Science.gov

Sample records for active control landing

  1. Experimental investigation of active loads control for aircraft landing gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, J. R.; Dreher, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    Aircraft dynamic loads and vibrations resulting from landing impact and from runway and taxiway unevenness are recognized as significant in causing fatigue damage, dynamic stress on the airframe, crew and passenger discomfort, and reduction of the pilot's ability to control the aircraft during ground operations. One potential method for improving operational characteistics of aircraft on the ground is the application of active control technology to the landing gears to reduce ground loads applied to the airframe. An experimental investigation was conducted which simulated the landing dynamics of a light airplane to determine the feasibility and potential of a series hydraulic active control main landing gear. The experiments involved a passive gear and an active control gear. Results of this investigation show that a series hydraulically controlled gear is feasible and that such a gear is very effective in reducing the loads transmitted by the gear to the airframe during ground operations.

  2. Active control landing gear for ground load alleviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, J. R.; Morris, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    Results of analytical and experimental investigations of a series-hydraulic active control landing gear show that such a gear is feasible when using existing hardware and is very effective in reducing loads, relative to those generated by a conventional (passive year) gear, transmitted to the airframe during ground operations. Analytical results obtained from an active gear, flexible aircraft, take-off and landing analysis are in good agreement with experimental data and indicate that the analysis is a valid tool for study and initial design of series-hydraulic active control landing gears. An analytical study of a series-hydraulic active control main landing gear on an operational supersonic airplane shows that the active gear has the potential for improving the dynamic response of the aircraft and significantly reducing structural fatigue damage during ground operations.

  3. Flightworthy active control landing gear for a supersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, I.

    1980-01-01

    A flightworthy active control landing gear system for a supersonic aircraft was designed to minimize aircraft loads during takeoff, impact, rollout, and taxi. The design consists of hydromechanical modifications to the existing gear and the development of a fail-safe electronic controller. analytical RESULTS INDICATE that for an aircraft sink rate of 0.914 m/sec (3 ft/sec) the system achieves a peak load reduction of 36% during landing impact.

  4. Actively Controlled Landing Gear for Aircraft Vibration Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Daugherty, Robert H.; Martinson, Veloria J.

    1999-01-01

    Concepts for long-range air travel are characterized by airframe designs with long, slender, relatively flexible fuselages. One aspect often overlooked is ground induced vibration of these aircraft. This paper presents an analytical and experimental study of reducing ground-induced aircraft vibration loads using actively controlled landing gears. A facility has been developed to test various active landing gear control concepts and their performance. The facility uses a NAVY A6-intruder landing gear fitted with an auxiliary hydraulic supply electronically controlled by servo valves. An analytical model of the gear is presented including modifications to actuate the gear externally and test data is used to validate the model. The control design is described and closed-loop test and analysis comparisons are presented.

  5. An electronic control for an electrohydraulic active control landing gear for the F-4 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, I.

    1982-01-01

    A controller for an electrohydraulic active control landing gear was developed for the F-4 aircraft. A controller was modified for this application. Simulation results indicate that during landing and rollout over repaired bomb craters the active gear effects a force reduction, relative to the passive gear, or approximately 70%.

  6. Active control landing gear for ground loads alleviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    An active landing gear has been created by connecting the hydraulic piston in an oleo strut to a hydraulic supply. A controller modulates the pressure in the oleo to achieve the desired dynamic characteristics. Tests on ground rigs (documented by a film) have demonstrated the successful alleviation of induced structural ground loads and the next step will be a flight test using a fighter aircraft.

  7. An electric control for an electrohydraulic active control aircraft landing gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, I.; Edson, R.

    1979-01-01

    An electronic controller for an electrohydraulic active control aircraft landing gear was developed. Drop tests of a modified gear from a 2722 Kg (6000 lbm) class of airplane were conducted to illustrate controller performance. The results indicate that the active gear effects a force reduction, relative to that of the passive gear, from 9 to 31 percent depending on the aircraft sink speed and the static gear pressure.

  8. An electrorheologically controlled semi-active landing gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lou, Zheng; Ervin, Robert D.; Winkler, Christopher B.; Filisko, Frank E.

    1993-01-01

    This study is to explore the application of electrorheology (ER) to the real-time control of damping forces that are transmitted through the nose landing gear for an F-106B aircraft. The main part of the landing gear is a strut that consists of a pneumatic spring and an ER controlled damper that is situatted on the strut centerline and applies a force directly opposing the vertical displacement of the nose wheel. The damping element rotates in response to strut displacement, employing a co-axial arrangement of stator and rotor plates connected to the opposing electrodes in the control circuit. The vertical displacement is conveted into rotation of the damper through a screw-nut mechanism. The ER fluid between the electrodes is thus engaged in shear along circumferential lines of action. This design results in a fast time response and a high ratio of strut forces achieved under Er-vs. zero-field control. Compact size and simplicity in fabrication are also attained. The analysis shows that when using an ER fluid of a yield stress of 7kPa, the energy absorption efficiency of the landing gear can reach almost 100% at various sink rates.

  9. Experimental and analytical investigation of active loads control for aircraft landing gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, D. L.; Mcgehee, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    A series hydraulic, active loads control main landing gear from a light, twin-engine civil aircraft was investigated. Tests included landing impact and traversal of simulated runway roughness. It is shown that the active gear is feasible and very effective in reducing the force transmitted to the airframe. Preliminary validation of a multidegree of freedom active gear flexible airframe takeoff and landing analysis computer program, which may be used as a design tool for active gear systems, is accomplished by comparing experimental and computed data for the passive and active gears.

  10. Improvements to the FATOLA computer program including added actively controlled landing gear subroutines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, G. H.

    1983-01-01

    Modifications to a multi-degree-of-freedom flexible aircraft take-off and landing analysis (FATOLA) computer program, including a provision for actively controlled landing gears to expand the programs simulation capabilities, are presented. Supplemental instructions for preparation of data and for use of the modified program are included.

  11. Semi-active control of a landing gear system using magnetrorheological damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Y. J.; Park, M. K.; Choi, J. W.; Yamane, R.

    2007-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the applicability of the developed MR damper to the landing gear system for the attenuating undesired shock and vibration in the landing and taxing phases. First of all, the experimental model of the MR damper is derived based on the results of performance evaluations. Next, a simplified skyhook controller, which is one of the most straightforward, but effective approaches for improving ride comport in vehicles with active suspensions, is formulated. Finally, the vibration control performances of the landing gear system using the MR damper are theoretically evaluated in the landing phase of the aircraft. A series of simulation analyses show that the proposed MR damper with the skyhook controller is effective for suppressing undesired vibration of the aircraft body.

  12. Modeling and Validation of a Navy A6-Intruder Actively Controlled Landing Gear System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Daugherty, Robert H.; Martinson, Veloria J.

    1999-01-01

    Concepts for long-range air travel are characterized by airframe designs with long, slender, relatively flexible fuselages. One aspect often overlooked is ground-induced vibration of these aircraft. This paper presents an analytical and experimental study of reducing ground-induced aircraft vibration loads by using actively controlled landing gear. A facility has been developed to test various active landing gear control concepts and their performance, The facility uses a Navy A6 Intruder landing gear fitted with an auxiliary hydraulic supply electronically controlled by servo valves. An analytical model of the gear is presented, including modifications to actuate the gear externally, and test data are used to validate the model. The control design is described and closed-loop test and analysis comparisons are presented.

  13. F-106B airplane active control landing gear drop test performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, William E.; Mccehee, John R.; Daugherty, Robert H.; Vogler, William A.

    1990-01-01

    Aircraft dynamic loads and vibrations resulting from landing impact and from runway and taxiway unevenness are recognized as significant factors in causing fatigue damage, dynamic stress on the airframe, crew and passenger discomfort, and reduction of the pilot's ability to control the aircraft during ground operations. One potential method for improving operational characteristics of aircraft on the ground is the application of active-control technology to the landing gears to reduce ground loads applied to the airframe. An experimental investigation was conducted on series-hydraulic active control nose gear. The experiments involved testing the gear in both passive and active control modes. Results of this investigation show that a series-hydraulic active-control gear is feasible and that such a gear is effective in reducing the loads transmitted by the gear to the airframe during ground operations.

  14. F-106B airplane active control landing gear drop test performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, William E.; Mcgehee, John R.; Daugherty, Robert H.; Vogler, William A.

    1990-01-01

    Aircraft dynamic loads and vibrations resulting from landing impact and from runway and taxiway unevenness are recognized as significant factors in causing fatigue damage, dynamic stress on the airframe, crew and passenger discomfort, and reduction of the pilot's ability to control the aircraft during ground operations. One potential method for improving operational characteristics of aircraft on the ground is the application of active control technology to the landing gears to reduce ground loads applied to the airframe. An experimental investigation was conducted on series-hydraulic active control nose gear. The experiments involved testing the gear in both passive and active control modes. Results of this investigation show that a series-hydraulic active control gear is feasible and that such a gear is effective in reducing the loads transmitted by the gear to the airframe during ground operations.

  15. Brain activity in predictive sensorimotor control for landings: an EEG pilot study.

    PubMed

    Baumeister, J; von Detten, S; van Niekerk, S-M; Schubert, M; Ageberg, E; Louw, Q A

    2013-12-01

    Landing from a jump is related to predictive sensorimotor control. Frontal, central and parietal brain areas are known to play a role in this process based on online sensory feedback. This can be measured by EEG. However, there is only limited knowledge about brain activity during predictive preparation for drop landings (DL). The purpose is to demonstrate changes in brain activity in preparation for DL in different conditions. After resting, 10 athletes performed a series of DLs and were asked to concentrate on the landing preparation for 10 s before an auditory signal required them to drop land from a 30 cm platform. This task was executed before and after a standardized fatigue protocol. EEG spectral power was calculated during DL preparation. Frontal Theta power was increased during preparation compared to rest. Parietal Alpha-2 power demonstrated higher values in preparation after fatigue condition while lower limb kinematics remained unchanged. Cortical activity in frontal and parietal brain areas is sensitive for predictive sensorimotor control of drop landings. Frontal Theta power demonstrates an increase and is related to higher attentional control. In a fatigued condition the parietal Alpha-2 power increase might be related to a deactivation in the somatosensory brain areas. PMID:23740338

  16. Brain activity in predictive sensorimotor control for landings: an EEG pilot study.

    PubMed

    Baumeister, J; von Detten, S; van Niekerk, S-M; Schubert, M; Ageberg, E; Louw, Q A

    2013-12-01

    Landing from a jump is related to predictive sensorimotor control. Frontal, central and parietal brain areas are known to play a role in this process based on online sensory feedback. This can be measured by EEG. However, there is only limited knowledge about brain activity during predictive preparation for drop landings (DL). The purpose is to demonstrate changes in brain activity in preparation for DL in different conditions. After resting, 10 athletes performed a series of DLs and were asked to concentrate on the landing preparation for 10 s before an auditory signal required them to drop land from a 30 cm platform. This task was executed before and after a standardized fatigue protocol. EEG spectral power was calculated during DL preparation. Frontal Theta power was increased during preparation compared to rest. Parietal Alpha-2 power demonstrated higher values in preparation after fatigue condition while lower limb kinematics remained unchanged. Cortical activity in frontal and parietal brain areas is sensitive for predictive sensorimotor control of drop landings. Frontal Theta power demonstrates an increase and is related to higher attentional control. In a fatigued condition the parietal Alpha-2 power increase might be related to a deactivation in the somatosensory brain areas.

  17. Improved aircraft dynamic response and fatigue life during ground operations using an active control landing gear system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, J. R.; Carden, H. D.; Edson, R.

    1978-01-01

    A three-degree-of-freedom aircraft landing analysis incorporating a series-hydraulic active control main landing gear has been developed and verified using preliminary experimental data from drop tests of a modified main landing gear from a 2722 kg (6000 lbm) class of airplane. The verified analysis was also employed to predict the landing dynamics of a supersonic research airplane with an active control main landing gear system. The results of this investigation have shown that this type of active gear is feasible and indicate a potential for improving airplane dynamic response and reducing structural fatigue damage during ground operations by approximately 90% relative to that incurred with the passive gear.

  18. Birds achieve high robustness in uneven terrain through active control of landing conditions.

    PubMed

    Birn-Jeffery, Aleksandra V; Daley, Monica A

    2012-06-15

    We understand little about how animals adjust locomotor behaviour to negotiate uneven terrain. The mechanical demands and constraints of such behaviours likely differ from uniform terrain locomotion. Here we investigated how common pheasants negotiate visible obstacles with heights from 10 to 50% of leg length. Our goal was to determine the neuro-mechanical strategies used to achieve robust stability, and address whether strategies vary with obstacle height. We found that control of landing conditions was crucial for minimising fluctuations in stance leg loading and work in uneven terrain. Variation in touchdown leg angle (θ(TD)) was correlated with the orientation of ground force during stance, and the angle between the leg and body velocity vector at touchdown (β(TD)) was correlated with net limb work. Pheasants actively targeted obstacles to control body velocity and leg posture at touchdown to achieve nearly steady dynamics on the obstacle step. In the approach step to an obstacle, the birds produced net positive limb work to launch themselves upward. On the obstacle, body dynamics were similar to uniform terrain. Pheasants also increased swing leg retraction velocity during obstacle negotiation, which we suggest is an active strategy to minimise fluctuations in peak force and leg posture in uneven terrain. Thus, pheasants appear to achieve robustly stable locomotion through a combination of path planning using visual feedback and active adjustment of leg swing dynamics to control landing conditions. We suggest that strategies for robust stability are context specific, depending on the quality of sensory feedback available, especially visual input.

  19. Application of active control landing gear technology to the A-10 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, I.; Edson, R.

    1983-01-01

    Two concepts which reduce the A-10 aircraft's wing/gear interface forces as a result of applying active control technology to the main landing gear are described. In the first concept, referred to as the alternate concept a servovalve in a closed pressure control loop configuration effectively varies the size of the third stage spool valve orifice which is embedded in the strut. This action allows the internal energy in the strut to shunt hydraulic flow around the metering orifice. The command signal to the loop is reference strut pressure which is compared to the measured strut pressure, the difference being the loop error. Thus, the loop effectively varies the spool valve orifice size to maintain the strut pressure, and therefore minimizes the wing/gear interface force referenced.

  20. Land- and water-based exercise intervention in women with fibromyalgia: the al-andalus physical activity randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The al-Andalus physical activity intervention study is a randomised control trial to investigate the effectiveness of a land- and water-based exercise intervention for reducing the overall impact of fibromyalgia (primary outcome), and for improving tenderness and pain-related measures, body composition, functional capacity, physical activity and sedentary behaviour, fatigue, sleep quality, health-related quality of life, and cognitive function (secondary outcomes) in women with fibromyalgia. Methods/Design One hundred eighty women with fibromyalgia (age range: 35-65 years) will be recruited from local associations of fibromyalgia patients in Andalucía (Southern Spain). Patients will be randomly assigned to a usual care (control) group (n = 60), a water-based exercise intervention group (n = 60) or a land-based exercise intervention group (n = 60). Participants in the usual care group will receive general physical activity guidelines and participants allocated in the intervention groups will attend three non-consecutive training sessions (60 min each) per week during 24 weeks. Both exercise interventions will consist of aerobic, muscular strength and flexibility exercises. We will also study the effect of a detraining period (i.e., 12 weeks with no exercise intervention) on the studied variables. Discussion Our study attempts to reduce the impact of fibromyalgia and improve patients' health status by implementing two types of exercise interventions. Results from this study will help to assess the efficacy of exercise interventions for the treatment of fibromyalgia. If the interventions would be effective, this study will provide low-cost and feasible alternatives for health professionals in the management of fibromyalgia. Results from the al-Andalus physical activity intervention will help to better understand the potential of regular physical activity for improving the well-being of women with fibromyalgia. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT

  1. Land Use Control Implementation Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, Andrew Scott

    2015-01-01

    This Land Use Control Implementation Plan (LUCIP) has been prepared to inform current and potential future users of Building M7-505 of institutional controls that have been implemented at the site. Although there are no current unacceptable risks to human health or the environment associated with Building M7-505, institutional land use controls (LUCs) are necessary to prohibit the use of groundwater from the site. LUCs are also necessary to prevent access to soil under electrical equipment in the northwest portion of the site. Controls necessary to prevent human exposure will include periodic inspection, condition certification, and agency notification.

  2. Biomechanics and control of landing in toads.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Gary; Ekstrom, Laura; Azizi, Emanuel

    2014-12-01

    Anything that jumps must land, but unlike during jumping when muscles produce energy to accelerate the body into the air, controlled landing requires muscles to dissipate energy and decelerate the body. Among anurans, toads (genus Bufo) exhibit highly coordinated landing behaviors, using their forelimbs to stabilize the body after touch-down as they lower their hindlimbs to the ground. Moreover, toads land frequently, as they cover distances by stringing together long series of relatively short hops. We have been using toads as a model to understand the biomechanics and motor control strategies of coordinated landing. Our results show that toads prepare for landing differently depending on how far they hop. For example, the forelimbs are extended farther prior to impact after long hops than after short ones. Such kinematic alterations are mirrored by predictable modulation of the recruitment intensity of forelimb muscles before impact, such that longer hops lead to higher levels of pre-landing recruitment of muscles. These differences in kinematics and muscular activity help to control the most flexed configuration of the elbow that is achieved after impact, which in turn constrains the extent to which muscles involved in dissipating energy are stretched. Indeed, a combination of in vivo and in vitro experiments has shown that the elbow-extending anconeus muscle, which is stretched during landing as the elbow flexes, rarely reaches lengths longer than those on the plateau of the muscle's length-tension curve (where damage becomes more likely). We have also been studying how movements of the hindlimbs after take-off help to stabilize animals during landing. In particular, the immediate and rapid flexion of a toad's knees after take-off leads to a repositioning of the animal's center of mass (COM) that better aligns it with ground-reaction forces (GRFs) at impact and reduces torques that would destabilize the animal. Finally, recent work on sensory feedback involved

  3. Data Acquisition for Land Subsidence Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Y.; Balke, K.

    2009-12-01

    For controlling land subsidence caused by groundwater over-exploitation, loading of engineered structures, mining and other anthropogenic activities in this fast changing world, a large variety of different data of various scales of concerning areas are needed for scientific study and administrative operational purposes. The economical, social and environmental impacts of anthropogenic land subsidence have long been recognized by many scientific institutions and management authorities based on results of monitoring and analysis at an interdisciplinary level. The land subsidence information systems composed of the surface and subsurface monitoring nets (monitoring and development wells, GPS stations and other facilities) and local data processing centers as a system management tool in Shanghai City was started with the use of GPS technology to monitor land subsidence in 1998. After years of experiences with a set of initiatives by adopting adequate countermeasures, the particular attention given to new improved methodologies to monitor and model the process of land subsidence in a simple and timely way, this is going to be promoted in the whole Yangtze River Delta region in China, where land subsidence expands in the entire region of urban cluster. The Delta land subsidence monitoring network construction aims to establish an efficient and coordinated water resource management system. The land subsidence monitoring network records "living history" of land subsidence, produces detailed scheduled reports and environmental impact statements. For the different areas with local factors and site characteristics, parallel packages need to be designed for predicting changes, land sensitivity and uncertainty analysis, especially for the risk analysis in the rapid growth of megacities and urban areas. In such cases, the new models with new types of local data and the new ways of data acquisition provide the best information for the decision makers for their mitigating

  4. 50 CFR 80.20 - Land control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE-WILDLIFE SPORT FISH RESTORATION PROGRAM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS, PITTMAN-ROBERTSON WILDLIFE RESTORATION AND DINGELL-JOHNSON SPORT FISH RESTORATION ACTS § 80.20 Land control. The State must control lands or waters on which capital improvements are made with Wildlife and Sport Fish...

  5. Interim Land Use Control Implementation Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applegate, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    This Interim Land Use Control Implementation Plan (LUCIP) has been prepared to inform current and potential future users of the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Contractors Road Heavy Equipment (CRHE) Area (SWMU 055; "the Site") of institutional controls that have been implemented at the Site1. Although there are no current unacceptable risks to human health or the environment associated with the CRHE Area, an interim institutional land use control (LUC) is necessary to prevent human health exposure to volatile organic compound (VOC)-affected groundwater at the Site. Controls will include periodic inspection, condition certification, and agency notification.

  6. Bumblebees Perform Well-Controlled Landings in Dim Light

    PubMed Central

    Reber, Therese; Dacke, Marie; Warrant, Eric; Baird, Emily

    2016-01-01

    To make a smooth touchdown when landing, an insect must be able to reliably control its approach speed as well as its body and leg position—behaviors that are thought to be regulated primarily by visual information. Bumblebees forage and land under a broad range of light intensities and while their behavior during the final moments of landing has been described in detail in bright light, little is known about how this is affected by decreasing light intensity. Here, we investigate this by characterizing the performance of bumblebees, B. terrestris, landing on a flat platform at two different orientations (horizontal and vertical) and at four different light intensities (ranging from 600 lx down to 19 lx). As light intensity decreased, the bees modified their body position and the distance at which they extended their legs, suggesting that the control of landing in these insects is visually mediated. Nevertheless, the effect of light intensity was small and the landings were still well controlled, even in the dimmest light. We suggest that the changes in landing behavior that occurred in dim light might represent adaptations that allow the bees to perform smooth landings across the broad range of light intensities at which they are active. PMID:27683546

  7. Bumblebees Perform Well-Controlled Landings in Dim Light.

    PubMed

    Reber, Therese; Dacke, Marie; Warrant, Eric; Baird, Emily

    2016-01-01

    To make a smooth touchdown when landing, an insect must be able to reliably control its approach speed as well as its body and leg position-behaviors that are thought to be regulated primarily by visual information. Bumblebees forage and land under a broad range of light intensities and while their behavior during the final moments of landing has been described in detail in bright light, little is known about how this is affected by decreasing light intensity. Here, we investigate this by characterizing the performance of bumblebees, B. terrestris, landing on a flat platform at two different orientations (horizontal and vertical) and at four different light intensities (ranging from 600 lx down to 19 lx). As light intensity decreased, the bees modified their body position and the distance at which they extended their legs, suggesting that the control of landing in these insects is visually mediated. Nevertheless, the effect of light intensity was small and the landings were still well controlled, even in the dimmest light. We suggest that the changes in landing behavior that occurred in dim light might represent adaptations that allow the bees to perform smooth landings across the broad range of light intensities at which they are active. PMID:27683546

  8. Bumblebees Perform Well-Controlled Landings in Dim Light

    PubMed Central

    Reber, Therese; Dacke, Marie; Warrant, Eric; Baird, Emily

    2016-01-01

    To make a smooth touchdown when landing, an insect must be able to reliably control its approach speed as well as its body and leg position—behaviors that are thought to be regulated primarily by visual information. Bumblebees forage and land under a broad range of light intensities and while their behavior during the final moments of landing has been described in detail in bright light, little is known about how this is affected by decreasing light intensity. Here, we investigate this by characterizing the performance of bumblebees, B. terrestris, landing on a flat platform at two different orientations (horizontal and vertical) and at four different light intensities (ranging from 600 lx down to 19 lx). As light intensity decreased, the bees modified their body position and the distance at which they extended their legs, suggesting that the control of landing in these insects is visually mediated. Nevertheless, the effect of light intensity was small and the landings were still well controlled, even in the dimmest light. We suggest that the changes in landing behavior that occurred in dim light might represent adaptations that allow the bees to perform smooth landings across the broad range of light intensities at which they are active.

  9. Bumblebees Perform Well-Controlled Landings in Dim Light.

    PubMed

    Reber, Therese; Dacke, Marie; Warrant, Eric; Baird, Emily

    2016-01-01

    To make a smooth touchdown when landing, an insect must be able to reliably control its approach speed as well as its body and leg position-behaviors that are thought to be regulated primarily by visual information. Bumblebees forage and land under a broad range of light intensities and while their behavior during the final moments of landing has been described in detail in bright light, little is known about how this is affected by decreasing light intensity. Here, we investigate this by characterizing the performance of bumblebees, B. terrestris, landing on a flat platform at two different orientations (horizontal and vertical) and at four different light intensities (ranging from 600 lx down to 19 lx). As light intensity decreased, the bees modified their body position and the distance at which they extended their legs, suggesting that the control of landing in these insects is visually mediated. Nevertheless, the effect of light intensity was small and the landings were still well controlled, even in the dimmest light. We suggest that the changes in landing behavior that occurred in dim light might represent adaptations that allow the bees to perform smooth landings across the broad range of light intensities at which they are active.

  10. Performance evaluation on vibration control of MR landing gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D. Y.; Nam, Y. J.; Yamane, R.; Park, M. K.

    2009-02-01

    This paper is concerned with the applicability of the developed MR damper to the landing gear system for the attenuating undesired shock and vibration in the landing and taxing phases. First of all, the experimental model of the MR damper is derived based on the results of performance evaluations. Next, a simplified skyhook controller, which is one of the most straightforward, but effective approaches for improving ride comport in vehicles with active suspensions, is formulated. Then, the vibration control performances of the landing gear system using the MR damper are theoretically evaluated in the landing phase of the aircraft. A series of simulation analyses show that the proposed MR damper with the skyhook controller is effective for suppressing undesired vibration of the aircraft body. Finally, the effectiveness of the simulation results are additionally verified via HILS (Hardware-in-the-loop-simulation) method.

  11. 40 CFR 52.784 - Transportation and land use controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Transportation and land use controls... land use controls. (a) To complete the requirements of subpart L and subpart G of this chapter, the.../or land use control strategies and a demonstration that said strategies, along with...

  12. 40 CFR 52.784 - Transportation and land use controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Transportation and land use controls... land use controls. (a) To complete the requirements of subpart L and subpart G of this chapter, the.../or land use control strategies and a demonstration that said strategies, along with...

  13. 40 CFR 52.784 - Transportation and land use controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Transportation and land use controls... land use controls. (a) To complete the requirements of subpart L and subpart G of this chapter, the.../or land use control strategies and a demonstration that said strategies, along with...

  14. 40 CFR 52.784 - Transportation and land use controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Transportation and land use controls... land use controls. (a) To complete the requirements of subpart L and subpart G of this chapter, the.../or land use control strategies and a demonstration that said strategies, along with...

  15. 40 CFR 52.784 - Transportation and land use controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Transportation and land use controls... land use controls. (a) To complete the requirements of subpart L and subpart G of this chapter, the.../or land use control strategies and a demonstration that said strategies, along with...

  16. Toward Reform in Land Reform: Coupling Local Control and Social Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geisler, Charles C.

    An alternative to the traditional land reform movement in the United States and the recent land use reform movement would result in a merging of social control with local control over land. Traditional land reformers perceive that land is a private commodity subject to fee-simple ownership and near absolute control over its use and disposition.…

  17. AGFATL- ACTIVE GEAR FLEXIBLE AIRCRAFT TAKEOFF AND LANDING ANALYSIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    The Active Gear, Flexible Aircraft Takeoff and Landing Analysis program, AGFATL, was developed to provide a complete simulation of the aircraft takeoff and landing dynamics problem. AGFATL can represent an airplane either as a rigid body with six degrees of freedom or as a flexible body with multiple degrees of freedom. The airframe flexibility is represented by the superposition of up to twenty free vibration modes on the rigid-body motions. The analysis includes maneuver logic and autopilots programmed to control the aircraft during glide slope, flare, landing, and takeoff. The program is modular so that performance of the aircraft in flight and during landing and ground maneuvers can be studied separately or in combination. A program restart capability is included in AGFATL. Effects simulated in the AGFATL program include: (1) flexible aircraft control and performance during glide slope, flare, landing roll, and takeoff roll under conditions of changing winds, engine failures, brake failures, control system failures, strut failures, restrictions due to runway length, and control variable limits and time lags; (2) landing gear loads and dynamics for up to five gears; (3) single and multiple engines (maximum of four) including selective engine reversing and failure; (4) drag chute and spoiler effects; (5) wheel braking (including skid-control) and selective brake failure; (6) aerodynamic ground effects; (7) aircraft carrier operations; (8) inclined runways and runway perturbations; (9) flexible or rigid airframes; 10) rudder and nose gear steering; and 11) actively controlled landing gear shock struts. Input to the AGFATL program includes data which describe runway roughness; vehicle geometry, flexibility and aerodynamic characteristics; landing gear(s); propulsion; and initial conditions such as attitude, attitude change rates, and velocities. AGFATL performs a time integration of the equations of motion and outputs comprehensive information on the airframe

  18. Analytical investigation of the landing dynamics of a large airplane with a load-control system in the main landing gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, J. R.; Carden, H. D.

    1979-01-01

    The results of an evaluation of an active load-control landing gear computer program (ACOLAG) for predicting the landing dynamics of airplanes with passive and active main gears are presented. ACOLAG was used in an analytical investigation of the landing dynamics of a large airplane with both passive and active main gears. It was concluded that the program is valid for predicting the landing dynamics of airplanes with both passive and active main gears. It was shown that the active gear reduces airframe-gear forces and airplane motions following initial impact, and has the potential for significant reductions in structural fatigue damage relative to that which occurs with the passive gear.

  19. Knee Muscular Control During Jump Landing in Multidirections

    PubMed Central

    Sinsurin, Komsak; Vachalathiti, Roongtiwa; Jalayondeja, Wattana; Limroongreungrat, Weerawat

    2016-01-01

    Background Jump landing is a complex movement in sports. While competing and practicing, athletes frequently perform multi-planar jump landing. Anticipatory muscle activity could influence the amount of knee flexion and prepare the knee for dynamic weight bearing such as landing tasks. Objectives The aim of the present study was to examine knee muscle function and knee flexion excursion as athletes naturally performed multi-direction jump landing. Materials and Methods Eighteen male athletes performed the jump-landing test in four directions: forward (0°), 30° diagonal, 60° diagonal, and lateral (90°). Muscles tested were vastus medialis (VM), vastus lateralis (VL), rectus femoris (RF), semitendinosus (ST), and biceps femoris (BF). A ViconTM 612 workstation collected the kinematic data. An electromyography was synchronized with the ViconTM Motion system to quantify dynamic muscle function. Repeated measure ANOVA was used to analyze the data. Results Jump-landing direction significantly influenced (P < 0.05) muscle activities of VL, RF, and ST and knee flexion excursion. Jumpers landed with a trend of decreasing knee flexion excursion and ST muscle activity 100 ms before foot contact progressively from forward to lateral directions of jump landing. Conclusions A higher risk of knee injury might occur during lateral jump landing than forward and diagonal directions. Athletes should have more practice in jump landing in lateral direction to avoid injury. Landing technique with high knee flexion in multi-directions should be taught to jumpers for knee injury prevention. PMID:27625758

  20. Knee Muscular Control During Jump Landing in Multidirections

    PubMed Central

    Sinsurin, Komsak; Vachalathiti, Roongtiwa; Jalayondeja, Wattana; Limroongreungrat, Weerawat

    2016-01-01

    Background Jump landing is a complex movement in sports. While competing and practicing, athletes frequently perform multi-planar jump landing. Anticipatory muscle activity could influence the amount of knee flexion and prepare the knee for dynamic weight bearing such as landing tasks. Objectives The aim of the present study was to examine knee muscle function and knee flexion excursion as athletes naturally performed multi-direction jump landing. Materials and Methods Eighteen male athletes performed the jump-landing test in four directions: forward (0°), 30° diagonal, 60° diagonal, and lateral (90°). Muscles tested were vastus medialis (VM), vastus lateralis (VL), rectus femoris (RF), semitendinosus (ST), and biceps femoris (BF). A ViconTM 612 workstation collected the kinematic data. An electromyography was synchronized with the ViconTM Motion system to quantify dynamic muscle function. Repeated measure ANOVA was used to analyze the data. Results Jump-landing direction significantly influenced (P < 0.05) muscle activities of VL, RF, and ST and knee flexion excursion. Jumpers landed with a trend of decreasing knee flexion excursion and ST muscle activity 100 ms before foot contact progressively from forward to lateral directions of jump landing. Conclusions A higher risk of knee injury might occur during lateral jump landing than forward and diagonal directions. Athletes should have more practice in jump landing in lateral direction to avoid injury. Landing technique with high knee flexion in multi-directions should be taught to jumpers for knee injury prevention.

  1. 40 CFR 52.1128 - Transportation and land use controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Transportation and land use controls. 52.1128 Section 52.1128 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Transportation and land use controls. (a) For purposes of this subpart, the definitions herein are applicable....

  2. 40 CFR 52.1128 - Transportation and land use controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Transportation and land use controls. 52.1128 Section 52.1128 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Transportation and land use controls. (a) For purposes of this subpart, the definitions herein are applicable....

  3. 40 CFR 52.1128 - Transportation and land use controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Transportation and land use controls. 52.1128 Section 52.1128 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Transportation and land use controls. (a) For purposes of this subpart, the definitions herein are applicable....

  4. 40 CFR 52.1128 - Transportation and land use controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Transportation and land use controls. 52.1128 Section 52.1128 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Transportation and land use controls. (a) For purposes of this subpart, the definitions herein are applicable....

  5. 40 CFR 52.1128 - Transportation and land use controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Transportation and land use controls. 52.1128 Section 52.1128 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Transportation and land use controls. (a) For purposes of this subpart, the definitions herein are applicable....

  6. 18. VERTICAL VIEW. DETAIL, VIEW FROM LANDING ON CONTROL CABIN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. VERTICAL VIEW. DETAIL, VIEW FROM LANDING ON CONTROL CABIN LADDER, AT APPROXIMATELY BRIDGE DECK LEVEL, SHOWING PORTION OF GEAR TRAIN AT TURNTABLE. - Gianella Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at State Highway 32, Hamilton City, Glenn County, CA

  7. 7. Northeast view interior, air traffic control and landing system ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Northeast view interior, air traffic control and landing system room 25 - Selfridge Field, Building No. 1050, Northwest corner of Doolittle Avenue & D Street; Harrison Township, Mount Clemens, Macomb County, MI

  8. Motor Control of Landing from a Jump in Simulated Hypergravity

    PubMed Central

    Gambelli, Clément N.; Theisen, Daniel; Willems, Patrick A.; Schepens, Bénédicte

    2015-01-01

    On Earth, when landing from a counter-movement jump, muscles contract before touchdown to anticipate imminent collision with the ground and place the limbs in a proper position. This study assesses how the control of landing is modified when gravity is increased above 1 g. Hypergravity was simulated in two different ways: (1) by generating centrifugal forces during turns of an aircraft (A300) and (2) by pulling the subject downwards in the laboratory with a Subject Loading System (SLS). Eight subjects were asked to perform counter-movement jumps at 1 g on Earth and at 3 hypergravity levels (1.2, 1.4 and 1.6 g) both in A300 and with SLS. External forces applied to the body, movements of the lower limb segments and muscular activity of 6 lower limb muscles were recorded. Our results show that both in A300 and with SLS, as in 1 g: (1) the anticipation phase is present; (2) during the loading phase (from touchdown until the peak of vertical ground reaction force), lower limb muscles act like a stiff spring, whereas during the second part (from the peak of vertical ground reaction force until the return to the standing position), they act like a compliant spring associated with a damper. (3) With increasing gravity, the preparatory adjustments and the loading phase are modified whereas the second part does not change drastically. (4) The modifications are similar in A300 and with SLS, however the effect of hypergravity is accentuated in A300, probably due to altered sensory inputs. This observation suggests that otolithic information plays an important role in the control of the landing from a jump. PMID:26505472

  9. Motor Control of Landing from a Jump in Simulated Hypergravity.

    PubMed

    Gambelli, Clément N; Theisen, Daniel; Willems, Patrick A; Schepens, Bénédicte

    2015-01-01

    On Earth, when landing from a counter-movement jump, muscles contract before touchdown to anticipate imminent collision with the ground and place the limbs in a proper position. This study assesses how the control of landing is modified when gravity is increased above 1 g. Hypergravity was simulated in two different ways: (1) by generating centrifugal forces during turns of an aircraft (A300) and (2) by pulling the subject downwards in the laboratory with a Subject Loading System (SLS). Eight subjects were asked to perform counter-movement jumps at 1 g on Earth and at 3 hypergravity levels (1.2, 1.4 and 1.6 g) both in A300 and with SLS. External forces applied to the body, movements of the lower limb segments and muscular activity of 6 lower limb muscles were recorded. Our results show that both in A300 and with SLS, as in 1 g: (1) the anticipation phase is present; (2) during the loading phase (from touchdown until the peak of vertical ground reaction force), lower limb muscles act like a stiff spring, whereas during the second part (from the peak of vertical ground reaction force until the return to the standing position), they act like a compliant spring associated with a damper. (3) With increasing gravity, the preparatory adjustments and the loading phase are modified whereas the second part does not change drastically. (4) The modifications are similar in A300 and with SLS, however the effect of hypergravity is accentuated in A300, probably due to altered sensory inputs. This observation suggests that otolithic information plays an important role in the control of the landing from a jump. PMID:26505472

  10. Task Analysis of Shuttle Entry and Landing Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Albert W.; Vanderark, Stephen T.

    1993-01-01

    The Task Analysis of Shuttle Entry and Landing (E/L) Activities documents all tasks required to land the Orbiter following an STS mission. In addition to analysis of tasks performed, task conditions are described, including estimated time for completion, altitude, relative velocity, normal and lateral acceleration, location of controls operated or monitored, and level of g's experienced. This analysis precedes further investigations into potential effects of zero g on piloting capabilities for landing the Orbiter following long-duration missions. This includes, but is not limited to, researching the effects of extended duration missions on piloting capabilities. Four primary constraints of the analysis must be clarified: (1) the analysis depicts E/L in a static manner--the actual process is dynamic; (2) the task analysis was limited to a paper analysis, since it was not feasible to conduct research in the actual setting (i.e., observing or filming duration an actual E/L); (3) the tasks included are those required for E/L during nominal, daylight conditions; and (4) certain E/L tasks will vary according to the flying style of each commander.

  11. Landing-Time-Controlled Management Of Air Traffic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erzberger, Heinz; Tobias, Leonard

    1988-01-01

    Conceptual system controls aircraft with old and new guidance equipment. Report begins with overview of concept, then reviews controller-interactive simulations. Describes fuel-conservative-trajectory algorithm, based on equations of motion for controlling landing time. Finally, presents results of piloted simulations.

  12. Flight Investigation of an Automatic Throttle Control in Landing Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lina, Lindsay J.; Champine, Robert A.; Morris, Garland J.

    1959-01-01

    A flight investigation of an automatic throttle control in landing approaches has been made. It was found that airspeed could be maintained satisfactorily by the automatic throttle control. Turbulent air caused undesirably large variations of engine power which were uncomfortable and disconcerting; nevertheless, the pilot felt that he could make approaches 5 knots slower with equal assurance when the automatic control was in operation.

  13. Mars Surveyor Project Landing Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, Virginia C.; Briggs, Geoffrey; Saunders, R. Stephen; Gilmore, Martha; Soderblom, Larry

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Surveyor Program --now a cooperative program led by NASA and CNES along with other international partners -- is underway. It has the primary science objective of furthering our understanding of the biological potential and possible biological history of Mars and has the complementary objective of improving our understanding of martian climate evolution and planetary history The missions will develop technology and acquire data necessary for eventual human Exploration. Launches of orbiters, landers and rovers will take place in 2001 and in 2003; in 2005 a complete system will be launched capable of returning samples to Earth by 2008. A key aspect of the program is the selection of landing sites. This abstract 1) reports on the status of the landing site selection process that begins with the 2001 lander mission and 2) outlines be opportunities for the Mars community to provide input into the landing site selection process.

  14. Mars Surveyor Project Landing Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, V. C.; Briggs, Geoffrey; Saunders, R. Stephen; Gilmore, Martha; Soderblom, Larry

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Surveyor Program -- now a cooperative program led by NASA and CNES along with other international partners -- is underway. It has the primary science objective of furthering our understanding of the biological potential and possible biological history of Mars and has the complementary objective of improving our understanding of martian climate evolution and planetary history. The missions will develop technology and acquire data necessary for eventual human exploration. Launches of orbiters, landers and rovers will take place in 2001 and in 2003; in 2005 a complete system will be launched capable of returning samples to Earth by 2008. A key aspect of the program is the selection of landing sites. This abstract 1) reports on the status of the landing site selection process that begins with the 2001 lander mission and 2) outlines the opportunities for the Mars community to provide input into the landing site selection process.

  15. Wet runways. [aircraft landing and directional control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, W. B.

    1975-01-01

    Aircraft stopping and directional control performance on wet runways is discussed. The major elements affecting tire/ground traction developed by jet transport aircraft are identified and described in terms of atmospheric, pavement, tire, aircraft system and pilot performance factors or parameters. Research results are summarized, and means for improving or restoring tire traction/aircraft performance on wet runways are discussed.

  16. Validation of an Active Gear, Flexible Aircraft Take-off and Landing analysis (AGFATL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    The results of an analytical investigation using a computer program for active gear, flexible aircraft take off and landing analysis (AGFATL) are compared with experimental data from shaker tests, drop tests, and simulated landing tests to validate the AGFATL computer program. Comparison of experimental and analytical responses for both passive and active gears indicates good agreement for shaker tests and drop tests. For the simulated landing tests, the passive and active gears were influenced by large strut binding friction forces. The inclusion of these undefined forces in the analytical simulations was difficult, and consequently only fair to good agreement was obtained. An assessment of the results from the investigation indicates that the AGFATL computer program is a valid tool for the study and initial design of series hydraulic active control landing gear systems.

  17. Pre-landing wrist muscle activity in hopping toads.

    PubMed

    Ekstrom, Laura J; Gillis, Gary B

    2015-08-01

    Coordinated landing requires preparation. Muscles in the limbs important for decelerating the body should be activated prior to impact so that joints may be stiffened and limbs stabilized during landing. Moreover, because landings vary in impact force and timing, muscle recruitment patterns should be modulated accordingly. In toads, which land using their forelimbs, previous work has demonstrated such modulation in muscles acting at the elbow, but not at the shoulder. In this study, we used electromyography and high-speed video to test the hypothesis that antagonistic muscles acting at the wrists of toads are activated in advance of impact, and that these activation patterns are tuned to the timing and force of impact. We recorded from two wrist extensors: extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) and extensor digitorum communis longus (EDCL), and two wrist flexors: flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) and palmaris longus (PL). Each muscle was recorded in 4-5 animals (≥15 hops per animal). In all muscles, activation intensity was consistently greatest shortly before impact, suggesting the importance of these muscles during landing. Pre-landing recruitment intensity regularly increased with aerial phase duration (i.e. hop distance) in all muscles except PL. In addition, onset timing in both wrist flexors was also modulated with hop distance, with later onset times being associated with longer hops. Thus, activation patterns in major flexors and extensors of the wrist are tuned to hop distance with respect to recruitment intensity, onset timing or both.

  18. Controllable set analysis for planetary landing under model uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Jiateng; Gao, Ai; Cui, Pingyuan

    2015-07-01

    Controllable set analysis is a beneficial method in planetary landing mission design by feasible entry state selection in order to achieve landing accuracy and satisfy entry path constraints. In view of the severe impact of model uncertainties on planetary landing safety and accuracy, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the controllable set under uncertainties between on-board model and the real situation. Controllable set analysis under model uncertainties is composed of controllable union set (CUS) analysis and controllable intersection set (CIS) analysis. Definitions of CUS and CIS are demonstrated and computational method of them based on Gauss pseudospectral method is presented. Their applications on entry states distribution analysis under uncertainties and robustness of nominal entry state selection to uncertainties are illustrated by situations with ballistic coefficient, lift-to-drag ratio and atmospheric uncertainty in Mars entry. With analysis of CUS and CIS, the robustness of entry state selection and entry trajectory to model uncertainties can be guaranteed, thus enhancing the safety, reliability and accuracy under model uncertainties during planetary entry and landing.

  19. 36 CFR 72.36 - Land ownership, control and conversion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Land ownership, control and conversion. 72.36 Section 72.36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR URBAN PARK AND RECREATION RECOVERY ACT OF 1978 Grants for Recovery Action Program...

  20. The Potential Radiative Forcing of Global Land Use and Land Cover Change Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, D. S.; Mahowald, N. M.; Kloster, S.

    2014-12-01

    Given the expected increase in pressure on land resources over the next century, there is a need to understand the total impacts of activities associated with land use and land cover change (LULCC). Here we quantify these impacts using the radiative forcing metric, including forcings from changes in long-lived greenhouse gases, tropospheric ozone, aerosol effects, and land surface albedo. We estimate radiative forcings from the different agents for historical LULCC and for six future projections using simulations from the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Land Model and Community Atmosphere Models and additional offline analyses. When all forcing agents are considered together we show that 45% (+30%, -20%) of the present-day (2010) anthropogenic radiative forcing can be attributed to LULCC. Changes in the emission of non-CO2 greenhouse gases and aerosols from LULCC enhance the total LULCC radiative forcing by a factor of 2 to 3 with respect to the forcing from CO2 alone. In contrast, the non-CO2 forcings from fossil fuel burning are roughly neutral, due largely to the negative (cooling) impact of aerosols from these sources. We partition the global LULCC radiative forcing into three major sources: direct modification of land cover (e.g. deforestation), agricultural activities, and fire regime changes. Contributions from deforestation and agriculture are roughly equal in the present day, while changes to wildfire activity impose a small negative forcing globally. In 2100, deforestation activities comprise the majority of the LULCC radiative forcing for all projections except one (Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 4.5). This suggests that realistic scenarios of future forest area change are essential for projecting the contribution of LULCC to climate change. However, the commonly used RCP land cover change projections all include decreases in global deforestation rates over the next 85 years. To place an upper bound on the potential

  1. Evaluation of compost blankets for erosion control from disturbed lands.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Rabin; Kalita, Prasanta K; Yatsu, Shotaro; Howard, Heidi R; Svendsen, Niels G

    2011-03-01

    Soil erosion due to water and wind results in the loss of valuable top soil and causes land degradation and environmental quality problems. Site specific best management practices (BMP) are needed to curb erosion and sediment control and in turn, increase productivity of lands and sustain environmental quality. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of three different types of biodegradable erosion control blankets- fine compost, mulch, and 50-50 mixture of compost and mulch, for soil erosion control under field and laboratory-scale experiments. Quantitative analysis was conducted by comparing the sediment load in the runoff collected from sloped and tilled plots in the field and in the laboratory with the erosion control blankets. The field plots had an average slope of 3.5% and experiments were conducted under natural rainfall conditions, while the laboratory experiments were conducted at 4, 8 and 16% slopes under simulated rainfall conditions. Results obtained from the field experiments indicated that the 50-50 mixture of compost and mulch provides the best erosion control measures as compared to using either the compost or the mulch blanket alone. Laboratory results under simulated rains indicated that both mulch cover and the 50-50 mixture of mulch and compost cover provided better erosion control measures compared to using the compost alone. Although these results indicate that the 50-50 mixtures and the mulch in laboratory experiments are the best measures among the three erosion control blankets, all three types of blankets provide very effective erosion control measures from bare-soil surface. Results of this study can be used in controlling erosion and sediment from disturbed lands with compost mulch application. Testing different mixture ratios and types of mulch and composts, and their efficiencies in retaining various soil nutrients may provide more quantitative data for developing erosion control plans.

  2. Land cover controls on summer discharge and runoff solution chemistry of semi-arid urban catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallo, Erika L.; Brooks, Paul D.; Lohse, Kathleen A.; McLain, Jean E. T.

    2013-04-01

    SummaryRecharge of urban runoff to groundwater as a stormwater management practice has gained importance in semi-arid regions where water resources are scarce and urban centers are growing. Despite this trend, the importance of land cover in controlling semi-arid catchment runoff quantity and quality remains unclear. Here we address the question: How do land cover characteristics control the amount and quality of storm runoff in semi-arid urban catchments? We monitored summertime runoff quantity and quality from five catchments dominated by distinct urban land uses: low, medium, and high density residential, mixed use, and commercial. Increasing urban land cover increased runoff duration and the likelihood that a rainfall event would result in runoff, but did not increase the time to peak discharge of episodic runoff. The effect of urban land cover on hydrologic responses was tightly coupled to the magnitude of rainfall. At distinct rainfall thresholds, roads, percent impervious cover and the stormwater drainage network controlled runoff frequency, runoff depth and runoff ratios. Contrary to initial expectations, runoff quality did not vary in repose to impervious cover or land use. We identified four major mechanisms controlling runoff quality: (1) variable solute sourcing due to land use heterogeneity and above ground catchment connectivity; (2) the spatial extent of pervious and biogeochemically active areas; (3) the efficiency of overland flow and runoff mobilization; and (4) solute flushing and dilution. Our study highlights the importance of the stormwater drainage systems characteristics in controlling urban runoff quantity and quality; and suggests that enhanced wetting and in-stream processes may control solute sourcing and retention. Finally, we suggest that the characteristics of the stormwater drainage system should be integrated into stormwater management approaches.

  3. Rosetta Lander - Philae: activities after hibernation and landing preparations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulamec, Stephan; Biele, Jens; Sierks, Holger; Blazquez, Alejandro; Cozzoni, Barbara; Fantinati, Cinzia; Gaudon, Philippe; Geurts, Koen; Jurado, Eric; Paetz, Brigitte.; Maibaum, Michael

    Rosetta is a Cornerstone Mission of the ESA Horizon 2000 programme. It is going to rendezvous with comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko after a ten year cruise and will study both its nucleus and coma with an orbiting spacecraft as well as with a Lander, Philae. Aboard Philae, a payload consisting of ten scientific instruments will perform in-situ studies of the cometary material. Rosetta and Philae have been in hibernation until January 20, 2014. After the successful wakeup they will undergo a post hibernation commissioning. The orbiter instruments (like e.g. the OSIRIS cameras) are to characterize the target comet to allow landing site selection and the definition of a separation, descent and landing (SDL) strategy for the Lander. By August 2014 our currently very poor knowledge of the characteristics of the nucleus of the comet will have increased dramatically. The paper will report on the latest updates in Separation-Descent-Landing (SDL) planning. Landing is foreseen for November 2014 at a heliocentric distance of 3 AU. Philae will be separated from the mother spacecraft from a dedicated delivery trajectory. It then descends ballistically to the surface of the comet, stabilized with an internal flywheel. At touch-down anchoring harpoons will be fired and a damping mechanism within the landing gear will provide the lander from re-bouncing. The paper will give an overview of the Philae system, the operational activities after hibernation and the latest status on the preparations for landing.

  4. Rural-Urban Cooperation: Controlling the Land, Controlling the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritchie, Mark

    1994-01-01

    Provides a history of cooperation between the progressive farm movement and organized labor. Discusses the prospects for continued cooperation, the impacts of corporate-controlled farm policy, and priorities of the progressive farm movement. (LZ)

  5. Mining Claim Activity on Federal Land in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Causey, J. Douglas

    2007-01-01

    Several statistical compilations of mining claim activity on Federal land derived from the Bureau of Land Management's LR2000 database have previously been published by the U.S Geological Survey (USGS). The work in the 1990s did not include Arkansas or Florida. None of the previous reports included Alaska because it is stored in a separate database (Alaska Land Information System) and is in a different format. This report includes data for all states for which there are Federal mining claim records, beginning in 1976 and continuing to the present. The intent is to update the spatial and statistical data associated with this report on an annual basis, beginning with 2005 data. The statistics compiled from the databases are counts of the number of active mining claims in a section of land each year from 1976 to the present for all states within the United States. Claim statistics are subset by lode and placer types, as well as a dataset summarizing all claims including mill site and tunnel site claims. One table presents data by case type, case status, and number of claims in a section. This report includes a spatial database for each state in which mining claims were recorded, except North Dakota, which only has had two claims. A field is present that allows the statistical data to be joined to the spatial databases so that spatial displays and analysis can be done by using appropriate geographic information system (GIS) software. The data show how mining claim activity has changed in intensity, space, and time. Variations can be examined on a state, as well as a national level. The data are tied to a section of land, approximately 640 acres, which allows it to be used at regional, as well as local scale. The data only pertain to Federal land and mineral estate that was open to mining claim location at the time the claims were staked.

  6. Remote sensing of environmental impact of land use activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, C. K.

    1977-01-01

    The capability to monitor land cover, associated in the past with aerial film cameras and radar systems, was discussed in regard to aircraft and spacecraft multispectral scanning sensors. A proposed thematic mapper with greater spectral and spatial resolutions for the fourth LANDSAT is expected to usher in new environmental monitoring capability. In addition, continuing improvements in image classification by supervised and unsupervised computer techniques are being operationally verified for discriminating environmental impacts of human activities on the land. The benefits of employing remote sensing for this discrimination was shown to far outweigh the incremental costs of converting to an aircraft-satellite multistage system.

  7. Land processes distributed active archive center product lifecycle plan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daucsavage, John C.; Bennett, Stacie D.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Science Data System Program worked together to establish, develop, and operate the Land Processes (LP) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) to provide stewardship for NASA’s land processes science data. These data are critical science assets that serve the land processes science community with potential value beyond any immediate research use, and therefore need to be accounted for and properly managed throughout their lifecycle. A fundamental LP DAAC objective is to enable permanent preservation of these data and information products. The LP DAAC accomplishes this by bridging data producers and permanent archival resources while providing intermediate archive services for data and information products.

  8. Do Neighborhood Physical Activity Resources and Land Use Influence Physical Activity among African American Public Housing Residents?

    PubMed

    Parker, Nathan H; O'Connor, Daniel P; Kao, Dennis T; Lee, Rebecca E

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have examined neighborhood influences on physical activity (PA) among low-income African Americans living in public housing. This study measured the associations of PA resources and land use with PA among 216 African Americans living in 12 low-income housing developments in Houston, Texas. Neighborhood measures included both detailed information from in-person audits and geographic information systems (GIS) data. Hierarchical linear regression models tested the associations of neighborhood PA resource availability and quality and land use density and diversity with individual-level, self-reported PA. Land use diversity was positively associated with walking among men after controlling for other neighborhood characteristics. Policies that promote land use diversity or improve the pedestrian environment in areas with diverse destinations may encourage PA among public housing residents. PMID:27524771

  9. 43 CFR 4710.7 - Maintenance of wild horses and burros on privately controlled lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Maintenance of wild horses and burros on...) PROTECTION, MANAGEMENT, AND CONTROL OF WILD FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND BURROS Management Considerations § 4710.7 Maintenance of wild horses and burros on privately controlled lands. Individuals controlling lands...

  10. 43 CFR 4710.7 - Maintenance of wild horses and burros on privately controlled lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Maintenance of wild horses and burros on...) PROTECTION, MANAGEMENT, AND CONTROL OF WILD FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND BURROS Management Considerations § 4710.7 Maintenance of wild horses and burros on privately controlled lands. Individuals controlling lands...

  11. 43 CFR 4710.7 - Maintenance of wild horses and burros on privately controlled lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Maintenance of wild horses and burros on...) PROTECTION, MANAGEMENT, AND CONTROL OF WILD FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND BURROS Management Considerations § 4710.7 Maintenance of wild horses and burros on privately controlled lands. Individuals controlling lands...

  12. 43 CFR 4710.7 - Maintenance of wild horses and burros on privately controlled lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Maintenance of wild horses and burros on...) PROTECTION, MANAGEMENT, AND CONTROL OF WILD FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND BURROS Management Considerations § 4710.7 Maintenance of wild horses and burros on privately controlled lands. Individuals controlling lands...

  13. Microwave landing system modeling with application to air traffic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poulose, M. M.

    1991-01-01

    Compared to the current instrument landing system, the microwave landing system (MLS), which is in the advanced stage of implementation, can potentially provide significant fuel and time savings as well as more flexibility in approach and landing functions. However, the expanded coverage and increased accuracy requirements of the MLS make it more susceptible to the features of the site in which it is located. An analytical approach is presented for evaluating the multipath effects of scatterers that are commonly found in airport environments. The approach combines a multiplane model with a ray-tracing technique and a formulation for estimating the electromagnetic fields caused by the antenna array in the presence of scatterers. The model is applied to several airport scenarios. The reduced computational burden enables the scattering effects on MLS position information to be evaluated in near real time. Evaluation in near real time would permit the incorporation of the modeling scheme into air traffic control automation; it would adaptively delineate zones of reduced accuracy within the MLS coverage volume, and help establish safe approach and takeoff trajectories in the presence of uneven terrain and other scatterers.

  14. Vector control activities: Fiscal Year, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    The program is divided into two major components - operations and support studies. The support studies are designed to improve the operational effectiveness and efficiency of the control program and to identify other vector control problems requiring TVA attention and study. Nonchemical methods of control are emphasized and are supplemented with chemical measures as needed. TVA also cooperates with various concerned municipalities in identifying blood-sucking arthropod pest problems and demonstrating control techniques useful in establishing abatement programs, and provides technical assistance to other TVA programs and organizations. The program also helps Land Between The Lakes (LBL) plan and conduct vector control operations and tick control research. Specific program control activities and support studies are discussed.

  15. U.S. Geological Survey land remote sensing activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frederick, Doyle G.

    1983-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Department of the Interior (DOI) were among the earliest to recognize the potential applications of satellite land remote sensing for management of the country's land and water resources…not only as a user but also as a program participant responsible for final data processing, product generation, and data distribution. With guidance from Dr. William T. Pecora, who was the Survey's Director at that time and later Under Secretary of Interior, the Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Program was established in 1966 as a focal point for these activities within the Department. Dr. Pecora was among the few who could envision a role for the Survey and the Department as active participants in programs yet to come--like the Landsat, Magsat, Seasat and, most recently, Shuttle Imaging Radar programs.

  16. The Continuously Evolving Land Use Control Climate in FUSRAP - 12285

    SciTech Connect

    Ewy, Ann; Waples, Richard

    2012-07-01

    In recent years the topic of Land Use Controls (LUCs) has become much more prevalent in the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) for a number of reasons. Some regulatory agencies have been placing much more emphasis on this topic than they historically did. Also as the FUSRAP has matured, more sites are approaching a point in the project lifecycle that LUCs are needed to be implemented. There are many issues, some site specific, some agency specific, and some programmatic, that may arise when addressing LUCs on a FUSRAP site. These issues can span the life of a project from planning to implementation. As the emphasis on LUCs increases at a fast pace, USACE is faced with the task of developing consistency in how we respond, and at the same time leaving enough latitude for projects to accomplish their individual missions while taking into consideration the site specific concerns. The Land Use Controls arena encompasses a large number of tools to address the matter at hand. There are numerous mechanisms that can accomplish Land Use Control goals, some of which include administrative controls and engineering controls. This paper will discuss some of the mechanisms being utilized by USACE at our FUSRAP projects. Having a better understanding of how LUCs are currently being handled in the FUSRAP will be beneficial to project delivery teams in order to make the best decisions moving through the project lifecycle. Being aware of LUC requirements and options at an early stage in a project will help a team effectively plan for and execute the chosen alternative for remedial action. There are a number of guidance tools from various other agencies that exist for consideration during Land Use Control planning and implementation. The USACE is currently evaluating these guidance tools to determine applicability and impact to FUSRAP projects. Some of these tools are under review at Army and the Department of Defense. Critical to this evaluation is internal team

  17. 77 FR 70988 - Control Date To Limit Excessive Accumulation of Control, Qualifying Landings History, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 648 RIN 0648-BC70 Control Date To Limit Excessive Accumulation of Control, Qualifying Landings History, and Referendum Eligibility in the...

  18. Vector control activities. Fiscal year, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Pickard, E.; Cooney, J.C.; McDuff, B.R.

    1983-06-01

    The goal of the TVA Vector Control Program is to protect the public from potential vectors of disease by controlling medically-important arthropod pests that are propagated on TVA lands or waters. In addition, freedom from annoying mosquitoes and other blood-sucking pests permits the development, use, and full enjoyment of the vast recreational opportunities offered by the many miles of freshwater lakes. To attain this goal the program is divided into operations and support studies. The support studies are designed to improve the operational effectiveness and efficiency of the control program and to identify other vector control problems that require TVA attention and study. Specifically, activities concerning water level management of TVA lakes, dewatering projects, plant growth control, drainage and insect control programs are detailed. Further, report is made of post-impoundment surveys, soil sampling studies of Mosquite larvae and ecological mosquito management studies.

  19. Fixed Foot Balance Training Increases Rectus Femoris Activation During Landing and Jump Height in Recreationally Active Women

    PubMed Central

    Kean, Crystal O.; Behm, David G.; Young, Warren B.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of fixed foot and functionally directed balance training on static balance time, muscle activation during landing, vertical jump height and sprint time. Twenty-four recreationally active females were tested pre- and post-training (fixed foot balance training, n= 11, functionally directed balance training, n = 7 and control group, n = 6). Experimental subjects completed either fixed foot or functionally directed balance exercises 4 times/week for 6 weeks. Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to assess preparatory and reactive muscle activity of the rectus femoris (RF), biceps femoris (BF), and the soleus during one- and two-foot landings following a jump. Maximum vertical jump height, static balance and 20-meter sprint times were also examined. The fixed foot balance-training group showed a 33% improvement (p < 0.05) in static balance time and 9% improvement in jump height. Neither type of training improved sprint times. Further analysis revealed significant (p < 0.05) overall (data collapsed over groups and legs) increases in reactive RF activity when landing. Independently, the fixed foot balance group showed a 33% increase in reactive RF activity (p < 0.01). Overall, there was also significantly less reactive co-activation following training (p < 0.05). It appears that fixed foot balance training for recreationally active women may provide greater RF activity when landing and increased countermovement jump height. Key points Balance training increased rectus femoris EMG activity upon landing from a stride. Fixed foot balance training improved countermovement jump height. Neither fixed foot nor functionally directed balance training elicited changes in sprint times. PMID:24198691

  20. A Basic Introduction to Land Use Control Law and Doctrine. Publication 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, E. F.

