Science.gov

Sample records for active control technique

  1. Monitoring by Control Technique - Activated Carbon Adsorber

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page is about Activated Carbon Adsorber control techniques used to reduce pollutant emissions.

  2. Active load control techniques for wind turbines.

    SciTech Connect

    van Dam, C.P.; Berg, Dale E.; Johnson, Scott J.

    2008-07-01

    This report provides an overview on the current state of wind turbine control and introduces a number of active techniques that could be potentially used for control of wind turbine blades. The focus is on research regarding active flow control (AFC) as it applies to wind turbine performance and loads. The techniques and concepts described here are often described as 'smart structures' or 'smart rotor control'. This field is rapidly growing and there are numerous concepts currently being investigated around the world; some concepts already are focused on the wind energy industry and others are intended for use in other fields, but have the potential for wind turbine control. An AFC system can be broken into three categories: controls and sensors, actuators and devices, and the flow phenomena. This report focuses on the research involved with the actuators and devices and the generated flow phenomena caused by each device.

  3. Active Control Technique Evaluation for Spacecraft (ACES)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-16

    Due to Test Results 3-9 3.5 Representative Data 3-11 3.6 Control Model 3-21 4.0 Simulation 4-1 5.0 HAC/LAC 5-1 5.1 Theory 5-1...5.1.1 HAC Theory 5-1 5.1.2 LAC Theory 5-4 5.1.3 HAC/LAC Combined Control 5-6 5.1.4 HAC/LAC Applied to ACES 5-7 5.2 Model Selection and...5-39 5-50 6.0 Positivity 6-1 6-1 6-9 6-9 6-17 6-31 5.4 Observation 5.5 Test Results 5.6 Conclusions 6.1 Theory 6.2 Model

  4. Robust control design techniques for active flutter suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozbay, Hitay; Bachmann, Glen R.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, an active flutter suppression problem is studied for a thin airfoil in unsteady aerodynamics. The mathematical model of this system is infinite dimensional because of Theodorsen's function which is irrational. Several second order approximations of Theodorsen's function are compared. A finite dimensional model is obtained from such an approximation. We use H infinity control techniques to find a robustly stabilizing controller for active flutter suppression.

  5. Active vibration control techniques for flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parlos, Alexander G.; Jayasuriya, Suhada

    1990-01-01

    Two proposed control system design techniques for active vibration control in flexible space structures are detailed. Control issues relevant only to flexible-body dynamics are addressed, whereas no attempt was made to integrate the flexible and rigid-body spacecraft dynamics. Both of the proposed approaches revealed encouraging results; however, further investigation of the interaction of the flexible and rigid-body dynamics is warranted.

  6. Active Flow Control: Instrumentation Automation and Experimental Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gimbert, N. Wes

    1995-01-01

    In investigating the potential of a new actuator for use in an active flow control system, several objectives had to be accomplished, the largest of which was the experimental setup. The work was conducted at the NASA Langley 20x28 Shear Flow Control Tunnel. The actuator named Thunder, is a high deflection piezo device recently developed at Langley Research Center. This research involved setting up the instrumentation, the lighting, the smoke, and the recording devices. The instrumentation was automated by means of a Power Macintosh running LabVIEW, a graphical instrumentation package developed by National Instruments. Routines were written to allow the tunnel conditions to be determined at a given instant at the push of a button. This included determination of tunnel pressures, speed, density, temperature, and viscosity. Other aspects of the experimental equipment included the set up of a CCD video camera with a video frame grabber, monitor, and VCR to capture the motion. A strobe light was used to highlight the smoke that was used to visualize the flow. Additional effort was put into creating a scale drawing of another tunnel on site and a limited literature search in the area of active flow control.

  7. Application of Semi Active Control Techniques to the Damping Suppression Problem of Solar Sail Booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adetona, O.; Keel, L. H.; Whorton, M. S.

    2007-01-01

    Solar sails provide a propellant free form for space propulsion. These are large flat surfaces that generate thrust when they are impacted by light. When attached to a space vehicle, the thrust generated can propel the space vehicle to great distances at significant speeds. For optimal performance the sail must be kept from excessive vibration. Active control techniques can provide the best performance. However, they require an external power-source that may create significant parasitic mass to the solar sail. However, solar sails require low mass for optimal performance. Secondly, active control techniques typically require a good system model to ensure stability and performance. However, the accuracy of solar sail models validated on earth for a space environment is questionable. An alternative approach is passive vibration techniques. These do not require an external power supply, and do not destabilize the system. A third alternative is referred to as semi-active control. This approach tries to get the best of both active and passive control, while avoiding their pitfalls. In semi-active control, an active control law is designed for the system, and passive control techniques are used to implement it. As a result, no external power supply is needed so the system is not destabilize-able. Though it typically underperforms active control techniques, it has been shown to out-perform passive control approaches and can be unobtrusively installed on a solar sail boom. Motivated by this, the objective of this research is to study the suitability of a Piezoelectric (PZT) patch actuator/sensor based semi-active control system for the vibration suppression problem of solar sail booms. Accordingly, we develop a suitable mathematical and computer model for such studies and demonstrate the capabilities of the proposed approach with computer simulations.

  8. Nonlinear control of an activated sludge aeration process: use of fuzzy techniques for tuning PID controllers.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, M A; Seco, A; Ferrer, J; Penya-roja, J M; Valverde, J L

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, several tuning algorithms, specifically ITAE, IMC and Cohen and Coon, were applied in order to tune an activated sludge aeration PID controller. Performance results of these controllers were compared by simulation with those obtained by using a nonlinear fuzzy PID controller. In order to design this controller, a trial and error procedure was used to determine, as a function of error at current time and at a previous time, sets of parameters (including controller gain, integral time and derivative time) which achieve satisfactory response of a PID controller actuating over the aeration process. Once these sets of data were obtained, neural networks were used to obtain fuzzy membership functions and fuzzy rules of the fuzzy PID controller.

  9. Space shuttle active-pogo-suppressor control design using linear quadratic regulator techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehtinen, B.; Lorenz, C. F.

    1979-01-01

    Two methods of active pogo suppression (stabilization) for the space shuttle vehicle were studied analytically. The basis for both approaches was the linear quadratic regulator, state space technique. The first approach minimized root-mean-square pump inlet pressure by using either fullstate feedback, partial-state feedback, or output feedback with a Kalman filter. The second approach increased the modal damping associated with the critical structural modes by using either full-state feedback or reconstructed state feedback. A number of implementable controls were found by both approaches. The designs were analyzed with respect to sensitivity, complexity, and controller energy requirements, as well as controller performance. Practical controllers resulting from the two design approaches tended to use pressure and flow as feedback variables for the minimum-rms method and structural accelerations or velocities for the modal control method. Both approaches are suitable for the design of active pogo-suppression controllers.

  10. Approaches to Adaptive Active Acoustic Noise Control at a Point Using Feedforward Techniques.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulch, Peter A.

    Active acoustic noise control systems have been of interest since their birth in the 1930's. The principle is to superimpose on an unwanted noise wave shape its inverse with the intention of destructive interference. This work presents two approaches to this idea. The first approach uses a direct design method to develop a controller using an auto-regressive moving-average (ARMA) model that will be used to condition the primary noise to produce the required anti-noise for cancellation. The development of this approach has shown that the stability of the controller relies heavily on a non-minimum phase model of the secondary noise path. For this reason, a second approach, using a controller consisting of two parts was developed. The first part of the controller is designed to cancel broadband noise and the second part is an adaptive controller designed to cancel periodic noise. A simple technique for identifying the parameters of the broadband controller is developed. An ARMA model is used, and it is shown that its stability is improved by prefiltering the test signal with a minimum-phase inverse of the secondary noise channel. The periodic controller uses an estimate of the fundamental frequency to cancel the first few harmonics of periodic noise. A computationally efficient adaptive technique based on least squares is developed for updating the harmonic controller gains at each time step. Experimental results are included for the broadband controller, the harmonic controller, and the combination of the two algorithms. The advantages of using both techniques in conjunction are shown using test cases involving both broadband noise and periodic noise.

  11. Development of an Active Flow Control Technique for an Airplane High-Lift Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shmilovich, Arvin; Yadlin, Yoram; Dickey, Eric D.; Hartwich, Peter M.; Khodadoust, Abdi

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on Active Flow Control methods used in conjunction with airplane high-lift systems. The project is motivated by the simplified high-lift system, which offers enhanced airplane performance compared to conventional high-lift systems. Computational simulations are used to guide the implementation of preferred flow control methods, which require a fluidic supply. It is first demonstrated that flow control applied to a high-lift configuration that consists of simple hinge flaps is capable of attaining the performance of the conventional high-lift counterpart. A set of flow control techniques has been subsequently considered to identify promising candidates, where the central requirement is that the mass flow for actuation has to be within available resources onboard. The flow control methods are based on constant blowing, fluidic oscillators, and traverse actuation. The simulations indicate that the traverse actuation offers a substantial reduction in required mass flow, and it is especially effective when the frequency of actuation is consistent with the characteristic time scale of the flow.

  12. Head-mounted active noise control system with virtual sensing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Nobuhiro; Kajikawa, Yoshinobu

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we apply a virtual sensing technique to a head-mounted active noise control (ANC) system we have already proposed. The proposed ANC system can reduce narrowband noise while improving the noise reduction ability at the desired locations. A head-mounted ANC system based on an adaptive feedback structure can reduce noise with periodicity or narrowband components. However, since quiet zones are formed only at the locations of error microphones, an adequate noise reduction cannot be achieved at the locations where error microphones cannot be placed such as near the eardrums. A solution to this problem is to apply a virtual sensing technique. A virtual sensing ANC system can achieve higher noise reduction at the desired locations by measuring the system models from physical sensors to virtual sensors, which will be used in the online operation of the virtual sensing ANC algorithm. Hence, we attempt to achieve the maximum noise reduction near the eardrums by applying the virtual sensing technique to the head-mounted ANC system. However, it is impossible to place the microphone near the eardrums. Therefore, the system models from physical sensors to virtual sensors are estimated using the Head And Torso Simulator (HATS) instead of human ears. Some simulation, experimental, and subjective assessment results demonstrate that the head-mounted ANC system with virtual sensing is superior to that without virtual sensing in terms of the noise reduction ability at the desired locations.

  13. Contamination Control Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    EBY, J.L.

    2000-05-16

    Welcome to a workshop on contamination Control techniques. This work shop is designed for about two hours. Attendee participation is encouraged during the workshop. We will address different topics within contamination control techniques; present processes, products and equipment used here at Hanford and then open the floor to you, the attendees for your input on the topics.

  14. Experimental Studies of Active and Passive Flow Control Techniques Applied in a Twin Air-Intake

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Shrey; Jindal, Aman; Maurya, Shivam P.; Jain, Anuj

    2013-01-01

    The flow control in twin air-intakes is necessary to improve the performance characteristics, since the flow traveling through curved and diffused paths becomes complex, especially after merging. The paper presents a comparison between two well-known techniques of flow control: active and passive. It presents an effective design of a vortex generator jet (VGJ) and a vane-type passive vortex generator (VG) and uses them in twin air-intake duct in different combinations to establish their effectiveness in improving the performance characteristics. The VGJ is designed to insert flow from side wall at pitch angle of 90 degrees and 45 degrees. Corotating (parallel) and counterrotating (V-shape) are the configuration of vane type VG. It is observed that VGJ has the potential to change the flow pattern drastically as compared to vane-type VG. While the VGJ is directed perpendicular to the side walls of the air-intake at a pitch angle of 90 degree, static pressure recovery is increased by 7.8% and total pressure loss is reduced by 40.7%, which is the best among all other cases tested for VGJ. For bigger-sized VG attached to the side walls of the air-intake, static pressure recovery is increased by 5.3%, but total pressure loss is reduced by only 4.5% as compared to all other cases of VG. PMID:23935422

  15. Monitoring by Control Technique

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page links to different control techniques used to reduce pollutant emissions.

  16. Metabolic rate control during extravehicular activity simulations and measurement techniques during actual EVAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horrigan, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    A description of the methods used to control and measure metabolic rate during ground simulations is given. Work levels attained at the Space Environment Simulation Laboratory are presented. The techniques and data acquired during ground simulations are described and compared with inflight procedures. Data from both the Skylab and Apollo Program were utilized and emphasis is given to the methodology, both in simulation and during flight. The basic techniques of work rate assessment are described. They include oxygen consumption, which was useful for averages over long time periods, heart rate correlations based on laboratory calibrations, and liquid cooling garment temperature changes. The relative accuracy of these methods as well as the methods of real-time monitoring at the Mission Control Center are discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of each of the metabolic measurement techniques are discussed. Particular emphasis is given to the problem of utilizing oxygen decrement for short time periods and heart rate at low work levels. A summary is given of the effectiveness of work rate control and measurements; and current plans for future EVA monitoring are discussed.

  17. Active cleaning technique device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, R. L.; Gillette, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    The objective of this program was to develop a laboratory demonstration model of an active cleaning technique (ACT) device. The principle of this device is based primarily on the technique for removing contaminants from optical surfaces. This active cleaning technique involves exposing contaminated surfaces to a plasma containing atomic oxygen or combinations of other reactive gases. The ACT device laboratory demonstration model incorporates, in addition to plasma cleaning, the means to operate the device as an ion source for sputtering experiments. The overall ACT device includes a plasma generation tube, an ion accelerator, a gas supply system, a RF power supply and a high voltage dc power supply.

  18. Guidance, Navigation, and Control Techniques and Technologies for Active Satellite Removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega Hernando, Guillermo; Erb, Sven; Cropp, Alexander; Voirin, Thomas; Dubois-Matra, Olivier; Rinalducci, Antonio; Visentin, Gianfranco; Innocenti, Luisa; Raposo, Ana

    2013-09-01

    This paper shows an internal feasibility analysis to de- orbit a non-functional satellite of big dimensions by the Technical Directorate of the European Space Agency ESA. The paper focuses specifically on the design of the techniques and technologies for the Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GNC) system of the spacecraft mission that will capture the satellite and ultimately will de-orbit it on a controlled re-entry.The paper explains the guidance strategies to launch, rendezvous, close-approach, and capture the target satellite. The guidance strategy uses chaser manoeuvres, hold points, and collision avoidance trajectories to ensure a safe capture. It also details the guidance profile to de-orbit it in a controlled re-entry.The paper continues with an analysis of the required sensing suite and the navigation algorithms to allow the homing, fly-around, and capture of the target satellite. The emphasis is placed around the design of a system to allow the rendezvous with an un-cooperative target, including the autonomous acquisition of both the orbital elements and the attitude of the target satellite.Analysing the capture phase, the paper provides a trade- off between two selected capture systems: the net and the tentacles. Both are studied from the point of view of the GNC system.The paper analyses as well the advanced algorithms proposed to control the final compound after the capture that will allow the controlled de-orbiting of the assembly in a safe place in the Earth.The paper ends proposing the continuation of this work with the extension to the analysis of the destruction process of the compound in consecutive segments starting from the entry gate to the rupture and break up.

  19. Improving Radium-Based Tracer Techniques: Hydrologic Controls on Porewater Radium Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, A. L.; Wilson, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrologic variability influences coastal ecosystems and groundwater biogeochemistry on a range of temporal and spatial scales. Radium isotopes (223Ra, t1/2=11.1 d; 224Ra, t1/2=3.66 d; 226Ra, t1/2=1600 y; and 228Ra, t1/2=5.75 y) are excellent tracers of groundwater movement and discharge in coastal systems, but the accuracy of these tracers has been hindered by poor constraints on porewater radium activity. Porewater activities vary by as much as two orders of magnitude, creating a proportionally large uncertainty in radium-based estimates of coastal groundwater discharge. To determine the primary hydrologic factors that control porewater radium activity, a field and modeling study was performed at an island within North Inlet Salt Marsh in Georgetown, South Carolina. We chose this island because of its well-defined boundaries, the lack of a freshwater upland, its relatively constant elevated salinity, and its stable porewater chemistry (pH and redox). Vibracores collected across the site revealed marsh mud from 1 - 4m thick overlying sand. Porewater radium activity was measured in groundwater samples (wells screened at 1, 2, and 4m depth) and nearby surface water samples collected from November 2009 to February 2011. Water salinity, temperature, pH, and redox were also recorded. Sediment samples were collected from the top 10 cm of the marsh mud as well as from previously-collected sediment cores for analysis of bulk radium generation rates. Statistical analyses revealed no significant relationship (P > 0.05) between porewater radium activity and the known controls of salinity, pH, temperature, and redox. Spatial variations in radium were controlled by differences in groundwater residence time. Porewater radium activity decreased with depth by up to an order of magnitude and laterally by up to a factor of four. Vertical activity variations reflect the contrasting sediment grain size, permeability, and porewater residence time between marsh mud and underlying sand

  20. Console Log Keeping Made Easier - Tools and Techniques for Improving Quality of Flight Controller Activity Logs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, David W.; Underwood, Debrah (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    At the Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) for International Space Station (ISS), each flight controller maintains detailed logs of activities and communications at their console position. These logs are critical for accurately controlling flight in real-time as well as providing a historical record and troubleshooting tool. This paper describes logging methods and electronic formats used at the POIC and provides food for thought on their strengths and limitations, plus proposes some innovative extensions. It also describes an inexpensive PC-based scheme for capturing and/or transcribing audio clips from communications consoles. Flight control activity (e.g. interpreting computer displays, entering data/issuing electronic commands, and communicating with others) can become extremely intense. It's essential to document it well, but the effort to do so may conflict with actual activity. This can be more than just annoying, as what's in the logs (or just as importantly not in them) often feeds back directly into the quality of future operations, whether short-term or long-term. In earlier programs, such as Spacelab, log keeping was done on paper, often using position-specific shorthand, and the other reader was at the mercy of the writer's penmanship. Today, user-friendly software solves the legibility problem and can automate date/time entry, but some content may take longer to finish due to individual typing speed and less use of symbols. File layout can be used to great advantage in making types of information easy to find, and creating searchable master logs for a given position is very easy and a real lifesaver in reconstructing events or researching a given topic. We'll examine log formats from several console position, and the types of information that are included and (just as importantly) excluded. We'll also look at when a summary or synopsis is effective, and when extensive detail is needed.

  1. Active Interrogation using Photofission Technique for Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Haori

    2016-03-31

    Innovative systems with increased sensitivity and resolution are in great demand to detect diversion and to prevent misuse in support of nuclear materials management for the U.S. fuel cycle. Nuclear fission is the most important multiplicative process involved in non-destructive active interrogation. This process produces the most easily recognizable signature for nuclear materials. In addition to thermal or high-energy neutrons, high-energy gamma rays can also excite a nucleus and cause fission through a process known as photofission. Electron linear accelerators (linacs) are widely used as the interrogating photon sources for inspection methods involving photofission technique. After photofission reactions, prompt signals are much stronger than the delayed signals, but it is difficult to quantify them in practical measurements. Delayed signals are easily distinguishable from the interrogating radiation. Linac-based, advanced inspection techniques utilizing the delayed signals after photofission have been extensively studied for homeland security applications. Previous research also showed that a unique delayed gamma ray energy spectrum exists for each fissionable isotope. In this work, high-energy delayed γ-rays were demonstrated to be signatures for detection, identification, and quantification of special nuclear materials. Such γ-rays were measured in between linac pulses using independent data acquisition systems. A list-mode system was developed to measure low-energy delayed γ-rays after irradiation. Photofission product yields of 238U and 239Pu were determined based on the measured delayed γ-ray spectra. The differential yields of delayed γ-rays were also proven to be able to discriminate nuclear from non-nuclear materials. The measurement outcomes were compared with Monte Carlo simulation results. It was demonstrated that the current available codes have capabilities and limitations in the simulation of photofission process. A two

  2. Reproduction in chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera): current status of environmental control of gonadal activity and advances in reproductive techniques.

    PubMed

    Busso, J M; Ponzio, M F; Fiol de Cuneo, M; Ruiz, R D

    2012-07-01

    A review of the biology of reproduction of chinchilla, focusing on environmental control of the gonadal activity, is presented. Chinchilla is a South American hystricomorph rodent genus currently considered almost extinct in the wild. However, a domestic form is still widespread in breeding farms around the world. Information regarding their reproductive biology has been obtained from studies on captive animals. In the case of Chinchilla lanigera, a seasonal reproductive pattern has been frequently reported in breeding facilities, but factors that might trigger gonadal activity have not been identified. The available information on reproductive productivity in farms worldwide shows a range of 1.2 to 2.4 deliveries per female per yr (with up to 2.1 weaned young per female per yr). Indeed, as found in all rodents, chinchillas can multiply at high fecundity and fertility rates (4 to 6 follicles mature during estrous cycles). Some new research avenues are postulated to improve the control of gonadal activity by means of environmental and/or pharmacologic factors. Furthermore, reproductive techniques that have been validated in chinchilla are reviewed (noninvasive hormone monitoring, semen collection, sperm cryopreservation, estrus induction), and several technical steps are proposed to be able to achieve AI. Because domesticated chinchilla still share some genomic characteristics with their counterparts in the wild, validated reproductive techniques in chinchilla males and females might contribute to the success of breeding programs.

  3. A local active noise control system based on a virtual-microphone technique for railway sleeping vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, J.; Egaña, J. M.; Viñolas, J.

    2006-11-01

    Low-frequency broadband noise generated on a railway vehicle by the wheel-rail interaction could be a big annoyance for passengers in sleeping cars. Low-frequency acoustic radiation is extremely difficult to attenuate by using passive devices. In this article, an active noise control (ANC) technique has been proposed for this purpose. A three-dimensional cabin was built in the laboratory to carry out the experiments. The proposed scheme is based on a Filtered-X Least Mean Square (FXLMS) control algorithm, particularised for a virtual-microphone technique. Control algorithms were designed with the Matlab-Simulink tool, and the Real Time Windows Target toolbox of Matlab was used to run in real time the ANC system. Referring to the results, different simulations and experimental performances were analysed to enlarge the silence zone around the passenger's ear zone and along the bed headboard. Attenuations of up to 20 and 15 dB(A) (re:20 μPa) were achieved at the passenger's ear in simulations and in experimental results, respectively.

  4. Active technique by suction to control the flow structure over a van model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harinaldi, Budiarso, Warjito, Kosasih, Engkos A.; Tarakka, Rustan; Simanungkalit, Sabar P.

    2012-06-01

    Today research trend in car aerodynamics are carried out from the point of view of the durable development. Some car companies have the objective to develop control solution that enable to reduce the aerodynamic drag of vehicle. It provides the possibility to modify the flow separation to reduce the development of the swirling structures around the vehicle. In this study, a family van is modeled with a modified form of Ahmed's body by changing the orientation of the flow from its original form (modified/reversed Ahmed Body). This model is equipped with a suction on the rear side to comprehensively examine the pressure field modifications that occur. The investigation combines computational and experimental work. The computational simulation used is k-epsilon flow turbulence model. The reversed Ahmed body used in the investigation has slant angle (φ) 35° at the front part. In the computational work, meshing type is tetra/hybrid element with hex core type and the grid number is more than 1.7 million in order to ensure detail discretization and more accurate calculation results. The boundary condition is upstream velocity of 11.1 m/s. Mean free stream at far upstream region is assumed in a steady state condition and uniform. The suction velocity is set at 1 m/s. Meanwhile in the experimental work a reversed Ahmed model is tested in a controlled wind tunnel experiments. The main measurement is the drag aerodynamic measurement at rear of the body of the model using strain gage. The results show that the application of a suction in the rear part of the van model give the effect of reducing the wake and the vortex is formed. Aerodynamic drag reduction close to 24% for the computational approach and 14.8% for the experimental approach by introducing a suction have been obtained.

