Science.gov

Sample records for active control devices

  1. Dual control active superconductive devices

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Beyer, James B.; Nordman, James E.; Hohenwarter, Gert K. G.

    1993-07-20

    A superconducting active device has dual control inputs and is constructed such that the output of the device is effectively a linear mix of the two input signals. The device is formed of a film of superconducting material on a substrate and has two main conduction channels, each of which includes a weak link region. A first control line extends adjacent to the weak link region in the first channel and a second control line extends adjacent to the weak link region in the second channel. The current flowing from the first channel flows through an internal control line which is also adjacent to the weak link region of the second channel. The weak link regions comprise small links of superconductor, separated by voids, through which the current flows in each channel. Current passed through the control lines causes magnetic flux vortices which propagate across the weak link regions and control the resistance of these regions. The output of the device taken across the input to the main channels and the output of the second main channel and the internal control line will constitute essentially a linear mix of the two input signals imposed on the two control lines. The device is especially suited to microwave applications since it has very low input capacitance, and is well suited to being formed of high temperature superconducting materials since all of the structures may be formed coplanar with one another on a substrate.

  2. Active control of excessive sound emission on a mobile device.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Se-Woon; Youn, Dae Hee; Park, Young-cheol; Lee, Gun-Woo

    2015-04-01

    During a phone conversation, loud vocal emission from the far-end to the near-end space can disturb nearby people. In this paper, the possibility of actively controlling such unwanted sound emission using a control source placed on the mobile device is investigated. Two different approaches are tested: Global control, minimizing the potential energy measured along a volumetric space surface, and local control, minimizing the squared sound pressure at a discrete point on the phone. From the test results, both approaches can reduce the unwanted sound emission by more than 6 dB in the frequency range up to 2 kHz.

  3. Method and apparatus for actively controlling a micro-scale flexural plate wave device

    DOEpatents

    Dohner, Jeffrey L.

    2001-01-01

    An actively controlled flexural plate wave device provides a micro-scale pump. A method of actively controlling a flexural plate wave device produces traveling waves in the device by coordinating the interaction of a magnetic field with actively controlled currents. An actively-controlled flexural plate wave device can be placed in a fluid channel and adapted for use as a micro-scale fluid pump to cool or drive micro-scale systems, for example, micro-chips, micro-electrical-mechanical devices, micro-fluid circuits, or micro-scale chemical analysis devices.

  4. Semi-active control of helicopter vibration using controllable stiffness and damping devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anusonti-Inthra, Phuriwat

    Semi-active concepts for helicopter vibration reduction are developed and evaluated in this dissertation. Semi-active devices, controllable stiffness devices or controllable orifice dampers, are introduced; (i) in the blade root region (rotor-based concept) and (ii) between the rotor and the fuselage as semi-active isolators (in the non-rotating frame). Corresponding semi-active controllers for helicopter vibration reduction are also developed. The effectiveness of the rotor-based semi-active vibration reduction concept (using stiffness and damping variation) is demonstrated for a 4-bladed hingeless rotor helicopter in moderate- to high-speed forward flight. A sensitivity study shows that the stiffness variation of root element can reduce hub vibrations when proper amplitude and phase are used. Furthermore, the optimal semi-active control scheme can determine the combination of stiffness variations that produce significant vibration reduction in all components of vibratory hub loads simultaneously. It is demonstrated that desired cyclic variations in properties of the blade root region can be practically achieved using discrete controllable stiffness devices and controllable dampers, especially in the flap and lag directions. These discrete controllable devices can produce 35--50% reduction in a composite vibration index representing all components of vibratory hub loads. No detrimental increases are observed in the lower harmonics of blade loads and blade response (which contribute to the dynamic stresses) and controllable device internal loads, when the optimal stiffness and damping variations are introduced. The effectiveness of optimal stiffness and damping variations in reducing hub vibration is retained over a range of cruise speeds and for variations in fundamental rotor properties. The effectiveness of the semi-active isolator is demonstrated for a simplified single degree of freedom system representing the semi-active isolation system. The rotor

  5. MEMS Device Being Developed for Active Cooling and Temperature Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Matthew E.

    2001-01-01

    High-capacity cooling options remain limited for many small-scale applications such as microelectronic components, miniature sensors, and microsystems. A microelectromechanical system (MEMS) is currently under development at the NASA Glenn Research Center to meet this need. It uses a thermodynamic cycle to provide cooling or heating directly to a thermally loaded surface. The device can be used strictly in the cooling mode, or it can be switched between cooling and heating modes in milliseconds for precise temperature control. Fabrication and assembly are accomplished by wet etching and wafer bonding techniques routinely used in the semiconductor processing industry. Benefits of the MEMS cooler include scalability to fractions of a millimeter, modularity for increased capacity and staging to low temperatures, simple interfaces and limited failure modes, and minimal induced vibration.

  6. Integrated Electromechanical Devices for Active Control of Vibration and Sound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-11-01

    of peak power • Minimize ambient noise generation broadband and narrowband • Standard temperature (-25C--55C) with possible extended operation • Must...operate in a vacuum and in non-volatile fluids • Minimize heat generation , EMI, and outgassing • Baseline for application to flat surfaces but allow... generation . An actuator integrated in an electromechanical device could generate sufficient internal heat to affect other components, or alter its

  7. Re-active Passive (RAP) Devices for Control of Noise Transmission through a Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carneal, James P.; Giovanardi, Marco; Fuller, Chris R.; Palumbo, Daniel L.

    2008-01-01

    Re-Active Passive (RAP) devices have been developed to control low frequency (<1000 Hz) noise transmission through a panel. These devices use a combination of active, re-active, and passive technologies packaged into a single unit to control a broad frequency range utilizing the strength of each technology over its best suited frequency range. The RAP device uses passive constrained layer damping to cover the relatively high frequency range (>200 Hz), reactive distributed vibration absorber) to cover the medium frequency range (75 to 250 Hz), and active control for controlling low frequencies (<200 Hz). The device was applied to control noise transmission through a panel mounted in a transmission loss test facility. Experimental results are presented for the bare panel, and combinations of passive treatment, reactive treatment, and active control. Results indicate that three RAP devices were able to increase the overall broadband (15-1000 Hz) transmission loss by 9.4 dB. These three devices added a total of 285 grams to the panel mass of 6.0 kg, or approximately 5%, not including control electronics.

  8. Water Pollution Scrubber Activity Simulates Pollution Control Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Edward C., III; Waggoner, Todd C.

    2003-01-01

    A laboratory activity caused students to think actively about water pollution. The students realized that it would be easier to keep water clean than to remove pollutants. They created a water scrubbing system allowing them to pour water in one end and have it emerge clean at the other end. (JOW)

  9. CONTROL LIMITER DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    DeShong, J.A.

    1960-03-01

    A control-limiting device for monltoring a control system is described. The system comprises a conditionsensing device, a condition-varying device exerting a control over the condition, and a control means to actuate the condition-varying device. A control-limiting device integrates the total movement or other change of the condition-varying device over any interval of time during a continuum of overlapping periods of time, and if the tothl movement or change of the condition-varying device exceeds a preset value, the control- limiting device will switch the control of the operated apparatus from automatic to manual control.

  10. Seismic Response Control Of Structures Using Semi-Active and Passive Variable Stiffness Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Mohamed M. A.

    Controllable devices such as Magneto-Rheological Fluid Dampers, Electro-Rheological Dampers, and controllable friction devices have been studied extensively with limited implementation in real structures. Such devices have shown great potential in reducing seismic demands, either as smart base isolation systems, or as smart devices for multistory structures. Although variable stiffness devices can be used for seismic control of structures, the vast majority of research effort has been given to the control of damping. The primary focus of this dissertation is to evaluate the seismic control of structures using semi-active and passive variable stiffness characteristics. Smart base isolation systems employing variable stiffness devices have been studied, and two semi-active control strategies are proposed. The control algorithms were designed to reduce the superstructure and base accelerations of seismically isolated structures subject to near-fault and far-field ground motions. Computational simulations of the proposed control algorithms on the benchmark structure have shown that excessive base displacements associated with the near-fault ground motions may be better mitigated with the use of variable stiffness devices. However, the device properties must be controllable to produce a wide range of stiffness changes for an effective control of the base displacements. The potential of controllable stiffness devices in limiting the base displacement due to near-fault excitation without compromising the performance of conventionally isolated structures, is illustrated. The application of passive variable stiffness devices for seismic response mitigation of multistory structures is also investigated. A stiffening bracing system (SBS) is proposed to replace the conventional bracing systems of braced frames. An optimization process for the SBS parameters has been developed. The main objective of the design process is to maintain a uniform inter-story drift angle over the

  11. Active control of all-fibre graphene devices with electrical gating

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Jung; Choi, Sun Young; Jeong, Hwanseong; Park, Nam Hun; Yim, Woongbin; Kim, Mi Hye; Park, Jae-Ku; Son, Suyeon; Bae, Sukang; Kim, Sang Jin; Lee, Kwanil; Ahn, Yeong Hwan; Ahn, Kwang Jun; Hong, Byung Hee; Park, Ji-Yong; Rotermund, Fabian; Yeom, Dong-Il

    2015-01-01

    Active manipulation of light in optical fibres has been extensively studied with great interest because of its compatibility with diverse fibre-optic systems. While graphene exhibits a strong electro-optic effect originating from its gapless Dirac-fermionic band structure, electric control of all-fibre graphene devices remains still highly challenging. Here we report electrically manipulable in-line graphene devices by integrating graphene-based field effect transistors on a side-polished fibre. Ion liquid used in the present work critically acts both as an efficient gating medium with wide electrochemical windows and transparent over-cladding facilitating light–matter interaction. Combined study of unique features in gate-variable electrical transport and optical transition at monolayer and randomly stacked multilayer graphene reveals that the device exhibits significant optical transmission change (>90%) with high efficiency-loss figure of merit. This subsequently modifies nonlinear saturable absorption characteristics of the device, enabling electrically tunable fibre laser at various operational regimes. The proposed device will open promising way for actively controlled optoelectronic and nonlinear photonic devices in all-fibre platform with greatly enhanced graphene–light interaction. PMID:25897687

  12. Active control of all-fibre graphene devices with electrical gating.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Jung; Choi, Sun Young; Jeong, Hwanseong; Park, Nam Hun; Yim, Woongbin; Kim, Mi Hye; Park, Jae-Ku; Son, Suyeon; Bae, Sukang; Kim, Sang Jin; Lee, Kwanil; Ahn, Yeong Hwan; Ahn, Kwang Jun; Hong, Byung Hee; Park, Ji-Yong; Rotermund, Fabian; Yeom, Dong-Il

    2015-04-21

    Active manipulation of light in optical fibres has been extensively studied with great interest because of its compatibility with diverse fibre-optic systems. While graphene exhibits a strong electro-optic effect originating from its gapless Dirac-fermionic band structure, electric control of all-fibre graphene devices remains still highly challenging. Here we report electrically manipulable in-line graphene devices by integrating graphene-based field effect transistors on a side-polished fibre. Ion liquid used in the present work critically acts both as an efficient gating medium with wide electrochemical windows and transparent over-cladding facilitating light-matter interaction. Combined study of unique features in gate-variable electrical transport and optical transition at monolayer and randomly stacked multilayer graphene reveals that the device exhibits significant optical transmission change (>90%) with high efficiency-loss figure of merit. This subsequently modifies nonlinear saturable absorption characteristics of the device, enabling electrically tunable fibre laser at various operational regimes. The proposed device will open promising way for actively controlled optoelectronic and nonlinear photonic devices in all-fibre platform with greatly enhanced graphene-light interaction.

  13. Active Feedback Control of a Web Flutter Using Flow Control Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Yusuke; Watanabe, Masahiro; Hara, Kensuke

    This paper develops a non-contact active feedback control of web flutter in a narrow passage by using movable plates set at inlet and outlet of the passage. The strategy of this active feedback control is based on the flow-control which cancels the exciting fluid force acting on the web, i.e., cancels the self-excited feedback mechanism. In this paper, suppression of the web flutter by the active feedback control is demonstrated experimentally. In the experiments, a web (film), as a controlled object, is subjected to air flow in a narrow passage. The web flutter occurs to the web in the translational motion over the critical flow velocity. And the web flutter is actively controlled and suppressed by the movable plate motion which changes the air flow in the passage. The critical flow velocity under controlled condition is examined with changing the controller gain and phase-shift between the web motion and the movable plate motion. As a result, it is indicated that the active feedback control increases the critical flow velocity, and suppress the web flutter effectively. Moreover, the control performance is examined experimentally, and stabilization mechanism by the active feedback control is discussed.

  14. Active flow control of subsonic flow in an adverse pressure gradient using synthetic jets and passive micro flow control devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denn, Michael E.

    Several recent studies have shown the advantages of active and/or passive flow control devices for boundary layer flow modification. Many current and future proposed air vehicles have very short or offset diffusers in order to save vehicle weight and create more optimal vehicle/engine integration. Such short coupled diffusers generally result in boundary layer separation and loss of pressure recovery which reduces engine performance and in some cases may cause engine stall. Deployment of flow control devices can alleviate this problem to a large extent; however, almost all active flow control devices have some energy penalty associated with their inclusion. One potential low penalty approach for enhancing the diffuser performance is to combine the passive flow control elements such as micro-ramps with active flow control devices such as synthetic jets to achieve higher control authority. The goal of this dissertation is twofold. The first objective is to assess the ability of CFD with URANS turbulence models to accurately capture the effects of the synthetic jets and micro-ramps on boundary layer flow. This is accomplished by performing numerical simulations replicating several experimental test cases conducted at Georgia Institute of Technology under the NASA funded Inlet Flow Control and Prediction Technologies Program, and comparing the simulation results with experimental data. The second objective is to run an expanded CFD matrix of numerical simulations by varying various geometric and other flow control parameters of micro-ramps and synthetic jets to determine how passive and active control devices interact with each other in increasing and/or decreasing the control authority and determine their influence on modification of boundary layer flow. The boundary layer shape factor is used as a figure of merit for determining the boundary layer flow quality/modification and its tendency towards separation. It is found by a large number of numerical experiments and

  15. Device for controlling a safety valve disposed below an activation pump in a hydrocarbon production well

    SciTech Connect

    Lefebvre, H. M.; Helderle, P. M.

    1985-05-21

    In a hydrocarbon production well in which the effluent is activated by an activation pump installed in a production pipe, a safety valve is disposed in the production pipe below the pump, the safety valve being operated by lowering of an operating member by a controlling device. The controlling device comprises a piston and cylinder system, and connection means connecting the piston to the operating member during the downward movement of the piston. The cylinder and piston system is provided at the level of the pump, and is advantageously constituted by the production pipe and pump respectively, so that pressurized fluid present at the level of the pump will cause downward movement of the piston.

  16. Conceiving semi-active control devices for large-size monolithic monuments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casciati, Fabio; El Attar, Adel; Casciati, Sara

    2001-07-01

    CHIME is a research project, funded by the European Union, which investigates the adoption of innovative structural control techniques in view of the seismic rehabilitation of the wide monumental cultural heritage in Mediterranean countries as Egypt, Tunisia and Cyprus. The structural control devices are mainly of the semi-active type. In this particular paper one reports the first results achieved within a case study. It considers an Egyptian large size monolithic monument. Alternative solutions for its seismic rehabilitation are eventually conceived and discussed.

  17. Real-Time Control of Biological Motor Activity using Graphene-polymer Hybrid Bioenergy Storage Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong; Byun, Kyung-Eun; Choi, Dong; Kim, Eunji; Kim, Daesan; Seo, David; Yang, Heejun; Seo, Sunae; Hong, Seunghun; Hybrid Nanodevice Lab Team; Samsung Research Park Team

    2013-03-01

    Biological motors have been drawing an attention as a key component for highly efficient nanomechanical systems. For such applications, many researchers have tried to control the activity of motor proteins through various methods such as microfluidics or UV-active compounds. However, these methods have some limitations such as the incapability of controlling local biomotor activity and a slow response rate. Herein, we developed a graphene-polymer hybrid nanostructure-based bioenergy storage device which enables the real-time control of biomotor activity. In this strategy, graphene layers functionalized with amine groups were utilized as a transparent electrode supporting the motility of biomotors. And conducting polymer patterns doped with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were electrically deposited on the graphene and utilized for the fast release of ATP by electrical stimuli through the graphene. Such controlled release of ATP allowed us to control the motility of actin filaments propelled by myosin biomotors in real time. This strategy should enable integrated nanodevices for the real-time control of biological motors to the nanodevices, which can be a significant stepping stone toward hybrid nanomechanical systems based on motor proteins.

  18. Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) Device Being Developed for Active Cooling and Temperature Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, Duane E.

    2003-01-01

    High-capacity cooling options remain limited for many small-scale applications such as microelectronic components, miniature sensors, and microsystems. A microelectromechanical system (MEMS) using a Stirling thermodynamic cycle to provide cooling or heating directly to a thermally loaded surface is being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to meet this need. The device can be used strictly in the cooling mode or can be switched between cooling and heating modes in milliseconds for precise temperature control. Fabrication and assembly employ techniques routinely used in the semiconductor processing industry. Benefits of the MEMS cooler include scalability to fractions of a millimeter, modularity for increased capacity and staging to low temperatures, simple interfaces, limited failure modes, and minimal induced vibration. The MEMS cooler has potential applications across a broad range of industries such as the biomedical, computer, automotive, and aerospace industries. The basic capabilities it provides can be categorized into four key areas: 1) Extended environmental temperature range in harsh environments; 2) Lower operating temperatures for electronics and other components; 3) Precision spatial and temporal thermal control for temperature-sensitive devices; and 4) The enabling of microsystem devices that require active cooling and/or temperature control. The rapidly expanding capabilities of semiconductor processing in general, and microsystems packaging in particular, present a new opportunity to extend Stirling-cycle cooling to the MEMS domain. The comparatively high capacity and efficiency possible with a MEMS Stirling cooler provides a level of active cooling that is impossible at the microscale with current state-of-the-art techniques. The MEMS cooler technology builds on decades of research at Glenn on Stirling-cycle machines, and capitalizes on Glenn s emerging microsystems capabilities.

  19. System and method of active vibration control for an electro-mechanically cooled device

    DOEpatents

    Lavietes, Anthony D.; Mauger, Joseph; Anderson, Eric H.

    2000-01-01

    A system and method of active vibration control of an electro-mechanically cooled device is disclosed. A cryogenic cooling system is located within an environment. The cooling system is characterized by a vibration transfer function, which requires vibration transfer function coefficients. A vibration controller generates the vibration transfer function coefficients in response to various triggering events. The environments may differ by mounting apparatus, by proximity to vibration generating devices, or by temperature. The triggering event may be powering on the cooling system, reaching an operating temperature, or a reset action. A counterbalance responds to a drive signal generated by the vibration controller, based on the vibration signal and the vibration transfer function, which adjusts vibrations. The method first places a cryogenic cooling system within a first environment and then generates a first set of vibration transfer function coefficients, for a vibration transfer function of the cooling system. Next, the cryogenic cooling system is placed within a second environment and a second set of vibration transfer function coefficients are generated. Then, a counterbalance is driven, based on the vibration transfer function, to reduce vibrations received by a vibration sensitive element.

  20. Active cleaning technique device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, R. L.; Gillette, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    The objective of this program was to develop a laboratory demonstration model of an active cleaning technique (ACT) device. The principle of this device is based primarily on the technique for removing contaminants from optical surfaces. This active cleaning technique involves exposing contaminated surfaces to a plasma containing atomic oxygen or combinations of other reactive gases. The ACT device laboratory demonstration model incorporates, in addition to plasma cleaning, the means to operate the device as an ion source for sputtering experiments. The overall ACT device includes a plasma generation tube, an ion accelerator, a gas supply system, a RF power supply and a high voltage dc power supply.

  1. Ferroelectric Light Control Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Elliott, Jr., James R. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A light control device is formed by ferroelectric material and N electrodes positioned adjacent thereto to define an N-sided regular polygonal region or circular region there between where N is a multiple of four.

  2. Active control of near-field coupling in conductively coupled microelectromechanical system metamaterial devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitchappa, Prakash; Manjappa, Manukumara; Ho, Chong Pei; Qian, You; Singh, Ranjan; Singh, Navab; Lee, Chengkuo

    2016-03-01

    We experimentally report a structurally reconfigurable metamaterial for active switching of near-field coupling in conductively coupled, orthogonally twisted split ring resonators (SRRs) operating in the terahertz spectral region. Out-of-plane reconfigurable microcantilevers integrated into the dark SRR geometry are used to provide active frequency tuning of dark SRR resonance. The geometrical parameters of individual SRRs are designed to have identical inductive-capacitive resonant frequency. This allows for the excitation of classical analogue of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) due to the strong conductive coupling between the SRRs. When the microcantilevers are curved up, the resonant frequency of dark SRR blue-shifts and the EIT peak is completely modulated while the SRRs are still conductively connected. EIT modulation contrast of ˜50% is experimentally achieved with actively switchable group delay of ˜2.5 ps. Electrical control, miniaturized size, and readily integrable fabrication process of the proposed structurally reconfigurable metamaterial make it an ideal candidate for the realization of various terahertz communication devices such as electrically controllable terahertz delay lines, buffers, and tunable data-rate channels.

  3. Device Oriented Project Controller

    SciTech Connect

    Dalesio, Leo; Kraimer, Martin

    2013-11-20

    This proposal is directed at the issue of developing control systems for very large HEP projects. A de-facto standard in accelerator control is the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS), which has been applied successfully to many physics projects. EPICS is a channel based system that requires that each channel of each device be configured and controlled. In Phase I, the feasibility of a device oriented extension to the distributed channel database was demonstrated by prototyping a device aware version of an EPICS I/O controller that functions with the current version of the channel access communication protocol. Extensions have been made to the grammar to define the database. Only a multi-stage position controller with limit switches was developed in the demonstration, but the grammar should support a full range of functional record types. In phase II, a full set of record types will be developed to support all existing record types, a set of process control functions for closed loop control, and support for experimental beam line control. A tool to configure these records will be developed. A communication protocol will be developed or extensions will be made to Channel Access to support introspection of components of a device. Performance bench marks will be made on both communication protocol and the database. After these records and performance tests are under way, a second of the grammar will be undertaken.

  4. Contamination control device

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Robert M.; Cronin, John C.

    1977-01-01

    A contamination control device for use in a gas-insulated transmission bus consisting of a cylindrical center conductor coaxially mounted within a grounded cylindrical enclosure. The contamination control device is electrically connected to the interior surface of the grounded outer shell and positioned along an axial line at the lowest vertical position thereon. The contamination control device comprises an elongated metallic member having a generally curved cross-section in a first plane perpendicular to the axis of the bus and having an arcuate cross-section in a second plane lying along the axis of the bus. Each opposed end of the metallic member and its opposing sides are tapered to form a pair of generally converging and downward sloping surfaces to trap randomly moving conductive particles in the relatively field-free region between the metallic member and the interior surface of the grounded outer shell. The device may have projecting legs to enable the device to be spot welded to the interior of the grounded housing. The control device provides a high capture probability and prevents subsequent release of the charged particles after the capture thereof.

  5. REACTOR CONTROL DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Graham, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    A wholly mechanical compact control device is designed for automatically rendering the core of a fission reactor subcritical in response to core temperatures in excess of the design operating temperature limit. The control device comprises an expansible bellows interposed between the base of a channel in a reactor core and the inner end of a fuel cylinder therein which is normally resiliently urged inwardly. The bellows contains a working fluid which undergoes a liquid to vapor phase change at a temperature substantially equal to the design temperature limit. Hence, the bellows abruptiy expands at this limiting temperature to force the fuel cylinder outward and render the core subcritical. The control device is particularly applicable to aircraft propulsion reactor service. (AEC)

  6. Contaminate Control Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, Robert H. (Inventor); Flynn, Kenneth P. (Inventor); Stapleton, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A contaminate control device for filtering contaminates from a gas such as air is provided. The device includes a housing having a first inlet and a first outlet. An axial flow filter is fluidly coupled between the first inlet and the first outlet, the axial flow filter has a second inlet and a second outlet. A second filter disposed about the axial flow filter and is fluidly coupled between the first inlet and the first outlet, the second filter having a third inlet on an inner diameter and a third outlet disposed on an outer diameter. A flow restrictor is fluidly coupled between the second inlet and the first inlet.

  7. REMOTE CONTROLLED SWITCHING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Hobbs, J.C.

    1959-02-01

    An electrical switching device which can be remotely controlled and in which one or more switches may be accurately operated at predetermined times or with predetermined intervening time intervals is described. The switching device consists essentially of a deck, a post projecting from the deck at right angles thereto, cam means mounted for rotation around said posts and a switch connected to said deck and actuated by said cam means. Means is provided for rotating the cam means at a constant speed and the switching apparatus is enclosed in a sealed container with external adjusting means and electrical connection elements.

  8. Silicon active photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitropoulos, Dimitrios

    Active photonic devices utilizing the optical nonlinearities of silicon have emerged in the last 5 years and the effort for commercial photonic devices in the material that has been the workhorse of electronics has been building up since. This dissertation presents the theory for some of these devices. We are concerned herein with CW lasers, amplifiers and wavelength converters that are based on the Raman effect. There have already been cursory experimental demonstrations of these devices and some of their limitations are already apparent. Most of the limitations observed are because of the appearance of effects that are competing with stimulated Raman scattering. Under the high optical powers that are necessary for the Raman effect (tens to hundrends of mW's) the process of optical two-photon (TPA) absorption occurs. The absorption of optical power that it causes itself is weak but in the process electrons and holes are generated which can further absorb light through the free-carrier absorption effect (FCA). The effective "lifetime" that these carriers have determines the magnitude of the FCA loss. We present a model for the carrier lifetime in Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) waveguides and numerical simulations to understand how this critical parameter varies and how it can be controlled. A p-i-n junction built along SOI waveguides can help achieve lifetime of the order of 20--100 ps but the price one has to pay is on-chip electrical power consumption on the order of 100's of mWs. We model CW Raman lasers and we find that the carrier lifetime reduces the output power. If the carrier lifetime exceeds a certain "critical" value optical losses become overwhelming and lasing is impossible. As we show, in amplifiers, the nonlinear loss does not only result in diminished gain, but also in a higher noise figure. Finally the effect of Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is examined. The effect is important because with a pump frequency at 1434nm coherent power

  9. Remotely controllable actuating device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKillip, Jr., Robert M. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An actuating device can change a position of an active member that remains in substantially the same position in the absence of a force of a predetermined magnitude on the active member. The actuating device comprises a shape-memory alloy actuating member for exerting a force when actuated by changing the temperature thereof, which shape-memory alloy actuating member has a portion for connection to the active member for exerting thereon a force having a magnitude at least as large as the predetermined magnitude for moving the active member to a desired position. Actuation circuitry is provided for actuating the shape-memory alloy actuating member by changing the temperature thereof only for the time necessary to move the active member to the desired position. The invention is particularly useful for changing the position of a camber-adjusting tab on a helicopter rotor blade by using two shape-memory alloy members that can act against each other to adjust dynamic properties of the rotor blade as it is rotating.

  10. Controllable Mirror Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A deformable Mirror Device (DMD) is a type of spatial light modulator in which mirrors fabricated monolithically on a silicon chip are deformed, or tilted, under electronic control to change the direction of light that falls upon the mirror. NASA and Texas Instruments (TI) have worked to develop this technology, which has subsequently been commercialized by TI. Initial application is the DMD 2000 Travel Information Printer for high speed, high volume printing of airline tickets and boarding passes. Other possible applications range from real-time object tracking to advanced industrial machine vision systems.

  11. An Exploratory Simulator Study on the Use of Active Control Devices in Car Driving

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-04

    system to the driver and therefore concurrently serve as a proprioceptive -tactual display (RPihmann, 1981). The term "tactual" is used in the meaning of...displayed proprioceptive -tactual cues (see common coding approach in information processing, Prinz, 1990). The control loop for an active control...KlMckner & St6cker; 1990). In its present form the accelerator hardly pvrode- any systematic proprioceptive - tactual feedback to the driver abot.t the

  12. Device and programming abstractions for spatiotemporal control of active micro-particle swarms.

    PubMed

    Lam, Amy T; Samuel-Gama, Karina G; Griffin, Jonathan; Loeun, Matthew; Gerber, Lukas C; Hossain, Zahid; Cira, Nate J; Lee, Seung Ah; Riedel-Kruse, Ingmar H

    2017-03-21

    We present a hardware setup and a set of executable commands for spatiotemporal programming and interactive control of a swarm of self-propelled microscopic agents inside a microfluidic chip. In particular, local and global spatiotemporal light stimuli are used to direct the motion of ensembles of Euglena gracilis, a unicellular phototactic organism. We develop three levels of programming abstractions (stimulus space, swarm space, and system space) to create a scripting language for directing swarms. We then implement a multi-level proof-of-concept biotic game using these commands to demonstrate their utility. These device and programming concepts will enhance our capabilities for manipulating natural and synthetic swarms, with future applications for on-chip processing, diagnostics, education, and research on collective behaviors.

  13. Wellhead flow control devices

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, D.K.

    1981-09-15

    A wellhead flow control device includes a main flow control valve and associated packings designed for operation under extreme conditions associated with the pumping of high viscosity asphaltic crude wherein the formation includes toxic gases. The formation is produced using steam flooding techniques. The main valve seat and the associated valve closure, consisting of a reciprocating ram and packing plug, are coaxial with the pump polished rod. The valve seat icludes tapered walls defining a shoulder which partially confronts the ram plug. The ram plug is formed of a compressible material formed to the shape of the valve seat. The packing plug is retained on the end of the ram by axial tie rods and a retaining ring. The ring may engage the valve seat shoulder to effect axial compression of the packing plug between the retaining ring and ram face, with consequent radial expansion into the sealing engagement. The ram is reciprocated axially, either manually or hydraulically relative to the ram body. A packing gland, suitable to seal against toxic gases, is provided between the ram and valve body. A rod packing, at the upper end of the ram, includes a primary adjustable packing gland for sealing between the ram and the reciprocating polished rod. 41 claims.

  14. Coherent phonon optics in a chip with an electrically controlled active device.

    PubMed

    Poyser, Caroline L; Akimov, Andrey V; Campion, Richard P; Kent, Anthony J

    2015-02-05

    Phonon optics concerns operations with high-frequency acoustic waves in solid media in a similar way to how traditional optics operates with the light beams (i.e. photons). Phonon optics experiments with coherent terahertz and sub-terahertz phonons promise a revolution in various technical applications related to high-frequency acoustics, imaging, and heat transport. Previously, phonon optics used passive methods for manipulations with propagating phonon beams that did not enable their external control. Here we fabricate a phononic chip, which includes a generator of coherent monochromatic phonons with frequency 378 GHz, a sensitive coherent phonon detector, and an active layer: a doped semiconductor superlattice, with electrical contacts, inserted into the phonon propagation path. In the experiments, we demonstrate the modulation of the coherent phonon flux by an external electrical bias applied to the active layer. Phonon optics using external control broadens the spectrum of prospective applications of phononics on the nanometer scale.

  15. Coherent phonon optics in a chip with an electrically controlled active device

    PubMed Central

    Poyser, Caroline L.; Akimov, Andrey V.; Campion, Richard P.; Kent, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Phonon optics concerns operations with high-frequency acoustic waves in solid media in a similar way to how traditional optics operates with the light beams (i.e. photons). Phonon optics experiments with coherent terahertz and sub-terahertz phonons promise a revolution in various technical applications related to high-frequency acoustics, imaging, and heat transport. Previously, phonon optics used passive methods for manipulations with propagating phonon beams that did not enable their external control. Here we fabricate a phononic chip, which includes a generator of coherent monochromatic phonons with frequency 378 GHz, a sensitive coherent phonon detector, and an active layer: a doped semiconductor superlattice, with electrical contacts, inserted into the phonon propagation path. In the experiments, we demonstrate the modulation of the coherent phonon flux by an external electrical bias applied to the active layer. Phonon optics using external control broadens the spectrum of prospective applications of phononics on the nanometer scale. PMID:25652241

  16. Graphene-polymer hybrid nanostructure-based bioenergy storage device for real-time control of biological motor activity.

    PubMed

    Byun, Kyung-Eun; Choi, Dong Shin; Kim, Eunji; Seo, David H; Yang, Heejun; Seo, Sunae; Hong, Seunghun

    2011-11-22

    We report a graphene-polymer hybrid nanostructure-based bioenergy storage device to turn on and off biomotor activity in real-time. In this strategy, graphene was functionalized with amine groups and utilized as a transparent electrode supporting the motility of biomotors. Conducting polymer patterns doped with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were fabricated on the graphene and utilized for the fast release of ATP by electrical stimuli through the graphene. The controlled release of biomotor fuel, ATP, allowed us to control the actin filament transportation propelled by the biomotor in real-time. This strategy should enable the integrated nanodevices for the real-time control of biological motors, which can be a significant stepping stone toward hybrid nanomechanical systems based on motor proteins.

  17. A novel device based on smart textile to control heart's activity during exercise.

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, Marco; Alis, Rafael; Guillen, Javier; Basterra, Javier; Villacastin, J P; Guillen, Sergio

    2014-06-01

    In recent years, several systems have been developed to control cardiac function during exercise, and some are also capable of recording RR data to provide heart rate variability (HRV) analyses. In this study we compare time between heart beats and HRV parameters obtained with a smart textile system (GOW; Weartech sl., Spain) and an electrocardiogram machine commonly used in hospitals during continuous cycling tests. Twelve cardiology patients performed a 30-min cycling test at stable submaximal intensity. RR interval data were recorded during the test by both systems. 3-min RR segments were taken to compare the time intervals between beats and HRV variables using Bland-Altman analyses and intraclass correlation coefficients. Limits of agreement (LoAs) on RR intervals were stable at around 3 ms (widest LoAs -5.754 to 6.094 ms, tightest LoAs -2.557 to 3.105 ms, medium LoAs -3.638 ± 0.812 to 3.145 ± 0.539 ms). HRV parameters related to short-term change presented wide LoAs (RMSSD -0.17 to 18.41 %, HF -17.64 to 33.21 %, SD1 -0.50 to 17.54 %) as an effect of the error measurement of the GOW system. The GOW system is a valid tool for controlling HR during physical activity, although its use as a clinical tool for HRV cannot be supported.

  18. Vehicle speed control device

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton-Trump, W.E.

    1987-03-10

    An apparatus is described for automatically limiting the speed of a vehicle powered by an internal combustion engine having a spark ignition system with an ignition coil, comprising: sensor means for generating a speed signal directly representative of the speed of the vehicle comprising a series of speed signal pulses having a pulse repetition frequency proportional to the speed of the vehicle; control means for converting speed signal pulses into a DC voltage proportional to the vehicle speed; means for comparing the DC voltage to a predetermined DC voltage having substantially zero AC components representative of a predetermined maximum speed and for generating a difference signal in response thereto; and means for generating a pulse-width modulated control signal responsive to the difference signal; power means responsive to the control signal for intermittently interrupting the ignition system.

  19. Control method for prosthetic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A control system and method for prosthetic devices is provided. The control system comprises a transducer for receiving movement from a body part for generating a sensing signal associated with that movement. The sensing signal is processed by a linearizer for linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part. The linearized sensing signal is normalized to be a function of the entire range of body part movement from the no-shrug position of the moveable body part. The normalized signal is divided into a plurality of discrete command signals. The discrete command signals are used by typical converter devices which are in operational association with the prosthetic device. The converter device uses the discrete command signals for driving the moveable portions of the prosthetic device and its sub-prosthesis. The method for controlling a prosthetic device associated with the present invention comprises the steps of receiving the movement from the body part, generating a sensing signal in association with the movement of the body part, linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part, normalizing the linear signal to be a function of the entire range of the body part movement, dividing the normalized signal into a plurality of discrete command signals, and implementing the plurality of discrete command signals for driving the respective moveable prosthesis device and its sub-prosthesis.

  20. Pollution Control Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    BHA Group Inc.'s PrecipTech Power Guard SQ-200 automatic voltage controller, combined with a remote computer, is an automatic management system for smoke-cleaning precipitators. It is the second generation of the SQ 100 developed at Langley Research Center, and was commercialized by two NASA employees. An electrostatic precipitator cleans the smoke by removing particulate matter from smokestack gases before gases are expelled into the atmosphere. Smokestack gas is passed through a precipitator chamber and exposed to an electrostatic field; dust particles in the gas become electrically charged, migrate to collection surfaces and are "captured." Developed under a NASA program seeking a way to dispose refuse, the system monitors sparking, automatically adjusts to changes in operating conditions and does not require a skilled operator.

  1. Control System for Prosthetic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A control system and method for prosthetic devices is provided. The control system comprises a transducer for receiving movement from a body part for generating a sensing signal associated with that of movement. The sensing signal is processed by a linearizer for linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part. The linearized sensing signal is normalized to be a function of the entire range of body part movement from the no-shrug position of the moveable body part through the full-shrg position of the moveable body part. The normalized signal is divided into a plurality of discrete command signals. The discrete command signals are used by typical converter devices which are in operational association with the prosthetic device. The converter device uses the discrete command signals for driving the moveable portions of the prosthetic device and its sub-prosthesis. The method for controlling a prosthetic device associated with the present invention comprises the steps of receiving the movement from the body part, generating a sensing signal in association with the movement of the body part, linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part, normalizing the linear signal to be a function of the entire range of the body part movement, dividing the normalized signal into a plurality of discrete command signals, and implementing the plurality of discrete command signals for driving the respective moveable prosthesis device and its sub-prosthesis.

  2. Preparation of carboxylated Ag nanoparticles as a coating material for medical devices and control of antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Furuzono, Tsutomu; Iwamoto, Takashi; Azuma, Yoshinao; Okada, Masahiro; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2013-12-01

    Carboxyl group-donated silver (Ag) nanoparticles for coating on medical devices were prepared by a two-phase reduction system in situ. AgNO3 was the Ag ion source, tetraoctylammonium bromide [N(C8H17)4Br] the phase-transfer agent, sodium tetrahydroborate (NaBH4) the reducing agent and 10-carboxy-1-decanthiol (C11H22O2S, CDT) the capping agent. The characterizations of the Ag nanoparticles were conducted by diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA) and transmission electron microscope. With CDT capped on Ag nanoparticles, we found that the band around 3,100 cm(-1) was attributed to COO-H stretching vibration, two adsorptions at 2,928 and 2,856 cm(-1) to C-H symmetric/anti-symmetric stretching vibration, and at 1,718 cm(-1) to C=O stretching vibration in the FT-IR spectra. The organic components of the carboxylated Ag nanoparticles were 5.8-25.9 wt%, determined by TG/DTA. The particle sizes of the carboxylated Ag nanoparticles were well controlled by the addition of the capping agent, CDT, into the reaction system. The antimicrobial activity of the Ag nanoparticles covered with different contents of CDT against E. coli was evaluated. Smaller-size Ag nanoparticles showed higher antibacterial activity, which depended on a surface area that attached easily to a microorganism cell membrane.

  3. Active terahertz metamaterial devices

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Houtong; Padilla, Willie John; Averitt, Richard Douglas; O'Hara, John F.; Lee, Mark

    2010-11-02

    Metamaterial structures are taught which provide for the modulation of terahertz frequency signals. Each element within an array of metamaterial (MM) elements comprises multiple loops and at least one gap. The MM elements may comprise resonators with conductive loops and insulated gaps, or the inverse in which insulated loops are present with conductive gaps; each providing useful transmissive control properties. The metamaterial elements are fabricated on a semiconducting substrate configured with a means of enhancing or depleting electrons from near the gaps of the MM elements. An on to off transmissivity ratio of about 0.5 is achieved with this approach. Embodiments are described in which the MM elements incorporated within a Quantum Cascade Laser (QCL) to provide surface emitting (SE) properties.

  4. Compact, Controlled Resistance Exercise Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulus, David C.; DeWitt, John K.; Reich, Alton J.; Shaw, James E.; Deaconu, Stelu S.

    2011-01-01

    Spaceflight leads to muscle and bone atrophy. Isoinertial (free-weight) exercises provide a sufficient stimulus to elicit increases in both muscle strength and bone mineral density in Earth-based studies. While exercise equipment is in use on the International Space Station for crewmember health maintenance, current devices are too large to place in a transport vehicle or small spacecraft. Therefore, a portable computer controlled resistance exercise device is being developed that is able to simulate the inertial loading experienced when lifting a mass on Earth. This portable device weighs less than 50 lb and can simulate the resistance of lifting and lowering up to 600 lb of free-weights. The objective is to allow crewmembers to perform resistance exercise with loads capable of maintaining muscle and bone health. The device is reconfigurable and allows for the performance of typical Earth-based free-weight exercises. Forces exerted, volume of work, range of motion, time-under-tension, and speed/ acceleration of movement are recorded and can be remotely monitored to track progress and modify individual protocols based on exercise session data. A performance evaluation will be completed and data will be presented that include ground-reaction force comparisons between the device and free-weight dead-lifts over a spectrum of resistance levels. Movement biomechanics will also be presented.

  5. Electronically Controlled Continuous Culture Device

    PubMed Central

    Eisler, William J.; Webb, Robert B.

    1968-01-01

    A photocell-controlled continuous culture device, a Nephelostat, is described that maintains a wide variety of cultures of microorganisms in balanced growth. This Nephelostat controls concentrations of bacteria within ±3% over a cell concentration range of 106 to 109 cells per ml. Growth rates are recorded so that changes in the growth rate are observed over small increments of time. Spontaneous and caffeine-induced mutation rates of two strains of Escherichia coli were compared under Nephelostat and chemostat conditions. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:4877660

  6. Portable control device for networked mobile robots

    DOEpatents

    Feddema, John T.; Byrne, Raymond H.; Bryan, Jon R.; Harrington, John J.; Gladwell, T. Scott

    2002-01-01

    A handheld control device provides a way for controlling one or multiple mobile robotic vehicles by incorporating a handheld computer with a radio board. The device and software use a personal data organizer as the handheld computer with an additional microprocessor and communication device on a radio board for use in controlling one robot or multiple networked robots.

  7. Particle fuel delivery control device

    SciTech Connect

    Eshleman, R. D.

    1985-04-30

    A particle fuel burning furnace has an upper combustion chamber for holding a pile of particle fuel and burning the same from the bottom thereof. The furnace also includes a lower combustion chamber for afterburning combustible gases given off by the burning of solid fuel in the upper chamber and a series of spaced apart verrtically-extending passageways arranged in a row and interconnecting the upper and lower chambers for communicating the combustible gases from the upper to the lower chamber. A first improved feature relates to a particle fuel delivery control device which operates an auger for filling the upper chamber with particle fuel to a particle fuel to a desired level. A beam of light is transmitted and reflected between a photoelectric cell and reflector respectively of the device. When the particle fuel pile has grown in height during filling to the desired level the light beam is interrupted and filling is terminated. A second improved feature relates to a particle fuel diversion structure positioned in space relationship above and overlying the row of passageways. The structure forms a horizontal slot which extends laterally from the passageways which prevents particles of fuel from falling rhoguh the passageways and particles of fuel from falling through the passageways and relocates the flame which burns the particle fuel pile from the bottom to a region away from the passageways.

  8. Patient's breath controls comfort devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, M.; Carpenter, B.; Nichols, C. D.

    1972-01-01

    Patient assist system for totally disabled persons was developed which permits a person, so paralyzed as to be unable to move, to activate by breathing, a call system to summon assistance, turn the page of a book, ajust his bed, or do any one of a number of other things. System consists of patient assist control and breath actuated switch.

  9. 25 CFR 226.36 - Control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Control devices. 226.36 Section 226.36 Indians BUREAU OF... AND GAS MINING Requirements of Lessees § 226.36 Control devices. In drilling operations in fields... operations to maintain proper control of subsurface strata....

  10. 25 CFR 226.36 - Control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Control devices. 226.36 Section 226.36 Indians BUREAU OF... AND GAS MINING Requirements of Lessees § 226.36 Control devices. In drilling operations in fields... operations to maintain proper control of subsurface strata....

  11. 25 CFR 226.36 - Control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Control devices. 226.36 Section 226.36 Indians BUREAU OF... AND GAS MINING Requirements of Lessees § 226.36 Control devices. In drilling operations in fields... operations to maintain proper control of subsurface strata....

  12. 3D elastic control for mobile devices.

    PubMed

    Hachet, Martin; Pouderoux, Joachim; Guitton, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    To increase the input space of mobile devices, the authors developed a proof-of-concept 3D elastic controller that easily adapts to mobile devices. This embedded device improves the completion of high-level interaction tasks such as visualization of large documents and navigation in 3D environments. It also opens new directions for tomorrow's mobile applications.

  13. Cursor Control Device Test Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Kritina; Sandor, Aniko; Pace, John; Thompson, Shelby

    2013-01-01

    The test battery was developed to provide a standard procedure for cursor control device evaluation. The software was built in Visual Basic and consists of nine tasks and a main menu that integrates the set-up of the tasks. The tasks can be used individually, or in a series defined in the main menu. Task 1, the Unidirectional Pointing Task, tests the speed and accuracy of clicking on targets. Two rectangles with an adjustable width and adjustable center- to-center distance are presented. The task is to click back and forth between the two rectangles. Clicks outside of the rectangles are recorded as errors. Task 2, Multidirectional Pointing Task, measures speed and accuracy of clicking on targets approached from different angles. Twenty-five numbered squares of adjustable width are arranged around an adjustable diameter circle. The task is to point and click on the numbered squares (placed on opposite sides of the circle) in consecutive order. Clicks outside of the squares are recorded as errors. Task 3, Unidirectional (horizontal) Dragging Task, is similar to dragging a file into a folder on a computer desktop. Task 3 requires dragging a square of adjustable width from one rectangle and dropping it into another. The width of each rectangle is adjustable, as well as the distance between the two rectangles. Dropping the square outside of the rectangles is recorded as an error. Task 4, Unidirectional Path Following, is similar to Task 3. The task is to drag a square through a tunnel consisting of two lines. The size of the square and the width of the tunnel are adjustable. If the square touches any of the lines, it is counted as an error and the task is restarted. Task 5, Text Selection, involves clicking on a Start button, and then moving directly to the underlined portion of the displayed text and highlighting it. The pointing distance to the text is adjustable, as well as the to-be-selected font size and the underlined character length. If the selection does not

  14. DEVICE FOR CONTROL OF OXYGEN PARTIAL PRESSURE

    DOEpatents

    Bradner, H.; Gordon, H.S.

    1957-12-24

    A device is described that can sense changes in oxygen partial pressure and cause a corresponding mechanical displacement sufficient to actuate meters, valves and similar devices. A piston and cylinder arrangement contains a charge of crystalline metal chelate pellets which have the peculiar property of responding to variations in the oxygen content of the ambient atmosphere by undergoing a change in dimension. A lever system amplifies the relative displacement of the piston in the cylinder, and actuates the controlled valving device. This partial pressure oxygen sensing device is useful in controlled chemical reactions or in respiratory devices such as the oxygen demand meters for high altitude aircraft.

  15. Daylight control system device and method

    DOEpatents

    Paton, John Douglas

    2009-12-01

    A system and device for and a method of programming and controlling light fixtures is disclosed. A system in accordance with the present invention includes a stationary controller unit that is electrically coupled to the light fixtures. The stationary controller unit is configured to be remotely programmed with a portable commissioning device to automatically control the lights fixtures. The stationary controller unit and the portable commissioning device include light sensors, micro-computers and transceivers for measuring light levels, running programs, storing data and transmitting data between the stationary controller unit and the portable commissioning device. In operation, target light levels selected with the portable commissioning device and the controller unit is remotely programmed to automatically maintain the target level.

  16. Daylight control system, device and method

    DOEpatents

    Paton, John Douglas

    2012-08-28

    A system and device for and a method of programming and controlling light fixtures is disclosed. A system in accordance with the present invention includes a stationary controller unit that is electrically coupled to the light fixtures. The stationary controller unit is configured to be remotely programmed with a portable commissioning device to automatically control the lights fixtures. The stationary controller unit and the portable commissioning device include light sensors, micro-computers and transceivers for measuring light levels, running programs, storing data and transmitting data between the stationary controller unit and the portable commissioning device. In operation, target light levels selected with the portable commissioning device and the controller unit is remotely programmed to automatically maintain the target level.

  17. Daylight control system device and method

    DOEpatents

    Paton, John Douglas

    2007-03-13

    A system and device for and a method of programming and controlling light fixtures is disclosed. A system in accordance with the present invention includes a stationary controller unit that is electrically coupled to the light fixtures. The stationary controller unit is configured to be remotely programmed with a portable commissioning device to automatically control the lights fixtures. The stationary controller unit and the portable commissioning device include light sensors, micro-computers and transceivers for measuring light levels, running programs, storing data and transmitting data between the stationary controller unit and the portable commissioning device. In operation, target light levels selected with the portable commissioning device and the controller unit is remotely programmed to automatically maintain the target level.

