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Sample records for active control loop

  1. Closed-loop and activity-guided optogenetic control.

    PubMed

    Grosenick, Logan; Marshel, James H; Deisseroth, Karl

    2015-04-01

    Advances in optical manipulation and observation of neural activity have set the stage for widespread implementation of closed-loop and activity-guided optical control of neural circuit dynamics. Closing the loop optogenetically (i.e., basing optogenetic stimulation on simultaneously observed dynamics in a principled way) is a powerful strategy for causal investigation of neural circuitry. In particular, observing and feeding back the effects of circuit interventions on physiologically relevant timescales is valuable for directly testing whether inferred models of dynamics, connectivity, and causation are accurate in vivo. Here we highlight technical and theoretical foundations as well as recent advances and opportunities in this area, and we review in detail the known caveats and limitations of optogenetic experimentation in the context of addressing these challenges with closed-loop optogenetic control in behaving animals. PMID:25856490

  2. Closed-Loop and Activity-Guided Optogenetic Control

    PubMed Central

    Grosenick, Logan; Marshel, James H.; Deisseroth, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Advances in optical manipulation and observation of neural activity have set the stage for widespread implementation of closed-loop and activity-guided optical control of neural circuit dynamics. Closing the loop optogenetically (i.e., basing optogenetic stimulation on simultaneously observed dynamics in a principled way) is a powerful strategy for causal investigation of neural circuitry. In particular, observing and feeding back the effects of circuit interventions on physiologically relevant timescales is valuable for directly testing whether inferred models of dynamics, connectivity, and causation are accurate in vivo. Here we highlight technical and theoretical foundations as well as recent advances and opportunities in this area, and we review in detail the known caveats and limitations of optogenetic experimentation in the context of addressing these challenges with closed-loop optogenetic control in behaving animals. PMID:25856490

  3. Active Closed-Loop Stator Vane Flow Control Demonstrated in a Low-Speed Multistage Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bright, Michelle M.; Culley, Dennis E.; Strazisar, Anthony J.

    2004-01-01

    Closed-loop flow control was successfully demonstrated on the surface of stator vanes in NASA Glenn Research Center's Low-Speed Axial Compressor (LSAC) facility. This facility provides a flow field that accurately duplicates the aerodynamics of modern highly loaded compressors. Closed-loop active flow control uses sensors and actuators embedded within engine components to dynamically alter the internal flow path during off-nominal operation in order to optimize engine performance and maintain stable operation.

  4. The SH2 domain of Abl kinases regulates kinase autophosphorylation by controlling activation loop accessibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamontanara, Allan Joaquim; Georgeon, Sandrine; Tria, Giancarlo; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Hantschel, Oliver

    2014-11-01

    The activity of protein kinases is regulated by multiple molecular mechanisms, and their disruption is a common driver of oncogenesis. A central and almost universal control element of protein kinase activity is the activation loop that utilizes both conformation and phosphorylation status to determine substrate access. In this study, we use recombinant Abl tyrosine kinases and conformation-specific kinase inhibitors to quantitatively analyse structural changes that occur after Abl activation. Allosteric SH2-kinase domain interactions were previously shown to be essential for the leukemogenesis caused by the Bcr-Abl oncoprotein. We find that these allosteric interactions switch the Abl activation loop from a closed to a fully open conformation. This enables the trans-autophosphorylation of the activation loop and requires prior phosphorylation of the SH2-kinase linker. Disruption of the SH2-kinase interaction abolishes activation loop phosphorylation. Our analysis provides a molecular mechanism for the SH2 domain-dependent activation of Abl that may also regulate other tyrosine kinases.

  5. Novel sensors to enable closed-loop active clearance control in gas turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisheimer, Jonathan; Holst, Tom

    2014-06-01

    Active clearance control within the turbine section of gas turbine engines presents and opportunity within aerospace and industrial applications to improve operating efficiencies and the life of downstream components. Open loop clearance control is currently employed during the development of all new large core aerospace engines; however, the ability to measure the gap between the blades and the case and close down the clearance further presents as opportunity to gain even greater efficiencies. The turbine area is one of the harshest environments for long term placement of a sensor in addition to the extreme accuracy requirements required to enable closed loop clearance control. This paper gives an overview of the challenges of clearance measurements within the turbine as well as discusses the latest developments of a microwave sensor designed for this application.

  6. Closed-loop control of epileptiform activities in a neural population model using a proportional-derivative controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun-Song; Wang, Mei-Li; Li, Xiao-Li; Ernst, Niebur

    2015-03-01

    Epilepsy is believed to be caused by a lack of balance between excitation and inhibitation in the brain. A promising strategy for the control of the disease is closed-loop brain stimulation. How to determine the stimulation control parameters for effective and safe treatment protocols remains, however, an unsolved question. To constrain the complex dynamics of the biological brain, we use a neural population model (NPM). We propose that a proportional-derivative (PD) type closed-loop control can successfully suppress epileptiform activities. First, we determine the stability of root loci, which reveals that the dynamical mechanism underlying epilepsy in the NPM is the loss of homeostatic control caused by the lack of balance between excitation and inhibition. Then, we design a PD type closed-loop controller to stabilize the unstable NPM such that the homeostatic equilibriums are maintained; we show that epileptiform activities are successfully suppressed. A graphical approach is employed to determine the stabilizing region of the PD controller in the parameter space, providing a theoretical guideline for the selection of the PD control parameters. Furthermore, we establish the relationship between the control parameters and the model parameters in the form of stabilizing regions to help understand the mechanism of suppressing epileptiform activities in the NPM. Simulations show that the PD-type closed-loop control strategy can effectively suppress epileptiform activities in the NPM. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61473208, 61025019, and 91132722), ONR MURI N000141010278, and NIH grant R01EY016281.

  7. Closed Loop Active Flow Separation Detection and Control in a Multistage Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bright, Michelle M.; Culley, Dennis E.; Braunscheidel, Edward P.; Welch, Gerard E.

    2005-01-01

    Active closed loop flow control was successfully demonstrated on a full annulus of stator vanes in a low speed axial compressor. Two independent methods of detecting separated flow conditions on the vane suction surface were developed. The first technique detects changes in static pressure along the vane suction surface, while the second method monitors variation in the potential field of the downstream rotor. Both methods may feasibly be used in future engines employing embedded flow control technology. In response to the detection of separated conditions, injection along the suction surface of each vane was used. Injected mass flow on the suction surface of stator vanes is known to reduce separation and the resulting limitation on static pressure rise due to lowered diffusion in the vane passage. A control algorithm was developed which provided a proportional response of the injected mass flow to the degree of separation, thereby minimizing the performance penalty on the compressor system.

  8. Adaptable Single Active Loop Thermal Control System (TCS) for Future Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mudawar, Issam; Lee, Seunghyun; Hasan, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    This presentation will examine the development of a thermal control system (TCS) for future space missions utilizing a single active cooling loop. The system architecture enables the TCS to be reconfigured during the various mission phases to respond, not only to varying heat load, but to heat rejection temperature as well. The system will consist of an accumulator, pump, cold plates (evaporators), condenser radiator, and compressor, in addition to control, bypass and throttling valves. For cold environments, the heat will be rejected by radiation, during which the compressor will be bypassed, reducing the system to a simple pumped loop that, depending on heat load, can operate in either a single-phase liquid mode or two-phase mode. For warmer environments, the pump will be bypassed, enabling the TCS to operate as a heat pump. This presentation will focus on recent findings concerning two-phase flow regimes, pressure drop, and heat transfer coefficient trends in the cabin and avionics micro-channel heat exchangers when using the heat pump mode. Also discussed will be practical implications of using micro-channel evaporators for the heat pump.

  9. Akt kinase C-terminal modifications control activation loop dephosphorylation and enhance insulin response

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Tung O.; Zhang, Jin; Tiegs, Brian C.; Blumhof, Brian; Yan, Linda; Keny, Nikhil; Penny, Morgan; Li, Xue; Pascal, John M.; Armen, Roger S.; Rodeck, Ulrich; Penn, Raymond B.

    2015-01-01

    The Akt protein kinase, also known as protein kinase B, plays key roles in insulin receptor signalling and regulates cell growth, survival and metabolism. Recently, we described a mechanism to enhance Akt phosphorylation that restricts access of cellular phosphatases to the Akt activation loop (Thr308 in Akt1 or protein kinase B isoform alpha) in an ATP-dependent manner. In the present paper, we describe a distinct mechanism to control Thr308 dephosphorylation and thus Akt deactivation that depends on intramolecular interactions of Akt C-terminal sequences with its kinase domain. Modifications of amino acids surrounding the Akt1 C-terminal mTORC2 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2) phosphorylation site (Ser473) increased phosphatase resistance of the phosphorylated activation loop (pThr308) and amplified Akt phosphorylation. Furthermore, the phosphatase-resistant Akt was refractory to ceramide-dependent dephosphorylation and amplified insulin-dependent Thr308 phosphorylation in a regulated fashion. Collectively, these results suggest that the Akt C-terminal hydrophobic groove is a target for the development of agents that enhance Akt phosphorylation by insulin. PMID:26201515

  10. Effect of control surface mass unbalance on the stability of a closed-loop active control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.

    1989-01-01

    The effects on stability of inertial forces arising from closed-loop activation of mass-unbalanced control surfaces are studied analytically using inertial energy approach, similar to the aerodynamic energy approach used for flutter suppression. The limitations of a single control surface like a leading-edge (LE) control or a trailing-edge (TE) control are demonstrated and compared to the superior combined LE-TE mass unbalanced system. It is shown that a spanwise section for sensor location can be determined which ensures minimum sensitivity to the mode shapes of the aircraft. It is shown that an LE control exhibits compatibility between inertial stabilization and aerodynamic stabilization, and that a TE control lacks such compatibility. The results of the present work should prove valuable, both for the purpose of flutter suppression using mass unbalanced control surfaces, or for the stabilization of structural modes of large space structures by means of inertial forces.

  11. From Concept-to-Flight: An Active Active Fluid Loop Based Thermal Control System for Mars Science Laboratory Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birur, Gajanana C.; Bhandari, Pradeep; Bame, David; Karlmann, Paul; Mastropietro, A. J.; Liu, Yuanming; Miller, Jennifer; Pauken, Michael; Lyra, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover, Curiosity, which was launched on November 26, 2011, incorporates a novel active thermal control system to keep the sensitive electronics and science instruments at safe operating and survival temperatures. While the diurnal temperature variations on the Mars surface range from -120 C to +30 C, the sensitive equipment are kept within -40 C to +50 C. The active thermal control system is based on a single-phase mechanically pumped fluid loop (MPFL) system which removes or recovers excess waste heat and manages it to maintain the sensitive equipment inside the rover at safe temperatures. This paper will describe the entire process of developing this active thermal control system for the MSL rover from concept to flight implementation. The development of the rover thermal control system during its architecture, design, fabrication, integration, testing, and launch is described.

  12. Suppressing epileptic activity in a neural mass model using a closed-loop proportional-integral controller.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junsong; Niebur, Ernst; Hu, Jinyu; Li, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Closed-loop control is a promising deep brain stimulation (DBS) strategy that could be used to suppress high-amplitude epileptic activity. However, there are currently no analytical approaches to determine the stimulation parameters for effective and safe treatment protocols. Proportional-integral (PI) control is the most extensively used closed-loop control scheme in the field of control engineering because of its simple implementation and perfect performance. In this study, we took Jansen's neural mass model (NMM) as a test bed to develop a PI-type closed-loop controller for suppressing epileptic activity. A graphical stability analysis method was employed to determine the stabilizing region of the PI controller in the control parameter space, which provided a theoretical guideline for the choice of the PI control parameters. Furthermore, we established the relationship between the parameters of the PI controller and the parameters of the NMM in the form of a stabilizing region, which provided insights into the mechanisms that may suppress epileptic activity in the NMM. The simulation results demonstrated the validity and effectiveness of the proposed closed-loop PI control scheme. PMID:27273563

  13. Suppressing epileptic activity in a neural mass model using a closed-loop proportional-integral controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junsong; Niebur, Ernst; Hu, Jinyu; Li, Xiaoli

    2016-06-01

    Closed-loop control is a promising deep brain stimulation (DBS) strategy that could be used to suppress high-amplitude epileptic activity. However, there are currently no analytical approaches to determine the stimulation parameters for effective and safe treatment protocols. Proportional-integral (PI) control is the most extensively used closed-loop control scheme in the field of control engineering because of its simple implementation and perfect performance. In this study, we took Jansen’s neural mass model (NMM) as a test bed to develop a PI-type closed-loop controller for suppressing epileptic activity. A graphical stability analysis method was employed to determine the stabilizing region of the PI controller in the control parameter space, which provided a theoretical guideline for the choice of the PI control parameters. Furthermore, we established the relationship between the parameters of the PI controller and the parameters of the NMM in the form of a stabilizing region, which provided insights into the mechanisms that may suppress epileptic activity in the NMM. The simulation results demonstrated the validity and effectiveness of the proposed closed-loop PI control scheme.

  14. Suppressing epileptic activity in a neural mass model using a closed-loop proportional-integral controller

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junsong; Niebur, Ernst; Hu, Jinyu; Li, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Closed-loop control is a promising deep brain stimulation (DBS) strategy that could be used to suppress high-amplitude epileptic activity. However, there are currently no analytical approaches to determine the stimulation parameters for effective and safe treatment protocols. Proportional-integral (PI) control is the most extensively used closed-loop control scheme in the field of control engineering because of its simple implementation and perfect performance. In this study, we took Jansen’s neural mass model (NMM) as a test bed to develop a PI-type closed-loop controller for suppressing epileptic activity. A graphical stability analysis method was employed to determine the stabilizing region of the PI controller in the control parameter space, which provided a theoretical guideline for the choice of the PI control parameters. Furthermore, we established the relationship between the parameters of the PI controller and the parameters of the NMM in the form of a stabilizing region, which provided insights into the mechanisms that may suppress epileptic activity in the NMM. The simulation results demonstrated the validity and effectiveness of the proposed closed-loop PI control scheme. PMID:27273563

  15. Low-order design and high-order simulation of active closed-loop control for aerospace structures under construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balas, Mark J.

    1989-01-01

    Partially constructed/assembled structures in space are complicated enough but their dynamics will also be operating in closed-loop with feedback controllers. The dynamics of such structures are modeled by large-scale finite element models. The model dimension L is extremely large (approximately 10,000) while the numbers of actuators (M) and sensors (P) are small. The model parameters M(sub m) mass matrix, D(sub o) damping matrix, and K(sub o) stiffness matrix, are all symmetric and sparse (banded). Thus simulation of open-loop structure models of very large dimension can be accomplished by special integration techniques for sparse matrices. The problem of simulation of closed-loop control of such structures is complicated by the addition of controllers. Simulation of closed-loop controlled structures is an essential part of the controller design and evaluation process. Current research in the following areas is presented: high-order simulation of actively controlled aerospace structures; low-order controller design and SCI compensation for unmodeled dynamics; prediction of closed-loop stability using asymptotic eigenvalue series; and flexible robot manipulator control experiment.

  16. Dynamic PID loop control

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, L.; Klebaner, A.; Theilacker, J.; Soyars, W.; Martinez, A.; Bossert, R.; DeGraff, B.; Darve, C.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01

    The Horizontal Test Stand (HTS) SRF Cavity and Cryomodule 1 (CM1) of eight 9-cell, 1.3GHz SRF cavities are operating at Fermilab. For the cryogenic control system, how to hold liquid level constant in the cryostat by regulation of its Joule-Thompson JT-valve is very important after cryostat cool down to 2.0 K. The 72-cell cryostat liquid level response generally takes a long time delay after regulating its JT-valve; therefore, typical PID control loop should result in some cryostat parameter oscillations. This paper presents a type of PID parameter self-optimal and Time-Delay control method used to reduce cryogenic system parameters oscillation.

  17. Physical Activity Capture Technology With Potential for Incorporation Into Closed-Loop Control for Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Dadlani, Vikash; Levine, James A; McCrady-Spitzer, Shelly K; Dassau, Eyal; Kudva, Yogish C

    2015-11-01

    Physical activity is an important determinant of glucose variability in type 1 diabetes (T1D). It has been incorporated as a nonglucose input into closed-loop control (CLC) protocols for T1D during the last 4 years mainly by 3 research groups in single center based controlled clinical trials involving a maximum of 18 subjects in any 1 study. Although physical activity data capture may have clinical benefit in patients with T1D by impacting cardiovascular fitness and optimal body weight achievement and maintenance, limited number of such studies have been conducted to date. Clinical trial registries provide information about a single small sample size 2 center prospective study incorporating physical activity data input to modulate closed-loop control in T1D that are seeking to build on prior studies. We expect an increase in such studies especially since the NIH has expanded support of this type of research with additional grants starting in the second half of 2015. Studies (1) involving patients with other disorders that have lasted 12 weeks or longer and tracked physical activity and (2) including both aerobic and resistance activity may offer insights about the user experience and device optimization even as single input CLC heads into real-world clinical trials over the next few years and nonglucose input is introduced as the next advance. PMID:26481641

  18. Active Control of the Operating Temperature in a Loop Heat Pipe with Two Evaporators and Two Condensers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Birur, Gaj; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The operating temperature of a loop heat pipe (LHP) with multiple evaporators is a function of the total heat load, heat load distribution among evaporators, condenser temperature and ambient temperature. Because of the many variables involved, the operating temperature also showed more hystereses than an LHP with a single evaporator. Tight temperature control can be achieved by controlling its compensation chamber (CC) temperatures at the desired set point. This paper describes a test program on active control of the operating temperature in an LHP with two evaporators and two condensers. Temperature control was achieved by heating one or both CC's. Tests performed included start-up, power cycle, sink temperature cycle, CC temperature cycle, and capillary limit. Test results show that, regardless one or two CC's were heated to the set point temperature, one of CC's was always flooded with liquid. The loop could operate successfully at the desired set point temperature under most conditions, including some fast transients. At low heat loads, however, the CC temperature could suddenly increase above the set point temperature, possibly due to a sudden change of the vapor content inside the evaporator core.

  19. All digital pulsewidth control loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hong-Yi; Jan, Shiun-Dian; Pu, Ruei-Iun

    2013-03-01

    This work presents an all-digital pulsewidth control loop (ADPWCL). The proposed system accepts a wide range of input duty cycles and performs a fast correction to the target output pulsewidth. An all-digital delay-locked loop (DLL) with fast locking time using a simplified time to digital converter and a new differential two-step delay element is proposed. The area of the delay element is much smaller than that in conventional designs, while having the same delay range. A test chip is verified in a 0.18-µm CMOS process. The measured duty cycle ranges from 4% to 98% with 7-bit resolution.

  20. Active magnetic bearing control loop modeling for a finite element rotordynamics code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genta, Giancarlo; Delprete, Cristiana; Carabelli, Stefano

    1994-01-01

    A mathematical model of an active electromagnetic bearing which includes the actuator, the sensor and the control system is developed and implemented in a specialized finite element code for rotordynamic analysis. The element formulation and its incorporation in the model of the machine are described in detail. A solution procedure, based on a modal approach in which the number of retained modes is controlled by the user, is then shown together with other procedures for computing the steady-state response to both static and unbalance forces. An example of application shows the numerical results obtained on a model of an electric motor suspended on a five active-axis magnetic suspension. The comparison of some of these results with the experimental characteristics of the actual system shows the ability of the present model to predict its performance.

  1. Active magnetic bearing control loop modeling for a finite element rotordynamics code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genta, Giancarlo; Delprete, Cristiana; Carabelli, Stefano

    1994-05-01

    A mathematical model of an active electromagnetic bearing which includes the actuator, the sensor and the control system is developed and implemented in a specialized finite element code for rotordynamic analysis. The element formulation and its incorporation in the model of the machine are described in detail. A solution procedure, based on a modal approach in which the number of retained modes is controlled by the user, is then shown together with other procedures for computing the steady-state response to both static and unbalance forces. An example of application shows the numerical results obtained on a model of an electric motor suspended on a five active-axis magnetic suspension. The comparison of some of these results with the experimental characteristics of the actual system shows the ability of the present model to predict its performance.

  2. Bandwidth controller for phase-locked-loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockman, Milton H. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A phase locked loop utilizing digital techniques to control the closed loop bandwidth of the RF carrier phase locked loop in a receiver provides high sensitivity and a wide dynamic range for signal reception. After analog to digital conversion, a digital phase locked loop bandwidth controller provides phase error detection with automatic RF carrier closed loop tracking bandwidth control to accommodate several modes of transmission.

  3. A dual-loop model of the human controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    A representative model of the human controller in single-axis compensatory tracking tasks that exhibits an internal feedback loop which is not evident in single-loop models now in common use is presented. This hypothetical inner-loop involves a neuromuscular command signal derived from the time rate of change of controlled element output which is due to control activity. It is not contended that the single-loop human controller models now in use are incorrect, but that they contain an implicit but important internal loop closure, which, if explicitly considered, can account for a good deal of the adaptive nature of the human controller in a systematic manner.

  4. Pre-miRNA Loop Nucleotides Control the Distinct Activities of mir-181a-1 and mir-181c in Early T Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Sibiao; Chen, Chang-Zheng

    2008-01-01

    Background Mature miRNAs can often be classified into large families, consisting of members with identical seeds (nucleotides 2 through 7 of the mature miRNAs) and highly homologous ∼21-nucleotide (nt) mature miRNA sequences. However, it is unclear whether members of a miRNA gene family, which encode identical or nearly identical mature miRNAs, are functionally interchangeable in vivo. Methods and Findings We show that mir-181a-1, but not mir-181c, can promote CD4 and CD8 double-positive (DP) T cell development when ectopically expressed in thymic progenitor cells. The distinct activities of mir-181a-1 and mir-181c are largely determined by their unique pre-miRNA loop nucleotides—not by the one-nucleotide difference in their mature miRNA sequences. Moreover, the activity of mir-181a-1 on DP cell development can be quantitatively influenced by nucleotide changes in its pre-miRNA loop region. We find that both the strength and the functional specificity of miRNA genes can be controlled by the pre-miRNA loop nucleotides. Intriguingly, we note that mutations in the pre-miRNA loop regions affect pre-miRNA and mature miRNA processing, but find no consistent correlation between the effects of pre-miRNA loop mutations on the levels of mature miRNAs and the activities of the mir-181a-1/c genes. Conclusions These results demonstrate that pre-miRNA loop nucleotides play a critical role in controlling the activity of miRNA genes and that members of the same miRNA gene families could have evolved to achieve different activities via alterations in their pre-miRNA loop sequences, while maintaining identical or nearly identical mature miRNA sequences. PMID:18974849

  5. Current control loop of 3-phase grid-connected inverter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbar, A. F.; Mansor, M.

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a comparative study of current control loop in 3-phase inverter which is used to control the active and reactive output power. Generally, current control loop, power control loop and phase lock-loop are the conventional parameters that can be found in an inverter system controlled by the conventional linear control type, for instance proportional (P), integral (I) and derivative (D). If the grid remains stable throughout the day, PID control can be use. However variation of magnitude, frequency, voltage dips, transient, and other related power quality issues occur in a 3-phase grid often affects the control loop. This paper aims to provide an overall review on the available current control techniques used in grid connected system.

  6. Closed-loop feedback control and bifurcation analysis of epileptiform activity via optogenetic stimulation in a mathematical model of human cortex.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Prashanth; Sleigh, Jamie W; Kirsch, Heidi E; Szeri, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics provides a method of neuron stimulation that has high spatial, temporal, and cell-type specificity. Here we present a model of optogenetic feedback control that targets the inhibitory population, which expresses light-sensitive channelrhodopsin-2 channels, in a mean-field model of undifferentiated cortex that is driven to seizures. The inhibitory population is illuminated with an intensity that is a function of electrode measurements obtained via the cortical model. We test the efficacy of this control method on seizurelike activity observed in two parameter spaces of the cortical model that most closely correspond to seizures observed in patients. We also compare the effect of closed-loop and open-loop control on seizurelike activity using a less-complicated ordinary differential equation model of the undifferentiated cortex in parameter space. Seizurelike activity is successfully suppressed in both parameter planes using optimal illumination intensities less likely to have adverse effects on cortical tissue. PMID:26871110

  7. Voice loops as coordination aids in space shuttle mission control.

    PubMed

    Patterson, E S; Watts-Perotti, J; Woods, D D

    1999-01-01

    Voice loops, an auditory groupware technology, are essential coordination support tools for experienced practitioners in domains such as air traffic management, aircraft carrier operations and space shuttle mission control. They support synchronous communication on multiple channels among groups of people who are spatially distributed. In this paper, we suggest reasons for why the voice loop system is a successful medium for supporting coordination in space shuttle mission control based on over 130 hours of direct observation. Voice loops allow practitioners to listen in on relevant communications without disrupting their own activities or the activities of others. In addition, the voice loop system is structured around the mission control organization, and therefore directly supports the demands of the domain. By understanding how voice loops meet the particular demands of the mission control environment, insight can be gained for the design of groupware tools to support cooperative activity in other event-driven domains. PMID:12269347

  8. Voice loops as coordination aids in space shuttle mission control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, E. S.; Watts-Perotti, J.; Woods, D. D.

    1999-01-01

    Voice loops, an auditory groupware technology, are essential coordination support tools for experienced practitioners in domains such as air traffic management, aircraft carrier operations and space shuttle mission control. They support synchronous communication on multiple channels among groups of people who are spatially distributed. In this paper, we suggest reasons for why the voice loop system is a successful medium for supporting coordination in space shuttle mission control based on over 130 hours of direct observation. Voice loops allow practitioners to listen in on relevant communications without disrupting their own activities or the activities of others. In addition, the voice loop system is structured around the mission control organization, and therefore directly supports the demands of the domain. By understanding how voice loops meet the particular demands of the mission control environment, insight can be gained for the design of groupware tools to support cooperative activity in other event-driven domains.

  9. A Threonine on the Active Site Loop Controls Transition State Formation in Escherichia Coli Respiratory Complex II

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasiak, T.M.; Maklashina, E.; Cecchini, G.; Iverson, T.M.

    2009-05-26

    In Escherichia coli, the complex II superfamily members succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (SQR) and quinol:fumarate reductase (QFR) participate in aerobic and anaerobic respiration, respectively. Complex II enzymes catalyze succinate and fumarate interconversion at the interface of two domains of the soluble flavoprotein subunit, the FAD binding domain and the capping domain. An 11-amino acid loop in the capping domain (Thr-A234 to Thr-A244 in quinol:fumarate reductase) begins at the interdomain hinge and covers the active site. Amino acids of this loop interact with both the substrate and a proton shuttle, potentially coordinating substrate binding and the proton shuttle protonation state. To assess the loop's role in catalysis, two threonine residues were mutated to alanine: QFR Thr-A244 (act-T; Thr-A254 in SQR), which hydrogen-bonds to the substrate at the active site, and QFR Thr-A234 (hinge-T; Thr-A244 in SQR), which is located at the hinge and hydrogen-bonds the proton shuttle. Both mutations impair catalysis and decrease substrate binding. The crystal structure of the hinge-T mutation reveals a reorientation between the FAD-binding and capping domains that accompanies proton shuttle alteration. Taken together, hydrogen bonding from act-T to substrate may coordinate with interdomain motions to twist the double bond of fumarate and introduce the strain important for attaining the transition state.

  10. Compact, closed-loop controlled waste incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Schadow, K.C.; Seeker, W.R.

    1999-07-01

    Technologies for solid and liquid waste destruction in compact incinerators are being developed in collaboration between industry, universities, and a Government laboratory. This paper reviews progress on one technology, namely active combustion control to achieve efficient and controlled afterburning of air-starved reaction products. This technology which uses synchronized waste gas injection into acoustically stabilized air vortices was transitioned to a simplified afterburner design and practical operational conditions. The full-scale, simplified afterburner, which achieved CO and NO{sub x} emissions of about 30 ppm with a residence time of less than 50 msec, was integrated with a commercially available marine incinerator to increase throughput and reduce emissions. Closed-loop active control with diode laser sensors and novel control strategies was demonstrated on a sub-scale afterburner.

  11. Chromosome Compaction by Active Loop Extrusion.

    PubMed

    Goloborodko, Anton; Marko, John F; Mirny, Leonid A

    2016-05-24

    During cell division, chromosomes are compacted in length by more than a 100-fold. A wide range of experiments demonstrated that in their compacted state, mammalian chromosomes form arrays of closely stacked consecutive ∼100 kb loops. The mechanism underlying the active process of chromosome compaction into a stack of loops is unknown. Here we test the hypothesis that chromosomes are compacted by enzymatic machines that actively extrude chromatin loops. When such loop-extruding factors (LEF) bind to chromosomes, they progressively bridge sites that are further away along the chromosome, thus extruding a loop. We demonstrate that collective action of LEFs leads to formation of a dynamic array of consecutive loops. Simulations and an analytically solved model identify two distinct steady states: a sparse state, where loops are highly dynamic but provide little compaction; and a dense state, where there are more stable loops and dramatic chromosome compaction. We find that human chromosomes operate at the border of the dense steady state. Our analysis also shows how the macroscopic characteristics of the loop array are determined by the microscopic properties of LEFs and their abundance. When the number of LEFs are used that match experimentally based estimates, the model can quantitatively reproduce the average loop length, the degree of compaction, and the general loop-array morphology of compact human chromosomes. Our study demonstrates that efficient chromosome compaction can be achieved solely by an active loop-extrusion process. PMID:27224481

  12. RUPERT closed loop control design.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Sivakumar; Wei, Ruihua; He, Jiping

    2008-01-01

    Rehabilitation robotics is an active area of research in the field of stroke rehabilitation. There is significant potential for improving the current physical rehabilitation methods after stroke through the use of robotic devices. RUPERT is a wearable robotic exoskeleton powered by pneumatic muscle actuators. An adaptive robot control strategy combining a PID-based feedback controller and an Iterative Learning Controller (ILC) is proposed for performing passive reaching tasks. Additionally, a fuzzy rule-base for estimating the learning rate for the ILC is also proposed. The proposed control scheme has the ability to adapt to different subject for performing different reaching tasks. The preliminary results from two able-bodied subjects demonstrate that the proposed controller can provide consistent performance for different subjects performing different reaching tasks. PMID:19163455

  13. RUPERT closed loop control design.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hang; Balasubramanian, Sivakumar; Wei, Ruihua; Austin, Hiroko; Buchanan, Sharon; Herman, Richard; He, Jiping

    2010-01-01

    Robot-assisted rehabilitation is an active area of research in the field of stroke rehabilitation. RUPERT is a wearable robotic exoskeleton powered by pneumatic muscle actuators. In this study, we described the structure of the controllers for the five degrees of freedom currently used by RUPERT. We applied the RUPERT on 6 stroke patients to provide robot-assisted rehabilitation therapy in a clinical study. Statistical χ(2) test on the proportion of successfully reaching targets showed that 3 out of the 6 patients demonstrated significant improvement in reaching targets successfully, and the remaining 3 did not show performance improvement or deterioration. We plan to implement the RUPERT in the patient's house for easier access and more frequent use. More significant performance results are expected. PMID:21097049

  14. Direct Optical Ice Sensing and Closed-Loop Controller Design for Active De-icing of Wind Turbines Using Distributed Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shajiee, Shervin

    Ice accumulation on wind turbines operating in cold regions reduces power generation by degrading aerodynamic efficiency and causes mass imbalance and fatigue loads on the blades. Due to blade rotation and variation of the pitch angle, different locations on the blade experience large variations of Reynolds number, Nusselt number, heat loss, and non-uniform ice distribution. Hence, applying different amounts of heat flux in different blade locations can provide more effective de-icing for the same total power consumption. This large variation of required heat flux motivates using distributed resistive heating, with the capability of locally adjusting thermal power as a function of location on the blade. The main contributions of this research are developing the experimental feasibility of direct ice sensing using an optical sensing technique as well as development of a computational framework for implementation of closed-loop localized active de-icing using distributed sensing. A script-base module was developed in a commercial finite-element software (ANSYS) which provides the capability of (i) Closed-loop de-icing simulations for a distributed network of sensors and actuators, (ii) investigating different closed-loop thermal control schemes and their de-icing efficiency (iii) optimizing thermal actuation for a distributed resistive heating, and (iv) analyzing different faulty scenarios for sensors and thermal actuators under known faults in the network. Different surrogate models were used to enhance the computational efficiency of this approach. The results showed that optimal value of control parameters in a distributed network of heaters depends on convective heat transfer characteristics, layout of heaters and type of closed-loop controller scheme used for thermal actuation. Furthermore, It was shown that closed-loop control provides much faster de-icing than the open-loop constant heat flux thermal actuation. It was observed both experimentally and

  15. Closed Loop Welding Controller for Manufacturing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaccorso, F.; Bruno, C.; Cantelli, L.; Longo, D.; Muscato, G.; Rapisarda, S.

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate on the closed loop welding controller of a rapid manufacturing Shaped Metal Deposition (SMD) process. SMD was developed and patented by Rolls-Royce in order to produce mechanical parts directly from a CAD model. A simplified SMD plant has been set up in order to investigate the welding dynamics and parameters and to develop a SMD automatic controller. On the basis of the experience acquired, some basic control laws have been developed, and a closed loop controller has been implemented. This controller permits to find and to maintain the process stability condition, so that the final process results totally automatic. The control is performed adjusting the welding conditions on the basis of arc voltage information obtained from the welding machine during the deposition. The experimental results reported confirm the validity of the proposed strategy.

  16. Mitotic chromosome compaction via active loop extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goloborodko, Anton; Imakaev, Maxim; Marko, John; Mirny, Leonid; MIT-Northwestern Team

    During cell division, two copies of each chromosome are segregated from each other and compacted more than hundred-fold into the canonical X-shaped structures. According to earlier microscopic observations and the recent Hi-C study, chromosomes are compacted into arrays of consecutive loops of ~100 kilobases. Mechanisms that lead to formation of such loop arrays are largely unknown. Here we propose that, during cell division, chromosomes can be compacted by enzymes that extrude loops on chromatin fibers. First, we use computer simulations and analytical modeling to show that a system of loop-extruding enzymes on a chromatin fiber self-organizes into an array of consecutive dynamic loops. Second, we model the process of loop extrusion in 3D and show that, coupled with the topo II strand-passing activity, it leads to robust compaction and segregation of sister chromatids. This mechanism of chromosomal condensation and segregation does not require additional proteins or specific DNA markup and is robust against variations in the number and properties of such loop extruding enzymes. Work at NU was supported by the NSF through Grants DMR-1206868 and MCB-1022117, and by the NIH through Grants GM105847 and CA193419. Work at MIT was supported by the NIH through Grants GM114190 R01HG003143.

  17. Adaptive Inner-Loop Rover Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Nilesh; Ippolito, Corey; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje; Al-Ali, Khalid M.

    2006-01-01

    Adaptive control technology is developed for the inner-loop speed and steering control of the MAX Rover. MAX, a CMU developed rover, is a compact low-cost 4-wheel drive, 4-wheel steer (double Ackerman), high-clearance agile durable chassis, outfitted with sensors and electronics that make it ideally suited for supporting research relevant to intelligent teleoperation and as a low-cost autonomous robotic test bed and appliance. The design consists of a feedback linearization based controller with a proportional - integral (PI) feedback that is augmented by an online adaptive neural network. The adaptation law has guaranteed stability properties for safe operation. The control design is retrofit in nature so that it fits inside the outer-loop path planning algorithms. Successful hardware implementation of the controller is illustrated for several scenarios consisting of actuator failures and modeling errors in the nominal design.

  18. Hierarchical curiosity loops and active sensing.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Goren; Ahissar, Ehud

    2012-08-01

    A curious agent acts so as to optimize its learning about itself and its environment, without external supervision. We present a model of hierarchical curiosity loops for such an autonomous active learning agent, whereby each loop selects the optimal action that maximizes the agent's learning of sensory-motor correlations. The model is based on rewarding the learner's prediction errors in an actor-critic reinforcement learning (RL) paradigm. Hierarchy is achieved by utilizing previously learned motor-sensory mapping, which enables the learning of other mappings, thus increasing the extent and diversity of knowledge and skills. We demonstrate the relevance of this architecture to active sensing using the well-studied vibrissae (whiskers) system, where rodents acquire sensory information by virtue of repeated whisker movements. We show that hierarchical curiosity loops starting from optimally learning the internal models of whisker motion and then extending to object localization result in free-air whisking and object palpation, respectively. PMID:22386787

  19. Closed-Loop Control of Epilepsy by Transcranial Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Berényi, Antal; Belluscio, Mariano; Mao, Dun; Buzsáki, György

    2016-01-01

    Many neurological and psychiatric diseases are associated with clinically detectable, altered brain dynamics. The aberrant brain activity, in principle, can be restored through electrical stimulation. In epilepsies, abnormal patterns emerge intermittently, and therefore, a closed-loop feedback brain control that leaves other aspects of brain functions unaffected is desirable. Here, we demonstrate that seizure-triggered, feedback transcranial electrical stimulation (TES) can dramatically reduce spike-and-wave episodes in a rodent model of generalized epilepsy. Closed-loop TES can be an effective clinical tool to reduce pathological brain patterns in drug-resistant patients. PMID:22879515

  20. ACSYNT inner loop flight control design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bortins, Richard; Sorensen, John A.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Ames Research Center developed the Aircraft Synthesis (ACSYNT) computer program to synthesize conceptual future aircraft designs and to evaluate critical performance metrics early in the design process before significant resources are committed and cost decisions made. ACSYNT uses steady-state performance metrics, such as aircraft range, payload, and fuel consumption, and static performance metrics, such as the control authority required for the takeoff rotation and for landing with an engine out, to evaluate conceptual aircraft designs. It can also optimize designs with respect to selected criteria and constraints. Many modern aircraft have stability provided by the flight control system rather than by the airframe. This may allow the aircraft designer to increase combat agility, or decrease trim drag, for increased range and payload. This strategy requires concurrent design of the airframe and the flight control system, making trade-offs of performance and dynamics during the earliest stages of design. ACSYNT presently lacks means to implement flight control system designs but research is being done to add methods for predicting rotational degrees of freedom and control effector performance. A software module to compute and analyze the dynamics of the aircraft and to compute feedback gains and analyze closed loop dynamics is required. The data gained from these analyses can then be fed back to the aircraft design process so that the effects of the flight control system and the airframe on aircraft performance can be included as design metrics. This report presents results of a feasibility study and the initial design work to add an inner loop flight control system (ILFCS) design capability to the stability and control module in ACSYNT. The overall objective is to provide a capability for concurrent design of the aircraft and its flight control system, and enable concept designers to improve performance by exploiting the interrelationships between

  1. Dual-loop model of the human controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    A dual-loop model of the human controller in single-axis compensatory tracking tasks is introduced. This model possesses an inner-loop closure that involves feeding back that portion of controlled element output rate that is due to control activity. A novel feature of the model is the explicit appearance of the human's internal representation of the manipulator-controlled element dynamics in the inner loop. The sensor inputs to the human controller are assumed to be system error and control force. The former can be sensed via visual, aural, or tactile displays, whereas the latter is assumed to be sensed in kinesthetic fashion. A set of general adaptive characteristics for the model is hypothesized, including a method for selecting simplified internal models of the manipulator-controlled element dynamics. It is demonstrated that the model can produce controller describing functions that closely approximate those measured in four laboratory tracking tasks in which the controlled element dynamics vary considerably in terms of ease of control. An empirically derived expression for the normalized injected error remnant spectrum is introduced.

  2. Iterative LQG Controller Design Through Closed-Loop Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsiao, Min-Hung; Huang, Jen-Kuang; Cox, David E.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an iterative Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) controller design approach for a linear stochastic system with an uncertain open-loop model and unknown noise statistics. This approach consists of closed-loop identification and controller redesign cycles. In each cycle, the closed-loop identification method is used to identify an open-loop model and a steady-state Kalman filter gain from closed-loop input/output test data obtained by using a feedback LQG controller designed from the previous cycle. Then the identified open-loop model is used to redesign the state feedback. The state feedback and the identified Kalman filter gain are used to form an updated LQC controller for the next cycle. This iterative process continues until the updated controller converges. The proposed controller design is demonstrated by numerical simulations and experiments on a highly unstable large-gap magnetic suspension system.

  3. Man-in-the-control-loop simulation of manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, J. L.; Lin, Tsung-Chieh; Yae, K. Harold

    1989-01-01

    A method to achieve man-in-the-control-loop simulation is presented. Emerging real-time dynamics simulation suggests a potential for creating an interactive design workstation with a human operator in the control loop. The recursive formulation for multibody dynamics simulation is studied to determine requirements for man-in-the-control-loop simulation. High speed computer graphics techniques provides realistic visual cues for the simulator. Backhoe and robot arm simulations are implemented to demonstrate the capability of man-in-the-control-loop simulation.

  4. Robust tuning of two-loop automatic control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, N. I.; Sabanin, V. R.; Repin, A. I.

    2007-07-01

    We propose a solution to the problem of finding trade-off robust tuning parameters for two-loop automatic control systems by means of a numerical simulation method using the authors’ version of the Optim-MGA evolutionary optimization algorithm. Results from calculating and analyzing a two-loop superheated steam temperature control system employing a PI controller and a differentiator are presented.

  5. Continuous control of phase-locked-loop bandwidth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motal, G. W.; Vanelli, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    Tracking loop filter with continuous bandwidth control smooths transition from wide to narrow band. Circuit was designed for Space Shuttle where bandwidth varied between 320 Hz for acquisition and 20 Hz for tracking. Field-effect transitor (FET) acts as voltage controlled variable resistance, changing time constant of filter between phase detector and voltage-controlled oscillator in phase-locked loop.

  6. Control and optimization system and method for chemical looping processes

    DOEpatents

    Lou, Xinsheng; Joshi, Abhinaya; Lei, Hao

    2014-06-24

    A control system for optimizing a chemical loop system includes one or more sensors for measuring one or more parameters in a chemical loop. The sensors are disposed on or in a conduit positioned in the chemical loop. The sensors generate one or more data signals representative of an amount of solids in the conduit. The control system includes a data acquisition system in communication with the sensors and a controller in communication with the data acquisition system. The data acquisition system receives the data signals and the controller generates the control signals. The controller is in communication with one or more valves positioned in the chemical loop. The valves are configured to regulate a flow of the solids through the chemical loop.

  7. Control and optimization system and method for chemical looping processes

    DOEpatents

    Lou, Xinsheng; Joshi, Abhinaya; Lei, Hao

    2015-02-17

    A control system for optimizing a chemical loop system includes one or more sensors for measuring one or more parameters in a chemical loop. The sensors are disposed on or in a conduit positioned in the chemical loop. The sensors generate one or more data signals representative of an amount of solids in the conduit. The control system includes a data acquisition system in communication with the sensors and a controller in communication with the data acquisition system. The data acquisition system receives the data signals and the controller generates the control signals. The controller is in communication with one or more valves positioned in the chemical loop. The valves are configured to regulate a flow of the solids through the chemical loop.

  8. Speed-Accuracy Trade-Off in Skilled Typewriting: Decomposing the Contributions of Hierarchical Control Loops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamaguchi, Motonori; Crump, Matthew J. C.; Logan, Gordon D.

    2013-01-01

    Typing performance involves hierarchically structured control systems: At the higher level, an outer loop generates a word or a series of words to be typed; at the lower level, an inner loop activates the keystrokes comprising the word in parallel and executes them in the correct order. The present experiments examined contributions of the outer-…

  9. Open-loop control of class-2 tensegrity towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masic, Milenko; Skelton, Robert E.

    2004-07-01

    This paper concerns open-loop control laws for reconfiguration of tensegrity towers. By postulating the control strategy as an equilibrium tracking control, very little control energy is required. Several different reconfiguration scenarios are possible for different string connectivity schemes. This includes unit radius control, twist angle control and truncation parameter control. All these control laws allow a nonuniform distribution of the control parameters among units. By defining a wave--like reference signal and injecting it in the open--loop control law, we demonstrate the concept of self--propelled tensegrity structure that are capable of locomotion.

  10. Improvement of process closed-loop control systems for power units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilenko, V. A.; Mikushevich, E. E.; Nikol'Skii, D. Yu.; Rogachev, R. L.; Romanov, N. A.

    2008-10-01

    We describe the results of activities carried out at ZAO Interavtomatika (Interautomatika AG) on the development and putting into use of improved systems for closed-loop control of the main process values of Russian power units equipped with once-through boilers. We also consider a general approach for improving control systems and describe specific technical solutions taken for furnishing the main technological items of coal-and gas-and-oil-fired power units with closed-loop control systems.

  11. Open-loop, closed-loop and compensatory control: performance improvement under pressure in a rhythmic task

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Kunlin; Sternad, Dagmar

    2012-01-01

    According to explicit monitoring theories, the phenomenon of choking under pressure is due to actors focusing their attention on the execution of the skill. This step-by-step perceptually guided control may then interfere with automatic execution. In order to examine the changes in control at the sensorimotor level, we examined the rhythmic task of ball bouncing which affords detailed quantification of indicators of control based on previous research. The hypothesis was that under psychological pressure perceptually guided control should lead to decreased performance due to over-emphasis on closed-loop control and decreased compensatory control. In two experiments of different difficulty psychological stress was induced via setting up a fake competition. Results showed that, contrary to the hypothesis, performance accuracy and consistency improved together with an increase in compensatory control. Indicators for open- and closed-loop processes did not change. Only under more challenging conditions in Experiment 2, enhanced performance under pressure was accompanied by more active, closed-loop and less passive control. The results are discussed in light of task demands and the continuous rhythmic nature of the task: in more challenging tasks, control appears to be more prone to disturbance due to psychological stress. The different control demands in continuous rhythmic tasks may be less prone to interference due to psychological stress than in discrete tasks. PMID:19943039

  12. 3D MHD Models of Active Region Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, Leon

    2004-01-01

    Present imaging and spectroscopic observations of active region loops allow to determine many physical parameters of the coronal loops, such as the density, temperature, velocity of flows in loops, and the magnetic field. However, due to projection effects many of these parameters remain ambiguous. Three dimensional imaging in EUV by the STEREO spacecraft will help to resolve the projection ambiguities, and the observations could be used to setup 3D MHD models of active region loops to study the dynamics and stability of active regions. Here the results of 3D MHD models of active region loops are presented, and the progress towards more realistic 3D MHD models of active regions. In particular the effects of impulsive events on the excitation of active region loop oscillations, and the generation, propagations and reflection of EIT waves are shown. It is shown how 3D MHD models together with 3D EUV observations can be used as a diagnostic tool for active region loop physical parameters, and to advance the science of the sources of solar coronal activity.

  13. The effects of spaceflight on open-loop and closed-loop postural control mechanisms: human neurovestibular studies on SLS-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J. J.; De Luca, C. J.; Pavlik, A. E.; Roy, S. H.; Emley, M. S.; Young, L. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Stabilogram-diffusion analysis was used to examine how prolonged periods in microgravity affect the open-loop and closed-loop postural control mechanisms. It was hypothesized that following spaceflight: (1) the effective stochastic activity of the open-loop postural control schemes in astronauts is increased; (2) the effective stochastic activity and uncorrelated behavior, respectively, of the closed-loop postural control mechanisms in astronauts are increased; and (3) astronauts utilized open-loop postural controls schemes for shorter time intervals and smaller displacements. Four crew members and two alternates from the 14-day Spacelab Life Sciences 2 Mission were included in the study. Each subject was tested under eyes-open, quiet-standing conditions on multiple preflight and postflight days. The subjects' center-of-pressure trajectories were measured with a force platform and analyzed according to stabilogram-diffusion analysis. It was found that the effective stochastic activity of the open-loop postural control schemes in three of the four crew members was increased following spaceflight. This result is interpreted as an indication that there may be in-flight adaptations to higher-level descending postural control pathways, e.g., a postflight increase in the tonic activation of postural muscles. This change may also be the consequence of a compensatory (e.g., "stiffening") postural control strategy that is adopted by astronauts to account for general feeling of postflight unsteadiness. The crew members, as a group, did not exhibit any consistent preflight/postflight differences in the steady-state behavior of their closed-loop postural control mechanisms or in the functional interaction of their open-loop and closed-loop postural control mechanisms. These results are interpreted as indications that although there may be in-flight adaptations to the vestibular system and/or proprioceptive system, input from the visual system can compensate for such changes

  14. Development of closed loop roll control for magnetic balance systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Covert, E. E.; Haldeman, C. W.; Ramohalli, G.; Way, P.

    1982-01-01

    This research was undertaken with the goal of demonstrating closed loop control of the roll degree of freedom on the NASA prototype magnetic suspension and balance system at the MIT Aerophysics Laboratory, thus, showing feasibility for a roll control system for any large magnetic balance system which might be built in the future. During the research under this grant, study was directed toward the several areas of torque generation, position sensing, model construction and control system design. These effects were then integrated to produce successful closed loop operation of the analogue roll control system. This experience indicated the desirability of microprocessor control for the angular degrees of freedom.

  15. Virtual Grasping: Closed-Loop Force Control Using Electrotactile Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Jorgovanovic, Nikola; Dosen, Strahinja; Djozic, Damir J.; Krajoski, Goran; Farina, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Closing the control loop by providing somatosensory feedback to the user of a prosthesis is a well-known, long standing challenge in the field of prosthetics. Various approaches have been investigated for feedback restoration, ranging from direct neural stimulation to noninvasive sensory substitution methods. Although there are many studies presenting closed-loop systems, only a few of them objectively evaluated the closed-loop performance, mostly using vibrotactile stimulation. Importantly, the conclusions about the utility of the feedback were partly contradictory. The goal of the current study was to systematically investigate the capability of human subjects to control grasping force in closed loop using electrotactile feedback. We have developed a realistic experimental setup for virtual grasping, which operated in real time, included a set of real life objects, as well as a graphical and dynamical model of the prosthesis. We have used the setup to test 10 healthy, able bodied subjects to investigate the role of training, feedback and feedforward control, robustness of the closed loop, and the ability of the human subjects to generalize the control to previously “unseen” objects. Overall, the outcomes of this study are very optimistic with regard to the benefits of feedback and reveal various, practically relevant, aspects of closed-loop control. PMID:24516504

  16. HIPK2 kinase activity depends on cis-autophosphorylation of its activation loop.

    PubMed

    Saul, Vera V; de la Vega, Laureano; Milanovic, Maja; Krüger, Marcus; Braun, Thomas; Fritz-Wolf, Karin; Becker, Katja; Schmitz, M Lienhard

    2013-02-01

    The multitude of mechanisms regulating the activity of protein kinases includes phosphorylation of amino acids contained in the activation loop. Here we show that the serine/threonine kinase HIPK2 (homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2) is heavily modified by autophosphorylation, which occurs by cis-autophosphorylation at the activation loop and by trans-autophosphorylation at other phosphorylation sites. Cis-autophosphorylation of HIPK2 at Y354 and S357 in the activation loop is essential for its kinase function and the binding to substrates and the interaction partner Pin1. HIPK2 activation loop phosphorylation is also required for its biological activity as a regulator of gene expression and cell proliferation. Phosphorylation of HIPK2 at Y354 alone is not sufficient for full HIPK2 activity, which is in marked contrast to some dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylated and regulated kinases where tyrosine phosphorylation is absolutely essential. This study shows that differential phosphorylation of HIPK2 provides a mechanism for controlling and specifying the signal output from this kinase. PMID:23000554

  17. Multi-loop networked process control: a synchronized approach.

    PubMed

    Das, M; Ghosh, R; Goswami, B; Chandra, A K; Balasubramanian, R; Luksch, P; Gupta, A

    2009-01-01

    Modern day process control uses digital controllers which are based on the principle of distributed rather than centralized control. Distributing controllers, sensors and actuators across a plant entails considerable wiring which can be reduced substantially by integrating the components of a control loop over a network. The other advantages include greater flexibility and higher reliability with lower hardware redundancy. The controllers and sensors are on a network and can take over the function of a failed component automatically, without the need of manual reconfiguration, thus eliminating the need of having a redundant component for each and every component. Though elaborate techniques have been developed for Single Input Single Output (SISO) systems, the major challenge lies in extending these ideas to control a practical process plant where de-centralized control is actually achieved through control of individual SISO control loops derived through de-coupling of the original system. Multiple loops increase network load and hence the sampling times associated with the control loops and makes synchronization difficult. This paper presents a methodology by which network based process control can be applied to practical process plants, with a simple direct synchronization mechanism. PMID:19028386

  18. ac power control in the Core Flow Test Loop

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, D.W.

    1980-01-01

    This work represents a status report on a development effort to design an ac power controller for the Core Flow Test Loop. The Core Flow Test Loop will be an engineering test facility which will simulate the thermal environment of a gas-cooled fast-breeder reactor. The problems and limitations of using sinusoidal ac power to simulate the power generated within a nuclear reactor are addressed. The transformer-thyristor configuration chosen for the Core Flow Test Loop power supply is presented. The initial considerations, design, and analysis of a closed-loop controller prototype are detailed. The design is then analyzed for improved performance possibilities and failure modes are investigated at length. A summary of the work completed to date and a proposed outline for continued development completes the report.

  19. Decentralized Control of Sound Radiation Using Iterative Loop Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Cabell, Randolph H.; Fuller, Chris R.

    2009-01-01

    A decentralized model-based control strategy is designed to reduce low-frequency sound radiation from periodically stiffened panels. While decentralized control systems tend to be scalable, performance can be limited due to modeling error introduced by the unmodeled interaction between neighboring control units. Since bounds on modeling error are not known in advance, it is difficult to ensure the decentralized control system will be robust without making the controller overly conservative. Therefore an iterative approach is suggested, which utilizes frequency-shaped loop recovery. The approach accounts for modeling error introduced by neighboring control loops, requires no communication between subsystems, and is relatively simple. The control strategy is evaluated numerically using a model of a stiffened aluminum panel that is representative of the sidewall of an aircraft. Simulations demonstrate that the iterative approach can achieve significant reductions in radiated sound power from the stiffened panel without destabilizing neighboring control units.

  20. Decentralized control of sound radiation using iterative loop recovery.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Noah H; Cabell, Randolph H; Fuller, Chris R

    2010-10-01

    A decentralized model-based control strategy is designed to reduce low-frequency sound radiation from periodically stiffened panels. While decentralized control systems tend to be scalable, performance can be limited due to modeling error introduced by the unmodeled interaction between neighboring control units. Since bounds on modeling error are not known in advance, it is difficult to ensure the decentralized control system will be robust without making the controller overly conservative. Therefore an iterative approach is suggested, which utilizes frequency-shaped loop recovery. The approach accounts for modeling error introduced by neighboring control loops, requires no communication between subsystems, and is relatively simple. The control strategy is evaluated numerically using a model of a stiffened aluminum panel that is representative of the sidewall of an aircraft. Simulations demonstrate that the iterative approach can achieve significant reductions in radiated sound power from the stiffened panel without destabilizing neighboring control units. PMID:20968346

  1. Closed-loop step motor control using absolute encoders

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, J.S.; Wright, M.C.

    1997-08-01

    A multi-axis, step motor control system was developed to accurately position and control the operation of a triple axis spectrometer at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Triple axis spectrometers are used in neutron scattering and diffraction experiments and require highly accurate positioning. This motion control system can handle up to 16 axes of motion. Four of these axes are outfitted with 17-bit absolute encoders. These four axes are controlled with a software feedback loop that terminates the move based on real-time position information from the absolute encoders. Because the final position of the actuator is used to stop the motion of the step motors, the moves can be made accurately in spite of the large amount of mechanical backlash from a chain drive between the motors and the spectrometer arms. A modified trapezoidal profile, custom C software, and an industrial PC, were used to achieve a positioning accuracy of 0.00275 degrees of rotation. A form of active position maintenance ensures that the angles are maintained with zero error or drift.

  2. VERSATILE TWO-AXIS OPEN-LOOP SOLAR TRACKER CONTROLLER*

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Christina D; Maxey, L Curt; Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen; Lapsa, Melissa Voss

    2008-01-01

    A versatile single-board controller for two-axis solar tracking applications has been developed and tested on operating solar tracking systems with over two years of field experience. The operating experience gained from the two systems and associated modifications are discussed as representative examples of the practical issues associated with implementing a new two-axis solar tracker design. In this research, open and closed loop control methods were evaluated; however, only the open loop method met the 0.125 tracking accuracy requirement and the requirement to maintain pointing accuracy in hazy and scattered cloudy skies. The open loop algorithm was finally implemented in a microcontroller-based tracking system. Methods of applying this controller hardware to different tracker geometries and hardware are discussed along with the experience gained to date.

  3. Closed-Loop Motor-Speed Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Matthew A.; Delcher, Ray C.; Huston, Steven W.

    1989-01-01

    Electronic motor-speed control circuit designed to operate in electrically noisy environment. Includes optoelectronic pick-up device, placed inside motor housing to provide speed feedback signal. Automatically maintains speed motor at commanded value. Measures speed of motor in terms of frequency of pulses of infrared light chopped by fan blades of motor. Difference between measured and commanded speeds serves as control signal for external amplifier driving motor. Major advantage of circuit is low cost.

  4. Methods of Controlling the Loop Heat Pipe Operating Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung

    2008-01-01

    The operating temperature of a loop heat pipe (LHP) is governed by the saturation temperature of its compensation chamber (CC); the latter is in turn determined by the balance among the heat leak from the evaporator to the CC, the amount of subcooling carried by the liquid returning to the CC, and the amount of heat exchanged between the CC and ambient. The LHP operating temperature can be controlled at a desired set point by actively controlling the CC temperature. The most common method is to cold bias the CC and use electric heater power to maintain the CC set point temperature. The required electric heater power can be large when the condenser sink is very cold. Several methods have been developed to reduce the control heater power, including coupling block, heat exchanger and separate subcooler, variable conductance heat pipe, by-pass valve with pressure regulator, secondary evaporator, and thermoelectric converter. The paper discusses the operating principles, advantages and disadvantages of each method.

  5. Feedback Control Systems Loop Shaping Design with Practical Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopsakis, George

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes loop shaping control design in feedback control systems, primarily from a practical stand point that considers design specifications. Classical feedback control design theory, for linear systems where the plant transfer function is known, has been around for a long time. But it s still a challenge of how to translate the theory into practical and methodical design techniques that simultaneously satisfy a variety of performance requirements such as transient response, stability, and disturbance attenuation while taking into account the capabilities of the plant and its actuation system. This paper briefly addresses some relevant theory, first in layman s terms, so that it becomes easily understood and then it embarks into a practical and systematic design approach incorporating loop shaping design coupled with lead-lag control compensation design. The emphasis is in generating simple but rather powerful design techniques that will allow even designers with a layman s knowledge in controls to develop effective feedback control designs.

  6. ATOPS B-737 inner-loop control system linear model construction and verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broussard, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Nonlinear models and block diagrams of an inner-loop control system for the ATOPS B-737 Research Aircraft are presented. Continuous time linear model representations of the nonlinear inner-loop control systems are derived. Closed-loop aircraft simulations comparing nonlinear and linear dynamic responses to step inputs are used to verify the inner-loop control system models.

  7. Quality control loop for 3D laser beam cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitznagel, Juergen

    1996-08-01

    Existing systems for computer integrated manufacturing are based on the principle of the process chain: The product runs through different production sections as design, work planning and manufacturing in a sequential order. The data generated by a production sequence are transferred via interface to the following production sequence. These tightly-packed production sequences leave little scope for responding to quality deviations. This deficit is highlighted particularly in 3D laser cutting processes. In order to achieve an optimum machining result, a series of preliminary tests is required. Quality control loops play an important role in restricting the scope of necessary testing to a minimum. The represented control loop contains a CAD- system to design the workpiece, an offline-programming system to develop working strategies and NC/RC-programs as well as a shop-floor oriented tool to record quality data of the workpiece. The systems are coupled by an integrated product model. The control loop feeds quality data back to Operations Planning in the form of rules for processing strategies and technological data, so that the quality of the production process is enhanced. It is intended to supply optimum process parameters, so that the number of preliminary tests can be reduced. On the other hand the control loop contributes quality enhancement measures which serve as rules for the designers.

  8. Feasibility of Outpatient Fully Integrated Closed-Loop Control

    PubMed Central

    Kovatchev, Boris P.; Renard, Eric; Cobelli, Claudio; Zisser, Howard C.; Keith-Hynes, Patrick; Anderson, Stacey M.; Brown, Sue A.; Chernavvsky, Daniel R.; Breton, Marc D.; Farret, Anne; Pelletier, Marie-Josée; Place, Jérôme; Bruttomesso, Daniela; Del Favero, Simone; Visentin, Roberto; Filippi, Alessio; Scotton, Rachele; Avogaro, Angelo; Doyle, Francis J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the feasibility of a wearable artificial pancreas system, the Diabetes Assistant (DiAs), which uses a smart phone as a closed-loop control platform. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Twenty patients with type 1 diabetes were enrolled at the Universities of Padova, Montpellier, and Virginia and at Sansum Diabetes Research Institute. Each trial continued for 42 h. The United States studies were conducted entirely in outpatient setting (e.g., hotel or guest house); studies in Italy and France were hybrid hospital–hotel admissions. A continuous glucose monitoring/pump system (Dexcom Seven Plus/Omnipod) was placed on the subject and was connected to DiAs. The patient operated the system via the DiAs user interface in open-loop mode (first 14 h of study), switching to closed-loop for the remaining 28 h. Study personnel monitored remotely via 3G or WiFi connection to DiAs and were available on site for assistance. RESULTS The total duration of proper system communication functioning was 807.5 h (274 h in open-loop and 533.5 h in closed-loop), which represented 97.7% of the total possible time from admission to discharge. This exceeded the predetermined primary end point of 80% system functionality. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrated that a contemporary smart phone is capable of running outpatient closed-loop control and introduced a prototype system (DiAs) for further investigation. Following this proof of concept, future steps should include equipping insulin pumps and sensors with wireless capabilities, as well as studies focusing on control efficacy and patient-oriented clinical outcomes. PMID:23801798

  9. Investigation of Inner Loop Flight Control Strategies for High-Speed Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Brett; Kassem, Ayman

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the activities and findings conducted under contract NAS1-19858 with NASA Langley Research Center. Subject matter is the investigation of suitable flight control design methodologies and solutions for large, flexible high-speed vehicles. Specifically, methodologies are to address the inner control loops used for stabilization and augmentation of a highly coupled airframe system possibly involving rigid-body motion, structural vibrations, unsteady aerodynamics, and actuator dynamics. Techniques considered in this body of work are primarily conventional-based, and the vehicle of interest is the High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). Major findings include 1) current aeroelastic vehicle modeling procedures require further emphasis and refinement, 2) traditional and nontraditional inner loop flight control strategies employing a single feedback loop do not appear sufficient for highly flexible HSCT class vehicles, 3) inner loop flight control systems will, in all likelihood, require multiple interacting feedback loops, and 4) Ref. H HSCT configuration presents major challenges to designing acceptable closed-loop flight dynamics.

  10. L2′ loop is critical for caspase-7 active site formation

    PubMed Central

    Witkowski, Witold A; Hardy, Jeanne A

    2009-01-01

    The active sites of caspases are composed of four mobile loops. A loop (L2) from one half of the dimer interacts with a loop (L2′) from the other half of the dimer to bind substrate. In an inactive form, the two L2′ loops form a cross-dimer hydrogen-bond network over the dimer interface. Although the L2′ loop has been implicated as playing a central role in the formation of the active-site loop bundle, its precise role in catalysis has not been shown. A detailed understanding of the active and inactive conformations is essential to control the caspase function. We have interrogated the contributions of the residues in the L2′ loop to catalytic function and enzyme stability. In wild-type and all mutants, active-site binding results in substantial stabilization of the complex. One mutation, P214A, is significantly destabilized in the ligand-free conformation, but is as stable as wild type when bound to substrate, indicating that caspase-7 rests in different conformations in the absence and presence of substrate. Residues K212 and I213 in the L2′ loop are shown to be essential for substrate-binding and thus proper catalytic function of the caspase. In the crystal structure of I213A, the void created by side-chain deletion is compensated for by rearrangement of tyrosine 211 to fill the void, suggesting that the requirements of substrate-binding are sufficiently strong to induce the active conformation. Thus, although the L2′ loop makes no direct contacts with substrate, it is essential for buttressing the substrate-binding groove and is central to native catalytic efficiency. PMID:19530232

  11. Functional dichotomy in the 16S rRNA (m1A1408) methyltransferase family and control of catalytic activity via a novel tryptophan mediated loop reorganization

    PubMed Central

    Witek, Marta A.; Conn, Graeme L.

    2016-01-01

    Methylation of the bacterial small ribosomal subunit (16S) rRNA on the N1 position of A1408 confers exceptionally high-level resistance to a broad spectrum of aminoglycoside antibiotics. Here, we present a detailed structural and functional analysis of the Catenulisporales acidiphilia 16S rRNA (m1A1408) methyltransferase (‘CacKam’). The apo CacKam structure closely resembles other m1A1408 methyltransferases within its conserved SAM-binding fold but the region linking core β strands 6 and 7 (the ‘β6/7 linker’) has a unique, extended structure that partially occludes the putative 16S rRNA binding surface, and sequesters the conserved and functionally critical W203 outside of the CacKam active site. Substitution of conserved residues in the SAM binding pocket reveals a functional dichotomy in the 16S rRNA (m1A1408) methyltransferase family, with two apparently distinct molecular mechanisms coupling cosubstrate/ substrate binding to catalytic activity. Our results additionally suggest that CacKam exploits the W203-mediated remodeling of the β6/7 linker as a novel mechanism to control 30S substrate recognition and enzymatic turnover. PMID:26609134

  12. Influences of Frailty Syndrome on Open-loop and Closed-loop Postural Control Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Toosizadeh, Nima; Mohler, Jane; Wendel, Chris; Najafi, Bijan

    2014-01-01

    Background As the population of older adults quickly increases, the incidence of frailty syndrome, a reduction in physiological reserve across multiple physiological systems, likewise increases. To date, impaired balance has been associated with frailty; however, the underlying frailty-related postural balance mechanisms remain unclear. Objective The aim of the current study was to use open-loop (postural muscles) and closed-loop (postural muscles plus sensory feedback) (OLCL) mechanisms to explore differences in postural balance mechanisms between non-frail (n = 44), pre-frail (n = 59), and frail individuals (n = 19). Methods One-hundred and twenty-two older adults (age ≥ 65 years) without major mobility disorders were recruited, and frailty was measured using Fried's criteria. Each participant performed two 15-second trials of Romberg balance assessment, once with eyes-open, and once with eyes-closed. Body-worn sensors were used to estimate center-of-gravity (COG) plots. Body sway (traditional stabilogram analysis) and OLCL (stabilogram diffusion analysis) parameters were derived using COG plots and compared between groups using ANOVA. Frailty and pre-frailty were estimated using a multiple variable logistic regression while controlling for age, BMI, body sway, and OLCL parameters. Results Between-group differences in parameters of interest were more pronounced during eyes-closed condition. During eyes-closed, open-loop duration was approximately 33% and 22% shorter in frail and pre-frail, when compared to non-frail controls (mean = 1.9±1.1 sec, p = 0.01). The average rate of sway during open-loop was 164% and 66% higher, respectively in frail and pre-frail when compared to non-frail subjects (0.03±0.02 cm2/sec, p < 0.001). Results also suggest that OLCL parameters can predict frail and pre-frail categories when compared to non-frail controls. Using this method, frailty was identified with a sensitivity and specificity of 97% and 85% (as compared to non

  13. Integrated otpical monitoring of MEMS for closed-loop control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Jeremy M.; Wang, Limin; McCormick, W. B.; Rittenhouse, S. A.; Famouri, Parviz F.; Hornak, Lawrence A.