  5. Advanced Wavefront Control Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S S; Brase, J M; Avicola, K; Thompson, C A; Kartz, M W; Winters, S; Hartley, R; Wihelmsen, J; Dowla, F V; Carrano, C J; Bauman, B J; Pennington, D M; Lande, D; Sawvel, R M; Silva, D A; Cooke, J B; Brown, C G

    2001-02-21

    Programs at LLNL that involve large laser systems--ranging from the National Ignition Facility to new tactical laser weapons--depend on the maintenance of laser beam quality through precise control of the optical wavefront. This can be accomplished using adaptive optics, which compensate for time-varying aberrations that are often caused by heating in a high-power laser system. Over the past two decades, LLNL has developed a broad capability in adaptive optics technology for both laser beam control and high-resolution imaging. This adaptive optics capability has been based on thin deformable glass mirrors with individual ceramic actuators bonded to the back. In the case of high-power lasers, these adaptive optics systems have successfully improved beam quality. However, as we continue to extend our applications requirements, the existing technology base for wavefront control cannot satisfy them. To address this issue, this project studied improved modeling tools to increase our detailed understanding of the performance of these systems, and evaluated novel approaches to low-order wavefront control that offer the possibility of reduced cost and complexity. We also investigated improved beam control technology for high-resolution wavefront control. Many high-power laser systems suffer from high-spatial-frequency aberrations that require control of hundreds or thousands of phase points to provide adequate correction. However, the cost and size of current deformable mirrors can become prohibitive for applications requiring more than a few tens of phase control points. New phase control technologies are becoming available which offer control of many phase points with small low-cost devices. The goal of this project was to expand our wavefront control capabilities with improved modeling tools, new devices that reduce system cost and complexity, and extensions to high spatial and temporal frequencies using new adaptive optics technologies. In FY 99, the second year of

  6. Monitoring by Control Technique - Condensers

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page is about condenser control techniques used to reduce pollutant emissions.

  7. Monitoring by Control Technique - Cyclone

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page is about cyclone control techniques used to reduce pollutant emissions.

  8. Techniques for active passivation

    SciTech Connect

    Roscioli, Joseph R.; Herndon, Scott C.; Nelson, Jr., David D.

    2016-12-20

    In one embodiment, active (continuous or intermittent) passivation may be employed to prevent interaction of sticky molecules with interfaces inside of an instrument (e.g., an infrared absorption spectrometer) and thereby improve response time. A passivation species may be continuously or intermittently applied to an inlet of the instrument while a sample gas stream is being applied. The passivation species may have a highly polar functional group that strongly binds to either water or polar groups of the interfaces, and once bound presents a non-polar group to the gas phase in order to prevent further binding of polar molecules. The instrument may be actively used to detect the sticky molecules while the passivation species is being applied.

  9. Advanced Adaptive Optics Control Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-01

    Optimal estimation and control methods for high energy laser adaptive optics systems are described. Three system types are examined: Active...the adaptive optics approaches and potential system implementations are recommended.

  10. Control technique for planetary rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakatani, Ichiro; Kubota, Takashi; Adachi, Tadashi; Saitou, Hiroaki; Okamoto, Sinya

    1994-01-01

    Beginning next century, several schemes for sending a planetary rover to the moon or Mars are being planned. As part of the development program, autonomous navigation technology is being studied to allow the rover the ability to move autonomously over a long range of unknown planetary surface. In the previous study, we ran the autonomous navigation experiment on an outdoor test terrain by using a rover test-bed that was controlled by a conventional sense-plan-act method. In some cases during the experiment, a problem occurred with the rover moving into untraversable areas. To improve this situation, a new control technique has been developed that gives the rover the ability of reacting to the outputs of the proximity sensors, a reaction behavior if you will. We have developed a new rover test-bed system on which an autonomous navigation experiment was performed using the newly developed control technique. In this outdoor experiment, the new control technique effectively produced the control command for the rover to avoid obstacles and be guided to the goal point safely.

  11. Eigenspace techniques for active flutter suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, William L.; Liebst, Bradley S.; Farm, Jerome A.

    1987-01-01

    The use of eigenspace techniques for the design of an active flutter suppression system for a hypothetical research drone is discussed. One leading edge and two trailing edge aerodynamic control surfaces and four sensors (accelerometers) are available for each wing. Full state control laws are designed by selecting feedback gains which place closed loop eigenvalues and shape closed loop eigenvectors so as to stabilize wing flutter and reduce gust loads at the wing root while yielding accepatable robustness and satisfying constrains on rms control surface activity. These controllers are realized by state estimators designed using an eigenvalue placement/eigenvector shaping technique which results in recovery of the full state loop transfer characteristics. The resulting feedback compensators are shown to perform almost as well as the full state designs. They also exhibit acceptable performance in situations in which the failure of an actuator is simulated.

  12. Muscle Activation Patterns During Different Squat Techniques.

    PubMed

    Slater, Lindsay V; Hart, Joseph M

    2017-03-01

    Slater, LV, and Hart, JM. Muscle activation patterns during different squat techniques. J Strength Cond Res 31(3): 667-676, 2017-Bilateral squats are frequently used exercises in sport performance programs. Lower extremity muscle activation may change based on knee alignment during the performance of the exercise. The purpose of this study was to compare lower extremity muscle activation patterns during different squat techniques. Twenty-eight healthy, uninjured subjects (19 women, 9 men, 21.5 ± 3 years, 170 ± 8.4 cm, 65.7 ± 11.8 kg) volunteered. Electromyography (EMG) electrodes were placed on the vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, rectus femoris, biceps femoris, and the gastrocnemius of the dominant leg. Participants completed 5 squats while purposefully displacing the knee anteriorly (AP malaligned), 5 squats while purposefully displacing the knee medially (ML malaligned) and 5 squats with control alignment (control). Normalized EMG data (MVIC) were reduced to 100 points and represented as percentage of squat cycle with 50% representing peak knee flexion and 0 and 99% representing fully extended. Vastus lateralis, medialis, and rectus femoris activity decreased in the medio-lateral (ML) malaligned squat compared with the control squat. In the antero-posterior (AP) malaligned squat, the vastus lateralis, medialis, and rectus femoris activity decreased during initial descent and final ascent; however, vastus lateralis and rectus femoris activation increased during initial ascent compared with the control squat. The biceps femoris and gastrocnemius displayed increased activation during both malaligned squats compared with the control squat. In conclusion, participants had altered muscle activation patterns during squats with intentional frontal and sagittal malalignment as demonstrated by changes in quadriceps, biceps femoris, and gastrocnemius activation during the squat cycle.

  13. Multiphase soft switched DC/DC converter and active control technique for fuel cell ripple current elimination

    DOEpatents

    Lai, Jih-Sheng; Liu, Changrong; Ridenour, Amy

    2009-04-14

    DC/DC converter has a transformer having primary coils connected to an input side and secondary coils connected to an output side. Each primary coil connects a full-bridge circuit comprising two switches on two legs, the primary coil being connected between the switches on each leg, each full-bridge circuit being connected in parallel wherein each leg is disposed parallel to one another, and the secondary coils connected to a rectifying circuit. An outer loop control circuit that reduces ripple in a voltage reference has a first resistor connected in series with a second resistor connected in series with a first capacitor which are connected in parallel with a second capacitor. An inner loop control circuit that reduces ripple in a current reference has a third resistor connected in series with a fourth resistor connected in series with a third capacitor which are connected in parallel with a fourth capacitor.

  14. Kinetic activation-relaxation technique.

    PubMed

    Béland, Laurent Karim; Brommer, Peter; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Joly, Jean-François; Mousseau, Normand

    2011-10-01

    We present a detailed description of the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice, self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithm with on-the-fly event search. Combining a topological classification for local environments and event generation with ART nouveau, an efficient unbiased sampling method for finding transition states, k-ART can be applied to complex materials with atoms in off-lattice positions or with elastic deformations that cannot be handled with standard KMC approaches. In addition to presenting the various elements of the algorithm, we demonstrate the general character of k-ART by applying the algorithm to three challenging systems: self-defect annihilation in c-Si (crystalline silicon), self-interstitial diffusion in Fe, and structural relaxation in a-Si (amorphous silicon).

  15. Kinetic activation-relaxation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béland, Laurent Karim; Brommer, Peter; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Joly, Jean-François; Mousseau, Normand

    2011-10-01

    We present a detailed description of the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice, self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithm with on-the-fly event search. Combining a topological classification for local environments and event generation with ART nouveau, an efficient unbiased sampling method for finding transition states, k-ART can be applied to complex materials with atoms in off-lattice positions or with elastic deformations that cannot be handled with standard KMC approaches. In addition to presenting the various elements of the algorithm, we demonstrate the general character of k-ART by applying the algorithm to three challenging systems: self-defect annihilation in c-Si (crystalline silicon), self-interstitial diffusion in Fe, and structural relaxation in a-Si (amorphous silicon).

  16. Buteyko technique use to control asthma symptoms.

    PubMed

    Austin, Gillian

    The Buteyko breathing technique is recommended in national guidance for control of asthma symptoms. This article explores the evidence base for the technique, outlines its main principles and includes two cases studies.

  17. Research review: Indoor air quality control techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, W.J.

    1986-10-01

    Techniques for controlling the concentration of radon, formaldehyde, and combustion products in the indoor air are reviewed. The most effective techniques, which are generally based on limiting or reducing indoor pollutant source strengths, can decrease indoor pollutant concentrations by a factor of 3 to 10. Unless the initial ventilation rate is unusually low, it is difficult to reduce indoor pollutant concentrations more than approximately 50% by increasing the ventilation rate of an entire building. However, the efficiency of indoor pollutant control by ventilation can be enhanced through the use of local exhaust ventilation near concentrated sources of pollutants, by minimizing short circuiting of air from supply to exhaust when pollutant sources are dispersed and, in some situations, by promoting a displacement flow of air and pollutants toward the exhaust. Active air cleaning is also examined briefly. Filtration and electrostatic air cleaning for removal of particles from the indoor air are the most practical and effective currently available techniques of air cleaning. 49 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Robust control technique for nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, G.V.; Bailey, J.M.

    1989-03-01

    This report summarizes the linear quadratic Guassian (LQG) design technique with loop transfer recovery (LQG/LTR) for design of control systems. The concepts of return ratio, return difference, inverse return difference, and singular values are summarized. The LQG/LTR design technique allows the synthesis of a robust control system. To illustrate the LQG/LTR technique, a linearized model of a simple process has been chosen. The process has three state variables, one input, and one output. Three control system design methods are compared: LQG, LQG/LTR, and a proportional plus integral controller (PI). 7 refs., 20 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Broadband Noise Control Using Predictive Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eure, Kenneth W.; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1997-01-01

    Predictive controllers have found applications in a wide range of industrial processes. Two types of such controllers are generalized predictive control and deadbeat control. Recently, deadbeat control has been augmented to include an extended horizon. This modification, named deadbeat predictive control, retains the advantage of guaranteed stability and offers a novel way of control weighting. This paper presents an application of both predictive control techniques to vibration suppression of plate modes. Several system identification routines are presented. Both algorithms are outlined and shown to be useful in the suppression of plate vibrations. Experimental results are given and the algorithms are shown to be applicable to non- minimal phase systems.

  20. Control Techniques for Particulate Air Pollutants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Air Pollution Control Administration (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Included is a comprehensive review of the approaches commonly recommended for controlling the sources of particulate air pollution. Not all possible combinations of control techniques that might bring about more stringent control of each individual source are reviewed. The many agricultural, commercial, domestic, industrial, and municipal…

  1. Monitoring by Control Technique - Electrostatic Precipitators

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page is about electrostatic precipitator control techniques used to reduce pollutant emissions.

  2. Monitoring by Control Technique - Catalytic Oxidizer

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page is about catalytic oxidizer control techniques used to reduce pollutant emissions.

  3. Monitoring by Control Technique - Fabric Filters

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page is about fabric filter control techniques used to reduce pollutant emissions.

  4. Monitoring by Control Technique - Thermal Oxidizer

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page is about thermal oxidizer control techniques used to reduce pollutant emissions.

  5. Monitoring by Control Technique - Electrified Filter Bed

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page is about electrified filter bed control techniques used to reduce pollutant emissions.

  6. Monitoring by Control Technique - Capture Systems

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page is about capture system control techniques used to reduce pollutant emissions.

  7. [Cost control techniques in Hungarian medicine reimbursement].

    PubMed

    Inotai, András; Bodrogi, József

    2007-01-01

    Health care, and especially reimbursement of medicaments has limited financial resources. The gap between the medically possible and economically acceptable is becoming wider. To keep the costs at a low level, cost controll techniques should be used. The severity of current Hungarian economic situation gives extra actuality of this question. This paper gives a short review of cost control techniques adopted in Hungary during the last approximately 20 years, analyses the present financial situation of health care by focusing on pharmaceutical market, and displays the possible alternative solutions.

  8. Ultrasonic techniques for process monitoring and control.

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, H.-T.

    1999-03-24

    Ultrasonic techniques have been applied successfully to process monitoring and control for many industries, such as energy, medical, textile, oil, and material. It helps those industries in quality control, energy efficiency improving, waste reducing, and cost saving. This paper presents four ultrasonic systems, ultrasonic viscometer, on-loom, real-time ultrasonic imaging system, ultrasonic leak detection system, and ultrasonic solid concentration monitoring system, developed at Argonne National Laboratory in the past five years for various applications.

  9. Five Climate Control Techniques for Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Maurice J.

    1963-01-01

    There are many reasons for air-conditioning schools and among them are--(1) the improvement of learning and teaching efficiency, (2) effective use of the educational plant for a greater part of the year, and (3) more efficient use of space through compact building design. Five climate control techniques are cited as providing optimum…

  10. Multidisciplinary Techniques and Novel Aircraft Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Sharon L.; Rogers, James L.; Raney, David L.

    2000-01-01

    The Aircraft Morphing Program at NASA Langley Research Center explores opportunities to improve airframe designs with smart technologies. Two elements of this basic research program are multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) and advanced flow control. This paper describes examples where MDO techniques such as sensitivity analysis, automatic differentiation, and genetic algorithms contribute to the design of novel control systems. In the test case, the design and use of distributed shape-change devices to provide low-rate maneuvering capability for a tailless aircraft is considered. The ability of MDO to add value to control system development is illustrated using results from several years of research funded by the Aircraft Morphing Program.

  11. Multidisciplinary Techniques and Novel Aircraft Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Sharon L.; Rogers, James L.; Raney, David L.

    2000-01-01

    The Aircraft Morphing Program at NASA Langley Research Center explores opportunities to improve airframe designs with smart technologies. Two elements of this basic research program are multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) and advanced flow control. This paper describes examples where MDO techniques such as sensitivity analysis, automatic differentiation, and genetic algorithms contribute to the design of novel control systems. In the test case, the design and use of distributed shapechange devices to provide low-rate maneuvering capability for a tailless aircraft is considered. The ability of MDO to add value to control system development is illustrated using results from several years of research funded by the Aircraft Morphing Program.

  12. System identification techniques for helicopter higher harmonic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacklin, S. A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents and compares several system identification techniques proposed for use with higher harmonic control algorithms designed to alleviate helicopter vibration. All method for actively controlling helicopter vibration require the knowledge of how the vibration outputs are related to the control inputs. Off-line or batch identification methods for obtaining this knowledge are presented first. Then the more advanced, adaptive identification techniques proposed to track the helicopter model parameters in flight are discussed. Considerations regarding system identifiability, identification algorithm stability, and computer implementation are also discussed.

  13. Active control system trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yore, E. E.; Gunderson, D. C.

    1976-01-01

    The active control concepts which achieve the benefit of improved mission performance and lower cost and generate system trends towards improved dynamic performance, more integration, and digital fly by wire mechanization are described. Analytical issues and implementation requirements and tools and approaches developed to address the analytical and implementation issues are briefly discussed.

  14. Theory-Based Interventions Combining Mental Simulation and Planning Techniques to Improve Physical Activity: Null Results from Two Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Meslot, Carine; Gauchet, Aurélie; Allenet, Benoît; François, Olivier; Hagger, Martin S.

    2016-01-01

    Interventions to assist individuals in initiating and maintaining regular participation in physical activity are not always effective. Psychological and behavioral theories advocate the importance of both motivation and volition in interventions to change health behavior. Interventions adopting self-regulation strategies that foster motivational and volitional components may, therefore, have utility in promoting regular physical activity participation. We tested the efficacy of an intervention adopting motivational (mental simulation) and volitional (implementation intentions) components to promote a regular physical activity in two studies. Study 1 adopted a cluster randomized design in which participants (n = 92) were allocated to one of three conditions: mental simulation plus implementation intention, implementation intention only, or control. Study 2 adopted a 2 (mental simulation vs. no mental simulation) × 2 (implementation intention vs. no implementation intention) randomized controlled design in which fitness center attendees (n = 184) were randomly allocated one of four conditions: mental simulation only, implementation intention only, combined, or control. Physical activity behavior was measured by self-report (Study 1) or fitness center attendance (Study 2) at 4- (Studies 1 and 2) and 19- (Study 2 only) week follow-up periods. Findings revealed no statistically significant main or interactive effects of the mental simulation and implementation intention conditions on physical activity outcomes in either study. Findings are in contrast to previous research which has found pervasive effects for both intervention strategies. Findings are discussed in light of study limitations including the relatively small sample sizes, particularly for Study 1, deviations in the operationalization of the intervention components from previous research and the lack of a prompt for a goal intention. Future research should focus on ensuring uniformity in the format of the

  15. Active Flow Control Activities at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Scott G.; Sellers, William L., III; Washburn, Anthony E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Langley continues to aggressively investigate the potential advantages of active flow control over more traditional aerodynamic techniques. This paper provides an update to a previous paper and describes both the progress in the various research areas and the significant changes in the NASA research programs. The goals of the topics presented are focused on advancing the state of knowledge and understanding of controllable fundamental mechanisms in fluids as well as to address engineering challenges. An organizational view of current research activities at NASA Langley in active flow control as supported by several projects is presented. On-center research as well as NASA Langley funded contracts and grants are discussed at a relatively high level. The products of this research are to be demonstrated either in bench-top experiments, wind-tunnel investigations, or in flight as part of the fundamental NASA R&D program and then transferred to more applied research programs within NASA, DOD, and U.S. industry.

  16. Balancing Training Techniques for Flight Controller Certification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Training of ground control teams has been a difficult task in space operations. There are several intangible skills that must be learned to become the steely eyed men and women of mission control who respond to spacecraft failures that can lead to loss of vehicle or crew if handled improperly. And as difficult as training is, it can also be costly. Every day, month or year an operator is in training, is a day that not only they are being trained without direct benefit to the organization, but potentially an instructor or mentor is also being paid for hours spent assisting them. Therefore, optimization of the training flow is highly desired. Recently the Expedition Division (DI) at Johnson Space Flight Center has recreated their training flows for the purpose of both moving to an operator/specialist/instructor hierarchy and to address past inefficiencies in the training flow. This paper will discuss the types of training DI is utilizing in their new flows, and the balance that has been struck between the ideal learning environments and realistic constraints. Specifically, the past training flow for the ISS Attitude Determination and Control Officer will be presented, including drawbacks that were encountered. Then the new training flow will be discussed and how a new approach utilizes more training methods and teaching techniques. We will look at how DI has integrated classes, workshops, checkouts, module reviews, scenarios, OJT, paper sims, Mini Sims, and finally Integrated Sims to balance the cost and timing of training a new flight controller.

  17. Magnetic force control technique in industrial application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishijima, S.

    2010-11-01

    Techniques of the magnetic force control have been examined for industrial application. The problems and the technique are different in dispersion medium of gas and that of liquid. In addition, the method is different depending on the magnetic characteristic of the target objects. In case of the liquid, the dispersion medium having different viscosity was examined. The separation speed is decided with the magnitude of the magnetic force because a drag force increases with the viscosity. When the water is the dispersion medium, magnetic seeding is possible and hence the nonmagnetic materials can be separated and even the dissolved material could be separated. The separation technique has been used for purifying the waste water form paper mill or wash water of drum. On the other hand when the water is not dispersion medium, mainly the ferromagnetism particle becomes the target object because the magnetic seeding becomes difficult. The iron fragments have been separated from the slurry of slicing machine of solar battery. It has been clarified high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) can be applied for the viscous fluid of which viscosity was as high as 10 Pa s. When the dispersion medium is gaseous material, the air is important. The drag force from air depends greatly on Reynolds number. When speed of the air is small, the Reynolds number is small, and the drag force is calculated by the Stokes' law of resistance. The study with gaseous dispersion medium is not carried out much. The magnetic separation will discuss the possibility of the industrial application of this technique.

  18. Active control of convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Jonathan; Bau, Haim H.

    1991-12-01

    It is demonstrated theoretically that active (feedback) control can be used to alter the characteristics of thermal convection in a toroidal, vertical loop heated from below and cooled from above. As the temperature difference between the heated and cooled sections of the loop increases, the flow in the uncontrolled loop changes from no motion to steady, time-independent motion to temporally oscillatory, chaotic motion. With the use of a feedback controller effecting small perturbations in the boundary conditions, one can maintain the no-motion state at significantly higher temperature differences than the critical one corresponding to the onset of convection in the uncontrolled system. Alternatively, one can maintain steady, time-independent flow under conditions in which the flow would otherwise be chaotic. That is, the controller can be used to suppress chaos. Likewise, it is possible to stabilize periodic nonstable orbits that exist in the chaotic regime of the uncontrolled system. Finally, the controller also can be used to induce chaos in otherwise laminar (fully predictable), nonchaotic flow.

  19. Active control of combustion instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Masoud, Nidal A.

    A theoretical analysis of active control of combustion thermo-acoustic instabilities is developed in this dissertation. The theoretical combustion model is based on the dynamics of a two-phase flow in a liquid-fueled propulsion system. The formulation is based on a generalized wave equation with pressure as the dependent variable, and accommodates all influences of combustion, mean flow, unsteady motions and control inputs. The governing partial differential equations are converted to an equivalent set of ordinary differential equations using Galerkin's method by expressing the unsteady pressure and velocity fields as functions of normal mode shapes of the chamber. This procedure yields a representation of the unsteady flow field as a system of coupled nonlinear oscillators that is used as a basis for controllers design. Major research attention is focused on the control of longitudinal oscillations with both linear and nonlinear processes being considered. Starting with a linear model using point actuators, the optimal locations of actuators and sensors are developed. The approach relies on the quantitative measures of the degree of controllability and component cost. These criterion are arrived at by considering the energies of the system's inputs and outputs. The optimality criteria for sensor and actuator locations provide a balance between the importance of the lower order (controlled) and the higher (residual) order modes. To address the issue of uncertainties in system's parameter, the minimax principles based controller is used. The minimax corresponds to finding the best controller for the worst parameter deviation. In other words, choosing controller parameters to minimize, and parameter deviation to maximize some quadratic performance metric. Using the minimax-based controller, a remarkable improvement in the control system's ability to handle parameter uncertainties is achieved when compared to the robustness of the regular control schemes such as LQR

  20. Error-control techniques for digital communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelson, A. M.; Levesque, A. H.

