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Sample records for active contractile properties

  1. Anisotropic Elastography for Local Passive Properties and Active Contractility of Myocardium from Dynamic Heart Imaging Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ge; Sun, L. Z.

    2006-01-01

    Major heart diseases such as ischemia and hypertrophic myocardiopathy are accompanied with significant changes in the passive mechanical properties and active contractility of myocardium. Identification of these changes helps diagnose heart diseases, monitor therapy, and design surgery. A dynamic cardiac elastography (DCE) framework is developed to assess the anisotropic viscoelastic passive properties and active contractility of myocardial tissues, based on the chamber pressure and dynamic displacement measured with cardiac imaging techniques. A dynamic adjoint method is derived to enhance the numerical efficiency and stability of DCE. Model-based simulations are conducted using a numerical left ventricle (LV) phantom with an ischemic region. The passive material parameters of normal and ischemic tissues are identified during LV rapid/reduced filling and artery contraction, and those of active contractility are quantified during isovolumetric contraction and rapid/reduced ejection. It is found that quasistatic simplification in the previous cardiac elastography studies may yield inaccurate material parameters. PMID:23165032

  2. Anisotropic elastography for local passive properties and active contractility of myocardium from dynamic heart imaging sequence.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Wang, Ge; Sun, L Z

    2006-01-01

    Major heart diseases such as ischemia and hypertrophic myocardiopathy are accompanied with significant changes in the passive mechanical properties and active contractility of myocardium. Identification of these changes helps diagnose heart diseases, monitor therapy, and design surgery. A dynamic cardiac elastography (DCE) framework is developed to assess the anisotropic viscoelastic passive properties and active contractility of myocardial tissues, based on the chamber pressure and dynamic displacement measured with cardiac imaging techniques. A dynamic adjoint method is derived to enhance the numerical efficiency and stability of DCE. Model-based simulations are conducted using a numerical left ventricle (LV) phantom with an ischemic region. The passive material parameters of normal and ischemic tissues are identified during LV rapid/reduced filling and artery contraction, and those of active contractility are quantified during isovolumetric contraction and rapid/reduced ejection. It is found that quasistatic simplification in the previous cardiac elastography studies may yield inaccurate material parameters.

  3. An active learning mammalian skeletal muscle lab demonstrating contractile and kinetic properties of fast- and slow-twitch muscle.

    PubMed

    Head, S I; Arber, M B

    2013-12-01

    The fact that humans possess fast- and slow-twitch muscle in the ratio of ∼50% has profound implications for designing exercise training strategies for power and endurance activities. With the growth of exercise and sport science courses, we have seen the need to develop an undergraduate student laboratory that demonstrates the basic properties of fast- and slow-twitch mammalian skeletal muscle. This laboratory illustrates the major differences in contractile properties and fatigue profiles exhibited by the two muscle types. Students compare and contrast twitch kinetics, fused tetanus characteristics, force-frequency relationships, and fatigue properties of fast- and slow-twitch muscles. Examples of results collected by students during class are used to illustrate the type of data collected and analysis performed. During the laboratory, students are encouraged to connect factual information from their skeletal muscle lectures to their laboratory findings. This enables student learning in an active fashion; in particular, the isolated muscle preparation demonstrates that much of what makes muscle fast or slow is myogenic and not the product of the nervous or circulatory systems. This has far-reaching implications for motor control and exercise behavior and therefore is a crucial element in exercise science, with its focus on power and endurance sport activities. To measure student satisfaction with this active learning technique, a questionnaire was administered after the laboratory; 96% of the comments were positive in their support of active versus passive learning strategies.

  4. Contractile properties of thin (actin) filament-reconstituted muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Ishiwata, S; Funatsu, T; Fujita, H

    1998-01-01

    Selective removal and reconstitution of the components of muscle fibers (fibrils) is a useful means of examining the molecular mechanism underlying the formation of the contractile apparatus. In addition, this approach is powerful for examining the structure-function relationship of a specific component of the contractile system. In previous studies, we have achieved the partial structural and functional reconstitution of thin filaments in the skeletal contractile apparatus and full reconstitution in the cardiac contractile apparatus. First, all thin filaments other than short fragments at the Z line were removed by treatment with plasma gelsolin, an actin filament-severing protein. Under these conditions, no active tension could be generated. By incorporating exogenous actin into these thin filament-free fibers, actin filaments were reconstituted by polymerization on the short actin fragments remaining at the Z line, and active tension, which was insensitive to Ca2+, was restored. The active tension after the reconstitution of thin filaments reached as high as 30% of the original level in skeletal muscle, while it reached 140% in cardiac muscle. The augmentation of tension in cardiac muscle is mainly attributable to the elongation of reconstituted filaments, longer than the average length of thin filaments in an intact muscle. These results indicate that a muscle contractile apparatus with a high order structure and function can be constructed by the self-assembly of constituent proteins. Recently, we applied this reconstitution system to the study of the mechanism of spontaneous oscillatory contraction (SPOC) in thin (actin) filament-reconstituted cardiac muscle fibers. As a result, we found that SPOC occurs even in regulatory protein-free actin filament-reconstituted fibers (Fujita & Ishiwata, manuscript submitted), although the SPOC conditions were slightly different from the standard SPOC conditions. This result strongly suggests that spontaneous oscillation

  5. A Comparison of the Contractile Properties of Myometrium from Singleton and Twin Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, Jonathan; Ballard, Celia; Bricker, Leanne; Neilson, James; Wray, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Objective Over half of twin pregnancies in US and UK deliver prematurely but the reasons for this are unclear. The contractility of myometrium from twin pregnancies has not been directly investigated. The objective of this research was to determine if there are differences in the contractile activity and response to oxytocin, between myometrium from singleton and twin pregnancies, across a range of gestational ages. Furthermore, we wished to determine if contractile activity correlates with increasing level of stretch, using neonatal birth weights as a marker of uterine stretch. Methods This was an in vitro, laboratory based study of myometrial contractility in women pregnant with one or two babies, using biopsies obtained from non-labouring women undergoing Caesarean section. Spontaneous, oxytocin-stimulated and depolarization induced contractile activity was compared. Results Direct measurements of myometrial contractility under controlled conditions show that the frequency of contractions and responses to oxytocin are significantly increased in twins compared to singletons. The duration of contraction however was significantly reduced. We find that contractile activity correlates with increasing levels of stretch, using neonatal birth weights as a surrogate for uterine stretch, with response to oxytocin being significantly positively correlated with birth weight. Conclusions We have found significant differences in contractile properties between myometrium from singleton and twin pregnancies and that increasing uterine stretch can alter the contractile properties of myometrium. We discuss the implication of these findings to preterm delivery and future studies. PMID:23671701

  6. Longitudinal decline of lower extremity muscle power in healthy and mobility-limited older adults: influence of muscle mass, strength, composition, neuromuscular activation and single fiber contractile properties

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Kieran F.; Pasha, Evan; Doros, Gheorghe; Clark, David J.; Patten, Carolynn; Phillips, Edward M.; Frontera, Walter R.; Fielding, Roger A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This longitudinal study examined the major physiological mechanisms that determine the age-related loss of lower extremity muscle power in two distinct groups of older humans. We hypothesized that after ~ 3 years of follow-up, mobility-limited older adults (mean age: 77.2 ± 4, n = 22, 12 females) would have significantly greater reductions in leg extensor muscle power compared to healthy older adults (74.1 ± 4, n = 26, 12 females). Methods Mid-thigh muscle size and composition were assessed using computed tomography. Neuromuscular activation was quantified using surface electromyography and vastus lateralis single muscle fibers were studied to evaluate intrinsic muscle contractile properties. Results At follow-up, the overall magnitude of muscle power loss was similar between groups: mobility-limited: −8.5% vs. healthy older: −8.8%, P > 0.8. Mobility-limited elders had significant reductions in muscle size (−3.8%, P< 0.01) and strength (−5.9%, P< 0.02), however, these parameters were preserved in healthy older (P ≥ 0.7). Neuromuscular activation declined significantly within healthy older but not in mobility-limited participants. Within both groups, the cross sectional areas of type I and type IIA muscle fibers were preserved while substantial increases in single fiber peak force ( > 30%), peak power (> 200%) and unloaded shortening velocity (>50%) were elicited at follow-up. Conclusion Different physiological mechanisms contribute to the loss of lower extremity muscle power in healthy older and mobility-limited older adults. Neuromuscular changes may be the critical early determinant of muscle power deficits with aging. In response to major whole muscle decrements, major compensatory mechanisms occur within the contractile properties of surviving single muscle fibers in an attempt to restore overall muscle power and function with advancing age. PMID:24122149

  7. Contractile properties and sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium content in type I and type II skeletal muscle fibres in active aged humans

    PubMed Central

    Lamboley, C R; Wyckelsma, V L; Dutka, T L; McKenna, M J; Murphy, R M; Lamb, G D

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the contractile properties and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ content in mechanically skinned vastus lateralis muscle fibres of Old (70 ± 4 years) and Young (22 ± 3 years) humans to investigate whether changes in muscle fibre properties contribute to muscle weakness in old age. In type II fibres of Old subjects, specific force was reduced by ∼17% and Ca2+ sensitivity was also reduced (pCa50 decreased ∼0.05 pCa units) relative to that in Young. S-Glutathionylation of fast troponin I (TnIf) markedly increased Ca2+ sensitivity in type II fibres, but the increase was significantly smaller in Old versus Young (+0.136 and +0.164 pCa unit increases, respectively). Endogenous and maximal SR Ca2+ content were significantly smaller in both type I and type II fibres in Old subjects. In fibres of Young, the SR could be nearly fully depleted of Ca2+ by a combined caffeine and low Mg2+ stimulus, whereas in fibres of Old the amount of non-releasable Ca2+ was significantly increased (by > 12% of endogenous Ca2+ content). Western blotting showed an increased proportion of type I fibres in Old subjects, and increased amounts of calsequestrin-2 and calsequestrin-like protein. The findings suggest that muscle weakness in old age is probably attributable in part to (i) an increased proportion of type I fibres, (ii) a reduction in both maximum specific force and Ca2+ sensitivity in type II fibres, and also a decreased ability of S-glutathionylation of TnIf to counter the fatiguing effects of metabolites on Ca2+ sensitivity, and (iii) a reduction in the amount of releasable SR Ca2+ in both fibre types. Key points Muscle weakness in old age is due in large part to an overall loss of skeletal muscle tissue, but it remains uncertain how much also stems from alterations in the properties of the individual muscle fibres. This study examined the contractile properties and amount of stored intracellular calcium in single muscle fibres of Old (70

  8. An Active Learning Mammalian Skeletal Muscle Lab Demonstrating Contractile and Kinetic Properties of Fast- and Slow-Twitch Muscle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Head, S. I.; Arber, M. B.

    2013-01-01

    The fact that humans possess fast and slow-twitch muscle in the ratio of approximately 50% has profound implications for designing exercise training strategies for power and endurance activities. With the growth of exercise and sport science courses, we have seen the need to develop an undergraduate student laboratory that demonstrates the basic…

  9. Contractile and Mechanical Properties of Epithelia with Perturbed Actomyosin Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Sabine C.; Blanchard, Guy B.; Duque, Julia; Adams, Richard J.; Arias, Alfonso Martinez; Guest, Simon D.; Gorfinkiel, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Mechanics has an important role during morphogenesis, both in the generation of forces driving cell shape changes and in determining the effective material properties of cells and tissues. Drosophila dorsal closure has emerged as a reference model system for investigating the interplay between tissue mechanics and cellular activity. During dorsal closure, the amnioserosa generates one of the major forces that drive closure through the apical contraction of its constituent cells. We combined quantitation of live data, genetic and mechanical perturbation and cell biology, to investigate how mechanical properties and contraction rate emerge from cytoskeletal activity. We found that a decrease in Myosin phosphorylation induces a fluidization of amnioserosa cells which become more compliant. Conversely, an increase in Myosin phosphorylation and an increase in actin linear polymerization induce a solidification of cells. Contrary to expectation, these two perturbations have an opposite effect on the strain rate of cells during DC. While an increase in actin polymerization increases the contraction rate of amnioserosa cells, an increase in Myosin phosphorylation gives rise to cells that contract very slowly. The quantification of how the perturbation induced by laser ablation decays throughout the tissue revealed that the tissue in these two mutant backgrounds reacts very differently. We suggest that the differences in the strain rate of cells in situations where Myosin activity or actin polymerization is increased arise from changes in how the contractile forces are transmitted and coordinated across the tissue through ECadherin-mediated adhesion. Altogether, our results show that there is an optimal level of Myosin activity to generate efficient contraction and suggest that the architecture of the actin cytoskeleton and the dynamics of adhesion complexes are important parameters for the emergence of coordinated activity throughout the tissue. PMID:24759936

  10. Altitude-induced changes in muscle contractile properties.

    PubMed

    Perrey, Stéphane; Rupp, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Because of its high energetic demand, skeletal muscle is sensitive to changes in the partial pressure of oxygen. Most human studies on in vivo skeletal muscle function during hypoxia were performed with voluntary contractions. However, skeletal muscle function is not only characterized by voluntary maximal or repeated force- generating capacity, but also by force generated by evoked muscle contractions (i.e., force-frequency properties). This mini-review reports on the effects of acute or prolonged exposure to hypoxia on human skeletal muscle performance and contractile properties. The latter depend on both the amount and type of contractile proteins and the efficiency of the cellular mechanism of excitation-contraction coupling. Observations on humans indicate that hypoxia (during simulated ascent or brief exposure) exerts modest influences on the membrane propagation of the muscle action potentials during voluntary contractions. Overall in humans, in physiological conditions, including that of climbing Mt. Everest, there is extraordinarily little that changes with regard to maximal force-generating capacity. Interestingly, it appears that the adaptations to chronic hypoxia minimize the effects on skeletal muscle dysfunction (i.e., impairment during fatigue resistance exercise and in muscle contractile properties) that may occur during acute hypoxia for some isolated muscle exercises. Only sustained isometric exercise exceeding a certain intensity (30% MVC) and causing substantial and sustained ischemia is not affected by acute hypoxia.

  11. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant preserves contractile properties and mitochondrial function of skeletal muscle in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Javadov, Sabzali; Jang, Sehwan; Rodriguez-Reyes, Natividad; Rodriguez-Zayas, Ana E.; Hernandez, Jessica Soto; Krainz, Tanja; Wipf, Peter; Frontera, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in the pathogenesis of sarcopenia associated with a loss of mass and activity of skeletal muscle. In addition to energy deprivation, increased mitochondrial ROS damage proteins and lipids in aged skeletal muscle. Therefore, prevention of mitochondrial ROS is important for potential therapeutic strategies to delay sarcopenia. This study elucidates the pharmacological efficiency of the new developed mitochondria-targeted ROS and electron scavenger, XJB-5-131 (XJB) to restore muscle contractility and mitochondrial function in aged skeletal muscle. Male adult (5-month old) and aged (29-month old) Fischer Brown Norway (F344/BN) rats were treated with XJB for four weeks and contractile properties of single skeletal muscle fibres and activity of mitochondrial ETC complexes were determined at the end of the treatment period. XJB-treated old rats showed higher muscle contractility associated with prevention of protein oxidation in both muscle homogenate and mitochondria compared with untreated counterparts. XJB-treated animals demonstrated a high activity of the respiratory complexes I, III, and IV with no changes in citrate synthase activity. These data demonstrate that mitochondrial ROS play a causal role in muscle weakness, and that a ROS scavenger specifically targeted to mitochondria can reverse age-related alterations of mitochondrial function and improve contractile properties in skeletal muscle. PMID:26415224

  12. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant preserves contractile properties and mitochondrial function of skeletal muscle in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Javadov, Sabzali; Jang, Sehwan; Rodriguez-Reyes, Natividad; Rodriguez-Zayas, Ana E; Soto Hernandez, Jessica; Krainz, Tanja; Wipf, Peter; Frontera, Walter

    2015-11-24

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in the pathogenesis of sarcopenia associated with a loss of mass and activity of skeletal muscle. In addition to energy deprivation, increased mitochondrial ROS damage proteins and lipids in aged skeletal muscle. Therefore, prevention of mitochondrial ROS is important for potential therapeutic strategies to delay sarcopenia. This study elucidates the pharmacological efficiency of the new developed mitochondria-targeted ROS and electron scavenger, XJB-5-131 (XJB) to restore muscle contractility and mitochondrial function in aged skeletal muscle. Male adult (5-month old) and aged (29-month old) Fischer Brown Norway (F344/BN) rats were treated with XJB for four weeks and contractile properties of single skeletal muscle fibres and activity of mitochondrial ETC complexes were determined at the end of the treatment period. XJB-treated old rats showed higher muscle contractility associated with prevention of protein oxidation in both muscle homogenate and mitochondria compared with untreated counterparts. XJB-treated animals demonstrated a high activity of the respiratory complexes I, III, and IV with no changes in citrate synthase activity. These data demonstrate that mitochondrial ROS play a causal role in muscle weakness, and that a ROS scavenger specifically targeted to mitochondria can reverse age-related alterations of mitochondrial function and improve contractile properties in skeletal muscle.

  13. Molecular effects of the myosin activator omecamtiv mecarbil on contractile properties of skinned myocardium lacking cardiac myosin binding protein-C.

    PubMed

    Mamidi, Ranganath; Gresham, Kenneth S; Li, Amy; dos Remedios, Cristobal G; Stelzer, Julian E

    2015-08-01

    Decreased expression of cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) in the myocardium is thought to be a contributing factor to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in humans, and the initial molecular defect is likely abnormal cross-bridge (XB) function which leads to impaired force generation, decreased contractile performance, and hypertrophy in vivo. The myosin activator omecamtiv mecarbil (OM) is a pharmacological drug that specifically targets the myosin XB and recent evidence suggests that OM induces a significant decrease in the in vivo motility velocity and an increase in the XB duty cycle. Thus, the molecular effects of OM maybe beneficial in improving contractile function in skinned myocardium lacking cMyBP-C because absence of cMyBP-C in the sarcomere accelerates XB kinetics and enhances XB turnover rate, which presumably reduces contractile efficiency. Therefore, parameters of XB function were measured in skinned myocardium lacking cMyBP-C prior to and following OM incubation. We measured ktr, the rate of force redevelopment as an index of XB transition from both the weakly- to strongly-bound state and from the strongly- to weakly-bound states and performed stretch activation experiments to measure the rates of XB detachment (krel) and XB recruitment (kdf) in detergent-skinned ventricular preparations isolated from hearts of wild-type (WT) and cMyBP-C knockout (KO) mice. Samples from donor human hearts were also used to assess the effects of OM in cardiac muscle expressing a slow β-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC). Incubation of skinned myocardium with OM produced large enhancements in steady-state force generation which were most pronounced at low levels of [Ca(2+)] activations, suggesting that OM cooperatively recruits additional XB's into force generating states. Despite a large increase in steady-state force generation following OM incubation, parallel accelerations in XB kinetics as measured by ktr were not observed, and there was a significant OM

  14. Depressed phosphatidic acid-induced contractile activity of failing cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Tappia, Paramjit S; Maddaford, Thane G; Hurtado, Cecilia; Panagia, Vincenzo; Pierce, Grant N

    2003-01-10

    The effects of phosphatidic acid (PA), a known inotropic agent, on Ca(2+) transients and contractile activity of cardiomyocytes in congestive heart failure (CHF) due to myocardial infarction were examined. In control cells, PA induced a significant increase (25%) in active cell shortening and Ca(2+) transients. The phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor, 2-nitro-4-carboxyphenyl N,N-diphenylcarbonate, blocked the positive inotropic action induced by PA, indicating that PA induces an increase in contractile activity and Ca(2+) transients through stimulation of PLC. Conversely, in failing cardiomyocytes there was a loss of PA-induced increase in active cell shortening and Ca(2+) transients. PA did not alter resting cell length. Both diastolic and systolic [Ca(2+)] were significantly elevated in the failing cardiomyocytes. In vitro assessment of the cardiac sarcolemmal (SL) PLC activity revealed that the impaired failing cardiomyocyte response to PA was associated with a diminished stimulation of SL PLC activity by PA. Our results identify an important defect in the PA-PLC signaling pathway in failing cardiomyocytes, which may have significant implications for the depressed contractile function during CHF.

  15. Maternal age effects on myometrial expression of contractile proteins, uterine gene expression, and contractile activity during labor in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Elmes, Matthew; Szyszka, Alexandra; Pauliat, Caroline; Clifford, Bethan; Daniel, Zoe; Cheng, Zhangrui; Wathes, Claire; McMullen, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Advanced maternal age of first time pregnant mothers is associated with prolonged and dysfunctional labor and significant risk of emergency cesarean section. We investigated the influence of maternal age on myometrial contractility, expression of contractile associated proteins (CAPs), and global gene expression in the parturient uterus. Female Wistar rats either 8 (YOUNG n = 10) or 24 (OLDER n = 10) weeks old were fed laboratory chow, mated, and killed during parturition. Myometrial strips were dissected to determine contractile activity, cholesterol (CHOL) and triglycerides (TAG) content, protein expression of connexin-43 (GJA1), prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2), and caveolin 1 (CAV-1). Maternal plasma concentrations of prostaglandins PGE2, PGF2α, and progesterone were determined by RIA. Global gene expression in uterine samples was compared using Affymetrix Genechip Gene 2.0 ST arrays and Ingenuity Pathway analysis (IPA). Spontaneous contractility in myometrium exhibited by YOUNG rats was threefold greater than OLDER animals (P < 0.027) but maternal age had no significant effect on myometrial CAP expression, lipid profiles, or pregnancy-related hormones. OLDER myometrium increased contractile activity in response to PGF2α, phenylephrine, and carbachol, a response absent in YOUNG rats (all P < 0.002). Microarray analysis identified that maternal age affected expression of genes related to immune and inflammatory responses, lipid transport and metabolism, steroid metabolism, tissue remodeling, and smooth muscle contraction. In conclusion YOUNG laboring rat myometrium seems primed to contract maximally, whereas activity is blunted in OLDER animals and requires stimulation to meet contractile potential. Further work investigating maternal age effects on myometrial function is required with focus on lipid metabolism and inflammatory pathways. PMID:25876907

  16. Changes in contractile activation characteristics of rat fast and slow skeletal muscle fibres during regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gregorevic, Paul; Plant, David R; Stupka, Nicole; Lynch, Gordon S

    2004-01-01

    Damaged skeletal muscle fibres are replaced with new contractile units via muscle regeneration. Regenerating muscle fibres synthesize functionally distinct isoforms of contractile and regulatory proteins but little is known of their functional properties during the regeneration process. An advantage of utilizing single muscle fibre preparations is that assessment of their function is based on the overall characteristics of the contractile apparatus and regulatory system and as such, these preparations are sensitive in revealing not only coarse, but also subtle functional differences between muscle fibres. We examined the Ca2+- and Sr2+-activated contractile characteristics of permeabilized fibres from rat fast-twitch (extensor digitorum longus) and slow-twitch (soleus) muscles at 7, 14 and 21 days following myotoxic injury, to test the hypothesis that fibres from regenerating fast and slow muscles have different functional characteristics to fibres from uninjured muscles. Regenerating muscle fibres had ∼10% of the maximal force producing capacity (Po) of control (uninjured) fibres, and an altered sensitivity to Ca2+ and Sr2+ at 7 days post-injury. Increased force production and a shift in Ca2+ sensitivity consistent with fibre maturation were observed during regeneration such that Po was restored to 36–45% of that in control fibres by 21 days, and sensitivity to Ca2+ and Sr2+ was similar to that of control (uninjured) fibres. The findings support the hypothesis that regenerating muscle fibres have different contractile activation characteristics compared with mature fibres, and that they adopt properties of mature fast- or slow-twitch muscle fibres in a progressive manner as the regeneration process is completed. PMID:15181161

  17. Influence of the Cardiac Myosin Hinge Region on Contractile Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margossian, Sarkis S.; Krueger, John W.; Sellers, James R.; Cuda, Giovanni; Caulfield, James B.; Norton, Paul; Slayter, Henry S.

    1991-06-01

    The participation of cardiac myosin hinge in contractility was investigated by in vitro motility and ATPase assays and by measurements of sarcomere shortening. The effect on contractile activity was analyzed using an antibody directed against a 20-amino acid peptide within the hinge region of myosin. This antibody bound specifically at the hinge at a distance of 55 nm from the S1/S2 junction, was specific to human, dog, and rat cardiac myosins, did not crossreact with gizzard or skeletal myosin, and had no effect on ATPase activity of purified S1 and myofibrils. However, it completely suppressed the movement of actin filaments in in vitro motility assays and reduced active shortening of sarcomeres of skinned cardiac myocytes by half. Suppression of motion by the antihinge antibody may reflect a mechanical constraint imposed by the antibody upon the mobility of the S2 region of myosin. The results suggest that the steps in the mechanochemical energy transduction can be separately influenced through S2.

  18. Vascular smooth muscle cell functional contractility depends on extracellular mechanical properties

    PubMed Central

    Steucke, Kerianne E.; Tracy, Paige V.; Hald, Eric S.; Hall, Jennifer L.; Alford, Patrick W.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells’ primary function is to maintain vascular homeostasis through active contraction and relaxation. In diseases such as hypertension and atherosclerosis, this function is inhibited concurrent to changes in the mechanical environment surrounding vascular smooth muscle cells. It is well established that cell function and extracellular mechanics are interconnected; variations in substrate modulus affect cell migration, proliferation, and differentiation. To date, it is unknown how the evolving extracellular mechanical environment of vascular smooth muscle cells affects their contractile function. Here, we have built upon previous vascular muscular thin film technology to develop a variable-modulus vascular muscular thin film that measures vascular tissue functional contractility on substrates with a range of pathological and physiological moduli. Using this modified vascular muscular thin film, we found that vascular smooth muscle cells generated greater stress on substrates with higher moduli compared to substrates with lower moduli. We then measured protein markers typically thought to indicate a contractile phenotype in vascular smooth muscle cells and found that phenotype is unaffected by substrate modulus. These data suggest that mechanical properties of vascular smooth muscle cells’ extracellular environment directly influence their functional behavior and do so without inducing phenotype switching. PMID:26283412

  19. Contractile properties of muscle fibers from the deep and superficial digital flexors of horses.

    PubMed

    Butcher, M T; Chase, P B; Hermanson, J W; Clark, A N; Brunet, N M; Bertram, J E A

    2010-10-01

    Equine digital flexor muscles have independent tendons but a nearly identical mechanical relationship to the main joint they act upon. Yet these muscles have remarkable diversity in architecture, ranging from long, unipennate fibers ("short" compartment of DDF) to very short, multipennate fibers (SDF). To investigate the functional relevance of the form of the digital flexor muscles, fiber contractile properties were analyzed in the context of architecture differences and in vivo function during locomotion. Myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform fiber type was studied, and in vitro motility assays were used to measure actin filament sliding velocity (V(f)). Skinned fiber contractile properties [isometric tension (P(0)/CSA), velocity of unloaded shortening (V(US)), and force-Ca(2+) relationships] at both 10 and 30°C were characterized. Contractile properties were correlated with MHC isoform and their respective V(f). The DDF contained a higher percentage of MHC-2A fibers with myosin (heavy meromyosin) and V(f) that was twofold faster than SDF. At 30°C, P(0)/CSA was higher for DDF (103.5 ± 8.75 mN/mm(2)) than SDF fibers (81.8 ± 7.71 mN/mm(2)). Similarly, V(US) (pCa 5, 30°C) was faster for DDF (2.43 ± 0.53 FL/s) than SDF fibers (1.20 ± 0.22 FL/s). Active isometric tension increased with increasing Ca(2+) concentration, with maximal Ca(2+) activation at pCa 5 at each temperature in fibers from each muscle. In general, the collective properties of DDF and SDF were consistent with fiber MHC isoform composition, muscle architecture, and the respective functional roles of the two muscles in locomotion.

  20. Reliability of Contractile Properties of the Knee Extensor Muscles in Individuals with Post-Polio Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Voorn, Eric L.; Brehm, Merel A.; Beelen, Anita; de Haan, Arnold; Nollet, Frans; Gerrits, Karin H. L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the reliability of contractile properties of the knee extensor muscles in 23 individuals with post-polio syndrome (PPS) and 18 age-matched healthy individuals. Methods Contractile properties of the knee extensors were assessed from repeated electrically evoked contractions on 2 separate days, with the use of a fixed dynamometer. Reliability was determined for fatigue resistance, rate of torque development (MRTD), and early and late relaxation time (RT50 and RT25), using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and standard error of measurement (SEM, expressed as % of the mean). Results In both groups, reliability for fatigue resistance was good, with high ICCs (>0.90) and small SEM values (PPS: 7.1%, healthy individuals: 7.0%). Reliability for contractile speed indices varied, with the best values found for RT50 (ICCs>0.82, SEM values <2.8%). We found no systematic differences between test and retest occasions, except for RT50 in healthy subjects (p = 0.016). Conclusions In PPS and healthy individuals, the reliability of fatigue resistance, as obtained from electrically evoked contractions is high. The reliability of contractile speed is only moderate, except for RT50 in PPS, demonstrating high reliability. Significance This was the first study to examine the reliability of electrically evoked contractile properties in individuals with PPS. Our results demonstrate its potential to study mechanisms underlying muscle fatigue in PPS and to evaluate changes in contractile properties over time in response to interventions or from natural course. PMID:25019943

  1. Detecting cardiac contractile activity in the early mouse embryo using multiple modalities

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chiann-Mun; Miranda, António M. A.; Bub, Gil; Srinivas, Shankar

    2015-01-01

    The heart is one of the first organs to develop during mammalian embryogenesis. In the mouse, it starts to form shortly after gastrulation, and is derived primarily from embryonic mesoderm. The embryonic heart is unique in having to perform a mechanical contractile function while undergoing complex morphogenetic remodeling. Approaches to imaging the morphogenesis and contractile activity of the developing heart are important in understanding not only how this remodeling is controlled but also the origin of congenital heart defects (CHDs). Here, we describe approaches for visualizing contractile activity in the developing mouse embryo, using brightfield time lapse microscopy and confocal microscopy of calcium transients. We describe an algorithm for enhancing this image data and quantifying contractile activity from it. Finally we describe how atomic force microscopy can be used to record contractile activity prior to it being microscopically visible. PMID:25610399

  2. Effect of chronic contractile activity on SS and IMF mitochondrial apoptotic susceptibility in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Adhihetty, Peter J; Ljubicic, Vladimir; Hood, David A

    2007-03-01

    Chronic contractile activity of skeletal muscle induces an increase in mitochondria located in proximity to the sarcolemma [subsarcolemmal (SS)] and in mitochondria interspersed between the myofibrils [intermyofibrillar (IMF)]. These are energetically favorable metabolic adaptations, but because mitochondria are also involved in apoptosis, we investigated the effect of chronic contractile activity on mitochondrially mediated apoptotic signaling in muscle. We hypothesized that chronic contractile activity would provide protection against mitochondrially mediated apoptosis despite an elevation in the expression of proapoptotic proteins. To induce mitochondrial biogenesis, we chronically stimulated (10 Hz; 3 h/day) rat muscle for 7 days. Chronic contractile activity did not alter the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, an index of apoptotic susceptibility, and did not affect manganese superoxide dismutase levels. However, contractile activity increased antiapoptotic 70-kDa heat shock protein and apoptosis repressor with a caspase recruitment domain by 1.3- and 1.4-fold (P<0.05), respectively. Contractile activity elevated SS mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production 1.4- and 1.9-fold (P<0.05) during states IV and III respiration, respectively, whereas IMF mitochondrial state IV ROS production was suppressed by 28% (P<0.05) and was unaffected during state III respiration. Following stimulation, exogenous ROS treatment produced less cytochrome c release (25-40%) from SS and IMF mitochondria, and also reduced apoptosis-inducing factor release (approximately 30%) from IMF mitochondria, despite higher inherent cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor expression. Chronic contractile activity did not alter mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mtPTP) components in either subfraction. However, SS mitochondria exhibited a significant increase in the time to Vmax of mtPTP opening. Thus, chronic contractile activity induces predominantly antiapoptotic adaptations in both

  3. Grip force, EDL contractile properties, and voluntary wheel running after postdevelopmental myostatin depletion in mice.

    PubMed

    Personius, Kirkwood E; Jayaram, Aditi; Krull, David; Brown, Roger; Xu, Tianshun; Han, Bajin; Burgess, Kerri; Storey, Christopher; Shah, Bharati; Tawil, Rabi; Welle, Stephen

    2010-09-01

    There is no consensus about whether making muscles abnormally large by reducing myostatin activity affects force-generating capacity or the ability to perform activities requiring muscular endurance. We therefore examined grip force, contractile properties of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles, and voluntary wheel running in mice in which myostatin was depleted after normal muscle development. Cre recombinase activity was induced to knock out exon 3 of the myostatin gene in 4-mo-old mice in which this exon was flanked by loxP sequences (Mstn[f/f]). Control mice with normal myostatin genes (Mstn[w/w]) received the same Cre-activating treatment. Myostatin depletion increased the mass of all muscles that were examined (gastrocnemius, quadriceps, tibialis anterior, EDL, soleus, triceps) by approximately 20-40%. Grip force, measured multiple times 2-22 wk after myostatin knockout, was not consistently greater in the myostatin-deficient mice. EDL contractile properties were determined 7-13 mo after myostatin knockout. Twitch force tended to be greater in myostatin-deficient muscles (+24%; P=0.09), whereas tetanic force was not consistently elevated (mean +11%; P=0.36), even though EDL mass was greater than normal in all myostatin-deficient mice (mean +36%; P<0.001). The force deficit induced by eccentric contractions was approximately twofold greater in myostatin-deficient than in normal EDL muscles (31% vs. 16% after five eccentric contractions; P=0.02). Myostatin-deficient mice ran 19% less distance (P<0.01) than control mice during the 12 wk following myostatin depletion, primarily because of fewer running bouts per night rather than diminished running speed or bout duration. Reduced specific tension (ratio of force to mass) and reduced running have been observed after muscle hypertrophy was induced by other means, suggesting that they are characteristics generally associated with abnormally large muscles rather than unique effects of myostatin deficiency.

  4. Crustacean muscle plasticity: molecular mechanisms determining mass and contractile properties.

    PubMed

    Mykles, D L

    1997-07-01

    Two crustacean models for understanding molecular mechanisms of muscle plasticity are reviewed. Metabolic changes underlying muscle protein synthesis and degradation have been examined in the Bermuda land crab, Gecarcinus lateralis. During proecdysis, the claw closer muscle undergoes a programmed atrophy, which results from a highly controlled breakdown of myofibrillar proteins by Ca(2+)-dependent and, possibly, ATP/ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic enzymes. The advantage of this model is that there is neither fiber degeneration nor contractile-type switching, which often occurs in mammalian skeletal muscles. The second model uses American lobster, Homarus americanus, to understand the genetic regulation of fiber-type switching. Fibers in the claw closer muscles undergo a developmentally-regulated transformation as the isomorphic claws of larvae and juveniles differentiate into the heteromorphic cutter and crusher claws of adults. This switching occurs at the boundary between fast- and slow-fiber regions, and thus the transformation of a specific fiber is determined by its position within the muscle. The ability to predict fiber switching can be exploited to isolate and identify putative master regulatory factors that initiate and coordinate the expression of contractile proteins.

  5. Menthol Inhibits Detrusor Contractility Independently of TRPM8 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Filho, Antonio Celso Saragossa; Shah, Ajay; Augusto, Taize Machado; Barbosa, Guilherme Oliveira; Leiria, Luiz Osorio; de Carvalho, Hernandes Faustino; Antunes, Edson; Grant, Andrew Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Agonists such as icilin and menthol can activate the cool temperature-sensitive ion channel TRPM8. However, biological responses to menthol may occur independently of TRPM8 activation. In the rodent urinary bladder, menthol facilitates the micturition reflex but inhibits muscarinic contractions of the detrusor smooth muscle. The site(s) of TRPM8 expression in the bladder are controversial. In this study we investigated the regulation of bladder contractility in vitro by menthol. Bladder strips from wild type and TRPM8 knockout male mice (25–30 g) were dissected free and mounted in organ baths. Isometric contractions to carbachol (1 nM–30 µM), CaCl2 (1 µM to 100 mM) and electrical field stimulation (EFS; 8, 16, 32 Hz) were measured. Strips from both groups contracted similarly in response to both carbachol and EFS. Menthol (300 µM) or nifedipine (1 µM) inhibited carbachol and EFS-induced contractions in both wild type and TRPM8 knockout bladder strips. Incubation with the sodium channel blocker tetrodotoxin (1 µM), replacement of extracellular sodium with the impermeant cation N-Methyl-D-Glucamine, incubation with a cocktail of potassium channel inhibitors (100 nM charybdotoxin, 1 µM apamin, 10 µM glibenclamide and 1 µM tetraethylammonium) or removal of the urothelium did not affect the inhibitory actions of menthol. Contraction to CaCl2 was markedly inhibited by either menthol or nifedipine. In cultured bladder smooth muscle cells, menthol or nifedipine abrogated the carbachol or KCl-induced increases in [Ca2+]i. Intravesical administration of menthol increased voiding frequency while decreasing peak voiding pressure. We conclude that menthol inhibits muscarinic bladder contractions through blockade of L-type calcium channels, independently of TRPM8 activation. PMID:25375115

  6. Activity-induced regulation of myosin isoform distribution - Comparison of two contractile activity programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diffee, Gary M.; Caiozzo, Vince J.; Mccue, Samuel A.; Herrick, Robert E.; Baldwin, Kenneth M.

    1993-01-01

    This study examined the role of specific types of contractile activity in regulating myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform expression in rodent soleus. A combination of hindlimb suspension (SN) and two programmed contractile training activity paradigms, either isometric contractile activity (ST-IM) or high-load slowly shortening isovelocity activity, were utilized. Both training paradigms increased muscle mass compared with SN alone. However, only ST-IM resulted in a partial prevention of the suspension-induced decrease in type I MHC. With the use of a fluorescently labeled antibody to type IIa MHC, the distribution of MHCs among fibers was examined immunohistochemically. In SN, the percentage of cells staining positive for type IIa MHC was increased but the staining intensity of the positively staining cells was unchanged compared with control cells. In the ST-IM soleus, the percentage of positively staining fibers was unchanged but the intensity of the positively staining cells was decreased compared with SN values. These results suggest that 1) isometric contractile activity is more effective than isovelocity activity in preventing suspension-induced shifts in soleus MHC distribution and 2) changes associated with both suspension and training occur in only a small number of fibers, with the majority of fibers apparently unresponsive to these interventions.

  7. Triceps surae contractile properties and firing rates in the soleus of young and old men.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Brian H; Harwood, Brad; Davidson, Andrew W; Rice, Charles L

    2009-12-01

    Mean maximal motor unit firing rates (MUFRs) of the human soleus are lower (5-20 Hz) than other limb muscles (20-50 Hz) during brief sustained contractions. With healthy adult aging, maximal MUFRs are 20-40% lower and twitch contractile speed of lower limb muscles are 10-40% slower compared with young adults. However, it is unknown whether the inherently low maximal MUFRs for the soleus are further reduced with aging in association with age-related slowing in contractile properties. The purpose of the present study was to compare the changes in triceps surae contractile properties and MUFRs of the soleus throughout a variety of contraction intensities in six old ( approximately 75 yr old) and six young ( approximately 24 yr old) men. Neuromuscular measures were collected from the soleus and triceps surae during repeated sessions (2-6 sessions). Populations of single MUFR trains were recorded from the soleus with tungsten microelectrodes during separate sustained 6- to 10-s isometric contractions of varying intensities [25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC)]. The old men had weaker triceps surae strength (MVC; 35% lower) and slower contractile properties (contraction duration; 20% longer) than the young men. However, there was no difference in average MUFRs of the soleus at 75% and 100% MVC ( approximately 14.5 Hz and approximately 16.5 Hz, respectively). At 25% and 50% MVC, average rates were 10% and 20% lower in the old men compared with young, respectively. Despite a significant slowing in triceps surae contraction duration, there was no age-related change in MUFRs recorded at high contractile intensities in the soleus. Thus the relationship between the whole muscle contractile properties and MUFRs found in other muscle groups may not exist between the triceps surae and soleus and may be muscle dependent.

  8. Locomotion as an emergent property of muscle contractile dynamics.

    PubMed

    Biewener, Andrew A

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscles share many common, highly conserved features of organization at the molecular and myofilament levels, giving skeletal muscle fibers generally similar and characteristic mechanical and energetic properties; properties well described by classical studies of muscle mechanics and energetics. However, skeletal muscles can differ considerably in architectural design (fiber length, pinnation, and connective tissue organization), as well as fiber type, and how they contract in relation to the timing of neuromotor activation and in vivo length change. The in vivo dynamics of muscle contraction is, therefore, crucial to assessing muscle design and the roles that muscles play in animal movement. Architectural differences in muscle-tendon organization combined with differences in the phase of activation and resulting fiber length changes greatly affect the time-varying force and work that muscles produce, as well as the energetic cost of force generation. Intrinsic force-length and force-velocity properties of muscles, together with their architecture, also play important roles in the control of movement, facilitating rapid adjustments to changing motor demands. Such adjustments complement slower, reflex-mediated neural feedback control of motor recruitment. Understanding how individual fiber forces are integrated to whole-muscle forces, which are transmitted to the skeleton for producing and controlling locomotor movement, is therefore essential for assessing muscle design in relation to the dynamics of movement.

  9. Contractile properties of extraocular muscle in Siamese cat.

    PubMed

    Lennerstrand, G

    1979-01-01

    Siamese cats are albinos with poor visual resolution and severely impaired binocular vision. Eey muscle phyiology was studied in Siamese cats as a part of a more extensive project on eye muscle properties in cats with deficient binocular vision. Isometric contractions of the inferior oblique muscle were recorded in response to single and repetitive muscle nerve stimulation. Speed of contraction, measured as twitch contraction time, fusion frequency and rate of tetanic tension rise, was lower in Siamese than in normal cats. Eye muscles of Siamese cats fatiqued more easily to continuous activation than normal cat eye mucle. These functional changes have also been found in cats with binocular defects from monocular lid suture, but were much more marked in Siamese cats. It is suggested that the eye muscle changes represent muscular adaptations to genetically caused impairments of binocular vision and visual resolution in Siamese cats.

  10. Transmural stretch-dependent regulation of contractile properties in rat heart and its alteration after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Cazorla, Olivier; Szilagyi, Szabolcs; Le Guennec, Jean-Yves; Vassort, Guy; Lacampagne, Alain

    2005-01-01

    The "stretch-sensitization" response is essential to the regulation of heart contractility. An increase in diastolic volume improves systolic contraction. The cellular mechanisms of this modulation, the Frank-Starling law, are still uncertain. Moreover, their alterations in heart failure remains controversial. Here, using left ventricular skinned rat myocytes, we show a nonuniform stretch-sensitization of myofilament activation across the ventricular wall. Stretch-dependent Ca2+ sensitization of myofilaments increases from sub-epicardium to sub-endocardium and is correlated with an increase in passive tension. This passive tension-dependent component of myofibrillar activation is not associated with expression of titin isoforms, changes in troponin I level, and phosphorylation status. Instead, we observe that stretch induces phosphorylation of ventricular myosin light chain 2 isoform (VLC2b) in sub-endocardium specifically. Thus, VLC2b phosphorylation could act as a stretch-dependent modulator of activation tuned within normal heart. Moreover, in postmyocardial infarcted rat, the gradient of stretch-dependent Ca2+ sensitization disappears associated with a lack of VLC2b phosphorylation in sub-endocardium. In conclusion, nonuniformity is a major characteristic of the normal adult left ventricle (LV). The heterogeneous myocardial deformation pattern might be caused not only by the morphological heterogeneity of the tissue in the LV wall, but also by the nonuniform contractile properties of the myocytes across the wall. The loss of a contractile transmural gradient after myocardial infarction should contribute to the impaired LV function.

  11. Inter-rater reliability of muscle contractile property measurements using non-invasive tensiomyography.

    PubMed

    Tous-Fajardo, Julio; Moras, Gerard; Rodríguez-Jiménez, Sergio; Usach, Robert; Doutres, Daniel Moreno; Maffiuletti, Nicola A

    2010-08-01

    Tensiomyography (TMG) is a relatively novel technique to assess muscle mechanical response based on radial muscle belly displacement consecutive to a single electrical stimulus. Although intra-session reliability has been found to be good, inter-rater reliability and the influence of sensor repositioning and electrodes placement on TMG measurements is unknown. The purpose of this study was to analyze the inter-rater reliability of vastus medialis muscle contractile property measurements obtained with TMG as well as the effect of inter-electrode distance (IED). Five contractile parameters were analyzed from vastus medialis muscle belly displacement-time curves: maximal displacement (Dm), contraction time (Tc), sustain time (Ts), delay time (Td), and half-relaxation time (Tr). The inter-rater reliability and IED effect on these measurements were evaluated in 18 subjects. Intra-class correlation coefficients, standard errors of measurement, Bland and Altman systematic bias and random error as well as coefficient of variations were used as measures of reliability. Overall, a good to excellent inter-rater reliability was found for all contractile parameters, except Tr, which showed insufficient reliability. Alterations in IED significantly affected Dm with a trend for all the other parameters. The present results legitimate the use of TMG for the assessment of vastus medialis muscle contractile properties, particularly for Dm and Tc. It is recommended to avoid Tr quantification and IED modifications during multiple TMG measurements.

  12. Matching of sarcoplasmic reticulum and contractile properties in rat fast- and slow-twitch muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Huong H; Lamb, Graham D

    2006-07-01

    1. The twitch characteristics (fast-twitch or slow-twitch) of skeletal muscle fibres are determined not only by the contractile apparatus properties of the fibre, but also by the time-course of Ca2+ release and re-uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). The present study examined, in individual fibres from non-transforming muscle of the rat, whether particular SR properties are matched to the contractile apparatus properties of the fibre, in particular in the case of fibres with fast-twitch contractile apparatus located in a slow-twitch muscle, namely the soleus. 2. Force was recorded in single, mechanically skinned fibres from extensor digitorum longus (EDL), gastrocnemius, peroneus longus and soleus muscles. Using repeated cycles in which the SR was emptied of all releasable Ca2+ and then reloaded, it was possible to determine the relative amount of Ca2+ present in the SR endogenously, the maximum SR capacity and the rate of Ca2+ loading. The sensitivity of the contractile apparatus to Ca2+ and Sr2+ was used to classify the fibres as fast-twitch (FT), slow-twitch (ST) or mixed (< 3% of the fibres examined) and thereby identify the likely troponin C and myosin heavy chain types present. 3. There was no significant difference in SR properties between the groups of FT fibres obtained from the four different muscles, including soleus. Despite some overlap in the SR properties of individual fibres between the FT and ST groups, the properties of the FT fibres in all four muscles studied were significantly different from those of the ST and mixed fibres. 4. In general, in FT fibres the SR had a larger capacity and the endogenous Ca2+ content was a relatively lower percentage of maximum compared with ST fibres. Importantly, in terms of their SR properties, FT fibres from soleus muscle more closely resembled FT fibres from other muscles than they did ST fibres from soleus muscle.

  13. Contractile properties of skinned muscle fibres from young and adult normal and dystrophic (mdx) mice.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, D A; Head, S I; Lynch, G S; Stephenson, D G

    1993-01-01

    1. Single muscle fibres were enzymatically isolated from the soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of genetically dystrophic mdx and normal (C57BL/10) mice aged 3-6 or 17-23 weeks. 2. Fibres of both muscles were chemically skinned with the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100 (2% v/v). Ca(2+)- and Sr(2+)-activated contractile responses were recorded and comparisons were made between several contractile parameters of various fibre types of normal and dystrophic mice of similar age. 3. There were no significant differences in the following contractile parameters of skinned fibres of normal and mdx mice of the same age: sensitivity to activating Ca2+ (pCa50) or Sr2+ (pSr50) and differential sensitivity to the activating ions (pCa50-pSr50). However the maximum isometric tension (Po) and the frequency of myofibrillar force oscillations in EDL fast-twitch fibres of young mdx mice were significantly lower than those of soleus fast-twitch fibres of the same animals, or fast-twitch fibres (EDL or soleus) of normal mice. 4. Age-related differences were apparent in some contractile parameters of both normal and mdx mice. In particular the steepness of force-pCa and force-pSr curves increased with age in normal mice, yet decreased with age in fibres of mdx mice. 5. A fluorescent probe, ethidium bromide, which interchelates with DNA, was used with laser-scanning confocal microscopy to determine the distribution of myonuclei in fibres. Fibres isolated from either muscle type of normal animals displayed a characteristic peripheral spiral of myonuclei. Fibres from muscles of mdx mice displayed three major patterns of nuclear distribution; the normal peripheral spiral, long central strands of nuclei, and a mixture of these two patterns. 6. The contractile characteristics of mdx fibres were not markedly influenced by the nuclear distribution pattern in that there were no discernible differences in the major contractile parameters (the Hill coefficients nCa and nSr, which

  14. Mechanisms of Discoordination of Contractile Activity in the Gastroduodenal Zone during Psychogenic Stress in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Ovsyannikov, V I; Berezina, T P; Shemerovskii, K A

    2015-08-01

    Inhibition of the contractile activity of the stomach induced by psychogenic stress persisted after blockade of muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors and α2 and β1/β2-adrenergic receptors. Stress-induced increase in contractile activity in the proximal part of the duodenum persisted during blockade of muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors, β1/β2-adrenergic receptors. At the same time, blockade of the above cholinergic and adrenergic receptors eliminated the stress-induced increase in contractive activity in the distal part of the duodenum.

  15. Effect of Tramadol on Rabbit Uterine Contractile Activity Induced in Late Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Yakovleva, A A; Nazarova, L A; Prokopenko, V M; Pavlova, N G

    2017-01-01

    Effect of Tramadol infusion (5 mg/ml) on oxytocin-induced uterine contractile activity was studied in chronic experiment on female rabbits with different degrees of biological readiness for parturition. In case of sufficient biological readiness for parturition, Tramadol did not change the number of uterine contractions, but increased the amplitude and duration of each contraction against the background of increased creatine phosphate consumption by the myometrium. At the same time, Tramadol infusion to females without biological readiness for partirition suppressed induced uterine contractile activity by reducing the amplitude of each uterine contraction.

  16. Contractile activity is required for Z-disc sarcomere maturation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Geach, Timothy J; Hirst, Elizabeth M A; Zimmerman, Lyle B

    2015-05-01

    Sarcomere structure underpins structural integrity, signaling, and force transmission in the muscle. In embryos of the frog Xenopus tropicalis, muscle contraction begins even while sarcomerogenesis is ongoing. To determine whether contractile activity plays a role in sarcomere formation in vivo, chemical tools were used to block acto-myosin contraction in embryos of the frog X. tropicalis, and Z-disc assembly was characterized in the paralyzed dicky ticker mutant. Confocal and ultrastructure analysis of paralyzed embryos showed delayed Z-disc formation and defects in thick filament organization. These results suggest a previously undescribed role for contractility in sarcomere maturation in vivo.

  17. Investigations of the dual contractile/relaxant properties showed by antioquine in rat aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Ivorra, M. D.; Lugnier, C.; Catret, M.; Anselmi, E.; Cortes, D.; D'Ocon, P.

    1993-01-01

    1. In the present study we assessed the activity of antioquine, a bisbenzyltetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloid isolated from Pseudoxandra sclerocarpa, by examining its effects on the contractile activity of rat isolated aorta, specific binding of [3H]-(+)-cis-diltiazem, [3H]-nitrendipine and [3H]-prazosin to cerebral cortical membranes and the different molecular forms of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDE) isolated from bovine aorta. 2. Contractions in rat aorta induced by high concentrations of KCl (80 mM) and noradrenaline (1 microM) were inhibited by antioquine in a concentration-dependent manner (0.1 microM- 300 microM). The alkaloid appeared more potent against KCl-induced contractions. This inhibitory effect was observed at both 37 degrees C and 25 degrees C. 3. Paradoxically, at the highest concentration tested (300 microM) antioquine induced a contractile response of similar magnitude in the presence and absence of extracellular calcium, at 37 degrees C. This activity was greatly attenuated at 25 degrees C. Antioquine-induced contractions were not inhibited by prazosin (0.1 microM), nifedipine (1 microM) or diltiazem (100 microM). On the contrary, prazosin and nifedipine slightly increased the contractions in the presence of extracellular calcium. Papaverine (100 microM) partially inhibited the contractile response to antioquine both in the presence and absence of extracellular calcium. 4. At 25 degrees C, in Ca(2+)-free solution, antioquine (300 microM) did not modify the contractile response (phasic and tonic) evoked by noradrenaline, but increased the phasic contraction induced by caffeine. At 37 degrees C, the contraction elicited by antioquine made it impossible to observe the noradrenaline-induced one.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8358549

  18. Lysophosphatidylcholine potentiates vascular contractile responses in rat aorta via activation of tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Suenaga, Hiroshi; Kamata, Katsuo

    2002-02-01

    We previously reported that while lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) does not itself produce contraction, it significantly potentiates the contractile responses induced by high-K(+), UK14,304 (a selective alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist) and phorbol ester in the endothelium-denuded rat aorta. To further investigate this phenomenon, we examined the effects of genistein and tyrphostin B42 (both tyrosine kinase inhibitors) on the LPC-induced potentiation of the contractile responses to high-K(+) and UK14,304 in the endothelium-denuded rat aorta. Although genistein (3 x 10(-6) M, 10(-5) M) did not affect the high-K(+)-induced contractile response, it selectively inhibited the potentiating effect of LPC on the contraction and it strongly inhibited the LPC-induced augmentation of the associated increases in [Ca(2+)](i). Genistein also attenuated the LPC-induced augmentation effects on both the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) and contractile response induced by the UK14,304. In contrast, daidzein (10(-5) M) did not inhibit the potentiating effect of LPC. Tyrphostin B42 (3 x 10(-5) M) attenuated the potentiating effect of LPC on high K(+)-induced contractions. Western blot analysis showed that LPC increased the tyrosine phosphorylation of a number of proteins, including 42 and 44 kDa proteins and 53 - 64 kDa proteins. These protein phosphorylations were inhibited by genistein. Sodium orthovanadate (10(-4) M), a tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, also markedly enhanced the high-K(+)-induced contractile responses. This enhancing effect was attenuated by genistein. These results suggest that the LPC-induced augmentation of contractile responses in the rat aorta is due to activation of tyrosine kinase, which in turn regulates Ca(2+) influx.

  19. Elevated osmolytes in rainbow smelt: the effects of urea, glycerol and trimethylamine oxide on muscle contractile properties.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, David J; Long, Gabrielle M; Gezzi, Nicole L; Modi, Parth M; Woluko, Kossivi N

    2016-04-01

    Rainbow smelt, Osmerus mordax, experience a wide range of temperatures in their native habitat. In response to cold, smelt express anti-freeze proteins and the osmolytes glycerol, trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) and urea to avoid freezing. The physiological influences of these osmolytes are not well understood. Urea destabilizes proteins, while TMAO counteracts the protein-destabilizing forces of urea. The influence of glycerol on muscle function has not been explored. We examined the effects of urea, glycerol and TMAO through muscle mechanics experiments with treatments of the three osmolytes at physiological concentrations. Experiments were carried out at 10°C. The contractile properties of fast-twitch muscle bundles were determined in physiological saline and in the presence of 50 mmol l(-1)urea, 50 mmol l(-1)TMAO and/or 200 mmol l(-1)glycerol in saline. Muscle exposed to urea and glycerol produced less force and displayed slower contractile properties. However, treatment with TMAO led to higher force and faster relaxation by muscle bundles. TMAO increased power production during cyclical activity, while urea and glycerol led to reduced oscillatory power output. When muscle bundles were exposed to a combination of the three osmolytes, they displayed little change in contraction kinetics relative to control, although power output under lower oscillatory conditions was enhanced while maximum power output was reduced. The results suggest that maintenance of muscle function in winter smelt requires a balanced combination of urea, glycerol and TMAO.

  20. β-Citronellol, an alcoholic monoterpene with inhibitory properties on the contractility of rat trachea

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, T.B.; Ribeiro-Filho, H.V.; Lucetti, L.T.; Magalhães, P.J.C.

    2015-01-01

    β-Citronellol is an alcoholic monoterpene found in essential oils such Cymbopogon citratus (a plant with antihypertensive properties). β-Citronellol can act against pathogenic microorganisms that affect airways and, in virtue of the popular use of β-citronellol-enriched essential oils in aromatherapy, we assessed its pharmacologic effects on the contractility of rat trachea. Contractions of isolated tracheal rings were recorded isometrically through a force transducer connected to a data-acquisition device. β-Citronellol relaxed sustained contractions induced by acetylcholine or high extracellular potassium, but half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) for K+-elicited stimuli were smaller than those for cholinergic contractions. It also inhibited contractions induced by electrical field stimulation or sodium orthovanadate with pharmacologic potency equivalent to that seen against acetylcholine-induced contractions. When contractions were evoked by selective recruitment of Ca2+ from the extracellular medium, β-citronellol preferentially inhibited contractions that involved voltage-operated (but not receptor-operated) pathways. β-Citronellol (but not verapamil) inhibited contractions induced by restoration of external Ca2+ levels after depleting internal Ca2+ stores with the concomitant presence of thapsigargin and recurrent challenge with acetylcholine. Treatment of tracheal rings with L-NAME, indomethacin or tetraethylammonium did not change the relaxing effects of β-citronellol. Inhibition of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) or transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) receptors with selective antagonists caused no change in the effects of β-citronellol. In conclusion, β-citronellol exerted inhibitory effects on rat tracheal rings, with predominant effects on contractions that recruit Ca2+ inflow towards the cytosol by voltage-gated pathways, whereas it appears less active against contractions elicited by receptor

  1. Assessment of Muscle Contractile Properties at Acute Moderate Altitude Through Tensiomyography.

    PubMed

    Morales-Artacho, Antonio J; Padial, Paulino; Rodríguez-Matoso, Dario; Rodríguez-Ruiz, David; García-Ramos, Amador; García-Manso, Juan Manuel; Calderón, Carmen; Feriche, Belén

    2015-12-01

    Under hypoxia, alterations in muscle contractile properties and faster fatigue development have been reported. This study investigated the efficacy of tensiomyography (TMG) in assessing muscle contractile function at acute moderate altitude. Biceps femoris (BF) and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles of 18 athletes (age 20.1 ± 6.1 years; body mass 65.4 ± 13.9 kg; height 174.6 ± 9.5 cm) were assessed at sea level and moderate altitude using electrically evoked contractions on two consecutive days. Maximum radial displacement (Dm), time of contraction (Tc), reaction time (Td), sustained contraction time (Ts), and relaxation time (Tr) were recorded at 40, 60, 80, and 100 mA. At altitude, VL showed lower Dm values at 40 mA (p = 0.008; ES = -0.237). Biceps femoris showed Dm decrements in all electrical stimulations (p < 0.001, ES > 0.61). In VL, Tc was longer at altitude at 40 (p = 0.031, ES = 0.56), and 100 mA (p = 0.03, ES = 0.51). Regarding Td, VL showed significant increases in all electrical intensities under hypoxia (p ≤ 0.03, ES ≥ 0.33). TMG appears effective at detecting slight changes in the muscle contractile properties at moderate altitude. Further research involving TMG along with other muscle function assessment methods is needed to provide additional insight into peripheral neuromuscular alterations at moderate altitude.

  2. Effects of a hydrogen sulfide donor on spontaneous contractile activity of rat stomach and jejunum.

    PubMed

    Shafigullin, M Y; Zefirov, R A; Sabirullina, G I; Zefirov, A L; Sitdikova, G F

    2014-07-01

    We studied the effect of sodium hydrosulfite (NaHS), a donor of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), on spontaneous contractive activity of isolated preparations of rat stomach and jejunum under isometric conditions. NaHS in concentrations of 10-200 μM reduced the amplitude, tonic tension, and frequency of contractions of the preparations. Blockade of K(+) channels with a non-specific antagonist tetraethylammonium (10 mM) increased contraction amplitude in the stomach strip and jejunum segment. The effects of NaHS on all parameters of contractile activity of the stomach and jejunum were fully preserved against the background of tetraethylammonium application. These data suggest that H2S in physiologically relevant concentrations inhibited spontaneous contractile activity of smooth muscle cells in rat stomach and jejunum by reducing the amplitude and frequency of contractions and decreased tonic tension without affecting the function of voltage- and calcium-dependent K(+) channels.

  3. Contractile properties of rat, rhesus monkey, and human type I muscle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widrick, J. J.; Romatowski, J. G.; Karhanek, M.; Fitts, R. H.

    1997-01-01

    It is well known that skeletal muscle intrinsic maximal shortening velocity is inversely related to species body mass. However, there is uncertainty regarding the relationship between the contractile properties of muscle fibers obtained from commonly studied laboratory animals and those obtained from humans. In this study we determined the contractile properties of single chemically skinned fibers prepared from rat, rhesus monkey, and human soleus and gastrocnemius muscle samples under identical experimental conditions. All fibers used for analysis expressed type I myosin heavy chain as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Allometric coefficients for type I fibers from each muscle indicated that there was little change in peak tension (force/fiber cross-sectional area) across species. In contrast, both soleus and gastrocnemius type I fiber maximal unloaded shortening velocity (Vo), the y-intercept of the force-velocity relationship (Vmax), peak power per unit fiber length, and peak power normalized for fiber length and cross-sectional area were all inversely related to species body mass. The present allometric coefficients for soleus fiber Vo (-0.18) and Vmax (-0.11) are in good agreement with published values for soleus fibers obtained from common laboratory and domesticated mammals. Taken together, these observations suggest that the Vo of slow fibers from quadrupeds and humans scale similarly and can be described by the same quantitative relationships. These findings have implications in the design and interpretation of experiments, especially those that use small laboratory mammals as a model of human muscle function.

  4. Effect of undernutrition on contractile and fatigue properties of rat diaphragm during development.

    PubMed

    Brozanski, B S; Watchko, J F; O'Day, T L; Guthrie, R D

    1993-05-01

    The present study was designed to assess the effects of combined pre- and postnatal undernutrition on the in vitro contractile and fatigue properties of the rat diaphragm during development. In vitro direct stimulation of costal diaphragm from control (CTL) and undernourished (UN) rats was done on postnatal days 1, 4, 14, 21, 30, 40, 50, and 60. Combined pre- and postnatal undernutrition resulted in stunted animal growth but did not alter the diaphragm-to-total body weight ratio. Twitch contraction time, half-relaxation time, and force-frequency relationships were not consistently affected by undernutrition. Specific twitch force and specific tetanic force were also unchanged in the UN group. Fatigue resistance was high and comparable in UN and CTL groups at days 1 and 4. At day 14 and thereafter, fatigue resistance declined but was consistently higher in the UN than in the CTL group. We conclude that combined pre- and postnatal undernutrition results in a significant increase in fatigue resistance of the diaphragm compared with CTL, whereas diaphragm muscle contractile properties are not appreciably affected by prolonged undernutrition.

  5. Rapid fusion between mesenchymal stem cells and cardiomyocytes yields electrically active, non-contractile hybrid cells.

    PubMed

    Shadrin, Ilya Y; Yoon, Woohyun; Li, Liqing; Shepherd, Neal; Bursac, Nenad

    2015-07-10

    Cardiac cell therapies involving bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) have shown promising results, although their mechanisms of action are still poorly understood. Here, we investigated direct interactions between hMSCs and cardiomyocytes in vitro. Using a genetic Ca(2+) indicator gCaMP3 to efficiently label hMSCs in co-cultures with neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs), we determined that 25-40% of hMSCs (from 4 independent donors) acquired periodic Ca(2+) transients and cardiac markers through spontaneous fusion with NRVMs. Sharp electrode and voltage-clamp recordings in fused cells showed action potential properties and Ca(2+) current amplitudes in between those of non-fused hMSCs and NRVMs. Time-lapse video-microscopy revealed the first direct evidence of active fusion between hMSCs and NRVMs within several hours of co-culture. Application of blebbistatin, nifedipine or verapamil caused complete and reversible inhibition of fusion, suggesting potential roles for actomyosin bridging and Ca(2+) channels in the fusion process. Immunostaining for Cx43, Ki67, and sarcomeric α-actinin showed that fused cells remain strongly coupled to surrounding NRVMs, but downregulate sarcomeric structures over time, acquiring a non-proliferative and non-contractile phenotype. Overall, these results describe the phenotype and mechanisms of hybrid cell formation via fusion of hMSCs and cardiomyocytes with potential implications for cardiac cell therapy.

  6. Mitochondrial fusion dynamics is robust in the heart and depends on calcium oscillations and contractile activity.

    PubMed

    Eisner, Verónica; Cupo, Ryan R; Gao, Erhe; Csordás, György; Slovinsky, William S; Paillard, Melanie; Cheng, Lan; Ibetti, Jessica; Chen, S R Wayne; Chuprun, J Kurt; Hoek, Jan B; Koch, Walter J; Hajnóczky, György

    2017-01-31

    Mitochondrial fusion is thought to be important for supporting cardiac contractility, but is hardly detectable in cultured cardiomyocytes and is difficult to directly evaluate in the heart. We overcame this obstacle through in vivo adenoviral transduction with matrix-targeted photoactivatable GFP and confocal microscopy. Imaging in whole rat hearts indicated mitochondrial network formation and fusion activity in ventricular cardiomyocytes. Promptly after isolation, cardiomyocytes showed extensive mitochondrial connectivity and fusion, which decayed in culture (at 24-48 h). Fusion manifested both as rapid content mixing events between adjacent organelles and slower events between both neighboring and distant mitochondria. Loss of fusion in culture likely results from the decline in calcium oscillations/contractile activity and mitofusin 1 (Mfn1), because (i) verapamil suppressed both contraction and mitochondrial fusion, (ii) after spontaneous contraction or short-term field stimulation fusion activity increased in cardiomyocytes, and (iii) ryanodine receptor-2-mediated calcium oscillations increased fusion activity in HEK293 cells and complementing changes occurred in Mfn1. Weakened cardiac contractility in vivo in alcoholic animals is also associated with depressed mitochondrial fusion. Thus, attenuated mitochondrial fusion might contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy.

  7. Adaptation of muscle gene expression to changes in contractile activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, F. W.; Babij, P.; Thomason, D. B.; Wong, T. S.; Morrison, P. R.

    1987-01-01

    A review of the existing literature regarding the effects of different types of physical activities on the gene expression of adult skeletal muscles leads us to conclude that each type of exercise training program has, as a result, a different phenotype, which means that there are multiple mechanisms, each producing a unique phenotype. A portion of the facts which support this position is presented and interpreted here. [Abstract translated from the original French by NASA].

  8. [Electrical activity of the heart cells and myocardial contractility during a change in extracellular sodium concentration].

    PubMed

    Kobrin, V I; Alabovskiĭ, V V; Alipov, N N; Oleĭnikov, O D

    1988-09-01

    The transmembrane potentials of the cells of the ventricle contractile myocardium of the rat and frog isolated hearts were studied as well as the strength of the ventricle contraction under the effect of a decrease (to 30 mM) or increase (up to 200 mM) in the sodium chloride concentration in the perfusate. The decrease led to a fibrillation of ventricles, 80-85% of contractile cells generating a high-frequency activity, 12-15% preserving the same AP and 3-5% having completely lost the excitability. The increase only affects the transmembrane potentials of ischemized myocardium. The decrease in the sodium concentration led to an augmentation of the contraction strength through the sodium-calcium exchange mechanism.

  9. [Effect of acetylcholine and acetylcholinesterase on the activity of contractile vacuole of Amoeba proteus].

    PubMed

    Bagrov, Ia Iu; Manusova, N B

    2011-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh, 1 microM) stimulates activity of the contractile vacuole of proteus. The effect of ACh is not mimicked by its analogs which are not hydrolyzed by acetylcholinesterase (AChE), i. e., carbacholine and 5-methylfurmethide. The effect of ACh is not sensitive to the blocking action of M-cholinolytics, atropine and mytolone, but is suppressed by N-cholinolytic, tubocurarine. The inhibitors of AChE, eserine (0.01 microM) and armine (0.1 microM), suppress the effect of ACh on amoeba contractile vacuole. ACh does not affect activation of contractile vacuole induced by arginine-vasopressin (1 microM), but it blocks such effect of opiate receptors agonist, dynorphin A1-13 (0.01 microM). This effect of ACh is also suppressed by the inhibitors of AChE. These results suggest that, in the above-described effects of ACh, AChE acts not as an antagonist, but rather as a synergist.

  10. Vinculin contributes to Cell Invasion by Regulating Contractile Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2008-07-01

    Vinculin is a component of the focal adhesion complex and is described as a mechano-coupling protein connecting the integrin receptor and the actin cytoskeleton. Vinculin knock-out (k.o.) cells (vin-/-) displayed increased migration on a 2-D collagen- or fibronectin-coated substrate compared to wildtype cells, but the role of vinculin in cell migration through a 3-D connective tissue is unknown. We determined the invasiveness of established tumor cell lines using a 3-D collagen invasion assay. Gene expression analysis of 4 invasive and 4 non-invasive tumor cell lines revealed that vinculin expression was significantly increased in invasive tumor cell lines. To analyze the mechanisms by which vinculin increased cell invasion in a 3-D gel, we studied mouse embryonic fibroblasts wildtype and vin-/- cells. Wildtype cells were 3-fold more invasive compared vin-/- cells. We hypothesized that the ability to generate sufficient traction forces is a prerequisite for tumor cell migration in a 3-D connective tissue matrix. Using traction microscopy, we found that wildtype exerted 3-fold higher tractions on fibronectin-coated polyacrylamide gels compared to vin-/- cells. These results show that vinculin controls two fundamental functions that lead to opposite effects on cell migration in a 2-D vs. a 3-D environment: On the one hand, vinculin stabilizes the focal adhesions (mechano-coupling function) and thereby reduces motility in 2-D. On the other hand, vinculin is also a potent activator of traction generation (mechano-regulating function) that is important for cell invasion in a 3-D environment.

  11. Age and hypertrophy related changes in contractile post-rest behavior and action potential properties in isolated rat myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Quan; Schuettel, Manuela; Thomas, Daniel; Dreiner, Ulrike; Grohé, Christian; Meyer, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    “Physiological” aging as well as early and progressive cardiac hypertrophy may affect action potential (AP) pattern, contractile function, and Ca2+ handling. We hypothesize that contractile function is disturbed in hypertrophy from early stages and is differently affected in aged myocardium. In vivo function, cardiomyocyte contractile behavior and APs were compared in Wistar-Kyoto (WIS) rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) at different ages and degrees of hypertrophy (3–4, 9–11, 20–24 months). Post-rest (PR) behavior was used to investigate the relative contribution of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and the Na/Ca exchanger (NCX) to cytosolic Ca2+ removal. APs were recorded by whole-cell current-clamp and sarcomere shortening by video microscopy. Cyclopiazonic acid was used to suppress Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA) function. Heart weight/body weight ratio was increased in SHR versus WIS within all age groups. Myocyte steady state (SS) shortening amplitude was reduced in young SHR versus WIS. Aging led to a significant decay of SS contractile amplitude and relengthening velocity in WIS, but the PR potentiation was maintained. In contrast, aging in SHR led to a decrease of PR potentiation, while SS contraction and relengthening velocity increased. APD50% was always prolonged in SHR versus WIS. With aging, APD50% increased in both WIS and SHR, but was still shorter in WIS. However, in old WIS the late AP portion (APD90%) was prolonged. Ca2+ handling and AP properties are disturbed progressively with aging and with increasing hypertrophy. Decreased amplitude of shortening and velocity of relengthening in aged WIS may be attributed to reduced SERCA function. In SHR, an increase in SR leak and shift towards transmembraneous Ca handling via NCX may be responsible for the changes in contractile function. A prolonged APD90% in aged WIS may be an adaptive mechanism to preserve basal contractility. Therefore, the effects on contractile parameters and AP are

  12. [Contractile properties of skeletal muscles of rats after flight on "Kosmos-1887"].

    PubMed

    Oganov, V S; Skuratova, S A; Murashko, L M

    1991-01-01

    Contractile properties of skeletal muscles of rats were investigated using glycerinated muscle preparations that were obtained from Cosmos-1887 animals flown for 13 days (plus 2 days on the ground) and from rats that remained hypokinetic for 13 days on the ground. In the flow rats, the absolute mass of postural muscles remained unchanged while their relative mass increased; this may be attributed to their enhanced hydration which developed during the first 2 days after landing. Strength losses of the postural muscles were less significant than after previous flights. Comparison of the Cosmos-1887 and hypokinesia control data has shown that even 2-day exposure to 1 G after 13-day flight can modify drastically flight-induced changes.

  13. Hindlimb immobilization - Length-tension and contractile properties of skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzmann, F. A.; Kim, D. H.; Fitts, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    Casts were placed around rat feet in plantar flexion position to immobilize the soleus muscle in a shortened position, while the other foot was fixed in dorsal flexion to set the extensor digitorum longus in a shortened position. The total muscular atrophy and contractile properties were measured at 1, 2, 4, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 42 days after immobilization, with casts being replaced every two weeks. The slow twitch soleus and the fast-twitch vastus lateralis and longus muscles were excised after termination of the experiment. The muscles were then stretched and subjected to electric shock to elicit peak tetanic tension and peak tetanic tension development. Force velocity features of the three muscles were assayed in a series of afterloaded contractions and fiber lengths were measured from subsequently macerated muscle. All muscles atrophied during immobilization, reaching a new steady state by day 21. Decreases in fiber and sarcomere lengths were also observed.

  14. Contractile properties of rat fast-twitch skeletal muscle during reinnervation - Effects of testosterone and castration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeagle, S. P.; Mayer, R. F.; Max, S. R.

    1983-01-01

    The peroneal nerve of subject rats were crushed 1 cm from the muscle in order to examine the isometric contractile properties of skeletal muscle in the recovery sequency during reinnervation of normal, castrated, and testosterone-treated rats. The particular muscle studied was the extensor digitorum longus, with functional reinnervation first observed 8-9 days after nerve crush. No evidence was found that either castration or testosterone injections altered the process of reinnervation after the nerve crush, with the conclusion being valid at the 0.05 p level. The most reliable index of reinnervation was found to be the twitch:tetanus ratio, a factor of use in future studies of the reinnervation of skeletal muscle.

  15. Effects of testosterone on contractile properties of sexually dimorphic forelimb muscles in male bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana, Shaw 1802)

    PubMed Central

    Kampe, Aaron R.; Peters, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    Summary This study examined the effects of testosterone (T) on the contractile properties of two sexually dimorphic forelimb muscles and one non-dimorphic muscle in male bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana, Shaw 1802). The dimorphic muscles in castrated males with testosterone replacement (T+) achieved higher forces and lower fatigability than did castrated males without replaced testosterone (T0 males), but the magnitude of the differences was low and many of the pair-wise comparisons of each muscle property were not statistically significant. However, when taken as a whole, the means of seven contractile properties varied in the directions expected of masculine values in T+ animals in the sexually dimorphic muscles. Moreover, these data, compared with previous data on male and female bullfrogs, show that values for T+ males are similar to normal males and are significantly different from females. The T0 males tended to be intermediate in character between T+ males and females, generally retaining masculine values. This suggests that the exposure of young males to T in their first breeding season produces a masculinizing effect on the sexually dimorphic muscles that is not reversed between breeding seasons when T levels are low. The relatively minor differences in contractile properties between T+ and T0 males may indicate that as circulating T levels rise during breeding season in normal males, contractile properties can be enhanced rapidly to maximal functional levels for breeding success. PMID:24143280

  16. Contractile properties of the rat external abdominal oblique and diaphragm muscles during development.

    PubMed

    Watchko, J F; Brozanski, B S; O'Day, T L; Guthrie, R D; Sieck, G C

    1992-04-01

    We studied the in vitro contractile and fatigue properties of the rat external abdominal oblique (EAO) and costal diaphragm (DIA) muscles during postnatal development. Isometric twitch contraction (CT) and half-relaxation (RT1/2) times were longer in both the EAO and DIA muscles during the early postnatal period and decreased with age. In the first postnatal week, the CT and RT1/2 were longer in the EAO than the DIA muscle. At 14 days of age and thereafter, the CT and RT1/2 were shorter in the EAO than in the DIA muscle. Force-frequency relationships of the EAO and DIA muscles changed during postnatal development such that the relative force (percent maximum) generated at lower frequencies (less than 15 pulses/s) decreased with age. Moreover the relative force generated by the EAO muscle at lower frequencies was greater than that of the DIA muscle during the early postnatal period but less than that of the DIA muscle in adults. The specific force of both the EAO and DIA muscles increased progressively with age. There were no differences in specific force between the EAO and DIA muscles at any age. The fatigability of the EAO and DIA muscles was comparable during the early postnatal period and increased in both muscles with postnatal development. In adults the EAO muscle was more fatigable than the DIA muscle. We conclude that the contractile and fatigue properties of the EAO and DIA muscles undergo significantly different postnatal transitions, which may reflect their functional involvement in sustaining ventilation.