  18. Signal processing device to control microwave output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, J. G.

    1989-08-01

    The development of an electronic device to control the operation of a commercial microwave oven is discussed. This device when installed in conjunction with the existing circuitry of SHARP MICROWAVE OVEN (model R-9524) is capable of automatically advancing through a sequence of thawing recipes programmed and stored in the memory bank of the oven. The device therefore eliminates or minimizes human operator action needed in previous prototype version of a blood thawing device.

  19. Bidirectional Telemetry Controller for Neuroprosthetic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vishnu; McCreery, Douglas B.; Han, Martin; Pikov, Victor

    2010-01-01

    We present versatile multifunctional programmable controller with bidirectional data telemetry, implemented using existing commercial microchips and standard Bluetooth protocol, which adds convenience, reliability, and ease-of-use to neuroprosthetic devices. Controller, weighing 190 g, is placed on animal's back and provides bidirectional sustained telemetry rate of 500 kb/s, allowing real-time control of stimulation parameters and viewing of acquired data. In continuously-active state, controller consumes ∼420 mW and operates without recharge for 8 h. It features independent 16-channel current-controlled stimulation, allowing current steering; customizable stimulus current waveforms; recording of stimulus voltage waveforms and evoked neuronal responses with stimulus artifact blanking circuitry. Flexibility, scalability, cost-efficiency, and a user-friendly computer interface of this device allow use in animal testing for variety of neuroprosthetic applications. Initial testing of the controller has been done in a feline model of brainstem auditory prosthesis. In this model, the electrical stimulation is applied to the array of microelectrodes implanted in the ventral cochlear nucleus, while the evoked neuronal activity was recorded with the electrode implanted in the contralateral inferior colliculus. Stimulus voltage waveforms to monitor the access impedance of the electrodes were acquired at the rate of 312 kilosamples/s. Evoked neuronal activity in the inferior colliculus was recorded after the blanking (transient silencing) of the recording amplifier during the stimulus pulse, allowing the detection of neuronal responses within 100 μs after the end of the stimulus pulse applied in the cochlear nucleus. PMID:19933010

  20. How organic molecules can control electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Vilan, Ayelet; Cahen, David

    2002-01-01

    This article examines a somewhat counter-intuitive approach to molecular-based electronic devices. Control over the electronic energy levels at the surfaces of conventional semiconductors and metals is achieved by assembling on the solid surfaces, poorly organized, partial monolayers (MLs) of molecules instead of the more commonly used ideal ones. Once those surfaces become interfaces, these layers exert electrostatic rather than electrodynamic control over the resulting devices, based on both electrical monopole and dipole effects of the molecules. Thus electronic transport devices, incorporating molecules, can be constructed without current flow through the molecules. This is illustrated for a gallium arsenide (GaAs) sensor as well as for gold-silicon (Au-Si) and Au-GaAs diodes. Incorporating molecules into solid interfaces becomes possible, using a 'soft' electrical contacting procedure, so as not to damage the molecules. Because there are only a few molecular restrictions, this approach opens up possibilities for the use of more complex (including biologically active) molecules as it circumvents requirements for ideal MLs and for molecules that can tolerate actual electron transport through them.

  1. The Annular Momentum Control Device (AMCD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. W.; Groom, N. J.

    1975-01-01

    An annular momentum control device consisting principally of a spinning rim, a set of noncontacting magnetic bearings for supporting the rim, a noncontacting electric motor for driving the rim, and, for some applications, one or more gimbals is described. The device is intended for applications where requirements for control torque and momentum storage exist. Hardware requirements and potential unit configurations are discussed. Theoretical considerations for the passive use of the device are discussed. Potential applications of the device in other than passive configurations for the attitude control, stabilization, and maneuvering of spacecraft are reported.

  2. System for remote control of underground device

    DOEpatents

    Brumleve, T.D.; Hicks, M.G.; Jones, M.O.

    1975-10-21

    A system is described for remote control of an underground device, particularly a nuclear explosive. The system includes means at the surface of the ground for transmitting a seismic signal sequence through the earth having controlled and predetermined signal characteristics for initiating a selected action in the device. Additional apparatus, located with or adjacent to the underground device, produces electrical signals in response to the seismic signals received and compares these electrical signals with the predetermined signal characteristics.

  3. Active superconducting devices formed of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Beyer, James B.; Nordman, James E.; Hohenwarter, Gert K. G.

    1991-05-28

    Active superconducting devices are formed of thin films of superconductor which include a main conduction channel which has an active weak link region. The weak link region is composed of an array of links of thin film superconductor spaced from one another by voids and selected in size and thickness such that magnetic flux can propagate across the weak link region when it is superconducting. Magnetic flux applied to the weak link region will propagate across the array of links causing localized loss of superconductivity in the links and changing the effective resistance across the links. The magnetic flux can be applied from a control line formed of a superconducting film deposited coplanar with the main conduction channel and weak link region on a substrate. The devices can be formed of any type to superconductor but are particularly well suited to the high temperature superconductors since the devices can be entirely formed from coplanar films with no overlying regions. The devices can be utilized for a variety of electrical components, including switching circuits, amplifiers, oscillators and modulators, and are well suited to microwave frequency applications.

  4. Cortical control for prosthetic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Andrew B.; Kipke, D. W.; Perepelkin, P. D.

    1996-05-01

    The work presented in this session is part of a project to develop an arm-control system based on neuronal activity recorded from the cerebral cortex. This will make it possible for amputees or paralyzed individuals to move a prosthetic arm or, using functional neural stimulation, their own limbs as effortlessly and with as much skill as intact individuals. We are developing and testing this system in monkeys and hope to have a prototype working in the next couple of years. This project has been made more feasible because we have been able, in the last 15 years to extract, from the brain, a signal that represents arm trajectory accurately. In this paper, we describe how this technique was developed and how we use this as the basis for our control signal. An alternative approach using a self-organizing feature map, an algorithm to deduce arm configuration given an endpoint trajectory and the development of a telemetry system to transmit the neuronal data is described in subsequent papers.

  5. Performing mathematics activities with non-standard units of measurement using robots controlled via speech-generating devices: three case studies.

    PubMed

    Adams, Kim D; Cook, Albert M

    2016-03-15

    Purpose To examine how using a Lego robot controlled via a speech-generating device (SGD) can contribute to how students with physical and communication impairments perform hands-on and communicative mathematics measurement activities. This study was a follow-up to a previous study. Method Three students with cerebral palsy used the robot to measure objects using non-standard units, such as straws, and then compared and ordered the objects using the resulting measurement. Their performance was assessed, and the manipulation and communication events were observed. Teachers and education assistants were interviewed regarding robot use. Results Similar benefits to the previous study were found in this study. Gaps in student procedural knowledge were identified such as knowing to place measurement units tip-to-tip, and students' reporting revealed gaps in conceptual understanding. However, performance improved with repeated practice. Stakeholders identified that some robot tasks took too long or were too difficult to perform. Conclusions Having access to both their SGD and a robot gave the students multiple ways to show their understanding of the measurement concepts. Though they could participate actively in the new mathematics activities, robot use is most appropriate in short tasks requiring reasonable operational skill. Implications for Rehabilitation Lego robots controlled via speech-generating devices (SGDs) can help students to engage in the mathematics pedagogy of performing hands-on activities while communicating about concepts. Students can "show what they know" using the Lego robots, and report and reflect on concepts using the SGD. Level 1 and Level 2 mathematics measurement activities have been adapted to be accomplished by the Lego robot. Other activities can likely be accomplished with similar robot adaptations (e.g., gripper, pen). It is not recommended to use the robot to measure items that are long, or perform measurements that require high

  6. Open active cloaking and illusion devices for the Laplace equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qian; Yang, Fan; Jin, Tian Yu; Lei Mei, Zhong; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-04-01

    We propose open active cloaking and illusion devices for the Laplace equation. Compared with the closed configurations of active cloaking and illusion devices, we focus on improving the distribution schemes for the controlled sources, which do not have to surround the protected object strictly. Instead, the controlled sources can be placed in several small discrete clusters, and produce the desired voltages along the controlled boundary, to actively hide or disguise the protected object. Numerical simulations are performed with satisfactory results, which are further validated by experimental measurements. The open cloaking and illusion devices have many advantages over the closed configurations in various potential applications.

  7. Control method for physical systems and devices

    DOEpatents

    Guckenheimer, John

    1997-01-01

    A control method for stabilizing systems or devices that are outside the control domain of a linear controller is provided. When applied to nonlinear systems, the effectiveness of this method depends upon the size of the domain of stability that is produced for the stabilized equilibrium. If this domain is small compared to the accuracy of measurements or the size of disturbances within the system, then the linear controller is likely to fail within a short period. Failure of the system or device can be catastrophic: the system or device can wander far from the desired equilibrium. The method of the invention presents a general procedure to recapture the stability of a linear controller, when the trajectory of a system or device leaves its region of stability. By using a hybrid strategy based upon discrete switching events within the state space of the system or device, the system or device will return from a much larger domain to the region of stability utilized by the linear controller. The control procedure is robust and remains effective under large classes of perturbations of a given underlying system or device.

  8. Determining Desirable Cursor Control Device Characteristics for NASA Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandor, Aniko; Holden, Kritina L.

    2007-01-01

    A test battery was developed for cursor control device evaluation: four tasks were taken from ISO 9241-9, and three from previous studies conducted at NASA. The tasks focused on basic movements such as pointing, clicking, and dragging. Four cursor control devices were evaluated with and without Extravehicular Activity (EVA) gloves to identify desirable cursor control device characteristics for NASA missions: 1) the Kensington Expert Mouse, 2) the Hulapoint mouse, 3) the Logitech Marble Mouse, and 4) the Honeywell trackball. Results showed that: 1) the test battery is an efficient tool for differentiating among input devices, 2) gloved operations were about 1 second slower and had at least 15% more errors; 3) devices used with gloves have to be larger, and should allow good hand positioning to counteract the lack of tactile feedback, 4) none of the devices, as designed, were ideal for operation with EVA gloves.

  9. Probing a Device's Active Atoms.

    PubMed

    Studniarek, Michał; Halisdemir, Ufuk; Schleicher, Filip; Taudul, Beata; Urbain, Etienne; Boukari, Samy; Hervé, Marie; Lambert, Charles-Henri; Hamadeh, Abbass; Petit-Watelot, Sebastien; Zill, Olivia; Lacour, Daniel; Joly, Loïc; Scheurer, Fabrice; Schmerber, Guy; Da Costa, Victor; Dixit, Anant; Guitard, Pierre André; Acosta, Manuel; Leduc, Florian; Choueikani, Fadi; Otero, Edwige; Wulfhekel, Wulf; Montaigne, François; Monteblanco, Elmer Nahuel; Arabski, Jacek; Ohresser, Philippe; Beaurepaire, Eric; Weber, Wolfgang; Alouani, Mébarek; Hehn, Michel; Bowen, Martin

    2017-03-13

    Materials science and device studies have, when implemented jointly as "operando" studies, better revealed the causal link between the properties of the device's materials and its operation, with applications ranging from gas sensing to information and energy technologies. Here, as a further step that maximizes this causal link, the paper focuses on the electronic properties of those atoms that drive a device's operation by using it to read out the materials property. It is demonstrated how this method can reveal insight into the operation of a macroscale, industrial-grade microelectronic device on the atomic level. A magnetic tunnel junction's (MTJ's) current, which involves charge transport across different atomic species and interfaces, is measured while these atoms absorb soft X-rays with synchrotron-grade brilliance. X-ray absorption is found to affect magnetotransport when the photon energy and linear polarization are tuned to excite FeO bonds parallel to the MTJ's interfaces. This explicit link between the device's spintronic performance and these FeO bonds, although predicted, challenges conventional wisdom on their detrimental spintronic impact. The technique opens interdisciplinary possibilities to directly probe the role of different atomic species on device operation, and shall considerably simplify the materials science iterations within device research.

  10. Fast-acting nuclear reactor control device

    DOEpatents

    Kotlyar, Oleg M.; West, Phillip B.

    1993-01-01

    A fast-acting nuclear reactor control device for moving and positioning a fety control rod to desired positions within the core of the reactor between a run position in which the safety control rod is outside the reactor core, and a shutdown position in which the rod is fully inserted in the reactor core. The device employs a hydraulic pump/motor, an electric gear motor, and solenoid valve to drive the safety control rod into the reactor core through the entire stroke of the safety control rod. An overrunning clutch allows the safety control rod to freely travel toward a safe position in the event of a partial drive system failure.

  11. Microfluidic control using colloidal devices.

    PubMed

    Terray, Alex; Oakey, John; Marr, David W M

    2002-06-07

    By manipulating colloidal microspheres within customized channels, we have created micrometer-scale fluid pumps and particulate valves. We describe two positive-displacement designs, a gear and a peristaltic pump, both of which are about the size of a human red blood cell. Two colloidal valve designs are also demonstrated, one actuated and one passive, for the direction of cells or small particles. The use of colloids as both valves and pumps will allow device integration at a density far beyond what is currently achievable by other approaches and may provide a link between fluid manipulation at the macro- and nanoscale.

  12. Microfluidic Control Using Colloidal Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terray, Alex; Oakey, John; Marr, David W. M.

    2002-06-01

    By manipulating colloidal microspheres within customized channels, we have created micrometer-scale fluid pumps and particulate valves. We describe two positive-displacement designs, a gear and a peristaltic pump, both of which are about the size of a human red blood cell. Two colloidal valve designs are also demonstrated, one actuated and one passive, for the direction of cells or small particles. The use of colloids as both valves and pumps will allow device integration at a density far beyond what is currently achievable by other approaches and may provide a link between fluid manipulation at the macro- and nanoscale.

  13. Field studies of beach cones as coastal erosion control/reversal devices for areas with significant oil and gas activities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-17

    A field demonstration/study of a novel shoreline erosion protection device called beach cones is planned. These patented, fiberglass- reinforced concreted devices are to be deployed in a number of geometric patterns at seven location in the Bastian Bay area of Western Plaquemines Parish. The purpose of the work described in this report was to evaluate the proposed study's impact on living and non-living shellfish resources within each of the project's seven separate Study Areas. Major accomplishments for this reporting period were as follows: aerial photographs of the experimental sites were taken; all permit applications were filed; information was submitted for the Environmental Report; several reconnaissance trips to the experimental sites were made; meetings were held among all participating organizations to further plan the research; permit was obtained from the US Army Corps of Engineers; test sites were surveyed by the Xavier University contingent; survey data were taken at all sites; the Oyster Assessment was completed; permit was obtained from the State of Louisiana Department of Natural Resources; and initial survey data were finalized at all sites.

  14. Robotics and teleoperator-controlled devices.

    PubMed

    Meieran, H B

    1988-08-01

    This paper presents a rationale for and a summary of tasks and missions to which mobile and stationary robots and other teleoperator-controlled devices could be assigned in response to the accidental release of radioactive and other hazardous/toxic materials to the environment. Many of these vehicles and devices currently support operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants and other nuclear industry facilities. This paper also discusses specific missions for these devices at the Three Mile Island and Chernobyl nuclear power plant sites at the time of the accidents. Also discussed is the status of devices under development for future applications, as well as research on robotics.

  15. Simple control device senses solar position

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lonborg, J. O.; Randall, J. C.

    1965-01-01

    The amount of solar radiation incident on a specially prepared bimetallic strip is simply and reliably controlled by a light valve. This device is valuable for systems requiring temperature regulation.

  16. Dephasing-controlled particle transport devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapetanović, Edin; Rodríguez-Rosario, César A.; Frauenheim, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    We study the role of dephasing in transport through different structures. We show that interference effects invalidate Kirchhoff's circuit laws in quantum devices and illustrate the emergence of Ohmic conduction under strong dephasing. We present circuits where the particle transport and the direction of rectification can be controlled through the dephasing strength. This suggests the possibility of constructing molecular devices with new functionalities which use dephasing as a control parameter.

  17. Platelet actively cooled thermal management devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueggenburg, H. H.; Hidahl, J. W.; Kessler, E. L.; Rousar, D. C.

    1992-07-01

    An overview of 28 years of actively-cooled platelet thermal management devices design and development history is presented. Platelet devices are created by bonding together thin metal sheets (platelets) which contain chemically-etched coolant pasages. The bonding process produces an intricate and precise matrix of coolant passages and structural walls contained within a monolithic structure. Thirteen specific applications for platelet thermal management devices are described. These devices are cooled using convective, film, and transpiration cooling techniques. Platelet thermal management devices have been fabricated from a variety of metals, cooled with a variety of fluids, and operated at heat fluxes up to 200 Btu/sq in.-sec.

  18. Infrared control coating of thin film devices

    DOEpatents

    Berland, Brian Spencer; Stowell, Jr., Michael Wayne; Hollingsworth, Russell

    2017-02-28

    Systems and methods for creating an infrared-control coated thin film device with certain visible light transmittance and infrared reflectance properties are disclosed. The device may be made using various techniques including physical vapor deposition, chemical vapor deposition, thermal evaporation, pulsed laser deposition, sputter deposition, and sol-gel processes. In particular, a pulsed energy microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process may be used. Production of the device may occur at speeds greater than 50 Angstroms/second and temperatures lower than 200.degree. C.

  19. Piezo Voltage Controlled Planar Hall Effect Devices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bao; Meng, Kang-Kang; Yang, Mei-Yin; Edmonds, K W; Zhang, Hao; Cai, Kai-Ming; Sheng, Yu; Zhang, Nan; Ji, Yang; Zhao, Jian-Hua; Zheng, Hou-Zhi; Wang, Kai-You

    2016-06-22

    The electrical control of the magnetization switching in ferromagnets is highly desired for future spintronic applications. Here we report on hybrid piezoelectric (PZT)/ferromagnetic (Co2FeAl) devices in which the planar Hall voltage in the ferromagnetic layer is tuned solely by piezo voltages. The change of planar Hall voltage is associated with magnetization switching through 90° in the plane under piezo voltages. Room temperature magnetic NOT and NOR gates are demonstrated based on the piezo voltage controlled Co2FeAl planar Hall effect devices without the external magnetic field. Our demonstration may lead to the realization of both information storage and processing using ferromagnetic materials.

  20. Piezo Voltage Controlled Planar Hall Effect Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bao; Meng, Kang-Kang; Yang, Mei-Yin; Edmonds, K. W.; Zhang, Hao; Cai, Kai-Ming; Sheng, Yu; Zhang, Nan; Ji, Yang; Zhao, Jian-Hua; Zheng, Hou-Zhi; Wang, Kai-You

    2016-06-01

    The electrical control of the magnetization switching in ferromagnets is highly desired for future spintronic applications. Here we report on hybrid piezoelectric (PZT)/ferromagnetic (Co2FeAl) devices in which the planar Hall voltage in the ferromagnetic layer is tuned solely by piezo voltages. The change of planar Hall voltage is associated with magnetization switching through 90° in the plane under piezo voltages. Room temperature magnetic NOT and NOR gates are demonstrated based on the piezo voltage controlled Co2FeAl planar Hall effect devices without the external magnetic field. Our demonstration may lead to the realization of both information storage and processing using ferromagnetic materials.

  1. Contactless heat flux control with photonic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Abdallah, Philippe; Biehs, Svend-Age

    2015-05-15

    The ability to control electric currents in solids using diodes and transistors is undoubtedly at the origin of the main developments in modern electronics which have revolutionized the daily life in the second half of 20th century. Surprisingly, until the year 2000 no thermal counterpart for such a control had been proposed. Since then, based on pioneering works on the control of phononic heat currents new devices were proposed which allow for the control of heat fluxes carried by photons rather than phonons or electrons. The goal of the present paper is to summarize the main advances achieved recently in the field of thermal energy control with photons.

  2. System and method for controlling remote devices

    DOEpatents

    Carrender, Curtis Lee; Gilbert, Ronald W.; Scott, Jeff W.; Clark, David A.

    2006-02-07

    A system and method for controlling remote devices utilizing a radio frequency identification (RFID) tag device having a control circuit adapted to render the tag device, and associated objects, permanently inoperable in response to radio-frequency control signals. The control circuit is configured to receive the control signals that can include an enable signal, and in response thereto enable an associated object, such as a weapon; and in response to a disable signal, to disable the tag itself, or, if desired, to disable the associated weapon or both the device and the weapon. Permanent disabling of the tag can be accomplished by several methods, including, but not limited to, fusing a fusable link, breaking an electrically conductive path, permanently altering the modulation or backscattering characteristics of the antenna circuit, and permanently erasing an associated memory. In this manner, tags in the possession of unauthorized employees can be remotely disabled, and weapons lost on a battlefield can be easily tracked and enabled or disabled automatically or at will.

  3. Evaluation of Motor Control Using Haptic Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuruki, Atsuo; Kawabata, Takuro; Shimozono, Tomoyuki; Yamada, Masafumi; Yunokuchi, Kazutomo

    When the kinesthesia and the touch act at the same time, such perception is called haptic perception. This sense has the key role in motor information on the force and position control. The haptic perception is important in the field where the evaluation of the motor control is needed. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the motor control, perception of heaviness and distance in normal and fatigue conditions using psychophysical experiment. We used a haptic device in order to generate precise force and distance, but the precedent of the evaluation system with the haptic device has been few. Therefore, it is another purpose to examine whether the haptic device is useful as evaluation system for the motor control. The psychophysical quantity of force and distance was measured by two kinds of experiments. Eight healthy subjects participated in this study. The stimulation was presented by haptic device [PHANTOM Omni: SensAble Company]. The subjects compared between standard and test stimulation, and answered it had felt which stimulation was strong. In the result of the psychophysical quantity of force, just noticeable difference (JND) had a significant difference, and point of subjective equality (PSE) was not different between normal and muscle fatigue. On the other hand, in the result of the psychophysical quantity of distance, JND and PSE were not difference between normal and muscle fatigue. These results show that control of force was influenced, but control of distance was not influenced in muscle fatigue. Moreover, these results suggested that the haptic device is useful as the evaluation system for the motor control.

  4. Control system and method for prosthetic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A control system and method for prosthetic devices is provided. The control system comprises a transducer for receiving movement from a body part for generating a sensing signal associated with that movement. The sensing signal is processed by a linearizer for linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part. The linearized sensing signal is normalized to be a function of the entire range of body part movement from the no-shrug position of the movable body part through the full-shrug position of the movable body part. The normalized signal is divided into a plurality of discrete command signals. The discrete command signals are used by typical converter devices which are in operational association with the prosthetic device. The converter device uses the discrete command signals for driving the movable portions of the prosthetic device and its sub-prosthesis. The method for controlling a prosthetic device associated with the present invention comprises the steps of receiving the movement from the body part, generating a sensing signal in association with the movement of the body part, linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part, normalizing the linear signal to be a function of the entire range of the body part movement, dividing the normalized signal into a plurality of discrete command signals, and implementing the plurality of discrete command signals for driving the respective movable prosthesis device and its sub-prosthesis.

  5. Fluid control structures in microfluidic devices

    DOEpatents

    Mathies, Richard A.; Grover, William H.; Skelley, Alison; Lagally, Eric; Liu, Chung N.

    2008-11-04

    Methods and apparatus for implementing microfluidic analysis devices are provided. A monolithic elastomer membrane associated with an integrated pneumatic manifold allows the placement and actuation of a variety of fluid control structures, such as structures for pumping, isolating, mixing, routing, merging, splitting, preparing, and storing volumes of fluid. The fluid control structures can be used to implement a variety of sample introduction, preparation, processing, and storage techniques.

  6. Fluid control structures in microfluidic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathies, Richard A. (Inventor); Grover, William H. (Inventor); Skelley, Alison (Inventor); Lagally, Eric (Inventor); Liu, Chung N. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for implementing microfluidic analysis devices are provided. A monolithic elastomer membrane associated with an integrated pneumatic manifold allows the placement and actuation of a variety of fluid control structures, such as structures for pumping, isolating, mixing, routing, merging, splitting, preparing, and storing volumes of fluid. The fluid control structures can be used to implement a variety of sample introduction, preparation, processing, and storage techniques.

  7. 40 CFR 65.155 - Other control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Other control devices. 65.155 Section...) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Closed Vent Systems, Control Devices, and Routing to a Fuel Gas System or a Process § 65.155 Other control devices. (a) Other control device equipment and operating requirements....

  8. Experimental and simulated control of lift using trailing edge devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooperman, A.; Blaylock, M.; van Dam, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    Two active aerodynamic load control (AALC) devices coupled with a control algorithm are shown to decrease the change in lift force experienced by an airfoil during a change in freestream velocity. Microtabs are small (1% chord) surfaces deployed perpendicular to an airfoil, while microjets are pneumatic jets with flow perpendicular to the surface of the airfoil near the trailing edge. Both devices are capable of producing a rapid change in an airfoil's lift coefficient. A control algorithm for microtabs has been tested in a wind tunnel using a modified S819 airfoil, and a microjet control algorithm has been simulated for a NACA 0012 airfoil using OVERFLOW. In both cases, the AALC devices have shown the ability to mitigate the changes in lift during a gust.

  9. Neutronics activities for next generation devices

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Neutronic activities for the next generation devices are the subject of this paper. The main activities include TFCX and FPD blanket/shield studies, neutronic aspects of ETR/INTOR critical issues, and neutronics computational modules for the tokamak system code and tandem mirror reactor system code. Trade-off analyses, optimization studies, design problem investigations and computational models development for reactor parametric studies carried out for these activities are summarized.

  10. Piezo Voltage Controlled Planar Hall Effect Devices

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bao; Meng, Kang-Kang; Yang, Mei-Yin; Edmonds, K. W.; Zhang, Hao; Cai, Kai-Ming; Sheng, Yu; Zhang, Nan; Ji, Yang; Zhao, Jian-Hua; Zheng, Hou-Zhi; Wang, Kai-You

    2016-01-01

    The electrical control of the magnetization switching in ferromagnets is highly desired for future spintronic applications. Here we report on hybrid piezoelectric (PZT)/ferromagnetic (Co2FeAl) devices in which the planar Hall voltage in the ferromagnetic layer is tuned solely by piezo voltages. The change of planar Hall voltage is associated with magnetization switching through 90° in the plane under piezo voltages. Room temperature magnetic NOT and NOR gates are demonstrated based on the piezo voltage controlled Co2FeAl planar Hall effect devices without the external magnetic field. Our demonstration may lead to the realization of both information storage and processing using ferromagnetic materials. PMID:27329068

  11. Distributed control using linear momentum exchange devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharkey, J. P.; Waites, Henry; Doane, G. B., III

    1987-01-01

    MSFC has successfully employed the use of the Vibrational Control of Space Structures (VCOSS) Linear Momentum Exchange Devices (LMEDs), which was an outgrowth of the Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratory (AFWAL) program, in a distributed control experiment. The control experiment was conducted in MSFC's Ground Facility for Large Space Structures Control Verification (GF/LSSCV). The GF/LSSCV's test article was well suited for this experiment in that the LMED could be judiciously placed on the ASTROMAST. The LMED placements were such that vibrational mode information could be extracted from the accelerometers on the LMED. The LMED accelerometer information was processed by the control algorithms so that the LMED masses could be accelerated to produce forces which would dampen the vibrational modes of interest. Experimental results are presented showing the LMED's capabilities.

  12. User interface devices for mission control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boatman, Wayne

    1987-01-01

    The Mission Control Center (MCC) at Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas, is being upgraded with new technology engineering/scientific workstations. These workstations will replace the existing consoles and will emulate the present hardware input and display media. The workstations will be using new and different input devices for the flight controller to interact with the workstation and mainframes. This paper presents the results of the User Interface survey conducted by the Workstation Prototype Lab (WPL). The WPL offered the opportunity for users to do hands-on evaluations of a number of user interface options prototyped by lab personnel.

  13. [Batteries Used in Active Implantable Medical Devices].

    PubMed

    Ma, Bozhi; Hao, Hongwei; Li, Luming

    2015-03-01

    In recent years active implantable medical devices(AIMD) are being developed rapidly. Many battery systems have been developed for different AIMD applications. These batteries have the same requirements which include high safety, reliability, energy density and long service life, discharge indication. History, present and future of batteries used in AIMD are introduced in the article.

  14. Modelling and Control of an Annular Momentum Control Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downer, James R.; Johnson, Bruce G.

    1988-01-01

    The results of a modelling and control study for an advanced momentum storage device supported on magnetic bearings are documented. The control challenge posed by this device lies in its dynamics being such a strong function of flywheel rotational speed. At high rotational speed, this can lead to open loop instabilities, resulting in requirements for minimum and maximum control bandwidths and gains for the stabilizing controllers. Using recently developed analysis tools for systems described by complex coefficient differential equations, the closed properties of the controllers were analyzed and stability properties established. Various feedback controllers are investigated and discussed. Both translational and angular dynamics compensators are developed, and measures of system stability and robustness to plant and operational speed variations are presented.

  15. Control device for prosthetic urinary sphincter cuff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinicke, Robert H. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A device for controlling flow of fluid to and from a resilient inflatable cuff implanted about the urethra to control flow of urine therethrough. The device comprises a flexible bulb reservoir and a control unit that includes a manually operated valve that opens automatically when the bulb is squeezed to force fluid into the cuff for closing the urethra. The control unit also includes a movable valve seat member having a relatively large area exposed to pressure of fluid in a chamber that is connected to the cuff and which moves to a position in which the valve member is unseated by an abutment when fluid pressure in the chamber exceeds a predetermined value to thereby relieve excess fluid pressure in the cuff. The arrangement is such that the valve element is held closed against the seat member by the full differential in fluid pressures acting on both sides of the valve element until the seat member is moved away from the valve element to thus insure positive closing of the valve element until the seat member is moved out of engagement with the valve element by excess pressure differential.

  16. 78 FR 36132 - National Standards for Traffic Control Devices; Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-17

    ...; Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices for Streets and Highways AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notification; response to comments. SUMMARY: The Manual on Uniform Traffic Control... all components that are under consideration as the FHWA develops ideas for the next edition of...

  17. Teaching medical device design using design control.

    PubMed

    May-Newman, Karen; Cornwall, G Bryan

    2012-01-01

    The design of medical devices requires an understanding of a large number of factors, many of which are difficult to teach in the traditional educational format. This subject benefits from using a challenge-based learning approach, which provides focused design challenges requiring students to understand important factors in the context of a specific device. A course was designed at San Diego State University (CA, USA) that applied challenge-based learning through in-depth design challenges in cardiovascular and orthopedic medicine, and provided an immersive field, needs-finding experience to increase student engagement in the process of knowledge acquisition. The principles of US FDA 'design control' were used to structure the students' problem-solving approach, and provide a format for the design documentation, which was the basis of grading. Students utilized a combination of lecture materials, industry guest expertise, texts and readings, and internet-based searches to develop their understanding of the problem and design their solutions. The course was successful in providing a greatly increased knowledge base and competence of medical device design than students possessed upon entering the course.

  18. Device Control Using Gestures Sensed from EMG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Kevin R.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present neuro-electric interfaces for virtual device control. The examples presented rely upon sampling Electromyogram data from a participants forearm. This data is then fed into pattern recognition software that has been trained to distinguish gestures from a given gesture set. The pattern recognition software consists of hidden Markov models which are used to recognize the gestures as they are being performed in real-time. Two experiments were conducted to examine the feasibility of this interface technology. The first replicated a virtual joystick interface, and the second replicated a keyboard.

  19. Electronic 4-wheel drive control device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayato, S.; Takanori, S.; Shigeru, H.; Tatsunori, S.

    1984-01-01

    The internal rotation torque generated during operation of a 4-wheel drive vehicle is reduced using a control device whose clutch is attached to one part of the rear-wheel drive shaft. One torque sensor senses the drive torque associated with the rear wheel drive shaft. A second sensor senses the drive torque associated with the front wheel drive shaft. Revolution count sensors sense the revolutions of each drive shaft. By means of a microcomputer, the engagement of the clutch is changed to insure that the ratio of the torque sensors remains constant.

  20. DSP control of superconducting quantum interference devices

    SciTech Connect

    Bracht, R.R.; Kung, Pang-Jen; Lewis, P.S.; Flynn, E.R.

    1994-08-01

    Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDS) are used to defect very law level magnetic fields. Los Alamos National Laboratory is involved in developing digital signal processing (DSP) based instrumentation for these devices in conjunction with detecting magnetic flux from the human brain. This field of application is known as magnetoencephalography (MEG). The magnetic signals generated by the brain are on the order of a billion times smaller than the earth`s magnetic field, yet they can readily be detected with these highly ,sensitive magnetic detectors. Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed and implemented DSP control of the SQUID system. This has been accomplished by using an AT&T DSP32C DSP in conjunction with dual 18 bit a-to-d and d-to-a converters. The DSP performs the signal demodulation by synchronously sampling the recovered signal and applying the appropriate full wave rectification. The signal is then integrated and filtered and applied to the output. Also, the modulation signal is generated with the DSP system. All of the flux lock loop electronics are replaced except for the low noise analog preamplifier at the front of the recovery components. The system has been tested with both an electronic SQUID simulator and a low temperature thin film SQUID from Conductus. A number of experiments have been performed to allow evaluation of the system improvement made possible by use of DSP control.

  1. Method and device for sand control

    SciTech Connect

    Best, D.A.; Grondin, K.C.

    1992-03-17

    This patent describes a single walled sand control device for use in a well. It comprises a single liner containing at least one slot that penetrates that liner and extends radially or axially therein which slot has a berm along each of its sides thereby causing a bridging of sand grains across the slot which results in substantially better sand control. This patent also describes a method for removing sand from hydrocarbonaceous fluids produced to the surface via a well. It comprises placing a single walled liner on the end of a tube used to produce hydrocarbonaceous fluids to the surface from a formation; cutting at least one slot through the liner which extends radially or axially therein; forming a berm along each side of the slot which causes a sand bridge to form across sail slot thereby removing substantially more sand from produced hydrocarbonaceous fluid.

  2. Active Optical Devices and Applications. Volume 228

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    obscuration, 5-cm-thick solid, segmented (6 petals) Zerodur . Mirror A is near the limit of what can be fabricated with current technology. The honeycomb...DEW Descriptors, Keywords: Active Optical Device Application Large Optics Adaptive Technology Wavefront Sensor Deformable Mirror Performance...Cuneo, Jr., U.S. Air Force, NASA Headquarters 228-01 Wavefront sensors and deformable mirrors for visible wavelengths 4 Noah Bareket, Lockheed

  3. 40 CFR 65.151 - Condensers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Condensers used as control devices. 65... (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Closed Vent Systems, Control Devices, and Routing to a Fuel Gas System or a Process § 65.151 Condensers used as control devices. (a) Condenser equipment and...

  4. 40 CFR 65.150 - Absorbers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Absorbers used as control devices. 65... (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Closed Vent Systems, Control Devices, and Routing to a Fuel Gas System or a Process § 65.150 Absorbers used as control devices. (a) Absorber equipment and...

  5. 30 CFR 75.330 - Face ventilation control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Face ventilation control devices. 75.330... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.330 Face ventilation control devices. (a) Brattice cloth, ventilation tubing and other face ventilation control devices...

  6. 30 CFR 75.330 - Face ventilation control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Face ventilation control devices. 75.330... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.330 Face ventilation control devices. (a) Brattice cloth, ventilation tubing and other face ventilation control devices...

  7. 30 CFR 75.330 - Face ventilation control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Face ventilation control devices. 75.330... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.330 Face ventilation control devices. (a) Brattice cloth, ventilation tubing and other face ventilation control devices...

  8. 30 CFR 75.330 - Face ventilation control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Face ventilation control devices. 75.330... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.330 Face ventilation control devices. (a) Brattice cloth, ventilation tubing and other face ventilation control devices...

  9. 30 CFR 75.330 - Face ventilation control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Face ventilation control devices. 75.330... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.330 Face ventilation control devices. (a) Brattice cloth, ventilation tubing and other face ventilation control devices...

  10. 36 CFR 1004.12 - Traffic control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Traffic control devices. 1004.12 Section 1004.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 1004.12 Traffic control devices. Failure to comply with the directions of a traffic control device...

  11. 36 CFR 4.12 - Traffic control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Traffic control devices. 4.12... VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.12 Traffic control devices. Failure to comply with the directions of a traffic control device is prohibited unless otherwise directed by the superintendent....

  12. 36 CFR 4.12 - Traffic control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Traffic control devices. 4.12... VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.12 Traffic control devices. Failure to comply with the directions of a traffic control device is prohibited unless otherwise directed by the superintendent....

  13. 36 CFR 1004.12 - Traffic control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Traffic control devices. 1004.12 Section 1004.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 1004.12 Traffic control devices. Failure to comply with the directions of a traffic control device...

  14. 36 CFR 4.12 - Traffic control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Traffic control devices. 4.12... VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.12 Traffic control devices. Failure to comply with the directions of a traffic control device is prohibited unless otherwise directed by the superintendent....

  15. 36 CFR 1004.12 - Traffic control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Traffic control devices. 1004.12 Section 1004.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 1004.12 Traffic control devices. Failure to comply with the directions of a traffic control device...

  16. 36 CFR 1004.12 - Traffic control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Traffic control devices. 1004.12 Section 1004.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 1004.12 Traffic control devices. Failure to comply with the directions of a traffic control device...

  17. 36 CFR 4.12 - Traffic control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Traffic control devices. 4.12... VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.12 Traffic control devices. Failure to comply with the directions of a traffic control device is prohibited unless otherwise directed by the superintendent....

  18. 36 CFR 4.12 - Traffic control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Traffic control devices. 4.12... VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.12 Traffic control devices. Failure to comply with the directions of a traffic control device is prohibited unless otherwise directed by the superintendent....

  19. 36 CFR 1004.12 - Traffic control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Traffic control devices. 1004.12 Section 1004.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 1004.12 Traffic control devices. Failure to comply with the directions of a traffic control device...

  20. Medical Devices; Cardiovascular Devices; Classification of the Steerable Cardiac Ablation Catheter Remote Control System. Final order.

    PubMed

    2015-09-30

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the steerable cardiac ablation catheter remote control system into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to the device are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the steerable cardiac ablation catheter remote control system's classification. The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device.

  1. Computer controlled fluorometer device and method of operating same

    DOEpatents

    Kolber, Zbigniew; Falkowski, Paul

    1990-01-01

    A computer controlled fluorometer device and method of operating same, said device being made to include a pump flash source and a probe flash source and one or more sample chambers in combination with a light condenser lens system and associated filters and reflectors and collimators, as well as signal conditioning and monitoring means and a programmable computer means and a software programmable source of background irradiance that is operable according to the method of the invention to rapidly, efficiently and accurately measure photosynthetic activity by precisely monitoring and recording changes in fluorescence yield produced by a controlled series of predetermined cycles of probe and pump flashes from the respective probe and pump sources that are controlled by the computer means.

  2. Computer controlled fluorometer device and method of operating same

    DOEpatents

    Kolber, Z.; Falkowski, P.

    1990-07-17

    A computer controlled fluorometer device and method of operating same, said device being made to include a pump flash source and a probe flash source and one or more sample chambers in combination with a light condenser lens system and associated filters and reflectors and collimators, as well as signal conditioning and monitoring means and a programmable computer means and a software programmable source of background irradiance that is operable according to the method of the invention to rapidly, efficiently and accurately measure photosynthetic activity by precisely monitoring and recording changes in fluorescence yield produced by a controlled series of predetermined cycles of probe and pump flashes from the respective probe and pump sources that are controlled by the computer means. 13 figs.

  3. Manual shift control lever device and self-contained electronic control for transmissions

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, F.F.

    1986-09-09

    A unitized shift control lever device is described for the remote activation of an electrically controlled transmission comprising: a housing; a manually operable range selector lever pivotally supported in the housing for selective movements to predetermined operating positions respectively indicative of a required operating condition of an associated electrically controlled transmission; means in the housing providing a source of radiations; radiation controlled switching means for generating discrete control signals in response to the presence and non-presence of the radiations; means interposed in the radiation path between the source and the switching means operable in response to the movement of the range selector lever for selectively determining the presence or non-presence of the radiations with respect to the switching means at each range selector position of the lever; and electronic circuit control means having input connections for receiving the generated signals and output connections adapted for connection with electrically activated condition controlling devices on the transmission.

  4. Methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullis, W. M. (Editor)

    1972-01-01

    Activities directed toward the development of methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices are described. Topics investigated include: measurements of transistor delay time; application of the infrared response technique to the study of radiation-damaged, lithium-drifted silicon detectors; and identification of a condition that minimizes wire flexure and reduces the failure rate of wire bonds in transistors and integrated circuits under slow thermal cycling conditions. Supplementary data concerning staff, standards committee activities, technical services, and publications are included as appendixes.

  5. Coherent control of meta-device (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Ming Lun; Fang, Xu; Chu, Cheng Hung; Wu, Hui Jun; Huang, Yao-Wei; Tsai, Wei-Yi; Chen, Mu-Ku; Wang, Hsiang-Chu; Chen, Ching-Fu; Zheludev, Nikolay I.; Tsai, Din Ping

    2016-09-01

    Selective excitation of specific multipolar resonances in matter can be of great utility in understanding the internal make-up of the underlying material and, as a result, in developing novel nanophotonic devices. Many efforts have been addressed on this topic. For example, the emission spectra related to the different multipolar transitions of trivalent europium can be modulated by changing the thickness of the dielectric spacer between the gold mirror and the fluorescent layer. In this talk, we reported the results about active control of the multipolar resonance in metadevices using the coherent control technique. In the coherent control spectroscopy system, the optical standing wave constructed from two counterpart propagation coherent beams is utilized as the excitation. By controlling the time delay between two ultrafast pulses to decide the location of metadivce as the electromagnetic field node or antinode node of standing wave, the absorption related to the specific multipolar resonance can be controlled. Using this technique, with the 30-nm-thick metadevice, the broadband controlling light with light without nonlinearity can be realized. The switching contrast ratios can be as high as 3:1 with a modulation bandwidth in excess of 2 THz. The active control of the high order and complex optical resonance related to the magnetic dipole, electric quadrupole, and toroidal dipole in the metamaterial is reported as well. This research can be applied in the all ultrafast all-optical data processing and the active control of the resonances of metadevice with high order multipolar resonance.

  6. Brain-controlled body movement assistance devices and methods

    DOEpatents

    Leuthardt, Eric C.; Love, Lonnie J.; Coker, Rob; Moran, Daniel W.

    2017-01-10

    Methods, devices, systems, and apparatus, including computer programs encoded on a computer storage medium, for brain-controlled body movement assistance devices. In one aspect, a device includes a brain-controlled body movement assistance device with a brain-computer interface (BCI) component adapted to be mounted to a user, a body movement assistance component operably connected to the BCI component and adapted to be worn by the user, and a feedback mechanism provided in connection with at least one of the BCI component and the body movement assistance component, the feedback mechanism being configured to output information relating to a usage session of the brain-controlled body movement assistance device.

  7. Solenoid-valve-controlled fuel injection device

    SciTech Connect

    Oshizawa, H.

    1988-12-06

    This patent describes a solenoid-valve-controlled fuel injection device comprising: a fuel injection pump having a pump cylinder, a plunger rotatably and reciprocably disposed in the pump cylinder in a fluid-tight manner and defining a fuel pressurization chamber between a distal end of the plunger and the pump cylinder, a drive shaft rotatable in synchronism with an output shaft of an internal combustion engine, means responsive to rotation of the drive shaft for reciprocably displacing the plunger to pressurize fuel in the pressurization chamber, and a fuel chamber for being supplied with fuel from a fuel tank in response to rotation of the drive shaft, whereby the pressurized fuel can be fed into cylinders of the internal combustion engine; a solenoid valve for selectively opening and closing a communication passage by which the pressurization chamber and the fuel chamber communicate with each other; valve opening delay time detecting means for detecting a valve opening delay time of the solenoid valve; valve closing delay time detecting means for detecting a valve closing delay time of the solenoid valve; valve closing period calculating means for calculating a valve closing time of the solenoid valve according to operating conditions of the internal combustion engine; target fuel injection time calculating means for calculating a target fuel injection time according to the operating conditions of the internal combustion engine.

  8. 21 CFR 890.5050 - Daily activity assist device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Daily activity assist device. 890.5050 Section 890.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5050 Daily...

  9. 21 CFR 890.5050 - Daily activity assist device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Daily activity assist device. 890.5050 Section 890.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5050 Daily...

  10. 21 CFR 890.5050 - Daily activity assist device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Daily activity assist device. 890.5050 Section 890.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5050 Daily...

  11. 21 CFR 890.5050 - Daily activity assist device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Daily activity assist device. 890.5050 Section 890.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5050 Daily...

  12. 21 CFR 890.5050 - Daily activity assist device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Daily activity assist device. 890.5050 Section 890.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5050 Daily...

  13. Graphene active plasmonics for terahertz device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuji, Taiichi; Dubinov, Alexander; Ryzhii, Maxim; Boubanga Tombet, Stephane; Satou, Akira; Mitin, Vladimir; Shur, Michael S.; Ryzhii, Victor

    2015-05-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in the double-graphene-layer (DGL) active plasmonic heterostructures for the terahertz (THz) device applications. The DGL consists of a core shell in which a thin tunnel barrier layer is sandwiched by the two GLs being independently connected with the side contacts and outer gate stack layers at both sides. The DGL core shell works as a nano-capacitor, exhibiting inter-GL resonant tunneling (RT) when the band offset between the two GLs is aligned. The RT produces a strong nonlinearity with a negative differential conductance in the DGL current-voltage characteristics. The excitation of the graphene plasmons by the THz radiation resonantly modulates the tunneling currentvoltage characteristics. When the band offset is aligned to the THz photon energy, the DGL structure can mediate photonassisted RT, resulting in resonant emission or detection of the THz radiation. The cooperative double-resonant excitation with structure-sensitive graphene plasmons gives rise to various functionalities such as rectification (detection), photomixing, higher harmonic generation, and self-oscillation, in the THz device implementations.

  14. Variable Emittance Electrochromic Devices for Satellite Thermal Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demiryont, Hulya; Shannon, Kenneth C.

    2007-01-01

    An all-solid-state electrochromic device (ECD) was designed for electronic variable emissivity (VE) control. In this paper, a low weight (5g/m2) electrochromic thermal control device, the EclipseVEECD™, is detailed as a viable thermal control system for spacecraft outer surface temperatures. Discussion includes the technology's performance, satellite applications, and preparations for space based testing. This EclipseVEECD™ system comprises substrate/mirror electrode/active element/IR transparent electrode layers. This system tunes and modulates reflection/emittance from 5 μm to 15 μm region. Average reflectance/emittance modulation of the system from the 400 K to 250 K region is about 75%, while at room temperature (9.5 micron) reflectance/emittance is around 90%. Activation voltage of the EclipseVEECD™ is around ±1 Volt. The EclipseVEECD™ can be used as a smart thermal modulator for the thermal control of satellites and spacecraft by monitoring and adjusting the amount of energy emitted from the outer surfaces. The functionality of the EclipseVEECD™ was successfully demonstrated in vacuum using a multi-purpose heat dissipation/absorption test module, the EclipseHEAT™. The EclipseHEAT™ has been successfully flight checked and integrated onto the United States Naval Alchemy MidSTAR satellite, scheduled to launch December 2006.

  15. Wearable Sensor/Device (Fitbit One) and SMS Text-Messaging Prompts to Increase Physical Activity in Overweight and Obese Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Cadmus-Bertram, Lisa A.; Natarajan, Loki; White, Martha M.; Madanat, Hala; Nichols, Jeanne F.; Ayala, Guadalupe X.; Pierce, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Studies have shown self-monitoring can modify health behaviors, including physical activity (PA). This study tested the utility of a wearable sensor/device (Fitbit® One™; Fitbit Inc., San Francisco, CA) and short message service (SMS) text-messaging prompts to increase PA in overweight and obese adults. Materials and Methods: Sixty-seven adults wore a Fitbit One tracker for 6 weeks; half were randomized to also receive three daily SMS-based PA prompts. The Fitbit One consisted of a wearable tracker for instant feedback on performance and a Web site/mobile application (app) for detailed summaries. Outcome measures were objectively measured steps and minutes of PA by intensity using two accelerometers: Actigraph™ (Pensacola, FL) GT3X+ (primary measure) at baseline and Week 6 and Fitbit One (secondary measure) at baseline and Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6. Results: Mixed-model repeated-measures analysis of primary measures indicated a significant within-group increase of +4.3 (standard error [SE]=2.0) min/week of moderate- to vigorous-intensity PA (MVPA) at 6-week follow-up (p=0.04) in the comparison group (Fitbit only), but no study group differences across PA levels. Secondary measures indicated the SMS text-messaging effect lasted for only 1 week: the intervention group increased by +1,266 steps (SE=491; p=0.01), +17.8 min/week MVPA (SE=8.5; p=0.04), and +38.3 min/week total PA (SE=15.9; p=0.02) compared with no changes in the comparison group, and these between-group differences were significant for steps (p=0.01), fairly/very active minutes (p<0.01), and total active minutes (p=0.02). Conclusions: These data suggest that the Fitbit One achieved a small increase in MVPA at follow-up and that the SMS-based PA prompts were insufficient in increasing PA beyond 1 week. Future studies can test this intervention in those requiring less help and/or test strategies to increase participants' engagement levels. PMID:26431257

  16. Quality Control On Strained Semiconductor Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Dommann, Alex; Neels, Antonia

    2010-11-24

    New semiconductor devices are based very often on strained silicon which promises to squeeze more device performance out of current devices. With strained silicon it is possible to get the same device performance using less power. The technique is using strain as a 'design element' for silicon to improve the device performance and has become a hot topic in semiconductor research in the past years. However in the same time topics like 'System in Package'(SiP) on thin wafers are getting more and more important. The chips of thin wafers in advanced packaging are extremely sensitive to induced stresses due to packaging issues. If we are using now strain as a design element for improving device performance we increase the sensitivity again and therefore also the risk of aging of such SiP's. High Resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) techniques such as Rocking Curves (RC's) and Reciprocal Space Mapping (RSM) are therefore very powerful tools to study the stresses in packaged devices.