    The reliable transmission of digital information is discussed, taking into account the communication system design problem, the elements of a digital communication system, important channel models, information theory and channel capacity, modulation performance on the AWGN channel, and combined modulation and coding for efficient signal design. Other topics studied are related to fundamental and simple block codes, the algebra of linear block codes, binary cyclic codes and BCH codes, decoding techniques for binary BCH codes, nonbinary BCH codes and Reed-Solomon codes, the performance of linear block codes with bounded-distance decoding an introduction to convolutional codes, maximum likelihood decoding of convolutional codes, sequential decoding, and applications of error-control coding. Attention is given to groups, fields, vector spaces, binary linear block codes, the parity-check matrix revisited, dual codes, Hamming distance and the weight distribution, code geometry and error-correction capability, and the representations of finite fields.

  1. Error control techniques for satellite and space communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costello, Daniel J., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Research activities related to error control techniques for satellite and space communication are reported. Specific areas of research include: coding gains for bandwidth efficient codes, hardware implementation of a bandwidth efficient coding scheme for the Hubble Space Telescope, construction of long trellis codes for use with sequential decoding, performance analysis of multilevel trellis codes, and M-algorithm decoding of trellis codes. Each topic is discussed in a corresponding paper that appears in the appendices.

  2. Alternative control techniques document: Nitric and adipic acid manufacturing plants

    SciTech Connect

    Lazzo, D.W.

    1991-12-01

    The Alternative Control Techniques document describes available control techniques for reducing NOx emission levels from nitric and adipic acid manufacturing plants. The document contains information on the formation of NOx and uncontrolled NOx emissions from nitric and adipic acid plants. The following NOx control techniques for nitric acid plants are discussed: extended absorption, nonselective catalytic reduction (NSCR), and selective catalytic reduction (SCR). The following NOx control techniques for adipic acid plants are discussed: extended absorption and thermal reduction. For each control technique, achievable controlled NOx emission levels, capital and annual costs, cost effectiveness, and environmental and energy impacts are presented.

  3. The conservative treatment of Trigger Thumb using Graston Techniques and Active Release Techniques®

    PubMed Central

    Howitt, Scott; Wong, Jerome; Zabukovec, Sonja

    2006-01-01

    Objective To detail the progress of a patient with unresolved symptoms of Trigger thumb who underwent a treatment plan featuring Active Release Technique (ART) and Graston Technique. Clinical Features The most important feature is painful snapping or restriction of movement, most notably in actively extending or flexing the digit. The cause of this flexor tendinopathy is believed to be multi-factorial including anatomical variations of the pulley system and biomechanical etiologies such as exposure to shear forces and unaccustomed activity. Conventional treatment aims at decreasing inflammation through corticosteroid injection or surgically removing imposing tissue. Intervention and Outcome The conservative treatment approach utilized in this case involved Active Release Technique (ART®) and Graston Technique (GT). An activity specific rehabilitation protocol was employed to re-establish thumb extensor strength and ice was used to control pain and any residual inflammation. Outcome measures included subjective pain ratings with range of motion and motion palpation of the first right phalangeal joint. Objective measures were made by assessing range of motion. Conclusion A patient with trigger thumb appeared to be relieved of his pain and disability after a treatment plan of GT and ART. PMID:17549185

  4. Active Control Evaluation for Spacecraft (ACES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J.; Yuen, W.

    1986-01-01

    The Air Force goal is to develop vibration control techniques for large flexible spacecraft by addressing sensor, actuator, and control hardware and dynamic testing. The Active Control Evaluation for Spacecraft (ACES) program will address the Air Force goal by looking at two leading control techniques and implementing them on a structural model of a flexible spacecraft under laboratory testing. The first phase in the ACES program is to review and to assess the High Authority Control/Low Authority Control (HAC/LAC) and Filter accomodated Model Error Sensitivity Suppression (FAMESS) control techniques for testing on the modified VCOSS structure. Appropriate sensors and actuators will be available for use with both techniques; locations will be the same for both techniques. The control actuators will be positioned at the midpoint and free end of the structure. The laser source for the optical sensor is mounted on the feed mast. The beam will be reflected from a mirror on the offset antenna onto the detectors mounted above the shaker table bay. The next phase is to develop an analysis simulation with the control algorithms implemented for dynamics verification. The third phase is to convert the control laws into high level computer language and test them in the NASA-MSFC facility. The final phase is to compile all analytical and test results for performance comparisons.

  5. A novel technique for active fibre production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner-Erny, Ruth; Di Labio, Loredana; Lüthy, Willy

    2007-04-01

    Active fibre devices are conventionally manufactured using MCVD technique. Recently it has been shown that nearly equivalent results can also be obtained with sol-gel technology. Now we present a novel technique allowing simplification of the manufacturing process even more. The required constituents are mixed in the form of dry micro- and nano-sized particles. A silica glass tube forming the future core region of a fibre preform is filled with a powder mix of SiO 2, 1% Nd (as Nd 2O 3) and 10% Al (as Al 2O 3). This tube is mounted in the centre of a larger tube forming the future cladding. The empty space between the two tubes is filled with SiO 2 powder. After preheating, the evacuated preform is drawn to a fibre. A length of 45 cm, cladding-pumped with a diode laser at 808 nm as well as a core-pumped fibre of 5.1 cm length showed laser action between 1.05 and 1.1 μm.

  6. A grid spacing control technique for algebraic grid generation methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. E.; Kudlinski, R. A.; Everton, E. L.

    1982-01-01

    A technique which controls the spacing of grid points in algebraically defined coordinate transformations is described. The technique is based on the generation of control functions which map a uniformly distributed computational grid onto parametric variables defining the physical grid. The control functions are smoothed cubic splines. Sets of control points are input for each coordinate directions to outline the control functions. Smoothed cubic spline functions are then generated to approximate the input data. The technique works best in an interactive graphics environment where control inputs and grid displays are nearly instantaneous. The technique is illustrated with the two-boundary grid generation algorithm.

  7. Fixed gain and adaptive techniques for rotorcraft vibration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, R. H.; Saberi, H. A.; Walker, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    The results of an analysis effort performed to demonstrate the feasibility of employing approximate dynamical models and frequency shaped cost functional control law desgin techniques for helicopter vibration suppression are presented. Both fixed gain and adaptive control designs based on linear second order dynamical models were implemented in a detailed Rotor Systems Research Aircraft (RSRA) simulation to validate these active vibration suppression control laws. Approximate models of fuselage flexibility were included in the RSRA simulation in order to more accurately characterize the structural dynamics. The results for both the fixed gain and adaptive approaches are promising and provide a foundation for pursuing further validation in more extensive simulation studies and in wind tunnel and/or flight tests.

  8. Active control of convection

    SciTech Connect

    Bau, H.H.

    1995-12-31

    Using stability theory, numerical simulations, and in some instances experiments, it is demonstrated that the critical Rayleigh number for the bifurcation (1) from the no-motion (conduction) state to the motion state and (2) from time-independent convection to time-dependent, oscillatory convection in the thermal convection loop and Rayleigh-Benard problems can be significantly increased or decreased. This is accomplished through the use of a feedback controller effectuating small perturbations in the boundary data. The controller consists of sensors which detect deviations in the fluid`s temperature from the motionless, conductive values and then direct actuators to respond to these deviations in such a way as to suppress the naturally occurring flow instabilities. Actuators which modify the boundary`s temperature/heat flux are considered. The feedback controller can also be used to control flow patterns and generate complex dynamic behavior at relatively low Rayleigh numbers.

  9. Multivariable Techniques for High-Speed Research Flight Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Brett A.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the activities and findings conducted under contract with NASA Langley Research Center. Subject matter is the investigation of suitable multivariable flight control design methodologies and solutions for large, flexible high-speed vehicles. Specifically, methodologies are to address the inner control loops used for stabilization and augmentation of a highly coupled airframe system possibly involving rigid-body motion, structural vibrations, unsteady aerodynamics, and actuator dynamics. Design and analysis techniques considered in this body of work are both conventional-based and contemporary-based, and the vehicle of interest is the High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). Major findings include: (1) control architectures based on aft tail only are not well suited for highly flexible, high-speed vehicles, (2) theoretical underpinnings of the Wykes structural mode control logic is based on several assumptions concerning vehicle dynamic characteristics, and if not satisfied, the control logic can break down leading to mode destabilization, (3) two-loop control architectures that utilize small forward vanes with the aft tail provide highly attractive and feasible solutions to the longitudinal axis control challenges, and (4) closed-loop simulation sizing analyses indicate the baseline vane model utilized in this report is most likely oversized for normal loading conditions.

  10. Feedback Control Analysis Using Parameter Plane Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    compensation of linear control systems. General equations have been derived for the cases of feedback, cascade, and combination feedback-cascade...Bode and root-locus analyses, the program provides the capability to investigate ř% the entire gamut of linear control system architecture. A basis

  11. Techniques for designing rotorcraft control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yudilevitch, Gil; Levine, William S.

    1994-01-01

    Over the last two and a half years we have been demonstrating a new methodology for the design of rotorcraft flight control systems (FCS) to meet handling qualities requirements. This method is based on multicriterion optimization as implemented in the optimization package CONSOL-OPTCAD (C-O). This package has been developed at the Institute for Systems Research (ISR) at the University of Maryland at College Park. This design methodology has been applied to the design of a FCS for the UH-60A helicopter in hover having the ADOCS control structure. The controller parameters have been optimized to meet the ADS-33C specifications. Furthermore, using this approach, an optimal (minimum control energy) controller has been obtained and trade-off studies have been performed.

  12. Active weld control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Bradley W.; Burroughs, Ivan A.

    1994-01-01

    Through the two phases of this contract, sensors for welding applications and parameter extraction algorithms have been developed. These sensors form the foundation of a weld control system which can provide action weld control through the monitoring of the weld pool and keyhole in a VPPA welding process. Systems of this type offer the potential of quality enhancement and cost reduction (minimization of rework on faulty welds) for high-integrity welding applications. Sensors for preweld and postweld inspection, weld pool monitoring, keyhole/weld wire entry monitoring, and seam tracking were developed. Algorithms for signal extraction were also developed and analyzed to determine their application to an adaptive weld control system. The following sections discuss findings for each of the three sensors developed under this contract: (1) weld profiling sensor; (2) weld pool sensor; and (3) stereo seam tracker/keyhole imaging sensor. Hardened versions of these sensors were designed and built under this contract. A control system, described later, was developed on a multiprocessing/multitasking operating system for maximum power and flexibility. Documentation for sensor mechanical and electrical design is also included as appendices in this report.

  13. Assessing voluntary muscle activation with the twitch interpolation technique.

    PubMed

    Shield, Anthony; Zhou, Shi

    2004-01-01

    The twitch interpolation technique is commonly employed to assess the completeness of skeletal muscle activation during voluntary contractions. Early applications of twitch interpolation suggested that healthy human subjects could fully activate most of the skeletal muscles to which the technique had been applied. More recently, however, highly sensitive twitch interpolation has revealed that even healthy adults routinely fail to fully activate a number of skeletal muscles despite apparently maximal effort. Unfortunately, some disagreement exists as to how the results of twitch interpolation should be employed to quantify voluntary activation. The negative linear relationship between evoked twitch force and voluntary force that has been observed by some researchers implies that voluntary activation can be quantified by scaling a single interpolated twitch to a control twitch evoked in relaxed muscle. Observations of non-linear evoked-voluntary force relationships have lead to the suggestion that the single interpolated twitch ratio can not accurately estimate voluntary activation. Instead, it has been proposed that muscle activation is better determined by extrapolating the relationship between evoked and voluntary force to provide an estimate of true maximum force. However, criticism of the single interpolated twitch ratio typically fails to take into account the reasons for the non-linearity of the evoked-voluntary force relationship. When these reasons are examined, it appears that most are even more challenging to the validity of extrapolation than they are to the linear equation. Furthermore, several factors that contribute to the observed non-linearity can be minimised or even eliminated with appropriate experimental technique. The detection of small activation deficits requires high resolution measurement of force and careful consideration of numerous experimental details such as the site of stimulation, stimulation intensity and the number of interpolated

  14. Active control of turbomachine discrete tones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleeter, Sanford

    This paper was directed at active control of discrete frequency noise generated by subsonic blade rows through cancellation of the blade row interaction generated propagating acoustic waves. First discrete frequency noise generated by a rotor and stator in a duct was analyzed to determine the propagating acoustic pressure waves. Then a mathematical model was developed to analyze and predict the active control of discrete frequency noise generated by subsonic blade rows through cancellation of the propagating acoustic waves, accomplished by utilizing oscillating airfoil surfaces to generate additional control propagating pressure waves. These control waves interact with the propagating acoustic waves, thereby, in principle, canceling the acoustic waves and thus, the far field discrete frequency tones. This model was then applied to a fan exit guide vane to investigate active airfoil surface techniques for control of the propagating acoustic waves, and thus the far field discrete frequency tones, generated by blade row interactions.

  15. Cost averaging techniques for robust control of flexible structural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagood, Nesbitt W.; Crawley, Edward F.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on cost averaging techniques for robust control of flexible structural systems are presented. Topics covered include: modeling of parameterized systems; average cost analysis; reduction of parameterized systems; and static and dynamic controller synthesis.

  16. Adaptive Control Techniques for Large Space Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-15

    Adaptive Systems: A Ji . Fixed-Point Analysis", submitted, IEEE Trans. on Circuits and Systems; Special Issue on Adaptive Systems, Sept. 1987. I.M.Y...Shaped Cost Functionals: Extensions of LQG Methods," *.. AIAA J. of Guidance and Control, pp. 529-535, Nov-Dec. 1980. [81 C.A. Desoer , R.W. Liu, J. Murray...for Parameter Conver- gence in Adaptive Control," Memo No. UCB/ERL M84/25, Univ. of California, Berke- ley, 1984. [19] C.A. Desoer and M. Vidyasagar

  17. Hydraulic Control Design and Modeling Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-01

    methodologies. This report may be difficult to read for the casual reader . It is written assuming the reader has some fundamental background in control...INTERVAL DTSMP=.O0012207 STEP=. 0012207 INDEX=INDEX+i DOUT( INDEX2)=L1 A- 4 END $*OF DISCRETE SAMP 2" DERIVATIVE tarot (INDEX2 .GE. 4098) END $*OF

  18. Classical controller design techniques for fractional order case.

    PubMed

    Yeroglu, Celaleddin; Tan, Nusret

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents some classical controller design techniques for the fractional order case. New robust lag, lag-lead, PI controller design methods for control systems with a fractional order interval transfer function (FOITF) are proposed using classical design methods with the Bode envelopes of the FOITF. These controllers satisfy the robust performance specifications of the fractional order interval plant. In order to design a classical PID controller, an optimization technique based on fractional order reference model is used. PID controller parameters are obtained using the least squares optimization method. Different PID controller parameters that satisfy stability have been obtained for the same plant.

  19. Failure Control Techniques for the SSME

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taniguchi, M. H.

    1987-01-01

    Since ground testing of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) began in 1975, the detection of engine anomalies and the prevention of major damage have been achieved by a multi-faceted detection/shutdown system. The system continues the monitoring task today and consists of the following: sensors, automatic redline and other limit logic, redundant sensors and controller voting logic, conditional decision logic, and human monitoring. Typically, on the order of 300 to 500 measurements are sensed and recorded for each test, while on the order of 100 are used for control and monitoring. Despite extensive monitoring by the current detection system, twenty-seven (27) major incidents have occurred. This number would appear insignificant compared with over 1200 hot-fire tests which have taken place since 1976. However, the number suggests the requirement for and future benefits of a more advanced failure detection system.

  20. Adaptive Control Techniques for Large Space Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-23

    2500 Mizssion. CoV~ege Boulevard Sar-ta Clara, Califorr-Iia 950541-1215 P--epared for: AFOSR, O irectcorate of Aerospace Sciences Bolling Air Force...formulated in late 1982 in re- sponse to the increasing concern that performance robustness of Air Force LSS type system would be inadequate to meet...Reducing the effects of on-board disturbance rejection) is particularly important for planned Air Force missions. For these cases, adaptive control

  1. Sintering techniques for microstructure control in ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberger, Andrew T.

    Sintering techniques can be manipulated to enhance densification in difficult to sinter materials and to produce property enhancing microstructures. However, the interplay between materials, sintering techniques, and end properties is not fully understood in many material systems, and some fundamental aspects of sintering such as the nature of the effects of electric fields remains unknown. The processing property relationships were examined in two classes of materials; zirconium diboride ultra high temperature ceramic composites, and all solid lithium-ion battery phosphate materials. Investigation of zirconium diboride ceramics focused on the effects of zirconium carbide as a secondary or tertiary phase in ZrB2 and ZrB2 -- SiC. Addition of zirconium carbide was observed to increase flexural strength of composites up to 590MPa at 50wt% ZrC, significantly higher than the flexural strength of 380MPa observed in similarly prepared ZrB2 -- SiC. This difference was attributed to the absence of CTE mismatch induced residual stresses in the ZrB2 -- ZrC composites. A high temperature reaction between ZrB2 and TiC producing Zr1-xTixB2 -- ZrC composites was discovered and found to enhance densification while reducing the average grain size to as small as 1.4mum, lower than the starting powder size of 1.8mum. While a high flexural strength of 670MPa was observed, a strength dependence on the ZrC grain size indicative of CTE mismatch residual stresses was also seen. Finally, the oxidation and ablation resistance of ZrB2 -- ZrC -- SiC composites as a function of ZrC fraction and ZrC:SiC ratio was investigated. Above 5vol% ZrC, the oxidation and ablation resistance of the composites was significantly reduced due to ZrC oxidation, regardless of SiC content. While ZrC can significantly enhance the mechanical properties of the composite, the volume fraction must be kept low to avoid an undesirable reduction in the oxidation resistance. The influence of applied electrical fields

  2. Techniques for controlling a two-link flexible arm

    SciTech Connect

    Feddema, J.T.; Eisler, G.R.; Segalman, D.J.; Robinett, R.D. III; Morimoto, A.K.; Schoenwald, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    The long length and relatively small cross sectional area of the robotic arms envisioned for use inside of the underground nuclear waste storage tanks will require the control of flexible structures. This will become an important problem in the characterization and remediation of these tanks. We are developing control strategies to actively damp residual vibrations in flexible robotic arms caused by high speed motion and abrupt external forces. A planar, two-link flexible arm is currently being used to test these control strategies. In this paper, two methods of control are discussed. The first is a minimum-time control approach which utilizes a finite element model and and optimization program. These tools plan the motor torque profiles necessary for the tip of the arm to move along a straight line, in minimum time, within the motors' torque constraints, and end in a quiescent state. To account for modeling errors in the finite element model, errors in joint angles, velocities, and link curvatures are added to the optimal torque trajectory. Linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) regulatory design theory is used to determine the feedback gains. The second method of control is a teleoperated joystick controller which uses an input shaping technique to alter the commands of the joystick so as to reduce the residual vibration of the fundamental modes. Approximating the system as linear, the natural frequency and damping ratio are estimated on-line for the complete system, which includes the structure plus a lower level proportional derivative controller. An input shaping filter is determined from the estimated natural frequency, estimated damping ratio, and the desired transfer function of the system. 11 reps., 9 figs.

  3. Technique for controlling spread of limnotic oncomelania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Damei; Wang, Xiangsan; Lai, Yonggen

    2003-09-01

    Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease mostly found in areas along the Changjiang River of China. The disease is spread solely through an intermediary named oncomelania, so its spread of schistosomiasis can be controlled by properly designing water intakes which prevent oncomelania from entering farming land or residential areas. This paper reports a successful design process and a new oncomelania-free intake device. The design of the new intake is based on a sound research program in which extensive experimental studies were carried out to gain knowledge of oncomelania eco-hydraulic behavior and detailed flow field information through CFD simulation.

  4. Nonsurgical techniques to control massive bleeding.

    PubMed

    Zentai, Christian; Grottke, Oliver; Spahn, Donat R; Rossaint, Rolf

    2013-03-01

    Significant advancements in nonsurgical and surgical approaches to control bleeding in severely injured patients have also improved the treatment of critical trauma-related coagulopathy. Nonsurgical procedures such as angiographic embolization are progressively considered to terminate arterial bleeding from pelvic fractures. The disturbance of coagulation may aggravate bleeding and hamper surgical procedures. The administration of coagulation factors and factor concentrates may be useful for correcting systemic coagulopathy and reducing the need for fresh frozen plasma, platelet, and red blood cell transfusions, which are associated with various adverse outcomes. In this review, nonsurgical management of critical trauma bleeding is discussed.

  5. Techniques for designing rotorcraft control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, William S.; Barlow, Jewel

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the work that was done on the project from 1 Apr. 1992 to 31 Mar. 1993. The main goal of this research is to develop a practical tool for rotorcraft control system design based on interactive optimization tools (CONSOL-OPTCAD) and classical rotorcraft design considerations (ADOCS). This approach enables the designer to combine engineering intuition and experience with parametric optimization. The combination should make it possible to produce a better design faster than would be possible using either pure optimization or pure intuition and experience. We emphasize that the goal of this project is not to develop an algorithm. It is to develop a tool. We want to keep the human designer in the design process to take advantage of his or her experience and creativity. The role of the computer is to perform the calculation necessary to improve and to display the performance of the nominal design. Briefly, during the first year we have connected CONSOL-OPTCAD, an existing software package for optimizing parameters with respect to multiple performance criteria, to a simplified nonlinear simulation of the UH-60 rotorcraft. We have also created mathematical approximations to the Mil-specs for rotorcraft handling qualities and input them into CONSOL-OPTCAD. Finally, we have developed the additional software necessary to use CONSOL-OPTCAD for the design of rotorcraft controllers.

  6. Controls Considerations for Turbine Active Clearance Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, Kevin J.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation discusses active control of turbine tip clearance from a control systems perspective. It is a subset of charts that were presented at the 2003 meeting of the International Society of Air Breathing Engines which was held August 31 through September 5 in Cleveland, Ohio. The associated reference paper is cited at the end of the presentation. The presentation describes active tip clearance control research being conducted by NASA to improve turbine engine systems. The target application for this effort is commercial aircraft engines. However, it is believed that the technologies developed as part of this research will benefit a broad spectrum of current and future turbomachinery. The first part of the presentation discusses the concept of tip clearance, problems associated with it, and the benefits of controlling it. It lays out a framework for implementing tip clearance controls that enables the implementation to progress from purely analytical to hardware-in-the-loop to fully experimental. And it briefly discusses how the technologies developed will be married to the previously described ACC Test Rig for hardware-in-the-loop demonstrations. The final portion of the presentation, describes one of the key technologies in some detail by presenting equations and results for a functional dynamic model of the tip clearance phenomena. As shown, the model exhibits many of the clearance dynamics found in commercial gas turbine engines. However, initial attempts to validate the model identified limitations that are being addressed to make the model more realistic.

  7. Recent advances in techniques for tsetse-fly control*

    PubMed Central

    MacLennan, K. J. R.

    1967-01-01

    With the advent of modern persistent insecticides, it has become possible to utilize some of the knowledge that has accumulated on the ecology and bionomics of Glossina and to devise more effective techniques for the control and eventual extermination of these species. The present article, based on experience of the tsetse fly problem in Northern Nigeria, points out that the disadvantages of control techniques—heavy expenditure of money and manpower and undue damage to the biosystem—can now largely be overcome by basing the application of insecticides on knowledge of the habits of the particular species of Glossina in a particular environment. Two factors are essential to the success of a control project: the proper selection of sites for spraying (the concept of restricted application) and the degree of persistence of the insecticide used. Reinfestation from within or outside the project area must also be taken into account. These and other aspects are discussed in relation to experience gained from a successful extermination project carried out in the Sudan vegetation zone and from present control activities in the Northern Guinea vegetation zone. PMID:5301739

  8. Wafer Stepper Characterization And Process Control Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, S. C.; Friedberg, C. B.

