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Sample records for active continental collision

  1. Continental collisions and seismic signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, R.; Wever, Th.; Sadowiak, P.

    1991-04-01

    Reflection seismics in compressional belts has revealed the structure of crustal shortening and thickening processes, showing complex patterns of indentation and interfingering of colliding crusts and subcrustal lithospheres. Generally, in the upper crust large zones of detachments develop, often showing duplexes and 'crocodile' structures. The lower crust from zones of active collision (e.g. Alps, Pyrenees) is characterized by strongly dipping reflections. The base of the crust with the Moho must be continuously equilibrating after orogenic collapse as areas of former continental collision exhibit flat Mohos and subhorizontal reflections. The depth to the Moho increases during collision and decreases after the onset of post-orogenic extension, until finally the crustal root disappears completely together with the erosion of the mountains. Processes, active during continental collisions and orogenic collapse, create distinct structures which are imaged by reflection seismic profiling. Examples are shown and discussed.

  2. Changing mechanical response during continental collision: Active examples from the foreland thrust belts of Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Dan M.; Lillie, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    We have used data from teleseismic, seismic reflection and field geologic studies, along with both geomechanical and gravity modeling to contrast the tectonics of four active orogenic wedges in Pakistan: the Kashmir Himalaya, the Salt Range-Potwar Plateau foldbelt, the Sulaiman Range and the Makran accretionary wedge. In Makran, oceanic crust is still being subducted, and a thick pile of sediments is being accreted and underplated. Undercompaction and excess pore pressures can explain the narrow cross-sectional taper and frontal aseismicity of this wedge. Beneath the Sulaiman wedge, continental crust is just starting to be underthrust. Indirect evidence suggests that fine-grained carbonate rocks found in abundance deep in the stratigraphic section may be deforming ductilely at the base of the Sulaiman wedge and provide a zone of ductile detachment. The collision has proceeded to a much more mature stage in the Salt Range-Potwar Plateau foldbelt and the Kashmir Himalaya. Isostatic response to underthrusting of continental crust has kept the sedimentary pile quite thin in both of these wedges, so in that respect the two foldbelts are similar. However, thick Eocambrian salt beneath the Salt Range and Potwar Plateau permits that foldbelt to be much wider in map view, with a thinner cross-sectional taper and a mixture of thrust vergence directions. A major normal fault in basement causes the Salt Range to rise in front of the mildly deformed molasse basin of the southern Potwar Plateau. Much of the diversity among these mountain belts can be understood in terms of differences in the maturity of the collision process in each area, the resulting thickness of the sedimentary pile encountered at the deformation front, and the presence or absence of large contrasts in strength between the various layers of the stratigraphic section and basement relief.

  3. Basins in ARC-continental collisions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.; Clift, Peter D.; Busby, Cathy; Azor, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Arc-continent collisions occur commonly in the plate-tectonic cycle and result in rapidly formed and rapidly collapsing orogens, often spanning just 5-15 My. Growth of continental masses through arc-continent collision is widely thought to be a major process governing the structural and geochemical evolution of the continental crust over geologic time. Collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with passive continental margins (a situation in which the arc, on the upper plate, faces the continent) involve a substantially different geometry than collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with active continental margins (a situation requiring more than one convergence zone and in which the arc, on the lower plate, backs into the continent), with variable preservation potential for basins in each case. Substantial differences also occur between trench and forearc evolution in tectonically erosive versus tectonically accreting margins, both before and after collision. We examine the evolution of trenches, trench-slope basins, forearc basins, intra-arc basins, and backarc basins during arc-continent collision. The preservation potential of trench-slope basins is low; in collision they are rapidly uplifted and eroded, and at erosive margins they are progressively destroyed by subduction erosion. Post-collisional preservation of trench sediment and trench-slope basins is biased toward margins that were tectonically accreting for a substantial length of time before collision. Forearc basins in erosive margins are usually floored by strong lithosphere and may survive collision with a passive margin, sometimes continuing sedimentation throughout collision and orogeny. The low flexural rigidity of intra-arc basins makes them deep and, if preserved, potentially long records of arc and collisional tectonism. Backarc basins, in contrast, are typically subducted and their sediment either lost or preserved only as fragments in melange sequences. A substantial proportion of the sediment derived from

  4. Collision zone magmatism aids continental crustal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savov, Ivan; Meliksetian, Khachatur; Ralf, Halama; Gevorg, Navasardian; Chuck, Connor; Massimo, D'Antonio; Samuele, Agostini; Osamu, Ishizuka; Sergei, Karapetian; Arkadi, Karakhanian

    2014-05-01

    The continental crust has a broadly andesitic bulk composition and is predominantly generated at convergent margins. However, estimates of the bulk composition of oceanic arcs indicate a bulk composition closer to basalt than to andesite. Hence, reworking processes that transform basaltic island arc crust into andesitic continental crust are essential[1] and explaining growth of andesitic continental crust via accretion of arc crustal fragments remains problematic. Recent studies of magmatism in the Great Tibetan Plateau[2], as site of multiple and still active continent-continent collisions, have proposed that andesitic CC is generated via amalgamation of large volumes of collision-related felsic magmas generated by melting of hydrated oceanic crust with mantle geochemical signatures. We aim to test this hypothesis by evaluating geochemical data from the volcanically and tectonically active Lesser Caucasus region (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia and E. Turkey), as the only other region where active continent-continent collision takes place. We will benefit from the newly compiled volcano-tectonic database of collision-related volcanic and plutonic rocks of Armenia that is comparable in quality and detail to the one available on Tibet. Our dataset combines several detailed studies from the large Aragats shield volcano[3] and associated monogenetic volcanic fields (near the capital city of Yerevan), as well as > 500 Quaternary to Holocene volcanoes from Gegham, Vardenis and Syunik volcanic highlands (toward Armenia-Nagorno-Karabakh-Azerbaijan-Iran border). The Armenian collision-related magmatism is diverse in volume, composition, eruption style and volatile contents. Interestingly, the majority of exposed volcanics are andesitic in composition. Nearly all collision-related volcanic rocks, even the highly differentiated dacite and rhyolite ignimbrites, have elevated Sr concentrations and 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd ratios varying only little (average ~ 0.7043 and ~ 0

  5. Active Dehydration, Delamination and Deformation of Transitional Continental Crust in an Arc-Continent Collision, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, T. B.; Rau, R. J.; Chen, K. H.; Huang, H. H.; Wang, Y. J.; Ouimet, W. B.

    2014-12-01

    A new study of the 3-D velocity structure of Taiwan, using a new tomographic model (Vp and Vs; Huang et al., 2014), suggests that subducted continental crust is delaminated from the subducting mantle of the Eurasia plate and progressively deformed by the subducting Philippine Sea plate. In southern Taiwan, vertical sections show an east-dipping, asymmetric lobe of low velocity that projects down dip to a band of seismicity interpreted as the Wadati-Benioff zone of the subducting Eurasian plate. Seismic tremors in the mid-crust also suggest dehydration (Chuang et al., 2014), consistent with prograde metamorphism of crustal materials. In central Taiwan, however, the seismicity of the W-B zone progressively disappears and the low velocity lobe shallows and broadens. The velocity structure of the lower and middle crust (represented by the 7.5 and 6.5 km/sec isovelocity surfaces, respectively) also appear distinctly out-of-phase, with the lower crust forming a broad, smooth synformal structure that contrasts with the higher amplitude undulations of the middle crust. These mid-crust structures appear as smaller irregular lobes separated by patches of higher velocity. In northern Taiwan, the velocity structure of the lower and middle crust again appear "in phase" and form a symmetrical crustal root centered beneath the Central Range. Seismicity patterns and 3-D analysis of the velocity structure also show the western edge of the PSP subducting beneath the eastern Central Range. We interpret these south-to-north changes to reflect the partial subduction (southern Taiwan), delamination (central Taiwan) and deformation (northern Taiwan) of continental-like crust. Support for these interpretation comes from: 1) unusually high rates of surface uplift (up to 15 mm/yr; Ching et al., 2011); 2) Vp and Vs attenuation studies that suggest anomalously high temperatures; 3) evidence for NE-SW extension; and 4) anomalous areas of low topographic relief.

  6. Numerical Geodynamic Experiments of Continental Collision: Past and Present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Robert

    Research explores deep continental lithosphere (i.e., the continental lower crust and mantle lithosphere) deformation during continental collision. I found that depending on the composition/rheology of the crust and the amount of radiogenic heat production in the crust, three dominant modes of mantle lithosphere deformation evolve under Neoarchean-like conditions: (1) a pure-shear thickening style; (2) an imbrication style; (3) and a "flat-subduction" style. The imbrication and the flat-subduction styles result in the emplacement of "plate-like" mantle lithosphere at depths between 200 km and 325 km. The imbrication style behavior shifts to the "flat-subduction" style behavior after a crustal inversion event. I investigated mature Phanerozoic-style collision and found that it is sensitive to mantle lithosphere density, mantle lithosphere yield stress, lower-crustal strength and to the presence of phase change-related density changes in the lower crust. The early stages of collision are accommodated by subduction of lower crust and mantle lithosphere along a discrete shear zone beneath the overriding plate. Next, the subducting lower crust and mantle lithosphere retreat from the collision zone, permitting the sub-lithospheric mantle to upwell and intrude the overriding plate. Next, the lower crust and mantle lithosphere of the overriding plate delaminate from the overlying crust. This process produces plateau-like uplift. These modeling results are interpreted in the context of available geological and geophysical observables for the Himalayan-Tibetan orogen. I quantitatively investigated the effects that sediment deposition may have on continental lithosphere deformation during collision. In the absence of sedimentation, the early stages of collision are accommodated by subduction of lower crust and mantle lithosphere beneath the overriding plate. Next, the subducting lower crust and mantle lithosphere retreat from the collision zone. This permits the sub

  7. Differential structural and geomorphic mountain-front evolution in an active continental collision zone: the NW Pamir, southern Kyrgyzstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strecker, M. R.; Hilley, G. E.; Arrowsmith, J. R.; Coutand, I.

    2002-12-01

    Western, central, and eastern segments of the Trans Alai mountain front in the northern Pamir of Kyrgyzstan have accommodated varying degrees of approachment of the Pamir orogen with respect to the Tien Shan mountains to the north. Ongoing collision between the northwestern corner of the Indian indenter and Eurasia has resulted in closure of the intramontane Alai Valley, which separates the Tien Shan and Trans Alai (Pamir) ranges. The different segments highlight the processes of shaping tectonically active mountain fronts in a semi-arid environment. In this study, we have characterized this variation in processes with compilations of regional tectonic information, detailed geologic and geomorphic maps, topographic analyses, and interpretation of seismic reflection data. Along the sinuous western segment of the mountain front, dextrally oblique thrusting has created a wide (>500m) zone of highly erodible fault gouge. This fault zone impinges on the southern Tien Shan, but complete basin closure is prevented by erosion of the westward-flowing Kyzilsu River; the Kyzilsu valley forms the only outlet and is the vestige of a formerly contiguous sedimentary basin linking the Tarim Basin of China with the Tadjik Depression in the west. Numerous large landslides rooted in the fault zone have covered the trace of the active fault, which is partially undercut by the Kyzilsu River. Older, large landslides in this setting are associated with different levels of fluvial terraces of the former or present course of the Kyzilsu River, suggesting a causative relation between lateral fluvial scouring, failure of mechanically weak mountain fronts, ongoing faulting, and mass transfer. Along the linear central segment, deformation is confined to a narrow single south-dipping thrust fault that juxtaposes Pliocene/Pleistocene and Holocene conglomerates. In this sector, the mountain front has numerous Holocene offsets. This prevailing structural style and the long-term deformation are

  8. Differential structural and geomorphic mountain-front evolution in an active continental collision zone: the NW Pamir, southern Kyrgyzstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strecker, M. R.; Hilley, G. E.; Arrowsmith, J. R.; Coutand, I.

    2003-04-01

    Western, central, and eastern segments of the Trans Alai mountain front in the northern Pamir of Kyrgyzstan have accommodated varying degrees of approachment of the Pamir orogen with respect to the Tien Shan mountains to the north. Ongoing collision between the northwestern corner of the Indian indenter and Eurasia has resulted in closure of the intramontane Alai Valley, which separates the Tien Shan and Trans Alai (Pamir) ranges. The different segments highlight the processes of shaping tectonically active mountain fronts in a semi-arid environment. In this study, we have characterized this variation in processes with compilations of regional tectonic information, detailed geologic and geomorphic maps, topographic analyses, and interpretation of seismic reflection data. Along the sinuous western segment of the mountain front, dextrally oblique thrusting has created a wide (>500m) zone of highly erodible fault gouge. This fault zone impinges on the southern Tien Shan, but complete basin closure is prevented by erosion of the westward-flowing Kyzilsu River; the Kyzilsu valley forms the only outlet and is the vestige of a formerly contiguous sedimentary basin linking the Tarim Basin of China with the Tadjik Depression in the west. Numerous large landslides rooted in the fault zone have covered the trace of the active fault, which is partially undercut by the Kyzilsu River. Older, large landslides in this setting are associated with different levels of fluvial terraces of the former or present course of the Kyzilsu River, suggesting a causative relation between lateral fluvial scouring, failure of mechanically weak mountain fronts, ongoing faulting, and mass transfer. Along the linear central segment, deformation is confined to a narrow single south-dipping thrust fault that juxtaposes Pliocene/Pleistocene and Holocene conglomerates. In this sector, the mountain front has numerous Holocene offsets. This prevailing structural style and the long-term deformation are

  9. Introduction to TETHYS—an interdisciplinary GIS database for studying continental collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, S. D.; Flower, M. F. J.; Sultan, M. I.; Sandvol, E.

    2006-05-01

    The TETHYS GIS database is being developed as a way to integrate relevant geologic, geophysical, geochemical, geochronologic, and remote sensing data bearing on Tethyan continental plate collisions. The project is predicated on a need for actualistic model 'templates' for interpreting the Earth's geologic record. Because of their time-transgressive character, Tethyan collisions offer 'actualistic' models for features such as continental 'escape', collision-induced upper mantle flow magmatism, and marginal basin opening, associated with modern convergent plate margins. Large integrated geochemical and geophysical databases allow for such models to be tested against the geologic record, leading to a better understanding of continental accretion throughout Earth history. The TETHYS database combines digital topographic and geologic information, remote sensing images, sample-based geochemical, geochronologic, and isotopic data (for pre- and post-collision igneous activity), and data for seismic tomography, shear-wave splitting, space geodesy, and information for plate tectonic reconstructions. Here, we report progress on developing such a database and the tools for manipulating and visualizing integrated 2-, 3-, and 4-d data sets with examples of research applications in progress. Based on an Oracle database system, linked with ArcIMS via ArcSDE, the TETHYS project is an evolving resource for researchers, educators, and others interested in studying the role of plate collisions in the process of continental accretion, and will be accessible as a node of the national Geosciences Cyberinfrastructure Network—GEON via the World-Wide Web and ultra-high speed internet2. Interim partial access to the data and metadata is available at: http://geoinfo.geosc.uh.edu/Tethys/ and http://www.esrs.wmich.edu/tethys.htm. We demonstrate the utility of the TETHYS database in building a framework for lithospheric interactions in continental collision and accretion.

  10. Conditions for lower lithosphere exhumation from continental collision: South Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunje, A.; Pysklywec, R. N.

    2013-12-01

    The South Island of New Zealand provides a unique opportunity for the investigation of active deep crustal dynamics and the effects of surface processes during collision, as a fairly young and relatively well-constrained convergent plate boundary. One of the uncertainties of the orogenesis is the fate of the lower crust during the continental collision: portions of the crust are exhumed along the Alpine Fault, but the lowermost crust does not seem to follow. This work focuses on the fate of the mid- and lower-crust during the collision, investigating several of the primary controls - rheology, boundary conditions, temperature - that regulate the behaviour of the crust during an idealized continental collision event. We use forward thermo-mechanical numerical modelling of the mantle and lithosphere, with variable surface boundary conditions of erosion and deposition, to explore the deformation of the crust and mantle lithosphere via the collision; the 2D models are configured for a South Island-type system using available observational constraints. The models show several end member modes of behaviour of the lower crust from complete exhumation, to 'ponding'/ accumulation at the base of the orogen, to subduction and deep entrainment. The rheology of the lower crust is the dominant factor controlling these behaviours, although there is also modification of the dynamics depending on the rates of continental convergence, the presence of active and varying degrees of erosion, and the effects of differing ratios of deposition.

  11. Zircon from Mesoproterozoic sediments sheds light on the subduction-collision history at the eastern active continental margin of the Archaean Kalahari-Grunehogna Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschall, H.; Hawkesworth, C. J.; Leat, P. T.; Dhuime, B.; Storey, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Grunehogna Craton (East Antarctica) was a part of the Archean Kalahari Craton of southern Africa prior to Gondwana breakup. Granite from the basement of the craton has been dated by U-Pb zircon dating to 3,067 Ma with inherited grains showing ages of up to 3,433 Ma [1]. At the eastern margin of the craton, the Ahlmannryggen nunataks comprise an ~2000 m thick pile of clastic and volcanic sediments of the Ritscherflya Supergroup. These were sourced from eroding a proximal active continental arc as demonstrated through the age distribution and internal zoning of detrital zircon [2]. Detrital zircon grains from the Ritscherflya Supergroup show an age distribution with a dominant age peak at ~1,130 Ma, i.e., close to the sedimentation age. Older age peaks include those at 1370 Ma, 1725 Ma, 1880 Ma, 2050 Ma, and 2700 Ma. Palaeo- and Mesoarchaean zircon grains (2800-3445 Ma) were also discovered, corresponding to the age of the Kalahari-Grunehogna Craton basement. Most significantly we found a number of inherited Archaean cores in ~1130 Ma zircons. They demonstrate that the volcanic arc was indeed located on Archaean continental crust, rather than in Mesoproterozoic, intra-oceanic island arcs. The age spectrum of the zircons bears strong evidence for (i) derivation of the entire Ritscherflya sediment sequence from an active continental convergent margin; (ii) a cratonic provenance of part of the sediments from population peaks coinciding with major tectono-thermal events in the Kalahari Craton; (iii) at least some of the active volcanism being located on cratonic basement rather than a juvenile island arc. Detrital zircons in the ~1130 Ma age group show several distinct populations in their Hf isotopic compositions. The dominant group shows negative ɛHf values of -11.5 corresponding to a model age (TDM) of ~2700 Ma (average crustal 176Lu/177Hf = 0.015). A smaller group shows ɛHf values of +2 to +6, which may represent mantle-derived subduction-zone volcanism at

  12. Influence of Earth crust composition on continental collision style in Precambrian conditions: Results of supercomputer modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavyalov, Sergey; Zakharov, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    A number of issues concerning Precambrian geodynamics still remain unsolved because of uncertainity of many physical (thermal regime, lithosphere thickness, crust thickness, etc.) and chemical (mantle composition, crust composition) parameters, which differed considerably comparing to the present day values. In this work, we show results of numerical supercomputations based on petrological and thermomechanical 2D model, which simulates the process of collision between two continental plates, each 80-160 km thick, with various convergence rates ranging from 5 to 15 cm/year. In the model, the upper mantle temperature is 150-200 ⁰C higher than the modern value, while the continental crust radiogenic heat production is higher than the present value by the factor of 1.5. These settings correspond to Archean conditions. The present study investigates the dependence of collision style on various continental crust parameters, especially on crust composition. The 3 following archetypal settings of continental crust composition are examined: 1) completely felsic continental crust; 2) basic lower crust and felsic upper crust; 3) basic upper crust and felsic lower crust (hereinafter referred to as inverted crust). Modeling results show that collision with completely felsic crust is unlikely. In the case of basic lower crust, a continental subduction and subsequent continental rocks exhumation can take place. Therefore, formation of ultra-high pressure metamorphic rocks is possible. Continental subduction also occurs in the case of inverted continental crust. However, in the latter case, the exhumation of felsic rocks is blocked by upper basic layer and their subsequent interaction depends on their volume ratio. Thus, if the total inverted crust thickness is about 15 km and the thicknesses of the two layers are equal, felsic rocks cannot be exhumed. If the total thickness is 30 to 40 km and that of the felsic layer is 20 to 25 km, it breaks through the basic layer leading to

  13. Continental subduction induced tremor activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, H. J.; Chen, K. H.; Ide, S.; Mouyen, M.; Byrne, T. B.

    2015-12-01

    Southern Central Range of Taiwan, a place where deep-seated tectonic tremors (a proxy of slow slip) and earthquake swarms are closely located in space and highly correlated in time, provides rare opportunity towards the understanding of physical mechanisms governing different style of slip. To identify tremor events, we used the identification scheme similar to Ide et al. (2015) but applied slightly different techniques: (1) Higher waveform cross-correlation coefficient (>0.6) (2) careful visual inspection for excluding local earthquakes and short-lasted event (duration < 60 s) (3) Signal to noise ratio higher than 1.2 and lower than 30 (4) No spatio-temporal clustering technique used. During the study period of 2007-2012, we identified 2320 tremor events with duration ranging from 60 s to 1550 s. They are located underneath southern Central Range, forming a NS-striking and SE-dipping pipe-like structure at a depth of 20-40 km. The up-dip extension of this tremor structure reaches an aseismic zone under the western flank of Central Range at shallow depths, where is an area characterized by high heat flow, low Vp and Vs anomaly. Such seismic gap was explained by the buoyancy induced crust detachment during continental subduction of Eurasian Plate. This detachment may open a new channel for hot and ductile material ascending to shallow depth, producing high temperatures along the way. This provides a common mechanism for down-dip tremor and up-dip shallow seismic gap along the same eastern dipping channel. In addition, the tremor events are found to be mostly occurred in high tides and exhibit higher correlation with tide data from west coast of Taiwan. This may again imply the association between tremor activity and subduction of Eurasian Plate.

  14. Styles of continental subduction and collision and their effect on formation and exhumation of UHP rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, C. J.; Beaumont, C.; Jamieson, R. A.

    2006-12-01

    Ultra-high pressure (UHP) metamorphic rocks are exposed in many Phanerozoic mountain belts. It is now widely accepted that they represent continental margin rocks that were subducted to ≥100km during the transition from oceanic subduction to continental collision. A range of subduction-collision mechanisms have been proposed to account for UHP formation and exhumation. A series of upper-mantle-scale geodynamic models is used to test the sensitivity of a subset of these mechanisms to variations in lithosphere density, radioactive heat production, and crustal strength. The subducting crust includes an oceanic domain, a continental margin domain with variable width, thickness, strength, and heat production, and a strong internal continental domain. The models involve dynamic subduction, constant convergence velocity, density changes that accompany the main phase changes during burial, and surface erosion in the collision zone. Results show that continental subduction without retro-continent deformation is favored by relatively dense mantle lithosphere. Subduction of the retro-continent (forearc subduction) is associated with shallow-dipping, low- density mantle lithosphere. Back-thrusting of retro-lithosphere is favored by relatively weak retro-continental crust. UHP material can be exhumed in all 3 model styles, depending on the evolving geometry of the subduction-accretion zone and the degree of decoupling between subducting upper and lower continental crust in this zone. Weaker and/or hotter margins decouple and accrete, and their subsequent exhumation is driven by bulk density contrast (buoyancy) and/or forced expulsion in response to advection of strong continental material into the subduction zone (plunger effect). Stronger and/or colder continental margin material is subducted without decoupling and is then transported laterally, underplating the retro-mantle lithosphere. Model results are compatible with observed geometries and PTt paths from some UHP

  15. The differ respond of China continental to the collision between Eurasian and Philippine Sea plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q.; Gao, R.; He, C.; Guan, Y.; Li, W.

    2010-12-01

    The southeastern margin of China continental is one of ideal area to study modern plate interaction. This area most attract geologists attention is largely covered by widely distributed late Mesozoic igneous rocks. In the past decades many studies focus on the relations of the collision between the Philippine Sea plate and the Eurasian plate in the east of Taiwan region based on geological and geophysical data. In the recent decades the globe or large regional passive and active source seismic images proposed a fine geometry model in which the crust present gradually thinning from inner continent to southeastern margin. This is regarded as evidence of the southeastern margin of China continental —Eurasian plate respond to the collision over against the Taiwan Strait. Relatively the partition feature—the Model if there is difference and how to vary across margin of mainland, still remains poorly defined. In this study, the data recorded by 20 flexible broadband stations deployed onshore along the margin of main continental in Fujian province from 2008 to 2010 and 130 permanent stations of New China Digital Seismology Network (NCDSN), was combined used. And totally 16664 reliable receiver functions were obtained for imaging the structure of the crust and upper mantle beneath the stations array. Only visually comparison, we find the receiver functions are evident different for teleseismic events between the station located at the southwest and the northeast of Fujian province. After the auto-searching algorithm, H-k method, which sums the amplitudes of the receiver functions at the predicted arrival times of Ps and its multiple phases, has been used to determine the best estimations of crustal thickness (H) and VP/VS ratio (k). The preliminary result show that crustal thicknesses stepwise vary from 33-36,32-30 to 29-27km in average north to south, that is a poignant contras with northeastward surface tectonic.the subordinate characteristic, there seems is a Moho

  16. Kinematics of late paleozoic continental collision between laurentia and gondwana.

    PubMed

    Sacks, P E; Secor, D T

    1990-12-21

    In the Appalachians, late Paleozoic Alleghanian orogenesis is widely regarded as resulting from dextral oblique collision between irregular margins of Gondwana and Laurentia. However, this relative plate motion cannot account for coeval convergence in the Ouachitas and Variscides and is incompatible with some tectonic transport indicators in the Appalachians. An alternative kinematic model is proposed in which early sinistral transpression in the Appalachians is followed by counterclockwise rotation of Gondwana and the development of a system of dextral strike-slip faults extending from southern Europe to Alabama.

  17. Kinematics of late Paleozoic continental collision between Laurentia and Gondwana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sacks, P.E.; Secor, D.T.

    1990-01-01

    In the Appalachians, late Paleozoic Alleghanian orogenesis is widely regarded as resulting from dextral oblique collision between irregular margins of Gondwana and Laurentia. However, this relative plate motion cannot account for coeval convergence in the Ouachitas and Variscides and is incompatible with some tectonic transport indicators in the Appalachians. An alternative kinematic model is proposed in which early sinistral transpression in the Appalachians is followed by counterclockwise rotation of Gondwana and the development of a system of dextral strike-slip faults extending from southern Europe to Alabama.

  18. Continental collision slowing due to viscous mantle lithosphere rather than topography.

    PubMed

    Clark, Marin Kristen

    2012-02-29

    Because the inertia of tectonic plates is negligible, plate velocities result from the balance of forces acting at plate margins and along their base. Observations of past plate motion derived from marine magnetic anomalies provide evidence of how continental deformation may contribute to plate driving forces. A decrease in convergence rate at the inception of continental collision is expected because of the greater buoyancy of continental than oceanic lithosphere, but post-collisional rates are less well understood. Slowing of convergence has generally been attributed to the development of high topography that further resists convergent motion; however, the role of deforming continental mantle lithosphere on plate motions has not previously been considered. Here I show that the rate of India's penetration into Eurasia has decreased exponentially since their collision. The exponential decrease in convergence rate suggests that contractional strain across Tibet has been constant throughout the collision at a rate of 7.03 × 10(-16) s(-1), which matches the current rate. A constant bulk strain rate of the orogen suggests that convergent motion is resisted by constant average stress (constant force) applied to a relatively uniform layer or interface at depth. This finding follows new evidence that the mantle lithosphere beneath Tibet is intact, which supports the interpretation that the long-term strain history of Tibet reflects deformation of the mantle lithosphere. Under conditions of constant stress and strength, the deforming continental lithosphere creates a type of viscous resistance that affects plate motion irrespective of how topography evolved.

  19. Strong Lg-wave attenuation in the Middle East continental collision orogenic belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lian-Feng; Xie, Xiao-Bi

    2016-04-01

    Using Lg-wave Q tomography, we construct a broadband crustal attenuation model for the Middle East. The QLg images reveal a relationship between attenuation and geological structures. Strong attenuation is found in the continental collision orogenic belt that extends from the Turkish and Iranian plateau to the Pamir plateau. We investigate the frequency dependence of QLg in different geologic formations. The results illustrate that QLg values generally increase with increasing frequency but exhibit complex relationships both with frequency and between regions. An average QLg value between 0.2 and 2.0 Hz, QLg (0.2-2.0 Hz), may be a critical index for crustal attenuation and is used to infer the regional geology. Low-QLg anomalies are present in the eastern Turkish plateau and correlate well with low Pn-velocities and Cenozoic volcanic activity, thus indicating possible partial melting within the crust in this region. Very strong attenuation is also observed in central Iran, the Afghanistan block, and the southern Caspian Sea. This in line with the previously observed high crustal temperature, high-conductivity layers, and thick marine sediments in these areas, suggests the high Lg attenuation is caused by abnormally high tectonic and thermal activities.

  20. Partitioning of crustal shortening during continental collision: 2-D thermomechanical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jie; Gerya, Taras

    2017-01-01

    Partitioning of crustal shortening between the colliding continental plates is highly variable in nature. Physical controls of such variability remain largely enigmatic and require quantitative understanding. In this study, we employ 2-D thermomechanical numerical modeling to investigate the influence of the rheological properties of the continental crust on the dynamics and distribution of crustal shortening during continental collision. Three major physical parameters, (i) the mechanical strength of the upper crust, (ii) the Moho temperature, and (iii) the convergence rate, are investigated, and their influences on crustal shortening partitioning between the lower and upper plates are systematically documented. Numerical modeling results suggest that a strong upper crust of the lower plate, high Moho temperature, and slow convergence rate favor migration of crustal shortening from the lower to the upper plate. Our numerical modeling results compare well with natural observations from the Alpine orogenic system where variable partitioning of crustal deformation between the plates is documented.

  1. Topographic Evolution and Climate Aridification during Continental Collision: Insights from Computer Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    How do the feedbacks between tectonics, sediment transport and climate work to shape the topographic evolution of the Earth? This question has been widely addressed via numerical models constrained with thermochronological and geomorphological data at scales ranging from local to orogenic. Here we present a novel numerical model that aims at reproducing the interaction between these processes at the continental scale. For this purpose, we combine in a single computer program: 1) a thin-sheet viscous model of continental deformation; 2) a stream-power surface-transport approach; 3) flexural isostasy allowing for the formation of large sedimentary foreland basins; and 4) an orographic precipitation model that reproduces basic climatic effects such as continentality and rain shadow. We quantify the feedbacks between these processes in a synthetic scenario inspired by the India-Asia collision and the growth of the Tibetan Plateau. We identify a feedback between erosion and crustal thickening leading locally to a <50% increase in deformation rates in places where orographic precipitation is concentrated. This climatically-enhanced deformation takes place preferentially at the upwind flank of the growing plateau, specially at the corners of the indenter (syntaxes). We hypothesize that this may provide clues for better understanding the mechanisms underlying the intriguing tectonic aneurisms documented in the Himalayas. At the continental scale, however, the overall distribution of topographic basins and ranges seems insensitive to climatic factors, despite these do have important, sometimes counterintuitive effects on the amount of sediments trapped within the continent. The dry climatic conditions that naturally develop in the interior of the continent, for example, trigger large intra-continental sediment trapping at basins similar to the Tarim Basin because they determine its endorheic/exorheic drainage. These complex climatic-drainage-tectonic interactions make the

  2. Topographic Evolution and Climate Aridification during Continental Collision: Insights from Computer Simulations.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Castellanos, Daniel; Jiménez-Munt, Ivone

    2015-01-01

    How do the feedbacks between tectonics, sediment transport and climate work to shape the topographic evolution of the Earth? This question has been widely addressed via numerical models constrained with thermochronological and geomorphological data at scales ranging from local to orogenic. Here we present a novel numerical model that aims at reproducing the interaction between these processes at the continental scale. For this purpose, we combine in a single computer program: 1) a thin-sheet viscous model of continental deformation; 2) a stream-power surface-transport approach; 3) flexural isostasy allowing for the formation of large sedimentary foreland basins; and 4) an orographic precipitation model that reproduces basic climatic effects such as continentality and rain shadow. We quantify the feedbacks between these processes in a synthetic scenario inspired by the India-Asia collision and the growth of the Tibetan Plateau. We identify a feedback between erosion and crustal thickening leading locally to a <50% increase in deformation rates in places where orographic precipitation is concentrated. This climatically-enhanced deformation takes place preferentially at the upwind flank of the growing plateau, specially at the corners of the indenter (syntaxes). We hypothesize that this may provide clues for better understanding the mechanisms underlying the intriguing tectonic aneurisms documented in the Himalayas. At the continental scale, however, the overall distribution of topographic basins and ranges seems insensitive to climatic factors, despite these do have important, sometimes counterintuitive effects on the amount of sediments trapped within the continent. The dry climatic conditions that naturally develop in the interior of the continent, for example, trigger large intra-continental sediment trapping at basins similar to the Tarim Basin because they determine its endorheic/exorheic drainage. These complex climatic-drainage-tectonic interactions make the

  3. Relict basin closure and crustal shortening budgets during continental collision: An example from Caucasus sediment provenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowgill, Eric; Forte, Adam M.; Niemi, Nathan; Avdeev, Boris; Tye, Alex; Trexler, Charles; Javakhishvili, Zurab; Elashvili, Mikheil; Godoladze, Tea

    2016-12-01

    Comparison of plate convergence with the timing and magnitude of upper crustal shortening in collisional orogens indicates both shortening deficits (200-1700 km) and significant (10-40%) plate deceleration during collision, the cause(s) for which remains debated. The Greater Caucasus Mountains, which result from postcollisional Cenozoic closure of a relict Mesozoic back-arc basin on the northern margin of the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone, help reconcile these debates. Here we use U-Pb detrital zircon provenance data and the regional geology of the Caucasus to investigate the width of the now-consumed Mesozoic back-arc basin and its closure history. The provenance data record distinct southern and northern provenance domains that persisted until at least the Miocene. Maximum basin width was likely 350-400 km. We propose that closure of the back-arc basin initiated at 35 Ma, coincident with initial (soft) Arabia-Eurasia collision along the Bitlis-Zagros suture, eventually leading to 5 Ma (hard) collision between the Lesser Caucasus arc and the Scythian platform to form the Greater Caucasus Mountains. Final basin closure triggered deceleration of plate convergence and tectonic reorganization throughout the collision. Postcollisional subduction of such small (102-103 km wide) relict ocean basins can account for both shortening deficits and delays in plate deceleration by accommodating convergence via subduction/underthrusting, although such shortening is easily missed if it occurs along structures hidden within flysch/slate belts. Relict basin closure is likely typical in continental collisions in which the colliding margins are either irregularly shaped or rimmed by extensive back-arc basins and fringing arcs, such as those in the modern South Pacific.

  4. Seismic structure and dynamics of cratons: Stability and modification, continental collision and subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, Sergei; Meier, Thomas; Schaeffer, Andrew J.; Agius, Matthew R.; Adam, Joanne M.-C.

    2014-05-01

    relatively low shear-wave speeds in the mantle lithosphere. This anomaly is present in regions of both Proterozoic and Archean crust, which suggests an alteration of the mantle lithosphere after the formation of the cratons. In orogenies, cratons generally resist deformation and subduction. Collisions of cratonic blocks, such as seen presently in the western part of the India-Asia convergence zone, can change the character of the orogeny, as well as the motions of the entire tectonic plates that are converging. Beneath western Tibet, cratonic Indian lithosphere has been stripped of its upper crust, pushed down underneath the thick Tibetan crust, and is now colliding with the Tarim Craton to the north. This recent deepening of the cold Indian lithosphere explains the exceptionally high shear speeds (up to 5.0 km/s) within it, higher than beneath any stable cratons with steady-state geotherms. High-velocity anomalies beneath central and eastern Tibet require negative thermal anomalies of hundreds of degrees at depths below 120-150 km, indicating, most likely, subducted Indian lithosphere. The active India-Asia convergence zone thus demonstrates different mechanisms of continental convergence, from craton-craton collision to underthrusting of a craton beneath thick orogenic crust and to shallow-angle subduction of cratonic lithosphere. References Agius, M. R., S. Lebedev. Tibetan and Indian lithospheres in the upper mantle beneath Tibet: Evidence from broadband surface-wave dispersion. Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst. 14, 4260-4281, doi:10.1002/ggge.20274, 2013. Legendre, C., T. Meier, S. Lebedev, W. Friederich, L. Viereck-Goette. A shear-wave velocity model of the European upper mantle from automated inversion of seismic shear and surface waveforms. Geophys. J. Int. 191, 282-304, 2012. Schaeffer, A. J., S. Lebedev. Global shear-speed structure of the upper mantle and transition zone. Geophys. J. Int. 194, 417-449, 2013.

  5. Using garnet peridotites as tools to reconstruct paleo-geodynamic settings of fossil continental collision zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cong; van Roermund, Herman; Zhang, Lifei

    2010-05-01

    Orogenic garnet peridotites (metamorphic rocks containing the characteristic HP garnet-olivine mineral assemblage) form volumetrically minor, but important components of (ultra)high pressure (UHP) metamorphic terranes. Such terranes form along convergent plate margins where two adjacent plates collide and one of the plates is subducted below the other. After eduction back to the surface such fossil continental subduction/collision zones form the basic components of exposed (U)HP metamorphic terranes. In the absence of significant amounts of tectonic overpressure (Vrijmoed et al., 2010), the discovery of diamond and majoritic garnet in (U)HP metamorphic terranes provide evidence that subduction of continental crust into the mantle was deep enough to reach the garnet stability field in the overlying mantle wedge above the subduction zone. Brueckner (1998) was the first author who noticed that garnet peridotite bodies, present in such mantle wedges, could be transferred during collision from the mantle wedge into the subducted continental crust. Subsequent buoyancy, most likely generated by slab break off of previously subducted oceanic crust, is the most likely candidate to enable the subducted continental crust and its garnet peridotite "cargo" to return back to (sub)crustal levels. During the latter process mantle wedge garnet peridotite may recrystallize (partly or completely) into what will be called here subduction zone garnet peridotite. Alternatively subduction zone garnet peridotite may be formed by prograde subduction of ultramafic protoliths (serpentinites, Fe-Ti peridotite) that may be present in subducting continental crust prior to subduction. Subdivision between these two basic types of orogenic garnet peridotites (mantle wedge - versus subduction zone peridotite) allows however that in mantle wedge garnet peridotite the subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) - versus crustal-incorporation processes can be identified which a.o. has lead to the recent

  6. Database of Active Structures From the Indo-Asian Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Styron, Richard; Taylor, Michael; Okoronkwo, Kelechi

    2010-05-01

    The ongoing collision of India and Asia has produced a vast system of folds and faults, many of which are active today, as evidenced by such recent deadly earthquakes as the 12 May 2008 Sichuan quake [Parsons et al., 2008]. Understanding these events requires knowledge of the region’s geologic structures. Taylor and Yin [2009] have assembled HimaTibetMap-1.0, a multiformat, comprehensive database of first-order active structures in central Asia that may aid researchers, educators, and students in their studies of Indo-Asian tectonics. For example, this database may be used by seismologists, geodesists, and modelers to identify structures in particular locations that contribute to active deformation, or it may be used by teachers to illustrate concepts such as continental collision or distributed deformation of continents.

  7. Geodynamic constraints on stress and strength of the continental lithosphere during India-Asia collision.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaus, B. J. P.; Schmalholz, S. M.; Lebedev, S.; Deschamps, F.

    2009-04-01

    There has been quite some debate in recent years on what the long-term strength of the continental lithosphere is and how it is related to the occurrence of earthquakes. One of the best studied areas in this respect is the India-Asia collision zone, where -in some profiles- the Moho depth is known to within a few km's. A relocation of earthquake source locations revealed that in India earthquakes occur throughout the whole lithosphere whereas in Tibet, earthquakes are restricted to the upper 10-15 km of the crust with few exceptions slightly above or below the Moho. The lack of substantial earthquake activity in the sub-Moho mantle lithosphere seems puzzling since (1D) strength envelop models for the continental lithosphere predict large differential stresses (and brittle failure) in these locations. A way out of this paradox is to assume that the rheology of the mantle lithosphere (i.e. the effective viscosity) is significantly smaller than usually assumed, either because of the effects of hydration, or because of increased Moho temperatures. As a consequence, the strength of the lithosphere resides in the crust and not in the upper mantle as previously assumed. This conclusion gets some support from spectral-based inverse models of the effective elastic thickness (using topography and gravity as input data), which is typically smaller than the seismogenic thickness. Even though this explanation might appear appealing at first, there are at least two major problems with it: (1) Estimations of the effective elastic thickness (EET) of the lithosphere are non-unique and model-dependent. Others, using a direct (non-spectral) modelling approach, find significantly larger values of the EET in the same locations (again using gravity & topography as constraints). (2) Long term geodynamic models indicate that if the mantle lithosphere would indeed be as weak as suggested, it would be very difficult to generate plate-tectonics like behavior: Subducting slabs behave more

  8. Continental collision with a sandwiched accreted terrane: Insights into Himalayan-Tibetan lithospheric mantle tectonics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Sean; Butler, Jared P.; Beaumont, Christopher

    2016-12-01

    Many collisional orogens contain exotic terranes that were accreted to either the subducting or overriding plate prior to terminal continent-continent collision. The ways in which the physical properties of these terranes influence collision remain poorly understood. We use 2D thermomechanical finite element models to examine the effects of prior 'soft' terrane accretion to a continental upper plate (retro-lithosphere) on the ensuing continent-continent collision. The experiments explore how the style of collision changes in response to variations in the density and viscosity of the accreted terrane lithospheric mantle, as well as the density of the pro-lithospheric mantle, which determines its propensity to subduct or compress the accreted terrane and retro-lithosphere. The models evolve self-consistently through several emergent phases: breakoff of subducted oceanic lithosphere; pro-continent subduction; shortening of the retro-lithosphere accreted terrane, sometimes accompanied by lithospheric delamination; and, terminal underthrusting of pro-lithospheric mantle beneath the accreted terrane crust or mantle. The modeled variations in the properties of the accreted terrane lithospheric mantle can be interpreted to reflect metasomatism during earlier oceanic subduction beneath the terrane. Strongly metasomatized (i.e., dense and weak) mantle is easily removed by delamination or entrainment by the subducting pro-lithosphere, and facilitates later flat-slab underthrusting. The models are a prototype representation of the Himalayan-Tibetan orogeny in which there is only one accreted terrane, representing the Lhasa terrane, but they nonetheless exhibit processes like those inferred for the more complex Himalayan-Tibetan system. Present-day underthrusting of the Tibetan Plateau crust by Indian mantle lithosphere requires that the Lhasa terrane lithospheric mantle has been removed. Some of the model results support previous conceptual interpretations that Tibetan

  9. Temporal evolution of continental lithospheric strength in actively deforming regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thatcher, W.; Pollitz, F.F.

    2008-01-01

    It has been agreed for nearly a century that a strong, load-bearing outer layer of earth is required to support mountain ranges, transmit stresses to deform active regions and store elastic strain to generate earthquakes. However the dept and extent of this strong layer remain controversial. Here we use a variety of observations to infer the distribution of lithospheric strength in the active western United States from seismic to steady-state time scales. We use evidence from post-seismic transient and earthquake cycle deformation reservoir loading glacio-isostatic adjustment, and lithosphere isostatic adjustment to large surface and subsurface loads. The nearly perfectly elastic behavior of Earth's crust and mantle at the time scale of seismic wave propagation evolves to that of a strong, elastic crust and weak, ductile upper mantle lithosphere at both earthquake cycle (EC, ???10?? to 103 yr) and glacio-isostatic adjustment (GIA, ???103 to 104 yr) time scales. Topography and gravity field correlations indicate that lithosphere isostatic adjustment (LIA) on ???106-107 yr time scales occurs with most lithospheric stress supported by an upper crust overlying a much weaker ductile subtrate. These comparisons suggest that the upper mantle lithosphere is weaker than the crust at all time scales longer than seismic. In contrast, the lower crust has a chameleon-like behavior, strong at EC and GIA time scales and weak for LIA and steady-state deformation processes. The lower crust might even take on a third identity in regions of rapid crustal extension or continental collision, where anomalously high temperatures may lead to large-scale ductile flow in a lower crustal layer that is locally weaker than the upper mantle. Modeling of lithospheric processes in active regions thus cannot use a one-size-fits-all prescription of rheological layering (relation between applied stress and deformation as a function of depth) but must be tailored to the time scale and tectonic

  10. Collision of a loop current anticyclonic ring against the continental shelf slope of the western Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, VíCtor M. V.; Vidal, Francisco V.; PéRez-Molero, José M.

    1992-02-01

    A Loop Current anticyclonic ring ˜330 km in diameter and extending to a depth of >1500 m was observed to collide in January of 1984 against the continental shelf slope of the western Gulf of Mexico between 21.5° and 23°N. The collision occurred precisely at the time we conducted our Argos 84-1 hydrographic cruise in the western gulf (26°00' to 19°20'N) aboard the R/V Justo Sierra. The Caribbean Subtropical Underwater (SUW) was used as a tracer to identify the Loop Current anticyclonic ring within the western gulf. The collision was identified from temperature and salinity distributions and from the dynamic topography distribution relative to 500 m. The ring's collision zone was identified by the presence of a horizontal baroclinic flow divergence, to the east of Tamiahua, that divides the surface circulation into northward and southward baroclinic currents parallel to the western gulf's continental shelf break, with speeds of 85 and 32 cm s-1, respectively. Horizontal divergence and vertical convergence (ring asymmetries) resulted at the focus of the anticyclonic ring's collision and originated the alongshore self advection and northward translation of the colliding anticyclone. Upon colliding the anticyclonic ring shed approximately one third of its volume (˜2 × 104 km3), mass, and transferred angular momentum to the south flanking water mass, thus generating a cyclonic ring to the south of the collision zone. The observed alongshelf southward current results from mass conservation and volume continuity requirements associated with the anticyclonic ring's volume shedding and most probably constitutes the colliding ring's potential vorticity conservation mechanism. The weakening of the anticyclonic ring's relative vorticity due to the collision is most likely made up by gain of vorticity from lateral shear in the northward and southward current jets parallel to the continental shelf break. The core of both the anticyclonic and cyclonic rings had typical SUW

  11. The Himalaya-Tibet System: A Natural laboratory for continental collision and seismogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meltzer, A.; Brown, L. D.; Song, X.

    2015-12-01

    The Himalaya-Tibet system remains one of the best places to study continental dynamics, mountain building, and nucleation of great earthquakes. Over the past several decades, numerous research projects have used the Himalaya and Tibet as a natural laboratory to investigate the process of continental collision. Much has been learned about the orogen, including the remarkable along-strike continuity of many features: the orogen's basic geology and structure, the morphology and drainages of the Himalayan arc, and the apparent symmetry of the syntaxes at either end. At the same time, numerous focused studies have also identified considerable spatial variability in the GPS field, seismicity, crust and mantle structure, magnitude and timing of exhumation, erosion, and strain. While much has been learned and many details revealed, significant questions about the Himalaya and Tibet remain and we lack integrated 4D models that explain observed complexity. The time is right for a community initiative to systematically integrate the breadth of data available to test and refine geodynamic models to illuminate the structure and 4-D evolution of the India-Asia collision at scales that account for both first order observations and lateral heterogeneity, link deep earth and surface processes, and address the geohazards associated with the collisional zone and surrounding areas. Any such effort requires community consensus on science goals, setting priorities regarding what's needed to make significant progress, and open access data. An effort of this scale needs to address the societal impacts of hazards associated with the India-Asia collisional system and engage international collaborations across the region. The April 2015 Mw 7.8 Gorkha, Nepal earthquake serves as the most recent reminder that the Himalaya-Tibet system is capable of producing large magnitude events, impacting lives, livelihoods, and the built environment. The 1950 Mw 8.6 Assam and 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan

  12. Comparing thin-sheet models with 3-D multilayer models for continental collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechmann, S. M.; May, D. A.; Kaus, B. J. P.; Schmalholz, S. M.

    2011-10-01

    Various models have been proposed to explain tectonic deformations during continent collision. A frequently applied model is the thin viscous sheet model which is however not fully 3-D and assumes a priori diffuse thickening as the dominant deformation style. We compare a fully 3-D multilayer numerical model with a corresponding thin viscous sheet numerical model for the scenario of continent indentation. In our comparison we focus on the three basic viscous deformation styles thickening, buckling (folding) and lateral crustal flow. Both numerical models are based on the finite element method (FEM) and employ either a linear or power-law viscous rheology. The 3-D model consists of four layers representing a simplified continental lithosphere: strong upper crust, weak lower crust, strong upper mantle and weak lower mantle. The effective viscosity depth-profile in the 3-D model is used to calculate the depth-averaged effective viscosity used in the thin-sheet model allowing a direct comparison of both models. We quantify the differences in the strain rate and velocity fields, and investigate the evolution of crustal thickening, buckling and crustal flow resulting from the two models for two different phases of deformation: (1) indentation with a constant velocity and (2) gravitational collapse after a decrease of the indenting velocity by a factor of 5. The results indicate that thin-sheet models approximate well the overall large-scale lithospheric deformation, especially during indentation and for a linear viscous rheology. However, in the 3-D model, additional processes such as multilayer buckling and lower crustal flow emerge, which are ignored in the thin-sheet model but dominate the deformation style in the 3-D model within a range of a few hundreds of kilometres around the collision zone and indenter corner. Differences between the 3-D and thin-sheet model are considerably larger for a power-law viscous than for a linear viscous rheology. Buckling and lower

  13. A case of Distributed Continental Collision: Late Cretaceous Intraplate Shortening from Central Europe to North Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kley, J.; Voigt, T.; Jaehne, F.

    2008-12-01

    Intraplate thrusting and basin inversion affected west-central Europe in Late Cretaceous time. The timing of this event is fairly well constrained between c. 90 and 65 Ma. The dominantly NW-trending European intraplate structures were often interpreted to have been dextrally transpressive, reflecting a northward push induced by the early collision of the Adria microplate with Europe's southern margin. However, many fault kinematic and other structural data from central Europe indicate dip-slip contraction essentially perpendicular to the main faults, suggesting a push from the southwest. In addition, recent plate reconstructions of the Mediterranean around 85 Ma place Adria far to the southeast and roughly along strike of the central European intraplate structures. The early Alpine nappe stack on Adria's leading edge was still separated from Europe by subducting oceanic lithosphere and had entered a phase of extension after the first orogenic event. All this makes Alpine collision an unlikely cause for intraplate thrusting in Europe. Rather, the timing, kinematics and location of structures suggest that intraplate shortening in Europe was a direct effect of convergence with the Iberian and African plates, with stresses transmitted across the Azores-Gibraltar fracture zone. This hypothesis is supported by structures of Late Cretaceous age indicating SW-NE to S-N shortening in France, Spain (particularly the onset of convergence in the Pyrenees) and northwestern Africa. In contrast to other examples such as the Laramides, intraplate thrusting in this case was not a foreland phenomenon related to a coeval orogen. It does not reflect a transition from subduction to continental collision, but the beginning of convergence across two former transform boundaries. This system which included no strongly thickened and weakened crust was mostly governed by far-field stresses and therefore responded rapidly to plate reorganizations. Specifically, the onset of thrusting

  14. Intraplate deformation due to continental collisions: A numerical study of deformation in a thin viscous sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.; Morgan, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    A model of crustal deformation from continental collision that involves the penetration of a rigid punch into a deformable sheet is investigated. A linear viscous flow law is used to compute the magnitude and rate of change of crustal thickness, the velocity of mass points, strain rates and their principal axes, modes of deformation, areal changes, and stress. In general, a free lateral boundary reduces the magnitude of changes in crustal thickening by allowing material to more readily escape the advancing punch. The shearing that occurs diagonally in front of the punch terminates in compression or extension depending on whether the lateral boundary is fixed or free. When the ratio of the diameter of the punch to that of the sheet exceeds one-third, the deformation is insenstive to the choice of lateral boundary conditions. When the punch is rigid with sharply defined edges, deformation is concentrated near the punch corners. With non-rigid punches, shearing results in deformation being concentrated near the center of the punch. Variations with respect to linearity and nonlinearity of flow are discussed.

  15. 78 FR 33859 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Geological and Geophysical Exploration Activities in the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-05

    ... Continental Shelf (OCS) Geological and Geophysical Exploration Activities in the Gulf of Mexico; Correction... in the Federal Register (78 FR 27427) entitled ``Outer Continental Shelf Geological and...

  16. Is the Ventersdorp rift system of southern Africa related to a continental collision between the Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe Cratons at 2.64 Ga AGO?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, K.; Kidd, W. S. F.; Kusky, T.

    1985-01-01

    Rocks of the Ventersdorp Supergroup were deposited in a system of northeast trending grabens on the Kaapvaal Craton approximately 2.64 Ga ago contemporary with a continental collision between the Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe Cratons. It is suggested that it was this collision that initiated the Ventersdorp rifting. Individual grabens strike at high angles toward the continental collision zone now exposed in the Limpopo Province where late orogenic left-lateral strike-slip faulting and anatectic granites are recognized. The Ventersdorp rift province is related to extension in the Kaapvaal Craton associated with the collision, and some analogy is seen with such rifts as the Shansi and Baikal Systems associated with the current India-Asia continental collision.

  17. A Coupled Thermomechanical Model of Continental Collision In Alpine-type Mountain Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burov, E.; Jolivet, L.; Lepourhiet, L.; Toussaint, G.

    A coupled numerical thermo-mechanical model that accounts for strain localization, surface processes, phase changes and high viscosity contrasts is used to test different mechanisms (and the very possibility) of subduction in continental collision zones. We consider various end member cases including low and high buoyancy of the subducted crustal material, which it may acquire after metamorphic reactions. The low buoyancy model predicts steep stable (i.e. SoceanicT type) subduction with early break-off and & cedil;three levels of metamorphic rock exhumation: the corner flow LP-LT exhumation in the accretionary prism; deeper (70 km) HP-HT exhumation for the thickened sub- ducting crustal-sedimentary wedge, and ultra HP-HT exhumation from the SlowerT & cedil;crustal chamber, forming at the depth of 100-120 km and separated from the upper one by a narrow crustal channel, which width can oscillate in the process of short- ening, thus controlling the quantity of the crustal material exchanged between the crustal wedge and the lower crustal chamber. Although both zones of crustal accu- mulation and the narrow channel between them resemble a vortex-shaped nozzle, this SnozzleT appears to be too soft to produce any significant overpressures. The high & cedil;buoyancy model predicts rapid crustal delamination and unstable subduction associ- ated with development of RT instabilities in the subducting lithosphere. In this case, strong crustal underplating may occur and the latter mechanisms become dominant resulting in fast exhumation of the crust to the surface, accelerated or slowed unstable subduction in case of full or partial crustal decoupling, respectively, and upper plate extension. The model suggest that stable continental subduction is only possible in case of full crustal metamorphism resulting in zero or negative buoyancy of the sub- ducted crust, at relatively important convergence rates (> 20 mm/y). In case of high buoyancy of the subducting material or slow

  18. Active Collision Avoidance for Planetary Landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Doug; Hannan, Mike; Srinivasan, Karthik

    2014-01-01

    Present day robotic missions to other planets require precise, a priori knowledge of the terrain to pre-determine a landing spot that is safe. Landing sites can be miles from the mission objective, or, mission objectives may be tailored to suit landing sites. Future robotic exploration missions should be capable of autonomously identifying a safe landing target within a specified target area selected by mission requirements. Such autonomous landing sites must (1) 'see' the surface, (2) identify a target, and (3) land the vehicle. Recent advances in radar technology have resulted in small, lightweight, low power radars that are used for collision avoidance and cruise control systems in automobiles. Such radar systems can be adapted for use as active hazard avoidance systems for planetary landers. The focus of this CIF proposal is to leverage earlier work on collision avoidance systems for MSFC's Mighty Eagle lander and evaluate the use of automotive radar systems for collision avoidance in planetary landers.

  19. A lithospheric seismic profile across northern Taiwan, from arc-continental collision to extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Avendonk, H. J.; McIntosh, K. D.; Lavier, L. L.; Wu, F. T.; Okaya, D. A.; Kuochen, H.

    2012-12-01

    Taiwan is one of a few locations where a subduction zone is transitioning to arc-continent collision. The north-south trending Luzon arc, which is built on the Philippine Sea Plate, has been overriding the Eurasian margin here since the Late Miocene. Shortening of the Eurasian margin lead to the formation of the Taiwan mountain belt. The plate boundary is quite complicated in northeastern Taiwan, because the Philippine Sea Plate also subducts beneath the Eurasian plate along the east-west trending Ryukyu trench. Since the Pleistocene, backarc extension behind the Ryukyu arc in the Okinawa Trough has propagated into the Ilan Plain, a region that previously experienced shortening during collision with the Luzon arc. The deep structure of northern Taiwan can therefore give us insight in the evolution of the orogen from compression to post-collisional collapse. During the 2008 and 2009 field seasons of the TAIGER project we acquired active-source and earthquake seismic data in Taiwan and surrounding oceans to better understand the different stages of arc-continent collision. On the island of Taiwan, explosion seismic, onshore-offshore and marine seismic data constrain the crustal structure along three large east-west transects across the plate boundary. In the north, TAIGER transect T6 spans a distance of 360 km from the Taiwan Strait eastward across the Hsuehshan Range and the Central Range, and onto the Ryukyu forearc. Marine seismic data were shot with the R/V Marcus Langseth in the Taiwan Strait and east of Taiwan. Twelve ocean-bottom seismometers from National Taiwan Ocean University (NTOU) recorded seismic refractions offshore, and land-seismic stations from IRIS/PASSCAL recorded airgun shots from the Langseth and 4 large land seismic explosions. These different types of active-source data together provide good spatial coverage for imaging seismic velocity structure across the orogen and the plate boundary. The seismic refraction data include crustal turning

  20. Chemical activation through super energy transfer collisions.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jonathan M; Nikow, Matthew; Ma, Jianqiang; Wilhelm, Michael J; Han, Yong-Chang; Sharma, Amit R; Bowman, Joel M; Dai, Hai-Lung

    2014-02-05

    Can a molecule be efficiently activated with a large amount of energy in a single collision with a fast atom? If so, this type of collision will greatly affect molecular reactivity and equilibrium in systems where abundant hot atoms exist. Conventional expectation of molecular energy transfer (ET) is that the probability decreases exponentially with the amount of energy transferred, hence the probability of what we label "super energy transfer" is negligible. We show, however, that in collisions between an atom and a molecule for which chemical reactions may occur, such as those between a translationally hot H atom and an ambient acetylene (HCCH) or sulfur dioxide, ET of chemically significant amounts of energy commences with surprisingly high efficiency through chemical complex formation. Time-resolved infrared emission observations are supported by quasi-classical trajectory calculations on a global ab initio potential energy surface. Results show that ∼10% of collisions between H atoms moving with ∼60 kcal/mol energy and HCCH result in transfer of up to 70% of this energy to activate internal degrees of freedom.

  1. Record of Cenozoic sedimentation from the Amanos Mountains, Southern Turkey: Implications for the inception and evolution of the Arabia-Eurasia continental collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulton, Sarah J.

    2009-04-01

    The sedimentary succession of the southern Amanos Mountains, bordering the eastern margin of the Karasu Rift in south central Turkey, provides a record of environmental change from the Eocene (Lutetian) to the Upper Miocene (Tortonian) that charts the final evolution of the northern margin of the Arabian plate prior to and during continental collision. Eocene shallow-marine carbonates (Hacıdağı Formation) are interpreted as the youngest unit of the Arabian passive margin succession deposited on a northwards facing carbonate ramp. Subsequent deformation and uplift took place during the Oligocene represented by folding of the Eocene and older strata. This is interpreted to be the result of initial continental collision between Arabia and Eurasia. Unconformably overlying the Eocene limestone are Lower Miocene conglomerates, sandstones and palaeosols up to 150 m thick (Kıcı Formation). These were deposited in a range of marginal marine settings consisting of alluvial fan/fan delta facies, flood plain as well as basinal facies. Subsequently, during the Middle Miocene, local patch reefs developed in restricted areas (Kepez Formation) followed by Upper Miocene sediments (Gökdere Formation) composed of relatively deep water hemipelagic marl, with clastic interbeds, which represent a transgression during this period. The Upper Miocene becomes sandier upwards, this records the regression from the relatively deep water facies to coastal sediments. Water depth gradually became shallower until during Pliocene time the area became continental in nature. By the Quaternary rifting had resulted in the development of the Karasu Rift with active alluvial fans along the margins and braided rivers depositing coarse conglomerates in the axial zone. These conglomerates are interbedded with basaltic lava flows that resulted from the region extension across the area. This research shows that initial continental collision occurred in this area after the Lutetian (40.4 Ma) and before

  2. Vertical tectonics at an active continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlié, N.; Stern, T. A.

    2017-01-01

    Direct observations of vertical movements of the earth's surface are now possible with space-based GPS networks, and have applications to resources, hazards and tectonics. Here we present data on vertical movements of the Earth's surface in New Zealand, computed from the processing of GPS data collected between 2000 and 2015 by 189 permanent GPS stations. We map the geographical variation in vertical rates and show how these variations are explicable within a tectonic framework of subduction, volcanic activity and slow slip earthquakes. Subsidence of >3 mm/yr is observed along southeastern North Island and is interpreted to be due to the locked segment of the Hikurangi subduction zone. Uplift of 1-3 mm/yr further north along the margin of the eastern North Island is interpreted as being due to the plate interface being unlocked and underplating of sediment on the subduction thrust. The Volcanic Plateau of the central North Island is being uplifted at about 1 mm/yr, which can be explained by basaltic melts being injected in the active mantle-wedge at a rate of ∼6 mm/yr. Within the Central Volcanic Region there is a 250 km2 area that subsided between 2005 and 2012 at a rate of up to 14 mm/yr. Time series from the stations located within and near the zone of subsidence show a strong link between subsidence, adjacent uplift and local earthquake swarms.

  3. The continental collision zone, South Island, New Zealand: Comparison of geodynamical models and observations

    SciTech Connect

    Beaumont, C.; Hamilton, J.; Fullsack, P.; Kamp, P.J.J.

    1996-02-10

    In this report geodynamical models are used to test the applicability of the mantle subduction model to the compressional character and evaluation of the South Island continental convergence zone of New Zealand.

  4. 76 FR 58273 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-20

    ... Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations; EPA ICR... all outer continental shelf (OCS) sources except those located in the Gulf of Mexico west of 87.5... boundary extends three leagues (about nine miles) from the coastline. Title: Outer Continental Shelf...

  5. Two-dimensional numerical modeling of tectonic and metamorphic histories at active continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerya, Taras; Stöckhert, Bernhard

    2006-04-01

    The evolution of an active continental margin is simulated in two dimensions, using a finite difference thermomechanical code with half-staggered grid and marker-in-cell technique. The effect of mechanical properties, changing as a function of P and T, assigned to different crustal layers and mantle materials in the simple starting structure is discussed for a set of numerical models. For each model, representative P T paths are displayed for selected markers. Both the intensity of subduction erosion and the size of the frontal accretionary wedge are strongly dependent on the rheology chosen for the overriding continental crust. Tectonically eroded upper and lower continental crust is carried down to form a broad orogenic wedge, intermingling with detached oceanic crust and sediments from the subducted plate and hydrated mantle material from the overriding plate. A small portion of the continental crust and trench sediments is carried further down into a narrow subduction channel, intermingling with oceanic crust and hydrated mantle material, and to some extent extruded to the rear of the orogenic wedge underplating the overriding continental crust. The exhumation rates for (ultra)high pressure rocks can exceed subduction and burial rates by a factor of 1.5 3, when forced return flow in the hanging wall portion of the self-organizing subduction channel is focused. The simulations suggest that a minimum rate of subduction is required for the formation of a subduction channel, because buoyancy forces may outweigh drag forces for slow subduction. For a weak upper continental crust, simulated by a high pore pressure coefficient in the brittle regime, the orogenic wedge and megascale melange reach a mid- to upper-crustal position within 10 20 Myr (after 400 600 km of subduction). For a strong upper crust, a continental lid persists over the entire time span covered by the simulation. The structural pattern is similar in all cases, with four zones from trench toward arc

  6. Triassic mafic and intermediate magmatism associated with continental collision between the North and South China Cratons in the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Sang-Bong; Oh, Chang Whan; Lee, Seung-Yeol; Choi, Seon-Gyu; Kim, Taesung; Yi, Keewook

    2016-03-01

    Triassic coeval mafic and intermediate magmatism occurred in the area suggested to be the southern margin of the North China Craton (NCC) in the Gyeonggi Massif (GM) of the Korean Peninsula. This study investigates aspects of the mafic and intermediate magmatism using SHRIMP zircon ages and whole-rock chemical and isotopic Sr-Nd data. The mafic and intermediate rocks intruded into a basement paragneiss in three areas (Yangpyeong, Odesan and Yangyang) within the GM at ca. 230 Ma. The paragneiss was metamorphosed in both the Paleoproterozoic and Triassic. Gabbros (hornblende gabbro and pyroxene-mica gabbro) from the study areas exhibit strong light REE (LREE) enrichment relative to chondrite (LaN/YbN = 11.1-30.6) and a high LILE/HFSE pattern, Ta-Nb-P-Ti troughs and positive Ba-K-Pb-Sr spikes on the N-MORB-normalized multi-element variation diagram. These features are typical characteristics of arc-related gabbros. The gabbros also show strongly enriched initial isotopic compositions (87Sr/86Sr(i) = 0.7100-0.7137; εNd(t) = - 13.1 to - 19.7). The coeval intermediate intrusive rocks also exhibit whole-rock chemical and isotopic features (87Sr/86Sr(i) = 0.7099-0.7143; εNd(t) = - 10.8 to - 18.6) similar to those of the gabbros. The mafic and intermediate intrusive rocks plot in the within-plate and/or post-collisional fields on tectonic discrimination diagrams. These data indicate that the mafic and intermediate magmatism in the study areas occurred during the Triassic post-collisional relaxation period via partial melting of sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) that was enriched in a subduction environment prior to (or during) the Permo-Triassic continental collision between the NCC and the South China Craton (SCC). The highly enriched mantle signatures revealed by the gabbros from the study areas are matched to the enriched features identified in Cretaceous mafic igneous rocks (ca. 130 Ma) on the southern margin of the NCC. Thus, this study suggests that the

  7. Record of Cenozoic sedimentation from the Amanos Mountains, Southern Turkey: implications for the inception and evolution of the Arabia-Eurasia continental collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulton, S. J.

    2009-04-01

    The sedimentary succession of the southern Amanos Mountains, bordering the eastern margin of the Karasu Rift in south central Turkey, provides a record of environmental change from the Eocene (Lutetian) to the Upper Miocene (Tortonian) charting the final evolution of the northern Arabian plate margin prior to, and during, continental collision. Eocene shallow-marine carbonates (Hacıdağı Formation) are interpreted as the youngest unit of the Arabian passive margin succession deposited on a northwards facing carbonate ramp. Subsequent deformation and uplift took place during the Oligocene represented by folding of the Eocene and older strata. Unconformably overlying the Eocene limestone are Lower Miocene conglomerates, sandstones and palaeosols up to 150 m thick (Kıcı Formation). These were deposited in a range of marginal marine settings consisting of alluvial fan, flood plain and shallow marine/lower shoreface environments interpreted as a ‘fan-delta' prograding from the uplifted proto-Amanos into a marine embayment. Subsequently, during the Middle Miocene, local patch reefs developed in restricted areas (Kepez Formation) followed by Upper Miocene sediments (Gökdere Formation) composed of deeper water marine marl, with clastic interbeds, which represents a transgression during this period. The Upper Miocene becomes sandier upwards, this records the regression from the relatively deep water facies to coastal sediments. Water depth gradually became shallower until during the Pliocene the area became continental. By the Quaternary rifting had resulted in the development of the Karasu Rift with active alluvial fans along the margins and braided rivers depositing coarse conglomerates in the axial zone. These conglomerates are interbedded with basaltic lava flows that resulted from the regional extension across the area. This research shows that initial continental collision occurred in this area after the Lutetian (40.4 Ma) and before the Aquitanian (23.03 Ma

  8. Continental break-up and collision in the Neoproterozoic and Palaeozoic — A tale of Baltica and Laurentia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torsvik, T. H.; Smethurst, M. A.; Meert, J. G.; Van der Voo, R.; McKerrow, W. S.; Brasier, M. D.; Sturt, B. A.; Walderhaug, H. J.