    2003-01-01

    Robust control and failure assessment of MEMS employed in physically demanding, mission critical applications will allow for higher degrees of quality assurance in MEMS operation. Device fault detection and closed-loop control require detailed knowledge of the operational states of MEMS over the lifetime of the device, obtained by a means decoupled from the system. Preliminary through-wafer optical monitoring research efforts have shown that through-wafer optical probing is suitable for characterizing and monitoring the behavior of MEMS, and can be implemented in an integrated optical monitoring package for continuous in-situ device monitoring. This presentation will discuss research undertaken to establish integrated optical device metrology for closed-loop control of a MUMPS fabricated lateral harmonic oscillator. Successful linear closed-loop control results using a through-wafer optical microprobe position feedback signal will be presented. A theoretical optical output field intensity study of grating structures, fabricated on the shuttle of the resonator, was performed to improve the position resolution of the optical microprobe position signal. Through-wafer microprobe signals providing a positional resolution of 2 μm using grating structures will be shown, along with initial binary Fresnel diffractive optical microelement design layout, process development, and testing results. Progress in the design, fabrication, and test of integrated optical elements for multiple microprobe signal delivery and recovery will be discussed, as well as simulation of device system model parameter changes for failure assessment.

  14. Experimental Study of Flexible Plate Vibration Control by Using Two-Loop Sliding Mode Control Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jingyu; Lin, Jiahui; Liu, Yuejun; Yang, Kang; Zhou, Lanwei; Chen, Guoping

    2016-06-01

    It is well known that intelligent control theory has been used in many research fields, novel modeling method (DROMM) is used for flexible rectangular active vibration control, and then the validity of new model is confirmed by comparing finite element model with new model. In this paper, taking advantage of the dynamics of flexible rectangular plate, a two-loop sliding mode (TSM) MIMO approach is introduced for designing multiple-input multiple-output continuous vibration control system, which can overcome uncertainties, disturbances or unstable dynamics. An illustrative example is given in order to show the feasibility of the method. Numerical simulations and experiment confirm the effectiveness of the proposed TSM MIMO controller.

  15. Slow Magnetosonic Waves and Fast Flows in Active Region Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, L.; Wang, T. J.; Davila, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent extreme ultraviolet spectroscopic observations indicate that slow magnetosonic waves are present in active region (AR) loops. Some of the spectral data were also interpreted as evidence of fast (approx 100-300 km/s) quasiperiodic flows. We have performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) modeling of a bipolar AR that contains impulsively generated waves and flows in coronal loops. The model AR is initiated with a dipole magnetic field and gravitationally stratified density, with an upflow-driven steadily or periodically in localized regions at the footpoints of magnetic loops. The resulting flows along the magnetic field lines of the AR produce higher density loops compared to the surrounding plasma by injection of material into the flux tubes and the establishment of siphon flow.We find that the impulsive onset of flows with subsonic speeds result in the excitation of damped slow magnetosonic waves that propagate along the loops and coupled nonlinearly driven fast-mode waves. The phase speed of the slow magnetosonic waves is close to the coronal sound speed. When the amplitude of the driving pulses is increased we find that slow shock-like wave trains are produced. When the upflows are driven periodically, undamped oscillations are produced with periods determined by the periodicity of the upflows. Based on the results of the 3D MHD model we suggest that the observed slow magnetosonic waves and persistent upflows may be produced by the same impulsive events at the bases of ARs.

  16. SLOW MAGNETOSONIC WAVES AND FAST FLOWS IN ACTIVE REGION LOOPS

    SciTech Connect

    Ofman, L.; Wang, T. J.; Davila, J. M.

    2012-08-01

    Recent extreme ultraviolet spectroscopic observations indicate that slow magnetosonic waves are present in active region (AR) loops. Some of the spectral data were also interpreted as evidence of fast ({approx}100-300 km s{sup -1}) quasi-periodic flows. We have performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) modeling of a bipolar AR that contains impulsively generated waves and flows in coronal loops. The model AR is initiated with a dipole magnetic field and gravitationally stratified density, with an upflow-driven steadily or periodically in localized regions at the footpoints of magnetic loops. The resulting flows along the magnetic field lines of the AR produce higher density loops compared to the surrounding plasma by injection of material into the flux tubes and the establishment of siphon flow. We find that the impulsive onset of flows with subsonic speeds result in the excitation of damped slow magnetosonic waves that propagate along the loops and coupled nonlinearly driven fast-mode waves. The phase speed of the slow magnetosonic waves is close to the coronal sound speed. When the amplitude of the driving pulses is increased we find that slow shock-like wave trains are produced. When the upflows are driven periodically, undamped oscillations are produced with periods determined by the periodicity of the upflows. Based on the results of the 3D MHD model we suggest that the observed slow magnetosonic waves and persistent upflows may be produced by the same impulsive events at the bases of ARs.

  17. Loop Dynamics of the Extracellular Domain of Human Tissue Factor and Activation of Factor VIIa

    PubMed Central

    Minazzo, Agnese S.; Darlington, Reuben C.; Ross, J.B. Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Abstract In the crystal structure of the complex between the soluble extracellular domain of tissue factor (sTF) and active-site-inhibited VIIa, residues 91 and 92 in the Pro79-Pro92 loop of sTF interact with the catalytic domain of VIIa. It is not known, however, whether this loop has a role in allosteric activation of VIIa. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements of probes covalently bound to sTF mutants E84C and T121C show that binding uninhibited Factor VIIa affects segmental motions in sTF. Glu84 resides in the Pro79-Pro92 loop, and Thr121 resides in the turn between the first and second antiparallel β-strands of the sTF subdomain that interacts with the Gla and EGF1 domains of VIIa; neither Glu84 nor Thr121 makes direct contact with VIIa. Probes bound to T121C report limited segmental flexibility in free sTF, which is lost after VIIa binding. Probes bound to E84C report substantial segmental flexibility in the Pro79-Pro92 loop in free sTF, which is greatly reduced after VIIa binding. Thus, VIIa binding reduces dynamic motions in sTF. In particular, the decrease in the Pro79-Pro92 loop motions indicates that loop entropy has a role in the thermodynamics of the protein-protein interactions involved in allosteric control of VIIa activation. PMID:19167313

  18. A dual-loop model of the human controller in single-axis tracking tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    A dual loop model of the human controller in single axis compensatory tracking tasks is introduced. This model possesses an inner-loop closure which involves feeding back that portion of the controlled element output rate which is due to control activity. The sensory inputs to the human controller are assumed to be system error and control force. The former is assumed to be sensed via visual, aural, or tactile displays while the latter is assumed to be sensed in kinesthetic fashion. A nonlinear form of the model is briefly discussed. This model is then linearized and parameterized. A set of general adaptive characteristics for the parameterized model is hypothesized. These characteristics describe the manner in which the parameters in the linearized model will vary with such things as display quality. It is demonstrated that the parameterized model can produce controller describing functions which closely approximate those measured in laboratory tracking tasks for a wide variety of controlled elements.

  19. On the periodic coordination of linear stochastic systems. [open-loop and closed-loop feedback optimal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chong, C.-Y.; Athans, M.

    1975-01-01

    The decentralized stochastic control of a linear dynamic system consisting of several subsystems is considered. A two-level approach is used by the introduction of a coordinator who collects measurements from the local controllers periodically and in return transmits coordinating parameters. Two types of coordination are considered: open-loop feedback and closed loop. The resulting control laws are found to be intuitively attractive.

  20. Reliable Control Using Disturbance Observer and Equivalent Transfer Function for Position Servo System in Current Feedback Loop Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Kaoru; Nakamura, Taro; Osumi, Hisashi

    A reliable control method is proposed for multiple loop control system. After a feedback loop failure, such as case of the sensor break down, the control system becomes unstable and has a big fluctuation even if it has a disturbance observer. To cope with this problem, the proposed method uses an equivalent transfer function (ETF) as active redundancy compensation after the loop failure. The ETF is designed so that it does not change the transfer function of the whole system before and after the loop failure. In this paper, the characteristic of reliable control system that uses an ETF and a disturbance observer is examined by the experiment that uses the DC servo motor for the current feedback loop failure in the position servo system.

  1. Optimal open-loop and feedback control using single gimbal control moment gyroscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoelscher, Brian R.; Vadali, Srinvas R.

    1993-01-01

    Methods for control of spacecraft maneuvers through the use of single gimbal control moment gyroscopes are developed. The development employs an integrated model of the spacecraft dynamics with the control moment gyroscope dynamics. Smooth and continuous open-loop control profiles are obtained which minimize a weighted function of maneuver time, magnitude of control effort, and proximity to singular gimbal configurations. Closed-loop state feedback control laws are derived by invoking Lyapunov stability theory. The schemes are presented for implementing the commanded state feedback: gimbal rate control and gimbal acceleration control. The appropriate handling of singular gimbal configurations is also discussed.

  2. Reflective chamber for hardware-in-the-loop simulation of active/passive millimeter wave sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sholes, W. J.; Wilsdorf, T. T.

    A unique reflective chamber has been developed at the MICOM Advanced Simulation Center for hardware-in-the-loop simulation for combined active and passive millimeter sensors. This paper describes the reasons for developing such a reflective chamber and provides results of measurement of active reflection levels and radiometric temperatures within the chamber. Utilization of this chamber in a hardware-in-the-loop simulation for a millimeter wave weapon system is described, including the computer equipment and software system for real-time control of the simulator.

  3. Supervisory control of a pilot-scale cooling loop

    SciTech Connect

    Kris Villez; Venkat Venkatasubramanian; Humberto Garcia

    2011-08-01

    We combine a previously developed strategy for Fault Detection and Identification (FDI) with a supervisory controller in closed loop. The combined method is applied to a model of a pilot-scale cooling loop of a nuclear plant, which includes Kalman filters and a model-based predictive controller as part of normal operation. The system has two valves available for flow control meaning that some redundancy is available. The FDI method is based on likelihood ratios for different fault scenarios which in turn are derived from the application of the Kalman filter. A previously introduced extension of the FDI method is used here to enable detection and identification of non-linear faults like stuck valve problems and proper accounting of the time of fault introduction. The supervisory control system is designed so to take different kinds of actions depending on the status of the fault diagnosis task and on the type of identified fault once diagnosis is complete. Some faults, like sensor bias and drift, are parametric in nature and can be adjusted without need for reconfiguration of the regulatory control system. Other faults, like a stuck valve problem, require reconfiguration of the regulatory control system. The whole strategy is demonstrated for several scenarios.

  4. Operator in-the-loop control of rotary cranes

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.G.; Robinett, R.D.; Driessen, B.J.; Dohrmann, C.R.

    1996-03-01

    An open-loop control method is presented for reducing the oscillatory motion of rotary crane payloads during operator commanded maneuvers. A typical rotary crane consists of a multiple degree-of-freedom platform for positioning a spherical pendulum with an attached payload. The crane operator positions the Payload by issuing a combination of translational and rotational commands to the platform as well as load-line length changes. Frequently, these pendulum modes are time-varying and exhibit low natural frequencies. Maneuvers are therefore performed at rates sufficiently slow so as not to excite oscillation. The strategy presented here generates crane commands which suppress vibration of the payload without a priori knowledge of the desired maneuver. Results are presented for operator in-the-loop positioning using a real-time dynamics simulation of a three-axis rotary crane where the residual sway magnitude is reduced in excess of 4OdB.

  5. Closed-Loop Control for Sonic Fatigue Testing Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Bossaert, Guido

    2001-01-01

    This article documents recent improvements to the acoustic control system of the Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus (TAFA), a progressive wave tube test facility at the NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA. A brief summary of past acoustic performance is first given to serve as a basis of comparison with the new performance data using a multiple-input, closed-loop, narrow-band controller. Performance data in the form of test section acoustic power spectral densities and coherence are presented for a variety of input spectra including uniform, band-limited random and an expendable launch vehicle payload bay environment.

  6. Numerical investigation of closed-loop control for Hall accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Barral, S.; Miedzik, J.

    2011-01-01

    Low frequency discharge current oscillations in Hall accelerators are conventionally damped with external inductor-capacitor (LC) or resistor-inductor-capacitor (RLC) networks. The role of such network in the stabilization of the plasma discharge is investigated with a numerical model and the potential advantages of proportional-integral-derivative (PID) closed-loop control over RLC networks are subsequently assessed using either discharge voltage or magnetic field modulation. Simulations confirm the reduction of current oscillations in the presence of a RLC network, but suggest that PID control could ensure nearly oscillation-free operation with little sensitivity toward the PID settings.

  7. Practical Loop-Shaping Design of Feedback Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2010-01-01

    An improved methodology for designing feedback control systems has been developed based on systematically shaping the loop gain of the system to meet performance requirements such as stability margins, disturbance attenuation, and transient response, while taking into account the actuation system limitations such as actuation rates and range. Loop-shaping for controls design is not new, but past techniques do not directly address how to systematically design the controller to maximize its performance. As a result, classical feedback control systems are designed predominantly using ad hoc control design approaches such as proportional integral derivative (PID), normally satisfied when a workable solution is achieved, without a good understanding of how to maximize the effectiveness of the control design in terms of competing performance requirements, in relation to the limitations of the plant design. The conception of this improved methodology was motivated by challenges in designing control systems of the types needed for supersonic propulsion. But the methodology is generally applicable to any classical control-system design where the transfer function of the plant is known or can be evaluated. In the case of a supersonic aerospace vehicle, a major challenge is to design the system to attenuate anticipated external and internal disturbances, using such actuators as fuel injectors and valves, bypass doors, and ramps, all of which are subject to limitations in actuator response, rates, and ranges. Also, for supersonic vehicles, with long slim type of structures, coupling between the engine and the structural dynamics can produce undesirable effects that could adversely affect vehicle stability and ride quality. In order to design distributed controls that can suppress these potential adverse effects, within the full capabilities of the actuation system, it is important to employ a systematic control design methodology such as this that can maximize the

  8. Recovery of Dynamics and Function in Spiking Neural Networks with Closed-Loop Control

    PubMed Central

    Vlachos, Ioannis; Deniz, Taşkin; Aertsen, Ad; Kumar, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing interest in developing novel brain stimulation methods to control disease-related aberrant neural activity and to address basic neuroscience questions. Conventional methods for manipulating brain activity rely on open-loop approaches that usually lead to excessive stimulation and, crucially, do not restore the original computations performed by the network. Thus, they are often accompanied by undesired side-effects. Here, we introduce delayed feedback control (DFC), a conceptually simple but effective method, to control pathological oscillations in spiking neural networks (SNNs). Using mathematical analysis and numerical simulations we show that DFC can restore a wide range of aberrant network dynamics either by suppressing or enhancing synchronous irregular activity. Importantly, DFC, besides steering the system back to a healthy state, also recovers the computations performed by the underlying network. Finally, using our theory we identify the role of single neuron and synapse properties in determining the stability of the closed-loop system. PMID:26829673

  9. Recovery of Dynamics and Function in Spiking Neural Networks with Closed-Loop Control.

    PubMed

    Vlachos, Ioannis; Deniz, Taşkin; Aertsen, Ad; Kumar, Arvind

    2016-02-01

    There is a growing interest in developing novel brain stimulation methods to control disease-related aberrant neural activity and to address basic neuroscience questions. Conventional methods for manipulating brain activity rely on open-loop approaches that usually lead to excessive stimulation and, crucially, do not restore the original computations performed by the network. Thus, they are often accompanied by undesired side-effects. Here, we introduce delayed feedback control (DFC), a conceptually simple but effective method, to control pathological oscillations in spiking neural networks (SNNs). Using mathematical analysis and numerical simulations we show that DFC can restore a wide range of aberrant network dynamics either by suppressing or enhancing synchronous irregular activity. Importantly, DFC, besides steering the system back to a healthy state, also recovers the computations performed by the underlying network. Finally, using our theory we identify the role of single neuron and synapse properties in determining the stability of the closed-loop system. PMID:26829673

  10. Sensor enabled closed-loop bending control of soft beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, Jennifer C.; White, Edward L.; Kramer, Rebecca K.

    2016-04-01

    Control of soft-bodied systems is challenging, as the absence of rigidity typically implies distributed deformations and infinite degrees-of-freedom. In this paper, we demonstrate closed-loop control of three elastomer beams that vary in bending stiffness. The most stiff beam is comprised of a single prismatic structure made from a single elastomer. In the next beam, increased flexibility is introduced via an indentation in the elastomer, forming a joint. The most flexible beam uses a softer elastomer in the joint section, along with an indentation. An antagonistic pair of actuators bend the joint while a pair of liquid-metal-embedded strain sensors provide angle feedback to a control loop. We were able to achieve control of the system with a proportional-integral-derivative control algorithm. The procedure we demonstrate in this work is not dependent on actuator and sensor choice and could be applied to to other hardware systems, as well as more complex multi-joint robotic structures in the future.

  11. Closed loop kinesthetic feedback for postural control rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Vérité, Fabien; Bachta, Wael; Morel, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Postural control rehabilitation may benefit from the use of smart devices providing biofeedback. This approach consists of increasing the patients perception of their postural state. Namely, postural state is monitored and fed back in real time to the patients through one or more sensory channels. This allows implementing rehabilitation exercises where the patients control their posture with the help of additional sensory inputs. In this paper, a closed loop control of the Center-Of-Pressure (CoP) based on kinesthetic feedback is proposed as a new form of biofeedback. The motion of a one Degree of Freedom (DoF) translational device, lightly touched by the patient's forefinger, is servoed to the patient's CoP position extracted from the measurements of a force plate on which he/she stands. As a result, the patient's CoP can be controllably displaced. A first set of experiments is used to prove the feasibility of this closed-loop control under ideal conditions favoring the perception of the kinesthetic feedback, while the subject is totally unaware of the context. A second set of experiments is then proposed to evaluate the robustness of this approach under experimental conditions that are more realistic with regards to the clinical context of a rehabilitation program involving biofeedback-based exercises. PMID:24968379

  12. Closed-loop Separation Control Using Oscillatory Flow Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian G.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Raney, David L.; Seifert, Avi; Pack, latunia G.; Brown, Donald E.

    2000-01-01

    Design and implementation of a digital feedback controller for a flow control experiment was performed. The experiment was conducted in a cryogenic pressurized wind tunnel on a generic separated configuration at a chord Reynolds number of 16 million and a Mach number of 0.25. The model simulates the upper surface of a 20% thick airfoil at zero angle-of-attack. A moderate favorable pressure gradient, up to 55% of the chord, is followed by a severe adverse pressure gradient which is relaxed towards the trailing edge. The turbulent separation bubble, behind the adverse pressure gradient, is then reduced by introducing oscillatory flow excitation just upstream of the point of flow separation. The degree of reduction in the separation region can be controlled by the amplitude of the oscillatory excitation. A feedback controller was designed to track a given trajectory for the desired degree of flow reattachment and to improve the transient behavior of the flow system. Closed-loop experiments demonstrated that the feedback controller was able to track step input commands and improve the transient behavior of the open-loop response.

  13. Closed loop computer control for an automatic transmission

    DOEpatents

    Patil, Prabhakar B.

    1989-01-01

    In an automotive vehicle having an automatic transmission that driveably connects a power source to the driving wheels, a method to control the application of hydraulic pressure to a clutch, whose engagement produces an upshift and whose disengagement produces a downshift, the speed of the power source, and the output torque of the transmission. The transmission output shaft torque and the power source speed are the controlled variables. The commanded power source torque and commanded hydraulic pressure supplied to the clutch are the control variables. A mathematical model is formulated that describes the kinematics and dynamics of the powertrain before, during and after a gear shift. The model represents the operating characteristics of each component and the structural arrangement of the components within the transmission being controlled. Next, a close loop feedback control is developed to determine the proper control law or compensation strategy to achieve an acceptably smooth gear ratio change, one in which the output torque disturbance is kept to a minimum and the duration of the shift is minimized. Then a computer algorithm simulating the shift dynamics employing the mathematical model is used to study the effects of changes in the values of the parameters established from a closed loop control of the clutch hydraulic and the power source torque on the shift quality. This computer simulation is used also to establish possible shift control strategies. The shift strategies determined from the prior step are reduced to an algorithm executed by a computer to control the operation of the power source and the transmission.

  14. Optical Closed-Loop Propulsion Control System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppel, Gary L.

    1998-01-01

    The overall objective of this program was to design and fabricate the components required for optical closed-loop control of a F404-400 turbofan engine, by building on the experience of the NASA Fiber Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI) program. Evaluating the performance of fiber optic technology at the component and system levels will result in helping to validate its use on aircraft engines. This report includes descriptions of three test plans. The EOI Acceptance Test is designed to demonstrate satisfactory functionality of the EOI, primarily fail-safe throughput of the F404 sensor signals in the normal mode, and validation, switching, and output of the five analog sensor signals as generated from validated optical sensor inputs, in the optical mode. The EOI System Test is designed to demonstrate acceptable F404 ECU functionality as interfaced with the EOI, making use of a production ECU test stand. The Optical Control Engine Test Request describes planned hardware installation, optical signal calibrations, data system coordination, test procedures, and data signal comparisons for an engine test demonstration of the optical closed-loop control.

  15. Application of loop analysis for evaluation of malaria control interventions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite continuous efforts and recent rapid expansion in the financing and implementation of malaria control interventions, malaria still remains one of the most devastating global health issues. Even in countries that have been successful in reducing the incidence of malaria, malaria control is becoming more challenging because of the changing epidemiology of malaria and waning community participation in control interventions. In order to improve the effectiveness of interventions and to promote community understanding of the necessity of continued control efforts, there is an urgent need to develop new methodologies that examine the mechanisms by which community-based malaria interventions could reduce local malaria incidence. Methods This study demonstrated how the impact of community-based malaria control interventions on malaria incidence can be examined in complex systems by qualitative analysis combined with an extensive review of literature. First, sign digraphs were developed through loop analysis to analyse seven interventions: source reduction, insecticide/larvicide use, biological control, treatment with anti-malarials, insecticide-treated mosquito net/long-lasting insecticidal net, non-chemical personal protection measures, and educational intervention. Then, for each intervention, the sign digraphs and literature review were combined to analyse a variety of pathways through which the intervention can influence local malaria incidence as well as interactions between variables involved in the system. Through loop analysis it is possible to see whether increases in one variable qualitatively increases or decreases other variables or leaves them unchanged and the net effect of multiple, interacting variables. Results Qualitative analysis, specifically loop analysis, can be a useful tool to examine the impact of community-based malaria control interventions. Without relying on numerical data, the analysis was able to describe pathways through

  16. Galileo attitude and articulation control subsystem closed loop testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lembeck, M. F.; Pignatano, N. D.

    1983-01-01

    In order to ensure the reliable operation of the Attitude and Articulation Control Subsystem (AACS) which will guide the Galileo spacecraft on its two and one-half year journey to Jupiter, the AACS is being rigorously tested. The primary objectives of the test program are the verification of the AACS's form, fit, and function, especially with regard to subsystem external interfaces and the functional operation of the flight software. Attention is presently given to the Galileo Closed Loop Test System, which simulates the dynamic and 'visual' flight environment for AACS components in the laboratory.

  17. Closed-Loop Control Better than Open-Loop Control of Profofol TCI Guided by BIS: A Randomized, Controlled, Multicenter Clinical Trial to Evaluate the CONCERT-CL Closed-Loop System

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuena; Wu, Anshi; Yao, Shanglong; Xue, Zhanggang; Yue, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Background The CONCERT-CL closed-loop infusion system designed by VERYARK Technology Co., Ltd. (Guangxi, China) is an innovation using TCI combined with closed-loop controlled intravenous anesthesia under the guide of BIS. In this study we performed a randomized, controlled, multicenter study to compare closed-loop control and open-loop control of propofol by using the CONCERT-CL closed-loop infusion system. Methods 180 surgical patients from three medical centers undergone TCI intravenous anesthesia with propofol and remifentanil were randomly assigned to propofol closed-loop group and propofol opened-loop groups. Primary outcome was global score (GS, GS = (MDAPE+Wobble)/% of time of bispectral index (BIS) 40-60). Secondary outcomes were doses of the anesthetics and emergence time from anesthesia, such as, time to tracheal extubation. Results There were 89 and 86 patients in the closed-loop and opened-loop groups, respectively. GS in the closed-loop groups (22.21±8.50) were lower than that in the opened-loop group (27.19±15.26) (p=0.009). The higher proportion of time of BIS between 40 and 60 was also observed in the closed-loop group (84.11±9.50%), while that was 79.92±13.17% in the opened-loop group, (p=0.016). No significant differences in propofol dose and time of tracheal extubation were observed. The frequency of propofol regulation in the closed-loop group (31.55±9.46 times/hr) was obverse higher than that in the opened-loop group (6.84±6.21 times/hr) (p=0.000). Conclusion The CONCERT-CL closed-loop infusion system can automatically regulate the TCI of propofol, maintain the BIS value in an adequate range and reduce the workload of anesthesiologists better than open-loop system. Trial Registration ChiCTR ChiCTR-OOR-14005551 PMID:25886041

  18. Closed Loop Software Control of the MIDEX Power System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castell, Karen; Hernandez-Pellerano, Amri; Wismer, Margaret

    1998-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) is a follow-on to the Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) instrument on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) spacecraft. The design and analysis of the MAP attitude control system (ACS) have been refined since work previously reported. The full spacecraft and instrument flexible model was developed in NASTRAN, and the resulting flexible modes were plotted and reduced with the Modal Significance Analysis Package (MSAP). The reduced-order model was used to perform the linear stability analysis for each control mode, the results of which are presented in this paper. Although MAP is going to a relatively disturbance-free Lissajous orbit around the Earth-Sun L2 Lagrange point, a detailed disturbance-torque analysis is required because there are only a small number of opportunities for momentum unloading each year. Environmental torques, including solar pressure at L2, and aerodynamic and gravity gradient during phasing-loop orbits, were calculated and simulated. A simple model of fuel slosh was derived to model its effect on the motion of the spacecraft. In addition, a thruster mode linear impulse controller was developed to meet the accuracy requirements of the phasing loop burns. A dynamic attitude error limiter was added to improve the performance of the ACS during large attitude slews. The result of this analysis is a stable ACS subsystem that meets all of the mission's requirements.

  19. STC/DBS Power subsystem control loop stability analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Peck, S.R.; Devaux, R.N.

    1984-08-01

    Many types of solar array regulation schemes are utilized throughout the spacecraft design community. Ensuring adequate control loop stability margins while achieving acceptable transient response performance is a complex and difficult task due to the extremely large number of variables and nonlinearities inherent in these systems. In recent years significant improvements in computer software have made this task more manageable and enabled a better understanding of the effects of system parameters. This paper describes the analytical approach utilized to evaluate and optimize the control loops for two partial shunt systems used on Satellite Television Corporation's Direct Broadcast Satellite presently in development at RCA Astro-Electronics. The 100V payload bus regulator is a linear sequential partial shunt system, and the 35.3V housekeeping bus utilizes a linear parallel partial shunt approach. For each case, detailed models of the solar arrays, control electronics, and spacecraft loads were developed and then combined to simulate the complete system. The analytical results have been and/or are being verified by test. The results will be verified with illuminated solar arrays during full-up spacecraft systems testing.

  20. Identification-Based Closed-Loop NMES Limb Tracking With Amplitude-Modulated Control Input.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Teng-Hu; Wang, Qiang; Kamalapurkar, Rushikesh; Dinh, Huyen T; Bellman, Matthew; Dixon, Warren E

    2016-07-01

    An upper motor neuron lesion (UMNL) can be caused by various neurological disorders or trauma and leads to disabilities. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is a technique that is widely used for rehabilitation and restoration of motor function for people suffering from UMNL. Typically, stability analysis for closed-loop NMES ignores the modulated implementation of NMES. However, electrical stimulation must be applied to muscle as a modulated series of pulses. In this paper, a muscle activation model with an amplitude modulated control input is developed to capture the discontinuous nature of muscle activation, and an identification-based closed-loop NMES controller is designed and analyzed for the uncertain amplitude modulated muscle activation model. Semi-global uniformly ultimately bounded tracking is guaranteed. The stability of the closed-loop system is analyzed with Lyapunov-based methods, and a pulse frequency related gain condition is obtained. Experiments are performed with five able-bodied subjects to demonstrate the interplay between the control gains and the pulse frequency, and results are provided which indicate that control gains should be increased to maintain stability if the stimulation pulse frequency is decreased to mitigate muscle fatigue. For the first time, this paper brings together an analysis of the controller and modulation scheme. PMID:26241989

  1. Compaction and segregation of sister chromatids via active loop extrusion

    PubMed Central

    Goloborodko, Anton; Imakaev, Maxim V; Marko, John F; Mirny, Leonid

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism by which chromatids and chromosomes are segregated during mitosis and meiosis is a major puzzle of biology and biophysics. Using polymer simulations of chromosome dynamics, we show that a single mechanism of loop extrusion by condensins can robustly compact, segregate and disentangle chromosomes, arriving at individualized chromatids with morphology observed in vivo. Our model resolves the paradox of topological simplification concomitant with chromosome 'condensation', and explains how enzymes a few nanometers in size are able to control chromosome geometry and topology at micron length scales. We suggest that loop extrusion is a universal mechanism of genome folding that mediates functional interactions during interphase and compacts chromosomes during mitosis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14864.001 PMID:27192037

  2. Closed loop high precision position control system with optical scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Cheng-liang; Liao, Yuan; He, Zhong-wu; Luo, Zhong-xiang; Huang, Zhi-wei; Wan, Min; Hu, Xiao-yang; Fan, Guo-bin; Liang, Zheng

    2008-03-01

    With the developments of science of art, there are more and more demands on the high resolution control of position of object to be controlled, such as lathe, product line, elements in the optical resonant cavity, telescope, and so on. As one device with high resolution, the optical scale has more and more utility within the industrial and civil applications. With one optical scale and small DC servo motor, one closed loop high resolution position control system is constructed. This apparatus is used to control the position of the elements of optical system. The optical scale is attached on the object or reference guide way. The object position is sampled by a readhead of non-contact optical encoder. Control system processes the position information and control the position of object through the motion control of servo DC motor. The DC motor is controlled by one controller which is connected to an industrial computer. And the micro frictionless slide table does support the smooth motion of object to be controlled. The control algorithm of system is PID (Proportional-Integral-Differential) methods. The PID control methods have well ROBUST. The needed data to control are position, velocity and acceleration of the object. These three parameters correspond to the PID characters respectively. After the accomplishments of hardware, GUI (Graphical user interface), that is, the software of control system is also programmed. The whole system is assembled by specialized worker. Through calibration experiments, the coefficients of PID are obtained respectively. And then the precision of position control of the system is about 0.1μm.

  3. Closed-loop response properties of a visual interneuron involved in fly optomotor control

    PubMed Central

    Ejaz, Naveed; Krapp, Holger G.; Tanaka, Reiko J.

    2013-01-01

    Due to methodological limitations neural function is mostly studied under open-loop conditions. Normally, however, nervous systems operate in closed-loop where sensory input is processed to generate behavioral outputs, which again change the sensory input. Here, we investigate the closed-loop responses of an identified visual interneuron, the blowfly H1-cell, that is part of a neural circuit involved in optomotor flight and gaze control. Those behaviors may be triggered by attitude changes during flight in turbulent air. The fly analyses the resulting retinal image shifts and performs compensatory body and head rotations to regain its default attitude. We developed a fly robot interface to study H1-cell responses in a 1 degree-of-freedom image stabilization task. Image shifts, induced by externally forced rotations, modulate the cell’s spike rate that controls counter rotations of a mobile robot to minimize relative motion between the robot and its visual surroundings. A feedback controller closed the loop between neural activity and the rotation of the robot. Under these conditions we found the following H1-cell response properties: (i) the peak spike rate decreases when the mean image velocity is increased, (ii) the relationship between spike rate and image velocity depends on the standard deviation of the image velocities suggesting adaptive scaling of the cell’s signaling range, and (iii) the cell’s gain decreases linearly with increasing image accelerations. Our results reveal a remarkable qualitative similarity between the response dynamics of the H1-cell under closed-loop conditions with those obtained in previous open-loop experiments. Finally, we show that the adaptive scaling of the H1-cell’s responses, while maximizing information on image velocity, decreases the cell’s sensitivity to image accelerations. Understanding such trade-offs in biological vision systems may advance the design of smart vision sensors for autonomous robots. PMID

  4. Closed-loop response properties of a visual interneuron involved in fly optomotor control.

    PubMed

    Ejaz, Naveed; Krapp, Holger G; Tanaka, Reiko J

    2013-01-01

    Due to methodological limitations neural function is mostly studied under open-loop conditions. Normally, however, nervous systems operate in closed-loop where sensory input is processed to generate behavioral outputs, which again change the sensory input. Here, we investigate the closed-loop responses of an identified visual interneuron, the blowfly H1-cell, that is part of a neural circuit involved in optomotor flight and gaze control. Those behaviors may be triggered by attitude changes during flight in turbulent air. The fly analyses the resulting retinal image shifts and performs compensatory body and head rotations to regain its default attitude. We developed a fly robot interface to study H1-cell responses in a 1 degree-of-freedom image stabilization task. Image shifts, induced by externally forced rotations, modulate the cell's spike rate that controls counter rotations of a mobile robot to minimize relative motion between the robot and its visual surroundings. A feedback controller closed the loop between neural activity and the rotation of the robot. Under these conditions we found the following H1-cell response properties: (i) the peak spike rate decreases when the mean image velocity is increased, (ii) the relationship between spike rate and image velocity depends on the standard deviation of the image velocities suggesting adaptive scaling of the cell's signaling range, and (iii) the cell's gain decreases linearly with increasing image accelerations. Our results reveal a remarkable qualitative similarity between the response dynamics of the H1-cell under closed-loop conditions with those obtained in previous open-loop experiments. Finally, we show that the adaptive scaling of the H1-cell's responses, while maximizing information on image velocity, decreases the cell's sensitivity to image accelerations. Understanding such trade-offs in biological vision systems may advance the design of smart vision sensors for autonomous robots. PMID:23543872

  5. Determining the 3D Structure of the Corona Using Vertical Height Constraints on Observed Active Region Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gary, G. Allen; Hu, Qiang; Lee, Jong Kwan; Aschwanden, Markus J.

    2014-10-01

    The corona associated with an active region is structured by high-temperature, magnetically dominated closed and open loops. The projected 2D geometry of these loops is captured in EUV filtergrams. In this study using SDO/AIA 171 Å filtergrams, we expand our previous method to derive the 3D structure of these loops, independent of heliostereoscopy. We employ an automated loop recognition scheme (Occult-2) and fit the extracted loops with 2D cubic Bézier splines. Utilizing SDO/HMI magnetograms, we extrapolate the magnetic field to obtain simple field models within a rectangular cuboid. Using these models, we minimize the misalignment angle with respect to Bézier control points to extend the splines to 3D (Gary, Hu, and Lee 2014). The derived Bézier control points give the 3D structure of the fitted loops. We demonstrate the process by deriving the position of 3D coronal loops in three active regions (AR 11117, AR 11158, and AR 11283). The numerical minimization process converges and produces 3D curves which are consistent with the height of the loop structures when the active region is seen on the limb. From this we conclude that the method can be important in both determining estimates of the 3D magnetic field structure and determining the best magnetic model among competing advanced magnetohydrodynamics or force-free magnetic-field computer simulations.

  6. Multiple Model-Informed Open-Loop Control of Uncertain Intracellular Signaling Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Perley, Jeffrey P.; Mikolajczak, Judith; Harrison, Marietta L.; Buzzard, Gregery T.; Rundell, Ann E.

    2014-01-01

    Computational approaches to tune the activation of intracellular signal transduction pathways both predictably and selectively will enable researchers to explore and interrogate cell biology with unprecedented precision. Techniques to control complex nonlinear systems typically involve the application of control theory to a descriptive mathematical model. For cellular processes, however, measurement assays tend to be too time consuming for real-time feedback control and models offer rough approximations of the biological reality, thus limiting their utility when considered in isolation. We overcome these problems by combining nonlinear model predictive control with a novel adaptive weighting algorithm that blends predictions from multiple models to derive a compromise open-loop control sequence. The proposed strategy uses weight maps to inform the controller of the tendency for models to differ in their ability to accurately reproduce the system dynamics under different experimental perturbations (i.e. control inputs). These maps, which characterize the changing model likelihoods over the admissible control input space, are constructed using preexisting experimental data and used to produce a model-based open-loop control framework. In effect, the proposed method designs a sequence of control inputs that force the signaling dynamics along a predefined temporal response without measurement feedback while mitigating the effects of model uncertainty. We demonstrate this technique on the well-known Erk/MAPK signaling pathway in T cells. In silico assessment demonstrates that this approach successfully reduces target tracking error by 52% or better when compared with single model-based controllers and non-adaptive multiple model-based controllers. In vitro implementation of the proposed approach in Jurkat cells confirms a 63% reduction in tracking error when compared with the best of the single-model controllers. This study provides an experimentally

  7. Multiple model-informed open-loop control of uncertain intracellular signaling dynamics.

    PubMed

    Perley, Jeffrey P; Mikolajczak, Judith; Harrison, Marietta L; Buzzard, Gregery T; Rundell, Ann E

    2014-04-01

    Computational approaches to tune the activation of intracellular signal transduction pathways both predictably and selectively will enable researchers to explore and interrogate cell biology with unprecedented precision. Techniques to control complex nonlinear systems typically involve the application of control theory to a descriptive mathematical model. For cellular processes, however, measurement assays tend to be too time consuming for real-time feedback control and models offer rough approximations of the biological reality, thus limiting their utility when considered in isolation. We overcome these problems by combining nonlinear model predictive control with a novel adaptive weighting algorithm that blends predictions from multiple models to derive a compromise open-loop control sequence. The proposed strategy uses weight maps to inform the controller of the tendency for models to differ in their ability to accurately reproduce the system dynamics under different experimental perturbations (i.e. control inputs). These maps, which characterize the changing model likelihoods over the admissible control input space, are constructed using preexisting experimental data and used to produce a model-based open-loop control framework. In effect, the proposed method designs a sequence of control inputs that force the signaling dynamics along a predefined temporal response without measurement feedback while mitigating the effects of model uncertainty. We demonstrate this technique on the well-known Erk/MAPK signaling pathway in T cells. In silico assessment demonstrates that this approach successfully reduces target tracking error by 52% or better when compared with single model-based controllers and non-adaptive multiple model-based controllers. In vitro implementation of the proposed approach in Jurkat cells confirms a 63% reduction in tracking error when compared with the best of the single-model controllers. This study provides an experimentally

  8. Androgynous, Reconfigurable Closed Loop Feedback Controlled Low Impact Docking System With Load Sensing Electromagnetic Capture Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, James L. (Inventor); Carroll, Monty B. (Inventor); Morales, Ray H. (Inventor); Le, Thang D. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to a fully androgynous, reconfigurable closed loop feedback controlled low impact docking system with load sensing electromagnetic capture ring. The docking system of the present invention preferably comprises two Docking- assemblies, each docking assembly comprising a load sensing ring having an outer face, one of more electromagnets, one or more load cells coupled to said load sensing ring. The docking assembly further comprises a plurality of actuator arms coupled to said load sensing ring and capable of dynamically adjusting the orientation of said load sensing ring and a reconfigurable closed loop control system capable of analyzing signals originating from said plurality of load cells and of outputting real time control for each of the actuators. The docking assembly of the present invention incorporates an active load sensing system to automatically dynamically adjust the load sensing ring during capture instead of requiring significant force to push and realign the ring.

  9. Motorized CPM/CAM physiotherapy device with sliding-mode Fuzzy Neural Network control loop.

    PubMed

    Ho, Hung-Jung; Chen, Tien-Chi

    2009-11-01

    Continuous passive motion (CPM) and controllable active motion (CAM) physiotherapy devices promote rehabilitation of damaged joints. This paper presents a computerized CPM/CAM system that obviates the need for mechanical resistance devices such as springs. The system is controlled by a computer which performs sliding-mode Fuzzy Neural Network (FNN) calculations online. CAM-type resistance force is generated by the active performance of an electric motor which is controlled so as to oppose the motion of the patient's leg. A force sensor under the patient's foot on the device pedal provides data for feedback in a sliding-mode FNN control loop built around the motor. Via an active impedance control feedback system, the controller drives the motor to behave similarly to a damped spring by generating and controlling the amplitude and direction of the pedal force in relation to the patient's leg. Experiments demonstrate the high sensitivity and speed of the device. The PC-based feedback nature of the control loop means that sophisticated auto-adaptable CPM/CAM custom-designed physiotherapy becomes possible. The computer base also allows extensive data recording, data analysis and network-connected remote patient monitoring. PMID:19439391

  10. Design of a constant-voltage and constant-current controller with dual-loop and adaptive switching frequency control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yingping, Chen; Zhiqian, Li

    2015-05-01

    A 5.0-V 2.0-A flyback power supply controller providing constant-voltage (CV) and constant-current (CC) output regulation without the use of an optical coupler is presented. Dual-close-loop control is proposed here due to its better regulation performance of tolerance over process and temperature compared with open loop control used in common. At the same time, the two modes, CC and CV, could switch to each other automatically and smoothly according to the output voltage level not sacrificing the regulation accuracy at the switching phase, which overcomes the drawback of the digital control scheme depending on a hysteresis comparator to change the mode. On-chip compensation using active capacitor multiplier technique is applied to stabilize the voltage loop, eliminate an additional package pin, and save on the die area. The system consumes as little as 100 mW at no-load condition without degrading the transient response performance by utilizing the adaptive switching frequency control mode. The proposed controller has been implemented in a commercial 0.35-μm 40-V BCD process, and the active chip area is 1.5 × 1.0 mm2. The total error of the output voltage due to line and load variations is less than ±1.7%.

  11. Skylab observations of X-ray loops connecting separate active regions. [solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, R. C.; Krieger, A. S.; Svestka, Z.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1976-01-01

    One hundred loops interconnecting 94 separate active solar regions detectable in soft X-rays were identified during the Skylab mission. While close active regions are commonly interconnected with loops, the number of such interconnections decreases steeply for longer distances; the longest interconnecting loop observed in the Skylab data connected regions separated by 37 deg. Several arguments are presented which support the point of view that this is the actual limit of the size of magnetic interconnections between active regions. No sympathetic flares could be found in the interconnected regions. These results cast doubt on the hypothesis that accelerated particles can be guided in interconnecting loops from one active region to another over distances of 100 deg or more and eventually produce sympathetic flares in them.

  12. Securing robust control in systems for closed-loop control of inertial thermal power facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovrigo, Yu. M.; Bagan, T. G.; Bunke, A. S.

    2014-03-01

    We consider two approaches to achieving the necessary stability margin in systems for closed-loop control of inertial thermal power facilities under the conditions of a variable operating mode of process equipment. Structural solutions for these systems are proposed, and tuning procedures are given. Transients in the synthesized systems are simulated, and the control quality indicators are calculated and compared. Application of the proposed procedures makes it possible to obtain a sufficient stability margin with preserving highquality performance of the closed-loop control systems.

  13. Closed-loop control of spinal cord stimulation to restore hand function after paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Jonas B.; Jackson, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    As yet, no cure exists for upper-limb paralysis resulting from the damage to motor pathways after spinal cord injury or stroke. Recently, neural activity from the motor cortex of paralyzed individuals has been used to control the movements of a robot arm but restoring function to patients' actual limbs remains a considerable challenge. Previously we have shown that electrical stimulation of the cervical spinal cord in anesthetized monkeys can elicit functional upper-limb movements like reaching and grasping. Here we show that stimulation can be controlled using cortical activity in awake animals to bypass disruption of the corticospinal system, restoring their ability to perform a simple upper-limb task. Monkeys were trained to grasp and pull a spring-loaded handle. After temporary paralysis of the hand was induced by reversible inactivation of primary motor cortex using muscimol, grasp-related single-unit activity from the ventral premotor cortex was converted into stimulation patterns delivered in real-time to the cervical spinal gray matter. During periods of closed-loop stimulation, task-modulated electromyogram, movement amplitude, and task success rate were improved relative to interleaved control periods without stimulation. In some sessions, single motor unit activity from weakly active muscles was also used successfully to control stimulation. These results are the first use of a neural prosthesis to improve the hand function of primates after motor cortex disruption, and demonstrate the potential for closed-loop cortical control of spinal cord stimulation to reanimate paralyzed limbs. PMID:24904251

  14. Controls Considerations for Turbine Active Clearance Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, Kevin J.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation discusses active control of turbine tip clearance from a control systems perspective. It is a subset of charts that were presented at the 2003 meeting of the International Society of Air Breathing Engines which was held August 31 through September 5 in Cleveland, Ohio. The associated reference paper is cited at the end of the presentation. The presentation describes active tip clearance control research being conducted by NASA to improve turbine engine systems. The target application for this effort is commercial aircraft engines. However, it is believed that the technologies developed as part of this research will benefit a broad spectrum of current and future turbomachinery. The first part of the presentation discusses the concept of tip clearance, problems associated with it, and the benefits of controlling it. It lays out a framework for implementing tip clearance controls that enables the implementation to progress from purely analytical to hardware-in-the-loop to fully experimental. And it briefly discusses how the technologies developed will be married to the previously described ACC Test Rig for hardware-in-the-loop demonstrations. The final portion of the presentation, describes one of the key technologies in some detail by presenting equations and results for a functional dynamic model of the tip clearance phenomena. As shown, the model exhibits many of the clearance dynamics found in commercial gas turbine engines. However, initial attempts to validate the model identified limitations that are being addressed to make the model more realistic.

  15. Hot topic, warm loops, cooling plasma? Multithermal analysis of active region loops

    SciTech Connect

    Schmelz, J. T.; Pathak, S.; Christian, G. M.; Dhaliwal, R. S.; Brooks, D. H.

    2014-11-10

    We have found indications of a relationship between the differential emission measure (DEM) weighted temperature and the cross-field DEM width for coronal loops. The data come from the Hinode X-ray Telescope, the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer, and the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly. These data show that cooler loops tend to have narrower DEM widths. If most loops observed by these instruments are composed of bundles of unresolved magnetic strands and are only observed in their cooling phase, as some studies have suggested, then this relationship implies that the DEM of a coronal loop narrows as it cools. This could imply that fewer strands are seen emitting in the later cooling phase, potentially resolving the long standing controversy of whether the cross-field temperatures of coronal loops are multithermal or isothermal.

  16. Closing The Fromm Control Loop On The Infrared Thermal Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Herbert

    1988-11-01

    Substituting infrared thermal sensors for conventional thermocouples to measure the temperature of a product, or a point in a process, often provides the industrial user with distinct advantages such as freedom from contact with the product and better speed of response. The major disadvantage has always been higher sensor cost. Now that costs of ir sensors have come down, the non-contact approach is becoming more of a valid alternative, and the instrument or process control engineer often weighs the relative advantages of the two approaches before making a decision. With the advent of "smart" thermal scanning systems, however, it is becoming possible to rapidly measure and control several, many or all points on a product surface remotely and without contact, a capability without precedent, and not feasible with conventional contact sensors. This paper will trace the evolution of infrared noncontact temperature measurement, its development as a process control tool and the introduction of IR line scanners and imagers as industrial control sensors. Several applications of modern closed-loop control systems based on infrared sensors, scanners and imagers will be reviewed. 1. INTRODUCTION Temperature and thermal behavior of materials and fabricated parts in process are most critical factors in the manufacturing process. For this reason temperature is by far the most measured quantity in industrial process monitoring and control. Conventional methods of temperature measurement using thermometers and thermocouples are commonly used for the majority of monitoring and control applications. Non-contact temperature measurement using infrared sensors has become an increasingly desirable alternative over conventional methods as ir sensors have become less expensive, more reliable and electrically interchangeable with conventional thermistors and thermocouples. Now, with the introduction of innovative computer hardware and software, full image thermal control of products and

  17. An optimal open/closed-loop control method with application to a pre-stressed thin duralumin plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadimpalli, Sruthi Raju

    The excessive vibrations of a pre-stressed duralumin plate, suppressed by a combination of open-loop and closed-loop controls, also known as open/closed-loop control, is studied in this thesis. The two primary steps involved in this process are: Step (I) with an assumption that the closed-loop control law is proportional, obtain the optimal open-loop control by direct minimization of the performance measure consisting of energy at terminal time and a penalty on open-loop control force via calculus of variations. If the performance measure also involves a penalty on closed-loop control effort then a Fourier based method is utilized. Step (II) the energy at terminal time is minimized numerically to obtain optimal values of feedback gains. The optimal closed-loop control gains obtained are used to describe the displacement and the velocity of open-loop, closed-loop and open/closed-loop controlled duralumin plate.

  18. A Digital Self Excited Loop for Accelerating Cavity Field Control

    SciTech Connect

    Curt Hovater; Trent Allison; Jean Delayen; John Musson; Tomasz Plawski

    2007-06-22

    We have developed a digital process that emulates an analog oscillator and ultimately a self excited loop (SEL) for field control. The SEL, in its analog form, has been used for many years for accelerating cavity field control. In essence the SEL uses the cavity as a resonant circuit -- much like a resonant (tank) circuit is used to build an oscillator. An oscillating resonant circuit can be forced to oscillate at different, but close, frequencies to resonance by applying a phase shift in the feedback path. This allows the circuit to be phased-locked to a master reference, which is crucial for multiple cavity accelerators. For phase and amplitude control the SEL must be forced to the master reference frequency, and feedback provided for in both dimensions. The novelty of this design is in the way digital signal processing (DSP) is structured to emulate an analog system. While the digital signal processing elements are not new, to our knowledge this is the first time that the digital SEL concept has been designed and demonstrated. This paper reports on the progress of the design and implementation of the digital SEL for field control of superconducting accelerating cavities.

  19. The BASL Polarity Protein Controls a MAPK Signaling Feedback Loop in Asymmetric Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Pengcheng; Shao, Wanchen; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Dong, Juan

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Cell polarization is linked to fate determination during asymmetric division of plant stem cells, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. In Arabidopsis, BREAKING OF ASYMMETRY IN THE STOMATAL LINEAGE (BASL) is polarized to control stomatal asymmetric division. A MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE (MAPK) cascade determines terminal stomatal fate by promoting the degradation of the lineage determinant SPEECHLESS (SPCH). Here we demonstrate that a positive feedback loop between BASL and the MAPK pathway constitutes a polarity module at the cortex. Cortical localization of BASL requires phosphorylation mediated by MPK3/6. Phosphorylated BASL functions as a scaffold and recruits the MAPKKK YODA and MPK3/6 to spatially concentrate signaling at the cortex. Activated MPK3/6 reinforces the feedback loop by phosphorylating BASL, and inhibits stomatal fate by phosphorylating SPCH. Polarization of the BASL-MAPK signaling feedback module represents a mechanism connecting cell polarity to fate differentiation during asymmetric stem cell division in plants. PMID:25843888

  20. Pre-frontal control of closed-loop limbic neurostimulation by rodents using a brain-computer interface

    PubMed Central

    Widge, Alik S.; Moritz, Chet T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective There is great interest in closed-loop neurostimulators that sense and respond to a patient’s brain state. Such systems may have value for neurological and psychiatric illnesses where symptoms have high intraday variability. Animal models of closed-loop stimulators would aid preclinical testing. We sought to demonstrate that rodents can directly control a closed-loop limbic neurostimulator via a brain-computer interface (BCI). Approach We trained rats to use an auditory BCI controlled by single units in prefrontal cortex (PFC). The BCI controlled electrical stimulation in the medial forebrain bundle (MFB), a limbic structure involved in reward-seeking. Rigorous offline analyses were performed to confirm volitional control of the neurostimulator. Main Results All animals successfully learned to use the BCI and neurostimulator, with closed-loop control of this challenging task demonstrated at 80% of PFC recording locations. Analysis across sessions and animals confirmed statistically robust BCI control and specific, rapid modulation of PFC activity. Significance Our results provide a preliminary demonstration of a method for emotion-regulating closed-loop neurostimulation. They further suggest that activity in prefrontal cortex can be used to control a BCI without pre-training on a predicate task. This offers the potential for BCI-based treatments in refractory neurological and mental illness. PMID:24608127

  1. Pre-frontal control of closed-loop limbic neurostimulation by rodents using a brain-computer interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widge, Alik S.; Moritz, Chet T.

    2014-04-01

    Objective. There is great interest in closed-loop neurostimulators that sense and respond to a patient's brain state. Such systems may have value for neurological and psychiatric illnesses where symptoms have high intraday variability. Animal models of closed-loop stimulators would aid preclinical testing. We therefore sought to demonstrate that rodents can directly control a closed-loop limbic neurostimulator via a brain-computer interface (BCI). Approach. We trained rats to use an auditory BCI controlled by single units in prefrontal cortex (PFC). The BCI controlled electrical stimulation in the medial forebrain bundle, a limbic structure involved in reward-seeking. Rigorous offline analyses were performed to confirm volitional control of the neurostimulator. Main results. All animals successfully learned to use the BCI and neurostimulator, with closed-loop control of this challenging task demonstrated at 80% of PFC recording locations. Analysis across sessions and animals confirmed statistically robust BCI control and specific, rapid modulation of PFC activity. Significance. Our results provide a preliminary demonstration of a method for emotion-regulating closed-loop neurostimulation. They further suggest that activity in PFC can be used to control a BCI without pre-training on a predicate task. This offers the potential for BCI-based treatments in refractory neurological and mental illness.

  2. Electrically controllable terahertz square-loop metamaterial based on VO₂ thin film.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jun-Hwan; Park, Kyung Hyun; Ryu, Han-Cheol

    2016-05-13

    An electrically controllable square-loop metamaterial based on vanadium dioxide (VO2) thin film was proposed in the terahertz frequency regime. The square-loop shaped metamaterial was adopted to perform roles not only as a resonator but also as a micro-heater for the electrical control of the VO2. A dual-resonant square-loop structure was designed to realize band-pass characteristics in the desired frequency band. The measured Q-factors of the basic and scaled-down metamaterials fabricated on VO2 thin films were 2.22 and 1.61 at the center frequencies of 0.44 and 1.14 THz in the passbands, respectively. The transmittances of the proposed metamaterial were successfully controlled by applying a bias voltage without an external heater. The measured transmittance on-off ratios of the metamaterials were over 40 at the center frequencies in the passbands. In the future, electrically controllable terahertz metamaterial based on VO2 metamaterial could be employed as high-performance active filters or sensors. PMID:27039711

  3. Electrically controllable terahertz square-loop metamaterial based on VO2 thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jun-Hwan; Park, Kyung Hyun; Ryu, Han-Cheol

    2016-05-01

    An electrically controllable square-loop metamaterial based on vanadium dioxide (VO2) thin film was proposed in the terahertz frequency regime. The square-loop shaped metamaterial was adopted to perform roles not only as a resonator but also as a micro-heater for the electrical control of the VO2. A dual-resonant square-loop structure was designed to realize band-pass characteristics in the desired frequency band. The measured Q-factors of the basic and scaled-down metamaterials fabricated on VO2 thin films were 2.22 and 1.61 at the center frequencies of 0.44 and 1.14 THz in the passbands, respectively. The transmittances of the proposed metamaterial were successfully controlled by applying a bias voltage without an external heater. The measured transmittance on–off ratios of the metamaterials were over 40 at the center frequencies in the passbands. In the future, electrically controllable terahertz metamaterial based on VO2 metamaterial could be employed as high-performance active filters or sensors.

  4. Bidirectional neural interface: Closed-loop feedback control for hybrid neural systems.

    PubMed

    Chou, Zane; Lim, Jeffrey; Brown, Sophie; Keller, Melissa; Bugbee, Joseph; Broccard, Frédéric D; Khraiche, Massoud L; Silva, Gabriel A; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2015-08-01

    Closed-loop neural prostheses enable bidirectional communication between the biological and artificial components of a hybrid system. However, a major challenge in this field is the limited understanding of how these components, the two separate neural networks, interact with each other. In this paper, we propose an in vitro model of a closed-loop system that allows for easy experimental testing and modification of both biological and artificial network parameters. The interface closes the system loop in real time by stimulating each network based on recorded activity of the other network, within preset parameters. As a proof of concept we demonstrate that the bidirectional interface is able to establish and control network properties, such as synchrony, in a hybrid system of two neural networks more significantly more effectively than the same system without the interface or with unidirectional alternatives. This success holds promise for the application of closed-loop systems in neural prostheses, brain-machine interfaces, and drug testing. PMID:26737158

  5. UV Observations of Prominence Activation and Cool Loop Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucera, Therese A.; Landi, Enrico

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the thermal and dynamic properties of dynamic structures in and around a prominence channel observed on the limb on 17 April 2003. Observations were taken with the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory's Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SOHO/SUMER) in lines formed at temperatures from 80,000 to 1.6 MK. The instrument was pointed to a single location and took a series of 90 s exposures. Two-dimensional context was provided by the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) in the UV and EUV and the Kanzelhohe Solar Observatory in H-alpha. Two dynamic features were studied in depth: an activated prominence and repeated motions in a loop near the prominence. We calculated three-dimensional geometries and trajectories, differential emission measure, and limits on the mass, pressure, average density, and kinetic and thermal energies. These observations provide important tests for models of dynamics in prominences and cool (approx. 10(exp 5) K)loops, which will ultimately lead to a better understanding the mechanism(s) leading to energy and mass flow in these solar features.

  6. ORION Environmental Control and Life Support Systems Suit Loop and Pressure Control Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckhardt, Brad; Conger, Bruce; Stambaugh, Imelda C.

    2015-01-01

    Under NASA's ORION Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) Project at Johnson Space Center's (JSC), the Crew and Thermal Systems Division has developed performance models of the air system using Thermal Desktop/FloCAD. The Thermal Desktop model includes an Air Revitalization System (ARS Loop), a Suit Loop, a Cabin Loop, and Pressure Control System (PCS) for supplying make-up gas (N2 and O2) to the Cabin and Suit Loop. The ARS and PCS are designed to maintain air quality at acceptable O2, CO2 and humidity levels as well as internal pressures in the vehicle Cabin and during suited operations. This effort required development of a suite of Thermal Desktop Orion ECLSS models to address the need for various simulation capabilities regarding ECLSS performance. An initial highly detailed model of the ARS Loop was developed in order to simulate rapid pressure transients (water hammer effects) within the ARS Loop caused by events such as cycling of the Pressurized Swing Adsorption (PSA) Beds and required high temporal resolution (small time steps) in the model during simulation. A second ECLSS model was developed to simulate events which occur over longer periods of time (over 30 minutes) where O2, CO2 and humidity levels, as well as internal pressures needed to be monitored in the cabin and for suited operations. Stand-alone models of the PCS and the Negative Pressure relief Valve (NPRV) were developed to study thermal effects within the PCS during emergency scenarios (Cabin Leak) and cabin pressurization during vehicle re-entry into Earth's atmosphere. Results from the Orion ECLSS models were used during Orion Delta-PDR (July, 2014) to address Key Design Requirements (KDR's) for Suit Loop operations for multiple mission scenarios.

  7. The temperature structure and pressure balance of magnetic loops in active regions. [in solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foukal, P.

    1975-01-01

    EUV observations show many active region loops in lines formed at temperatures between 10,000 and 2,000,000 K. The brightest loops are associated with flux tubes leading to the umbrae of sunspots. It is shown that the high visibility of certain loops in transition region lines is due principally to a sharp radial decrease of temperature to chromospheric values toward the loop axis. The plasma density of these cool loops is not significantly greater than in the hot gas immediately surrounding it. Consequently, the internal gas pressure of the cool material is clearly lower. The hot material immediately surrounding the cool loops is generally denser than the external corona by a factor 3-4. When the active region is examined in coronal lines, this hot high pressure plasma shows up as loops that are generally parallel to the cool loops but significantly displaced laterally.

  8. Stability analysis and compensation of a boost regulator with two-loop control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wester, G. W.

    1974-01-01

    A useful stability measure has been demonstrated by Wester (1973) for switching regulators with a single feedback loop by applying the Nyquist criterion to the approximate loop gain determined by a time-averaging technique. This approach is extended and applied to the characterization, stability analysis, and compensation design of a switching regulator with two-loop control. The role and relative significance of each control loop is clarified on the basis of a description of circuit operation, and the major and minor loops are identified. In view of the inapplicability of linear feedback theory, describing functions of the feedback loops and power stage are derived, using small-signal analysis. Several phenomena revealed from an analysis of the major loop gain are discussed.

  9. Neural network setpoint control of an advanced test reactor experiment loop simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Cordes, G.A.; Bryan, S.R.; Powell, R.H.; Chick, D.R.

    1990-09-01

    This report describes the design, implementation, and application of artificial neural networks to achieve temperature and flow rate control for a simulation of a typical experiment loop in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The goal of the project was to research multivariate, nonlinear control using neural networks. A loop simulation code was adapted for the project and used to create a training set and test the neural network controller for comparison with the existing loop controllers. The results for three neural network designs are documented and compared with existing loop controller action. The neural network was shown to be as accurate at loop control as the classical controllers in the operating region represented by the training set. 9 refs., 28 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. A Novel Controller for Model with Combined LFC and AVR Loops of Single Area Power System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Monika; Srivastava, Smriti; Gupta, J. R. P.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, a novel controller is designed to study low frequency oscillations for load frequency control (LFC) and voltage control of a single area power system. For more accuracy in dynamic and steady state responses, mutual effects between LFC and automatic voltage regulation (AVR) loops are investigated in a combined simulink model of LFC and AVR loops. The effectiveness of the proposed controller is first simulated on model with LFC loop alone. The proposed controller is a hybrid of neural network and fast traversal filters. The proposed hybrid controller requires less number of samples for training of weights, thus making the system fast. To study the coupling effects of AVR and LFC loops, dynamic performance of a complete system model for low frequency oscillation studies comprising of mechanical and electrical loops is done with the proposed controller.

  11. Closed-loop analysis and control of a non-inverting buck-boost converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zengshi; Hu, Jiangang; Gao, Wenzhong

    2010-11-01

    In this article, a cascade controller is designed and analysed for a non-inverting buck-boost converter. The fast inner current loop uses sliding mode control. The slow outer voltage loop uses the proportional-integral (PI) control. Stability analysis and selection of PI gains are based on the nonlinear closed-loop error dynamics incorporating both the inner and outer loop controllers. The closed-loop system is proven to have a nonminimum phase structure. The voltage transient due to step changes of input voltage or resistance is predictable. The operating range of the reference voltage is discussed. The controller is validated by a simulation circuit. The simulation results show that the reference output voltage is well-tracked under system uncertainties or disturbances, confirming the validity of the proposed controller.

  12. Identification of system, observer, and controller from closed-loop experimental data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Phan, Minh

    1992-01-01

    This paper considers the identification problem of a system operating in closed-loop with an existing feedback controller. The closed-loop system is excited by a known excitation signal, and the resulting time histories of the closed-loop system response and the feedback signal are measured. From the time history data, the algorithm computes the Markov parameters of a closed-loop observer, from which the Markov parameters of the individual open-loop plant, observer, and controller are recovered. A state space model of the open-loop plant and the gain matrices for the controller and the observer are then realized. The results of the paper are demonstrated by an example using actual aircraft flutter test data.

  13. Open-Loop Control of Oxidative Phosphorylation in Skeletal and Cardiac Muscle Mitochondria by Ca(2.).

    PubMed

    Vinnakota, Kalyan C; Singhal, Abhishek; Van den Bergh, Françoise; Bagher-Oskouei, Masoumeh; Wiseman, Robert W; Beard, Daniel A

    2016-02-23

    In cardiac muscle, mitochondrial ATP synthesis is driven by demand for ATP through feedback from the products of ATP hydrolysis. However, in skeletal muscle at higher workloads there is an apparent contribution of open-loop stimulation of ATP synthesis. Open-loop control is defined as modulation of flux through a biochemical pathway by a moiety, which is not a reactant or a product of the biochemical reactions in the pathway. The role of calcium, which is known to stimulate the activity of mitochondrial dehydrogenases, as an open-loop controller, was investigated in isolated cardiac and skeletal muscle mitochondria. The kinetics of NADH synthesis and respiration, feedback from ATP hydrolysis products, and stimulation by calcium were characterized in isolated mitochondria to test the hypothesis that calcium has a stimulatory role in skeletal muscle mitochondria not apparent in cardiac mitochondria. A range of respiratory states were obtained in cardiac and skeletal muscle mitochondria utilizing physiologically relevant concentrations of pyruvate and malate, and flux of respiration, NAD(P)H fluorescence, and rhodamine 123 fluorescence were measured over a range of extra mitochondrial calcium concentrations. We found that under these conditions calcium stimulates NADH synthesis in skeletal muscle mitochondria but not in cardiac mitochondria. PMID:26910432

  14. EVIDENCE OF IMPULSIVE HEATING IN ACTIVE REGION CORE LOOPS

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, Durgesh; Mason, Helen E.; Klimchuk, James A.

    2010-11-01

    Using a full spectral scan of an active region from the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) we have obtained emission measure EM(T) distributions in two different moss regions within the same active region. We have compared these with theoretical transition region EMs derived for three limiting cases, namely, static equilibrium, strong condensation, and strong evaporation from Klimchuk et al. The EM distributions in both the moss regions are strikingly similar and show a monotonically increasing trend from log T[K] = 5.15-6.3. Using photospheric abundances, we obtain a consistent EM distribution for all ions. Comparing the observed and theoretical EM distributions, we find that the observed EM distribution is best explained by the strong condensation case (EM{sub con}), suggesting that a downward enthalpy flux plays an important and possibly dominant role in powering the transition region moss emission. The downflows could be due to unresolved coronal plasma that is cooling and draining after having been impulsively heated. This supports the idea that the hot loops (with temperatures of 3-5 MK) seen in the core of active regions are heated by nanoflares.