    1982-09-01

    A process control vehicle is described which allows the characterization and comparison of wafer steppers with respect to distortion, resolution, uniformity, and misregistration. A block of test structures consisting of optical resolution patterns, verniers, and electrical line width and misalignment resistors is arrayed on an 11 x 11 grid which fills the entire available field of a 10X reticle. Fach block also contains a pair of targets for the THE laser-interferometric auto-alignment system. The ability of the auto-aligner to acquire such targets to within 500 is exploited as a metrology tool whereby the measured coordinates at each site are compared to the ideal (theoretical) coordinates to generate a vector distortion map across the field. Subsequent reduction of misregistration data is accomplished via application of the six parameter model developed by Perloff and co-workers. It is shown that these diagnostic tools permit the rapid characterization of distortion anisotropy for a given stepper and can be used to optimize and monitor level-to-level regis-tration. Further applications are suggested.

  9. Aerospace Education Workshop Techniques and Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frizzell, Helen J.

    1977-01-01

    Outlines procedures and lists hints for planning successful workshops in aerospace education; included are possible locations, resources, orientation activities, brochures, speakers, and follow-up activities for various combinations of participants (parents, elementary school and secondary school teachers, vocational-technical oriented students,…

  10. A Colloquial Approach: An Active Learning Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arce, Pedro

    1994-01-01

    Addresses the problem of the effectiveness of teaching methodologies on fundamental engineering courses such as transport phenomena. Recommends the colloquial approach, an active learning strategy, to increase student involvement in the learning process. (ZWH)

  11. Control of nucleus accumbens activity with neurofeedback.

    PubMed

    Greer, Stephanie M; Trujillo, Andrew J; Glover, Gary H; Knutson, Brian

    2014-08-01

    The nucleus accumbens (NAcc) plays critical roles in healthy motivation and learning, as well as in psychiatric disorders (including schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder). Thus, techniques that confer control of NAcc activity might inspire new therapeutic interventions. By providing second-to-second temporal resolution of activity in small subcortical regions, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can resolve online changes in NAcc activity, which can then be presented as "neurofeedback." In an fMRI-based neurofeedback experiment designed to elicit NAcc activity, we found that subjects could increase their own NAcc activity, and that display of neurofeedback significantly enhanced their ability to do so. Subjects were not as capable of decreasing their NAcc activity, however, and enhanced control did not persist after subsequent removal of neurofeedback. Further analyses suggested that individuals who recruited positive aroused affect were better able to increase NAcc activity in response to neurofeedback, and that NAcc neurofeedback also elicited functionally correlated activity in the medial prefrontal cortex. Together, these findings suggest that humans can modulate their own NAcc activity and that fMRI-based neurofeedback may augment their efforts. The observed association between positive arousal and effective NAcc control further supports an anticipatory affect account of NAcc function.

  12. Optical control of antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velema, Willem A.; van der Berg, Jan Pieter; Hansen, Mickel J.; Szymanski, Wiktor; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial resistance is a major problem in the modern world, stemming in part from the build-up of antibiotics in the environment. Novel molecular approaches that enable an externally triggered increase in antibiotic activity with high spatiotemporal resolution and auto-inactivation are highly desirable. Here we report a responsive, broad-spectrum, antibacterial agent that can be temporally activated with light, whereupon it auto-inactivates on the scale of hours. The use of such a ‘smart’ antibiotic might prevent the build-up of active antimicrobial material in the environment. Reversible optical control over active drug concentration enables us to obtain pharmacodynamic information. Precisely localized control of activity is achieved, allowing the growth of bacteria to be confined to defined patterns, which has potential for the development of treatments that avoid interference with the endogenous microbial population in other parts of the organism.

  13. Monitoring by Control Technique - Wet Scrubber For Gaseous Control

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page is about Wet Scrubber For Gaseous controls used to reduce pollutant emissions.

  14. Demonstration of Active Combustion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovett, Jeffrey A.; Teerlinck, Karen A.; Cohen, Jeffrey M.

    2008-01-01

    The primary objective of this effort was to demonstrate active control of combustion instabilities in a direct-injection gas turbine combustor that accurately simulates engine operating conditions and reproduces an engine-type instability. This report documents the second phase of a two-phase effort. The first phase involved the analysis of an instability observed in a developmental aeroengine and the design of a single-nozzle test rig to replicate that phenomenon. This was successfully completed in 2001 and is documented in the Phase I report. This second phase was directed toward demonstration of active control strategies to mitigate this instability and thereby demonstrate the viability of active control for aircraft engine combustors. This involved development of high-speed actuator technology, testing and analysis of how the actuation system was integrated with the combustion system, control algorithm development, and demonstration testing in the single-nozzle test rig. A 30 percent reduction in the amplitude of the high-frequency (570 Hz) instability was achieved using actuation systems and control algorithms developed within this effort. Even larger reductions were shown with a low-frequency (270 Hz) instability. This represents a unique achievement in the development and practical demonstration of active combustion control systems for gas turbine applications.

  15. Active control of electric potential of spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, R.

    1977-01-01

    Techniques are discussed for controlling the potential of a spacecraft by means of devices which release appropriate charged particles from the spacecraft to the environment. Attention is given to electron emitters, ion emitters, a basic electron emitter arrangement, techniques for sensing electric field or potential, and flight experiments on active potential control. It is recommended to avoid differential charging on spacecraft surfaces because it can severely affect the efficacy of emitters. Discharging the frame of a spacecraft with dielectric surfaces involves the risk of stressing the dielectric material excessively. The spacecraft should, therefore, be provided with grounded conductive surfaces. It is pointed out that particles released by control systems can return to the spacecraft.

  16. Fractional active disturbance rejection control.

    PubMed

    Li, Dazi; Ding, Pan; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-01

    A fractional active disturbance rejection control (FADRC) scheme is proposed to improve the performance of commensurate linear fractional order systems (FOS) and the robust analysis shows that the controller is also applicable to incommensurate linear FOS control. In FADRC, the traditional extended states observer (ESO) is generalized to a fractional order extended states observer (FESO) by using the fractional calculus, and the tracking differentiator plus nonlinear state error feedback are replaced by a fractional proportional-derivative controller. To simplify controller tuning, the linear bandwidth-parameterization method has been adopted. The impacts of the observer bandwidth ωo and controller bandwidth ωc on system performance are then analyzed. Finally, the FADRC stability and frequency-domain characteristics for linear single-input single-output FOS are analyzed. Simulation results by FADRC and ADRC on typical FOS are compared to demonstrate the superiority and effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  17. Optimal and suboptimal control technique for aircraft spin recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    An analytic investigation has been made of procedures for effecting recovery from equilibrium spin conditions for three assumed aircraft configurations. Three approaches which utilize conventional aerodynamic controls are investigated. Included are a constant control recovery mode, optimal recoveries, and a suboptimal control logic patterned after optimal recovery results. The optimal and suboptimal techniques are shown to yield a significant improvement in recovery performance over that attained by using a constant control recovery procedure.

  18. Active Control of Stationary Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nino, Giovanni; Breidenthal, Robert; Bhide, Aditi; Sridhar, Aditya

    2016-11-01

    A system for active stationary vortex control is presented. The system uses a combination of plasma actuators, pressure sensors and electrical circuits deposited on aerodynamic surfaces using printing electronics methods. Once the pressure sensors sense a change on the intensity or on the position of the stationary vortices, its associated controller activates a set of plasma actuator to return the vortices to their original or intended positions. The forces produced by the actuators act on the secondary flow in the transverse plane, where velocities are much less than in the streamwise direction. As a demonstration case, the active vortex control system is mounted on a flat plate under low speed wind tunnel testing. Here, a set of vortex generators are used to generate the stationary vortices and the plasma actuators are used to move them. Preliminary results from the experiments are presented and compared with theoretical values. Thanks to the USAF AFOSR STTR support under contract # FA9550-15-C-0007.

  19. Opportunities to Create Active Learning Techniques in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camacho, Danielle J.; Legare, Jill M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to contribute to the growing body of research that focuses on active learning techniques. Active learning techniques require students to consider a given set of information, analyze, process, and prepare to restate what has been learned--all strategies are confirmed to improve higher order thinking skills. Active…

  20. Flow cytometric allergy diagnosis: basophil activation techniques.

    PubMed

    Bridts, Chris H; Sabato, Vito; Mertens, Christel; Hagendorens, Margo M; De Clerck, Luc S; Ebo, Didier G

    2014-01-01

    The basis of flow cytometric allergy diagnosis is quantification of changes in expression of basophilic surface membrane markers (Ebo et al., Clin Exp Allergy 34: 332-339, 2004). Upon encountering specific allergens recognized by surface receptor FcεRI-bound IgE, basophils not only secrete and generate quantifiable bioactive mediators but also up-regulate the expression of different markers (e.g., CD63, CD203c) which can be detected by multicolor flow cytometry using specific monoclonal antibodies (Ebo et al., Cytometry B Clin Cytom 74: 201-210, 2008). Here, we describe two flow cytometry-based protocols which allow detection of surface marker activation (Method 1) and changes in intragranular histamine (Method 2), both reflecting different facets of basophil activation.

  1. Technique for surface oxidation of activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Sircar, S.; Golden, T.C.

    1987-10-27

    A method of activating a carbon adsorbent is described, which comprises oxidizing the surface of the carbon adsorbent with a mild oxidizing acid in the presence of a metal oxidation catalyst at an elevated temperature and boiling the mixture of the carbon adsorbent, mild oxidizing acid and metal oxidation catalyst to dryness. Then rinse the surface oxidizing carbon adsorbent with water; and dry the rinsed surface oxidized carbon adsorbent. In a process for the removal of water or carbon dioxide from a gas stream containing water or carbon dioxide of the type wherein the gas stream containing water or carbon dioxide is contacted with a solid phase adsorbent under pressure-swing adsorption or thermal-swing adsorption processing conditions, the improvement is described comprising utilizing an adsorbent produced by the activation of a carbon adsorbent. The activation comprises oxidizing the surface of the carbon adsorbent with a mold oxidizing acid in the presence of a metal oxidation catalyst at an elevated temperature and boiling the mixture of the carbon adsorbent, mild oxidizing acid and metal oxidation catalyst to dryness. Then rinse the surface oxidized carbon adsorbent with water; and dry the rinsed surface oxidized carbon adsorbent.

  2. Extended active disturbance rejection controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang (Inventor); Tian, Gang (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Multiple designs, systems, methods and processes for controlling a system or plant using an extended active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based controller are presented. The extended ADRC controller accepts sensor information from the plant. The sensor information is used in conjunction with an extended state observer in combination with a predictor that estimates and predicts the current state of the plant and a co-joined estimate of the system disturbances and system dynamics. The extended state observer estimates and predictions are used in conjunction with a control law that generates an input to the system based in part on the extended state observer estimates and predictions as well as a desired trajectory for the plant to follow.

  3. Extended Active Disturbance Rejection Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang (Inventor); Tian, Gang (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Multiple designs, systems, methods and processes for controlling a system or plant using an extended active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based controller are presented. The extended ADRC controller accepts sensor information from the plant. The sensor information is used in conjunction with an extended state observer in combination with a predictor that estimates and predicts the current state of the plant and a co-joined estimate of the system disturbances and system dynamics. The extended state observer estimates and predictions are used in conjunction with a control law that generates an input to the system based in part on the extended state observer estimates and predictions as well as a desired trajectory for the plant to follow.

  4. Extended Active Disturbance Rejection Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang (Inventor); Tian, Gang (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Multiple designs, systems, methods and processes for controlling a system or plant using an extended active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based controller are presented. The extended ADRC controller accepts sensor information from the plant. The sensor information is used in conjunction with an extended state observer in combination with a predictor that estimates and predicts the current state of the plant and a co-joined estimate of the system disturbances and system dynamics. The extended state observer estimates and predictions are used in conjunction with a control law that generates an input to the system based in part on the extended state observer estimates and predictions as well as a desired trajectory for the plant to follow.

  5. Dual control active superconductive devices

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Beyer, James B.; Nordman, James E.; Hohenwarter, Gert K. G.

    1993-07-20

    A superconducting active device has dual control inputs and is constructed such that the output of the device is effectively a linear mix of the two input signals. The device is formed of a film of superconducting material on a substrate and has two main conduction channels, each of which includes a weak link region. A first control line extends adjacent to the weak link region in the first channel and a second control line extends adjacent to the weak link region in the second channel. The current flowing from the first channel flows through an internal control line which is also adjacent to the weak link region of the second channel. The weak link regions comprise small links of superconductor, separated by voids, through which the current flows in each channel. Current passed through the control lines causes magnetic flux vortices which propagate across the weak link regions and control the resistance of these regions. The output of the device taken across the input to the main channels and the output of the second main channel and the internal control line will constitute essentially a linear mix of the two input signals imposed on the two control lines. The device is especially suited to microwave applications since it has very low input capacitance, and is well suited to being formed of high temperature superconducting materials since all of the structures may be formed coplanar with one another on a substrate.

  6. Engine control techniques to account for fuel effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Shankar; Frazier, Timothy R.; Stanton, Donald W.; Xu, Yi; Bunting, Bruce G.; Wolf, Leslie R.

    2014-08-26

    A technique for engine control to account for fuel effects including providing an internal combustion engine and a controller to regulate operation thereof, the engine being operable to combust a fuel to produce an exhaust gas; establishing a plurality of fuel property inputs; establishing a plurality of engine performance inputs; generating engine control information as a function of the fuel property inputs and the engine performance inputs; and accessing the engine control information with the controller to regulate at least one engine operating parameter.

  7. Novel Active Combustion Control Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caspermeyer, Matt

    2014-01-01

    This project presents an innovative solution for active combustion control. Relative to the state of the art, this concept provides frequency modulation (greater than 1,000 Hz) in combination with high-amplitude modulation (in excess of 30 percent flow) and can be adapted to a large range of fuel injector sizes. Existing valves often have low flow modulation strength. To achieve higher flow modulation requires excessively large valves or too much electrical power to be practical. This active combustion control valve (ACCV) has high-frequency and -amplitude modulation, consumes low electrical power, is closely coupled with the fuel injector for modulation strength, and is practical in size and weight. By mitigating combustion instabilities at higher frequencies than have been previously achieved (approximately 1,000 Hz), this new technology enables gas turbines to run at operating points that produce lower emissions and higher performance.

  8. Active controls for ride smoothing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, D. W.; Thompson, G. O.

    1976-01-01

    Active controls technology offers great promise for significantly smoothing the ride, and thus improving public and air carrier acceptance, of certain types of transport aircraft. Recent findings which support this promise are presented in the following three pertinent areas: (1) Ride quality versus degree of traveler satisfaction; (2) significant findings from a feasibility study of a ride smoothing system; and (3) potential ride problems identified for several advanced transport concepts.

  9. Optogenetic control of epileptiform activity

    PubMed Central

    Tønnesen, Jan; Sørensen, Andreas T.; Deisseroth, Karl; Lundberg, Cecilia; Kokaia, Merab

    2009-01-01

    The optogenetic approach to gain control over neuronal excitability both in vitro and in vivo has emerged as a fascinating scientific tool to explore neuronal networks, but it also opens possibilities for developing novel treatment strategies for neurologic conditions. We have explored whether such an optogenetic approach using the light-driven halorhodopsin chloride pump from Natronomonas pharaonis (NpHR), modified for mammalian CNS expression to hyperpolarize central neurons, may inhibit excessive hyperexcitability and epileptiform activity. We show that a lentiviral vector containing the NpHR gene under the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα promoter transduces principal cells of the hippocampus and cortex and hyperpolarizes these cells, preventing generation of action potentials and epileptiform activity during optical stimulation. This study proves a principle, that selective hyperpolarization of principal cortical neurons by NpHR is sufficient to curtail paroxysmal activity in transduced neurons and can inhibit stimulation train-induced bursting in hippocampal organotypic slice cultures, which represents a model tissue of pharmacoresistant epilepsy. This study demonstrates that the optogenetic approach may prove useful for controlling epileptiform activity and opens a future perspective to develop it into a strategy to treat epilepsy. PMID:19581573

  10. Active and passive techniques for tiltrotor aeroelastic stability augmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hathaway, Eric L.

    Tiltrotors are susceptible to whirl flutter, an aeroelastic instability characterized by a coupling of rotor-generated aerodynamic forces and elastic wing modes in high speed airplane-mode flight. The conventional approach to ensuring adequate whirl flutter stability will not scale easily to larger tiltrotor designs. This study constitutes an investigation of several alternatives for improving tiltrotor aerolastic stability. A whirl flutter stability analysis is developed that does not rely on more complex models to determine the variations in crucial input parameters with flight condition. Variation of blade flap and lag frequency, and pitch-flap, pitch-lag, and flap-lag couplings, are calculated from physical parameters, such as blade structural flap and lag stiffness distribution (inboard or outboard of pitch bearing), collective pitch, and precone. The analysis is used to perform a study of the influence of various design parameters on whirl flutter stability. While previous studies have investigated the individual influence of various design parameters, the present investigation uses formal optimization techniques to determine a unique combination of parameters that maximizes whirl flutter stability. The optimal designs require only modest changes in the key rotor and wing design parameters to significantly increase flutter speed. When constraints on design parameters are relaxed, optimized configurations are obtained that allow large values of kinematic pitch-flap (delta3) coupling without degrading aeroelastic stability. Larger values of delta3 may be desirable for advanced tiltrotor configurations. An investigation of active control of wing flaperons for stability augmentation is also conducted. Both stiff- and soft-inplane tiltrotor configurations are examined. Control systems that increase flutter speed and wing mode sub-critical damping are designed while observing realistic limits on flaperon deflection. The flaperon is shown to be particularly

  11. Lightweight active controlled primary mirror technology demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzinghi, P.; Bratina, V.; Ferruzzi, D.; Gambicorti, L.; Simonetti, F.; Zuccaro Marchi, A.; Salinari, P.; Lisi, F.; Olivier, M.; Bursi, A.; Gallieni, D.; Biasi, R.; Pereira, J.

    2007-10-01

    This paper describes the design, manufacturing and test of a ground demonstrator of an innovative technology able to realize lightweight active controlled space-borne telescope mirror. This analysis is particularly devoted to applications for a large aperture space telescope for advanced LIDAR, but it can be used for any lightweight mirror. For a space-borne telescope the mirror weight is a fundamental parameter to be minimized (less than 15 Kg/m2), while maximizing the optical performances (optical quality better than λ/3). In order to guarantee these results, the best selected solution is a thin glass primary mirror coupled to a stiff CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic) panel with a surface active control system. A preliminary design of this lightweight structure highlighted the critical areas that were deeply analyzed by the ground demonstrator: the 1 mm thick mirror survivability on launch and the actuator functional performances with low power consumption. To preserve the mirror glass the Electrostatic Locking technique was developed and is here described. The active optics technique, already widely used for ground based telescopes, consists of a metrology system (wave front sensor, WFS), a control algorithm and a system of actuators to slightly deform the primary mirror and/or displace the secondary, in a closed-loop control system that applies the computed corrections to the mirror's optical errors via actuators. These actuators types are properly designed and tested in order to guarantee satisfactory performances in terms of stroke, force and power consumption. The realized and tested ground demonstrator is a square CFRP structure with a flat mirror on the upper face and an active actuator beneath it. The test campaign demonstrated the technology feasibility and robustness, supporting the next step toward the large and flat surface with several actuators.

  12. A control theory approach to clock steering techniques.

    PubMed

    Farina, Marcello; Galleani, Lorenzo; Tavella, Patrizia; Bittanti, Sergio

    2010-10-01

    Several clock and time scale steering methods have been developed according to different viewpoints by various time laboratories. By resorting to control theory ideas, we propose a common theoretical framework encompassing these methods. A comparison of the most common steering methodologies, namely, the classical steering approach, the GPS bang-bang method, and the linear quadratic Gaussian technique, is carried out. We believe that the use of control theory methods can potentially lead to a better understanding of clock steering algorithms.

  13. Study of synthesis techniques for insensitive aircraft control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, C. A.; Pope, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    Insensitive flight control system design criteria was defined in terms of maximizing performance (handling qualities, RMS gust response, transient response, stability margins) over a defined parameter range. Wing load alleviation for the C-5A was chosen as a design problem. The C-5A model was a 79-state, two-control structure with uncertainties assumed to exist in dynamic pressure, structural damping and frequency, and the stability derivative, M sub w. Five new techniques (mismatch estimation, uncertainty weighting, finite dimensional inverse, maximum difficulty, dual Lyapunov) were developed. Six existing techniques (additive noise, minimax, multiplant, sensitivity vector augmentation, state dependent noise, residualization) and the mismatch estimation and uncertainty weighting techniques were synthesized and evaluated on the design example. Evaluation and comparison of these six techniques indicated that the minimax and the uncertainty weighting techniques were superior to the other six, and of these two, uncertainty weighting has lower computational requirements. Techniques based on the three remaining new concepts appear promising and are recommended for further research.

  14. Weight Control Techniques among Female Adolescents: A Comparative Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, LeAdelle; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Surveyed secondary school girls in 1984 (n=442), 1989 (n=395), and 1992 (n=367) to assess changes in use of weight reduction/control techniques. Found significant decrease in dieting, fasting, and use of appetite suppressants among high school students. Middle school students reported significant increase in fasting and no change in medication use…

  15. Optogenetic feedback control of neural activity

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Jonathan P; Fong, Ming-fai; Millard, Daniel C; Whitmire, Clarissa J; Stanley, Garrett B; Potter, Steve M

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetic techniques enable precise excitation and inhibition of firing in specified neuronal populations and artifact-free recording of firing activity. Several studies have suggested that optical stimulation provides the precision and dynamic range requisite for closed-loop neuronal control, but no approach yet permits feedback control of neuronal firing. Here we present the ‘optoclamp’, a feedback control technology that provides continuous, real-time adjustments of bidirectional optical stimulation in order to lock spiking activity at specified targets over timescales ranging from seconds to days. We demonstrate how this system can be used to decouple neuronal firing levels from ongoing changes in network excitability due to multi-hour periods of glutamatergic or GABAergic neurotransmission blockade in vitro as well as impinging vibrissal sensory drive in vivo. This technology enables continuous, precise optical control of firing in neuronal populations in order to disentangle causally related variables of circuit activation in a physiologically and ethologically relevant manner. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07192.001 PMID:26140329

  16. Robust control of seismic structures using independent modal-space techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Kerry S.; Rao, Vittal S.; Cheng, Franklin Y.

