality of life, and increase ambulatory activity in a population of meat processing workers when compared to a control group receiving educational material alone. Methods/design A feasibility study employing a randomized controlled trial (RCT) design will collect data at three time points. A sample of up to 60 meat workers will be recruited and randomly assigned to either an intervention group N = 30 (12-week pedometer-driven walking program, brief intervention, and educational material), or control group N = 30 (educational material only). The primary outcomes of ambulatory activity, health-related quality of life, and functional capacity, will be evaluated at baseline, immediately following the 12-week intervention and then at three month post-intervention. Discussion This paper describes the design of a feasibility randomized controlled trial, which aims to assess the effectiveness of the introduction of a workplace pedometer-driven walking program compared to normal lifestyle advice in meat processing workers. Trial Registration Number (ANZCTR): 12613000087752. PMID:24175980

  7. Adjunctive Behavioral Activation for the Treatment of Bipolar Depression: A Proof of Concept Trial

    PubMed Central

    Weinstock, Lauren M.; Melvin, Caitlin; Munroe, Mary K.; Miller, Ivan W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Grounded in a model focused on exposure to response-contingent positive reinforcement, and with evidence supporting its acute treatment effects for unipolar depression, an adjunctive behavioral activation (BA) intervention may be especially well suited to the treatment of bipolar depression. The goal of this study was to modify BA for the adjunctive treatment of bipolar depression and to pilot it in a proof of concept trial to assess its preliminary feasibility and acceptability for this population. Methods Twelve adults with bipolar depression were recruited from hospital settings and enrolled in a 20-week open trial of the modified BA, delivered in 16 outpatient sessions, as an adjunct to community pharmacotherapy for bipolar disorder. Symptom severity was assessed at pre- and post-treatment by an independent evaluator. Patient satisfaction was also assessed post-treatment. Results Feasibility and acceptability were high, with 10 of 12 patients completing treatment, an average of 14.8 (SD = 5.2) of 16 sessions attended, and high levels of self-reported treatment satisfaction. Patients exhibited statistically significant improvement from pre- to post-treatment on measures of depressive symptoms, manic symptoms, and severity of suicidal ideation. Conclusions Although preliminary and requiring replication in a larger sample, these study data suggest that a modified BA intervention may offer promise as an adjunctive approach for the acute treatment of bipolar depression. Future studies that employ more rigorous randomized controlled designs and that directly assess potential mechanisms of action are recommended. PMID:27138086

  8. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Theory-Based Activities for the Behavioral Symptoms of Dementia in Nursing Home Residents

    PubMed Central

    Kolanowski, Ann; Litaker, Mark; Buettner, Lin; Moeller, Joyel; Costa, Paul T.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To test the main and interactive effects of activities derived from the Need-driven Dementia-compromised Behavior model for responding to behavioral symptoms in nursing home residents. Activities tailored to functional level and personality style of interest were hypothesized to improve behavioral outcomes to a greater extent than partially- tailored or non-tailored activities. DESIGN Randomized clinical trial, double-blind. SETTING Nine community-based nursing homes. PARTICIPANTS One hundred and twenty eight cognitively impaired residents randomly assigned to activities tailored to: functional level (FL) (n= 32); personality style of interest (PSI) (n= 33); functional level and personality style of interest (FL+PSI) (n= 31); or active control (AC) (n= 32). INTERVENTION Three weeks of activities provided twice daily. MEASUREMENTS Agitation, passivity, engagement, affect, and mood assessed from video-recordings and real time observations during baseline, intervention, random times outside of intervention, and one week post-intervention. RESULTS Compared to baseline all treatments improved outcomes during intervention except mood which worsened under AC. During intervention the PSI group demonstrated greater engagement, alertness, and attention than the other groups; the FL+PSI group demonstrated greater pleasure. During random times, engagement returned to baseline levels except in the FL group where it decreased. There was also less agitation and passivity in groups with a tailored to personality style of interest component. One week post intervention mood, anxiety and passivity improved over baseline; there was significantly less pleasure displayed following withdrawal of treatment. CONCLUSION The hypothesis was partially supported. Personality style of interest is a critical component of individualized activity prescription. PMID:21649633