  17. Effect of a Periodized Power Training Program on the Functional Performances and Contractile Properties of the Quadriceps in Sprinters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamandulis, Sigitas; Skurvydas, Albertas; Brazaitis, Marius; Stanislovaitis, Aleksas; Duchateau, Jacques; Stanislovaitiene, Jurate

    2012-01-01

    Our purpose was to compare the effect of a periodized preparation consisting of power endurance training and high-intensity power training on the contractile properties of the quadriceps muscle and functional performances in well trained male sprinters (n = 7). After 4 weeks of high-intensity power training, 60-m sprint running time improved by an…

  18. Peanut protein reduces body protein mass and alters skeletal muscle contractile properties and lipid metabolism in rats.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Hélène; Leblanc, Nadine; Papineau, Roxanne; Richard, Denis; Côté, Claude H

    2010-05-01

    It is well known that diets high in nuts or peanuts favourably affect plasma lipid concentrations. However, few studies have examined the effects of nut and peanut protein (PP) on body composition and skeletal muscle properties. The present study was aimed at evaluating the effect of dietary PP compared with two animal proteins, casein (C) and cod protein (CP) on body composition, skeletal muscle contractile properties and lipid metabolism in rats. Thirty-two male rats were assigned to one of the following four diets containing either C, CP, PP or C+peanut protein (CPP, 50:50) mixture. After 28 d of ad libitum feeding and after 12-h fast, blood, liver and muscle were collected for measurements of plasma and hepatic cholesterol and TAG, plasma glucose and insulin and contractile properties. Rats fed with the low-quality protein, PP, had lower body weight gain, body protein mass, soleus mass and liver weight than those fed with the high-quality dietary proteins, C and CP. PP also caused a deficit in contractile properties in soleus. Likewise, PP increased plasma cholesterol and body fat mass compared with CP. However, these elevations were accompanied with increased hepatic TAG concentrations and lowered intestinal fat excretion. These results show that PP intake alters body composition by reducing skeletal muscle mass and liver weight as well as muscle contractility and lipid metabolism. Adding a complete protein such as C might partially counteract these adverse effects.

  19. The Effect of Cleft Palate Repair on Contractile Properties of Single Permeabilized Muscle Fibers From Congenitally Cleft Goats Palates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A cleft palate goat model was used to study the contractile properties of the levator veli palatini (LVP) muscle which is responsible for the movement of the soft palate. In 15-25% of patients that undergo palatoplasty, residual velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) remains a problem and often require...

  20. Aging alters contractile properties and fiber morphology in pigeon skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Pistilli, Emidio E; Alway, Stephen E; Hollander, John M; Wimsatt, Jeffrey H

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that skeletal muscle from pigeons would display age-related alterations in isometric force and contractile parameters as well as a shift of the single muscle fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) distribution toward smaller fiber sizes. Maximal force output, twitch contraction durations and the force-frequency relationship were determined in tensor propatagialis pars biceps muscle from young 3-year-old pigeons, middle-aged 18-year-old pigeons, and aged 30-year-old pigeons. The fiber CSA distribution was determined by planimetry from muscle sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Maximal force output of twitch and tetanic contractions was greatest in muscles from young pigeons, while the time to peak force of twitch contractions was longest in muscles from aged pigeons. There were no changes in the force-frequency relationship between the age groups. Interestingly, the fiber CSA distribution in aged muscles revealed a greater number of larger sized muscle fibers, which was verified visually in histological images. Middle-aged and aged muscles also displayed a greater amount of slow myosin containing muscle fibers. These data demonstrate that muscles from middle-aged and aged pigeons are susceptible to alterations in contractile properties that are consistent with aging, including lower force production and longer contraction durations. These functional changes were supported by the appearance of slow myosin containing muscle fibers in muscles from middle-aged and aged pigeons. Therefore, the pigeon may represent an appropriate animal model for the study of aging-related alterations in skeletal muscle function and structure.

  1. How to make rapid eye movements “rapid”: the role of growth factors for muscle contractile properties

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tian; Feng, Cheng-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Different muscle functions require different muscle contraction properties. Saccade-generating extraocular muscles (EOMs) are the fastest muscles in the human body, significantly faster than limb skeletal muscles. Muscle contraction speed is subjected to plasticity, i.e., contraction speed can be adjusted to serve different demands, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms that control contraction speed. Therefore, we examined whether myogenic growth factors modulate contractile properties, including twitch contraction time (onset of force to peak force) and half relaxation time (peak force to half relaxation). We examined effects of three muscle-derived growth factors: insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), cardiotrophin-1 (CT1), and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). In gain-of-function experiments, CT1 or GDNF injected into the orbit shortened contraction time, and IGF1 or CT1 shortened half relaxation time. In loss-of-function experiments with binding proteins or neutralizing antibodies, elimination of endogenous IGFs prolonged both contraction time and half relaxation time, while eliminating endogenous GDNF prolonged contraction time, with no effect on half relaxation time. Elimination of endogenous IGFs or CT1, but not GDNF, significantly reduced contractile force. Thus, IGF1, CT1, and GDNF have partially overlapping but not identical effects on muscle contractile properties. Expression of these three growth factors was measured in chicken and/or rat EOMs by real-time PCR. The “fast” EOMs express significantly more message encoding these growth factors and their receptors than skeletal muscles with slower contractile properties. Taken together, these findings indicate that EOM contractile kinetics is regulated by the amount of myogenic growth factors available to the muscle. PMID:21279379

  2. Dual effect of GABA on the contractile activity of the guinea-pig isolated urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Maggi, C A; Santicioli, P; Meli, A

    1985-06-01

    The effects of GABA and related substances were examined in isolated detrusor strips from the dome of the guinea-pig urinary bladder. GABA (0.01-1 mM) produced concentration-related phasic contractions of isolated strips from the guinea-pig urinary bladder dome. This effect of GABA was mimicked by homotaurine and muscimol, selective GABAA receptor agonists but not by (+/-)-baclofen, a selective GABAB receptor agonist. A specific cross desensitization was observed between GABA, homotaurine and muscimol but not between (+/-)-baclofen and GABA. GABA (1 mM)-induced contractions were antagonized by picrotoxin, a selective GABAA receptor antagonist. GABA-induced contractions were almost abolished by tetrodotoxin (0.5 microM, TTX) thus indicating their neurogenic origin. In addition GABA-induced contractions were partially antagonized by atropine (to about the same extent as those produced by dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP), a ganglionic stimulant), but were unaffected by hexamethonium (10 microM), phentolamine (0.2 microM) or indomethacin (5 microM). In the presence of GABA the contractile effect of both DMPP (TTX-sensitive) and acetylcholine (ACh, TTX-insensitive) were significantly reduced. Similar findings were obtained with DMPP, i.e. in preparations exposed to this ganglionic stimulant both GABA- and ACh-induced contractions were depressed. Homotaurine but not (+/-)-baclofen mimicked the depressant effect of GABA on DMPP-induced contractions. The depressant effect of GABA on ACh-induced contractions of the guinea-pig urinary bladder was neurogenic in origin, i.e., was not observed in preparations exposed to TTX. These experiments indicate that GABA has a dual effect on the contractile behaviour of the guinea-pig isolated urinary bladder. Recently it has been proposed that endogenous GABA plays a neuromodulatory role in this organ. Our data suggest that in the early phase of neurogenic activation of detrusor muscle (micturition reflex) GABA might transiently

  3. alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptor mechanisms in spontaneous contractile activity of rat ileal longitudinal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Roland; Rickenbacher, Andreas; Shaw, Sidney; Balsiger, Bruno M

    2005-02-01

    Gastrointestinal motility is influenced by adrenergic modulation. Our aim was to identify specific subtypes of adrenergic receptors involved in inhibitory mechanisms that modulate gut smooth muscle contractile activity. Muscle strips of rat ileal longitudinal muscle were evaluated for spontaneous contractile activity and for equimolar dose-responses (10(-7) to 3 x 10(-5) M) to the adrenergic agents norepinephrine (nonselective agonist), phenylephrine (alpha(1)-agonist), clonidine (alpha(2)-agonist), prenalterol (beta(1)-agonist), ritodrine (beta(2)-agonist), and ZD7114 (beta(3)-agonist) in the presence and absence of tetrodotoxin (nonselective nerve blocker). Norepinephrine (3 x 10(-5) M) inhibited 65 +/- 6% (mean +/- SEM) of spontaneous contractile activity. The same molar dose of ritodrine, phenylephrine, or ZD7114 resulted in less inhibition (46 +/- 7%, 31 +/- 5%, and 39 +/- 3%, respectively; P < 0.05). The calculated molar concentration of ZD7114 needed to induce 50% inhibition was similar to that of norepinephrine, whereas higher concentrations of phenylephrine or ritodrine were required. Clonidine and prenalterol had no effect on contractile activity. Blockade of intramural neural transmission by tetrodotoxin affected the responses to ritodrine and phenylephrine (but not to norepinephrine or ZD7114), suggesting that these agents exert part of their effects via neurally mediated enteric pathways. Our results suggest that adrenergic modulation of contractile activity in the rat ileum is mediated primarily by muscular beta(3)-, beta(2)-, and alpha(1)-receptor mechanisms; the latter two also involve neural pathways.

  4. Chronic administration of taurine to aged rats improves the electrical and contractile properties of skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Pierno, S; De Luca, A; Camerino, C; Huxtable, R J; Camerino, D C

    1998-09-01

    A reduction of resting chloride conductance (GCl) and a decrease of the voltage threshold for contraction are observed during aging in rat skeletal muscle. The above alterations are also observed in muscle of adult rat after taurine depletion. As lower levels of taurine were found by others in aged rats compared to young rats, we tested the hypothesis that a depletion of taurine may contribute to the alteration of the electrical and contractile properties we found in skeletal muscle during aging. This was accomplished by evaluating the potential benefit of a pharmacological treatment with the amino acid. To this aim 25-mo-old Wistar rats were chronically treated (2-3 mo) with taurine (1 g/kg p.o. daily) and the effects of such a treatment were evaluated in vitro on the passive and active membrane electrical properties of extensor digitorum longus muscle fibers by means of current-clamp intracellular microelectrode technique. Excitation-contraction coupling was also evaluated by measuring the voltage threshold for contraction with the intracellular microelectrode "point" voltage clamp method. In parallel muscle and blood taurine contents were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Taurine supplementation significantly raised taurine content in muscle toward that found in adult rats. Supplementation also significantly increased GCl vs. the adult value, in parallel the excitability characteristics (threshold current and latency) related to this parameter were ameliorated. The increase of GCl induced by taurine was accompanied by a restoration of the pharmacological sensitivity to the R(+) enantiomer of 2-(p-chlorophenoxy) propionic acid, a specific chloride channel ligand. In parallel also the protein kinase C-mediated modulation of the channel was restored; in fact the potency of 4-beta-phorbol 12, 13-dibutyrate in reducing GCl was lower in taurine-treated muscles vs. untreated aged, being rather similar to that observed in adult. The treatment also

  5. The effects of hibernation on the contractile and biochemical properties of skeletal muscles in the thirteen-lined ground squirrel, Ictidomys tridecemlineatus.

    PubMed

    James, Rob S; Staples, James F; Brown, Jason C L; Tessier, Shannon N; Storey, Kenneth B

    2013-07-15

    Hibernation is a crucial strategy of winter survival used by many mammals. During hibernation, thirteen-lined ground squirrels, Ictidomys tridecemlineatus, cycle through a series of torpor bouts, each lasting more than a week, during which the animals are largely immobile. Previous hibernation studies have demonstrated that such natural models of skeletal muscle disuse cause limited or no change in either skeletal muscle size or contractile performance. However, work loop analysis of skeletal muscle, which provides a realistic assessment of in vivo power output, has not previously been undertaken in mammals that undergo prolonged torpor during hibernation. In the present study, our aim was to assess the effects of 3 months of hibernation on contractile performance (using the work loop technique) and several biochemical properties that may affect performance. There was no significant difference in soleus muscle power output-cycle frequency curves between winter (torpid) and summer (active) animals. Total antioxidant capacity of gastrocnemius muscle was 156% higher in torpid than in summer animals, suggesting one potential mechanism for maintenance of acute muscle performance. Soleus muscle fatigue resistance was significantly lower in torpid than in summer animals. Gastrocnemius muscle glycogen content was unchanged. However, state 3 and state 4 mitochondrial respiration rates were significantly suppressed, by 59% and 44%, respectively, in mixed hindlimb skeletal muscle from torpid animals compared with summer controls. These findings in hindlimb skeletal muscles suggest that, although maximal contractile power output is maintained in torpor, there is both suppression of ATP production capacity and reduced fatigue resistance.

  6. Myocardial contractile and metabolic properties of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by cardiac troponin I gene mutations: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bo; Wang, Longhui; Liu, Qian; Luo, Qingming

    2012-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is an inherited disease that is caused by sarcomeric protein gene mutations. The mechanism by which these mutant proteins cause disease is uncertain. Experimentally, cardiac troponin I (CTnI) gene mutations mainly alter myocardial performance via increases in the Ca(2+) sensitivity of cardiac contractility. In this study, we used an integrated simulation that links electrophysiology, contractile activity and energy metabolism of the myocardium to investigate alterations in myocardial contractile function and energy metabolism regulation as a result of increased Ca(2+) sensitivity in CTnI mutations. Simulation results reproduced the following typical features of FHC: (1) slower relaxation (diastolic dysfunction) caused by prolonged [Ca(2+)](i) and force transients; (2) higher energy consumption with the increase in Ca(2+) sensitivity; and (3) reduced fatty acid oxidation and enhanced glucose utilization in hypertrophied heart metabolism. Furthermore, the simulation indicated that in conditions of high energy consumption (that is, more than an 18.3% increase in total energy consumption), the myocardial energetic metabolic network switched from a net consumer to a net producer of lactate, resulting in a low coupling of glucose oxidation to glycolysis, which is a common feature of hypertrophied hearts. This study provides a novel systematic myocardial contractile and metabolic analysis to help elucidate the pathogenesis of FHC and suggests that the alterations in resting heart energy supply and demand could contribute to disease progression.

  7. Enhanced calcium cycling and contractile function in transgenic hearts expressing constitutively active G alpha o* protein.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ming; Gach, Agnieszka A; Liu, GongXin; Xu, Xiaomei; Lim, Chee Chew; Zhang, Julie X; Mao, Lan; Chuprun, Kurt; Koch, Walter J; Liao, Ronglih; Koren, Gideon; Blaxall, Burns C; Mende, Ulrike

    2008-03-01

    In contrast to the other heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (G proteins) Gs and Gi, the functional role of G o is still poorly defined. To investigate the role of G alpha o in the heart, we generated transgenic mice with cardiac-specific expression of a constitutively active form of G alpha o1* (G alpha o*), the predominant G alpha o isoform in the heart. G alpha o expression was increased 3- to 15-fold in mice from 5 independent lines, all of which had a normal life span and no gross cardiac morphological abnormalities. We demonstrate enhanced contractile function in G alpha o* transgenic mice in vivo, along with increased L-type Ca2+ channel current density, calcium transients, and cell shortening in ventricular G alpha o*-expressing myocytes compared with wild-type controls. These changes were evident at baseline and maintained after isoproterenol stimulation. Expression levels of all major Ca2+ handling proteins were largely unchanged, except for a modest reduction in Na+/Ca2+ exchanger in transgenic ventricles. In contrast, phosphorylation of the ryanodine receptor and phospholamban at known PKA sites was increased 1.6- and 1.9-fold, respectively, in G alpha o* ventricles. Density and affinity of beta-adrenoceptors, cAMP levels, and PKA activity were comparable in G alpha o* and wild-type myocytes, but protein phosphatase 1 activity was reduced upon G alpha o* expression, particularly in the vicinity of the ryanodine receptor. We conclude that G alpha o* exerts a positive effect on Ca2+ cycling and contractile function. Alterations in protein phosphatase 1 activity rather than PKA-mediated phosphorylation might be involved in hyperphosphorylation of key Ca2+ handling proteins in hearts with constitutive G alpha o activation.

  8. Muscle contractile activity regulates Sirt3 protein expression in rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Hokari, Fumi; Kawasaki, Emi; Sakai, Atsushi; Koshinaka, Keiichi; Sakuma, Kunihiro; Kawanaka, Kentaro

    2010-08-01

    Sirt3, a member of the sirtuin family, is known to control cellular mitochondrial function. Furthermore, because sirtuins require NAD for their deacetylase activity, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt), which is a rate-limiting enzyme in the intracellular NAD biosynthetic pathway, influences their activity. We examined the effects of exercise training and normal postural contractile activity on Sirt3 and Nampt protein expression in rat skeletal muscles. Male rats were trained by treadmill running at 20 m/min, 60 min/day, 7 days/wk for 4 wk. This treadmill training program increased the Sirt3 protein expression in the soleus and plantaris muscles by 49% and 41%, respectively (P < 0.05). Moreover, a 4-wk voluntary wheel-running program also induced 66% and 95% increases in Sirt3 protein in the plantaris and triceps muscles of rats, respectively (P < 0.05). Treadmill-running and voluntary running training induced no significant changes in Nampt protein expression in skeletal muscles. In resting rats, the soleus muscle, which is recruited during normal postural activity, possessed the greatest expression levels of the Sirt3 and Nampt proteins, followed by the plantaris and triceps muscles. Furthermore, the Sirt3, but not Nampt, protein level was reduced in the soleus muscles from immobilized hindlimbs compared with that shown in the contralateral control muscle. These results demonstrated that 1) Sirt3 protein expression is upregulated by exercise training in skeletal muscles and 2) local postural contractile activity plays an important role in maintaining a high level of Sirt3 protein expression in postural muscle.

  9. In vitro drug testing based on contractile activity of C2C12 cells in an epigenetic drug model

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Kazushi; Ito, Akira; Imada, Ryusuke; Sato, Masanori; Kawabe, Yoshinori; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue engineering holds great promise for pharmacological studies. Herein, we demonstrated an in vitro drug testing system using tissue-engineered skeletal muscle constructs. In response to epigenetic drugs, myotube differentiation of C2C12 myoblast cells was promoted in two-dimensional cell cultures, but the levels of contractile force generation of tissue-engineered skeletal muscle constructs prepared by three-dimensional cell cultures were not correlated with the levels of myotube differentiation in two-dimensional cell cultures. In contrast, sarcomere formation and contractile activity in two-dimensional cell cultures were highly correlated with contractile force generation of tissue-engineered skeletal muscle constructs. Among the epigenetic drugs tested, trichostatin A significantly improved contractile force generation of tissue-engineered skeletal muscle constructs. Follistatin expression was also enhanced by trichostatin A treatment, suggesting the importance of follistatin in sarcomere formation of muscular tissues. These observations indicate that contractility data are indispensable for in vitro drug screening. PMID:28300163

  10. [Mechanisms of inhibition of the contractile activity in the ileo-caecal zone in rabbits under psychogenic stress].

    PubMed

    Berezina, T P; Ovsiannikov, V I

    2005-08-01

    In experiments on unanaesthetized rabbits, myoelectric activity (contractile activity index) of distal ileum, caecum, and proximal colon in two sites was studied under stress induced by fastening a rabbit to the table in supine position. The stress caused sharp decrease (up to complete disappearance) of the contractile activity in all studied compartments of the ileocaecal intestine with partial or complete restoration after release of the animal. Nonselective blockade of pre- and postsynaptic alpha-adrenoceptor with dihydroergotoxin abolished the initial component of the specified inhibitory response. The latter was caused by "adrenergic inhibition" as a result of action of catecholamines circulating in blood on inhibitory smooth muscle alpha-adrenoceptor. Against the background of muscarinic cholinoceptor blockade, the stressor inhibition of ileocaecal contractile activity observed in control experiments was completely preserved. The periods of supression of ileoceacal contractile activity under stress resistant to blockade of alpha-, beta-adrenoceptor and muscarinic cholinoceptor, are caused by the mechanism of "nonadrenergic noncholinergic inhibition", which is realized at the expence of activation of the enteric inhibitory neurones.

  11. Inhibition of activin A ameliorates skeletal muscle injury and rescues contractile properties by inducing efficient remodeling in female mice.

    PubMed

    Yaden, Benjamin C; Wang, Yan X; Wilson, Jonathan M; Culver, Alexander E; Milner, Andrea; Datta-Mannan, Amita; Shetler, Pamela; Croy, Johnny E; Dai, Guoli; Krishnan, Venkatesh

    2014-04-01

    Activin A, a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, provides pleiotropic regulation of fibrosis and inflammation. We aimed at determining whether selective inhibition of activin A would provide a regenerative benefit. The introduction of activin A into normal muscle increased the expression of inflammatory and muscle atrophy genes Tnf, Tnfrsf12a, Trim63, and Fbxo32 by 3.5-, 10-, 2-, and 4-fold, respectively. The data indicate a sensitive response of muscle to activin A. Two hours after cardiotoxin-induced muscle damage, local activin A protein expression increased by threefold to ninefold. Neutralization of activin A with a specific monoclonal antibody in this muscle injury model decreased the muscle protein levels of lymphotoxin α and Il17a by 32% and 42%, respectively. Muscle histopathological features showed that activin A antibody-treated mice displayed an increase in muscle degradation, with the concomitant 9.2-fold elevation in F4/80-positive cells 3 days after injury. At the same time, the number of Pax7/Myod1-positive cells also increased, indicative of potentiated muscle precursor activation. Ultimately, activin A inhibition resulted in rapid recovery of muscle contractile properties indicated by a restoration of maximum and specific force. In summary, selective inhibition of activin A with a monoclonal antibody in muscle injury leads to the early onset of tissue degradation and subsequent enhanced myogenesis, thereby accelerating muscle repair and functional recovery.

  12. Effects of Using Tricaine Methanesulfonate and Metomidate before Euthanasia on the Contractile Properties of Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Jordan C; Syme, Douglas A

    2016-01-01

    Because many anesthetics work through depressing cell excitability, unanesthetized euthanasia has become common for research involving excitable tissues (for example muscle and nerve) to avoid these depressive effects. However, anesthetic use during euthanasia may be indicated for studies involving isolated tissues if the potential depressive effects of brief anesthetic exposure dissipate after subsequent tissue isolation, washout, and saline perfusion. We explore this here by measuring whether, when applied prior to euthanasia, standard immersion doses of 2 fish anesthetics, tricaine methanesulfonate (TMS; 100 mg/L, n = 6) and methyl 1-(1-phenylethyl)-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylate (metomidate, 10 mg/L, n = 6), have residual effects on the contractile properties (force and work output) of isolated and saline-perfused ventricular compact myocardium from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Results suggest that direct exposure of muscle to immersion doses of TMS—but not metomidate—impairs muscle contractile performance. However, brief exposure (2 to 3 min) to either anesthetic during euthanasia only—providing that the agent is washed out prior to tissue experimentation—does not have an effect on the contractile properties of the myocardium. Therefore, the use of TMS, metomidate, and perhaps other anesthetics that depress cell excitability during euthanasia may be indicated when conducting research on isolated and rinsed tissues. PMID:27657711

  13. Contractile properties of the striated adductor muscle in the bay scallop Argopecten irradians at several temperatures.

    PubMed

    Olson, J M; Marsh, R L

    1993-03-01

    The isometric and isotonic contractile properties of the cross-striated adductor muscle of the bay scallop (Argopecten irradians) were measured in vitro at 10, 15 and 20 degrees C. The length at which twitch force was maximal as a function of the closed length in situ (L0/Lcl) averaged 1.38 +/- 0.01 (mean +/- S.E.M.) at 10 degrees C. This length is very close to the typical length at maximum gape during natural swimming at this temperature. Passive force was very low over the range of lengths measured here; at L0, passive force averaged approximately 0.08 N cm-2, or only 0.5% of the corresponding peak twitch force. The mean peak isometric twitch force (Ptw,max) at 10 degrees C was 21.43 +/- 0.68 N cm-2 (S.E.M.), and the ratio of peak twitch force to tetanic force (Ptw,max/P0) averaged 0.89 +/- 0.01. Temperature did not affect either twitch force (Ptw), once fatigue was taken into account, or Ptw,max/P0. In contrast, the time-related properties of twitch contractions (latent period, tL; time to peak tension, tPtw; and time from peak tension to half-relaxation, t50%R) were positively modified by temperature at all temperatures measured (Q10 > 1.8). All three properties were more temperature-sensitive over the range 10-15 degrees C than over the range 15-20 degrees C. The force-velocity relationships of the striated adductor muscle were fitted to the hyperbolic-linear (HYP-LIN) equation. The force-velocity curves of the striated adductor muscle of the scallop were strongly influenced by temperature. Maximal velocity at zero force (Vmax), and therefore maximal power output, increased significantly with temperature. The Q10 over the temperature range 10-15 degrees C (1.42) was significantly lower than that over the range 15-20 degrees C (2.41). The shape of the force-velocity relationship, assessed through comparisons of the power ratio (Wmax/VmaxP0), was not influenced by temperature.

  14. Contractile properties of skeletal muscle fibre bundles from mice deficient in carbonic anhydrase II.

    PubMed

    Beekley, Matthew D; Wetzel, Petra; Kubis, Hans-Peter; Gros, Gerolf

    2006-07-01

    The function of cytosolic carbonic anhydrase (CA) isozyme II is largely unknown in skeletal muscle. Because of this, we compared the in vitro contractile properties of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus (SOL) fibre bundles from mice deficient in CA II (CAD) to litter mate controls (LM). Twitch rise, 1/2 relaxation time and peak twitch force at 22 degrees C of fibre bundles from CAD EDL [28.4+/-1.4 ms, 31.2+/-2.3 ms, 6.2+/-1.0 Newton/cm(2) (N/cm(2)), respectively] and CAD SOL (54.2+/-7.5 ms, 75.7+/-13.8 ms, 2.9+/-0.5 N/cm(2), respectively) were significantly higher compared to LM EDL (20.5+/-2.2 ms, 21.9+/-3.7 ms, 4.5+/-0.2 N/cm(2)) and LM SOL (42.8+/-3.5 ms, 51.4+/-2.4 ms, 2.1+/-0.4 N/cm(2)). However, in acidic Krebs-Henseleit solution, mimicking the pH, PCO(2), and HCO(3) (-) of arterial blood from CAD mice, twitch rise, 1/2 relaxation time, and peak twitch force of fibre bundles from CAD EDL (19.3+/-0.7 ms, 19.7+/-2.3 ms, 4.8+/-0.8 N/cm(2)) and CAD SOL (41.4+/-3.6 ms, 51.9+/-5.5 ms, 2.2+/-0.7 N/cm(2)) were not significantly different from LM fibre bundles in normal Krebs-Henseleit solution (EDL: 19.7+/-1.1 ms, 21.6+/-0.6 ms, 4.7+/-0.2 N/cm(2); SOL: 42.5+/-3.1 ms, 51.8+/-2.6 ms, 1.8+/-0.3 N/cm(2)). A higher pH(i) during exposure to acidic bathing solution was maintained by CAD EDL (7.37+/-0.02) and CAD SOL (7.33+/-0.05) compared to LM EDL (7.28+/-0.04) and LM SOL (7.22+/-0.02). This suggests that the skeletal muscle of CAD mice possesses an improved defense of pH(i) against elevated pCO(2). In support of this, apparent non-bicarbonate buffer capacity (in mequiv H(+) (pH unit)(-1) (kg cell H(2)O)(-1)) as determined by pH microelectrode was markedly increased in CAD EDL (75.7+/-4.1) and CAD SOL (85.9+/-3.3) compared to LM EDL (39.3+/-4.7) and LM SOL (37.5+/-3.8). Both latter phenomena may be related to the slowed rate of intracellular acidification seen in CAD SOL in comparison with LM SOL upon an increase in PCO(2) of the bath. In conclusion, skeletal

  15. Reptilian skeletal muscle: contractile properties of identified, single fast-twitch and slow fibers from the lizard Dipsosaurus dorsalis.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, T T; Johnston, I A

    1987-06-01

    Contractile properties and innervation patterns were determined in identified single fibers from the iliofibularis muscle of the desert iguana, Dipsosaurus dorsalis. Single fibers from both the red and white regions of the iliofibularis muscle were dissected along their length under oil and a portion was mounted on transducers for determination of maximum isometric tension (Po) and unloaded shortening velocity (Vmax) using the slack test method. Fibers were chemically skinned and activated by high Ca++. The remaining portion of the muscle fiber was mounted on a glass slide and histochemically treated to demonstrate myosin ATPase activity. Fibers studied functionally could therefore be classified as fast or slow according to their myosin ATPase activity, and they could also be classified metabolically according to the region of the muscle from which they were dissected. Fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) fibers from the white region and fast-twitch oxidative, glycolytic (FOG) and slow fibers from the red region had shortening velocities at 25 degrees C of 7.5, 4.4, and 1.5 l X s-1, respectively. Po did not differ in the three fiber types, averaging 279 kN X m-2. In a second experiment, 10 microns sections were examined every 30 microns through the proximal-most 7.5 mm of the iliofibularis muscle for motor endplates. Sections were stained to demonstrate regions of acetylcholinesterase activity. Fibers with visible endplates were classified in serial sections by histochemical treatment for myosin ATPase and succinic dehydrogenase. All slow fibers examined (n = 22) exhibited multiple endplates, averaging one every 725 microns.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. The contractile properties of the medial gastrocnemius motor units innervated by L4 and L5 spinal nerves in the rat.

    PubMed

    Celichowski, Jan; Taborowska, Malwina

    2011-01-01

    When a muscle innervation originates from more than one spinal cord segment, the injury of one of the respective ventral roots evokes an overload, and alters the activity and properties of the remaining motor units. However, it is not well documented if the three types of motor units are equally represented within the innervating ventral roots. Single motor units in the rat medial gastrocnemius muscle were studied and their contractile properties as well as distribution of different types of motor units belonging to subpopulations innervated by axons in L4 and L5 ventral roots were analyzed. The composition of the three physiological types of motor units in the two subpopulations was similar. Force parameters were similar for motor units belonging to the two subpopulations. However, the twitch time parameters were slightly longer in L4 in comparison to L5 motor units although the difference was significant only for fast resistant to fatigue motor units. The force-frequency relationships in the two subpopulations of motor units were not different. Concluding, the two subpopulations of motor units in the studied muscle differ in the number of motor units, but contain similar proportions of the three physiological types of these units and their contractile properties are similar. Therefore, the injury of one ventral root evokes various degrees of muscle denervation, but is non-selective in relation to the three types of motor units.

  17. Changes in contractile properties by androgen hormones in sexually dimorphic muscles of male frogs (Xenopus laevis).

    PubMed

    Regnier, M; Herrera, A A

    1993-02-01

    1. Male frogs (Xenopus laevis) were castrated then given either empty or testosterone-filled implants to produce animals with low or high levels of circulating testosterone. Eight weeks later the contractile properties of an androgen-sensitive forelimb flexor, the flexor carpi radialis muscle (FCR), were measured in vitro. Another forelimb flexor muscle, the coracoradialis, and a hindlimb muscle, the iliofibularis, were analysed similarly. 2. Plasma testosterone levels were 0.9 +/- 0.3 ng/ml (+/- S.E.M.) in castrated frogs with blank implants (C) and 61.3 +/- 4.7 ng/ml in castrates with testosterone implants (CT). Unoperated males, sampled at various times of the year, ranged between 10.8 and 51.0 ng/ml. 3. With direct electrical stimulation of the FCR, contraction time of the isometric twitch was not affected by testosterone levels. Relaxation times were affected, however. Half- and 90% relaxation times were 27 and 42% longer, respectively, for CT compared to C muscles. 4. Testosterone also had no effect on the contraction time of twitches elicited by stimulation of the FCR nerve. Half- and 90% relaxation times were 51 and 76% longer, respectively, for CT compared to C muscles. 5. Tetanus tension, elicited by direct stimulation of the FCR at 50 Hz, was 86% greater in CT compared to C muscles. The average cross-sectional area of FCR muscle fibres was 84% greater in CT muscles. These results implied that testosterone treatment had no effect on specific muscle tension. 6. Stimulation of the FCR nerve at 50 Hz resulted in 53% less tension than the same stimulus applied directly to CT muscles. In C muscles the difference was only 14%. This suggested that testosterone treatment reduced synaptic efficacy. 7. In CT muscles, direct or nerve stimulation of fibres in the shoulder region of the FCR elicited twitches that contracted and relaxed more slowly than fibres in the elbow region. In C muscles there was no difference in contraction or relaxation time between fibres in

  18. Contractile properties of human prostate adenomas and the development of infravesical obstruction.

    PubMed

    Gup, D I; Shapiro, E; Baumann, M; Lepor, H

    1989-01-01

    The contractile response of human prostate adenomas to KCl, phenylephrine (alpha 1 adrenergic agonist), UK 14304 (alpha 2 adrenergic agonist), and carbachol (muscarinic cholinergic agonist) was evaluated in tissue specimens obtained from men with symptomatic and asymptomatic BPH. Prostate specimens were obtained from 5 men with asymptomatic BPH undergoing cystoprostatectomy, 11 men with symptomatic BPH undergoing open prostatectomy, and 11 men with symptomatic BPH undergoing transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). Quantitative symptom score analysis and urinary flow rate determination documented the absence of bladder outlet obstruction in men undergoing cystoprostatectomy and confirmed the presence of bladder outlet obstruction in men undergoing prostatectomy. The magnitude of the contractile response (Emax) and the potency of phenylephrine-induced contractions (EC50) in prostatic preparations obtained from men with symptomatic and asymptomatic BPH were similar. The IC50 for the inhibition of phenylephrine-induced contractions by prazosin was 3.2 nM, confirming that phenylephrine-induced contraction in the human prostate is mediated by the alpha 1 adrenoceptor. The contractile responses of prostate adenomas to muscarinic cholinergic and alpha 2 agonists were negligible. This study demonstrates that the development of bladder outlet obstruction in men with BPH is not related to alterations in the functional response of the smooth muscle component of the prostate adenoma.

  19. Calcium-activated chloride channels anoctamin 1 and 2 promote murine uterine smooth muscle contractility

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Kyra; Vink, Joy Y; Fu, Xiao Wen; Wakita, Hiromi; Danielsson, Jennifer; Wapner, Ronald; Gallos, George

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the presence of calcium activated chloride channels anoctamin 1 and 2 in human and murine uterine smooth muscle and evaluate the physiologic role for these ion channels in murine myometrial contractility. Study Design We performed reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to determine if anoctamin 1 and 2 are expressed in human and murine uterine tissue to validate the study of this protein in mouse models. Immunohistochemical staining of anoctamin 1 and 2 was then performed to determine protein expression in murine myometrial tissue. The function of anoctamin 1 and 2 in murine uterine tissue was evaluated using electrophysiological studies, organ bath, and calcium flux experiments. Results Anoctamin 1 and 2 are expressed in human and murine USM cells. Functional studies show that selective antagonism of these channels promotes relaxation of spontaneous murine uterine smooth muscle contractions. Blockade of anoctamin 1 and 2 inhibits both agonist-induced and spontaneous transient inward currents and abolishes G-protein coupled receptor (oxytocin) mediated elevations in intracellular calcium. Conclusion The calcium activated chloride channels ANO 1 and 2 are present in human and murine myometrial tissue and may provide novel potential therapeutic targets to achieve effective tocolysis. PMID:24928056

  20. Thermal acclimation to cold alters myosin content and contractile properties of rainbow smelt, Osmerus mordax, red muscle.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, David J; Shiels, Lisa P; Nuthakki, Seshuvardhan; Shuman, Jacie L

    2016-06-01

    Rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax), a eurythermal fish, live in environments from -1.8 to 20°C, with some populations facing substantial annual variation in environmental temperature. These different temperature regimes pose distinct challenges to locomotion by smelt. Steady swimming performance, red muscle function and muscle myosin content were examined to assess the prediction that cold acclimation by smelt will lead to improved steady swimming performance and that any performance shift will be associated with changes in red muscle function and in its myosin heavy chain composition. Cold acclimated (4°C) smelt had a faster maximum steady swimming speed and swam with a higher tailbeat frequency than warm acclimated (10°C) smelt when tested at the same temperature (10°C). Muscle mechanics experiments demonstrated faster contractile properties in the cold acclimated fish when tested at 10°C. The red muscle of cold acclimated smelt had a shorter twitch times, a shorter relaxation times and a higher maximum shortening velocity. In addition, red muscle from cold acclimated fish displayed reduced thermal sensitivity to cold, maintaining higher force levels at 4°C compared to red muscle from warm acclimated fish. Immunohistochemistry suggests shifts in muscle myosin composition and a decrease in muscle cross-sectional area with cold acclimation. Dot blot analysis confirmed a shift in myosin content. Rainbow smelt do show a significant thermal acclimation response to cold. An examination of published values of maximum muscle shortening velocity in fishes suggests that smelt are particularly well suited to high levels of activity in very cold water.

  1. Methionine enhances the contractile activity of human colon circular smooth muscle in vitro.

    PubMed

    Choe, Eun Kyung; Moon, Jung Sun; Park, Kyu Joo

    2012-07-01

    Effective drug to manage constipation has been unsatisfactory. We sought to determine whether methionine has effect on the human colon. Human colon tissues were obtained from the specimens of colon resection. Microelectrode recording was performed and contractile activity of muscle strips and the propagation of the contractions in the colon segment were measured. At 10 µM, methionine depolarized the resting membrane potential (RMP) of circular muscle (CM) cells. In the CM strip, methionine increased the amplitude and area under the curve (AUC) of contractions. In the whole segment of colon, methionine increased the amplitude and AUC of the high amplitude contractions in the CM. These effects on contraction were maximal at 10 µM and were not observed in longitudinal muscles in both the strip and the colon segment. Methionine reversed the effects of pretreatment with sodium nitroprusside, tetrodotoxin and N(w)-oxide-L-arginine, resulting in depolarization of the RMP, and increased amplitude and AUC of contractions in the muscle strip. Methionine treatment affected the wave pattern of the colon segment by evoking small sized amplitude contractions superimposed on preexisting wave patterns. Our results indicate that a compound mimicking methionine may provide prokinetic functions in the human colon.

  2. Temperature effect on contractile activity of the Ambystoma dumerilii heart previously treated with isoproterenol.

    PubMed

    Cano-Martínez, A; Vargas-González, A; Guarner-Lans, V

    2007-07-01

    The spontaneous heart rate (HR) and ventricular (V) and atrium (A) tensions (T) were evaluated through isolated organ assays at different temperatures in hearts from Ambystoma dumerilii control and treated with isoproterenol (ISO) [(150 mg/kg i.p. each 24 h, for 3 days)] on days 1, 5, 30 and 90 after ISO. In control hearts, the HR increased and the T decreased when temperature was augmented. One day after ISO the HR (43-24%) and T (50-25%) decreased with respect to control, between 8 and 24 degrees C. Five, 30 and 90 days after ISO, HR showed a gradual recovery with similar effect when the temperature was changed; but the AT increased and VT decreased at temperatures between 8 and 12 degrees C and were only recovered at temperatures above 12 degrees C. Our results indicate that the HR recovers after ISO in A. dumerilii independently of temperature. The recovery of AT and VT is similar to HR at temperatures higher than 12 degrees C and the increases in VT could be compensating the decrease in VT caused by ISO, at temperatures lower than 12 degrees C. The changes in heart contractile activity of A. dumerilii after insult show the thermic plasticity that is observed in ectothermic vertebrates.

  3. Insoluble elastin reduces collagen scaffold stiffness, improves viscoelastic properties, and induces a contractile phenotype in smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Alan J; O'Brien, Fergal J

    2015-12-01

    Biomaterials with the capacity to innately guide cell behaviour while also displaying suitable mechanical properties remain a challenge in tissue engineering. Our approach to this has been to utilise insoluble elastin in combination with collagen as the basis of a biomimetic scaffold for cardiovascular tissue engineering. Elastin was found to markedly alter the mechanical and biological response of these collagen-based scaffolds. Specifically, during extensive mechanical assessment elastin was found to reduce the specific tensile and compressive moduli of the scaffolds in a concentration dependant manner while having minimal effect on scaffold microarchitecture with both scaffold porosity and pore size still within the ideal ranges for tissue engineering applications. However, the viscoelastic properties were significantly improved with elastin addition with a 3.5-fold decrease in induced creep strain, a 6-fold increase in cyclical strain recovery, and with a four-parameter viscoelastic model confirming the ability of elastin to confer resistance to long term deformation/creep. Furthermore, elastin was found to result in the modulation of SMC phenotype towards a contractile state which was determined via reduced proliferation and significantly enhanced expression of early (α-SMA), mid (calponin), and late stage (SM-MHC) contractile proteins. This allows the ability to utilise extracellular matrix proteins alone to modulate SMC phenotype without any exogenous factors added. Taken together, the ability of elastin to alter the mechanical and biological response of collagen scaffolds has led to the development of a biomimetic biomaterial highly suitable for cardiovascular tissue engineering.

  4. [Contractile properties of fibers and cytoskeletal proteins of gerbil's hindlimb muscles after space flight].

    PubMed

    Lipets, E N; Ponomareva, E V; Ogneva, I V; Vikhliantsev, I M; Karaduleva, E V; Kratashkina, N L; Kuznetsov, S L; Podlubnaia, Z A; Shenkman, B S

    2009-01-01

    The work had the goal to compare the microgravity effects on gerbil's muscles-antagonists, m. soleus and m. tibialis anterior. The animals were exposed in 12-d space microgravity aboard Earth's artificial satellite "Foton-M3". Findings of the analysis of single skinned fibers contractility are 19.7% diminution of the diameter and 21.8% loss of the total contractive force of m. soleus fibers post flight. However, there was no significant difference in calcium sensitivity which agrees with the absence of changes in the relative content of several major cytoskeletal proteins (titin and nebulin ratios to heavy chains of myosin were identical in the flight and control groups) and a slight shifting of the myosin phenotype toward the "fast type" (9%, p < 0.05). These parameters were mostly unaffected by the space flight in m. tibialis anterior. To sum up, the decline of contractility and diminution of gerbil's myofibers after the space flight were less significant as compared with rats and did not impact the sytoskeletal protein ratios.

  5. Integrated Analysis of Contractile Kinetics, Force Generation, and Electrical Activity in Single Human Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Kijlstra, Jan David; Hu, Dongjian; Mittal, Nikhil; Kausel, Eduardo; van der Meer, Peter; Garakani, Arman; Domian, Ibrahim J

    2015-12-08

    The quantitative analysis of cardiomyocyte function is essential for stem cell-based approaches for the in vitro study of human cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. We present a method to comprehensively assess the function of single human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte (hPSC-CMs) through simultaneous quantitative analysis of contraction kinetics, force generation, and electrical activity. We demonstrate that statistical analysis of movies of contracting hPSC-CMs can be used to quantify changes in cellular morphology over time and compute contractile kinetics. Using a biomechanical model that incorporates substrate stiffness, we calculate cardiomyocyte force generation at single-cell resolution and validate this approach with conventional traction force microscopy. The addition of fluorescent calcium indicators or membrane potential dyes allows the simultaneous analysis of contractility and calcium handling or action potential morphology. Accordingly, our approach has the potential for broad application in the study of cardiac disease, drug discovery, and cardiotoxicity screening.

  6. Integrated Analysis of Contractile Kinetics, Force Generation, and Electrical Activity in Single Human Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kijlstra, Jan David; Hu, Dongjian; Mittal, Nikhil; Kausel, Eduardo; van der Meer, Peter; Garakani, Arman; Domian, Ibrahim J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The quantitative analysis of cardiomyocyte function is essential for stem cell-based approaches for the in vitro study of human cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. We present a method to comprehensively assess the function of single human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte (hPSC-CMs) through simultaneous quantitative analysis of contraction kinetics, force generation, and electrical activity. We demonstrate that statistical analysis of movies of contracting hPSC-CMs can be used to quantify changes in cellular morphology over time and compute contractile kinetics. Using a biomechanical model that incorporates substrate stiffness, we calculate cardiomyocyte force generation at single-cell resolution and validate this approach with conventional traction force microscopy. The addition of fluorescent calcium indicators or membrane potential dyes allows the simultaneous analysis of contractility and calcium handling or action potential morphology. Accordingly, our approach has the potential for broad application in the study of cardiac disease, drug discovery, and cardiotoxicity screening. PMID:26626178

  7. Contractile mechanisms coupled to TRPA1 receptor activation in rat urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Edinéia Lemos; Ferreira, Juliano; André, Eunice; Calixto, João B

    2006-06-28

    TRPA1 is a member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family present in sensory neurons. Here we show that vanilloid receptor (TRPV1) stimulation with capsaicin and activation of TRPA1 with allyl isothiocyanate or cinnamaldehyde cause a graded contraction of the rat urinary bladder in vitro. Repeated applications of maximal concentrations of the agonists produce desensitization to their contractile effects. Moreover, contraction caused by TRPA1 agonists generates cross-desensitization with capsaicin. The TRP receptor antagonist ruthenium red (10-100 microM) inhibits capsaicin (0.03 microM), allyl isothiocyanate (100 microM) and cinnamaldehyde (300 microM)-induced contractions in the rat urinary bladder. The selective TRPV1 receptor antagonist SB 366791 (10 microM) blocks capsaicin-induced contraction, but partially reduces allyl isothiocyanate- or cinnamaldehyde-mediated contraction. However, allyl isothiocyanate and cinnamaldehyde (10-1000 microM) completely fail to interfere with the specific binding sites for the TRPV1 agonist [(3)H]-resiniferatoxin. Allyl isothiocyanate or cinnamaldehyde-mediated contractions of rat urinary bladder, which rely on external Ca(2+) influx, are significantly inhibited by tachykinin receptor antagonists as well as by tetrodotoxin (1 microM) or indomethacin (1 microM). Allyl isothiocyanate-induced contraction is not changed by atropine (1 microM) or suramin (300 microM). The exposure of urinary bladders to allyl isothiocyanate (100 microM) causes an increase in the prostaglandin E(2) and substance P levels. Taken together, these results indicate that TRPA1 agonists contract rat urinary bladder through sensory fibre stimulation, depending on extracellular Ca(2+) influx and release of tachykinins and cyclooxygenase metabolites, probably prostaglandin E(2). Thus, TRPA1 appears to exert an important role in urinary bladder function.

  8. Muscle-specific deletion of exons 2 and 3 of the IL15RA gene in mice: effects on contractile properties of fast and slow muscles.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Grant; Guo, Ge; Stricker, Janelle; Quinn, LeBris S; Ma, Averil; Pistilli, Emidio E

    2015-02-15

    Interleukin-15 (IL-15) is a putative myokine hypothesized to induce an oxidative skeletal muscle phenotype. The specific IL-15 receptor alpha subunit (IL-15Rα) has also been implicated in specifying this contractile phenotype. The purposes of this study were to determine the muscle-specific effects of IL-15Rα functional deficiency on skeletal muscle isometric contractile properties, fatigue characteristics, spontaneous cage activity, and circulating IL-15 levels in male and female mice. Muscle creatine kinase (MCK)-driven IL-15Rα knockout mice (mIl15ra(fl/fl)/Cre(+)) were generated using the Cre-loxP system. We tested the hypothesis that IL-15Rα functional deficiency in skeletal muscle would increase resistance to contraction-induced fatigue, cage activity, and circulating IL-15 levels. There was a significant effect of genotype on the fatigue curves obtained in extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles from female mIl15ra(fl/fl)/Cre(+) mice, such that force output was greater during the repeated contraction protocol compared with mIl15ra(fl/fl)/Cre(-) control mice. Muscles from female mIl15ra(fl/fl)/Cre(+) mice also had a twofold greater amount of the mitochondrial genome-specific COXII gene compared with muscles from mIl15ra(fl/fl)/Cre(-) control mice, indicating a greater mitochondrial density in these skeletal muscles. There was a significant effect of genotype on the twitch:tetanus ratio in EDL and soleus muscles from mIl15ra(fl/fl)/Cre(+) mice, such that the ratio was lower in these muscles compared with mIl15ra(fl/fl)/Cre(-) control mice, indicating a pro-oxidative shift in muscle phenotype. However, spontaneous cage activity was not different and IL-15 protein levels were lower in male and female mIl15ra(fl/fl)/Cre(+) mice compared with control. Collectively, these data support a direct effect of muscle IL-15Rα deficiency in altering contractile properties and fatigue characteristics in skeletal muscles.

  9. Effect of short-term creatine supplementation on markers of skeletal muscle damage after strenuous contractile activity.

    PubMed

    Bassit, Reinaldo Abunasser; Pinheiro, Carlos Hermano da Justa; Vitzel, Kaio Fernando; Sproesser, Antônio José; Silveira, Leonardo R; Curi, Rui

    2010-03-01

    The protective effect of short-term creatine supplementation (CrS) upon markers of strenuous contractile activity-induced damage in human and rat skeletal muscles was investigated. Eight Ironman triathletes were randomized into the placebo (Pl; n = 4) and creatine-supplemented (CrS; n = 4) groups. Five days prior to the Ironman competition, the CrS group received creatine monohydrate (20 g day(-1)) plus maltodextrin (50 g) divided in two equal doses. The Pl group received maltodextrin (50 g day(-1)) only. The effect of CrS (5 g day(-1)/kg body weight for 5 days) was also evaluated in a protocol of strenuous contractile activity induced by electrical stimulation in rats. Blood samples were collected before and 36 and 60 h after the competition and were used to determine plasma activities of creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), aldolase (ALD), glutamic oxaloacetic acid transaminase (GOT), glutamic pyruvic acid transaminase (GPT), and C-reactive protein (CRP) level. In rats, plasma activities of CK and LDH, muscle vascular permeability (MVP) using Evans blue dye, muscle force and fatigue were evaluated. Activities of CK, ALD, LDH, GOT, GTP, and levels of CRP were increased in the Pl group after the competition as compared to basal values. CrS decreased plasma activities of CK, LDH, and ALD, and prevented the rise of GOT and GPT plasma activities. In rats, CrS delayed the fatigue, preserved the force, and prevented the rise of LDH and CK plasma activities and MVP in the gastrocnemius muscle. CrS presented a protective effect on muscle injury induced by strenuous contractile activities.

  10. Effective contractile response to voltage-gated Na+ channels revealed by a channel activator.

    PubMed

    Ho, W-S Vanessa; Davis, Alison J; Chadha, Preet S; Greenwood, Iain A

    2013-04-15

    This study investigated the molecular identity and impact of enhancing voltage-gated Na(+) (Na(V)) channels in the control of vascular tone. In rat isolated mesenteric and femoral arteries mounted for isometric tension recording, the vascular actions of the Na(V) channel activator veratridine were examined. Na(V) channel expression was probed by molecular techniques and immunocytochemistry. In mesenteric arteries, veratridine induced potent contractions (pEC(50) = 5.19 ± 0.20, E(max) = 12.0 ± 2.7 mN), which were inhibited by 1 μM TTX (a blocker of all Na(V) channel isoforms, except Na(V)1.5, Na(V)1.8, and Na(V)1.9), but not by selective blockers of Na(V)1.7 (ProTx-II, 10 nM) or Na(V)1.8 (A-80347, 1 μM) channels. The responses were insensitive to endothelium removal but were partly (~60%) reduced by chemical destruction of sympathetic nerves by 6-hydroxydopamine (2 mM) or antagonism at the α1-adrenoceptor by prazosin (1 μM). KB-R7943, a blocker of the reverse mode of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (3 μM), inhibited veratridine contractions in the absence or presence of prazosin. T16A(inh)-A01, a Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel blocker (10 μM), also inhibited the prazosin-resistant contraction to veratridine. Na(V) channel immunoreactivity was detected in freshly isolated mesenteric myocytes, with apparent colocalization with the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger. Veratridine induced similar contractile effects in the femoral artery, and mRNA transcripts for Na(V)1.2 and Na(V)1.3 channels were evident in both vessel types. We conclude that, in addition to sympathetic nerves, NaV channels are expressed in vascular myocytes, where they are functionally coupled to the reverse mode of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger and subsequent activation of Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels, causing contraction. The TTX-sensitive Na(V)1.2 and Na(V)1.3 channels are likely involved in vascular control.

  11. Effect of spaceflight on the isotonic contractile properties of single skeletal muscle fibers in the rhesus monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, R. H.; Romatowski, J. G.; Blaser, C.; De La Cruz, L.; Gettelman, G. J.; Widrick, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    Experiments from both Cosmos and Space Shuttle missions have shown weightlessness to result in a rapid decline in the mass and force of rat hindlimb extensor muscles. Additionally, despite an increased maximal shortening velocity, peak power was reduced in rat soleus muscle post-flight. In humans, declines in voluntary peak isometric ankle extensor torque ranging from 15-40% have been reported following long- and short-term spaceflight and prolonged bed rest. Complete understanding of the cellular events responsible for the fiber atrophy and the decline in force, as well as the development of effective countermeasures, will require detailed knowledge of how the physiological and biochemical processes of muscle function are altered by spaceflight. The specific purpose of this investigation was to determine the extent to which the isotonic contractile properties of the slow- and fast-twitch fiber types of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were altered by a 14-day spaceflight.

  12. Muscle contractile properties as an explanation of the higher mean power output in marmosets than humans during jumping.

    PubMed

    Plas, Rogier L C; Degens, Hans; Meijer, J Peter; de Wit, Gerard M J; Philippens, Ingrid H C H M; Bobbert, Maarten F; Jaspers, Richard T

    2015-07-01

    The muscle mass-specific mean power output (PMMS,mean) during push-off in jumping in marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) is more than twice that in humans. In the present study it was tested whether this is attributable to differences in muscle contractile properties. In biopsies of marmoset m. vastus lateralis (VL) and m. gastrocnemius medialis (GM) (N=4), fibre-type distribution was assessed using fluorescent immunohistochemistry. In single fibres from four marmoset and nine human VL biopsies, the force-velocity characteristics were determined. Marmoset VL contained almost exclusively fast muscle fibres (>99.0%), of which 63% were type IIB and 37% were hybrid fibres, fibres containing multiple myosin heavy chains. GM contained 9% type I fibres, 44% type IIB and 47% hybrid muscle fibres. The proportions of fast muscle fibres in marmoset VL and GM were substantially larger than those reported in the corresponding human muscles. The curvature of the force-velocity relationships of marmoset type IIB and hybrid fibres was substantially flatter than that of human type I, IIA, IIX and hybrid fibres, resulting in substantially higher muscle fibre mass-specific peak power (PFMS,peak). Muscle mass-specific peak power output (PMMS,peak) values of marmoset whole VL and GM, estimated from their fibre-type distributions and force-velocity characteristics, were more than twice the estimates for the corresponding human muscles. As the relative difference in estimated PMMS,peak between marmosets and humans is similar to that of PMMS,mean during push-off in jumping, it is likely that the difference in in vivo mechanical output between humans and marmosets is attributable to differences in muscle contractile properties.

  13. Loss of contractile activity of endothelin-1 induced by electrical field stimulation-generated free radicals.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, N; Kasuya, Y; Yamada, G; Hama, H; Masaki, T; Goto, K

    1994-09-01

    1. Electrical field stimulation (EFS; 10 V, 10 Hz, 2 ms) of porcine coronary artery strips precontracted with 10 nM endothelin-1 (ET-1) for 5 min caused a biphasic response, consisting of a slight contraction during EFS and a marked and irreversible relaxation just after EFS. This irreversible relaxation after EFS has never been investigated. In the present study, we have investigated the mechanism of the relaxation after EFS. 2. The EFS-induced response was not affected by the presence or absence of endothelium and was insensitive to 10 microM tetrodotoxin (TTX). 3. In the presence of free radical scavengers (40 u ml-1 superoxide dismutase (SOD), 1200 u ml-1 catalase or 80 mM D-mannitol), the relaxation after EFS was significantly inhibited. Moreover, relaxation after EFS was not observed in porcine coronary artery strips precontracted with 20 mM KCl. 4. In a cascade experiment, EFS of Krebs-Ringer solution containing 10 nM ET-1 induced marked suppression of the contractile activity of ET-1 in porcine coronary artery strips, which was in accord with the observed decrease in release of immunoreactive ET-1 (ir-ET-1). This effect of EFS was significantly inhibited by each of the free radical scavengers, 3 mM vitamin C, 40 u ml-1 SOD, 1200 u ml-1 catalase and 80 mM D-mannitol. 5. The exchange of 95% O2/5% CO2 gas for 95% N2/5% CO2 gas significantly inhibited the EFS-induced decrease in release of ir-ET-1. 6. Neither superoxide anions generated by xanthine (10 JM) plus xanthine oxidase (0.1 micro ml-1) nor hydrogen peroxide (10 microM) exogenously added to Krebs-Ringer solution containing 10 nM ET-1 affected the level of ir-ET-1.7. Generation of hydroxyl radicals was detected in the EFS-applied Krebs-Ringer solution. The EFS-induced generation of hydroxyl radicals was dependent on the period of stimulation and 02-bubbling, and significant generation of hydroxyl radicals was detectable with stimulation of over 5 min.Moreover, hydroxyl radicals generated in 50 mM Na

  14. Fibronectin upregulates cGMP-dependent protein kinase type Iβ through C/EBP transcription factor activation in contractile cells.

    PubMed

    Chamorro-Jorganes, Aranzazu; Calleros, Laura; Griera, Mercedes; Saura, Marta; Luengo, Alicia; Rodriguez-Puyol, D; Rodriguez-Puyol, M

    2011-03-01

    The nitric oxide (NO)-soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) pathway exerts most of its cellular actions through the activation of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG). Accumulation of extracellular matrix is one of the main structural changes in pathological conditions characterized by a decreased activity of this pathway, such as hypertension, diabetes, or aging, and it is a well-known fact that extracellular matrix proteins modulate cell phenotype through the interaction with membrane receptors such as integrins. The objectives of this study were 1) to evaluate whether extracellular matrix proteins, particularly fibronectin (FN), modulate PKG expression in contractile cells, 2) to analyze the mechanisms involved, and 3) to evaluate the functional consequences. FN increased type I PKG (PKG-I) protein content in human mesangial cells, an effect dependent on the interaction with β(1)-integrin. The FN upregulation of PKG-I protein content was due to increased mRNA expression, determined by augmented transcriptional activity of the PKG-I promoter region. Akt and the transcription factor CCAAT enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) mediated the genesis of these changes. FN also increased PKG-I in another type of contractile cell, rat vascular smooth muscle cells (RVSMC). Tirofiban, a pharmacological analog of FN, increased PKG-I protein content in RVSMC and rat aortic walls and magnified the hypotensive effect of dibutyryl cGMP in conscious Wistar rats. The present results provide evidence of a mechanism able to increase PKG-I protein content in contractile cells. Elucidation of this novel mechanism provides a rationale for future pharmacotherapy in certain vascular diseases.

  15. Focal adhesion kinase activity is required for actomyosin contractility-based invasion of cells into dense 3D matrices

    PubMed Central

    Mierke, Claudia T.; Fischer, Tony; Puder, Stefanie; Kunschmann, Tom; Soetje, Birga; Ziegler, Wolfgang H.

    2017-01-01

    The focal adhesion kinase (FAK) regulates the dynamics of integrin-based cell adhesions important for motility. FAK’s activity regulation is involved in stress-sensing and focal-adhesion turnover. The effect of FAK on 3D migration and cellular mechanics is unclear. We analyzed FAK knock-out mouse embryonic fibroblasts and cells expressing a kinase-dead FAK mutant, R454-FAK, in comparison to FAK wild-type cells. FAK knock-out and FAKR454/R454 cells invade dense 3D matrices less efficiently. These results are supported by FAK knock-down in wild-type fibroblasts and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells showing reduced invasiveness. Pharmacological interventions indicate that in 3D matrices, cells deficient in FAK or kinase-activity behave similarly to wild-type cells treated with inhibitors of Src-activity or actomyosin-contractility. Using magnetic tweezers experiments, FAKR454/R454 cells are shown to be softer and exhibit impaired adhesion to fibronectin and collagen, which is consistent with their reduced 3D invasiveness. In line with this, FAKR454/R454 cells cannot contract the matrix in contrast to FAK wild-type cells. Finally, our findings demonstrate that active FAK facilitates 3D matrix invasion through increased cellular stiffness and transmission of actomyosin-dependent contractile force in dense 3D extracellular matrices. PMID:28202937

  16. Measurement of Contractile Activity in Small Animal's Digestive Organ by Carbon Nanotube-Based Force Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Takamichi; Takeda, Naoki; Tsutsui, Chihiro; Koike, Kanako; Shimatani, Yuichi; Sakai, Takafumi; Akiya, Masahiro; Taguchi, Akira

    2011-03-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT)-based force transducer designed to be embedded in the body of a live animal was fabricated and implanted into the stomach of a rat omit to measure contractile movement. The transducer comprised dispersed poly(ethylene glycol)-grafted multiwalled CNTs applied to a comb-like Au-electrode formed on a poly(dimethylsiloxane) sheet. The implanted rat was injected with acetylcholine to induce muscular contractions and changes in the resistance of the transducer were measured. Such changes arise owing to strain in the CNT network upon distortion. The measured resistance change was found to be proportional to the concentration of injected acetylcholine.

  17. Rate-dependent changes of twitch force duration in rat cardiac trabeculae: a property of the contractile system

    PubMed Central

    Kassiri, Z; Myers, R; Kaprielian, R; Banijamali, H S; Backx, P H

    2000-01-01

    We examined the mechanisms for rate-dependent changes in twitch force duration by simultaneously measuring force and [Ca2+]i in rat cardiac trabeculae. Peak force decreased when the rate of stimulation was increased from 0.2 to 0.5 Hz, whilst it increased from 1 to 2 Hz. Over the same range of frequencies, peak [Ca2+]i transients increased monotonically, whilst both force and [Ca2+]i transient duration were abbreviated. Changes in peak force or peak [Ca2+]i transients were not responsible for the changes in force or [Ca2+]i transient duration. The changes in twitch force and [Ca2+]i transient duration were completed roughly within one beat following an abrupt change in the rate of stimulation. Rate-dependent changes resembled those observed with isoproterenol (isoprenaline) application. However, kinase inhibitors (i.e. K252-a, H-89, KN-62 and KN-93) had no effect on the rate-dependent changes of twitch force and [Ca2+]i transient kinetics, suggesting that protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase G (PKG) and Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM/kinase II) were not responsible for these kinetic changes. Despite the changes in twitch force and [Ca2+]i transient kinetics, the rate-limiting step for the rate-dependent force relaxation still resides at the level of the contractile proteins. Our results suggest that rate-dependent changes in force and [Ca2+]i transients do not depend on PKA or CaM/kinase II activity but might result from intrinsic features of the contractile and/or Ca2+-handling proteins. PMID:10747194

  18. Pharmacological investigation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) contractile activity in rat detrusor muscle.

    PubMed

    Patacchini, Riccardo; Santicioli, Paolo; Giuliani, Sandro; Maggi, Carlo Alberto

    2005-02-21

    We have investigated the mechanism through which hydrogen sulfide (H2S) stimulates capsaicin-sensitive primary afferent neurons in the rat isolated urinary bladder. Sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaHS), a donor of H2S, produced concentration-dependent contractile responses (pEC50=3.5+/-0.1) that were unaffected by the transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) antagonist capsazepine (30 microM) and SB 366791 (10 microM) and by the N-type Ca2+ channel blocker omega-conotoxin GVIA (omega-CTX; 100 nM). In contrast, the unselective transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels blocker ruthenium red (30 microM) almost abolished NaHS-induced contractions. Ruthenium red (30 microM) greatly reduced capsaicin-induced contractions, whereas it did not attenuate the contractile response to neurokinin A. The putative TRPV1 receptor antagonist iodo-resiniferatoxin, from 100 nM upward, produced agonist responses per se, and could not be tested against NaHS. We conclude that H2S either acts at TRPV1 receptorial sites unblocked by capsazepine or SB 366791, or stimulates a still unidentified transient receptor potential-like channel co-expressed with TRPV1 on sensory neurons.

  19. β1-Subunit of the Ca2+-activated K+ channel regulates contractile activity of mouse urinary bladder smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Petkov, Georgi V; Bonev, Adrian D; Heppner, Thomas J; Brenner, Robert; Aldrich, Richard W; Nelson, Mark T

    2001-01-01

    The large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channel plays an important role in controlling membrane potential and contractility of urinary bladder smooth muscle (UBSM). These channels are composed of a pore-forming α-subunit and an accessory, smooth muscle-specific, β1-subunit. Our aim was to determine the functional role of the β1-subunit of the BK channel in controlling the contractions of UBSM by using BK channel β1-subunit ‘knock-out’ (KO) mice. The β-galactosidase reporter (lacZ gene) was targeted to the β1 locus, which provided the opportunity to examine the expression of the β1-subunit in UBSM. Based on this approach, the β1-subunit is highly expressed in UBSM. BK channels lacking β1-subunits have reduced activity, consistent with a shift in BK channel voltage/Ca2+ sensitivity. Iberiotoxin, an inhibitor of BK channels, increased the amplitude and decreased the frequency of phasic contractions of UBSM strips from control mice. The effects of the β1-subunit deletion on contractions were similar to the effect of iberiotoxin on control mice. The UBSM strips from β1-subunit KO mice had elevated phasic contraction amplitude and decreased frequency when compared to control UBSM strips. Iberiotoxin increased the amplitude and frequency of phasic contractions, and UBSM tone of UBSM strips from β1-subunit KO mice, suggesting that BK channels still regulate contractions in the absence of the β1-subunit. The results indicate that the β1-subunit, by modulating BK channel activity, plays a significant role in the regulation of phasic contractions of the urinary bladder. PMID:11731577

  20. Contractile properties of motor units and expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms in rat fast-type muscle after volitional weight-lifting training.

    PubMed

    Łochyński, Dawid; Kaczmarek, Dominik; Mrówczyński, Włodzimierz; Warchoł, Wojciech; Majerczak, Joanna; Karasiński, Janusz; Korostyński, Michał; Zoladz, Jerzy A; Celichowski, Jan

    2016-10-01

    Dynamic resistance training increases the force and speed of muscle contraction, but little is known about modifications to the contractile properties of the main physiological types of motor units (MUs) that contribute to these muscle adaptations. Although the contractile profile of MU muscle fibers is tightly coupled to myosin heavy chain (MyHC) protein expression, it is not well understood if MyHC transition is a prerequisite for modifications to the contractile characteristics of MUs. In this study, we examined MU contractile properties, the mRNA expression of MyHC, parvalbumin, and sarcoendoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pump isoforms, as well as the MyHC protein content after 5 wk of volitional progressive weight-lifting training in the medial gastrocnemius muscle in rats. The training had no effect on MyHC profiling or Ca(2+)-handling protein gene expression. Maximum force increased in slow (by 49%) and fast (by 21%) MUs. Within fast MUs, the maximum force increased in most fatigue-resistant and intermediate but not most fatigable MUs. Twitch contraction time was shortened in slow and fast fatigue-resistant MUs. Twitch half-relaxation was shortened in fast most fatigue-resistant and intermediate MUs. The force-frequency curve shifted rightward in fast fatigue-resistant MUs. Fast fatigable MUs fatigued less within the initial 15 s while fast fatigue-resistant units increased the ability to potentiate the force within the first minute of the standard fatigue test. In conclusion, at the early stage of resistance training, modifications to the contractile characteristics of MUs appear in the absence of MyHC transition and the upregulation of Ca(2+)-handling genes.

  1. Activity of Cecropia lyratiloba extract on contractility of cardiac and smooth muscles in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Ramos Almeida, Roberta; Montani Raimundo, Juliana; Rodrigues Oliveira, Rodrigo; Coelho Kaplan, Maria Auxiliadora; Gattass, Cerli Rocah; Sudo, Roberto Takashi; Zapata-Sudo, Gisele

    2006-01-01

    1. Brazilian forests show high diversity of medicinal plants and several are used in folk medicine for the treatment of hypertension and asthma. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of a methanol extract (ME) of Cecropia lyratiloba and its flavonoid fraction (FF) on the contractility of cardiac, vascular and tracheal smooth muscles. 2. Twitches of rat papillary muscles were obtained with electrical stimulation and were recorded before and after exposure to increasing concentrations of ME and FF. 3. Cardiac depression was induced by FF. At 500 microg/mL FF, the amplitude of twitches was reduced to 56.7 +/- 5.1% of control values (P < 0.05). 4. The contractile response to a single concentration of adrenaline (10 micromol/L) was measured before and after exposure to ME and FF in rat aorta rings with intact endothelium. Both ME and FF inhibited adrenaline-induced contractions of the aorta in a concentration-dependent manner. Adrenaline-induced contractions were reduced to 46.4 +/- 9.9 and 34.2 +/- 6.9% (P < 0.05) of control in the presence of 500 microg/mL ME and FF, respectively. 5. The flavonoids isolated from FF, namely isoorientin and a mixture of orientin and isovitexin, were also tested in the aorta. These flavonoid do not seem to be responsible for the vasorelaxant effects of ME and FF. 6. No changes were observed in acetylcholine-precontracted trachea when exposed to ME or FF. 7. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation induced by FF is likely to be mediated by the release of nitric oxide because vascular relaxation was abolished in the presence of N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase. 8. In conclusion, vascular relaxation induced by ME and FF could explain the traditional use of the extract of C. lyratiloba for treatment of arterial hypertension.

  2. The effect of taurine depletion on the contractile properties and fatigue in fast-twitch skeletal muscle of the mouse.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, E J; Berg, H M; Easton, C J; Bakker, A J

    2006-10-01

    Taurine increases force production in skeletal muscle, and taurine levels may fall during exercise. The contractile properties and fatigability of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles depleted of taurine by guanodinoethane sulfonate (GES) treatment were investigated. GES treatment decreased muscle taurine levels to <40% of controls. Peak twitch force levels were 23% of controls in GES treated EDL muscles (p < 0.05), but maximal specific force was unaffected. The force-frequency relationship was examined and significantly less force was produced by the GES treated muscles compared to controls at stimulation frequencies from 50 to 100 Hz (p < 0.05). GES treated EDL muscles exhibited significantly slower rates of fatigue than controls (p < 0.05). In skinned fibres, 20 mM GES had a small but significant effect on force production, indicating that GES may have some minor taurine-like effects. In this study, a fall in taurine levels decreased force output, and increased the endurance of EDL skeletal muscles.

  3. Contractility studies on isolated bovine choroidal small arteries: determination of the active and passive wall tension-internal circumference relation.

    PubMed

    Delaey, C; Boussery, K; Van de Voorde, J

    2002-09-01

    Studies on isolated choroidal arteries could help to understand the regulatory mechanisms in the choroidal circulation. The aim of the present study was therefore to assess whether contractility studies on isolated choroidal arteries were feasible and to determine the active and passive wall tension-internal circumference relation of these arteries. This relation is essential for reliable further pharmacodynamic studies on these vessels. Isolated choroidal arteries were mounted on a wire myograph for isometric tension recording. After the vessel was mounted, the L(100) (the circumference of the vessel at a transmural pressure of 100 mmHg) was determined. Then the passive and active wall tension-internal circumference relation of the choroidal vessels was obtained by stepwise increasing the internal circumference. The changes in the internal circumference were expressed as a percentage of L(100). After each increase in circumference, the passive tone (in a calcium free medium), the spontaneous tone (in a Krebs--Ringer bicarbonate solution) and the active tone (in a solution containing K(+) 120 mM and prostaglandin F(2 alpha) 30 microM) was measured. The passive tone of the vessel increased exponentially with the circumference of the vessel. Both the spontaneous tone and the active tone also increased when the vessel was stretched. They peaked when the internal circumference approached 90% of the L(100) and diminished again when the circumference was further increased. The peak value of the active tension curve averaged 2.24+/-0.47 Nm(-1) (n=10). The passive tension was 0.57+/-0.08 Nm(-1) (n=10) at this circumference. The peak value of the spontaneous tension curve averaged 0.37+/-0.08 Nm(-1) (n=10). It can be concluded that in vitro contractility studies on isolated choroidal arteries are feasible. The optimal length or preload of the choroidal arteries is attained when the internal circumference of the artery is set to 90% of the L(100).

  4. Actomyosin contractility rotates the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhishek; Maitra, Ananyo; Sumit, Madhuresh; Ramaswamy, Sriram; Shivashankar, G V

    2014-01-21

    The cell nucleus functions amidst active cytoskeletal filaments, but its response to their contractile stresses is largely unexplored. We study the dynamics of the nuclei of single fibroblasts, with cell migration suppressed by plating onto micro-fabricated patterns. We find the nucleus undergoes noisy but coherent rotational motion. We account for this observation through a hydrodynamic approach, treating the nucleus as a highly viscous inclusion residing in a less viscous fluid of orientable filaments endowed with active stresses. Lowering actin contractility selectively by introducing blebbistatin at low concentrations drastically reduced the speed and coherence of the angular motion of the nucleus. Time-lapse imaging of actin revealed a correlated hydrodynamic flow around the nucleus, with profile and magnitude consistent with the results of our theoretical approach. Coherent intracellular flows and consequent nuclear rotation thus appear to be an intrinsic property of cells.

  5. A RhoGEF and Rho family GTPase-activating protein complex links the contractile ring to cortical microtubules at the onset of cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Somers, W Gregory; Saint, Robert

    2003-01-01

    The mechanism that positions the cytokinetic contractile ring is unknown, but derives from the spindle midzone. We show that an interaction between the Rho GTP exchange factor, Pebble, and the Rho family GTPase-activating protein, RacGAP50C, connects the contractile ring to cortical microtubules at the site of furrowing in D. melanogaster cells. Pebble regulates actomyosin organization, while RacGAP50C and its binding partner, the Pavarotti kinesin-like protein, regulate microtubule bundling. All three factors are required for cytokinesis. As furrowing begins, these proteins colocalize to a cortical equatorial ring. We propose that RacGAP50C-Pavarotti complexes travel on cortical microtubules to the cell equator, where they associate with the Pebble RhoGEF to position contractile ring formation and coordinate F-actin and microtubule remodeling during cytokinesis.