  17. Abdominal Palpation Haptic Device for Colonoscopy Simulation Using Pneumatic Control.

    PubMed

    Cheng, M; Marinovic, W; Watson, M; Ourselin, S; Passenger, J; De Visser, H; Salvado, O; Riek, S

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of a haptic device to be used in a simulator aiming to train the skills of gastroenterology assistants in abdominal palpation during colonoscopy, as well as to train team interaction skills for the colonoscopy team. To understand the haptic feedback forces to be simulated by the haptic device, we conducted an experiment with five participants of varying BMI. The applied forces and displacements were measured and hysteresis modeling was used to characterize the experimental data. These models were used to determine the haptic feedback forces required to simulate a BMI case in response to the real-time user interactions. The pneumatic haptic device consisted of a sphygmomanometer bladder as the haptic interface and a fuzzy controller to regulate the bladder pressure. The haptic device showed good steady state and dynamic response was adequate for simulating haptic interactions. Tracking accuracy averaged 94.2 percent within 300 ms of the reference input while the user was actively applying abdominal palpation and minor repositioning.

  18. Field studies of beach cones as coastal erosion control/reversal devices for areas with significant oil and gas activities. Final report, February 24, 1992--September 18, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Law, V.J.

    1995-09-18

    The primary objective of this project was to evaluate the utility of a device called the {open_quotes}beach cone{close_quotes} in combating coastal erosion. Seven initial sites were selected for testing beach cones in a variety of geometric configurations. Permits were obtained from the State of Louisiana and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to perform the work associated with this study. Six hundred beach cones were actually installed at six of the sites in late July and early August, 1992. Findings indicate that beach cones accreted significant amounts of materials along the beach of a barrier island, and they might have been instrumental in repairing an approximately 200 meter gap in the island. At the eighth installation the amount of accreted material was measured by surveys to be 2200 cubic meters (2900 cubic yards) in February of 1993, when the cones were found to have been completely covered by the material. At other test sites, accretion rates have been less dramatic but importantly, no significant additional erosion has occurred, which is a positive result. The cost of sediment accretion using beach cones was found to be about $13.72 per cubic yard, which would be much lower if the cones were mass produced (on the order of $3.00 per cubic yard). The survival of the cones through the fringes of Hurricane Andrew indicates that they can be anchored sufficiently to survive significant storms. The measurements of the cones settling rates indicate that this effect is not significant enough to hinder their effectiveness. A subcontract to Xavier University to assess the ecological quality of the experimental sites involved the study of the biogeochemical cycle of trace metals. The highest concentration of heavy metals were near a fishing camp while the lowest levels were in the beach sand of a barrier island. This suggests that the metals do not occur naturally in these areas, but have been placed in the sediments by man`s activities.

  19. Wireless device for activation of an underground shock wave absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikhradze, M.; Akhvlediani, I.; Bochorishvili, N.; Mataradze, E.

    2011-10-01

    The paper describes the mechanism and design of the wireless device for activation of energy absorber for localization of blast energy in underground openings. The statistics shows that the greatest share of accidents with fatal results associate with explosions in coal mines due to aero-methane and/or air-coal media explosion. The other significant problem is terrorist or accidental explosions in underground structures. At present there are different protective systems to reduce the blast energy. One of the main parts of protective Systems is blast Identification and Registration Module. The works conducted at G. Tsulukidze Mining Institute of Georgia enabled to construct the wireless system of explosion detection and mitigation of shock waves. The system is based on the constant control on overpressure. The experimental research continues to fulfill the system based on both threats, on the constant control on overpressure and flame parameters, especially in underground structures and coal mines. Reaching the threshold value of any of those parameters, the system immediately starts the activation. The absorber contains a pyrotechnic device ensuring the discharge of dispersed water. The operational parameters of wireless device and activation mechanisms of pyrotechnic element of shock wave absorber are discussed in the paper.

  20. Multi-band terahertz active device with complementary metamaterial

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, Shen; Zhang, Yaxin Sun, Linlin; Sun, Han; Xu, Gaiqi; Zhao, Yuncheng; Yang, Ziqiang; Liang, Shixiong

    2015-09-28

    We describe a multi-band terahertz-active device using a composite structure made of complementary metamaterial and doped silicon that can be dynamically controlled. This special complementary metamaterial exhibits three resonances that produce three pass-bands. The pass-bands can be uniformly manipulated by exploiting the photoinduced characteristics of the doped silicon. Simulations were performed to analyze the magnetic field and surface current distributions. The simulation results agree well with experimental results obtained from terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. Using an 808-nm-wavelength laser beam, a modulation depth of up to 80% was obtained. In numerical simulations, we used a conductivity mode to characterize photoinduction. The development of multi-band terahertz-active devices has many potential applications, for example, in filters, modulators, switches, and sensors.

  1. Antifungal activity of antimicrobial-impregnated devices.

    PubMed

    Darouiche, R O; Mansouri, M D; Kojic, E M

    2006-04-01

    The in-vitro and in-vivo efficacy against Candida albicans and Candida krusei of devices impregnated with chlorhexidine and chloroxylenol was examined. The impregnated devices produced large zones of inhibition against both organisms (mean size, 39 mm and 38 mm, respectively). In a rabbit model in which segments of silicone catheters were placed percutaneously, non-impregnated devices were twice as likely as impregnated devices to become colonised with either C. albicans or C. krusei. Impregnated devices also had significantly lower colony counts of C. albicans (58 vs. 1361 CFU; p 0.008) and C. krusei (19 vs. 764 CFU; p 0.008).

  2. Energy-based control of a haptic device using brakes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Changhyun; Song, Jae-Bok; Kim, Munsang

    2007-04-01

    This paper proposes an energy-based control method of a haptic device with electric brakes. Unsmooth motion is frequently observed in a haptic system using brakes during a wall-following task. Since it is generally known that a haptic system using brakes is passive due to brake's characteristics, its energy behavior has seldom been investigated. However, force distribution at the end effector reveals that the unsmooth motion of a haptic system using brakes represents active behavior of the system in the specific direction. A force control scheme is proposed that computes the gain for smooth motion by considering the energy behavior of a system. Experiments show that smooth wall following is possible with a proposed force control scheme.

  3. 49 CFR 236.501 - Forestalling device and speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES, STANDARDS, AND INSTRUCTIONS GOVERNING THE INSTALLATION... Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Standards § 236.501 Forestalling device and speed control. (a) An automatic train stop system may include a device by means of which the...

  4. 49 CFR 236.501 - Forestalling device and speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES, STANDARDS, AND INSTRUCTIONS GOVERNING THE INSTALLATION... Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Standards § 236.501 Forestalling device and speed control. (a) An automatic train stop system may include a device by means of which the...

  5. 49 CFR 236.501 - Forestalling device and speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES, STANDARDS, AND INSTRUCTIONS GOVERNING THE INSTALLATION... Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Standards § 236.501 Forestalling device and speed control. (a) An automatic train stop system may include a device by means of which the...

  6. 49 CFR 236.501 - Forestalling device and speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES, STANDARDS, AND INSTRUCTIONS GOVERNING THE INSTALLATION... Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Standards § 236.501 Forestalling device and speed control. (a) An automatic train stop system may include a device by means of which the...

  7. 49 CFR 236.501 - Forestalling device and speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES, STANDARDS, AND INSTRUCTIONS GOVERNING THE INSTALLATION... Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Standards § 236.501 Forestalling device and speed control. (a) An automatic train stop system may include a device by means of which the...

  8. Variable control of neutron albedo in toroidal fusion devices

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, D.L.; Micklich, B.J.

    1983-06-01

    This invention pertains to methods of controlling in the steady state, neutron albedo in toroidal fusion devices, and in particular, to methods of controlling the flux and energy distribution of collided neutrons which are incident on an outboard wall of a toroidal fusion device.

  9. Light-induced self-assembly of active rectification devices.

    PubMed

    Stenhammar, Joakim; Wittkowski, Raphael; Marenduzzo, Davide; Cates, Michael E

    2016-04-01

    Self-propelled colloidal objects, such as motile bacteria or synthetic microswimmers, have microscopically irreversible individual dynamics-a feature they share with all living systems. The incoherent behavior of individual swimmers can be harnessed (or "rectified") by microfluidic devices that create systematic motions that are impossible in equilibrium. We present a computational proof-of-concept study showing that such active rectification devices could be created directly from an unstructured "primordial soup" of light-controlled motile particles, solely by using spatially modulated illumination to control their local propulsion speed. Alongside both microscopic irreversibility and speed modulation, our mechanism requires spatial symmetry breaking, such as a chevron light pattern, and strong interactions between particles, such as volume exclusion, which cause a collisional slowdown at high density. Together, we show how these four factors create a novel, many-body rectification mechanism. Our work suggests that standard spatial light modulator technology might allow the programmable, light-induced self-assembly of active rectification devices from an unstructured particle bath.

  10. Light-induced self-assembly of active rectification devices

    PubMed Central

    Stenhammar, Joakim; Wittkowski, Raphael; Marenduzzo, Davide; Cates, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Self-propelled colloidal objects, such as motile bacteria or synthetic microswimmers, have microscopically irreversible individual dynamics—a feature they share with all living systems. The incoherent behavior of individual swimmers can be harnessed (or “rectified”) by microfluidic devices that create systematic motions that are impossible in equilibrium. We present a computational proof-of-concept study showing that such active rectification devices could be created directly from an unstructured “primordial soup” of light-controlled motile particles, solely by using spatially modulated illumination to control their local propulsion speed. Alongside both microscopic irreversibility and speed modulation, our mechanism requires spatial symmetry breaking, such as a chevron light pattern, and strong interactions between particles, such as volume exclusion, which cause a collisional slowdown at high density. Together, we show how these four factors create a novel, many-body rectification mechanism. Our work suggests that standard spatial light modulator technology might allow the programmable, light-induced self-assembly of active rectification devices from an unstructured particle bath. PMID:27051883

  11. Control of Thermal Conductance of Peltier Device Using Heat Disturbance Observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimitsu, Hidetaka; Katsura, Seiichiro

    Presently in the industry, temperature control and heat flow control are conducted for many thermal devices, including the Peltier device, which facilitates heat transfer on the basis of the Peltier effect. Generally, temperature control compensates for the heat flowing from the external environment, while the heat actively flows into the system during heat flow control. Thus, temperature control and heat flow control differ from each other. However, there have been no detailed discussions on a thermal control process in which the thermal conductance of control ranges between 0 and ∞. This paper focuses on the thermal conductance of control and the construction of a thermal conductance control system for a Peltier device using a heat disturbance observer. When using the thermal conductance controller, the thermal conductance of control is altered, and the system becomes thermally compliant with the external environment. This paper also shows the experimental results that confirm the validity of the proposed control system.

  12. INSERTION DEVICE ACTIVITIES FOR NSLS-II.

    SciTech Connect

    TANABE,T.; HARDER, D.A.; HULBERT, S.; RAKOWSKI, G.; SKARITKA, J.

    2007-06-25

    National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) will be a medium energy storage ring of 3GeV electron beam energy with sub-nm.rad horizontal emittance and top-off capability at 500mA. Damping wigglers will be used not only to reduce the beam emittance but also used as broadband sources for users. Cryo-Permanent Magnet Undulators (CPMUs) are considered for hard X-ray linear device, and permanent magnet based elliptically polarized undulators (EPUs) for variable polarization devices for soft X-ray. 6T superconducting wiggler with minimal fan angle will be installed in the second phase as well as quasi-periodic EPU for VUV and possibly high-temperature superconducting undulator. R&D plans have been established to pursue the performance enhancement of the baseline devices and to design new types of insertion devices. A new insertion device development laboratory will also be established.

  13. Active load control techniques for wind turbines.

    SciTech Connect

    van Dam, C.P.; Berg, Dale E.; Johnson, Scott J.

    2008-07-01

    This report provides an overview on the current state of wind turbine control and introduces a number of active techniques that could be potentially used for control of wind turbine blades. The focus is on research regarding active flow control (AFC) as it applies to wind turbine performance and loads. The techniques and concepts described here are often described as 'smart structures' or 'smart rotor control'. This field is rapidly growing and there are numerous concepts currently being investigated around the world; some concepts already are focused on the wind energy industry and others are intended for use in other fields, but have the potential for wind turbine control. An AFC system can be broken into three categories: controls and sensors, actuators and devices, and the flow phenomena. This report focuses on the research involved with the actuators and devices and the generated flow phenomena caused by each device.

  14. Gravity controlled anti-reverse rotation device

    DOEpatents

    Dickinson, Robert J.; Wetherill, Todd M.

    1983-01-01

    A gravity assisted anti-reverse rotation device for preventing reverse rotation of pumps and the like. A horizontally mounted pawl is disposed to mesh with a fixed ratchet preventing reverse rotation when the pawl is advanced into intercourse with the ratchet by a vertically mounted lever having a lumped mass. Gravitation action on the lumped mass urges the pawl into mesh with the ratchet, while centrifugal force on the lumped mass during forward, allowed rotation retracts the pawl away from the ratchet.

  15. Linear optimal control of tokamak fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kessel, C.E.; Firestone, M.A.; Conn, R.W.

    1989-05-01

    The control of plasma position, shape and current in a tokamak fusion reactor is examined using linear optimal control. These advanced tokamaks are characterized by non up-down symmetric coils and structure, thick structure surrounding the plasma, eddy currents, shaped plasmas, superconducting coils, vertically unstable plasmas, and hybrid function coils providing ohmic heating, vertical field, radial field, and shaping field. Models of the electromagnetic environment in a tokamak are derived and used to construct control gains that are tested in nonlinear simulations with initial perturbations. The issues of applying linear optimal control to advanced tokamaks are addressed, including complex equilibrium control, choice of cost functional weights, the coil voltage limit, discrete control, and order reduction. Results indicate that the linear optimal control is a feasible technique for controlling advanced tokamaks where the more common classical control will be severely strained or will not work. 28 refs., 13 figs.

  16. Investigations of semiconductor devices using SIMS; diffusion, contamination, process control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Cheol; Won, Jeongyeon; Chung, Youngsu; Lee, Hyungik; Lee, Eunha; Kang, Donghun; Kim, Changjung; Choi, Jinhak; Kim, Jeomsik

    2008-12-01

    We have surveyed 22,155 analyses issues to know the portion of surface analysis at the total analyses activities. According to the survey result, the contribution of SIMS in the total analyses issues was about 7%. The portions of semiconductor process control, composition and contamination in the SIMS analyses issues are 25%, 29% and 16%, respectively. In this article, some examples of the semiconductor device process control, identification of contaminants, and failure analyses have been reviewed. The behavior of H, O, and Ti at the Pt/Ti/GaInZnO interfaces and their influences on the electrical property of thin film transistor are demonstrated. Also discolor issues including organic material contamination problem on Au pad are discussed in detail.

  17. Network device interface for digitally interfacing data channels to a controller a via network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellerbrock, Philip J. (Inventor); Grant, Robert L. (Inventor); Konz, Daniel W. (Inventor); Winkelmann, Joseph P. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The present invention provides a network device interface and method for digitally connecting a plurality of data channels to a controller using a network bus. The network device interface interprets commands and data received from the controller and polls the data channels in accordance with these commands. Specifically, the network device interface receives digital commands and data from the controller, and based on these commands and data, communicates with the data channels to either retrieve data in the case of a sensor or send data to activate an actuator. In one embodiment, the bus controller transmits messages to the network device interface containing a plurality of bits having a value defined by a transition between first and second states in the bits. The network device interface determines timing of the data sequence of the message and uses the determined timing to communicate with the bus controller.

  18. Network device interface for digitally interfacing data channels to a controller via a network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellerbrock, Philip J. (Inventor); Grant, Robert L. (Inventor); Konz, Daniel W. (Inventor); Winkelmann, Joseph P. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The present invention provides a network device interface and method for digitally connecting a plurality of data channels, such as sensors, actuators, and subsystems, to a controller using a network bus. The network device interface interprets commands and data received from the controller and polls the data channels in accordance with these commands. Specifically, the network device interface receives digital commands and data from the controller, and based on these commands and data, communicates with the data channels to either retrieve data in the case of a sensor or send data to activate an actuator. Data retrieved from the sensor is then converted by the network device interface into digital signals and transmitted back to the controller. In one advantageous embodiment, the network device interface is a state machine, such as an ASIC, that operates independent of a processor in communicating with the bus controller and data channels.

  19. Cognitive Inference Device for Activity Supervision in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Human activity, life span, and quality of life are enhanced by innovations in science and technology. Aging individual needs to take advantage of these developments to lead a self-regulated life. However, maintaining a self-regulated life at old age involves a high degree of risk, and the elderly often fail at this goal. Thus, the objective of our study is to investigate the feasibility of implementing a cognitive inference device (CI-device) for effective activity supervision in the elderly. To frame the CI-device, we propose a device design framework along with an inference algorithm and implement the designs through an artificial neural model with different configurations, mapping the CI-device's functions to minimise the device's prediction error. An analysis and discussion are then provided to validate the feasibility of CI-device implementation for activity supervision in the elderly. PMID:25405211

  20. Migrated Essure permanent birth control device: sonographic findings.

    PubMed

    Khati, Nadia Juliet; Gorodenker, Joseph; Brindle, Kathleen Ann

    2014-05-01

    We report a case of a migrated Essure permanent birth control device. The correct diagnosis was made on conventional two-dimensional and three-dimensional pelvic sonography 7 years after placement of the device when the patient presented with persistent right-sided pain. The 3-month post placement hysterosalpingogram had shown an appropriately occluded right fallopian tube but had overlooked the abnormal position of the right Essure device, which was too proximal and extending slightly in the uterine cavity.

  1. Self-regulating flow control device

    DOEpatents

    Humphreys, Duane A.

    1984-01-01

    A variable, self-regulating valve having a hydraulic loss coefficient proportional to a positive exponential power of the flow rate. The device includes two objects in a flow channel and structure which assures that the distance between the two objects is an increasing function of the flow rate. The range of spacing between the objects is such that the hydraulic resistance of the valve is an increasing function of the distance between the two objects so that the desired hydraulic loss coefficient as a function of flow rate is obtained without variation in the flow area.

  2. CFD Modeling for Active Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, Pieter G.

    2001-01-01

    This presentation describes current work under UEET Active Flow Control CFD Research Tool Development. The goal of this work is to develop computational tools for inlet active flow control design. This year s objectives were to perform CFD simulations of fully gridded vane vortex generators, micro-vortex genera- tors, and synthetic jets, and to compare flowfield results with wind tunnel tests of simple geometries with flow control devices. Comparisons are shown for a single micro-vortex generator on a flat plate, and for flow over an expansion ramp with sidewall effects. Vortex core location, pressure gradient and oil flow patterns are compared between experiment and computation. This work lays the groundwork for evaluating simplified modeling of arrays of devices, and provides the opportunity to test simple flow control device/sensor/ control loop interaction.

  3. 40 CFR 65.155 - Other control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 98 weight-percent emission reduction or 20 parts per million by volume outlet concentration... a control device to replace an existing recovery device that is used on a Group 2A process vent, the... existing ranges or limits established under a referencing subpart....

  4. Inverted Control Rod Lock-In Device

    DOEpatents

    Brussalis, W. G.; Bost, G. E.

    1962-12-01

    A mechanism which prevents control rods from dropping out of the reactor core in the event the vessel in which the reactor is mounted should capsize is described. The mechanism includes a pivoted toothed armature which engages the threaded control rod lead screw and prevents removal of the rod whenever the armature is not attracted by the provided electromagnetic means. (AEC)

  5. Discrete control of resonant wave energy devices.

    PubMed

    Clément, A H; Babarit, A

    2012-01-28

    Aiming at amplifying the energy productive motion of wave energy converters (WECs) in response to irregular sea waves, the strategies of discrete control presented here feature some major advantages over continuous control, which is known to require, for optimal operation, a bidirectional power take-off able to re-inject energy into the WEC system during parts of the oscillation cycles. Three different discrete control strategies are described: latching control, declutching control and the combination of both, which we term latched-operating-declutched control. It is shown that any of these methods can be applied with great benefit, not only to mono-resonant WEC oscillators, but also to bi-resonant and multi-resonant systems. For some of these applications, it is shown how these three discrete control strategies can be optimally defined, either by analytical solution for regular waves, or numerically, by applying the optimal command theory in irregular waves. Applied to a model of a seven degree-of-freedom system (the SEAREV WEC) to estimate its annual production on several production sites, the most efficient of these discrete control strategies was shown to double the energy production, regardless of the resource level of the site, which may be considered as a real breakthrough, rather than a marginal improvement.

  6. Network device interface for digitally interfacing data channels to a controller via a network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellerbrock, Philip J. (Inventor); Grant, Robert L. (Inventor); Konz, Daniel W. (Inventor); Winkelmann, Joseph P. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention provides a network device interface and method for digitally connecting a plurality of data channels, such as sensors, actuators, and subsystems, to a controller using a network bus. The network device interface interprets commands and data received from the controller and polls the data channels in accordance with these commands. Specifically, the network device interface receives digital commands and data from the controller, and based on these commands and data, communicates with the data channels to either retrieve data in the case of a sensor or send data to activate an actuator. Data retrieved from the sensor is then converted by the network device interface into digital signals and transmitted back to the controller. In one advantageous embodiment, the network device interface uses a specialized protocol for communicating across the network bus that uses a low-level instruction set and has low overhead for data communication.

  7. Network device interface for digitally interfacing data channels to a controller via a network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellerbrock, Philip J. (Inventor); Grant, Robert L. (Inventor); Konz, Daniel W. (Inventor); Winkelmann, Joseph P. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention provides a network device interface and method for digitally connecting a plurality of data channels, such as sensors, actuators, and subsystems, to a controller using a network bus. The network device interface interprets commands and data received from the controller and polls the data channels in accordance with these commands. Specifically, the network device interface receives digital commands and data from the controller, and based on these commands and data, communicates with the data channels to either retrieve data in the case of a sensor or send data to activate an actuator. Data retrieved from the sensor is then converted by the network device interface into digital signals and transmitted back to the controller. In one advantageous embodiment, the network device interface uses a specialized protocol for communicating across the network bus that uses a low-level instruction set and has low overhead for data communication.

  8. 14 CFR 25.697 - Lift and drag devices, controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... automatic positioning or load limiting device, without further attention by the pilots. (b) Each lift and... response to the operation of the control and the characteristics of the automatic positioning or...

  9. 14 CFR 25.697 - Lift and drag devices, controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... automatic positioning or load limiting device, without further attention by the pilots. (b) Each lift and... response to the operation of the control and the characteristics of the automatic positioning or...

  10. The dynamics and control of a haptic interface device

    SciTech Connect

    Kazerooni, H. . Mechanical Engineering Dept.); Her, M.G. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-08-01

    Haptic Interface Devices are machines that are controlled by the human arm contact forces. These devices are necessary elements of virtual reality machines. These devices may be programmed to give the human arm the sensation of forces associated with various arbitrary maneuvers. As examples, these devices can give the human the sensation that he/she is maneuvering a mass, or pushing onto a spring or a damper. In general, these devices may be programmed for any trajectory-dependant force. To illustrate and verify the analysis of these machines, a two-degree-of-freedom electrically-powered haptic interface device was designed and built at the Human Engineering Laboratory (HEL) of the University of California-Berkeley.

  11. Activated-Carbon Sorbent With Integral Heat-Transfer Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.; Yavrouian, Andre

    1996-01-01

    Prototype adsorption device used, for example, in adsorption heat pump, to store natural gas to power automobile, or to separate components of fluid mixtures. Device includes activated carbon held together by binder and molded into finned heat-transfer device providing rapid heating or cooling to enable rapid adsorption or desorption of fluids. Concepts of design and fabrication of device equally valid for such other highly thermally conductive devices as copper-finned tubes, and for such other high-surface-area sorbents as zeolites or silicates.

  12. Control of impurities in toroidal plasma devices

    DOEpatents

    Ohkawa, Tihiro

    1980-01-01

    A method and apparatus for plasma impurity control in closed flux plasma systems such as Tokamak reactors is disclosed. Local axisymmetrical injection of hydrogen gas is employed to reverse the normally inward flow of impurities into the plasma.

  13. Network device interface for digitally interfacing data channels to a controller via a network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellerbrock, Philip J. (Inventor); Grant, Robert L. (Inventor); Konz, Daniel W. (Inventor); Winkelmann, Joseph P. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The present invention provides a network device interface and method for digitally connecting a plurality of data channels, such as sensors, actuators, and subsystems, to a controller using a network bus. The network device interface interprets commands and data received from the controller and polls the data channels in accordance with these commands. Specifically, the network device interface receives digital commands and data from the controller, and based on these commands and data, communicates with the data channels to either retrieve data in the case of a sensor or send data to activate an actuator. Data retrieved from the sensor is then converted into digital signals and transmitted back to the controller. In one embodiment, the bus controller sends commands and data a defined bit rate, and the network device interface senses this bit rate and sends data back to the bus controller using the defined bit rate.

  14. Optically controlled multiple switching operations of DNA biopolymer devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, Chao-You; Tu, Waan-Ting; Lin, Yi-Tzu; Fruk, Ljiljana; Hung, Yu-Chueh

    2015-12-21

    We present optically tunable operations of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) biopolymer devices, where a single high-resistance state, write-once read-many-times memory state, write-read-erase memory state, and single low-resistance state can be achieved by controlling UV irradiation time. The device is a simple sandwich structure with a spin-coated DNA biopolymer layer sandwiched by two electrodes. Upon irradiation, the electrical properties of the device are adjusted owing to a phototriggered synthesis of silver nanoparticles in DNA biopolymer, giving rise to multiple switching scenarios. This technique, distinct from the strategy of doping of pre-formed nanoparticles, enables a post-film fabrication process for achieving optically controlled memory device operations, which provides a more versatile platform to fabricate organic memory and optoelectronic devices.

  15. Knowledge system and method for simulating chemical controlled release device performance

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, Christina E.; Van Voris, Peter; Streile, Gary P.; Cataldo, Dominic A.; Burton, Frederick G.

    1991-01-01

    A knowledge system for simulating the performance of a controlled release device is provided. The system includes an input device through which the user selectively inputs one or more data parameters. The data parameters comprise first parameters including device parameters, media parameters, active chemical parameters and device release rate; and second parameters including the minimum effective inhibition zone of the device and the effective lifetime of the device. The system also includes a judgemental knowledge base which includes logic for 1) determining at least one of the second parameters from the release rate and the first parameters and 2) determining at least one of the first parameters from the other of the first parameters and the second parameters. The system further includes a device for displaying the results of the determinations to the user.

  16. Field studies of beach cones as coastal erosion control/reversal devices for areas with significant oil and gas activities. [Annual report], February 24, 1992--February 23, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Law, V.J.

    1993-03-15

    The primary objective of this project is to evaluate the utility of a device called the ``beach cone`` in combating coastal erosion. Seven initial sites were selected for testing beach cones in a variety of geometric configurations. Permits were obtained from the State of Louisiana and the US Army Corps of Engineers to perform the work associated with this study. Six hundred beach cones were actually installed at six of the sites in late July and early August, 1992. One of the initial sites was abandoned because it was found to be unsuitable for beach cone placement. The test sites have been observed for six months and preliminary findings indicate that beach cones accreted significant amounts of materials along the beach of a barrier island. At other test sites, accretion rates have been less dramatic but importantly, no significant additional erosion has occurred, which is a positive result. It is too soon to state the categorical success of the beach cones, but results to date are encouraging.

  17. Optimization of a fluidic temperature control device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zabsky, J. M.; Rask, D. R.; Starr, J. B.

    1970-01-01

    Refinements are described to an existing fluidic temperature control system developed under a prior study which modulated temperature at the inlet to the liquid-cooled garment by using existing liquid supply and return lines to transmit signals to a fluidic controller located in the spacecraft. This earlier system produced a limited range of garment inlet temperatures, requiring some bypassing of flow around the suit to make the astronaut comfortable at rest conditions. Refinements were based on a flow visualization study of the key element in the fluidic controller: the fluidic mixing valve. The valve's mixing-ratio range was achieved by making five key changes: (1) geometrical changes to the valve; (2) attenuation of noise generated in proportional amplifier cascades; (3) elimination of vortices at the exit of the fluidic mixing valve; (4) reduction of internal heat transfer; and (5) flow balancing through venting. As a result, the refined system is capable of modulating garment inlet temperature from 45 F to 70 F with a single manual control valve in series with the garment. This control valve signals without changing or bypassing flow through the garment.

  18. DEVICE FOR CONTROLLING INSERTION OF ROD

    DOEpatents

    Beaty, B.J.

    1958-10-14

    A device for rapidly inserting a safety rod into a nuclear reactor upon a given signal or in the event of a power failure in order to prevent the possibility of extensive damage caused by a power excursion is described. A piston is slidably mounted within a vertical cylinder with provision for an electromagnetic latch at the top of the cylinder. This assembly, with a safety rod attached to the piston, is mounted over an access port to the core region of the reactor. The piston is normally latched at the top of the cylinder with the safety rod clear of the core area, however, when the latch is released, the piston and rod drop by their own weight to insert the rod. Vents along the side of the cylinder permit the escape of the air entrapped under the piston over the greater part of the distance, however, at the end of the fall the entrapped air is compressed thereby bringing the safety rod gently to rest, thus providing for a rapid automatic insertion of the rod with a minimum of structural shock.

  19. Implementation of Adaptive Digital Controllers on Programmable Logic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwaltney, David A.; King, Kenneth D.; Smith, Keary J.; Montenegro, Justino (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Much has been made of the capabilities of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA's) in the hardware implementation of fast digital signal processing functions. Such capability also makes an FPGA a suitable platform for the digital implementation of closed loop controllers. Other researchers have implemented a variety of closed-loop digital controllers on FPGA's. Some of these controllers include the widely used Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) controller, state space controllers, neural network and fuzzy logic based controllers. There are myriad advantages to utilizing an FPGA for discrete-time control functions which include the capability for reconfiguration when SRAM- based FPGA's are employed, fast parallel implementation of multiple control loops and implementations that can meet space level radiation tolerance requirements in a compact form-factor. Generally, a software implementation on a Digital Signal Processor (DSP) device or microcontroller is used to implement digital controllers. At Marshall Space Flight Center, the Control Electronics Group has been studying adaptive discrete-time control of motor driven actuator systems using DSP devices. While small form factor, commercial DSP devices are now available with event capture, data conversion, Pulse Width Modulated (PWM) outputs and communication peripherals, these devices are not currently available in designs and packages which meet space level radiation requirements. In general, very few DSP devices are produced that are designed to meet any level of radiation tolerance or hardness. An alternative is required for compact implementation of such functionality to withstand the harsh environment encountered on spacemap. The goal of this effort is to create a fully digital, flight ready controller design that utilizes an FPGA for implementation of signal conditioning for control feedback signals, generation of commands to the controlled system, and hardware insertion of adaptive-control algorithm

  20. Field studies of beach cones as coastal erosion control/reversal devices for areas with significant oil and gas activities. Annual report, February 24, 1993--February 23, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Law, V.J.

    1994-07-07

    The primary objective of this project was to evaluate the utility of a device called the ``beach cone`` in combating coastal erosion. Seven initial sites were selected for testing beach cones in a variety of geometric configurations, and six sites were actually used. Six hundred beach cones were installed at the six sites in late July and early August, 1992. An additional 109 cones were installed at an eighth site in December of 1992. Findings indicate that beach cones accreted significant amounts of materials along the beach of a barrier island. At the eighth installation the amount of accreted material was measured by surveys to be 2200 cubic meters (2900 cubic yards) in February of 1993, when the cones were found to have been completely covered by the material. The average increase in elevation was about 7 inches (0. 18 in) with a maximum buildup of 3 ft. (I in). At other test sites, accretion rates have been less dramatic but importantly, no significant additional erosion has occurred, which is a positive result. The cost of sediment accretion using beach cones was found to be about $13.72 per cubic yard of sand or approximately $500,000 per mile of beach, which would be much lower if the cones were mass produced. The survival of the cones through the fringes of Hurricane Andrew indicates that they can be anchored sufficiently to survive significant storms. The measurements of the cones settling rates indicate that this effect is negligible, does not hinder their effectiveness. We do not yet have sufficient data to state the categorical success of the beach cones, but results to date are encouraging.

  1. Automatic Exposure Control Device for Digital Mammography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    developing innovative approaches for controlling DM exposures. These approaches entail using the digital detector and an artificial neural network to...of interest that determine the exposure parameters for the fully exposed image; and (2) to use an artificial neural network to select exposure

  2. Automatic Exposure Control Device for Digital Mammography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-08-01

    developing innovative approaches for controlling DM exposures. These approaches entail using the digital detector and an artificial neural network to...34 regions of interest that determine the exposure parameters for the fully exposed image; and (2) to use an artificial neural network to select exposure

  3. A Wirelessly Powered and Controlled Device for Optical Neural Control of Freely-Behaving Animals

    PubMed Central

    Wentz, Christian T.; Bernstein, Jacob G.; Monahan, Patrick; Guerra, Alexander; Rodriguez, Alex; Boyden, Edward S.

    2011-01-01

    Optogenetics, the ability to use light to activate and silence specific neuron types within neural networks in vivo and in vitro, is revolutionizing neuroscientists’ capacity to understand how defined neural circuit elements contribute to normal and pathological brain functions. Typically awake behaving experiments are conducted by inserting an optical fiber into the brain, tethered to a remote laser, or by utilizing an implanted LED, tethered to a remote power source. A fully wireless system would enable chronic or longitudinal experiments where long duration tethering is impractical, and would also support high-throughput experimentation. However, the high power requirements of light sources (LEDs, lasers), especially in the context of the high-frequency pulse trains often desired in experiments, precludes battery-powered approaches from being widely applicable. We have developed a headborne device weighing 2 grams capable of wirelessly receiving power using a resonant RF power link and storing the energy in an adaptive supercapacitor circuit, which can algorithmically control one or more headborne LEDs via a microcontroller. The device can deliver approximately 2W of power to the LEDs in steady state, and 4.3W in bursts. We also present an optional radio transceiver module (1 gram) which, when added to the base headborne device, enables real-time updating of light delivery protocols; dozens of devices can be simultaneously controlled from one computer. We demonstrate use of the technology to wirelessly drive cortical control of movement in mice. These devices may serve as prototypes for clinical ultra-precise neural prosthetics that use light as the modality of biological control. PMID:21701058

  4. A wirelessly powered and controlled device for optical neural control of freely-behaving animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentz, Christian T.; Bernstein, Jacob G.; Monahan, Patrick; Guerra, Alexander; Rodriguez, Alex; Boyden, Edward S.

    2011-08-01

    Optogenetics, the ability to use light to activate and silence specific neuron types within neural networks in vivo and in vitro, is revolutionizing neuroscientists' capacity to understand how defined neural circuit elements contribute to normal and pathological brain functions. Typically, awake behaving experiments are conducted by inserting an optical fiber into the brain, tethered to a remote laser, or by utilizing an implanted light-emitting diode (LED), tethered to a remote power source. A fully wireless system would enable chronic or longitudinal experiments where long duration tethering is impractical, and would also support high-throughput experimentation. However, the high power requirements of light sources (LEDs, lasers), especially in the context of the extended illumination periods often desired in experiments, precludes battery-powered approaches from being widely applicable. We have developed a headborne device weighing 2 g capable of wirelessly receiving power using a resonant RF power link and storing the energy in an adaptive supercapacitor circuit, which can algorithmically control one or more headborne LEDs via a microcontroller. The device can deliver approximately 2 W of power to the LEDs in steady state, and 4.3 W in bursts. We also present an optional radio transceiver module (1 g) which, when added to the base headborne device, enables real-time updating of light delivery protocols; dozens of devices can be controlled simultaneously from one computer. We demonstrate use of the technology to wirelessly drive cortical control of movement in mice. These devices may serve as prototypes for clinical ultra-precise neural prosthetics that use light as the modality of biological control.

  5. Active control system trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yore, E. E.; Gunderson, D. C.

    1976-01-01

    The active control concepts which achieve the benefit of improved mission performance and lower cost and generate system trends towards improved dynamic performance, more integration, and digital fly by wire mechanization are described. Analytical issues and implementation requirements and tools and approaches developed to address the analytical and implementation issues are briefly discussed.

  6. Antimicrobial activity of antiseptic-coated orthopaedic devices.

    PubMed

    Darouiche, R O; Green, G; Mansouri, M D

    1998-04-01

    Antimicrobial coating of medical devices, including fracture fixation devices, has evolved as a potentially effective method for preventing device-related infections. We examined the in vitro antimicrobial activity of titanium cylinders coated with the antiseptic combination of chlorhexidine and chloroxylenol. The coated devices provided zones of inhibition against Staphylococcus epidermidis, S. aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans, at baseline and up to 8 weeks after incubation of the coated cylinders in human serum at 37 degrees C. This durable antimicrobial activity was attributed to the relatively slow leaching of chlorhexidine and chloroxylenol from the coated cylinders as measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. These results suggest that antiseptic-coated orthopaedic devices may provide broad-spectrum and durable antimicrobial protection against device-related infection.

  7. Specification of supervisory control systems for ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Cavalheiro, André C M; Santos Fo, Diolino J; Andrade, Aron; Cardoso, José Roberto; Horikawa, Osvaldo; Bock, Eduardo; Fonseca, Jeison

    2011-05-01

    One of the most important recent improvements in cardiology is the use of ventricular assist devices (VADs) to help patients with severe heart diseases, especially when they are indicated to heart transplantation. The Institute Dante Pazzanese of Cardiology has been developing an implantable centrifugal blood pump that will be able to help a sick human heart to keep blood flow and pressure at physiological levels. This device will be used as a totally or partially implantable VAD. Therefore, an improvement on device performance is important for the betterment of the level of interaction with patient's behavior or conditions. But some failures may occur if the device's pumping control does not follow the changes in patient's behavior or conditions. The VAD control system must consider tolerance to faults and have a dynamic adaptation according to patient's cardiovascular system changes, and also must attend to changes in patient conditions, behavior, or comportments. This work proposes an application of the mechatronic approach to this class of devices based on advanced techniques for control, instrumentation, and automation to define a method for developing a hierarchical supervisory control system that is able to perform VAD control dynamically, automatically, and securely. For this methodology, we used concepts based on Bayesian network for patients' diagnoses, Petri nets to generate a VAD control algorithm, and Safety Instrumented Systems to ensure VAD system security. Applying these concepts, a VAD control system is being built for method effectiveness confirmation.

  8. Virtual Machine Language Controls Remote Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center worked with Blue Sun Enterprises, based in Boulder, Colorado, to enhance the company's virtual machine language (VML) to control the instruments on the Regolith and Environment Science and Oxygen and Lunar Volatiles Extraction mission. Now the NASA-improved VML is available for crewed and uncrewed spacecraft, and has potential applications on remote systems such as weather balloons, unmanned aerial vehicles, and submarines.

  9. Network device interface for digitally interfacing data channels to a controller via a network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellerbrock, Philip J. (Inventor); Grant, Robert L. (Inventor); Konz, Daniel W. (Inventor); Winkelmann, Joseph P. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention provides a network device interface and method for digitally connecting a plurality of data channels, such as sensors, actuators, and subsystems, to a controller using a network bus. The network device interface interprets commands and data received from the controller and polls the data channels in accordance with these commands. Specifically, the network device interface receives digital commands and data from the controller, and based on these commands and data, communicates with the data channels to either retrieve data in the case of a sensor or send data to activate an actuator. Data retrieved from the sensor is converted into digital signals and transmitted to the controller. In some embodiments, network device interfaces associated with different data channels coordinate communications with the other interfaces based on either a transition in a command message sent by the bus controller or a synchronous clock signal.

  10. A proposed protocol for remote control of automated assessment devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kissock, P.S.

    1996-09-01

    Systems and devices that are controlled remotely are becoming more common in security systems in the US Air Force and other government agencies to provide protection of valuable assets. These systems reduce the number of needed personnel while still providing a high level of protection. However, each remotely controlled device usually has its own communication protocol. This limits the ability to change devices without changing the system that provides the communications control to the device. Sandia is pursuing a standard protocol that can be used to communicate with the different devices currently in use, or may be used in the future, in the US Air Force and other government agencies throughout the security community. Devices to be controlled include intelligent pan/tilt mounts, day/night video cameras., thermal imaging cameras, and remote data processors. Important features of this protocol include the ability to send messages of varying length, identify the sender, and more importantly, control remote data processors. As camera and digital signal processor (DSP) use expands, the DSP will begin to reside in the camera itself. The DSP can be used to provide auto-focus, frame-to- frame image registration, video motion detection (VMD), target detection, tracking, image compression, and many other functions. With the serial data control link, the actual DSP software can be updated or changed as required. Coaxial video cables may become obsolete once a compression algorithm is established in the DSP. This paper describes the proposed public domain protocol, features, and examples of use. The authors hope to elicit comments from security technology developers regarding format and use of remotely controlled automated assessment devices. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. MMIC devices for active phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittra, R.

    1985-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in the calculation and measurement of the scattering parameters of printed circuit discontinuities. These discontinuities occur in a variety of structures, such as transitions between rectangular waveguide and printed circuits, junctions between circuits of different dielectric constants, and filters and impedance matching circuits. Because of the variety of devices in which these discontinuities occur, it is very useful to understand them in as great a detail as possible. Both theoretical and experimental studies of discontinuities were considered. The theoretical studies have focused on finding ways to predict the scattering from discontinuities. The experimental studies have concentrated on developing measurement techniques for determining the scattering parameters of these discontinuities.

  12. Voltage controlled spintronic devices for logic applications

    DOEpatents

    You, Chun-Yeol; Bader, Samuel D.

    2001-01-01

    A reprogrammable logic gate comprising first and second voltage-controlled rotation transistors. Each transistor comprises three ferromagnetic layers with a spacer and insulating layer between the first and second ferromagnetic layers and an additional insulating layer between the second and third ferromagnetic layers. The third ferromagnetic layer of each transistor is connected to each other, and a constant external voltage source is applied to the second ferromagnetic layer of the first transistor. As input voltages are applied to the first ferromagnetic layer of each transistor, the relative directions of magnetization of the ferromagnetic layers and the magnitude of the external voltage determines the output voltage of the gate. By altering these parameters, the logic gate is capable of behaving as AND, OR, NAND, or NOR gates.

  13. Implementation of Adaptive Digital Controllers on Programmable Logic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwaltney, David A.; King, Kenneth D.; Smith, Keary J.; Monenegro, Justino (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Much has been made of the capabilities of FPGA's (Field Programmable Gate Arrays) in the hardware implementation of fast digital signal processing. Such capability also makes an FPGA a suitable platform for the digital implementation of closed loop controllers. Other researchers have implemented a variety of closed-loop digital controllers on FPGA's. Some of these controllers include the widely used proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller, state space controllers, neural network and fuzzy logic based controllers. There are myriad advantages to utilizing an FPGA for discrete-time control functions which include the capability for reconfiguration when SRAM-based FPGA's are employed, fast parallel implementation of multiple control loops and implementations that can meet space level radiation tolerance requirements in a compact form-factor. Generally, a software implementation on a DSP (Digital Signal Processor) or microcontroller is used to implement digital controllers. At Marshall Space Flight Center, the Control Electronics Group has been studying adaptive discrete-time control of motor driven actuator systems using digital signal processor (DSP) devices. While small form factor, commercial DSP devices are now available with event capture, data conversion, pulse width modulated (PWM) outputs and communication peripherals, these devices are not currently available in designs and packages which meet space level radiation requirements. In general, very few DSP devices are produced that are designed to meet any level of radiation tolerance or hardness. The goal of this effort is to create a fully digital, flight ready controller design that utilizes an FPGA for implementation of signal conditioning for control feedback signals, generation of commands to the controlled system, and hardware insertion of adaptive control algorithm approaches. An alternative is required for compact implementation of such functionality to withstand the harsh environment

  14. 49 CFR 178.338-11 - Discharge control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... control system. (ii) On a cargo tank motor vehicle of 3,500 gallons water capacity or less, at least one... Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.338-11 Discharge control devices. (a) Excess...-closing shutoff valve. (1) If pressure from a reservoir or from an engine-driven pump or compressor...

  15. 49 CFR 178.338-11 - Discharge control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... control system. (ii) On a cargo tank motor vehicle of 3,500 gallons water capacity or less, at least one... Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.338-11 Discharge control devices. (a) Excess...-closing shutoff valve. (1) If pressure from a reservoir or from an engine-driven pump or compressor...

  16. 14 CFR 25.697 - Lift and drag devices, controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... their controls in flight if that operation could be hazardous. (c) The rate of motion of the surfaces in response to the operation of the control and the characteristics of the automatic positioning or load limiting device must give satisfactory flight and performance characteristics under steady or...

  17. 49 CFR 178.338-11 - Discharge control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.338-11 Discharge control devices. (a) Excess... liquid filling and liquid discharge line must be provided with an on-vehicle remotely controlled...

  18. Electromechanical Devices and Controllers. Electronics Module 10. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Ed

    This module is the tenth of 10 modules in the competency-based electronics series. Introductory materials include a listing of competencies addressed in the module, a parts/equipment list, and a cross-reference table of instructional materials. Six instructional units cover: electromechanical control devices; programmable logic controllers (PLC);…

  19. [Key Technology and Quantity Control of Wearable Medical Devices].

    PubMed

    Cui, Hongen; Yao, Shaowei

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, because the wearable medical devices can indicate the health monitoring index of blood sugar, blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen content, temperature, respiration of the human body anytime and anywhere, can also be used for the treatment of various diseases, accompanied by the development of large data, which will bring a subversive revolution for the medical device industry. This paper introduces the development of wearable devices, key technical index of main products, and to make a preliminary study on its quantity control.

  20. Collaborative Research: Fundamental studies of plasma control using surface embedded electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Raja, Laxminarayan L.; PanneerChelvam, PremKumar; Levko, Dimtry

    2016-02-26

    The proposed study will investigate the effect of active electron injection of from electrode surfaces To the best of our knowledge, no such a study has ever been attempted even though it could lead to the formation of whole new classes of plasma based devices and systems. We are motivated by recent articles and simple theory which gives strong reason to believe that embedded electronic devices can be used to exert control over the SEE coefficient of semiconductor surfaces (and maybe other surface types as well). Furthermore, the research will explore how such sub-surface electronic devices can best be used to exert control over an associated plasma.

  1. Rehabilitation device with variable resistance and intelligent control

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Shufang; Lu, Ke-Qian; Sun, J.Q.; Rudolph, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    Resistance exercise has been widely reported to have positive rehabilitation effects for patients with neuromuscular and orthopaedic conditions. This paper presents an optimal design of magneto-rheological fluid dampers for variable resistance exercise device in the form of a knee brace. An intelligent supervisory control for regulating the resistive force or torque of the knee brace has also been studied. The device provides both isometric and isokinetic strength training for the knee. PMID:15694609

  2. 40 CFR 65.145 - Nonflare control devices used to control emissions from storage vessels or low-throughput...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... operate and maintain the nonflare control device, including a halogen reduction device for a low... regulated material are routed to the control device and halogen reduction device, except during periods of... transfer rack vent streams routed to a combustion device and then to a halogen reduction device to meet...

  3. 40 CFR 65.145 - Nonflare control devices used to control emissions from storage vessels or low-throughput...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... operate and maintain the nonflare control device, including a halogen reduction device for a low... regulated material are routed to the control device and halogen reduction device, except during periods of... transfer rack vent streams routed to a combustion device and then to a halogen reduction device to meet...

  4. 40 CFR 65.145 - Nonflare control devices used to control emissions from storage vessels or low-throughput...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... operate and maintain the nonflare control device, including a halogen reduction device for a low... regulated material are routed to the control device and halogen reduction device, except during periods of... transfer rack vent streams routed to a combustion device and then to a halogen reduction device to meet...

  5. 40 CFR 65.145 - Nonflare control devices used to control emissions from storage vessels or low-throughput...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... operate and maintain the nonflare control device, including a halogen reduction device for a low... regulated material are routed to the control device and halogen reduction device, except during periods of... transfer rack vent streams routed to a combustion device and then to a halogen reduction device to meet...