    Divided into four sections, this paper discusses the historical development of land-use control law and doctrine. Entitled "Genesis of the Zoning Mechanism", Part 1 discusses zoning in terms of: a by-product of urbanization: common law land-use controls (public and private nuisance laws); private property as restraint on land-use legislation…

  1. Engineering geomorphology at the cutting edge of land disturbance: erosion and sediment control on construction sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbor, Jon

    1999-12-01

    Construction site management, traditionally dominated by professional engineers, provides an important opportunity for engineers and geomorphologists to work together in minimizing the environmental impacts of land disturbance. Areas disturbed for construction activity have soil erosion rates from 2 to 40,000 times greater than pre-construction conditions, and are important components of nonpoint source (NPS) pollution that degrades surface water quality. Despite significant local-to-watershed-scale environmental and economic impacts, the lack of an individual economic incentive for land developers to control erosion has limited voluntary adoption of erosion and sediment control measures. However, increased regulatory requirements, combined with efforts to identify and publicize the benefits of erosion control, are increasing the number of construction sites on which erosion control efforts are being implemented. Geomorphologists have the opportunity to play an active role in erosion and sediment control by implementing knowledge of erosion and sedimentation processes and of the variables that effect these processes. Pre-project geomorphological site assessments allow project designers to work around areas with high erosion potential, and to stage and schedule land disturbing activities to minimize erosion potential. Combined engineering and geomorphological analyses can increase the likelihood that streams and drainage channels are stable under altered hydrologic conditions, both during and after land use change, and can be used to design a drainage plan that minimizes surface water flow through disturbed areas. A variety of temporary measures to reduce erosion and to trap sediment on site can be designed and implemented, such as temporary surface covers, silt fence, and sedimentation basins. However, design and implementation of these measures require an understanding of erosion and sedimentation processes, and in many cases incorrect installation and maintenance

  2. Monocular distance estimation from optic flow during active landing maneuvers.

    PubMed

    van Breugel, Floris; Morgansen, Kristi; Dickinson, Michael H

    2014-06-01

    Vision is arguably the most widely used sensor for position and velocity estimation in animals, and it is increasingly used in robotic systems as well. Many animals use stereopsis and object recognition in order to make a true estimate of distance. For a tiny insect such as a fruit fly or honeybee, however, these methods fall short. Instead, an insect must rely on calculations of optic flow, which can provide a measure of the ratio of velocity to distance, but not either parameter independently. Nevertheless, flies and other insects are adept at landing on a variety of substrates, a behavior that inherently requires some form of distance estimation in order to trigger distance-appropriate motor actions such as deceleration or leg extension. Previous studies have shown that these behaviors are indeed under visual control, raising the question: how does an insect estimate distance solely using optic flow? In this paper we use a nonlinear control theoretic approach to propose a solution for this problem. Our algorithm takes advantage of visually controlled landing trajectories that have been observed in flies and honeybees. Finally, we implement our algorithm, which we term dynamic peering, using a camera mounted to a linear stage to demonstrate its real-world feasibility.

  3. Active control of convection

    SciTech Connect

    Bau, H.H.

    1995-12-31

    Using stability theory, numerical simulations, and in some instances experiments, it is demonstrated that the critical Rayleigh number for the bifurcation (1) from the no-motion (conduction) state to the motion state and (2) from time-independent convection to time-dependent, oscillatory convection in the thermal convection loop and Rayleigh-Benard problems can be significantly increased or decreased. This is accomplished through the use of a feedback controller effectuating small perturbations in the boundary data. The controller consists of sensors which detect deviations in the fluid`s temperature from the motionless, conductive values and then direct actuators to respond to these deviations in such a way as to suppress the naturally occurring flow instabilities. Actuators which modify the boundary`s temperature/heat flux are considered. The feedback controller can also be used to control flow patterns and generate complex dynamic behavior at relatively low Rayleigh numbers.

  4. Active microwave remote sensing of earth/land, chapter 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Geoscience applications of active microwave remote sensing systems are examined. Major application areas for the system include: (1) exploration of petroleum, mineral, and ground water resources, (2) mapping surface and structural features, (3) terrain analysis, both morphometric and genetic, (4) application in civil works, and (5) application in the areas of earthquake prediction and crustal movements. Although the success of radar surveys has not been widely publicized, they have been used as a prime reconnaissance data base for mineral exploration and land-use evaluation in areas where photography cannot be obtained.

  5. 77 FR 27175 - Control Date To Limit Excessive Accumulation of Control, Qualifying Landings History, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-09

    ... conducting a referendum on December 15, 2008 (73 FR 75968), that detailed the procedures for (1) determining... Excessive Accumulation of Control, Qualifying Landings History, and Referendum Eligibility in the Monkfish... allocation-based management program, and referendum qualification, should one be required in the...

  6. Alternative Attitude Commanding and Control for Precise Spacecraft Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Gurkirpal

    2004-01-01

    A report proposes an alternative method of control for precision landing on a remote planet. In the traditional method, the attitude of a spacecraft is required to track a commanded translational acceleration vector, which is generated at each time step by solving a two-point boundary value problem. No requirement of continuity is imposed on the acceleration. The translational acceleration does not necessarily vary smoothly. Tracking of a non-smooth acceleration causes the vehicle attitude to exhibit undesirable transients and poor pointing stability behavior. In the alternative method, the two-point boundary value problem is not solved at each time step. A smooth reference position profile is computed. The profile is recomputed only when the control errors get sufficiently large. The nominal attitude is still required to track the smooth reference acceleration command. A steering logic is proposed that controls the position and velocity errors about the reference profile by perturbing the attitude slightly about the nominal attitude. The overall pointing behavior is therefore smooth, greatly reducing the degree of pointing instability.

  7. Active weld control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Bradley W.; Burroughs, Ivan A.

    1994-01-01

    Through the two phases of this contract, sensors for welding applications and parameter extraction algorithms have been developed. These sensors form the foundation of a weld control system which can provide action weld control through the monitoring of the weld pool and keyhole in a VPPA welding process. Systems of this type offer the potential of quality enhancement and cost reduction (minimization of rework on faulty welds) for high-integrity welding applications. Sensors for preweld and postweld inspection, weld pool monitoring, keyhole/weld wire entry monitoring, and seam tracking were developed. Algorithms for signal extraction were also developed and analyzed to determine their application to an adaptive weld control system. The following sections discuss findings for each of the three sensors developed under this contract: (1) weld profiling sensor; (2) weld pool sensor; and (3) stereo seam tracker/keyhole imaging sensor. Hardened versions of these sensors were designed and built under this contract. A control system, described later, was developed on a multiprocessing/multitasking operating system for maximum power and flexibility. Documentation for sensor mechanical and electrical design is also included as appendices in this report.

  8. Land Use Control: Interface of Law and Geography. Resource Paper No. 75-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platt, Rutherford H.

    The document suggests that problems of land use control can often be solved by applying geographic skills in analyzing the physical, economic, and cultural attributes of land. The paper is intended predominately for use by citizens' groups as they study the legal and judicial components of land management legislation. It can also be used as…

  9. The Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Golon, Danielle K.

    2016-10-03

    The Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC) operates as a partnership with the U.S. Geological Survey and is 1 of 12 DAACs within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). The LP DAAC ingests, archives, processes, and distributes NASA Earth science remote sensing data. These data are provided to the public at no charge. Data distributed by the LP DAAC provide information about Earth’s surface from daily to yearly intervals and at 15 to 5,600 meter spatial resolution. Data provided by the LP DAAC can be used to study changes in agriculture, vegetation, ecosystems, elevation, and much more. The LP DAAC provides several ways to access, process, and interact with these data. In addition, the LP DAAC is actively archiving new datasets to provide users with a variety of data to study the Earth.

  10. Medical Screening for Individuals Supporting Spacecraft Launch and Landing Activities in Remote Locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers. W. Edward

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the medical screening process and spacecraft launch and landing mission activities for astronauts. The topics include: 1) Launch and Landing Mission Overview; 2) Available Resources; and 3) Medical Screening Process.

  11. Proactive and reactive neuromuscular control in subjects with chronic ankle instability: evidence from a pilot study on landing.

    PubMed

    Levin, Oron; Vanwanseele, Benedicte; Thijsen, Jo R J; Helsen, Werner F; Staes, Filip F; Duysens, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    To understand why subjects with chronic ankle instability (CAI) have frequent sprains, one must study the preparation/reactions of these subjects to situations related to ankle inversion in real life. In the present pilot study, we examined whether subjects with CAI altered their neuromuscular control and reflex responses during and after ankle perturbations in landing. EMG signals were collected from the tibialis anterior (TA), peroneus longus (PL), medial gastrocnemius (MG), and gluteus medius (GLM) of both legs in 9 subjects with CAI and 9 subjects with intact ankles (control). A trapdoor was used to produce an ankle inversion of 25° with the left leg (control) or the affected leg (CAI) in 0%, 50% or 100% of the landing trials. As compared to controls, subjects with CAI had increased proactive activity in the contralateral side prior to touchdown during landing trials with 50% (PL) and 100% (PL and MG) chance of inversion (all, p < 0.05). The increase proactive control on the contralateral side could be part of a strategy to smooth the impact of landing on the affected side in subjects with CAI. Following touchdown, the CAI group showed decreased ipsilateral short latency reflex (SLR) responses in all test conditions both in distal (PL and MG) and in proximal muscles (GLM) on the affected side (all, p < 0.05). Finally, subjects with CAI adjusted their reflex gain differently as compared to controls when exposed to a possible inversion. Overall, individuals with CAI displayed different neuromuscular strategies from controls while landing. PMID:25439444

  12. Recent Controlled Meteorological Balloon experiments in Queen Maud Land, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hole, L. R.; Voss, P. B.; Vihma, T. P.

    2013-12-01

    Controlled Meteorological (CMET) balloons are unique in that their altitude can be changed at any time during flight. They are remotely controlled via the Iridium network and use GPS for positioning. Over the past seven years, they have been operated at altitudes from sea-level to six kilometers and have flown for periods as long as five days. Campaigns have been carried out from the Amazon via Mexico City to polar regions. CMET balloons can perform repeated soundings in order to probe evolving thermal and chemical structure, measure wind shear, and track atmospheric layers. Typical ascent/descent rate is 1 m/s and the data sampling rate is 10 sec. The standard CMET balloon consists of zero-pressure balloon (~300-500 liters at sea level) which itself contains a much smaller (~100 liter) super-pressure balloon. Transferring helium between the super-pressure balloon and the zero-pressure balloon regulates the volume (and density) of the system, leading to controlled ascent and descent. Due to the rarity of meteorological observations from the Antarctic, especially from inland and over the sea, CMET balloons have potential to provide strongly needed data for evaluation of numerical weather prediction and climate models. Here, we present data from a CMET campaign carried out at the Finnish Aboa station in Antarctica (73° 03' S, 13° 25' W) in January 2013. The campaign was unique in that three CMET balloons were shipped to the station and launched by the local team. After the launch, they were controlled by scientists located in MA, USA and Norway. One balloon, Bravo, cruised for more than 100 hours over the coastal slopes of Queen Maud Land and nearby sea ice with a total trajectory length of over 3000 km (Fig. 1). It also passed nearby the UK Halley station. The altitude was generally kept at about 3000-3500 masl, but 8 controlled soundings down to 400-500 masl were carried out. The balloon data were compared with the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF

  13. Active Control of Environmental Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, S. E.; Vuksanovic, B.

    1996-02-01

    Most of the current research on active noise control is confined to restricted spaces such as earphones, active silencers, air-conditioning ducts, truck cabins and aircraft fuselages. In this paper the basic concepts of environmental noise reduction by using active noise control in unconfined spaces are explored. The approach is to develop a controlled acoustic shadow, generated by a wall of secondary sources, to reduce unwanted sound in the direction of a complaint area. The basic acoustic theory is considered, followed by computer modelling, and some results to show the effectiveness of the approach. EA Technology and Yorkshire electric in the United Kingdom are supporting this work.

  14. Controls Considerations for Turbine Active Clearance Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, Kevin J.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation discusses active control of turbine tip clearance from a control systems perspective. It is a subset of charts that were presented at the 2003 meeting of the International Society of Air Breathing Engines which was held August 31 through September 5 in Cleveland, Ohio. The associated reference paper is cited at the end of the presentation. The presentation describes active tip clearance control research being conducted by NASA to improve turbine engine systems. The target application for this effort is commercial aircraft engines. However, it is believed that the technologies developed as part of this research will benefit a broad spectrum of current and future turbomachinery. The first part of the presentation discusses the concept of tip clearance, problems associated with it, and the benefits of controlling it. It lays out a framework for implementing tip clearance controls that enables the implementation to progress from purely analytical to hardware-in-the-loop to fully experimental. And it briefly discusses how the technologies developed will be married to the previously described ACC Test Rig for hardware-in-the-loop demonstrations. The final portion of the presentation, describes one of the key technologies in some detail by presenting equations and results for a functional dynamic model of the tip clearance phenomena. As shown, the model exhibits many of the clearance dynamics found in commercial gas turbine engines. However, initial attempts to validate the model identified limitations that are being addressed to make the model more realistic.

  15. Integrated Weed Control for Land Stewardship at Legacy Management's Rocky Flats Site in Colorado - 13086

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Jody K.

    2013-07-01

    Land stewardship is one of nine sustainability programs in the U.S. Department of Energy's Environmental Management System. Land stewardship includes maintaining and improving ecosystem health. At the Rocky Flats Site near Westminster, Colorado, land stewardship is an integral component of the Office of Legacy Management's post-closure monitoring and management at the site. Nearly 263 hectares (650 acres) were disturbed and re-vegetated during site cleanup and closure operations. Proactive management of revegetation areas is critical to the successful reestablishment of native grasslands, wetlands, and riparian communities. The undisturbed native plant communities that occur at the site also require active management to maintain the high-quality wetlands and other habitats that are home to numerous species of birds and other wildlife such as elk and deer, rare plant communities, and the federally listed threatened Preble's meadow jumping mouse. Over the past several decades, an increase of Noxious weeds has impacted much of Colorado's Front Range. As a result, weed control is a key component of the land stewardship program at Rocky Flats. Thirty-three species of state-listed Noxious weeds are known to occur in the Central and Peripheral Operable Units at Rocky Flats, along with another five species that are considered invasive at the site. Early detection and rapid response to control new invasive species is crucial to the program. An integrated weed control/vegetation management approach is key to maintaining healthy, sustainable plant communities that are able to resist Noxious weed invasions. Weed mapping, field surveys, and field-staff training sessions (to learn how to identify new potential problem species) are conducted to help detect and prevent new weed problems. The integrated approach at Rocky Flats includes administrative and cultural techniques (prevention), mechanical controls, biological controls, and chemical controls. Several species of biocontrol

  16. 10 CFR 60.121 - Requirements for ownership and control of interests in land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Requirements for ownership and control of interests in land. 60.121 Section 60.121 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Technical Criteria Land Ownership and Control §...

  17. 10 CFR 60.121 - Requirements for ownership and control of interests in land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Requirements for ownership and control of interests in land. 60.121 Section 60.121 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Technical Criteria Land Ownership and Control §...

  18. 10 CFR 60.121 - Requirements for ownership and control of interests in land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Requirements for ownership and control of interests in land. 60.121 Section 60.121 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Technical Criteria Land Ownership and Control §...

  19. Higher Landing Accuracy in Expert Pilots is Associated with Lower Activity in the Caudate Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Maheen M.; Taylor, Joy L.; Heraldez, Daniel; Khorasani, Allen; Noda, Art; Hernandez, Beatriz; Yesavage, Jerome A.

    2014-01-01

    The most common lethal accidents in General Aviation are caused by improperly executed landing approaches in which a pilot descends below the minimum safe altitude without proper visual references. To understand how expertise might reduce such erroneous decision-making, we examined relevant neural processes in pilots performing a simulated landing approach inside a functional MRI scanner. Pilots (aged 20–66) were asked to “fly” a series of simulated “cockpit view” instrument landing scenarios in an MRI scanner. The scenarios were either high risk (heavy fog–legally unsafe to land) or low risk (medium fog–legally safe to land). Pilots with one of two levels of expertise participated: Moderate Expertise (Instrument Flight Rules pilots, n = 8) or High Expertise (Certified Instrument Flight Instructors or Air-Transport Pilots, n = 12). High Expertise pilots were more accurate than Moderate Expertise pilots in making a “land” versus “do not land” decision (CFII: d′ = 3.62±2.52; IFR: d′ = 0.98±1.04; p<.01). Brain activity in bilateral caudate nucleus was examined for main effects of expertise during a “land” versus “do not land” decision with the no-decision control condition modeled as baseline. In making landing decisions, High Expertise pilots showed lower activation in the bilateral caudate nucleus (0.97±0.80) compared to Moderate Expertise pilots (1.91±1.16) (p<.05). These findings provide evidence for increased “neural efficiency” in High Expertise pilots relative to Moderate Expertise pilots. During an instrument approach the pilot is engaged in detailed examination of flight instruments while monitoring certain visual references for making landing decisions. The caudate nucleus regulates saccade eye control of gaze, the brain area where the “expertise” effect was observed. These data provide evidence that performing “real world” aviation tasks in an fMRI provide objective data regarding the

  20. Optical control of antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velema, Willem A.; van der Berg, Jan Pieter; Hansen, Mickel J.; Szymanski, Wiktor; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial resistance is a major problem in the modern world, stemming in part from the build-up of antibiotics in the environment. Novel molecular approaches that enable an externally triggered increase in antibiotic activity with high spatiotemporal resolution and auto-inactivation are highly desirable. Here we report a responsive, broad-spectrum, antibacterial agent that can be temporally activated with light, whereupon it auto-inactivates on the scale of hours. The use of such a ‘smart’ antibiotic might prevent the build-up of active antimicrobial material in the environment. Reversible optical control over active drug concentration enables us to obtain pharmacodynamic information. Precisely localized control of activity is achieved, allowing the growth of bacteria to be confined to defined patterns, which has potential for the development of treatments that avoid interference with the endogenous microbial population in other parts of the organism.

  1. Actively Controlled Components. Chapter 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horn, W.; Hiller, S.-J.; Pfoertner, H.; Schadow, K.; Rosenfeld, T.; Garg, S.

    2009-01-01

    Active Control can help to meet future engine requirements by an active improvement of the component characteristics. The concept is based on an intelligent control logic, which senses actual operating conditions and reacts with adequate actuator action. This approach can directly improve engine characteristics as performance, operability, durability and emissions on the one hand. On the other hand active control addresses the design constrains imposed by unsteady phenomena like inlet distortion, compressor surge, combustion instability, flow separations, vibration and noise, which only occur during exceptional operating conditions. The feasibility and effectiveness of active control technologies have been demonstrated in lab-scale tests. This chapter describes a broad range of promising applications for each engine component. Significant efforts in research and development remain to implement these technologies in engine rig and finally production engines and to demonstrate today s engine generation airworthiness, safety, reliability, and durability requirements. Active control applications are in particular limited by the gap between available and advanced sensors and actuators, which allow an operation in the harsh environment in an aero engine. The operating and performance requirements for actuators and sensors are outlined for each of the gas turbine sections from inlet to nozzle.

  2. Demonstration of Active Combustion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovett, Jeffrey A.; Teerlinck, Karen A.; Cohen, Jeffrey M.

    2008-01-01

    The primary objective of this effort was to demonstrate active control of combustion instabilities in a direct-injection gas turbine combustor that accurately simulates engine operating conditions and reproduces an engine-type instability. This report documents the second phase of a two-phase effort. The first phase involved the analysis of an instability observed in a developmental aeroengine and the design of a single-nozzle test rig to replicate that phenomenon. This was successfully completed in 2001 and is documented in the Phase I report. This second phase was directed toward demonstration of active control strategies to mitigate this instability and thereby demonstrate the viability of active control for aircraft engine combustors. This involved development of high-speed actuator technology, testing and analysis of how the actuation system was integrated with the combustion system, control algorithm development, and demonstration testing in the single-nozzle test rig. A 30 percent reduction in the amplitude of the high-frequency (570 Hz) instability was achieved using actuation systems and control algorithms developed within this effort. Even larger reductions were shown with a low-frequency (270 Hz) instability. This represents a unique achievement in the development and practical demonstration of active combustion control systems for gas turbine applications.

  3. Stochastic control of light UAV at landing with the aid of bearing-only observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Alexander; Miller, Boris

    2015-12-01

    This work considers the tracking of the UAV (unmanned aviation vehicle) at landing on unprepared field. Despite the advantages in UAV guidance the autonomous landing remains to be one of most serious problems. The principal difficulties are the absence of the precise UAV position measurements with respect to the landing field and the action of external atmospheric perturbations (turbulence and wind). So the control problem for UAV landing is the nonlinear stochastic one with incomplete information. The aim of the article is the development of stochastic control algorithms based on pseudomeasurement Kalman filter in the problem of the UAV autonomous landing with the aid of ground-based optical/radio radars in the case of strong wind and large initial error of the UAV entrance into the area covered by radars. The novelty of the article is the joint control-observation algorithm based on unbiased pseudomeasurement Kalman filter which provides the quadratic characteristics of the estimation errors. The later property is highly important for the UAV control based on the data fusion from INS (inertial navigation system) and the bearing observations obtained from external terrain based locators. The principal difficulty in the UAV landing control is the absence of the direct control tools at the terrain end, so the possible control can be based on the angular-range data obtained by terrain locators which must be transmitted from terrain location station to the UAV control unit. Thus the stochastic approach looks very effective in this challenging problem of the UAV landing.

  4. Controls of climatic variability and land cover on land surface hydrology of northern Wisconsin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vano, Julie A.; Foley, Jonathan A.; Kucharik, Christopher J.; Coe, Michael T.

    2008-12-01

    Ecosystem processes are strongly affected by the magnitude, timing, and variability of water flows. As such, our understanding of biogeochemical and ecological processes can be enhanced when our ability to track water flow and storage within ecosystems is improved. We assess how climatic variability and land cover change affect water flow and storage within a temperate forest region of the north central United States (46°N, 89°W). We use a well-validated process-based ecosystem model (IBIS) to investigate evapotranspiration, surface runoff, and drainage rates across a continuum of time scales. We found from 1951 to 2000, climatic variability imposed a large, detectable signal on both annual and seasonal surface water balance that resulted in changes in total runoff that ranged from 30% to 200% of the 50-year average. Conversely, land cover change resulted in subtler, persistent changes (i.e., forest to grassland changed total runoff by 10% annually), which were not detectable from year to year. If, however, changes in land cover persist, within 6 years the cumulative difference from land cover change became slightly more than two standard deviations of annual runoff variability, and within 15 years the accumulated differences were greater than changes between the largest and smallest runoff events within the 50-year period. As a result, in the context of this study, climatic variations typically had a strong effect on the surface water balance in the short term (season or year-to-year variations), but land cover change had influence on water balance over the long-term (6 years and beyond). These changes in hydrology from land cover were detectable as subtle, yet persistent differences that accumulate as changes in magnitude and shifts in seasonal cycles. Through this, we provide a process-based context for understanding the historical causes of water cycle variability, which allows us to better identify the hydrology of this system. Ultimately, this allows for

  5. Active Flow Control Activities at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Scott G.; Sellers, William L., III; Washburn, Anthony E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Langley continues to aggressively investigate the potential advantages of active flow control over more traditional aerodynamic techniques. This paper provides an update to a previous paper and describes both the progress in the various research areas and the significant changes in the NASA research programs. The goals of the topics presented are focused on advancing the state of knowledge and understanding of controllable fundamental mechanisms in fluids as well as to address engineering challenges. An organizational view of current research activities at NASA Langley in active flow control as supported by several projects is presented. On-center research as well as NASA Langley funded contracts and grants are discussed at a relatively high level. The products of this research are to be demonstrated either in bench-top experiments, wind-tunnel investigations, or in flight as part of the fundamental NASA R&D program and then transferred to more applied research programs within NASA, DOD, and U.S. industry.

  6. 36 CFR 72.36 - Land ownership, control and conversion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... conversion. 72.36 Section 72.36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... at will be the lessor. The costs of acquisition or leasing of land or facilities are not eligible for... Acquisition Policies Act (See 41 CFR parts 114-50)....

  7. Extended Active Disturbance Rejection Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang (Inventor); Tian, Gang (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Multiple designs, systems, methods and processes for controlling a system or plant using an extended active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based controller are presented. The extended ADRC controller accepts sensor information from the plant. The sensor information is used in conjunction with an extended state observer in combination with a predictor that estimates and predicts the current state of the plant and a co-joined estimate of the system disturbances and system dynamics. The extended state observer estimates and predictions are used in conjunction with a control law that generates an input to the system based in part on the extended state observer estimates and predictions as well as a desired trajectory for the plant to follow.

  8. Extended Active Disturbance Rejection Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang (Inventor); Tian, Gang (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Multiple designs, systems, methods and processes for controlling a system or plant using an extended active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based controller are presented. The extended ADRC controller accepts sensor information from the plant. The sensor information is used in conjunction with an extended state observer in combination with a predictor that estimates and predicts the current state of the plant and a co-joined estimate of the system disturbances and system dynamics. The extended state observer estimates and predictions are used in conjunction with a control law that generates an input to the system based in part on the extended state observer estimates and predictions as well as a desired trajectory for the plant to follow.

  9. Extended active disturbance rejection controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang (Inventor); Tian, Gang (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Multiple designs, systems, methods and processes for controlling a system or plant using an extended active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based controller are presented. The extended ADRC controller accepts sensor information from the plant. The sensor information is used in conjunction with an extended state observer in combination with a predictor that estimates and predicts the current state of the plant and a co-joined estimate of the system disturbances and system dynamics. The extended state observer estimates and predictions are used in conjunction with a control law that generates an input to the system based in part on the extended state observer estimates and predictions as well as a desired trajectory for the plant to follow.

  10. 10 CFR 63.121 - Requirements for ownership and control of interests in land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Requirements for ownership and control of interests in land. 63.121 Section 63.121 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Technical Criteria Land Ownership...

  11. 10 CFR 63.121 - Requirements for ownership and control of interests in land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirements for ownership and control of interests in land. 63.121 Section 63.121 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Technical Criteria Land Ownership...

  12. 10 CFR 63.121 - Requirements for ownership and control of interests in land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Requirements for ownership and control of interests in land. 63.121 Section 63.121 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Technical Criteria Land Ownership...

  13. Dual control active superconductive devices

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Beyer, James B.; Nordman, James E.; Hohenwarter, Gert K. G.

    1993-07-20

    A superconducting active device has dual control inputs and is constructed such that the output of the device is effectively a linear mix of the two input signals. The device is formed of a film of superconducting material on a substrate and has two main conduction channels, each of which includes a weak link region. A first control line extends adjacent to the weak link region in the first channel and a second control line extends adjacent to the weak link region in the second channel. The current flowing from the first channel flows through an internal control line which is also adjacent to the weak link region of the second channel. The weak link regions comprise small links of superconductor, separated by voids, through which the current flows in each channel. Current passed through the control lines causes magnetic flux vortices which propagate across the weak link regions and control the resistance of these regions. The output of the device taken across the input to the main channels and the output of the second main channel and the internal control line will constitute essentially a linear mix of the two input signals imposed on the two control lines. The device is especially suited to microwave applications since it has very low input capacitance, and is well suited to being formed of high temperature superconducting materials since all of the structures may be formed coplanar with one another on a substrate.

  14. LAND USE AND NATURAL HYDRAULIC CONTROLS ON STREAM SUBSTRATE AND MACROINVERTEBRATE ASSEMBLAGES IN REGIONAL SURVEYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In large regions, human land uses typically overlay wide ranges of natural geomorphic factors that control stream habitat characteristics and benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages. Many macroinvertebrate measures of stream "health" show strong association with substrate size, a ...

  15. Development of a digital guidance and control law for steep approach automatic landings using modern control techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halyo, N.

    1979-01-01

    The development of a digital automatic control law for a small jet transport to perform a steep final approach in automatic landings is reported along with the development of a steady-state Kalman filter used to provide smooth estimates to the control law. The control law performs the functions of localizer and glides capture, localizer and glideslope track, decrab, and place. The control law uses the microwave landing system position data, and aircraft body-mounted accelerators, attitude and attitude rate information. The results obtained from a digital simulation of the aircraft dynamics, wind conditions, and sensor noises using the control law and filter developed are described.

  16. Can Land Managers Control Japanese Knotweed? Lessons from Control Tests in Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delbart, Emmanuel; Mahy, Grégory; Weickmans, Bernard; Henriet, François; Crémer, Sébastien; Pieret, Nora; Vanderhoeven, Sonia; Monty, Arnaud

    2012-12-01

    Japanese knotweed Fallopia japonica is an extremely abundant invasive plant in Belgium and surrounding countries. To date, no eradication method is available for land managers facing the invasion of this rhizomatous plant. We tested different chemical herbicides with two application methods (spraying and stem injection), as well as mechanical treatments, on knotweed clones throughout southern Belgium. The tested control methods were selected to be potentially usable by managers, e.g., using legally accepted rates for herbicides. Stem volume, height and density reduction were assessed after one or two years, depending on the control method. Labor estimations were made for each control method. No tested control method completely eradicated the clones. Stem injection with glyphosate-based herbicide (3.6 kg ha-1 of acid equivalent glyphosate) caused the most damage, i.e., no sprouting shoots were observed the year following the injection. The following year, though, stunted shoots appeared. Among the mechanical control methods, repeated cuts combined with native tree transplanting most appreciably reduced knotweed development. The most efficient methods we tested could curb knotweed invasion, but are not likely to be effective in eradicating the species. As such, they should be included in a more integrated restoration strategy, together with prevention and public awareness campaigns.

  17. Novel Active Combustion Control Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caspermeyer, Matt

    2014-01-01

    This project presents an innovative solution for active combustion control. Relative to the state of the art, this concept provides frequency modulation (greater than 1,000 Hz) in combination with high-amplitude modulation (in excess of 30 percent flow) and can be adapted to a large range of fuel injector sizes. Existing valves often have low flow modulation strength. To achieve higher flow modulation requires excessively large valves or too much electrical power to be practical. This active combustion control valve (ACCV) has high-frequency and -amplitude modulation, consumes low electrical power, is closely coupled with the fuel injector for modulation strength, and is practical in size and weight. By mitigating combustion instabilities at higher frequencies than have been previously achieved (approximately 1,000 Hz), this new technology enables gas turbines to run at operating points that produce lower emissions and higher performance.

  18. Active controls for ride smoothing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, D. W.; Thompson, G. O.

    1976-01-01

    Active controls technology offers great promise for significantly smoothing the ride, and thus improving public and air carrier acceptance, of certain types of transport aircraft. Recent findings which support this promise are presented in the following three pertinent areas: (1) Ride quality versus degree of traveler satisfaction; (2) significant findings from a feasibility study of a ride smoothing system; and (3) potential ride problems identified for several advanced transport concepts.

  19. Health Impact Assessment, Physical Activity and Federal Lands Trail Policy

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Sally M.; Cruz, Theresa H.; Kozoll, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this paper are to describe the application of Health Impact Assessment (HIA) to inform trail decisions affecting a rural, under-resourced community and propose the routine integration of HIAs to enhance NEPA environmental assessments and environmental impact statements for trail decisions on federal lands. Methods Screening, scoping, assessment, recommendations, reporting, monitoring and evaluation are being used to examine the health impact of trail location and design. Results HIA recommendations are being integrated into the public lands National Environmental Protection Act process for planning access to a new segment of the Continental Divide National Scenic Trail. Potential users from a nearby rural New Mexico community and a region of almost one million may benefit from this HIA-informed planning. Conclusions HIA can be integrated into the policy and decision-making process for trails on public lands. PMID:27213163

  20. Carrier-phase differential GPS for automatic control of land vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Michael Lee

    Real-time centimeter-level navigation has countless potential applications in land vehicles, including precise topographic field mapping, runway snowplowing in bad weather, and land mine detection and avoidance. Perhaps the most obvious and immediate need for accurate, robust land vehicle sensing is in the guidance and control of agricultural vehicles. Accurate guidance and automatic control of farm vehicles offers many potential advantages; however, previous attempts to automate these vehicles have been unsuccessful due to sensor limitations. With the recent development of real-time carrier-phase differential GPS (CDGPS), a single inexpensive GPS receiver can measure a vehicle's position to within a few centimeters and orientation to fractions of a degree. This ability to provide accurate real-time measurements of multiple vehicle states makes CDGPS ideal for automatic control of vehicles. This work describes the theoretical and experimental work behind the first successfully demonstrated automatic control system for land vehicles based on CDGPS. An extension of pseudolite-based CDGPS initialization methods was explored for land vehicles and demonstrated experimentally. Original land vehicle dynamic models were developed and identified using this innovative sensor. After initial automatic control testing using a Yamaha Fleetmaster golf cart, a centimeter-level, fully autonomous row guidance capability was demonstrated on a John Deere 7800 farm tractor.

  1. Shuttle Flight Operations Contract Generator Maintenance Facility Land Use Control Implementation Plan (LUCIP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applegate, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    This Land Use Control Implementation Plan (LUCIP) has been prepared to inform current and potential future users of the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Shuttle Flight Operations Contract Generator Maintenance Facility (SFOC; SWMU 081; "the Site") of institutional controls that have been implemented at the Site1. Although there are no current unacceptable risks to human health or the environment associated with the SFOC, an institutional land use control (LUC) is necessary to prevent human health exposure to antimony-affected groundwater at the Site. Controls will include periodic inspection, condition certification, and agency notification.

  2. Mining claim activity on federal land in the contiguous United States, 1976 through 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Causey, J. Douglas; Frank, David G.

    2006-01-01

    The data show how mining claim activity has changed in intensity, space, and time. Variations can be examined on a state, as well as a national level. The data are tied to a section of land, approximately 640 acres, which allows it to be used at regional, as well as local scale. It is restricted in that it only encompasses Federal land.

  3. 78 FR 73875 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Canadian Border Boat Landing Permit (CBP Form I-68)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-09

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Canadian Border Boat Landing Permit (CBP Form I-68) AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Department of Homeland... requirement concerning the Canadian Border Boat Landing Permit (Form I-68). This request for comment is...

  4. Design criteria for flightpath and airspeed control for the approach and landing of STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, J. A.; Innis, R. C.; Hardy, G. H.; Stephenson, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    A flight research program was conducted to assess requirements for flightpath and airspeed control for glide-slope tracking during a precision approach and for flare control, particularly as applied to powered-lift, short takeoff and landing (STOL) aircraft. Ames Research Center's Augmentor Wing Research Aircraft was used to fly approaches on a 7.5 deg glide slope to landings on a 30 X 518 m (100 X 1700 ft) STOL runway. The dominant aircraft response characteristics determined were flightpath overshoot, flightpath-airspeed coupling, and initial flightpath response time. The significant contribution to control of the landing flare using pitch attitude was the short-term flightpath response. The limiting condition for initial flightpath response time for flare control with thrust was also identified. It is possible to define flying-qualities design criteria for glide-slope and flare control based on the aforementioned response characteristics.

  5. H. R. 4804: A bill to amend titles I, II, IV and V of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977, and to add a new title X, to encourage the remining and reclamation of abandoned mined lands by active mining operations, and for other purposes. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, Second Session, June 14, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Surface coal mining operations can be effective in the reclamation of abandoned mined lands and are being encouraged by the amendments to the existing Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. The new section X - Remining spells out the authority of the Secretary of the Interior to enter into agreements with mining companies to use excess spoil from an active surface mine to reclaim an abandoned site, to develop a bond guarantee program whereby the operators may be compensated with reclamation bond credits for up to 80% of the reclamation costs incurred, and to make funds available on a matching basis to states or tribes to collect certain geologic and hydrologic data for watersheds or regions adversely affected by past coal mining abuses for the use of regulatory authorities to assist applicants for surface mining permits within such areas.

  6. Neuronal activity controls transsynaptic geometry

    PubMed Central

    Glebov, Oleg O.; Cox, Susan; Humphreys, Lawrence; Burrone, Juan

    2016-01-01

    The neuronal synapse is comprised of several distinct zones, including presynaptic vesicle zone (SVZ), active zone (AZ) and postsynaptic density (PSD). While correct relative positioning of these zones is believed to be essential for synaptic function, the mechanisms controlling their mutual localization remain unexplored. Here, we employ high-throughput quantitative confocal imaging, super-resolution and electron microscopy to visualize organization of synaptic subdomains in hippocampal neurons. Silencing of neuronal activity leads to reversible reorganization of the synaptic geometry, resulting in a increased overlap between immunostained AZ and PSD markers; in contrast, the SVZ-AZ spatial coupling is decreased. Bayesian blinking and bleaching (3B) reconstruction reveals that the distance between the AZ-PSD distance is decreased by 30 nm, while electron microscopy shows that the width of the synaptic cleft is decreased by 1.1 nm. Our findings show that multiple aspects of synaptic geometry are dynamically controlled by neuronal activity and suggest mutual repositioning of synaptic components as a potential novel mechanism contributing to the homeostatic forms of synaptic plasticity. PMID:26951792

  7. Refining Operational Practice for Controlling Introduced European Rabbits on Agricultural Lands in New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Latham, A. David M.; Latham, M. Cecilia; Nugent, Graham; Smith, James; Warburton, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) pose a major threat to agricultural production and conservation values in several countries. In New Zealand, population control via poisoning is a frontline method for limiting rabbit damage, with large areas commonly treated using the metabolic toxin sodium fluoroacetate (‘1080’) delivered in bait via aerial dispersal. However, this method is expensive and the high application rates of the active ingredient cause public antipathy towards it. To guide reductions in cost and toxin usage, we evaluated the economics and efficacy of rabbit control using an experimental approach of sowing 1080-bait in strips instead of the commonly-used broadcast sowing method (i.e. complete coverage). Over a 4-year period we studied aerial delivery of 0.02% 1080 on diced carrot bait over ~3500 ha of rabbit-prone land in the North and South islands. In each case, experimental sowing via strip patterns using 10–15 kg of bait per hectare was compared with the current best practice of aerial broadcast sowing at 30–35 kg/ha. Operational kill rates exceeded 87% in all but one case and averaged 93–94% across a total of 19 treatment replicates under comparable conditions; there was no statistical difference in overall efficacy observed between the two sowing methods. We project that strip-sowing could reduce by two thirds the amount of active 1080 applied per hectare in aerial control operations against rabbits, both reducing the non-target poisoning risk and promoting cost savings to farming operations. These results indicate that, similarly to the recently-highlighted benefits of adopting strip-sowing for poison control of introduced brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) in New Zealand, aerial strip-sowing of toxic bait could also be considered a best practice method for rabbit control in pest control policy. PMID:27341209

  8. Refining Operational Practice for Controlling Introduced European Rabbits on Agricultural Lands in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Latham, A David M; Latham, M Cecilia; Nugent, Graham; Smith, James; Warburton, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) pose a major threat to agricultural production and conservation values in several countries. In New Zealand, population control via poisoning is a frontline method for limiting rabbit damage, with large areas commonly treated using the metabolic toxin sodium fluoroacetate ('1080') delivered in bait via aerial dispersal. However, this method is expensive and the high application rates of the active ingredient cause public antipathy towards it. To guide reductions in cost and toxin usage, we evaluated the economics and efficacy of rabbit control using an experimental approach of sowing 1080-bait in strips instead of the commonly-used broadcast sowing method (i.e. complete coverage). Over a 4-year period we studied aerial delivery of 0.02% 1080 on diced carrot bait over ~3500 ha of rabbit-prone land in the North and South islands. In each case, experimental sowing via strip patterns using 10-15 kg of bait per hectare was compared with the current best practice of aerial broadcast sowing at 30-35 kg/ha. Operational kill rates exceeded 87% in all but one case and averaged 93-94% across a total of 19 treatment replicates under comparable conditions; there was no statistical difference in overall efficacy observed between the two sowing methods. We project that strip-sowing could reduce by two thirds the amount of active 1080 applied per hectare in aerial control operations against rabbits, both reducing the non-target poisoning risk and promoting cost savings to farming operations. These results indicate that, similarly to the recently-highlighted benefits of adopting strip-sowing for poison control of introduced brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) in New Zealand, aerial strip-sowing of toxic bait could also be considered a best practice method for rabbit control in pest control policy. PMID:27341209

  9. Validation and Verification of Operational Land Analysis Activities at the Air Force Weather Agency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Michael; Kumar, Sujay V.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Cetola, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    The NASA developed Land Information System (LIS) is the Air Force Weather Agency's (AFWA) operational Land Data Assimilation System (LDAS) combining real time precipitation observations and analyses, global forecast model data, vegetation, terrain, and soil parameters with the community Noah land surface model, along with other hydrology module options, to generate profile analyses of global soil moisture, soil temperature, and other important land surface characteristics. (1) A range of satellite data products and surface observations used to generate the land analysis products (2) Global, 1/4 deg spatial resolution (3) Model analysis generated at 3 hours. AFWA recognizes the importance of operational benchmarking and uncertainty characterization for land surface modeling and is developing standard methods, software, and metrics to verify and/or validate LIS output products. To facilitate this and other needs for land analysis activities at AFWA, the Model Evaluation Toolkit (MET) -- a joint product of the National Center for Atmospheric Research Developmental Testbed Center (NCAR DTC), AFWA, and the user community -- and the Land surface Verification Toolkit (LVT), developed at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), have been adapted to operational benchmarking needs of AFWA's land characterization activities.

  10. Active load control using microtabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Dora Te-Lun

    2001-11-01

    Micro-electro-mechanical (MEM) translational tabs are introduced for enhancing and controlling the aerodynamic loading on lifting surfaces. These microtabs are mounted near the trailing edge of lifting surfaces, retract and extend approximately normal to the surface and have a maximum deployment height on the order of the boundary-layer thickness. Deployment of the device effectively modifies the camber distribution of the lifting surface and hence, the lift generated. The effect of the microtabs on lift is shown to be as powerful as conventional control surfaces with lift changes of 30%--50% in the linear range of the lift curve using a tab with a height of 1% of airfoil chord placed at 5% of chord upstream of the trailing edge on the lower surface. A multi-disciplinary approach incorporating aspects of experimental and computational aerodynamics, mechanical design and microfabrication techniques has been taken to develop and test a "proof of concept" model. Flow simulations, using a Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes solver, have been conducted to optimize the size and placement of the devices based on trailing edge volume constraints. Numerical and experimental wind tunnel results are in good agreement, and both confirm that these micro-scale devices create macro-scale changes in aerodynamic loading. Application of this rather simple but innovative lift control system based on microfabrication techniques introduces a robust, dynamic control device and will allow for the miniaturization of conventional high lift and control systems. The result is a significant reduction in typical control system weight, complexity and cost. Also due to the minute size of these tabs, their activation and response times are much faster than that of conventional trailing edge devices. The "proof of concept" tab design, fabrication techniques, computational and experimental setup, and test results using a representative airfoil are presented in this research. (For more information, see

  11. Land-Jump Performance in Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA): A Comparison to Matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Kevin R.; Myer, Gregory D.; Melson, Paula G.; Darnell, Shannon C.; Brunner, Hermine I.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2009-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine if high functioning children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) with minimal disease activity have different biomechanics during high loading tasks compared to controls. Patients were included if they had minimal inflammation documented in one or both knees. Methods. The subject groups consisted of eleven patients with JIA and eleven sex, age, height, and weight matched controls. Sagittal plane kinematic and kinetics were calculated during a drop vertical jump maneuver. The Child Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ) was collected on each patient with JIA. Results. The subjects with JIA had increased knee (P = .011) and hip flexion (P < .001) compared to control subjects. Subjects with JIA also demonstrated decreased knee extensor moments during take-off (P = .028) and ankle plantar flexor moments during landing (P = .024) and take-off (P = .004). In the JIA group, increased hip extensor moments were predictive of increased disability (R2 = .477, SEE = .131). Conclusions. Patients with JIA may demonstrate underlying biomechanical deviations compared to controls. In addition, biomechanical assessment of hip extensor mechanics during dynamic tasks may provide an objective assessment tool to determine overall function in patients with JIA. PMID:20148070

  12. Phenological Versus Meteorological Controls on Land-atmosphere Water and Carbon Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puma, Michael J.; Koster, Randal D.; Cook, Benjamin I.

    2013-01-01

    Phenological dynamics and their related processes strongly constrain land-atmosphere interactions, but their relative importance vis-à-vis meteorological forcing within general circulation models (GCMs) is still uncertain. Using an off-line land surface model, we evaluate leaf area and meteorological controls on gross primary productivity, evapotranspiration, transpiration, and runoff at four North American sites, representing different vegetation types and background climates. Our results demonstrate that compared to meteorological controls, variation in leaf area has a dominant control on gross primary productivity, a comparable but smaller influence on transpiration, a weak influence on total evapotranspiration, and a negligible impact on runoff. Climate regime and characteristic variations in leaf area have important modulating effects on these relative controls, which vary depending on the fluxes and timescales of interest. We find that leaf area in energylimited evaporative regimes tends to exhibit greater control on annual gross primary productivity than in moisture-limited regimes, except when vegetation exhibits little interannual variation in leaf area. For transpiration, leaf area control is somewhat less in energylimited regimes and greater in moisture-limited regimes for maximum pentad and annual fluxes. These modulating effects of climate and leaf area were less clear for other fluxes and at other timescales. Our findings are relevant to land-atmosphere coupling in GCMs, especially considering that leaf area variations are a fundamental element of land use and land cover change simulations.

  13. Automatic carrier landing system for V/STOL aircraft using L1 adaptive and optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariharapura Ramesh, Shashank

    This thesis presents a framework for developing automatic carrier landing systems for aircraft with vertical or short take-off and landing capability using two different control strategies---gain-scheduled linear optimal control, and L1 adaptive control. The carrier landing sequence of V/STOL aircraft involves large variations in dynamic pressure and aerodynamic coefficients arising because of the transition from aerodynamic-supported to jet-borne flight, descent to the touchdown altitude, and turns performed to align with the runway. Consequently, the dynamics of the aircraft exhibit a highly non-linear dynamical behavior with variations in flight conditions prior to touchdown. Therefore, the implication is the need for non-linear control techniques to achieve automatic landing. Gain-scheduling has been one of the most widely employed techniques for control of aircraft, which involves designing linear controllers for numerous trimmed flight conditions, and interpolating them to achieve a global non-linear control. Adaptive control technique, on the other hand, eliminates the need to schedule the controller parameters as they adapt to changing flight conditions.

  14. Decentralized aircraft landing scheduling at single runway non-controlled airports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yuanyuan

    The existing air transportation system is approaching a bottleneck because its dominant hub-and-spoke model results in a concentration of a large percentage of the air traffic at a few hub airports. Advanced technologies are greatly needed to enhance the transportation capabilities of the small airports in the U.S.A., and distribute the high volume of air traffic at the hub airports to those small airports, which are mostly non-controlled airports. Currently, two major focus areas of research are being pursued to achieve this objective. One focus concentrates on the development of tools to improve operations in the current Air Traffic Management system. A more long-term research effort focuses on the development of decentralized Air Traffic Management techniques. This dissertation takes the latter approach and seeks to analyze the degree of decentralization for scheduling aircraft landings in the dynamic operational environment at single runway non-controlled airports. Moreover, it explores the feasibility and capability of scheduling aircraft landings within uninterrupted free-flight environment in which there is no existence of Air Traffic Control (ATC). First, it addresses the approach of developing static optimization algorithms for scheduling aircraft landings and, thus, analyzes the capability of automated aircraft landing scheduling at single runway non-controlled airports. Then, it provides detailed description of the implementation of a distributed Air Traffic Management (ATM) system that achieves decentralized aircraft landing scheduling with acceptable performance whereas a solution to the distributed coordination issues is presented. Finally real-time Monte Carlo flight simulations of multi-aircraft landing scenarios are conducted to evaluate the static and dynamic performance of the aircraft landing scheduling algorithms and operation concepts introduced. Results presented in the dissertation demonstrate that decentralized aircraft landing scheduling

  15. Curved descending landing approach guidance and control. M.S. Thesis - George Washington Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    Linear optimal regulator theory is applied to a nonlinear simulation of a transport aircraft performing a helical landing approach. A closed form expression for the quasi-steady nominal flight path is presented along with the method for determining the corresponding constant nominal control inputs. The Jacobian matrices and the weighting matrices in the cost functional are time varying. A method of solving for the optimal feedback gains is reviewed. The control system is tested on several alternative landing approaches using both three and six degree flight path angles. On each landing approach, the aircraft was subjected to large random initial state errors and to randomly directed crosswinds. The system was also tested for sensitivity to changes in the parameters of the aircraft and of the atmosphere. Performance of the optimal controller on all the three degree approaches was very good, and the control system proved to be reasonably insensitive to parametric uncertainties.

  16. Influences of different land use spatial control schemes on farmland conversion and urban development.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Min; Tan, Shukui; Zhang, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Land use planning is always officially implemented as an effective tool to control urban development and protect farmland. However, its impact on land use change remains untested in China. Using a case study of Hang-Jia-Hu region, the main objective of this paper was to investigate the influence of different land use spatial control schemes on farmland conversion and urban development. Comparisons of farmland conversion and urban development patterns between the urban planning area and the non-urban planning area were characterized by using remote sensing, geographical information systems, and landscape metrics. Results indicated that farmland conversion in the non-urban planning area was more intensive than that in the urban planning area, and that farmland patterns was more fragmented in the non-urban planning area. Built-up land patterns in the non-urban planning area showed a trend of aggregation, while those in the urban planning area had a dual trend of fragmentation and aggregation. Existing built-up areas had less influence on built-up land sprawl in the non-urban planning area than that in the urban planning area. Built-up land sprawl in the form of continuous development in the urban planning area led to farmland conversion; and in the non-urban planning area, built-up land sprawl in the form of leapfrogging development resulted in farmland areal declines and fragmentation. We argued that it is a basic requirement to integrate land use plans in urban and non-urban planning areas for land use planning and management. PMID:25915897

  17. Influences of different land use spatial control schemes on farmland conversion and urban development.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Min; Tan, Shukui; Zhang, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Land use planning is always officially implemented as an effective tool to control urban development and protect farmland. However, its impact on land use change remains untested in China. Using a case study of Hang-Jia-Hu region, the main objective of this paper was to investigate the influence of different land use spatial control schemes on farmland conversion and urban development. Comparisons of farmland conversion and urban development patterns between the urban planning area and the non-urban planning area were characterized by using remote sensing, geographical information systems, and landscape metrics. Results indicated that farmland conversion in the non-urban planning area was more intensive than that in the urban planning area, and that farmland patterns was more fragmented in the non-urban planning area. Built-up land patterns in the non-urban planning area showed a trend of aggregation, while those in the urban planning area had a dual trend of fragmentation and aggregation. Existing built-up areas had less influence on built-up land sprawl in the non-urban planning area than that in the urban planning area. Built-up land sprawl in the form of continuous development in the urban planning area led to farmland conversion; and in the non-urban planning area, built-up land sprawl in the form of leapfrogging development resulted in farmland areal declines and fragmentation. We argued that it is a basic requirement to integrate land use plans in urban and non-urban planning areas for land use planning and management.

  18. Development and evaluation of automatic landing control laws for light wing loading STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinreich, B.; Degani, O.; Gevaert, G.

    1981-01-01

    Automatic flare and decrab control laws were developed for NASA's experimental Twin Otter. This light wing loading STOL aircraft was equipped with direct lift control (DLC) wing spoilers to enhance flight path control. Automatic landing control laws that made use of the spoilers were developed, evaluated in a simulation and the results compared with these obtained for configurations that did not use DLC. The spoilers produced a significant improvement in performance. A simulation that could be operated faster than real time in order to provide statistical landing data for a large number of landings over a wide spectrum of disturbances in a short time was constructed and used in the evaluation and refinement of control law configurations. A longitudinal control law that had been previously developed and evaluated in flight was also simulated and its performance compared with that of the control laws developed. Runway alignment control laws were also defined, evaluated, and refined to result in a final recommended configuration. Good landing performance, compatible with Category 3 operation into STOL runways, was obtained.

  19. Biology, ecology, and control of elaterid beetles in agricultural land.

    PubMed

    Traugott, Michael; Benefer, Carly M; Blackshaw, Rod P; van Herk, Willem G; Vernon, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    Wireworms, the larvae of click beetles (Coleoptera: Elateridae), have had a centuries-long role as major soil insect pests worldwide. With insecticidal control options dwindling, research on click beetle biology and ecology is of increasing importance in the development of new control tactics. Methodological improvements have deepened our understanding of how larvae and adults spatially and temporarily utilize agricultural habitats and interact with their environment. This progress, however, rests with a few pest species, and efforts to obtain comparable knowledge on other economically important elaterids are crucial. There are still considerable gaps in our understanding of female and larval ecology; movement of elaterids within landscapes; and the impact of natural enemies, cultivation practices, and environmental change on elaterid population dynamics. This knowledge will allow generation of multifaceted control strategies, including cultural, physical, and chemical measures, tailored toward species complexes and crops across a range of appropriate spatial scales. PMID:25341096

  20. Influence of drop-landing exercises on bone geometry and biomechanical properties in prepubertal girls: a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Greene, David A; Wiebe, Peter N; Naughton, Geraldine A

    2009-08-01

    We conducted a 28-week school-based exercise trial of single-leg drop-landing exercise with 42 girls (Tanner stage 1, 6-10 years old) randomly assigned to control (C), low-drop (LD), or high-drop (HD) exercise groups. The LD and HD groups performed single-leg drop-landings (three sessions/week and 50 landings/session) from 14 and 28 cm, respectively, using the nondominant leg. Single-leg peak ground-reaction impact forces in a subsample ranged between 2.5 and 4.4 times body weight. Dependent variables were bone geometry and biomechanical properties using magnetic resonance imaging. No differences (P > 0.05) were found among groups at baseline for age, stature, lean tissue mass (DXA--Lunar 3.6-DPX), leisure-time physical activity, average daily calcium intake, or measures of knee extensor or flexor torque. A series of ANOVA and ANCOVA tests showed no within- or between-group differences from baseline to posttraining. Group comparisons assessing magnitude of change in side-to-side differences in geometry (area cm(2)) and cross-sectional moment of inertia (cm(4)) at proximal, mid, and distal sites revealed negligible effect sizes. Our findings suggest that strictly controlled unimodal, unidirectional single-leg drop-landing exercises involving low to moderate peak ground-reaction impact forces do not influence geometrical or biomechanical measures in the developing prepubertal female skeleton. PMID:19458887

  1. U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY LAND REMOTE SENSING ACTIVITIES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frederick, Doyle G.

    1983-01-01

    USGS uses all types of remotely sensed data, in combination with other sources of data, to support geologic analyses, hydrologic assessments, land cover mapping, image mapping, and applications research. Survey scientists use all types of remotely sensed data with ground verifications and digital topographic and cartographic data. A considerable amount of research is being done by Survey scientists on developing automated geographic information systems that can handle a wide variety of digital data. The Survey is also investigating the use of microprocessor computer systems for accessing, displaying, and analyzing digital data.

  2. Tamarisk control on public lands in the desert of southern California: two case studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1994-01-01

    As a land manager, the Federal Government faces enormous challenges from exotic pest invasions and associated changes to the structure and stability of native ecosystems (Bureau of Land Management, 1988). On public lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) alone, it is estimated that almost three million hectares are occupied by invasive exotic plant species (weeds). Assuming an annual rate of invasion of 14 percent, 930 hectares of BLM-administered land are infested everyday by weeds (Jerry Asher, personal communication). When one considers the fact that BLM administers only about one-third of the public land in the United States (The Keystone Center, 1991), the magnitude of the problem assumes staggering proportions. The scenario described in the quote above portrays only some of the problems associated with the spread of the exotic plant tamarisk, a species on the California Exotic Pest Plant Council’s list of exotic pest plants of greatest concern (California Exotic Pest Plant Council, 1993). In this paper we review the threats posed by tamarisk invasion and proliferation and examine the traits that make the plant such a successful competitor. In addition, we highlight two tamarisk control efforts conducted by the Bureau of Land Management in the southern California desert.

  3. Evaluation model coupling exploitable groundwater resources and land subsidence control in regional loose sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Z. J.; Zhao, S. J.; Jin, WZ; Ma, Q. S.; Wu, X. H.

    2016-08-01

    The loose sediments in the Yangtze River Delta, the North China Plain, the plain of Northern Jiangsu and other districts in China are of great thickness, complex in structure and abundant in groundwater. Groundwater overexploitation easily results in geological disasters of land subsidence. Aiming at the issues, assessment models coupling exploitable groundwater resources and land subsidence control in regional loose sediments were brought up in this paper. The two models were: (1) a three dimensional groundwater seepage model with land subsidence based on the one dimensional Terzaghi consolidation theory; (2) a three dimensional full coupling model on groundwater seepage and land subsidence based on the Biot consolidation theory to simulate and calculate. It can be used to simulate and calculate the problems in real situations. Thus, the groundwater seepage and land subsidence were coupled together in the model to evaluate the amount of exploitable groundwater under the specific requirements of land subsidence control. The full coupling model, which considers the non-linear characteristics of soil mass and the dynamic changes of soil permeability with stress state based on the Biot consolidation theory, is more coincident with the variation characteristics of the hydraulic and mechanical properties of soil mass during the pumping process, making the evaluation results more scientific and reasonable.

  4. Active Spacecraft Potential Control Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torkar, K.; Nakamura, R.; Tajmar, M.; Scharlemann, C.; Jeszenszky, H.; Laky, G.; Fremuth, G.; Escoubet, C. P.; Svenes, K.

    2016-03-01

    In tenuous plasma the floating potential of sunlit spacecraft reaches tens of volts, positive. The corresponding field disturbs measurements of the ambient plasma by electron and ion sensors and can reduce micro-channel plate lifetime in electron detectors owing to large fluxes of attracted photoelectrons. Also the accuracy of electric field measurements may suffer from a high spacecraft potential. The Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) neutralizes the spacecraft potential by releasing positive charge produced by indium ion emitters. The method has been successfully applied on other spacecraft such as Cluster and Double Star. Two ASPOC units are present on each spacecraft. Each unit contains four ion emitters, whereby one emitter per instrument is operated at a time. ASPOC for the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission includes new developments in the design of the emitters and the electronics. New features include the use of capillaries instead of needles, new materials for the emitters and their internal thermal insulators, an extended voltage and current range of the electronics, both for ion emission and heating purposes, and a more capable control software. This enables lower spacecraft potentials, higher reliability, and a more uniform potential structure in the spacecraft's sheath compared to previous missions. Results from on-ground testing demonstrate compliance with requirements. Model calculations confirm the findings from previous applications that the plasma measurements will not be affected by the beam's space charge. Finally, the various operating modes to adapt to changing boundary conditions are described along with the main data products.

  5. Codominant water control on global interannual variability and trends in land surface phenology and greenness.

    PubMed

    Forkel, Matthias; Migliavacca, Mirco; Thonicke, Kirsten; Reichstein, Markus; Schaphoff, Sibyll; Weber, Ulrich; Carvalhais, Nuno

    2015-09-01

    Identifying the relative importance of climatic and other environmental controls on the interannual variability and trends in global land surface phenology and greenness is challenging. Firstly, quantifications of land surface phenology and greenness dynamics are impaired by differences between satellite data sets and phenology detection methods. Secondly, dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) that can be used to diagnose controls still reveal structural limitations and contrasting sensitivities to environmental drivers. Thus, we assessed the performance of a new developed phenology module within the LPJmL (Lund-Potsdam-Jena managed Lands) DGVM with a comprehensive ensemble of three satellite data sets of vegetation greenness and ten phenology detection methods, thereby thoroughly accounting for observational uncertainties. The improved and tested model allows us quantifying the relative importance of environmental controls on interannual variability and trends of land surface phenology and greenness at regional and global scales. We found that start of growing season interannual variability and trends are in addition to cold temperature mainly controlled by incoming radiation and water availability in temperate and boreal forests. Warming-induced prolongations of the growing season in high latitudes are dampened by a limited availability of light. For peak greenness, interannual variability and trends are dominantly controlled by water availability and land-use and land-cover change (LULCC) in all regions. Stronger greening trends in boreal forests of Siberia than in North America are associated with a stronger increase in water availability from melting permafrost soils. Our findings emphasize that in addition to cold temperatures, water availability is a codominant control for start of growing season and peak greenness trends at the global scale. PMID:25882036

  6. Suppression of Na+/K+-ATPase activity during estivation in the land snail Otala lactea.

    PubMed

    Ramnanan, Christopher J; Storey, Kenneth B

    2006-02-01

    Entry into the hypometabolic state of estivation requires a coordinated suppression of the rate of cellular ATP turnover, including both ATP-generating and ATP-consuming reactions. As one of the largest consumers of cellular ATP, the plasma membrane Na+/K+-ATPase is a potentially key target for regulation during estivation. Na+/K+-ATPase was investigated in foot muscle and hepatopancreas of the land snail Otala lactea, comparing active and estivating states. In both tissues enzyme properties changed significantly during estivation: maximal activity was reduced by about one-third, affinity for Mg.ATP was reduced (Km was 40% higher), and activation energy (derived from Arrhenius plots) was increased by approximately 45%. Foot muscle Na+/K+-ATPase from estivated snails also showed an 80% increase in Km Na+ and a 60% increase in Ka Mg2+ as compared with active snails, whereas hepatopancreas Na+/K+-ATPase showed a 70% increase in I50 K+ during estivation. Western blotting with antibodies recognizing the alpha subunit of Na+/K+-ATPase showed no change in the amount of enzyme protein during estivation. Instead, the estivation-responsive change in Na+/K+-ATPase activity was linked to posttranslational modification. In vitro incubations manipulating endogenous kinase and phosphatase activities indicated that Na+/K+-ATPase from estivating snails was a high phosphate, low activity form, whereas dephosphorylation returned the enzyme to a high activity state characteristic of active snails. Treatment with protein kinases A, C or G could all mediate changes in enzyme properties in vitro that mimicked the effect of estivation, whereas treatments with protein phosphatase 1 or 2A had the opposite effect. Reversible phosphorylation control of Na+/K+-ATPase can provide the means of coordinating ATP use by this ion pump with the rates of ATP generation by catabolic pathways in estivating snails. PMID:16449562

  7. Guidance and control law for automatic landing flight experiment of reentry space vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazawa, Yoshikazu; Ishikawa, Kazutoshi; Fujii, Kenji

    An automatic landing flight experiment with a sub-scale model is being prepared for a planned future reentry space vehicle by the National Aerospace Laboratory and the National Space Development Agency of Japan. The subscale model is dropped from a helicopter at a 1500-m altitude, and, controlled by an on-board navigation, guidance, and control system, it automatically lands on a 1000-m runway. This paper discusses preliminary study results obtained from numerical simulation. The guidance and control law was designed using a multiple delay model and multiple design point approach. Control system robustness against uncertain and time varying dynamics is especially considered in this approach. The control performances are evaluated with appropriately defined quadratic indices of tracking error. Simple control structures are assumed and parameters are obtained with numerical optimization. The approach was successfully applied to the design, and feasibility of the experiment has been verified with numerical simulations.