  6. Mechanistic heterogeneity in contractile properties of α-tropomyosin (TPM1) mutants associated with inherited cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Gupte, Tejas M; Haque, Farah; Gangadharan, Binnu; Sunitha, Margaret S; Mukherjee, Souhrid; Anandhan, Swetha; Rani, Deepa Selvi; Mukundan, Namita; Jambekar, Amruta; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan; Sommese, Ruth F; Nag, Suman; Spudich, James A; Mercer, John A

    2015-03-13

    The most frequent known causes of primary cardiomyopathies are mutations in the genes encoding sarcomeric proteins. Among those are 30 single-residue mutations in TPM1, the gene encoding α-tropomyosin. We examined seven mutant tropomyosins, E62Q, D84N, I172T, L185R, S215L, D230N, and M281T, that were chosen based on their clinical severity and locations along the molecule. The goal of our study was to determine how the biochemical characteristics of each of these mutant proteins are altered, which in turn could provide a structural rationale for treatment of the cardiomyopathies they produce. Measurements of Ca(2+) sensitivity of human β-cardiac myosin ATPase activity are consistent with the hypothesis that hypertrophic cardiomyopathies are hypersensitive to Ca(2+) activation, and dilated cardiomyopathies are hyposensitive. We also report correlations between ATPase activity at maximum Ca(2+) concentrations and conformational changes in TnC measured using a fluorescent probe, which provide evidence that different substitutions perturb the structure of the regulatory complex in different ways. Moreover, we observed changes in protein stability and protein-protein interactions in these mutants. Our results suggest multiple mechanistic pathways to hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies. Finally, we examined a computationally designed mutant, E181K, that is hypersensitive, confirming predictions derived from in silico structural analysis.

  7. Mechanistic Heterogeneity in Contractile Properties of α-Tropomyosin (TPM1) Mutants Associated with Inherited Cardiomyopathies*

    PubMed Central

    Gupte, Tejas M.; Haque, Farah; Gangadharan, Binnu; Sunitha, Margaret S.; Mukherjee, Souhrid; Anandhan, Swetha; Rani, Deepa Selvi; Mukundan, Namita; Jambekar, Amruta; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan; Sommese, Ruth F.; Nag, Suman; Spudich, James A.; Mercer, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The most frequent known causes of primary cardiomyopathies are mutations in the genes encoding sarcomeric proteins. Among those are 30 single-residue mutations in TPM1, the gene encoding α-tropomyosin. We examined seven mutant tropomyosins, E62Q, D84N, I172T, L185R, S215L, D230N, and M281T, that were chosen based on their clinical severity and locations along the molecule. The goal of our study was to determine how the biochemical characteristics of each of these mutant proteins are altered, which in turn could provide a structural rationale for treatment of the cardiomyopathies they produce. Measurements of Ca2+ sensitivity of human β-cardiac myosin ATPase activity are consistent with the hypothesis that hypertrophic cardiomyopathies are hypersensitive to Ca2+ activation, and dilated cardiomyopathies are hyposensitive. We also report correlations between ATPase activity at maximum Ca2+ concentrations and conformational changes in TnC measured using a fluorescent probe, which provide evidence that different substitutions perturb the structure of the regulatory complex in different ways. Moreover, we observed changes in protein stability and protein-protein interactions in these mutants. Our results suggest multiple mechanistic pathways to hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies. Finally, we examined a computationally designed mutant, E181K, that is hypersensitive, confirming predictions derived from in silico structural analysis. PMID:25548289

  8. Effect of a 17 day spaceflight on contractile properties of human soleus muscle fibres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widrick, J. J.; Knuth, S. T.; Norenberg, K. M.; Romatowski, J. G.; Bain, J. L.; Riley, D. A.; Karhanek, M.; Trappe, S. W.; Trappe, T. A.; Costill, D. L.; Fitts, R. H.

    1999-01-01

    1. Soleus biopsies were obtained from four male astronauts 45 days before and within 2 h after a 17 day spaceflight. 2. For all astronauts, single chemically skinned post-flight fibres expressing only type I myosin heavy chain (MHC) developed less average peak Ca2+ activated force (Po) during fixed-end contractions (0.78 +/- 0. 02 vs. 0.99 +/- 0.03 mN) and shortened at a greater mean velocity during unloaded contractions (Vo) (0.83 +/- 0.02 vs. 0.64 +/- 0.02 fibre lengths s-1) than pre-flight type I fibres. 3. The flight-induced decline in absolute Po was attributed to reductions in fibre diameter and/or Po per fibre cross-sectional area. Fibres from the astronaut who experienced the greatest relative loss of peak force also displayed a reduction in Ca2+ sensitivity. 4. The elevated Vo of the post-flight slow type I fibres could not be explained by alterations in myosin heavy or light chain composition. One alternative possibility is that the elevated Vo resulted from an increased myofilament lattice spacing. This hypothesis was supported by electron micrographic analysis demonstrating a reduction in thin filament density post-flight. 5. Post-flight fibres shortened at 30 % higher velocities than pre-flight fibres at external loads associated with peak power output. This increase in shortening velocity either reduced (2 astronauts) or prevented (2 astronauts) a post-flight loss in fibre absolute peak power (microN (fibre length) s-1). 6. The changes in soleus fibre diameter and function following spaceflight were similar to those observed after 17 days of bed rest. Although in-flight exercise countermeasures probably reduced the effects of microgravity, the results support the idea that ground-based bed rest can serve as a model of human spaceflight. 7. In conclusion, 17 days of spaceflight decreased force and increased shortening velocity of single Ca2+-activated muscle cells expressing type I MHC. The increase in shortening velocity greatly reduced the impact

  9. The ultrastructure and contractile properties of a fast-acting, obliquely striated, myosin-regulated muscle: the funnel retractor of squids.

    PubMed

    Rosenbluth, Jack; Szent-Györgyi, Andrew G; Thompson, Joseph T

    2010-07-15

    We investigated the ultrastructure, contractile properties, and in vivo length changes of the fast-acting funnel retractor muscle of the long-finned squid Doryteuthis pealeii. This muscle is composed of obliquely striated, spindle-shaped fibers ~3 mum across that have an abundant sarcoplasmic reticulum, consisting primarily of membranous sacs that form 'dyads' along the surface of each cell. The contractile apparatus consists of 'myofibrils' approximately 0.25-0.5 microm wide in cross section arrayed around the periphery of each cell, surrounding a central core that contains the nucleus and large mitochondria. Thick myofilaments are approximately 25 nm in diameter and approximately 2.8 microm long. 'Dense bodies' are narrow, resembling Z lines, but are discontinuous and are not associated with the cytoskeletal fibrillar elements that are so prominent in slower obliquely striated muscles. The cells approximate each other closely with minimal intervening intercellular connective tissue. Our physiological experiments, conducted at 17 degrees C, showed that the longitudinal muscle fibers of the funnel retractor were activated rapidly (8 ms latent period following stimulation) and generated force rapidly (peak twitch force occurred within 50 ms). The longitudinal fibers had low V(max) (2.15 +/-0.26 L(0) s(-1), where L(0) was the length that generated peak isometric force) but generated relatively high isometric stress (270+/-20 mN mm(-2) physiological cross section). The fibers exhibited a moderate maximum power output (49.9 W kg(-1)), compared with vertebrate and arthropod cross striated fibers, at a V/V(max) of 0.33+/-0.044. During ventilation of the mantle cavity and locomotion, the funnel retractor muscle operated in vivo over a limited range of strains (+0.075 to -0.15 relative to resting length, L(R)) and at low strain rates (from 0.16 to 0.91 L(R) s(-1) ), corresponding to a range of V/V(max) from 0.073 to 0.42. During the exhalant phase of the jet the range of

  10. The ultrastructure and contractile properties of a fast-acting, obliquely striated, myosin-regulated muscle: the funnel retractor of squids

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbluth, Jack; Szent-Györgyi, Andrew G.; Thompson, Joseph T.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the ultrastructure, contractile properties, and in vivo length changes of the fast-acting funnel retractor muscle of the long-finned squid Doryteuthis pealeii. This muscle is composed of obliquely striated, spindle-shaped fibers ~3 μm across that have an abundant sarcoplasmic reticulum, consisting primarily of membranous sacs that form ‘dyads’ along the surface of each cell. The contractile apparatus consists of ‘myofibrils’ ~0.25–0.5 μm wide in cross section arrayed around the periphery of each cell, surrounding a central core that contains the nucleus and large mitochondria. Thick myofilaments are ~25 nm in diameter and ~2.8 μm long. ‘Dense bodies’ are narrow, resembling Z lines, but are discontinuous and are not associated with the cytoskeletal fibrillar elements that are so prominent in slower obliquely striated muscles. The cells approximate each other closely with minimal intervening intercellular connective tissue. Our physiological experiments, conducted at 17°C, showed that the longitudinal muscle fibers of the funnel retractor were activated rapidly (8 ms latent period following stimulation) and generated force rapidly (peak twitch force occurred within 50 ms). The longitudinal fibers had low Vmax (2.15 ±0.26 L0 s−1, where L0 was the length that generated peak isometric force) but generated relatively high isometric stress (270±20 mN mm−2 physiological cross section). The fibers exhibited a moderate maximum power output (49.9 W kg−1), compared with vertebrate and arthropod cross striated fibers, at a V/Vmax of 0.33±0.044. During ventilation of the mantle cavity and locomotion, the funnel retractor muscle operated in vivo over a limited range of strains (+0.075 to −0.15 relative to resting length, LR) and at low strain rates (from 0.16 to 0.91 LR s−1 ), corresponding to a range of V/Vmax from 0.073 to 0.42. During the exhalant phase of the jet the range of strains was even narrower: maximum range less than ±0

  11. Compensatory Hypertrophy of Skeletal Muscle: Contractile Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ianuzzo, C. D.; Chen, V.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an experiment using rats that demonstrates contractile characteristics of normal and hypertrophied muscle. Compensatory hypertrophy of the plantaris muscle is induced by surgical removal of the synergistic gastrocnemium muscle. Includes methods for determination of contractile properties of normal and hypertrophied muscle and…

  12. [THE ROLE OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE IN VOLUME-DEPENDENT MECHANISMS OF REGULATION OF VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS CONTRACTILE ACTIVITY].

    PubMed

    Smagliy, L V; Gusakova, S V; Birulina, Yu G; Kovalev, I V; Orlov, S N

    2015-04-01

    The hydrogen sulfide (H2S) influence on the contractile activity of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) was studied on endothelium-denuded aortic ring segments of male Wistar rats with method of mechanography. Contractions of SMS were induced by incubation in high potassium solution as well as in hyper-, hypo- and isosmotic solutions. 5-100 LM of H2S donor--sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) increased mechanical tension of SMC precontracted with high potassium solution that was abolished by bumetanide--the inhibitor of Na+, K+, 2Cl(-) -cotransporter (NKCC), but 100-1000 microM of NaHS relaxed SMS. NaHS (10 microM) increased the amplitude of hyper- and isosmotic contraction, but not of hyposmotic contraction. NaHS (ImM) decreased the amplitude of hyper-, iso-, and hyposmotic contractions. The direct measurements of NKCC activity with radionuclide method showed an increase in NKCC activity under the action of 5-100 microM of NaHS. These findings suggest that low concentrations of H2S participate in the NKCC activation. This mechanism underlines constrictive action of H2S on smooth muscle cells.

  13. Upregulation of contractile endothelin type B receptors by lipid-soluble cigarette smoking particles in rat cerebral arteries via activation of MAPK

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhu, Hardip; Xu, Cang Bao; Edvinsson, Lars

    2010-11-15

    Cigarette smoke exposure increases the risk of stroke. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Endothelin system plays key roles in the pathogenesis of stroke. The present study was designed to examine if lipid-soluble (dimethyl sulfoxide-soluble) cigarette smoke particles (DSP) induces upregulation of contractile endothelin type B (ET{sub B}) receptors in rat cerebral arteries and if activation of mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-{kappa}B) mediate the upregulation of contractile endothelin receptors in the cerebral arteries. Rat middle cerebral arteries were isolated and organ cultured in serum free medium for 24 h in the presence of DSP with or without specific inhibitors: MEK specific (U0126), p38 specific (SB202190), JNK specific (SP600125), NF-{kappa}B specific (BMS-345541) or (IMD-0354), transcription inhibitor (actinomycin D), or translation blocker (cycloheximide). Contractile responses to the ET{sub B} receptor agonist sarafotoxin 6c were investigated by a sensitive myograph. The expression of the ET{sub B} receptors were studied at mRNA and protein levels using quantitative real time PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Results show that organ culture per se induced transcriptional upregulation of contractile ET{sub B} receptors in the cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells. This upregulation was further increased at the translational level by addition of DSP to the organ culture, but this increase was not seen by addition of nicotine or water-soluble cigarette smoke particles to the organ culture. The increased upregulation of contractile ET{sub B} receptors by DSP was abrogated by U0126, SP600125, actinomycin D, and cycloheximide, suggesting that the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in this process include activation of MEK and JNK MAPK-mediated transcription and translation of new contractile ET{sub B} receptors. Thus, the MAPK-mediated upregulation of contractile ET{sub B

  14. Surface action potential and contractile properties of the human triceps surae muscle: effect of "dry" water immersion.

    PubMed

    Koryak, Yuri A

    2002-01-01

    The effects of 7 days of "dry" water immersion were investigated in six subjects. Changes in the contraction properties were studied in the triceps surae muscle. After immersion, the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) was reduced by 18.9 % (P < 0.01), and the electrically evoked (150 impulses s(-1)) maximal tension during tetanic contraction (P(o)) was reduced by 8.2 % (P > 0.05). The difference between P(o) and MVC expressed as a percentage of P(o) and referred to as force deficiency was also calculated. The force deficiency increased by 44.1 % (P < 0.001) after immersion. The decrease in P(o) was associated with increased maximal rates of tension development (7.2 %) and relaxation. The twitch time-to-peak was not significantly changed, and half-relaxation and total contraction time were decreased by 5.3 % and 2.8 %, respectively, but the twitch tension (P(t)) was not significantly changed and the P(t)/P(o) ratio was decreased by 8.7 %. The 60 s intermittent contractions (50 impulses s(-1)) decreased tetanic force to 57 % (P < 0.05) of initial values, but force reduction was not significantly different in the two fatigue-inducing tests: fatigue index (the mean loss of force of the last five contractions, expressed as a percentage of the mean value of the first five contractions) was 36.2 +/- 5.4 % vs. 38.6 +/- 2.8 %, respectively (P > 0.05). While identical force reduction was present in the two fatigue-inducing tests, it would appear that concomitant electrical failure was considerably different. Comparison of the electrical and mechanical alterations recorded during voluntary contractions, and in contractions evoked by electrical stimulation of the motor nerve, suggests that immersion not only modifies the peripheral processes associated with contraction, but also changes central and/or neural command of the contraction. At peripheral sites, it is proposed that the intracellular processes of contraction play a role in the contractile impairment recorded during

  15. Biphasic regulation of myosin light chain phosphorylation by p21-activated kinase modulates intestinal smooth muscle contractility.

    PubMed

    Chu, Ji; Pham, Ngoc T; Olate, Nicole; Kislitsyna, Karina; Day, Mary-Clare; LeTourneau, Phillip A; Kots, Alexander; Stewart, Randolph H; Laine, Glen A; Cox, Charles S; Uray, Karen

    2013-01-11

    Supraphysiological mechanical stretching in smooth muscle results in decreased contractile activity. However, the mechanism is unclear. Previous studies indicated that intestinal motility dysfunction after edema development is associated with increased smooth muscle stress and decreased myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation in vivo, providing an ideal model for studying mechanical stress-mediated decrease in smooth muscle contraction. Primary human intestinal smooth muscle cells (hISMCs) were subjected to either control cyclical stretch (CCS) or edema (increasing) cyclical stretch (ECS), mimicking the biophysical forces in non-edematous and edematous intestinal smooth muscle in vivo. ECS induced significant decreases in phosphorylation of MLC and MLC phosphatase targeting subunit (MYPT1) and a significant increase in p21-activated kinase (PAK) activity compared with CCS. PAK regulated MLC phosphorylation in an activity-dependent biphasic manner. PAK activation increased MLC and MYPT1 phosphorylation in CCS but decreased MLC and MYPT1 phosphorylation in hISMCs subjected to ECS. PAK inhibition had the opposite results. siRNA studies showed that PAK1 plays a critical role in regulating MLC phosphorylation in hISMCs. PAK1 enhanced MLC phosphorylation via phosphorylating MYPT1 on Thr-696, whereas PAK1 inhibited MLC phosphorylation via decreasing MYPT1 on both Thr-696 and Thr-853. Importantly, in vivo data indicated that PAK activity increased in edematous tissue, and inhibition of PAK in edematous intestine improved intestinal motility. We conclude that PAK1 positively regulates MLC phosphorylation in intestinal smooth muscle through increasing inhibitory phosphorylation of MYPT1 under physiologic conditions, whereas PAK1 negatively regulates MLC phosphorylation via inhibiting MYPT1 phosphorylation when PAK activity is increased under pathologic conditions.

  16. Ano1, a Ca2+-activated Cl− channel, coordinates contractility in mouse intestine by Ca2+ transient coordination between interstitial cells of Cajal

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Raman Deep; Gibbons, Simon J; Saravanaperumal, Siva Arumugam; Du, Peng; Hennig, Grant W; Eisenman, Seth T; Mazzone, Amelia; Hayashi, Yujiro; Cao, Chike; Stoltz, Gary J; Ordog, Tamas; Rock, Jason R; Harfe, Brian D; Szurszewski, Joseph H; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2014-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are pacemaker cells that generate electrical activity to drive contractility in the gastrointestinal tract via ion channels. Ano1 (Tmem16a), a Ca2+-activated Cl− channel, is an ion channel expressed in ICC. Genetic deletion of Ano1 in mice resulted in loss of slow waves in smooth muscle of small intestine. In this study, we show that Ano1 is required to maintain coordinated Ca2+ transients between myenteric ICC (ICC-MY) of small intestine. First, we found spontaneous Ca2+ transients in ICC-MY in both Ano1 WT and knockout (KO) mice. However, Ca2+ transients within the ICC-MY network in Ano1 KO mice were uncoordinated, while ICC-MY Ca2+ transients in Ano1 WT mice were rhythmic and coordinated. To confirm the role of Ano1 in the loss of Ca2+ transient coordination, we used pharmacological inhibitors of Ano1 activity and shRNA-mediated knock down of Ano1 expression in organotypic cultures of Ano1 WT small intestine. Coordinated Ca2+ transients became uncoordinated using both these approaches, supporting the conclusion that Ano1 is required to maintain coordination/rhythmicity of Ca2+ transients. We next determined the effect on smooth muscle contractility using spatiotemporal maps of contractile activity in Ano1 KO and WT tissues. Significantly decreased contractility that appeared to be non-rhythmic and uncoordinated was observed in Ano1 KO jejunum. In conclusion, Ano1 has a previously unidentified role in the regulation of coordinated gastrointestinal smooth muscle function through coordination of Ca2+ transients in ICC-MY. PMID:25063822

  17. [Effect of potassium ions on the contractile activity of renal artery smooth muscle].

    PubMed

    Orlov, R S; Aĭvar, Iu P

    1979-07-01

    Study of isolated segments of renal arteries in rabbits showed that decrease of potassium ion concentration in the bathing fluid was followed by increase in tension, while its increase from 5 meq/l to 10 meq/l was accompanied by gradual relaxation of vessel muscles and increase of their sensitivity to noradrenalin (NA). This relationship was lacking in segments activated with NA. The ability of NA and angiotensin to activate renal arterial muscles by electromechanic and pharmacomechanic coupling mechanismes was proved experimentally. The paper discussed the role of the cell membrane sodium potassium pump in vascular muscles.

  18. Single adult rabbit and rat cardiac myocytes retain the Ca2+- and species-dependent systolic and diastolic contractile properties of intact muscle

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    The systolic and diastolic properties of single myocytes and intact papillary muscles isolated from hearts of adult rats and rabbits were examined at 37 degrees C over a range of stimulation frequencies and bathing [Ca2+]o (Cao). In both rabbit myocytes and intact muscles bathed in 1 mM Cao, increasing the frequency of stimulation from 6 to 120 min-1 resulted in a positive staircase of twitch performance. During stimulation at 2 min-1, twitch performance also increased with increases in Cao up to 20 mM. In the absence of stimulation, both rabbit myocytes and muscles were completely quiescent in less than 15 mM Cao. Further increases in Cao caused the appearance of spontaneous asynchronous contractile waves in myocytes and in intact muscles caused scattered light intensity fluctuations (SLIF), which were previously demonstrated to be caused by Ca2+-dependent spontaneous contractile waves. In contrast to rabbit preparations, intact rat papillary muscles exhibited SLIF in 1.0 mM Cao. Two populations of rat myocytes were observed in 1 mM Cao: approximately 85% of unstimulated cells exhibited low-frequency (3-4 min-1) spontaneous contractile waves, whereas 15%, during a 1-min observation period, were quiescent. In a given Cao, the contractile wave frequency in myocytes and SLIF in intact muscles were constant for long periods of time. In both intact rat muscles and myocytes with spontaneous waves, in 1 mM Cao, increasing the frequency of stimulation from 6 to 120 min-1 resulted, on the average, in a 65% reduction in steady state twitch amplitude. Of the rat myocytes that did not manifest waves, some had a positive, some had a flat, and some had a negative staircase; the average steady state twitch amplitude of these cells during stimulation at 120 min-1 was 30% greater than that at 6 min-1. In contrast to rabbit preparations, twitch performance during stimulation at 2 min-1 saturated at 1.5 mM Cao in both intact rat muscles and in the myocytes with spontaneous waves. We

  19. Effect of previous strength training episode and retraining on facilitation of skeletal muscle hypertrophy and contractile properties after long-term detraining in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sukho; Hong, Kwang-Seok; Kim, Kijeong

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of previous strength training and retraining following long-term cessation of exercise on muscle mass and contractile properties. Female Sprague-Dawley rats (n=24) aged eight weeks were randomly assigned one of the four groups: control (CON), detraining (DT), training (TR), and retraining (RT). The training regimen consisted of climbing ladder 5×3 sets, once every third day for eight weeks with weight attached to the tail. The weight carried during each training session was initially 50% of body weight and progressively increased by 10% per session. The rats in DT were detained for 20 weeks followed by eight weeks strength training. The rats in the both TR and RT groups underwent eight weeks training. DT was age matched new training group while RT was retraining group after 20 weeks of detraining. Soleus, gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, and flexor hallucis longus (FHL) muscles were harvested in order to measure the weight, and in situ contractile properties of FHL were measured including specific twitch tension (Spt) and specific tetanic tension (Spo). TR showed significant increase in muscle mass compared to CON (P<0.05). DT and RT showed significant increase in muscle mass when compared to all other groups (P<0.05). There was no statistical difference in Spt and Spo among the groups. The present study showed that previous strength training facilitates retraining-induced muscle hypertrophy following long-term cessation of exercise. PMID:27162768

  20. Modulatory effects of taurine on jejunal contractility.

    PubMed

    Yao, Q Y; Chen, D P; Ye, D M; Diao, Y P; Lin, Y

    2014-12-01

    Taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) is widely distributed in animal tissues and has diverse pharmacological effects. However, the role of taurine in modulating smooth muscle contractility is still controversial. We propose that taurine (5-80 mM) can exert bidirectional modulation on the contractility of isolated rat jejunal segments. Different low and high contractile states were induced in isolated jejunal segments of rats to observe the effects of taurine and the associated mechanisms. Taurine induced stimulatory effects on the contractility of isolated rat jejunal segments at 3 different low contractile states, and inhibitory effects at 3 different high contractile states. Bidirectional modulation was not observed in the presence of verapamil or tetrodotoxin, suggesting that taurine-induced bidirectional modulation is Ca(2+) dependent and requires the presence of the enteric nervous system. The stimulatory effects of taurine on the contractility of isolated jejunal segments was blocked by atropine but not by diphenhydramine or by cimetidine, suggesting that muscarinic-linked activation was involved in the stimulatory effects when isolated jejunal segments were in a low contractile state. The inhibitory effects of taurine on the contractility of isolated jejunal segments were blocked by propranolol and L-NG-nitroarginine but not by phentolamine, suggesting that adrenergic β receptors and a nitric oxide relaxing mechanism were involved when isolated jejunal segments were in high contractile states. No bidirectional effects of taurine on myosin phosphorylation were observed. The contractile states of jejunal segments determine taurine-induced stimulatory or inhibitory effects, which are associated with muscarinic receptors and adrenergic β receptors, and a nitric oxide associated relaxing mechanism.

  1. Endothelium dependency of contractile activity differs in infant and adult vertebral arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Charpie, J R; Schreur, K D; Papadopoulos, S M; Webb, R C

    1994-01-01

    Contractions to serotonin (5-HT) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) in infant (0-2 yr) and adult (38-71 yr) vertebral arteries were examined in the presence of either the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin or NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), an inhibitor of nitric oxide production. In addition, endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine were characterized in arteries contracted with agonist. The results showed that: (a) Contractions of infant arteries to 5-HT or ET-1 decreased to 44 +/- 8% and 27 +/- 13%, respectively, within 10 min. Indomethacin or removal of endothelium abolished this decreased response, whereas L-NMMA had no effect. (b) Adult arteries produced sustained contractions to 5-HT or ET-1 that were unaffected by indomethacin, endothelium denudation, or L-NMMA. (c) Endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine were greater in infant than adult arteries and were abolished by indomethacin (but not L-NMMA) in infants and L-NMMA (but not indomethacin) in adults. Thus, endothelium-dependent responses in infant arteries are attenuated because of increased prostaglandin activity not observed in adult tissues. Additionally, there is an age-dependent change in the primary mechanism responsible for acetylcholine-induced vasodilation. Apparently, endothelium dependency of acetylcholine-induced relaxation is highly dependent on cyclooxygenase activity in the infant vertebral artery, but in the adult artery, nitric oxide is linked to the vasodilator response. Images PMID:8132776

  2. β2-Adrenergic stimulation enhances Ca2+ release and contractile properties of skeletal muscles, and counteracts exercise-induced reductions in Na+–K+-ATPase Vmax in trained men

    PubMed Central

    Hostrup, M; Kalsen, A; Ørtenblad, N; Juel, C; Mørch, K; Rzeppa, S; Karlsson, S; Backer, V; Bangsbo, J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of β2-adrenergic stimulation on skeletal muscle contractile properties, sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) rates of Ca2+ release and uptake, and Na+–K+-ATPase activity before and after fatiguing exercise in trained men. The study consisted of two experiments (EXP1, n = 10 males, EXP2, n = 20 males), where β2-adrenoceptor agonist (terbutaline) or placebo was randomly administered in double-blinded crossover designs. In EXP1, maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) of m. quadriceps was measured, followed by exercise to fatigue at 120% of maximal oxygen uptake (). A muscle biopsy was taken after MVC (non-fatigue) and at time of fatigue. In EXP2, contractile properties of m. quadriceps were measured with electrical stimulations before (non-fatigue) and after two fatiguing 45 s sprints. Non-fatigued MVCs were 6 ± 3 and 6 ± 2% higher (P < 0.05) with terbutaline than placebo in EXP1 and EXP2, respectively. Furthermore, peak twitch force was 11 ± 7% higher (P < 0.01) with terbutaline than placebo at non-fatigue. After sprints, MVC declined (P < 0.05) to the same levels with terbutaline as placebo, whereas peak twitch force was lower (P < 0.05) and half-relaxation time was prolonged (P < 0.05) with terbutaline. Rates of SR Ca2+ release and uptake at 400 nm [Ca2+] were 15 ± 5 and 14 ± 5% (P < 0.05) higher, respectively, with terbutaline than placebo at non-fatigue, but declined (P < 0.05) to similar levels at time of fatigue. Na+–K+-ATPase activity was unaffected by terbutaline compared with placebo at non-fatigue, but terbutaline counteracted exercise-induced reductions in maximum rate of activity (Vmax) at time of fatigue. In conclusion, increased contractile force induced by β2-adrenergic stimulation is associated with enhanced rate of Ca2+ release in humans. While β2-adrenergic stimulation elicits positive inotropic and lusitropic effects on non-fatigued m. quadriceps, these effects are blunted when

  3. β2-adrenergic stimulation enhances Ca2+ release and contractile properties of skeletal muscles, and counteracts exercise-induced reductions in Na+-K+-ATPase Vmax in trained men.

    PubMed

    Hostrup, M; Kalsen, A; Ortenblad, N; Juel, C; Mørch, K; Rzeppa, S; Karlsson, S; Backer, V; Bangsbo, J

    2014-12-15

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of β2-adrenergic stimulation on skeletal muscle contractile properties, sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) rates of Ca(2+) release and uptake, and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity before and after fatiguing exercise in trained men. The study consisted of two experiments (EXP1, n = 10 males, EXP2, n = 20 males), where β2-adrenoceptor agonist (terbutaline) or placebo was randomly administered in double-blinded crossover designs. In EXP1, maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) of m. quadriceps was measured, followed by exercise to fatigue at 120% of maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2, max ). A muscle biopsy was taken after MVC (non-fatigue) and at time of fatigue. In EXP2, contractile properties of m. quadriceps were measured with electrical stimulations before (non-fatigue) and after two fatiguing 45 s sprints. Non-fatigued MVCs were 6 ± 3 and 6 ± 2% higher (P < 0.05) with terbutaline than placebo in EXP1 and EXP2, respectively. Furthermore, peak twitch force was 11 ± 7% higher (P < 0.01) with terbutaline than placebo at non-fatigue. After sprints, MVC declined (P < 0.05) to the same levels with terbutaline as placebo, whereas peak twitch force was lower (P < 0.05) and half-relaxation time was prolonged (P < 0.05) with terbutaline. Rates of SR Ca(2+) release and uptake at 400 nm [Ca(2+)] were 15 ± 5 and 14 ± 5% (P < 0.05) higher, respectively, with terbutaline than placebo at non-fatigue, but declined (P < 0.05) to similar levels at time of fatigue. Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity was unaffected by terbutaline compared with placebo at non-fatigue, but terbutaline counteracted exercise-induced reductions in maximum rate of activity (Vmax) at time of fatigue. In conclusion, increased contractile force induced by β2-adrenergic stimulation is associated with enhanced rate of Ca(2+) release in humans. While β2-adrenergic stimulation elicits positive inotropic and lusitropic effects on non-fatigued m. quadriceps, these effects

  4. Dual Role for Microtubules in Regulating Cortical Contractility during Cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Kausalya; Wadsworth, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    Microtubules stimulate contractile ring formation in the equatorial cortex and simultaneously suppress contractility in the polar cortex; how they accomplish these differing activities is incompletely understood. We measured the behavior of GFP-actin in mammalian cells treated with nocodazole under conditions that either completely eliminate microtubules or selectively disassemble astral microtubules. Selective disassembly of astral microtubules resulted functional contractile rings that were wider than controls and had altered dynamic activity, as measured by FRAP. Complete microtubule disassembly or selective loss of astral microtubules resulted in wave-like contractile behavior of actin in the non-equatorial cortex and mislocalization of myosin II and Rho. FRAP experiments showed that both contractility and actin polymerization contributed to the wave-like behavior of actin. Wave-like, contractile behavior in anaphase cells was Rho-dependent. We conclude that dynamic astral microtubules function to suppress Rho activation in the nonequatorial cortex, limiting the contractile activity of the polar cortex. PMID:18559890

  5. Properties of single FDB fibers following a collagenase digestion for studying contractility, fatigue, and pCa-sarcomere shortening relationship.

    PubMed

    Selvin, David; Hesse, Erik; Renaud, Jean-Marc

    2015-03-15

    The objective of this study was to optimize the approach to obtain viable single flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) fibers following a collagenase digestion. A first aim was to determine the culture medium conditions for the collagenase digestion. The MEM yielded better fibers in terms of morphology and contractility than the DMEM. The addition of FBS to culture media was crucial to prevent fiber supercontraction. The addition of FBS to the physiological solution used during an experiment was also beneficial, especially during fatigue. Optimum FBS concentration in MEM was 10% (vol/vol), and for the physiological solution, it ranged between 0.2 and 1.0%. A second aim was to document the stability of single FDB fibers. If tested the day of the preparation, most fibers (∼80%) had stable contractions for up to 3 h, normal stimulus duration strength to elicit contractions, and normal and stable resting membrane potential during prolonged microelectrode penetration. A third aim was to document their fatigue kinetics. Major differences in fatigue resistance were observed between fibers as expected from the FDB fiber-type composition. All sarcoplasmic [Ca(2+)] and sarcomere length parameters returned to their prefatigue levels after a short recovery. The pCa-sarcomere shortening relationship of unfatigued fibers is very similar to the pCa-force curve reported in other studies. The pCa-sarcomere shortening from fatigue data is complicated by large decreases in sarcomere length between contractions. It is concluded that isolation of single fibers by a collagenase digestion is a viable preparation to study contractility and fatigue kinetics.

  6. Contractile-Ring Assembly in Fission Yeast Cytokinesis: Recent Advances and New Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Lee, I-Ju; Coffman, Valerie C.; Wu, Jian-Qiu

    2017-01-01

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is an excellent model organism to study cytokinesis. Here, we review recent advances on contractile-ring assembly in fission yeast. First, we summarize the assembly of cytokinesis nodes, the precursors of a normal contractile ring. IQGAP Rng2 and myosin essential light chain Cdc4 are recruited by the anillin-like protein Mid1, followed by the addition of other cytokinesis node proteins. Mid1 localization on the plasma membrane is stabilized by interphase node proteins. Second, we discuss proteins and processes that contribute to the search, capture, pull, and release mechanism of contractile-ring assembly. Actin filaments nucleated by formin Cdc12, the motor activity of myosin-II, the stiffness of the actin network, and severing of actin filaments by cofilin all play essential roles in contractile-ring assembly. Finally, we discuss the Mid1-independent pathway for ring assembly, and the possible mechanisms underlying the ring maturation and constriction. Collectively, we provide an overview of the current understanding of contractile-ring assembly and uncover future directions in studying cytokinesis in fission yeast. PMID:22887981

  7. Effects of Hange-shashin-to (TJ-14) and Keishi-ka-shakuyaku-to (TJ-60) on contractile activity of circular smooth muscle of the rat distal colon.

    PubMed

    Kito, Yoshihiko; Teramoto, Noriyoshi

    2012-11-01

    The Japanese Kampo medicines Hange-shashin-to (TJ-14) and Keishi-ka-shakuyaku-to (TJ-60) have been used to treat symptoms of human diarrhea on an empirical basis as Japanese traditional medicines. However, it remains unclear how these drugs affect smooth muscle tissues in the distal colon. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of TJ-14 and TJ-60 on the contractile activity of circular smooth muscle from the rat distal colon. TJ-14 and TJ-60 (both 1 mg/ml) inhibited spontaneous contractions of circumferentially cut preparations with the mucosa intact. Blockade of nitric oxide (NO) synthase or soluble guanylate cyclase activity abolished the inhibitory effects of TJ-60 but only attenuated the inhibitory effects of TJ-14. Apamin (1 μM), a blocker of small-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (SK channels), attenuated the inhibitory effects of 5 mg/ml TJ-60 but not those of 5 mg/ml TJ-14. TJ-14 suppressed contractile responses (phasic contractions and off-contractions) evoked by transmural nerve stimulation and increased basal tone, whereas TJ-60 had little effect on these parameters. These results suggest that 1 mg/ml TJ-14 or TJ-60 likely inhibits spontaneous contractions of the rat distal colon through the production of NO. Activation of SK channels seems to be involved in the inhibitory effects of 5 mg/ml TJ-60. Since TJ-14 has potent inhibitory effects on myogenic and neurogenic contractile activity, TJ-14 may be useful in suppressing gastrointestinal motility.

  8. Metronidazole and 5-aminosalicylic acid enhance the contractile activity of histaminergic agonists on the guinea-pig isolated ileum

    SciTech Connect

    Winbery, S.L.; Barker, L.A.

    1986-03-01

    The effects of metronidazole and 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) on histamine receptor-effector systems in the small intestine and right atrium of the guinea pig were studied. In an apparently all-or-none manner, both caused a sinistral shift in dose-response curves for the phasic component of the contractile response to histamine at H1 receptors on the ileum. In the presence of either, the EC50 value for histamine was reduced from 0.07 to about 0.03 microM. Similarly, in an apparently all-or-none fashion, both produced an elevation in the dose-response curve for the actions of dimaprit at H2-receptors in the ileum; the response to all doses was increased about 30% with no significant change in the EC50 value. Metronidazole and 5-ASA did not alter dose-response curves for the tonic contractile response to histamine or curves generated by the cumulative addition of histamine. Also, neither altered the positive chronotropic response on isolated right atria or the phasic contractile response on isolated segments of jejunum and duodenum to histamine or dimaprit. Likewise, neither altered dose-response curves for the direct action of carbamylcholine at muscarinic receptors or for the indirect actions of dimethylphenylpiperazinium on the ileum. The effects of 5-ASA or metronidazole on the response to histamine could be prevented as well as reversed by scopolamine or tetrodotoxin. The results suggest that metronidazole and 5-ASA enhance the actions of histamine and dimaprit on the ileum by an action on myenteric plexus neurons.

  9. Acute experimental colitis decreases colonic circular smooth muscle contractility in rats.

    PubMed

    Myers, B S; Martin, J S; Dempsey, D T; Parkman, H P; Thomas, R M; Ryan, J P

    1997-10-01

    Distal colitis decreases the contractility of the underlying circular smooth muscle. We examined how time after injury and lesion severity contribute to the decreased contractility and how colitis alters the calcium-handling properties of the affected muscle. Distal colitis was induced in rats by intrarectal administration of 4% acetic acid. Contractile responses to acetylcholine, increased extracellular potassium, and the G protein activator NaF were determined for circular muscle strips from sham control and colitic rats at days 1, 2, 3, 7, and 14 postenemas. Acetylcholine stimulation of tissues from day 3 colitic rats was performed in a zero calcium buffer, in the presence of nifedipine, and after depletion of intracellular stores of calcium. The colitis was graded macroscopically as mild, moderate, or severe. Regardless of agonist, maximal decrease in force developed 2 to 3 days posttreatment, followed by a gradual return to control by day 14. The inhibitory effect of colitis on contractility increased with increasing severity of inflammation. Limiting extracellular calcium influx had a greater inhibitory effect on tissues from colitic rats; intracellular calcium depletion had a greater inhibitory effect on tissues from control animals. The data suggest that both lesion severity and time after injury affect the contractile response of circular smooth muscle from the inflamed distal colon. Impaired utilization of intracellular calcium may contribute to the decreased contractility.

  10. [Registration with piezoelectric sensors of the in vivo activity of right ventricular contractile elements in acute experimental pulmonary stenosis].

    PubMed

    Irigoyen, E H; Méndez, R J

    1988-01-01

    Recordings with piezoelectric sensors of the variations of the contractile state due to severe acute pulmonary hypertension, provoked in intact canine hearts, are described. During the stenosis, a proportional increment of the isometric tension of the right ventricular wall and of the right atrial kick, due to the increasing difficulties for the respective blood contents evacuation of both cavities, were appreciated. Furthermore, lost of the right wall compliance, becoming more rigid, limited the systolic and diastolic pressure development of the right ventricle. Meanwhile, the piezoelectric sensor sutured on the left ventricular wall describes the consequent variations of the left ventricular contraction.

  11. Contractile activity of circular smooth muscle in rats one year after small bowel transplantation: differing adaptive response of the jejunum and ileum to denervation.

    PubMed

    Shibata, C; Murr, M M; Balsiger, B; Anding, W J; Sarr, M G

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the long-term effects of isogeneic small bowel transplantation (SBT) on jejunal and ileal circular smooth muscle contractile activity in the rat. Transmural strips of circular muscle were prepared from proximal jejunum and distal ileum of 1-year-old control rats and rats 1 year after SBT (SBT-1Y) to measure isometric force. Spontaneous contractile activity and the dose-responses to bethanechol and norepinephrine were studied. Electrical field stimulation (EFS) at varying frequencies (1 to 20 Hz) was evaluated under adrenergic and cholinergic blockade to investigate inhibitory nerves. Spontaneous activity both in the jejunum and ileum in SBT-1Y rats was not different compared to control rats. Sensitivity to bethanechol did not differ between control and SBT-1Y rats in the jejunum or ileum. Sensitivity to norepinephrine, however, was significantly increased after SBT in the ileum but not in the jejunum. During EFS, inhibition was seen at low frequencies, and contractions were induced at high frequencies in all groups. The degree of inhibition did not differ between control and SBT-1Y rats in the jejunum; however, it tended to be increased in the ileum after SBT. The long-term adaptive response of smooth muscle to the extrinsic denervation accompanying SBT differs between the jejunum and the ileum.

  12. Maternal Nutrient Restriction Alters Ca2+ Handling Properties and Contractile Function of Isolated Left Ventricle Bundles in Male But Not Female Juvenile Rats

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Robyn M.; Morrison, Janna L.

    2015-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), defined as a birth weight below the 10th centile, may be caused by maternal undernutrition, with evidence that IUGR offspring have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in adulthood. Calcium ions (Ca2+) are an integral messenger for several steps associated with excitation-contraction coupling (ECC); the cascade of events from the initiation of an action potential at the surface membrane, to contraction of the cardiomyocyte. Any changes in Ca2+ storage and release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), or sensitivity of the contractile apparatus to Ca2+ may underlie the mechanism linking IUGR to an increased risk of CVD. This study aimed to explore the effects of maternal nutrient restriction on cardiac function, including Ca2+ handling by the SR and force development by the contractile apparatus. Juvenile Long Evans hooded rats born to Control (C) and nutrient restricted (NR) dams were anaesthetized for collection of the heart at 10–12 weeks of age. Left ventricular bundles from male NR offspring displayed increased maximum Ca2+-activated force, and decreased protein content of troponin I (cTnI) compared to C males. Furthermore, male NR offspring showed a reduction in rate of rise of the caffeine-induced Ca2+ force response and a decrease in the protein content of ryanodine receptor (RYR2). These physiological and biochemical findings observed in males were not evident in female offspring. These findings illustrate a sex-specific effect of maternal NR on cardiac development, and also highlight a possible mechanism for the development of hypertension and hypertrophy in male NR offspring. PMID:26406887

  13. Impact of tetrodotoxin application and lidocaine supplementation on equine jejunal smooth muscle contractility and activity of the enteric nervous system in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tappenbeck, K; Hoppe, S; Geburek, F; Feige, K; Huber, K

    2014-09-01

    By blocking the enteric nervous system (ENS) using tetrodotoxin (TTX), previous studies have documented the contractility-enhancing (CE) effects of lidocaine in equine intestinal smooth muscle (SM) at the level of SM cells and/or interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). The present study examined the impact of ENS deactivation on CE lidocaine effects, and investigated the effects of lidocaine on ENS activity. TTX application did not affect the CE effects of lidocaine, indicating that these were not mediated by TTX-sensitive sodium channels. Application of TTX or ≥100 mg/L lidocaine reduced ENS activity. Although such concentrations of lidocaine exceed therapeutic blood concentrations, tissue concentrations may be higher with the potential to reduce ENS activity and impair intestinal motility in vivo. Improved understanding of underlying mechanisms is relevant for therapeutic use of lidocaine in horses with postoperative ileus.

  14. Different effects of verapamil and low calcium on repetitive contractile activity of frog fatigue-resistant and easily-fatigued muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Lipská, E; Radzyukevich, T

    1999-06-01

    The effects of low calcium and verapamil on contractility of two muscle fibre types (m. iliofibularis, Rana temporaria) upon different stimulation protocols were been compared. Verapamil (0.02 mmol/l) induced temporal excitation-contraction coupling failure during single tetanic stimulation and enhanced the decline of tetanic force during 30 s repetitive tetanic stimulation in both fatigue-resistant fibres and easily-fatigued fibres. In contrast to verapamil, low extracellular calcium (0.02 mmol/l) only enhanced the decline of tetanic force in fatigue-resistant during repetitive tetanic stimulation but had no effect on easily-fatigued fibres. The effect of verapamil on the decline of tetanic force in fatigue-resistant fibres was more profound in low calcium conditions. Both verapamil and low calcium eliminated twitch facilitation that appeared after prolonged contractile activity in fatigue-resistant fibres. 4mmol/l Ni+2, used as calcium channel antagonist, had effects similar to low calcium medium. It could be concluded that (i) extracellular Ca2+-requirements for excitation-contraction coupling are different in fatigue-resistant and easily-fatigued fibres; (ii) the effects of verapamil on force performance are not entirely dependent upon calcium channel blockade.

  15. Contractile system of muscle as an auto-oscillator.

    PubMed

    Ishiwata, Shin'ichi; Shimamoto, Yuta; Fukuda, Norio

    2011-05-01

    It is widely known that the contractile system of muscle takes on either the state of contraction (force-generating) or the state of relaxation (non-force-generating), which is known as the "all-or-nothing" principle. However, it is important to note that under intermediate activation conditions there exists a third state, which demonstrates auto-oscillatory properties and is termed SPOC (SPontaneous Oscillatory Contraction) state. We present a phase diagram, in which the states of the contractile system of muscle are divided into three regions consisting of contraction, relaxation and SPOC states. In the present review, experimental data related to the characteristics of SPOC are summarized and the mechanism of SPOC is described. We propose that the bio-motile system itself is an auto-oscillator, even in a membrane-less supra-molecular structure composed of an assembly of molecular motors and cytoskeletons (actin filaments and microtubules). Finally, the physiological significance of SPOC is discussed.

  16. Growth Differentiation Factor-15–Induced Contractile Activity and Extracellular Matrix Production in Human Trabecular Meshwork Cells

    PubMed Central

    Muralidharan, Arumugam Ramachandran; Maddala, Rupalatha; Skiba, Nikolai P.; Rao, Ponugoti Vasantha

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the role and regulation of growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15), a TGF-β–related cytokine in human trabecular meshwork (TM) cells in the context of aqueous humor (AH) outflow and IOP. Methods Regulation of expression by external cues, and the distribution and secretion of GDF-15 by human TM primary cell cultures, and the effects of recombinant (r) GDF-15 on TM cell contractile characteristics, actin cytoskeleton, cell adhesion, extracellular matrix (ECM), α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA), SMAD signaling, and gene expression were determined by immunoblot, immunofluorescence, mass spectrometry, cDNA microarray, and real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analyses. Results Growth differentiation factor-15, a common constituent of ECM derived from the human TM cells, was confirmed to be distributed throughout the conventional aqueous humor outflow pathway of the human eye. Growth differentiation factor-15 protein levels were significantly increased in human TM cells in response to TGF-β2, dexamethasone, endothelin-1, lysophosphatidic acid, TNF-α, IL-1β treatment, and by cyclic mechanical stretch. Stimulation of human TM cells with rGDF-15 caused a significant increase in the formation of actin stress fibers and focal adhesions, myosin light chain phosphorylation, SMAD signaling, gene expression, and the levels of αSMA and ECM proteins. Conclusions The results of this study, including a robust induction of GDF-15 expression by several external factors known to elevate IOP, and rGDF-15–induced increase in contractility, cell adhesion, and the levels of ECM proteins and αSMA in TM cells, collectively suggest a potential role for GDF-15 in homeostasis and dysregulation of AH outflow and IOP in normal and glaucomatous eyes, respectively. PMID:27918822

  17. The effects of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of brain myosin on its actin-activated Mg2+-ATPase and contractile activities.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, S; Takashima, T; Ohmori, H; Kumon, A

    1988-02-01

    Purified bovine brain myosin contained approximately 1 and 3 mol of protein-bound phosphate/mol myosin in the light chains and heavy chains, respectively. Large portions of this light chain- and heavy chain-bound phosphate (about 0.8 and 2.4 mol, respectively) were removed by incubation with a brain phosphoprotein phosphatase and potato acid phosphatase, respectively. Upon phosphorylation of the dephosphorylated brain myosin with myosin light chain kinase and casein kinase II, about 1.6 and 3.0 mol of phosphate was incorporated into the light chains and heavy chains, respectively, while much lower levels of phosphate were incorporated into the non-dephosphorylated brain myosin under the same conditions. The actin-activated Mg2+-ATPase activity of brain myosin rephosphorylated with myosin light chain kinase was about twice as high as that of dephosphorylated brain myosin (about 30 and 15 nmol phosphate/mg/min, respectively). On the other hand, whereas the rephosphorylated brain myosin superprecipitated rapidly with F-actin, the rate of superprecipitation of the dephosphorylated brain myosin was extremely low. Under appropriate conditions, a loose network of tiny superprecipitates, which formed initially throughout the solution, contracted to form eventually a large and dense particle. These results indicate that phosphorylation of the light chains of brain myosin is a prerequisite for the contraction of brain actomyosin. The role of phosphorylation of the heavy chains by casein kinase II remains to be elucidated.

  18. Effects of ZD7288, a hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel blocker, on term-pregnant rat uterine contractility in vitro.

    PubMed

    Alotaibi, Mohammed; Kahlat, Karima; Nedjadi, Taoufik; Djouhri, Laiche

    2017-03-01

    The uterus is a myogenic organ that is able to produce discrete spontaneous action potentials and contractions without any stimuli. Myometrial excitability is governed by ion channels including Ca(+2) and K(+) channels, but whether or not other channels such as hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels, which play an important role in regulating cellular excitability, are also involved has not been reported in uterine smooth muscles. The aim of the present study was to examine whether blocking HCN channels with a specific blocker ZD7288 would modulate the uterine contractility in a rat model. Using longitudinal uterine strips from term-pregnant rats, the effects of varying concentrations of ZD7288 (50 μM, 100 μM, and 200 μM) were examined on uterine contractions generated spontaneously or by oxytocin (5 nmol/L) and on uterine strips depolarized by high-KCl (60 mM/L), or activated by L-type Ca(2+) channels agonist (Bay K8644; 1 μM). Application of ZD7288 at concentrations of 200 μM and 100 μM, but not 50 μM, significantly decreased the amplitude of spontaneous uterine contractions. In addition, 200 μM of ZD7288 significantly reduced the force of contractions induced by oxytocin with a pronounced reduction while the tissues were depolarized by high-KCl solution, or activated by Bay K8644. The present study provides pharmacological evidence suggesting that pregnant uterine contractility is modulated by HCN channels and that these channels might represent a therapeutic target for controlling premature activation of uterine activity associated with preterm labor.

  19. Troponin I Mutations R146G and R21C Alter Cardiac Troponin Function, Contractile Properties, and Modulation by Protein Kinase A (PKA)-mediated Phosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yuanhua; Rao, Vijay; Tu, An-yue; Lindert, Steffen; Wang, Dan; Oxenford, Lucas; McCulloch, Andrew D.; McCammon, J. Andrew; Regnier, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Two hypertrophic cardiomyopathy-associated cardiac troponin I (cTnI) mutations, R146G and R21C, are located in different regions of cTnI, the inhibitory peptide and the cardiac-specific N terminus. We recently reported that these regions may interact when Ser-23/Ser-24 are phosphorylated, weakening the interaction of cTnI with cardiac TnC. Little is known about how these mutations influence the affinity of cardiac TnC for cTnI (KC-I) or contractile kinetics during β-adrenergic stimulation. Here, we tested how cTnIR146G or cTnIR21C influences contractile activation and relaxation and their response to protein kinase A (PKA). Both mutations significantly increased Ca2+ binding affinity to cTn (KCa) and KC-I. PKA phosphorylation resulted in a similar reduction of KCa for all complexes, but KC-I was reduced only with cTnIWT. cTnIWT, cTnIR146G, and cTnIR21C were complexed into cardiac troponin and exchanged into rat ventricular myofibrils, and contraction/relaxation kinetics were measured ± PKA phosphorylation. Maximal tension (Tmax) was maintained for cTnIR146G- and cTnIR21C-exchanged myofibrils, and Ca2+ sensitivity of tension (pCa50) was increased. PKA phosphorylation decreased pCa50 for cTnIWT-exchanged myofibrils but not for either mutation. PKA phosphorylation accelerated the early slow phase relaxation for cTnIWT myofibrils, especially at Ca2+ levels that the heart operates in vivo. Importantly, this effect was blunted for cTnIR146G- and cTnIR21C-exchanged myofibrils. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest both mutations inhibit formation of intra-subunit contacts between the N terminus and the inhibitory peptide of cTnI that is normally seen with WT-cTn upon PKA phosphorylation. Together, our results suggest that cTnIR146G and cTnIR21C blunt PKA modulation of activation and relaxation kinetics by prohibiting cardiac-specific N-terminal interaction with the cTnI inhibitory peptide. PMID:26391394

  20. Characterization of the adenosine receptor in cultured embryonic chick atrial myocytes: Coupling to modulation of contractility and adenylate cyclase activity and identification by direct radioligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, B.T.

    1989-06-01

    Adenosine receptors in a spontaneously contracting atrial myocyte culture from 14-day chick embryos were characterized by radioligand binding studies and by examining the involvement of G-protein in coupling these receptors to a high-affinity state and to the adenylate cyclase and the myocyte contractility. Binding of the antagonist radioligand (3H)-8-cyclopentyl-1,3-diproylxanthine ((3H)CPX) was rapid, reversible and saturable and was to a homogeneous population of sites with a Kd value of 2.1 +/- 0.2 nM and an apparent maximum binding of 26.2 +/- 3 fmol/mg of protein (n = 10, +/- S.E.). Guanyl-5-yl-(beta, gamma-imido)diphosphate had no effect on either the Kd or the maximum binding and CPX reversed the N6-R-phenyl-2-propyladenosine-induced inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity and contractility, indicating that (3H) CPX is an antagonist radioligand. Competition curves for (3H) CPX binding by a series of reference adenosine agonists were consistent with labeling of an A1 adenosine receptor and were better fit by a two-site model than by a one-site model. ADP-ribosylation of the G-protein by the endogenous NAD+ in the presence of pertussis toxin shifted the competition curves from bi to monophasic with Ki values similar to those of the KL observed in the absence of prior pertussis intoxication. The adenosine agonists were capable of inhibiting both the adenylate cyclase activity and myocyte contractility in either the absence or the presence of isoproterenol. The A1 adenosine receptor-selective antagonist CPX reversed these agonist effects. The order of ability of the reference adenosine receptor agonists in causing these inhibitory effects was similar to the order of potency of the same agonists in inhibiting the specific (3H)CPX binding (N6-R-phenyl-2-propyladenosine greater than N6-S-phenyl-2-propyladenosine or N-ethyladenosine-5'-uronic acid).

  1. Controlling contractile instabilities in the actomyosin cortex

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Masatoshi; Naganathan, Sundar Ram; Jülicher, Frank; Grill, Stephan W

    2017-01-01

    The actomyosin cell cortex is an active contractile material for driving cell- and tissue morphogenesis. The cortex has a tendency to form a pattern of myosin foci, which is a signature of potentially unstable behavior. How a system that is prone to such instabilities can rveliably drive morphogenesis remains an outstanding question. Here, we report that in the Caenorhabditis elegans zygote, feedback between active RhoA and myosin induces a contractile instability in the cortex. We discover that an independent RhoA pacemaking oscillator controls this instability, generating a pulsatory pattern of myosin foci and preventing the collapse of cortical material into a few dynamic contracting regions. Our work reveals how contractile instabilities that are natural to occur in mechanically active media can be biochemically controlled to robustly drive morphogenetic events. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19595.001 PMID:28117665

  2. Proliferation of mouse embryonic stem cell progeny and the spontaneous contractile activity of cardiomyocytes are affected by microtopography.

    PubMed

    Biehl, Jesse K; Yamanaka, Satoshi; Desai, Tejal A; Boheler, Kenneth R; Russell, Brenda

    2009-08-01

    The niche in which stem cells reside and differentiate is a complex physicochemical microenvironment that regulates cell function. The role played by three-dimensional physical contours was studied on cell progeny derived from mouse embryonic stem cells using microtopographies created on PDMS (poly-dimethyl-siloxane) membranes. While markers of differentiation were not affected, the proliferation of heterogeneous mouse embryonic stem cell-derived progeny was attenuated by 15 microm-, but not 5 microm-high microprojections. This reduction was reversed by Rho kinase and myosin light chain kinase inhibition, which diminishes the tension generating ability of stress fibers. Purified cardiomyocytes derived from embryonic stem cells also showed significant blunting of proliferation and increased beating rates compared with cells grown on flat substrates. Thus, proliferation of stem cell-derived progeny appears to be regulated by microtopography through tension-generation of contractility in the third-dimension. These results emphasize the importance of topographic cues in the modulation of stem cell progeny behavior.

  3. Enhanced Ca2+ binding of cardiac troponin reduces sarcomere length dependence of contractile activation independently of strong crossbridges.

    PubMed

    Korte, F Steven; Feest, Erik R; Razumova, Maria V; Tu, An-Yue; Regnier, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Calcium sensitivity of the force-pCa relationship depends strongly on sarcomere length (SL) in cardiac muscle and is considered to be the cellular basis of the Frank-Starling law of the heart. SL dependence may involve changes in myofilament lattice spacing and/or myosin crossbridge orientation to increase probability of binding to actin at longer SLs. We used the L48Q cardiac troponin C (cTnC) variant, which has enhanced Ca(2+) binding affinity, to test the hypotheses that the intrinsic properties of cTnC are important in determining 1) thin filament binding site availability and responsiveness to crossbridge activation and 2) SL dependence of force in cardiac muscle. Trabeculae containing L48Q cTnC-cTn lost SL dependence of the Ca(2+) sensitivity of force. This occurred despite maintaining the typical SL-dependent changes in maximal force (F(max)). Osmotic compression of preparations at SL 2.0 μm with 3% dextran increased F(max) but not pCa(50) in L48Q cTnC-cTn exchanged trabeculae, whereas wild-type (WT)-cTnC-cTn exchanged trabeculae exhibited increases in both F(max) and pCa(50). Furthermore, crossbridge inhibition with 2,3-butanedione monoxime at SL 2.3 μm decreased F(max) and pCa(50) in WT cTnC-cTn trabeculae to levels measured at SL 2.0 μm, whereas only F(max) was decreased with L48Q cTnC-cTn. Overall, these results suggest that L48Q cTnC confers reduced crossbridge dependence of thin filament activation in cardiac muscle and that changes in the Ca(2+) sensitivity of force in response to changes in SL are at least partially dependent on properties of thin filament troponin.

  4. Rottlerin increases cardiac contractile performance and coronary perfusion through BKCa++ channel activation following cold cardioplegic arrest in isolated hearts

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Richard T; Cordeiro, Brenda; Feng, Jun; Bianchi, Cesario; Sellke, Frank W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Cardioplegia and cardiopulmonary bypass(CP/CPB) subjects myocardium to complex injurious stimuli that can result in cardiomyocyte and vascular contractile abnormalities. Rottlerin, originally identified as a PKCδ inhibitor has a number of known additional effects that may be beneficial in the setting of CP/CPB. We tested the hypothesis that rottlerin would mitigate deleterious effects associated with CP/CPB. Methods and Results Langendorff-perfused isolated rat hearts were subjected to 2 hours intermittent cold (10 deg C) cardioplegia (St Thomas II) followed by 30 min normothermic reperfusion. Cardioplegia was delivered every 30 min, for 1 min. Hearts were treated with (CP+R, n=7) or without (CP, n=9) the PKCδ inhibitor, rottlerin (1μM) and/or the BKCa++ channel inhibitor Paxilline (100 nM) supplied in the cardioplegia. Hearts constantly perfused with Krebs-Heinslet buffer served as controls (n=6). Baseline parameters of cardiac function were similar between groups. CP resulted in reduced cardiac function (LVDP:39±3.8%,±dP/dt: 32±4.4%,-41±5.1% decrease compared to baseline). Treatment with 1uM Rottlerin significantly improved CP-induced cardiac function (LVDP: 20±5.9%, ±dP/dt: 5.2 ±4.5%, -11.6 ± 4.7% decrease versus baseline, (p < .05 CP+R vs CP)). Rottlerin also caused a significant increase in coronary flow post reperfusion (CP 34±4.2% decrease from baseline, vs CP+R 26±9.6% increase over baseline, p=.01). Independent of vascular effects, CP significantly decreased isolated myocyte contraction which was restored by rottlerin treatment. The BKCa++ channel inhibitor greatly reduced the majority of beneficial effects associated with Rottlerin. Conclusions Rottlerin significantly improves cardiac performance following cardioplegic arrest via improved cardiomyocyte contraction and coronary perfusion. PMID:21911819

  5. Effects of regular exercise training on skeletal muscle contractile function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, Robert H.

    2003-01-01

    Skeletal muscle function is critical to movement and one's ability to perform daily tasks, such as eating and walking. One objective of this article is to review the contractile properties of fast and slow skeletal muscle and single fibers, with particular emphasis on the cellular events that control or rate limit the important mechanical properties. Another important goal of this article is to present the current understanding of how the contractile properties of limb skeletal muscle adapt to programs of regular exercise.

  6. Contractile properties of early human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes: beta-adrenergic stimulation induces positive chronotropy and lusitropy but not inotropy.

    PubMed

    Pillekamp, Frank; Haustein, Moritz; Khalil, Markus; Emmelheinz, Markus; Nazzal, Rewa; Adelmann, Roland; Nguemo, Filomain; Rubenchyk, Olga; Pfannkuche, Kurt; Matzkies, Matthias; Reppel, Michael; Bloch, Wilhelm; Brockmeier, Konrad; Hescheler, Juergen

    2012-08-10

    Human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) provide the unique opportunity to study the very early development of the human heart. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of calcium and beta-adrenergic stimulation on the contractile properties of early hESC-CMs. Beating clusters containing hESC-CMs were co-cultured in vitro with noncontractile slices of neonatal murine ventricles. After 5-7 days, when beating clusters had integrated morphologically into the damaged tissue, isometric force measurements were performed during spontaneous beating as well as during electrical field stimulation. Spontaneous beating stopped when extracellular calcium ([Ca²⁺](ec)) was removed or after administration of the Ca²⁺ channel blocker nifedipine. During field stimulation at a constant rate, the developed force increased with incremental concentrations of [Ca²⁺](ec). During spontaneous beating, rising [Ca²⁺](ec) increased beating rate and developed force up to a [Ca²⁺](ec) of 2.5 mM. When [Ca²⁺](ec) was increased further, spontaneous beating rate decreased, whereas the developed force continued to increase. The beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol induced a dose-dependent increase of the frequency of spontaneous beating; however, it did not significantly change the developed force during spontaneous contractions or during electrical stimulation at a constant rate. Force developed by early hESC-CMs depends on [Ca²⁺](ec) and on the L-type Ca²⁺ channel. The lack of an inotropic reaction despite a pronounced chronotropic response after beta-adrenergic stimulation most likely indicates immaturity of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. For cell-replacement strategies, further maturation of cardiac cells has to be achieved either in vitro before or in vivo after transplantation.

  7. [Influence of physical training under conditions of 120-day simulated microgravity on contractile properties and musculo-tendinous stiffness of the triceps surae muscle].

    PubMed

    Koriak, Iu A

    2013-01-01

    The effect of a 120-day -5 degrees head-down tilt (HDT) bed rest with countermeasures (physical training) on the mechanical properties of the human triceps surae muscle was studied in four healthy young women aged 28.0. The results showed that the contractile properties of the skeletal muscle studied changed considerably. After HDT without countermeasures the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) had decreased by 36% (P < 0.05), and the electrically evoked tetanic tension at 150 Hz (P) and isometric twitch contraction (P(t)) had decreased by 24% (P < 0.05) and 12 % (P < 0.05), respectively. Time-to-peak tension (TPT) of the twitch had significantly increased by 14% (P < 0.05), but half-relaxation time (1/2 RT), and total contraction time (TCT) had decreased by 19% (P < 0.05) and 18% (P < 0.05), respectively. The difference between P(o) and MVC expressed as a percentage of P(o) and referred to as force deficiency (P(d)), was also calculated. The P(d) had increased by 40% (P < 0.001). The rate of increase of voluntary contractions calculated according to a relative scale had significantly reduced, but for the electrically evoked contraction no substantial changes were observed. After HDT with countermeasures TPT, 1/2 RT and TCT had decreased by 4%, 7%, 19%, respectively in relation to the control condition. Training had caused a decrease of 3% (P > 0.05) in MVC, and P(t) and in P(o) of 14%, and of 9% (P > 0.05), respectively. The Pd had decreased significantly by 10% (P < 0.05). The rate of increase of electrically evoked tetanic tension did not change significantly during HDT with countermeasures but the rate of increase in isometric voluntary tension development was increased. Physical training provided a reserve of neuromuscular function, which attenuated the effect of bed rest. The experimental findings indicated that neural as well as muscle adaptation occurred in response to HDT with countermeasures.

  8. [The role of thyroid hormones in prevention of disorders of myocardial contractile function and antioxidant activity during heat stress].

    PubMed

    Bozhko, A P; Gorodetskaia, I V

    1998-03-01

    The stress of heat under conditions of immobilisation induced an obvious depression of the cardiodynamic parameters. This correlated well with intensification of lipoperoxydation and a drop in the myocardial antioxydant activity. Small doses of thyroid hormones prevented the decline of the parameters, normalisied myocardial free-radical homeostasis in result of activation of superoxyddysmutase, catalase, and general antioxydant activity.

  9. Muscular tissues of the squid Doryteuthis pealeii express identical myosin heavy chain isoforms: an alternative mechanism for tuning contractile speed.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Justin F; Kier, William M

    2012-01-15

    The speed of muscle contraction is largely controlled at the sarcomere level by the ATPase activity of the motor protein myosin. Differences in amino acid sequence in catalytically important regions of myosin yield different myosin isoforms with varying ATPase activities and resulting differences in cross-bridge cycling rates and interfilamentary sliding velocities. Modulation of whole-muscle performance by changes in myosin isoform ATPase activity is regarded as a universal mechanism to tune contractile properties, especially in vertebrate muscles. Invertebrates such as squid, however, may exhibit an alternative mechanism to tune contractile properties that is based on differences in muscle ultrastructure, including variable myofilament and sarcomere lengths. To determine definitively whether contractile properties of squid muscles are regulated via different myosin isoforms (i.e. different ATPase activities), the nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the myosin heavy chain from the squid Doryteuthis pealeii were determined from the mantle, arm, tentacle, fin and funnel retractor musculature. We identified three myosin heavy chain isoforms in squid muscular tissues, with differences arising at surface loop 1 and the carboxy terminus. All three isoforms were detected in all five tissues studied. These results suggest that the muscular tissues of D. pealeii express identical myosin isoforms, and it is likely that differences in muscle ultrastructure, not myosin ATPase activity, represent the most important mechanism for tuning contractile speeds.

  10. KDR-5169, a new gastrointestinal prokinetic agent, enhances gastric contractile and emptying activities in dogs and rats.

    PubMed

    Tazawa, Shigeki; Masuda, Naoyuki; Koizumi, Takashi; Kitazawa, Makio; Nakane, Tokio; Miyata, Hiroshi

    2002-01-11

    KDR-5169, 4-amino-5-chloro-N-[1-(3-fluoro-4-methoxybenzyl)piperidin-4-yl]-2-(2-hydroxyethoxy)benzamide hydrochloride dihydrate, is a new prokinetic with a dual action, i.e., stimulation of the 5-HT4 receptor and antagonism of the dopamine D2 receptor. In this study, we determined in vitro activities of KDR-5169 towards both receptors and demonstrated the effect of the compound on gastrointestinal motor activity in conscious dogs and rats. In dogs, intravenous KDR-5169 stimulated upper gastrointestinal motility in the fasting state and also eliminated the depressive effect of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) on this motility in the postprandial state. The effect of KDR-5169 on gastric emptying was further characterized by the use of three rat gastroparesis models (dopamine D2 receptor agonist (quinpirol)-, abdominal surgery-, or combined-situation-induced). Domperidone (a dopamine D2 receptor antagonist) was effective in the quinpirol-delay and combination-delay models, and cisapride and mosapride (5-HT4 receptor agonists) were effective in the surgery-delay model. Only KDR-5169 eliminated the delay of gastric emptying in all three models. In addition, KDR-5169 accelerated emptying to above the normal level in the combination-delay model. These results suggest that KDR-5169 would be effective in various types of gastric ileus caused by different mechanisms.

  11. Effects of flavone on the contractile activity of the circular smooth muscle of the rabbit middle colon in vitro.

    PubMed

    Benabdallah, Hassiba; Gharzouli, Kamel

    2015-08-05

    The circular smooth muscles of the middle colon of the rabbit generate giant contractions of high amplitude and low frequency. Flavone, at various concentrations, reduces the giant contractions and the tonic contraction induced by 10 µM carbachol and 80 mM KCl. The contractions induced by dequalinium and tetraethylammonium are reduced by flavone (30 µM). At 100 µM, flavone decreases the contraction induced by 100 µM methylene blue and 1mM orthovanadate. These results suggest that flavone inhibit the giant contractions by (1) inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels, (2) activation of guanyl cyclase, (3) opening of K(+) channels and (4) inhibition of tyrosines kinases.

  12. Activation of Pax7-positive cells in a non-contractile tissue contributes to regeneration of myogenic tissues in the electric fish S. macrurus.

    PubMed

    Weber, Christopher M; Martindale, Mark Q; Tapscott, Stephen J; Unguez, Graciela A

    2012-01-01

    The ability to regenerate tissues is shared across many metazoan taxa, yet the type and extent to which multiple cellular mechanisms come into play can differ across species. For example, urodele amphibians can completely regenerate all lost tissues, including skeletal muscles after limb amputation. This remarkable ability of urodeles to restore entire limbs has been largely linked to a dedifferentiation-dependent mechanism of regeneration. However, whether cell dedifferentiation is the fundamental factor that triggers a robust regeneration capacity, and whether the loss or inhibition of this process explains the limited regeneration potential in other vertebrates is not known. Here, we studied the cellular mechanisms underlying the repetitive regeneration of myogenic tissues in the electric fish S. macrurus. Our in vivo microinjection studies of high molecular weight cell lineage tracers into single identified adult myogenic cells (muscle or noncontractile muscle-derived electrocytes) revealed no fragmentation or cellularization proximal to the amputation plane. In contrast, ultrastructural and immunolabeling studies verified the presence of myogenic stem cells that express the satellite cell marker Pax7 in mature muscle fibers and electrocytes of S. macrurus. These data provide the first example of Pax-7 positive muscle stem cells localized within a non-contractile electrogenic tissue. Moreover, upon amputation, Pax-7 positive cells underwent a robust replication and were detected exclusively in regions that give rise to myogenic cells and dorsal spinal cord components revealing a regeneration process in S. macrurus that is dependent on the activation of myogenic stem cells for the renewal of both skeletal muscle and the muscle-derived electric organ. These data are consistent with the emergent concept in vertebrate regeneration that different tissues provide a distinct progenitor cell population to the regeneration blastema, and these progenitor cells

  13. Skeletal muscle signaling associated with impaired glucose tolerance in spinal cord-injured men and the effects of contractile activity

    PubMed Central

    Yarar-Fisher, Ceren; Bickel, C. Scott; Windham, Samuel T.; McLain, Amie B.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying poor glucose tolerance in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI), along with its improvement after several weeks of neuromuscular electrical stimulation-induced resistance exercise (NMES-RE) training, remain unclear, but presumably involve the affected skeletal musculature. We, therefore, investigated skeletal muscle signaling pathways associated with glucose transporter 4 (GLUT-4) translocation at rest and shortly after a single bout of NMES-RE in SCI (n = 12) vs. able-bodied (AB, n = 12) men. Subjects completed an oral glucose tolerance test during visit 1 and ≈90 NMES-RE isometric contractions of the quadriceps during visit 2. Muscle biopsies were collected before, and 10 and 60 min after, NMES-RE. We assessed transcript levels of GLUT-4 by quantitative PCR and protein levels of GLUT-4 and phosphorylated- and total AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-α, CaMKII, Akt, and AS160 by immunoblotting. Impaired glucose tolerance in SCI was confirmed by higher (P < 0.05) plasma glucose concentrations than AB at all time points after glucose ingestion, despite equivalent insulin responses to the glucose load. GLUT-4 protein content was lower (P < 0.05) in SCI vs. AB at baseline. Main group effects revealed higher phosphorylation in SCI of AMPK-α, CaMKII, and Akt (P < 0.05), and Akt phosphorylation increased robustly (P < 0.05) following NMES-RE in SCI only. In SCI, low skeletal muscle GLUT-4 protein concentration may, in part, explain poor glucose tolerance, whereas heightened phosphorylation of relevant signaling proteins (AMPK-α, CaMKII) suggests a compensatory effort. Finally, it is encouraging to find (based on Akt) that SCI muscle remains both sensitive and responsive to mechanical loading (NMES-RE) even ≈22 yr after injury. PMID:23766505

  14. Human lymphatic vessel contractile activity is inhibited in vitro but not in vivo by the calcium channel blocker nifedipine

    PubMed Central

    Telinius, Niklas; Mohanakumar, Sheyanth; Majgaard, Jens; Kim, Sukhan; Pilegaard, Hans; Pahle, Einar; Nielsen, Jørn; de Leval, Marc; Aalkjaer, Christian; Hjortdal, Vibeke; Boedtkjer, Donna Briggs

    2014-01-01

    Calcium channel blockers (CCB) are widely prescribed anti-hypertensive agents. The commonest side-effect, peripheral oedema, is attributed to a larger arterial than venous dilatation causing increased fluid filtration. Whether CCB treatment is detrimental to human lymphatic vessel function and thereby exacerbates oedema formation is unknown. We observed that spontaneous lymphatic contractions in isolated human vessels (thoracic duct and mesenteric lymphatics) maintained under isometric conditions were inhibited by therapeutic concentrations (nanomolar) of the CCB nifedipine while higher than therapeutic concentrations of verapamil (micromolar) were necessary to inhibit activity. Nifedipine also inhibited spontaneous action potentials measured by sharp microelectrodes. Furthermore, noradrenaline did not elicit normal increases in lymphatic vessel tone when maximal constriction was reduced to 29.4 ± 4.9% of control in the presence of 20 nmol l−1 nifedipine. Transcripts for the L-type calcium channel gene CACNA1C were consistently detected from human thoracic duct samples examined and the CaV1.2 protein was localized by immunoreactivity to lymphatic smooth muscle cells. While human lymphatics ex vivo were highly sensitive to nifedipine, this was not apparent in vivo when nifedipine was compared to placebo in a randomized, double-blinded clinical trial: conversely, lymphatic vessel contraction frequency was increased and refill time was faster despite all subjects achieving target nifedipine plasma concentrations. We conclude that human lymphatic vessels are highly sensitive to nifedipine in vitro but that care must be taken when extrapolating in vitro observations of lymphatic vessel function to the clinical situation, as similar changes in lymphatic function were not evident in our clinical trial comparing nifedipine treatment to placebo. PMID:25172950

  15. Caveolin-1 regulates contractility in differentiated vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Je, Hyun-Dong; Gallant, Cynthia; Leavis, Paul C; Morgan, Kathleen G

    2004-01-01

    Caveolin is a principal component of caveolar membranes. In the present study, we utilized a decoy peptide approach to define the degree of involvement of caveolin in PKC-dependent regulation of contractility of differentiated vascular smooth muscle. The primary isoform of caveolin in ferret aorta vascular smooth muscle is caveolin-1. Chemical loading of contractile vascular smooth muscle tissue with a synthetic caveolin-1 scaffolding domain peptide inhibited PKC-dependent increases in contractility induced by a phorbol ester or an alpha agonist. Peptide loading also resulted in a significant inhibition of phorbol ester-induced adducin Ser662 phosphorylation, an intracellular monitor of PKC kinase activity, ERK1/2 activation, and Ser789 phosphorylation of the actin binding protein caldesmon. alpha-Agonist-induced ERK1-1/2 activation was also inhibited by the caveolin-1 peptide. Scrambled peptide-loaded tissues or sham-loaded tissues were unaffected with respect to both contractility and signaling. Depolarization-induced activation of contraction was not affected by caveolin peptide loading. Similar results with respect to contractility and ERK1/2 activation during exposure to the phorbol ester or the alpha-agonist were obtained with the cholesterol-depleting agent methyl-beta-cyclodextrin. These results are consistent with a role for caveolin-1 in the coordination of signaling leading to the regulation of contractility of smooth muscle.