    1996-04-01

    Active robust structural controls have been utilized in the control of aerospace structures for many years but they have only been recently investigated in the context of control for civil engineering structures. The results of an investigation of the utilization of these methods on building-like structures are presented in this paper. The closed-loop systems take into account the limited available actuation force and are inherently insensitive to parameter variations and modeling uncertainties. Independent modal-space control (IMSC) is a structural control technique where the multi-input-multi-output configuration-space system is transformed into a set of uncoupled single-input-single-output modal-space systems. A modal controller is designed for each modal-space system and the set of modal controllers is transformed back into configuration-space. By combining IMSC with robust control techniques such as LQG/LTR or H(infinity ), a robust structural control design technique is proposed in this paper. Robust IMSC techniques are employed for control of seismic structures where a small number of actuators are used to control the first few modes of the structure. We have designed and implemented robust IMSC controllers on an experimental building-like structure. This structure utilizes torque motor driven active tendons as actuators and rests on a shaking table which is capable of providing one dimensional base excitation similar to earthquake ground motion. A three input-three output model of the structure, including the torque motor actuators, was developed using experimental data. The experimental structural identification technique, based on standard modal analysis methods, provides the mathematical model that describes the behavior of the structure. An H(infinity ) based IMSC controller has been designed and implemented on this structure using a dSPACE control development system. The results show that the performance of the system is satisfactory in the presence of

  17. Recent advances in active control of aircraft cabin noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, Gopal; Fuller, Christopher

    2002-11-01

    Active noise control techniques can provide significant reductions in aircraft interior noise levels without the structural modifications or weight penalties usually associated with passive techniques, particularly for low frequency noise. Our main objective in this presentation is to give a review of active control methods and their applications to aircraft cabin noise reduction with an emphasis on recent advances and challenges facing the noise control engineer in the practical application of these techniques. The active noise control method using secondary acoustic sources, e.g., loudspeakers, as control sources for tonal noise reduction is first discussed with results from an active noise control flight test demonstration. An innovative approach of applying control forces directly to the fuselage structure using piezoelectric actuators, known as active structural acoustic control (ASAC), to control cabin noise is then presented. Experimental results from laboratory ASAC tests conducted on a full-scale fuselage and from flight tests on a helicopter will be discussed. Finally, a hybrid active/passive noise control approach for achieving significant broadband noise reduction will be discussed. Experimental results of control of broadband noise transmission through an aircraft structure will be presented.

  18. Comparative research on activation technique for GaAs photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang; Qian, Yunsheng; Chang, Benkang; Chen, Xinlong; Yang, Rui

    2012-03-01

    The properties of GaAs photocathodes mainly depend on the material design and activation technique. In early researches, high-low temperature two-step activation has been proved to get more quantum efficiency than high-temperature single-step activation. But the variations of surface barriers for two activation techniques have not been well studied, thus the best activation temperature, best Cs-O ratio and best activation time for two-step activation technique have not been well found. Because the surface photovoltage spectroscopy (SPS) before activation is only in connection with the body parameters for GaAs photocathode such as electron diffusion length and the spectral response current (SRC) after activation is in connection with not only body parameters but also surface barriers, thus the surface escape probability (SEP) can be well fitted through the comparative research between SPS before activation and SEP after activation. Through deduction for the tunneling process of surface barriers by Schrödinger equation, the width and height for surface barrier I and II can be well fitted through the curves of SEP. The fitting results were well proved and analyzed by quantitative analysis of angle-dependent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ADXPS) which can also study the surface chemical compositions, atomic concentration percentage and layer thickness for GaAs photocathodes. This comparative research method for fitting parameters of surface barriers through SPS before activation and SRC after activation shows a better real-time in system method for the researches of activation techniques.

  19. Incorporating Active Learning Techniques into a Genetics Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, W. Theodore; Jabot, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    We revised a sophomore-level genetics class to more actively engage the students in their learning. The students worked in groups on quizzes using the Immediate Feedback Assessment Technique (IF-AT) and active-learning projects. The IF-AT quizzes allowed students to discuss key concepts in small groups and learn the correct answers in class. The…

  20. Synchronization of two different systems by using generalized active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Ming-Chung; Hung, Yao-Chen

    2002-09-01

    We have already generalized the techniques from active control theory, and applied them to synchronize two different systems. In this Letter, we demonstrate these techniques by period-system, Lorenz and Rossler systems. Moreover, the effect of external noise is also included in our discussion.

  1. Reinforcement learning output feedback NN control using deterministic learning technique.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Yang, Chenguang; Shi, Zhongke

    2014-03-01

    In this brief, a novel adaptive-critic-based neural network (NN) controller is investigated for nonlinear pure-feedback systems. The controller design is based on the transformed predictor form, and the actor-critic NN control architecture includes two NNs, whereas the critic NN is used to approximate the strategic utility function, and the action NN is employed to minimize both the strategic utility function and the tracking error. A deterministic learning technique has been employed to guarantee that the partial persistent excitation condition of internal states is satisfied during tracking control to a periodic reference orbit. The uniformly ultimate boundedness of closed-loop signals is shown via Lyapunov stability analysis. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control.

  2. H(sub infinity) techniques for spacecraft control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frapard, B.; Leballois, S.; Champetier, C.

    1993-09-01

    The high performance Attitude and Orbit Control Systems (AOCS) and high accuracy Instrument Pointing Systems design require more and more control bandwidth: dynamic couplings can be no more neglected and control laws tend to be highly sensitive to the unmodeled dynamics. Multivariable systems analysis and optimal control synthesis tools, with robustness bounds/robustness constraints with respect to the unmodeled dynamics, are a major area of research for space applications. Among others, the large field of techniques provided by H(sub infinity) theory appears to be very promising. Two typical applications are presented in this paper, one concerning high accuracy pointing for observation satellites, with a particular interest in the SPOT Mark II platform, the other addressing the Drag Free Control problem for missions such as Aristoteles, STEP and Gravity Probe B.

  3. Adaptive resonator control techniques for high-power lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, R.H.; Spinhirne, J.M.; Anafi, D.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental results and interpretations for correcting tilt and astigmatism aberrations using intracavity adaptive optics versus extracavity adaptive optics are presented, along with control algorithm and resonator design considerations when utilizing a multidither COAT control system for astigmatism and tilt correction. It is shown that in a high-power device, PIB (Power-in-the-Bucket) optimization, with the possible added requirement of extracavity beam clean-up to achieve good beam quality, would be a more desirable control algorithm than BQ (beam quality) optimization. Zonal multidither hill-climbing servo COAT techniques applied to tilt correction fail to achieve good correction for large tilt amplitudes when the control loop is closed after tilt is introduced. Therefore, it is suggested that a separate tilt sensor be used to provide error signal for correction of tilt and let the multidither system COAT correct for higher order aberrations

  4. Control of sound radiation with active/adaptive structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. R.; Rogers, C. A.; Robertshaw, H. H.

    1992-01-01

    Recent research is discussed in the area of active structural acoustic control with active/adaptive structures. Progress in the areas of structural acoustics, actuators, sensors, and control approaches is presented. Considerable effort has been given to the interaction of these areas with each other due to the coupled nature of the problem. A discussion is presented on actuators bonded to or embedded in the structure itself. The actuators discussed are piezoceramic actuators and shape memory alloy actuators. The sensors discussed are optical fiber sensors, Nitinol fiber sensors, piezoceramics, and polyvinylidene fluoride sensors. The active control techniques considered are state feedback control techniques and least mean square adaptive algorithms. Results presented show that significant progress has been made towards controlling structurally radiated noise by active/adaptive means applied directly to the structure.

  5. UML activity diagram swimlanes in logic controller design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grobelny, Michał; Grobelna, Iwona

    2015-12-01

    Logic controller behavior can be specified using various techniques, including UML activity diagrams and control Petri nets. Each technique has its advantages and disadvantages. Application of both specification types in one project allows to take benefits from both of them. Additional elements of UML models make it possible to divide a specification into some parts, considered from other point of view (logic controller, user or system). The paper introduces an idea to use UML activity diagrams with swimlanes to increase the understandability of design models.

  6. First fusion proton measurements in TEXTOR plasmas using activation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Bonheure, G.; Wassenhove, G. Van; Mlynar, J.; Hult, M.; Gonzalez de Orduna, R.; Lutter, G.; Vermaercke, P.; Huber, A.; Schweer, B.; Esser, G.; Biel, W.

    2012-10-15

    MeV particle loss measurements from fusion plasmas, in particular alpha particles, remain difficult in large fusion devices and further R and D is needed for ITER. This paper describes the first attempt to measure 3 MeV escaping fusion protons emitted from TEXTOR tokamak plasmas using activation technique. This technique was successfully demonstrated, initially, in 2006 on the JET tokamak. An ion camera equipped with a collimator and several types of activation detectors was installed inside the TEXTOR vacuum vessel to perform these measurements. After irradiation, the detectors were analyzed using ultra low level gamma-ray spectrometry at the HADES underground laboratory. 3 MeV escaping fusion protons were detected in larger number -{approx}6 times more - compared to earlier measurements using this technique on JET. Another major progress was the reduction of the cooling time by a factor of 50, which made possible to detect radionuclides with half-life of less than 90 min.

  7. First fusion proton measurements in TEXTOR plasmas using activation technique.

    PubMed

    Bonheure, G; Mlynar, J; Van Wassenhove, G; Hult, M; González de Orduña, R; Lutter, G; Vermaercke, P; Huber, A; Schweer, B; Esser, G; Biel, W

    2012-10-01

    MeV particle loss measurements from fusion plasmas, in particular alpha particles, remain difficult in large fusion devices and further R&D is needed for ITER. This paper describes the first attempt to measure 3 MeV escaping fusion protons emitted from TEXTOR tokamak plasmas using activation technique. This technique was successfully demonstrated, initially, in 2006 on the JET tokamak. An ion camera equipped with a collimator and several types of activation detectors was installed inside the TEXTOR vacuum vessel to perform these measurements. After irradiation, the detectors were analyzed using ultra low level gamma-ray spectrometry at the HADES underground laboratory. 3 MeV escaping fusion protons were detected in larger number -~6 times more--compared to earlier measurements using this technique on JET. Another major progress was the reduction of the cooling time by a factor of 50, which made possible to detect radionuclides with half-life of less than 90 min.

  8. Innovative Perceptual Motor Activities: Programing Techniques That Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorrell, Howard M.

    1978-01-01

    A circuit approach and station techniques are used to depict perceptual motor games for handicapped and nonhandicapped children. Twenty activities are described in terms of objectives, materials, and procedures, and their focus on visual tracking, visual discrimination and copying of forms, spatial body perception, fine motor coordination, tactile…

  9. Reinforcement learning techniques for controlling resources in power networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowli, Anupama Sunil

    As power grids transition towards increased reliance on renewable generation, energy storage and demand response resources, an effective control architecture is required to harness the full functionalities of these resources. There is a critical need for control techniques that recognize the unique characteristics of the different resources and exploit the flexibility afforded by them to provide ancillary services to the grid. The work presented in this dissertation addresses these needs. Specifically, new algorithms are proposed, which allow control synthesis in settings wherein the precise distribution of the uncertainty and its temporal statistics are not known. These algorithms are based on recent developments in Markov decision theory, approximate dynamic programming and reinforcement learning. They impose minimal assumptions on the system model and allow the control to be "learned" based on the actual dynamics of the system. Furthermore, they can accommodate complex constraints such as capacity and ramping limits on generation resources, state-of-charge constraints on storage resources, comfort-related limitations on demand response resources and power flow limits on transmission lines. Numerical studies demonstrating applications of these algorithms to practical control problems in power systems are discussed. Results demonstrate how the proposed control algorithms can be used to improve the performance and reduce the computational complexity of the economic dispatch mechanism in a power network. We argue that the proposed algorithms are eminently suitable to develop operational decision-making tools for large power grids with many resources and many sources of uncertainty.

  10. Active control of combustion instability

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, W.; Poinsot, T.; Candel, S.

    1987-12-01

    The principle of 'antisound' is used to construct a method for the suppression of combustion instabilities. This active instability control (AIC) method uses external acoustic excitation by a loudspeaker to suppress the oscillations of a flame. The excitation signal is provided by a microphone located upstream of the flame. This signal is filtered, processed, amplified, and sent to the loudspeaker. The AIC method is validated on a laboratory combustor. It allows the suppression of all unstable modes of the burner for any operating ratio. The influence of the microphone and loudspeaker locations on the performance of the AIC system is described. For a given configuration, domains of stability, i.e., domains where the AIC system parameters provide suppression of the oscillation, are investigated. Measurements of the electric input of the loudspeaker show that the energy consumption of the AIC system is almost negligible and suggest that this method could be used for industrial combustor stabilization. Finally, a simple model describing the effects of the AIC system is developed and its results compared to the experiment.

  11. Active thermal control system evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petete, Patricia A.; Ames, Brian E.

    1991-01-01

    The 'restructured' baseline of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) has eliminated many of the growth options for the Active Thermal Control System (ATCS). Modular addition of baseline technology to increase heat rejection will be extremely difficult. The system design and the available real estate no longer accommodate this type of growth. As the station matures during its thirty years of operation, a demand of up to 165 kW of heat rejection can be expected. The baseline configuration will be able to provide 82.5 kW at Eight Manned Crew Capability (EMCC). The growth paths necessary to reach 165 kW have been identified. Doubling the heat rejection capability of SSF will require either the modification of existing radiator wings or the attachment of growth structure to the baseline truss for growth radiator wing placement. Radiator performance can be improved by enlarging the surface area or by boosting the operating temperature with a heat pump. The optimal solution will require both modifications. The addition of growth structure would permit the addition of a parallel ATCS using baseline technology. This growth system would simplify integration. The feasibility of incorporating these growth options to improve the heat rejection capacity of SSF is under evaluation.

  12. Volcanic Monitoring Techniques Applied to Controlled Fragmentation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueppers, U.; Alatorre-Ibarguengoitia, M. A.; Hort, M. K.; Kremers, S.; Meier, K.; Scharff, L.; Scheu, B.; Taddeucci, J.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2010-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions are an inevitable natural threat. The range of eruptive styles is large and short term fluctuations of explosivity or vent position pose a large risk that is not necessarily confined to the immediate vicinity of a volcano. Explosive eruptions rather may also affect aviation, infrastructure and climate, regionally as well as globally. Multiparameter monitoring networks are deployed on many active volcanoes to record signs of magmatic processes and help elucidate the secrets of volcanic phenomena. However, our mechanistic understanding of many processes hiding in recorded signals is still poor. As a direct consequence, a solid interpretation of the state of a volcano is still a challenge. In an attempt to bridge this gap, we combined volcanic monitoring and experimental volcanology. We performed 15 well-monitored, field-based, experiments and fragmented natural rock samples from Colima volcano (Mexico) by rapid decompression. We used cylindrical samples of 60 mm height and 25 mm and 60 mm diameter, respectively, and 25 and 35 vol.% open porosity. The applied pressure range was from 4 to 18 MPa. Using different experimental set-ups, the pressurised volume above the samples ranged from 60 - 170 cm3. The experiments were performed at ambient conditions and at controlled sample porosity and size, confinement geometry, and applied pressure. The experiments have been thoroughly monitored with 1) Doppler Radar (DR), 2) high-speed and high-definition cameras, 3) acoustic and infrasound sensors, 4) pressure transducers, and 5) electrically conducting wires. Our aim was to check for common results achieved by the different approaches and, if so, calibrate state-of-the-art monitoring tools. We present how the velocity of the ejected pyroclasts was measured by and evaluated for the different approaches and how it was affected by the experimental conditions and sample characteristics. We show that all deployed instruments successfully measured the pyroclast

  13. Positron plasma control techniques for the production of cold antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Funakoshi, R.; Hayano, R. S.; Amoretti, M.; Macri, M.; Testera, G.; Variola, A.; Bonomi, G.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Madsen, N.; Canali, C.; Carraro, C.; Lagomarsino, V.; Manuzio, G.; Cesar, C. L.; Charlton, M.; Joergensen, L. V.; Mitchard, D.; Werf, D. P. van der; Doser, M.

    2007-07-15

    An observation of a clear dependence of antihydrogen production on positron plasma shapes is reported. For this purpose a plasma control method has been developed combining the plasma rotating-wall technique with a mode diagnostic system. With the help of real-time and nondestructive observations, the rotating-wall parameters have been optimized. The positron plasma can be manipulated into a wide range of shapes (aspect ratio 6.5{<=}{alpha} < or approx. 80) and densities (1.5x10{sup 8}{<=}n < or approx. 7x10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}) within a short duration (25 s) compatible with the ATHENA antihydrogen production cycle.

  14. Practical applications of activation analysis and other nuclear techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, W S

    1982-01-01

    Neeutron activation analysis (NAA) is a versatile, sensitive multielement, usually nondestructive analytical technique used to determine elemental concentrations in a variety of materials. Samples are irradiated with neutrons in a nuclear reactor, removed, and for the nondestructive technique, the induced radioactivity measured. This measurement of ..gamma.. rays emitted from specific radionuclides makes possible the quantitative determination of elements present. The method is described, advantages and disadvantages listed and a number of examples of its use given. Two other nuclear methods, particle induced x-ray emission and synchrotron produced x-ray fluorescence are also briefly discussed.

  15. DC Microgrids–Part I: A Review of Control Strategies and Stabilization Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Dragicevic, Tomislav; Lu, Xiaonan; Vasquez, Juan; Guerrero, Josep

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a review of control strategies, stability analysis, and stabilization techniques for dc microgrids (MGs). Overall control is systematically classified into local and coordinated control levels according to respective functionalities in each level. As opposed to local control, which relies only on local measurements, some line of communication between units needs to be made available in order to achieve the coordinated control. Depending on the communication method, three basic coordinated control strategies can be distinguished, i.e., decentralized, centralized, and distributed control. Decentralized control can be regarded as an extension of the local control since it is also based exclusively on local measurements. In contrast, centralized and distributed control strategies rely on digital communication technologies. A number of approaches using these three coordinated control strategies to achieve various control objectives are reviewed in this paper. Moreover, properties of dc MG dynamics and stability are discussed. This paper illustrates that tightly regulated point-of-load converters tend to reduce the stability margins of the system since they introduce negative impedances, which can potentially oscillate with lightly damped power supply input filters. It is also demonstrated that how the stability of the whole system is defined by the relationship of the source and load impedances, referred to as the minor loop gain. Several prominent specifications for the minor loop gain are reviewed. Finally, a number of active stabilization techniques are presented.

  16. Control techniques for an automated mixed traffic vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meisenholder, G. W.; Johnston, A. R.

    1977-01-01

    The paper describes an automated mixed traffic vehicle (AMTV), a driverless low-speed tram designed to operate in mixed pedestrian and vehicular traffic. The vehicle is a six-passenger electric tram equipped with sensing and control which permit it to function on existing streets in an automatic mode. The design includes established wire-following techniques for steering and near-IR headway sensors. A 7-mph cruise speed is reduced to 2 mph or a complete stop in response to sensor (or passenger) inputs. The AMTV performance is evaluated by operation on a loop route and by simulation. Some necessary improvements involving sensors, sensor pattern, use of an audible signal, and control lag are discussed. It is suggested that appropriate modifications will eliminate collision incidents.

  17. Space Shuttle stability and control flight test techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    A unique approach for obtaining vehicle aerodynamic characteristics during entry has been developed for the Space Shuttle. This is due to the high cost of Shuttle testing, the need to open constraints for operational flights, and the fact that all flight regimes are flown starting with the first flight. Because of uncertainties associated with predicted aerodynamic coefficients, nine flight conditions have been identified at which control problems could occur. A detailed test plan has been developed for testing at these conditions and is presented. Due to limited testing, precise computer initiated maneuvers are implemented. These maneuvers are designed to optimize the vehicle motion for determining aerodynamic coefficients. Special sensors and atmospheric measurements are required to provide stability and control flight data during an entire entry. The techniques employed in data reduction are proven programs developed and used at NASA/DFRC.

  18. Digital control of high performance aircraft using adaptive estimation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Landingham, H. F.; Moose, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    In this paper, an adaptive signal processing algorithm is joined with gain-scheduling for controlling the dynamics of high performance aircraft. A technique is presented for a reduced-order model (the longitudinal dynamics) of a high performance STOL aircraft. The actual controller views the nonlinear behavior of the aircraft as equivalent to a randomly switching sequence of linear models taken from a preliminary piecewise-linear fit of the system nonlinearities. The adaptive nature of the estimator is necessary to select the proper sequence of linear models along the flight trajectory. Nonlinear behavior is approximated by effective switching of the linear models at random times, with durations reflecting aircraft motion in response to pilot commands.

  19. Overview of Langley activities in active controls research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, I.; Newsom, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    The application of active controls technology to reduce aeroelastic response of aircraft structures offers a potential for significant payoffs in terms of aerodynamic efficiency and weight savings. The activities of the Langley Research Center (laRC) in advancing active controls technology. Activities are categorized into the development of appropriate analysis tools, control law synthesis methodology, and experimental investigations aimed at verifying both analysis and synthesis methodology.

  20. Application of Active Learning Techniques to an Advanced Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knop, R. A.

    2004-05-01

    The New Faculty Workshop provided a wealth of techniques as well as an overriding philosophy for the teaching of undergraduate Physics and Astronomy courses. The focus of the workshop was active learning, summarized in ``Learner-Centered Astronomy Teaching" by Slater & Adams: it's not what you do in class that matters, it's what the students do. Much of the specific focus of the New Faculty Workshop is on teaching the large, introductory Physics classes that many of the faculty present are sure to teach, both algebra-based and calculus-based. Many of these techniques apply directly and with little modification to introductory Astronomy courses. However, little direct attention is given to upper-division undergraduate, or even graduate, courses. In this presentation, I will share my experience in attempting to apply some of the techniques discussed at the New Faculty Workshop to an upper-division course in Galactic Astrophysics at Vanderbilt University during the Spring semester of 2004.

  1. Evolutionary biology and genetic techniques for insect control.

    PubMed

    Leftwich, Philip T; Bolton, Michael; Chapman, Tracey

    2016-01-01

    The requirement to develop new techniques for insect control that minimize negative environmental impacts has never been more pressing. Here we discuss population suppression and population replacement technologies. These include sterile insect technique, genetic elimination methods such as the release of insects carrying a dominant lethal (RIDL), and gene driving mechanisms offered by intracellular bacteria and homing endonucleases. We also review the potential of newer or underutilized methods such as reproductive interference, CRISPR technology, RNA interference (RNAi), and genetic underdominance. We focus on understanding principles and potential effectiveness from the perspective of evolutionary biology. This offers useful insights into mechanisms through which potential problems may be minimized, in much the same way that an understanding of how resistance evolves is key to slowing the spread of antibiotic and insecticide resistance. We conclude that there is much to gain from applying principles from the study of resistance in these other scenarios - specifically, the adoption of combinatorial approaches to minimize the spread of resistance evolution. We conclude by discussing the focused use of GM for insect pest control in the context of modern conservation planning under land-sparing scenarios.

  2. Antimisting kerosene: Base fuel effects, blending and quality control techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yavrouian, A. H.; Ernest, J.; Sarohia, V.

    1984-01-01

    The problems associated with blending of the AMK additive with Jet A, and the base fuel effects on AMK properties are addressed. The results from the evaluation of some of the quality control techniques for AMK are presented. The principal conclusions of this investigation are: significant compositional differences for base fuel (Jet A) within the ASTM specification DI655; higher aromatic content of the base fuel was found to be beneficial for the polymer dissolution at ambient (20 C) temperature; using static mixer technology, the antimisting additive (FM-9) is in-line blended with Jet A, producing AMK which has adequate fire-protection properties 15 to 20 minutes after blending; degradability of freshly blended and equilibrated AMK indicated that maximum degradability is reached after adequate fire protection is obtained; the results of AMK degradability as measured by filter ratio, confirmed previous RAE data that power requirements to decade freshly blended AMK are significantly higher than equilibrated AMK; blending of the additive by using FM-9 concentrate in Jet A produces equilibrated AMK almost instantly; nephelometry offers a simple continuous monitoring capability and is used as a real time quality control device for AMK; and trajectory (jet thurst) and pressure drop tests are useful laboratory techniques for evaluating AMK quality.

  3. Materials and techniques for spacecraft static charge control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amore, L. J.; Eagles, A. E.