  6. Measurement of active shoulder proprioception: dedicated system and device.

    PubMed

    Lubiatowski, Przemyslaw; Ogrodowicz, Piotr; Wojtaszek, Marcin; Kaniewski, Ryszard; Stefaniak, Jakub; Dudziński, Witold; Romanowski, Leszek

    2013-02-01

    Proprioception is an essential part of shoulder stability and neuromuscular control. The purpose of the study was the development of a precise system of shoulder proprioception assessment in the active mode (Propriometr). For that purpose, devices such as the electronic goniometer and computer software had been designed. A pilot study was carried out on a control group of 27 healthy subjects, the average age being 23.8 (22-29) in order to test the system. The result of the assessment was the finding of the error of active reproduction of the joint position (EARJP). EARJP was assessed for flexion, abduction, external and internal rotation. For every motion, reference positions were used at three different angles. The results showed EARJP to range in 3-6.1°. The proprioception evaluation system (propriometr) allows a precise measurement of active joint position sense. The designed system can be used to assess proprioception in both shoulder injuries and treatment. In addition, all achieved results of normal shoulders may serve as reference to be compared with the results of forthcoming studies.

  7. Implementation of Adaptive Digital Controllers on Programmable Logic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwaltney, David A.; King, Kenneth D.; Smith, Keary J.; Ormsby, John (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Much has been made of the capabilities of FPGA's (Field Programmable Gate Arrays) in the hardware implementation of fast digital signal processing (DSP) functions. Such capability also makes and FPGA a suitable platform for the digital implementation of closed loop controllers. There are myriad advantages to utilizing an FPGA for discrete-time control functions which include the capability for reconfiguration when SRAM- based FPGA's are employed, fast parallel implementation of multiple control loops and implementations that can meet space level radiation tolerance in a compact form-factor. Other researchers have presented the notion that a second order digital filter with proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control functionality can be implemented in an FPGA. At Marshall Space Flight Center, the Control Electronics Group has been studying adaptive discrete-time control of motor driven actuator systems using digital signal processor (DSF) devices. Our goal is to create a fully digital, flight ready controller design that utilizes an FPGA for implementation of signal conditioning for control feedback signals, generation of commands to the controlled system, and hardware insertion of adaptive control algorithm approaches. While small form factor, commercial DSP devices are now available with event capture, data conversion, pulse width modulated outputs and communication peripherals, these devices are not currently available in designs and packages which meet space level radiation requirements. Meeting our goals requires alternative compact implementation of such functionality to withstand the harsh environment encountered on spacecraft. Radiation tolerant FPGA's are a feasible option for reaching these goals.

  8. 40 CFR 63.997 - Performance test and compliance assessment requirements for control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Devices, Recovery Devices and Routing to a Fuel Gas System or a Process § 63.997 Performance test and... permit, if an owner or operator elects to use a recovery device to replace an existing control device at a later date, or elects to use a different flare, nonflare control device or recovery device...

  9. 40 CFR 63.997 - Performance test and compliance assessment requirements for control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Devices, Recovery Devices and Routing to a Fuel Gas System or a Process § 63.997 Performance test and... permit, if an owner or operator elects to use a recovery device to replace an existing control device at a later date, or elects to use a different flare, nonflare control device or recovery device...

  10. Partial reconfiguration of concurrent logic controllers implemented in FPGA devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiśniewski, Remigiusz; Grobelna, Iwona; Stefanowicz, Łukasz

    2016-12-01

    Reconfigurable systems are recently used in many domains. Although the concept of multi-context logic controllers is relatively new, it may be noticed that the subject is receiving a lot of attention, especially in the industry. The work constitutes a stepping stone in design of reconfigurable logic controllers implemented in an FPGA device. An approach of designing of logic controllers oriented for further partial reconfiguration is proposed. A case study of a milling machine is used for an illustration.

  11. Near-infrared–actuated devices for remotely controlled drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Timko, Brian P.; Arruebo, Manuel; Shankarappa, Sahadev A.; McAlvin, J. Brian; Okonkwo, Obiajulu S.; Mizrahi, Boaz; Stefanescu, Cristina F.; Gomez, Leyre; Zhu, Jia; Zhu, Angela; Santamaria, Jesus; Langer, Robert; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    A reservoir that could be remotely triggered to release a drug would enable the patient or physician to achieve on-demand, reproducible, repeated, and tunable dosing. Such a device would allow precise adjustment of dosage to desired effect, with a consequent minimization of toxicity, and could obviate repeated drug administrations or device implantations, enhancing patient compliance. It should exhibit low off-state leakage to minimize basal effects, and tunable on-state release profiles that could be adjusted from pulsatile to sustained in real time. Despite the clear clinical need for a device that meets these criteria, none has been reported to date to our knowledge. To address this deficiency, we developed an implantable reservoir capped by a nanocomposite membrane whose permeability was modulated by irradiation with a near-infrared laser. Irradiated devices could exhibit sustained on-state drug release for at least 3 h, and could reproducibly deliver short pulses over at least 10 cycles, with an on/off ratio of 30. Devices containing aspart, a fast-acting insulin analog, could achieve glycemic control after s.c. implantation in diabetic rats, with reproducible dosing controlled by the intensity and timing of irradiation over a 2-wk period. These devices can be loaded with a wide range of drug types, and therefore represent a platform technology that might be used to address a wide variety of clinical indications. PMID:24474759

  12. A controlled biochemical release device with embedded nanofluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Haifeng; Hong, Wei; Dong, Liang

    2012-04-01

    A controlled release device is developed by embedding nanofluidic biomolecule reservoirs into a polymer network of a stimuli-responsive hydrogel. The reservoirs are made of liquid core-polymer shell nanofibers using co-electrospinning. The mechanism of controlled release is based on buckling instability of the polymer shell under combined axial and radial compression, caused by volume changes of hydrogel responding to a specific stimulus. The device decouples releasable biomolecules from a hydrogel polymer matrix, avoiding chemical interactions between biomolecules and hydrogel polymer chains, and thus, alleviating nontrivial chemical and biological engineering design of hydrogel formulations. Temperature-sensitive hydrogel is used as a model hydrogel.

  13. EXOS research on master controllers for robotic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcus, Beth A.; An, Ben; Eberman, Brian

    1992-01-01

    Two projects are currently being conducted by EXOS under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program with NASA. One project will develop a force feedback device for controlling robot hands, the other will develop an elbow and shoulder exoskeleton which can be integrated with other EXOS devices to provide whole robot arm and hand control. Aspects covered are the project objectives, important research issues which have arisen during the developments, and interim results of the projects. The Phase 1 projects currently underway will result in hardware prototypes and identification of research issues required for complete system development and/or integration.

  14. PARduino: A Simple Device Measuring and Logging Photosynthetically Active Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, H. R.; Findley, M. C.

    2013-12-01

    Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR, 400 to 700 nm) is one of the primary controls of forest carbon and water relations. In complex terrain, PAR has high spatial-variability. Given the high cost of commercial datalogging equipment, spatially-distributed measurements of PAR have been typically modeled using geographic coordinates and terrain indices. Here, we present a design for a low cost, field-deployable device for measuring and logging PAR built around an Arduino microcontroller (we named it PARduino). PARduino provides for widely distributed sensor arrays and tests the feasibility of using hobbyist-grade electronics for collecting scientific data. PARduino components include a LiCor quantum sensor, EME Systems signal converter/amplifier, and Sparkfun's Arduino Pro Mini microcontroller. Additional components include a real time clock, a microSD flash memory card, and a custom printed circuit board (PCB). We selected the components with an eye towards ease of assembly. Everything can be connected to the PCB using through-hole soldering techniques. Since the device will be deployed in remote research plots that lack easy access to line power, battery life was also a consideration in the design. Extended deployment is possible because PARduino's software keeps it in a low-power sleep mode until ready to make a measurement. PARduino will be open-source hardware for use and improvement by others.

  15. Development of novel active transport membrande devices

    SciTech Connect

    Laciak, D.V.

    1994-11-01

    Air Products has undertaken a research program to fabricate and evaluate gas separation membranes based upon promising ``active-transport`` (AT) materials recently developed in our laboratories. Active Transport materials are ionic polymers and molten salts which undergo reversible interaction or reaction with ammonia and carbon dioxide. The materials are useful for separating these gases from mixtures with hydrogen. Moreover, AT membranes have the unique property of possessing high permeability towards ammnonia and carbon dioxide but low permeability towards hydrogen and can thus be used to permeate these components from a gas stream while retaining hydrogen at high pressure.

  16. Active control of convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Jonathan; Bau, Haim H.

    1991-12-01

    It is demonstrated theoretically that active (feedback) control can be used to alter the characteristics of thermal convection in a toroidal, vertical loop heated from below and cooled from above. As the temperature difference between the heated and cooled sections of the loop increases, the flow in the uncontrolled loop changes from no motion to steady, time-independent motion to temporally oscillatory, chaotic motion. With the use of a feedback controller effecting small perturbations in the boundary conditions, one can maintain the no-motion state at significantly higher temperature differences than the critical one corresponding to the onset of convection in the uncontrolled system. Alternatively, one can maintain steady, time-independent flow under conditions in which the flow would otherwise be chaotic. That is, the controller can be used to suppress chaos. Likewise, it is possible to stabilize periodic nonstable orbits that exist in the chaotic regime of the uncontrolled system. Finally, the controller also can be used to induce chaos in otherwise laminar (fully predictable), nonchaotic flow.

  17. Control, interaction mitigation and location for FACTS devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Liangying

    This dissertation focuses on the investigation and mitigation of the potential dynamic control interactions among multiple UPFC controllers installed in power systems and the optimal location of UPFC for system stability improvement. Two different interaction phenomena are highlighted by their distinctive frequency characteristics: low frequency modal interaction and high frequency interaction. Due to the difference between the interaction phenomena, two approaches are proposed respectively to eliminate these adverse interactions. By introducing a series of additional global control signals, low frequency modal interactions can be effectively alleviated to improve system dynamic stability performance. Also, a nonlinear hybrid fuzzy logic PI controller is developed in this dissertation, which is shown to be effective in mitigating the high frequency interactions. It is indicated that the effectiveness of the FACTS device control in improving the stability mainly depends on the location of devices in the network. This dissertation develops a placement sensitivity index, which is derived from the controllability and observability factors of the system to evaluate the interaction phenomena severity. In addition, this dissertation presents the schematic and basic controls of a reconfigurable FACTS system that can be used to realize the major voltage-sourced-converter FACTS topologies. Furthermore, performance indices are developed for different FACTS devices with Energy Storage System (ESS) and dynamic responses of different FACTS combinations are presented to support the validity of the developed indices and increased controller flexibility introduced by integrating the ESS.

  18. Motorized CPM/CAM physiotherapy device with sliding-mode Fuzzy Neural Network control loop.

    PubMed

    Ho, Hung-Jung; Chen, Tien-Chi

    2009-11-01

    Continuous passive motion (CPM) and controllable active motion (CAM) physiotherapy devices promote rehabilitation of damaged joints. This paper presents a computerized CPM/CAM system that obviates the need for mechanical resistance devices such as springs. The system is controlled by a computer which performs sliding-mode Fuzzy Neural Network (FNN) calculations online. CAM-type resistance force is generated by the active performance of an electric motor which is controlled so as to oppose the motion of the patient's leg. A force sensor under the patient's foot on the device pedal provides data for feedback in a sliding-mode FNN control loop built around the motor. Via an active impedance control feedback system, the controller drives the motor to behave similarly to a damped spring by generating and controlling the amplitude and direction of the pedal force in relation to the patient's leg. Experiments demonstrate the high sensitivity and speed of the device. The PC-based feedback nature of the control loop means that sophisticated auto-adaptable CPM/CAM custom-designed physiotherapy becomes possible. The computer base also allows extensive data recording, data analysis and network-connected remote patient monitoring.

  19. Performance Assessment of Active Hearing Protection Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-08

    report is published in the interest of scientific and technical information exchange, and its publication does not constitute the Government’s...approval or disapproval of its ideas or findings. i REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this...collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT

  20. Geometric investigation of a gaming active device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menna, Fabio; Remondino, Fabio; Battisti, Roberto; Nocerino, Erica

    2011-07-01

    3D imaging systems are widely available and used for surveying, modeling and entertainment applications, but clear statements regarding their characteristics, performances and limitations are still missing. The VDI/VDE and the ASTME57 committees are trying to set some standards but the commercial market is not reacting properly. Since many new users are approaching these 3D recording methodologies, clear statements and information clarifying if a package or system satisfies certain requirements before investing are fundamental for those users who are not really familiar with these technologies. Recently small and portable consumer-grade active sensors came on the market, like TOF rangeimaging cameras or low-cost triangulation-based range sensor. A quite interesting active system was produced by PrimeSense and launched on the market thanks to the Microsoft Xbox project with the name of Kinect. The article reports the geometric investigation of the Kinect active sensors, considering its measurement performances, the accuracy of the retrieved range data and the possibility to use it for 3D modeling application.

  1. Control system devices : architectures and supply channels overview.

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, Jason; Atkins, William Dee; Schwartz, Moses Daniel; Mulder, John C.

    2010-08-01

    This report describes a research project to examine the hardware used in automated control systems like those that control the electric grid. This report provides an overview of the vendors, architectures, and supply channels for a number of control system devices. The research itself represents an attempt to probe more deeply into the area of programmable logic controllers (PLCs) - the specialized digital computers that control individual processes within supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems. The report (1) provides an overview of control system networks and PLC architecture, (2) furnishes profiles for the top eight vendors in the PLC industry, (3) discusses the communications protocols used in different industries, and (4) analyzes the hardware used in several PLC devices. As part of the project, several PLCs were disassembled to identify constituent components. That information will direct the next step of the research, which will greatly increase our understanding of PLC security in both the hardware and software areas. Such an understanding is vital for discerning the potential national security impact of security flaws in these devices, as well as for developing proactive countermeasures.

  2. Network device interface for digitally interfacing data channels to a controller via a network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellerbrock, Philip J. (Inventor); Grant, Robert L. (Inventor); Konz, Daniel W. (Inventor); Winkelmann, Joseph P. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A communications system and method are provided for digitally connecting a plurality of data channels, such as sensors, actuators, and subsystems, to a controller using a network bus. The network device interface interprets commands and data received from the controller and polls the data channels in accordance with these commands. Specifically, the network device interface receives digital commands and data from the controller, and based on these commands and data, communicates with the data channels to either retrieve data in the case of a sensor or send data to activate an actuator. Data retrieved from the sensor is converted into digital signals and transmitted to the controller. Network device interfaces associated with different data channels can coordinate communications with the other interfaces based on either a transition in a command message sent by the bus controller or a synchronous clock signal.

  3. 40 CFR 65.151 - Condensers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirements. (1) Owners or operators using condensers to meet the 98 weight-percent emission reduction or 20... replace an existing recovery or control device at a later date, the owner or operator shall notify the... change, either of the following provisions, as applicable, shall be followed: (i) Replace final...

  4. 40 CFR 65.150 - Absorbers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirements. (1) Owners or operators using absorbers to meet the 98 weight-percent emission reduction or 20... existing recovery or control device at a later date, the owner or operator shall notify the Administrator... change, either of the following provisions, as applicable, shall be followed: (i) Replace final...

  5. Biopolymers in controlled release devices for agricultural applications.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of biopolymers such as starch for agricultural applications including controlled release devices is growing due the environmental benefits. Recently, concerns have grown about the worldwide spread of parasitic mites (Varroa destructor) that infect colonies of honey bees (Apis mellifera L.). ...

  6. Automatic coolant flow control device for a nuclear reactor assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, E.

    1984-01-27

    A device which controls coolant flow through a nuclear reactor assembly comprises a baffle means at the exit end of said assembly having a plurality of orifices, and a bimetallic member in operative relation to the baffle means such that at increased temperatures said bimetallic member deforms to unblock some of said orifices and allow increased coolant flow therethrough.

  7. Determining Desirable Cursor Control Device Characteristics for NASA Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandor, Aniko; Holden, Kritina

    2007-01-01

    The Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) that will travel to the moon and Mars, and all future Exploration vehicles and habitats will be highly computerized, necessitating an accurate method of interaction with the computers. The design of a cursor control device will have to take into consideration g-forces, vibration, gloved operations, and the specific types of tasks to be performed. The study described here is being undertaken to begin identifying characteristics of cursor control devices that will work well for the unique Exploration mission environments. The objective of the study is not to identify a particular device, but to begin identifying design characteristics that are usable and desirable for space missions. Most cursor control devices have strengths and weaknesses; they are more appropriate for some tasks and less suitable for others. The purpose of this study is to collect some initial usability data on a large number of commercially available and proprietary cursor control devices. A software test battery was developed for this purpose. Once data has been collected using these low-level, basic point/click/drag tasks, higher fidelity, scenario-driven evaluations will be conducted with a reduced set of devices. The standard tasks used for testing cursor control devices are based on a model of human movement known as Fitts law. Fitts law predicts that the time to acquire a target is logarithmically related to the distance over the target size. To gather data for analysis with this law, fundamental, low-level tasks are used such as dragging or pointing at various targets of different sizes from various distances. The first four core tasks for the study were based on the ISO 9241-9:(2000) document from the International Organization for Standardization that contains the requirements for non-keyboard input devices. These include two pointing tasks, one dragging and one tracking task. The fifth task from ISO 9241-9, the circular tracking task was not used

  8. Micropatterned photoalignment for wavefront controlled switchable optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazar, Nikolaus

    Photoalignment is a well-established technique for surface alignment of the liquid crystal director. Previously, chrome masks were necessary for patterned photoalignment but were difficult to use, costly, and inflexible. To extend the capabilities of photoalignment we built an automated maskless multi-domain photoalignment device based on a DMD (digital multimirror device) projection system. The device is capable of creating arbitrary photoalignment patterns with micron-sized features. Pancharatnam-Berry phase (PB-phase) is a geometric phase that arises from cyclic change of polarization state. By varying the azimuthal anchoring angle in a hybrid-aligned liquid crystal cell we can control the spatial variation of the PB-phase shift. Using our automated photoalignment device to align the liquid crystal arbitrary wave front manipulations are possible. The PB-phase shift effect is maximized when the cell is tuned to have a half-wave retardation and disappears at full-wave retardation, so the cell can be switched on and off by applying a voltage. Two wavefront controlled devices developed using this technique will be discussed: A switchable liquid crystal phase shift mask for creating sub-diffraction sized photolithographic features, and a transparent diffractive display that utilizes a switchable liquid crystal diffraction grating.

  9. 242-A Control System device logic software documentation. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, J.F.

    1995-05-19

    A Distributive Process Control system was purchased by Project B-534. This computer-based control system, called the Monitor and Control System (MCS), was installed in the 242-A Evaporator located in the 200 East Area. The purpose of the MCS is to monitor and control the Evaporator and Monitor a number of alarms and other signals from various Tank Farm facilities. Applications software for the MCS was developed by the Waste Treatment System Engineering Group of Westinghouse. This document describes the Device Logic for this system.

  10. Solid state carbon nanotube device for controllable trion electroluminescence emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shuang; Ma, Ze; Wei, Nan; Liu, Huaping; Wang, Sheng; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2016-03-01

    Semiconducting carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have a direct chirality-dependent bandgap and reduced dimensionality-related quantum confinement effects, which are closely related to the performance of optoelectronic devices. Here, taking advantage of the large energy separations between neutral singlet excitons and charged excitons, i.e. trions in CNTs, we have achieved for the first time all trion electroluminescence (EL) emission from chirality-sorted (8,3) and (8,4) CNT-based solid state devices. We showed that strong trion emission can be obtained as a result of localized impact excitation and electrically injected holes, with an estimated efficiency of ~5 × 10-4 photons per injected hole. The importance of contact-controlled carrier injection (including symmetric and asymmetric contact configurations) and EL spectral stability for gradually increasing bias were also investigated. The realization of electrically induced pure trion emission opens up a new opportunity for CNT film-based optoelectronic devices, providing a new degree of freedom in controlling the devices to extend potential applications in spin or magnetic optoelectronics fields.Semiconducting carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have a direct chirality-dependent bandgap and reduced dimensionality-related quantum confinement effects, which are closely related to the performance of optoelectronic devices. Here, taking advantage of the large energy separations between neutral singlet excitons and charged excitons, i.e. trions in CNTs, we have achieved for the first time all trion electroluminescence (EL) emission from chirality-sorted (8,3) and (8,4) CNT-based solid state devices. We showed that strong trion emission can be obtained as a result of localized impact excitation and electrically injected holes, with an estimated efficiency of ~5 × 10-4 photons per injected hole. The importance of contact-controlled carrier injection (including symmetric and asymmetric contact configurations) and EL spectral stability for

  11. The Lick Observatory charge-coupled device /CCD/ and controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, L. B.

    1981-01-01

    A description is given of a flexible microprocessor-based controller for charge-coupled device two-dimensional detectors. It is noted that the controller can operate under manual control or as a slave to a remote computer linked by coaxial cable. The system is discussed, together with data taken at the telescope and in the laboratory. The flexibility of the controller derives from its modular form and from the use of a programmable 8-bit microprocessor to control and sequence the electronic logic. The electronic circuits for such functions as signal processing, clock sequencing, voltage level adjustment, and temperature control are on small individual plug-in cards, making future improvements and changes simple. The software of the microprocessor is stored in erasable, programmable, read-only memory. Among the limitations of the controller is a scan speed of roughly 35 microsec per pixel.

  12. Mobile monolithic polymer elements for flow control in microfluidic devices

    DOEpatents

    Hasselbrink, Jr., Ernest F.; Rehm, Jason E.; Shepodd, Timothy J.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2005-11-11

    A cast-in-place and lithographically shaped mobile, monolithic polymer element for fluid flow control in microfluidic devices and method of manufacture. Microfluid flow control devices, or microvalves that provide for control of fluid or ionic current flow can be made incorporating a cast-in-place, mobile monolithic polymer element, disposed within a microchannel, and driven by fluid pressure (either liquid or gas) against a retaining or sealing surface. The polymer elements are made by the application of lithographic methods to monomer mixtures formulated in such a way that the polymer will not bond to microchannel walls. The polymer elements can seal against pressures greater than 5000 psi, and have a response time on the order of milliseconds. By the use of energetic radiation it is possible to depolymerize selected regions of the polymer element to form shapes that cannot be produced by conventional lithographic patterning and would be impossible to machine.

  13. Mobile monolithic polymer elements for flow control in microfluidic devices

    DOEpatents

    Hasselbrink, Jr., Ernest F.; Rehm, Jason E.; Shepodd, Timothy J.

    2004-08-31

    A cast-in-place and lithographically shaped mobile, monolithic polymer element for fluid flow control in microfluidic devices and method of manufacture. Microfluid flow control devices, or microvalves that provide for control of fluid or ionic current flow can be made incorporating a cast-in-place, mobile monolithic polymer element, disposed within a microchannel, and driven by either fluid or gas pressure against a retaining or sealing surface. The polymer elements are made by the application of lithographic methods to monomer mixtures formulated in such a way that the polymer will not bond to microchannel walls. The polymer elements can seal against pressures greater than 5000 psi, and have a response time on the order of milliseconds. By the use of energetic radiation it is possible to depolymerize selected regions of the polymer element to form shapes that cannot be produced by conventional lithographic patterning and would be impossible to machine.

  14. Design control considerations for biologic-device combination products.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Dave; Liu, Roger; Anand Subramony, J; Cammack, Jon

    2017-01-11

    Combination products are therapeutic and diagnostic medical products that combine drugs, devices, and/or biological products with one another. Historically, biologics development involved identifying efficacious doses administered to patients intravenously or perhaps by a syringe. Until fairly recently, there has been limited focus on developing an accompanying medical device, such as a prefilled syringe or auto-injector, to enable easy and more efficient delivery. For the last several years, and looking forward, where there may be little to distinguish biologics medicines with relatively similar efficacy profiles, the biotechnology market is beginning to differentiate products by patient-focused, biologic-device based combination products. As innovative as biologic-device combination products are, they can pose considerable development, regulatory, and commercialization challenges due to unique physicochemical properties and special clinical considerations (e.g., dosing volumes, frequency, co-medications, etc.) of the biologic medicine. A biologic-device combination product is a marriage between two partners with "cultural differences," so to speak. There are clear differences in the development, review, and commercialization processes of the biologic and the device. When these two cultures come together in a combination product, developers and reviewers must find ways to address the design controls and risk management processes of both the biologic and device, and knit them into a single entity with supporting product approval documentation. Moreover, digital medicine and connected health trends are pushing the boundaries of combination product development and regulations even further. Despite an admirable cooperation between industry and FDA in recent years, unique product configurations and design features have resulted in review challenges. These challenges have prompted agency reviewers to modernize consultation processes, while at the same time, promoting

  15. Controlling The Position And Morphology of Nanotubes For Device Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiff, Emer; Leahy, Rory; Minett, Andrew I.; Blau, Werner J.

    2004-09-01

    In producing nanotube based devices as diverse as composite materials and sensing platforms, the in-situ growth of carbon nanotubes is most advantageous. Obtaining growth from organo-metallic catalysts pre-patterned on silicon wafers, precise structured nanotube patterns have then easily been incorporated into flexible stand-alone composites. In an alternative approach, aligned and sometimes ultra-long (>40μm) nanotubes have been obtained from catalytic growth in porous alumina membranes. Three-way (T) and now four-way (X) interconnects have been observed during the growth process, which can be incorporated into nanoscale electronic devices. Current approaches are for use as on-chip interconnects and single tube devices that can be used as the transducer in small scale bio- and chemical-sensors. In both these approaches, the density, morphology and position of the nanotubes can be controlled. This provides more precise placement of conduction channels in composites or devices, resulting in more efficient fabrication over conventional device formation.

  16. Active MMI devices: concept, proof, and recent progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, Kiichi; Jiang, Haisong

    2015-09-01

    Multi-mode interference (MMI) couplers (waveguides) are widely studied and developed as key components of photonic integrated circuits, including power coupler/dividers, and others. Furthermore, another possibility utilizing MMI has been investigated on active devices so far. Owing to the wider area of the multi-mode waveguide section compared with that of the regular single-mode waveguide, MMI may result in higher performance (high power, low power consumption, and others) rather than conventional active devices while maintaining regular single-mode output. Thus, active multi-mode interferometer (active-MMI) devices, including laser diodes (LDs), super-luminescent light emitting diodes (SLEDs), and semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) have been studied. Moreover, they have been also exploited to bi-stable LDs and single wavelength emitters, and others using the interference inside the MMI section. In this paper, we review and summarize the recent progress in active MMI devices. We provide proof of MMI phenomena in active waveguides and discuss the results.

  17. Radio controlled release apparatus for animal data acquisition devices

    DOEpatents

    Stamps, James Frederick

    2000-01-01

    A novel apparatus for reliably and selectively releasing a data acquisition package from an animal for recovery. The data package comprises two parts: 1) an animal data acquisition device and 2) a co-located release apparatus. One embodiment, which is useful for land animals, the release apparatus includes two major components: 1) an electronics package, comprising a receiver; a decoder comparator, having at plurality of individually selectable codes; and an actuator circuit and 2) a release device, which can be a mechanical device, which acts to release the data package from the animal. To release a data package from a particular animal, a radio transmitter sends a coded signal which is decoded to determine if the code is valid for that animal data package. Having received a valid code, the release device is activated to release the data package from the animal for subsequent recovery. A second embodiment includes floatation means and is useful for releasing animal data acquisition devices attached to sea animals. This embodiment further provides for releasing a data package underwater by employing an acoustic signal.

  18. Fluoropolymer surface coatings to control droplets in microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Riche, Carson T; Zhang, Chuchu; Gupta, Malancha; Malmstadt, Noah

    2014-06-07

    We have demonstrated the application of low surface energy fluoropolymer coatings onto poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic devices for droplet formation and extraction-induced merger of droplets. Initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) was used to pattern fluoropolymer coatings within microchannels based on geometrical constraints. In a two-phase flow system, the range of accessible flow rates for droplet formation was greatly enhanced in the coated devices. The ability to controllably apply the coating only at the inlet facilitated a method for merging droplets. An organic spacer droplet was extracted from between a pair of aqueous droplets. The size of the organic droplet and the flow rate controlled the time to merge the aqueous droplets; the process of merging was independent of the droplet sizes. Extraction-induced droplet merging is a robust method for manipulating droplets that could be applied in translating multi-step reactions to microfluidic platforms.

  19. Description of a laboratory model Annular Momentum Control Device (AMCD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, N. J.

    1984-01-01

    The basic concept of the Annular Momentum Control Device (AMCD) is that of a rotating annular rim suspended by noncontacting magnetic bearings and driven by a noncontacting electromagnetic spin motor. The purpose of this paper is to highlight some of the design requirements for AMCD's in general and describe how these requirements were met in the implementation of laboratory test model AMCD. An AMCD background summary is presented.

  20. Emission control devices, fuel additive, and fuel composition changes.

    PubMed Central

    Piver, W T

    1977-01-01

    Emission control devices are installed to meet the exhaust standards of the Clean Air Act for carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons, and it is necessary to know, from a public health point of view, how exhaust emissions may be affected by changes in fuel additives and fuel composition. Since these topics are concerned with developing technologies, the available literature on exhaust emission characteristics and the limited information on health effects, is reviewed. PMID:71235

  1. Annular Momentum Control Device (AMCD). Volume 1: Laboratory model development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The annular momentum control device (AMCD) a thin hoop-like wheel with neither shaft nor spokes is described. The wheel floats in a magnetic field and can be rotated by a segmented motor. Potential advantages of such a wheel are low weight, configuration flexibility, a wheel that stiffens with increased speed, vibration isolation, and increased reliability. The analysis, design, fabrication, and testing is described of the laboratory model of the AMCD.

  2. Evaluation of a laboratory test model annular momentum control device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, N. J.; Terray, D. E.

    1978-01-01

    A 4068 Nm Sec laboratory test model annular momentum control device (AMCD) was described and static and dynamic test results were presented. An AMCD is a spinning annular rim suspended by noncontacting magnetic bearings and powered by a noncontacting linear electromagnetic motor. Test results include spin motor torque characteristics and spin motor and magnetic bearing drag losses. Limitations of some of the design approaches taken was also discussed.

  3. A compact inflow control device for simulating flight fan noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homyak, L.; Mcardle, J. G.; Heidelberg, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    Inflow control device (ICD's) of various shapes and sizes have been used to simulate inflight fan tone noise during ground static tests. A small, simple inexpensive ICD design was optimized from previous design and fabrication techniques. This compact two-fan-diameter ICD exhibits satisfactory acoustic performance characteristics without causing noise attenuation or redirection. In addition, it generates no important new noise sources. Design and construction details of the compact ICD are discussed and acoustic performance test results are presented.

  4. Highly tunable local gate controlled complementary graphene device performing as inverter and voltage controlled resistor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wonjae; Riikonen, Juha; Li, Changfeng; Chen, Ya; Lipsanen, Harri

    2013-10-04

    Using single-layer CVD graphene, a complementary field effect transistor (FET) device is fabricated on the top of separated back-gates. The local back-gate control of the transistors, which operate with low bias at room temperature, enables highly tunable device characteristics due to separate control over electrostatic doping of the channels. Local back-gating allows control of the doping level independently of the supply voltage, which enables device operation with very low VDD. Controllable characteristics also allow the compensation of variation in the unintentional doping typically observed in CVD graphene. Moreover, both p-n and n-p configurations of FETs can be achieved by electrostatic doping using the local back-gate. Therefore, the device operation can also be switched from inverter to voltage controlled resistor, opening new possibilities in using graphene in logic circuitry.

  5. 40 CFR 63.943 - Standards-Surface impoundment vented to control device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the cover not vented to the control device shall be equipped with a closure device. If the pressure in the vapor headspace underneath the cover is less than atmospheric pressure when the control device is... headspace underneath the cover is equal to or greater than atmospheric pressure when the control device...

  6. 40 CFR 63.943 - Standards-Surface impoundment vented to control device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the cover not vented to the control device shall be equipped with a closure device. If the pressure in the vapor headspace underneath the cover is less than atmospheric pressure when the control device is... headspace underneath the cover is equal to or greater than atmospheric pressure when the control device...

  7. 40 CFR 63.943 - Standards-Surface impoundment vented to control device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the cover not vented to the control device shall be equipped with a closure device. If the pressure in the vapor headspace underneath the cover is less than atmospheric pressure when the control device is... headspace underneath the cover is equal to or greater than atmospheric pressure when the control device...

  8. 40 CFR 63.943 - Standards-Surface impoundment vented to control device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the cover not vented to the control device shall be equipped with a closure device. If the pressure in the vapor headspace underneath the cover is less than atmospheric pressure when the control device is... headspace underneath the cover is equal to or greater than atmospheric pressure when the control device...

  9. 40 CFR 63.943 - Standards-Surface impoundment vented to control device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the cover not vented to the control device shall be equipped with a closure device. If the pressure in the vapor headspace underneath the cover is less than atmospheric pressure when the control device is... headspace underneath the cover is equal to or greater than atmospheric pressure when the control device...

  10. Temperature-Controlled Continuous Cold Flow Device after Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Randomized Controlled Trial Study.

    PubMed

    Ruffilli, Alberto; Castagnini, Francesco; Traina, Francesco; Corneti, Isabella; Fenga, Domenico; Giannini, Sandro; Faldini, Cesare

    2016-11-30

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a widely accepted and successful procedure for end-stage arthritis. Nevertheless, fast-track may be compromised by many factors, such as pain, edema, and blood loss. Cryotherapy has been advocated as a safe and effective strategy to improve the postoperative results, acting on pain, edema, and blood loss. This study is a prospective randomized controlled study, involving 50 patients after primary TKA. A power analysis was performed preoperatively. Twenty-four patients were addressed to a postoperative treatment with a continuous cold flow device (Hilotherm, Hilotherm GmbH, Germany). Twenty-six patients represented the control group, treated with crushed ice packs. All the patients shared the same analgesic strategy and the same rehabilitation protocol. Pain, analgesic consumption, active knee range of motion, drain output, transfusion requirement, and total blood loss were evaluated at different follow-ups (postoperative first, third, and seventh days). The two groups were homogenous for preoperative and intraoperative features. The groups showed no statistically significant differences in all the evaluated parameters. A modest reduction of knee volume was evident after 7 days from surgery (trend). No differences in blood loss were noticed. Continuous cold flow device in the acute postoperative setting after TKA did not show superiority in reducing edema, pain, and blood loss, compared with traditional icing regimen. Thus, due to the costs, it should be reserved to selected cases.

  11. Evaluation of volitional control of hand with vertical force assist device for high tetraplegia.

    PubMed

    Solanki, Swarna; Kirsch, Robert F

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with high tetraplegia have lost motor and sensory function below the neck. This population is highly disabled and requires some method of assistance to accomplish activities of daily living. To date, rehabilitative interventions available in the clinic are limited and have not been designed to exploit residual volitional control. The goal of this study was to validate the presence of volitional control at the hand in individuals with high tetraplegia when the arm is supported against gravity with a vertical assist device. Any volitional control is pertinent to the development of rehabilitative interventions for high tetraplegia because it can be utilized to improve the overall performance and user acceptance of the device. The results from this study provide evidence toward the possibility of an individual with high tetraplegia being able to position their hand and generate forces volitionally in a functional workspace if the weight of their arm is supported by a vertical assist device.

  12. Respiratory protective device design using control system techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, W. A.; Yankovich, D.

    1972-01-01

    The feasibility of a control system analysis approach to provide a design base for respiratory protective devices is considered. A system design approach requires that all functions and components of the system be mathematically identified in a model of the RPD. The mathematical notations describe the operation of the components as closely as possible. The individual component mathematical descriptions are then combined to describe the complete RPD. Finally, analysis of the mathematical notation by control system theory is used to derive compensating component values that force the system to operate in a stable and predictable manner.

  13. Optimal fine pointing control of a large space telescope using an Annular Momentum Control Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadkarni, A. A.; Joshi, S. M.; Groom, N. J.

    1977-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of an Annular Momentum Control Device (AMCD) to fine pointing control of a large space telescope (LST). The AMCD represents a new development in the field of momentum storage devices. A linearized mathematical model is developed for the AMCD/LST system, including the magnetic suspension actuators. Two approaches to control system design are considered. The first approach uses a stochastic linear-quadratic Gaussian controller which utilizes feedback of all states. The second approach considers a more practical control system design in which the axial and radial loops are designed independently.

  14. Design of a continuous passive and active motion device for hand rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Birch, B; Haslam, E; Heerah, I; Dechev, N; Park, E J

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a novel, portable device for hand rehabilitation. The device provides for CPM (continuous passive motion) and CAM (continuous active motion) hand rehabilitation for patients recovering from damage such as flexor tendon repair and strokes. The device is capable of flexing/extending the MCP (metacarpophalangeal) and PIP (proximal interphalangeal) joints through a range of motion of 0 degrees to 90 degrees for both the joints independently. In this way, typical hand rehabilitation motions such as intrinsic plus, intrinsic minus, and a fist can be achieved without the need of any splints or attachments. The CPM mode is broken into two subgroups. The first mode is the use of preset waypoints for the device to cycle through. The second mode involves motion from a starting position to a final position, but senses the torque from the user during the cycle. Therefore the user can control the ROM by resisting when they are at the end of the desired motion. During the CPM modes the device utilizes a minimum jerk trajectory model under PD control, moving smoothly and accurately between preselected positions. CAM is the final mode where the device will actively resist the movement of the user. The user moves from a start to end position while the device produces a torque to resist the motion. This active resistance motion is a unique ability designed to mimic the benefits of a human therapist. Another unique feature of the device is its ability to independently act on both the MCP and PIP joints. The feedback sensing built into the device makes it capable of offering a wide and flexible range of rehabilitation programs for the hand.

  15. Control device for clutch and transmission in vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Miyazawa, T.; Sueshige, H.; Niikawa, Y.; Shimokawa, M.

    1986-09-09

    A control device is described for a clutch and a transmission in a vehicle, comprising: (a) a clutch including a release lever and a clutch spring, and disconnectable by the release lever; (b) a transmission including a plurality of gears for changing the speed of the vehicle and a shifter for selecting one of the gears at a time for operation; (c) a substantially single control lever angularly moveable about at least one shaft for actuating the clutch and the transmission; (d) a first link mechanism for transmitting angular movement of the control lever to the release lever of the clutch; (e) a second link mechanism for transmitting angular movement of the control lever to the shifter of the transmission; (f) a damper for imposing a dampening force during engagement of the clutch, the damper is a hydraulic damper connected to the second link mechanism.

  16. Laser-activated shape memory polymer intravascular thrombectomy device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, Ward, IV; Wilson, Thomas S.; Benett, William J.; Loge, Jeffrey M.; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2005-10-01

    A blood clot (thrombus) that becomes lodged in the arterial network supplying the brain can cause an ischemic stroke, depriving the brain of oxygen and often resulting in permanent disability. As an alternative to conventional clot-dissolving drug treatment, we are developing an intravascular laser-activated therapeutic device using shape memory polymer (SMP) to mechanically retrieve the thrombus and restore blood flow to the brain. Thermal imaging and computer simulation were used to characterize the optical and photothermal behavior of the SMP microactuator. Deployment of the SMP device in an in vitro thrombotic vascular occlusion model demonstrated the clinical treatment concept.

  17. Microfluidic devices for the controlled manipulation of small volumes

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, Michael J; Jacobson, Stephen C

    2012-09-18

    A method for conducting a broad range of biochemical analyses or manipulations on a series of nano- to subnanoliter reaction volumes and an apparatus for carrying out the same are disclosed. The invention is implemented on a fluidic microchip to provide high serial throughput. In particular, the disclosed device is a microfabricated channel device that can manipulate nanoliter or subnanoliter reaction volumes in a controlled manner to produce results at rates of 1 to 10 Hz per channel. The reaction volumes are manipulated in serial fashion analogous to a digital shift register. The invention has application to such problems as screening molecular or cellular targets using single beads from split-synthesis combinatorial libraries, screening single cells for RNA or protein expression, genetic diagnostic screening at the single cell level, or performing single cell signal transduction studies.

  18. Microfluidic devices for the controlled manipulation of small volumes

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, J Michael [Knoxville, TN; Jacobson, Stephen C [Knoxville, TN

    2007-07-03

    A method for conducting a broad range of biochemical analyses or manipulations on a series of nano- to subnanoliter reaction volumes and an apparatus for carrying out the same are disclosed. The invention is implemented on a fluidic microchip to provide high serial throughput. In particular, the disclosed device is a microfabricated channel device that can manipulate nanoliter or subnanoliter reaction volumes in a controlled manner to produce results at rates of 1 to 10 Hz per channel. The reaction volumes are manipulated in serial fashion analogous to a digital shift register. The invention has application to such problems as screening molecular or cellular targets using single beads from split-synthesis combinatorial libraries, screening single cells for RNA or protein expression, genetic diagnostic screening at the single cell level, or performing single cell signal transduction studies.

  19. Microfluidic Device for Studying Controllable Hydrodynamic Flow Induced Cellular Responses.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chunhong; Zhang, Xiannian; Li, Chunmei; Pang, Yuhong; Huang, Yanyi

    2017-03-07

    Hydrodynamic flow is an essential stimulus in many cellular functions, regulating many mechanical sensitive pathways and closely associating with human health status and diseases. The flow pattern of blood in vessels is the key factor in causing atherosclerosis. Hemodynamics has great effect on endothelial cells' gene expression and biological functions. There are various tools that can be used for studying flow-induced cellular responses but most of them are either bulky or lack precise controllability. We develop an integrated microfluidic device that can precisely generate different flow patterns to human endothelial cells cultured on-chip. We monitored cell morphology and used small-input RNA-seq technology to depict the transcriptome profiles of human umbilical vein endothelial cells under uni- or bidirectional flow. Such integrated and miniatured device has greatly facilitated our understanding of endothelial functions with shear stimulus, not only providing new data on the transcriptomic scale but also building the connection between cell phenotypic changes and expression alternations.

  20. Method and device for controlling plume during laser welding

    DOEpatents

    Fuerschbach, Phillip W.; Jellison, James L.; Keicher, David M.; Oberkampf, William L.

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus for enhancing the weldment of a laser welding system is provided. The laser weld plume control device includes a cylindrical body defining an upside-down cone cavity; the upper surface of the body circumscribes the base of the cone cavity, and the vertex of the cone cavity forms an orifice concentrically located with respect to the laser beam and the plume which forms as a result of the welding operation. According to the method of the invention, gas is directed radially inward through inlets in the upper surface of the body into and through channels in the wall of the body and finally through the orifice of the body, and downward onto the surface of the weldment. The gas flow is then converted by the orifice of the device from radial flow to an axisymmetric gas jet flowing away from the weldment surface in a direction perpendicular to the surface and opposite to that of the laser.

  1. An Autonomous and Controllable Light-Driven DNA Walking Device

    PubMed Central

    You, Mingxu; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Xiaobing; Liu, Haipeng; Wang, Ruowen; Wang, Kelong; Williams, Kathryn R.; Tan, Weihong

    2013-01-01

    The development of nanotechnology has been largely inspired by the biological world. The complex, but well-organized, living system hosts an array of molecular-sized machines responsible for information processing, structure building and, sometimes, movement. We present here a novel light-powered DNA mechanical device, which is reminiscent of cellular protein motors in nature, especially those of green plants. This walking device, which is based on pyrene- assisted photolysis of disulfide bonds, is capable of autonomous locomotion, with light control of initiation, termination and velocity. Based on DNA sequence design and such physical conditions as temperature and ionic strength, this photon-fueled DNA walker exhibits the type of operational freedom and mechanical speed that may rival protein motors in the future. PMID:22298502

  2. Complement activation by candidate biomaterials of an implantable microfabricated medical device.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Andrey; Hellerud, Bernt C; Pharo, Anne; Johannessen, Erik A; Mollnes, Tom E

    2011-08-01

    Implantable devices realized by microfabrication have introduced a new class of potential biomaterials whose properties would need to be assessed. Such devices include sensors for measuring biological substances like glucose. Thus, 14 different candidate materials intended for design of such a device were investigated with respect to their complement activation potential in human serum. The fluid-phase activation was measured by the products C4d, Bb, C3bc, and the terminal complement complex (TCC), whereas solid-phase activation was measured by deposition of TCC on the material surfaces. No fluid-phase activation was found for materials related to the capsule, carrier, or sealing. Fluid-phase activation was, however, triggered to a various extent in three of the four nanoporous membranes (cellulose, polyamide, and aluminium oxide), whereas polycarbonate was rendered inactive. Solid-phase activation discriminated more sensitively between all the materials, revealing that the capsule candidate polydimethylsiloxane and sealing candidate silicone 3140 were highly compatible, showing significantly lower TCC deposition than the negative control (p < 0.01). Three of the candidate materials were indifferent, whereas the remaining nine showed significantly higher deposition of TCC than the negative control (p < 0.01). In conclusion, complement activation, in particular when examined on the solid phase, discriminated well between the different candidate materials tested and could be used as a guide for the selection of the best-suited materials for further investigation and development of the device.

  3. Magnetic Control of Locked Modes in Present Devices and ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, F. A.; Sabbagh, S.; Sweeney, R.; Hender, T.; Kirk, A.; La Haye, R. J.; Strait, E. J.; Ding, Y. H.; Rao, B.; Fietz, S.; Maraschek, M.; Frassinetti, L.; in, Y.; Jeon, Y.; Sakakihara, S.

    2014-10-01

    The toroidal phase of non-rotating (``locked'') neoclassical tearing modes was controlled in several devices by means of applied magnetic perturbations. Evidence is presented from various tokamaks (ASDEX Upgrade, DIII-D, JET, J-TEXT, KSTAR), spherical tori (MAST, NSTX) and a reversed field pinch (EXTRAP-T2R). Furthermore, the phase of interchange modes was controlled in the LHD helical device. These results share a common interpretation in terms of torques acting on the mode. Based on this interpretation, it is predicted that control-coil currents will be sufficient to control the phase of locking in ITER. This will be possible both with the internal coils and with the external error-field-correction coils, and might have promising consequences for disruption avoidance (by aiding the electron cyclotron current drive stabilization of locked modes), as well as for spatially distributing heat loads during disruptions. This work was supported in part by the US Department of Energy under DE-SC0008520, DE-FC-02-04ER54698 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  4. Optimizing the response from a passively controlled biventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Gaddum, Nicholas Richard; Timms, Daniel L; Pearcy, Mark John

    2010-05-01

    Recent studies into rotary biventricular support have indicated that inadequate left/right flow balancing may lead to vascular congestion and/or ventricular suckdown. The implementation of a passive controller that automatically adjusts left/right flow during total and partial cardiac support would improve physiological interaction. This has encouraged the development of a biventricular assist device (BiVAD) prototype that achieves passive control of the two rotary pumps' hydraulic output by way of a nonrotating double pressure plate configuration, the hub, suspended between the ventricular assist device (VAD) impellers. Fluctuations in either the VAD's inlet or outlet pressure will cause the hub to translate, and in doing so, affect each pump's hydraulic outputs. In order to achieve partial support, the floating assembly needed to respond to pathologic blood pressure signals while being insensitive to residual ventricular function. An incorporated mechanical spring-mass-damper assembly affects the passive response to optimize the dynamic interaction between the prototype and the supported cardiovascular system. It was found that increasing the damping from a medium to a high level was effective in filtering out the higher frequency ventricular pressure signals, reducing a modified amplitude ratio by up to 72%. A spring response was also identified as being inherent in the passive response and was characterized as being highly nonlinear at the extremes of the floating assembly's translation range. The results from this study introduce a new means of BiVAD control as well as the characterization of a fully passive mechanical physiological controller.

  5. Modeling of power control schemes in induction cooking devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beato, Alessio; Conti, Massimo; Turchetti, Claudio; Orcioni, Simone

    2005-06-01

    In recent years, with remarkable advancements of power semiconductor devices and electronic control systems, it becomes possible to apply the induction heating technique for domestic use. In order to achieve the supply power required by these devices, high-frequency resonant inverters are used: the force commutated, half-bridge series resonant converter is well suited for induction cooking since it offers an appropriate balance between complexity and performances. Power control is a key issue to attain efficient and reliable products. This paper describes and compares four power control schemes applied to the half-bridge series resonant inverter. The pulse frequency modulation is the most common control scheme: according to this strategy, the output power is regulated by varying the switching frequency of the inverter circuit. Other considered methods, originally developed for induction heating industrial applications, are: pulse amplitude modulation, asymmetrical duty cycle and pulse density modulation which are respectively based on variation of the amplitude of the input supply voltage, on variation of the duty cycle of the switching signals and on variation of the number of switching pulses. Each description is provided with a detailed mathematical analysis; an analytical model, built to simulate the circuit topology, is implemented in the Matlab environment in order to obtain the steady-state values and waveforms of currents and voltages. For purposes of this study, switches and all reactive components are modelled as ideal and the "heating-coil/pan" system is represented by an equivalent circuit made up of a series connected resistance and inductance.