  16. Elastomeric contractile actuators for hand rehabilitation splints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpi, Federico; Mannini, Andrea; De Rossi, Danilo

    2008-03-01

    The significant electromechanical performances typically shown by dielectric elastomer actuators make this polymer technology particularly attractive for possible active orthoses for rehabilitation. Folded contractile actuators made of dielectric elastomers were recently described as a simple configuration, suitable to easily implement linear contractile devices. This paper describes an application of folded actuators for so-called hand splints: they consist of orthotic systems for hand rehabilitation. The dynamic versions of the state-of-the-art splints typically include elastic bands, which exert a passive elastic resistance to voluntary elongations of one or more fingers. In order to provide such splints with the possibility of electrically modulating the compliance of the resistive elements, the substitution of the passive elastic bands with the contractile actuators is here described. The electrical activation of the actuators is used to vary the compliance of the system; this enables modulations of the force that acts as an antagonist to voluntary finger movements, according to programmable rehabilitation exercises. The paper reports results obtained from the first prototype implementations of such a type of system.

  17. Origins of the vagal drive controlling left ventricular contractility

    PubMed Central

    Machhada, Asif; Marina, Nephtali; Korsak, Alla; Stuckey, Daniel J.; Lythgoe, Mark F.

    2016-01-01

    allatostatin receptor were silenced by application of an insect peptide allatostatin. Microinjections of glutamate and muscimol to activate or inhibit neuronal cell bodies in distinct locations along the rostro‐caudal extent of the left and right DVMN revealed that vagal preganglionic neurones, which have an impact on LV contractility, are located in the caudal region of the left DVMN. Changes in LV contractility were only observed when this subpopulation of DVMN neurones was activated or inhibited. These data confirm the existence of a tonic inhibitory muscarinic influence on LV contractility. Activity of a subpopulation of DVMN neurones provides functionally significant parasympathetic control of LV contractile function. PMID:26940639

  18. Cadmium translocation by contractile roots differs from that in regular, non-contractile roots

    PubMed Central

    Lux, Alexander; Lackovič, Andrej; Van Staden, Johannes; Lišková, Desana; Kohanová, Jana; Martinka, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Contractile roots are known and studied mainly in connection with the process of shrinkage of their basal parts, which acts to pull the shoot of the plant deeper into the ground. Previous studies have shown that the specific structure of these roots results in more intensive water uptake at the base, which is in contrast to regular root types. The purpose of this study was to find out whether the basal parts of contractile roots are also more active in translocation of cadmium to the shoot. Methods Plants of the South African ornamental species Tritonia gladiolaris were cultivated in vitro for 2 months, at which point they possessed well-developed contractile roots. They were then transferred to Petri dishes with horizontally separated compartments of agar containing 50 µmol Cd(NO3)2 in the region of the root base or the root apex. Seedlings of 4-d-old maize (Zea mays) plants, which do not possess contractile roots, were also transferred to similar Petri dishes. The concentrations of Cd in the leaves of the plants were compared after 10 d of cultivation. Anatomical analyses of Tritonia roots were performed using appropriately stained freehand cross-sections. Key Results The process of contraction required specific anatomical adaptation of the root base in Tritonia, with less lignified and less suberized tissues in comparison with the subapical part of the root. These unusual developmental characteristics were accompanied by more intensive translocation of Cd ions from the basal part of contractile roots to the leaves than from the apical–subapical root parts. The opposite effects were seen in the non-contractile roots of maize, with higher uptake and transport by the apical parts of the root and lower uptake and transport by the basal part. Conclusions The specific characteristics of contractile roots may have a significant impact on the uptake of ions, including toxic metals from the soil surface layers. This may be important for plant

  19. Effect of exercise training and myocardial infarction on force development and contractile kinetics in isolated canine myocardium.

    PubMed

    Canan, Benjamin D; Haizlip, Kaylan M; Xu, Ying; Monasky, Michelle M; Hiranandani, Nitisha; Milani-Nejad, Nima; Varian, Kenneth D; Slabaugh, Jessica L; Schultz, Eric J; Fedorov, Vadim V; Billman, George E; Janssen, Paul M L

    2016-04-15

    It is well known that moderate exercise training elicits a small increase in ventricular mass (i.e., a physiological hypertrophy) that has many beneficial effects on overall cardiac health. It is also well known that, when a myocardial infarction damages part of the heart, the remaining myocardium remodels to compensate for the loss of viable functioning myocardium. The effects of exercise training, myocardial infarction (MI), and their interaction on the contractile performance of the myocardium itself remain largely to be determined. The present study investigated the contractile properties and kinetics of right ventricular myocardium isolated from sedentary and exercise trained (10-12 wk progressively increasing treadmill running, begun 4 wk after MI induction) dogs with and without a left ventricular myocardial infarction. Exercise training increased force development, whereas MI decreased force development that was not improved by exercise training. Contractile kinetics were significantly slower in the trained dogs, whereas this impact of training was less or no longer present after MI. Length-dependent activation, both evaluated on contractile force and kinetics, was similar in all four groups. The control exercise-trained group exhibited a more positive force-frequency relationship compared with the sedentary control group while both sedentary and trained post-MI dogs had a more negative relationship. Last, the impact of the β-adrenergic receptor agonist isoproterenol resulted in a similar increase in force and acceleration of contractile kinetics in all groups. Thus, exercise training increased developed force but slowed contractile kinetics in control (noninfarcted animals), actions that were attenuated or completely absent in post-MI dogs.

  20. Adenoviral gene transfer of Akt enhances myocardial contractility and intracellular calcium handling

    PubMed Central

    Cittadini, A; Monti, MG; Iaccarino, G; Di Rella, F; Tsichlis, PN; Di Gianni, A; Strömer, H; Sorriento, D; Peschle, C; Trimarco, B; Saccà, L; Condorelli, G

    2010-01-01

    The serine-threonine kinase Akt/PKB mediates stimuli from different classes of cardiomyocyte receptors, including the growth hormone/insulin like growth factor and the β-adrenergic receptors. Whereas the growth-promoting and antiapoptotic properties of Akt activation are well established, little is known about the effects of Akt on myocardial contractility, intracellular calcium (Ca2+) handling, oxygen consumption, and β-adrenergic pathway. To this aim, Sprague–Dawley rats were subjected to a wild-type Akt in vivo adenoviral gene transfer using a catheter-based technique combined with aortopulmonary crossclamping. Left ventricular (LV) contractility and intracellular Ca2+ handling were evaluated in an isolated isovolumic buffer-perfused, aequorin-loaded whole heart preparations 10 days after the surgery. The Ca2+–force relationship was obtained under steady-state conditions in tetanized muscles. No significant hypertrophy was detected in adenovirus with wild-type Akt (Ad.Akt) versus controls rats (LV-to-body weight ratio 2.6±0.2 versus 2.7±0.1 mg/g, controls versus Ad.Akt, P, NS). LV contractility, measured as developed pressure, increased by 41% in Ad.Akt. This was accounted for by both more systolic Ca2+ available to the contractile machinery (+19% versus controls) and by enhanced myofilament Ca2+ responsiveness, documented by an increased maximal Ca2+-activated pressure (+19% versus controls) and a shift to the left of the Ca2+–force relationship. Such increased contractility was paralleled by a slight increase of myocardial oxygen consumption (14%), while titrated dose of dobutamine providing similar inotropic effect augmented oxygen consumption by 39% (P<0.01). Phospholamban, calsequestrin, and ryanodine receptor LV mRNA and protein content were not different among the study groups, while sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase protein levels were significantly increased in Ad.Akt rats. β-Adrenergic receptor density, affinity, kinase-1 levels, and

  1. Active properties of neuronal dendrites.

    PubMed

    Johnston, D; Magee, J C; Colbert, C M; Cristie, B R

    1996-01-01

    Dendrites of neurons in the central nervous system are the principal sites for excitatory synaptic input. Although little is known about their function, two disparate perspectives have arisen to describe the activity patterns inherent to these diverse tree-like structures. Dendrites are thus considered either passive or active in their role in integrating synaptic inputs. This review follows the history of dendritic research from before the turn of the century to the present, with a primary focus on the hippocampus. A number of recent techniques, including high-speed fluorescence imaging and dendritic patch clamping, have provided new information and perspectives about the active properties of dendrites. The results support previous notions about the dendritic propagation of action potentials and also indicate which types of voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels are expressed and functionally active in dendrites. Possible roles for the active properties of dendrites in synaptic plasticity and integration are also discussed.

  2. Airway smooth muscle cell tone amplifies contractile function in the presence of chronic cyclic strain.

    PubMed

    Fairbank, Nigel J; Connolly, Sarah C; Mackinnon, James D; Wehry, Kathrin; Deng, Linhong; Maksym, Geoffrey N

    2008-09-01

    Chronic contractile activation, or tone, in asthma coupled with continuous stretching due to breathing may be involved in altering the contractile function of airway smooth muscle (ASM). Previously, we (11) showed that cytoskeletal remodeling and stiffening responses to acute (2 h) localized stresses were modulated by the level of contractile activation of ASM. Here, we investigated if altered contractility in response to chronic mechanical strain was dependent on repeated modulation of contractile tone. Cultured human ASM cells received 5% cyclic (0.3 Hz), predominantly uniaxial strain for 5 days, with once-daily dosing of either sham, forskolin, carbachol, or histamine to alter tone. Stiffness, contractility (KCl), and "relaxability" (forskolin) were then measured as was cell alignment, myosin light-chain phosphorylation (pMLC), and myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK) content. Cells became aligned and baseline stiffness increased with strain, but repeated lowering of tone inhibited both effects (P < 0.05). Strain also reversed a negative tone-modulation dependence of MLCK, observed in static conditions in agreement with previous reports, with strain and tone together increasing both MLCK and pMLC. Furthermore, contractility increased 176% (SE 59) with repeated tone elevation. These findings indicate that with strain, and not without, repeated tone elevation promoted contractile function through changes in cytoskeletal organization and increased contractile protein. The ability of repeated contractile activation to increase contractility, but only with mechanical stretching, suggests a novel mechanism for increased ASM contractility in asthma and for the role of continuous bronchodilator and corticosteroid therapy in reversing airway hyperresponsiveness.

  3. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Andrew D.; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils. PMID:26548801

  4. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Andrew D; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2015-11-09

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils.

  5. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Andrew D.; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2015-11-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils.

  6. Changes of contractile responses due to simulated weightlessness in rat soleus muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkhammari, A.; Noireaud, J.; Léoty, C.

    1994-08-01

    Some contractile and electrophysiological properties of muscle fibers isolated from the slow-twitch soleus (SOL) and fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of rats were compared with those measured in SOL muscles from suspended rats. In suspendede SOL (21 days of tail-suspension) membrane potential (Em), intracellular sodium activity (aiNa) and the slope of the relationship between Em and log [K]o were typical of fast-twitch muscles. The relation between the maximal amplitude of K-contractures vs Em was steeper for control SOL than for EDL and suspended SOL muscles. After suspension, in SOL muscles the contractile threshold and the inactivation curves for K-contractures were shifted to more positive Em. Repriming of K-contractures was unaffected by suspencion. The exposure of isolated fibers to perchlorate (ClO4-)-containing (6-40 mM) solutions resulted ina similar concentration-dependent shift to more negative Em of activation curves for EDL and suspended SOL muscles. On exposure to a Na-free TEA solution, SOL from control and suspended rats, in contrast to EDL muscles, generated slow contractile responses. Suspended SOL showed a reduced sensitivity to the contracture-producing effect of caffeine compared to control muscles. These results suggested that the modification observed due to suspension could be encounted by changes in the characteristics of muscle fibers from slow to fast-twitch type.

  7. THE CONTRACTILE PROCESS IN THE CILIATE, STENTOR COERULEUS

    PubMed Central

    Huang, B.; Pitelka, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    The structural basis for the function of microtubules and filaments in cell body contractility in the ciliate Stentor coeruleus was investigated. Cells in the extended state were obtained for ultrastructural analysis by treatment before fixation with a solution containing 10 mM EGTA, 50–80 mM Tris, 3 mM MgSO4, 7.5 mM NH4Cl, 10 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7.1). The response of Stentor to changes in the divalent cation concentrations in this solution suggests that Ca+2 and Mg+2 are physiologically important in the regulation of ciliate contractility. The generation of motive force for changes in cell length in Stentor resides in two distinct longitudinal cortical fiber systems, the km fibers and myonemes. Cyclic changes in cell length are associated with (a) the relative sliding of parallel, overlapping microtubule ribbons in the km fibers, and (b) a distinct alteration in the structure of the contractile filaments constituting the myonemes. The microtubule and filament systems are distinguished functionally as antagonistic contractile elements. The development of motive force for cell extension is accomplished by active microtubule-to-microtubule sliding generated by specific intertubule bridges. Evidence is presented which suggests that active shortening of contractile filaments, reflected in a reversible structural transformation of dense 4-nm filaments to tubular 10–12-nm filaments, provides the basis for rapid cell contraction. PMID:4633444

  8. Probing the viscoelastic behavior of cultured airway smooth muscle cells with atomic force microscopy: stiffening induced by contractile agonist.

    PubMed

    Smith, Benjamin A; Tolloczko, Barbara; Martin, James G; Grütter, Peter

    2005-04-01

    Complex rheology of airway smooth muscle cells and its dynamic response during contractile stimulation involves many molecular processes, foremost of which are actomyosin cross-bridge cycling and actin polymerization. With an atomic force microscope, we tracked the spatial and temporal variations of the viscoelastic properties of cultured airway smooth muscle cells. Elasticity mapping identified stiff structural elements of the cytoskeletal network. Using a precisely positioned microscale probe, picoNewton forces and nanometer level indentation modulations were applied to cell surfaces at frequencies ranging from 0.5 to 100 Hz. The resulting elastic storage modulus (G') and dissipative modulus (G'') increased dramatically, with hysteresivity (eta = G''/G') showing a definitive decrease after stimulation with the contractile agonist 5-hydroxytryptamine. Frequency-dependent assays showed weak power-law structural damping behavior and universal scaling in support of the soft-glassy material description of cellular biophysics. Additionally, a high-frequency component of the loss modulus (attributed to cellular Newtonian viscosity) increased fourfold during the contractile process. The complex shear modulus showed a strong sensitivity to the degree of actin polymerization. Inhibitors of myosin light chain kinase activity had little effect on the stiffening response to contractile stimulation. Thus, our measurements appear to be particularly well suited for characterization of dynamic actin rheology during airway smooth muscle contraction.

  9. Deletion of the UT receptor gene results in the selective loss of urotensin-II contractile activity in aortae isolated from UT receptor knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Behm, David J; Harrison, Stephen M; Ao, Zhaohui; Maniscalco, Kristeen; Pickering, Susan J; Grau, Evelyn V; Woods, Tina N; Coatney, Robert W; Doe, Christopher P A; Willette, Robert N; Johns, Douglas G; Douglas, Stephen A

    2003-01-01

    Urotensin-II (U-II) is among the most potent mammalian vasoconstrictors identified and may play a role in the aetiology of essential hypertension. Currently, only one mouse U-II receptor (UT) gene has been cloned. It is postulated that this protein is solely responsible for mediating U-II-induced vasoconstriction. This hypothesis has been investigated in the present study, which assessed basal haemodynamics and vascular reactivity to hU-II in wild-type (UT(+/+)) and UT receptor knockout (UT(−/−)) mice. Basal left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes/pressures, stroke volumes, mean arterial blood pressures, heart rates, cardiac outputs and ejection fractions in UT(+/+) mice and in UT(−/−) mice were similar. Relative to UT(+/+) mouse isolated thoracic aorta, where hU-II was a potent spasmogen (pEC50=8.26±0.08) that evoked relatively little vasoconstriction (17±2% 60 mM KCl), vessels isolated from UT(−/−) mice did not respond to hU-II. However, in contrast, the superior mesenteric artery isolated from both the genotypes did not contract in the presence of hU-II. Reactivity to unrelated vasoconstrictors (phenylephrine, endothelin-1, KCl) and endothelium-dependent/independent vasodilator agents (carbachol, sodium nitroprusside) was similar in the aorta and superior mesenteric arteries isolated from both the genotypes. The present study is the first to directly link hU-II-induced vasoconstriction with the UT receptor. Deletion of the UT receptor gene results in loss of hU-II contractile action with no ‘nonspecific' alterations in vascular reactivity. However, as might be predicted based on the limited contractile efficacy recorded in vitro, the contribution that hU-II and its receptor make to basal systemic haemodynamics appears to be negligible in this species. PMID:12770952

  10. The role of cyclic nucleotides in guinea-pig bladder contractility

    PubMed Central

    Longhurst, Penelope A; Briscoe, Janice A K; Rosenberg, David J; Leggett, Robert E

    1997-01-01

    The effects of phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibition and forskolin pretreatment on the contractile responses of guinea-pig urinary bladder strips to electrical field stimulation, carbachol, ATP and KCl were studied. Inhibition of cyclic AMP-specific PDE4 isozymes by rolipram significantly reduced the contractile response of bladder strips to field stimulation. Rolipram also suppressed the contractile response to low concentrations of carbachol, but potentiated the response to high concentrations. The contractile response to ATP was significantly reduced by rolipram treatment, but that to KCl was unaltered. Inhibition of cyclic GMP-specific PDE5 isozymes by zaprinast had no effects on the contractile response of bladder strips to field stimulation, ATP or KCl. Zaprinast suppressed the contractile responses to 1 μM carbachol and potentiated the response to high concentrations. Contractile responses to field stimulation and to carbachol after pretreatment with the adenylyl cyclase activator, forskolin, were qualitatively similar to those caused by rolipram treatment. β-Adrenoceptor blockade with propranolol partially reversed the inhibitory effects of rolipram on the response to field stimulation. Rolipram significantly reduced the contractile response of bladder strips from sensitized guinea-pigs to ovalbumin challenge, but zaprinast was ineffective. PDE inhibition had similar effects on the responsiveness of control and of sensitized guinea-pig bladder strips to field stimulation, carbachol, ATP and KCl. The data suggest that the contractile response of guinea-pig bladder strips can be modified by increases in cyclic AMP levels. PMID:9283701

  11. Ex Vivo Assessment of Contractility, Fatigability and Alternans in Isolated Skeletal Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ki Ho; Brotto, Leticia; Lehoang, Oanh; Brotto, Marco; Ma, Jianjie; Zhao, Xiaoli

    2012-01-01

    Described here is a method to measure contractility of isolated skeletal muscles. Parameters such as muscle force, muscle power, contractile kinetics, fatigability, and recovery after fatigue can be obtained to assess specific aspects of the excitation-contraction coupling (ECC) process such as excitability, contractile machinery and Ca2+ handling ability. This method removes the nerve and blood supply and focuses on the isolated skeletal muscle itself. We routinely use this method to identify genetic components that alter the contractile property of skeletal muscle though modulating Ca2+ signaling pathways. Here, we describe a newly identified skeletal muscle phenotype, i.e., mechanic alternans, as an example of the various and rich information that can be obtained using the in vitro muscle contractility assay. Combination of this assay with single cell assays, genetic approaches and biochemistry assays can provide important insights into the mechanisms of ECC in skeletal muscle. PMID:23149471

  12. Spiral waves on a contractile tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesin, L.; Ambrosi, D.

    2011-02-01

    In a healthy cardiac tissue, electric waves propagate in the form of a travelling pulse, from the apex to the base, and activate the contraction of the heart. Defects in the propagation can destabilize travelling fronts and originate possible new periodic solutions, as spiral waves. Spiral waves are quite stable, but the interplay between currents and strain can distort the periodic pattern, provided the coupling is strong enough. In this paper we investigate the stability of spiral waves on a contractile medium in a non-standard framework, in which the electrical potential dictates the active strain (not stress) of the muscle. The role of conducting and contracting fibers is included in the model and periodic boundary conditions are adopted. A correlation analysis allows to evaluate numerically the range of stability of the parameters for the spiral waves, depending on the strain of the contracted fibers and on the magnitude of the stretch activated current.

  13. Prostaglandin E2 excitatory effects on rat urinary bladder: a comparison between the β-adrenoceptor modulation of non-voiding activity in vivo and micro-contractile activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Granato, C; Korstanje, C; Guilloteau, V; Rouget, C; Palea, S; Gillespie, J I

    2015-07-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is well known to modulate urinary bladder functions, but it is also thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of lower urinary tract dysfunctions, since high levels of PGE2 have been found in overactive bladder (OAB) patients. β-Adrenoceptors are major players in detrusor muscle relaxation, and the selective β3-adrenoceptor (AR) agonist mirabegron was recently approved for the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB). β-Adrenoceptor modulation of PGE2 excitatory effects on bladder detrusor muscle was investigated by i.v. mirabegron after intravesical PGE2 infusion in conscious rats. Non-voiding activity (NVA) was assessed under isovolumetric conditions. In addition, mirabegron and isoprenaline (0.01-10 μM) were studied on PGE2-increased micro-contractile activity during isometric tension recordings of intact isolated bladder muscle strips. Our investigations showed that PGE2 dramatically increased NVA in vivo and spontaneous micro-contractions in vitro. In vivo administration of mirabegron (0.1, 0.3 and 3 mg/kg) reduced PGE2-augmented NVA in dose-dependent manner, while the PGE2-increased micro-contractions in isolated bladder strips were poorly inhibited. Isoprenaline inhibited PGE2-augmented micro-contractions in a concentration-dependent manner and had a higher potency compared to mirabegron. The apparent pKB of 7.25 for metoprolol at the isoprenaline concentration-response curve for PGE2-augmented micro-contractions suggests a β1-AR-mediated.

  14. Melatonin treatment reverts age-related changes in Guinea pig gallbladder neuromuscular transmission and contractility.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Pinilla, Pedro J; Camello-Almaraz, Cristina; Moreno, Rosario; Camello, Pedro J; Pozo, María J

    2006-11-01

    The incidence of gallbladder illness increases with age, but the altered mechanisms leading to gallbladder dysfunction are poorly understood. Here we determine the age-related alterations in gallbladder contractility and the impact of melatonin treatment. Isometric tension changes in response to electrical field stimulation and to agonists were recorded from guinea pig gallbladder muscle strips. [Ca(2+)](i) was determined by epifluorescence microscopy in fura-2 loaded isolated gallbladder smooth muscle cells, and F-actin content was quantified by confocal microscopy. Aging reduced neurogenic contractions, which was associated with the impairment of nitrergic innervation and with increased responsiveness of capsaicin-sensitive relaxant nerves, possibly involving calcitonin gene-related peptide. Melatonin treatment for 4 weeks restored neurogenic responses to normal values, with an associated recovery of nitrergic function and the disappearance of the capsaicin-sensitive component. Aging also reduced the contractile responses to cholecystokinin and Ca(2+) influx. The impaired contractility only correlated with diminished Ca(2+) mobilization in response to activation of Ca(2+) influx. Melatonin improved contractility and increased smooth muscle F-actin content without changing Ca(2+) homeostasis. In conclusion, aging impairs gallbladder function as the result of changes in the inhibitory neuromodulation of smooth muscle contractility and the reduction in the myogenic response to contractile agonists. Impaired contractility seems to be related to decreased Ca(2+) influx and damage of contractile proteins. Melatonin significantly ameliorated these age-related changes.

  15. Contractile properties of myofibrillar bundles and fusion of sarcolemma vesicles of normal and diseased skeletal muscle using UV-laser microbeam dissection and IR-optical trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veigel, Claudia; von Pfeil, Dorothea; Harim, Abdellah; Fink, Rainer H.

    1994-12-01

    Applying ultraviolet-laser microdissection enabled us to obtain very small myofibrillar preparations (e.g. 3 micrometers diameter) of normal and diseased muscle fibers which develop forces in the range of nano to micronewton too small to be measured with conventional force transducers. For the present study we built a very sensitive force transducer based on determining the force induced light beam deflection of a 50 micrometers optical fiber, connected to a 635 nm diode laser and detected by two photodiodes at two oppositely positioned 100 micrometers optical fibers to measure forces of smallest myofibrillar preparations. Also, for electrophysiological and stability studies selected vesicles of normal and myopathic fibers were trapped by the infrared-microbeam, brought into close membrane contact with other vesicles and fused by single pulses of the ultraviolet-microbeam. This approach allows for the first time to study membrane properties of normal and myopathic tissue in one preparation under the same intra and extravesicular medium conditions. These 'hybrid' vesicles should be of particular importance for studies of structural stability and electrophysiological properties or lateral mobility of ion channels, e.g. in presence or absence of the membrane-bound cytoskeleton dystrophin-glycoprotein complex which is less or not at all expressed in mdx-mice and Duchenne/Becker patients.

  16. The Modulation of Cardiac Contractile Function by the Pharmacological and Toxicological Effects of Urocortin2

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Si; Wang, Zhenhua; Xu, Bo; Mi, Xiangquan; Sun, Wanqing; Quan, Nanhu; Wang, Lin; Chen, Xingchi; Liu, Quan; Zheng, Yang; Leng, Jiyan; Li, Ji

    2015-01-01

    Urocortin2 (Ucn2) has been revealed to enhance cardiac function in heart failure. However, the pharmacological and toxicological effects of Ucn2 on cardiomyocytes are incompletely understood. In this study, we investigated the possible mechanisms of Ucn2 on mediating the contractility of cardiomyocytes. Mechanical properties and intracellular Ca2+ properties were measured in isolated cardiomyocytes from different treatment groups. The stress signaling was evaluated using Western blot. The results demonstrated that Ucn2 induced maximal velocity of shortening (+dL/dt), peak height, peak shortening (PS) amplitude, maximal velocity of relengthening (−dL/dt), accompanied by a significant rise in intracellular Ca2+ level and a fall of the mean time constant of Ca2+ transient decay (Tau) in WT cardiomyocytes. However, these effects were abolished by preincubation of type 2 CRF receptors (CRFR2) antagonist anti-sauvagine 30 (a-SVG-30). We also found that Ucn2 treatment activated the AMPK pathway in isolated cardiomyocytes via CRFR2. Furthermore, Ucn2 induced protein kinase A (PKA) and phospholamban (PLN) phosphorylation. Pretreatment of PKA inhibitor H89 reduced the inotropic and lusitropic effects of Ucn2 as well as decreased the intracellular Ca2+ load and slowed down the Ca2+ transient decay. We also showed that preincubation of Compound C, an inhibitor of AMPK, inhibited the phosphorylation of PKA and the intracellular Ca2+ level in cardiomyocytes without affecting the contractile function and the Tau of cardiomyocytes. Taken together, it suggests that Ucn2 facilitate the contractility of cardiomyocytes via activating both AMPK and PKA. PMID:26342213

  17. Implementing cell contractility in filament-based cytoskeletal models.

    PubMed

    Fallqvist, B

    2016-02-01

    Cells are known to respond over time to mechanical stimuli, even actively generating force at longer times. In this paper, a microstructural filament-based cytoskeletal network model is extended to incorporate this active response, and a computational study to assess the influence on relaxation behaviour was performed. The incorporation of an active response was achieved by including a strain energy function of contractile activity from the cross-linked actin filaments. A four-state chemical model and strain energy function was adopted, and generalisation to three dimensions and the macroscopic deformation field was performed by integration over the unit sphere. Computational results in MATLAB and ABAQUS/Explicit indicated an active cellular response over various time-scales, dependent on contractile parameters. Important features such as force generation and increasing cell stiffness due to prestress are qualitatively predicted. The work in this paper can easily be extended to encompass other filament-based cytoskeletal models as well.

  18. Cortical actin regulation modulates vascular contractility and compliance in veins

    PubMed Central

    Saphirstein, Robert J; Gao, Yuan Z; Lin, Qian Qian; Morgan, Kathleen G

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The literature on arterial mechanics is extensive, but far less is known about mechanisms controlling mechanical properties of veins. We use here a multi-scale approach to identify subcellular sources of venous stiffness. Portal vein tissue displays a severalfold decrease in passive stiffness compared to aortic tissues. The α-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine (PE) increased tissue stress and stiffness, both attenuated by cytochalasin D (CytoD) and PP2, inhibitors of actin polymerization and Src activity, respectively. We quantify, for the first time, cortical cellular stiffness in freshly isolated contractile vascular smooth muscle cells using magnetic microneedle technology. Cortical stiffness is significantly increased by PE and CytoD inhibits this increase but, surprisingly, PP2 does not. No detectable change in focal adhesion size, measured by immunofluorescence of FAK and zyxin, accompanies the PE-induced changes in cortical stiffness. Probing with phospho-specific antibodies confirmed activation of FAK/Src and ERK pathways and caldesmon phosphorylation. Thus, venous tissue stiffness is regulated both at the level of the smooth muscle cell cortex, via cortical actin polymerization, and by downstream smooth muscle effectors of Src/ERK signalling pathways. These findings identify novel potential molecular targets for the modulation of venous capacitance and venous return in health and disease. Key points Most cardiovascular research focuses on arterial mechanisms of disease, largely ignoring venous mechanisms. Here we examine ex vivo venous stiffness, spanning tissue to molecular levels, using biomechanics and magnetic microneedle technology, and show for the first time that venous stiffness is regulated by a molecular actin switch within the vascular smooth muscle cell in the wall of the vein. This switch connects the contractile apparatus within the cell to adhesion structures and facilitates stiffening of the vessel wall, regulating blood flow return

  19. The effectiveness of two novel techniques in establishing the mechanical and contractile responses of biceps femoris.

    PubMed

    Ditroilo, Massimiliano; Hunter, Angus M; Haslam, Samuel; De Vito, Giuseppe

    2011-08-01

    Portable tensiomyography (TMG) and myotonometry (MMT) devices have been developed to measure mechanical and contractile properties of skeletal muscle. The aim of this study was to explore the sensitivity of the aforementioned techniques in detecting a change in passive mechanical properties of the biceps femoris (BF) muscle as a result of change in knee joint angle (i.e. muscle length). BF responses were assessed in 16 young participants (23.4 ± 4.9 years), at three knee joint angles (0°, 45° and 90°), for maximal isometric torque (MIT) along with myo-electrical activity. Contractile and mechanical properties were measured in a relaxed state. Inter-day reliability of the TMG and MMT was also assessed. MIT changed significantly (p < 0.01) across the three angles, so did stiffness and other parameters measured with MMT (p < 0.01). Conversely, TMG could detect changes only at two knee angles (0° and 45°, p < 0.01), when there is enough tension in the muscle. Reliability was overall insufficient for TMG whilst absolute reliability was excellent (coefficient of variation < 5%) for MMT. The ability of MMT more than TMG to detect an inherent change in stiffness can be conceivably exploited in a number of clinical/therapeutic applications that have to do with unnatural changes in passive muscle stiffness.

  20. Role of L-type Ca(2+) channels, sarcoplasmic reticulum and Rho kinase in rat basilar artery contractile properties in a new model of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Egea-Guerrero, Juan José; Murillo-Cabezas, Francisco; Muñoz-Sánchez, María Ángeles; Vilches-Arenas, Angel; Porras-González, Cristina; Castellano, Antonio; Ureña, Juan; González-Montelongo, María del Carmen

    2015-09-01

    We have previously described that L-type Ca(2+) channels' (LTCCs) activation and metabotropic Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) regulate RhoA/Rho kinase (ROCK) activity and sustained arterial contraction. We have investigated whether this signaling pathway can be altered in a new experimental model of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). For this purpose, arterial reactivity was evaluated on days 1 to 5 after surgery. A significant increase of basal tone, measured 4 and 60min after normalization, was observed on day 5 after SAH and at 60min on days 2 and 3 after SAH. This phenomenon was suppressed with LTCCs and ROCK inhibitors. We have also studied arterial rings vasoreactivity in response to high K(+) solutions. Interestingly, there were no significant differences in the phasic component of the high K(+)-induced contraction between sham and SAH groups, whereas a significant increase in the sustained contraction was observed on day 5 after SAH. This latter component was sensitive to fasudil, and selectively reduced by low nifedipine concentration, and phospholipase C and SR-ATPase inhibitors. Therefore, our data suggest that the metabotropic function of LTCCs is potentiated in SAH. Our results could provide a new strategy to optimize the pharmacological treatment of this pathological process.

  1. The effects of space flight on the contractile apparatus of antigravity muscles: implications for aging and deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, K. M.; Caiozzo, V. J.; Haddad, F.; Baker, M. J.; Herrick, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the unloading of skeletal muscle, as occurring during exposure to space flight, exerts a profound effect on both the mass (cross sectional area) of skeletal muscle fibers and the relative expression of protein isoforms comprising the contractile system. Available information suggests that slow (type I) fibers, comprising chiefly the antigravity muscles of experimental animals, in addition to atrophying, undergo alterations in the type of myosin heavy chain (MHC) expressed such that faster isoforms become concomitantly expressed in a sub-population of slow fibers when insufficient force-bearing activity is maintained on the muscle. Consequently, these transformations in both mass and myosin heavy chain phenotype could exert a significant impact on the functional properties of skeletal muscle as manifest in the strength, contractile speed, and endurance scope of the muscle. To further explore these issues, a study was performed in which young adult male rats were exposed to zero gravity for six days, following which, the antigravity soleus muscle was examined for a) contractile properties, determined in situ and b) isomyosin expression, as studied using biochemical, molecular biology, and histochemical/immunohistochemical techniques.

  2. The effects of space flight on the contractile apparatus of antigravity muscles: implications for aging and deconditioning.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, K M; Caiozzo, V J; Haddad, F; Baker, M J; Herrick, R E

    1994-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that the unloading of skeletal muscle, as occurring during exposure to space flight, exerts a profound effect on both the mass (cross sectional area) of skeletal muscle fibers and the relative expression of protein isoforms comprising the contractile system. Available information suggests that slow (type I) fibers, comprising chiefly the antigravity muscles of experimental animals, in addition to atrophying, undergo alterations in the type of myosin heavy chain (MHC) expressed such that faster isoforms become concomitantly expressed in a sub-population of slow fibers when insufficient force-bearing activity is maintained on the muscle. Consequently, these transformations in both mass and myosin heavy chain phenotype could exert a significant impact on the functional properties of skeletal muscle as manifest in the strength, contractile speed, and endurance scope of the muscle. To further explore these issues, a study was performed in which young adult male rats were exposed to zero gravity for six days, following which, the antigravity soleus muscle was examined for a) contractile properties, determined in situ and b) isomyosin expression, as studied using biochemical, molecular biology, and histochemical/immunohistochemical techniques.

  3. Effect of 23-day muscle disuse on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ properties and contractility in human type I and type II skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Lamboley, C R; Wyckelsma, V L; Perry, B D; McKenna, M J; Lamb, G D

    2016-08-01

    Inactivity negatively impacts on skeletal muscle function mainly through muscle atrophy. However, recent evidence suggests that the quality of individual muscle fibers is also altered. This study examined the effects of 23 days of unilateral lower limb suspension (ULLS) on specific force and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) content in individual skinned muscle fibers. Muscle biopsies of the vastus lateralis were taken from six young healthy adults prior to and following ULLS. After disuse, the endogenous SR Ca(2+) content was ∼8% lower in type I fibers and maximal SR Ca(2+) capacity was lower in both type I and type II fibers (-11 and -5%, respectively). The specific force, measured in single skinned fibers from three subjects, decreased significantly after ULLS in type II fibers (-23%) but not in type I fibers (-9%). Western blot analyses showed no significant change in the amounts of myosin heavy chain (MHC) I and MHC IIa following the disuse, whereas the amounts of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase 1 (SERCA1) and calsequestrin increased by ∼120 and ∼20%, respectively, and the amount of troponin I decreased by ∼21%. These findings suggest that the decline in force and power occurring with muscle disuse is likely to be exacerbated in part by reductions in maximum specific force in type II fibers, and in the amount of releasable SR Ca(2+) in both fiber types, the latter not being attributable to a reduced calsequestrin level. Furthermore, the ∼3-wk disuse in human elicits change in SR properties, in particular a more than twofold upregulation in SERCA1 density, before any fiber-type shift.

  4. Cardiac-specific overexpression of metallothionein rescues nicotine-induced cardiac contractile dysfunction and interstitial fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Nan; Guo, Rui; Han, Xuefeng; Zhu, Baocheng; Ren, Jun

    2011-04-10

    Cigarette smoking is a devastating risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and nicotine is believed the main toxin component responsible for the toxic myocardial effects of smoking. Nonetheless, neither the precise mechanism of nicotine-induced cardiac dysfunction nor effective treatment is elucidated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of cardiac-specific overexpression of heavy metal scavenger metallothionein on myocardial geometry and mechanical function following nicotine exposure. Adult male friend virus B (FVB) wild-type and metallothionein mice were injected with nicotine (2 mg/kg/d) intraperitoneally for 10 days. Mechanical and intracellular Ca²+ properties were examined. Myocardial histology (cross-sectional area and fibrosis) was evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and Masson trichrome staining, respectively. Oxidative stress and apoptosis were measured by fluoroprobe 5-(6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (CM-H₂DCFDA) fluorescence and caspase-3 activity, respectively. Nicotine exposure failed to affect the protein abundance of metallothionein. Our data revealed reduced echocardiographic contractile capacity (fractional shortening), altered cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca²+ properties including depressed peak shortening amplitude, maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening, resting and electrically-stimulated rise in intracellular Ca²+, as well as prolonged duration of relengthening and intracellular Ca²+ clearance in hearts from nicotine-treated FVB mice, the effect of which was ameliorated by metallothionein. Biochemical and histological findings depicted overt accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), apoptosis and myocardial fibrosis without any change in myocardial cross-sectional area following nicotine treatment, which was mitigated by metallothionein. Taken together, our findings suggest the antioxidant metallothionein may reconcile short-term nicotine exposure

  5. Chronic Contractile Dysfunction without Hypertrophy Does Not Provoke a Compensatory Transcriptional Response in Mouse Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Grubb, David R.; McMullen, Julie R.; Woodcock, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Diseased myocardium from humans and experimental animal models shows heightened expression and activity of a specific subtype of phospholipase C (PLC), the splice variant PLCβ1b. Previous studies from our group showed that increasing PLCβ1b expression in adult mouse hearts by viral transduction was sufficient to cause sustained contractile dysfunction of rapid onset, which was maintained indefinitely in the absence of other pathological changes in the myocardium. We hypothesized that impaired contractility alone would be sufficient to induce a compensatory transcriptional response. Unbiased, comprehensive mRNA-sequencing was performed on 6 biological replicates of rAAV6-treated blank, PLCβ1b and PLCβ1a (closely related but inactive splice variant) hearts 8 weeks after injection, when reduced contractility was manifest in PLCβ1b hearts without evidence of induced hypertrophy. Expression of PLCβ1b resulted in expression changes in only 9 genes at FDR<0.1 when compared with control and these genes appeared unrelated to contractility. Importantly, PLCβ1a caused similar mild expression changes to PLCβ1b, despite a complete lack of effect of this isoform on cardiac contractility. We conclude that contractile depression caused by PLCβ1b activation is largely independent of changes in the transcriptome, and thus that lowered contractility is not sufficient in itself to provoke measurable transcriptomic alterations. In addition, our data stress the importance of a stringent control group to filter out transcriptional changes unrelated to cardiac function. PMID:27359099

  6. O-GlcNAcylation, contractile protein modifications and calcium affinity in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Cieniewski-Bernard, Caroline; Lambert, Matthias; Dupont, Erwan; Montel, Valérie; Stevens, Laurence; Bastide, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    O-GlcNAcylation, a generally undermined atypical protein glycosylation process, is involved in a dynamic and highly regulated interplay with phosphorylation. Akin to phosphorylation, O-GlcNAcylation is also involved in the physiopathology of several acquired diseases, such as muscle insulin resistance or muscle atrophy. Recent data underline that the interplay between phosphorylation and O-GlcNAcylation acts as a modulator of skeletal muscle contractile activity. In particular, the O-GlcNAcylation level of the phosphoprotein myosin light chain 2 seems to be crucial in the modulation of the calcium activation properties, and should be responsible for changes in calcium properties observed in functional atrophy. Moreover, since several key structural proteins are O-GlcNAc-modified, and because of the localization of the enzymes involved in the O-GlcNAcylation/de-O-GlcNAcylation process to the nodal Z disk, a role of O-GlcNAcylation in the modulation of the sarcomeric structure should be considered.

  7. Disordered actomyosin networks are sufficient to produce cooperative and telescopic contractility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsmeier, Ian; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Oakes, Patrick W.; Jung, Wonyeong; Kim, Taeyoon; Murrell, Michael P.

    2016-08-01

    While the molecular interactions between individual myosin motors and F-actin are well established, the relationship between F-actin organization and actomyosin forces remains poorly understood. Here we explore the accumulation of myosin-induced stresses within a two-dimensional biomimetic model of the disordered actomyosin cytoskeleton, where myosin activity is controlled spatiotemporally using light. By controlling the geometry and the duration of myosin activation, we show that contraction of disordered actin networks is highly cooperative, telescopic with the activation size, and capable of generating non-uniform patterns of mechanical stress. We quantitatively reproduce these collective biomimetic properties using an isotropic active gel model of the actomyosin cytoskeleton, and explore the physical origins of telescopic contractility in disordered networks using agent-based simulations.

  8. Disordered actomyosin networks are sufficient to produce cooperative and telescopic contractility

    PubMed Central

    Linsmeier, Ian; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Oakes, Patrick W.; Jung, Wonyeong; Kim, Taeyoon; Murrell, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    While the molecular interactions between individual myosin motors and F-actin are well established, the relationship between F-actin organization and actomyosin forces remains poorly understood. Here we explore the accumulation of myosin-induced stresses within a two-dimensional biomimetic model of the disordered actomyosin cytoskeleton, where myosin activity is controlled spatiotemporally using light. By controlling the geometry and the duration of myosin activation, we show that contraction of disordered actin networks is highly cooperative, telescopic with the activation size, and capable of generating non-uniform patterns of mechanical stress. We quantitatively reproduce these collective biomimetic properties using an isotropic active gel model of the actomyosin cytoskeleton, and explore the physical origins of telescopic contractility in disordered networks using agent-based simulations. PMID:27558758

  9. Catecholamines and myocardial contractile function during hypodynamia and with an altered thyroid hormone balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruss, G. M.; Kuznetsov, V. I.; Zhilinskaya, A. A.

    1980-01-01

    The dynamics of catecholamine content and myocardial contractile function during hypodynamia were studied in 109 white rats whose motor activity was severely restricted for up to 30 days. During the first five days myocardial catecholamine content, contractile function, and physical load tolerance decreased. Small doses of thyroidin counteracted this tendency. After 15 days, noradrenalin content and other indices approached normal levels and, after 30 days, were the same as control levels, although cardiac functional reserve was decreased. Thyroidin administration after 15 days had no noticeable effect. A detailed table shows changes in 17 indices of myocardial contractile function during hypodynamia.

  10. Recovery in skeletal muscle contractile function after prolonged hindlimb immobilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, R. H.; Brimmer, C. J.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of three-month hindlimb immobilization (IM) in rats on contractile properties of slow-twitch soleus (SOL), fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus, and fast-twitch superficial region of the vastus lateralis were measured after 0, 14, 28, 60, and 90 days of recovery on excized, horizontally suspended muscles stimulated electrically to maximal twitch tension. IM caused decreases in muscle-to-body weight ratios for all muscles, with no complete recovery even after 90 days. The contractile properties of the fast-twitch muscles were less affected by IM than those of the slow-twitch SOL. The SOL isometric twitch duration was shortened, due to reduced contraction and half-relaxation time, both of which returned to control levels after 14 days of recovery. The peak tetanic tension, P(O), g/sq cm,, decreased with IM by 46 percent in the SOL, but recovered by the 28th day. The maximum shortening velocity was not altered by IM in any of the muscles. Thus, normal contractile function could recover after prolonged limb IM.

  11. Substrate stiffness regulates cadherin-dependent collective migration through myosin-II contractility

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Mei Rosa; Besser, Achim

    2012-01-01

    The mechanical microenvironment is known to influence single-cell migration; however, the extent to which mechanical cues affect collective migration of adherent cells is not well understood. We measured the effects of varying substrate compliance on individual cell migratory properties in an epithelial wound-healing assay. Increasing substrate stiffness increased collective cell migration speed, persistence, and directionality as well as the coordination of cell movements. Dynamic analysis revealed that wounding initiated a wave of motion coordination from the wound edge into the sheet. This was accompanied by a front-to-back gradient of myosin-II activation and establishment of cell polarity. The propagation was faster and farther reaching on stiff substrates, indicating that substrate stiffness affects the transmission of directional cues. Manipulation of myosin-II activity and cadherin–catenin complexes revealed that this transmission is mediated by coupling of contractile forces between neighboring cells. Thus, our findings suggest that the mechanical environment integrates in a feedback with cell contractility and cell–cell adhesion to regulate collective migration. PMID:23091067

  12. In utero LPS exposure impairs preterm diaphragm contractility.

    PubMed

    Song, Yong; Karisnan, Kanakeswary; Noble, Peter B; Berry, Clare A; Lavin, Tina; Moss, Timothy J M; Bakker, Anthony J; Pinniger, Gavin J; Pillow, J Jane

    2013-11-01

    Preterm birth is associated with inflammation of the fetal membranes (chorioamnionitis). We aimed to establish how chorioamnionitis affects the contractile function and phenotype of the preterm diaphragm. Pregnant ewes received intra-amniotic injections of saline or 10 mg LPS, 2 days or 7 days before delivery at 121 days of gestation (term = 150 d). Diaphragm strips were dissected for the assessment of contractile function after terminal anesthesia. The inflammatory cytokine response, myosin heavy chain (MHC) fibers, proteolytic pathways, and intracellular molecular signaling were analyzed using quantitative PCR, ELISA, immunofluorescence staining, biochemical assays, and Western blotting. Diaphragm peak twitch force and maximal tetanic force were approximately 30% lower than control values in the 2-day and 7-day LPS groups. Activation of the NF-κB pathway, an inflammatory response, and increased proteasome activity were observed in the 2-day LPS group relative to the control or 7-day LPS group. No inflammatory response was evident after a 7-day LPS exposure. Seven-day LPS exposure markedly decreased p70S6K phosphorylation, but no effect on other signaling pathways was evident. The proportion of MHC IIa fibers was lower than that for control samples in the 7-day LPS group. MHC I fiber proportions did not differ between groups. These results demonstrate that intrauterine LPS impairs preterm diaphragmatic contractility after 2-day and 7-day exposures. Diaphragm dysfunction, resulting from 2-day LPS exposure, was associated with a transient activation of proinflammatory signaling, with subsequent increased atrophic gene expression and enhanced proteasome activity. Persistently impaired contractility for the 7-day LPS exposure was associated with the down-regulation of a key component of the protein synthetic signaling pathway and a reduction in the proportions of MHC IIa fibers.

  13. Effect of hypokinesia on contractile function of cardiac muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyerson, F. Z.; Kapelko, V. I.; Trikhpoyeva, A. M.; Gorina, M. S.

    1980-01-01

    Rats were subjected to hypokinesia for two months and the contractile function of isolated papillary muscle was studied. Hypokinesia reduced significantly the isotonic contraction rate which depended on the ATPase activity of the myofibrils; it also reduced the rate and index of relaxation which depended on the functional capacity of the Ca(++) pump of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The maximum force of isometric contraction determined by the quantity of actomyosin bridges in the myofibrils did not change after hypokinesia. This complex of changes is contrary to that observed in adaptation to exercise when the rate of isotonic contraction and relaxation increases while the force of isometric contraction does not change. The possible mechanism of this stability of the contractile force during adaptation and readaptation of the heart is discussed.

  14. Na+-K+ pump regulation and skeletal muscle contractility.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Torben

    2003-10-01

    In skeletal muscle, excitation may cause loss of K+, increased extracellular K+ ([K+]o), intracellular Na+ ([Na+]i), and depolarization. Since these events interfere with excitability, the processes of excitation can be self-limiting. During work, therefore, the impending loss of excitability has to be counterbalanced by prompt restoration of Na+-K+ gradients. Since this is the major function of the Na+-K+ pumps, it is crucial that their activity and capacity are adequate. This is achieved in two ways: 1) by acute activation of the Na+-K+ pumps and 2) by long-term regulation of Na+-K+ pump content or capacity. 1) Depending on frequency of stimulation, excitation may activate up to all of the Na+-K+ pumps available within 10 s, causing up to 22-fold increase in Na+ efflux. Activation of the Na+-K+ pumps by hormones is slower and less pronounced. When muscles are inhibited by high [K+]o or low [Na+]o, acute hormone- or excitation-induced activation of the Na+-K+ pumps can restore excitability and contractile force in 10-20 min. Conversely, inhibition of the Na+-K+ pumps by ouabain leads to progressive loss of contractility and endurance. 2) Na+-K+ pump content is upregulated by training, thyroid hormones, insulin, glucocorticoids, and K+ overload. Downregulation is seen during immobilization, K+ deficiency, hypoxia, heart failure, hypothyroidism, starvation, diabetes, alcoholism, myotonic dystrophy, and McArdle disease. Reduced Na+-K+ pump content leads to loss of contractility and endurance, possibly contributing to the fatigue associated with several of these conditions. Increasing excitation-induced Na+ influx by augmenting the open-time or the content of Na+ channels reduces contractile endurance. Excitability and contractility depend on the ratio between passive Na+-K+ leaks and Na+-K+ pump activity, the passive leaks often playing a dominant role. The Na+-K+ pump is a central target for regulation of Na+-K+ distribution and excitability, essential for second

  15. Effects of protamine sulphate on spontaneous and calcium-induced contractile activity in the rat uterus are potassium channels-mediated.

    PubMed

    Orescanin-Dusić, Zorana; Milovanović, Slobodan; Radojicić, Ratko; Nikolić-Kokić, Aleksandra; Appiah, Isabella; Slavić, Marija; Cutura, Nedo; Trbojević, Stevan; Spasić, Mihajlo; Blagojević, Dusko

    2009-01-01

    Protamine sulphate (PS) effect on spontaneous and calcium-induced rhythmic contractions of isolated virgin rat uteri was studied. PS caused dose-dependent relaxation of both types of contractions (two-way ANOVA, significant dose effects). Pretreatment with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 10(-5) mol/l), methylene blue (MB; 0.9 x 10(-6) mol/l) or propranolol (1.7 x 10(-5) mol/l) enhanced PS-mediated uterine muscle relaxation of spontaneous contractions. Dosedependent relaxation of spontaneous active isolated rat uterus with PS was lower in uteri pretreated with single dose of tetraethylammonium (TEA; 6 x 10(-3) mol/l), glibenclamide (2 x 10(-6) mol/l) and 4-aminopyridine (4-AP; 10(-3) mol/l). Calcium-induced activity of the isolated rat uterus pretreated with the same concentration of L-NAME, MB, or propranolol modified the kinetic of PS-induced relaxation without changes in EC(50) values. Pre-treatment with glibenclamide, TEA and 4-AP significantly reduce PS relaxing effect of calcium-induced activity and according to EC(50) values the order of magnitude was glibenclamide > TEA > 4-AP. PS is mixture of polyamines and may activate different signal-transduction pathways. Our results cleary demonstrate that in uterine smooth muscle PS act dominantly through potassium chanels and marginaly through beta-adrenergic receptos or nitric oxide-dependent pathways.

  16. Effect of hydrogen peroxide on contractility and citrate synthase activity of the rabbit urinary bladder in the presence and absence of resveratrol and a whole-grape suspension.

    PubMed

    Francis, Johdi-Ann; Leggett, Robert E; Schuler, Catherine; Levin, Robert M

    2014-06-01

    One etiology related directly to obstructive urinary bladder dysfunction is ischemia/reperfusion resulting in significant oxidative stress to the bladder. Grapes, a natural source of antioxidants, have been proven effective in preventing obstructive and ischemic bladder dysfunction. Many investigators believe that resveratrol is the primary active antioxidant ingredient in grapes. We compared the ability of a whole-grape suspension with pure resveratrol in their ability to protect the bladder from in vitro oxidative stress mediated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Four male rabbit bladders were used. Two strips from each bladder were incubated in the presence of 1 mg/mL grape suspension for 30 min, another two strips were incubated in the presence of 1 mg/mL resveratrol solution, and the last two strips were incubated in the presence of 1 mg/mL sucrose/and fructose as controls. The rest of the bladder was separated into muscle and mucosa, frozen and stored for biochemical evaluation. (1) Chemically, resveratrol has about 20 times the antioxidant capacity of the grape suspension. (2) The grape suspension had significant protective effects when the rate of tension was quantitated at all concentrations of H2O2, while the resveratrol had no effect. (3) Citrate synthase activities of the muscle and mucosa were significantly protected by the grape suspension but not by resveratrol. These data demonstrate that the grape suspension protects the mitochondria to a significantly greater degree than resveratrol, which suggests that the antioxidant activities are due to the combination of active components found in the grape suspension and not just resveratrol.

  17. Activated T cell trans-endothelial migration relies on myosin-IIA contractility for squeezing the cell nucleus through endothelial cell barriers.

    PubMed

    Jacobelli, Jordan; Estin Matthews, Miriam; Chen, Stephanie; Krummel, Matthew F

    2013-01-01

    Following activation, T cells are released from lymph nodes to traffic via the blood to effector sites. The re-entry of these activated T cells into tissues represents a critical step for them to carry out local effector functions. Here we have assessed defects in effector T cells that are acutely depleted in Myosin-IIA (MyoIIA) and show a T cell intrinsic requirement for this motor to facilitate the diapedesis step of extravasation. We show that MyoIIA accumulates at the rear of T cells undergoing trans-endothelial migration. T cells can extend protrusions and project a substantial portion of their cytoplasm through the endothelial wall in the absence of MyoIIA. However, this motor protein plays a crucial role in allowing T cells to complete the movement of their relatively rigid nucleus through the endothelial junctions. In vivo, this defect manifests as poor entry into lymph nodes, tumors and into the spinal cord, during tissue-specific autoimmunity, but not the spleen. This suggests that therapeutic targeting of this molecule may allow for differential attenuation of tissue-specific inflammatory responses.

  18. Considerations for Contractile Electroactive Materials and Actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, Lenore; Erickson, Carl J.; Meixler, Lewis D.; Ascione, George; Gentile, Charles A.; Tilson, Carl; Bernasek, Stephen L.; Abelev, Esta

    2010-02-19

    Ras Labs produces electroactive polymer (EAP) based materials and actuators that bend, swell, ripple and now contract (new development) with low electric input. This is an important attribute because of the ability of contraction to produce life-like motion. The mechanism of contraction is not well understood. Radionuclide-labeled experiments were conducted to follow the movement of electrolytes and water in these EAPs when activated. Extreme temperature experiments were performed on the contractile EAPs with very favorable results. One of the biggest challenges in developing these actuators, however, is the electrode-EAP interface because of the pronounced movement of the EAP. Plasma treatments of metallic electrodes were investigated in order to improve the attachment of the embedded electrodes to the EAP material. Surface analysis, adhesive testing, and mechanical testing were conducted to test metal surfaces and metal-polymer interfaces. The nitrogen plasma treatment of titanium produced a strong metal-polymer interface; however, oxygen plasma treatment of both stainless steel and titanium produced even stronger metal-polymer interfaces. Plasma treatment of the electrodes allows for the embedded electrodes and the EAP material of the actuator to work and move as a unit, with no detachment, by significantly improving the metal-polymer interface.

  19. Dimethyl sulphoxide enhances the effects of P(i) in myofibrils and inhibits the activity of rabbit skeletal muscle contractile proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Mariano, A C; Alexandre, G M; Silva, L C; Romeiro, A; Cameron, L C; Chen, Y; Chase, P B; Sorenson, M M

    2001-01-01

    In the catalytic cycle of skeletal muscle, myosin alternates between strongly and weakly bound cross-bridges, with the latter contributing little to sustained tension. Here we describe the action of DMSO, an organic solvent that appears to increase the population of weakly bound cross-bridges that accumulate after the binding of ATP, but before P(i) release. DMSO (5-30%, v/v) reversibly inhibits tension and ATP hydrolysis in vertebrate skeletal muscle myofibrils, and decreases the speed of unregulated F-actin in an in vitro motility assay with heavy meromyosin. In solution, controls for enzyme activity and intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of myosin subfragment 1 (S1) in the presence of different cations indicate that structural changes attributable to DMSO are small and reversible, and do not involve unfolding. Since DMSO depresses S1 and acto-S1 MgATPase activities in the same proportions, without altering acto-S1 affinity, the principal DMSO target apparently lies within the catalytic cycle rather than with actin-myosin binding. Inhibition by DMSO in myofibrils is the same in the presence or the absence of Ca(2+) and regulatory proteins, in contrast with the effects of ethylene glycol, and the Ca(2+) sensitivity of isometric tension is slightly decreased by DMSO. The apparent affinity for P(i) is enhanced markedly by DMSO (and to a lesser extent by ethylene glycol) in skinned fibres, suggesting that DMSO stabilizes cross-bridges that have ADP.P(i) or ATP bound to them. PMID:11535124

  20. The transport properties of activated carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    di Vittorio, S.L. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Dresselhaus, M.S. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA . Dept. of Physics); Endo, M. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

    1990-07-01

    The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  1. The Transport Properties of Activated Carbon Fibers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    di Vittorio, S. L.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Endo, M.; Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

    1990-07-01

    The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons.

  2. [Effects of chronic nicotine exposure on electrogenic activity of the Na+, K(+)-ATPase and contractility in the rat diaphragm muscle].

    PubMed

    Vasil'ev, A N; Kravtsova, V V; Krivoĭ, I I

    2011-11-01

    Rats were chronically treated with nicotine via subcutaneous injections up to a dose 6 mg/kg/day during 2-3 weeks. After this period, resting membrane potential and action potentials of muscle fibres as well as isometric twitch and tetanic (20 s(-1) and 50(-1)) contractions of isolated rat diaphragm were studied. To estimate electrogenic contribution of the alpha2 isoform of the Na+, K(+)-ATPase ouabain in concentration 1 microM was used. Chronic nicotine exposure induced depolarization of resting membrane potential of 2.2 +/- 0.6 mV (p < 0.01). In rats chronically exposed to nicotine, electrogenic contribution of the Na+, K(+)-ATPase alpha2 isoform was twofold lesser than in control animals (3.7 +/- 0.6 mV and 6.4 +/- 0.6 mV, respectively, p < 0.01). Chronic nicotine exposure did not affect force of twitch and tetanic contractions in response to direct or indirect stimulation. A decrease in the twitch contraction time as well as in the rise time of tetanic contractions was observed. Fatigue dynamics was unchanged. The results suggest that chronic nicotine exposure leads to decrease of the Na+, K(+)-ATPase alpha2 isoform electrogenic activity, and as a consequence to damage of the rat diaphragm muscle electogenesis.

  3. Contractile and extensile effects of red and white wine on rat and Mongolian gerbil gastrointestinal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Shimamura, Hideo; Hirota, Mikako; Miyazawa, Mitsuo; Kinjo, Noriko; Mineshita, Satoru

    2010-01-01

    The contractile and extensile effects of red and white wine on rat and Mongolian gerbil (gerbil) gastrointestinal smooth muscle were investigated. Both wines elicited contractile responses on rat and gerbil duodenum and ileum but had no such effects on the colon or rectum. Dichloromethane extracts derived from either wine showed extensile responses only on rat duodenum and ileum, and did not elicit extensile effects on the colon or rectum. In contrast, wine dichloromethane extracts did not elicit any extensile effects on either gerbil duodenum or ileum. Moreover, dichloromethane extracts had suppressive effects on acetylcholine-induced contractile responses. Red and white wine has been documented to contain a number of organic acids such as tartaric, malic, lactic, and citric acid. Individually, such compounds evoked contractile response on rat duodenum with an order of contractile potency; citric > tartaric >or= malic > lactic acid. The abundance of such compounds in either wine implicates them as the active component responsible for gastrointestinal smooth muscle responses.

  4. Requirements for contractility in disordered cytoskeletal bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Martin; Gardel, Margaret L.; Dinner, Aaron R.

    2012-03-01

    Actomyosin contractility is essential for biological force generation, and is well understood in highly organized structures such as striated muscle. Additionally, actomyosin bundles devoid of this organization are known to contract both in vivo and in vitro, which cannot be described by standard muscle models. To narrow down the search for possible contraction mechanisms in these systems, we investigate their microscopic symmetries. We show that contractile behavior requires non-identical motors that generate large-enough forces to probe the nonlinear elastic behavior of F-actin. This suggests a role for filament buckling in the contraction of these bundles, consistent with recent experimental results on reconstituted actomyosin bundles.

  5. Regulation of the uterine contractile apparatus and cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Kathleen G

    2007-01-01

    Parturition at term, the end stage of a successful pregnancy occurs as a result of powerful, co-ordinated and periodic contractions of uterine smooth muscle (myometrium). To occur in a propitious manner, a high degree of control over the activation of a myometrial cell is required. We review the molecular mechanisms and structural composition of myometrial cells that may contribute to their increased contractile capacity at term. We focus attention on pathways that lead to the activation of filamentous networks traditionally labeled ‘contractile’ or ‘cytoskeletal’ yet draw attention to the fact that functional discrimination between these systems is not absolute. PMID:17582796

  6. Honey: its medicinal property and antibacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Manisha Deb; Mandal, Shyamapada

    2011-01-01

    Indeed, medicinal importance of honey has been documented in the world's oldest medical literatures, and since the ancient times, it has been known to possess antimicrobial property as well as wound-healing activity. The healing property of honey is due to the fact that it offers antibacterial activity, maintains a moist wound condition, and its high viscosity helps to provide a protective barrier to prevent infection. Its immunomodulatory property is relevant to wound repair too. The antimicrobial activity in most honeys is due to the enzymatic production of hydrogen peroxide. However, another kind of honey, called non-peroxide honey (viz., manuka honey), displays significant antibacterial effects even when the hydrogen peroxide activity is blocked. Its mechanism may be related to the low pH level of honey and its high sugar content (high osmolarity) that is enough to hinder the growth of microbes. The medical grade honeys have potent in vitro bactericidal activity against antibiotic-resistant bacteria causing several life-threatening infections to humans. But, there is a large variation in the antimicrobial activity of some natural honeys, which is due to spatial and temporal variation in sources of nectar. Thus, identification and characterization of the active principle(s) may provide valuable information on the quality and possible therapeutic potential of honeys (against several health disorders of humans), and hence we discussed the medicinal property of honeys with emphasis on their antibacterial activities. PMID:23569748

  7. Honey: its medicinal property and antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Manisha Deb; Mandal, Shyamapada

    2011-04-01

    Indeed, medicinal importance of honey has been documented in the world's oldest medical literatures, and since the ancient times, it has been known to possess antimicrobial property as well as wound-healing activity. The healing property of honey is due to the fact that it offers antibacterial activity, maintains a moist wound condition, and its high viscosity helps to provide a protective barrier to prevent infection. Its immunomodulatory property is relevant to wound repair too. The antimicrobial activity in most honeys is due to the enzymatic production of hydrogen peroxide. However, another kind of honey, called non-peroxide honey (viz., manuka honey), displays significant antibacterial effects even when the hydrogen peroxide activity is blocked. Its mechanism may be related to the low pH level of honey and its high sugar content (high osmolarity) that is enough to hinder the growth of microbes. The medical grade honeys have potent in vitro bactericidal activity against antibiotic-resistant bacteria causing several life-threatening infections to humans. But, there is a large variation in the antimicrobial activity of some natural honeys, which is due to spatial and temporal variation in sources of nectar. Thus, identification and characterization of the active principle(s) may provide valuable information on the quality and possible therapeutic potential of honeys (against several health disorders of humans), and hence we discussed the medicinal property of honeys with emphasis on their antibacterial activities.

  8. Contractility of sphincter pharyngoplasty: Relevance to speech outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Bradley A; Rice, Gale; Muzaffar, Arshad R

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sphincter pharyngoplasty has demonstrated time-tested results as a surgical treatment for velopharyngeal incompetence (VPI). However, controversy surrounding the contractility of the transposed muscles persists. Completely unaddressed in the literature is whether the dynamism of the sphincter affects speech outcomes. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether active sphincter contraction following sphincter pharyngoplasty influences velopharyngeal closure, nasal emission and hypernasality. METHODS: A prospective analysis of patients with VPI after cleft palate repair undergoing sphincter pharyngoplasty by a single surgeon was performed. Video nasendoscopy and videofluoroscopy were performed preoperatively and postoperatively at three and 12 months. Eighteen consecutive patients with cleft palate with or without cleft lip and VPI were reviewed. The average age of the patients at initial evaluation was 7.3 years, with a range of three to 19 years. Dynamicity of sphincter pharyngoplasty, velar closing ratio (VCR), and lateral wall movement (LWM) were assessed by nasendoscopy and videofluoroscopy. Nasal emission and hypernasality were assessed by perceptual speech examination. RESULTS: For longitudinal comparison, three groups were created: dynamic at three and 12 months (n=12); adynamic at three months and dynamic at 12 months (n=4); and adynamic at three and 12 months (n=2). Perceived hypernasality scores significantly improved at three months (P=0.0001) and showed continued improvement at 12 months (P=0.03), despite no change in VCR and LWM from three to 12 months. There were no significant differences among the three groups at any time point. DISCUSSION: Sphincter pharyngoplasty effectively treats VPI in appropriately selected patients. Although the VCR and LWM remained stable between three months and one year, four of six adynamic sphincters became dynamic. Considering all patients, hypernasality showed continued improvement from three months to one year

  9. Parvalbumin gene transfer impairs skeletal muscle contractility in old mice.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kate T; Ham, Daniel J; Church, Jarrod E; Naim, Timur; Trieu, Jennifer; Williams, David A; Lynch, Gordon S

    2012-08-01

    Sarcopenia is the progressive age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass associated with functional impairments that reduce mobility and quality of life. Overt muscle wasting with sarcopenia is usually preceded by a slowing of the rate of relaxation and a reduction in maximum force production. Parvalbumin (PV) is a cytosolic Ca(2+) buffer thought to facilitate relaxation in muscle. We tested the hypothesis that restoration of PV levels in muscles of old mice would increase the magnitude and hasten relaxation of submaximal and maximal force responses. The tibialis anterior (TA) muscles of young (6 month), adult (13 month), and old (26 month) C57BL/6 mice received electroporation-assisted gene transfer of plasmid encoding PV or empty plasmid (pcDNA3.1). Contractile properties of TA muscles were assessed in situ 14 days after transfer. In old mice, muscles with increased PV expression had a 40% slower rate of tetanic force development (p<0.01), and maximum twitch and tetanic force were 22% and 16% lower than control values, respectively (p<0.05). Muscles with increased PV expression from old mice had an 18% lower maximum specific (normalized) force than controls, and absolute force was `26% lower at higher stimulation frequencies (150-300 Hz, p<0.05). In contrast, there was no effect of increased PV expression on TA muscle contractile properties in young and adult mice. The impairments in skeletal muscle function in old mice argue against PV overexpression as a therapeutic strategy for ameliorating aspects of contractile dysfunction with sarcopenia and help clarify directions for therapeutic interventions for age-related changes in skeletal muscle structure and function.

  10. Cellular contractility changes are sufficient to drive epithelial scattering.

    PubMed

    Hoj, Jacob P; Davis, John A; Fullmer, Kendra E; Morrell, David J; Saguibo, Nicholas E; Schuler, Jeffrey T; Tuttle, Kevin J; Hansen, Marc D H

    2014-08-15

    Epithelial scattering occurs when cells disassemble cell-cell junctions, allowing individual epithelial cells to act in a solitary manner. Epithelial scattering occurs frequently in development, where it accompanies epithelial-mesenchymal transitions and is required for individual cells to migrate and invade. While migration and invasion have received extensive research focus, how cell-cell junctions are detached remains poorly understood. An open debate has been whether disruption of cell-cell interactions occurs by remodeling of cell-cell adhesions, increased traction forces through cell substrate adhesions, or some combination of both processes. Here we seek to examine how changes in adhesion and contractility are coupled to drive detachment of individual epithelial cells during hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/scatter factor-induced EMT. We find that HGF signaling does not alter the strength of cell-cell adhesion between cells in suspension, suggesting that changes in cell-cell adhesion strength might not accompany epithelial scattering. Instead, cell-substrate adhesion seems to play a bigger role, as cell-substrate adhesions are stronger in cells treated with HGF and since rapid scattering in cells treated with HGF and TGFβ is associated with a dramatic increase in focal adhesions. Increases in the pliability of the substratum, reducing cells ability to generate traction on the substrate, alter cells׳ ability to scatter. Further consistent with changes in substrate adhesion being required for cell-cell detachment during EMT, scattering is impaired in cells expressing both active and inactive RhoA mutants, though in different ways. In addition to its roles in driving assembly of both stress fibers and focal adhesions, RhoA also generates myosin-based contractility in cells. We therefore sought to examine how RhoA-dependent contractility contributes to cell-cell detachment. Inhibition of Rho kinase or myosin II induces the same effect on cells, namely an

  11. Smooth muscle adaptation and recovery of contractility after massive small bowel resection in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Wen, Jie; Cai, Wei

    2012-05-01

    Previous studies have suggested that massive small bowel resection (mSBR) compromises the normal intestinal processes of digestion and absorption, and requires an adaptive response to regain full function and reinstate coordinated contractile activity of the circular smooth muscle. This study was designed to investigate spontaneous contractile activity of circular smooth muscle using the mSBR rat model and to determine the functional role of M(2) and M(3) muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) in this process. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent an 80% proximal SBR or sham operation. Markers of adaptation, including villus and microvillus height, were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining and transmission electron microscopy. Contractility was measured by attaching the distal ileum strips to strain gauge transducers and exposing the tissue to varying doses of the cholinergic agonist carbachol. Protein expressions of M(2)- and M(3)-mAChR in intestinal smooth muscle (ISM) were detected by Western blot. Following mSBR, the ISM showed perturbed spontaneous rhythmic contraction, irregular amplitude and slow frequency by muscle strip test. However, by two weeks after mSBR, the contractile function of circular smooth muscle was found to have returned to normal levels. Protein expression of M(2)-mAChR was down-regulated following mSBR but up-regulated during the adaptive process when contractile activity of circular smooth muscle was regained. These results indicate that smooth muscle contractility was spontaneously restored in rats following mSBR, and involved the acetylcholine receptors M(2) and M(3). Thus, the disrupted contractile response of smooth muscle in short bowel syndrome may be corrected by therapeutic intervention to restore the expressions of M(2)- and M(3)-mAChR to pre-mSBR levels.

  12. Architecture and Connectivity Govern Actin Network Contractility.

    PubMed

    Ennomani, Hajer; Letort, Gaëlle; Guérin, Christophe; Martiel, Jean-Louis; Cao, Wenxiang; Nédélec, François; De La Cruz, Enrique M; Théry, Manuel; Blanchoin, Laurent

    2016-03-07

    Actomyosin contractility plays a central role in a wide range of cellular processes, including the establishment of cell polarity, cell migration, tissue integrity, and morphogenesis during development. The contractile response is variable and depends on actomyosin network architecture and biochemical composition. To determine how this coupling regulates actomyosin-driven contraction, we used a micropatterning method that enables the spatial control of actin assembly. We generated a variety of actin templates and measured how defined actin structures respond to myosin-induced forces. We found that the same actin filament crosslinkers either enhance or inhibit the contractility of a network, depending on the organization of actin within the network. Numerical simulations unified the roles of actin filament branching and crosslinking during actomyosin contraction. Specifically, we introduce the concept of "network connectivity" and show that the contractions of distinct actin architectures are described by the same master curve when considering their degree of connectivity. This makes it possible to predict the dynamic response of defined actin structures to transient changes in connectivity. We propose that, depending on the connectivity and the architecture, network contraction is dominated by either sarcomeric-like or buckling mechanisms. More generally, this study reveals how actin network contractility depends on its architecture under a defined set of biochemical conditions.

  13. The contractile state of rabbit papillary muscle in relation to stimulation frequency.

    PubMed Central

    Edman, K A; Jóhannsson, M

    1976-01-01

    1. The relationship between active force and stimulation frequency (0-25-5/sec) was studied at 36-37 degrees C in isolated papillary muscles of the rabbit. 2. The muscle's force producing capability at a given frequency was determined as the isometric twitch response to a test stimulus that was applied at various times after a priming period. The optimum contractile response was obtained at an interval of 0-8 sec between the test pulse and the last stimulus of the priming period. 3. The optimum contractile response exceeded the steady-state twitch amplitude at all stimulation frequencies higher than 1/sec. While the steady-state twitch resonse declined at frequencies higher than 4/sec, the optimum contractile response was steadily increased as the stimulation frequency was raised. 4. The optimum contractile response was also determined after priming the muscle with a sinusoidal a.c. pulse (field strength, 10 V (r.m.s.)/cm; frequency, 20 c/s; duration, 2-5 sec). The optimum contractile response obtained after a.c. stimulation was 2-2 times greater than the maximal steady-state response. Its absolute value was 67-3+/-6-1 mN/mm2 (mean +/-S.E. of mean, n = 6). 5. The twitch potentiation produced by priming the muscle at a given frequency decayed exponentially in two phases after optimum contractile response had been attained. The time constants of the two phases, determined after a.c. stimulation, were 2-6+/-0-8 (n = 4) and 92-0+/-13-3 sec (n = 7), respectively. 6. The optimum contractile response determined at various stimulation frequencies was linearly related to the fraction of time during which the cell membrane was depolarized (beyond -40 mV) by the action potentials. 7. The results are interpreted in terms of a two-component model of the metabolism of activator calcium in the excitation-contraction coupling. PMID:1255501

  14. Cholesterol Depletion Alters Cardiomyocyte Subcellular Signaling and Increases Contractility

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Victoria J.; Abou Samra, Abdul B.; Mohammad, Ramzi M.; Lasley, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane cholesterol levels play an important factor in regulating cell function. Sarcolemmal cholesterol is concentrated in lipid rafts and caveolae, which are flask-shaped invaginations of the plasma membrane. The scaffolding protein caveolin permits the enrichment of cholesterol in caveolae, and caveolin interactions with numerous proteins regulate their function. The purpose of this study was to determine whether acute reductions in cardiomyocyte cholesterol levels alter subcellular protein kinase activation, intracellular Ca2+ and contractility. Methods: Ventricular myocytes, isolated from adult Sprague Dawley rats, were treated with the cholesterol reducing agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD, 5 mM, 1 hr, room temperature). Total cellular cholesterol levels, caveolin-3 localization, subcellular, ERK and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, contractility, and [Ca2+]i were assessed. Results: Treatment with MβCD reduced cholesterol levels by ~45 and shifted caveolin-3 from cytoskeleton and triton-insoluble fractions to the triton-soluble fraction, and increased ERK isoform phosphorylation in cytoskeletal, cytosolic, triton-soluble and triton-insoluble membrane fractions without altering their subcellular distributions. In contrast the primary effect of MβCD was on p38 subcellular distribution of p38α with little effect on p38 phosphorylation. Cholesterol depletion increased cardiomyocyte twitch amplitude and the rates of shortening and relaxation in conjunction with increased diastolic and systolic [Ca2+]i. Conclusions: These results indicate that acute reductions in membrane cholesterol levels differentially modulate basal cardiomyocyte subcellular MAPK signaling, as well as increasing [Ca2+]i and contractility. PMID:27441649

  15. The contractile process in the ciliate, Stentor coeruleus. I. The role of microtubules and filaments.

    PubMed

    Huang, B; Pitelka, D R

    1973-06-01

    The structural basis for the function of microtubules and filaments in cell body contractility in the ciliate Stentor coeruleus was investigated. Cells in the extended state were obtained for ultrastructural analysis by treatment before fixation with a solution containing 10 mM EGTA, 50-80 mM Tris, 3 mM MgSO(4), 7.5 mM NH(4)Cl, 10 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7.1). The response of Stentor to changes in the divalent cation concentrations in this solution suggests that Ca(+2) and Mg(+2) are physiologically important in the regulation of ciliate contractility. The generation of motive force for changes in cell length in Stentor resides in two distinct longitudinal cortical fiber systems, the km fibers and myonemes. Cyclic changes in cell length are associated with (a) the relative sliding of parallel, overlapping microtubule ribbons in the km fibers, and (b) a distinct alteration in the structure of the contractile filaments constituting the myonemes. The microtubule and filament systems are distinguished functionally as antagonistic contractile elements. The development of motive force for cell extension is accomplished by active microtubule-to-microtubule sliding generated by specific intertubule bridges. Evidence is presented which suggests that active shortening of contractile filaments, reflected in a reversible structural transformation of dense 4-nm filaments to tubular 10-12-nm filaments, provides the basis for rapid cell contraction.