    1977-01-01

    An overview of the design, development, fabrication, and testing of transparent conductive coatings and conductive lattices deposited or formed on high resistivity spacecraft dielectric materials to obtain control static charge buildup on spacecraft external surfaces is presented. Fabrication techniques for the deposition of indium/tin oxide coatings and copper grid networks on Kapton and FEP Teflon films and special frit coatings for OSR and solar cell cover glasses are discussed. The techniques include sputtering, photoetching, silkscreening, and mechanical processes. A facility designed and built to simulate the electron plasma at geosynchronous altitudes is described along with test procedures. The results of material characterizations as well as electron irradiation aging effects in this facility for spacecraft polymers treated to control static charge are presented. The data presents results for electron beam energies up to 30 kV and electron current densities of 30 nA/cm squared. Parameters measured include secondary emission, surface leakage, and through the sample currents as a function of primary beam energy and voltage.

  4. A new polarimetric active radar calibrator and calibration technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jianguo; Xu, Xiaojian

    2015-10-01

    Polarimetric active radar calibrator (PARC) is one of the most important calibrators with high radar cross section (RCS) for polarimetry measurement. In this paper, a new double-antenna polarimetric active radar calibrator (DPARC) is proposed, which consists of two rotatable antennas with wideband electromagnetic polarization filters (EMPF) to achieve lower cross-polarization for transmission and reception. With two antennas which are rotatable around the radar line of sight (LOS), the DPARC provides a variety of standard polarimetric scattering matrices (PSM) through the rotation combination of receiving and transmitting polarization, which are useful for polarimatric calibration in different applications. In addition, a technique based on Fourier analysis is proposed for calibration processing. Numerical simulation results are presented to demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed DPARC and processing technique.

  5. A Comparison of Multivariable Control Design Techniques for a Turbofan Engine Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay; Watts, Stephen R.

    1995-01-01

    This paper compares two previously published design procedures for two different multivariable control design techniques for application to a linear engine model of a jet engine. The two multivariable control design techniques compared were the Linear Quadratic Gaussian with Loop Transfer Recovery (LQG/LTR) and the H-Infinity synthesis. The two control design techniques were used with specific previously published design procedures to synthesize controls which would provide equivalent closed loop frequency response for the primary control loops while assuring adequate loop decoupling. The resulting controllers were then reduced in order to minimize the programming and data storage requirements for a typical implementation. The reduced order linear controllers designed by each method were combined with the linear model of an advanced turbofan engine and the system performance was evaluated for the continuous linear system. Included in the performance analysis are the resulting frequency and transient responses as well as actuator usage and rate capability for each design method. The controls were also analyzed for robustness with respect to structured uncertainties in the unmodeled system dynamics. The two controls were then compared for performance capability and hardware implementation issues.

  6. Achievements and tasks for active noise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichy, Jiri

    This short survey attempted to highlight some achievements of the latest active control applications. Except for the active control of a one-dimensional sound field in ducts and active headphones, the applications for active control technology are still being developed. Although the principles of active control are simple, their applications still require substantial research and modeling of the sound fields to find optimal solutions. There is no doubt that active control of sound field triggered extensive research of the fundamental properties of the sound field which goes beyond the textbook simplifications. Also, new hardware, particularly actuators, are under development. As more realism is brought into assessment of applicability of active control, we will see in the future increasing confidence of industry to adopt this new technology.

  7. Microencapsulation: A promising technique for controlled drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Singh, M.N.; Hemant, K.S.Y.; Ram, M.; Shivakumar, H.G.

    2010-01-01

    Microparticles offer various significant advantages as drug delivery systems, including: (i) an effective protection of the encapsulated active agent against (e.g. enzymatic) degradation, (ii) the possibility to accurately control the release rate of the incorporated drug over periods of hours to months, (iii) an easy administration (compared to alternative parenteral controlled release dosage forms, such as macro-sized implants), and (iv) Desired, pre-programmed drug release profiles can be provided which match the therapeutic needs of the patient. This article gives an overview on the general aspects and recent advances in drug-loaded microparticles to improve the efficiency of various medical treatments. An appropriately designed controlled release drug delivery system can be a foot ahead towards solving problems concerning to the targeting of drug to a specific organ or tissue, and controlling the rate of drug delivery to the target site. The development of oral controlled release systems has been a challenge to formulation scientist due to their inability to restrain and localize the system at targeted areas of gastrointestinal tract. Microparticulate drug delivery systems are an interesting and promising option when developing an oral controlled release system. The objective of this paper is to take a closer look at microparticles as drug delivery devices for increasing efficiency of drug delivery, improving the release profile and drug targeting. In order to appreciate the application possibilities of microcapsules in drug delivery, some fundamental aspects are briefly reviewed. PMID:21589795

  8. Tools for active control system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, W. M., Jr.; Tiffany, S. H.; Newsom, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Efficient control law analysis and design tools which properly account for the interaction of flexible structures, unsteady aerodynamics and active controls are developed. Development, application, validation and documentation of efficient multidisciplinary computer programs for analysis and design of active control laws are also discussed.

  9. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, S.; Schmidt, D. K.

    1986-01-01

    The utility of augmenting displays to aid the human operator in controlling high order complex systems is well known. Analytical evaluation of various display designs for a simple k/s sup 2 plant in a compensatory tracking task using an optimal Control Model (OCM) of human behavior is carried out. This analysis reveals that significant improvement in performance should be obtained by skillful integration of key information into the display dynamics. The cooperative control synthesis technique previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing augmented displays. The application of the cooperative control synthesis technique to the design of augmented displays is discussed for the simple k/s sup 2 plant. This technique is intended to provide a systematic approach to design optimally augmented displays tailored for specific tasks.

  10. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, S.; Schmidt, D. K.

    1985-01-01

    The utility of augmenting displays to aid the human operator in controlling high order complex systems is well known. Analytical evaluations of various display designs for a simple k/s-squared plant in a compensatory tracking task using an Optimal Control Model (OCM) of human behavior is carried out. This analysis reveals that significant improvement in performance should be obtained by skillful integration of key information into the display dynamics. The cooperative control synthesis technique previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing augmented displays. The application of the cooperative control synthesis technique to the design of augmented displays is discussed for the simple k/s-squared plant. This technique is intended to provide a systematic approach to design optimally augmented displays tailored for specific tasks.

  11. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, S.; Schmidt, D. K.

    1985-01-01

    A technique is developed that is intended to provide a systematic approach to synthesizing display augmentation for optimal manual control in complex, closed-loop tasks. A cooperative control synthesis technique, previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation for the plant, is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing displays. The technique utilizes an optimal control model of the man in the loop. It is applied to the design of a quickening control law for a display and a simple K/s(2) plant, and then to an F-15 type aircraft in a multi-channel task. Utilizing the closed loop modeling and analysis procedures, the results from the display design algorithm are evaluated and an analytical validation is performed. Experimental validation is recommended for future efforts.

  12. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, Sanjay; Schmidt, David K.

    1987-01-01

    A technique is developed that is intended to provide a systematic approach to synthesizing display augmentation for optimal manual control in complex, closed-loop tasks. A cooperative control synthesis technique, previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation for the plant, is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing displays. The technique utilizes an optimal control model of the man in the loop. It is applied to the design of a quickening control law for a display and a simple K/(s squared) plant, and then to an F-15 type aircraft in a multichannel task. Utilizing the closed-loop modeling and analysis procedures, the results from the display design algorithm are evaluated and an analytical validation is performed. Experimental validation is recommended for future efforts.

  13. Using geophysical techniques to control in situ thermal remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, S.; Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.; Wilt, M.; Goldman, R.; Kayes, D.; Kenneally, K.; Udell, K.; Hunter, R.

    1994-01-22

    Monitoring the thermal and hydrologic processes that occur during thermal environmental remediation programs in near real-time provides essential information for controlling the process. Geophysical techniques played a crucial role in process control as well as for characterization during the recent Dynamic Underground Stripping Project demonstration in which several thousand gallons of gasoline were removed from heterogeneous soils both above and below the water table. Dynamic Underground Stripping combines steam injection and electrical heating for thermal enhancement with ground water pumping and vacuum extraction for contaminant removal. These processes produce rapid changes in the subsurface properties including changes in temperature fluid saturation, pressure and chemistry. Subsurface imaging methods are used to map the heated zones and control the thermal process. Temperature measurements made in wells throughout the field reveal details of the complex heating phenomena. Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) provides near real-time detailed images of the heated zones between boreholes both during electrical heating and steam injection. Borehole induction logs show close correlation with lithostratigraphy and, by identifying the more permeable gravel zones, can be used to predict steam movement. They are also useful in understanding the physical changes in the field and in interpreting the ERT images. Tiltmeters provide additional information regarding the shape of the steamed zones in plan view. They were used to track the growth of the steam front from individual injectors.

  14. Developing Internal Controls through Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, F. Herbert

    2009-01-01

    Life events can include the Tuesday afternoon cooking class with the group worker or the Saturday afternoon football game, but in the sense that Fritz Redl thought of them, these activities are only threads in a fabric of living that includes all the elements of daily life: playing, working, school-based learning, learning through activities,…

  15. Investigating Coincidence Techniques in Biomedical Applications of Neutron Activation Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, P.; Gramer, R.; Tandel, S. K.; Reinhardt, C. J.

    2004-05-01

    While neutron activation analysis has been widely used in biomedical applications for some time, the use of non-radioactive tracer techniques, to monitor, for example, organ blood flow, is more recent. In these studies, pre-clinical animal models are injected with micro-spheres labeled with stable isotopes of elements that have a high neutron absorption cross-section. Subsequently, samples of blood and/or tissue from different locations in the body are subjected to neutron activation analysis to measure the propagation of the labeled micro-spheres through the body. Following irradiation, the counting (with high-resolution Ge detectors) is typically delayed by a few days to dissipate short-lived activity in the samples and improve signal-to-noise for the peaks of interest in the activation spectrum. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether coincidence techniques (for isotopes which decay via two-photon cascades) could improve signal-to-noise and turn-around times. The samples were irradiated at the 1 MW research reactor at the UMass Lowell Radiation Laboratory. The analysis of the multi-parameter coincidence data recorded in event-mode will be presented and compared with the standard method of recording singles spectra.

  16. Orbiter active thermal control system description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laubach, G. E.

    1975-01-01

    A brief description of the Orbiter Active Thermal Control System (ATCS) including (1) major functional requirements of heat load, temperature control and heat sink utilization, (2) the overall system arrangement, and (3) detailed description of the elements of the ATCS.

  17. Diagnostics and Active Control of Aircraft Interior Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. R.

    1998-01-01

    This project deals with developing advanced methods for investigating and controlling interior noise in aircraft. The work concentrates on developing and applying the techniques of Near Field Acoustic Holography (NAH) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to the aircraft interior noise dynamic problem. This involves investigating the current state of the art, developing new techniques and then applying them to the particular problem being studied. The knowledge gained under the first part of the project was then used to develop and apply new, advanced noise control techniques for reducing interior noise. A new fully active control approach based on the PCA was developed and implemented on a test cylinder. Finally an active-passive approach based on tunable vibration absorbers was to be developed and analytically applied to a range of test structures from simple plates to aircraft fuselages.

  18. Combination of electrochemical, spectrometric and other analytical techniques for high throughput screening of pharmaceutically active compounds.

    PubMed

    Suzen, Sibel; Ozkan, Sibel A

    2010-08-01

    Recently, use of electrochemistry and combination of this method with spectroscopic and other analytical techniques are getting one of the important approaches in drug discovery and research as well as quality control, drug stability, determination of physiological activity, measurement of neurotransmitters. Many fundamental physiological processes are depending on oxido-reduction reactions in the body. Therefore, it may be possible to find connections between electrochemical and biochemical reactions concerning electron transfer pathways. Applications of electrochemical techniques to redox-active drug development and studies are one of the recent interests in drug discovery. In this review, the latest developments related to the use of electrochemical techniques in drug research in order to evaluate possible combination spectrometric methods with electrochemical techniques.

  19. Active Control of Open Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    UKeiley, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Open loop edge blowing was demonstrated as an effective method for reducing the broad band and tonal components of the fluctuating surface pressure in open cavities. Closed loop has been successfully applied to low Mach number open cavities. Need to push actuators that are viable for closed loop control in bandwidth and output. Need a better understanding of the effects of control on the flow through detailed measurements so better actuation strategies can be developed.

  20. Intelligent type controlled release systems by radiation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaetsu, Isao; Uchida, Kumao; Shindo, Hironori; Gomi, Seiji; Sutani, Kouichi

    1999-06-01

    Intelligent controlled release systems have been designed and constructed. The systems have a sensor-actuator gate consisting of polyelectrolyte hydrogel layer with immobilized enzymes inside fine holes of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film and silicon wafer as base materials. Excimer-laser or ion-beam irradiation was used for the etching of holes in PET film and photo-lithography was used for the etching of silicon wafer. U.V. and γ-ray irradiations were used for the polymerization and immobilization of electrolyte layers in the holes. Various kinds of signal responsive release systems such as pH responsive, substrate responsive, Ca 2+ responsive, photo-responsive and electric field responsive systems have been developed using those techniques. Some integrated systems have been designed and constructed by combination of unit systems in series and in parallel and proved the selective signal transfer and the successive signal responsive release functions.

  1. Advanced terahertz techniques for quality control and counterfeit detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahi, Kiarash; Anwar, Mehdi

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports our invented methods for detection of counterfeit electronic. These versatile techniques are also handy in quality control applications. Terahertz pulsed laser systems are capable of giving the material characteristics and thus make it possible to distinguish between the materials used in authentic components and their counterfeit clones. Components with material defects can also be distinguished in section in this manner. In this work different refractive indices and absorption coefficients were observed for counterfeit components compared to their authentic counterparts. Existence of unexpected ingredient materials was detected in counterfeit components by Fourier Transform analysis of the transmitted terahertz pulse. Thicknesses of different layers are obtainable by analyzing the reflected terahertz pulse. Existence of unexpected layers is also detectable in this manner. Recycled, sanded and blacktopped counterfeit electronic components were detected as a result of these analyses. Counterfeit ICs with die dislocations were detected by depicting the terahertz raster scanning data in a coordinate plane which gives terahertz images. In the same manner, raster scanning of the reflected pulse gives terahertz images of the surfaces of the components which were used to investigate contaminant materials and sanded points on the surfaces. The results of the later technique, reveals the recycled counterfeit components.

  2. Ecological Insights from Pelagic Habitats Acquired Using Active Acoustic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J.; Lawson, Gareth L.

    2016-01-01

    Marine pelagic ecosystems present fascinating opportunities for ecological investigation but pose important methodological challenges for sampling. Active acoustic techniques involve producing sound and receiving signals from organisms and other water column sources, offering the benefit of high spatial and temporal resolution and, via integration into different platforms, the ability to make measurements spanning a range of spatial and temporal scales. As a consequence, a variety of questions concerning the ecology of pelagic systems lend themselves to active acoustics, ranging from organism-level investigations and physiological responses to the environment to ecosystem-level studies and climate. As technologies and data analysis methods have matured, the use of acoustics in ecological studies has grown rapidly. We explore the continued role of active acoustics in addressing questions concerning life in the ocean, highlight creative applications to key ecological themes ranging from physiology and behavior to biogeography and climate, and discuss emerging avenues where acoustics can help determine how pelagic ecosystems function.

  3. Ecological Insights from Pelagic Habitats Acquired Using Active Acoustic Techniques.

    PubMed

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J; Lawson, Gareth L

    2016-01-01

    Marine pelagic ecosystems present fascinating opportunities for ecological investigation but pose important methodological challenges for sampling. Active acoustic techniques involve producing sound and receiving signals from organisms and other water column sources, offering the benefit of high spatial and temporal resolution and, via integration into different platforms, the ability to make measurements spanning a range of spatial and temporal scales. As a consequence, a variety of questions concerning the ecology of pelagic systems lend themselves to active acoustics, ranging from organism-level investigations and physiological responses to the environment to ecosystem-level studies and climate. As technologies and data analysis methods have matured, the use of acoustics in ecological studies has grown rapidly. We explore the continued role of active acoustics in addressing questions concerning life in the ocean, highlight creative applications to key ecological themes ranging from physiology and behavior to biogeography and climate, and discuss emerging avenues where acoustics can help determine how pelagic ecosystems function.

  4. New photochemical tools for controlling neuronal activity

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Richard H.; Fortin, Doris L.; Trauner, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Neurobiology has entered a new era in which optical methods are challenging electrophysiological techniques for their value in measuring and manipulating neuronal activity. This change is occurring largely because of the development of new photochemical tools, some synthesized by chemists and some provided by nature. This review is focused on the three types of photochemical tools for neuronal control that have emerged in recent years. Caged neurotransmitters, including caged glutamate, are synthetic molecules that enable highly localized activation of neurotransmitter receptors in response to light. Natural photosensitive proteins, including channelrhodopsin-2 and halorhodopsin, can be exogenously expressed in neurons and enable rapid photocontrol of action potential firing. Synthetic small-molecule photoswitches can bestow light-sensitivity on native or exogenously expressed proteins, including K+ channels and glutamate receptors, allowing photocontrol of action potential firing and synaptic events. At a rapid pace, these tools are being improved and new tools are being introduced, thanks to molecular biology and synthetic chemistry. The three families of photochemical tools have different capabilities and uses, but they all share in enabling precise and non-invasive exploration of neural function with light. PMID:19828309

  5. Controlled shear filtration: A novel technique for animal cell separation.

    PubMed

    Vogel, J H; Kroner, K H

    1999-06-20

    A novel rotary microfiltration technique specifically suited for the separation of animal cells has been developed. The concept allows the independent adjustment of wall shear stress, transmembrane pressure, and residence time, allowing straightforward optimization of the microfiltration process. By using a smooth, conically shaped rotor, it is possible to establish a controlled shear field in which animal cells experience a significant hydrodynamic lift away from the membrane surface. It is shown in preliminary experiments that shear-induced cell-rupture speeds up membrane clogging and that cell debris poses the most significant problem in harvesting of BHK cell cultures by dynamic microfiltration. However, a threshold value of shear stability exists which depends on the frequency of passing the shear field, the residence time in the shear field, as well as on cell status. By operating close to this threshold value, cell viability can be maintained while concentration polarization is efficiently minimized. By applying this concept, it is possible to attain flux rates several times higher compared to conventional crossflow filtration. Controlled shear filtration (CSF) can be used for batch harvesting as well as for cell retention in high cell density systems. In batch harvesting of hIL-2 from rBHK cell culture, a constant flux rate of 290 L h-1 m-2 has been adjusted without indication of membrane clogging or fouling.

  6. Student Activity Funds: Procedures & Controls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuzzetto, Charles E.

    Student activity funds may create educational opportunities for students, but they frequently create problems for business administrators. The first part of this work reviews the types of organizational issues and transactions an organized student group is likely to encounter, including establishing a constitution, participant roles,…

  7. The effects of the Bowen technique on hamstring flexibility over time: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Marr, Michelle; Baker, Julian; Lambon, Nicky; Perry, Jo

    2011-07-01

    The hamstring muscles are regularly implicated in recurrent injuries, movement dysfunction and low back pain. Links between limited flexibility and development of neuromusculoskeletal symptoms are frequently reported. The Bowen Technique is used to treat many conditions including lack of flexibility. The study set out to investigate the effect of the Bowen Technique on hamstring flexibility over time. An assessor-blind, prospective, randomised controlled trial was performed on 120 asymptomatic volunteers. Participants were randomly allocated into a control group or Bowen group. Three flexibility measurements occurred over one week, using an active knee extension test. The intervention group received a single Bowen treatment. A repeated measures univariate analysis of variance, across both groups for the three time periods, revealed significant within-subject and between-subject differences for the Bowen group. Continuing increases in flexibility levels were observed over one week. No significant change over time was noted for the control group.

  8. Pulsed neutron generator for use with pulsed neutron activation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Rochau, G.E.

    1980-01-01

    A high-output, transportable, pulsed neutron generator has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories for use with Pulsed Neutron Activation (PNA) techniques. The PNA neutron generator generates > 10/sup 10/ 14 MeV D-T neutrons in a 1.2 millisecond pulse. Each operation of the unit will produce a nominal total neutron output of 1.2 x 10/sup 10/ neutrons. The generator has been designed to be easily repaired and modified. The unit requires no additional equipment for operation or measurement of output.

  9. Transonic Flutter Suppression Control Law Design Using Classical and Optimal Techniques with Wind-Tunnel Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek

    1999-01-01

    The benchmark active controls technology and wind tunnel test program at NASA Langley Research Center was started with the objective to investigate the nonlinear, unsteady aerodynamics and active flutter suppression of wings in transonic flow. The paper will present the flutter suppression control law design process, numerical nonlinear simulation and wind tunnel test results for the NACA 0012 benchmark active control wing model. The flutter suppression control law design processes using (1) classical, (2) linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG), and (3) minimax techniques are described. A unified general formulation and solution for the LQG and minimax approaches, based on the steady state differential game theory is presented. Design considerations for improving the control law robustness and digital implementation are outlined. It was shown that simple control laws when properly designed based on physical principles, can suppress flutter with limited control power even in the presence of transonic shocks and flow separation. In wind tunnel tests in air and heavy gas medium, the closed-loop flutter dynamic pressure was increased to the tunnel upper limit of 200 psf. The control law robustness and performance predictions were verified in highly nonlinear flow conditions, gain and phase perturbations, and spoiler deployment. A non-design plunge instability condition was also successfully suppressed.

  10. [Population dynamics and control techniques of aphids on honeysuckle].

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying; Xue, Ming; Zhang, Xiao; Zhao, Hai-Peng; Li, Zhao-Xia

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study is to define the population dynamics of Semiaphis heraclei in the main-producing district of Lonicera japonica in Shandong, and screen for highly efficient, safety control technique. Through fixed field investigation, we tested the toxicity of eight kinds of insecticides by using dipping methods, and carried out the field experiment. The results showed that the aphids' emergence peak appeared in May. The aphids on the Sijihua variety of L. japonica was more susceptible and the peak was also seven days earlier than Damao variety of L. japonica. The aphid populations on Sijihua were 1 fold than those on the Daomao in happened peak. Comparing the eight kinds of insecticides, the LC50 of lambda-cyhaothrin, abamectin, imidacloprid and pyrethrin to wingless aphids were 1.494, 1.690, 2.840, 2.861 mg x L(-1), respectively, whose toxicity were higher, the toxicity of matrine, pymetrozine and azadirachtin were also high. The field efficacy trials indicated that during the period of aphids occurred, 25% imidacloprid wettable powder, 1.8% abamectin missible oil, 2.5% lambda-cyhaothrin missible oil, 25% pymetrozine wettable powder, 5% pyrethrin missible oil, 1% matrine water aqua were sprayed at concentrations of 20,000, 2,000, 2,500, 5,000, 500 and 50 times, respectively,the control effect achieved 91.69%, 98.90%, 96.18%, 95.06%, 99.24%, 90.10%, respectively, after 5 days. During the growing period of L. japonica in spring, application of thiamethoxam, thiacloprid, pymetrozine and imidacloprid, all of the control effect against aphids achieved above 98.88% after 50 days. The result indicated that May was the S. heraclei Takahashi's emergence peak in Pingyi, Shandong. The efficient safety and environmentally friendly insecticides by spraying and systemic insecticide of pymetrozine and imidacloprid by root application were all efficient controlled aphids. These insecticides were long for controlling S. heraclei Takahashi and worthy of being widely

  11. Actively controlled shaft seals for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salant, Richard F.

    1991-01-01

    Actively controlled mechanical seals have recently been developed for industrial use. This study investigates the feasibility of using such seals for aerospace applications. In a noncontacting mechanical seal, the film thickness depends on the geometry of the seal interface. The amount of coning, which is a measure of the radial convergence or divergence of the seal interface, has a primary effect on the film thickness. Active control of the film thickness is established by controlling the coning with a piezoelectric material. A mathematical model has been formulated to predict the performance of an actively controlled mechanical seal.