  9. Apps for IMproving FITness and Increasing Physical Activity Among Young People: The AIMFIT Pragmatic Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yannan; Whittaker, Robyn; Maddison, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    app intervention (n=16), or the control group (n=18). The mean age of participants was 15.7 (SD 1.2) years; participants were mostly NZ Europeans (61%, 31/51) and 57% (29/51) were female. Overall retention rate was 96% (49/51). There was no significant intervention effect on the primary outcome using either of the apps. Compared to the control, time to complete the fitness test was –28.4 seconds shorter (95% CI –66.5 to 9.82, P=.20) for the immersive app group and –24.7 seconds (95% CI –63.5 to 14.2, P=.32) for the nonimmersive app group. No significant intervention effects were found for secondary outcomes. Conclusions Although apps have the ability to increase reach at a low cost, our pragmatic approach using readily available commercial apps as a stand-alone instrument did not have a significant effect on fitness. However, interest in future use of PA apps is promising and highlights a potentially important role of these tools in a multifaceted approach to increase fitness, promote PA, and consequently reduce the adverse health outcomes associated with insufficient activity. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12613001030763; https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?ACTRN=12613001030763 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6aasfJVTJ). PMID:26316499

  10. Using self-determination theory to promote physical activity and weight control: a randomized controlled trial in women.

    PubMed

    Silva, Marlene N; Vieira, Paulo N; Coutinho, Sílvia R; Minderico, Cláudia S; Matos, Margarida G; Sardinha, Luís B; Teixeira, Pedro J

    2010-04-01

    Behavior change interventions are effective to the extent that they affect appropriately-measured outcomes, especially in experimental controlled trials. The primary goal of this study was to analyze the impact of a 1-year weight management intervention based on self-determination theory (SDT) on theory-based psychosocial mediators, physical activity/exercise, and body weight and composition. Participants were 239 women (37.6 +/- 7.1 years; 31.5 +/- 4.1 kg/m(2)) who received either an intervention focused on promoting autonomous forms of exercise regulation and intrinsic motivation, or a general health education program (controls). At 12 months, the intervention group showed increased weight loss (-7.29%,) and higher levels of physical activity/exercise (+138 +/- 26 min/day of moderate plus vigorous exercise; +2,049 +/- 571 steps/day), compared to controls (P < 0.001). Main intervention targets such as more autonomous self-regulation (for treatment and for exercise) and a more autonomous perceived treatment climate revealed large effect sizes (between 0.80 and .96), favoring intervention (P < 0.001). Results suggest that interventions grounded in SDT can be successfully implemented in the context of weight management, enhancing the internalization of more autonomous forms of behavioral regulation, and facilitating exercise adherence, while producing clinically-significant weight reduction, when compared to a control condition. Findings are fully consistent with previous studies conducted within this theoretical framework in other areas of health behavior change.

  11. Comparative activity of Choristoneura fumiferana nucleopolyhedrovirus propagated in different hosts.

    PubMed

    Ebling, Peter M

    2004-07-01

    The biological activity of the Ireland strain of Choristoneura fumiferana (Clem) nucleopolyhedrovirus (CfMNPV) propagated in different hosts was determined to provide the basis upon which genetically modified CfMNPV, or other naturally occurring isolates, should be compared. Occlusion bodies (OB) derived from CF-203 cells were significantly larger and more pathogenic than those propagated in vivo when tested against the fifth larval instar of C fumiferana (Clem) and C occidentalis Freeman. The dose-responses (LD50 and LD95, expressed as occlusion bodies per larva) of C fumiferana larvae to in vitro-propagated OBs were 274 and 5785, respectively. The values of LD50 and LD95 to C occidentalis larvae were 19 and 118, respectively. There were no significant differences in pathogenicity or size when OBs propagated in C fumiferana larvae were tested against either insect species, nor were there significant differences for OBs propagated in C occidentalis larvae. The LD50 and LD95 of in vivo-produced OBs to C fumiferana were 925 and 61988, respectively. The LD50 and LD95 to C occidentalis were 50 and 453, respectively. OBs propagated in vitro had a mean volume of 13.13 microm3, whereas those propagated in vivo ranged from 0.84 to 1.41 microm3. The median survival time-responses (ST50) of fifth-instar C fumiferana or C occidentalis larvae to OBs propagated in vivo were not significantly different from those propagated in vitro at the dosage levels tested. Values of ST50 of C fumiferana larvae to in vitro- and in vivo-produced OBs at dosages causing less than 50% mortality rangedfrom 9.6 to 9.8 days post-inoculation (dpi), whereas a LD95 dose resulted in ST50 values ranging from 7.3 to 7.7 days. ST50 values of C occidentalis larvae at dosages causing less than 50% mortality ranged from 9.8 to 10.2 dpi, whereas a LD95 dose resulted in ST50 values ranging from 9.5 to 9.8 dpi. The median feeding cessation time-response (FT50) of fifth-instar C fumiferana larvae to OBs

  12. 21 CFR 312.87 - Active monitoring of conduct and evaluation of clinical trials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... clinical trials. 312.87 Section 312.87 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... and evaluation of clinical trials. For drugs covered under this section, the Commissioner and other agency officials will monitor the progress of the conduct and evaluation of clinical trials and...