    1996-06-01

    a short and rapid excursion to lower latitudes in the Late Vendian, remained mostly in intermediate to high southerly latitudes and closer to the Gondwana margin until Early Ordovician times. In Early Ordovician times, Arenig-Llanvirn platform trilobites show a broad distinction between the continents of Laurentia/Siberia/North China Block (Bathyurid), Baltica (Ptychopygine/ Megalaspid) and the areas of NW Gondwana/Avalonia/Armorica (Calymenacean-Dalmanitacean). During the Ordovician, Baltica rotated and moved northward, approaching close enough to Laurentia by the late Caradoc for trilobite and brachiopod spat to cross the intervening Iapetus Ocean. Docking appears to have been irregular both in time and manner: the collision between Scotland/Greenland and western Norway resulted in the early Scandian Orogeny in the Silurian (c. 425 Ma), but further south, there is evidence of late Silurian impingement with subduction of Avalonian continental crust (in England and Ireland) below the eastern edge of Laurentia until the Emsian. In the northern Appalachians the main time of collision appears to have been during the Emsian/Eifellian Acadian Orogeny. Recent analyses invalidates the traditional concept of a sustained orthogonal relationship between Baltica and Laurentia across a single Iapetus Ocean throughout the Caledonide evolution. The active margin of Baltica (Scandinavian Caledonides) faced Siberia during the Late Cambrian and Early Ordovician with oceanic separation between these landmasses in the order of 1200-1500 km. This may explain the local occureences of Siberia-Laurentian type Bathyarid tribobite faunas in Central Norwegian Caledonian nappes, earlier interpreted as Laurentia-Baltica trilobite mixing. Subsequent counterclockwise rotation of Baltica transferred the Caledonian margin in the direction of Laurentia by Silurian times, when the two continents once again started to collide to form Euramerica. This rotation, along with the strongly asymmetric

  9. Investigating Continental Margins: An Activity to Help Students Better Understand the Continental Margins of North America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poli, Maria-Serena; Capodivacca, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Continental margins are an important part of the ocean floor. They separate the land above sea level from the deep ocean basins below and occupy about 11% of Earth's surface. They are also economically important, as they harbor both mineral resources and some of the most valuable fisheries in the world. In this article students investigate North…

  10. Mapping seismic moment and b-value within the continental-collision orogenic-belt region of the Iranian Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, S. Mostafa

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, high-resolution map of the Gutenberg-Richter b-value and seismic moment-release are provided for the Iranian Plateau using the unified and homogeneous part of the seismicity record of the region (January 1995-July 2016). We use these parameters as stressmeters and qualitatively explore their correlations with the GPS velocity field, strain rate, faulting mechanism, attenuation, and structure of the region. Our goal is to reveal the correlations and anomalous patterns that can help to better understand the seismotectonics and the state of present-day crustal stress within the region. A negative correlation between b-value and seismic moment release as well as convergence rates is found. Correlation between geodetic measurements and seismic observations might indicate the existence of a strong mechanical coupling between the basement and the sediment cover across Zagros. High geodetic strain rates east of the Hormuz strait, southern central Alborz, and along the north Tabriz fault correspond to low b-value anomalies at these areas. A strong low b-value anomaly is observed at the major tectonic discontinuity between the Zagros continental collision and the oceanic Makran subduction.

  11. Arc-continent collision and the formation of continental crust: A new geochemical and isotopic record from the Ordovician Tyrone Igneous Complex, Ireland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.; Clift, Peter D.; Amato, Jeffrey M.; Blusztajn, Jerzy; Schouten, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Collisions between oceanic island-arc terranes and passive continental margins are thought to have been important in the formation of continental crust throughout much of Earth's history. Magmatic evolution during this stage of the plate-tectonic cycle is evident in several areas of the Ordovician Grampian-Taconic orogen, as we demonstrate in the first detailed geochemical study of the Tyrone Igneous Complex, Ireland. New U-Pb zircon dating yields ages of 493 2 Ma from a primitive mafic intrusion, indicating intra-oceanic subduction in Tremadoc time, and 475 10 Ma from a light rare earth element (LREE)-enriched tonalite intrusion that incorporated Laurentian continental material by early Arenig time (Early Ordovician, Stage 2) during arc-continent collision. Notably, LREE enrichment in volcanism and silicic intrusions of the Tyrone Igneous Complex exceeds that of average Dalradian (Laurentian) continental material that would have been thrust under the colliding forearc and potentially recycled into arc magmatism. This implies that crystal fractionation, in addition to magmatic mixing and assimilation, was important to the formation of new crust in the Grampian-Taconic orogeny. Because similar super-enrichment of orogenic melts occurred elsewhere in the Caledonides in the British Isles and Newfoundland, the addition of new, highly enriched melt to this accreted arc terrane was apparently widespread spatially and temporally. Such super-enrichment of magmatism, especially if accompanied by loss of corresponding lower crustal residues, supports the theory that arc-continent collision plays an important role in altering bulk crustal composition toward typical values for ancient continental crust. ?? 2009 Geological Society of London.

  12. Validity of the thin viscous sheet approximation in models of continental collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garthwaite, Matthew C.; Houseman, Gregory A.

    2011-02-01

    The two-dimensional thin viscous sheet approximation is widely used to describe large-scale continental deformation. It treats the lithosphere as a fluid layer in which deformation results from a balance between buoyancy forces and tectonic boundary conditions. Comparisons between two-dimensional thin sheet and full three-dimensional solutions of a simple indenter model show that appreciable differences exist, especially when the indenter half width, D, is of the same order as the thickness of the deforming layer, L (i.e., D/L ≈ 1). These differences are amplified by increasing the power law exponent of the viscous constitutive law (n) but decrease as the Argand number (Ar) is increased. The greatest differences between two-dimensional and three-dimensional solutions are found at the indenter corner, where the thin sheet consistently overestimates vertical strain rates. Differences between strain rates at the corner may be 50% or greater for small Argand numbers. Other differences arise because a lithospheric root zone is formed in the three-dimensional solutions and vertically averaged strain rate is decreased in regions close to the indenter. This effect is absent from thin sheet calculations since the thickness of the load-bearing layer is assumed constant. In general, the thin viscous sheet approximation provides a reasonably accurate estimate of long wavelength deformation for D/L as low as 1 if n is less than ˜3. However, even at large D/L the solutions may be inaccurate close to strain rate concentrations at the indenter corners where horizontal gradients of deformation are large.

  13. Finite strain calculations of continental deformation. I - Method and general results for convergent zones. II - Comparison with the India-Asia collision zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, G.; England, P.

    1986-01-01

    The present investigation has the objective to perform numerical experiments on a rheologically simple continuum model for the continental lithosphere. It is attempted to obtain a better understanding of the dynamics of continental deformation. Calculations are presented of crustal thickness distributions, stress, strain, strain rate fields, latitudinal displacements, and finite rotations, taking into account as basis a model for continental collision which treats the litoshphere as a thin viscous layer subject to indenting boundary conditions. The results of this paper support the conclusions of England and McKenzie (1982) regarding the role of gravity in governing the deformation of a thin viscous layer subject to indenting boundary conditions. The results of the experiments are compared with observations of topography, stress and strain rate fields, and palaeomagnetic latitudinal displacements in Asia.

  14. Electromagnetic study of the active continental margin in northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echternacht, Friedrich; Tauber, Sebastian; Eisel, Markus; Brasse, Heinrich; Schwarz, Gerhard; Haak, Volker

    1997-06-01

    Magnetotelluric and geomagnetic deep sounding measurements were carried out in the magmatic arc and forearc regions of northern Chile between 19.5° and 22°S to study the electrical conductivity structures of this active continental margin. The instruments used covered a very broad period range from 10 -4 s to approx. 2 × 10 4 s and thus enabled a resolution of deep as well as shallow structures. In this paper we focus on the interpretation of data from an east-west profile crossing Chile from the Pacific coast to the Western Cordillera at 20.5°S. A decomposition of the impedance tensors using the Groom-Bailey decomposition scheme shows that a two-dimensional interpretation is possible. The resulting regional strike direction is N9°W. Two-dimensional models were calculated in this coordinate frame and include the significant bathymetry of the trench as well as the topography of the Andes. The final model shows a generally high resistivity in the forearc and a very good conductor below the Precordillera. Unlike earlier models from areas further south, a good conductor is not observed below the magmatic arc itself. This correlates with the so-called Pica gap in the volcanic chain and a higher age of volcanic activity compared with adjacent areas.

  15. Spacing and strength of active continental strike-slip faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuza, Andrew V.; Yin, An; Lin, Jessica; Sun, Ming

    2017-01-01

    Parallel and evenly-spaced active strike-slip faults occur widely in nature across diverse tectonic settings. Despite their common existence, the fundamental question of what controls fault spacing remains unanswered. Here we present a mechanical model for the generation of parallel strike-slip faults that relates fault spacing to the following parameters: (1) brittle-crust thickness, (2) fault strength, (3) crustal strength, and (4) crustal stress state. Scaled analogue experiments using dry sand, dry crushed walnut shells, and viscous putty were employed to test the key assumptions of our quantitative model. The physical models demonstrate that fault spacing (S) is linearly proportional to brittle-layer thickness (h), both in experiments with only brittle materials and in two-layer trials involving dry sand overlying viscous putty. The S / h slope in the two-layer sand-putty experiments may be controlled by the (1) rheological/geometric properties of the viscous layer, (2) effects of distributed basal loading caused by the viscous shear of the putty layer, and/or (3) frictional interaction at the sand-putty interface (i.e., coupling between the viscous and brittle layers). We tentatively suggest that this third effect exerts the strongest control on fault spacing in the analogue experiments. By applying our quantitative model to crustal-scale strike-slip faults using fault spacing and the seismogenic-zone thickness obtained from high-resolution earthquake-location data, we estimate absolute fault friction of active strike-slip faults in Asia and along the San Andreas fault system in California. We show that the average friction coefficient of strike-slip faults in the India-Asia collisional orogen is lower than that of faults in the San Andreas fault system. Weaker faults explain why deformation penetrates >3500 km into Asia from the Himalaya and why the interior of Asia is prone to large (M > 7.0) devastating earthquakes along major intra-continental strike

  16. Deep seismic reflection evidence for ancient subduction and collision zones within the continental lithosphere of northwestern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balling, N.

    2000-12-01

    Deep seismic profiling experiments in the region of NW Europe (including BABEL in the Gulf of Bothnia and the Baltic Sea, Mobil Search in the Skagerrak and MONA LISA in the North Sea) have demonstrated the existence of seismic reflectors in the mantle lithosphere beneath the Baltic Shield, the Tornquist Zone and the North Sea basins. Different sets of reflectors are observed, notably dipping and sub-horizontal. Dipping, distinct reflectivity, which may be followed from Moho/Moho offsets into the deeper parts of the continental lithosphere, is of special interest because of its tectonic and geodynamic significance. Such reflectivity, observed in several places, dipping 15-35° and covering a depth range of 30-90 km, constrained by surface geological information and radiometric age data, is interpreted to represent fossil, ancient subduction and collison zones. Subduction slabs with remnant oceanic basaltic crust transformed into eclogite is assumed, in particular, to generate deep seismic reflectivity. Deep seismic evidence is presented for subduction, crustal accretion and collision processes with inferred ages from 1.9 to 1.1 Ga from the main structural provinces within the Baltic Shield including Svecofennian, Transscandinavian Igneous Belt, Gothian and Sveconorwegian. Along the southwestern border of Baltica (in the southeastern North Sea) south-dipping crustal and sub-crustal reflectivity is observed down to a depth of about 90 km, close to the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. These structures are interpreted to reveal a lithosphere-scale Caledonian (ca. 440 Ma) suture zone resulting from the closure of the Tornquist Sea/Thor Ocean and the amalgamation of Baltica and Eastern Avalonia. These results demonstrate that deep structures within the continental lithosphere, originating from early crust-forming plate tectonic processes, may survive for a very long time and form seismic marker reflectivity of great value in geotectonic interpretation and

  17. A study of models and controls for basin formation during continental collision: (1) Australian lithosphere along Banda orogen (Indonesia) and (2) Alboran Sea basin (western Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tandon, Kush

    Mechanisms for the formation of a foreland basin at the beginning of continental collision (Pliocene-Recent Australian continental foreland along the Banda orogen) and a post-orogenic, continental, Miocene extensional basin (Alboran Sea) are studied. Such a study investigates the controls on the basin formation during the start of the Wilson cycle and later during the break up of a thickened continent in a collisional environment. Effective Elastic Thickness (EET) of the Australian continental lithosphere from Roti to the Kai Plateau ({˜}121sp°{-}137sp°E longitude) are estimated using an elastic-half beam model to match the sea floor bathymetry and the Bouguer gravity anomalies. Range of constant EET values from 27-75 km across the shelf of Australian lithosphere shows a variation of 64% with the highest value in the vicinity of central Timor where the collision is most advanced. Downdip on the Australian continental lithosphere from shelf to beneath the Banda orogen, the reduction in EET is from ˜90 km-˜30 km (66%). Variations in EET can be explained by inelastic yielding (brittle and plastic failure, crust-mantle decoupling in the lower crust and brittle-ductile decoupling in the upper-middle crust) in the Australian lithosphere. Change in EET occurred at the start of continental subduction due to change in curvature, both in map and cross-sectional view. Oroclinal bending of the continental Australian lithosphere increased the inelastic failure in the eastern end. Different mechanisms of basin formation at a site of post-orogenic collapse are studied by constraining the timing of rifting in the western, eastern, and northern parts of the Alboran Sea basin on seismic reflectors via synthetic seismograms using ODP Leg 161 and Andalucia A-1 data. Regions of adjacent coeval compression and extension are found in the Alboran Sea basin. Normal faulting continues in parts of the eastern Alboran Sea basin later than in the western Alboran Sea basin. The development

  18. Nurture Versus Nature: Accounting for the Differences Between the Taiwan and Timor active arc-continent collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    The active Banda arc/continent collision of the Timor region provides many important contrasts to what is observed in Taiwan, which is mostly a function of differences in the nature of the subducting plate. One of the most important differences is the thermal state of the respective continental margins: 30 Ma China passive margin versus 160 Ma NW Australian continental margin. The subduction of the cold and strong NW Australian passive margin beneath the Banda trench provides many new constraints for resolving longstanding issues about the formative stages of collision and accretion of continental crust. Some of these issues include evidence for slab rollback and subduction erosion, deep continental subduction, emplacement or demise of forearc basement, relative amounts of uplift from crustal vs. lithospheric processes, influence of inherited structure, partitioning of strain away from the thrust front, extent of mélange development, metamorphic conditions and exhumation mechanisms, continental contamination and accretion of volcanic arcs, does the slab tear, and does subduction polarity reverse? Most of these issues link to the profound control of lower plate crustal heterogeneity, thermal state and inherited structure. The thermomechanical characteristics of subducting an old continental margin allow for extensive underthrusting of lower plate cover units beneath the forearc and emplacement and uplift of extensive nappes of forearc basement. It also promotes subduction of continental crust to deep enough levels to experience high pressure metamorphism (not found in Taiwan) and extensive contamination of the volcanic arc. Seismic tomography confirms subduction of continental lithosphere beneath the Banda Arc to at least 400 km with no evidence for slab tear. Slab rollback during this process results in massive subduction erosion and extension of the upper plate. Other differences in the nature of the subducting plates in Taiwan in Timor are differences in the

  19. Considering the collision probability of Active Debris Removal missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidtke, Aleksander A.; Lewis, Hugh G.; Armellin, Roberto; Urrutxua, Hodei

    2017-02-01

    Active Debris Removal (ADR) methods are being developed due to a growing concern about the congestion on-orbit and sustainability of spaceflight. This study examined the probability of an on-orbit collision between an ADR target, whilst being de-orbited, and all the objects in the public catalogue published by the US Strategic Command. Such a collision could have significant effects because the target is likely to be located in a densely populated orbital regime and thus follow-on collisions could take place. Six impulsive and three low-thrust example ADR mission trajectories were screened for conjunctions. Extremely close conjunctions were found to result in as much as 99% of the total accumulated collision probability. The need to avoid those conjunctions is highlighted, which raises concerns about ADR methods that do not support collision avoidance. Shortening the removal missions, at an expense of more ΔV and so cost, will also lower their collision probability by reducing the number of conjunctions that they will experience.

  20. New geoelectrical characterisation of a continental collision zone in the West-Central Pyrenees: Constraints from long period and broadband magnetotellurics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanyà, Joan; Ledo, Juanjo; Queralt, Pilar; Marcuello, Alex; Liesa, Montserrat; Muñoz, Josep A.

    2012-06-01

    Continental collision dominates the development of a large number of mountain ranges on Earth. Although the geological evolution of these regions is highly studied, lithospheric-scale physical processes are less well characterised and their interpretations frequently differ. A new magnetotelluric profile crossing the West-Central Pyrenees with broadband and long period magnetotelluric data constrains the geoelectrical features of this continental collision zone confining the geological and physical processes that take place at a lithospheric scale. Three geoelectrical structures associated with partial melting and its melt migration are imaged for the first time in the West-Central Pyrenees suggesting an Iberian subducted lower crust reaching the depth of 70 km. This result, supported by an analysis of the thermal evolution of the Iberian subducted lower crust, reinforces the hypothesis of partial melting in this region. From the long period magnetotelluric data, the asthenosphere has been imaged as a geoelectrical structure with electrical resistivity values between 20 Ω m and 70 Ω m. The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary close to the collision zone has been constrained between 90 km and 110 km depth below the Iberian plate and between 120 km and 160 km depth below the transition zone between plates and the European plate, in agreement with the previous geophysical data. Additionally, other geoelectrical anomalies imaged have been associated with an unexpected major Variscan boundary located below the Ebro basin, Silurian sediments and free fluids in the Gavarnie thrust, and with a thick sequence of Jurassic and Early Cretaceous sediments situated below the North Pyrenean Thrust Sheet.

  1. Episodic nature of continental arc activity since 750 Ma: A global compilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wenrong; Lee, Cin-Ty A.; Lackey, Jade Star

    2017-03-01

    Continental arcs have been recently hypothesized to outflux large amounts of CO2 compared to island arcs so that global flare-ups in continental arc magmatism might drive long-term greenhouse events. Quantitative testing of this hypothesis, however, has been limited by the lack of detailed studies on the spatial distribution of continental arcs through time. Here, we compile a worldwide database of geological maps and associated literature to delineate the surface exposure of granitoid plutons, allowing reconstruction of how the surface area addition rate of granitoids and the length of continental arcs have varied since 750 Ma. These results were integrated into an ArcGIS framework and plate reconstruction models. We find that the spatial extent of continental arcs is episodic with time and broadly matches the detrital zircon age record. Most vigorous arc magmatism occurred during the 670-480 Ma and the 250-50 Ma when major greenhouse events are recognized. Low continental arc activity characterized most of the Cryogenian, middle-late Paleozoic, and Cenozoic when climate was cold. Our results indicate that plate tectonics is not steady, with fluctuations in the nature of subduction zones possibly related in time to the assembly and dispersal of continents. Our results corroborate the hypothesis that variations in continental arc activity may play a first order role in driving long-term climate change. The dataset presented here provides a quantitative basis for upscaling continental arc processes to explore their effects on mountain building, climate, and crustal growth on a global scale.

  2. Resistivity image beneath an area of active methane seeps in the west Svalbard continental slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Bedanta K.; Weitemeyer, Karen A.; Minshull, Timothy A.; Sinha, Martin C.; Westbrook, Graham K.; Marín-Moreno, Héctor

    2016-11-01

    The Arctic continental margin contains large amounts of methane in the form of methane hydrates. The west Svalbard continental slope is an area where active methane seeps have been reported near the landward limit of the hydrate stability zone. The presence of bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs) on seismic reflection data in water depths greater than 600 m suggests the presence of free gas beneath gas hydrates in the area. Resistivity obtained from marine controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) data provides a useful complement to seismic methods for detecting shallow hydrate and gas as they are more resistive than surrounding water saturated sediments. We acquired two CSEM lines in the west Svalbard continental slope, extending from the edge of the continental shelf (250 m water depth) to water depths of around 800 m. High resistivities (5-12 Ωm) observed above the BSR support the presence of gas hydrate in water depths greater than 600 m. High resistivities (3-4 Ωm) at 390-600 m water depth also suggest possible hydrate occurrence within the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) of the continental slope. In addition, high resistivities (4-8 Ωm) landward of the GHSZ are coincident with high-amplitude reflectors and low velocities reported in seismic data that indicate the likely presence of free gas. Pore space saturation estimates using a connectivity equation suggest 20-50 per cent hydrate within the lower slope sediments and less than 12 per cent within the upper slope sediments. A free gas zone beneath the GHSZ (10-20 per cent gas saturation) is connected to the high free gas saturated (10-45 per cent) area at the edge of the continental shelf, where most of the seeps are observed. This evidence supports the presence of lateral free gas migration beneath the GHSZ towards the continental shelf.

  3. Structural rejuvenation of the eastern Arabian Shield during continental collision: 40Ar/ 39Ar evidence from the Ar Ridayniyah ophiolitic mélange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Saleh, A. M.; Boyle, A. P.

    2001-07-01

    The Ar Ridayniyah ophiolitic mélange is one of a number of such complexes found within or at the peripheries of the Neoproterozoic Al-Amar Suture of the eastern Arabian Shield. This suture is sandwiched between the Ar Rayn island-arc terrane on the east and the much larger Afif continental block to the west, and is thought to represent the site of a 695—680 Ma back-arc basin that separated the two terranes. A thick and monotonous unit of metagraywacke (Abt Schist) underlies most of the suture along with scattered outcrops of metavolcanics and ophiolitic mélange. One of these bodies is the Ar Ridayniyah mélange, which occurs as a longitudinal belt of sheared ultramafic schists enclosing abundant blocks of oceanic serpentinites, as well as subordinate gabbros and basalts. The western boundary of this mélange is defined by the Ar Ridayniyah thrust fault. The 610—600 Ma ages obtained from the metagabbros of this complex are considered to record the reactivation of the Ar Ridayniyah Fault during continental collision, 60 Ma after ophiolite emplacement.

  4. Geodynamics of continental plate collision during late tertiary foreland basin evolution in the Timor Sea: constraints from foreland sequences, elastic flexure and normal faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londoño, John; Lorenzo, Juan M.

    2004-11-01

    Tectonic subsidence of the Australian lithosphere during the Late Tertiary propagates from the southwest to the northeast in the Timor Sea, as a consequence of the oblique collision between the Eurasian and Australian plates. We reconstruct the asynchronous nature of deflection of the Australian plate created during the plate convergence by best-matching the geometry of de-compacted foreland strata against the predictions of simple bending elastic beam models. We infer a maximum subsidence of 3500 m and a maximum width for the basin of ˜470 km. The effective elastic thickness of the Australian lithosphere (˜80 to 100 km) does not change significantly during basin evolution. The low curvature imposed on the plate (˜5.1×10 -8 m -1) during bending is too small to weaken the plate. Yet, abundant but small-slip, normal faulting related to bending implies some degree of inelastic yielding. The polarity of fault propagation supports the oblique nature of the collision. Flexural models indicate that at least 570 km of Australian plate (mostly areas of stretched continental crust) was flexed, primarily by the tectonic loading of the Timor Island and that the total amount of subducted plate was at least 100 km during basin evolution.

  5. 78 FR 5836 - Adjustment of Service Fees for Outer Continental Shelf Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Adjustment of Service Fees for Outer Continental Shelf Activities AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: Adjustment of Service Fees....

  6. 77 FR 74218 - Commercial Wind Leasing and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... identified in the document entitled, Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Wind Leasing and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic... agencies, states, tribes, local governments, offshore wind energy developers, and the public in...

  7. Atlantic update, July 1986--June 1990: Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities

    SciTech Connect

    Karpas, R.M.; Gould, G.J.

    1990-10-01

    This report describes outer continental shelf oil and gas activities in the Atlantic Region. This edition of the Atlantic Update includes an overview of the Mid-Atlantic Planning Area and a summary of the Manteo Prospect off-shore North Carolina. 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  8. Understanding Tensions: Activity Systems Analysis of Cross-Continental Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryder, LanHui Zhang; Yamagata-Lynch, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Using the lens of Vygotsky's sociocultural theory, activity theory, and Engeström's activity systems analysis, this qualitative study explores students' experiences in the context of a sixteen-week transpacific collaboration between seven students at Northern Illinois University (NIU) and seven students from Shandong Normal University (SDNU),…

  9. The speciation of marine particulate iron adjacent to active and passive continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Phoebe J.; Ohnemus, Daniel C.; Marcus, Matthew A.

    2012-03-01

    We use synchrotron-based chemical-species mapping techniques to compare the speciation of suspended (1-51 μm) marine particulate iron collected in two open ocean environments adjacent to active and passive continental margins. Chemical-species mapping provides speciation information for heterogeneous environmental samples, and is especially good for detecting spectroscopically distinct trace minerals and species that could not be detectable by other methods. The average oxidation state of marine particulate iron determined by chemical-species mapping is comparable to that determined by standard bulk X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure spectroscopy. Using chemical-species mapping, we find that up to 43% of particulate Fe in the Northwest Pacific at the depth of the adjacent active continental margin is in the Fe(II) state, with the balance Fe(III). In contrast, particulate iron in the eastern tropical North Atlantic, which receives the highest dust deposition on Earth and is adjacent to a passive margin, is dominated by weathered and oxidized Fe compounds, with Fe(III) contributing 90% of total iron. The balance is composed primarily of Fe(II)-containing species, but we detected individual pyrite particles in some samples within an oxygen minimum zone in the upper thermocline. Several lines of evidence point to the adjacent Mauritanian continental shelf as the source of pyrite to the water column. The speciation of suspended marine particulate iron reflects the mineralogy of iron from the adjacent continental margins. Since the solubility of particulate iron has been shown to be a function of its speciation, this may have implications for the bioavailability of particulate iron adjacent to passive compared to active continental margins.

  10. An activation-collision mechanism for cholesterol transfer between membranes.

    PubMed

    Steck, T L; Kezdy, F J; Lange, Y

    1988-09-15

    We report the results of experiments which show that cholesterol transfer between membranes cannot proceed by aqueous diffusion, as widely held, but must involve a more complex mechanism. (a) The rate of transfer of [3H]cholesterol from red blood cells was found to vary inversely with the size of the acceptor particle (ghosts, vesicles of ghosts, liposomes, and plasma lipoproteins). (b) The transfer of [3H]cholesterol from red blood cells to ghosts was accelerated by the presence of plasma, even though the plasma competed with the ghosts as an acceptor. (c) The rate of transfer of [3H]cholesterol from red blood cells to ghosts decreased to zero with increasing dilution but was not simply second-order. (d) The cholesterol in retinal rod disc membranes is not at equilibrium with plasma lipoproteins in that disc cholesterol increased when the homogenates were incubated in vitro with plasma. (e) The kinetics of cholesterol transfer cannot be limited by unstirred layer effects since the transfer of lysolecithin in the same system was faster than that of cholesterol by 3 orders of magnitude. The simplest model compatible with all the data suggests a two-step pathway involving a first-order followed by a second-order process. The first step could be a unimolecular activation event, perhaps the movement of the sterol in the donor particle to a more exposed (hydrated) position. In the second step, the activated sterol would be transferred during transient collisions between donor and acceptor particles. When collision is not rate-limiting, the overall process would appear to be simply first-order, hence kinetically indistinguishable from the aqueous diffusion mechanism. The activation-collision model thus not only rationalizes our data but is also consistent with the simpler kinetics previously reported for the transfer of both membrane phospholipids and sterols.

  11. PTt path in metamorphic rocks of the Khoy region (northwest Iran) and their tectonic significance for Cretaceous Tertiary continental collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, H.; Moinevaziri, H.; Mohajjel, M.; Yagobpoor, A.

    2006-06-01

    Metamorphic rocks in the Khoy region are exposed between obducted ophiolites to the southwest and sedimentary rocks of Precambrian-Paleozoic age to the northeast. The Qom formation (Oligocene-Miocene) with a basal conglomerate transgressively overlies all of these rocks. The metamorphic rocks consist of both metasediments and metabasites. The metasediments are micaschist, garnet-staurolite schist and garnet-staurolite sillimanite schist with some meta-arkose, marble and quartzite. The metabasites are metamorphosed to greenschist and amphibolite facies from a basaltic and gabbroic protolith of tholeiitic and calc-alkaline rocks. Geothermobarometry based on the equivalence of minerals stability and their paragenesis in these rocks and microprobe analyses by several different methods indicate that metamorphism occurred in a temperature range between 450 and 680 °C at 5.5 and 7.5 kb pressure. Rims of minerals reveal a considerable decrease of pressure (<2 kb) and insignificant decrease of temperature. The PTt path of this metamorphism is normal. The MFG line passes above the triple junction of Al 2SiO 5 polymorphs, and the average geothermal gradient during metamorphism was from 27 to 37 °C/km, which is more concordant with the temperature regime of collision zones. We infer that crustal thickening during post-Cretaceous (possibly Eocene) collision of the Arabian plate and the Azerbaijan-Albourz block was the main factor that caused the metamorphism in the studied area.

  12. Activation of the Inner Continental Shelf Following the Great Mississippi/Atchafalaya River Flood of 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolker, A.; Li, C.; Allison, M. A.; Ameen, A. D.; Dash, P.; Ramatchandirane, C. G.; Sinclair, G.; Smith, D.; Ullah, M.; Williams, K.

    2011-12-01

    While rives are the primary means by which material is delivered from continents to the ocean, relatively little is known about the role that large rivers, particularly in North America, play in the geology of the inner continental shelf. Flood control measures initiated in response the to massive 2011 Mississippi River flood diverted nearly 22,900 m3 sec-1 of freshwater through the Atchafalaya River basin into the Atchafalaya River shelf in southwest Louisiana, temporarily creating one of the largest shelf-discharging rivers on Earth, and providing an historic opportunity to study shelf-to-shore exchange processes. A multi-disciplinary approach using Acoustic Current Doppler Profilers, CTDs, satellite photographs, and the naturally occurring radiotracer 7Be revealed that event produced intense gradients in temperature, salinity and turbidity across the inner continental shelf, resulting in complex circulation patterns. The freshwater plume extended over 30 km into the, "marine," environment. Furthermore, the flood activated sedimentary dynamics across the shelf, leading to large deposits of fine-grained material across the Atchafalaya/Chenier coast. Our study indicates that large rivers produce unique oceanographic dynamics when they interact with the continental shelf, and that these systems should be viewed differently from small shelf-discharging rivers (like the Hudson) or large continental-slope discharging rivers (like the Mississippi).

  13. Syn-collisional granitoids in the Qilian Block on the Northern Tibetan Plateau: A long-lasting magmatism since continental collision through slab steepening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hui; Niu, Yaoling; Mo, Xuanxue

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present a new model that can explain the large zircon age spectrum of 510 - 420 Ma within a single sample from the Gangcha (Gcha) biotite granodiorite and the Huangyuan (HY) two-mica monzogranite on the northern Tibetan Plateau. The large age spread recorded in zircons is characteristic of granitoid samples from the studied region, which is best explained by the long-lasting magmatism since the onset of continental collision at 500 Ma, followed by slab steepening and the ultimate slab break-off at 450 Ma. These granitoids have a large major and trace element compositional variation, but limited initial Sr (ISr[450] = 0.709 to 0.715), Nd (ԐNd[450] = - 6.5 to - 3.7), Hf (ԐHf[450] = - 4.3 to 1.5) and Pb (206Pb/204Pb[450] = 17.70 to 17.17; 207Pb/204Pb[450] = 15.60 to 15.69; 208Pb/204Pb[450] = 38.04 to 38.73) isotopic variation. The small negative whole rock ԐNd[450] and ԐHf[450] values are most consistent with the granitoid source being dominated by subducted seafloor materials. The inherited zircons with large negative ԐHf[450] values (e.g. - 50) are indicative of input from the lower continental crust and subducted sediments. The correlated variations among major elements, trace elements and radiogenic isotopes are best interpreted as reflecting melting-induced mixing of a compositionally heterogeneous source with superimposed effect of varying extent of fractional crystallization and crustal assimilation. The inherited zircons of Palaeo-Proterozoic age and the Archean crustal model ages signify the involvement of ancient basement rocks.

  14. Collision tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Coward, M.P.; Ries, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    The motions of lithospheric plates have produced most existing mountain ranges, but structures produced as a result of, and following the collision of continental plates need to be distinguished from those produced before by subduction. If subduction is normally only stopped when collision occurs, then most geologically ancient fold belts must be collisional, so it is essential to recognize and understand the effects of the collision process. This book consists of papers that review collision tectonics, covering tectonics, structure, geochemistry, paleomagnetism, metamorphism, and magmatism.

  15. Role of local to regional-scale collisions in the closure history of the Southern Neotethys, exemplified by tectonic development of the Kyrenia Range active margin/collisional lineament, N Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Alastair; Kinnaird, Tim; McCay, Gillian; Palamakumbura, Romesh; Chen, Guohui

    2016-04-01

    Active margin processes including subduction, accretion, arc magmatism and back-arc extension play a key role in the diachronous, and still incomplete closure of the S Neotethys. The S Neotethys rifted along the present-day Africa-Eurasia continental margin during the Late Triassic and, after sea-floor spreading, began to close related to northward subduction during the Late Cretaceous. The northern, active continental margin of the S Neotethys was bordered by several of the originally rifted continental fragments (e.g. Taurides). The present-day convergent lineament ranges from subaqueous (e.g. Mediterranean Ridge), to subaerial (e.g. SE Turkey). The active margin development is partially obscured by microcontinent-continent collision and post-collisional strike-slip deformation (e.g. Tauride-Arabian suture). However, the Kyrenia Range, N Cyprus provides an outstanding record of convergent margin to early stage collisional processes. It owes its existence to strong localised uplift during the Pleistocene, which probably resulted from the collision of a continental promontory of N Africa (Eratosthenes Seamount) with the long-lived S Neotethyan active margin to the north. A multi-stage convergence history is revealed, mainly from a combination of field structural, sedimentological and igneous geochemical studies. Initial Late Cretaceous convergence resulted in greenschist facies burial metamorphism that is likely to have been related to the collision, then rapid exhumation, of a continental fragment (stage 1). During the latest Cretaceous-Palaeogene, the Kyrenia lineament was characterised by subduction-influenced magmatism and syn-tectonic sediment deposition. Early to Mid-Eocene, S-directed thrusting and folding (stage 2) is likely to have been influenced by the suturing of the Izmir-Ankara-Erzincan ocean to the north ('N Neotethys'). Convergence continued during the Neogene, dominated by deep-water terrigenous gravity-flow accumulation in a foredeep setting

  16. P-wave tomographic images in the Central Betics-Alborán Sea (South Spain) using local earthquakes: Contribution for a continental collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, Inmaculada; Morales, José; Zhao, Dapeng; Torcal, Federico; Vidal, Francisco

    To investigate the relationship between shallow and intermediate-depth earthquakes and the crust and upper mantle structure beneath the Betic-Cordillera and Alborán sea region, we have applied seismic tomography to 2569 P-wave arrival times from 367 microearthquakes recorded by both permanent and temporary seismic stations deployed in the region. These earthquakes occurred in the depth range of 0 to 110 km beneath the Central Betic Cordilleras and Alborán sea. Our results have revealed significant structural heterogeneities in the crust and upper mantle beneath the study area. In the upper crust there is a high-velocity anomaly at Sierra Gorda (western boundary of the Granada basin) penetrating to 15 km depth, which is in good agreement with the aeromagnetic anomaly. In the Granada basin, a low-velocity anomaly is located in the middle crust, which coincides with a previously detected greater cutoff depth of seismicity, and are considered to be associated with a highly fractured zone generated by an intracrustal detachment. The northern boundary of the Alborán sea (Málaga coast) is well imaged as low velocities from 50 to 90 km depths. This low-velocity zone in the upper mantle is associated with the intermediate-depth seismicity, which outline a section of continental crust related to the collision/subduction beneath the northern part of the Alborán sea-southern part of the Central Betics.

  17. Active mud volcanoes on the continental slope of the Canadian Beaufort Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paull, C. K.; Dallimore, S. R.; Caress, D. W.; Gwiazda, R.; Melling, H.; Riedel, M.; Jin, Y. K.; Hong, J. K.; Kim, Y.-G.; Graves, D.; Sherman, A.; Lundsten, E.; Anderson, K.; Lundsten, L.; Villinger, H.; Kopf, A.; Johnson, S. B.; Hughes Clarke, J.; Blasco, S.; Conway, K.; Neelands, P.; Thomas, H.; Côté, M.

    2015-09-01

    Morphologic features, 600-1100 m across and elevated up to 30 m above the surrounding seafloor, interpreted to be mud volcanoes were investigated on the continental slope in the Beaufort Sea in the Canadian Arctic. Sediment cores, detailed mapping with an autonomous underwater vehicle, and exploration with a remotely operated vehicle show that these are young and actively forming features experiencing ongoing eruptions. Biogenic methane and low-chloride, sodium-bicarbonate-rich waters are extruded with warm sediment that accumulates to form cones and low-relief circular plateaus. The chemical and isotopic compositions of the ascending water indicate that a mixture of meteoric water, seawater, and water from clay dehydration has played a significant role in the evolution of these fluids. The venting methane supports extensive siboglinid tubeworms communities and forms some gas hydrates within the near seafloor. We believe that these are the first documented living chemosynthetic biological communities in the continental slope of the western Arctic Ocean.

  18. Geochemical Interpretation of Collision Volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Julian

    2014-05-01

    Collision volcanism can be defined as volcanism that takes place during an orogeny from the moment that continental subduction starts to the end of orogenic collapse. Its importance in the Geological Record is greatly underestimated as collision volcanics are easily misinterpreted as being of volcanic arc, extensional or mantle plume origin. There are many types of collision volcanic province: continent-island arc collision (e.g. Banda arc); continent-active margin collision (e.g. Tibet, Turkey-Iran); continent-rear-arc collision (e.g. Bolivia); continent-continent collision (e.g. Tuscany); and island arc-island arc collision (e.g. Taiwan). Superimposed on this variability is the fact that every orogeny is different in detail. Nonetheless, there is a general theme of cyclicity on different time scales. This starts with syn-collision volcanism resulting from the subduction of an ocean-continent transition and continental lithosphere, and continues through post-collision volcanism. The latter can be subdivided into orogenic volcanism, which is related to thickened crust, and post-orogenic, which is related to orogenic collapse. Typically, but not always, collision volcanism is preceded by normal arc volcanism and followed by normal intraplate volcanism. Identification and interpretation of collision volcanism in the Geologic Record is greatly facilitated if a dated stratigraphic sequence is present so that the petrogenic evolution can be traced. In any case, the basis of fingerprinting collision terranes is to use geochemical proxies for mantle and subduction fluxes, slab temperatures, and depths and degrees of melting. For example, syn-collision volcanism is characterized by a high subduction flux relative to mantle flux because of the high input flux of fusible sediment and crust coupled with limited mantle flow, and because of high slab temperatures resulting from the decrease in subduction rate. The resulting geochemical patterns are similar regardless of

  19. Prograde infiltration of Cl-rich fluid into the granulitic continental crust from a collision zone in East Antarctica (Perlebandet, Sør Rondane Mountains)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Tetsuo; Higashino, Fumiko; Skrzypek, Etienne; Satish-Kumar, M.; Grantham, Geoffrey; Tsuchiya, Noriyoshi; Ishikawa, Masahiro; Sakata, Shuhei; Hirata, Takafumi

    2017-03-01

    input of Cl-rich fluids through tectonic boundaries during continental collision.

  20. Assessing the activity of faults in continental interiors: Palaeoseismic insights from SE Kazakhstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grützner, C.; Carson, E.; Walker, R. T.; Rhodes, E. J.; Mukambayev, A.; Mackenzie, D.; Elliott, J. R.; Campbell, G.; Abdrakhmatov, K.

    2017-02-01

    The presence of fault scarps is a first-order criterion for identifying active faults. Yet the preservation of these features depends on the recurrence interval between surface rupturing events, combined with the rates of erosional and depositional processes that act on the landscape. Within arid continental interiors single earthquake scarps can be preserved for thousands of years, and yet the interval between surface ruptures on faults in these regions may be much longer, such that the lack of evidence for surface faulting in the morphology may not preclude activity on those faults. In this study we investigate the 50 km-long 'Toraigyr' thrust fault in the northern Tien Shan. From palaeoseismological trenching we show that two surface rupturing earthquakes occurred in the last 39.9 ± 2.7 ka BP, but only the most recent event (3.15-3.6 ka BP) has a clear morphological expression. We conclude that a landscape reset took place in between the two events, likely as a consequence of the climatic change at the end of the last glacial maximum. These findings illustrate that in the Tien Shan evidence for the most recent active faulting can be easily obliterated by climatic processes due to the long earthquake recurrence intervals. Our results illustrate the problems related to the assessment of active tectonic deformation and seismic hazard assessments in continental interior settings.

  1. Fractional activation of accumulation-mode particles in warm continental stratiform clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Gillani, N.V.; Daum, P.H.; Schwartz, S.E.; Leaitch, W.R.; Strapp, J.W.; Isaac, G.A.

    1991-07-01

    The degree of activation of accumulation-mode particles (AMP) in clouds has been studied using continuous (1 second average) aircraft measurements of the number concentrations of cloud droplets (N{sub cd}, 2 to 35 {mu}m diameter) and of unactivated AMP (N{sub amp}, 0.17 to 2.07 {mu}m diameter) in cloud interstitial air. The magnitude and spatial variation of the activated fraction (F) of all measured particles (defined as F {triple_bond} N{sub cd}/N{sub tot}, where N{sub tot} = N{sub cd} + N{sub amp}) are investigated, based on measurements made during ten aircraft flights in non-precipitating warm continental stratiform clouds near Syracuse NY in the fall of 1984. Based on instantaneous observations throughout the clouds, the spatial distribution of F was found to be quite nonuniform. In general, F was low in cloud edges and where total particle loading was high and/or cloud convective activity was low. In the interior of clouds, the value of F exceeded 0.9 for 36% of the data, but was below 0.6 for 28%. Factors influencing F the most were the total particle loading (N{sub tot}) and the thermal stability of the cloud layer. The dependence of F on N{sub tot} in cloud interior was characterized by two distinct regimes. For N{sub tot} < 600 cm{sup {minus}3}, F was generally close to unity and relatively insensitive to N{sub tot}. For N{sub tot} > 800 cm{sup {minus}3}, F tended to decrease with increasing N{sub tot}. This decrease was greatest in a stable stratus deck embedded in a warm moist airmass. The results suggest that, in warm continental stratiform clouds, the process of particle activation becomes nonlinear and self-limiting at high particle loading. The degree of this nonlinearity depends on cloud convective activity (thermal instability).

  2. Fractional activation of accumulation-mode particles in warm continental stratiform clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Gillani, N.V. Associates, Inc., St. Louis, MO ); Daum, P.H.; Schwartz, S.E. ); Leaitch, W.R.; Strapp, J.W.; Isaac, G.A. . Cloud Physics Research Div.)

    1991-07-01

    The degree of activation of accumulation-mode particles (AMP) in clouds has been studied using continuous (1 second average) aircraft measurements of the number concentrations of cloud droplets (N[sub cd], 2 to 35 [mu]m diameter) and of unactivated AMP (N[sub amp], 0.17 to 2.07 [mu]m diameter) in cloud interstitial air. The magnitude and spatial variation of the activated fraction (F) of all measured particles (defined as F [triple bond] N[sub cd]/N[sub tot], where N[sub tot] = N[sub cd] + N[sub amp]) are investigated, based on measurements made during ten aircraft flights in non-precipitating warm continental stratiform clouds near Syracuse NY in the fall of 1984. Based on instantaneous observations throughout the clouds, the spatial distribution of F was found to be quite nonuniform. In general, F was low in cloud edges and where total particle loading was high and/or cloud convective activity was low. In the interior of clouds, the value of F exceeded 0.9 for 36% of the data, but was below 0.6 for 28%. Factors influencing F the most were the total particle loading (N[sub tot]) and the thermal stability of the cloud layer. The dependence of F on N[sub tot] in cloud interior was characterized by two distinct regimes. For N[sub tot] < 600 cm[sup [minus]3], F was generally close to unity and relatively insensitive to N[sub tot]. For N[sub tot] > 800 cm[sup [minus]3], F tended to decrease with increasing N[sub tot]. This decrease was greatest in a stable stratus deck embedded in a warm moist airmass. The results suggest that, in warm continental stratiform clouds, the process of particle activation becomes nonlinear and self-limiting at high particle loading. The degree of this nonlinearity depends on cloud convective activity (thermal instability).

  3. Investigation of shallow gas hydrate occurrence and gas seep activity on the Sakhalin continental slope, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Young Keun; Baranov, Boris; Obzhirov, Anatoly; Salomatin, Alexander; Derkachev, Alexander; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Minami, Hrotsugu; Kuk Hong, Jong

    2016-04-01

    The Sakhalin continental slope has been a well-known gas hydrate area since the first finding of gas hydrate in 1980's. This area belongs to the southernmost glacial sea in the northern hemisphere where most of the area sea is covered by sea ice the winter season. Very high organic carbon content in the sediment, cold sea environment, and active tectonic regime in the Sakhalin slope provide a very favorable condition for occurring shallow gas hydrate accumulation and gas emission phenomena. Research expeditions under the framework of a Korean-Russian-Japanese long-term international collaboration projects (CHAOS, SSGH-I, SSGH-II projects) have been conducted to investigate gas hydrate occurrence and gas seepage activities on the Sakhalin continental slope, Russia from 2003 to 2015. During the expeditions, near-surface gas hydrate samples at more than 30 sites have been retrieved and hundreds of active gas seepage structures on the seafloor were newly registered by multidisciplinary surveys. The gas hydrates occurrence at the various water depths from about 300 m to 1000 m in the study area were accompanied by active gas seepage-related phenomena in the sub-bottom, on the seafloor, and in the water column: well-defined upward gas migration structures (gas chimney) imaged by high-resolution seismic, hydroacoustic anomalies of gas emissions (gas flares) detected by echosounders, seafloor high backscatter intensities (seepage structures) imaged by side-scan sonar and bathymetric structures (pockmarks and mounds) mapped by single/multi-beam surveys, and very shallow SMTZ (sulphate-methane transition zone) depths, strong microbial activities and high methane concentrations measured in sediment/seawater samples. The highlights of the expeditions are shallow gas hydrate occurrences around 300 m in the water depth which is nearly closed to the upper boundary of gas hydrate stability zone in the area and a 2,000 m-high gas flare emitted from the deep seafloor.

  4. Hydrothermal Petroleum in Active Continental Rift: Lake Chapala, Western Mexico, Initial Results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarate-del Valle, P. F.; Simoneit, B. R.; Ramirez-Sanchez, H. U.

    2003-12-01

    Lake Chapala in western Mexico is located partially in the Citala Rift, which belongs to the well-known neotectonic Jalisco continental triple junction. The region is characterized by active volcanism (Ceboruco, Volcan de Fuego), tectonic (1995 earthquake, M=8, 40-50 mm to SW) and hydrothermal (San Juan Cosala & Villa Corona spas and La Calera sinter deposit) activities. Hydrothermal petroleum has been described in active continental rift (East African Rift) and marine spreading zones (Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California). In 1868 the Mexican local press reported that manifestations of bitumen were appearing in front of the Columba Cap on the mid south shore of Lake Chapala. This bitumen is linked to the lake bottom and when the water level decreases sufficiently it is possible to access these tar bodies as islands. Because of these manifestations the Mexican oil company (PEMEX) drilled an exploration well (2,348m) at Tizapan El Alto without success. Hydrothermal activity is evident in the tar island zone as three in-shore thermal springs (26.8 m depth, 48.5° C, pH 7.8 and oriented N-S). The preliminary analyses by GC-MS of the tar from these islands indicate hydrothermal petroleum derived from lake sedimentary organic matter, generated at low temperatures (150° -200° C). The tars contain no n-alkanes, no PAH or other aromatics, but a major UCM of branched and cyclic hydrocarbons and mature biomarkers derived from lacustrine biota. The biomarkers consist of mainly 17α (H),21β (H)-hopanes ranging from C27 to C34 (no C28), gammacerane, tricyclic terpanes (C20-C26), carotane and its cracking products, and drimanes (C14-C16). The biomarker composition indicates an organic matter source from bacteria and algae, typical of lacustrine ecosystems. 14C dating of samples from two tar islands yielded ages exceeding 40 kyrs, i.e., old carbon from hydrothermal/tectonic remobilization of bitumen from deeper horizons to the surface. The occurrence of hydrothermal petroleum in

  5. Lu-Hf geochronology on cm-sized garnets using microsampling: New constraints on garnet growth rates and duration of metamorphism during continental collision (Menderes Massif, Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Alexander; Pourteau, Amaury; Candan, Osman; Oberhänsli, Roland

    2015-12-01

    provides a precise age determination for prograde Barrovian metamorphism in the southern Menderes Massif, which so far was placed between 63 and 27 Ma on the basis of mica Rb-Sr and Ar-Ar dating. This study provides new constraints crucial to the understanding of the tectonic evolution of southwest Anatolia and the Aegean realm, as it yields a shorter outline for Alpine aged continental collision.

  6. Modeling activities in air traffic control systems: antecedents and consequences of a mid-air collision.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Paulo Victor R; Ferreira, Bemildo

    2012-01-01

    In this article we present a model of some functions and activities of the Brazilian Air traffic Control System (ATS) in the period in which occurred a mid-air collision between flight GLO1907, a commercial aircraft Boeing 737-800, and flight N600XL, an executive jet EMBRAER E-145, to investigate key resilience characteristics of the ATM. Modeling in some detail activities during the collision and related them to overall behavior and antecedents that stress the organization uncover some drift into failure mechanisms that erode safety defenses provided by the Air Navigation Service Provider (ANSP), enabling a mid-air collision to be happen.

  7. Tectonic evolution of Late Cenozoic arc-continent collision in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.S. )

    1990-06-01

    The island of Taiwan is an active orogen formed by the collision between the Luzon arc and the Asian continent. The kinematic progression of the arc-continent collision can be reconstructed by superimposing the restored paleopositions of Luzon arc upon the precollisional Asian continental margin. The geological history of the collision can be interpreted from the rock records of the mountain ranges of Taiwan. By incorporating geological information into plate kinematics, the collision can be attributed to the northwesterly impingement of the Luzon arc upon the continental margin in the last 12 million years. During the initial stage of the collision, some of the continental materials might have been metamorphosed in the deep subduction zone, but no distinct effects can be perceived in the sedimentary record. In the Mio-Pliocene time (about 5 Ma), the accretionary wedge grew large enough to become a sediment source for the Luzon forearc basin and to induce foreland subsidence on the continental margin. In the early late Pliocene (about 3 Ma), drastic collision caused rapid uplift of the collision orogen that shed voluminous orogenic sediments into the forearc and foreland basins. Continued collision progressively accreted the forearc and foreland basins to the collision orogen from north to south to the present configuration.

  8. Middle Triassic magma mixing in an active continental margin: Evidence from mafic enclaves and host granites from the Dewulu pluton in West Qinling, central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, X.; Mo, X.; Yu, X.

    2015-12-01

    The Qinling-Dabie-Sulu orogen was formed through the collision of the North and South China blocks, but the precise timing of the closure of the Paleo-Tethys ocean between the two blocks remains debated. Large volumes of Triassic granites associated with mafic microgranular enclaves (MMEs) were emplaced in the Qinling terrane. This paper presents field observations, petrography, geochronology and geochemistry of the MMEs and their host granites from the Dewulu pluton in West Qinling. The host rocks comprise granodiorite and granodioritic porphyry, and the The MMEs range in composition from gabbroic diorite to diorite. Zircon LA-ICP-MS U-Pb ages suggest that the granites and MMEs were coeval at ca. 245 Ma. The granites are relatively enriched in LILE and depleted in HFSE, and have evolved Sr-Nd-Pb and zircon Hf isotopic compositions [initial 87Sr/86Sr = 0.7070-0.7076, ɛNd(t) = -7.5 to -6.8, ɛHf(t) = -8.2 to -4.2], indicative of an origin from the amphibolitic lower crust. The near-primitive gabbro-dioritic MMEs bear a remarkable geochemical resemblance to the high-magnesium andesite (HMA), such as moderate SiO2 (~55 wt.%), low FeOT/MgO (~0.75), high Cr (268-308 ppm) and MgO (8.58-8.77 wt.%) with Mg# of ~70. Additionally, they exhibit lower initial 87Sr/86Sr, higher ɛNd(t) and ɛHf(t), and more radiogenic Pb isotopes than the dioritic MMEs which share similar isotopic compositions with the granites. These features, together with the presence of the specific minerals in the MMEs (e.g., felsic xenocrysts and acicular apatite), point to mixing process between the lower crust-derived magmas and the melts produced by the reaction of the subducting sediment-derived components and the overlying mantle. Taking into account the regional occurrence of synchronous plutonic-volcanic complexes (250-234 Ma) ranging from basaltic to granitic variants, we suggest that the Dewulu pluton formed in an active continental margin in response to the local extension triggered by the

  9. New Isotopic Constraints on the Sources of Methane at Sites of Active Continental Serpentinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D. T.; Gruen, D.; Morrill, P. L.; Rietze, A.; Nealson, K. H.; Kubo, M. D.; Cardace, D.; Schrenk, M. O.; Hoehler, T. M.; McCollom, T. M.; Etiope, G.; Hosgormez, H.; Schoell, M.; Ono, S.

    2014-12-01

    of methane, and the flow of energy and carbon, in areas of active continental serpentinization. [1] Ono et al. (2014) Anal. Chem. 86, 6487. [2] Morrill et al. (2013) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 109, 222. [3] Cardace et al. (2013) Sci. Dril. 16, 45. [4] Etiope et al. (2011) Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 310, 96.

  10. Three-Dimensional Numerical Modeling of Crustal Growth at Active Continental Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, G.; Gerya, T.; Tackley, P. J.

    2011-12-01

    Active margins are important sites of new continental crust formation by magmatic processes related to the subduction of oceanic plates. We investigate these phenomena using a three-dimensional coupled petrological-geochemical-thermomechanical numerical model, which combines a finite-difference flow solver with a non-diffusive marker-in-cell technique for advection (I3ELVIS code, Gerya and Yuen, PEPI,2007). The model includes mantle flow associated with the subducting plate, water release from the slab, fluid propagation that triggers partial melting at the slab surface, melt extraction and the resulting volcanic crustal growth at the surface. The model also accounts for variations in physical properties (mainly density and viscosity) of both fluids and rocks as a function of local conditions in temperature, pressure, deformation, nature of the rocks, and chemical exchanges. Our results show different patterns of crustal growth and surface topography, which are comparable to nature, during subduction at active continental margins. Often, two trench-parallel lines of magmatic activity, which reflect two maxima of melt production atop the slab, are formed on the surface. The melt extraction rate controls the patterns of new crust at different ages. Moving free water reflects the path of fluids, and the velocity of free water shows the trend of two parallel lines of magmatic activity. The formation of new crust in particular time intervals is distributed in finger-like shapes, corresponding to finger-like and ridge-like cold plumes developed atop the subducting slabs (Zhu et al., G-cubed,2009; PEPI,2011). Most of the new crust is basaltic, formed from peridotitic mantle. Granitic crust extracted from melted sediment and upper crust forms in a line closer to the trench, and its distribution reflects the finger-like cold plumes. Dacitic crust extracted from the melted lower crust forms in a line farther away from the trench, and its distribution is anticorrelated with

  11. Arctic summary report: Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities in the Arctic and their onshore impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, C.; Slitor, D. L.; Rudolph, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    Issues and developments occuring in the Arctic Outer Continental Shelf subregion are discussed. The geology and hydrocarbon potential of the Diapir Field petroleum provinces are detailed. Recent lease sales, exploration activities, and the first development proposals for offshore areas of the North slope are considered. Issues relating to transporting resources from production islands to shore and various proposals for moving Arctic hydrocarbons to market are presented. Production projects onshore and possible support bases for offshore activity are also examined.

  12. Geothermal activity at continental rift Citala, Western Mexico, where Lake Chapala is emplaced: past and present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zárate-del Valle, P. F.

    2003-04-01

    Lake Chapala is a tectonic lake developed on a continental rift named Citala (CRC) which belongs to a tectonically active zone in Western Mexico: the so-called Jalisco continental triple junction. Fossil sinter deposit, thermal spring, hydrothermal (hy) petroleum manifestation and hy alteration halo characterized the Lake Chapala basin. On the SE shore, outcrops a carbonate deposit named ``La Calera" (LC) which consists of a carbonate fossil sinter that measures 2 km in E-W direction and 600 m in N-S direction and overlays andesitic rock. With a thickness of approximately 5 m and a roughly horizontal attitude, the LC is characterized by a two-fold structure: when massive, it is colored in yellow brownish and grey and elsewhere it shows a pseudo-brecciated structure and when banded, yellow and dark millimetre alternated bands can be seen. The LC is marked by vuggy porosity and silica (quartz and chalcedony) vein lets. Under microscope a pseudo-micritic texture is observed; vugs coated by iron oxides, are filled with calcite, and/or quartz, chalcedony and clay minerals. Six samples of LC were analysed (LODC-UParis VI) for their stable isotopes (δ18O and δ13C): From δ13C{PDB} values we have two sets of data: -8.03 to -8.69 ppm that means a no contribution of organic carbon (oc) and -0.35 to -0.75 ppm meaning an important contribution of oc; from δ18O{PDB} values: -8.5 to -10.27 ppm we deduced a deposit in meteoric water with a temperature deposition higher than the surface. The CRC is characterized also by the presence of hydrothermal petroleum (hp): Inside the Chapala and ˜2 km from SE shore (Los Arcos) there are some small spots made of hp which look like islands (<3-4 m^2) linked to the bottom of the lake which consist of solid bitumen. Thermal springs (ths) occur both inside and outside the lake Chapala: the water in out-shore ths is of carbonate type (69^oC; ˜ 240 mg L-1 [HCO_3]^-; with one exception: the ths at the San Juan Cosalá spa (N shore), which is

  13. First hydroacoustic evidence of marine, active fluid vents in the Naples Bay continental shelf (Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passaro, Salvatore; Genovese, Simona; Sacchi, Marco; Barra, Marco; Rumolo, Paola; Tamburrino, Stella; Mazzola, Salvatore; Basilone, Gualtiero; Placenti, Francesco; Aronica, Salvatore; Bonanno, Angelo

    2014-09-01

    We present the first results of a multidisciplinary research aimed at the detection and mapping of Active Fluid Vents (AFVs) at the seafloor of the Naples Bay, Italy. This segment of the Campania continental margin is characterised by severe Quaternary extension and intense volcanism at Ischia and Procida islands, the Campi Flegrei and Somma-Vesuvius volcanic complexes. High resolution hydroacoustic profilers were used to identify and localize fluid emission from the seafloor. ROV direct observation showed that each emission centre is generally composed by the coalescence of several emitting points. CTD probes showed that there are no significant gradients in temperature profiles. The results of this study include the detection and mapping of 54 fluid emission points all located in the - 71/- 158 m depth range, and spatially distributed into four main clusters. Three of the described clusters are located along the margin of a complex, toe-shaped seafloor morphology southwest of the Somma-Vesuvius, representing the shallow expression of partly buried, coalesced depositional features (namely, two flank collapses and one pyroclastic flow) associated with the Late Pleistocene activity of the volcano. The fourth AFV cluster was detected at the morphological - high, located about 8 km south of Naples (Banco della Montagna), represented by a field of volcaniclastic diapirs composed of massive pumiceous deposits originated from the Campi Flegrei intruding rising through the latest Quaternary-Holocene marine deposits. Our study suggests that the occurrence of AFV in this area could be genetically linked to the interaction between volcanic related seafloor morphologies and the main, NE striking faults present in the area, i.e. the Magnaghi-Sebeto line and the Vesuvian fault.

  14. Shelfal sediment transport by undercurrents forces turbidity current activity during high sea level, Chile continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, Anne; Hebbeln, Dierk; Regenberg, Marcus; Lückge, Andreas; Strecker, Manfred. R.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the links between terrigenous sediment supply and marine transport and depositional processes along tectonically active margins is essential to decipher turbidite successions as potential archives of climatic and seismic forcings and to comprehend timing and quantity of marine clastic deposition. Sequence stratigraphic models predict coarse-grained terrigenous sediment delivery to deep-marine sites mainly during sea-level fall and lowstand. Marine clastic deposition during periods of transgression and highstand has been attributed to the continued geomorphic connectivity between terrestrial sediment sources and marine sinks (e.g., rivers connected to submarine canyons) often facilitated by narrow shelves, high sediment supply causing delta migration to the shelf edge, and/or abrupt increases in sediment supply due to climatic variability or catastrophic events. To decipher the controls on Holocene highstand turbidite deposition, we analyzed twelve sediment cores of spatially disparate, coeval Holocene turbidite systems along the Chile margin (29-40°S) with changing climatic and geomorphic characteristics but uniform changes of sea level. Intraslope basins in north-central Chile (29-33°S) offshore a narrow to absent shelf record a shut-off of turbidite activity during the Holocene. In contrast, core sites in south-central Chile (36-40°S) offshore a wide continental shelf have repeatedly experienced turbidite deposition during sea-level highstand conditions, even though most of the depocenters are not connected via canyons to sediment sources. The interplay of stable high sediment supply related to strong onshore precipitation in combination with a wide shelf, over which undercurrents move sediment towards the shelf edge, appears to control Holocene turbidite sedimentation and sediment export to the deep sea.

  15. The Continental Plates are Getting Thicker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Richard A.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews seismological studies that provide evidence of the existence of continental roots beneath the continents. Suggests, that through the collisions of plate tectonics, continents stabilized part of the mobile mantle rock beneath them to form deep roots. (ML)

  16. Two active-electron classical trajectory Monte Carlo methods for ion-He collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman, F.; Errea, L. F.; Pons, B.

    2009-10-15

    We introduce two active-electron classical trajectory Monte Carlo models for ion-He collisions, in which the electron-electron force is smoothed using a Gaussian kernel approximation for the pointwise classical particles. A first model uses independent pairs of Gaussian electrons, while a second one employs time-dependent mean-field theory to define an averaged electron-electron repulsion force. These models are implemented for prototypical p+He collisions and the results are compared to available experimental and theoretical data.

  17. 78 FR 48180 - Consolidation of Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection For Outer Continental Shelf Activities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-07

    ... for all Mobile Offshore Drilling Units and Floating Outer Continental Shelf Facilities (as defined in... engage directly in oil and gas exploration or production in the offshore waters of the Eighth Coast Guard... Commander. Vessels requiring Coast Guard inspection include Mobile Offshore Drilling Units (MODUs),...

  18. Why does continental convergence stop

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, A.

    1985-01-01

    Convergence between India and Asia slowed at 45 Ma when they collided, but continues today. This requires that substantial proportions of the Indian and/or Asian lithospheric mantle are still being subducted. The resulting slab-pull is probably comparable with that from complete lithospheric slabs and may promote continued continental convergence even after collision. Since descending lithospheric slabs are present at all collision zones at the time of collision such continued convergence may be general after continental collisions. It may cease only when there is a major (global) plate reorganization which results in new forces on the convergent continents that may counteract the slab-pull. These inferences may be tested on the late Paleozoic collision between Gondwanaland and Laurasia. This is generally considered to have been complete by mid-Permian time (250 Ma). However, this may be only the time of docking of Gondwanaland with North America, not that of the cessation of convergence. Paleomagnetic polar-wander paths for the Gondwanide continents exhibit consistently greater latitudinal shifts from 250 Ma to 200 Ma than those of Laurasia when corrected for post-Triassic drift, suggesting that convergence continued through late Permian well into the Triassic. It may have been accommodated by crustal thickening under what is now the US Coastal Plain, or by strike-slip faulting. Convergence may have ceased only when Pangea began to fragment again, in which case the cause for its cessation may be related to the cause of continental fragmentation.

  19. Application of Global Positioning Measurements to Continental Collision in the Pamir-Tien Shan Region, Central Asia and GPS Survey of the Western Tien Shan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamburger, Michael W.; Reilinger, Robert E.; Hager, Bradford H.; Molnar, Peter

    1997-01-01

    In this report, we summarize what we have accomplished with five years of funding from NASA under its DOSE program, and with a comparable level of funding from NSF. We describe the development of a GPS network in the Tien Shan of Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan of the former Soviet Union, the analysis of data, and the main results. This discussion presents the state of the current network, which has grown significantly since the termination of our DOSE grants, with continued support both from NSF through its continental dynamics program and from NASA's SENH program. Although grants from NASA's DOSE program did not support this growth not directly, it did so indirectly by building the infrastructure that has enabled further expansion in an area where otherwise there would be only a small GPS presence. We note how the network has grown over time, but the emphasis of this discussion is on the quantity and quality of measurements that we have made.

  20. The Late Paleozoic Southern Margin of the Siberian paleocontinent: transformation from an active continental margin to intracontinental rifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovsky, A. M.; Yarmolyuk, V. V.; Sal'Nikova, E. B.

    2009-04-01

    The large volcanoplutonic belt was formed on the southern margin of Siberian paleocontinent in the Early Carboniferous-Early Permian. Now it's stretched through whole Mongolia and the adjacent region of China. In the belt structure there are defined the successive rock complexes: the older one represented by differentiated basalt-andesite-rhyodacite series and younger bimodal complex of basalt-comendite-trachyrhyolite composition. The granodiorite-plagiogranite and diorite-monzonite-granodiorite plutonic massifs are associated with the former, while peralkaline granite massifs are characteristic of the latter. Geochronological results and geological relations between rocks of the bimodal and differentiated complexes showed first that rocks of the differentiated complex originated 350 to 330 Ma ago at the initial stage of forming of the marginal continental belt, linked with development active continental margin. This is evident from geochronological dates obtained for the Adzh-Bogd and Edrengiyn-Nuruu massifs and for volcanic associations of the complex. The dates are consistent with paleontological data. The bimodal association was formed later, 320 to 290 Ma ago. The time span separating formation of two igneous complexes ranges from several to 20-30 m.y. in different areas of the marginal belt. The bimodal magmatism was interrelated with rifting responsible for development of the Gobi-Tien Shan rift zone in the belt axial part and the Main Mongolian lineament along the belt northern boundary. Loci of bimodal rift magmatism likely migrated with time: the respective magmatic activity first initiated on the west of the rift system and then advanced gradually eastward with development of rift structures. Normal granitoids untypical but occurring nevertheless among the products of rift magmatism in addition to peralkaline massifs are assumed to have been formed, when the basic magmatism associated with rifting stimulated crustal anatexis and generation of crustal

  1. Active Beacon Collision Avoidance System (BCAS) Conference Proceedings, January 27-28, 1981.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    PERFORMANCE OF THE FIRST GENERATION ACTIVE BCAS EQUIPMENTS DESIGNED BY MITRE CORPORATION. THE EQUIPMENTS EVALUATED DURING L980 WERE BASED ON A SECOND...and medium density airspace to include airspace not under surveillance by ground- based radars. It is designed to resolve reliably collision and near...CONSTRUCTIVE COMMENTS. BASED ON THESE COMMENTS, THE COMPLETION OF THE TECHNICAL AND OPERATIONAL EVALUATIONS, WE EXPECT TO PRODUCE THE FINAL, APPROVED

  2. Early Jurassic Volcanism in the South Lhasa Terrane, Southern Tibet: Record of Back-arc Extension in the Active Continental Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhu, D. C.; Wang, Z.; Liu, D.; Mo, X.

    2015-12-01

    Indus-Yarlung Zangbo Suture Zone (IYZSZ) represents the Mesozoic remnants of the Neo-Tethyan Ocean lithosphere after its northward subduction beneath the Lhasa Terrane. The evolution of the Neo-Tethyan Ocean prior to India-Asia collision remains unclear. To explore this period of history, we investigate zircon U-Pb geochronology, geochemistry and Nd-Hf isotopes of the Early Jurassic bimodal-like volcanic sequence around Dagze area, south Tibet. The volcanic sequence comprises calc-alkaline basalts to rhyolites whereas intermediate components are volumetrically restricted. Zircons from a basaltic andesite yielded crystallization age of 178Ma whereas those from 5 silicic rocks were dated at 183-174Ma, which suggest that both the basaltic and the silicic rocks are coeval. The basaltic rocks are enriched in LREE and LILE, and depleted in HFSE, with Epsilon Nd(t) of 1.6-4.0 and zircon Epsilon Hf(t) of 0.7-11.8, which implies that they were derived from a heterogenetic mantle source metasomatized by subduction components. Trace element geochemistry shows that the basaltic rocks are compositionally transitional from normal mid-ocean ridge basalts (N-MORB) to island arc basalts (IAB, e.g. Zedong arc basalts of ~160-155Ma in the south margin of Lhasa Terrane), with the signature of immature back-arc basin basalts. The silicic rocks display similar Nd-Hf isotopic features of the Gangdese batholith with Epsilon Nd(t) of 0.9-3.4 and zircon Epsilon Hf(t) of 2.4-17.7, indicating that they were possibly generated by anatexis of basaltic juvenile lower crust, instead of derived from the basaltic magma. These results support an Early to Middle Jurassic (183-155Ma) model that the back-arc extension tectonic setting were existing in the active continental margin in the south Lhasa Terrane.

  3. Initiation of Extension in South China Continental Margin during the Active-Passive Margin Transition: Thermochronological and Kinematic Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, X.; Chan, L. S.