  6. Electric Field Control of Ferromagnetism and Magnetic Devices Using Multiferroics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, John Thomas

    This dissertation presents a study of a heterostructure composed of room temperature magnetoelectric multiferroic BiFeO3 and ferromagnetic Co.90Fe.10, with specific interest in understanding the interfacial coupling mechanisms in this system and establishing the electric field control of a magnetization and spintronic devices. The field of spintronics has been plagued with the problem of a large energy dissipation as a consequence of the resistive losses that come during the writing of the magnetic state (i.e. reversing the magnetization direction). The primary aim of the work presented here is to investigate and understand a novel heterostructure and materials interface that can be demonstrated as a pathway to low energy spintronics. In this dissertation, I will address the specific aspects of multiferroicity, magnetoelectricity, and interface coupling that must be addressed in order to reverse a magnetization with an electric field. Furthermore, I will demonstrate the reversal of a magnetization with an electric field in single and multilayer magnetic devices. The primary advances made as a result of the work described herein are the use of epitaxial constraints to control the nanoscale domain structure of a multiferroic which is then correlated to the domain structure of the exchange coupled ferromagnet. Additionally, the magnetization direction of the ferromagnetic layer is controlled with only an applied electric field at both macroscopic and microscopic scales. Lastly, using this electric field control of ferromagnetism, the first demonstration of a magnetoelectric memory bit is presented.

  7. Performance of sanitary sewer collection system odour control devices operating in diverse conditions.

    PubMed

    Camarillo, Mary Kay; Stringfellow, William T; Hanlon, Jeremy S; Basha, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Controlling odours from sanitary sewer systems is challenging as a result of the expansive nature of these systems. Addition of oxidizing chemicals is often practiced as a mitigation strategy. One alternative is to remove odorous compounds in the gases vented from manholes using adsorptive media. In this study, odour control devices located at manholes were observed to determine the ability of these systems to reduce hydrogen sulphide from vented gases. The odour control devices incorporated pressure regulation to control gas flow out of manhole covers and adsorptive media to remove hydrogen sulphide in the vented gases prior to release. Pressure regulation was accomplished using a variable volume bladder and two pressure relief valves that permitted gas flow when pressures exceeded 1.3 to 2.5 cm water column. The reduction in gas flow vented from manholes was intended to extend the service life of the adsorptive media, as compared with odour control devices that do not incorporate pressure modulation. Devices were deployed at four locations and three adsorptive media were tested. Although measured collection system hydrogen sulphide concentrations varied from zero to over 1,000 ppm, the removal rates observed using odour control devices were typically above 90%. The lower removal rates observed at one of the sites (50.5 ± 36.1%) appeared related to high gas flow rates being emitted at this location. Activated carbon was used in most of the tests, although use of iron media resulted in the highest removal observed: 97.8 ± 3.6%. The expected service life of the adsorptive media contained within the odour control devices is a function of site-specific hydrogen sulphide concentrations and gas flow rates. The units used in this study were in service for more than 8 to 12 months prior to requiring media replacement.

  8. Active control of convection

    SciTech Connect

    Bau, H.H.

    1995-12-31

    Using stability theory, numerical simulations, and in some instances experiments, it is demonstrated that the critical Rayleigh number for the bifurcation (1) from the no-motion (conduction) state to the motion state and (2) from time-independent convection to time-dependent, oscillatory convection in the thermal convection loop and Rayleigh-Benard problems can be significantly increased or decreased. This is accomplished through the use of a feedback controller effectuating small perturbations in the boundary data. The controller consists of sensors which detect deviations in the fluid`s temperature from the motionless, conductive values and then direct actuators to respond to these deviations in such a way as to suppress the naturally occurring flow instabilities. Actuators which modify the boundary`s temperature/heat flux are considered. The feedback controller can also be used to control flow patterns and generate complex dynamic behavior at relatively low Rayleigh numbers.

  9. 40 CFR 65.158 - Performance test procedures for control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... performance test of a control device or a halogen reduction device, an owner or operator shall comply with the... halogen reduction device at maximum or minimum representative operating conditions for monitored control or halogen reduction device parameters, whichever results in lower emission reduction....

  10. 40 CFR 65.158 - Performance test procedures for control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... performance test of a control device or a halogen reduction device, an owner or operator shall comply with the... halogen reduction device at maximum or minimum representative operating conditions for monitored control or halogen reduction device parameters, whichever results in lower emission reduction....

  11. 40 CFR 63.139 - Process wastewater provisions-control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Process wastewater provisions-control... Manufacturing Industry for Process Vents, Storage Vessels, Transfer Operations, and Wastewater § 63.139 Process wastewater provisions—control devices. (a) For each control device or combination of control devices used...

  12. 40 CFR 63.139 - Process wastewater provisions-control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Process wastewater provisions-control... Manufacturing Industry for Process Vents, Storage Vessels, Transfer Operations, and Wastewater § 63.139 Process wastewater provisions—control devices. (a) For each control device or combination of control devices used...

  13. 40 CFR 63.139 - Process wastewater provisions-control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Process wastewater provisions-control... Manufacturing Industry for Process Vents, Storage Vessels, Transfer Operations, and Wastewater § 63.139 Process wastewater provisions—control devices. (a) For each control device or combination of control devices used...

  14. Microfluidic devices for the controlled manipulation of small volumes

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, J Michael [Knoxville, TN; Jacobson, Stephen C [Knoxville, TN

    2003-02-25

    A method for conducting a broad range of biochemical analyses or manipulations on a series of nano- to subnanoliter reaction volumes and an apparatus for carrying out the same are disclosed. The method and apparatus are implemented on a fluidic microchip to provide high serial throughput. The method and device of the invention also lend themselves to multiple parallel analyses and manipulation to provide greater throughput for the generation of biochemical information. In particular, the disclosed device is a microfabricated channel device that can manipulate nanoliter or subnanoliter biochemical reaction volumes in a controlled manner to produce results at rates of 1 to 10 Hz per channel. The individual reaction volumes are manipulated in serial fashion analogous to a digital shift register. The method and apparatus according to this invention have application to such problems as screening molecular or cellular targets using single beads from split-synthesis combinatorial libraries, screening single cells for RNA or protein expression, genetic diagnostic screening at the single cell level, or performing single cell signal transduction studies.

  15. Modeling and Control of the Automated Radiator Inspection Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Darren

    1991-01-01

    Many of the operations performed at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) are dangerous and repetitive tasks which make them ideal candidates for robotic applications. For one specific application, KSC is currently in the process of designing and constructing a robot called the Automated Radiator Inspection Device (ARID), to inspect the radiator panels on the orbiter. The following aspects of the ARID project are discussed: modeling of the ARID; design of control algorithms; and nonlinear based simulation of the ARID. Recommendations to assist KSC personnel in the successful completion of the ARID project are given.

  16. Methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullis, W. M. (Editor)

    1971-01-01

    The development of methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices is discussed. The following subjects are also presented: (1) demonstration of the high sensitivity of the infrared response technique by the identification of gold in a germanium diode, (2) verification that transient thermal response is significantly more sensitive to the presence of voids in die attachment than steady-state thermal resistance, and (3) development of equipment for determining susceptibility of transistors to hot spot formation by the current-gain technique.

  17. Variable control of neutron albedo in toroidal fusion devices

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, Daniel L.; Micklich, Bradley J.

    1986-01-01

    An arrangement is provided for controlling neutron albedo in toroidal fusion devices having inboard and outboard vacuum vessel walls for containment of the neutrons of a fusion plasma. Neutron albedo material is disposed immediately adjacent the inboard wall, and is movable, preferably in vertical directions, so as to be brought into and out of neutron modifying communication with the fusion neutrons. Neutron albedo material preferably comprises a liquid form, but may also take pebble, stringer and curtain-like forms. A neutron flux valve, rotatable about a vertical axis is also disclosed.

  18. Device and software used to carry out Cyclic Neutron Activation Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-García, M. P.; Rey-Ronco, M. A.; Alonso-Sánchez, T.

    2014-11-01

    This paper discusses the device and software used to carry out Cyclic Neutron Activation Analysis (CNAA). The aim of this investigation is defining through this device the fluorite content present on different samples from fluorspar concentration plant through the DGNAA (Delayed Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis) method. This device is made of americium-beryllium neutron source, NaI (2"×2") and BGO (2"×2") gamma rays detectors, multichannel and an automatic mechanism which moves the samples from activation and reading position. This mechanism is controlled by a software which allows moving the samples precisely and in a safe way (~ms), which it is very useful when the radioactive isotopes have to be detected with a half time less than 8s.

  19. Nanoscale architectural tuning of parylene patch devices to control therapeutic release rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierstorff, Erik; Lam, Robert; Ho, Dean

    2008-11-01

    The advent of therapeutic functionalized implant coatings has significantly impacted the medical device field by enabling prolonged device functionality for enhanced patient treatment. Incorporation of drug release from a stable, biocompatible surface is instrumental in decreasing systemic application of toxic therapeutics and increasing the lifespan of implants by the incorporation of antibiotics and anti-inflammatories. In this study, we have developed a parylene C-based device for controlled release of Doxorubicin, an anti-cancer chemotherapy and definitive read-out for preserved drug functionality, and further characterized the parylene deposition condition-dependent tunability of drug release. Drug release is controlled by the deposition of a layer of 20-200 nm thick parylene over the drug layer. This places a porous layer above the Doxorubicin, limiting drug elution based on drug accessibility to solvent and the solvent used. An increase in the thickness of the porous top layer prolongs the elution of active drug from the device from, in the conditions tested, the order of 10 min to the order of 2 d in water and from the order of 10 min to no elution in PBS. Thus, the controlled release of an anti-cancer therapeutic has been achieved via scalably fabricated, parylene C-encapsulated drug delivery devices.

  20. Active weld control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Bradley W.; Burroughs, Ivan A.

    1994-01-01

    Through the two phases of this contract, sensors for welding applications and parameter extraction algorithms have been developed. These sensors form the foundation of a weld control system which can provide action weld control through the monitoring of the weld pool and keyhole in a VPPA welding process. Systems of this type offer the potential of quality enhancement and cost reduction (minimization of rework on faulty welds) for high-integrity welding applications. Sensors for preweld and postweld inspection, weld pool monitoring, keyhole/weld wire entry monitoring, and seam tracking were developed. Algorithms for signal extraction were also developed and analyzed to determine their application to an adaptive weld control system. The following sections discuss findings for each of the three sensors developed under this contract: (1) weld profiling sensor; (2) weld pool sensor; and (3) stereo seam tracker/keyhole imaging sensor. Hardened versions of these sensors were designed and built under this contract. A control system, described later, was developed on a multiprocessing/multitasking operating system for maximum power and flexibility. Documentation for sensor mechanical and electrical design is also included as appendices in this report.

  1. Applications of magnetorheological brakes in manual control of lifting devices and manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chciuk, M.; Milecki, A.; Myszkowski, A.

    2009-02-01

    The article is aimed to design and testing of joystick with force feedback used in direct, human control of lifting device. The paper starts with the basic description of designed and tested by us MR rotary brake. Some initial laboratory investigations results of such brakes are presented. The usage of MR brakes in 2 axis joystick is proposed. Such, built by as joystick, is described. It was used as Human-Machine Interface in active control of lifting device. The designed and built 2 axis manipulator with electrohydraulic drive is described. In the paper, the based on PC with input/output card, control system of mentioned above joystick with MR brake and manipulator is described. Finally the control algorithm is proposed.

  2. 77 FR 8900 - Certain Vaginal Ring Birth Control Devices; Termination of the Investigation Based on Withdrawal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Vaginal Ring Birth Control Devices; Termination of the Investigation Based on Withdrawal... within the United States after importation of certain vaginal birth control devices by reason...

  3. Use of piezoelectric devices to control snowboard vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchini, Emanuele; Spangler, Ronald L., Jr.; Andrus, Cameron

    1998-07-01

    This paper explains how piezoelectric devices can be used to control vibrations in a snowboard. Furthermore the details of the approach, testing, design and analysis of a piezoelectric damper applied to a production snowboard are described here. The approach consisted of determining the principal modes of vibration of a snowboard during its operation (on-slope). This information was used to develop a finite element model of the structure. The finite element model was used to find the areas of higher strain energy where a piezoelectric device could be applied and be effective in reducing undesired vibrations. Several prototype piezoelectric dampers were built, applied to snowboards and tested on snow. The proper amount of damping was selected by the test riders, so that a configuration could be selected for production of the 1998 K2 Electra snowboard. The piezoelectric damper selected reduced the snowboard vibration by 75% at the mode to which it was tuned, allowing for a smoother ride and a more precise control of the snowboard in any kind of snow condition.

  4. Sand control devices and method of installation thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, L.M.

    1987-10-20

    A jet shoe adapted for connection to a lower end of a sand control device to allow for ejection of a working fluid through the bottom of the shoe for setting the sand control device in a fluid bearing formation at substantially the same elevational location as the fluid bearing formation is described. The jet shoe comprises a body formed with an internal cavity housing a check valve permitting the downward flow of working fluid into the cavity while restricting any upward flow of working fluid from the cavity; and means for connecting the jet shoe to a source of working fluid. The body is further formed with a downwardly extending passage in communication with the cavity to direct working fluid in a downward direction from the shoe. The body further includes an upwardly extending passage in communication with the cavity to direct part of the working fluid out of the bottom of the shoe in an upward direction, wherein a bottom of the cavity is formed with a generally conical surface.. The inlet port of the downwardly extending passage is formed in the conical surface proximate the apex thereof. The inlet port of the upwardly extending passage is formed at the intersection of the conical surface with the cylindrical side wall.

  5. A portable device for temperature control along microchannels.

    PubMed

    Vigolo, Daniele; Rusconi, Roberto; Piazza, Roberto; Stone, Howard A

    2010-03-21

    For many physical, chemical and biological measurements, temperature is a crucial parameter to control. In particular, the recent development of microreactors and chip-based technologies requires integrated thermostatic systems. However, the requirements of disposability and visual inspection of a device under a microscope cannot accommodate equipment such as external heaters. By exploiting a silver-filled epoxy that can be injected and solidified in a microfluidic chip, we demonstrate a simple and inexpensive design of a conductive path, which allows heating by the Joule effect of both sides of a microchannel. In addition to permitting the maintenance of a constant temperature along the channel walls, our method can control the temperature gradient across the channel, thus enabling non-equilibrium studies in a microfluidic geometry.

  6. 76 FR 55394 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Medical Devices...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... Collection; Comment Request; Medical Devices: Humanitarian Use Devices AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration... of information technology. Medical Devices: Humanitarian Use Devices--21 CFR Part 814 (OMB Control... to grant HUD designation of a medical device; (2) exempt an HUD from the effectiveness...

  7. Surface EMG and intra-socket force measurement to control a prosthetic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, Joe; Patterson, Rita; Popa, Dan

    2015-06-01

    Surface electromyography (SEMG) has been shown to be a robust and reliable interaction method allowing for basic control of powered prosthetic devices. Research has shown a marked decrease in EMG-classification efficiency throughout activities of daily life due to socket shift and movement and fatigue as well as changes in degree of fit of the socket throughout the subject's lifetime. Users with the most severe levels of amputation require the most complex devices with the greatest number of degrees of freedom. Controlling complex dexterous devices with limited available inputs requires the addition of sensing and interaction modalities. However, the larger the amputation severity, the fewer viable SEMG sites are available as control inputs. Previous work reported the use of intra-socket pressure, as measured during wrist flexion and extension, and has shown that it is possible to control a powered prosthetic device with pressure sensors. In this paper, we present data correlations of SEMG data with intra-socket pressure data. Surface EMG sensors and force sensors were housed within a simulated prosthetic cuff fit to a healthy-limbed subject. EMG and intra-socket force data was collected from inside the cuff as a subject performed pre-defined grip motions with their dominant hand. Data fusion algorithms were explored and allowed a subject to use both intra-socket pressure and SEMG data as control inputs for a powered prosthetic device. This additional input modality allows for an improvement in input classification as well as information regarding socket fit through out activities of daily life.

  8. Frank-starling control of a left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Michael Charles; Gaddum, Nicholas Richard; Pearcy, Mark; Salamonsen, Robert F; Timms, Daniel Lee; Mason, David Glen; Fraser, John F

    2011-01-01

    A physiological control system was developed for a rotary left ventricular assist device (LVAD) in which the target pump flow rate (LVADQ) was set as a function of left atrial pressure (LAP), mimicking the Frank-Starling mechanism. The control strategy was implemented using linear PID control and was evaluated in a pulsatile mock circulation loop using a prototyped centrifugal pump by varying pulmonary vascular resistance to alter venous return. The control strategy automatically varied pump speed (2460 to 1740 to 2700 RPM) in response to a decrease and subsequent increase in venous return. In contrast, a fixed-speed pump caused a simulated ventricular suction event during low venous return and higher ventricular volumes during high venous return. The preload sensitivity was increased from 0.011 L/min/mmHg in fixed speed mode to 0.47L/min/mmHg, a value similar to that of the native healthy heart. The sensitivity varied automatically to maintain the LAP and LVADQ within a predefined zone. This control strategy requires the implantation of a pressure sensor in the left atrium and a flow sensor around the outflow cannula of the LVAD. However, appropriate pressure sensor technology is not yet commercially available and so an alternative measure of preload such as pulsatility of pump signals should be investigated.

  9. 40 CFR 65.146 - Nonflare control devices used for equipment leaks only.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nonflare control devices used for... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Closed Vent Systems, Control Devices, and Routing to a Fuel Gas System or a Process § 65.146 Nonflare control devices used for equipment leaks...

  10. 23 CFR 630.1110 - Maintenance of temporary traffic control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... traffic control devices, each agency shall develop and implement quality guidelines to help maintain the quality and adequacy of the temporary traffic control devices for the duration of the project. Agencies... Association's (ATSSA) Quality Guidelines for Work Zone Traffic Control Devices uses photos and...

  11. 23 CFR 630.1110 - Maintenance of temporary traffic control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Maintenance of temporary traffic control devices. 630... AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS PRECONSTRUCTION PROCEDURES Temporary Traffic Control Devices § 630.1110 Maintenance of temporary traffic control devices. To provide for the continued effectiveness of...

  12. 23 CFR 630.1110 - Maintenance of temporary traffic control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Maintenance of temporary traffic control devices. 630... AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS PRECONSTRUCTION PROCEDURES Temporary Traffic Control Devices § 630.1110 Maintenance of temporary traffic control devices. To provide for the continued effectiveness of...

  13. 23 CFR 630.1110 - Maintenance of temporary traffic control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Maintenance of temporary traffic control devices. 630... AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS PRECONSTRUCTION PROCEDURES Temporary Traffic Control Devices § 630.1110 Maintenance of temporary traffic control devices. To provide for the continued effectiveness of...

  14. 23 CFR 630.1110 - Maintenance of temporary traffic control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Maintenance of temporary traffic control devices. 630... AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS PRECONSTRUCTION PROCEDURES Temporary Traffic Control Devices § 630.1110 Maintenance of temporary traffic control devices. To provide for the continued effectiveness of...

  15. 40 CFR 1700.14 - Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD) Performance Standards. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD... DISCHARGE STANDARDS FOR VESSELS OF THE ARMED FORCES Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD) Performance Standards § 1700.14 Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD) Performance Standards....

  16. 40 CFR 1700.14 - Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD) Performance Standards. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD... DISCHARGE STANDARDS FOR VESSELS OF THE ARMED FORCES Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD) Performance Standards § 1700.14 Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD) Performance Standards....

  17. 40 CFR 1700.14 - Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD) Performance Standards. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD... UNIFORM NATIONAL DISCHARGE STANDARDS FOR VESSELS OF THE ARMED FORCES Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD) Performance Standards § 1700.14 Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD) Performance Standards. [Reserved]...

  18. 40 CFR 1700.14 - Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD) Performance Standards. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD... DISCHARGE STANDARDS FOR VESSELS OF THE ARMED FORCES Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD) Performance Standards § 1700.14 Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD) Performance Standards....

  19. 40 CFR 1700.14 - Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD) Performance Standards. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD... DISCHARGE STANDARDS FOR VESSELS OF THE ARMED FORCES Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD) Performance Standards § 1700.14 Marine Pollution Control Device (MPCD) Performance Standards....

  20. A microfluidic paper-based device to assess acetylcholinesterase activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunye; Gomez, Frank A

    2017-04-01

    Neurotransmitters play key roles in cell-to-cell communication. These chemical messengers are involved in many functional processes, including growth, reproduction, memory, and behavior. In this communication, we describe a novel microfluidic paper-based analytical device (μPAD) to detect acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and inhibitor screening through a colorimetric analysis. The μPAD is easily fabricated via a wax printing process whereby wax is deposited onto the surface of chromatographic paper, and heated to create a hydrophobic barrier. Separate solutions of 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) and samples containing AChE and acetylthiocholine iodide (ATC) (or cysteine, Cys), respectively, are directly spotted onto the μPAD. DTNB and AChE/ATC (or Cys) flow towards each other where a reaction occurs to form the yellow colored 2-nitro-5-thiobenzoic acid anion (TNB(2-) ). The device is dried, scanned, and analyzed yielding a linear range of average inverse yellow intensities versus substrate concentration. An IC50 value (0.045 nM) with a known inhibitor, neostigmine bromide (NB), is obtained on the device. μPADs are low cost and easy to fabricate and have great potential to quantify neurotransmitter activity.

  1. Symmetric miniaturized heating system for active microelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCracken, Michael; Mayer, Michael; Jourard, Isaac; Moon, Jeong-Tak; Persic, John

    2010-07-01

    To qualify interconnect technologies such as microelectronic fine wire bonds for mass production of integrated circuit (IC) packages, it is necessary to perform accelerated aging tests, e.g., to age a device at an elevated temperature or to subject the device to thermal cycling and measure the decrease of interconnect quality. There are downsides to using conventional ovens for this as they are relatively large and have relatively slow temperature change rates, and if electrical connections are required between monitoring equipment and the device being heated, they must be located inside the oven and may be aged by the high temperatures. Addressing these downsides, a miniaturized heating system (minioven) is presented, which can heat individual IC packages containing the interconnects to be tested. The core of this system is a piece of copper cut from a square shaped tube with high resistance heating wire looped around it. Ceramic dual in-line packages are clamped against either open end of the core. One package contains a Pt100 temperature sensor and the other package contains the device to be aged placed in symmetry to the temperature sensor. According to the temperature detected by the Pt100, a proportional-integral-derivative controller adjusts the power supplied to the heating wire. The system maintains a dynamic temperature balance with the core hot and the two symmetric sides with electrical connections to the device under test at a cooler temperature. Only the face of the package containing the device is heated, while the socket holding it remains below 75 °C when the oven operates at 200 °C. The minioven can heat packages from room temperature up to 200 °C in less than 5 min and maintain this temperature at 28 W power. During long term aging, a temperature of 200 °C was maintained for 1120 h with negligible resistance change of the heating wires after 900 h (heating wire resistance increased 0.2% over the final 220 h). The device is also subjected to

  2. Symmetric miniaturized heating system for active microelectronic devices.

    PubMed

    McCracken, Michael; Mayer, Michael; Jourard, Isaac; Moon, Jeong-Tak; Persic, John

    2010-07-01

    To qualify interconnect technologies such as microelectronic fine wire bonds for mass production of integrated circuit (IC) packages, it is necessary to perform accelerated aging tests, e.g., to age a device at an elevated temperature or to subject the device to thermal cycling and measure the decrease of interconnect quality. There are downsides to using conventional ovens for this as they are relatively large and have relatively slow temperature change rates, and if electrical connections are required between monitoring equipment and the device being heated, they must be located inside the oven and may be aged by the high temperatures. Addressing these downsides, a miniaturized heating system (minioven) is presented, which can heat individual IC packages containing the interconnects to be tested. The core of this system is a piece of copper cut from a square shaped tube with high resistance heating wire looped around it. Ceramic dual in-line packages are clamped against either open end of the core. One package contains a Pt100 temperature sensor and the other package contains the device to be aged placed in symmetry to the temperature sensor. According to the temperature detected by the Pt100, a proportional-integral-derivative controller adjusts the power supplied to the heating wire. The system maintains a dynamic temperature balance with the core hot and the two symmetric sides with electrical connections to the device under test at a cooler temperature. Only the face of the package containing the device is heated, while the socket holding it remains below 75 degrees C when the oven operates at 200 degrees C. The minioven can heat packages from room temperature up to 200 degrees C in less than 5 min and maintain this temperature at 28 W power. During long term aging, a temperature of 200 degrees C was maintained for 1120 h with negligible resistance change of the heating wires after 900 h (heating wire resistance increased 0.2% over the final 220 h). The

  3. Toxin activity assays, devices, methods and systems therefor

    DOEpatents

    Koh, Chung-Yan; Schaff, Ulrich Y.; Sommer, Gregory Jon

    2016-04-05

    Embodiments of the present invention are directed toward devices, system and method for conducting toxin activity assay using sedimentation. The toxin activity assay may include generating complexes which bind to a plurality of beads in a fluid sample. The complexes may include a target toxin and a labeling agent, or may be generated due to presence of active target toxin and/or labeling agent designed to be incorporated into complexes responsive to the presence of target active toxin. The plurality of beads including the complexes may be transported through a density media, wherein the density media has a lower density than a density of the beads and higher than a density of the fluid sample, and wherein the transporting occurs, at least in part, by sedimentation. Signal may be detected from the labeling agents of the complexes.

  4. Integration of active devices on smart polymers for neural interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avendano-Bolivar, Adrian Emmanuel

    The increasing ability to ever more precisely identify and measure neural interactions and other phenomena in the central and peripheral nervous systems is revolutionizing our understanding of the human body and brain. To facilitate further understanding, more sophisticated neural devices, perhaps using microelectronics processing, must be fabricated. Materials often used in these neural interfaces, while compatible with these fabrication processes, are not optimized for long-term use in the body and are often orders of magnitude stiffer than the tissue with which they interact. Using the smart polymer substrates described in this work, suitability for processing as well as chronic implantation is demonstrated. We explore how to integrate reliable circuitry onto these flexible, biocompatible substrates that can withstand the aggressive environment of the body. To increase the capabilities of these devices beyond individual channel sensing and stimulation, active electronics must also be included onto our systems. In order to add this functionality to these substrates and explore the limits of these devices, we developed a process to fabricate single organic thin film transistors with mobilities up to 0.4 cm2/Vs and threshold voltages close to 0V. A process for fabricating organic light emitting diodes on flexible substrates is also addressed. We have set a foundation and demonstrated initial feasibility for integrating multiple transistors onto thin-film flexible devices to create new applications, such as matrix addressable functionalized electrodes and organic light emitting diodes. A brief description on how to integrate waveguides for their use in optogenetics is addressed. We have built understanding about device constraints on mechanical, electrical and in vivo reliability and how various conditions affect the electronics' lifetime. We use a bi-layer gate dielectric using an inorganic material such as HfO 2 combined with organic Parylene-c. A study of

  5. Using ERF Devices to Control Deployments of Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Chang, Zensheu; Salama, Moktar; Bao, Xiaoqi; Sherrit, Steward; Jenkins, Christopher; Vinogradov, Aleksandra

    2003-01-01

    A report proposes devices containing electrorheological fluids (ERFs) damper for controlling deployments of lightweight, flexible structures in outer space. The structures would include spring members that could be wound or compressed for compact stowage during transport. The ERF based damper would keep the structures compacted and/or regulate the speeds with which the structures would spring out for deployment. After deployment, ERF based dampening mechanism could be used to rigidize the structures or damp their vibrations. An experimental ERF deployment controlled structure described in the report comprised two metal carpenter s measuring tapes sandwiched together, held slightly apart by rubber-band spacers, and placed in a bag filled with an ERF. The viscosity of the ERF varied with the voltage applied to the tapes, such that it was possible to hold the tapes in the wound condition or slow the speed with which they sprung from the wound to the straight condition. The report describes several potential variations on the basic concept of an ERF-controlled structural member, including compartmentalization of the interior volume to prevent total loss of the ERF in case of a leak and the use of multiple, individually addressable electrode pairs to enable more localized control.

  6. An autoregulation unit for enabling adaptive control of sensorized left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Fontana, R; Silvestri, M; Tortora, G; Vatteroni, M; Trivella, M G; Dario, P

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an integrated system for facing heart failures (HF) in an innovative way. Existing left ventricular assist devices (LVAD or VAD) are usually devoted to blood pumping without the possibility to adapt the speed to patient conditions during everyday activities. This is essentially due to the lack of sensorization, bulkiness, and the need of relying on device-specific controllers with reduced computing ability for the existing ventricular assist systems. In this work, an innovative integrated and portable device, the ARU, is presented for enhancing VADs applicability as a long-term solution to HF. The ARU is an universal device able to fulfill with the needs of sensorized VADs in terms of data storing, continuous monitoring, autoregulation and adaptation to patient condition changes during daily activities. The ARU is able to wirelessly interface wearable devices for offering additional monitoring features from remote. The ARU functionalities on bench have been tested by the interfacing with a sensorized VAD platform in order to prove the feasibility of the approach. Experiments of local and remote VAD speed changes and autoregulation algorithms have been successfully tested showing response time of 1 s.

  7. Design, implementation and control of a magnetic levitation device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shameli, Ehsan

    Magnetic levitation technology has shown a great deal of promise for micromanipulation tasks. Due to the lack of mechanical contact, magnetic levitation systems are free of problems caused by friction, wear, sealing and lubrication. These advantages have made magnetic levitation systems a great candidate for clean room applications. In this thesis, a new large gap magnetic levitation system is designed, developed and successfully tested. The system is capable of levitating a 6.5(gr) permanent magnet in 3D space with an air gap of approximately 50(cm) with the traveling range of 20x20x30 mm3. The overall positioning accuracy of the system is 60mum. With the aid of finite elements method, an optimal geometry for the magnetic stator is proposed. Also, an energy optimization approach is utilized in the design of the electromagnets. In order to facilitate the design of various controllers for the system, a mathematical model of the magnetic force experienced by the levitated object is obtained. The dynamic magnetic force model is determined experimentally using frequency response system identification. The response of the system components including the power amplifiers, and position measurement system are also considered in the development of the force model. The force model is then employed in the controller design for the magnetic levitation device. Through a modular approach, the controller design for the 3D positioning system is started with the controller design for the vertical direction, i.e. z, and then followed by the controller design in the horizontal directions, i.e. x and y. For the vertical direction, several controllers such as PID, feed forward and feedback linearization are designed and their performances are compared. Also a control command conditioning method is introduced as a solution to increase the control performance and the results of the proposed controller are compared with the other designs. Experimental results showed that for the magnetic

  8. Radiofrequency identification and medical devices: the regulatory framework on electromagnetic compatibility. Part II: active implantable medical devices.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Eugenio; Censi, Federica; Triventi, Michele; Bartolini, Pietro; Calcagnini, Giovanni

    2012-05-01

    The number and the types of electromagnetic emitters to which patients with active implantable medical devices (AIMD) are exposed to in their daily activities have proliferated over the last decade. Radiofrequency identification (RFID) is an example of wireless technology applied in many fields. The interaction between RFID emitters and AIMD is an important issue for patients, industry and regulators, because of the risks associated with such interactions. The different AIMDs refer to different standards that address the electromagnetic immunity issue in different ways. Indeed, different test setups, immunity levels and rationales are used to guarantee that AIMDs are immune to electromagnetic nonionizing radiation. In this article, the regulatory framework concerning electromagnetic compatibility between RFID systems and AIMDs is analyzed to understand whether and how the application of the current AIMD standards allows for the effective control of the possible risks associated with RFID technology.

  9. 4H-SiC power devices for use in power electronic motor control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casady, J. B.; Agarwal, A. K.; Seshadri, S.; Siergiej, R. R.; Rowland, L. B.; MacMillan, M. F.; Sheridan, D. C.; Sanger, P. A.; Brandt, C. D.

    1998-12-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is an emerging semiconductor material which has been widely predicted to be superior to both Si and GaAs in the area of power electronic switching devices. This paper presents an overview of SiC power devices and concludes that the MOS turn-off thyristor (MTO™), comprising of a hybrid connection of SiC gate turn-off thyristor (GTO) and MOSFET, is one of the most promising near term SiC switching device given its high power potential, ease of turn-off, 500°C operation and resulting reduction in cooling requirements. The use of a SiC and an anti-parallel diode are primary active components which can then be used to construct an inverter module for high-temperature, high-power direct current (d.c.) motor control.

  10. Virtual collaborative environments: programming and controlling robotic devices remotely

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Brady R.; McDonald, Michael J., Jr.; Harrigan, Raymond W.

    1995-12-01

    This paper describes a technology for remote sharing of intelligent electro-mechanical devices. An architecture and actual system have been developed and tested, based on the proposed National Information Infrastructure (NII) or Information Highway, to facilitate programming and control of intelligent programmable machines (like robots, machine tools, etc.). Using appropriate geometric models, integrated sensors, video systems, and computing hardware; computer controlled resources owned and operated by different (in a geographic sense as well as legal sense) entities can be individually or simultaneously programmed and controlled from one or more remote locations. Remote programming and control of intelligent machines will create significant opportunities for sharing of expensive capital equipment. Using the technology described in this paper, university researchers, manufacturing entities, automation consultants, design entities, and others can directly access robotic and machining facilities located across the country. Disparate electro-mechanical resources will be shared in a manner similar to the way supercomputers are accessed by multiple users. Using this technology, it will be possible for researchers developing new robot control algorithms to validate models and algorithms right from their university labs without ever owning a robot. Manufacturers will be able to model, simulate, and measure the performance of prospective robots before selecting robot hardware optimally suited for their intended application. Designers will be able to access CNC machining centers across the country to fabricate prototypic parts during product design validation. An existing prototype architecture and system has been developed and proven. Programming and control of a large gantry robot located at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, was demonstrated from such remote locations as Washington D.C., Washington State, and Southern California.

  11. Advanced Energy Harvesting Control Schemes for Marine Renewable Energy Devices

    SciTech Connect

    McEntee, Jarlath; Polagye, Brian; Fabien, Brian; Thomson, Jim; Kilcher, Levi; Marnagh, Cian; Donegan, James

    2016-03-31

    The Advanced Energy Harvesting Control Schemes for Marine Renewable Energy Devices (Project) investigated, analyzed and modeled advanced turbine control schemes with the objective of increasing the energy harvested by hydrokinetic turbines in turbulent flow. Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC) implemented and validated a feedforward controller to increase power capture; and applied and tested the controls on ORPC’s RivGen® Power Systems in Igiugig, Alaska. Assessments of performance improvements were made for the RivGen® in the Igiugig environment and for ORPC’s TidGen® Power System in a reference tidal environment. Annualized Energy Production (AEP) and Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) improvements associated with implementation of the recommended control methodology were made for the TidGen® Power System in the DOE reference tidal environment. System Performance Advancement (SPA) goals were selected for the project. SPA targets were to improve Power to Weight Ratio (PWR) and system Availability, with the intention of reducing Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE). This project focused primarily reducing in PWR. Reductions in PWR of 25.5% were achieved. Reductions of 20.3% in LCOE were achieved. This project evaluated four types of controllers which were tested in simulation, emulation, a laboratory flume, and the field. The adaptive Kω2 controller performs similarly to the non-adaptive version of the same controller and may be useful in tidal channels where the mean velocity is continually evolving. Trends in simulation were largely verified through experiments, which also provided the opportunity to test assumptions about turbine responsiveness and control resilience to varying scales of turbulence. Laboratory experiments provided an essential stepping stone between simulation and implementation on a field-scale turbine. Experiments also demonstrated that using “energy loss” as a metric to differentiate between well-designed controllers operating at

  12. The Use of Multiple Slate Devices to Support Active Reading Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Nicholas Yen-Cherng

    2012-01-01

    Reading activities in the classroom and workplace occur predominantly on paper. Since existing electronic devices do not support these reading activities as well as paper, users have difficulty taking full advantage of the affordances of electronic documents. This dissertation makes three main contributions toward supporting active reading…

  13. Temperature-dependent liquid metal flowrate control device

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Roger D.

    1978-01-01

    A temperature-dependent liquid metal flowrate control device includes a magnet and a ferromagnetic member defining therebetween a flow path for liquid metal, the ferromagnetic member being formed of a material having a curie temperature at which a change in the flow rate of the liquid metal is desired. According to the preferred embodiment the magnet is a cylindrical rod magnet axially disposed within a cylindrical member formed of a curie material and having iron pole pieces at the ends. A cylindrical iron shunt and a thin wall stainless steel barrier are disposed in the annulus between magnet and curie material. Below the curie temperature flow between steel barrier and curie material is impeded and above the curie temperature flow impedance is reduced.

  14. Electrostatic charging and control of droplets in microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongbo; Yao, Shuhuai

    2013-03-07

    Precharged droplets can facilitate manipulation and control of low-volume liquids in droplet-based microfluidics. In this paper, we demonstrate non-contact electrostatic charging of droplets by polarizing a neutral droplet and splitting it into two oppositely charged daughter droplets in a T-junction microchannel. We performed numerical simulation to analyze the non-contact charging process and proposed a new design with a notch at the T-junction in aid of droplet splitting for more efficient charging. We experimentally characterized the induced charge in droplets in microfabricated devices. The experimental results agreed well with the simulation. Finally, we demonstrated highly effective droplet manipulation in a path selection unit appending to the droplet charging. We expect our work could enable precision manipulation of droplets for more complex liquid handling in microfluidics and promote electric-force based manipulation in 'lab-on-a-chip' systems.

  15. Controls Considerations for Turbine Active Clearance Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, Kevin J.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation discusses active control of turbine tip clearance from a control systems perspective. It is a subset of charts that were presented at the 2003 meeting of the International Society of Air Breathing Engines which was held August 31 through September 5 in Cleveland, Ohio. The associated reference paper is cited at the end of the presentation. The presentation describes active tip clearance control research being conducted by NASA to improve turbine engine systems. The target application for this effort is commercial aircraft engines. However, it is believed that the technologies developed as part of this research will benefit a broad spectrum of current and future turbomachinery. The first part of the presentation discusses the concept of tip clearance, problems associated with it, and the benefits of controlling it. It lays out a framework for implementing tip clearance controls that enables the implementation to progress from purely analytical to hardware-in-the-loop to fully experimental. And it briefly discusses how the technologies developed will be married to the previously described ACC Test Rig for hardware-in-the-loop demonstrations. The final portion of the presentation, describes one of the key technologies in some detail by presenting equations and results for a functional dynamic model of the tip clearance phenomena. As shown, the model exhibits many of the clearance dynamics found in commercial gas turbine engines. However, initial attempts to validate the model identified limitations that are being addressed to make the model more realistic.

  16. Training augmentation device for the Air Force satellite Control Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoates, Keith B.

    1993-01-01

    From the 1960's and into the early 1980's satellite operations and control were conducted by Air Force Systems Command (AFSC), now Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC), out of the Satellite Control Facility at Onizuka AFB, CA. AFSC was responsible for acquiring satellite command and control systems and conducting routine satellite operations. The daily operations, consisting of satellite health and status contacts and station keeping activities, were performed for AFSC by a Mission Control Team (MCT) staffed by civilian contractors who were responsible for providing their own technically 'qualified' personnel as satellite operators. An MCT consists of five positions: mission planner, ground controller, planner analyst, orbit analyst, and ranger controller. Most of the training consisted of On-the-Job-Training (OJT) with junior personnel apprenticed to senior personnel until they could demonstrate job proficiency. With most of the satellite operators having 15 to 25 years of experience, there was minimal risk to the mission. In the mid 1980's Air Force Space Command (AFSPACOM) assumed operational responsibility for a newly established control node at Falcon AFB (FAFB) in CO. The satellites and ground system program offices (SPO's) are organized under AFSC's Space and Missiles Systems Center (SMC) to function as a systems engineering and acquisition agency for AFSPACECOM. The collection of the satellite control nodes, ground tracking stations, computer processing equipment, and connecting communications links is referred to as the Air Force Satellite Control Network (AFSCN).

  17. NIRS monitoring of muscle contraction to control a prosthetic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Thomas; Zambarbieri, Daniela; Beltrami, Giorgio; Verni, Gennaro

    1999-01-01

    The fitting of upper-extremity amputees requires special efforts, and its significance has been increased by the development of the myoelectrically controlled prosthetic arm. This solution is not free of problems due to the nature of the amputation, to the electromagnetic noise affecting the myelectrical signal and to the perspiration due to the contact between socket and the residual limb. Starting from the fact that NIRS and electromyographic signals are similar during a muscle contraction, we have first studied the NIRS signal during forearm muscle contractions in normal and amputee subjects. Then a new system to interface the NIRS unit and the myoelectrical prosthetic hand has been developed. The NIRS unit has been used as optical sensor and all the operations (I/O and signal processing) are performed via software. This system has been tested on normal and amputee subjects performing hand grasping using a visual biofeedback control scheme. All the subjects have been able to perform these operations demonstrating the NIRS technique. This could represent an alternative solution for controlling a prosthetic device.

  18. On-demand controlled release of docetaxel from a battery-less MEMS drug delivery device.

    PubMed

    Pirmoradi, Fatemeh Nazly; Jackson, John K; Burt, Helen M; Chiao, Mu

    2011-08-21

    We report the development of a magnetically controlled MEMS device capable of on-demand release of defined quantities of an antiproliferative drug, docetaxel (DTX). Controlled release of DTX with a dosage suitable for the treatment of diabetic retinopathy has been achieved for 35 days. The device consists of a drug-loaded microreservoir (Ø6 mm ×∼550 μm), sealed by an elastic magnetic PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) membrane (Ø6 mm × 40 μm) with a laser-drilled aperture (∼100 × 100 μm(2)). By applying a magnetic field, the magnetic PDMS membrane deforms, causing the discharge of the drug solution from the device. Controlled DTX release at a rate of 171 ± 16.7 ng per actuation interval has been achieved for 35 days using a 255 mT magnetic field. The background leakage of drug solution through the aperture was negligible at 0.053 ± 0.014 ng min(-1). The biological activity of the released drug was investigated using a cytotoxicity assay (cell apoptosis) for two cell lines, HUVEC (human umbilical vein endothelial cells) and PC3 (prostate cancer) cells. Reproducible release rates have been achieved and DTX within the PDMS MEMS reservoir maintains full pharmacological efficacy for more than two months. This device is a proof-of-concept development for targeted delivery of hydrophobic drugs such as DTX and other taxane-based agents that require accurate delivery in nanomolar concentrations.

  19. Active fiber optic technologies used as tamper-indicating devices

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, P.R.V.; Waddoups, I.G.

    1995-11-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Safeguards and Seals Evaluation Program is evaluating new fiber optic active seal technologies for use at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The goal of the program is to investigate active seal technologies that can monitor secured containers storing special nuclear materials (SNM) within DOE vaults. Specifically investigated were active seal technologies that can be used as tamper-indicating devices to monitor secured containers within vaults while personnel remain outside the vault area. Such a system would allow minimal access into vaults while ensuring container content accountability. The purpose of this report is to discuss tamper-indicating devices that were evaluated for possible DOE use. While previous seal evaluations (Phase I and II) considered overall facility applications, this discussion focuses specifically on their use in vault storage situations. The report will highlight general background information, specifications and requirements, and test procedures. Also discussed are the systems available from four manufacturers: Interactive Technologies, Inc., Fiber SenSys, Inc., Inovonics, Inc., and Valve Security Systems.

  20. Device for measuring oxygen activity in liquid sodium

    DOEpatents

    Roy, P.; Young, R.S.

    1973-12-01

    A composite ceramic electrolyte in a configuration (such as a closed end tube or a plate) suitable to separate liquid sodium from a reference electrode with a high impedance voltmeter connected to measure EMF between the sodium and the reference electrode as a measure of oxygen activity in the sodium is described. The composite electrolyte consists of zirconiacalcia with a bonded layer of thoria-yttria. The device is used with a gaseous reference electrode on the zirconia-calcia side and liquid sodium on the thoria-yttria side of the electrolyte. (Official Gazette)

  1. Infrared micro-thermography of an actively heated preconcentrator device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furstenberg, Robert; Kendziora, C. A.; Stepnowski, Stanley V.; Mott, David R.; McGill, R. Andrew

    2008-03-01

    We report infrared micro-thermography measurements and analysis of static and transient temperature maps of an actively heated micro-fabricated preconcentrator device that incorporates a dual serpentine platinum heater trace deposited on a perforated polyimide membrane and suspended over a silicon frame. The sorbent coated perforated membrane is used to collect vapors and gases that flow through the preconcentrator. After heating, a concentrated pulse of analyte is released into the detector. Due to its small thermal mass, precise thermal management of the preconcentrator is critical to its performance. The sizes of features, the semi-transparent membrane, the need to flow air through the device, and changes in surface emissivity on a micron scale present many challenges for traditional infrared micro-thermography. We report an improved experimental test-bed. The hardware incorporates a custom-designed miniature calibration oven which, in conjunction with spatial filtering and a simple calibration algorithm, allows accurate temperature maps to be obtained. The test-bed incorporates a micro-bolometer array as the infrared imager. Instrumentation design, calibration and image processing algorithms are discussed and analyzed. The procedure does not require prior knowledge of the emissivity. We show that relatively inexpensive uncooled bolometers arrays can be used in certain radiometric applications. Heating profiles were examined with both uniform and non-uniform air flow through the device. The conclusions from this study provide critical information for optimal integration of the preconcentrator within a detection system, and in the design of the heater trace layout to achieve a more even temperature distribution across the device.

  2. Rotor position and vibration control for aerospace flywheel energy storage devices and other vibration based devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, B. X. S.

    Flywheel energy storage has distinct advantages over conventional energy storage methods such as electrochemical batteries. Because the energy density of a flywheel rotor increases quadratically with its speed, the foremost goal in flywheel design is to achieve sustainable high speeds of the rotor. Many issues exist with the flywheel rotor operation at high and varying speeds. A prominent problem is synchronous rotor vibration, which can drastically limit the sustainable rotor speed. In a set of projects, the novel Active Disturbance Rejection Control (ADRC) is applied to various problems of flywheel rotor operation. These applications include rotor levitation, steady state rotation at high speeds and accelerating operation. Several models such as the lumped mass model and distributed three-mass models have been analyzed. In each of these applications, the ADRC has been extended to cope with disturbance, noise, and control effort optimization; it also has been compared to various industry-standard controllers such as PID and PD/observer, and is proven to be superior. The control performance of the PID controller and the PD/observer currently used at NASA Glenn has been improved by as much as an order of magnitude. Due to the universality of the second order system, the results obtained in the rotor vibration problem can be straightforwardly extended to other vibrational systems, particularly, the MEMS gyroscope. Potential uses of a new nonlinear controller, which inherits the ease of use of the traditional PID, are also discussed.

  3. Control of Fuel Microorganisms with Magnetic Devices: Laboratory Investigation with Hormoconis Resinae

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-01

    Aircraft Materials Technical Memorandum 408 CONTROL OF FUEL MICROORGANISMS WITH MAGNETIC DEVICES: LABORATORY INN, ESTIGATION WITH HORMOCONIS RESINAE...LABORATORY Aircraft Materials Technical Memorandum 408 CONTROL OF FUEL MICROORGANISMS WITH MAGNETIC DEVICES: LABORATORY INVESTIGATION WITH HORMOCONIS...presence of a grey black material , which probably arose from the magneticmaterial in the device. This material was most likely responsible for the

  4. 40 CFR 65.162 - Nonflare control and recovery device monitoring records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... control and halogen reduction device monitoring records. (1) Each owner or operator using a combustion control or halogen reduction device to comply with this subpart shall keep, as applicable, up-to-date and... process heater monitoring); § 65.154(c) (halogen reduction device monitoring); § 65.155(c) (other...

  5. 40 CFR 65.162 - Nonflare control and recovery device monitoring records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... control and halogen reduction device monitoring records. (1) Each owner or operator using a combustion control or halogen reduction device to comply with this subpart shall keep, as applicable, up-to-date and... process heater monitoring); § 65.154(c) (halogen reduction device monitoring); § 65.155(c) (other...

  6. 40 CFR 65.162 - Nonflare control and recovery device monitoring records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... control and halogen reduction device monitoring records. (1) Each owner or operator using a combustion control or halogen reduction device to comply with this subpart shall keep, as applicable, up-to-date and... process heater monitoring); § 65.154(c) (halogen reduction device monitoring); § 65.155(c) (other...

  7. Active control of nano dimers response using piezoelectric effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekkawy, Ahmed A.; Ali, Tamer A.; Badawi, Ashraf H.

    2016-09-01

    Nano devices can be used as building blocks for Internet of Nano-Things network devices, such as sensors/actuators, transceivers, and routers. Although nano particles response can be engineered to fit in different regimes, for such a nano particle to be used as an active nano device, its properties should be dynamically controlled. This controllability is a challenge, and there are many proposed techniques to tune nanoparticle response on the spot through a sort of control signal, wither that signal is optical (for all-optical systems) or electronic (for opto-electronic systems). This will allow the use of nano particles as nano-switches or as dynamic sensors that can pick different frequencies depending on surrounding conditions or depending on a smart decisions. In this work, we propose a piezoelectric substrate as an active control mediator to control plasmonic gaps in nano dimers. This method allows for integrating nano devices with regular electronics while communicating control signals to nano devices through applying electric signals to a piezoelectric material, in order to control the gaps between nano particles in a nano cluster. We do a full numerical study to the system, analyzing the piezoelectric control resolution (minimum gap change step) and its effect on a nanodimer response as a nanoantenna. This analysis considers the dielectric functions of materials within the visible frequencies range. The effects of different parameters, such as the piezoelectric geometrical structure and materials, on the gap control resolution and the operating frequency are studied.