  15. Microprocessor-controlled pulsatile flow loop for hemodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Lynch, T G; Hobson, R W; Pawel, H E

    1986-03-01

    Validation of spectral analytic techniques in the clinical assessment and quantitation of vascular stenoses has been aided by use of in vitro flow loops. We have used a recently developed microprocessor-controlled pulsatile flow model to examine the influence of varying stenoses on Doppler-shifted peak systolic frequencies. A nonaxisymmetric, vertically oriented stenosis was produced by extrinsic compression of latex rubber tubing 12 mm in diameter, reducing the cross-sectional area (CSA) by 25, 40, 50, 60, 70, 85, and 97%. A rolling diaphragm pump, driven through a slider-crank mechanism by a microprocessor-controlled stepper motor, generated characteristic arterial pulse waves at a rate of 75 cycles per minute. Using an 8 MHz, continuous-wave, directional Doppler velocimeter, the Doppler-shifted frequencies were recorded at the stenosis. Four sets of observations were made at each of the stenoses, and the peak systolic frequency (PSF) was determined using a spectrum analyzer. The PSF in the absence of an obstructing stenosis was 2.56 +/- 0.03 (KHz +/- SEM). This increased significantly (P less than 0.05) to 4.80 +/- 0.09 when the CSA was reduced by 50%, to 5.90 +/- 0.37 when the CSA was reduced by 60% (P less than 0.05), to 8.40 +/- 0.10 when the CSA was reduced by 70% (P less than 0.05), and to 17.84 +/- 0.89 when the CSA was reduced by 85% (P less than 0.05). These data establish the utility of this pulsatile flow model, confirming the direct relationship between the Doppler-shifted PSF and the percentage reduction in CSA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3951221

  16. A novel double loop control model design for chemical unstable processes.

    PubMed

    Cong, Er-Ding; Hu, Ming-Hui; Tu, Shan-Tung; Xuan, Fu-Zhen; Shao, Hui-He

    2014-03-01

    In this manuscript, based on Smith predictor control scheme for unstable process in industry, an improved double loop control model is proposed for chemical unstable processes. Inner loop is to stabilize integrating the unstable process and transform the original process to first-order plus pure dead-time dynamic stable process. Outer loop is to enhance the performance of set point response. Disturbance controller is designed to enhance the performance of disturbance response. The improved control system is simple with exact physical meaning. The characteristic equation is easy to realize stabilization. Three controllers are separately design in the improved scheme. It is easy to design each controller and good control performance for the respective closed-loop transfer function separately. The robust stability of the proposed control scheme is analyzed. Finally, case studies illustrate that the improved method can give better system performance than existing design methods. PMID:24309506

  17. Structural Study of a Flexible Active Site Loop in Human Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase and Its Functional Implications.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Lucía; Lewis-Ballester, Ariel; Roitberg, Adrián; Estrin, Darío A; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Marti, Marcelo A; Capece, Luciana

    2016-05-17

    Human indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase catalyzes the oxidative cleavage of tryptophan to N-formyl kynurenine, the initial and rate-limiting step in the kynurenine pathway. Additionally, this enzyme has been identified as a possible target for cancer therapy. A 20-amino acid protein segment (the JK loop), which connects the J and K helices, was not resolved in the reported hIDO crystal structure. Previous studies have shown that this loop undergoes structural rearrangement upon substrate binding. In this work, we apply a combination of replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations and site-directed mutagenesis experiments to characterize the structure and dynamics of this protein region. Our simulations show that the JK loop can be divided into two regions: the first region (JK loop(C)) displays specific and well-defined conformations and is within hydrogen bonding distance of the substrate, while the second region (JK loop(N)) is highly disordered and exposed to the solvent. The peculiar flexible nature of JK loop(N) suggests that it may function as a target for post-translational modifications and/or a mediator for protein-protein interactions. In contrast, hydrogen bonding interactions are observed between the substrate and Thr379 in the highly conserved "GTGG" motif of JK loop(C), thereby anchoring JK loop(C) in a closed conformation, which secures the appropriate substrate binding mode for catalysis. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments confirm the key role of this residue, highlighting the importance of the JK loop(C) conformation in regulating the enzymatic activity. Furthermore, the existence of the partially and totally open conformations in the substrate-free form suggests a role of JK loop(C) in controlling substrate and product dynamics. PMID:27112409

  18. Closed-loop separation control over a sharp edge ramp using genetic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debien, Antoine; von Krbek, Kai A. F. F.; Mazellier, Nicolas; Duriez, Thomas; Cordier, Laurent; Noack, Bernd R.; Abel, Markus W.; Kourta, Azeddine

    2016-03-01

    We experimentally perform open and closed-loop control of a separating turbulent boundary layer downstream from a sharp edge ramp. The turbulent boundary layer just above the separation point has a Reynolds number Re_{θ }≈ 3500 based on momentum thickness. The goal of the control is to mitigate separation and early re-attachment. The forcing employs a spanwise array of active vortex generators. The flow state is monitored with skin-friction sensors downstream of the actuators. The feedback control law is obtained using model-free genetic programming control (GPC) (Gautier et al. in J Fluid Mech 770:442-457, 2015). The resulting flow is assessed using the momentum coefficient, pressure distribution and skin friction over the ramp and stereo PIV. The PIV yields vector field statistics, e.g. shear layer growth, the back-flow area and vortex region. GPC is benchmarked against the best periodic forcing. While open-loop control achieves separation reduction by locking-on the shedding mode, GPC gives rise to similar benefits by accelerating the shear layer growth. Moreover, GPC uses less actuation energy.

  19. Evoked electromyography-based closed-loop torque control in functional electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin; Hayashibe, Mitsuhiro; Azevedo-Coste, Christine

    2013-08-01

    This paper proposed a closed-loop torque control strategy of functional electrical stimulation (FES) with the aim of obtaining an accurate, safe, and robust FES system. Generally, FES control systems are faced with the challenge of how to deal with time-variant muscle dynamics due to physiological and biochemical factors (such as fatigue). The degraded muscle force needs to be compensated in order to ensure the accuracy of the motion restored by FES. Another challenge concerns the fact that implantable sensors are unavailable to feedback torque information for FES in humans. As FES-evoked electromyography (EMG) represents the activity of stimulated muscles, and also enables joint torque prediction as presented in our previous studies, here we propose an EMG-feedback predictive controller of FES to control joint torque adaptively. EMG feedback contributes to taking the activated muscle state in the FES torque control system into account. The nature of the predictive controller facilitates prediction of the muscle mechanical response and the system can therefore control joint torque from EMG feedback and also respond to time-variant muscle state changes. The control performance, fatigue compensation and aggressive control suppression capabilities of the proposed controller were evaluated and discussed through experimental and simulation studies. PMID:23529189

  20. SATB1 packages densely-looped, transciptionally-active chromatinfor coordinated expression of cytokine genes

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Shutao; Lee, Charles C.; Kohwi-Shigematsu, Terumi

    2006-05-23

    SATB1 is an important regulator of nuclear architecture that anchors specialized DNA sequences onto its cage-like network and recruits chromatin remodeling/modifying factors to control gene transcription. We studied the role of SATB1 in regulating the coordinated expression of Il5, Il4, and Il13 from the 200kb cytokine gene cluster region of mouse chromosome 11 during T-helper 2 (Th2)-cell activation. We show that upon cell activation, SATB1 is rapidly induced to form a unique transcriptionally-active chromatin structure that includes the cytokine gene region. Chromatin is folded into numerous small loops all anchored by SATB1, is histone H3 acetylated at lysine 9/14, and associated with Th2-specific factors, GATA3, STAT6, c-Maf, the chromatin-remodeling enzyme Brg-1, and RNA polymerase II across the 200kb region. Before activation, the chromatin displays some of these features, such as association with GATA3 and STAT6, but these were insufficient for cytokine gene expression. Using RNA interference (RNAi), we show that upon cell activation, SATB1 is not only required for chromatin folding into dense loops, but also for c-Maf induction and subsequently for Il4, Il5, and Il13 transcription. Our results show that SATB1 is an important determinant for chromatin architecture that constitutes a novel higher-order, transcriptionally-active chromatin structure upon Th2-cell activation.

  1. A Novel Feedback Loop That Controls Bimodal Expression of Genetic Competence

    PubMed Central

    Gamba, Pamela; Jonker, Martijs J.; Hamoen, Leendert W.

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression can be highly heterogeneous in isogenic cell populations. An extreme type of heterogeneity is the so-called bistable or bimodal expression, whereby a cell can differentiate into two alternative expression states. Stochastic fluctuations of protein levels, also referred to as noise, provide the necessary source of heterogeneity that must be amplified by specific genetic circuits in order to obtain a bimodal response. A classical model of bimodal differentiation is the activation of genetic competence in Bacillus subtilis. The competence transcription factor ComK activates transcription of its own gene, and an intricate regulatory network controls the switch to competence and ensures its reversibility. However, it is noise in ComK expression that determines which cells activate the ComK autostimulatory loop and become competent for genetic transformation. Despite its important role in bimodal gene expression, noise remains difficult to investigate due to its inherent stochastic nature. We adapted an artificial autostimulatory loop that bypasses all known ComK regulators to screen for possible factors that affect noise. This led to the identification of a novel protein Kre (YkyB) that controls the bimodal regulation of ComK. Interestingly, Kre appears to modulate the induction of ComK by affecting the stability of comK mRNA. The protein influences the expression of many genes, however, Kre is only found in bacteria that contain a ComK homologue and, importantly, kre expression itself is downregulated by ComK. The evolutionary significance of this new feedback loop for the reduction of transcriptional noise in comK expression is discussed. Our findings show the importance of mRNA stability in bimodal regulation, a factor that requires more attention when studying and modelling this non-deterministic developmental mechanism. PMID:26110430

  2. Testing of a controller for a hybrid capillary pumped loop thermal control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweickart, Russell; Ottenstein, Laura; Cullimore, Brent; Egan, Curtis; Wolf, Dave

    1989-01-01

    A controller for a series hybrid capillary pumped loop (CPL) system that requires no moving parts does not resrict fluid flow has been tested and has demonstrated improved performance characteristics over a plain CPL system and simple hybrid CPL systems. These include heat load sharing, phase separation, self-regulated flow control and distribution, all independent of most system pressure drop. In addition, the controlled system demonstrated a greater heat transport capability than the simple CPL system but without the large fluid inventory requirement of the hybrid systems. A description of the testing is presented along with data that show the advantages of the system.

  3. Predictive wavefront control for Adaptive Optics with arbitrary control loop delays

    SciTech Connect

    Poyneer, L A; Veran, J

    2007-10-30

    We present a modification of the closed-loop state space model for AO control which allows delays that are a non-integer multiple of the system frame rate. We derive the new forms of the Predictive Fourier Control Kalman filters for arbitrary delays and show that they are linear combinations of the whole-frame delay terms. This structure of the controller is independent of the delay. System stability margins and residual error variance both transition gracefully between integer-frame delays.

  4. ELECTRODIALYSIS FOR CLOSED LOOP CONTROL OF CYANIDE RINSE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Full scale demonstration of electrodialysis for closed loop treatment of brass plating cyanide rinse waters was conducted in the Keystone Lamp Manufacturing plant at Slatington, Pa. In treatment of actual rinse water, the system was only one-quarter as effective as anticipated. N...

  5. Differential Active Site Loop Conformations Mediate Promiscuous Activities in the Lactonase SsoPox

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Mikael; Chabriere, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes are proficient catalysts that enable fast rates of Michaelis-complex formation, the chemical step and products release. These different steps may require different conformational states of the active site that have distinct binding properties. Moreover, the conformational flexibility of the active site mediates alternative, promiscuous functions. Here we focused on the lactonase SsoPox from Sulfolobus solfataricus. SsoPox is a native lactonase endowed with promiscuous phosphotriesterase activity. We identified a position in the active site loop (W263) that governs its flexibility, and thereby affects the substrate specificity of the enzyme. We isolated two different sets of substitutions at position 263 that induce two distinct conformational sampling of the active loop and characterized the structural and kinetic effects of these substitutions. These sets of mutations selectively and distinctly mediate the improvement of the promiscuous phosphotriesterase and oxo-lactonase activities of SsoPox by increasing active-site loop flexibility. These observations corroborate the idea that conformational diversity governs enzymatic promiscuity and is a key feature of protein evolvability. PMID:24086491

  6. Evaluation of an Outer Loop Retrofit Architecture for Intelligent Turbofan Engine Thrust Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Sowers, T. Shane

    2006-01-01

    The thrust control capability of a retrofit architecture for intelligent turbofan engine control and diagnostics is evaluated. The focus of the study is on the portion of the hierarchical architecture that performs thrust estimation and outer loop thrust control. The inner loop controls fan speed so the outer loop automatically adjusts the engine's fan speed command to maintain thrust at the desired level, based on pilot input, even as the engine deteriorates with use. The thrust estimation accuracy is assessed under nominal and deteriorated conditions at multiple operating points, and the closed loop thrust control performance is studied, all in a complex real-time nonlinear turbofan engine simulation test bed. The estimation capability, thrust response, and robustness to uncertainty in the form of engine degradation are evaluated.

  7. Real-time open-loop control of a 1024-actuator MEMS deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, Célia; Conan, Rodolphe; Bradley, Colin; Guyon, Olivier; Gamroth, Darryl; Nash, Reston

    2010-07-01

    This article reports the progress made at the University of Victoria AO Lab, regarding the realtime open-loop control of a 1024-actuator MEMS deformable mirror (DM). The setup is an hybrid woofer-tweeter/open-loop bench. A tip-tilt mirror and a woofer DM (a 57-actuator CILAS DM) are driven in closed-loop while a 1024-actuator MEMS DM is utilized on a parallel open-loop path. Previous work shows that open-loop control providing low residual error (with frozen Kolmogorov turbulence) can be obtained without the need of DM modelling. A preliminary methodical calibration of the DM is employed instead. The MEMS electronics were upgraded to an update rate of 500 Hz and the experiment lays the groundwork for showing how these performances can also be achieved on the bench with dynamic turbulence (created with custom hot air turbulence generators). The current status of the experiment and the next milestones are presented.

  8. A Method for Precision Closed-Loop Irrigation Using a Modified PID Control Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodchild, Martin; Kühn, Karl; Jenkins, Malcolm; Burek, Kazimierz; Dutton, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    The benefits of closed-loop irrigation control have been demonstrated in grower trials which show the potential for improved crop yields and resource usage. Managing water use by controlling irrigation in response to soil moisture changes to meet crop water demands is a popular approach but requires knowledge of closed-loop control practice. In theory, to obtain precise closed-loop control of a system it is necessary to characterise every component in the control loop to derive the appropriate controller parameters, i.e. proportional, integral & derivative (PID) parameters in a classic PID controller. In practice this is often difficult to achieve. Empirical methods are employed to estimate the PID parameters by observing how the system performs under open-loop conditions. In this paper we present a modified PID controller, with a constrained integral function, that delivers excellent regulation of soil moisture by supplying the appropriate amount of water to meet the needs of the plant during the diurnal cycle. Furthermore, the modified PID controller responds quickly to changes in environmental conditions, including rainfall events which can result in: controller windup, under-watering and plant stress conditions. The experimental work successfully demonstrates the functionality of a constrained integral PID controller that delivers robust and precise irrigation control. Coir substrate strawberry growing trial data is also presented illustrating soil moisture control and the ability to match water deliver to solar radiation.

  9. Control Loop Tuning and Surge Response for Hanford WTP Melter Offgas Systems

    SciTech Connect

    SMITH, FG III

    2004-06-14

    This report describes control loop tuning in models of the high level waste (HLW) melter offgas system, the low activity waste (LAW) melter offgas system and the HLW Pulse Jet Ventilation system and an assessment of the response to steam surges in both melter offgas systems. The three offgas systems were modeled using the Aspen Custom Modeler (ACM) software. The ACM models have been recently updated. Flowsheets of the system models used in this study are provided in Appendix D. To facilitate testing, these flowsheets represent somewhat simplified versions of the full models. For example, the HLW and LAW vessel ventilation systems have been represented as fixed air sources that provide a constant gas flow and specified air surges. Similarly, the six tanks and individual pulse-jet air sources in the HLW Pulse Jet Ventilation system are represented as a constant air source for control loop tuning purposes. The second LAW melter system has also been represented as a constant flow air source and several other simplifications such as removing HLW and LAW control interlocks, submerged bed scrubber bypass lines, and pressure relief valves have been made.

  10. Hybrid FES orthosis incorporating closed loop control and sensory feedback.

    PubMed

    Andrews, B J; Baxendale, R H; Barnett, R; Phillips, G F; Yamazaki, T; Paul, J P; Freeman, P A

    1988-04-01

    A hybrid functional electrical stimulation (FES) orthosis is described, comprising a rigid ankle-foot brace, a multi-channel FES stimulator with surface electrodes, body mounted sensors, a 'rule-based' controller and an electro-cutaneous display for supplementary sensory feedback. The mechanical brace provides stability, without FES activation of muscles, for standing postures normally adopted by patients. This avoids inducing muscle fatigue during prolonged upright activity. However, stability is conditional upon the position of the ground reaction vector (GRV) relative to the knee joint. The finite state FES controller reacts automatically to destabilizing shifts of the GRV by stimulating appropriate anti-gravity musculature to brace the leg. The FES system also features a control mode to initiate and terminate flexion of the leg during forward progression. A simple mode of supplementary sensory feedback was used during the laboratory standing tests to assist the patient in maintaining a set posture. Preliminary results of laboratory tests for two spinal cord injured subjects are presented. PMID:3361878

  11. Double closed-loop cascade control for lower limb exoskeleton with elastic actuation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanhe; Zheng, Tianjiao; Jin, Hongzhe; Yang, Jixing; Zhao, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Unlike traditional rigid actuators, the significant features of Series Elastic Actuator (SEA) are stable torque control, lower output impedance, impact resistance and energy storage. Recently, SEA has been applied in many exoskeletons. In such applications, a key issue is how to realize the human-exoskeleton movement coordination. In this paper, double closed-loop cascade control for lower limb exoskeleton with SEA is proposed. This control method consists of inner SEA torque loop and outer contact force loop. Utilizing the SEA torque control with a motor velocity loop, actuation performances of SEA are analyzed. An integrated exoskeleton control system is designed, in which joint angles are calculated by internal encoders and resolvers and contact forces are gathered by external pressure sensors. The double closed-loop cascade control model is established based on the feedback signals of internal and external sensor. Movement experiments are accomplished in our prototype of lower limb exoskeleton. Preliminary results indicate the exoskeleton movements with pilot can be realized stably by utilizing this double closed-loop cascade control method. Feasibility of the SEA in our exoskeleton robot and effectiveness of the control method are verified. PMID:26409545

  12. Active control of convection

    SciTech Connect

    Bau, H.H.

    1995-12-31

    Using stability theory, numerical simulations, and in some instances experiments, it is demonstrated that the critical Rayleigh number for the bifurcation (1) from the no-motion (conduction) state to the motion state and (2) from time-independent convection to time-dependent, oscillatory convection in the thermal convection loop and Rayleigh-Benard problems can be significantly increased or decreased. This is accomplished through the use of a feedback controller effectuating small perturbations in the boundary data. The controller consists of sensors which detect deviations in the fluid`s temperature from the motionless, conductive values and then direct actuators to respond to these deviations in such a way as to suppress the naturally occurring flow instabilities. Actuators which modify the boundary`s temperature/heat flux are considered. The feedback controller can also be used to control flow patterns and generate complex dynamic behavior at relatively low Rayleigh numbers.

  13. Active-Loop Dynamics within the Michaelis Complex of Lactate Dehydrogenase from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Nie, Beining; Lodewyks, Kara; Deng, Hua; Desamero, Ruel Z B; Callender, Robert

    2016-07-12

    Laser-induced temperature-jump relaxation spectroscopy was used to study the active site mobile-loop dynamics found in the binding of the NADH nucleotide cofactor and oxamate substrate mimic to lactate dehydrogenase in Bacillus stearothermophilus thermophilic bacteria (bsLDH). The kinetic data can be best described by a model in which NADH can bind only to the open-loop apoenzyme, oxamate can bind only to the bsLDH·NADH binary complex in the open-loop conformation, and oxamate binding is followed by closing of the active site loop preventing oxamate unbinding. The open and closed states of the loop are in dynamic equilibrium and interconvert on the submillisecond time scale. This interconversion strongly accelerates with an increase in temperature because of significant enthalpy barriers. Binding of NADH to bsLDH results in minor changes of the loop dynamics and does not shift the open-closed equilibrium, but binding of the oxamate substrate mimic shifts this equilibrium to the closed state. At high excess oxamate concentrations where all active sites are nearly saturated with the substrate mimic, all active site mobile loops are mainly closed. The observed active-loop dynamics for bsLDH is very similar to that previously observed for pig heart LDH. PMID:27319381

  14. Active-member control of precision structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanson, J. L.; Blackwood, G. H.; Chu, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the results of closed loop experiments that use piezoelectric active-members to control the flexible motion of a precision truss structure. These experiments are directed toward the development of high performance structural systems as part of the Control/Structure Interaction program at JPL. Order of magnitude reductions in dynamic response are achieved with relatively simple control techniques. The practical implementation of high stiffness, high bandwidth active-members in a precision structure highlights specific issues of importance relating to the modelling and implementation of active-member control.

  15. Development of Computational Approaches for Simulation and Advanced Controls for Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Abhinaya; Lou, Xinsheng; Neuschaefer, Carl; Chaudry, Majid; Quinn, Joseph

    2012-07-31

    This document provides the results of the project through September 2009. The Phase I project has recently been extended from September 2009 to March 2011. The project extension will begin work on Chemical Looping (CL) Prototype modeling and advanced control design exploration in preparation for a scale-up phase. The results to date include: successful development of dual loop chemical looping process models and dynamic simulation software tools, development and test of several advanced control concepts and applications for Chemical Looping transport control and investigation of several sensor concepts and establishment of two feasible sensor candidates recommended for further prototype development and controls integration. There are three sections in this summary and conclusions. Section 1 presents the project scope and objectives. Section 2 highlights the detailed accomplishments by project task area. Section 3 provides conclusions to date and recommendations for future work.

  16. An Environment for Hardware-in-the-Loop Formation Navigation and Control Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Rich

    2004-01-01

    Recent interest in formation flying satellite systems has spurred a considerable amount of research in the relative navigation and control of satellites. Development in this area has included new estimation and control algorithms as well as sensor and actuator development specifically geared toward the relative control problem. This paper describes a simulation facility, the Formation Flying Testbed (FFTB) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, which allows engineers to test new algorithms for the formation flying problem with relevant GN&C hardware in a closed loop simulation. The FFTB currently supports the injection of GPS receiver hardware into the simulation loop, and support for satellite crosslink ranging technology is at a prototype stage. This closed-loop, hardware inclusive simulation capability permits testing of navigation and control software in the presence of the actual hardware with which the algorithms must interact. This capability provides the navigation or control developer with a perspective on how the algorithms perform as part of the closed-loop system. In this paper, the overall design and evolution of the FFTB are presented. Each component of the FFTB is then described in detail. Interfaces between the components of the FFTB are shown and the interfaces to and between navigation and control software are described in detail. Finally, an example of closed-loop formation control with GPS receivers in the loop is presented and results are analyzed.

  17. An Environmental for Hardware-in-the-Loop Formation Navigation and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Rich; Naasz, Bo; Gaylor, Dave; Higinbotham, John

    2004-01-01

    Recent interest in formation flying satellite systems has spurred a considerable amount of research in the relative navigation and control of satellites. Development in this area has included new estimation and control algorithms as well as sensor and actuator development specifically geared toward the relative control problem. This paper describes a simulation facility, the Formation Flying Test Bed (FFTB) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, which allows engineers to test new algorithms for the formation flying problem with relevant GN&C hardware in a closed loop simulation. The FFTB currently supports the inclusion of GPS receiver hardware in the simulation loop. Support for satellite crosslink ranging technology is at a prototype stage. This closed-loop, hardware inclusive simulation capability permits testing of navigation and control software in the presence of the actual hardware with which the algorithms must interact. This capability provides the navigation or control developer with a perspective on how the algorithms perform as part of the closed-loop system. In this paper, the overall design and evolution of the FFTB are presented. Each component of the FFTB is then described. Interfaces between the components of the FFTB are shown and the interfaces to and between navigation and control software are described. Finally, an example of closed-loop formation control with GPS receivers in the loop is presented.

  18. [Closed-loop control for chest compression based on coronary perfusion pressure: a computer simulation study].

    PubMed

    Chen, Aihua; Gao, Lei; Tian, Linhuai; Zhang, Jian; Zhan, Ningbo

    2014-08-01

    In this study, a closed-loop controller for chest compression which adjusts chest compression depth according to the coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) was proposed. An effective and personalized chest compression method for automatic mechanical compression devices was provided, and the traditional and uniform chest compression standard neglecting individual difference was improved. This study rebuilds Charles F. Babbs human circulation model with CPP simulation module and proposes a closed-loop controller based on a fuzzy control algorithm. The performance of the fuzzy controller was evaluated and compared to that of a traditional PID controller in computer simulation studies. The simulation results demonstrated that the fuzzy closed-loop controller produced shorter regulation time, fewer oscillations and smaller overshoot than those of the traditional PID controller and outperforms the traditional PID controller in CPP regulation and maintenance. PMID:25464812

  19. [Closed-loop control for chest compression based on coronary perfusion pressure: a computer simulation study].

    PubMed

    Chen, Aihua; Gao, Lei; Tian, Linhuai; Zhang, Jian; Zhan, Ningbo

    2014-08-01

    In this study, a closed-loop controller for chest compression which adjusts chest compression depth according to the coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) was proposed. An effective and personalized chest compression method for automatic mechanical compression devices was provided, and the traditional and uniform chest compression standard neglecting individual difference was improved. This study rebuilds Charles F. Babbs human circulation model with CPP simulation module and proposes a closed-loop controller based on a fuzzy control algorithm. The performance of the fuzzy controller was evaluated and compared to that of a traditional PID controller in computer simulation studies. The simulation results demonstrated that the fuzzy closed-loop controller produced shorter regulation time, fewer oscillations and smaller overshoot than those of the traditional PID controller and outperforms the traditional PID controller in CPP regulation and maintenance. PMID:25508443

  20. Positive And Negative Feedback Loops Coupled By Common Transcription Activator And Repressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sielewiesiuk, Jan; Łopaciuk, Agata

    2015-03-01

    Dynamical systems consisting of two interlocked loops with negative and positive feedback have been studied using the linear analysis of stability and numerical solutions. Conditions for saddle-node bifurcation were formulated in a general form. Conditions for Hopf bifurcations were found in a few symmetrical cases. Auto-oscillations, when they exist, are generated by the negative feedback repressive loop. This loop determines the frequency and amplitude of oscillations. The positive feedback loop of activation slightly modifies the oscillations. Oscillations are possible when the difference between Hilll's coefficients of the repression and activation is sufficiently high. The highly cooperative activation loop with a fast turnover slows down or even makes the oscillations impossible. The system under consideration can constitute a component of epigenetic or enzymatic regulation network.

  1. Analysis and design of DSP-based dual-loop controlled UPS inverters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xie-Hua; Yan, Chao

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a novel digital dual-loop control scheme of the PWM (Pulse width modulate) inverter. Deadbeat control technique are employed to enhance the performance. Half switching period delayed sampling and control tining strategy is used to improve the system dynamic response. Simulation and experimental results presented in the paper verified the validity of the proposed control scheme. PMID:12765279

  2. Gain-scheduling Control of Rotary Inverted Pendulum by Weight Optimization and H∞ Loop Shaping Procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yubai, Kazuhiro; Okuhara, Kazunori; Hirai, Junji

    Gain-scheduling control is one of effective methods for plants whose dynamics changes significantly according to its operating point. A frozen parameter method is known to be a practical gain-scheduling controller synthesis, which interpolates the controllers designed at the prespecified (frozen) operating points according to the current operation point. Hyde et al. proposed a gain-scheduling control that H∞ loop shaping procedure is adopted as a controller synthesis at each operating point. H∞ loop shaping procedure is based on loop shaping of an open loop characteristic by frequency weights and is known to be effective for plants with bad condition number. However, weight selection satisfying control specifications is hard job for a designer. This paper describes the design of a suboptimal weight and a controller by means of algorithm that maximizes the robust stability margin and shapes the open loop characteristic into the desired shape at each operating point. Moreover, we formulate a weight optimization problem as a generalized eigenvalue minimization problem, which reduces the designer's burden of weight selection. Finally, we realize robust and high performance control system by scheduling both weights and controllers. The effectiveness of the proposed control system is verified in terms of the achieved robust stability margin and experimental time responses of a rotary inverted pendulum which involves strong nonlinear dynamics.

  3. Open-Loop HIRF Experiments Performed on a Fault Tolerant Flight Control Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppen, Daniel M.

    1997-01-01

    During the third quarter of 1996, the Closed-Loop Systems Laboratory was established at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to study the effects of High Intensity Radiated Fields on complex avionic systems and control system components. This new facility provided a link and expanded upon the existing capabilities of the High Intensity Radiated Fields Laboratory at LaRC that were constructed and certified during 1995-96. The scope of the Closed-Loop Systems Laboratory is to place highly integrated avionics instrumentation into a high intensity radiated field environment, interface the avionics to a real-time flight simulation that incorporates aircraft dynamics, engines, sensors, actuators and atmospheric turbulence, and collect, analyze, and model aircraft performance. This paper describes the layout and functionality of the Closed-Loop Systems Laboratory, and the open-loop calibration experiments that led up to the commencement of closed-loop real-time flight experiments.

  4. Disturbance rejection performance analyses of closed loop control systems by reference to disturbance ratio.

    PubMed

    Alagoz, Baris Baykant; Deniz, Furkan Nur; Keles, Cemal; Tan, Nusret

    2015-03-01

    This study investigates disturbance rejection capacity of closed loop control systems by means of reference to disturbance ratio (RDR). The RDR analysis calculates the ratio of reference signal energy to disturbance signal energy at the system output and provides a quantitative evaluation of disturbance rejection performance of control systems on the bases of communication channel limitations. Essentially, RDR provides a straightforward analytical method for the comparison and improvement of implicit disturbance rejection capacity of closed loop control systems. Theoretical analyses demonstrate us that RDR of the negative feedback closed loop control systems are determined by energy spectral density of controller transfer function. In this manner, authors derived design criteria for specifications of disturbance rejection performances of PID and fractional order PID (FOPID) controller structures. RDR spectra are calculated for investigation of frequency dependence of disturbance rejection capacity and spectral RDR analyses are carried out for PID and FOPID controllers. For the validation of theoretical results, simulation examples are presented. PMID:25311160

  5. MIT Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE): noncollocated payload pointing control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMartin, Douglas G.; Miller, David W.

    1993-09-01

    The Middeck Active Control Experiment is a space shuttle flight experiment intended to demonstrate high authority active structural control in zero gravity conditions. The prediction of on-orbit closed-loop dynamics is based on analysis and ground testing. The MACE test article is representative of multiple payload platforms, and includes two 2-axis gimballing payloads connected by a flexible bus. The goal of active control is to maintain pointing accuracy of one payload, while the remaining payload is moving independently. Current control results on the ground test article are presented. Multiple input, multiple output controllers are designed based on high order measurement based models. Linear Quadratic Gaussian controllers yield reasonable performance. At high authority, however, these controllers destabilize the actual structure, due to parametric errors in the control design model. A robust control design procedure is required to yield high performance in the presence of these errors.

  6. High alpha feedback control for agile half-loop maneuvers of the F-18 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalford, Harold

    1988-01-01

    A nonlinear feedback control law for the F/A-18 airplane that provides time-optimal or agile maneuvering of the half-loop maneuver at high angles of attack is given. The feedback control law was developed using the mathematical approach of singular perturbations, in which the control devices considered were conventional aerodynamic control surfaces and thrusting. The derived nonlinear control law was used to simulate F/A-18 half-loop maneuvers. The simulated results at Mach 0.6 and 0.9 compared well with pilot simulations conducted at NASA.

  7. On the feasibility of closed-loop control of intra-aortic balloon pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, J. W., Jr.; Bourland, H. M.; Kane, G. R.

    1973-01-01

    A closed-loop control scheme for the control of intra-aortic balloon pumping has been developed and tested in dog experiments. A performance index reflecting the general objectives of balloon-assist pumping is developed and a modified steepest ascent control algorithm is utilized for the selection of a proper operating point for the balloon during its pumping cycle. This paper attempts to indicate the feasibility of closed-loop control of balloon pumping, and particularly its flexibility in achieving both diastolic augmentation of mean aortic pressure and control of the level of end-diastolic pressure (EDP) an important factor in reducing heart work.

  8. Human-in-the-loop evaluation of RMS Active Damping Augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demeo, Martha E.; Gilbert, Michael G.; Scott, Michael A.; Lepanto, Janet A.; Bains, Elizabeth M.; Jensen, Mary C.

    1993-01-01

    Active Damping Augmentation is the insertion of Controls-Structures Integration Technology to benefit the on-orbit performance of the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System. The goal is to reduce the vibration decay time of the Remote Manipulator System following normal payload maneuvers and operations. Simulation of Active Damping Augmentation was conducted in the realtime human-in-the-loop Systems Engineering Simulator at the NASA Johnson Space Center. The objective of this study was to obtain a qualitative measure of operational performance improvement from astronaut operators and to obtain supporting quantitative performance data. Sensing of vibratory motions was simulated using a three-axis accelerometer mounted at the end of the lower boom of the Remote Manipulator System. The sensed motions were used in a feedback control law to generate commands to the joint servo mechanisms which reduced the unwanted oscillations. Active damping of the Remote Manipulator System with an attached 3990 lb. payload was successfully demonstrated. Six astronaut operators examined the performance of an Active Damping Augmentation control law following single-joint and coordinated six-joint translational and rotational maneuvers. Active Damping Augmentation disturbance rejection of Orbiter thruster firings was also evaluated. Significant reductions in the dynamic response of the 3990 lb. payload were observed. Astronaut operators recommended investigation of Active Damping Augmentation benefits to heavier payloads where oscillations are a bigger problem (e.g. Space Station Freedom assembly operators).

  9. HIPK2 catalytic activity and subcellular localization are regulated by activation-loop Y354 autophosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Siepi, Francesca; Gatti, Veronica; Camerini, Serena; Crescenzi, Marco; Soddu, Silvia

    2013-06-01

    HIPK2 (homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2) binds to and phosphorylates, at Ser and Thr residues, a large number of targets involved in cell division and cell fate decision in response to different physiological or stress stimuli. Inactivation of HIPK2 has been observed in human and mouse cancers supporting its role as a tumor suppressor. Despite the biological relevance of this kinase, very little is known on how HIPK2 becomes catalytically active. Based on sequence homologies, HIPK2 has been taxonomically classified as a subfamily member of the dual-specificity tyrosine-regulated kinases (DYRKs) and the activation-loop Y354 of HIPK2 has been found phosphorylated in different cells; however, the relevance of this Y phosphorylation is presently unknown. Here, we show that HIPK2, which is extensively phosphorylated at S/T sites throughout its functional domains, becomes catalytically active by autophosphorylation at the activation-loop Y354. In particular, we found that, in analogy to DYRKs, HIPK2-Y354 phosphorylation is an autocatalytic event and its prevention, through Y354 substitution with non-phosphorylatable amino acids or by using the kinase inhibitor purvalanol A, induces a strong reduction of the HIPK2 S/T-kinase activity on different substrates. Interestingly, at variance from DYRKs, inhibition of HIPK2-Y354 phosphorylation induces a strong out-of-target Y-kinase activity in cis and a strong cytoplasmic relocalization of the kinase. Together, these results demonstrate that the catalytic activity, substrate specificity, and subcellular localization of HIPK2 are regulated by autophosphorylation of its activation-loop Y354. PMID:23485397

  10. HIPK2 catalytic activity and subcellular localization are regulated by activation-loop Y354 autophosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Siepi, Francesca; Gatti, Veronica; Camerini, Serena; Crescenzi, Marco; Soddu, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    HIPK2 (homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2) binds to and phosphorylates, at Ser and Thr residues, a large number of targets involved in cell division and cell fate decision in response to different physiological or stress stimuli. Inactivation of HIPK2 has been observed in human and mouse cancers supporting its role as a tumor suppressor. Despite the biological relevance of this kinase, very little is known on how HIPK2 becomes catalytically active. Based on sequence homologies, HIPK2 has been taxonomically classified as a subfamily member of the dual-specificity tyrosine-regulated kinases (DYRKs) and the activation-loop Y354 of HIPK2 has been found phosphorylated in different cells; however, the relevance of this Y phosphorylation is presently unknown. Here, we show that HIPK2, which is extensively phosphorylated at S/T sites throughout its functional domains, becomes catalytically active by autophosphorylation at the activation-loop Y354. In particular, we found that, in analogy to DYRKs, HIPK2-Y354 phosphorylation is an autocatalytic event and its prevention, through Y354 substitution with non-phosphorylatable amino acids or by using the kinase inhibitor purvalanol A, induces a strong reduction of the HIPK2 S/T-kinase activity on different substrates. Interestingly, at variance from DYRKs, inhibition of HIPK2-Y354 phosphorylation induces a strong out-of-target Y-kinase activity in cis and a strong cytoplasmic relocalization of the kinase. Together, these results demonstrate that the catalytic activity, substrate specificity, and subcellular localization of HIPK2 are regulated by autophosphorylation of its activation-loop Y354. PMID:23485397

  11. Genome-Wide Identification of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Gene Family across Fungal Lineage Shows Presence of Novel and Diverse Activation Loop Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Mohanta, Tapan Kumar; Mohanta, Nibedita; Parida, Pratap; Panda, Sujogya Kumar; Ponpandian, Lakshmi Narayanan; Bae, Hanhong

    2016-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is characterized by the presence of the T-E-Y, T-D-Y, and T-G-Y motifs in its activation loop region and plays a significant role in regulating diverse cellular responses in eukaryotic organisms. Availability of large-scale genome data in the fungal kingdom encouraged us to identify and analyse the fungal MAPK gene family consisting of 173 fungal species. The analysis of the MAPK gene family resulted in the discovery of several novel activation loop motifs (T-T-Y, T-I-Y, T-N-Y, T-H-Y, T-S-Y, K-G-Y, T-Q-Y, S-E-Y and S-D-Y) in fungal MAPKs. The phylogenetic analysis suggests that fungal MAPKs are non-polymorphic, had evolved from their common ancestors around 1500 million years ago, and are distantly related to plant MAPKs. We are the first to report the presence of nine novel activation loop motifs in fungal MAPKs. The specificity of the activation loop motif plays a significant role in controlling different growth and stress related pathways in fungi. Hence, the presences of these nine novel activation loop motifs in fungi are of special interest. PMID:26918378

  12. Closed-loop identification and control application for dissolved oxygen concentration in a full-scale coke wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Yoo, C K; Cho, J H; Kwak, H J; Choi, S K; Chun, H D; Lee, I

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to apply a closed-loop identification to actual dissolved oxygen control system in the coke wastewater treatment plant. It approximates the dissolved oxygen dynamics to a high order model using the integral transform method and reduces it to the first-order plus time delay (FOPTD) or second-order plus time delay (SOPTD) for the PID controller tuning. To experiment the process identification on the real plant, a simple set-point change of the speed of surface aerator under the closed-loop control without any mode change was used as an activation signal of the identification. The full-scale experimental results show a good identification performance and a good tracking ability for set-point change. As a result of improved control performance, the fluctuation of dissolved oxygen concentration variation has been decreased and the electric power saving has been accomplished. PMID:11385849

  13. Modulation of activation-loop phosphorylation by JAK inhibitors is binding mode dependent

    PubMed Central

    Bonenfant, Débora; Rubert, Joëlle; Vangrevelinghe, Eric; Scheufler, Clemens; Marque, Fanny; Régnier, Catherine H.; De Pover, Alain; Ryckelynck, Hugues; Bhagwat, Neha; Koppikar, Priya; Goel, Aviva; Wyder, Lorenza; Tavares, Gisele; Baffert, Fabienne; Pissot-Soldermann, Carole; Manley, Paul W.; Gaul, Christoph; Voshol, Hans; Levine, Ross L.; Sellers, William R.; Hofmann, Francesco; Radimerski, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    JAK inhibitors are being developed for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, myeloproliferative neoplasms and leukemias. Most of these drugs target the ATP-binding pocket and stabilize the active conformation of the JAK kinases. This type-I binding mode leads to an increase in JAK activation-loop phosphorylation, despite blockade of kinase function. Here we report that stabilizing the inactive state via type-II inhibition acts in the opposite manner, leading to a loss of activation-loop phosphorylation. We used X-ray crystallography to corroborate the binding mode and report for the first time the crystal structure of the JAK2 kinase domain in an inactive conformation. Importantly, JAK inhibitor-induced activation-loop phosphorylation requires receptor interaction, as well as intact kinase and pseudokinase domains. Hence, depending on the respective conformation stabilized by a JAK inhibitor, hyperphosphorylation of the activation-loop may or may not be elicited. PMID:22684457

  14. Multisession, noninvasive closed-loop neuroprosthetic control of grasping by upper limb amputees.

    PubMed

    Agashe, H A; Paek, A Y; Contreras-Vidal, J L

    2016-01-01

    Upper limb amputation results in a severe reduction in the quality of life of affected individuals due to their inability to easily perform activities of daily living. Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) that translate grasping intent from the brain's neural activity into prosthetic control may increase the level of natural control currently available in myoelectric prostheses. Current BMI techniques demonstrate accurate arm position and single degree-of-freedom grasp control but are invasive and require daily recalibration. In this study we tested if transradial amputees (A1 and A2) could control grasp preshaping in a prosthetic device using a noninvasive electroencephalography (EEG)-based closed-loop BMI system. Participants attempted to grasp presented objects by controlling two grasping synergies, in 12 sessions performed over 5 weeks. Prior to closed-loop control, the first six sessions included a decoder calibration phase using action observation by the participants; thereafter, the decoder was fixed to examine neuroprosthetic performance in the absence of decoder recalibration. Ability of participants to control the prosthetic was measured by the success rate of grasping; ie, the percentage of trials within a session in which presented objects were successfully grasped. Participant A1 maintained a steady success rate (63±3%) across sessions (significantly above chance [41±5%] for 11 sessions). Participant A2, who was under the influence of pharmacological treatment for depression, hormone imbalance, pain management (for phantom pain as well as shoulder joint inflammation), and drug dependence, achieved a success rate of 32±2% across sessions (significantly above chance [27±5%] in only two sessions). EEG signal quality was stable across sessions, but the decoders created during the first six sessions showed variation, indicating EEG features relevant to decoding at a smaller timescale (100ms) may not be stable. Overall, our results show that (a) an EEG

  15. Dual-control nonlinear-optical loop mirrors for all-optical soliton synchronous modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigo, Sébastien; Desurvire, Emmanuel; Audouin, Olivier

    1996-09-01

    A novel dual-control configuration of nonlinear loop mirrors is used for all-optical soliton synchronous regeneration. Simulations show substantial improvement in transmission in this device compared with single-control devices, owing to chirp-free modulation. The absence of chirp is confirmed experimentally through a spectral analysis of the dual-control modulator.

  16. Breaking a habit: a further role of the phonological loop in action control.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Erina; Baddeley, Alan D; Hitch, Graham J; Saito, Satoru

    2013-10-01

    Recent research has suggested that keeping track of a task goal in rapid task switching may depend on the phonological loop component of working memory. In this study, we investigated whether the phonological loop plays a similar role when a single switch extending over several trials is required after many trials on which one has performed a competing task. Participants were shown pairs of digits varying in numerical and physical size, and they were required to decide which digit was numerically or physically larger. An experimental cycle consisted of four blocks of 24 trials. In Experiment 1, participants in the task change groups performed the numerical-size judgment task during the first three blocks, and then changed to the physical-size judgment task in the fourth. Participants in the continuation groups performed only the physical-size judgment task throughout all four blocks. We found negative effects of articulatory suppression on the fourth block, but only in the task change groups. Experiment 2 was a replication, with the modification that both groups received identical instructions and practice. Experiment 3 was a further replication using numerical-size judgment as the target task. The results showed a pattern similar to that from Experiment 1, with negative effects of articulatory suppression found only in the task change group. The congruity of numerical and physical size had a reliable effect on performance in all three experiments, but unlike the task change, it did not reliably interact with articulatory suppression. The results suggest that in addition to its well-established role in rapid task switching, the phonological loop also contributes to active goal maintenance in longer-term action control. PMID:23595305

  17. Error mapping controller: a closed loop neuroprosthesis controlled by artificial neural networks

    PubMed Central

    Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Ferrante, Simona; De Momi, Elena; Ferrigno, Giancarlo

    2006-01-01

    Background The design of an optimal neuroprostheses controller and its clinical use presents several challenges. First, the physiological system is characterized by highly inter-subjects varying properties and also by non stationary behaviour with time, due to conditioning level and fatigue. Secondly, the easiness to use in routine clinical practice requires experienced operators. Therefore, feedback controllers, avoiding long setting procedures, are required. Methods The error mapping controller (EMC) here proposed uses artificial neural networks (ANNs) both for the design of an inverse model and of a feedback controller. A neuromuscular model is used to validate the performance of the controllers in simulations. The EMC performance is compared to a Proportional Integral Derivative (PID) included in an anti wind-up scheme (called PIDAW) and to a controller with an ANN as inverse model and a PID in the feedback loop (NEUROPID). In addition tests on the EMC robustness in response to variations of the Plant parameters and to mechanical disturbances are carried out. Results The EMC shows improvements with respect to the other controllers in tracking accuracy, capability to prolong exercise managing fatigue, robustness to parameter variations and resistance to mechanical disturbances. Conclusion Different from the other controllers, the EMC is capable of balancing between tracking accuracy and mapping of fatigue during the exercise. In this way, it avoids overstressing muscles and allows a considerable prolongation of the movement. The collection of the training sets does not require any particular experimental setting and can be introduced in routine clinical practice. PMID:17029636

  18. A Review of Control Strategies in Closed-Loop Neuroprosthetic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wright, James; Macefield, Vaughan G.; van Schaik, André; Tapson, Jonathan C.

    2016-01-01

    It has been widely recognized that closed-loop neuroprosthetic systems achieve more favorable outcomes for users then equivalent open-loop devices. Improved performance of tasks, better usability, and greater embodiment have all been reported in systems utilizing some form of feedback. However, the interdisciplinary work on neuroprosthetic systems can lead to miscommunication due to similarities in well-established nomenclature in different fields. Here we present a review of control strategies in existing experimental, investigational and clinical neuroprosthetic systems in order to establish a baseline and promote a common understanding of different feedback modes and closed-loop controllers. The first section provides a brief discussion of feedback control and control theory. The second section reviews the control strategies of recent Brain Machine Interfaces, neuromodulatory implants, neuroprosthetic systems, and assistive neurorobotic devices. The final section examines the different approaches to feedback in current neuroprosthetic and neurorobotic systems. PMID:27462202

  19. Active Site Loop Conformation Regulates Promiscuous Activity in a Lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Yang, Guang-Yu; Bai, Aixi; Zheng, Baisong; Lou, Zhiyong; Wu, Geng; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a “hot spot” in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km) toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity. PMID:25706379

  20. Parsing the phonological loop: activation timing in the dorsal speech stream determines accuracy in speech reproduction.

    PubMed

    Herman, Alexander B; Houde, John F; Vinogradov, Sophia; Nagarajan, Srikantan S

    2013-03-27

    Despite significant research and important clinical correlates, direct neural evidence for a phonological loop linking speech perception, short-term memory and production remains elusive. To investigate these processes, we acquired whole-head magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings from human subjects performing a variable-length syllable sequence reproduction task. The MEG sensor data were source localized using a time-frequency optimized spatially adaptive filter, and we examined the time courses of cortical oscillatory power and the correlations of oscillatory power with behavior between onset of the audio stimulus and the overt speech response. We found dissociations between time courses of behaviorally relevant activations in a network of regions falling primarily within the dorsal speech stream. In particular, verbal working memory load modulated high gamma power in both Sylvian-parietal-temporal and Broca's areas. The time courses of the correlations between high gamma power and subject performance clearly alternated between these two regions throughout the task. Our results provide the first evidence of a reverberating input-output buffer system in the dorsal stream underlying speech sensorimotor integration, consistent with recent phonological loop, competitive queuing, and speech-motor control models. These findings also shed new light on potential sources of speech dysfunction in aphasia and neuropsychiatric disorders, identifying anatomically and behaviorally dissociable activation time windows critical for successful speech reproduction. PMID:23536060

  1. Digital phase-locked-loop speed sensor for accuracy improvement in analog speed controls. [feedback control and integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenough, A. G.

    1975-01-01

    A digital speed control that can be combined with a proportional analog controller is described. The stability and transient response of the analog controller were retained and combined with the long-term accuracy of a crystal-controlled integral controller. A relatively simple circuit was developed by using phase-locked-loop techniques and total error storage. The integral digital controller will maintain speed control accuracy equal to that of the crystal reference oscillator.

  2. Closed loop control of the induction heating process using miniature magnetic sensors

    DOEpatents

    Bentley, Anthony E.; Kelley, John Bruce; Zutavern, Fred J.

    2003-05-20

    A method and system for providing real-time, closed-loop control of the induction hardening process. A miniature magnetic sensor located near the outer surface of the workpiece measures changes in the surface magnetic field caused by changes in the magnetic properties of the workpiece as it heats up during induction heating (or cools down during quenching). A passive miniature magnetic sensor detects a distinct magnetic spike that appears when the saturation field, B.sub.sat, of the workpiece has been exceeded. This distinct magnetic spike disappears when the workpiece's surface temperature exceeds its Curie temperature, due to the sudden decrease in its magnetic permeability. Alternatively, an active magnetic sensor can measure changes in the resonance response of the monitor coil when the excitation coil is linearly swept over 0-10 MHz, due to changes in the magnetic permeability and electrical resistivity of the workpiece as its temperature increases (or decreases).

  3. Active parallel redundancy for electronic integrator-type control circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, R. A.

    1971-01-01

    Circuit extends concept of redundant feedback control from type-0 to type-1 control systems. Inactive channels are slaves to the active channel, if latter fails, it is rejected and slave channel is activated. High reliability and elimination of single-component catastrophic failure are important in closed-loop control systems.

  4. LOOP- SIMULATION OF THE AUTOMATIC FREQUENCY CONTROL SUBSYSTEM OF A DIFFERENTIAL MINIMUM SHIFT KEYING RECEIVER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, F.

    1994-01-01

    The LOOP computer program was written to simulate the Automatic Frequency Control (AFC) subsystem of a Differential Minimum Shift Keying (DMSK) receiver with a bit rate of 2400 baud. The AFC simulated by LOOP is a first order loop configuration with a first order R-C filter. NASA has been investigating the concept of mobile communications based on low-cost, low-power terminals linked via geostationary satellites. Studies have indicated that low bit rate transmission is suitable for this application, particularly from the frequency and power conservation point of view. A bit rate of 2400 BPS is attractive due to its applicability to the linear predictive coding of speech. Input to LOOP includes the following: 1) the initial frequency error; 2) the double-sided loop noise bandwidth; 3) the filter time constants; 4) the amount of intersymbol interference; and 5) the bit energy to noise spectral density. LOOP output includes: 1) the bit number and the frequency error of that bit; 2) the computed mean of the frequency error; and 3) the standard deviation of the frequency error. LOOP is written in MS SuperSoft FORTRAN 77 for interactive execution and has been implemented on an IBM PC operating under PC DOS with a memory requirement of approximately 40K of 8 bit bytes. This program was developed in 1986.

  5. Enzymatic activation of autotaxin by divalent cations without EF-hand loop region involvement.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Jung, I D; Nam, S W; Clair, T; Jeong, E M; Hong, S Y; Han, J W; Lee, H W; Stracke, M L; Lee, H Y

    2001-07-15

    Autotaxin (ATX) is a recently described member of the nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase (NPP) family of proteins with potent tumor cell motility-stimulating activity. Like other NPPs, ATX is a glycoprotein with peptide sequences homologous to the catalytic site of bovine intestinal alkaline phosphodiesterase (PDE) and the loop region of an EF-hand motif. The PDE active site of ATX has been associated with the motility-stimulating activity of ATX. In this study, we examined the roles of the EF-hand loop region and of divalent cations on the enzymatic activities of ATX. Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) was each demonstrated to increase the PDE activity of ATX in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas incubation of ATX with chelating agents abolished this activity, indicating a requirement for divalent cations. Non-linear regression analysis of enzyme kinetic data indicated that addition of these divalent cations increases reaction velocity predominantly through an effect on V(max.) Three mutant proteins, Ala(740)-, Ala(742)-, and Ala(751)-ATX, in the EF-hand loop region of ATX had enzymatic activity comparable to that of the wild-type protein. A deletion mutation of the entire loop region resulted in slightly reduced PDE activity but normal motility-stimulating activity. However, the PDE activity of this same deletion mutant remained sensitive to augmentation by cations, strongly implying that cations exert their effect by interactions outside of the EF-hand loop region. PMID:11389881

  6. A neurochemical closed-loop controller for deep brain stimulation: toward individualized smart neuromodulation therapies.

    PubMed

    Grahn, Peter J; Mallory, Grant W; Khurram, Obaid U; Berry, B Michael; Hachmann, Jan T; Bieber, Allan J; Bennet, Kevin E; Min, Hoon-Ki; Chang, Su-Youne; Lee, Kendall H; Lujan, J L

    2014-01-01

    Current strategies for optimizing deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy involve multiple postoperative visits. During each visit, stimulation parameters are adjusted until desired therapeutic effects are achieved and adverse effects are minimized. However, the efficacy of these therapeutic parameters may decline with time due at least in part to disease progression, interactions between the host environment and the electrode, and lead migration. As such, development of closed-loop control systems that can respond to changing neurochemical environments, tailoring DBS therapy to individual patients, is paramount for improving the therapeutic efficacy of DBS. Evidence obtained using electrophysiology and imaging techniques in both animals and humans suggests that DBS works by modulating neural network activity. Recently, animal studies have shown that stimulation-evoked changes in neurotransmitter release that mirror normal physiology are associated with the therapeutic benefits of DBS. Therefore, to fully understand the neurophysiology of DBS and optimize its efficacy, it may be necessary to look beyond conventional electrophysiological analyses and characterize the neurochemical effects of therapeutic and non-therapeutic stimulation. By combining electrochemical monitoring and mathematical modeling techniques, we can potentially replace the trial-and-error process used in clinical programming with deterministic approaches that help attain optimal and stable neurochemical profiles. In this manuscript, we summarize the current understanding of electrophysiological and electrochemical processing for control of neuromodulation therapies. Additionally, we describe a proof-of-principle closed-loop controller that characterizes DBS-evoked dopamine changes to adjust stimulation parameters in a rodent model of DBS. The work described herein represents the initial steps toward achieving a "smart" neuroprosthetic system for treatment of neurologic and psychiatric disorders

  7. Space Station environmental control and life support system distribution and loop closure studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, William R.; Reuter, James L.; Schunk, Richard G.

    1986-01-01

    The NASA Space Station's environmental control and life support system (ECLSS) encompasses functional elements concerned with temperature and humidity control, atmosphere control and supply, atmosphere revitalization, fire detection and suppression, water recovery and management, waste management, and EVA support. Attention is presently given to functional and physical module distributions of the ECLSS among these elements, with a view to resource requirements and safety implications. A strategy of physical distribution coupled with functional centralization is for the air revitalization and water reclamation systems. Also discussed is the degree of loop closure desirable in the initial operational capability status Space Station's oxygen and water reclamation loops.

  8. Sensory feedback in prosthetics: a standardized test bench for closed-loop control.

    PubMed

    Dosen, Strahinja; Markovic, Marko; Hartmann, Cornelia; Farina, Dario

    2015-03-01

    Closing the control loop by providing sensory feedback to the user of a prosthesis is an important challenge, with major impact on the future of prosthetics. Developing and comparing closed-loop systems is a difficult task, since there are many different methods and technologies that can be used to implement each component of the system. Here, we present a test bench developed in Matlab Simulink for configuring and testing the closed-loop human control system in standardized settings. The framework comprises a set of connected generic blocks with normalized inputs and outputs, which can be customized by selecting specific implementations from a library of predefined components. The framework is modular and extensible and it can be used to configure, compare and test different closed-loop system prototypes, thereby guiding the development towards an optimal system configuration. The use of the test bench was demonstrated by investigating two important aspects of closed-loop control: performance of different electrotactile feedback interfaces (spatial versus intensity coding) during a pendulum stabilization task and feedforward methods (joystick versus myocontrol) for force control. The first experiment demonstrated that in the case of trained subjects the intensity coding might be superior to spatial coding. In the second experiment, the control of force was rather poor even with a stable and precise control interface (joystick), demonstrating that inherent characteristics of the prosthesis can be an important limiting factor when considering the overall effectiveness of the closed-loop control. The presented test bench is an important instrument for investigating different aspects of human manual control with sensory feedback. PMID:25420268

  9. SimSup's Loop: A Control Theory Approach to Spacecraft Operator Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Brandon Dewain; Crocker, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    Immersive simulation is a staple of training for many complex system operators, including astronauts and ground operators of spacecraft. However, while much has been written about simulators, simulation facilities, and operator certification programs, the topic of how one develops simulation scenarios to train a spacecraft operator is relatively understated in the literature. In this paper, an approach is presented for using control theory as the basis for developing the immersive simulation scenarios for a spacecraft operator training program. The operator is effectively modeled as a high level controller of lower level hardware and software control loops that affect a select set of system state variables. Simulation scenarios are derived from a STAMP-based hazard analysis of the operator's high and low level control loops. The immersive simulation aspect of the overall training program is characterized by selecting a set of scenarios that expose the operator to the various inadequate control actions that stem from control flaws and inadequate control executions in the different sections of the typical control loop. Results from the application of this approach to the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) mission are provided through an analysis of the simulation scenarios used for operator training and the actual anomalies that occurred during the mission. The simulation scenarios and inflight anomalies are mapped to specific control flaws and inadequate control executions in the different sections of the typical control loop to illustrate the characteristics of anomalies arising from the different sections of the typical control loop (and why it is important for operators to have exposure to these characteristics). Additionally, similarities between the simulation scenarios and inflight anomalies are highlighted to make the case that the simulation scenarios prepared the operators for the mission.

  10. Experimental Verification of Application of Looped System and Centralized Voltage Control in a Distribution System with Renewable Energy Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanai, Yuji; Hayashi, Yasuhiro; Matsuki, Junya

    The line voltage control in a distribution network is one of the most important issues for a penetration of Renewable Energy Sources (RES). A loop distribution network configuration is an effective solution to resolve voltage and distribution loss issues concerned about a penetration of RES. In this paper, for a loop distribution network, the authors propose a voltage control method based on tap change control of LRT and active/reactive power control of RES. The tap change control of LRT takes a major role of the proposed voltage control. Additionally the active/reactive power control of RES supports the voltage control when voltage deviation from the upper or lower voltage limit is unavoidable. The proposed method adopts SCADA system based on measured data from IT switches, which are sectionalizing switch with sensor installed in distribution feeder. In order to check the validity of the proposed voltage control method, experimental simulations using a distribution system analog simulator “ANSWER” are carried out. In the simulations, the voltage maintenance capability in the normal and the emergency is evaluated.

  11. Combining Charge Couple Devices and Rate Sensors for the Feedforward Control System of a Charge Coupled Device Tracking Loop.

    PubMed

    Tang, Tao; Tian, Jing; Zhong, Daijun; Fu, Chengyu

    2016-01-01

    A rate feed forward control-based sensor fusion is proposed to improve the closed-loop performance for a charge couple device (CCD) tracking loop. The target trajectory is recovered by combining line of sight (LOS) errors from the CCD and the angular rate from a fiber-optic gyroscope (FOG). A Kalman filter based on the Singer acceleration model utilizes the reconstructive target trajectory to estimate the target velocity. Different from classical feed forward control, additive feedback loops are inevitably added to the original control loops due to the fact some closed-loop information is used. The transfer function of the Kalman filter in the frequency domain is built for analyzing the closed loop stability. The bandwidth of the Kalman filter is the major factor affecting the control stability and close-loop performance. Both simulations and experiments are provided to demonstrate the benefits of the proposed algorithm. PMID:27347970

  12. Combining Charge Couple Devices and Rate Sensors for the Feedforward Control System of a Charge Coupled Device Tracking Loop

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Tao; Tian, Jing; Zhong, Daijun; Fu, Chengyu

    2016-01-01

    A rate feed forward control-based sensor fusion is proposed to improve the closed-loop performance for a charge couple device (CCD) tracking loop. The target trajectory is recovered by combining line of sight (LOS) errors from the CCD and the angular rate from a fiber-optic gyroscope (FOG). A Kalman filter based on the Singer acceleration model utilizes the reconstructive target trajectory to estimate the target velocity. Different from classical feed forward control, additive feedback loops are inevitably added to the original control loops due to the fact some closed-loop information is used. The transfer function of the Kalman filter in the frequency domain is built for analyzing the closed loop stability. The bandwidth of the Kalman filter is the major factor affecting the control stability and close-loop performance. Both simulations and experiments are provided to demonstrate the benefits of the proposed algorithm. PMID:27347970

  13. Closed-loop control of anesthesia: a primer for anesthesiologists.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Guy A; Ansermino, J Mark

    2013-11-01

    Feedback control is ubiquitous in nature and engineering and has revolutionized safety in fields from space travel to the automobile. In anesthesia, automated feedback control holds the promise of limiting the effects on performance of individual patient variability, optimizing the workload of the anesthesiologist, increasing the time spent in a more desirable clinical state, and ultimately improving the safety and quality of anesthesia care. The benefits of control systems will not be realized without widespread support from the health care team in close collaboration with industrial partners. In this review, we provide an introduction to the established field of control systems research for the everyday anesthesiologist. We introduce important concepts such as feedback and modeling specific to control problems and provide insight into design requirements for guaranteeing the safety and performance of feedback control systems. We focus our discussion on the optimization of anesthetic drug administration. PMID:23835456

  14. Closed-loop motor control using high-speed fiber optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Reginald (Inventor); Rodriquiz, Dagobert (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A closed-loop control system for controlling the operation of one or more servo motors or other controllable devices is described. The system employs a fiber optics link immune to electromagnetic interference, for transmission of control signals from a controller or controllers at a remote station to the power electronics located in proximity to the motors or other devices at the local station. At the remote station the electrical control signals are time-multiplexed, converted to a formatted serial bit stream, and converted to light signals for transmission over a single fiber of the fiber optics link. At the local station, the received optical signals are reconstructed as electrical control signals for the controlled motors or other devices. At the local station, an encoder sensor linked to the driven device generates encoded feedback signals which provide information as to a condition of the controlled device. The encoded signals are placed in a formatted serial bit stream, multiplexed, and transmitted as optical signals over a second fiber of the fiber optic link which closes the control loop of the closed-loop motor controller. The encoded optical signals received at the remote station are demultiplexed, reconstructed and coupled to the controller(s) as electrical feedback signals.

  15. Clinical requirements for closed-loop control systems.

    PubMed

    Clarke, William L; Renard, Eric

    2012-03-01

    Closed-loop (CL) therapy systems should be safe, efficacious, and easily manageable for type 1 diabetes mellitus patient use. For the first two clinical requirements, noninferiority and superiority criteria must be determined based on current conventional and intensive therapy outcomes. Current frequencies of hypoglycemia and diabetic ketoacidosis are reviewed and safety expectations for CL therapy systems are proposed. Glycosylated hemoglobin levels lower than current American Diabetes Association recommendations for different age groups are proposed as superiority criteria. Measures of glycemic variability are described and the recording of blood glucose levels as percentages within, above, and below a target range are suggested as reasonable alternatives to sophisticated statistical analyses. It is also suggested that Diabetes Quality of Life and Fear of Hypoglycemia surveys should be used to track psychobehavioral outcomes. Manageability requirements for safe and effective clinical management of CL systems are worth being underscored. The weakest part of the infusion system remains the catheter, which is exposed to variable and under-delivery incidents. Detection methods are needed to warn both the system and the patient about altered insulin delivery, including internal pressure and flow alarms. Glucose monitor sensor accuracy is another requirement; it includes the definition of conditions that lead to capillary glucose measurement, eventually followed by sensor recalibration or replacement. The crucial clinical requirement will be a thorough definition of the situations when the patient needs to move from CL to manual management of insulin delivery, or inversely can switch back to CL after a requested interruption. Instructions about these actions will constitute a major part of the education process of the patients before using CL systems and contribute to the manageability of these systems. PMID:22538159

  16. Use of an open-loop system to increase physical activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of an open-loop system that reinforces physical activity with TV watching to increase children’s physical activity. Non-overweight, sedentary boys and girls (8-12 y) were randomized to a group that received feedback of activity counts + reinforcement for physic...

  17. Pilot-in-the-loop analysis of propulsive-only flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Hwei-Lan; Biezad, Daniel J.

    1992-01-01

    Longitudinal control system architectures which directly couple flight stick motions to throttle commands for a multi-engine aircraft are presented. This coupling enables positive attitude control with complete failure of the flight control system. The architectures chosen vary from simple feedback gains to classical lead-lag compensators with and without prefilters. Each architecture is reviewed for its appropriateness for piloted flight. The control systems are then analyzed with pilot-in-the-loop metrics related to bandwidth required for landing. Results indicate that current and proposed bandwidth requirements should be modified for throttles-only flight control. Pilot ratings consistently showed better ratings than predicted by analysis. Recommendations are made for more robust design and implementation. The use of quantitative feedback theory for compensator design is discussed. Although simple and effective augmented control can be achieved in a wide variety of failed configurations, a few configuration characteristics are dominant for pilot-in-the-loop control.

  18. Closed-loop controller for chest compressions based on coronary perfusion pressure: a computer simulation study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunfei; Zhang, Guang; Wu, Taihu; Zhan, Ningbo; Wang, Yaling

    2016-03-01

    High-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation contributes to cardiac arrest survival. The traditional chest compression (CC) standard, which neglects individual differences, uses unified standards for compression depth and compression rate in practice. In this study, an effective and personalized CC method for automatic mechanical compression devices is provided. We rebuild Charles F. Babbs' human circulation model with a coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) simulation module and propose a closed-loop controller based on a fuzzy control algorithm for CCs, which adjusts the CC depth according to the CPP. Compared with a traditional proportion-integration-differentiation (PID) controller, the performance of the fuzzy controller is evaluated in computer simulation studies. The simulation results demonstrate that the fuzzy closed-loop controller results in shorter regulation time, fewer oscillations and smaller overshoot than traditional PID controllers and outperforms the traditional PID controller for CPP regulation and maintenance. PMID:26142111

  19. Camera Based Closed Loop Control for Partial Penetration Welding of Overlap Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, F.; Heider, A.; Weber, R.; Graf, T.; Blug, A.; Carl, D.; Höfler, H.; Nicolosi, L.; Tetzlaff, R.