    2015-12-01

    The South China continental margin is characterized by a widespread magmatic belt, prominent NE-striking faults and numerous rifted basins filled by Cretaceous-Eocene sediments. The geology denotes a transition from active to passive margin, which led to rapid modifications of crustal stress configuration and reactivation of older faults in this area. Our zircon fission-track data in this region show two episodes of exhumation: The first episode, occurring during 170-120Ma, affected local parts of the Nanling Range. The second episode, a more regional exhumation event, occurred during 115-70Ma, including the Yunkai Terrane and the Nanling Range. Numerical geodynamic modeling was conducted to simulate the subduction between the paleo-Pacific plate and the South China Block. The modeling results could explain the fact that exhumation of the granite-dominant Nanling Range occurred earlier than that of the gneiss-dominant Yunkai Terrane. In addition to the difference in rock types, the heat from Jurassic-Early Cretaceous magmatism in Nanling may have softened the upper crust, causing the area to exhume more readily than Yunkai. Numerical modeling results also indicate that (1) high lithospheric geothermal gradient, high slab dip angle and low convergence velocity favor the reversal of crustal stress state from compression to extension in the upper continental plate; (2) late Mesozoic magmatism in South China was probably caused by a slab roll-back; and (3) crustal extension could have occurred prior to the cessation of plate subduction. The inversion of stress regime in the continental crust from compression to crustal extension imply that the Late Cretaceous-early Paleogene red-bed basins in South China could have formed during the late stage of the subduction, accounting for the occurrence of volcanic events in some sedimentary basins. We propose that the rifting started as early as Late Cretaceous, probably before the cessation of subduction process.

  4. Active-sterile neutrino oscillations in the early Universe with full collision terms

    SciTech Connect

    Hannestad, Steen; Hansen, Rasmus Sloth; Tram, Thomas; Wong, Yvonne Y.Y. E-mail: rshansen@phys.au.dk E-mail: yvonne.y.wong@unsw.edu.au

    2015-08-01

    Sterile neutrinos are thermalised in the early Universe via oscillations with the active neutrinos for certain mixing parameters. The most detailed calculation of this thermalisation process involves the solution of the momentum-dependent quantum kinetic equations, which track the evolution of the neutrino phase space distributions. Until now the collision terms in the quantum kinetic equations have always been approximated using equilibrium distributions, but this approximation has never been checked numerically. In this work we revisit the sterile neutrino thermalisation calculation using the full collision term, and compare the results with various existing approximations in the literature. We find a better agreement than would naively be expected, but also identify some issues with these approximations that have not been appreciated previously. These include an unphysical production of neutrinos via scattering and the importance of redistributing momentum through scattering, as well as details of Pauli blocking. Finally, we devise a new approximation scheme, which improves upon some of the shortcomings of previous schemes.

  5. Active-sterile neutrino oscillations in the early Universe with full collision terms

    SciTech Connect

    Hannestad, Steen; Hansen, Rasmus Sloth; Tram, Thomas; Wong, Yvonne Y.Y.

    2015-08-11

    Sterile neutrinos are thermalised in the early Universe via oscillations with the active neutrinos for certain mixing parameters. The most detailed calculation of this thermalisation process involves the solution of the momentum-dependent quantum kinetic equations, which track the evolution of the neutrino phase space distributions. Until now the collision terms in the quantum kinetic equations have always been approximated using equilibrium distributions, but this approximation has never been checked numerically. In this work we revisit the sterile neutrino thermalisation calculation using the full collision term, and compare the results with various existing approximations in the literature. We find a better agreement than would naively be expected, but also identify some issues with these approximations that have not been appreciated previously. These include an unphysical production of neutrinos via scattering and the importance of redistributing momentum through scattering, as well as details of Pauli blocking. Finally, we devise a new approximation scheme, which improves upon some of the shortcomings of previous schemes.

  6. Hanging canyons of Haida Gwaii, British Columbia, Canada: Fault-control on submarine canyon geomorphology along active continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Peter T.; Barrie, J. Vaughn; Conway, Kim W.; Greene, H. Gary

    2014-06-01

    Faulting commonly influences the geomorphology of submarine canyons that occur on active continental margins. Here, we examine the geomorphology of canyons located on the continental margin off Haida Gwaii, British Columbia, that are truncated on the mid-slope (1200-1400 m water depth) by the Queen Charlotte Fault Zone (QCFZ). The QCFZ is an oblique strike-slip fault zone that has rates of lateral motion of around 50-60 mm/yr and a small convergent component equal to about 3 mm/yr. Slow subduction along the Cascadia Subduction Zone has accreted a prism of marine sediment against the lower slope (1500-3500 m water depth), forming the Queen Charlotte Terrace, which blocks the mouths of submarine canyons formed on the upper slope (200-1400 m water depth). Consequently, canyons along this margin are short (4-8 km in length), closely spaced (around 800 m), and terminate uniformly along the 1400 m isobath, coinciding with the primary fault trend of the QCFZ. Vertical displacement along the fault has resulted in hanging canyons occurring locally. The Haida Gwaii canyons are compared and contrasted with the Sur Canyon system, located to the south of Monterey Bay, California, on a transform margin, which is not blocked by any accretionary prism, and where canyons thus extend to 4000 m depth, across the full breadth of the slope.

  7. Continental shelves

    SciTech Connect

    Postma, H.; Zijlstra

    1987-01-01

    Continental shelves form a relatively narrow fringe, of varying width, around the continents. Altogether they take up only about 7% of the ocean's surface and less than 0.2% if its volume. Nevertheless, their specific biological characteristics and economical importance justify a separate discussion in this series. Ecosystems of the World. The specific biological characteristics are due to the position of continental shelves between the land masses on one side and the oceans on the other, to their relative shallowness and variable sea-floor texture and to the fact that, besides residual currents, tidal streams exert a great influence on the movements of water bodies.

  8. Evolution and stability of shock waves in dissipative gases characterized by activated inelastic collisions.

    PubMed

    Sirmas, N; Radulescu, M I

    2015-02-01

    Previous experiments have revealed that shock waves driven through dissipative gases may become unstable, for example, in granular gases and in molecular gases undergoing strong relaxation effects. The mechanisms controlling these instabilities are not well understood. We successfully isolated and investigated this instability in the canonical problem of piston-driven shock waves propagating into a medium characterized by inelastic collision processes. We treat the standard model of granular gases, where particle collisions are taken as inelastic, with a constant coefficient of restitution. The inelasticity is activated for sufficiently strong collisions. Molecular dynamic simulations were performed for 30,000 particles. We find that all shock waves investigated become unstable, with density nonuniformities forming in the relaxation region. The wavelength of these fingers is found to be comparable to the characteristic relaxation thickness. Shock Hugoniot curves for both elastic and inelastic collisions were obtained analytically and numerically. Analysis of these curves indicates that the instability is not of the Bethe-Zeldovich-Thompson or D'yakov-Kontorovich type. Analysis of the shock relaxation rates and rates for clustering in a convected fluid element with the same thermodynamic history ruled out the clustering instability of a homogeneous granular gas. Instead, wave reconstruction of the early transient evolution indicates that the onset of instability occurs during repressurization of the gas following the initial relaxation of the medium behind the lead shock. This repressurization gives rise to internal pressure waves in the presence of strong density gradients. This indicates that the mechanism of instability is more likely of the vorticity-generating Richtmyer-Meshkov type, relying on the action of the inner pressure wave development during the transient relaxation.

  9. Mid to late Holocene aeolian activity revealed by a multiproxy peat record in continental CE Europe (Northern Romania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panait, Andrei Marian; Feurdean, Angelica; Hutchinson, Simon Mark; Tanţǎu, Ioan

    2016-04-01

    Peat bogs, and especially ombrogenous mire, are increasingly used as continental archives of aeolian dust and sand deposition. Since ombrogenous peat is formed above ground water level all the inputs are atmospheric. Dust is more influenced by regional climatic patterns due to its small size, whereas sand tends to record local patterns in storm frequency and intensity reflecting its larger particle size. However, both size fractions are significantly underused proxies of past climate variability. Here, an ombrogenous peat profile from Tǎul Muced in the Rodnei Mountains (Northern Romanian Carpathians), located in a temperate continental climate, with Atlantic and Baltic influences, provides the very first record of mid to late Holocene aeolian activity from Romania highlighting the interplay between local and regional controls in a continental area of CE Europe. We use a multiproxy approach combining radiocarbon dating, the physical properties of the peat (loss-on-ignition, bulk density), mineral magnetic measurements (ARM, SIRM), geochemical (Ti and Zr) and particle size analysis (via both laser diffraction and the manual counting of sand particles under a steromicroscope) to determine changes in: i) atmospheric dust deposition and ii) wind velocities during the last 7800 years. We found that the aeolian particles are mainly silt (3.9-63 μm) (dust) and sand (63-1200 μm). The mineralogical composition of the aeolian sediment in peat is mainly quartz, more rarely calcite and very rarely other minerals such as feldspar, sulphur, mica (biotite and muscovite), magnetite and other melanocrate minerals. The roundness of the sand particles varies from well-rounded to sub-angular and angular, and suggests that the sand particles have different source areas. Results from this study show that over the last 7600 years the pattern of wind frequency changed several times: there are periods characterised by a low aeolian input around 6950-6550, 5000-3900, 3500-2900, 1650

  10. 77 FR 5039 - Accommodation Service Provided on Vessels Engaged in U.S. Outer Continental Shelf Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Accommodation Service Provided on Vessels Engaged in U.S. Outer Continental Shelf... providing accommodation service on the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf. DATES: Comments and related material... or reach the Docket Management Facility by that date. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments...

  11. 77 FR 5561 - Information Collection Activities: Oil, Gas, and Sulphur Operations in the Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... Appropriations Bill (Pub. L. 104-133, 110 Stat. 1321, April 26, 1996), and OMB Circular A-25, authorize Federal... assumed that respondents perform certain requirements in the normal course of their activities....

  12. The role of statistical fluctuations on the stability of shockwaves through gases with activated inelastic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirmas, Nick; Radulescu, Matei

    2016-11-01

    The present study addresses the stability of piston driven shock waves through a system of hard particles subject to activated inelastic collisions. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations have previously revealed an unstable structure for such a system in the form of high density non-uniformities and convective rolls within the shock structure. The work has now been extended to the continuum level by considering the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations for granular gases with a modified cooling rate to include an impact threshold necessary for inelastic collisions. We find that the pattern formations produced in MD can be reproduced at the continuum level by continually perturbing the incoming density field. By varying the perturbation amplitude and wavelength, we find that fluctuations consistent with the statistical fluctuations seen in MD yield similar instabilities to those previously observed. While the inviscid model predicts a highly chaotic structure from these perturbations, the inclusion of viscosity and heat conductivity yields equivalent wavelengths of pattern formations to those seen in MD, which is equal to the relaxation length scale of the dissipative shock structure. The authors acknowledged funding through the Alexander Graham Bell Canada Graduate Scholarship (NSERC) and Ontario Graduate Scholarship.

  13. Remote Maneuver of Space Debris Using Photon Pressure for Active Collision Avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C.

    2014-09-01

    The Space Environment Research Corporation (SERC) is a consortium of companies and research institutions that have joined together to pursue research and development of technologies and capabilities that will help to preserve the orbital space environment. The consortium includes, Electro Optics Systems (Australia), Lockheed Martin Australia, Optus Satellite Systems (Australia), The Australian national University, RMIT University, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT, Japan) as well as affiliates from NASA Ames and ESA. SERC is also the recipient of and Australian Government Cooperative Research Centre grant. SERC will pursue a wide ranging research program including technologies to improve tracking capability and capacity, orbit determination and propagation algorithms, conjunction analysis and collision avoidance. All of these technologies will contribute to the flagship program to demonstrate active collision avoidance using photon pressure to provide remote maneuver of space debris. This project joins of the proposed NASA Lightforce concept with infrastructure and capabilities provided by SERC. This paper will describe the proposed research and development program to provide an on-orbit demonstration within the next five years for remote maneuver of space debris.

  14. Measurement of inter- and intra-annual variability of landscape fire activity at a continental scale: the Australian case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Grant J.; Prior, Lynda D.; Jolly, W. Matt; Cochrane, Mark A.; Murphy, Brett P.; Bowman, David M. J. S.

    2016-03-01

    Climate dynamics at diurnal, seasonal and inter-annual scales shape global fire activity, although difficulties of assembling reliable fire and meteorological data with sufficient spatio-temporal resolution have frustrated quantification of this variability. Using Australia as a case study, we combine data from 4760 meteorological stations with 12 years of satellite-derived active fire detections to determine day and night time fire activity, fire season start and end dates, and inter-annual variability, across 61 objectively defined climate regions in three climate zones (monsoon tropics, arid and temperate). We show that geographic patterns of landscape burning (onset and duration) are related to fire weather, resulting in a latitudinal gradient from the monsoon tropics in winter, through the arid zone in all seasons except winter, and then to the temperate zone in summer and autumn. Peak fire activity precedes maximum lightning activity by several months in all regions, signalling the importance of human ignitions in shaping fire seasons. We determined median daily McArthur forest fire danger index (FFDI50) for days and nights when fires were detected: FFDI50 varied substantially between climate zones, reflecting effects of fire management in the temperate zone, fuel limitation in the arid zone and abundance of flammable grasses in the monsoon tropical zone. We found correlations between the proportion of days when FFDI exceeds FFDI50 and the Southern Oscillation index across the arid zone during spring and summer, and Indian Ocean dipole mode index across south-eastern Australia during summer. Our study demonstrates that Australia has a long fire weather season with high inter-annual variability relative to all other continents, making it difficult to detect long term trends. It also provides a way of establishing robust baselines to track changes to fire seasons, and supports a previous conceptual model highlighting multi-temporal scale effects of climate in

  15. 78 FR 8190 - Commercial Wind Leasing and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Wind Leasing and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic... Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Assessment (EA) for Commercial Wind Leasing and...

  16. 76 FR 79705 - Information Collection Activities: Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf for Minerals Other...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-22

    ..., gas, and sulphur to qualified parties. This regulation governs mining operations within the OCS and...) facilitate participation by States directly affected by OCS mining activities; (c) provide opportunities for... complying with the regulations that implement the mining operations program for minerals other than oil,...

  17. 77 FR 5830 - Commercial Wind Leasing and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Wind Leasing and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic... of involving Federal agencies, states, tribes, local governments, offshore wind energy developers, and the public in the Department of the Interior's (DOI) ``Smart from the Start'' wind...

  18. Dynamics of Continental Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moresi, L. N.; Betts, P. G.; Miller, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    Subduction zones become congested when they try to swallow buoyant exotic crust. Accretionary mountain belts (orogens) that form at these convergent plate margins are the principal sites of lateral continental growth through Earth's history. Modern examples of accretionary margins are the North and South American Cordilleras and southwest Pacific. The geologic record is riddled with accretionary orogens, such as the Tasmanides along the eastern margin of the supercontinent Gondwana and the Altaides that formed on the southern margin of Laurasia. Both the modern and ancient examples are characterised by episodic switches between extension and shortening associated with transitions from collision of exotic crust and subduction related rollback. We present three-dimensional dynamic models that show for the first time how accretionary margins evolve from the initial collision, through a period of plate margin instability, to re-establishment of a stable convergent margin. The models illustrate how significant curvature of the orogenic system develops, as well as the mechanism for tectonic escape of the back arc region. The complexity of the morphology and evolution of the system are driven by lateral rollback of a tightly arcuate trench migrating parallel to the plate boundary and orthogonal to the convergence direction. We find geological and geophysical evidence for this process in the Tasmanides of eastern Australia, but infer that this is a global phenomena throughout Earth's evolution.

  19. Collision-induced signal enhancement (CISE): the use of boundary activation to effect non-resonant CISE.

    PubMed

    Asam, Michael R; Glish, Gary L

    2002-06-01

    An alternative to resonant excitation collision-induced signal enhancement (CISE) is presented. This alternative utilizes boundary activation instead of resonant excitation to effect CISE and is called boundary activated collision induced signal enhancement (BA-CISE). There are three ways to effect BA-CISE to enhance the signal for an MS(n+1) experiment. Each technique utilizes the beta(z) = 0 boundary, which ions encounter from high to low mass/charge ratio. BA-CISE is shown to produce an almost 900% increase in the C2 ion of [maltohexaose + Li]+. The use of a heavy collision gas in addition to the helium bath gas generally produced a signal enhancement inferior to the same experiment without the heavy gas.

  20. Seismotectonics of the Gulf of Cadiz and Horseshoe Abyssal Plain - active faulting in continental and oceanic mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevemeyer, Ingo; Matias, Luis

    2013-04-01

    In the area to the west of the Gibraltar Arc the plate boundary between Africa and Iberia is poorly defined. The deformation in the area is forced by the slow NW-SE convergence of 4 mm/yr between the oceanic domains of Iberia/Eurasia and Africa and is accommodated over a 200 km broad tectonically-active deformation zone. The region, however, is also characterized by large earthquakes and tsunamis, such as the 1969 Mw=7.9 Horseshoe Abyssal Plain earthquake and the November 1, 1755 Great Lisbon earthquake with an estimated magnitude of Mw~8.5. The exact location of the source of the 1755 Lisbon earthquake is still unknown. Recent work, however, may suggest that the event occurred in the vicinity of the Horseshoe fault, an oblique thrust fault. Further, the area is marked by the presence of compressive structures with a roughly NE-SW orientation and E-W trending, segmented, crustal-scale, strike slip faults that extend from the Gorringe Bank to the Gibraltar arc in the eastern Gulf of Cadiz, which were called "South West Iberian Margin" or SWIM faults. The fault system may mark a developing Eurasia-Africa plate boundary. Two local seismic networks were operated in the area. First, within the framework of TOPOE-EUROPE, a network of 24 ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) monitored the seismicity between January and July 2010 in the northern Gulf of Cadiz to the north of 36°N between 9°30'W and ~7 °W. The second network operated between April and October 2012 14OBS in the vicinity of the Horseshoe fault between 10°W to 11°W, and 35°50'N to 36°10'N. Recordings from the both deployments were supplemented by land stations operated in Portugal and the Gibraltar Arc. The networks provided in the order of 100 locale earthquakes occurring with the networks. In the Gulf of Cadiz, the two largest events of Mw~3.6 where thrust faulting events occurring in the vicinity of the Portimao Bank. With a depth of 40-50 km these events, among others, occurred within the continental

  1. Horizontal coherence of low-frequency fixed-path sound in a continental shelf region with internal-wave activity.

    PubMed

    Duda, Timothy F; Collis, Jon M; Lin, Ying-Tsong; Newhall, Arthur E; Lynch, James F; DeFerrari, Harry A

    2012-02-01

    Sound at 85 to 450 Hz propagating in approximately 80-m depth water from fixed sources to a joint horizontal/vertical line array (HLA/VLA) is analyzed. The data are from a continental shelf area east of Delaware Bay (USA) populated with tidally generated long- and short-wavelength internal waves. Sound paths are 19 km in the along-shore (along internal-wave crest) direction and 30 km in the cross-shore direction. Spatial statistics of HLA arrivals are computed as functions of beam steering angle and time. These include array gain, horizontally lagged spatial correlation function, and coherent beam power. These quantities vary widely in magnitude, and vary over a broad range of time scales. For example, correlation scale can change rapidly from forty to five wavelengths, and correlation-scale behavior is anisotropic. In addition, the vertical array can be used to predict correlation expected for adiabatic propagation with cylindrical symmetry, forming a benchmark. Observed variations are in concert with internal-wave activity. Temporal variations of three coherence measures, horizontal correlation length, array gain, and ratio of actual correlation length to predicted adiabatic-mode correlation length, are very strong, varying by almost a factor of ten as internal waves pass.

  2. Ice nucleation active particles in continental air samples over Mainz, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pummer, Bernhard G.; Pöschl, Ulrich; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol particles are of central importance for atmospheric chemistry and physics, climate and public health. Some of these particles possess ice nucleation activity (INA), which is highly relevant for cloud formation and precipitation. In 2010, air filter samples were collected with a high-volume filter sampler separating fine and coarse particles (aerodynamic cut-off diameter 3 μm) in Mainz, Germany. In this study, the INA of the atmospheric particles deposited on these filters was determined. Therefore,they were extracted with ultrapure water, which was then measured in a droplet freezing assay, as described in Fröhlich-Nowoisky et al. (2015). The determined concentration of ice nucleators (INs) was between 0.3 and 2per m³ at 266 K, and between5 and 75 per m³ at 260 K. The INs were further characterized by different treatments, like heating (308 K, 371 K), filtration (0.1 μm, 300 kDa), and digestion with papain (10 mg/ml). We further investigated, which atmospheric conditions (e.g. weather) and distinguished events (e.g. dust storms, volcanic eruptions, and pollen peaks) influenced the number and nature of these INs. Fröhlich-Nowoisky, J., Hill, T. C. J., Pummer, B. G., Yordanova, P., Franc, G. D., and Pöschl, U.: Ice nucleation activity in the widespread soil fungus Mortierella alpina, Biogeosci., 12, 1057-1071, doi:10.5194/bg-12-1057-2015, 2015.

  3. Rare, threatened, and endangered vertebrates of southwest Florida and potential OCS (outer continental shelf) activity impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Woolfender, G.E.

    1983-02-01

    The eight southwestern Florida counties include populations of 68 vertebrates considered in this report as rare, threatened, or endangered. The terrestrial and near-shore habitats of the study area and the habitat preferences of each of the 68 vertebrates are described. Each vertebrate is listed in the habitats it occupies, and information about reproduction, feeding, and where available, population estimates, is given under the habitat considered most important for each species. The distributions of the rare, threatened and endangered vertebrates by county and habitat demonstrate the relative importance of the southernmost counties (Monroe and Collier) and wetland and coastal habitats. Activities contributing to the decline of these 68 vertebrates are assessed and habitat loss is overwhelmingly more important for all.

  4. Sidescan sonar imagery of widespread fossil and active cold seeps along the central Chilean continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaucke, Ingo; Weinrebe, Wilhelm; Linke, Peter; Kläschen, Dirk; Bialas, Jörg

    2012-12-01

    The central Chilean subduction zone between 35°S and 37°S was investigated in order to identify, document and possibly understand fluid flow and fluid venting within the forearc region. Several areas were mapped using multibeam bathymetry and backscatter, high-resolution sidescan sonar, chirp subbottom profiling and reflection seismic data. On a subsequent cruise ground-truthing observations were made using a video sled. In general, this dataset shows surprisingly little evidence of fluid venting along the mid-slope region, in contrast to other subduction zones such as Central America and New Zealand. There were abundant indications of active and predominantly fossil fluid venting along the upper slope between 36.5°S and 36.8°S at the seaward margin of an intraslope basin. Here, backscatter anomalies suggest widespread authigenic carbonate deposits, likely the result of methane-rich fluid expulsion. There is unpublished evidence that these fluids are of biogenic origin and generated within the slope sediments, similar to other accretionary margins but in contrast to the erosional margin off Central America, where fluids have geochemical signals indicating an origin from the subducting plate.

  5. Operational support to collision avoidance activities by ESA's space debris office

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, V.; Flohrer, T.; Krag, H.; Merz, K.; Lemmens, S.; Bastida Virgili, B.; Funke, Q.

    2016-09-01

    The European Space Agency's (ESA) Space Debris Office provides a service to support operational collision avoidance activities. This support currently covers ESA's missions Cryosat-2, Sentinel-1A and -2A, the constellation of Swarm-A/B/C in low-Earth orbit (LEO), as well as missions of third-party customers. In this work, we describe the current collision avoidance process for ESA and third-party missions in LEO. We give an overview on the upgrades developed and implemented since the advent of conjunction summary messages (CSM)/conjunction data messages (CDM), addressing conjunction event detection, collision risk assessment, orbit determination, orbit and covariance propagation, process control, and data handling. We pay special attention to the effect of warning thresholds on the risk reduction and manoeuvre rates, as they are established through risk mitigation and analysis tools, such as ESA's Debris Risk Assessment and Mitigation Analysis (DRAMA) software suite. To handle the large number of CDMs and the associated risk analyses, a database-centric approach has been developed. All CDMs and risk analysis results are stored in a database. In this way, a temporary local "mini-catalogue" of objects close to our target spacecraft is obtained, which can be used, e.g., for manoeuvre screening and to update the risk analysis whenever a new ephemeris becomes available from the flight dynamics team. The database is also used as the backbone for a Web-based tool, which consists of the visualization component and a collaboration tool that facilitates the status monitoring and task allocation within the support team as well as communication with the control team. The visualization component further supports the information sharing by displaying target and chaser motion over time along with the involved uncertainties. The Web-based solution optimally meets the needs for a concise and easy-to-use way to obtain a situation picture in a very short time, and the support for

  6. Active layer thermal monitoring of a Dry Valley of the Ellsworth Mountains, Continental Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Carlos Ernesto; Michel, Roberto; Souza, Karoline; Senra, Eduardo; Bremer, Ulisses

    2015-04-01

    The Ellsworth Mountains occur along the southern edge of the Ronne-Filchner Ice Shelf and are subdivided by the Minnesota Glacier into the Heritage Range to the east and the Sentinel Range to the West. The climate of the Ellsworth Mountains is strongly controlled by proximity to the Ronne-Filchner Ice Shelf and elevation. The mean annual air temperature at the 1,000 m level is estimated to be -25°C, and the average annual accumulation of water-equivalent precipitation likely ranges from 150 to 175 mm yr-1 (Weyant, 1966). The entire area is underlain by continuous permafrost of unknown thickness. Based on data collected from 22 pits, 41% of the sites contained dry permafrost below 70 cm, 27% had ice-cemented permafrost within 70 cm of the surface, 27% had bedrock within 70 cm, and 5% contained an ice-core (Bockheim, unpublished; Schaefer et al., 2015). Dry-frozen permafrost, which may be unique to Antarctica, appears to form from sublimation of moisture in ice-cemented permafrost over time. Active-layer depths in drift sheets of the Ellsworth Mountains range from 15 to 50 cm (Bockheim, unpublished); our understanding of Antarctic permafrost is poor, especially at the continent. The active layer monitoring sites were installed at Edson Hills, Ellsworth_Mountains, in the summer of 2012, and consist of thermistors (accuracy ± 0.2 °C) installed at 1 m above ground for air temperature measurements at two soil profiles on quartzite drift deposits, arranged in a vertical array (Lithic Haplorthel 886 m asl, 5 cm, 10 cm, 30 cm and Lithic Anyorthel 850 m asl, 5 cm, 10 cm, 30 cm). All probes were connected to a Campbell Scientific CR 1000 data logger recording data at hourly intervals from January 2nd 2012 until December 29th 2013. We calculated the thawing days (TD), freezing days (FD); isothermal days (ID), freeze thaw days (FTD), thawing degree days (TDD) and freezing degree days (FDD); all according to Guglielmin et al. (2008). Temperature at 5 cm reaches a maximum

  7. Continental rifts and mineral resources

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, K. . Geosciences Dept.)

    1992-01-01

    Continental rifts are widespread and range in age from the present to 3 b.y. Individual rifts may form parts of complex systems as in E. Africa and the Basin and Range. Rifts have originated in diverse environments such as arc-crests, sites of continental collision, collapsing mountain belts and on continents at rest over the mantle circulation pattern. Continental rift resources can be classified by depth of origin: For example, in the Great Dike, Norilsk and Mwadui magma from the mantle is the host. At shallower depths continental crust partly melted above mafic magma hosts ore (Climax, Henderson). Rift volcanics are linked to local hydrothermal systems and to extensive zeolite deposits (Basin and Range, East Africa). Copper (Zambia, Belt), zinc (Red Dog) and lead ores (Benue) are related to hydrothermal systems which involve hot rock and water flow through both pre-rift basement and sedimentary and volcanic rift fill. Economically significant sediments in rifts include coals (the Gondwana of Inida), marine evaporites (Lou Ann of the Gulf of Mexico) and non-marine evaporites (East Africa). Oil and gas in rifts relate to a variety of source, reservoir and trap relations (North Sea, Libya), but rift-lake sediment sources are important (Sung Liao, Bo Hai, Mina, Cabinda). Some ancient iron ores (Hammersley) may have formed in rift lakes but Algoman ores and greenstone belt mineral deposits in general are linked to oceanic and island arc environments. To the extent that continental environments are represented in such areas as the Archean of the Superior and Slave they are Andean Arc environments which today have locally rifted crests (Ecuador, N. Peru). The Pongola, on Kaapvaal craton may, on the other hand represent the world's oldest preserved, little deformed, continental rift.

  8. Progressive Emergence and Warping of Islands in the Active Banda Arc-Continent Collision As Recorded By Uplifted Coral Terraces: Tectonic and Geohazards Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, R. A.; Cox, N.; Major, J. R.; Merritts, D. J.; Prasetyadi, C.

    2014-12-01

    Uplifted coral terraces throughout the Banda-Sunda Arc transition reveal how strain is distributed over the past thousand to million years in the active arc-continent collision, and are key to identifying hazardous active faults. U-series age analysis of the lowest coral terraces yields surface uplift rates that vary in a non-systematic way along strike from 0.2 to 1.5 mm/a over short wavelengths of a few kms. For example, coral terraces are tilted varying degrees northward in Sumba, SSE in Savu, NNW in Rote and generally south along the north coast of Timor. In all of these cases the tilt is away from zones of active thrusting and folding. In Sumba the forearc is ramping up and over the northern edge of the Scott Plateau along what is likely a north dipping thrust. In Savu the coral terraces rise where the back of the accretionary wedge is ramping up over the forearc basin on the south dipping Savu Thrust. In Rote coral terraces form on the front of the accretionary wedge where it is ramping up over the subducting Australian continental margin. The north coast of East Timor is likely uplifting due to internal thrusting and closure of the Wetar Strait. Localized uplift of circular islands is associated with diapirism. The diapiric island of Kisar is cored by syn-collisional metamorphic rocks. The association of uplift and warping with short wavelength deformational processes argues against the commonly held interpretation that coral terraces in the Banda arc-continent collision manifest the effects of slab tear or some other lithospheric scale process. The pattern of uplift correlates best with proximity to active faults, folds and diapirs. In terms of geohazards, flights of uplifted coral terraces are the smoking gun for sources of large earthquakes and tsunami. Many of the terraces show signs of co-seismic uplift. Tsunami deposits with young corals are found on some of these terraces as high as 20 m above sea level.

  9. Repeated large-magnitude earthquakes in a tectonically active, low-strain continental interior: The northern Tien Shan, Kyrgyzstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landgraf, A.; Dzhumabaeva, A.; Abdrakhmatov, K. E.; Strecker, M. R.; Macaulay, E. A.; Arrowsmith, Jr.; Sudhaus, H.; Preusser, F.; Rugel, G.; Merchel, S.

    2016-05-01

    The northern Tien Shan of Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan has been affected by a series of major earthquakes in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. To assess the significance of such a pulse of strain release in a continental interior, it is important to analyze and quantify strain release over multiple time scales. We have undertaken paleoseismological investigations at two geomorphically distinct sites (Panfilovkoe and Rot Front) near the Kyrgyz capital Bishkek. Although located near the historic epicenters, both sites were not affected by these earthquakes. Trenching was accompanied by dating stratigraphy and offset surfaces using luminescence, radiocarbon, and 10Be terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide methods. At Rot Front, trenching of a small scarp did not reveal evidence for surface rupture during the last 5000 years. The scarp rather resembles an extensive debris-flow lobe. At Panfilovkoe, we estimate a Late Pleistocene minimum slip rate of 0.2 ± 0.1 mm/a, averaged over at least two, probably three earthquake cycles. Dip-slip reverse motion along segmented, moderately steep faults resulted in hanging wall collapse scarps during different events. The most recent earthquake occurred around 3.6 ± 1.3 kyr ago (1σ), with dip-slip offsets between 1.2 and 1.4 m. We calculate a probabilistic paleomagnitude to be between 6.7 and 7.2, which is in agreement with regional data from the Kyrgyz range. The morphotectonic signals in the northern Tien Shan are a prime example of deformation in a tectonically active intracontinental mountain belt and as such can help understand the longer-term coevolution of topography and seismogenic processes in similar structural settings worldwide.

  10. Measurement of Biocolloid Collision Efficiencies for Granular Activated Carbon by Use of a Two-Layer Filtration Model

    PubMed Central

    Paramonova, Ekaterina; Zerfoss, Erica L.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2006-01-01

    Point-of-use filters containing granular activated carbon (GAC) are an effective method for removing certain chemicals from water, but their ability to remove bacteria and viruses has been relatively untested. Collision efficiencies (α) were determined using clean-bed filtration theory for two bacteria (Raoutella terrigena 33257 and Escherichia coli 25922), a bacteriophage (MS2), and latex microspheres for four GAC samples. These GAC samples had particle size distributions that were bimodal, but only a single particle diameter can be used in the filtration equation. Therefore, consistent with previous reports, we used a particle diameter based on the smallest diameter of the particles (derived from the projected areas of 10% of the smallest particles). The bacterial collision efficiencies calculated using the filtration model were high (0.8 ≤ α ≤ 4.9), indicating that GAC was an effective capture material. Collision efficiencies greater than unity reflect an underestimation of the collision frequency, likely as a result of particle roughness and wide GAC size distributions. The collision efficiencies for microspheres (0.7 ≤ α ≤ 3.5) were similar to those obtained for bacteria, suggesting that the microspheres were a reasonable surrogate for the bacteria. The bacteriophage collision efficiencies ranged from ≥0.2 to ≤0.4. The predicted levels of removal for 1-cm-thick carbon beds ranged from 0.8 to 3 log for the bacteria and from 0.3 to 1.0 log for the phage. These tests demonstrated that GAC can be an effective material for removal of bacteria and phage and that GAC particle size is a more important factor than relative stickiness for effective particle removal. PMID:16885264

  11. Characterization of an active offshore coast-parallel fault system on the shallow SE continental shelf of New Zealand's South Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorman, A. R.; Bruce, C.; Reid-Lindroos, Z.; Preskett, S.

    2009-12-01

    The Akatore Fault is an active reverse fault that is mapped along the SE coast of New Zealand’s South Island, south of Dunedin. It is the easternmost in a series of onshore faults resulting from the tectonic-inversion of a former range and basin system. This system of faults, lying within Pacific continental crust, extends across the ~250 km width of the South Island. It accommodates some of the motion resulting from the oblique collision of the Pacific and Australian plates, the boundary of which lies along the west coast of the South Island. The Akatore Fault runs onshore for about 25 km along a slight bulge in the coastline, and is inferred to continue just offshore to the NE and SW. Other coast-parallel faults have been proposed based on limited shallow seismic imaging of the shelf. Earthquakes in 1974 and 1989 with offshore epicenters were attributed to these faults. In February 2009, a detailed high-frequency seismic survey was undertaken over the northernmost section of the offshore Akatore Fault. Data recorded included single-channel Chirp and electro-acoustic (boomer) sub-bottom imaging, and interferometric side scanning sonar (C3D). A grid of 31 lines was collected with line spacing of ~250 m. Lines ran from just outside the surf zone to ~4 km offshore in water depths from ~10 to 60 m. Chirp and boomer data image the upper 5 to 60 m of sub-seafloor sediments and sedimentary rocks. Most of the shelf has little Quaternary cover in this region. Seismic lines are characterized by distinct, continuous, southeast-dipping reflections that correlate to the late Cretaceous - Tertiary sedimentary sequences that outcrop onshore. The boomer dataset recorded in this region has remarkably good penetration, often limited only by the occurrence of seafloor multiples. In a few locations, more rugged seafloor outcrops lead to poor penetration. These outcrops may consist of metamorphic basement rocks, volcanic extrusions, eroded igneous intrusions, or organic communities

  12. A Fundamental Tandem Mass Spectrometry Study of the Collision-Activated Dissociation of Small Deprotonated Molecules Related to Lignin.

    PubMed

    Marcum, Christopher L; Jarrell, Tiffany M; Zhu, Hanyu; Owen, Benjamin C; Haupert, Laura J; Easton, Mckay; Hosseinaei, Omid; Bozell, Joseph; Nash, John J; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2016-12-20

    The collision-activated fragmentation pathways and reaction mechanisms of 34 deprotonated model compounds representative of lignin degradation products were explored experimentally and computationally. The compounds were evaporated and ionized by using negative-ion mode electrospray ionization doped with NaOH to produce abundant deprotonated molecules. The ions were isolated and subjected to collision-activated dissociation (CAD). Their fragment ions were then isolated and also subjected to CAD. This was repeated until no further fragmentation was observed (up to MS(6) ). This approach enabled the identification of characteristic reaction pathways and delineation of reasonable fragmentation mechanisms for deprotonated molecules containing various functional groups. The varying fragmentation patterns observed for different types of compounds allow for the identification of the functionalities in these compounds. This information was utilized to identify the presence of specific functionalities and their combinations in molecules in an organosolv lignin sample.

  13. Dynamics of continental accretion.

    PubMed

    Moresi, L; Betts, P G; Miller, M S; Cayley, R A

    2014-04-10

    Subduction zones become congested when they try to consume buoyant, exotic crust. The accretionary mountain belts (orogens) that form at these convergent plate margins have been the principal sites of lateral continental growth through Earth's history. Modern examples of accretionary margins are the North American Cordilleras and southwest Pacific subduction zones. The geologic record contains abundant accretionary orogens, such as the Tasmanides, along the eastern margin of the supercontinent Gondwana, and the Altaïdes, which formed on the southern margin of Laurasia. In modern and ancient examples of long-lived accretionary orogens, the overriding plate is subjected to episodes of crustal extension and back-arc basin development, often related to subduction rollback and transient episodes of orogenesis and crustal shortening, coincident with accretion of exotic crust. Here we present three-dimensional dynamic models that show how accretionary margins evolve from the initial collision, through a period of plate margin instability, to re-establishment of a stable convergent margin. The models illustrate how significant curvature of the orogenic system develops, as well as the mechanism for tectonic escape of the back-arc region. The complexity of the morphology and the evolution of the system are caused by lateral rollback of a tightly arcuate trench migrating parallel to the plate boundary and orthogonally to the convergence direction. We find geological and geophysical evidence for this process in the Tasmanides of eastern Australia, and infer that this is a recurrent and global phenomenon.

  14. Dynamics of continental accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moresi, L.; Betts, P. G.; Miller, M. S.; Cayley, R. A.

    2014-04-01

    Subduction zones become congested when they try to consume buoyant, exotic crust. The accretionary mountain belts (orogens) that form at these convergent plate margins have been the principal sites of lateral continental growth through Earth's history. Modern examples of accretionary margins are the North American Cordilleras and southwest Pacific subduction zones. The geologic record contains abundant accretionary orogens, such as the Tasmanides, along the eastern margin of the supercontinent Gondwana, and the Altaïdes, which formed on the southern margin of Laurasia. In modern and ancient examples of long-lived accretionary orogens, the overriding plate is subjected to episodes of crustal extension and back-arc basin development, often related to subduction rollback and transient episodes of orogenesis and crustal shortening, coincident with accretion of exotic crust. Here we present three-dimensional dynamic models that show how accretionary margins evolve from the initial collision, through a period of plate margin instability, to re-establishment of a stable convergent margin. The models illustrate how significant curvature of the orogenic system develops, as well as the mechanism for tectonic escape of the back-arc region. The complexity of the morphology and the evolution of the system are caused by lateral rollback of a tightly arcuate trench migrating parallel to the plate boundary and orthogonally to the convergence direction. We find geological and geophysical evidence for this process in the Tasmanides of eastern Australia, and infer that this is a recurrent and global phenomenon.

  15. The northern Egyptian continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawy, Ahmed; Mohamed, Gad; Omar, Khaled; Farid, Walid

    2015-01-01

    Africa displays a variety of continental margin structures, tectonics and sedimentary records. The northern Egyptian continental margin represents the NE portion of the North African passive continental margin. Economically, this region is of great importance as a very rich and productive hydrocarbon zone in Egypt. Moreover, it is characterized by remarkable tectonic setting accompanied by active tectonic processes from the old Tethys to recent Mediterranean. In this article, seismicity of the northern Egyptian continental margin has been re-evaluated for more than 100-years and the source parameters of three recent earthquakes (October 2012, January 2013 and July 2013) have been estimated. Moment tensor inversions of 19th October 2012 and 17th January 2013 earthquakes reveal normal faulting mechanism with strike-slip component having seismic moment of 3.5E16 N m and 4.3E15 N m respectively. The operation of the Egyptian National Seismic Network (ENSN) since the end of 1997 has significantly enhanced the old picture of earthquake activity across northern Egyptian continental margin whereas; the record-ability (annual rate) has changed from 2-events/year to 54-event/year before and after ENSN respectively. The spatial distribution of earthquakes foci indicated that the activity tends to cluster at three zones: Mediterranean Ridge (MR), Nile Cone (NC) and Eratosthenes Seamount (ERS). However, two seismic gaps are reported along Levant Basin (LEV) and Herodotus Basin (HER).

  16. Accretion of a Small Continental Fragment to a Larger Continental Plate: Mesozoic Ecuador as a Case-Study Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massonne, H.

    2013-05-01

    Only a few regions on Earth are appropriate to study processes that have happened in deeper crustal levels during the accretion of a microplate to a larger continental plate. Ecuador is one of these regions where in middle Mesozoic times a small continental fragment collided with the South-American plate. Along the suture between both plates, which occurs close to the present volcanic belt of Ecuador, high-pressure (HP) metamorphic rocks developed. These rocks, which are metapelites, metabasites, and metagranitoids, record processes during the microcontinent-continent collision (Massonne and Toulkeridis, 2012, Int. Geol. Rev. 54). The pressures, determined for the HP rocks, were as high as 14 kbar at temperatures somewhat above 500°C. The HP stage was followed by slight heating at the early exhumation. Peak temperatures up to 560°C were reached at pressures ≥10 kbar. This HP metamorphism was caused by the collision of the microplate with the South-American plate resulting in crustal thickening. The ascent of the HP rocks occurred in an exhumation channel. Before the collision, an oceanic basin existed between these plates. Probably, it was narrow as eclogite bodies are lacking in the N-S trending HP belt of Ecuador. Such bodies, especially if the eclogites had experienced pressures in excess of 20 kbar, are markers of a collision of major continental plates in Phanerozoic times with originally extended oceanic basins between these plates. In a more global context, the narrow ocean between the microplate and the South American continent is assumed to have been the westernmost portion of the Neo-Tethys which had extended to completely separate the two major fragments of former Pangaea before the opening of the southern Atlantic Ocean. This opening caused the closure of the narrow Neo-Tethys segment between the colliding microplate and the South American plate. This segment was bordered by E-W trending transform faults. A fault system (La Palma - El Guayabo fault

  17. Continental Jigsaw.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oringer, Richard H.

    1985-01-01

    The article outlines an activity for providing a hands-on opportunity for elementary and middle school science students to study the theory of the earth's crustal change over the past several hundred million years. The theory of continents drifting away from one super continent is presented with the supportive evidence that scientists have…

  18. Active Collisions in Altered Gravity Reveal Eye-Hand Coordination Strategies

    PubMed Central

    White, Olivier; Lefèvre, Philippe; Wing, Alan M.; Bracewell, R. Martyn; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2012-01-01

    Most object manipulation tasks involve a series of actions demarcated by mechanical contact events, and gaze is usually directed to the locations of these events as the task unfolds. Typically, gaze foveates the target 200 ms in advance of the contact. This strategy improves manual accuracy through visual feedback and the use of gaze-related signals to guide the hand/object. Many studies have investigated eye-hand coordination in experimental and natural tasks; most of them highlighted a strong link between eye movements and hand or object kinematics. In this experiment, we analyzed gaze strategies in a collision task but in a very challenging dynamical context. Participants performed collisions while they were exposed to alternating episodes of microgravity, hypergravity and normal gravity. First, by isolating the effects of inertia in microgravity, we found that peak hand acceleration marked the transition between two modes of grip force control. Participants exerted grip forces that paralleled load force profiles, and then increased grip up to a maximum shifted after the collision. Second, we found that the oculomotor strategy adapted visual feedback of the controlled object around the collision, as demonstrated by longer durations of fixation after collision in new gravitational environments. Finally, despite large variability of arm dynamics in altered gravity, we found that saccades were remarkably time-locked to the peak hand acceleration in all conditions. In conclusion, altered gravity allowed light to be shed on predictive mechanisms used by the central nervous system to coordinate gaze, hand and grip motor actions during a mixed task that involved transport of an object and high impact loads. PMID:22984488

  19. Estimated likelihood of observing a large earthquake on a continental low-angle normal fault and implications for low-angle normal fault activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Styron, Richard H.; Hetland, Eric A.

    2014-04-01

    The lack of observed continental earthquakes that clearly occurred on low-angle normal faults (LANFs) may indicate that these structures are not seismically active or that these earthquakes are simply rare events. To address this, we compile all potentially active continental LANFs (24 in total) and calculate the likelihood of observing a significant earthquake on them over periods of 1-100 years. This probability depends on several factors including the frequency-magnitude distribution. For either a characteristic or Gutenberg-Richter distribution, we calculate a probability of about 0.5 that an earthquake greater than M6.5 (large enough to avoid ambiguity in dip angle) will be observed on any LANF in a period of 35 years, which is the current length of the global centroid moment tensor catalog. We then use Bayes' Theorem to illustrate how the absence of observed significant LANF seismicity over the catalog period moderately decreases the likelihood that the structures generate large earthquakes.

  20. Magmatic record of India-Asia collision

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Di-Cheng; Wang, Qing; Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Cawood, Peter A.; Niu, Yaoling; Liu, Sheng-Ao; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Mo, Xuan-Xue

    2015-01-01

    New geochronological and geochemical data on magmatic activity from the India-Asia collision zone enables recognition of a distinct magmatic flare-up event that we ascribe to slab breakoff. This tie-point in the collisional record can be used to back-date to the time of initial impingement of the Indian continent with the Asian margin. Continental arc magmatism in southern Tibet during 80–40 Ma migrated from south to north and then back to south with significant mantle input at 70–43 Ma. A pronounced flare up in magmatic intensity (including ignimbrite and mafic rock) at ca. 52–51 Ma corresponds to a sudden decrease in the India-Asia convergence rate. Geological and geochemical data are consistent with mantle input controlled by slab rollback from ca. 70 Ma and slab breakoff at ca. 53 Ma. We propose that the slowdown of the Indian plate at ca. 51 Ma is largely the consequence of slab breakoff of the subducting Neo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere, rather than the onset of the India-Asia collision as traditionally interpreted, implying that the initial India-Asia collision commenced earlier, likely at ca. 55 Ma. PMID:26395973

  1. Magmatic record of India-Asia collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Di-Cheng; Wang, Qing; Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Cawood, Peter A.; Niu, Yaoling; Liu, Sheng-Ao; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Mo, Xuan-Xue

    2015-09-01

    New geochronological and geochemical data on magmatic activity from the India-Asia collision zone enables recognition of a distinct magmatic flare-up event that we ascribe to slab breakoff. This tie-point in the collisional record can be used to back-date to the time of initial impingement of the Indian continent with the Asian margin. Continental arc magmatism in southern Tibet during 80-40 Ma migrated from south to north and then back to south with significant mantle input at 70-43 Ma. A pronounced flare up in magmatic intensity (including ignimbrite and mafic rock) at ca. 52-51 Ma corresponds to a sudden decrease in the India-Asia convergence rate. Geological and geochemical data are consistent with mantle input controlled by slab rollback from ca. 70 Ma and slab breakoff at ca. 53 Ma. We propose that the slowdown of the Indian plate at ca. 51 Ma is largely the consequence of slab breakoff of the subducting Neo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere, rather than the onset of the India-Asia collision as traditionally interpreted, implying that the initial India-Asia collision commenced earlier, likely at ca. 55 Ma.

  2. Magmatic record of India-Asia collision.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Di-Cheng; Wang, Qing; Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Cawood, Peter A; Niu, Yaoling; Liu, Sheng-Ao; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Mo, Xuan-Xue

    2015-09-23

    New geochronological and geochemical data on magmatic activity from the India-Asia collision zone enables recognition of a distinct magmatic flare-up event that we ascribe to slab breakoff. This tie-point in the collisional record can be used to back-date to the time of initial impingement of the Indian continent with the Asian margin. Continental arc magmatism in southern Tibet during 80-40 Ma migrated from south to north and then back to south with significant mantle input at 70-43 Ma. A pronounced flare up in magmatic intensity (including ignimbrite and mafic rock) at ca. 52-51 Ma corresponds to a sudden decrease in the India-Asia convergence rate. Geological and geochemical data are consistent with mantle input controlled by slab rollback from ca. 70 Ma and slab breakoff at ca. 53 Ma. We propose that the slowdown of the Indian plate at ca. 51 Ma is largely the consequence of slab breakoff of the subducting Neo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere, rather than the onset of the India-Asia collision as traditionally interpreted, implying that the initial India-Asia collision commenced earlier, likely at ca. 55 Ma.

  3. Weighing the deep continental biosphere.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Sean; Parnell, John

    2014-01-01

    There is abundant evidence for widespread microbial activity in deep continental fractures and aquifers, with important implications for biogeochemical cycling on Earth and the habitability of other planetary bodies. Whitman et al. (P Natl Acad Sci USA, 95, 1998, 6578) estimated a continental subsurface biomass on the order of 10(16) -10(17) g C. We reassess this value in the light of more recent data including over 100 microbial population density measurements from groundwater around the world. Making conservative assumptions about cell carbon content and the ratio of attached and free-living microorganisms, we find that the evidence continues to support a deep continental biomass estimate of 10(16) -10(17) g C, or 2-19% of Earth's total biomass.

  4. Star-disk collisions in active galactic nuclei and the origin of the broad line region

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, W.H.; Colgate, S.A.; Siemiginowska, A.

    1991-12-05

    Stars of a cluster surrounding the central black hole in an AGN will collide with the accretion disk. For a central black hole of 10{sup 8} M{circle_dot} and a cluster with 10{sup 7} {minus} 10{sup 8} stars within a parsec, one estimates that {approximately}10{sup 4} such collisions will occur per year. Collisions are hypersonic (Mach number M {much_gt} 1). Some of the wake of the star -- the disk material shocked by its passage -- will follow it out of the disk. Such ``star tails`` with the estimated masses {delta}m {approximately} 10{sup 25} {minus} 10{sup 27} g subsequently expand, cool and begin to recombine. We propose that -- when illuminated by the ionizing flux from the central source -- they are likely to be the origin of the observed broad emission lines.

  5. Star-disk collisions in active galactic nuclei and the origin of the broad line region

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, W.H.; Colgate, S.A. ); Siemiginowska, A. )

    1991-12-05

    Stars of a cluster surrounding the central black hole in an AGN will collide with the accretion disk. For a central black hole of 10{sup 8} M{circle dot} and a cluster with 10{sup 7} {minus} 10{sup 8} stars within a parsec, one estimates that {approximately}10{sup 4} such collisions will occur per year. Collisions are hypersonic (Mach number M {much gt} 1). Some of the wake of the star -- the disk material shocked by its passage -- will follow it out of the disk. Such star tails'' with the estimated masses {delta}m {approximately} 10{sup 25} {minus} 10{sup 27} g subsequently expand, cool and begin to recombine. We propose that -- when illuminated by the ionizing flux from the central source -- they are likely to be the origin of the observed broad emission lines.

  6. Geophysical study of the structure and processes of the continental convergence zones: Alpine-Himalayan belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toksoz, M. N.; Molnar, P.

    1983-01-01

    Studies of the structure of the continental collision zones using seismic and body waves, theoretical modelling of the thermal regime of the convergence processes, and studies of earthquake mechanisms and deformation aspects of the model are covered.

  7. Processes of lithosphere evolution: New evidence on the structure of the continental crust and uppermost mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Artemieva, I.M.; Mooney, W.D.; Perchuc, E.; Thybo, H.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the structure of the continental lithosphere, its physical properties, and the mechanisms that formed and modified it since the early Archean. The structure of the upper mantle and the crust is derived primarily from global and regional seismic tomography studies of Eurasia and from global and regional data on seismic anisotropy. These data as documented in the papers of this special issue of Tectonophysics are used to illustrate the role of different tectonic processes in the lithospheric evolution since Archean to present. These include, but are not limited to, cratonization, terrane accretion and collision, continental rifting (both passive and active), subduction, and lithospheric basal erosion due to a relative motion of cratonic keels and the convective mantle. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Estimates of suspended-sediment flux and bedform activity on the inner portion of the Eel continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cacchione, D.A.; Wiberg, P.L.; Lynch, J.; Irish, J.; Traykovski, P.

    1999-01-01

    Energetic waves, strong bottom currents, and relatively high rates of sediment discharge from the Eel River combined to produce large amounts of suspended-sediment transport on the inner continental shelf near the Eel River during the winter of 1995-1996. Bottom-boundary-layer (BBL) measurements at a depth of ~50 m using the GEOPROBE tripod showed that the strongest near-bottom flows (combined wave and current speeds of over 1 m/s) and highest sediment concentrations (exceeding 2 g/l at ~1.2 m above the bed) occurred during two storms, one in December 1995 and the other in February 1996. Discharge from the Eel River during these storms was estimated at between 2 and 4 x 103 m3/s. Suspended-sediment flux (SSF) was measured 1.2 m above the bed and calculated throughout the BBL, by applying the tripod data to a shelf sediment-transport model. These results showed initially northward along-shelf SSF during the storms, followed by abrupt and persistent southward reversals. Along-shelf flux was more pronounced during and after the December storm than in February. Across-shelf SSF over the entire measurement period was decidedly seaward. This seaward transport could be responsible for surficial deposits of recent sediment on the outer shelf and upper continental slope in this region. Sediment ripples and larger bedforms were observed in the very fine to fine sand at 50-m depth using a sector-scanning sonar mounted on the tripod. Ripple wavelengths estimated from the sonar images were about 9 cm, which compared favorably with photographs of the bottom taken with a camera mounted on the tripod. The ripple patterns were stable during periods of low combined wave-current bottom stresses, but changed significantly during high-stress events, such as the February storm. Two different sonic altimeters recorded changes in bed elevation of 10 to 20 cm during the periods of measurement. These changes are thought to have been caused principally by the migration of low-amplitude, long

  9. Neogene collision and deformation of convergent margins along the backbone of the Americas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Von Huene, R.; Ranero, C.R.

    2009-01-01

    Along Pacific convergent margins of the Americas, high-standing relief on the subducting oceanic plate "collides" with continental slopes and subducts. Features common to many collisions are uplift of the continental margin, accelerated seafloor erosion, accelerated basal subduction erosion, a flat slab, and a lack of active volcanism. Each collision along America's margins has exceptions to a single explanation. Subduction of an ???600 km segment of the Yakutat terrane is associated with >5000-m-high coastal mountains. The terrane may currently be adding its unsubducted mass to the continent by a seaward jump of the deformation front and could be a model for docking of terranes in the past. Cocos Ridge subduction is associated with >3000-m-high mountains, but its shallow subduction zone is not followed by a flat slab. The entry point of the Nazca and Juan Fernandez Ridges into the subduction zone has migrated southward along the South American margin and the adjacent coast without unusually high mountains. The Nazca Ridge and Juan Fernandez Ridges are not actively spreading but the Chile Rise collision is a triple junction. These collisions form barriers to trench sediment transport and separate accreting from eroding segments of the frontal prism. They also occur at the separation of a flat slab from a steeply dipping one. At a smaller scale, the subduction of seamounts and lesser ridges causes temporary surface uplift as long as they remain attached to the subducting plate. Off Costa Rica, these features remain attached beneath the continental shelf. They illustrate, at a small scale, the processes of collision. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America. All rights reserved.

  10. Management guidelines for participation in collision activities with congenital, developmental, or post-injury lesions involving the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Torg, J S; Ramsey-Emrhein, J A

    1997-01-01

    Conditions involving the cervical spine in the athlete requiring management decisions are numerous. The purpose of this paper is to present appropriate guidelines for return to collision activities in those with congenital, developmental, or post-injury lesions. Collision activities include boxing, football, ice hockey, lacrosse, rugby and wrestling. Information compiled from over 1200 cervical spine lesions documented by the National Football Head and Neck Injury Registry, an extensive literature review, as well as an understanding of injury mechanisms have resulted in reasonable management guidelines. Each of the congenital, developmental and post-traumatic conditions presented are identified as either no contraindication, relative contraindication, or an absolute contraindication on the basis of a variety of parameters. Conditions involved in the discussion include: odontoid anomalies, spina bifida occulta, atlanto-occipital fusion, K1ippel-Feil syndrome, cervical canal stenosis, spear tackler's spine; and traumatic conditions of the upper, middle and lower cervical spine including ligamentous injuries and fractures, intervertebral disc injuries and post-cervical spine fusion. It should be emphasized that the proposed guidelines should be used in the decision making process and in conjunction with other such factors as age, experience, ability of the individual, level of participation, position played, as well as the attitude and desires of the athlete and his parents, where applicable following an informed discussion of the problem with particular regard to potential risk.

  11. Transition from collision to subduction in Western Greece: the Katouna-Stamna active fault system and regional kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérouse, E.; Sébrier, M.; Braucher, R.; Chamot-Rooke, N.; Bourlès, D.; Briole, P.; Sorel, D.; Dimitrov, D.; Arsenikos, S.

    2016-06-01

    Transition from subduction to collision occurs in Western Greece and is accommodated along the downgoing plate by the Kefalonia right-lateral fault that transfers the Hellenic subduction front to the Apulian collision front. Here we present an active tectonic study of Aitolo-Akarnania (Western Greece) that highlights how such a transition is accommodated in the overriding plate. Based on new multi-scale geomorphic and tectonic observations, we performed an accurate active fault trace mapping in the region, and provide evidence for active normal and left-lateral faulting along the Katouna-Stamna Fault (KSF), a 65-km-long NNW-striking fault system connecting the Amvrakikos Gulf to the Patras Gulf. We further show that the Cenozoic Hellenide thrusts located west of the KSF are no longer active, either in field observation or in GPS data, leading us to propose that the KSF forms the northeastern boundary of a rigid Ionian Islands-Akarnania Block (IAB). Cosmic ray exposure measurements of 10Be and 36Cl were performed on a Quaternary alluvial fan offset along the KSF (~50 m left-lateral offset). A maximum abandonment age of ~12-14 ka for the alluvial fan surface can be determined, giving an estimated KSF minimum geological left-lateral slip rate of ~4 mm year-1, in agreement with high GPS slip rates (~10 mm year-1). Despite this high slip rate, the KSF is characterized by subdued morphological evidence of tectonic activity, a gypsum-breccia bedrock and a low level of seismicity, suggesting a dominantly creeping behavior for this fault. Finally, we discuss how the IAB appears to have been progressively individualized during the Pleistocene (younger than ~1.5 Ma).

  12. The rise and fall of continental arcs: Interplays between magmatism, uplift, weathering, and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cin-Ty A.; Thurner, Sally; Paterson, Scott; Cao, Wenrong

    2015-09-01

    Continental arcs, such as the modern Andes or the Cretaceous Sierra Nevada batholith, are some of the highest topographic features on Earth. Continental arc volcanoes may produce more CO2 than most other types of volcanoes due to the interaction of magmas with sedimentary carbonates stored in the continental upper plate. As such, global flare-ups in continental arc magmatism may amplify atmospheric CO2 concentrations, leading to climatic warming. However, the high elevations of continental arcs may also enhance orographic precipitation and change global atmospheric circulation patterns, possibly increasing the efficiency of chemical weathering and drawdown of atmospheric CO2, which may subdue the climatic warming response to volcanic activity. To better evaluate the climatic response, we develop models that integrate magmatic crustal thickening, topographic uplift, isostasy and erosion. The topographic response is used to predict how soil formation rates, soil residence times, and chemical weathering rates vary during and after a magmatic episode. Although magmatism leads to crustal thickening, which requires topographic uplift, highest elevations peak ∼10 My after magmatism ends. Relatively high elevations, which enhance erosion and chemical weathering of the continental arc, persist for tens of million years after magmatism ends, depending on erosion kinetics. It has recently been suggested that the Cretaceous-Paleogene greenhouse (high atmospheric CO2 and warm climate) coincided with a global chain of continental arcs, whereas mid- to late Cenozoic icehouse conditions (low atmospheric CO2 and cold climate) coincided with a lull in continental arc activity after 50 Ma. Application of our models to the Sierra Nevada (California, USA) continental arc, which represents a segment of this global Cretaceous-Paleogene continental arc, reproduces the observed topographic and erosional response. Our models require that the newly formed continental arc crust remained

  13. Late Pleistocene to Holocene sedimentation and hydrocarbon seeps on the continental shelf of a steep, tectonically active margin, southern California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.; Hart, Patrick E.; Lorenson, T.D.; Ryan, Holly F.; Wong, Florence L.; Sliter, Ray W.; Conrad, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Small, steep, uplifting coastal watersheds are prolific sediment producers that contribute significantly to the global marine sediment budget. This study illustrates how sedimentation evolves in one such system where the continental shelf is largely sediment-starved, with most terrestrial sediment bypassing the shelf in favor of deposition in deeper basins. The Santa Barbara-Ventura coast of southern California, USA, is considered a classic area for the study of active tectonics and of Tertiary and Quaternary climatic evolution, interpretations of which depend upon an understanding of sedimentation patterns. High-resolution seismic-reflection data over >570 km2 of this shelf show that sediment production is concentrated in a few drainage basins, with the Ventura and Santa Clara River deltas containing most of the upper Pleistocene to Holocene sediment on the shelf. Away from those deltas, the major factor controlling shelf sedimentation is the interaction of wave energy with coastline geometry. Depocenters containing sediment 5-20 m thick exist opposite broad coastal embayments, whereas relict material (bedrock below a regional unconformity) is exposed at the sea floor in areas of the shelf opposite coastal headlands. Locally, natural hydrocarbon seeps interact with sediment deposition either to produce elevated tar-and-sediment mounds or as gas plumes that hinder sediment settling. As much as 80% of fluvial sediment delivered by the Ventura and Santa Clara Rivers is transported off the shelf (some into the Santa Barbara Basin and some into the Santa Monica Basin via Hueneme Canyon), leaving a shelf with relatively little recent sediment accumulation. Understanding factors that control large-scale sediment dispersal along a rapidly uplifting coast that produces substantial quantities of sediment has implications for interpreting the ancient stratigraphic record of active and transform continental margins, and for inferring the distribution of hydrocarbon resources

  14. Collision and coalescence of liquid drops in a dynamically active ambient fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambath, Krishnaraj; Subramani, Hariprasad; Basaran, Osman

    2012-11-01

    The fluid dynamics of the collision and coalescence of liquid drops has intrigued scientists and engineers for more than a century owing to its ubiquitousness in nature, e.g. raindrop coalescence, and industry, e.g. breaking of emulsions in the oil and gas industry. The complexity of the underlying dynamics, e.g. occurrence of hydrodynamic singularities, has required study of the problem at different scales - macroscopic, mesoscopic and molecular - using stochastic and deterministic methods. In this work, we adopt a multiscale, deterministic method to simulate the approach, collision, and eventual coalescence of two drops where the drops as well as the ambient fluid are incompressible, Newtonian fluids. The free boundary problem governing the dynamics consists of the Navier-Stokes system and associated initial and boundary conditions that have been augmented to account for the effects of disjoining pressure as the separation between the drops becomes of the order of a few hundred nanometers. This free boundary problem is solved by a Galerkin finite element-based algorithm. The approach and results to be reported build on earlier work by Leal and coworkers, and are used to identify conditions conducive for coalescence in terms of flow and fluid properties.

  15. Joint geophysical and petrological models for the lithosphere structure of the Antarctic Peninsula continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yegorova, Tamara; Bakhmutov, Vladimir; Janik, Tomasz; Grad, Marek

    2011-01-01

    The Antarctic Peninsula (AP) is a composite magmatic arc terrane formed at the Pacific margin of Gondwana. Through the late Mesozoic and Cenozoic subduction has stopped progressively from southwest to northeast as a result of a series of ridge trench collisions. Subduction may be active today in the northern part of the AP adjacent to the South Shetland Islands. The subduction system is confined by the Shackleton and Hero fracture zones. The magmatic arc of the AP continental margin is marked by high-amplitude gravity and magnetic anomaly belts reaching highest amplitudes in the region of the South Shetland Islands and trench. The sources for these anomalies are highly magnetic and dense batholiths of mafic bulk composition, which were intruded in the Cretaceous, due to partial melting of upper-mantle and lower-crustal rocks. 2-D gravity and magnetic models provide new insights into crustal and upper-mantle structure of the active and passive margin segments of the northern AP. Our models incorporate seismic refraction constraints and physical property data. This enables us to better constrain both Moho geometry and petrological interpretations in the crust and upper mantle. Model along the DSS-12 profile crosses the AP margin near the Anvers Island and shows typical features of a passive continental margin. The second model along the DSS-17 profile extends from the Drake Passage through the South Shetland Trench/Islands system and Bransfield Strait to the AP and indicates an active continental margin linked to slow subduction and on-going continental rifting in the backarc region. Continental rifting beneath the Bransfield Strait is associated with an upward of hot upper mantle rocks and with extensive magmatic underplating.

  16. Cenozoic evolution of the Antarctic Peninsula continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.B. )

    1990-05-01

    Cenozoic evolution of the Antarctic Peninsula continental margin has involved a series of ridge (Aluk Ridge)-trench collisions between the Pacific and Antarctic plates. Subduction occurred episodically between segments of the Pacific plate that are bounded by major fracture zones. The age of ridge-trench collisions decreases from south to north along the margin. The very northern part of the margin, between the Hero and Shackleton fracture zones, has the last surviving Aluk-Antarctic spreading ridge segments and the only remaining trench topography. The sedimentary cover on the northern margin is relatively thin generally less than 1.5 km, thus providing a unique setting in which to examine margin evolution using high resolution seismic methods. Over 5,000 km of high resolution (water gun) seismic profiles were acquired from the Antarctic Peninsula margin during four cruises to the region. The margin is divided into discrete fracture-zone-bounded segments; each segment displays different styles of development. Highly tectonized active margin sequences have been buried beneath a seaward-thickening sediment wedge that represents the passive stage of margin development Ice caps, which have existed in the Antarctic Peninsula region since at least the late Oligocene, have advanced onto the continental shelf on numerous occasions, eroding hundreds of meters into the shelf and depositing a thick sequence of deposits characterized by till tongues and glacial troughs. Glacial erosion has been the main factor responsible for overdeepening of the shelf; isostasy is of secondary importance. As the shelf was lowered by glacial erosion, it was able to accommodate thicker and more unstable marine ice sheets. The shelf also became a vast reservoir for cold, saline shelf water, one of the key ingredients of Antarctic bottom water.

  17. Syn- and post-orogenic alkaline magmatism in a continental arc: Along-strike variations in the composition, source, and timing of igneous activity in the Ross Orogen, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen-Peter, G.; Cottle, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Neoproterozoic-Paleozoic convergence and subduction along the margin of East Gondwana (Australia, New Zealand, Antarctica) resulted in a belt of deformed and metamorphosed sedimentary rocks and batholith-scale igneous intrusions comparable in size to the present day Andes. Mid-crustal levels of this belt, known as the Ross Orogen in Antarctica, are exposed in the basement of the Cenozoic Transantarctic Mountains, providing snapshots of the intrusive magma system of a major continental arc. Whole rock major- and trace-element geochemistry, Hf isotopes in zircon, and U-Pb geochronology have identified along-strike variations in the composition, source, and timing of magmatism along ~200 km of the southern Victoria Land segment of the orogen. There is an apparent younging of the igneous activity from south to north. New U-Pb ages for intrusive rocks from the Koettlitz Glacier Alkaline Province (KGAP) reveal that igneous activity spanned ca. 565-500 Ma (~30 m.y. longer than previously recognized), while immediately to the north in the Dry Valleys area most igneous activity was confined to a relatively short period (ca. 515-495 Ma). Alkaline and subalkaline igneous rocks occur in both the Dry Valleys area and the KGAP, but alkaline rocks in the Dry Valleys are restricted to the latest phase of magmatism. Na-alkaline rocks in the KGAP, including nepheline syenites, carbonatites, and A-type granites, range in age from ca. 545-500 Ma and overlap in age with more typical subduction/collision-related I- and S-type granites elsewhere in southern Victoria Land. Strong enrichments in the LILE and LREE and high LILE/HFSE and LREE/HREE of samples from the KGAP reveal a source enriched in aqueous-mobile elements, potentially a strongly metasomatized mantle wedge beneath the arc. In the Dry Valleys area, rocks with alkali-calcic composition constitute only the youngest intrusions (505-495 Ma), apparently reflecting a shift to post-orogenic magmatism. Zircons from Dry Valleys

  18. Energy Expenditure Derived From Micro-Technology is Not Suitable for Assessing Internal Load in Collision-Based Activities.