  12. Activated mechanisms in proteins: a multiple-temperature activation-relaxation technique study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, Rachid; Mousseau, Normand; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2001-03-01

    The low-temperature dynamics of proteins is controlled by a complex activated dynamics taking place over long time-scales compared with the period of thermal oscillations. In view of the range of relevant time scales, the numerical study of these processes remains a challenge and numerous methods have been introduced to address this problem. We introduce here a mixture of two algorithms, the activation-relaxation technique (ART)^1,2 coupled with the parallel tempering method, and use it to study the structure of the energy landscape around the native state of a 38-residue polypeptide. While ART samples rapidly the local energy landscape, the parallel tempering, which sets up exchanges of configuration between simultaneous runs at multiple temperatures, generates a very efficient sampling of energy basins separated by high barriers^(3). Results show the nature of the barriers and local minima surrounding the native state of this 38-residue peptide, modeled with off-lattice OPEP-like interactions^4. (1) G.T. Barkema and N. Mousseau, PRL 77, 4358 (1996) (2) N. Mousseau and G.T. Barkema, PRE 57, 2419 (1998) (3) E. Marinari and G. Parisi, Europhys. Lett., 19 (6), 451 (1992) (4) Ph. Derreumaux, J. Chem. Phys. 111, 2301 (1999); PRB 85, 206 (2000)

  13. Reduction of Helicopter Blade-Vortex Interaction Noise by Active Rotor Control Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Yung H.; Gmelin, Bernd; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Brooks, Thomas F.; Philippe, Jean J.; Prieur, Jean

    1997-01-01

    Helicopter blade-vortex interaction noise is one of the most severe noise sources and is very important both in community annoyance and military detection. Research over the decades has substantially improved basic physical understanding of the mechanisms generating rotor blade-vortex interaction noise and also of controlling techniques, particularly using active rotor control technology. This paper reviews active rotor control techniques currently available for rotor blade vortex interaction noise reduction, including higher harmonic pitch control, individual blade control, and on-blade control technologies. Basic physical mechanisms of each active control technique are reviewed in terms of noise reduction mechanism and controlling aerodynamic or structural parameters of a blade. Active rotor control techniques using smart structures/materials are discussed, including distributed smart actuators to induce local torsional or flapping deformations, Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  14. Active vibration control using mechanical and electrical analogies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Perez, A.; Hassan, A.; Kaczmarczyk, S.; Picton, P.

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical-electrical analogous circuit models are widely used in electromechanical system design as they represent the function of a coupled electrical and mechanical system using an equivalent electrical system. This research uses electrical circuits to establish a discussion of simple active vibration control principles using two scenarios: an active vibration isolation system and an active dynamic vibration absorber (DVA) using a voice coil motor (VCM) actuator. Active control laws such as gain scheduling are intuitively explained using circuit analysis techniques. Active vibration control approaches are typically constraint by electrical power requirements. The electrical analogous is a fast approach for specifying power requirements on the experimental test platform which is based on a vibration shaker that provides the based excitation required for the single Degree- of-Freedom (1DoF) vibration model under study.

  15. Sustainable practices for fertilizer use through controlled release techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faez, Roselena; Messa, Lucas; Froes, José; Souza, Claudinei

    2015-04-01

    Controlled release fertilizers are efficient tools that increase the sustainability of agricultural practices. However, the biodegradability of the matrices and the determination of the release into soil still require some investigation. This work describes the preparation of potassium-containing microspheres based on chitosan- montmorillonite clay as fertilizer double coated. The release profile in water (ion conductivity measurement) and soil (ion movement performed with time-domain reflectometry (TDR) technique) were evaluated. The potassium-containing microspheres were placed in a 7.5-L container filled with soil (Typic dystrophic LVd). The container was prepared with a water drainage system consisting of a thin layer of gravel at the bottom, which was followed by a geotextile fabric to prevent the loss of soil. The container was filled with soil (9 kg) in layers of 0.05 m to simulate the original bulk density of 1.30 g.cm-3. Each container received 4 g of microspheres placed at a single spot. They were placed at a depth of 10 cm. The fertilizer release was monitored using three electromagnetic probes for TDR that consisted of three continuous metal rods of 20 cm, which were in contact with the material and can be used to estimate the moisture and electrical conductivity. One probe was installed at the center of the container, which meant the rod was in contact with the microspheres in the soil. The other two probes were installed 5 cm from the central probe, and they were only in contact with the soil. Therefore, the purpose of these probes was to monitor the lateral displacement of the fertilizer from the microspheres in the soil. The release in water is fast than in soil, since the total amount of fertilizer in water was delivery during only one week and in soil during 60 days the fertilizer still continue drifting. The composite based on chitosan biopolymer as controlled release material is an efficient method to monitor the fertilizer consumption.

  16. Trend of Control Technique of Power Electronic Equipments for Power System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Noriyuki; Nakajima, Tatsuhito; Gibo, Naoki

    This paper aims to introduce recent topics about the control technique of power electronic equipments for power system. the control technique is explained from the view points of the power system control, the local system control and the converter control. The installation of STATCOM in Japan and UPFC in Korea are mentioned as the examples.

  17. Active Shielding and Control of Environmental Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsynkov, S. V.

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of the research project supported by NASA under grant # NAG-1-01064, we have studied the mathematical aspects of the problem of active control of sound, i.e., time-harmonic acoustic disturbances. The foundations of the methodology are described in our paper [1]. Unlike. many other existing techniques, the approach of [1] provides for the exact volumetric cancellation of the unwanted noise on a given predetermined region airspace, while leaving unaltered those components of the total acoustic field that are deemed as friendly. The key finding of the work is that for eliminating the unwanted component of the acoustic field in a given area, one needs to know relatively little; in particular, neither the locations nor structure nor strength of the exterior noise sources need to be known. Likewise, there is no need to know the volumetric properties of the supporting medium across which the acoustic signals propagate, except, maybe, in a narrow area of space near the perimeter of the protected region. The controls are built based solely on the measurements performed on the perimeter of the domain to be shielded; moreover, the controls themselves (i.e., additional sources) are concentrated also only on or near this perimeter. Perhaps as important, the measured quantities can refer to the total acoustic field rather than to its unwanted component only, and the methodology can automatically distinguish between the two. In [1], we have constructed the general solution for controls. The apparatus used for deriving this general solution is closely connected to the concepts of generalized potentials and boundary projections of Calderon's type. For a given total wave field, the application of a Calderon's projection allows one to definitively tell between its incoming and outgoing components with respect to a particular domain of interest, which may have arbitrary shape. Then, the controls are designed so that they suppress the incoming component for the domain

  18. [Techniques for assaying the activity of transcription factor NF-κB].

    PubMed

    Ling, Xiao-Qian; Wang, Jin-Ke

    2013-05-01

    NF-κB is a stimulatory transcription factor that is ubiquitous in almost all kinds of cells. When cells are under various stimuli, NF-κB is activated and regulates large numbers of target genes, and thus controls important cellular processes, ranging from cell growth and differentiation to apoptosis and cancer. Therefore, NF-κB is a forefront hotspot transcription factor that is intensively studied in virtually all fields of biomedical sciences, and becomes a promising target for disease therapy and drug screening. The activity detection is the first and inevitable step for the studies of NF-κB activation and function.Therefore, the techniques for detection of NF-κB activity have always been paid more attention and continuously developed. Especially in recent year, along with the development of each disciplines, various new techniques have been developed, including ELISA-like assays based on dsDNA-coupled plate, filter binding assays, FRET assays, fluorescence reporting and nucleic acids amplification assays based on exonuclease and endonuclease, MS and flow cytometry assays based on immunomicrobeads, and other biophysical and electrochemical assays. Some of these techniques have already played important roles in NF-κB studies. This paper reviewed new techniques developed in recent years by classification, in order to provide an overview of NF-κB activity assays, which may be helpful for researchers to select appropriate techniques used in their studies. Moreover, the learning and understanding of these techniques may inspire researchers to improve currently existing techniques and develop novel methods for the studies of NF-κB.

  19. Reusable Launch Vehicle Attitude Control Using a Time-Varying Sliding Mode Control Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shtessel, Yuri B.; Zhu, J. Jim; Daniels, Dan; Jackson, Scott (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present a time-varying sliding mode control (TVSMC) technique for reusable launch vehicle (RLV) attitude control in ascent and entry flight phases. In ascent flight the guidance commands Euler roll, pitch and yaw angles, and in entry flight it commands the aerodynamic angles of bank, attack and sideslip. The controller employs a body rate inner loop and the attitude outer loop, which are separated in time-scale by the singular perturbation principle. The novelty of the TVSMC is that both the sliding surface and the boundary layer dynamics can be varied in real time using the PD-eigenvalue assignment technique. This salient feature is used to cope with control command saturation and integrator windup in the presence of severe disturbance or control effector failure, which enhances the robustness and fault tolerance of the controller. The TV-SMC ascent and descent designs are currently being tested with high fidelity, 6-DOF dispersion simulations. The test results will be presented in the final version of this paper.

  20. PID feedback controller used as a tactical asset allocation technique: The G.A.M. model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandolfi, G.; Sabatini, A.; Rossolini, M.

    2007-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to illustrate a tactical asset allocation technique utilizing the PID controller. The proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller is widely applied in most industrial processes; it has been successfully used for over 50 years and it is used by more than 95% of the plants processes. It is a robust and easily understood algorithm that can provide excellent control performance in spite of the diverse dynamic characteristics of the process plant. In finance, the process plant, controlled by the PID controller, can be represented by financial market assets forming a portfolio. More specifically, in the present work, the plant is represented by a risk-adjusted return variable. Money and portfolio managers’ main target is to achieve a relevant risk-adjusted return in their managing activities. In literature and in the financial industry business, numerous kinds of return/risk ratios are commonly studied and used. The aim of this work is to perform a tactical asset allocation technique consisting in the optimization of risk adjusted return by means of asset allocation methodologies based on the PID model-free feedback control modeling procedure. The process plant does not need to be mathematically modeled: the PID control action lies in altering the portfolio asset weights, according to the PID algorithm and its parameters, Ziegler-and-Nichols-tuned, in order to approach the desired portfolio risk-adjusted return efficiently.

  1. Active Control of Transition and Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio

    1987-01-01

    Two active means of manipulating boundary-layer flow developed, one controlling laminar-to-turbulent transition, other controlling amplitude of turbulent fluctuation. Purpose to control skin-friction drag over surfaces inside inlets and ducts. Resulting turbulence downstream has lower skin-friction drag than equivalent flow developing over same surfaces in absence of intervention. Heating strips trigger turbulence while transition amplitude and bandwidth controlled by acoustic signal.

  2. Reliable and Affordable Control Systems Active Combustor Pattern Factor Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarty, Bob; Tomondi, Chris; McGinley, Ray

    2004-01-01

    Active, closed-loop control of combustor pattern factor is a cooperative effort between Honeywell (formerly AlliedSignal) Engines and Systems and the NASA Glenn Research Center to reduce emissions and turbine-stator vane temperature variations, thereby enhancing engine performance and life, and reducing direct operating costs. Total fuel flow supplied to the engine is established by the speed/power control, but the distribution to individual atomizers will be controlled by the Active Combustor Pattern Factor Control (ACPFC). This system consist of three major components: multiple, thin-film sensors located on the turbine-stator vanes; fuel-flow modulators for individual atomizers; and control logic and algorithms within the electronic control.

  3. Active Control by Conservation of Energy Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio

    2000-01-01

    Three unrelated experiments are discussed; each was extremely sensitive to initial conditions. The initial conditions are the beginnings of the origins of the information that nonlinearity displays. Initial conditions make the phenomenon unstable and unpredictable. With the knowledge of the initial conditions, active control requires far less power than that present in the system response. The first experiment is on the control of shocks from an axisymmetric supersonic jet; the second, control of a nonlinear panel response forced by turbulent boundary layer and sound; the third, control of subharmonic and harmonics of a panel forced by sound. In all three experiments, control is achieved by redistribution of periodic energy response such that the energy is nearly preserved from a previous uncontrolled state. This type of active control improves the performance of the system being controlled.

  4. UML activity diagrams in requirements specification of logic controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grobelna, Iwona; Grobelny, Michał

    2015-12-01

    Logic controller specification can be prepared using various techniques. One of them is the wide understandable and user-friendly UML language and its activity diagrams. Using formal methods during the design phase increases the assurance that implemented system meets the project requirements. In the approach we use the model checking technique to formally verify a specification against user-defined behavioral requirements. The properties are usually defined as temporal logic formulas. In the paper we propose to use UML activity diagrams in requirements definition and then to formalize them as temporal logic formulas. As a result, UML activity diagrams can be used both for logic controller specification and for requirements definition, what simplifies the specification and verification process.

  5. Activation studies of NEG coatings by surface techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R. K.; Jagannath,; Bhushan, K. G.; Gadkari, S. C.; Mukund, R.; Gupta, S. K.

    2013-02-05

    NEG (Non Evaporable Getters)materials in the form of ternary alloy coatings have many benefits compare to traditional bare surfaces such as Extreme high vacuum(XHV), lower secondary electron yield(SEY), low photon desorption cofficient. The extreme high vacuum (pressure > 10{sup -10} mbar) is very useful to the study of surfaces of the material, for high energy particle accelerators(LHC, Photon Factories), synchrotrons (ESRF, Ellectra) etc. Low secondary electron yield leads to better beam life time. In LHC the pressure in the interaction region of the two beams is something of the order of 10{sup -12} mbar. In this paper preparation of the coatings and their characterization to get the Activation temperature by using the surface techniques XPS, SEM and SIMS has been shown.

  6. Active Learning Techniques Applied to an Interdisciplinary Mineral Resources Course.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aird, H. M.

    2015-12-01

    An interdisciplinary active learning course was introduced at the University of Puget Sound entitled 'Mineral Resources and the Environment'. Various formative assessment and active learning techniques that have been effective in other courses were adapted and implemented to improve student learning, increase retention and broaden knowledge and understanding of course material. This was an elective course targeted towards upper-level undergraduate geology and environmental majors. The course provided an introduction to the mineral resources industry, discussing geological, environmental, societal and economic aspects, legislation and the processes involved in exploration, extraction, processing, reclamation/remediation and recycling of products. Lectures and associated weekly labs were linked in subject matter; relevant readings from the recent scientific literature were assigned and discussed in the second lecture of the week. Peer-based learning was facilitated through weekly reading assignments with peer-led discussions and through group research projects, in addition to in-class exercises such as debates. Writing and research skills were developed through student groups designing, carrying out and reporting on their own semester-long research projects around the lasting effects of the historical Ruston Smelter on the biology and water systems of Tacoma. The writing of their mini grant proposals and final project reports was carried out in stages to allow for feedback before the deadline. Speakers from industry were invited to share their specialist knowledge as guest lecturers, and students were encouraged to interact with them, with a view to employment opportunities. Formative assessment techniques included jigsaw exercises, gallery walks, placemat surveys, think pair share and take-home point summaries. Summative assessment included discussion leadership, exams, homeworks, group projects, in-class exercises, field trips, and pre-discussion reading exercises

  7. Active Flow Control with Thermoacoustic Actuators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-31

    dielectric barrier discharge ( DBD ) plasma actuators [4], or combustion powered actuators [5]. Compared to passive flow control techniques, such as vortex...space nor adding significant weight, which is similar to how DBD plasma actuators can be installed. 3 The sound generation mechanism, known as

  8. Active control of buildings during earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vance, Vicki L.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this report is to provide an overview of the different types of control systems used in buildings, to discuss the problems associated with current active control mechanisms, and to show the cost-effectiveness of applying active control to buildings. In addition, a small case study investigates the feasibility and benefits of using embedded actuators in buildings. Use of embedded actuators could solve many of the current problems associated with active control by providing a wider bandwidth of control, quicker speed of response, increased reliability and reduced power requirement. Though embedded actuators have not been developed for buildings, they have previously been used in space structures. Many similarities exist between large civil and aerospace structures indicating that direct transfer of concepts between the two disciplines may be possible. In particular, much of the Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) technology currently being developed could be beneficially applied to civil structures. While several buildings with active control systems have been constructed in Japan, additional research and experimental verification are necessary before active control systems become widely accepted and implemented.

  9. Controls on fire activity over the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloster, S.; Brücher, T.; Brovkin, V.; Wilkenskjeld, S.

    2014-11-01

    Changes in fire activity over the last 8000 years are simulated with a global fire model driven by changes in climate and vegetation cover. The changes were separated into those caused through variations in fuel availability, fuel moisture or wind speed which react differently to changes in climate. Disentangling these controlling factors helps to understand the overall climate control on fire activity over the Holocene. Globally the burned area is simulated to increase by 2.5% between 8000 and 200 cal yr BP with larger regional changes compensating on a global scale. Despite the absence of anthropogenic fire ignitions, the simulated trends in fire activity agree reasonably well with continental scale reconstructions from charcoal records, with the exception of Europe. For some regions the change in fire activity is predominantly controlled through changes in fuel availability (Australia-Monsoon, American Tropics/Subtropics). For other regions changes in fuel moisture are more important for the overall trend in fire activity (North America, Sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, Asia-Monsoon). In Sub-Saharan Africa, for example, changes in fuel moisture alone lead to an increase in fire activity between 8000 and 200 cal yr BP, while changes in fuel availability lead to a decrease. Overall, the fuel moisture control is dominating the simulated fire activity for Sub-Saharan Africa. The simulations clearly demonstrate that both changes in fuel availability and changes in fuel moisture are important drivers for the fire activity over the Holocene. Fuel availability and fuel moisture do, however, have different climate controls. As such observed changes in fire activity can not be related to single climate parameters such as precipitation or temperature alone. Fire models, as applied in this study, in combination with observational records can help to understand the climate control on fire activity, which is essential to project future fire activity.

  10. Controls on fire activity over the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloster, S.; Brucher, T.; Brovkin, V.; Wilkenskjeld, S.

    2015-05-01

    Changes in fire activity over the last 8000 years are simulated with a global fire model driven by changes in climate and vegetation cover. The changes were separated into those caused through variations in fuel availability, fuel moisture or wind speed, which react differently to changes in climate. Disentangling these controlling factors helps in understanding the overall climate control on fire activity over the Holocene. Globally the burned area is simulated to increase by 2.5% between 8000 and 200 cal yr BP, with larger regional changes compensating nearly evening out on a global scale. Despite the absence of anthropogenic fire ignitions, the simulated trends in fire activity agree reasonably well with continental-scale reconstructions from charcoal records, with the exception of Europe. For some regions the change in fire activity is predominantly controlled through changes in fuel availability (Australia monsoon, Central America tropics/subtropics). For other regions changes in fuel moisture are more important for the overall trend in fire activity (North America, Sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, Asia monsoon). In Sub-Saharan Africa, for example, changes in fuel moisture alone lead to an increase in fire activity between 8000 and 200 cal yr BP, while changes in fuel availability lead to a decrease. Overall, the fuel moisture control is dominating the simulated fire activity for Sub-Saharan Africa. The simulations clearly demonstrate that both changes in fuel availability and changes in fuel moisture are important drivers for the fire activity over the Holocene. Fuel availability and fuel moisture do, however, have different climate controls. As such, observed changes in fire activity cannot be related to single climate parameters such as precipitation or temperature alone. Fire models, as applied in this study, in combination with observational records can help in understanding the climate control on fire activity, which is essential to project future fire

  11. MATLAB Simulation of UPQC for Power Quality Mitigation Using an Ant Colony Based Fuzzy Control Technique

    PubMed Central

    Kumarasabapathy, N.; Manoharan, P. S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a fuzzy logic based new control scheme for the Unified Power Quality Conditioner (UPQC) for minimizing the voltage sag and total harmonic distortion in the distribution system consequently to improve the power quality. UPQC is a recent power electronic module which guarantees better power quality mitigation as it has both series-active and shunt-active power filters (APFs). The fuzzy logic controller has recently attracted a great deal of attention and possesses conceptually the quality of the simplicity by tackling complex systems with vagueness and ambiguity. In this research, the fuzzy logic controller is utilized for the generation of reference signal controlling the UPQC. To enable this, a systematic approach for creating the fuzzy membership functions is carried out by using an ant colony optimization technique for optimal fuzzy logic control. An exhaustive simulation study using the MATLAB/Simulink is carried out to investigate and demonstrate the performance of the proposed fuzzy logic controller and the simulation results are compared with the PI controller in terms of its performance in improving the power quality by minimizing the voltage sag and total harmonic distortion. PMID:26504895

  12. MATLAB Simulation of UPQC for Power Quality Mitigation Using an Ant Colony Based Fuzzy Control Technique.

    PubMed

    Kumarasabapathy, N; Manoharan, P S

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a fuzzy logic based new control scheme for the Unified Power Quality Conditioner (UPQC) for minimizing the voltage sag and total harmonic distortion in the distribution system consequently to improve the power quality. UPQC is a recent power electronic module which guarantees better power quality mitigation as it has both series-active and shunt-active power filters (APFs). The fuzzy logic controller has recently attracted a great deal of attention and possesses conceptually the quality of the simplicity by tackling complex systems with vagueness and ambiguity. In this research, the fuzzy logic controller is utilized for the generation of reference signal controlling the UPQC. To enable this, a systematic approach for creating the fuzzy membership functions is carried out by using an ant colony optimization technique for optimal fuzzy logic control. An exhaustive simulation study using the MATLAB/Simulink is carried out to investigate and demonstrate the performance of the proposed fuzzy logic controller and the simulation results are compared with the PI controller in terms of its performance in improving the power quality by minimizing the voltage sag and total harmonic distortion.

  13. Approximate active fault detection and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škach, Jan; Punčochář, Ivo; Šimandl, Miroslav

    2014-12-01

    This paper deals with approximate active fault detection and control for nonlinear discrete-time stochastic systems over an infinite time horizon. Multiple model framework is used to represent fault-free and finitely many faulty models. An imperfect state information problem is reformulated using a hyper-state and dynamic programming is applied to solve the problem numerically. The proposed active fault detector and controller is illustrated in a numerical example of an air handling unit.

  14. Active Polymer Microfiber with Controlled Polarization Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Hongyan; Wang, Ruxue; Liu, Yingying; Cheng, Junjie; Zou, Gang; Zhang, Qijin; Zhang, Douguo; Wang, Pei; Ming, Hai; Badugu, Ramachandram; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2016-01-01

    Controlled Polarization Sensitivity of an active polymer microfiber has been proposed and realized with the electrospun method. The fluorescence intensity guiding through this active polymer microfiber shows high sensitivity to the polarization state of the excitation light. What is more, the fluorescence out-coupled from tip of the microfiber can be of designed polarization state. Principle of these phenomena lies on the ordered and controlled orientation of the polydiacetylene (PDA) main chains inside polymer microfiber. PMID:27099828

  15. An extended active control for chaos synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Rong-An; Liu, Ya-Li; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2009-04-01

    By introducing a control strength matrix, the active control theory in chaotic synchronization is developed. With this extended method, chaos complete synchronization can be achieved more easily, i.e., a much smaller control signal is enough to reach synchronization in most cases. Numerical simulations on Rossler, Liu's four-scroll, and Chen system confirmed this and show that the synchronization result depends on the control strength significantly. Especially, in the case of Liu and Chen systems, the response systems' largest Lyapunov exponents' variation with the control strength is not monotone and there exist minima. It is novel for Chen system that the synchronization speed with a special small strength is higher than that of the usual active control which, as a special case of the extended method, has a much larger control strength. All these results indicate that the control strength is an important factor in the actual synchronization. So, with this extended active control, one can make a better and more practical synchronization scheme by adjusting the control strength matrix.