    Welding of overlap joints with partial penetration in automotive applications is a challenging process, since the laser power must be set very precisely to achieve a proper connection between the two joining partners without damaging the backside of the sheet stack. Even minor changes in welding conditions can lead to bad results. To overcome this problem a camera based closed loop control for partial penetration welding of overlap joints was developed. With this closed loop control it is possible to weld such configurations with a stable process result even under changing welding conditions.

  20. Closed-Loop HIRF Experiments Performed on a Fault Tolerant Flight Control Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcastro, Celeste M.

    1997-01-01

    ABSTRACT Closed-loop HIRF experiments were performed on a fault tolerant flight control computer (FCC) at the NASA Langley Research Center. The FCC used in the experiments was a quad-redundant flight control computer executing B737 Autoland control laws. The FCC was placed in one of the mode-stirred reverberation chambers in the HIRF Laboratory and interfaced to a computer simulation of the B737 flight dynamics, engines, sensors, actuators, and atmosphere in the Closed-Loop Systems Laboratory. Disturbances to the aircraft associated with wind gusts and turbulence were simulated during tests. Electrical isolation between the FCC under test and the simulation computer was achieved via a fiber optic interface for the analog and discrete signals. Closed-loop operation of the FCC enabled flight dynamics and atmospheric disturbances affecting the aircraft to be represented during tests. Upset was induced in the FCC as a result of exposure to HIRF, and the effect of upset on the simulated flight of the aircraft was observed and recorded. This paper presents a description of these closed- loop HIRF experiments, upset data obtained from the FCC during these experiments, and closed-loop effects on the simulated flight of the aircraft.

  1. Multi-Evaporator Miniature Loop Heat Pipe for Small Spacecraft Thermal Control. Part 2; Validation Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Ottenstein, Laura; Douglas, Donya; Hoang, Triem

    2010-01-01

    Under NASA s New Millennium Program Space Technology 8 (ST 8) Project, Goddard Space Fight Center has conducted a Thermal Loop experiment to advance the maturity of the Thermal Loop technology from proof of concept to prototype demonstration in a relevant environment , i.e. from a technology readiness level (TRL) of 3 to a level of 6. The thermal Loop is an advanced thermal control system consisting of a miniature loop heat pipe (MLHP) with multiple evaporators and multiple condensers designed for future small system applications requiring low mass, low power, and compactness. The MLHP retains all features of state-of-the-art loop heat pipes (LHPs) and offers additional advantages to enhance the functionality, performance, versatility, and reliability of the system. An MLHP breadboard was built and tested in the laboratory and thermal vacuum environments for the TRL 4 and TRL 5 validations, respectively, and an MLHP proto-flight unit was built and tested in a thermal vacuum chamber for the TRL 6 validation. In addition, an analytical model was developed to simulate the steady state and transient behaviors of the MLHP during various validation tests. The MLHP demonstrated excellent performance during experimental tests and the analytical model predictions agreed very well with experimental data. All success criteria at various TRLs were met. Hence, the Thermal Loop technology has reached a TRL of 6. This paper presents the validation results, both experimental and analytical, of such a technology development effort.

  2. THE ROLE OF MAGNETIC TOPOLOGY IN THE HEATING OF ACTIVE REGION CORONAL LOOPS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.-Y.; Reeves, Katharine K.; Korreck, K. E.; Golub, L.; DeLuca, E. E.; Barnes, Graham; Leka, K. D.

    2010-11-10

    We investigate the evolution of coronal loop emission in the context of the coronal magnetic field topology. New modeling techniques allow us to investigate the magnetic field structure and energy release in active regions (ARs). Using these models and high-resolution multi-wavelength coronal observations from the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer and the X-ray Telescope on Hinode, we are able to establish a relationship between the light curves of coronal loops and their associated magnetic topologies for NOAA AR 10963. We examine loops that show both transient and steady emission, and we find that loops that show many transient brightenings are located in domains associated with a high number of separators. This topology provides an environment for continual impulsive heating events through magnetic reconnection at the separators. A loop with relatively constant X-ray and EUV emission, on the other hand, is located in domains that are not associated with separators. This result implies that larger-scale magnetic field reconnections are not involved in heating plasma in these regions, and the heating in these loops must come from another mechanism, such as small-scale reconnections (i.e., nanoflares) or wave heating. Additionally, we find that loops that undergo repeated transient brightenings are associated with separators that have enhanced free energy. In contrast, we find one case of an isolated transient brightening that seems to be associated with separators with a smaller free energy.

  3. THE ROLE OF ACTIVE REGION LOOP GEOMETRY. I. HOW CAN IT AFFECT CORONAL SEISMOLOGY?

    SciTech Connect

    Selwa, M.; Ofman, L.; Solanki, S. K. E-mail: leon.ofman@nasa.gov

    2011-01-01

    We present numerical results of coronal loop oscillation excitation using a three-dimensional (3D) MHD model of an idealized active region (AR) field. The AR is initialized as a potential dipole magnetic configuration with gravitationally stratified density and contains a loop with a higher density than its surroundings. We study different ways of excitation of vertical kink oscillations of this loop by velocity: as an initial condition, and as an impulsive excitation with a pulse of a given position, duration, and amplitude. We vary the geometry of the loop in the 3D MHD model and find that it affects both the period of oscillations and the synthetic observations (difference images) that we get from oscillations. Due to the overestimated effective length of the loop in the case of loops which have maximum separation between their legs above the footpoints (>50% of observed loops), the magnetic field obtained from coronal seismology can also be overestimated. The 3D MHD model shows how the accuracy of magnetic field strength determined from coronal seismology can be improved. We study the damping mechanism of the oscillations and find that vertical kink waves in 3D stratified geometry are damped mainly due to wave leakage in the horizontal direction.

  4. Field Test of Boiler Primary Loop Temperature Controller

    SciTech Connect

    Glanville, P.; Rowley, P.; Schroeder, D.; Brand, L.

    2014-09-01

    Beyond these initial system efficiency upgrades are an emerging class of Advanced Load Monitoring (ALM) aftermarket controllers that dynamically respond to the boiler load, with claims of 10% to 30% of fuel savings over a heating season. For hydronic boilers specifically, these devices perform load monitoring, with continuous measurement of supply and in some cases return water temperatures. Energy savings from these ALM controllers are derived from dynamic management of the boiler differential, where a microprocessor with memory of past boiler cycles prevents the boiler from firing for a period of time, to limit cycling losses and inefficient operation during perceived low load conditions. These differ from OTR controllers, which vary boiler setpoint temperatures with ambient conditions while maintaining a fixed differential. PARR installed and monitored the performance of one type of ALM controller, the M2G from Greffen Systems, at multifamily sites in the city of Chicago and its suburb Cary, IL, both with existing OTR control. Results show that energy savings depend on the degree to which boilers are over-sized for their load, represented by cycling rates. Also savings vary over the heating season with cycling rates, with greater savings observed in shoulder months. Over the monitoring period, over-sized boilers at one site showed reductions in cycling and energy consumption in line with prior laboratory studies, while less over-sized boilers at another site showed muted savings.

  5. Closed-loop adaptive control for torsional micromirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ke-Min; Wang, Yi-Chih; Yeh, Chih-Hsien; Chen, Rongshun

    2004-01-01

    An adaptive control scheme to achieve accurate positioning and trajectory tracking of torsional micromirror is presented in this study. The torsional micromirror is fabricated by using surface micromachining processes, in which phosphorusdoped polysilicon is employed as the structure layer as well as the bottom electrode. Generally, every fabrication step contributes to imperfections in micromirror. The proposed adaptive self-tuning controller has advantages of on-line compensating parameter variations or model uncertainty of the torsional micromirror, resulting from fabrication imperfections that produce asymmetric structures, misalignment of actuation mechanism, and deviations of the center of mass from the geometric center. In our design, the amount of detection of differential capacitance between the left and right electrodes at the femtofarad (fF) level is utilized as feedback signals. Simulation results show that the designed controller has better transient response compared to the PID control scheme. The micromirror can follow the reference trajectory (5 kHz) with acceptable error in several microseconds, thus the convergence of the controller is confirmed. Furthermore, the unknown model parameters can be identified correctly while the so-called persistent excitation condition is satisfied.

  6. Facilitation of polymer looping and giant polymer diffusivity in crowded solutions of active particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jaeoh; Cherstvy, Andrey G.; Kim, Won Kyu; Metzler, Ralf

    2015-11-01

    We study the dynamics of polymer chains in a bath of self-propelled particles (SPP) by extensive Langevin dynamics simulations in a two-dimensional model system. Specifically, we analyse the polymer looping properties versus the SPP activity and investigate how the presence of the active particles alters the chain conformational statistics. We find that SPPs tend to extend flexible polymer chains, while they rather compactify stiffer semiflexible polymers, in agreement with previous results. Here we show that higher activities of SPPs yield a higher effective temperature of the bath and thus facilitate the looping kinetics of a passive polymer chain. We explicitly compute the looping probability and looping time in a wide range of the model parameters. We also analyse the motion of a monomeric tracer particle and the polymer’s centre of mass in the presence of the active particles in terms of the time averaged mean squared displacement, revealing a giant diffusivity enhancement for the polymer chain via SPP pooling. Our results are applicable to rationalising the dimensions and looping kinetics of biopolymers at constantly fluctuating and often actively driven conditions inside biological cells or in suspensions of active colloidal particles or bacteria cells.

  7. Field Test of Boiler Primary Loop Temperature Controller

    SciTech Connect

    Glanville, P.; Rowley, P.; Schroeder, D.; Brand, L.

    2014-09-01

    Beyond these initial system efficiency upgrades are an emerging class of Advanced Load Monitoring (ALM) aftermarket controllers that dynamically respond to the boiler load, with claims of 10% to 30% of fuel savings over a heating season. For hydronic boilers specifically, these devices perform load monitoring, with continuous measurement of supply and, in some cases, return water temperatures. Energy savings from these ALM controllers are derived from dynamic management of the boiler differential, where a microprocessor with memory of past boiler cycles prevents the boiler from firing for a period of time, to limit cycling losses and inefficient operation during perceived low load conditions. These differ from OTR controllers, which vary boiler setpoint temperatures with ambient conditions while maintaining a fixed differential.

  8. Realization of tin freezing point using a loop heat pipe-based hydraulic temperature control technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joung, Wukchul; Gam, Kee Sool; Kim, Yong-Gyoo

    2015-10-01

    In this work, the freezing point of tin (Sn FP) was realized by inside nucleation where the supercooling of tin and the reheating of the sample after the nucleation were achieved without extracting the cell from an isothermal apparatus. To this end, a novel hydraulic temperature control technique, which was based on the thermo-hydraulic characteristics of a pressure-controlled loop heat pipe (LHP), was employed to provide a slow cooling of the sample for deep supercooling and fast reheating after nucleation to minimize the amount of initial freeze of the sample. The required temperature controls were achieved by the active pressure control of a control gas inside the compensation chamber of the pressure-controlled LHP, and slow cooling at  -0.05 K min-1 for the deep supercooling of tin and fast heating at 2 K min-1 for reheating the sample after nucleation was attained. Based on this hydraulic temperature control technique, the nucleation of tin was realized at supercooling of around 19 K, and a satisfactorily fast reheating of the sample to the plateau-producing temperature (i.e. 0.5 K below the Sn FP) was achieved without any temperature overshoots of the isothermal region. The inside-nucleated Sn FP showed many desirable features compared to the Sn FP realized by the conventional outside nucleation method. The longer freezing plateaus and the better immersion characteristics of the Sn FP were obtained by inside nucleation, and the measured freezing temperature of the inside-nucleated Sn FP was as much as 0.37 mK higher than the outside-nucleated Sn FP with an expanded uncertainty of 0.19 mK. Details on the experiment are provided and explanations for the observed differences are discussed.

  9. Apparatus for externally controlled closed-loop feedback digital epitaxy

    DOEpatents

    Eres, D.; Sharp, J.W.

    1996-07-30

    A method and apparatus for digital epitaxy are disclosed. The apparatus includes a pulsed gas delivery assembly that supplies gaseous material to a substrate to form an adsorption layer of the gaseous material on the substrate. Structure is provided for measuring the isothermal desorption spectrum of the growth surface to monitor the active sites which are available for adsorption. The vacuum chamber housing the substrate facilitates evacuation of the gaseous material from the area adjacent the substrate following exposure. In use, digital epitaxy is achieved by exposing a substrate to a pulse of gaseous material to form an adsorption layer of the material on the substrate. The active sites on the substrate are monitored during the formation of the adsorption layer to determine if all the active sites have been filled. Once the active sites have been filled on the growth surface of the substrate, the pulse of gaseous material is terminated. The unreacted portion of the gas pulse is evacuated by continuous pumping. Subsequently, a second pulse is applied when availability of active sites is determined by studying the isothermal desorption spectrum. These steps are repeated until a thin film of sufficient thickness is produced. 5 figs.

  10. Apparatus for externally controlled closed-loop feedback digital epitaxy

    DOEpatents

    Eres, Djula; Sharp, Jeffrey W.

    1996-01-01

    A method and apparatus for digital epitaxy. The apparatus includes a pulsed gas delivery assembly that supplies gaseous material to a substrate to form an adsorption layer of the gaseous material on the substrate. Structure is provided for measuring the isothermal desorption spectrum of the growth surface to monitor the active sites which are available for adsorption. The vacuum chamber housing the substrate facilitates evacuation of the gaseous material from the area adjacent the substrate following exposure. In use, digital epitaxy is achieved by exposing a substrate to a pulse of gaseous material to form an adsorption layer of the material on the substrate. The active sites on the substrate are monitored during the formation of the adsorption layer to determine if all the active sites have been filled. Once the active sites have been filled on the growth surface of the substrate, the pulse of gaseous material is terminated. The unreacted portion of the gas pulse is evacuated by continuous pumping. Subsequently, a second pulse is applied when availability of active sites is determined by studying the isothermal desorption spectrum. These steps are repeated until a thin film of sufficient thickness is produced.

  11. A closed-loop photon beam control study for the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Portmann, G.; Bengtsson, J.

    1993-05-01

    The third generation Advanced Light Source (ALS) will produce extremely bright photon beams using undulators and wigglers. In order to position the photon beams accurate to the micron level, a closed-loop feedback system is being developed. Using photon position monitors and dipole corrector magnets, a closed-loop system can automatically compensate for modeling uncertainties and exogenous disturbances. The following paper will present a dynamics model for the perturbations of the closed orbit of the electron beam in the ALS storage ring including the vacuum chamber magnetic field penetration effects. Using this reference model, two closed-loop feedback algorithms will be compared -- a classical PI controller and a two degree-of-freedom approach. The two degree-of-freedom method provides superior disturbance rejection while maintaining the desired performance goals. Both methods will address the need to gain schedule the controller due to the time varying dynamics introduced by changing field strengths when scanning the insertion devices.

  12. Staying competitive with advanced technologies for closed loop supervisory control

    SciTech Connect

    Radl, B.J.; Roland, W.B.; Kish, B.

    1996-05-01

    The following paper discusses the experience gained from installing a neural network-based supervisory control system for selected combustion parameters at Penn Power`s New Castle station. The primary goal of the program was to reduce NO{sub x} emissions, while maintaining or improving unit heat rate. The advanced technologies used to implement supervisory control include: Neural Networks, Genetic Algorithms, Pattern Recognition and Data Visualization. The program was jointly funded by Ohio Edison, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Pegasus Technologies Corporation, under a National Industrial Competitiveness through Energy, Environment and Economics (NICE) grant program. The system is installed on a 1950s vintage Babcock & Wilcox front-fired (four levels) drum unit with a gross generation capacity of 146 MW The program linked a Unix workstation, where the supervisory control system resides, with a Network 90 Digital Control System (DCS). The system uses a neural network-based nonlinear model of the combustion process to interactively adjust setpoints and bias settings in the DCS. The system performs many {open_quotes}what if{close_quotes} simulations to optimize setpoints for the current operating conditions. The neural network model is updated periodically, learning from the most recent data. New setpoints are generated accordingly and downloaded into the DCS. Setpoint and bias adjustments are constrained within the original control system limits. Conditioning algorithms were developed to handle the inherently {open_quote}noisy{close_quote} input data and to provide stable output recommendations. Test results and parameters used for combustion optimization are summarized in this paper.

  13. Design of an Implicit GMV-PID Controller Using Closed Loop Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakitani, Shin; Hosokawa, Kei; Yamamoto, Toru

    In industrial processes, PID control has been applied to a lot of real systems. The control performance strongly depends on PID parameters. Although, some schemes for tuning PID parameters have been proposed, however, these schemes need system parameters which are estimated by system identification in order to calculate PID parameters. On the other hand, model-free controller design schemes represented by VRFT or FRIT which have received much attention in last few years. These methods can calculate control parameters using closed-loop data and are expected to reduce computational costs. In this paper, a type of implicit PID controllers using closed-loop data is proposed. According to the proposed method, PID parameters are calculated based on the implicit GMVC. Moreover, the control performance can be suitably adjusted by only user-specified parameter. The effectiveness of the proposed method is numerically and experimentally evaluated.

  14. A closed-loop anesthetic delivery system for real-time control of burst suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberman, Max Y.; Ching, ShiNung; Chemali, Jessica; Brown, Emery N.

    2013-08-01

    Objective. There is growing interest in using closed-loop anesthetic delivery (CLAD) systems to automate control of brain states (sedation, unconsciousness and antinociception) in patients receiving anesthesia care. The accuracy and reliability of these systems can be improved by using as control signals electroencephalogram (EEG) markers for which the neurophysiological links to the anesthetic-induced brain states are well established. Burst suppression, in which bursts of electrical activity alternate with periods of quiescence or suppression, is a well-known, readily discernible EEG marker of profound brain inactivation and unconsciousness. This pattern is commonly maintained when anesthetics are administered to produce a medically-induced coma for cerebral protection in patients suffering from brain injuries or to arrest brain activity in patients having uncontrollable seizures. Although the coma may be required for several hours or days, drug infusion rates are managed inefficiently by manual adjustment. Our objective is to design a CLAD system for burst suppression control to automate management of medically-induced coma. Approach. We establish a CLAD system to control burst suppression consisting of: a two-dimensional linear system model relating the anesthetic brain level to the EEG dynamics; a new control signal, the burst suppression probability (BSP) defining the instantaneous probability of suppression; the BSP filter, a state-space algorithm to estimate the BSP from EEG recordings; a proportional-integral controller; and a system identification procedure to estimate the model and controller parameters. Main results. We demonstrate reliable performance of our system in simulation studies of burst suppression control using both propofol and etomidate in rodent experiments based on Vijn and Sneyd, and in human experiments based on the Schnider pharmacokinetic model for propofol. Using propofol, we further demonstrate that our control system reliably

  15. Inner loop flight control for the High-Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Brett A.

    1994-01-01

    High-speed aerospace vehicles which employ high strength, light weight, yet deformable materials may exhibit significant interaction between the rigid-body and vibrational dynamics. Preliminary High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configurations are a prime example. Traditionally, separate control systems have been used to augment the rigid-body and vibrational dynamics. In the HSCT arena, the highly coupled motions may not allow this design freedom. The research activity addresses two specific issues associated with the design and development of an integrated flight control system (FCS) for HSCT configurations, which are discussed next. The HSCT is expected to have a short period instability at subsonic speeds. Flight vehicles with this characteristic (i.e., F-16, F-22, X-29, Space Shuttle) are stabilized with what is called a superaugmented pitch rate loop. One concern is 'Will this stability augmentation logic work for a HSCT?' Studies show that an idealized pitch rate design would be acceptable, but is not realistic. Investigations using a contaminated pitch rate design reveal serious hurdles to overcome in the FCS design. Mounting location for the pitch rate sensor is critical. Results indicate a forward location leads to destabilizing pick-up of aeroelastic modes, while aft locations lead to undesirable coupling of the dominate pitch mode with the first aeroelastic mode. Intermediate locations for the sensor may not be acceptable. The source of the problem is the presence of low frequency aeroelastic modes in HSCT configurations, which are not present in vehicles currently using the superaugmented logic. To say the least, a conventional superaugmented pitch rate loop strategy may have undesirable characteristics. An unconventional strategy, which attempts to eliminate the above deficiencies by blending several pitch rate signals, indicates an improvement in the FCS architecture feasibility, but is still lacking in some respects. The HSCT configuration does not

  16. Assessing Students' Learning of Internal Controls: Closing the Loop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amer, T. S.; Mohrweis, Lawrence C.

    2009-01-01

    This study describes the multifaceted components of an assessment process. The paper explains a novel approach in which an advisory council participated in a "fun," hands-on activity to rank-order learning outcomes. The top ranked learning competency, as identified by the advisory council, was the need for students to gain a better…

  17. Controlled Chemistry Helium High Temperature Materials Test Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Richard N. WRight

    2005-08-01

    A system to test aging and environmental effects in flowing helium with impurity content representative of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) has been designed and assembled. The system will be used to expose microstructure analysis coupons and mechanical test specimens for up to 5,000 hours in helium containing potentially oxidizing or carburizing impurities controlled to parts per million levels. Impurity levels in the flowing helium are controlled through a feedback mechanism based on gas chromatography measurements of the gas chemistry at the inlet and exit from a high temperature retort containing the test materials. Initial testing will focus on determining the nature and extent of combined aging and environmental effects on microstructure and elevated temperature mechanical properties of alloys proposed for structural applications in the NGNP, including Inconel 617 and Haynes 230.

  18. An innovative strategy for open loop control of hot deformation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malas, J. C.; Irwin, R. D.; Grandhi, R. V.

    1993-10-01

    A new strategy for systematically calculating near optimal control parameters for hot deformation processes is presented in this article. This approach is based on modern control theory and involves deriving state-space models directly from available material behavior and hot deformation process models. Two basic stages of analysis and optimization are established in this strategy for nonlinear, open loop control system design for producing required microstructural characteristics, uniformity of deformation and temperature distribution, and other important physical requirements of hot worked products.

  19. Research developing closed loop roll control for magnetic balance systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Covert, E. E.; Haldeman, C. W.

    1981-01-01

    Computer inputs were interfaced to the magnetic balance outputs to provide computer position control and data acquisition. The use of parameter identification of a means of determining dynamic characteristics was investigated. The thyraton and motor generator power supplies for the pitch and yaw degrees of freedom were repaired. Topics covered include: choice of a method for handling dynamic system data; applications to the magnetic balance; the computer interface; and wind tunnel tests, results, and error analysis.

  20. Hardware Evolution of Closed-Loop Controller Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwaltney, David; Ferguson, Ian

    2002-01-01

    Poster presentation will outline on-going efforts at NASA, MSFC to employ various Evolvable Hardware experimental platforms in the evolution of digital and analog circuitry for application to automatic control. Included will be information concerning the application of commercially available hardware and software along with the use of the JPL developed FPTA2 integrated circuit and supporting JPL developed software. Results to date will be presented.

  1. A Possible Mechanism for Redox Control of Human Neuroglobin Activity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb) promotes neuron survival under hypoxic/ischemic conditions. In vivo and in vitro assays provide evidence for redox-regulated functioning of Ngb. On the basis of X-ray crystal structures and our MD simulations, a mechanism for redox control of human Ngb (hNgb) activity via the influence of the CD loop on the active site is proposed. We provide evidence that the CD loop undergoes a strand-to-helix transition when the external environment becomes sufficiently oxidizing, and that this CD loop conformational transition causes critical restructuring of the active site. We postulate that the strand-to-helix mechanics of the CD loop allows hNgb to utilize the lability of Cys46/Cys55 disulfide bonding and of the Tyr44/His64/heme propionate interaction network for redox-controlled functioning of hNgb. PMID:24855999

  2. Reliable and Affordable Control Systems Active Combustor Pattern Factor Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarty, Bob; Tomondi, Chris; McGinley, Ray

    2004-01-01

    Active, closed-loop control of combustor pattern factor is a cooperative effort between Honeywell (formerly AlliedSignal) Engines and Systems and the NASA Glenn Research Center to reduce emissions and turbine-stator vane temperature variations, thereby enhancing engine performance and life, and reducing direct operating costs. Total fuel flow supplied to the engine is established by the speed/power control, but the distribution to individual atomizers will be controlled by the Active Combustor Pattern Factor Control (ACPFC). This system consist of three major components: multiple, thin-film sensors located on the turbine-stator vanes; fuel-flow modulators for individual atomizers; and control logic and algorithms within the electronic control.

  3. A unified double-loop multi-scale control strategy for NMP integrating-unstable systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seer, Qiu Han; Nandong, Jobrun

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a new control strategy which unifies the direct and indirect multi-scale control schemes via a double-loop control structure. This unified control strategy is proposed for controlling a class of highly nonminimum-phase processes having both integrating and unstable modes. This type of systems is often encountered in fed-batch fermentation processes which are very difficult to stabilize via most of the existing well-established control strategies. A systematic design procedure is provided where its applicability is demonstrated via a numerical example.

  4. TRITIUM LABORATORY, TRA666, INTERIOR. COOLANT LOOP PIPING DETAIL AND CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TRITIUM LABORATORY, TRA-666, INTERIOR. COOLANT LOOP PIPING DETAIL AND CONTROL VALVE EQUIPMENT ALONG EAST WALL. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD30-2-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 6/2001 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. Open-loop quantum control as a resource for secure communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastorello, Davide

    2016-05-01

    Properties of unitary time evolution of quantum systems can be applied to define quantum cryptographic protocols. Dynamics of a qubit can be exploited as a data encryption/decryption procedure by means of timed measurements, implementation of an open-loop control scheme over a qubit increases robustness of a protocol employing this principle.

  6. Phase-locked loop with controlled phase slippage

    DOEpatents

    Mestha, L.K.

    1994-03-29

    A system for synchronizing a first subsystem controlled by a changing frequency sweeping from a first frequency to a second frequency, with a second subsystem operating at a steady state second frequency is described. Trip plan parameters are calculated in advance to determine the phase relationship between the frequencies of the first subsystem and second subsystem in order to obtain synchronism at the end of the frequency sweep of the first subsystem. During the time in which the frequency of the first subsystem is sweeping from the first frequency to the second frequency, the phase locked system compares the actual phase difference with the trip plan phase difference and incrementally changes the sweep frequency in a manner so that phase lock is achieved when the first subsystem reaches a frequency substantially identical to that of the second subsystem. 10 figures.

  7. Phase-locked loop with controlled phase slippage

    SciTech Connect

    Mestha, Lingappa K.

    1994-01-01

    A system for synchronizing a first subsystem controlled by a changing frequency sweeping from a first frequency to a second frequency, with a second subsystem operating at a steady state second frequency. Trip plan parameters are calculated in advance to determine the phase relationship between the frequencies of the first subsystem and second subsystem in order to obtain synchronism at the end of the frequency sweep of the first subsystem. During the time in which the frequency of the first subsystem is sweeping from the first frequency to the second frequency, the phase locked system compares the actual phase difference with the trip plan phase difference and incrementally changes the sweep frequency in a manner so that phase lock is achieved when the first subsystem reaches a frequency substantially identical to that of the second subsystem.

  8. In Silico Closed-Loop Control Validation Studies for Optimal Insulin Delivery in Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zavitsanou, Stamatina; Mantalaris, Athanasios; Georgiadis, Michael C; Pistikopoulos, Efstratios N

    2015-10-01

    This study presents a general closed-loop control strategy for optimal insulin delivery in type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM). The proposed control strategy aims toward an individualized optimal insulin delivery that consists of a patient-specific model predictive controller, a state estimator, a personalized scheduling level, and an open-loop optimization problem subjected to patient-specific process model and constraints. This control strategy can be also modified to address the case of limited patient data availability resulting in an "approximation" control strategy. Both strategies are validated in silico in the presence of predefined and unknown meal disturbances using both a novel mathematical model of glucose-insulin interactions and the UVa/Padova Simulator model as a virtual patient. The robustness of the control performance is evaluated under several conditions such as skipped meals, variability in the meal time, and metabolic uncertainty. The simulation results of the closed-loop validation studies indicate that the proposed control strategies can potentially achieve improved glycaemic control. PMID:25935026

  9. Magnetic field-controlled hysteresis loop bias in orthogonal exchange-spring coupling composite magnetic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jun; Yu, Tian; Pan, Rui; Zhang, Qin-Tong; Liu, Pan; Naganuma, Hiroshi; Oogane, Mikihiko; Ando, Yasuo; Han, Xiufeng

    2016-06-01

    The exchange bias (EB) is an effective fundamental and applicational method to realize magnetic hysteresis loop shifting. However, further manipulation of EB unidirectional anisotropy is difficult after setup using either field deposition or post-annealing. In this work, we experimentally show a new approach to control the magnetic hysteresis loop bias in a [Co(0.2)/Pd(1)]5/CoFeB orthogonal exchange-spring (ES) coupling system, where the direction and strength of unidirectional anisotropy can be easily manipulated by applying an external magnetic field.

  10. Tuning of active vibration controllers for ACTEX by genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Moon K.; Denoyer, Keith K.

    1999-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the optimal tuning of digitally programmable analog controllers on the ACTEX-1 smart structures flight experiment. The programmable controllers for each channel include a third order Strain Rate Feedback (SRF) controller, a fifth order SRF controller, a second order Positive Position Feedback (PPF) controller, and a fourth order PPF controller. Optimal manual tuning of several control parameters can be a difficult task even though the closed-loop control characteristics of each controller are well known. Hence, the automatic tuning of individual control parameters using Genetic Algorithms is proposed in this paper. The optimal control parameters of each control law are obtained by imposing a constraint on the closed-loop frequency response functions using the ACTEX mathematical model. The tuned control parameters are then uploaded to the ACTEX electronic control electronics and experiments on the active vibration control are carried out in space. The experimental results on ACTEX will be presented.

  11. Package architecture and component design for an implanted neural stimulator with closed loop control.

    PubMed

    Bjune, Caroline K; Marinis, Thomas F; Brady, Jeanne M; Moran, James; Wheeler, Jesse; Sriram, Tirunelveli S; Parks, Philip D; Widge, Alik S; Dougherty, Darin D; Eskandar, Emad N

    2015-08-01

    An implanted neural stimulator with closed loop control requires electrodes for stimulation pulses and recording neuron activity. Our system features arrays of 64 electrodes. Each electrode can be addressed through a cross bar switch, to enable it to be used for stimulation or recording. This electrode switch, a bank of low noise amplifiers with an integrated analog to digital converter, power conditioning electronics, and a communications and control gate array are co-located with the electrode array in a 14 millimeter diameter satellite package that is designed to be flush mounted in a skull burr hole. Our system features five satellite packages connected to a central hub processor-controller via ten conductor cables that terminate in a custom designed, miniaturized connector. The connector incorporates features of high reliability, military grade devices and utilizes three distinct seals to isolate the contacts from fluid permeation. The hub system is comprised of a connector header, hermetic electronics package, and rechargeable battery pack, which are mounted on and electrically interconnected by a flexible circuit board. The assembly is over molded with a compliant silicone rubber. The electronics package contains two antennas, a large coil, used for recharging the battery and a high bandwidth antenna that is used to download data and update software. The package is assembled from two machined alumina pieces, a flat base with brazed in, electrical feed through pins and a rectangular cover with rounded corners. Titanium seal rings are brazed onto these two pieces so that they can be sealed by laser welding. A third system antenna is incorporated in the flexible circuit board. It is used to communicate with an externally worn control package, which monitors the health of the system and allows both the user and clinician to control or modify various system function parameters. PMID:26738106

  12. Open-loop control of SCExAO's MEMS deformable mirror using the Fast Iterative Algorithm: speckle control performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, Célia; Guyon, Olivier; Martinache, Frantz; Bradley, Colin; Clergeon, Christophe

    2012-07-01

    Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) deformable mirrors (DMs) are widely utilized in astronomical Adaptive Optics (AO) instrumentation. High precision open-loop control of MEMS DMs has been achieved by developing a high accuracy DM model, the Fast Iterative Algorithm (FIA), a physics-based model allowing precise control of the DM shape. Accurate open-loop control is particularly critical for the wavefront control of High- Contrast Imaging (HCI) instruments to create a dark hole area free of most slow and quasi-static speckles which remain the limiting factor for direct detection and imaging of exoplanets. The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics (SCExAO) system is one of these high contrast imaging instruments and uses a 1024-actuator MEMS deformable mirror (DM) both in closed-loop and open-loop. The DM is used to modulate speckles in order to distinguish (i) speckles due to static and slow-varying residual aberrations from (ii) speckles due to genuine structures, such as exoplanets. The FIA has been fully integrated into the SCExAO wavefront control software and we report the FIA’s performance for the control of speckles in the focal plane.

  13. Control of whistler radiation efficiency of a loop antenna by generation of ambient magnetic field irregularities

    SciTech Connect

    Gushchin, M. E.; Korobkov, S. V.; Kostrov, A. V.; Strikovsky, A. V.; Koldanov, V. A.; Zaboronkova, T. M.; Krafft, C.

    2008-05-15

    Electrodynamic means for the control of loop antenna radiation efficiency in plasma is proposed, which can be used in the whistler frequency band. The method is based on the generation, without perturbing the plasma density, of localized ambient magnetic field irregularities in the vicinity of the antenna. In order to produce such irregularities, it is suggested to feed the antenna with additional dc current along with the rf current. Experiments performed in a large laboratory magnetoplasma showed that the generation of localized magnetic field enhancements provides the possibility of increasing the amplitude of the whistlers emitted by the loop antenna. Moreover, experiments have shown that the amplification of the whistlers' signals from the receiving loop antenna fed with additional dc current is observed when a static magnetic field enhancement is generated in the vicinity of the receiver. The experimental data are in good agreement with the theoretical results obtained for comparatively weak ambient magnetic field perturbations.

  14. Scaling laws of coronal loops compared to a 3D MHD model of an active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdin, Ph.-A.; Bingert, S.; Peter, H.

    2016-04-01

    Context. The structure and heating of coronal loops have been investigated for decades. Established scaling laws relate fundamental quantities like the loop apex temperature, pressure, length, and coronal heating. Aims: We test these scaling laws against a large-scale 3D magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) model of the solar corona, which became feasible with current high-performance computing. Methods: We drove an active region simulation with photospheric observations and find strong similarities to the observed coronal loops in X-rays and extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wavelength. A 3D reconstruction of stereoscopic observations shows that our model loops have a realistic spatial structure. We compared scaling laws to our model data extracted along an ensemble of field lines. Finally, we fit a new scaling law that represents hot loops and also cooler structures, which was not possible before based only on observations. Results: Our model data gives some support for scaling laws that were established for hot and EUV-emissive coronal loops. For the Rosner-Tucker-Vaiana (RTV) scaling law we find an offset to our model data, which can be explained by 1D considerations of a static loop with a constant heat input and conduction. With a fit to our model data we set up a new scaling law for the coronal heat input along magnetic field lines. Conclusions: RTV-like scaling laws were fitted to hot loops and therefore do not predict well the coronal heat input for cooler structures that are barely observable. The basic differences between 1D and self-consistent 3D modeling account for deviations between earlier scaling laws and ours. We also conclude that a heating mechanism by MHD-turbulent dissipation within a braided flux tube would heat the corona stronger than is consistent with our model corona.

  15. Closing the loop in legged neuromechanics: an open-source computer vision controlled treadmill.

    PubMed

    Spence, Andrew J; Nicholson-Thomas, Georgia; Lampe, Rachel

    2013-05-15

    The neural circuitry that controls legged locomotion is exquisitely state dependent. The response to a perturbation at one phase of the locomotor cycle is very different from another. As such, tools that enable closed loop experiments in which freely moving animals can be precisely perturbed, either neurally or mechanically, will improve our ability to probe the locomotor control architecture. Because locomotion emerges from the coupled interaction of the nervous system, musculoskeletal system, and physics of the moving body, ideally an experimenter could simultaneously perturb the nervous system, mechanics of the moving animal, or both, at precise moments during well defined locomotor behaviour. Combining the new technique of optogenetics with closed loop tracking of state and fast mechanical perturbations would make this possible. Here we present a computer vision feedback controlled treadmill designed to enable such perturbations. We show that insects (cockroaches Blaberus discoidalis) and mice (Mus mus; C57BL/6) run freely, with preferred speeds in agreement with the literature, over many strides, on the system. We demonstrate the utility of the closed loop system by automatically gathering high speed video (HSV) data when the running animal meets specific operational criteria; here, running within a restricted range of speeds near the midline of the treadmill for a minimum of 2s. We quantify the mouse's gait from HSV data with a phase-based approach, confirming a normal trotting gait. These results demonstrate the system's potential for dissecting the neuromechanical basis of legged locomotion through closed-loop experimental design. PMID:23541994

  16. Closed loop control of dielectric elastomer actuators based on self-sensing displacement feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzello, G.; Naso, D.; York, A.; Seelecke, S.

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a sensorless control algorithm for a positioning system based on a dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA). The voltage applied to the membrane and the resulting current can be measured during the actuation and used to estimate its displacement, i.e., to perform self-sensing. The estimated displacement can be then used as a feedback signal for a position control algorithm, which results in a compact device capable of operating in closed loop control without the need for additional electromechanical or optical transducers. In this work, a circular DEA preloaded with a bi-stable spring is used as a case of study to validate the proposed control architecture. A comparison of the closed loop performance achieved using an accurate laser displacement sensor for feedback is also provided to better assess the performance limitations of the overall sensorless scheme.

  17. Small-Molecule Inhibition and Activation-Loop Trans-Phosphorylation of the IGF1 Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Wu,J.; Li, W.; Craddock, B.; Foreman, K.; Mulvihill, M.; Ji, Q.; Miller, W.; Hubbard, S.

    2008-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) is a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) that has a critical role in mitogenic signalling during embryogenesis and an antiapoptotic role in the survival and progression of many human tumours. Here, we present the crystal structure of the tyrosine kinase domain of IGF1R (IGF1RK), in its unphosphorylated state, in complex with a novel compound, cis-3-[3-(4-methyl-piperazin-l-yl)-cyclobutyl]-1-(2-phenyl-quinolin-7-yl)-imidazo[1, 5-a]pyrazin-8-ylamine (PQIP), which we show is a potent inhibitor of both the unphosphorylated (basal) and phosphorylated (activated) states of the kinase. PQIP interacts with residues in the ATP-binding pocket and in the activation loop, which confers specificity for IGF1RK and the highly related insulin receptor (IR) kinase. In this crystal structure, the IGF1RK active site is occupied by Tyr1135 from the activation loop of an symmetry (two-fold)-related molecule. This dimeric arrangement affords, for the first time, a visualization of the initial trans-phosphorylation event in the activation loop of an RTK, and provides a molecular rationale for a naturally occurring mutation in the activation loop of the IR that causes type II diabetes mellitus.

  18. Automatic PID Control Loops Design for Performance Improvement of Cryogenic Turboexpander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, D. M.; Patel, H. K.; Shah, D. K.

    2015-04-01

    Cryogenics field involves temperature below 123 K which is much less than ambient temperature. In addition, many industrially important physical processes—from fulfilling the needs of National Thermonuclear Fusion programs, superconducting magnets to treatment of cutting tools and preservation of blood cells, require extreme low temperature. The low temperature required for liquefaction of common gases can be obtained by several processes. Liquefaction is the process of cooling or refrigerating a gas to a temperature below its critical temperature so that liquid can be formed at some suitable pressure which is below the critical pressure. Helium liquefier is used for the liquefaction process of helium gas. In general, the Helium Refrigerator/Liquefier (HRL) needs turboexpander as expansion machine to produce cooling effect which is further used for the production of liquid helium. Turboexpanders, a high speed device that is supported on gas bearings, are the most critical component in many helium refrigeration systems. A very minor fault in the operation and manufacturing or impurities in the helium gas can destroy the turboexpander. However, since the performance of expanders is dependent on a number of operating parameters and the relations between them are quite complex, the instrumentation and control system design for turboexpander needs special attention. The inefficiency of manual control leads to the need of designing automatic control loops for turboexpander. Proper design and implementation of the control loops plays an important role in the successful operation of the cryogenic turboexpander. The PID control loops has to be implemented with accurate interlocks and logic to enhance the performance of the cryogenic turboexpander. For different normal and off-normal operations, speeds will be different and hence a proper control method for critical rotational speed avoidance is must. This paper presents the design of PID control loops needed for the

  19. The Second Extracellular Loop of the Adenosine A1 Receptor Mediates Activity of Allosteric Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Dylan P.; McRobb, Fiona M.; Leonhardt, Susan A.; Purdy, Michael; Figler, Heidi; Marshall, Melissa A.; Chordia, Mahendra; Figler, Robert; Linden, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Allosteric enhancers of the adenosine A1 receptor amplify signaling by orthosteric agonists. Allosteric enhancers are appealing drug candidates because their activity requires that the orthosteric site be occupied by an agonist, thereby conferring specificity to stressed or injured tissues that produce adenosine. To explore the mechanism of allosteric enhancer activity, we examined their action on several A1 receptor constructs, including (1) species variants, (2) species chimeras, (3) alanine scanning mutants, and (4) site-specific mutants. These findings were combined with homology modeling of the A1 receptor and in silico screening of an allosteric enhancer library. The binding modes of known docked allosteric enhancers correlated with the known structure-activity relationship, suggesting that these allosteric enhancers bind to a pocket formed by the second extracellular loop, flanked by residues S150 and M162. We propose a model in which this vestibule controls the entry and efflux of agonists from the orthosteric site and agonist binding elicits a conformational change that enables allosteric enhancer binding. This model provides a mechanism for the observations that allosteric enhancers slow the dissociation of orthosteric agonists but not antagonists. PMID:24217444

  20. Bio-Inspired Controller on an FPGA Applied to Closed-Loop Diaphragmatic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zbrzeski, Adeline; Bornat, Yannick; Hillen, Brian; Siu, Ricardo; Abbas, James; Jung, Ranu; Renaud, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury can disrupt connections between the brain respiratory network and the respiratory muscles which can lead to partial or complete loss of ventilatory control and require ventilatory assistance. Unlike current open-loop technology, a closed-loop diaphragmatic pacing system could overcome the drawbacks of manual titration as well as respond to changing ventilation requirements. We present an original bio-inspired assistive technology for real-time ventilation assistance, implemented in a digital configurable Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). The bio-inspired controller, which is a spiking neural network (SNN) inspired by the medullary respiratory network, is as robust as a classic controller while having a flexible, low-power and low-cost hardware design. The system was simulated in MATLAB with FPGA-specific constraints and tested with a computational model of rat breathing; the model reproduced experimentally collected respiratory data in eupneic animals. The open-loop version of the bio-inspired controller was implemented on the FPGA. Electrical test bench characterizations confirmed the system functionality. Open and closed-loop paradigm simulations were simulated to test the FPGA system real-time behavior using the rat computational model. The closed-loop system monitors breathing and changes in respiratory demands to drive diaphragmatic stimulation. The simulated results inform future acute animal experiments and constitute the first step toward the development of a neuromorphic, adaptive, compact, low-power, implantable device. The bio-inspired hardware design optimizes the FPGA resource and time costs while harnessing the computational power of spike-based neuromorphic hardware. Its real-time feature makes it suitable for in vivo applications. PMID:27378844

  1. Bio-Inspired Controller on an FPGA Applied to Closed-Loop Diaphragmatic Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zbrzeski, Adeline; Bornat, Yannick; Hillen, Brian; Siu, Ricardo; Abbas, James; Jung, Ranu; Renaud, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury can disrupt connections between the brain respiratory network and the respiratory muscles which can lead to partial or complete loss of ventilatory control and require ventilatory assistance. Unlike current open-loop technology, a closed-loop diaphragmatic pacing system could overcome the drawbacks of manual titration as well as respond to changing ventilation requirements. We present an original bio-inspired assistive technology for real-time ventilation assistance, implemented in a digital configurable Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). The bio-inspired controller, which is a spiking neural network (SNN) inspired by the medullary respiratory network, is as robust as a classic controller while having a flexible, low-power and low-cost hardware design. The system was simulated in MATLAB with FPGA-specific constraints and tested with a computational model of rat breathing; the model reproduced experimentally collected respiratory data in eupneic animals. The open-loop version of the bio-inspired controller was implemented on the FPGA. Electrical test bench characterizations confirmed the system functionality. Open and closed-loop paradigm simulations were simulated to test the FPGA system real-time behavior using the rat computational model. The closed-loop system monitors breathing and changes in respiratory demands to drive diaphragmatic stimulation. The simulated results inform future acute animal experiments and constitute the first step toward the development of a neuromorphic, adaptive, compact, low-power, implantable device. The bio-inspired hardware design optimizes the FPGA resource and time costs while harnessing the computational power of spike-based neuromorphic hardware. Its real-time feature makes it suitable for in vivo applications. PMID:27378844

  2. Analysis and design of a 3rd order velocity-controlled closed-loop for MEMS vibratory gyroscopes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huan-ming; Yang, Hai-gang; Yin, Tao; Jiao, Ji-wei

    2013-01-01

    The time-average method currently available is limited to analyzing the specific performance of the automatic gain control-proportional and integral (AGC-PI) based velocity-controlled closed-loop in a micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) vibratory gyroscope, since it is hard to solve nonlinear functions in the time domain when the control loop reaches to 3rd order. In this paper, we propose a linearization design approach to overcome this limitation by establishing a 3rd order linear model of the control loop and transferring the analysis to the frequency domain. Order reduction is applied on the built linear model's transfer function by constructing a zero-pole doublet, and therefore mathematical expression of each control loop's performance specification is obtained. Then an optimization methodology is summarized, which reveals that a robust, stable and swift control loop can be achieved by carefully selecting the system parameters following a priority order. Closed-loop drive circuits are designed and implemented using 0.35 μm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process, and experiments carried out on a gyroscope prototype verify the optimization methodology that an optimized stability of the control loop can be achieved by constructing the zero-pole doublet, and disturbance rejection capability (D.R.C) of the control loop can be improved by increasing the integral term. PMID:24051522

  3. A Derivation of the Long-Term Degradation of a Pulsed Atomic Frequency Standard from a Control-Loop Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    The phase of a frequency standard that uses periodic interrogation and control of a local oscillator (LO) is degraded by a long-term random-walk component induced by downconversion of LO noise into the loop passband. The Dick formula for the noise level of this degradation is derived from an explicit solution of an LO control-loop model.

  4. Analysis and Design of a 3rd Order Velocity-Controlled Closed-Loop for MEMS Vibratory Gyroscopes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Huan-ming; Yang, Hai-gang; Yin, Tao; Jiao, Ji-wei

    2013-01-01

    The time-average method currently available is limited to analyzing the specific performance of the automatic gain control-proportional and integral (AGC-PI) based velocity-controlled closed-loop in a micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) vibratory gyroscope, since it is hard to solve nonlinear functions in the time domain when the control loop reaches to 3rd order. In this paper, we propose a linearization design approach to overcome this limitation by establishing a 3rd order linear model of the control loop and transferring the analysis to the frequency domain. Order reduction is applied on the built linear model's transfer function by constructing a zero-pole doublet, and therefore mathematical expression of each control loop's performance specification is obtained. Then an optimization methodology is summarized, which reveals that a robust, stable and swift control loop can be achieved by carefully selecting the system parameters following a priority order. Closed-loop drive circuits are designed and implemented using 0.35 μm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process, and experiments carried out on a gyroscope prototype verify the optimization methodology that an optimized stability of the control loop can be achieved by constructing the zero-pole doublet, and disturbance rejection capability (D.R.C) of the control loop can be improved by increasing the integral term. PMID:24051522

  5. Loop substitution as a tool to identify active sites of interleukin-1 beta.

    PubMed

    Palla, E; Bensi, G; Solito, E; Buonamassa, D T; Fassina, G; Raugei, G; Spano, F; Galeotti, C; Mora, M; Domenighini, M

    1993-06-25

    By computer analysis of the amino acid sequence of human interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) and of the human type I IL-1 receptor (IL-1RI), we have identified two hydropathically complementary peptides (Fassina, G., Roller, P. P., Olson, A. D., Thorgeirsson, S. S., and Omichinski, J. G. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 11252-11257) capable of binding to each other. The sequence of the IL-1 beta peptide corresponds to that of residues 88-99 (loop 7 of the crystal structure of mature IL-1 beta) of mature IL-1 beta, one of the exposed and highly charged regions of the molecule. The substitution of this loop with an amino acid sequence of the same length but different hydropathic profile generates a mutant with drastically reduced binding activity to IL-1RI. In contrast, the binding affinity to the type II IL-1R (IL-1RII) is the same as that of wild type IL-1 beta. The results show that 1) loop 7 is part of the binding site of IL-1 beta to IL-1RI, but not to IL-1RII. 2) The structure of the mutant protein is not grossly altered except locally at the position of the substituted loop. 3) The substitution of amino acids by site-directed mutagenesis of the loop 7 region generates mutants with binding affinity constants slightly lower than that of wild type IL-1 beta and not comparable to that of the loop substitution analogue. 4. All mutants analyzed, including the loop substitutions, are biologically active, confirming the structural integrity of the proteins. We propose a binding site in which the cooperation of several low energy bonds extended over a wide area results in a high affinity complex between IL-1 and the type I receptor. PMID:7685764

  6. Dynamic Effects of Topoisomerase I Inhibition on R-Loops and Short Transcripts at Active Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Marinello, Jessica; Bertoncini, Stefania; Aloisi, Iris; Cristini, Agnese; Malagoli Tagliazucchi, Guidantonio; Forcato, Mattia; Sordet, Olivier; Capranico, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase I-DNA-cleavage complexes (Top1cc) stabilized by camptothecin (CPT) have specific effects at transcriptional levels. We recently reported that Top1cc increase antisense transcript (aRNAs) levels at divergent CpG-island promoters and, transiently, DNA/RNA hybrids (R-loop) in nuclear and mitochondrial genomes of colon cancer HCT116 cells. However, the relationship between R-loops and aRNAs was not established. Here, we show that aRNAs can form R-loops in N-TERA-2 cells under physiological conditions, and that promoter-associated R-loops are somewhat increased and extended in length immediately upon cell exposure to CPT. In contrast, persistent Top1ccs reduce the majority of R-loops suggesting that CPT-accumulated aRNAs are not commonly involved in R-loops. The enhancement of aRNAs by Top1ccs is present both in human colon cancer HCT116 cells and WI38 fibroblasts suggesting a common response of cancer and normal cells. Although Top1ccs lead to DSB and DDR kinases activation, we do not detect a dependence of aRNA accumulation on ATM or DNA-PK activation. However, we showed that the cell response to persistent Top1ccs can involve an impairment of aRNA turnover rather than a higher synthesis rate. Finally, a genome-wide analysis shows that persistent Top1ccs also determine an accumulation of sense transcripts at 5’-end gene regions suggesting an increased occurrence of truncated transcripts. Taken together, the results indicate that Top1 may regulate transcription initiation by modulating RNA polymerase-generated negative supercoils, which can in turn favor R-loop formation at promoters, and that transcript accumulation at TSS is a response to persistent transcriptional stress by Top1 poisoning. PMID:26784695

  7. Closed-Loop Process Control for Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication and Deposition Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taminger, Karen M. (Inventor); Hafley, Robert A. (Inventor); Martin, Richard E. (Inventor); Hofmeister, William H. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A closed-loop control method for an electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF(sup 3)) process includes detecting a feature of interest during the process using a sensor(s), continuously evaluating the feature of interest to determine, in real time, a change occurring therein, and automatically modifying control parameters to control the EBF(sup 3) process. An apparatus provides closed-loop control method of the process, and includes an electron gun for generating an electron beam, a wire feeder for feeding a wire toward a substrate, wherein the wire is melted and progressively deposited in layers onto the substrate, a sensor(s), and a host machine. The sensor(s) measure the feature of interest during the process, and the host machine continuously evaluates the feature of interest to determine, in real time, a change occurring therein. The host machine automatically modifies control parameters to the EBF(sup 3) apparatus to control the EBF(sup 3) process in a closed-loop manner.

  8. CFD Modeling for Active Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, Pieter G.

    2001-01-01

    This presentation describes current work under UEET Active Flow Control CFD Research Tool Development. The goal of this work is to develop computational tools for inlet active flow control design. This year s objectives were to perform CFD simulations of fully gridded vane vortex generators, micro-vortex genera- tors, and synthetic jets, and to compare flowfield results with wind tunnel tests of simple geometries with flow control devices. Comparisons are shown for a single micro-vortex generator on a flat plate, and for flow over an expansion ramp with sidewall effects. Vortex core location, pressure gradient and oil flow patterns are compared between experiment and computation. This work lays the groundwork for evaluating simplified modeling of arrays of devices, and provides the opportunity to test simple flow control device/sensor/ control loop interaction.

  9. Long-range looping of a locus control region drives tissue-specific chromatin packing within a multigene cluster.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Cooke, Nancy E; Liebhaber, Stephen A

    2016-06-01

    The relationships of higher order chromatin organization to mammalian gene expression remain incompletely defined. The human Growth Hormone (hGH) multigene cluster contains five gene paralogs. These genes are selectively activated in either the pituitary or the placenta by distinct components of a remote locus control region (LCR). Prior studies have revealed that appropriate activation of the placental genes is dependent not only on the actions of the LCR, but also on the multigene composition of the cluster itself. Here, we demonstrate that the hGH LCR 'loops' over a distance of 28 kb in primary placental nuclei to make specific contacts with the promoters of the two GH genes in the cluster. This long-range interaction sequesters the GH genes from the three hCS genes which co-assemble into a tightly packed 'hCS chromatin hub'. Elimination of the long-range looping, via specific deletion of the placental LCR components, triggers a dramatic disruption of the hCS chromatin hub. These data reveal a higher-order structural pathway by which long-range looping from an LCR impacts on local chromatin architecture that is linked to tissue-specific gene regulation within a multigene cluster. PMID:26893355

  10. Study on the dynamic performance of a novel buck-boost matrix converter based on double-loop control strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qing; Zhang, Xiao-ping; Chen, Qi

    2011-12-01

    The dynamic performance of a novel Buck-Boost matrix converter (BBMC) based on double-loop control strategy is put forward in this paper. The fundamental principle of BBMC has been elaborated and the method of the double-loop control strategy has been built with Matlab, and then the dynamic performances of BBMC based on the double-loop control strategy are discussed. The results show that the output voltage and frequency can be almost constant with the BBMC and double-loop control strategy despite of the changeable input voltage and frequency. Moreover, a high-quality sine output wave with low harmonic distortion can be directly obtained without filtering. So it can be drawn that the BBMC based on the double-loop control strategy has perfectly dynamic performance and practical importance to the engineering.

  11. Impact of cofactor-binding loop mutations on thermotolerance and activity of E. coli transketolase.

    PubMed

    Morris, P; Rios-Solis, L; García-Arrazola, R; Lye, G J; Dalby, P A

    2016-07-01

    Improvement of thermostability in engineered enzymes can allow biocatalysis on substrates with poor aqueous solubility. Denaturation of the cofactor-binding loops of Escherichia coli transketolase (TK) was previously linked to the loss of enzyme activity under conditions of high pH or urea. Incubation at temperatures just below the thermal melting transition, above which the protein aggregates, was also found to anneal the enzyme to give an increased specific activity. The potential role of cofactor-binding loop instability in this process remained unclear. In this work, the two cofactor-binding loops (residues 185-192 and 382-392) were progressively mutated towards the equivalent sequence from the thermostable Thermus thermophilus TK and variants assessed for their impact on both thermostability and activity. Cofactor-binding loop 2 variants had detrimental effects on specific activity at elevated temperatures, whereas the H192P mutation in cofactor-binding loop 1 resulted in a two-fold improved stability to inactivation at elevated temperatures, and increased the critical onset temperature for aggregation. The specific activity of H192P was 3-fold and 19-fold higher than that for wild-type at 60°C and 65°C respectively, and also remained 2.7-4 fold higher after re-cooling from pre-incubations at either 55°C or 60°C for 1h. Interestingly, H192P was also 2-times more active than wild-type TK at 25°C. Optimal activity was achieved at 60°C for H192P compared to 55°C for wild type. These results show that cofactor-binding loop 1, plays a pivotal role in partial denaturation and aggregation at elevated temperatures. Furthermore, a single rigidifying mutation within this loop can significantly improve the enzyme specific activity, as well as the stability to thermal denaturation and aggregation, to give an increased temperature optimum for activity. PMID:27233131

  12. Improvements To Progressive Wave Tube Performance Through Closed-Loop Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2000-01-01

    This report documents recent improvements to the acoustic and thermal control systems of the Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus (TAFA), a progressive wave tube test facility at the NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. A brief summary of past acoustic performance is given first to serve as a basis for comparison with the new performance data using a multiple-input, closed-loop, narrow-band controller. Performance data in the form of test section acoustic power spectral densities and coherence are presented in three of six facility configurations for a variety of input spectra. Tested spectra include uniform, two cases of pink noise, three cases of narrow-band random, a simulated launch payload bay environment for an expendable launch vehicle, and a simulated external acoustic load for the aft section of a reusable launch vehicle. In addition, a new closed-loop temperature controller and thermocouple data acquisition system are described.

  13. Closed Loop Control of Penetration Depth during CO2 Laser Lap Welding Processes

    PubMed Central

    Sibillano, Teresa; Rizzi, Domenico; Mezzapesa, Francesco P.; Lugarà, Pietro Mario; Konuk, Ali Riza; Aarts, Ronald; Veld, Bert Huis in 't; Ancona, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we describe a novel spectroscopic closed loop control system capable of stabilizing the penetration depth during laser welding processes by controlling the laser power. Our novel approach is to analyze the optical emission from the laser generated plasma plume above the keyhole, to calculate its electron temperature as a process-monitoring signal. Laser power has been controlled by using a quantitative relationship between the penetration depth and the plasma electron temperature. The sensor is able to correlate in real time the difference between the measured electron temperature and its reference value for the requested penetration depth. Accordingly the closed loop system adjusts the power, thus maintaining the penetration depth. PMID:23112646

  14. Closed loop control of penetration depth during CO₂ laser lap welding processes.

    PubMed

    Sibillano, Teresa; Rizzi, Domenico; Mezzapesa, Francesco P; Lugarà, Pietro Mario; Konuk, Ali Riza; Aarts, Ronald; Veld, Bert Huis In 't; Ancona, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we describe a novel spectroscopic closed loop control system capable of stabilizing the penetration depth during laser welding processes by controlling the laser power. Our novel approach is to analyze the optical emission from the laser generated plasma plume above the keyhole, to calculate its electron temperature as a process-monitoring signal. Laser power has been controlled by using a quantitative relationship between the penetration depth and the plasma electron temperature. The sensor is able to correlate in real time the difference between the measured electron temperature and its reference value for the requested penetration depth. Accordingly the closed loop system adjusts the power, thus maintaining the penetration depth. PMID:23112646

  15. Development of a Hardware-In-Loop (HIL) Simulator for Spacecraft Attitude Control Using Momentum Wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dohee; Park, Sang-Young; Kim, Jong-Woo; Choi, Kyu-Hong

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, a Hardware-In-the-Loop simulator to simulate attitude control of spacecraft using momentum wheels is developed. The simulator consists of a spherical air bearing system allowing rotation and tilt in all three axes, three momentum wheels for actuation, and an AHRS (Attitude Heading Reference System). The simulator processes various types of data in PC104 and wirelessly communicates with a host PC using TCP/IP protocol. A simple low-cost momentum wheel assembly set and its drive electronics are also developed. Several experiments are performed to test the performance of the momentum wheels. For the control performance test of the simulator, a PID controller is implemented. The results of experimental demonstrations confirm the feasibility and validity of the Hardware-In-the-Loop simulator developed in the current study.

  16. Benchmarking and Hardware-In-The-Loop Operation of a 2014 MAZDA SkyActiv

    EPA Science Inventory

    Engine Performance evaluation in support of LD MTE. EPA used elements of its ALPHA model to apply hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) controls to the SKYACTIV engine test setup to better understand how the engine would operate in a chassis test after combined with future leading edge tech...

  17. Multi-loop Control System Design for Biodiesel Process using Waste Cooking Oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patle, Dipesh S.; Z, Ahmad; Rangaiah, G. P.

    2015-06-01

    Biodiesel is one of the promising liquid fuels for future due to its advantages such as renewability and eco-friendliness. This manuscript describes the development of a multi-loop control system design for a comprehensive biodiesel process using waste cooking oil. Method for controlled variable-manipulated variable (CV-MV) pairings are vital for the stable, effective and economical operation of the process. Liquid recycles, product quality requirements and effective inventory control pose tough challenges to the safe operation of the biodiesel process. A simple and easy to apply effective RGA method [Xiong Q, Cai W J and He M J 2005 A practical loop pairing criterion for multivariable processes Journal of Process Control vol. 15 pp 741-747.] is applied to determine CV-MV pairings i.e. control configuration design for the bioprocess. This method uses steady state gain as well as bandwidth information of the process open loop transfer function to determine input-output pairings.

  18. Closed-Loop Control System for Friction Stir Welding Retractable Pin Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey; Romine, Peter L.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA invention disclosure, NASA Case No. MFS-31413, entitled "System for Controlling the Stirring Pin of a Friction Stir Welding Apparatus", (Patent Pending) authored by Jeff Ding, Dr Peter Romine and Pete Oelgoetz, addresses the precision control of the friction stir welding process. The closed-loop control system automatically adjusts the spinning welding pin, real-time, to maintain a precise penetration ligament (i.e., distance between pin-tip and weld panel backside surface). A specific pin length can be maintained while welding constant thickness or tapered material thickness weld panels. The closed-loop control system provides operator data and information relative to the exact position of the welding pin inside the weld joint. This paper presents the closed-loop RPT control system that operates using the auto-feedback of force signals sensed by the tip and shoulder of the welding pin. Significance: The FSW process can be successfully used in a production environment only if there is a method or technique that informs the FSW operator the precise location of the welding pin inside the weld joint. This is essential for applications in aerospace, automotive, pressure vessel, commercial aircraft and other industries.

  19. Scenario-based, closed-loop model predictive control with application to emergency vehicle scheduling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Graham. C.; Medioli, Adrian. M.

    2013-08-01

    Model predictive control has been a major success story in process control. More recently, the methodology has been used in other contexts, including automotive engine control, power electronics and telecommunications. Most applications focus on set-point tracking and use single-sequence optimisation. Here we consider an alternative class of problems motivated by the scheduling of emergency vehicles. Here disturbances are the dominant feature. We develop a novel closed-loop model predictive control strategy aimed at this class of problems. We motivate, and illustrate, the ideas via the problem of fluid deployment of ambulance resources.

  20. Systematic mutagenesis of the active site omega loop of TEM-1 beta-lactamase.

    PubMed Central

    Petrosino, J F; Palzkill, T

    1996-01-01

    Beta-Lactamase is a bacterial protein that provides resistance against beta-lactam antibiotics. TEM-1 beta-lactamase is the most prevalent plasmid-mediated beta-lactamase in gram-negative bacteria. Normally, this enzyme has high levels of hydrolytic activity for penicillins, but mutant beta-lactamases have evolved with activity toward a variety of beta-lactam antibiotics. It has been shown that active site substitutions are responsible for changes in the substrate specificity. Since mutant beta-lactamases pose a serious threat to antimicrobial therapy, the mechanisms by which mutations can alter the substrate specificity of TEM-1 beta-lactamase are of interest. Previously, screens of random libraries encompassing 31 of 55 active site amino acid positions enabled the identification of the residues responsible for maintaining the substrate specificity of TEM-1 beta-lactamase. In addition to substitutions found in clinical isolates, many other specificity-altering mutations were also identified. Interestingly, many nonspecific substitutions in the N-terminal half of the active site omega loop were found to increase ceftazidime hydrolytic activity and decrease ampicillin hydrolytic activity. To complete the active sight study, eight additional random libraries were constructed and screened for specificity-altering mutations. All additional substitutions found to alter the substrate specificity were located in the C-terminal half of the active site loop. These mutants, much like the N-terminal omega loop mutants, appear to be less stable than the wild-type enzyme. Further analysis of a 165-YYG-167 triple mutant, selected for high levels of ceftazidime hydrolytic activity, provides an example of the correlation which exists between enzyme instability and increased ceftazidime hydrolytic activity in the ceftazidime-selected omega loop mutants. PMID:8606154

  1. Learning tensegrity locomotion using open-loop control signals and coevolutionary algorithms.

    PubMed

    Iscen, Atil; Caluwaerts, Ken; Bruce, Jonathan; Agogino, Adrian; SunSpiral, Vytas; Tumer, Kagan

    2015-01-01

    Soft robots offer many advantages over traditional rigid robots. However, soft robots can be difficult to control with standard control methods. Fortunately, evolutionary algorithms can offer an elegant solution to this problem. Instead of creating controls to handle the intricate dynamics of these robots, we can simply evolve the controls using a simulation to provide an evaluation function. In this article, we show how such a control paradigm can be applied to an emerging field within soft robotics: robots based on tensegrity structures. We take the model of the Spherical Underactuated Planetary Exploration Robot ball (SUPERball), an icosahedron tensegrity robot under production at NASA Ames Research Center, develop a rolling locomotion algorithm, and study the learned behavior using an accurate model of the SUPERball simulated in the NASA Tensegrity Robotics Toolkit. We first present the historical-average fitness-shaping algorithm for coevolutionary algorithms to speed up learning while favoring robustness over optimality. Second, we use a distributed control approach by coevolving open-loop control signals for each controller. Being simple and distributed, open-loop controllers can be readily implemented on SUPERball hardware without the need for sensor information or precise coordination. We analyze signals of different complexities and frequencies. Among the learned policies, we take one of the best and use it to analyze different aspects of the rolling gait, such as lengths, tensions, and energy consumption. We also discuss the correlation between the signals controlling different parts of the tensegrity robot. PMID:25951199

  2. [Particle swarm optimization fuzzy modeling and closed-loop anaesthesia control based on cerebral state index].