  16. Spontaneous actin dynamics in contractile rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, Karsten; Wollrab, Viktoria; Thiagarajan, Raghavan; Wald, Anne; Riveline, Daniel

    Networks of polymerizing actin filaments are known to be capable to self-organize into a variety of structures. For example, spontaneous actin polymerization waves have been observed in living cells in a number of circumstances, notably, in crawling neutrophils and slime molds. During later stages of cell division, they can also spontaneously form a contractile ring that will eventually cleave the cell into two daughter cells. We present a framework for describing networks of polymerizing actin filaments, where assembly is regulated by various proteins. It can also include the effects of molecular motors. We show that the molecular processes driven by these proteins can generate various structures that have been observed in contractile rings of fission yeast and mammalian cells. We discuss a possible functional role of each of these patterns. The work was supported by Agence Nationale de la Recherche, France, (ANR-10-LABX-0030-INRT) and by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft through SFB1027.

  17. Loss of cortactin causes endothelial barrier dysfunction via disturbed adrenomedullin secretion and actomyosin contractility.

    PubMed

    García Ponce, Alexander; Citalán Madrid, Alí F; Vargas Robles, Hilda; Chánez Paredes, Sandra; Nava, Porfirio; Betanzos, Abigail; Zarbock, Alexander; Rottner, Klemens; Vestweber, Dietmar; Schnoor, Michael

    2016-06-30

    Changes in vascular permeability occur during inflammation and the actin cytoskeleton plays a crucial role in regulating endothelial cell contacts and permeability. We demonstrated recently that the actin-binding protein cortactin regulates vascular permeability via Rap1. However, it is unknown if the actin cytoskeleton contributes to increased vascular permeability without cortactin. As we consistently observed more actin fibres in cortactin-depleted endothelial cells, we hypothesised that cortactin depletion results in increased stress fibre contractility and endothelial barrier destabilisation. Analysing the contractile machinery, we found increased ROCK1 protein levels in cortactin-depleted endothelium. Concomitantly, myosin light chain phosphorylation was increased while cofilin, mDia and ERM were unaffected. Secretion of the barrier-stabilising hormone adrenomedullin, which activates Rap1 and counteracts actomyosin contractility, was reduced in plasma from cortactin-deficient mice and in supernatants of cortactin-depleted endothelium. Importantly, adrenomedullin administration and ROCK1 inhibition reduced actomyosin contractility and rescued the effect on permeability provoked by cortactin deficiency in vitro and in vivo. Our data suggest a new role for cortactin in controlling actomyosin contractility with consequences for endothelial barrier integrity.

  18. Loss of cortactin causes endothelial barrier dysfunction via disturbed adrenomedullin secretion and actomyosin contractility

    PubMed Central

    García Ponce, Alexander; Citalán Madrid, Alí F.; Vargas Robles, Hilda; Chánez Paredes, Sandra; Nava, Porfirio; Betanzos, Abigail; Zarbock, Alexander; Rottner, Klemens; Vestweber, Dietmar; Schnoor, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Changes in vascular permeability occur during inflammation and the actin cytoskeleton plays a crucial role in regulating endothelial cell contacts and permeability. We demonstrated recently that the actin-binding protein cortactin regulates vascular permeability via Rap1. However, it is unknown if the actin cytoskeleton contributes to increased vascular permeability without cortactin. As we consistently observed more actin fibres in cortactin-depleted endothelial cells, we hypothesised that cortactin depletion results in increased stress fibre contractility and endothelial barrier destabilisation. Analysing the contractile machinery, we found increased ROCK1 protein levels in cortactin-depleted endothelium. Concomitantly, myosin light chain phosphorylation was increased while cofilin, mDia and ERM were unaffected. Secretion of the barrier-stabilising hormone adrenomedullin, which activates Rap1 and counteracts actomyosin contractility, was reduced in plasma from cortactin-deficient mice and in supernatants of cortactin-depleted endothelium. Importantly, adrenomedullin administration and ROCK1 inhibition reduced actomyosin contractility and rescued the effect on permeability provoked by cortactin deficiency in vitro and in vivo. Our data suggest a new role for cortactin in controlling actomyosin contractility with consequences for endothelial barrier integrity. PMID:27357373

  19. Sphingolipid Metabolism, Oxidant Signaling, and Contractile Function of Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Nikolova-Karakashian, Mariana N.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Significance Sphingolipids are a class of bioactive lipids that regulate diverse cell functions. Ceramide, sphingosine, and sphingosine-1-phosphate accumulate in tissues such as liver, brain, and lung under conditions of cellular stress, including oxidative stress. The activity of some sphingolipid metabolizing enzymes, chiefly the sphingomyelinases, is stimulated during inflammation and in response to oxidative stress. Ceramide, the sphingomyelinase product, as well as the ceramide metabolite, sphingosine-1-phosphate, can induce the generation of more reactive oxygen species, propagating further inflammation. Recent Advances This review article summarizes information on sphingolipid biochemistry and signaling pertinent to skeletal muscle and describes the potential influence of sphingolipids on contractile function. Critical Issues It encompasses topics related to (1) the pathways for complex sphingolipid biosynthesis and degradation, emphasizing sphingolipid regulation in various muscle fiber types and subcellular compartments; (2) the emerging evidence that implicates ceramide, sphingosine, and sphingosine-1-phosphate as regulators of muscle oxidant activity, and (3) sphingolipid effects on contractile function and fatigue. Future Directions We propose that prolonged inflammatory conditions alter ceramide, sphingosine, and sphingosine-1-phosphate levels in skeletal muscle and that these changes promote the weakness, premature fatigue, and cachexia that plague individuals with heart failure, cancer, diabetes, and other chronic inflammatory diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 2501–2517. PMID:21453197

  20. Contractile apparatus dysfunction early in the pathophysiology of diabetic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Waddingham, Mark T; Edgley, Amanda J; Tsuchimochi, Hirotsugu; Kelly, Darren J; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Pearson, James T

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus significantly increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and heart failure in patients. Independent of hypertension and coronary artery disease, diabetes is associated with a specific cardiomyopathy, known as diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM). Four decades of research in experimental animal models and advances in clinical imaging techniques suggest that DCM is a progressive disease, beginning early after the onset of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, ahead of left ventricular remodeling and overt diastolic dysfunction. Although the molecular pathogenesis of early DCM still remains largely unclear, activation of protein kinase C appears to be central in driving the oxidative stress dependent and independent pathways in the development of contractile dysfunction. Multiple subcellular alterations to the cardiomyocyte are now being highlighted as critical events in the early changes to the rate of force development, relaxation and stability under pathophysiological stresses. These changes include perturbed calcium handling, suppressed activity of aerobic energy producing enzymes, altered transcriptional and posttranslational modification of membrane and sarcomeric cytoskeletal proteins, reduced actin-myosin cross-bridge cycling and dynamics, and changed myofilament calcium sensitivity. In this review, we will present and discuss novel aspects of the molecular pathogenesis of early DCM, with a special focus on the sarcomeric contractile apparatus. PMID:26185602

  1. Characterization of the pharyngo-UES contractile reflex in humans.

    PubMed

    Shaker, R; Ren, J; Xie, P; Lang, I M; Bardan, E; Sui, Z

    1997-10-01

    Preliminary human studies suggest the presence of an upper esophageal sphincter (UES) contractile reflex triggered by pharyngeal water stimulation. The purposes of this study were to further characterize this reflex and determine the threshold volume for its activation. We studied 10 healthy young volunteers by manometric technique before and after topical pharyngeal anesthesia. UES pressure responses to various volumes and temperatures of water injected into the pharynx were elucidated. At a threshold volume, rapid-pulse and slow continuous pharyngeal water injection resulted in significant augmentation of UES pressure in all volunteers. Threshold volume for inducing UES contraction averaged 0.1 +/- 0.01 ml for rapid-pulse injection and was significantly smaller than that for slow continuous injection (1.0 +/- 0.2 ml). UES pressure increase duration averaged 16 +/- 4 s. Augmentation of UES resting tone by injection of water with three different temperatures was similar. This augmentation was abolished after topical anesthesia. Conclusions were that stimulation of the human pharynx by injection of minute amounts of water results in a significant increase in resting UES pressure: the pharyngo-UES contractile reflex. The magnitude of pressure increase due to activation of this reflex is not volume or temperature dependent. Loss of pharyngeal sensation abolishes this reflex.

  2. Mechanically Induced Chromatin Condensation Requires Cellular Contractility in Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Heo, Su-Jin; Han, Woojin M; Szczesny, Spencer E; Cosgrove, Brian D; Elliott, Dawn M; Lee, David A; Duncan, Randall L; Mauck, Robert L

    2016-08-23

    Mechanical cues play important roles in directing the lineage commitment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In this study, we explored the molecular mechanisms by which dynamic tensile loading (DL) regulates chromatin organization in this cell type. Our previous findings indicated that the application of DL elicited a rapid increase in chromatin condensation through purinergic signaling mediated by ATP. Here, we show that the rate and degree of condensation depends on the frequency and duration of mechanical loading, and that ATP release requires actomyosin-based cellular contractility. Increases in baseline cellular contractility via the addition of an activator of G-protein coupled receptors (lysophosphatidic acid) induced rapid ATP release, resulting in chromatin condensation independent of loading. Conversely, inhibition of contractility through pretreatment with either a RhoA/Rock inhibitor (Y27632) or MLCK inhibitor (ML7) abrogated ATP release in response to DL, blocking load-induced chromatin condensation. With loading, ATP release occurred very rapidly (within the first 10-20 s), whereas changes in chromatin occurred at a later time point (∼10 min), suggesting a downstream biochemical pathway mediating this process. When cells were pretreated with blockers of the transforming growth factor (TGF) superfamily, purinergic signaling in response to DL was also eliminated. Further analysis showed that this pretreatment decreased contractility, implicating activity in the TGF pathway in the establishment of the baseline contractile state of MSCs (in the absence of exogenous ligands). These data indicate that chromatin condensation in response to DL is regulated through the interplay between purinergic and RhoA/Rock signaling, and that ligandless activity in the TGF/bone morphogenetic proteins signaling pathway contributes to the establishment of baseline contractility in MSCs.

  3. Relationship between membrane Cl− conductance and contractile endurance in isolated rat muscles

    PubMed Central

    de Paoli, Frank Vincenzo; Broch-Lips, Martin; Pedersen, Thomas Holm; Nielsen, Ole Bækgaard

    2013-01-01

    Resting skeletal muscle fibres have a large membrane Cl− conductance (GCl) that dampens their excitability. Recently, however, muscle activity was shown to induce PKC-mediated reduction in GCl in rat muscles of 40–90%. To examine the physiological significance of this PKC-mediated GCl reduction for the function of muscles, this study explored effects of GCl reductions on contractile endurance in isolated rat muscles. Contractile endurance was assessed from the ability of muscle to maintain force during prolonged stimulation under conditions when GCl was manipulated by: (i) inhibition of PKC, (ii) reduction of solution Cl− or (iii) inhibition of ClC-1 Cl− channels using 9-anthracene-carboxylic acid (9-AC). Experiments showed that contractile endurance was optimally preserved by reductions in GCl similar to what occurs in active muscle. Contrastingly, further GCl reductions compromised the endurance. The experiments thus show a biphasic relationship between GCl and contractile endurance in which partial GCl reduction improves endurance while further GCl reduction compromises endurance. Intracellular recordings of trains of action potentials suggest that this biphasic dependency of contractile endurance on GCl reflects that lowering GCl enhances muscle excitability but low GCl also increases the depolarisation of muscle fibres during excitation and reduces their ability to re-accumulate K+ lost during excitation. If GCl becomes very low, the latter actions dominate causing reduced endurance. It is concluded that the PKC-mediated ClC-1 channel inhibition in active muscle reduces GCl to a level that optimises contractile endurance during intense exercise. PMID:23045345

  4. A key function of non-planar membranes and their associated microtubular ribbons in contractile vacuole membrane dynamics is revealed by electrophysiologically controlled fixation of Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, T; Naitoh, Y; Allen, R D

    1999-11-01

    The contractile vacuole complex of the fresh water protozoan Paramecium multimicronucleatum exhibits periodic exocytotic activity. This keeps cytosolic osmolarity at a constant value. The contractile vacuole, the central exocytotic vesicle of the complex, becomes disconnected from its surrounding radial arms and rounds before its fluid content is expelled. We previously proposed a hypothesis that the rounding of the contractile vacuole corresponds to an increase in its membrane tension and that a periodic increase in membrane tension governs the exocytotic cycle. We also proposed a hypothesis that transformation of excess planar membrane of the contractile vacuole into 40 nm diameter tubules, that remain continuous with the contractile vacuole membrane, is a primary cause for the tension development in the planar membrane. In order to investigate tension development further, we have examined electron microscopically the contractile vacuole membrane at the rounding phase. To do this, we developed a computer-aided system to fix the cell precisely at the time that the contractile vacuole exhibited rounding. In this system a decrease in the electrical potential across the contractile vacuole membrane that accompanied the vacuole's rounding was monitored through a fine-tipped microelectrode inserted directly into the in vivo contractile vacuole. A decrease in membrane potential was used to generate an electric signal that activated an injector for injecting a fixative through a microcapillary against the cell at the precise time of rounding. Subsequent electron micrographs of the contractile vacuole membrane clearly demonstrated that numerous approximately 40 nm membrane-bound tubules formed in the vicinity of the vacuole's microtubule ribbons when the vacuole showed rounding. This finding suggested that membrane tubulation was the cause for topographical isolation of excess membrane from the planar membrane during the periodic rounding of the contractile vacuole. This

  5. β-Arrestin mediates the Frank-Starling mechanism of cardiac contractility.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Dennis M; Davis, Robert T; Warren, Chad M; Mao, Lan; Wolska, Beata M; Solaro, R John; Rockman, Howard A

    2016-12-13

    The Frank-Starling law of the heart is a physiological phenomenon that describes an intrinsic property of heart muscle in which increased cardiac filling leads to enhanced cardiac contractility. Identified more than a century ago, the Frank-Starling relationship is currently known to involve length-dependent enhancement of cardiac myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity. However, the upstream molecular events that link cellular stretch to the length-dependent myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity are poorly understood. Because the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and the multifunctional transducer protein β-arrestin have been shown to mediate mechanosensitive cellular signaling, we tested the hypothesis that these two proteins are involved in the Frank-Starling mechanism of the heart. Using invasive hemodynamics, we found that mice lacking β-arrestin 1, β-arrestin 2, or AT1R were unable to generate a Frank-Starling force in response to changes in cardiac volume. Although wild-type mice pretreated with the conventional AT1R blocker losartan were unable to enhance cardiac contractility with volume loading, treatment with a β-arrestin-biased AT1R ligand to selectively activate β-arrestin signaling preserved the Frank-Starling relationship. Importantly, in skinned muscle fiber preparations, we found markedly impaired length-dependent myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity in β-arrestin 1, β-arrestin 2, and AT1R knockout mice. Our data reveal β-arrestin 1, β-arrestin 2, and AT1R as key regulatory molecules in the Frank-Starling mechanism, which potentially can be targeted therapeutically with β-arrestin-biased AT1R ligands.

  6. [Contractile proteins in chemical signal transduction in plant microspores].

    PubMed

    Roshchina, V V

    2005-01-01

    Involvement of contractile components in chemical signal transduction from the cell surface to the organelles was studied using unicellular systems. Neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin as well as active forms of oxygen hydrogen peroxide and tert-butyl peroxide were used as chemical signals. Experiments were carried out on vegetative microspores of field horsetail Equisetum arvense and generative microspores (pollen) of amaryllis Hippeastrum hybridum treated with cytochalasin B (an inhibitor of actin polymerization in microfilaments), colchicine, and vinblastine (inhibitors of tubulin polymerization in microtubules). Both types of thus treated microspores demonstrated suppressed development, particularly, for cytochalasin B treatment. At the same time, an increased typical blue fluorescence of certain cell regions (along the cell wall and around nuclei and chloroplasts) where the corresponding contractile proteins could reside was observed. In contrast to anticontractile agents, dopamine, serotonin B, and the peroxides stimulated microspore germination. Microspore pretreatment with cytochalasin B and colchicine followed by the treatment with serotonin, dopamine, or the peroxides decreased the germination rate. Involvement of actin and tubulin in chemical signal transduction from the cell surface to the nucleus is proposed.

  7. Dynamic regulation of β1 subunit trafficking controls vascular contractility.

    PubMed

    Leo, M Dennis; Bannister, John P; Narayanan, Damodaran; Nair, Anitha; Grubbs, Jordan E; Gabrick, Kyle S; Boop, Frederick A; Jaggar, Jonathan H

    2014-02-11

    Ion channels composed of pore-forming and auxiliary subunits control physiological functions in virtually all cell types. A conventional view is that channels assemble with their auxiliary subunits before anterograde plasma membrane trafficking of the protein complex. Whether the multisubunit composition of surface channels is fixed following protein synthesis or flexible and open to acute and, potentially, rapid modulation to control activity and cellular excitability is unclear. Arterial smooth muscle cells (myocytes) express large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium (BK) channel α and auxiliary β1 subunits that are functionally significant modulators of arterial contractility. Here, we show that native BKα subunits are primarily (∼95%) plasma membrane-localized in human and rat arterial myocytes. In contrast, only a small fraction (∼10%) of total β1 subunits are located at the cell surface. Immunofluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy demonstrated that intracellular β1 subunits are stored within Rab11A-postive recycling endosomes. Nitric oxide (NO), acting via cGMP-dependent protein kinase, and cAMP-dependent pathways stimulated rapid (≤1 min) anterograde trafficking of β1 subunit-containing recycling endosomes, which increased surface β1 almost threefold. These β1 subunits associated with surface-resident BKα proteins, elevating channel Ca(2+) sensitivity and activity. Our data also show that rapid β1 subunit anterograde trafficking is the primary mechanism by which NO activates myocyte BK channels and induces vasodilation. In summary, we show that rapid β1 subunit surface trafficking controls functional BK channel activity in arterial myocytes and vascular contractility. Conceivably, regulated auxiliary subunit trafficking may control ion channel activity in a wide variety of cell types.

  8. Diminished contractile responses of isolated conduit arteries in two rat models of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zemancíková, Anna; Török, Jozef

    2013-08-31

    Hypertension is accompanied by thickening of arteries, resulting in marked changes in their passive and active mechanical properties. The aim of this study was to demonstrate that the large conduit arteries from hypertensive individuals may not exhibit enhanced contractions in vitro, as is often claimed. Mechanical responses to vasoconstrictor stimuli were measured under isometric conditions using ring arterial segments isolated from spontaneously hypertensive rats, N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME)-treated Wistar rats, and untreated Wistar rats serving as normotensive control. We found that thoracic aortas from both types of hypertensive rats had a greater sensitivity but diminished maximal developed tension in response to noradrenaline, when compared with that from normotensive rats. In superior mesenteric arteries, the sensitivity to noradrenaline was similar in all examined rat groups but in L-NAME-treated rats, these arteries exhibited decreased active force when stimulated with high noradrenaline concentrations, or with 100 mM KCl. These results indicate that hypertension leads to specific biomechanical alterations in diverse arterial types which are reflected in different modifications in their contractile properties.

  9. Cytoskeletal reorganization by mycophenolic acid alters mesangial cell migration and contractility.

    PubMed

    Dubus, Isabelle; L'Azou, Beatrice; Gordien, Myriam; Delmas, Yahsou; Labouyrie, Jean-Pierre; Bonnet, Jacques; Combe, Christian

    2003-11-01

    Cytoskeleton alterations are a hallmark of mesangial cell activation during glomerulosclerosis. The aim of this study was to investigate whether mycophenolic acid (MPA) affects cytoskeletal organization and motility of human mesangial cells. Using the IP15 cell line, we found that treatment with 1 micromol/L MPA inhibited both receptor-dependent (angiotensin II) and receptor-independent (KCl) contractile responses, as well as serum-induced migration activity, suggesting alterations in the intracellular mechanisms that control mesangial cell motility. Immunofluorescence studies of MPA-treated cells provided evidence for decreased membrane disassembly/reassembly of alpha-smooth muscle actin and F-actin fibers, which was correlated with sustained quantitative and qualitative modifications of actin-associated proteins: calponin was overexpressed and became associated with actin fibers, whereas phosphorylation levels of cofilin and myosin light chain increased, suggesting both an activation of the mechanisms responsible for actin polymerization and an inhibition of actin-depolymerizing processes. These observations support a stabilizing effect of MPA on the mesangial actin cytoskeleton, which constitutes an additive action by which MPA, beyond its anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative and antifibrotic properties, might protect against excessive mesangial activation in the context of various glomerulopathies and kidney transplantation.

  10. Cytoskeletal Role in the Contractile Dysfunction of Hypertrophied Myocardium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Hiroyuki; Ishihara, Kazuaki; Cooper, George

    1993-04-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy in response to systolic pressure loading frequently results in contractile dysfunction of unknown cause. In the present study, pressure loading increased the microtubule component of the cardiac muscle cell cytoskeleton, which was responsible for the cellular contractile dysfunction observed. The linked microtubule and contractile abnormalities were persistent and thus may have significance for the deterioration of initially compensatory cardiac hypertrophy into congestive heart failure.

  11. Photonic properties of erbium activated coated microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jestin, Y.; Armellini, C.; Chiappini, A.; Chiasera, A.; Dumeige, Y.; Ferrari, M.; Féron, P.; Ghisa, L.; Nunzi Conti, G.; Trebaol, S.; Righini, G. C.

    2008-02-01

    μA simple method based on the sol-gel technology has been developed to coat passive microspheres with an active coating. The microspheres were prepared by fusion of a standard telecom fiber with a dimension of about 200 μm and 400 μm and have been respectively dipped in a 70SiO II-30HfO II sol activated by 1 mol% and 0.1 mol% of erbium ions. Here we first report about the luminescence properties of a silica-hafnia coating doped with erbium ions and then whispering gallery mode spectra were analysed for different sphere diameters, thickness of coating and erbium concentration. The thickness of the coating has been chosen in order to support at least one whispering gallery mode at 1.5 μm.

  12. ON INTRINSIC STRESS FIBER CONTRACTILE FORCES IN SEMILUNAR HEART VALVE INTERSTITIAL CELLS USING A CONTINUUM MIXTURE MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Yusuke; Buchanan, Rachel M.; Sacks, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Heart valve interstitial cells (VICs) play a critical role in the maintenance and pathophysiology of heart valve tissues. Normally quiescent in the adult, VICs can become activated in periods of growth and disease. When activated, VICs exhibit increased levels of cytokines and extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis, and upregulated expression and strong contraction of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) fibers. However, it remains unknown how expression and contraction of the α-SMA fibers, which vary among different VIC types, contribute to the overall VIC mechanical responses, including the nucleus and cytoskeleton contributions. In the present study, we developed a novel solid-mixture model for VIC biomechanical behavior that incorporated 1) the underlying cytoskeletal network, 2) the oriented α-SMA stress fibers with passive elastic and active contractile responses, 3) a finite deformable elastic nucleus. We implemented the model in a full 3D finite element simulation of a VIC based on known geometry. Moreover, we examined the respective mechanical responses of aortic and pulmonary VICs (AVICs and PVICs, respectively), which are known to have different levels of α-SMA expression levels and contractile behaviors. To calibrate the model, we simulated the combined mechanical responses of VICs in both micropipette aspiration (MA) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments. These two states were chosen as the VICs were under significantly different mechanical loading conditions and activation states, with the α-SMA fibers inactivated in the MA studies while fully activated in the AFM studies. We also used the AFM to study the mechanical property of the nucleus. Our model predicted that the substantial differences found in stiffening of the AVIC compared to the PVICs was due to a 9 to 16 times stronger intrinsic AVIC α-SMA stress fiber contractile force. Model validation was done by simulating a traction force microscopy experiment to estimate the forces the VICs

  13. Store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) contributes to normal skeletal muscle contractility in young but not in aged skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Angela M; Zhao, Xiaoli; Weisleder, Noah; Brotto, Leticia S; Bougoin, Sylvain; Nosek, Thomas M; Reid, Michael; Hardin, Brian; Pan, Zui; Ma, Jianjie; Parness, Jerome; Brotto, Marco

    2011-06-01

    Muscle atrophy alone is insufficient to explain the significant decline in contractile force of skeletal muscle during normal aging. One contributing factor to decreased contractile force in aging skeletal muscle could be compromised excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling, without sufficient available Ca(2+) to allow for repetitive muscle contractility, skeletal muscles naturally become weaker. Using biophysical approaches, we previously showed that store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) is compromised in aged skeletal muscle but not in young ones. While important, a missing component from previous studies is whether or not SOCE function correlates with contractile function during aging. Here we test the contribution of extracellular Ca(2+) to contractile function of skeletal muscle during aging. First, we demonstrate graded coupling between SR Ca(2+) release channel-mediated Ca(2+) release and activation of SOCE. Inhibition of SOCE produced significant reduction of contractile force in young skeletal muscle, particularly at high frequency stimulation, and such effects were completely absent in aged skeletal muscle. Our data indicate that SOCE contributes to the normal physiological contractile response of young healthy skeletal muscle and that defective extracellular Ca(2+) entry through SOCE contributes to the reduced contractile force characteristic of aged skeletal muscle.

  14. Store-Operated Ca2+ Entry (SOCE) Contributes to Normal Skeletal Muscle Contractility in young but not in aged skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Brotto, Leticia S.; Bougoin, Sylvain; Nosek, Thomas M.; Reid, Michael; Hardin, Brian; Pan, Zui; Ma, Jianjie; Parness, Jerome

    2011-01-01

    Muscle atrophy alone is insufficient to explain the significant decline in contractile force of skeletal muscle during normal aging. One contributing factor to decreased contractile force in aging skeletal muscle could be compromised excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling, without sufficient available Ca2+ to allow for repetitive muscle contractility, skeletal muscles naturally become weaker. Using biophysical approaches, we previously showed that store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) is compromised in aged skeletal muscle but not in young ones. While important, a missing component from previous studies is whether or not SOCE function correlates with contractile function during aging. Here we test the contribution of extracellular Ca2+ to contractile function of skeletal muscle during aging. First, we demonstrate graded coupling between SR Ca2+ release channel-mediated Ca2+ release and activation of SOCE. Inhibition of SOCE produced significant reduction of contractile force in young skeletal muscle, particularly at high frequency stimulation, and such effects were completely absent in aged skeletal muscle. Our data indicate that SOCE contributes to the normal physiological contractile response of young healthy skeletal muscle and that defective extracellular Ca2+ entry through SOCE contributes to the reduced contractile force characteristic of aged skeletal muscle. PMID:21666285

  15. Assembly and positioning of actomyosin rings by contractility and planar cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Sehring, Ivonne M; Recho, Pierre; Denker, Elsa; Kourakis, Matthew; Mathiesen, Birthe; Hannezo, Edouard; Dong, Bo; Jiang, Di

    2015-01-01

    The actomyosin cytoskeleton is a primary force-generating mechanism in morphogenesis, thus a robust spatial control of cytoskeletal positioning is essential. In this report, we demonstrate that actomyosin contractility and planar cell polarity (PCP) interact in post-mitotic Ciona notochord cells to self-assemble and reposition actomyosin rings, which play an essential role for cell elongation. Intriguingly, rings always form at the cells′ anterior edge before migrating towards the center as contractility increases, reflecting a novel dynamical property of the cortex. Our drug and genetic manipulations uncover a tug-of-war between contractility, which localizes cortical flows toward the equator and PCP, which tries to reposition them. We develop a simple model of the physical forces underlying this tug-of-war, which quantitatively reproduces our results. We thus propose a quantitative framework for dissecting the relative contribution of contractility and PCP to the self-assembly and repositioning of cytoskeletal structures, which should be applicable to other morphogenetic events. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09206.001 PMID:26486861

  16. TRPA1-dependent regulation of bladder detrusor smooth muscle contractility in normal and type I diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Philyppov, Igor B.; Paduraru, Oksana N.; Gulak, Kseniya L.; Skryma, Roman; Prevarskaya, Natalia; Shuba, Yaroslav M.

    2016-01-01

    TRPA1 is a Ca2+-permeable cation channel that is activated by painful low temperatures (˂17 °C), irritating chemicals, reactive metabolites and mediators of inflammation. In the bladder TRPA1 is predominantly expressed in sensory afferent nerve endings, where it mediates sensory transduction. The contractile effect of its activation on detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) is explained by the release from sensory afferents of inflammatory factors – tachykinins and prostaglandins, which cause smooth muscle cell contraction. Diabetes is a systemic disease, with common complications being diabetic cystopathies and urinary incontinence. However, data on how diabetes affects bladder contractility associated with TRPA1 activation are not available. In this study, by using a rat model with streptozotocin-induced type I diabetes, contractility measurements of DSM strips in response to TRPA1-activating and modulating pharmacological agents and assessment of TRPA1 mRNA expression in bladder-innervating dorsal root ganglia, we have shown that diabetes enhances the TRPA1-dependent mechanism involved in bladder DSM contractility. This is not due to changes in TRPA1 expression, but mainly due to the general inflammatory reaction caused by diabetes. The latter leads to an increase in cyclooxygenase-2-dependent prostaglandin synthesis through the mechanisms associated with substance P activity. This results in the enhanced functional coupling between the tachykinin and prostanoid systems, and the concomitant increase of their impact on DSM contractility in response to TRPA1 activation. PMID:26935999

  17. TRPA1-dependent regulation of bladder detrusor smooth muscle contractility in normal and type I diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Philyppov, Igor B; Paduraru, Oksana N; Gulak, Kseniya L; Skryma, Roman; Prevarskaya, Natalia; Shuba, Yaroslav M

    2016-01-01

    TRPA1 is a Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel that is activated by painful low temperatures (<17°C), irritating chemicals, reactive metabolites and mediators of inflammation. In the bladder TRPA1 is predominantly expressed in sensory afferent nerve endings, where it mediates sensory transduction. The contractile effect of its activation on detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) is explained by the release from sensory afferents of inflammatory factors - tachykinins and prostaglandins, which cause smooth muscle cell contraction. Diabetes is a systemic disease, with common complications being diabetic cystopathies and urinary incontinence. However, data on how diabetes affects bladder contractility associated with TRPA1 activation are not available. In this study, by using a rat model with streptozotocin-induced type I diabetes, contractility measurements of DSM strips in response to TRPA1-activating and modulating pharmacological agents and assessment of TRPA1 mRNA expression in bladder-innervating dorsal root ganglia, we have shown that diabetes enhances the TRPA1-dependent mechanism involved in bladder DSM contractility. This is not due to changes in TRPA1 expression, but mainly due to the general inflammatory reaction caused by diabetes. The latter leads to an increase in cyclooxygenase-2-dependent prostaglandin synthesis through the mechanisms associated with substance P activity. This results in the enhanced functional coupling between the tachykinin and prostanoid systems, and the concomitant increase of their impact on DSM contractility in response to TRPA1 activation.

  18. Tension generation by threads of contractile proteins

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    Threads of contractile proteins were formed via extrusion and their isometric tensions and isotonic contraction velocities were measured. We obtained reproducible data by using a new and sensitive tensiometer. The force-velocity curves of actomyosin threads were similar to those of muscle, with isometric tensions of the order of 10g/cm2 and maximum contraction velocites of the order of 10(-2) lengths/s. The data could be fitted by Hill's equation. Addition of tropomyosin and troponin to the threads increased isometric tension and maximum contraction velocity. Threads which contained troponin and tropomyosin required Ca++ for contraction and the dependence of their isometric tension on the level of free Ca++ was like that of muscle. The dependence of tension or of contraction velocity upon temperature or upon ionic strength is similar for actomyosin threads and muscle fibers. In contrast, the dependence of most parameters which are characteristic of the actomyosin interaction in solution (or suspension) upon these variables is not similar to the dependence of the muscle fiber parameters. The conclusion we have drawn from these results is that the mechanism of tension generation in the threads is similar to the mechanism that exists in muscle. Because the protein composition of the thread system can be manipulated readily and because the tensions and velocities of the threads can be related directly to the physiological parameters of muscle fibers, the threads provide a powerful method for studying contractile proteins. PMID:137958

  19. Contractility and calcium signaling of human myometrium are profoundly affected by cholesterol manipulation: implications for labor?

    PubMed

    Jie Zhang; Kendrick, Annabelle; Quenby, Siobhan; Wray, Susan

    2007-07-01

    The authors elucidate cholesterol's effect on human uterine contractility and calcium signaling to test the hypotheses that elevation of cholesterol decreases uterine activity and that oxytocin cannot augment contraction when cholesterol is elevated. The effects of cholesterol extraction with methyl beta-cyclodextrin and enrichment with low-density lipoproteins and cholesterol on contractile activity and intracellular calcium signaling in spontaneous or oxytocin-stimulated myometrium are determined. Force occurring spontaneously and with oxytocin is significantly increased by cholesterol extraction. Cholesterol enrichment profoundly inhibits force production in a dose-dependent manner and could reverse the effects of cholesterol extraction. Qualitatively similar results are found for nonpregnant and pregnant laboring and non-laboring myometrium. These contractile changes are related to changes in intracellular Ca2+ . Thus, elevated cholesterol is deleterious to contractility and Ca2+ signaling in human myometrium. Cholesterol may contribute to uterine quiescence but could cause difficulties in labor in obese/dyslipidemic women, consistent with their increased cesarean delivery rates.

  20. Experimental evidence and mathematical modeling of thermal effects on human colonic smooth muscle contractility.

    PubMed

    Altomare, A; Gizzi, A; Guarino, M P L; Loppini, A; Cocca, S; Dipaola, M; Alloni, R; Cicala, M; Filippi, S

    2014-07-01

    It has been shown, in animal models, that gastrointestinal tract (GIT) motility is influenced by temperature; nevertheless, the basic mechanism governing thermal GIT smooth muscle responses has not been fully investigated. Studies based on physiologically tuned mathematical models have predicted that thermal inhomogeneity may induce an electrochemical destabilization of peristaltic activity. In the present study, the effect of thermal cooling on human colonic muscle strip (HCMS) contractility was studied. HCMSs were obtained from disease-free margins of resected segments for cancer. After removal of the mucosa and serosa layers, strips were mounted in separate chambers. After 30 min, spontaneous contractions developed, which were measured using force displacement transducers. Temperature was changed every hour (37, 34, and 31°C). The effect of cooling was analyzed on mean contractile activity, oscillation amplitude, frequency, and contraction to ACh (10(-5) M). At 37°C, HCMSs developed a stable phasic contraction (~0.02 Hz) with a significant ACh-elicited mean contractile response (31% and 22% compared with baseline in the circular and longitudinal axis, respectively). At a lower bath temperature, higher mean contractile amplitude was observed, and it increased in the presence of ACh (78% and 43% higher than the basal tone in the circular and longitudinal axis, respectively, at 31°C). A simplified thermochemomechanical model was tuned on experimental data characterizing the stress state coupling the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration to tissue temperature. In conclusion, acute thermal cooling affects colonic muscular function. Further studies are needed to establish the exact mechanisms involved to better understand clinical consequences of hypothermia on intestinal contractile activity.

  1. Predicting changes in cardiac myocyte contractility during early drug discovery with in vitro assays

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, M.J.; Armstrong, D.; Abi Gerges, N.; Bridgland-Taylor, M.; Pollard, C.E.; Bowes, J.; Valentin, J.-P.

    2014-09-01

    Cardiovascular-related adverse drug effects are a major concern for the pharmaceutical industry. Activity of an investigational drug at the L-type calcium channel could manifest in a number of ways, including changes in cardiac contractility. The aim of this study was to define which of the two assay technologies – radioligand-binding or automated electrophysiology – was most predictive of contractility effects in an in vitro myocyte contractility assay. The activity of reference and proprietary compounds at the L-type calcium channel was measured by radioligand-binding assays, conventional patch-clamp, automated electrophysiology, and by measurement of contractility in canine isolated cardiac myocytes. Activity in the radioligand-binding assay at the L-type Ca channel phenylalkylamine binding site was most predictive of an inotropic effect in the canine cardiac myocyte assay. The sensitivity was 73%, specificity 83% and predictivity 78%. The radioligand-binding assay may be run at a single test concentration and potency estimated. The least predictive assay was automated electrophysiology which showed a significant bias when compared with other assay formats. Given the importance of the L-type calcium channel, not just in cardiac function, but also in other organ systems, a screening strategy emerges whereby single concentration ligand-binding can be performed early in the discovery process with sufficient predictivity, throughput and turnaround time to influence chemical design and address a significant safety-related liability, at relatively low cost. - Highlights: • The L-type calcium channel is a significant safety liability during drug discovery. • Radioligand-binding to the L-type calcium channel can be measured in vitro. • The assay can be run at a single test concentration as part of a screening cascade. • This measurement is highly predictive of changes in cardiac myocyte contractility.

  2. Cardiac-Specific Knockout of ETA Receptor Mitigates Paraquat-Induced Cardiac Contractile Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiaxing; Lu, Songhe; Zheng, Qijun; Hu, Nan; Yu, Wenjun; Li, Na; Liu, Min; Gao, Beilei; Zhang, Guoyong; Zhang, Yingmei; Wang, Haichang

    2016-07-01

    Paraquat (1,1'-dim ethyl-4-4'-bipyridinium dichloride), a highly toxic quaternary ammonium herbicide widely used in agriculture, exerts potent toxic prooxidant effects resulting in multi-organ failure including the lung and heart although the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Recent evidence suggests possible involvement of endothelin system in paraquat-induced acute lung injury. This study was designed to examine the role of endothelin receptor A (ETA) in paraquat-induced cardiac contractile and mitochondrial injury. Wild-type (WT) and cardiac-specific ETA receptor knockout mice were challenged to paraquat (45 mg/kg, i.p.) for 48 h prior to the assessment of echocardiographic, cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) properties, as well as apoptosis and mitochondrial damage. Levels of the mitochondrial proteins for biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation including UCP2, HSP90 and PGC1α were evaluated. Our results revealed that paraquat elicited cardiac enlargement, mechanical anomalies including compromised echocardiographic parameters (elevated left ventricular end-systolic and end-diastolic diameters as well as reduced factional shortening), suppressed cardiomyocyte contractile function, intracellular Ca(2+) handling, overt apoptosis and mitochondrial damage. ETA receptor knockout itself failed to affect myocardial function, apoptosis, mitochondrial integrity and mitochondrial protein expression. However, ETA receptor knockout ablated or significantly attenuated paraquat-induced cardiac contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) defect, apoptosis and mitochondrial damage. Taken together, these findings revealed that endothelin system in particular the ETA receptor may be involved in paraquat-induced toxic myocardial contractile anomalies possibly related to apoptosis and mitochondrial damage.

  3. Regional left ventricular myocardial contractility and stress in a finite element model of posterobasal myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Wenk, Jonathan F; Sun, Kay; Zhang, Zhihong; Soleimani, Mehrdad; Ge, Liang; Saloner, David; Wallace, Arthur W; Ratcliffe, Mark B; Guccione, Julius M

    2011-04-01

    Recently, a noninvasive method for determining regional myocardial contractility, using an animal-specific finite element (FE) model-based optimization, was developed to study a sheep with anteroapical infarction (Sun et al., 2009, "A Computationally Efficient Formal Optimization of Regional Myocardial Contractility in a Sheep With Left Ventricular Aneurysm," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 131(11), p. 111001). Using the methodology developed in the previous study (Sun et al., 2009, "A Computationally Efficient Formal Optimization of Regional Myocardial Contractility in a Sheep With Left Ventricular Aneurysm," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 131(11), p. 111001), which incorporates tagged magnetic resonance images, three-dimensional myocardial strains, left ventricular (LV) volumes, and LV cardiac catheterization pressures, the regional myocardial contractility and stress distribution of a sheep with posterobasal infarction were investigated. Active material parameters in the noninfarcted border zone (BZ) myocardium adjacent to the infarct (T(max_B)), in the myocardium remote from the infarct (T(max_R)), and in the infarct (T(max_I)) were estimated by minimizing the errors between FE model-predicted and experimentally measured systolic strains and LV volumes using the previously developed optimization scheme. The optimized T(max_B) was found to be significantly depressed relative to T(max_R), while T(max_I) was found to be zero. The myofiber stress in the BZ was found to be elevated, relative to the remote region. This could cause further damage to the contracting myocytes, leading to heart failure.

  4. Impaired pulmonary artery contractile responses in a rat model of microgravity: role of nitric oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyhan, Daniel; Kim, Soonyul; Dunbar, Stacey; Li, Dechun; Shoukas, Artin; Berkowitz, Dan E.

    2002-01-01

    Vascular contractile hyporesponsiveness is an important mechanism underlying orthostatic intolerance after microgravity. Baroreceptor reflexes can modulate both pulmonary resistance and capacitance function and thus cardiac output. We hypothesized, therefore, that pulmonary vasoreactivity is impaired in the hindlimb-unweighted (HLU) rat model of microgravity. Pulmonary artery (PA) contractile responses to phenylephrine (PE) and U-46619 (U4) were significantly decreased in the PAs from HLU vs. control (C) animals. N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (10(-5) M) enhanced the contractile responses in the PA rings from both C and HLU animals and completely abolished the differential responses to PE and U4 in HLU vs. C animals. Vasorelaxant responses to ACh were significantly enhanced in PA rings from HLU rats compared with C. Moreover, vasorelaxant responses to sodium nitroprusside were also significantly enhanced. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and soluble guanlyl cyclase expression were significantly enhanced in PA and lung tissue from HLU rats. In marked contrast, the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase was unchanged in lung tissue. These data support the hypothesis that vascular contractile responsiveness is attenuated in PAs from HLU rats and that this hyporesponsiveness is due at least in part to increased nitric oxide synthase activity resulting from enhanced eNOS expression. These findings may have important implications for blood volume distribution and attenuated stroke volume responses to orthostatic stress after microgravity exposure.

  5. A device for rapid and quantitative measurement of cardiac myocyte contractility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaitas, Angelo; Malhotra, Ricky; Li, Tao; Herron, Todd; Jalife, José

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac contractility is the hallmark of cardiac function and is a predictor of healthy or diseased cardiac muscle. Despite advancements over the last two decades, the techniques and tools available to cardiovascular scientists are limited in their utility to accurately and reliably measure the amplitude and frequency of cardiomyocyte contractions. Isometric force measurements in the past have entailed cumbersome attachment of isolated and permeabilized cardiomyocytes to a force transducer followed by measurements of sarcomere lengths under conditions of submaximal and maximal Ca2+ activation. These techniques have the inherent disadvantages of being labor intensive and costly. We have engineered a micro-machined cantilever sensor with an embedded deflection-sensing element that, in preliminary experiments, has demonstrated to reliably measure cardiac cell contractions in real-time. Here, we describe this new bioengineering tool with applicability in the cardiovascular research field to effectively and reliably measure cardiac cell contractility in a quantitative manner. We measured contractility in both primary neonatal rat heart cardiomyocyte monolayers that demonstrated a beat frequency of 3 Hz as well as human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes with a contractile frequency of about 1 Hz. We also employed the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol (100 nmol l-1) and observed that our cantilever demonstrated high sensitivity in detecting subtle changes in both chronotropic and inotropic responses of monolayers. This report describes the utility of our micro-device in both basic cardiovascular research as well as in small molecule drug discovery to monitor cardiac cell contractions.

  6. MRTF-A signaling regulates the acquisition of the contractile phenotype in dedifferentiated chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Parreno, Justin; Raju, Sneha; Wu, Po-Han; Kandel, Rita A

    2016-10-14

    Chondrocyte culture as a monolayer for cell number expansion results in dedifferentiation whereby expanded cells acquire contractile features and increased actin polymerization status. This study determined whether the actin polymerization based signaling pathway, myocardin-related transcription factor-a (MRTF-A) is involved in regulating this contractile phenotype. Serial passaging of chondrocytes in monolayer culture to passage 2 resulted in increased gene and protein expression of the contractile molecules alpha-smooth muscle actin, transgelin and vinculin compared to non-passaged, primary cells. This resulted in a functional change as passaged 2, but not primary, chondrocytes were capable of contracting type I collagen gels in a stress-relaxed contraction assay. These changes were associated with increased actin polymerization and MRTF-A nuclear localization. The involvement of actin was demonstrated by latrunculin B depolymerization of actin which reversed these changes. Alternatively cytochalasin D which activates MRTF-A increased gene and protein expression of α-smooth muscle actin, transgelin and vinculin, whereas CCG1423 which deactivates MRTF-A decreased these molecules. The involvement of MRTF-A signaling was confirmed by gene silencing of MRTF or its co-factor serum response factor. Knockdown experiments revealed downregulation of α-smooth muscle actin and transgelin gene and protein expression, and inhibition of gel contraction. These findings demonstrate that passaged chondrocytes acquire a contractile phenotype and that this change is modulated by the actin-MRTF-A-serum response factor signaling pathway.

  7. Effect of phorbol esters on contractile state and calcium flux in cultured chick heart cells

    SciTech Connect

    Leatherman, G.F.; Kim, D.; Smith, T.W.

    1987-07-01

    Phorbol esters are potent tumor promoters that have been widely used in studies of transmembrane signaling because of their ability to activate protein kinase C. To study the effect of phorbol esters (and indirectly, the role of protein kinase C) on the cardiac muscle contractility, the authors examined the effects of phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) on contractile state, transmembrane /sup 45/Ca fluxes, and cytosolic free Ca concentration ((Ca)/sub i/) using spontaneously contracting cultured chick ventricular cells. PMA produced a concentration- and time-dependent decrease in the amplitude of cell motion (half maximum inhibitory concentration) with maximal effect observed at 1 ..mu..M. PMA (1 ..mu..M) reduced /sup 45/Ca uptake rate by 16 /plus minus/ 4% and the size of the rapidly exchangeable Ca pool by 11 /plus minus/ 2%, but did not alter the /sup 45/Ca efflux rate. In fura-2-loaded cells. PMA produced a decrease in (Ca)/sub i/ from 96 /plus minus/ 7 to 72 /plus minus/ 5 nM with a time course similar to that of alteration in contractile amplitude. These results indicate that PMA influences transsarcolemmal Ca uptake, and thus the excitation-contraction process, and suggest that protein kinase C may modulate myocardial Ca homeostassis and contractile state.

  8. Carvedilol Prevents Ovariectomy-Induced Myocardial Contractile Dysfunction in Female Rat

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Rogerio Faustino; Potratz, Felipe F.; Pavan, Brunella M. M.; Forechi, Ludimila; Lima, Filipe Lugon Moulin; Fiorim, Jonaina; Fernandes, Aurelia Araujo; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim; Stefanon, Ivanita

    2013-01-01

    Carvedilol has beneficial effects on cardiac function in patients with heart failure but its effect on ovariectomy-induced myocardial contractile dysfunction remains unclear. Estrogen deficiency induces myocardial contractile dysfunction and increases cardiovascular disease risk in postmenopausal women. Our aim was to investigate whether carvedilol, a beta receptor blocker, would prevent ovariectomy-induced myocardial contractile dysfunction. Female rats (8 weeks old) that underwent bilateral ovariectomy were randomly assigned to receive daily treatment with carvedilol (OVX+CAR, 20 mg/kg), placebo (OVX) and SHAM for 58 days. Left ventricle papillary muscle was mounted for isometric tension recordings. The inotropic response to Ca2+ (0.62 to 3.75 mM) and isoproterenol (Iso 10−8 to 10−2 M) were assessed. Expression of calcium handling proteins was measured by western blot analysis. Carvedilol treatment in the OVX animals: prevented weight gain and slight hypertrophy, restored the reduced positive inotropic responses to Ca2+ and isoproterenol, prevented the reduction in SERCA2a expression, abolished the increase in superoxide anion production, normalized the increase in p22phox expression, and decreased serum angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity. This study demonstrated that myocardial contractile dysfunction and SERCA2a down regulation were prevented by carvedilol treatment. Superoxide anion production and NADPH oxidase seem to be involved in this response. PMID:23308166

  9. Longitudinal decline of lower extremity muscle power in healthy and mobility-limited older adults: influence of muscle mass, strength, composition, neuromuscular activation and single fiber contractile properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This longitudinal study examined the major physiological mechanisms that determine the age related loss of lower extremity muscle power in two distinct groups of older humans. We hypothesized that after ~3 years of follow-up, mobility-limited older adults (mean age: 77.2 +/- 4, n = 22, 12 females) w...

  10. Heme-induced contractile dysfunction in human cardiomyocytes caused by oxidant damage to thick filament proteins.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Gerardo; Jeney, Viktória; Tóth, Attila; Csősz, Éva; Kalló, Gergő; Huynh, An T; Hajnal, Csaba; Kalász, Judit; Pásztor, Enikő T; Édes, István; Gram, Magnus; Akerström, Bo; Smith, Ann; Eaton, John W; Balla, György; Papp, Zoltán; Balla, József

    2015-12-01

    Intracellular free heme predisposes to oxidant-mediated tissue damage. We hypothesized that free heme causes alterations in myocardial contractility via disturbed structure and/or regulation of the contractile proteins. Isometric force production and its Ca(2+)-sensitivity (pCa50) were monitored in permeabilized human ventricular cardiomyocytes. Heme exposure altered cardiomyocyte morphology and evoked robust decreases in Ca(2+)-activated maximal active force (Fo) while increasing Ca(2+)-independent passive force (F passive). Heme treatments, either alone or in combination with H2O2, did not affect pCa50. The increase in F passive started at 3 µM heme exposure and could be partially reversed by the antioxidant dithiothreitol. Protein sulfhydryl (SH) groups of thick myofilament content decreased and sulfenic acid formation increased after treatment with heme. Partial restoration in the SH group content was observed in a protein running at 140 kDa after treatment with dithiothreitol, but not in other proteins, such as filamin C, myosin heavy chain, cardiac myosin binding protein C, and α-actinin. Importantly, binding of heme to hemopexin or alpha-1-microglobulin prevented its effects on cardiomyocyte contractility, suggesting an allosteric effect. In line with this, free heme directly bound to myosin light chain 1 in human cardiomyocytes. Our observations suggest that free heme modifies cardiac contractile proteins via posttranslational protein modifications and via binding to myosin light chain 1, leading to severe contractile dysfunction. This may contribute to systolic and diastolic cardiac dysfunctions in hemolytic diseases, heart failure, and myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  11. Considerations for contractile electroactive materials and actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Lenore; Schramm, David; Rasmussen, Paul; Mullally, Kevin; Meixler, Lewis D.; Pearlman, Daniel; Kirk, Alice

    2011-04-01

    Ras Labs produces contractile electroactive polymer (EAP) based materials and actuators that bend, swell, ripple, and contract (new development) with low electric input. In addition, Ras Labs produces EAP materials that quickly contract and expand, repeatedly, by reversing the polarity of the electric input, which can be cycled. This phenomenon was explored using molecular modeling, followed by experimentation. Applied voltage step functions were also investigated. High voltage steps followed by low voltage steps produced a larger contraction followed by a smaller contraction. Actuator control by simply adjusting the electric input is extremely useful for biomimetic applications. Muscles are able to partially contract. If muscles could only completely contract, nobody could hold an egg, for example, without breaking it. A combination of high and low voltage step functions could produce gross motor function and fine manipulation within the same actuator unit. Plasma treated electrodes with various geometries were investigated as a means of providing for more durable actuation.

  12. Considerations for contractile electroactive materials and actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Lenore; Meixler, Lewis D.; Gentile, Charles A.

    2012-04-01

    Electroactive polymers (EAPs) that bend, swell, ripple (first generation materials), and now contract with low electric input (new development) have been produced. The mechanism of contraction is not well understood. Radionuclide-labeled experiments, molecular modeling, electrolyte experiments, pH experiments, and an ionic concentration experiment were used to determine the chain of events that occur during contraction and, reciprocally, expansion when the polarity is reversed, in these ionic EAPs. Plasma treatment of the electrodes, along with other strategies, allows for the embedded electrodes and the EAP material of the actuator to work and move as a unit, with no detachment, by significantly improving the metal-polymer interface, analogous to nerves and tendons moving with muscles during movement. Challenges involved with prototyping actuation using contractile EAPs are also discussed.

  13. Considerations for Contractile Electroactive Materials and Actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Lenore Rasmussen, David Schramm, Paul Rasmussen, Kevin Mullaly, Ras Labs, LLC, Intelligent Materials for Prosthetics & Automation, Lewis D. Meixler, Daniel Pearlman and Alice Kirk

    2011-05-23

    Ras Labs produces contractile electroactive polymer (EAP) based materials and actuators that bend, swell, ripple, and contract (new development) with low electric input. In addition, Ras Labs produces EAP materials that quickly contract and expand, repeatedly, by reversing the polarity of the electric input, which can be cycled. This phenomenon was explored using molecular modeling, followed by experimentation. Applied voltage step functions were also investigated. High voltage steps followed by low voltage steps produced a larger contraction followed by a smaller contraction. Actuator control by simply adjusting the electric input is extremely useful for biomimetic applications. Muscles are able to partially contract. If muscles could only completely contract, nobody could hold an egg, for example, without breaking it. A combination of high and low voltage step functions could produce gross motor function and fine manipulation within the same actuator unit. Plasma treated electrodes with various geometries were investigated as a means of providing for more durable actuation.

  14. Non-muscle contractile proteins in the organ of corti

    SciTech Connect

    Thalmann, I.; Giometti, C.S.; Thalmann, R. )

    1985-01-01

    Evidence indicates that an active contractile process exists in the outer hair cells of the mammalian cochlea. Proteins ordinarily associated with muscle contraction have been identified in the outer hair cells by immunohistologic techniques. On this basis a muscle-like mechanism of contraction/relaxation has been postulated by several investigators. The possibility must be considered, however, that the contractile proteins identified thus far in inner ear structures may be nonmuscle rather than muscle forms. In skeletal muscle, actin and myosin are responsible for the physical movement of the muscle fibers, and tropomyosin and troponin are involved in regulating this movement; these four proteins, as well as a variety of proteins involved with the normal cell maintenance functions are all of a muscle-specific type. Non-muscle-like motion also depends upon the interaction of actin with myosin; however, not only are these proteins structurally different from those specific to skeletal muscle but their proportions are also different. We have used two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to study the proteins in freeze dried preparations of whole organ of Corti from the guinea pig. The identified proteins include non-muscle actin, three forms of non-muscle tropomyosin, alpha- and beta-tubulin, alpha-actinin, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH B). Myosin heavy and light chains were not detected in the organ of Corti preparation, but the levels of those proteins might be too low to be detected with the protein load used of those proteins might be too low to be detected with the protein load used for this analysis. Although troponin could not be detected, calmodulin was present. All of these findings tend to indicate that the contraction/relaxation processes that have been associated with the organ of Corti by others are of the non-muscle variety.

  15. Electrically contractile polymers augment right ventricular output in the heart.

    PubMed

    Ruhparwar, Arjang; Piontek, Patricia; Ungerer, Matthias; Ghodsizad, Ali; Partovi, Sasan; Foroughi, Javad; Szabo, Gabor; Farag, Mina; Karck, Matthias; Spinks, Geoffrey M; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2014-12-01

    Research into the development of artificial heart muscle has been limited to assembly of stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes seeded around a matrix, while nonbiological approaches to tissue engineering have rarely been explored. The aim of the study was to apply electrically contractile polymer-based actuators as cardiomyoplasty for positive inotropic support of the right ventricle. Complex trilayer polypyrrole (PPy) bending polymers for high-speed applications were generated. Bending motion occurred directly as a result of electrochemically driven charging and discharging of the PPy layers. In a rat model (n = 5), strips of polymers (3 × 20 mm) were attached and wrapped around the right ventricle (RV). RV pressure was continuously monitored invasively by direct RV cannulation. Electrical activation occurred simultaneously with either diastole (in order to evaluate the polymer's stand-alone contraction capacity; group 1) or systole (group 2). In group 1, the pressure generation capacity of the polymers was measured by determining the area under the pressure curve (area under curve, AUC). In group 2, the RV pressure AUC was measured in complexes directly preceding those with polymer contraction and compared to RV pressure complexes with simultaneous polymer contraction. In group 1, the AUC generated by polymer contraction was 2768 ± 875 U. In group 2, concomitant polymer contraction significantly increased AUC compared with complexes without polymer support (5987 ± 1334 U vs. 4318 ± 691 U, P ≤ 0.01). Electrically contractile polymers are able to significantly augment right ventricular contraction. This approach may open new perspectives for myocardial tissue engineering, possibly in combination with fetal or embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes.

  16. Contractile function of the myocardium with prolonged hypokinesia in patients with surgical tuberculosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakutayeva, V. P.; Matiks, N. I.

    1978-01-01

    The changes in the myocardial contractile function with hypokinesia in surgical tuberculosis patients are discussed. The phase nature of the changes is noted, specifically the changes in the various systoles, diastole, and other parts of the cardiac cycle. The data compare these changes during confinement in bed with no motor activity to and with a return to motor activity after leaving the in-bed regimen.

  17. Regional variation in myofilament length-dependent activation.

    PubMed

    Cazorla, Olivier; Lacampagne, Alain

    2011-07-01

    The Frank-Starling law is an important regulatory mechanism of the heart that links the end-diastolic volume with the systolic ejection fraction. This beat-to-beat regulation of the heart, underlined at the cellular level by higher myofilament calcium sensitivity at longer sarcomere length, is known as length-dependent activation or stretch sensitization of activation. However, the heart is structurally and functionally heterogeneous and asymmetrical. Specifically, contractile properties are not uniform within the left ventricle partly due to transmural differences in action potential waveforms and calcium homeostasis. The present review will focus on the role of the contractile machinery in the transmural contractile heterogeneity and its adaptation to changes in muscle strain. The expression of different myosin isoforms, the level of titin-based passive tension, and thin and thick sarcomeric regulatory proteins are considered to explain the regional cellular contractile properties. Finally, the importance of transmural heterogeneity of length-dependent activation and the consequences of its modification on the heart mechanics are discussed. Despite extensive research since the characterization of the Frank-Starling law, the molecular mechanisms by which strain information is transduced to the contractile machinery have not been fully determined yet.

  18. Modulatory effect of three antibiotics on uterus bovine contractility in vitro and likely therapeutic approaches in reproduction.

    PubMed

    Piccinno, M; Rizzo, A; Maselli, M A; Derosa, M; Sciorsci, R L

    2014-12-01

    This in vitro study investigates the modulatory effect of three antibiotics (amoxicillin, enrofloxacin, and rifaximin) on contractility of the bovine uterine tissue in follicular and luteal phases. The effects of these antibiotics at three single doses (10(-6), 10(-5), and 10(-4) M) on their basal contractility were evaluated in isolated organ bath. The functionality of the strip throughout the experiment was evaluated by a dose of carbachol (10(-5) M); the obtained effect had to be repeatable (difference of ≤20%) that is comparable to that induced by the previous administration of the same substance. The results demonstrate the different modulatory activities of these antibiotics on uterine contractility in follicular and luteal phases. The effects induced by amoxicillin and enrofloxacin are opposite: the first relaxes and the second increases the uterine contractility in both cycle phases. Instead, the activity of rifaximin varies depending on the phase of estrous cycle: it increases in the follicular phase and relaxes in the luteal phase. The obtained data provide the hypothesis of possible implications of these drugs in the pharmacologic modulation of uterine contractions. Their action at this level, associated with their specific antimicrobial effects, could suggest using these antibiotics for the treatment of diseases related to postpartum or infections that may occur in pregnant cattle, by virtue of their effects on myometrial contractility too.

  19. Inducible nitric oxide synthase in rat hepatic lipocytes and the effect of nitric oxide on lipocyte contractility.

    PubMed Central

    Rockey, D C; Chung, J J

    1995-01-01

    In liver injury, perisinusoidal cells known as lipocytes (Ito cells) undergo "activation," acquiring smooth muscle-like features and a contractile phenotype. To assess whether contraction of these cells is regulated by nitric oxide (NO), we examined the production of NO by lipocytes and the effect of NO on lipocyte contractility. Cultured lipocytes were exposed to cytokines and/or LPS. Single agents had little or no effect on the level of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) mRNA. However, interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), or LPS in combination with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) stimulated iNOS mRNA, which was present within 4 h after exposure. iNOS mRNA levels were paralleled by changes in nitrite (a metabolic product of NO). Intraperitoneal administration of IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, and LPS led to rapid induction of iNOS mRNA in lipocytes, confirming in vivo the culture findings. Ligation of the common hepatic bile duct, which induces periportal-based liver injury, stimulated iNOS mRNA in lipocytes. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 decreased IFN-gamma/TNF-alpha--stimulated iNOS mRNA and nitrite. Finally, the effect of NO on lipocyte contractility was examined. In cells incubated with IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha, the contractile response to either serum or endothelin-1 was blocked. Contraction was restored entirely by an inhibitor of NO synthase, NG-monomethylarginine. Furthermore, 8-bromoguanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate and sodium nitroprusside inhibited lipocyte contractility, consistent with the effect of NO induced by cytokines. We conclude that NO is a potent modulator of lipocyte contractility and may regulate this function by autocrine (or intracrine) mechanisms. Moreover, NO may play an important role in liver injury, countering the effect of contractile agonists on lipocytes. Images PMID:7533786

  20. Kaurane and pimarane-type diterpenes from the Viguiera species inhibit vascular smooth muscle contractility.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Sergio R; Tirapelli, Carlos R; da Costa, Fernando B; de Oliveira, Ana M

    2006-08-01

    The research, development and use of natural products as therapeutic agents, especially those derived from plants, have been increasing in recent years. Despite the fact that plants provide a rich source of novel biologically active compounds, only a small percentage have been phytochemically investigated and studied for their medical potential. Viguiera is a genus that belongs to the family Asteraceae and to the sunflower tribe Heliantheae, which is widespread mostly in Mexico and in other areas of the Andes and upland areas of Brazil. A review on the secondary metabolites pointed out that sesquiterpene lactones and diterpenes, of the kaurane and pimarane-type, are the main compounds produced by these plants. Some reports have shown that kaurane- and pimarane-type diterpenes exert several biological activities such as anti-inflammatory action, antimicrobial and antispasmodic activities. Kaurenoic and pimaradienoic acids, which are the main secondary metabolites isolated by our research group from the roots of Viguiera robusta and V. arenaria, respectively, have been evaluated on vascular smooth muscle contractility. We showed that these diterpenoids are able to inhibit the vascular contractility mainly by blocking extracellular Ca(2+) influx. Additionally, in this review we discuss the structure-activity relationship of the diterpenes regarding their inhibitory activity on vascular contractility.

  1. Contractile dysfunction of the shoulder (rotator cuff tendinopathy): an overview.

    PubMed

    Littlewood, Chris

    2012-11-01

    It is now over a decade since the features defining a contractile dysfunction of the shoulder were first reported. Since this time, some progress has been made to better understand this mechanical syndrome. In response to these developments, this narrative review will explore current understanding in relation to pathology, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of this syndrome with reference to literature specifically relating to contractile dysfunction but also literature relating to rotator cuff tendinopathy where necessary. The review not only identifies the strengths of the mechanical diagnosis and therapy approach with reference to a contractile dysfunction of the shoulder but also identifies where further progress needs to be made.

  2. Uterine contractility of plants used to facilitate childbirth in Nigerian ethnomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Attah, Alfred F.; O'Brien, Margaret; Koehbach, Johannes; Sonibare, Mubo A.; Moody, Jones O.; Smith, Terry J.; Gruber, Christian W.

    2012-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance Pregnant women in Nigeria use plant preparations to facilitate childbirth and to reduce associated pain. The rationale for this is not known and requires pharmacological validation. Aim of study Obtain primary information regarding the traditional use of plants and analyze their uterine contractility at cellular level. Materials and methods Semi-structured, open interviews using questionnaires of traditional healthcare professionals and other informants triggered the collection and identification of medicinal plant species. The relative traditional importance of each medicinal plant was determined by its use-mention index. Extracts of these plants were analyzed for their uterotonic properties on an in vitro human uterine cell collagen model. Result The plants Calotropis procera, Commelina africana, Duranta repens, Hyptis suaveolens, Ocimum gratissimum, Saba comorensis, Sclerocarya birrea, Sida corymbosa and Vernonia amygdalina were documented and characterized. Aqueous extracts from these nine plants induced significant sustained increases in human myometrial smooth muscle cell contractility, with varying efficiencies, depending upon time and dose of exposure. Conclusion The folkloric use of several plant species during childbirth in Nigeria has been validated. Seven plants were for the first time characterized to have contractile properties on uterine myometrial cells. The results serve as ideal starting points in the search for safe, longer lasting, effective and tolerable uterotonic drug leads. PMID:22766472

  3. The lung strip: evaluation of a method to study contractility of pulmonary parenchyma.

    PubMed

    Evans, J N; Adler, K B

    1981-08-01

    Isolated strips of rabbit lung were examined as an in vitro model for assessment of the direct effect of pharmacologic agents on the pulmonary parenchyma. Changes in force of the strip were measured with an isometric force transducer. Histamine, acetylcholine and epinephrine elicited dose-related contractile responses. Morphological and immunohistochemical examination revealed three possible sources of force generation within the strip: airway smooth muscle, vascular smooth muscle, and interstitial actin-containing cells. Generation of force by the strip could reflect contraction of any combination of these three elements. Therefore, ascription of such contraction to peripheral airway smooth muscle alone is questionable. In order to assess the properties of the contractile elements within the strip, it is necessary to isolate and study them individually.

  4. Cell density and actomyosin contractility control the organization of migrating collectives within an epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Loza, Andrew J.; Koride, Sarita; Schimizzi, Gregory V.; Li, Bo; Sun, Sean X.; Longmore, Gregory D.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying collective migration are important for understanding development, wound healing, and tumor invasion. Here we focus on cell density to determine its role in collective migration. Our findings show that increasing cell density, as might be seen in cancer, transforms groups from broad collectives to small, narrow streams. Conversely, diminishing cell density, as might occur at a wound front, leads to large, broad collectives with a distinct leader–follower structure. Simulations identify force-sensitive contractility as a mediator of how density affects collectives, and guided by this prediction, we find that the baseline state of contractility can enhance or reduce organization. Finally, we test predictions from these data in an in vivo epithelium by using genetic manipulations to drive collective motion between predicted migratory phases. This work demonstrates how commonly altered cellular properties can prime groups of cells to adopt migration patterns that may be harnessed in health or exploited in disease. PMID:27605707

  5. Cell density and actomyosin contractility control the organization of migrating collectives within an epithelium.

    PubMed

    Loza, Andrew J; Koride, Sarita; Schimizzi, Gregory V; Li, Bo; Sun, Sean X; Longmore, Gregory D

    2016-11-07

    The mechanisms underlying collective migration are important for understanding development, wound healing, and tumor invasion. Here we focus on cell density to determine its role in collective migration. Our findings show that increasing cell density, as might be seen in cancer, transforms groups from broad collectives to small, narrow streams. Conversely, diminishing cell density, as might occur at a wound front, leads to large, broad collectives with a distinct leader-follower structure. Simulations identify force-sensitive contractility as a mediator of how density affects collectives, and guided by this prediction, we find that the baseline state of contractility can enhance or reduce organization. Finally, we test predictions from these data in an in vivo epithelium by using genetic manipulations to drive collective motion between predicted migratory phases. This work demonstrates how commonly altered cellular properties can prime groups of cells to adopt migration patterns that may be harnessed in health or exploited in disease.

  6. The myogenic electric organ of Sternopygus macrurus: a non-contractile tissue with a skeletal muscle transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Manoj P.; Chaidez, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    In most electric fish species, the electric organ (EO) derives from striated muscle cells that suppress many muscle properties. In the gymnotiform Sternopygus macrurus, mature electrocytes, the current-producing cells of the EO, do not contain sarcomeres, yet they continue to make some cytoskeletal and sarcomeric proteins and the muscle transcription factors (MTFs) that induce their expression. In order to more comprehensively examine the transcriptional regulation of genes associated with the formation and maintenance of the contractile sarcomere complex, results from expression analysis using qRT-PCR were informed by deep RNA sequencing of transcriptomes and miRNA compositions of muscle and EO tissues from adult S. macrurus. Our data show that: (1) components associated with the homeostasis of the sarcomere and sarcomere-sarcolemma linkage were transcribed in EO at levels similar to those in muscle; (2) MTF families associated with activation of the skeletal muscle program were not differentially expressed between these tissues; and (3) a set of microRNAs that are implicated in regulation of the muscle phenotype are enriched in EO. These data support the development of a unique and highly specialized non-contractile electrogenic cell that emerges from a striated phenotype and further differentiates with little modification in its transcript composition. This comprehensive analysis of parallel mRNA and miRNA profiles is not only a foundation for functional studies aimed at identifying mechanisms underlying the transcription-independent myogenic program in S. macrurus EO, but also has important implications to many vertebrate cell types that independently activate or suppress specific features of the skeletal muscle program. PMID:27114860

  7. Nonmuscle Myosin IIA Regulates Platelet Contractile Forces Through Rho Kinase and Myosin Light-Chain Kinase.

    PubMed

    Feghhi, Shirin; Tooley, Wes W; Sniadecki, Nathan J

    2016-10-01

    Platelet contractile forces play a major role in clot retraction and help to hold hemostatic clots against the vessel wall. Platelet forces are produced by its cytoskeleton, which is composed of actin and nonmuscle myosin filaments. In this work, we studied the role of Rho kinase, myosin light-chain kinase, and myosin in the generation of contractile forces by using pharmacological inhibitors and arrays of flexible microposts to measure platelet forces. When platelets were seeded onto microposts, they formed aggregates on the tips of the microposts. Forces produced by the platelets in the aggregates were measured by quantifying the deflection of the microposts, which bent in proportion to the force of the platelets. Platelets were treated with small molecule inhibitors of myosin activity: Y-27632 to inhibit the Rho kinase (ROCK), ML-7 to inhibit myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK), and blebbistatin to inhibit myosin ATPase activity. ROCK inhibition reduced platelet forces, demonstrating the importance of the assembly of actin and myosin phosphorylation in generating contractile forces. Similarly, MLCK inhibition caused weaker platelet forces, which verifies that myosin phosphorylation is needed for force generation in platelets. Platelets treated with blebbistatin also had weaker forces, which indicates that myosin's ATPase activity is necessary for platelet forces. Our studies demonstrate that myosin ATPase activity and the regulation of actin-myosin assembly by ROCK and MLCK are needed for the generation of platelet forces. Our findings illustrate and explain the importance of myosin for clot compaction in hemostasis and thrombosis.

  8. Membrane-bound ICAM-1 contributes to the onset of proinvasive tumor stroma by controlling acto-myosin contractility in carcinoma-associated fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Bonan, Stephanie; Albrengues, Jean; Grasset, Eloise; Kuzet, Sanya-Eduarda; Nottet, Nicolas; Bourget, Isabelle; Bertero, Thomas; Mari, Bernard; Meneguzzi, Guerrino; Gaggioli, Cedric

    2017-01-01

    Acto-myosin contractility in carcinoma-associated fibroblasts leads to assembly of the tumor extracellular matrix. The pro-inflammatory cytokine LIF governs fibroblast activation in cancer by regulating the myosin light chain 2 activity. So far, however, how LIF mediates cytoskeleton contractility remains unknown. Using phenotypic screening assays based on knock-down of LIF-dependent genes in fibroblasts, we identified the glycoprotein ICAM-1 as a crucial regulator of stroma fibroblast proinvasive matrix remodeling. We demonstrate that the membrane-bound ICAM-1 isoform is necessary and sufficient to promote inflammation-dependent extracellular matrix contraction, which favors cancer cell invasion. Indeed, ICAM-1 mediates generation of acto-myosin contractility downstream of the Src kinases in stromal fibroblasts. Moreover, acto-myosin contractility regulates ICAM-1 expression by establishing a positive feedback signaling. Thus, targeting stromal ICAM-1 might constitute a possible therapeutic mean to counteract tumor cell invasion and dissemination. PMID:27901489

  9. VE-Cadherin Disassembly and Cell Contractility in the Endothelium are Necessary for Barrier Disruption Induced by Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aragon-Sanabria, Virginia; Pohler, Steven E.; Eswar, Vikram J.; Bierowski, Matthew; Gomez, Esther W.; Dong, Cheng

    2017-01-01

    During metastasis, breakdown of the endothelial barrier is critical for tumor cell extravasation through blood vessel walls and is mediated by a combination of tumor secreted soluble factors and receptor-ligand interactions. However, a complete mechanism governing tumor cell transendothelial migration remains unclear. Here, we investigate the roles of tumor-associated signals in regulating endothelial cell contractility and adherens junction disassembly leading to endothelial barrier breakdown. We show that Src mediates VE-cadherin disassembly in response to metastatic melanoma cells. Through the use of pharmacological inhibitors of cytoskeletal contractility we find that endothelial cell contractility is responsive to interactions with metastatic cancer cells and that reducing endothelial cell contractility abrogates migration of melanoma cells across endothelial monolayers. Furthermore, we find that a combination of tumor secreted soluble factors and receptor-ligand interactions mediate activation of Src within endothelial cells that is necessary for phosphorylation of VE-cadherin and for breakdown of the endothelial barrier. Together, these results provide insight into how tumor cell signals act in concert to modulate cytoskeletal contractility and adherens junctions disassembly during extravasation and may aid in identification of therapeutic targets to block metastasis. PMID:28393886

  10. Acute effects of taurine on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ accumulation and contractility in human type I and type II skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Dutka, T L; Lamboley, C R; Murphy, R M; Lamb, G D

    2014-10-01

    Taurine occurs in high concentrations in muscle and is implicated in numerous physiological processes, yet its effects on many aspects of contractility remain unclear. Using mechanically skinned segments of human vastus lateralis muscle fibers, we characterized the effects of taurine on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ accumulation and contractile apparatus properties in type I and type II fibers. Prolonged myoplasmic exposure (>10 min) to taurine substantially increased the rate of accumulation of Ca2+ by the SR in both fiber types, with no change in the maximum amount accumulated; no such effect was found with carnosine. SR Ca2+ accumulation was similar with 10 or 20 mM taurine, but was significantly slower at 5 mM taurine. Cytoplasmic taurine (20 mM) had no detectable effects on the responsiveness of the Ca2+ release channels in either fiber type. Taurine caused a small increase in Ca2+ sensitivity of the contractile apparatus in type I fibers, but type II fibers were unaffected; maximum Ca(2+)-activated force was unchanged in both cases. The effects of taurine on SR Ca2+ accumulation (1) only became apparent after prolonged cytoplasmic exposure, and (2) persisted for some minutes after complete removal of taurine from the cytoplasm, consistent with the hypothesis that the effects were due to an action of taurine from inside the SR. In summary, taurine potentiates the rate of SR Ca2+ uptake in both type I and type II human fibers, possibly via an action from within the SR lumen, with the degree of potentiation being significantly reduced at low physiological taurine levels.