  8. Alternative zoning scenarios for regional sustainable land use controls in China: a knowledge-based multiobjective optimisation model.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yin; Liu, Dianfeng; Liu, Yaolin; He, Jianhua; Hong, Xiaofeng

    2014-08-28

    Alternative land use zoning scenarios provide guidance for sustainable land use controls. This study focused on an ecologically vulnerable catchment on the Loess Plateau in China, proposed a novel land use zoning model, and generated alternative zoning solutions to satisfy the various requirements of land use stakeholders and managers. This model combined multiple zoning objectives, i.e., maximum zoning suitability, maximum planning compatibility and maximum spatial compactness, with land use constraints by using goal programming technique, and employed a modified simulated annealing algorithm to search for the optimal zoning solutions. The land use zoning knowledge was incorporated into the initialisation operator and neighbourhood selection strategy of the simulated annealing algorithm to improve its efficiency. The case study indicates that the model is both effective and robust. Five optimal zoning scenarios of the study area were helpful for satisfying the requirements of land use controls in loess hilly regions, e.g., land use intensification, agricultural protection and environmental conservation.

  9. Alternative Zoning Scenarios for Regional Sustainable Land Use Controls in China: A Knowledge-Based Multiobjective Optimisation Model

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yin; Liu, Dianfeng; Liu, Yaolin; He, Jianhua; Hong, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    Alternative land use zoning scenarios provide guidance for sustainable land use controls. This study focused on an ecologically vulnerable catchment on the Loess Plateau in China, proposed a novel land use zoning model, and generated alternative zoning solutions to satisfy the various requirements of land use stakeholders and managers. This model combined multiple zoning objectives, i.e., maximum zoning suitability, maximum planning compatibility and maximum spatial compactness, with land use constraints by using goal programming technique, and employed a modified simulated annealing algorithm to search for the optimal zoning solutions. The land use zoning knowledge was incorporated into the initialisation operator and neighbourhood selection strategy of the simulated annealing algorithm to improve its efficiency. The case study indicates that the model is both effective and robust. Five optimal zoning scenarios of the study area were helpful for satisfying the requirements of land use controls in loess hilly regions, e.g., land use intensification, agricultural protection and environmental conservation. PMID:25170679

  10. Patterns and controls of CO2 exchange from developed land in the mid-continental United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFadden, J. P.; Balogun, A. A.; Bauer, M. E.; Peters, E. B.; Wu, J.

    2006-12-01

    The rate at which wildlands and croplands are being developed for human settlement in the Unites States currently exceeds population growth by a factor of two to four. In the mid-continental U.S., the region of the first NACP intensive experiment, the area occupied by traditionally defined urban areas (cities and towns) is 4%, whereas the area covered by relatively lower density residential development is approximately 11% (Radeloff et al. 2005). Developed land areas represent major sources of CO2 and other radiatively- important trace gases due to the concentration of human activities that consume fossil fuels. However, they are also ecosystems with significant tree cover and green spaces that take up CO2 and soils that release CO2. Direct measurements are needed to quantify the land-based sources and sinks of CO2 in developed areas, especially lower density residential land, which is the type that accounts for most of the land- use change. Scaling CO2 exchange from developed land up to heterogeneous regions (10's to 100's of km) requires the integration of continuous in-situ measurements, biophysical models, and remote sensing. We measured CO2, water vapor, and energy fluxes using the eddy covariance technique on a 170-m tall radio transmission tower above a suburban residential neighborhood of Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN. We made concurrent measurements from a mobile tower over an un-irrigated, experimental turfgrass field that is similar to residential lawns in the study area. A preliminary land-cover classification using an new treatment of shadow areas was developed using QuickBird imagery from 2003. A suite of biophysical measurements was made at 7-10 day intervals on a replicated set of sample locations stratified by land cover type. Results from the 2006 growing season showed that seasonal drought and temperature both strongly modulated CO2 exchange, varying from net uptake of 0.79 g m^-2 d^-^1 under mesic conditions to net loss of 1.56 g m^-2 d^-^1 under

  11. Tectonic control of the damaged areas by land subsidence: Ameca, Jalisco Mexico, a study case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas-Elguera, J.; Malagon, A.; Maciel, R.; Alatorre, M. A.; Perez, G.

    2009-04-01

    The Miocene to Quaternary Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB), one of the largest mexican volcanic arcs built on the North America plate, covers about 1000 km along central Mexico from the Pacific ocean to the Gulf of Mexico. The structure of west-central Mexico is dominated by a complex assemblage of crustal blocks bounded by major tectonic structures of the TMVB. These are the NW-SE Tepic-Zacoalco, the N-S Colima, and the E-W Chapala grabens, which separate the Jalisco and Michoacan blocks from the stable North American plate. The three grabens join south of Guadalajara to form what has been long interpreted as an active triple junction. The Tepic-Zacoalco rift is composed of the eastern part of the Plan de Barrancas-Santa Rosa graben and by the Ameca and Zacoalco half-grabens. The Ameca city is located in the Ameca half-graben. From 80´s several houses and buildings (more than 300) have been affected by land subsidence for more than two decades. The damage area follows a specific pattern with NW trend which is similar to the regional faults. The land subsidence is associated with the water extraction. We suggest that the distribution of the damage area is controlled by the fault system in combination with the water extraction. Because of the Ameca half-graben has been affected by historical and present day earthquakes and considering the subsurface geology (sandstones, siltstone intercalated with conglomerates) sudden collapses can be expected.

  12. Natural control of Japanese fleeceflower (Polygonum cuspidatum) on mined land

    SciTech Connect

    Young, R.G.; Aharrah, E.C.

    1984-12-01

    Japanese fleeceflower (Polygonum cuspidatum), because of its rapid growth, extensive fibrous root system, and spreading deciduous branches, along with its ability to grow vigorously in rocky soils of low pH, is well suited for revegetation of strip-mine spoil. In the 1960's, fleeceflower was introduced to two mined areas in Pennsylvania, at Clarion and Clintonville, as part of a problem spoil planting. Presently, the fleeceflower on these sites has been over topped by other pioneer species, predominately aspen and birch. Fleeceflower has been classified by the USDA Soil Conservation Service as an undesirable species. Because of its rapidly-spreading nature and its tenacious perennial root system, it is very difficult to eradicate once it has become established. The current investigation studied the response of the fleeceflower to the overtopping canopy. The objective was a natural control which would cause the fleeceflower to recede, or perhaps die out completely. Among the authors' observations, it is noted that there is an evident response in the reproductive capabilities of the fleeceflower as it adjusts to the diminished light. Changes in the redistribution of energy within the plant are reported using calorimetry as a tool. Earlier studies have indicated that fleeceflower does support initial growth of some of these other pioneers.

  13. Effects of land use on bird populations and pest control services on coffee farms.

    PubMed

    Railsback, Steven F; Johnson, Matthew D

    2014-04-22

    Global increases in both agriculture and biodiversity awareness raise a key question: Should cropland and biodiversity habitat be separated, or integrated in mixed land uses? Ecosystem services by wildlife make this question more complex. For example, birds benefit agriculture by preying on pest insects, but other habitat is needed to maintain the birds. Resulting land use questions include what areas and arrangements of habitat support sufficient birds to control pests, whether this pest control offsets the reduced cropland, and the comparative benefits of "land sharing" (i.e., mixed cropland and habitat) vs. "land sparing" (i.e., separate areas of intensive agriculture and habitat). Such questions are difficult to answer using field studies alone, so we use a simulation model of Jamaican coffee farms, where songbirds suppress the coffee berry borer (CBB). Simulated birds select habitat and prey in five habitat types: intact forest, trees (including forest fragments), shade coffee, sun coffee, and unsuitable habitat. The trees habitat type appears to be especially important, providing efficient foraging and roosting sites near coffee plots. Small areas of trees (but not forest alone) could support a sufficient number of birds to suppress CBB in sun coffee; the degree to which trees are dispersed within coffee had little effect. In simulations without trees, shade coffee supported sufficient birds to offset its lower yield. High areas of both trees and shade coffee reduced pest control because CBB was less often profitable prey. Because of the pest control service provided by birds, land sharing was predicted to be more beneficial than land sparing in this system. PMID:24711377

  14. Effects of land use on bird populations and pest control services on coffee farms.

    PubMed

    Railsback, Steven F; Johnson, Matthew D

    2014-04-22

    Global increases in both agriculture and biodiversity awareness raise a key question: Should cropland and biodiversity habitat be separated, or integrated in mixed land uses? Ecosystem services by wildlife make this question more complex. For example, birds benefit agriculture by preying on pest insects, but other habitat is needed to maintain the birds. Resulting land use questions include what areas and arrangements of habitat support sufficient birds to control pests, whether this pest control offsets the reduced cropland, and the comparative benefits of "land sharing" (i.e., mixed cropland and habitat) vs. "land sparing" (i.e., separate areas of intensive agriculture and habitat). Such questions are difficult to answer using field studies alone, so we use a simulation model of Jamaican coffee farms, where songbirds suppress the coffee berry borer (CBB). Simulated birds select habitat and prey in five habitat types: intact forest, trees (including forest fragments), shade coffee, sun coffee, and unsuitable habitat. The trees habitat type appears to be especially important, providing efficient foraging and roosting sites near coffee plots. Small areas of trees (but not forest alone) could support a sufficient number of birds to suppress CBB in sun coffee; the degree to which trees are dispersed within coffee had little effect. In simulations without trees, shade coffee supported sufficient birds to offset its lower yield. High areas of both trees and shade coffee reduced pest control because CBB was less often profitable prey. Because of the pest control service provided by birds, land sharing was predicted to be more beneficial than land sparing in this system.

  15. Effects of land use on bird populations and pest control services on coffee farms

    PubMed Central

    Railsback, Steven F.; Johnson, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    Global increases in both agriculture and biodiversity awareness raise a key question: Should cropland and biodiversity habitat be separated, or integrated in mixed land uses? Ecosystem services by wildlife make this question more complex. For example, birds benefit agriculture by preying on pest insects, but other habitat is needed to maintain the birds. Resulting land use questions include what areas and arrangements of habitat support sufficient birds to control pests, whether this pest control offsets the reduced cropland, and the comparative benefits of “land sharing” (i.e., mixed cropland and habitat) vs. “land sparing” (i.e., separate areas of intensive agriculture and habitat). Such questions are difficult to answer using field studies alone, so we use a simulation model of Jamaican coffee farms, where songbirds suppress the coffee berry borer (CBB). Simulated birds select habitat and prey in five habitat types: intact forest, trees (including forest fragments), shade coffee, sun coffee, and unsuitable habitat. The trees habitat type appears to be especially important, providing efficient foraging and roosting sites near coffee plots. Small areas of trees (but not forest alone) could support a sufficient number of birds to suppress CBB in sun coffee; the degree to which trees are dispersed within coffee had little effect. In simulations without trees, shade coffee supported sufficient birds to offset its lower yield. High areas of both trees and shade coffee reduced pest control because CBB was less often profitable prey. Because of the pest control service provided by birds, land sharing was predicted to be more beneficial than land sparing in this system. PMID:24711377

  16. Active control of combustion instability

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, W.; Poinsot, T.; Candel, S.

    1987-12-01

    The principle of 'antisound' is used to construct a method for the suppression of combustion instabilities. This active instability control (AIC) method uses external acoustic excitation by a loudspeaker to suppress the oscillations of a flame. The excitation signal is provided by a microphone located upstream of the flame. This signal is filtered, processed, amplified, and sent to the loudspeaker. The AIC method is validated on a laboratory combustor. It allows the suppression of all unstable modes of the burner for any operating ratio. The influence of the microphone and loudspeaker locations on the performance of the AIC system is described. For a given configuration, domains of stability, i.e., domains where the AIC system parameters provide suppression of the oscillation, are investigated. Measurements of the electric input of the loudspeaker show that the energy consumption of the AIC system is almost negligible and suggest that this method could be used for industrial combustor stabilization. Finally, a simple model describing the effects of the AIC system is developed and its results compared to the experiment.

  17. Active thermal control system evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petete, Patricia A.; Ames, Brian E.

    1991-01-01

    The 'restructured' baseline of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) has eliminated many of the growth options for the Active Thermal Control System (ATCS). Modular addition of baseline technology to increase heat rejection will be extremely difficult. The system design and the available real estate no longer accommodate this type of growth. As the station matures during its thirty years of operation, a demand of up to 165 kW of heat rejection can be expected. The baseline configuration will be able to provide 82.5 kW at Eight Manned Crew Capability (EMCC). The growth paths necessary to reach 165 kW have been identified. Doubling the heat rejection capability of SSF will require either the modification of existing radiator wings or the attachment of growth structure to the baseline truss for growth radiator wing placement. Radiator performance can be improved by enlarging the surface area or by boosting the operating temperature with a heat pump. The optimal solution will require both modifications. The addition of growth structure would permit the addition of a parallel ATCS using baseline technology. This growth system would simplify integration. The feasibility of incorporating these growth options to improve the heat rejection capacity of SSF is under evaluation.

  18. LandScape Command Set: Local Area Network Distributed Supervisory Control and Programming Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Burchard, R.L.; Small, D.E.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the Local Area Network Distributed Supervisory Control and Programming Environment (LandScape) commands set that provides a Generic Device Subsystem Application Programmers Interface (API). These commands are implemented using the Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) specification with Orbix from Iona Technologies.

  19. 43 CFR 2884.25 - What activities may I conduct on BLM lands covered by my application for a grant or TUP while BLM...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What activities may I conduct on BLM lands covered by my application for a grant or TUP while BLM is processing my application? 2884.25 Section 2884.25 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND...

  20. 43 CFR 2804.29 - What activities may I conduct on the lands covered by the proposed right-of-way while BLM is...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What activities may I conduct on the lands covered by the proposed right-of-way while BLM is processing my application? 2804.29 Section 2804.29 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND...

  1. Controlling Gully Erosion: An Analysis of Land Reclamation Processes and Challenges in Chambal Badlands, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Padmini

    2016-04-01

    Gully erosion is among the significant environmental problems in the Central Indian states. The Chambal badlands, spread over an area of around 4000 sq. kms is among the worst affected regions in terms of land degradation. The enormity of the Chambal ravines, which achieve depths of more than 60 metres, points to the significance of the geological explanation, suggesting that neotectonics may have paved the way for ravine erosion, but it is most definitely exacerbated by anthropogenic activities. Although, there is field evidence that ephemeral gully erosion is responsible for significant soil losses, little is known about the contributing factors. The region also faces significant developmental challenges and the inaccessibility and low productivity of the area contributes to its continued underdevelopment. This study uses a combination of geo-spatial techniques and physical and socio-economic field survey to evaluate the responses to gully erosion and its implications. This paper attempts to study (a) extent and severity of gully erosion process in the Chambal badlands; (b) an evaluation of reclamation measures undertaken by various agencies, including the affected people; (c) to examine the sustainability implications of land reclamation measures. The extent, pattern and inter-temporal changes of gully erosion have been examined through various mapping techniques and field survey. The land reclamation have been mapped using satellite images and ground truth verification. The various kinds of land reclamation measures that have been undertaken on the ground and their sustainability implications have been investigated through survey of affected households in selected villages. The results show that in response to the severe loss of agricultural land because of gully head encroachment in the agricultural field and decline in land productivity, farmers have undertaken various land reclamation measures, including mechanised land levelling. The land levelling

  2. On Active Layer Environments and Processes in Western Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, C. D.; Meiklejohn, I.; Nel, W.

    2012-12-01

    The current understanding of Antarctic permafrost is poor, particularly regarding its evolution, the current thermal characteristics, and relationships with pedogenesis, hydrology, geomorphic, dynamics, biotic activity and response to global changes. Results from borehole temperature measurements over a four-year period in Western Dronning Maud Land suggest that the active layer depth is dependent on the substrate, latitude, altitude and the volume of ground exposed; the latter alludes to the potential impact of surrounding ice on the ground thermal regime. The active layer depths at the monitoring sites, varied between 16 cm at Vesleskarvet, a small nunatak at 850 masl to 28 cm in granitic till at Jutulsessen (1 270 masl). The mean near surface (1.5 cm depth) ground temperatures from 2009 to 2012 in the region have a narrow range from -16.4°C at 850m to -17.5°C at 1270 masl. Permafrost temperatures for the same locations vary between -16.3°C and -18.3°C. While little variability exists between the mean temperatures at the study locations, each site is distinct and seasonal and shorter-term frost cycles have produced landforms that are characteristic of both permafrost and diurnal frost environments. One of the key aspects of investigation is the control that the active layer has on autochthonous blockfield development in the region. The, thus far, exploratory research is being used to understand controls on the landscape and the relationship between distribution and abundance of biota. Given the rapidly changing climates in the region, improving knowledge of what drives patterns of biodiversity at a local and regional scale is vital to assess consequences of environmental change.

  3. The Development of the MSL Guidance, Navigation, and Control System for Entry, Descent, and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    San Martin, A. Miguel; Lee, Steven W.; Wong, Edward C.

    2013-01-01

    On August 5, 2012, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission successfully delivered the Curiosity rover to its intended target. It was the most complex and ambitious landing in the history of the red planet. A key component of the landing system, the requirements for which were driven by the mission ambitious science goals, was the Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN&C) system. This paper will describe the technical challenges of the MSL GN&C system, the resulting architecture and design needed to meet those challenges, and the development process used for its implementation and testing.

  4. Cloud — Aerosol interaction during lightning activity over land and ocean: Precipitation pattern assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Jayanti; Chaudhuri, Sutapa; Chowdhury, Arumita Roy; Bandyopadhyay, Tanuka

    2016-06-01

    The present study attempts to identify the land - ocean contrast in cloud - aerosol relation during lightning and non-lightning days and its effect on subsequent precipitation pattern. The thermal hypothesis in view of Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) behind the land - ocean contrast is observed to be insignificant in the present study region. The result shows that the lightning activities are significantly and positively correlated with aerosols over both land and ocean in case of low aerosol loading whereas for high aerosol loading the correlation is significant but, only over land. The study attempts to comprehend the mechanism through which the aerosol and lightning interact using the concept of aerosol indirect effect that includes the study of cloud effective radius, cloud fraction and precipitation rate. The result shows that the increase in lightning activity over ocean might have been caused due to the first aerosol indirect effect, while over land the aerosol indirect effect might have been suppressed due to lightning. Thus, depending on the region and relation between cloud parameters it is observed that the precipitation rate decreases (increases) over ocean during lightning (non-lightning) days. On the other hand during non-lightning days, the precipitation rate decreases over land.

  5. Microbial dynamics and enzyme activities in tropical Andosols depending on land use and nutrient inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mganga, Kevin; Razavi, Bahar; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    Microbial decomposition of soil organic matter is mediated by enzymes and is a key source of terrestrial CO2 emissions. Microbial and enzyme activities are necessary to understand soil biochemical functioning and identify changes in soil quality. However, little is known about land use and nutrients availability effects on enzyme activities and microbial processes, especially in tropical soils of Africa. This study was conducted to examine how microbial and enzyme activities differ between different land uses and nutrient availability. As Andosols of Mt. Kilimanjaro are limited by nutrient concentrations, we hypothesize that N and P additions will stimulate enzyme activity. N and P were added to soil samples (0-20 cm) representing common land use types in East Africa: (1) savannah, (2) maize fields, (3) lower montane forest, (4) coffee plantation, (5) grasslands and (6) traditional Chagga homegardens. Total CO2 efflux from soil, microbial biomass and activities of β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, chitinase and phosphatase involved in C, N and P cycling, respectively was monitored for 60 days. Total CO2 production, microbial biomass and enzyme activities varied in the order forest soils > grassland soils > arable soils. Increased β-glucosidase and cellobiohydrolase activities after N addition of grassland soils suggest that microorganisms increased N uptake and utilization to produce C-acquiring enzymes. Low N concentration in all soils inhibited chitinase activity. Depending on land use, N and P addition had an inhibitory or neutral effect on phosphatase activity. We attribute this to the high P retention of Andosols and low impact of N and P on the labile P fractions. Enhanced CO2 production after P addition suggests that increased P availability could stimulate soil organic matter biodegradation in Andosols. In conclusion, land use and nutrients influenced soil enzyme activities and microbial dynamics and demonstrated the decline in soil quality after landuse

  6. A guidance and control assessment of three vertical landing options for RLV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallaher, M.; Coughlin, D.; Krupp, D.

    1995-09-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is considering a vertical lander as a candidate concept for a single-stage-to-orbit reusable launch vehicle (RLV). Three strategies for guiding and controlling the inversion of a reentering RLV from a nose-first attitude to a vertical landing attitude are suggested. Each option is simulated from a common reentry state to touchdown, using a common guidance algorithm and different controllers. Results demonstrate the characteristics that typify and distinguish each concept and help to identify peculiar problems, level of guidance and control sophistication required, feasibility concerns, and areas in which stringent subsystem requirements will be imposed by guidance and control.

  7. A guidance and control assessment of three vertical landing options for RLV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallaher, M.; Coughlin, D.; Krupp, D

    1995-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is considering a vertical lander as a candidate concept for a single-stage-to-orbit reusable launch vehicle (RLV). Three strategies for guiding and controlling the inversion of a reentering RLV from a nose-first attitude to a vertical landing attitude are suggested. Each option is simulated from a common reentry state to touchdown, using a common guidance algorithm and different controllers. Results demonstrate the characteristics that typify and distinguish each concept and help to identify peculiar problems, level of guidance and control sophistication required, feasibility concerns, and areas in which stringent subsystem requirements will be imposed by guidance and control.

  8. Global observation-based diagnosis of soil moisture control on land surface flux partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego-Elvira, Belen; Taylor, Christopher M.; Harris, Phil P.; Ghent, Darren; Veal, Karen L.; Folwell, Sonja S.

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture plays a central role in the partition of available energy at the land surface between sensible and latent heat flux to the atmosphere. As soils dry out, evapotranspiration becomes water-limited ("stressed"), and both land surface temperature (LST) and sensible heat flux rise as a result. This change in surface behaviour during dry spells directly affects critical processes in both the land and the atmosphere. Soil water deficits are often a precursor in heat waves, and they control where feedbacks on precipitation become significant. State-of-the-art global climate model (GCM) simulations for the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) disagree on where and how strongly the surface energy budget is limited by soil moisture. Evaluation of GCM simulations at global scale is still a major challenge owing to the scarcity and uncertainty of observational datasets of land surface fluxes and soil moisture at the appropriate scale. Earth observation offers the potential to test how well GCM land schemes simulate hydrological controls on surface fluxes. In particular, satellite observations of LST provide indirect information about the surface energy partition at 1km resolution globally. Here, we present a potentially powerful methodology to evaluate soil moisture stress on surface fluxes within GCMs. Our diagnostic, Relative Warming Rate (RWR), is a measure of how rapidly the land warms relative to the overlying atmosphere during dry spells lasting at least 10 days. Under clear skies, this is a proxy for the change in sensible heat flux as soil dries out. We derived RWR from MODIS Terra and Aqua LST observations, meteorological re-analyses and satellite rainfall datasets. Globally we found that on average, the land warmed up during dry spells for 97% of the observed surface between 60S and 60N. For 73% of the area, the land warmed faster than the atmosphere (positive RWR), indicating water stressed conditions and increases in sensible heat flux

  9. Adaptive Data-based Predictive Control for Short Take-off and Landing (STOL) Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, Jonathan Spencer; Acosta, Diana Michelle; Phan, Minh Q.

    2010-01-01

    Data-based Predictive Control is an emerging control method that stems from Model Predictive Control (MPC). MPC computes current control action based on a prediction of the system output a number of time steps into the future and is generally derived from a known model of the system. Data-based predictive control has the advantage of deriving predictive models and controller gains from input-output data. Thus, a controller can be designed from the outputs of complex simulation code or a physical system where no explicit model exists. If the output data happens to be corrupted by periodic disturbances, the designed controller will also have the built-in ability to reject these disturbances without the need to know them. When data-based predictive control is implemented online, it becomes a version of adaptive control. The characteristics of adaptive data-based predictive control are particularly appropriate for the control of nonlinear and time-varying systems, such as Short Take-off and Landing (STOL) aircraft. STOL is a capability of interest to NASA because conceptual Cruise Efficient Short Take-off and Landing (CESTOL) transport aircraft offer the ability to reduce congestion in the terminal area by utilizing existing shorter runways at airports, as well as to lower community noise by flying steep approach and climb-out patterns that reduce the noise footprint of the aircraft. In this study, adaptive data-based predictive control is implemented as an integrated flight-propulsion controller for the outer-loop control of a CESTOL-type aircraft. Results show that the controller successfully tracks velocity while attempting to maintain a constant flight path angle, using longitudinal command, thrust and flap setting as the control inputs.

  10. Effect of land use activities on PAH contamination in urban soils of Rawalpindi and Islamabad, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ud Din, Ikhtiar; Rashid, Audil; Mahmood, Tariq; Khalid, Azeem

    2013-10-01

    Urbanization can increase the vulnerability of soils to various types of contamination. Increased contamination of urban soils with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) could relate to increased number of petrol pump stations and mechanical workshops-a phenomenon that needs to be constantly monitored. This study was undertaken to explore the soil PAH levels in Rawalpindi and Islamabad urban areas in relation to land use activities. Composite soil samples from petrol pump stations and mechanical workshops (n = 32) areas were evaluated for five PAHs--naphthalene, phenanthrene, pyrene, benzo[a]pyrene, and indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene-and compared with control area locations with minimum petroleum-related activity (n = 16). Surface samples up to 3 cm depth were collected and extraction of analytes was carried out using n-hexane and dichloromethane. Prior to running the samples, standards (100 μg ml(-1)) were run on HPLC to optimize signal to noise ratio using acetonitrile as mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.25 ml/min at 40 °C. Significant differences between petrol pump stations and mechanical workshop areas were observed for individual PAH as well as with control area soil samples. Naphthalene was found to be the most abundant PAH in soil, ranging from 2.47 to 24.36 mg kg(-1). Correlation between the benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) level in soil and the total PAH concentration (r = 0.82, P < 0.0001) revealed that BaP can be used as a potential marker for PAH pollution. A clear segregation between petrogenic and pyrogenic sources of contamination was observed when low molecular weight PAHs detected in soil was plotted against high molecular weight PAHs. The former source comprised lubricants and used engine oil found at mechanical workshops, whereas the latter could be mostly attributed to vehicular emission at petrol pumps. The results indicate that PAH contamination in urban areas of Rawalpindi and Islamabad has direct relevance with land use for petroleum

  11. Enhanced retention of drop vertical jump landing technique: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Welling, Wouter; Benjaminse, Anne; Gokeler, Alli; Otten, Bert

    2016-02-01

    External focus instructions have been shown to result in superior motor performance compared to internal focus instructions. Using an EF may help to optimize current anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention programs. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effects of instructions on landing technique and performance by comparing an external focus (EF), internal focus (IF), video (VI) and control (CTRL) group. Subjects (age 22.50±1.62years, height 179.70±10.43cm, mass 73.98±12.68kg) were randomly assigned to IF (n=10), EF (n=10), VI (n=10) or CTRL group (n=10). Landing was assessed from a drop vertical jump (DVJ) in five sessions: pretest, two training blocks (TR1 and TR2) and directly after the training sessions (post test) and retention test 1week later. Group specific instructions were offered in TR1 and TR2. Landing technique was assessed with the Landing Error Scoring System (LESS) and jump height was taken as performance measure. The results show that males in the VI group and females both in the VI and EF groups significantly improved jump-landing technique. Retention was achieved and jump height was maintained for males in the VI group and females both in the VI and EF groups. It is therefore concluded that EF and VI instructions have great potential in ACL injury prevention. PMID:26615475

  12. A Review of Land-Cover Mapping Activities in Coastal Alabama and Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kathryn E.L.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Land-use and land-cover (LULC) data provide important information for environmental management. Data pertaining to land-cover and land-management activities are a common requirement for spatial analyses, such as watershed modeling, climate change, and hazard assessment. In coastal areas, land development, storms, and shoreline modification amplify the need for frequent and detailed land-cover datasets. The northern Gulf of Mexico coastal area is no exception. The impact of severe storms, increases in urban area, dramatic changes in land cover, and loss of coastal-wetland habitat all indicate a vital need for reliable and comparable land-cover data. Four main attributes define a land-cover dataset: the date/time of data collection, the spatial resolution, the type of classification, and the source data. The source data are the foundation dataset used to generate LULC classification and are typically remotely sensed data, such as aerial photography or satellite imagery. These source data have a large influence on the final LULC data product, so much so that one can classify LULC datasets into two general groups: LULC data derived from aerial photography and LULC data derived from satellite imagery. The final LULC data can be converted from one format to another (for instance, vector LULC data can be converted into raster data for analysis purposes, and vice versa), but each subsequent dataset maintains the imprint of the source medium within its spatial accuracy and data features. The source data will also influence the spatial and temporal resolution, as well as the type of classification. The intended application of the LULC data typically defines the type of source data and methodology, with satellite imagery being selected for large landscapes (state-wide, national data products) and repeatability (environmental monitoring and change analysis). The coarse spatial scale and lack of refined land-use categories are typical drawbacks to satellite

  13. Developing Internal Controls through Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, F. Herbert

    2009-01-01

    Life events can include the Tuesday afternoon cooking class with the group worker or the Saturday afternoon football game, but in the sense that Fritz Redl thought of them, these activities are only threads in a fabric of living that includes all the elements of daily life: playing, working, school-based learning, learning through activities,…

  14. Orbiter active thermal control system description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laubach, G. E.

    1975-01-01

    A brief description of the Orbiter Active Thermal Control System (ATCS) including (1) major functional requirements of heat load, temperature control and heat sink utilization, (2) the overall system arrangement, and (3) detailed description of the elements of the ATCS.

  15. Knee Control and Jump-Landing Technique in Young Basketball and Floorball Players.

    PubMed

    Leppänen, M; Pasanen, K; Kulmala, J-P; Kujala, U M; Krosshaug, T; Kannus, P; Perttunen, J; Vasankari, T; Parkkari, J

    2016-04-01

    Poor knee alignment is associated with increased loading of the joints, ligaments and tendons, and may increase the risk of injury. The study purpose was to compare differences in knee kinematics between basketball and floorball players during a vertical drop jump (VDJ) task. We wanted to investigate whether basketball players, whose sport includes frequent jump-landings, exhibited better knee control compared with floorball players, whose sport involves less jumping. Complete data was obtained from 173 basketball and 141 floorball players. Peak knee valgus and flexion angles during the VDJ were analyzed by 3D motion analysis.Larger knee valgus angles were observed among basketball players (- 3.2°, 95%CI -4.5 to - 2.0) compared with floorball players (- 0.9°, 95%CI -2.3 to 0.6) (P=0.022). Basketball players landed with a decreased peak knee flexion angle (83.1°, 95%CI 81.4 to 84.8) compared with floorball players (86.5°, 95%CI 84.6 to 88.4) (P=0.016). There were no significant differences in height, weight or BMI between basketball and floorball players. Female athletes exhibited significantly greater valgus angles than males. This study revealed that proper knee control during jump-landing does not seem to develop in young athletes simply by playing the sport, despite the fact that jump-landings occur frequently in practice and games. PMID:26701826

  16. Knee Control and Jump-Landing Technique in Young Basketball and Floorball Players.

    PubMed

    Leppänen, M; Pasanen, K; Kulmala, J-P; Kujala, U M; Krosshaug, T; Kannus, P; Perttunen, J; Vasankari, T; Parkkari, J

    2016-04-01

    Poor knee alignment is associated with increased loading of the joints, ligaments and tendons, and may increase the risk of injury. The study purpose was to compare differences in knee kinematics between basketball and floorball players during a vertical drop jump (VDJ) task. We wanted to investigate whether basketball players, whose sport includes frequent jump-landings, exhibited better knee control compared with floorball players, whose sport involves less jumping. Complete data was obtained from 173 basketball and 141 floorball players. Peak knee valgus and flexion angles during the VDJ were analyzed by 3D motion analysis.Larger knee valgus angles were observed among basketball players (- 3.2°, 95%CI -4.5 to - 2.0) compared with floorball players (- 0.9°, 95%CI -2.3 to 0.6) (P=0.022). Basketball players landed with a decreased peak knee flexion angle (83.1°, 95%CI 81.4 to 84.8) compared with floorball players (86.5°, 95%CI 84.6 to 88.4) (P=0.016). There were no significant differences in height, weight or BMI between basketball and floorball players. Female athletes exhibited significantly greater valgus angles than males. This study revealed that proper knee control during jump-landing does not seem to develop in young athletes simply by playing the sport, despite the fact that jump-landings occur frequently in practice and games.

  17. Soft Landing of Bare Nanoparticles with Controlled Size, Composition, and Morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Grant E.; Colby, Robert J.; Laskin, Julia

    2015-01-01

    A kinetically-limited physical synthesis method based on magnetron sputtering and gas aggregation has been coupled with size-selection and ion soft landing to prepare bare metal nanoparticles on surfaces with controlled coverage, size, composition, and morphology. Employing atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), it is demonstrated that the size and coverage of bare nanoparticles soft landed onto flat glassy carbon and silicon as well as stepped graphite surfaces may be controlled through size-selection with a quadrupole mass filter and the length of deposition, respectively. The bare nanoparticles are observed with AFM to bind randomly to the flat glassy carbon surface when soft landed at relatively low coverage (1012 ions). In contrast, on stepped graphite surfaces at intermediate coverage (1013 ions) the soft landed nanoparticles are shown to bind preferentially along step edges forming extended linear chains of particles. At the highest coverage (5 x 1013 ions) examined in this study the nanoparticles are demonstrated with both AFM and SEM to form a continuous film on flat glassy carbon and silicon surfaces. On a graphite surface with defects, however, it is shown with SEM that the presence of localized surface imperfections results in agglomeration of nanoparticles onto these features and the formation of neighboring depletion zones that are devoid of particles. Employing high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy in the high angular annular dark field imaging mode (STEM-HAADF) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) it is demonstrated that the magnetron sputtering/gas aggregation synthesis technique produces single metal particles with controlled morphology as well as bimetallic alloy nanoparticles with clearly defined core-shell structure. Therefore, this kinetically-limited physical synthesis technique, when combined with ion soft landing, is a versatile complementary method for preparing a wide range of

  18. Application of Calspan pitch rate control system to the Space Shuttle for approach and landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weingarten, N. C.; Chalk, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    A pitch rate control system designed for use in the shuttle during approach and landing was analyzed and compared with a revised control system developed by NASA and the existing OFT control system. The design concept control system uses filtered pitch rate feedback with proportional plus integral paths in the forward loop. Control system parameters were designed as a function of flight configuration. Analysis included time and frequency domain techniques. Results indicate that both the Calspan and NASA systems significantly improve the flying qualities of the shuttle over the OFT. Better attitude and flight path control and less time delay are the primary reasons. The Calspan system is preferred because of reduced time delay and simpler mechanization. Further testing of the improved flight control systems in an in-flight simulator is recommended.

  19. The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, David W.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE) are presented. Topics covered include: program objectives; program features; flight experiment features; current activities; MACE development model lab testing; MACE test article deployed on STS middeck; and development model testing.

  20. Controlled-Source Electromagnetic Approaches for Hydrocarbon Exploration and Monitoring on Land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streich, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetic methods that utilize controlled sources have been applied for natural resource exploration for more than a century. Nevertheless, concomitant with the recent adoption of marine controlled-source electromagnetics (CSEM) by the hydrocarbon industry, the overall usefulness of CSEM methods on land has been questioned within the industry. Truly, there are few published examples of land CSEM surveys carried out completely analogously to the current marine CSEM standard approach of towing a bipole source across an array of stationary receivers, continuously transmitting a low-frequency signal and interpreting the data in the frequency domain. Rather, different sensitivity properties of different exploration targets in diverse geological settings, gradual advances in theoretical understanding, acquisition and computer technology, and different schools in different parts of the world have resulted in a sometimes confusing multitude of land-based controlled-source EM surveying approaches. Here, I aim to review previous and present-day approaches, and provide reasoning for their diversity. I focus on surface-based techniques while excluding airborne EM and well logging and on applications for hydrocarbon exploration. Attempts at the very demanding task of using onshore controlled-source EM for reservoir monitoring are shown, and the possible future potential of EM monitoring is discussed.

  1. Automatic guidance and control of a transport aircraft during a helical landing approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    A linear optimal regulator theory was applied to a nonlinear simulation of a transport aircraft performing a helical landing approach. A closed-form expression for the quasi-steady nominal flight path is presented along with the method for determining the corresponding constant nominal control inputs. The Jacobian matrices and the weighting matrices in the cost functional were time varying. A method of solving for the optimal feedback gains is reviewed. The control system was tested on several alternative landing approaches using both 3 deg and 6 deg flight path angles. On each landing approach, the aircraft was subjected to large random initial-state errors and to randomly directed crosswinds. The system was also tested for sensitivity to changes in the parameters of the aircraft and of the atmosphere. Results indicate that performance of the optimal controller on all the 3 deg approaches is very good. The control system proved to be reasonably insensitive to parametric uncertainties. Performance is not as good on the 6 deg approaches. A modification to the 6 deg flight path was proposed for the purpose of improving performance.

  2. Rainfall Controls on Land Surface Phenology over "Never-green" and "Ever-green" Lands in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, D.; Zhang, X.; Yu, Y.; Guo, W.

    2015-12-01

    The characteristics of land surface phenology (LSP) in the "Never-green" Sahara desert and the "Ever-green" equatorial Congo Basin were rarely discussed due to the extremely low seasonal greenness variations across the Sahara desert and the prolonged cloud cover over the Congo Basin. Based on 30-minute observations acquired by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager onboard the METEOSAT geostationary satellites, we generated a three-day angularly corrected Two-band Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI2) time series for each year between 2006 and 2013. We further reconstructed EVI2 temporal trajectories and retrieved LSP transitions using the Hybrid Piecewise Logistic Model. We associated the LSP transitions with the rainy season transitions derived from the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission Product 3B42. Results show that LSP within both the Sahara Desert and the Congo Basin was strongly controlled by the rainfall seasonality. Specially, although there is no vegetation growth in most part of the Sahara Desert, recurring LSP was spatially detected in irrigation agriculture and the geomorphological regions of wadis, dayas, chotts/sebkhas and rocky hills. These geomorphological features are able to store moisture in soil to keep plants growing during the long dry seasons after vegetation greenup is triggered by rainfall events. The spatial shift of phenological timing is controlled by the Mediterranean rainfall regime in the north and the rainfalls brought by the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) in the south. Across the equatorial Congo Basin, EVI2 time series reveals that canopy greenness cycles (CGC) of the seasonal leaf variation occur in tropical rainforests, which differs from the commonly termed "growing season" with complete leafless canopies. The seasonal EVI2 amplitude is very small and represents the gradual "leaf-exchange" processes. Two annual CGC are found and their spatial shifts closely follow the seasonal migration of ITCZ precipitation.

  3. Recent advances in active noise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guicking, D.

    Advances in the field of active noise control over the last few years are reviewed. Some commercially available products and their technical applications are described, with particular attention given to broadband duct noise silencers, broadband active headphones, waveform synthesis, and LMS controllers. Recent theoretical and experimental research activities are then reviewed. These activities are concerned with duct noise, structural sound, interior spaces, algorithms, echo cancellation, and miscellaneous applications.

  4. Quadriceps and hamstrings prelanding myoelectric activity during landing from different heights among male and female athletes.

    PubMed

    de Britto, Morgana Alves; Carpes, Felipe P; Koutras, Georgios; Pappas, Evangelos

    2014-08-01

    ACL tear is a major concern among athletes, coaches and sports scientists. More than taking the athlete away from training and competition, ACL tear is a risk factor for early-onset of knee osteoarthritis, and, therefore addressing strategies to avoid such injury is pertinent not only for competitive athletes, but for all physically active subjects. Imbalances in the prelanding myoelectric activity of the hamstrings and quadriceps muscles have been linked to ACL injuries. We investigated the effect of landing from different heights on prelanding myoelectric activity of the hamstrings and quadriceps muscles in recreational athletes. Thirty recreational athletes (15 male and 15 female) performed three bilateral drop jumps from two different heights; 20cm and 40cm while myoelectric activity of the vastus medialis, rectus femoris, biceps femoris and medial hamstrings were collected. When increasing the height of drop landing tasks prelanding normalized myoelectric activity of the quadriceps was increased by 15-20% but no significant changes were found for the hamstrings. Female athletes exhibited higher activity of the medial hamstrings compared to their male counterparts. We concluded that increasing the height of drop landing tasks is associated with increased myoelectric activity of the quadriceps but not the hamstrings in recreational athletes. These differences in muscle activity may be related to increased risk for ACL injury when the height is increased. Female athletes demonstrated higher recruitment of the medial hamstrings.

  5. The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE): Identification for robust control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlov, Valery I.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on identification for robust control for the Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE) are presented. Topics covered include: identification for robust control; three levels of identification; basic elements of the approach; advantages of 'post-ID' model of uncertainty; advantages of optimization; and practical realization.

  6. Altered knee joint neuromuscular control during landing from a jump in 10-15 year old children with Generalised Joint Hypermobility. A substudy of the CHAMPS-study Denmark.

    PubMed

    Junge, Tina; Wedderkopp, Niels; Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Søgaard, Karen; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit

    2015-06-01

    Generalised Joint Hypermobility (GJH) is considered an intrinsic risk factor for knee injuries. Knee neuromuscular control during landing may be altered in GJH due to reduced passive stability. The aim was to identify differences in knee neuromuscular control during landing of the Single-Leg-Hop-for-Distance test (SLHD) in 25 children with GJH compared to 29 children without GJH (controls), all 10-15years. Inclusion criteria for GJH: Beighton score⩾5/9 and minimum one hypermobile knee. EMG was recorded from the quadriceps, the hamstring and the calf muscles, presented relative to Maximum Voluntary Electrical activity (MVE). There was no difference in jump length between groups. Before landing, GJH had 33% lower Semitendinosus, but 32% higher Gastrocnemius Medialis activity and 39% higher co contraction of the lateral knee muscles, than controls. After landing, GJH had 36% lower Semitendinosus activity than controls, all significant findings. Although the groups performed equally in SLHD, GJH had a Gastrocnemius Medialis dominated neuromuscular strategy before landing, plausibly caused by reduced Semitendinosus activity. Reduced Semitendinosus activity was seen in GJH after landing, but with no compensatory Gastrocnemius Medialis activity. Reduced pre and post-activation of the Semitendinosus may present a risk factor for traumatic knee injuries as ACL ruptures in GJH with knee hypermobility.

  7. Analyzing the flared landing task with pitch-rate flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Ronald A.; Yousefpor, Marduke

    1990-01-01

    A closed-loop handling qualities methodology is applied to an analysis of the flared landing task with pitch-rate flight control systems. A model of pilot behavior throughout approach and flare is developed which postulates the manner in which the pilot may move from pitch attitude to flight path angle control. Twenty-five configurations flight tested on the NC-131H Total In-flight Simulator aircraft are analyzed using a structural pilot model ad a handling qualities methodology previously reported in the literature. Closed-loop simulation of the simplified landing task is undertaken using the structural model. The pilot ratings from flight test extended the data base supporting the utility of a model-based handling qualities metric. A handling qualities sensitivity function is introduced which may have potential as a design tool.

  8. 76 FR 2917 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Canadian Border Boat Landing Permit (CBP Form I-68)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-18

    ... proposed information collection was previously published in the Federal Register (75 FR 61508) on October 5... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Canadian Border Boat Landing Permit (CBP Form I-68) AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland...

  9. Muscle activity response to external moment during single-leg drop landing in young basketball players: the importance of biceps femoris in reducing internal rotation of knee during landing.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Meguru; Sato, Haruhiko; Takahira, Naonobu

    2012-01-01

    Internal tibial rotation with the knee close to full extension combined with valgus collapse during drop landing generally results in non-contact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between internal rotation of the knee and muscle activity from internal and external rotator muscles, and between the internal rotation of knee and externally applied loads on the knee during landing in collegiate basketball players. Our hypothesis was that the activity of biceps femoris muscle would be an important factor reducing internal knee rotation during landing. The subjects were 10 collegiate basketball students: 5 females and 5 males. The subjects performed a single-leg drop landing from a 25-cm height. Femoral and tibial kinematics were measured using a 3D optoelectronic tracking system during the drop landings, and then the knee angular motions were determined. Ground reaction forces and muscle activation patterns (lateral hamstring and medial hamstring) were simultaneously measured and computed. Results indicated that lower peak internal tibial rotation angle at the time of landing was associated with greater lateral hamstring activity (r = -0.623, p < 0.001). When gender was considered, the statistically significant correlation remained only in females. There was no association between the peak internal tibial rotation angle and the knee internal rotation moment. Control of muscle activity in the lateral to medial hamstring would be an important factor in generating sufficient force to inhibit excessive internal rotation during landing. Strengthening the biceps femoris might mitigate the higher incidence of non-contact ACL injury in female athletes. Key pointsLower activity of the external rotator muscle of the knee, which inhibits internal rotation of the knee, may be the reason why females tend to show a large internal rotation of the knee during drop landing.Externally applied internal rotation moment of

  10. Student Activity Funds: Procedures & Controls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuzzetto, Charles E.

    Student activity funds may create educational opportunities for students, but they frequently create problems for business administrators. The first part of this work reviews the types of organizational issues and transactions an organized student group is likely to encounter, including establishing a constitution, participant roles,…

  11. Land-use change, not climate, controls organic carbon burial in lakes.

    PubMed

    Anderson, N J; Dietz, R D; Engstrom, D R

    2013-10-22

    Lakes are a central component of the carbon cycle, both mineralizing terrestrially derived organic matter and storing substantial amounts of organic carbon (OC) in their sediments. However, the rates and controls on OC burial by lakes remain uncertain, as do the possible effects of future global change processes. To address these issues, we derived OC burial rates in (210)Pb-dated sediment cores from 116 small Minnesota lakes that cover major climate and land-use gradients. Rates for individual lakes presently range from 7 to 127 g C m(-2) yr(-1) and have increased by up to a factor of 8 since Euro-American settlement (mean increase: 2.8×). Mean pre-disturbance OC burial rates were similar (14-22 g C m(-2) yr(-1)) across all land-cover categories (prairie, mixed deciduous and boreal forest), indicating minimal effect of the regional temperature gradient (approx. 4 °C) on background carbon burial. The relationship between modern OC burial rates and temperature was also not significant after removal of the effect of total phosphorus. Contemporary burial rates were strongly correlated with lake-water nutrients and the extent of agricultural land cover in the catchment. Increased OC burial, documented even in relatively undisturbed boreal lake ecosystems, indicates a possible role for atmospheric nitrogen deposition. Our results suggest that globally, future land-cover change, intensification of agriculture and associated nutrient loading together with atmospheric N-deposition will enhance OC sequestration by lakes.

  12. The effect of control and display lag on unmanned air system internal pilot manual landing performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Marshall Everett

    An important characteristic of UASs is lag because it can become a considerable challenge to successful human-in-the-loop control. As such, UASs are designed and configured to minimize system lag, though this can increase acquisition and operation costs considerably. In an effort to cut costs, an organization may choose to accept greater risk and deploy a UAS with high system lag. Before this risk can be responsibly accepted, it must be quantified. While many studies have examined system lag, very few have been able to quantify the risk that various levels of lag pose to an internally piloted, manually landed UAS. This study attempted to do so by evaluating pilot landing performance in a simulator with 0 ms, 240 ms, and 1000 ms of additional lag. Various measures were used, including a novel coding technique. Results indicated that 1000 ms of lag was unsafe by all measures. They also indicate that 240 ms of lag degrades performance, but participants were able to successfully land the simulated aircraft. This study showed the utility of using several measures to evaluate the effect of lag on landing performance and it helped demonstrate that while 1000 ms poses a high risk, 240 ms of lag may be a much more manageable risk. Future research suggested by this research includes: investigating lag between 240 ms and 1000 ms, introducing different weather phenomena, developing system lag training techniques for operators, and investigating the effect of aides such as predictive displays and autopilot-assisted recovery.

  13. Land-use change, not climate, controls organic carbon burial in lakes

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, N. J.; Dietz, R. D.; Engstrom, D. R.

    2013-01-01

    Lakes are a central component of the carbon cycle, both mineralizing terrestrially derived organic matter and storing substantial amounts of organic carbon (OC) in their sediments. However, the rates and controls on OC burial by lakes remain uncertain, as do the possible effects of future global change processes. To address these issues, we derived OC burial rates in 210Pb-dated sediment cores from 116 small Minnesota lakes that cover major climate and land-use gradients. Rates for individual lakes presently range from 7 to 127 g C m–2 yr–1 and have increased by up to a factor of 8 since Euro-American settlement (mean increase: 2.8×). Mean pre-disturbance OC burial rates were similar (14–22 g C m–2 yr–1) across all land-cover categories (prairie, mixed deciduous and boreal forest), indicating minimal effect of the regional temperature gradient (approx. 4°C) on background carbon burial. The relationship between modern OC burial rates and temperature was also not significant after removal of the effect of total phosphorus. Contemporary burial rates were strongly correlated with lake-water nutrients and the extent of agricultural land cover in the catchment. Increased OC burial, documented even in relatively undisturbed boreal lake ecosystems, indicates a possible role for atmospheric nitrogen deposition. Our results suggest that globally, future land-cover change, intensification of agriculture and associated nutrient loading together with atmospheric N-deposition will enhance OC sequestration by lakes. PMID:23966637

  14. Validation and Verification of the Operational Land Analysis Activities at the Air Force Weather Agency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, M.; Kumar, S.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.; Cetola, J.

    2011-12-01

    The importance of operational benchmarking and uncertainty characterization of land surface modeling can be clear upon considering the wide range of performance characteristics of numerical land surface models realizable through various combinations of factors. Such factors might include model physics and numerics, resolution, and forcing datasets used in operational implementation versus those that might have been involved in any prior development benchmarking. Of course, decisions concerning operational implementation may be better informed through more effective benchmarking of performance under various blends of such aforementioned operational factors. To facilitate this and other needs for land analysis activities at the Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA), the Model Evaluation Toolkit (MET) - a joint product of the National Center for Atmospheric Research Developmental Testbed Center (NCAR DTC), AFWA, and the user community - and the land information system (LIS) Verification Toolkit (LVT) - developed at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) - have been adapted to the operational benchmarking needs of AFWA's land characterization activities in order to compare the performance of new land modeling and related activities with that of previous activities as well as observational or analyzed datasets. In this talk, three examples of adaptations of MET and LVT to evaluation of LIS-related operations at AFWA will be presented. One example will include comparisons of new surface rainfall analysis capabilities, towards forcing of AFWA's LIS, with previous capabilities. Comparisons will be relative to retrieval-, model-, and measurement-based precipitation fields. Results generated via MET's grid-stat, neighborhood, wavelet, and object based evaluation (MODE) utilities adapted to AFWA's needs will be discussed. This example will be framed in the context of better informing optimal blends of land surface model (LSM) forcing data sources - namely precipitation data- under

  15. Actively controlled shaft seals for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salant, Richard F.

    1991-01-01

    Actively controlled mechanical seals have recently been developed for industrial use. This study investigates the feasibility of using such seals for aerospace applications. In a noncontacting mechanical seal, the film thickness depends on the geometry of the seal interface. The amount of coning, which is a measure of the radial convergence or divergence of the seal interface, has a primary effect on the film thickness. Active control of the film thickness is established by controlling the coning with a piezoelectric material. A mathematical model has been formulated to predict the performance of an actively controlled mechanical seal.

  16. [Effects of Different Land Uses on Soil Active Organic Carbon and Nitrogen Fractions in Jinyun Mountain].

    PubMed

    Qi, Xin; Jiang, Chang-sheng; Hao, Qing-ju; Li, Jian-lin

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we take Jinyun Mountain where located in Beibei district of Chongqing as the research object and explore the effect of different ways of land use on soil active organic carbon, nitrogen components by collecting the soil samples from 0 to 60 cm depth in subtropical evergreen broad-leaved forest (hereinafter referred to as the forest), abandoned land, orchard, farmland and measuring the content of MBC, MBN, DOC and DON. The research results show that the contents of soil MBC, MBN, DOC, DON are reduced with the increase of soil depth in four types of land using soils. Variance analysis of the single factor shows that four kinds of land uses have no significant difference in the contents of MBC, MBN and DON, but the DOC content of the abandoned land is significantly higher than that of other three kinds. It shows that the different ways of land use have no obvious effects on soil MBC, MBN and DON but the abandonment of slope cropland can significantly increase the content of soil DOC. There is no significant difference among the distribution ratio of MBN, DOC, DON in forest, abandoned land, orchard and farmland within the soil from 0 to 60 cm, but the distribution ratio of slope MBC is significantly higher than that of other three kinds. It means farmland soil organic carbon has a higher biological activity, this could due to the application of green manure, farmland manure and other organic fertilizers. Under different land utilizations, DOC/DON is the highest, MBC/MBN is the second, and SOC/TN is the lowest. It means the biological solidification of dissolved organic matter is the strongest, and the mineralization of soil organic matter is the most obvious. Under the four kinds of land uses, there are the lowest ratios in SOC/TN, MBC/MBN and DOC/DON in the farmland. And all the ratios are less than 20, which suggest that the mineralization of farmland soil organic matter is stronger and it's easy to cause the loss of soil carbon.

  17. Flight Test of L1 Adaptive Control Law: Offset Landings and Large Flight Envelope Modeling Work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Irene M.; Xargay, Enric; Cao, Chengyu; Hovakimyan, Naira

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents new results of a flight test of the L1 adaptive control architecture designed to directly compensate for significant uncertain cross-coupling in nonlinear systems. The flight test was conducted on the subscale turbine powered Generic Transport Model that is an integral part of the Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research system at the NASA Langley Research Center. The results presented include control law evaluation for piloted offset landing tasks as well as results in support of nonlinear aerodynamic modeling and real-time dynamic modeling of the departure-prone edges of the flight envelope.

  18. Active vibration control of lightweight floor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baader, J.; Fontana, M.

    2016-04-01

    Wide-span and lightweight floors are often prone to structural vibrations due to their low resonance frequency and poor material damping. Their dynamic behaviour can be improved using passive, semi-active or active vibration control devices. The following article proposes a novel method for the controller synthesis for active vibration control. An existing passive TMD (tuned mass damper) is modelled and equipped with an actuator in order to provide more efficient damping. Using an iterative optimization approach under constraints, an optimal controller is found which minimizes a quadratic cost function in frequency domain. A simulation of an existing test bench shows that the active vibration control device is able to provide increased damping compared to the passive TMD.

  19. Preventing and controlling land subsidence in Shanghai -towards more integrated and effective land use and ground water governance in the Yangtze Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Liping

    2016-04-01

    The Yangtze Delta, covers 210,700 square kilometers and with 156 million inhabitants (NRDC, 2010; The National Bureau of Statistics, 2011), is one of the areas most severely affected by land subsidence in China. Up to 2012, the area with cumulative subsidence above 200 mm in Yangtze Delta has been closed to 10,000 square kilometers. Shanghai, located at the estuary of the Yangtze River and with a population of 23 million, is the most densely populated city in Yangtze Delta (The National Bureau of Statistics, 2011). Since 1921, the recorded cumulative subsidence has been 200 to 300 mm in the central area of the city (Chai, Shen, Zhu, & Zhang, 2005). Excessive pumping of groundwater is considered to be the leading reason, accounts for nearly 70%, of the city's land subsidence, the weight of skyscrapers and global warming also play hefty roles (30%) (Springer, 2012). Research has shown that the main method to control land subsidence in Shanghai is to prevent groundwater from dropping (Chai, Shen, Zhu, & Zhang, 2005), the city has made great efforts in this regard since 1965 (the beginning of the so-called "control period"), for example, it has been recharging underground water through 121 wells with more than 60,000 tons every day since 2012 (Chinadaily, 2012). It is a huge burden considering the city has been suffering from a shortage of fresh water. In 2013, with the other two provinces of Jiangsu and Zhejiang in Yangtze Delta, Shanghai signed a delta cooperation agreement on the prevention and control of land subsidence and jointly issued a Prevention and Control Planning on Land Subsidence in Yangtze Delta (2014-2020), which aims to establish a long-effect mechanism in the delta scope. This research aims to analyze and assess the land and groundwater governance arrangements related to land subsidence in the Yangtze Delta in general and Shanghai in specific, in order to develop optimizing adaptation strategies and associated governance arrangements. It examines the

  20. Comparative study of flare control laws. [optimal control of b-737 aircraft approach and landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadkarni, A. A.; Breedlove, W. J., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A digital 3-D automatic control law was developed to achieve an optimal transition of a B-737 aircraft between various initial glid slope conditions and the desired final touchdown condition. A discrete, time-invariant, optimal, closed-loop control law presented for a linear regulator problem, was extended to include a system being acted upon by a constant disturbance. Two forms of control laws were derived to solve this problem. One method utilized the feedback of integral states defined appropriately and augmented with the original system equations. The second method formulated the problem as a control variable constraint, and the control variables were augmented with the original system. The control variable constraint control law yielded a better performance compared to feedback control law for the integral states chosen.

  1. Reliable and Affordable Control Systems Active Combustor Pattern Factor Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarty, Bob; Tomondi, Chris; McGinley, Ray

    2004-01-01

    Active, closed-loop control of combustor pattern factor is a cooperative effort between Honeywell (formerly AlliedSignal) Engines and Systems and the NASA Glenn Research Center to reduce emissions and turbine-stator vane temperature variations, thereby enhancing engine performance and life, and reducing direct operating costs. Total fuel flow supplied to the engine is established by the speed/power control, but the distribution to individual atomizers will be controlled by the Active Combustor Pattern Factor Control (ACPFC). This system consist of three major components: multiple, thin-film sensors located on the turbine-stator vanes; fuel-flow modulators for individual atomizers; and control logic and algorithms within the electronic control.

  2. Control of landing flight by laying hens: implications for the design of extensive housing systems.

    PubMed

    Moinard, C; Statham, P; Green, P R

    2004-10-01

    (1) Ten domestic hens (Lohmann Brown) were video-recorded while moving between perches at a horizontal distance of 0.6, 0.8 or 1.15 m apart. The take-off perch was either 0.2 m above or below the landing perch. (2) Weight and wing area of the hens were measured at the end of the experiment. The same measures where taken from 10 jungle fowls. (3) Clumsy or missed landings were observed on some downward flights over 0.8 and 1.15 m. (4) Hens' trajectories on take-off were closely related to the position of the target perch, and variation in take-off trajectory decreased as the distance between perches increased. (5) The standard deviation of the horizontal distance between head and perch, at the point when the feet first contacted the perch, did not vary with flight distance, suggesting that timing of foot extension was equally accurate at all distances. (6) The standard deviation of the vertical distance between head and perch, at the point when the feet first contacted the perch, did increase with distance, suggesting increasing difficulty in controlling the height of the flight trajectory above the landing perch. (7) Wing loading of the hens (mean 213 N/m2) was approximately twice that of the jungle fowl (mean 111 N/m2). (8) Loss of accuracy in hens' landings at greater distances can be attributed specifically to the effects of high wing loading on the ability to generate and control lift.

  3. An international land-biosphere model benchmarking activity for the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5)

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Forrest M; Randerson, James T; Thornton, Peter E; Bonan, Gordon; Erickson III, David J; Fung, Inez

    2009-12-01

    The need to capture important climate feedbacks in general circulation models (GCMs) has resulted in efforts to include atmospheric chemistry and land and ocean biogeochemistry into the next generation of production climate models, called Earth System Models (ESMs). While many terrestrial and ocean carbon models have been coupled to GCMs, recent work has shown that such models can yield a wide range of results (Friedlingstein et al., 2006). This work suggests that a more rigorous set of global offline and partially coupled experiments, along with detailed analyses of processes and comparisons with measurements, are needed. The Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) was designed to meet this need by providing a simulation protocol and model performance metrics based upon comparisons against best-available satellite- and ground-based measurements (Hoffman et al., 2007). Recently, a similar effort in Europe, called the International Land Model Benchmark (ILAMB) Project, was begun to assess the performance of European land surface models. These two projects will now serve as prototypes for a proposed international land-biosphere model benchmarking activity for those models participating in the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5). Initially used for model validation for terrestrial biogeochemistry models in the NCAR Community Land Model (CLM), C-LAMP incorporates a simulation protocol for both offline and partially coupled simulations using a prescribed historical trajectory of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Models are confronted with data through comparisons against AmeriFlux site measurements, MODIS satellite observations, NOAA Globalview flask records, TRANSCOM inversions, and Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) site measurements. Both sets of experiments have been performed using two different terrestrial biogeochemistry modules coupled to the CLM version 3 in the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3): the CASA model of Fung, et al., and the carbon

  4. An International Land-Biosphere Model Benchmarking Activity for the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, F. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Thornton, P. E.; Bonan, G. B.; Brooks, B. J.; Erickson, D. J.; Fung, I.