    PubMed

    Tang, Jingtian; Cao, Yang; Xiao, Jiaying; Guo, Qulian

    2014-06-01

    Due to individual differences of the depth of anaesthesia (DOA) controlled objects, the drawbacks of monitoring index, the traditional PID controller of anesthesia depth could not meet the demands of nonlinear control. However, the adjustments of the rules of DOA fuzzy control often rely on personal experience and, therefore, it could not achieve the satisfactory control effects. The present research established a fuzzy closed-loop control system which takes the cerebral state index (CSI) value as a feedback controlled variable, and it also adopts the particle swarm optimization (PSO) to optimize the fuzzy control rule and membership functions between the change of CSI and propofol infusion rate. The system sets the CSI targets at 40 and 30 through the system simulation, and it also adds some Gaussian noise to imitate clinical disturbance. Experimental results indicated that this system could reach the set CSI point accurately, rapidly and stably, with no obvious perturbation in the presence of noise. The fuzzy controller based on CSI which has been optimized by PSO has better stability and robustness in the DOA closed loop control system. PMID:25219229

  3. Actively controlled shaft seals for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salant, Richard F.

    1994-01-01

    This study experimentally investigates an actively controlled mechanical seal for aerospace applications. The seal of interest is a gas seal, which is considerably more compact than previous actively controlled mechanical seals that were developed for industrial use. In a mechanical seal, the radial convergence of the seal interface has a primary effect on the film thickness. Active control of the film thickness is established by controlling the radial convergence of the seal interface with piezoelectric actuator. An actively controlled mechanical seal was initially designed and evaluated using a mathematical model. Based on these results, a seal was fabricated and tested under laboratory conditions. The seal was tested with both helium and air, at rotational speeds up to 3770 rad/sec, and at sealed pressures as high as 1.48 x 10(exp 6) Pa. The seal was operated with both manual control and with a closed-loop control system that used either the leakage rate or face temperature as the feedback. The output of the controller was the voltage applied to the piezoelectric actuator. The seal operated successfully for both short term tests (less than one hour) and for longer term tests (four hours) with a closed-loop control system. The leakage rates were typically 5-15 slm (standard liters per minute), and the face temperatures were generally maintained below 100 C. When leakage rate was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint leakage rate was typically maintained within 1 slm. However, larger deviations occurred during sudden changes in sealed pressure. When face temperature was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint face temperature was generally maintained within 3 C, with larger deviations occurring when the sealed pressure changed suddenly.

  4. A technique for sequential segmental neuromuscular stimulation with closed loop feedback control.

    PubMed

    Zonnevijlle, Erik D H; Abadia, Gustavo Perez; Somia, Naveen N; Kon, Moshe; Barker, John H; Koenig, Steven; Ewert, D L; Stremel, Richard W

    2002-01-01

    In dynamic myoplasty, dysfunctional muscle is assisted or replaced with skeletal muscle from a donor site. Electrical stimulation is commonly used to train and animate the skeletal muscle to perform its new task. Due to simultaneous tetanic contractions of the entire myoplasty, muscles are deprived of perfusion and fatigue rapidly, causing long-term problems such as excessive scarring and muscle ischemia. Sequential stimulation contracts part of the muscle while other parts rest, thus significantly improving blood perfusion. However, the muscle still fatigues. In this article, we report a test of the feasibility of using closed-loop control to economize the contractions of the sequentially stimulated myoplasty. A simple stimulation algorithm was developed and tested on a sequentially stimulated neo-sphincter designed from a canine gracilis muscle. Pressure generated in the lumen of the myoplasty neo-sphincter was used as feedback to regulate the stimulation signal via three control parameters, thereby optimizing the performance of the myoplasty. Additionally, we investigated and compared the efficiency of amplitude and frequency modulation techniques. Closed-loop feedback enabled us to maintain target pressures within 10% deviation using amplitude modulation and optimized control parameters (correction frequency = 4 Hz, correction threshold = 4%, and transition time = 0.3 s). The large-scale stimulation/feedback setup was unfit for chronic experimentation, but can be used as a blueprint for a small-scale version to unveil the theoretical benefits of closed-loop control in chronic experimentation. PMID:12028619

  5. An Allosteric Cross-Talk Between the Activation Loop and the ATP Binding Site Regulates the Activation of Src Kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucheta-Martínez, Encarna; Saladino, Giorgio; Morando, Maria Agnese; Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge; Lelli, Moreno; Sutto, Ludovico; D’Amelio, Nicola; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi

    2016-04-01

    Phosphorylation of the activation loop is a fundamental step in the activation of most protein kinases. In the case of the Src tyrosine kinase, a prototypical kinase due to its role in cancer and its historic importance, phosphorylation of tyrosine 416 in the activation loop is known to rigidify the structure and contribute to the switch from the inactive to a fully active form. However, whether or not phosphorylation is able per-se to induce a fully active conformation, that efficiently binds ATP and phosphorylates the substrate, is less clear. Here we employ a combination of solution NMR and enhanced-sampling molecular dynamics simulations to fully map the effects of phosphorylation and ATP/ADP cofactor loading on the conformational landscape of Src tyrosine kinase. We find that both phosphorylation and cofactor binding are needed to induce a fully active conformation. What is more, we find a complex interplay between the A-loop and the hinge motion where the phosphorylation of the activation-loop has a significant allosteric effect on the dynamics of the C-lobe.

  6. An Allosteric Cross-Talk Between the Activation Loop and the ATP Binding Site Regulates the Activation of Src Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Pucheta-Martínez, Encarna; Saladino, Giorgio; Morando, Maria Agnese; Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge; Lelli, Moreno; Sutto, Ludovico; D’Amelio, Nicola; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of the activation loop is a fundamental step in the activation of most protein kinases. In the case of the Src tyrosine kinase, a prototypical kinase due to its role in cancer and its historic importance, phosphorylation of tyrosine 416 in the activation loop is known to rigidify the structure and contribute to the switch from the inactive to a fully active form. However, whether or not phosphorylation is able per-se to induce a fully active conformation, that efficiently binds ATP and phosphorylates the substrate, is less clear. Here we employ a combination of solution NMR and enhanced-sampling molecular dynamics simulations to fully map the effects of phosphorylation and ATP/ADP cofactor loading on the conformational landscape of Src tyrosine kinase. We find that both phosphorylation and cofactor binding are needed to induce a fully active conformation. What is more, we find a complex interplay between the A-loop and the hinge motion where the phosphorylation of the activation-loop has a significant allosteric effect on the dynamics of the C-lobe. PMID:27063862

  7. Electromechanical Simulation of Actively Controlled Rotordynamic Systems with Piezoelectric Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Reng Rong; Palazzolo, A. B.; Kascak, A. F.; Montague, G.

    1991-01-01

    Theories and tests for incorporating piezoelectric pushers as actuator devices for active vibration control are discussed. It started from a simple model with the assumption of ideal pusher characteristics and progressed to electromechanical models with nonideal pushers. Effects on system stability due to the nonideal characteristics of piezoelectric pushers and other elements in the control loop were investigated.

  8. Decentralized Control of Sound Radiation from an Aircraft-Style Panel Using Iterative Loop Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Cabell, Randolph H.; Fuller, Chris R.

    2008-01-01

    A decentralized LQG-based control strategy is designed to reduce low-frequency sound transmission through periodically stiffened panels. While modern control strategies have been used to reduce sound radiation from relatively simple structural acoustic systems, significant implementation issues have to be addressed before these control strategies can be extended to large systems such as the fuselage of an aircraft. For instance, centralized approaches typically require a high level of connectivity and are computationally intensive, while decentralized strategies face stability problems caused by the unmodeled interaction between neighboring control units. Since accurate uncertainty bounds are not known a priori, it is difficult to ensure the decentralized control system will be robust without making the controller overly conservative. Therefore an iterative approach is suggested, which utilizes frequency-shaped loop recovery. The approach accounts for modeling error introduced by neighboring control loops, requires no communication between subsystems, and is relatively simple. The control strategy is validated using real-time control experiments performed on a built-up aluminum test structure representative of the fuselage of an aircraft. Experiments demonstrate that the iterative approach is capable of achieving 12 dB peak reductions and a 3.6 dB integrated reduction in radiated sound power from the stiffened panel.

  9. Computer simulation of a pilot in V/STOL aircraft control loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogt, William G.; Mickle, Marlin H.; Zipf, Mark E.; Kucuk, Senol

    1989-01-01

    The objective was to develop a computerized adaptive pilot model for the computer model of the research aircraft, the Harrier II AV-8B V/STOL with special emphasis on propulsion control. In fact, two versions of the adaptive pilot are given. The first, simply called the Adaptive Control Model (ACM) of a pilot includes a parameter estimation algorithm for the parameters of the aircraft and an adaption scheme based on the root locus of the poles of the pilot controlled aircraft. The second, called the Optimal Control Model of the pilot (OCM), includes an adaption algorithm and an optimal control algorithm. These computer simulations were developed as a part of the ongoing research program in pilot model simulation supported by NASA Lewis from April 1, 1985 to August 30, 1986 under NASA Grant NAG 3-606 and from September 1, 1986 through November 30, 1988 under NASA Grant NAG 3-729. Once installed, these pilot models permitted the computer simulation of the pilot model to close all of the control loops normally closed by a pilot actually manipulating the control variables. The current version of this has permitted a baseline comparison of various qualitative and quantitative performance indices for propulsion control, the control loops and the work load on the pilot. Actual data for an aircraft flown by a human pilot furnished by NASA was compared to the outputs furnished by the computerized pilot and found to be favorable.

  10. Behaviour of oscillations in loop structures above active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobov, D. Y.; Kobanov, N. I.; Chelpanov, A. A.; Kochanov, A. A.; Anfinogentov, S. A.; Chupin, S. A.; Myshyakov, I. I.; Tomin, V. E.

    2015-12-01

    In this study we combine the multiwavelength ultraviolet-optical (Solar Dynamics Observatory, SDO) and radio (Nobeyama Radioheliograph, NoRH) observations to get further insight into space-frequency distribution of oscillations at different atmospheric levels of the Sun. We processed the observational data on NOAA 11711 active region and found oscillations propagating from the photospheric level through the transition region upward into the corona. The power maps of low-frequency (1-2 mHz) oscillations reproduce well the fan-like coronal structures visible in the Fe IX 171 Å line. High frequency oscillations (5-7 mHz) propagate along the vertical magnetic field lines and concentrate inside small-scale elements in the umbra and at the umbra-penumbra boundary. We investigated the dependence of the dominant oscillation frequency upon the distance from the sunspot barycentre to estimate inclination of magnetic tubes in higher levels of sunspots where it cannot be measured directly, and found that this angle is close to 40° above the umbra boundaries in the transition region.

  11. Miniature Loop Heat Pipe with Multiple Evaporators for Thermal Control of Small Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Ottenstein, Laura; Douglas, Denya; Pauken, Michael; Birur, Gajanana

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents an advanced miniature heat transport system for thermal control of small spacecraft. The thermal system consists of a loop heat pipe (LHP) with multiple evaporators and multiple deployable radiators for heat transfer, and variable emittance coatings on the radiators for performance enhancement. Thermoelectric coolers are used to control the loop operating temperature. The thermal system combines the functions of variable conductance heat pipes, thermal switches, thermal diodes, and the state-of-the-art LHPs into a single integrated thermal system. It retains all the performance characteristics of state-of-the-art LHPs and offers additional advantages to enhance the functionality, performance, versatility, and reliability of the system. Steady state and transient analytical models have been developed, and scaling criteria have also been established. A breadboard unit has been built for functional testing in laboratory and thermal vacuum environments. Experimental results show excellent performance of the thermal system and correlate very well with theoretical predictions.

  12. Pumped Fluid Loop Heat Rejection and Recovery Systems for Thermal Control of the Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhandari, Pradeep; Birur, Gajanana; Prina, Mauro; Ramirez, Brenda; Paris, Anthony; Novak, Keith; Pauken, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the heat rejection and heat recovery system for thermal control of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). The MSL mission will use mechanically pumped fluid loop based architecture for thermal control of the spacecraft and rover. The architecture is designed to harness waste heat from an Multi Mission Radioisotope Thermo-electric Generator (MMRTG) during Mars surface operations for thermal control during cold conditions and also reject heat during the cruise aspect of the mission. There are several test that are being conducted that will insure the safety of this concept. This architecture can be used during any future interplanetary missions utilizing radioisotope power systems for power generation.

  13. A new linear quadratic optimal controller for the 34-meter high efficiency antenna position loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickerson, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    The design of a new position loop controller for the 34-meter High Efficiency Deep Space antennas using linear quadratic (LQ) optimal control techniques is discussed. The LQ optimal control theory is reviewed, and model development and verification are discussed. Families of optimal gain vectors are generated by varying weight parameters. Performance specifications were used to select a final gain vector. Estimator dynamics were selected and the corresponding gain vectors were computed. Final estimator selection was based on position, commanded rate, and estimator error responses.

  14. Pilot-in-the-Loop Analysis of Propulsive-Only Flight Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Hwei-Lan; Biezad, Daniel J.

    1996-01-01

    Longitudinal control system architectures are presented which directly couple flight stick motions to throttle commands for a multi-engine aircraft. This coupling enables positive attitude control with complete failure of the flight control system. The architectures chosen vary from simple feedback gains to classical lead-lag compensators with and without prefilters. Each architecture is reviewed for its appropriateness for piloted flight. The control systems are then analyzed with pilot-in-the-loop metrics related to bandwidth required for landing. Results indicate that current and proposed bandwidth requirements should be modified for throttles only flight control. Pilot ratings consistently showed better ratings than predicted by analysis. Recommendations are made for more robust design and implementation. The use of Quantitative Feedback Theory for compensator design is discussed. Although simple and effective augmented control can be achieved in a wide variety of failed configurations, a few configuration characteristics are dominant for pilot-in-the-loop control. These characteristics will be tested in a simulator study involving failed flight controls for a multi-engine aircraft.

  15. Open-loop and closed-loop control of dissociative ionization of ethanol in intense laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Yazawa, Hiroki; Tanabe, Takasumi; Okamoto, Tatsuyoshi; Yamanaka, Mio; Kannari, Fumihiko; Itakura, Ryuji; Yamanouchi, Kaoru

    2006-05-28

    The relative yield of the C-O bond breaking with respect to the C-C bond breaking in ethanol cation C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH{sup +} is maximized in intense laser fields (10{sup 13}-10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}) by open-loop and closed-loop optimization procedures. In the open-loop optimization, a train of intense laser pulses are synthesized so that the temporal separation between the first and last pulses becomes 800 fs, and the number and width of the pulses within a train are systematically varied. When the duration of 800 fs is filled with laser fields by increasing the number of pulses or by stretching all pulses in a triple pulse train, the relative yield of the C-O bond breaking becomes significantly large. In the closed-loop optimization using a self-learning algorithm, the four dispersion coefficients or the phases of 128 frequency components of an intense laser pulse are adopted as optimized parameters. From these optimization experiments it is revealed that the yield ratio of the C-O bond breaking is maximized as far as the total duration of the intense laser field reaches as long as {approx}1 ps and that the intermittent disappearance of the laser field within a pulse does not affect the relative yields of the bond breaking pathways.

  16. Lag Synchronization Between Two Coupled Networks via Open-Plus-Closed-Loop and Adaptive Controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Tong-Chun; Wu, Yong-Qing; Li, Shi-Xing

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study lag synchronization between two coupled networks and apply two types of control schemes, including the open-plus-closed-loop (OPCL) and adaptive controls. We then design the corresponding control algorithms according to the OPCL and adaptive feedback schemes. With the designed controllers, we obtain two theorems on the lag synchronization based on Lyapunov stability theory and Barbalat's lemma. Finally we provide numerical examples to show the effectiveness of the obtained controllers and see that the adaptive control is stronger than the OPCL control when realizing the lag synchronization between two coupled networks with different coupling structures. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 61304173, Foundation of Liaoning Educational Committee (No. 13-1069) and Hangzhou Polytechnic (No. KZYZ-2009-2)

  17. Structural Basis of Human p70 Ribosomal S6 Kinase-1 Regulation by Activation Loop Phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Sunami, Tomoko; Byrne, Noel; Diehl, Ronald E.; Funabashi, Kaoru; Hall, Dawn L.; Ikuta, Mari; Patel, Sangita B.; Shipman, Jennifer M.; Smith, Robert F.; Takahashi, Ikuko; Zugay-Murphy, Joan; Iwasawa, Yoshikazu; Lumb, Kevin J.; Munshi, Sanjeev K.; Sharma, Sujata

    2010-03-04

    p70 ribosomal S6 kinase (p70S6K) is a downstream effector of the mTOR signaling pathway involved in cell proliferation, cell growth, cell-cycle progression, and glucose homeostasis. Multiple phosphorylation events within the catalytic, autoinhibitory, and hydrophobic motif domains contribute to the regulation of p70S6K. We report the crystal structures of the kinase domain of p70S6K1 bound to staurosporine in both the unphosphorylated state and in the 3{prime}-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1-phosphorylated state in which Thr-252 of the activation loop is phosphorylated. Unphosphorylated p70S6K1 exists in two crystal forms, one in which the p70S6K1 kinase domain exists as a monomer and the other as a domain-swapped dimer. The crystal structure of the partially activated kinase domain that is phosphorylated within the activation loop reveals conformational ordering of the activation loop that is consistent with a role in activation. The structures offer insights into the structural basis of the 3{prime}-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1-induced activation of p70S6K and provide a platform for the rational structure-guided design of specific p70S6K inhibitors.

  18. Neural signal processing and closed-loop control algorithm design for an implanted neural recording and stimulation system.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Lei; McConley, Marc; Angermueller, Kai; Goldberg, David; Corba, Massimiliano; Kim, Louis; Moran, James; Parks, Philip D; Sang Chin; Widge, Alik S; Dougherty, Darin D; Eskandar, Emad N

    2015-08-01

    A fully autonomous intracranial device is built to continually record neural activities in different parts of the brain, process these sampled signals, decode features that correlate to behaviors and neuropsychiatric states, and use these features to deliver brain stimulation in a closed-loop fashion. In this paper, we describe the sampling and stimulation aspects of such a device. We first describe the signal processing algorithms of two unsupervised spike sorting methods. Next, we describe the LFP time-frequency analysis and feature derivation from the two spike sorting methods. Spike sorting includes a novel approach to constructing a dictionary learning algorithm in a Compressed Sensing (CS) framework. We present a joint prediction scheme to determine the class of neural spikes in the dictionary learning framework; and, the second approach is a modified OSort algorithm which is implemented in a distributed system optimized for power efficiency. Furthermore, sorted spikes and time-frequency analysis of LFP signals can be used to generate derived features (including cross-frequency coupling, spike-field coupling). We then show how these derived features can be used in the design and development of novel decode and closed-loop control algorithms that are optimized to apply deep brain stimulation based on a patient's neuropsychiatric state. For the control algorithm, we define the state vector as representative of a patient's impulsivity, avoidance, inhibition, etc. Controller parameters are optimized to apply stimulation based on the state vector's current state as well as its historical values. The overall algorithm and software design for our implantable neural recording and stimulation system uses an innovative, adaptable, and reprogrammable architecture that enables advancement of the state-of-the-art in closed-loop neural control while also meeting the challenges of system power constraints and concurrent development with ongoing scientific research designed

  19. A portable hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) device for automotive diagnostic control systems.

    PubMed

    Palladino, A; Fiengo, G; Lanzo, D

    2012-01-01

    In-vehicle driving tests for evaluating the performance and diagnostic functionalities of engine control systems are often time consuming, expensive, and not reproducible. Using a hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) simulation approach, new control strategies and diagnostic functions on a controller area network (CAN) line can be easily tested in real time, in order to reduce the effort and the cost of the testing phase. Nowadays, spark ignition engines are controlled by an electronic control unit (ECU) with a large number of embedded sensors and actuators. In order to meet the rising demand of lower emissions and fuel consumption, an increasing number of control functions are added into such a unit. This work aims at presenting a portable electronic environment system, suited for HIL simulations, in order to test the engine control software and the diagnostic functionality on a CAN line, respectively, through non-regression and diagnostic tests. The performances of the proposed electronic device, called a micro hardware-in-the-loop system, are presented through the testing of the engine management system software of a 1.6 l Fiat gasoline engine with variable valve actuation for the ECU development version. PMID:22075387

  20. Heating mechanisms for intermittent loops in active region cores from AIA/SDO EUV observations

    SciTech Connect

    Cadavid, A. C.; Lawrence, J. K.; Christian, D. J.; Jess, D. B.; Nigro, G.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate intensity variations and energy deposition in five coronal loops in active region cores. These were selected for their strong variability in the AIA/SDO 94 Å intensity channel. We isolate the hot Fe XVIII and Fe XXI components of the 94 Å and 131 Å by modeling and subtracting the 'warm' contributions to the emission. HMI/SDO data allow us to focus on 'inter-moss' regions in the loops. The detailed evolution of the inter-moss intensity time series reveals loops that are impulsively heated in a mode compatible with a nanoflare storm, with a spike in the hot 131 Å signals leading and the other five EUV emission channels following in progressive cooling order. A sharp increase in electron temperature tends to follow closely after the hot 131 Å signal confirming the impulsive nature of the process. A cooler process of growing emission measure follows more slowly. The Fourier power spectra of the hot 131 Å signals, when averaged over the five loops, present three scaling regimes with break frequencies near 0.1 min{sup –1} and 0.7 min{sup –1}. The low frequency regime corresponds to 1/f noise; the intermediate indicates a persistent scaling process and the high frequencies show white noise. Very similar results are found for the energy dissipation in a 2D 'hybrid' shell model of loop magneto-turbulence, based on reduced magnetohydrodynamics, that is compatible with nanoflare statistics. We suggest that such turbulent dissipation is the energy source for our loops.

  1. NMR structure of the A730 loop of the Neurospora VS ribozyme: insights into the formation of the active site

    PubMed Central

    Bonneau, Eric; Girard, Nicolas; Boisbouvier, Jérôme; Legault, Pascale

    2011-01-01

    The Neurospora VS ribozyme is a small nucleolytic ribozyme with unique primary, secondary and global tertiary structures, which displays mechanistic similarities to the hairpin ribozyme. Here, we determined the high-resolution NMR structure of a stem–loop VI fragment containing the A730 internal loop, which forms part of the active site. In the presence of magnesium ions, the A730 loop adopts a structure that is consistent with existing biochemical data and most likely reflects its conformation in the VS ribozyme prior to docking with the cleavage site internal loop. Interestingly, the A730 loop adopts an S-turn motif that is also present in loop B within the hairpin ribozyme active site. The S-turn appears necessary to expose the Watson–Crick edge of a catalytically important residue (A756) so that it can fulfill its role in catalysis. The A730 loop and the cleavage site loop of the VS ribozyme display structural similarities to internal loops found in the active site of the hairpin ribozyme. These similarities provided a rationale to build a model of the VS ribozyme active site based on the crystal structure of the hairpin ribozyme. PMID:21266483

  2. Active Thermal Control System Development for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westheimer, David

    2007-01-01

    All space vehicles or habitats require thermal management to maintain a safe and operational environment for both crew and hardware. Active Thermal Control Systems (ATCS) perform the functions of acquiring heat from both crew and hardware within a vehicle, transporting that heat throughout the vehicle, and finally rejecting that energy into space. Almost all of the energy used in a space vehicle eventually turns into heat, which must be rejected in order to maintain an energy balance and temperature control of the vehicle. For crewed vehicles, Active Thermal Control Systems are pumped fluid loops that are made up of components designed to perform these functions. NASA has been actively developing technologies that will enable future missions or will provide significant improvements over the state of the art technologies. These technologies have are targeted for application on the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), or Orion, and a Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM). The technologies that have been selected and are currently under development include: fluids that enable single loop ATCS architectures, a gravity insensitive vapor compression cycle heat pump, a sublimator with reduced sensitivity to feedwater contamination, an evaporative heat sink that can operate in multiple ambient pressure environments, a compact spray evaporator, and lightweight radiators that take advantage of carbon composites and advanced optical coatings.

  3. Novel gas sensor combined active fiber loop ring-down and dual wavelengths differential absorption method.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanjie; Chang, Jun; Ni, Jiasheng; Wang, Qingpu; Liu, Tongyu; Wang, Chang; Wang, Pengpeng; Lv, Guangping; Peng, Gangding

    2014-05-01

    A novel active fiber loop ring-down gas sensor combined with dual wavelengths differential absorption method is proposed. Two Distributed Feedback Laser Diodes (DFB LDs) with different wavelengths are employed. One LD whose wavelength covered with the absorption line of target gas is used for sensing. Another LD whose wavelength is centered outside the absorption line is used for reference. The gas absorption loss can be obtained by differencing the reference signal and sensing signal. Compared with traditional method of one wavelength employed, it can eliminate the influence of the cavity loss variety and photoelectric device drift in the system efficiently. An Erbium Doped Fiber Amplifier (EDFA) with Automatic Gain Control (AGC) is used to compensate the loss of the light in the ring-down cavity, which will increase the cavity round trips and improve the precision of gas detection. And two fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are employed to get rid of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) spectrum noise as filters. The calibrating ethyne samples of different concentrations are measured with a 65 mm long gas cell in order to evaluate the effect of reference. The results show the relative deviation is found to be less than ± 0.4% of 0.1% ethyne when a certain additional loss from 0 to 1.2dB is introduced to the cavity and the relative deviation of measured concentration is less than ± 0.5% over 24 hours. PMID:24921822

  4. MicroRNAs Constitute a Negative Feedback Loop in Streptococcus pneumoniae-Induced Macrophage Activation.

    PubMed

    Griss, Kathrin; Bertrams, Wilhelm; Sittka-Stark, Alexandra; Seidel, Kerstin; Stielow, Christina; Hippenstiel, Stefan; Suttorp, Norbert; Eberhardt, Martin; Wilhelm, Jochen; Vera, Julio; Schmeck, Bernd

    2016-07-15

    Streptococcus pneumoniae causes high mortality as a major pneumonia-inducing pathogen. In pneumonia, control of innate immunity is necessary to prevent organ damage. We assessed the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) as regulators in pneumococcal infection of human macrophages. Exposure of primary blood-derived human macrophages with pneumococci resulted in transcriptional changes in several gene clusters and a significant deregulation of 10 microRNAs. Computational network analysis retrieved miRNA-146a as one putatively important regulator of pneumococci-induced host cell activation. Its induction depended on bacterial structural integrity and was completely inhibited by blocking Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2) or depleting its mediator MyD88. Furthermore, induction of miRNA-146a release did not require the autocrine feedback of interleukin 1β and tumor necrosis factor α released from infected macrophages, and it repressed the TLR-2 downstream mediators IRAK-1 and TRAF-6, as well as the inflammatory factors cyclooxygenase 2 and interleukin 1β. In summary, pneumococci recognition induces a negative feedback loop, preventing excessive inflammation via miR-146a and potentially other miRNAs. PMID:26984146

  5. Open loop pneumatic control of a Lysholm engine or turbine exhaust pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Plonski, B.A.

    1981-07-17

    A Lysholm engine, or helical screw expander, is currently being evaluated at the University of California, Berkeley for staging with a conventional turbine in geothermal energy conversion. A pneumatic closed loop, proportional-integral control system was implemented to control the Lysholm engine's exhaust pressure for performance testing of the engine at constant inlet/outlet pressure ratios. The control system will also be used to control the exhaust pressure of the conventional turbine during future testing of the staged Lysholm-turbine system. Analytical modeling of the control system was performed and successful tuning was achieved by applying Ziegler-Nichol's tuning method. Stable control and quick response, of approximately 1 minute, was demonstrated for load and set point changes in desired exhaust pressures.

  6. Loop Heat Pipe Operation Using Heat Source Temperature for Set Point Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Paiva, Kleber; Mantelli, Marcia

    2011-01-01

    Loop heat pipes (LHPs) have been used for thermal control of several NASA and commercial orbiting spacecraft. The LHP operating temperature is governed by the saturation temperature of its compensation chamber (CC). Most LHPs use the CC temperature for feedback control of its operating temperature. There exists a thermal resistance between the heat source to be cooled by the LHP and the LHP's CC. Even if the CC set point temperature is controlled precisely, the heat source temperature will still vary with its heat output. For most applications, controlling the heat source temperature is of most interest. A logical question to ask is: "Can the heat source temperature be used for feedback control of the LHP operation?" A test program has been implemented to answer the above question. Objective is to investigate the LHP performance using the CC temperature and the heat source temperature for feedback control

  7. Active control of vibration transmission through struts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelinescu, Ion; Balachandran, Balakumar

    1998-07-01

    In this work, analytical investigations into active control of longitudinal and flexural vibrations transmitted through a cylindrical strut are conducted. A mechanics based model for a strut fitted with a piezoelectric actuator is developed. For harmonic disturbances, a linear dynamic formulation describing the motion of the actuator is integrated with the formulation describing wave transmission through the strut, and the resulting system is studied in the frequency domain. Open-loop studies are conducted with the aid of numerical simulations, and the potential of active control schemes to attenuate the transmitted vibrations over the frequency range of 10 Hz to 6000 Hz is examined. The relevance of the current work to control of helicopter cabin interior noise is also discussed.

  8. A comparative analysis of loop heat pipe based thermal architectures for spacecraft thermal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauken, Mike; Birur, Gaj

    2004-01-01

    Loop Heat Pipes (LHP) have gained acceptance as a viable means of heat transport in many spacecraft in recent years. However, applications using LHP technology tend to only remove waste heat from a single component to an external radiator. Removing heat from multiple components has been done by using multiple LHPs. This paper discusses the development and implementation of a Loop Heat Pipe based thermal architecture for spacecraft. In this architecture, a Loop Heat Pipe with multiple evaporators and condensers is described in which heat load sharing and thermal control of multiple components can be achieved. A key element in using a LHP thermal architecture is defining the need for such an architecture early in the spacecraft design process. This paper describes an example in which a LHP based thermal architecture can be used and how such a system can have advantages in weight, cost and reliability over other kinds of distributed thermal control systems. The example used in this paper focuses on a Mars Rover Thermal Architecture. However, the principles described here are applicable to Earth orbiting spacecraft as well.

  9. On Sequence Learning Models: Open-loop Control Not Strictly Guided by Hick's Law.

    PubMed

    Pavão, Rodrigo; Savietto, Joice P; Sato, João R; Xavier, Gilberto F; Helene, André F

    2016-01-01

    According to the Hick's law, reaction times increase linearly with the uncertainty of target stimuli. We tested the generality of this law by measuring reaction times in a human sequence learning protocol involving serial target locations which differed in transition probability and global entropy. Our results showed that sigmoid functions better describe the relationship between reaction times and uncertainty when compared to linear functions. Sequence predictability was estimated by distinct statistical predictors: conditional probability, conditional entropy, joint probability and joint entropy measures. Conditional predictors relate to closed-loop control models describing that performance is guided by on-line access to past sequence structure to predict next location. Differently, joint predictors relate to open-loop control models assuming global access of sequence structure, requiring no constant monitoring. We tested which of these predictors better describe performance on the sequence learning protocol. Results suggest that joint predictors are more accurate than conditional predictors to track performance. In conclusion, sequence learning is better described as an open-loop process which is not precisely predicted by Hick's law. PMID:26975409

  10. Dynamic control of modeled tonic-clonic seizure states with closed-loop stimulation.

    PubMed

    Beverlin Ii, Bryce; Netoff, Theoden I

    2012-01-01

    Seizure control using deep brain stimulation (DBS) provides an alternative therapy to patients with intractable and drug resistant epilepsy. This paper presents novel DBS stimulus protocols to disrupt seizures. Two protocols are presented: open-loop stimulation and a closed-loop feedback system utilizing measured firing rates to adjust stimulus frequency. Stimulation suppression is demonstrated in a computational model using 3000 excitatory Morris-Lecar (M-L) model neurons connected with depressing synapses. Cells are connected using second order network topology (SONET) to simulate network topologies measured in cortical networks. The network spontaneously switches from tonic to clonic as synaptic strengths and tonic input to the neurons decreases. To this model we add periodic stimulation pulses to simulate DBS. Periodic forcing can synchronize or desynchronize an oscillating population of neurons, depending on the stimulus frequency and amplitude. Therefore, it is possible to either extend or truncate the tonic or clonic phases of the seizure. Stimuli applied at the firing rate of the neuron generally synchronize the population while stimuli slightly slower than the firing rate prevent synchronization. We present an adaptive stimulation algorithm that measures the firing rate of a neuron and adjusts the stimulus to maintain a relative stimulus frequency to firing frequency and demonstrate it in a computational model of a tonic-clonic seizure. This adaptive algorithm can affect the duration of the tonic phase using much smaller stimulus amplitudes than the open-loop control. PMID:23390413

  11. Dynamic control of modeled tonic-clonic seizure states with closed-loop stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Beverlin II, Bryce; Netoff, Theoden I.

    2013-01-01

    Seizure control using deep brain stimulation (DBS) provides an alternative therapy to patients with intractable and drug resistant epilepsy. This paper presents novel DBS stimulus protocols to disrupt seizures. Two protocols are presented: open-loop stimulation and a closed-loop feedback system utilizing measured firing rates to adjust stimulus frequency. Stimulation suppression is demonstrated in a computational model using 3000 excitatory Morris–Lecar (M–L) model neurons connected with depressing synapses. Cells are connected using second order network topology (SONET) to simulate network topologies measured in cortical networks. The network spontaneously switches from tonic to clonic as synaptic strengths and tonic input to the neurons decreases. To this model we add periodic stimulation pulses to simulate DBS. Periodic forcing can synchronize or desynchronize an oscillating population of neurons, depending on the stimulus frequency and amplitude. Therefore, it is possible to either extend or truncate the tonic or clonic phases of the seizure. Stimuli applied at the firing rate of the neuron generally synchronize the population while stimuli slightly slower than the firing rate prevent synchronization. We present an adaptive stimulation algorithm that measures the firing rate of a neuron and adjusts the stimulus to maintain a relative stimulus frequency to firing frequency and demonstrate it in a computational model of a tonic-clonic seizure. This adaptive algorithm can affect the duration of the tonic phase using much smaller stimulus amplitudes than the open-loop control. PMID:23390413

  12. Closed-loop focal plane wavefront control with the SCExAO instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinache, Frantz; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Guyon, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Aims: This article describes the implementation of a focal plane based wavefront control loop on the high-contrast imaging instrument SCExAO (Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics). The sensor relies on the Fourier analysis of conventional focal-plane images acquired after an asymmetric mask is introduced in the pupil of the instrument. Methods: This absolute sensor is used here in a closed-loop to compensate for the non-common path errors that normally affects any imaging system relying on an upstream adaptive optics system.This specific implementation was used to control low-order modes corresponding to eight zernike modes (from focus to spherical). Results: This loop was successfully run on-sky at the Subaru Telescope and is used to offset the SCExAO deformable mirror shape used as a zero-point by the high-order wavefront sensor. The paper details the range of errors this wavefront-sensing approach can operate within and explores the impact of saturation of the data and how it can be bypassed, at a cost in performance. Conclusions: Beyond this application, because of its low hardware impact, the asymmetric pupil Fourier wavefront sensor (APF-WFS) can easily be ported in a wide variety of wavefront sensing contexts, for ground- as well space-borne telescopes, and for telescope pupils that can be continuous, segmented or even sparse. The technique is powerful because it measures the wavefront where it really matters, at the level of the science detector.

  13. On Sequence Learning Models: Open-loop Control Not Strictly Guided by Hick’s Law

    PubMed Central

    Pavão, Rodrigo; Savietto, Joice P.; Sato, João R.; Xavier, Gilberto F.; Helene, André F.

    2016-01-01

    According to the Hick’s law, reaction times increase linearly with the uncertainty of target stimuli. We tested the generality of this law by measuring reaction times in a human sequence learning protocol involving serial target locations which differed in transition probability and global entropy. Our results showed that sigmoid functions better describe the relationship between reaction times and uncertainty when compared to linear functions. Sequence predictability was estimated by distinct statistical predictors: conditional probability, conditional entropy, joint probability and joint entropy measures. Conditional predictors relate to closed-loop control models describing that performance is guided by on-line access to past sequence structure to predict next location. Differently, joint predictors relate to open-loop control models assuming global access of sequence structure, requiring no constant monitoring. We tested which of these predictors better describe performance on the sequence learning protocol. Results suggest that joint predictors are more accurate than conditional predictors to track performance. In conclusion, sequence learning is better described as an open-loop process which is not precisely predicted by Hick’s law. PMID:26975409

  14. Active Noise Control of Radiated Noise from Jets Originating NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Michael J.; Fuller, Christopher R.; Schiller, Noah H.; Turner, Travis L.

    2013-01-01

    The reduction of jet noise using a closed-loop active noise control system with highbandwidth active chevrons was investigated. The high frequency energy introduced by piezoelectrically-driven chevrons was demonstrated to achieve a broadband reduction of jet noise, presumably due to the suppression of large-scale turbulence. For a nozzle with one active chevron, benefits of up to 0.8 dB overall sound pressure level (OASPL) were observed compared to a static chevron nozzle near the maximum noise emission angle, and benefits of up to 1.9 dB OASPL were observed compared to a baseline nozzle with no chevrons. The closed-loop actuation system was able to effectively reduce noise at select frequencies by 1-3 dB. However, integrated OASPL did not indicate further reduction beyond the open-loop benefits, most likely due to the preliminary controller design, which was focused on narrowband performance.

  15. Three-dimensional closed-loop control of self-propelled microjets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Islam S. M.; Magdanz, Veronika; Sanchez, Samuel; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Misra, Sarthak

    2013-10-01

    We demonstrate precise closed-loop control of microjets under the influence of the magnetic fields in three-dimensional (3D) space. For this purpose, we design a magnetic-based control system that directs the field lines towards reference positions. Microjets align along the controlled field lines using the magnetic torque exerted on their magnetic dipole, and move towards the reference positions using their self-propulsion force. We demonstrate the controlled motion of microjets in 3D space, and show that their propulsion force allows them to overcome vertical forces, such as buoyancy forces, interaction forces with oxygen bubbles, and vertical flow. The closed-loop control localizes the microjets within a spherical region of convergence with an average diameter of 406±220 μm, whereas the self-propulsion force allows them to swim at an average speed of 222±74 μm/s within the horizontal plane. Furthermore, we observe that the controlled microjets dive downward and swim upward towards reference positions at average speeds of 232±40 μm/s and 316±81 μm/s, respectively.

  16. Stereovision and augmented reality for closed-loop control of grasping in hand prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovic, Marko; Dosen, Strahinja; Cipriani, Christian; Popovic, Dejan; Farina, Dario

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Technologically advanced assistive devices are nowadays available to restore grasping, but effective and effortless control integrating both feed-forward (commands) and feedback (sensory information) is still missing. The goal of this work was to develop a user friendly interface for the semi-automatic and closed-loop control of grasping and to test its feasibility. Approach. We developed a controller based on stereovision to automatically select grasp type and size and augmented reality (AR) to provide artificial proprioceptive feedback. The system was experimentally tested in healthy subjects using a dexterous hand prosthesis to grasp a set of daily objects. The subjects wore AR glasses with an integrated stereo-camera pair, and triggered the system via a simple myoelectric interface. Main results. The results demonstrated that the subjects got easily acquainted with the semi-autonomous control. The stereovision grasp decoder successfully estimated the grasp type and size in realistic, cluttered environments. When allowed (forced) to correct the automatic system decisions, the subjects successfully utilized the AR feedback and achieved close to ideal system performance. Significance. The new method implements a high level, low effort control of complex functions in addition to the low level closed-loop control. The latter is achieved by providing rich visual feedback, which is integrated into the real life environment. The proposed system is an effective interface applicable with small alterations for many advanced prosthetic and orthotic/therapeutic rehabilitation devices.

  17. Interaction between 2 extracellular loops influences the activity of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, Steven D; Wang, Wuyang; Linsdell, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Activity of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is thought to be controlled by cytoplasmic factors. However, recent evidence has shown that overall channel activity is also influenced by extracellular anions that interact directly with the extracellular loops (ECLs) of the CFTR protein. Very little is known about the structure of the ECLs or how substances interacting with these ECLs might affect CFTR function. We used patch-clamp recording to investigate the accessibility of cysteine-reactive reagents to cysteines introduced throughout ECL1 and 2 key sites in ECL4. Furthermore, interactions between ECL1 and ECL4 were investigated by the formation of disulfide crosslinks between cysteines introduced into these 2 regions. Crosslinks could be formed between R899C (in ECL4) and a number of sites in ECL1 in a manner that was dependent on channel activity, suggesting that the relative orientation of these 2 loops changes on activation. Formation of these crosslinks inhibited channel function, suggesting that relative movement of these ECLs is important to normal channel function. Implications of these findings for the effects of mutations in the ECLs that are associated with cystic fibrosis and interactions with extracellular substances that influence channel activity are discussed. PMID:25253636

  18. Mechanically Pumped Fluid Loop (MPFL) Technologies for Thermal Control of Future Mars Rovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birur, Gaj; Bhandari, Pradeep; Prina, Mauro; Bame, Dave; Yavrouian, Andre; Plett, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Mechanically pumped fluid loop has been the basis of thermal control architecture for the last two Mars lander and rover missions and is the key part of the MSL thermal architecture. Several MPFL technologies are being developed for the MSL rover include long-life pumps, thermal control valves, mechanical fittings for use with CFC-11 at elevated temperatures of approx.100 C. Over three years of life tests and chemical compatibility tests on these MPFL components show that MPFL technology is mature for use on MSL. The advances in MPFL technologies for MSL Rover will benefit any future MPFL applications on NASA s Moon, Mars and Beyond Program.

  19. Examining System-Wide Impacts of Solar PV Control Systems with a Power Hardware-in-the-Loop Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Tess L.; Fuller, Jason C.; Schneider, Kevin P.; Palmintier, Bryan; Lundstrom, Blake; Chakraborty, Sudipta

    2014-10-11

    High penetration levels of distributed solar PV power generation can lead to adverse power quality impacts such as excessive voltage rise, voltage flicker, and reactive power values that result in unacceptable voltage levels. Advanced inverter control schemes have been proposed that have the potential to mitigate many power quality concerns. However, closed-loop control may lead to unintended behavior in deployed systems as complex interactions can occur between numerous operating devices. In order to enable the study of the performance of advanced control schemes in a detailed distribution system environment, a Hardware-in-the-Loop (HIL) platform has been developed. In the HIL system, GridLAB-D, a distribution system simulation tool, runs in real-time mode at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and supplies power system parameters at a point of common coupling to hardware located at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Hardware inverters interact with grid and PV simulators emulating an operational distribution system and power output from the inverters is measured and sent to PNNL to update the real-time distribution system simulation. The platform is described and initial test cases are presented. The platform is used to study the system-wide impacts and the interactions of controls applied to inverters that are integrated into a simulation of the IEEE 8500-node test feeder, with inverters in either constant power factor control or active volt/VAR control. We demonstrate that this HIL platform is well-suited to the study of advanced inverter controls and their impacts on the power quality of a distribution feeder. Additionally, the results from HIL are used to validate GridLAB-D simulations of advanced inverter controls.

  20. Active regulation of receptor ratios controls integration of quorum-sensing signals in Vibrio harveyi

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Shu-Wen; Schaffer, Jessica N; Tu, Kimberly C; Mehta, Pankaj; Lu, Wenyun; Ong, N P; Bassler, Bonnie L; Wingreen, Ned S

    2011-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a chemical signaling mechanism used by bacteria to communicate and orchestrate group behaviors. Multiple feedback loops exist in the quorum-sensing circuit of the model bacterium Vibrio harveyi. Using fluorescence microscopy of individual cells, we assayed the activity of the quorum-sensing circuit, with a focus on defining the functions of the feedback loops. We quantitatively investigated the signaling input–output relation both in cells with all feedback loops present as well as in mutants with specific feedback loops disrupted. We found that one of the feedback loops regulates receptor ratios to control the integration of multiple signals. Together, the feedback loops affect the input–output dynamic range of signal transmission and the noise in the output. We conclude that V. harveyi employs multiple feedback loops to simultaneously control quorum-sensing signal integration and to ensure signal transmission fidelity. PMID:21613980

  1. Open and closed-loop control of transonic buffet on 3D turbulent wings using fluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandois, Julien; Lepage, Arnaud; Dor, Jean-Bernard; Molton, Pascal; Ternoy, Frédéric; Geeraert, Arnaud; Brunet, Vincent; Coustols, Éric

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents an overview of the work performed recently at ONERA on the control of the buffet phenomenon. This aerodynamic instability induces strong wall pressure fluctuations and as such limits aircraft envelope; consequently, it is interesting to try to delay its onset, in order to enlarge aircraft flight envelop, but also to provide more flexibility during the design phase. Several types of flow control have been investigated, either passive (mechanical vortex generators) or active (fluidic VGs, fluidic trailing-edge device (TED)). It is shown than mechanical and fluidic VGs are able to delay buffet onset in the angle-of-attack domain by suppressing the separation downstream of the shock. The effect of the fluidic TED is different, the separation is not suppressed, but the rear wing loading is increased and consequently the buffet onset is not delayed to higher angles of attack, but only to higher lift coefficient. Then, a closed loop control methodology based on a quasi-static approach is defined and several architectures are tested for various parameters such as the input signal, the objective function or, the tuning of the feedback gain. All closed loop methods are implemented on a dSPACE device calculating in real time the fluidic actuators command from the unsteady pressure sensors data.

  2. Mock Circulatory Loop Compliance Chamber Employing a Novel Real-Time Control Process.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Charles E; Miller, Gerald E

    2012-12-01

    The use of compliance chambers in mock circulatory loop construction is the predominant means of simulating arterial compliance. Utilizing mock circulatory loops as bench test methods for cardiac assist technologies necessitates that they must be capable of reproducing the circulatory conditions that would exist physiologically. Of particular interest is the ability to determine instantaneous compliance of the system, and the ability to change the compliance in real-time. This capability enables continuous battery testing of conditions without stopping the flow to change the compliance chamber settings, and the simulation of dynamic changes in arterial compliance. The method tested involves the use of a compliance chamber utilizing a circular natural latex rubber membrane separating the fluid and air portions of the device. Change in system compliance is affected by the airspace pressure, which creates more reaction force at the membrane to the fluid pressure. A pressure sensor in the fluid portion of the chamber and a displacement sensor monitoring membrane center deflection allow for real-time inputs to the control algorithm. A predefined numerical model correlates the displacement sensor data to the volume displacement of the membrane. The control algorithm involves a tuned π loop maintaining the volume distention of the membrane via regulation of the air space pressure. The proportional integral (PI) controller tuning was achieved by creating a computational model of the compliance chamber using Simulink™ Simscape(®) toolboxes. These toolboxes were used to construct a model of the hydraulic, mechanical, and pneumatic elements in the physical design. Parameter Estimation™ tools and Design Optimization™ methods were employed to determine unknown physical parameters in the system, and tune the process controller used to maintain the compliance setting. It was found that the resulting control architecture was capable of maintaining compliance along a

  3. Transient response and stability of the AGC-PI closed-loop controlled MEMS vibratory gyroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, J.; Chi, X. Z.; Ding, H. T.; Lin, L. T.; Yang, Z. C.; Yan, G. Z.

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents a detailed study on the transient response and stability of the automatic gain control (AGC) with a proportion-integral (PI) controller for a MEMS vibratory gyroscope, which constructs a closed-loop control system to make the gyroscope achieve a constant amplitude vibration at its resonant frequency. The nonlinear mathematical model for the control system is established by applying the averaging and linearization method, which is evaluated through numerical simulations. The stability and convergence characteristics of the whole loop are investigated by using the phase plane method and Routh-Hurwitz criterion. The analysis provides a quantitative methodology for selecting the system parameters to approach stability and an optimal transient response. The negative impact induced by drift of the resonant frequency and Q-factor is also discussed. Simulation results predicted by the model are shown to be in close agreement with the experimental results carried out on a doubly decoupled bulk micromachined gyroscope. By optimizing the control parameters, the measured rising time is less than 100 ms without obvious overshoot. The setting time of the whole loop is less than 200 ms with the relative fluctuation of velocity amplitude within approximately 16 ppm for an hour. The resulting overall performance of the gyroscope is tested under atmospheric pressure. The resonant frequencies and the Q-factor of the drive mode and sense mode are 2.986 kHz, 213 and 3.199 kHz, 233, respectively. The gyroscope achieves a scale factor of 27.6 mV/deg/s with nonlinearity less than 120 ppm in the full-scale range of 800° s-1. The threshold of sensitivity is measured to be about 0.005° s-1 with noise equivalent angular rate evaluated to be 0.001°/s/Hz1/2.

  4. A statistical learning strategy for closed-loop control of fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guéniat, Florimond; Mathelin, Lionel; Hussaini, M. Yousuff

    2016-04-01

    This work discusses a closed-loop control strategy for complex systems utilizing scarce and streaming data. A discrete embedding space is first built using hash functions applied to the sensor measurements from which a Markov process model is derived, approximating the complex system's dynamics. A control strategy is then learned using reinforcement learning once rewards relevant with respect to the control objective are identified. This method is designed for experimental configurations, requiring no computations nor prior knowledge of the system, and enjoys intrinsic robustness. It is illustrated on two systems: the control of the transitions of a Lorenz'63 dynamical system, and the control of the drag of a cylinder flow. The method is shown to perform well.

  5. UKF-based closed loop iterative learning control of epileptiform wave in a neural mass model.

    PubMed

    Shan, Bonan; Wang, Jiang; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile; Yu, Haitao; Li, Huiyan

    2015-02-01

    A novel closed loop control framework is proposed to inhibit epileptiform wave in a neural mass model by external electric field, where the unscented Kalman filter method is used to reconstruct dynamics and estimate unmeasurable parameters of the model. Specifically speaking, the iterative learning control algorithm is introduced into the framework to optimize the control signal. In the proposed method, the control effect can be significantly improved based on the observation of the past attempts. Accordingly, the proposed method can effectively suppress the epileptiform wave as well as showing robustness to noises and uncertainties. Lastly, the simulation is carried out to illustrate the feasibility of the proposed method. Besides, this work shows potential value to design model-based feedback controllers for epilepsy treatment. PMID:26052360

  6. Stabilization loop of a two axes gimbal system using self-tuning PID type fuzzy controller.

    PubMed

    Abdo, Maher Mahmoud; Vali, Ahmad Reza; Toloei, Ali Reza; Arvan, Mohammad Reza

    2014-03-01

    The application of inertial stabilization system is to stabilize the sensor's line of sight toward a target by isolating the sensor from the disturbances induced by the operating environment. The aim of this paper is to present two axes gimbal system. The gimbals torque relationships are derived using Lagrange equation considering the base angular motion and dynamic mass unbalance. The stabilization loops are constructed with cross coupling unit utilizing proposed fuzzy PID type controller. The overall control system is simulated and validated using MATLAB. Then, the performance of proposed controller is evaluated comparing with conventional PI controller in terms of transient response analysis and quantitative study of error analysis. The simulation results obtained in different conditions prove the efficiency of the proposed fuzzy controller which offers a better response than the classical one, and improves further the transient and steady-state performance. PMID:24461337

  7. Wireless Magnetic-Based Closed-Loop Control of Self-Propelled Microjets

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Islam S. M.; Magdanz, Veronika; Sanchez, Samuel; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Misra, Sarthak

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate closed-loop motion control of self-propelled microjets under the influence of external magnetic fields. We control the orientation of the microjets using external magnetic torque, whereas the linear motion towards a reference position is accomplished by the thrust and pulling magnetic forces generated by the ejecting oxygen bubbles and field gradients, respectively. The magnetic dipole moment of the microjets is characterized using the U-turn technique, and its average is calculated to be 1.310−10 A.m2 at magnetic field and linear velocity of 2 mT and 100 µm/s, respectively. The characterized magnetic dipole moment is used in the realization of the magnetic force-current map of the microjets. This map in turn is used for the design of a closed-loop control system that does not depend on the exact dynamical model of the microjets and the accurate knowledge of the parameters of the magnetic system. The motion control characteristics in the transient- and steady-states depend on the concentration of the surrounding fluid (hydrogen peroxide solution) and the strength of the applied magnetic field. Our control system allows us to position microjets at an average velocity of 115 m/s, and within an average region-of-convergence of 365 m. PMID:24505244

  8. Distributed flow sensing for closed-loop speed control of a flexible fish robot.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feitian; Lagor, Francis D; Yeo, Derrick; Washington, Patrick; Paley, Derek A

    2015-12-01

    Flexibility plays an important role in fish behavior by enabling high maneuverability for predator avoidance and swimming in turbulent flow. This paper presents a novel flexible fish robot equipped with distributed pressure sensors for flow sensing. The body of the robot is molded from soft, hyperelastic material, which provides flexibility. Its Joukowski-foil shape is conducive to modeling the fluid analytically. A quasi-steady potential-flow model is adopted for real-time flow estimation, whereas a discrete-time vortex-shedding flow model is used for higher-fidelity simulation. The dynamics for the flexible fish robot yield a reduced model for one-dimensional swimming. A recursive Bayesian filter assimilates pressure measurements to estimate flow speed, angle of attack, and foil camber. The closed-loop speed-control strategy combines an inverse-mapping feedforward controller based on an average model derived for periodic actuation of angle-of-attack and a proportional-integral feedback controller utilizing the estimated flow information. Simulation and experimental results are presented to show the effectiveness of the estimation and control strategy. The paper provides a systematic approach to distributed flow sensing for closed-loop speed control of a flexible fish robot by regulating the flapping amplitude. PMID:26495855

  9. Algorithms for a Closed-Loop Artificial Pancreas: The Case for Model Predictive Control

    PubMed Central

    Bequette, B. Wayne

    2013-01-01

    The relative merits of model predictive control (MPC) and proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control are discussed, with the end goal of a closed-loop artificial pancreas (AP). It is stressed that neither MPC nor PID are single algorithms, but rather are approaches or strategies that may be implemented very differently by different engineers. The primary advantages to MPC are that (i) constraints on the insulin delivery rate (and/or insulin on board) can be explicitly included in the control calculation; (ii) it is a general framework that makes it relatively easy to include the effect of meals, exercise, and other events that are a function of the time of day; and (iii) it is flexible enough to include many different objectives, from set-point tracking (target) to zone (control to range). In the end, however, it is recognized that the control algorithm, while important, represents only a portion of the effort required to develop a closed-loop AP. Thus, any number of algorithms/approaches can be successful—the engineers involved in the design must have experience with the particular technique, including the important experience of implementing the algorithm in human studies and not simply through simulation studies. PMID:24351190

  10. Extending the Capabilities of Closed-loop Distributed Engine Control Simulations Using LAN Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aretskin-Hariton, Eliot D.; Zinnecker, Alicia Mae; Culley, Dennis E.

    2014-01-01

    Distributed Engine Control (DEC) is an enabling technology that has the potential to advance the state-of-the-art in gas turbine engine control. To analyze the capabilities that DEC offers, a Hardware-In-the-Loop (HIL) test bed is being developed at NASA Glenn Research Center. This test bed will support a systems-level analysis of control capabilities in closed-loop engine simulations. The structure of the HIL emulates a virtual test cell by implementing the operator functions, control system, and engine on three separate computers. This implementation increases the flexibility and extensibility of the HIL. Here, a method is discussed for implementing these interfaces by connecting the three platforms over a dedicated Local Area Network (LAN). This approach is verified using the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40k (C-MAPSS40k), which is typically implemented on one computer. There are marginal differences between the results from simulation of the typical and the three-computer implementation. Additional analysis of the LAN network, including characterization of network load, packet drop, and latency, is presented. The three-computer setup supports the incorporation of complex control models and proprietary engine models into the HIL framework.

  11. The insertion of human dynamics models in the flight control loops of V/STOL research aircraft. Appendix 2: The optimal control model of a pilot in V/STOL aircraft control loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zipf, Mark E.

    1989-01-01

    An overview is presented of research work focussed on the design and insertion of classical models of human pilot dynamics within the flight control loops of V/STOL aircraft. The pilots were designed and configured for use in integrated control system research and design. The models of human behavior that were considered are: McRuer-Krendel (a single variable transfer function model); and Optimal Control Model (a multi-variable approach based on optimal control and stochastic estimation theory). These models attempt to predict human control response characteristics when confronted with compensatory tracking and state regulation tasks. An overview, mathematical description, and discussion of predictive limitations of the pilot models is presented. Design strategies and closed loop insertion configurations are introduced and considered for various flight control scenarios. Models of aircraft dynamics (both transfer function and state space based) are developed and discussed for their use in pilot design and application. Pilot design and insertion are illustrated for various flight control objectives. Results of pilot insertion within the control loops of two V/STOL research aricraft (Sikorski Black Hawk UH-60A, McDonnell Douglas Harrier II AV-8B) are presented and compared against actual pilot flight data. Conclusions are reached on the ability of the pilot models to adequately predict human behavior when confronted with similar control objectives.

  12. Brain State-Dependent Closed-Loop Modulation of Paired Associative Stimulation Controlled by Sensorimotor Desynchronization

    PubMed Central

    Royter, Vladislav; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pairing peripheral electrical stimulation (ES) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) increases corticospinal excitability when applied with a specific temporal pattern. When the two stimulation techniques are applied separately, motor imagery (MI)-related oscillatory modulation amplifies both ES-related cortical effects—sensorimotor event-related desynchronization (ERD), and TMS-induced peripheral responses—motor-evoked potentials (MEP). However, the influence of brain self-regulation on the associative pairing of these stimulation techniques is still unclear. Objective: The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the effects of MI-related ERD during associative ES and TMS on subsequent corticospinal excitability. Method: The paired application of functional electrical stimulation (FES) of the extensor digitorum communis (EDC) muscle and subsequent single-pulse TMS (110% resting motor threshold (RMT)) of the contralateral primary motor cortex (M1) was controlled by beta-band (16–22 Hz) ERD during MI of finger extension and applied within a brain-machine interface environment in six healthy subjects. Neural correlates were probed by acquiring the stimulus-response curve (SRC) of both MEP peak-to-peak amplitude and area under the curve (AUC) before and after the intervention. Result: The application of approximately 150 pairs of associative FES and TMS resulted in a significant increase of MEP amplitudes and AUC, indicating that the induced increase of corticospinal excitability was mediated by the recruitment of additional neuronal pools. MEP increases were brain state-dependent and correlated with beta-band ERD, but not with the background EDC muscle activity; this finding was independent of the FES intensity applied. Conclusion: These results could be relevant for developing closed-loop therapeutic approaches such as the application of brain state-dependent, paired associative stimulation (PAS) in the context of neurorehabilitation. PMID

  13. Closed-Loop Control of a Neuroprosthetic Hand by Magnetoencephalographic Signals

    PubMed Central

    Fukuma, Ryohei; Yanagisawa, Takufumi; Yorifuji, Shiro; Kato, Ryu; Yokoi, Hiroshi; Hirata, Masayuki; Saitoh, Youichi; Kishima, Haruhiko; Kamitani, Yukiyasu; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2015-01-01

    Objective A neuroprosthesis using a brain–machine interface (BMI) is a promising therapeutic option for severely paralyzed patients, but the ability to control it may vary among individual patients and needs to be evaluated before any invasive procedure is undertaken. We have developed a neuroprosthetic hand that can be controlled by magnetoencephalographic (MEG) signals to noninvasively evaluate subjects’ ability to control a neuroprosthesis. Method Six nonparalyzed subjects performed grasping or opening movements of their right hand while the slow components of the MEG signals (SMFs) were recorded in an open-loop condition. The SMFs were used to train two decoders to infer the timing and types of movement by support vector machine and Gaussian process regression. The SMFs were also used to calculate estimated slow cortical potentials (eSCPs) to identify the origin of motor information. Finally, using the trained decoders, the subjects controlled a neuroprosthetic hand in a closed-loop condition. Results The SMFs in the open-loop condition revealed movement-related cortical field characteristics and successfully inferred the movement type with an accuracy of 75.0 ± 12.9% (mean ± SD). In particular, the eSCPs in the sensorimotor cortex contralateral to the moved hand varied significantly enough among the movement types to be decoded with an accuracy of 76.5 ± 10.6%, which was significantly higher than the accuracy associated with eSCPs in the ipsilateral sensorimotor cortex (58.1 ± 13.7%; p = 0.0072, paired two-tailed Student’s t-test). Moreover, another decoder using SMFs successfully inferred when the accuracy was the greatest. Combining these two decoders allowed the neuroprosthetic hand to be controlled in a closed-loop condition. Conclusions Use of real-time MEG signals was shown to successfully control the neuroprosthetic hand. The developed system may be useful for evaluating movement-related slow cortical potentials of severely paralyzed patients

  14. Active control of buckling of flexible beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baz, A.; Tampe, L.

    1989-01-01

    The feasibility of using the rapidly growing technology of the shape memory alloys actuators in actively controlling the buckling of large flexible structures is investigated. The need for such buckling control systems is becoming inevitable as the design trends of large space structures have resulted in the use of structural members that are long, slender, and very flexible. In addition, as these truss members are subjected mainly to longitudinal loading they become susceptible to structural instabilities due to buckling. Proper control of such instabilities is essential to the effective performance of the structures as stable platforms for communication and observation. Mathematical models are presented that simulate the dynamic characteristics of the shape memory actuator, the compressive structural members, and the associated active control system. A closed-loop computer-controlled system is designed, based on the developed mathematical models, and implemented to control the buckling of simple beams. The performance of the computer-controlled system is evaluated experimentally and compared with the theoretical predictions to validate the developed models. The obtained results emphasize the importance of buckling control and suggest the potential of the shape memory actuators as attractive means for controlling structural deformation in a simple and reliable way.

  15. Examining System-Wide Impacts of Solar PV Control Systems with a Power Hardware-in-the-Loop Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Tess L.; Fuller, Jason C.; Schneider, Kevin P.; Palmintier, Bryan; Lundstrom, Blake; Chakraborty, Sudipta

    2014-06-08

    High penetration levels of distributed solar PV power generation can lead to adverse power quality impacts, such as excessive voltage rise, voltage flicker, and reactive power values that result in unacceptable voltage levels. Advanced inverter control schemes have been developed that have the potential to mitigate many power quality concerns. However, local closed-loop control may lead to unintended behavior in deployed systems as complex interactions can occur between numerous operating devices. To enable the study of the performance of advanced control schemes in a detailed distribution system environment, a test platform has been developed that integrates Power Hardware-in-the-Loop (PHIL) with concurrent time-series electric distribution system simulation. In the test platform, GridLAB-D, a distribution system simulation tool, runs a detailed simulation of a distribution feeder in real-time mode at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and supplies power system parameters at a point of common coupling. At the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), a hardware inverter interacts with grid and PV simulators emulating an operational distribution system. Power output from the inverters is measured and sent to PNNL to update the real-time distribution system simulation. The platform is described and initial test cases are presented. The platform is used to study the system-wide impacts and the interactions of inverter control modes—constant power factor and active Volt/VAr control—when integrated into a simulated IEEE 8500-node test feeder. We demonstrate that this platform is well-suited to the study of advanced inverter controls and their impacts on the power quality of a distribution feeder. Additionally, results are used to validate GridLAB-D simulations of advanced inverter controls.

  16. Long-range looping of a locus control region drives tissue-specific chromatin packing within a multigene cluster

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Cooke, Nancy E.; Liebhaber, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    The relationships of higher order chromatin organization to mammalian gene expression remain incompletely defined. The human Growth Hormone (hGH) multigene cluster contains five gene paralogs. These genes are selectively activated in either the pituitary or the placenta by distinct components of a remote locus control region (LCR). Prior studies have revealed that appropriate activation of the placental genes is dependent not only on the actions of the LCR, but also on the multigene composition of the cluster itself. Here, we demonstrate that the hGH LCR ‘loops’ over a distance of 28 kb in primary placental nuclei to make specific contacts with the promoters of the two GH genes in the cluster. This long-range interaction sequesters the GH genes from the three hCS genes which co-assemble into a tightly packed ‘hCS chromatin hub’. Elimination of the long-range looping, via specific deletion of the placental LCR components, triggers a dramatic disruption of the hCS chromatin hub. These data reveal a higher-order structural pathway by which long-range looping from an LCR impacts on local chromatin architecture that is linked to tissue-specific gene regulation within a multigene cluster. PMID:26893355

  17. A closed-loop inductive power control system for an instrumented strain sensing tibial implant.

    PubMed

    Shiying Hao; Taylor, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Inductively-powered implantable biomedical devices are widely used nowadays, however the power variations due to the coil misalignment can significantly affect the device performance. A closed-loop power control system is proposed in this paper, which is implemented in a Subject-Carried Implant Monitoring Inductive Telemetric Ambulatory Reader (SCIMITAR) for remote strain data acquisition from an instrumented ovine tibia implant. The output power of the energizer is adaptively adjusted via a feedback circuitry connected the demodulator with the power energizer. Lab results showed that feedback suppressed variations in induced power caused by coil misalignment and extended the functional range of the device in axial and planar directions. PMID:25571497

  18. Model-Based, Closed-Loop Control of PZT Creep for Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    McCartt, A D; Ognibene, T J; Bench, G; Turteltaub, K W

    2014-01-01

    Cavity ring-down spectrometers typically employ a PZT stack to modulate the cavity transmission spectrum. While PZTs ease instrument complexity and aid measurement sensitivity, PZT hysteresis hinders the implementation of cavity-length-stabilized, data-acquisition routines. Once the cavity length is stabilized, the cavity’s free spectral range imparts extreme linearity and precision to the measured spectrum’s wavelength axis. Methods such as frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy have successfully mitigated PZT hysteresis, but their complexity limits commercial applications. Described herein is a single-laser, model-based, closed-loop method for cavity length control. PMID:25395738

  19. Time Difference Amplifier with Robust Gain Using Closed-Loop Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakura, Toru; Mandai, Shingo; Ikeda, Makoto; Asada, Kunihiro

    This paper presents a Time Difference Amplifier (TDA) that amplifies the input time difference into the output time difference. Cross coupled chains of variable delay cells with the same number of stages are applicable for TDA, and the gain is adjusted via the closed-loop control. The TDA was fabricated using 65nm CMOS and the measurement results show that the time difference gain is 4.78 at a nominal power supply while the designed gain is 4.0. The gain is stable enough to be less than 1.4% gain shift under ±10% power supply voltage fluctuation.

  20. Active control of combustion for optimal performance

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, M.D.; Agrawal, A.K.

    1999-07-01

    Combustion-zone stoichiometry and fuel-air premixing were actively controlled to optimize the combustor performance over a range of operating conditions. The objective was to maximize the combustion temperature, while maintaining NO{sub x} within a specified limit. The combustion system consisted of a premixer located coaxially near the inlet of a water-cooled shroud. The equivalence ratio was controlled by a variable-speed suction fan located downstream. The split between the premixing air and diffusion air was governed by the distance between the premixer and shroud. The combustor performance was characterized by a cost function evaluated from time-averaged measurements of NO{sub x} and oxygen concentrations in products. The cost function was minimized by downhill simplex algorithm employing closed-loop feedback. Experiments were conducted at different fuel flow rates to demonstrate that the controller optimized the performance without prior knowledge of the combustor behavior.