    PubMed

    Highton, Jamie; Mullen, Thomas; Norris, Jonathan; Oxendale, Chelsea; Twist, Craig

    2016-08-24

    This aim of this study was to examine the validity of energy expenditure derived from micro-technology when measured during a repeated effort rugby protocol. Sixteen male rugby players completed a repeated effort protocol comprising 3 sets of 6 collisions during which movement activity and energy expenditure (EEGPS) were measured using micro-technology. In addition, energy expenditure was also estimated from open circuit spirometry (EEVO2). Whilst related (r = 0.63, 90%CI 0.08-0.89), there was a systematic underestimation of energy expenditure during the protocol (-5.94 ± 0.67 kcal·min(-1)) for EEGPS (7.2 ± 1.0 kcal·min(-1)) compared to EEVO2 (13.2 ± 2.3 kcal·min(-1)). High-speed running distance (r = 0.50, 95%CI -0.66-0.84) was related to EEVO2, while Player Load was not (r = 0.37, 95%CI -0.81-0.68). Whilst metabolic power might provide a different measure of external load than other typically used micro-technology metrics (e.g. high-speed running, Player Load), it underestimates energy expenditure during intermittent team sports that involve collisions.

  19. Tectonic escape in the evolution of the continental crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, K.; Sengor, C.

    1986-01-01

    The continental crust originated by processes similar to those operating today and continents consist of material most of which originated long ago in arc-systems that have later been modified, especially at Andean margins and in continental collisions where crustal thickening is common. Collision-related strike-slip motion is a general process in continental evolution. Because buoyant continental (or arc) material generally moves during collision toward a nearby oceanic margin where less buoyant lithosphere crops out, the process of major strike-slip dominated motion toward a 'free-face' is called 'tectonic escape'. Tectonic escape is and has been an element in continental evolution throughout recorded earth-history. It promotes: (1) rifting and the formation of rift-basins with thinning of thickened crust; (2) pervasive strike-slip faulting late in orogenic history which breaks up mountain belts across strike and may juxtapose unrelated sectors in cross-section; (3) localized compressional mountains and related foreland-trough basins.

  20. Freshly brewed continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazel, E.; Hayes, J. L.; Caddick, M. J.; Madrigal, P.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's crust is the life-sustaining interface between our planet's deep interior and surface. Basaltic crusts similar to Earth's oceanic crust characterize terrestrial planets in the solar system while the continental masses, areas of buoyant, thick silicic crust, are a unique characteristic of Earth. Therefore, understanding the processes responsible for the formation of continents is fundamental to reconstructing the evolution of our planet. We use geochemical and geophysical data to reconstruct the evolution of the Central American Land Bridge (Costa Rica and Panama) over the last 70 Ma. We also include new preliminary data from a key turning point (~12-6 Ma) from the evolution from an oceanic arc depleted in incompatible elements to a juvenile continental mass in order to evaluate current models of continental crust formation. We also discovered that seismic P-waves (body waves) travel through the crust at velocities closer to the ones observed in continental crust worldwide. Based on global statistical analyses of all magmas produced today in oceanic arcs compared to the global average composition of continental crust we developed a continental index. Our goal was to quantitatively correlate geochemical composition with the average P-wave velocity of arc crust. We suggest that although the formation and evolution of continents may involve many processes, melting enriched oceanic crust within a subduction zone, a process probably more common in the Achaean where most continental landmasses formed, can produce the starting material necessary for juvenile continental crust formation.

  1. Sticking transition in a minimal model for the collisions of active particles in quantum fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Vishwanath; Brachet, Marc; Pandit, Rahul

    2016-10-01

    Particles of low velocity, traveling without dissipation in a superfluid, can interact and emit sound when they collide. We propose a minimal model in which the equations of motion of the particles, including a short-range repulsive force, are self-consistently coupled with the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. We show that this model generates naturally an effective superfluid-mediated attractive interaction between the particles; and we study numerically the collisional dynamics of particles as a function of their incident kinetic energy and the length scale of the repulsive force. We find a transition from almost elastic to completely inelastic (sticking) collisions as the parameters are tuned. We find that aggregation and clustering result from this sticking transition in multiparticle systems.

  2. NON-THERMAL RADIATION FROM COLLISIONS OF COMPACT OBJECTS WITH INTERMEDIATE-SCALE JETS IN ACTIVE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bednarek, W.; Banasiński, P.

    2015-07-10

    Massive black holes in active galaxies are immersed in huge concentrations of late-type stars in the galactic bulges and also early-type massive stars in the nuclear stellar clusters, which are additionally surrounded by quasi-spherical halos on a scale of several kpc that contain from a few hundred up to several thousand globular clusters (GCs). It is expected that significant numbers of red giant stars, massive stars, and also GCs can move through the jet expelled from the central engine of the active galaxy. We consider collisions of stars from the galactic bulge, nuclear cluster, and GCs with the jet plasma. As a result of such collisions, multiple shocks are expected to appear in the jet around these compact objects. Therefore, the plasma in the kpc-scale jet can be significantly disturbed. We show that particles can be accelerated on these shocks up to multi-TeV energies. TeV leptons emit synchrotron radiation, extending up to X-ray energies, and also comptonize radiation produced in a stellar cluster and also the microwave background radiation to TeV γ-ray energies. We show that such non-thermal radiation is likely to be detectable from the intermediate-scale jets of nearby active galaxies for a reasonable number of stars and GCs immersed within the jet. As an example, we calculate the expected non-thermal emission in X-ray and gamma-ray energies from the nearby radio galaxy Cen A, from which steady gamma-ray emission with a complex spectrum has recently been reported by Fermi and the HESS Observatories.

  3. U-Pb geochronology and petrology of the late Paleozoic Gil Marquez pluton: magmatism in the Variscan suture zone, southern Iberia, during continental collision and the amalgamation of Pangea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladney, Evan R.; Braid, James A.; Murphy, J. Brendan; Quesada, Cecilio; McFarlane, Christopher R. M.

    2014-07-01

    The origin of plutonic complexes that stitch suture zones developed during collision is not well understood. In southern Iberia, the Pulo du Lobo suture zone (PDLZ) is intruded by the syn- to postcollisional Gil Marquez pluton (GMP), thought to be part of the Sierra Norte Batholith. U-Pb (LA-ICPMS, zircon) data on various phases of the GMP yield from oldest to youngest: (1) a 354.4 ± 7.6 Ma unfoliated gabbro; (2) a 345.6 ± 2.5 Ma foliated intermediate phase; (3) a 346.5 ± 5.4 Ma unfoliated porphyritic granite; (4) a 335.1 ± 2.8 Ma unfoliated biotite granite. This sequence is consistent with cross-cutting relationships observed in the field. The range in ages is consistent with interpretations that the GMP is part of the composite (ca. 350-308 Ma) SNB. Inherited ages preserved in the GMP intermediate and felsic phases indicate that its magmas traversed through South Portuguese Zone and PDLZ crust during emplacement. The ca. 345 Ma emplacement of the late kinematic foliated intermediate phase constrains the age of late-stage strike slip deformation within the PDLZ, and the lack of a foliation in the older gabbro indicates that is was not proximal to a shear zone neither at the time of emplacement, nor during its subsequent history. The unfoliated porphyritic granite and unfoliated biotite granite cut the foliation of the intermediate phase indicating emplacement during the waning stages of collision, while the ca. 335 Ma biotite granite intrudes the Santa Ira Flysch, thereby providing a tight constraint for the latest stage of deformation in the PDLZ.

  4. Activity of descending contralateral movement detector neurons and collision avoidance behaviour in response to head-on visual stimuli in locusts.

    PubMed

    Gray, J R; Lee, J K; Robertson, R M

    2001-03-01

    We recorded the activity of the right and left descending contralateral movement detectors responding to 10-cm (small) or 20-cm (large) computer-generated spheres approaching along different trajectories in the locust's frontal field of view. In separate experiments we examined the steering responses of tethered flying locusts to identical stimuli. The descending contralateral movement detectors were more sensitive to variations in target trajectory in the horizontal plane than in the vertical plane. Descending contralateral movement detector activity was related to target trajectory and to target size and was most sensitive to small objects converging on a direct collision course from above and to one side. Small objects failed to induce collision avoidance manoeuvres whereas large objects produced reliable collision avoidance responses. Large targets approaching along a converging trajectory produced steering responses that were either away from or toward the side of approach of the object, whereas targets approaching along trajectories that were offset from the locust's mid-longitudinal body axis primarily evoked responses away from the target. We detected no differences in the discharge properties of the descending contralateral movement detector pair that could account for the different collision avoidance behaviours evoked by varying the target size and trajectories. We suggest that descending contralateral movement detector properties are better suited to predator evasion than collision avoidance.

  5. The timing of India-Asia collision onset - facts, theories, controversies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiumian; Garzanti, Eduardo; Wang, Jiangang; Huang, Wentao; An, Wei; Webb, Alex

    2016-04-01

    The timing of initial collision between India and Asia has remained grossly and windingly controversial for half a century. This paper attempts to review this crucial and hotly debated argument, describing first the different methods used to constrain the age of collision and discussing next the rationale, results, inferences and problems associated with each. We conclude that stratigraphy represents the best direct way to unravel collision chronology. Other methods focusing on the magmatic, metamorphic or paleomagnetic record provide additional fundamental constraints, but cannot provide a robust direct estimate of collision onset. Initial collision in the central-eastern Himalaya is dated directly at the Middle Paleocene (59±1 Ma) by the abrupt change in sediment provenance recorded in trench settings (Hu et al., 2015). The quasi-synchronous unconformities documented along both Tethyan passive margin of India and active margin of Asia from Tibet to Zanskar-Ladakh confirm that orogeny was underway at the close of the Paleocene (56 Ma) (Garzanti et al., 1987; Li et al., 2015; Hu et al., 2016), well before the disappearance of marine seaways in the Himalaya during the Eocene (50 Ma) (Najman et al., 2010). Sedimentary evolution and provenance changes in marine to fluvio-deltaic successions are recorded synchronously within error from the western to the central-eastern Himalaya, failing to provide evidence for diachronous collision. These coherent observations are hard to reconcile with three widely cited hypotheses invoking either earlier events of arc-continent collision or ophiolite obduction, or the protracted existence of a Greater India Basin, which should be all rejected after discussing the geological evidence. A scenario no more complex than the one involving solely the passive continental margin of India and the active continental margin of Asia is needed to explain the geological evolution of the nascent Himalaya. The collision between the Tethys

  6. Temporal patterns of deer-vehicle collisions consistent with deer activity pattern and density increase but not general accident risk.

    PubMed

    Hothorn, Torsten; Müller, Jörg; Held, Leonhard; Möst, Lisa; Mysterud, Atle

    2015-08-01

    The increasing number of deer-vehicle collisions (DVCs) across Europe during recent decades poses a serious threat to human health and animal welfare and increasing costs for society. DVCs are triggered by both a human-related and a deer-related component. Mitigation requires an understanding of the processes driving temporal and spatial collision patterns. Separating human-related from deer-related processes is important for identifying potentially effective countermeasures, but this has rarely been done. We analysed two time series of 341,655 DVCs involving roe deer and 854,659 non-deer-related accidents (non-DVCs) documented between 2002 and 2011. Nonparametric smoothing and temporal parametric modelling were used to estimate annual, seasonal, weekly and diurnal patterns in DVCs, non-DVCs and adjusted DVCs. As we had access to data on both DVCs and non-DVCs, we were able to disentangle the relative role of human-related and deer-related processes contributing to the overall temporal DVC pattern. We found clear evidence that variation in DVCs was mostly driven by deer-related and not human-related activity on annual, seasonal, weekly and diurnal scales. A very clear crepuscular activity pattern with high activity after sunset and around sunrise throughout the year was identified. Early spring and the mating season between mid-July and mid-August are typically periods of high roe deer activity, and as expected we found a high number of DVC during these periods, although these patterns differed tremendously during different phases of a day. The role of human activity was mainly reflected in fewer DVCs on weekends than on weekdays. Over the ten-year study period, we estimated that DVCs increased by 25%, whereas the number of non-DVCs decreased by 10%. Increasing deer densities are the most likely driver behind this rise in DVCs. Precise estimates of DVC patterns and their relationship to deer and human activity patterns allow implementation of specific mitigation

  7. Styles of Cenozoic collisions in the western and southwestern Pacific and their applications to Palaeozoic collisions in the Tasmanides of eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glen, R. A.; Meffre, S.

    2009-12-01

    The western and southwestern Pacific preserve evidence of Cenozoic collisions that guide our understanding of processes and geometries involved in collisions in ancient orogens, in particular in this case, the Palaeozoic Tasmanides of southeastern Australia. Although several styles of collisions are present in the Pacific, ranging from arc-arc collision to arc-plateau collision, the dominant two are oblique and strike-slip collisions between island arcs and rifted continental fragments, and collisions between forearc lithosphere and continental fragments. The 58 Ma collision along the northern margin of the Australian plate in New Guinea, the 44-34 Ma collision preserved in New Caledonia and the 26-25 Ma collision in the North Island of New Zealand may be parts of a single plate boundary collision that migrated southwards along the plate boundary. They characterize the main style of deformation in which a collision between forearc crust and continental fragment produces subduction flip or rollback, thereby avoiding a classic arc-continent collision. Processes involved in, and geometries that have developed from, SW and W Pacific style collisions have been applied to the interpretation of the evolution of the Delamerian Orogen and Lachlan Orogen in the southern Tasmanides with varying degrees of success. The ophiolite obduction model has been successfully applied to the western Tasmania part of the Delamerian Orogen, although there is discussion about its applicability to the mainland. The best example of an arc accretion, that of the Ordovician Macquarie Arc in the eastern Lachlan Orogen, developed from rare geometry in the western Pacific wherein (with the constraint that no forearc or subduction complex has been identified) the arc lies on the continental plate, above a continental-dipping subduction zone. The multiple subduction zone model of Halmahera has been widely applied to the back arc of the Lachlan Orogen, but evidence for clear subduction zones or arcs

  8. Characteristics of Ion Activation and Collision Induced Dissociation Using Digital Ion Trap Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fuxing; Dang, Qiankun; Dai, Xinhua; Fang, Xiang; Wang, Yuanyuan; Ding, Li; Ding, Chuan-Fan

    2016-08-01

    Collision induced dissociation (CID) is one of the most established techniques for tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The CID of mass selected ion could be realized by ion resonance excitation with a digital rectangular waveform. The method is simple, and highly efficient CID result could be obtained by optimizing the experimental parameters, such as digital waveform voltage, frequency, and q value. In this work, the relationship between ion trapping waveform voltage and frequency at preselected q value, the relationship between waveform frequency and the q value at certain ion trapping voltage for optimum CID efficiency were investigated. Experiment results showed that the max CID efficiency of precursor reserpine ions can be obtained at different trapping waveform voltage and frequency when q and β are different. Based on systematic experimental analysis, the optimum experimental conditions for high CID efficiency can be calculated at any selected β or q. By using digital ion trap technology, the CID process and efficient fragmentation of parent ions can be realized by simply changing the trapping waveform amplitude, frequency, and the β values in the digital ion trap mass spectrometry. The technology and method are simple. It has potential use in ion trap mass spectrometry.

  9. Violent Gas Venting on the Heng-Chun Mud Volcano, South China Sea Active Continental Margin offshore SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, S.; Cheng, W. Y.; Tseng, Y. T.; Chen, N. C.; Hsieh, I. C.; Yang, T. F.

    2014-12-01

    Accumulation of methane as gas hydrate under the sea floor has been considered a major trap for both thermal and biogenic gas in marine environment. Aided by rapid AOM process near the sea floor, fraction of methane escaping the sea floor has been considered at minuscule. However, most studies focused mainly on deepwater gas hydrate systems where gas hydrate remain relatively stable. We have studied methane seeps on the active margin offshore Taiwan, where rapid tectonic activities occur. Our intention is to evaluate the scale and condition of gas seeps in the tectonic active region. Towcam, coring, heat probe, chirp, multibeam bathymetric mapping and echo sounding were conducted at the study areas. Our results showed that gas is violently venting at the active margin, not only through sediments, but also through overlying sea water, directly into the atmosphere. Similar ventings, but, not in this scale, have also been identified previously in the nearby region. High concentrations of methane as well as traces of propane were found in sediments and in waters with flares. In conjunction, abundant chemosynthetic community, life mussel, clams, tube worms, bacterial mats together with high concentrations of dissolve sulfide, large authigenic carbonate buildups were also found. Our results indicate that methane could be another major green house gas in the shallow water active margin region.

  10. Tibet and Beyond: Magmatic Records from CIA (Caucasus-Iran-Anatolia) and Southern Tibet with Implications for Asian Orogeny and Continental Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Sun-Lin

    2016-04-01

    This study, based on an ongoing joint research project "Tibet and Beyond", presents a synthesis of principal magmatic records from the CIA (Caucasus-Iran-Anatolia) and Tibet-Himalaya orogens resulting from the continental collisions of Arabia and India, respectively, with Eurasia. In both orogens, through this and other recent studies, the temporal and spatial variations in magmatism pre-, syn- and post-dating the collisions can now be much better defined, thus improving our understanding of collision zone magmatism that appears to have evolved with changes in the lithospheric structures over time and space by collisional processes. The two "collisional" Tethyan orogens were preceded by accretionary orogenic processes, which not only had produced a substantial amount of juvenile continental crust but also fulfill the "orogenic cycle" that evolved from an accretionary into a collisional system. Geochemical data reveal that in contrast to generating vast portions of juvenile crust in the early, accretionary stages of orogenic development, crustal recycling plays a more important role in the later, collisional stages. The latter, as exemplified in SE Turkey and southern Tibet, involves addition of older continental crust material back into the mantle, which subsequently melted and caused compositional transformation of the juvenile crust produced in the accretionary stages. Similar features are observed in young volcanic rocks from eastern Taiwan, the northern Luzon arc complex and part of the active subduction/accretion/collision system in Southeast Asia that may evolve one day to resemble the eastern Tethyan and central Asian orogenic belts by collision with the advancing Australian continent.

  11. Continental drift before 1900.

    PubMed

    Rupke, N A

    1970-07-25

    The idea that Francis Bacon and other seventeenth and eighteenth century thinkers first conceived the notion of continental drift does not stand up to close scrutiny. The few authors who expressed the idea viewed the process as a catastrophic event.

  12. Continental crust beneath southeast Iceland

    PubMed Central

    Torsvik, Trond H.; Amundsen, Hans E. F.; Trønnes, Reidar G.; Doubrovine, Pavel V.; Gaina, Carmen; Kusznir, Nick J.; Steinberger, Bernhard; Corfu, Fernando; Ashwal, Lewis D.; Griffin, William L.; Werner, Stephanie C.; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2015-01-01

    The magmatic activity (0–16 Ma) in Iceland is linked to a deep mantle plume that has been active for the past 62 My. Icelandic and northeast Atlantic basalts contain variable proportions of two enriched components, interpreted as recycled oceanic crust supplied by the plume, and subcontinental lithospheric mantle derived from the nearby continental margins. A restricted area in southeast Iceland—and especially the Öræfajökull volcano—is characterized by a unique enriched-mantle component (EM2-like) with elevated 87Sr/86Sr and 207Pb/204Pb. Here, we demonstrate through modeling of Sr–Nd–Pb abundances and isotope ratios that the primitive Öræfajökull melts could have assimilated 2–6% of underlying continental crust before differentiating to more evolved melts. From inversion of gravity anomaly data (crustal thickness), analysis of regional magnetic data, and plate reconstructions, we propose that continental crust beneath southeast Iceland is part of ∼350-km-long and 70-km-wide extension of the Jan Mayen Microcontinent (JMM). The extended JMM was marginal to East Greenland but detached in the Early Eocene (between 52 and 47 Mya); by the Oligocene (27 Mya), all parts of the JMM permanently became part of the Eurasian plate following a westward ridge jump in the direction of the Iceland plume. PMID:25825769

  13. Continental crust beneath southeast Iceland.

    PubMed

    Torsvik, Trond H; Amundsen, Hans E F; Trønnes, Reidar G; Doubrovine, Pavel V; Gaina, Carmen; Kusznir, Nick J; Steinberger, Bernhard; Corfu, Fernando; Ashwal, Lewis D; Griffin, William L; Werner, Stephanie C; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2015-04-14

    The magmatic activity (0-16 Ma) in Iceland is linked to a deep mantle plume that has been active for the past 62 My. Icelandic and northeast Atlantic basalts contain variable proportions of two enriched components, interpreted as recycled oceanic crust supplied by the plume, and subcontinental lithospheric mantle derived from the nearby continental margins. A restricted area in southeast Iceland--and especially the Öræfajökull volcano--is characterized by a unique enriched-mantle component (EM2-like) with elevated (87)Sr/(86)Sr and (207)Pb/(204)Pb. Here, we demonstrate through modeling of Sr-Nd-Pb abundances and isotope ratios that the primitive Öræfajökull melts could have assimilated 2-6% of underlying continental crust before differentiating to more evolved melts. From inversion of gravity anomaly data (crustal thickness), analysis of regional magnetic data, and plate reconstructions, we propose that continental crust beneath southeast Iceland is part of ∼350-km-long and 70-km-wide extension of the Jan Mayen Microcontinent (JMM). The extended JMM was marginal to East Greenland but detached in the Early Eocene (between 52 and 47 Mya); by the Oligocene (27 Mya), all parts of the JMM permanently became part of the Eurasian plate following a westward ridge jump in the direction of the Iceland plume.

  14. 75 FR 54372 - BOEMRE Information Collection Activity: 1010-0081, Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation, and Enforcement BOEMRE Information Collection Activity..., Extension of a Collection; Comment Request AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation, and... . Mail or hand-carry comments to the Department of the Interior; Bureau of Ocean Energy...

  15. Influence of explosive volcanic events on the activation versus de-activation of a modern turbidite system: the example of the Dohrn canyon-fan in the continental slope of the Campania volcanic district (Naples Bay, Italy - Western Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca, M.; Budillon, F.; Pappone, G.; Insinga, D.

    2015-12-01

    The interplay between volcanic activity, volcano-clastic yield and activation/deactivation of a turbidite system can be evaluated along the continental margin of Campania region (Tyrrhenian Sea - Italy), an active volcanic area, where three wide canyon-fans occur at short distances one to another. Actually, the Dohrn, Magnaghi and Cuma canyons cut the continental slope and shelf off Ischia and Procida volcanic islands and off the Campania Plain where Phlegraean Field and Mt. Vesuvius active vents are located. This research, partly supported by the Italian Flagship Project Ritmare, is based on single-channel, high-resolution seismic profiles (Sparker-One 16 kJ, 0.5 s twtt), swath-bathymetry and litho- and tephra-stratigraphy of gravity cores. We focused on the stratigraphic constraint of paleo-thalweg features and channel/levees deposits in seismics, debris flow, turbidites and hemipelagites in cores, to learn more on the activation/deactivation stages of the canyon Dohrn, in the frame of relative eustatic sea level variations over the Middle Pleistocene-Holocene time span.Preliminary outcomes suggest that even major volcanic events occurred in the last 300 ky, such as ignimbrite eruptions or large fallouts, have caused the infilling of the canyon head and the cover of pre-existing seabed morphology. As a consequence, the temporary deactivation of the turbidite system has occurred, despite the volcano-clastic overload in the coastal environment. Phases of renewed activities of the thalweg are observed to be in step with falling stages of sea level, which have driven the re-incision of canyon valleys through continuous volcano-clastic debris and turbidites down-flows. Since Holocene, the quiescence of the Dohrn Canyon has been documented, despite the intense volcano-tectonic activity in the area.

  16. Neoproterozoic active continental margin in the southeastern Yangtze Block of South China: Evidence from the ca. 830-810 Ma sedimentary strata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Zhou, Mei-Fu; Zhao, Jun-Hong; Pandit, Manoj K.; Zheng, Jian-Ping; Liu, Ze-Rui

    2016-08-01

    The Jiangnan Fold Belt in the South China Block has been traditionally assumed to be Mesoproterozoic in age and related to the global Grenville orogeny. Sedimentary successions in the Jiangnan Fold Belt archive direct record of tectonic evolution; however, they have not yet been evaluated properly. The Lushan massif, comprising Kangwanggu and Xingzi groups, is the major basement complex in the Jiangnan Belt. Regional correlation of these two groups is poorly constrained, such as with the Shuangqiaoshan group, and thus their role in the regional tectonic evolution is not clear. Detrital zircon U-Pb ages suggest that the Xingzi and Kangwanggu groups were deposited at 820-810 and ca. 830 Ma, respectively. They are composed of dominantly felsic to intermediate volcanic detritus, as indicated by the relatively high Th/Cr (0.24-0.06) ratios and radiogenic Nd isotopes (εNd(t) values = + 1.5 to - 2.9) of the sedimentary rocks. An overwhelming abundance of Neoproterozoic (ca. 860-810 Ma) angular, detrital zircon grains in both the groups indicates derivation chiefly from locally distributed syn-sedimentary igneous rocks. A predominance of zircons with ages close to the time of deposition implies a convergent plate margin setting for Kangwanggu and Xingzi groups. Geochemical signatures, such as La-Th-Co and Th-Sc-Zr/10 plots for Xingzi and Kangwanggu sedimentary rocks also underline tectonically active settings, consistent with the arc affinity of the associated mafic and felsic volcanic rocks. In contrast to the dominant Neoproterozoic detritus in the Kangwanggu sandstone, argillaceous rocks of the Xingzi group received additional input of pre-Neoproterozoic detritus. Moreover, the Xingzi argillaceous rocks have εNd(t) values (+ 0.9 to - 2.9) slightly lower than those of the Kangwanggu sandstones (+ 1.5 to 0.0), indicating contribution from mature crustal materials exposed during progressive uplift of continental basement during orogenesis. These features suggest the

  17. Early Pleistocene to Holocene glacial activity along the southern Alaska continental shelf inferred from the sedimentary record in the northern Gulf of Alaska - preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forwick, M.; Cowan, E. A.; Bahlburg, H.; Childress, L. B.; Jaeger, J. M.; Moy, C. M.; Müller, J.; Ribeiro, F.; Ridgway, K. D.; Gulick, S. P.; Worthington, L. L.; Reece, R.

    2013-12-01

    Preliminary analyses of the lithology at Site U1418 (IODP Expedition 341), located on the proximal Surveyor Fan, provide evidence of continuous presence of tidewater glaciers on the southern Alaska continental shelf for more than c. 1.2 Ma, as well as evidence of prolonged presence of grounded ice at the shelf break and/or the initiation of ice streams. The lowermost lithostratigraphic unit (Unit IV) of the 941 m long record is composed of heavily deformed sediments that are interpreted to be the top of the recently discovered Surveyor mass-transport deposit. Unit III contains mostly laminated mud with thin interbeds of sand, silt and clast-rich muddy diamict with rip-up clasts. A few lonestones of granule and pebble size are present. Massive and laminated mud with scattered lonestones, as well as interbedded intervals of clast-poor diamict (clasts of granule and pebble size) compose Unit II. Unit I contains massive mud with interbedded silt laminae and sand beds. Most silt laminae have the same color as the matrix, but some are lighter. Diatom oozes and graded sand beds occur infrequently and lonestones are present below 3 m. The dominance of mud suggests that sedimentation at Site U1418 was strongly influenced by suspension settling from turbid meltwater plumes emanating into the Gulf of Alaska during the past c. 1.2 Ma. Laminated intervals may reflect temporal variations in meltwater runoff from a single sediment source and/or supply from several sources during the deposition of Units II and III. Lonestones and clasts of granule and pebble size are regarded to be mostly iceberg-rafted debris, indicating that tidewater glaciers have been present on the continental shelf for most of the time since the onset of the deposition of Unit III. Diamicts in Unit II most probably reflect periods of enhanced ice rafting and/or reduced meltwater runoff. Minor silt and sand beds provide evidence of occasional sediment reworking during the deposition of Units II and III. The

  18. Impacts of Sea-Level Rise and Human Activity on a Tropical Continental Shelf, RN State, NE Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vital, H.; Barros Pereira, T. R.; Lira, H. F.; Tabosa, W. F.; Eichler, P.; Stattegger, K.; Sen Gupta, B. K.; Gomes, M. P.; Nogueira, M. L. D. S.; Pierri, G. C. S.

    2014-12-01

    The northeastern Brazilian, tropical coast-shelf system along the Atlantic Ocean is a sediment-starved zone, because of low relief, small drainage basins, and a semiarid climate. This work presents the major results of a study of environmental changes, particularly those related to Holocene sea-level rise, affecting the coast and shallow waters of Rio Grande do Norte (RN) State, NE Brazil. The methods included bottom-sediment characterization, bioindicator tracking, and integrated shallow-water geophysical investigation. This coastline is marked by active sea cliffs carved into tablelands alternating with reef- or dune-barrier sections, beach rocks and lagoons, whereas the shelf is a narrow, very shallow, and highly energetic system. Overall, the area is under the natural influence of tides (with a semidiurnal mesotidal regime) and the anthropogenic influence of salt exploration, oil industry, shrimp farms, tourism, and wind-farms. Sedimentation during the Holocene has been controlled mainly by sea-level variation, longshore currents, and the advance and westward propagation of active dunes along the coast. As in other areas around the world, growing numbers of permanent and seasonal residents choose to live at or near the ocean. Coastal erosion is a cause for concern along many Brazilian beaches, and several erosion hot spots are already recognized in RN State. Curves of Holocene relative sea-level variation were established for RN State, but the absence of long-term oceanographic observations in the last centuries or that of detailed altimetry maps hinders the evaluation of different risk scenarios at the local level. Nevertheless, impacts of the current sea-level rise and human activity can be observed along the RN coastal-shelf system. Particular aspects of the study, such as oil-spill monitoring, coastal-water sewage contamination, and coastal erosion, will be highlighted.

  19. Air Traffic Control/Active Beacon Collision Avoidance System Knoxville Simulation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    Traffic Conditions 3 Error and Response Models 5 Desensitization Methods 5 Data Collection Plan 6 Controller Questionnaires 6 RESULTS AND ANALYSIS 10 ...Operations Rates 10 Effect of Active BCAS on Controllers and Control Procedures 10 Conflict Analysis 10 Active BCAS Protection 13 Active BCAS Alert Rates...Altitude Desensitization 23 10 Encounter on Parallel Approach (Horizontal View) 27 (See Appendix H For Legend) 11 Encounter on Parallel Approach

  20. Activated Ion ETD Performed in a Modified Collision Cell on a Hybrid QLT-Oribtrap Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledvina, Aaron R.; Rose, Christopher M.; McAlister, Graeme C.; Syka, John E. P.; Westphall, Michael S.; Griep-Raming, Jens; Schwartz, Jae C.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2013-11-01

    We describe the implementation and characterization of activated ion electron transfer dissociation (AI-ETD) on a hybrid QLT-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. AI-ETD was performed using a collision cell that was modified to enable ETD reactions, in addition to normal collisional activation. The instrument manifold was modified to enable irradiation of ions along the axis of this modified cell with IR photons from a CO2 laser. Laser power settings were optimized for both charge (z) and mass to charge ( m/z) and the instrument control firmware was updated to allow for automated adjustments to the level of irradiation. This implementation of AI-ETD yielded 1.6-fold more unique identifications than ETD in an nLC-MS/MS analysis of tryptic yeast peptides. Furthermore, we investigated the application of AI-ETD on large scale analysis of phosphopeptides, where laser power aids ETD, but can produce b- and y-type ions because of the phosphoryl moiety's high IR adsorption. nLC-MS/MS analysis of phosphopeptides derived from human embryonic stem cells using AI-ETD yielded 2.4-fold more unique identifications than ETD alone, demonstrating a promising advance in ETD sequencing of PTM containing peptides.

  1. Activated ion ETD performed in a modified collision cell on a hybrid QLT-Oribtrap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Ledvina, Aaron R; Rose, Christopher M; McAlister, Graeme C; Syka, John E P; Westphall, Michael S; Griep-Raming, Jens; Schwartz, Jae C; Coon, Joshua J

    2013-11-01

    We describe the implementation and characterization of activated ion electron transfer dissociation (AI-ETD) on a hybrid QLT-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. AI-ETD was performed using a collision cell that was modified to enable ETD reactions, in addition to normal collisional activation. The instrument manifold was modified to enable irradiation of ions along the axis of this modified cell with IR photons from a CO2 laser. Laser power settings were optimized for both charge (z) and mass to charge (m/z) and the instrument control firmware was updated to allow for automated adjustments to the level of irradiation. This implementation of AI-ETD yielded 1.6-fold more unique identifications than ETD in an nLC-MS/MS analysis of tryptic yeast peptides. Furthermore, we investigated the application of AI-ETD on large scale analysis of phosphopeptides, where laser power aids ETD, but can produce b- and y-type ions because of the phosphoryl moiety's high IR adsorption. nLC-MS/MS analysis of phosphopeptides derived from human embryonic stem cells using AI-ETD yielded 2.4-fold more unique identifications than ETD alone, demonstrating a promising advance in ETD sequencing of PTM containing peptides.

  2. Activated Ion ETD Performed in a Modified Collision Cell on a Hybrid QLT-Oribtrap Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Ledvina, Aaron R.; Rose, Christopher M.; McAlister, Graeme C.; Syka, John E.P.; Westphall, Michael S.; Griep-Raming, Jens; Schwartz, Jae C.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the implementation and characterization of activated ion electron transfer dissociation (AI-ETD) on a hybrid QLT-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. AI-ETD was performed using a collision cell that was modified to enable ETD reactions, in addition to normal collisional activation. The instrument manifold was modified to enable irradiation of ions along the axis of this modified cell with IR photons from a CO2 laser. Laser power settings were optimized for both charge (z) and mass to charge (m/z) and the instrument control firmware was updated to allow for automated adjustments to the level of irradiation. This implementation of AI-ETD yielded 1.6 fold more unique identifications than ETD in an nLC-MS/MS analysis of tryptic yeast peptides. Furthermore, we investigated the application of AI-ETD on large scale analysis of phosphopeptides, where laser power aids ETD, but can produce b- and y-type ions due to the phosphoryl moiety's high IR adsorption. nLC-MS/MS analysis of phosphopeptides derived from human embryonic stem cells using AI-ETD yielded 2.4 fold more unique identifications than ETD alone, demonstrating a promising advance in ETD sequencing of PTM containing peptides. PMID:23677544

  3. Loss of testate amoeba functional diversity with increasing frost intensity across a continental gradient reduces microbial activity in peatlands.

    PubMed

    Jassey, Vincent E J; Lamentowicz, Mariusz; Bragazza, Luca; Hofsommer, Maaike L; Mills, Robert T E; Buttler, Alexandre; Signarbieux, Constant; Robroek, Bjorn J M

    2016-09-01

    Soil microbial communities significantly contribute to global fluxes of nutrients and carbon. Their response to climate change, including winter warming, is expected to modify these processes through direct effects on microbial functions due to osmotic stress, and changing temperature regimes. Using four European peatlands reflecting different frequencies of frost events, we show that peatland testate amoeba communities diverge among sites with different winter climates, and that this is reflected through contrasting functions. We found that exposure to harder soil frost promoted species β-diversity (species turnover) thus shifting the community composition of testate amoebae. In particular, we found that harder soil frost, and lower water-soluble phenolic compounds, induced functional turnover through the decrease of large species (-68%, >80μm) and the increase of small-bodied mixotrophic species (i.e. Archerella flavum; +79%). These results suggest that increased exposure to soil frost could be highly limiting for large species while smaller species are more resistant. Furthermore, we found that β-glucosidase enzymatic activity, in addition to soil temperature, strongly depended of the functional diversity of testate amoebae (R(2)=0.95, ANOVA). Changing winter conditions can therefore strongly impact peatland decomposition process, though it remains unclear if these changes are carried-over to the growing season.

  4. The transition from hydrostatic to greater than hydrostatic fluid pressure in presently active continental hydrothermal systems in crystalline rock

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, R.O. )

    1991-05-01

    Fluid flow at hydrostatic pressure (P{sub h}) is relatively common through fractures in silicic and in mafic crystalline rocks where temperatures are less than about 350-370C. In contrast, pore-fluid pressure (P{sub f}) > P{sub h} has been encountered at the bottom of 3 geothermal exploration wells that attained temperatures >370C (at Larderello, Italy, at Nesjavellir, Iceland, and at The Geysers, California). Chemical sealing by deposition of minerals in veins appears to have allowed the development of the high P{sub f} encountered in the above wells. The upper limit for the magnitude of P{sub f} that can be attained is controlled by either the onset of shear fracturing (where differential stress is relatively high) that reopens clogged veins, or the hydraulic opening of new or old fractures (at relatively low values of differential stress). The brittle-plastic transition for silicic rocks can occur at temperatures as high as 370-400C in tectonically active regions. In regions where high-temperature geothermal systems develop and persist, it appears that either strain rates commonly are in the range 10{sup {minus}12} to 10{sup {minus}13}, or that silicic rocks in the shallow crust generally behave rheologically more like wet quartz diorite than wet Westerly granite.

  5. Raising the continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Ian H.; Davies, D. Rhodri

    2017-02-01

    The changes that occur at the boundary between the Archean and Proterozoic eons are arguably the most fundamental to affect the evolution of Earth's continental crust. The principal component of Archean continental crust is Granite-Greenstone Terranes (GGTs), with granites always dominant. The greenstones consist of a lower sequence of submarine komatiites and basalts, which erupted onto a pre-existing Tonalite-Trondhjemite-Granodiorite (TTG) crust. These basaltic rocks pass upwards initially into evolved volcanic rocks, such as andesites and dacites and, subsequently, into reworked felsic pyroclastic material and immature sediments. This transition coincides with widespread emplacement of granitoids, which stabilised (cratonised) the continental crust. Proterozoic supra-crustal rocks, on the other hand, are dominated by extensive flat-lying platform sequences of mature sediments, which were deposited on stable cratonic basements, with basaltic rocks appreciably less abundant. The siliceous TTGs cannot be produced by direct melting of the mantle, with most hypotheses for their origin requiring them to be underlain by a complimentary dense amphibole-garnet-pyroxenite root, which we suggest acted as ballast to the early continents. Ubiquitous continental pillow basalts in Archean lower greenstone sequences require the early continental crust to have been sub-marine, whereas the appearance of abundant clastic sediments, at higher stratigraphic levels, shows that it had emerged above sea level by the time of sedimentation. We hypothesise that the production of komatiites and associated basalts, the rise of the continental crust, widespread melting of the continental crust, the onset of sedimentation and subsequent cratonisation form a continuum that is the direct result of removal of the continent's dense amphibole-garnet-pyroxenite roots, triggered at a regional scale by the arrival of a mantle plume at the base of the lithosphere. Our idealised calculations suggest

  6. New data on the period of existence of the continental margin subduction zone in the Middle Urals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, V. N.; Ivanov, K. S.; Shokalsky, S. P.

    2016-12-01

    U-Pb (SIMS) dating of zircons from granite of the Petrokamensk gabbro-granitoid complex, marking termination of the Devonian island-arc magmatism in the Verkhisetsk-Tura Zone of the Middle Urals, gave an age of 386 ± 3 Ma. Zircons from the West Verkhisetsk granitoids, the formation of which corresponds to the beginning stage of magmatism of the continental margin in the region, yielded ages of 386.6 ± 4.1 and 381.8 ± 6.0 Ma. This suggests that the change in the regime of the island-arc geodynamic mode to an active continental margin took place at the boundary of the Middle and Late Devonian. The upper boundary of existence of the continental margin subduction zone is determined by the closure of the Ural paleo-ocean and the beginning of continental collision processes, which resulted in accumulation of flysch in the Ural foreland trough from the second half of the Bashkirian Stage.

  7. Determining how the pelagic ecosystem over the continental shelf of the Bay of Biscay (NE Atlantic) functions: An approach using mesozooplankton enzyme activities as descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Jean-Pierre; Delmas, Daniel; Koueta, Noussithé

    2009-04-01

    A fisheries research cruise conducted in 2000 offered a first opportunity to take simultaneous measurements of the activities of three enzymes in mesozooplankton samples collected at a regional scale over the continental shelf of the Bay of Biscay in the NE Atlantic, with the aim of characterizing main aspects of the functioning of the biotic environment of small pelagic fish populations. The activity of the digestive endopeptidase trypsin was selected to characterize the assimilation rate of proteins, whereas pyruvate kinase (PK) was chosen as an indicator of carbohydrate assimilation and aspartate transcarbamylase (ATC) provided an overall assessment of mesozooplankton productivity. The Bay of Biscay region is subject to various strong physical driving forces that directly affect the primary structure of the pelagic food web. On our cruise, the phytoplankton biomass distribution reflected these different physical influences: diatoms dominated the nutrient-enriched coastal water; picoplankton dominated the northern-central part where nutrients were depleted; and nanoplankton were abundant at the shelf break where internal waves provided an input of nutrients. These and other results (on bacteria, particulate organic carbon distribution, among others) illustrate the differences that exist in the microbial food webs of different sectors of the bay. The living matter produced was characterized by the quality and quantity of the smallest prey items that were available to higher trophic levels. Variations in mesozooplankton enzyme activities may agree well not only with classically expected results, but also present unexpected special features: high ATC specific activities were measured around the mouth of the Gironde, in the nutrient-rich desalted water of the plume, but surprisingly not in front of the Loire river. PK specific activities reflected preponderantly the balance between phytoplankton cells sizes and the related bacterial abundance resulting from nutrient

  8. Bering Sea summary report: Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities in the Bering Sea and their onshore impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Deis, J.; Pierson, R.; Kurz, F.

    1983-09-01

    Two federal offshore oil-and-gas lease sales have been held in the Bering Sea Subregion. Lease Sale 57, Norton Basin, was held on March 15, 1983. Lease Sale 70, St. George Basin, was held on April 12, 1983. The sale offered 479 tracts, of which 97 received bids. The Department of the Interior has indicated that it will accept 96 of the 97 high bids; however, to date, leases have not been awarded. The Department of the Interior was enjoined from issuing leases by the US District Court of Alaska because of possible impacts from postlease preliminary seismic activities on gray and right whales. In accordance with the Court's ruling, leases cannot be issued until the completion of a supplemental environmental impact statement, which is anticipated to occur in November 1983. Six lease offerings in the Bering Sea Subregion are scheduled through 1987. Six deep stratigraphic test wells are the only wells drilled to date in the Bering Sea Subregion. To date, oil companies have not submitted exploration plans for the Norton Basin Planning Area. Exploration in Norton Basin could begin in the summer of 1984, at the earliest. Exploration plans cannot be submitted for the St. George Basin Planning Area until the leases are awarded. At this time, various onshore areas are being considered as possible support bases for offshore oil-and-gas exploration. At this stage, before exploratory drilling has occurred and in the absence of a commercial discovery, plans for transporting petroleum from the Bering Sea to markets in the United States are unclear. The current estimates of risked resources for lands leased in Lease Sale 57, Norton Basin, are 33 million barrels of oil and 110 billion cubic feet of gas. Lease Sale 70, St. George Basin, estimates of risked resources for leased lands are 27 million barrels of oil and 310 billion cubic feet of gas. 55 references, 10 figures, 3 tables.

  9. Seismic stratigraphy and cenozoic evolution of the mesetan moroccan atlantic continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roy, Pascal; Sahabi, Mohamed; Lahsini, Salim; Mehdi, Khalid; Zourarah, Bendehhou

    2004-06-01

    A recent high-resolution seismic survey of the El Jadida continental shelf allows the characterization of the Cenozoic evolution of the Northern Atlantic Moroccan Shelf, which belongs to the Western Meseta structural domain. Seismic stratigraphy indicates a subdivision of the Cenozoic deposits into four sequences (Sca1 to Sca4) restricted to the northern portion of the shelf. Chronostratigraphic identification of the sequences shows that principal deposits correspond to Upper Miocene deposits overlying the Cenomanian carbonate platform. Quaternary deposits are restricted to the lowstand sedimentary wedge extending below a water depth of 130 m and to the last highstand system tract corresponding to the Oum Er Rbia prodelta. Cenozoic evolution of the continental shelf was controlled by a combination of pluvial/interpluvial stages and eustatic fluctuations, but also by local tectonics. Terrigenous sediments built up the Oum Er Rbia prodelta during the estimated time interval 6-2 ka coinciding with stabilisation of high sea level and pluvial stage. Tectonic deformations occurred mainly during the Upper Miocene and accentuated shelf subsidence through reactivation of inherited N20°/N40° and N140° faults in response to the Europe/Africa collision. Some of the N140° faulting zones are still active during the Quaternary. Currently subsidence has ceased and a broad uplift of the greater part of the continental shelf probably occurs.

  10. Tectonics of China: Continental scale cataclastic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, John J., Jr.

    inference is made from recently published plate tectonic interpretations. Geologic maps show that there are six elements and that each element has a Precambrian, crystalline core which is surrounded by upper Paleozoic continental margin suites of rocks, including subduction complexes, among others. Geologic data on ophiolites demonstrate that the brittle elements and their margins were juxtaposed and then welded together along suture zones during Permian and Triassic time to make China. Cenofcoic plate motions affecting China resulted in the collision with India where it converges with southwest China and the extension in eastern China where island arcs move away from the mainland and where grabens are actively forming. The juxtaposition to Siberia, which acts as a buttress against northern China, explains the compression of western China, and the absence of a buttress in the Pacific Ocean explains why eastern China can extend. Furthermore, laboratory data on the mechanical behavior of rock under conditions analogous to the shallow crustal conditions of interest in China show that all rocks are weaker in extension than they are in compression. Basement rock in western China is strong because it is compressed, but this same basement rock is weak in eastern China because it is in extension. The tectonics of China or, in mechanistic terms, the way in which the mechanical framework of China responds to Cenozoic boundary forces was a result of China's previous plate tectonic history. Crystalline cores are the rigid blocks that form brittle elements. Both the continental margin suites and the sutures are the ductile zones. The sutures and sediment patterns seen in the basins and ranges of China can be explained in terms of this tectonic scenario.

  11. Collision-activated cleavage of a peptide/antibiotic disulfide linkage: possible evidence for intramolecular disulfide bond rearrangement upon collisional activation.

    PubMed

    Fagerquist, Clifton K

    2004-01-01

    Ceftiofur is an important veterinary beta-lactam antibiotic whose bioactive metabolite, desfuroylceftiofur, has a free thiol group. Desfuroylceftiofur (DFC) was reacted with two peptides, [Arg8]-vasopressin and reduced glutathione, both of which have cysteine residues to form disulfide-linked peptide/antibiotic complexes. The products of the reaction, [vasopressin + (DFC-H) + (DFC-H) + H]+, [(vasopressin+H) + (DFC-H) + H]+ and [(glutathione-H) + (DFC-H) + H]+, were analyzed using collision-activated dissociation (CAD) with a quadrupole ion trap tandem mass spectrometer. MS/MS of [vasopressin + (DFC-H) + (DFC-H) + H]+ resulted in facile dissociative loss of one and two covalently bound DFC moieties. Loss of one DFC resulted from either homolytic or heterolytic dissociation of the peptide/antibiotic disulfide bond with equal or unequal partitioning of the two sulfur atoms between the fragment ion and neutral loss. Hydrogen migration preceded heterolytic dissociation. Loss of two DFC moieties from [vasopressin + (DFC-H) + (DFC-H) + H]+ appears to result from collision-activated intramolecular disulfide bond rearrangement (IDBR) to produce cyclic [vasopressin + H]+ (at m/z 1084) as well as other cyclic fragment ions at m/z 1084 +/- 32 and +64. The cyclic structure of these ions could only be inferred as MS/MS may result in rearrangement to non-cyclic structures prior to dissociative loss. IDBR was also detected from MS(3) experiments of [vasopressin + (DFC-H) + (DFC-H) + H]+ fragment ions. MS/MS of [(glutathione-H) + (DFC-H) + H]+ resulted in cleavage of the peptide backbone with retention of the DFC moiety as well as heterolytic cleavage of the peptide/antibiotic disulfide bond to produce the fragment ion: [(DFC-2H) + H]+. These results demonstrate the facile dissociative loss by CAD of DFC moieties covalently attached to peptides through disulfide bonds. Published in 2004 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Continental magnetic anomaly constraints on continental reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Olivier, R.; Bentley, C. R.

    1985-01-01

    Crustal magnetic anomalies mapped by the MAGSAT satellite for North and South America, Europe, Africa, India, Australia and Antarctica and adjacent marine areas were adjusted to a common elevation of 400 km and differentially reduced to the radial pole of intensity 60,000 nT. These radially polarized anomalies are normalized for differential inclination, declination and intensity effects of the geomagnetic field, so that in principle they directly reflected the geometric and magnetic polarization attributes of sources which include regional petrologic variations of the crust and upper mantle, and crustal thickness and thermal perturbations. Continental anomalies demonstrate remarkably detailed correlation of regional magnetic sources across rifted margins when plotted on a reconstruction of Pangea. Accordingly, they suggest further fundamental constraints on the geologic evolution of the continents and their reconstructions.

  13. The Continental Crust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burchfiel, B. Clark

    1983-01-01

    Continental crust underlies the continents, their margins, and also small shallow regions in oceans. The nature of the crust (much older than oceanic crust) and its dynamics are discussed. Research related to and effects of tectonics, volcanism, erosion, and sedimentation on the crust are considered. (JN)

  14. Faults Activities And Crustal Deformation Along The Arc-Continent Collision Boundary, Eastern Taiwan - Observed From Persistent Scatterer SAR Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Jiun-Yee; Chang, Chung-Pai; Hooper, Andrew; Chang, Yo-Ho; Liang, Wen-Tzong; Chang, Tsui-Yu

    2010-05-01

    Located in the southeastern periphery of the Eurasian plate, eastern Taiwan marks the collional boundary between the Eurasian plate and the Philippine Sea plate. These two plates converge at about 8 cm/yr near Taiwan and nearly half of the shortening is consumed in eastern Taiwan. There have been many studies in this area about the dynamics of the plate convergence, however, most of the geodetic studies focused on small area (strainmeter), with very few data points (GPS), or only gather data along a specific profile (leveling). We applied the Persistent Scatterer SAR Interferometry in the Longitudinal Valley of eastern Taiwan to observe temporally-variable processes using both ERS and Envisat data. At the same time, leveling and GPS data were measured for the auxiliary tool to verify the deformation rate in this area. Our result indicated that although the area is under active collision, faults do not move in the same fashion along the boundary. In the very northern part of the collided arc, small subsidence has been detected, while in the north-central part very few activity is observed. In the central and southern part of the collisional boundary, patches of faults are moving as rapidly as 15 mm/yr along radar line-of-sight. In addition. between late 2004 and middle 2005 there had been an earthquake swarm consists of shallow earthquakes, which coincided with PSI observation of a large vertical displacement. The comparison between our leveling data and PS results indicated PSI is a reliable tool even in the highly vegetated area in eastern Taiwan.

  15. Distribution of fault activity in the early stages of continental breakup: an analysis of faults and volcanic products of the Natron Basin, East African Rift, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muirhead, J. D.; Kattenhorn, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Recent magmatic-tectonic crises in Ethiopia (e.g. 2005 Dabbahu rifting episode, Afar) have informed our understanding of the spatial and temporal distribution of strain in magmatic rifts transitioning to sea-floor spreading. However, the evolving contributions of magmatic and tectonic processes during the initial stages of rifting, is a subject of ongoing debate. The <5 Ma northern Tanzania and southern Kenya sectors of the East Africa Rift provide ideal locations to address this problem. We present preliminary findings from an investigation of fault structures utilizing aerial photography and satellite imagery of the ~35 km wide Natron rift-basin in northern Tanzania. Broad-scale structural mapping will be supplemented by field observations and 40Ar-39Ar dating of lava flows cut by faults to address three major aspects of magma-assisted rifting: (1) the relative timing of activity between the border fault and smaller faults distributed across the width of the rift; (2) time-averaged slip rates along rift-zone faults; and (3) the spatial distribution of faults and volcanic products, and their relative contributions to strain accommodation. Preliminary field observations suggest that the ~500 m high border fault system along the western edge of the Natron basin is either inactive or has experienced a reduced slip rate and higher recurrence interval between surface-breaking events, as evidence by a lack of recent surface-rupture along the main fault escarpments. An exception is an isolated, ~2 km-long segment of the Natron border fault, which is located in close proximity (< 5km) to the active Oldoinyo Lengai volcano. Here, ~10 m of seemingly recent throw is observed in volcaniclastic deposits. The proximity of the fault segment to Oldoinyo Lengai volcano and the localized distribution of fault-slip are consistent with magma-assisted faulting. Faults observed within the Natron basin and on the flanks of Gelai volcano, located on the eastern side of the rift, have

  16. Distribution and relation of total bacteria, active bacteria, bacterivory, and volume of organic detritus in Atlantic continental shelf waters off Cape Hatteras NC, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherr, Evelyn B.; Sherr, Barry F.; Verity, Peter G.

    During the Ocean Margins Program, we obtained data on the abundances of bacterioplankton and heterotrophic flagellates, and on rates of bacterivory, across the mid-Atlantic continental shelf off Cape Hatteras, NC, during four spring and summer cruises from 1993 to 1996. Bacterial and grazing parameters were compared for inner, middle, and outer shelf regions. In 1996, we sampled during two seasons: early spring (March) and mid-summer (July), and in addition determined the fractions of in situ bacterioplankton that had visible nucleoids (NV cells), or that had highly active electron transport systems (ETS), i.e. that were positive for reduction of the fluorogenic formazan compound, 5 cyano-2,3 ditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC+ cells), as well as the volumetric concentration of organic detrital particles. Detrital volumes and abundances of bacterioplankton and of heterotrophic flagellates, varied by an order of magnitude, and decreased from inshore to offshore shelf regions. In 1996, bacterial abundances and percentages of CTC+ cells were higher across the shelf during the early spring bloom season (March) compared to the post-bloom season (July). In March 1996, percentages of bacterial cells with visible nucleoids varied between 20% and 70%, but showed little change across the shelf; while fractions of total bacteria with highly active ETS were lower and more variable (1-16% CTC+ cells), and on average were twice as high in the inner shelf region compared to the rest of the shelf. Percentages of CTC+ cells were also higher for particle-associated bacteria. There was a strong positive relationship between percent CTC+ cells and volume of organic detrital particles. However, % CTC+ cells and detrital volume were not consistently related to either bulk particulate organic carbon or chlorophyll. Bacterivory, assessed via rate of ingestion of fluorescently labeled bacteria, could remove 2-9% (4-18% accounting for motile cells) of total bacterial stocks per day. If

  17. India-Eurasia collision triggers formation of an oceanic microplate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Kara; Müller, Dietmar; Sandwell, David

    2016-04-01

    Detailed mapping of seafloor tectonic fabric in the Indian Ocean, using high-resolution satellite-derived vertical gravity gradient data, reveals an extinct Pacific-style oceanic microplate - the Mammerickx Microplate - west of the Ninetyeast Ridge. It is one of the first Pacific-style microplates to be mapped outside the Pacific basin, suggesting that geophysical conditions during formation probably resembled those that have dominated at eastern Pacific ridges. The microplate formed at the Indian-Antarctic ridge and is bordered by an extinct ridge in the north and pseudofault in the south, whose conjugate is located north of the Kerguelen Plateau. Independent microplate rotation is indicated by asymmetric pseudofaults and rotated abyssal hill fabric, also identified in multibeam data. Magnetic anomaly picks and age estimates calculated from published spreading rates suggest formation during chron 21o (~47.3 Ma). Plate reorganizations can trigger ridge propagation and microplate development, and we propose that formation of the Mammerickx Microplate is linked with the initial 'soft' stage of the India-Eurasia collision. The collision altered the stress regime at the Indian-Antarctic ridge, leading to a change in segmentation and ridge propagation from an establishing transform fault. Fast Indian-Antarctic spreading that preceded microplate formation, and Kerguelen Plume activity may have facilitated ridge propagation via the production of thin and weak lithosphere. However, both factors had been present for tens of millions of years and are therefore unlikely to have triggered the event. Prior to the collision, this combination of fast spreading and plume activity was responsible for the production of a wide region of undulate seafloor to the north of the extinct ridge and 'W' shaped lineations that record back and forth ridge propagation. Microplate formation provides a means of dating the onset of the India-Eurasia collision, and is completely independent of and

  18. EFFECT OF ION-NEUTRAL COLLISIONS IN SIMULATIONS OF EMERGING ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Leake, James E.; Linton, Mark G.

    2013-02-10

    We present results of 2.5D numerical simulations of the emergence of sub-surface magnetic flux into the solar atmosphere, with emerging flux regions ranging from 10{sup 18} to 10{sup 21} Mx, representing both ephemeral and active regions. We include the presence of neutral hydrogen in the governing equations, improve upon previous models by including the ionization in the equation of state, and use a more realistic convection zone model. We find that ionization and recombination of plasma during the rise of a convection zone flux tube reduces the rise speed of the tube's axis. The presence of neutral hydrogen allows the effective flow of mass across field lines, by the addition of a Pedersen resistivity to the generalized Ohm's law, which dissipates current perpendicular to the magnetic field. This causes an increase of up to 10% in the amount of magnetic in-plane flux supplied to the corona and a reduction of up to 89% in the amount of sub-surface plasma brought up into the corona. However, it also reduces the amount of free magnetic energy supplied to the corona, and thus does not positively affect the likelihood of creating unstable coronal structures.

  19. Fundamentals of tandem mass spectrometry: a dynamics study of simple C-C bond cleavage in collision-activated dissociation of polyatomic ions at low energy.

    PubMed

    Shukla, A K; Qian, K; Anderson, S; Futrell, J H

    1990-02-01

    The loss of methyl radical in collision-activated dissociation (CAD) of acetone and propane molecular ions has been studied at low energy using a tandem hybrid mass spectrometer. Although the two processes are very similar chemically and energetically, very different dynamical features are observed. Acetyl ions from acetone ion are predominantly backward-scattered, with intensity maxima lying inside and outside the elastic scattering circle, confirming our previous observation that electronically excited states are important in low-energy acetone CAD. Ethyl ions from propane ion show a forward-scattered peak maximum at a nonzero scattering angle, which is consistent with generally accepted models for vibrational excitation and redistribution of energy before dissociation. Both processes demonstrate that CAD at low energy proceeds via small-impact-parameter collisions with momentum transfer. Comparison of the present results with higher energy CAD dynamics studies and earlier work leads to some tentative general conclusions about energy transfer in these processes.

  20. Tectonic events, continental intraplate volcanism, and mantle plume activity in northern Arabia: Constraints from geochemistry and Ar-Ar dating of Syrian lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krienitz, M.-S.; Haase, K. M.; Mezger, K.; van den Bogaard, P.; Thiemann, V.; Shaikh-Mashail, M. A.

    2009-04-01

    New 40Ar/39Ar ages combined with chemical and Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope data for volcanic rocks from Syria along with published data of Syrian and Arabian lavas constrain the spatiotemporal evolution of volcanism, melting regime, and magmatic sources contributing to the volcanic activity in northern Arabia. Several volcanic phases occurred in different parts of Syria in the last 20 Ma that partly correlate with different tectonic events like displacements along the Dead Sea Fault system or slab break-off beneath the Bitlis suture zone, although the large volume of magmas and their composition suggest that hot mantle material caused volcanism. Low Ce/Pb (<20), Nb/Th (<10), and Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope variations of Syrian lavas indicate the role of crustal contamination in magma genesis, and contamination of magmas with up to 30% of continental crustal material can explain their 87Sr/86Sr. Fractionation-corrected major element compositions and REE ratios of uncontaminated lavas suggest a pressure-controlled melting regime in western Arabia that varies from shallow and high-degree melt formation in the south to increasingly deeper regions and lower extents of the beginning melting process northward. Temperature estimates of calculated primary, crustally uncontaminated Arabian lavas indicate their formation at elevated mantle temperatures (Texcess ˜ 100-200°C) being characteristic for their generation in a plume mantle region. The Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope systematic of crustally uncontaminated Syrian lavas reveal a sublithospheric and a mantle plume source involvement in their formation, whereas a (hydrous) lithospheric origin of lavas can be excluded on the basis of negative correlations between Ba/La and K/La. The characteristically high 206Pb/204Pb (˜19.5) of the mantle plume source can be explained by material entrainment associated with the Afar mantle plume. The Syrian volcanic rocks are generally younger than lavas from the southern Afro-Arabian region, indicating

  1. Brazilian continental cretaceous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petri, Setembrino; Campanha, Vilma A.

    1981-04-01

    Cretaceous deposits in Brazil are very well developed, chiefly in continental facies and in thick sequences. Sedimentation occurred essentially in rift-valleys inland and along the coast. Three different sequences can be distinguished: (1) a lower clastic non-marine section, (2) a middle evaporitic section, (3) an upper marine section with non-marine regressive lithosomes. Continental deposits have been laid down chiefly between the latest Jurassic and Albian. The lower lithostratigraphic unit is represented by red shales with occasional evaporites and fresh-water limestones, dated by ostracods. A series of thick sandstone lithosomes accumulated in the inland rift-valleys. In the coastal basins these sequences are often incompletely preserved. Uplift in the beginning of the Aptian produced a widespread unconformity. In many of the inland rift-valleys sedimentation ceased at that time. A later transgression penetrated far into northeastern Brazil, but shortly after continental sedimentation continued, with the deposition of fluvial sandstones which once covered large areas of the country and which have been preserved in many places. The continental Cretaceous sediments have been laid down in fluvial and lacustrine environments, under warm climatic conditions which were dry from time to time. The fossil record is fairly rich, including besides plants and invertebrates, also reptiles and fishes. As faulting tectonism was rather strong, chiefly during the beginning of the Cretaceous, intercalations of igneous rocks are frequent in some places. Irregular uplift and erosion caused sediments belonging to the remainder of this period to be preserved only in tectonic basins scattered across the country.

  2. Large-scale subduction of continental crust implied by India-Asia mass-balance calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingalls, Miquela; Rowley, David B.; Currie, Brian; Colman, Albert S.

    2016-11-01

    Continental crust is buoyant compared with its oceanic counterpart and resists subduction into the mantle. When two continents collide, the mass balance for the continental crust is therefore assumed to be maintained. Here we use estimates of pre-collisional crustal thickness and convergence history derived from plate kinematic models to calculate the crustal mass balance in the India-Asia collisional system. Using the current best estimates for the timing of the diachronous onset of collision between India and Eurasia, we find that about 50% of the pre-collisional continental crustal mass cannot be accounted for in the crustal reservoir preserved at Earth's surface today--represented by the mass preserved in the thickened crust that makes up the Himalaya, Tibet and much of adjacent Asia, as well as southeast Asian tectonic escape and exported eroded sediments. This implies large-scale subduction of continental crust during the collision, with a mass equivalent to about 15% of the total oceanic crustal subduction flux since 56 million years ago. We suggest that similar contamination of the mantle by direct input of radiogenic continental crustal materials during past continent-continent collisions is reflected in some ocean crust and ocean island basalt geochemistry. The subduction of continental crust may therefore contribute significantly to the evolution of mantle geochemistry.

  3. Incipient Crustal Stretching across AN Active Collision Belt: the Case of the Siculo-Calabrian Rift Zone (central Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, S.; Tortorici, G.; Romagnoli, G.; Pavano, F.

    2012-12-01

    In the Central Mediterranean, the differential roll-back of the subducting Nubia Plate caused the Neogene-Quaternary extrusion of the Calabrian arc onto the oceanic Ionian slab, and the opening of the oceanic Tyrrhenian Basin, in the overriding Eurasia Plate. The differential motion at the edges of the arc was largely accommodated along transform faults that propagated across the orogenic belt. Since the Late Quaternary, the southern edge of the arc has been replaced by the roughly N-S oriented Siculo-Calabrian Rift Zone (SCRZ) that formed as the NNW-directed normal faults of NE Sicily, crossing the orogenic belt, have linked the NNE-oriented Tyrrhenian margin of southern Calabria with the NNW-trending Africa-Ionian boundary of southeastern Sicily. Our study focused on the Sicily shoulder of the SCRZ, where the transition zone between the extensional belt and the still active Nubia-Eurasia convergent margin is characterized by two distinct mobile crustal wedges, both lying on an upwarped Mantle, where a re-orientations of the σ1 is combined with volcanism (e.g. Etna, Aeolian islands) and a huge tectonic uplift. In southeastern Sicily, the Hyblean-Etnean region evolved, since about 0.85 Ma, as an indipendent crustal wedge, moving towards the NNW and pointing to the active Mt. Etna volcano. A local ENE crustal stretching accompanied the traslation of the block and pre-dated the ESE-oriented extension governing the propagation of the southernmost branch of the SCR, which started at about 330 ka B.P.. Similarly, the Peloritani-Aeolian region, flanked by the 125 ka-old NE-Sicily branch of the rift zone, represents a mostly submerged crustal wedge that migrates towards the NE, diverging from the rest of the Sicily collision zone and pointing to the Stromboli volcano. The Peloritani-Aeolian block is characterized by the occurrence of a wide central NE-oriented collapsed basin contoured by an actively uplifting region, whose tectonic boundaries are evidenced by a sharp

  4. Active seismic monitoring of changes of the reflection response of a crystalline shear zone due to fluid injection in the crust at the Continental Deep Drilling Site, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beilecke, T.; Kurt, B.; Stefan, B.

    2005-12-01

    In theory and in the laboratory variations of the hydraulic pressure can be detected with seismic methods: A lowering of the hydraulic pressure leads to the closure of micro-cracks within the rock (increase of the differential or effective pressure). Subsequently, the seismic velocities increase. An increase of the hydraulic pressure leads to reverse seismic effects. Consequently, seismic impedance contrasts and associated reflection amplitudes vary in the case of a propagating fluid pressure front in a rock matrix with inhomogeneous permeability - as is the case at shear zones. The largest amplitude changes can be expected with vertical ray inclination on the impedance contrast. Generally, the expected effects are small however (Kaselow, 2004). The practical utilization of active seismics for the detection of pressure changes at large scale in hard rock is currently being studied at the Continental Deep Drilling Site (KTB). The injection of water (200 l/min) in a depth of about 4000 m into the so-called SE2 shear zone in the KTB pilot hole was monitored with active seismics between May 2004 and April 2005. The core of the experiment layout is a fixed 5-arm geophone array consisting of 24 3-component geophones, buried at about 70 cm depth. The source signal is a vertical vibrator sweep of 30 s length with the spectrum 30-120 Hz. The signal is sent into the ground 32 times during each cycle, detected with the array and recorded separately for each geophone channel, without prior correlation with the source signal. This allows maximum post-processing with seismic processing and analysis tools and especially permits the use of array properties to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. Critical parameters of the experiment are the repeatability of the source signal as well as the stability of the receiver properties. Another pivot is the hydraulic pressure and its distribution built up within the rock matrix. Estimations based on model calculations show that a change of

  5. Tectonic architecture of the Hongseong collision zone in the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seung-Ik; Kim, Sung Won

    2015-04-01

    The Hongseong collision zone in the Korean Peninsula is tectonically correlated to the Chinese Qinling-Dabie-Sulu belt, and it preserves evidence of breakup-subduction-collision prior to final amalgamation of NE Asia. This study presents the tectonic domains of the Hongseong collision zone, divided primarily based on protolith age, origin, and metamorphic and structural characteristics of the constituent rock units, and their tectonic significances. Domain 1, the eastern-most part of the Hongseong collision zone, consists mainly of Paleoproterozoic basement gneiss, which was mainly affected by Neoproterozoic and Paleozoic mafic magmatic activities. Part of the Neoproterozoic metabasite preserves evidence of eclogite-facies metamorphism. Domain 2 mainly records Neoproterozoic arc magmatism, as well as Paleozoic volcanism and sedimentation that occurred in an arc-forearc setting. The volcano-sedimentary sequence contains evidence of Paleozoic high-grade metamorphism. Many serpentinite lenses are present in domain 2, including suprasubduction zone peridotite that was serpentinized during the Late Paleozoic. Domain 3 is a broad exposure of Late Paleozoic turbidite, interpreted to be a flysch derived from uplifted sedimentary or metasedimentary rock. Greenschist-facies metamorphism occurred in this domain. Geological age decreases from domain 1 to domain 3, which may indicate that the continental crust grew westward prior to the Late Paleozoic in the Hongseong area. This interpretation is concordant with the westward sequential change from basement through suprasubduction zone to flysch.

  6. Magnetotelluric imaging beneath the Taiwan orogen: An arc-continent collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, Edward A.; Unsworth, Martyn J.; Chiang, Chih-Wen; Chen, Chow-Son; Chen, Chien-Chih; Wu, Francis T.; TürkoǧLu, Ersan; Hsu, Han-Lun; Hill, Graham J.