  13. 21 CFR 312.87 - Active monitoring of conduct and evaluation of clinical trials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... clinical trials. 312.87 Section 312.87 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... and evaluation of clinical trials. For drugs covered under this section, the Commissioner and other agency officials will monitor the progress of the conduct and evaluation of clinical trials and...

  14. 21 CFR 312.87 - Active monitoring of conduct and evaluation of clinical trials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... clinical trials. 312.87 Section 312.87 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... and evaluation of clinical trials. For drugs covered under this section, the Commissioner and other agency officials will monitor the progress of the conduct and evaluation of clinical trials and...

  15. 21 CFR 312.87 - Active monitoring of conduct and evaluation of clinical trials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... clinical trials. 312.87 Section 312.87 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... and evaluation of clinical trials. For drugs covered under this section, the Commissioner and other agency officials will monitor the progress of the conduct and evaluation of clinical trials and...

  16. Protocol for a randomised controlled trial comparing aqueous with alcoholic chlorhexidine antisepsis for the prevention of superficial surgical site infection after minor surgery in general practice: the AVALANCHE trial

    PubMed Central

    Heal, C F; Charles, D; Hardy, A; Delpachitra, M; Banks, J; Wohlfahrt, M; Saednia, Sabine; Buettner, P

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Surgical site infection (SSI) after minor skin excisions has a significant impact on patient morbidity and healthcare resources. Skin antisepsis prior to surgical incision is used to prevent SSI, and is performed routinely worldwide. However, in spite of the routine use of skin antisepsis, there is no consensus regarding which antiseptic agents are most effective. The AVALANCHE trial will compare Aqueous Versus Alcoholic Antisepsis with Chlorhexidine for Skin Excisions. Methods and analysis The study design is a prospective, randomised controlled trial (RCT) with the aim of investigating the impact of two different antiseptic preparations on the incidence of superficial SSI in patients undergoing minor skin excisions. The intervention of 0.5% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) in 70% alcohol will be compared with that of 0.5% CHG in aqueous solution. The trial will be conducted in four Australian general practices over a 9-month period, with 920 participants to be recruited. Consecutive patients presenting for minor skin excisions will be eligible to participate. Randomisation will be on the level of the patient. The primary outcome is superficial SSI in the first 30 days following the excision. Secondary outcomes will be adverse effects, including anaphylaxis, skin irritation, contact dermatitis and rash and patterns of antibiotic resistance. Ethics and dissemination The study has been approved by the James Cook University Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC). Findings will be disseminated in conference presentations and journals and through online electronic media. Discussion RCTs conducted in general practice differ from hospital-based projects in terms of feasibility, pragmatism and funding. The success of this trial will be cemented in the fact that the research question was established by a group of general practitioners who identified an interesting question which is relevant to their clinical practice and not answered by current evidence. Trial

  17. Young Children's Preference for Television Viewing Compared with Other Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavenas, Rosemarie

    1987-01-01

    Young children's own perceptions of their preference for television viewing relative to other developmentally appropriate activities were studied through means of a questionnaire. The respondents rated television viewing as a less attractive activity than playing outside, playing with play dough, and building with sand, but few preferred story…

  18. Prevention of deep vein thrombosis in potential neurosurgical patients. A randomized trial comparing graduated compression stockings alone or graduated compression stockings plus intermittent pneumatic compression with control

    SciTech Connect

    Turpie, A.G.; Hirsh, J.; Gent, M.; Julian, D.; Johnson, J.