    2009-12-01

    The need to capture important climate feedbacks in general circulation models (GCMs) has resulted in efforts to include atmospheric chemistry and land and ocean biogeochemistry into the next generation of production climate models, called Earth System Models (ESMs). While many terrestrial and ocean carbon models have been coupled to GCMs, recent work has shown that such models can yield a wide range of results (Friedlingstein et al., 2006). This work suggests that a more rigorous set of global offline and partially coupled experiments, along with detailed analyses of processes and comparisons with measurements, are needed. The Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) was designed to meet this need by providing a simulation protocol and model performance metrics based upon comparisons against best-available satellite- and ground-based measurements (Hoffman et al., 2007). Recently, a similar effort in Europe, called the International Land Model Benchmark (ILAMB) Project, was begun to assess the performance of European land surface models. These two projects will now serve as prototypes for a proposed international land-biosphere model benchmarking activity for those models participating in the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5). Initially used for model validation for terrestrial biogeochemistry models in the NCAR Community Land Model (CLM), C-LAMP incorporates a simulation protocol for both offline and partially coupled simulations using a prescribed historical trajectory of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Models are confronted with data through comparisons against AmeriFlux site measurements, MODIS satellite observations, NOAA Globalview flask records, TRANSCOM inversions, and Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) site measurements. Both sets of experiments have been performed using two different terrestrial biogeochemistry modules coupled to the CLM version 3 in the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3): the CASA model of Fung, et al., and the carbon

  5. Knee and Hip Joint Kinematics Predict Quadriceps and Hamstrings Neuromuscular Activation Patterns in Drop Jump Landings

    PubMed Central

    Malfait, Bart; Dingenen, Bart; Smeets, Annemie; Staes, Filip; Pataky, Todd; Robinson, Mark A.; Vanrenterghem, Jos; Verschueren, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose was to assess if variation in sagittal plane landing kinematics is associated with variation in neuromuscular activation patterns of the quadriceps-hamstrings muscle groups during drop vertical jumps (DVJ). Methods Fifty female athletes performed three DVJ. The relationship between peak knee and hip flexion angles and the amplitude of four EMG vectors was investigated with trajectory-level canonical correlation analyses over the entire time period of the landing phase. EMG vectors consisted of the {vastus medialis(VM),vastus lateralis(VL)}, {vastus medialis(VM),hamstring medialis(HM)}, {hamstring medialis(HM),hamstring lateralis(HL)} and the {vastus lateralis(VL),hamstring lateralis(HL)}. To estimate the contribution of each individual muscle, linear regressions were also conducted using one-dimensional statistical parametric mapping. Results The peak knee flexion angle was significantly positively associated with the amplitudes of the {VM,HM} and {HM,HL} during the preparatory and initial contact phase and with the {VL,HL} vector during the peak loading phase (p<0.05). Small peak knee flexion angles were significantly associated with higher HM amplitudes during the preparatory and initial contact phase (p<0.001). The amplitudes of the {VM,VL} and {VL,HL} were significantly positively associated with the peak hip flexion angle during the peak loading phase (p<0.05). Small peak hip flexion angles were significantly associated with higher VL amplitudes during the peak loading phase (p = 0.001). Higher external knee abduction and flexion moments were found in participants landing with less flexed knee and hip joints (p<0.001). Conclusion This study demonstrated clear associations between neuromuscular activation patterns and landing kinematics in the sagittal plane during specific parts of the landing. These findings have indicated that an erect landing pattern, characterized by less hip and knee flexion, was significantly associated with an

  6. Evolution of an artificial neural network based autonomous land vehicle controller.

    PubMed

    Baluja, S

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an evolutionary method for creating an artificial neural network based autonomous land vehicle controller. The evolved controllers perform better in unseen situations than those trained with an error backpropagation learning algorithm designed for this task. In this paper, an overview of the previous connectionist based approaches to this task is given, and the evolutionary algorithms used in this study are described in detail. Methods for reducing the high computational costs of training artificial neural networks with evolutionary algorithms are explored. Error metrics specific to the task of autonomous vehicle control are introduced; the evolutionary algorithms guided by these error metrics reveal improved performance over those guided by the standard sum-squared error metric. Finally, techniques for integrating evolutionary search and error backpropagation are presented. The evolved networks are designed to control Carnegie Mellon University's NAVLAB vehicles in road following tasks. PMID:18263046

  7. Land Use and Climate Impacts on Fluvial Systems (LUCIFS): A PAGES - Focus 4 (PHAROS) research activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dearing, John; Hoffmann, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    LUCIFS is a global research program which is concerned with understanding past interactions between climate, human activity and fluvial systems. Its focus is on evaluating the geomorphic impact of humans on landscapes, with a strong emphasis on geomorphological and sedimentological perspectives on mid- to long-term man-landscape interactions. Of particular relevance are aspects of sediment redistribution systems such as non-linear behaviour, the role of system configuration, scale effects, and emergent properties Over the last decade the LUCIFS program has been investigating both contemporary and long-term river response to global change with the principal aims of i)quantifying land use and climate change impacts of river-borne fluxes of water, sediment, C, N and P; ii) identification of key controls on these fluxes at the catchment scale; and iii) identification of the feedback on both human society and biogeochemical cycles of long-term changes in the fluxes of these materials The major scientific tasks of the LUCIFS-program are: • synthesising results of regional case studies • identify regional gaps and encouraging new case studies • addressing research gaps and formulating new research questions • organising workshops and conferences In this paper we present the LUCIFS program within the new PAGES structure. LUCIFS is located in the Focus 4 (PHAROS) dealing with how a knowledge of human-climate-ecosystem interactions in the past can help inform understanding and management today. In conjunction with the other working groups HITE (Human Impacts on Terrestrial Ecosystems), LIMPACS (Human Impacts on Lake Ecosystems) and IHOPE (Integrated History of People on Earth) PHAROS aims to compare regional-scale reconstructions of environmental and climatic processes using natural archives, documentary and instrumental data, with evidence of past human activity obtained from historical, paleoecological and archaeological records.

  8. Active Control by Conservation of Energy Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio

    2000-01-01

    Three unrelated experiments are discussed; each was extremely sensitive to initial conditions. The initial conditions are the beginnings of the origins of the information that nonlinearity displays. Initial conditions make the phenomenon unstable and unpredictable. With the knowledge of the initial conditions, active control requires far less power than that present in the system response. The first experiment is on the control of shocks from an axisymmetric supersonic jet; the second, control of a nonlinear panel response forced by turbulent boundary layer and sound; the third, control of subharmonic and harmonics of a panel forced by sound. In all three experiments, control is achieved by redistribution of periodic energy response such that the energy is nearly preserved from a previous uncontrolled state. This type of active control improves the performance of the system being controlled.

  9. Summary of NASA landing-gear research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, B. D.; Sleeper, R. K.; Stubbs, S. M.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents a brief summary of the airplane landing gear research underway at NASA. The technology areas include: ground handling simulator, antiskid braking systems, space shuttle nose-gear shimmy, active control landing gear, wire brush skid landing gear, air cushion landing systems, tire/surface friction characteristics, tire mechanical properties, tire-tread materials, powered wheels for taxiing, and crosswind landing gear. This paper deals mainly with the programs on tire-tread materials, powered wheel taxiing, air cushion landing systems, and crosswind landing gear research with particular emphasis on previously unreported results of recently completed flight tests. Work in the remaining areas is only mentioned.

  10. Effects of various midsole densities of basketball shoes on impact attenuation during landing activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Songning; Clowers, Kurt; Kohstall, Charles; Yu, Yeon-Joo

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine effects of shoe midsole densities and mechanical demands (landing heights) on impact shock attenuation and lower extremity biomechanics during a landing activity. Nine healthy male college athletes performed 5 trials of step-off landing in each of 9 test conditions, i.e., a combination of landings in shoes of 3 midsole densities (soft, normal, hard) from each of 3 landing potential energy (PE) levels (low, median, high). Ground reaction forces (GRF), accelerations (ACC) of the tibia and forehead, and sagittal kinematic data were sampled simultaneously. A 3 x 3 two-way (surface x height) repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed on selected kinematic, ACC, and GRF variables; a 3 x 3 x 3 three-way (surface x height x joint) ANOVA was performed on variables related to eccentric muscular work. The GRF results showed that the forefoot peak GRF in the normal and hard midsoles was significantly greater than the soft midsole at the low and median PEs. Rearfoot peak GRF was significantly greater for the hard midsole than for the soft and normal midsoles at the median and high PEs, respectively. The peak head and tibia peak ACC were also attenuated in similar fashion. Kinematic variables did not vary significantly across different midsoles, nor did energy absorbed through lower extremity extensors in response to the increased shoe stiffness. Knee joint extensors were shown to be dominant in attenuating the forefoot impact force across the landing heights. The results showed limited evidence of impact-attenuating benefits of the soft midsole in the basketball shoes.

  11. Decree No. 922 on land use and exercise of agricultural activities, 19 May 1989.

    PubMed

    1989-01-01

    The Bulgarian Decree 922, May 19, 1989, regulates land use and the exercise of agricultural activities. It stipulates in general that agricultural activities and land use will be based on the principles of company organization, ensuring the unity and indivisibility of socialist property and the variety of forms of land use and management, using collective farms and companies. Citizens may engage in agricultural activities without having a registered company; users of farmland must protect the environment; observe veterinary, plant protection, and sanitary hygiene regulations; and protect and improve soil fertility. Farms and other companies will carry out their activities under equal conditions, may sell their commodities may set up an association for the protection of their economic and social interests, and may establish agricultural stock exchanges and other cooperatives in accordance with stipulated procedures. Individual farms include an individual farmer or several farmers. Farmers may rent or purchase agricultural equipment without restriction as to model, capacity, or other features. Limitations apply on the number of workers employed on a nonseasonal basis. Farmers may form associations for specified purposes. Taxation is based on the general income tax law. Piece rate is a form of organization and payment of labor in agriculture; written agreements are required regarding wages, quality, quantity, deadlines, and supplies furnished. Lease contracts must be in writing, be registered by the municipal people's council at the location of the project, and contain specified information.

  12. Active control of buildings during earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vance, Vicki L.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this report is to provide an overview of the different types of control systems used in buildings, to discuss the problems associated with current active control mechanisms, and to show the cost-effectiveness of applying active control to buildings. In addition, a small case study investigates the feasibility and benefits of using embedded actuators in buildings. Use of embedded actuators could solve many of the current problems associated with active control by providing a wider bandwidth of control, quicker speed of response, increased reliability and reduced power requirement. Though embedded actuators have not been developed for buildings, they have previously been used in space structures. Many similarities exist between large civil and aerospace structures indicating that direct transfer of concepts between the two disciplines may be possible. In particular, much of the Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) technology currently being developed could be beneficially applied to civil structures. While several buildings with active control systems have been constructed in Japan, additional research and experimental verification are necessary before active control systems become widely accepted and implemented.

  13. Crowd-Sourcing Management Activity Data to Drive GHG Emission Inventories in the Land Use Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paustian, K.; Herrick, J.

    2015-12-01

    Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the land use sector constitute the largest source category for many countries in Africa. Enhancing C sequestration and reducing GHG emissions on managed lands in Africa has to potential to attract C financing to support adoption of more sustainable land management practices that, in addition to GHG mitigation, can provide co-benefits of more productive and climate-resilient agroecosystems. However, robust systems to measure and monitor C sequestration/GHG reductions are currently a significant barrier to attracting more C financing to land use-related mitigation efforts.Anthropogenic GHG emissions are driven by a variety of environmental factors, including climate and soil attributes, as well as human-activities in the form of land use and management practices. GHG emission inventories typically use empirical or process-based models of emission rates that are driven by environmental and management variables. While a lack of field-based flux and C stock measurements are a limiting factor for GHG estimation, we argue that an even greater limitation may be availabiity of data on the management activities that influence flux rates, particularly in developing countries in Africa. In most developed countries there is a well-developed infrastructure of agricultural statistics and practice surveys that can be used to drive model-based GHG emission estimations. However, this infrastructure is largely lacking in developing countries in Africa. While some activity data (e.g. land cover change) can be derived from remote sensing, many key data (e.g., N fertilizer practices, residue management, manuring) require input from the farmers themselves. The explosive growth in cellular technology, even in many of the poorest parts of Africa, suggests the potential for a new crowd-sourcing approach and direct engagement with farmers to 'leap-frog' the land resource information model of developed countries. Among the many benefits of this approach

  14. The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, David W.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE) are presented. Topics covered include: science program objectives and rationale; science requirements; capturing the essential physics; science development approach; development model hardware; development model test plan; and flight hardware and operations.

  15. Active control of turbomachine discrete tones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleeter, Sanford

    This paper was directed at active control of discrete frequency noise generated by subsonic blade rows through cancellation of the blade row interaction generated propagating acoustic waves. First discrete frequency noise generated by a rotor and stator in a duct was analyzed to determine the propagating acoustic pressure waves. Then a mathematical model was developed to analyze and predict the active control of discrete frequency noise generated by subsonic blade rows through cancellation of the propagating acoustic waves, accomplished by utilizing oscillating airfoil surfaces to generate additional control propagating pressure waves. These control waves interact with the propagating acoustic waves, thereby, in principle, canceling the acoustic waves and thus, the far field discrete frequency tones. This model was then applied to a fan exit guide vane to investigate active airfoil surface techniques for control of the propagating acoustic waves, and thus the far field discrete frequency tones, generated by blade row interactions.

  16. Flight evaluation of advanced controls and displays for transition and landing on the NASA V/STOL systems research aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, James A.; Stortz, Michael W.; Borchers, Paul F.; Moralez, Ernesto, III

    1996-01-01

    Flight experiments were conducted on Ames Research Center's V/STOL Systems Research Aircraft (VSRA) to assess the influence of advanced control modes and head-up displays (HUD's) on flying qualities for precision approach and landing operations. Evaluations were made for decelerating approaches to hover followed by a vertical landing and for slow landings for four control/display mode combinations: the basic YAV-8B stability augmentation system; attitude command for pitch, roll, and yaw; flightpath/acceleration command with translational rate command in the hover; and height-rate damping with translational-rate command. Head-up displays used in conjunction with these control modes provided flightpath tracking/pursuit guidance and deceleration commands for the decelerating approach and a mixed horizontal and vertical presentation for precision hover and landing. Flying qualities were established and control usage and bandwidth were documented for candidate control modes and displays for the approach and vertical landing. Minimally satisfactory bandwidths were determined for the translational-rate command system. Test pilot and engineer teams from the Naval Air Warfare Center, the Boeing Military Airplane Group, Lockheed Martin, McDonnell Douglas Aerospace, Northrop Grumman, Rolls-Royce, and the British Defense Research Agency participated in the program along with NASA research pilots from the Ames and Lewis Research Centers. The results, in conjunction with related ground-based simulation data, indicate that the flightpath/longitudinal acceleration command response type in conjunction with pursuit tracking and deceleration guidance on the HUD would be essential for operation to instrument minimums significantly lower than the minimums for the AV-8B. It would also be a superior mode for performing slow landings where precise control to an austere landing area such as a narrow road is demanded. The translational-rate command system would reduce pilot workload for

  17. Active load control techniques for wind turbines.

    SciTech Connect

    van Dam, C.P.; Berg, Dale E.; Johnson, Scott J.

    2008-07-01

    This report provides an overview on the current state of wind turbine control and introduces a number of active techniques that could be potentially used for control of wind turbine blades. The focus is on research regarding active flow control (AFC) as it applies to wind turbine performance and loads. The techniques and concepts described here are often described as 'smart structures' or 'smart rotor control'. This field is rapidly growing and there are numerous concepts currently being investigated around the world; some concepts already are focused on the wind energy industry and others are intended for use in other fields, but have the potential for wind turbine control. An AFC system can be broken into three categories: controls and sensors, actuators and devices, and the flow phenomena. This report focuses on the research involved with the actuators and devices and the generated flow phenomena caused by each device.

  18. Student Activity Funds: Procedures and Controls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuzzetto, Charles E.

    2000-01-01

    An effective internal-control system can help school business administrators meet the challenges of accounting for student activity funds. Such a system should include appropriate policies and procedures, identification of key control points, self-assessments, audit trails, and internal and external audits. (MLH)

  19. Mission control activity during STS-61 EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Flight controller Susan P. Rainwater observes as two astronauts work through a lengthy period of extravehicular activity (EVA) in the cargo bay of the Earth-looking Space Shuttle Endeavour. Rainwater's EVA console was one of Mission Control's busiest during this eleven-day Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing mission in Earth orbit.

  20. Actively Controlled Magnetic Vibration-Isolation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodsinky, Carlos M.; Logsdon, Kirk A.; Wbomski, Joseph F.; Brown, Gerald V.

    1993-01-01

    Prototype magnetic suspension system with active control isolates object from vibrations in all six degrees of freedom at frequencies as low as 0.01 Hz. Designed specifically to protect instruments aboard spacecraft by suppressing vibrations to microgravity levels; basic control approach used for such terrestrial uses as suppression of shocks and other vibrations in trucks and railroad cars.

  1. [Septal Activation and Control of Limbic Structures].

    PubMed

    Fedotova, I R; Frolov, A A

    2015-01-01

    Coherent activation of limbic system structures as the main function of theta-rhythm is widely discussed in the literature. However until now does not exist the common view on its generation in these brain structures. The model of septal theta-rhythmic activation and control of limbic structures is suggested basing on the literature and own experimental data.

  2. Control of nucleus accumbens activity with neurofeedback.

    PubMed

    Greer, Stephanie M; Trujillo, Andrew J; Glover, Gary H; Knutson, Brian

    2014-08-01

    The nucleus accumbens (NAcc) plays critical roles in healthy motivation and learning, as well as in psychiatric disorders (including schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder). Thus, techniques that confer control of NAcc activity might inspire new therapeutic interventions. By providing second-to-second temporal resolution of activity in small subcortical regions, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can resolve online changes in NAcc activity, which can then be presented as "neurofeedback." In an fMRI-based neurofeedback experiment designed to elicit NAcc activity, we found that subjects could increase their own NAcc activity, and that display of neurofeedback significantly enhanced their ability to do so. Subjects were not as capable of decreasing their NAcc activity, however, and enhanced control did not persist after subsequent removal of neurofeedback. Further analyses suggested that individuals who recruited positive aroused affect were better able to increase NAcc activity in response to neurofeedback, and that NAcc neurofeedback also elicited functionally correlated activity in the medial prefrontal cortex. Together, these findings suggest that humans can modulate their own NAcc activity and that fMRI-based neurofeedback may augment their efforts. The observed association between positive arousal and effective NAcc control further supports an anticipatory affect account of NAcc function.

  3. Control of nucleus accumbens activity with neurofeedback

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Stephanie M.; Trujillo, Andrew J.; Glover, Gary H.; Knutson, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens (NAcc) plays critical roles in healthy motivation and learning, as well as in psychiatric disorders (including schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder). Thus, techniques that confer control of NAcc activity might inspire new therapeutic interventions. By providing second-to-second temporal resolution of activity in small subcortical regions, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can resolve online changes in NAcc activity, which can then be presented as “neurofeedback.” In an fMRI-based neurofeedback experiment designed to elicit NAcc activity, we found that subjects could increase their own NAcc activity, and that display of neurofeedback significantly enhanced their ability to do so. Subjects were not as capable of decreasing their NAcc activity, however, and enhanced control did not persist after subsequent removal of neurofeedback. Further analyses suggested that individuals who recruited positive arousal affect were better able to increase NAcc activity in response to neurofeedback, and that NAcc neurofeedback also elicited functionally correlated activity in the medial prefrontal cortex. Together, these findings suggest that humans can modulate their own NAcc activity and that fMRI-based neurofeedback may augment their efforts. The observed association between positive arousal and effective NAcc control further supports an anticipatory affect account of NAcc function. PMID:24705203

  4. Active vibration control of civil structures

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.; Baker, W.; Fales, J.; Shevitz, D.

    1996-11-01

    This is a final report of a one year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Active vibration control (AVC) of structural and mechanical systems is one of the rapidly advancing areas of engineering research. The multifaceted nature of AVC covers many disciplines, such as sensors and instrumentation, numerical modeling, experimental mechanics, and advanced power systems. This work encompassed a review of the literature on active control of structures focusing both on active control hardware and on control algorithms, a design of an isolation systems using magneto-rheological fluid-filled (MRF) dampers and numerical simulations to study the enhanced vibration mitigation effects of this technology.

  5. Efficacy of a 3 month training program on the jump-landing technique in jump-landing sports. Design of a cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background With the relatively high rate of injuries to the lower extremity due to jump-landing movement patterns and the accompanied high costs, there is need for determining potential preventive programs. A program on the intervention of jump-landing technique is possibly an important preventative measure since it appeared to reduce the incidence of lower extremity injuries. In real life situations, amateur sports lack the infrastructure and funds to have a sports physician or therapist permanently supervising such a program. Therefore the current prevention program is designed so that it could be implemented by coaches alone. Objective The objective of this randomized controlled trial is to evaluate the effect of a coach supervised intervention program targeting jump-landing technique on the incidence of lower extremity injuries. Methods Of the 110 Flemish teams of the elite division, 24 teams are included and equally randomized to two study groups. An equal selection of female and male teams with allocation to intervention and control group is obtained. The program is a modification of other prevention programs previously proven to be effective. All exercises in the current program are adjusted so that a more progressive development in the exercise is presented. Both the control and intervention group continue with their normal training routine, while the intervention group carries out the program on jump-landing technique. The full intervention program has a duration of three months and is performed 2 times a week during warm-up (5-10 min). Injuries are registered during the entire season. Discussion The results of this study can give valuable information on the effect of a coach supervised intervention program on jump-landing technique and injury occurrence. Results will become available in 2011. Trial registration Trial registration number: NTR2560 PMID:21144030

  6. Muscle Activity Onset Prior to Landing in Patients after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Theisen, Daniel; Rada, Isabel; Brau, Amélie; Gette, Paul; Seil, Romain

    2016-01-01

    Muscle activation during landing is paramount to stabilise lower limb joints and avoid abnormal movement patterns. Delayed muscle activity onset measured by electromyography (EMG) has been suggested to be associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Therefore, the aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to test the hypothesis if ACL-injured patients display different results for muscle onset timing during standard deceleration tasks compared to healthy control participants. PubMed, Embase, Scopus and ScienceDirect databases were systematically searched over the period from January 1980 to February 2015, yielding a total of 1461 citations. Six studies meeting inclusion criteria underwent quality assessment, data extraction and re-computing procedures for the meta-analysis. The quality was rated “moderate” for 2 studies and “poor” for 4. Patients included and procedures used were highly heterogeneous. The tasks investigated were single leg hopping, decelerating from running or walking, tested on a total of 102 ACL-injured participants and 86 controls. EMG analyses of the muscles vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, lateral and medial hamstrings revealed trivial and non-significant standardised mean differences (SMD<0.20; p>0.05) between patients and control participants. Furthermore, no differences were found between the contralateral leg of patients and controls for muscle activity onset of the medial and lateral gastrocnemius (SMD<0.20; p>0.05). Based on 3 studies, the involved legs of ACL-injured patients showed overall earlier muscle activity onset compared to control participants for the medial gastrocnemius (SMD = 0.5; p = 0.05). Similar results were found for the lateral gastrocnemius (SMD = 2.1; p<0.001), with a greater effect size but based only on a single study. We conclude that there are no differences between leg muscles of ACL-injured patients and healthy controls regarding the muscle activity onset during landing. However

  7. Implementation of active magnetic bearing digital controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hu; Fang, Jiancheng; Liu, Gang

    2006-11-01

    An active magnetic bearing digital controller is presented. This system is based on high-speed floating-point digital signal processor (DSP) and field programmable gate array (FPGA). The active vibration control algorithms are coded in C language where is possible to reduce the probabilities of software errors occurring and to reduce the debugging time for those errors and are executed by the high-speed floating-point DSP. This paper describes the implementation of the controller. The proposed digital control system can meet the requirement of enough throughput which is difficult using a single fixed-pointing DSP, realize integration of magnetic bearings controller and have the merits of easily to maintain and be applied in other magnetic bearings systems. The system has been applied successfully in several actual magnetic bearings systems at Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics and the experimental results verify its feasibility.

  8. CFD Modeling for Active Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, Pieter G.

    2001-01-01

    This presentation describes current work under UEET Active Flow Control CFD Research Tool Development. The goal of this work is to develop computational tools for inlet active flow control design. This year s objectives were to perform CFD simulations of fully gridded vane vortex generators, micro-vortex genera- tors, and synthetic jets, and to compare flowfield results with wind tunnel tests of simple geometries with flow control devices. Comparisons are shown for a single micro-vortex generator on a flat plate, and for flow over an expansion ramp with sidewall effects. Vortex core location, pressure gradient and oil flow patterns are compared between experiment and computation. This work lays the groundwork for evaluating simplified modeling of arrays of devices, and provides the opportunity to test simple flow control device/sensor/ control loop interaction.

  9. Active vibration control in microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.

    1987-01-01

    The low gravity environment of the space station is suitable for experiments or manufacturing processes which require near zero gravity. An experiment was fabricated to test the validity of the active control process and to verify the flow and control parameters identified in a theoretical model. Zero gravity is approximated in the horizontal plane using a low friction air bearing table. An analog control system was designed to activate calibrated air jets when displacement of the test mass is sensed. The experiment demonstrates that an air jet control system introduces an effective damping factor to control oscillatory response. The amount of damping as well as the flow parameters, such as pressure drop across the valve and flow rate of air, are verified by the analytical model.

  10. PARK-IT! Elementary School Land Laboratories in Toledo City Parks. Curriculum Activity Guide, Grades K-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuFour, Marilyn Berry; Courter, Linda Kothera; Garvin, Dennis M.

    The project PARK-IT! represents a unique partnership between a public elementary school and a city park in which students and teachers utilize a small naturalized area of the park as a Land Laboratory, and in return become its stewards. The project also includes this curriculum activity guide which can assist teachers in using the Land Lab with…

  11. PARK-IT! Elementary School Land Laboratories in Toledo City Parks. Curriculum Activity Guide, Grades 2-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuFour, Marilyn Berry; Courter, Linda Kothera; Garvin, Dennis M.

    The project PARK-IT! represents a unique partnership between a public elementary school and a city park in which students and teachers utilize a small naturalized area of the park as a Land Laboratory, and in return become its stewards. The project also includes this curriculum activity guide which can assist teachers in using the Land Lab with…

  12. PARK-IT! Elementary School Land Laboratories in Toledo City Parks. Curriculum Activity Guide, Grades 4-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuFour, Marilyn Berry; Courter, Linda Kothera; Garvin, Dennis M.

    The project PARK-IT! represents a unique partnership between a public elementary school and a city park in which students and teachers utilize a small naturalized area of the park as a Land Laboratory, and in return become its stewards. The project also includes this curriculum activity guide which can assist teachers in using the Land Lab with…

  13. Active control of robot manipulator compliance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, C. C.; Pooran, F. J.

    1986-01-01

    Work performed at Catholic University on the research grant entitled Active Control of Robot Manipulator Compliance, supported by NASA/Goddard space Flight Center during the period of May 15th, 1986 to November 15th, 1986 is described. The modelling of the two-degree-of-freedom robot is first presented. Then the complete system including the robot and the hybrid controller is simulated on an IBM-XT Personal Computer. Simulation results showed that proper adjustments of controller gains enable the robot to perform successful operations. Further research should focus on developing a guideline for the controller gain design to achieve system stability.

  14. Examination of Terrain and Land use Control on Soil Water Chemistry in Two Suburban Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sopacua, J.; Endreny, T. A.

    2004-12-01

    Scientific literature has advanced our understanding about controlling factors of water chemistry in forested watersheds, however the linkage between watershed characteristics and soil water chemistry in suburban watersheds is poorly understood. A better understanding of suburban watershed characteristics that control soil water chemistry concentrations will help watershed managers in addressing water pollution issue. Soil water samples were taken biweekly from nineteen sampling clusters throughout the study areas; B28 watershed, a 558860 m2 catchment, and Power Station watershed, a 446450 m2 catchment, in Croton New York City water supply system, from June 2001 to August 2002. Watershed characteristics (land use and topographic) were generated from land use data and 2 meters grided digital elevation model using extensive ARC/GIS functions and analyses. Clusters have a range of development density. Relationships between annual average total phosphorous (TP), total nitrogen (TN) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration and watershed characteristics were examined and regression models for TP, TN, and DOC concentration were developed. The best predictive model for average TP concentration was based on Number of houses and Road width (R2 adj = 0.47), based predictive model for average TN concentration was based on number of houses and impervious area (R2 adj = 0.78), and best predictive model for average DOC concentration based on road width (R2 adj = 0.46).

  15. Land cover variation and West Nile virus prevalence: Patterns, processes, and implications for disease control

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ezenwa, V.O.; Milheim, L.E.; Coffey, M.F.; Godsey, M.S.; King, R.J.; Guptill, S.C.

    2007-01-01

    Identifying links between environmental variables and infectious disease risk is essential to understanding how human-induced environmental changes will effect the dynamics of human and wildlife diseases. Although land cover change has often been tied to spatial variation in disease occurrence, the underlying factors driving the correlations are often unknown, limiting the applicability of these results for disease prevention and control. In this study, we described associations between land cover composition and West Nile virus (WNV) infection prevalence, and investigated three potential processes accounting for observed patterns: (1) variation in vector density; (2) variation in amplification host abundance; and (3) variation in host community composition. Interestingly, we found that WNV infection rates among Culex mosquitoes declined with increasing wetland cover, but wetland area was not significantly associated with either vector density or amplification host abundance. By contrast, wetland area was strongly correlated with host community composition, and model comparisons suggested that this factor accounted, at least partially, for the observed effect of wetland area on WNV infection risk. Our results suggest that preserving large wetland areas, and by extension, intact wetland bird communities, may represent a valuable ecosystem-based approach for controlling WNV outbreaks. ?? Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  16. Periodic spring-mass running over uneven terrain through feedforward control of landing conditions.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Luther R; Eaton, Caitrin E

    2014-09-01

    This work pursues a feedforward control algorithm for high-speed legged locomotion over uneven terrain. Being able to rapidly negotiate uneven terrain without visual or a priori information about the terrain will allow legged systems to be used in time-critical applications and alongside fast-moving humans or vehicles. The algorithm is shown here implemented on a spring-loaded inverted pendulum model in simulation, and can be configured to approach fixed running height over uneven terrain or self-stable terrain following. Offline search identifies unique landing conditions that achieve a desired apex height with a constant stride period over varying ground levels. Because the time between the apex and touchdown events is directly related to ground height, the landing conditions can be computed in real time as continuous functions of this falling time. Enforcing a constant stride period reduces the need for inertial sensing of the apex event, which is nontrivial for physical systems, and allows for clocked feedfoward control of the swing leg.

  17. Simulation evaluation of two VTOL control/display systems in IMC approach and shipboard landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrick, V. K.

    1984-01-01

    Two control/display systems, which differed in overall complexity but were both designed for VTOL flight operations to and from small ships in instrument meteorological conditions (IMC), were tested using the Ames Flight Simulator for Advanced Aircraft (FSAA). Both systems have attitude command in transition and horizontal-velocity command in hover; the more complex system also has longitudinal-acceleration and flightpath-angle command in transition, and vertical-velocity command in hover. The most important overall distinction between the two systems for the viewpoint of implementation is that in one - the more complex - engine power and nozzle position are operated indirectly through flight controllers, whereas in the other they are operated directly by the pilot. Simulated landings were made on a moving model of a DD 963 Spruance-class destroyer. Acceptable transitions can be performed in turbulence of 3 m/sec rms using either system. Acceptable landings up to sea state 6 can be performed using the more complex system, and up to sea state 5 using the other system.

  18. Screening of Potential Landing Gear Noise Control Devices at Virginia Tech For QTD II Flight Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravetta, Patricio A.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Ng, Wing F.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Stoker, Robert W.

    2007-01-01

    In support of the QTD II (Quiet Technology Demonstrator) program, aeroacoustic measurements of a 26%-scale, Boeing 777 main landing gear model were conducted in the Virginia Tech Stability Tunnel. The objective of these measurements was to perform risk mitigation studies on noise control devices for a flight test performed at Glasgow, Montana in 2005. The noise control devices were designed to target the primary main gear noise sources as observed in several previous tests. To accomplish this task, devices to reduce noise were built using stereo lithography for landing gear components such as the brakes, the forward cable harness, the shock strut, the door/strut gap and the lower truck. The most promising device was down selected from test results. In subsequent stages, the initial design of the selected lower truck fairing was improved to account for all the implementation constraints encountered in the full-scale airplane. The redesigned truck fairing was then retested to assess the impact of the modifications on the noise reduction potential. From extensive acoustic measurements obtained using a 63-element microphone phased array, acoustic source maps and integrated spectra were generated in order to estimate the noise reduction achievable with each device.

  19. Control of the African trypanosomiases with special reference to land use.

    PubMed

    Ford, J

    1969-01-01

    There is a need to reassess the role of the trypanosomiases, both human and animal, in African ecology and economy. Withdrawal of control services from the Congo basin was followed by a resurgence of infection from ancient foci, many of them thought to have been extinguished. Successful elimination of Glossina in savanna habitats has sometimes been followed by reinvasion causing massive epizootics. Elsewhere continued recession of the tsetse fly has been followed by cattle population growth which is periodically interrupted by catastrophic pasture famines.Efficiency of control rather than large-scale eradication should be the immediate aim. Efficient control keeps trypanosomiasis at a tolerable level in relation to the competence of medical and veterinary services and ensures that the beneficial effects of disease in maintaining a balance between natural resource potential of the continent and the energy output of its inhabitants, are retained until they can be replaced by new social and economic controls integrated in local cultures.Many ideas about control planning formulated before 1960 are now irrelevant. To provide foundations for a new policy 3 requirements must be fulfilled. The first is to understand the nature of natural foci of infection of trypanosomiasis; the second is to collate knowledge of land-use potentials of the fly-belts; the third is to find a means of integrating information to achieve balanced control programmes. To do this a formal mathematical study of the epidemiology and epizootiology of the trypanosomiases should be initiated.

  20. Control of the African trypanosomiases with special reference to land use*

    PubMed Central

    Ford, John

    1969-01-01

    There is a need to reassess the role of the trypanosomiases, both human and animal, in African ecology and economy. Withdrawal of control services from the Congo basin was followed by a resurgence of infection from ancient foci, many of them thought to have been extinguished. Successful elimination of Glossina in savanna habitats has sometimes been followed by reinvasion causing massive epizootics. Elsewhere continued recession of the tsetse fly has been followed by cattle population growth which is periodically interrupted by catastrophic pasture famines. Efficiency of control rather than large-scale eradication should be the immediate aim. Efficient control keeps trypanosomiasis at a tolerable level in relation to the competence of medical and veterinary services and ensures that the beneficial effects of disease in maintaining a balance between natural resource potential of the continent and the energy output of its inhabitants, are retained until they can be replaced by new social and economic controls integrated in local cultures. Many ideas about control planning formulated before 1960 are now irrelevant. To provide foundations for a new policy 3 requirements must be fulfilled. The first is to understand the nature of natural foci of infection of trypanosomiasis; the second is to collate knowledge of land-use potentials of the fly-belts; the third is to find a means of integrating information to achieve balanced control programmes. To do this a formal mathematical study of the epidemiology and epizootiology of the trypanosomiases should be initiated. PMID:5307600

  1. Effect of land use on microbial biomass and enzyme activities in tropical soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maharjan, Menuka; Sanaullah, Muhammad; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-04-01

    Land use change especially from forest to intensive agriculture for sustaining livelihood causing severe consequence on soil quality. Soil microbial biomass and enzyme activities are very sensitive to change in environment. The objective was to assess effects of three land uses i.e. forest, organic and conventional farming on microbial biomass C and N and enzymes involved in C-cycle (β-glucosidase), N-cycle (leucine-aminopeptidase), P-cycle (Phosphatase) and S-cycle (Sulphatase) at different depth (0-100 cm with 10 cm in interval) of soil in Chitwan, Nepal. The result showed that both carbon and nitrogen content (%) was significantly higher in organic farming than conventional farming and forest. However, the trend decreased in lower depth. Significantly high microbial biomass C and N (μg C and N g-1 soil) were found in organic farming than conventional farming and forest at 0-10 cm but the trend was inconsistent in lower depth. β-glucosidase, leucine-aminopeptidase and sulphatase (nmol g-1 soil) activities were higher in organic and conventional farming compared to forest at 0-20 cm. Phosphatase activity was higher in conventional farming than forest and organic farming at 0-20cm. The activities were inconsistent below 20 cm. Application of farmyard manure and organic matter from the vegetation contributes the higher microbial biomass and enzyme activities in organic farming.

  2. A trend analysis of global fire activity. Is it land use or climate the main driver?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bistinas, Ioannis; Oom, Duarte; Silva, Joao M. N.; Lopez-Saldaña, Gerardo; Pereira, Jose M. C.

    2016-04-01

    We perform a global trend analysis of active fire counts at 0.5o spatial resolution, using 156 months (January 2001 - December 2013) of MODIS Climate Modelling Grid data (TERRA). We use the Contextual Mann-Kendall (CMK) test to assess the statistical significance at cell level and found that 13% of the global land area displays statistically significant active fire count trends, with a slight predominance of negative trends (50.63% of the total significant cells). We perform the same trend analysis with the unexplained variability (residuals) between active fires and the Fire Weather Index (FWI) that is used as a proxy for climate. There is agreement between the main patterns from the trend analysis coming from the residuals and the active fire trends, implying that the main contemporary fire trends are not climate driven. Spatially coherent patches with significant trends were found in all continents (with the obvious exception of Antarctica). The majority of significant trends occur in areas of high fire incidence, and both increasing and decreasing trends appear to be associated with land use change processes. The analysis reveals large negative trends at the Sahel and between Russia and Kazakhstan, whereas a massive and coherent positive trend appears in southeastern Asia. Smaller patches of positive trends appear in southeastern United States and in Mexico, as well as in Brazil and between Argentina and Paraguay, and in Asia in India. There are also negative trends in Brazil, Argentina and in Australia. The study highlights the land use activities as the main driver of these trends, but also the need for data driven analyses and longer time series for future studies in order to gain better knowledge on fire occurrence.

  3. Simulation studies for multichannel active vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Shashikala; Balasubramaniam, R.; Praseetha, K. K.

    2003-10-01

    Traditional approach to vibration control uses passive techniques, which are relatively large, costly and ineffective at low frequencies. Active Vibration Control (AVC) is used to overcome these problems & in AVC additional sources (secondary) are used to cancel vibration from primary source based on the principle of superposition theorem Since the characteristics of the vibration source and environment are time varying, the AVC system must be adaptive. Adaptive systems have the ability to track time varying disturbances and provide optimal control over a much broader range of conditions than conventional fixed control systems. In multi channel AVC vibration fields in large dimensions are controlled & is more complicated. Therefore to actively control low frequency vibrations on large structures, multi channel AVC requires a control system that uses multiple secondary sources to control the vibration field simultaneously at multiple error sensor locations. The error criterion that can be directly measured is the sum of squares of outputs of number of sensors. The adaptive algorithm is designed to minimize this & the algorithm implemented is the "Multiple error LMS algorithm." The best known applications of multiple channel FXLMS algorithm is in real time AVC and system identification. More wider applications are in the control of propeller induced noise in flight cabin interiors. In the present paper the results of simulation studies carried out in MATLAB as well as on TMS320C32 DSP processor will be brought out for a two-channel case.

  4. Active control of buckling of flexible beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baz, A.; Tampe, L.

    1989-01-01

    The feasibility of using the rapidly growing technology of the shape memory alloys actuators in actively controlling the buckling of large flexible structures is investigated. The need for such buckling control systems is becoming inevitable as the design trends of large space structures have resulted in the use of structural members that are long, slender, and very flexible. In addition, as these truss members are subjected mainly to longitudinal loading they become susceptible to structural instabilities due to buckling. Proper control of such instabilities is essential to the effective performance of the structures as stable platforms for communication and observation. Mathematical models are presented that simulate the dynamic characteristics of the shape memory actuator, the compressive structural members, and the associated active control system. A closed-loop computer-controlled system is designed, based on the developed mathematical models, and implemented to control the buckling of simple beams. The performance of the computer-controlled system is evaluated experimentally and compared with the theoretical predictions to validate the developed models. The obtained results emphasize the importance of buckling control and suggest the potential of the shape memory actuators as attractive means for controlling structural deformation in a simple and reliable way.

  5. Simulating future trends in urban stormwater quality for changing climate, urban land use and environmental controls.

    PubMed

    Borris, Matthias; Viklander, Maria; Gustafsson, Anna-Maria; Marsalek, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    The effects of climatic changes, progressing urbanization and improved environmental controls on the simulated urban stormwater quality in a northern Sweden community were studied. Future scenarios accounting for those changes were developed and their effects simulated with the Storm Water Management Model (SWMM). It was observed that the simulated stormwater quality was highly sensitive to the scenarios, mimicking progressing urbanization with varying catchment imperviousness and area. Thus, land use change was identified as one of the most influential factors and in some scenarios, urban growth caused changes in runoff quantity and quality exceeding those caused by a changing climate. Adaptation measures, including the reduction of directly connected impervious surfaces (DCIS) through the integration of more green spaces into the urban landscape, or disconnection of DCIS were effective in reducing runoff volume and pollutant loads. Furthermore, pollutant source control measures, including material substitution, were effective in reducing pollutant loads and significantly improving stormwater quality.

  6. Study on controlling measures of ground water resources and the effects on alleviating land subsidence in Shanghai, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, S.; Wu, J.; Xue, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Land subsidence in Shanghai caused by overly exploitation of ground water has been 93 years since 1921, with the largest cumulative land subsidence of 2.6m. Studies on controlling and alleviating land subsidence have been 53 years since 1961. Control on ground water exploitation, change in pumping aquifers, increase in artificial recharge have been used as the three measures to mitigate land subsidence. The amount of ground water exploitation decreased from 0.2 billion m3 in 1963 to 13 million m3, which meant the amount decreased by 93.5%. The amount of artificial recharge increased from 1.9 million m3 in 1963 to 18 million m3 in 2011, which meant it increased by 9.5 times. The amount of recharge was even 6 million m3 larger than the discharge. The main pumping aquifers were shift from the second and third confined aquifers to the fourth and fifth confined aquifers. With the application of the three measures, ground water levels in second and third confined aquifers increased from -20m in 1965 to -1m in 2011 and that in the fourth confined aquifer increased from -36m in 1998 to -9m in 2011. Some regional ground water drawdown cones disappeared. Land subsidence rate reduces from 38mm/year before 1965 to 7mm/year by now and some areas even rebound. The details of measures taken to control land subsidence between 1961 and 2011, and the responses in ground water flows and land subsidence characteristics are introduced. It concludes that decrease in ground water pumping is the most effective way to control land subsidence, increase in artificial recharge is a good assistant measure, and changing in pumping aquifers is not always show good results. Shanghai got increased land subsidence rate from 1990 to 2000 when changing pumping aquifers from the second and third to the fourth and fifth ones without properly evaluating the amount of exploitation in advance. It must be very careful when take the measure of changing pumping aquifers, and the proper amount of pumpage in

  7. Actively controlled shaft seals for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salant, Richard F.

    1994-01-01

    This study experimentally investigates an actively controlled mechanical seal for aerospace applications. The seal of interest is a gas seal, which is considerably more compact than previous actively controlled mechanical seals that were developed for industrial use. In a mechanical seal, the radial convergence of the seal interface has a primary effect on the film thickness. Active control of the film thickness is established by controlling the radial convergence of the seal interface with piezoelectric actuator. An actively controlled mechanical seal was initially designed and evaluated using a mathematical model. Based on these results, a seal was fabricated and tested under laboratory conditions. The seal was tested with both helium and air, at rotational speeds up to 3770 rad/sec, and at sealed pressures as high as 1.48 x 10(exp 6) Pa. The seal was operated with both manual control and with a closed-loop control system that used either the leakage rate or face temperature as the feedback. The output of the controller was the voltage applied to the piezoelectric actuator. The seal operated successfully for both short term tests (less than one hour) and for longer term tests (four hours) with a closed-loop control system. The leakage rates were typically 5-15 slm (standard liters per minute), and the face temperatures were generally maintained below 100 C. When leakage rate was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint leakage rate was typically maintained within 1 slm. However, larger deviations occurred during sudden changes in sealed pressure. When face temperature was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint face temperature was generally maintained within 3 C, with larger deviations occurring when the sealed pressure changed suddenly.

  8. Model based optimization of wind erosion control by tree shelterbelt for suitable land management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartus, M.; Farsang, A.; Szatmári, J.; Barta, K.

    2012-04-01

    The degradation of soil by wind erosion causes huge problem in many parts of the world. The wind erodes the upper, nutrition rich part of the soil, therefore erosion causes soil productivity loss. The length of tree shelterbelts was significantly reduced by the collectivisation (1960-1989) and the wind erosion affected areas expanded in Hungary. The tree shelterbelt is more than just a tool of wind erosion control; by good planning it can increase the yield. The tree shelterbelt reduces the wind speed and changes the microclimate providing better condition to plant growth. The aim of our work is to estimate wind erosion risk and to find the way to reduce it by tree shelterbelts. A GIS based model was created to calculate the risk and the optimal windbreak position was defined to reduce the wind erosion risk to the minimum. The model is based on the DIN 19706 (Ermitlung der Erosiongefährdung von Böden durch Wind, Estimation of Wind Erosion Risk) German standard. The model uses five input data: structure and carbon content of soil, average yearly wind speed at 10 meters height, the cultivated plants and the height and position of windbreak. The study field (16km2) was chosen near Szeged (SE Hungary). In our investigation, the cultivated plant species and the position and height of windbreaks were modified. Different scenarios were made using the data of the land management in the last few years. The best case scenario (zero wind erosion) and the worst case scenario (with no tree shelter belt and the worst land use) were made to find the optimal windbreak position. Finally, the research proved that the tree shelterbelts can provide proper protection against wind erosion, but for optimal land management the cultivated plant types should also controlled. As a result of the research, a land management plan was defined to reduce the wind erosion risk on the study field, which contains the positions of new tree shelterbelts planting and the optimal cultivation.

  9. Actively Controlling Buffet-Induced Excitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Robert W.; Pototzky, Anthony S.; Henderson, Douglas A.; Galea, Stephen C.; Manokaran, Donald S.; Zimcik, David G.; Wickramasinghe, Viresh; Pitt, Dale M.; Gamble, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    High performance aircraft, especially those with twin vertical tails, encounter unsteady buffet loads when flying at high angles of attack. These loads result in significant random stresses, which may cause fatigue damage leading to restricted capabilities and availability of the aircraft. An international collaborative research activity among Australia, Canada and the United States, conducted under the auspices of The Technical Cooperation Program (TTCP) contributed resources toward a program that coalesced a broad range of technical knowledge and expertise into a single investigation to demonstrate the enhanced performance and capability of the advanced active BLA control system in preparation for a flight test demonstration. The research team investigated the use of active structural control to alleviate the damaging structural response to these loads by applying advanced directional piezoelectric actuators, the aircraft rudder, switch mode amplifiers, and advanced control strategies on an F/A-18 aircraft empennage. Some results of the full-scale investigation are presented herein.

  10. Guidance and Control Algorithms for the Mars Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jody L.; CwyerCianciolo, Alicia M.; Powell, Richard W.; Shidner, Jeremy D.; Garcia-Llama, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the Mars Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis (EDL-SA) study was to identify feasible technologies that will enable human exploration of Mars, specifically to deliver large payloads to the Martian surface. This paper focuses on the methods used to guide and control two of the contending technologies, a mid- lift-to-drag (L/D) rigid aeroshell and a hypersonic inflatable aerodynamic decelerator (HIAD), through the entry portion of the trajectory. The Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST2) is used to simulate and analyze the trajectories of the contending technologies and guidance and control algorithms. Three guidance algorithms are discussed in this paper: EDL theoretical guidance, Numerical Predictor-Corrector (NPC) guidance and Analytical Predictor-Corrector (APC) guidance. EDL-SA also considered two forms of control: bank angle control, similar to that used by Apollo and the Space Shuttle, and a center-of-gravity (CG) offset control. This paper presents the performance comparison of these guidance algorithms and summarizes the results as they impact the technology recommendations for future study.

  11. Active Flow Control Stator With Coanda Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guendogdu; Vorreiter; Seume

    2010-01-01

    Active Flow Control increases the permissible aerodynamic loading. Curved surface near the trailing edge ("Coanda surface"): a) increases turning -> higher pressure ratio. b) controls boundary layer separation -> increased surge margin. Objective: Reduce the number of vanes or compressor stages. Constraints: 1. In a real compressor, the vane must still function entirely without blowing. 2. Maintain the flow exit angle of the reference stator despite the resulting increase in stator loading.

  12. Active disturbance rejection controller for chemical reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Both, Roxana; Dulf, Eva H.; Muresan, Cristina I.

    2015-03-10

    In the petrochemical industry, the synthesis of 2 ethyl-hexanol-oxo-alcohols (plasticizers alcohol) is of high importance, being achieved through hydrogenation of 2 ethyl-hexenal inside catalytic trickle bed three-phase reactors. For this type of processes the use of advanced control strategies is suitable due to their nonlinear behavior and extreme sensitivity to load changes and other disturbances. Due to the complexity of the mathematical model an approach was to use a simple linear model of the process in combination with an advanced control algorithm which takes into account the model uncertainties, the disturbances and command signal limitations like robust control. However the resulting controller is complex, involving cost effective hardware. This paper proposes a simple integer-order control scheme using a linear model of the process, based on active disturbance rejection method. By treating the model dynamics as a common disturbance and actively rejecting it, active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) can achieve the desired response. Simulation results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  13. Active Control of Cryogenic Propellants in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notardonato, William

    2011-01-01

    A new era of space exploration is being planned. Exploration architectures under consideration require the long term storage of cryogenic propellants in space. This requires development of active control systems to mitigate the effect of heat leak. This work summarizes current state of the art, proposes operational design strategies and presents options for future architectures. Scaling and integration of active systems will be estimated. Ideal long range spacecraft systems will be proposed with Exploration architecture benefits considered.

  14. Seismic active control by neutral networks

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yu

    1995-12-31

    A study on the application of artificial neural networks (ANNs) to active structural control under seismic loads is carried out. The structure considered is a single-degree-of-freedom (SDF) system with an active bracing device. The control force is computed by a trained neural network. The feedforward neural network architecture and an adaptive backpropagation training algorithm is used in the study. The neural net is trained to reproduce the function that represents the response-excitation relationship of the SDF system under seismic loads. The input-output training patterns are generated randomly. In the backpropagation training algorithm, the learning rate is determined by ensuring the decrease of the error function at each epoch. The computer program implemented is validated by solving the classification of the XOR problem. Then, the trained ANN is used to compute the control force according to the control strategy. If the control force exceeds the actuator`s capacity limit, it is set equal to that limit. The concept of the control strategy employed herein is to apply the control force at every time step to cancel the system velocity induced at the preceding time step so that the gradual rhythmic buildup of the response is destroyed. The ground motions considered in the numerical example are the 1940 El Centro earthquake and the 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake in California. The system responses with and without the control are calculated and compared. The feasibility and potential of applying ANNs to seismic active control is asserted by the promising results obtained from the numerical examples studied.

  15. Land-subsidence and ground-water storage monitoring in the Tucson Active Management Area, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pool, Don R.; Winster, Daniel; Cole, K.C.

    2000-01-01

    The Tucson Active Management Area (TAMA) comprises two basins--Tucson Basin and Avra Valley. The TAMA has been directed by Arizona ground-water law to attain an annual balance between groundwater withdrawals and recharge by the year 2025. This balance is defined by the statute as "safe yield." Current ground-water withdrawals exceed recharge, resulting in conditions of ground-water overdraft, which causes removal of water from ground-water storage and subsidence of the land surface. Depletion of storage and associated land subsidence will not be halted until all discharge from the system, both natural and human induced, is balanced by recharge. The amount of the ground-water overdraft has been difficult to estimate until recently because it could not be directly measured. Overdraft has been estimated using indirect water-budget methods that rely on uncertain estimates of recharge. As a result, the status of the ground-water budget could not be known with great certainty. Gravity methods offer a means to directly measure ground-water overdraft through measurement of changes in the gravitational field of the Earth that are caused by changes in the amount of water stored in the subsurface. Changes in vertical position also affect the measured gravity value and thus subsidence also must be monitored. The combination of periodic observations of gravity and vertical positions provide direct measures of changes in stored ground water and land subsidence.

  16. Piezoelectric Power Requirements for Active Vibration Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennan, Matthew C.; McGowan, Anna-Maria Rivas

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a method for predicting the power consumption of piezoelectric actuators utilized for active vibration control. Analytical developments and experimental tests show that the maximum power required to control a structure using surface-bonded piezoelectric actuators is independent of the dynamics between the piezoelectric actuator and the host structure. The results demonstrate that for a perfectly-controlled system, the power consumption is a function of the quantity and type of piezoelectric actuators and the voltage and frequency of the control law output signal. Furthermore, as control effectiveness decreases, the power consumption of the piezoelectric actuators decreases. In addition, experimental results revealed a non-linear behavior in the material properties of piezoelectric actuators. The material non- linearity displayed a significant increase in capacitance with an increase in excitation voltage. Tests show that if the non-linearity of the capacitance was accounted for, a conservative estimate of the power can easily be determined.

  17. Conserved regulatory mechanism controls the development of cells with rooting functions in land plants

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Thomas Ho Yuen; Catarino, Bruno; Dolan, Liam

    2015-01-01

    Land plants develop filamentous cells—root hairs, rhizoids, and caulonemata—at the interface with the soil. Members of the group XI basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH) transcription factors encoded by LOTUS JAPONICUS ROOTHAIRLESS1-LIKE (LRL) genes positively regulate the development of root hairs in the angiosperms Lotus japonicus, Arabidopsis thaliana, and rice (Oryza sativa). Here we show that auxin promotes rhizoid and caulonema development by positively regulating the expression of PpLRL1 and PpLRL2, the two LRL genes in the Physcomitrella patens genome. Although the group VIII bHLH proteins, AtROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE6 and AtROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE SIX-LIKE1, promote root-hair development by positively regulating the expression of AtLRL3 in A. thaliana, LRL genes promote rhizoid development independently of PpROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE SIX-LIKE1 and PpROOT HAIR DEFECITVE SIX-LIKE2 (PpRSL1 and PpRSL2) gene function in P. patens. Together, these data demonstrate that both LRL and RSL genes are components of an ancient auxin-regulated gene network that controls the development of tip-growing cells with rooting functions among most extant land plants. Although this network has diverged in the moss and the angiosperm lineages, our data demonstrate that the core network acted in the last common ancestor of the mosses and angiosperms that existed sometime before 420 million years ago. PMID:26150509

  18. Conserved regulatory mechanism controls the development of cells with rooting functions in land plants.

    PubMed

    Tam, Thomas Ho Yuen; Catarino, Bruno; Dolan, Liam

    2015-07-21

    Land plants develop filamentous cells-root hairs, rhizoids, and caulonemata-at the interface with the soil. Members of the group XI basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors encoded by LOTUS JAPONICUS ROOTHAIRLESS1-LIKE (LRL) genes positively regulate the development of root hairs in the angiosperms Lotus japonicus, Arabidopsis thaliana, and rice (Oryza sativa). Here we show that auxin promotes rhizoid and caulonema development by positively regulating the expression of PpLRL1 and PpLRL2, the two LRL genes in the Physcomitrella patens genome. Although the group VIII bHLH proteins, AtROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE6 and AtROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE SIX-LIKE1, promote root-hair development by positively regulating the expression of AtLRL3 in A. thaliana, LRL genes promote rhizoid development independently of PpROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE SIX-LIKE1 and PpROOT HAIR DEFECITVE SIX-LIKE2 (PpRSL1 and PpRSL2) gene function in P. patens. Together, these data demonstrate that both LRL and RSL genes are components of an ancient auxin-regulated gene network that controls the development of tip-growing cells with rooting functions among most extant land plants. Although this network has diverged in the moss and the angiosperm lineages, our data demonstrate that the core network acted in the last common ancestor of the mosses and angiosperms that existed sometime before 420 million years ago. PMID:26150509

  19. Actively Controlled Shaft Seals for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salant, Richard F.; Wolff, Paul

    1995-01-01

    This study experimentally investigates an actively controlled mechanical seal for aerospace applications. The seal of interest is a gas seal, which is considerably more compact than previous actively controlled mechanical seals that were developed for industrial use. In a mechanical seal, the radial convergence of the seal interface has a primary effect on the film thickness. Active control of the film thickness is established by controlling the radial convergence of the seal interface with a piezoelectric actuator. An actively controlled mechanical seal was initially designed and evaluated using a mathematical model. Based on these results, a seal was fabricated and tested under laboratory conditions. The seal was tested with both helium and air, at rotational speeds up to 3770 rad/sec, and at sealed pressures as high as 1.48 x 10(exp 6) Pa. The seal was operated with both manual control and with a closed-loop control system that used either the leakage rate or face temperature as the feedback. The output of the controller was the voltage applied to the piezoelectric actuator. The seal operated successfully for both short term tests (less than one hour) and for longer term tests (four hours) with a closed-loop control system. The leakage rates were typically 5-15 slm (standard liters per minute), and the face temperatures were generally maintained below 100C. When leakage rate was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint leakage rate was typically maintained within 1 slm. However, larger deviations occurred during sudden changes in sealed pressure. When face temperature was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint face temperature was generally maintained within 3 C, with larger deviations occurring when the sealed pressure changes suddenly. the experimental results were compared to the predictions from the mathematical model. The model was successful in predicting the trends in leakage rate that occurred as the balance ratio and sealed pressure changed

  20. Neural predictive control for active buffet alleviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pado, Lawrence E.; Lichtenwalner, Peter F.; Liguore, Salvatore L.; Drouin, Donald

    1998-06-01

    The adaptive neural control of aeroelastic response (ANCAR) and the affordable loads and dynamics independent research and development (IRAD) programs at the Boeing Company jointly examined using neural network based active control technology for alleviating undesirable vibration and aeroelastic response in a scale model aircraft vertical tail. The potential benefits of adaptive control includes reducing aeroelastic response associated with buffet and atmospheric turbulence, increasing flutter margins, and reducing response associated with nonlinear phenomenon like limit cycle oscillations. By reducing vibration levels and thus loads, aircraft structures can have lower acquisition cost, reduced maintenance, and extended lifetimes. Wind tunnel tests were undertaken on a rigid 15% scale aircraft in Boeing's mini-speed wind tunnel, which is used for testing at very low air speeds up to 80 mph. The model included a dynamically scaled flexible fail consisting of an aluminum spar with balsa wood cross sections with a hydraulically powered rudder. Neural predictive control was used to actuate the vertical tail rudder in response to strain gauge feedback to alleviate buffeting effects. First mode RMS strain reduction of 50% was achieved. The neural predictive control system was developed and implemented by the Boeing Company to provide an intelligent, adaptive control architecture for smart structures applications with automated synthesis, self-optimization, real-time adaptation, nonlinear control, and fault tolerance capabilities. It is designed to solve complex control problems though a process of automated synthesis, eliminating costly control design and surpassing it in many instances by accounting for real world non-linearities.

  1. Dielectric elastomer actuators for active microfluidic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoul, David; Murray, Coleman; Di Carlo, Dino; Pei, Qibing

    2013-04-01

    Dielectric elastomers with low modulus and large actuation strain have been investigated for applications in which they serve as "active" microfluidic channel walls. Anisotropically prestrained acrylic elastomer membranes are bonded to cover open trenches formed on a silicone elastomer substrate. Actuation of the elastomer membranes increases the cross-sectional area of the resulting channels, in turn controlling hydraulic flow rate and pressure. Bias voltage increases the active area of the membranes, allowing intrachannel pressure to alter channel geometry. The channels have also demonstrated the ability to actively clear a blockage. Applications may include adaptive microfilters, micro-peristaltic pumps, and reduced-complexity lab-on-a-chip devices.

  2. Real-time infrared target processor for advanced land fire control applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lithopoulos, Erik; Sevigny, Leandre; Laurent, John

    1994-10-01

    The infrared target processor (IRTP) is a real-time processor capable of automatic and operator-aided detection, lock-on and tracking of multiple targets in infrared imagery. The IRTP has been developed under a feeder project to the advanced land fire control system (ALFCS) program, a project to develop accurate fire on the move capability for Canadian tanks. The IRTP is built around the datacube pipelined architecture using commercially available image processing and general purpose components. Presently, the IRTP is capable of real-time detection and tracking of up to five targets at video rates (30 frames/sec), and its operation is controlled via a single monitor that contains graphical control panels and a real- time video display. To augment the operation of the target detection/tracking and the gun fire control operations of the ALFCS a position orientation system (POS) can be used to provide accurate vertical reference measurements of the turret. The POS is built around an inertial measurement unit (IMU) and specialized real-time software implemented on a general purpose CPU card. Although the IRTP is currently being developed for ALFCS applications, the testbed architecture and algorithms are flexible and the system has been used to test and develop algorithms for general target processing applications.

  3. Flight test evaluation of a digital controller used in a VTOL automatic approach and landing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downing, D. R.; Bryant, W. H.

    1979-01-01

    As part of the NASA Langley Research Center's effort to develop technology for VTOL operation in the air transportation system in the late 1980's and beyond, research has been conducted aimed at developing digital controller design procedures. This paper describes the verification of one design procedure by the flight evaluation of an advanced digital control algorithm. The control algorithm, operating at 10 iterations per second, follows step guidance commands with zero steady state error and thus provides an autotrim capability for the nonlinear vehicle. Changes in vehicle dynamics are accounted for using a gain scheduling technique. This control algorithm is combined with sensor filters, a trajectory generator, and a closed loop guidance algorithm to form a VTOL autoland system. A CH-47 tandem rotor helicopter which contains a set of sensors, onboard digital flight computers and electro-hydraulic actuators is used in the evaluation. All software, except input-output routines, is coded in FORTRAN using floating point arithmetic and executed in the flight computer. This autoland system is exercised by automatically flying straight-in descending decelerating trajectories typical of VFR manual approaches to a predetermined landing pad.