    2012-01-01

    The Taiwan orogen has formed since the late Miocene by oblique collision between the Luzon Volcanic Arc on the Philippine Sea Plate, and the Eurasian continental margin. This oblique collision has produced an orogen that decreases in age from north to south, and permits study of the temporal evolution of an arc-continent collision. These factors make Taiwan a favorable location to study the process of arc-continent collision. The first long-period magnetotelluric (MT) measurements were recorded in Taiwan as part of the Taiwan Integrated Geodynamics Research (TAIGER) project in 2006-7. Measurements were made at 82 sites on three transects across south, central and north Taiwan, that span the breadth of the orogen and cross all major tectonic boundaries. Robust, remote reference processing of the MT time series data resulted in high-quality soundings that were modeled in both 2 and 3-dimensions. These MT models support predictions of lithospheric deformation (i.e., thick-skinned tectonics) beneath the Central Ranges in south and central Taiwan, but are inconsistent with predictions of orogen-scale thin-skinned models. The MT resistivity model for northern Taiwan is consistent with dewatering of the subducting Philippine slab, and with deformation described by the subducting-indenter tectonic model. Modeling the TAIGER MT data has definitively shown that conductive, and seismically active crustal structures, exist to 30+ km beneath the orogen. These conductive regions, interpreted as interconnected fluid, map pervasive zones of collisional deformation that are lithospheric in scale.

  7. Magnetostratigraphic Record of the Early Evolution of the Southwestern Tian Shan Foreland Basin (Ulugqat Area), Interactions with Pamir Indentation and India-Asia Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, W.; Wang, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Tian Shan range is an inherited intracontinental structure reactivated by the far-field effects of India-Asia collision. A growing body of thermochronology and magnetostratigraphy datasets shows the range grew through several tectonic pulses since ~25 Ma, however the early Cenozoic history remains poorly constrained. Particularly enigmatic is the time-lag between the Eocene India-Asia collision and the Miocene onset of Tian Shan exhumation. This peculiar period is potentially recorded along the southwestern Tian Shan piedmont. There, recently dated late Eocene marine deposits of the proto-Paratethys epicontinental sea transition to continental foreland basin sediments of unknown age. We provide magnetostratigraphic dating of these continental sediments from the 1700-m-thick Mine section integrated with previously published detrital apatite fission track and U/Pb zircon ages. The most likely correlation to the geomagnetic polarity time scale indicates an age span from 20.8 to 13.3 Ma with a marked accumulation rate increase at 19-18 Ma. This implies the entire Oligocene period is missing between the last marine and first continental sediments, as suggested by previous southwestern Tian Shan results. This differs from the southwestern Tarim basin where Eocene marine deposits are continuously overlain by late Eocene-Oligocene continental sediments. This supports a simple evolution model of the western Tarim basin with Eocene-Oligocene foreland basin activation to the south related to northward thrusting of the Kunlun Shan, followed by early Miocene activation of northern foreland basin related to overthrusting of the south Tian Shan. Our data also support southward propagation of the Tian Shan piedmont from 20-18 Ma that may relate to motion on the Talas Fergana Fault. The coeval activation of a major right-lateral strike-slip system allowing indentation of the Pamir Salient into the Tarim basin, suggest far-field deformation from the India-Asia collision zone

  8. 76 FR 2254 - Notice of Arrival on the Outer Continental Shelf

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-13

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 146 RIN 1625-AB28 Notice of Arrival on the Outer Continental Shelf AGENCY... Continental Shelf (OCS) Activities to enhance maritime domain safety and security awareness on the OCS by... Arrival. NOA OCS Notice of Arrival on the Outer Continental Shelf. NPRM Notice of Proposed...

  9. Earthquakes in stable continental crust

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.C.; Kanter, L.R. )

    1990-03-01

    Earthquakes can strike even in stable crust, well away from the familiar earthquake zones at the edges of tectonic plates, but their mere occurrence is both a source of concern in planning critical facilities such as nuclear power plants. The authors sought answers to two major questions: Just how much seismic activity does take place within the stable parts of continents And are there specific geologic features that make some areas of stable crust particularly susceptible to earthquakes They began by studying North America alone, but it soon became clear that the fairly short record of these rare events on a single continent would not provide enough data for reliable analysis. Hence, they decided to substitute space for time--to survey earthquake frequency and distribution in stable continental areas worldwide. This paper discusses their findings.

  10. Continental Lower Crust: Wavespeeds, Composition, and Relamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, B. R.; Kelemen, P. B.; Behn, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    The composition of much of Earth's lower continental crust is enigmatic. The available heat-flow and wavespeed constraints can be satisfied if lower continental crust elsewhere contains anywhere from 49 to 62 wt% SiO2 (similar to andesite and dacite), with high to moderate concentrations of K, Th and U. Beneath shields and platforms, Vp suggests that 20-30% of lower crust is mafic. A large fraction of this material could be denser than peridotite. In these settings the underlying upper mantle is too cold to permit development of a convective instability. High Vp lithologies in these settings may be the result of mafic underplating, or slow metamorphic growth of large proportions of garnet. Vp from lower crust of Paleozoic-Mesozoic orogens indicates a smaller amount of mafic rock and little or no material that is denser than peridotite. Beneath rifts, arcs, and volcanic plateaux and beneath continent-collision zones, ~10-20% of lower crust is mafic, and about half that is denser than peridotite. The inferred gravitational instability and high Moho temperatures suggest that the mafic lower crust in these regions may be temporary. During sediment subduction, subduction erosion, arc subduction, and continent subduction, mafic rocks become eclogite and may continue to descend into the mantle, whereas more silica-rich rocks are transformed into felsic gneisses that are less dense than peridotite but more dense than continental upper crust. These more-felsic rocks may rise buoyantly, undergo decompression melting and melt extraction, and may be relaminated to the base of the crust. As a result of this refining/differentiation process, such relatively felsic rocks could form much of lower crust.

  11. Numerical model of the transition from continental rifting to oceanization: the case study of the Ligure-Piemontese ocean.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roda, M.; Marotta, A. M.; Conte, K.; Spalla, M. I.

    2015-12-01

    The transition from continental rifting to oceanization has been investigated by mean of a 2D thermo-mechanical numerical model in which the formation of oceanic crust by mantle serpentinization, due to the hydration of the uprising peridotite, as been implemented. Model predictions have been compared with natural data related to the Permian-Triassic thinning affecting the continental lithosphere of the Alpine domain, in order to identify which portions of the present Alpine-Apennine system, preserving the imprints of Permian-Triassic high temperature (HT) metamorphism, is compatible, in terms of lithostratigraphy and tectono-metamorphic evolution, with a lithospheric extension preceding the opening of the Ligure-Piemontese oceanic basin. At this purpose age, petrological and structural data from the Alpine and Apennine ophiolite complexes are compared with model predictions from the oceanization stage. Our comparative analysis supports the thesis that the lithospheric extension preceding the opening of the Alpine Tethys did not start on a stable continental lithosphere, but developed by recycling part of the old Variscan collisional suture. The HT Permian-Triassic metamorphic re-equilibration overprints an inherited tectonic and metamorphic setting consequent to the Variscan subduction and collision, making the Alps a key case history to explore mechanisms responsible for the re-activation of orogenic scars.

  12. Crustal redistribution, crust-mantle recycling and Phanerozoic evolution of the continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clift, Peter D.; Vannucchi, Paola; Morgan, Jason Phipps

    2009-12-01

    We here attempt a global scale mass balance of the continental crust during the Phanerozoic and especially the Cenozoic (65 Ma). Continental crust is mostly recycled back into the mantle as a result of the subduction of sediment in trenches (1.65 km 3/a), by the subduction of eroded forearc basement (1.3 km 3/a) and by the delamination of lower crustal material from orogenic plateaus (ca. 1.1 km 3/a). Subduction of rifted crust in continent-continent collision zones (0.4 km 3/a), and dissolved materials fixed into the oceanic crust (ca. 0.4 km 3/a) are less important crustal sinks. At these rates the entire continental crust could be reworked in around 1.8 Ga. Nd isotope data indicate that ca. 80% of the subducted continental crust is not recycled by melting at shallow levels back into arcs, but is subducted to depth into the upper mantle. Continent-continent collision zones do not generally form new crust, but rather cause crustal loss by subduction and as a result of their physical erosion, which exports crust from the orogen to ocean basins where it may be subducted. Regional sedimentation rates suggest that most orogens have their topography eliminated within 100-200 million years. We estimate that during the Cenozoic the global rivers exported an average of 1.8 km 3/a to the oceans, approximately balancing the subducted loss. Accretion of sediment to active continental margins is a small contribution to crustal construction (ca. 0.3 km 3/a). Similarly, continental large igneous provinces (flood basalts) represent construction of only around 0.12 km 3/a, even after accounting for their intrusive roots. If oceanic plateaus are accreted to continental margins then they would average construction rates of 1.1 km 3/a, meaning that to keep constant crustal volumes, arc magmatism would have to maintain production of around 3.8 km 3/a (or 94 km 3/Ma/km of trench). This slightly exceeds the rates derived from sparse seismic experiments in oceanic arc systems. Although

  13. Continental lithospheric evolution: Constraints from the geochemistry of felsic volcanic rocks in the Dharwar Craton, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manikyamba, C.; Ganguly, Sohini; Saha, Abhishek; Santosh, M.; Rajanikanta Singh, M.; Subba Rao, D. V.

    2014-12-01

    low and fractionated HREE patterns and minor negative Eu anomalies are in conformity with Type 1 rhyolites and suggest that they were erupted in an intraoceanic island arc system. The overall geochemical systematics of the rhyolites from both the sectors of Dharwar Craton suggest a change in the geodynamic conditions from intraoceanic island arc of eastern Dharwar Craton and an active continental margin of western Dharwar marked by ocean-ocean subduction and migration of oceanic arc towards a continent followed by arc-continent collision that contributed for the evolution of continental lithosphere in the Dharwar Craton.

  14. Puck collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauge, E. H.

    2012-09-01

    Collisions between two ice hockey pucks sliding on frictionless ice are studied, with both inelasticity and frictional contact between the colliding surfaces of the two pucks taken into account. The latter couples translational and rotational motion. The full solution depends on the sign and magnitude of the initial mismatch between the surface velocities at the point of contact. The initial state defines two physically distinct regimes for the friction coefficient. To illustrate the complexities, we discuss at length the typical situation (well known from curling) when puck number 1 is initially at rest, and is hit by puck number 2 with an arbitrary impact parameter, velocity and angular velocity. We find that the total outgoing angle between the pucks exceeds \\frac{1}{2}\\pi if and only if the collision leads to a net increase in the translational part of the kinetic energy. The conditions for this to happen are scrutinized, and the results are presented both analytically and numerically by a set of representative curves. This paper is written with an ambitious undergraduate, and her teacher, in mind.

  15. The Mindanao collision zone: a soft collision event within a continuous Neogene strike-slip setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pubellier, M.; Quebral, R.; Rangin, C.; Deffontaines, B.; Muller, C.; Butterlin, J.; Manzano, J.

    Two volcanic belts are presently juxtaposed on Mindanao Island in the southern Philippines. Southward, the collision is still active in the Molucca Sea which is commonly regarded as a region of doubly verging subduction, plunging eastward below the Halmahera arc and westward below the Sangihe arc. In the Molluca Sea, tectonic features related to the incipient collision appear only in the very thick sediments of the basin, and the morphology of the parallel Halmahera, Talaud and Sangihe ridges is closely controlled by recent N-S strike-slip faults. Among these faults, the Philippine Fault is a neotectonic feature crosscutting the Agusan-Davao Basin which seals tectonic events not younger than Eocene. In addition, the Central Cordillera shows strong similarities with the Pacific Cordillera for both stratigraphy and tectonic evolution, and several indications favour a Eurasian margin affinity for the Daguma Range (Southern and Eastern Kudarat Plateau that may be part of the Sangihe arc, as inferred for the Zamboanga Peninsula and the Northern Arm of Sulawesi. Thus the island of Mindanao can be divided into two composite terranes, the western one (northward extension of the Sangihe arc) being restricted to the Kudarat Plateau and the Zamboanga Peninsula. The apparent continuation of the Sangihe arc into the Central Cordillera of Mindanao is thus the result of post collision tectonics. The portion of the suture where the collision is completed curves westward north of the southern peninsula and extends beneath the sediments of the Cotabato Basin or the volcanic plateaus of the Lanao-Misamis-Bukidnon Highlands. In the northern part, the contact is linear and suggests, together with the absence of compressional deformation, a docking of the eastern oceanic terrane (Philippine Mobile Belt-Halmahera arc) against the western continental terrane (Zamboanga-Daguma) in a strike-slip environment. Prior to Early Pliocene, the eastern and the western terranes were subject to

  16. Earth's continental crustal gold endowment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frimmel, H. E.

    2008-03-01

    The analysis of the temporal distribution of gold deposits, combined with gold production data as well as reserve and resource estimates for different genetic types of gold deposit, revealed that the bulk of the gold known to be concentrated in ore bodies was added to the continental crust during a giant Mesoarchaean gold event at a time (3 Ga) when the mantle temperature reached a maximum and the dominant style of tectonic movement changed from vertical, plume-related to subhorizontal plate tectonic. A magmatic derivation of the first generation of crustal gold from a relatively hot mantle that was characterized by a high degree of partial melting is inferred from the gold chemistry, specifically high Os contents. While a large proportion of that gold is still present in only marginally modified palaeoplacer deposits of the Mesoarchaean Witwatersrand Basin in South Africa, accounting for about 40% of all known gold, the remainder has been recycled repeatedly on a lithospheric scale, predominantly by plate-tectonically induced magmatic and hydrothermal fluid circulation, to produce the current variety of gold deposit types. Post-Archaean juvenile gold addition to the continental crust has been limited, but a mantle contribution to some of the largest orogenic or intrusion-related gold deposits is indicated, notably for the Late Palaeozoic Tien Shan gold province. Magmatic fluids in active plate margins seem to be the most effective transport medium for gold mobilization, giving rise to a large proportion of volcanic-arc related gold deposits. Due to their generally shallow crustal level of formation, they have a low preservation potential. In contrast, those gold deposits that form at greater depth are more widespread also in older rocks. This explains the high proportion of orogenic (including intrusion-related) gold (32%) amongst all known gold deposits. The overall proportion of gold concentrated in known ore bodies is only 7 × 10- 7 of the estimated total

  17. Resonance activation and collision-induced-dissociation of ions using rectangular wave dipolar potentials in a digital ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fuxing; Wang, Liang; Dai, Xinhua; Fang, Xiang; Ding, Chuan-Fan

    2014-04-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) of ions by resonance activation in a quadrupole ion trap is usually accomplished by resonance exciting the ions to higher kinetic energy, whereby the high kinetic energy ions collide with a bath gas, such as helium or argon, inside the trap and dissociate to fragments. A new ion activation method using a well-defined rectangular wave dipolar potential formed by dividing down the trapping rectangular waveform is developed and examined herein. The mass-selected parent ions are resonance excited to high kinetic energies by simply changing the frequency of the rectangular wave dipolar potential and dissociation proceeds. A relationship between the ion mass and the activation waveform frequency is also identified and described. This highly efficient (CID) procedure can be realized by simply changing the waveform frequency of the dipolar potential, which could certainly simplify tandem mass spectrometry analysis methods.

  18. Cs-137 geochronology, epithermal neutron activation analysis, and principal component analysis of heavy metals pollution of the Black Sea anoxic continental shelf sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duliu, O. G.; Cristache, C.; Oaie, G.; Culicov, O. A.; Frontasyeva, M. V.

    2009-04-01

    Anthropogenic Cs-137 Gamma-ray Spectroscopy assay (GrSA) performed at the National Institute of Research and Development for Physics and Nuclear Engineering - Bucharest (Romania) in correlation with Epithermal Neutrons Activation Analysis (ENAA) performed at the Joint Institute of Nuclear Researches - Dubna (Russia) were used to investigate a 50 cm core containing unconsolidated sediments collected at a depth of 600 m off Romanian town of Constantza, located in the anoxic zone of the Black Sea Continental Shelf. A digital radiography showed the presence of about 265 distinct laminae, 1 to 3 mm thick, a fact attesting a stationary sedimentary process, completely free of bioturbation. After being radiographed, the core was sliced into 45 segments whose thickness gradually increased from 0.5 to 5 cm, such that the minimum thickness corresponded to the upper part of the core. From each segment two aliquots of about 0.5 g and 50 g were extracted for subsequent ENAA and Cs-137 GrSA. The Cs-137 vertical profile evidenced two maxima, one of them was very sharp and localized at a depth of 1 cm and the other very broad, almost undistinguished at about 8 cm depth, the first one being attributed to 1986 Chernobyl accident. Based on these date, we have estimated a sedimentation ratio of about 0.5 mm/year, value taken as reference for further assessment of recent pollution history. By means of ENAA we have determined the vertical content of five presumed pollutants, e.i. Zn, As, Br, Sn and Sb and of Sc, as natural, nonpolluting element. In the first case, all five elements presented a more or less similar vertical profile consisting of an almost exponential decrease for the first 10 cm below sediment surface followed by a plateau until the core base, i.e. 50 cm below surface, dependency better described by the equation: c(z) = c0 [1+k exp (-z/Z)] (1) where: where c(z) represents the concentration vertical profile; z represents depth (in absolute value); c0 represents the plateau

  19. Beaufort Sea monitoring program: analysis of trace metals and hydrocarbons from Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) activities. Final report, 1983-1986

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, P.D.; Crecelius, E.; Steinhauer, W.; Steinhauer, M.; Tuckfield, C.

    1986-08-13

    An environmental-monitoring program, designed to detect and quantify long-term changes in sediment and tissue concentrations of metals and hydrocarbons potentially due to oil and gas exploration and development on the U.S. Beaufort Sea continental shelf, was initiated in 1984. In Year-1 of the three-year study, a series of benthic stations was established in the nearshore area between Barter Island and Cape Halkett. In Year-2 of the study, areal coverage of the Study Area was increased to 39 marine stations and 10 shoreline and river stations. Analysis of six replicate sediment samples for trace metals, and saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons revealed a wide range of concentrations. Both trace metal and hydrocarbon analyses of bivalve and crustacean tissues indicated concentrations differences between species but no apparent relationship between animal body burdens and sediment concentrations.

  20. Continental rifting - Progress and outlook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, B. H.; Morgan, P.

    1981-01-01

    It is noted that in spite of the flood of new data on continental rifts in the last 15 years, there is little consensus about the basic mechanisms and causes of rifting. The remarkable similarities in rift cross sections (shown in a figure), are considered to suggest that the anomalous lithospheric structure of rifts is more dependent on lithosphere properties than the mode of rifting. It is thought that there is a spectrum of rifting processes for which two fundamental mechanisms can be postulated: an active mechanism, whereby thermal energy is transmitted into the lithosphere from the underlying asthenosphere, and a passive mechanism by which mechanical energy is transmitted laterally through the lithosphere as a consequence of plate interactions at a distance. In order to permit the concept of the two fundamentally different mechanisms to be tested, a tentative classification is proposed that divides rifts into two basic categories: active rifting and passive rifting. Here, the magnitude of active rifting will depend on the rate at which lithosphere moves over the thermal source, with rifts being restricted to stationary or slow-moving plates.

  1. Continental rifting - Progress and outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, B.H.; Morgan, P.

    1981-07-21

    It is noted that in spite of the flood of new data on continental rifts in the last 15 years, there is little consensus about the basic mechanisms and causes of rifting. The remarkable similarities in rift cross sections (shown in a figure), are considered to suggest that the anomalous lithospheric structure of rifts is more dependent on lithosphere properties than the mode of rifting. It is thought that there is a spectrum of rifting processes for which two fundamental mechanisms can be postulated: an active mechanism, whereby thermal energy is transmitted into the lithosphere from the underlying asthenosphere, and a passive mechanism by which mechanical energy is transmitted laterally through the lithosphere as a consequence of plate interactions at a distance. In order to permit the concept of the two fundamentally different mechanisms to be tested, a tentative classification is proposed that divides rifts into two basic categories: active rifting and passive rifting. Here, the magnitude of active rifting will depend on the rate at which lithosphere moves over the thermal source, with rifts being restricted to stationary or slow-moving plates.

  2. Influences of offshore activity. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Panama Canal/Outer Continental Shelf, of the House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session on offshore oil and gas activity and its socio-economic and environmental influences, October 12, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    A field hearing in Humble, Texas heard testimony on the socio-economic and environmental effects of Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activity in the Gulf of Mexico. These activities influence the commercial and recreational climate of the area as well as municipal services. The 20 witnesses included representatives of the petroleum, shipping, fishing, and other industries, environmental groups, and both organizations and agencies concerned with coastal management. Additional material and communications supplied for the record follows the testimony.

  3. New Caledonia a classic example of an arc continent collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitchison, J.

    2011-12-01

    The SW Pacific island of New Caledonia presents a classic example of an arc-continent collision. This event occurred in the Late Eocene when elements of an intra-oceanic island arc system, the Loyalty-D'Entrecasteaux arc, which stretched SSE from near Papua New Guinea east of New Caledonia to offshore New Zealand, collided with micro-continental fragments that had rifted off eastern Gondwana (Australia) in the late Cretaceous. Intervening Late Cretaceous to Paleogene oceanic crust of the South Loyalty Basin was eliminated through eastward subduction beneath this west-facing intra-oceanic island arc. As with many arc-continent collisions elsewhere collision was accompanied by ophiolite emplacement. The erosional remnants of which are extensive in New Caledonia. Collision led to subduction flip, followed by extensive rollback in front of the newly established east-facing Vitiaz arc. Post-collisional magmatism occurred after slab break-off and is represented by small-scale granitoid intrusions. Additional important features of New Caledonia include the presence of a regionally extensive UHP metamorphic terrain consisting of blueschists and eclogites that formed during the subduction process and were rapidly exhumed as a result of the collision Not only was collision and associated orogeny short-lived this collision system has not been overprinted by any major subsequent collision. New Caledonia thus provides an exceptional location for the study of processes related to arc-continent collision in general.

  4. Double subduction of continental lithosphere, a key to form wide plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Replumaz, Anne; Funiciello, Francesca; Reitano, Riccardo; Faccenna, Claudio; Balon, Marie

    2016-04-01

    The mechanisms involved in the creation of the high and wide topography, like the Tibetan Plateau, are still controversial. In particular, the behaviour of the indian and asian lower continental lithosphere during the collision is a matter of debate, either thickening, densifying and delaminating, or keeping its rigidity and subducting. But since several decades seismicity, seismic profiles and global tomography highlight the lithospheric structure of the Tibetan Plateau, and make the hypotheses sustaining the models more precise. In particular, in the western syntaxis, it is now clear that the indian lithosphere subducts northward beneath the Hindu Kush down to the transition zone, while the asian one subducts southward beneath Pamir (e.g. Negredo et al., 2007; Kufner et al., 2015). Such double subduction of continental lithospheres with opposite vergence has also been inferred in the early collision time. Cenozoic volcanic rocks between 50 and 30 Ma in the Qiangtang block have been interpreted as related to an asian subduction beneath Qiangtang at that time (De Celles et al., 2011; Guillot and Replumaz, 2013). We present here analogue experiments silicone/honey to explore the subduction of continental lithosphere, using a piston as analogue of far field forces. We explore the parameters that control the subductions dynamics of the 2 continental lithospheres and the thickening of the plates at the surface, and compare with the Tibetan Plateau evolution. We show that a continental lithosphere is able to subduct in a collision context, even lighter than the mantle, if the plate is rigid enough. In that case the horizontal force due to the collision context, modelled by the piston push transmitted by the indenter, is the driving force, not the slab pull which is negative. It is not a subduction driving by the weight of the slab, but a subduction induced by the collision, that we could call "collisional subduction".

  5. Seismotectonics of the southern boundary of Anatolia, Eastern Mediterranean region: subduction, collision, and arc jumping

    SciTech Connect

    Rotstein, Y.; Kafka, A.L.

    1982-09-10

    The pattern of seismicity and fault plane solutions of earthquakes are used to outline the tectonic features of the southern boundary of Anatolia in the eastern Mediterranean and southeastern Turkey. The results of this study show that this boundary is composed of two distinct parts. One, in southeastern Turkey and Syria, is a wide and complex zone of continental collision. The other, in the Levantine basin of the eastern Mediterranean, is a zone of oceanic subduction. In the region of continental collision three zones of seismicity are observed. Most of the seismic activity in this region follows the Bitlis zone and is associated with a zone of thrusting and mountain building. This appears to be the zone of most active deformation and plate consumption in the plate boundary region between Arabia and Turkey. A less active zone of seismicity to the north of the Bitlis zone is interpreted to have been more active in the past whereas another active zone of seismicity to the south is interpreted to be a zone which may be more active in the future as the main zone of plate consumption jumps to the south. In the subduction zone of the eastern Mediterranean the depth of the subducted slab and the rate of seismicity generally increease from east to west. The zone of present-day convergence between Africa and Turkey in the Levantine basin can be best outlined by the northern edge of the Mediterranean ridge. Deep seismic activity near the Gulf of Antalya is associated with a detached subducted slab north of the Anaximander Mountains that is distinctly different from the seismic trend which is associated with present-day active subduction. Most of the focal mechanisms of the earthquakes along the entire southern boundary of Anatolia indicate that N to NNW thrusting is the dominant mode of seismic deformation.

  6. A role for pre-collision processes in the origin of the aseismic zone of the southern Taiwan Central Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, J. C.; Cavallotti, C. J.; Rau, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Although Taiwan is one of the most seismically active areas on Earth, two areas on the island are notable for their lack of earthquakes, the coastal plain of central western Taiwan and an elongate area centered on the eastern flank of the southern Central Range. I focus on the latter area and suggest that pre-collision processes may have contributed to its development. Seismogenic strain offshore southeastern Taiwan reveals that the west side of the Luzon arc hosts a forearc sliver that was initially uplifted during basin inversion then tectonically thinned by pull-apart basin formation as collision initiated. This pre-collision history favors the tectonic insertion of a sliver of oceanic crust at depth in the orogenic suture zone. The presence of oceanic crust in this region is consistent with high seismic velocity observations as well as existing analog models. Strain inversions spanning the aseismic zone broadly show crustal thickening and NW-directed shortening to the east, and crustal thinning and SW-directed stretching to the west. Oceanic crust at depth could contribute to the aseismic zone by acting as a relatively strong body sandwiched between the accreted arc and weaker transitional continental crust to the west. In this scenario the aseismic zone is largely composed of forearc rocks that are not internally deforming by elastic deformation mechanisms. Alternatively the sliver may act as a west-pointing wedge (in profile view) that is promoting weaker transitional continental material to detach, imbricate or delaminate in front of the colliding continental promontory (i.e., the Peikang high) that appears to contribute to the low rates of seismicity in western Taiwan. In any of these latter scenarios it would be reasonable to expect changes in crustal architecture that might promote shallowing of the brittle-plastic transition as is observed around the aseismic zone. The specific mechanism for this shallowing remains unresolved and clearly the presence of

  7. Palaeomagnetism and the continental crust

    SciTech Connect

    Piper, J.D.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book is an introduction to palaeomagnetism offering treatment of theory and practice. It analyzes the palaeomagnetic record over the whole of geological time, from the Archaean to the Cenozoic, and goes on to examine the impact of past geometries and movements of the continental crust at each geological stage. Topics covered include theory of rock and mineral magnetism, field and laboratory methods, growth and consolidation of the continental crust in Archaean and Proterozoic times, Palaeozoic palaeomagnetism and the formation of Pangaea, the geomagnetic fields, continental movements, configurations and mantle convection.

  8. Continental tectonics in the aftermath of plate tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, Peter

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that the basic tenet of plate tectonics, rigid-body movements of large plates of lithosphere, fails to apply to continental interiors. There, buoyant continental crust can detach from the underlying mantle to form mountain ranges and broad zones of diffuse tectonic activity. The role of crustal blocks and of the detachment of crustal fragments in this process is discussed. Future areas of investigation are addressed.

  9. Coordination: Southeast continental shelf studies

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, D.W.

    1989-01-26

    The objective of this investigation is to obtain model descriptions of the flow modifications in the Southeast Atlantic continental shelf due to Gulf Stream fluctuations and topographic effects. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Orogenic plateau magmatism of the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, M. B.; Neill, I.; Kheirkhah, M.; van Hunen, J.; Davidson, J. P.; Meliksetian, Kh.; Emami, M. H.

    2012-04-01

    Magmatism is a common feature of high plateaux created during continental collision, but the causes remain enigmatic. Here we study Pliocene-Quaternary volcanics from the active Arabia-Eurasia collision zone, to determine the chemistry of these rocks and their relations to faulting and deeper lithospheric structure. The great majority of the centres lie within the overriding Eurasian plate in Iran, eastern Turkey and Armenia , implying that mantle fertilised by pre-collision subduction processes plays a significant role in magma generation. The composition of the Pliocene-Quaternary centres is extremely variable, ranging from OIB-like alkali basalts, to intermediate types resembling mature continental arc lavas, to potassic and even ultrapotassic lavas. These centres are erupted across a mosaic of pre-Cenozoic suture zones and heterogeneous lithospheric blocks. The chemical diversity implies a range of partial melting conditions operating on lithospheric and perhaps sub-lithospheric sources. Published data show a thick (>200 km) lithospheric keel beneath the Arabia-Eurasia suture, thinning to near normal thicknesses (~120 km) across much of central and northern Iran. Thin mantle lithosphere under eastern Turkey (max. ~30 km) may relate to the region's juvenile, accretionary lithosphere. These variable thicknesses are constraints on the cause of the melting in each area, and the degree of variation suggests that no one mechanism applies across the plateau. Various melting models have been suggested. Break-off of the subducted Neo-Tethyan oceanic slab is supported by tomographic data, which may have permitted melting related to adiabatic ascent of hot asthenosphere under areas where the lithosphere is thin. This seems a less plausible mechanism where the lithosphere is at normal or greater than normal thickness. The same problem applies to postulated lower lithosphere delamination. Isolated pull-aparts may account for the location of some centres, but are not

  11. Use of collision induced dissociation mass spectrometry as a rapid technique for the identification of pharmacologically active peptides in pharmacopoeial testing.

    PubMed

    Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Nap, Cees-Jan; Almeling, Stefan

    2011-07-15

    The applicability of collision induced dissociation mass spectrometry (CID-MS) for the pharmacopoeial identification of pharmacologically active peptides was examined. Two different classes of related peptides were selected, i.e. four synthetic gonadotropin releasing hormone analogues (gonadorelin, goserelin, buserelin and leuprorelin) being either nona- or decapeptides, and human insulin and 2 insulin analogues (insulin lispro and insulin aspart). For all these substances the pharmacopoeial identification currently requires a combination of several partly rather laborious tests using sophisticated equipment. In contrast, CID-MS as a stand alone test can provide increased reassurance about the identity and is rapid and efficient. Moreover, the substance consumption for testing is significantly lower, which is a non-negligible factor for very expensive substances.

  12. Peralkaline volcanism in a continental collisional setting: Mount Nemrut volcano, Eastern Anatolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çubukçu, H. E.; Ulusoy, I.; Aydar, E.; Sen, E.; Ersoy, O.; Gourgaud, A.

    2012-04-01

    Quaternary Mount Nemrut is an active volcano in the Eastern Anatolia which culminates at 2948 m and having an elliptic summit caldera with 8.5 x 7 km diameter. The volcano is situated on the east of the deformed and dissected remnant of the Muş-Van ramp basin located at the northern foot of the Bitlis-Zagros suture zone. The suture zone is the southern margin of the continental collision between Arabian and Anatolian plates. The continental collision along the Bitlis-Zagros suture zone commenced in the Middle Miocene following the closure of the southern segment of Neo-Tethys ocean and the subduction of northern margin of Arabian plate beneath Anatolian plate. Upon the collision and the uplift of the region, widespread volcanism, which exhibits varying eruption styles and geochemical characteristics, affected most of the Eastern Anatolia. The intracontinental convergence and N - S directed compressional - contractional tectonic regime remained till the end of Late Miocene. However, compressional - extensional regime became dominant in the Early-Late Pliocene. Following the slab break off, asthenosphere beneath the Arabian Foreland probably have migrated towards the slab window, which was opened during the detachment, and invaded the mantle wedge beneath East Anatolian Collision zone. Volcanism is still active in the region, represented by major Quaternary volcanic centers. The magmatic characteristics of Nemrut volcano is appealingly distinct compared to the other Quaternary volcanic centers in the region. The overall geochemical and mineralogical affinity of Nemrut volcanism exhibits strong similarities with the well-known sites of continental intra-plate extension. The volcano has distinguishing features of a typical silica oversaturated peralkaline (molecular ratio (Na + K / Al)>1) suite: (a) The volcanic products vary from transitional olivine basalt to peralkaline rhyolite (abundant comendite and scarce pantellerite) (b) Predominance by erupted volume of

  13. Investigation of Biomass Combustion Rate of Fire Radiative Energy Using Multiple-Satellite-observed Active Fires and Landsat TM Burn Severities across the Continental United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, F.; Zhang, X.; Kondragunta, S.

    2015-12-01

    Biomass burning is a major source of atmospheric aerosol and greenhouse gases that substantially influence climate and regional air quality. However, the accuracy of biomass burning emissions estimated using traditional method is limited by large uncertainties in burned area and fuel loading. Alternatively, fire radiative energy (FRE) has recently been demonstrated to be linearly related to biomass combustion, which potentially improves the estimation of biomass burning emissions. The FRE-based combustion rate is 0.368-0.453 kg/MJ according to field controlled experiments while it varies from 1.37-4.5 kg/MJ derived from satellite-based bottom-up and top-down aerosol optical thickness estimates. Here we investigate the FRE combustion rate in over 1000 burn scars from 2011 to 2012 across the Continental United States (CONUS). Specifically, FRE was calculated by combining the high spatial observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the high temporal observations from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES). Biomass consumption in burn scars was modeled using Landsat TM 30m burn severities, 30m fuel loading from Fuel Characteristic Classification System, and combustion completeness compiled from recent literatures. The combustion rate was then investigated by correlating FRE to biomass consumption across CONUS and Bailey's ecoregions. Our results show that the combustion rate can be extracted from the linear relationship between biomass consumption and FRE. The combustion rate is 0.415±10% kg/MJ across CONUS, which is similar to the rate derived from field experiments. However, it varies from 0.18-1.9 kg/MJ among ecoregions. This implies that a single combustion rate could produce large uncertainty in the estimation of biomass consumption at large scales. We suggest that ecoregion specified combustion rates should help to improve the accuracy of quantifying biomass burning emissions regionally and globally.

  14. Analog Modeling of Continental Lithosphere Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willingshofer, E.; Sokoutis, D.; Luth, S.; Beekman, F.; Cloetingh, S.

    2012-12-01

    Lithospheric-scale analog modeling sheds light on the consequences of decoupling within the continental lithosphere and along plate interfaces during continental collision. The model results provide valuable information in terms of strain localization, deformation of the subducting slab and the evolution and architecture of the overlying mountain belt and its topography. A weak layer has been implemented in three-layer models to simulate decoupling along the plate interface and at different levels of the lithosphere (brittle-ductile transition, entire lower crust, crust-mantle boundary). Additionally, varying the strength of the mantle lithosphere of both the upper as well as the lower plate regulated the degree of plate coupling. Plate boundaries were orthogonal to the convergence direction. All models emphasize that strong decoupling at the plate interface is a pre-requisite for the subduction of continental lithosphere. In addition, deformation of the subducting slab was found to be sensitive to the strength contrast between the subduction zone and the mantle lithosphere of the downgoing as well as the upper plate. As such, a low strength contrast between the plate interface and the lower plate leads to deformation of the subducting slab by thickening and the development of a shallow slab. Conversely, when the strength contrast is high, deep slabs evolve which undergo relatively less deformation. Furthermore, the level of decoupling in the downgoing plate governs how much continental crust is subducted together with the mantle lithosphere. Shallow decoupling, at the brittle-ductile transition, results in subduction of the lower crust whereas small amounts of lower crust are subducted when decoupling occurs at the level of the Moho. Weak plate coupling and a weak lower crust of the lower plate steer the evolution of mountain belts such that deformation propagates outward, in the direction of the incoming plate, by successive imbrication of upper crustal thrust

  15. Measurement of the underlying event activity using charged-particle jets in proton-proton collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 2.76 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-09-21

    A measurement of the underlying event (UE) activity in proton-proton collisions is performed using events with charged-particle jets produced in the central pseudorapidity region (|η jet| < 2) and with transverse momentum 1 ≤ pT jet < 100 GeV. The analysis uses a data sample collected at a centre-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The UE activity is measured as a function of pT jet in terms of the average multiplicity and scalar sum of transverse momenta (pT) of charged particles, with |η| < 2 and pT > 0.5 GeV, in the azimuthal regionmore » transverse to the highest pT jet direction. By further dividing the transverse region into two regions of smaller and larger activity, various components of the UE activity are separated. As a result, the measurements are compared to previous results at 0.9 and 7 TeV, and to predictions of several Monte Carlo event generators, providing constraints on the modelling of the UE dynamics« less

  16. Measurement of the underlying event activity using charged-particle jets in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 2.76 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-09-21

    A measurement of the underlying event (UE) activity in proton-proton collisions is performed using events with charged-particle jets produced in the central pseudorapidity region (|η jet| < 2) and with transverse momentum 1 ≤ pT jet < 100 GeV. The analysis uses a data sample collected at a centre-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The UE activity is measured as a function of pT jet in terms of the average multiplicity and scalar sum of transverse momenta (pT) of charged particles, with |η| < 2 and pT > 0.5 GeV, in the azimuthal region transverse to the highest pT jet direction. By further dividing the transverse region into two regions of smaller and larger activity, various components of the UE activity are separated. As a result, the measurements are compared to previous results at 0.9 and 7 TeV, and to predictions of several Monte Carlo event generators, providing constraints on the modelling of the UE dynamics

  17. Mantle Dynamics of Australia-Banda Arc Collision as Inferred from Shear Wave Splitting Analysis of Teleseismic and Local Slab Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, C. W.; Miller, M. S.; O'Driscoll, L.; Porritt, R. W.; Roosmawati, N.; Widiyantoro, S.

    2015-12-01

    Arc-continent collision is an important factor in continent building, orogensis, and ocean closure, yet the details associated with it are not fully understood. East-Timor and the Nusa Tenggara Timur region of Indonesia provide a unique setting to study a young arc-continent collision (~8 Ma) and incipient orogenesis. The NSF funded Banda Arc project affords a rare opportunity to investigate unconstrained processes such as active continental subduction and slab rupture beneath a regional deployment of broadband seismometers. We use data from 35 broadband sensors to analyze seismic anisotropy through measuring shear wave splitting. These stations span the roughly east-west transition from normal oceanic subduction at the Sunda Arc to collision at the Banda Arc, and cross areas associated with back-arc thrusting, arc volcanism, extinct volcanism and a rapidly exhuming forearc. Thirty of the sensors used in the analysis are temporary stations installed by our research team in 2014 and will remain in the field until 2016 or later. The remaining stations are part of the open-access GFZ GEOFON global seismic network. We present preliminary shear wave splitting results for teleseismic (*KS core phases) and local (direct S phase) arrivals in order to inspect the sub-slab mantle and the supra-slab mantle wedge for anisotropic patterns related to olivine flow fabric. These results can be used to assess regional strain linked to ongoing collision and may elucidate any slab tearing that has resulted from the (partial) subduction of buoyant continental material of Australian affinity. Presently, we observe a trend of primarily trench-parallel sub-slab fast polarization directions and perhaps more complicated anisotropy in the mantle wedge. Relative to the trench, there appears to be more spatial variation in fast axis orientation for direct arrivals than teleseismic phases. We discuss how the interpretation of our initial results provides insight into the mantle dynamics of the

  18. Great earthquakes in low strain rate continental interiors: An example from SE Kazakhstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, G. E.; Walker, R. T.; Abdrakhmatov, K.; Jackson, J.; Elliott, J. R.; Mackenzie, D.; Middleton, T.; Schwenninger, J.-L.

    2015-08-01

    The Lepsy fault of the northern Tien Shan, SE Kazakhstan, extends E-W 120 km from the high mountains of the Dzhungarian Ala-tau, a subrange of the northern Tien Shan, into the low-lying Kazakh platform. It is an example of an active structure that connects a more rapidly deforming mountain region with an apparently stable continental region and follows a known Palaeozoic structure. Field-based and satellite observations reveal an ˜10 m vertical offset exceptionally preserved along the entire length of the fault. Geomorphic analysis and age control from radiocarbon and optically stimulated luminescence dating methods indicate that the scarp formed in the Holocene and was generated by at least two substantial earthquakes. The most recent event, dated to sometime after ˜400 years B.P., is likely to have ruptured the entire ˜120 km fault length in a Mw 7.5-8.2 earthquake. The Lepsy fault kinematics were characterized using digital elevation models and high-resolution satellite imagery, which indicate that the predominant sense of motion is reverse right lateral with a fault strike, dip, and slip vector azimuth of ˜110°, 50°S, and 317-343°, respectively, which is consistent with predominant N-S shortening related to the India-Eurasia collision. In light of these observations, and because the activity of the Lepsy fault would have been hard to ascertain if it had not ruptured in the recent past, we note that the absence of known active faults within low-relief and low strain rate continental interiors does not always imply an absence of seismic hazard.

  19. Collision Repair Campaign

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Collision Repair Campaign targets meaningful risk reduction in the Collision Repair source category to reduce air toxic emissions in their communities. The Campaign also helps shops to work towards early compliance with the Auto Body Rule.

  20. Star Formation Activity in the Molecular Cloud G35.20–0.74: Onset of Cloud–Cloud Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewangan, L. K.

    2017-03-01

    To probe star formation (SF) processes, we present results of an analysis of the molecular cloud G35.20‑0.74 (hereafter MCG35.2) using multi-frequency observations. The MCG35.2 is depicted in a velocity range of 30–40 km s‑1. An almost horseshoe-like structure embedded within the MCG35.2 is evident in the infrared and millimeter images and harbors the previously known sites, ultra-compact/hyper-compact G35.20‑0.74N H ii region, Ap2-1, and Mercer 14 at its base. The site, Ap2-1, is found to be excited by a radio spectral type of B0.5V star where the distribution of 20 cm and Hα emission is surrounded by the extended molecular hydrogen emission. Using the Herschel 160–500 μm and photometric 1–24 μm data analysis, several embedded clumps and clusters of young stellar objects (YSOs) are investigated within the MCG35.2, revealing the SF activities. A majority of the YSOs clusters and massive clumps (500–4250 {M}ȯ ) are seen toward the horseshoe-like structure. The position–velocity analysis of 13CO emission shows a blueshifted peak (at 33 km s‑1) and a redshifted peak (at 37 km s‑1) interconnected by lower intensity intermediate velocity emission, tracing a broad bridge feature. The presence of such a broad bridge feature suggests the onset of a collision between molecular components in the MCG35.2. A noticeable change in the H-band starlight mean polarization angles has also been observed in the MCG35.2, probably tracing the interaction between molecular components. Taken together, it seems that the cloud–cloud collision process has influenced the birth of massive stars and YSOs clusters in the MCG35.2.

  1. Bioenergetics of Continental Serpentinites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardace, D.; Meyer-Dombard, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Serpentinization is the aqueous alteration of ultramafic (Fe- and Mg-rich) rocks, resulting in secondary mineral assemblages of serpentine, brucite, iron oxyhydroxides and magnetite, talc, and possibly carbonate and silica-rich veins and other minor phases-all depending on the evolving pressure-temperature-composition of the system. The abiotic evolution of hydrogen and possibly organic compounds via serpentinization (McCollom and Bach, 2009) highlights the relevance of this geologic process to carbon and energy sources for the deep biosphere. Serpentinization may fuel life over long stretches of geologic time, throughout the global seabed and in exposed, faulted peridotite blocks (as at Lost City Hydrothermal Field, Kelley et al., 2005), and in obducted oceanic mantle units in ophiolites (e.g., Tiago et al., 2004). Relatively little work has been published on life in continental serpentinite settings, though they likely host a unique resident microbiota. In this work, we systematically model the serpentinizing fluid as an environmental niche. Reported field data for high and moderate pH serpentinizing fluids were modeled from Cyprus, the Philippines, Oman, Northern California, New Caledonia, Yugoslavia, Portugal, Italy, Newfoundland Canada, New Zealand, and Turkey. Values for Gibbs Energy of reaction (ΔGr), kJ per mole of electrons transferred for a given metabolism, are calculated for each field site. Cases are considered both for (1) modest assumptions of 1 nanomolar hydrogen and 1 micromolar methane, based on unpublished data for a similar northern California field site (Cardace and Hoehler, in prep.) and (2) an upper estimate of 10 nanomolar hydrogen and 500 micromolar methane. We survey the feasibility of microbial metabolisms for key steps in the nitrogen cycle, oxidation of sulfur in pyrite, iron oxidation or reduction reactions, sulfate reduction coupled to hydrogen or methane oxidation, methane oxidation coupled to the reduction of oxygen, and

  2. 76 FR 2919 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram and Supplemental Official Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-18

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram and Supplemental Official Outer Continental Shelf Block Diagrams AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean... American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83) Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram and...

  3. Late Cretaceous-Cenozoic subduction-collision history of the Southern Neotethys: new evidence from the Çağlayancerit area, SE Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akıncı, Ahmet Can; Robertson, Alastair H. F.; Ünlügenç, Ulvi Can

    2016-01-01

    Evidence of the subduction-collision history of the S Neotethys is well exposed in the frontal part of the SE Anatolian thrust belt and the adjacent Arabian continental margin. The foreland succession in the study area begins with Eocene shelf carbonates, ranging from shallow marine to deeper marine, without sedimentary input from the Tauride continent to the north. After a regional hiatus (Oligocene), sedimentation resumed during the Early Miocene with terrigenous gravity-flow deposition in the north (Lice Formation) and shallow-marine carbonates further south. Clastic detritus was derived from the Tauride continent and oceanic accretionary material. The base of the overriding Tauride allochthon comprises ophiolite-derived debris flows, ophiolite-related mélange and dismembered ophiolitic rocks. Above this, the regional-scale Bulgurkaya sedimentary mélange (an olistostrome) includes blocks and dismembered thrust sheets of metamorphic rocks, limestone and sandstone, which include Late Cretaceous and Eocene foraminifera. The matrix is mainly strongly deformed Eocene-Oligocene mudrocks, hemipelagic marl and sandstone turbidites. The thrust stack is topped by a regionally extensive thrust sheet (Malatya metamorphic unit), which includes greenschist facies marble, calcschist, schist and phyllite, representing Tauride continental crust. Beginning during the Late Mesozoic, the S Neotethys subducted northwards beneath a backstop represented by the Tauride microcontinent (Malatya metamorphic unit). Ophiolites formed within the S Neotethys and accreted to the Tauride active margin. Large-scale sedimentary mélange developed along the Tauride active margin during Eocene-Oligocene. On the Arabian margin, a sedimentary hiatus and tilting (Oligocene) is interpreted to record initial continental collision. The Early Miocene terrigenous gravity flows represent a collision-related flexural foreland basin. Southward overthrusting of the Tauride allochthon took place during Early

  4. H.R. 73: A Bill to protect the ecologically fragile coastal resources of south Florida by prohibiting offshore oil and gas activities and by cancelling Federal leases in the area of the Outer Continental Shelf adjacent to the south Florida coast. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First session

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This document contains H.R. 73, A Bill to protect the ecologically fragile coastal resources of south Florida by prohibiting offshore oil and gas activities and by cancelling Federal leases in the area of the Outer Continental Shelf adjacent to south Florida. This Bill was introduced in the House of Representatives, 104th Congress, First Session, January 4, 1995.

  5. Continental crust: a geophysical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Meissner, R.

    1986-01-01

    This book develops an integrated and balanced picture of present knowledge of the continental crust. Crust and lithosphere are first defined, and the formation of crusts as a general planetary phenomenon is described. The background and methods of geophysical studies of the earth's crust and the collection of related geophysical parameters are examined. Creep and friction experiments and the various methods of radiometric age dating are addressed, and geophysical and geological investigations of the crustal structure in various age provinces of the continents are studied. Specific tectonic structures such as rifts, continental margins, and geothermal areas are discussed. Finally, an attempt is made to give a comprehensive view of the evolution of the continental crust and to collect and develop arguments for crustal accretion and recycling. 647 references.

  6. Outer continental shelf oil and gas activities in the Pacific (Southern California) and their onshore impacts: a summary report, May 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Macpherson, George S.; Bernstein, Janis

    1980-01-01

    Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) oil and gas exploration and development have been under way in the Pacific (Southern California) Region since 1966. During that time, there have been four Federal lease sales: in 1966, 1968, 1975 (Sale 35), and 1979 (Sale 48). Oil and gas production from three leases has been going on since 1968. It peaked in 1971 and now averages around 31,400 barrels of oil and 15.4 million cubic feet of gas per day. Discoveries on areas leased in the 1968 and 1975 sales have led to plans for eight new platforms to begin production in the early 1980's. Five platforms are in the eastern end of Santa Barbara Channel, one is in the western Channel, and two are in San Pedro Bay, south of Long Beach. Three rigs are doing exploratory drilling in the Region. The most recent estimates by the U.S. Geological Survey of remaining reserves for all identified fields in the Southern California Region are 695 million barrels of oil and 1,575 billion cubic feet of gas (January 1979). The USGS has also made risked estimates of economically recoverable oil and gas resources for all the leased tracts in the Region (March 1980). These risked estimates of economically recoverable resources are 394 billion barrels of oil and 1,295 billion cubic feet of gas. The USGS estimates of undiscovered recoverable resources for the entire Southern California OCS Region (January 1980) are 3,200 million barrels of oil and 3,400 billion cubic feet of gas. Because of the long history of oil and gas production in Southern California from wells onshore and in State waters, there are many existing facilities for the transportation, processing, and refining of oil and gas. Some of the expected new OCS production can be accommodated in these facilities. Four new onshore projects will be required. Two of these are under construction: (1) a 9.6-km (6-mi) onshore oil pipeline (capacity: 60,000 bpd) between Carpinteria (Santa Barbara County) and the existing Mobil-Rincon separation and treatment

  7. Early Cenozoic tectonic quiescence at the southern Levant continental margin, eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schattner, Uri; Segev, Amit; Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

    2010-05-01

    The geological record of the easternmost Mediterranean shows almost continuous tectonic activity across the Levant continental margin since its formation during the early Mesozoic until the Recent. The margin developed as part of the Gondwana super continent breakup. Since mid Cenozoic onwards Gondwana descendants, the African and Arabian plates, progressively collided with Eurasia. This collision along with the initiation activity of the Afar plume led to the Cenozoic reactivation of the Levant margin. We explore the geodynamic development of the Levant region between its formation and reactivation through one of the poorly understood time periods in its history. Geological evidence shows that tectonomagmatic processes associated with the formation of the Levant margin and later geodynamic events lasted until the Maastrichtian. During the following ~25 Myr exclusively, thick pelagic and deep sea sediments accumulated on the submerged northwestern Arabian plate. We interpret this early-to-middle Paleogene time window as a unique interval of tectonic and magmatic quiescence. During this mature post continental, breakup stage, thermal equilibrium and isostatic compensation were achieved. A three-dimensional layered lithosphere model was constructed to describe this Middle-Late Eocene geodynamic scene of the Levant area before its reactivation. Layers of the model include the Moho, top of the basement interfaces and the top Avedat Group (Upper Eocene) interfaces. The model was established after a 100 km horizontal restoration along the Dead Sea transform and vertical correction by isostatic compensation to achieve the paleo structure which prevailed in the study area at the end of the Eocene. The reconstructed elevation defines a ramp-shaped structure compatible with independent geological evidence. Results show that most parts of the central Levant margin were submerged ~200 m to ~1800 m, while the paleo bathymetric slopes ranged from ~2° (shelf) to ~6° (slope

  8. Probability of satellite collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarter, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    A method is presented for computing the probability of a collision between a particular artificial earth satellite and any one of the total population of earth satellites. The collision hazard incurred by the proposed modular Space Station is assessed using the technique presented. The results of a parametric study to determine what type of satellite orbits produce the greatest contribution to the total collision probability are presented. Collision probability for the Space Station is given as a function of Space Station altitude and inclination. Collision probability was also parameterized over miss distance and mission duration.

  9. Subduction-Driven Recycling of Continental Margin Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levander, Alan; Bezada, Maximiliano; Niu, Fenglin; Palomeras, Imma; Humphreys, Eugene; Carbonell, Ramon; Gallart, Josep; Schmitz, Michael; Miller, Meghan

    2016-04-01

    Subduction recycling of oceanic lithosphere, a central theme of plate tectonics, is relatively well understood. Recycling continental lithosphere is more difficult to recognize, can take a number of different forms, and appears to require an external trigger for initiation. Delamination and localized convective downwelling are two processes invoked to explain the removal of lithospheric mantle under or adjacent to orogenic belts. We describe a related process that can lead to the loss of continental lithosphere adjacent to a subduction zone: Subducting oceanic plates can entrain and recycle lithospheric mantle from an adjacent continent and disrupt the continental lithosphere far inland from the subduction zone. Body wave tomograms from dense broadband seismograph arrays in northeastern South America (SA) and the western Mediterranean show larger than expected volumes of positive velocity anomalies which we identify as the subducted Atlantic slab under northeastern SA, and the Alboran slab beneath the Gibraltar arc (GA). The positive anomalies lie under and are aligned with the continental margins at sublithospheric depths. The continental margins along which the subduction zones have traversed, i.e. the northeastern SA plate boundary and east of GA, have significantly thinner lithosphere than expected. The thinner than expected lithosphere extends inland as far as the edges of nearby cratons as determined from receiver function images and surface wave tomography. These observations suggest that subducting oceanic plates viscously entrain and remove continental mantle lithosphere from beneath adjacent continental margins, modulating the surface tectonics and pre-conditioning the margins for further deformation. The latter can include delamination of the entire lithospheric mantle and include the lower crust, as around GA, inferred by results from active and passive seismic experiments. Viscous removal of continental margin lithosphere creates LAB topography leading

  10. Mantle plumes and continental tectonics.

    PubMed

    Hill, R I; Campbell, I H; Davies, G F; Griffiths, R W

    1992-04-10

    Mantle plumes and plate tectonics, the result of two distinct modes of convection within the Earth, operate largely independently. Although plumes are secondary in terms of heat transport, they have probably played an important role in continental geology. A new plume starts with a large spherical head that can cause uplift and flood basalt volcanism, and may be responsible for regional-scale metamorphism or crustal melting and varying amounts of crustal extension. Plume heads are followed by narrow tails that give rise to the familiar hot-spot tracks. The cumulative effect of processes associated with tail volcanism may also significantly affect continental crust.

  11. Multi-stage barites in partially melted UHP eclogite: implications for fluid/melt activities during deep continental subduction in the Sulu orogenic belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Songjie; Wang, Lu

    2015-04-01

    . Zr-in-rutile thermometry shows their formation temperature to be 586-664 oC at 1.5-2.5 GPa. Barite-bearing MS inclusions with Ba-bearing K-feldspar (type-II) connected by Kfs+Pl+Bt veinlets of in-situ phengite breakdown and thin barite veinlets along grain boundaries (type-III) are products of phengite breakdown and induced fluid flow during exhumation. These barites have witnessed the gradational separation process of melt/ fluid from miscibility on/above the second critical endpoint during UHP metamorphism, to immiscibility along the exhumation path of the subducted slab. Associated reactions from pyrite to hematite and goethite with the type-III barite ring surrounding the pyrite provide evidence for a local high oxygen fugacity environment during eclogite partial melting and subsequent melt/fluid crystallization processes. Moreover, large grain barite aggregations (type-IV) modified by amphibole+albite symplectite are most likely formed by release of molecular and hydroxyl water from anhydrous minerals of eclogite during high-grade amphibolite-facies retrogression. The growth of multi-stage barites in UHP eclogite further advances our understanding of fluid/melt transfer, crystallization processes along the subduction-exhumation path of the partially melted eclogite, broadening our knowledge of melt/fluid evolution within subduction-collision zones worldwide. REFERENCES Chen Y.X., et al., 2014, Lithos, 200, 1-21. Liu J.B., et al., 2000, Acta Petrologica Sinica 16(4), 482-484. Zeng L.S., et al., 2007, Chinese Science Bulletin, 52(21), 2995-3001. Gao X.Y., et al., 2012, Journal of Metamorphic Geology, 30(2), 193-212.

  12. Constraining the upper plate surface deformation across coupled subduction-collision systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternai, P.; Jolivet, L.; Menant, A.; Gerya, T.; Avouac, J. P.; Pirouz, M.; Ueda, K.

    2014-12-01

    The relationships between subduction dynamics, continental collision, surface erosion, upper mantle flow and the tectonic history recorded in the continental crust have attracted significant interest. Major results confirmed that mantle convection is a valuable mechanism behind much of the observed dynamic topography and plate motion. However, the degree to which mantle flow controls surface deformation and how this is modulated by erosion are major open questions. Geodetic measurements, coupled with geological observations, enable to achieve a fairly good understanding of the evolution of active features, but the long-term dynamic origins of this kinematics are still controversial. For example, mantle flow is proposed as a driver of plate tectonics, but lithospheric processes such as slab rollback are also known to affect mantle flow. In addition, surface erosion affects crustal deformation, but the interactions between surface mass transfer, crustal strain and deeper dynamics are still widely unknown. More definitive conclusions, especially regarding how the dynamical mantle flow associated to slab tearing and rollback and the mass transfer by surface erosion affect crustal strain, require the investigation of the 3D relationships between the lithosphere and mantle, from the topmost crustal layers to the asthenosphere. We present new high-resolution 3D thermo-mechanical numerical joint models of continental collision, oceanic subduction and slab tearing which allow self-consistent reproduction of first order Tethyan tectonic structures such as back-arc rifting and large scale strike-slip faults accommodating continental escape. We compare these numerical outcomes with observations from the Aegean-Anatolian and eastern Indian-Eurasian margins. We show that the dynamical mantle flow due to slab rollback and tearing can modulate surface deformation by locally enhancing trench retreat and actively dragging the upper plate from below. Further investigations will

  13. Estimation of continental precipitation recycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brubaker, Kaye L.; Entekhabi, Dara; Eagleson, P. S.

    1993-01-01

    The total amount of water that precipitates on large continental regions is supplied by two mechanisms: 1) advection from the surrounding areas external to the region and 2) evaporation and transpiration from the land surface within the region. The latter supply mechanism is tantamount to the recycling of precipitation over the continental area. The degree to which regional precipitation is supplied by recycled moisture is a potentially significant climate feedback mechanism and land surface-atmosphere interaction, which may contribute to the persistence and intensification of droughts. Gridded data on observed wind and humidity in the global atmosphere are used to determine the convergence of atmospheric water vapor over continental regions. A simplified model of the atmospheric moisture over continents and simultaneous estimates of regional precipitation are employed to estimate, for several large continental regions, the fraction of precipitation that is locally derived. The results indicate that the contribution of regional evaporation to regional precipitation varies substantially with location and season. For the regions studied, the ratio of locally contributed to total monthly precipitation generally lies between 0. 10 and 0.30 but is as high as 0.40 in several cases.

  14. Fire activity inside and outside protected areas in Sub-Saharan Africa: a continental analysis of fire and its implications for biodiversity and land management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palumbo, Ilaria; Gregoire, Jean-Marie; Simonetti, Dario; Punga, Mihkel; Dubois, Gregoire

    2010-05-01

    Fire is an important ecological factor in many natural ecosystems. Without doubt one of the biomes with the highest fire activity in the world is the African savannah. Savannahs have evolved with fires since climate in these regions is characterized by definite dry and wet seasons that create the conditions for burning. During the wet months the herbaceous vegetation shows a quick growth, followed by a long dry period during which the abundant build-up of fine materials becomes highly flammable and most of fires occur. Animals and plants are adapted to these conditions and their lives depend on recurrent fires. In this context fire becomes an essential element to promote biodiversity and nature conservation. Park managers are using programmed fires as a tool to maintain the habitats and favorable conditions to the animal communities. Satellite products like burned areas and active fire maps are a valuable mean to analyze the fire activity and provide support to experts working for conservation and natural resource management. In the framework of the Digital Observatory for Protected Areas (DOPA), the MONDE group (Monitoring Natural Resources for Development) of the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission is using satellite products to analyze the fire occurrence and its effects on protected areas located in sub-Saharan Africa. Information on the fire activity was derived from the MODIS fire products (active fires and burned areas) and allows the DOPA to provide support to park managers as well as to experts working for conservation and natural resource management. We assessed 741 protected areas classified by the IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) with a level of protection between class I and IV. The MODIS datasets are available since the year 2000 and were used to characterize the spatio-temporal distribution of fires over a period of 10 years. Information on fire activity was extracted for the protected areas and a 25km buffer zone

  15. Fire activity inside and outside protected areas in Sub-Saharan Africa: a continental analysis of fire and its implications for biodiversity and management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palumbo, Ilaria; Gregoire, Jean-Marie; Simonetti, Dario; Punga, Mihkel; Dubois, Gregoire

    2010-05-01

    Fire is an important ecological factor in many natural ecosystems. Without doubt one of the biomes with the highest fire activity in the world is the African savannah. Savannahs have evolved with fires since climate in these regions is characterized by definite dry and wet seasons that create the conditions for burning. During the wet months the herbaceous vegetation shows a quick growth, followed by a long dry period during which the abundant build-up of fine materials becomes highly flammable and most of fires occur. Animals and plants are adapted to these conditions and their lives depend on recurrent fires. In this context fire becomes an essential element to promote biodiversity and nature conservation. Park managers are using programmed fires as a tool to maintain the habitats and favorable conditions to the animal communities. Satellite products like burned areas and active fire maps are a valuable mean to analyze the fire activity and provide support to experts working for conservation and natural resource management. In the framework of the Digital Observatory for Protected Areas (DOPA), the MONDE group (Monitoring Natural Resources for Development) of the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission is using satellite products to analyze the fire occurrence and its effects on protected areas located in sub-Saharan Africa. Information on the fire activity was derived from the MODIS fire products (active fires and burned areas) and allows the DOPA to provide support to park managers as well as to experts working for conservation and natural resource management. We assessed 741 protected areas classified by the IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) with a level of protection between class I and IV. The MODIS datasets are available since the year 2000 and were used to characterize the spatio-temporal distribution of fires over a period of 10 years. Information on fire activity was extracted for the protected areas and a 25km buffer zone

  16. Seismic Tomography of the Arabian-Eurasian Collision Zone and Surrounding Areas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-30

    in the upper mantle beneath the collision zone . The fate of the Neotethys plate subducted prior to the continental collision remains largely unknown...There are no intermediate and deep earthquakes under the Zagros-Bitlis suture zone , yet the subduction is too recent for the slab to reach thermal...2005). In the Makran subduction zone in the south, seismicity and structure have been studied with the deployment of dense seismic networks (Yamini

  17. Seismic Tomography of the Arabian-Eurasian Collision Zone and Surrounding Areas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-30

    about the structure and processes in the upper mantle beneath the collision zone . The fate of the Neotethys plate subducted prior to the continental...collision remains largely unknown. There are no intermediate and deep earthquakes under the Zagros-Bitlis suture zone , yet the subduction is too...suture zone (Bird, 1978; Molinaro et al., 2005). In the Makran subduction zone in the south, seismicity and structure have been studied with the

  18. Drift of continental rafts with asymmetric heating.

    PubMed

    Knopoff, L; Poehls, K A; Smith, R C

    1972-06-02

    A laboratory model of a lithospheric raft is propelled through a viscous asthenospheric layer with constant velocity of scaled magnitude appropriate to continental drift. The propulsion is due to differential heat concentration in the model oceanic and continental crusts.

  19. Measurement of [Formula: see text] production with a veto on additional central jet activity in pp collisions at [Formula: see text] TeV using the ATLAS detector.

    PubMed

    Aad, G; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdel Khalek, S; Abdelalim, A A; Abdesselam, A; Abdinov, O; Abi, B; Abolins, M; AbouZeid, O S; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Acerbi, E; Acharya, B S; Adamczyk, L; Adams, D L; Addy, T N; Adelman, J; Aderholz, M; Adomeit, S; Adragna, P; Adye, T; Aefsky, S; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Aharrouche, M; Ahlen, S P; Ahles, F; Ahmad, A; Ahsan, M; Aielli, G; Akdogan, T; Åkesson, T P A; Akimoto, G; Akimov, A V; Akiyama, A; Alam, M S; Alam, M A; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alessandria, F; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexandre, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Aliev, M; Alimonti, G; Alison, J; Aliyev, M; Allbrooke, B M M; Allport, P P; Allwood-Spiers, S E; Almond, J; Aloisio, A; Alon, R; Alonso, A; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Alviggi, M G; Amako, K; Amaral, P; Amelung, C; Ammosov, V V; Amorim, A; Amorós, G; Amram, N; Anastopoulos, C; Ancu, L S; Andari, N; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anders, G; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Andrieux, M-L; Anduaga, X S; Angerami, A; 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Sykora, I; Sykora, T; Szeless, B; Sánchez, J; Ta, D; Tackmann, K; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Taiblum, N; Takahashi, Y; Takai, H; Takashima, R; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Takubo, Y; Talby, M; Talyshev, A; Tamsett, M C; Tanaka, J; Tanaka, R; Tanaka, S; Tanaka, S; Tanaka, Y; Tanasijczuk, A J; Tani, K; Tannoury, N; Tappern, G P; Tapprogge, S; Tardif, D; Tarem, S; Tarrade, F; Tartarelli, G F; Tas, P; Tasevsky, M; Tassi, E; Tatarkhanov, M; Tayalati, Y; Taylor, C; Taylor, F E; Taylor, G N; Taylor, W; Teinturier, M; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M; Teixeira-Dias, P; Temming, K K; Ten Kate, H; Teng, P K; Terada, S; Terashi, K; Terron, J; Testa, M; Teuscher, R J; Thadome, J; Therhaag, J; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T; Thioye, M; Thoma, S; Thomas, J P; Thompson, E N; Thompson, P D; Thompson, P D; Thompson, A S; Thomsen, L A; Thomson, E; Thomson, M; Thun, R P; Tian, F; Tibbetts, M J; Tic, T; Tikhomirov, V O; Tikhonov, Y A; Timoshenko, S; Tipton, P; Tique Aires Viegas, F J; Tisserant, S; Toczek, B; Todorov, T; Todorova-Nova, S; Toggerson, B; Tojo, J; Tokár, S; Tokunaga, K; Tokushuku, K; Tollefson, K; Tomoto, M; Tompkins, L; Toms, K; Tong, G; Tonoyan, A; Topfel, C; Topilin, N D; Torchiani, I; Torrence, E; Torres, H; Torró Pastor, E; Toth, J; Touchard, F; Tovey, D R; Trefzger, T; Tremblet, L; Tricoli, A; Trigger, I M; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tripiana, M F; Trischuk, W; Trivedi, A; Trocmé, B; Troncon, C; Trottier-McDonald, M; Trzebinski, M; Trzupek, A; Tsarouchas, C; Tseng, J C-L; Tsiakiris, M; Tsiareshka, P V; Tsionou, D; Tsipolitis, G; Tsiskaridze, V; Tskhadadze, E G; Tsukerman, I I; Tsulaia, V; Tsung, J-W; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Tua, A; Tudorache, A; Tudorache, V; Tuggle, J M; Turala, M; Turecek, D; Turk Cakir, I; Turlay, E; Turra, R; Tuts, P M; Tykhonov, A; Tylmad, M; Tyndel, M; Tzanakos, G; Uchida, K; Ueda, I; Ueno, R; Ugland, M; Uhlenbrock, M; Uhrmacher, M; Ukegawa, F; Unal, G; Underwood, D G; Undrus, A; Unel, G; Unno, Y; Urbaniec, D; Usai, G; Uslenghi, M; Vacavant, L; Vacek, V; Vachon, B; Vahsen, S; Valenta, J; Valente, P; Valentinetti, S; Valkar, S; Valladolid Gallego, E; Vallecorsa, S; Valls Ferrer, J A; van der Graaf, H; van der Kraaij, E; Van Der Leeuw, R; van der Poel, E; van der Ster, D; van Eldik, N; van Gemmeren, P; van Kesteren, Z; van Vulpen, I; Vanadia, M; Vandelli, W; Vandoni, G; Vaniachine, A; Vankov, P; Vannucci, F; Varela Rodriguez, F; Vari, R; Varol, T; Varouchas, D; Vartapetian, A; Varvell, K E; Vassilakopoulos, V I; Vazeille, F; Vazquez Schroeder, T; Vegni, G; Veillet, J J; Vellidis, C; Veloso, F; Veness, R; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Ventura, D; Venturi, M; Venturi, N; Vercesi, V; Verducci, M; Verkerke, W; Vermeulen, J C; Vest, A; Vetterli, M C; Vichou, I; Vickey, T; Vickey Boeriu, O E; Viehhauser, G H A; Viel, S; Villa, M; Villaplana Perez, M; Vilucchi, E; Vincter, M G; Vinek, E; Vinogradov, V B; Virchaux, M; Virzi, J; Vitells, O; Viti, M; Vivarelli, I; Vives Vaque, F; Vlachos, S; Vladoiu, D; Vlasak, M; Vlasov, N; Vogel, A; Vokac, P; Volpi, G; Volpi, M; Volpini, G; von der Schmitt, H; von Loeben, J; von Radziewski, H; von Toerne, E; Vorobel, V; Vorobiev, A P; Vorwerk, V; Vos, M; Voss, R; Voss, T T; Vossebeld, J H; Vranjes, N; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M; Vrba, V; Vreeswijk, M; Vu Anh, T; Vuillermet, R; Vukotic, I; Wagner, W; Wagner, P; Wahlen, H; Wakabayashi, J; Walch, S; Walder, J; Walker, R; Walkowiak, W; Wall, R; Waller, P; Wang, C; Wang, H; Wang, H; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, J C; Wang, R; Wang, S M; Wang, T; Warburton, A; Ward, C P; Warsinsky, M; Washbrook, A; Wasicki, C; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, I J; Watson, M F; Watts, G; Watts, S; Waugh, A T; Waugh, B M; Weber, M; Weber, M S; Weber, P; Weidberg, A R; Weigell, P; Weingarten, J; Weiser, C; Wellenstein, H; Wells, P S; Wenaus, T; Wendland, D; Wendler, S; Weng, Z; Wengler, T; Wenig, S; Wermes, N; Werner, M; Werner, P; Werth, M; Wessels, M; Wetter, J; Weydert, C; Whalen, K; Wheeler-Ellis, S J; Whitaker, S P; White, A; White, M J; White, S; Whitehead, S R; Whiteson, D; Whittington, D; Wicek, F; Wicke, D; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wienemann, P; Wiglesworth, C; Wiik-Fuchs, L A M; Wijeratne, P A; Wildauer, A; Wildt, M A; Wilhelm, I; Wilkens, H G; Will, J Z; Williams, E; Williams, H H; Willis, W; Willocq, S; Wilson, J A; Wilson, M G; Wilson, A; Wingerter-Seez, I; Winkelmann, S; Winklmeier, F; Wittgen, M; Wolter, M W; Wolters, H; Wong, W C; Wooden, G; Wosiek, B K; Wotschack, J; Woudstra, M J; Wozniak, K W; Wraight, K; Wright, C; Wright, M; Wrona, B; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Wu, Y; Wulf, E; Wunstorf, R; Wynne, B M; Xella, S; Xiao, M; Xie, S; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Xu, D; Xu, G; Yabsley, B; Yacoob, S; Yamada, M; Yamaguchi, H; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamamoto, S; Yamamura, T; Yamanaka, T; Yamaoka, J; Yamazaki, T; Yamazaki, Y; Yan, Z; Yang, H; Yang, U K; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Yang, Z; Yanush, S; Yao, Y; Yasu, Y; Ybeles Smit, G V; Ye, J; Ye, S; Yilmaz, M; Yoosoofmiya, R; Yorita, K; Yoshida, R; Young, C; Young, C J; Youssef, S; Yu, D; Yu, J; Yu, J; Yuan, L; Yurkewicz, A; Zabinski, B; Zaets, V G; Zaidan, R; Zaitsev, A M; Zajacova, Z; Zanello, L; Zaytsev, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zeller, M; Zeman, M; Zemla, A; Zendler, C; Zenin, O; Ženiš, T; Zinonos, Z; Zenz, S; Zerwas, D; Zevi Della Porta, G; Zhan, Z; Zhang, D; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Zhang, X; Zhang, Z; Zhao, L; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, S; Zhong, J; Zhou, B; Zhou, N; Zhou, Y; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zhuravlov, V; Zieminska, D; Zimmermann, R; Zimmermann, S; Zimmermann, S; Ziolkowski, M; Zitoun, R; Živković, L; Zmouchko, V V; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zsenei, A; Zur Nedden, M; Zutshi, V; Zwalinski, L

    A measurement of the jet activity in [Formula: see text] events produced in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV is presented, using 2.05 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity collected by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The [Formula: see text] events are selected in the dilepton decay channel with two identified b-jets from the top quark decays. Events are vetoed if they contain an additional jet with transverse momentum above a threshold in a central rapidity interval. The fraction of events surviving the jet veto is presented as a function of this threshold for four different central rapidity interval definitions. An alternate measurement is also performed, in which events are vetoed if the scalar transverse momentum sum of the additional jets in each rapidity interval is above a threshold. In both measurements, the data are corrected for detector effects and compared to the theoretical models implemented in MC@NLO, Powheg, Alpgen and Sherpa. The experimental uncertainties are often smaller than the spread of theoretical predictions, allowing deviations between data and theory to be observed in some regions of phase space.