  8. Inferring Human Activity in Mobile Devices by Computing Multiple Contexts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruizhi; Chu, Tianxing; Liu, Keqiang; Liu, Jingbin; Chen, Yuwei

    2015-08-28

    This paper introduces a framework for inferring human activities in mobile devices by computing spatial contexts, temporal contexts, spatiotemporal contexts, and user contexts. A spatial context is a significant location that is defined as a geofence, which can be a node associated with a circle, or a polygon; a temporal context contains time-related information that can be e.g., a local time tag, a time difference between geographical locations, or a timespan; a spatiotemporal context is defined as a dwelling length at a particular spatial context; and a user context includes user-related information that can be the user's mobility contexts, environmental contexts, psychological contexts or social contexts. Using the measurements of the built-in sensors and radio signals in mobile devices, we can snapshot a contextual tuple for every second including aforementioned contexts. Giving a contextual tuple, the framework evaluates the posteriori probability of each candidate activity in real-time using a Naïve Bayes classifier. A large dataset containing 710,436 contextual tuples has been recorded for one week from an experiment carried out at Texas A&M University Corpus Christi with three participants. The test results demonstrate that the multi-context solution significantly outperforms the spatial-context-only solution. A classification accuracy of 61.7% is achieved for the spatial-context-only solution, while 88.8% is achieved for the multi-context solution.

  9. Inferring Human Activity in Mobile Devices by Computing Multiple Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ruizhi; Chu, Tianxing; Liu, Keqiang; Liu, Jingbin; Chen, Yuwei

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a framework for inferring human activities in mobile devices by computing spatial contexts, temporal contexts, spatiotemporal contexts, and user contexts. A spatial context is a significant location that is defined as a geofence, which can be a node associated with a circle, or a polygon; a temporal context contains time-related information that can be e.g., a local time tag, a time difference between geographical locations, or a timespan; a spatiotemporal context is defined as a dwelling length at a particular spatial context; and a user context includes user-related information that can be the user’s mobility contexts, environmental contexts, psychological contexts or social contexts. Using the measurements of the built-in sensors and radio signals in mobile devices, we can snapshot a contextual tuple for every second including aforementioned contexts. Giving a contextual tuple, the framework evaluates the posteriori probability of each candidate activity in real-time using a Naïve Bayes classifier. A large dataset containing 710,436 contextual tuples has been recorded for one week from an experiment carried out at Texas A&M University Corpus Christi with three participants. The test results demonstrate that the multi-context solution significantly outperforms the spatial-context-only solution. A classification accuracy of 61.7% is achieved for the spatial-context-only solution, while 88.8% is achieved for the multi-context solution. PMID:26343665

  10. Use of drugs and intrauterine devices for birth control.

    PubMed

    Meeker, C I

    1969-05-08

    The current use of oral contraceptives and intrauterine devices for population control is reviewed including the mechanism of their antifertility actions and the use-effectiveness of each method. The use-effectiveness of the IUD has been calculated as 1.5-3.0 pregnancies per 100 woman-years of exposure. The IUD has a high continuation rate (70% after 2 years) and is excellent for poorly motivated population groups. The most serious common side-effect--pelvic infection--can be controlled by more careful screening and modern antibiotic therapy. Other side-effects include irregular bleeding and uterine perforation, but not at significantly high levels. Oral contraceptives have been found to be virtually 100% effective, even in the new lower dose preparations containing around .5 mg progesterone and .05-.15 mg estrogen per tablet. New hormonal contraceptive approaches include pills which progesterone only, high postcoital estrogen administration, and long-acting injectable progestogen (Depo-Provera). All of these methods are highly effective but have some undesirable side-effects and require further study. Careful examination of the recent research reports connecting oral contraceptive use with increased risk of thromboembolism indicate that whatever the danger in oral contraceptive use, the direct physical hazards of pregnancy after contraceptive failure are much higher and more serious. Though a 100% safe contraceptive is a desirable ideal, the safety of current oral contraceptives and IUDs is higher than most other aspects of modern life.

  11. Active control of electric potential of spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, R.

    1977-01-01

    Techniques are discussed for controlling the potential of a spacecraft by means of devices which release appropriate charged particles from the spacecraft to the environment. Attention is given to electron emitters, ion emitters, a basic electron emitter arrangement, techniques for sensing electric field or potential, and flight experiments on active potential control. It is recommended to avoid differential charging on spacecraft surfaces because it can severely affect the efficacy of emitters. Discharging the frame of a spacecraft with dielectric surfaces involves the risk of stressing the dielectric material excessively. The spacecraft should, therefore, be provided with grounded conductive surfaces. It is pointed out that particles released by control systems can return to the spacecraft.

  12. Activated T lymphocytes migrate toward the cathode of DC electric fields in microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Nandagopal, Saravanan; Wu, Dan; Romanuik, Sean F; Paul, Kausik; Thomson, Douglas J; Lin, Francis

    2011-04-07

    Immune cell migration is a fundamental process that enables immunosurveillance and immune responses. Understanding the mechanism of immune cell migration is not only of importance to the biology of cells, but also has high relevance to cell trafficking mediated physiological processes and diseases such as embryogenesis, wound healing, autoimmune diseases and cancers. In addition to the well-known chemical concentration gradient based guiding mechanism (i.e. chemotaxis), recent studies have shown that lymphocytes can respond to applied physiologically relevant direct current (DC) electric fields by migrating toward the cathode of the fields (i.e. electrotaxis) in both in vitro and in vivo settings. In the present study, we employed two microfluidic devices allowing controlled application of electric fields inside the microfluidic channel for quantitative studies of lymphocyte electrotaxis in vitro at the single cell level. The first device is fabricated by soft-lithography and the second device is made in glass with integrated on-chip electrodes. Using both devices, we for the first time showed that anti-CD3/CD28 antibodies activated human blood T cells migrate to the cathode of the applied DC electric field. This finding is consistent with previous electrotaxis studies on other lymphocyte subsets suggesting electrotaxis is a novel guiding mechanism for immune cell migration. Furthermore, the characteristics of electrotaxis and chemotaxis of activated T cells in PDMS microfluidic devices are compared.

  13. Cooling device featuring thermoelectric and diamond materials for temperature control of heat-dissipating devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandersande, Ian W. (Inventor); Ewell, Richard (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor); Lyon, Hylan B. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A cooling device for lowering the temperature of a heat-dissipating device. The cooling device includes a heat-conducting substrate (composed, e.g., of diamond or another high thermal conductivity material) disposed in thermal contact with the heat-dissipating device. During operation, heat flows from the heat-dissipating device into the heat-conducting substrate, where it is spread out over a relatively large area. A thermoelectric cooling material (e.g., a Bi.sub.2 Te.sub.3 -based film or other thermoelectric material) is placed in thermal contact with the heat-conducting substrate. Application of electrical power to the thermoelectric material drives the thermoelectric material to pump heat into a second heat-conducting substrate which, in turn, is attached to a heat sink.

  14. Optical control of antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velema, Willem A.; van der Berg, Jan Pieter; Hansen, Mickel J.; Szymanski, Wiktor; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial resistance is a major problem in the modern world, stemming in part from the build-up of antibiotics in the environment. Novel molecular approaches that enable an externally triggered increase in antibiotic activity with high spatiotemporal resolution and auto-inactivation are highly desirable. Here we report a responsive, broad-spectrum, antibacterial agent that can be temporally activated with light, whereupon it auto-inactivates on the scale of hours. The use of such a ‘smart’ antibiotic might prevent the build-up of active antimicrobial material in the environment. Reversible optical control over active drug concentration enables us to obtain pharmacodynamic information. Precisely localized control of activity is achieved, allowing the growth of bacteria to be confined to defined patterns, which has potential for the development of treatments that avoid interference with the endogenous microbial population in other parts of the organism.

  15. Electromechanical Simulation of Actively Controlled Rotordynamic Systems with Piezoelectric Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Reng Rong; Palazzolo, A. B.; Kascak, A. F.; Montague, G.

    1991-01-01

    Theories and tests for incorporating piezoelectric pushers as actuator devices for active vibration control are discussed. It started from a simple model with the assumption of ideal pusher characteristics and progressed to electromechanical models with nonideal pushers. Effects on system stability due to the nonideal characteristics of piezoelectric pushers and other elements in the control loop were investigated.

  16. Demonstration of Active Combustion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovett, Jeffrey A.; Teerlinck, Karen A.; Cohen, Jeffrey M.

    2008-01-01

    The primary objective of this effort was to demonstrate active control of combustion instabilities in a direct-injection gas turbine combustor that accurately simulates engine operating conditions and reproduces an engine-type instability. This report documents the second phase of a two-phase effort. The first phase involved the analysis of an instability observed in a developmental aeroengine and the design of a single-nozzle test rig to replicate that phenomenon. This was successfully completed in 2001 and is documented in the Phase I report. This second phase was directed toward demonstration of active control strategies to mitigate this instability and thereby demonstrate the viability of active control for aircraft engine combustors. This involved development of high-speed actuator technology, testing and analysis of how the actuation system was integrated with the combustion system, control algorithm development, and demonstration testing in the single-nozzle test rig. A 30 percent reduction in the amplitude of the high-frequency (570 Hz) instability was achieved using actuation systems and control algorithms developed within this effort. Even larger reductions were shown with a low-frequency (270 Hz) instability. This represents a unique achievement in the development and practical demonstration of active combustion control systems for gas turbine applications.

  17. Seismic active control by neutral networks

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yu

    1995-12-31

    A study on the application of artificial neural networks (ANNs) to active structural control under seismic loads is carried out. The structure considered is a single-degree-of-freedom (SDF) system with an active bracing device. The control force is computed by a trained neural network. The feedforward neural network architecture and an adaptive backpropagation training algorithm is used in the study. The neural net is trained to reproduce the function that represents the response-excitation relationship of the SDF system under seismic loads. The input-output training patterns are generated randomly. In the backpropagation training algorithm, the learning rate is determined by ensuring the decrease of the error function at each epoch. The computer program implemented is validated by solving the classification of the XOR problem. Then, the trained ANN is used to compute the control force according to the control strategy. If the control force exceeds the actuator`s capacity limit, it is set equal to that limit. The concept of the control strategy employed herein is to apply the control force at every time step to cancel the system velocity induced at the preceding time step so that the gradual rhythmic buildup of the response is destroyed. The ground motions considered in the numerical example are the 1940 El Centro earthquake and the 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake in California. The system responses with and without the control are calculated and compared. The feasibility and potential of applying ANNs to seismic active control is asserted by the promising results obtained from the numerical examples studied.

  18. A device for investigating neuromuscular control in the human masticatory system.

    PubMed

    Türker, K S; Brinkworth, R S A; Abolfathi, P; Linke, I R; Nazeran, H

    2004-07-30

    A new apparatus has been developed to study the control of mastication in humans. The subject places his/her teeth on fixed upper and mobile lower bite plates; the device then enables opening and closing movements of the lower jaw against a controlled resistance. It is also possible to vary the number of teeth in contact with the device during an experiment from the entire dental arcade to a single tooth. The specially designed lower bite plate is dynamic and allows for both rotation and translation of the lower jaw during movement, thus, permitting the natural curvilinear trajectory of the jaw. The lower bite plate can follow chewing initiated by the subject without resisting the movement ('no force' mode) via a dedicated microprocessor controlled compensation mechanism. Another function of the device is to inject a constant predetermined load onto the lower bite plate so that the subject 'chews' against a fixed resistance simulating rapidly yielding food bolus ('fixed force' mode). The device can be programmed to increase or decrease the force during the closing or opening phase of chewing by feeding the position information into the force compensation system so both position and force change in parallel, hence, simulating a bite onto a non-yielding, or sticky, food bolus ('normal chewing' mode). By use of a jaw position compensation mechanism, the device can actively move the lower jaw, following any imposed position pattern ('position controlled' mode). The chewing simulator also has a mode that holds the position at a fixed level and allows the force to change ('position hold' mode). Furthermore, the device can inject additional rapid or slow forces or displacements onto the lower bite plate in order to elicit reflexes so that the response of jaw muscles to such stimuli can be examined at various jaw positions, force levels, phases of motion and velocities. The different modes of the apparatus can be used to study the operation and feedback control of human

  19. Active Flow Control Activities at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Scott G.; Sellers, William L., III; Washburn, Anthony E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Langley continues to aggressively investigate the potential advantages of active flow control over more traditional aerodynamic techniques. This paper provides an update to a previous paper and describes both the progress in the various research areas and the significant changes in the NASA research programs. The goals of the topics presented are focused on advancing the state of knowledge and understanding of controllable fundamental mechanisms in fluids as well as to address engineering challenges. An organizational view of current research activities at NASA Langley in active flow control as supported by several projects is presented. On-center research as well as NASA Langley funded contracts and grants are discussed at a relatively high level. The products of this research are to be demonstrated either in bench-top experiments, wind-tunnel investigations, or in flight as part of the fundamental NASA R&D program and then transferred to more applied research programs within NASA, DOD, and U.S. industry.

  20. Fractional active disturbance rejection control.

    PubMed

    Li, Dazi; Ding, Pan; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-01

    A fractional active disturbance rejection control (FADRC) scheme is proposed to improve the performance of commensurate linear fractional order systems (FOS) and the robust analysis shows that the controller is also applicable to incommensurate linear FOS control. In FADRC, the traditional extended states observer (ESO) is generalized to a fractional order extended states observer (FESO) by using the fractional calculus, and the tracking differentiator plus nonlinear state error feedback are replaced by a fractional proportional-derivative controller. To simplify controller tuning, the linear bandwidth-parameterization method has been adopted. The impacts of the observer bandwidth ωo and controller bandwidth ωc on system performance are then analyzed. Finally, the FADRC stability and frequency-domain characteristics for linear single-input single-output FOS are analyzed. Simulation results by FADRC and ADRC on typical FOS are compared to demonstrate the superiority and effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  1. Active Control of Stationary Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nino, Giovanni; Breidenthal, Robert; Bhide, Aditi; Sridhar, Aditya

    2016-11-01

    A system for active stationary vortex control is presented. The system uses a combination of plasma actuators, pressure sensors and electrical circuits deposited on aerodynamic surfaces using printing electronics methods. Once the pressure sensors sense a change on the intensity or on the position of the stationary vortices, its associated controller activates a set of plasma actuator to return the vortices to their original or intended positions. The forces produced by the actuators act on the secondary flow in the transverse plane, where velocities are much less than in the streamwise direction. As a demonstration case, the active vortex control system is mounted on a flat plate under low speed wind tunnel testing. Here, a set of vortex generators are used to generate the stationary vortices and the plasma actuators are used to move them. Preliminary results from the experiments are presented and compared with theoretical values. Thanks to the USAF AFOSR STTR support under contract # FA9550-15-C-0007.

  2. Transmission and transmission control device for providing downshifting

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, H.; Akashi, T.

    1986-11-18

    This patent describes a transmission for a vehicle, comprising a transmission mechanism, and an automatic control device; the transmission mechanism comprising: an input shaft; an output shaft, a first on-off clutch; a second on-off clutch; a first one way clutch; a second one way clutch; a first gear train having a first reduction gear ratio; a second gear train having a second reduction gear ratio smaller than the first reduction gear ratio; a third gear train having a third reduction gear ratio smaller than the second reduction gear ratio; and a fourth gear train having a fourth reduction gear ratio smaller than the third reduction gear ratio. A first synchronizer connects the input shaft and the output shaft via a series connection of the first on-off clutch, the first one way clutch, and the first gear train when the first synchronizer is shifted to a first side of a neutral position thereof so as to transmit rotational power from the input shaft to the output shaft in a normal rotational direction at a first speed stage and which connects the input shaft and the output shaft via series connection of the first on-off clutch.

  3. Guidewire-Controlled Advancement of the Amplatz Thrombectomy Device

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller-Huelsbeck, Stefan; Schwarzenberg, Helmut; Heller, Martin

    1998-01-15

    The Amplatz Thrombectomy Device (ATD) is a percutaneous rotational catheter proven to homogenize thrombus. The catheter design allows neither application over a coaxial running guidewire nor the use of the device as a monorail system. We report a technical modification that provides guided advancement of the catheter over a wire in order to prevent failure of application and to facilitate the interventional procedure.

  4. Inventory Control. Easily Made Electronic Device for Conductivity Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadek, Frank J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes how to construct an electronic device to be used in conductivity experiments using a 35 millimeter film canister, nine volt battery replacement snaps, a 200-300 ohm resistor, and a light-emitting diode. Provides a diagram and photographs of the device. (TW)

  5. Extended active disturbance rejection controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang (Inventor); Tian, Gang (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Multiple designs, systems, methods and processes for controlling a system or plant using an extended active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based controller are presented. The extended ADRC controller accepts sensor information from the plant. The sensor information is used in conjunction with an extended state observer in combination with a predictor that estimates and predicts the current state of the plant and a co-joined estimate of the system disturbances and system dynamics. The extended state observer estimates and predictions are used in conjunction with a control law that generates an input to the system based in part on the extended state observer estimates and predictions as well as a desired trajectory for the plant to follow.

  6. Extended Active Disturbance Rejection Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang (Inventor); Tian, Gang (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Multiple designs, systems, methods and processes for controlling a system or plant using an extended active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based controller are presented. The extended ADRC controller accepts sensor information from the plant. The sensor information is used in conjunction with an extended state observer in combination with a predictor that estimates and predicts the current state of the plant and a co-joined estimate of the system disturbances and system dynamics. The extended state observer estimates and predictions are used in conjunction with a control law that generates an input to the system based in part on the extended state observer estimates and predictions as well as a desired trajectory for the plant to follow.

  7. Extended Active Disturbance Rejection Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang (Inventor); Tian, Gang (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Multiple designs, systems, methods and processes for controlling a system or plant using an extended active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based controller are presented. The extended ADRC controller accepts sensor information from the plant. The sensor information is used in conjunction with an extended state observer in combination with a predictor that estimates and predicts the current state of the plant and a co-joined estimate of the system disturbances and system dynamics. The extended state observer estimates and predictions are used in conjunction with a control law that generates an input to the system based in part on the extended state observer estimates and predictions as well as a desired trajectory for the plant to follow.

  8. Breath alcohol ignition interlock devices: controlling the recidivist.

    PubMed

    Raub, Richard A; Lucke, Roy E; Wark, Richard I

    2003-01-01

    This study compares the recidivism rates of two groups of Illinois drivers who had their driver's licenses revoked for alcohol-impaired driving and who received restricted driving permits. Drivers in both groups had more than two driving under the influence (DUI) actions against their record within 5 years or were classed as level III alcohol dependents. Drivers in one group were required to install breath alcohol ignition interlock devices in their vehicles and drivers in the other group were not. The research found that drivers with the interlock were one-fifth as likely to be arrested for DUI during the 1 year the device was installed as the comparison group, which did not have the device. However, once the ignition interlock was removed, drivers in this group rapidly returned to DUI arrest rates similar to those in the comparison group. These findings echo previous literature. Additionally, the study showed that this voluntary program in Illinois reached only 16% of the drivers who met the requirements for installing the interlock device. Finally, this study found that individuals who were removed from the interlock program and returned to revoked status continued to drive. Within 3 years, approximately 50% of this latter group were involved in a crash or were arrested for DUI or with an invalid driver's license. Conclusions drawn from the study suggest that the breath alcohol ignition interlock device is effective in preventing continued driving while impaired. However, the large-scale effectiveness of the device is limited since most of the drivers eligible for the device do not have it installed. To have a significant impact, the interlock device must represent a better alternative to drivers whose licenses were suspended or revoked because of alcohol arrests compared to remaining on revoked status without having the device installed. Finally the research suggests that, given the rapid return to predevice recidivism, the devices should remain installed until

  9. Breath alcohol ignition interlock devices: controlling the recidivist.

    PubMed

    Raub, Richard A; Lucke, Roy E; Wark, Richard I

    2003-09-01

    This study compares the recidivism rates of two groups of Illinois drivers who had their driver's licenses revoked for alcohol-impaired driving and who received restricted driving permits. Drivers in both groups had more than two driving under the influence (DUI) actions against their record within 5 years or were classed as level III alcohol dependents. Drivers in one group were required to install breath alcohol ignition interlock devices in their vehicles and drivers in the other group were not. The research found that drivers with the interlock were one-fifth as likely to be arrested for DUI during the 1 year the device was installed as the comparison group, which did not have the device. However, once the ignition interlock was removed, drivers in this group rapidly returned to DUI arrest rates similar to those in the comparison group. These findings echo previous literature. Additionally, the study showed that this voluntary program in Illinois reached only 16% of the drivers who met the requirements for installing the interlock device. Finally, this study found that individuals who were removed from the interlock program and returned to revoked status continued to drive. Within 3 years, approximately 50% of this latter group were involved in a crash or were arrested for DUI or with an invalid driver's license. Conclusions drawn from the study suggest that the breath alcohol ignition interlock device is effective in preventing continued driving while impaired. However, the large-scale effectiveness of the device is limited since most of the drivers eligible for the device do not have it installed. To have a significant impact, the interlock device must represent a better alternative to drivers whose licenses were suspended or revoked because of alcohol arrests compared to remaining on revoked status without having the device installed. Finally the research suggests that, given the rapid return to predevice recidivism, the devices should remain installed until

  10. Coherent Structures and Chaos Control in High-Power Microwave Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-29

    06/29/2006 Final 1 April 2003- 30 March 2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Coherent Structures and Chaos Control in High-Power Microwave...Final Report Coherent Structures and Chaos Control in High-Power Microwave Devices AFOSR Grant No. F49620-03-1-0230 Submitted to: Dr. Arje Nachman...for HPM Device Applications 22 6. References 23 2 Final Report Coherent Structures and Chaos Control in High-Power Microwave Devices AFOSR Grant No

  11. 40 CFR 65.156 - General monitoring requirements for control and recovery devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... control and recovery devices. 65.156 Section 65.156 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Closed Vent Systems, Control... control and recovery devices. (a) General monitoring requirement applicability. (1) This section...

  12. Understanding the brain by controlling neural activity

    PubMed Central

    Krug, Kristine; Salzman, C. Daniel; Waddell, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Causal methods to interrogate brain function have been employed since the advent of modern neuroscience in the nineteenth century. Initially, randomly placed electrodes and stimulation of parts of the living brain were used to localize specific functions to these areas. Recent technical developments have rejuvenated this approach by providing more precise tools to dissect the neural circuits underlying behaviour, perception and cognition. Carefully controlled behavioural experiments have been combined with electrical devices, targeted genetically encoded tools and neurochemical approaches to manipulate information processing in the brain. The ability to control brain activity in these ways not only deepens our understanding of brain function but also provides new avenues for clinical intervention, particularly in conditions where brain processing has gone awry. PMID:26240417

  13. Device for self-verifying temperature measurement and control

    DOEpatents

    Watkins, Arthur D.; Cannon, Collins P.; Tolle, Charles R.

    2004-08-03

    A measuring instrument includes a first temperature sensor, a second temperature sensor and circuitry. The first and second temperature sensors each generate a signal indicative of the temperature of a medium being detected. The circuitry is configured to activate verification of temperature being sensed with the first sensor. According to one construction, the first temperature sensor comprises at least one thermocouple temperature sensor and the second temperature sensor comprises an optical temperature sensor, each sensor measuring temperature over the same range of temperature, but using a different physical phenomena. Also according to one construction, the circuitry comprises a computer configured to detect failure of one of the thermocouples by comparing temperature of the optical temperature sensor with each of the thermocouple temperature sensors. Even further, an output control signal is generated via a fuzzy inference machine and control apparatus.

  14. Active control of combustion instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Masoud, Nidal A.

    A theoretical analysis of active control of combustion thermo-acoustic instabilities is developed in this dissertation. The theoretical combustion model is based on the dynamics of a two-phase flow in a liquid-fueled propulsion system. The formulation is based on a generalized wave equation with pressure as the dependent variable, and accommodates all influences of combustion, mean flow, unsteady motions and control inputs. The governing partial differential equations are converted to an equivalent set of ordinary differential equations using Galerkin's method by expressing the unsteady pressure and velocity fields as functions of normal mode shapes of the chamber. This procedure yields a representation of the unsteady flow field as a system of coupled nonlinear oscillators that is used as a basis for controllers design. Major research attention is focused on the control of longitudinal oscillations with both linear and nonlinear processes being considered. Starting with a linear model using point actuators, the optimal locations of actuators and sensors are developed. The approach relies on the quantitative measures of the degree of controllability and component cost. These criterion are arrived at by considering the energies of the system's inputs and outputs. The optimality criteria for sensor and actuator locations provide a balance between the importance of the lower order (controlled) and the higher (residual) order modes. To address the issue of uncertainties in system's parameter, the minimax principles based controller is used. The minimax corresponds to finding the best controller for the worst parameter deviation. In other words, choosing controller parameters to minimize, and parameter deviation to maximize some quadratic performance metric. Using the minimax-based controller, a remarkable improvement in the control system's ability to handle parameter uncertainties is achieved when compared to the robustness of the regular control schemes such as LQR

  15. Use of a Far-Infrared Active Warming Device in Guinea Pigs (Cavia porcellus).

    PubMed

    Zarndt, Bethany S; Buchta, Jessica N; Garver, Lindsey S; Davidson, Silas A; Rowton, Edgar D; Despain, Kenneth E

    2015-11-01

    Small mammals have difficulty maintaining body temperature under anesthesia. This hypothermia is a potential detriment not only to the health and comfort of the animal but also to the integrity of any treatment given or data gathered during the anesthetic period. Using an external warming device to assist with temperature regulation can mitigate these effects. In this study, we investigated the ability of an advanced warming device that uses far-infrared (FIR) heating and responds to real-time core temperature monitoring to maintain a normothermic core temperature in guinea pigs. Body temperatures were measured during 30 min of ketamine-xylazine general anesthesia with and without application of the heating device. The loss of core body heat from anesthetized guinea pigs under typical (unwarmed) conditions was significant, and this loss was almost completely mitigated by application of the FIR heating pad. The significant difference between the temperatures of the actively warmed guinea pigs as compared with the control group began as early as 14 min after anesthetic administration, leading to a 2.6 °C difference at 30 min. Loss of core body temperature was not correlated with animals' body weight; however, weight influences the efficiency of FIR warming slightly. These study results show that the FIR heating device accurately controls core body temperature in guinea pigs, therefore potentially alleviating the effects of body heat loss on animal physiology.

  16. 40 CFR 60.2141 - By what date must I conduct the initial air pollution control device inspection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspection? 60.2141 Section 60.2141 Protection of Environment... initial air pollution control device inspection? (a) The initial air pollution control device inspection... startup. (b) Within 10 operating days following an air pollution control device inspection, all...

  17. 40 CFR 60.2141 - By what date must I conduct the initial air pollution control device inspection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspection? 60.2141 Section 60.2141 Protection of Environment... initial air pollution control device inspection? (a) The initial air pollution control device inspection... startup. (b) Within 10 operating days following an air pollution control device inspection, all...

  18. Flow Control Device Evaluation for an Internal Flow with an Adverse Pressure Gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Luther N.; Gorton, Susan Althoff; Anders, Scott G.

    2002-01-01

    The effectiveness of several active and passive devices to control flow in an adverse pressure gradient with secondary flows present was evaluated in the 15 Inch Low Speed Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. In this study, passive micro vortex generators, micro bumps, and piezoelectric synthetic jets were evaluated for their flow control characteristics using surface static pressures, flow visualization, and 3D Stereo Digital Particle Image Velocimetry. Data also were acquired for synthetic jet actuators in a zero flow environment. It was found that the micro vortex generator is very effective in controlling the flow environment for an adverse pressure gradient, even in the presence of secondary vortical flow. The mechanism by which the control is effected is a re-energization of the boundary layer through flow mixing. The piezoelectric synthetic jet actuators must have sufficient velocity output to produce strong longitudinal vortices if they are to be effective for flow control. The output of these devices in a laboratory or zero flow environment will be different than the output in a flow environment. In this investigation, the output was higher in the flow environment, but the stroke cycle in the flow did not indicate a positive inflow into the synthetic jet.

  19. Photovoltaic performance of block copolymer devices is independent of the crystalline texture in the active layer

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Changhe; Lee, Youngmin; Lin, Yen -Hao; ...

    2016-06-15

    The electronic properties of organic semiconductors are strongly influenced by intermolecular packing. When cast as thin films, crystalline π-conjugated molecules are strongly textured, potentially leading to anisotropic charge transport. Consequently, it is hypothesized that the orientation of crystallites in the active layer plays an important role in charge extraction and organic photovoltaic device performance. Here we demonstrate orientation control of molecular packing from mostly face-on to edge-on configurations in the active layer of P3HT-b-PFTBT block copolymer photovoltaics using 1-chloronaphthalene as a solvent additive. The effect of molecular orientations in P3HT crystals on charge transport and solar cell performance is examined.more » We find that optimized photovoltaic device performance is independent of the crystalline texture of P3HT. Our observations provide further insights into the molecular organization required for efficient charge transport and overall device efficiencies. That is, the dominant crystal orientation, whether face-on or edge-on, is not critical to organic solar cells. Furthermore, a broad distribution of crystallite orientations ensures pathways for charge transport in any direction and enables efficient charge extraction in photovoltaic devices.« less

  20. Photovoltaic performance of block copolymer devices is independent of the crystalline texture in the active layer

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Changhe; Lee, Youngmin; Lin, Yen -Hao; Strzalka, Joseph; Wang, Cheng; Hexemer, Alexander; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel A.; Verduzco, Rafael; Wang, Qing; Gomez, Enrique D.

    2016-06-15

    The electronic properties of organic semiconductors are strongly influenced by intermolecular packing. When cast as thin films, crystalline π-conjugated molecules are strongly textured, potentially leading to anisotropic charge transport. Consequently, it is hypothesized that the orientation of crystallites in the active layer plays an important role in charge extraction and organic photovoltaic device performance. Here we demonstrate orientation control of molecular packing from mostly face-on to edge-on configurations in the active layer of P3HT-b-PFTBT block copolymer photovoltaics using 1-chloronaphthalene as a solvent additive. The effect of molecular orientations in P3HT crystals on charge transport and solar cell performance is examined. We find that optimized photovoltaic device performance is independent of the crystalline texture of P3HT. Our observations provide further insights into the molecular organization required for efficient charge transport and overall device efficiencies. That is, the dominant crystal orientation, whether face-on or edge-on, is not critical to organic solar cells. Furthermore, a broad distribution of crystallite orientations ensures pathways for charge transport in any direction and enables efficient charge extraction in photovoltaic devices.

  1. 40 CFR 65.151 - Condensers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... provisions of this subpart according to the procedures in §§ 65.157 and 65.158. Performance test records... providing a continuous record or a condenser exit (product side) temperature monitoring device capable...

  2. Emulating Industrial Control System Field Devices Using Gumstix Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    servers are only basic simulations and offer a limited number of functions to interact with. The work is no longer maintained; however, a follow on...fingerprinting techniques specific to ICS devices. This research develops such a device that is able to be expanded upon and deployed to a live environment to...Sean Laughter , Ronald Williams, “Security Issues in SCADA networks”. Computers & Security, v 25, pp 498-506, num 7, 2006. [19] Krutz, R. L. (2006

  3. Semi Active Control of Civil Structures, Analytical and Numerical Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerboua, M.; Benguediab, M.; Megnounif, A.; Benrahou, K. H.; Kaoulala, F.

    Structural control for civil structures was born out of a need to provide safer and more efficient designs with the reality of limited resources. The purpose of structural control is to absorb and to reflect the energy introduced by dynamic loads such as winds, waves, earthquakes, and traffic. Today, the protection of civil structures from severe dynamic loading is typically achieved by allowing the structures to be damaged. Semi-active control devices, also called "smart" control devices, assume the positive aspects of both the passive and active control devices. A semi-active control strategy is similar to the active control strategy. Only here, the control actuator does not directly apply force to the structure, but instead it is used to control the properties of a passive energy device, a controllable passive damper. Semi-active control strategies can be used in many of the same civil applications as passive and active control. One method of operating smart cable dampers is in a purely passive capacity, supplying the dampers with constant optimal voltage. The advantages to this strategy are the relative simplicity of implementing the control strategy as compared to a smart or active control strategy and that the dampers are more easily optimally tuned in- place, eliminating the need to have passive dampers with unique optimal damping coefficients. This research investigated semi-active control of civil structures for natural hazard mitigation. The research has two components, the seismic protection of buildings and the mitigation of wind-induced vibration in structures. An ideal semi-active motion equation of a composite beam that consists of a cantilever beam bonded with a PZT patch using Hamilton's principle and Galerkin's method was treated. A series R-L and a parallel R-L shunt circuits are coupled into the motion equation respectively by means of the constitutive relation of piezoelectric material and Kirchhoff's law to control the beam vibration. A

  4. Ionic Liquid Activation of Amorphous Metal-Oxide Semiconductors for Flexible Transparent Electronic Devices

    DOE PAGES

    Pudasaini, Pushpa Raj; Noh, Joo Hyon; Wong, Anthony T.; ...

    2016-02-09

    To begin this abstract, amorphous metal-oxide semiconductors offer the high carrier mobilities and excellent large-area uniformity required for high performance, transparent, flexible electronic devices; however, a critical bottleneck to their widespread implementation is the need to activate these materials at high temperatures which are not compatible with flexible polymer substrates. The highly controllable activation of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide semiconductor channels using ionic liquid gating at room temperature is reported. Activation is controlled by electric field-induced oxygen migration across the ionic liquid-semiconductor interface. In addition to activation of unannealed devices, it is shown that threshold voltages of a transistormore » can be linearly tuned between the enhancement and depletion modes. Finally, the first ever example of transparent flexible thin film metal oxide transistor on a polyamide substrate created using this simple technique is demonstrated. Finally, this study demonstrates the potential of field-induced activation as a promising alternative to traditional postdeposition thermal annealing which opens the door to wide scale implementation into flexible electronic applications.« less

  5. Ionic Liquid Activation of Amorphous Metal-Oxide Semiconductors for Flexible Transparent Electronic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Pudasaini, Pushpa Raj; Noh, Joo Hyon; Wong, Anthony T.; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Haglund, Amanda V.; Dai, Sheng; Ward, Thomas Zac; Mandrus, David; Rack, Philip D.

    2016-02-09

    To begin this abstract, amorphous metal-oxide semiconductors offer the high carrier mobilities and excellent large-area uniformity required for high performance, transparent, flexible electronic devices; however, a critical bottleneck to their widespread implementation is the need to activate these materials at high temperatures which are not compatible with flexible polymer substrates. The highly controllable activation of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide semiconductor channels using ionic liquid gating at room temperature is reported. Activation is controlled by electric field-induced oxygen migration across the ionic liquid-semiconductor interface. In addition to activation of unannealed devices, it is shown that threshold voltages of a transistor can be linearly tuned between the enhancement and depletion modes. Finally, the first ever example of transparent flexible thin film metal oxide transistor on a polyamide substrate created using this simple technique is demonstrated. Finally, this study demonstrates the potential of field-induced activation as a promising alternative to traditional postdeposition thermal annealing which opens the door to wide scale implementation into flexible electronic applications.

  6. Acidity-Controlled Conducting Polymer Films for Organic Thermoelectric Devices with Horizontal and Vertical Architectures

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woongki; Song, Myeonghun; Park, Soohyung; Nam, Sungho; Seo, Jooyeok; Kim, Hwajeong; Kim, Youngkyoo

    2016-01-01

    Organic thermoelectric devices (OTEDs) are recognized one of the next generation energy conversion platforms because of their huge potentials for securing electricity continuously from even tiny heat sources in our daily life. The advantage of OTEDs can be attributable to the design freedom in device shapes and the low-cost fabrication by employing solution coating processes at low temperatures. As one of the major OTE materials to date, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) has been used, but no study has been yet carried out on its acidity control even though the acidic components in OTEDs can seriously affect the device performance upon operation. Here we demonstrate that the addition of aniline (a weak base) can control the acidity of PEDOT:PSS and enhance the performance of OTEDs. In particular, the vertical OTEDs with aniline-doped PEDOT:PSS films (active area = 1.0 cm2) could continuously generate electricity (0.06 nW) even at low temperatures (<38 °C) when they were mounted on a desk lamp (power = 24 W). PMID:27667013

  7. Development of a confocal ultrasound device using an inertial cavitation control for transfection in-vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mestas, J. L.; Chettab, K.; Roux, S.; Prieur, F.; Lafond, M.; Dumontet, C.; Lafon, C.

    2015-12-01

    Sonoporation using low-frequency high-pressure ultrasound (US) is a non-viral approach for in vitro and in vivo gene delivery. We developed a new sonoporation device designed for spatial and temporal control of ultrasound cavitation. This device was evaluated for the in vitro transfection efficiency of a plasmid coding for Green Fluorescent Protein (peGFP- C1) in adherent and non-adherent cell lines. The frequency spectrum of the signal receive by a hydrophone is used to compute a cavitation index (CI) representative of the inertial cavitation activity. The influence of the CI on transfection efficiency, as well as reproducibility were determined. A real-time feedback loop control on CI was integrated in the process to regulate the cavitation level during sonoporation. In both adherent and non-adherent cell lines, the sonoporation device produced a highly efficient transfection of peGFP-C1 (40-80%), as determined by flow cytometry analysis of GFP expression, along with a low rate of mortality assessed by propidium iodide staining. Moreover, the sonoporation of non-adherent cell lines Jurkat and K562 was found to be equivalent to nucleofection in terms of efficiency and toxicity while these two cell lines were resistant to transfection with lipofection.

  8. Acidity-Controlled Conducting Polymer Films for Organic Thermoelectric Devices with Horizontal and Vertical Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woongki; Song, Myeonghun; Park, Soohyung; Nam, Sungho; Seo, Jooyeok; Kim, Hwajeong; Kim, Youngkyoo

    2016-09-01

    Organic thermoelectric devices (OTEDs) are recognized one of the next generation energy conversion platforms because of their huge potentials for securing electricity continuously from even tiny heat sources in our daily life. The advantage of OTEDs can be attributable to the design freedom in device shapes and the low-cost fabrication by employing solution coating processes at low temperatures. As one of the major OTE materials to date, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) has been used, but no study has been yet carried out on its acidity control even though the acidic components in OTEDs can seriously affect the device performance upon operation. Here we demonstrate that the addition of aniline (a weak base) can control the acidity of PEDOT:PSS and enhance the performance of OTEDs. In particular, the vertical OTEDs with aniline-doped PEDOT:PSS films (active area = 1.0 cm2) could continuously generate electricity (0.06 nW) even at low temperatures (<38 °C) when they were mounted on a desk lamp (power = 24 W).

  9. Biofuel cell controlled by enzyme logic network--approaching physiologically regulated devices.

    PubMed

    Tam, Tsz Kin; Pita, Marcos; Ornatska, Maryna; Katz, Evgeny

    2009-09-01

    A "smart" biofuel cell switchable ON and OFF upon application of several chemical signals processed by an enzyme logic network was designed. The biocomputing system performing logic operations on the input signals was composed of four enzymes: alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), amyloglucosidase (AGS), invertase (INV) and glucose dehydrogenase (GDH). These enzymes were activated by different combinations of chemical input signals: NADH, acetaldehyde, maltose and sucrose. The sequence of biochemical reactions catalyzed by the enzymes models a logic network composed of concatenated AND/OR gates. Upon application of specific "successful" patterns of the chemical input signals, the cascade of biochemical reactions resulted in the formation of gluconic acid, thus producing acidic pH in the solution. This resulted in the activation of a pH-sensitive redox-polymer-modified cathode in the biofuel cell, thus, switching ON the entire cell and dramatically increasing its power output. Application of another chemical signal (urea in the presence of urease) resulted in the return to the initial neutral pH value, when the O(2)-reducing cathode and the entire cell are in the mute state. The reversible activation-inactivation of the biofuel cell was controlled by the enzymatic reactions logically processing a number of chemical input signals applied in different combinations. The studied biofuel cell exemplifies a new kind of bioelectronic device where the bioelectronic function is controlled by a biocomputing system. Such devices will provide a new dimension in bioelectronics and biocomputing benefiting from the integration of both concepts.

  10. INVITED PAPER: Application of an active device for helicopter noise reduction in JAXA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Shigeru; Kobiki, Noboru; Tanabe, Yasutada

    2010-02-01

    Important issues in noise problems for current helicopters are described. An active tab (AT) was developed as a new active device for noise/vibration reduction under research cooperation between Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and Kawada Industries, Inc. The wind tunnel test was conducted in order to investigate the effectiveness of the AT on the aeroacoustic characteristics of a helicopter. From the wind tunnel test, the capability of reducing blade vortex interaction (BVI) noise by an AT was verified. A new control law using instantaneous pressure change on a blade during BVI phenomena was introduced and applied to the wind tunnel testing. This new control law shows reasonable controllability for helicopter noise reduction. Furthermore, in order to analyze noise characteristics, the advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code named JAXA_ov3d was developed in JAXA and extended to include CFD-CSD (computational structure dynamics) coupling by using the beam theory for blade deformation.

  11. 40 CFR 63.985 - Nonflare control devices used to control emissions from storage vessels and low throughput...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... vapors, the type of condenser, and the design flow rate of the emission stream. (ii) Performance test. A... control device as described in paragraph (b)(1)(i) of this section if a performance test will be performed... Compliance Status whenever emissions of regulated material are routed to the control device except...

  12. Novel Active Combustion Control Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caspermeyer, Matt

    2014-01-01

    This project presents an innovative solution for active combustion control. Relative to the state of the art, this concept provides frequency modulation (greater than 1,000 Hz) in combination with high-amplitude modulation (in excess of 30 percent flow) and can be adapted to a large range of fuel injector sizes. Existing valves often have low flow modulation strength. To achieve higher flow modulation requires excessively large valves or too much electrical power to be practical. This active combustion control valve (ACCV) has high-frequency and -amplitude modulation, consumes low electrical power, is closely coupled with the fuel injector for modulation strength, and is practical in size and weight. By mitigating combustion instabilities at higher frequencies than have been previously achieved (approximately 1,000 Hz), this new technology enables gas turbines to run at operating points that produce lower emissions and higher performance.

  13. Active controls for ride smoothing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, D. W.; Thompson, G. O.

    1976-01-01

    Active controls technology offers great promise for significantly smoothing the ride, and thus improving public and air carrier acceptance, of certain types of transport aircraft. Recent findings which support this promise are presented in the following three pertinent areas: (1) Ride quality versus degree of traveler satisfaction; (2) significant findings from a feasibility study of a ride smoothing system; and (3) potential ride problems identified for several advanced transport concepts.

  14. Contemporary and futuristic views of pollution control devices in foundries.

    PubMed

    Krishnaraj, R

    2015-10-01

    Foundry practices are used in contemporary world to produce large volume of components and products. Foundry practices involve the melting of metals and pouring the molten metal into the cavities called molds. On solidification, the metals which assume the shape of molds are removed as castings. Foundries that employ these practices were growing in large number till the middle part of the twentieth century in the world. After the middle part of the twentieth century, the world community begun to realize that, foundries were emitting pollutants which were affecting the health of humans. In order to overcome this situation, several countries in the world promulgated laws stipulating the maximum level of pollutants that can emit by foundries. These laws affected the functioning and growth of foundries. In order to sustain amidst these constraints, foundries begun to install energy efficient melting technologies and pollution control devices (PCDs). In this back ground, this paper reports to assess the contemporary scenario and project the future needs for sustaining the foundries. During the conduct of this literature review, it was discernable that, research papers have reported three categories of researches. In the first category of research papers, the researches reporting the achievement of cleaner production technologies in foundries using PCDs have appeared. In the second category of research papers, the application of cleaner production technology in foundries located in different countries has been examined. In the third category of research papers, the application of efficient melting technologies and PCDs in different clusters of foundries located in different parts of world has been explored. Subsequently implementation technics of Environmental Management System in cleaner production technics in foundries has been described the analysis of the information and knowledge drawn from these three categories of papers has revealed that, researches exploring the

  15. 40 CFR 61.349 - Standards: Closed-vent systems and control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... management unit vented to the control device except when maintenance or repair of the waste management unit... Emission Standard for Benzene Waste Operations § 61.349 Standards: Closed-vent systems and control devices... process heater) shall meet one of the following conditions: (A) Reduce the organic emissions vented to...

  16. 32 CFR 636.21 - Obedience to official traffic control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Obedience to official traffic control devices... (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION (SPECIFIC INSTALLATIONS) Fort Stewart, Georgia § 636.21 Obedience to official traffic control devices. (a) All...

  17. 32 CFR 636.21 - Obedience to official traffic control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Obedience to official traffic control devices... (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION (SPECIFIC INSTALLATIONS) Fort Stewart, Georgia § 636.21 Obedience to official traffic control devices. (a) All...

  18. 32 CFR 636.21 - Obedience to official traffic control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Obedience to official traffic control devices... (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION (SPECIFIC INSTALLATIONS) Fort Stewart, Georgia § 636.21 Obedience to official traffic control devices. (a) All...

  19. 32 CFR 636.21 - Obedience to official traffic control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Obedience to official traffic control devices... (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION (SPECIFIC INSTALLATIONS) Fort Stewart, Georgia § 636.21 Obedience to official traffic control devices. (a) All...

  20. 32 CFR 636.21 - Obedience to official traffic control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Obedience to official traffic control devices... (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION (SPECIFIC INSTALLATIONS) Fort Stewart, Georgia § 636.21 Obedience to official traffic control devices. (a) All...

  1. An Empirical Study on Operator Interface Design for Handheld Devices to Control Micro Aerial Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    An Empirical Study on Operator Interface Design for Handheld Devices to Control Micro Aerial Vehicles Ming Hou...Report DRDC Toronto TR 2010-075 October 2010 An Empirical Study on Operator Interface Design for Handheld Devices to...drives the need for a small and light controller which will not hinder a soldier carrying it. This requirement brings an issue of designing an

  2. Optogenetic control of epileptiform activity

    PubMed Central

    Tønnesen, Jan; Sørensen, Andreas T.; Deisseroth, Karl; Lundberg, Cecilia; Kokaia, Merab

    2009-01-01

    The optogenetic approach to gain control over neuronal excitability both in vitro and in vivo has emerged as a fascinating scientific tool to explore neuronal networks, but it also opens possibilities for developing novel treatment strategies for neurologic conditions. We have explored whether such an optogenetic approach using the light-driven halorhodopsin chloride pump from Natronomonas pharaonis (NpHR), modified for mammalian CNS expression to hyperpolarize central neurons, may inhibit excessive hyperexcitability and epileptiform activity. We show that a lentiviral vector containing the NpHR gene under the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα promoter transduces principal cells of the hippocampus and cortex and hyperpolarizes these cells, preventing generation of action potentials and epileptiform activity during optical stimulation. This study proves a principle, that selective hyperpolarization of principal cortical neurons by NpHR is sufficient to curtail paroxysmal activity in transduced neurons and can inhibit stimulation train-induced bursting in hippocampal organotypic slice cultures, which represents a model tissue of pharmacoresistant epilepsy. This study demonstrates that the optogenetic approach may prove useful for controlling epileptiform activity and opens a future perspective to develop it into a strategy to treat epilepsy. PMID:19581573

  3. Control and automation of multilayered integrated microfluidic device fabrication.

    PubMed

    Kipper, Sarit; Frolov, Ludmila; Guy, Ortal; Pellach, Michal; Glick, Yair; Malichi, Asaf; Knisbacher, Binyamin A; Barbiro-Michaely, Efrat; Avrahami, Dorit; Yavets-Chen, Yehuda; Levanon, Erez Y; Gerber, Doron

    2017-01-31

    Integrated microfluidics is a sophisticated three-dimensional (multi layer) solution for high complexity serial or parallel processes. Fabrication of integrated microfluidic devices requires soft lithography and the stacking of thin-patterned PDMS layers. Precise layer alignment and bonding is crucial. There are no previously reported standards for alignment of the layers, which is mostly performed using uncontrolled processes with very low alignment success. As a result, integrated microfluidics is mostly used in academia rather than in the many potential industrial applications. We have designed and manufactured a semiautomatic Microfluidic Device Assembly System (μDAS) for full device production. μDAS comprises an electrooptic mechanical system consisting of four main parts: optical system, smart media holder (for PDMS), a micropositioning xyzθ system and a macropositioning XY mechanism. The use of the μDAS yielded valuable information regarding PDMS as the material for device fabrication, revealed previously unidentified errors, and enabled optimization of a robust fabrication process. In addition, we have demonstrated the utilization of the μDAS technology for fabrication of a complex 3 layered device with over 12 000 micromechanical valves and an array of 64 × 64 DNA spots on a glass substrate with high yield and high accuracy. We increased fabrication yield from 25% to about 85% with an average layer alignment error of just ∼4 μm. It also increased our protein expression yields from 80% to over 90%, allowing us to investigate more proteins per experiment. The μDAS has great potential to become a valuable tool for both advancing integrated microfluidics in academia and producing and applying microfluidic devices in the industry.