  11. Short-term lenalidomide (Revlimid) administration ameliorates cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction in ob/ob obese mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Linlin; Hua, Yinan; Dong, Maolong; Li, Quan; Smith, Derek T; Yuan, Ming; Jones, Kyla R; Ren, Jun

    2012-11-01

    Lenalidomide is a potent immunomodulatory agent capable of downregulating proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and upregulating anti-inflammatory cytokines. Lenalidomide has been shown to elicit cardiovascular effects, although its impact on cardiac function remains obscure. This study was designed to examine the effect of lenalidomide on cardiac contractile function in ob/ob obese mice. C57BL lean and ob/ob obese mice were given lenalidomide (50 mg/kg/day, p.o.) for 3 days. Body fat composition was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) properties were evaluated. Expression of TNF-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6), Fas, Fas ligand (FasL), the short-chain fatty acid receptor GPR41, the NFκB regulator IκB, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, the apoptotic protein markers Bax, Bcl-2, caspase-8, tBid, cytosolic cytochrome C, and caspase-12; and the stress signaling molecules p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) were evaluated by western blot. ob/ob mice displayed elevated serum TNF-α and IL-6 levels, fat composition and glucose intolerance, the effects of which except glucose intolerance and fat composition were attenuated by lenalidomide. Cardiomyocytes from ob/ob mice exhibited depressed peak shortening (PS) and maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening, prolonged time-to-PS and time-to-90% relengthening as well as intracellular Ca(2+) mishandling, which were ablated by lenalidomide. Western blot analysis revealed elevated levels of TNF-α, IL-6, Fas, Bip, Bax, caspase-8, tBid, cleaved caspase-3 caspase-12, cytochrome C, phosphorylation of p38, and ERK in ob/ob mouse hearts, the effects of which with the exception of Bip, Bax, and caspase-12 were alleviated by lenalidomide. Taken together, these data suggest that lenalidomide is protective against obesity-induced cardiomyopathy possibly through antagonism of cytokine/Fas-induced activation of stress signaling and

  12. Optimum periodicity of repeated contractile actions applied in mass transport

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sungsook; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-01-01

    Dynamically repeated periodic patterns are abundant in natural and artificial systems, such as tides, heart beats, stock prices, and the like. The characteristic repeatability and periodicity are expected to be optimized in effective system-specific functions. In this study, such optimum periodicity is experimentally evaluated in terms of effective mass transport using one-valve and multi-valve systems working in contractile fluid flows. A set of nanoscale gating functions is utilized, operating in nanocomposite networks through which permeates selectively pass under characteristic contractile actions. Optimized contractile periodicity exists for effective energy impartment to flow in a one-valve system. In the sequential contractile actions for a multi-valve system, synchronization with the fluid flow is critical for effective mass transport. This study provides fundamental understanding on the various repeated periodic patterns and dynamic repeatability occurring in nature and mechanical systems, which are useful for broad applications. PMID:25622949

  13. Mechanisms of Contractile-Ring Assembly in Fission Yeast and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Laporte, Damien; Zhao, Ran; Wu, Jian-Qiu

    2010-01-01

    Most eukaryotes including fungi, amoebas, and animal cells assemble an actin/myosin-based contractile ring during cytokinesis. The majority of proteins implied in ring formation, maturation, and constriction are evolutionarily conserved, suggesting that common mechanisms exist among these divergent eukaryotes. Here, we review the recent advances in positioning and assembly of the actomyosin ring in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and animal cells. In particular, major findings have been made recently in understanding ring formation in genetically tractable S. pombe, revealing a dynamic and robust search, capture, pull, and release mechanism. PMID:20708088

  14. Operative contractility: a functional concept of the inotropic state.

    PubMed

    Curiel, Roberto; Perez-Gonzalez, Juan; Torres, Edwar; Landaeta, Ruben; Cerrolaza, Miguel

    2005-10-01

    1. Initial unsuccessful attempts to evaluate ventricular function in terms of the 'heart as a pump' led to focusing on the 'heart as a muscle' and to the concept of myocardial contractility. However, no clinically ideal index exists to assess the contractile state. The aim of the present study was to develop a mathematical model to assess cardiac contractility. 2. A tri-axial system was conceived for preload (PL), afterload (AL) and contractility, where stroke volume (SV) was represented as the volume of the tetrahedron. Based on this model, 'operative' contractility ('OperCon') was calculated from the readily measured values of PL, AL and SV. The model was tested retrospectively under a variety of different experimental and clinical conditions, in 71 studies in humans and 29 studies in dogs. A prospective echocardiographic study was performed in 143 consecutive subjects to evaluate the ability of the model to assess contractility when SV and PL were measured volumetrically (mL) or dimensionally (cm). 3. With inotropic interventions, OperCon changes were comparable to those of ejection fraction (EF), velocity of shortening (Vcf) and dP/dt-max. Only with positive inotropic interventions did elastance (Ees) show significantly larger changes. With load manipulations, OperCon showed significantly smaller changes than EF and Ees and comparable changes to Vcf and dP/dt-max. Values of OperCon were similar when AL was represented by systolic blood pressure or wall stress and when volumetric or dimensional values were used. 4. Operative contractility is a reliable, simple and versatile method to assess cardiac contractility.

  15. Structure and function of contractile proteins in muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Barden, J A; Bennetts, B H; dos Remedios, C G; Hambly, B D; Miki, M; Phillips, L

    1988-01-01

    The structural unit of muscle has long been defined as the myofibril, a supramolecular assembly of a dozen or more proteins of which two, actin and myosin, comprise more than 75%. In the past 40 years since Albert Szent-Gyorgyi first described the contractile response from the complex of actin and myosin, knowledge of the structure and function of these contractile proteins has been substantially refined. This paper describes these new discoveries and identifies the problems which remain to be elucidated.

  16. Differential responsiveness to contractile agents of isolated smooth muscle cells from human colons as a function of age and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Boyer, J C; Guitton, C; Pignodel, C; Cuq, P; Moussu, P; Pouderoux, P; Christen, M O; Balmes, J L; Bali, J P

    1997-11-01

    To study the involvement of age and inflammation in motor colonic activity in man, contractile responses to CCK, carbachol, and KCl of isolated colonic smooth muscle cells (SMC) from normal and inflamed human colons were evaluated; the incidence of sex and smoking on contraction was also analyzed. Contractile responses to the three agonists were significantly lower in tissues with a low degree of inflammation than in tissues with high level of inflammation or normal tissues. This reduction in cell responsiveness appears to be nonspecific and nonreceptor mediated. A positive correlation of the contractile responses to the three stimulants with the age of patients was observed. In contrast, no association was found between sex, smoking, and cell contraction. In conclusion, contractions of SMC due to CCK, carbachol, and KCl were significantly modified during life; inflammation of the colon led to a loss of SMC responsiveness.

  17. Multi-cellular interactions sustain long-term contractility of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Burridge, Paul W; Metzler, Scott A; Nakayama, Karina H; Abilez, Oscar J; Simmons, Chelsey S; Bruce, Marc A; Matsuura, Yuka; Kim, Paul; Wu, Joseph C; Butte, Manish; Huang, Ngan F; Yang, Phillip C

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic delivery of cardiomyocytes derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC-CMs) represents a novel clinical approach to regenerate the injured myocardium. However, poor survival and contractility of these cells are a significant bottleneck to their clinical use. To better understand the role of cell-cell communication in enhancing the phenotype and contractile properties of hPSC-CMs, we developed a three-dimensional (3D) hydrogel composed of hPSC-CMs, human pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells (hPSC-ECs), and/or human amniotic mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs). The objective of this study was to examine the role of multi-cellular interactions among hPSC-ECs and hAMSCs on the survival and long-term contractile phenotype of hPSC-CMs in a 3D hydrogel. Quantification of spontaneous contractility of hPSC-CMs in tri-culture demonstrated a 6-fold increase in the area of contractile motion after 6 weeks with characteristic rhythmic contraction frequency, when compared to hPSC-CMs alone (P < 0.05). This finding was supported by a statistically significant increase in cardiac troponin T protein expression in the tri-culture hydrogel construct at 6 weeks, when compared to hPSC-CMs alone (P < 0.001). The sustained hPSC-CM survival and contractility in tri-culture was associated with a significant upregulation in the gene expression of L-type Ca2+ ion channel, Cav1.2, and the inward-rectifier potassium channel, Kir2.1 (P < 0.05), suggesting a role of ion channels in mediating these processes. These findings demonstrate that multi-cellular interactions modulate hPSC-CM phenotype, function, and survival, and they will have important implications in engineering cardiac tissues for treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25628783

  18. Ca2+-dependent in vitro contractility of a precipitate isolated from an extract of the heliozoon Actinophrys sol.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, Mikihiko; Saito, Akira; Omura, Gen; Khan, S M Mostafa Kamal; Suetomo, Yasutaka; Kakuta, Soichiro; Suzaki, Toshinobu

    2006-02-01

    Contraction of axopodia in actinophrid heliozoons (protozoa) is induced by a unique contractile structure, the "contractile tubules structure (CTS)". We have previously shown that a cell homogenate of the heliozoon Actinophrys sol yields a precipitate on addition of Ca2+ that is mainly composed of filamentous structures morphologically identical to the CTS. In this study, to further characterize the nature of the CTS in vitro, biochemical and physiological properties of the precipitate were examined. SDS-PAGE analysis showed that the Ca2+-induced precipitate was composed of many proteins, and that no proteins in the precipitate showed any detectable changes in electrophoretic mobility on addition of Ca2+. Addition of extraneous proteins such as bovine serum albumin to the cell homogenate resulted in cosedimentation of the proteins with the Ca2+-induced precipitate, suggesting that the CTS has a high affinity for other proteins that are not related to precipitate formation. Appearance and disappearance of the precipitate were repeatedly induced by alternating addition of Ca2+ and EGTA, and its protein composition remained unchanged even after repeated cycles. When adhered to a glass surface, the precipitate showed Ca2+-dependent contractility with a threshold of 10-100 nM, and this contractility was not inhibited by colchicine or cytochalasin B. The precipitate repeatedly contracted and relaxed with successive addition and removal of Ca2+, indicating that the contraction was controlled by Ca2+ alone with no need for any other energy supply. From our characterization of the precipitate, we concluded that its Ca2+-dependent formation and contraction are associated with the unique contractile organelle, the "contractile tubules structure".

  19. The heart in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: early detection of contractile performance alteration

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Sören; Knipp, Stephan; Weber, Cornelia; Hein, Selina; Schinkel, Stefanie; Walther, Andreas; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Müller, Oliver J; Friedrich, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Progressive cardiomyopathy is a major cause of death in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients. Coupling between Ca2+ handling and contractile properties in dystrophic hearts is poorly understood. It is also not clear whether developing cardiac failure is dominated by alterations in Ca2+ pathways or more related to the contractile apparatus. We simultaneously recorded force and Ca2+ transients in field-stimulated papillary muscles from young (10–14 weeks) wild-type (wt) and dystrophic mdx mice. Force amplitudes were fivefold reduced in mdx muscles despite only 30 % reduction in fura-2 ratio amplitudes. This indicated mechanisms other than systolic Ca2+ to additionally account for force decrements in mdx muscles. pCa-force relations revealed decreased mdx myofibrillar Ca2+ sensitivity. ‘In vitro’ motility assays, studied in mdx hearts here for the first time, showed significantly slower sliding velocities. mdx MLC/MHC isoforms were not grossly altered. Dystrophic hearts showed echocardiography signs of early ventricular wall hypertrophy with a significantly enlarged end-diastolic diameter ‘in vivo’. However, fractional shortening was still comparable to wt mice. Changes in the contractile apparatus satisfactorily explained force drop in mdx hearts. We give first evidence of early hypertrophy in mdx mice and possible mechanisms for already functional impairment of cardiac muscle in DMD. PMID:22970922

  20. Contractile function is unaltered in diaphragm from mice lacking calcium release channel isoform 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, J. S.; Takeshima, H.; Hamilton, S. L.; Reid, M. B.

    1999-01-01

    Skeletal muscle expresses at least two isoforms of the calcium release channel in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (RyR1 and RyR3). Whereas the function of RyR1 is well defined, the physiological significance of RyR3 is unclear. Some authors have suggested that RyR3 participates in excitation-contraction coupling and that RyR3 may specifically confer resistance to fatigue. To test this hypothesis, we measured contractile function of diaphragm strips from adult RyR3-deficient mice (exon 2-targeted mutation) and their heterozygous and wild-type littermates. In unfatigued diaphragm, there were no differences in isometric contractile properties (twitch characteristics, force-frequency relationships, maximal force) among the three groups. Our fatigue protocol (30 Hz, 0.25 duty cycle, 37 degrees C) depressed force to 25% of the initial force; however, lack of RyR3 did not accelerate the decline in force production. The force-frequency relationship was shifted to higher frequencies and was depressed in fatigued diaphragm; lack of RyR3 did not exaggerate these changes. We therefore provide evidence that RyR3 deficiency does not alter contractile function of adult muscle before, during, or after fatigue.

  1. A small-molecule inhibitor of sarcomere contractility suppresses hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Green, Eric M; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Anderson, Robert L; Evanchik, Marc J; Gorham, Joshua M; Harrison, Brooke C; Henze, Marcus; Kawas, Raja; Oslob, Johan D; Rodriguez, Hector M; Song, Yonghong; Wan, William; Leinwand, Leslie A; Spudich, James A; McDowell, Robert S; Seidman, J G; Seidman, Christine E

    2016-02-05

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an inherited disease of heart muscle that can be caused by mutations in sarcomere proteins. Clinical diagnosis depends on an abnormal thickening of the heart, but the earliest signs of disease are hyperdynamic contraction and impaired relaxation. Whereas some in vitro studies of power generation by mutant and wild-type sarcomere proteins are consistent with mutant sarcomeres exhibiting enhanced contractile power, others are not. We identified a small molecule, MYK-461, that reduces contractility by decreasing the adenosine triphosphatase activity of the cardiac myosin heavy chain. Here we demonstrate that early, chronic administration of MYK-461 suppresses the development of ventricular hypertrophy, cardiomyocyte disarray, and myocardial fibrosis and attenuates hypertrophic and profibrotic gene expression in mice harboring heterozygous human mutations in the myosin heavy chain. These data indicate that hyperdynamic contraction is essential for HCM pathobiology and that inhibitors of sarcomere contraction may be a valuable therapeutic approach for HCM.

  2. Effect of the flavonoid galangin on urinary bladder rat contractility in-vitro.

    PubMed

    Capasso, Raffaele; Tavares, Ignatius A

    2002-08-01

    Galangin is a flavanol with several biological activities. We have evaluated the effect of galangin on the contractile response elicited by electrical field stimulation (EFS) in the rat isolated urinary bladder. Galangin (10(-8)-10(-4) M) produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of the EFS contractile response without modifying the contractions produced by exogenous acetylcholine (10(-6) M). Blockade of adrenergic and cholinergic nerves with a combination of atropine (10(-6) M), phentolamine (10(-6) M) and propranolol (10(-6) M) or blockade of tachykinin NK1 and NK2 receptors with SR140333 (10(-7) M) and SR48968 (10(-6) M) did not modify the inhibitory effect of galangin. However, verapamil (10(-7) M) significantly reduced the inhibitory effect of galangin. It is concluded that the galangin inhibits EFS-induced contractions of the rat urinary bladder by acting on L-type calcium channels on presynaptic nerves.

  3. A small-molecule inhibitor of sarcomere contractility suppresses hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Green, Eric M.; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Anderson, Robert L.; Evanchik, Marc J.; Gorham, Joshua M.; Harrison, Brooke C.; Henze, Marcus; Kawas, Raja; Oslob, Johan D.; Rodriguez, Hector M.; Song, Yonghong; Wan, William; Leinwand, Leslie A.; Spudich, James A.; McDowell, Robert S.; Seidman, J. G.; Seidman, Christine E.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an inherited disease of heart muscle that can be caused by mutations in sarcomere proteins. Clinical diagnosis depends on an abnormal thickening of the heart, but the earliest signs of disease are hyperdynamic contraction and impaired relaxation. Whereas some in vitro studies of power generation by mutant and wild-type sarcomere proteins are consistent with mutant sarcomeres exhibiting enhanced contractile power, others are not. We identified a small molecule, MYK-461, that reduces contractility by decreasing the adenosine triphosphatase activity of the cardiac myosin heavy chain. Here we demonstrate that early, chronic administration of MYK-461 suppresses the development of ventricular hypertrophy, cardiomyocyte disarray, and myocardial fibrosis and attenuates hypertrophic and profibrotic gene expression in mice harboring heterozygous human mutations in the myosin heavy chain. These data indicate that hyperdynamic contraction is essential for HCM pathobiology and that inhibitors of sarcomere contraction may be a valuable therapeutic approach for HCM. PMID:26912705

  4. The effects of Ginseng Java root extract on uterine contractility in nonpregnant rats

    PubMed Central

    Sukwan, Catthareeya; Wray, Susan; Kupittayanant, Sajeera

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Ginseng Java or Talinum paniculatum (Jacq.) Geartn has long been used in herbal recipes because of its various therapeutic properties. Ginseng Java is believed to be beneficial to the female reproductive system by inducing lactation and restoring uterine functions after the postpartum period. There are, however, no scientific data on verifying the effects on the uterus to support its therapeutic relevance. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Ginseng Java root extract and its possible mechanism(s) of action on uterine contractility. Female virgin rats were humanely killed by CO2 asphyxia and uteri removed. Isometric force was measured in strips of longitudinal myometrium. The effects of Ginseng Java root extract at its IC50 concentration (0.23 mg/mL) on spontaneous, oxytocin‐induced (10 nmol/L), and depolarized (KCl 40 mmol/L) contraction were investigated. After establishing regular phasic contractions, the application of Java root extract significantly inhibited spontaneous uterine contractility (n =5). The extract also significantly inhibited the contraction induced by high KCl solution (n =5) and oxytocin (n =5). The extract also inhibited oxytocin‐induced contraction in the absence of external Ca entry (n =7) and the tonic force induced by oxytocin in the presence of high KCl solution. Taken together, the data demonstrate a potent and consistent ability of extract from Ginseng Java root to reduce myometrial contractility. The tocolytic effects were demonstrated on both spontaneous and agonist‐induced contractions. The fact that force was inhibited in depolarized conditions suggests that the possible mechanisms may be blockade of Ca influx via L‐type Ca channels. The data in Ca‐free solutions suggest that the extract also reduces IP3‐induced Ca release from the internal store. These tocolytic effects do not support the use of ginseng to help with postpartum contractility, but instead suggest it may be

  5. Novel approaches to determine contractile function of the isolated adult zebrafish ventricular cardiac myocyte

    PubMed Central

    Dvornikov, Alexey V; Dewan, Sukriti; Alekhina, Olga V; Pickett, F Bryan; de Tombe, Pieter P

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) has been used extensively in cardiovascular biology, but mainly in the study of heart development. The relative ease of its genetic manipulation may indicate the suitability of this species as a cost-effective model system for the study of cardiac contractile biology. However, whether the zebrafish heart is an appropriate model system for investigations pertaining to mammalian cardiac contractile structure–function relationships remains to be resolved. Myocytes were isolated from adult zebrafish hearts by enzymatic digestion, attached to carbon rods, and twitch force and intracellular Ca2+ were measured. We observed the modulation of twitch force, but not of intracellular Ca2+, by both extracellular [Ca2+] and sarcomere length. In permeabilized cells/myofibrils, we found robust myofilament length-dependent activation. Moreover, modulation of myofilament activation–relaxation and force redevelopment kinetics by varied Ca2+ activation levels resembled that found previously in mammalian myofilaments. We conclude that the zebrafish is a valid model system for the study of cardiac contractile structure–function relationships. PMID:24591576

  6. Increased acetyl group availability enhances contractile function of canine skeletal muscle during ischemia.

    PubMed Central

    Timmons, J A; Poucher, S M; Constantin-Teodosiu, D; Worrall, V; Macdonald, I A; Greenhaff, P L

    1996-01-01

    Skeletal muscle contractile function is impaired during acute ischemia such as that experienced by peripheral vascular disease patients. We therefore, examined the effects of dichloroacetate, which can alter resting metabolism, on canine gracilis muscle contractile function during constant flow ischemia. Pretreatment with dichloroacetate increased resting pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity and resting acetylcarnitine concentration by approximately 4- and approximately 10-fold, respectively. After 20-min contraction the control group had demonstrated an approximately 40% reduction in isomeric tension whereas the dichloroacetate group had fatigued by approximately 25% (P < 0.05). Dichloroacetate resulted in less lactate accumulation (10.3 +/- 3.0 vs 58.9 +/- 10.5 mmol.kg-1 dry muscle [dm], P < 0.05) and phosphocreatine hydrolysis (15.6 +/- 6.3 vs 33.8 +/- 9.0 mmol.kg-1 dm, P < 0.05) during contraction. Acetylcarnitine concentration fell during contraction by 5.4 +/- 1.8 mmol.kg-1 dm in the dichloroacetate group but increased by 10.0 +/- 1.9 mmol.kg-1 dm in the control group. In conclusion, dichloroacetate enhanced contractile function during ischemia, independently of blood flow, such that it appears oxidative ATP regeneration is limited by pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity and acetyl group availability. PMID:8609248

  7. Impaired contractile recovery after low-flow myocardial ischemia in a porcine model of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Huang, Janice V; Lu, Li; Ye, Shuyu; Bergman, Bryan C; Sparagna, Genevieve C; Sarraf, Mohammad; Reusch, Jane E B; Greyson, Clifford R; Schwartz, Gregory G

    2013-03-15

    Clinical metabolic syndrome conveys a poor prognosis in patients with acute coronary syndrome, not fully accounted for by the extent of coronary atherosclerosis. To explain this observation, we determined whether postischemic myocardial contractile and metabolic function are impaired in a porcine dietary model of metabolic syndrome without atherosclerosis. Micropigs (n = 28) were assigned to a control diet (low fat, no added sugars) or an intervention diet (high saturated fat and simple sugars, no added cholesterol) for 7 mo. The intervention diet produced obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and impaired glucose tolerance, but not atherosclerosis. Under open-chest, anesthetized conditions, pigs underwent 45 min of low-flow myocardial ischemia and 120 min of reperfusion. In both diet groups, contractile function was similar at baseline and declined similarly during ischemia. However, after 120 min of reperfusion, regional work recovered to 21 ± 12% of baseline in metabolic syndrome pigs compared with 61 ± 13% in control pigs (P = 0.01). Ischemia-reperfusion caused a progressive decline in mechanical/metabolic efficiency (regional work/O2 consumption) in metabolic syndrome hearts, but not in control hearts. Metabolic syndrome hearts demonstrated altered fatty acyl composition of cardiolipin and increased Akt phosphorylation in both ischemic and nonischemic regions, suggesting tonic activation. Metabolic syndrome hearts used more fatty acid than control hearts (P = 0.03). When fatty acid availability was restricted by prior insulin exposure, differences between groups in postischemic contractile recovery and mechanical/metabolic efficiency were eliminated. In conclusion, pigs with characteristics of metabolic syndrome demonstrate impaired contractile and metabolic recovery after low-flow myocardial ischemia. Contributory mechanisms may include remodeling of cardiolipin, abnormal activation of Akt, and excessive utilization of fatty acid substrates.

  8. Impaired contractile recovery after low-flow myocardial ischemia in a porcine model of metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Janice V.; Lu, Li; Ye, Shuyu; Bergman, Bryan C.; Sparagna, Genevieve C.; Sarraf, Mohammad; Reusch, Jane E. B.; Greyson, Clifford R.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical metabolic syndrome conveys a poor prognosis in patients with acute coronary syndrome, not fully accounted for by the extent of coronary atherosclerosis. To explain this observation, we determined whether postischemic myocardial contractile and metabolic function are impaired in a porcine dietary model of metabolic syndrome without atherosclerosis. Micropigs (n = 28) were assigned to a control diet (low fat, no added sugars) or an intervention diet (high saturated fat and simple sugars, no added cholesterol) for 7 mo. The intervention diet produced obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and impaired glucose tolerance, but not atherosclerosis. Under open-chest, anesthetized conditions, pigs underwent 45 min of low-flow myocardial ischemia and 120 min of reperfusion. In both diet groups, contractile function was similar at baseline and declined similarly during ischemia. However, after 120 min of reperfusion, regional work recovered to 21 ± 12% of baseline in metabolic syndrome pigs compared with 61 ± 13% in control pigs (P = 0.01). Ischemia-reperfusion caused a progressive decline in mechanical/metabolic efficiency (regional work/O2 consumption) in metabolic syndrome hearts, but not in control hearts. Metabolic syndrome hearts demonstrated altered fatty acyl composition of cardiolipin and increased Akt phosphorylation in both ischemic and nonischemic regions, suggesting tonic activation. Metabolic syndrome hearts used more fatty acid than control hearts (P = 0.03). When fatty acid availability was restricted by prior insulin exposure, differences between groups in postischemic contractile recovery and mechanical/metabolic efficiency were eliminated. In conclusion, pigs with characteristics of metabolic syndrome demonstrate impaired contractile and metabolic recovery after low-flow myocardial ischemia. Contributory mechanisms may include remodeling of cardiolipin, abnormal activation of Akt, and excessive utilization of fatty acid substrates. PMID:23335793

  9. Pericyte contractility controls endothelial cell cycle progression and sprouting: insights into angiogenic switch mechanics.

    PubMed

    Durham, Jennifer T; Surks, Howard K; Dulmovits, Brian M; Herman, Ira M

    2014-11-01

    Microvascular stability and regulation of capillary tonus are regulated by pericytes and their interactions with endothelial cells (EC). While the RhoA/Rho kinase (ROCK) pathway has been implicated in modulation of pericyte contractility, in part via regulation of the myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP), the mechanisms linking Rho GTPase activity with actomyosin-based contraction and the cytoskeleton are equivocal. Recently, the myosin phosphatase-RhoA-interacting protein (MRIP) was shown to mediate the RhoA/ROCK-directed MLCP inactivation in vascular smooth muscle. Here we report that MRIP directly interacts with the β-actin-specific capping protein βcap73. Furthermore, manipulation of MRIP expression influences pericyte contractility, with MRIP silencing inducing cytoskeletal remodeling and cellular hypertrophy. MRIP knockdown induces a repositioning of βcap73 from the leading edge to stress fibers; thus MRIP-silenced pericytes increase F-actin-driven cell spreading twofold. These hypertrophied and cytoskeleton-enriched pericytes demonstrate a 2.2-fold increase in contractility upon MRIP knockdown when cells are plated on a deformable substrate. In turn, silencing pericyte MRIP significantly affects EC cycle progression and angiogenic activation. When MRIP-silenced pericytes are cocultured with capillary EC, there is a 2.0-fold increase in EC cycle entry. Furthermore, in three-dimensional models of injury and repair, silencing pericyte MRIP results in a 1.6-fold elevation of total tube area due to EC network formation and increased angiogenic sprouting. The pivotal role of MRIP expression in governing pericyte contractile phenotype and endothelial growth should lend important new insights into how chemomechanical signaling pathways control the "angiogenic switch" and pathological angiogenic induction.

  10. Cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced myocardial contractile dysfunction: role of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Turdi, Subat; Han, Xuefeng; Huff, Anna F; Roe, Nathan D; Hu, Nan; Gao, Feng; Ren, Jun

    2012-09-15

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from gram-negative bacteria is a major initiator of sepsis, leading to cardiovascular collapse. Accumulating evidence has indicated a role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cardiovascular complications in sepsis. This study was designed to examine the effect of cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase in LPS-induced cardiac contractile dysfunction and the underlying mechanism(s) with a focus on autophagy. Catalase transgenic and wild-type FVB mice were challenged with LPS (6 mg/kg) and cardiac function was evaluated. Levels of oxidative stress, autophagy, apoptosis, and protein damage were examined using fluorescence microscopy, Western blot, TUNEL assay, caspase-3 activity, and carbonyl formation. A Kaplan-Meier curve was constructed for survival after LPS treatment. Our results revealed a lower mortality in catalase mice compared with FVB mice after LPS challenge. LPS injection led to depressed cardiac contractile capacity as evidenced by echocardiography and cardiomyocyte contractile function, the effect of which was ablated by catalase overexpression. LPS treatment induced elevated TNF-α level, autophagy, apoptosis (TUNEL, caspase-3 activation, cleaved caspase-3), production of ROS and O(2)(-), and protein carbonyl formation, the effects of which were significantly attenuated by catalase overexpression. Electron microscopy revealed focal myocardial damage characterized by mitochondrial injury after LPS treatment, which was less severe in catalase mice. Interestingly, LPS-induced cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction was prevented by the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine and the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. Taken together, our data revealed that catalase protects against LPS-induced cardiac dysfunction and mortality, which may be associated with inhibition of oxidative stress and autophagy.

  11. SOME CHEMICAL PROPERTIES UNDERLYING ARSENIC'S BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    In this paper some of the chemical properties of arsenicals (atomic
    and molecular orbitals, electronegativity, valence state, changes between
    valence state, nucleophilicity, the hard/soft acid/base principle) that may
    account for some of the b...

  12. Role of microtubules in the contractile dysfunction of hypertrophied myocardium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zile, M. R.; Koide, M.; Sato, H.; Ishiguro, Y.; Conrad, C. H.; Buckley, J. M.; Morgan, J. P.; Cooper, G. 4th

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We sought to determine whether the ameliorative effects of microtubule depolymerization on cellular contractile dysfunction in pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy apply at the tissue level. BACKGROUND: A selective and persistent increase in microtubule density causes decreased contractile function of cardiocytes from cats with hypertrophy produced by chronic right ventricular (RV) pressure overloading. Microtubule depolymerization by colchicine normalizes contractility in these isolated cardiocytes. However, whether these changes in cellular function might contribute to changes in function at the more highly integrated and complex cardiac tissue level was unknown. METHODS: Accordingly, RV papillary muscles were isolated from 25 cats with RV pressure overload hypertrophy induced by pulmonary artery banding (PAB) for 4 weeks and 25 control cats. Contractile state was measured using physiologically sequenced contractions before and 90 min after treatment with 10(-5) mol/liter colchicine. RESULTS: The PAB significantly increased RV systolic pressure and the RV weight/body weight ratio in PAB; it significantly decreased developed tension from 59+/-3 mN/mm2 in control to 25+/-4 mN/mm2 in PAB, shortening extent from 0.21+/-0.01 muscle lengths (ML) in control to 0.12+/-0.01 ML in PAB, and shortening rate from 1.12+/-0.07 ML/s in control to 0.55+/-0.03 ML/s in PAB. Indirect immunofluorescence confocal microscopy showed that PAB muscles had a selective increase in microtubule density and that colchicine caused complete microtubule depolymerization in both control and PAB papillary muscles. Microtubule depolymerization normalized myocardial contractility in papillary muscles of PAB cats but did not alter contractility in control muscles. CONCLUSIONS: Excess microtubule density, therefore, is equally important to both cellular and to myocardial contractile dysfunction caused by chronic, severe pressure-overload cardiac hypertrophy.

  13. Contractile Force of Human Extraocular Muscle: A Theoretical Analysis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongmei; Gao, Zhipeng; Chen, Weiyi

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The length-contractile force relationships of six human extraocular muscles (EOMs) in primary innervations should be determined during eye movement modeling and surgery of clinical EOMs. This study aims to investigate these relationships. Method. The proposal is based on the assumption that six EOMs have similar constitutive relationships, with the eye suspended in the primary position. The constitutive relationships of EOMs are obtained by optimizing from previous experimental data and the theory of mechanical equilibrium using traditional model. Further, simulate the existing experiment of resistance force, and then compare the simulated results with the existing experimental results. Finally, the mechanical constitutive relationships of EOMs are obtained. Results. The results show that the simulated resistance forces from the other four EOMs except for the horizontal recti well agree with previous experimental results. Conclusion. The mechanical constitutive relationships of six EOMs in primary innervations are obtained, and the rationality of the constitutive relationships is verified. Whereafter, the active stress-strain relationships of the six EOMs in the primary innervations are obtained. The research results can improve the eye movement model to predict the surgical amounts of EOMs before EOM surgery more precisely.

  14. Considerations for Contractile Electroactive Polymeric Materials and Actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, Lenore; Erickson, Carl J.; Meixler, Lewis D.; Ascione, George; Gentile, Charles A.; Tilson, Charles; Bernasek, Stephen L.; Abelev, Esta

    2009-06-16

    Ras Labs produces electroactive polymer (EAP) based materials and actuators that bend, swell, ripple and now contract (new development) with low electric input. This is an important attribute because of the ability of contraction to produce life-like motion. The mechanism of contraction is not well understood. Radionuclide-labeled experiments were conducted to follow the movement of electrolytes and water in these EAPs when activated. Extreme temperature experiments were performed on the contractile EAPs with very favorable results. One of the biggest challenges in developing these actuators, however, is the electrode-EAP interface because of the pronounced movement of the EAP. Plasma treatments of metallic electrodes were investigated in order to improve the attachment of the embedded electrodes to the EAP material. Surface analysis, adhesive testing, and mechanical testing were conducted to test metal surfaces and metal-polymer interfaces. The nitrogen plasma treatment of titanium produced a strong metal-polymer interface; however, oxygen plasma treatment of both stainless steel and titanium produced even stronger metal-polymer interfaces. Plasma treatment of the electrodes allows for the embedded electrodes and the EAP material of the actuator to work and move as a unit, with no detachment, by significantly improving the metal-polymer interface.

  15. Contractile Force of Human Extraocular Muscle: A Theoretical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongmei; Gao, Zhipeng; Chen, Weiyi

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The length-contractile force relationships of six human extraocular muscles (EOMs) in primary innervations should be determined during eye movement modeling and surgery of clinical EOMs. This study aims to investigate these relationships. Method. The proposal is based on the assumption that six EOMs have similar constitutive relationships, with the eye suspended in the primary position. The constitutive relationships of EOMs are obtained by optimizing from previous experimental data and the theory of mechanical equilibrium using traditional model. Further, simulate the existing experiment of resistance force, and then compare the simulated results with the existing experimental results. Finally, the mechanical constitutive relationships of EOMs are obtained. Results. The results show that the simulated resistance forces from the other four EOMs except for the horizontal recti well agree with previous experimental results. Conclusion. The mechanical constitutive relationships of six EOMs in primary innervations are obtained, and the rationality of the constitutive relationships is verified. Whereafter, the active stress-strain relationships of the six EOMs in the primary innervations are obtained. The research results can improve the eye movement model to predict the surgical amounts of EOMs before EOM surgery more precisely. PMID:27087774

  16. Passive and active mechanical properties of the superficial and deep digital flexor muscles in the forelimbs of anesthetized Thoroughbred horses.

    PubMed

    Swanstrom, Michael D; Zarucco, Laura; Stover, Susan M; Hubbard, Mont; Hawkins, David A; Driessen, Bernd; Steffey, Eugene P

    2005-03-01

    The superficial (SDF) and deep digital flexor (DDF) muscles are critical for equine forelimb locomotion. Knowledge of their mechanical properties will enhance our understanding of limb biomechanics. Muscle contractile properties derived from architectural-based algorithms may overestimate real forces and underestimate shortening capacity because of simplistic assumptions regarding muscle architecture. Therefore, passive and active (=total - passive) force-length properties of the SDF and DDF muscles were measured directly in vivo. Muscles from the right forelimbs of four Thoroughbred horses were evaluated during general anesthesia. Limbs were fixed to an external frame with the muscle attached to a linear actuator and load cell. Each muscle was stretched from an unloaded state to a range of prefixed lengths, then stimulated while held at that length. The total force did not exceed 4000 N, the limit for the clamping device. The SDF and DDF muscles produced 716+/-192 and 1577+/-203 N maximum active isometric force (F(max)), had ascending force-length ranges (R(asc)) of 5.1+/-0.2 and 9.1+/-0.4 cm, and had passive stiffnesses of 1186+/-104 and 1132+/-51 N/cm, respectively. The values measured for F(max) were much smaller than predicted based on conservative estimates of muscle specific tension and muscle physiological cross-sectional area. R(asc) were much larger than predicted based on muscle fiber length estimates. These data suggest that accurate prediction of the active mechanical behavior of architecturally complex muscles such as the equine DDF and SDF requires more sophisticated algorithms.

  17. [Study on influence between activated carbon property and immobilized biological activated carbon purification effect].

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-zhi; Li, Wei-guang; He, Wen-jie; Han, Hong-da; Ding, Chi; Ma, Xiao-na; Qu, Yan-ming

    2006-10-01

    By means of immobilizing five kinds of activated carbon, we studied the influence between the chief activated carbon property items and immobilized bioactivated carbon (IBAC) purification effect with the correlation analysis. The result shows that the activated carbon property items which the correlation coefficient is up 0.7 include molasses, abrasion number, hardness, tannin, uniform coefficient, mean particle diameter and effective particle diameter; the activated carbon property items which the correlation coefficient is up 0.5 include pH, iodine, butane and tetrachloride. In succession, the partial correlation analysis shows that activated carbon property items mostly influencing on IBAC purification effect include molasses, hardness, abrasion number, uniform coefficient, mean particle diameter and effective particle diameter. The causation of these property items bringing influence on IBAC purification is that the activated carbon holes distribution (representative activated carbon property item is molasses) provides inhabitable location and adjust food for the dominance bacteria; the mechanical resist-crash property of activated carbon (representative activated carbon property items: abrasion number and hardness) have influence on the stability of biofilm; and the particle diameter size and distribution of activated carbon (representative activated carbon property items: uniform coefficient, mean particle diameter and effective particle diameter) can directly affect the force of water in IBAC filter bed, which brings influence on the dominance bacteria immobilizing on activated carbon.

  18. Vascular contractile reactivity in hypotension due to reduced renal reabsorption of Na(+) and restricted dietary Na().

    PubMed

    Alshahrani, Saeed; Rapoport, Robert M; Soleimani, Manoocher

    2017-03-01

    Reduced renal Na(+) reabsorption along with restricted dietary Na(+) depletes intravascular plasma volume which can then result in hypotension. Whether hypotension occurs and the magnitude of hypotension depends in part on compensatory angiotensin II-mediated increased vascular resistance. We investigated whether the ability of vascular resistance to mitigate the hypotension was compromised by decreased contractile reactivity. In vitro reactivity was investigated in aorta from mouse models of reduced renal Na(+) reabsorption and restricted dietary Na(+) associated with considerable hypotension and renin-angiotensin system activation: (1) the Na(+)-Cl(-)-Co-transporter (NCC) knockout (KO) with Na(+) restricted diet (0.1%, 2 weeks) and (2) the relatively more severe pendrin (apical chloride/bicarbonate exchanger) and NCC double KO. Contractile sensitivity to KCl, phenylephrine, and/or U46619 remained unaltered in aorta from both models. Maximal KCl and phenylephrine contraction expressed as force/aorta length from NCC KO with Na(+)-restricted diet remained unaltered, while in pendrin/NCC double KO were reduced to 49 and 64%, respectively. Wet weight of aorta from NCC KO with Na(+)-restricted diet remained unaltered, while pendrin/NCC double KO was reduced to 67%, consistent with decreased medial width determined with Verhoeff-Van Gieson stain. These findings suggest that hypotension associated with severe intravascular volume depletion, as the result of decreased renal Na(+) reabsorption, may in part be due to decreased contractile reactivity as a consequence of reduced vascular hypertrophy.

  19. Metabolites of MDMA induce oxidative stress and contractile dysfunction in adult rat left ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Shenouda, Sylvia K; Varner, Kurt J; Carvalho, Felix; Lucchesi, Pamela A

    2009-03-01

    Repeated administration of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) (ecstasy) produces eccentric left ventricular (LV) dilation and diastolic dysfunction. While the mechanism(s) underlying this toxicity are unknown, oxidative stress plays an important role. MDMA is metabolized into redox cycling metabolites that produce superoxide. In this study, we demonstrated that metabolites of MDMA induce oxidative stress and contractile dysfunction in adult rat left ventricular myocytes. Metabolites of MDMA used in this study included alpha-methyl dopamine, N-methyl alpha-methyl dopamine and 2,5-bis(glutathion-S-yl)-alpha-MeDA. Dihydroethidium was used to detect drug-induced increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in ventricular myocytes. Contractile function and changes in intracellular calcium transients were measured in paced (1 Hz), Fura-2 AM loaded, myocytes using the IonOptix system. Production of ROS in ventricular myocytes treated with MDMA was not different from control. In contrast, all three metabolites of MDMA exhibited time- and concentration-dependent increases in ROS that were prevented by N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC). The metabolites of MDMA, but not MDMA alone, significantly decreased contractility and impaired relaxation in myocytes stimulated at 1 Hz. These effects were prevented by NAC. Together, these data suggest that MDMA-induced oxidative stress in the left ventricle can be due, at least in part, to the metabolism of MDMA to redox active metabolites.

  20. Minimally invasive high-speed imaging of sarcomere contractile dynamics in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Llewellyn, Michael E; Barretto, Robert P J; Delp, Scott L; Schnitzer, Mark J

    2008-08-07

    Sarcomeres are the basic contractile units of striated muscle. Our knowledge about sarcomere dynamics has primarily come from in vitro studies of muscle fibres and analysis of optical diffraction patterns obtained from living muscles. Both approaches involve highly invasive procedures and neither allows examination of individual sarcomeres in live subjects. Here we report direct visualization of individual sarcomeres and their dynamical length variations using minimally invasive optical microendoscopy to observe second-harmonic frequencies of light generated in the muscle fibres of live mice and humans. Using microendoscopes as small as 350 microm in diameter, we imaged individual sarcomeres in both passive and activated muscle. Our measurements permit in vivo characterization of sarcomere length changes that occur with alterations in body posture and visualization of local variations in sarcomere length not apparent in aggregate length determinations. High-speed data acquisition enabled observation of sarcomere contractile dynamics with millisecond-scale resolution. These experiments point the way to in vivo imaging studies demonstrating how sarcomere performance varies with physical conditioning and physiological state, as well as imaging diagnostics revealing how neuromuscular diseases affect contractile dynamics.

  1. TRPM4 Is a Novel Component of the Adhesome Required for Focal Adhesion Disassembly, Migration and Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Cáceres, Mónica; Ortiz, Liliana; Recabarren, Tatiana; Romero, Anibal; Colombo, Alicia; Leiva-Salcedo, Elías; Varela, Diego; Rivas, José; Silva, Ian; Morales, Diego; Campusano, Camilo; Almarza, Oscar; Simon, Felipe; Toledo, Hector; Park, Kang-Sik; Trimmer, James S.; Cerda, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Cellular migration and contractility are fundamental processes that are regulated by a variety of concerted mechanisms such as cytoskeleton rearrangements, focal adhesion turnover, and Ca2+ oscillations. TRPM4 is a Ca2+-activated non-selective cationic channel (Ca2+-NSCC) that conducts monovalent but not divalent cations. Here, we used a mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach to identify putative TRPM4-associated proteins. Interestingly, the largest group of these proteins has actin cytoskeleton-related functions, and among these nine are specifically annotated as focal adhesion-related proteins. Consistent with these results, we found that TRPM4 localizes to focal adhesions in cells from different cellular lineages. We show that suppression of TRPM4 in MEFs impacts turnover of focal adhesions, serum-induced Ca2+ influx, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Rac activities, and results in reduced cellular spreading, migration and contractile behavior. Finally, we demonstrate that the inhibition of TRPM4 activity alters cellular contractility in vivo, affecting cutaneous wound healing. Together, these findings provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, for a TRP channel specifically localized to focal adhesions, where it performs a central role in modulating cellular migration and contractility. PMID:26110647

  2. TRPM4 Is a Novel Component of the Adhesome Required for Focal Adhesion Disassembly, Migration and Contractility.

    PubMed

    Cáceres, Mónica; Ortiz, Liliana; Recabarren, Tatiana; Romero, Anibal; Colombo, Alicia; Leiva-Salcedo, Elías; Varela, Diego; Rivas, José; Silva, Ian; Morales, Diego; Campusano, Camilo; Almarza, Oscar; Simon, Felipe; Toledo, Hector; Park, Kang-Sik; Trimmer, James S; Cerda, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Cellular migration and contractility are fundamental processes that are regulated by a variety of concerted mechanisms such as cytoskeleton rearrangements, focal adhesion turnover, and Ca2+ oscillations. TRPM4 is a Ca2+-activated non-selective cationic channel (Ca2+-NSCC) that conducts monovalent but not divalent cations. Here, we used a mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach to identify putative TRPM4-associated proteins. Interestingly, the largest group of these proteins has actin cytoskeleton-related functions, and among these nine are specifically annotated as focal adhesion-related proteins. Consistent with these results, we found that TRPM4 localizes to focal adhesions in cells from different cellular lineages. We show that suppression of TRPM4 in MEFs impacts turnover of focal adhesions, serum-induced Ca2+ influx, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Rac activities, and results in reduced cellular spreading, migration and contractile behavior. Finally, we demonstrate that the inhibition of TRPM4 activity alters cellular contractility in vivo, affecting cutaneous wound healing. Together, these findings provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, for a TRP channel specifically localized to focal adhesions, where it performs a central role in modulating cellular migration and contractility.

  3. Ghrelin does not affect gastrointestinal contractility in rainbow trout and goldfish in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Takio; Itoh, Kentaro; Yaosaka, Noriko; Maruyama, Keisuke; Matsuda, Kouhei; Teraoka, Hiroki; Kaiya, Hiroyuki

    2012-09-15

    Ghrelin has been identified in rainbow trout and goldfish, and it has been shown to regulate growth hormone release and food intake in these species as seen in mammals. The aim of this study was to investigate the functional role of ghrelin in regulation of gastrointestinal contractility in both fishes. Neither rainbow trout ghrelin nor rat ghrelin affected the contractility of gastrointestinal strips of rainbow trout. Similarly, goldfish ghrelin-17 and rat ghrelin did not cause marked contraction in the goldfish intestinal bulb. Detail examinations using the goldfish intestine revealed that human neurotensin, substance-P, goldfish neuromedine-U and carbachol showed apparent contractile activities in the intestinal strips. Electrical field stimulation (EFS, 1-20 Hz) caused a frequency-dependent contraction of the intestinal bulb. Atropine partially inhibited and tetrodotoxin abolished the EFS-induced contraction. Pretreatments with goldfish ghrelin-17 and rat ghrelin did not modify the EFS-induced contraction. The mRNAs of two types of growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R), GHS-R1a-1 and GHS-R1a-2, were detected in the goldfish intestine, and the expression level of GHS-R1a-2 was 4-times higher than that of GHS-R1a-1. The expression levels of GHS-R1a-1 and GHS-R1a-2 in four regions of the goldfish intestine (intestinal bulb, intestine-1, intestine-2 and intestine-3) were almost the same. In conclusion, ghrelin does not affect gastrointestinal contractility of the rainbow trout and goldfish, although GHSR-like receptor/GHS-R1a is expressed entire intestine. These results suggest diversity of ghrelin function in vertebrates.

  4. Effects of Hindlimb Unweighting on Arterial Contractile Responses in Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Jia; Ren, Xin-Ling; Purdy, Ralph E.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine if hindlimb unweighting in mice alters arterial contractile responses. Sixteen male C57B/6 mice and 16 male Chinese Kunming mice were divided into control and 3 weeks hindlimb unweighting groups, respectively. Using isolated arterial rings from different arteries of mouse, effects of 3 weeks hindlimb unweighting on arterial contractile responsiveness were examined in vitro. The results showed that, in arterial rings from both C57B/6 and Chinese Kunming mice, maximum isometric contractile tensions evoked by either KCl or phenylephrine were significantly lower in abdominal aortic, mesenteric arterial and femoral arterial rings from hindlimb unweighting, compared to control mice. However, the maximal contractile responses of common carotid rings to KCl and PE were not significantly different between control and hindlimb unweighting groups. The sensitivity (EC(sub 50)) of all arteries to KCl or PE showed no significant differences between control and hindlimb unweighting mice. These data indicated that 3 weeks hindlimb unweighting results in a reduced capacity of the arterial smooth muscle of the hindquarter to develop tension. In addition, the alterations in arterial contractile responses caused by hindlimb unweighting in mice are similar as those in rats. Our work suggested that hindlimb unweighting mouse model may be used as a model for the study of postflight cardiovascular deconditioning.

  5. Micropost arrays for measuring stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte contractility

    PubMed Central

    Beussman, Kevin M.; Rodriguez, Marita L.; Leonard, Andrea; Taparia, Nikita; Thompson, Curtis R.; Sniadecki, Nathan J.

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes have the potential to be used to study heart disease and maturation, screen drug treatments, and restore heart function. Here, we discuss the procedures involved in using micropost arrays to measure the contractile forces generated by stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. Cardiomyocyte contractility is needed for the heart to pump blood, so measuring the contractile forces of cardiomyocytes is a straightforward way to assess their function. Microfabrication and soft lithography techniques are utilized to create identical arrays of flexible, silicone microposts from a common master. Micropost arrays are functionalized with extracellular matrix protein to allow cardiomyocytes to adhere to the tips of the microposts. Live imaging is used to capture videos of the deflection of microposts caused by the contraction of the cardiomyocytes. Image analysis code provides an accurate means to quantify these deflections. The contractile forces produced by a beating cardiomyocyte are calculated by modeling the microposts as cantilever beams. We have used this assay to assess techniques for improving the maturation and contractile function of stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. PMID:26344757

  6. Advanced glycation end products interfere with gastric smooth muscle contractile marker expression via the AGE/RAGE/NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ting; Zheng, Yongping; Wang, Yun; Xiong, Wenjie; Lin, Lin

    2017-02-01

    Excessive production of advanced glycation end products (AGE) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. Smooth muscle (SM) phenotype transition is involved in diabetes-associated gastric motility dysfunction. We investigated whether AGE interfere with gastric antral SM contractile marker expression. Sixteen Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into control and streptozotocin-induced diabetic groups. Sixteen weeks after streptozotocin administration, gastric antral SM strip contractility in the groups were measured. The gastric tissue expression of AGE was tested. Primary cultured gastric smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were used in complementary in vitro studies. In the presence and absence of AGE, SMCs were transfected with myocardin plasmid or treated with nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) inhibitor or anti-RAGE antibody. Diabetic rats showed weakness of SM strip contractility and decreased expression of SM contractile marker genes (myosin heavy chains [MHC], α-actin, calponin) as compared with the control group. Gastric antral SM layer Nε-(carboxymethyl) lysine (CML) level, the major AGE compound, were increased in the diabetic rats. AGE downregulated SM contractile markers and myocardin expression in a concentration-dependent manner. Myocardin overexpression prevented these results. AGE treatment activated NF-κB in SMCs. The NF-κB inhibitor BAY 11-7082 and anti-RAGE antibody blocked the effects of AGE on myocardin downregulation. AGE may induce the development of gastric dysmotility by downregulating SM contractile proteins and myocardin expression via the AGE/RAGE/NF-κB pathway.

  7. Reduced Contractility and Motility of Prostatic Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts after Inhibition of Heat Shock Protein 90

    PubMed Central

    Henke, Alex; Franco, Omar E.; Stewart, Grant D.; Riddick, Antony C.P.; Katz, Elad; Hayward, Simon W.; Thomson, Axel A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prostate cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) can stimulate malignant progression and invasion of prostatic tumour cells via several mechanisms including those active in extracellular matrix; Methods: We isolated CAF from prostate cancer patients of Gleason Score 6–10 and confirmed their cancer-promoting activity using an in vivo tumour reconstitution assay comprised of CAF and BPH1 cells. We tested the effects of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) inhibitors upon reconstituted tumour growth in vivo. Additionally, CAF contractility was measured in a 3D collagen contraction assay and migration was measured by scratch assay; Results: HSP90 inhibitors dipalmitoyl-radicicol and 17-dimethylaminoethylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-DMAG) reduced tumour size and proliferation in CAF/BPH1 reconstituted tumours in vivo. We observed that the most contractile CAF were derived from patients with lower Gleason Score and of younger age compared with the least contractile CAF. HSP90 inhibitors radicicol and 17-DMAG inhibited contractility and reduced the migration of CAF in scratch assays. Intracellular levels of HSP70 and HSP90 were upregulated upon treatment with HSP90 inhibitors. Inhibition of HSP90 also led to a specific increase in transforming growth factor beta 2 (TGFβ2) levels in CAF; Conclusions: We suggest that HSP90 inhibitors act not only upon tumour cells, but also on CAF in the tumour microenvironment. PMID:27563925

  8. Assessment of contractility in intact ventricular cardiomyocytes using the dimensionless 'Frank-Starling Gain' index.

    PubMed

    Bollensdorff, Christian; Lookin, Oleg; Kohl, Peter

    2011-07-01

    This paper briefly recapitulates the Frank-Starling law of the heart, reviews approaches to establishing diastolic and systolic force-length behaviour in intact isolated cardiomyocytes, and introduces a dimensionless index called 'Frank-Starling Gain', calculated as the ratio of slopes of end-systolic and end-diastolic force-length relations. The benefits and limitations of this index are illustrated on the example of regional differences in Guinea pig intact ventricular cardiomyocyte mechanics. Potential applicability of the Frank-Starling Gain for the comparison of cell contractility changes upon stretch will be discussed in the context of intra- and inter-individual variability of cardiomyocyte properties.

  9. Muscle fatigue in frog semitendinosus: alterations in contractile function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, L. V.; Balog, E. M.; Riley, D. A.; Fitts, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the contractile properties of the frog semitendinosus (ST) muscle before and during recovery from fatigue, to relate the observed functional changes to alterations in specific steps in the crossbridge model of muscle contraction, and to determine how fatigue affects the force-frequency relationship. The frog ST (22 degrees C) was fatigued by direct electrical stimulation with 100-ms 150-Hz trains at 1/s for 5 min. The fatigue protocol reduced peak twitch (Pt) and tetanic (Po) force to 32 and 8.5% of initial force, respectively. The decline in Pt was less than Po, in part due to a prolongation in the isometric contraction time (CT), which increased to 300% of the initial value. The isometric twitch duration was greatly prolonged as reflected by the lengthened CT and the 800% increase in the one-half relaxation time (1/2RT). Both Pt and Po showed a biphasic recovery, a rapid initial phase (2 min) followed by a slower (40 min) return to the prefatigue force. CT and 1/2RT also recovered in two phases, returning to 160 and 265% of control in the first 5 min. CT returned to the prefatigue value between 35 and 40 min, whereas even at 60 min 1/2RT was 133% of control. The maximal velocity of shortening, determined by the slack test, was significantly reduced [from 6.7 +/- 0.5 to 2.5 +/- 0.4 optimal muscle length/s] at fatigue. The force-frequency relationship was shifted to the left, so that optimal frequency for generating Po was reduced.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  10. Combined calcium fluorescence recording with ionic currents in contractile cells.

    PubMed

    Rainbow, Richard D

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of calcium (Ca(2+)) fluorescence in conjunction with ionic currents is of particular importance in contractile cells, such as cardiac ventricular myocytes and vascular smooth muscle. The interplay between membrane potential and intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) is fundamental to the regulation of contractile function and cell signalling. Here the loading of cells either with an esterified fluorescence indicator prior to patch clamp recording, or dye loading via the patch pipette with "free" indicator, is described to allow simultaneous measurement of fluorescence and electrical signals.

  11. Influence of mechanical activation of steel powder on its properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaulina, O. Yu; Darenskaia, E. A.; Myachin, Y. V.; Vasilyeva, I. E.; Kulkov, S. N.

    2017-02-01

    It has been studied properties of stainless steel based powders after mechanical activation using planetary ball milling technique. It have been shown that after one minute mechanical activation porosity of sintered steel is less than 5%, which is less than the porosity of the sintered steel powder without mechanical activation. The sample without activation has austenite state, which changes after activation toaustenite and ferrite mixtures. X-ray analysis confirmed that the mechanical activation leads to a change in the phase state of the samples: the samples without activation of the FCC structure (γ-Fe), after activation - FCC (γ-Fe) and BCC (α-Fe). The hardness increases at increasing activation time from 800 MPa for the sample without mechanical activation to 1250 MPa for the sample with the activation time of 10 minutes.

  12. Protective effects of anisodamine on cigarette smoke extract-induced airway smooth muscle cell proliferation and tracheal contractility

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Guang-Ni; Yang, Kai; Xu, Zu-Peng; Zhu, Liang; Hou, Li-Na; Qi, Hong; Chen, Hong-Zhuan Cui, Yong-Yao

    2012-07-01

    Anisodamine, an antagonist of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs), has been used therapeutically to improve smooth muscle function, including microvascular, intestinal and airway spasms. Our previous studies have revealed that airway hyper-reactivity could be prevented by anisodamine. However, whether anisodamine prevents smoking-induced airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell proliferation remained unclear. In this study, a primary culture of rat ASM cells was used to evaluate an ASM phenotype through the ability of the cells to proliferate and express contractile proteins in response to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and intervention of anisodamine. Our results showed that CSE resulted in an increase in cyclin D1 expression concomitant with the G0/G1-to-S phase transition, and high expression of M2 and M3. Functional studies showed that tracheal hyper-contractility accompanied contractile marker α-SMA high-expression. These changes, which occur only after CSE stimulation, were prevented and reversed by anisodamine, and CSE-induced cyclin D1 expression was significantly inhibited by anisodamine and the specific inhibitor U0126, BAY11-7082 and LY294002. Thus, we concluded that the protective and reversal effects and mechanism of anisodamine on CSE-induced events might involve, at least partially, the ERK, Akt and NF-κB signaling pathways associated with cyclin D1 via mAChRs. Our study validated that anisodamine intervention on ASM cells may contribute to anti-remodeling properties other than bronchodilation. -- Highlights: ► CSE induces tracheal cell proliferation, hyper-contractility and α-SMA expression. ► Anisodamine reverses CSE-induced tracheal hyper-contractility and cell proliferation. ► ERK, PI3K, and NF-κB pathways and cyclin D1 contribute to the reversal effect.

  13. Adsorption Properties of Lignin-derived Activated Carbon Fibers (LACF)

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I.; Gallego, Nidia C.; Thibaud-Erkey, Catherine; Karra, Reddy

    2016-04-01

    The object of this CRADA project between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) is the characterization of lignin-derived activated carbon fibers (LACF) and determination of their adsorption properties for volatile organic compounds (VOC). Carbon fibers from lignin raw materials were manufactured at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the technology previously developed at ORNL. These fibers were physically activated at ORNL using various activation conditions, and their surface area and pore-size distribution were characterized by gas adsorption. Based on these properties, ORNL did down-select five differently activated LACF materials that were delivered to UTRC for measurement of VOC adsorption properties. UTRC used standard techniques based on breakthrough curves to measure and determine the adsorption properties of indoor air pollutants (IAP) - namely formaldehyde and carbon dioxide - and to verify the extent of saturated fiber regenerability by thermal treatments. The results are summarized as follows: (1) ORNL demonstrated that physical activation of lignin-derived carbon fibers can be tailored to obtain LACF with surface areas and pore size distributions matching the properties of activated carbon fibers obtained from more expensive, fossil-fuel precursors; (2) UTRC investigated the LACF potential for use in air cleaning applications currently pursued by UTRC, such as building ventilation, and demonstrated their regenerability for CO2 and formaldehyde, (3) Both partners agree that LACF have potential for possible use in air cleaning applications.

  14. Changes in muscle fiber contractility and extracellular matrix production during skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Mendias, Christopher L; Schwartz, Andrew J; Grekin, Jeremy A; Gumucio, Jonathan P; Sugg, Kristoffer B

    2017-03-01

    Skeletal muscle can adapt to increased mechanical loads by undergoing hypertrophy. Transient reductions in whole muscle force production have been reported during the onset of hypertrophy, but contractile changes in individual muscle fibers have not been previously studied. Additionally, the extracellular matrix (ECM) stores and transmits forces from muscle fibers to tendons and bones, and determining how the ECM changes during hypertrophy is important in understanding the adaptation of muscle tissue to mechanical loading. Using the synergist ablation model, we sought to measure changes in muscle fiber contractility, collagen content, and cross-linking, and in the expression of several genes and activation of signaling proteins that regulate critical components of myogenesis and ECM synthesis and remodeling during muscle hypertrophy. Tissues were harvested 3, 7, and 28 days after induction of hypertrophy, and nonoverloaded rats served as controls. Muscle fiber specific force (sFo), which is the maximum isometric force normalized to cross-sectional area, was reduced 3 and 7 days after the onset of mechanical overload, but returned to control levels by 28 days. Collagen abundance displayed a similar pattern of change. Nearly a quarter of the transcriptome changed over the course of overload, as well as the activation of signaling pathways related to hypertrophy and atrophy. Overall, this study provides insight into fundamental mechanisms of muscle and ECM growth, and indicates that although muscle fibers appear to have completed remodeling and regeneration 1 mo after synergist ablation, the ECM continues to be actively remodeling at this time point.NEW & NOTEWORTHY This study utilized a rat synergist ablation model to integrate changes in single muscle fiber contractility, extracellular matrix composition, activation of important signaling pathways in muscle adaption, and corresponding changes in the muscle transcriptome to provide novel insight into the basic

  15. Intracellular dynamics measurements with full field optical coherence tomography suggest hindering effect of actomyosin contractility on organelle transport

    PubMed Central

    Leroux, Charles-Edouard; Bertillot, Fabien; Thouvenin, Olivier; Boccara, Albert-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular motion can be quantitatively monitored in tissues using coherence-gated microscopic techniques. With full-field optical coherence tomography (FFOCT), the use of high numerical aperture microscope objectives provides a high resolution mapping of intracellular dynamics that are probed with subwavelength sensitivity. In the upper temporal bandwidth that we have used (1-6 Hz) the main contribution to the dynamic signal arises from the overall dynamical, optically heterogeneous cytoplasm. We propose a method to specifically study the impact of actomyosin contractility on the intracellular dynamic signal by performing high throughput, comparative measurements of multicellular aggregates with and without blebbistatin action, a selective inhibitor of class-II myosins that disrupts actomyosin contractile activity. Our results indicate a significant increase in the fraction of the signal that decorrelates within 1 second after inhibition of contractility. This observation mitigates the anticipated importance of actomyosin contractile forces to directly move organelles, but highlights their role in hindering organelle transport via their stiffening effect of the viscoelastic cytoplasm. PMID:27895991

  16. The differential effect of propofol on contractility of isolated myocardial trabeculae of rat and guinea-pig

    PubMed Central

    Klarenbosch, J van; Stienen, G J M; Ruijter, W de; Scheffer, G J; Lange, J J de

    2001-01-01

    The effects of propofol on myocardial contractility were studied in rat, in which the contractile activation mainly depends on calcium derived from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), and guinea-pig, in which transsarcolemmal influx of calcium plays a major role. Intact and chemically skinned trabeculae from the right ventricle were studied. Intact trabeculae were electrically stimulated and force development during steady state and post rest contractions was measured. In saponin skinned trabeculae Ca2+ uptake and release by the SR was studied. In Triton skinned trabeculae the influence of propofol on calcium sensitivity of the myofilaments was studied. In intact rat trabeculae propofol in concentrations of 28, 112 and 280 μM did not change peak force development nor the pattern of post rest contraction. In guinea-pig trabeculae propofol significantly reduced peak force to respectively 64, 40 and 23% of control values and the post rest contractions were potentiated. In skinned trabeculae propofol did not affect Ca2+ handling by the SR, nor did it change force production and Ca2+ sensitivity of the myofilaments. This study shows that, in contrast to rat, in guinea-pig propofol directly depresses myocardial contractility, probably by decreasing transsarcolemmal Ca2+ influx. There is no significant influence of propofol on Ca2+ handling by the SR, nor on the contractile proteins. PMID:11159727

  17. [A basis for application of cardiac contractility variability in the Evaluation and assessment of exercise and fitness].

    PubMed

    Bu, Bin; Wang, Aihua; Han, Haijun; Xiao, Shouzhong

    2010-06-01

    Cardiac contractility variability (CCV) is a new concept which is introduced in the research field of cardiac contractility in recent years, that is to say, there are some disparities between cardiac contractilities when heart contracts. The changing signals of cardiac contractility contain a plenty of information on the cardiovascular function and disorder. In order to collect and analyze the message, we could quantitatively evaluate the tonicity and equilibrium of cardiac sympathetic nerve and parasympathetic nerve, and the effects of bio-molecular mechanism on the cardiovascular activities. By analyzing CCV, we could further understand the background of human being's heritage characteristics, nerve types, the adjusting mechanism, the molecular biology, and the adjustment of cardiac automatic nerve. With the development of the computing techniques, the digital signal processing method and its application in medical field, this analysis has been progressing greatly. By now, the assessment of CCV, just like the analysis of heart rate variability, is mainly via time domain and frequency domain analysis. CCV is one of the latest research fields in human cardiac signals being scarcely reported in the field of sports medicine; however, its research progresses are of important value for cardiac physiology and pathology in sports medicine and rehabilitation medicine.

  18. Expansion and concatenation of nonmuscle myosin IIA filaments drive cellular contractile system formation during interphase and mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Fenix, Aidan M.; Taneja, Nilay; Buttler, Carmen A.; Lewis, John; Van Engelenburg, Schuyler B.; Ohi, Ryoma; Burnette, Dylan T.

    2016-01-01

    Cell movement and cytokinesis are facilitated by contractile forces generated by the molecular motor, nonmuscle myosin II (NMII). NMII molecules form a filament (NMII-F) through interactions of their C-terminal rod domains, positioning groups of N-terminal motor domains on opposite sides. The NMII motors then bind and pull actin filaments toward the NMII-F, thus driving contraction. Inside of crawling cells, NMIIA-Fs form large macromolecular ensembles (i.e., NMIIA-F stacks), but how this occurs is unknown. Here we show NMIIA-F stacks are formed through two non–mutually exclusive mechanisms: expansion and concatenation. During expansion, NMIIA molecules within the NMIIA-F spread out concurrent with addition of new NMIIA molecules. Concatenation occurs when multiple NMIIA-Fs/NMIIA-F stacks move together and align. We found that NMIIA-F stack formation was regulated by both motor activity and the availability of surrounding actin filaments. Furthermore, our data showed expansion and concatenation also formed the contractile ring in dividing cells. Thus interphase and mitotic cells share similar mechanisms for creating large contractile units, and these are likely to underlie how other myosin II–based contractile systems are assembled. PMID:26960797

  19. Molecular organization of cytokinesis nodes and contractile rings by super-resolution fluorescence microscopy of live fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Laplante, Caroline; Huang, Fang; Tebbs, Irene R.; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Pollard, Thomas D.

    2016-01-01

    Cytokinesis in animals, fungi, and amoebas depends on the constriction of a contractile ring built from a common set of conserved proteins. Many fundamental questions remain about how these proteins organize to generate the necessary tension for cytokinesis. Using quantitative high-speed fluorescence photoactivation localization microscopy (FPALM), we probed this question in live fission yeast cells at unprecedented resolution. We show that nodes, protein assembly precursors to the contractile ring, are discrete structural units with stoichiometric ratios and distinct distributions of constituent proteins. Anillin Mid1p, Fes/CIP4 homology-Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs (F-BAR) Cdc15p, IQ motif containing GTPase-activating protein (IQGAP) Rng2p, and formin Cdc12p form the base of the node that anchors the ends of myosin II tails to the plasma membrane, with myosin II heads extending into the cytoplasm. This general node organization persists in the contractile ring where nodes move bidirectionally during constriction. We observed the dynamics of the actin network during cytokinesis, starting with the extension of short actin strands from nodes, which sometimes connected neighboring nodes. Later in cytokinesis, a broad network of thick bundles coalesced into a tight ring around the equator of the cell. The actin ring was ∼125 nm wide and ∼125 nm thick. These observations establish the organization of the proteins in the functional units of a cytokinetic contractile ring. PMID:27647921

  20. Alteration of Contractile Function and Calcium Ion Movements in Vascular Smooth Muscle by Gentamicin and Other Aminoglycoside Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Adams, H. Richard; Goodman, Frank R.; Weiss, George B.

    1974-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to examine the effects of certain aminoglycoside antibiotics on contractile responses and related calcium ion (Ca2+) movements in isolated vascular smooth muscle. Gentamicin, kanamycin, and streptomycin decreased contractile responses produced by norepinephrine, histamine, and high K+ in rabbit aortic strips. The inhibitory action of these antibiotics on mechanical function was more pronounced when the Ca2+ concentration of the bathing solution was decreased from 1.5 mM (normal Ca2+ solution) to 0.05 mM (low Ca2+ solution). The uptake of radiocalcium (45Ca) into the isolated media-intimal layer of rabbit aortae was decreased in a maintained manner by each antibiotic. With gentamicin, the inhibitory effect on 45Ca uptake was shown to be dependent upon the concentration of gentamicin employed and to be more evident in a 0.1 mM Ca2+ solution than in a normal Ca2+ solution. In addition, the rate of 45Ca efflux from the rabbit aortic media-intimal layer was increased in a sustained manner by gentamicin, streptomycin, and kanamycin. Furthermore, contractile responses induced by high K+ and norepinephrine in canine carotid arterial strips were inhibited by gentamicin. Present findings indicate that aminoglycoside antibiotics interfere with Ca2+-linked events leading to activation of the contractile mechanism of vascular smooth muscle. These in vitro findings may partially explain the occurrence of in vivo cardiovascular depression that has occasionally been observed after the administration of chemically related antimicrobial agents. PMID:15825418

  1. The transition of smooth muscle cells from a contractile to a migratory, phagocytic phenotype: direct demonstration of phenotypic modulation

    PubMed Central

    Sandison, Mairi E.; Dempster, John

    2016-01-01

    Key points Smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotypic conversion from a contractile to a migratory phenotype is proposed to underlie cardiovascular disease but its contribution to vascular remodelling and even its existence have recently been questioned.Tracking the fate of individual SMCs is difficult as no specific markers of migratory SMCs exist.This study used a novel, prolonged time‐lapse imaging approach to continuously track the behaviour of unambiguously identified, fully differentiated SMCs.In response to serum, highly‐elongated, contractile SMCs initially rounded up, before spreading and migrating and these migratory cells displayed clear phagocytic activity.This study provides a direct demonstration of the transition of fully contractile SMCs to a non‐contractile, migratory phenotype with phagocytic capacity that may act as a macrophage‐like cell. Abstract Atherosclerotic plaques are populated with smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and macrophages. SMCs are thought to accumulate in plaques because fully differentiated, contractile SMCs reprogramme into a ‘synthetic’ migratory phenotype, so‐called phenotypic modulation, whilst plaque macrophages are thought to derive from blood‐borne myeloid cells. Recently, these views have been challenged, with reports that SMC phenotypic modulation may not occur during vascular remodelling and that plaque macrophages may not be of haematopoietic origin. Following the fate of SMCs is complicated by the lack of specific markers for the migratory phenotype and direct demonstrations of phenotypic modulation are lacking. Therefore, we employed long‐term, high‐resolution, time‐lapse microscopy to track the fate of unambiguously identified, fully‐differentiated, contractile SMCs in response to the growth factors present in serum. Phenotypic modulation was clearly observed. The highly elongated, contractile SMCs initially rounded up, for 1–3 days, before spreading outwards. Once spread, the SMCs became motile and

  2. Computational analysis of contractility in engineered heart tissue.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Grant; Sondergaard, Claus; Jeffreys, Angela; Childs, William; Le, Bao Linh; Sahota, Amrit; Najibi, Skender; Nolta, Jan; Si, Ming-Sing

    2012-05-01

    Engineered heart tissue (EHT) is a potential therapy for heart failure and the basis of functional in vitro assays of novel cardiovascular treatments. Self-organizing EHT can be generated in fiber form, which makes the assessment of contractile function convenient with a force transducer. Contractile function is a key parameter of EHT performance. Analysis of EHT force data is often performed manually; however, this approach is time consuming, incomplete and subjective. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to develop a computer algorithm to efficiently and objectively analyze EHT force data. This algorithm incorporates data filtering, individual contraction detection and validation, inter/intracontractile analysis and intersample analysis. We found the algorithm to be accurate in contraction detection, validation and magnitude measurement as compared to human operators. The algorithm was efficient in processing hundreds of data acquisitions and was able to determine force-length curves, force-frequency relationships and compare various contractile parameters such as peak systolic force generation. We conclude that this computer algorithm is a key adjunct to the objective and efficient assessment of EHT contractile function.

  3. Clinical Relationship between Steatocholecystitis and Gallbladder Contractility Measured by Cholescintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Chang Seok; Lee, Yong Sub; Yoon, Jai Hoon; Kim, Youn Jeong; Kim, Jin Bong; Kim, Dong Joon

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Contractility of gallbladder is known to be decreased in fatty gallbladder diseases. However, clinical estimation data about this relationship is still lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between steatocholecystitis and contractility of gallbladder. Methods. Patients with cholecystitis (steatocholecystitis versus nonsteatocholecystitis) who underwent cholescintigraphy before cholecystectomy were retrospectively evaluated in a single teaching hospital of Korea. The association of steatocholecystitis with contractility of gallbladder, measured by preoperative cholescintigraphy, was assessed by univariable and multivariable analysis. Results. A total of 432 patients were finally enrolled (steatocholecystitis versus nonsteatocholecystitis; 75 versus 357, calculous versus acalculous cholecystitis; 316 versus 116). In the multivariable analysis, age (OR: 0.94, 95% CI: 0.90–0.99, P = 0.01) and total serum cholesterol (OR: 1.02, 95% CI: 1.01–1.04, P = 0.04) were related to steatocholecystitis in patients with acalculous cholecystitis. Only age (OR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.94–0.99, P = 0.004) was significantly related to steatocholecystitis in patients with calculous cholecystitis. However, ejection fraction of gallbladder reflecting contractility measured by cholescintigraphy was not related to steatocholecystitis irrespective of presence of gallbladder stone in patients with cholecystitis. Conclusion. Ejection fraction of gallbladder measured by cholescintigraphy cannot be used for the detection or confirmation of steatocholecystitis. PMID:25705222

  4. Clinical Relationship between Steatocholecystitis and Gallbladder Contractility Measured by Cholescintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Bang, Chang Seok; Lee, Yong Sub; Yoon, Jai Hoon; Kim, Youn Jeong; Kim, Jin Bong; Kim, Dong Joon

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Contractility of gallbladder is known to be decreased in fatty gallbladder diseases. However, clinical estimation data about this relationship is still lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between steatocholecystitis and contractility of gallbladder. Methods. Patients with cholecystitis (steatocholecystitis versus nonsteatocholecystitis) who underwent cholescintigraphy before cholecystectomy were retrospectively evaluated in a single teaching hospital of Korea. The association of steatocholecystitis with contractility of gallbladder, measured by preoperative cholescintigraphy, was assessed by univariable and multivariable analysis. Results. A total of 432 patients were finally enrolled (steatocholecystitis versus nonsteatocholecystitis; 75 versus 357, calculous versus acalculous cholecystitis; 316 versus 116). In the multivariable analysis, age (OR: 0.94, 95% CI: 0.90-0.99, P = 0.01) and total serum cholesterol (OR: 1.02, 95% CI: 1.01-1.04, P = 0.04) were related to steatocholecystitis in patients with acalculous cholecystitis. Only age (OR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.94-0.99, P = 0.004) was significantly related to steatocholecystitis in patients with calculous cholecystitis. However, ejection fraction of gallbladder reflecting contractility measured by cholescintigraphy was not related to steatocholecystitis irrespective of presence of gallbladder stone in patients with cholecystitis. Conclusion. Ejection fraction of gallbladder measured by cholescintigraphy cannot be used for the detection or confirmation of steatocholecystitis.

  5. The demonstration of alternating contractile state in pulsus alternans

    PubMed Central

    Noble, R. Joe; Nutter, Donald O.