  4. Land-cover observations as part of a Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS): progress, activities, and prospects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herold, M.; Woodcock, C.E.; Loveland, Thomas R.; Townshend, J.; Brady, M.; Steenmans, C.; Schmullius, C. C.

    2008-01-01

    The international land-cover community has been working with GEO since 2005 to build the foundations for land-cover observations as an integral part of a Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). The Group on Earth Observation (GEO) has provided the platform to elevate the societal relevance of land cover monitoring and helped to link a diverse set of global, regional, and national activities. A dedicated 2007-2009 GEO work plan task has resulted in achievements on the strategic and implementation levels. Integrated Global Observations of the Land (IGOL), the land theme of the Integrated Global Observation Strategy (IGOS), has been approved and is now in the process of transition into GEO implementation. New global land-cover maps at moderate spatial resolutions (i.e., GLOBCOVER) are being produced using guidelines and standards of the international community. The Middecadal Global Landsat Survey for 2005-2006 is extending previous 1990 and 2000 efforts for global, high-quality Landsat data. Despite this progress, essential challenges for building a sustained global land-cover-observing system remain, including: international cooperation on the continuity of global observations; ensuring consistency in land monitoring approaches; community engagement and country participation in mapping activities; commitment to ongoing quality assurance and validation; and regional networking and capacity building.

  5. MODELING MERCURY CONTROL WITH POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents a mathematical model of total mercury removed from the flue gas at coal-fired plants equipped with powdered activated carbon (PAC) injection for Mercury control. The developed algorithms account for mercury removal by both existing equipment and an added PAC in...

  6. Active coping, personal satisfaction, and attachment to land in older African-American farmers.

    PubMed

    Maciuba, Sandra A; Westneat, Susan C; Reed, Deborah B

    2013-05-01

    Elevated suicide mortality rates have been reported for farmers and for the elderly. Very little literature exists that looks at the health of older minority farmers. This mixed-method study describes older African-American farmers (N = 156) in the contexts of active coping, personal satisfaction from farm work, and attachment to their farmland to provide insight into the psychosocial dimensions of their mental health. Findings show that the farmers have positive perspectives on work and farm future, and strong attachment to the land. Differences were noted by gender. Nurses can use these findings to frame culturally appropriate strategies for aging farmers to maximize positive outcomes.

  7. Active control of automotive fan noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerard, Anthony; Berry, Alain; Masson, Patrice

    2002-11-01

    Active control for globally reducing the noise radiated by automotive axial engine cooling fans is investigated. First, an aeroacoutic model of the fan is combined with acoustic directivity measurements to derive a distribution of equivalent dipole sources on the fan surface. The results reveal that the fan behaves like a distributed dipole at blade passage tones when the upstream flow through the fan is spatially nonuniform. Numerical simulations of active noise control in the free field have been carried out using the previous aeroacoustic model of the fan and a dipole secondary source in front of the fan. The numerical results show that a single dipole control source is effective in globally controlling the sound radiation of the fan at the blade passage frequency and its first harmonic. Last, an experimental investigation of active control is presented. It consists of a SISO feedforward configuration with either a LMS algorithm (for FIR filters) or a back-retropopagation algorithm (for neural networks) using the Simulink/Dspace environment for real-time implementation.

  8. DNA-based control of protein activity

    PubMed Central

    Engelen, W.; Janssen, B. M. G.

    2016-01-01

    DNA has emerged as a highly versatile construction material for nanometer-sized structures and sophisticated molecular machines and circuits. The successful application of nucleic acid based systems greatly relies on their ability to autonomously sense and act on their environment. In this feature article, the development of DNA-based strategies to dynamically control protein activity via oligonucleotide triggers is discussed. Depending on the desired application, protein activity can be controlled by directly conjugating them to an oligonucleotide handle, or expressing them as a fusion protein with DNA binding motifs. To control proteins without modifying them chemically or genetically, multivalent ligands and aptamers that reversibly inhibit their function provide valuable tools to regulate proteins in a noncovalent manner. The goal of this feature article is to give an overview of strategies developed to control protein activity via oligonucleotide-based triggers, as well as hurdles yet to be taken to obtain fully autonomous systems that interrogate, process and act on their environments by means of DNA-based protein control. PMID:26812623

  9. Active Noise Control for Dishwasher noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Nokhaeng; Park, Youngjin

    2016-09-01

    The dishwasher is a useful home appliance and continually used for automatically washing dishes. It's commonly placed in the kitchen with built-in style for practicality and better use of space. In this environment, people are easily exposed to dishwasher noise, so it is an important issue for the consumers, especially for the people living in open and narrow space. Recently, the sound power levels of the noise are about 40 - 50 dBA. It could be achieved by removal of noise sources and passive means of insulating acoustical path. For more reduction, such a quiet mode with the lower speed of cycle has been introduced, but this deteriorates the washing capacity. Under this background, we propose active noise control for dishwasher noise. It is observed that the noise is propagating mainly from the lower part of the front side. Control speakers are placed in the part for the collocation. Observation part of estimating sound field distribution and control part of generating the anti-noise are designed for active noise control. Simulation result shows proposed active noise control scheme could have a potential application for dishwasher noise reduction.

  10. Egyptian propolis: 3. Antioxidant, antimicrobial activities and chemical composition of propolis from reclaimed lands.

    PubMed

    Hegazi, Ahmed G; Abd El Hady, Faten K

    2002-01-01

    The free radical scavenging effect of two propolis samples collected from reclaimed land, Egypt as well as of vitamin C and caffeic acid in 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical system was determined. The antimicrobial (Staphylococcus aureus; Escherichia coli and Candida albicans) activity was also investigated. The results of the free radical scavenging effect of El-Saff and Ismailia propolis showed a concentration-dependent activity. The antioxidant activity was varied according to the examined material. It was obvious that caffeic acid and vitamin C showed the highest activity if compared with the propolis samples. El- Saff propolis had a higher antioxidant activity than Ismailia propolis, it showed a higher antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and a higher anti-fungal activity against Candida albicans. While the Ismailia propolis had a higher antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, than El-Saff propolis. The chemical composition of propolis samples was investigated by GC/MS, where 75 compounds were identified, 22 being new for propolis. The Ismailia propolis was characterized by the presence of a highly significant amount of aromatic acid esters (47.3%) and triterpenoids (17.3%), while El-Saff propolis contained 3% and 1.9% respectively. The new esters belonged to 4-methoxyhydrocinnamic acid, hydroferulic acid and ferulic acid. El-Saff propolis had a very high significant amount (27%) of 2,6-bis-(pentanyloxy)-4-pentanylphenethanol, which is also a new compound for propolis.

  11. Active control of transmitted sound in buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompsett, Russell Harvey George

    The problem of noise from neighbours has increased dramatically over the last few years. Many of the noise complaints are due to the high level, low frequency noise from modern stereo equipment, and are often described in terms of the low frequency characteristics of the music; the repetitive, booming, bass beat. The objective of this research was to establish the feasibility of applying active noise control to alleviate this problem. The initial approach was to evaluate the possibility of exploiting the dominance of individual modes in the response of rooms at low frequency to effect global control. However, initial investigations using a modal model of the sound field revealed that this would be difficult due to the contribution of many acoustic modes excited off resonance. This conclusion was supported by measurements of acoustic room responses in typical buildings, illustrating a non-resonant characteristic. Consequently, attention was turned to the feasibility of using local active control systems to create zones of quiet by concentrating control at a specific location near the observers ears, for example in a seat headrest, or near the pillows of a bed. The lack of a reference signal in either approach requires the use of a feedback control strategy. With a typically non-resonant system, the predictability in the disturbance necessary for successful feedback control must be contained in the primary excitation, namely the music. Examples of different music styles were investigated and of those with the potential to be a nuisance surprisingly few were significantly more predictable than a random disturbance. As expected the most encouraging control performance simulations were found for modern dance music, with a strong repetitive beat. A real-time, local controller was demonstrated in the laboratory with such a disturbance signal and the properties of the quiet zone were measured. The subjective response when hearing the controller in operation was found to be

  12. Active control of multiple resistive wall modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Yadikin, D.; Gregoratto, D.; Paccagnella, R.; Liu, Y. Q.; Bolzonella, T.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.; Kuldkepp, M.; Manduchi, G.; Marchiori, G.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, P.; Menmuir, S.; Ortolani, S.; Rachlew, E.; Spizzo, G.; Zanca, P.

    2005-12-01

    A two-dimensional array of saddle coils at Mc poloidal and Nc toroidal positions is used on the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch (Brunsell P R et al 2001 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43 1457) to study active control of resistive wall modes (RWMs). Spontaneous growth of several RWMs with poloidal mode number m = 1 and different toroidal mode number n is observed experimentally, in agreement with linear MHD modelling. The measured plasma response to a controlled coil field and the plasma response computed using the linear circular cylinder MHD model are in quantitive agreement. Feedback control introduces a linear coupling of modes with toroidal mode numbers n, n' that fulfil the condition |n - n'| = Nc. Pairs of coupled unstable RWMs are present in feedback experiments with an array of Mc × Nc = 4 × 16 coils. Using intelligent shell feedback, the coupled modes are generally not controlled even though the field is suppressed at the active coils. A better suppression of coupled modes may be achieved in the case of rotating modes by using the mode control feedback scheme with individually set complex gains. In feedback with a larger array of Mc × Nc = 4 × 32 coils, the coupling effect largely disappears, and with this array, the main internal RWMs n = -11, -10, +5, +6 are all simultaneously suppressed throughout the discharge (7 8 wall times). With feedback there is a two-fold extension of the pulse length, compared to discharges without feedback.

  13. Control Systems Cyber Security Standards Support Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Evans

    2009-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security’s Control Systems Security Program (CSSP) is working with industry to secure critical infrastructure sectors from cyber intrusions that could compromise control systems. This document describes CSSP’s current activities with industry organizations in developing cyber security standards for control systems. In addition, it summarizes the standards work being conducted by organizations within the sector and provides a brief listing of sector meetings and conferences that might be of interest for each sector. Control systems cyber security standards are part of a rapidly changing environment. The participation of CSSP in the development effort for these standards has provided consistency in the technical content of the standards while ensuring that information developed by CSSP is included.

  14. Actively controlled vibration welding system and method

    DOEpatents

    Cai, Wayne W.; Kang, Bongsu; Tan, Chin-An

    2013-04-02

    A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an active material element, and anvil assembly. The assembly may include an anvil body connected to a back plate and support member. The element, e.g., a piezoelectric stack or shape memory alloy, is positioned with respect to the assembly. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction to form a weld on a work piece. The element controls any vibrations in a second direction by applying calibrated response to the anvil body in the second direction. A method for controlling undesirable vibrations in the system includes positioning the element with respect to the anvil assembly, connecting the anvil body to the support member through the back plate, vibrating the horn in a desirable first direction, and transmitting an input signal to the element to control vibration in an undesirable second direction.

  15. Enzymatic activity inside and outside of water-stable aggregates in soils under different land use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbuz, S. A.; Yaroslavtseva, N. V.; Kholodov, V. A.

    2016-03-01

    A method is presented for assessing the distribution of enzymatic activity inside and outside of water-stable aggregates. Two samples of water-stable aggregates >1 mm have been isolated from dry aggregates of 1-2 mm. To determine the enzymatic activity, a substrate has been added to one of the samples without disaggregation; the other sample has been preliminarily disaggregated. Enzymatic activity within waterstable aggregates has been assessed from the difference between the obtained results under the supposition that the penetration of substrate within the water-saturated aggregates is hampered, and enzymatic reactions occur only at the periphery. The levels and distributions of enzymatic (peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, and catalase) activities in water-stable aggregates of soddy-podzolic soils under forest and plowland and typical chernozems of long-term field experiments have been studied. The peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, and catalase activities of water-stable aggregates vary from 6 to 23, from 7 to 30, and from 5 to 7 mmol/(g h), respectively. The ratio between the enzymatic activities inside and outside of soil aggregates showed a higher dependence on soil type and land use, as well as on the input of organic matter and the structural state, than the general activity level in water-stable aggregates.

  16. Numerical simulation of the actuation system for the ALDF's propulsion control valve. [Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korte, John J.

    1990-01-01

    A numerical simulation of the actuation system for the propulsion control valve (PCV) of the NASA Langley Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility was developed during the preliminary design of the PCV and used throughout the entire project. The simulation is based on a predictive model of the PCV which is used to evaluate and design the actuation system. The PCV controls a 1.7 million-pound thrust water jet used in propelling a 108,000-pound test carriage. The PCV can open and close in 0.300 second and deliver over 9,000 gallons of water per sec at pressures up to 3150 psi. The numerical simulation results are used to predict transient performance and valve opening characteristics, specify the hydraulic control system, define transient loadings on components, and evaluate failure modes. The mathematical model used for numerically simulating the mechanical fluid power system is described, and numerical results are demonstrated for a typical opening and closing cycle of the PCV. A summary is then given on how the model is used in the design process.

  17. Effects of higher order control systems on aircraft approach and landing longitudinal handling qualities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasha, M. A.; Dazzo, J. J.; Silverthorn, J. T.

    1982-01-01

    An investigation of approach and landing longitudinal flying qualities, based on data generated using a variable stability NT-33 aircraft combined with significant control system dynamics is described. An optimum pilot lead time for pitch tracking, flight path angle tracking, and combined pitch and flight path angle tracking tasks is determined from a closed loop simulation using integral squared error (ISE) as a performance measure. Pilot gain and lead time were varied in the closed loop simulation of the pilot and aircraft to obtain the best performance for different control system configurations. The results lead to the selection of an optimum lead time using ISE as a performance criterion. Using this value of optimum lead time, a correlation is then found between pilot rating and performance with changes in the control system and in the aircraft dynamics. It is also shown that pilot rating is closely related to pilot workload which, in turn, is related to the amount of lead which the pilot must generate to obtain satisfactory response. The results also indicate that the pilot may use pitch angle tracking for the approach task and then add flight path angle tracking for the flare and touchdown.

  18. Optogenetic feedback control of neural activity

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Jonathan P; Fong, Ming-fai; Millard, Daniel C; Whitmire, Clarissa J; Stanley, Garrett B; Potter, Steve M

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetic techniques enable precise excitation and inhibition of firing in specified neuronal populations and artifact-free recording of firing activity. Several studies have suggested that optical stimulation provides the precision and dynamic range requisite for closed-loop neuronal control, but no approach yet permits feedback control of neuronal firing. Here we present the ‘optoclamp’, a feedback control technology that provides continuous, real-time adjustments of bidirectional optical stimulation in order to lock spiking activity at specified targets over timescales ranging from seconds to days. We demonstrate how this system can be used to decouple neuronal firing levels from ongoing changes in network excitability due to multi-hour periods of glutamatergic or GABAergic neurotransmission blockade in vitro as well as impinging vibrissal sensory drive in vivo. This technology enables continuous, precise optical control of firing in neuronal populations in order to disentangle causally related variables of circuit activation in a physiologically and ethologically relevant manner. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07192.001 PMID:26140329

  19. Temporal variation of nitrate and phosphate transport in headwater catchments: the hydrological controls and land use alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T.-Y.; Huang, J.-C.; Kao, S.-J.; Tung, C.-P.

    2013-04-01

    Oceania rivers are hotspots of DIN (dissolved inorganic nitrogen) and DIP (dissolved inorganic phosphorus) transport due to humid/warm climate, typhoon-induced episodic rainfall and high tectonic activity that create an environment favorable for high/rapid runoff and soil erosion. In spite of its uniqueness, effects of hydrologic controls and land use on the transport behaviors of DIN and DIP are rarely documented. A 2 yr monitoring study for DIN and DIP from three headwater catchments with different cultivation gradient (0 To 8.9%) was implemented during a ~ 3 day interval with an additional monitoring campaign at a 3 h interval during typhoon periods. Results showed the DIN yields in the pristine, moderately cultivated (2.7%), and intensively cultivated (8.9%) watersheds were 8.3, 26, and 37 kg N ha-1 yr-1, respectively. For the DIP yields, they were 0.36, 0.35, and 0.56 kg P ha-1 yr-1, respectively. Higher year-round DIN concentrations and five times larger in DIN yields in intensively cultivated watersheds indicate DIN is more sensitive to land use changes. The high background DIN yield from the relatively pristine watershed was likely due to high atmospheric nitrogen deposition and large subterranean N pool. The correlations between runoff and concentration reveals that typhoon floods purge out more DIN from the subterranean reservoir, i.e., soil, by contrast, runoff washes off surface soil resulting in higher suspended sediment with higher DIP. Collectively, typhoon runoff contributes 20-70% and 47-80%, respectively, to the annual DIN and DIP exports. The DIN yield to DIP yield ratio varied from 97 to 410, which is higher than the global mean of ~ 18. Such a high ratio indicates a P-limiting condition in stream and the downstream aquatic environment. Based on our field observation, we constructed a conceptual model illustrating different remobilization mechanisms for DIN and DIP from headwaters in a mountainous river, which is analogous to typical Oceania

  20. Hydrological response to land cover changes and human activities in arid regions using a geographic information system and remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Shereif H; Alazba, A A

    2015-01-01

    The hydrological response to land cover changes induced by human activities in arid regions has attracted increased research interest in recent decades. The study reported herein assessed the spatial and quantitative changes in surface runoff resulting from land cover change in the Al-Baha region of Saudi Arabia between 1990 and 2000 using an ArcGIS-surface runoff model and predicted land cover and surface runoff depth in 2030 using Markov chain analysis. Land cover maps for 1990 and 2000 were derived from satellite images using ArcGIS 10.1. The findings reveal a 26% decrease in forest and shrubland area, 28% increase in irrigated cropland, 1.5% increase in sparsely vegetated land and 0.5% increase in bare soil between 1990 and 2000. Overall, land cover changes resulted in a significant decrease in runoff depth values in most of the region. The decrease in surface runoff depth ranged from 25-106 mm/year in a 7020-km2 area, whereas the increase in such depth reached only 10 mm/year in a 243-km2 area. A maximum increase of 73 mm/year was seen in a limited area. The surface runoff depth decreased to the greatest extent in the central region of the study area due to the huge transition in land cover classes associated with the construction of 25 rainwater harvesting dams. The land cover prediction revealed a greater than twofold increase in irrigated cropland during the 2000-2030 period, whereas forest and shrubland are anticipated to occupy just 225 km2 of land area by 2030, a significant decrease from the 747 km2 they occupied in 2000. Overall, changes in land cover are predicted to result in an annual increase in irrigated cropland and dramatic decline in forest area in the study area over the next few decades. The increase in surface runoff depth is likely to have significant implications for irrigation activities.

  1. Hydrological Response to Land Cover Changes and Human Activities in Arid Regions Using a Geographic Information System and Remote Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Shereif H.; Alazba, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    The hydrological response to land cover changes induced by human activities in arid regions has attracted increased research interest in recent decades. The study reported herein assessed the spatial and quantitative changes in surface runoff resulting from land cover change in the Al-Baha region of Saudi Arabia between 1990 and 2000 using an ArcGIS-surface runoff model and predicted land cover and surface runoff depth in 2030 using Markov chain analysis. Land cover maps for 1990 and 2000 were derived from satellite images using ArcGIS 10.1. The findings reveal a 26% decrease in forest and shrubland area, 28% increase in irrigated cropland, 1.5% increase in sparsely vegetated land and 0.5% increase in bare soil between 1990 and 2000. Overall, land cover changes resulted in a significant decrease in runoff depth values in most of the region. The decrease in surface runoff depth ranged from 25-106 mm/year in a 7020-km2 area, whereas the increase in such depth reached only 10 mm/year in a 243-km2 area. A maximum increase of 73 mm/year was seen in a limited area. The surface runoff depth decreased to the greatest extent in the central region of the study area due to the huge transition in land cover classes associated with the construction of 25 rainwater harvesting dams. The land cover prediction revealed a greater than twofold increase in irrigated cropland during the 2000-2030 period, whereas forest and shrubland are anticipated to occupy just 225 km2 of land area by 2030, a significant decrease from the 747 km2 they occupied in 2000. Overall, changes in land cover are predicted to result in an annual increase in irrigated cropland and dramatic decline in forest area in the study area over the next few decades. The increase in surface runoff depth is likely to have significant implications for irrigation activities. PMID:25923712

  2. Land Desertification and it’s Control in Gonghe Basin of Qinghai Plateau, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D.; Gao, S.; Lu, R.

    2009-12-01

    Land desertification is an important environmental and social-economic problems that threatening people’s living conditions and impacting social sustainable development. The Gonghe basin in Qinghai Plateau is a fragile cold alpine area which is one of the places seriously threatened by desertification in China. This paper selected Gonghe basin as a study area to study land sandy desertification and its controlling measures. The engineering measures for sandy desertification control include setting clay sand barrier, Salix cheilophila sand barrier, Tamarix sand barrier, Artemisia sand barrier and straw-checker sand-barriers to fix dunes; the biological measures include closure for natural vegetation recovery, direct seeding forestation, transplanting seedlings, and so on. The combination of engineering and biologic measures can fix dunes 2~3 years earlier than the common single measure; and the costs were basically identical. A synthesized evaluation system established based on experimental results and experience in recent years indicated that the effectiveness of the four kinds of sand barrier for prevention and control of sand in study area were: Tamarix sand barrier > Artemisia sand barrier > clay sand barrier > straw-checker sand-barriers. In addition, different optimized management model can be selected according to local material and geographical place. New plants such as Salix cheilophila and Tamarix, which are available in study area, can change from dead sand barrier to live one set in proper seasons, changing engineering measure to biological one directly speeds the progress of forestation and dunes fixation. In addition, we developed new technique of deep planting Salix cheilophila and Tamarix with their long stem, which can effectively resist drought. We found that it had lower cost and higher live rate, and has a better sand prevention effect than deep planting of Poplar. Finally we choose the optimize management model as follows: Artemisia direct

  3. Geochemical signature of land-based activities in Caribbean coral surface samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prouty, N.G.; Hughen, K.A.; Carilli, J.

    2008-01-01

    Anthropogenic threats, such as increased sedimentation, agrochemical run-off, coastal development, tourism, and overfishing, are of great concern to the Mesoamerican Caribbean Reef System (MACR). Trace metals in corals can be used to quantify and monitor the impact of these land-based activities. Surface coral samples from the MACR were investigated for trace metal signatures resulting from relative differences in water quality. Samples were analyzed at three spatial scales (colony, reef, and regional) as part of a hierarchical multi-scale survey. A primary goal of the paper is to elucidate the extrapolation of information between fine-scale variation at the colony or reef scale and broad-scale patterns at the regional scale. Of the 18 metals measured, five yielded statistical differences at the colony and/or reef scale, suggesting fine-scale spatial heterogeneity not conducive to regional interpretation. Five metals yielded a statistical difference at the regional scale with an absence of a statistical difference at either the colony or reef scale. These metals are barium (Ba), manganese (Mn), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), and antimony (Sb). The most robust geochemical indicators of land-based activities are coral Ba and Mn concentrations, which are elevated in samples from the southern region of the Gulf of Honduras relative to those from the Turneffe Islands. These findings are consistent with the occurrence of the most significant watersheds in the MACR from southern Belize to Honduras, which contribute sediment-laden freshwater to the coastal zone primarily as a result of human alteration to the landscape (e.g., deforestation and agricultural practices). Elevated levels of Cu and Sb were found in samples from Honduras and may be linked to industrial shipping activities where copper-antimony additives are commonly used in antifouling paints. Results from this study strongly demonstrate the impact of terrestrial runoff and anthropogenic activities on coastal water

  4. Geochemical signature of land-based activities in Caribbean coral surface samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prouty, N. G.; Hughen, K. A.; Carilli, J.

    2008-12-01

    Anthropogenic threats, such as increased sedimentation, agrochemical run-off, coastal development, tourism, and overfishing, are of great concern to the Mesoamerican Caribbean Reef System (MACR). Trace metals in corals can be used to quantify and monitor the impact of these land-based activities. Surface coral samples from the MACR were investigated for trace metal signatures resulting from relative differences in water quality. Samples were analyzed at three spatial scales (colony, reef, and regional) as part of a hierarchical multi-scale survey. A primary goal of the paper is to elucidate the extrapolation of information between fine-scale variation at the colony or reef scale and broad-scale patterns at the regional scale. Of the 18 metals measured, five yielded statistical differences at the colony and/or reef scale, suggesting fine-scale spatial heterogeneity not conducive to regional interpretation. Five metals yielded a statistical difference at the regional scale with an absence of a statistical difference at either the colony or reef scale. These metals are barium (Ba), manganese (Mn), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), and antimony (Sb). The most robust geochemical indicators of land-based activities are coral Ba and Mn concentrations, which are elevated in samples from the southern region of the Gulf of Honduras relative to those from the Turneffe Islands. These findings are consistent with the occurrence of the most significant watersheds in the MACR from southern Belize to Honduras, which contribute sediment-laden freshwater to the coastal zone primarily as a result of human alteration to the landscape (e.g., deforestation and agricultural practices). Elevated levels of Cu and Sb were found in samples from Honduras and may be linked to industrial shipping activities where copper-antimony additives are commonly used in antifouling paints. Results from this study strongly demonstrate the impact of terrestrial runoff and anthropogenic activities on coastal water

  5. Unsteady aerodynamic modeling and active aeroelastic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Unsteady aerodynamic modeling techniques are developed and applied to the study of active control of elastic vehicles. The problem of active control of a supercritical flutter mode poses a definite design goal stability, and is treated in detail. The transfer functions relating the arbitrary airfoil motions to the airloads are derived from the Laplace transforms of the linearized airload expressions for incompressible two dimensional flow. The transfer function relating the motions to the circulatory part of these loads is recognized as the Theodorsen function extended to complex values of reduced frequency, and is termed the generalized Theodorsen function. Inversion of the Laplace transforms yields exact transient airloads and airfoil motions. Exact root loci of aeroelastic modes are calculated, providing quantitative information regarding subcritical and supercritical flutter conditions.

  6. Active control of locomotion facilitates nonvisual navigation.

    PubMed

    Philbeck, J W; Klatzky, R L; Behrmann, M; Loomis, J M; Goodridge, J

    2001-02-01

    In some navigation tasks, participants are more accurate if they view the environment beforehand. To characterize the benefits associated with visual previews, 32 blindfolded participants were guided along simple paths and asked to walk unassisted to a specified destination (e.g., the origin). Paths were completed without vision, with or without a visual preview of the environment. Previews did not necessarily improve nonvisual navigation. When previewed landmarks stood near the origin or at off-path locations, they provided little benefit; by contrast, when they specified intermediate destinations (thereby increasing the degree of active control), performance was greatly enhanced. The results suggest that the benefit of a visual preview stems from the information it supplies for actively controlled locomotion. Accuracy in reaching the final destination, however, is strongly contingent upon the destination's location during the preview.

  7. Land Surface Microwave Emissivities Derived from AMSR-E and MODIS Measurements with Advanced Quality Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moncet, Jean-Luc; Liang, Pan; Galantowicz, John F.; Lipton, Alan E.; Uymin, Gennady; Prigent, Catherine; Grassotti, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    A microwave emissivity database has been developed with data from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E) and with ancillary land surface temperature (LST) data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the same Aqua spacecraft. The primary intended application of the database is to provide surface emissivity constraints in atmospheric and surface property retrieval or assimilation. An additional application is to serve as a dynamic indicator of land surface properties relevant to climate change monitoring. The precision of the emissivity data is estimated to be significantly better than in prior databases from other sensors due to the precise collocation with high-quality MODIS LST data and due to the quality control features of our data analysis system. The accuracy of the emissivities in deserts and semi-arid regions is enhanced by applying, in those regions, a version of the emissivity retrieval algorithm that accounts for the penetration of microwave radiation through dry soil with diurnally varying vertical temperature gradients. These results suggest that this penetration effect is more widespread and more significant to interpretation of passive microwave measurements than had been previously established. Emissivity coverage in areas where persistent cloudiness interferes with the availability of MODIS LST data is achieved using a classification-based method to spread emissivity data from less-cloudy areas that have similar microwave surface properties. Evaluations and analyses of the emissivity products over homogeneous snow-free areas are presented, including application to retrieval of soil temperature profiles. Spatial inhomogeneities are the largest in the vicinity of large water bodies due to the large water/land emissivity contrast and give rise to large apparent temporal variability in the retrieved emissivities when satellite footprint locations vary over time. This issue will be dealt with in the future by

  8. The Victoria Land Network for DEFormation control (VLNDEF): 12 years of episodic surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negusini, M.; Capra, A.; Dubbini, M.; Sarti, P.; Vittuari, L.; Zanutta, A.

    2011-12-01

    During the Antarctic Italian expedition carried out in 1999 a geodetic network was materialized on rocky outcrops throughout the Northern Victoria Land (NVL), Antarctica. The project, named VLNDEF (Victoria Land Network for DEFormation control), started with the goal to detect neotectonic phenomena present in the region and to supply metrical information to constrain Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) models. The project is part of GIANT (Geodetic Infrastructure in ANTarctica) framework of the SCAR (Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research), an international program since 1992, with the supervision of Antarctic Neo-TECtonics (a committee of specialists). Objectives of this work are the evaluation of absolute motions of the VLNDEF GPS sites expressed in the ITRF reference frame and the estimation of relative residual intra-plate velocities, in order to investigate the present-day kinematics of NVL region. The network is formed by 28 points that are accessible by means of helicopter, the maximum distance of points from the Italian base Mario Zucchelli Station (MZS) being about 500 km. A permanent GPS station (TNB1) was installed in 1998 at MZS with Domes #66036M001. Three semi permanent remote stations (VL01 Cape Hallett, VL05 Cape Philips, VL18 Starr Nunatak), powered by sets of batteries and solar panels, provide a few months of data acquisition every year. Nine GPS measurement campaigns were conducted during the Antarctic summers 1999/2011, three of which being complete repetitions of the network. The computation of coordinates and velocities of the VLNDEF points has been implemented taking into account the campaign style dataset of 12 years and its framing into a global network, by means of different scientific software packages: Bernese V.5.0 and Gamit-Globk. In order to homogeneously process the data set, the same up-to-date data analysis strategy, ancillary files (IGS orbits and clock model, physical bias models, etc.), datum and constraints have been

  9. Advanced Active Thermal Control Systems Architecture Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanford, Anthony J.; Ewert, Michael K.

    1996-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) initiated a dynamic study to determine possible improvements available through advanced technologies (not used on previous or current human vehicles), identify promising development initiatives for advanced active thermal control systems (ATCS's), and help prioritize funding and personnel distribution among many research projects by providing a common basis to compare several diverse technologies. Some technologies included were two-phase thermal control systems, light-weight radiators, phase-change thermal storage, rotary fluid coupler, and heat pumps. JSC designed the study to estimate potential benefits from these various proposed and under-development thermal control technologies for five possible human missions early in the next century. The study compared all the technologies to a baseline mission using mass as a basis. Each baseline mission assumed an internal thermal control system; an external thermal control system; and aluminum, flow-through radiators. Solar vapor compression heat pumps and light-weight radiators showed the greatest promise as general advanced thermal technologies which can be applied across a range of missions. This initial study identified several other promising ATCS technologies which offer mass savings and other savings compared to traditional thermal control systems. Because the study format compares various architectures with a commonly defined baseline, it is versatile and expandable, and is expected to be updated as needed.

  10. Active Thermal Control System Development for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westheimer, David

    2007-01-01

    All space vehicles or habitats require thermal management to maintain a safe and operational environment for both crew and hardware. Active Thermal Control Systems (ATCS) perform the functions of acquiring heat from both crew and hardware within a vehicle, transporting that heat throughout the vehicle, and finally rejecting that energy into space. Almost all of the energy used in a space vehicle eventually turns into heat, which must be rejected in order to maintain an energy balance and temperature control of the vehicle. For crewed vehicles, Active Thermal Control Systems are pumped fluid loops that are made up of components designed to perform these functions. NASA has been actively developing technologies that will enable future missions or will provide significant improvements over the state of the art technologies. These technologies have are targeted for application on the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), or Orion, and a Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM). The technologies that have been selected and are currently under development include: fluids that enable single loop ATCS architectures, a gravity insensitive vapor compression cycle heat pump, a sublimator with reduced sensitivity to feedwater contamination, an evaporative heat sink that can operate in multiple ambient pressure environments, a compact spray evaporator, and lightweight radiators that take advantage of carbon composites and advanced optical coatings.

  11. Distributed control system for active mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Ramos, Luis F.; Williams, Mark R.; Castro, Javier; Cruz, A.; Gonzalez, Juan C.; Mack, Brian; Martin, Carlos; Pescador, German; Sanchez, Vicente; Sosa, Nicolas A.

    1994-06-01

    This paper presents the IAC (Instituto de Astrofisica de Canaries, Spain) proposal of a distributed control system intended for the active support of a 8 m mirror. The system incorporates a large number of compact `smart' force actuators, six force definers, and a mirror support computer (MSC) for interfacing with the telescope control system and for general housekeeping. We propose the use of a network for the interconnection of the actuators, definers and the MSC, which will minimize the physical complexity of the interface between the mirror support system and the MSC. The force actuator control electronics are described in detail, as is the system software architecture of the actuator and the MSC. As the network is a key point for the system, we also detail the evaluation of three candidates, before electing the CAN bus.

  12. Large-Scale Controls of the Coupled Water and Energy Balance over Land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padrón, Ryan; Greve, Peter; Gudmundsson, Lukas; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2016-04-01

    On climatological time scales, water availability in a catchment is determined by the percentage of precipitation that is evaporated or transpired, thus consuming energy. The Budyko framework analytically describes the coupled water-energy balance over land. A widely used solution to this framework describes evapotranspiration (ET) as function of precipitation, potential evapotranspiration, and one free parameter (ω) that encompasses all other potentially influencing factors. Numerous regional studies have analyzed the relationships between the ω parameter and factors such as vegetation, topography, climate variability, etc; however results are ambiguous. A clear understanding of the primary controls over the ω parameter - and thus ET - is yet to be achieved, especially at a global scale. A new dataset with empirical evidence on ω, information about possible controlling factors, and a relatively good global coverage was obtained from a comprehensive and systematic review of the literature. A total of 1461 catchments from all continents, except Antarctica, are included in the dataset. Latitude, catchment size, mean annual temperature and precipitation, vegetation density, catchment slope, seasonality of precipitation and potential ET, and snow influence were among the examined possible explanatory variables for ω. The validity of several previously proposed hypotheses about the dominant factors controlling ω (ET) was assessed using the new dataset. Furthermore, generalized linear models were used to identify which factors can significantly explain the ω values from our gathered data. This study provides new insights on the global picture of relevant factors controlling how precipitation in a catchment is partitioned into ET and runoff, and consequently allows for improved estimates of water availability.

  13. Flight-path and airspeed control during landing approach for powered-lift aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, J. A.; Innis, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    Manual control of flight path and airspeed during landing approach has been investigated for powered-lift transport aircraft. An analysis was conducted to identify the behavior of the aircraft which would be potentially significant to the pilot controlling flight path and airspeed during the approach. The response characteristics found to describe the aircraft behavior were (1) the initial flight-path response and flight-path overshoot for a step change in thrust, (2) the steady-state coupling of flight path and airspeed for a step change in thrust, and (3) the sensitivity of airspeed to changes in pitch attitude. The significance of these response characteristics was evaluated by pilots on a large-motion, ground-based simulator at Ames Research Center. Coupling between flight path and airspeed was considered by the pilot to be the dominant influence on handling qualities for the approach task. Results are compared with data obtained from flight tests of three existing powered-lift V/STOL aircraft.

  14. Controls on soil carbon sequestration and dynamics: lessons from land-use change.

    PubMed

    Morris, Sherri J; Conant, Richard; Mellor, Nathan; Brewer, Elizabeth; Paul, Eldor A

    2010-03-01

    Soil carbon (C) dynamics and sequestration are controlled by interactions of chemical, physical and biological factors. These factors include biomass quantity and quality, physical environment and the biota. Management can alter these factors in ways that alter C dynamics. We have focused on a range of managed sites with documented land use change from agriculture or grassland to forest. Our results suggest that interactions of soil type, plant and environment impact soil C sequestration. Above and below ground C storage varied widely across sites. Results were related to plant type and calcium on sandy soils in our Northern sites. Predictors of sequestration were more difficult to detect over the temperature range of 12.4°C in the present study. Accrual of litter under pines in the moist Mississippi site limited C storage in a similar manner to our dry Nebraska site. Pre-planting heterogeneity of agricultural fields such as found in Illinois influences C contents. Manipulation of controls on C sequestration such as species planted or amelioration of soil quality before planting within managed sites could increase soil C to provide gains in terrestrial C storage. Cost effective management would also improve soil C pools positively affecting soil fertility and site productivity. PMID:22736841

  15. The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, David W.; Sepe, Raymond B.; Rey, Daniel; Saarmaa, Erik; Crawley, Edward F.

    1993-01-01

    The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE) is a NASA In-Step and Control Structure Interaction (CSI) Office funded Shuttle middeck experiment. The objective is to investigate the extent to which closed-loop behavior of flexible spacecraft in zero-gravity (0-g) can be predicted. This prediction becomes particularly difficult when dynamic behavior during ground testing exhibits extensive suspension and direct gravity coupling. On-orbit system identification and control reconfiguration is investigated to improve performance which would otherwise be limited due to errors in prediction. The program is presently in its preliminary design phase with launch expected in the summer of 1994. The MACE test article consists of three attitude control torque wheels, a two axis gimballing payload, inertial sensors and a flexible support structure. With the acquisition of a second payload, this will represent a multiple payload platform with significant structural flexibility. This paper presents on-going work in the areas of modelling and control of the MACE test article in the zero and one-gravity environments. Finite element models, which include suspension and gravity effects, and measurement models, derived from experimental data, are used as the basis for Linear Quadratic Gaussian controller designs. Finite element based controllers are analytically used to study the differences in closed-loop performance as the test article transitions between the 0-g and 1-g environments. Measurement based controllers are experimentally applied to the MACE test article in the 1-g environment and achieve over an order of magnitude improvement in payload pointing accuracy when disturbed by a broadband torque disturbance. The various aspects of the flight portion of the experiment are also discussed.

  16. Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE), phase A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Deluis, Javier; Miller, David W.

    1989-01-01

    A rationale to determine which structural experiments are sufficient to verify the design of structures employing Controlled Structures Technology was derived. A survey of proposed NASA missions was undertaken to identify candidate test articles for use in the Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE). The survey revealed that potential test articles could be classified into one of three roles: development, demonstration, and qualification, depending on the maturity of the technology and the mission the structure must fulfill. A set of criteria was derived that allowed determination of which role a potential test article must fulfill. A review of the capabilities and limitations of the STS middeck was conducted. A reference design for the MACE test article was presented. Computing requirements for running typical closed-loop controllers was determined, and various computer configurations were studied. The various components required to manufacture the structure were identified. A management plan was established for the remainder of the program experiment development, flight and ground systems development, and integration to the carrier. Procedures for configuration control, fiscal control, and safety, reliabilty, and quality assurance were developed.

  17. Local flow control for active building facades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaligotla, Srikar; Chen, Wayne; Glauser, Mark

    2010-11-01

    Existing building facade designs are for a passive and an impermeable shell to prevent migration of outdoor air into the building and to control heat transfers between the exterior environment and the building interior. An active facade that can respond in real time to changing environmental conditions like wind speed and direction, pollutant load, temperature, humidity and light can lower energy use and maximize occupant comfort. With an increased awareness of cost and environmental effects of energy use, cross or natural ventilation has become an attractive method to lower energy use. Separated flow regions around such buildings are undesirable due to high concentration of pollutants, especially if the vents or dynamic windows for cross ventilation are situated in these regions. Outside pollutant load redistribution through vents can be regulated via flow separation control to minimize transport of pollutants into the building. Flow separation has been substantially reduced with the application of intelligent flow control tools developed at Syracuse University for flow around "silo" (turret) like structures. Similar flow control models can be introduced into buildings with cross ventilation for local external flow separation control. Initial experiments will be performed for turbulent flow over a rectangular block (scaled to be a mid-rise building) that has been configured with dynamic vents and unsteady suction actuators in a wind tunnel at various wind speeds.

  18. The control of land-use patterns for stormwater management at multiple spatial scales.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ge; Guhathakurta, Subhro; Dai, Gang; Wu, Lingying; Yan, Lijiao

    2013-03-01

    While most research about the relationship between land use and watershed hydrological output has focused primarily on land-use types and their impact on hydrological processes, the relationship between characteristics of land-use patterns (such as pattern fragmentation, connectivity, and coherence) and hydrological processes has not been well examined. Using historical stormwater data, this study evaluates the hydrological effects of different land-use scenarios in the Qing-shui watershed in Beijing, China, at a variety of spatial scales. This study demonstrates that planning and managing land-use patterns can significantly reduce runoff under different scales, particularly for small storm events. In contrast to other aspects of land-use structure characteristics, such as the shape complexity of land-use patches, fragmented level of the patches of land-use types appear as dominant drivers of runoff. The results of the study suggest that land-use pattern management should be an important component of Best Management Practices to reduce the impacts of urbanization on natural hydrological processes.

  19. Factors controlling carbon isotopic composition of land snail shells estimated from lab culturing experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Naizhong; Yamada, Keita; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2014-05-01

    Carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of land snail shell carbonate is widely applied in reconstructing the C3/C4 vegetation distribution of paleo-environment, which is considered to reflect variations of some environmental parameters [1][2][3]. Land snail shell carbon has three potential sources: diet, atmospheric CO2 and ingested carbonate (limestone) [4]. However, their relative contributions to shell carbonate have not been understood well yet [4][5][6][7][8]. More researches are necessary before we could apply this tool in paleo-environment reconstruction, especially inter-lab culturing experiment. A kind of land snail species, Acusta despecta sieboldiana, was collected at Yokohama, Japan and cultured under suitable environment to lay eggs. The second generations were growing up from eggs to adults around 6-12 months at the temperature of 20°, 25° and 30°, respectively. All of the snails at 25° and 30° and most of those at 20° were fed by cabbage (C3 plant) during their life span while others were fed by corn (C4 plant). To investigate the effect of ingested carbonate, some of them were fed by Ca3(PO4)2 powder while others were fed by CaCO3 powder. δ13C of shells were analyzed by an Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (Thermo Finnigan MAT 253); δ13C of food and snail tissue were measured by a Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (Picarro G1121-i). At the same time, δ13C of eggshell and new born snails were analyzed by a Continuous Flow Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (GasBench II). We confirmed that diet, atmospheric CO2 and ingested limestone could be important sources controlling shell δ13C values. And the temperature could affect shell carbonate δ13C values, too. A simple but credible frame was raised to discuss the mechanism of how each possible source and environmental parameter could affect shell carbonate δ13C values based on previous works [4][6][8] and this study. According to this frame and some reasonable assumptions, we have estimated the

  20. Take-off and landing forces and the evolution of controlled gliding in northern flying squirrels Glaucomys sabrinus.

    PubMed

    Paskins, Keith E; Bowyer, Adrian; Megill, William M; Scheibe, John S

    2007-04-01

    Flying squirrels are well known for their ability to glide between trees at the top of a forest canopy. We present experimental performance and behavioural evidence that flight in flying squirrels may have evolved out of a need to control landing forces. Northern flying squirrels were filmed jumping from a horizontal branch to a much larger vertical pole. These were both slightly compliant (less than 1.9 mm N(-1)), and instrumented using strain gauges so that forces could be measured. Take-off and landing forces were both positively correlated with horizontal range between 0.5 and 2.5 m (r=0.355 and r=0.811, respectively, P<0.05), but not significantly different to each other at each range tested. Take-off forces ranged from 1 to 10 bodyweights, and landing forces were between 3 and 10 bodyweights. Glide angles increased rapidly with horizontal range, approaching 45 degrees at 3 m, above which they gradually decreased, suggesting that northern flying squirrels are optimised for long distance travel. We show that northern flying squirrels initiate full gliding posture at ranges of less than 1 m, without landing any higher than an equivalent ballistic projectile. However, this gliding posture enables them to pitch upwards, potentially stalling the wing, and spreads the landing reaction force over all four extended limbs. At steeper approach angles of close to 45 degrees , flying squirrels were unable to pitch up sufficiently and landed forelimbs first, consequently sustaining higher impact forces. We investigate four hypotheses to explain the origin of flight in these animals and conclude that the need to reduce landing impact forces was most likely to have stimulated the development of aerial control in flying squirrels. PMID:17401124

  1. Landing site characterization activities for the European Space Agency's Lunar Lander mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rosa, D.; Bussey, B.; Cahill, J. T.; Lutz, T.; Crawford, I.; Hackwill, T.; van Gasselt, S.; Neukum, G.; Witte, L.; McGovern, A.; Carpenter, J. D.

    2012-09-01

    The landing sites currently envisaged for the Lunar Lander mission of the European Space Agency have been identified in the South Pole Region (-85° to - 90° latitude) based on favourable illumination conditions, which make it possible to have a longduration mission with conventional power and thermal control subsystems instead of Radioisotope Heating Units. The illumination conditions are simulated based on topographic data from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA), using three independent tools. Risk assessment of the identified sites is also being performed through independent studies, based on LOLA and analysis of Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) images. The preliminary results show that areas with illumination periods of several months (interrupted only by darkness periods of few tens of hours) exist, and that the distributions of hazards in these areas are compatible with the capabilities of the on-board Hazard Detection and Avoidance system.

  2. Aircraft Landing Gear, Ice and Rain Control Systems (Course Outline), Aviation Mechanics 3 (Air Frame):9067.02.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    This document presents an outline for a 135-hour course designed to familiarize the student with operation, inspection, troubleshooting, and repair of aircraft landing gear, ice and rain control systems. It is designed to help the trainee master the knowledge and skills necessary to become an aviation airframe mechanic. The aviation airframe…

  3. 32 CFR 643.35 - Policy-Mineral leasing on lands controlled by the Department of the Army.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Department of the Army. 643.35 Section 643.35 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE Policy § 643.35 Policy—Mineral leasing on lands controlled by the Department of the Army. (a) Acquired lands—(1) General. The Coal Leasing Amendments Act...

  4. 32 CFR 643.35 - Policy-Mineral leasing on lands controlled by the Department of the Army.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the Department of the Army. 643.35 Section 643.35 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE Policy § 643.35 Policy—Mineral leasing on lands controlled by the Department of the Army. (a) Acquired lands—(1) General. The Coal Leasing Amendments Act...

  5. 77 FR 75966 - Control Date for Qualifying Landings History in the Central Gulf of Alaska Trawl Groundfish...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-26

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 679 RIN 0648-BC80 Control Date for Qualifying Landings History in the Central Gulf of Alaska Trawl Groundfish Fisheries AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Advance...

  6. 50 CFR 80.132 - Does an agency have to control the land or water where it completes capital improvements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Does an agency have to control the land or water where it completes capital improvements? 80.132 Section 80.132 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE-WILDLIFE AND SPORT FISH RESTORATION...

  7. Active optics control development at the LBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashby, David S.; Biddick, Christopher; Hill, John M.

    2014-07-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) is built around two 8.4 m-diameter primary mirrors placed with a centerline separation of 14.4 m in a common altitude/azimuth mount. Each side of the telescope can utilize a deployable prime focus instrument; alternatively, the beam can be directed to a Gregorian instrument by utilizing a deployable secondary mirror. The direct-Gregorian beam can be intercepted and redirected to several bent-Gregorian instruments by utilizing a deployable tertiary mirror. Two of the available bent-Gregorian instruments are interferometers, capable of coherently combining the beams from the two sides of the telescope. Active optics can utilize as many as 26 linearly independent degrees of freedom to position the primary, secondary and tertiary mirrors to control optical collimation while the telescope operates in its numerous observing modes. Additionally, by applying differential forces at 160 locations on each primary mirror, active optics controls the primary mirror figure. The authors explore the challenges associated with collimation and primary mirror figure control at the LBT and outline the ongoing related development aimed at optimizing image quality and preparing the telescope for interferometric operations.

  8. Terminal area automatic navigation, guidance and control research using the Microwave Landing System (MLS). Part 5: Design and development of a Digital Integrated Automatic Landing System (DIALS) for steep final approach using modern control techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halyo, N.

    1983-01-01

    The design and development of a 3-D Digital Integrated Automatic Landing System (DIALS) for the Terminal Configured Vehicle (TCV) Research Aircraft, a B-737-100 is described. The system was designed using sampled data Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LOG) methods, resulting in a direct digital design with a modern control structure which consists of a Kalman filter followed by a control gain matrix, all operating at 10 Hz. DIALS uses Microwave Landing System (MLS) position, body-mounted accelerometers, as well as on-board sensors usually available on commercial aircraft, but does not use inertial platforms. The phases of the final approach considered are the localizer and glideslope capture which may be performed simultaneously, localizer and steep glideslope track or hold, crab/decrab and flare to touchdown. DIALS captures, tracks and flares from steep glideslopes ranging from 2.5 deg to 5.5 deg, selected prior to glideslope capture. Digital Integrated Automatic Landing System is the first modern control design automatic landing system successfully flight tested. The results of an initial nonlinear simulation are presented here.

  9. Lateral control system design for VTOL landing on a DD963 in high sea states. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodson, M.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of designing lateral control systems for the safe landing of VTOL aircraft on small ships is addressed. A ship model is derived. The issues of estimation and prediction of ship motions are discussed, using optimal linear linear estimation techniques. The roll motion is the most important of the lateral motions, and it is found that it can be predicted for up to 10 seconds in perfect conditions. The automatic landing of the VTOL aircraft is considered, and a lateral controller, defined as a ship motion tracker, is designed, using optimal control techniqes. The tradeoffs between the tracking errors and the control authority are obtained. The important couplings between the lateral motions and controls are demonstrated, and it is shown that the adverse couplings between the sway and the roll motion at the landing pad are significant constraints in the tracking of the lateral ship motions. The robustness of the control system, including the optimal estimator, is studied, using the singular values analysis. Through a robustification procedure, a robust control system is obtained, and the usefulness of the singular values to define stability margins that take into account general types of unstructured modelling errors is demonstrated. The minimal destabilizing perturbations indicated by the singular values analysis are interpreted and related to the multivariable Nyquist diagrams.

  10. Collateral biodiversity benefits associated with 'free-market' approaches to sustainable land use and forestry activities.

    PubMed

    Koziell, Izabella; Swingland, Ian R

    2002-08-15

    Concern over the ever more rapid and widespread losses of biodiversity has instigated various remedial actions: whether in situ conservation, such as the establishment of protected areas, or ex situ, such as the conservation of germplasm in gene banks. In the past, such activities were funded and managed by the public sector; however, in recent years, public support has declined and this has spawned a growing interest in conservation opportunities that might arise from 'free-market' approaches to sustainable land use and management. The UN Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) is the key framework for articulating policies and actions on biodiversity; however, progress in developing suitable economic and market incentives for biodiversity conservation and its sustainable use has been slow, with activities such as bioprospecting and ecotourism making some, albeit limited, headway. Given the United Nations Framework for Climate Change or United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change's (UNFCCC's) high profile within the public and private sectors, there is some potential for using it to help advance CBD objectives and provide the much-needed economic incentives for conservation, through some of the market-based mechanisms presented under the Kyoto Protocol. Significant potential lies in the fact that many 'natural' forests and certain other ecosystems are both major stores of carbon and areas of valuable biodiversity. Thus, any attempt at conserving these areas has the potential to yield both carbon and biodiversity benefits. So far, however, the conservation of natural forests is not included in the Kyoto Protocol's definition of sinks. Instead the creation of sinks - through the establishment of fast-growing monocultures - may well lead to biodiversity losses, especially if partly degraded lands are cleared for this purpose. If real progress is to be made, our understanding of the relationship between land use and biodiversity benefits needs to be

  11. Collateral biodiversity benefits associated with 'free-market' approaches to sustainable land use and forestry activities.

    PubMed

    Koziell, Izabella; Swingland, Ian R

    2002-08-15

    Concern over the ever more rapid and widespread losses of biodiversity has instigated various remedial actions: whether in situ conservation, such as the establishment of protected areas, or ex situ, such as the conservation of germplasm in gene banks. In the past, such activities were funded and managed by the public sector; however, in recent years, public support has declined and this has spawned a growing interest in conservation opportunities that might arise from 'free-market' approaches to sustainable land use and management. The UN Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) is the key framework for articulating policies and actions on biodiversity; however, progress in developing suitable economic and market incentives for biodiversity conservation and its sustainable use has been slow, with activities such as bioprospecting and ecotourism making some, albeit limited, headway. Given the United Nations Framework for Climate Change or United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change's (UNFCCC's) high profile within the public and private sectors, there is some potential for using it to help advance CBD objectives and provide the much-needed economic incentives for conservation, through some of the market-based mechanisms presented under the Kyoto Protocol. Significant potential lies in the fact that many 'natural' forests and certain other ecosystems are both major stores of carbon and areas of valuable biodiversity. Thus, any attempt at conserving these areas has the potential to yield both carbon and biodiversity benefits. So far, however, the conservation of natural forests is not included in the Kyoto Protocol's definition of sinks. Instead the creation of sinks - through the establishment of fast-growing monocultures - may well lead to biodiversity losses, especially if partly degraded lands are cleared for this purpose. If real progress is to be made, our understanding of the relationship between land use and biodiversity benefits needs to be

  12. Gas turbine engine active clearance control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deveau, Paul J. (Inventor); Greenberg, Paul B. (Inventor); Paolillo, Roger E. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Method for controlling the clearance between rotating and stationary components of a gas turbine engine are disclosed. Techniques for achieving close correspondence between the radial position of rotor blade tips and the circumscribing outer air seals are disclosed. In one embodiment turbine case temperature modifying air is provided in flow rate, pressure and temperature varied as a function of engine operating condition. The modifying air is scheduled from a modulating and mixing valve supplied with dual source compressor air. One source supplies relatively low pressure, low temperature air and the other source supplies relatively high pressure, high temperature air. After the air has been used for the active clearance control (cooling the high pressure turbine case) it is then used for cooling the structure that supports the outer air seal and other high pressure turbine component parts.

  13. Control concepts for active magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegwart, Roland; Vischer, D.; Larsonneur, R.; Herzog, R.; Traxler, Alfons; Bleuler, H.; Schweitzer, G.

    1992-01-01

    Active Magnetic Bearings (AMB) are becoming increasingly significant for various industrial applications. Examples are turbo-compressors, centrifuges, high speed milling and grinding spindles, vibration isolation, linear guides, magnetically levitated trains, vacuum and space applications. Thanks to the rapid progress and drastic cost reduction in power- and micro-electronics, the number of AMB applications is growing very rapidly. Industrial uses of AMBs leads to new requirements for AMB-actuators, sensor systems, and rotor dynamics. Especially desirable are new and better control concepts to meet demand such as low cost AMB, high stiffness, high performance, high robustness, high damping up to several kHz, vibration isolation, force-free rotation, and unbalance cancellation. This paper surveys various control concepts for AMBs and discusses their advantages and disadvantages. Theoretical and experimental results are presented.

  14. Understanding the brain by controlling neural activity

    PubMed Central

    Krug, Kristine; Salzman, C. Daniel; Waddell, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Causal methods to interrogate brain function have been employed since the advent of modern neuroscience in the nineteenth century. Initially, randomly placed electrodes and stimulation of parts of the living brain were used to localize specific functions to these areas. Recent technical developments have rejuvenated this approach by providing more precise tools to dissect the neural circuits underlying behaviour, perception and cognition. Carefully controlled behavioural experiments have been combined with electrical devices, targeted genetically encoded tools and neurochemical approaches to manipulate information processing in the brain. The ability to control brain activity in these ways not only deepens our understanding of brain function but also provides new avenues for clinical intervention, particularly in conditions where brain processing has gone awry. PMID:26240417

  15. Exploring the control of land-atmospheric oscillations over terrestrial vegetation productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depoorter, Mathieu; Green, Julia; Gentine, Pierre; Liu, Yi; van Eck, Christel; Regnier, Pierre; Dorigo, Wouter; Verhoest, Niko; Miralles, Diego

    2015-04-01

    Vegetation dynamics play an important role in the climate system due to their control on the carbon, energy and water cycles. The spatiotemporal variability of vegetation is regulated by internal climate variability as well as natural and anthropogenic forcing mechanisms, including fires, land use, volcano eruptions or greenhouse gas emissions. Ocean-atmospheric oscillations, affect the fluxes of heat and water over continents, leading to anomalies in radiation, precipitation or temperature at widely separated locations (i.e. teleconnections); an effect of ocean-atmospheric oscillations on terrestrial primary productivity can therefore be expected. While different studies have shown the general importance of internal climate variability for global vegetation dynamics, the control by particular teleconnections over the regional growth and decay of vegetation is still poorly understood. At continental to global scales, satellite remote sensing offers a feasible approach to enhance our understanding of the main drivers of vegetation variability. Traditional studies of the multi-decadal variability of global vegetation have been usually based on the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) derived from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), which extends back to the early '80s. There are, however, some limitations to NDVI observations; arguably the most important of these limitations is that from the plant physiology perspective the index does not have a well-defined meaning, appearing poorly correlated to vegetation productivity. On the other hand, recently developed records from other remotely-sensed properties of vegetation, like fluorescence or microwave vegetation optical depth, have proven a significantly better correspondence to above-ground biomass. To enhance our understanding of the controls of ocean-atmosphere oscillations over vegetation, we propose to explore the link between climate oscillation extremes and net primary productivity

  16. Validation and Verification of Operational Land Analysis Activities at the Air Force Weather Agency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Michael; Kumar, Sujay V.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Cetola, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    The NASA developed Land Information System (LIS) is the Air Force Weather Agency's (AFWA) operational Land Data Assimilation System (LDAS) combining real time precipitation observations and analyses, global forecast model data, vegetation, terrain, and soil parameters with the community Noah land surface model, along with other hydrology module options, to generate profile analyses of global soil moisture, soil temperature, and other important land surface characteristics. (1) A range of satellite data products and surface observations used to generate the land analysis products (2) Global, 1/4 deg spatial resolution (3) Model analysis generated at 3 hours

  17. Active Displacement Control of Active Magnetic Bearing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertész, Milan; Kozakovič, Radko; Magdolen, Luboš; Masaryk, Michal

    2014-12-01

    The worldwide energy production nowadays is over 3400 GW while storage systems have a capacity of only 90 GW [1]. There is a good solution for additional storage capacity in flywheel energy storage systems (FES). The main advantage of FES is its relatively high efficiency especially with using the active magnetic bearing system. Therefore there exist good reasons for appropriate simulations and for creating a suitable magneto-structural control system. The magnetic bearing, including actuation, is simulated in the ANSYS parametric design language (APDL). APDL is used to create the loops of transient simulations where boundary conditions (BC) are updated based upon a "gap sensor" which controls the nodal position values of the centroid of the shaft and the current density inputs onto the copper windings.

  18. Active Aircraft Pylon Noise Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H. (Inventor); Czech, Michael J (Inventor); Elmiligui, Alaa A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An active pylon noise control system for an aircraft includes a pylon structure connecting an engine system with an airframe surface of the aircraft and having at least one aperture to supply a gas or fluid therethrough, an intake portion attached to the pylon structure to intake a gas or fluid, a regulator connected with the intake portion via a plurality of pipes, to regulate a pressure of the gas or fluid, a plenum chamber formed within the pylon structure and connected with the regulator, and configured to receive the gas or fluid as regulated by the regulator, and a plurality of injectors in communication with the plenum chamber to actively inject the gas or fluid through the plurality of apertures of the pylon structure.

  19. Nanomechanics of Actively Controlled Deployable Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Lee D.

    2000-01-01

    This document is the interim, annual report for the research grant entitled "Nanomechanics of Actively Controlled Deployed Optics." It is supported by NASA Langley Research Center Cooperative Agreement NCC-1 -281. Dr. Mark S. Lake is the technical monitor of the research program. This document reports activities for the year 1998, beginning 3/11/1998, and for the year 1999. The objective of this report is to summarize the results and the status of this research. This summary appears in Section 2.0. Complete details of the results of this research have been reported in several papers, publications and theses. Section 3.0 lists these publications and, when available, presents their abstracts. Each publication is available in electronic form from a web site identified in Section 3.0.

  20. Shearing along faults and stratigraphic joints controlled by land subsidence in the Valley of Queretaro, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreón-Freyre, D.; Cerca, M.; Ochoa-González, G.; Teatini, P.; Zuñiga, F. R.

    2016-05-01

    Slip of nearly vertical faults or horizontal stratigraphic joints has provoked the shearing of at least 16 well casings in a period of over 10 years in the Valley of Queretaro aquifer, Mexico. Evidence integrated from field observations, remote surface-deformation monitoring, in-situ monitoring, stratigraphic correlation, and numerical modeling indicate that groundwater depletion and land subsidence induce shearing. Two main factors conditioning the stress distribution and the location of sheared well casings have been identified: (1) slip on fault planes, and (2) slip on stratigraphic joints. Additionally, the distribution of piezometric gradients may be a factor that enhances shearing. Slip on faults can be generated either by the compaction of sedimentary units (passive faulting) or by slip of blocks delimited by pre-existing faults (reactivation). Major piezometric-level declines and the distribution of hydraulic gradients can also be associated with slip at stratigraphic joints. Faults and hydraulic contrasts in the heterogeneous rock sequence, along with groundwater extraction, influence the distribution of the gradients and delimit the compartments of groundwater in the aquifer. Analogue modeling allowed assessment of the distribution of stress-strain and displacements associated with the increase of the vertical stress. Fault-bounded aquifers in grabens are common in the central part of Mexico and the results obtained can be applied to other subsiding, structurally controlled aquifer systems elsewhere.