    1989-03-01

    In a randomized trial of neurosurgical patients, groups wearing graduated compression stockings alone (group 1) or graduated compression stockings plus intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) (group 2) were compared with an untreated control group in the prevention of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). In both active treatment groups, the graduated compression stockings were continued for 14 days or until hospital discharge, if earlier. In group 2, IPC was continued for seven days. All patients underwent DVT surveillance with iodine 125-labeled fibrinogen leg scanning and impedance plethysmography. Venography was carried out if either test became abnormal. Deep vein thrombosis occurred in seven (8.8%) of 80 patients in group 1, in seven (9.0%) of 78 patients in group 2, and in 16 (19.8%) of 81 patients in the control group. The observed differences among these rates are statistically significant. The results of this study indicate that graduated compression stockings alone or in combination with IPC are effective methods of preventing DVT in neurosurgical patients.

  19. Virtual reality compared with in vivo exposure in the treatment of social anxiety disorder: a three-arm randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Stéphane; Dumoulin, Stéphanie; Robillard, Geneviève; Guitard, Tanya; Klinger, Évelyne; Forget, Hélène; Loranger, Claudie; Roucaut, François Xavier

    2017-04-01

    BackgroundPeople with social anxiety disorder (SAD) fear social interactions and may be reluctant to seek treatments involving exposure to social situations. Social exposure conducted in virtual reality (VR), embedded in individual cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT), could be an answer.AimsTo show that conducting VR exposure in CBT for SAD is effective and is more practical for therapists than conducting exposure in vivoMethodParticipants were randomly assigned to either VR exposure (n = 17), in vivo exposure (n = 22) or waiting list (n = 20). Participants in the active arms received individual CBT for 14 weekly sessions and outcome was assessed with questionnaires and a behaviour avoidance test. (Trial registration number ISRCTN99747069)ResultsImprovements were found on the primary (Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale) and all five secondary outcome measures in both CBT groups compared with the waiting list. Conducting exposure in VR was more effective at post-treatment than in vivo on the primary outcome measure and on one secondary measure. Improvements were maintained at the 6-month follow-up. VR was significantly more practical for therapists than in vivo exposure.ConclusionsUsing VR can be advantageous over standard CBT as a potential solution for treatment avoidance and as an efficient, cost-effective and practical medium of exposure.

  20. Do brief online planning interventions increase physical activity amongst university students? A randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Skår, Silje; Sniehotta, Falko F; Molloy, Gerard J; Prestwich, Andrew; Araújo-Soares, Vera

    2011-04-01

    Brief planning interventions, usually delivered within paper and pencil questionnaires, have been found to be effective in changing health behaviours. Using a double-blind randomised controlled trial, this study examined the efficacy of two types of planning interventions (action plans and coping plans) in increasing physical activity levels when they are delivered via the internet. Following the completion of self-reported physical activity (primary outcome) and theory of planned behaviour (TPB) measures at baseline, students (N = 1273) were randomised into one of four conditions on the basis of a 2 (received instructions to form action plans or not) × 2 (received instructions to form coping plans or not) factorial design. Physical activity (primary outcome) and TPB measures were completed again at two-month follow-up. An objective measure (attendance at the university's sports facilities) was employed 6 weeks after a follow-up for a duration of 13 weeks (secondary outcome). The interventions did not change self-reported physical activity, attendance at campus sports facilities or TPB measures. This might be due to low adherence to the intervention protocol (ranging from 58.8 to 76.7%). The results of this study suggest that the planning interventions under investigation are ineffective in changing behaviour when delivered online to a sample of participants unaware of the allocation to different conditions. Possible moderators of the effectiveness of planning interventions in changing health behaviours are discussed.

  1. Enhancing physical activity adherence and well-being in multiple sclerosis: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    McAuley, E; Motl, R W; Morris, K S; Hu, L; Doerksen, S E; Elavsky, S; Konopack, J F

    2007-06-01

    Individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) are more sedentary than the general population, increasing their propensity for reduced functional ability, mobility, and activities of daily living. Self-efficacy has been one of the most consistent determinants of physical activity across populations, including those with MS. However, no studies exist that have attempted to influence self-efficacy in MS patients, in an effort to improve physical activity participation. We conducted a three-month randomised, controlled trial (n=26), contrasting the effects of an efficacy-enhancement exercise condition and a control exercise condition on exercise adherence, well-being, and affective responses to exercise. Analyses indicated that individuals in the efficacy enhancement condition attended more exercise sessions, reported greater levels of well-being and exertion, and felt better following exercise than individuals in the standard care condition. Regardless of treatment condition, individuals with a stronger sense of exercise self-efficacy, who reported more enjoyment following the exercise sessions, demonstrated significantly greater adherence with the exercise program. We believe this to be the first empirical attempt to change physical activity behavior in persons with MS using a well-established theoretical framework to drive the intervention. Continued examination of self-efficacy as a determinant of behavior change in individuals with MS is needed.