  1. Role of active site loop in coenzyme binding and flavin reduction in cytochrome P450 reductase.

    PubMed

    Mothersole, Robert G; Meints, Carla E; Louder, Alex; Wolthers, Kirsten R

    2016-09-15

    Cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) contains a loop within the active site (comprising Asp(634), Ala(635), Arg(636) and Asn(637); human CPR numbering) that relocates upon NADPH binding. Repositioning of the loop triggers the reorientation of an FAD-shielding tryptophan (Trp(679)) to a partially stacked conformer, reducing the energy barrier for displacement of the residue by the NADPH nicotinamide ring: an essential step for hydride transfer. We used site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic analysis to investigate if the amino acid composition of the loop influences the catalytic properties of CPR. The D634A and D634N variants elicited a modest increase in coenzyme binding affinity coupled with a 36- and 10-fold reduction in cytochrome c(3+) turnover and a 17- and 3-fold decrease in the pre-steady state rate of flavin reduction. These results, in combination with a reduction in the kinetic isotope effect for hydride transfer, suggest that diminished activity is due to destabilization of the partially stacked conformer of Trp(677) and slower release of NADP(+). In contrast, R636A, R636S and an A635G/R636S double mutant led to a modest increase in cytochrome c(3+) reduction, which is linked to weaker coenzyme binding and faster interflavin electron transfer. A potential mechanism by which Arg(636) influences catalysis is discussed. PMID:27461959

  2. Rolling Maneuver Load Alleviation using active controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods-Vedeler, Jessica A.; Pototzky, Anthony S.

    1992-01-01

    Rolling Maneuver Load Alleviation (RMLA) has been demonstrated on the Active Flexible Wing (AFW) wind tunnel model in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. The design objective was to develop a systematic approach for developing active control laws to alleviate wing incremental loads during roll maneuvers. Using linear load models for the AFW wind-tunnel model which were based on experimental measurements, two RMLA control laws were developed based on a single-degree-of-freedom roll model. The RMLA control laws utilized actuation of outboard control surface pairs to counteract incremental loads generated during rolling maneuvers and actuation of the trailing edge inboard control surface pairs to maintain roll performance. To evaluate the RMLA control laws, roll maneuvers were performed in the wind tunnel at dynamic pressures of 150, 200, and 250 psf and Mach numbers of 0.33, .38 and .44, respectively. Loads obtained during these maneuvers were compared to baseline maneuver loads. For both RMLA controllers, the incremental torsion moments were reduced by up to 60 percent at all dynamic pressures and performance times. Results for bending moment load reductions during roll maneuvers varied. In addition, in a multiple function test, RMLA and flutter suppression system control laws were operated simultaneously during roll maneuvers at dynamic pressures 11 percent above the open-loop flutter dynamic pressure.

  3. Advanced ECCD based NTM control in closed-loop operation at ASDEX Upgrade (AUG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, Matthias; Barrera-Orte, Laura; Behler, Karl; Bock, Alexander; Giannone, Louis; Maraschek, Marc; Poli, Emanuele; Rapson, Chris; Stober, Jörg; Treutterer, Wolfgang

    2012-10-01

    In high performance plasmas, Neoclassical Tearing Modes (NTMs) are regularly observed at reactor-grade beta-values. They limit the achievable normalized beta, which is undesirable because fusion performance scales as beta squared. The method of choice for controlling and avoiding NTMs at AUG is the deposition of ECCD inside the magnetic island for stabilization in real-time (rt). Our approach to tackling such complex control problems using real-time diagnostics allows rigorous optimization of all subsystems. Recent progress in rt-equilibrium reconstruction (< 3.5 ms), rt-localization of NTMs (< 8 ms) and rt beam tracing (< 25 ms) allows closed-loop feedback operation using multiple movable mirrors as the ECCD deposition actuator. The rt-equilibrium uses function parametrization or a fast Grad-Shafranov solver with an option to include rt-MSE measurements. The island localization is based on a correlation of ECE and filtered Mirnov signals. The rt beam-tracing module provides deposition locations and their derivative versus actuator position of multiple gyrotrons. The ``MHD controller'' finally drives the actuators. Results utilizing closed-loop operation with multiple gyrotrons and their effect on NTMs are shown.

  4. Analysis of dynamic nonlinearity of flow control loop through modified relay test probing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiko, I.; Sayedain, S.

    2010-12-01

    Most of the controller tuning methods in process control are based on linear models. Through the development of a detail model of the actuator-pneumatic valve dynamics, we show that even if the static characteristic of the valve is linear (including possible linearity of the flow dependence on the valve opening) the actuator-valve dynamics are strongly nonlinear. Therefore, tuning of the flow loop will be affected by the selection of the operating point and the amplitude of the relay in the relay feedback test (RFT) or modifications of this test. It is shown that Lyapunov linearisation around an equilibrium point fails to provide a local linear model of the system, and modified RFT probing is used for investigation of the system dynamics. The same test is used for the proportional-integral controller tuning in various operating points. It is recommended that the difference in the dynamic response of the loop for different relay amplitudes and operating points should be accounted for by larger stability margins.

  5. Tracking performance of unbalanced QPSK demodulators. II - Biphase Costas loop with active arm filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, M. K.

    1978-01-01

    In a Costas loop study for biphase modulation conducted by Simon and Lindsey (1977), it was demonstrated that considerable improvement in tracking performance could be obtained by employing active arm filters of the integrate-and-dump type as opposed to passive arm filters. An investigation is conducted concerning the possibility to obtain a similar performance improvement for an unbalanced quadriphase-shift-keying (QPSK) modulation. It is found that the biphase Costas loop can be used as an efficient demodulator of QPSK in cases in which the ratio of data rates is of the same order of magnitude as the inverse of the power ratio. These cases involve approximately equal signal energies in the two channels.

  6. Temperature Analysis of an Active Region Core Loop Using AIA and XRT Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garst, Jennifer W.; Schmelz, J.; Kimble, J.

    2012-05-01

    Data obtained on December 10, 2010 by both the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) are co-aligned and appropriately scaled in order to do a differential emission measure analysis of the combined data. This project uses Hybrid abundances from Fludra & Schmelz and atomic data from the CHIANTI atomic physics database to analyze an active region core loop and report on the multithermal analysis of the combined data set. The loop being analyzed is visible in the 94, 131, 171, 193, 211, 335 Å passbands on AIA; and the Al-thick, Ti-poly, Al-mesh, Al-poly/Ti-poly, C-Poly/Ti-poly, C-poly, Be-thin, Be-med, Al-med, and Al-poly filters on XRT. Solar physics research at the University of Memphis is supported by NSF ATM-0402729 as well as a Hinode subcontract from NASA/SAO.

  7. Actively Controlled Shaft Seals for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salant, Richard F.; Wolff, Paul

    1995-01-01

    This study experimentally investigates an actively controlled mechanical seal for aerospace applications. The seal of interest is a gas seal, which is considerably more compact than previous actively controlled mechanical seals that were developed for industrial use. In a mechanical seal, the radial convergence of the seal interface has a primary effect on the film thickness. Active control of the film thickness is established by controlling the radial convergence of the seal interface with a piezoelectric actuator. An actively controlled mechanical seal was initially designed and evaluated using a mathematical model. Based on these results, a seal was fabricated and tested under laboratory conditions. The seal was tested with both helium and air, at rotational speeds up to 3770 rad/sec, and at sealed pressures as high as 1.48 x 10(exp 6) Pa. The seal was operated with both manual control and with a closed-loop control system that used either the leakage rate or face temperature as the feedback. The output of the controller was the voltage applied to the piezoelectric actuator. The seal operated successfully for both short term tests (less than one hour) and for longer term tests (four hours) with a closed-loop control system. The leakage rates were typically 5-15 slm (standard liters per minute), and the face temperatures were generally maintained below 100C. When leakage rate was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint leakage rate was typically maintained within 1 slm. However, larger deviations occurred during sudden changes in sealed pressure. When face temperature was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint face temperature was generally maintained within 3 C, with larger deviations occurring when the sealed pressure changes suddenly. the experimental results were compared to the predictions from the mathematical model. The model was successful in predicting the trends in leakage rate that occurred as the balance ratio and sealed pressure changed

  8. The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, David W.; Sepe, Raymond B.; Rey, Daniel; Saarmaa, Erik; Crawley, Edward F.

    1993-01-01

    The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE) is a NASA In-Step and Control Structure Interaction (CSI) Office funded Shuttle middeck experiment. The objective is to investigate the extent to which closed-loop behavior of flexible spacecraft in zero-gravity (0-g) can be predicted. This prediction becomes particularly difficult when dynamic behavior during ground testing exhibits extensive suspension and direct gravity coupling. On-orbit system identification and control reconfiguration is investigated to improve performance which would otherwise be limited due to errors in prediction. The program is presently in its preliminary design phase with launch expected in the summer of 1994. The MACE test article consists of three attitude control torque wheels, a two axis gimballing payload, inertial sensors and a flexible support structure. With the acquisition of a second payload, this will represent a multiple payload platform with significant structural flexibility. This paper presents on-going work in the areas of modelling and control of the MACE test article in the zero and one-gravity environments. Finite element models, which include suspension and gravity effects, and measurement models, derived from experimental data, are used as the basis for Linear Quadratic Gaussian controller designs. Finite element based controllers are analytically used to study the differences in closed-loop performance as the test article transitions between the 0-g and 1-g environments. Measurement based controllers are experimentally applied to the MACE test article in the 1-g environment and achieve over an order of magnitude improvement in payload pointing accuracy when disturbed by a broadband torque disturbance. The various aspects of the flight portion of the experiment are also discussed.

  9. The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, David W.; Sepe, Raymond B.; Rey, Daniel; Saarmaa, Erik; Crawley, Edward F.

    1993-02-01

    The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE) is a NASA In-Step and Control Structure Interaction (CSI) Office funded Shuttle middeck experiment. The objective is to investigate the extent to which closed-loop behavior of flexible spacecraft in zero-gravity (0-g) can be predicted. This prediction becomes particularly difficult when dynamic behavior during ground testing exhibits extensive suspension and direct gravity coupling. On-orbit system identification and control reconfiguration is investigated to improve performance which would otherwise be limited due to errors in prediction. The program is presently in its preliminary design phase with launch expected in the summer of 1994. The MACE test article consists of three attitude control torque wheels, a two axis gimballing payload, inertial sensors and a flexible support structure. With the acquisition of a second payload, this will represent a multiple payload platform with significant structural flexibility. This paper presents on-going work in the areas of modelling and control of the MACE test article in the zero and one-gravity environments. Finite element models, which include suspension and gravity effects, and measurement models, derived from experimental data, are used as the basis for Linear Quadratic Gaussian controller designs. Finite element based controllers are analytically used to study the differences in closed-loop performance as the test article transitions between the 0-g and 1-g environments. Measurement based controllers are experimentally applied to the MACE test article in the 1-g environment and achieve over an order of magnitude improvement in payload pointing accuracy when disturbed by a broadband torque disturbance. The various aspects of the flight portion of the experiment are also discussed.

  10. A rapidly settled closed-loop control for airfoil aerodynamics based on plasma actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z.; Wong, C. W.; Wang, L.; Lu, Z.; Zhu, Y.; Zhou, Y.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on the response of the slope seeking with extended Kalman filter (EKF) deployed in a closed-loop system for airfoil aerodynamics control. A novel dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuator was used to manipulate the flow around the NACA 0015 airfoil. Experiments were performed under different freestream velocities U ∞, covering the chord Reynolds number Re from 4.4 × 104 to 7.7 × 104. Firstly, the advantages of applying this DBD plasma actuator (hereafter called sawtooth plasma actuator) on the airfoil were examined in an open-loop system at Re = 7.7 × 104. The sawtooth plasma actuator led to a delay in the stall angle α stall by 5° and an increase in the maximum lift coefficient by about 9 %. On the other hand, at the same input power, the traditional DBD plasma actuator managed a delay in α stall by only 3° and an increase in by about 3 %. Secondly, the convergence time t c of the lift force F L at Re from 4.4 × 104 to 7.7 × 104 was investigated for two closed-loop systems. It has been demonstrated that the t c was about 70 % less under the slope seeking with EKF than that under the conventional slope seeking with high-pass (HP) and low-pass (LP) filters at Re = 7.7 × 104. The reduction in t c was also observed at a different Re. Finally, the slope seeking with EKF showed excellent robustness over a moderate Re range; that is, the voltage amplitude determined by the control algorithm promptly responded to a change in Re, much faster than that of the conventional slope seeking with HP and LP filters.

  11. A Hybrid Nonlinear Control Scheme for Active Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xia, F.; Albritton, N. G.; Hung, J. Y.; Nelms, R. M.

    1996-01-01

    A nonlinear control scheme for active magnetic bearings is presented in this work. Magnet winding currents are chosen as control inputs for the electromechanical dynamics, which are linearized using feedback linearization. Then, the desired magnet currents are enforced by sliding mode control design of the electromagnetic dynamics. The overall control scheme is described by a multiple loop block diagram; the approach also falls in the class of nonlinear controls that are collectively known as the 'integrator backstepping' method. Control system hardware and new switching power electronics for implementing the controller are described. Various experiments and simulation results are presented to demonstrate the concepts' potentials.

  12. Rolling maneuver load alleviation using active controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods-Vedeler, Jessica A.; Pototzky, Anthony S.

    1992-01-01

    Rolling Maneuver Load Alleviation (RMLA) was demonstrated on the Active Flexible Wing (AFW) wind tunnel model in the LaRC Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. The design objective was to develop a systematic approach for developing active control laws to alleviate wing incremental loads during roll maneuvers. Using linear load models for the AFW wind-tunnel model which were based on experimental measurements, two RMLA control laws were developed based on a single-degree-of-freedom roll model. The RMLA control laws utilized actuation of outboard control surface pairs to counteract incremental loads generated during rolling maneuvers and roll performance. To evaluate the RMLA control laws, roll maneuvers were performed in the wind tunnel at dynamic pressures of 150, 200, and 250 psf and Mach numbers of .33, .38, and .44, respectively. Loads obtained during these maneuvers were compared to baseline maneuver loads. For both RMLA controllers, the incremental torsion moments were reduced by up to 60 percent at all dynamic pressures and performance times. Results for bending moment load reductions during roll maneuvers varied. In addition, in a multiple function test, RMLA and flutter suppression system control laws were operated simultaneously during roll maneuvers at dynamic pressures 11 percent above the open-loop flutter dynamic pressure.

  13. Dielectric elastomers for active vibration control applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herold, S.; Kaal, W.; Melz, T.

    2011-04-01

    Dielectric elastomers (DE) have proved to have high potential for smart actuator applications in many laboratory setups and also in first commercially available components. Because of their large deformation capability and the inherent fast response to external stimulation they proffer themselves to applications in the field of active vibration control, especially for lightweight structures. These structures typically tend to vibrate with large amplitudes even at low excitation forces. Here, DE actuators seem to be ideal components for setting up control loops to suppress unwanted vibrations. Due to the underlying physical effect DE actuators are generally non-linear elements with an approximately quadratic relationship between in- and output. Consequently, they automatically produce higher-order frequencies. This can cause harmful effects for vibration control on structures with high modal density. Therefore, a linearization technique is required to minimize parasitic effects. This paper shows and quantifies the nonlinearity of a commercial DE actuator and demonstrates the negative effects it can have in technical applications. For this purpose, two linearization methods are developed. Subsequently, the actuator is used to implement active vibration control for two different mechanical systems. In the first case a concentrated mass is driven with the controlled actuator resulting in a tunable oscillator. In the second case a more complex mechanical structure with multiple resonances is used. Different control approaches are applied likewise and their impact on the whole system is demonstrated. Thus, the potential of DE actuators for vibration control applications is highlighted.

  14. Ionization controls for biomineralization-inspired CO2 chemical looping at constant room temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhaoming; Hu, Yadong; Zhao, Hongqing; Wang, Yang; Xu, Xurong; Pan, Haihua; Tang, Ruikang

    2015-04-21

    Living organisms such as corals can carry out CO2 looping efficiently via biomineralization under ambient conditions. Inspired by this natural process, we establish a solution system of calcium acetate-ethanol-water (Ca(Ac)2-C2H5OH-H2O) for CO2 chemical looping at constant room temperature. The CO2 capture is achieved by its reaction with Ca(Ac)2 to form calcium carbonate (CaCO3) mineral and HAc in the binary solvent with a high C2H5OH content. However, an increase in the H2O content in the system triggers acetic acid (HAc)-induced CaCO3 dissolution to release CO2. The system can be recovered for CO2 capture readily by the replenishment of C2H5OH. This biomimetic mineralization-based CO2 capture/release is controlled by the ionization states of the electrolytes, and is precisely regulated in the C2H5OH-H2O binary solvent. Our attempt highlights the fundamental principle of solution chemistry in reaction control and provides a bioinspired strategy for CO2 capture/release with very low cost and easy availability. PMID:25787086

  15. Expanding Hardware-in-the-Loop Formation Navigation and Control with Radio Frequency Crosslink Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Jason W.; Barbee, Brent W.; Baldwin, Philip J.; Luquette, Richard J.

    2007-01-01

    The Formation Flying Testbed (FFTB) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) provides a hardware-in-the-loop test environment for formation navigation and control. The facility continues to evolve as a modular, hybrid, dynamic simulation facility for end-to-end guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) design and analysis of formation flying spacecraft. The core capabilities of the FFTB, as a platform for testing critical hardware and software algorithms in-the-loop, are reviewed with a focus on recent improvements. With the most recent improvement, in support of Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 6 testing of the Inter-spacecraft Ranging and Alarm System (IRAS) for the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, the FFTB has significantly expanded its ability to perform realistic simulations that require Radio Frequency (RF) ranging sensors for relative navigation with the Path Emulator for RF Signals (PERFS). The PERFS, currently under development at NASA GSFC, modulates RF signals exchanged between spacecraft. The RF signals are modified to accurately reflect the dynamic environment through which they travel, including the effects of medium, moving platforms, and radiated power.

  16. Low-power adaptive spike detector based on a sigma-delta control loop.

    PubMed

    Gagnon-Turcotte, G; Sawan, M; Gosselin, B

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a resources-optimized digital action potential (AP) detector featuring an adaptive threshold based on a new Sigma-delta control loop. The proposed AP detector is optimized for utilizing low hardware resources, which makes it suitable for implementation on most popular low-power microcontrollers units (MCU). The adaptive threshold is calculated using a digital control loop based on a Sigma-delta modulator that precisely estimates the standard deviation of the amplitude of the neuronal signal. The detector was implemented on a popular low-power MCU and fully characterized experimentally using previously recorded neural signals with different signal-to-noise ratios. A comparison of the obtained results with other thresholding approaches shows that the proposed method can compete with high performance and highly resources demanding spike detection approaches while achieving up to 100% of true positive detection rate at high SNR, and up to 63% for an SNR as low as 0 dB, while necessitating an execution time as low as 11 μs with the MCU operating at 8 MHz. PMID:26736719

  17. Recent Developments in Hardware-in-the-Loop Formation Navigation and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Jason W.; Luquette, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    The Formation Flying Test-Bed (FFTB) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) provides a hardware-in-the-loop test environment for formation navigation and control. The facility is evolving as a modular, hybrid, dynamic simulation facility for end-tc-end guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) design and analysis of formation flying spacecraft. The core capabilities of the FFTB, as a platform for testing critical hardware and software algorithms in-the-loop, are reviewed with a focus on many recent improvements. Two significant upgrades to the FFTB are a message-oriented middleware (MOM) architecture, and a software crosslink for inter-spacecraft ranging. The MOM architecture provides a common messaging bus for software agents, easing integration, arid supporting the GSFC Mission Services Evolution Center (GMSEC) architecture via software bridge. Additionally, the FFTB s hardware capabilities are expanding. Recently, two Low-Power Transceivers (LPTs) with ranging capability have been introduced into the FFTB. The LPT crosslinks will be connected to a modified Crosslink Channel Simulator (CCS), which applies realistic space-environment effects to the Radio Frequency (RF) signals produced by the LPTs.

  18. The active site loop of S-adenosylmethionine synthetase modulates catalytic efficiency.

    PubMed

    Taylor, John C; Takusagawa, Fusao; Markham, George D

    2002-07-30

    Crystallographic studies of Escherichia coli S-adenosylmethionine synthetase (ATP:L-methionine S-adenosyltransferase, MAT) have defined a flexible polypeptide loop that can gate access to the active site without contacting the substrates. The influence of the length and sequence of this active site loop on catalytic efficiency has been characterized in a mutant in which the E. coli MAT sequence (DRADPLEQ) has been replaced with the distinct sequence of the corresponding region of the otherwise highly homologous rat liver enzyme (HDLRNEEDV). Four additional mutants in which the entire DRADPLEQ sequence was replaced by five, six, seven, or eight glycines have been studied to unveil the effects of loop length and the influence of side chains. In all of the mutants, the maximal rate of S-adenosylmethionine formation (k(cat)) is diminished by more than 200-fold whereas the rate of hydrolysis of the tripolyphosphate intermediate is decreased by less than 3-fold. Thus, the function of the loop is localized to the first step in the overall reaction. The K(m) for methionine increases in all of the oligoglycine mutants, whereas the K(m) values for ATP are not substantially different. The k(cat) for the wild-type enzyme is decreased by increases in solution microviscosity with 55% of the maximal dependence. Thus, a diffusional event is coupled to the chemical step of AdoMet formation, which is known to be rate-limiting. The results indicate that a conformational change, possibly loop closure, is associated with AdoMet synthesis. The data integrate a previously discovered conformational change associated with PPP(i) binding to the E x AdoMet complex into the reaction sequence, reflecting a difference in protein conformation in the E x AdoMet x PPP(i) complex whether it is formed from the E x ATP x methionine complex or from binding of exogenous PPP(i). The temperature dependence of the k(cat) for S-adenosylmethionine formation shows that the removal of the side chains in the

  19. The role of feed-forward and feedback processes for closed-loop prosthesis control

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background It is widely believed that both feed-forward and feed-back mechanisms are required for successful object manipulation. Open-loop upper-limb prosthesis wearers receive no tactile feedback, which may be the cause of their limited dexterity and compromised grip force control. In this paper we ask whether observed prosthesis control impairments are due to lack of feedback or due to inadequate feed-forward control. Methods Healthy subjects were fitted with a closed-loop robotic hand and instructed to grasp and lift objects of different weights as we recorded trajectories and force profiles. We conducted three experiments under different feed-forward and feed-back configurations to elucidate the role of tactile feedback (i) in ideal conditions, (ii) under sensory deprivation, and (iii) under feed-forward uncertainty. Results (i) We found that subjects formed economical grasps in ideal conditions. (ii) To our surprise, this ability was preserved even when visual and tactile feedback were removed. (iii) When we introduced uncertainty into the hand controller performance degraded significantly in the absence of either visual or tactile feedback. Greatest performance was achieved when both sources of feedback were present. Conclusions We have introduced a novel method to understand the cognitive processes underlying grasping and lifting. We have shown quantitatively that tactile feedback can significantly improve performance in the presence of feed-forward uncertainty. However, our results indicate that feed-forward and feed-back mechanisms serve complementary roles, suggesting that to improve on the state-of-the-art in prosthetic hands we must develop prostheses that empower users to correct for the inevitable uncertainty in their feed-forward control. PMID:22032545

  20. Safety and Efficacy of 24-h Closed-Loop Insulin Delivery in Well-Controlled Pregnant Women With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Helen R.; Kumareswaran, Kavita; Elleri, Daniela; Allen, Janet M.; Caldwell, Karen; Biagioni, Martina; Simmons, David; Dunger, David B.; Nodale, Marianna; Wilinska, Malgorzata E.; Amiel, Stephanie A.; Hovorka, Roman

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the safety and efficacy of closed-loop insulin delivery in well-controlled pregnant women with type 1 diabetes treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 12 women with type 1 diabetes (aged 32.9 years, diabetes duration 17.6 years, BMI 27.1 kg/m2, and HbA1c 6.4%) were randomly allocated to closed-loop or conventional CSII. They performed normal daily activities (standardized meals, snacks, and exercise) for 24 h on two occasions at 19 and 23 weeks’ gestation. Plasma glucose time in target (63–140 mg/dL) and time spent hypoglycemic were calculated. RESULTS Plasma glucose time in target was comparable for closed-loop and conventional CSII (median [interquartile range]: 81 [59–87] vs. 81% [54–90]; P = 0.75). Less time was spent hypoglycemic (<45 mg/dL [0.0 vs. 0.3%]; P = 0.04), with a lower low blood glucose index (2.4 [0.9–3.5] vs. 3.3 [1.9–5.1]; P = 0.03), during closed-loop insulin delivery. CONCLUSIONS Closed-loop insulin delivery was as effective as conventional CSII, with less time spent in extreme hypoglycemia. PMID:22011408

  1. Development of spin coater with close loop control system using ATMega8535 microcontroller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratama, Iqbal; Mindara, Jajat Yuda; Maulana, Dwindra W.; Panatarani, C.; Joni, I. Made

    2016-02-01

    Spin coater usually applied in preparation of a thin layer in industrial coatings and advanced material functionalization in various applications. This paper reports the development of spin coater with a closed loop control system using ATMega8535 microcontroller. The thickness of the thin film layer depend on the rotation of spin coater in which usually controlled by open-loop type. In long-term utilization of the spin coater, the performance of the motor usually degraded and caused the speed of the rotation is no longer accurate. Therefore to resolve the drawback, a close-loop system is applied in currently developed spin coater. The speed range of the spin coater was designed in between 450-6000 rpm, equipped with user interface through push button and LCD display. The rotary encoder transducer was applied to sense the speed of the dc motor. The pulse width modulation (PWM) method is applied to control the speed of the dc motor. The performance of the control system were evaluated based on the applied voltage to the PWM driver (L298) versus speed of the motor and also the rise time, overshoot, and settling time of the control system. The result shows that in the setting of low speed (450 rpm), the settling time is very fast about 12 seconds and very high overshoot about 225 rpm, contrary for the high speed (5550 rpm) the setting time is 71 seconds and very low overshot about 30 rpm. In addition, to evaluate the stability of the mechanical system, the spin coater was tested to prepare a ZnO thin film in various speed of rotations and at various concentrations of the solution, i.e. 10 wt.% and 15 wt.%. It is concluded that the spin coater can be utilized for thin film coating after pass the maximum of the settling time (71 seconds). The currently developed spin coater produce a film with common characteristics of the spin coater where thicker film was obtained when higher concentration was used and thinner the film was obtained when higher speed of the rotation

  2. A Machine Tool Controller using Cascaded Servo Loops and Multiple Feedback Sensors per Axis

    SciTech Connect

    Weinert, G F; Hopkins, D J; Wulff, T A

    2004-03-19

    In the past, several of LLNL precision machine tools have been built with custom in-house designed machine tool controllers (CNC). In addition, many of these controllers have reached the end of their maintainable lifetime, limit future machine application enhancements, have poor operator interfaces and are a potential single point of failure for the machine tool. There have been attempts to replace some of these custom controllers with commercial controller products, unfortunately, this has occurred with only limited success. Many commercial machine tool controllers have the following undesirable characteristics, a closed architecture (use as the manufacturer intended and not as LLNL would desire), allow only a single feedback device per machine axis and have limited servo axis compensation calculations. Technological improvements in recent years have allowed for the development of some commercial machine tool controllers that are more open in their architecture and have the power to solve some of these limitations. In this paper, we exploit the capabilities of one of these controllers to allow it to process multiple feedback sensors for tool tip calculations in real time and to extend the servo compensation capabilities by cascading several standard motor compensation loops.

  3. Closed-Loop Control of Chemical Injection Rate for a Direct Nozzle Injection System

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xiang; Walgenbach, Martin; Doerpmond, Malte; Schulze Lammers, Peter; Sun, Yurui

    2016-01-01

    To realize site-specific and variable-rate application of agricultural pesticides, accurately metering and controlling the chemical injection rate is necessary. This study presents a prototype of a direct nozzle injection system (DNIS) by which chemical concentration transport lag was greatly reduced. In this system, a rapid-reacting solenoid valve (RRV) was utilized for injecting chemicals, driven by a pulse-width modulation (PWM) signal at 100 Hz, so with varying pulse width the chemical injection rate could be adjusted. Meanwhile, a closed-loop control strategy, proportional-integral-derivative (PID) method, was applied for metering and stabilizing the chemical injection rate. In order to measure chemical flow rates and input them into the controller as a feedback in real-time, a thermodynamic flowmeter that was independent of chemical viscosity was used. Laboratory tests were conducted to assess the performance of DNIS and PID control strategy. Due to the nonlinear input–output characteristics of the RRV, a two-phase PID control process obtained better effects as compared with single PID control strategy. Test results also indicated that the set-point chemical flow rate could be achieved within less than 4 s, and the output stability was improved compared to the case without control strategy. PMID:26805833

  4. Closed-Loop Control of Chemical Injection Rate for a Direct Nozzle Injection System.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiang; Walgenbach, Martin; Doerpmond, Malte; Schulze Lammers, Peter; Sun, Yurui

    2016-01-01

    To realize site-specific and variable-rate application of agricultural pesticides, accurately metering and controlling the chemical injection rate is necessary. This study presents a prototype of a direct nozzle injection system (DNIS) by which chemical concentration transport lag was greatly reduced. In this system, a rapid-reacting solenoid valve (RRV) was utilized for injecting chemicals, driven by a pulse-width modulation (PWM) signal at 100 Hz, so with varying pulse width the chemical injection rate could be adjusted. Meanwhile, a closed-loop control strategy, proportional-integral-derivative (PID) method, was applied for metering and stabilizing the chemical injection rate. In order to measure chemical flow rates and input them into the controller as a feedback in real-time, a thermodynamic flowmeter that was independent of chemical viscosity was used. Laboratory tests were conducted to assess the performance of DNIS and PID control strategy. Due to the nonlinear input-output characteristics of the RRV, a two-phase PID control process obtained better effects as compared with single PID control strategy. Test results also indicated that the set-point chemical flow rate could be achieved within less than 4 s, and the output stability was improved compared to the case without control strategy. PMID:26805833

  5. A general transfer-function approach to noise filtering in open-loop quantum control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, Lorenza

    2015-03-01

    Hamiltonian engineering via unitary open-loop quantum control provides a versatile and experimentally validated framework for manipulating a broad class of non-Markovian open quantum systems of interest, with applications ranging from dynamical decoupling and dynamically corrected quantum gates, to noise spectroscopy and quantum simulation. In this context, transfer-function techniques directly motivated by control engineering have proved invaluable for obtaining a transparent picture of the controlled dynamics in the frequency domain and for quantitatively analyzing performance. In this talk, I will show how to identify a computationally tractable set of ``fundamental filter functions,'' out of which arbitrary filter functions may be assembled up to arbitrary high order in principle. Besides avoiding the infinite recursive hierarchy of filter functions that arises in general control scenarios, this fundamental set suffices to characterize the error suppression capabilities of the control protocol in both the time and frequency domain. I will show, in particular, how the resulting notion of ``filtering order'' reveals conceptually distinct, albeit complementary, features of the controlled dynamics as compared to the ``cancellation order,'' traditionally defined in the Magnus sense. Implications for current quantum control experiments will be discussed. Work supported by the U.S. Army Research Office under Contract No. W911NF-14-1-0682.

  6. Development of a Hardware-in-the-loop Simulator for Spacecraft Attitude Control Using Thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Dong-Wook; Park, Sang-Young; Kim, Do-Hee; Choi, Kyu-Hong

    2009-03-01

    In this study, a Hardware-In-the-Loop (HIL) simulator using thrusters is developed to validate the spacecraft attitude system. To control the attitude of the simulator, eight cold gas thrusters are aligned with roll, pitch and yaw axis. Also linear actuators are applied to the HIL simulator for automatic mass balancing to compensate the center of mass offset from the center of rotation. The HIL simulator consists of an embedded computer (Onboard PC) for simulator system control, a wireless adapter for wireless network, a rate gyro sensor to measure 3-axis attitude of the simulator, an inclinometer to measure horizontal attitude, and a battery set to supply power for the simulator independently. For the performance test of the HIL simulator, a bang-bang controller and Pulse-Width Pulse-Frequency (PWPF) modulator are evaluated successfully. The maneuver of 68 deg. in yaw axis is tested for the comparison of the both controllers. The settling time of the bang-bang controller is faster than that of the PWPF modulator by six seconds in the experiment. The required fuel of the PWPF modulator is used as much as 51% of bang-bang controller in the experiment. Overall, the HIL simulator is appropriately developed to validate the control algorithms using thrusters.

  7. Closed-Loop Acoustic Control of Reverberant Room for Satellite Environmental Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssens, Karl; Bianciardi, Fabio; Sabbatini, Danilo; Debille, Jan; Carrella, Alex

    2012-07-01

    The full satellite acoustic test is an important milestone in a satellite launch survivability verification campaign. This test is required to verify the satellite’s mechanical design against the high-level acoustic loads induced by the launch vehicle during the atmospheric flight. During the test, the satellite is subjected to a broadband diffuse acoustic field, reproducing the pressure levels observed during launch. The excitation is in most cases provided by a combination of horns for the low frequencies and noise generators for the higher frequencies. Acoustic control tests are commonly performed in reverberant rooms, controlling the sound pressure levels in third octave bands over the specified target spectrum. This paper discusses an automatic feedback control system for acoustic control of large reverberation rooms for satellite environmental testing. The acoustic control system consists of parallel third octave PI (Proportional Integral) feedback controllers that take the reverberation characteristics of the room into consideration. The drive output of the control system is shaped at every control step based on the comparison of the average third octave noise spectrum, measured from a number of microphones in the test room, with the target spectrum. Cross-over filters split the output drive into band- limited signals to feed each of the horns. The control system is realized in several steps. In the first phase, a dynamic process model is developed, including the non-linear characteristics of the horns and the reverberant properties of the room. The model is identified from dynamic experiments using system identification techniques. In the next phase, an adequate control strategy is designed which is capable of reaching the target spectrum in the required time period without overshoots. This control strategy is obtained from model-in-the-loop (MIL) simulations, evaluating the performance of various potential strategies. Finally, the proposed strategy is

  8. Wide field adaptive optics laboratory demonstration with closed-loop tomographic control.

    PubMed

    Costille, Anne; Petit, Cyril; Conan, Jean-Marc; Kulcsár, Caroline; Raynaud, Henri-François; Fusco, Thierry

    2010-03-01

    HOMER, the new bench developed at ONERA devoted to wide field adaptive optics (WFAO) laboratory research, has allowed the first experimental validations of multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) and laser tomography adaptive optics (LTAO) concepts with a linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) control approach. Results obtained in LTAO in closed loop show the significant gain in performance brought by LQG control, which allows tomographic reconstruction. We present a calibration and model identification strategy. Experimental results are shown to be consistent with end-to-end simulations. These results are very encouraging and demonstrate robustness of performance with respect to inevitable experimental uncertainties. They represent a first step for the study of very large telescope (VLT) and extremely large telescopes (ELT) instruments. PMID:20208937

  9. On the dynamics and control of flexible multibody systems with closed loops

    SciTech Connect

    Damaren, C.J.

    2000-03-01

    The motion control problem for cooperating flexible robot arms manipulating a large rigid payload is considered. An output that depends on the payload position and contributions form the joint motion of each arm is constructed whose rate yields the passivity property with respect to a special input. The input is a combination of the torques from each arm and contains a free load-sharing parameter. The passivity property is shown to depend on the payload mass properties, and in cases where the payload is large, a passivity-based controller combining feedforward and feedback as elements is devised, which yields tracking. An experimental facility consisting of two planar 3-DoF arms is used to implement the strategies. Good tracking is observed and compared with simulation predictions for closed-loop flexible multibody systems.

  10. Closed-loop control of zebrafish response using a bioinspired robotic-fish in a preference test

    PubMed Central

    Kopman, Vladislav; Laut, Jeffrey; Polverino, Giovanni; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we study the response of zebrafish to a robotic-fish whose morphology and colour pattern are inspired by zebrafish. Experiments are conducted in a three-chambered instrumented water tank where a robotic-fish is juxtaposed with an empty compartment, and the preference of live subjects is scored as the mean time spent in the vicinity of the tank's two lateral sides. The tail-beating of the robotic-fish is controlled in real-time based on feedback from fish motion to explore a spectrum of closed-loop systems, including proportional and integral controllers. Closed-loop control systems are complemented by open-loop strategies, wherein the tail-beat of the robotic-fish is independent of the fish motion. The preference space and the locomotory patterns of fish for each experimental condition are analysed and compared to understand the influence of real-time closed-loop control on zebrafish response. The results of this study show that zebrafish respond differently to the pattern of tail-beating motion executed by the robotic-fish. Specifically, the preference and behaviour of zebrafish depend on whether the robotic-fish tail-beating frequency is controlled as a function of fish motion and how such closed-loop control is implemented. PMID:23152102

  11. Closed-loop control of zebrafish response using a bioinspired robotic-fish in a preference test.

    PubMed

    Kopman, Vladislav; Laut, Jeffrey; Polverino, Giovanni; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we study the response of zebrafish to a robotic-fish whose morphology and colour pattern are inspired by zebrafish. Experiments are conducted in a three-chambered instrumented water tank where a robotic-fish is juxtaposed with an empty compartment, and the preference of live subjects is scored as the mean time spent in the vicinity of the tank's two lateral sides. The tail-beating of the robotic-fish is controlled in real-time based on feedback from fish motion to explore a spectrum of closed-loop systems, including proportional and integral controllers. Closed-loop control systems are complemented by open-loop strategies, wherein the tail-beat of the robotic-fish is independent of the fish motion. The preference space and the locomotory patterns of fish for each experimental condition are analysed and compared to understand the influence of real-time closed-loop control on zebrafish response. The results of this study show that zebrafish respond differently to the pattern of tail-beating motion executed by the robotic-fish. Specifically, the preference and behaviour of zebrafish depend on whether the robotic-fish tail-beating frequency is controlled as a function of fish motion and how such closed-loop control is implemented. PMID:23152102

  12. Active Displacement Control of Active Magnetic Bearing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertész, Milan; Kozakovič, Radko; Magdolen, Luboš; Masaryk, Michal

    2014-12-01

    The worldwide energy production nowadays is over 3400 GW while storage systems have a capacity of only 90 GW [1]. There is a good solution for additional storage capacity in flywheel energy storage systems (FES). The main advantage of FES is its relatively high efficiency especially with using the active magnetic bearing system. Therefore there exist good reasons for appropriate simulations and for creating a suitable magneto-structural control system. The magnetic bearing, including actuation, is simulated in the ANSYS parametric design language (APDL). APDL is used to create the loops of transient simulations where boundary conditions (BC) are updated based upon a "gap sensor" which controls the nodal position values of the centroid of the shaft and the current density inputs onto the copper windings.

  13. Closed-loop control of renal perfusion pressure in physiological experiments.

    PubMed

    Campos-Delgado, D U; Bonilla, I; Rodríguez-Martínez, M; Sánchez-Briones, M E; Ruiz-Hernández, E

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents the design, experimental modeling, and control of a pump-driven renal perfusion pressure (RPP)-regulatory system to implement precise and relatively fast RPP regulation in rats. The mechatronic system is a simple, low-cost, and reliable device to automate the RPP regulation process based on flow-mediated occlusion. Hence, the regulated signal is the RPP measured in the left femoral artery of the rat, and the manipulated variable is the voltage applied to a dc motor that controls the occlusion of the aorta. The control system is implemented in a PC through the LabView software, and a data acquisition board NI USB-6210. A simple first-order linear system is proposed to approximate the dynamics in the experiment. The parameters of the model are chosen to minimize the error between the predicted and experimental output averaged from eight input/output datasets at different RPP operating conditions. A closed-loop servocontrol system based on a pole-placement PD controller plus dead-zone compensation was proposed for this purpose. First, the feedback structure was validated in simulation by considering parameter uncertainty, and constant and time-varying references. Several experimental tests were also conducted to validate in real time the closed-loop performance for stepwise and fast switching references, and the results show the effectiveness of the proposed automatic system to regulate the RPP in the rat, in a precise, accurate (mean error less than 2 mmHg) and relatively fast mode (10-15 s of response time). PMID:23358945

  14. On-board closed-loop congestion control for satellite based packet switching networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Pong P.; Ivancic, William D.; Kim, Heechul

    1993-01-01

    NASA LeRC is currently investigating a satellite architecture that incorporates on-board packet switching capability. Because of the statistical nature of packet switching, arrival traffic may fluctuate and thus it is necessary to integrate congestion control mechanism as part of the on-board processing unit. This study focuses on the closed-loop reactive control. We investigate the impact of the long propagation delay on the performance and propose a scheme to overcome the problem. The scheme uses a global feedback signal to regulate the packet arrival rate of ground stations. In this scheme, the satellite continuously broadcasts the status of its output buffer and the ground stations respond by selectively discarding packets or by tagging the excessive packets as low-priority. The two schemes are evaluated by theoretical queuing analysis and simulation. The former is used to analyze the simplified model and to determine the basic trends and bounds, and the later is used to assess the performance of a more realistic system and to evaluate the effectiveness of more sophisticated control schemes. The results show that the long propagation delay makes the closed-loop congestion control less responsive. The broadcasted information can only be used to extract statistical information. The discarding scheme needs carefully-chosen status information and reduction function, and normally requires a significant amount of ground discarding to reduce the on-board packet loss probability. The tagging scheme is more effective since it tolerates more uncertainties and allows a larger margin of error in status information. It can protect the high-priority packets from excessive loss and fully utilize the downlink bandwidth at the same time.

  15. On-board closed-loop congestion control for satellite based packet switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Pong P.; Ivancic, William D.; Kim, Heechul

    1993-12-01

    NASA LeRC is currently investigating a satellite architecture that incorporates on-board packet switching capability. Because of the statistical nature of packet switching, arrival traffic may fluctuate and thus it is necessary to integrate congestion control mechanism as part of the on-board processing unit. This study focuses on the closed-loop reactive control. We investigate the impact of the long propagation delay on the performance and propose a scheme to overcome the problem. The scheme uses a global feedback signal to regulate the packet arrival rate of ground stations. In this scheme, the satellite continuously broadcasts the status of its output buffer and the ground stations respond by selectively discarding packets or by tagging the excessive packets as low-priority. The two schemes are evaluated by theoretical queuing analysis and simulation. The former is used to analyze the simplified model and to determine the basic trends and bounds, and the later is used to assess the performance of a more realistic system and to evaluate the effectiveness of more sophisticated control schemes. The results show that the long propagation delay makes the closed-loop congestion control less responsive. The broadcasted information can only be used to extract statistical information. The discarding scheme needs carefully-chosen status information and reduction function, and normally requires a significant amount of ground discarding to reduce the on-board packet loss probability. The tagging scheme is more effective since it tolerates more uncertainties and allows a larger margin of error in status information. It can protect the high-priority packets from excessive loss and fully utilize the downlink bandwidth at the same time.

  16. Day and Night Closed-Loop Control in Adults With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Luijf, Yoeri M.; DeVries, J. Hans; Zwinderman, Koos; Leelarathna, Lalantha; Nodale, Marianna; Caldwell, Karen; Kumareswaran, Kavita; Elleri, Daniela; Allen, Janet M.; Wilinska, Malgorzata E.; Evans, Mark L.; Hovorka, Roman; Doll, Werner; Ellmerer, Martin; Mader, Julia K.; Renard, Eric; Place, Jerome; Farret, Anne; Cobelli, Claudio; Del Favero, Simone; Dalla Man, Chiara; Avogaro, Angelo; Bruttomesso, Daniela; Filippi, Alessio; Scotton, Rachele; Magni, Lalo; Lanzola, Giordano; Di Palma, Federico; Soru, Paola; Toffanin, Chiara; De Nicolao, Giuseppe; Arnolds, Sabine; Benesch, Carsten; Heinemann, Lutz

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare two validated closed-loop (CL) algorithms versus patient self-control with CSII in terms of glycemic control. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This study was a multicenter, randomized, three-way crossover, open-label trial in 48 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus for at least 6 months, treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. Blood glucose was controlled for 23 h by the algorithm of the Universities of Pavia and Padova with a Safety Supervision Module developed at the Universities of Virginia and California at Santa Barbara (international artificial pancreas [iAP]), by the algorithm of University of Cambridge (CAM), or by patients themselves in open loop (OL) during three hospital admissions including meals and exercise. The main analysis was on an intention-to-treat basis. Main outcome measures included time spent in target (glucose levels between 3.9 and 8.0 mmol/L or between 3.9 and 10.0 mmol/L after meals). RESULTS Time spent in the target range was similar in CL and OL: 62.6% for OL, 59.2% for iAP, and 58.3% for CAM. While mean glucose level was significantly lower in OL (7.19, 8.15, and 8.26 mmol/L, respectively) (overall P = 0.001), percentage of time spent in hypoglycemia (<3.9 mmol/L) was almost threefold reduced during CL (6.4%, 2.1%, and 2.0%) (overall P = 0.001) with less time ≤2.8 mmol/L (overall P = 0.038). There were no significant differences in outcomes between algorithms. CONCLUSIONS Both CAM and iAP algorithms provide safe glycemic control. PMID:24170747

  17. Open-loop control of liquid-crystal spatial light modulators for vertical atmospheric turbulence wavefront correction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Hu, Lifa; Mu, Quanquan; Cao, Zhaoliang; Xuan, Li

    2011-01-01

    We present an open-loop adaptive optics (AO) system based on two liquid-crystal spatial light modulators (LCSLMs) that profit from high precision wavefront generation and good repeatability. A wide optical bandwidth of 300 nm is designed for the system, and a new open-loop optical layout is invented to conveniently switch between the open and closed loop. The corresponding control algorithm is introduced with a loop frequency (the reciprocal of the total time delay of a correction loop) of 103 Hz. The system was mounted onto a 2.16 m telescope for vertical atmospheric turbulence correction. The full width at half-maximum of the image of the star α Boo reached 0.636 arc sec after the open-loop correction, while it was 2.12 arc sec before the correction. The result indicates that the open-loop AO system based on LCSLMs potentially has the ability to be used for general astronomical applications. PMID:21221164

  18. Experimental evaluation of open-loop UpLink Power Control using ACTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dissanayake, Asoka

    1995-01-01

    The present investigation deals with the implementation of open-loop up-link power control using a beacon signal in the down-link frequency band as the control parameter. A power control system was developed and tested using the ACTS satellite. ACTS carries beacon signals in both up- and down-link bands with which the relationship between the up- and down-link fading can be established. A power controlled carrier was transmitted to the ACTS satellite from a NASA operated ground station and the transponded signal was received at COMSAT Laboratories using a terminal that was routinely used to monitor the two ACTS beacon signals. The experiment ran for a period of approximately six months and the collected data were used to evaluate the performance of the power control system. A brief review of propagation factors involved in estimating the up-link fade using a beacon signal in the down-link band are presented. The power controller design and the experiment configuration are discussed. Results of the experiment are discussed.

  19. A linear control design structure to maintain loop properties during limit operation in a multi-nozzle turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattern, Duane; Ouzts, Peter

    1991-01-01

    The implementation of multi-variable control systems on turbofan engines requires the use of limit protection to maintain safe engine operation. Since a turbofan engine typically encounters limits during transient operation, the use of a limit protection scheme that modifies the feedback loop may void the desired 'guarantees' associated with linear multi-variable control design methods, necessitating considerable simulation to validate the control with limited protection. An alternative control design structure is proposed that maintains the desired linear feedback properties when certain safety limits are encountered by moving the limit protection scheme outside the feedback loop. This proposed structure is compared to a structure with a limit protection scheme that modifies the feedback loop properties. The two design structures are compared using both linear and nonlinear simulations. The evaluation emphasizes responses where the fan surge margin limit is encountered.

  20. A linear control design structure to maintain loop properties during limit operation in a multi-nozzle turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattern, Duane; Ouzts, Peter

    1991-01-01

    The implementation of multi-variable control systems on turbofan engines requires the use of limit protection to maintain safe engine operation. Since a turbofan engine typically encounters limits during transient operation, the use of a limit protection scheme that modifies the feedback loop may void the desired 'guarantees' associated with linear multi-variable control design methods, necessitating considerable simulation to validate the control with limit protection. An alternative control design structure is proposed that maintains the desired linear feedback properties when certain safety limits are encountered by moving the limit protection scheme outside of the feedback loop. This proposed structure is compared to a structure with a limit protection scheme that modifies the feedback loop properties. The two design structures are compared using both linear and nonlinear simulations. The evaluation emphasizes responses where the fan surge margin limit is encountered.

  1. Latest developments on the loop control system of AdOpt@TNG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghedina, Adriano; Gaessler, Wolfgang; Cecconi, Massimo; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Puglisi, Alfio T.; De Bonis, Fulvio

    2004-10-01

    The Adaptive Optics System of the Galileo Telescope (AdOpt@TNG) is the only adaptive optics system mounted on a telescope which uses a pyramid wavefront snesor and it has already shown on sky its potentiality. Recently AdOpt@TNG has undergone deep changes at the level of its higher orders control system. The CCD and the Real Time Computer (RTC) have been substituted as a whole. Instead of the VME based RTC, due to its frequent breakdowns, a dual pentium processor PC with Real-Time-Linux has been chosen. The WFS CCD, that feeds the images to the RTC, was changed to an off-the-shelf camera system from SciMeasure with an EEV39 80x80 pixels as detector. While the APD based Tip/Tilt loop has shown the quality on the sky at the TNG site and the ability of TNG to take advantage of this quality, up to the diffraction limit, the High-Order system has been fully re-developed and the performance of the closed loop is under evaluation to offer the system with the best performance to the astronomical community.

  2. Negative Feedback Loops Involving Small Regulatory RNAs Precisely Control the Vibrio harveyi Quorum-Sensing Response

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Kimberly C.; Long, Tao; Svenningsen, Sine L.; Wingreen, Ned S.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Quorum sensing (QS) bacteria assess population density through secretion and detection of molecules called autoinducers (AIs). We identify and characterize two Vibrio harveyi negative feedback loops that facilitate precise transitions between low-cell-density (LCD) and high-cell-density (HCD) states. The QS central regulator LuxO autorepresses its own transcription and the Qrr small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) posttranscriptionally repress luxO. Disrupting feedback increases the concentration of AIs required for cells to transit from LCD to HCD QS modes. Thus, the two cooperative negative feedback loops determine the point at which V. harveyi has reached a quorum and control the range of AIs over which the transition occurs. Negative feedback regulation also constrains the range of QS output – by preventing sRNA levels from becoming too high and preventing luxO mRNA levels from reaching zero. We suggest that sRNA-mediated feedback regulation is a network design feature that permits fine-tuning of gene regulation and maintenance of homeostasis. PMID:20188674

  3. Consecutive Positive Feedback Loops Create a Bistable Switch that Controls Preadipocyte-to-Adipocyte Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Park, Byung Ouk; Ahrends, Robert; Teruel, Mary N.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Adipogenesis, or the conversion of proliferating preadipocytes into nondividing adipocytes, is an important part of the vertebrate weight-maintenance program. It is not yet understood how and when an irreversible transition occurs into a distinct state capable of accumulating lipid. Here, we use single-cell fluorescence imaging to show that an all-or-none switch is induced before lipid accumulation occurs. Conversion begins by glucocorticoid and cAMP signals raising C/EBPβ levels above a critical threshold, triggering three consecutive positive feedback loops: from PPARγ to C/EBPα, then to C/EBPβ, and last to the insulin receptor. Experiments and modeling show that these feedbacks create a robust, irreversible transition to a terminally differentiated state by rejecting short- and low-amplitude stimuli. After the differentiation switch is triggered, insulin controls fat accumulation in a graded fashion. Altogether, our study introduces a regulatory motif that locks cells in a differentiated state by engaging a sequence of positive feedback loops. PMID:23063366

  4. Enhancer-like long-range transcriptional activation by λ CI-mediated DNA looping

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Lun; Murchland, Iain; Shearwin, Keith E.; Dodd, Ian B.

    2013-01-01

    How distant enhancer elements regulate the assembly of a transcription complex at a promoter remains poorly understood. Here, we use long-range gene regulation by the bacteriophage λ CI protein as a powerful system to examine this process in vivo. A 2.3-kb DNA loop, formed by CI bridging its binding sites at OR and OL, is known already to enhance repression at the lysogenic promoter PRM, located at OR. Here, we show that CI looping also activates PRM by allowing the C-terminal domain of the α subunit of the RNA polymerase bound at PRM to contact a DNA site adjacent to the distal CI sites at OL. Our results establish OL as a multifaceted enhancer element, able to activate transcription from long distances independently of orientation and position. We develop a physicochemical model of our in vivo data and use it to show that the observed activation is consistent with a simple recruitment mechanism, where the α–C-terminal domain to DNA contact need only provide ∼2.7 kcal/mol of additional binding energy for RNA polymerase. Structural modeling of this complete enhancer–promoter complex reveals how the contact is achieved and regulated, and suggests that distal enhancer elements, once appropriately positioned at the promoter, can function in essentially the same way as proximal promoter elements. PMID:23382214

  5. Enhancer-like long-range transcriptional activation by λ CI-mediated DNA looping.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lun; Murchland, Iain; Shearwin, Keith E; Dodd, Ian B

    2013-02-19

    How distant enhancer elements regulate the assembly of a transcription complex at a promoter remains poorly understood. Here, we use long-range gene regulation by the bacteriophage λ CI protein as a powerful system to examine this process in vivo. A 2.3-kb DNA loop, formed by CI bridging its binding sites at OR and OL, is known already to enhance repression at the lysogenic promoter PRM, located at OR. Here, we show that CI looping also activates PRM by allowing the C-terminal domain of the α subunit of the RNA polymerase bound at PRM to contact a DNA site adjacent to the distal CI sites at OL. Our results establish OL as a multifaceted enhancer element, able to activate transcription from long distances independently of orientation and position. We develop a physicochemical model of our in vivo data and use it to show that the observed activation is consistent with a simple recruitment mechanism, where the α-C-terminal domain to DNA contact need only provide ∼2.7 kcal/mol of additional binding energy for RNA polymerase. Structural modeling of this complete enhancer-promoter complex reveals how the contact is achieved and regulated, and suggests that distal enhancer elements, once appropriately positioned at the promoter, can function in essentially the same way as proximal promoter elements. PMID:23382214

  6. Development of Small Molecules that Specifically Inhibit the D-loop Activity of RAD51.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wei; Budke, Brian; Pawlowski, Michal; Connell, Philip P; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2016-05-26

    RAD51 is the central protein in homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair and represents a therapeutic target in oncology. Herein we report a novel class of RAD51 inhibitors that were identified by high throughput screening. In contrast to many previously reported RAD51 inhibitors, our lead compound 1 is capable of blocking RAD51-mediated D-loop formation (IC50 21.3 ± 7.8 μM) at concentrations that do not influence RAD51 binding to ssDNA. In human cells, 1 inhibits HR (IC50 13.1 ± 1.6 μM) without blocking RAD51's ability to assemble into subnuclear foci at sites of DNA damage. We determined that the active constituent of 1 is actually an oxidized derivative (termed RI(dl)-1 or 8) of the original screening compound. Our SAR campaign also yielded RI(dl)-2 (hereafter termed 9h), which effectively blocks RAD51's D-loop activity in biochemical systems (IC50 11.1 ± 1.3 μM) and inhibits HR activity in human cells (IC50 3.0 ± 1.8 μM). PMID:27049177

  7. Loop Heat Pipe Operation Using Heat Source Temperature for Set Point Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Paiva, Kleber; Mantelli, Marcia

    2011-01-01

    The LHP operating temperature is governed by the saturation temperature of its reservoir. Controlling the reservoir saturation temperature is commonly accomplished by cold biasing the reservoir and using electrical heaters to provide the required control power. Using this method, the loop operating temperature can be controlled within +/- 0.5K. However, because of the thermal resistance that exists between the heat source and the LHP evaporator, the heat source temperature will vary with its heat output even if LHP operating temperature is kept constant. Since maintaining a constant heat source temperature is of most interest, a question often raised is whether the heat source temperature can be used for LHP set point temperature control. A test program with a miniature LHP has been carried out to investigate the effects on the LHP operation when the control temperature sensor is placed on the heat source instead of the reservoir. In these tests, the LHP reservoir is cold-biased and is heated by a control heater. Tests results show that it is feasible to use the heat source temperature for feedback control of the LHP operation. Using this method, the heat source temperature can be maintained within a tight range for moderate and high powers. At low powers, however, temperature oscillations may occur due to interactions among the reservoir control heater power, the heat source mass, and the heat output from the heat source. In addition, the heat source temperature could temporarily deviate from its set point during fast thermal transients. The implication is that more sophisticated feedback control algorithms need to be implemented for LHP transient operation when the heat source temperature is used for feedback control.

  8. Optogenetic feedback control of neural activity

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Jonathan P; Fong, Ming-fai; Millard, Daniel C; Whitmire, Clarissa J; Stanley, Garrett B; Potter, Steve M

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetic techniques enable precise excitation and inhibition of firing in specified neuronal populations and artifact-free recording of firing activity. Several studies have suggested that optical stimulation provides the precision and dynamic range requisite for closed-loop neuronal control, but no approach yet permits feedback control of neuronal firing. Here we present the ‘optoclamp’, a feedback control technology that provides continuous, real-time adjustments of bidirectional optical stimulation in order to lock spiking activity at specified targets over timescales ranging from seconds to days. We demonstrate how this system can be used to decouple neuronal firing levels from ongoing changes in network excitability due to multi-hour periods of glutamatergic or GABAergic neurotransmission blockade in vitro as well as impinging vibrissal sensory drive in vivo. This technology enables continuous, precise optical control of firing in neuronal populations in order to disentangle causally related variables of circuit activation in a physiologically and ethologically relevant manner. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07192.001 PMID:26140329

  9. A small-RNA-mediated negative feedback loop controls quorum-sensing dynamics in Vibrio harveyi

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Kimberly C; Waters, Christopher M; Svenningsen, Sine L; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2008-01-01

    The bioluminescent marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi uses a cell-to-cell communication process called quorum sensing (QS) to co-ordinate behaviours in response to changes in population density. QS is accomplished through the secretion and detection of extracellular signalling molecules called autoinducers. At the centre of the V. harveyi QS circuit are five small regulatory RNAs called Qrr1–5 which destabilize the mRNA of luxR, encoding LuxR, the master transcriptional regulator of QS target genes. Here we show that LuxR directly activates transcription of qrr2, qrr3 and qrr4, leading to the rapid downregulation of luxR. The LuxR-binding sites in the promoters of qrr2, qrr3 and qrr4 were identified and mutated to determine the consequences of this regulatory loop on QS dynamics. Disruption of the loop delays the transition from high to low cell density, and more significantly, decreases the cell density at which the population reaches a quorum. Our results suggest that feedback is essential for optimizing the dynamics of the transitions between individual and group behaviours. PMID:18808382

  10. Apparatus and method for closed-loop control of reactor power in minimum time

    DOEpatents

    Bernard, Jr., John A.

    1988-11-01

    Closed-loop control law for altering the power level of nuclear reactors in a safe manner and without overshoot and in minimum time. Apparatus is provided for moving a fast-acting control element such as a control rod or a control drum for altering the nuclear reactor power level. A computer computes at short time intervals either the function: .rho.=(.beta.-.rho.).omega.-.lambda..sub.e '.rho.-.SIGMA..beta..sub.i (.lambda..sub.i -.lambda..sub.e ')+l* .omega.+l* [.omega..sup.2 +.lambda..sub.e '.omega.] or the function: .rho.=(.beta.-.rho.).omega.-.lambda..sub.e .rho.-(.lambda..sub.e /.lambda..sub.e)(.beta.-.rho.)+l* .omega.+l* [.omega..sup.2 +.lambda..sub.e .omega.-(.lambda..sub.e /.lambda..sub.e).omega.] These functions each specify the rate of change of reactivity that is necessary to achieve a specified rate of change of reactor power. The direction and speed of motion of the control element is altered so as to provide the rate of reactivity change calculated using either or both of these functions thereby resulting in the attainment of a new power level without overshoot and in minimum time. These functions are computed at intervals of approximately 0.01-1.0 seconds depending on the specific application.

  11. Closed-loop neuromodulation of spinal sensorimotor circuits controls refined locomotion after complete spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Nikolaus; Moraud, Eduardo Martin; Raspopovic, Stanisa; Bonizzato, Marco; DiGiovanna, Jack; Musienko, Pavel; Morari, Manfred; Micera, Silvestro; Courtine, Grégoire

    2014-09-24

    Neuromodulation of spinal sensorimotor circuits improves motor control in animal models and humans with spinal cord injury. With common neuromodulation devices, electrical stimulation parameters are tuned manually and remain constant during movement. We developed a mechanistic framework to optimize neuromodulation in real time to achieve high-fidelity control of leg kinematics during locomotion in rats. We first uncovered relationships between neuromodulation parameters and recruitment of distinct sensorimotor circuits, resulting in predictive adjustments of leg kinematics. Second, we established a technological platform with embedded control policies that integrated robust movement feedback and feed-forward control loops in real time. These developments allowed us to conceive a neuroprosthetic system that controlled a broad range of foot trajectories during continuous locomotion in paralyzed rats. Animals with complete spinal cord injury performed more than 1000 successive steps without failure, and were able to climb staircases of various heights and lengths with precision and fluidity. Beyond therapeutic potential, these findings provide a conceptual and technical framework to personalize neuromodulation treatments for other neurological disorders. PMID:25253676

  12. Interaction between beam control and rf feedback loops for high Q cavities an heavy beam loading. Revision A

    SciTech Connect

    Mestha, L.K.; Kwan, C.M.; Yeung, K.S.

    1994-04-01

    An open-loop state space model of all the major low-level rf feedback control loops is derived. The model has control and state variables for fast-cycling machines to apply modern multivariable feedback techniques. A condition is derived to know when exactly we can cross the boundaries between time-varying and time-invariant approaches for a fast-cycling machine like the Low Energy Booster (LEB). The conditions are dependent on the Q of the cavity and the rate at which the frequency changes with time. Apart from capturing the time-variant characteristics, the errors in the magnetic field are accounted in the model to study the effects on synchronization with the Medium Energy Booster (MEB). The control model is useful to study the effects on beam control due to heavy beam loading at high intensities, voltage transients just after injection especially due to time-varying voltages, instability thresholds created by the cavity tuning feedback system, cross coupling between feedback loops with and without direct rf feedback etc. As a special case we have shown that the model agrees with the well known Pedersen model derived for the CERN PS booster. As an application of the model we undertook a detailed study of the cross coupling between the loops by considering all of them at once for varying time, Q and beam intensities. A discussion of the method to identify the coupling is shown. At the end a summary of the identified loop interactions is presented.

  13. A Conserved Surface Loop in Type I Dehydroquinate Dehydratases Positions an Active Site Arginine and Functions in Substrate Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Light, Samuel H.; Minasov, George; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Peterson, Scott N.; Caffrey, Michael; Anderson, Wayne F.; Lavie, Arnon

    2012-04-18

    Dehydroquinate dehydratase (DHQD) catalyzes the third step in the biosynthetic shikimate pathway. We present three crystal structures of the Salmonella enterica type I DHQD that address the functionality of a surface loop that is observed to close over the active site following substrate binding. Two wild-type structures with differing loop conformations and kinetic and structural studies of a mutant provide evidence of both direct and indirect mechanisms of involvement of the loop in substrate binding. In addition to allowing amino acid side chains to establish a direct interaction with the substrate, closure of the loop necessitates a conformational change of a key active site arginine, which in turn positions the substrate productively. The absence of DHQD in humans and its essentiality in many pathogenic bacteria make the enzyme a target for the development of nontoxic antimicrobials. The structures and ligand binding insights presented here may inform the design of novel type I DHQD inhibiting molecules.

  14. SEMICONDUCTOR INTEGRATED CIRCUITS: A low power automatic gain control loop for a receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guofeng, Li; Zhiqing, Geng; Nanjian, Wu

    2010-09-01

    This paper proposes a new structure to lower the power consumption of a variable gain amplifier (VGA) and keep the linearity of the VGA unchanged. The structure is used in a high rate amplitude-shift keying (ASK) based IF-stage. It includes an automatic gain control (AGC) loop and ASK demodulator. The AGC mainly consists of six-stage VGAs. The IF-stage is realized in 0.18 μm CMOS technology. The measurement results show that the power consumption of the whole system is very low. The system consumes 730 μA while operating at 1.8 V. The minimum ASK signal the system could detect is 0.7 mV (peak to peak amplitude).

  15. Designing Scenarios for Controller-in-the-Loop Air Traffic Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kupfer, Michael; Mercer, Joey S.; Cabrall, Christopher; Callantine, Todd

    2013-01-01

    Well prepared traffic scenarios contribute greatly to the success of controller-in-the-loop simulations. This paper describes each stage in the design process of realistic scenarios based on real-world traffic, to be used in the Airspace Operations Laboratory for simulations within the Air Traffic Management Technology Demonstration 1 effort. The steps from the initial analysis of real-world traffic, to the editing of individual aircraft records in the scenario file, until the final testing of the scenarios before the simulation conduct, are all described. The iterative nature of the design process and the various efforts necessary to reach the required fidelity, as well as the applied design strategies, challenges, and tools used during this process are also discussed.

  16. Long Duration Life Test of Propylene Glycol Water Based Thermal Fluid Within Thermal Control Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Hung; Hill, Charles; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2010-01-01

    Evaluations of thermal properties and resistance to microbial growth concluded that 50% Propylene Glycol (PG)-based fluid and 50% de-ionized water mixture was desirable for use as a fluid within a vehicle s thermal control loop. However, previous testing with a commercial mixture of PG and water containing phosphate corrosion inhibitors resulted in corrosion of aluminum within the test system and instability of the test fluid. This paper describes a follow-on long duration testing and analysis of 50% Propylene Glycol (PG)-based fluid and 50% de-ionized water mixture with inorganic corrosion inhibitors used in place of phosphates. The test evaluates the long-term fluid stability and resistance to microbial and chemical changes

  17. Multiple loop activations and continuous energy release in the solar flare of June 15, 1973

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widing, K. G.; Dere, K. P.