  1. [Relationships of soil organic carbon with its active and non-active components under different land use types in the middle reaches of Heihe River, China].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun-Hua; Li, Guo-Dong; Wang, Yan-Song; Nan, Zhong-Ren; Zhao, Li-Ping

    2012-12-01

    Taking the seven typical land use types (paddy field, dry land, medium coverage grassland, saline-alkali field, bare land, desert, and sandlot) in the middle reaches of Heihe River as test objects, this paper studied the relationships of soil organic carbon content with its components. In the 0-100 cm soil profile, the contents of soil total organic carbon (TOC) , active organic carbon (AOC), and non-active organic carbon (NOC) decreased with increasing depth. The soil TOC, AOC, and NOC contents differed with land use type. Land use change induced the increase or decrease of soil organic carbon content. The tillage in paddy field was an available way to increase the contents of soil TOC, AOC, and NOC. After land use change, soil NOC rather than AOC contributed more to soil TOC content. For the same land use types, soil AOC and NOC contents increased together with increasing soil TOC content, and the NOC content increased faster than the AOC content. The soil TOC content corresponding to the crossing point of the variation trend lines of soil AOC and NOC contents could be considered as the boundary point of TOC accumulation or loss, and the saturation capacities of soil AOC and NOC could be obtained by the variation trend lines of the AOC and NOC.

  2. A model-based analysis of a display for helicopter landing approach. [control theoretical model of human pilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. A.; Wheat, L. W.

    1975-01-01

    A control theoretic model of the human pilot was used to analyze a baseline electronic cockpit display in a helicopter landing approach task. The head down display was created on a stroke written cathode ray tube and the vehicle was a UH-1H helicopter. The landing approach task consisted of maintaining prescribed groundspeed and glideslope in the presence of random vertical and horizontal turbulence. The pilot model was also used to generate and evaluate display quickening laws designed to improve pilot vehicle performance. A simple fixed base simulation provided comparative tracking data.

  3. Ecosystem Controls on C & N Sequestration Following Afforestation of Agricultural Lands

    SciTech Connect

    E.A. Paul, S.J. Morris, R.T. Conant

    2013-03-05

    In our project, we proposed to continue analysis of our available soil samples and data, and to develop new studies to answer the following objectives: Objective 1) Broaden field based studies of ecosystem C and N compartments to enhance current understanding of C and N sequestration and dynamics. Objective 2) Improve our understanding of mechanism controlling C and N stabilization and dynamics. Objective 3) Investigate the interrelated role of soil temperature and organism type and activity as controlling mechanism in SOC dynamics and sequestration.

  4. Changes in microbial activity of soils during the natural restoration of abandoned lands in central Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovsepyan, Lilit; Mostovaya, Anna; Lopes de Gerenyu, Valentin; Kurganova, Irina

    2015-04-01

    Most changes in land use affect significantly the amount of soil organic carbon (SOC) and alter the nutrition status of soil microbial community. The arable lands withdrawal induced usually the carbon sequestration in soil, the significant shifts in quality of soil organic matter and structure of microbial community. This study was aimed to determine the microbial activity of the abandoned lands in Central Russia due to the process of natural self-restoration. For the study, two representative chronosequences were selected in Central Russia: (1) deciduous forest area, DFA (Moscow region, 54o49N'; 37o34'E; Haplic Luvisols) and (2) forest steppe area, FSA (Belgorod region 50o36'N, 36o01'E Luvic Phaeozems). Each chronosequence included current arable, abandoned lands of different age, and forest plots. The total soil organic carbon (Corg, automatic CHNS analyzer), carbon immobilized in microbial biomass (Cmic, SIR method), and respiratory activity (RA) were determined in the topsoil (0-5, 5-10, 10-20 and 20-30 cm layers) for each plots. Relationships between Corg, Cmic, and RA were determined by liner regression method. Our results showed that the conversion of croplands to the permanent forest induced the progressive accumulation Corg, Cmic and acceleration of RA in the top 10-cm layer for both chronosequences. Carbon stock increased from 24.1 Mg C ha-1 in arable to 45.3 Mg C ha-1 in forest soil (Luvic Phaeozems, Belgorod region). In Haplic Luvisols (Moscow region), SOC build up was 2 time less: from 13.5 Mg C ha-1 in arable to 27.9 Mg C ha-1 in secondary forest. During post-agrogenic evolution, Cmic also increased significantly: from 0.34 to 1.43 g C kg-1 soil in Belgorod region and from 0.34 to 0.64 g C kg-1 soil in Moscow region. RA values varied widely in soils studied: from 0.54-0.63 mg C kg-1h-1 in arable plots to 2.02-3.4 mg C kg-1h-1 in forest ones. The close correlations between Cmic, RA and Corg in the top 0-5cm layer (R2 = 0.81-0.90; P<0.01-0.05) were

  5. The impact of human activities on land use and land cover changes and environmental processes in the Gorce Mountains (Western Polish Carpathians) in the past 50 years.

    PubMed

    Bucała, Anna

    2014-06-01

    The role of human impact on the natural environment was studied in the Jaszcze and Jamne catchments in the Gorce Mountains (Western Polish Carpathians). Analysis of land use and land cover changes using GIS techniques and cartographic materials between 1954 and 2004 indicates an increase in forest area by 11.5% and 18.5%, respectively, at the expense of arable land and grassland areas. Agricultural abandonment often occurred on steep slopes (above 10°) with skeletal (shallow) soils at higher elevations (above 800 m a.s.l.). In addition, the density of dirt roads decreased from 6.97 km/km(2) in 1981 to 4.3 km/km(2) in 2008. In former agricultural areas, long expanses of terraces have either disappeared or experienced shallow mass movements. The statistical reports and questionnaire survey indicate reduced income from farm activities in this region. As a result of LULC changes and stream transformation, the Jaszcze and Jamne stream channels were shortened, straightened, and narrowed, with tendency to incision estimated at 1 cm per year over the past 40 years. The changes observed in the environment under human impact, accelerated following 1989, are representative of the Western Polish Carpathians. PMID:24565936

  6. Donor-Control of Scavenging Food Webs at the Land-Ocean Interface.

    PubMed

    Schlacher, Thomas A; Strydom, Simone; Connolly, Rod M; Schoeman, David

    2013-01-01

    Food webs near the interface of adjacent ecosystems are potentially subsidised by the flux of organic matter across system boundaries. Such subsidies, including carrion of marine provenance, are predicted to be instrumental on open-coast sandy shores where in situ productivity is low and boundaries are long and highly permeable to imports from the sea. We tested the effect of carrion supply on the structure of consumer dynamics in a beach-dune system using broad-scale, repeated additions of carcasses at the strandline of an exposed beach in eastern Australia. Carrion inputs increased the abundance of large invertebrate scavengers (ghost crabs, Ocypode spp.), a numerical response most strongly expressed by the largest size-class in the population, and likely due to aggregative behaviour in the short term. Consumption of carrion at the beach-dune interface was rapid and efficient, driven overwhelmingly by facultative avian scavengers. This guild of vertebrate scavengers comprises several species of birds of prey (sea eagles, kites), crows and gulls, which reacted strongly to concentrations of fish carrion, creating hotspots of intense scavenging activity along the shoreline. Detection of carrion effects at several trophic levels suggests that feeding links arising from carcasses shape the architecture and dynamics of food webs at the land-ocean interface. PMID:23826379

  7. Donor-Control of Scavenging Food Webs at the Land-Ocean Interface

    PubMed Central

    Schlacher, Thomas A.; Strydom, Simone; Connolly, Rod M.; Schoeman, David

    2013-01-01

    Food webs near the interface of adjacent ecosystems are potentially subsidised by the flux of organic matter across system boundaries. Such subsidies, including carrion of marine provenance, are predicted to be instrumental on open-coast sandy shores where in situ productivity is low and boundaries are long and highly permeable to imports from the sea. We tested the effect of carrion supply on the structure of consumer dynamics in a beach-dune system using broad-scale, repeated additions of carcasses at the strandline of an exposed beach in eastern Australia. Carrion inputs increased the abundance of large invertebrate scavengers (ghost crabs, Ocypode spp.), a numerical response most strongly expressed by the largest size-class in the population, and likely due to aggregative behaviour in the short term. Consumption of carrion at the beach-dune interface was rapid and efficient, driven overwhelmingly by facultative avian scavengers. This guild of vertebrate scavengers comprises several species of birds of prey (sea eagles, kites), crows and gulls, which reacted strongly to concentrations of fish carrion, creating hotspots of intense scavenging activity along the shoreline. Detection of carrion effects at several trophic levels suggests that feeding links arising from carcasses shape the architecture and dynamics of food webs at the land-ocean interface. PMID:23826379

  8. Donor-Control of Scavenging Food Webs at the Land-Ocean Interface.

    PubMed

    Schlacher, Thomas A; Strydom, Simone; Connolly, Rod M; Schoeman, David

    2013-01-01

    Food webs near the interface of adjacent ecosystems are potentially subsidised by the flux of organic matter across system boundaries. Such subsidies, including carrion of marine provenance, are predicted to be instrumental on open-coast sandy shores where in situ productivity is low and boundaries are long and highly permeable to imports from the sea. We tested the effect of carrion supply on the structure of consumer dynamics in a beach-dune system using broad-scale, repeated additions of carcasses at the strandline of an exposed beach in eastern Australia. Carrion inputs increased the abundance of large invertebrate scavengers (ghost crabs, Ocypode spp.), a numerical response most strongly expressed by the largest size-class in the population, and likely due to aggregative behaviour in the short term. Consumption of carrion at the beach-dune interface was rapid and efficient, driven overwhelmingly by facultative avian scavengers. This guild of vertebrate scavengers comprises several species of birds of prey (sea eagles, kites), crows and gulls, which reacted strongly to concentrations of fish carrion, creating hotspots of intense scavenging activity along the shoreline. Detection of carrion effects at several trophic levels suggests that feeding links arising from carcasses shape the architecture and dynamics of food webs at the land-ocean interface.

  9. What controls vulnerability of watersheds to climate and land use change across the United States?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R.; Deshmukh, A.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the response of watersheds to climate and land use change is crucial for management of water resources. However, obtaining reliable projections of water resources remains a challenge in the wake of large uncertainties in projections of climate and land use change. Thus, alternative assessment criteria independent of projections of climate and land use change would be useful in providing decision makers with an approximate evaluation of vulnerability of a watershed to change. Here, we present an analysis to ascertain the vulnerability of watersheds to climate and land use change independent of future projections. Using a recently developed bottom up approach, we first identify critical thresholds of climate and land use change across 78 watersheds of United States. Then, we explore the relationship between critical climate thresholds and watershed characteristics to identify characteristics that are correlated to these thresholds. We perform this analysis for various streamflow indicators that capture the magnitude, frequency, and duration of flows. We find significant negative correlation between soil properties like average percentage sand and critical threshold of precipitation change causing vulnerability of indicator representing water availability - mean annual streamflow. This indicates that higher amounts of sand content in soils may be related with reduced vulnerability to climatic changes. We also find significant positive correlation between urban land use and critical threshold of precipitation change across the watersheds for mean annual streamflow. This suggests that watersheds with higher urban land use may be more vulnerable to precipitation change.

  10. Active control of shocks and sonic boom ground signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagiz, Bedri

    The manipulation of a flow field to obtain a desired change is a much heightened subject. Active flow control has been the subject of the major research areas in fluid mechanics for the past two decades. It offers new solutions for mitigation of shock strength, sonic boom alleviation, drag minimization, reducing blade-vortex interaction noise in helicopters, stall control and the performance maximization of existing designs to meet the increasing requirements of the aircraft industries. Despite the wide variety of the potential applications of active flow control, the majority of studies have been performed at subsonic speeds. The active flow control cases were investigated in transonic speed in this study. Although the active flow control provides significant improvements, the sensibility of aerodynamic performance to design parameters makes it a nontrivial and expensive problem, so the designer has to optimize a number of different parameters. For the purpose of gaining understanding of the active flow control concepts, an automated optimization cycle process was generated. Also, the optimization cycle reduces cost and turnaround time. The mass flow coefficient, location, width and angle were chosen as design parameters to maximize the aerodynamic performance of an aircraft. As the main contribution of this study, a detailed parametric study and optimization process were presented. The second step is to appraise the practicability of weakening the shock wave and thereby reducing the wave drag in transonic flight regime using flow control devices such as two dimensional contour bump, individual jet actuator, and also the hybrid control which includes both control devices together, thereby gaining the desired improvements in aerodynamic performance of the air-vehicle. After this study, to improve the aerodynamic performance, the flow control and shape parameters are optimized separately, combined, and in a serial combination. The remarkable part of all these

  11. Controlling the Charge State and Redox Properties of Supported Polyoxometalates via Soft Landing of Mass Selected Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Gunaratne, Kalupathirannehelage Don D.; Johnson, Grant E.; Andersen, Amity; Du, Dan; Zhang, Weiying; Prabhakaran, Venkateshkumar; Lin, Yuehe; Laskin, Julia

    2014-12-04

    We investigate the controlled deposition of Keggin polyoxometalate (POM) anions, PMo12O403- and PMo12O402-, onto different self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces via soft landing of mass-selected ions. Utilizing in situ infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS), ex situ cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electronic structure calculations, we examine the structure and charge retention of supported multiply-charged POM anions and characterize the redox properties of the modified surfaces. SAMs of alkylthiol (HSAM), perfluorinated alkylthiol (FSAM), and alkylthiol terminated with NH3+ functional groups (NH3+SAM) are chosen as model substrates for soft landing to examine the factors which influence the immobilization and charge retention of multiply charged anionic molecules. The distribution of charge states of POMs on different SAM surfaces are determined by comparing the IRRAS spectra with vibrational spectra calculated using density functional theory (DFT). In contrast to the results obtained previously for multiply charged cations, soft landed anions are found to retain charge on all three SAM surfaces. This charge retention is attributed to the substantial electron binding energy of the POM anions. Investigation of redox properties by CV reveals that, while surfaces prepared by soft landing exhibit similar features to those prepared by adsorption of POM from solution, the soft landed POM2- has a pronounced shift in oxidation potential compared to POM3- for one of the redox couples. These results demonstrate that ion soft landing is uniquely suited for precisely controlled preparation of substrates with specific electronic and chemical properties that cannot be achieved using conventional deposition techniques.

  12. Development and evaluation of automatic landing control laws for power lift STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinreich, B.; Gevaert, G.

    1981-01-01

    A series of investigations were conducted to generate and verify through ground bases simulation and flight research a data base to aid in the design and certification of advanced propulsive lift short takeoff and landing aircraft. Problems impacting the design of powered lift short haul aircraft that are to be landed automatically on STOL runways in adverse weather were examined. An understanding of the problems was gained by a limited coverage of important elements that are normally included in the certification process of a CAT 3 automatic landing system.

  13. Changes in summer TC activity related to thermal differences between land and the sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ki-Seon; Kim, Baek-Jo; Cha, Yu-Mi; Kim, Hae-Dong

    2015-08-01

    This study analyzed the effects of thermal differences between land and the sea on tropical cyclone (TC) activity. To this end, northern China in which thermal ridges appear in summer in the continent east of Asia was defined as "Land" and an area of the sea where temperatures are low in the tropical and subtropical western North Pacific was defined as "Sea" to analyze the time series of thermal differences between the land and the sea over the last 62 years. Change-point analysis was applied to these time series. According to the results, a significant climate regime shift existed in 1978. That is, positive values were distributed from 1951 to 1978 (5178) and negative values were distributed from 1979 to 2012 (7912). Thereafter, average differences between the 5178 period during which positive values were apparent and the 7912 period during which negative values were apparent was analyzed. With regard to TC genesis, TCs during the 7912 period showed a tendency of being mainly formed in the northwestern quadrant of the tropical and subtropical western North Pacific, and those during the 5178 period showed a tendency of being mainly formed in the southeastern quadrant. With regard to TC movements, whereas TCs during the 7912 period showed a pattern of moving west from the Philippines toward the Indochina peninsular and southern China, those during the 5178 period showed a pattern of moving north from the far southeastern sea of the Philippines to pass the East China Sea and go toward Korea and Japan. Therefore, the TCs during the 7912 period showed a tendency of being formed and moving in regions further west than those of the TCs during the 5178 period. With regard to TC intensities during the two periods, TCs during the 5178 period were more intense. Large-scale environments that affected these changes in TC activity between the two periods were analyzed. During the 7912 period, since temperature in the continent were lower than those in the sea, anomalous

  14. Nonlinear automatic landing control of unmanned aerial vehicles on moving platforms via a 3D laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervas, Jaime Rubio; Reyhanoglu, Mahmut; Tang, Hui

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a motion tracking and control system for automatically landing Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) on an oscillating platform using Laser Radar (LADAR) observations. The system itself is assumed to be mounted on a ship deck. A full nonlinear mathematical model is first introduced for the UAV. The ship motion is characterized by a Fourier transform based method which includes a realistic characterization of the sea waves. LADAR observation models are introduced and an algorithm to process those observations for yielding the relative state between the vessel and the UAV is presented, from which the UAV's state relative to an inertial frame can be obtained and used for feedback purposes. A sliding mode control algorithm is derived for tracking a landing trajectory defined by a set of desired waypoints. An extended Kalman filter (EKF) is proposed to account for process and observation noises in the design of a state estimator. The effectiveness of the control algorithm is illustrated through a simulation example.

  15. Nonlinear automatic landing control of unmanned aerial vehicles on moving platforms via a 3D laser radar

    SciTech Connect

    Hervas, Jaime Rubio; Tang, Hui; Reyhanoglu, Mahmut

    2014-12-10

    This paper presents a motion tracking and control system for automatically landing Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) on an oscillating platform using Laser Radar (LADAR) observations. The system itself is assumed to be mounted on a ship deck. A full nonlinear mathematical model is first introduced for the UAV. The ship motion is characterized by a Fourier transform based method which includes a realistic characterization of the sea waves. LADAR observation models are introduced and an algorithm to process those observations for yielding the relative state between the vessel and the UAV is presented, from which the UAV's state relative to an inertial frame can be obtained and used for feedback purposes. A sliding mode control algorithm is derived for tracking a landing trajectory defined by a set of desired waypoints. An extended Kalman filter (EKF) is proposed to account for process and observation noises in the design of a state estimator. The effectiveness of the control algorithm is illustrated through a simulation example.

  16. Land use influence on 3-D distribution of soil microbiological activity in forest-steppe zone of Central Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasenev, Viacheslav; Tembo, Alan; Sarzhanov, Dmirty; Sotnikova, Julia; Ryzhkov, Oleg; Lakeev, Pavel; Valentini, Riccardo

    2014-05-01

    Land use is the principal factor influencing soil environmental functions and quality. Quite a few studies on soil quality mainly focus on natural and agroecosystems. Much less is known about urban ecosystems, although the urbanization effect on soil quality can be considerable. Parameters of soil microbiological activity are very sensitive to land-use change. Microbial biomass carbon (Cmic), basal respiration (BR) and microbial metabolic coefficient (qCO2) are among most widely used parameters of soil microbiological activity. They are directly associated with such soil functions as fertility, microorganisms' habitat and participation in carbon cycle. So far, most of the studies focus on the effect of land-use change on the topsoil (0-10 cm) microbiological activity, averaged for different land-use types. Much less is known about changes in spatial variability and profile distribution of Cmic, BR and qCO2 in response to different land-use. Land-use influence on spatial and profile distribution of soil microbiological activity may differ between bioclimatic zones. Very fertile and rich in carbon Chernozemic soils (depth of the A horizon up to 1 m, carbon concentration up to 7-9%), dominating in forest-steppe zone are among the most sensitive to land-use change. This study aims to improve understanding of land-use influence on 3-D distribution of Cmic, BR and qCO2 in Central Chernozemic region of Russia. We observed three land-use types (fallow land, natural pasture and meadow) located in Kursk region and three contrast urban functional zone (industrial, residential and recreational) in Kursk city. Soil samples were collected by auguring in five replicas per land-use type, four layers each sampling point (0-10, 10-50, 50-100 and 100-150 cm). Cmic, BR and qCO2 as well as Corg, N and pHKCl were analyzed in all the samples. Cmic (µg C g-1 soil) was analyzed based on the substrate induced respiration (SIR) approach. qCO2 (μg CO2-C mg-1 Cmic h-1) was calculated as the

  17. Changes in biomechanics and muscle activation in injured ballet dancers during a jump-land task with turnout (Sissonne Fermée).

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsing-Hsan; Lin, Chia-Wei; Wu, Hong-Wen; Wu, Tzu-Chuan; Lin, Cheng-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Large impact loading with abnormal muscle activity and motion patterns may contribute to lower extremity injuries in ballet dancers. Yet, few studies investigated the influence of injury on the ballet movement. The purpose of this study was to find the neuromuscular and biomechanical characteristics in dancers with and without ankle injury during a jump-landing Sissonne Fermée task. Twenty-two ballet dancers were recruited and divided into the injured group (n = 11) and the uninjured group (n = 11). They performed a ballet movement called "Sissonne Fermée" with reflective markers and electrodes attached to their lower extremities. Ground reaction force, joint kinematics, and muscle activity were measured. The injured dancers had greater peak ankle eversion but smaller hindfoot-to-tibial eversion angles. Also, the injured dancers had greater activity of the hamstring of the dominant leg and tibialis anterior of the non-dominant leg during the pre-landing phase. The injured dancers had greater tibialis anterior activity of the dominant leg but less muscle activity in the medial gastrocnemius of the non-dominant leg during the post-landing phase. The injured dancers had a greater co-contraction index in the non-dominant ankle and a lower loading rate. The higher co-contraction indices showed that the injured dancers required more muscle effort to control ankle stability. Furthermore, the injured dancers used a "load avoidance strategy" to protect themselves from re-injury. Neuromuscular control training of the ankle joint for ballet dancers to prevent injury is necessary.

  18. Amplitude Scaling of Active Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalnov, Oksana; Seifert, Avraham

    2010-01-01

    Three existing and two new excitation magnitude scaling options for active separation control at Reynolds numbers below one Million. The physical background for the scaling options was discussed and their relevance was evaluated using two different sets of experimental data. For F+ approx. 1, 2D excitation: a) The traditional VR and C(mu) - do not scale the data. b) Only the Re*C(mu) is valid. This conclusion is also limited for positive lift increment.. For F+ > 10, 3D excitation, the Re corrected C(mu), the St corrected velocity ratio and the vorticity flux coefficient, all scale the amplitudes equally well. Therefore, the Reynolds weighted C(mu) is the preferred choice, relevant to both excitation modes. Incidence also considered, using Ue from local Cp.

  19. Tectonomorphic evolution of Marie Byrd Land - Implications for Cenozoic rifting activity and onset of West Antarctic glaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiegel, Cornelia; Lindow, Julia; Kamp, Peter J. J.; Meisel, Ove; Mukasa, Samuel; Lisker, Frank; Kuhn, Gerhard; Gohl, Karsten

    2016-10-01

    The West Antarctic Rift System is one of the largest continental rifts on Earth. Because it is obscured by the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, its evolution is still poorly understood. Here we present the first low-temperature thermochronology data from eastern Marie Byrd Land, an area that stretches ~ 1000 km along the rift system, in order to shed light on its development. Furthermore, we petrographically analysed glacially transported detritus deposited in the marine realm, offshore Marie Byrd Land, to augment the data available from the limited terrestrial exposures. Our data provide information about the subglacial geology, and the tectonic and morphologic history of the rift system. Dominant lithologies of coastal Marie Byrd Land are igneous rocks that intruded (presumably early Paleozoic) low-grade meta-sedimentary rocks. No evidence was found for un-metamorphosed sedimentary rocks exposed beneath the ice. According to the thermochronology data, rifting occurred in two episodes. The earlier occurred between ~ 100 and 60 Ma and led to widespread tectonic denudation and block faulting over large areas of Marie Byrd Land. The later episode started during the Early Oligocene and was confined to western Pine Island Bay area. This Oligocene tectonic activity may be linked kinematically to previously described rift structures reaching into Bellingshausen Sea and beneath Pine Island Glacier, all assumed to be of Cenozoic age. However, our data provide the first direct evidence for Cenozoic tectonic activity along the rift system outside the Ross Sea area. Furthermore, we tentatively suggest that uplift of the Marie Byrd Land dome only started at ~ 20 Ma; that is, nearly 10 Ma later than previously assumed. The Marie Byrd Land dome is the only extensive part of continental West Antarctica elevated above sea level. Since the formation of a continental ice sheet requires a significant area of emergent land, our data, although only based on few samples, imply that extensive

  20. A comparison of flight and simulation data for three automatic landing system control laws for the Augmentor wing jet STOL research airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinreich, B.; Gevaert, G.

    1980-01-01

    Automatic flare and decrab control laws for conventional takeoff and landing aircraft were adapted to the unique requirements of the powered lift short takeoff and landing airplane. Three longitudinal autoland control laws were developed. Direct lift and direct drag control were used in the longitudinal axis. A fast time simulation was used for the control law synthesis, with emphasis on stochastic performance prediction and evaluation. Good correlation with flight test results was obtained.

  1. Ribosome-dependent activation of stringent control.

    PubMed

    Brown, Alan; Fernández, Israel S; Gordiyenko, Yuliya; Ramakrishnan, V

    2016-06-01

    In order to survive, bacteria continually sense, and respond to, environmental fluctuations. Stringent control represents a key bacterial stress response to nutrient starvation that leads to rapid and comprehensive reprogramming of metabolic and transcriptional patterns. In general, transcription of genes for growth and proliferation is downregulated, while those important for survival and virulence are upregulated. Amino acid starvation is sensed by depletion of the aminoacylated tRNA pools, and this results in accumulation of ribosomes stalled with non-aminoacylated (uncharged) tRNA in the ribosomal A site. RelA is recruited to stalled ribosomes and activated to synthesize a hyperphosphorylated guanosine analogue, (p)ppGpp, which acts as a pleiotropic secondary messenger. However, structural information about how RelA recognizes stalled ribosomes and discriminates against aminoacylated tRNAs is missing. Here we present the cryo-electron microscopy structure of RelA bound to the bacterial ribosome stalled with uncharged tRNA. The structure reveals that RelA utilizes a distinct binding site compared to the translational factors, with a multi-domain architecture that wraps around a highly distorted A-site tRNA. The TGS (ThrRS, GTPase and SpoT) domain of RelA binds the CCA tail to orient the free 3' hydroxyl group of the terminal adenosine towards a β-strand, such that an aminoacylated tRNA at this position would be sterically precluded. The structure supports a model in which association of RelA with the ribosome suppresses auto-inhibition to activate synthesis of (p)ppGpp and initiate the stringent response. Since stringent control is responsible for the survival of pathogenic bacteria under stress conditions, and contributes to chronic infections and antibiotic tolerance, RelA represents a good target for the development of novel antibacterial therapeutics. PMID:27279228

  2. Active Control of Wind Tunnel Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Patrick (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    The need for an adaptive active control system was realized, since a wind tunnel is subjected to variations in air velocity, temperature, air turbulence, and some other factors such as nonlinearity. Among many adaptive algorithms, the Least Mean Squares (LMS) algorithm, which is the simplest one, has been used in an Active Noise Control (ANC) system by some researchers. However, Eriksson's results, Eriksson (1985), showed instability in the ANC system with an ER filter for random noise input. The Restricted Least Squares (RLS) algorithm, although computationally more complex than the LMS algorithm, has better convergence and stability properties. The ANC system in the present work was simulated by using an FIR filter with an RLS algorithm for different inputs and for a number of plant models. Simulation results for the ANC system with acoustic feedback showed better robustness when used with the RLS algorithm than with the LMS algorithm for all types of inputs. Overall attenuation in the frequency domain was better in the case of the RLS adaptive algorithm. Simulation results with a more realistic plant model and an RLS adaptive algorithm showed a slower convergence rate than the case with an acoustic plant as a delay plant. However, the attenuation properties were satisfactory for the simulated system with the modified plant. The effect of filter length on the rate of convergence and attenuation was studied. It was found that the rate of convergence decreases with increase in filter length, whereas the attenuation increases with increase in filter length. The final design of the ANC system was simulated and found to have a reasonable convergence rate and good attenuation properties for an input containing discrete frequencies and random noise.

  3. Flight evaluation of highly augmented controls and electronic displays for precision approach and landing of powered-lift aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, J. A.; Hynes, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on simulators and on the Quiet Short-Haul Research Aircraft to evaluate the effect of highly augmented control modes and electronic displays on the ability of pilots to execute precision approaches and landings on a short runway. It is found that the primary benefits of highly augmented flightpath and airspeed controls and electronic displays are realized when the pilot is required to execute precisely a complex transition and approach under instrument conditions and in the presence of a wide range of wind and turbulence conditions. A flightpath and airspeed command and stabilization system incorporating nonlinear, inverse system concepts produced fully satisfactory flightpath control throughout the aircraft's terminal operating envelope.

  4. Active Shielding and Control of Environmental Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsynkov, S. V.

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of the research project supported by NASA under grant # NAG-1-01064, we have studied the mathematical aspects of the problem of active control of sound, i.e., time-harmonic acoustic disturbances. The foundations of the methodology are described in our paper [1]. Unlike. many other existing techniques, the approach of [1] provides for the exact volumetric cancellation of the unwanted noise on a given predetermined region airspace, while leaving unaltered those components of the total acoustic field that are deemed as friendly. The key finding of the work is that for eliminating the unwanted component of the acoustic field in a given area, one needs to know relatively little; in particular, neither the locations nor structure nor strength of the exterior noise sources need to be known. Likewise, there is no need to know the volumetric properties of the supporting medium across which the acoustic signals propagate, except, maybe, in a narrow area of space near the perimeter of the protected region. The controls are built based solely on the measurements performed on the perimeter of the domain to be shielded; moreover, the controls themselves (i.e., additional sources) are concentrated also only on or near this perimeter. Perhaps as important, the measured quantities can refer to the total acoustic field rather than to its unwanted component only, and the methodology can automatically distinguish between the two. In [1], we have constructed the general solution for controls. The apparatus used for deriving this general solution is closely connected to the concepts of generalized potentials and boundary projections of Calderon's type. For a given total wave field, the application of a Calderon's projection allows one to definitively tell between its incoming and outgoing components with respect to a particular domain of interest, which may have arbitrary shape. Then, the controls are designed so that they suppress the incoming component for the domain

  5. Sensor Development for Active Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahng, Seun K.; Gorton, Susan A.; Mau, Johnney C.; Soto, Hector L.; Hernandez, Corey D.

    2001-01-01

    Presented are the developmental efforts for MEMS sensors for a closed-loop active flow control in a low-speed wind tunnel evaluation. The MEMS sensors are designed in-house and fabricated out of house, and the shear sensors are a thermal type that are collocated with temperature and pressure sensors on a flexible polyimide sheet, which conforms to surfaces of a simple curvature. A total of 6 sensors are located within a 1.5 by 3 mm area as a cluster with each sensor being 300 pm square. The thickness of this sensor cluster is 75 pm. Outputs from the shear sensors have been compared with respect to those of the Preston tube for evaluation of the sensors on a flat plate. Pressure sensors are the absolute type and have recorded pressure measurements within 0.05 percent of the tunnel ESP pressure sensor readings. The sensors and signal conditioning electronics have been tested on both a flat plate and a ramp in Langley s 15-Inch Low-Turbulence Tunnel. The system configuration and control PC is configured with LabView, where calibration constants are stored for desired compensation and correction. The preliminary test results are presented within.

  6. Active controlled studies in antibiotic drug development.

    PubMed

    Dane, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    The increasing concern of antibacterial resistance has been well documented, as has the relative lack of antibiotic development. This paradox is in part due to challenges with clinical development of antibiotics. Because of their rapid progression, untreated bacterial infections are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. As a consequence, placebo-controlled studies of new agents are unethical. Rather, pivotal development studies are mostly conducted using non-inferiority designs versus an active comparator. Further, infections because of comparator-resistant isolates must usually be excluded from the trial programme. Unfortunately, the placebo-controlled data classically used in support of non-inferiority designs are largely unavailable for antibiotics. The only available data are from the 1930s and 1940s and their use is associated with significant concerns regarding constancy and assay sensitivity. Extended public debate on this challenge has led to proposed solutions by some in which these concerns are addressed by using very conservative approaches to trial design, endpoints and non-inferiority margins, in some cases leading to potentially impractical studies. To compound this challenge, different Regulatory Authorities seem to be taking different approaches to these key issues. If harmonisation does not occur, antibiotic development will become increasingly challenging, with the risk of further decreases in the amount of antibiotic drug development. However with clarity on Regulatory requirements and an ability to feasibly conduct global development programmes, it should be possible to bring much needed additional antibiotics to patients.

  7. Actively controlled thin-shell space optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denoyer, Keith K.; Flint, Eric M.; Main, John A.; Lindler, Jason E.

    2003-08-01

    Increasingly, scientific and military missions require the use of space-based optical systems. For example, new capabilities are required for imaging terrestrial like planets, for surveillance, and for directed energy applications. Given the difficulties in producing and launching large optics, it is doubtful that refinements of conventional technology will meet future needs, particularly in a cost-effective manner. To meet this need, recent research has been investigating the feasibility of a new class of ultra-lightweight think-skin optical elements that combine recent advances in lightweight thermally formed materials, active materials, and novel sensing and control architectures. If successful, the approach may lead to an order of magnitude reduction in space optics areal density, improved large scale manufacturing capability, and dramatic reductions in manufacturing and launch costs. In a recent effort, a one meter thin-film mirror like structure was fabricated. This paper provides an overview of tools used to model and simulate this structure as well as results from structural dynamic testing. In addition, progress in the area of non-contact global shape control using smart materials is presented.

  8. High performance composites with active stiffness control.

    PubMed

    Tridech, Charnwit; Maples, Henry A; Robinson, Paul; Bismarck, Alexander

    2013-09-25

    High performance carbon fiber reinforced composites with controllable stiffness could revolutionize the use of composite materials in structural applications. Here we describe a structural material, which has a stiffness that can be actively controlled on demand. Such a material could have applications in morphing wings or deployable structures. A carbon fiber reinforced-epoxy composite is described that can undergo an 88% reduction in flexural stiffness at elevated temperatures and fully recover when cooled, with no discernible damage or loss in properties. Once the stiffness has been reduced, the required deformations can be achieved at much lower actuation forces. For this proof-of-concept study a thin polyacrylamide (PAAm) layer was electrocoated onto carbon fibers that were then embedded into an epoxy matrix via resin infusion. Heating the PAAm coating above its glass transition temperature caused it to soften and allowed the fibers to slide within the matrix. To produce the stiffness change the carbon fibers were used as resistance heating elements by passing a current through them. When the PAAm coating had softened, the ability of the interphase to transfer load to the fibers was significantly reduced, greatly lowering the flexural stiffness of the composite. By changing the moisture content in PAAm fiber coating, the temperature at which the PAAm softens and the composites undergo a reduction in stiffness can be tuned. PMID:23978266

  9. AVIRIS and TIMS data processing and distribution at the land processes distributed active archive center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mah, G. R.; Myers, J.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Government has initiated the Global Change Research program, a systematic study of the Earth as a complete system. NASA's contribution of the Global Change Research Program is the Earth Observing System (EOS), a series of orbital sensor platforms and an associated data processing and distribution system. The EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is the archiving, production, and distribution system for data collected by the EOS space segment and uses a multilayer architecture for processing, archiving, and distributing EOS data. The first layer consists of the spacecraft ground stations and processing facilities that receive the raw data from the orbiting platforms and then separate the data by individual sensors. The second layer consists of Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAAC) that process, distribute, and archive the sensor data. The third layer consists of a user science processing network. The EOSDIS is being developed in a phased implementation. The initial phase, Version 0, is a prototype of the operational system. Version 0 activities are based upon existing systems and are designed to provide an EOSDIS-like capability for information management and distribution. An important science support task is the creation of simulated data sets for EOS instruments from precursor aircraft or satellite data. The Land Processes DAAC, at the EROS Data Center (EDC), is responsible for archiving and processing EOS precursor data from airborne instruments such as the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS), the Thematic Mapper Simulator (TMS), and Airborne Visible and Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). AVIRIS, TIMS, and TMS are flown by the NASA-Ames Research Center ARC) on an ER-2. The ER-2 flies at 65000 feet and can carry up to three sensors simultaneously. Most jointly collected data sets are somewhat boresighted and roughly registered. The instrument data are being used to construct data sets that simulate the spectral and spatial

  10. Aerodynamically controlled expansion (ACE) nozzle for short takeoff and vertical landing aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrier, Douglas Anthony

    2000-10-01

    An Aerodynamically Controlled Expansion (ACE) propulsion nozzle that improves hover thrust performance by 2.5 percent in a short take off and vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft has been developed. The ACE concept employs a carefully defined step in the nozzle internal contour that interacts with the boundary layer to induce flow separation in the divergent section, thereby relieving over-expansion losses during hover. This study specifies design parameters for a passive boundary layer control step for application on the Joint Strike Fighter (JSF). In addition, parametric performance predictions presented herein provide a basic understanding of how the step concept can be applied to overcome undesirable over-expansion in generalized supersonic nozzle flows. The aerodynamic phenomena governing the interaction of the step with the nozzle flow were investigated in an extensive, parametric CFD analysis. The CFD analysis matrix consists of thirty-three axi-symmetric nozzle cases including expansion area ratios (A9/A 8) of 1.1, 1.3 and 1.5, slot area ratios (A s/A8) of 1.0 (baseline), 1.1 and 1.2, and covering the nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) range of 2.0 to 8.0. The CFD results define the NPR at which flow separation occurs as a function of A9/A8, and A s/A8, and the effect of the step on nozzle performance. Results indicate that the onset of separation occurs at higher NPR with increasing A9/A 8 and increasing As/A 8. For the case of the JSF nozzle with A9/ A8 = 1.3, the CFD analysis predicted that a nozzle having an As/A8 = 1.1 produces an improvement of approximately 2.5 percent in hover thrust relative to the baseline with a minimal adverse impact at other design conditions. Twelve percent scale models representing the baseline, and step sizes of 1.1 and 1.2 were tested in the Lockheed Martin Thrust Measurement Facility (TMF). Test results showed excellent agreement with CFD predictions and validated the step performance. Preliminary design integration studies support

  11. Vegetation controls on surface heat flux partitioning, and land-atmosphere coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, I. N.; Torn, M. S.; Lu, Y.; Kueppers, L. M.; Bagley, J.

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between soil moisture and surface evaporative fraction (latent heat flux normalized by the sum of sensible and latent heat flux) is critical in linking land surface forcing to clouds and precipitation. The evaporative fraction (EF) can influence precipitation directly through precipitation recycling, and indirectly through convective triggering. Several studies have shown that the observed correlation between soil moisture and EF is weaker than the correlation predicted in climate models, suggesting that land-atmosphere coupling is overestimated in models. Here, we present evidence that observed land-atmosphere coupling is underestimated when defined by the correlation between soil moisture and EF. Land-atmosphere coupling is three times stronger when using leaf area index as a correlate of EF instead of soil moisture, in the Southern Great Plains. This stronger coupling results from transpiration of relatively deep soil moisture. Furthermore, transpiration makes the relationship between EF and soil moisture nonlinear, and gives rise to the false appearance of weak coupling when using linear soil moisture metrics. The geographical extent of land-atmosphere coupling is not as small as in previous estimates. Regions of substantial land-atmosphere coupling extend to semi-arid and humid continental climates across the United States, in terms of correlations between vegetation metrics and EF. A comparison of the Community Land Model (CLM4.5) to observations in the Southern Great Plains reveals that the model overestimates correlations between soil moisture and EF, but underestimates correlations between leaf area index and EF by 30%, even when using observed daily leaf area index and meteorological forcing. It appears that the hydrological cycle is more tightly constrained by vegetation in observations than in climate models.

  12. Cortical control of thermoregulatory sympathetic activation.

    PubMed

    Fechir, M; Klega, A; Buchholz, H G; Pfeifer, N; Balon, S; Schlereth, T; Geber, C; Breimhorst, M; Maihöfner, C; Birklein, F; Schreckenberger, M

    2010-06-01

    Thermoregulation enables adaptation to different ambient temperatures. A complex network of central autonomic centres may be involved. In contrast to the brainstem, the role of the cortex has not been clearly evaluated. This study was therefore designed to address cerebral function during a whole thermoregulatory cycle (cold, neutral and warm stimulation) using 18-fluordeoxyglucose-PET (FDG-PET). Sympathetic activation parameters were co-registered. Ten healthy male volunteers were examined three times on three different days in a water-perfused whole-body suit. After a baseline period (32 degrees C), temperature was either decreased to 7 degrees C (cold), increased to 50 degrees C (warm) or kept constant (32 degrees C, neutral), thereafter the PET examination was performed. Cerebral glucose metabolism was increased in infrapontine brainstem and cerebellar hemispheres during cooling and warming, each compared with neutral temperature. Simultaneously, FDG uptake decreased in the bilateral anterior/mid-cingulate cortex during warming, and in the right insula during cooling and warming. Conjunction analyses revealed that right insular deactivation and brainstem activation appeared both during cold and warm stimulation. Metabolic connectivity analyses revealed positive correlations between the cortical activations, and negative correlations between these cortical areas and brainstem/cerebellar regions. Heart rate changes negatively correlated with glucose metabolism in the anterior cingulate cortex and in the middle frontal gyrus/dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and changes of sweating with glucose metabolism in the posterior cingulate cortex. In summary, these results suggest that the cerebral cortex exerts an inhibitory control on autonomic centres located in the brainstem or cerebellum. These findings may represent reasonable explanations for sympathetic hyperactivity, which occurs, for example, after hemispheric stroke.

  13. Estimation of landslides activities evolution due to land-use changes in a Pyrenean valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandromme, Rosalie; Desramaut, Nicolas; Cottin, Léa; Bernardie, Séverine; Grandjean, Gilles

    2015-04-01

    Global changes would have impacts worldwide, but their effects should be even more exacerbated in areas particularly vulnerable. Mountainous areas are among these vulnerable territories. Ecological systems are often at a fragile equilibrium, socio-economical activities are often climate-dependent and climate-driven natural hazards can be a major threat for human activities. In order to estimate the capacity of such mountainous valleys to face global changes (climate, but also climate- and human- induced land-use changes), it is necessary to be able to evaluate the evolution of the different threats. The present work presents a method to evaluate the influences of the evolution of both climate and vegetation cover on landslides activities over a whole valley, to propose adequate solutions for current and future forestry management. It is therefore necessary to properly estimate the vegetation influences on slope stabilities. In the present study, we develop a complementary module to our large-scale slope stability assessment tool to take into account the effects of vegetation on the mechanical soil properties (cohesion and over-load), but also on the slope hydrology (change in interceptions, run-off, and infiltration). Hence the proposed method combines a mechanical stability model (using finite slope analysis), a hydrological model, and a vegetation module which interfere with both aspects. All these elements are interfaced within a GIS-based solution. The whole chain is applied to a 100-km² Pyrenean Valley, for the ANR Project SAMCO (Society Adaptation for coping with Mountain risks in a global change COntext), as a first step in the chain for risk assessment for different climate and economical development scenarios, to evaluate the resilience of mountainous areas.

  14. Robust controllers for the Middeck Active Control Experiment using Popov controller synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    How, Jonathan P.; Hall, Steven R.

    1993-01-01

    Recent work in robust control with real parameter uncertainties has focused on absolute stability and its connections to real mu theory. In particular, the research has investigated the Popov stability criterion and its associated Lur'e-Postnikov Liapunov functions. State space representations of this Popov stability analysis tests are included in an H2 design formulation to provide a powerful technique for robust controller synthesis. This synthesis approach uses a state space optimization procedure to design controllers that minimize an overbound of an H2 cost functional and satisfy stability analysis tests based on the Popov multiplier. The controller and stability multiplier coefficients are optimized simultaneously, which avoids the iteration and curve-fitting procedures required by the D-K algorithm of mu synthesis. While previous work has demonstrated this synthesis approach on benchmark control problems, the purpose of this paper is to use Popov controller synthesis to design robust compensators for the Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE).

  15. Climate and Land Use Controls on Soil Organic Carbon in the Loess Plateau Region of China

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Bo; Chen, Guangsheng; Lu, Chaoqun; Yang, Jia; Pan, Shufen; Wang, Guodong; Li, Shiqing; Tian, Hanqin

    2014-01-01

    The Loess Plateau of China has the highest soil erosion rate in the world where billion tons of soil is annually washed into Yellow River. In recent decades this region has experienced significant climate change and policy-driven land conversion. However, it has not yet been well investigated how these changes in climate and land use have affected soil organic carbon (SOC) storage on the Loess Plateau. By using the Dynamic Land Ecosystem Model (DLEM), we quantified the effects of climate and land use on SOC storage on the Loess Plateau in the context of multiple environmental factors during the period of 1961–2005. Our results show that SOC storage increased by 0.27 Pg C on the Loess Plateau as a result of multiple environmental factors during the study period. About 55% (0.14 Pg C) of the SOC increase was caused by land conversion from cropland to grassland/forest owing to the government efforts to reduce soil erosion and improve the ecological conditions in the region. Historical climate change reduced SOC by 0.05 Pg C (approximately 19% of the total change) primarily due to a significant climate warming and a slight reduction in precipitation. Our results imply that the implementation of “Grain for Green” policy may effectively enhance regional soil carbon storage and hence starve off further soil erosion on the Loess Plateau. PMID:24788559

  16. Climate and land use controls on soil organic carbon in the loess plateau region of China.

    PubMed

    Dang, Yaai; Ren, Wei; Tao, Bo; Chen, Guangsheng; Lu, Chaoqun; Yang, Jia; Pan, Shufen; Wang, Guodong; Li, Shiqing; Tian, Hanqin

    2014-01-01

    The Loess Plateau of China has the highest soil erosion rate in the world where billion tons of soil is annually washed into Yellow River. In recent decades this region has experienced significant climate change and policy-driven land conversion. However, it has not yet been well investigated how these changes in climate and land use have affected soil organic carbon (SOC) storage on the Loess Plateau. By using the Dynamic Land Ecosystem Model (DLEM), we quantified the effects of climate and land use on SOC storage on the Loess Plateau in the context of multiple environmental factors during the period of 1961-2005. Our results show that SOC storage increased by 0.27 Pg C on the Loess Plateau as a result of multiple environmental factors during the study period. About 55% (0.14 Pg C) of the SOC increase was caused by land conversion from cropland to grassland/forest owing to the government efforts to reduce soil erosion and improve the ecological conditions in the region. Historical climate change reduced SOC by 0.05 Pg C (approximately 19% of the total change) primarily due to a significant climate warming and a slight reduction in precipitation. Our results imply that the implementation of "Grain for Green" policy may effectively enhance regional soil carbon storage and hence starve off further soil erosion on the Loess Plateau.

  17. Corrective measures technology for shallow land burial at arid sites: field studies of biointrusion barriers and erosion control

    SciTech Connect

    Nyhan, J.W.; Hakonson, T.E.; Lopez, E.A.

    1986-03-01

    The field research program involving corrective measures technologies for arid shallow land burial (SLB) sites is described. Results of field testing of a biointrusion barrier installed at a close-out waste disposal site (Area B) at Los Alamos are presented. Soil erosion and infiltration of water into a simulated trench cap with various surface treatments were measured, and the interaction between erosion control and subsurface water dynamics is discussed relative to waste management.

  18. RSL Class I Genes Controlled the Development of Epidermal Structures in the Common Ancestor of Land Plants.

    PubMed

    Proust, Hélène; Honkanen, Suvi; Jones, Victor A S; Morieri, Giulia; Prescott, Helen; Kelly, Steve; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Kohchi, Takayuki; Dolan, Liam

    2016-01-11

    The colonization of the land by plants, sometime before 470 million years ago, was accompanied by the evolution tissue systems [1-3]. Specialized structures with diverse functions-from nutrient acquisition to reproduction-derived from single cells in the outermost layer (epidermis) were important sources of morphological innovation at this time [2, 4, 5]. In extant plants, these structures may be unicellular extensions, such as root hairs or rhizoids [6-9], or multicellular structures, such as asexual propagules or secretory hairs (papillae) [10-12]. Here, we show that a ROOTHAIR DEFECTIVE SIX-LIKE (RSL) class I basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor positively regulates the development of the unicellular and multicellular structures that develop from individual cells that expand out of the epidermal plane of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha; mutants that lack MpRSL1 function do not develop rhizoids, slime papillae, mucilage papillae, or gemmae. Furthermore, we discovered that RSL class I genes are also required for the development of multicellular axillary hairs on the gametophyte of the moss Physcomitrella patens. Because class I RSL proteins also control the development of rhizoids in mosses and root hairs in angiosperms [13, 14], these data demonstrate that the function of RSL class I genes was to control the development of structures derived from single epidermal cells in the common ancestor of the land plants. Class I RSL genes therefore controlled the generation of adaptive morphological diversity as plants colonized the land from the water. PMID:26725198

  19. RSL Class I Genes Controlled the Development of Epidermal Structures in the Common Ancestor of Land Plants

    PubMed Central

    Proust, Hélène; Honkanen, Suvi; Jones, Victor A.S.; Morieri, Giulia; Prescott, Helen; Kelly, Steve; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Kohchi, Takayuki; Dolan, Liam

    2016-01-01

    Summary The colonization of the land by plants, sometime before 470 million years ago, was accompanied by the evolution tissue systems [1, 2, 3]. Specialized structures with diverse functions—from nutrient acquisition to reproduction—derived from single cells in the outermost layer (epidermis) were important sources of morphological innovation at this time [2, 4, 5]. In extant plants, these structures may be unicellular extensions, such as root hairs or rhizoids [6, 7, 8, 9], or multicellular structures, such as asexual propagules or secretory hairs (papillae) [10, 11, 12]. Here, we show that a ROOTHAIR DEFECTIVE SIX-LIKE (RSL) class I basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor positively regulates the development of the unicellular and multicellular structures that develop from individual cells that expand out of the epidermal plane of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha; mutants that lack MpRSL1 function do not develop rhizoids, slime papillae, mucilage papillae, or gemmae. Furthermore, we discovered that RSL class I genes are also required for the development of multicellular axillary hairs on the gametophyte of the moss Physcomitrella patens. Because class I RSL proteins also control the development of rhizoids in mosses and root hairs in angiosperms [13, 14], these data demonstrate that the function of RSL class I genes was to control the development of structures derived from single epidermal cells in the common ancestor of the land plants. Class I RSL genes therefore controlled the generation of adaptive morphological diversity as plants colonized the land from the water. PMID:26725198

  20. RSL Class I Genes Controlled the Development of Epidermal Structures in the Common Ancestor of Land Plants.

    PubMed

    Proust, Hélène; Honkanen, Suvi; Jones, Victor A S; Morieri, Giulia; Prescott, Helen; Kelly, Steve; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Kohchi, Takayuki; Dolan, Liam

    2016-01-11

    The colonization of the land by plants, sometime before 470 million years ago, was accompanied by the evolution tissue systems [1-3]. Specialized structures with diverse functions-from nutrient acquisition to reproduction-derived from single cells in the outermost layer (epidermis) were important sources of morphological innovation at this time [2, 4, 5]. In extant plants, these structures may be unicellular extensions, such as root hairs or rhizoids [6-9], or multicellular structures, such as asexual propagules or secretory hairs (papillae) [10-12]. Here, we show that a ROOTHAIR DEFECTIVE SIX-LIKE (RSL) class I basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor positively regulates the development of the unicellular and multicellular structures that develop from individual cells that expand out of the epidermal plane of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha; mutants that lack MpRSL1 function do not develop rhizoids, slime papillae, mucilage papillae, or gemmae. Furthermore, we discovered that RSL class I genes are also required for the development of multicellular axillary hairs on the gametophyte of the moss Physcomitrella patens. Because class I RSL proteins also control the development of rhizoids in mosses and root hairs in angiosperms [13, 14], these data demonstrate that the function of RSL class I genes was to control the development of structures derived from single epidermal cells in the common ancestor of the land plants. Class I RSL genes therefore controlled the generation of adaptive morphological diversity as plants colonized the land from the water.

  1. Vegetation controls on surface heat flux partitioning, and land-atmosphere coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Ian N.; Torn, Margaret S.

    2015-11-01

    We provide observational evidence that land-atmosphere coupling is underestimated by a conventional metric defined by the correlation between soil moisture and surface evaporative fraction (latent heat flux normalized by the sum of sensible and latent heat flux). Land-atmosphere coupling is 3 times stronger when using leaf area index as a correlate of evaporative fraction instead of soil moisture, in the Southern Great Plains. The role of vegetation was confirmed using adjacent flux measurement sites having identical atmospheric forcing but different vegetation phenology. Transpiration makes the relationship between evaporative fraction and soil moisture nonlinear and gives the appearance of weak coupling when using linear soil moisture metrics. Regions of substantial coupling extend to semiarid and humid continental climates across the United States, in terms of correlations between vegetation metrics and evaporative fraction. The hydrological cycle is more tightly constrained by the land surface than previously inferred from soil moisture.

  2. Space shuttle orbiter approach and landing test evaluation report. Captive-active flight test summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Captive-active tests consisted of three mated carrier aircraft/Orbiter flights with an active manned Orbiter. The objectives of this series of flights were to (1) verify the separation profile, (2) verify the integrated structure, aerodynamics, and flight control system, (3) verify Orbiter integrated system operations, and (4) refine and finalize carrier aircraft, Orbiter crew, and ground procedures in preparation for free flight tests. A summary description of the flights is presented with assessments of flight test requirements, and of the performance operations, and of significant flight anomalies is included.

  3. Simulation study of two VTOL control/display systems in IMC approach and landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrick, V. K.

    1981-01-01

    Both systems had full attitude command; the more complex system (Type 1) also had translational velocity command. The systems were applied to existing models of a VTOL lift-fan transport and the AV-8A Harrier. Simulated landings were made on a model of a DD963 Spruance-class destroyer. It was concluded that acceptable transitions and vertical landings can be performed, using the Type 1 system, in free-air turbulence up to 2.5 m/sec and sea state 6 and, using the Type 2 system, in free-air turbulence up to 1.5 m/sec and sea state 4.

  4. County-Scale Spatial Distribution of Soil Enzyme Activities and Enzyme Activity Indices in Agricultural Land: Implications for Soil Quality Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Baoni; Wang, Junxing; He, Wenxiang; Wang, Xudong; Wei, Gehong

    2014-01-01

    Here the spatial distribution of soil enzymatic properties in agricultural land was evaluated on a county-wide (567 km2) scale in Changwu, Shaanxi Province, China. The spatial variations in activities of five hydrolytic enzymes were examined using geostatistical methods. The relationships between soil enzyme activities and other soil properties were evaluated using both an integrated total enzyme activity index (TEI) and the geometric mean of enzyme activities (GME). At the county scale, soil invertase, phosphatase, and catalase activities were moderately spatially correlated, whereas urease and dehydrogenase activities were weakly spatially correlated. Correlation analysis showed that both TEI and GME were better correlated with selected soil physicochemical properties than single enzyme activities. Multivariate regression analysis showed that soil OM content had the strongest positive effect while soil pH had a negative effect on the two enzyme activity indices. In addition, total phosphorous content had a positive effect on TEI and GME in orchard soils, whereas alkali-hydrolyzable nitrogen and available potassium contents, respectively, had negative and positive effects on these two enzyme indices in cropland soils. The results indicate that land use changes strongly affect soil enzyme activities in agricultural land, where TEI provides a sensitive biological indicator for soil quality. PMID:25610908

  5. County-scale spatial distribution of soil enzyme activities and enzyme activity indices in agricultural land: implications for soil quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiangping; Xie, Baoni; Wang, Junxing; He, Wenxiang; Wang, Xudong; Wei, Gehong

    2014-01-01

    Here the spatial distribution of soil enzymatic properties in agricultural land was evaluated on a county-wide (567 km(2)) scale in Changwu, Shaanxi Province, China. The spatial variations in activities of five hydrolytic enzymes were examined using geostatistical methods. The relationships between soil enzyme activities and other soil properties were evaluated using both an integrated total enzyme activity index (TEI) and the geometric mean of enzyme activities (GME). At the county scale, soil invertase, phosphatase, and catalase activities were moderately spatially correlated, whereas urease and dehydrogenase activities were weakly spatially correlated. Correlation analysis showed that both TEI and GME were better correlated with selected soil physicochemical properties than single enzyme activities. Multivariate regression analysis showed that soil OM content had the strongest positive effect while soil pH had a negative effect on the two enzyme activity indices. In addition, total phosphorous content had a positive effect on TEI and GME in orchard soils, whereas alkali-hydrolyzable nitrogen and available potassium contents, respectively, had negative and positive effects on these two enzyme indices in cropland soils. The results indicate that land use changes strongly affect soil enzyme activities in agricultural land, where TEI provides a sensitive biological indicator for soil quality. PMID:25610908

  6. Global metabolite analysis of the land snail Theba pisana hemolymph during active and aestivated states.

    PubMed

    Bose, U; Centurion, E; Hodson, M P; Shaw, P N; Storey, K B; Cummins, S F

    2016-09-01

    The state of metabolic dormancy has fascinated people for hundreds of years, leading to research exploring the identity of natural molecular components that may induce and maintain this state. Many animals lower their metabolism in response to high temperatures and/or arid conditions, a phenomenon called aestivation. The biological significance for this is clear; by strongly suppressing metabolic rate to low levels, animals minimize their exposure to stressful conditions. Understanding blood or hemolymph metabolite changes that occur between active and aestivated animals can provide valuable insights relating to those molecular components that regulate hypometabolism in animals, and how they afford adaptation to their different environmental conditions. In this study, we have investigated the hemolymph metabolite composition from the land snail Theba pisana, a remarkably resilient mollusc that displays an annual aestivation period. Using LC-MS-based metabolomics analysis, we have identified those hemolymph metabolites that show significant changes in relative abundance between active and aestivated states. We show that certain metabolites, including some phospholipids [e.g. LysoPC(14:0)], and amino acids such as l-arginine and l-tyrosine, are present at high levels within aestivated snails. Further investigation of our T. pisana RNA-sequencing data elucidated the entire repertoire of phospholipid-synthesis genes in the snail digestive gland, as a precursor towards future comparative investigation between the genetic components of aestivating and non-aestivating species. In summary, we have identified a large number of metabolites that are elevated in the hemolymph of aestivating snails, supporting their role in protecting against heat or desiccation. PMID:27318654

  7. Global metabolite analysis of the land snail Theba pisana hemolymph during active and aestivated states.

    PubMed

    Bose, U; Centurion, E; Hodson, M P; Shaw, P N; Storey, K B; Cummins, S F

    2016-09-01

    The state of metabolic dormancy has fascinated people for hundreds of years, leading to research exploring the identity of natural molecular components that may induce and maintain this state. Many animals lower their metabolism in response to high temperatures and/or arid conditions, a phenomenon called aestivation. The biological significance for this is clear; by strongly suppressing metabolic rate to low levels, animals minimize their exposure to stressful conditions. Understanding blood or hemolymph metabolite changes that occur between active and aestivated animals can provide valuable insights relating to those molecular components that regulate hypometabolism in animals, and how they afford adaptation to their different environmental conditions. In this study, we have investigated the hemolymph metabolite composition from the land snail Theba pisana, a remarkably resilient mollusc that displays an annual aestivation period. Using LC-MS-based metabolomics analysis, we have identified those hemolymph metabolites that show significant changes in relative abundance between active and aestivated states. We show that certain metabolites, including some phospholipids [e.g. LysoPC(14:0)], and amino acids such as l-arginine and l-tyrosine, are present at high levels within aestivated snails. Further investigation of our T. pisana RNA-sequencing data elucidated the entire repertoire of phospholipid-synthesis genes in the snail digestive gland, as a precursor towards future comparative investigation between the genetic components of aestivating and non-aestivating species. In summary, we have identified a large number of metabolites that are elevated in the hemolymph of aestivating snails, supporting their role in protecting against heat or desiccation.

  8. Geochemical Signature of Land-based Activities in Caribbean Coral Surface Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prouty, N. G.; Hughen, K.; Carilli, J.

    2007-12-01

    Anthropogenic threats to the Mesoamerican Caribbean Reef Ecoregion, resulting from increased sedimentation, agrochemical run-off, coastal development, tourism and overfishing, are of great concern for future coral reef health and sustainability. Abundances of trace metal in corals can be used to monitor and identify the impact of land-based activities on the reef itself. In this study we demonstrate that surface coral samples from four sites in the Mesoamerican Caribbean Reef Ecoregion, Turneffe Atoll, Sapodilla Cayes and Honduras Bay Islands (Utila and Cayos Cochinos), yield statistically different chemical signatures due to their water quality and relative distance from pollution sources. Specifically, samples from the Sapodilla Cayes and the Bay Islands of Honduras yield elevated Ba/Ca and Mn/Ca levels, indicative of greater exposure to sediment-laden runoff form the south. In a similar manner, elevated coral Pb/Ca and Zn/Ca, and Sb/Ca and Cu/Ca values can be linked to mining activities and the use of antifouling paints, respectively. In addition, site heterogeneity was investigated by analyzing replicate cores at a single site from different colonies. We show that regional variability within the Sapodilla Cayes Marine Reserve can be explained by relative location and orientation within the reef and distance from the continental shelf. Our results indicate good reproducibility for the majority of trace metals investigated (not including Sr/Ca or Mg/Ca), suggesting that local environmental changes such as seawater chemistry, and not climate, is the dominant influence on the metal/Ca ratios.

  9. Agricultural land use and best management practices to control nonpoint water pollution.

    PubMed

    Ripa, Maria Nicoletta; Leone, Antonio; Garnier, Monica; Lo Porto, Antonio

    2006-08-01

    proposed approach, being completely distributed, represents a considerable step ahead compared to the semidistributed or lumped approaches, which are traditionally employed in research into tools to support the decision-making process for land-use planning aimed at water pollution control.

  10. Agricultural Land Use and Best Management Practices to Control Nonpoint Water Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripa, Maria Nicoletta; Leone, Antonio; Garnier, Monica; Porto, Antonio Lo

    2006-08-01

    proposed approach, being completely distributed, represents a considerable step ahead compared to the semidistributed or lumped approaches, which are traditionally employed in research into tools to support the decision-making process for land-use planning aimed at water pollution control.