    1970-01-01

    Pulsus alternans was induced in 11 anesthetized, open-chest dogs by rapid atrial pacing, and the left ventricular filling characteristics and length-tension-velocity relationship of alternating beats were compared. The end-diastolic circumferences (cire) of the strong beats were slightly, but significantly, increased over the weak beats (7.3 > 6.9 cm, P < 0.01), confirming that diastolic filling does alternate in pulsus alternans. This alternation in initial fiber length seemed to result from an alternation in the prior end-systolic length, rather than from an alternation in diastolic filling time or compliance. There was also no difference in end-diastolic tension as measured by an isometric strain gauge suggesting no difference in contractile element relaxation before weak and strong beats. The contractile state of the strong beats was consistently greater than that of the weak beats when contractility was defined in terms of: (a) Vmax (3.13 > 2.53 circ/sec, P < 0.01); and (b) the velocity of circumferential fiber shortening (0.84 > 0.39 circ/sec, P < 0.001) and developed tension (82.5 > 74 g/cm, P < 0.01) at isolength. The length-tension-velocity relationship of the left ventricle also varied between strong and weak beats when: (a) the maximum velocity of contractile element shortening at least common tension (1.68 > 1.28 circ/sec, P < 0.05); and (b) the velocity of circumferential fiber shortening (0.81 > 0.39 circ/sec, P < 0.001) at maximum developed tension were examined. Analysis of the length-tension-velocity characteristics of sequential beats at the onset of alternans in three dogs suggests that an alternation in contractility initiates alternans, with secondary alternations in ventricular filling. Cross-clamping of the aorta in three other dogs essentially eliminated the alternating changes in end-diastolic length and pressure, while the resultant isovolumic contractions continued to demonstrate clear evidence of pulsus alternans in the ventricular

  6. Dilated Cardiomyopathy: Normalized Multiparametric Myocardial Strain Predicts Contractile Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Henn, Matthew C.; Lawrance, Christopher P.; Kar, Julia; Cupps, Brian P.; Kulshrestha, Kevin; Koerner, Danielle; Wallace, Kathleen; Joseph, Susan; Ewald, Greg; Pasque, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Left ventricular (LV) contractile injury in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) may occur in a consistently heterogeneous distribution, suggesting that early injury “sentinel” regions may have prognostic significance. Heightened surveillance of these regions with high-resolution contractile metrics may predict recovery in DCM. Methods Multiple 3D strain parameters were calculated at each of 15,300 LV grid-points from systolic displacement data obtained from cardiac MRI in 124 test subjects. In 24 DCM patients, z-scores for two strain parameters at each grid-point were calculated by comparison of patient-specific strain values to respective point-specific mean and standard deviation values from a normal human strain database (n=100). Multiparametric strain z-scores were averaged over 6 LV regions at basilar, mid, and apical levels (18 sub-regions). DCM patients were stratified into 3 groups based on a blinded review of clinical contractile recovery (complete[n=7]; incomplete[n=7]; none[n=10]). Results Basilar-septal sub-regions were consistently heavily injured. Basilar-septal z-scores were significantly larger (worse) than those for the rest of the LV (2.73±1.27 vs 2.22±0.83; p=0.011) and lateral wall (2.73±1.27 vs 1.44±0.72; p<0.001). All patients with sentinel region average multiparametric strain z-scores <2 standard deviations (n=6) experienced complete recovery, while 17/18 DCM patients with z-scores >2 standard deviations experienced incomplete or no contractile recovery. Conclusions Contractile injury in DCM is heterogeneous with basilar-septal regions injured more than lateral regions. The targeting of early-injury sentinel regions for heightened surveillance with high-resolution metrics of micro-regional contractile function may accurately predict recovery on medical therapy. A 2 standard deviation z-score threshold may predict contractile recovery. PMID:26228597

  7. Muscle metaboreflex-induced coronary vasoconstriction functionally limits increases in ventricular contractility

    PubMed Central

    Coutsos, Matthew; Sala-Mercado, Javier A.; Ichinose, Masashi; Li, ZhenHua; Dawe, Elizabeth J.

    2010-01-01

    Muscle metaboreflex activation during dynamic exercise induces a substantial increase in cardiac work and oxygen demand via a significant increase in heart rate, ventricular contractility, and afterload. This increase in cardiac work should cause coronary metabolic vasodilation. However, little if any coronary vasodilation is observed due to concomitant sympathetically induced coronary vasoconstriction. The purpose of the present study is to determine whether the restraint of coronary vasodilation functionally limits increases in left ventricular contractility. Using chronically instrumented, conscious dogs (n = 9), we measured mean arterial pressure, cardiac output, and circumflex blood flow and calculated coronary vascular conductance, maximal derivative of ventricular pressure (dp/dtmax), and preload recruitable stroke work (PRSW) at rest and during mild exercise (2 mph) before and during activation of the muscle metaboreflex. Experiments were repeated after systemic α1-adrenergic blockade (∼50 μg/kg prazosin). During prazosin administration, we observed significantly greater increases in coronary vascular conductance (0.64 ± 0.06 vs. 0.46 ± 0.03 ml·min−1·mmHg−1; P < 0.05), circumflex blood flow (77.9 ± 6.6 vs. 63.0 ± 4.5 ml/min; P < 0.05), cardiac output (7.38 ± 0.52 vs. 6.02 ± 0.42 l/min; P < 0.05), dP/dtmax (5,449 ± 339 vs. 3,888 ± 243 mmHg/s; P < 0.05), and PRSW (160.1 ± 10.3 vs. 183.8 ± 9.2 erg·103/ml; P < 0.05) with metaboreflex activation vs. those seen in control experiments. We conclude that the sympathetic restraint of coronary vasodilation functionally limits further reflex increases in left ventricular contractility. PMID:20413426

  8. MDMA induces cardiac contractile dysfunction through autophagy upregulation and lysosome destabilization in rats.

    PubMed

    Shintani-ishida, Kaori; Saka, Kanju; Yamaguchi, Koji; Hayashida, Makiko; Nagai, Hisashi; Takemura, Genzou; Yoshida, Ken-ichi

    2014-05-01

    The underlying mechanisms of cardiotoxicity of 3,4-methylenedioxymethylamphetamine (MDMA, "ecstasy") abuse are unclear. Autophagy exerts either adaptive or maladaptive effects on cardiac function in various pathological settings, but nothing is known on the role of autophagy in the MDMA cardiotoxicity. Here, we investigated the mechanism through which autophagy may be involved in MDMA-induced cardiac contractile dysfunction. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with MDMA (20mg/kg) or saline. Left ventricular (LV) echocardiography and LV pressure measurement demonstrated reduction of LV systolic contractility 24h after MDMA administration. Western blot analysis showed a time-dependent increase in the levels of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3-II (LC3-II) and cathepsin-D after MDMA administration. Electron microscopy showed the presence of autophagic vacuoles in cardiomyocytes. MDMA upregulated phosphorylation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) at Thr172, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) at Thr2446, Raptor at Ser792, and Unc51-like kinase (ULK1) at Ser555, suggesting activation of autophagy through the AMPK-mTOR pathway. The effects of autophagic inhibitors 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and chloroquine (CQ) on LC3-II levels indicated that MDMA enhanced autophagosome formation, but attenuated autophagosome clearance. MDMA also induced release of cathepsins into cytosol, and western blotting and electron microscopy showed cardiac troponin I (cTnI) degradation and myofibril damage, respectively. 3-MA, CQ, and a lysosomal inhibitor, E64c, inhibited cTnI proteolysis and improved contractile dysfunction after MDMA administration. In conclusion, MDMA causes lysosome destabilization following activation of the autophagy-lysosomal pathway, through which released lysosomal proteases damage myofibrils and induce LV systolic dysfunction in rat heart.

  9. Identification of Contractile Vacuole Proteins in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Park, Miyoung; Martins, Vicente P.; Atwood, James; Moles, Kristen; Collins, Dalis; Rohloff, Peter; Tarleton, Rick; Moreno, Silvia N. J.; Orlando, Ron; Docampo, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Contractile vacuole complexes are critical components of cell volume regulation and have been shown to have other functional roles in several free-living protists. However, very little is known about the functions of the contractile vacuole complex of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, other than a role in osmoregulation. Identification of the protein composition of these organelles is important for understanding their physiological roles. We applied a combined proteomic and bioinfomatic approach to identify proteins localized to the contractile vacuole. Proteomic analysis of a T. cruzi fraction enriched for contractile vacuoles and analyzed by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis and LC-MS/MS resulted in the addition of 109 newly detected proteins to the group of expressed proteins of epimastigotes. We also identified different peptides that map to at least 39 members of the dispersed gene family 1 (DGF-1) providing evidence that many members of this family are simultaneously expressed in epimastigotes. Of the proteins present in the fraction we selected several homologues with known localizations in contractile vacuoles of other organisms and others that we expected to be present in these vacuoles on the basis of their potential roles. We determined the localization of each by expression as GFP-fusion proteins or with specific antibodies. Six of these putative proteins (Rab11, Rab32, AP180, ATPase subunit B, VAMP1, and phosphate transporter) predominantly localized to the vacuole bladder. TcSNARE2.1, TcSNARE2.2, and calmodulin localized to the spongiome. Calmodulin was also cytosolic. Our results demonstrate the utility of combining subcellular fractionation, proteomic analysis, and bioinformatic approaches for localization of organellar proteins that are difficult to detect with whole cell methodologies. The CV localization of the proteins investigated revealed potential novel roles of these organelles in phosphate metabolism

  10. Ndrg2 is a PGC-1α/ERRα target gene that controls protein synthesis and expression of contractile-type genes in C2C12 myotubes.

    PubMed

    Foletta, Victoria C; Brown, Erin L; Cho, Yoshitake; Snow, Rod J; Kralli, Anastasia; Russell, Aaron P

    2013-12-01

    The stress-responsive, tumor suppressor N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (Ndrg2) is highly expressed in striated muscle. In response to anabolic and catabolic signals, Ndrg2 is suppressed and induced, respectively, in mouse C2C12 myotubes. However, little is known about the mechanisms regulating Ndrg2 expression in muscle, as well as the biological role for Ndrg2 in differentiated myotubes. Here, we show that Ndrg2 is a target of a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRα) transcriptional program and is induced in response to endurance exercise, a physiological stress known also to increase PGC-1α/ERRα activity. Analyses of global gene and protein expression profiles in C2C12 myotubes with reduced levels of NDRG2, suggest that NDRG2 affects muscle growth, contractile properties, MAPK signaling, ion and vesicle transport and oxidative phosphorylation. Indeed, suppression of NDRG2 in myotubes increased protein synthesis and the expression of fast glycolytic myosin heavy chain isoforms, while reducing the expression of embryonic myosin Myh3, other contractile-associated genes and the MAPK p90 RSK1. Conversely, enhanced expression of NDRG2 reduced protein synthesis, and furthermore, partially blocked the increased protein synthesis rates elicited by a constitutively active form of ERRα. In contrast, suppressing or increasing levels of NDRG2 did not affect mRNA expression of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis that are regulated by PGC-1α or ERRα. This study shows that in C2C12 myotubes Ndrg2 is a novel PGC-1α/ERRα transcriptional target, which influences protein turnover and the regulation of genes involved in muscle contraction and function.

  11. Regulation of contractile protein gene expression in unloaded mouse skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, D. S.; Carson, J. A.; Booth, F. W.

    1996-01-01

    Hindlimb unloading was performed on mice in an effort to study the regulation of contractile protein genes. In particular, the regulation of myosin heavy chain IIb was examined. During unloading, muscle fibers undergo a type conversion. Preliminary data from this study does not support the hypothesis that the fiber type conversion is due to an increase in promoter activity of fast isoform genes, such as myosin heavy chain IIb. The consequences of this finding are examined, with particular focus on other factors controlling gene regulation.

  12. Testosterone regulates smooth muscle contractile pathways in the rat prostate: emphasis on PDE5 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinhua; Zang, Ning; Wei, Yu; Yin, Jin; Teng, Ruobing; Seftel, Allen

    2012-01-01

    Testosterone (T) plays a permissive role in the development of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors (PDE5is) have been found to be effective for BPH and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in clinical trials. This study investigated the effect of T on smooth muscle (SM) contractile and regulatory signaling pathways, including PDE5 expression and functional activity in prostate in male rats (sham-operated, surgically castrated, and castrated with T supplementation). In vitro organ bath studies, real-time RT-PCR, Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry were performed. Castration heavily attenuated contractility, including sensitivity to phenylephrine with SM myosin immunostaining revealing a disrupted SM cell arrangement in the stroma. PDE5 was immunolocalized exclusively in the prostate stroma, and orchiectomy signficantly reduced PDE5 immunopositivity, mRNA, and protein expression, along with nNOS and ROKβ mRNA, whereas it increased eNOS plus α1a and α1b adrenoreceptor expression in castrated animals. The PDE5i zaprinast significantly increased prostate strip relaxation to the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) in control but not castrated rats. But SNP alone was more effective on castrated rats, comparable with sham treated with SNP plus zaprinast. T supplementation prevented or restored all above changes, including SNP and zaprinast in vitro responsiveness. In conclusion, our data show that T positively regulates PDE5 expression and functional activities in prostate, and T ablation not only suppresses prostate size but also reduces prostatic SM contractility, with several potential SM contraction/relaxation pathways implicated. Zaprinast findings strongly suggest a major role for PDE5/cGMP in this signaling cascade. PDE5 inhibition may represent a novel mechanism for treatment of BPH. PMID:22028410

  13. Age exacerbates chronic catecholamine-induced impairments in contractile reserve in the rat.

    PubMed

    Liles, John T; Ida, Kevin K; Joly, Kristin M; Chapo, Joseph; Plato, Craig F

    2011-08-01

    Contractile reserve decreases with advancing age and chronic isoproterenol (ISO) administration is a well-characterized model of cardiac hypertrophy known to impair cardiovascular function. This study evaluated whether nonsenescent, mature adult rats are more susceptible to detrimental effects of chronic ISO administration than younger adult rats. Rats received daily injections of ISO (0.1 mg/kg sc) or vehicle for 3 wk. ISO induced a greater impairment in contractile reserve [maximum of left ventricular pressure development (Δ+dP/dt(max))] in mature adult ISO-treated (MA-ISO) than in young adult ISO-treated rats (YA-ISO) in response to infusions of mechanistically distinct inotropes (digoxin, milrinone; 20-200 μl·kg(-1)·min(-1)), while basal and agonist-induced changes in heart rate and systolic arterial pressure (SAP) were not different across groups. ISO decreased expression of the calcium handling protein, sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase-2a, in MA-ISO compared with YA, YA-ISO, and MA rats. Chronic ISO also induced greater increases in cardiac hypertrophy [left ventricular (LV) index: 33 ± 3 vs. 22 ± 5%] and caspase-3 activity (34 vs. 5%) in MA-ISO relative to YA-ISO rats. Moreover, β-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC) and atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) mRNA expression was significantly elevated in MA-ISO. These results demonstrate that adult rats develop greater impairments in systolic performance than younger rats when exposed to chronic catecholamine excess. Reduced contractile reserve may result from calcium dysregulation, increased caspase-3 activity, or increased β-MHC and ANF expression. Although several studies report age-related declines in systolic performance in older and senescent animals, the present study demonstrates that catecholamine excess induces reductions in systolic performance significantly earlier in life.

  14. Role of selective alpha and beta adrenergic receptor mechanisms in rat jejunal longitudinal muscle contractility.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Roland; Rickenbacher, Andreas; Shaw, Sidney; Haefliger, Simon; Balsiger, Bruno M

    2008-06-01

    Gut motility is modulated by adrenergic mechanisms. The aim of our study was to examine mechanisms of selective adrenergic receptors in rat jejunum. Spontaneous contractile activity of longitudinal muscle strips from rat jejunum was measured in 5-ml tissue chambers. Dose-responses (six doses, 10(-7) -3 x 10(-5)M) to norepinephrine (NE, nonspecific), phenylephrine (PH, alpha1), clonidine (C, alpha2), prenalterol (PR, beta1), ritodrine (RI, beta2), and ZD7714 (ZD, beta3) were evaluated with and without tetrodotoxin (TTX, nerve blocker). NE(3 x 10(-5)M) inhibited 74 +/- 5% (mean +/- SEM) of spontaneous activity. This was the maximum effect. The same dose of RI(beta2), PH(alpha1), or ZD(beta(3)) resulted in an inhibition of only 56 +/- 5, 43 +/- 4, 33 +/- 6, respectively. The calculated concentration to induce 50% inhibition (EC50) of ZD(beta3) was similar to NE, whereas higher concentrations of PH(alpha1) or RI(beta2) were required. C(alpha2) and PR(beta1) had no effect. TTX changed exclusively the EC50 of RI from 4.4 +/- 0.2 to 2.7 +/- 0.8% (p < 0.04). Contractility was inhibited by NE (nonspecific). PH(alpha1), RI(beta2), and ZD(beta3) mimic the effect of NE. TTX reduced the inhibition by RI. Our results suggest that muscular alpha1, beta2, and beta3 receptor mechanisms mediate adrenergic inhibition of contractility in rat jejunum. beta2 mechanisms seem to involve also neural pathways.

  15. Loss of smooth muscle cell hypoxia inducible factor-1α underlies increased vascular contractility in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Elizabeth A; Chen, Chih-Hsin; Sedan, Oshra; Cornfield, David N

    2017-02-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is an often fatal disease with limited treatment options. Whereas current data support the notion that, in pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs), expression of transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is increased, the role of HIF-1α in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) remains controversial. This study investigates the hypothesis that, in PASMCs from patients with PAH, decreases in HIF-1α expression and activity underlie augmented pulmonary vascular contractility. PASMCs and tissues were isolated from nonhypertensive control patients and patients with PAH. Compared with controls, HIF-1α and Kv1.5 protein expression were decreased in PAH smooth muscle cells (primary culture). Myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation and MLC kinase (MLCK) activity-major determinants of vascular tone-were increased in patients with PAH. Cofactors involved in prolyl hydroxylase domain activity were increased in PAH smooth muscle cells. Functionally, PASMC contractility was inversely correlated with HIF-1α activity. In PASMCs derived from patients with PAH, HIF-1α expression is decreased, and MLCK activity, MLC phosphorylation, and cell contraction are increased. We conclude that compromised PASMC HIF-1α expression may contribute to the increased tone that characterizes pulmonary hypertension.-Barnes, E. A., Chen, C.-H., Sedan, O., Cornfield, D. N. Loss of smooth muscle cell hypoxia inducible factor-1α underlies increased vascular contractility in pulmonary hypertension.

  16. α,β-Unsaturated aldehyde crotonaldehyde triggers cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction: role of TRPV1 and mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Pei, Zhaohui; Zhuang, Zhiqiang; Sang, Hanfei; Wu, Zhenbiao; Meng, Rongsen; He, Emily Y; Scott, Glenda I; Maris, Jackie R; Li, Ruiman; Ren, Jun

    2014-04-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that cigarette smoking is associated with an increased prevalence of heart diseases. Given that cigarette smoking triggers proinflammatory response via stimulation of the capsaicin-sensitive transient receptor potential cation channel TRPV1, this study was designed to evaluate the effect of an essential α,β-unsaturated aldehyde from cigarette smoke crotonaldehyde on myocardial function and the underlying mechanism with a focus on TRPV1 and mitochondria. Cardiomyocyte mechanical and intracellular Ca2+ properties were evaluated including peak shortening (PS), maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening (±dL/dt), time-to-PS (TPS), time-to-90% relengthening (TR90), fura-2 fluorescence intensity (FFI), intracellular Ca2+ decay and SERCA activity. Apoptosis and TRPV1 were evaluated using Western blot analysis. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage were measured using the intracellular fluoroprobe 5-(6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), respectively. Our data revealed that crotonaldehyde interrupted cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca2+ property including depressed PS, ±dL/dt, ΔFFI and SERCA activity, as well as prolonged TR90 and intracellular Ca2+ decay. Crotonaldehyde exposure increased TRPV1 and NADPH oxidase levels, promoted apoptosis, mitochondrial injury (decreased aconitase activity, PGC-1α and UCP-2) as well as production of ROS and 8-OHdG. Interestingly, crotonaldehyde-induced cardiac defect was obliterated by the ROS scavenger glutathione and the TRPV1 inhibitor capsazepine. Capsazepine (not glutathione) ablated crotonaldehyde-induced mitochondrial damage. Capsazepine, glutathione and the NADPH inhibitor apocynin negated crotonaldehyde-induced ROS accumulation. Our data suggest a role of crotonaldehyde compromises cardiomyocyte mechanical function possibly through a TRPV1- and mitochondria-dependent oxidative stress mechanism.

  17. Passive heating following the prematch warm-up in soccer: examining the time-course of changes in muscle temperature and contractile function.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Paul W M; Cross, Rebecca; Lovell, Ric

    2015-12-01

    This study examined changes in muscle temperature, electrically evoked muscle contractile properties, and voluntary power before and after a soccer specific active warm-up and subsequent rest period. Ten amateur soccer players performed two experimental sessions that involved performance of a modified FIFA 11+ soccer specific warm-up, followed by a 12.5-min rest period where participants were required to wear either normal clothing or a passive electrical heating garment was applied to the upper thigh muscles. Assessments around the warm-up and cool-down included measures of maximal torque, rate of torque development, muscle temperature (Tm), and electrically evoked measures of quadriceps contractile function. Tm was increased after the warm-up by 3.2 ± 0.7°C (P < 0.001). Voluntary and evoked rates of torque development increased after the warm-up between 20% and 30% (P < 0.05), despite declines in both maximal voluntary torque and voluntary activation (P < 0.05). Application of a passive heating garment in the cool-down period after the warm-up did not effect variables measured. While Tm was reduced by 1.4 ± 0.4°C after the rest period (P < 0.001), this value was still higher than pre warm-up levels. Voluntary and evoked rate of torque development remained elevated from pre warm-up levels at the end of the cool-down (P < 0.05). The soccer specific warm-up elevated muscle temperature by 3.2°C and was associated with concomitant increases of between 20% and 30% in voluntary rate of torque development, which seems explained by elevations in rate-dependent measures of intrinsic muscle contractile function. Application of a passive heating garment did not attenuate declines in muscle temperature during a 12.5-min rest period.

  18. Study of Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni antioxidant activities and cellular properties.

    PubMed

    Bender, Cecilia; Graziano, Sara; Zimmermann, Benno F

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the antioxidant activities, cytotoxicity and proliferative properties in Stevia rebaudiana leaves and stems. Leaves extracts exhibited a higher antioxidant activity than stems extract, through oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) and cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) assays. Stevioside and rebaudioside A, the main sweetening metabolites in stevia leaves, exhibited a low ORAC value in comparison with plant extracts, while did not elicit any CAA. Stevia rebaudiana did not exhibit toxicity against HepG2 (hepatocellular carcinoma) human cells. No proliferative nor catalase modulations were observed in cells treated with such extracts. Our findings support the promising role of stevia that, apart from its sweetness, can act as a source of antioxidants, even at the intracellular level. This activity makes S. rebaudiana crude extract an interesting resource of natural sweetness with antioxidant properties which may find numerous applications in foods and nutritional supplements industries.

  19. Control of mammary myoepithelial cell contractile function by α3β1 integrin signalling.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Karine; Cagnet, Stéphanie; Kreft, Maaike; Janssen, Hans; Sonnenberg, Arnoud; Glukhova, Marina A

    2011-05-18

    In the functionally differentiated mammary gland, basal myoepithelial cells contract to eject the milk produced by luminal epithelial cells from the body. We report that conditional deletion of a laminin receptor, α3β1 integrin, from myoepithelial cells leads to low rates of milk ejection due to a contractility defect but does not interfere with the integrity or functional differentiation of the mammary epithelium. In lactating mammary gland, in the absence of α3β1, focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation is impaired, the Rho/Rac balance is altered and myosin light-chain (MLC) phosphorylation is sustained. Cultured mammary myoepithelial cells depleted of α3β1 contract in response to oxytocin, but are unable to maintain the state of post-contractile relaxation. The expression of constitutively active Rac or its effector p21-activated kinase (PAK), or treatment with MLC kinase (MLCK) inhibitor, rescues the relaxation capacity of mutant cells, strongly suggesting that α3β1-mediated stimulation of the Rac/PAK pathway is required for the inhibition of MLCK activity, permitting completion of the myoepithelial cell contraction/relaxation cycle and successful lactation. This is the first study highlighting the impact of α3β1 integrin signalling on mammary gland function.

  20. Elevated Intraocular Pressure Induces Rho GTPase Mediated Contractile Signaling in the Trabecular Meshwork

    PubMed Central

    Pattabiraman, Padmanabhan P; Inoue, Toshihiro; Rao, P. Vasantha

    2015-01-01

    Rho GTPase regulated contractile signaling in the trabecular meshwork (TM) has been shown to modulate aqueous humor (AH) outflow and intraocular pressure (IOP). To explore whether elevated IOP, a major risk factor for primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) influences Rho GTPase signaling in the TM, we recorded AH outflow in enucleated contralateral porcine eyes perfused for 4–5 hours at either 15 mm or 50 mm Hg pressure. After perfusion, TM tissue extracted from perfused eyes was evaluated for the activation status of Rho GTPase, myosin light chain (MLC), myosin phosphatase target substrate 1 (MYPT1), myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate (MARCKS) and paxillin. Eyes perfused at 50 mm Hg exhibited a significant decrease in AH outflow facility compared with those perfused at 15 mm Hg. Additionally, TM tissue from eyes perfused at 50 mm Hg revealed significantly increased levels of activated RhoA and phosphorylated MLC, MYPT1, MARCKS and paxillin compared to TM tissue derived from eyes perfused at 15 mm Hg. Taken together, these observations indicate that elevated IOP-induced activation of Rho GTPase-dependent contractile signaling in the TM is associated with increased resistance to AH outflow through the trabecular pathway, and demonstrate the sensitivity of Rho GTPase signaling to mechanical force in the AH outflow pathway. PMID:25956210

  1. Autonomic modification of intestinal smooth muscle contractility.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Laura E A; Tansey, Etain A; Johnson, Chris D; Roe, Sean M; Quinn, Joe G

    2016-03-01

    Intestinal smooth muscle contracts rhythmically in the absence of nerve and hormonal stimulation because of the activity of pacemaker cells between and within the muscle layers. This means that the autonomic nervous system modifies rather than initiates intestinal contractions. The practical described here gives students an opportunity to observe this spontaneous activity and its modification by agents associated with parasympathetic and sympathetic nerve activity. A section of the rabbit small intestine is suspended in an organ bath, and the use of a pressure transducer and data-acquisition software allows the measurement of tension generated by the smooth muscle of intestinal walls. The application of the parasympathetic neurotransmitter ACh at varying concentrations allows students to observe an increase in intestinal smooth muscle tone with increasing concentrations of this muscarinic receptor agonist. Construction of a concentration-effect curve allows students to calculate an EC50 value for ACh and consider some basic concepts surrounding receptor occupancy and activation. Application of the hormone epinephrine to the precontracted intestine allows students to observe the inhibitory effects associated with sympathetic nerve activation. Introduction of the drug atropine to the preparation before a maximal concentration of ACh is applied allows students to observe the inhibitory effect of a competitive antagonist on the physiological response to a receptor agonist. The final experiment involves the observation of the depolarizing effect of K(+) on smooth muscle. Students are also invited to consider why the drugs atropine, codeine, loperamide, and botulinum toxin have medicinal uses in the management of gastrointestinal problems.

  2. R4496C RyR2 mutation impairs atrial and ventricular contractility

    PubMed Central

    Coppini, Raffaele; Scellini, Beatrice; Ferrara, Claudia; Pioner, Josè Manuel; Mazzoni, Luca; Priori, Silvia; Cerbai, Elisabetta; Tesi, Chiara; Poggesi, Corrado

    2016-01-01

    Ryanodine receptor (RyR2) is the major Ca2+ channel of the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and plays a crucial role in the generation of myocardial force. Changes in RyR2 gating properties and resulting increases in its open probability (Po) are associated with Ca2+ leakage from the SR and arrhythmias; however, the effects of RyR2 dysfunction on myocardial contractility are unknown. Here, we investigated the possibility that a RyR2 mutation associated with catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, R4496C, affects the contractile function of atrial and ventricular myocardium. We measured isometric twitch tension in left ventricular and atrial trabeculae from wild-type mice and heterozygous transgenic mice carrying the R4496C RyR2 mutation and found that twitch force was comparable under baseline conditions (30°C, 2 mM [Ca2+]o, 1 Hz). However, the positive inotropic responses to high stimulation frequency, 0.1 µM isoproterenol, and 5 mM [Ca2+]o were decreased in R4496C trabeculae, as was post-rest potentiation. We investigated the mechanisms underlying inotropic insufficiency in R4496C muscles in single ventricular myocytes. Under baseline conditions, the amplitude of the Ca2+ transient was normal, despite the reduced SR Ca2+ content. Under inotropic challenge, however, R4496C myocytes were unable to boost the amplitude of Ca2+ transients because they are incapable of properly increasing the amount of Ca2+ stored in the SR because of a larger SR Ca2+ leakage. Recovery of force in response to premature stimuli was faster in R4496C myocardium, despite the unchanged rates of recovery of L-type Ca2+ channel current (ICa-L) and SR Ca2+ content in single myocytes. A faster recovery from inactivation of the mutant R4496C channels could explain this behavior. In conclusion, changes in RyR2 channel gating associated with the R4496C mutation could be directly responsible for the alterations in both ventricular and atrial contractility. The increased RyR2 Po

  3. Cardiac-specific elevations in thyroid hormone enhance contractility and prevent pressure overload-induced cardiac dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Trivieri, Maria Giovanna; Oudit, Gavin Y.; Sah, Rajan; Kerfant, Benoit-Gilles; Sun, Hui; Gramolini, Anthony O.; Pan, Yan; Wickenden, Alan D.; Croteau, Walburga; Morreale de Escobar, Gabriella; Pekhletski, Roman; St. Germain, Donald; MacLennan, David H.; Backx, Peter H.

    2006-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is critical for cardiac development and heart function. In heart disease, TH metabolism is abnormal, and many biochemical and functional alterations mirror hypothyroidism. Although TH therapy has been advocated for treating heart disease, a clear benefit of TH has yet to be established, possibly because of peripheral actions of TH. To assess the potential efficacy of TH in treating heart disease, type 2 deiodinase (D2), which converts the prohormone thyroxine to active triiodothyronine (T3), was expressed transiently in mouse hearts by using the tetracycline transactivator system. Increased cardiac D2 activity led to elevated cardiac T3 levels and to enhanced myocardial contractility, accompanied by increased Ca2+ transients and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ uptake. These phenotypic changes were associated with up-regulation of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) 2a expression as well as decreased Na+/Ca2+ exchanger, β-myosin heavy chain, and sarcolipin (SLN) expression. In pressure overload, targeted increases in D2 activity could not block hypertrophy but could completely prevent impaired contractility and SR Ca2+ cycling as well as altered expression patterns of SERCA2a, SLN, and other markers of pathological hypertrophy. Our results establish that elevated D2 activity in the heart increases T3 levels and enhances cardiac contractile function while preventing deterioration of cardiac function and altered gene expression after pressure overload. PMID:16595628

  4. Autonomic Modification of Intestinal Smooth Muscle Contractility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Laura E. A.; Tansey, Etain A.; Johnson, Chris D.; Roe, Sean M.; Quinn, Joe G.

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal smooth muscle contracts rhythmically in the absence of nerve and hormonal stimulation because of the activity of pacemaker cells between and within the muscle layers. This means that the autonomic nervous system modifies rather than initiates intestinal contractions. The practical described here gives students an opportunity to observe…

  5. Molecular mechanisms autonomic dysfunction and impaired cardiac contractility in critical illness

    PubMed Central

    Ackland, Gareth L.; Whittle, John; Toner, Andrew; Machhada, Asif; Gutierrez Del Arroyo, Ana; Sciuso, Alberto; Jenkins, Nicholas; Dyson, Alex; Struthers, Richard; Sneyd, Robert; Minto, Gary; Singer, Mervyn; Shah, Ajay M.; Gourine, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Molecular mechanisms linking autonomic dysfunction with poorer clinical outcomes in critical illness remain unclear. We hypothesized that baroreflex dysfunction alone is sufficient to cause cardiac impairment through neurohormonal activation of (NADPH oxidase-dependent) oxidative stress resulting in increased expression of G-protein coupled receptor kinase (GRK)-2, a key negative regulator of cardiac function. Design: Laboratory/clinical investigations. Setting: University laboratory/medical centers. Subjects: Adult rats; wild-type/NAPDH oxidase subunit-2 (NOX-2) deficient mice; elective surgical patients. Interventions: Cardiac performance was assessed by transthoracic echocardiography following experimental baroreflex dysfunction (BD, sino-aortic denervation) in rats and mice. Immunoblots assessed GPCR recycling proteins expression in rodent cardiomyocytes and patient mononuclear leukocytes. In surgical patients, heart rate recovery after cardio-pulmonary exercise testing, time/frequency measures of parasympathetic parameters were related to the presence/absence of BD (defined by spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity of <6ms.mmHg-1). The associations of BD with intraoperative cardiac function and outcomes were assessed. Measurements and Main Results: Experimental BD in rats and mice resulted in impaired cardiac contractility and upregulation of GRK-2 expression. In mice, genetic deficiency of gp91 NADPH-oxidase (NOX-2) subunit prevented upregulation of GRK-2 expression in conditions of BD and preserved cardiac function. BD was present in 81/249 (32.5%) patients, and was characterized by lower parasympathetic tone and increased GRK-2 expression in mononuclear leukocytes. BD in patients was also associated with impaired intraoperative cardiac contractility. Critical illness and mortality were more frequent in surgical patients with BD (relative risk: 1.66 [95%CI:1.16-2.39]; p=0.006). Conclusions: Reduced baroreflex sensitivity is associated with NOX-2

  6. Ca+2/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Mediates Glucose Toxicity-Induced Cardiomyocyte Contractile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rong-Huai; Guo, Haitao; Kandadi, Machender R.; Wang, Xiao-Ming; Ren, Jun

    2012-01-01

    (1) Hyperglycemia leads to cytotoxicity in the heart. Although several theories are postulated for glucose toxicity-induced cardiomyocyte dysfunction, the precise mechanism still remains unclear. (2) This study was designed to evaluate the impact of elevated extracellular Ca2+ on glucose toxicity-induced cardiac contractile and intracellular Ca2+ anomalies as well as the mechanism(s) involved with a focus on Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent kinase. Isolated adult rat cardiomyocytes were maintained in normal (NG, 5.5 mM) or high glucose (HG, 25.5 mM) media for 6-12 hours. Contractile indices were measured including peak shortening (PS), maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening (±dL/dt), time-to-PS (TPS), and time-to-90% relengthening (TR90). (3) Cardiomyocytes maintained with HG displayed abnormal mechanical function including reduced PS, ±dL/dt, and prolonged TPS, TR90 and intracellular Ca2+ clearance. Expression of intracellular Ca2+ regulatory proteins including SERCA2a, phospholamban and Na+-Ca2+ exchanger were unaffected whereas SERCA activity was inhibited by HG. Interestingly, the HG-induced mechanical anomalies were abolished by elevated extracellular Ca2+ (from 1.0 to 2.7 mM). Interestingly, the high extracellular Ca2+-induced beneficial effect against HG was abolished by the CaM kinase inhibitor KN93. (4) These data suggest that elevated extracellular Ca2+ protects against glucose toxicity-induced cardiomyocyte contractile defects through a mechanism associated with CaM kinase. PMID:22745633

  7. Oscillatory behaviors and hierarchical assembly of contractile structures in intercalating cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Zallen, Jennifer A.

    2011-08-01

    Fluctuations in the size of the apical cell surface have been associated with apical constriction and tissue invagination. However, it is currently not known if apical oscillatory behaviors are a unique property of constricting cells or if they constitute a universal feature of the force balance between cells in multicellular tissues. Here, we set out to determine whether oscillatory cell behaviors occur in parallel with cell intercalation during the morphogenetic process of axis elongation in the Drosophila embryo. We applied multi-color, time-lapse imaging of living embryos and SIESTA, an integrated tool for automated and semi-automated cell segmentation, tracking, and analysis of image sequences. Using SIESTA, we identified cycles of contraction and expansion of the apical surface in intercalating cells and characterized them at the molecular, cellular, and tissue scales. We demonstrate that apical oscillations are anisotropic, and this anisotropy depends on the presence of intact cell-cell junctions and spatial cues provided by the anterior-posterior patterning system. Oscillatory cell behaviors during axis elongation are associated with the hierarchical assembly and disassembly of contractile actomyosin structures at the medial cortex of the cell, with actin localization preceding myosin II and with the localization of both proteins preceding changes in cell shape. We discuss models to explain how the architecture of cytoskeletal networks regulates their contractile behavior and the mechanisms that give rise to oscillatory cell behaviors in intercalating cells.

  8. Lidocaine decreases the xylazine-evoked contractility in pregnant cows.

    PubMed

    Piccinno, M; Rizzo, A; Mutinati, M; D'Onghia, G; Sciorsci, R L

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the effects of xylazine on basal uterine contractility of bovine pregnant uterine strips and that of lidocaine on xylazine-sensitized bovine pregnant uterine strips, at different stages of pregnancy. Basal contractility was evaluated in an isolated organ bath and the functionality of the strips throughout the experiment was evaluated using a dose of carbachol (10(-5)M). Uterine motility, expressed with amplitude, frequency of contractions as well as the area under the curve, was recorded in different stages of pregnancy and data were collected at 15-min intervals (5-min before and 5-min after xylazine administration and 5-min after lidocaine addition on the plateau contraction induced by xylazine). Uterine motility increased in all the stages of pregnancy after xylazine addition and gradually decreased after treatment with lidocaine. These data suggest that lidocaine might decrease the tonic effect induced by xylazine on bovine pregnant uteri.

  9. Wound-induced contractile ring: a model for cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Darenfed, Hassina; Mandato, Craig A

    2005-12-01

    The actomyosin-based contractile ring is required for several biological processes, such as wound healing and cytokinesis of animal cells. Despite progress in defining the roles of this structure in both wound closure and cell division, we still do not fully understand how an actomyosin ring is spatially and temporally assembled, nor do we understand the molecular mechanism of its contraction. Recent results have demonstrated that microtubule-dependent local assembly of F-actin and myosin-II is present in wound closure and is similar to that in cytokinesis in animal cells. Furthermore, signalling factors such as small Rho GTPases have been shown to be involved in the regulation of actin dynamics during both processes. In this review we address recent findings in an attempt to better understand the dynamics of actomyosin contractile rings during wound healing as compared with the final step of animal cell division.

  10. Some Fundamental Molecular Mechanisms of Contractility in Fibrous Macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Mandelkern, L.

    1967-01-01

    The fundamental molecular mechanisms of contractility and tension development in fibrous macromolecules are developed from the point of view of the principles of polymer physical chemistry. The problem is treated in a general manner to encompass the behavior of all macromolecular systems irrespective of their detailed chemical structure and particular function, if any. Primary attention is given to the contractile process which accompanies the crystal-liquid transition in axially oriented macromolecular systems. The theoretical nature of the process is discussed, and many experimental examples are given from the literature which demonstrate the expected behavior. Experimental attention is focused on the contraction of fibrous proteins, and the same underlying molecular mechanism is shown to be operative for a variety of different systems. PMID:6050598

  11. Active auditory mechanics in mosquitoes.

    PubMed Central

    Göpfert, M. C.; Robert, D.

    2001-01-01

    In humans and other vertebrates, hearing is improved by active contractile properties of hair cells. Comparable active auditory mechanics is now demonstrated in insects. In mosquitoes, Johnston's organ transduces sound-induced vibrations of the antennal flagellum. A non-muscular 'motor' activity enhances the sensitivity and tuning of the flagellar mechanical response in physiologically intact animals. This motor is capable of driving the flagellum autonomously, amplifying sound-induced vibrations at specific frequencies and intensities. Motor-related electrical activity of Johnston's organ strongly suggests that mosquito hearing is improved by mechanoreceptor motility. PMID:11270428

  12. Sphingomyelinase depresses force and calcium sensitivity of the contractile apparatus in mouse diaphragm muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Leonardo F.; Moylan, Jennifer S.; Stasko, Shawn; Smith, Jeffrey D.; Campbell, Kenneth S.

    2012-01-01

    Diseases that result in muscle weakness, e.g., heart failure, are characterized by elevated sphingomyelinase (SMase) activity. In intact muscle, SMase increases oxidants that contribute to diminished muscle force. However, the source of oxidants, specific processes of muscle contraction that are dysfunctional, and biochemical changes underlying the weakness elicited by SMase remain unknown. We tested three hypotheses: 1) SMase-induced depression of muscle force is mediated by mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), 2) SMase depresses force and calcium sensitivity of the contractile apparatus, and 3) SMase promotes oxidation and phosphorylation of myofibrillar proteins. Our experiments included intact muscle bundles, permeabilized single fibers, and isolated myofibrillar proteins. The mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant d-Arg-2′,6′-dimethyl-Tyr-Lys-Phe-NH2, decreased cytosolic oxidants and protected intact muscle bundles from weakness stimulated by SMase. SMase depressed maximal calcium-activated force by 20% in permeabilized single fibers (in kN/m2: control 117 ± 6; SMase 93 ± 8; P < 0.05). Calcium sensitivity of permeabilized single fibers decreased from 5.98 ± 0.03 (control) to 5.91 ± 0.02 (SMase; P < 0.05). Myofibrillar protein nitrotyrosines, carbonyls, and phosphorylation were unaltered by SMase. Our study shows that the fall in specific force of intact muscle elicited by SMase is mediated by mitochondrial ROS and can be attributed largely to dysfunction of the contractile apparatus. PMID:22362402

  13. Epigenetic reprogramming of human embryonic stem cells into skeletal muscle cells and generation of contractile myospheres.

    PubMed

    Albini, Sonia; Coutinho, Paula; Malecova, Barbora; Giordani, Lorenzo; Savchenko, Alex; Forcales, Sonia Vanina; Puri, Pier Lorenzo

    2013-03-28

    Direct generation of a homogeneous population of skeletal myoblasts from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and formation of three-dimensional contractile structures for disease modeling in vitro are current challenges in regenerative medicine. Previous studies reported on the generation of myoblasts from ESC-derived embryoid bodies (EB), but not from undifferentiated ESCs, indicating the requirement for mesodermal transition to promote skeletal myogenesis. Here, we show that selective absence of the SWI/SNF component BAF60C (encoded by SMARCD3) confers on hESCs resistance to MyoD-mediated activation of skeletal myogenesis. Forced expression of BAF60C enables MyoD to directly activate skeletal myogenesis in hESCs by instructing MyoD positioning and allowing chromatin remodeling at target genes. BAF60C/MyoD-expressing hESCs are epigenetically committed myogenic progenitors, which bypass the mesodermal requirement and, when cultured as floating clusters, give rise to contractile three-dimensional myospheres composed of skeletal myotubes. These results identify BAF60C as a key epigenetic determinant of hESC commitment to the myogenic lineage and establish the molecular basis for the generation of hESC-derived myospheres exploitable for "disease in a dish" models of muscular physiology and dysfunction.

  14. Multicellular contractility contributes to the emergence of mesothelioma nodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czirok, Andras

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) nodules arise from the mesothelial lining of the pleural cavity by a poorly understood mechanism. We demonstrate that macroscopic multicellular aggregates, reminiscent of the MPM nodules found in patients, develop when MPM cell lines are cultured at high cell densities for several weeks. Surprisingly, the nodule-like aggregates do not arise by excessive local cell proliferation, but by myosin II-driven cell contractility. Contractile nodules contain prominent actin cables that can span several cells. Several features of the in vitro MPM nodule development can be explained by a computational model that assumes uniform and steady intercellular contractile forces within a monolayer of cells, and a mechanical load-dependent lifetime of cell-cell contacts. The model behaves as a self-tensioned Maxwell fluid and exhibits an instability that leads to pattern formation. Altogether, our findings suggest that inhibition of the actomyosin system may provide a hitherto not utilized therapeutic approach to affect MPM growth. NIH R01-GM102801.

  15. Human capacity for explosive force production: neural and contractile determinants.

    PubMed

    Folland, J P; Buckthorpe, M W; Hannah, R

    2014-12-01

    This study assessed the integrative neural and contractile determinants of human knee extension explosive force production. Forty untrained participants performed voluntary and involuntary (supramaximally evoked twitches and octets - eight pulses at 300 Hz that elicit the maximum possible rate of force development) explosive isometric contractions of the knee extensors. Explosive force (F0-150 ms) and sequential rate of force development (RFD, 50-ms epochs) were measured. Surface electromyography (EMG) amplitude was recorded (superficial quadriceps and hamstrings, 50-ms epochs) and normalized (quadriceps to Mmax, hamstrings to EMGmax). Maximum voluntary force (MVF) was also assessed. Multiple linear regressions assessed the significant neural and contractile determinants of absolute and relative (%MVF) explosive force and sequential RFD. Explosive force production exhibited substantial interindividual variability, particularly during the early phase of contraction [F50, 13-fold (absolute); 7.5-fold (relative)]. Multiple regression explained 59-93% (absolute) and 35-60% (relative) of the variance in explosive force production. The primary determinants of explosive force changed during the contraction (F0-50, quadriceps EMG and Twitch F; RFD50-100, Octet RFD0-50; F100-150, MVF). In conclusion, explosive force production was largely explained by predictor neural and contractile variables, but the specific determinants changed during the phase of contraction.

  16. Intrauterine Telemetry to Measure Mouse Contractile Pressure In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rada, Cara C.; Pierce, Stephanie L.; Grotegut, Chad A.; England, Sarah K.

    2015-01-01

    A complex integration of molecular and electrical signals is needed to transform a quiescent uterus into a contractile organ at the end of pregnancy. Despite the discovery of key regulators of uterine contractility, this process is still not fully understood. Transgenic mice provide an ideal model in which to study parturition. Previously, the only method to study uterine contractility in the mouse was ex vivo isometric tension recordings, which are suboptimal for several reasons. The uterus must be removed from its physiological environment, a limited time course of investigation is possible, and the mice must be sacrificed. The recent development of radiometric telemetry has allowed for longitudinal, real-time measurements of in vivo intrauterine pressure in mice. Here, the implantation of an intrauterine telemeter to measure pressure changes in the mouse uterus from mid-pregnancy until delivery is described. By comparing differences in pressures between wild type and transgenic mice, the physiological impact of a gene of interest can be elucidated. This technique should expedite the development of therapeutics used to treat myometrial disorders during pregnancy, including preterm labor. PMID:25867820

  17. IP3 receptors regulate vascular smooth muscle contractility and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qingsong; Zhao, Guiling; Fang, Xi; Peng, Xiaohong; Tang, Huayuan; Wang, Hong; Jing, Ran; Liu, Jie; Ouyang, Kunfu

    2016-01-01

    Inositol 1, 4, 5-trisphosphate receptor–mediated (IP3R-mediated) calcium (Ca2+) release has been proposed to play an important role in regulating vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) contraction for decades. However, whether and how IP3R regulates blood pressure in vivo remains unclear. To address these questions, we have generated a smooth muscle–specific IP3R triple-knockout (smTKO) mouse model using a tamoxifen-inducible system. In this study, the role of IP3R-mediated Ca2+ release in adult VSMCs on aortic vascular contractility and blood pressure was assessed following tamoxifen induction. We demonstrated that deletion of IP3Rs significantly reduced aortic contractile responses to vasoconstrictors, including phenylephrine, U46619, serotonin, and endothelin 1. Deletion of IP3Rs also dramatically reduced the phosphorylation of MLC20 and MYPT1 induced by U46619. Furthermore, although the basal blood pressure of smTKO mice remained similar to that of wild-type controls, the increase in systolic blood pressure upon chronic infusion of angiotensin II was significantly attenuated in smTKO mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate an important role for IP3R-mediated Ca2+ release in VSMCs in regulating vascular contractility and hypertension. PMID:27777977

  18. Mechanical properties that influence antimicrobial peptide activity in lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Marín-Medina, Nathaly; Ramírez, Diego Alejandro; Trier, Steve; Leidy, Chad

    2016-12-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are small amphiphilic proteins found in animals and plants as essential components of the innate immune system and whose function is to control bacterial infectious activity. In order to accomplish their function, antimicrobial peptides use different mechanisms of action which have been deeply studied in view of their potential exploitation to treat antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections. One of the main mechanisms of action of these peptides is the disruption of the bacterial membrane through pore formation, which, in some cases, takes place via a monomer to oligomer cooperative transition. Previous studies have shown that lipid composition, and the presence of exogenous components, such as cholesterol in model membranes or carotenoids in bacteria, can affect the potency of distinct antimicrobial peptides. At the same time, considering the membrane as a two-dimensional material, it has been shown that membrane composition defines its mechanical properties which might be relevant in many membrane-related processes. Nevertheless, the correlation between the mechanical properties of the membrane and antimicrobial peptide potency has not been considered according to the importance it deserves. The relevance of these mechanical properties in membrane deformation due to peptide insertion is reviewed here for different types of pores in order to elucidate if indeed membrane composition affects antimicrobial peptide activity by modulation of the mechanical properties of the membrane. This would also provide a better understanding of the mechanisms used by bacteria to overcome antimicrobial peptide activity.

  19. Elevated temperature creep properties for selected active metal braze alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J.J.

    1997-02-01

    Active metal braze alloys reduce the number of processes required for the joining of metal to ceramic components by eliminating the need for metallization and/or Ni plating of the ceramic surfaces. Titanium (Ti), V, and Zr are examples of active element additions which have been used successfully in such braze alloys. Since the braze alloy is expected to accommodate thermal expansion mismatch strains between the metal and ceramic materials, a knowledge of its elevated temperature mechanical properties is important. In particular, the issue of whether or not the creep strength of an active metal braze alloy is increased or decreased relative to its non-activated counterpart is important when designing new brazing processes and alloy systems. This paper presents a survey of high temperature mechanical properties for two pairs of conventional braze alloys and their active metal counterparts: (a) the conventional 72Ag-28Cu (Cusil) alloy, and the active braze alloy 62.2Ag- 36.2Cu-1.6Ti (Cusil ABA), and (b) the 82Au-18Ni (Nioro) alloy and the active braze alloy Mu-15.5M-0.75Mo-1.75V (Nioro ABA). For the case of the Cusil/Cusil ABA pair, the active metal addition contributes to solid solution strengthening of the braze alloy, resulting in a higher creep strength as compared to the non-active alloy. In the case of the Nioro/Nioro ABA pair, the Mo and V additions cause the active braze alloy to have a two-phase microstructure, which results in a reduced creep strength than the conventional braze alloy. The Garofalo sinh equation has been used to quantitatively describe the stress and temperature dependence of the deformation behavior. It will be observed that the effective stress exponent in the Garofalo sinh equation is a function of the instantaneous value of the stress argument.

  20. Optical properties of actively controlled reflection and transmission gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Miguel Angel

    2001-05-01

    Reflection and transmission gratings have found a wide variety of applications as optical filters and beam steering elements. In this work we have studied the optical properties of reflection and transmission gratings whose diffraction properties could be actively controlled. Two different material systems were utilized for the study. Reflection gratings in optical fibers were used and reflection and transmission gratings were fabricated holographically in a polymer dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) material. The optical properties of refractive index-shifted gratings were studied using the fiber Bragg gratings. It was found that narrow, high transmission spikes developed inside a high reflectivity stopgap when the refractive index of a section of the grating is shifted. The refractive index-shift was achieved using the thermo- optic effect. Experimental as well as theoretical results are presented and discussed. The optical properties of electrically switchable reflection and transmission gratings fabricated in polymer dispersed liquid crystal materials were also studied. The PDLC material is electro-optic and therefore by applying an external electric field to the gratings the diffraction properties are modified. Gratings were fabricated holographically. From the study of the transmission properties of the reflection gratings we found that the reflection of the structures can be switched off by applying an external electric field and that the reflectivity is polarization insensitive for normal incidence. We also studied the diffraction properties of PDLC transmission gratings. In our analysis of the diffraction properties of these electrically- switchable liquid crystal gratings we found that it was necessary to use a generalized two-wave coupled mode theory that includes the effects of the optical anisotropy of the liquid crystal. We found that the morphology of the PDLC gratings depends on the specific PDLC mixture used to fabricate the grating.

  1. Comparison of the contractile responses to irregular and regular trains of stimuli during microstimulation of single human motor axons.

    PubMed

    Leitch, Michael; Macefield, Vaughan G

    2014-04-01

    During voluntary contractions, human motoneurons discharge with a physiological variability of ∼20%. However, studies that have measured the contractile responses to microstimulation of single motor axons have used regular trains of stimuli with no variability. We tested the hypothesis that irregular (physiological) trains of stimuli produce greater contractile responses than regular (nonphysiological) trains of identical mean frequency but zero variability. High-impedance tungsten microelectrodes were inserted into the common peroneal nerve and guided into fascicles supplying a toe extensor muscle. Selective microstimulation was achieved for 14 single motor axons. Contractile responses were measured via an angular displacement transducer over the relevant toe. After the responses to regular trains of 10 stimuli extending from 2 to 100 Hz were recorded, irregular trains of 10 stimuli, based on the interspike intervals recorded from single motor units during voluntary contractions, were delivered. Finally, the stimulation sequences were repeated following a 2-min period of continuous stimulation at 10 Hz to induce muscle fatigue. Regular trains of stimuli generated a sigmoidal increase in displacement with frequency, whereas irregular trains, emulating the firing of volitionally driven motoneurons, displayed significantly greater responses over the same frequency range (8-24 Hz). This was maintained even in the presence of fatigue. We conclude that physiological discharge variability, which incorporates short and long interspike intervals, offers an advantage to the neuromuscular system by allowing motor units to operate on a higher level of the contraction-frequency curve and taking advantage of catch-like properties in skeletal muscle.

  2. Evidence for the maintenance of motoneurone properties by msucel activity.

    PubMed Central

    Czéh, G; Gallego, R; Kudo, N; Kuno, M

    1978-01-01

    1. Electrophysiological properties of soleus motoneurones in adult cats were examined with intracellular electrodes following alterations of activity of the soleus muscle induced by transection of the thoracic spinal cord or by conduction block of the muscle nerve with tetrodotoxin (TTX) cuffs. Attempts were also made to maintain muscle activity by daily stimulation of the maintain muscle activity by daily stimulation of the peripheral nerve. 2. Within 8 days after transection of the thoracic cord, soleus motoneurones showed a significant decrease in the duration of afterhyperpolarization following action potentials. This change in motoneurone properties induced by cord transection was prevented by daily stimulation of the sciatic nerve. 3. Soleus motoneurones showed a significant decrease in the duration of after-hyperpolarization within 8 days after conduction block of the soleus nerve with TTX. This change in montoneurone properties was prevented by daily stimulation of the nerve peripheral to the TTX cuff but not central to the cuff. 4. The soleus muscle showed a significant decrease in weight relative to body weight within 8 days after transection of the thoracic cord. This decrease in muscle weight following cord transection was prevented by daily stimulation of the sciatic nerve. 5. No fibrillation was detected in the soleus muscle 8 days after conduction block of the soleus nerve with TTX. The maximum twitch tension of the soleus muscle evoked by nerve stimulation showed no significant difference between the two sides treated and untreated with TTX. Fast axoplasmic transport measured with cholinesterase as a marker was not affected by TTX. Thus, there was no sign of functional although morphological abnormalities were found in some nerve fibres. 6. It is concluded that motoneurone properties in an adult depend partly upon some factors associated with activity of the innervated muscles and that such trophic signals are retrogradely carried by the motor axons

  3. Patterned Contractile Forces Promote Epidermal Spreading and Regulate Segment Positioning during Drosophila Head Involution.

    PubMed

    Czerniak, Natalia Dorota; Dierkes, Kai; D'Angelo, Arturo; Colombelli, Julien; Solon, Jérôme

    2016-07-25

    Epithelial spreading is a fundamental mode of tissue rearrangement occurring during animal development and wound closure. It has been associated either with the collective migration of cells [1, 2] or with actomyosin-generated forces acting at the leading edge (LE) and pulling the epithelial tissue [3, 4]. During the process of Drosophila head involution (HI), the epidermis spreads anteriorly to envelope the head tissues and fully cover the embryo [5]. This results in epidermal segments of equal width that will give rise to the different organs of the fly [6]. Here we perform a quantitative analysis of tissue spreading during HI. Combining high-resolution live microscopy with laser microsurgery and genetic perturbations, we show that epidermal movement is in part, but not solely, driven by a contractile actomyosin cable at the LE. Additional driving forces are generated within each segment by a gradient of actomyosin-based circumferential tension. Interfering with Hedgehog (Hh) signaling can modulate this gradient, thus suggesting the involvement of polarity genes in the regulation of HI. In particular, we show that disruption of these contractile forces alters segment widths and leads to a mispositioning of segments. Within the framework of a physical description, we confirm that given the geometry of the embryo, a patterned profile of active circumferential tensions can indeed generate propelling forces and control final segment position. Our study thus unravels a mechanism by which patterned tensile forces can regulate spreading and positioning of epithelial tissues.

  4. Depolarization-stimulated contractility of gastrointestinal smooth muscle in calcium-free solution: a review.

    PubMed

    Evans, Emily D; Mangel, Allen W

    2011-01-01

    The membrane of most gastrointestinal smooth muscles shows slow waves, slow rhythmic changes in membrane potential. Slow waves serve to bring the membrane potential of smooth muscle cells to a threshold level that elicits a second electrical event known as the spike or action potential. The inward current of the spike, in most gastrointestinal smooth muscle preparations, is carried, at least in part, by calcium. Indeed, considering the narrow diameter of smooth muscle cells, some have hypothesized that the influx of calcium during the spike is sufficient for activation of the contractile machinery. Findings consistent with this include marked reduction in contractility during exposure of muscle segments to blockers of L-type calcium channels or following reductions in external calcium levels. However, it has also been observed that following exposure of muscle segments to external bathing solutions containing no added calcium plus 5 mM EGTA to remove any remaining extracellular calcium, contractions can be triggered following membrane depolarization. It is noteworthy that in isolated smooth muscle cells or in small muscle segments, during incubation in calcium-free solution, depolarization does not induce contractions. The present paper discusses the evidence in support of depolarization-mediated contractions occurring in gastrointestinal smooth muscle segments during incubation in solutions devoid of calcium.

  5. Oncometabolite d-2-hydroxyglutarate impairs α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and contractile function in rodent heart

    PubMed Central

    Karlstaedt, Anja; Zhang, Xiaotian; Vitrac, Heidi; Harmancey, Romain; Vasquez, Hernan; Wang, Jing Han; Goodell, Margaret A.; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich

    2016-01-01

    Hematologic malignancies are frequently associated with cardiac pathologies. Mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) occur in a subset of acute myeloid leukemia patients, causing metabolic and epigenetic derangements. We have now discovered that altered metabolism in leukemic cells has a profound effect on cardiac metabolism. Combining mathematical modeling and in vivo as well as ex vivo studies, we found that increased amounts of the oncometabolite d-2-hydroxyglutarate (D2-HG), produced by IDH2 mutant leukemic cells, cause contractile dysfunction in the heart. This contractile dysfunction is associated with impaired oxidative decarboxylation of α-ketoglutarate, a redirection of Krebs cycle intermediates, and increased ATP citrate lyase (ACL) activity. Increased availability of D2-HG also leads to altered histone methylation and acetylation in the heart. We propose that D2-HG promotes cardiac dysfunction by impairing α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and induces histone modifications in an ACL-dependent manner. Collectively, our results highlight the impact of cancer cell metabolism on function and metabolism of the heart. PMID:27582470

  6. Different myofilament nearest-neighbor interactions have distinctive effects on contractile behavior.

    PubMed Central

    Razumova, M V; Bukatina, A E; Campbell, K B

    2000-01-01

    Cooperativity in contractile behavior of myofilament systems almost assuredly arises because of interactions between neighboring sites. These interactions may be of different kinds. Tropomyosin thin-filament regulatory units may have neighbors in steric blocking positions (off) or steric permissive positions (on). The position of these neighbors influence the tendency for the regulatory unit to assume the on or off state. Likewise, the tendency of a myosin cross-bridge to achieve a force-bearing state may be influenced by whether neighboring cross-bridges are in force-bearing states. Also, a cross-bridge in the force-bearing state may influence the tendency of a regulatory unit to enter the on state. We used a mathematical model to examine the influence of each of these three kinds of neighbor interactions on the steady-state force-pCa relation and on the dynamic force redevelopment process. Each neighbor interaction was unique in its effects on maximal Ca(2+)-activated force, position, and symmetry of the force-pCa curve and on the Hill coefficient. Also, each neighbor interaction had a distinctive effect on the time course of force development as assessed by its rate coefficient, k(dev). These diverse effects suggest that variations in all three kinds of nearest-neighbor interactions may be responsible for a wide variety of currently unexplained observations of myofilament contractile behavior. PMID:10827989

  7. Synaptopodin couples epithelial contractility to α-actinin-4–dependent junction maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Nivetha

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial junction experiences mechanical force exerted by endogenous actomyosin activities and from interactions with neighboring cells. We hypothesize that tension generated at cell–cell adhesive contacts contributes to the maturation and assembly of the junctional complex. To test our hypothesis, we used a hydraulic apparatus that can apply mechanical force to intercellular junction in a confluent monolayer of cells. We found that mechanical force induces α-actinin-4 and actin accumulation at the cell junction in a time- and tension-dependent manner during junction development. Intercellular tension also induces α-actinin-4–dependent recruitment of vinculin to the cell junction. In addition, we have identified a tension-sensitive upstream regulator of α-actinin-4 as synaptopodin. Synaptopodin forms a complex containing α-actinin-4 and β-catenin and interacts with myosin II, indicating that it can physically link adhesion molecules to the cellular contractile apparatus. Synaptopodin depletion prevents junctional accumulation of α-actinin-4, vinculin, and actin. Knockdown of synaptopodin and α-actinin-4 decreases the strength of cell–cell adhesion, reduces the monolayer permeability barrier, and compromises cellular contractility. Our findings underscore the complexity of junction development and implicate a control process via tension-induced sequential incorporation of junctional components. PMID:26504173

  8. Elevated blood pressure and enhanced myocardial contractility in mice with severe IGF-1 deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Lembo, G; Rockman, H A; Hunter, J J; Steinmetz, H; Koch, W J; Ma, L; Prinz, M P; Ross, J; Chien, K R; Powell-Braxton, L

    1996-01-01

    To circumvent the embryonic lethality of a complete deficiency in insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), we generated mice homozygous for a site-specific insertional event that created a mutant IGF-1 allele (igf1m). These mice have IGF-1 levels 30% of wild type yet survive to adulthood, thereby allowing physiological analysis of the phenotype. Miniaturized catheterization technology revealed elevated conscious blood pressure in IGF-1(m/m) mice, and measurements of left ventricular contractility were increased. Adenylyl cyclase activity was enhanced in IGF-1(m/m) hearts, without an increase in beta-adrenergic receptor density, suggesting that crosstalk between IGF-1 and beta-adrenergic signaling pathways may mediate the increased contractility. The hypertrophic response of the left ventricular myocardium in response to aortic constriction, however, was preserved in IGF-1(m/m) mice. We conclude that chronic alterations in IGF-1 levels can selectively modulate blood pressure and left ventricular function, while not affecting adaptive myocardial hypertrophy in vivo. PMID:8958230

  9. Effects of filament rigidity in myosin II-induced actin network contractility and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weirich, Kimberly; Gardel, Margaret

    2014-03-01

    Cells change shape, deforming to move and divide. The dynamic protein scaffold that shapes the cell is the cortex, a disordered, thin network of actin filaments. Random, local stresses generated by myosin II in the network create cellular-scale deformations. Myosin induced buckling and severing of actin filaments has been shown to underlie the contractility of two-dimensional disordered actin networks. This non-linear elastic response of actin filaments is thought to be an essential symmetry breaking mechanism to produce robust contractility in disordered actomyosin networks. To test this idea, we explore the effects of an actin bundling protein fascin, a crosslinker which induces polarity specific bundling of actin filaments, to create a network of F-actin bundles. We investigate myosin-induced stresses in a network of randomly oriented actin filaments, confined to a thin sheet at a supported lipid bilayer surface through a crowding agent. We find fascin-bundled filaments are less prone to filament buckling and show increased filament sliding, causing the myosin activity to induce network reorganization rather than contraction. Thus, changes in the filament bending rigidity in motor-filament systems can drive the system between distinct states with unique dynamic and mechanical signatures.

  10. Comparative Study of Surface-Active Properties and Antimicrobial Activities of Disaccharide Monoesters

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi; Song, Fei; Taxipalati, Maierhaba; Wei, Wei; Feng, Fengqin

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this research was to determine the effect of sugar or fatty acid in sugar ester compounds on the surface-active properties and antimicrobial activities of these compounds. Disaccharides of medium-chain fatty acid monoesters were synthesized through transesterifications by immobilized lipase (Lipozyme TLIM) to yield nine monoesters for subsequent study. Their antimicrobial activities were investigated using three pathogenic microorganisms: Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Candida albicans. Their surface-active properties including air–water surface tension, critical micelle concentration, and foaming and emulsion power and stability were also studied. The results showed that all of the tested monoesters were more effective against Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive bacterium) than against Escherichia coli O157:H7 (Gram-negative bacterium). The results demonstrated that the carbon chain length was the most important factor influencing the surface properties, whereas degree of esterification and hydrophilic groups showed little effect. PMID:25531369

  11. A Survey of Nanoflare Properties in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viall, N. M.; Klimchuk, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate coronal heating using a systematic technique to analyze the properties of nanoflares in active regions (AR). Our technique computes cooling times, or time-lags, on a pixel-by-pixel basis using data taken with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Our technique has the advantage that it allows us to analyze all of the coronal AR emission, including the so-called diffuse emission. We recently presented results using this time-lag analysis on NOAA AR 11082 (Viall & Klimchuk 2012) and found that the majority of the pixels contained cooling plasma along their line of sight, consistent with impulsive coronal nanoflare heating. Additionally, our results showed that the nanoflare energy is stronger in the AR core and weaker in the active region periphery. Are these results representative of the nanoflare properties exhibited in the majority of ARs, or is AR 11082 unique? Here we present the time-lag results for a survey of ARs and show that these nanoflare patterns are born out in other active regions, for a range of ages, magnetic complexity, and total unsigned magnetic flux. Other aspects of the nanoflare properties, however, turn out to be dependent on certain AR characteristics.

  12. Contractile Units in Disordered Actomyosin Bundles Arise from F-Actin Buckling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Martin; Thoresen, Todd; Gardel, Margaret L.; Dinner, Aaron R.

    2012-06-01

    Bundles of filaments and motors are central to contractility in cells. The classic example is striated muscle, where actomyosin contractility is mediated by highly organized sarcomeres which act as fundamental contractile units. However, many contractile bundles in vivo and in vitro lack sarcomeric organization. Here we propose a model for how contractility can arise in bundles without sarcomeric organization and validate its predictions with experiments on a reconstituted system. In the model, internal stresses in frustrated arrangements of motors with diverse velocities cause filaments to buckle, leading to overall shortening. We describe the onset of buckling in the presence of stochastic motor head detachment and predict that buckling-induced contraction occurs in an intermediate range of motor densities. We then calculate the size of the “contractile units” associated with this process. Consistent with these results, our reconstituted actomyosin bundles show contraction at relatively high motor density, and we observe buckling at the predicted length scale.

  13. Fission yeast IQGAP arranges actin filaments into the cytokinetic contractile ring

    PubMed Central

    Takaine, Masak; Numata, Osamu; Nakano, Kentaro

    2009-01-01

    The contractile ring (CR) consists of bundled actin filaments and myosin II; however, the actin-bundling factor remains elusive. We show that the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe IQGAP Rng2 is involved in the generation of CR F-actin and required for its arrangement into a ring. An N-terminal fragment of Rng2 is necessary for the function of Rng2 and is localized to CR F-actin. In vitro the fragment promotes actin polymerization and forms linear arrays of F-actin, which are resistant to the depolymerization induced by the actin-depolymerizing factor Adf1. Our findings indicate that Rng2 is involved in the generation of CR F-actin and simultaneously bundles the filaments and regulates its dynamics by counteracting the effects of Adf1, thus enabling the reconstruction of CR F-actin bundles, which provides an insight into the physical properties of the building blocks that comprise the CR. PMID:19713940

  14. Antioedematogenic activity, acetylcholinesterase inhibition and antimicrobial properties of Jacaranda oxyphylla.

    PubMed

    Pereira, V V; Silva, R R; Dos Santos, M H; Dias, D F; Moreira, M E C; Takahashi, J A

    2016-09-01

    Jacaranda oxyphylla Cham. (Bignoniaceae) is a shrub found in the Brazilian cerrado and used in folk medicine to treat microbial infections. The aim of this study was to carry out a phytochemical screening and evaluate antioedematogenic, antimicrobial and antiacetylcholinesterase properties of J. oxyphylla crude extracts. All extracts analysed showed presence of terpenoids, which are potentially active chemical substances. A high AChE inhibitory activity for hexane extract from leaves and for the extracts from twigs was found. Ethanol extract from leaves of J. oxyphylla showed activity against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria. This extract was also effective in inhibiting the stages of inflammation evaluated. Biological investigation and phytochemical screening of J. oxyphylla extracts provided additional evidence of its traditional medicinal value.

  15. Contractile basis of ameboid movement. VII. The distribution of fluorescently labeled actin in living amebas

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    The technique of molecular cytochemistry has been used to follow the distribution of fluorescently labeled actin in living Chaos carolinensis and Amoeba proteus during ameboid movement and various cellular processes. The distribution of 5-iodoacetamidofluorescein- labeled actin was compared with that of Lissamine rhodamine B sulfonyl chloride-labeled ovalbumin microinjected into the same cell and recorded with an image intensification microscope system. Actively motile cells demonstrated a rather uniform distribution of actin throughout most of the cytoplasm, except in the tail ectoplasm and in plasma gel sheets, where distinct actin structures were observed. In addition, actin-containing structures were induced in the cortex during wound healing, concanavalin A capping, pinocytosis, and contractions elicited by phalloidin injections. The formation of distinct fluorescent actin structures has been correlated with contractile activities. PMID:6893200

  16. Regulation of human myometrial contractility during pregnancy and labour: are calcium homeostatic pathways important?

    PubMed

    Tribe, R M

    2001-03-01

    If we are to develop new strategies for the treatment and management of preterm and dysfunctional term labour, it is imperative that we improve current understanding of the control of human uterine activity. Despite many studies of animal pregnancy, there is a paucity of knowledge relating to the complex control of human myometrium during pregnancy. It is hypothesized that human myometrium is relatively quiescent during the majority of pregnancy and that as term approaches there is cascade of molecular events that prepare the uterus for labour. This review will consider the cellular mechanisms involved in the regulation of human myometrial activity and the modulation of these by hormonal and mechanical signals. In particular, the contribution of calcium homeostatic pathways to the control of human myometrial contractility during gestation will be discussed. Experimental Physiology (2001) 86.2, 247-254.

  17. The role of microtubules in contractile ring function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, A. H.; Paulsen, A. Q.; Conrad, G. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    During cytokinesis, a cortical contractile ring forms around a cell, constricts to a stable tight neck and terminates in separation of the daughter cells. At first cleavage, Ilyanassa obsoleta embryos form two contractile rings simultaneously. The cleavage furrow (CF), in the animal hemisphere between the spindle poles, constricts to a stable tight neck and separates the daughter cells. The third polar lobe constriction (PLC-3), in the vegetal hemisphere below the spindle, constricts to a transient tight neck, but then relaxes, allowing the polar lobe cytoplasm to merge with one daughter cell. Eggs exposed to taxol, a drug that stabilizes microtubules, before the CF or the PLC-3 develop, fail to form CFs, but form stabilized tight PLCs. Eggs exposed to taxol at the time of PLC-3 formation develop varied numbers of constriction rings in their animal hemispheres and one PLC in their vegetal hemisphere, none of which relax. Eggs exposed to taxol after PLC-3 initiation form stabilized tight CFs and PLCs. At maximum constriction, control embryos display immunolocalization of nonextractable alpha-tubulin in their CFs, but not in their PLCs, and reveal, via electron microscopy, many microtubules extending through their CFs, but not through their PLCs. Embryos which form stabilized tightly constricted CFs and PLCs in the presence of taxol display immunolocalization of nonextractable alpha-tubulin in both constrictions and show many polymerized microtubules extending through both CFs and PLCs. These results suggest that the extension of microtubules through a tight contractile ring may be important for stabilizing that constriction and facilitating subsequent cytokinesis.

  18. Cyclic Mechanical Stress and Trabecular Meshwork Cell Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Renata F.; Sumida, Grant M.; Stamer, W. Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Ocular pulse decreases outflow facility of perfused anterior segments. However, the mechanism by which conventional outflow tissues respond to cyclic intraocular pressure oscillations is unknown. The purpose of the present study was to examine responses of trabecular meshwork (TM) cells to cyclic biomechanical stress in the presence and absence of compounds known to affect cell contractility. Methods To model flow in the juxtacanalicular region of the TM and to measure changes in transendothelial flow, human TM cell monolayers on permeable filters were perfused at a constant flow rate until reaching a stable baseline pressure and then were exposed to cyclic stress with an average amplitude of 2.7 mm Hg peak to peak at a 1-Hz frequency for 2 hours in the presence or absence of compounds known to affect cell contractility (isoproterenol, Y27632, pilocarpine, and nifedipine). Pressure was recorded continuously. Immunocytochemistry staining was used to determine filamentous actin stress fiber content, whereas Western blot analysis was used to measure the extent of myosin light chain (p-MLC) phosphorylation and ratio of filamentous to globular actin. Results Human TM cells respond to cyclic pressure oscillations by increasing mean intrachamber pressure (decreasing hydraulic conductivity) (126.13% ± 2.4%; P < 0.05), a response blocked in the presence of Y27632, a rho-kinase inhibitor (101.35 ± 0.59; P = 0.234), but not isoproterenol, pilocarpine, or nifedipine. Although mechanical stress appeared to have no effect, Y27632 decreased phosphorylated myosin light chain, filamentous/globular actin ratio, and stress fiber formation in TM cells. Conclusions Human TM cells respond to cyclic mechanical stress by increasing intrachamber pressure. Pulse-mediated effects are blocked by Y27632, implicating a role for Rho-kinase-mediated signaling and cellular contractility in ocular pulse-associated changes in outflow facility. PMID:19339745

  19. Effects of wortmannin on alpha-1/alpha-2 adrenergic receptor-mediated contractile responses in rabbit vascular tissues.

    PubMed

    Waen-Safranchik, V I; Deth, R C

    1994-06-01

    The inhibitory effect of wortmannin (WO), a fungus-derived protein kinase inhibitor, was assessed on contractile responses elicited by phenylephrine-induced alpha 1-(alpha 1 R) and UK 14304-induced alpha 2-adrenergic receptor (alpha 2R) stimulation in the rabbit aorta and saphenous vein, respectively. In agonist dose-response studies, WO caused a noncompetitive inhibition of both alpha 1R and alpha 2R responses, but was more potent against alpha 2R. Maximally effective single-dose responses at both receptors were less sensitive to WO. The initial alpha 1R contractile response, associated with intracellular Ca2+ release and myosin light chain kinase activation, was relatively insensitive to WO, while the Ca2+ influx-dependent tonic contraction was more sensitive. Contractions induced by high K+ buffer were relatively insensitive to WO in both the aorta and saphenous vein. These results indicate that WO inhibits receptor-initiated Ca2+ influx-dependent contractile responses such as those caused by alpha 2R stimulation and the sustained phase of alpha 1R stimulation more readily than Ca2+ release-dependent responses.

  20. Emergence of airway smooth muscle mechanical behavior through dynamic reorganization of contractile units and force transmission pathways

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in asthma remains poorly understood despite significant research effort to elucidate relevant underlying mechanisms. In particular, a significant body of experimental work has focused on the effect of tidal fluctuations on airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, tissues, lung slices, and whole airways to understand the bronchodilating effect of tidal breathing and deep inspirations. These studies have motivated conceptual models that involve dynamic reorganization of both cytoskeletal components as well as contractile machinery. In this article, a biophysical model of the whole ASM cell is presented that combines 1) crossbridge cycling between actin and myosin; 2) actin-myosin disconnectivity, under imposed length changes, to allow dynamic reconfiguration of “force transmission pathways”; and 3) dynamic parallel-to-serial transitions of contractile units within these pathways that occur through a length fluctuation. Results of this theoretical model suggest that behavior characteristic of experimentally observed force-length loops of maximally activated ASM strips can be explained by interactions among the three mechanisms. Crucially, both sustained disconnectivity and parallel-to-serial transitions are necessary to explain the nature of hysteresis and strain stiffening observed experimentally. The results provide strong evidence that dynamic rearrangement of contractile machinery is a likely mechanism underlying many of the phenomena observed at timescales associated with tidal breathing. This theoretical cell-level model captures many of the salient features of mechanical behavior observed experimentally and should provide a useful starting block for a bottom-up approach to understanding tissue-level mechanical behavior. PMID:24481961

  1. Emergence of airway smooth muscle mechanical behavior through dynamic reorganization of contractile units and force transmission pathways.