    1977-01-01

    The spatial and temporal evolution of the high-temperature plasma in the solar flare of June 15, 1973, is studied using XUV spectroheliograms and X-ray filtergrams obtained from Skylab. The analysis focuses on the changing forms and brightness of Fe XXIII 263-A and Fe XXIV 255-A images. Temperatures and emission measures computed for different times during the flare are compared with those derived from Solrad-9 flux data, the electron temperature in the bright compact core of the Fe XXIV image is determined, and a coronal origin is suggested for this bright core. The observational evidence shows that the overall flare event involved a number of different preexisting loops and arches which were activated in succession. The activation and heating are found to have persisted well past the end of the burst phase, implying that the energy release did not end when the impulsive phase was over. The overall development of the flare is summarized on the basis of the observed order of appearance of the loops.

  18. Closed-loop controlled noninvasive ultrasonic glucose sensing and insulin delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Eun-Joo; Werner, Jacob; Jaiswal, Devina; Smith, Nadine Barrie

    2010-03-01

    To prevent complications in diabetes, the proper management of blood glucose levels is essential. Previously, ultrasonic transdermal methods using a light-weight cymbal transducer array has been studied for noninvasive methods of insulin delivery for Type-1 diabetes and glucose level monitoring. In this study, the ultrasound systems of insulin delivery and glucose sensing have been combined by a feedback controller. This study was designed to show the feasibility of the feedback controlled ultrasound system for the noninvasive glucose control. For perspective human application, in vivo experiments were performed on large animals that have a similar size to humans. Four in vivo experiments were performed using about 200 lbs pigs. The cymbal array of 3×3 pattern has been used for insulin delivery at 30 kHz with the spatial-peak temporal-peak intensity (Isptp) of 100 mW/cm2. For glucose sensing, a 2×2 array was operated at 20 kHz with Isptp = 100 mW/cm2. Based on the glucose level determined by biosensors after the ultrasound exposure, the ultrasound system for the insulin delivery was automatically operated. The glucose level of 115 mg/dl was set as a reference value for operating the insulin delivery system. For comparison, the glucose levels of blood samples collected from the ear vein were measured by a commercial glucose meter. Using the ultrasound system operated by the close-loop, feed-back controller, the glucose levels of four pigs were determined every 20 minutes and continuously controlled for 120 minutes. In comparison to the commercial glucose meter, the glucose levels determined by the biosensor were slightly higher. The results of in vivo experiments indicate the feasibility of the feedback controlled ultrasound system using the cymbal array for noninvasive glucose sensing and insulin delivery. Further studies on the extension of the glucose control will be continued for the effective method of glucose control.

  19. A Fluorescent Responsive Hybrid Nanogel for Closed-Loop Control of Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weitai; Chen, Shoumin; Hu, Yumei; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2012-01-01

    Background The concept of closed-loop control of glucose, in which continuous glucose sensing is coupled to a fully automated insulin delivery device, without human input, has been an attractive idea for diabetes management. This study presents a new class of hybrid nanogels that can integrate glucose sensing and glucose-responsive insulin release into a single nano-object. Methods Zinc oxide@poly[N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM)-acrylamide (AAm)- 2-aminomethyl-5-fluorophenylboronic acid (FPBA)] hybrid nanogels were synthesized and investigated for size, morphology, volume phase transition, photoluminescence properties, and in vitro insulin release under different glucose concentrations. Glucose sensing was performed both in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and in blood samples. The insulin release in PBS of varying glucose levels, as well as a stepwise treatment between two glucose levels (126.0 and 270.0 mg/dl), was performed to test the glucose-responsive insulin release ability of the hybrid nanogels. Results Zinc oxide@poly(NIPAM-AAm-FPBA) hybrid nanogels can sensitively and selectively detect glucose in highly reproducible fluorescent signals over the clinically relevant glucose concentration range of 18−540 mg/dl. The glucose-responsive volume phase transition of the nanogels can further regulate the release of the preloaded insulin. The insulin release from the nanogels exhibits the slowest rate (~5% released in 76 h) at a normal glucose level (108.0 mg/dl) but becomes quicker and quicker as the glucose increases to higher and higher levels. Conclusions The rationally designed hybrid nanogel can optically signal the glucose level with high sensitivity and selectivity and simultaneously regulate the insulin release rate in response to the glucose reading, which shows a promising concept toward the development of a miniaturized closed-loop glycemic control system. PMID:22920816

  20. The PP-motif in luminal loop 2 of ZnT transporters plays a pivotal role in TNAP activation.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Shigeyuki; Tsuji, Tokuji; Fujiwara, Takashi; Takeda, Taka-Aki; Merriman, Chengfeng; Fukunaka, Ayako; Nishito, Yukina; Fu, Dax; Hoch, Eitan; Sekler, Israel; Fukue, Kazuhisa; Miyamae, Yusaku; Masuda, Seiji; Nagao, Masaya; Kambe, Taiho

    2016-09-01

    Secretory and membrane-bound zinc-requiring enzymes are thought to be activated by binding zinc in the early secretory pathway. One such enzyme, tissue-non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP), is activated through a two-step mechanism, via protein stabilization and subsequent enzyme activation through metalation, by ZnT5-ZnT6 heterodimers or ZnT7 homodimers. However, little is known about the molecular basis underlying the activation process. In the present study, we found that the di-proline motif (PP-motif) in luminal loop 2 of ZnT5 and ZnT7 is important for TNAP activation. TNAP activity was significantly reduced in cells lacking ZnT5-ZnT6 heterodimers and ZnT7 homodimers [triple knockout (TKO) cells]. The decreased TNAP activity was restored by expressing hZnT5 with hZnT6 or hZnT7, but significantly less so (almost 90% less) by expressing mutants thereof in which the PP-motif was mutated to alanine (PP-AA). In TKO cells, overexpressed hTNAP was not completely activated, and it was converted less efficiently into the holo form by expressing a PP-AA mutant of hZnT5 with hZnT6, whose defects were not restored by zinc supplementation. The zinc transport activity of hZnT7 was not significantly impaired by the PP-AA mutation, indicating that the PP-motif is involved in the TNAP maturation process, although it does not control zinc transport activity. The PP-motif is highly conserved in ZnT5 and ZnT7 orthologues, and its importance for TNAP activation is conserved in the Caenorhabditis elegans hZnT5 orthologue CDF5. These results provide novel molecular insights into the TNAP activation process in the early secretory pathway. PMID:27303047

  1. Closed-loop transfer recovery with observer-based controllers. II - Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Ben M.; Saberi, Ali; Ly, Uy-Loi

    1991-01-01

    The paper focuses on the design problem related to the recovery of a target closed-loop transfer function using both full-order and reduced-order observer-based controllers. Design schemes for the reduced-order observer-based controllers are similar to those of full-order controllers; hence, for simplicity, only the case for full-order observer-based controller designs is given. Three types of design schemes are discussed in detail. The first one is an asymptotic time-scale eigenstructure assignment method, and the other two are optimization-based methods where a certain norm of the recovery matrix is minimized. Asymptotic behavior associated with each design method is highlighted. Relative advantages and disadvantages of both the ATEA and optimization-based schemes are discussed. A numerical example is used to illustrate the design possibilities from each of these methods, the available design freedom, and the significance of selecting the limit of the recovery matrix, especially in the case of a nonrecoverable design.

  2. Mutations in the Catalytic Loop HRD Motif Alter the Activity and Function of Drosophila Src64

    PubMed Central

    Strong, Taylor C.; Kaur, Gurvinder; Thomas, Jeffrey H.

    2011-01-01

    The catalytic loop HRD motif is found in most protein kinases and these amino acids are predicted to perform functions in catalysis, transition to, and stabilization of the active conformation of the kinase domain. We have identified mutations in a Drosophila src gene, src64, that alter the three HRD amino acids. We have analyzed the mutants for both biochemical activity and biological function during development. Mutation of the aspartate to asparagine eliminates biological function in cytoskeletal processes and severely reduces fertility, supporting the amino acid's critical role in enzymatic activity. The arginine to cysteine mutation has little to no effect on kinase activity or cytoskeletal reorganization, suggesting that the HRD arginine may not be critical for coordinating phosphotyrosine in the active conformation. The histidine to leucine mutant retains some kinase activity and biological function, suggesting that this amino acid may have a biochemical function in the active kinase that is independent of its side chain hydrogen bonding interactions in the active site. We also describe the phenotypic effects of other mutations in the SH2 and tyrosine kinase domains of src64, and we compare them to the phenotypic effects of the src64 null allele. PMID:22132220

  3. Active weld control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Bradley W.; Burroughs, Ivan A.

    1994-01-01

    Through the two phases of this contract, sensors for welding applications and parameter extraction algorithms have been developed. These sensors form the foundation of a weld control system which can provide action weld control through the monitoring of the weld pool and keyhole in a VPPA welding process. Systems of this type offer the potential of quality enhancement and cost reduction (minimization of rework on faulty welds) for high-integrity welding applications. Sensors for preweld and postweld inspection, weld pool monitoring, keyhole/weld wire entry monitoring, and seam tracking were developed. Algorithms for signal extraction were also developed and analyzed to determine their application to an adaptive weld control system. The following sections discuss findings for each of the three sensors developed under this contract: (1) weld profiling sensor; (2) weld pool sensor; and (3) stereo seam tracker/keyhole imaging sensor. Hardened versions of these sensors were designed and built under this contract. A control system, described later, was developed on a multiprocessing/multitasking operating system for maximum power and flexibility. Documentation for sensor mechanical and electrical design is also included as appendices in this report.

  4. Control of high frequency microactuators using active structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreth, P. A.; Alvi, F. S.; Reese, B. M.; Oates, W. S.

    2015-02-01

    A fluidically driven microactuator that generates supersonic, pulsed microjets has been implemented with smart materials to actively and precisely control the frequency of the microjets in a closed-loop manner. Since this actuator relies on a number of microscale flow and acoustic phenomena to produce the pulsed microjets, its resonant frequency is determined by its geometry and other flow parameters. The design discussed in this paper integrates piezoelectric stacks by connecting them to movable sidewalls within the actuator such that the microactuator's internal geometry can be controlled by varying the voltage across the piezo-stacks. An open-loop control scheme demonstrates the frequency modulation capabilities that are enabled with this design: very large frequency deviations (up to +/- 500 Hz) around the actuator design frequency are attained at very high rates (up to 1 kHz). Closed-loop control of the microactuator's frequency was also demonstrated, and the results indicate that (combined with appropriate sensors) this actuator could be used effectively for active, feedback control in high-speed, resonance-dominated flowfields. This proof of concept study clearly illustrates the ability of this robust and compact actuator to produce perturbations that can be modulated and controlled based on the desired control objective.

  5. The solar extreme ultra-violet corona: Resolved loops and the unresolved active region corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirtain, Jonathan Wesley

    In this work, physical characteristics of the solar corona as observed in the Extreme Ultra-Violet (EUV) regime are investigated. The focus will be the regions of intense EUV radiation generally found near the locations of sunspots. These regions are commonly called active regions. Multiple space- based observing platforms have been deployed in the last decade; it is possible to use several of these observatories in combination to develop a more complete picture of the solar corona. Joint Observing Program 146 was created to collect spectroscopic intensities using the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer on Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and EUV images using NASA's Transition Region and Coronal Explorer. The emission line intensities are analyzed to develop an understanding of the temperature and density of the active region coronal plasma. However, the performance of the CDS instrument in the spatial and temporal domains is limited and to compensate for these limitations, data collected by the TRACE instrument provide a high spatial and temporal resolution set of observations. One of the most exciting unsolved problems in solar astrophysics is to understand why the corona maintains a temperature roughly two orders of magnitude higher than the underlying material. A detailed investigation of the coronal emission has provided constraints on models of the heating mechanism, since the temperature, density and evolution of emission rates for multiple ionic species are indicative of the mechanism(s) working to heat the corona. The corona appears to consist of multiple unresolved structures as well as resolved active region structures, called coronal loops. The purpose of the present work is to determine the characteristics of the unresolved background corona. Using the characterizations of the coronal unresolved background, results for loops after background subtraction are also presented. This work demonstrates the magnitude of the unresolved coronal emission with

  6. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, S.; Schmidt, D. K.

    1985-01-01

    A technique is developed that is intended to provide a systematic approach to synthesizing display augmentation for optimal manual control in complex, closed-loop tasks. A cooperative control synthesis technique, previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation for the plant, is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing displays. The technique utilizes an optimal control model of the man in the loop. It is applied to the design of a quickening control law for a display and a simple K/s(2) plant, and then to an F-15 type aircraft in a multi-channel task. Utilizing the closed loop modeling and analysis procedures, the results from the display design algorithm are evaluated and an analytical validation is performed. Experimental validation is recommended for future efforts.

  7. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, Sanjay; Schmidt, David K.

    1987-01-01

    A technique is developed that is intended to provide a systematic approach to synthesizing display augmentation for optimal manual control in complex, closed-loop tasks. A cooperative control synthesis technique, previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation for the plant, is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing displays. The technique utilizes an optimal control model of the man in the loop. It is applied to the design of a quickening control law for a display and a simple K/(s squared) plant, and then to an F-15 type aircraft in a multichannel task. Utilizing the closed-loop modeling and analysis procedures, the results from the display design algorithm are evaluated and an analytical validation is performed. Experimental validation is recommended for future efforts.

  8. Pre-Hardware Optimization and Implementation Of Fast Optics Closed Control Loop Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizhner, Semion; Lyon, Richard G.; Herman, Jay R.; Abuhassan, Nader

    2004-01-01

    One of the main heritage tools used in scientific and engineering data spectrum analysis is the Fourier Integral Transform and its high performance digital equivalent - the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). The FFT is particularly useful in two-dimensional (2-D) image processing (FFT2) within optical systems control. However, timing constraints of a fast optics closed control loop would require a supercomputer to run the software implementation of the FFT2 and its inverse, as well as other image processing representative algorithm, such as numerical image folding and fringe feature extraction. A laboratory supercomputer is not always available even for ground operations and is not feasible for a night project. However, the computationally intensive algorithms still warrant alternative implementation using reconfigurable computing technologies (RC) such as Digital Signal Processors (DSP) and Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA), which provide low cost compact super-computing capabilities. We present a new RC hardware implementation and utilization architecture that significantly reduces the computational complexity of a few basic image-processing algorithm, such as FFT2, image folding and phase diversity for the NASA Solar Viewing Interferometer Prototype (SVIP) using a cluster of DSPs and FPGAs. The DSP cluster utilization architecture also assures avoidance of a single point of failure, while using commercially available hardware. This, combined with the control algorithms pre-hardware optimization, or the first time allows construction of image-based 800 Hertz (Hz) optics closed control loops on-board a spacecraft, based on the SVIP ground instrument. That spacecraft is the proposed Earth Atmosphere Solar Occultation Imager (EASI) to study greenhouse gases CO2, C2H, H2O, O3, O2, N2O from Lagrange-2 point in space. This paper provides an advanced insight into a new type of science capabilities for future space exploration missions based on on-board image processing

  9. A double-loop structure in the adaptive generalized predictive control algorithm for control of robot end-point contact force.

    PubMed

    Wen, Shuhuan; Zhu, Jinghai; Li, Xiaoli; Chen, Shengyong

    2014-09-01

    Robot force control is an essential issue in robotic intelligence. There is much high uncertainty when robot end-effector contacts with the environment. Because of the environment stiffness effects on the system of the robot end-effector contact with environment, the adaptive generalized predictive control algorithm based on quantitative feedback theory is designed for robot end-point contact force system. The controller of the internal loop is designed on the foundation of QFT to control the uncertainty of the system. An adaptive GPC algorithm is used to design external loop controller to improve the performance and the robustness of the system. Two closed loops used in the design approach realize the system׳s performance and improve the robustness. The simulation results show that the algorithm of the robot end-effector contacting force control system is effective. PMID:24973336

  10. Effects of backlash and dead band on temperature control of the primary loop of a conceptual nuclear Brayton space powerplant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrick, E. J.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical study was made of the stability of a closed-loop liquid-lithium temperature control of the primary loop of a conceptual nuclear Brayton space powerplant. The operating point was varied from 20 to 120 percent of design. A describing-function technique was used to evaluate the effects of temperature dead band and control coupling backlash. From the system investigation, it was predicted that a limit cycle will not exist with a temperature dead band, but a limit cycle will not exist when backlash is present. The results compare favorably with a digital computer simulation.

  11. Implementation on a desktop computer of the real time feedback control loop of a scanning probe microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloisi, G.; Bacci, F.; Carlà, M.; Dolci, D.; Lanzi, L.

    2008-11-01

    A software package has been developed to implement the real time feedback control loop needed in scanning probe microscopy on a general purpose desktop computer of the current high-speed/multicore generation. The main features of the implementation of both the feedback loop and the control of the experiment on the same computer are discussed. The package can work with several general purpose data acquisition boards and can be extended in a modular way to further board models; timing performance has been tested with several hardware configurations and some applications common in scanning probe microscopy. The package is available under an Open Source license.

  12. Active Control of Engine Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-11-01

    Active control can alleviate design constraints and improve the response to operational requirements in gas turbines. The Course presented the state-of-the-art including experimental, theoretical knowledge and practical information. Topics treated: stability characteristics; active control approaches; robustness and fundamental limits; combustion systems processes; combustor dynamics; compression system dynamics models; diagnostics and control of compression instabilities; sensor and actuator architectures; R&D needs of future prospects. The course has shown that for combustion systems, as well as in actuator and sensor technologies the active control approach is a viable option even at full scale with potential for aero engines and air breathing missiles.

  13. Multi-Evaporator Miniature Loop Heat Pipe for Small Spacecraft Thermal Control. Part 1; New Technologies and Validation Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Ottenstein, Laura; Douglas, Donya; Hoang, Triem

    2010-01-01

    Under NASA s New Millennium Program Space Technology 8 (ST 8) Project, four experiments Thermal Loop, Dependable Microprocessor, SAILMAST, and UltraFlex - were conducted to advance the maturity of individual technologies from proof of concept to prototype demonstration in a relevant environment , i.e. from a technology readiness level (TRL) of 3 to a level of 6. This paper presents the new technologies and validation approach of the Thermal Loop experiment. The Thermal Loop is an advanced thermal control system consisting of a miniature loop heat pipe (MLHP) with multiple evaporators and multiple condensers designed for future small system applications requiring low mass, low power, and compactness. The MLHP retains all features of state-of-the-art loop heat pipes (LHPs) and offers additional advantages to enhance the functionality, performance, versatility, and reliability of the system. Details of the thermal loop concept, technical advances, benefits, objectives, level 1 requirements, and performance characteristics are described. Also included in the paper are descriptions of the test articles and mathematical modeling used for the technology validation. An MLHP breadboard was built and tested in the laboratory and thermal vacuum environments for TRL 4 and TRL 5 validations, and an MLHP proto-flight unit was built and tested in a thermal vacuum chamber for the TRL 6 validation. In addition, an analytical model was developed to simulate the steady state and transient behaviors of the MLHP during various validation tests. Capabilities and limitations of the analytical model are also addressed.

  14. Non-hypoxic activation of the negative regulatory feedback loop of prolyl-hydroxylase oxygen sensors.

    PubMed

    Tug, Suzan; Delos Reyes, Buena; Fandrey, Joachim; Berchner-Pfannschmidt, Utta

    2009-07-10

    Hypoxia inducible factors (HIF) coordinate cellular responses towards hypoxia. HIFs are mainly regulated by a group of prolyl-hydroxylases (PHDs) that in the presence of oxygen, target the HIFalpha subunit for degradation. Herein, we studied the role of nitric oxide (NO) in regulating PHD activities under normoxic conditions. In the present study we show that different NO-donors initially inhibited endogenous PHD2 activity which led to accumulation of HIF-1alpha subsequently to enhance HIF-1 dependent increased PHD2 promoter activity. Consequently PHD2 abundance and activity were strongly induced which caused downregulation of HIF-1alpha. Interestingly, upregulation of endogenous PHD2 activity by NO was not found in cells that lack an intact pVHL dependent degradation pathway. Recovery of PHD activity required intact cells and was not observed in cell extracts or recombinant PHD2. In conclusion induction of endogenous PHD2 activity by NO is dependent on a feedback loop initiated despite normoxic conditions. PMID:19427832

  15. Simple control-theoretic models of human steering activity in visually guided vehicle control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Ronald A.

    1991-01-01

    A simple control theoretic model of human steering or control activity in the lateral-directional control of vehicles such as automobiles and rotorcraft is discussed. The term 'control theoretic' is used to emphasize the fact that the model is derived from a consideration of well-known control system design principles as opposed to psychological theories regarding egomotion, etc. The model is employed to emphasize the 'closed-loop' nature of tasks involving the visually guided control of vehicles upon, or in close proximity to, the earth and to hypothesize how changes in vehicle dynamics can significantly alter the nature of the visual cues which a human might use in such tasks.

  16. Variants of the yeast MAPK Mpk1 are fully functional independently of activation loop phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Goshen-Lago, Tal; Goldberg-Carp, Anat; Melamed, Dganit; Darlyuk-Saadon, Ilona; Bai, Chen; Ahn, Natalie G; Admon, Arie; Engelberg, David

    2016-09-01

    MAP kinases of the ERK family are conserved from yeast to humans. Their catalytic activity is dependent on dual phosphorylation of their activation loop's TEY motif, catalyzed by MAPK kinases (MEKs). Here we studied variants of Mpk1, a yeast orthologue of Erk, which is essential for cell wall integrity. Cells lacking MPK1, or the genes encoding the relevant MEKs, MKK1 and MKK2, do not proliferate under cell wall stress, imposed, for example, by caffeine. Mutants of Mpk1, Mpk1(Y268C) and Mpk1(Y268A), function independently of Mkk1 and Mkk2. We show that these variants are phosphorylated at their activation loop in mkk1∆mkk2∆ and mkk1∆mkk2∆pbs2∆ste7∆ cells, suggesting that they autophosphorylate. However, strikingly, when Y268C/A mutations were combined with the kinase-dead mutation, K54R, or mutations at the TEY motif, T190A+Y192F, the resulting proteins still allowed mkk1∆mkk2∆ cells to proliferate under caffeine stress. Mutating the equivalent residue, Tyr-280/Tyr-261, in Erk1/Erk2 significantly impaired Erk1/2's catalytic activity. This study describes the first case in which a MAPK, Erk/Mpk1, imposes a phenotype via a mechanism that is independent of TEY phosphorylation and an unusual case in which an equivalent mutation in a highly conserved domain of yeast and mammalian Erks causes an opposite effect. PMID:27413009

  17. Low-Frequency Sound Field Control in a Reverberant Room with a Single Active Controller Source.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, John Drayton, Jr.

    The operation of a single active controller source in a reverberant room has been investigated. The system consists of a controlled transducer source and a near-source microphone, with electronics arranged as a closed feedback loop. The controller system responds to a single source placed arbitrarily in the room. A theoretical analysis is presented based on the two port model of the controller transducer interfaced to an equivalent description of the reverberant room. The room acoustic transfer impedances between the active controller, room exciter source, near controller pressure sensor, and an arbitrary point in the reverberant sound field are described by a Green's function model. To minimize resonant effects of the controller piston diaphragm, a second control feedback loop using a diaphragm mounted accelerometer was added to the pressure control loop. Examples of the controller system operation were drawn from a computer model. Experimental data were gathered in a test reverberation room at the Applied Research Laboratory of The Pennsylvania State University. This investigation has brought forth three factors which define the limits on wide band control loop gain. They are (i) the position of an accelerometer on the controller diaphragm, (ii) the spacing between the controller and pressure sensor microphone, and (iii) the first mode frequency and the Q of the controller diaphragm. These system and transducer constraints can introduce instability in the control system. The controller system operation in the room has been modeled as a lumped element ideal piston using a flow graph representation. Additional loops on the graph are used to represent non-ideal transducer aberrations, and to define the pressure at various points in the room. Four cases for controller operation have been defined based on the proximity of the room source, the pressure sensor, and the controller. Two of these are important for practical applications: (i) the sensor microphone and

  18. Woofer-tweeter deformable mirror control for closed-loop adaptive optics: theory and practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavel, Donald; Norton, Andrew

    2014-08-01

    Deformable mirrors with very high order correction generally have smaller dynamic range of motion than what is required to correct seeing over large aperture telescopes. As a result, systems will need to have an architecture that employs two deformable mirrors in series, one for the low-order but large excursion parts of the wavefront and one for the finer and smaller excursion components. The closed-loop control challenge is to a) keep the overall system stable, b) avoid the two mirrors using control energy to cancel each others correction, c) resolve actuator saturations stably, d) assure that on average the mirrors are each correcting their assigned region of spatial frequency space. We present the control architecture and techniques for assuring that it is linear and stable according to the above criteria. We derived the analytic forms for stability and performance and show results from simulations and on-sky testing using the new ShaneAO system on the Lick 3-meter telescope.

  19. Linear motor drive system for continuous-path closed-loop position control of an object

    DOEpatents

    Barkman, William E.

    1980-01-01

    A precision numerical controlled servo-positioning system is provided for continuous closed-loop position control of a machine slide or platform driven by a linear-induction motor. The system utilizes filtered velocity feedback to provide system stability required to operate with a system gain of 100 inches/minute/0.001 inch of following error. The filtered velocity feedback signal is derived from the position output signals of a laser interferometer utilized to monitor the movement of the slide. Air-bearing slides mounted to a stable support are utilized to minimize friction and small irregularities in the slideway which would tend to introduce positioning errors. A microprocessor is programmed to read command and feedback information and converts this information into the system following error signal. This error signal is summed with the negative filtered velocity feedback signal at the input of a servo amplifier whose output serves as the drive power signal to the linear motor position control coil.

  20. Temperature Control with Two Parallel Small Loop Heat Pipes for GLM Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khrustalev, Dmitry; Stouffer, Chuck; Ku, Jentung; Hamilton, Jon; Anderson, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The concept of temperature control of an electronic component using a single Loop Heat Pipe (LHP) is well established for Aerospace applications. Using two LHPs is often desirable for redundancy/reliability reasons or for increasing the overall heat source-sink thermal conductance. This effort elaborates on temperature controlling operation of a thermal system that includes two small ammonia LHPs thermally coupled together at the evaporator end as well as at the condenser end and operating "in parallel". A transient model of the LHP system was developed on the Thermal Desktop (TradeMark) platform to understand some fundamental details of such parallel operation of the two LHPs. Extensive thermal-vacuum testing was conducted with two thermally coupled LHPs operating simultaneously as well as with only one LHP operating at a time. This paper outlines the temperature control procedures for two LHPs operating simultaneously with widely varying sink temperatures. The test data obtained during the thermal-vacuum testing, with both LHPs running simultaneously in comparison with only one LHP operating at a time, are presented with detailed explanations.

  1. Incorporating real time velocity map image reconstruction into closed-loop coherent control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rallis, C. E.; Burwitz, T. G.; Andrews, P. R.; Zohrabi, M.; Averin, R.; De, S.; Bergues, B.; Jochim, Bethany; Voznyuk, A. V.; Gregerson, Neal; Gaire, B.; Znakovskaya, I.; McKenna, J.; Carnes, K. D.; Kling, M. F.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Wells, E.

    2014-11-01

    We report techniques developed to utilize three-dimensional momentum information as feedback in adaptive femtosecond control of molecular dynamics. Velocity map imaging is used to obtain the three-dimensional momentum map of the dissociating ions following interaction with a shaped intense ultrafast laser pulse. In order to recover robust feedback information, however, the two-dimensional momentum projection from the detector must be inverted to reconstruct the full three-dimensional momentum of the photofragments. These methods are typically slow or require manual inputs and are therefore accomplished offline after the images have been obtained. Using an algorithm based upon an "onion-peeling" (also known as "back projection") method, we are able to invert 1040 × 1054 pixel images in under 1 s. This rapid inversion allows the full photofragment momentum to be used as feedback in a closed-loop adaptive control scheme, in which a genetic algorithm tailors an ultrafast laser pulse to optimize a specific outcome. Examples of three-dimensional velocity map image based control applied to strong-field dissociation of CO and O2 are presented.

  2. Analog Study of Interacting and Noninteracting Multiple-loop Control Systems for Turbojet Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, George J; Phillips, W E , Jr

    1955-01-01

    The results of an analog investigation of several turbojet-engine control configurations is presented in this report. Both proportional and proportional-plus-integral controllers were studied, and compensating terms for engine interaction were added to the control system. Data were obtained on the stability limits and the transient responses of these various configurations. Analytical expressions in terms of the component transfer functions were developed for the configurations studied, and the optimum form for the compensation terms was determined. It was found that the addition of the integral term, while making the system slower and more oscillatory, was desirable in that it made the final values of the system parameters independent of source of disturbance and also eliminated droop in these parameters. Definite improvement in system characteristics resulted from the use of proper compensation terms. At comparable gain points the compensated system was faster and more stable. Complete compensation eliminated engine interaction, permitting each loop to be developed to an optimum point independently.

  3. Loop Heat Pipe with Thermal Control Valve as a Variable Thermal Link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartenstine, John; Anderson, William G.; Walker, Kara; Dussinger, Pete

    2012-01-01

    Future lunar landers and rovers will require variable thermal links that allow for heat rejection during the lunar daytime and passively prevent heat rejection during the lunar night. During the lunar day, the thermal management system must reject the waste heat from the electronics and batteries to maintain them below the maximum acceptable temperature. During the lunar night, the heat rejection system must either be shut down or significant amounts of guard heat must be added to keep the electronics and batteries above the minimum acceptable temperature. Since guard heater power is unfavorable because it adds to system size and complexity, a variable thermal link is preferred to limit heat removal from the electronics and batteries during the long lunar night. Conventional loop heat pipes (LHPs) can provide the required variable thermal conductance, but they still consume electrical power to shut down the heat transfer. This innovation adds a thermal control valve (TCV) and a bypass line to a conventional LHP that proportionally allows vapor to flow back into the compensation chamber of the LHP. The addition of this valve can achieve completely passive thermal control of the LHP, eliminating the need for guard heaters and complex controls.

  4. Turbidity management during flushing-flows: A model for open-loop control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fovet, Ophelie; Litrico, Xavier; Belaud, Gilles

    2012-04-01

    Fixed algae developments induce strong constraints for the management of open-channel networks. They cause clogging issues on hydraulic devices and can sometimes lead to water quality alteration. An original strategy to limit the algal biomass is to carry out regular flushes. A flush is performed by increasing the hydraulic shear conditions using the hydraulic structures of the canal. Consequently to the shear stress increase, a part of the fixed algae is detached, then re-suspended into the water column, and finally transported into the canal network. This leads to a peak of turbidity that needs to be controlled. The present paper proposes a quasi-linear model of the turbidity response to a discharge increase, that can be used for automatic controller design. The model parameters are identified on a real network. The calibration is based on continuous monitoring of water turbidity. Flushes are simulated on the whole branch and on an intermediate reach in order to test the ability of the model to simulate the propagation of a turbidity peak. Then, the model is used to develop an open-loop controller of turbidity for flush design. The efficiency of a flush will depend on its amplitude and duration. The design objective consists in maximizing the algae detachment without exceeding a maximal turbidity level, and using as little water as possible. The designed flush is finally tested on a nonlinear model.

  5. Open-loop control of noise amplification in a separated boundary layer flow

    SciTech Connect

    Boujo, E. Gallaire, F.; Ehrenstein, U.

    2013-12-15

    Linear optimal gains are computed for the subcritical two-dimensional separated boundary-layer flow past a bump. Very large optimal gain values are found, making it possible for small-amplitude noise to be strongly amplified and to destabilize the flow. The optimal forcing is located close to the summit of the bump, while the optimal response is the largest in the shear layer. The largest amplification occurs at frequencies corresponding to eigenvalues which first become unstable at higher Reynolds number. Nonlinear direct numerical simulations show that a low level of noise is indeed sufficient to trigger random flow unsteadiness, characterized here by large-scale vortex shedding. Next, a variational technique is used to compute efficiently the sensitivity of optimal gains to steady control (through source of momentum in the flow, or blowing/suction at the wall). A systematic analysis at several frequencies identifies the bump summit as the most sensitive region for control with wall actuation. Based on these results, a simple open-loop control strategy is designed, with steady wall suction at the bump summit. Linear calculations on controlled base flows confirm that optimal gains can be drastically reduced at all frequencies. Nonlinear direct numerical simulations also show that this control allows the flow to withstand a higher level of stochastic noise without becoming nonlinearly unstable, thereby postponing bypass transition. In the supercritical regime, sensitivity analysis of eigenvalues supports the choice of this control design. Full restabilization of the flow is obtained, as evidenced by direct numerical simulations and linear stability analysis.

  6. Open-loop control of noise amplification in a separated boundary layer flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boujo, E.; Ehrenstein, U.; Gallaire, F.

    2013-12-01

    Linear optimal gains are computed for the subcritical two-dimensional separated boundary-layer flow past a bump. Very large optimal gain values are found, making it possible for small-amplitude noise to be strongly amplified and to destabilize the flow. The optimal forcing is located close to the summit of the bump, while the optimal response is the largest in the shear layer. The largest amplification occurs at frequencies corresponding to eigenvalues which first become unstable at higher Reynolds number. Nonlinear direct numerical simulations show that a low level of noise is indeed sufficient to trigger random flow unsteadiness, characterized here by large-scale vortex shedding. Next, a variational technique is used to compute efficiently the sensitivity of optimal gains to steady control (through source of momentum in the flow, or blowing/suction at the wall). A systematic analysis at several frequencies identifies the bump summit as the most sensitive region for control with wall actuation. Based on these results, a simple open-loop control strategy is designed, with steady wall suction at the bump summit. Linear calculations on controlled base flows confirm that optimal gains can be drastically reduced at all frequencies. Nonlinear direct numerical simulations also show that this control allows the flow to withstand a higher level of stochastic noise without becoming nonlinearly unstable, thereby postponing bypass transition. In the supercritical regime, sensitivity analysis of eigenvalues supports the choice of this control design. Full restabilization of the flow is obtained, as evidenced by direct numerical simulations and linear stability analysis.

  7. Structural and dynamic insights into the energetics of activation loop rearrangement in FGFR1 kinase.

    PubMed

    Klein, Tobias; Vajpai, Navratna; Phillips, Jonathan J; Davies, Gareth; Holdgate, Geoffrey A; Phillips, Chris; Tucker, Julie A; Norman, Richard A; Scott, Andrew D; Higazi, Daniel R; Lowe, David; Thompson, Gary S; Breeze, Alexander L

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases differ widely in their propensity to undergo rearrangements of the N-terminal Asp-Phe-Gly (DFG) motif of the activation loop, with some, including FGFR1 kinase, appearing refractory to this so-called 'DFG flip'. Recent inhibitor-bound structures have unexpectedly revealed FGFR1 for the first time in a 'DFG-out' state. Here we use conformationally selective inhibitors as chemical probes for interrogation of the structural and dynamic features that appear to govern the DFG flip in FGFR1. Our detailed structural and biophysical insights identify contributions from altered dynamics in distal elements, including the αH helix, towards the outstanding stability of the DFG-out complex with the inhibitor ponatinib. We conclude that the αC-β4 loop and 'molecular brake' regions together impose a high energy barrier for this conformational rearrangement, and that this may have significance for maintaining autoinhibition in the non-phosphorylated basal state of FGFR1. PMID:26203596

  8. Thermal and Kinetic Properties of Motions in a Prominence Activation and Nearby Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucera, Therese; Landi, E.

    2005-01-01

    We perform a quantitative analysis of the thermal properties of a prominence activation and motions in a nearby loop. In order to make measurements of the quickly moving features seen in prominences in the UV we use the SOHO/SUMER spectrograph to take a time series of exposures from a single pointing position, providing a measurement of spectral line properties as a function of time and position along the slit. The lines observed cover a broad range of temperatures from 80,000 - 1.6 million K. These measurements are combined with TRACE movies in transition region and coronal temperature bands to obtain more complete information concerning prominence structure and motions. The resulting observations allow us to analyze the thermal and kinetic energy of the moving sources as functions of time. The loop and prominence are most apparent in lines formed at temperatures below 250,000 K. We find that in most cases the temperature distribution of plasma in a moving feature changes relatively little over time periods of about 20 minutes.

  9. Structural and dynamic insights into the energetics of activation loop rearrangement in FGFR1 kinase

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Tobias; Vajpai, Navratna; Phillips, Jonathan J.; Davies, Gareth; Holdgate, Geoffrey A.; Phillips, Chris; Tucker, Julie A.; Norman, Richard A.; Scott, Andrew D.; Higazi, Daniel R.; Lowe, David; Thompson, Gary S.; Breeze, Alexander L.

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases differ widely in their propensity to undergo rearrangements of the N-terminal Asp–Phe–Gly (DFG) motif of the activation loop, with some, including FGFR1 kinase, appearing refractory to this so-called ‘DFG flip'. Recent inhibitor-bound structures have unexpectedly revealed FGFR1 for the first time in a ‘DFG-out' state. Here we use conformationally selective inhibitors as chemical probes for interrogation of the structural and dynamic features that appear to govern the DFG flip in FGFR1. Our detailed structural and biophysical insights identify contributions from altered dynamics in distal elements, including the αH helix, towards the outstanding stability of the DFG-out complex with the inhibitor ponatinib. We conclude that the αC-β4 loop and ‘molecular brake' regions together impose a high energy barrier for this conformational rearrangement, and that this may have significance for maintaining autoinhibition in the non-phosphorylated basal state of FGFR1. PMID:26203596

  10. Structural and dynamic insights into the energetics of activation loop rearrangement in FGFR1 kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Tobias; Vajpai, Navratna; Phillips, Jonathan J.; Davies, Gareth; Holdgate, Geoffrey A.; Phillips, Chris; Tucker, Julie A.; Norman, Richard A.; Scott, Andrew D.; Higazi, Daniel R.; Lowe, David; Thompson, Gary S.; Breeze, Alexander L.

    2015-07-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases differ widely in their propensity to undergo rearrangements of the N-terminal Asp-Phe-Gly (DFG) motif of the activation loop, with some, including FGFR1 kinase, appearing refractory to this so-called `DFG flip'. Recent inhibitor-bound structures have unexpectedly revealed FGFR1 for the first time in a `DFG-out' state. Here we use conformationally selective inhibitors as chemical probes for interrogation of the structural and dynamic features that appear to govern the DFG flip in FGFR1. Our detailed structural and biophysical insights identify contributions from altered dynamics in distal elements, including the αH helix, towards the outstanding stability of the DFG-out complex with the inhibitor ponatinib. We conclude that the αC-β4 loop and `molecular brake' regions together impose a high energy barrier for this conformational rearrangement, and that this may have significance for maintaining autoinhibition in the non-phosphorylated basal state of FGFR1.

  11. Modeling active region transient brightenings observed with X-ray telescope as multi-stranded loops

    SciTech Connect

    Kobelski, Adam R.; McKenzie, David E.; Donachie, Martin

    2014-05-10

    Strong evidence exists that coronal loops as observed in extreme ultraviolet and soft X-rays may not be monolithic isotropic structures, but can often be more accurately modeled as bundles of independent strands. Modeling the observed active region transient brightenings (ARTBs) within this framework allows for the exploration of the energetic ramifications and characteristics of these stratified structures. Here we present a simple method of detecting and modeling ARTBs observed with the Hinode X-Ray Telescope (XRT) as groups of zero-dimensional strands, which allows us to probe parameter space to better understand the spatial and temporal dependence of strand heating in impulsively heated loops. This partially automated method can be used to analyze a large number of observations to gain a statistical insight into the parameters of coronal structures, including the number of heating events required in a given model to fit the observations. In this article, we present the methodology and demonstrate its use in detecting and modeling ARTBs in a sample data set from Hinode/XRT. These initial results show that, in general, multiple heating events are necessary to reproduce observed ARTBs, but the spatial dependence of these heating events cannot yet be established.

  12. A Self-regulatory System of Interlinked Signaling Feedback Loops Controls Mouse Limb Patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benazet, Jean-Denis; Bischofberger, Mirko; Tiecke, Eva; Gonalves, Alexandre; Martin, James F.; Zuniga, Aime; Naef, Felix; Zeller, Rolf

    Developmental pathways need to be robust against environmental and genetic variation to enable reliable morphogenesis. Here, we take a systems biology approach to explain how robustness is achieved in the developing mouse limb, a classical model of organogenesis. By combining quantitative genetics with computational modeling we established a computational model of multiple interlocked feedback modules, involving sonic hedgehog (SHH) morphogen, fibroblast growth factor (FGFs) signaling, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and its antagonist GREM1. Earlier modeling work had emphasized the versatile kinetic characteristics of interlocked feedback loops operating at different time scales. Here we develop and then validate a similar computational model to show how BMP4 first initiates and SHH then propagates feedback in the network through differential transcriptional regulation of Grem1 to control digit specification. This switch occurs by linking a fast BMP4/GREM1 module to a slower SHH/GREM1/FGF feedback loop. Simulated gene expression profiles modeled normal limb development as well those of single-gene knockouts. Sensitivity analysis showed how the model was robust and insensitive to variability in parameters. A surprising prediction of the model was that an early Bmp4 signal is essential to kick-start Grem1 expression and the digit specification system. We experimentally validated the prediction using inducible alleles and showed that early, but not late, removal of Bmp4 dramatically disrupted limb development. Sensitivity analysis showed how robustness emerges from this circuitry. This study shows how modeling and computation can help us understand how self-regulatory signaling networks achieve robust regulation of limb development, by exploiting interconnectivity among the three signaling pathways. We expect that similar computational analyses will shed light on the origins of robustness in other developmental systems, and I will discuss some recent examples from

  13. Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE), phase A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Deluis, Javier; Miller, David W.

    1989-01-01

    A rationale to determine which structural experiments are sufficient to verify the design of structures employing Controlled Structures Technology was derived. A survey of proposed NASA missions was undertaken to identify candidate test articles for use in the Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE). The survey revealed that potential test articles could be classified into one of three roles: development, demonstration, and qualification, depending on the maturity of the technology and the mission the structure must fulfill. A set of criteria was derived that allowed determination of which role a potential test article must fulfill. A review of the capabilities and limitations of the STS middeck was conducted. A reference design for the MACE test article was presented. Computing requirements for running typical closed-loop controllers was determined, and various computer configurations were studied. The various components required to manufacture the structure were identified. A management plan was established for the remainder of the program experiment development, flight and ground systems development, and integration to the carrier. Procedures for configuration control, fiscal control, and safety, reliabilty, and quality assurance were developed.

  14. Casein kinase 1α–dependent feedback loop controls autophagy in RAS-driven cancers

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Jit Kong; Zhang, Fuquan; Chua, Pei Jou; Bay, Boon Huat; Thorburn, Andrew; Virshup, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Activating mutations in the RAS oncogene are common in cancer but are difficult to therapeutically target. RAS activation promotes autophagy, a highly regulated catabolic process that metabolically buffers cells in response to diverse stresses. Here we report that casein kinase 1α (CK1α), a ubiquitously expressed serine/threonine kinase, is a key negative regulator of oncogenic RAS–induced autophagy. Depletion or pharmacologic inhibition of CK1α enhanced autophagic flux in oncogenic RAS–driven human fibroblasts and multiple cancer cell lines. FOXO3A, a master longevity mediator that transcriptionally regulates diverse autophagy genes, was a critical target of CK1α, as depletion of CK1α reduced levels of phosphorylated FOXO3A and increased expression of FOXO3A-responsive genes. Oncogenic RAS increased CK1α protein abundance via activation of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway. In turn, elevated levels of CK1α increased phosphorylation of nuclear FOXO3A, thereby inhibiting transactivation of genes critical for RAS-induced autophagy. In both RAS-driven cancer cells and murine xenograft models, pharmacologic CK1α inactivation synergized with lysosomotropic agents to inhibit growth and promote tumor cell death. Together, our results identify a kinase feedback loop that influences RAS-dependent autophagy and suggest that targeting CK1α-regulated autophagy offers a potential therapeutic opportunity to treat oncogenic RAS–driven cancers. PMID:25798617

  15. Reactive Center Loop (RCL) Peptides Derived from Serpins Display Independent Coagulation and Immune Modulating Activities.

    PubMed

    Ambadapadi, Sriram; Munuswamy-Ramanujam, Ganesh; Zheng, Donghang; Sullivan, Colin; Dai, Erbin; Morshed, Sufi; McFadden, Baron; Feldman, Emily; Pinard, Melissa; McKenna, Robert; Tibbetts, Scott; Lucas, Alexandra

    2016-02-01

    Serpins regulate coagulation and inflammation, binding serine proteases in suicide-inhibitory complexes. Target proteases cleave the serpin reactive center loop scissile P1-P1' bond, resulting in serpin-protease suicide-inhibitory complexes. This inhibition requires a near full-length serpin sequence. Myxomavirus Serp-1 inhibits thrombolytic and thrombotic proteases, whereas mammalian neuroserpin (NSP) inhibits only thrombolytic proteases. Both serpins markedly reduce arterial inflammation and plaque in rodent models after single dose infusion. In contrast, Serp-1 but not NSP improves survival in a lethal murine gammaherpesvirus68 (MHV68) infection in interferon γ-receptor-deficient mice (IFNγR(-/-)). Serp-1 has also been successfully tested in a Phase 2a clinical trial. We postulated that proteolytic cleavage of the reactive center loop produces active peptide derivatives with expanded function. Eight peptides encompassing predicted protease cleavage sites for Serp-1 and NSP were synthesized and tested for inhibitory function in vitro and in vivo. In engrafted aorta, selected peptides containing Arg or Arg-Asn, not Arg-Met, with a 0 or +1 charge, significantly reduced plaque. Conversely, S-6 a hydrophobic peptide of NSP, lacking Arg or Arg-Asn with -4 charge, induced early thrombosis and mortality. S-1 and S-6 also significantly reduced CD11b(+) monocyte counts in mouse splenocytes. S-1 peptide had increased efficacy in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 serpin-deficient transplants. Plaque reduction correlated with mononuclear cell activation. In a separate study, Serp-1 peptide S-7 improved survival in the MHV68 vasculitis model, whereas an inverse S-7 peptide was inactive. Reactive center peptides derived from Serp-1 and NSP with suitable charge and hydrophobicity have the potential to extend immunomodulatory functions of serpins. PMID:26620556

  16. Large loop conformation sampling using the activation relaxation technique, ART-nouveau method.

    PubMed

    St-Pierre, Jean-François; Mousseau, Normand

    2012-07-01

    We present an adaptation of the ART-nouveau energy surface sampling method to the problem of loop structure prediction. This method, previously used to study protein folding pathways and peptide aggregation, is well suited to the problem of sampling the conformation space of large loops by targeting probable folding pathways instead of sampling exhaustively that space. The number of sampled conformations needed by ART nouveau to find the global energy minimum for a loop was found to scale linearly with the sequence length of the loop for loops between 8 and about 20 amino acids. Considering the linear scaling dependence of the computation cost on the loop sequence length for sampling new conformations, we estimate the total computational cost of sampling larger loops to scale quadratically compared to the exponential scaling of exhaustive search methods. PMID:22488731

  17. Thermoelectric Converter for Loop Heat Pipe Temperature Control: Experience and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Ottenstein, Laura

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the theoretical background and implementation methodology of using a thermoelectric converter (TEC) for operating temperature control of a loop heat pipe (LHP). In particular, experimental results from ambient and thermal vacuum tests of an LHP are presented for illustrations. The most commonly used state-of-the-art method to control the LHP operating temperature is to cold bias its compensation chamber (CC) and use an electrical heater to maintain the CC at the desired set point temperature. Although effective, this approach has its shortcomings in that the electrical heater can only provide heating to the CC, and the required power can be large under certain conditions. An alternative method is to use a TEC, which is capable of providing both heating and cooling to the CC. In this method, one side of the TEC is attached to the CC, and the other side is connected to the evaporator via a thermal strap. Using a bipolar power supply and a control algorithm, a TEC can function as a heater or a cooler, depending on the direction of the current flow. Extensive ground tests of several LHPs have demonstrated that a TEC can provide very tight temperature control for the CC. It also offers several additional advantages: (1) The LHP can operate at temperatures below its natural operating temperature at low heat loads; (2) The required heater power for a TEC is much less than that for an electrical heater; and (3) It enhances the LHP start-up success. Although the concept of using a TEC for LHP temperature control is simple, there are many factors to be considered in its implementation for space applications because the TEC is susceptible to the shear stress and yet has to sustain the dynamic load under the spacecraft launch environment. The added features that help the TEC to withstand the dynamic load will inevitably affect the TEC thermal performance. Some experiences and lessons learned are addressed in this paper.

  18. Closed loop engine control for regulating NOx emissions, using a two-dimensional fuel-air curve

    DOEpatents

    Bourn, Gary D.; Smith, Jack A.; Gingrich, Jess W.

    2007-01-30

    An engine control strategy that ensures that NOx emissions from the engine will be maintained at an acceptable level. The control strategy is based on a two-dimensional fuel-air curve, in which air manifold pressure (AMP) is a function of fuel header pressure and engine speed. The control strategy provides for closed loop NOx adjustment to a base AMP value derived from the fuel-air curve.

  19. An extended loop in CE7 carbohydrate esterase family is dispensable for oligomerization but required for activity and thermostability.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mrityunjay K; Manoj, Narayanan

    2016-06-01

    The carbohydrate esterase family 7 (CE7) belonging to the α/β hydrolase superfamily contains a structurally conserved loop extension element relative to the canonical α/β hydrolase fold. This element called the β-interface loop contributes 20-30% of the total buried surface area at intersubunit interfaces of the functional hexameric state. To test whether this loop is an enabling region for the structure and function of the oligomeric assembly, we designed a truncation variant of the thermostable CE7 acetyl esterase from Thermotoga maritima (TmAcE). Although deletion of 26 out of 40 residues in the loop had little impact on the hexamer formation, the variant exhibited altered dynamics of the oligomeric assembly and a loss of thermal stability. Furthermore, the mutant lacked catalytic activity. Crystal structures of the variant and a new crystal form of the wild type protein determined at 2.75Å and 1.76Å, respectively, provide a rationale for the properties of the variant. The hexameric assembly in the variant is identical to that of the wild type and differed only in the lack of buried surface area interactions at the original intersubunit interfaces. This is accompanied by disorder in an extended region of the truncated loop that consequently induces disorder in the neighboring oxyanion hole loop. Overall, the results suggest that the β-interface loop in CE7 enzymes is dispensable for the oligomeric assembly. Rather, the loop extension event was evolutionarily selected to regulate activity, conformational flexibility and thermal stability. PMID:27085421

  20. Thermal Control Utilizing an Thermal Control Utilizing an Two-Phase Loop with High Heat Flux Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeong, Seong-Il; Didion, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    The electric field applied in dielectric fluids causes an imbalance in the dissociation-recombination reaction generated free space charges. The generated charges are redistributed by the applied electric field resulting in the heterocharge layers in the Vicinity of the electrodes. Proper design of the electrodes generates net axial flow motion pumping the fluid. The electrohydrodynamic (EHD) conduction pump is a new device that pumps dielectric fluids utilizing heterocharge layers formed by imposition of electrostatic fields. This paper evaluates the experimental performance of a two-phase breadboard thermal control loop consisting of an EHD conduction pump, condenser, pre-heater, high heat flux evaporator (HE), transport lines, and reservoir (accumulator). The generated pressure head and the maximum applicable heat flux are experimentally determined at various applied voltages and sink temperatures. Recovery from dryout condition by increasing the applied voltage to the pump is also demonstrated.

  1. Helix-loop-helix transcription factors mediate activation and repression of the p75LNGFR gene.

    PubMed Central

    Chiaramello, A; Neuman, K; Palm, K; Metsis, M; Neuman, T

    1995-01-01

    Sequence analysis of rat and human low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor p75LNGFR gene promoter regions revealed a single E-box cis-acting element, located upstream of the major transcription start sites. Deletion analysis of the E-box sequence demonstrated that it significantly contributes to p75LNGFR promoter activity. This E box has a dual function; it mediates either activation or repression of the p75LNGFR promoter activity, depending on the interacting transcription factors. We showed that the two isoforms of the class A basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor ME1 (ME1a and ME1b), the murine homolog of the human HEB transcription factor, specifically repress p75LNGFR promoter activity. This repression can be released by coexpression of the HLH Id2 transcriptional regulator. In vitro analyses demonstrated that ME1a forms a stable complex with the p75LNGFR E box and likely competes with activating E-box-binding proteins. By using ME1a-overexpressing PC12 cells, we showed that the endogenous p75LNGFR gene is a target of ME1a repression. Together, these data demonstrate that the p75LNGFR E box and the interacting bHLH transcription factors are involved in the regulation of p75LNGFR gene expression. These results also show that class A bHLH transcription factors can repress and Id-like negative regulators can stimulate gene expression. PMID:7565756

  2. Electromagnetic Steering of a Magnetic Cylindrical Microrobot Using Optical Feedback Closed-Loop Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari, Ali; Chang, Pyung H.; Nelson, Bradley J.; Choi, Hongsoo

    2014-04-01

    Control of small magnetic machines in viscous fluids may enable new medical applications of microrobots. Small-scale viscous environments lead to low Reynolds numbers, and although the flow is linear and steady, the magnetic actuation introduces a dynamic response that is nonlinear. We account for these nonlinearities, and the uncertainties in the dynamic and magnetic properties of the microrobot, by using time-delay estimation. The microrobot consists of a cylindrical magnet, 1 mm long and 500 µm in diameter, and is tracked using a visual feedback system. The microrobot was placed in silicone oil with a dynamic viscosity of 1 Pa.s, and followed step inputs with rise times of 0.45 s, 0.51 s, and 1.77 s, and overshoots of 37.5%, 33.3%, and 34.4% in the x, y, and z directions, respectively. In silicone oil with a viscosity of 3 Pa.s, the rise times were 1.04 s, 0.72 s, and 2.19 s, and the overshoots were 47.8%, 48.5%, and 86.8%. This demonstrates that closed-loop control of the magnetic microrobot was better in the less viscous fluid.

  3. Design and implementation of sensor systems for control of a closed-loop life support system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alnwick, Leslie; Clark, Amy; Debs, Patricia; Franczek, Chris; Good, Tom; Rodrigues, Pedro

    1989-01-01

    The sensing and controlling needs for a Closed-Loop Life Support System (CLLSS) were investigated. The sensing needs were identified in five particular areas and the requirements were defined for workable sensors. The specific areas of interest were atmosphere and temperature, nutrient delivery, plant health, plant propagation and support, and solids processing. The investigation of atmosphere and temperature control focused on the temperature distribution within the growth chamber as well as the possibility for sensing other parameters such as gas concentration, pressure, and humidity. The sensing needs were studied for monitoring the solution level in a porous membrane material along with the requirements for measuring the mass flow rate in the delivery system. The causes and symptoms of plant disease were examined and the various techniques for sensing these health indicators were explored. The study of sensing needs for plant propagation and support focused on monitoring seed viability and measuring seed moisture content as well as defining the requirements for drying and storing the seeds. The areas of harvesting, food processing, and resource recycling, were covered with a main focus on the sensing possibilities for regulating the recycling process.

  4. Studies on the closed-loop digital control of multi-modular reactors. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, J.A.; Henry, A.F.; Lanning, D.D.; Meyer, J.E.

    1992-11-01

    This report describes the theoretical development and the evaluation via both experiment and simulation of digital methods for the closed-loop control of power, temperature, and steam generator level in multi-modular reactors. The major conclusion of the research reported here is that the technology is currently available to automate many aspects of the operation of multi-modular plants. This will in turn minimize the number of required personnel and thus contain both operating and personnel costs, allow each module to be operated at a different power level thereby staggering the times at which refuelings would be needed, and maintain the competitiveness of US industry relative to foreign vendors who are developing and applying advanced control concepts. The technology described in this report is appropriate to the proposed multi-modular reactor designs and to present-generation pressurized water reactors. Its extension to boiling water reactors is possible provided that the commitment is made to create a real-time model of a BWR. The work reported here was performed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) under contract to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and to the United States Department of Energy (Division of Industry and University Programs, Contract No. DE-FG07-90ER12930.)

  5. Studies on the closed-loop digital control of multi-modular reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, J.A. . Nuclear Reactor Lab.); Henry, A.F.; Lanning, D.D.; Meyer, J.E. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1992-11-01

    This report describes the theoretical development and the evaluation via both experiment and simulation of digital methods for the closed-loop control of power, temperature, and steam generator level in multi-modular reactors. The major conclusion of the research reported here is that the technology is currently available to automate many aspects of the operation of multi-modular plants. This will in turn minimize the number of required personnel and thus contain both operating and personnel costs, allow each module to be operated at a different power level thereby staggering the times at which refuelings would be needed, and maintain the competitiveness of US industry relative to foreign vendors who are developing and applying advanced control concepts. The technology described in this report is appropriate to the proposed multi-modular reactor designs and to present-generation pressurized water reactors. Its extension to boiling water reactors is possible provided that the commitment is made to create a real-time model of a BWR. The work reported here was performed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) under contract to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and to the United States Department of Energy (Division of Industry and University Programs, Contract No. DE-FG07-90ER12930.)

  6. MEMS closed-loop control incorporating a memristor as feedback sensing element

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Ernest J.; Almeida, Sergio F.; Mireles, Jr., Jose; Zubia, David

    2015-12-01

    In this work the integration of a memristor with a MEMS parallel plate capacitor coupled by an amplification stage is simulated. It is shown that the MEMS upper plate position can be controlled up to 95% of the total gap. Due to its common operation principle, the change in the MEMS plate position can be interpreted by the change in the memristor resistance, or memristance. A memristance modulation of ~1 KΩ was observed. A polynomial expression representing the MEMS upper plate displacement as a function of the memristance is presented. Thereafter a simple design for a voltage closed-loop control is presented showing that the MEMS upper plate can be stabilized up to 95% of the total gap using the memristor as a feedback sensing element. As a result, the memristor can play important dual roles in overcoming the limited operation range of MEMS parallel plate capacitors and in simplifying read-out circuits of those devices by representing the motion of the upper plate in the form of resistance change instead of capacitance change.

  7. MEMS closed-loop control incorporating a memristor as feedback sensing element

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Garcia, Ernest J.; Almeida, Sergio F.; Mireles, Jr., Jose; Zubia, David

    2015-12-01

    In this work the integration of a memristor with a MEMS parallel plate capacitor coupled by an amplification stage is simulated. It is shown that the MEMS upper plate position can be controlled up to 95% of the total gap. Due to its common operation principle, the change in the MEMS plate position can be interpreted by the change in the memristor resistance, or memristance. A memristance modulation of ~1 KΩ was observed. A polynomial expression representing the MEMS upper plate displacement as a function of the memristance is presented. Thereafter a simple design for a voltage closed-loop control ismore » presented showing that the MEMS upper plate can be stabilized up to 95% of the total gap using the memristor as a feedback sensing element. As a result, the memristor can play important dual roles in overcoming the limited operation range of MEMS parallel plate capacitors and in simplifying read-out circuits of those devices by representing the motion of the upper plate in the form of resistance change instead of capacitance change.« less

  8. System identification of closed-loop cardiovascular control mechanisms: diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, R.; Mathias, J. M.; Mullen, T. J.; Cohen, R. J.; Freeman, R.

    1999-01-01

    We applied cardiovascular system identification (CSI) to characterize closed-loop cardiovascular regulation in patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN). The CSI method quantitatively analyzes beat-to-beat fluctuations in noninvasively measured heart rate, arterial blood pressure (ABP), and instantaneous lung volume (ILV) to characterize four physiological coupling mechanisms, two of which are autonomically mediated (the heart rate baroreflex and the coupling of respiration, measured in terms of ILV, to heart rate) and two of which are mechanically mediated (the coupling of ventricular contraction to the generation of the ABP wavelet and the coupling of respiration to ABP). We studied 37 control and 60 diabetic subjects who were classified as having minimal, moderate, or severe DAN on the basis of standard autonomic tests. The autonomically mediated couplings progressively decreased with increasing severity of DAN, whereas the mechanically mediated couplings were essentially unchanged. CSI identified differences between the minimal DAN and control groups, which were indistinguishable based on the standard autonomic tests. CSI may provide a powerful tool for assessing DAN.

  9. Closed-loop transfer recovery with observer-based controllers. I - Analysis. II - Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Ben M.; Saberi, Ali; Ly, Uy-Loi

    1992-01-01

    A detailed study is presented of three fundamental issues related to the problem of closed-loop transfer (CLT) recovery. The first issues concerns what can and cannot be achieved for a given system and for an arbitrary target CLT function (TCLTF). The second issue involves developing necessary and/or sufficient conditions for a TCLTF to be recoverable either exactly or approximately. The third issue involves the necessary and/or sufficient conditions on a given system such that it has at least one recoverable TCLTF. The results of the analysis identify some fundamental limitations of the given system as a consequence of its structural properties which enables designers to appreciate at the outset different design limitations incurred in the synthesis of output-feedback controllers. Then, the actual design of full-order or reduced-order observer-based controllers is addressed which will achieve as close as possibly the desired TCLTF. Three design methods are considered: (1) the ATEA method, (2) a method that minimizes the H2-norm of a recovery matrix, and (3) a method that minimizes the respective H(infinity) norm. The relative merits of the methods are discussed.

  10. System identification of closed-loop cardiovascular control: effects of posture and autonomic blockade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, T. J.; Appel, M. L.; Mukkamala, R.; Mathias, J. M.; Cohen, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    We applied system identification to the analysis of fluctuations in heart rate (HR), arterial blood pressure (ABP), and instantaneous lung volume (ILV) to characterize quantitatively the physiological mechanisms responsible for the couplings between these variables. We characterized two autonomically mediated coupling mechanisms [the heart rate baroreflex (HR baroreflex) and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (ILV-HR)] and two mechanically mediated coupling mechanisms [the blood pressure wavelet generated with each cardiac contraction (circulatory mechanics) and the direct mechanical effects of respiration on blood pressure (ILV-->ABP)]. We evaluated the method in humans studied in the supine and standing postures under control conditions and under conditions of beta-sympathetic and parasympathetic pharmacological blockades. Combined beta-sympathetic and parasympathetic blockade abolished the autonomically mediated couplings while preserving the mechanically mediated coupling. Selective autonomic blockade and postural changes also altered the couplings in a manner consistent with known physiological mechanisms. System identification is an "inverse-modeling" technique that provides a means for creating a closed-loop model of cardiovascular regulation for an individual subject without altering the underlying physiological control mechanisms.

  11. International Space Station (ISS) External Thermal Control System (ETCS) Loop A Pump Module (PM) Jettison Options Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Daniel G.; Dwyer Cianciolo, Alicia; Shidner, Jeremy D.; Powell, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    On December 11, 2013, the International Space Station (ISS) experienced a failure of the External Thermal Control System (ETCS) Loop A Pump Module (PM). To minimize the number of extravehicular activities (EVA) required to replace the PM, jettisoning the faulty pump was evaluated. The objective of this study was to independently evaluate the jettison options considered by the ISS Trajectory Operations Officer (TOPO) and to provide recommendations for safe jettison of the ETCS Loop A PM. The simulation selected to evaluate the TOPO options was the NASA Engineering and Safety Center's (NESC) version of Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST2) developed to support another NESC assessment. The objective of the jettison analysis was twofold: (1) to independently verify TOPO posigrade and retrograde jettison results, and (2) to determine jettison guidelines based on additional sensitivity, trade study, and Monte Carlo (MC) analysis that would prevent PM recontact. Recontact in this study designates a propagated PM trajectory that comes within 500 m of the ISS propagated trajectory. An additional simulation using Systems Tool Kit (STK) was run for independent verification of the POST2 simulation results. Ultimately, the ISS Program removed the PM jettison option from consideration. However, prior to the Program decision, the retrograde jettison option remained part of the EVA contingency plan. The jettison analysis presented showed that, in addition to separation velocity/direction and the atmosphere conditions, the key variables in determining the time to recontact the ISS is highly dependent on the ballistic number (BN) difference between the object being jettisoned and the ISS.

  12. The Role of Flexible Loops in Folding, Trafficking and Activity of Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Aseervatham, Jaya; Tran, Lucky; Machaca, Khaled; Boudker, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs) are integral membrane proteins, which reside in plasma membranes of all eukaryotic cells and mediate thermodynamically downhill transport of nucleosides. This process is essential for nucleoside recycling, and also plays a key role in terminating adenosine-mediated cellular signaling. Furthermore, ENTs mediate the uptake of many drugs, including anticancer and antiviral nucleoside analogues. The structure and mechanism, by which ENTs catalyze trans-membrane transport of their substrates, remain unknown. To identify the core of the transporter needed for stability, activity, and for its correct trafficking to the plasma membrane, we have expressed human ENT deletion mutants in Xenopus laevis oocytes and determined their localization, transport properties and susceptibility to inhibition. We found that the carboxyl terminal trans-membrane segments are essential for correct protein folding and trafficking. In contrast, the soluble extracellular and intracellular loops appear to be dispensable, and must be involved in the fine-tuning of transport regulation. PMID:26406980

  13. The Role of Flexible Loops in Folding, Trafficking and Activity of Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporters.

    PubMed

    Aseervatham, Jaya; Tran, Lucky; Machaca, Khaled; Boudker, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs) are integral membrane proteins, which reside in plasma membranes of all eukaryotic cells and mediate thermodynamically downhill transport of nucleosides. This process is essential for nucleoside recycling, and also plays a key role in terminating adenosine-mediated cellular signaling. Furthermore, ENTs mediate the uptake of many drugs, including anticancer and antiviral nucleoside analogues. The structure and mechanism, by which ENTs catalyze trans-membrane transport of their substrates, remain unknown. To identify the core of the transporter needed for stability, activity, and for its correct trafficking to the plasma membrane, we have expressed human ENT deletion mutants in Xenopus laevis oocytes and determined their localization, transport properties and susceptibility to inhibition. We found that the carboxyl terminal trans-membrane segments are essential for correct protein folding and trafficking. In contrast, the soluble extracellular and intracellular loops appear to be dispensable, and must be involved in the fine-tuning of transport regulation. PMID:26406980

  14. Decentralized Sliding Mode Observer Based Dual Closed-Loop Fault Tolerant Control for Reconfigurable Manipulator against Actuator Failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bo; Li, Yuanchun

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers a decentralized fault tolerant control (DFTC) scheme for reconfigurable manipulators. With the appearance of norm-bounded failure, a dual closed-loop trajectory tracking control algorithm is proposed on the basis of the Lyapunov stability theory. Characterized by the modularization property, the actuator failure is estimated by the proposed decentralized sliding mode observer (DSMO). Moreover, the actuator failure can be treated in view of the local joint information, so its control performance degradation is independent of other normal joints. In addition, the presented DFTC scheme is significantly simplified in terms of the structure of the controller due to its dual closed-loop architecture, and its feasibility is highly reflected in the control of reconfigurable manipulators. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed DFTC scheme is demonstrated using simulations. PMID:26181826

  15. Closed-loop control of a 2-D mems micromirror with sidewall electrodes for a laser scanning microscope system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Chen, Albert; Jie Sun, Wei; Sun, Zhen Dong; Yeow, John TW

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the development and implementation of a robust nonlinear control scheme for a 2-D micromirror-based laser scanning microscope system. The presented control scheme, built around sliding mode control approach and augmented an adaptive algorithm, is proposed to improve the tracking accuracy in presence of cross-axis effect. The closed-loop controlled imaging system is developed through integrating a 2-D micromirror with sidewall electrodes (SW), a laser source, NI field-programmable gate array (FPGA) hardware, the optics, position sensing detector (PSD) and photo detector (PD). The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed scheme is able to achieve accurate tracking of a reference triangular signal. Compared with open-loop control, the scanning performance is significantly improved, and a better 2-D image is obtained using the micromirror with the proposed scheme.