  11. A Critical Review of the Effect of Air Pollution Control Regulations on Land Use Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, John J.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Although a number of recent federal initiatives explicitly require greater coordination of land use and air quality management, viable working relationships among the planning and regulatory agencies have not been developed. The concept of emission density zoning is endorsed. (Author/BT)

  12. Land and atmospheric controls on initiation and intensity of moist convection: CAPE dynamics and LCL crossings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The local role that land-atmosphere interactions play in the rainfall process has been explored by investigating the initiation of moist convection as the top of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) crosses the lifting condensation level (LCL). However, this LCL crossing alone is not a sufficient in...

  13. Land use control of stream nitrate concentrations in mountainous coastal California watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodridge, Blair M.; Melack, John M.

    2012-06-01

    Concentration versus runoff relationships can reveal how land use and watershed hydrology interactively regulate solute inputs to streams and downstream aquatic ecosystems. In six mountainous southern California coastal watersheds, consistent nitrate-runoff patterns within three broad land use classes exist: dilution in agricultural watersheds, invariance in urban watersheds, and enrichment in an undeveloped watershed. Locally weighted scatterplot smoothing (LOWESS) revealed these patterns in nitrate-runoff relationships. A hyperbolic equation reproduced these relationships, also identifying the most common nitrate concentration (i.e., nitrate mode) observed in stream water during periods of low runoff (i.e., base flow) and high runoff (i.e., stormflow). LOWESS and the hyperbolic equation were also used to reveal and reproduce electrical conductance-runoff relationships, which contrary to nitrate-runoff relationships, demonstrated uniform behavior (significant dilution; p < 0.0001) in all watersheds regardless of land use. Nitrate-electrical conductance plots revealed seasonal shifts in stormflow nitrate modes, indicating nitrate flushing behavior at the beginning of the winter wet season for all watersheds except the two with the highest agricultural land usage. Despite variation in land uses between watersheds, we found a consistent reduction in the variability of stormflow nitrate (˜12%) and electrical conductance (˜21%) modes relative to base flow modes indicating a common water and nitrate source during periods of high runoff. We propose the undeveloped, mountainous upland regions of the watersheds as this source, and suggest that this region plays an important role in determining watershed stream nitrate concentrations and nitrate flux to the Santa Barbara Channel (Pacific Ocean).

  14. Effects of land use on plague (Yersinia pestis) activity in rodents in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    McCauley, Douglas J; Salkeld, Daniel J; Young, Hillary S; Makundi, Rhodes; Dirzo, Rodolfo; Eckerlin, Ralph P; Lambin, Eric F; Gaffikin, Lynne; Barry, Michele; Helgen, Kristofer M

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the effects of land-use change on zoonotic disease risk is a pressing global health concern. Here, we compare prevalence of Yersinia pestis, the etiologic agent of plague, in rodents across two land-use types-agricultural and conserved-in northern Tanzania. Estimated abundance of seropositive rodents nearly doubled in agricultural sites compared with conserved sites. This relationship between land-use type and abundance of seropositive rodents is likely mediated by changes in rodent and flea community composition, particularly via an increase in the abundance of the commensal species, Mastomys natalensis, in agricultural habitats. There was mixed support for rodent species diversity negatively impacting Y. pestis seroprevalence. Together, these results suggest that land-use change could affect the risk of local transmission of plague, and raise critical questions about transmission dynamics at the interface of conserved and agricultural habitats. These findings emphasize the importance of understanding disease ecology in the context of rapidly proceeding landscape change.

  15. Relationship Between Watershed Land Use and Denitrification Enzyme Activity in Headwater Streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    Headwater streams are the dominant land-water interface across much of the landscape. Denitrification is an important ecological service provided by headwater streams. Anthropogenic inputs of N to terrestrial ecosystems largely result from agricultural practices. Animal agricultu...

  16. Pest control industry and vector control activities in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wang, C H; Lin, C H; Liao, M J

    1994-12-01

    At the end of 1993, there were 117 private pest control companies in Taiwan, with 438 technical managers and 274 technicians. Their business includes the control of mosquitoes, cockroaches, fleas, rodents, termites, houseflies, etc. Pyrethroids and some organophosphates are employed. At present, no applications of insect growth regulators or microbial agents are used by private pest control operators. During dengue epidemics they assist the government in space spraying with insecticides. The Environmental Protection Administration, Executive Yuan, R.O.C., is responsible for the training and management of pest control operators. In addition, the Administration is also in charge of affairs concerning the manufacture, import, registration and sale of environmental pesticides and microbial agents. It establishes protocols for testing the efficacy of insecticides and promotes pest control on the community level.

  17. Optimal Land Use Management for Soil Erosion Control by Using an Interval-Parameter Fuzzy Two-Stage Stochastic Programming Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jing-Cheng; Huang, Guo-He; Zhang, Hua; Li, Zhong

    2013-09-01

    Soil erosion is one of the most serious environmental and public health problems, and such land degradation can be effectively mitigated through performing land use transitions across a watershed. Optimal land use management can thus provide a way to reduce soil erosion while achieving the maximum net benefit. However, optimized land use allocation schemes are not always successful since uncertainties pertaining to soil erosion control are not well presented. This study applied an interval-parameter fuzzy two-stage stochastic programming approach to generate optimal land use planning strategies for soil erosion control based on an inexact optimization framework, in which various uncertainties were reflected. The modeling approach can incorporate predefined soil erosion control policies, and address inherent system uncertainties expressed as discrete intervals, fuzzy sets, and probability distributions. The developed model was demonstrated through a case study in the Xiangxi River watershed, China's Three Gorges Reservoir region. Land use transformations were employed as decision variables, and based on these, the land use change dynamics were yielded for a 15-year planning horizon. Finally, the maximum net economic benefit with an interval value of [1.197, 6.311] × 109 was obtained as well as corresponding land use allocations in the three planning periods. Also, the resulting soil erosion amount was found to be decreased and controlled at a tolerable level over the watershed. Thus, results confirm that the developed model is a useful tool for implementing land use management as not only does it allow local decision makers to optimize land use allocation, but can also help to answer how to accomplish land use changes.

  18. Optimal land use management for soil erosion control by using an interval-parameter fuzzy two-stage stochastic programming approach.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing-Cheng; Huang, Guo-He; Zhang, Hua; Li, Zhong

    2013-09-01

    Soil erosion is one of the most serious environmental and public health problems, and such land degradation can be effectively mitigated through performing land use transitions across a watershed. Optimal land use management can thus provide a way to reduce soil erosion while achieving the maximum net benefit. However, optimized land use allocation schemes are not always successful since uncertainties pertaining to soil erosion control are not well presented. This study applied an interval-parameter fuzzy two-stage stochastic programming approach to generate optimal land use planning strategies for soil erosion control based on an inexact optimization framework, in which various uncertainties were reflected. The modeling approach can incorporate predefined soil erosion control policies, and address inherent system uncertainties expressed as discrete intervals, fuzzy sets, and probability distributions. The developed model was demonstrated through a case study in the Xiangxi River watershed, China's Three Gorges Reservoir region. Land use transformations were employed as decision variables, and based on these, the land use change dynamics were yielded for a 15-year planning horizon. Finally, the maximum net economic benefit with an interval value of [1.197, 6.311] × 10(9) $ was obtained as well as corresponding land use allocations in the three planning periods. Also, the resulting soil erosion amount was found to be decreased and controlled at a tolerable level over the watershed. Thus, results confirm that the developed model is a useful tool for implementing land use management as not only does it allow local decision makers to optimize land use allocation, but can also help to answer how to accomplish land use changes.

  19. Measurement systems in the area of land remediation and soil segregation activities

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Gerold G.; Sokcic-Kostic, Marina; Auler, Ingolf; Eickelpasch, Ludger; Betts, Jonathan

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The remediation of radioactively contaminated land is a small but growing sector in the area of decommissioning of nuclear facilities. This also includes the material from buildings after demolition. Contamination comprises in general alpha and beta activities and emission of alpha, beta and gamma radiation. The measurement is in practice restricted to the measurement of gamma emission, because of the high penetration of material by gamma rays. All isotopes, which do not emit gammas are estimated on the basis of given relation between alpha and beta emitters without gamma radiation and emitters with gamma radiation. This method is called 'key nuclide method'. Whilst many studies have been completed, others still continue in the processing of large volumes of concrete, steel and soil. An important conclusion from these and similar research programs is that a significant proportion of the waste contains only low concentrations of radioactive nuclides. Therefore, much of the material from the remediation can be considered for 'free release'. It was often not possible to attain adequate specific information on these materials, so a measurement system is needed for their classification and characterization. NUKEM Technologies has practical experience in characterising and remediating of nuclear sites. Recently, it has pioneered the use of innovative in-situ and ex-situ characterisation and waste segregation technologies, which enhance the efficiency of remedial actions and provide assurance to customers, regulators and the public that all significant contamination has been removed and sites can be used for new purposes. (authors)

  20. Web Services Implementations at Land Process and Goddard Earth Sciences Distributed Active Archive Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, M.; Bambacus, M.; Lynnes, C.; Sauer, B.; Falke, S.; Yang, W.

    2007-12-01

    NASA's vast array of scientific data within its Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) is especially valuable to both traditional research scientists as well as the emerging market of Earth Science Information Partners. For example, the air quality science and management communities are increasingly using satellite derived observations in their analyses and decision making. The Air Quality Cluster in the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP) uses web infrastructures of interoperability, or Service Oriented Architecture (SOA), to extend data exploration, use, and analysis and provides a user environment for DAAC products. In an effort to continually offer these NASA data to the broadest research community audience, and reusing emerging technologies, both NASA's Goddard Earth Science (GES) and Land Process (LP) DAACs have engaged in a web services pilot project. Through these projects both GES and LP have exposed data through the Open Geospatial Consortiums (OGC) Web Services standards. Reusing several different existing applications and implementation techniques, GES and LP successfully exposed a variety data, through distributed systems to be ingested into multiple end-user systems. The results of this project will enable researchers world wide to access some of NASA's GES & LP DAAC data through OGC protocols. This functionality encourages inter-disciplinary research while increasing data use through advanced technologies. This paper will concentrate on the implementation and use of OGC Web Services, specifically Web Map and Web Coverage Services (WMS, WCS) at GES and LP DAACs, and the value of these services within scientific applications, including integration with the DataFed air quality web infrastructure and in the development of data analysis web applications.

  1. Active flutter control for flexible vehicles, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahesh, J. K.; Garrard, W. L.; Stones, C. R.; Hausman, P. D.

    1979-01-01

    An active flutter control methodology based on linear quadratic gaussian theory and its application to the control of a super critical wing is presented. Results of control surface and sensor position optimization are discussed. Both frequency response matching and residualization used to obtain practical flutter controllers are examined. The development of algorithms and computer programs for flutter modeling and active control design procedures is reported.

  2. Effect of gender on trunk and pelvis control during lateral movements with perturbed landing.

    PubMed

    Weltin, Elmar; Gollhofer, Albert; Mornieux, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    In lateral reactive movements, core stability may influence knee and hip joint kinematics and kinetics. Insufficient core stabilisation is discussed as a major risk factor for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. Due to the higher probability of ACL injuries in women, this study concentrates on how gender influences trunk, pelvis and leg kinematics during lateral reactive jumps (LRJs). Perturbations were investigated in 12 men and 12 women performing LRJs under three different landing conditions: a movable landing platform was programmed to slide, resist or counteract upon landing. Potential group effects on three-dimensional trunk, pelvic, hip and knee kinematics were analysed for initial contact (IC) and the time of peak pelvic medial tilt (PPT). Regardless of landing conditions, the joint excursions in the entire lower limb joints were gender-specific. Women exhibited higher trunk left axial rotation at PPT (women: 4.0 ± 7.5°, men: -3.1 ± 8.2°; p = 0.011) and higher hip external rotation at both IC and PPT (p < 0.01). But women demonstrated higher knee abduction compared to men. Men demonstrated more medial pelvic tilt at IC and especially PPT (men: -5.8 ± 4.9°, women: 0.3 ± 6.3°; p = 0.015). Strategies for maintaining trunk, pelvis and lower limb alignment during lateral reactive movements were gender-specific; the trunk and hip rotations displayed by the women were associated with the higher knee abduction amplitudes and therefore might reflect a movement strategy which is associated with higher injury risk. However, training interventions are needed to fully understand how gender-specific core stability strategies are related to performance and knee injury.

  3. Gully head development controlled by land surface management in Lake Tana basin, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsieurs, Elise; Nyssen, Jan; Dessie, Mekete; Verhoest, Niko E. C.; Deckers, Jozef; Adgo, Enyew; Poesen, Jean

    2015-04-01

    In contrast to level areas where drainage ditches mainly aim at lowering the level of the phreatic surface when it comes near or at the surface, digging ditches to divert runoff water on sloping cropland is a physical soil conservation practice to protect the land from uncontrolled runoff and hence decrease the risk of topsoil and seedling erosion. However, researchers are still divided about the balance of the positive and negative effects which can be both on-site and off-site. A case study area was chosen around Wanzaye (North Ethiopia) where three different cropland-management practices were studied in 75 catchments: (i) the catchment-wide use of stone bunds on the contour, (ii) the use of slightly sloping drainage furrows (feses), and (iii) the combined use of stone bunds and feses. A standardized procedure for topographical threshold analysis was applied to study the impact of different land management practices on gully head development in cropland. Topographical thresholds for gully head development reflect the vulnerability of lands to gullying, i.e. s > kA^-b, where s represents slope gradient of the soil surface, A the drainage area at the gully head, b an exponent, and k the resistance of the land to gully head development. The lowest k-values are found for feses catchments, which implies that catchments with the exclusive use of drainage ditches are the most vulnerable to gully head development compared to mixed catchments and stone bund catchments. Yet, on-site sheet and rill erosion are reduced by the use of feses as they reduce the runoff gradient.

  4. Flight control and landing precision in the nocturnal bee Megalopta is robust to large changes in light intensity

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Emily; Fernandez, Diana C.; Wcislo, William T.; Warrant, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Like their diurnal relatives, Megalopta genalis use visual information to control flight. Unlike their diurnal relatives, however, they do this at extremely low light intensities. Although Megalopta has developed optical specializations to increase visual sensitivity, theoretical studies suggest that this enhanced sensitivity does not enable them to capture enough light to use visual information to reliably control flight in the rainforest at night. It has been proposed that Megalopta gain extra sensitivity by summing visual information over time. While enhancing the reliability of vision, this strategy would decrease the accuracy with which they can detect image motion—a crucial cue for flight control. Here, we test this temporal summation hypothesis by investigating how Megalopta's flight control and landing precision is affected by light intensity and compare our findings with the results of similar experiments performed on the diurnal bumblebee Bombus terrestris, to explore the extent to which Megalopta's adaptations to dim light affect their precision. We find that, unlike Bombus, light intensity does not affect flight and landing precision in Megalopta. Overall, we find little evidence that Megalopta uses a temporal summation strategy in dim light, while we find strong support for the use of this strategy in Bombus. PMID:26578977

  5. Flight control and landing precision in the nocturnal bee Megalopta is robust to large changes in light intensity.

    PubMed

    Baird, Emily; Fernandez, Diana C; Wcislo, William T; Warrant, Eric J

    2015-01-01

    Like their diurnal relatives, Megalopta genalis use visual information to control flight. Unlike their diurnal relatives, however, they do this at extremely low light intensities. Although Megalopta has developed optical specializations to increase visual sensitivity, theoretical studies suggest that this enhanced sensitivity does not enable them to capture enough light to use visual information to reliably control flight in the rainforest at night. It has been proposed that Megalopta gain extra sensitivity by summing visual information over time. While enhancing the reliability of vision, this strategy would decrease the accuracy with which they can detect image motion-a crucial cue for flight control. Here, we test this temporal summation hypothesis by investigating how Megalopta's flight control and landing precision is affected by light intensity and compare our findings with the results of similar experiments performed on the diurnal bumblebee Bombus terrestris, to explore the extent to which Megalopta's adaptations to dim light affect their precision. We find that, unlike Bombus, light intensity does not affect flight and landing precision in Megalopta. Overall, we find little evidence that Megalopta uses a temporal summation strategy in dim light, while we find strong support for the use of this strategy in Bombus. PMID:26578977

  6. Land use control of stream nitrate concentrations in mountainous coastal California watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodridge, B.; Melack, J.

    2011-12-01

    Concentration versus runoff relationships can reveal how land use and watershed hydrology interactively regulate chemical inputs to streams and downstream aquatic ecosystems. In six mountainous southern California coastal watersheds, consistent nitrate-runoff patterns within three broad land use classes exist: dilution in agricultural watersheds, invariance in urban watersheds, and enrichment in an undeveloped watershed. Locally-weighted scatter plot smoothing revealed these patterns in nitrate-runoff relationships. A hyperbolic hydrochemical mixing model reproduced these relationships by generating three parameters for each watershed that identified the form of nitrate-runoff relationships and characteristic nitrate concentrations for two hydrological regimes, baseflow and stormflow. Despite differing land uses and sources of nitrate, we found that stream nitrate concentrations during periods of stormflow were less variable than during baseflow. This reduction in inter-watershed variability in stormflow nitrate concentrations indicates a common source of water and nitrate to all watersheds that mutes higher inter-watershed variability in baseflow nitrate concentrations. We propose the undeveloped, mountainous upland regions of the watersheds as this source, and suggest that this region plays an important role in determining watershed stream nitrate concentrations and nitrate flux to the Santa Barbara Channel (Pacific Ocean).

  7. Land use and energy

    SciTech Connect

    Robeck, K.E.; Ballou, S.W.; South, D.W.; Davis, M.J.; Chiu, S.Y.; Baker, J.E.; Dauzvardis, P.A.; Garvey, D.B.; Torpy, M.F.

    1980-07-01

    This report provides estimates of the amount of land required by past and future energy development in the United States and examines major federal legislation that regulates the impact of energy facilities on land use. An example of one land use issue associated with energy development - the potential conflict between surface mining and agriculture - is illustrated by describing the actual and projected changes in land use caused by coal mining in western Indiana. Energy activities addressed in the report include extraction of coal, oil, natural gas, uranium, oil shale, and geothermal steam; uranium processing; preparation of synfuels from coal; oil refineries; fossil-fuel, nuclear, and hydro-electric power plants; biomass energy farms; and disposal of solid wastes generated during combustion of fossil fuels. Approximately 1.1 to 3.3 x 10/sup 6/ acres were devoted to these activities in the United States in 1975. As much as 1.8 to 2.0 x 10/sup 6/ additional acres could be required by 1990 for new, nonbiomass energy development. The production of grain for fuel ethanol could require an additional 16.9 to 55.7 x 10/sup 6/ acres by 1990. Federal laws that directly or indirectly regulate the land-use impacts of energy facilities include the National Environmental Protection Act, Clean Air Act, Federal Water Pollution Control Act, Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act, and Coastal Zone Management Act. The major provisions of these acts, other relevant federal regulations, and similar state and local regulatons are described in this report. Federal legislation relating to air quality, water quality, and the management of public lands has the greatest potential to influence the location and timing of future energy development in the United States.

  8. Guide to good practices for control area activities

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This Guide to Good Practices is written to enhance understanding of, and provide direction for, Control Area Activities, Chapter III of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities. The practices in this guide should be considered for controlling the activities in control areas. Contractors are advised to adopt procedures that meet the intent of DOE Order 5480.19. Control Area Activities is an element of an effective Conduct of Operations program. The complexity and array of activities performed in DOE facilities dictate the necessity for maintaining a formal environment in operational control areas to promote safe and efficient operations.

  9. Active parallel redundancy for electronic integrator-type control circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, R. A.

    1971-01-01

    Circuit extends concept of redundant feedback control from type-0 to type-1 control systems. Inactive channels are slaves to the active channel, if latter fails, it is rejected and slave channel is activated. High reliability and elimination of single-component catastrophic failure are important in closed-loop control systems.

  10. Land use Controls on Water Quality and Aquatic Ecosystems in the Andean Amazon, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waggoner, L. A.; McClain, M. E.

    2007-05-01

    Agro-pastoral systems are replacing many of the tropical forests in the world, and much of this deforestation occurs in watersheds where people's livelihoods rely directly on water and aquatic resources in local streams and rivers. We examined relationships between land use and aquatic ecosystems in 34 catchments exhibiting a gradient of land use disturbance and human settlement in the Andean Amazon of Peru. Our research objectives were to 1) classify and characterize watershed land use and physical properties using remotely sensed data, 2) characterize the physical, biological and chemical conditions of streams 3) examine relationships between land use and water quality parameters at 3 scales: watershed, riparian and reach habitat and 4) translate research findings into management strategies that minimize disturbance and maximize ecosystem services. Primary forest was the dominant cover (68%) across the catchments, and the remaining study area was composed of: mixed forest (11.5%), grassland (10.75%) cropland (9.17%) and bare rock (0.02%). Among watersheds, forest cover ranged from 14% to 100%, mixed forest ranged from 0% to 26%, grassland ranged from 0% to 45% and cropland ranged from 0% to 26%. Physical habitat index scores ranged from 12.80 (very impaired) to 29.50 (reference conditions). Although nitrogen, phosphorous, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), pH, electric conductivity, and dissolved oxygen (DO), varied across sites, total concentrations remained within acceptable levels. Simpson's diversity and Family Biotic Index (FBI) were calculated for macroinvertebrates collected at each site; Simpson's diversity ranged from 0.24 to 0.95 and FBI ranged from 1.97 (excellent) to 7.49 (fairly poor). Forest cover at the watershed scale was the best explanatory variable and was positively correlated with inorganic phosphate (0.50), DO (0.90) and Simpson's diversity (0.46) and negatively correlated with organic phosphate (- 0.64), DOC (-0.75), water temperature (-0

  11. Modeling the Benchmark Active Control Technology Wind-Tunnel Model for Active Control Design Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the formulation of a model of the dynamic behavior of the Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) wind tunnel model for active control design and analysis applications. The model is formed by combining the equations of motion for the BACT wind tunnel model with actuator models and a model of wind tunnel turbulence. The primary focus of this report is the development of the equations of motion from first principles by using Lagrange's equations and the principle of virtual work. A numerical form of the model is generated by making use of parameters obtained from both experiment and analysis. Comparisons between experimental and analytical data obtained from the numerical model show excellent agreement and suggest that simple coefficient-based aerodynamics are sufficient to accurately characterize the aeroelastic response of the BACT wind tunnel model. The equations of motion developed herein have been used to aid in the design and analysis of a number of flutter suppression controllers that have been successfully implemented.

  12. Field studies on the annual activity and the metabolic responses of a land snail population living in high altitude.

    PubMed

    Staikou, Alexandra; Tachtatzis, George; Feidantsis, Konstantinos; Michaelidis, Basile

    2016-01-01

    In the context of the metabolic cold adaptation hypothesis (MCA), we investigated a) the life and activity cycle characteristics and b) the metabolic responses of the endemic land snail species Cattania trizona olympica living at 1100m altitude in Olympus mountain (Greece). Field observations on the annual activity cycle of C. trizona olympica revealed that snails' activity was restricted mainly between the end of May and September, when the higher temperatures were recorded, while first matings were recorded in July and the last ones in mid September indicating a restricted favorable time period for reproduction. The activities of enzymes of intermediate metabolism showed a periodic seasonal pattern of change which seems to be closely related to the pattern of annual changes of air temperature and most of them exhibited higher activities during the coldest and warmest periods of the year. Moreover the data indicate a distinct differentiation of fuel oxidation during arousal and reproductive periods with lipid oxidation, apart from carbohydrates, contributing significantly to ATP turnover during reproductive activity. The higher enzymatic activities, determined in the tissues of C. trizona olympica than the corresponding ones determined in the tissues of the land snail species living at low altitudes, might indicate higher sensitivity of the intermediate metabolism and ATP turnover in C. trizona olympica to changes in environmental factors. Although the latter seems to be in line with the MCA hypothesis, it needs further investigation on metabolic rates to support it. PMID:26408810

  13. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, S.; Schmidt, D. K.

    1986-01-01

    The utility of augmenting displays to aid the human operator in controlling high order complex systems is well known. Analytical evaluation of various display designs for a simple k/s sup 2 plant in a compensatory tracking task using an optimal Control Model (OCM) of human behavior is carried out. This analysis reveals that significant improvement in performance should be obtained by skillful integration of key information into the display dynamics. The cooperative control synthesis technique previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing augmented displays. The application of the cooperative control synthesis technique to the design of augmented displays is discussed for the simple k/s sup 2 plant. This technique is intended to provide a systematic approach to design optimally augmented displays tailored for specific tasks.

  14. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, Sanjay; Schmidt, David K.

    1987-01-01

    A technique is developed that is intended to provide a systematic approach to synthesizing display augmentation for optimal manual control in complex, closed-loop tasks. A cooperative control synthesis technique, previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation for the plant, is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing displays. The technique utilizes an optimal control model of the man in the loop. It is applied to the design of a quickening control law for a display and a simple K/(s squared) plant, and then to an F-15 type aircraft in a multichannel task. Utilizing the closed-loop modeling and analysis procedures, the results from the display design algorithm are evaluated and an analytical validation is performed. Experimental validation is recommended for future efforts.

  15. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, S.; Schmidt, D. K.

    1985-01-01

    The utility of augmenting displays to aid the human operator in controlling high order complex systems is well known. Analytical evaluations of various display designs for a simple k/s-squared plant in a compensatory tracking task using an Optimal Control Model (OCM) of human behavior is carried out. This analysis reveals that significant improvement in performance should be obtained by skillful integration of key information into the display dynamics. The cooperative control synthesis technique previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing augmented displays. The application of the cooperative control synthesis technique to the design of augmented displays is discussed for the simple k/s-squared plant. This technique is intended to provide a systematic approach to design optimally augmented displays tailored for specific tasks.

  16. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, S.; Schmidt, D. K.

    1985-01-01

    A technique is developed that is intended to provide a systematic approach to synthesizing display augmentation for optimal manual control in complex, closed-loop tasks. A cooperative control synthesis technique, previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation for the plant, is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing displays. The technique utilizes an optimal control model of the man in the loop. It is applied to the design of a quickening control law for a display and a simple K/s(2) plant, and then to an F-15 type aircraft in a multi-channel task. Utilizing the closed loop modeling and analysis procedures, the results from the display design algorithm are evaluated and an analytical validation is performed. Experimental validation is recommended for future efforts.

  17. A new paradigm for quarantine and public health activities at land borders: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Waterman, Stephen H; Escobedo, Miguel; Wilson, Todd; Edelson, Paul J; Bethel, Jeffrey W; Fishbein, Daniel B

    2009-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) report Quarantine Stations at Ports of Entry: Protecting the Public's Health focused almost exclusively on U.S. airports and seaports, which served 106 million entries in 2005. IOM concluded that the primary function of these quarantine stations (QSs) should shift from providing inspection to providing strategic national public health leadership. The large expanse of our national borders, large number of crossings, sparse federal resources, and decreased regulation regarding conveyances crossing these borders make land borders more permeable to a variety of threats. To address the health challenges related to land borders, the QSs serving such borders must assume unique roles and partnerships to achieve the strategic leadership and public health research roles envisioned by the IOM. In this article, we examine how the IOM recommendations apply to the QSs that serve the land borders through which more than 319 million travelers, immigrants, and refugees entered the U.S. in 2005.

  18. Watershed-Scale Land Use Activities Influence the Physiological Condition of Stream Fish.

    PubMed

    King, Gregory D; Chapman, Jacqueline M; Midwood, Jonathan D; Cooke, Steven J; Suski, Cory D

    2016-01-01

    Land use changes within watersheds can have large effects on stream ecosystems, but the mechanistic basis of those effects remains poorly understood. While changes to population size presumably reflect underlying variation in organismal health and condition, such individual-level metrics are rarely evaluated in the context of ecosystem disturbance. To address this deficiency, we combined physiological sampling with geographic information systems to quantify the effects of land use on physiological indicators of health in largemouth bass. More specifically, we first quantified blood metrics relating to nutrition, oxidative stress, and the glucocorticoid stress response from largemouth bass residing in eight watersheds. We then used Akaike's information criterion to define relationships between these blood metrics and land cover, including forests, agricultural areas, urban areas, and wetlands. The proportion of forest cover in a watershed was the best predictor of blood metrics representing recent feeding and resistance to oxidative stress, whereas the proportion of wetlands was the best predictor of glucocorticoid function; however, further investigation is needed, as the explanatory power of the models was relatively low. Patterns in energy reserves were not influenced by any land use practices. Interestingly, anthropogenic land use categories, such as urban and agricultural areas, were not the best predictor for any blood metrics. Together, our results indicate that fish health is most related to natural features of a landscape rather than anthropogenic land uses. Furthermore, these findings suggest that physiological methods could supplement traditional population and community assessments to develop a more comprehensive understanding of ecosystem interactions and improve stream management. PMID:27082521

  19. Coordination of Mars Orbiting Assets to Support Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neelon, Joseph G.; Wallace, Mark; Craig, Lynn E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA policy requires continuous telecommunications with missions during the execution of their critical events, which implies constraints on where missions to other planets may land or inject into orbit. JPL is working to establish a telecommunications network at Mars to provide contact with inbound missions to Mars and assets that have landed on the Martian surface, thus reducing the constraints on where critical events may be performed. Coordination of network assets is required to cover an inbound mission's critical event, such as EDL. This paper describes the development of a tool to evaluate EDL coverage capability of Mars network assets over a specified launch date/arrival date space.

  20. Statistical evaluation of control inputs and eye movements in the use of instruments clusters during aircraft landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, A. O.; Brown, J. L.; Bailey, G.

    1977-01-01

    Two different types of analyses were done on data from a study in which eye movements and other variables were recorded while four pilots executed landing sequences in a Boeing 737 simulation. Various conditions were manupulated, including changes in turbulence, starting position, and instrumentation. Control inputs were analyzed in the context of the various conditions and compared against ratings of workload obtained using the Cooper-Harper scale. A number of eye-scanning measures including mean dwell time and transition from one instrument to another were entered into a principal components factor analysis. The results show a differentiation between control inputs and eye-scanning behavior. This shows the need for improved definition of workload and experiments to uncover the important differences among control inputs, eye-scanning and cognitive processes of the pilot.

  1. Pitch attitude, flight path, and airspeed control during approach and landing of a powered lift STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, J. A.; Innis, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    Analytical investigations and piloted moving base simulator evaluations were conducted for manual control of pitch attitude, flight path, and airspeed for the approach and landing of a powered lift jet STOL aircraft. Flight path and speed response characteristics were described analytically and were evaluated for the simulation experiments which were carried out on a large motion simulator. The response characteristics were selected and evaluated for a specified path and speed control technique. These charcteristics were: (1) the initial pitch response and steady pitch rate sensitivity for control of attitude with a pitch rate command/ attitude hold system, (2) the initial flight path response, flight path overshoot, and flight path-airspeed coupling in response to a change in thrust, and (3) the sensitivity of airspeed to pitch attitude changes. Results are presented in the form of pilot opinion ratings and commentary, substantiated where appropriate by response time histories and aircraft states at the point of touchdown.

  2. A 125 year long record of DOC flux from a major temperate catchment: land-use vs. climate control?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clay, G.; Worrall, F.; Howden, N. K.; Burt, T. P.

    2010-12-01

    Our understanding of the controls upon carbon biogeochemistry has always been limited by lack of long term observational data at the same time as having long term monitoring of possible environmental drivers. For the River Thames catchment in the UK (9998 km2) records of DOM have been kept since 1868 and DOM flux since 1882. In addition to riverflow being monitored in the catchment there has also been monitoring of climate, land-use and population back to at least 1868. The Thames catchment is a mixed agricultural urban catchment dominated by mineral soils where groundwater plays a significant part in the catchments flow system. During the period of the record the catchment has undergone urbanisation, climate warming but has also undergone large-scale land use change associated with World War II and agricultural intensification in the 1960s. The importance of these combinations of pressures are explored in the time series through a range of time series techniques and the results show: i) That DOC flux in the catchment is now at historic low levels, with the maximum flux being 35 ktonnes C/yr (3.5 tonnes/km2/yr) in 1915 and the lowest flux being 2 ktonnes C/yr (0.2 tonnes/km2/yr) in 1997. ii) The trend in the DOC flux is explained by changes in flow, which appear associated with both with groundwater storage in the catchment and with changes in land-use. iii) The significant decline in the DOC flux appears to be due to the transition in the catchment from dominated from pasture to an arable land use. iv) The decline of DOC flux with temperature would suggest that DOC mineralisation reaction has a higher Q10 than the DOC production. v) Declining DOC flux from mineral soils catchments would offset increases in DOC flux from organic soils but would also represent a shift in carbon losses from fluvial to being direct to the atmosphere.

  3. Hip External Rotator Strength Is Associated With Better Dynamic Control of the Lower Extremity During Landing Tasks.

    PubMed

    Malloy, Philip J; Morgan, Alexander M; Meinerz, Carolyn M; Geiser, Christopher F; Kipp, Kristof

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the association between hip strength and lower extremity kinematics and kinetics during unanticipated single-leg landing and cutting tasks in collegiate female soccer players. Twenty-three National Collegiate Athletic Association division I female soccer players were recruited for strength testing and biomechanical analysis. Maximal isometric hip abduction and external rotation strength were measured using a hand-held dynamometer and expressed as muscle torque (force × femoral length) and normalized to body weight. Three-dimensional lower extremity kinematics and kinetics were assessed with motion analysis and force plates, and an inverse dynamics approach was used to calculate net internal joint moments that were normalized to body weight. Greater hip external rotator strength was significantly associated with greater peak hip external rotation moments (r = 0.47; p = 0.021), greater peak knee internal rotation moments (r = 0.41; p = 0.048), greater hip frontal plane excursion (r = 0.49; p = 0.017), and less knee transverse plane excursion (r = -0.56; p = 0.004) during unanticipated single-leg landing and cutting tasks. In addition, a statistical trend was detected between hip external rotator strength and peak hip frontal plane moments (r = 0.39; p = 0.06). The results suggest that females with greater hip external rotator strength demonstrate better dynamic control of the lower extremity during unanticipated single-leg landing and cutting tasks and provide further support for the link between hip strength and lower extremity landing mechanics. PMID:26110347

  4. Active Combustion Control for Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLaat, John C.; Breisacher, Kevin J.; Saus, Joseph R.; Paxson, Daniel E.

    2000-01-01

    Lean-burning combustors are susceptible to combustion instabilities. Additionally, due to non-uniformities in the fuel-air mixing and in the combustion process, there typically exist hot areas in the combustor exit plane. These hot areas limit the operating temperature at the turbine inlet and thus constrain performance and efficiency. Finally, it is necessary to optimize the fuel-air ratio and flame temperature throughout the combustor to minimize the production of pollutants. In recent years, there has been considerable activity addressing Active Combustion Control. NASA Glenn Research Center's Active Combustion Control Technology effort aims to demonstrate active control in a realistic environment relevant to aircraft engines. Analysis and experiments are tied to aircraft gas turbine combustors. Considerable progress has been shown in demonstrating technologies for Combustion Instability Control, Pattern Factor Control, and Emissions Minimizing Control. Future plans are to advance the maturity of active combustion control technology to eventual demonstration in an engine environment.

  5. PARTICULATE EMISSION MEASUREMENTS FROM CONTROLLED CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarized the results of field testing of the effectiveness of control measures for sources of fugitive particulate emissions found at construction sites. The effectiveness of watering temporary, unpaved travel surfaces on emissions of particulate matter with aerodyna...

  6. 15. INTERIOR OVERVIEW TO SOUTHEAST. ACTIVE CONTROL PANEL AND GENERATORS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. INTERIOR OVERVIEW TO SOUTHEAST. ACTIVE CONTROL PANEL AND GENERATORS AT LEFT, HISTORIC CONTROL PANEL AT RIGHT. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-1 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  7. Active control of flexural vibrations in beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of using piezoelectric actuators to control the flexural oscillations of large structures in space is investigated. Flexural oscillations are excited by impulsive loads. The vibratory response can degrade the pointing accuracy of cameras and antennae, and can cause high stresses at structural node points. Piezoelectric actuators have the advantage of exerting localized bending moments. In this way, vibration is controlled without exciting rigid body modes. The actuators are used in collocated sensor/driver pairs to form a feedback control system. The sensor produces a voltage that is proportional to the dynamic stress at the sensor location, and the driver produces a force that is proportional to the voltage applied to it. The analog control system amplifies and phase shifts the sensor signal to produce the voltage signal that is applied to the driver. The feedback control is demonstrated to increase the first mode damping in a cantilever beam by up to 100 percent, depending on the amplifier gain. The damping efficiency of the control system when the piezoelectrics are not optimally positioned at points of high stress in the beam is evaluated.

  8. Active chatter control in a milling machine

    SciTech Connect

    Dohner, J.L.; Hinnerichs, T.D.; Lauffer, J.P.

    1997-08-01

    The use of active feedback compensation to mitigate cutting instabilities in an advanced milling machine is discussed in this paper. A linear structural model delineating dynamics significant to the onset of cutting instabilities was combined with a nonlinear cutting model to form a dynamic depiction of an existing milling machine. The model was validated with experimental data. Modifications made to an existing machine model were used to predict alterations in dynamics due to the integration of active feedback compensation. From simulations, subcomponent requirements were evaluated and cutting enhancements were predicted. Active compensation was shown to enable more than double the metal removal rate over conventional milling machines. 25 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Effects of Land Use on Plague (Yersinia pestis) Activity in Rodents in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    McCauley, Douglas J.; Salkeld, Daniel J.; Young, Hillary S.; Makundi, Rhodes; Dirzo, Rodolfo; Eckerlin, Ralph P.; Lambin, Eric F.; Gaffikin, Lynne; Barry, Michele; Helgen, Kristofer M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the effects of land-use change on zoonotic disease risk is a pressing global health concern. Here, we compare prevalence of Yersinia pestis, the etiologic agent of plague, in rodents across two land-use types—agricultural and conserved—in northern Tanzania. Estimated abundance of seropositive rodents nearly doubled in agricultural sites compared with conserved sites. This relationship between land-use type and abundance of seropositive rodents is likely mediated by changes in rodent and flea community composition, particularly via an increase in the abundance of the commensal species, Mastomys natalensis, in agricultural habitats. There was mixed support for rodent species diversity negatively impacting Y. pestis seroprevalence. Together, these results suggest that land-use change could affect the risk of local transmission of plague, and raise critical questions about transmission dynamics at the interface of conserved and agricultural habitats. These findings emphasize the importance of understanding disease ecology in the context of rapidly proceeding landscape change. PMID:25711606

  10. 43 CFR 24.4 - Resource management and public activities on Federal lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... National Park System contain natural, recreation, historic, and cultural values of national significance as... Management, units of the National Wildlife Refuge System and national fish hatcheries, and units of the National Park System. (b) The Bureau of Reclamation withdraws public lands and acquires non-Federal...

  11. Identifying and Evaluating the Relationships that Control a Land Surface Model's Hydrological Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, Randal D.; Mahanama, Sarith P.

    2012-01-01

    The inherent soil moisture-evaporation relationships used in today 's land surface models (LSMs) arguably reflect a lot of guesswork given the lack of contemporaneous evaporation and soil moisture observations at the spatial scales represented by regional and global models. The inherent soil moisture-runoff relationships used in the LSMs are also of uncertain accuracy. Evaluating these relationships is difficult but crucial given that they have a major impact on how the land component contributes to hydrological and meteorological variability within the climate system. The relationships, it turns out, can be examined efficiently and effectively with a simple water balance model framework. The simple water balance model, driven with multi-decadal observations covering the conterminous United States, shows how different prescribed relationships lead to different manifestations of hydrological variability, some of which can be compared directly to observations. Through the testing of a wide suite of relationships, the simple model provides estimates for the underlying relationships that operate in nature and that should be operating in LSMs. We examine the relationships currently used in a number of different LSMs in the context of the simple water balance model results and make recommendations for potential first-order improvements to these LSMs.

  12. Increasing pre-activation of the quadriceps muscle protects the anterior cruciate ligament during the landing phase of a jump: an in vitro simulation.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Javad; Breighner, Ryan; Jang, Taek-Hyun; Chandrashekar, Naveen; Ekwaro-Osire, Stephen; Slauterbeck, James R

    2010-06-01

    We hypothesize that application of an unopposed quadriceps force coupled with an impulsive ground reaction force may induce anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. This situation is similar to landing from a jump if only the quadriceps muscle is active; an unlikely but presumably dangerous circumstance. The purpose of this study was to test our hypothesis using in vitro simulation of jump landing. A jump-landing simulator was utilized. Nine cadaveric knees were tested at an initial flexion angle of 20 degrees . Each ACL was instrumented with a differential variable reluctance transducer (DVRT). Quadriceps pre-activation forces (QPFs) ranging from 25N to 700N were applied to each knee, followed by an impulsive ground reaction force produced by a carriage-mounted drop weight (7kg) that impulsively drove the ankle upward. ACL strain was monitored before landing due to application of QPF (pre-activation strain) and at landing due to application of the ground reaction force (landing strain). No ACLs were injured. Pre-activation strains exhibited a positive correlation with QPF (r=0.674, p<0.001) while landing strains showed a negative correlation (r=-0.235, p=0.032). Total ACL strain (pre-activation+landing strain) showed no correlation with QPF (r=0.023, p=0.428). Our findings indicate that elevated QPF increases pre-activation strain but reduces the landing strain and is therefore protective post-landing. Overall, there is a complete lack of correlation between "total" ACL strain and QPF suggesting that the total strain in the ACL is independent of the QPF under the simulated conditions.

  13. Broadband radiation modes: Estimation and active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2002-03-01

    In this paper we give a formulation of the most efficiently radiating vibration patterns of a vibrating body, the radiation modes, in the time domain. The radiation modes can be used to arrive at efficient weighting schemes for an array of sensors in order to reduce the controller dimensionality. Because these particular radiation modes are optimum in a broadband sense, they are termed broadband radiation modes. Methods are given to obtain these modes from measured data. The broadband radiation modes are used for the design of an actuator array in a feedback control system to reduce the sound power radiated from a plate. Three methods for the design of the actuator are compared, taking into account the reduction of radiated sound power in the controlled frequency range, but also the possible increase of radiated sound power in the uncontrolled frequency range.

  14. COSTS OF BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES AND ASSOCIATED LAND FOR URBAN STORMWATER CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this paper is to present information on the cost of stormwater pollution control facilities in urban areas, including collection, control, and treatment systems. Information on prior cost studies of control technologies and cost estimating models used in these stu...

  15. Quantifying the sensitivity of ephemeral streams to land disturbance activities in arid ecosystems at the watershed scale.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Ben L; Hamada, Yuki; Bowen, Esther E; Grippo, Mark A; Hartmann, Heidi M; Patton, Terri L; Van Lonkhuyzen, Robert A; Carr, Adrianne E

    2014-11-01

    Large areas of public lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management and located in arid regions of the southwestern United States are being considered for the development of utility-scale solar energy facilities. Land-disturbing activities in these desert, alluvium-filled valleys have the potential to adversely affect the hydrologic and ecologic functions of ephemeral streams. Regulation and management of ephemeral streams typically falls under a spectrum of federal, state, and local programs, but scientifically based guidelines for protecting ephemeral streams with respect to land-development activities are largely nonexistent. This study developed an assessment approach for quantifying the sensitivity to land disturbance of ephemeral stream reaches located in proposed solar energy zones (SEZs). The ephemeral stream assessment approach used publicly-available geospatial data on hydrology, topography, surficial geology, and soil characteristics, as well as high-resolution aerial imagery. These datasets were used to inform a professional judgment-based score index of potential land disturbance impacts on selected critical functions of ephemeral streams, including flow and sediment conveyance, ecological habitat value, and groundwater recharge. The total sensitivity scores (sum of scores for the critical stream functions of flow and sediment conveyance, ecological habitats, and groundwater recharge) were used to identify highly sensitive stream reaches to inform decisions on developable areas in SEZs. Total sensitivity scores typically reflected the scores of the individual stream functions; some exceptions pertain to groundwater recharge and ecological habitats. The primary limitations of this assessment approach were the lack of high-resolution identification of ephemeral stream channels in the existing National Hydrography Dataset, and the lack of mechanistic processes describing potential impacts on ephemeral stream functions at the watershed scale. The

  16. Pulley With Active Antifriction Actuator And Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ih, Che-Hang C.; Vivian, Howard C.

    1994-01-01

    Torque actuator and associated control system minimizes effective friction of rotary bearing. Motor exerts compensating torque in response to feedback from external optical sensor. Compensation torque nearly cancels frictional torque of shaft bearings. Also useful in reducing bearing friction in gyro-scopes, galvanometers, torquemeters, accelerometers, earth-motion detectors, and balances.

  17. Selective Activation and Disengagement of Moral Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bandura, Albert

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes psychological mechanisms by which moral control is selectively disengaged from inhumane conduct in ordinary and unusual circumstances. Explores the symptoms of moral exclusion as described in the literature. Presents categories that unify theory on moral exclusion and contribute practical classifications for use in empirical studies. (JS)

  18. Evaluation of insecticide impregnated baits for control of mosquito larvae in land crab burrows on French Polynesian atolls.

    PubMed

    Lardeux, Frederic; Sechan, Yves; Faaruia, Marc

    2002-07-01

    Land crab burrows are larval mosquito habitats of major significance in the Pacific region. They are constituted by a sinuous tunnel leading to a chamber in contact with the water table, where mosquito larvae proliferate. Controlling larvae in these sites is difficult, because the configuration of burrows prevents the use of standard techniques. An experiment was carried out in French Polynesia to control Aedes polynesiensis Marks and Culex spp. breeding in burrows of the land crab Cardisoma carnifex (Herbst). The technique was based on the crab's behavior, which involves the crab carrying food into its burrow. It was shown that appetizing baits impregnated with an insecticide were carried by crabs into the flooded chamber of their burrows. A field treatment of burrows was carried out by sowing insecticide impregnated baits on the ground. The treatment coverage was almost perfect and the easy implementation of the technique enabled large areas to be treated in a short time. The bait was developed by compacting various flours, which easily incorporate a large variety of insecticide formulations. Although the baits can be easily stocked, a reliable insecticide is still to be found. The results indicate that our technique could be a method of choice for treating crab burrows. PMID:12144299

  19. Evaluation of insecticide impregnated baits for control of mosquito larvae in land crab burrows on French Polynesian atolls.

    PubMed

    Lardeux, Frederic; Sechan, Yves; Faaruia, Marc

    2002-07-01

    Land crab burrows are larval mosquito habitats of major significance in the Pacific region. They are constituted by a sinuous tunnel leading to a chamber in contact with the water table, where mosquito larvae proliferate. Controlling larvae in these sites is difficult, because the configuration of burrows prevents the use of standard techniques. An experiment was carried out in French Polynesia to control Aedes polynesiensis Marks and Culex spp. breeding in burrows of the land crab Cardisoma carnifex (Herbst). The technique was based on the crab's behavior, which involves the crab carrying food into its burrow. It was shown that appetizing baits impregnated with an insecticide were carried by crabs into the flooded chamber of their burrows. A field treatment of burrows was carried out by sowing insecticide impregnated baits on the ground. The treatment coverage was almost perfect and the easy implementation of the technique enabled large areas to be treated in a short time. The bait was developed by compacting various flours, which easily incorporate a large variety of insecticide formulations. Although the baits can be easily stocked, a reliable insecticide is still to be found. The results indicate that our technique could be a method of choice for treating crab burrows.

  20. Land management as a factor controlling dissolved organic carbon release from upland peat soils 1: spatial variation in DOC productivity.

    PubMed

    Yallop, A R; Clutterbuck, B

    2009-06-01

    The importance of soil storage in global carbon cycling is well recognised and factors leading to increased losses from this pool may act as a positive feedback mechanism in global warming. Upland peat soils are usually assumed to serve as carbon sinks, there is however increasing evidence of carbon loss from upland peat soils, and DOC concentrations in UK rivers have increased markedly over the past three decades. A number of drivers for increasing DOC release from peat soils have been proposed although many of these would not explain fine-scale variations in DOC release observed in many catchments. We examined the effect of land use and management on DOC production in upland peat catchments at two spatial scales within the UK. DOC concentration was measured in streams draining 50 small-scale catchments (b3 km2) in three discrete regions of the south Pennines and one area in the North Yorkshire Moors. Annual mean DOC concentration was also derived from water colour data recorded at water treatment works for seven larger scale catchments (1.5-20 km2) in the south Pennines. Soil type and land use/management in all catchments were characterised from NSRI digital soil data and ortho-corrected colour aerial imagery. Of the factors assessed, representing all combinations of soil type and land use together with catchment slope and area, the proportion of exposed peat surface resulting from new heather burning was consistently identified as the most significant predictor of variation in DOC concentration. This relationship held across all blanket peat catchments and scales. We propose that management activities are driving changes in edaphic conditions in upland peat to those more favourable for aerobic microbial activity and thus enhance peat decomposition leading to increased losses of carbon from these environments.

  1. Coupled C, N and P controls on photosynthesis, primary production and decomposition across a land use intensification gradient and implications for land atmosphere C exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinsch, Sabine; Glanville, Helen; Smart, Simon; Jones, Davey; Mercado, Lina; Blanes-Alberola, Mamen; Cosby, Jack; Emmett, Bridget

    2016-04-01

    The coupling of C, N and P cycles has rarely been studied through the air- land-water continuum. This is essential if we are to enhance land-atmosphere models to account for N and P limitations. It is also important for developing integrated catchment management solutions to deliver improved water quality combined with a wide range of other ecosystem functions and services. We present results from a project which is part of the interdisciplinary pan-UK NERC Macronutrient Cycles Programme (macronutrient-cycles.ouce.ox.ac.uk/). Our aim is to quantify how coupled C, N & P cycles change across a land use intensification gradient from arable to grass, woodland and bog ecosystems and identify the implications for land-atmosphere C exchange. We focus on three key processes; photosynthesis, annual net primary productivity and decomposition and explore their consequences for biodiversity. Other aspects of the project track delivery to, and transformations within, the freshwater and coastal systems. When we explore relationships between C, N and P, results indicate all habitat types fall on a single land use intensification gradient. Stoichiometry suggests plant productivity is primarily N limited. P limitation occurs rarely but at all levels of intensification. Soil priming shows our soils are primarily C limited and, surprisingly, soil acidity provides one of the most powerful single predictors of processes and ecosystem services perhaps as it is a good integrator of many soil properties. Incorporating this knowledge into the UK land-atmosphere model JULES will improve aNPP projections. These are then being used as inputs into a plant species model called MULTIMOVE to enable future scenarios of climate change, land use and air pollution on habitat suitability for > 1400 plant species to be explored. The enhanced Jules model will ensure both N and P limitations on C fluxes from above and below-ground are incorporated into future UK scenario applications.

  2. Coupled C, N and P Controls on Photosynthesis, Primary Production and Decomposition across a Land Use Intensification Gradient and Implications for Land Atmosphere C Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinsch, S.; Emmett, B.; Cosby, J.; Mercado, L. M.; Smart, S.; Glanville, H.; Alberola, M. B.; Clark, D.; Robinson, E.; Jones, D.

    2015-12-01

    The coupling of C, N and P cycles has rarely been studied through the air- land-water continuum. This is essential if we are to enhance land-atmosphere models to account for N and P limitations. It is also important for developing integrated catchment management solutions to deliver improved water quality combined with a wide range of other ecosystem functions and services.We present results from a project which is part of the interdisciplinary pan-UK NERC Macronutrient Cycles Programme (macronutrient-cycles.ouce.ox.ac.uk/). Our aim is to quantify how coupled C, N & P cycles change across a land use intensification gradient from arable to grass, woodland and bog ecosystems and identify the implications for land-atmosphere C exchange. We focus on three key processes; photosynthesis, annual net primary productivity (ANPP) and decomposition and explore their consequences for biodiversity. Other aspects of the project track delivery to, and transformations within, the freshwater and coastal systems. When we explore relationships between C, N and P, results indicate all habitat types fall on a single land use intensification gradient. Stoichiometry suggests plant productivity is primarily N limited. P limitation occurs rarely but at all levels of intensification. Soil priming shows our soils are primarily C limited and, surprisingly, soil acidity provides one of the most powerful single predictors of processes and ecosystem services perhaps as it is a good integrator of many soil properties. Incorporating this knowledge into the UK land-atmosphere model JULES will be used to improve ANPP projections. These will then be used as inputs into a plant species model called MULTIMOVE to enable future scenarios of climate change, land use and air pollution on habitat suitability for > 1400 plant species to be explored. The enhanced Jules model will ensure both N and P limitations on C fluxes from above and below-ground are incorporated into future UK scenario applications.

  3. Genetic Control of Active Neural Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Reijmers, Leon; Mayford, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The use of molecular tools to study the neurobiology of complex behaviors has been hampered by an inability to target the desired changes to relevant groups of neurons. Specific memories and specific sensory representations are sparsely encoded by a small fraction of neurons embedded in a sea of morphologically and functionally similar cells. In this review we discuss genetics techniques that are being developed to address this difficulty. In several studies the use of promoter elements that are responsive to neural activity have been used to drive long-lasting genetic alterations into neural ensembles that are activated by natural environmental stimuli. This approach has been used to examine neural activity patterns during learning and retrieval of a memory, to examine the regulation of receptor trafficking following learning and to functionally manipulate a specific memory trace. We suggest that these techniques will provide a general approach to experimentally investigate the link between patterns of environmentally activated neural firing and cognitive processes such as perception and memory. PMID:20057936

  4. Flocculated meltwater particles control Arctic land-sea fluxes of labile iron.

    PubMed

    Markussen, Thor Nygaard; Elberling, Bo; Winter, Christian; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest

    2016-01-01

    Glacial meltwater systems supply the Arctic coastal ocean with large volumes of sediment and potentially bioavailable forms of iron, nitrogen and carbon. The particulate fraction of this supply is significant but estuarine losses have been thought to limit the iron supply from land. Here, our results reveal how flocculation (particle aggregation) involving labile iron may increase horizontal transport rather than enhance deposition close to the source. This is shown by combining field observations in Disko Fjord, West Greenland, and laboratory experiments. Our data show how labile iron affects floc sizes, shapes and densities and consequently yields low settling velocities and extended sediment plumes. We highlight the importance of understanding the flocculation mechanisms when examining fluxes of meltwater transported iron in polar regions today and in the future, and we underline the influence of terrestrial hotspots on the nutrient and solute cycles in Arctic coastal waters. PMID:27050673

  5. Effects of time delay and pitch control sensitivity in the flared landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berthe, C. J.; Chalk, C. R.; Wingarten, N. C.; Grantham, W.

    1986-01-01

    Between December 1985 and January 1986, a flared landing program was conducted, using the USAF Total In-Flight simulator airplane, to examine time delay effects in a formal manner. Results show that as pitch sensitivity is increased, tolerance to time delay decreases. With the proper selection of pitch sensitivity, Level I performance was maintained with time delays ranging from 150 milliseconds to greater than 300 milliseconds. With higher sensitivity, configurations with Level I performance at 150 milliseconds degraded to level 2 at 200 milliseconds. When metrics of time delay and pitch sensitivity effects are applied to enhance previously developed predictive criteria, the result is an improved prediction technique which accounts for significant closed loop items.

  6. Flocculated meltwater particles control Arctic land-sea fluxes of labile iron

    PubMed Central

    Markussen, Thor Nygaard; Elberling, Bo; Winter, Christian; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest

    2016-01-01

    Glacial meltwater systems supply the Arctic coastal ocean with large volumes of sediment and potentially bioavailable forms of iron, nitrogen and carbon. The particulate fraction of this supply is significant but estuarine losses have been thought to limit the iron supply from land. Here, our results reveal how flocculation (particle aggregation) involving labile iron may increase horizontal transport rather than enhance deposition close to the source. This is shown by combining field observations in Disko Fjord, West Greenland, and laboratory experiments. Our data show how labile iron affects floc sizes, shapes and densities and consequently yields low settling velocities and extended sediment plumes. We highlight the importance of understanding the flocculation mechanisms when examining fluxes of meltwater transported iron in polar regions today and in the future, and we underline the influence of terrestrial hotspots on the nutrient and solute cycles in Arctic coastal waters. PMID:27050673

  7. Muddy Water and American Agriculture: How to Best Control Sedimentation From Agricultural Land?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovejoy, Stephen B.; Lee, John Gary; Beasley, David B.

    1985-08-01

    The role of agricultural sediment in water quality is well documented. While numerous policies have been advocated and initiated, it still appears to be a significant problem. The present analysis concentrates on the outcome of several policy alternatives in terms of sediment delivery and project costs. These results are obtained by combining social science investigation of probable farmer behavior under a variety of scenarios with a hydrologic simulation model which predicts the sediment delivery with different land uses. This integration of social science behavioral research with the hydrologic response simulation model provides a framework to assess the environmental effectiveness of alternative policies aimed at reducing sedimentation. While the results presented here are preliminary, this approach seems to offer great promise as a tool for federal, state and local conservation agencies in their efforts to efficiently and effectively use their limited resources to reduce soil loss.

  8. Flocculated meltwater particles control Arctic land-sea fluxes of labile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markussen, Thor Nygaard; Elberling, Bo; Winter, Christian; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest

    2016-04-01

    Glacial meltwater systems supply the Arctic coastal ocean with large volumes of sediment and potentially bioavailable forms of iron, nitrogen and carbon. The particulate fraction of this supply is significant but estuarine losses have been thought to limit the iron supply from land. Here, our results reveal how flocculation (particle aggregation) involving labile iron may increase horizontal transport rather than enhance deposition close to the source. This is shown by combining field observations in Disko Fjord, West Greenland, and laboratory experiments. Our data show how labile iron affects floc sizes, shapes and densities and consequently yields low settling velocities and extended sediment plumes. We highlight the importance of understanding the flocculation mechanisms when examining fluxes of meltwater transported iron in polar regions today and in the future, and we underline the influence of terrestrial hotspots on the nutrient and solute cycles in Arctic coastal waters.

  9. Land cover controls on depression-focused recharge: an example from southern Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttle, J. M.; Greenwood, W. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Oak Ridges Moraine (ORM) is a critical hydrogeologic feature in southern Ontario. Although previous research has highlighted the implications of spatially-focused recharge in closed topographic depressions for regional groundwater resources, such depression-focused recharge (DFR) has not been empirically demonstrated on the ORM. Permeable surficial sands and gravels mantling much of the ORM imply that water fluxes will largely be vertical recharge rather than lateral downslope transfer into depressions. Nevertheless, lateral fluxes may occur in winter and spring, when concrete frost development encourages surface runoff of rainfall and snowmelt. The potential for DFR was examined under forest and agricultural land cover with similar soils and surficial geology. Soil water contents, soil temperatures and ground frost thickness were measured at the crest and base of closed depressions in two agricultural fields and two forest stands on permeable ORM outcrops. Recharge from late-fall to the end of spring snowmelt was estimated via 1-d water balances and surface-applied bromide tracing. Both forest and agricultural sites experienced soil freezing; however, greater soil water contents prior to freeze-up at the latter led to concrete soil frost development. This resulted in lateral movement of snowmelt and rainfall into topographic depressions and surface ponding, which did not occur in forest depressions. Water balance recharge exceeded estimates from the bromide tracer approach at all locations; nevertheless, both methods indicated DRF exceeded recharge at the depression crest in agricultural areas with little difference in forest areas. Water balance estimates suggest winter-spring DFR (1300 - 2000 mm) is 3-5× recharge on level agricultural sites. Differences in the potential for DFR between agricultural and forest land covers have important implications for the spatial variability of recharge fluxes and the quality of recharging water on the ORM.

  10. Hybrid Architecture Active Wavefront Sensing and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Dean, Bruce; Hyde, Tupper

    2010-01-01

    A method was developed for performing relatively high-speed wavefront sensing and control to overcome thermal instabilities in a segmented primary mirror telescope [e.g., James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) at L2], by using the onboard fine guidance sensor (FGS) to minimize expense and complexity. This FGS performs centroiding on a bright star to feed the information to the pointing and control system. The proposed concept is to beam split the image of the guide star (or use a single defocused guide star image) to perform wavefront sensing using phase retrieval techniques. Using the fine guidance sensor star image for guiding and fine phasing eliminates the need for other, more complex ways of achieving very accurate sensing and control that is needed for UV-optical applications. The phase retrieval occurs nearly constantly, so passive thermal stability over fourteen days is not required. Using the FGS as the sensor, one can feed segment update information to actuators on the primary mirror that can update the primary mirror segment fine phasing with this frequency. Because the thermal time constants of the primary mirror are very slow compared to this duration, the mirror will appear extremely stable during observations (to the level of accuracy of the sensing and control). The sensing can use the same phase retrieval techniques as the JWST by employing an additional beam splitter, and having each channel go through a weak lens (one positive and one negative). The channels can use common or separate detectors. Phase retrieval can be performed onboard. The actuation scheme would include a coarse stage able to achieve initial alignment of several millimeters of range (similar to JWST and can use a JWST heritage sensing approach in the science camera) and a fine stage capable of continual updates.

  11. Interactive MRI Segmentation with Controlled Active Vision

    PubMed Central

    Karasev, Peter; Kolesov, Ivan; Chudy, Karol; Muller, Grant; Xerogeanes, John; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2013-01-01

    Partitioning Magnetic-Resonance-Imaging (MRI) data into salient anatomic structures is a problem in medical imaging that has continued to elude fully automated solutions. Implicit functions are a common way to model the boundaries between structures and are amenable to control-theoretic methods. In this paper, the goal of enabling a human to obtain accurate segmentations in a short amount of time and with little effort is transformed into a control synthesis problem. Perturbing the state and dynamics of an implicit function’s driving partial differential equation via the accumulated user inputs and an observer-like system leads to desirable closed-loop behavior. Using a Lyapunov control design, a balance is established between the influence of a data-driven gradient flow and the human’s input over time. Automatic segmentation is thus smoothly coupled with interactivity. An application of the mathematical methods to orthopedic segmentation is shown, demonstrating the expected transient and steady state behavior of the implicit segmentation function and auxiliary observer. PMID:24584213

  12. Active control for turbulent premixed flame simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Grcar, Joseph F.; Lijewski, Michael J.