  20. Enhancement of Ion Activation and Collision-Induced Dissociation by Simultaneous Dipolar Excitation of Ions in x- and y-Directions in a Linear Ion Trap.

    PubMed

    Dang, Qiankun; Xu, Fuxing; Xie, Xiaodong; Xu, Chongsheng; Dai, Xinhua; Fang, Xiang; Ding, Li; Ding, Chuan-Fan

    2015-06-02

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) in linear ion traps is usually performed by applying a dipolar alternating current (AC) signal to one pair of electrodes, which results in ion excitation mainly in one direction. In this paper, we report simulation and experimental studies of the ion excitation in two coordinate directions by applying identical dipolar AC signals to two pairs of electrodes simultaneously. Theoretical analysis and simulation results demonstrate that the ion kinetic energy is higher than that using the conventional CID method. Experimental results show that more activation energy (as determined by the intensity ratio of the a4/b4 fragments from the CID of protonated leucine enkephalin) can be deposited into parent ions in this method. The dissociation rate constant in this method was about 3.8 times higher than that in the conventional method under the same experimental condition, at the Mathieu parameter qu (where u = x, y) value of 0.25. The ion fragmentation efficiency is also significantly improved. Compared with the conventional method, the smaller qu value can be used in this method to obtain the same internal energy deposited into ions. Consequently, the "low mass cut-off" is redeemed and more fragment ions can be detected. This excitation method can be implemented easily without changing any experimental parameters.

  1. The development of topographic plateaus in an India-Asia-like collision zone using 3D numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusok, Adina E.; Kaus, Boris; Popov, Anton

    2014-05-01

    The Himalayas and the adjacent Tibetan Plateau represent the most remarkable feature of the Earth's surface as the largest region of elevated topography and anomalously thick crust. Understanding the formation and evolution of the Himalayan-Tibetan region has become of high interest in the scientific community and different models have emerged over the last decades. They range from wholescale underthrusting of Indian lithospheric mantle under Tibet, distributed homogeneous shortening or the thin-sheet model, slip-line field model to the lower crustal flow model for the exhumation of the Himalayan units and lateral spreading of the Tibetan plateau. While some of these models have successfully illustrated some of the basic physics of continental collision, none can simultaneously represent active processes such as subduction, underthrusting, delamination, channel flow or extrusion, which are thought to be important during continental convergence, since these mechanisms require the lithosphere to interact with the underlying mantle. As such, 3D numerical models prove to be powerful tools in understanding the dynamics of coupled systems. However, because of yet recent developments and various complexities, the current 3D models simulating the dynamics of continental collision zones have relied on certain explicit assumptions, either focusing on crustal dynamics or slab-mantle dynamics. Here, we employ the parallel 3D code LaMEM (Lithosphere and Mantle Evolution Model), with a finite difference staggered grid solver, which is capable of simulating lithospheric deformation while simultaneously taking mantle flow and an internal free surface into account, which allows for the development of topography. We investigate the way deep processes affect continental tectonics at convergent margins, addressing the role continent subduction and collision have on the future of the subducting and overriding plates, and we discuss the implications these offer for the Asian tectonics

  2. Ediacaran 2,500-km-long synchronous deep continental subduction in the West Gondwana Orogen.

    PubMed

    Ganade de Araujo, Carlos E; Rubatto, Daniela; Hermann, Joerg; Cordani, Umberto G; Caby, Renaud; Basei, Miguel A S

    2014-10-16

    The deeply eroded West Gondwana Orogen is a major continental collision zone that exposes numerous occurrences of deeply subducted rocks, such as eclogites. The position of these eclogites marks the suture zone between colliding cratons, and the age of metamorphism constrains the transition from subduction-dominated tectonics to continental collision and mountain building. Here we investigate the metamorphic conditions and age of high-pressure and ultrahigh-pressure eclogites from Mali, Togo and NE-Brazil and demonstrate that continental subduction occurred within 20 million years over at least a 2,500-km-long section of the orogen during the Ediacaran. We consider this to be the earliest evidence of large-scale deep-continental subduction and consequent appearance of Himalayan-scale mountains in the geological record. The rise and subsequent erosion of such mountains in the Late Ediacaran is perfectly timed to deliver sediments and nutrients that are thought to have been necessary for the subsequent evolution of sustainable life on Earth.

  3. Faults paragenesis and paleostress state in the zone of actively propagating continental strike-slip on the example of North Khangai fault (Northern Mongolia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankov, Vladimir; Parfeevets, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Sublatitudinal North Khangai fault extends from Ubsunuur basin to the eastern part of the Selenga corridor trough 800 km. It is the northern boundary of the massive Mongolian block and limits of the Baikal rift system structures propagation in the south (Logatchev, 2003). Late Cenozoic and present-day fault activity are expressed in the left-lateral displacements of a different order of river valleys and high seismicity. We have carried out studies of the kinematics of active faults and palaeostresses reconstruction in the zone of the dynamic influence of North Khangai fault, the width of which varies along the strike and can exceeds 100 km. The result shows that the fault zone has a longitudinal and a transverse zoning. Longitudinal zonation presented gradual change from west to east regions of compression and transpression regimes (Khan-Khukhey ridge) to strike-slip regime (Bolnay ridge) and strike-slip and transtensive regimes (west of Selenga corridor). Strike-slip zones are represented by linearly concentrated rupture deformations. In contrast, near the termination of the fault the cluster fault deformation formed. Here, from north to south, there are radical changes in the palaeostress state. In the north-western sector (east of Selenga corridor) strike-slip faults, strike-slip faults with normal components and normal faults are dominated. For this sector the stress tensors of extensive, transtension and strike-slip regimes are typical. South-western sector is separated from the north-eastern one by massive Buren Nuruu ridge within which the active faults are not identified. In the south-western sector between the Orkhon and Tola rivers the cluster of NW thrusts and N-S strike-slip faults with reverse component are discovered. The faults are perfectly expressed by NW and N-S scarps in the relief. The most structures dip to the east and north-east. Holocene fault activity is demonstrated by the hanging river valleys and horizontal displacements with amplitudes

  4. Imaging the transition from Aleutian subduction to Yakutat collision in central Alaska, with local earthquakes and active source data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberhart-Phillips, D.; Christensen, D.H.; Brocher, T.M.; Hansen, R.; Ruppert, N.A.; Haeussler, P.J.; Abers, G.A.

    2006-01-01

    In southern and central Alaska the subduction and active volcanism of the Aleutian subduction zone give way to a broad plate boundary zone with mountain building and strike-slip faulting, where the Yakutat terrane joins the subducting Pacific plate. The interplay of these tectonic elements can be best understood by considering the entire region in three dimensions. We image three-dimensional seismic velocity using abundant local earthquakes, supplemented by active source data. Crustal low-velocity correlates with basins. The Denali fault zone is a dominant feature with a change in crustal thickness across the fault. A relatively high-velocity subducted slab and a low-velocity mantle wedge are observed, and high Vp/Vs beneath the active volcanic systems, which indicates focusing of partial melt. North of Cook Inlet, the subducted Yakutat slab is characterized by a thick low-velocity, high-Vp/Vs, crust. High-velocity material above the Yakutat slab may represent a residual older slab, which inhibits vertical flow of Yakutat subduction fluids. Alternate lateral flow allows Yakutat subduction fluids to contribute to Cook Inlet volcanism and the Wrangell volcanic field. The apparent northeast edge of the subducted Yakutat slab is southwest of the Wrangell volcanics, which have adakitic composition consistent with melting of this Yakutat slab edge. In the mantle, the Yakutat slab is subducting with the Pacific plate, while at shallower depths the Yakutat slab overthrusts the shallow Pacific plate along the Transition fault. This region of crustal doubling within the shallow slab is associated with extremely strong plate coupling and the primary asperity of the Mw 9.2 great 1964 earthquake. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Central collisions of heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, Sun-yiu.

    1992-10-01

    This report describes the activities of the Heavy Ion Physics Group at the University of California, Riverside from October 1, 1991 to September 30, 1992. During this period, the program focused on particle production at AGS energies, and correlation studies at the Bevalac in nucleus-nucleus central collisions. As part of the PHENIX collaboration, contributions were made to the Preliminary Conceptual Design Report (pCDR), and work on a RHIC silicon microstrip detector R D project was performed.

  6. Yellowstone hotspot-continental lithosphere interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean, Marlon M.; Hanan, Barry B.; Shervais, John W.

    2014-03-01

    The Snake River Plain represents 17 m.y. of volcanic activity that took place as the North American continent migrated over a relatively fixed magma source, or hotspot. We present new Pb, Sr, and Nd data for a suite of 25 basalts collected from Western and Central Snake River Plain (SRP). The new isotope data, combined with previously published data from the SRP, provide a traverse of the Wyoming craton margin, from the 87Sr/86Sr = 0.706 line boundary of western SRP with Phanerozoic accreted terranes, east through the central and eastern SRP, to the Yellowstone Plateau. Low-K basalts from the western SRP, overlain by high-K basalts, provide a temporal record of regional source variation from ∼16.8 to 0.2 Ma. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of the new and previously published SRP basalt Pb isotopes reveals that >97% of the total variability is accounted for by mixing between three end-members and is consistent with a sublithospheric Yellowstone hotspot mantle source with a radiogenic isotope composition similar to the mantle source of the early Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) and two continental lithosphere end-members, heterogeneous in age and composition. We use the SRP Pb, Sr, and Nd isotope data to model the Yellowstone Hotspot-continental lithosphere interaction by three component mixing between two continental lithospheric components, Archean lithosphere (CL1) that represents older lithosphere underlying the Yellowstone Plateau in the east, and Paleoproterozoic lithosphere (CL2) representing the younger lithosphere underlying the SRP in the west near the craton margin, and a sublithospheric end-member, representing the Yellowstone hotspot (PL). The results suggest a continuous flow of PL material westward as the NA continental lithosphere migrated over the upwelling hotspot along a shoaling gradient in the sub-continental mantle lithosphere. The model shows a decrease in Total Lithosphere end-members (CL1 + CL2) and the Lithosphere Ratio (CL1/CL2

  7. Physical oceanography of continental shelves

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.S.; Beardlsey, R.C.; Blanton, J.O.; Boicourt, W.C.; Butman, B.; Coachman, L.K.; Huyer, A.; Kinder, T.H.; Royer, T.C.; Schumacher, J.D.

    1983-06-01

    Knowledge of the physical oceanography of continental shelves has increased tremendously in recent years, primarily as a result of new current and hydrographic measurements made in locations where no comparable measurements existed previously. In general, observations from geographically distinct continental shelves have shown that the nature of the flow may vary considerably from region to region. Although some characteristics, such as the response of currents to wind forcing, are common to many shelves, the relative importance of various physical processes in influencing the shelf flow field frequently is different. In the last several years, the scientific literature on shelf studies has expanded rapidly, with that for separate regions, to some extent, developing independently because of the variable role played by different physical effects. Consequently, it seems that a simultaneous review of progress in physical oceanographic research in different shelf regions would be especially useful at this time in order to help assess the overall progress in the field. This multi-author report has been compiled as a result. Included are sections on the physical oceanography of continental shelves, in or off of, the eastern Bering Sea, northern Gulf of Alaska, Pacific Northwest, southern California, west Florida, southeastern US, Middle Atlantic Bight, Georges Bank and Peru. These discussions clearly point to the diverse nature of the dominant physics in several of the regions, as well as to some of the dynamical features they share in common. 390 references, 23 figures.

  8. Glaciomarine sedimentation and bottom current activity on the north-western and northern continental margins of Svalbard during the late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Teena; Noormets, Riko; Rasmussen, Tine L.

    2016-04-01

    Palaeo-bottom current strength of the West Spitsbergen Current (WSC) and the influence of the Svalbard-Barents Sea Ice Sheet (SBIS) on the depositional environment along the northern Svalbard margins are poorly known. Two gravity cores from the southern Yermak Plateau and the upper slope north of Nordaustlandet, covering marine isotope stage (MIS) 1 to MIS 5, are investigated. Five lithofacies, based on grain size distribution, silt/clay ratio, content and mean of sortable silt (SS), are distinguished to characterise the contourite-dominated sedimentary environments. In addition, depositional environments are described using total organic carbon (TOC), total sulphur (TS) and calcium carbonate (CaCO3) contents of sediments. Facies A, containing coarse SS, suggests strong bottom current activity and good bottom water ventilation conditions as inferred from low TOC content. This facies was deposited during the glacial periods MIS 4, MIS 2 and during the late Holocene. Facies B is dominated by fine SS indicating weak bottom current and poor ventilation (cf. high TOC content of 1.2-1.6%), and correlates with the MIS 4/3 and MIS 2/1 transition periods. With an equal amount of clay and sand, fine SS and high content of TOC, facies C indicates reduced bottom current strength for intervals with sediment supply from proximal sources such as icebergs, sea ice or meltwater discharge. This facies was deposited during the last glacial maximum. Facies D represents mass-flow deposits on the northern Svalbard margin attributed to the SBIS advance at or near the shelf edge. Facies E sediments indicating moderate bottom current strength were deposited during MIS 5 and MIS 3, and during parts of MIS 2. This first late Quaternary proxy record of the WSC flow and sedimentation history from the northern Svalbard margin suggests that the oceanographic conditions and ice sheet processes have exerted first-order control on sediment properties.

  9. Comprehensive lake dynamics mapping at continental scales using Landsat 8

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inland lakes, important water resources, play a crucial role in the global water cycle and are sensitive to global warming and human activities. There clearly is a pressing need to understand temporal and spatial variations of lakes at global and continental scales. The recent operation of Landsat...

  10. Greater India Basin hypothesis and a two-stage Cenozoic collision between India and Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hinsbergen, D. J.; Lippert, P. C.; Dupont-Nivet, G.; McQuarrie, N.; Doubrovine, P. V.; Spakman, W.; Torsvik, T. H.

    2012-12-01

    Cenozoic convergence between the Indian and Asian plates pro- duced the archetypical continental collision zone comprising the Himalaya mountain belt and the Tibetan Plateau. How and where India-Asia convergence was accommodated after collision at or before 52 Ma remains a long-standing controversy. Since 52 Ma, the two plates have converged up to 3,600 +/- 35 km, yet the upper crustal shortening documented from the geological record of Asia and the Himalaya is up to approximately 2,350-km less. Here we show that the discrepancy between the convergence and the shortening can be explained by subduction of highly extended continental and oceanic Indian lithosphere within the Himalaya be- tween approximately 50 and 25 Ma. Paleomagnetic data show that this extended continental and oceanic "Greater India" promontory resulted from 2,675 +/- 700 km of North-South extension between 120 and 70 Ma, accommodated between the Tibetan Himalaya and cratonic India. We suggest that the approximately 50 Ma "India"- Asia collision was a collision of a Tibetan-Himalayan microcontinent with Asia, followed by subduction of the largely oceanic Greater India Basin along a subduction zone at the location of the Greater Himalaya. The "hard" India-Asia collision with thicker and contiguous Indian continental lithosphere occurred around 25-20 Ma. This hard collision is coincident with far-field deformation in central Asia and rapid exhumation of Greater Himalaya crystalline rocks, and may be linked to intensification of the Asian monsoon system. This two-stage collision between India and Asia is also reflected in the deep mantle remnants of subduction imaged with seismic tomography.

  11. Greater India Basin hypothesis and a two-stage Cenozoic collision between India and Asia.

    PubMed

    van Hinsbergen, Douwe J J; Lippert, Peter C; Dupont-Nivet, Guillaume; McQuarrie, Nadine; Doubrovine, Pavel V; Spakman, Wim; Torsvik, Trond H

    2012-05-15

    Cenozoic convergence between the Indian and Asian plates produced the archetypical continental collision zone comprising the Himalaya mountain belt and the Tibetan Plateau. How and where India-Asia convergence was accommodated after collision at or before 52 Ma remains a long-standing controversy. Since 52 Ma, the two plates have converged up to 3,600 ± 35 km, yet the upper crustal shortening documented from the geological record of Asia and the Himalaya is up to approximately 2,350-km less. Here we show that the discrepancy between the convergence and the shortening can be explained by subduction of highly extended continental and oceanic Indian lithosphere within the Himalaya between approximately 50 and 25 Ma. Paleomagnetic data show that this extended continental and oceanic "Greater India" promontory resulted from 2,675 ± 700 km of North-South extension between 120 and 70 Ma, accommodated between the Tibetan Himalaya and cratonic India. We suggest that the approximately 50 Ma "India"-Asia collision was a collision of a Tibetan-Himalayan microcontinent with Asia, followed by subduction of the largely oceanic Greater India Basin along a subduction zone at the location of the Greater Himalaya. The "hard" India-Asia collision with thicker and contiguous Indian continental lithosphere occurred around 25-20 Ma. This hard collision is coincident with far-field deformation in central Asia and rapid exhumation of Greater Himalaya crystalline rocks, and may be linked to intensification of the Asian monsoon system. This two-stage collision between India and Asia is also reflected in the deep mantle remnants of subduction imaged with seismic tomography.

  12. Greater India Basin hypothesis and a two-stage Cenozoic collision between India and Asia

    PubMed Central

    van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.; Lippert, Peter C.; Dupont-Nivet, Guillaume; McQuarrie, Nadine; Doubrovine, Pavel V.; Spakman, Wim; Torsvik, Trond H.

    2012-01-01

    Cenozoic convergence between the Indian and Asian plates produced the archetypical continental collision zone comprising the Himalaya mountain belt and the Tibetan Plateau. How and where India–Asia convergence was accommodated after collision at or before 52 Ma remains a long-standing controversy. Since 52 Ma, the two plates have converged up to 3,600 ± 35 km, yet the upper crustal shortening documented from the geological record of Asia and the Himalaya is up to approximately 2,350-km less. Here we show that the discrepancy between the convergence and the shortening can be explained by subduction of highly extended continental and oceanic Indian lithosphere within the Himalaya between approximately 50 and 25 Ma. Paleomagnetic data show that this extended continental and oceanic “Greater India” promontory resulted from 2,675 ± 700 km of North–South extension between 120 and 70 Ma, accommodated between the Tibetan Himalaya and cratonic India. We suggest that the approximately 50 Ma “India”–Asia collision was a collision of a Tibetan-Himalayan microcontinent with Asia, followed by subduction of the largely oceanic Greater India Basin along a subduction zone at the location of the Greater Himalaya. The “hard” India–Asia collision with thicker and contiguous Indian continental lithosphere occurred around 25–20 Ma. This hard collision is coincident with far-field deformation in central Asia and rapid exhumation of Greater Himalaya crystalline rocks, and may be linked to intensification of the Asian monsoon system. This two-stage collision between India and Asia is also reflected in the deep mantle remnants of subduction imaged with seismic tomography. PMID:22547792

  13. Understanding Continental Margin Biodiversity: A New Imperative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Lisa A.; Sibuet, Myriam

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, the deep continental margins (200-4,000 m) were perceived as monotonous mud slopes of limited ecological or environmental concern. Progress in seafloor mapping and direct observation now reveals unexpected heterogeneity, with a mosaic of habitats and ecosystems linked to geomorphological, geochemical, and hydrographic features that influence biotic diversity. Interactions among water masses, terrestrial inputs, sediment diagenesis, and tectonic activity create a multitude of ecological settings supporting distinct communities that populate canyons and seamounts, high-stress oxygen minimum zones, and methane seeps, as well as vast reefs of cold corals and sponges. This high regional biodiversity is fundamental to the production of valuable fisheries, energy, and mineral resources, and performs critical ecological services (nutrient cycling, carbon sequestration, nursery and habitat support). It is under significant threat from climate change and human resource extraction activities. Serious actions are required to preserve the functions and services provided by the deep-sea settings we are just now getting to know.

  14. Understanding continental margin biodiversity: a new imperative.

    PubMed

    Levin, Lisa A; Sibuet, Myriam

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, the deep continental margins (200-4,000 m) were perceived as monotonous mud slopes of limited ecological or environmental concern. Progress in seafloor mapping and direct observation now reveals unexpected heterogeneity, with a mosaic of habitats and ecosystems linked to geomorphological, geochemical, and hydrographic features that influence biotic diversity. Interactions among water masses, terrestrial inputs, sediment diagenesis, and tectonic activity create a multitude of ecological settings supporting distinct communities that populate canyons and seamounts, high-stress oxygen minimum zones, and methane seeps, as well as vast reefs of cold corals and sponges. This high regional biodiversity is fundamental to the production of valuable fisheries, energy, and mineral resources, and performs critical ecological services (nutrient cycling, carbon sequestration, nursery and habitat support). It is under significant threat from climate change and human resource extraction activities. Serious actions are required to preserve the functions and services provided by the deep-sea settings we are just now getting to know.

  15. Composition of the Continental Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnick, R. L.; Gao, S.

    2003-12-01

    The Earth is an unusual planet in our solar system in having a bimodal topography that reflects the two distinct types of crust found on our planet. The low-lying oceanic crust is thin (˜7 km on average), composed of relatively dense rock types such as basalt and is young (≤200 Ma old) (see Chapter 3.13). In contrast, the high-standing continental crust is thick (˜40 km on average), is composed of highly diverse lithologies (virtually every rock type known on Earth) that yield an average intermediate or "andesitic" bulk composition (Taylor and McLennan (1985) and references therein), and contains the oldest rocks and minerals yet observed on Earth (currently the 4.0 Ga Acasta gneisses (Bowring and Williams, 1999) and 4.4 Ga detrital zircons from the Yilgarn Block, Western Australia (Wilde et al., 2001)), respectively. Thus, the continents preserve a rich geological history of our planet's evolution and understanding their origin is critical for understanding the origin and differentiation of the Earth.The origin of the continents has received wide attention within the geological community, with hundreds of papers and several books devoted to the topic (the reader is referred to the following general references for further reading: Taylor and McLennan (1985), Windley (1995), and Condie (1997). Knowledge of the age and composition of the continental crust is essential for understanding its origin. Patchett and Samson (Chapter 3.10) review the present-day age distribution of the continental crust and Kemp and Hawkesworth (Chapter 3.11) review secular evolution of crust composition. Moreover, to understand fully the origin and evolution of continents requires an understanding of not only the crust, but also the mantle lithosphere that formed more-or-less contemporaneously with the crust and translates with it as the continents move across the Earth's surface. The latter topic is reviewed in Chapter 2.05.This chapter reviews the present-day composition of the

  16. A genome-wide function of THSC/TREX-2 at active genes prevents transcription–replication collisions

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Pereira, José M.; García-Rubio, María L.; González-Aguilera, Cristina; Luna, Rosa; Aguilera, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    The THSC/TREX-2 complex of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mediates the anchoring of transcribed genes to the nuclear pore, linking transcription elongation with mRNA export and genome stability, as shown for specific reporters. However, it is still unknown whether the function of TREX-2 is global and the reason for its relevant role in genome integrity. Here, by studying two TREX-2 representative subunits, Thp1 and Sac3, we show that TREX-2 has a genome-wide role in gene expression. Both proteins show similar distributions along the genome, with a gradient disposition at active genes that increases towards the 3′ end. Thp1 and Sac3 have a relevant impact on the expression of long, G+C-rich and highly transcribed genes. Interestingly, replication impairment detected by the genome-wide accumulation of the replicative Rrm3 helicase is increased preferentially at highly expressed genes in the thp1Δ and sac3Δ mutants analyzed. Therefore, our work provides evidence of a function of TREX-2 at the genome-wide level and suggests a role for TREX-2 in preventing transcription–replication conflicts, as a source of genome instability derived from a defective messenger ribonucleoprotein particle (mRNP) biogenesis. PMID:25294824

  17. Future accreted terranes: a compilation of island arcs, oceanic plateaus, submarine ridges, seamounts, and continental fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetreault, J. L.; Buiter, S. J. H.

    2014-07-01

    Allochthonous accreted terranes are exotic geologic units that originated from anomalous crustal regions on a subducting oceanic plate and were transferred to the overriding plate during subduction by accretionary processes. The geographical regions that eventually become accreted allochthonous terranes include island arcs, oceanic plateaus, submarine ridges, seamounts, continental fragments, and microcontinents. These future allochthonous terranes (FATs) contribute to continental crustal growth, subduction dynamics, and crustal recycling in the mantle. We present a review of modern FATs and their accreted counterparts based on available geological, seismic, and gravity studies and discuss their crustal structure, geological origin, and bulk crustal density. Island arcs have an average crustal thickness of 26 km, average bulk crustal density of 2.79 g cm-3, and have 3 distinct crustal units overlying a crust-mantle transition zone. Oceanic plateaus and submarine ridges have an average crustal thickness of 21 km and average bulk crustal density of 2.84 g cm-3. Continental fragments presently on the ocean floor have an average crustal thickness of 25 km and bulk crustal density of 2.81 g cm-3. Accreted allochthonous terranes can be compared to these crustal compilations to better understand which units of crust are accreted or subducted. In general, most accreted terranes are thin crustal units sheared off of FATs and added onto the accretionary prism, with thicknesses on the order of hundreds of meters to a few kilometers. In addition many island arcs, oceanic plateaus, and submarine ridges were sheared off in the subduction interface and underplated onto the overlying continent. And other times we find evidence of collision leaving behind accreted terranes 25 to 40 km thick. We posit that rheologically weak crustal layers or shear zones that were formed when the FATs were produced can be activated as detachments during subduction, allowing parts of the FAT crust to

  18. Future accreted terranes: a compilation of island arcs, oceanic plateaus, submarine ridges, seamounts, and continental fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetreault, J. L.; Buiter, S. J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Allochthonous accreted terranes are exotic geologic units that originated from anomalous crustal regions on a subducting oceanic plate and were transferred to the overriding plate by accretionary processes during subduction. The geographical regions that eventually become accreted allochthonous terranes include island arcs, oceanic plateaus, submarine ridges, seamounts, continental fragments, and microcontinents. These future allochthonous terranes (FATs) contribute to continental crustal growth, subduction dynamics, and crustal recycling in the mantle. We present a review of modern FATs and their accreted counterparts based on available geological, seismic, and gravity studies and discuss their crustal structure, geological origin, and bulk crustal density. Island arcs have an average crustal thickness of 26 km, average bulk crustal density of 2.79 g cm-3, and three distinct crustal units overlying a crust-mantle transition zone. Oceanic plateaus and submarine ridges have an average crustal thickness of 21 km and average bulk crustal density of 2.84 g cm-3. Continental fragments presently on the ocean floor have an average crustal thickness of 25 km and bulk crustal density of 2.81 g cm-3. Accreted allochthonous terranes can be compared to these crustal compilations to better understand which units of crust are accreted or subducted. In general, most accreted terranes are thin crustal units sheared off of FATs and added onto the accretionary prism, with thicknesses on the order of hundreds of meters to a few kilometers. However, many island arcs, oceanic plateaus, and submarine ridges were sheared off in the subduction interface and underplated onto the overlying continent. Other times we find evidence of terrane-continent collision leaving behind accreted terranes 25-40 km thick. We posit that rheologically weak crustal layers or shear zones that were formed when the FATs were produced can be activated as detachments during subduction, allowing parts of the FAT

  19. Subduction of continental lithosphere in the Banda Sea region: Combining evidence from full waveform tomography and isotope ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtner, Andreas; De Wit, Maarten; van Bergen, Manfred

    2010-09-01

    We provide new insight into the subduction of old continental lithosphere to depths of more than 100 km beneath the Banda arc, based on a spatial correlation of full waveform tomographic images of its lithosphere with He, Pb, Nd and Sr isotope signatures in its arc volcanics. The thickness of the subducted lithosphere of around 200 km coincides with the thickness of Precambrian lithosphere as inferred from surface wave tomography. While the deep subduction of continental material in continent-continent collisions is widely recognised, the analogue process in the arc-continent collision of the Banda region is currently unique. The integrated data suggest that the late Jurassic ocean lithosphere north of the North Australian craton was capable of entraining large volumes of continental lithosphere. The Banda arc example demonstrates that continental lithosphere in arc-continent collisions is not generally preserved, thus increasing the complexity of tectonic reconstructions. In the particular case of Timor, the tomographic images indicate that this island is not located directly above the northern margin of the North Australian craton, and that decoupled oceanic lithosphere must be located at a considerable distance north of Timor, possibly as far north as the northern margin of the volcanically extinct arc sector. The tomographic images combined with isotope data suggest that subduction of the continental lithosphere did not lead to the delamination of its complete crust. A plausible explanation involves delamination within the continental crust, separating upper from lower crustal units. This interpretation is consistent with the existence of a massive accretionary complex on Timor island, with evidence from Pb isotope analysis for lower-crust involvement in arc volcanism; and with the approximate gravitational stability of the subducted lithosphere as inferred from the tomographic images. The subduction of continental lithosphere including crustal material beneath

  20. Ball Collision Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, R.

    2015-01-01

    Experiments are described on collisions between two billiard balls and between a bat and a ball. The experiments are designed to extend a student's understanding of collision events and could be used either as a classroom demonstration or for a student project.

  1. Elastic and Inelastic Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Paul

    2010-01-01

    There have been two articles in this journal that described a pair of collision carts used to demonstrate vividly the difference between elastic and inelastic collisions. One cart had a series of washers that were mounted rigidly on a rigid wooden framework, the other had washers mounted on rubber bands stretched across a framework. The rigidly…

  2. Closing the North American Carbon Budget: Continental Margin Fluxes Matter!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najjar, R.; Benway, H. M.; Siedlecki, S. A.; Boyer, E. W.; Cai, W. J.; Coble, P. G.; Cross, J. N.; Friedrichs, M. A.; Goni, M. A.; Griffith, P. C.; Herrmann, M.; Lohrenz, S. E.; Mathis, J. T.; McKinley, G. A.; Pilskaln, C. H.; Smith, R. A.; Alin, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Despite their relatively small surface area, continental margins are regions of intense carbon and nutrient processing, export and exchange, and thus have a significant impact on global biogeochemical cycles. In response to recommendations for regional synthesis and carbon budget estimation for North America put forth in the North American Continental Margins workshop report (Hales et al., 2008), the Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry (OCB) Program and North American Carbon Program (NACP) began coordinating a series of collaborative, interdisciplinary Coastal CARbon Synthesis (CCARS) research activities in five coastal regions of North America (Atlantic Coast, Pacific Coast, Gulf of Mexico, Arctic, Laurentian Great Lakes) to improve quantitative assessments of the North American carbon budget. CCARS workshops and collaborative research activities have resulted in the development of regional coastal carbon budgets based on recent literature- and model-based estimates of major carbon fluxes with estimated uncertainties. Numerous peer-reviewed papers and presentations by involved researchers have highlighted these findings and provided more in-depth analyses of processes underlying key carbon fluxes in continental margin systems. As a culminating outcome of these synthesis efforts, a comprehensive science plan highlights key knowledge gaps identified during this synthesis and provides explicit guidance on future research and observing priorities in continental margin systems to help inform future agency investments in continental margins research. This presentation will provide an overview of regional and flux-based (terrestrial inputs, biological transformations, sedimentary processes, atmospheric exchanges, lateral carbon transport) synthesis findings and key recommendations in the science plan, as well as a set of overarching priorities and recommendations on observations and modeling approaches for continental margin systems.

  3. Bubble collision with gravitation

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Dong-il; Lee, Bum-Hoon; Lee, Wonwoo; Yeom, Dong-han E-mail: bhl@sogang.ac.kr E-mail: innocent.yeom@gmail.com

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we study vacuum bubble collisions with various potentials including gravitation, assuming spherical, planar, and hyperbolic symmetry. We use numerical calculations from double-null formalism. Spherical symmetry can mimic the formation of a black hole via multiple bubble collisions. Planar and especially hyperbolic symmetry describes two bubble collisions. We study both cases, when two true vacuum regions have the same field value or different field values, by varying tensions. For the latter case, we also test symmetric and asymmetric bubble collisions, and see details of causal structures. If the colliding energy is sufficient, then the vacuum can be destabilized, and it is also demonstrated. This double-null formalism can be a complementary approach in the context of bubble collisions.

  4. A new technique for predicting geosynchronous satellite collision probability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, B.

    1986-01-01

    A new technique has been developed to predict the probability of an expired geosynchronous satellite colliding with an active satellite. This new technique employs deterministic methods for modeling the motion of satellites and applies statistical techniques to estimate the collision probability. The collision probability is used to estimate the expected time between collisions based on realistic distributions of expired and active satellites. The primary advantage of this new technique is that realistic distributions can be used in the prediction process instead of uniform distributions as has been used in previous techniques. The expected time between collisions based on a current NORAD database is estimated to be in the hundreds of years.

  5. Identification of epoxide functionalities in protonated monofunctional analytes by using ion/molecule reactions and collision-activated dissociation in different ion trap tandem mass spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Eismin, Ryan J; Fu, Mingkun; Yem, Sonoeun; Widjaja, Fanny; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2012-01-01

    A mass spectrometric method has been delineated for the identification of the epoxide functionalities in unknown monofunctional analytes. This method utilizes gas-phase ion/molecule reactions of protonated analytes with neutral trimethyl borate (TMB) followed by collision-activated dissociation (CAD) in an ion trapping mass spectrometer (tested for a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance and a linear quadrupole ion trap). The ion/molecule reaction involves proton transfer from the protonated analyte to TMB, followed by addition of the analyte to TMB and elimination of methanol. Based on literature, this reaction allows the general identification of oxygen-containing analytes. Vinyl and phenyl epoxides can be differentiated from other oxygen-containing analytes, including other epoxides, based on the loss of a second methanol molecule upon CAD of the addition/methanol elimination product. The only other analytes found to undergo this elimination are some amides but they also lose O = B-R (R = group bound to carbonyl), which allows their identification. On the other hand, other epoxides can be differentiated from vinyl and phenyl epoxides and from other monofunctional analytes based on the loss of (CH(3)O)(2)BOH or formation of protonated (CH(3)O)(2)BOH upon CAD of the addition/methanol elimination product. For propylene oxide and 2,3-dimethyloxirane, the (CH(3)O)(2)BOH fragment is more basic than the hydrocarbon fragment, and the diagnostic ion (CH(3)O)(2)BOH (2) (+) is formed. These reactions involve opening of the epoxide ring. The only other analytes found to undergo (CH(3)O)(2)BOH elimination are carboxylic acids, but they can be differentiated from the rest based on several published ion/molecule reaction methods. Similar results were obtained in the Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance and linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer.

  6. Continental arc volcanism as the principal driver of icehouse-greenhouse variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, N. Ryan; Horton, Brian K.; Loomis, Shannon E.; Stockli, Daniel F.; Planavsky, Noah J.; Lee, Cin-Ty A.

    2016-04-01

    Variations in continental volcanic arc emissions have the potential to control atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels and climate change on multimillion-year time scales. Here we present a compilation of ~120,000 detrital zircon uranium-lead (U-Pb) ages from global sedimentary deposits as a proxy to track the spatial distribution of continental magmatic arc systems from the Cryogenian period to the present. These data demonstrate a direct relationship between global arc activity and major climate shifts: Widespread continental arcs correspond with prominent early Paleozoic and Mesozoic greenhouse climates, whereas reduced continental arc activity corresponds with icehouse climates of the Cryogenian, Late Ordovician, late Paleozoic, and Cenozoic. This persistent coupled behavior provides evidence that continental volcanic outgassing drove long-term shifts in atmospheric CO2 levels over the past ~720 million years.

  7. Continental arc volcanism as the principal driver of icehouse-greenhouse variability.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, N Ryan; Horton, Brian K; Loomis, Shannon E; Stockli, Daniel F; Planavsky, Noah J; Lee, Cin-Ty A

    2016-04-22

    Variations in continental volcanic arc emissions have the potential to control atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels and climate change on multimillion-year time scales. Here we present a compilation of ~120,000 detrital zircon uranium-lead (U-Pb) ages from global sedimentary deposits as a proxy to track the spatial distribution of continental magmatic arc systems from the Cryogenian period to the present. These data demonstrate a direct relationship between global arc activity and major climate shifts: Widespread continental arcs correspond with prominent early Paleozoic and Mesozoic greenhouse climates, whereas reduced continental arc activity corresponds with icehouse climates of the Cryogenian, Late Ordovician, late Paleozoic, and Cenozoic. This persistent coupled behavior provides evidence that continental volcanic outgassing drove long-term shifts in atmospheric CO2 levels over the past ~720 million years.

  8. The Interpretation of Crustal Dynamics Data in Terms of Plate Interactions and Active Tectonics of the Anatolian Plate and Surrounding Regions in the Middle East

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toksoz, M. Nafi; Reilinger, Robert E.

    1990-01-01

    During the past 6 months, efforts were concentrated on the following areas: (1) Continued development of realistic, finite element modeling of plate interactions and associated deformation in the Eastern Mediterranean; (2) Neotectonic field investigations of seismic faulting along the active fault systems in Turkey with emphasis on identifying seismic gaps along the North Anatolian fault; and (3) Establishment of a GPS regional monitoring network in the zone of ongoing continental collision in eastern Turkey (supported in part by NSF).

  9. Crustal structure of the Southeast Georgia embayment-Carolina trough: Preliminary results of a composite seismic image of a continental suture ( ) and a volcanic passive margin

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, J.A. Jr.; Stoffa, P.L.; Phillips, J.D. ); Oh, Jinyong ); Sawyer, D.S. ); Purdy, G.M.; Reiter, E. ); Makris, J. )

    1990-10-01

    New deep-penetration multichannel seismic reflection data, combined with refraction results and magnetics modeling, support a hypothesis that the Carolina trough is a Mesozoic volcanic passive margin exhibiting a seaward-dipping wedge and associated underplating. The structure of Carolina platform continental crust is consistent with the late Paleozoic continental collision that produced the Appalachians, but imbrication has had no obvious effect on shallower structures produced by Mesozoic extension and volcanism. The origin of prominent magnetic anomalies crossing the Southeast Georgia embayment can be explained by processes attending Mesozoic separation of Africa and North America, and is not related to a Paleozoic continental suture, as previously postulated.

  10. The Peruvian Continental Margin: Results from wide angle seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krabbenhoeft, A.; Bialas, J.; Kopp, H.; Kukowski, N.; Huebscher, C.

    2003-04-01

    Within the scope of the GEOPECO (Geophysical Experiments at the Peruvian Continental Margin) project, seismic investigations along the Pacific margin of Peru were carried out using ocean bottom hydrophones (OBH) and seismometers (OBS) recording marine airgun shots. The structure and the P- wave velocity of the oblique subducting Nazca and overriding South-American Plates from 8°S to 15°S were determined by forward modeling and tomographic inversion of the wide-angle seismic data combined with the analysis of reflection seismic data. The region south of 12°S has been influenced by the southward migration of the aseismic Nazca Ridge the past 11 Ma. The oceanic Nazca Plate is divided by Mendana Fracture Zone (MFZ) which marks a transition zone of a different crustal age of approximately 28 Ma in the north to 38 Ma in the south at the Peruvian trench. North of MFZ the oceanic crust is influenced by Trujillo Trough trending N15E and the surrounding extensional stresses leading to a crustal thinning as can be seen in the northernmost refraction seismic model. The oceanic crust south of MFZ is overall homogeneous with a thin pelagic sedimentary layer and normal oceanic crustal layers. The P-wave velocity of the mantle is overall 7.9-8.1km/s. The Peruvian Continental Margin is characterized by the continental slope and several basins, Trujillo and Yaquina basin, Lima basin and Pisco basin, which are partly affected by the southward migration of the subducting Nazca Ridge. This caused uplift and subsidence along the margin leading to erosional tectonic features. The basins and continental basement could be mapped with forward modeling and tomographic inversion as well as the continental backstop on each profile. An accretionary prism is set up with a width of 20 to 30 km and 4 to 5 km thickness which does not further increase in size as revealed by the profiles recorded further north of Nazca Ridge. This and a taper of 14- 17 degrees at the collision zone indicates that

  11. Insight into collision zone dynamics from topography: numerical modelling results and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottrill, A. D.; van Hunen, J.; Allen, M. B.

    2012-07-01

    Dynamic models of subduction and continental collision are used to predict dynamic topography changes on the overriding plate. The modelling results show a distinct evolution of topography on the overriding plate, during subduction, continental collision and slab break-off. A prominent topographic feature is a temporary (few Myrs) deepening in the area of the back arc-basin after initial collision. This collisional mantle dynamic basin (CMDB) is caused by slab steepening drawing material away from the base of the overriding plate. Also during this initial collision phase, surface uplift is predicted on the overriding plate between the suture zone and the CMDB, due to the subduction of buoyant continental material and its isostatic compensation. After slab detachment, redistribution of stresses and underplating of the overriding plate causes the uplift to spread further into the overriding plate. This topographic evolution fits the stratigraphy found on the overriding plate of the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone in Iran and south east Turkey. The sedimentary record from the overriding plate contains Upper Oligocene-Lower Miocene marine carbonates deposited between terrestrial clastic sedimentary rocks, in units such as the Qom Formation and its lateral equivalents. This stratigraphy shows that during the Late Oligocene-Early Miocene the surface of the overriding plate sank below sea level before rising back above sea level, without major compressional deformation recorded in the same area. This uplift and subsidence pattern correlates well with our modelled topography changes.

  12. Insight into collision zone dynamics from topography: numerical modelling results and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottrill, A. D.; van Hunen, J.; Allen, M. B.

    2012-11-01

    Dynamic models of subduction and continental collision are used to predict dynamic topography changes on the overriding plate. The modelling results show a distinct evolution of topography on the overriding plate, during subduction, continental collision and slab break-off. A prominent topographic feature is a temporary (few Myrs) basin on the overriding plate after initial collision. This "collisional mantle dynamic basin" (CMDB) is caused by slab steepening drawing, material away from the base of the overriding plate. Also, during this initial collision phase, surface uplift is predicted on the overriding plate between the suture zone and the CMDB, due to the subduction of buoyant continental material and its isostatic compensation. After slab detachment, redistribution of stresses and underplating of the overriding plate cause the uplift to spread further into the overriding plate. This topographic evolution fits the stratigraphy found on the overriding plate of the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone in Iran and south east Turkey. The sedimentary record from the overriding plate contains Upper Oligocene-Lower Miocene marine carbonates deposited between terrestrial clastic sedimentary rocks, in units such as the Qom Formation and its lateral equivalents. This stratigraphy shows that during the Late Oligocene-Early Miocene the surface of the overriding plate sank below sea level before rising back above sea level, without major compressional deformation recorded in the same area. Our modelled topography changes fit well with this observed uplift and subsidence.

  13. Transform continental margins - part 1: Concepts and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basile, Christophe

    2015-10-01

    This paper reviews the geodynamic concepts and models related to transform continental margins, and their implications on the structure of these margins. Simple kinematic models of transform faulting associated with continental rifting and oceanic accretion allow to define three successive stages of evolution, including intra-continental transform faulting, active transform margin, and passive transform margin. Each part of the transform margin experiences these three stages, but the evolution is diachronous along the margin. Both the duration of each stage and the cumulated strike-slip deformation increase from one extremity of the margin (inner corner) to the other (outer corner). Initiation of transform faulting is related to the obliquity between the trend of the lithospheric deformed zone and the relative displacement of the lithospheric plates involved in divergence. In this oblique setting, alternating transform and divergent plate boundaries correspond to spatial partitioning of the deformation. Both obliquity and the timing of partitioning influence the shape of transform margins. Oblique margin can be defined when oblique rifting is followed by oblique oceanic accretion. In this case, no transform margin should exist in the prolongation of the oceanic fracture zones. Vertical displacements along transform margins were mainly studied to explain the formation of marginal ridges. Numerous models were proposed, one of the most used is being based on thermal exchanges between the oceanic and the continental lithospheres across the transform fault. But this model is compatible neither with numerical computation including flexural behavior of the lithosphere nor with timing of vertical displacements and the lack of heating related to the passing of the oceanic accretion axis as recorded by the Côte d'Ivoire-Ghana marginal ridge. Enhanced models are still needed. They should better take into account the erosion on the continental slope, and the level of coupling

  14. The effect of thicker oceanic crust in the Archaean on the growth of continental crust through time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilks, M. E.

    1988-01-01

    Present crustal evolution models fail to account for the generation of the large volume of continental crust in the required time intervals. All Archaean plate tectonic models, whether invoking faster spreading rates, similar to today's spreading rates, or longer ridge lengths, essentially propose that continental crust has grown by island arc accretion due to the subduction of oceanic crust. The petrological differences that characterize the Archaean from later terrains result from the subduction of hotter oceanic crust into a hotter mantle. If the oceanic crust was appreciably thicker in the Archaean, as geothermal models would indicate, this thicker crust is surely going to have an effect on tectonic processes. A more valid approach is to compare the possible styles of convergence of thick oceanic crust with modern convergence zones. The best modern analog occurs where thick continental crust is colliding with thick continental crust. Oceanic crustal collision on the scale of the present-day Himalayan continental collision zone may have been a frequent occurrence in the Archaean, resulting in extensive partial melting of the hydrous underthrust oceanic crust to produce voluminous tonalite melts, leaving a depleted stabilized basic residuum. Present-day island arc accretion may not have been the dominant mechanism for the growth of the early Archaean crust.

  15. Continental crust composition constrained by measurements of crustal Poisson's ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandt, George; Ammon, Charles J.

    1995-03-01

    DECIPHERING the geological evolution of the Earth's continental crust requires knowledge of its bulk composition and global variability. The main uncertainties are associated with the composition of the lower crust. Seismic measurements probe the elastic properties of the crust at depth, from which composition can be inferred. Of particular note is Poisson's ratio,Σ ; this elastic parameter can be determined uniquely from the ratio of P- to S-wave seismic velocity, and provides a better diagnostic of crustal composition than either P- or S-wave velocity alone1. Previous attempts to measure Σ have been limited by difficulties in obtaining coincident P- and S-wave data sampling the entire crust2. Here we report 76 new estimates of crustal Σ spanning all of the continents except Antarctica. We find that, on average, Σ increases with the age of the crust. Our results strongly support the presence of a mafic lower crust beneath cratons, and suggest either a uniformitarian craton formation process involving delamination of the lower crust during continental collisions, followed by magmatic underplating, or a model in which crust formation processes have changed since the Precambrian era.

  16. GEWEX Continental-scale International Project (GCIP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Try, Paul

    1993-01-01

    The Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) represents the World Climate Research Program activities on clouds, radiation, and land-surface processes. The goal of the program is to reproduce and predict, by means of suitable models, the variations of the global hydrological regime and its impact on atmospheric and oceanic dynamics. However, GEWEX is also concerned with variations in regional hydrological processes and water resources and their response to changes in the environment such as increasing greenhouse gases. In fact, GEWEX contains a major new international project called the GEWEX Continental-scale International Project (GCIP), which is designed to bridge the gap between the small scales represented by hydrological models and those scales that are practical for predicting the regional impacts of climate change. The development and use of coupled mesoscale-hydrological models for this purpose is a high priority in GCIP. The objectives of GCIP are presented.

  17. Thermal models pertaining to continental growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Paul; Ashwal, Lew

    1988-01-01

    Thermal models are important to understanding continental growth as the genesis, stabilization, and possible recycling of continental crust are closely related to the tectonic processes of the earth which are driven primarily by heat. The thermal energy budget of the earth was slowly decreasing since core formation, and thus the energy driving the terrestrial tectonic engine was decreasing. This fundamental observation was used to develop a logic tree defining the options for continental growth throughout earth history.

  18. Current transients in single nanoparticle collision events.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiaoyin; Fan, Fu-Ren F; Zhou, Jiping; Bard, Allen J

    2008-12-10

    Electrochemical hydrazine oxidation and proton reduction occur at a significantly higher rate at Pt than at Au or C electrodes. Thus, the collision and adhesion of a Pt particle on a less active Au or C electrode leads to a large current amplification by electrocatalysis at single nanoparticles (NPs). At low particle concentrations, the collision of Pt NPs was characterized by current transients composed of individual current profiles that rapidly attained a steady state, signaling single NP collisions. The characteristic steady-state current was used to estimate the particle size. The fluctuation in collision frequency with time indicates that the collision of NPs at the detector electrodes occurs in a statistically random manner, with the average frequency a function of particle concentration and diffusion coefficient. A longer term current decay in single current transients, as opposed to the expected steady-state behavior, was more pronounced for proton reduction than for hydrazine oxidation, revealing microscopic details of the nature of the particle interaction with the detector electrode and the kinetics of electrocatalysis at single NPs. The study of single NP collisions allows one to screen particle size distributions and estimate NP concentrations and diffusion coefficients.

  19. The initiation of segmented buoyancy-driven melting during continental breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallacher, Ryan J.; Keir, Derek; Harmon, Nicholas; Stuart, Graham; Leroy, Sylvie; Hammond, James O. S.; Kendall, J.-Michael; Ayele, Atalay; Goitom, Berhe; Ogubazghi, Ghebrebrhan; Ahmed, Abdulhakim

    2016-10-01

    Melting of the mantle during continental breakup leads to magmatic intrusion and volcanism, yet our understanding of the location and dominant mechanisms of melt generation in rifting environments is impeded by a paucity of direct observations of mantle melting. It is unclear when during the rifting process the segmented nature of magma supply typical of seafloor spreading initiates. Here, we use Rayleigh-wave tomography to construct a high-resolution absolute three-dimensional shear-wave velocity model of the upper 250 km beneath the Afar triple junction, imaging the mantle response during progressive continental breakup. Our model suggests melt production is highest and melting depths deepest early during continental breakup. Elevated melt production during continental rifting is likely due to localized thinning and melt focusing when the rift is narrow. In addition, we interpret segmented zones of melt supply beneath the rift, suggesting that buoyancy-driven active upwelling of the mantle initiates early during continental rifting.

  20. The initiation of segmented buoyancy-driven melting during continental breakup.

    PubMed

    Gallacher, Ryan J; Keir, Derek; Harmon, Nicholas; Stuart, Graham; Leroy, Sylvie; Hammond, James O S; Kendall, J-Michael; Ayele, Atalay; Goitom, Berhe; Ogubazghi, Ghebrebrhan; Ahmed, Abdulhakim

    2016-10-18

    Melting of the mantle during continental breakup leads to magmatic intrusion and volcanism, yet our understanding of the location and dominant mechanisms of melt generation in rifting environments is impeded by a paucity of direct observations of mantle melting. It is unclear when during the rifting process the segmented nature of magma supply typical of seafloor spreading initiates. Here, we use Rayleigh-wave tomography to construct a high-resolution absolute three-dimensional shear-wave velocity model of the upper 250 km beneath the Afar triple junction, imaging the mantle response during progressive continental breakup. Our model suggests melt production is highest and melting depths deepest early during continental breakup. Elevated melt production during continental rifting is likely due to localized thinning and melt focusing when the rift is narrow. In addition, we interpret segmented zones of melt supply beneath the rift, suggesting that buoyancy-driven active upwelling of the mantle initiates early during continental rifting.

  1. Asteroidal collision probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottke, W. F.; Greenberg, R.

    1993-05-01

    Several past calculations of collision probabilities between pairs of bodies on independent orbits have yielded inconsistent results. We review the methodologies and identify their various problems. Greenberg's (1982) collision probability formalism (now with a corrected symmetry assumption) is equivalent to Wetherill's (1967) approach, except that it includes a way to avoid singularities near apsides. That method shows that the procedure by Namiki and Binzel (1991) was accurate for those cases where singularities did not arise.

  2. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Studies of photon-photon collisions are reviewed with particular emphasis on new results reported to this conference. These include results on light meson spectroscopy and deep inelastic e..gamma.. scattering. Considerable work has now been accumulated on resonance production by ..gamma gamma.. collisions. Preliminary high statistics studies of the photon structure function F/sub 2//sup ..gamma../(x,Q/sup 2/) are given and comments are made on the problems that remain to be solved.

  3. Enantioselective Collision-Activated Dissociation of Gas-Phase Tryptophan Induced by Chiral Recognition of Protonated uc(l)-Alanine Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujihara, Akimasa; Matsuyama, Hiroki; Tajiri, Michiko; Wada, Yoshinao; Hayakawa, Shigeo

    2016-06-01

    Enantioselective dissociation in the gas phase is important for enantiomeric enrichment and chiral transmission processes in molecular clouds regarding the origin of homochirality in biomolecules. Enantioselective collision-activated dissociation (CAD) of tryptophan (Trp) and the chiral recognition ability of uc(l)-alanine peptides (uc(l)-Ala n ; n = 2-4) were examined using a linear ion trap mass spectrometer. CAD spectra of gas-phase heterochiral H+(uc(d)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala n ) and homochiral H+(uc(l)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala n ) noncovalent complexes were obtained as a function of the peptide size n. The H2O-elimination product was observed in CAD spectra of both heterochiral and homochiral complexes for n = 2 and 4, and in homochiral H+(uc(l)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3), indicating that the proton is attached to the uc(l)-alanine peptide, and H2O loss occurs from H+(uc(l)-Ala n ) in the noncovalent complexes. H2O loss did not occur in heterochiral H+(uc(d)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3), where NH3 loss and (H2O + CO) loss were the primary dissociation pathways. In heterochiral H+(uc(d)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3), the protonation site is the amino group of uc(d)-Trp, and NH3 loss and (H2O + CO) loss occur from H+(uc(d)-Trp). uc(l)-Ala peptides recognize uc(d)-Trp through protonation of the amino group for peptide size n = 3. NH3 loss and (H2O + CO) loss from H+(uc(d)-Trp) proceeds via enantioselective CAD in gas-phase heterochiral H+(uc(d)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3) at room temperature, whereas uc(l)-Trp dissociation was not observed in homochiral H+(uc(l)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3). These results suggest that enantioselective dissociation induced by chiral recognition of uc(l)-Ala peptides through protonation could play an important role in enantiomeric enrichment and chiral transmission processes of amino acids.

  4. Launch Collision Probability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bollenbacher, Gary; Guptill, James D.

    1999-01-01

    This report analyzes the probability of a launch vehicle colliding with one of the nearly 10,000 tracked objects orbiting the Earth, given that an object on a near-collision course with the launch vehicle has been identified. Knowledge of the probability of collision throughout the launch window can be used to avoid launching at times when the probability of collision is unacceptably high. The analysis in this report assumes that the positions of the orbiting objects and the launch vehicle can be predicted as a function of time and therefore that any tracked object which comes close to the launch vehicle can be identified. The analysis further assumes that the position uncertainty of the launch vehicle and the approaching space object can be described with position covariance matrices. With these and some additional simplifying assumptions, a closed-form solution is developed using two approaches. The solution shows that the probability of collision is a function of position uncertainties, the size of the two potentially colliding objects, and the nominal separation distance at the point of closest approach. ne impact of the simplifying assumptions on the accuracy of the final result is assessed and the application of the results to the Cassini mission, launched in October 1997, is described. Other factors that affect the probability of collision are also discussed. Finally, the report offers alternative approaches that can be used to evaluate the probability of collision.

  5. Actively evolving microplate formation by oblique collision and sideways motion along strike-slip faults: An example from the northeastern Caribbean plate margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Paul; Taylor, F. W.; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Ku, Teh-Lung

    1995-06-01

    The pattern of folding, faulting, and late Quaternary coral-reef uplift rates in western and central Hispaniola (Haiti and Dominican Republic) suggest that the elongate Gonave microplate, a 190,000-km 2 area of the northeastern Caribbean plate, is in the process of shearing off the Caribbean plate and accreting to the North American plate. Late Cenozoic transpression between the southeastern Bahama Platform and the Caribbean plate in Hispaniola has inhibited the eastward motion of the northeastern corner of the plate. Transpression is manifested in western and central Hispaniola by the formation of regional scale folds that correspond to present-day, anticlinal topographic mountain chains continuous with offshore anticlinal ridges. Areas of most rapid Quaternary uplift determined from onland coral reefs 125 ka and younger, coincide with the axial traces of these folds. Offshore data suggest recent folding and faulting of the seafloor. Onshore reef data do not conclusively require late Quaternary folding, but demonstrate that tectonic uplift rates of the axial areas of the anticlines decrease from the Northwest Peninsula of Haiti (0.37 mm/yr) to to the central part of the coast of western Haiti (0.19 mm/yr) to the south-central part of western Haiti (0 mm/yr). Formation of the 1200-km-long Enriquillo-Plantain Garden-Walton fault zone as a 'bypass' strike-slip fault has isolated the southern edge of the Gonave microplate and is allowing continued, unimpeded eastward motion of a smaller Caribbean plate past the zone of late Neogene convergence and Quaternary uplift of coral reefs in Hispaniola. Offshore seismic reflection data from the Jamaica Passage, the marine strait separating Jamaica and Haiti, show that the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault zone forms a narrow but deep, active fault-bounded trough beneath the passage. The active fault is continuous with active faults mapped onshore in western Haiti and eastern Jamaica; the bathymetric deep is present because the

  6. Morphology and shallow geological structure of the continental slope located between Manzanillo, Colima and Chamela, Jalisco, Mexico, using multibeam bathymetry and high resolution seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, M.; Bandy, W. L.; Mortera-Gutierrez, C. A.

    2013-05-01

    The west coast of Mexico presents a complex array of tectonic processes related with the subduction of the Rivera plate beneath the Jalisco Block/North American plate including seamount subduction and forearc slivering. To better understand these processes and related deformation, an analysis and integration of marine geophysical data was undertaken to map the morphology and shallow geologic structure of the continental slope located between Manzanillo, Colima and Chamela, Jalisco, Mexico (Longitude: 104 ° 20 'to 106 ° 0 Latitude: 18 ° 24 'to 19 ° 48'). These data include multibeam bathymetry and seafloor backscatter data (Kongsberg EM300 system) and high-resolution seismic reflection data (Kongsberg TOPAS system) collected during the MORTIC07 campaign aboard the oceanographic vessel "El Puma". 3D models of the bathymetry and acoustic backscatter strength were constructed along with maps of the major geological and structural features, such as landslides and active faults and folds. The analysis indicates that the continental slope in this area has undergone significant vertical and horizontal movements producing several large slump blocks, a prominent sedimentary filled basin, and a series of transpressional ridges suggestive of a recent collision and subduction of a seamount, or similar bathymetric features.

  7. Continental margin sedimentation: from sediment transport to sequence stratigraphy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nittrouer, Charles A.; Austin, James A.; Field, Michael E.; Kravitz, Joseph H.; Syvitski, James P.M.; Wiberg, Patricia L.; Nittrouer, Charles A.; Austin, James A.; Field, Michael E.; Kravitz, Joseph H.; Syvitski, James P. M.; Wiberg, Patricia L.

    2007-01-01

    This volume on continental margin sedimentation brings together an expert editorial and contributor team to create a state-of-the-art resource. Taking a global perspective, the book spans a range of timescales and content, ranging from how oceans transport particles, to how thick rock sequences are formed on continental margins. - Summarizes and integrates our understanding of sedimentary processes and strata associated with fluvial dispersal systems on continental shelves and slopes - Explores timescales ranging from particle transport at one extreme, to deep burial at the other - Insights are presented for margins in general, and with focus on a tectonically active margin (northern California) and a passive margin (New Jersey), enabling detailed examination of the intricate relationships between a wide suite of sedimentary processes and their preserved stratigraphy - Includes observational studies which document the processes and strata found on particular margins, in addition to numerical models and laboratory experimentation, which provide a quantitative basis for extrapolation in time and space of insights about continental-margin sedimentation - Provides a research resource for scientists studying modern and ancient margins, and an educational text for advanced students in sedimentology and stratigraphy

  8. Deformation in the continental lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Physical Properties of Earth Materials Committee, a technical committee of AGU's Tectonophysics Section, is organizing a dinner/colloquium as part of the Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif. This event will be held Monday, December 3rd, in the Gold Rush Room of the Holiday Inn Golden Gateway Hotel at 1500 Van Ness St. There will be a no-host bar from 6:30 to 7:30 P.M., followed by dinner from 7:30 to 8:30 P.M. Paul Tapponnier will deliver the after-dinner talk, “Large-Scale Deformation Mechanisms in the Continental Lithosphere: Where Do We Stand?” It will start at 8:30 P.M. and a business meeting will follow at 9:30 P.M.

  9. Composition of the continental plates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilluly, J.

    1954-01-01

    The structures of continental plates and of oceanic basins suggested by several seismologists are utilized to estimate the relative volumes of sial and sima in the earth's crust. It seems that sial of the composition of the average igneous rock constitutes fully 26% and perhaps as much as 43% of the total crust. This ratio is far higher than seems likely if the sial had been entirely derived through fractional crystallization of a basaltic magma. The relative paucity of intermediate rocks as compared with granite and gabbro in the crust points in the same direction. The tentative conclusion is reached that the sial owes a large part of its volume to some process other than fractional crystallization of basalt-possibly to the emanation of low-melting constituents such as water, silica, potassa, soda, and alumina directly from the mantle to the crust. ?? 1954 Springer-Verlag.

  10. A Facies Model for Temperate Continental Glaciers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashley, Gail Mowry

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the presence and dynamics of continental glaciers in the domination of the physical processes of erosion and deposition in the mid-latitudes during the Pleistocene period. Describes the use of a sedimentary facies model as a guide to recognizing ancient temperate continental glacial deposits. (TW)

  11. Evolution of Oxidative Continental Weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konhauser, Kurt; Lalonde, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    The Great Oxidation Event (GOE) is currently viewed as a protracted process during which atmospheric oxygen levels increased above 10-5 times the present atmospheric level. This value is based on the loss of sulphur isotope mass independent fractionation (S-MIF) from the rock record, beginning at 2.45 Ga and disappearing by 2.32 Ga. However, a number of recent papers have pushed back the timing for oxidative continental weathering, and by extension, the onset of atmospheric oxygenation several hundreds of million years earlier despite the presence of S-MIF (e.g., Crowe et al., 2013). This apparent discrepancy can, in part, be resolved by the suggestion that recycling of older sedimentary sulphur bearing S-MIF might have led to this signal's persistence in the rock record for some time after atmospheric oxygenation (Reinhard et al., 2013). Here we suggest another possibility, that the earliest oxidative weathering reactions occurred in environments at profound redox disequilibrium with the atmosphere, such as biological soil crusts, riverbed and estuarine sediments, and lacustrine microbial mats. We calculate that the rate of O2 production via oxygenic photosynthesis in these terrestrial microbial ecosystems provides largely sufficient oxidizing potential to mobilise sulphate and a number of redox-sensitive trace metals from land to the oceans while the atmosphere itself remained anoxic with its attendant S-MIF signature. These findings reconcile geochemical signatures in the rock record for the earliest oxidative continental weathering with the history of atmospheric sulphur chemistry, and demonstrate the plausible antiquity of a terrestrial biosphere populated by cyanobacteria. Crowe, S.A., Dossing, L.N., Beukes, N.J., Bau, M., Kruger, S.J., Frei, R. & Canfield, D.E. Atmospheric oxygenation three billion years ago. Nature 501, 535-539 (2013). Reinhard, C.T., Planavsky, N.J. & Lyons, T.W. Long-term sedimentary recycling of rare sulphur isotope anomalies. Nature 497

  12. Ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism: tracing continental crust into the mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopin, Christian

    2003-07-01

    More and more evidence is being discovered in Phanerozoic collision belts of the burial of crustal rocks to previously unsuspected (and ever increasing) depths, presently on the order of 150-200 km, and of exhumation from such depths. This extends by almost one order of magnitude the depth classically ascribed to the metamorphic cycling of continental crust, and demonstrates its possible subduction. The pieces of evidence for this new, ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphism exclusively occur in the form of relics of high-pressure minerals that escaped back-transformation during decompression. The main UHP mineral indicators are the high-pressure polymorphs of silica and carbon, coesite and microdiamond, respectively; the latter often demonstrably precipitated from a metamorphic fluid and is completely unrelated to kimberlitic diamond or any shock event. Recent discoveries of pyroxene exsolutions in garnet and of coesite exsolutions in titanite suggest a precursor garnet or titanite containing six-fold coordinated silicon, therefore still higher pressures than implied by diamond stability, on the order of 6 GPa. The UHP rocks raise a formidable geological problem: that of the mechanisms responsible for their burial and, more pressingly, for their exhumation from the relevant depths. The petrological record indicates that large tracts of UHP rocks were buried to conditions of low T/ P ratio, consistent with a subduction-zone context. Decompression occurred in most instances under continuous cooling, implying continuous heat loss to the footwall and hangingwall of the rising body. This rise along the subduction channel - an obvious mechanical discontinuity and weak zone - may be driven by buoyancy up to mid-crustal levels as a result of the lesser density of the acidic crustal rocks (even if completely re-equilibrated at depth) after delamination from the lower crust, in a convergent setting. Chronological studies suggest that the rates involved are typical plate

  13. Continental Flood Basalt Chemistry, Age and Volcanic Volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humler, E.; Doubre, C.; Doubre, C.