  4. Mathematical modeling of a flat-membrane-controlled release device

    SciTech Connect

    Ramraj, R.; Farrell, S.; Loney, N.W.

    1999-08-01

    The closed form solution to a mathematical model of a flat membrane device successfully predicts the release profile of benzoic acid. Physically, the device consists of a given concentration of benzoic acid in octanol (reservoir) bounded by a microporous flat film (Cellgard 2400) with water-filled pores. The prediction shows excellent agreement with the experimentally derived release profile (maximum difference < 10%). Predicted results are obtained from the use of the steady state plus the first term of the transient solution (infinite series) and with the use of the first nonzero eigenvalue.

  5. Nanoporous noninvasive cellular electrical activity-based analysis devices.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Shalini; Quijano, Jorge

    2007-03-01

    In recent years, rapid advancements have been made in the biomedical applications of microtechnology and nanotechnology. While the focus of such technologies have been primarily on in vitro analytical and diagnostic tools, more recently in vivo therapeutic and sensing applications have gained attention. The long-term integration of cells with inorganic materials provides the basis for novel sensing platforms. The work presented here focuses on the ability to maintain cells long-term in nanoporous silicon-based microenvironments. This article describes the creation of nanoporous, biocompatible, alumina membranes as a platform for incorporation into a cell-based device targeted for in situ recording of cellular electrical activity variations due to the changes associated with the surrounding microenvironments. Studies described herein focus on the interaction of nanoporous alumina substrates embedded in silicon patterned with cells of interest. The fidelity of such a system is demonstrated in terms of viability, proliferation, and functionality. The capability of such microfabricated nanoporous membranes, as in vitro for cell-based assays for sensing and drug delivery applications, is also demonstrated. It has potential in vivo application for therapeutic immunoisolation.

  6. SHADE: A Shape-Memory-Activated Device Promoting Ankle Dorsiflexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittaccio, S.; Viscuso, S.; Rossini, M.; Magoni, L.; Pirovano, S.; Villa, E.; Besseghini, S.; Molteni, F.

    2009-08-01

    Acute post-stroke rehabilitation protocols include passive mobilization as a means to prevent contractures. A device (SHADE) that provides repetitive passive motion to a flaccid ankle by using shape memory alloy actuators could be of great help in providing this treatment. A suitable actuator was designed as a cartridge of approximately 150 × 20 × 15 mm, containing 2.5 m of 0.25 mm diameter NiTi wire. This actuator was activated by Joule’s effect employing a 7 s current input at 0.7 A, which provided 10 N through 76 mm displacement. Cooling and reset by natural convection took 30 s. A prototype of SHADE was assembled with two thermoplastic shells hinged together at the ankle and strapped on the shin and foot. Two actuators were fixed on the upper shell while an inextensible thread connected each NiTi wire to the foot shell. The passive ankle motion (passive range of motion, PROM) generated by SHADE was evaluated optoelectronically on three flaccid patients (58 ± 5 years old); acceptability was assessed by a questionnaire presented to further three flaccid patients (44 ± 11.5 years old) who used SHADE for 5 days, 30 min a day. SHADE was well accepted by all patients, produced good PROM, and caused no pain. The results prove that suitable limb mobilization can be produced by SMA actuators.

  7. Active pixel as dosimetric device for interventional radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servoli, L.; Baldaccini, F.; Biasini, M.; Checcucci, B.; Chiocchini, S.; Cicioni, R.; Conti, E.; Di Lorenzo, R.; Dipilato, A. C.; Esposito, A.; Fanó, L.; Paolucci, M.; Passeri, D.; Pentiricci, A.; Placidi, P.

    2013-08-01

    Interventional Radiology (IR) is a subspecialty of radiology comprehensive of all minimally invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures performed using radiological devices to obtain image guidance. The interventional procedures are potentially harmful for interventional radiologists and medical staff due to the X-ray diffusion by the patient's body. The characteristic energy range of the diffused photons spans few tens of keV. In this work we will present a proposal for a new X-ray sensing element in the energy range of interest for IR procedures. The sensing element will then be assembled in a dosimeter prototype, capable of real-time measurement, packaged in a small form-factor, with wireless communication and no external power supply to be used for individual operators dosimetry for IR procedures. For the sensor, which is the heart of the system, we considered three different Active Pixel Sensors (APS). They have shown a good capability as single X-ray photon detectors, up to several tens keV photon energy. Two dosimetric quantities have been considered, the number of detected photons and the measured energy deposition. Both observables have a linear dependence with the dose, as measured by commercial dosimeters. The uncertainties in the measurement are dominated by statistic and can be pushed at ˜5% for all the sensors under test.

  8. On-line Monitoring and Active Control for Transformer Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jiabi; Zhao, Tong; Tian, Chun; Wang, Xia; He, Zhenhua; Duan, Lunfeng

    This paper introduces the system for on-line monitoring and active noise control towards the transformer noise based on LabVIEW and the hardware equipment including the hardware and software. For the hardware part, it is mainly focused on the composition and the role of hardware devices, as well as the mounting location in the active noise control experiment. And the software part introduces the software flow chats, the measurement and analysis module for the sound pressure level including A, B, C weighting methods, the 1/n octave spectrum and the power spectrum, active noise control module and noise data access module.

  9. PREFACE: Atomically controlled fabrication technology: new physics and functional device realization Atomically controlled fabrication technology: new physics and functional device realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Yuji; Kasai, Hideaki

    2011-10-01

    To realize next generation functional devices, atomic level controllability of the application and fabrication techniques is necessary. The conventional route to advance solid state devices, which involves improvement of 'instrumental accuracy', is now facing a major paradigm shift towards 'phenomenal accuracy'. Therefore, to keep up with this critical turn in the development of devices, pioneering research (both theoretical and experimental) on relevant materials, focusing on new physics at the atomic scale, is inevitable. This special section contains articles on the advancements in fabrication of functional devices with an emphasis on the exploration, clarification and understanding of atomistic phenomena. Research articles reporting theoretical and experimental findings on various materials such as semiconductors, metals, magnetic and organic systems, collectively present and 'capture' the appropriate processes and mechanisms of this rapidly developing field. The theoretical investigations employ first-principles quantum-mechanical simulations to clarify and bring about design principles and guidelines, or to develop more reliable computational methods. Experimental studies, on the other hand, introduce novel capabilities to build, view and manipulate materials at the atomic scale by employing pioneering techniques. Thus, the section pays significant attention to novel structures and properties and the accompanying fabrication techniques and design arising from the understanding of properties and structures at the atomic scale. We hope that researchers in the area of physics, materials science and engineering, interested in the development of functional devices via atomic level control, will find valuable information in this collaborative work. We are grateful to all of the authors for their contributions. Atomically controlled fabrication contents On the mechanism of carbon nanotube formation: the role of the catalyst G N Ayre, T Uchino, B Mazumder, A L Hector

  10. Polymer/fullerene photovoltaic devices: Nanoscale control of the interface by thermally-controlled interdiffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drees, Martin

    -PPV bulk in the form of >10 nm clusters. This clustering of C60 is a result of its tendency to crystallize and the low miscibility of C 60 in MEH-PPV, leading to strong phase separation. To improve the interdiffusion process, the donor polymer is replaced by poly(3-octylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3OT), which has a better miscibility with C60. Again, the photocurrents of the interdiffused devices are improved significantly. A monochromatic power conversion efficiency of 1.5% is obtained for illumination of 3.8 mW/cm2 at 470 nm. The polymer concentration in unheated and interdiffused films is studied with Auger spectroscopy in combination with ion beam milling. The concentration profile shows a distinct interface between P3OT and C60 in unheated films and a slow rise of the P3OT concentration throughout a large cross-section of the interdiffused film. TEM studies on P3OT/C60 films show that C60 still has some tendency to form clusters. The results of this thesis demonstrate that thermally-controlled interdiffusion is a viable approach for fabrication of efficient photovoltaic devices through nanoscale control of composition and morphology. These results are also used to draw conclusions about the influence of film morphology on the photovoltaic device efficiency and to identify important issues related to materials choice for the interdiffusion process. Prospective variations in materials choice are suggested to achieve better film morphologies.

  11. Development of a laboratory demonstration model active cleaning device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, R. L.; Gillette, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    A laboratory demonstration model of a device for removing contaminant films from optical surfaces in space was developed. The development of a plasma tube, which would produce the desired cleaning effects under high vacuum conditions, represented the major problem in the program. This plasma tube development is discussed, and the resulting laboratory demonstration-model device is described.

  12. Diagnostic for two-mode variable valve activation device

    SciTech Connect

    Fedewa, Andrew M

    2014-01-07

    A method is provided for diagnosing a multi-mode valve train device which selectively provides high lift and low lift to a combustion valve of an internal combustion engine having a camshaft phaser actuated by an electric motor. The method includes applying a variable electric current to the electric motor to achieve a desired camshaft phaser operational mode and commanding the multi-mode valve train device to a desired valve train device operational mode selected from a high lift mode and a low lift mode. The method also includes monitoring the variable electric current and calculating a first characteristic of the parameter. The method also includes comparing the calculated first characteristic against a predetermined value of the first characteristic measured when the multi-mode valve train device is known to be in the desired valve train device operational mode.

  13. Journey to Flexible, Reliable, Laboratory Platform for Simultaneous Control of Multiple Reactive Power Producing Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, Jason; Rizy, D Tom; Kueck, John D

    2007-01-01

    Herein is discussed the instrumentation and control requirements for achieving the goal of operating multiple Distributed Energy (DE) devices in parallel to regulate local voltage. The process for establishing the flexible laboratory control and data acquisition system that allows for the integration of multiple Distributed Energy (DE) devices in XXXX Laboratory's Distributed Energy - Communications and Controls Laboratory (DECC) is discussed. The DE devices control local distribution system voltage through dynamic reactive power production. Although original efforts were made to control the reactive power (RP) output using information from commercially available meters specifically designed for monitoring and analyzing electric power values, these "intelligent" meters did not provide the flexibility needed. A very flexible and capable real-time monitoring and control system was selected after the evaluation of various methods of data acquisition (DAQ) and control. The purpose of this paper is to describe the DAQ and controls system development. The chosen controller is a commercially available real-time controller from dSPACE. This controller has many excellent features including a very easy programming platform through Simulink and Matlab's Real Time Workshop. The dSPACE system proved to provide both the flexibility and expandability needed to integrate and control the RP producing devices under consideration. The desire was to develop controls with this flexible laboratory instrumentation and controls setup that could be eventually be included in an embedded controller on a DE device. Some experimental results are included that clearly show that some functional control strategies are currently being tested.

  14. High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Devices using Trap-Controlled Quantum-Dot Ink prepared via Phase-Transfer Exchange.

    PubMed

    Aqoma, Havid; Al Mubarok, Muhibullah; Hadmojo, Wisnu Tantyo; Lee, Eun-Hye; Kim, Tae-Wook; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Oh, Seung-Hwan; Jang, Sung-Yeon

    2017-03-07

    Colloidal-quantum-dot (CQD) photovoltaic devices are promising candidates for low-cost power sources owing to their low-temperature solution processability and bandgap tunability. A power conversion efficiency (PCE) of >10% is achieved for these devices; however, there are several remaining obstacles to their commercialization, including their high energy loss due to surface trap states and the complexity of the multiple-step CQD-layer-deposition process. Herein, high-efficiency photovoltaic devices prepared with CQD-ink using a phase-transfer-exchange (PTE) method are reported. Using CQD-ink, the fabrication of active layers by single-step coating and the suppression of surface trap states are achieved simultaneously. The CQD-ink photovoltaic devices achieve much higher PCEs (10.15% with a certified PCE of 9.61%) than the control devices (7.85%) owing to improved charge drift and diffusion. Notably, the CQD-ink devices show much lower energy loss than other reported high-efficiency CQD devices. This result reveals that the PTE method is an effective strategy for controlling trap states in CQDs.

  15. Linear motion device and method for inserting and withdrawing control rods

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jay E.

    1984-01-01

    A linear motion device, more specifically a control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) for inserting and withdrawing control rods into a reactor core, is capable of independently and sequentially positioning two sets of control rods with a single motor stator and rotor. The CRDM disclosed can control more than one control rod lead screw without incurring a substantial increase in the size of the mechanism.

  16. Electrooptical behaviour and control of a suspended particle device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergaz, R.; Pena, J. M. S.; Barrios, D.; Pérez, I.; Torres, J. C.

    2007-09-01

    A suspended particle device is made by electrophoretic rod-shape particles suspended in an organic gel. These particles can twist and order with an applied voltage. The light crossing the material suffers more or less scattering according to that voltage. A commercial device is analyzed in this work. Several electrical models are tested, being the best one a series configuration including a shunt double layer capacitance and a Warburg element. Main parameter errors are below 2%, showing the quality of this new electrical model for this kind of devices. A quick method to improve the manufacturing process on-line is also proposed. Impedance measurements will be fitted to the selected electrical model, in order to check physical aspects such as charge diffusion lengths and response times. An electronic driver to obtain several levels of device transmission has been also developed, being its linearity demonstrated too. Colour changes are negligible for the main part of the bleaching process. All these features allow the use of this set in domotics application.

  17. Theory of electrically controlled resonant tunneling spin devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. -Y.; Cartoixa, Xavier

    2004-01-01

    We report device concepts that exploit spin-orbit coupling for creating spin polarized current sources using nonmagnetic semiconductor resonant tunneling heterostructures, without external magnetic fields. The resonant interband tunneling psin filter exploits large valence band spin-orbit interaction to provide strong spin selectivity.

  18. Electronic security systems and active implantable medical devices.

    PubMed

    Irnich, Werner

    2002-08-01

    How do active implantable medical devices react in the presence of strong magnetic fields in the frequency range between extremely low frequency (ELF) to radiofrequency (RF) as they are emitted by electronic security systems (ESS)? There are three different sorts of ESSs: electronic article surveillance (EAS) devices, metal detector (MDS) devices, and radiofrequency identification (RFID) systems. Common to all is the production of magnetic fields. There is an abundance of literature concerning interference by ESS gates with respect to if there is an influence possible and if such an influence can bear a risk for the AIMD wearers. However, there has been no attempt to study the physical mechanism nor to develop a model of how and under which conditions magnetic fields can influence pacemakers and defibrillators and how they could be disarmed by technological means. It is too often assumed that interference of AIMD with ESS is inevitable. Exogenous signals of similar intensity and rhythm to heart signals can be misinterpreted and, thus, confuse the implant. Important for the interference coupling mechanism is the differentiation between a "unipolar" and a "bipolar" system. With respect to magnetic fields, the left side implanted pacemaker is the most unfavorable case as the lead forms approximately a semicircular area of maximum 225 cm2 into which a voltage can be induced. This assumption yields an interference coupling model that can be expressed by simple mathematics. The worst-case conditions for induced interference voltages are a coupling area of 225 cm2 that is representative for a large human, a homogeneous magnetic field perpendicular to the area formed by the lead, and a unipolar ventricular pacemaker system that is implanted on the left side of the thorax and has the highest interference sensitivity. In bipolar systems the fields must be 17 times larger when compared to a unipolar system to have the same effect. The magnetic field for interfering with ICDs

  19. Graphene-coated meshes for electroactive flow control devices utilizing two antagonistic functions of repellency and permeability

    PubMed Central

    Tabassian, Rassoul; Oh, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Sooyeun; Kim, Donggyu; Ryu, Seunghwa; Cho, Seung-Min; Koratkar, Nikhil; Oh, Il-Kwon

    2016-01-01

    The wettability of graphene on various substrates has been intensively investigated for practical applications including surgical and medical tools, textiles, water harvesting, self-cleaning, oil spill removal and microfluidic devices. However, most previous studies have been limited to investigating the intrinsic and passive wettability of graphene and graphene hybrid composites. Here, we report the electrowetting of graphene-coated metal meshes for use as electroactive flow control devices, utilizing two antagonistic functions, hydrophobic repellency versus liquid permeability. Graphene coating was able to prevent the thermal oxidation and corrosion problems that plague unprotected metal meshes, while also maintaining its hydrophobicity. The shapes of liquid droplets and the degree of water penetration through the graphene-coated meshes were controlled by electrical stimuli based on the functional control of hydrophobic repellency and liquid permeability. Furthermore, using the graphene-coated metal meshes, we developed two active flow devices demonstrating the dynamic locomotion of water droplets and electroactive flow switching. PMID:27796291

  20. Graphene-coated meshes for electroactive flow control devices utilizing two antagonistic functions of repellency and permeability.

    PubMed

    Tabassian, Rassoul; Oh, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Sooyeun; Kim, Donggyu; Ryu, Seunghwa; Cho, Seung-Min; Koratkar, Nikhil; Oh, Il-Kwon

    2016-10-31

    The wettability of graphene on various substrates has been intensively investigated for practical applications including surgical and medical tools, textiles, water harvesting, self-cleaning, oil spill removal and microfluidic devices. However, most previous studies have been limited to investigating the intrinsic and passive wettability of graphene and graphene hybrid composites. Here, we report the electrowetting of graphene-coated metal meshes for use as electroactive flow control devices, utilizing two antagonistic functions, hydrophobic repellency versus liquid permeability. Graphene coating was able to prevent the thermal oxidation and corrosion problems that plague unprotected metal meshes, while also maintaining its hydrophobicity. The shapes of liquid droplets and the degree of water penetration through the graphene-coated meshes were controlled by electrical stimuli based on the functional control of hydrophobic repellency and liquid permeability. Furthermore, using the graphene-coated metal meshes, we developed two active flow devices demonstrating the dynamic locomotion of water droplets and electroactive flow switching.

  1. Graphene-coated meshes for electroactive flow control devices utilizing two antagonistic functions of repellency and permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabassian, Rassoul; Oh, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Sooyeun; Kim, Donggyu; Ryu, Seunghwa; Cho, Seung-Min; Koratkar, Nikhil; Oh, Il-Kwon

    2016-10-01

    The wettability of graphene on various substrates has been intensively investigated for practical applications including surgical and medical tools, textiles, water harvesting, self-cleaning, oil spill removal and microfluidic devices. However, most previous studies have been limited to investigating the intrinsic and passive wettability of graphene and graphene hybrid composites. Here, we report the electrowetting of graphene-coated metal meshes for use as electroactive flow control devices, utilizing two antagonistic functions, hydrophobic repellency versus liquid permeability. Graphene coating was able to prevent the thermal oxidation and corrosion problems that plague unprotected metal meshes, while also maintaining its hydrophobicity. The shapes of liquid droplets and the degree of water penetration through the graphene-coated meshes were controlled by electrical stimuli based on the functional control of hydrophobic repellency and liquid permeability. Furthermore, using the graphene-coated metal meshes, we developed two active flow devices demonstrating the dynamic locomotion of water droplets and electroactive flow switching.

  2. Mobile technology habits: patterns of association among device usage, intertemporal preference, impulse control, and reward sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Wilmer, Henry H; Chein, Jason M

    2016-10-01

    Mobile electronic devices are playing an increasingly pervasive role in our daily activities. Yet, there has been very little empirical research investigating how mobile technology habits might relate to individual differences in cognition and affect. The research presented in this paper provides evidence that heavier investment in mobile devices is correlated with a relatively weaker tendency to delay gratification (as measured by a delay discounting task) and a greater inclination toward impulsive behavior (i.e., weaker impulse control, assessed behaviorally and through self-report) but is not related to individual differences in sensitivity to reward. Analyses further demonstrated that individual variation in impulse control mediates the relationship between mobile technology usage and delay of gratification. Although based on correlational results, these findings lend some backing to concerns that increased use of portable electronic devices could have negative impacts on impulse control and the ability to appropriately valuate delayed rewards.

  3. Description of a digital computer simulation of an Annular Momentum Control Device (AMCD) laboratory test model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolley, C. T.; Groom, N. J.

    1981-01-01

    A description of a digital computer simulation of an Annular Momentum Control Device (AMCD) laboratory model is presented. The AMCD is a momentum exchange device which is under development as an advanced control effector for spacecraft attitude control systems. The digital computer simulation of this device incorporates the following models: six degree of freedom rigid body dynamics; rim warp; controller dynamics; nonlinear distributed element axial bearings; as well as power driver and power supply current limits. An annotated FORTRAN IV source code listing of the computer program is included.

  4. A cerebellar model for predictive motor control tested in a brain-based device.

    PubMed

    McKinstry, Jeffrey L; Edelman, Gerald M; Krichmar, Jeffrey L

    2006-02-28

    The cerebellum is known to be critical for accurate adaptive control and motor learning. We propose here a mechanism by which the cerebellum may replace reflex control with predictive control. This mechanism is embedded in a learning rule (the delayed eligibility trace rule) in which synapses onto a Purkinje cell or onto a cell in the deep cerebellar nuclei become eligible for plasticity only after a fixed delay from the onset of suprathreshold presynaptic activity. To investigate the proposal that the cerebellum is a general-purpose predictive controller guided by a delayed eligibility trace rule, a computer model based on the anatomy and dynamics of the cerebellum was constructed. It contained components simulating cerebellar cortex and deep cerebellar nuclei, and it received input from a middle temporal visual area and the inferior olive. The model was incorporated in a real-world brain-based device (BBD) built on a Segway robotic platform that learned to traverse curved paths. The BBD learned which visual motion cues predicted impending collisions and used this experience to avoid path boundaries. During learning, the BBD adapted its velocity and turning rate to successfully traverse various curved paths. By examining neuronal activity and synaptic changes during this behavior, we found that the cerebellar circuit selectively responded to motion cues in specific receptive fields of simulated middle temporal visual areas. The system described here prompts several hypotheses about the relationship between perception and motor control and may be useful in the development of general-purpose motor learning systems for machines.

  5. Methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullis, W. M. (Editor)

    1972-01-01

    Significant accomplishments include development of a procedure to correct for the substantial differences of transistor delay time as measured with different instruments or with the same instrument at different frequencies; association of infrared response spectra of poor quality germanium gamma ray detectors with spectra of detectors fabricated from portions of a good crystal that had been degraded in known ways; and confirmation of the excellent quality and cosmetic appearance of ultrasonic bonds made with aluminum ribbon wire. Work is continuing on measurement of resistivity of semiconductor crystals; study of gold-doped silicon, development of the infrared response technique; evaluation of wire bonds and die attachment; and measurement of thermal properties of semiconductor devices, delay time and related carrier transport properties in junction devices, and noise properties of microwave diodes.

  6. New cosurface capacitive stimulators for the development of active osseointegrative implantable devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares Dos Santos, Marco P.; Marote, Ana; Santos, T.; Torrão, João; Ramos, A.; Simões, José A. O.; da Cruz E Silva, Odete A. B.; Furlani, Edward P.; Vieira, Sandra I.; Ferreira, Jorge A. F.

    2016-07-01

    Non-drug strategies based on biophysical stimulation have been emphasized for the treatment and prevention of musculoskeletal conditions. However, to date, an effective stimulation system for intracorporeal therapies has not been proposed. This is particularly true for active intramedullary implants that aim to optimize osseointegration. The increasing demand for these implants, particularly for hip and knee replacements, has driven the design of innovative stimulation systems that are effective in bone-implant integration. In this paper, a new cosurface-based capacitive system concept is proposed for the design of implantable devices that deliver controllable and personalized electric field stimuli to target tissues. A prototype architecture of this system was constructed for in vitro tests, and its ability to deliver controllable stimuli was numerically analyzed. Successful results were obtained for osteoblastic proliferation and differentiation in the in vitro tests. This work provides, for the first time, a design of a stimulation system that can be embedded in active implantable devices for controllable bone-implant integration and regeneration. The proposed cosurface design holds potential for the implementation of novel and innovative personalized stimulatory therapies based on the delivery of electric fields to bone cells.

  7. New cosurface capacitive stimulators for the development of active osseointegrative implantable devices

    PubMed Central

    Soares dos Santos, Marco P.; Marote, Ana; Santos, T.; Torrão, João; Ramos, A.; Simões, José A. O.; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A. B.; Furlani, Edward P.; Vieira, Sandra I.; Ferreira, Jorge A. F.

    2016-01-01

    Non-drug strategies based on biophysical stimulation have been emphasized for the treatment and prevention of musculoskeletal conditions. However, to date, an effective stimulation system for intracorporeal therapies has not been proposed. This is particularly true for active intramedullary implants that aim to optimize osseointegration. The increasing demand for these implants, particularly for hip and knee replacements, has driven the design of innovative stimulation systems that are effective in bone-implant integration. In this paper, a new cosurface-based capacitive system concept is proposed for the design of implantable devices that deliver controllable and personalized electric field stimuli to target tissues. A prototype architecture of this system was constructed for in vitro tests, and its ability to deliver controllable stimuli was numerically analyzed. Successful results were obtained for osteoblastic proliferation and differentiation in the in vitro tests. This work provides, for the first time, a design of a stimulation system that can be embedded in active implantable devices for controllable bone-implant integration and regeneration. The proposed cosurface design holds potential for the implementation of novel and innovative personalized stimulatory therapies based on the delivery of electric fields to bone cells. PMID:27456818

  8. Isolating plasma from blood using a dielectrophoresis-active hydrophoretic device.

    PubMed

    Yan, Sheng; Zhang, Jun; Alici, Gursel; Du, Haiping; Zhu, Yonggang; Li, Weihua

    2014-08-21

    Plasma is a complex substance that contains proteins and circulating nucleic acids and viruses that can be utilised for clinical diagnostics, albeit a precise analysis depends on the plasma being totally free of cells. We proposed the use of a dielectrophoresis (DEP)-active hydrophoretic method to isolate plasma from blood in a high-throughput manner. This microfluidic device consists of anisotropic microstructures embedded on the top of the channel which generate lateral pressure gradients while interdigitised electrodes lay on the bottom of the channel which can push particles or cells into a higher level using a negative DEP force. Large and small particles or cells (3 μm and 10 μm particles, and red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets) can be focused at the same time in our DEP-active hydrophoretic device at an appropriate flow rate and applied voltage. Based on this principle, all the blood cells were filtrated from whole blood and then the plasma was extracted with a purity of 94.2% and a yield of 16.5% at a flow rate of 10 μL min(-1). This solved the challenging problem caused by the relatively low throughput of the DEP based device. Our DEP-active hydrophoretic device is a flexible and tunable system that can control the lateral positions of particles by modulating the external voltages without redesigning and fabricating a new channel, and because it is easy to operate, it is easily compatible with other microfluidic platforms that are used for further detection.

  9. Design and control of a dual unidirectional brake hybrid actuation system for haptic devices.

    PubMed

    Rossa, Carlos; Lozada, José; Micaelli, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid actuators combining brakes and motors have emerged as an efficient solution to achieve high performance in haptic devices. In this paper, an actuation approach using two unidirectional brakes and a DC motor is proposed. The brakes are coupled to overrunning clutches and can apply a torque in only one rotational direction. The associated control laws, that are independent of the virtual environment model, calculate the control gains in real time in order limit the energy and the stiffness delivered by the motor to ensure stability. The reference torque is respected using the combination of the motor and the brake. Finally, an user experiment has been performed to evaluate the influence of passive and active torque differences in the perception of elasticity. The proposed actuator has a torque range of 0.03 Nm to 5.5 Nm with a 17.75 kNm (-2) torque density.

  10. Temperature control during therapeutic hypothermia for newborn encephalopathy using different Blanketrol devices.

    PubMed

    Laptook, Abbot R; Kilbride, Howard; Shepherd, Edward; McDonald, Scott A; Shankaran, Seetha; Truog, William; Das, Abhik; Higgins, Rosemary D

    2014-12-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia improves the survival and neurodevelopmental outcome of infants with newborn encephalopathy of a hypoxic-ischemic origin. The NICHD Neonatal Research Network (NRN) Whole Body Cooling trial used the Cincinnati Sub-Zero Blanketrol II to achieve therapeutic hypothermia. The Blanketrol III is now available and provides additional cooling modes that may result in better temperature control. This report is a retrospective comparison of infants undergoing hypothermia using two different cooling modes of the Blanketrol device. Infants from the NRN trial were cooled with the Blanketrol II using the Automatic control mode (B2 cohort) and were compared with infants from two new NRN centers that adopted the NRN protocol and used the Blanketrol III in a gradient mode (B3 cohort). The primary outcome was the percent time the esophageal temperature stayed between 33°C and 34°C (target 33.5°C) during maintenance of hypothermia. Cohorts had similar birth weight, gestational age, and level of encephalopathy at the initiation of therapy. Baseline esophageal temperature differed between groups (36.6°C ± 1.0°C for B2 vs. 33.9°C ± 1.2°C for B3, p<0.0001) reflecting the practice of passive cooling during transport prior to initiation of active device cooling in the B3 cohort. This difference prevented comparison of temperatures during induction of hypothermia. During maintenance of hypothermia the mean and standard deviation of the percent time between 33°C and 34°C was similar for B2 compared to B3 cohorts (94.8% ± 0.1% vs. 95.8% ± 0.1%, respectively). Both the automatic and gradient control modes of the Blanketrol devices appear comparable in maintaining esophageal temperature within the target range during maintenance of therapeutic hypothermia.

  11. Acute Effects of a Therapeutic Mobility Device on Physical Activity and Heart Rate in Children with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauck, Janet L.; Ulrich, Dale A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this feasibility study was to provide an opportunity to increase physical activity (PA) and heart rate (HR) for children with Down syndrome (DS) during unstructured group exercise utilizing a riding device called the Power Pumper®. Method: Twenty-four children aged 5 to 7 years old participated in this case-control study,…

  12. In situ control and monitoring of photonic device intermixing during laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Chia, C K; Suryana, M; Hopkinson, M

    2011-05-09

    Apparatus and method for the in situ control of photonic device intermixing processes are described. The setup utilises an optical fiber splitter which delivers photons to selectively anneal the photonic device and simultaneously measures the emission spectra from the device to monitor the intermixing process in real time. The in situ monitoring of a laser annealing process for the modification of a semiconductor laser diode facet is demonstrated using the instrumentation. A progressive blueshift in the emission wavelength of the device can clearly be observed in real time while high energy photons are delivered to anneal the device facet, hence enabling the control on the degree of intermixing required. This instrumentation is also ideal for broadening of emission spectra in quantum dot and quantum well based light emitting devices such as superluminescent diodes and broadband laser.

  13. Temperature-gated thermal rectifier for active heat flow control.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jia; Hippalgaonkar, Kedar; Shen, Sheng; Wang, Kevin; Abate, Yohannes; Lee, Sangwook; Wu, Junqiao; Yin, Xiaobo; Majumdar, Arun; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-08-13

    Active heat flow control is essential for broad applications of heating, cooling, and energy conversion. Like electronic devices developed for the control of electric power, it is very desirable to develop advanced all-thermal solid-state devices that actively control heat flow without consuming other forms of energy. Here we demonstrate temperature-gated thermal rectification using vanadium dioxide beams in which the environmental temperature actively modulates asymmetric heat flow. In this three terminal device, there are two switchable states, which can be regulated by global heating. In the "Rectifier" state, we observe up to 28% thermal rectification. In the "Resistor" state, the thermal rectification is significantly suppressed (<1%). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of solid-state active-thermal devices with a large rectification in the Rectifier state. This temperature-gated rectifier can have substantial implications ranging from autonomous thermal management of heating and cooling systems to efficient thermal energy conversion and storage.

  14. DC motor proportional control system for orthotic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaise, H. T.; Allen, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    Multi-channel proportional control system for operation of dc motors for use with externally-powered orthotic arm braces is described. Components of circuitry and principles of operation are described. Schematic diagram of control circuit is provided.

  15. Augmented thermal bus wih multiple thermoelectric devices individually controlled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrage, Dean S. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an augmented thermal bus. In the present design a plurality of thermo-electric heat pumps are used to couple a source plate to a sink plate. Each heat pump is individually controlled by a model based controller. The controller coordinates the heat pumps to maintain isothermality in the source.

  16. Assistive Device Use in Visually Impaired Older Adults: Role of Control Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Stefanie; Wahl, Hans-Werner; Schilling, Oliver; Burmedi, David

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We investigate whether psychological control, conceptually framed within the life-span theory of control by Heckhausen and Schulz, drives assistive device use in visually impaired elders. In particular, we expect the two primary control modes differentiated in the life-span theory of control (i.e., selective primary and compensatory…

  17. Endoscopic hemostasis with an ultrasonically activated device for hemorrhage from a branch of the maxillary artery during endoscopically assisted reduction of condylar neck fracture.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Toshinori; Matsui, Yoshiro; Omura, Susumu; Tohnai, Iwai

    2013-03-01

    We describe here a case in which sudden hemorrhage from a branch of the maxillary artery during endoscopically assisted transoral reduction of condylar neck fracture was successfully controlled by endoscopic hemostasis with an ultrasonically activated device.

  18. Safety of active implantable devices during MRI examinations: a finite element analysis of an implantable pump.

    PubMed

    Büchler, Philippe; Simon, Anne; Burger, Jürgen; Ginggen, Alec; Crivelli, Rocco; Tardy, Yanik; Luechinger, Roger; Olsen, Sigbjørn

    2007-04-01

    The goal of this study was to propose a general numerical analysis methodology to evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-safety of active implants. Numerical models based on the finite element (FE) technique were used to estimate if the normal operation of an active device was altered during MRI imaging. An active implanted pump was chosen to illustrate the method. A set of controlled experiments were proposed and performed to validate the numerical model. The calculated induced voltages in the important electronic components of the device showed dependence with the MRI field strength. For the MRI radiofrequency fields, significant induced voltages of up to 20 V were calculated for a 0.3T field-strength MRI. For the 1.5 and 3.0OT MRIs, the calculated voltages were insignificant. On the other hand, induced voltages up to 11 V were calculated in the critical electronic components for the 3.0T MRI due to the gradient fields. Values obtained in this work reflect to the worst case situation which is virtually impossible to achieve in normal scanning situations. Since the calculated voltages may be removed by appropriate protection circuits, no critical problems affecting the normal operation of the pump were identified. This study showed that the proposed methodology helps the identification of the possible incompatibilities between active implants and MR imaging, and can be used to aid the design of critical electronic systems to ensure MRI-safety.

  19. Feedback control of biomimetic exotendon device for hand rehabilitation in stroke.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Sang Wook; Park, Hyung-Soon

    2014-01-01

    Many hand exoskeleton devices have recently been developed for hand rehabilitation of stroke survivors, but most hand exoskeletons focused on implementing joint movement driven by individual actuator located at the finger joints rather than considering function of hand muscle-tendons and their coordination. In order to achieve hand rehabilitation targeted on restoration of specific muscle-tendon functions, a biomimetic hand exotendon device (BiomHED) was introduced recently. This paper introduces a ring-type design of exotendon device for easier donning and the design of a feedback control system for controlling posture of the finger. Technical details of the feedback sensor and controller with preliminary experimental results are presented.

  20. Adhesion control by inflation: implications from biology to artificial attachment device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dening, Kirstin; Heepe, Lars; Afferrante, Luciano; Carbone, Giuseppe; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2014-08-01

    There is an increasing demand for materials that incorporate advanced adhesion properties, such as an ability to adhere in a reversible and controllable manner. In biological systems, these features are known from adhesive pads of the tree frog, Litoria caerulea, and the bush-cricket, Tettigonia viridissima. These species have convergently developed soft, hemispherically shaped pads that might be able to control their adhesion through active changing the curvature of the pad. Inspired by these biological systems, an artificial model system is developed here. It consists of an inflatable membrane clamped to the metallic cylinder and filled with air. Pull-off force measurements of the membrane surface were conducted in contact with the membrane at five different radii of curvature r c with (1) a smooth polyvinylsiloxane membrane and (2) mushroom-shaped adhesive microstructured membrane made of the same polymer. The hypothesis that an increased internal pressure, acting on the membrane, reduces the radius of the membrane curvature, resulting in turn in a lower pull-off force, is verified. Such an active control of adhesion, inspired by biological models, will lead to the development of industrial pick-and-drop devices with controllable adhesive properties.

  1. Characteristics of magnetic force control device with magnetostrictive and piezoelectric laminate composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Toshiyuki; Qiu, Jinhao; Tani, Junji

    2003-08-01

    A magnetic force control device with laminate composite of giant magnetostrictive material (GMM) and piezo-electric material (PZT) is proposed. This magnetic force control is based on inverse magnetostrictive effect of a magnetic material, whereby the variation of stress applied on the material is converted to that of magnetic force via magnetic circuits. For the purpose of realizing the method in practical applications, disks of GMM and PZT are laminated to control the stress of GMM by electric field on PZT. Due to the capacitive properties of PZT, the device requires little electric energy hence generates no heat to maintain constant force. Furthermore compared with conventional electromagnetics, the device can be fabricated easily and in small size to be suitable for microactuators. This paper presents the principle of the magnetic force control by the lamination of GMM and PZT and investigates the static and dynamic characteristics of several devices to demonstrate their capabilities of the magnetic force control.

  2. Field studies of beach cones as coastal erosion control/reversal devices for areas with significant oil and gas activities. Technical progress report, April--June 1992 and Project status report, June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-17

    A field demonstration/study of a novel shoreline erosion protection device called beach cones is planned. These patented, fiberglass- reinforced concreted devices are to be deployed in a number of geometric patterns at seven location in the Bastian Bay area of Western Plaquemines Parish. The purpose of the work described in this report was to evaluate the proposed study`s impact on living and non-living shellfish resources within each of the project`s seven separate Study Areas. Major accomplishments for this reporting period were as follows: aerial photographs of the experimental sites were taken; all permit applications were filed; information was submitted for the Environmental Report; several reconnaissance trips to the experimental sites were made; meetings were held among all participating organizations to further plan the research; permit was obtained from the US Army Corps of Engineers; test sites were surveyed by the Xavier University contingent; survey data were taken at all sites; the Oyster Assessment was completed; permit was obtained from the State of Louisiana Department of Natural Resources; and initial survey data were finalized at all sites.

  3. Prevention and control of biofilm-based medical-device-related infections.

    PubMed

    Francolini, Iolanda; Donelli, Gianfranco

    2010-08-01

    Biofilms play a pivotal role in healthcare-associated infections, especially those related to the implant of medical devices, such as intravascular catheters, urinary catheters and orthopaedic implants. This paper reviews the most successful approaches for the control and prevention of these infections as well as promising perspectives for the development of novel devices refractory to microbial adhesion, colonization and biofilm formation.

  4. 40 CFR 60.692-5 - Standards: Closed vent systems and control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Performance for VOC Emissions From Petroleum Refinery Wastewater Systems § 60.692-5 Standards: Closed vent systems and control devices. (a) Enclosed combustion devices shall be designed and operated to reduce the VOC emissions vented to them with an efficiency of 95 percent or greater or to provide a...

  5. 40 CFR 60.692-5 - Standards: Closed vent systems and control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Performance for VOC Emissions From Petroleum Refinery Wastewater Systems § 60.692-5 Standards: Closed vent systems and control devices. (a) Enclosed combustion devices shall be designed and operated to reduce the VOC emissions vented to them with an efficiency of 95 percent or greater or to provide a...

  6. 40 CFR 60.692-5 - Standards: Closed vent systems and control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Performance for VOC Emissions From Petroleum Refinery Wastewater Systems § 60.692-5 Standards: Closed vent systems and control devices. (a) Enclosed combustion devices shall be designed and operated to reduce the VOC emissions vented to them with an efficiency of 95 percent or greater or to provide a...

  7. 40 CFR 60.692-5 - Standards: Closed vent systems and control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Performance for VOC Emissions From Petroleum Refinery Wastewater Systems § 60.692-5 Standards: Closed vent systems and control devices. (a) Enclosed combustion devices shall be designed and operated to reduce the VOC emissions vented to them with an efficiency of 95 percent or greater or to provide a...

  8. 40 CFR 60.692-5 - Standards: Closed vent systems and control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Performance for VOC Emissions From Petroleum Refinery Wastewater Systems § 60.692-5 Standards: Closed vent systems and control devices. (a) Enclosed combustion devices shall be designed and operated to reduce the VOC emissions vented to them with an efficiency of 95 percent or greater or to provide a...

  9. Propellantless Attitude Control of Solar Sail Technology Utilizing Reflective Control Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munday, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Solar sails offer an opportunity for a CubeSatscale, propellant-free spacecraft technology that enables long-term and long-distance missions not possible with traditional methods. Solar sails operate using the transfer of linear momentum from photons of sunlight reflected from the surface of the sail. To propel the spacecraft, no mechanically moving parts, thrusters, or propellant are needed. However, attitude control, or orientation, is still performed using traditional methods involving reaction wheels and propellant ejection, which severely limit mission lifetime. For example, the current state of the art solutions employed by upcoming missions couple solar sails with a state of the art propellant ejection gas system. Here, the use of the gas thruster has limited the lifetime of the mission. To solve the limited mission lifetime problem, the Propellantless Attitude Control of Solar Sail Technology Utilizing Reflective Control Devices project team is working on propellantless attitude control using thin layers of material, an optical film, electrically switchable from transparent to reflective. The technology is based on a polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC), which allows this switch upon application of a voltage. This technology removes the need for propellant, which reduces weight and cost while improving performance and lifetime.

  10. Synchronous response modelling and control of an annular momentum control device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hockney, Richard; Johnson, Bruce G.; Misovec, Kathleen

    1988-01-01

    Research on the synchronous response modelling and control of an advanced Annular Momentun Control Device (AMCD) used to control the attitude of a spacecraft is described. For the flexible rotor AMCD, two sources of synchronous vibrations were identified. One source, which corresponds to the mass unbalance problem of rigid rotors suspended in conventional bearings, is caused by measurement errors of the rotor center of mass position. The other sources of synchronous vibrations is misalignment between the hub and flywheel masses of the AMCD. Four different control algorithms were examined. These were lead-lag compensators that mimic conventional bearing dynamics, tracking notch filters used in the feedback loop, tracking differential-notch filters, and model-based compensators. The tracking differential-notch filters were shown to have a number of advantages over more conventional approaches for both rigid-body rotor applications and flexible rotor applications such as the AMCD. Hardware implementation schemes for the tracking differential-notch filter were investigated. A simple design was developed that can be implemented with analog multipliers and low bandwidth, digital hardware.

  11. Combining Charge Couple Devices and Rate Sensors for the Feedforward Control System of a Charge Coupled Device Tracking Loop

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Tao; Tian, Jing; Zhong, Daijun; Fu, Chengyu

    2016-01-01

    A rate feed forward control-based sensor fusion is proposed to improve the closed-loop performance for a charge couple device (CCD) tracking loop. The target trajectory is recovered by combining line of sight (LOS) errors from the CCD and the angular rate from a fiber-optic gyroscope (FOG). A Kalman filter based on the Singer acceleration model utilizes the reconstructive target trajectory to estimate the target velocity. Different from classical feed forward control, additive feedback loops are inevitably added to the original control loops due to the fact some closed-loop information is used. The transfer function of the Kalman filter in the frequency domain is built for analyzing the closed loop stability. The bandwidth of the Kalman filter is the major factor affecting the control stability and close-loop performance. Both simulations and experiments are provided to demonstrate the benefits of the proposed algorithm. PMID:27347970

  12. Effect of copper and plastic intra-uterine devices on the fibrinolytic activity of the endometrium in the rat.

    PubMed

    Larsson, B; Liedholm, P; Astedt, B

    1975-01-01

    The effect of copper and plastic intrauterine devices (IUD) on the fibrinolytic activity of the endometrium was studied in the rat. A copper or a plastic device was placed in one of the uterine horns, while the other horn served as a control. Biopsy specimens were obtained from both horns and examined histochemically. The copper concentration was determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The fibrinolytic activity of the control horn was found to be localized to small vessels in the outer layer of the uterine wall, while that of the endometrium was low. Plastic as well as copper IUDs increased the fibrinolytic activity which, in contrast with what was seen in the controls, was localized to the endometrium. Compared with the effect of the plastic device, the increase in the fibrinolytic activity induced by the copper device was more widespread in the endometrial area and was accompanied by an increase in the concentration of copper. These findings might help to explain why the contraceptive effect of IUDs is more reliable when they are partly coated with copper.

  13. Thin film thermoelectric devices as thermal control coatings: A study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemons, J. M.; Krupnick, A. C.

    1973-01-01

    Peltier effect, Thomson effect, and Seeback effect are utilized in design of thermal control coating that serves as versatile means for controlling heat absorbed and radiated by surface. Coatings may be useful in extreme temperature environment enclosures or as heat shields.

  14. Noiseless Non-Reciprocity in a Parametric Active Device

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    and isolators belong to an important class of microwave components employed in applications including the measurement of mesoscopic circuits at...devices such as circulators and isolators belong to an important class of microwave components employed in applications including the measurement of...class of microwave components employed in applications including the measurement of mesoscopic circuits at cryogenic temperatures. The measurement

  15. Placebo Devices as Effective Control Methods in Acupuncture Clinical Trials: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Claire Shuiqing; Tan, Hsiewe Ying; Zhang, George Shengxi; Zhang, Anthony Lin; Xue, Charlie Changli; Xie, Yi Min

    2015-01-01

    While the use of acupuncture has been recognised by the World Health Organisation, its efficacy for many of the common clinical conditions is still undergoing validation through randomised controlled trials (RCTs). A credible placebo control for such RCTs to enable meaningful evaluation of its efficacy is to be established. While several non-penetrating acupuncture placebo devices, namely the Streitberger, the Park and the Takakura Devices, have been developed and used in RCTs, their suitability as inert placebo controls needs to be rigorously determined. This article systematically reviews these devices as placebo interventions. Electronic searches were conducted on four English and two Chinese databases from their inceptions to July 2014; hand searches of relevant references were also conducted. RCTs, in English or Chinese language, comparing acupuncture with one of the aforementioned devices as the control intervention on human participants with any clinical condition and evaluating clinically related outcomes were included. Thirty-six studies were included for qualitative analysis while 14 were in the meta-analysis. The meta-analysis does not support the notion of either the Streitberger or the Park Device being inert control interventions while none of the studies involving the Takakura Device was included in the meta-analysis. Sixteen studies reported the occurrence of adverse events, with no significant difference between verum and placebo acupuncture. Author-reported blinding credibility showed that participant blinding was successful in most cases; however, when blinding index was calculated, only one study, which utilised the Park Device, seemed to have an ideal blinding scenario. Although the blinding index could not be calculated for the Takakura Device, it was the only device reported to enable practitioner blinding. There are limitations with each of the placebo devices and more rigorous studies are needed to further evaluate their effects and

  16. Consumer-grade EEG devices: are they usable for control tasks?

    PubMed Central

    Maskeliunas, Rytis; Martisius, Ignas; Vasiljevas, Mindaugas

    2016-01-01

    We present the evaluation of two well-known, low-cost consumer-grade EEG devices: the Emotiv EPOC and the Neurosky MindWave. Problems with using the consumer-grade EEG devices (BCI illiteracy, poor technical characteristics, and adverse EEG artefacts) are discussed. The experimental evaluation of the devices, performed with 10 subjects asked to perform concentration/relaxation and blinking recognition tasks, is given. The results of statistical analysis show that both devices exhibit high variability and non-normality of attention and meditation data, which makes each of them difficult to use as an input to control tasks. BCI illiteracy may be a significant problem, as well as setting up of the proper environment of the experiment. The results of blinking recognition show that using the Neurosky device means recognition accuracy is less than 50%, while the Emotiv device has achieved a recognition accuracy of more than 75%; for tasks that require concentration and relaxation of subjects, the Emotiv EPOC device has performed better (as measured by the recognition accuracy) by ∼9%. Therefore, the Emotiv EPOC device may be more suitable for control tasks using the attention/meditation level or eye blinking than the Neurosky MindWave device. PMID:27014511

  17. Consumer-grade EEG devices: are they usable for control tasks?

    PubMed

    Maskeliunas, Rytis; Damasevicius, Robertas; Martisius, Ignas; Vasiljevas, Mindaugas

    2016-01-01

    We present the evaluation of two well-known, low-cost consumer-grade EEG devices: the Emotiv EPOC and the Neurosky MindWave. Problems with using the consumer-grade EEG devices (BCI illiteracy, poor technical characteristics, and adverse EEG artefacts) are discussed. The experimental evaluation of the devices, performed with 10 subjects asked to perform concentration/relaxation and blinking recognition tasks, is given. The results of statistical analysis show that both devices exhibit high variability and non-normality of attention and meditation data, which makes each of them difficult to use as an input to control tasks. BCI illiteracy may be a significant problem, as well as setting up of the proper environment of the experiment. The results of blinking recognition show that using the Neurosky device means recognition accuracy is less than 50%, while the Emotiv device has achieved a recognition accuracy of more than 75%; for tasks that require concentration and relaxation of subjects, the Emotiv EPOC device has performed better (as measured by the recognition accuracy) by ∼9%. Therefore, the Emotiv EPOC device may be more suitable for control tasks using the attention/meditation level or eye blinking than the Neurosky MindWave device.