    2004-03-26

    Many turbulent premixed flames of practical interest are statistically stationary. They occur in combustors that have anchoring mechanisms to prevent blow-off and flashback. The stabilization devices often introduce a level of geometric complexity that is prohibitive for detailed computational studies of turbulent flame dynamics. As a result, typical detailed simulations are performed in simplified model configurations such as decaying isotropic turbulence or inflowing turbulence. In these configurations, the turbulence seen by the flame either decays or, in the latter case, increases as the flame accelerates toward the turbulent inflow. This limits the duration of the eddy evolutions experienced by the flame at a given level of turbulent intensity, so that statistically valid observations cannot be made. In this paper, we apply a feedback control to computationally stabilize an otherwise unstable turbulent premixed flame in two dimensions. For the simulations, we specify turbulent in flow conditions and dynamically adjust the integrated fueling rate to control the mean location of the flame in the domain. We outline the numerical procedure, and illustrate the behavior of the control algorithm. We use the simulations to study the propagation and the local chemical variability of turbulent flame chemistry.

  13. Dynamic Land Use and Coastline Changes in active Estuarine Regions - A Study of Sundarban Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, J. V.; Arunachalam, A.; Jaiswal, R. K.; Diwakar, P. G.; Kiran, B.

    2014-11-01

    Alteration of natural environment in the wake of global warming is one of the most serious issues, which is being discussed across the world. Over the last 100 years, global sea level rose by 1.0-2.5 mm/y. Present estimates of future sea-level rise induced by climate change range from 28 to 98 cm for the year 2100. It has been estimated that a 1-m rise in sea-level could displace nearly 7 million people from their homes in India. The climate change and associated sea level rise is proclaimed to be a serious threat especially to the low lying coastal areas. Thus, study of long term effects on an estuarine region not only gives opportunity for identifying the vulnerable areas but also gives a clue to the periods where the sea level rise was significant and verifies climate change impact on sea level rise. Multi-temporal remote sensing data and GIS tools are often used to study the pattern of erosion/ accretion in an area and to predict the future coast lines. The present study has been carried out in the Indian Sundarbans area. Major land cover/ land use classes has been delineated and change analysis of the land cover/ land use feature was performed using multi-temporal satellite images (Landsat MSS, TM, ETM+) from 1973 to 2010. Multivariate GIS based analysis was carried out to depict vulnerability and its trend, spatially. Digital Shoreline change analysis also was attempted for two islands, namely, Ghoramara and Sagar Islands using the past 40 years of satellite data and validated with 2012 Resourcesat-2 LISS III data.

  14. Land-based versus aquatic resistance therapeutic exercises for older women with sarcopenic obesity: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sarcopenic obesity is a health condition that combines excess adipose tissue and loss of muscle mass and strength. Sarcopenic obesity predisposes to more functional disabilities than obesity or sarcopenia alone. Progressive resistance exercises are recommended for older people as a potential treatment for sarcopenia and also for obesity. However, there is a lack of evidence indicating which programmes are best applied to older people, and no studies have investigated their effects on sarcopenic obese people. The aims of this protocol study are to investigate and compare the efficacy of land-based and aquatic resistance exercise programmes on improving muscle performance, functional capacity and quality of life of older women with sarcopenic obesity. Methods/Design This is a protocol study for a parallel randomised controlled clinical trial. Eligible participants are older women (≥65 years) with a body mass index ≥30 kg/m 2 and hand grip strength ≤21 kg force. A total sample of 36 participants will be randomly allocated to one of the intervention groups in blocks of three: land-based, aquatic or control. Each intervention group will undergo 2-week sessions of a 10-week therapeutic exercise programme for strength, power and endurance training of the lower-limb muscles. Participants in the control group will not participate in any strengthening activity for lower limbs and will receive telephone calls once a week. Baseline and final evaluation of outcomes will encompass muscle performance of the lower limbs assessed by an isokinetic dynamometer; functional tests of usual walking speed, maximal walking speed (shuttle walking test), stair speed and the Short Physical Performance Battery; and health-related quality of life (Medical Outcomes Study Short Form Questionnaire – SF-36). Data collectors will be blinded to randomisation and will not be in touch with participants during the interventions. Discussion This study is the first randomised controlled

  15. The impact of land use on biological activity of agriculture soils. An State-of-the-Art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morugán-Coronado, Alicia; Cerdà, Artemi; García-Orenes, Fuensanta

    2014-05-01

    Biological activity is a crucial soil property affecting soil sustainability and crop production. The unsuitable land management can lead to a loss in soil fertility and a reduction in the abundance and diversity of soil microorganisms. This can be as a consequence of high erosion rates due to the mismanagement of farmers (Cerdà et al., 2009a). However ecological practices and some organic amendments can promote the activities of soil microbial communities, and increase its biodiversity (García-Orenes et al., 2010; 2013). The impact of land use in microbiological properties of agriculture soil are presented and discussed in this review. Biological activity is quantified by microbial soil communities and soil enzyme activities to interpret the effects of soil management practices (Morugán-Coronado et al., 2013). The aim of biological activity tests is to give a reliable description of the state of agricultural soils under the effect of different land uses. Numerous methods have been used to determine the impact of land uses on microbiological properties. The current used methods for detecting microbial diversity are based on molecular techniques centered on the 16S and 18S rRNA encoding sequences such as CLPP: community-level physiological profiles; T-RFLP: terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism; DGGE: denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis; OFRG: oligonucleotide fingerprinting of rRNA genes, ARISA: Automated Ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis, SSCP: single-strand conformation polymorphism. And techniques based on the cellular composition of the microbes such as PLFA: phospholipid fatty acid analysis. Other methods are based on the activity of microbes, for example, Cmic: microbial biomass carbon; SIR: substrate induced respiration; BSR: Basal soil respiration; qCO2 metabolic quotient; enzymatic activities (Urease, ß-glucosidase and phosphatase) (Deng, 2012). Agricultural land management can contribute to increased rates of erosion due to

  16. Advanced Study for Active Noise Control in Aircraft (ASANCA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borchers, Ingo U.; Emborg, Urban; Sollo, Antonio; Waterman, Elly H.; Paillard, Jacques; Larsen, Peter N.; Venet, Gerard; Goeransson, Peter; Martin, Vincent

    1992-01-01

    Aircraft interior noise and vibration measurements are included in this paper from ground and flight tests. In addition, related initial noise calculations with and without active noise control are conducted. The results obtained to date indicate that active noise control may be an effective means for reducing the critical low frequency aircraft noise.

  17. 40 CFR 194.41 - Active institutional controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... COMPLIANCE WITH THE 40 CFR PART 191 DISPOSAL REGULATIONS Compliance Certification and Re-certification Assurance Requirements § 194.41 Active institutional controls. (a) Any compliance application shall include... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Active institutional controls....

  18. 40 CFR 194.41 - Active institutional controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... COMPLIANCE WITH THE 40 CFR PART 191 DISPOSAL REGULATIONS Compliance Certification and Re-certification Assurance Requirements § 194.41 Active institutional controls. (a) Any compliance application shall include... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Active institutional controls....

  19. 40 CFR 194.41 - Active institutional controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... COMPLIANCE WITH THE 40 CFR PART 191 DISPOSAL REGULATIONS Compliance Certification and Re-certification Assurance Requirements § 194.41 Active institutional controls. (a) Any compliance application shall include... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Active institutional controls....

  20. 40 CFR 194.41 - Active institutional controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... COMPLIANCE WITH THE 40 CFR PART 191 DISPOSAL REGULATIONS Compliance Certification and Re-certification Assurance Requirements § 194.41 Active institutional controls. (a) Any compliance application shall include... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Active institutional controls....

  1. 40 CFR 194.41 - Active institutional controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... COMPLIANCE WITH THE 40 CFR PART 191 DISPOSAL REGULATIONS Compliance Certification and Re-certification Assurance Requirements § 194.41 Active institutional controls. (a) Any compliance application shall include... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Active institutional controls....

  2. A reduced energy supply strategy in active vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichchou, M. N.; Loukil, T.; Bareille, O.; Chamberland, G.; Qiu, J.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, a control strategy is presented and numerically tested. This strategy aims to achieve the potential performance of fully active systems with a reduced energy supply. These energy needs are expected to be comparable to the power demands of semi-active systems, while system performance is intended to be comparable to that of a fully active configuration. The underlying strategy is called 'global semi-active control'. This control approach results from an energy investigation based on management of the optimal control process. Energy management encompasses storage and convenient restitution. The proposed strategy monitors a given active law without any external energy supply by considering purely dissipative and energy-demanding phases. Such a control law is offered here along with an analysis of its properties. A suboptimal form, well adapted for practical implementation steps, is also given. Moreover, a number of numerical experiments are proposed in order to validate test findings.

  3. The impact of land use on biological activity of agriculture soils. An State-of-the-Art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morugán-Coronado, Alicia; Cerdà, Artemi; García-Orenes, Fuensanta

    2014-05-01

    Biological activity is a crucial soil property affecting soil sustainability and crop production. The unsuitable land management can lead to a loss in soil fertility and a reduction in the abundance and diversity of soil microorganisms. This can be as a consequence of high erosion rates due to the mismanagement of farmers (Cerdà et al., 2009a). However ecological practices and some organic amendments can promote the activities of soil microbial communities, and increase its biodiversity (García-Orenes et al., 2010; 2013). The impact of land use in microbiological properties of agriculture soil are presented and discussed in this review. Biological activity is quantified by microbial soil communities and soil enzyme activities to interpret the effects of soil management practices (Morugán-Coronado et al., 2013). The aim of biological activity tests is to give a reliable description of the state of agricultural soils under the effect of different land uses. Numerous methods have been used to determine the impact of land uses on microbiological properties. The current used methods for detecting microbial diversity are based on molecular techniques centered on the 16S and 18S rRNA encoding sequences such as CLPP: community-level physiological profiles; T-RFLP: terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism; DGGE: denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis; OFRG: oligonucleotide fingerprinting of rRNA genes, ARISA: Automated Ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis, SSCP: single-strand conformation polymorphism. And techniques based on the cellular composition of the microbes such as PLFA: phospholipid fatty acid analysis. Other methods are based on the activity of microbes, for example, Cmic: microbial biomass carbon; SIR: substrate induced respiration; BSR: Basal soil respiration; qCO2 metabolic quotient; enzymatic activities (Urease, ß-glucosidase and phosphatase) (Deng, 2012). Agricultural land management can contribute to increased rates of erosion due to

  4. A Hybrid Nonlinear Control Scheme for Active Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xia, F.; Albritton, N. G.; Hung, J. Y.; Nelms, R. M.

    1996-01-01

    A nonlinear control scheme for active magnetic bearings is presented in this work. Magnet winding currents are chosen as control inputs for the electromechanical dynamics, which are linearized using feedback linearization. Then, the desired magnet currents are enforced by sliding mode control design of the electromagnetic dynamics. The overall control scheme is described by a multiple loop block diagram; the approach also falls in the class of nonlinear controls that are collectively known as the 'integrator backstepping' method. Control system hardware and new switching power electronics for implementing the controller are described. Various experiments and simulation results are presented to demonstrate the concepts' potentials.

  5. Analysis and design of a capsule landing system and surface vehicle control system for Mars exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A number of problems related to the design, construction and evaluation of an autonomous roving planetary vehicle and its control and operating systems intended for an unmanned exploration of Mars are studied. Vehicle configuration, dynamics, control, systems and propulsion; systems analysis; terrain sensing and modeling and path selection; and chemical analysis of samples are included.

  6. Langley Research Center contributions in advancing active control technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, I.; Newsom, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    The application of active control technology to reduce aeroelastic response of aircraft structures offers a potential for significant payoffs in terms of aerodynamic efficiency and weight savings. Some of the contributions of the Langley Research Center in advancing active control technology are described. Contributions are categorized into the development of appropriate analysis tools, control law synthesis methodology, and experimental investigations aimed at verifying both analysis and synthesis methodology.

  7. Interaction between pre-landing activities and stiffness regulation of the knee joint musculoskeletal system in the drop jump: implications to performance.

    PubMed

    Horita, T; Komi, P V; Nicol, C; Kyröläinen, H

    2002-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the interaction between the pre-landing activities and the stiffness regulation of the knee joint musculoskeletal system and the takeoff speed during a drop jump (DJ). Nine healthy male subjects performed a DJ test from the height of 50 cm. The surface electromyographic (EMG) activity of the vastus lateralis (VL) muscle was recorded to evaluate both the pre-landing and post-landing muscle activation levels. Simultaneous recording of the jumping motion and ground reaction force was performed by a high-speed video camera (100 frames x s(-1)), and a force platform was employed to allow joint moment analysis. Joint stiffness was calculated by a linear regression of the knee joint moment/angle relationship. Elasticity of the knee extensor muscle during DJ was estimated by means of a four-element muscle model consisting of a parallel elastic component, a series elastic component (SEC), a viscous damper, and a contractile element. DJ performance correlated positively with the positive peak power of the knee joint (P < 0.01) and with the moment of the knee joint at the end of stretch (P < 0.01). However, there was no significant relationship between DJ performance and the positive peak power of the ankle joint. The knee joint moment at the end of stretch correlated with the SEC stiffness during the transmission phase from the end of the initial impact to the onset of the concentric action (P < 0.01) and with the maximum rate of isometric force development of the knee extensors (P < 0.01). Multiple regression analysis showed that the SEC stiffness during the transmission phase of the knee joint can be explained by a combination of the pre-activity of the VL muscle and the knee joint angular velocity at touchdown (F = 5.76, P < 0.05). These results seem to emphasize the functional significance of the pre-programmed activity for controlling the subsequent stiffness regulation and then contributing to the performance in DJ

  8. Extracellular enzyme activities in a tropical mountain rainforest region of southern Ecuador affected by low soil P status and land-use change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tischer, Alexander; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Ute, Hamer

    2014-05-01

    Little is known about the enzymatic response of microorganisms in soils having a low P status and being subjected to global change phenomena, such as forest disturbance and land-use change. Along a land-use sequence (natural forest - young pasture - old pasture - abandoned pasture - shrubland) in the Andes of southern Ecuador mineral topsoils of Cambisols / Umbrisols were investigated. We tested whether the activities of the six hydrolytic enzymes (cellobiohydrolase, β-glucosidase, N-acetylglucosaminidase, α-glucosidase, xylanase, acid phosphomonoesterase) were affected by nutrient status and land-use induced alterations in soil pH (pHH2O from 3.7 to 5.2), resource quantity and quality (e.g. a SOC:N:P ratio from 182:13:1 to 1050:38:1) and microbial community structure (as monitored by phospholipid fatty acids). Microbial production of acid phosphatase responded to the low P status of the sites by a higher investment in the acquisition of P compared to C. We determined three major drivers of enzyme activities: 1.) Microbial demand for P regulated the production of acid phosphatase, provided that N and C were available. At the natural forest site the two-fold higher specific activity of acid phosphatase pointed to a high microbial P-demand, whereas the production of acid phosphatase was constrained by the availability of N and DOC after pasture abandonment. 2.) Microbial biomass that was controlled by pH and resource availability (total soil N (organic and inorganic N), organic P (Bray-fraction)) was the main driver for cellobiohydrolase, β-glucosidase and N-acetylglucosaminidase activities. 3.) Substrate induction due to increased litter inputs of herbaceous plant species seemed to regulate α-glucosidase and xylanase activities during secondary succession. In contrast, alterations in the abundance of microbial groups affected the variation in extracellular enzyme activities only marginally. At the level of broadly defined microbial groups (PLFA), our results

  9. Major pollutants in soils of abandoned agricultural land contaminated by e-waste activities in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Brenda Natalia; Man, Yu Bon; Zhao, Yin Ge; Zheng, Jin Shu; Leung, Anna Oi Wah; Yao, Jun; Wong, Ming Hung

    2011-07-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB), polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) compounds and five heavy metals (cadmium, copper, chromium, lead, and zinc) were determined in soil samples collected from six sites of abandoned agricultural land affected by electronic-waste: e-waste dismantling workshop [EW (DW)], e-waste open burning site [EW (OBS)], e-waste storage [EW (S)], and agricultural (A) in the New Territories, Hong Kong. Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and heavy metals were detected in all soil samples. EW (DW) contained the highest concentrations of PAHs, Cr, Cu, and Zn, whereas EW (OBS) had the highest concentrations of PCBs, PBDEs, Cd, and Pb. PAH at EW (DW) and EW (OBS) and PCB concentrations at EW (OBS) exceeded the target values of the New Dutch list, whereas Cd, Cu, Cr, Pb, and Zn levels exceeded the Chinese legislation for the protection of agricultural production and safeguarding of human health, by 3-11 times at EW (OBS) and 5-8 times at EW (DW). Lead at EW (OBS) and EW (DW) and Cr at EW (DW) greatly exceeded the Canadian Soil Quality Guidelines by 46 and 20 times and 27 times, respectively. Concentrations of POPs and heavy metals at EW (DW) and EW (OBS) were significantly higher than at EW (S) and A. It was concluded that e-waste activities led to increases of toxic chemicals at these abandoned agricultural land, which would hinder the redevelopment of the land. PMID:20811881

  10. [Characteristics of soil denitrifying enzyme activity in riparian zones with different land use types in Chongming Island, Shanghai of China].

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang-Liang; Li, Jian-Hua; Yang, Chang-Ming

    2013-10-01

    By using acetylene inhibition method, this paper studied the soil denitrifying enzyme activity (DEA) and its affecting factors in the riparian zone with different land use types (cropland riparian, forested riparian, and grassy riparian zones) in Chongming Island, Shanghai of China. The riparian soil DEA was (0.69 +/- 0.11)--(134.93 +/- 33.72) microg N x kg(-1) x h(-1), which differed obviously among different land types, with a decreasing trend of forested riparian zone > cropland riparian zone > grassy riparian zone. The soil DEA was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in 0-10 cm in 10-30, 30-50, and 50-70 cm layers. There were significant positive relationships between soil DEA and soil TOC, TN, and NO(3-)-N (P < 0.01). Land use change mainly altered the soil natural structure and soil physical and chemical properties, decreased the accumulation of soil organic carbon, and affected the soil nitrogen transformation, and thus, inhibited the occurrence of riparian soil denitrification.

  11. Major pollutants in soils of abandoned agricultural land contaminated by e-waste activities in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Brenda Natalia; Man, Yu Bon; Zhao, Yin Ge; Zheng, Jin Shu; Leung, Anna Oi Wah; Yao, Jun; Wong, Ming Hung

    2011-07-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB), polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) compounds and five heavy metals (cadmium, copper, chromium, lead, and zinc) were determined in soil samples collected from six sites of abandoned agricultural land affected by electronic-waste: e-waste dismantling workshop [EW (DW)], e-waste open burning site [EW (OBS)], e-waste storage [EW (S)], and agricultural (A) in the New Territories, Hong Kong. Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and heavy metals were detected in all soil samples. EW (DW) contained the highest concentrations of PAHs, Cr, Cu, and Zn, whereas EW (OBS) had the highest concentrations of PCBs, PBDEs, Cd, and Pb. PAH at EW (DW) and EW (OBS) and PCB concentrations at EW (OBS) exceeded the target values of the New Dutch list, whereas Cd, Cu, Cr, Pb, and Zn levels exceeded the Chinese legislation for the protection of agricultural production and safeguarding of human health, by 3-11 times at EW (OBS) and 5-8 times at EW (DW). Lead at EW (OBS) and EW (DW) and Cr at EW (DW) greatly exceeded the Canadian Soil Quality Guidelines by 46 and 20 times and 27 times, respectively. Concentrations of POPs and heavy metals at EW (DW) and EW (OBS) were significantly higher than at EW (S) and A. It was concluded that e-waste activities led to increases of toxic chemicals at these abandoned agricultural land, which would hinder the redevelopment of the land.

  12. Semi Active Control of Civil Structures, Analytical and Numerical Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerboua, M.; Benguediab, M.; Megnounif, A.; Benrahou, K. H.; Kaoulala, F.

    Structural control for civil structures was born out of a need to provide safer and more efficient designs with the reality of limited resources. The purpose of structural control is to absorb and to reflect the energy introduced by dynamic loads such as winds, waves, earthquakes, and traffic. Today, the protection of civil structures from severe dynamic loading is typically achieved by allowing the structures to be damaged. Semi-active control devices, also called "smart" control devices, assume the positive aspects of both the passive and active control devices. A semi-active control strategy is similar to the active control strategy. Only here, the control actuator does not directly apply force to the structure, but instead it is used to control the properties of a passive energy device, a controllable passive damper. Semi-active control strategies can be used in many of the same civil applications as passive and active control. One method of operating smart cable dampers is in a purely passive capacity, supplying the dampers with constant optimal voltage. The advantages to this strategy are the relative simplicity of implementing the control strategy as compared to a smart or active control strategy and that the dampers are more easily optimally tuned in- place, eliminating the need to have passive dampers with unique optimal damping coefficients. This research investigated semi-active control of civil structures for natural hazard mitigation. The research has two components, the seismic protection of buildings and the mitigation of wind-induced vibration in structures. An ideal semi-active motion equation of a composite beam that consists of a cantilever beam bonded with a PZT patch using Hamilton's principle and Galerkin's method was treated. A series R-L and a parallel R-L shunt circuits are coupled into the motion equation respectively by means of the constitutive relation of piezoelectric material and Kirchhoff's law to control the beam vibration. A

  13. Validating a topographically driven model of peatland water table: Implications for understanding land cover controls on water table.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Martin; Allott, Tim; Worrall, Fred; Rowson, James; Maskill, Rachael

    2014-05-01

    Water table is arguably the dominant control on biogeochemical cycling in peatland systems. Local water tables are controlled by peat surface water balance and lateral transfer of water driven by slope can be a significant component of this balance. In particular, blanket peatlands typically have relatively high surface slope compared to other peatland types so that there is the potential for water table to be significantly contolled by topographic context. UK blanket peatlands are also significantly eroded so that there is the potential for additional topographic drainage of the peatland surface. This paper presents a topographically driven model of blanket peat water table. An initial model presented in Allott et al. (2009) has been refined and tested against further water table data collected across the Bleaklow and Kinderscout plateaux of the English Peak District. The water table model quantifies the impact of peat erosion on water table throughout this dramatically dissected landscape demonstrating that almost 50% of the landscape has suffered significant water table drawdown. The model calibrates the impact of slope and degree of dissection on local water tables but does not incorporate any effects of surface cover on water table conditions. Consequently significant outliers in the test data are potentially indicative of important impacts of surface cover on water table conditions. In the test data presented here sites associated with regular moorland burning are significant outliers. The data currently available do not allow us to draw conclusions around the impact of land cover but they indicate an important potential application of the validated model in controlling for topographic position in further testing of the impact of land cover on peatland water tables. Allott, T.E.H. & Evans, M.G., Lindsay, J.B., Agnew, C.T., Freer, J.E., Jones, A. & Parnell, M. Water tables in Peak District blanket peatlands. Moors for the Future Report No. 17. Moors for the

  14. Analysis and design of a capsule landing system and surface vehicle control system for Mars exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gisser, D. G.; Frederick, D. K.; Yerazunis, S. W.

    1977-01-01

    A number of problems related to unmanned exploration of planets or other extraterrestrial bodies with Mars as a case in point were investigated. The design and evaluation of a prototype rover concept with emphasis on mobility, maneuverability, stability, control and propulsion is described along with the development of terrain sensor concepts and associated software for the autonomous control of any planetary rover. Results are applicable not only to the design of a mission rover but the vehicle is used as a test bed for the rigorous evaluation of alternative autonomous control systems.

  15. Combustion diagnostic for active engine feedback control

    DOEpatents

    Green, Jr., Johney Boyd; Daw, Charles Stuart; Wagner, Robert Milton

    2007-10-02

    This invention detects the crank angle location where combustion switches from premixed to diffusion, referred to as the transition index, and uses that location to define integration limits that measure the portions of heat released during the combustion process that occur during the premixed and diffusion phases. Those integrated premixed and diffusion values are used to develop a metric referred to as the combustion index. The combustion index is defined as the integrated diffusion contribution divided by the integrated premixed contribution. As the EGR rate is increased enough to enter the low temperature combustion regime, PM emissions decrease because more of the combustion process is occurring over the premixed portion of the heat release rate profile and the diffusion portion has been significantly reduced. This information is used to detect when the engine is or is not operating in a low temperature combustion mode and provides that feedback to an engine control algorithm.

  16. Active control system for high speed windmills

    DOEpatents

    Avery, D.E.

    1988-01-12

    A pump stroke is matched to the operating speed of a high speed windmill. The windmill drives a hydraulic pump for a control. Changes in speed of a wind driven shaft open supply and exhaust valves to opposite ends of a hydraulic actuator to lengthen and shorten an oscillating arm thereby lengthening and shortening the stroke of an output pump. Diminishing wind to a stall speed causes the valves to operate the hydraulic cylinder to shorten the oscillating arm to zero. A pressure accumulator in the hydraulic system provides the force necessary to supply the hydraulic fluid under pressure to drive the actuator into and out of the zero position in response to the windmill shaft speed approaching and exceeding windmill stall speed. 4 figs.

  17. Active control system for high speed windmills

    DOEpatents

    Avery, Don E.

    1988-01-01

    A pump stroke is matched to the operating speed of a high speed windmill. The windmill drives a hydraulic pump for a control. Changes in speed of a wind driven shaft open supply and exhaust valves to opposite ends of a hydraulic actuator to lengthen and shorten an oscillating arm thereby lengthening and shortening the stroke of an output pump. Diminishing wind to a stall speed causes the valves to operate the hydraulic cylinder to shorten the oscillating arm to zero. A pressure accumulator in the hydraulic system provides the force necessary to supply the hydraulic fluid under pressure to drive the actuator into and out of the zero position in response to the windmill shaft speed approaching and exceeding windmill stall speed.

  18. Study of tethered satellite active attitude control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G.

    1982-01-01

    Existing software was adapted for the study of tethered subsatellite rotational dynamics, an analytic solution for a stable configuration of a tethered subsatellite was developed, the analytic and numerical integrator (computer) solutions for this "test case' was compared in a two mass tether model program (DUMBEL), the existing multiple mass tether model (SKYHOOK) was modified to include subsatellite rotational dynamics, the analytic "test case,' was verified, and the use of the SKYHOOK rotational dynamics capability with a computer run showing the effect of a single off axis thruster on the behavior of the subsatellite was demonstrated. Subroutines for specific attitude control systems are developed and applied to the study of the behavior of the tethered subsatellite under realistic on orbit conditions. The effect of all tether "inputs,' including pendular oscillations, air drag, and electrodynamic interactions, on the dynamic behavior of the tether are included.

  19. Active shear flow control for improved combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmark, E.; Parr, T. P.; Hanson-Parr, D. M.; Schadow, K. C.

    1990-01-01

    The acoustical and fluid dynamic facets of an excited premixed flame were studied experimentally to evaluate possibilities for development of a stabilizing closed-loop control system. The flame was analyzed as a nonlinear system which includes different subcomponents: acoustics, fluid dynamics, and chemical reaction. Identification of the acoustical and fluid dynamics subsystems is done by analyzing the transfer function, which was obtained by driving the system with both white-noise and a frequency-sweeping sine-wave. The features obtained by this analysis are compared to results of flow visualization and hot-wire flow-field and spectral measurements. The acoustical subsystem is determined by the resonant acoustic modes of the settling chamber. These modes are subsequently filtered and amplified by the flow shear layer, whose instability characteristics are dominated by the preferred mode frequency.

  20. Controlling interneuron activity in Caenorhabditis elegans to evoke chemotactic behaviour.

    PubMed

    Kocabas, Askin; Shen, Ching-Han; Guo, Zengcai V; Ramanathan, Sharad

    2012-10-11

    Animals locate and track chemoattractive gradients in the environment to find food. With its small nervous system, Caenorhabditis elegans is a good model system in which to understand how the dynamics of neural activity control this search behaviour. Extensive work on the nematode has identified the neurons that are necessary for the different locomotory behaviours underlying chemotaxis through the use of laser ablation, activity recording in immobilized animals and the study of mutants. However, we do not know the neural activity patterns in C. elegans that are sufficient to control its complex chemotactic behaviour. To understand how the activity in its interneurons coordinate different motor programs to lead the animal to food, here we used optogenetics and new optical tools to manipulate neural activity directly in freely moving animals to evoke chemotactic behaviour. By deducing the classes of activity patterns triggered during chemotaxis and exciting individual neurons with these patterns, we identified interneurons that control the essential locomotory programs for this behaviour. Notably, we discovered that controlling the dynamics of activity in just one interneuron pair (AIY) was sufficient to force the animal to locate, turn towards and track virtual light gradients. Two distinct activity patterns triggered in AIY as the animal moved through the gradient controlled reversals and gradual turns to drive chemotactic behaviour. Because AIY neurons are post-synaptic to most chemosensory and thermosensory neurons, it is probable that these activity patterns in AIY have an important role in controlling and coordinating different taxis behaviours of the animal. PMID:23000898

  1. [Effects of land use change on soil active organic carbon in deep soils in Hilly Loess Plateau region of Northwest China].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; Xu, Ming-Xiang; Zhang, Ya-Feng; Wang, Chao-Hua; Chen, Gai

    2015-02-01

    Response of soil active organic carbon to land-use change has become a hot topic in current soil carbon and nutrient cycling study. Soil active organic carbon distribution characteristics in soil profile under four land-use types were investigated in Ziwuling forest zone of the Hilly Loess Plateau region. The four types of land-use changes included natural woodland converted into artificial woodland, natural woodland converted into cropland, natural shrubland converted into cropland and natural shrubland converted into revegetated grassland. Effects of land-use changes on soil active organic carbon in deep soil layers (60-200 cm) were explored by comparison with the shallow soil layers (0-60 cm). The results showed that: (1) The labile organic carbon ( LOC) and microbial carbon (MBC) content were mainly concentrated in the shallow 0-60 cm soil, which accounted for 49%-66% and 71%-84% of soil active organic carbon in the profile (0-200 cm) under different land-use types. Soil active organic carbon content in shallow soil was significantly varied for the land-use changes types, while no obvious difference was observed in soil active organic carbon in deep soil layer. (2) Land-use changes exerted significant influence on soil active organic carbon, the active organic carbon in shallow soil was more sensitive than that in deep soil. The four types of land-use changes, including natural woodland to planted woodland, natural woodland to cropland, natural shrubland to revegetated grassland and natural shrubland to cropland, LOC in shallow soil was reduced by 10%, 60%, 29%, 40% and LOC in the deep layer was decreased by 9%, 21%, 12%, 1%, respectively. MBC in the shallow soil was reduced by 24% 73%, 23%, 56%, and that in the deep layer was decreased by 25%, 18%, 8% and 11%, respectively. (Land-use changes altered the distribution ratio of active organic carbon in soil profile. The ratio between LOC and SOC in shallow soil increased when natural woodland and shrubland were

  2. Analysis and design of a capsule landing system and surface vehicle control system for Mars exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, D. K.; Lashmet, P. K.; Sandor, G. N.; Shen, C. N.; Smith, E. V.; Yerazunis, S. W.

    1973-01-01

    Problems related to the design and control of a mobile planetary vehicle to implement a systematic plan for the exploration of Mars are reported. Problem areas include: vehicle configuration, control, dynamics, systems and propulsion; systems analysis, terrain modeling and path selection; and chemical analysis of specimens. These tasks are summarized: vehicle model design, mathematical model of vehicle dynamics, experimental vehicle dynamics, obstacle negotiation, electrochemical controls, remote control, collapsibility and deployment, construction of a wheel tester, wheel analysis, payload design, system design optimization, effect of design assumptions, accessory optimal design, on-board computer subsystem, laser range measurement, discrete obstacle detection, obstacle detection systems, terrain modeling, path selection system simulation and evaluation, gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer system concepts, and chromatograph model evaluation and improvement.

  3. Soil controls on land-atmosphere methane fluxes from an arctic floodplain of the Lena River Delta, Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runkle, Benjamin; Sabrekov, Alexander; Glagolev, Mikail; Kutzbach, Lars

    2014-05-01

    Accurately quantifying methane emissions from permafrost tundra landscapes into the atmosphere is a major concern of the global climate modeling community. A better, data-driven understanding of the drivers of soil-atmosphere CH4 fluxes could help constrain the global methane balance, offer predictions in response to global climate change, and advance understanding of these regions' soil biogeochemistry and landscape ecology. Previous research at our Lena River Delta research site (72° N, 126° E) has found relatively low methane emissions (~18-30 mg m2 d1) in the polygonal tundra of the delta's Holocene river terrace (Sachs et al., 2008; Wille et al., 2008). In fall 2013 we compare methane emissions from this landscape type to the adjacent active river floodplain, a sandy, Equisetum - Salix -Alopecurus alpinus community ecosystem. This landscape has backswamp regions with higher organic matter accumulation though is generally dominated by soils with high sand contents, low organic matter content, and lower water tables than the Holocene terrace (Boike et al., 2013). The wet parts of a similar landscape unit in the Indigirka lowlands (71° N, 147° E) have been demonstrated to have greater methane emissions which were in part attributed to the annual deposition of nutrients via flooding, increased primary productivity and associated root exudates, and higher soil temperatures. The results presented in this study compare methane fluxes derived from the closed chamber technique from the two landscape units. In addition to descriptions of the inundation height and vegetation cover, we examine soil chemical and physical characteristics to test how these factors help control CH4 fluxes. We find, for example, relatively high concentrations of dissolved organic carbon at sites with relatively high CH4 production. As the modern floodplain landscape type covers 40% of the soil-covered area of the Lena River Delta and is analogous to similar regions across the Arctic

  4. The Promise of Wisconsin's 1999 Comprehensive Planning Law: Land-Use Policy Reforms to Support Active Living.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Joseph; Keyes, Sheila D

    2008-06-01

    Weaving together the disciplines of planning and policy change with the emerging research of active living, this article explores the competing interests and underlying political forces behind the design and passage of Wisconsin's Comprehensive Planning Law of 1999. While Wisconsin's law remains a work in progress, it illustrates the contemporary policy battles over land use and smart growth and the resurgence of the property-rights movement. It further highlights the influence of smart-growth coalitions and policy networks on planning reform. The authors suggest that planning practitioners and active-living proponents can adapt and transfer these policy lessons from Wisconsin to address the complex relationships of the built environment, physical activity, and the nation's current obesity problem through state and local planning reforms.

  5. Polybaric evolution of phonolite, trachyte, and rhyolite volcanoes in Eastern Marie Byrd Land, Antarctica: Controls on peralkalinity and silica saturation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LeMasurier, W.E.; Futa, K.; Hole, M.; Kawachi, Y.

    2003-01-01

    of plagioclase to clinopyroxene under conditions of low pH2O. With increasing pH2O, the ratio plagioclase/clinopyroxene in the fractionated assemblage decreases and metaluminous liquids resulted. Crustal contamination seems to have had a role in suppressing peralkalinity, and was probably a factor in the origin of high-silica metaluminous rhyolite, but metaluminous rocks are uncommon. The volume and diversity of felsic rocks were probably enhanced by the structure of the lithosphere, the persistence of plume activity, and the immobility of the Antarctic plate. Mechanical boundaries at the base of the lithosphere and crust, and within the crust, appear to have acted as filters, trapping magmas at multiple levels, and prolonging the fractionation process. Final volumes would have been further enhanced by repeated refluxing of the same magma chambers, controlled by plume activity and plate immobility.

  6. Robust control of an active precision truss structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, C. C.; Smith, R. S.; Fanson, J. L.

    1990-01-01

    A description is given of the efforts in control of an active precision truss structure experiment. The control objective is to provide vibration suppression to selected modes of the structure subject to a bandlimited disturbance and modeling errors. Based on performance requirements and an uncertainty description, several control laws using the H-infinity optimization method are synthesized. The controllers are implemented on the experimental facility. Preliminary experimental results are presented.

  7. Control techniques for millimeter-wave active arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Sjogren, L.B.; Liu, H.L.; Liu, T.; Wang, F.; Domier, C.W.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr. )

    1993-06-01

    Control techniques for millimeter-wave active arrays are considered. In addition to voltage control, optical and quasi-optical approaches are discussed as analog control techniques. Digital control techniques discussed include on/off switching arrays and designs with superimposed device and/or grid structures for multi-bit capability. A quasi-optical Q switch, capable of high peak power pulse generation, is discussed as an example application of these techniques. 31 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Imprinted control of gene activity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Golic, K G; Golic, M M; Pimpinelli, S

    1998-11-19

    Genetic imprinting is defined as a reversible, differential marking of genes or chromosomes that is determined by the sex of the parent from whom the genetic material is inherited [1]. Imprinting was first observed in insects where, in some species, most notably among the coccoids (scale insects and allies), the differential marking of paternally and maternally transmitted chromosome sets leads to inactivation or elimination of paternal chromosomes [2]. Imprinting is also widespread in plants and mammals [3,4], in which paternally and maternally inherited alleles may be differentially expressed. Despite imprinting having been discovered in insects, clear examples of parental imprinting are scarce in the model insect species Drosophila melanogaster. We describe a case of imprint-mediated control of gene expression in Drosophila. The imprinted gene - the white+ eye-color gene - is expressed at a low level when transmitted by males, and at a high level when transmitted by females. Thus, in common with coccoids, Drosophila is capable of generating an imprint, and can respond to that imprint by silencing the paternal allele. PMID:9822579

  9. Various applications of Active Field Control (AFC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Takayuki; Miyazaki, Hideo; Kishinaga, Shinji; Kawakami, Fukushi

    2003-10-01

    AFC is an electro-acoustic enhancement system, which has been under development at Yamaha Corporation. In this paper, several types of various AFC applications are discussed, while referring to representative projects for each application in Japan. (1) Realization of acoustics in a huge hall to classical music program, e.g., Tokyo International Forum. This venue is a multipurpose hall with approximately 5000 seats. AFC achieves loudness and reverberance equivalent to those of a hall with 2500 seats or fewer. (2) Optimization of acoustics for a variety of programs, e.g., Arkas Sasebo. AFC is used to create the optimum acoustics for each program, such as reverberance for classical concerts, acoustical support for opera singers, uniformity throughout the hall from the stage to under-balcony area, etc. (3) Control of room shape acoustical effect, e.g., Osaka Central Public Hall: In this renovation project, preservation of historically important architecture in the original form is required. AFC is installed to vary only the acoustical environment without architectural changes. (4) Assistance with crowd enthusiasm for sports entertainment, e.g., Tokyo Metropolitan Gymnasium. In this venue, which is designed as a very absorptive space for speech intelligibility, AFC is installed to enhance the atmosphere of live sports entertainment.

  10. Active control of transmission loss with smart foams.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Abhishek; Berry, Alain

    2011-02-01

    Smart foams combine the complimentary advantages of passive foam material and spatially distributed piezoelectric actuator embedded in it for active noise control applications. In this paper, the problem of improving the transmission loss of smart foams using active control strategies has been investigated both numerically and experimentally inside a waveguide under the condition of plane wave propagation. The finite element simulation of a coupled noise control system has been undertaken with three different smart foam designs and their effectiveness in cancelling the transmitted wave downstream of the smart foam have been studied. The simulation results provide insight into the physical phenomenon of active noise cancellation and explain the impact of the smart foam designs on the optimal active control results. Experimental studies aimed at implementing the real-time control for transmission loss optimization have been performed using the classical single input/single output filtered-reference least mean squares algorithm. The active control results with broadband and single frequency primary source inputs demonstrate a good improvement in the transmission loss of the smart foams. The study gives a comparative description of the transmission and absorption control problems in light of the modification of the vibration response of the piezoelectric actuator under active control.

  11. Flutter suppression and gust alleviation using active controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of active controls on the suppression of flutter and gust alleviation of two different types of subsonic aircraft (the Arava, twin turboprop STOL transport, and the Westwind twin-jet business transport) are investigated. The active controls are introduced in pairs which include, in any chosen wing strip, a leading-edge (LE) control and a trailing-edge (TE) control. Each control surface is allowed to be driven by a combined linear-rotational sensor system, located on the activated strip. The control law, which translates the sensor signals into control surface rotations, is based on the concept of aerodynamic energy. The results indicate the extreme effectiveness of the active systems in controlling flutter. A single system spanning 10% of the wing semispan made the Arava flutter-free, and a similar active system, for the Westwind aircraft, yielded a reduction of 75% in the maximum bending moment of the wing and a reduction of 90% in the acceleration of the cg of the aircraft. Results for simultaneous activation of several LE - TE systems are presented. Further work needed to bring the investigation to completion is also discussed.

  12. 32 CFR 643.35 - Policy-Mineral leasing on lands controlled by the Department of the Army.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... lease deposits of coal, phosphate, oil, oil shale, gas, sodium, potassium and sulfur which are within... which such lands are located. (b) Public domain lands. Deposits of coal, phosphate, sodium,...

  13. 32 CFR 643.35 - Policy-Mineral leasing on lands controlled by the Department of the Army.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... lease deposits of coal, phosphate, oil, oil shale, gas, sodium, potassium and sulfur which are within... which such lands are located. (b) Public domain lands. Deposits of coal, phosphate, sodium,...

  14. 32 CFR 643.35 - Policy-Mineral leasing on lands controlled by the Department of the Army.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... lease deposits of coal, phosphate, oil, oil shale, gas, sodium, potassium and sulfur which are within... which such lands are located. (b) Public domain lands. Deposits of coal, phosphate, sodium,...

  15. Active airborne contamination control using electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Veatch, B.D.

    1994-06-01

    In spite of our best efforts, radioactive airborne contamination continues to be a formidable problem at many of the Department of Energy (DOE) weapons complex sites. For workers that must enter areas with high levels of airborne contamination, personnel protective equipment (PPE) can become highly restrictive, greatly diminishing productivity. Rather than require even more restrictive PPE for personnel in some situations, the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) is actively researching and developing methods to aggressively combat airborne contamination hazards using electrophoretic technology. With appropriate equipment, airborne particulates can be effectively removed and collected for disposal in one simple process. The equipment needed to implement electrophoresis is relatively inexpensive, highly reliable, and very compact. Once airborne contamination levels are reduced, less PPE is required and a significant cost savings may be realized through decreased waste and maximized productivity. Preliminary ``cold,`` or non-radioactive, testing results at the RFP have shown the technology to be effective on a reasonable scale, with several potential benefits and an abundance of applications.

  16. CLP activities and control in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    The 10(th) December 2010 marked a new beginning for Regulation (EC) no. 1272/2008 on the classification, labelling and packaging of substances and mixtures (CLP) in Ireland with the start of its operational phase. It was on this date that the administrative and enforcement provisions for CLP were encompassed in the new Chemicals Amendment Act, 2010. In this Act, the Health and Safety Authority, known as the "the Authority" is named as Competent Authority (CA) for CLP, along with the Minister for Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, in respect of pesticides and plant protection products and the Beaumont Hospital Board with responsibility for receiving information relating to emergency health response. In practice, the Authority has been de facto CA for CLP since its publication on the 31(st) December 2008, given its role in existing classification and labelling regimes. This article focuses on the work undertaken by the Authority on CLP at a National, European and International level including its implementation, training, helpdesk, guidance, enforcement and awareness raising activities.

  17. Wireless sensor networks for active vibration control in automobile structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mieyeville, Fabien; Ichchou, Mohamed; Scorletti, Gérard; Navarro, David; Du, Wan

    2012-07-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are nowadays widely used in monitoring and tracking applications. This paper presents the feasibility of using WSNs in active vibration control strategies. The method employed here involves active-structural acoustic control using piezoelectric sensors distributed on a car structure. This system aims at being merged with a WSN whose head node collects data and processes control laws so as to command piezoelectric actuators wisely placed on the structure. We will study the feasibility of implementing WSNs in active vibration control and introduce a complete design methodology to optimize hardware/software and control law synergy in mechatronic systems. A design space exploration will be conducted so as to identify the best WSN platform and the resulting impact on control.

  18. Human activity accelerating the rapid desertification of the Mu Us Sandy Lands, North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Yunfa; Jin, Heling; Cui, Jianxin

    2016-03-01

    Over the past several thousand years, arid and semiarid China has experienced a series of asynchronous desertification events in its semiarid sandy and desert regions, but the precise identification of the driving forces of such events has remained elusive. In this paper we identify two rapid desertification events (RDEs) at ~4.6 ± 0.2 ka BP and ~3.3 ± 0.2 ka BP from the JJ Profile, located in the eastern Mu Us Sandy Lands. These RDEs appear to have occurred immediately following periods marked by persistently frequent and intense fires. We argue that such fire patterns, directly linked to an uncontrolled human use of vegetation as fuel, played a key role in accelerating RDEs by ensuring that the land surface was degraded beyond the threshold required for rapid desertification. This would suggest that the future use of a massive and sustained ecological program of vegetation rehabilitation should reduce the risk of destructive fire.

  19. Human activity accelerating the rapid desertification of the Mu Us Sandy Lands, North China

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yunfa; Jin, Heling; Cui, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several thousand years, arid and semiarid China has experienced a series of asynchronous desertification events in its semiarid sandy and desert regions, but the precise identification of the driving forces of such events has remained elusive. In this paper we identify two rapid desertification events (RDEs) at ~4.6 ± 0.2 ka BP and ~3.3 ± 0.2 ka BP from the JJ Profile, located in the eastern Mu Us Sandy Lands. These RDEs appear to have occurred immediately following periods marked by persistently frequent and intense fires. We argue that such fire patterns, directly linked to an uncontrolled human use of vegetation as fuel, played a key role in accelerating RDEs by ensuring that the land surface was degraded beyond the threshold required for rapid desertification. This would suggest that the future use of a massive and sustained ecological program of vegetation rehabilitation should reduce the risk of destructive fire. PMID:26961705

  20. Human activity accelerating the rapid desertification of the Mu Us Sandy Lands, North China.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yunfa; Jin, Heling; Cui, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several thousand years, arid and semiarid China has experienced a series of asynchronous desertification events in its semiarid sandy and desert regions, but the precise identification of the driving forces of such events has remained elusive. In this paper we identify two rapid desertification events (RDEs) at ~4.6 ± 0.2 ka BP and ~3.3 ± 0.2 ka BP from the JJ Profile, located in the eastern Mu Us Sandy Lands. These RDEs appear to have occurred immediately following periods marked by persistently frequent and intense fires. We argue that such fire patterns, directly linked to an uncontrolled human use of vegetation as fuel, played a key role in accelerating RDEs by ensuring that the land surface was degraded beyond the threshold required for rapid desertification. This would suggest that the future use of a massive and sustained ecological program of vegetation rehabilitation should reduce the risk of destructive fire. PMID:26961705

  1. Analysis and design of a capsule landing system and surface vehicle control system for Mars exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, D. K.; Lashmet, P. K.; Sandor, G. N.; Shen, C. N.; Smith, E. J.; Yerazunis, S. W.

    1972-01-01

    Investigation of problems related to the design and control of a mobile planetary vehicle to implement a systematic plan for the exploration of Mars has been undertaken. Problem areas receiving attention include: vehicle configuration, control, dynamics, systems and propulsion; systems analysis; terrain modeling and path selection; and chemical analysis of specimens. The following specific tasks have been under study: vehicle model design, mathematical modeling of a dynamic vehicle, experimental vehicle dynamics, obstacle negotiation, electromechanical controls, collapsibility and deployment, construction of a wheel tester, wheel analysis, payload design, system design optimization, effect of design assumptions, accessory optimal design, on-board computer sybsystem, laser range measurement, discrete obstacle detection, obstacle detection systems, terrain modeling, path selection system simulation and evaluation, gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer system concepts, chromatograph model evaluation and improvement.

  2. Analysis and design of a capsule landing system and surface vehicle control system for Mars exporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, D. K.; Lashmet, P. K.; Sandor, G. N.; Shen, C. N.; Smith, E. J.; Yerazunis, S. W.

    1972-01-01

    The problems related to the design and control of a mobile planetary vehicle to implement a systematic plan for the exploration of Mars were investigated. Problem areas receiving attention include: vehicle configuration, control, dynamics, systems and propulsion; systems analysis; navigation, terrain modeling and path selection; and chemical analysis of specimens. The following specific tasks were studied: vehicle model design, mathematical modeling of dynamic vehicle, experimental vehicle dynamics, obstacle negotiation, electromechanical controls, collapsibility and deployment, construction of a wheel tester, wheel analysis, payload design, system design optimization, effect of design assumptions, accessory optimal design, on-board computer subsystem, laser range measurement, discrete obstacle detection, obstacle detection systems, terrain modeling, path selection system simulation and evaluation, gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer system concepts, chromatograph model evaluation and improvement and transport parameter evaluation.

  3. Land use politics and law in the 1970's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, C. M.

    1975-01-01

    Political facets of the general land use challenge faced in the United States, and the legal authority for governmental action by state and federal officials under given conditions are discussed. Some current and future implications of these political and legal developments are presented. An overview of local versus state versus federal powers is presented along with practices for solving the nation's land use challenge. An analysis is provided of land use law and politics in five states playing active roles in land control. Land use politics and law at the federal level is addressed, with emphasis on three key legislative measures.

  4. Experimental Study on Control of Supersonic Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Vertical Landing Rocket by Using Opposing Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akita, Daisuke; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Kojiro

    In order to control a reentry trajectory of a vertical landing rocket, an opposing jet system is experimentally tested at supersonic speeds. Experiments are conducted at Mach number 4.0 in the supersonic wind tunnel of ISAS. Supersonic nozzles of the exit Mach number 2.4 are installed on a blunt nose of a rocket model. The most significant drag reduction due to the jet-spike effect is obtained when the jet is injected from the stagnation point of the body in the opposite direction to the freestream. Various types of the nozzle arrangement are investigated and the method to increase the L/D is discussed. It is found that the off-axis jet is effective both to increase the L/D and to enable a vehicle to be trimmed at an intended attack angle.

  5. [Actuator placement for active sound and vibration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Two refereed journal publications and ten talks given at conferences, seminars, and colloquia resulted from research supported by NASA. They are itemized in this report. The two publications were entitled "Reactive Tabu and Search Sensor Selection in Active Structural Acoustic Control Problems" and "Quelling Cabin Noise in Turboprop Aircraft via Active Control." The conference presentations covered various aspects of actuator placement, including location problems, for active sound and vibration control of cylinders, of commuter jets, of propeller driven or turboprop aircraft, and for quelling aircraft cabin or interior noise.

  6. On-line Monitoring and Active Control for Transformer Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jiabi; Zhao, Tong; Tian, Chun; Wang, Xia; He, Zhenhua; Duan, Lunfeng

    This paper introduces the system for on-line monitoring and active noise control towards the transformer noise based on LabVIEW and the hardware equipment including the hardware and software. For the hardware part, it is mainly focused on the composition and the role of hardware devices, as well as the mounting location in the active noise control experiment. And the software part introduces the software flow chats, the measurement and analysis module for the sound pressure level including A, B, C weighting methods, the 1/n octave spectrum and the power spectrum, active noise control module and noise data access module.

  7. Analysis and design of a capsule landing system and surface vehicle control system for Mars exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gisser, D. G.; Frederick, D. K.; Lashmet, P. K.; Sandor, G. N.; Shen, C. N.; Yerazunis, S. Y.

    1975-01-01

    Problems related to an unmanned exploration of the planet Mars by means of an autonomous roving planetary vehicle are investigated. These problems include: design, construction and evaluation of the vehicle itself and its control and operating systems. More specifically, vehicle configuration, dynamics, control, propulsion, hazard detection systems, terrain sensing and modelling, obstacle detection concepts, path selection, decision-making systems, and chemical analyses of samples are studied. Emphasis is placed on development of a vehicle capable of gathering specimens and data for an Augmented Viking Mission or to provide the basis for a Sample Return Mission.

  8. The aircraft energy efficiency active controls technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, R. V., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Broad outlines of the NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency Program for expediting the application of active controls technology to civil transport aircraft are presented. Advances in propulsion and airframe technology to cut down on fuel consumption and fuel costs, a program for an energy-efficient transport, and integrated analysis and design technology in aerodynamics, structures, and active controls are envisaged. Fault-tolerant computer systems and fault-tolerant flight control system architectures are under study. Contracts with leading manufacturers for research and development work on wing-tip extensions and winglets for the B-747, a wing load alleviation system, elastic mode suppression, maneuver-load control, and gust alleviation are mentioned.

  9. Active controls: A look at analytical methods and associated tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, J. R.; Adams, W. M., Jr.; Mukhopadhyay, V.; Tiffany, S. H.; Abel, I.

    1984-01-01

    A review of analytical methods and associated tools for active controls analysis and design problems is presented. Approaches employed to develop mathematical models suitable for control system analysis and/or design are discussed. Significant efforts have been expended to develop tools to generate the models from the standpoint of control system designers' needs and develop the tools necessary to analyze and design active control systems. Representative examples of these tools are discussed. Examples where results from the methods and tools have been compared with experimental data are also presented. Finally, a perspective on future trends in analysis and design methods is presented.

  10. Some experiences with active control of aeroelastic response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, J. R.; Abel, I.

    1981-01-01

    Flight and wind tunnel tests were conducted and multidiscipline computer programs were developed as part of investigations of active control technology conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center. Unsteady aerodynamics approximation, optimal control theory, optimal controller design, and the Delta wing and DC-10 models are described. The drones for aerodynamics and structural testing (DAST program) for evaluating procedures for aerodynamic loads prediction and the design of active control systems on wings with significant aeroelastic effects is described as well as the DAST model used in the wind tunnel tests.

  11. Continental Land Mass Air Traffic Control (COLM ATC). [using three artificial satellite configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pecar, J. A.; Henrich, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    The application of various satellite systems and techniques relative to providing air traffic control services for the continental United States was studied. Three satellite configurations were reviewed. The characteristics and capabilities of the satellites are described. The study includes consideration for the various ranging waveforms, multiple access alternatives, and the power and bandwidth required as a function of the number of users.

  12. EMAP SEDIMENTATION INDEX: LAND USE AND NATURAL HYDRAULIC CONTROLS ON STREAM SEDIMENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excessive erosion, transport and deposition of sediment in streams and rivers is a major problem in surface waters throughout the United States. It is important to have a reliable measure of stream sedimentation that properly accounts for natural controls on the amount of fine p...

  13. 10 CFR 60.121 - Requirements for ownership and control of interests in land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... rights. (1) DOE shall also have obtained such water rights as may be needed to accomplish the purpose of the geologic repository operations area. (2) Water rights are included in the additional controls to..., such as: (i) Rights arising under the general mining laws; (ii) easements for right-of-way; and...

  14. 10 CFR 60.121 - Requirements for ownership and control of interests in land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... rights. (1) DOE shall also have obtained such water rights as may be needed to accomplish the purpose of the geologic repository operations area. (2) Water rights are included in the additional controls to..., such as: (i) Rights arising under the general mining laws; (ii) easements for right-of-way; and...

  15. Perpetual factors involved in performance of air traffic controllers using a microwave landing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gershzohn, G.

    1978-01-01

    The task involved the control of two simulated aircraft targets per trial, in a 37.0 -km radius terminal area, by means of conventional radar vectoring and/or speed control. The goal was to insure that the two targets crossed the Missed Approach Point (MAP) at the runway threshold exactly 60 sec apart. The effects on controller performance of the MLS configuration under wind and no-wind conditions were examined. The data for mean separation time between targets at the MAP and the range about that mean were analyzed by appropriate analyses of variance. Significant effects were found for mean separation times as a result of the configuration of the MLS and for interaction between the configuration and wind conditions. The analysis of variance for range indicated significantly poorer performance under the wind condition. These findings are believed to be a result of certain perceptual factors involved in radar air traffic control (ATC) using the MLS with separation of targets in time.

  16. A simulation-based interval two-stage stochastic model for agricultural non-point source pollution control through land retirement.

    PubMed

    Luo, B; Li, J B; Huang, G H; Li, H L

    2006-05-15

    This study presents a simulation-based interval two-stage stochastic programming (SITSP) model for agricultural non-point source (NPS) pollution control through land retirement under uncertain conditions. The modeling framework was established by the development of an interval two-stage stochastic program, with its random parameters being provided by the statistical analysis of the simulation outcomes of a distributed water quality approach. The developed model can deal with the tradeoff between agricultural revenue and "off-site" water quality concern under random effluent discharge for a land retirement scheme through minimizing the expected value of long-term total economic and environmental cost. In addition, the uncertainties presented as interval numbers in the agriculture-water system can be effectively quantified with the interval programming. By subdividing the whole agricultural watershed into different zones, the most pollution-related sensitive cropland can be identified and an optimal land retirement scheme can be obtained through the modeling approach. The developed method was applied to the Swift Current Creek watershed in Canada for soil erosion control through land retirement. The Hydrological Simulation Program-FORTRAN (HSPF) was used to simulate the sediment information for this case study. Obtained results indicate that the total economic and environmental cost of the entire agriculture-water system can be limited within an interval value for the optimal land retirement schemes. Meanwhile, a best and worst land retirement scheme was obtained for the study watershed under various uncertainties.

  17. The control-freak mind: stereotypical biases are eliminated following conflict-activated cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Kleiman, Tali; Hassin, Ran R; Trope, Yaacov

    2014-04-01

    Numerous daily situations require control for successful goal attainment. An important question is whether control can adjust across situations, to create control readiness from one situation to the next. Using trial to trial control adjustment paradigms, previous research generally suggested that control adjustments are domain specific. However, this research typically used neutral stimuli (e.g., single letters) devoid of personally and socially relevant goals. We propose that personal relevance may be an important modulator of control adjustment and, hence, that personally relevant control tasks can benefit from control readiness, even if it is produced by a different task. In 2 experiments we test whether control over the expression of stereotypes, a highly meaningful and desirable goal for many, can benefit from control readiness evoked by a neutral unrelated Flanker task. Results suggest that stereotype-driven behavior is modulated by independently activated control and that personal relevance may facilitate control adjustments across domains.

  18. Analysis and design of a capsule landing system and surface vehicle control system for Mars exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, D. K.; Lashmet, P. K.; Moyer, W. R.; Sandor, G. N.; Shen, C. N.; Smith, E. J.; Yerazunis, S. W.

    1973-01-01

    The following tasks related to the design, construction, and evaluation of a mobile planetary vehicle for unmanned exploration of Mars are discussed: (1) design and construction of a 0.5 scale dynamic vehicle; (2) mathematical modeling of vehicle dynamics; (3) experimental 0.4 scale vehicle dynamics measurements and interpretation; (4) vehicle electro-mechanical control systems; (5) remote control systems; (6) collapsibility and deployment concepts and hardware; (7) design, construction and evaluation of a wheel with increased lateral stiffness, (8) system design optimization; (9) design of an on-board computer; (10) design and construction of a laser range finder; (11) measurement of reflectivity of terrain surfaces; (12) obstacle perception by edge detection; (13) terrain modeling based on gradients; (14) laser scan systems; (15) path selection system simulation and evaluation; (16) gas chromatograph system concepts; (17) experimental chromatograph separation measurements and chromatograph model improvement and evaluation.

  19. Determining the Dominant Controls of Land Surface Phenology: Implications for Global Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, T. F.; Richardson, A. D.; Hufkens, K.

    2014-12-01

    Phenology regulates multiple aspects of ecosystem function, along with associated feedbacks to the climate system. Models predict earlier spring and later fall under future climate change, which would help slow the rate of warming by enabling increased carbon sequestration. That said, current models perform poorly, and there is little consensus as to what are the determining controls of spring and autumn phenology. Here, using global observations of deciduous forest phenology we determine the dominant biotic and abiotic controls, and develop a new suite of predictive models. We examine relationships between spatial and temporal variability, derive a coherent temperature sensitivity of spring phenology, and show that the timing of autumn senescence is dependent on the timing of spring budburst.

  20. Response of soil microbial activity and community structure to land use changes in a mountain rainforest region of Southern Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potthast, Karin; Hamer, Ute; Makeschin, Franz

    2010-05-01

    Over the past several decades the mountain rainforest region of Southern Ecuador, a hotspot of biodiversity, is undergoing a rapid conversion to pastureland through slash and burn practice. Frequently this pastureland is invaded by the tropical bracken fern. When the bracken becomes dominant on the pasture sites the productivity decreases and the sites are abandoned. To assess the effect of these land use changes on nutrient turnover and on ecosystem functioning, a study was conducted in the area of the German research station Estación Científica San Francisco (ECSF) in Southern Ecuador. At 2000 m above sea level three adjacent sites were selected: a mountain rainforest site, an active pasture site dominated by the grass species Setaria sphacelata and an abandoned pasture site overgrown by bracken. Mineral soil samples of all three sites (0-5, 5-10 and 10-20 cm) as well as samples from the organic layer (Oi and Oa) of the natural forest site were taken to analyze biogeochemical properties. Besides pH-value, total organic C and N contents, the amounts of microbial biomass (CFE-method), microbial activity (basal respiration, net N mineralization (KCl-extraction); gross N mineralization (15N dilution technique) rates) and microbial community structure (PLFA-analysis) were determined. 17 years after pasture establishment, twofold higher stocks of soil microbial biomass carbon (Cmic) and nitrogen (Nmic) as well as significant lower C:N ratios were determined compared to the natural forest including the 11 cm thick organic layer. 10 years after bracken invasion and pasture abandonment the microbial biomass (Cmic) decreased and the C:N ratio increased again to forest levels. Generally, land use change from forest to pasture and from pasture to abandoned pasture induced shifts in the soil microbial community structure. The relative abundance of the fast growing copiotrophic Gram(-) bacteria was positively correlated with the amounts of readily available organic carbon