    2001-12-01

    We have compiled a large collection of published chemical analyses of the 11 known continental flood basalts of the last 250 millions years. Only basaltic lavas and some related basic intrusive rocks are considered to be representative of the major episodes. Differentiation trends exhibit varying amounts of scatter, the trends for SiO2, FeO, and TiO2 are quite well defined, have slopes of the same sign, and can be represented adaquately by straigth lines. In contrast, the trends of CaO, Al2O3 and Na2O are often poorly defined. There are clear differences in major element abundances between volcanic suites, particularly for elements with well defined slopes. The results of our regressions are generally consistent with those of Turner and Hawkesworth (1995), Peng et al (1994) and Lassister and DePaolo (1997), although some differences exist. Examination of the global data base shows that there are systematic global variations in continental flood basalt chemistry that correlate with age. Old CFB, such as the Central Atlantic and Karoo-Ferrar, show the following characteristics: low Na2O, TiO2 and FeO, high SiO2. In contrast, basalts associated with recent breakups such as Afar-Yemen and Ethiopia, show the opposite chemical trends. Between these old and young continental breakup, a continuum of compositions is observed. The observed chemical systematics suggest that basalts associated with old breakups are derived by larger extent of melting at shallower mean pressures of melt segregation. Estimating the original volumes of lava in flood basalt provinces is rendered difficult due to subsequent erosion, partial destruction during continental collisions or burial beneath passive margin sedimentation wedges. Many CFBs were erupted in geologically brief intervals (0.5 to 2 Ma) although some, notably the Siberian Traps and Brito-Arctic Province, were emplaced in two or more distinct phases separeted by quiescent intervals. Our calculated emplacement rate show correlation

  14. Continental Growth and the Sedimentary Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhuime, B.; Hawkesworth, C. J.; Robinson, R. A. J.; Cawood, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Detrital sedimentary rocks provide average samples of the continental crust formed at different times and in different places. Some materials are more susceptible to erosion and/or to preservation bias than others, and one issue is to understand how the compositions of a range of source rocks are then recorded in the sediments. Here we considered two different approaches to model the growth of the continental crust: (i) The variation of Nd isotopes in continental shales with different deposition ages, which requires a correction of the bias induced by preferential erosion of younger rocks through an erosion parameter usually referred to as 'K'. The determination of K, and the extent to which it varies in different erosion systems, thus have fundamental implications for the models of continental growth based on radiogenic isotopes in continental sediments. (ii) The variations in U-Pb, Hf and O isotopes in detrital zircons, from 'modern' sediments sampled worldwide. In this approach, O isotopes are used to screen 'hybrid' Hf model ages (i.e. ages resulting from mixing processes of crustal material from different ages) from Hf model ages that represent actual crust formation ages. These two approaches independently suggest that the continental crust has been generated continuously, but with a marked decrease in the continental growth rate at ~3 Ga. The >4 Ga to ~3 Ga period is characterised by relatively high net rates of continental growth (~3.0 km3.a-1), which are similar to the rates at which new crust is generated, and destroyed, at the present time. Net growth rates are much lower since 3 Ga (~0.8 km3.a-1), which may be attributed to higher rates of destruction of continental crust. The inflexion in the continental growth curve at ~3 Ga indicates a change in the way the crust was generated and preserved. This change may be linked to onset of subduction-driven plate tectonics and discrete subduction zones.

  15. Role of submarine canyons in the US Atlantic Continental Slope and upper Continental rise development

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, B.A.

    1984-04-01

    Three areas of the US Atlantic continental slope and rise (seaward of George Bank, Delaware Bay, and Pamlico Sound north of Cape Hatteras) have been studied using seismic reflection profiles and mid-range sidescan-sonar data. The continental slope in all three areas is dissected by numerous submarine canyons. The general sea floor gradient of the slope and the morphology of the rise, however, vary among the areas. Submarine canyons are dominant morphologic features on the slope and have an important function in sediment transport and distribution on the rise. In the study area north of Cape Hatteras, however, the low relief of the rise topography indicates that ocean currents flowing parallel to the margin may also affect sediment distribution on the rise. Morphology and sedimentation patterns suggest that differences in canyon ages exist both within each area and among the areas. Spatial and temporal variability of canyon activity is important in determining sediment sources for the construction of the rise. Although the US Atlantic slope and rise are relatively sediment-starved at present, mid-range sidescan data and submersible observations and samples suggest that periodic sediment transport events occur within the canyons.

  16. Lower crustal rocks in the Norwegian Caledonides: field analogues for understanding the geodynamics of continental subduction and UHP exhumation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Torgeir B.

    2010-05-01

    The Scandinavian Caledonides and their counterparts in East-Greenland represent the best ancient example of a Himalayan-type continental collision orogen on the Earth. The mountain- and plateau areas that formed in response to the Scandian continental collision and the extensional tectonics in the Late Silurian to Devonian were comparable in size to the present-day Himalayas and the Tibetan plateau, with a strike length close to 2000 km and a width of more than 500 km. The collision also affected areas within the overriding continent far behind the collision zone, which gave rise to intra-continental mountains in Arctic Canada. The Iapetus ocean intervening Baltica-Avalonia and Laurentia was consumed by rapid subduction (>12 cm/yr) and closed by the Middle Silurian (~430 Ma). The rapid convergence resulted in deep burial of continental lithosphere to (ultra) high-pressure [(U)HP] conditions. Syn-convergent thrust-stacking and upper crust-extension in the late Silurian to early Devonian was succeeded by buoyant eduction of the deeply buried, but still mostly coherent slab of continental rocks and some included lenses of mantle peridotite. These exhumed lower crustal rocks record a pressure-temperature gradient from amphibolite facies immediately below the Caledonian nappes via a wide belt of eclogite facies rocks (600C; 1.8-2 GPa) to coesite eclogites (700-800C; 2.7-2.8 GPa) across the ca 250 km wide Western Gneiss Region. Although the superstructure of the Scandian mountain belt is only rudimentarily preserved restoration of the SE-NW cross-sections can be used to constrain crustal thicknesses during the collision. These restored cross-sections allow explanation of burial and exhumation of coesite eclogite without direct conversion of pressure to burial. The exhumation of the very local and extreme UHP conditions recorded by micro-diamonds, majorite in peridotite garnet and ortho-pyroxene eclogite barometry cannot, however, be adequately explained by the available

  17. Petrogenesis of mafic magmatism in Arabia-Eurasia collision zone: valley filling flows in Armenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meliksetian, Khachatur; Neill, Iain; Allen, Mark; Navasardyan, Gevorg

    2015-04-01

    The Turkish- Armenian-Iranian orogenic plateau grew after the Middle Miocene following the initial Paleogene Arabia- Eurasia collision. It is widely accepted, that uplift of the plateau is related to break-off of the southern Neo-Tethys slab beneath the Bitlis-Zagros Suture at ~15-10 Ma, coupled with continued plate convergence and regional crustal shortening. Since this time there has also been a widespread mantle-derived collision magmatism over large parts of NW Iran, Eastern Anatolia and the Lesser Caucasus, potentially hundreds of kilometres from the site of southern Neo-Tethys slab break-off, >10 Myr after the proposed break-off event. Detailed wholer rock geochemistry and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotope data are presented for ~2.5 Ma trachy-basalt to trachy-basaltic andesite lavas erupted in Armenia in the South Caucasus. These thick (up to 400 m) mafic flows generated several plateaux within the Lesser Caucasus: the Javakheti Plateau (S Georgia and NW Armenia), and the Lori and Kotayk Plateaux (Armenia). These basalts sequences also extend to the NE Kars-Erzurum Plateau in eastern Turkey. It is demonstrated that studied series formed by <5% melting of fertile subduction-modified spinel-facies lithospheric mantle, and very few display elemental or isotopic evidence for contamination by the 45-km thick Mesozoic-Paleogene arc crust or South Armenian Block continental crust. Recent magmatic activity in Armenia may not a direct consequence of southern Neo-Tethys slab break-off 300-450 km to the south of the country. It is possible that Late Miocene break-off of a second (northern Neo-Tethys) slab beneath the Pontide Arc allowed asthenospheric upwelling over a much wider area than was affected by southern Neo-Tethyan break-off. Whole-scale delamination of mantle lithosphere can be ruled out due to the modest degrees of partial melting, a lack of asthenospheric components and limited crustal interaction of the Armenian magmas. Small-scale sub-lithospheric convection may be

  18. Sediment movement on the continental shelf near Washington and Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gross, M. Grant; Nelson, Jack L.

    1966-01-01

    The nuclides zinc-65 and cobalt-60 associated with river-borne particulate matter are incorporated in sediment on the Continental Shelf near the Colum- ia River. Changes in the relative concentrations of zinc-65 and cobalt-60 and in the ratio of the activity of zinc-65 and cobalt-60 suggest that radioactive sediment moves northward 12 to 30 kilometers per year along the shelf and 2.5 to 10 kilometers per year westward away from the coast.

  19. Microscope collision protection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    DeNure, Charles R.

    2001-10-23

    A microscope collision protection apparatus for a remote control microscope which protects the optical and associated components from damage in the event of an uncontrolled collision with a specimen, regardless of the specimen size or shape. In a preferred embodiment, the apparatus includes a counterbalanced slide for mounting the microscope's optical components. This slide replaces the rigid mounts on conventional upright microscopes with a precision ball bearing slide. As the specimen contacts an optical component, the contacting force will move the slide and the optical components mounted thereon. This movement will protect the optical and associated components from damage as the movement causes a limit switch to be actuated, thereby stopping all motors responsible for the collision.

  20. The impact of salt tectonics on supra-salt (Lago Mare?) deposits and on the structural evolution of the Cyprus-Eratosthenes collision zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiche, Sönke; Hübscher, Christian; Ehrhardt, Axel

    2015-04-01

    Averagely 1.5 km thick Messinian evaporites laterally continue from the Levant Basin, easternmost Mediterranean Sea, into the collision zone between Cyprus and Eratosthenes Seamount where incipient continent-continent-collision is believed to occur. In this study, the impact of Messinian evaporites on the structural evolution of the collision zone is investigated for the first time based on a comprehensive set of seismic reflection profiles. Results show that the collision zone may be subdivided into an eastern and a western domain. In the eastern part, bordered by Eratosthenes Seamount and the Hecataeus Rise, compressionally thickened autochthonous salt is observed. Sub- and supra-salt deposits within this area appear to be in the stage of active accretion. Further west, between Cyprus and Eratosthenes Seamount strongly deformed allochthonous salt has evidently started to advance across sediments of post-Messinian age. In this domain, previously active sediment accretion at the Cyprus margin has now become inactive and shortening is largely accommodated at the leading edge of the allochthonous salt sheet. Such observations bear important implications for the structural interrelation between salt tectonics and the evolution of a young collision zone. On top of highly deformed mobile Messinian evaporites, up to 700 m thick late Messinian supra-salt deposits are mapped within the western part of the Cyprus - Eratosthenes collision zone. Their uppermost 200 m were drilled in the course of ODP Leg 160 (Site 968) and interpreted as Lago Mare sediments, deposited during the final stage of the Messinian Salinity Crisis (Robertson, 1998). These sediments occupy small sub-basins flanked by salt diapirs, indicating a salt-tectonic control on late Messinian sediment deposition. Distribution of these sediments may have further been controlled by sea-level, inferred from rapid eastward thinning and pinchout of Messinian supra-salt deposits towards the Levant Basin

  1. Arc-continent collision on the southern Margin of North America: Cuba and Hispaniola

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draper, G.; Pindell, J.

    2004-12-01

    Comparison of the geology of Cuba and Hispaniola demonstrates how different tectonic styles can be produced in closely adjacent parts of the accretion arc. Cuba is a laterally extensive fold-and-thrust belt that includes a narrow belt of Early Cretaceous to Campanian arc rocks, ocean crust, sub-oceanic mantle and metamorphosed continental crust. Hispaniola represents a broader and more complete (although deformed) Early Cretaceous to Eocene arc structure with a single accreted, metamorphosed continental terrane. We suggest that Cuba's preset arc terrane is essentially a fore-arc that was underplated by continental crust in the Campanian collision of the Greater Antilles arc with southern Yucatan. Following this collision, the proto Caribbean lithosphere detached from the eastern margin of Yucatan resulting in rapid, north directed rollback. This, in turn, developed extension of the over-riding Cuban lithosphere and exhumed the underplated continental crust as extensional metamorphic core complexes. The present Cuban fold belt was formed as a result of collision with the southern margin of North America in the mid-Eocene. In contrast, Hispaniola was to the east of Cuba and was not detectably involved in the Campanian collisional event. At present, it is not clear if the extensional rollback event that affected Cuba had any significant effect on Hispaniola. Hispaniola's collision with North America began in the late Eocene(?) and culminated in the Oligocene and was highly oblique. This event resulted in highly oblique, south-verging thrusting that telescoped the back arc basin. It also produced a pop-up structure that reveals evidence of an earlier, mid-Cretaceous collisional event within the arc. This oblique collision persists until the present.

  2. Continental origin of the Bibong eclogite, southwestern Gyeonggi massif, South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seung-Ik; Kwon, Sanghoon; Kim, Sung Won; Yi, Keewook; Santosh, M.

    2014-12-01

    Eclogite is a high-pressure (HP) metamorphic rock that provides important information about the subduction of both continental and oceanic crusts. In this study we present SHRIMP zircon U-Pb isotopic data for a suite of the basement gneisses to investigate the origin of the Proterozoic Bibong eclogite in the Hongseong area, South Korea. Zircon grains from the basement felsic gneisses yielded Paleoproterozoic protolith ages ranging from ca. 2197 to 1880 Ma, and were intruded by syenite at ca. 750 Ma. A HP regional metamorphic event of Triassic age (ca. 255-227 Ma) is recorded in the zircon rims of the country rocks, which is also observed in the zircons from the eclogite. The contacts between the Bibong eclogite and its host rocks support an origin for the Proterozoic protoliths, indicating continental intrusions. The Hongseong area thus preserves evidence for the Triassic collision, indicating a tectonic linkage among the northeast Asian continents.

  3. Interparticle collision mechanism in turbulence.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung-Il; Park, Yongnam; Kwon, Ohjoon; Lee, Changhoon

    2016-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of particle-laden homogeneous isotropic turbulence are performed to investigate interparticle collisions in a wide range of Stokes numbers. Dynamics of the particles are described by Stokes drag including particle-particle interactions via hard-sphere collisions, while fluid turbulence is solved using a pseudospectral method. Particular emphasis is placed on interparticle-collision-based conditional statistics of rotation and dissipation rates of the fluid experienced by heavy particles, which provide essential information on the collision process. We also investigate the collision statistics of collision time interval and angle. Based on a Lamb vortex model for a vortex structure, we claim that collision events occur in the edge region for vortical structures in the intermediate-Stokes-number regime, suggesting that the sling effect enhances collision as well as clustering.

  4. Atomic cluster collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korol, Andrey V.; Solov'yov, Andrey

    2013-01-01

    Atomic cluster collisions are a field of rapidly emerging research interest by both experimentalists and theorists. The international symposium on atomic cluster collisions (ISSAC) is the premier forum to present cutting-edge research in this field. It was established in 2003 and the most recent conference was held in Berlin, Germany in July of 2011. This Topical Issue presents original research results from some of the participants, who attended this conference. This issues specifically focuses on two research areas, namely Clusters and Fullerenes in External Fields and Nanoscale Insights in Radiation Biodamage.

  5. Measurement of the underlying event activity in pp collisions at sqrt {s} = 0.9 and 7 TeV with the novel jet-area/median approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Teischinger, F.; Wagner, P.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, S.; Cerny, K.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Maes, T.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Charaf, O.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Rios, A. A. Ocampo; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Vanelderen, L.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Martins, M. Correa; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; De Souza, S. Fonseca; Figueiredo, D. Matos; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Da Silva, W. L. Prado; Santoro, A.; Amaral, S. M. Silva Do; Jorge, L. Soares; Sznajder, A.; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Tomei, T. R. Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Karadzhinova, A.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, S.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, S.; Zhu, B.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Dzelalija, M.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Kamel, A. Ellithi; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Azzolini, V.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Czellar, S.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Sillou, D.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; de Cassagnac, R. Granier; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Karim, M.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Baty, C.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bedjidian, M.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Boumediene, D.; Brun, H.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Falkiewicz, A.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Le Grand, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tosi, S.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Anagnostou, G.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.

    2012-08-01

    The first measurement of the charged component of the underlying event using the novel "jet-area/median" approach is presented for proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 0.9 and 7 TeV. The data were recorded in 2010 with the CMS experiment at the LHC. A new observable, sensitive to soft particle production, is introduced and investigated inclusively and as a function of the event scale defined by the transverse momentum of the leading jet. Various phenomenological models are compared to data, with and without corrections for detector effects. None of the examined models describe the data satisfactorily.

  6. Continental volume and freeboard through geological time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, G.; Reymer, A. P. S.

    1985-01-01

    The consequences of approximately constant freeboard for continental growth are explored using a model that relates the volumes of isostatically compensated continents and oceans to the secular decline in terrestrial heat flow. It is found that a post-Archean increase in freeboard by 200 m requires continental growth of only 10 percent, while a decrease in freeboard by 200 m during this same period necessitates a crustal growth of 40 percent. Shrinkage of the continental crust since the end of the Archean can be ruled out. Changes of more than 10 percent in post-Archean crustal thickness are highly unlikely.

  7. Potential evapotranspiration and continental drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milly, P. C. D.; Dunne, K. A.

    2016-10-01

    By various measures (drought area and intensity, climatic aridity index, and climatic water deficits), some observational analyses have suggested that much of the Earth’s land has been drying during recent decades, but such drying seems inconsistent with observations of dryland greening and decreasing pan evaporation. `Offline’ analyses of climate-model outputs from anthropogenic climate change (ACC) experiments portend continuation of putative drying through the twenty-first century, despite an expected increase in global land precipitation. A ubiquitous increase in estimates of potential evapotranspiration (PET), driven by atmospheric warming, underlies the drying trends, but may be a methodological artefact. Here we show that the PET estimator commonly used (the Penman-Monteith PET for either an open-water surface or a reference crop) severely overpredicts the changes in non-water-stressed evapotranspiration computed in the climate models themselves in ACC experiments. This overprediction is partially due to neglect of stomatal conductance reductions commonly induced by increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations in climate models. Our findings imply that historical and future tendencies towards continental drying, as characterized by offline-computed runoff, as well as other PET-dependent metrics, may be considerably weaker and less extensive than previously thought.

  8. Potential evapotranspiration and continental drying

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milly, Paul C.D.; Dunne, Krista A.

    2016-01-01

    By various measures (drought area and intensity, climatic aridity index, and climatic water deficits), some observational analyses have suggested that much of the Earth’s land has been drying during recent decades, but such drying seems inconsistent with observations of dryland greening and decreasing pan evaporation. ‘Offline’ analyses of climate-model outputs from anthropogenic climate change (ACC) experiments portend continuation of putative drying through the twenty-first century, despite an expected increase in global land precipitation. A ubiquitous increase in estimates of potential evapotranspiration (PET), driven by atmospheric warming, underlies the drying trends, but may be a methodological artefact. Here we show that the PET estimator commonly used (the Penman–Monteith PET for either an open-water surface or a reference crop) severely overpredicts the changes in non-water-stressed evapotranspiration computed in the climate models themselves in ACC experiments. This overprediction is partially due to neglect of stomatal conductance reductions commonly induced by increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations in climate models. Our findings imply that historical and future tendencies towards continental drying, as characterized by offline-computed runoff, as well as other PET-dependent metrics, may be considerably weaker and less extensive than previously thought.

  9. Convective Removal of Continental Margin Lithosphere at the Edges of Subducting Oceanic Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levander, A.; Bezada, M. J.; Palomeras, I.; Masy, J.; Humphreys, E.; Niu, F.

    2013-12-01

    Although oceanic lithosphere is continuously recycled to the deeper mantle by subduction, the rates and manner in which different types of continental lithospheric mantle are recycled is unclear. Cratonic mantle can be chemically reworked and essentially decratonized, although the frequency of decratonization is unclear. Lithospheric mantle under or adjacent to orogenic belts can be lost to the deeper mantle by convective downwellings and delamination phenomena. Here we describe how subduction related processes at the edges of oceanic plates adjacent to passive continental margins removes the mantle lithosphere from beneath the margin and from the continental interior. This appears to be a widespread means of recycling non-cratonic continental mantle. Lithospheric removal requires the edge of a subducting oceanic plate to be at a relatively high angle to an adjacent passive continental margin. From Rayleigh wave and body wave tomography, and receiver function images from the BOLIVAR and PICASSO experiments, we infer large-scale removal of continental margin lithospheric mantle from beneath 1) the northern South American plate margin due to Atlantic subduction, and 2) the Iberian and North African margins due to Alboran plate subduction. In both cases lithospheric mantle appears to have been removed several hundred kilometers inland from the subduction zones. This type of ';plate-edge' tectonics either accompanies or pre-conditions continental margins for orogenic activity by thinning and weakening the lithosphere. These processes show the importance of relatively small convective structures, i.e. small subducting plates, in formation of orogenic belts.

  10. Geophysical study of the structure and processes of the continental convergence zones: Alpine-Himalayan Belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toksoez, M. N.

    1981-01-01

    The seismic wave velocity structure in the crust and upper mantle region beneath the Tibetan plateau was studied in detail. Also, a preliminary study of the uppermost mantle P wave velocity beneath Iran and Turkey was carried out, and the results are compared with those for the Tibetan plateau. These two studies compose the bulk of the efforts on the observational aspects of continental collision zones in addition to satellite derived data. On the theoretical aspects the thermal evolution of converging plate boundaries was explored using a finite difference scheme.

  11. Dominant factors influencing precipitation efficiency in a continental mid-latitude location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisham Mohd Anip, Mohd; Market, Patrick S.

    2007-01-01

    The bulk precipitation efficiency (PE) of transient precipitation systems at a continental, mid-latitude location is established as a function of season and dominant cloud type (convective versus stratiform). These results quantify for the first time controls on PE that have long been assumed to be true. Moreover, previous studies have been unable to establish a link between the efficiency of precipitation systems and short-term changes in the warm cloud depth (T > -10°C). These results show that the depth of the warm cloud layer, over which the collision-coalescence process will dominate, is not a short-term control on PE, but a seasonal one.

  12. Neutrino-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouzakov, Konstantin A.; Studenikin, Alexander I.

    2016-05-01

    Neutrino-atom scattering provides a sensitive tool for probing nonstandard interactions of massive neutrinos in laboratory measurements. The ionization channel of this collision process plays an important role in experiments searching for neutrino magnetic moments. We discuss some theoretical aspects of atomic ionization by massive neutrinos. We also outline possible manifestations of neutrino electromagnetic properties in coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  13. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1988-07-01

    Highlights of the VIIIth International Workshop on Photon-Photon Collisions are reviewed. New experimental and theoretical results were reported in virtually every area of ..gamma gamma.. physics, particularly in exotic resonance production and tests of quantum chromodynamics where asymptotic freedom and factorization theorems provide predictions for both inclusive and exclusive ..gamma gamma.. reactions at high momentum transfer. 73 refs., 12 figs.

  14. Volatile components and continental material of planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florenskiy, K. P.; Nikolayeva, O. V.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that the continental material of the terrestrial planets varies in composition from planet to planet according to the abundances and composition of true volatiles (H20, CO2, etc.) in the outer shells of the planets. The formation of these shells occurs very early in a planet's evolution when the role of endogenous processes is indistinct and continental materials are subject to melting and vaporizing in the absence of an atmosphere. As a result, the chemical properties of continental materials are related not only to fractionation processes but also to meltability and volatility. For planets retaining a certain quantity of true volatile components, the chemical transformation of continental material is characterized by a close interaction between impact melting vaporization and endogeneous geological processes.

  15. Modeling the dynamics of continental shelf carbon.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Eileen E; Cahill, Bronwyn; Fennel, Katja; Friedrichs, Marjorie A M; Hyde, Kimberly; Lee, Cindy; Mannino, Antonio; Najjar, Raymond G; O'Reilly, John E; Wilkin, John; Xue, Jianhong

    2011-01-01

    Continental margin systems are important contributors to global nutrient and carbon budgets. Effort is needed to quantify this contribution and how it will be modified under changing patterns of climate and land use. Coupled models will be used to provide projections of future states of continental margin systems. Thus, it is appropriate to consider the limitations that impede the development of realistic models. Here, we provide an overview of the current state of modeling carbon cycling on continental margins as well as the processes and issues that provide the next challenges to such models. Our overview is done within the context of a coupled circulation-biogeochemical model developed for the northeastern North American continental shelf region. Particular choices of forcing and initial fields and process parameterizations are used to illustrate the consequences for simulated distributions, as revealed by comparisons to observations using quantitative statistical metrics.

  16. Linking magmatism with collision in an accretionary orogen

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Wilde, Simon A.; Wang, Tao; Xiao, Wen-Jiao; Guo, Qian-Qian

    2016-01-01

    A compilation of U-Pb age, geochemical and isotopic data for granitoid plutons in the southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), enables evaluation of the interaction between magmatism and orogenesis in the context of Paleo-Asian oceanic closure and continental amalgamation. These constraints, in conjunction with other geological evidence, indicate that following consumption of the ocean, collision-related calc-alkaline granitoid and mafic magmatism occurred from 255 ± 2 Ma to 251 ± 2 Ma along the Solonker-Xar Moron suture zone. The linear or belt distribution of end-Permian magmatism is interpreted to have taken place in a setting of final orogenic contraction and weak crustal thickening, probably as a result of slab break-off. Crustal anatexis slightly post-dated the early phase of collision, producing adakite-like granitoids with some S-type granites during the Early-Middle Triassic (ca. 251–245 Ma). Between 235 and 220 Ma, the local tectonic regime switched from compression to extension, most likely caused by regional lithospheric extension and orogenic collapse. Collision-related magmatism from the southern CAOB is thus a prime example of the minor, yet tell-tale linking of magmatism with orogenic contraction and collision in an archipelago-type accretionary orogen. PMID:27167207

  17. Linking magmatism with collision in an accretionary orogen.

    PubMed

    Li, Shan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Wilde, Simon A; Wang, Tao; Xiao, Wen-Jiao; Guo, Qian-Qian

    2016-05-11

    A compilation of U-Pb age, geochemical and isotopic data for granitoid plutons in the southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), enables evaluation of the interaction between magmatism and orogenesis in the context of Paleo-Asian oceanic closure and continental amalgamation. These constraints, in conjunction with other geological evidence, indicate that following consumption of the ocean, collision-related calc-alkaline granitoid and mafic magmatism occurred from 255 ± 2 Ma to 251 ± 2 Ma along the Solonker-Xar Moron suture zone. The linear or belt distribution of end-Permian magmatism is interpreted to have taken place in a setting of final orogenic contraction and weak crustal thickening, probably as a result of slab break-off. Crustal anatexis slightly post-dated the early phase of collision, producing adakite-like granitoids with some S-type granites during the Early-Middle Triassic (ca. 251-245 Ma). Between 235 and 220 Ma, the local tectonic regime switched from compression to extension, most likely caused by regional lithospheric extension and orogenic collapse. Collision-related magmatism from the southern CAOB is thus a prime example of the minor, yet tell-tale linking of magmatism with orogenic contraction and collision in an archipelago-type accretionary orogen.

  18. Pre-collisional, Tonian (ca. 790 Ma) continental arc magmatism in southern Mantiqueira Province, Brazil: Geochemical and isotopic constraints from the Várzea do Capivarita Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martil, Mariana Maturano Dias; de Fátima Bitencourt, Maria; Nardi, Lauro Valentim Stoll; Koester, Edinei; Pimentel, Márcio Martins

    2017-03-01

    This paper focuses on the pre-collisional mature arc magmatism (ca. 790 Ma) recorded in orthogneisses from the Várzea do Capivarita Complex (VCC), southern Mantiqueira Province (PM), Brazil. The complex comprises ortho- and paragneisses tectonically interleaved during a transpressive high grade regime (ca. 650 Ma), possibly related to oblique collision. The VCC orthogneisses are metaluminous to peraluminous calc-alkaline rocks, with high 87Sr/86Sr(i) ratios from 0.71628 to 0.72509 and εNd(790) values from - 7.19 to - 10.06. The VCC magmatism is correlated with other ca. 800 Ma arc sequences from southern PM, as the Porongos Metamorphic Complex (PMC) metavolcanic rocks and the orthogneisses from Cerro Bori (CB), Uruguay. All associations show signatures typical of accretionary orogens, TDM and Meso to Paleoproteroic inheritance ages, and strong evidence of crustal assimilation/contamination. Their high K contents, and the tendency to move toward the post-collisional field in geotectonic diagrams suggest that they were generated in thick-crust, mature arc environments. In contrast, the CB sequence exhibits a less mature continental-arc character, suggestive of thinner crust or shorter distance to the active margin. VCC and CB orthogneisses, and part of the PMC metavolcanic rocks may be interpreted as part of the same magmatism, or at least as fragments of similar magmatic arcs. However, VCC magmatism is distinct from continental arc sequences in the São Gabriel Block (ca. 700-750 Ma). Isotope signatures for this younger magmatism indicate major contribution of Neoproterozoic juvenile sources, with only little amounts of reworked, old continental crust. Geochemical and Sr-Nd signatures presented in this paper suggest that at least part of the PMC metavolcanic rocks are the protoliths of the VCC orthogneisses. This, together with the isotope evidence of similarity between VCC and PMC igneous and sedimentary fractions, corroborates the hypothesis that the VCC and PMC

  19. Magnesium isotope fractionation during continental weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, F. Z.; Huang, K. J.; Li, W.; Liu, X. M.; Ma, L.

    2014-12-01

    Continental weathering links the atmosphere, hydrosphere and continents as it regulates the CO2 content of the atmosphere, shifts the composition of the continental crust from basaltic to andesitic, and ultimately controls the chemical composition of river waters and seawater. Magnesium is a water-soluble major element in the hydrosphere, continental crust and the mantle, and has three stable isotopes (24Mg, 25Mg and 26Mg). Studies of Mg isotopes during continental weathering may help to document the interactions between hydrosphere, crust and mantle. Previous studies have shown that the continental crust has a heterogeneous but on average heavier Mg isotopic composition than the mantle, whereas the hydrosphere is isotopically light. The complementary characteristics of Mg isotopic compositions between continental and hydrosphere have been attributed to continental weathering, with light Mg isotopes partitioned into water, leaving heavy Mg isotopes behind in the crustal residue. Here we summarize our studies of Mg isotope fractionation in four weathering profiles under various climate conditions. We show that large Mg isotope fractionation can occur during continental weathering. Although the weathered residue is usually enriched in heavier Mg isotopes than unaltered parent rocks, some heavily weathered products can be quite light in Mg isotopic composition. The complicated behaviors of Mg isotopes reflect different control factors during weathering such as parent rock lithology, primary mineral dissolution, secondary mineral formation, ion exchange, vegetation uptake etc. Though studies of natural samples can provide direct evidence on isotope fractionation, more well-controlled laboratory experiments on Mg isotope fractionation between fluids and minerals are needed in order to fully understand the behaviors of Mg isotopes during weathering, which ultimately lays the foundation for making Mg isotope geochemistry an important tool for studying different geological

  20. Coordination: southeast continental shelf studies. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, D.W.

    1981-02-01

    The objectives are to identify important physical, chemical and biological processes which affect the transfer of materials on the southeast continental shelf, determine important parameters which govern observed temporal and spatial varibility on the continental shelf, determine the extent and modes of coupling between events at the shelf break and nearshore, and determine physical, chemical and biological exchange rates on the inner shelf. Progress in meeting these research objectives is presented. (ACR)

  1. The Continental Margins Program in Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cocker, M.D.; Shapiro, E.A.

    1999-01-01

    From 1984 to 1993, the Georgia Geologic Survey (GGS) participated in the Minerals Management Service-funded Continental Margins Program. Geological and geophysical data acquisition focused on offshore stratigraphic framework studies, phosphate-bearing Miocene-age strata, distribution of heavy minerals, near-surface alternative sources of groundwater, and development of a PC-based Coastal Geographic Information System (GIS). Seven GGS publications document results of those investigations. In addition to those publications, direct benefits of the GGS's participation include an impetus to the GGS's investigations of economic minerals on the Georgia coast, establishment of a GIS that includes computer hardware and software, and seeds for additional investigations through the information and training acquired as a result of the Continental Margins Program. These addtional investigations are quite varied in scope, and many were made possible because of GIS expertise gained as a result of the Continental Margins Program. Future investigations will also reap the benefits of the Continental Margins Program.From 1984 to 1993, the Georgia Geologic Survey (GGS) participated in the Minerals Management Service-funded Continental Margins Program. Geological and geophysical data acquisition focused on offshore stratigraphic framework studies, phosphate-bearing Miocene-age strata, distribution of heavy minerals, near-surface alternative sources of groundwater, and development of a PC-based Coastal Geographic Information System (GIS). Seven GGS publications document results of those investigations. In addition to those publications, direct benefits of the GGS's participation include an impetus to the GGS's investigations of economic minerals on the Georgia coast, establishment of a GIS that includes computer hardware and software, and seeds for additional investigations through the information and training acquired as a result of the Continental Margins Program. These additional

  2. Mechanisms of continental intraplate earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, Abhijit Kumar

    To better understand the mechanisms of continental intraplate earthquakes, a multistep approach was used. The first step involved analysis and synthesis of multidisciplinary data from 39 intraplate earthquakes spanning 20 continental intraplate regions, to identify their characteristic and diagnostic features. This led to the following testable hypothesis: Intraplate earthquakes occur within pre-existing zones of weakness (most commonly failed rifts), in the vicinity of stress concentrators, such as, intersecting faults, buried plutons, and/or rift pillows in the presence of the ambient stress field. The next step involved testing this hypothesis---first with 2-D mechanical models and then with 3-D models. Since two-thirds of the examined intraplate regions had intersecting faults as a stress concentrator, its role was first evaluated. A Distinct Element Method was used wherein the models comprised of the structural framework of the concerned region represented by a set of rock blocks that are assigned elastic properties conforming to the known geology, and subjected to tectonic loading along the direction of maximum regional compression (S Hmax) at a rate similar to the ambient plate velocity. The 2-D modeling was performed for two major intraplate regions in eastern U.S., viz., New Madrid and Middleton Place Summerville seismic zones, using a commercially available code called UDEC. These models adequately explain the spatial distribution of current seismicity in the regions. However, the absence of the third dimension limited the observation of tectonics in the depth dimension. Thus, 3-D models were developed for these two regions using the 3-D version of UDEC, called 3DEC. The preliminary results of these models adequately demonstrate correlation of locations of current seismicity with fault intersections in 3-D space, and also duplicate vertical movements. Although, the mechanical models demonstrated a causal association of seismicity with intersecting faults

  3. Canada basin: age and history of its continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, J.F.

    1985-02-01

    Presently available age controls suggest that the Canada basin formed during the Cretaceous Period between about 131 and 79 Ma. The opening process began with continental breakup that may have involved all parts of the North American polar margin at about the same time. The opening was completed by the formation of oceanic crust during the extended Cretaceous interval of normal geomagnetic polarity. Features characteristics of continental breakup, insofar as they are known, show systematic regional differences. From Brock to Axel Heiberg Island, continental breakup was associated with an extended (100 + Ma) stratigraphic hiatus and, northeastward from Ellef Ringnes Island, with extensive tholeiitic igneous activity. From Banks Island to northeastern Alaska, the breakup interval was abbreviated (20-30 Ma), and sparse igneous activity occurred. These differences can be produced by changes in the rate and/or amount of crustal stretching during margin formation and would imply relatively faster or more stretching northeast of Brock island. A continental margin of fixed age, exhibiting the indicated pattern of crustal stretching, could be produced along the trailing edge of a rotating block (Arctic Alaska terrane AA) with its pivot near the Mackenzie delta. When the rotation is restored, however, geological discrepancies are evident between Devonian and older rocks across the conjugate margins, suggesting an earlier history of drifting for the AA. Early Paleozoic correlations appear improved if the AA is placed, polar margin to polar margin, against northern Ellesmere Island and Greenland, where in the middle Paleozoic, it was sheared sinistrally along the Canadian margin to its pre-rotated position opposite Banks Island.

  4. Event activity dependence of Y(nS) production in $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=5.02 TeV pPb and $\\sqrt{s}$=2.76 TeV pp collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-04-15

    The production of Y(1S), Y(2S), and Y(3S) is investigated in pPb and pp collisions at centre-of-mass energies per nucleon pair of 5.02 TeV and 2.76 TeV, respectively. The datasets correspond to integrated luminosities of about 31 nb–1 (pPb) and 5.4 pb–1 (pp), collected in 2013 by the CMS experiment at the LHC. Upsilons that decay into muons are reconstructed within the rapidity interval (yCM) < 1.93 in the nucleon-nucleon centre-of-mass frame. Their production is studied as a function of two measures of event activity, namely the charged-particle multiplicity measured in the pseudorapidity interval |η| < 2.4, and the sum of transverse energy deposited at forward pseudorapidity, 4.0 < |η|< 5.2. The Y cross sections normalized by their event activity integrated values, Y(nS)/, are found to rise with both measures of the event activity in pp and pPb. In both collision systems, the ratios of the excited to the ground state cross sections, Y(nS)/Y(1S), are found to decrease with the charged-particle multiplicity, while as a function of the transverse energy the variation is less pronounced. Lastly, the event activity integrated double ratios, [Y(nS)/Y(1S)]pPb / [Y(nS)/Y(1S)]pp, are also measured and found to be 0.83 +/- 0.05 (stat.) +/- 0.05 (syst.) and 0.71 +/- 0.08 (stat.) +/- 0.09 (syst.) for Y(2S) and Y(3S), respectively.

  5. Event activity dependence of Y(nS) production in $$\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$$=5.02 TeV pPb and $$\\sqrt{s}$$=2.76 TeV pp collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-04-15

    The production of Y(1S), Y(2S), and Y(3S) is investigated in pPb and pp collisions at centre-of-mass energies per nucleon pair of 5.02 TeV and 2.76 TeV, respectively. The datasets correspond to integrated luminosities of about 31 nb–1 (pPb) and 5.4 pb–1 (pp), collected in 2013 by the CMS experiment at the LHC. Upsilons that decay into muons are reconstructed within the rapidity interval (yCM) < 1.93 in the nucleon-nucleon centre-of-mass frame. Their production is studied as a function of two measures of event activity, namely the charged-particle multiplicity measured in the pseudorapidity interval |η| < 2.4, and the sum ofmore » transverse energy deposited at forward pseudorapidity, 4.0 < |η|< 5.2. The Y cross sections normalized by their event activity integrated values, Y(nS)/, are found to rise with both measures of the event activity in pp and pPb. In both collision systems, the ratios of the excited to the ground state cross sections, Y(nS)/Y(1S), are found to decrease with the charged-particle multiplicity, while as a function of the transverse energy the variation is less pronounced. Lastly, the event activity integrated double ratios, [Y(nS)/Y(1S)]pPb / [Y(nS)/Y(1S)]pp, are also measured and found to be 0.83 +/- 0.05 (stat.) +/- 0.05 (syst.) and 0.71 +/- 0.08 (stat.) +/- 0.09 (syst.) for Y(2S) and Y(3S), respectively.« less

  6. Continental crust generated in oceanic arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazel, Esteban; Hayes, Jorden L.; Hoernle, Kaj; Kelemen, Peter; Everson, Erik; Holbrook, W. Steven; Hauff, Folkmar; van den Bogaard, Paul; Vance, Eric A.; Chu, Shuyu; Calvert, Andrew J.; Carr, Michael J.; Yogodzinski, Gene M.

    2015-04-01

    Thin oceanic crust is formed by decompression melting of the upper mantle at mid-ocean ridges, but the origin of the thick and buoyant continental crust is enigmatic. Juvenile continental crust may form from magmas erupted above intra-oceanic subduction zones, where oceanic lithosphere subducts beneath other oceanic lithosphere. However, it is unclear why the subduction of dominantly basaltic oceanic crust would result in the formation of andesitic continental crust at the surface. Here we use geochemical and geophysical data to reconstruct the evolution of the Central American land bridge, which formed above an intra-oceanic subduction system over the past 70 Myr. We find that the geochemical signature of erupted lavas evolved from basaltic to andesitic about 10 Myr ago--coincident with the onset of subduction of more oceanic crust that originally formed above the Galápagos mantle plume. We also find that seismic P-waves travel through the crust at velocities intermediate between those typically observed for oceanic and continental crust. We develop a continentality index to quantitatively correlate geochemical composition with the average P-wave velocity of arc crust globally. We conclude that although the formation and evolution of continents may involve many processes, melting enriched oceanic crust within a subduction zone--a process probably more common in the Archaean--can produce juvenile continental crust.

  7. Growth of the lower continental crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudnick, Roberta L.

    1988-01-01

    One of the largest uncertainties in crustal composition and growth models is the nature of the lower continental crust. Specifically, by what processes is it formed and modified, and when is it formed, particularly in reference to the upper crust? The main reason for this lack of information is the scarcity of lower crustal rock samples. These are restricted to two types: rocks which outcrop in granulite facies terrains and granulite facies xenoliths which are transported to the earth's surface by young volcanics. The important conclusions arising from the xenolith studies are: the majority of mafic lower crustal xenoliths formed through cumulate process, resitic xenoliths are rare; and formation and metamorphism of the deep crust is intimately linked to igneous activity and/or orogeny which are manifest in one form or another at the earth's surface. Therefore, estimates of crustal growth based on surface exposures is representative, although the proportion of remobilized pre-existing crust may be significantly greater at the surface than in the deep crust.

  8. Relict basin closure during initial suturing accommodates continental convergence with minimal crustal shortening or reduction in convergence rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowgill, E.; Forte, A. M.; Niemi, N. A.; Mumladze, T.; Elashvili, M.; Javakhishvili, Z.; Trexler, C.

    2013-12-01

    In both the Indo-Eurasian and Arabia-Eurasian (Ab-Eu) collisions, documented post-collisional crustal shortening is hundreds to thousands of kilometers less than the amount of plate convergence determined from independent plate reconstructions. We propose that relict-basin closure may help resolve such shortening deficits, based on a synthesis of the late Cenozoic evolution of the Greater Caucasus Mountains in the Ab-Eu collision zone. This range is located ~700 km north of the Bitlis suture and defines the northern margin of the Ab-Eu collision zone between the Black and Caspian seas. The range formed from late Cenozoic tectonic inversion of the Greater Caucasus basin, a relict Mesozoic back-arc basin that originally formed in the Jurassic during north-dipping subduction of Neo-Tethys and rifting of the Lesser Caucasus arc from the southern margin of Eurasia (i.e., Scythia). This basin was originally wide enough to prevent sedimentary exchange of turbidites across it, as shown by provenance studies using U-Pb detrital zircon geochronology. The floor of the relict basin now forms a NE-dipping slab that extends to at least 158 km depth beneath the central and eastern Greater Caucasus, as revealed by a new earthquake compilation. Miocene to Quaternary felsic volcanic and intrusive rocks in the Greater Caucasus have geochemical signatures and eruptive centers similar to those in continental margin arcs. Based on these data we propose the Ab-Eu collision occurred in two stages. The first (soft collision) started when Arabia collided with Eurasia, closed the Bitlis suture, and caused the locus of convergence to jump ~700 km north to the Greater Caucasus basin. Initial exhumation of the Greater Caucasus started at ~25-30 Ma and continued until ~ 5 Ma at rates of a few °C/Ma during north-directed subduction of the back-arc basin, with little structural evidence of this crustal shortening preserved. The second phase (hard collision) started at ~ 5 Ma, when the relict

  9. Tutorial: The EarthScope Investigation of Continental Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, E.

    2005-12-01

    EarthScope is an integrated investigation of continents that uses the U.S. as the study region. Why the U.S.? It is one of the most fruitful subjects for study and it is our country. EarthScope is drilling the San Andreas Fault, geodetically measuring deformation in the tectonically active western U.S., and seismically imaging continental lithosphere across the U.S. The goal is to understand the processes that create and shape continents, and an emphasis on earthquakes and volcanoes recognizes the scientific and social need to understand the underlying physics; these events are the fundamental agents in making continents and they pose genuine risk to society. Making significant progress toward these goals has proven elusive. In response, EarthScope has challenged our community to observe continental structure and earthquake and volcanic cycles on continuous and wide spatial and temporal scales, and to bridge across disciplines to provide an intellectually broad and continuous understanding. As EarthScope begins its study of the western U.S., the following overview provides a framework for consideration; however, we are just on the verge of understanding how this marvelous system works. The western U.S. is one of Earth's major orogenic plateaus. Unlike most regions, deformation is distributed over a broad area. The origins of the distinctive western U.S. tectonic provinces can be traced back to continental rifting 0.5 billion years ago, which created a continental margin upon which tectonic and magmatic activity constructed a coherently heterogeneous land. Aftermaths of the Laramide (Rocky Mountain) event include the current weakness and high elevations of the western U.S. These, combined with applied plate-tectonic loads at the plate margin and a protecting effect of the strong Canadian craton, result in extension of the continental interior (especially the very weak Basin and Range province), shear deformation across the westernmost swath of continent, and

  10. New observations of the active deformation along the oblique collision/subduction boundary zone between the North American and Caribbean plates (northern Hispaniola offshore margin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbó-Gorosabel, Andrés; Granja Bruña, José Luis; Rodríguez Zurrunero, Álvaro; Gómez de la Peña, Laura; Muñoz-Martín, Alfonso; Gómez Ballesteros, María; Gorosabel Araus, José Miguel; Espinosa, Salvador; Pazos, Anatonio; Catalán, Manuel; Yamil Rodríguez Asilis, Hector; Nuñez, José Luis; Muñoz, Santiago; ten Brink, Uri S.; Quijano, Jesús; Llanes Estrada, Pilar; Martín Dávila, José; Druet, María

    2015-04-01

    The Caribbean plate is moving relative to the North American plate at a rate of 20.0 ± 0.4 mm/y towards 074° ± 1°. This eastward motion has been taking place during most of the Cenozoic developing a 250 km-wide band of deformation, in which microplate and block tectonics take place. The eastward motion of the Hispaniola block is being impeded relative to the motion of the Caribbean plate's interior due to the collision with the Bahamas banks. This collision has resulted in the development of the Northern Hispaniola deformed belt along the northern Hispaniola offshore margin. A series of large (M6.2-M8.1) thrust earthquakes from 1943-1953, and two significant events in 1994 (M5.6) and 2003 (M6.4) occurred close to the city of Puerto Plata have been attributed to oblique collision/subduction of the North America plate and Bahamas banks beneath the northern Hispaniola. 300 km of 2D multi-channel seismic (MCS) reflection data and approximately 15000 km2 of high-resolution, systematic swath bathymetry data were recorded in the northern Hispaniola offshore margin as part of a larger survey carried out in November-December of 2013 aboard the Spanish R/V Sarmiento de Gamboa. MCS profiles were collected shooting a GI gun array (GGUN-II®) of 1750 ci. every 37.5 m and the signal recorded in a 3000 m-long streamer with 240 channels (Sentinel Sercel®). Differential GPS navigated high-resolution bathymetry data were collected using the hull-mounted Hydrosweep ATLAS DS echo-sounder system. Using new high-resolution multibeam bathymetry and MCS data, combined with previous 2D seismic data, we have studied the along- and across-strike variations of the geomorphology and shallower structure of the northern Hispaniola offshore margin. Here we present preliminary results focused on the identification and characterization of recent tectonic features in the region and provide well-defined targets to carry out future studies for seismic and tsunamigenic hazard assessment.

  11. Total Probability of Collision as a Metric for Finite Conjunction Assessment and Collision Risk Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frigm, R.; Johnson, L.

    The Probability of Collision (Pc) has become a universal metric and statement of on-orbit collision risk. Although several flavors of the computation exist and are well-documented in the literature, the basic calculation requires the same input: estimates for the position, position uncertainty, and sizes of the two objects involved. The Pc is used operationally to make decisions on whether a given conjunction poses significant collision risk to the primary object (or space asset of concern). It is also used to determine necessity and degree of mitigative action (typically in the form of an orbital maneuver) to be performed. The predicted post-maneuver Pc also informs the maneuver planning process into regarding the timing, direction, and magnitude of the maneuver needed to mitigate the collision risk. Although the data sources, techniques, decision calculus, and workflows vary for different agencies and organizations, they all have a common thread. The standard conjunction assessment and collision risk concept of operations (CONOPS) predicts conjunctions, assesses the collision risk (typically, via the Pc), and plans and executes avoidance activities for conjunctions as a discrete events. As the space debris environment continues to increase and improvements are made to remote sensing capabilities and sensitivities to detect, track, and predict smaller debris objects, the number of conjunctions will in turn continue to increase. The expected order-of-magnitude increase in the number of predicted conjunctions will challenge the paradigm of treating each conjunction as a discrete event. The challenge will not be limited to workload issues, such as manpower and computing performance, but also the ability for satellite owner/operators to successfully execute their mission while also managing on-orbit collision risk. Executing a propulsive maneuver occasionally can easily be absorbed into the mission planning and operations tempo; whereas, continuously planning evasive

  12. Reactive Collision Avoidance Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharf, Daniel; Acikmese, Behcet; Ploen, Scott; Hadaegh, Fred

    2010-01-01

    The reactive collision avoidance (RCA) algorithm allows a spacecraft to find a fuel-optimal trajectory for avoiding an arbitrary number of colliding spacecraft in real time while accounting for acceleration limits. In addition to spacecraft, the technology can be used for vehicles that can accelerate in any direction, such as helicopters and submersibles. In contrast to existing, passive algorithms that simultaneously design trajectories for a cluster of vehicles working to achieve a common goal, RCA is implemented onboard spacecraft only when an imminent collision is detected, and then plans a collision avoidance maneuver for only that host vehicle, thus preventing a collision in an off-nominal situation for which passive algorithms cannot. An example scenario for such a situation might be when a spacecraft in the cluster is approaching another one, but enters safe mode and begins to drift. Functionally, the RCA detects colliding spacecraft, plans an evasion trajectory by solving the Evasion Trajectory Problem (ETP), and then recovers after the collision is avoided. A direct optimization approach was used to develop the algorithm so it can run in real time. In this innovation, a parameterized class of avoidance trajectories is specified, and then the optimal trajectory is found by searching over the parameters. The class of trajectories is selected as bang-off-bang as motivated by optimal control theory. That is, an avoiding spacecraft first applies full acceleration in a constant direction, then coasts, and finally applies full acceleration to stop. The parameter optimization problem can be solved offline and stored as a look-up table of values. Using a look-up table allows the algorithm to run in real time. Given a colliding spacecraft, the properties of the collision geometry serve as indices of the look-up table that gives the optimal trajectory. For multiple colliding spacecraft, the set of trajectories that avoid all spacecraft is rapidly searched on

  13. Petrofabrics and Water Contents of Peridotites from the Western Gneiss Region (Norway): Implications for Fabric Transition of Olivine in Continental Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q.; Xia, Q.; O'Reilly, S.; Griffin, W. L.; Beyer, E.

    2010-12-01

    significantly affect the fabric development of peridotites during the continental collision. Combined with field observations in the WGR and recent deformation experiments on olivine, we propose that the B- and C-type fabrics of olivine were formed during the subduction of the Baltic plate in fluid-limited conditions. The combination of UHP and low temperature plays a more important role than water to promote [001] slip in continental subduction zones. The spatial distribution of olivine fabrics in the WGR could be related with the increasing pressure from south to north, i.e., the HP to UHP metamorphism transition. It is probable that in continental subduction zones, the B- and C-type fabrics will predominate over the A-type fabric with increasing depths of the subducting lithospheric mantle, and the C-type fabric is more easily to activated at pressure higher than 4 GPa on low geothermal gradients. Therefore the olivine C-type fabric may be a marker of ultradeep subduction.

  14. Tectonic framework of the Northern California continental margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clarke, S.H.

    1992-01-01

    The northern coast of California is one of the most seismically active regions in the continental United States. This activity is largely due to tectonic forces resulting from differing relative motions between three extensive lithospheric plates that meet in this region. These crustal plates are bounded by long fault systems-the Cascadia subduction zone, the San Andreas fault system, and the Mendocino fault- that accommodate these differences in plate motion and that are capable of periodically producing damaging earthquakes. Historic earthquake locations are concentrated in the victinity of the tectonically unstable intersection of these tthree plates and their bounding fault systems. 

  15. Comparative biogeochemistry-ecosystem-human interactions on dynamic continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Lisa A.; Liu, Kon-Kee; Emeis, Kay-Christian; Breitburg, Denise L.; Cloern, James; Deutsch, Curtis; Giani, Michele; Goffart, Anne; Hofmann, Eileen E.; Lachkar, Zouhair; Limburg, Karin; Liu, Su-Mei; Montes, Enrique; Naqvi, Wajih; Ragueneau, Olivier; Rabouille, Christophe; Sarkar, Santosh Kumar; Swaney, Dennis P.; Wassman, Paul; Wishner, Karen F.

    2015-01-01

    The oceans' continental margins face strong and rapid change, forced by a combination of direct human activity, anthropogenic CO2-induced climate change, and natural variability. Stimulated by discussions in Goa, India at the IMBER IMBIZO III, we (1) provide an overview of the drivers of biogeochemical variation and change on margins, (2) compare temporal trends in hydrographic and biogeochemical data across different margins, (3) review ecosystem responses to these changes, (4) highlight the importance of margin time series for detecting and attributing change and (5) examine societal responses to changing margin biogeochemistry and ecosystems. We synthesize information over a wide range of margin settings in order to identify the commonalities and distinctions among continental margin ecosystems. Key drivers of biogeochemical variation include long-term climate cycles, CO2-induced warming, acidification, and deoxygenation, as well as sea level rise, eutrophication, hydrologic and water cycle alteration, changing land use, fishing, and species invasion. Ecosystem responses are complex and impact major margin services. These include primary production, fisheries production, nutrient cycling, shoreline protection, chemical buffering, and biodiversity. Despite regional differences, the societal consequences of these changes are unarguably large and mandate coherent actions to reduce, mitigate and adapt to multiple stressors on continental margins.

  16. Comparative biogeochemistry-ecosystem-human interactions on dynamic continental margins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levin, Lisa A.; Liu, Kon-Kee; Emeis, Kay-Christian; Breitburg, Denise L.; Cloern, James; Deutsch, Curtis; Giani, Michele; Goffart, Anne; Hofmann, Eileen E.; Lachkar, Zouhair; Limburg, Karin; Liu, Su-Mei; Montes, Enrique; Naqvi, Wajih; Ragueneau, Olivier; Rabouille, Christophe; Sarkar, Santosh Kumar; Swaney, Dennis P.; Wassman, Paul; Wishner, Karen F.

    2014-01-01

    The ocean’s continental margins face strong and rapid change, forced by a combination of direct human activity, anthropogenic CO2-induced climate change, and natural variability. Stimulated by discussions in Goa, India at the IMBER IMBIZO III, we (1) provide an overview of the drivers of biogeochemical variation and change on margins, (2) compare temporal trends in hydrographic and biogeochemical data across different margins (3) review ecosystem responses to these changes, (4) highlight the importance of margin time series for detecting and attributing change and (5) examine societal responses to changing margin biogeochemistry and ecosystems. We synthesize information over a wide range of margin settings in order to identify the commonalities and distinctions among continental margin ecosystems. Key drivers of biogeochemical variation include long-term climate cycles, CO2-induced warming, acidification, and deoxygenation, as well as sea level rise, eutrophication, hydrologic and water cycle alteration, changing land use, fishing, and species invasion. Ecosystem responses are complex and impact major margin services including primary production, fisheries production, nutrient cycling, shoreline protection, chemical buffering, and biodiversity. Despite regional differences, the societal consequences of these changes are unarguably large and mandate coherent actions to reduce, mitigate and adapt to multiple stressors on continental margins.

  17. GEO Collision Avoidance using a Service Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, M.; Concha, M.

    2013-09-01

    Space Situational Awareness (SSA) is defined as the knowledge and characterization of all aspects of space. SSA is now a fundamental and critical component of space operations. The increased dependence on our space assets has in turn lead to a greater need for accurate, near real-time knowledge of all space activities. Key areas of SSA include improved tracking of small objects, determining the intent of maneuvering spacecraft, identifying all potential high risk conjunction events, and leveraging non-traditional sensors in support of the SSA mission. As the size of the space object population grows, the number of collision avoidance maneuvers grows. Moreover, as the SSA mission evolves to near real-time assessment and analysis, the need for new, more sophisticated collision avoidance methods are required. This paper demonstrates the utility of using a service vehicle to perform collision avoidance maneuver for GEO satellites. We present the planning and execution details required to successfully execute a maneuver; given the traditional conjunction analysis timelines. Various operational constraints and scenarios are considered as part of the demonstration. Development of the collision avoidance strategy is created using SpaceNav's collision risk management tool suite. This study aims to determine the agility required of any proposed servicing capability to provide collision avoidance within traditional conjunction analysis and collision avoidance operations timelines. Key trades and analysis items are given to be: 1. How do we fuse the spacecraft state data with the tracking data collected from the proximity sensor that resides on the servicing spacecraft? 2. How do we deal with the possibility that the collision threat for the event may change as the time to close approach is reduced? 3. Perform trade space of maneuver/thrust time versus achievable change in the spacecraft's orbit. 4. Perform trade space of proximity of service vehicle to spacecraft versus time

  18. Collision Dynamics of Decimeter Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deckers, Johannes; Teiser, J.

    2013-10-01

    The collision dynamics of decimeter bodies are important for the early phase of planet formation. Planets form by accretion of km-sized objects, the so called planetesimals. These planetesimals evolve from small grains, but their formation process is not yet understood entirely. Two groups of models try to explain the formation process. Decimeter bodies and their collision behavior play a vital role in both groups. The threshold between bouncing and fragmentation is especially interesting for coagulation models, as decimeter bodies are the direct precursors to meter sized bodies. But the collision dynamics are also relevant for the models, which describe planetesimal formation by gravitational collapse in dense regions of the protoplanetary disk. We will present preliminary results of our collision experiments. Previous experiments on mutual collisions of decimeter dust agglomerates showed that the threshold between bouncing and fragmentation lies at a collision velocity of 16.2 cm/s, which corresponds to a specific kinetic energy of 5 mJ/kg. We expand these experiments to investigate the conditions for “catastrophic disruption” of decimeter dust bodies. Here, “catastrophic disruption” means that the largest fragment of a collision partner has only half the mass of the original body. Furthermore, we extend the parameter range to ice aggregates. We will present first experimental results of collisions of ice aggregates in the decimeter range. In these first experiments we will analyze the threshold conditions for solid ice. We will investigate the collision dynamics for both central and non-central collisions.

  19. Operational Collision Avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guit, Bill

    2015-01-01

    This presentation will describe the early days of the EOS Aqua and Aura operational collision avoidance process. It will highlight EOS debris avoidance maneuvers, EOS high interest event statistic and A-Train systematic conjunctions and conclude with future challenges. This is related to earlier e-DAA (tracking number 21692) that an abstract was submitted to a different conference. Eric Moyer, ESMO Deputy Project Manager has reviewed and approved this presentation on May 6, 2015

  20. Differences between the internal energy depositions induced by collisional activation and by electron transfer of W(CO){sub 6}{sup 2+} ions on collision with Ar and K targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hayakawa, Shigeo; Kitaguchi, Akihiro; Kameoka, Satoko; Toyoda, Michisato; Ichihara, Toshio

    2006-06-14

    Doubly charged tungsten hexacarbonyl W(CO){sub 6}{sup 2+} ions were made to collide with Ar and K targets to give singly and doubly charged positive ions by collision-induced dissociation (CID). The resulting ions were analyzed and detected by using a spherical electrostatic analyzer. Whereas the doubly charged fragment ions resulting from collisional activation (CA) were dominant with the Ar target, singly charged fragment ions resulting from electron transfer were dominant with the K target. The internal energy deposition in collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) evaluated with the Ar target was broad and decreased with increasing internal energy. The predominant peaks observed with the K target were associated with singly charged W(CO){sub 2}{sup +} and W(CO){sub 3}{sup +} ions: these ions were not the result of CA, but arose from dissociation induced by electron transfer (DIET). The internal energy deposition resulting from the electron transfer was very narrow and centered at a particular energy, 7.8 eV below the energy level of the W(CO){sub 6}{sup 2+} ion. This narrow internal energy distribution was explained in terms of electron transfer by Landau-Zener [Z. Phys. Soviet 2, 46 (1932); Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 137, 646 (1952)] potential crossing at a separation of 5.9x10{sup -8} cm between a W(CO){sub 6}{sup 2+} ion and a K atom, and the coulombic repulsion between singly charged ions in the exit channel. A large cross section of 1.1x10{sup -14} cm{sup 2} was estimated for electron capture of the doubly charged W(CO){sub 6}{sup 2+} ion from the alkali metal target, whose ionization energy is very low. The term ''collision-induced dissociation,'' taken literally, includes all dissociation processes induced by collision, and therefore encompasses both CAD and DIET processes in the present work. Although the terms CID and CAD have been defined similarly, we would like to propose that they should not be used interchangeably, on the basis that there are

  1. Real-time collision avoidance in space: the GETEX experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Eckhard; Rossmann, Juergen; Schluse, Michael

    2000-10-01

    Intelligent autonomous robotic systems require efficient safety components to assure system reliability during the entire operation. Especially if commanded over long distances, the robotic system must be able to guarantee the planning of safe and collision free movements independently. Therefore the IRF developed a new collision avoidance methodology satisfying the needs of autonomous safety systems considering the dynamics of the robots to protect. To do this, the collision avoidance system cyclically calculates the actual collision danger of the robots with respect to all static and dynamic obstacles in the environment. If a robot gets in collision danger the methodology immediately starts an evasive action to avoid the collision and guides the robot around the obstacle to its target position. This evasive action is calculated in real-time in a mathematically exact way by solving a quadratic convex optimization problem. The secondary conditions of this optimization problem include the potential collision danger of the robots kinematic chain including all temporarily attached grippers and objects and the dynamic constraints of the robots. The result of the optimization procedure are joint accelerations to apply to prevent the robot from colliding and to guide it to its target position. This methodology has been tested very successfully during the Japanese/German space robot project GETEX in April 1999. During the mission, the collision avoidance system successfully protected the free flying Japanese robot ERA on board the satellite ETS-VII at all times. The experiments showed, that the developed system is fully capable of ensuring the safety of such autonomous robotic systems by actively preventing collisions and generating evasive actions in cases of collision danger.

  2. The effect of rheological approximations on the dynamics and topography in 3D subduction-collision models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusok, Adina E.; Kaus, Boris J. P.; Popov, Anton A.

    2016-04-01

    Most of the major mountain belts and orogenic plateaus are found within the overlying plate of active or fossil subduction and/or collision zones. Moreover, they evolve differently from one another as the result of specific combinations of surface and mantle processes. These differences arise for several reasons, such as different rheological properties, different amounts of regional isostatic compensation, and different mechanisms by which forces are applied to the convergent plates. Previous 3D geodynamic models of subduction/collision processes have used various rheological approximations, making numerical results difficult to compare, since there is no clear image on the extent of these approximations on the dynamics. Here, we employ the code LaMEM to perform high-resolution long-term 3D simulations of subduction/continental collision in an integrated lithospheric and upper-mantle scale model. We test the effect of rheological approximations on mantle and lithosphere dynamics in a geometrically simplified model setup that resembles a tectonic map of the India-Asia collision zone. We use the "sticky-air" approach to allow for the development of topography and the dynamics of subduction and collision is entirely driven by slab-pull (i.e. "free subduction"). The models exhibit a wide range of behaviours depending on the rheological law employed: from linear to temperature-dependent visco-elasto-plastic rheology that takes into account both diffusion and dislocation creep. For example, we find that slab dynamics varies drastically between end member models: in viscous approximations, slab detachment is slow following a viscous thinning, while for a non-linear visco-elasto-plastic rheology, slab detachment is relatively fast, inducing strong mantle flow in the slab window. We also examine the stress states in the subducting and overriding plates and topography evolution in the upper plate, and we discuss the implications on lithosphere dynamics at convergent margins

  3. The basins on the Argentine continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    Urien, C.M.

    1996-08-01

    After the stabilization of the central Gondwana Craton, orogenic belts were accreted, as a result of convergence events and an extensive passive margin developed in southwestern Gondwana. Thermal subsidence in Parana, Karoo-Ventania basins and the Late Paleozoic-Early Mesozoic rifts, were modified by the Gondwana breakup and the South Atlantic opening. Early Paleozoic marine transgressions deposited the Table Mountain Group in Ventania. In southwestern Patagonia foreland clastics were deposited. Magmatic arcs and marine units indicate a tectonic trough was formed, alternating with continental sequences, over Late Paleozoic metamorphics and intrusives, resulting from plastered terrains along the Gondwana margin. In Patagonia, Permo-Carboniferous continental and glacio marine clastics infill the basins, while in Ventania, paralic sequences, grade from neritic to continental to the northeast, extending beneath the continental margin. The Triassic-Jurassic rift basins progressed onto regional widespread acid lavas and were infilled by lagoonal organic-rich sequences. Early drift phase built basins transverse to the margin, with fluvio-lacustrine sequences: Salado, Colorado, Valdes-Rawson, San Julian and North Malvinas intracratonic basins, which underwent transtensional faulting. Post-Oxfordian to Neocomian brackish sequences, onlapped the conjugate basins during the margin`s drift, with petroleum systems, as in Austral and Malvinas. In the Valanginian, basic extrusions commenced to form on the continental border, heralding the oceanic phase. Due to thermal subsidence, offlaping sediments prograded onto the remaining half-grabens. Several petroleum systems, proven and hypothetical, are identified in this region.

  4. Division XII / Commission 14 / Working Group Collision Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peach, Gillian; Dimitrijevic, Milan S.

    2012-04-01

    Research in atomic and molecular collision processes and spectral line broadening has been very active since our last report, Peach, Dimitrijević & Stancil 2009. Given the large volume of the published literature and the limited space available, we have attempted to identify work most relevant to astrophysics. Since our report can not be comprehensive, additional publications can be found in the databases at the web addresses listed in the final section. Elastic and inelastic collisions among electrons, atoms, ions, and molecules are included and charge transfer can be very important in collisions between heavy particles.

  5. Illustrations of the importance of mass wasting in the evolution of continental margins

    SciTech Connect

    Pratson, L.; Ryan, W. ); Twichell, D. )

    1990-05-01

    Side-looking sonar imagery and swath bathymetry from a variety of contemporary continental slopes all display erosional scars and debris aprons, illustrating the importance of mass wasting in the evolution of continental margins. The continental slopes examined include slopes fed directly from the fronts of ice sheets, slopes adjacent to continental shelves that were the sites of glacial outwash, slopes supplied exclusively by fluvial drainage, slopes at carbonate platforms, and slopes on accretionary prisms. Examples are drawn from the Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Mediterranean Sea in both passive and active continental margin settings. The sonar imagery and bathymetry used in this study indicate that continental slopes in different tectonic and climatic environments show similar forms of mass wasting. However, in some cases the dominant mode of erosion and/or the overall degree of mass wasting appears to be distinct to particular sedimentary environments. Timing of both recent and older exhumed erosional surfaces identified in the imagery and in seismic reflection profiles is obtained by ground truth observations using submersibles, towed camera sleds, drilling, and coring. These observations suggest that eustatic fluctuations common to all the margins examined do not explain the range in magnitude and areal density of the observed mass wasting. More localized factors such as lithology, diagenesis, pore fluid conditions, sediment supply rates, and seismic ground motion appear to have a major influence in the evolution of erosional scars and their corresponding unconformities.

  6. What is the slope of the U.S. continental slope?

    SciTech Connect

    Pratson, L.F.; Haxby, W.F.

    1996-01-01

    Extensive high-resolution, multibeam bathymetry of five U. S. continental margins provides new, detailed information about the angle of continental slopes in different sedimentary and tectonic settings. The steepest continental slope examined is the passive-carbonate west Florida slope (4.4{degree} regional slope and 12.0{degree} mean local slope). The steepest of the four clastic continental slopes is the passive New Jersy-Maryland slope (2.5{degree} and 7.6{degree}). Less steep, at both regional and local scales, are the more rugged, tectonically active and probably unstable salt-tectonized louisiana slope (0.5{degree} and 2.9{degree}), strike-slip California slope (1.8{degree} and 5.2{degree}) and convergent oregon slope (2.0{degree} and 5.2{degree}). Frequency grids of local slope magnitude vs. depth and dip direction for the two passive continental slopes reflect present-day morphology predominantly being shaped by lithology (West Florida), sedimentation (New Jersey-Maryland), and downslope-directed erosion(New Jersey-Maryland, west Florida). The grids for the three tectonically acctive continental slopes reflect morphology partly (California) to predominantly (Louisiana, Oregon) being shaped by tectonics. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Cenozoic continental climatic evolution of Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Mosbrugger, Volker; Utescher, Torsten; Dilcher, David L

    2005-10-18

    Continental climate evolution of Central Europe has been reconstructed quantitatively for the last 45 million years providing inferred data on mean annual temperature and precipitation, and winter and summer temperatures. Although some regional effects occur, the European Cenozoic continental climate record correlates well with the global oxygen isotope record from marine environments. During the last 45 million years, continental cooling is especially pronounced for inferred winter temperatures but hardly observable from summer temperatures. Correspondingly, Cenozoic cooling in Central Europe is directly associated with an increase of seasonality. In contrast, inferred Cenozoic mean annual precipitation remained relatively stable, indicating the importance of latent heat transport throughout the Cenozoic. Moreover, our data support the concept that changes in atmospheric CO2 concentrations, although linked to climate changes, were not the major driving force of Cenozoic cooling.