  16. Decentralized Sliding Mode Observer Based Dual Closed-Loop Fault Tolerant Control for Reconfigurable Manipulator against Actuator Failure.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bo; Li, Chenghao; Liu, Derong; Li, Yuanchun

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers a decentralized fault tolerant control (DFTC) scheme for reconfigurable manipulators. With the appearance of norm-bounded failure, a dual closed-loop trajectory tracking control algorithm is proposed on the basis of the Lyapunov stability theory. Characterized by the modularization property, the actuator failure is estimated by the proposed decentralized sliding mode observer (DSMO). Moreover, the actuator failure can be treated in view of the local joint information, so its control performance degradation is independent of other normal joints. In addition, the presented DFTC scheme is significantly simplified in terms of the structure of the controller due to its dual closed-loop architecture, and its feasibility is highly reflected in the control of reconfigurable manipulators. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed DFTC scheme is demonstrated using simulations. PMID:26181826

  17. A feedback control loop for autonomous time synchronisation for mobile satellite systems, including satellites in any Earth orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soprano, C.

    This paper presents the preliminary results of the design, analysis and simulation of a feedback control-loop for application to autonomous epoch synchronization in a satellite mobile synchronous communications system which includes communications satellites in non-geostationary Earth orbits and fast-moving mobile users.

  18. Hardware-In-The-Loop Testing of Continuous Control Algorithms for a Precision Formation Flying Demonstration Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naasz, Bo J.; Burns, Richard D.; Gaylor, David; Higinbotham, John

    2004-01-01

    A sample mission sequence is defined for a low earth orbit demonstration of Precision Formation Flying (PFF). Various guidance navigation and control strategies are discussed for use in the PFF experiment phases. A sample PFF experiment is implemented and tested in a realistic Hardware-in-the-Loop (HWIL) simulation using the Formation Flying Test Bed (FFTB) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center.

  19. A real-time pressure estimation algorithm for closed-loop combustion control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Durra, Ahmed; Canova, Marcello; Yurkovich, Stephen

    2013-07-01

    The cylinder pressure is arguably the most important variable characterizing the combustion process in internal combustion engines. In light of the recent advances in combustion technologies and in engine control, the use of cylinder pressure is now frequently considered as a feedback signal for closed-loop combustion control algorithms. In order to generate an accurate pressure trace for real-time combustion control and diagnostics, the output of the in-cylinder pressure transducer must be conditioned with signal processing methods to mitigate the well-known issues of offset and noise. While several techniques have been proposed for processing the cylinder pressure signal with limited computational burden, most of the available methods still require one to apply low-pass filters or moving average windows in order to mitigate the noise. This ultimately limits the opportunity of exploiting the in-cylinder pressure feedback for a cycle-by-cycle control of the combustion process. To this extent, this paper presents an estimation algorithm that extracts the pressure signal from the in-cylinder sensor in real-time, allowing for estimating the 50% burn rate location and IMEP on a cycle-by-cycle basis. The proposed approach relies on a model-based estimation algorithm whose starting point is a crank-angle based engine combustion model that predicts the in-cylinder pressure from the definition of a burn rate function. Linear parameter varying (LPV) techniques are then used to expand the region of estimation to cover the engine operating map, as well as allowing for real-time cylinder estimation during transients. The estimator is tested on the experimental data collected on an engine dynamometer as well as on a high-fidelity engine simulator. The results obtained show the effectiveness of the estimator in reconstructing the cylinder pressure on a crank-angle basis and in rejecting measurement noise and modeling errors, with considerably low computation effort.

  20. Semi-active control of helicopter vibration using controllable stiffness and damping devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anusonti-Inthra, Phuriwat

    , represented by a lumped mass under harmonic force excitation, is supported by a spring and a parallel damper on the fuselage (assumed to have infinite mass). Properties of the spring or damper can then be controlled to reduce transmission of the force into the fuselage or the support structure. This semi-active isolation concept can produce additional 30% vibration reduction beyond the level achieved by a passive isolator. Different control schemes (i.e. open-loop, closed-loop, and closed-loop adaptive schemes) are developed and evaluated to control transmission of vibratory loads to the support structure (fuselage), and it is seen that a closed-loop adaptive controller is required to retain vibration reduction effectiveness when there is a change in operating condition. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  1. Loop gain stabilizing with an all-digital automatic-gain-control method for high-precision fiber-optic gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yue; Zhang, Chunxi; Li, Lijing; Song, Lailiang; Chen, Wen

    2016-06-10

    For a fiber-optic gyroscope (FOG) using electronic dithers to suppress the dead zone, without a fixed loop gain, the deterministic compensation for the dither signals in the control loop of the FOG cannot remain accurate, resulting in the dither residuals in the FOG rotation rate output and the navigation errors in the inertial navigation system. An all-digital automatic-gain-control method for stabilizing the loop gain of the FOG is proposed. By using a perturbation square wave to measure the loop gain of the FOG and adding an automatic gain control loop in the conventional control loop of the FOG, we successfully obtain the actual loop gain and make the loop gain converge to the reference value. The experimental results show that in the case of 20% variation in the loop gain, the dither residuals are successfully eliminated and the standard deviation of the FOG sampling outputs is decreased from 2.00  deg/h to 0.62  deg/h (sampling period 2.5 ms, 10 points smoothing). With this method, the loop gain of the FOG can be stabilized over the operation temperature range and in the long-time application, which provides a solid foundation for the engineering applications of the high-precision FOG. PMID:27409016

  2. Closed-loop control of a fragile network: application to seizure-like dynamics of an epilepsy model

    PubMed Central

    Ehrens, Daniel; Sritharan, Duluxan; Sarma, Sridevi V.

    2015-01-01

    It has recently been proposed that the epileptic cortex is fragile in the sense that seizures manifest through small perturbations in the synaptic connections that render the entire cortical network unstable. Closed-loop therapy could therefore entail detecting when the network goes unstable, and then stimulating with an exogenous current to stabilize the network. In this study, a non-linear stochastic model of a neuronal network was used to simulate both seizure and non-seizure activity. In particular, synaptic weights between neurons were chosen such that the network's fixed point is stable during non-seizure periods, and a subset of these connections (the most fragile) were perturbed to make the same fixed point unstable to model seizure events; and, the model randomly transitions between these two modes. The goal of this study was to measure spike train observations from this epileptic network and then apply a feedback controller that (i) detects when the network goes unstable, and then (ii) applies a state-feedback gain control input to the network to stabilize it. The stability detector is based on a 2-state (stable, unstable) hidden Markov model (HMM) of the network, and detects the transition from the stable mode to the unstable mode from using the firing rate of the most fragile node in the network (which is the output of the HMM). When the unstable mode is detected, a state-feedback gain is applied to generate a control input to the fragile node bringing the network back to the stable mode. Finally, when the network is detected as stable again, the feedback control input is switched off. High performance was achieved for the stability detector, and feedback control suppressed seizures within 2 s after onset. PMID:25784851

  3. Active control of aerothermoelastic effects for a conceptual hypersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Gilbert, Michael G.; Pototzky, Anthony S.

    1990-01-01

    Procedures for and results of aeroservothermoelastic studies are described. The objectives of these studies were to develop the necessary procedures for performing an aeroelastic analysis of an aerodynamically heated vehicle and to analyze a configuration in the classical cold state and in a hot state. Major tasks include the development of the structural and aerodynamic models, open loop analyses, design of active control laws for improving dynamic responses and analyses of the closed loop vehicles. The analyses performed focused on flutter speed calculations, short period eigenvalue trends and statistical analyses of the vehicle response to controls and turbulence. Improving the ride quality of the vehicle and raising the flutter boundary of the aerodynamically-heated vehicle up to that of the cold vehicle were the objectives of the control law design investigations.

  4. A Closed-Loop Optimal Neural-Network Controller to Optimize Rotorcraft Aeromechanical Behaviour. Volume 1; Theory and Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leyland, Jane Anne

    2001-01-01

    Given the predicted growth in air transportation, the potential exists for significant market niches for rotary wing subsonic vehicles. Technological advances which optimise rotorcraft aeromechanical behaviour can contribute significantly to both their commercial and military development, acceptance, and sales. Examples of the optimisation of rotorcraft aeromechanical behaviour which are of interest include the minimisation of vibration and/or loads. The reduction of rotorcraft vibration and loads is an important means to extend the useful life of the vehicle and to improve its ride quality. Although vibration reduction can be accomplished by using passive dampers and/or tuned masses, active closed-loop control has the potential to reduce vibration and loads throughout a.wider flight regime whilst requiring less additional weight to the aircraft man that obtained by using passive methads. It is ernphasised that the analysis described herein is applicable to all those rotorcraft aeromechanical behaviour optimisation problems for which the relationship between the harmonic control vector and the measurement vector can be adequately described by a neural-network model.

  5. Active spacecraft potential control: An ion emitter experiment. [Cluster mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedler, W.; Goldstein, R.; Hamelin, M.; Maehlum, B. N.; Troim, J.; Olsen, R. C.; Pedersen, A.; Grard, R. J. L.; Schmidt, R.; Rudenauer, F.

    1988-01-01

    The cluster spacecraft are instrumented with ion emitters for charge neutralization. The emitters produce indium ions at 6 keV. The ion current is adjusted in a feedback loop with instruments measuring the spacecraft potential. The system is based on the evaporation of indium in the apex field of a needle. The design of the active spacecraft potential control instruments, and the ion emitters is presented.

  6. Active vibration and noise control of vibro-acoustic system by using PID controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunlong; Wang, Xiaojun; Huang, Ren; Qiu, Zhiping

    2015-07-01

    Active control simulation of the acoustic and vibration response of a vibro-acoustic cavity of an airplane based on a PID controller is presented. A full numerical vibro-acoustic model is developed by using an Eulerian model, which is a coupled model based on the finite element formulation. The reduced order model, which is used to design the closed-loop control system, is obtained by the combination of modal expansion and variable substitution. Some physical experiments are made to validate and update the full-order and the reduced-order numerical models. Optimization of the actuator placement is employed in order to get an effective closed-loop control system. For the controller design, an iterative method is used to determine the optimal parameters of the PID controller. The process is illustrated by the design of an active noise and vibration control system for a cavity structure. The numerical and experimental results show that a PID-based active control system can effectively suppress the noise inside the cavity using a sound pressure signal as the controller input. It is also possible to control the noise by suppressing the vibration of the structure using the structural displacement signal as the controller input. For an airplane cavity structure, considering the issue of space-saving, the latter is more suitable.

  7. Zinc enhancement of cytidine deaminase activity highlights a potential allosteric role of loop-3 in regulating APOBEC3 enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Ailie; Galilee, Meytal; Alian, Akram

    2015-01-01

    The strong association of APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases with somatic mutations leading to cancers accentuates the importance of their tight intracellular regulation to minimize cellular transformations. We reveal a novel allosteric regulatory mechanism of APOBEC3 enzymes showing that APOBEC3G and APOBEC3A coordination of a secondary zinc ion, reminiscent to ancestral deoxycytidylate deaminases, enhances deamination activity. Zinc binding is pinpointed to loop-3 which whilst highly variable harbors a catalytically essential and spatially conserved asparagine at its N-terminus. We suggest that loop-3 may play a general role in allosterically tuning the activity of zinc-dependent cytidine deaminase family members. PMID:26678087

  8. Zinc enhancement of cytidine deaminase activity highlights a potential allosteric role of loop-3 in regulating APOBEC3 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Marx, Ailie; Galilee, Meytal; Alian, Akram

    2015-01-01

    The strong association of APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases with somatic mutations leading to cancers accentuates the importance of their tight intracellular regulation to minimize cellular transformations. We reveal a novel allosteric regulatory mechanism of APOBEC3 enzymes showing that APOBEC3G and APOBEC3A coordination of a secondary zinc ion, reminiscent to ancestral deoxycytidylate deaminases, enhances deamination activity. Zinc binding is pinpointed to loop-3 which whilst highly variable harbors a catalytically essential and spatially conserved asparagine at its N-terminus. We suggest that loop-3 may play a general role in allosterically tuning the activity of zinc-dependent cytidine deaminase family members. PMID:26678087

  9. Feedback control of combustion instabilities from within limit cycle oscillations using H∞ loop-shaping and the ν-gap metric

    PubMed Central

    Morgans, Aimee S.

    2016-01-01

    Combustion instabilities arise owing to a two-way coupling between acoustic waves and unsteady heat release. Oscillation amplitudes successively grow, until nonlinear effects cause saturation into limit cycle oscillations. Feedback control, in which an actuator modifies some combustor input in response to a sensor measurement, can suppress combustion instabilities. Linear feedback controllers are typically designed, using linear combustor models. However, when activated from within limit cycle, the linear model is invalid, and such controllers are not guaranteed to stabilize. This work develops a feedback control strategy guaranteed to stabilize from within limit cycle oscillations. A low-order model of a simple combustor, exhibiting the essential features of more complex systems, is presented. Linear plane acoustic wave modelling is combined with a weakly nonlinear describing function for the flame. The latter is determined numerically using a level set approach. Its implication is that the open-loop transfer function (OLTF) needed for controller design varies with oscillation level. The difference between the mean and the rest of the OLTFs is characterized using the ν-gap metric, providing the minimum required ‘robustness margin’ for an H∞ loop-shaping controller. Such controllers are designed and achieve stability both for linear fluctuations and from within limit cycle oscillations. PMID:27493558

  10. Dual-loop self-optimizing robust control of wind power generation with Doubly-Fed Induction Generator.

    PubMed

    Chen, Quan; Li, Yaoyu; Seem, John E

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a self-optimizing robust control scheme that can maximize the power generation for a variable speed wind turbine with Doubly-Fed Induction Generator (DFIG) operated in Region 2. A dual-loop control structure is proposed to synergize the conversion from aerodynamic power to rotor power and the conversion from rotor power to the electrical power. The outer loop is an Extremum Seeking Control (ESC) based generator torque regulation via the electric power feedback. The ESC can search for the optimal generator torque constant to maximize the rotor power without wind measurement or accurate knowledge of power map. The inner loop is a vector-control based scheme that can both regulate the generator torque requested by the ESC and also maximize the conversion from the rotor power to grid power. An ℋ(∞) controller is synthesized for maximizing, with performance specifications defined based upon the spectrum of the rotor power obtained by the ESC. Also, the controller is designed to be robust against the variations of some generator parameters. The proposed control strategy is validated via simulation study based on the synergy of several software packages including the TurbSim and FAST developed by NREL, Simulink and SimPowerSystems. PMID:26071967

  11. A Single Glycan at the 99-Loop of Human Kallikrein-related Peptidase 2 Regulates Activation and Enzymatic Activity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shihui; Skala, Wolfgang; Magdolen, Viktor; Briza, Peter; Biniossek, Martin L; Schilling, Oliver; Kellermann, Josef; Brandstetter, Hans; Goettig, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Human kallikrein-related peptidase 2 (KLK2) is a key serine protease in semen liquefaction and prostate cancer together with KLK3/prostate-specific antigen. In order to decipher the function of its potential N-glycosylation site, we produced pro-KLK2 in Leishmania tarentolae cells and compared it with its non-glycosylated counterpart from Escherichia coli expression. Mass spectrometry revealed that Asn-95 carries a core glycan, consisting of two GlcNAc and three hexoses. Autocatalytic activation was retarded in glyco-pro-KLK2, whereas the activated glyco-form exhibited an increased proteolytic resistance. The specificity patterns obtained by the PICS (proteomic identification of protease cleavage sites) method are similar for both KLK2 variants, with a major preference for P1-Arg. However, glycosylation changes the enzymatic activity of KLK2 in a drastically substrate-dependent manner. Although glyco-KLK2 has a considerably lower catalytic efficiency than glycan-free KLK2 toward peptidic substrates with P2-Phe, the situation was reverted toward protein substrates, such as glyco-pro-KLK2 itself. These findings can be rationalized by the glycan-carrying 99-loop that prefers to cover the active site like a lid. By contrast, the non-glycosylated 99-loop seems to favor a wide open conformation, which mostly increases the apparent affinity for the substrates (i.e. by a reduction of Km). Also, the cleavage pattern and kinetics in autolytic inactivation of both KLK2 variants can be explained by a shift of the target sites due to the presence of the glycan. These striking effects of glycosylation pave the way to a deeper understanding of kallikrein-related peptidase biology and pathology. PMID:26582203

  12. Back-stepping active disturbance rejection control design for integrated missile guidance and control system via reduced-order ESO.

    PubMed

    Xingling, Shao; Honglun, Wang

    2015-07-01

    This paper proposes a novel composite integrated guidance and control (IGC) law for missile intercepting against unknown maneuvering target with multiple uncertainties and control constraint. First, by using back-stepping technique, the proposed IGC law design is separated into guidance loop and control loop. The unknown target maneuvers and variations of aerodynamics parameters in guidance and control loop are viewed as uncertainties, which are estimated and compensated by designed model-assisted reduced-order extended state observer (ESO). Second, based on the principle of active disturbance rejection control (ADRC), enhanced feedback linearization (FL) based control law is implemented for the IGC model using the estimates generated by reduced-order ESO. In addition, performance analysis and comparisons between ESO and reduced-order ESO are examined. Nonlinear tracking differentiator is employed to construct the derivative of virtual control command in the control loop. Third, the closed-loop stability for the considered system is established. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed IGC law in enhanced interception performance such as smooth interception course, improved robustness against multiple uncertainties as well as reduced control consumption during initial phase are demonstrated through simulations. PMID:25776190

  13. Closed-Loop Control and Advisory Mode Evaluation of an Artificial Pancreatic β Cell: Use of Proportional–Integral–Derivative Equivalent Model-Based Controllers

    PubMed Central

    Percival, Matthew W.; Zisser, Howard; Jovanovič, Lois; Doyle, Francis J.

    2008-01-01

    Background Using currently available technology, it is possible to apply modern control theory to produce a closed-loop artificial β cell. Novel use of established control techniques would improve glycemic control, thereby reducing the complications of diabetes. Two popular controller structures, proportional–integral–derivative (PID) and model predictive control (MPC), are compared first in a theoretical sense and then in two applications. Methods The Bergman model is transformed for use in a PID equivalent model-based controller. The internal model control (IMC) structure, which makes explicit use of the model, is compared with the PID controller structure in the transfer function domain. An MPC controller is then developed as an optimization problem with restrictions on its tuning parameters and is shown to be equivalent to an IMC controller. The controllers are tuned for equivalent performance and evaluated in a simulation study as a closed-loop controller and in an advisory mode scenario on retrospective clinical data. Results Theoretical development shows conditions under which PID and MPC controllers produce equivalent output via IMC. The simulation study showed that the single tuning parameter for the equivalent controllers relates directly to the closed-loop speed of response and robustness, an important result considering system uncertainty. The risk metric allowed easy identification of instances of inadequate control. Results of the advisory mode simulation showed that suitable tuning produces consistently appropriate delivery recommendations. Conclusion The conditions under which PID and MPC are equivalent have been derived. The MPC framework is more suitable given the extensions necessary for a fully closed-loop artificial β cell, such as consideration of controller constraints. Formulation of the control problem in risk space is attractive, as it explicitly addresses the asymmetry of the problem; this is done easily with MPC. PMID:19885240

  14. Multichannel spike detector with an adaptive threshold based on a Sigma-delta control loop.

    PubMed

    Gagnon-Turcotte, G; Gosselin, B

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we present a digital spike detector using an adaptive threshold which is suitable for real time processing of 32 electrophysiological channels in parallel. Such a new scheme is based on a Sigma-delta control loop that precisely estimates the standard deviation of the amplitude of the noise of the input signal to optimize the detection rate. Additionally, it is not dependent on the amplitude of the input signal thanks to a robust algorithm. The spike detector is implemented inside a Spartan-6 FPGA using low resources, only FPGA basic logic blocks, and is using a low clock frequency under 6 MHz for minimal power consumption. We present a comparison showing that the proposed system can compete with a dedicated off-line spike detection software. The whole system achieves up to 100% of true positive detection rate for SNRs down to 5 dB while achieving 62.3% of true positive detection rate for an SNR as low as -2 dB at a 150 AP/s firing rate. PMID:26737934

  15. A closed-loop control "playback" smoking machine for generating mainstream smoke aerosols.

    PubMed

    Shihadeh, Alan; Azar, Sima

    2006-01-01

    A first generation smoking machine capable of reading and replicating detailed puffing behavior from recorded smoking topography data is presented. Unlike standard smoking machines, which model human puffing behavior as a steady periodic waveform with a fixed puff frequency, volume, and duration, this novel machine generates a mainstream smoke aerosol by automatically "playing-back" puff topography recordings. Because combustion chemistry is highly non-linear, representing real smoking behavior with a smoothed periodic waveform may result in a tobacco smoke aerosol with a significantly different chemical composition and physical properties than that generated by a smoker. The machine presented here utilizes a rapid closed-loop control algorithm coded in Labview to generate smoke aerosols for toxicological assessment and inhalation studies. To illustrate its use, dry particulate matter and carbon monoxide yields generated using the playback and equivalent periodic puffing regimens are compared for a single smoking session by a 26-year-old male narghile water-pipe smoker. It was found that the periodic puffing regimen yielded 20% less carbon monoxide (CO) than the played-back smoking session, indicating that steady periodic smoking regimens, which are widely used in tobacco smoke research, may not produce realistic smoke aerosols. PMID:16796538

  16. Cytoplasmic loop three of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator contributes to regulation of chloride channel activity.

    PubMed

    Seibert, F S; Linsdell, P; Loo, T W; Hanrahan, J W; Riordan, J R; Clarke, D M

    1996-11-01

    To examine the contribution of the large cytoplasmic loops of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) to channel activity, the three point-mutations (S945L, H949Y, G970R) were characterized that have been detected in the third cytoplasmic loop (CL3, residues 933-990) in patients with cystic fibrosis. Chinese hamster ovary cell lines stably expressing wild-type CFTR or mutant G970R-CFTR yielded polypeptides with apparent masses of 170 kDa as the major products, whereas the major products of mutants S945L-CFTR and H949Y-CFTR had apparent masses of 150 kDa. The 150-kDa forms of CFTR were sensitive to endoglycosidase H digestion, indicating that these mutations interfered with maturation of the protein. Increased levels of mature CFTR (170 kDa) could be obtained for mutant H949Y when cells were grown at a lower temperature (26 degrees C) or incubated in the presence of 10% glycerol. For all mutants, the open probability (P0) of the CFTR channels was significantly altered. S945L-CFTR and G970R-CFTR showed a severe reduction in the P0, whereas the H949Y mutation doubled the P0 relative to wild-type. The changes in P0 predominantly resulted from an alteration of the mean burst durations which suggests that CL3 is involved in obtaining and/or maintaining stability of the open state. In addition, mutants S945L and G970R had current-voltage relationships that were not completely linear over the range +/-80 mV, but showed slight outward rectification. The fact that CL3 mutations can have subtle effects on channel conductance indicates that this region may be physically close to the inner mouth of the pore. PMID:8910333

  17. The conserved active-site loop residues of ferrochelatase induce porphyrin conformational changes necessary for catalysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, Raid Edward; Shelnutt, John Allen; Shi, Zhen; Ferreira, Gloria C.; Franco, Ricardo T.

    2005-05-01

    Binding of porphyrin to murine ferrochelatase, the terminal enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway, is investigated by employing a set of variants harboring mutations in a putative porphyrin-binding loop. Using resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy, the structural properties of the ferrochelatase-bound porphyrins are examined, especially with respect to the porphyrin deformation occurring in the environment of the active site. This deformation is thought to be a key step in the enzymatic insertion of ferrous iron into the porphyrin ring to make heme. Our previous RR spectroscopic studies of binding of porphyrin to murine ferrochelatase led us to propose that the wild-type enzyme induces porphyrin distortion even in the absence of the metal ion substrate. Here, we broaden this view by presenting evidence that the degree of a specific nonplanar porphyrin deformation contributes to the catalytic efficiency of ferrochelatase and its variants. The results also suggest that the conserved Trp256 (murine ferrochelatase numbering) is partially responsible for the observed porphyrin deformation. Binding of porphyrin to the ferrochelatase variants causes a decrease in the intensity of RR out-of-plane vibrational mode {gamma}{sub 15}, a saddling-like mode that is strong in the wild-type enzyme. In particular, the variant with a catalytic efficiency 1 order of magnitude lower than that of the wild-type enzyme is estimated to produce less than 30% of the wild-type saddling deformation. These results suggest that specific conserved loop residues (especially Trp256) are directly involved in the saddling of the porphyrin substrate.

  18. Enhancer RNAs participate in androgen receptor-driven looping that selectively enhances gene activation.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chen-Lin; Fei, Teng; Chen, Yiwen; Li, Tiantian; Gao, Yanfei; Wang, Xiaodong; Sun, Tong; Sweeney, Christopher J; Lee, Gwo-Shu Mary; Chen, Shaoyong; Balk, Steven P; Liu, Xiaole Shirley; Brown, Myles; Kantoff, Philip W

    2014-05-20

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a key factor that regulates the behavior and fate of prostate cancer cells. The AR-regulated network is activated when AR binds enhancer elements and modulates specific enhancer-promoter looping. Kallikrein-related peptidase 3 (KLK3), which codes for prostate-specific antigen (PSA), is a well-known AR-regulated gene and its upstream enhancers produce bidirectional enhancer RNAs (eRNAs), termed KLK3e. Here, we demonstrate that KLK3e facilitates the spatial interaction of the KLK3 enhancer and the KLK2 promoter and enhances long-distance KLK2 transcriptional activation. KLK3e carries the core enhancer element derived from the androgen response element III (ARE III), which is required for the interaction of AR and Mediator 1 (Med1). Furthermore, we show that KLK3e processes RNA-dependent enhancer activity depending on the integrity of core enhancer elements. The transcription of KLK3e was detectable and its expression is significantly correlated with KLK3 (R(2) = 0.6213, P < 5 × 10(-11)) and KLK2 (R(2) = 0.5893, P < 5 × 10(-10)) in human prostate tissues. Interestingly, RNAi silencing of KLK3e resulted in a modest negative effect on prostate cancer cell proliferation. Accordingly, we report that an androgen-induced eRNA scaffolds the AR-associated protein complex that modulates chromosomal architecture and selectively enhances AR-dependent gene expression. PMID:24778216

  19. VARIABLE ACTIVE SITE LOOP CONFORMATIONS ACCOMMODATE THE BINDING OF MACROCYCLIC LARGAZOLE ANALOGUES TO HDAC8

    PubMed Central

    Decroos, Christophe; Clausen, Dane J.; Haines, Brandon E.; Wiest, Olaf; Williams, Robert M.; Christianson, David W.

    2015-01-01

    The macrocyclic depsipeptide Largazole is a potent inhibitor of metal-dependent histone deacetylases (HDACs), some of which are drug targets for cancer chemotherapy. Indeed, Largazole partially resembles Romidepsin (FK228), a macrocyclic depsipeptide already approved for clinical use. Each inhibitor contains a pendant side chain thiol that coordinates to the active site Zn2+ ion, as observed in the X-ray crystal structure of the HDAC8–Largazole complex [Cole, K. E.; Dowling, D. P.; Boone, M. A.; Phillips, A. J.; Christianson, D. W. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2011, 133, 12474]. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structures of HDAC8 complexed with three synthetic analogues of Largazole in which the depsipeptide ester is replaced with a rigid amide linkage. In two of these analogues, a 6-membered pyridine ring is also substituted (with two different orientations) for the 5-membered thiazole ring in the macrocycle skeleton. The side chain thiol group of each analogue coordinates to the active site Zn2+ ion with nearly ideal geometry, thereby preserving the hallmark structural feature of inhibition by Largazole. Surprisingly, in comparison with the binding of Largazole, these analogues trigger alternative conformational changes in the L1 and L2 loops flanking the active site. However, despite these structural differences, inhibitory potency is generally comparable to, or just moderately less than, the inhibitory potency of Largazole. Thus, this study reveals important new structure-affinity relationships for the binding of macrocyclic inhibitors to HDAC8. PMID:25793284

  20. Glucose deprivation activates a metabolic and signaling amplification loop leading to cell death

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Nicholas A; Tahmasian, Martik; Kohli, Bitika; Komisopoulou, Evangelia; Zhu, Maggie; Vivanco, Igor; Teitell, Michael A; Wu, Hong; Ribas, Antoni; Lo, Roger S; Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Mischel, Paul S; Graeber, Thomas G

    2012-01-01

    The altered metabolism of cancer can render cells dependent on the availability of metabolic substrates for viability. Investigating the signaling mechanisms underlying cell death in cells dependent upon glucose for survival, we demonstrate that glucose withdrawal rapidly induces supra-physiological levels of phospho-tyrosine signaling, even in cells expressing constitutively active tyrosine kinases. Using unbiased mass spectrometry-based phospho-proteomics, we show that glucose withdrawal initiates a unique signature of phospho-tyrosine activation that is associated with focal adhesions. Building upon this observation, we demonstrate that glucose withdrawal activates a positive feedback loop involving generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by NADPH oxidase and mitochondria, inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatases by oxidation, and increased tyrosine kinase signaling. In cells dependent on glucose for survival, glucose withdrawal-induced ROS generation and tyrosine kinase signaling synergize to amplify ROS levels, ultimately resulting in ROS-mediated cell death. Taken together, these findings illustrate the systems-level cross-talk between metabolism and signaling in the maintenance of cancer cell homeostasis. PMID:22735335

  1. Real-time Closed-loop Control in a Rodent Model of Medically-induced Coma Using Burst Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Ching, ShiNung; Liberman, Max Y.; Chemali, Jessica J.; Westover, M. Brandon; Kenny, Jonathan; Solt, Ken; Purdon, Patrick L.; Brown, Emery N.

    2013-01-01

    Background A medically-induced coma is an anesthetic state of profound brain inactivation created to treat status epilepticus and to provide cerebral protection following traumatic brain injuries. We hypothesized that a closed-loop anesthetic delivery system could automatically and precisely control the electroencephalogram state of burst suppression and efficiently maintain a medically-induced coma. Methods In six rats, we implemented a closed-loop anesthetic delivery system for propofol consisting of: a computer-controlled pump infusion, a two-compartment pharmacokinetics model defining propofol’s electroencephalogram effects, the burst suppression probability algorithm to compute in real time from the electroencephalogram the brain’s burst suppression state, an on-line parameter estimation procedure and a proportional-integral controller. In the control experiment each rat was randomly assigned to one of the six burst suppression probability target trajectories constructed by permuting the burst suppression probability levels of 0.4, 0.65 and 0.9 with linear transitions between levels. Results In each animal the controller maintained approximately 60 min of tight, real-time control of burst suppression by tracking each burst suppression probability target level for 15 min and two between-level transitions for 5 to 10 min. The posterior probability that the closed-loop anesthetic delivery system was reliable across all levels was 0.94 [95% confidence interval; (0.77 to 1.00) n = 18] and that the system was accurate was 1.00 [95% confidence interval; (0.84 to 1.00) n = 18]. Conclusion Our findings establish the feasibility of using a closed-loop anesthetic delivery systems to achieve in real-time reliable and accurate control of burst suppression in rodents and suggest a paradigm to precisely control medically-induced coma in patients. PMID:23770601

  2. The development of a closed-loop flight controller with panel method integration for gust alleviation using biomimetic feathers on aircraft wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blower, Christopher J.; Lee, Woody; Wickenheiser, Adam M.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the development of a biomimetic closed-loop flight controller that integrates gust alleviation and flight control into a single distributed system. Modern flight controllers predominantly rely on and respond to perturbations in the global states, resulting in rotation or displacement of the entire aircraft prior to the response. This bio-inspired gust alleviation system (GAS) employs active deflection of electromechanical feathers that react to changes in the airflow, i.e. the local states. The GAS design is a skeletal wing structure with a network of featherlike panels installed on the wing's surfaces, creating the airfoil profile and replacing the trailing-edge flaps. In this study, a dynamic model of the GAS-integrated wing is simulated to compute gust-induced disturbances. The system implements continuous adjustment to flap orientation to perform corrective responses to inbound gusts. MATLAB simulations, using a closed-loop LQR integrated with a 2D adaptive panel method, allow analysis of the morphing structure's aerodynamic data. Non-linear and linear dynamic models of the GAS are compared to a traditional single control surface baseline wing. The feedback loops synthesized rely on inertial changes in the global states; however, variations in number and location of feather actuation are compared. The bio-inspired system's distributed control effort allows the flight controller to interchange between the single and dual trailing edge flap profiles, thereby offering an improved efficiency to gust response in comparison to the traditional wing configuration. The introduction of aero-braking during continuous gusting flows offers a 25% reduction in x-velocity deviation; other flight parameters can be reduced in magnitude and deviation through control weighting optimization. Consequently, the GAS demonstrates enhancements to maneuverability and stability in turbulent intensive environments.

  3. Multiple Flow Loop SCADA System Implemented on the Production Prototype Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Baily, Scott A.; Dalmas, Dale Allen; Wheat, Robert Mitchell; Woloshun, Keith Albert; Dale, Gregory E.

    2015-11-16

    The following report covers FY 15 activities to develop supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system for the Northstar Moly99 production prototype gas flow loop. The goal of this effort is to expand the existing system to include a second flow loop with a larger production-sized blower. Besides testing the larger blower, this system will demonstrate the scalability of our solution to multiple flow loops.

  4. The use of real-time, hardware-in-the-loop simulation in the design and development of the new Hughes HS601 spacecraft attitude control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slafer, Loren I.

    1989-01-01

    Realtime simulation and hardware-in-the-loop testing is being used extensively in all phases of the design, development, and testing of the attitude control system (ACS) for the new Hughes HS601 satellite bus. Realtime, hardware-in-the-loop simulation, integrated with traditional analysis and pure simulation activities is shown to provide a highly efficient and productive overall development program. Implementation of high fidelity simulations of the satellite dynamics and control system algorithms, capable of real-time execution (using applied Dynamics International's System 100), provides a tool which is capable of being integrated with the critical flight microprocessor to create a mixed simulation test (MST). The MST creates a highly accurate, detailed simulated on-orbit test environment, capable of open and closed loop ACS testing, in which the ACS design can be validated. The MST is shown to provide a valuable extension of traditional test methods. A description of the MST configuration is presented, including the spacecraft dynamics simulation model, sensor and actuator emulators, and the test support system. Overall system performance parameters are presented. MST applications are discussed; supporting ACS design, developing on-orbit system performance predictions, flight software development and qualification testing (augmenting the traditional software-based testing), mission planning, and a cost-effective subsystem-level acceptance test. The MST is shown to provide an ideal tool in which the ACS designer can fly the spacecraft on the ground.

  5. Multinight “Bedside” Closed-Loop Control for Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kovatchev, Boris P.; Breton, Marc D.; Anderson, Stacey M.; Keith-Hynes, Patrick; Patek, Stephen D.; Jiang, Boyi; Ben Brahim, Najib; Vereshchetin, Paul; Bruttomesso, Daniela; Avogaro, Angelo; Del Favero, Simone; Boscari, Federico; Galasso, Silvia; Visentin, Roberto; Monaro, Marco; Cobelli, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Studies of closed-loop control (CLC) systems have improved glucose levels in patients with type 1 diabetes. In this study we test a new CLC concept aiming to “reset” the patient overnight to near-normoglycemia each morning, for several consecutive nights. Subjects and Methods: Ten insulin pump users with type 1 diabetes (mean age, 46.4±8.5 years) were enrolled in a two-center (in the United States and Italy) randomized crossover trial comparing 5 consecutive nights of CLC (23:00–07:00 h) in an outpatient setting versus sensor-augmented insulin pump therapy of the same duration at home. Primary end points included time spent in 80–140 mg/dL as measured by continuous glucose monitoring overnight and fasting blood glucose distribution at 7:00 h. Results: Compared with sensor-augmented pump therapy, CLC improved significantly time spent between 80 and 140 mg/dL (54.5% vs. 32.2%; P<0.001) and between 70 and 180 mg/dL (85.4% vs. 59.1%; P<0.001); CLC reduced the mean glucose level at 07:00 h (119.3 vs. 152.9 mg/dL; P<0.001) and overnight mean glucose level (139.0 vs. 170.3 mg/dL; P<0.001) using a marginally lower amount of insulin (6.1 vs. 6.8 units; P=0.1). Tighter overnight control led to improved daytime control on the next day: the overnight/next-day control correlation was r=0.52, P<0.01. Conclusions: Multinight CLC of insulin delivery (artificial pancreas) results in significant improvement in morning and overnight glucose levels and time in target range, with the potential to improve daytime control when glucose levels were “reset” to near-normoglycemia each morning. PMID:25594434

  6. Recent results on structural control of an active precision structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, C. C.; Fanson, J. L.; Smith, R. S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes recent results in structural control of an active precision truss structure at JPL. The goal is to develop practical control methodology and to apply to active truss structures intended for high precision space-based optics applications. The active structure considered incorporates piezoelectric active members which apply control forces internal to the structure and thereby improve the structure's dimensional stability. Two approaches to structural control system design were investigated. The first approach uses only noncollocated measurements of acceleration at the location of a simulated optical component to achieve structural stabilization. The second approach is essentially the same as the first one except that a viscous damper was used in place of a truss member on the structure to improve the dampings of selected flexible modes. The corresponding experimental closed-loop results are presented in this paper.

  7. In Silico Preclinical Trials: A Proof of Concept in Closed-Loop Control of Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kovatchev, Boris P.; Breton, Marc; Man, Chiara Dalla; Cobelli, Claudio

    2009-01-01

    Arguably, a minimally invasive system using subcutaneous (s.c.) continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) and s.c. insulin delivery via insulin pump would be a most feasible step to closed-loop control in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Consequently, diabetes technology is focusing on developing an artificial pancreas using control algorithms to link CGM with s.c. insulin delivery. The future development of the artificial pancreas will be greatly accelerated by employing mathematical modeling and computer simulation. Realistic computer simulation is capable of providing invaluable information about the safety and the limitations of closed-loop control algorithms, guiding clinical studies, and out-ruling ineffective control scenarios in a cost-effective manner. Thus computer simulation testing of closed-loop control algorithms is regarded as a prerequisite to clinical trials of the artificial pancreas. In this paper, we present a system for in silico testing of control algorithms that has three principal components: (1) a large cohort of n = 300 simulated “subjects” (n = 100 adults, 100 adolescents, and 100 children) based on real individuals' data and spanning the observed variability of key metabolic parameters in the general population of people with T1DM; (2) a simulator of CGM sensor errors representative of Freestyle Navigator™, Guardian RT, or Dexcom™ STS™, 7-day sensor; and (3) a simulator of discrete s.c. insulin delivery via OmniPod Insulin Management System or Deltec Cozmo® insulin pump. The system has been shown to represent adequate glucose fluctuations in T1DM observed during meal challenges, and has been accepted by the Food and Drug Administration as a substitute to animal trials in the preclinical testing of closed-loop control strategies. PMID:19444330

  8. Controlling the oscillation phase through precisely timed closed-loop optogenetic stimulation: a computational study

    PubMed Central

    Witt, Annette; Palmigiano, Agostina; Neef, Andreas; El Hady, Ahmed; Wolf, Fred; Battaglia, Demian

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic oscillatory coherence is believed to play a central role in flexible communication between brain circuits. To test this communication-through-coherence hypothesis, experimental protocols that allow a reliable control of phase-relations between neuronal populations are needed. In this modeling study, we explore the potential of closed-loop optogenetic stimulation for the control of functional interactions mediated by oscillatory coherence. The theory of non-linear oscillators predicts that the efficacy of local stimulation will depend not only on the stimulation intensity but also on its timing relative to the ongoing oscillation in the target area. Induced phase-shifts are expected to be stronger when the stimulation is applied within specific narrow phase intervals. Conversely, stimulations with the same or even stronger intensity are less effective when timed randomly. Stimulation should thus be properly phased with respect to ongoing oscillations (in order to optimally perturb them) and the timing of the stimulation onset must be determined by a real-time phase analysis of simultaneously recorded local field potentials (LFPs). Here, we introduce an electrophysiologically calibrated model of Channelrhodopsin 2 (ChR2)-induced photocurrents, based on fits holding over two decades of light intensity. Through simulations of a neural population which undergoes coherent gamma oscillations—either spontaneously or as an effect of continuous optogenetic driving—we show that precisely-timed photostimulation pulses can be used to shift the phase of oscillation, even at transduction rates smaller than 25%. We consider then a canonic circuit with two inter-connected neural populations oscillating with gamma frequency in a phase-locked manner. We demonstrate that photostimulation pulses applied locally to a single population can induce, if precisely phased, a lasting reorganization of the phase-locking pattern and hence modify functional interactions between the

  9. Optical control of antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velema, Willem A.; van der Berg, Jan Pieter; Hansen, Mickel J.; Szymanski, Wiktor; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial resistance is a major problem in the modern world, stemming in part from the build-up of antibiotics in the environment. Novel molecular approaches that enable an externally triggered increase in antibiotic activity with high spatiotemporal resolution and auto-inactivation are highly desirable. Here we report a responsive, broad-spectrum, antibacterial agent that can be temporally activated with light, whereupon it auto-inactivates on the scale of hours. The use of such a ‘smart’ antibiotic might prevent the build-up of active antimicrobial material in the environment. Reversible optical control over active drug concentration enables us to obtain pharmacodynamic information. Precisely localized control of activity is achieved, allowing the growth of bacteria to be confined to defined patterns, which has potential for the development of treatments that avoid interference with the endogenous microbial population in other parts of the organism.

  10. Coronal Loop Mapping to Infer the Best Magnetic Field Models for Active Region Prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gary, G. Allen; Hu, Qiang; Lee, Jong Kwan

    2014-01-01

    This article comments on the results of a new, rapid, and flexible manual method to map on-disk individual coronal loops of a two-dimensional EUV image into the three-dimensional coronal loops. The method by Gary, Hu, and Lee (2013) employs cubic Bézier splines to map coronal loops using only four free parameters per loop. A set of 2D splines for coronal loops is transformed to the best 3D pseudo-magnetic field lines for a particular coronal model. The results restrict the magnetic field models derived from extrapolations of magnetograms to those admissible and inadmissible via a fitness parameter. This method uses the minimization of the misalignment angles between the magnetic field model and the best set of 3D field lines that match a set of closed coronal loops. We comment on the implication of the fitness parameter in connection with the magnetic free energy and comment on extensions of our earlier work by considering the issues of employing open coronal loops or employing partial coronal loop.

  11. Thermal Vacuum Testing of a Small Loop Heat Pipe with a PTFE Wick for Spacecraft Thermal Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagano, Hosei; Nishikawara, Masahito; Fukuyoshi, Fuyuko; Nagai, Hiroki; Ogawa, Hiroyuki

    A loop heat pipe (LHP) is a two-phase heat transfer device that utilizes the evaporation and condensation of a working fluid to transfer heat, and the capillary forces developed in fine porous wicks to circulate the fluid. LHPs have been gaining increased acceptance for spacecraft missions, and recently, small LHPs on the order of a few hundred watts have been investigated for this purpose. In this study, a 100W class small LHP with a polytetrafluoroethylene wick as the primary wick was designed and fabricated for thermal vacuum testing. The LHP has a thermoelectric converter (TEC) to control the loop operating temperature. The thermal vacuum test was conducted to evaluate the LHP's thermal performance under a space-simulated environment such as ultra-high-vacuum, and black body radiation, except for a gravitational effect. The loop showed large thermal hysteresis before and after the large and small head loads. The TEC was able to control the loop operating temperature with a small amount of electrical power.

  12. Demonstration of Active Combustion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovett, Jeffrey A.; Teerlinck, Karen A.; Cohen, Jeffrey M.

    2008-01-01

    The primary objective of this effort was to demonstrate active control of combustion instabilities in a direct-injection gas turbine combustor that accurately simulates engine operating conditions and reproduces an engine-type instability. This report documents the second phase of a two-phase effort. The first phase involved the analysis of an instability observed in a developmental aeroengine and the design of a single-nozzle test rig to replicate that phenomenon. This was successfully completed in 2001 and is documented in the Phase I report. This second phase was directed toward demonstration of active control strategies to mitigate this instability and thereby demonstrate the viability of active control for aircraft engine combustors. This involved development of high-speed actuator technology, testing and analysis of how the actuation system was integrated with the combustion system, control algorithm development, and demonstration testing in the single-nozzle test rig. A 30 percent reduction in the amplitude of the high-frequency (570 Hz) instability was achieved using actuation systems and control algorithms developed within this effort. Even larger reductions were shown with a low-frequency (270 Hz) instability. This represents a unique achievement in the development and practical demonstration of active combustion control systems for gas turbine applications.

  13. Development and hardware-in-the-loop test of a guidance, navigation and control system for on-orbit servicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benninghoff, Heike; Rems, Florian; Boge, Toralf

    2014-09-01

    The rendezvous phase is one of the most important phases in future orbital servicing missions. To ensure a safe approach to a non-cooperative target satellite, a guidance, navigation and control system which uses measurements from optical sensors like cameras was designed and developed. During ground-based rendezvous, stability problems induced by delayed position measurements can be compensated by using a specially adapted navigation filter. Within the VIBANASS (VIsion BAsed NAvigation Sensor System) test campaign, hardware-in-the-loop tests on the terrestrial, robotic based facility EPOS 2.0 were performed to test and verify the developed guidance, navigation and control algorithms using real sensor measurements. We could demonstrate several safe rendezvous test cases in a closed loop mode integrating the VIBANASS camera system and the developed guidance, navigation and control system to a dynamic rendezvous simulation.

  14. Velocity map imaging as a tool for gaining mechanistic insight from closed-loop control studies of molecular fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Jochim, Bethany; Averin, R.; Gregerson, Neal; Wells, E.; McKenna, J.; De, S.; Ray, D.; Zohrabi, M.; Carnes, K. D.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Bergues, B.; Kling, M. F.

    2011-04-15

    Strong-field closed-loop control schemes using shaped ultrafast laser pulses have been used to selectively fragment a variety of molecules in recent years. The resulting pulses are often complex and resist an easy mechanistic interpretation. We report on the use of velocity map imaging to study the dissociative ionization of CO molecules by optimally-shaped ultrafast laser pulses. Using this technique, a mechanism is identified for the optimized CO{sup +} {yields} C + O{sup +} dissociation, and some of the observed control over the CO{sup +} dissociation branching ratio is ascribed to an angular discrimination effect. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the acquisition of two-dimensional velocity map images is rapid enough to incorporate directly into the adaptive control loop.

  15. Regulative Loops, Step Loops and Task Loops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanLehn, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    This commentary suggests a generalization of the conception of the behavior of tutoring systems, which the target article characterized as having an outer loop that was executed once per task and an inner loop that was executed once per step of the task. A more general conception sees these two loops as instances of regulative loops, which…

  16. CpG oligodeoxynucleotides with double stem-loops show strong immunostimulatory activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liang; Wu, Xiuli; Wan, Min; Yu, Yue; Yu, Yongli; Wang, Liying

    2013-01-01

    Based on the current understanding of TLR9 recognition of CpG ODN, we have tried to design a series of CpG ODNs that display double stem-loops when being analyzed for their secondary structures using 'mfold web server'. Proliferation of human PBMC and bioassay for IFN production were used as technical platforms in primary screening. Interestingly, two of them, designated as DSL01 and D-SL03, belonging to B class CpG ODN and C class CpG ODN respectively, showed vigorous immunostimulatory activity and were chosen for further tests. Flow cytometry analysis showed that both of them could activate human B cells, NK cells, mononuclear cells and T cells and up-regulate expression of CD80, CD86 and HLA-DR on the surface of subsets in human PBMCs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that those two ODNs potently stimulated proliferation of PBMC/splenocytes obtained from diverse vertebrate species. Noticeably, both of them displayed anti-breast cancer effect in mice when administered by peritumoral injection. PMID:23142503

  17. A digitally controlled AGC loop circuitry for GNSS receiver chip with a binary weighted accurate dB-linear PGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang, Jin; Yiqi, Zhuang; Yue, Yin; Miao, Cui

    2015-03-01

    A novel digitally controlled automatic gain control (AGC) loop circuitry for the global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receiver chip is presented. The entire AGC loop contains a programmable gain amplifier (PGA), an AGC circuit and an analog-to-digital converter (ADC), which is implemented in a 0.18 μm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process and measured. A binary-weighted approach is proposed in the PGA to achieve wide dB-linear gain control with small gain error. With binary-weighted cascaded amplifiers for coarse gain control, and parallel binary-weighted trans-conductance amplifier array for fine gain control, the PGA can provide a 64 dB dynamic range from -4 to 60 dB in 1.14 dB gain steps with a less than 0.15 dB gain error. Based on the Gaussian noise statistic characteristic of the GNSS signal, a digital AGC circuit is also proposed with low area and fast settling. The feed-backward AGC loop occupies an area of 0.27 mm2 and settles within less than 165 μs while consuming an average current of 1.92 mA at 1.8 V.

  18. A biological micro actuator: graded and closed-loop control of insect leg motion by electrical stimulation of muscles.

    PubMed

    Cao, Feng; Zhang, Chao; Vo Doan, Tat Thang; Li, Yao; Sangi, Daniyal Haider; Koh, Jie Sheng; Huynh, Ngoc Anh; Bin Aziz, Mohamed Fareez; Choo, Hao Yu; Ikeda, Kazuo; Abbeel, Pieter; Maharbiz, Michel M; Sato, Hirotaka

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a biological microactuator was demonstrated by closed-loop motion control of the front leg of an insect (Mecynorrhina torquata, beetle) via electrical stimulation of the leg muscles. The three antagonistic pairs of muscle groups in the front leg enabled the actuator to have three degrees of freedom: protraction/retraction, levation/depression, and extension/flexion. We observed that the threshold amplitude (voltage) required to elicit leg motions was approximately 1.0 V; thus, we fixed the stimulation amplitude at 1.5 V to ensure a muscle response. The leg motions were finely graded by alternation of the stimulation frequencies: higher stimulation frequencies elicited larger leg angular displacement. A closed-loop control system was then developed, where the stimulation frequency was the manipulated variable for leg-muscle stimulation (output from the final control element to the leg muscle) and the angular displacement of the leg motion was the system response. This closed-loop control system, with an optimized proportional gain and update time, regulated the leg to set at predetermined angular positions. The average electrical stimulation power consumption per muscle group was 148 µW. These findings related to and demonstrations of the leg motion control offer promise for the future development of a reliable, low-power, biological legged machine (i.e., an insect-machine hybrid legged robot). PMID:25140875

  19. A Biological Micro Actuator: Graded and Closed-Loop Control of Insect Leg Motion by Electrical Stimulation of Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Feng; Zhang, Chao; Vo Doan, Tat Thang; Li, Yao; Sangi, Daniyal Haider; Koh, Jie Sheng; Huynh, Ngoc Anh; Aziz, Mohamed Fareez Bin; Choo, Hao Yu; Ikeda, Kazuo; Abbeel, Pieter; Maharbiz, Michel M.; Sato, Hirotaka

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a biological microactuator was demonstrated by closed-loop motion control of the front leg of an insect (Mecynorrhina torquata, beetle) via electrical stimulation of the leg muscles. The three antagonistic pairs of muscle groups in the front leg enabled the actuator to have three degrees of freedom: protraction/retraction, levation/depression, and extension/flexion. We observed that the threshold amplitude (voltage) required to elicit leg motions was approximately 1.0 V; thus, we fixed the stimulation amplitude at 1.5 V to ensure a muscle response. The leg motions were finely graded by alternation of the stimulation frequencies: higher stimulation frequencies elicited larger leg angular displacement. A closed-loop control system was then developed, where the stimulation frequency was the manipulated variable for leg-muscle stimulation (output from the final control element to the leg muscle) and the angular displacement of the leg motion was the system response. This closed-loop control system, with an optimized proportional gain and update time, regulated the leg to set at predetermined angular positions. The average electrical stimulation power consumption per muscle group was 148 µW. These findings related to and demonstrations of the leg motion control offer promise for the future development of a reliable, low-power, biological legged machine (i.e., an insect–machine hybrid legged robot). PMID:25140875

  20. Feasibility Study of a 6.6kV, 1MW Transformerless BTB-Based Loop Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonetani, Shinsuke; Fujita, Hideaki; Akagi, Hirofumi; Okada, Naotaka

    This paper achieves a feasibility study of a 6.6kV, 1MW loop controller that consists of a transformerless back-to-back configuration using two 5-level diode-clamped converters. However, the loop controller requires reducing the zero-sequence current circulating between the two distribution lines below than 0.2 A in rms, in order to avoid malfunction of line-to-ground fault protection relays. Moreover, all the dc voltages across four capacitors in the dc link have to be controlled equally. This paper presents a solution to these problems. Two common-mode chokes are installed at the ac side of each converter to suppress high-frequency zero-sequence currents, while feedback control is applied to eliminate low-frequency zero-sequence currents. Two bidirectional buck-boost dc-dc converters are employed to keep the four capacitor voltages equal. Simulation results verify viability and effectiveness of the loop controller, along with the developed theoretical analysis.

  1. Active Flow Control Activities at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Scott G.; Sellers, William L., III; Washburn, Anthony E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Langley continues to aggressively investigate the potential advantages of active flow control over more traditional aerodynamic techniques. This paper provides an update to a previous paper and describes both the progress in the various research areas and the significant changes in the NASA research programs. The goals of the topics presented are focused on advancing the state of knowledge and understanding of controllable fundamental mechanisms in fluids as well as to address engineering challenges. An organizational view of current research activities at NASA Langley in active flow control as supported by several projects is presented. On-center research as well as NASA Langley funded contracts and grants are discussed at a relatively high level. The products of this research are to be demonstrated either in bench-top experiments, wind-tunnel investigations, or in flight as part of the fundamental NASA R&D program and then transferred to more applied research programs within NASA, DOD, and U.S. industry.

  2. Placing all closed loop poles of missile attitude control systems in the sliding mode via the root locus technique.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y J; Way, H K

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a robust control method for uncertain nonminimum phase systems with external disturbances. A systematic design algorithm is developed which links the sliding mode control and the root locus technique. Complete closed-loop pole placement is achieved in addition to the placement of the reduced order equivalent system poles. An integration function is employed in the sliding variable formulation. The output tracking error is guaranteed to vanish. The proposed method was successfully applied to control the angle of attack of a missile attitude control system. PMID:11577821

  3. Fractional active disturbance rejection control.

    PubMed

    Li, Dazi; Ding, Pan; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-01

    A fractional active disturbance rejection control (FADRC) scheme is proposed to improve the performance of commensurate linear fractional order systems (FOS) and the robust analysis shows that the controller is also applicable to incommensurate linear FOS control. In FADRC, the traditional extended states observer (ESO) is generalized to a fractional order extended states observer (FESO) by using the fractional calculus, and the tracking differentiator plus nonlinear state error feedback are replaced by a fractional proportional-derivative controller. To simplify controller tuning, the linear bandwidth-parameterization method has been adopted. The impacts of the observer bandwidth ωo and controller bandwidth ωc on system performance are then analyzed. Finally, the FADRC stability and frequency-domain characteristics for linear single-input single-output FOS are analyzed. Simulation results by FADRC and ADRC on typical FOS are compared to demonstrate the superiority and effectiveness of the proposed scheme. PMID:26928516

  4. Evidence for a trigeminal mesencephalic-hypoglossal nuclei loop involved in controlling vibrissae movements in the rat.

    PubMed

    Mameli, Ombretta; Caria, Marcello Alessandro; Pellitteri, Rosalia; Russo, Antonella; Saccone, Salvatore; Stanzani, Stefania

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies performed in rats showed that the whisker-pad motor innervation involves not only the facial nerve, but also some hypoglossal neurons whose axons travel within the trigeminal infraorbital nerve (ION) and target the extrinsic muscles surrounding the whisker-pad macrovibrissae. Furthermore, the electrical stimulation of the ION induced an increase in the EMG activity of these muscles, while the hypoglossal nucleus stimulation elicited evoked potentials and single motor unit responses. However, the existence of a neural network able to involve the XIIth nucleus in macrovibrissae whisking control was totally unknown until now. Since other recent experiments demonstrated that: (1) the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus (Me5) neurons respond to both spontaneous and artificial movements of macrovibrissae, and (2) the Me5 peripheral terminals provide a monosynaptic sensory innervation to the macrovibrissae, the present study was aimed at analyzing a possible role of the Me5 nucleus as a relay station in the sensory-motor loop that involves the XIIth nucleus neurons in rhythmic whisking control. Two tracers were used in the same animal: Fluoro Gold, which was injected into the whisker pad to retrogradely label the hypoglossal whisker-pad projection neurons, and Dil, which was instead injected into the Me5 to label its projections to these hypoglossal neurons. Results demonstrated that terminals of the Me5 neurons monosynaptically target the hypoglossal whisker-pad projection neurons. The functional role of this sensory-motor connection is discussed, with particular regard to a hypothesized proprioceptive reflex in whisker-pad extrinsic muscles that can be elicited by the activation of the Me5 macrovibrissae receptors. PMID:26645304

  5. Conformational dynamics of the active site loop of S-adenosylmethionine synthetase illuminated by site-directed spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Taylor, John C; Markham, George D

    2003-07-15

    S-adenosylmethionine synthetase (ATP: L-methionine S-adenosyltransferase, methionine adenosyltransferase, a.k.a. MAT) is one of numerous enzymes that have a flexible polypeptide loop that moves to gate access to the active site in a motion that is closely coupled to catalysis. Crystallographic studies of this tetrameric enzyme have shown that the loop is closed in the absence of bound substrates. However, the loop must open to allow substrate binding and a variety of data indicate that the loop is closed during the catalytic steps. Previous kinetic studies indicate that during turnover loop motion occurs on a time scale of 10(-2)s, ca. 10-fold faster than chemical transformations and turnover. Site-directed spin labeling has been used to introduce nitroxide groups at two positions in the loop to illuminate how the motion of the loop is affected by substrate binding. The two loop mutants constructed, G105C and D107C, retain wild type levels of MAT activity; attachment of a methanethiosulfonate spin label to convert the cysteine to the "R1" residue reduced the k(cat) only for the labeled D107R1 form (7-fold). The K(m) value for methionine increased 2- to 4-fold for the cysteine mutants and 2- to 7-fold for the labeled proteins, whereas the K(m) for ATP was changed by at most 2-fold. EPR spectra for both labeled proteins are nearly identical and show the presence of two major spin label environments with rotational diffusion rates differing by approximately 10-fold; the slower rate is ca. 4-fold faster than the estimated protein rotational rate. The spectra are not altered by addition of substrates or products. At both positions the less mobile conformation constitutes ca. 65% of the total species, indicating an equilibrium that only slightly favors one form, that in which the label is more immobilized. The equilibrium constant that relates the two forms is comparable to the equilibrium constant of 1.5 for a conformational change that was previously deduced from the

  6. Rearrangement of the Extracellular Domain/Extracellular Loop 1 Interface Is Critical for Thyrotropin Receptor Activation.

    PubMed

    Schaarschmidt, Joerg; Nagel, Marcus B M; Huth, Sandra; Jaeschke, Holger; Moretti, Rocco; Hintze, Vera; von Bergen, Martin; Kalkhof, Stefan; Meiler, Jens; Paschke, Ralf

    2016-07-01

    The thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) with a characteristic large extracellular domain (ECD). TSHR activation is initiated by binding of the hormone ligand TSH to the ECD. How the extracellular binding event triggers the conformational changes in the transmembrane domain (TMD) necessary for intracellular G protein activation is poorly understood. To gain insight in this process, the knowledge on the relative positioning of ECD and TMD and the conformation of the linker region at the interface of ECD and TMD are of particular importance. To generate a structural model for the TSHR we applied an integrated structural biology approach combining computational techniques with experimental data. Chemical cross-linking followed by mass spectrometry yielded 17 unique distance restraints within the ECD of the TSHR, its ligand TSH, and the hormone-receptor complex. These structural restraints generally confirm the expected binding mode of TSH to the ECD as well as the general fold of the domains and were used to guide homology modeling of the ECD. Functional characterization of TSHR mutants confirms the previously suggested close proximity of Ser-281 and Ile-486 within the TSHR. Rigidifying this contact permanently with a disulfide bridge disrupts ligand-induced receptor activation and indicates that rearrangement of the ECD/extracellular loop 1 (ECL1) interface is a critical step in receptor activation. The experimentally verified contact of Ser-281 (ECD) and Ile-486 (TMD) was subsequently utilized in docking homology models of the ECD and the TMD to create a full-length model of a glycoprotein hormone receptor. PMID:27129207

  7. Active control of buckling of flexible beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baz, A.; Tampe, L.

    1989-01-01

    Mathematical models are presented that simulate the dynamic characteristics of shape memory alloy actuators made of nickel-titanium alloy (Nitinol) controlling the buckling of compressive structural members. A closed-loop computer-controlled system has been designed, based on the proposed mathematical models, and has been implemented to control the buckling of simple beams. The performance of the computer-controlled system is evaluated experimentally and compared with the theoretical predictions to validate the developed models. The results emphasized the importance of buckling control and suggest the potential of shape memory alloy actuators as attractive means for controlling structural deformation in a simple and reliable way.

  8. Regulation of human CYP2C9 expression by electrophilic stress involves activator protein 1 activation and DNA looping.

    PubMed

    Makia, Ngome L; Surapureddi, Sailesh; Monostory, Katalin; Prough, Russell A; Goldstein, Joyce A

    2014-08-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP)2C9 and CYP2C19 are important human enzymes that metabolize therapeutic drugs, environmental chemicals, and physiologically important endogenous compounds. Initial studies using primary human hepatocytes showed induction of both the CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 genes by tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ). As a pro-oxidant, tBHQ regulates the expression of cytoprotective genes by activation of redox-sensing transcription factors, such as the nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and members of the activator protein 1 (AP-1) family of proteins. The promoter region of CYP2C9 contains two putative AP-1 sites (TGAGTCA) at positions -2201 and -1930, which are also highly conserved in CYP2C19. The CYP2C9 promoter is activated by ectopic expression of cFos and JunD, whereas Nrf2 had no effect. Using specific kinase inhibitors for mitogen-activated protein kinase, we showed that extracellular signal-regulated kinase and Jun N-terminal kinase are essential for tBHQ-induced expression of CYP2C9. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrate that cFos distinctly interacts with the distal AP-1 site and JunD with the proximal site. Because cFos regulates target genes as heterodimers with Jun proteins, we hypothesized that DNA looping might be required to bring the distal and proximal AP-1 sites together to activate the CYP2C9 promoter. Chromosome conformation capture analyses confirmed the formation of a DNA loop in the CYP2C9 promoter, possibly allowing interaction between cFos at the distal site and JunD at the proximal site to activate CYP2C9 transcription in response to electrophiles. These results indicate that oxidative stress generated by exposure to electrophilic xenobiotics and metabolites induces the expression of CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 in human hepatocytes. PMID:24830941

  9. Spectroscopic study of a dark lane and a cool loop in a solar limb active region by Hinode/EIS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kyoung-Sun; Imada, S.; Moon, Y.-J.; Lee, Jin-Yi

    2014-01-10

    We investigated a cool loop and a dark lane over a limb active region on 2007 March 14 using the Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer. The cool loop is clearly seen in the spectral lines formed at the transition region temperature. The dark lane is characterized by an elongated faint structure in the coronal spectral lines and is rooted on a bright point. We examined their electron densities, Doppler velocities, and nonthermal velocities as a function of distance from the limb. We derived electron densities using the density sensitive line pairs of Mg VII, Si X, Fe XII, Fe XIII, and Fe XIV spectra. We also compared the observed density scale heights with the calculated scale heights from each peak formation temperatures of the spectral lines under the hydrostatic equilibrium. We noted that the observed density scale heights of the cool loop are consistent with the calculated heights, with the exception of one observed cooler temperature; we also found that the observed scale heights of the dark lane are much lower than their calculated scale heights. The nonthermal velocity in the cool loop slightly decreases along the loop, while nonthermal velocity in the dark lane sharply falls off with height. Such a decrease in the nonthermal velocity may be explained by wave damping near the solar surface or by turbulence due to magnetic reconnection near the bright point.

  10. Conserved phosphorylation sites in the activation loop of the Arabidopsis phytosulfokine receptor PSKR1 differentially affect kinase and receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Jens; Linke, Dennis; Bönniger, Christine; Tholey, Andreas; Sauter, Margret

    2015-01-01

    PSK (phytosulfokine) is a plant peptide hormone perceived by a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase. Phosphosite mapping of epitope-tagged PSKR1 (phytosulfokine receptor 1) from Arabidopsis thaliana plants identified Ser696 and Ser698 in the JM (juxtamembrane) region and probably Ser886 and/or Ser893 in the AL (activation loop) as in planta phosphorylation sites. In vitro-expressed kinase was autophosphorylated at Ser717 in the JM, and at Ser733, Thr752, Ser783, Ser864, Ser911, Ser958 and Thr998 in the kinase domain. The LC–ESI–MS/MS spectra provided support that up to three sites (Thr890, Ser893 and Thr894) in the AL were likely to be phosphorylated in vitro. These sites are evolutionarily highly conserved in PSK receptors, indicative of a conserved function. Site-directed mutagenesis of the four conserved residues in the activation segment, Thr890, Ser893, Thr894 and Thr899, differentially altered kinase activity in vitro and growth-promoting activity in planta. The T899A and the quadruple-mutated TSTT-A (T890A/S893A/T894A/T899A) mutants were both kinase-inactive, but PSKR1(T899A) retained growth-promoting activity. The T890A and S893A/T894A substitutions diminished kinase activity and growth promotion. We hypothesize that phosphorylation within the AL activates kinase activity and receptor functi