  18. Advanced Controls for the Multi-pod Centipod WEC device

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, Alan; Fleming, Alex

    2016-02-15

    Dehlsen Associates, LLC (DA) has developed a Wave Energy Converter (WEC), Centipod, which is a multiple point absorber, extracting wave energy primarily in the heave direction through a plurality of point absorber floats sharing a common stable reference structure. The objective of this project was to develop advanced control algorithms that will be used to reduce Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE). This project investigated the use of Model Predictive Control (MPC) to improve the power capture of the WEC. The MPC controller developed in this work is a state-space, “look ahead” controller approach using knowledge of past and current states to predict future states to take action with the PTO to maximize power capture while still respecting system constraints. In order to maximize power, which is the product of force and velocity, the controller must aim to create phase alignment between excitation force and velocity. This project showed a 161% improvement in the Annual Energy Production (AEP) for the Centipod WEC when utilizing MPC, compared to a baseline, fixed passive damping control strategy. This improvement in AEP was shown to provide a substantial benefit to the WEC’s overall Cost of Energy, reducing LCOE by 50% from baseline. The results of this work proved great potential for the adoption of Model Predictive Controls in Wave Energy Converters.

  19. Compliance Assurance Monitoring Technical Guidance Document Appendix A: Scrubbers for Gaseous Pollutants Control Devices

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Compliance assurance monitoring is intended to provide a reasonable assurance of compliance with applicable requirements under the Clean Air Act for large emission units that rely on pollution control device equipment to achieve compliance.

  20. Compliance Assurance Monitoring Technical Guidance Document Appendix A: Carbon Adsorber Control Device

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Compliance assurance monitoring is intended to provide a reasonable assurance of compliance with applicable requirements under the Clean Air Act for large emission units that rely on pollution control device equipment to achieve compliance.

  1. Compliance Assurance Monitoring Technical Guidance Document Appendix A: Fabric Filter Control Devices

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Compliance assurance monitoring is intended to provide a reasonable assurance of compliance with applicable requirements under the Clean Air Act for large emission units that rely on pollution control device equipment to achieve compliance.

  2. Compliance Assurance Monitoring Technical Guidance Document Appendix A: Electrified Filter Bed Control Device

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Compliance assurance monitoring is intended to provide a reasonable assurance of compliance with applicable requirements under the Clean Air Act for large emission units that rely on pollution control device equipment to achieve compliance.

  3. Compliance Assurance Monitoring Technical Guidance Document Appendix A: Wet Electrostatic Precipitator Control Device

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Compliance assurance monitoring is intended to provide a reasonable assurance of compliance with applicable requirements under the Clean Air Act for large emission units that rely on pollution control device equipment to achieve compliance.

  4. Development of closed-fitting-type walking assistance device for legs and evaluation of muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Ikehara, Tadaaki; Nagamura, Kazuteru; Ushida, Takurou; Tanaka, Eiichirou; Saegusa, Shozo; Kojima, Sho; Yuge, Louis

    2011-01-01

    A walking assistance device using a flexible shaft was developed. The combination of a flexible shaft with a worm gear was successfully adopted on this device to simplify its appearance and reduce its size. A hybrid - control system on this device controls both torque and angle at the ankle and knee joints. In this system, the torsional spring constant of the flexible shaft is taken into account by the motor in controlling the power and angle of rotation of the motor. To expand the area in which a person may use the device, it is equipped with a self-contained system powered by a Lithium-ion battery and controlled by an SH-4 microcomputer and actuators, consisting of motors and gears, all of which are carried in a small backpack. Consequently, persons using the device may walk freely in both indoor and outdoor environments.

  5. Method for making a micromachined microwave signal control device

    DOEpatents

    Forman, Michael A [Mountain House, CA

    2011-02-15

    A method for fabricating a signal controller, e.g., a filter or a switch, for a coplanar waveguide during the LIGA fabrication process of the waveguide. Both patterns for the waveguide and patterns for the signal controllers are created on a mask. Radiation travels through the mask and reaches a photoresist layer on a substrate. The irradiated portions are removed and channels are formed on the substrate. A metal is filled into the channels to form the conductors of the waveguide and the signal controllers. Micromachined quasi-lumped elements are used alone or together as filters. The switch includes a comb drive, a spring, a metal plunger, and anchors.

  6. Temperature control of power semiconductor devices in traction applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugachev, A. A.; Strekalov, N. N.

    2017-02-01

    The peculiarity of thermal management of traction frequency converters of a railway rolling stock is highlighted. The topology and the operation principle of the automatic temperature control system of power semiconductor modules of the traction frequency converter are designed and discussed. The features of semiconductors as an object of temperature control are considered; the equivalent circuit of thermal processes in the semiconductors is suggested, the power losses in the two-level voltage source inverters are evaluated and analyzed. The dynamic properties and characteristics of the cooling fan induction motor electric drive with the scalar control are presented. The results of simulation in Matlab are shown for the steady state of thermal processes.

  7. Fluid control in microfluidic devices using a fluid conveyance extension and an absorbent microfluidic flow modulator.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Po Ki

    2013-05-07

    This article presents a simple method for controlling fluid in microfluidic devices without the need for valves or pumps. A fluid conveyance extension is fluidly coupled to the enclosed outlet chamber of a microfluidic device. After a fluid is introduced into the microfluidic device and saturates the fluid conveyance extension, a fluid flow in the microfluidic device is generated by contacting an absorbent microfluidic flow modulator with the fluid conveyance extension to absorb the fluid from the fluid conveyance extension through capillary action. Since the fluid in the microfluidic device is fluidly coupled with the fluid conveyance extension and the fluid conveyance extension is fluidly coupled with the absorbent microfluidic flow modulator, the absorption rate of the absorbent microfluidic flow modulator, which is the rate at which the absorbent microfluidic flow modulator absorbs fluid, matches the fluid flow rate in the microfluidic device. Thus, the fluid flow rate in the microfluidic device is set by the absorption rate of the absorbent microfluidic flow modulator. Sheath flow and fluid switching applications are demonstrated using this simple fluid control method without the need for valves or pumps. Also, the ability to control the fluid flow rate in the microfluidic device is demonstrated using absorbent microfluidic flow modulators with various absorbent characteristics and dimensions.

  8. Focus control budget analysis for critical layers of flash devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jong Hoon; Park, Tony; Park, Kyeong Dong; Hwang, Jong Hyun; Choi, Jin Phil; Kang, Young Seog

    2014-04-01

    As design rule shrinks down, on-product focus control became more important since available depth of focus (DOF) is getting narrower and also required critical dimension uniformity (CDU) becomes tighter. Thus monitoring, control the scanner focus error and reducing the focus control budget of scanner are essential for the production. There are some critical layers which has so narrow DOF margin that hardly be processed on old model scanners. Our study mainly focused on the analysis of the scanner focus control budget of such layers. Among the contributors to the focus budget, inter-field focus uniformity was turned out to be the most dominant. Leveling accuracy and intra-field focus uniformity were also dominant.

  9. Magnetic suspension system for an Annular Momentum Control Device (AMCD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A technique to control a rim suspended in a magnetic field was developed. A complete system was developed, incorporating a support structure, magnetic actuators, a rim drive mechanism, an emergency fail-safe system, servo control system, and control electronics. Open loop and closed loop response of the system at zero speed and at 500 revolutions per minute (r/min) of the rim was obtained and analyzed. The rim was then dynamically balanced and a rim speed of 725 r/min was achieved. An analog simulation of the hardware was developed and tested with the actual control electronics connected to the analog computer. The system under development is stable at rim speeds below 700 r/min. Test results indicate that the rim under test is not rigid. The rim has a warp and a number of binding modes which prevented achievement of higher speeds. Further development efforts are required to achieve higher rim speeds.

  10. Emission current control system for multiple hollow cathode devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beattie, John R. (Inventor); Hancock, Donald J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    An emission current control system for balancing the individual emission currents from an array of hollow cathodes has current sensors for determining the current drawn by each cathode from a power supply. Each current sensor has an output signal which has a magnitude proportional to the current. The current sensor output signals are averaged, the average value so obtained being applied to a respective controller for controlling the flow of an ion source material through each cathode. Also applied to each controller are the respective sensor output signals for each cathode and a common reference signal. The flow of source material through each hollow cathode is thereby made proportional to the current drawn by that cathode, the average current drawn by all of the cathodes, and the reference signal. Thus, the emission current of each cathode is controlled such that each is made substantially equal to the emission current of each of the other cathodes. When utilized as a component of a multiple hollow cathode ion propulsion motor, the emission current control system of the invention provides for balancing the thrust of the motor about the thrust axis and also for preventing premature failure of a hollow cathode source due to operation above a maximum rated emission current.

  11. Neuronal ensemble control of prosthetic devices by a human with tetraplegia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochberg, Leigh R.; Serruya, Mijail D.; Friehs, Gerhard M.; Mukand, Jon A.; Saleh, Maryam; Caplan, Abraham H.; Branner, Almut; Chen, David; Penn, Richard D.; Donoghue, John P.

    2006-07-01

    Neuromotor prostheses (NMPs) aim to replace or restore lost motor functions in paralysed humans by routeing movement-related signals from the brain, around damaged parts of the nervous system, to external effectors. To translate preclinical results from intact animals to a clinically useful NMP, movement signals must persist in cortex after spinal cord injury and be engaged by movement intent when sensory inputs and limb movement are long absent. Furthermore, NMPs would require that intention-driven neuronal activity be converted into a control signal that enables useful tasks. Here we show initial results for a tetraplegic human (MN) using a pilot NMP. Neuronal ensemble activity recorded through a 96-microelectrode array implanted in primary motor cortex demonstrated that intended hand motion modulates cortical spiking patterns three years after spinal cord injury. Decoders were created, providing a `neural cursor' with which MN opened simulated e-mail and operated devices such as a television, even while conversing. Furthermore, MN used neural control to open and close a prosthetic hand, and perform rudimentary actions with a multi-jointed robotic arm. These early results suggest that NMPs based upon intracortical neuronal ensemble spiking activity could provide a valuable new neurotechnology to restore independence for humans with paralysis.

  12. 40 CFR 61.349 - Standards: Closed-vent systems and control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Emission Standard for Benzene Waste Operations § 61.349 Standards: Closed-vent systems and control devices... efficiency of 95 weight percent or greater, or shall recover or control the benzene emissions vented to it..., or shall recover or control the benzene emissions vented to it with an efficiency of 98...

  13. 40 CFR 61.349 - Standards: Closed-vent systems and control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Emission Standard for Benzene Waste Operations § 61.349 Standards: Closed-vent systems and control devices... efficiency of 95 weight percent or greater, or shall recover or control the benzene emissions vented to it..., or shall recover or control the benzene emissions vented to it with an efficiency of 98...

  14. Controlled assembly and electronics in semiconductor nanocrystal-based devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drndic, Marija

    2006-03-01

    I will discuss the assembly of semiconductor nanocrystals (CdSe and PbSe) into electronic devices and the basic mechanisms of charge transport in nanocrystal arrays [1-4]. Spherical CdSe nanocrystals show robust memory effects that can be exploited for memory applications [1]. Nanocrystal memory can be erased electrically or optically and is rewritable. In PbSe nanocrystal arrays, as the interdot coupling is increased, the system evolves from an insulating regime dominated by Coulomb blockade to a semiconducting regime, where hopping conduction is the dominant transport mechanism [2]. Two-dimensional CdSe nanorod arrays show striking and anomalous transport properties, including strong and reproducible non-linearities and current oscillations with dc-voltage [4]. I will also discuss imaging of the charge transport in nanocrystal-based electronic devices. Nanocrystal arrays were investigated using electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) [3]. Changes in lattice and transport properties upon annealing in vacuum were revealed. Local charge transport was directly imaged by EFM and correlated to nanopatterns observed with TEM. This work shows how charge transport in complex nanocrystal networks can be identified with nm resolution [3]. This work was supported by the ONR grant N000140410489, the NSF grants DMR-0449553 and MRSEC DMR00-79909, and the ACS PRF grant 41256-G10. References:1) Fischbein M. D. and Drndic M., ``CdSe nanocrystal quantum-dot memory,'' Applied Physics Letters, 86 (19), 193106, 2005.2) H. E. Romero and Drndic M., ``Coulomb blockade and hopping conduction in PbSe quantum dots,'' Physical Review Letters 95, 156801, 2005.3) Hu Z., Fischbein M. D. and Drndic M., ``Local charge transport in two-dimensional PbSe nanocrystal arrays studied by electrostatic force microscopy",'' Nano Letters 5 (7), 1463, 2005.4) Romero H.E., Calusine G. and Drndic M., ``Current oscillations, switching and hysteresis in CdSe nanorod

  15. Origami-inspired active graphene-based paper for programmable instant self-folding walking devices

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Jiuke; Hou, Chengyi; Wang, Hongzhi; Li, Yaogang; Zhang, Qinghong; Zhu, Meifang

    2015-01-01

    Origami-inspired active graphene-based paper with programmed gradients in vertical and lateral directions is developed to address many of the limitations of polymer active materials including slow response and violent operation methods. Specifically, we used function-designed graphene oxide as nanoscale building blocks to fabricate an all-graphene self-folding paper that has a single-component gradient structure. A functional device composed of this graphene paper can (i) adopt predesigned shapes, (ii) walk, and (iii) turn a corner. These processes can be remote-controlled by gentle light or heating. We believe that this self-folding material holds potential for a wide range of applications such as sensing, artificial muscles, and robotics. PMID:26601135

  16. Non-linear control of the ''clam'' wave energy device. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-09-01

    A promising wave energy device being currently investigated is the ''clam'' device. The clam extracts energy by pumping air through a specially designed (Wells) turbine. Although operation of the Wells turbine does not require a rectified air flow, some additional control will be necessary to optimize the phase of the clam motion for good efficiencies. An examination of the equation of motion in the time domain suggests the possibility of non-linear phase control by mechanical, power take-off, or pneumatic latching. Latching can be shown to increase the efficiency of the device in the longer wavelengths of the wave spectrum, i.e. those of high incident wave power.

  17. Optically controlled microwave devices and circuits: Emerging applications in space communications systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, Kul B.; Simons, Rainee N.

    1987-01-01

    Optical control of microwave devices and circuits by an optical fiber has the potential to simplify signal distribution networks in high frequency communications systems. The optical response of two terminal and three terminal (GaAs MESFET, HEMT, PBT) microwave devices are compared and several schemes for controlling such devices by modulated optical signals examined. Monolithic integration of optical and microwave functions on a single semiconductor substrate is considered to provide low power, low loss, and reliable digital and analog optical links for signal distribution.

  18. Overview of magnetic bearing control and linearization approaches for annular magnetically suspended devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, N. J.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of magnetic bearing control and linearization approaches which have been considered for annular magnetically suspended devices is presented. These devices include the Annular Momentum Control Device and the Annular Suspension and Pointing System. Two approaches were investigated for controlling the magnetic actuator. One approach involves controlling the upper and lower electromagnets differentially about a bias flux. The bias flux can either be supplied by permanent magnets in the magnetic circuit or by bias currents. In the other approach, either the upper electromagnet or the lower electromagnet is controlled depending on the direction of force required. One advantage of the bias flux is that for small gap perturbations about a fixed operating point, the force-current characteristic is linear. Linearization approaches investigated for individual element control include an analog solution of the nonlinear electromagnet force equation and a microprocessor-based table lookup method.

  19. Linear motion device and method for inserting and withdrawing control rods

    DOEpatents

    Smith, J.E.

    Disclosed is a linear motion device and more specifically a control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) for inserting and withdrawing control rods into a reactor core. The CRDM and method disclosed is capable of independently and sequentially positioning two sets of control rods with a single motor stator and rotor. The CRDM disclosed can control more than one control rod lead screw without incurring a substantial increase in the size of the mechanism.

  20. Impact of optical antennas on active optoelectronic devices.

    PubMed

    Bonakdar, Alireza; Mohseni, Hooman

    2014-10-07

    Remarkable progress has been made in the fabrication and characterization of optical antennas that are integrated with optoelectronic devices. Herein, we describe the fundamental reasons for and experimental evidence of the dramatic improvements that can be achieved by enhancing the light-matter interaction via an optical antenna in both photon-emitting and -detecting devices. In addition, integration of optical antennas with optoelectronic devices can lead to the realization of highly compact multifunctional platforms for future integrated photonics, such as low-cost lab-on-chip systems. In this review paper, we further focus on the effect of optical antennas on the detectivity of infrared photodetectors. One particular finding is that the antenna can have a dual effect on the specific detectivity, while it can elevate light absorption efficiency of sub-wavelength detectors, it can potentially increase the noise of the detectors due to the enhanced spontaneous emission rate. In particular, we predict that the detectivity of interband photon detectors can be negatively affected by the presence of optical antennas across a wide wavelength region covering visible to long wavelength infrared bands. In contrast, the detectivity of intersubband detectors could be generally improved with a properly designed optical antenna.

  1. 40 CFR 60.2706 - By what date must I conduct the initial air pollution control device inspection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspection? 60.2706 Section 60.2706 Protection of Environment... pollution control device inspection? (a) The initial air pollution control device inspection must be... meeting the amended emission limitations. (b) Within 10 operating days following an air pollution...

  2. 40 CFR 62.14441 - When must I inspect my HMIWI equipment and air pollution control devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and air pollution control devices? 62.14441 Section 62.14441 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... my HMIWI equipment and air pollution control devices? (a) You must inspect your large, medium, small... inspect the air pollution control devices on your large, medium, small or small rural HMIWI by May...

  3. 40 CFR 60.2706 - By what date must I conduct the initial air pollution control device inspection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspection? 60.2706 Section 60.2706 Protection of Environment... Requirements § 60.2706 By what date must I conduct the initial air pollution control device inspection? (a) The initial air pollution control device inspection must be conducted within 60 days after installation of...

  4. 40 CFR 62.14441 - When must I inspect my HMIWI equipment and air pollution control devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and air pollution control devices? 62.14441 Section 62.14441 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... my HMIWI equipment and air pollution control devices? (a) You must inspect your large, medium, small... inspect the air pollution control devices on your large, medium, small or small rural HMIWI by May...

  5. 40 CFR 60.2151 - By what date must I conduct the annual air pollution control device inspection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspection? 60.2151 Section 60.2151 Protection of Environment... annual air pollution control device inspection? On an annual basis (no more than 12 months following the previous annual air pollution control device inspection), you must complete the air pollution...

  6. 40 CFR 60.2141 - By what date must I conduct the initial air pollution control device inspection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspection? 60.2141 Section 60.2141 Protection of Environment... Compliance Requirements § 60.2141 By what date must I conduct the initial air pollution control device inspection? (a) The initial air pollution control device inspection must be conducted within 60 days...

  7. 40 CFR 60.2141 - By what date must I conduct the initial air pollution control device inspection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspection? 60.2141 Section 60.2141 Protection of Environment... Compliance Requirements § 60.2141 By what date must I conduct the initial air pollution control device inspection? (a) The initial air pollution control device inspection must be conducted within 60 days...

  8. 40 CFR 60.2706 - By what date must I conduct the initial air pollution control device inspection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspection? 60.2706 Section 60.2706 Protection of Environment... pollution control device inspection? (a) The initial air pollution control device inspection must be... meeting the amended emission limitations. (b) Within 10 operating days following an air pollution...

  9. 40 CFR 60.2151 - By what date must I conduct the annual air pollution control device inspection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspection? 60.2151 Section 60.2151 Protection of Environment... annual air pollution control device inspection? On an annual basis (no more than 12 months following the previous annual air pollution control device inspection), you must complete the air pollution...

  10. 40 CFR 60.2706 - By what date must I conduct the initial air pollution control device inspection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... air pollution control device inspection? 60.2706 Section 60.2706 Protection of Environment... pollution control device inspection? (a) The initial air pollution control device inspection must be... meeting the amended emission limitations. (b) Within 10 operating days following an air pollution...

  11. Measuring steps with the Fitbit activity tracker: an inter-device reliability study.

    PubMed

    Dontje, Manon L; de Groot, Martijn; Lengton, Remko R; van der Schans, Cees P; Krijnen, Wim P

    2015-01-01

    Activity trackers like Fitbit are used for self-tracking of physical activity by an increasing number of individuals. Comparing physical activity scores with peers can contribute to the desired behavioural change. However, for meaningful social comparison a high inter-device reliability is paramount. This study aimed to determine the inter-device reliability of Fitbit activity trackers in measuring steps. Ten activity trackers (Fitbit Ultra) were worn by a single person (male, 46 years) during eight consecutive days. Inter-device reliability was assessed on three different levels of aggregation (minutes, hours, days) with various methods, including intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC), Bland-Altman plots, limits of agreement (LOA) and Mixed Model Analysis. Results showed that the inter-device reliability of the Fitbit in measuring steps is good at all levels of aggregation (minutes, hours, days), but especially when steps were measured per day. This implies that individuals can reliably compare their daily physical activity scores with peers.

  12. The implantable fuzzy controlled Helmholtz-left ventricular assist device: first in vitro testing.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, R; Nix, C; Klein, M; Reul, H; Rau, G

    1997-02-01

    To perform first experimental tests for validation of a new left ventricular assist device (LVAD) with a high efficiency energy converter, a new pump design and a novel type of perfusion control, a functional labtype, were manufactured. With a stroke volume of 65 ml, a total pump housing volume of 450 ml (including valves and connectors), and a weight of 430 g, it is one of the smallest and lightest implantable pulsatile electromechanical LVADs. Pulsatile operation is generated by a special reduction and displacement gear which transforms a uniform rotational movement of a sensorless, electronically commutated DC motor into a translatory pusher plate movement. A prolonged duration for filling (60% of the cycle time) supports full-empty pumping and consequently a high overall pump efficiency. Active adaptation of output flow to organ perfusion demand is achieved by changing the rotational speed of the motor by means of a sensorless fuzzy controller, which detects preload and afterload induced effects at the motor current input. First in vitro test results obtained within a circulatory mock loop that simulates physiological preloads and afterloads are presented. They comprise preload sensitivity and the function of the novel perfusion controller as well as preload and afterload related flow data. The results prove the feasability of the energy conversion with the novel gear and control concept for an implantable electromechanical pulsatile LVAD.

  13. Active control of combustion instability

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, W.; Poinsot, T.; Candel, S.

    1987-12-01

    The principle of 'antisound' is used to construct a method for the suppression of combustion instabilities. This active instability control (AIC) method uses external acoustic excitation by a loudspeaker to suppress the oscillations of a flame. The excitation signal is provided by a microphone located upstream of the flame. This signal is filtered, processed, amplified, and sent to the loudspeaker. The AIC method is validated on a laboratory combustor. It allows the suppression of all unstable modes of the burner for any operating ratio. The influence of the microphone and loudspeaker locations on the performance of the AIC system is described. For a given configuration, domains of stability, i.e., domains where the AIC system parameters provide suppression of the oscillation, are investigated. Measurements of the electric input of the loudspeaker show that the energy consumption of the AIC system is almost negligible and suggest that this method could be used for industrial combustor stabilization. Finally, a simple model describing the effects of the AIC system is developed and its results compared to the experiment.

  14. Active thermal control system evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petete, Patricia A.; Ames, Brian E.

    1991-01-01

    The 'restructured' baseline of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) has eliminated many of the growth options for the Active Thermal Control System (ATCS). Modular addition of baseline technology to increase heat rejection will be extremely difficult. The system design and the available real estate no longer accommodate this type of growth. As the station matures during its thirty years of operation, a demand of up to 165 kW of heat rejection can be expected. The baseline configuration will be able to provide 82.5 kW at Eight Manned Crew Capability (EMCC). The growth paths necessary to reach 165 kW have been identified. Doubling the heat rejection capability of SSF will require either the modification of existing radiator wings or the attachment of growth structure to the baseline truss for growth radiator wing placement. Radiator performance can be improved by enlarging the surface area or by boosting the operating temperature with a heat pump. The optimal solution will require both modifications. The addition of growth structure would permit the addition of a parallel ATCS using baseline technology. This growth system would simplify integration. The feasibility of incorporating these growth options to improve the heat rejection capacity of SSF is under evaluation.

  15. A Comprehensive Approach to Phonon Control for Enhanced Device Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-12

    composition on the elastic constants of GaAsN al- loys . A comparison of stresses determined using in-situ meas- urements of wafer curvature (MOSS) with...Stoica and J. K. Wahlstrand, "Coherent Control of Pulsed X-Ray Beams," Nature 413, 825-829 (2001). [5] H. T. Grahn, H. J. Maris and J. Tauc

  16. Safety factors in the remote control of infusion devices.

    PubMed

    Cantraine, F R; Coussaert, E J

    1996-02-01

    We have been using computer driven injections in surgery for many years to the benefit of more than thousand patients. Along these years we accumulated extensive experience in remote controlled infusion pumps. Today we have solved many communication problems. Despite the attention and care we brought in our software developments we still meet with some problems.

  17. 49 CFR 178.338-11 - Discharge control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR... pump or compressor is used to open this valve, the control must be of fail-safe design and spring... vehicle over 3,500 gallons water capacity, remote means of automatic closure must be installed at the...

  18. Controlling High Power Devices with Computers or TTL Logic Circuits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlton, Kevin

    2002-01-01

    Computers are routinely used to control experiments in modern science laboratories. This should be reflected in laboratories in an educational setting. There is a mismatch between the power that can be delivered by a computer interfacing card or a TTL logic circuit and that required by many practical pieces of laboratory equipment. One common way…

  19. The fate of mercury collected from air pollution control devices

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mercury that enters a coal-fired power plant, originates from the coal that is burned, and leaves through the output streams that include stack emissions and air pollution control (APC) residues (either in solid or liquid form). This article describes recent fmdings on the fa...

  20. Flight Investigation of the Effectiveness of an Automatic Aileron Trim Control Device for Personal Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, William H; Kuehnel, Helmut A; Whitten, James B

    1957-01-01

    A flight investigation to determine the effectiveness of an automatic aileron trim control device installed in a personal airplane to augment the apparent spiral stability has been conducted. The device utilizes a rate-gyro sensing element in order to switch an on-off type of control that operates the ailerons at a fixed rate through control centering springs. An analytical study using phase-plane and analog-computer methods has been carried out to determine a desirable method of operation for the automatic trim control.

  1. Two-Degree-of-Freedom Robust Temperature Control of Peltier Device Based on Heat Disturbance Observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimitsu, Hidetaka; Katsura, Seiichiro

    Recently, the Peltier device has been attracting attention as a haptic device that can transfer heat, because it has relatively fast response characteristics among thermal devices. To transmit the thermal sensation, temperature control is considered to be important. However, it is difficult to design a controller because of factors such as parameter variations, nonlinear characteristics of the device, and heat that flows from an external object. Moreover, it is preferable that the tracking performance and disturbance suppression characteristics be designed independently. To address these factors, this paper proposes a heat disturbance observer, which is constructed by using the disturbance observer commonly used in the field of motion control. When the observer is used, the thermal system becomes robust to the above-mentioned factors. In addition, it is possible to design the tracking performance independent of the disturbance suppression characteristics. The validity of the proposal is confirmed by experimental results.

  2. Control Board Digital Interface Input Devices – Touchscreen, Trackpad, or Mouse?

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas A. Ulrich; Ronald L. Boring; Roger Lew

    2015-08-01

    The authors collaborated with a power utility to evaluate input devices for use in the human system interface (HSI) for a new digital Turbine Control System (TCS) at a nuclear power plant (NPP) undergoing a TCS upgrade. A standalone dynamic software simulation of the new digital TCS and a mobile kiosk were developed to conduct an input device study to evaluate operator preference and input device effectiveness. The TCS software presented the anticipated HSI for the TCS and mimicked (i.e., simulated) the turbine systems’ responses to operator commands. Twenty-four licensed operators from the two nuclear power units participated in the study. Three input devices were tested: a trackpad, mouse, and touchscreen. The subjective feedback from the survey indicates the operators preferred the touchscreen interface. The operators subjectively rated the touchscreen as the fastest and most comfortable input device given the range of tasks they performed during the study, but also noted a lack of accuracy for selecting small targets. The empirical data suggest the mouse input device provides the most consistent performance for screen navigation and manipulating on screen controls. The trackpad input device was both empirically and subjectively found to be the least effective and least desired input device.

  3. A voltage-controlled silver nanograting device for dynamic modulation of transmitted light based on the surface plasmon polariton effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hailong; Li, Haibo; Wang, Yi; Xu, Shuping; Xu, Weiqing

    2016-02-01

    An active-controlled plasmonic device is designed and fabricated based on the index-sensitive properties of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). We utilize a one-dimensional silver nanograting with a period of 320 nm overlayered with a liquid crystal (LC) layer (50 μm in thickness), to transmit selectively the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) wavelength. This device realizes the active, reversible and continuous control of the transmitted light wavelength by modulating the external voltage signal applied to the LC layer. This voltage-controlled plasmonic filter has a dynamic wavelength modulation range of 17 nm, a fast respond speed of 4.24 ms and a low driving voltage of 1.06 V μm-1. This study opens up a unique way for the design of tunable nanophotonic devices, such as a micro light sources and switches.An active-controlled plasmonic device is designed and fabricated based on the index-sensitive properties of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). We utilize a one-dimensional silver nanograting with a period of 320 nm overlayered with a liquid crystal (LC) layer (50 μm in thickness), to transmit selectively the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) wavelength. This device realizes the active, reversible and continuous control of the transmitted light wavelength by modulating the external voltage signal applied to the LC layer. This voltage-controlled plasmonic filter has a dynamic wavelength modulation range of 17 nm, a fast respond speed of 4.24 ms and a low driving voltage of 1.06 V μm-1. This study opens up a unique way for the design of tunable nanophotonic devices, such as a micro light sources and switches. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: (1) The general theory of the VCP filter; (2) RI sensitivity; (3) the thickness optimization of the Ag grating sandwiched by photoresist layers; (4) image system; (5) detection systems for transmission and reflection spectra; (6) detection system for the response time of the VCP filter. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr

  4. A tunable microflow focusing device utilizing controllable moving walls and its applications for formation of micro-droplets in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chun-Hong; Hsiung, Suz-Kai; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2007-06-01

    This study reports a new microfluidic device capable of fine-tuned sample-flow focusing and generation of micro-droplets in liquids by controlling moving wall structures. Two microfluidic components including an 'active microchannel width controller' and a 'micro chopper' can be used to fine-tune the width of the hydrodynamically pre-focused stream and subsequently generate micro-droplets. In this study, a basic concept of a 'controllable moving wall' structure was addressed and applied as the active microchannel width controller and the micro chopper to generate the proposed function. Pneumatic side chambers were placed next to a main flow channel to construct the controllable moving wall structures. The deformation of the controllable moving wall structure can be generated by the pressurized air injected into the pneumatic side chambers. The proposed chip device was fabricated utilizing polymer material such as PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) to provide the flexibility of the controllable moving wall deformation. The microfluidic chip device with dimensions of 2.5 cm in width and 3.0 cm in length can be fabricated using a simple fabrication process. Experimental data showed that the deformation of the controllable moving wall structure can be adjusted by applying different air pressures, so that the width of the main flow channel can be controlled accordingly. By utilizing the proposed mechanism, the pre-focused dispersed phase stream could be actively focused into a narrower stream, and well-controlled micro-droplets with smaller diameters could be generated. The stream width can be reduced from 30 µm to 9 µm and micro-droplets with a diameter of 76 µm could be generated by utilizing the proposed device. In addition, to generate micro-droplets within smaller diameters, uniform size distribution of the micro-droplets can be obtained. According to the experimental results, development of the microfluidic device could be promising for a variety of applications such

  5. Integration of High Dose Boron Implants—Modification of Device Parametrics through Implant Temperature Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeide, Matthias; Ameen, M. S.; Kondratenko, Serguei; Krimbacher, Bernhard; Reece, Ronald N.

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we have extended a previously reported 250 nm logic p-S/D implant (7 keV B 4.5×1015 cm-2) process matching exercise [5] to include wafer temperature, and demonstrate that matching can be obtained by increasing the temperature of the wafer during implant. We found that the high dose rate delivered by the single wafer implanter caused the formation of a clear amorphous layer, which upon subsequent annealing altered the diffusion, activation, and clustering properties of the boron. Furthermore, increasing the temperature of the wafer during the implant was sufficient to suppress amorphization, allowing profiles and device parameters to become matched. Figure 5 shows a representative set of curves indicating the cluster phenomena observed for the lower temperature, high flux single wafer implanter, and the influence of wafer temperature on the profiles. The results indicate the strong primary effect of dose rate in determining final electrical properties of devices, and successful implementation of damage engineering using wafer temperature control.

  6. Control of a Glove-Based Grasp Assist Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergelin, Bryan J (Inventor); Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Davis, Donald R. (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Sanders, Adam M (Inventor); Askew, R. Scott (Inventor); Laske, Evan (Inventor); Ensley, Kody (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A grasp assist system includes a glove and sleeve. The glove includes a digit, i.e., a finger or thumb, and a force sensor. The sensor measures a grasping force applied to an object by an operator wearing the glove. The glove contains a tendon connected at a first end to the digit. The sleeve has an actuator assembly connected to a second end of the tendon and a controller in communication with the sensor. The controller includes a configuration module having selectable operating modes and a processor that calculates a tensile force to apply to the tendon for each of the selectable operating modes to assist the grasping force in a manner that differs for each of the operating modes. A method includes measuring the grasping force, selecting the mode, calculating the tensile force, and applying the tensile force to the tendon using the actuator assembly.

  7. Planar Gallium arsenide nanowire arrays for nanoelectronics: Controlled growth, doping, characterization, and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowdy, Ryan Stewart

    The Vapor-Liquid-Solid (VLS) mechanism is a bottom-up approach to produce onedimensional semiconductor structures, or nanowires. VLS nanowires are formed via a chemical or physical deposition process, where a metallic nanoparticle (seed) facilitates the growth. Nanowire growth diameter is strongly correlated to seed size, therefore top-down patterning can control site location and diameter of nanowire growth. Nanowires are sought after for their potential use as a manageable way produce small dimensioned semiconductor features without the need of expensive lithographic techniques. VLS nanowires commonly grow out-of-plane with respect to their growth substrate, resulting in difficulty with integrating VLS nanowires into existing device processing which is intended for planar geometries. Nanowires are typically removed from the substrate, which requires painstaking and uneconomical methods to pattern and align the nanowires. Planar nanowires are a potential solution to this issue; they grow in-plane on the substrate surface, epitaxially attached along its entire axis. Planar nanowires, as is, can be integrated into any preexisting planar semiconductor process, combining the advantages of nanowires with increased manufacturability. In this dissertation, planar GaAs nanowires are grown using metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) with Au nanoparticles as the liquid metal seed. Growth occurs across multiple substrates to elucidate the mechanism behind planar nanowire growth direction. Knowledge gained by observing planar nanowire growth is used to precisely control nanowire growth direction. Subsequently the doping of planar nanowires is explored and unique phenomena related to the p-type doping of planar nanowires are investigated and discussed. The advantages of using planar nanowires are demonstrated through the controlled growth and doping of planar nanowires, and ultimately fabrication of electronic devices using conventional planar process techniques

  8. Silk-based resorbable electronic devices for remotely controlled therapy and in vivo infection abatement.

    PubMed

    Tao, Hu; Hwang, Suk-Won; Marelli, Benedetto; An, Bo; Moreau, Jodie E; Yang, Miaomiao; Brenckle, Mark A; Kim, Stanley; Kaplan, David L; Rogers, John A; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G

    2014-12-09

    A paradigm shift for implantable medical devices lies at the confluence between regenerative medicine, where materials remodel and integrate in the biological milieu, and technology, through the use of recently developed material platforms based on biomaterials and bioresorbable technologies such as optics and electronics. The union of materials and technology in this context enables a class of biomedical devices that can be optically or electronically functional and yet harmlessly degrade once their use is complete. We present here a fully degradable, remotely controlled, implantable therapeutic device operating in vivo to counter a Staphylococcus aureus infection that disappears once its function is complete. This class of device provides fully resorbable packaging and electronics that can be turned on remotely, after implantation, to provide the necessary thermal therapy or trigger drug delivery. Such externally controllable, resorbable devices not only obviate the need for secondary surgeries and retrieval, but also have extended utility as therapeutic devices that can be left behind at a surgical or suturing site, following intervention, and can be externally controlled to allow for infection management by either thermal treatment or by remote triggering of drug release when there is retardation of antibiotic diffusion, deep infections are present, or when systemic antibiotic treatment alone is insufficient due to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains. After completion of function, the device is safely resorbed into the body, within a programmable period.

  9. Silk-based resorbable electronic devices for remotely controlled therapy and in vivo infection abatement

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Hu; Hwang, Suk-Won; Marelli, Benedetto; An, Bo; Moreau, Jodie E.; Yang, Miaomiao; Brenckle, Mark A.; Kim, Stanley; Kaplan, David L.; Rogers, John A.; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.

    2014-01-01

    A paradigm shift for implantable medical devices lies at the confluence between regenerative medicine, where materials remodel and integrate in the biological milieu, and technology, through the use of recently developed material platforms based on biomaterials and bioresorbable technologies such as optics and electronics. The union of materials and technology in this context enables a class of biomedical devices that can be optically or electronically functional and yet harmlessly degrade once their use is complete. We present here a fully degradable, remotely controlled, implantable therapeutic device operating in vivo to counter a Staphylococcus aureus infection that disappears once its function is complete. This class of device provides fully resorbable packaging and electronics that can be turned on remotely, after implantation, to provide the necessary thermal therapy or trigger drug delivery. Such externally controllable, resorbable devices not only obviate the need for secondary surgeries and retrieval, but also have extended utility as therapeutic devices that can be left behind at a surgical or suturing site, following intervention, and can be externally controlled to allow for infection management by either thermal treatment or by remote triggering of drug release when there is retardation of antibiotic diffusion, deep infections are present, or when systemic antibiotic treatment alone is insufficient due to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains. After completion of function, the device is safely resorbed into the body, within a programmable period. PMID:25422476

  10. Emerging Vocabulary Learning: From a Perspective of Activities Facilitated by Mobile Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Zengning

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the current mobile vocabulary learning practice to discover how far mobile devices are being used to support vocabulary learning. An activity-centered perspective is undertaken, with the consideration of new practice against existing theories of learning activities including behaviorist activities, constructivist activities,…

  11. Design and control of a bio-inspired soft wearable robotic device for ankle-foot rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong-Lae; Chen, Bor-rong; Pérez-Arancibia, Néstor O; Young, Diana; Stirling, Leia; Wood, Robert J; Goldfield, Eugene C; Nagpal, Radhika

    2014-03-01

    We describe the design and control of a wearable robotic device powered by pneumatic artificial muscle actuators for use in ankle-foot rehabilitation. The design is inspired by the biological musculoskeletal system of the human foot and lower leg, mimicking the morphology and the functionality of the biological muscle-tendon-ligament structure. A key feature of the device is its soft structure that provides active assistance without restricting natural degrees of freedom at the ankle joint. Four pneumatic artificial muscles assist dorsiflexion and plantarflexion as well as inversion and eversion. The prototype is also equipped with various embedded sensors for gait pattern analysis. For the subject tested, the prototype is capable of generating an ankle range of motion of 27° (14° dorsiflexion and 13° plantarflexion). The controllability of the system is experimentally demonstrated using a linear time-invariant (LTI) controller. The controller is found using an identified LTI model of the system, resulting from the interaction of the soft orthotic device with a human leg, and model-based classical control design techniques. The suitability of the proposed control strategy is demonstrated with several angle-reference following experiments.

  12. Sand control devices and method of installation thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, L.M.

    1987-09-15

    This patent describes a double walled sand control filter for installation in fluid bearing formations to prevent sanding and silting in during production, which consists of: (a) a pair of inner and outer spaced, substantially concentric screen members positioned to define an annular filter spaced therebetween adapted to contain a filtering medium for filtering sand and particulate materials having tendency to pass into a well, the filtration medium tending to be subjected to compaction during production of formation fluids; (b) means for connecting the inner and outer screens together so that the openings within the outer screen extend to a maximum elevational position E1 higher than the maximum elevational E2 of the openings in the inner screen; (c) means for defining a sedimentation area below the filter into which particulate materials filtered from formation fluid with the annular filter space pass to allow the filtrating medium to remain essentially unclogged by the particulate materials. A method is described for installing a sand control filter within an existing well bore formed within a fluid bearing formation, which consists of: (a) cleaning the well bore by removing sand tending to collect in the bottom of the well; (b) placing a wash down media into the bottom of the well, the wash down media substantially consisting of loose glass or polymer spheres; (c) installing into the well the sand control filter carrying a wash pipe and a jet shoe connected below the filter; (d) injecting a working fluid in sufficient quantities through the wash pipe for ejection through the jet shoe to displace the wash down media and allow the jet shoe to settle to the well bottom.

  13. Overview of Langley activities in active controls research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, I.; Newsom, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    The application of active controls technology to reduce aeroelastic response of aircraft structures offers a potential for significant payoffs in terms of aerodynamic efficiency and weight savings. The activities of the Langley Research Center (laRC) in advancing active controls technology. Activities are categorized into the development of appropriate analysis tools, control law synthesis methodology, and experimental investigations aimed at verifying both analysis and synthesis methodology.

  14. Fate of mercury collected from air pollution control devices

    SciTech Connect

    Constance L. Senior; Susan Thorneloe; Bernine Khan; David Goss

    2009-07-15

    Mercury that enters a coal-fired power plant originates from the coal that is burned and leaves through the output streams, which include stack emissions and air pollution control (APC) residues (either in solid or liquid form). This article describes recent findings on the fate and environmental stability of mercury in coal combustion residues (CCRs) such as fly ash and solid products from flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers when either disposed or reused in agricultural, commercial, or engineering applications. 19 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Feasibility of using a compact elliptical device to increase energy expenditure during sedentary activities

    PubMed Central

    Rovniak, Liza S.; Denlinger, LeAnn; Duveneck, Ellen; Sciamanna, Christopher N.; Kong, Lan; Freivalds, Andris; Ray, Chester A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of using a compact elliptical device to increase energy expenditure during sedentary activities. A secondary aim was to evaluate if two accelerometers attached to the elliptical device could provide reliable and valid assessments of participants’ frequency and duration of elliptical device use. Design Physically inactive adults (n = 32, age range = 25–65) were recruited through local advertisements and selected using stratified random sampling based on sex, body mass index (BMI), and age. Methods Indirect calorimetry was used to assess participants’ energy expenditure while seated and while using the elliptical device at a self-selected intensity level. Participants also self-reported their interest in using the elliptical device during sedentary activities. Two Actigraph GT3X accelerometers were attached to the elliptical device to record time-use patterns. Results Participants expended a median of 179.1 kilocalories per hour while using the elliptical device (range = 108.2–269.0), or a median of 87.9 more kilocalories (range = 19.7–178.6) than they would expend per hour of sedentary sitting. Participants reported high interest in using the elliptical device during TV watching and computer work, but relatively low interest in using the device during office meetings. Women reported greater interest in using the elliptical device than men. The two accelerometers recorded identical time-use patterns on the elliptical device and demonstrated concurrent validity with time-stamped computer records. Conclusions Compact elliptical devices could increase energy expenditure during sedentary activities, and may provide proximal environmental cues for increasing energy expenditure across multiple life domains. PMID:24035273

  16. Quality Control Method for a Micro-Nano-Channel Microfabricated Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grattoni, Alessandro; Ferrari, Mauro; Li, Xuewu

    2012-01-01

    A variety of silicon-fabricated devices is used in medical applications such as drug and cell delivery, and DNA and protein separation and analysis. When a fluidic device inlet is connected to a compressed gas reservoir, and the outlet is at a lower pressure, a gas flow occurs through the membrane toward the outside. The method relies on the measurement of the gas pressure over the elapsed time inside the upstream and downstream environments. By knowing the volume of the upstream reservoir, the gas flow rate through the membrane over the pressure drop can be calculated. This quality control method consists of measuring the gas flow through a device and comparing the results with a standard curve, which can be obtained by testing standard devices. Standard devices can be selected through a variety of techniques, both destructive and nondestructive, such as SEM, AFM, and standard particle filtration.

  17. Controlling epileptiform activity with organic electronic ion pumps.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Adam; Rivnay, Jonathan; Kergoat, Loïg; Jonsson, Amanda; Inal, Sahika; Uguz, Ilke; Ferro, Marc; Ivanov, Anton; Sjöström, Theresia Arbring; Simon, Daniel T; Berggren, Magnus; Malliaras, George G; Bernard, Christophe

    2015-05-27

    In treating epilepsy, the ideal solution is to act at a seizure's onset, but only in the affected regions of the brain. Here, an organic electronic ion pump is demonstrated, which directly delivers on-demand pure molecules to specific brain regions. State-of-the-art organic devices and classical pharmacology are combined to control pathological activity in vitro, and the results are verified with electrophysiological recordings.

  18. Sensor-actuator coupled device for active tracheal tube using solid polymer electrolyte membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihara, Tadashi; Nakamura, Taro; Mukai, Toshiharu; Asaka, Kinji

    2007-04-01

    A sensor-actuator coupled device was developed using solid polymer electrolyte membrane (SPM) as an active tracheal tube for ventilator. Active tracheal tube is a novel type of tube for ventilator that removes patient's phlegm automatically upon sensing the narrowing of trachea by phlegm. This type of active tube is extremely useful in clinical settings as currently the sole measure to remove phlegm from patient's tube is to do it manually by a nurse every few hours. As SPM works both as a sensor and an actuator, an effective compact device was developed. SPM based sensor-actuator coupled device was fabricated with modified gold plating method. Prepared SPM was fixed as an array on a plastic pipe of diameter 22 mm and was connected to a ventilator circuit and driven by a ventilator with a volume control ventilation (VCV) mode. SPM was connected both to a sensing unit and an actuation unit. Generated voltage developed by the membrane with the setting of the maximum pressure from 5 cmH IIO to 20 cmH IIO was in order of several hundred μV. SPM sensor demonstrated a biphasic response to the ventilator flow. The sensor data showed nearly linearly proportional voltage development to the intra-tracheal pressure. The sensed signal was filtered and digitized with an A/D converting unit on a PC board. A real time operating program was used to detect the sensed signal that indicates the narrowing of trachea. The program then activated a driving signal to control the actuation of the membrane. The signal was sent to a D/A converting unit. The output of the D/A unit was sent to an amplifier and the galvanostat unit which drives the membrane with constant current regardless of the change in the load. It was demonstrated that the sensor-actuator unit detects the narrowing of trachea within several hundreds milli-seconds and responds by actuating the same membrane with the driving voltage of 3-4 V and driving current of several hundred milli-ampere for each membrane. SPM array

  19. Pixelized Device Control Actuators for Large Adaptive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knowles, Gareth J.; Bird, Ross W.; Shea, Brian; Chen, Peter

    2009-01-01

    A fully integrated, compact, adaptive space optic mirror assembly has been developed, incorporating new advances in ultralight, high-performance composite mirrors. The composite mirrors use Q-switch matrix architecture-based pixelized control (PMN-PT) actuators, which achieve high-performance, large adaptive optic capability, while reducing the weight of present adaptive optic systems. The self-contained, fully assembled, 11x11x4-in. (approx.= 28x28x10-cm) unit integrates a very-high-performance 8-in. (approx.=20-cm) optic, and has 8-kHz true bandwidth. The assembled unit weighs less than 15 pounds (=6.8 kg), including all mechanical assemblies, power electronics, control electronics, drive electronics, face sheet, wiring, and cabling. It requires just three wires to be attached (power, ground, and signal) for full-function systems integration, and uses a steel-frame and epoxied electronics. The three main innovations are: 1. Ultralightweight composite optics: A new replication method for fabrication of very thin composite 20-cm-diameter laminate face sheets with good as-fabricated optical figure was developed. The approach is a new mandrel resin surface deposition onto previously fabricated thin composite laminates. 2. Matrix (regenerative) power topology: Waveform correction can be achieved across an entire face sheet at 6 kHz, even for large actuator counts. In practice, it was found to be better to develop a quadrant drive, that is, four quadrants of 169 actuators behind the face sheet. Each quadrant has a single, small, regenerative power supply driving all 169 actuators at 8 kHz in effective parallel. 3. Q-switch drive architecture: The Q-switch innovation is at the heart of the matrix architecture, and allows for a very fast current draw into a desired actuator element in 120 counts of a MHz clock without any actuator coupling.

  20. Achievements and tasks for active noise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichy, Jiri

    This short survey attempted to highlight some achievements of the latest active control applications. Except for the active control of a one-dimensional sound field in ducts and active headphones, the applications for active control technology are still being developed. Although the principles of active control are simple, their applications still require substantial research and modeling of the sound fields to find optimal solutions. There is no doubt that active control of sound field triggered extensive research of the fundamental properties of the sound field which goes beyond the textbook simplifications. Also, new hardware, particularly actuators, are under development. As more realism is brought into assessment of applicability of active control, we will see in the future increasing confidence of industry to adopt this new technology.