  8. Constraints on continental accretion from sedimentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Dallas

    1988-01-01

    Heat loss in the ancient Earth was discussed assuming that classical sea floor spreading was the only mechanism. This may be expressed as faster spreading or longer total ridge length. These have important implications as to the size and number of cratonic plates in the distant past, the degree to which they are flooded, the kinds of sediments and volcanics that would be expected, and the amount of recycling of continental material taking place. The higher proportion of marine sedimentary rocks and oceanic volcanics in the Archean, and the relative paucity of evaporites and continental volcanics may in part be due to smaller cratonic blocks. A model was developed of the percentage of continental flooding which utilizes round continents and a constant width of the zone of flooding. This model produces a reasonable good fit to the percentage of flooding on the present day continents.

  9. Catching Collisions in the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Fruguiele, Claudia; Hirschauer, Jim

    2015-06-16

    Now that the Large Hadron Collider has officially turned back on for its second run, within every proton collision could emerge the next new discovery in particle physics. Learn how the detectors on the Compact Muon Solenoid, or CMS, experiment capture and track particles as they are expelled from a collision. Talking us through these collisions are Claudia Fruguiele and Jim Hirschauer of Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the largest U.S. institution collaborating on the LHC.

  10. Catching Collisions in the LHC

    ScienceCinema

    Fruguiele, Claudia; Hirschauer, Jim

    2016-07-12

    Now that the Large Hadron Collider has officially turned back on for its second run, within every proton collision could emerge the next new discovery in particle physics. Learn how the detectors on the Compact Muon Solenoid, or CMS, experiment capture and track particles as they are expelled from a collision. Talking us through these collisions are Claudia Fruguiele and Jim Hirschauer of Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the largest U.S. institution collaborating on the LHC.

  11. Measurement of [Formula: see text] production with additional jet activity, including [Formula: see text] quark jets, in the dilepton decay channel using pp collisions at [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

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Lenzi, T; Léonard, A; Maerschalk, T; Marinov, A; Perniè, L; Randle-Conde, A; Reis, T; Seva, T; Vander Velde, C; Yonamine, R; Vanlaer, P; Yonamine, R; Zenoni, F; Zhang, F; Adler, V; Beernaert, K; Benucci, L; Cimmino, A; Crucy, S; Dobur, D; Fagot, A; Garcia, G; Gul, M; Mccartin, J; Ocampo Rios, A A; Poyraz, D; Ryckbosch, D; Salva, S; Sigamani, M; Strobbe, N; Tytgat, M; Van Driessche, W; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Beluffi, C; Bondu, O; Brochet, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, A; Ceard, L; Da Silveira, G G; Delaere, C; Favart, D; Forthomme, L; Giammanco, A; Hollar, J; Jafari, A; Jez, P; Komm, M; Lemaitre, V; Mertens, A; Musich, M; Nuttens, C; Perrini, L; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Popov, A; Quertenmont, L; Selvaggi, M; Vidal Marono, M; Beliy, N; Hammad, G H; Júnior, W L Aldá; Alves, F L; Alves, G A; Brito, L; Correa Martins Junior, M; Hamer, M; Hensel, C; Mora Herrera, C; Moraes, A; Pol, M E; Rebello Teles, P; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E; Carvalho, W; Chinellato, J; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Huertas Guativa, L M; Malbouisson, H; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santoro, A; Sznajder, A; Tonelli Manganote, E J; Vilela Pereira, A; Ahuja, S; Bernardes, C A; De Souza Santos, A; Dogra, S; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Gregores, E M; Mercadante, P G; Moon, C S; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Romero Abad, D; Ruiz Vargas, J C; Aleksandrov, A; Hadjiiska, R; Iaydjiev, P; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Glushkov, I; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Ahmad, M; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Cheng, T; Du, R; Jiang, C H; Plestina, R; Romeo, F; Shaheen, S M; Spiezia, A; Tao, J; Wang, C; Wang, Z; Zhang, H; Asawatangtrakuldee, C; Ban, Y; Li, Q; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Wang, D; Xu, Z; Avila, C; Cabrera, A; Chaparro Sierra, L F; Florez, C; Gomez, J P; Gomez Moreno, B; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Puljak, I; Ribeiro Cipriano, P M; Antunovic, Z; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Kadija, K; Luetic, J; Micanovic, S; Sudic, L; Attikis, A; Mavromanolakis, G; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Rykaczewski, H; Bodlak, M; Finger, M; Finger, M; El Sawy, M; El-Khateeb, E; Elkafrawy, T; Mohamed, A; Salama, E; Calpas, B; Kadastik, M; Murumaa, M; Raidal, M; Tiko, A; Veelken, C; Eerola, P; Pekkanen, J; Voutilainen, M; Härkönen, J; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Peltola, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Wendland, L; Talvitie, J; Tuuva, T; Besancon, M; Couderc, F; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Favaro, C; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Machet, M; Malcles, J; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Titov, M; Zghiche, A; Antropov, I; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Busson, P; Cadamuro, L; Chapon, E; Charlot, C; Dahms, T; Davignon, O; Filipovic, N; Florent, A; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Lisniak, S; Mastrolorenzo, L; Miné, P; 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Brodski, M; Dietz-Laursonn, E; Duchardt, D; Endres, M; Erdmann, M; Erdweg, S; Esch, T; Fischer, R; Güth, A; Hebbeker, T; Heidemann, C; Hoepfner, K; Klingebiel, D; Knutzen, S; Kreuzer, P; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Millet, P; Olschewski, M; Padeken, K; Papacz, P; Pook, T; Radziej, M; Reithler, H; Rieger, M; Scheuch, F; Sonnenschein, L; Teyssier, D; Thüer, S; Cherepanov, V; Erdogan, Y; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Geisler, M; Hoehle, F; Kargoll, B; Kress, T; Kuessel, Y; Künsken, A; Lingemann, J; Nehrkorn, A; Nowack, A; Nugent, I M; Pistone, C; Pooth, O; Stahl, A; Aldaya Martin, M; Asin, I; Bartosik, N; Behnke, O; Behrens, U; Bell, A J; Borras, K; Burgmeier, A; Campbell, A; Choudhury, S; Costanza, F; Diez Pardos, C; Dolinska, G; Dooling, S; Dorland, T; Eckerlin, G; Eckstein, D; Eichhorn, T; Flucke, G; Gallo, E; Garcia, J Garay; Geiser, A; Gizhko, A; Gunnellini, P; Hauk, J; Hempel, M; Jung, H; Kalogeropoulos, A; Karacheban, O; Kasemann, M; Katsas, P; Kieseler, J; Kleinwort, C; Korol, I; Lange, W; 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Eminizer, N; Fehling, D; Feng, L; Gritsan, A V; Maksimovic, P; Martin, C; Osherson, M; Roskes, J; Sady, A; Sarica, U; Swartz, M; Xiao, M; Xin, Y; You, C; Xiao, M; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Benelli, G; Bruner, C; Kenny, R P; Majumder, D; Majumder, D; Malek, M; Murray, M; Sanders, S; Stringer, R; Wang, Q; Ivanov, A; Kaadze, K; Khalil, S; Makouski, M; Maravin, Y; Mohammadi, A; Saini, L K; Skhirtladze, N; Toda, S; Lange, D; Rebassoo, F; Wright, D; Anelli, C; Baden, A; Baron, O; Belloni, A; Calvert, B; Eno, S C; Ferraioli, C; Gomez, J A; Hadley, N J; Jabeen, S; Jabeen, S; Kellogg, R G; Kolberg, T; Kunkle, J; Lu, Y; Mignerey, A C; Shin, Y H; Skuja, A; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Apyan, A; Barbieri, R; Baty, A; Bierwagen, K; Brandt, S; Bierwagen, K; Busza, W; Cali, I A; Demiragli, Z; Di Matteo, L; Gomez Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Gulhan, D; Iiyama, Y; Innocenti, G M; Klute, M; Kovalskyi, D; Lai, Y S; Lee, Y-J; Levin, A; Luckey, P D; Marini, A C; Mcginn, C; Mironov, C; Narayanan, S; Niu, X; Paus, C; Ralph, D; Roland, C; Roland, G; Salfeld-Nebgen, J; Stephans, G S F; Sumorok, K; Varma, M; Velicanu, D; Veverka, J; Wang, J; Wang, T W; Wyslouch, B; Yang, M; Zhukova, V; Dahmes, B; Evans, A; Finkel, A; Gude, A; Hansen, P; Kalafut, S; Kao, S C; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Lesko, Z; Mans, J; Nourbakhsh, S; Ruckstuhl, N; Rusack, R; Tambe, N; Turkewitz, J; Acosta, J G; Oliveros, S; Avdeeva, E; Bloom, K; Bose, S; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Fangmeier, C; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Kamalieddin, R; Keller, J; Knowlton, D; Kravchenko, I; Meier, F; Monroy, J; Ratnikov, F; Siado, J E; Snow, G R; Alyari, M; Dolen, J; George, J; Godshalk, A; Harrington, C; Iashvili, I; Kaisen, J; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Rappoccio, S; Roozbahani, B; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Baumgartel, D; Chasco, M; Hortiangtham, A; Massironi, A; Morse, D M; Nash, D; Orimoto, T; Teixeira De Lima, R; Trocino, D; Wang, R-J; Wood, D; Zhang, J; Hahn, K A; Kubik, A; Mucia, N; Odell, N; Pollack, B; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Sung, K; Trovato, M; Velasco, M; Brinkerhoff, A; Dev, N; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kellams, N; Lannon, K; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Meng, F; Mueller, C; Musienko, Y; Pearson, T; Planer, M; Reinsvold, A; Ruchti, R; Smith, G; Taroni, S; Valls, N; Wayne, M; Wolf, M; Woodard, A; Antonelli, L; Brinson, J; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Flowers, S; Hart, A; Hill, C; Hughes, R; Ji, W; Kotov, K; Ling, T Y; Liu, B; Luo, W; Puigh, D; Rodenburg, M; Winer, B L; Wulsin, H W; Driga, O; Elmer, P; Hardenbrook, J; Hebda, P; Koay, S A; Lujan, P; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Palmer, C; Piroué, P; Saka, H; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Zuranski, A; Malik, S; Barnes, V E; Benedetti, D; Bortoletto, D; Gutay, L; Jha, M K; Jones, M; Jung, K; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Primavera, F; Radburn-Smith, B C; Shi, X; Shipsey, I; Silvers, D; Sun, J; Svyatkovskiy, A; Wang, F; Xie, W; Xu, L; Parashar, N; Stupak, J; Adair, A; Akgun, B; Chen, Z; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Guilbaud, M; Li, W; Michlin, B; Northup, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Rorie, J; Tu, Z; Zabel, J; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Eshaq, Y; Ferbel, T; Galanti, M; Galanti, M; Garcia-Bellido, A; Han, J; Harel, A; Hindrichs, O; Hindrichs, O; Khukhunaishvili, A; Petrillo, G; Tan, P; Verzetti, M; Arora, S; Barker, A; Chou, J P; Contreras-Campana, C; Contreras-Campana, E; Duggan, D; Ferencek, D; Gershtein, Y; Gray, R; Halkiadakis, E; Hidas, D; Hughes, E; Kaplan, S; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R; Lath, A; Nash, K; Panwalkar, S; Park, M; Salur, S; Schnetzer, S; Sheffield, D; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Thomassen, P; Walker, M; Foerster, M; Riley, G; Rose, K; Spanier, S; York, A; Bouhali, O; Castaneda Hernandez, A; Dalchenko, M; De Mattia, M; Delgado, A; Dildick, S; Dildick, S; Eusebi, R; Gilmore, J; Kamon, T; Krutelyov, V; Krutelyov, V; Mueller, R; Osipenkov, I; Pakhotin, Y; Patel, R; Patel, R; Perloff, A; Rose, A; Safonov, A; Tatarinov, A; Ulmer, K A; Akchurin, N; Cowden, C; Damgov, J; Dragoiu, C; Dudero, P R; Faulkner, J; Kunori, S; Lamichhane, K; Lee, S W; Libeiro, T; Undleeb, S; Volobouev, I; Appelt, E; Delannoy, A G; Greene, S; Gurrola, A; Janjam, R; Johns, W; Maguire, C; Mao, Y; Melo, A; Ni, H; Sheldon, P; Snook, B; Tuo, S; Velkovska, J; Xu, Q; Arenton, M W; Cox, B; Francis, B; Goodell, J; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Li, H; Lin, C; Neu, C; Sinthuprasith, T; Sun, X; Wang, Y; Wolfe, E; Wood, J; Xia, F; Clarke, C; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C; Lamichhane, P; Sturdy, J; Belknap, D A; Carlsmith, D; Cepeda, M; Dasu, S; Dodd, L; Duric, S; Gomber, B; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Klabbers, P; Lanaro, A; Levine, A; Long, K; Loveless, R; Mohapatra, A; Ojalvo, I; Perry, T; Pierro, G A; Polese, G; Ruggles, T; Sarangi, T; Savin, A; Sharma, A; Smith, N; Smith, W H; Taylor, D; Woods, N; Collaboration, Authorinst The Cms

    2016-01-01

    Jet multiplicity distributions in top quark pair ([Formula: see text]) events are measured in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7[Formula: see text]. The measurement is performed in the dilepton decay channels ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text]). The absolute and normalized differential cross sections for [Formula: see text] production are measured as a function of the jet multiplicity in the event for different jet transverse momentum thresholds and the kinematic properties of the leading additional jets. The differential [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] cross sections are presented for the first time as a function of the kinematic properties of the leading additional [Formula: see text] jets. Furthermore, the fraction of events without additional jets above a threshold is measured as a function of the transverse momenta of the leading additional jets and the scalar sum of the transverse momenta of all additional jets. The data are compared and found to be consistent with predictions from several perturbative quantum chromodynamics event generators and a next-to-leading order calculation.

  12. GPS and seismological constraints on active tectonics and arc-continent collision in Papua New Guinea: Implications for mechanics of microplate rotations in a plate boundary zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Laura M.; Stevens, Colleen; Silver, Eli; McCaffrey, Rob; Loratung, Wesley; Hasiata, Suvenia; Stanaway, Richard; Curley, Robert; Rosa, Robert; Taugaloidi, Jones

    2004-05-01

    The island of New Guinea is located within the deforming zone between the Pacific and Australian plates that converge obliquely at ˜110 mm/yr. New Guinea has been fragmented into a complex array of microplates, some of which rotate rapidly about nearby vertical axes. We present velocities from a network of 38 Global Positioning System (GPS) sites spanning much of the nation of Papua New Guinea (PNG). The GPS-derived velocities are used to explain the kinematics of major tectonic blocks in the region and the nature of strain accumulation on major faults in PNG. We simultaneously invert GPS velocities, earthquake slip vectors on faults, and transform orientations in the Woodlark Basin for the poles of rotation of the tectonic blocks and the degree of elastic strain accumulation on faults in the region. The data are best explained by six distinct tectonic blocks: the Australian, Pacific, South Bismarck, North Bismarck, and Woodlark plates and a previously unrecognized New Guinea Highlands Block. Significant portions of the Ramu-Markham Fault appear to be locked, which has implications for seismic hazard determination in the Markham Valley region. We also propose that rapid clockwise rotation of the South Bismarck plate is controlled by edge forces initiated by the collision between the Finisterre arc and the New Guinea Highlands.

  13. Collision, rotation, and the initiation of subduction in the evolution of Sulawesi, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Eli A.; McCaffrey, Robert; Smith, Randall B.

    1983-11-01

    The island of Sulawesi, Indonesia, has been shaped and deformed as a result of collision with the Sula platform, a sliver of continental material from the northern margin of Australia-New Guinea. The collision has resulted in rotation of the north volcanic arm of Sulawesi and the development of the accretionary wedge of the North Sulawesi trench. The North Sulawesi trench changes laterally from a zone of no active deformation in the eastern part to a wide accretionary wedge in the west. Early stages of thrusting produce a steep frontal slope (8°-16°), indicative of relatively high basal shear stress, whereas the more advanced (western) zone of thrusting produces a gentle (2°) slope, consistent with low basal shear stress. Reported paleomagnetic data suggest post late Eocene counter-clockwise rotation of the North Arm, and the offshore geophysics are explained by a pivot of the North Arm with respect to the Celebes basin about the eastern end of the arc. Convergence between the north Banda basin and Southeast Sulawesi is documented by the presence of the Tolo thrust. Its outcrop is strongly arcuate and its accretionary wedge varies in width from a minimum of a few kilometers at each end to a maximum of 30-40 km in the central part. The northern end transforms to the leftlateral Matano fault, with a reported offset of 20 km. The southern end of the thrust projects toward the deformed rocks of Buton, but the structural relations there are not clear. The Matano fault zone appears to connect westward with the Palu fault, which forms the western transform of the North Sulawesi trench. The Palu-Matano fault system acts as a trench-trench transform between the North Sulawesi trench and the Tolo thrust, and this system is described by the same rotation pole as that for the Sulawesi North Arm.

  14. Gas hydrates of outer continental margins

    SciTech Connect

    Kvenvolden, K.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline substances in which a rigid framework of water molecules traps molecules of gas, mainly methane. Gas-hydrate deposits are common in continental margin sediment in all major oceans at water depths greater than about 300 m. Thirty-three localities with evidence for gas-hydrate occurrence have been described worldwide. The presence of these gas hydrates has been inferred mainly from anomalous lacoustic reflectors seen on marine seismic records. Naturally occurring marine gas hydrates have been sampled and analyzed at about tensites in several regions including continental slope and rise sediment of the eastern Pacific Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico. Except for some Gulf of Mexico gas hydrate occurrences, the analyzed gas hydrates are composed almost exclusively of microbial methane. Evidence for the microbial origin of methane in gas hydrates includes (1) the inverse relation between methane occurence and sulfate concentration in the sediment, (2) the subparallel depth trends in carbon isotopic compositions of methane and bicarbonate in the interstitial water, and (3) the general range of {sup 13}C depletion ({delta}{sub PDB}{sup 13}C = {minus}90 to {minus}60 {per thousand}) in the methane. Analyses of gas hydrates from the Peruvian outer continental margin in particular illustrate this evidence for microbially generated methane. The total amount of methane in gas hydrates of continental margins is not known, but estimates of about 10{sup 16} m{sup 3} seem reasonable. Although this amount of methane is large, it is not yet clear whether methane hydrates of outer continental margins will ever be a significant energy resource; however, these gas hydrates will probably constitute a drilling hazard when outer continental margins are explored in the future.

  15. Late-Archean continental emergence: consequences for the rise of atmospheric oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flament, N. E.; Coltice, N.; Rey, P. F.

    2008-12-01

    The balance between the secular cooling of the Earth's mantle and the growth of the continental crust implies changes in the isostatic equilibrium between continents and oceans, in the oceanic bathymetry, and in the area of emerged continental crust. The evolution of the latter is of fundamental importance to the geochemical coupling between the continental crust, the atmosphere and the oceans. The area of emerged land can be estimated from models that depend on mantle temperature, continental area and continental hypsometry. In the Archean, the mantle was probably 150-200°C hotter than present and the continental area could have increased from 20% of present at ~~3.5Ga to 80% of present by ~~2.5Ga. Using these values, and comparing different thermal evolution models for the Earth, we calculate that the area of emerged continental crust would be reduced to 1-12% of the Earth's area during the Archean (compared to 27.5% for present-day Earth). As for the continental hypsometry, a greater radiogenic crustal heat production and a greater mantle heat flow would have reduced the strength of the continental lithosphere in the Archean, thus limiting the crustal thickening due to mountain building processes and the maximum elevation in the Earth's topography [Rey and Coltice, Geology 36, 635-638 (2008)]. Taking this into account, we show that the continents were mostly flooded until the end of the Archean and that less than 3% of the Earth's area (which is roughly the superficy of South America) consisted of emerged continental crust by ~~2.5~Ga. These results are consistent with widespread Archean submarine continental flood basalts, and with the emergence of a sialic geochemical reservoir recorded from ~~2.5~Ga in (a) the composition of shales, (b) the isotopic ratio 87Sr/86Sr of marine carbonates and (c) the δ18O signature of igneous zircons. The progressive emergence of the continents as shown by our models from the late

  16. MAGSAT anomaly map and continental drift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemouel, J. L. (Principal Investigator); Galdeano, A.; Ducruix, J.

    1981-01-01

    Anomaly maps of high quality are needed to display unambiguously the so called long wave length anomalies. The anomalies were analyzed in terms of continental drift and the nature of their sources is discussed. The map presented confirms the thinness of the oceanic magnetized layer. Continental magnetic anomalies are characterized by elongated structures generally of east-west trend. Paleomagnetic reconstruction shows that the anomalies found in India, Australia, and Antarctic exhibit a fair consistency with the African anomalies. It is also shown that anomalies are locked under the continents and have a fixed geometry.

  17. Continental drift under the Third Reich.

    PubMed

    Buffetaut, Eric

    2003-12-01

    Contrary to what happened in many other countries in the 1930s and 1940s, Alfred Wegener's theory of continental drift was not generally rejected in Nazi Germany, although several leading German geologists of the time did not accept it. It was actually presented as the modern view of Earth history in books and magazine articles aimed at the general public. Although outlandish geological theories such as Hörbiger's Welteislehre were favoured by some Nazi dignitaries, they were not widely accepted in scientific circles. On the other hand, continental drift received official support under the Third Reich, at a time when it was ignored or ridiculed by most earth scientists outside Germany.

  18. Do the pyramids show continental drift?

    PubMed

    Pawley, G S; Abrahamsen, N

    1973-03-02

    The mystery of the orientation of the Great Pyramids of Giza has remained unexplained for many decades. The general alignment is 4 minutes west of north. It is argued that this is not a builders' error but is caused by movement over the centuries. Modern theories of continental drift do not predict quite such large movements, but other causes of polar wandering give even smaller shifts. Thus, continental drift is the most likely explanation, although somewhat implausible, especially as relevant measurements have been made over a 50-year period, whereas geophysical measurements of sea-floor spreading relate to million-year time scales.

  19. The nature of mutations induced by replication–transcription collisions.

    PubMed

    Sankar, T Sabari; Wastuwidyaningtyas, Brigitta D; Dong, Yuexin; Lewis, Sarah A; Wang, Jue D

    2016-07-07

    The DNA replication and transcription machineries share a common DNA template and thus can collide with each other co-directionally or head-on. Replication–transcription collisions can cause replication fork arrest, premature transcription termination, DNA breaks, and recombination intermediates threatening genome integrity. Collisions may also trigger mutations, which are major contributors to genetic disease and evolution. However, the nature and mechanisms of collision-induced mutagenesis remain poorly understood. Here we reveal the genetic consequences of replication–transcription collisions in actively dividing bacteria to be two classes of mutations: duplications/deletions and base substitutions in promoters. Both signatures are highly deleterious but are distinct from the previously well-characterized base substitutions in the coding sequence. Duplications/deletions are probably caused by replication stalling events that are triggered by collisions; their distribution patterns are consistent with where the fork first encounters a transcription complex upon entering a transcription unit. Promoter substitutions result mostly from head-on collisions and frequently occur at a nucleotide that is conserved in promoters recognized by the major σ factor in bacteria. This substitution is generated via adenine deamination on the template strand in the promoter open complex, as a consequence of head-on replication perturbing transcription initiation. We conclude that replication–transcription collisions induce distinct mutation signatures by antagonizing replication and transcription, not only in coding sequences but also in gene regulatory elements.

  20. The Nature of Mutations Induced by Replication-Transcription Collisions

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, T. Sabari; Wastuwidyaningtyas, Brigitta D.; Dong, Yuexin; Lewis, Sarah A.; Wang, Jue D.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The DNA replication and transcription machineries share a common DNA template and thus can collide with each other co-directionally or head-on1,2. Replication-transcription collisions can cause replication fork arrest, premature transcription termination, DNA breaks, and recombination intermediates threatening genome integrity1–10. Collisions may also trigger mutations, which are major contributors of genetic disease and evolution5,7,11. However, the nature and mechanisms of collision-induced mutagenesis remain poorly understood. Here we reveal the genetic consequence of replication-transcription collisions in actively dividing bacteria to be two classes of mutations: duplications/deletions and base substitutions in promoters. Both signatures are highly deleterious but are distinct from the well-characterized base substitutions in coding sequence. Duplications/deletions are likely caused by replication stalling events that are triggered by collisions; their distribution patterns are consistent with where the fork first encounters a transcription complex upon entering a transcription unit. Promoter substitutions result mostly from head-on collisions and frequently occur at a nucleotide conserved in promoters recognized by the major sigma factor in bacteria. This substitution is generated via adenine deamination on the template strand in the promoter open complex, as a consequence of head-on replication perturbing transcription initiation. We conclude that replication-transcription collisions induce distinct mutation signatures by antagonizing replication and transcription, not only in coding sequences but also in gene regulatory elements. PMID:27362223

  1. Experimental observation of the collision of three vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, R. H.; Monsalve, E.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate for the first time the motion, interaction and simultaneous collision between three initially stable vortex rings arranged symmetrically, making an angle of 120 degrees between their straight path lines. We report results with laminar vortex rings in air and water obtained through measurements of the ring velocity field with a hot-wire anemometer, both in free flight and during the entire collision. In the air experiment, our flow visualizations allowed us to identify two main collision stages. A first ring-dominated stage where the rings slowdown progressively, increasing their diameter rapidly, followed by secondary vortex structures resulting after the rings make contact. Local portions of the vortex tubes of opposite circulation are coupled together thus creating local arm-like vortex structures moving radially in outward directions, rapidly dissipating kinetic energy. From a similar water experiment, we provide detailed shadowgraph visualizations of both the ring bubble and the full size collision, showing clearly the final expanding vortex structure. It is accurately resolved that the physical contact between vortex ring tubes gives rise to three symmetric expanding vortex arms but also the vortex reconnection of the top and lower vortex tubes. The central collision zone was found to have the lowest kinetic energy during the entire collision and therefore it can be identified as a safe zone. The preserved collision symmetries leading to the weak kinematic activity in the safe zone is the first step into the development of an intermittent hydrodynamic trap for small and lightweight particles.

  2. The Aravalli sequence of Rajasthan, India: A Precambrian continental margin?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdougall, J. D.; Willis, R.; Lugmair, G. W.; Roy, A. B.; Gopalan, K.

    1985-01-01

    The extent to which plate tectonics in its present form operated during the Precambrian is unknown, but is a subject of considerable current interest. A remarkable succession of Precambrian rocks in Rajasthan, Northwestern India, which may help to shed more light on this question are discussed. Data indicates that the Aravalli sequence has a number of characteristics generally ascribed to active continental margins. Although much more work is required to bear this out, the evidence suggests that the processes operating in such an environment in the early Proterozoic or late Archean were not vastly different from today.

  3. Gravity models of two-level collision of lithospheric plates in northeastern Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrishchevsky, A. M.

    2013-11-01

    Structural forms of emplacement of crustal and mantle rigid sheets in collision zones of lithospheric plates in northeastern Asia are analyzed using formalized gravity models reflecting the rheological properties of geological media. Splitting of the lithosphere of moving plates into crustal and mantle constituents is the main feature of collision zones, which is repeated in the structural units irrespective of their location, rank, and age. Formal signs of crustal sheet thrusting over convergent plate boundaries and subduction of the lithospheric mantle beneath these boundaries have been revealed. The deep boundaries and thickness of lithospheric plates and asthenospheric lenses have been traced. A similarity in the deep structure of collision zones of second-order marginal-sea buffer plates differing in age is displayed at the boundaries with the Eurasian, North American, and Pacific plates of the first order. Collision of oceanic crustal segments with the Mesozoic continental margin in the Sikhote-Alin is characterized, as well as collision of the oceanic lithosphere with the Kamchatka composite island arc. A spatiotemporal series of deep-seated Middle Mesozoic, Late Mesosoic, and Cenozoic collision tectonic units having similar structure is displayed in the transitional zone from the Asian continent to the Pacific plate.

  4. Collision and Break-off : Numerical models and surface observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottrill, Andrew; van Hunen, Jeroen; Allen, Mark

    2013-04-01

    The process of continental collision and slab break-off has been explored by many authors using a number of different numerical models and approaches (Andrews and Billen, 2009; Gerya et al., 2004; van Hunen and Allen, 2011). One of the challenges of using numerical models to explore collision and break-off is relating model predictions to real observables from current collision zones. Part of the reason for this is that collision zones by their nature destroy a lot of potentially useful surface evidence of deep dynamics. One observable that offers the possibility for recording mantle dynamics at collision zones is topography. Here we present topography predictions from numerical models and show how these can be related to actual topography changes recoded in the sedimentary record. Both 2D and 3D numerical simulation of the closure of a small oceanic basin are presented (Bottrill et al., 2012; van Hunen and Allen, 2011). Topography is calculated from the normal stress at the surface applied to an elastic beam, to give a more realist prediction of topography by accounting for the expected elasticity of the lithosphere. Predicted model topography showed a number of interesting features on the overriding plate. The first is the formation of a basin post collision at around 300km from the suture. Our models also showed uplift postdating collision between the suture and this basin, caused by subduction of buoyant material. Once break-off has occurred we found that this uplift moved further into the overriding plate due to redistribution of stresses from the subducted plate. With our 3D numerical models we simulate a collision that propagates laterally along a subduction system. These models show that a basin forms, similar to that found in our 2D models, which propagates along the system at the same rate as collision. The apparent link between collision and basin formation leads to the investigation into the stress state in the overriding lithosphere. Preliminary

  5. Did the Indo-Asian collision alone create the Tibetan plateau?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, M. A.; Yin, An; Harrison, T. M.; Dürr, S. B.; Z, Chen; Ryerson, F. J.; Kidd, W. S. F.; X, Wang; X, Zhou

    1997-08-01

    It is widely believed that the Tibetan plateau is a late Cenozoic feature produced by the Indo-Asian collision. However, because Tibet was the locus of continental accretion and subduction throughout the Mesozoic, crustal thickening during that time may also have contributed to growth of the plateau. This portion of the geologic history was investigated in a traverse through the central Lhasa block, southern Tibet. Together with earlier studies, our mapping and geochronological results show that the Lhasa block underwent little north-south shortening during the Cenozoic. Rather, our mapping shows that ˜60% crustal shortening, perhaps due to the collision between the Lhasa and Qiangtang blocks, occurred during the Early Cretaceous. This observation implies that a significant portion of southern Tibet was raised to perhaps 3 4 km elevation prior to the Indo-Asian collision.

  6. Elephant teeth from the atlantic continental shelf.

    PubMed

    Whitmore, F C; Emery, K O; Cooke, H B; Swift, D J

    1967-06-16

    Teeth of mastodons and mammoths have been recovered by fishermen from at least 40 sites on the continental shelf as deep as 120 meters. Also present are submerged shorelines, peat deposits, lagoonal shells, anz relict sands. Evidently elephants and other large mammals ranged this region during the glacial stage of low sea level of the last 25,000 years.

  7. Elephant teeth from the atlantic continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitmore, F.C.; Emery, K.O.; Cooke, H.B.S.; Swift, D.J.P.

    1967-01-01

    Teeth of mastodons and mastodons have been recovered by fishermen from at least 40 sites on the continental shelf as deep as 120 meters. Also present are submerged shorelines, peat deposits, lagoonal shells, and relict sands. Evidently elephants and other large mammals ranged this region during the glacial stage of low sea level of the last 25.000 years.

  8. Plate Tectonics and Continental Drift: Classroom Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Prentice K.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests various classroom studies related to plate tectonics and continental drift, including comments on and sources of resource materials useful in teaching the topics. A complete list of magazine articles on the topics from the Sawyer Marine Resource Collection may be obtained by contacting the author. (JN)

  9. Collision-induced photon echo at the transition 0{r_reversible}1 in ytterbium vapor: Direct proof of depolarizing collision anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Rubtsova, N. N.; Gol'dort, V. G.; Ishchenko, V. N.; Khvorostov, E. B.; Kochubei, S. A.; Reshetov, V. A.; Yevseyev, I. V.

    2011-09-15

    A collision-induced photon echo arising at the transition 0{r_reversible}1 of ytterbium in the presence of heavy atomic buffer is investigated. Collision-induced echo signal appears in the case of mutually orthogonal linear polarizations of exciting pulses and it is absent without buffer. Collision-induced echo power grows with buffer pressure up to the maximum value and decays exponentially at further buffer pressure growth. Collision-induced echo power is essentially less than that of the ordinary echo generated by pulses with parallel polarizations in the same mixture, and its polarization is linear with the polarization vector directed along that of the first exciting pulse. All the properties of collision-induced photon echo are explained on the basis of collision relaxation dependence on the direction of active atom velocity.

  10. Spin Changing Collisions of Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zygelman, Bernard

    2006-01-01

    We discuss spin changing collisions of hydrogen atoms. Employing a fully quantal theory we calculate and present new collision data. We discuss the respective roles of spin exchange and long range magnetic interactions in collisonal redistribution of sub-level populations. The calculated atomic data is needed for accurate modeling of 21 cm line emission/absorption by primordial hydrogen in the early universe.

  11. Electron Collisions with Hydrogen Fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itikawa, Yukikazu

    2017-03-01

    Cross section data are reviewed for electron collisions with hydrogen fluoride. Collision processes considered are total scattering, elastic scattering, excitations of rotational, vibrational, and electronic states, ionization, and dissociative electron attachment. After a survey of the literature, recommended values of the cross sections are determined, as far as possible.

  12. Collision in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    On June 25, 1997, the Russian supply spacecraft Progress 234 collided with the Mir space station, rupturing Mir's pressure hull, throwing it into an uncontrolled attitude drift, and nearly forcing evacuation of the station. Like many high-profile accidents, this collision was the consequence of a chain of events leading to the final piloting errors that were its immediate cause. The discussion in this article does not resolve the relative contributions of the actions and decisions in this chain. Neither does it suggest corrective measures, many of which are straightforward and have already been implemented by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Russian Space Agency. Rather, its purpose is to identify the human factors that played a pervasive role in the incident. Workplace stress, fatigue, and sleep deprivation were identified by NASA as contributory factors in the Mir-Progress collision (Culbertson, 1997; NASA, forthcoming), but other contributing factors, such as requiring crew to perform difficult tasks for which their training is not current, could potentially become important factors in future situations.

  13. Collision in space.

    PubMed

    Ellis, S R

    2000-01-01

    On June 25, 1997, the Russian supply spacecraft Progress 234 collided with the Mir space station, rupturing Mir's pressure hull, throwing it into an uncontrolled attitude drift, and nearly forcing evacuation of the station. Like many high-profile accidents, this collision was the consequence of a chain of events leading to the final piloting errors that were its immediate cause. The discussion in this article does not resolve the relative contributions of the actions and decisions in this chain. Neither does it suggest corrective measures, many of which are straightforward and have already been implemented by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Russian Space Agency. Rather, its purpose is to identify the human factors that played a pervasive role in the incident. Workplace stress, fatigue, and sleep deprivation were identified by NASA as contributory factors in the Mir-Progress collision (Culbertson, 1997; NASA, forthcoming), but other contributing factors, such as requiring crew to perform difficult tasks for which their training is not current, could potentially become important factors in future situations.

  14. Continental accretion: contrasting Mesozoic and Early Proterozoic tectonic regimes in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condie, Kent C.; Chomiak, Beverly

    1996-11-01

    Juvenile continental crust was accreted to southern and western North America during the Early Proterozoic and Mesozoic, respectively. Graywacke, granite, granodiorite, and basalt comprise most of the accreted Early Proterozoic crust, whereas graywacke, andesite, basalt, and granodiorite comprise most of the Mesozoic crust. In addition, carbonates, ultramafics, pelagic sediments, and tonalite/diorite are minor but important components in the juvenile Mesozoic crust, whereas rhyolites are important in the Early Proterozoic crust. Mesozoic supracrustal rocks vary significantly in chemical composition, while Early Proterozoic supracrustals have a limited compositional range and exhibit a linear relation between many element concentrations suggesting a genetic linkage between accreted terranes. Although SiO 2, Al 2O 3, FeO, and incompatible elements are more enriched in Early Proterozoic than in Mesozoic supracrustal rocks, negative Eu anomalies are typical of rocks of both ages. Early Proterozoic granitoids are enriched in LILE (large ion lithophile elements) compared to Mesozoic granitoids, and granitoids of both ages of are enriched in LILE and have larger Eu anomalies than associated supracrustal rocks. Accreted Mesozoic upper crust is similar to andesite in chemical composition, and the bulk crust is similar to basaltic andesite. In contrast, accreted Early Proterozoic upper crust and bulk crust are similar to granodiorite and andesite, respectively. Incompatible elements are depleted in the Mesozoic compared to the Early Proterozoic crust, but both crustal types have negative NbTa anomalies. Depending on the composition assumed for the lower crust, both ages of crust have either very small or negligible Eu anomalies. Lifespans of the Early Proterozoic terranes (time interval between oldest rocks in a terrane and its collision with North America) are 20-80 My, whereas lifespans of Mesozoic terranes are 50-500 My, with most falling between 50 and 200 My. Within

  15. Deep observation and sampling of the earth's continental crust (DOSECC): Continental scientific drilling workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Research summaries are presented of ongoing or proposed deep drilling programs to explore hydrothermal systems, buried astroblemes, continental crust, magma systems, mountain belt tectonics, subduction zones, and volcanoes. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual papers. (ACR)

  16. 75 FR 61512 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement, Interior. ACTION... Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams (OPDs) located within Atlantic Ocean areas,...

  17. Taconic collision in SE Penna and Delaware

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, M.L.; Crawford, W.A.; Hoersch, A.L.; Srogi, L.A.; Wagner, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    Taconic metamorphism and tectonism in SE Pennsylvania and northern Delaware were a result of the collision of a volcanic arc with North America. The Wilmington Complex, the infrastructure of the arc, is presently the highest structural unit. It consists of granulite facies volcanogenic sediments intruded by gabbro and a ca. 500 Ma gabbronorite-charnockite suite. Latest Precambrian-earliest Paleozoic sediments of the Glenarm series were metamorphosed to conditions above the second sillimanite isograd beneath the overthrust hot (700-800/sup 0/C) Wilmington Complex. As the edge of the continent was depressed and heated under the advancing thrust complex, basement-involved nappes of Grenville age rocks (Avondale anticline, Woodville dome) with the Glenarm sedimentary cover were thrust over still rigid autochthonous basement (West Chester Prong). On the NW flank of the orogen, Grenville age gneiss-cored massifs (Honey Brook Upland, Mine Ridge, Trenton Prong), unconformably overlain by lower Paleozoic continental shelf sediments, were involved in the thrusting but metamorphosed only to the greenschist facies. Steep anticlines developed later in the Paleozoic, contributing to the present pattern of northeast trending Grenville basement massifs mantled by overlying units.

  18. Arc-continent collision in Banda Sea region

    SciTech Connect

    Bowin, C.; Purdy, G.M.; Johnston, C.; Shor, G.; Lawver, L.; Hartono, H.M.S.; Jezek, P.

    1980-06-01

    A 2-month marine geophysical study of the Banda arc region was conducted in late 1976 using the R/V Atlantis II of WHOI' and the R/V Thomas Washington of SIO; 19 seismic refraction lines were successfully completed. Oceanic crust underlies the Banda Sea and Weber Deep. Continental crust 35 to 40 km thick underlies the Australian Shelf. Thick continental crust is also present beneath the Timor and Aru Troughs. Low-amplitude magnetic anomalies are present over the Australian Shelf and extend to near the western edge of the Banda outer arc and, together with the presence of metamorphic rocks, suggest that continental crust may extend to the eastern lip of the Weber Deep. Continuous seismic reflection profiling shows the Australian Shelf sedimentary sequence dipping beneath the accretionary prisms of the outer Banda arc at the Timor and Seram Troughs: the tectonic front of the subduction zone lies along the axis of these troughs. The bathymetric profile on the outer flank of the Timor and Seram Troughs is unusual in that the profile asymptotically approaches a shallow depth near sea level and no outer rise is present as at oceanic trenches. It is concluded that the Outer Banda arc from Buru around to Timor, and possibly to Sumba, contained Australian continental crustal blocks and fragments prior to its collision with the Australian margin in the last 3 to 6 m.y. Continuous convergence following the addition of a thick Australian margin sedimentary sequence to the south Banda subduction zone has led to deformation being distributed over the width of the arc and not simply being taken up on a single thrust surface. This scenario helps reconcile the geologic relations on Timor, Seram, and Buru with the structural continuity of the Timor Trough with the Java Trench. 30 figures, 1 table.

  19. A bioinspired collision detection algorithm for VLSI implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuadri, J.; Linan, G.; Stafford, R.; Keil, M. S.; Roca, E.

    2005-06-01

    In this paper a bioinspired algorithm for collision detection is proposed, based on previous models of the locust (Locusta migratoria) visual system reported by F.C. Rind and her group, in the University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne. The algorithm is suitable for VLSI implementation in standard CMOS technologies as a system-on-chip for automotive applications. The working principle of the algorithm is to process a video stream that represents the current scenario, and to fire an alarm whenever an object approaches on a collision course. Moreover, it establishes a scale of warning states, from no danger to collision alarm, depending on the activity detected in the current scenario. In the worst case, the minimum time before collision at which the model fires the collision alarm is 40 msec (1 frame before, at 25 frames per second). Since the average time to successfully fire an airbag system is 2 msec, even in the worst case, this algorithm would be very helpful to more efficiently arm the airbag system, or even take some kind of collision avoidance countermeasures. Furthermore, two additional modules have been included: a "Topological Feature Estimator" and an "Attention Focusing Algorithm". The former takes into account the shape of the approaching object to decide whether it is a person, a road line or a car. This helps to take more adequate countermeasures and to filter false alarms. The latter centres the processing power into the most active zones of the input frame, thus saving memory and processing time resources.

  20. Development of an in-vehicle intersection collision countermeasure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierowicz, John

    1997-02-01

    Intersection collisions constitute approximately twenty-six percent of all accidents in the United States. Because of their complexity, and demands on the perceptual and decision making abilities of the driver, intersections present an increased risk of collisions between automobiles. This situation provides an opportunity to apply advanced sensor and processing capabilities to prevent these collisions. A program to determine the characteristics of intersection collisions and identify potential countermeasures will be described. This program, sponsored by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, utilized accident data to develop a taxonomy of intersection crashes. This taxonomy was used to develop a concept for an intersection collision avoidance countermeasure. The concept utilizes in-vehicle position, dynamic status, and millimeter wave radar system and an in-vehicle computer system to provide inputs to an intersection collision avoidance algorithm. Detection of potential violation of traffic control device, or proceeding into the intersection with inadequate gap will lead to the presentation of a warning to the driver. These warnings are presented to the driver primarily via a head-up display and haptic feedback. Roadside to vehicle communication provides information regarding phased traffic signal information. Active control of the vehicle's brake and steering systems are described. Progress in the development of the systems will be presented along with the schedule of future activities.

  1. Imaging the Subduction of Continental Lithosphere in the Banda Sea Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtner, A.; De Wit, M.; van Bergen, M.

    2014-12-01

    We present a 3D tomographic model of Australasia obtained by full seismic waveform inversion. Our model features a sharp lateral velocity contrast extending to >200 km depth, coincident with the abrupt transition from low to high Helium ratios in arc volcanics near 123°E (see figure). The joint analysis of the tomographic model and isotope data (for He, Pb, Nd, Sr) suggests that the North Australian craton subducted beneath the Banda Sea to around 100 km depth. The continuous increase of computing power combined with advances in numerical seismology allow us to develop full waveform inversion techniques that translate complete seismograms into 3D Earth models. The natural incorporation of any type of body and surface waves in full waveform inversion improves tomographic resolution in terms of both resolution length and amplitude recovery. We applied full waveform inversion to Australasia, including the Sunda and Banda arcs. The correlation of the tomographic model with isotope signatures of arc volcanics supports the shallow-angle subduction of North Australian lithosphere. The integrated data suggest that the late Jurassic ocean lithosphere north of the North Australian craton was capable of entraining large volumes of continental lithosphere. A plausible explanation involves delamination within the continental crust, separating upper from lower crustal units. This interpretation is consistent with the existence of a massive accretionary complex on Timor island, with evidence from Pb isotope analysis for lower-crust involvement in arc volcanism; and with the approximate gravitational stability of the subducted lithosphere as inferred from the tomographic images. The Banda arc example demonstrates that continental lithosphere in arc-continent collisions may not generally be preserved, thus increasing the complexity of tectonic reconstructions and models of recycling continental crust.

  2. Organic matter in the ancient Alpine Tethyan Ocean Continental Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateeva, Tsvetomila; Wolff, George; Kusznir, Nick; Wheeler, John; Manataschal, Gianreto

    2016-04-01

    Studies of hydrothermal vents in modern ocean settings suggest that methane produced by serpentinization can support methanotrophic bio-systems. Are such bio-systems locally restricted to hydrothermal vents or are more pervasive, being linked with the geology of serpentinized mantle in the subsurface? Answering this question has implications for our understanding of the global importance of hidden sub-surface bio-systems, the fate of methane and the carbon cycle. The ocean-continent transition (OCT) of magma-poor rifted continental margins, exhumed within mountain belts by continent collision, provides an opportunity to investigate this question. Initial data from the Totalp unit in the Eastern Swiss Alps, representing exhumed OCT of the Alpine Tethyan rifted continental margin, shows the presence of various hydrocarbons (Mateeva et al., in prep.). Samples from other Tethyan OCT locations, consisting of the Tasna nappe and Platta unit of the Eastern Swiss Alps and Chenaillet in the Western Alps, have also been analysed to investigate the presence or absence of methanotrophic biosystems within serpentinized exhumed mantle and associated ophicalcite and syn-rift sediments. Samples from these remnant Tethyan OCT locations are characterized by low and varied organic carbon concentrations that reflect the large lithological diversity of this area. The samples contain hydrocarbons in the form of n-alkanes mostly in the range C20 - C32, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and various biomarkers (e.g. steranes, hopanes). A typical sample from the hydrothermal system in Platta shows the lithological characteristics of a black smoker, but with no indication of a more developed biosystem. Preliminary results from the examined Tethyan OCT locations (Tasna, Platta, Chenaillet) show evidence for the preservation of marine organic matter in the serpentinized mantle and overlying sediments, although there is no unequivocal indication that the organic matter is generated from

  3. US Coast Guard collision at sea.

    PubMed

    McCaughey, B G

    1985-01-01

    The collision between the USCGC Cuyahoga and the motor vessel Santa Cruz II resulted in psychological distress among the Coast Guard crewmen. The US Navy Special Psychiatric Rapid Intervention Team (SPRINT) was activated to provide mental health services to the Coast Guard survivors and others who had been affected by the disaster. The psychiatric records of the 18 survivors were examined and summarized, and combined with anecdotal comments made by SPRINT members. The most prominent psychological reactions among the survivors were shock, anger, sadness, and guilt. Spouses of the survivors dealt with bereavement and strove to understand their husbands' reactions. Variables identified by the SPRINT as being important to their success were communication with and support from the training center command, assurances of confidentiality to the survivors, and commencement of their work almost immediately following the collision.

  4. Circum-Pacific accretion of oceanic terranes to continental blocks: accretion of the Early Permian Dun Mountain ophiolite to the E Gondwana continental margin, South Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Alastair

    2016-04-01

    Accretionary orogens, in part, grow as a result of the accretion of oceanic terranes to pre-existing continental blocks, as in the circum-Pacific and central Asian regions. However, the accretionary processes involved remain poorly understood. Here, we consider settings in which oceanic crust formed in a supra-subduction zone setting and later accreted to continental terranes (some, themselves of accretionary origin). Good examples include some Late Cretaceous ophiolites in SE Turkey, the Jurassic Coast Range ophiolite, W USA and the Early Permian Dun Mountain ophiolite of South Island, New Zealand. In the last two cases, the ophiolites are depositionally overlain by coarse clastic sedimentary rocks (e.g. Permian Upukerora Formation of South Island, NZ) that then pass upwards into very thick continental margin fore-arc basin sequences (Great Valley sequence, California; Matai sequence, South Island, NZ). Field observations, together with petrographical and geochemical studies in South Island, NZ, summarised here, provide evidence of terrane accretion processes. In a proposed tectonic model, the Early Permian Dun Mountain ophiolite was created by supra-subduction zone spreading above a W-dipping subduction zone (comparable to the present-day Izu-Bonin arc and fore arc, W Pacific). The SSZ oceanic crust in the New Zealand example is inferred to have included an intra-oceanic magmatic arc, which is no longer exposed (other than within a melange unit in Southland), but which is documented by petrographic and geochemical evidence. An additional subduction zone is likely to have dipped westwards beneath the E Gondwana margin during the Permian. As a result, relatively buoyant Early Permian supra-subduction zone oceanic crust was able to dock with the E Gondwana continental margin, terminating intra-oceanic subduction (although the exact timing is debatable). The amalgamation ('soft collision') was accompanied by crustal extension of the newly accreted oceanic slab, and

  5. 3. VIEW OF CONTINENTAL EAGLE GIN CO. ACROSS CREEK, TAKEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF CONTINENTAL EAGLE GIN CO. ACROSS CREEK, TAKEN FROM DAM, LOOKING SOUTH. FROM RIGHT TO LEFT: CUPOLA TOWER ON 1854 CONTINENTAL GIN CO., 1848, 1852, 1912 CONTINENTAL GIN CO. BUILDINGS. - Prattville Manufacturing Company, Number One, 242 South Court Street, Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  6. 7 CFR 319.56-64 - Avocados from continental Spain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Avocados from continental Spain. 319.56-64 Section 319... Avocados from continental Spain. Fresh avocados (Persea americana P. Mill.) may be imported into the United... accordance with § 319.56-6. (2) The avocados must be grown at places of production in continental Spain...

  7. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  8. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  9. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  10. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  11. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  12. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  13. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  14. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  15. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  16. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  17. 78 FR 48828 - Airworthiness Directives; Continental Motors, Inc. Reciprocating Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-12

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Continental Motors... Engine Components International Division (ECi), used on the Continental Motors, Inc. (CMI) models 520 and... identified in this proposed AD, contact Continental Motors, Inc., PO Box 90, Mobile, AL 36601; phone:...

  18. New insights into continental rifting from a damage rheology modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyakhovsky, Vladimir; Segev, Amit; Weinberger, Ram; Schattner, Uri

    2010-05-01

    parameters of the crustal rocks. Results of the modeling also demonstrate how the lithosphere structure and especially depth to the Moho interface affects the geometry of the propagating rift system. With the same boundary conditions and physical properties of rocks as in the case of the flat continental structure, a rift terminates above the passive continental margin and a new fault system is created normal to the direction of the rift propagation. These results demonstrate that the local lithosphere structure is one of the major key factors controlling the geometry of the evolving rift system, faulting and seismicity pattern. Results of simulations suggest that under wide range of conditions a rift propagating through a continental lithosphere might cease before it reaches the margin where transition to oceanic lithosphere occurs. Close to the margin different tectonic styles might take over the propagation. This behavior has been suggested for the NW continuation of the active Red Sea-Suez rift system and initiation of the Dead Sea Transform (Steckler and ten Brink, 1986). With the onset of the Red Sea opening (about Oligocene) the sub-parallel Azraq-Sirhan rift was also activated and propagated in a NW direction from the Arabian continent toward the Levant basin oceanic crust. By applying our 3-D lithosphere-scale numerical simulations on the Azraq-Sirhan rift system, we conclude that thinning of the crystalline crust and strengthening of the Arabian lithosphere led to a decrease or even termination of the rate of rift propagation next to the continental margin.

  19. THE IMPACT OF HUMANS ON CONTINENTAL EROSION AND SEDIMENTATION (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, B.; McElroy, B.

    2009-12-01

    Tectonic uplift and erosional denudation of orogenic belts have long been the most important geologic processes that serve to shape continental surfaces, but the rate of geomorphic change resulting from these natural phenomena has now been outstripped by human activities associated with agriculture, construction, and mining. Although humans are now the most important geomorphic agent on the planet’s surface, natural and anthropogenic processes serve to modify quite different parts of the Earth landscape. In order to better understand the impact of humans on continental erosion, we have examined both long-term and short-term data on rates of sediment transfer in response to glacio-fluvial and anthropogenic processes. Phanerozoic rates of subaerial denudation inferred from preserved volumes of sedimentary rock require a mean continental erosion rate on the order of 16 meters per million years (m/My), resulting in the accumulation of about 5 giga-tons of sediment per year (Gt/y). Erosion irregularly increased over the ~542 million year span of Phanerozoic time to a Pliocene value of 81 m/My (~19 Gt/y). Current estimates of large river sediment loads are similar to this late Neogene value, and require net denudation of ice-free land surfaces at a rate of about 74 m/My (~25 Gt/y). Consideration of variation in large river sediment loads and the geomorphology of respective river basin catchments suggests that natural erosion is primarily confined to drainage headwaters; ~83% of the global river sediment flux is derived from the highest 10% of the Earth’s surface. Subaerial erosion as a result of human activity, primarily through agricultural practices, has resulted in a sharp increase in net rates of continental denudation; although less well constrained than estimates based on surviving rock volumes or current river loads, available data suggest that present farmland denudation is proceeding at a rate of about 600 m/My (~74 Gt/y), and is largely confined to lower

  20. Buried Mesozoic rift basins of Moroccan Atlantic continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, N.; Jabour, H.; El Mostaine, M.

    1995-08-01

    The Atlantic continental margin is the largest frontier area for oil and gas exploration in Morocco. Most of the activity has been concentrated where Upper Jurassic carbonate rocks have been the drilling objectives, with only one significant but non commercial oil discovery. Recent exploration activities have focused on early Mesozoic Rift basins buried beneath the post-rift sediments of the Middle Atlantic coastal plain. Many of these basins are of interest because they contain fine-grained lacustrine rocks that have sufficient organic richness to be classified as efficient oil prone source rock. Location of inferred rift basins beneath the Atlantic coastal plain were determined by analysis of drilled-hole data in combination with gravity anomaly and aeromagnetic maps. These rift basins are characterized by several half graben filled by synrift sediments of Triassic age probably deposited in lacustrine environment. Coeval rift basins are known to be present in the U.S. Atlantic continental margin. Basin modeling suggested that many of the less deeply bored rift basins beneath the coastal plain are still within the oil window and present the most attractive exploration targets in the area.

  1. Sixteenth International Conference on the physics of electronic and atomic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Dalgarno, A.; Freund, R.S.; Lubell, M.S.; Lucatorto, T.B.

    1989-01-01

    This report contains abstracts of papers on the following topics: photons, electron-atom collisions; electron-molecule collisions; electron-ion collisions; collisions involving exotic species; ion- atom collisions, ion-molecule or atom-molecule collisions; atom-atom collisions; ion-ion collisions; collisions involving rydberg atoms; field assisted collisions; collisions involving clusters and collisions involving condensed matter.

  2. Lithosphere dynamics and continental deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, Peter

    1995-07-01

    The unifying theme in this section is the remarkable weakness of major faults. I will consider the diverse new evidence for weakness, and the evidence for high pore pressure localized in faults as a fundamental cause. With this background one can better understand why faults remain active even after large rotations with respect to stress: I will look at large Neogene (≤23.7 million year old) rotations about horizontal axes in the Basin and Range province, and about vertical axes along the Pacific margin. Recent developments will be summarized from studies of Neogene tectonics (neotectonics) in California, Alaska, and the Mississippi embayment, in the context of a weak North American stress field that results mainly from topographic forces. To close, I will present new geophysical studies relevant to the continuing controversy over whether the basic structure of the North American mantle lithosphere was altered by an early Tertiary episode of flat subduction.

  3. The Pan-African continental margin in northeastern Africa - Evidence from a geochronological study of granulites at Sabaloka, Sudan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroener, A.; Stern, R. J.; Dawoud, A. S.; Compston, W.; Reischmann, T.

    1987-09-01

    The evolution of the Pan-African ancient continental margin in northeastern Africa was investigated, using an Nd model age, ion-microprobe data on zircon ages, and Rb-Sr whole-rock dates on the high-grade gneiss terrain at Sabaloka, Sudan, a region which is formally considered to be part of the Archaean/early Proterozoic Nile craton. The analysis of these data indicates that the Sabaloka granulites and gneisses are not Archaen in age. Instead, they reflect Pan-African metamorphic events. The gneisses studied may represent the infrastructure of the ancient African continental margin onto which the juvenile arc assemblage of the Arabian-Nubian shield was accreted during intense horizontal shortening and crustal interstacking of a major collision event.

  4. Collision avoidance sensor skin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to totally eliminate the possibility of a robot (or any mechanism for that matter) inducing a collision in space operations. We were particularly concerned that human beings were safe under all circumstances. This was apparently accomplished, and it is shown that GSFC has a system that is ready for space qualification and flight. However, it soon became apparent that much more could be accomplished with this technology. Payloads could be made invulnerable to collision avoidance and the blind spots behind them eliminated. This could be accomplished by a simple, non-imaging set of 'Capaciflector' sensors on each payload. It also is evident that this system could be used to align and dock the system with a wide margin of safety. Throughout, lighting problems could be ignored, and unexpected events and modeling errors taken in stride. At the same time, computational requirements would be reduced. This can be done in a simple, rugged, reliable manner that will not disturb the form factor of space systems. It will be practical for space applications. The lab experiments indicate we are well on the way to accomplishing this. Still, the research trail goes deeper. It now appears that the sensors can be extended to end effectors to provide precontact information and make robot docking (or any docking connection) very smooth, with minimal loads impacted back into the mating structures. This type of ability would be a major step forward in basic control techniques in space. There are, however, baseline and restructuring issues to be tackled. The payloads must get power and signals to them from the robot or from the astronaut servicing tool. This requires a standard electromechanical interface. Any of several could be used. The GSFC prototype shown in this presentation is a good one. Sensors with their attendant electronics must be added to the payloads, end effectors, and robot arms and integrated into the system.

  5. Continental crustal composition and lower crustal models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, S. R.

    1983-01-01

    The composition of the upper crust is well established as being close to that of granodiorite. The upper crustal composition is reflected in the uniform REE abundances in shales which represent an homogenization of the various REE patterns. This composition can only persist to depths of 10-15 km, for heat flow and geochemical balance reasons. The composition of the total crust is model dependent. One constraint is that it should be capable of generating the upper granodioritic (S.L.) crust by partial melting within the crust. This composition is based on the andesite model, which assumes that the total crust has grown by accretion of island arc material. A representation of the growth rate of the continental crust is shown. The composition of the lower crust, which comprises 60-80% of the continental crust, remains a major unknown factor for models of terrestrial crustal evolution. Two approaches are used to model the lower crust.

  6. Continental and oceanic crustal magnetization modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, C. G. A.; Hayling, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Inversion of magnetic data from the MAGSAT satellite, to arrive at intensities of magnetization of the Earth's crust, was performed by two different methods. The first method uses a spherical harmonic model of the magnetic field. The coefficients believed to represent sources in the Earth's crust can then be inverted to arrive at vertical dipole moments per unit area at the Earth's surface. The spherical harmonic models contain coefficients of degrees of harmonics up to 23. The dipole moment per unit area for a surface element can then be determined by summing the contribution for each individual degree of harmonic. The magnetic moments were calculated for continental and oceanic areas separately as well as over certain latitudinal segments. Of primary concern was to determine whether there are any differences between continental and oceanic areas. The second analysis with magnetization intensities was made using narrower ranges of degrees of harmonics, assuming that higher degrees are present in the core field signal.

  7. A budget for continental growth and denudation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howell, D.G.; Murray, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Oceanic crustal material on a global scale is re-created every 110 million years. From the data presented it is inferred that potential sialic material is formed at a rate of about 1.35 cubic kilometers per year, including hemipelagic volcanic sediments that accumulate at a rate of about 0.05 cubic kilometer per year. It is estimated that the influx of 1.65 cubic kilometers per year of terrigenous and biogenic sediment is deposited on the deep ocean, and this represents continental denudation. Because all this material is brought into a subduction zone, continental accretion rates, which could include all this material, may be as high as 3.0 cubic kilometers per year with a potential net growth for continents of 1.35 cubic kilometers per year.

  8. Regional magnetic anomaly constraints on continental rifting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Olivier, R.; Bentley, C. R.

    1985-01-01

    Radially polarized MAGSAT anomalies of North and South America, Europe, Africa, India, Australia and Antarctica demonstrate remarkably detailed correlation of regional magnetic lithospheric sources across rifted margins when plotted on a reconstruction of Pangea. These major magnetic features apparently preserve their integrity until a superimposed metamorphoric event alters the magnitude and pattern of the anomalies. The longevity of continental scale magnetic anomalies contrasts markedly with that of regional gravity anomalies which tend to reflect predominantly isostatic adjustments associated with neo-tectonism. First observed as a result of NASA's magnetic satellite programs, these anomalies provide new and fundamental constraints on the geologic evolution and dynamics of the continents and oceans. Accordingly, satellite magnetic observations provide a further tool for investigating continental drift to compliment other lines of evidence in paleoclimatology, paleontology, paleomagnetism, and studies of the radiometric ages and geometric fit of the continents.

  9. Moroccan crustal response to continental drift.

    PubMed

    Kanes, W H; Saadi, M; Ehrlich, E; Alem, A

    1973-06-01

    The formation and development of a zone of spreading beneath the continental crust resulted in the breakup of Pangea and formation of the Atlantic Ocean. The crust of Morocco bears an extremely complete record of the crustal response to this episode of mantle dynamics. Structural and related depositional patterns indicate that the African margin had stabilized by the Middle Jurassic as a marine carbonate environment; that it was dominated by tensile stresses in the early Mesozoic, resulting in two fault systems paralleling the Atlantic and Mediterranean margins and a basin and range structural-depositional style; and that it was affected by late Paleozoic metamorphism and intrusion. Mesozoic events record the latter portion of African involvement in the spreading episode; late Paleozoic thermal orogenesis might reflect the earlier events in the initiation of the spreading center and its development beneath significant continental crust. In that case, more than 100 million years were required for mantle dynamics to break up Pangea.

  10. Collisions in the Oort Cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, S.A.

    1988-03-01

    The present assessment of the consequentiality of physical collisions between Oort Cloud objects by a first-generation model indicates that natural power-law population structures produce significant numbers of collisions between each comet and smaller objects over the age of the solar system. These collisions are held to constitute a feedback mechanism for small debris production. The impacts yield extensive comet surface evolution in the cloud, in conditions where the number of small orbiting objects conforms to the standard power-law populations. 16 references.

  11. A collision tumor of esophagus.

    PubMed

    Yao, Bin; Guan, Shanghui; Huang, Xiaochen; Su, Peng; Song, Qingxu; Cheng, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    The collision tumor is defined by Meyer as that arisen from the accidental meeting and eventual intermingling of two independent neoplasms, which is quite rare. Most of them occur in the junction of different epithelial types of tissue such as oral cavity, esophagogastric junction, anorectaljunction and cervix, while collision tumors occurring in the liver, gallbladder, pancreatic, urinary bladder also have been reported. Here we present a case of 55-year-old Chinese man diagnosed as a collision tumor composed of leiomyosarcoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) in the lower third part of esophagus with 6 years survival after surgery and radiotherapy.

  12. Detrital fingerprints of fossil continental-subduction zones (Axial Belt Provenance, European Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resentini, Alberto; Garzanti, Eduardo; Vezzoli, Giovanni; Andò, Sergio; Malusà, Marco G.; Padoan, Marta; Paparella, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    Alpine-type collision orogens are generated by attempted subduction of thinned continental margins. Because of complex tectonic structure, orogenic detritus is characterized by a range of detrital signatures, making its recognition an arduous task (Dickinson and Suczek, 1979). Among the various orogenic sub-provenances, Axial Belt Provenance, derived from the erosion of the neometamorphic axial pile, can be regarded as the most typifying signature of collision orogens (Garzanti et al., 2007). In the Austroalpine Cretaceous and Penninic Eocene axial belts of the Alps, we ideally distinguish three structural levels, each characterized by diagnostic detrital fingerprints. The shallow level chiefly consists of offscraped remnant-ocean turbidites and unmetamorphosed continental-margin sediments, and mostly produces lithic to lithoquartzose sedimentaclastic sands yielding very-poor heavy-mineral suites including ultrastable minerals. The intermediate level includes low-grade metasediments and polymetamorphic basements, and sheds lithoquartzose to quartzolithofeldspathic metamorphiclastic sands yielding moderately-rich epidote- amphibole suites with chloritoid or garnet. The deep level contains eclogitic remnants of continent- ocean transitions, and supplies quartzofeldspathic to quartzolithic high-rank metamorphiclastic to lithic ultramaficlastic sands yielding rich to extremely-rich suites dominated by garnet, hornblende, or epidote depending on protoliths (continental vs. oceanic) and pressure/temperature paths followed during exhumation. Although widely overprinted under greenschist-facies or amphibolite-facies conditions, occurrence of ultradense eclogite in source areas is readily revealed by the Heavy Mineral Concentration (HMC) index, which mirrors the average density of source rocks in the absence of hydraulic-sorting effects (Garzanti and Andò 2007). The Metamorphic Index (MI, Garzanti and Vezzoli, 2003) and Hornblende Colour Index (HCI) reflect peak

  13. Iceberg scouring on the Norwegian continental shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Lien, R.

    1983-05-01

    This paper is a condensed version of parts of a Dr. ing. thesis to be presented during 1983. The first part of the paper deals with the regional distribution of iceberg scouring on the Norwegian continental shelf, and some general aspects related to it. The second part deals with iceberg scouring as a local phenomenon and its relation to the sea floor topography, sediment distribution, and geological and geotechnical properties of the sediments.

  14. Ocean processes at the Antarctic continental slope

    PubMed Central

    Heywood, Karen J.; Schmidtko, Sunke; Heuzé, Céline; Kaiser, Jan; Jickells, Timothy D.; Queste, Bastien Y.; Stevens, David P.; Wadley, Martin; Thompson, Andrew F.; Fielding, Sophie; Guihen, Damien; Creed, Elizabeth; Ridley, Jeff K.; Smith, Walker

    2014-01-01

    The Antarctic continental shelves and slopes occupy relatively small areas, but, nevertheless, are important for global climate, biogeochemical cycling and ecosystem functioning. Processes of water mass transformation through sea ice formation/melting and ocean–atmosphere interaction are key to the formation of deep and bottom waters as well as determining the heat flux beneath ice shelves. Climate models, however, struggle to capture these physical processes and are unable to reproduce water mass properties of the region. Dynamics at the continental slope are key for correctly modelling climate, yet their small spatial scale presents challenges both for ocean modelling and for observational studies. Cross-slope exchange processes are also vital for the flux of nutrients such as iron from the continental shelf into the mixed layer of the Southern Ocean. An iron-cycling model embedded in an eddy-permitting ocean model reveals the importance of sedimentary iron in fertilizing parts of the Southern Ocean. Ocean gliders play a key role in improving our ability to observe and understand these small-scale processes at the continental shelf break. The Gliders: Excellent New Tools for Observing the Ocean (GENTOO) project deployed three Seagliders for up to two months in early 2012 to sample the water to the east of the Antarctic Peninsula in unprecedented temporal and spatial detail. The glider data resolve small-scale exchange processes across the shelf-break front (the Antarctic Slope Front) and the front's biogeochemical signature. GENTOO demonstrated the capability of ocean gliders to play a key role in a future multi-disciplinary Southern Ocean observing system. PMID:24891389

  15. Ocean processes at the Antarctic continental slope.

    PubMed

    Heywood, Karen J; Schmidtko, Sunke; Heuzé, Céline; Kaiser, Jan; Jickells, Timothy D; Queste, Bastien Y; Stevens, David P; Wadley, Martin; Thompson, Andrew F; Fielding, Sophie; Guihen, Damien; Creed, Elizabeth; Ridley, Jeff K; Smith, Walker

    2014-07-13

    The Antarctic continental shelves and slopes occupy relatively small areas, but, nevertheless, are important for global climate, biogeochemical cycling and ecosystem functioning. Processes of water mass transformation through sea ice formation/melting and ocean-atmosphere interaction are key to the formation of deep and bottom waters as well as determining the heat flux beneath ice shelves. Climate models, however, struggle to capture these physical processes and are unable to reproduce water mass properties of the region. Dynamics at the continental slope are key for correctly modelling climate, yet their small spatial scale presents challenges both for ocean modelling and for observational studies. Cross-slope exchange processes are also vital for the flux of nutrients such as iron from the continental shelf into the mixed layer of the Southern Ocean. An iron-cycling model embedded in an eddy-permitting ocean model reveals the im