  2. Associative learning over trials activates the hippocampus in healthy elderly but not mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sterling C; Schmitz, Taylor W; Asthana, Sanjay; Gluck, Mark A; Myers, Catherine

    2008-03-01

    The ability to form associations between choice alternatives and their contingent outcomes is an important aspect of learning that may be sensitive to hippocampal dysfunction in memory disorders of aging such as amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCIa), or early Alzheimer disease. In this preliminary study we examined brain activation using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 12 healthy elderly participants and nine patients with MCIa during an associative learning task. Using a high-field 3.0-Tesla MRI scanner, we examined the dynamic neural response during associative learning over trials. The slope of signal attenuation associated with learning was analyzed for differences between groups within an a priori defined hippocampal region. Results indicated dynamic signal attenuation associated with learning in the healthy elderly sample, but not in MCIa. The absence of an associative learning effect in the MCIa sample reaffirms an important link between the learning difficulties that are commonly encountered in MCIa and the mesial temporal region.

  3. Cortical activities of single-trial P300 amplitudes modulated by memory load using simultaneous EEG-fMRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiushi; Zhao, Xiaojie; Zhu, Chaozhe; Yang, Xueqian; Yao, Li

    2015-03-01

    The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) researches on working memory have found that activation of cortical areas appeared dependent on memory load, and event-related potentials (ERP) studies have demonstrated that amplitudes of P300 decreased significantly when working memory load increased. However, the cortical activities related with P300 amplitudes under different memory loads remains unclear. Joint fMRI and EEG analysis which fusions the time and spatial information in simultaneous EEG-fMRI recording can reveal the regional activation at each ERP time point. In this paper, we first used wavelet transform to obtain the single-trial amplitudes of P300 caused by a digital N-back task in the simultaneous EEG-fMRI recording as the ERP feature sequences. Then the feature sequences in 1-back condition and 3-back condition were introduced into general linear model (GLM) separately as parametric modulations to compare the cortical activation under different memory loads. The results showed that the average amplitudes of P300 in 3-back significantly decreased than that in 1-back, and the activities induced by ERP feature sequences in 3-back also significantly decreased than that in the 1-back, including the insular, anterior cingulate cortex, right inferior frontal gyrus, and medial frontal gyrus, which were relevant to the storage, monitoring, and manipulation of information in working memory task. Moreover, the difference in the activation caused by ERP feature showed a positive correlation with the difference in behavioral performance. These findings demonstrated the locations of P300 amplitudes differences modulated by the memory load and its relationship with the behavioral performance.

  4. Comparing the quality of oral anticoagulant management by anticoagulation clinics and by family physicians: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, S. Jo-Anne; Wells, Philip S.; Kovacs, Michael J.; Lewis, Geoffrey M.; Martin, Janet; Burton, Erica; Anderson, David R.

    2003-01-01

    Background There is growing evidence that better outcomes are achieved when anticoagulation is managed by anticoagulation clinics rather than by family physicians. We carried out a randomized controlled trial to evaluate these 2 models of anticoagulant care. Methods We randomly allocated patients who were expected to require warfarin sodium for 3 months either to anticoagulation clinics located in 3 Canadian tertiary hospitals or to their family physician practices. We evaluated the quality of oral anticoagulant management by comparing the proportion of time that the international normalized ratio (INR) of patients receiving warfarin sodium was within the target therapeutic range ± 0.2 INR units (expanded therapeutic range) while they were managed in anticoagulation clinics as opposed to family physicians' care over 3 months. We measured the rates of thromboembolic and major hemorrhagic events and patient satisfaction in the 2 groups. Results Of the 221 patients enrolled, 112 were randomly assigned to anticoagulation clinics and 109 to family physicians. The INR values of patients who were managed by anticoagulation clinics were within the expanded therapeutic range 82% of the time versus 76% of the time for those managed by family physicians (p = 0.034). High-risk INR values (defined as being < 1.5 or > 5.0) were more commonly observed in patients managed by family physicians (40%) than in patients managed by anticoagulation clinics (30%, p = 0.005). More INR measurements were performed by family physicians than by anticoagulation clinics (13 v. 11, p = 0.001). Major bleeding events (2 [2%] v. 1 [1%]), thromboembolic ev