    PubMed

    Brook, Bindi S

    2014-04-15

    Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in asthma remains poorly understood despite significant research effort to elucidate relevant underlying mechanisms. In particular, a significant body of experimental work has focused on the effect of tidal fluctuations on airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, tissues, lung slices, and whole airways to understand the bronchodilating effect of tidal breathing and deep inspirations. These studies have motivated conceptual models that involve dynamic reorganization of both cytoskeletal components as well as contractile machinery. In this article, a biophysical model of the whole ASM cell is presented that combines 1) crossbridge cycling between actin and myosin; 2) actin-myosin disconnectivity, under imposed length changes, to allow dynamic reconfiguration of "force transmission pathways"; and 3) dynamic parallel-to-serial transitions of contractile units within these pathways that occur through a length fluctuation. Results of this theoretical model suggest that behavior characteristic of experimentally observed force-length loops of maximally activated ASM strips can be explained by interactions among the three mechanisms. Crucially, both sustained disconnectivity and parallel-to-serial transitions are necessary to explain the nature of hysteresis and strain stiffening observed experimentally. The results provide strong evidence that dynamic rearrangement of contractile machinery is a likely mechanism underlying many of the phenomena observed at timescales associated with tidal breathing. This theoretical cell-level model captures many of the salient features of mechanical behavior observed experimentally and should provide a useful starting block for a bottom-up approach to understanding tissue-level mechanical behavior.

  2. Elevated Glucose Levels Promote Contractile and Cytoskeletal Gene Expression in Vascular Smooth Muscle via Rho/Protein Kinase C and Actin Polymerization*

    PubMed Central

    Hien, Tran Thi; Turczyńska, Karolina M.; Dahan, Diana; Ekman, Mari; Grossi, Mario; Sjögren, Johan; Nilsson, Johan; Braun, Thomas; Boettger, Thomas; Garcia-Vaz, Eliana; Stenkula, Karin; Swärd, Karl; Gomez, Maria F.; Albinsson, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. This is in part attributed to the effects of hyperglycemia on vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In diabetic animal models, hyperglycemia results in hypercontractility of vascular smooth muscle possibly due to increased activation of Rho-kinase. The aim of the present study was to investigate the regulation of contractile smooth muscle markers by glucose and to determine the signaling pathways that are activated by hyperglycemia in smooth muscle cells. Microarray, quantitative PCR, and Western blot analyses revealed that both mRNA and protein expression of contractile smooth muscle markers were increased in isolated smooth muscle cells cultured under high compared with low glucose conditions. This effect was also observed in hyperglycemic Akita mice and in diabetic patients. Elevated glucose activated the protein kinase C and Rho/Rho-kinase signaling pathways and stimulated actin polymerization. Glucose-induced expression of contractile smooth muscle markers in cultured cells could be partially or completely repressed by inhibitors of advanced glycation end products, L-type calcium channels, protein kinase C, Rho-kinase, actin polymerization, and myocardin-related transcription factors. Furthermore, genetic ablation of the miR-143/145 cluster prevented the effects of glucose on smooth muscle marker expression. In conclusion, these data demonstrate a possible link between hyperglycemia and vascular disease states associated with smooth muscle contractility. PMID:26683376

  3. Lysophosphatidylcholine potentiates vascular contractile responses by enhancing vasoconstrictor-induced increase in cytosolic free Ca2+ in rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Suenaga, H; Kamata, K

    1998-11-20

    We investigated the effects of palmitoyl-L-alpha-lysophosphatidylcholine on the contractile responses of the endothelium-denuded rat aorta to high K+, noradrenaline, UK14,304 (5-bromo-6-[2-imidazolin-2-ylamino]-quinoxaline) (a selective alpha2 adrenoceptor agonist) and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Lysophosphatidylcholine at concentrations from 10(-6) M to 10(-4) M did not contract aortic strips. However, lysophosphatidylcholine strongly potentiated the UK14,304-induced contraction. High K+ - and PMA-induced contractions were also potentiated. In contrast, the noradrenaline-induced contraction was only slightly potentiated by 10(-5) M lysophosphatidylcholine. In fura PE-3-loaded aortic strips, lysophosphatidylcholine (10(-5) M) markedly augmented the increase in both cytosolic free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) and contractile tension induced by UK14,304, high K+ and PMA. Nicardipine (10(-7) M) and 10(-6) M Ro-31-8220 (¿1-[3-(amidinothio)propyl-1H-indoyl-3-yl]-3-(1-methyl-1H-++ +indoyl-3-yl)-maleimide-methane sulfate) strongly inhibited the increase in [Ca2+]i and contractile tension induced by UK14,304 and in the presence of these inhibitors, the enhancing effects of lysophosphatidylcholine were attenuated. However, the enhancing effect on high K+ -induced contraction was not affected by Ro-31-8220. These results suggest that lysophosphatidylcholine may cause an augmentation of the increase in [Ca2+]i induced by UK14,304 which response is depend on protein kinase C activation and in this way potentiate contractile responses in the rat aorta. Protein kinase C independent mechanisms may also be involved in the enhancing effect of lysophosphatidylcholine on smooth muscle contraction.

  4. High-throughput screening for modulators of cellular contractile force†

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Young; Zhou, Enhua H.; Tambe, Dhananjay; Chen, Bohao; Lavoie, Tera; Dowell, Maria; Simeonov, Anton; Maloney, David J.; Marinkovic, Aleksandar; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.; Burger, Stephanie; Frykenberg, Matthew; Butler, James P.; Stamer, W. Daniel; Johnson, Mark; Solway, Julian; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    When cellular contractile forces are central to pathophysiology, these forces comprise a logical target of therapy. Nevertheless, existing high-throughput screens are limited to upstream signalling intermediates with poorly defined relationships to such a physiological endpoint. Using cellular force as the target, here we report a new screening technology and demonstrate its applications using human airway smooth muscle cells in the context of asthma and Schlemm's canal endothelial cells in the context of glaucoma. This approach identified several drug candidates for both asthma and glaucoma. We attained rates of 1000 compounds per screening day, thus establishing a force-based cellular platform for high-throughput drug discovery. PMID:25953078

  5. Single cell contractility studies based on compact moiré system over periodic gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiaoyu; Surks, Howard; Zhang, Xin

    2010-05-01

    Abnormal vascular cell contractile performance is a hallmark of cardiovascular diseases. Conventional cell force measurement technique requires individually tracking the sensing units and complex computation efforts for further studying cell contractility. We developed instead a robust and simple compact optical moiré system that measures phase changes encoded in carrier moiré patterns generated from two layers of gratings. Cell mechanics study including cell contractile forces and stress and strain distributions during normal and abnormal cell contractions can thus be conveniently analyzed. The distinct signals from moiré patterns in longitudinal and transverse directions revealed abnormal cell mechanical contractility linked to cardiovascular disease.

  6. Sodium tungstate administration ameliorated diabetes-induced electrical and contractile remodeling of rat heart without normalization of hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Aydemir, Mustafa; Ozturk, Nihal; Dogan, Serdar; Aslan, Mutay; Olgar, Yusuf; Ozdemir, Semir

    2012-08-01

    Recently, sodium tungstate was suggested to improve cardiac performance of diabetic rats in perfused hearts based on its insulinomimetic activity. In this study, we aimed to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this beneficial effect of sodium tungstate. Tungstate was administered (100 mg/kg/day) to diabetic and control rats intragastrically for 6 weeks. Blood glucose levels increased, whereas body weight, heart weight and plasma insulin levels decreased significantly in diabetic animals. Interestingly, none of these parameters was changed by tungstate treatment. On the other hand, fractional shortening and accompanying intracellular Ca(2+) [Ca(2+)](i) transients of isolated ventricular myocytes were measured, and sodium tungstate was found to improve the peak shortening and the amplitude of [Ca(2+)](i) transients in diabetic cardiomyocytes. Potassium and L-type Ca(2+) currents were also recorded in isolated ventricular cells. Significant restoration of suppressed I (to) and I (ss) was achieved by tungstate administration. Nevertheless, L-type calcium currents did not change either in untreated or treated diabetic rats. Tissue biochemical parameters including TBARS, protein carbonyl content, xanthine oxidase (XO) and xanthine dehydogenase (XDH) were also determined, and diabetes revealed a marked increase in TBARS and carbonyl content which were decreased significantly by tungstate treatment. Conversely, although XO and XDH activities didn't change in untreated diabetic rats, a remarkable but insignificant decrease was detected in treated animals. In conclusion, tungstate treatment improved diabetes-induced contractile abnormalities via restoration of dysregulated [Ca(2+)](i) and altered ionic currents. This beneficial effect is due to antioxidant property of sodium tungstate rather than normalization of hyperglycemia.

  7. Exposure to low mercury concentration in vivo impairs myocardial contractile function

    SciTech Connect

    Furieri, Lorena Barros; Fioresi, Mirian; Junior, Rogerio Faustino Ribeiro; Bartolome, Maria Visitacion; Fernandes, Aurelia Araujo; Cachofeiro, Victoria; Lahera, Vicente; Salaices, Mercedes; Stefanon, Ivanita; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim

    2011-09-01

    Increased cardiovascular risk after mercury exposure has been described but cardiac effects resulting from controlled chronic treatment are not yet well explored. We analyzed the effects of chronic exposure to low mercury concentrations on hemodynamic and ventricular function of isolated hearts. Wistar rats were treated with HgCl{sub 2} (1st dose 4.6 {mu}g/kg, subsequent dose 0.07 {mu}g/kg/day, im, 30 days) or vehicle. Mercury treatment did not affect blood pressure (BP) nor produced cardiac hypertrophy or changes of myocyte morphometry and collagen content. This treatment: 1) in vivo increased left ventricle end diastolic pressure (LVEDP) without changing left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP) and heart rate; 2) in isolated hearts reduced LV isovolumic systolic pressure and time derivatives, and {beta}-adrenergic response; 3) increased myosin ATPase activity; 4) reduced Na{sup +}-K{sup +} ATPase (NKA) activity; 5) reduced protein expression of SERCA and phosphorylated phospholamban on serine 16 while phospholamban expression increased; as a consequence SERCA/phospholamban ratio reduced; 6) reduced sodium/calcium exchanger (NCX) protein expression and {alpha}-1 isoform of NKA, whereas {alpha}-2 isoform of NKA did not change. Chronic exposure for 30 days to low concentrations of mercury does not change BP, heart rate or LVSP but produces small but significant increase of LVEDP. However, in isolated hearts mercury treatment promoted contractility dysfunction as a result of the decreased NKA activity, reduction of NCX and SERCA and increased PLB protein expression. These findings offer further evidence that mercury chronic exposure, even at small concentrations, is an environmental risk factor affecting heart function. - Highlights: > Unchanges blood pressure, heart rate, systolic pressure. > Increases end diastolic pressure. > Promotes cardiac contractility dysfunction. > Decreases NKA activity, NCX and SERCA, increases PLB protein expression. > Small

  8. Active doublet method for measuring small changes in physical properties

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, Peter M.; Fehler, Michael C.; Johnson, Paul A.; Phillips, W. Scott

    1994-01-01

    Small changes in material properties of a work piece are detected by measuring small changes in elastic wave velocity and attenuation within a work piece. Active, repeatable source generate coda wave responses from a work piece, where the coda wave responses are temporally displaced. By analyzing progressive relative phase and amplitude changes between the coda wave responses as a function of elapsed time, accurate determinations of velocity and attenuation changes are made. Thus, a small change in velocity occurring within a sample region during the time periods between excitation origin times (herein called "doublets") will produce a relative delay that changes with elapsed time over some portion of the scattered waves. This trend of changing delay is easier to detect than an isolated delay based on a single arrival and provides a direct measure of elastic wave velocity changes arising from changed material properties of the work piece.

  9. Brain Mechanical Property Measurement Using MRE with Intrinsic Activation

    PubMed Central

    Pattison, Adam J.; McGarry, Matthew D.; Perreard, Irina M.; Swienckowski, Jessica G.; Eskey, Clifford J.; Lollis, S. Scott; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2013-01-01

    the MRE procedures were repeated on the same day. Cardiac pulsation, termed intrinsic activation, produces sufficient motion to allow mechanical properties to be recovered. The poroelastic model is more consistent with the measured data from brain at low frequencies than the linear elastic model. Intrinsic activation allows MR elastography to be performed without a device shaking the head so the patient notices no differences between it and the other sequences in an MR examination. PMID:23079508

  10. Psychometric properties of the Arab Heritage Activity Card Sort.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Razan; Holm, Margo B

    2013-03-01

    The Activity Card Sort is a valid and reliable assessment tool that was created to assess Participation. It has been translated to several languages and adapted to different international cultures. The most recent version of this tool is the Arabic Heritage Activity Card Sort (A-ACS). The purpose of this study was to establish the psychometric properties of the new Arabic version in Jordanian adults. Forty three Jordanian patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and 62 healthy adults were recruited to test the psychometric properties of the tool. The A-ACS correlated moderately with the participation index of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (r = -0.458, p < 0.00) (concurrent validity), was able to discriminate between patients and healthy participants on the current and retained levels of participation (F = 5.09, p < 0.03; F = 6.01, p < 0.02, respectively) (discriminative validity), and correlated moderately with the total scores of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (r = -0.458, p < 0.00) and the total score on the Arabic version of the self-report Performance Assessment of Self-care Skills (r = 0.581, p < 0.00) (convergent validity). The tool also showed good test-retest reliability (r = 0.80, p < 0.00) and excellent internal consistency (α = 0.90). The Arabic Heritage of the Activity Card Sort is a valid and reliable tool for Arabic-speaking occupational therapists to use when assessing participation in Jordanian patients with MS or healthy adults. Limitations of this study include using only one diagnostic group from Jordan and examining only the Recovery and Community Versions of the tool. Future studies are needed to examine further psychometric properties for patients with different diagnoses and from different countries in the Arabic region for all three versions of the A-ACS.

  11. Molluscicidal properties and selective toxicity of surface-active agents

    PubMed Central

    Visser, S. A.

    1965-01-01

    Of over 100 commercially produced surface-active agents tested against the bilharziasis vector snail Biomphalaria sudanica, 13 were found to possess considerable and highly selective molluscicidal properties at concentrations of less than 1 ppm for exposures of 48 hours. Against crustacea, fish, water plants, mosquito larvae, mice, and the eggs of B. sudanica, the toxicities of the 13 surfactants were slight. The chemicals did not appear to be absorbed by organic matter to any appreciable extent. It is thought that the toxicity to B. sudanica is of both a chemical and a physical nature. PMID:5294185

  12. The molecular properties of nitrobenzanthrone isomers and their mutagenic activities.

    PubMed

    Ostojić, Bojana D; Stanković, Branislav; Ðorđević, Dragana S

    2014-06-01

    The mutagenic activity of five mono-substituted nitrobenzanthrones (NBA) has been determined in the Ames assay (Takamura-Enya et al., 2006). In the present study, a theoretical investigation of the electronic properties of all mono-substituted NBA isomers and their relation to mutagenic activity are presented. Equilibrium geometries, vertical ionization potentials (VIP), vertical electron affinities (VEA), relative energies, dipole moments and electronic dipole polarizabilities, and the IR and Raman spectra of NBA isomers calculated by Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods are presented. The position of the nitro group affects the spectral features of the IR and Raman spectra of the NBA isomers. The results show that a good linear relationship exists between the summation of Raman activities (∑ARaman) over all the 3N-6 vibrational modes and the mutagenic activity of the NBA isomers in Salmonella typhimurium strains. The spectroscopic results suggest that the unknown mutagenic activities of 4-NBA, 5-NBA, 6-NBA, 8-NBA and 10-NBA are predicted to follow the order 4-NBA>10-NBA>5-NBA>8-NBA>6-NBA.

  13. Immunoenhancing properties and antiviral activity of 7-deazaguanosine in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Smee, D F; Alaghamandan, H A; Gilbert, J; Burger, R A; Jin, A; Sharma, B S; Ramasamy, K; Revankar, G R; Cottam, H B; Jolley, W B

    1991-01-01

    The nucleotide analog 7-deazaguanosine has not previously been reported to possess biological (antiviral or antitumor) properties in cell culture or in vivo. Up to 10(5) U of interferon per ml was detected in mouse sera 1 to 4 h following oral (200-mg/kg of body weight) and intraperitoneal (50-mg/kg) doses of the compound. 7-Deazaguanosine also caused significant activation of natural killer and phagocytic cells but did not augment T- and B-cell blastogenesis. Intraperitoneal treatments of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg/day administered 24 and 18 h before virus inoculation were highly protective in mice inoculated with lethal doses of Semliki Forest or San Angelo viruses. Less but still significant survivor increases were evident in treated mice infected with banzi or encephalomyocarditis viruses. In most cases, the degree of antiviral activity was similar to that exhibited by the biological response modifier 7-thia-8-oxoguanosine. 7-Thia-8-oxoguanosine was more potent than 7-deazaguanosine against encephalomyocarditis virus in mice, however. Oral efficacy was achieved with 7-deazaguanosine treatments of greater than or equal to 100 mg/kg against all virus infections, whereas 7-thia-8-oxoguanosine is reported to be devoid of oral activity in rodents. Thus, 7-deazaguanosine represents the first reported orally active nucleoside biological response modifier exhibiting broad-spectrum antiviral activity against particular types of RNA viruses. PMID:1707603

  14. Swarming Bristle-Bots: Exploring Properties of Active Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forstner, Martin B.; Beasock, Damian

    Active Matter describes an ubiquitous class of non-equilibrium systems that encompasses a diverse range of phenomena in the living and non-living realm. Examples are microscopic bio-filaments and their associated motor proteins, flocks of birds and fish, vibrated rods and disks, or nanoscale colloids actuated by catalytic activity on their surface. What unifies these systems is that they are all composed of self-driven units. In consequence, these systems are not driven into non-equilibrium by energy input at their boundary, but by local energy injection. As fascinating as these systems are, there are currently barely any laboratory systems that allow for controlled experiments in dry active matter. That is, systems not immersed in a fluid that can be observed without specialized equipment. Here we present a two-dimensional `active matter' system consisting of hundreds of macroscopic (~0.05 m long), modified, commercially available bristle-bots. We show that this swarm of toys classifies as active matter as it exhibits properties such as dynamic phase separation. Because of their straight forward implementation, their size and controllability, such swarms can not only answer scientific questions, but they have great potential as educational tools in teaching labs and classrooms.

  15. Type VI secretion system: secretion by a contractile nanomachine

    PubMed Central

    Basler, Marek

    2015-01-01

    The type VI secretion systems (T6SS) are present in about a quarter of all Gram-negative bacteria. Several key components of T6SS are evolutionarily related to components of contractile nanomachines such as phages and R-type pyocins. The T6SS assembly is initiated by formation of a membrane complex that binds a phage-like baseplate with a sharp spike, and this is followed by polymerization of a long rigid inner tube and an outer contractile sheath. Effectors are preloaded onto the spike or into the tube during the assembly by various mechanisms. Contraction of the sheath releases an unprecedented amount of energy, which is used to thrust the spike and tube with the associated effectors out of the effector cell and across membranes of both bacterial and eukaryotic target cells. Subunits of the contracted sheath are recycled by T6SS-specific unfoldase to allow for a new round of assembly. Live-cell imaging has shown that the assembly is highly dynamic and its subcellular localization is in certain bacteria regulated with a remarkable precision. Through the action of effectors, T6SS has mainly been shown to contribute to pathogenicity and competition between bacteria. This review summarizes the knowledge that has contributed to our current understanding of T6SS mode of action. PMID:26370934

  16. A relationship between ultrasonic integrated backscatter and myocardial contractile function.

    PubMed Central

    Wickline, S A; Thomas, L J; Miller, J G; Sobel, B E; Perez, J E

    1985-01-01

    We have shown previously that the physiologic, mechanical cardiac cycle is associated with a parallel, cardiac cycle-dependent variation of integrated backscatter (IB). However, the mechanisms responsible are not known. The mathematical and physiological considerations explored in the present study suggest that the relationship between backscatter and myocardial contractile function reflects cyclic alterations in myofibrillar elastic parameters, with the juxtaposition of intracellular and extracellular elastic elements that have different intrinsic acoustic impedances providing an appropriately sized scattering interface at the cellular level. Cardiac cycle-dependent changes in the degree of local acoustic impedance mismatch therefore may elicit concomitant changes in backscatter. Because acoustic impedance is determined partly by elastic modulus, changes in local elastic moduli resulting from the non-Hookian behavior of myocardial elastic elements exposed to stretch may alter the extent of impedance mismatch. When cardiac cell mechanical behavior is represented by a three-component Maxwell-type model of muscle mechanics, the systolic decrease in IB that we have observed experimentally is predicted. Our prior observations of regional intramural differences in IB and the dependence of IB on global contractile function are accounted for as well. When the model is tested experimentally by assessing its ability to predict the regional and global behavior of backscatter in response to passive left ventricular distention, good concordance is observed. Images PMID:3908482

  17. Biological activities and medicinal properties of Gokhru (Pedalium murex L.)

    PubMed Central

    Rajashekar, V; Rao, E Upender; P, Srinivas

    2012-01-01

    Bada Gokhru (Pedalium murex L.) is perhaps the most useful traditional medicinal plant in India. Each part of the neem tree has some medicinal property and is thus commercially exploitable. During the last five decades, apart from the chemistry of the Pedalium murex compounds, considerable progress has been achieved regarding the biological activity and medicinal applications of this plant. It is now considered as a valuable source of unique natural products for development of medicines against various diseases and also for the development of industrial products. This review gives a bird's eye view mainly on the biological activities of some of this compounds isolated, pharmacological actions of the extracts, clinical studies and plausible medicinal applications of gokharu along with their safety evaluation. PMID:23569975

  18. Properties and Performance of Alkali-Activated Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Robert J.

    Alkali-activated concrete (AAC) made with industrial byproducts as the sole binder is rapidly emerging as a sustainable alternative to ordinary portland cement concrete (PCC). Despite its exemplary mechanical performance and durability, there remain several barriers to widespread commercialization of AAC. This dissertation addresses several of these barriers. Mathematical models are proposed which efficiently and accurately predict the compressive strength of AAC as a function of activator composition, binder type, and curing condition. The relationships between compressive strength and other mechanical properties (i.e., tensile strength and modulus of elasticity) are discussed, as are stress-strain relationships. Several aspects related to the durability of AAC are also discussed, including dimensional stability under drying conditions, alkali-silica reactivity, and chloride permeability. The results of these experimental investigations are disseminated in the context of real-world applicability.

  19. Rocket effluent: Its ice nucleation activity and related properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parungo, F. P.; Allee, P. A.

    1978-01-01

    To investigate the possibility of inadvertent weather modification from rocket effluent, aerosol samples were collected from an instrumented aircraft subsequent to the Voyager 1 and 2 launches. The aerosol's morphology, concentration, and size distribution were examined with an electron microscope. The elemental compositions of individual particles were analyzed with an X-ray energy spectrometer. Ice nucleus concentration was measured with a thermal diffusion chamber. The particles' physical and chemical properties were related to their ice nucleation activity. A laboratory experiment on rocket propellant exhaust was conducted under controlled conditions. Both laboratory and field experimental results indicated that rocket propellant exhaust can produce active ice nuclei and modify local weather in suitable meteorological conditions.

  20. Time course analysis of mechanical ventilation-induced diaphragm contractile muscle dysfunction in the rat.

    PubMed

    Corpeno, R; Dworkin, B; Cacciani, N; Salah, H; Bergman, H-M; Ravara, B; Vitadello, M; Gorza, L; Gustafson, A-M; Hedström, Y; Petersson, J; Feng, H-Z; Jin, J-P; Iwamoto, H; Yagi, N; Artemenko, K; Bergquist, J; Larsson, L

    2014-09-01

    Controlled mechanical ventilation (CMV) plays a key role in triggering the impaired diaphragm muscle function and the concomitant delayed weaning from the respirator in critically ill intensive care unit (ICU) patients. To date, experimental and clinical studies have primarily focused on early effects on the diaphragm by CMV, or at specific time points. To improve our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the impaired diaphragm muscle function in response to mechanical ventilation, we have performed time-resolved analyses between 6 h and 14 days using an experimental rat ICU model allowing detailed studies of the diaphragm in response to long-term CMV. A rapid and early decline in maximum muscle fibre force and preceding muscle fibre atrophy was observed in the diaphragm in response to CMV, resulting in an 85% reduction in residual diaphragm fibre function after 9-14 days of CMV. A modest loss of contractile proteins was observed and linked to an early activation of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway, myosin:actin ratios were not affected and the transcriptional regulation of myosin isoforms did not show any dramatic changes during the observation period. Furthermore, small angle X-ray diffraction analyses demonstrate that myosin can bind to actin in an ATP-dependent manner even after 9-14 days of exposure to CMV. Thus, quantitative changes in muscle fibre size and contractile proteins are not the dominating factors underlying the dramatic decline in diaphragm muscle function in response to CMV, in contrast to earlier observations in limb muscles. The observed early loss of subsarcolemmal neuronal nitric oxide synthase activity, onset of oxidative stress, intracellular lipid accumulation and post-translational protein modifications strongly argue for significant qualitative changes in contractile proteins causing the severely impaired residual function in diaphragm fibres after long-term mechanical ventilation. For the first time, the present study demonstrates

  1. Time course analysis of mechanical ventilation-induced diaphragm contractile muscle dysfunction in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Corpeno, R; Dworkin, B; Cacciani, N; Salah, H; Bergman, H-M; Ravara, B; Vitadello, M; Gorza, L; Gustafson, A-M; Hedström, Y; Petersson, J; Feng, H-Z; Jin, J-P; Iwamoto, H; Yagi, N; Artemenko, K; Bergquist, J; Larsson, L

    2014-01-01

    Controlled mechanical ventilation (CMV) plays a key role in triggering the impaired diaphragm muscle function and the concomitant delayed weaning from the respirator in critically ill intensive care unit (ICU) patients. To date, experimental and clinical studies have primarily focused on early effects on the diaphragm by CMV, or at specific time points. To improve our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the impaired diaphragm muscle function in response to mechanical ventilation, we have performed time-resolved analyses between 6 h and 14 days using an experimental rat ICU model allowing detailed studies of the diaphragm in response to long-term CMV. A rapid and early decline in maximum muscle fibre force and preceding muscle fibre atrophy was observed in the diaphragm in response to CMV, resulting in an 85% reduction in residual diaphragm fibre function after 9–14 days of CMV. A modest loss of contractile proteins was observed and linked to an early activation of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway, myosin:actin ratios were not affected and the transcriptional regulation of myosin isoforms did not show any dramatic changes during the observation period. Furthermore, small angle X-ray diffraction analyses demonstrate that myosin can bind to actin in an ATP-dependent manner even after 9–14 days of exposure to CMV. Thus, quantitative changes in muscle fibre size and contractile proteins are not the dominating factors underlying the dramatic decline in diaphragm muscle function in response to CMV, in contrast to earlier observations in limb muscles. The observed early loss of subsarcolemmal neuronal nitric oxide synthase activity, onset of oxidative stress, intracellular lipid accumulation and post-translational protein modifications strongly argue for significant qualitative changes in contractile proteins causing the severely impaired residual function in diaphragm fibres after long-term mechanical ventilation. For the first time, the present study

  2. Porosity and sorption properties of activated carbons prepared from anthracite by steam-air activation

    SciTech Connect

    Sych, N.V.; Kartel, N.T.; Tsyba, N.N.; Strelko, V.V.; Nikolaichuk, A.D.; Mironyuk, T.I.

    2006-04-15

    Fundamental aspects of the steam-air activation of anthracite from Donets coal fields were studied. The effect of the flow rate of moistened air on the development of a porous structure and the sorption properties of the adsorbents obtained were examined.

  3. Enhanced capacitive properties of commercial activated carbon by re-activation in molten carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Beihu; Xiao, Zuoan; Zhu, Hua; Xiao, Wei; Wu, Wenlong; Wang, Dihua

    2015-12-01

    Simple, affordable and green methods to improve capacitive properties of commercial activated carbon (AC) are intriguing since ACs possess a predominant role in the commercial supercapacitor market. Herein, we report a green reactivation of commercial ACs by soaking ACs in molten Na2CO3-K2CO3 (equal in mass ratios) at 850 °C combining the merits of both physical and chemical activation strategies. The mechanism of molten carbonate treatment and structure-capacitive activity correlations of the ACs are rationalized. Characterizations show that the molten carbonate treatment increases the electrical conductivity of AC without compromising its porosity and wettability of electrolytes. Electrochemical tests show the treated AC exhibited higher specific capacitance, enhanced high-rate capability and excellent cycle performance, promising its practical application in supercapacitors. The present study confirms that the molten carbonate reactivation is a green and effective method to enhance capacitive properties of ACs.

  4. Effects of Gestational and Postnatal Exposure to Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia on Diaphragm Muscle Contractile Function in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Fiona B.; Dempsey, Eugene M.; O'Halloran, Ken D.

    2016-01-01

    Alterations to the supply of oxygen during early life presents a profound stressor to physiological systems with aberrant remodeling that is often long-lasting. Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) is a feature of apnea of prematurity, chronic lung disease, and sleep apnea. CIH affects respiratory control but there is a dearth of information concerning the effects of CIH on respiratory muscles, including the diaphragm—the major pump muscle of breathing. We investigated the effects of exposure to gestational CIH (gCIH) and postnatal CIH (pCIH) on diaphragm muscle function in male and female rats. CIH consisted of exposure in environmental chambers to 90 s of hypoxia reaching 5% O2 at nadir, once every 5 min, 8 h a day. Exposure to gCIH started within 24 h of identification of a copulation plug and continued until day 20 of gestation; animals were studied on postnatal day 22 or 42. For pCIH, pups were born in normoxia and within 24 h of delivery were exposed with dams to CIH for 3 weeks; animals were studied on postnatal day 22 or 42. Sham groups were exposed to normoxia in parallel. Following gas exposures, diaphragm muscle contractile, and endurance properties were examined ex vivo. Neither gCIH nor pCIH exposure had effects on diaphragm muscle force-generating capacity or endurance in either sex. Similarly, early life exposure to CIH did not affect muscle tolerance of severe hypoxic stress determined ex vivo. The findings contrast with our recent observation of upper airway dilator muscle weakness following exposure to pCIH. Thus, the present study suggests a relative resilience to hypoxic stress in diaphragm muscle. Co-ordinated activity of thoracic pump and upper airway dilator muscles is required for optimal control of upper airway caliber. A mismatch in the force-generating capacity of the complementary muscle groups could have adverse consequences for the control of airway patency and respiratory homeostasis. PMID:27462274

  5. Frequency dependence of power and its implications for contractile function of muscle fibers from the digital flexors of horses

    PubMed Central

    Butcher, Michael T.; Bertram, John E.A.; Syme, Douglas A.; Hermanson, John W.; Chase, P. Bryant

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The digital flexors of horses must produce high force to support the body weight during running, and a need for these muscles to generate power is likely limited during locomotion over level ground. Measurements of power output from horse muscle fibers close to physiological temperatures, and when cyclic strain is imposed, will help to better understand the in vivo performance of the muscles as power absorbers and generators. Skinned fibers from the deep (DDF) and superficial (SDF) digital flexors, and the soleus (SOL) underwent sinusoidal oscillations in length over a range of frequencies (0.5–16 Hz) and strain amplitudes (0.01–0.06) under maximum activation (pCa 5) at 30°C. Results were analyzed using both workloop and Nyquist plot analyses to determine the ability of the fibers to absorb or generate power and the frequency dependence of those abilities. Power absorption was dominant at most cycling frequencies and strain amplitudes in fibers from all three muscles. However, small amounts of power were generated (0.002–0.05 Wkg−1) at 0.01 strain by all three muscles at relatively slow cycling frequencies: DDF (4–7 Hz), SDF (4–5 Hz) and SOL (0.5–1 Hz). Nyquist analysis, reflecting the influence of cross‐bridge kinetics on power generation, corroborated these results. The similar capacity for power generation by DDF and SDF versus lower for SOL, and the faster frequency at which this power was realized in DDF and SDF fibers, are largely explained by the fast myosin heavy chain isoform content in each muscle. Contractile function of DDF and SDF as power absorbers and generators, respectively, during locomotion may therefore be more dependent on their fiber architectural arrangement than on the physiological properties of their muscle fibers. PMID:25293602

  6. Contractile effect of TRPA1 receptor agonists in the isolated mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Penuelas, Angelica; Tashima, Kimihito; Tsuchiya, Shizuko; Matsumoto, Kenjiro; Nakamura, Tomonori; Horie, Syunji; Yano, Shingo

    2007-12-08

    TRPA1 is a member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family expressed in sensory neurons. The present study focused on the effects of TRPA1 activation on contractile responses in isolated mouse intestine preparations. The jejunum, ileum, and proximal and distal colon were surgically isolated from male ddY mice. Intestinal motility was recorded as changes in isotonic tension. TRPA1, TRPM8, and TRPV1 expressions were examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). A TRPA1 agonist allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) dose-dependently induced contractions in the proximal and distal colon, whereas in the jejunum and ileum, even 100 muM AITC caused very little contraction. Likewise, a TRPA1 and TRPM8 agonist icilin, a TRPA1 agonist allicin, and a TRPV1 agonist capsaicin induced contractions in the colon. However, a TRPM8 agonist menthol induced long-lasting relaxation in the colon. Repeated exposure to AITC produced desensitization of its own contraction in the colon. Moreover, contractions induced by AITC generate cross-desensitization with icilin and capsaicin. Tetrodotoxin completely abolished AITC-induced contractions in the colon, whereas atropine significantly attenuated AITC-induced contractions in the distal colon, but not in the proximal colon. Menthol-induced relaxation in the colon was not inhibited by tetrodotoxin and atropine. RT-PCR analysis revealed the expression of TRPA1 and TRPV1, but not TRPM8, throughout the mouse intestine. These results suggest that TRPA1, but not TRPM8, are functionally expressed in the enteric nervous system throughout the mouse intestine on neurons that may also co-express TRPV1, yet the contractile responses to TRPA1 activation differ depending on their location along the intestine.

  7. Modeling beta-adrenergic control of cardiac myocyte contractility in silico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saucerman, Jeffrey J.; Brunton, Laurence L.; Michailova, Anushka P.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; McCullough, A. D. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    The beta-adrenergic signaling pathway regulates cardiac myocyte contractility through a combination of feedforward and feedback mechanisms. We used systems analysis to investigate how the components and topology of this signaling network permit neurohormonal control of excitation-contraction coupling in the rat ventricular myocyte. A kinetic model integrating beta-adrenergic signaling with excitation-contraction coupling was formulated, and each subsystem was validated with independent biochemical and physiological measurements. Model analysis was used to investigate quantitatively the effects of specific molecular perturbations. 3-Fold overexpression of adenylyl cyclase in the model allowed an 85% higher rate of cyclic AMP synthesis than an equivalent overexpression of beta 1-adrenergic receptor, and manipulating the affinity of Gs alpha for adenylyl cyclase was a more potent regulator of cyclic AMP production. The model predicted that less than 40% of adenylyl cyclase molecules may be stimulated under maximal receptor activation, and an experimental protocol is suggested for validating this prediction. The model also predicted that the endogenous heat-stable protein kinase inhibitor may enhance basal cyclic AMP buffering by 68% and increasing the apparent Hill coefficient of protein kinase A activation from 1.0 to 2.0. Finally, phosphorylation of the L-type calcium channel and phospholamban were found sufficient to predict the dominant changes in myocyte contractility, including a 2.6x increase in systolic calcium (inotropy) and a 28% decrease in calcium half-relaxation time (lusitropy). By performing systems analysis, the consequences of molecular perturbations in the beta-adrenergic signaling network may be understood within the context of integrative cellular physiology.

  8. Physical Properties of Cooling Plasma in Quiescent Active Region Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, E.; Miralles, M. P.; Curdt, W.; Hara, H.

    2009-04-01

    In the present work, we use SOHO/SUMER, SOHO/UVCS, SOHO/EIT, SOHO/LASCO, STEREO/EUVI, and Hinode/EIS coordinated observations of an active region (AR 10989) at the west limb taken on 2008 April 8 to study the cooling of coronal loops. The cooling plasma is identified using the intensities of SUMER spectral lines emitted at temperatures in the 4.15 <= log T <= 5.45 range. EIS and SUMER spectral observations are used to measure the physical properties of the loops. We found that before cooling took place these loops were filled with coronal hole-like plasma, with temperatures in the 5.6 <= log T <= 5.9 range. SUMER spectra also allowed us to determine the plasma temperature, density, emission measure, element abundances, and dynamic status during the cooling process. The ability of EUVI to observe the emitting region from a different direction allowed us to measure the volume of the emitting region and estimate its emission measure. Comparison with values measured from line intensities provided us with an estimate of the filling factor. UVCS observations of the coronal emission above the active region showed no streamer structure associated with AR 10989 at position angles between 242°and 253fdg EIT, LASCO, and EUVI-A narrowband images and UVCS spectral observations were used to discriminate between different scenarios and monitor the behavior of the active region in time. The present study provides the first detailed measurements of the physical properties of cooling loops, a very important benchmark for theoretical models of loop cooling and condensation.

  9. Contractile reactions of guinea pig airway smooth muscles in the presence of stannum oxide nanosized particles.

    PubMed

    Kapilevich, L V; Zaytseva, T N; Nosarev, A V; Agev, B G; Dyakova, E Yu; Ogorodova, L M; Magaeva, A A; Terecova, O G; Itin, V I

    2012-05-01

    Contractile reactions of the guinea pig airway smooth muscles in the presence of stannum dioxide nanosized particles were studied. Contractile reactions to cholinergic and histaminergic stimulation were potentiated by inhalations of nanoparticle aerosol and by exposure of isolated smooth muscle segments to nanoparticle suspension.

  10. Migration in Confined 3D Environments Is Determined by a Combination of Adhesiveness, Nuclear Volume, Contractility, and Cell Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Lautscham, Lena A; Kämmerer, Christoph; Lange, Janina R; Kolb, Thorsten; Mark, Christoph; Schilling, Achim; Strissel, Pamela L; Strick, Reiner; Gluth, Caroline; Rowat, Amy C; Metzner, Claus; Fabry, Ben

    2015-09-01

    In cancer metastasis and other physiological processes, cells migrate through the three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix of connective tissue and must overcome the steric hindrance posed by pores that are smaller than the cells. It is currently assumed that low cell stiffness promotes cell migration through confined spaces, but other factors such as adhesion and traction forces may be equally important. To study 3D migration under confinement in a stiff (1.77 MPa) environment, we use soft lithography to fabricate polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) devices consisting of linear channel segments with 20 μm length, 3.7 μm height, and a decreasing width from 11.2 to 1.7 μm. To study 3D migration in a soft (550 Pa) environment, we use self-assembled collagen networks with an average pore size of 3 μm. We then measure the ability of four different cancer cell lines to migrate through these 3D matrices, and correlate the results with cell physical properties including contractility, adhesiveness, cell stiffness, and nuclear volume. Furthermore, we alter cell adhesion by coating the channel walls with different amounts of adhesion proteins, and we increase cell stiffness by overexpression of the nuclear envelope protein lamin A. Although all cell lines are able to migrate through the smallest 1.7 μm channels, we find significant differences in the migration velocity. Cell migration is impeded in cell lines with larger nuclei, lower adhesiveness, and to a lesser degree also in cells with lower contractility and higher stiffness. Our data show that the ability to overcome the steric hindrance of the matrix cannot be attributed to a single cell property but instead arises from a combination of adhesiveness, nuclear volume, contractility, and cell stiffness.

  11. Getting the jump on skeletal muscle disuse atrophy: preservation of contractile performance in aestivating Cyclorana alboguttata (Gunther 1867).

    PubMed

    Symonds, Beth L; James, Rob S; Franklin, Craig E

    2007-03-01

    Prolonged immobilisation or unloading of skeletal muscle causes muscle disuse atrophy, which is characterised by a reduction in muscle cross-sectional area and compromised locomotory function. Animals that enter seasonal dormancy, such as hibernators and aestivators, provide an interesting model for investigating atrophy associated with disuse. Previous research on the amphibian aestivator Cyclorana alboguttata (Günther 1867) demonstrated an absence of muscle disuse atrophy after 3 months of aestivation, as measured by gastrocnemius muscle contractile properties and locomotor performance. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of aestivation on iliofibularis and sartorius muscle morphology and contractile function of C. alboguttata over a longer, more ecologically relevant time-frame of 9 months. We found that whole muscle mass, muscle cross-sectional area, fibre number and proportions of fibre types remained unchanged after prolonged disuse. There was a significant reduction in iliofibularis fibre cross-sectional area (declined by 36% for oxidative fibre area and 39% for glycolytic fibre area) and sartorius fibre density (declined by 44%). Prolonged aestivation had little effect on the isometric properties of the skeletal muscle of C. alboguttata. There was a significant reduction in the isometric contraction times of the relatively slow-twitch iliofibularis muscle, suggesting that the muscle was becoming slower after 9 months of aestivation (time to peak twitch increased by 25%, time from peak twitch to half relaxation increased by 34% and time from last stimulus to half tetanus relation increased by 20%). However, the results of the work-loop analysis clearly demonstrate that, despite changes to muscle morphology and isometric kinetics, the overall contractile performance and power output levels of muscles from 9-month aestivating C. alboguttata are maintained at control levels.

  12. α,β-Unsaturated aldehyde pollutant acrolein suppresses cardiomyocyte contractile function: Role of TRPV1 and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhenbiao; He, Emily Y; Scott, Glenda I; Ren, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution is associated with an increased prevalence of heart disease and is known to trigger a proinflammatory response via stimulation of transient receptor potential vanilloid cation channels (TRPV1, also known as the capsaicin receptor). This study was designed to examine the effect of acrolein, an essential α,β-unsaturated aldehyde pollutant, on myocardial contractile function and the underlying mechanism involved with a focus on TRPV1 and oxidative stress. Cardiomyocyte mechanical and intracellular Ca(2+) properties were evaluated using an IonOptix MyoCam® system including peak shortening (PS), maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening (± dL/dt), time-to-PS (TPS), time-to-90% relengthening (TR90 ), fura-2 fluorescence intensity (FFI) and intracellular Ca(2+) decay. Changes in apoptosis and TRPV1 were evaluated using Western blot analysis. The degree of oxidative stress was assessed using the ratio between reduced and oxidized glutathione. Results obtained revealed that exposure of cardiomyocytes to acrolein acutely compromised contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) properties including depressed PS, ± dL/dt and ΔFFI, as well as prolonged TR90 and intracellular Ca(2+) decay. In addition, acrolein exposure upregulated TRPV1 associated with an increase in both apoptosis and oxidative stress. However, the acrolein-induced cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) anomalies, as well as apoptosis (as evidenced by Bcl-2, Bax, FasL, Caspase-3 and -8), were negated by the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger glutathione or the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine. Collectively these data suggest that the α,β-unsaturated aldehyde pollutant acrolein may play a role in the pathogenesis and sequelae of air pollution-induced heart disease via a TRPV1- and oxidative stress-dependent mechanism.

  13. ACTIVE STATE OF MUSCLE IN IODOACETATE RIGOR

    PubMed Central

    Mauriello, George E.; Sandow, Alexander

    1959-01-01

    Frog sartorius muscles, equilibrated to 2 x 10-4 M iodoacetic acid-Ringer's solution and activated by a series of twitches or a long tetanus, perform a rigor response consisting in general of a contractile change which plateaus and is then automatically reversed. Isotonic rigor shortening obeys a force-velocity relation which, with certain differences in value of the constants, accords with Hill's equation for this relation. Changes in rigidity during either isotonic or isometric rigor response show that the capacity of the rigor muscle to bear a load increases more abruptly than the corresponding onset of the ordinarily recorded response, briefly plateaus, and then decays. A quick release of about 1 mm. applied at any instant of isometric rigor output causes the tension to drop instantaneously to zero and then redevelop, the rate of redevelopment varying as does the intensity of the load-bearing capacity. These results demonstrate that rigor mechanical responses result from interaction of a passive, undamped series elastic component, and a contractile component with active state properties like those of normal contraction. Adenosinetriphosphate is known to break down in association with development of the rigor active state. This is discussed in relation to the apparent absence of ATP splitting in normal activation of the contractile component. PMID:13654738

  14. Force-sharing between cat soleus and gastrocnemius muscles during walking: explanations based on electrical activity, properties, and kinematics.

    PubMed

    Prilutsky, B I; Herzog, W; Allinger, T L

    1994-10-01

    Studying force sharing between synergistic muscles can be useful for understanding the functional significance of musculoskeletal redundancy and the mechanisms underlying the control of synergistic muscles. The purpose of this study was to quantify and explain force sharing between cat soleus (SO) and gastrocnemius (GA) muscles, and changes in force sharing, as a function of integrated electrical activity (IEMG), contractile and mechanical properties, and kinematics of the muscles for a variety of locomotor conditions. Forces in SO and GA were measured using standard tendon force transducers of the 'buckle' type, and EMGs were recorded using bipolar, indwelling fine wire electrodes. Muscle tendon and fiber lengths, as well as the corresponding velocities, were derived from the hindlimb kinematics, anthropometric measurements, and a muscle model. In order to describe force- and IEMG-sharing between SO and GA, SO force vs GA force and SO IEMG vs GA IEMG plots were constructed. Force- and IEMG-sharing curves had a loop-like shape. Direction of formation of the loop was typically counterclockwise for forces and clockwise for IEMG; that is, forces of GA reached the maximum and then decreased faster relative to forces of SO, and IEMG of SO reached the maximum and then decreased faster relative to IEMG of GA. With increasing speeds of locomotion, the width of the force-sharing loops tended to decrease, and the width of the IEMG-sharing loops increased. Peak forces in GA muscle and peak IEMGs in SO and GA muscles tended to increase with increasing speeds of locomotion, whereas peak SO forces remained nearly constant for all activities. Because of these changes in the peak forces and IEMGs of SO and GA, the slope of the force-sharing loop decreased, and the slope of the IEMG-sharing loop did not change significantly with increasing speeds of locomotion. Length changes and velocities of SO and GA increased with the speed of locomotion and were similar in absolute magnitude

  15. Beneficial effect of medicinal plants on the contractility of post-hypoxic isolated guinea pig atria - Potential implications for the treatment of ischemic-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Bipat, Robbert; Toelsie, Jerry R; Magali, Indira; Soekhoe, Rubaina; Stender, Karin; Wangsawirana, Angelique; Oedairadjsingh, Krishan; Pawirodihardjo, Jennifer; Mans, Dennis R A

    2016-08-01

    Context Ischemic-reperfusion injury is accompanied by a decreased contractility of the myocardium. Positive-inotropic agents have proven useful for treating this condition but may exert serious side-effects. Objective In this study, aqueous preparations from Abelmoschus esculentus L. Moench (Malvaceae), Annona muricata L. (Annonaceae), Bixa orellana L. (Bixaceae), Cecropia peltata L. (Moraceae), Erythrina fusca Lour. (Fabaceae), Psidium guajava L. (Myrtaceae) and Terminalia catappa L. (Combretaceae) were evaluated for their ability to improve the decreased contractility of isolated guinea pig atria after hypoxic stress. Materials and methods Guinea pig atria isolated in Ringer-Locke buffer gassed with 100% O2 at 30 °C were exposed for 5 min to hypoxia, then allowed to recover in oxygenated buffer alone or containing a single plant extract (0.001-1 mg/mL). The contractility (g/s) and beating frequency (beats/min), as well as troponin C contents of the bathing solution (ng/mL), were determined and expressed as means ± SDs. Results The extracts of A. muricata, B. orellana, C. peltata and T. catappa caused an increase in the contractility compared to untreated atria of 340 ± 102%, 151 ± 13%, 141 ± 14% and 238 ± 44%, respectively. However, the latter two preparations increased the troponin C contents of the bathing solution to 36 ± 11 and 69 ± 33, compared to the value of 11 ± 3 ng/mL found with untreated atria. Conclusions Preparations from A. muricata and B. orellana may possess positive-inotropic properties which may improve the contractility of the post-hypoxic myocardium. Studies to assess their usefulness in ischemic-reperfusion injury are warranted.

  16. X-ray recordings reveal how a human disease-linked skeletal muscle α-actin mutation leads to contractile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ochala, Julien; Ravenscroft, Gianina; McNamara, Elyshia; Nowak, Kristen J; Iwamoto, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-01

    In humans, mutant skeletal muscle α-actin proteins are associated with contractile dysfunction, skeletal muscle weakness and a wide range of primarily skeletal muscle diseases. Despite this knowledge, the exact molecular mechanisms triggering the contractile dysfunction remain unknown. Here, we aimed to unravel these. Hence, we used a transgenic mouse model expressing a well-described D286G mutant skeletal muscle α-actin protein and recapitulating the human condition of contractile deregulation and severe skeletal muscle weakness. We then recorded and analyzed the small-angle X-ray diffraction patterns of isolated membrane-permeabilized myofibers. Results showed that upon addition of Ca(2+), the intensity changes of the second (1/19 nm(-1)) and sixth (1/5.9 nm(-1)) actin layer lines and of the first myosin meridional reflection (1/14.3 nm(-1)) were disrupted when the thin-thick filament overlap was optimal (sarcomere length of 2.5-2.6 μm). However these reflections were normal when the thin and thick filaments were not interacting (sarcomere length>3.6 μm). These findings demonstrate, for the first time, that the replacement of just one amino acid in the skeletal muscle α-actin protein partly prevents actin conformational changes during activation, disrupting the strong binding of myosin molecules. This leads to a limited myosin-related tropomyosin movement over the thin filaments, further affecting the amount of cross-bridges, explaining the contractile dysfunction.

  17. Effect of Noni (Morinda citrifolia Linn.) Fruit and Its Bioactive Principles Scopoletin and Rutin on Rat Vas Deferens Contractility: An Ex Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Narasingam, Megala; Murugan, Dharmani Devi; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effect of methanolic extract of Morinda citrifolia Linn. (MMC) and its bioactive principles, scopoletin and rutin, on dopamine- and noradrenaline-evoked contractility in isolated rat vas deferens preparations. MMC (1–40 mg/mL), scopoletin (1–200 μg/mL), and rutin hydrate (0.6–312.6 μg/mL) dose-dependently inhibited the contractility evoked by submaximal concentrations of both dopamine and noradrenaline, respectively. Haloperidol and prazosin, reference dopamine D2, and α1-adrenoceptors antagonists significantly reversed the dopamine- and noradrenaline-induced contractions, respectively, in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, MMC per se at higher doses (60–100 mg/mL) showed dose-dependent contractile response in rat vas deferens which was partially inhibited by high doses of haloperidol but not by prazosin. These results demonstrated the biphasic effects of MMC on dopaminergic system; that is, antidopaminergic effect at lower concentrations (<40 mg/mL) and dopaminergic agonistic effect at higher concentrations (>60 mg/mL). However, similar contractile response at high doses of scopoletin (0.5–5 mg/mL) and rutin hydrate (0.5–5 mg/mL) per se was not observed. Therefore, it can be concluded that the bioactive principles of MMC, scopoletin, and rutin might be responsible for the antidopaminergic and antiadrenergic activities of MMC. PMID:25045753

  18. Effect of noni (Morinda citrifolia Linn.) fruit and its bioactive principles scopoletin and rutin on rat vas deferens contractility: an ex vivo study.

    PubMed

    Pandy, Vijayapandi; Narasingam, Megala; Kunasegaran, Thubasni; Murugan, Dharmani Devi; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effect of methanolic extract of Morinda citrifolia Linn. (MMC) and its bioactive principles, scopoletin and rutin, on dopamine- and noradrenaline-evoked contractility in isolated rat vas deferens preparations. MMC (1-40 mg/mL), scopoletin (1-200 μg/mL), and rutin hydrate (0.6-312.6 μg/mL) dose-dependently inhibited the contractility evoked by submaximal concentrations of both dopamine and noradrenaline, respectively. Haloperidol and prazosin, reference dopamine D2, and α 1-adrenoceptors antagonists significantly reversed the dopamine- and noradrenaline-induced contractions, respectively, in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, MMC per se at higher doses (60-100 mg/mL) showed dose-dependent contractile response in rat vas deferens which was partially inhibited by high doses of haloperidol but not by prazosin. These results demonstrated the biphasic effects of MMC on dopaminergic system; that is, antidopaminergic effect at lower concentrations (<40 mg/mL) and dopaminergic agonistic effect at higher concentrations (>60 mg/mL). However, similar contractile response at high doses of scopoletin (0.5-5 mg/mL) and rutin hydrate (0.5-5 mg/mL) per se was not observed. Therefore, it can be concluded that the bioactive principles of MMC, scopoletin, and rutin might be responsible for the antidopaminergic and antiadrenergic activities of MMC.

  19. Contractility parameters of human β-cardiac myosin with the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation R403Q show loss of motor function.

    PubMed

    Nag, Suman; Sommese, Ruth F; Ujfalusi, Zoltan; Combs, Ariana; Langer, Stephen; Sutton, Shirley; Leinwand, Leslie A; Geeves, Michael A; Ruppel, Kathleen M; Spudich, James A

    2015-10-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most frequently occurring inherited cardiovascular disease. It is caused by mutations in genes encoding the force-generating machinery of the cardiac sarcomere, including human β-cardiac myosin. We present a detailed characterization of the most debated HCM-causing mutation in human β-cardiac myosin, R403Q. Despite numerous studies, most performed with nonhuman or noncardiac myosin, there is no consensus about the mechanism of action of this mutation on the function of the enzyme. We use recombinant human β-cardiac myosin and new methodologies to characterize in vitro contractility parameters of the R403Q myosin compared to wild type. We extend our studies beyond pure actin filaments to include the interaction of myosin with regulated actin filaments containing tropomyosin and troponin. We find that, with pure actin, the intrinsic force generated by R403Q is ~15% lower than that generated by wild type. The unloaded velocity is, however, ~10% higher for R403Q myosin, resulting in a load-dependent velocity curve that has the characteristics of lower contractility at higher external loads compared to wild type. With regulated actin filaments, there is no increase in the unloaded velocity and the contractility of the R403Q myosin is lower than that of wild type at all loads. Unlike that with pure actin, the actin-activated adenosine triphosphatase activity for R403Q myosin with Ca(2+)-regulated actin filaments is ~30% lower than that for wild type, predicting a lower unloaded duty ratio of the motor. Overall, the contractility parameters studied fit with a loss of human β-cardiac myosin contractility as a result of the R403Q mutation.

  20. Contractility parameters of human β-cardiac myosin with the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation R403Q show loss of motor function

    PubMed Central

    Nag, Suman; Sommese, Ruth F.; Ujfalusi, Zoltan; Combs, Ariana; Langer, Stephen; Sutton, Shirley; Leinwand, Leslie A.; Geeves, Michael A.; Ruppel, Kathleen M.; Spudich, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most frequently occurring inherited cardiovascular disease. It is caused by mutations in genes encoding the force-generating machinery of the cardiac sarcomere, including human β-cardiac myosin. We present a detailed characterization of the most debated HCM-causing mutation in human β-cardiac myosin, R403Q. Despite numerous studies, most performed with nonhuman or noncardiac myosin, there is no consensus about the mechanism of action of this mutation on the function of the enzyme. We use recombinant human β-cardiac myosin and new methodologies to characterize in vitro contractility parameters of the R403Q myosin compared to wild type. We extend our studies beyond pure actin filaments to include the interaction of myosin with regulated actin filaments containing tropomyosin and troponin. We find that, with pure actin, the intrinsic force generated by R403Q is ~15% lower than that generated by wild type. The unloaded velocity is, however, ~10% higher for R403Q myosin, resulting in a load-dependent velocity curve that has the characteristics of lower contractility at higher external loads compared to wild type. With regulated actin filaments, there is no increase in the unloaded velocity and the contractility of the R403Q myosin is lower than that of wild type at all loads. Unlike that with pure actin, the actin-activated adenosine triphosphatase activity for R403Q myosin with Ca2+-regulated actin filaments is ~30% lower than that for wild type, predicting a lower unloaded duty ratio of the motor. Overall, the contractility parameters studied fit with a loss of human β-cardiac myosin contractility as a result of the R403Q mutation. PMID:26601291

  1. Effects of hindlimb unweighting on the mechanical and structure properties of the rat abdominal aorta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadopoulos, Anthony; Delp, Michael D.

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that hindlimb unweighting of rats, a model of microgravity, reduces evoked contractile tension of peripheral conduit arteries. It has been hypothesized that this diminished contractile tension is the result of alterations in the mechanical properties of these arteries (e.g., active and passive mechanics). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether the reduced contractile force of the abdominal aorta from 2-wk hindlimb-unweighted (HU) rats results from a mechanical function deficit resulting from structural vascular alterations or material property changes. Aortas were isolated from control (C) and HU rats, and vasoconstrictor responses to norepinephrine (10(-9)-10(-4) M) and AVP (10(-9)-10(-5) M) were tested in vitro. In a second series of tests, the active and passive Cauchy stress-stretch relations were determined by incrementally increasing the uniaxial displacement of the aortic rings. Maximal Cauchy stress in response to norepinephrine and AVP were less in aortic rings from HU rats. The active Cauchy stress-stretch response indicated that, although maximum stress was lower in aortas from HU rats (C, 8.1 +/- 0.2 kPa; HU, 7.0 +/- 0.4 kPa), it was achieved at a similar hoop stretch. There were also no differences in the passive Cauchy stress-stretch response or the gross vascular morphology (e.g., medial cross-sectional area: C, 0.30 +/- 0.02 mm(2); HU, 0.32 +/- 0.01 mm(2)) between groups and no differences in resting or basal vascular tone at the displacement that elicits peak developed tension between groups (resting tension: C, 1.71 +/- 0.06 g; HU, 1.78 +/- 0.14 g). These results indicate that HU does not alter the functional mechanical properties of conduit arteries. However, the significantly lower active Cauchy stress of aortas from HU rats demonstrates a true contractile deficit in these arteries.

  2. Lipoprotein electrostatic properties regulate hepatic lipase association and activity.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Jonathan G; Nguyen, Trang; Sparks, Daniel L

    2007-12-01

    The effect of lipoprotein electrostatic properties on the catalytic regulation of hepatic lipase (HL) was investigated. Enrichment of serum or very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) with oleic acid increased lipoprotein negative charge and stimulated lipid hydrolysis by HL. Similarly, enrichment of serum or isolated lipoproteins with the anionic phospholipids phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidic acid, or phosphatidylserine also increased lipoprotein negative charge and stimulated hydrolysis by HL. Anionic lipids had a small effect on phospholipid hydrolysis, but significantly stimulated triacylglyceride (TG) hydrolysis. High density lipoprotein (HDL) charge appears to have a specific effect on lipolysis. Enrichment of HDL with PI significantly stimulated VLDL-TG hydrolysis by HL. To determine whether HDL charge affects the association of HL with HDL and VLDL, HL-lipoprotein interactions were probed immunochemically. Under normal circumstances, HL associates with HDL particles, and only small amounts bind to VLDL. PI enrichment of HDL blocked the binding of HL with HDL. These data indicate that increasing the negative charge of HDL stimulates VLDL-TG hydrolysis by reducing the association of HL with HDL. Therefore, HDL controls the hydrolysis of VLDL by affecting the interlipoprotein association of HL. Lipoprotein electrostatic properties regulate lipase association and are an important regulator of the binding and activity of lipolytic enzymes.

  3. Anionic Gemini Surfactants:. Synthesis and Surface Active Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Dipti; Tyagi, V. K.

    New compounds bearing two phosphate groups and two long chain (dodecyl) were prepared by two-step reaction: (i) phosphorylation of dodecanol with pyrophosphoric acid, (ii) reaction of dodecyl phosphate with N(CH3)4OH and 1,6-dibromo hexane. The effect of reaction variables like time and molar ratio of reactants on yield has also been reported. The 1:2:0.5 molar ratio of reactants (dodecyl phosphate, N(CH3)4OH, and Br(CH2)6 Br, respectively) and 3 h duration resulted to give maximum yield of anionic gemini surfactants. The structure of synthesized surfactant was investigated by modern analytical techniques, viz. FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR. Amphipathic disodium phosphates were obtained by neutralization of free acids with sodium hydroxide and their surface active properties in aqueous solution were measured. These disodium phosphates possessed 77.3% anionic content and showed good water solubility. Foaming properties and wetting ability were also evaluated.

  4. Aged lymphatic contractility: recent answers and new questions.

    PubMed

    Gashev, Anatoliy A; Chatterjee, Victor

    2013-03-01

    Abstract An overview is presented of recent findings related to biology of aging of the lymph transport system. The authors discuss recently obtained data on the aging-associated alterations of lymphatic contractility in thoracic duct and mesenteric lymphatic vessels; on comparisons of function of aged mesenteric lymphatic vessels in situ versus isolated specimens and important conclusions which arose from these studies; on aging-associated changes in functional status of mast cells located close to aged mesenteric lymphatic vessels; on evidence of presence of oxidative stress in aged lymphatic vessels and changes in arrangement of muscle cells in their walls. The authors conclude that future continuation of the research efforts in this area is necessary and will be able to provide not only novel fundamental knowledge on the biology of lymphatic aging, but also will create solid foundation for the subsequent developments of lymphatic-oriented therapeutic interventions in many diseases of the elderly.

  5. Gall bladder contractility in children with beta-thalassaemia.

    PubMed

    Nasr, M R; Shaker, M; Mahdy, H; Hafez, A

    2009-01-01

    We studied gall bladder contractility in 61 children with beta-thalassaemia who were asymptomatic for gall bladder disease and 51 sex- and age-matched controls in Cairo, Egypt, using, andreal-time ultrasonography. Multiple gall bladder stones were present in 18.0% of thalassaemia patients and sludge in 6.6%. There were statistically significant differences between thalassaemia patients controls in gall bladder fasting volume, residual volume, emptying time and contraction index. There was significant positive correlation between fasting and residual volumes and age, weight and height, and between fasting volume and body mass index and serum ferritin level. Contraction index was negatively correlated with serum total bilirubin. Impaired gall bladder motility was evident in patients with beta-thalassaemia and it may be related to disease duration, serum ferritin and total serum bilirubin level.

  6. Contractile analysis with kriging based on MR myocardial velocity imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su-Lin; Huntbatch, Andrew; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2008-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease requires a full understanding of the intrinsic contractile mechanics of the heart. MR myocardial velocity imaging is a promising technique for revealing intramural cardiac motion but its ability to depict 3D strain tensor distribution is constrained by anisotropic voxel coverage of velocity imaging due to limited imaging slices and the achievable SNR in patient studies. This paper introduces a novel Kriging estimator for simultaneously improving the tracking and dense inter-slice estimation of the myocardial velocity data. A harmonic embedding technique is employed to determine point correspondence between left ventricle models between subjects, allowing for a statistical shape model to be reconstructed. The use of different semivariograms is investigated for optimal deformation reconstruction. Results from in vivo data demonstrate a marked improvement in tracking myocardial deformation, thus enhancing the potential clinical value of MR myocardial velocity imaging.

  7. Design of a novel chimeric tissue plasminogen activator with favorable Vampire bat plasminogen activator properties.

    PubMed

    Kazemali, MohammadReza; Majidzadeh-A, Keivan; Sardari, Soroush; Saadatirad, Amir Hossein; Khalaj, Vahid; Zarei, Najmeh; Barkhordari, Farzaneh; Adeli, Ahmad; Mahboudi, Fereidoun

    2014-12-01

    Fibrinolytic agents are widely used in treatment of the thromboembolic disorders. The new generations like recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA, alteplase) are not showing promising results in clinical practice in spite of displaying specific binding to fibrin in vitro. Vampire bat plasminogen activator (b-PA) is a plasminogen activator with higher fibrin affinity and specificity in comparison to t-PA resulting in reduced probability of hemorrhage. b-PA is also resistant to plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) showing higher half-life compared to other variants of t-PA. However, its non-human origin was a driving force to design a human t-PA with favorable properties of b-PA. In the present study, we designed a chimeric t-PA with desirable b-PA properties and this new molecule was called as CT-b. The construct was prepared through kringle 2 domain removal and replacement of t-PA finger domain with b-PA one. In addition, the KHRR sequence at the initial part of protease domain was replaced by four alanine residues. The novel construct was integrated in Pichia pastoris genome by electroporation. Catalytic activity was investigated in the presence and absence of fibrin. The purified protein was analyzed by western blot. Fibrin binding and PAI resistance assays were also conducted. The activity of the recombinant protein in the presence of fibrin was 1560 times more than its activity in the absence of fibrin, showing its higher specificity to fibrin. The fibrin binding of CT-b was 1.2 fold more than t-PA. In addition, it was inhibited by PAI enzyme 44% less than t-PA. Although the presented data demonstrate a promising in vitro activity, more in vivo studies are needed to confirm the therapeutic advantage of this novel plasminogen activator.

  8. Contractile function and energy metabolism of skeletal muscle in rats with secondary carnitine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Paul A; Bouitbir, Jamal; Bonifacio, Annalisa; Singh, François; Kaufmann, Priska; Urwyler, Albert; Krähenbühl, Stephan

    2015-08-01

    The consequences of carnitine depletion upon metabolic and contractile characteristics of skeletal muscle remain largely unexplored. Therefore, we investigated the effect of N-trimethyl-hydrazine-3-propionate (THP) administration, a carnitine analog inhibiting carnitine biosynthesis and renal reabsorption of carnitine, on skeletal muscle function and energy metabolism. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a standard rat chow in the absence (CON; n = 8) or presence of THP (n = 8) for 3 wk. Following treatment, rats were fasted for 24 h prior to excision of their soleus and EDL muscles for biochemical characterization at rest and following 5 min of contraction in vitro. THP treatment reduced the carnitine pool by ∼80% in both soleus and EDL muscles compared with CON. Carnitine depletion was associated with a 30% decrease soleus muscle weight, whereas contractile function (expressed per gram of muscle), free coenzyme A, and water content remained unaltered from CON. Muscle fiber distribution and fiber area remained unaffected, whereas markers of apoptosis were increased in soleus muscle of THP-treated rats. In EDL muscle, carnitine depletion was associated with reduced free coenzyme A availability (-25%, P < 0.05), impaired peak tension development (-44%, P < 0.05), and increased glycogen hydrolysis (52%, P < 0.05) during muscle contraction, whereas PDC activation, muscle weight, and water content remained unaltered from CON. In conclusion, myopathy associated with carnitine deficiency can have different causes. Although muscle atrophy, most likely due to increased apoptosis, is predominant in muscle composed predominantly of type I fibers (soleus), disturbance of energy metabolism appears to be the major cause in muscle composed of type II fibers (EDL).

  9. Myosin IIA-related Actomyosin Contractility Mediates Oxidative Stress-induced Neuronal Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Xu, Yingqiong; Liu, Qian; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Gao, Zhen; Yin, Mingzhu; Jiang, Nan; Cao, Guosheng; Yu, Boyang; Cao, Zhengyu; Kou, Junping

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress-induced neuronal apoptosis plays an important role in the progression of central nervous system (CNS) diseases. In our study, when neuronal cells were exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), an exogenous oxidant, cell apoptosis was observed with typical morphological changes including membrane blebbing, neurite retraction and cell contraction. The actomyosin system is considered to be responsible for the morphological changes, but how exactly it regulates oxidative stress-induced neuronal apoptosis and the distinctive functions of different myosin II isoforms remain unclear. We demonstrate that myosin IIA was required for neuronal contraction, while myosin IIB was required for neuronal outgrowth in normal conditions. During H2O2-induced neuronal apoptosis, myosin IIA, rather than IIB, interacted with actin filaments to generate contractile forces that lead to morphological changes. Moreover, myosin IIA knockout using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein-9 nuclease (CRISPR/Cas9) reduced H2O2-induced neuronal apoptosis and the associated morphological changes. We further demonstrate that caspase-3/Rho-associated kinase 1 (ROCK1) dependent phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC) was required for the formation of the myosin IIA-actin complex. Meanwhile, either inhibition of myosin II ATPase with blebbistatin or knockdown of myosin IIA with siRNA reversely attenuated caspase-3 activation, suggesting a positive feedback loop during oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. Based on our observation, myosin IIA-actin complex contributes to actomyosin contractility and is associated with the positive feedback loop of caspase-3/ROCK1/MLC pathway. This study unravels the biochemical and mechanistic mechanisms during oxidative stress-induced neuronal apoptosis and may be applicable for the development of therapies for CNS diseases. PMID:28352215

  10. Synthesis, surface-active properties, and antimicrobial activities of new double-chain gemini surfactants.

    PubMed

    Murguía, Marcelo C; Vaillard, Victoria A; Sánchez, Victoria G; Conza, José Di; Grau, Ricardo J

    2008-01-01

    A novel series of neutral and cationic dimeric surfactants were prepared involving ketalization reaction, Williamson etherification, and regioselective oxirane ring opening with primary and tertiary alkyl amines. The critical micelle concentration (CMC), effectiveness of surface tension reduction (gamma(CMC)), surface excess concentration (Gamma), and area per molecule at the interface (A) were determined and values indicate that the cationic series is characterized by good surface-active and self-aggregation properties. For the first time, we reported the antimicrobial activities against representative bacteria and fungi for dimeric compounds. The antimicrobial activity was found to be dependent on the target microorganism (Gram-positive bacteria > fungi > Gram-negative bacteria), as well as both the neutral or ionic nature (cationic > neutral) and alkyl chain length (di-C(12) > di-C(18) > di-C(8)) of the compounds. The cationic di-C(12) derivative was found to have equipotent activity to that of benzalkonium chloride (BAC) used as standard.

  11. Properties of the Hemolytic Activities of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Short, Everett C.; Kurtz, Harold J.

    1971-01-01

    Some properties of the cell-free and cell-associated hemolysins of Escherichia coli were studied. Several strains of E. coli that were isolated from intestines of pigs with edema disease produce large quantities of cell-free hemolysin when grown in the presence of an extract of meat. The component of meat that stimulates production of cell-free hemolysin is not extracted by lipid solvents and is not dialyzable. The cell-free hemolysin is an acidic substance that occurs in two forms. It is inactivated by trypsin but not by lecithinase, lysozyme, ribonuclease, or deoxyribonuclease, shows optimum activity between pH 7 and 8, and requires calcium ion for activity. It does not appear to be an enzyme. The kinetics of the lytic reaction are most consistent with the hypothesis that one molecule of cell-free hemolysin is sufficient to lyse one erythrocyte and that it is inactivated in the lytic reaction. The cell-free hemolysin does not sufficiently damage the cell during the prelytic period to cause lysis after the hemolysin-calcium-erythrocyte complex has been disrupted. The cell-associated hemolysin was not separated from the cell by autolysis, freezing, sonic treatment, or treatment with trypsin or lysozyme. It appears to be closely associated with the metabolic status of the cell. Organisms that are highly hemolytic under usual conditions of assay immediately lose most of their hemolytic capability in the presence of sodium cyanide, streptomycin, nalidixic acid, and rifampin. PMID:16558036

  12. CD4+ T cells enhance the unloaded shortening velocity of airway smooth muscle by altering the contractile protein expression.

    PubMed

    Matusovsky, Oleg S; Nakada, Emily M; Kachmar, Linda; Fixman, Elizabeth D; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2014-07-15

    Abundant data indicate that pathogenesis in allergic airways disease is orchestrated by an aberrant T-helper 2 (Th2) inflammatory response. CD4(+) T cells have been localized to airway smooth muscle (ASM) in both human asthmatics and in rodent models of allergic airways disease, where they have been implicated in proliferative responses of ASM. Whether CD4(+) T cells also alter ASM contractility has not been addressed. We established an in vitro system to assess the ability of antigen-stimulated CD4(+) T cells to modify contractile responses of the Brown Norway rat trachealis muscle. Our data demonstrated that the unloaded velocity of shortening (Vmax) of ASM was significantly increased upon 24 h co-incubation with antigen-stimulated CD4(+) T cells, while stress did not change. Enhanced Vmax was dependent upon contact between the CD4(+) T cells and the ASM and correlated with increased levels of the fast (+)insert smooth muscle myosin heavy chain isoform. The levels of myosin light chain kinase and myosin light chain phosphorylation were also increased within the muscle. The alterations in mechanics and in the levels of contractile proteins were transient, both declining to control levels after 48 h of co-incubation. More permanent alterations in muscle phenotype might be attainable when several inflammatory cells and mediators interact together or after repeated antigenic challenges. Further studies will await new tissue culture methodologies that preserve the muscle properties over longer periods of time. In conclusion, our data suggest that inflammatory cells promote ASM hypercontractility in airway hyper-responsiveness and asthma.

  13. New Findings on the Effects of Tannic Acid: Inhibition of L-Type Calcium Channels, Calcium Transient and Contractility in Rat Ventricular Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fengli; Chu, Xi; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Zhenyi; Guo, Hui; Liu, Hongying; Liu, Yang; Chu, Li; Zhang, Jianping

    2016-03-01

    Tannic acid (TA) is a group of water-soluble polyphenolic compounds that occur mainly in plant-derived feeds, food grains and fruits. Many studies have explored its biomedical properties, such as anticancer, antibacterial, antimutagenic, antioxidant, antidiabetic, antiinflammatory and antihypertensive activities. However, the effects of TA on the L-type Ca(2+) current (ICa-L) of cardiomyocytes remain undefined. The present study examined the effects of TA on ICa-L using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique and on intracellular Ca(2+) handling and cell contractility in rat ventricular myocytes with the aid of a video-based edge detection system. Exposure to TA resulted in a concentration- and voltage-dependent blockade of ICa-L, with the half maximal inhibitory concentration of 1.69 μM and the maximal inhibitory effect of 46.15%. Moreover, TA significantly inhibited the amplitude of myocyte shortening and peak value of Ca(2+) transient and increased the time to 10% of the peak. These findings provide new experimental evidence for the cellular mechanism of action of TA and may help to expand clinical treatments for cardiovascular disease.

  14. Spatially Offset Active Galactic Nuclei. I. Selection and Spectroscopic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrows, R. Scott; Comerford, Julia M.; Greene, Jenny E.; Pooley, David

    2016-09-01

    We present a sample of 18 optically selected and X-ray-detected spatially offset active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). In nine systems, the X-ray active galactic nucleus (AGN) is spatially offset from the galactic stellar core that is located within the 3″ diameter SDSS spectroscopic fiber. In 11 systems, the X-ray AGN is spatially offset from a stellar core that is located outside the fiber, with an overlap of two. To build the sample, we cross-matched Type II AGNs selected from the SDSS galaxy catalog with archival Chandra imaging and employed our custom astrometric and registration procedure. The projected angular (physical) offsets span a range of 0.″6 (0.8 kpc) to 17.″4 (19.4 kpc), with a median value of 2.″7 (4.6 kpc). The offset nature of an AGN is an unambiguous signature of a galaxy merger, and these systems can be used to study the properties of AGNs in galaxy mergers without the biases introduced by morphological merger selection techniques. In this paper (Paper I), we use our sample to assess the kinematics of AGN photoionized gas in galaxy mergers. We find that spectroscopic offset AGN selection may be up to {89}-16+7% incomplete due to small projected velocity offsets. We also find that the magnitude of the velocity offsets are generally larger than expected if our spatial selection introduces a bias toward face-on orbits, suggesting the presence of complex kinematics in the emission line gas of AGNs in galaxy mergers.

  15. Antifungal activity of two Lactobacillus strains with potential probiotic properties.