  16. Active noise control using a distributed mode flat panel loudspeaker.

    PubMed

    Zhu, H; Rajamani, R; Dudney, J; Stelson, K A

    2003-07-01

    A flat panel distributed mode loudspeaker (DML) has many advantages over traditional cone speakers in terms of its weight, size, and durability. However, its frequency response is uneven and complex, thus bringing its suitability for active noise control (ANC) under question. This paper presents experimental results demonstrating the effective use of panel DML speakers in an ANC application. Both feedback and feedforward control techniques are considered. Effective feedback control with a flat panel speaker could open up a whole range of new noise control applications and has many advantages over feedforward control. The paper develops a new control algorithm to attenuate tonal noise of a known frequency by feedback control. However, due to the uneven response of the speakers, feedback control is found to be only moderately effective even for this narrow-band application. Feedforward control proves to be most capable for the flat panel speaker. Using feedforward control, the sound pressure level can be significantly reduced in close proximity to an error microphone. The paper demonstrates an interesting application of the flat panel in which the panel is placed in the path of sound and effectively used to block sound transmission using feedforward control. This is a new approach to active noise control enabled by the use of flat panels and can be used to prevent sound from entering into an enclosure in the first place rather than the traditional approach of attempting to cancel sound after it enters the enclosure.

  17. Transitioning Active Flow Control to Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.; Horta, Lucas G.; Chen, Fang-Jenq

    1999-01-01

    Active Flow Control Programs at NASA, the U.S. Air Force, and DARPA have been initiated with the goals of obtaining revolutionary advances in aerodynamic performance and maneuvering compared to conventional approaches. These programs envision the use of actuators, sensors, and controllers on applications such as aircraft wings/tails, engine nacelles, internal ducts, nozzles, projectiles, weapons bays, and hydrodynamic vehicles. Anticipated benefits of flow control include reduced weight, part count, and operating cost and reduced fuel burn (and emissions), noise and enhanced safety if the sensors serve a dual role of flow control and health monitoring. To get from the bench-top or laboratory test to adaptive distributed control systems on realistic applications, reliable validated design tools are needed in addition to sub- and large-scale wind-tunnel and flight experiments. This paper will focus on the development of tools for active flow control applications.

  18. A Technique for Murine Irradiation in a Controlled Gas Environment

    PubMed Central

    Walb, M. C.; Moore, J. E.; Attia, A.; Wheeler, K. T.; Miller, M. S.; Munley, M. T.

    2013-01-01

    NASA’s extra-vehicular activities (EVAs) involve exposure to high energy photons while breathing 100% oxygen. Using previously verified mouse models, our laboratory is studying whether low dose irradiation under these hyperoxic conditions could lead to an increase in carcinogenic potential. To simulate the environment astronauts encounter during an EVA, enclosed chambers were constructed that allowed for mouse movement, controlled gas conditions, and uniform radiation dose delivery. Custom-built gas chambers with input/output gas valves and dividers that allowed for uniform gas flow were used to keep 6 unanesthetized mice separated while they were irradiated. The chambers were supplied with 100% oxygen or air using ball valves linked together with T-splitters. A calibrated ion chamber was used to verify the radiation dose distribution across an entire chamber. Mice were placed in the gas environments for 0.5 h, irradiated with a 10 or 18 MV photon beam from a medical linear accelerator, and left in their gas environment for 2 h post-irradiation. We irradiated 200 mice (5 different doses between 0–1000 mGy) under normoxic or 100% oxygen conditions. For the next step of this research, these mice will be euthanized 9 months post-irradiation, and lung tumors will be counted and sized to determine if hyperoxia increases the carcinogenic effect for this model. PMID:22846321

  19. Student Activity Funds: Procedures and Controls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuzzetto, Charles E.

    2000-01-01

    An effective internal-control system can help school business administrators meet the challenges of accounting for student activity funds. Such a system should include appropriate policies and procedures, identification of key control points, self-assessments, audit trails, and internal and external audits. (MLH)

  20. 78 FR 34306 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans: North Carolina; Control Techniques...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-07

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans: North Carolina; Control Techniques Guidelines and Reasonably Available Control Technology AGENCY: Environmental Protection... approval of its reasonably available control technology (RACT) requirements for volatile organic...

  1. 78 FR 15895 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans: North Carolina; Control Techniques...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-13

    ..., Emission Control Standards, Monitoring and Recordkeeping and Air Quality Permit Procedures and are not... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans: North Carolina; Control Techniques Guidelines and Reasonably Available Control Technology AGENCY: Environmental...

  2. Applications of active adaptive noise control to jet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoureshi, Rahmat; Brackney, Larry

    1993-01-01

    During phase 2 research on the application of active noise control to jet engines, the development of multiple-input/multiple-output (MIMO) active adaptive noise control algorithms and acoustic/controls models for turbofan engines were considered. Specific goals for this research phase included: (1) implementation of a MIMO adaptive minimum variance active noise controller; and (2) turbofan engine model development. A minimum variance control law for adaptive active noise control has been developed, simulated, and implemented for single-input/single-output (SISO) systems. Since acoustic systems tend to be distributed, multiple sensors, and actuators are more appropriate. As such, the SISO minimum variance controller was extended to the MIMO case. Simulation and experimental results are presented. A state-space model of a simplified gas turbine engine is developed using the bond graph technique. The model retains important system behavior, yet is of low enough order to be useful for controller design. Expansion of the model to include multiple stages and spools is also discussed.

  3. Predictive Techniques for Spacecraft Cabin Air Quality Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, J. L.; Cromes, Scott D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    As assembly of the International Space Station (ISS) proceeds, predictive techniques are used to determine the best approach for handling a variety of cabin air quality challenges. These techniques use equipment offgassing data collected from each ISS module before flight to characterize the trace chemical contaminant load. Combined with crew metabolic loads, these data serve as input to a predictive model for assessing the capability of the onboard atmosphere revitalization systems to handle the overall trace contaminant load as station assembly progresses. The techniques for predicting in-flight air quality are summarized along with results from early ISS mission analyses. Results from groundbased analyses of in-flight air quality samples are compared to the predictions to demonstrate the technique's relative conservatism.

  4. Synthesis of active controls for flutter suppression on a flight research wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, I.; Perry, B., III; Murrow, H. N.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes some activities associated with the preliminary design of an active control system for flutter suppression capable of demonstrating a 20% increase in flutter velocity. Results from two control system synthesis techniques are given. One technique uses classical control theory, and the other uses an 'aerodynamic energy method' where control surface rates or displacements are minimized. Analytical methods used to synthesize the control systems and evaluate their performance are described. Some aspects of a program for flight testing the active control system are also given. This program, called DAST (Drones for Aerodynamics and Structural Testing), employs modified drone-type vehicles for flight assessments and validation testing.

  5. Active vibration control of basic structures using macro fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Guo; Wang, Jinming; Liu, Liwu; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2011-03-01

    In the modern naval battle, as the anti-detection technique developing fleetly, enhancing submarine's hidden ability is becoming more and more important. However, in view of the worse control effect at low-frequency and weak adjustability to external influence, conventional passive vibration control can't satisfy the modern naval rigorous demands. Fortunately, active vibration control technology not only monitors the structure's real-time vibration, but also has more remarkable control effects and superior suitability. At the present time, it has a primary application in the vibration damping of ship engineering. In addition, due to functional materials rapidly developing, with the coming of piezoelectric composite materials, the advanced active control techniques have more applicability, lager damp amplitude and wider applied field, which basing on the piezoelectric-effect and inverse- piezoelectric-effect of piezoelectric materials. Especially, in the end of nineties, NASA had successfully manufactured the excellent macro fiber composite (MFC), which assembles actuating and sensing abilities. Comparing with the conventional piezoelectric ceramic materials, it provides the required durability, excellent flexibility, higher electromechanical coupling factors and stronger longitudinal actuating force by using interdigital electrodes. On the basis of the application of cantilever beam' active vibration control by using MFC actuators, this paper started with the mechanical characteristics of its actuating and sensing equations, and then investigated its piezoelectric feedback scale factor when equipped on the honeycomb aluminous panel. Finally, in order to validate the theoretical analysis method, the vibration control experiment of cantilever beam and honeycomb aluminous panel are built and tested with different activating force. The experimental results verify that MFC used in submarine structures' active vibration control are feasible and effective.

  6. Analysis and control of unified active power filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthu, Subramanian

    1999-11-01

    The combined series and shunt active filters have been proposed to alleviate the power quality problems at the demand-side power systems. However, the conventional approach for the control of the combined active filter systems have resulted in large operating capacity of the shunt active filter because reactive power compensation involves only the shunt active filter. Furthermore, the harmonic mitigation problems are handled mainly by indirect harmonic compensation schemes rather than direct harmonic isolation schemes. This thesis presents the analysis and control of Unified Active Power Filter (UAPF) and proposes a novel concept of load reactive power compensation involving both the series active filter and the shunt active filter. The thesis also applies discrete-time sliding-mode control technique to enhance the performance of the combined active filter system in terms of fast dynamic response and effective solution to harmonic mitigation problems. The thesis also presents simulation and experimental results to provide verification of the proposed UAPF concept. The involvement of series active filter for reactive power compensation is achieved by controlling the phase difference between the load voltage and the utility voltage. The complete steady-state operating characteristics of UAPF are analyzed with the identification of the different operating modes of UAPF and the analysis of active and reactive power handled by the active filter components. The performance of UAPF to meet the stringent power quality standards are realized by applying discrete-time sliding-mode control schemes for the load voltage regulation and the active power factor correction. The control algorithms are developed to track a given load voltage and line current reference signals respectively. The effect of computational delay in DSP implementation is studied extensively and the control law is designed with the consideration for the computational delay. The systematic approach for the

  7. Design, test, and evaluation of three active flutter suppression controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, William M., Jr.; Christhilf, David M.; Waszak, Martin R.; Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Srinathkumar, S.

    1992-01-01

    Three control law design techniques for flutter suppression are presented. Each technique uses multiple control surfaces and/or sensors. The first method uses traditional tools (such as pole/zero loci and Nyquist diagrams) for producing a controller that has minimal complexity and which is sufficiently robust to handle plant uncertainty. The second procedure uses linear combinations of several accelerometer signals and dynamic compensation to synthesize the model rate of the critical mode for feedback to the distributed control surfaces. The third technique starts with a minimum-energy linear quadratic Gaussian controller, iteratively modifies intensity matrices corresponding to input and output noise, and applies controller order reduction to achieve a low-order, robust controller. The resulting designs were implemented digitally and tested subsonically on the active flexible wing wind-tunnel model in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. Only the traditional pole/zero loci design was sufficiently robust to errors in the nominal plant to successfully suppress flutter during the test. The traditional pole/zero loci design provided simultaneous suppression of symmetric and antisymmetric flutter with a 24-percent increase in attainable dynamic pressure. Posttest analyses are shown which illustrate the problems encountered with the other laws.

  8. Active vibration control of civil structures

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.; Baker, W.; Fales, J.; Shevitz, D.

    1996-11-01

    This is a final report of a one year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Active vibration control (AVC) of structural and mechanical systems is one of the rapidly advancing areas of engineering research. The multifaceted nature of AVC covers many disciplines, such as sensors and instrumentation, numerical modeling, experimental mechanics, and advanced power systems. This work encompassed a review of the literature on active control of structures focusing both on active control hardware and on control algorithms, a design of an isolation systems using magneto-rheological fluid-filled (MRF) dampers and numerical simulations to study the enhanced vibration mitigation effects of this technology.

  9. Prospects of pharmaceuticals and biopharmaceuticals loaded microparticles prepared by double emulsion technique for controlled delivery

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Tapan Kumar; Choudhary, Chhatrapal; Ajazuddin; Alexander, Amit; Badwaik, Hemant; Tripathi, Dulal Krishna

    2012-01-01

    Several methods and techniques are potentially useful for the preparation of microparticles in the field of controlled drug delivery. The type and the size of the microparticles, the entrapment, release characteristics and stability of drug in microparticles in the formulations are dependent on the method used. One of the most common methods of preparing microparticles is the single emulsion technique. Poorly soluble, lipophilic drugs are successfully retained within the microparticles prepared by this method. However, the encapsulation of highly water soluble compounds including protein and peptides presents formidable challenges to the researchers. The successful encapsulation of such compounds requires high drug loading in the microparticles, prevention of protein and peptide degradation by the encapsulation method involved and predictable release, both rate and extent, of the drug compound from the microparticles. The above mentioned problems can be overcome by using the double emulsion technique, alternatively called as multiple emulsion technique. Aiming to achieve this various techniques have been examined to prepare stable formulations utilizing w/o/w, s/o/w, w/o/o, and s/o/o type double emulsion methods. This article reviews the current state of the art in double emulsion based technologies for the preparation of microparticles including the investigation of various classes of substances that are pharmaceutically and biopharmaceutically active. PMID:23960828

  10. CFD Modeling for Active Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, Pieter G.

    2001-01-01

    This presentation describes current work under UEET Active Flow Control CFD Research Tool Development. The goal of this work is to develop computational tools for inlet active flow control design. This year s objectives were to perform CFD simulations of fully gridded vane vortex generators, micro-vortex genera- tors, and synthetic jets, and to compare flowfield results with wind tunnel tests of simple geometries with flow control devices. Comparisons are shown for a single micro-vortex generator on a flat plate, and for flow over an expansion ramp with sidewall effects. Vortex core location, pressure gradient and oil flow patterns are compared between experiment and computation. This work lays the groundwork for evaluating simplified modeling of arrays of devices, and provides the opportunity to test simple flow control device/sensor/ control loop interaction.

  11. Active vibration control in microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.

    1987-01-01

    The low gravity environment of the space station is suitable for experiments or manufacturing processes which require near zero gravity. An experiment was fabricated to test the validity of the active control process and to verify the flow and control parameters identified in a theoretical model. Zero gravity is approximated in the horizontal plane using a low friction air bearing table. An analog control system was designed to activate calibrated air jets when displacement of the test mass is sensed. The experiment demonstrates that an air jet control system introduces an effective damping factor to control oscillatory response. The amount of damping as well as the flow parameters, such as pressure drop across the valve and flow rate of air, are verified by the analytical model.

  12. Vibration control through passive constrained layer damping and active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Margaretha J.; Inman, Daniel J.; Saunders, William R.

    1997-05-01

    To add damping to systems, viscoelastic materials (VEM) are added to structures. In order to enhance the damping effects of the VEM, a constraining layer is attached. When this constraining layer is an active element, the treatment is called active constrained layer damping (ACLD). Recently, the investigation of ACLD treatments has shown it to be an effective method of vibration suppression. In this paper, the treatment of a beam with a separate active element and passive constrained layer (PCLD) element is investigated. A Ritz- Galerkin approach is used to obtain discretized equations of motion. The damping is modeled using the GHM method and the system is analyzed in the time domain. By optimizing on the performance and control effort for both the active and passive case, it is shown that this treatment is capable of lower control effort with more inherent damping, and is therefore a better approach to damp vibration.

  13. Active control of robot manipulator compliance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, C. C.; Pooran, F. J.

    1986-01-01

    Work performed at Catholic University on the research grant entitled Active Control of Robot Manipulator Compliance, supported by NASA/Goddard space Flight Center during the period of May 15th, 1986 to November 15th, 1986 is described. The modelling of the two-degree-of-freedom robot is first presented. Then the complete system including the robot and the hybrid controller is simulated on an IBM-XT Personal Computer. Simulation results showed that proper adjustments of controller gains enable the robot to perform successful operations. Further research should focus on developing a guideline for the controller gain design to achieve system stability.

  14. Active sampling technique to enhance chemical signature of buried explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovell, John S.; French, Patrick D.

    2004-09-01

    Deminers and dismounted countermine engineers commonly use metal detectors, ground penetrating radar and probes to locate mines. Many modern landmines have a very low metal content, which severely limits the effectiveness of metal detectors. Canines have also been used for landmine detection for decades. Experiments have shown that canines smell the explosives which are known to leak from most types of landmines. The fact that dogs can detect landmines indicates that vapor sensing is a viable approach to landmine detection. Several groups are currently developing systems to detect landmines by "sniffing" for the ultra-trace explosive vapors above the soil. The amount of material that is available to passive vapor sensing systems is limited to no more than the vapor in equilibrium with the explosive related chemicals (ERCs) distributed in the surface soils over and near the landmine. The low equilibrium vapor pressure of TNT in the soil/atmosphere boundary layer and the limited volume of the boundary layer air imply that passive chemical vapor sensing systems require sensitivities in the picogram range, or lower. ADA is working to overcome many of the limitations of passive sampling methods, by the use of an active sampling method that employs a high-powered (1,200+ joules) strobe lamp to create a highly amplified plume of vapor and/or ERC-bearing fine particulates. Initial investigations have demonstrated that this approach can amplify the detectability of TNT by two or three orders of magnitude. This new active sampling technique could be used with any suitable explosive sensor.

  15. Residual matrix from different separation techniques impacts exosome biological activity

    PubMed Central

    Paolini, Lucia; Zendrini, Andrea; Noto, Giuseppe Di; Busatto, Sara; Lottini, Elisabetta; Radeghieri, Annalisa; Dossi, Alessandra; Caneschi, Andrea; Ricotta, Doris; Bergese, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are gaining a prominent role in research due to their intriguing biology and several therapeutic opportunities. However, their accurate purification from body fluids and detailed physicochemical characterization remain open issues. We isolated exosomes from serum of patients with Multiple Myeloma by four of the most popular purification methods and assessed the presence of residual contaminants in the preparations through an ad hoc combination of biochemical and biophysical techniques - including Western Blot, colloidal nanoplasmonics, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning helium ion microscopy (HIM). The preparations obtained by iodixanol and sucrose gradients were highly pure. To the contrary, those achieved with limited processing (serial centrifugation or one step precipitation kit) resulted contaminated by a residual matrix, embedding the exosomes. The contaminated preparations showed lower ability to induce NfkB nuclear translocation in endothelial cells with respect to the pure ones, probably because the matrix prevents the interaction and fusion of the exosomes with the cell membrane. These findings suggest that exosome preparation purity must be carefully assessed since it may interfere with exosome biological activity. Contaminants can be reliably probed only by an integrated characterization approach aimed at both the molecular and the colloidal length scales. PMID:27009329

  16. Rotor Flapping Response to Active Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Khanh; Johnson, Wayne

    2004-01-01

    Rotor active control using higher harmonic blade pitch has been proposed as a means to reduce both rotor radiated noise and airframe vibration and to enhance rotor performance. The higher harmonic input, however, can affect rotor thrust and cyclic flapping - the basic trim characteristics of the rotor. Some of the trim changes can negate the active control benefits. For example, wind tunnel test results of a full scale BO-105 rotor with individual-blade control indicate some rotor performance improvements, accompanied with changes in rotor trim, using two-per-rev blade pitch input. The observed performance benefits could therefore be a simple manifestation of the trim change rather than an efficient redistribution of the rotor airloads. More recently, the flight test of the BO-105 helicopter equip,ped with individual-blade-control actuators also reported trim changes whenever the two-per-rev blade pitch for noise reduction was activated. The pilot had to adjust the trim control to maintain the aircraft under a constant flight path. These two cases highlight the, importance of trim considerations in the application of active control to rotorcraft.

  17. Active control of an aircraft tail subject to harmonic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eissa, M.; Bauomy, H. S.; Amer, Y. A.

    2007-08-01

    Vibration of structures is often an undesirable phenomena and should be avoided or controlled. There are two techniques to control the vibration of a system, that is, active and passive control techniques. In this paper, a negative feedback velocity is applied to a dynamical system, which is represented by two coupled second order nonlinear differential equations having both quadratic and cubic nonlinearties. The system describes the vibration of an aircraft tail. The system is subjected to multi-external excitation forces. The method of multiple time scale perturbation is applied to solve the nonlinear differential equations and obtain approximate solutions up to third order of accuracy. The stability of the system is investigated applying frequency response equations. The effects of the different parameters are studied numerically. Various resonance cases are investigated. A comparison is made with the available published work.

  18. Actively controlled shaft seals for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salant, Richard F.

    1994-01-01

    This study experimentally investigates an actively controlled mechanical seal for aerospace applications. The seal of interest is a gas seal, which is considerably more compact than previous actively controlled mechanical seals that were developed for industrial use. In a mechanical seal, the radial convergence of the seal interface has a primary effect on the film thickness. Active control of the film thickness is established by controlling the radial convergence of the seal interface with piezoelectric actuator. An actively controlled mechanical seal was initially designed and evaluated using a mathematical model. Based on these results, a seal was fabricated and tested under laboratory conditions. The seal was tested with both helium and air, at rotational speeds up to 3770 rad/sec, and at sealed pressures as high as 1.48 x 10(exp 6) Pa. The seal was operated with both manual control and with a closed-loop control system that used either the leakage rate or face temperature as the feedback. The output of the controller was the voltage applied to the piezoelectric actuator. The seal operated successfully for both short term tests (less than one hour) and for longer term tests (four hours) with a closed-loop control system. The leakage rates were typically 5-15 slm (standard liters per minute), and the face temperatures were generally maintained below 100 C. When leakage rate was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint leakage rate was typically maintained within 1 slm. However, larger deviations occurred during sudden changes in sealed pressure. When face temperature was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint face temperature was generally maintained within 3 C, with larger deviations occurring when the sealed pressure changed suddenly.

  19. Mosquito Control Techniques Developed for the US Military

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA developed and field tested new techniques to reduce the risk to deployed military troops from vector-borne diseases. Some of the methods developed included (1) novel military personal protection methods, (2) barrier treatments of artificial materials and natural vegetation, and (3) ground a...

  20. Novel USDA Mosquito Control Techniques for the US Military

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel techniques that we developed at the USDA to protect deployed military troops from the threat of vector-borne diseases are described. Some of the methods developed included (1) novel military personal protection methods, (2) barrier treatments of artificial materials and natural vegetation, and...

  1. Reduced Environmental Stimulation Techniques and Control of Psychological Dependencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, G. David

    Three areas of research have supported the conceptual relevance of Reduced Environmental Stimulation (RES) techniques in the management of psychological dependencies. First, preliminary studies through the late l960's indicated that relatively short periods of RES had a facilitative effect on the type of subject who might be most vulnerable to…

  2. Vector control activities. Fiscal year, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Pickard, E.; Cooney, J.C.; McDuff, B.R.

    1983-06-01

    The goal of the TVA Vector Control Program is to protect the public from potential vectors of disease by controlling medically-important arthropod pests that are propagated on TVA lands or waters. In addition, freedom from annoying mosquitoes and other blood-sucking pests permits the development, use, and full enjoyment of the vast recreational opportunities offered by the many miles of freshwater lakes. To attain this goal the program is divided into operations and support studies. The support studies are designed to improve the operational effectiveness and efficiency of the control program and to identify other vector control problems that require TVA attention and study. Specifically, activities concerning water level management of TVA lakes, dewatering projects, plant growth control, drainage and insect control programs are detailed. Further, report is made of post-impoundment surveys, soil sampling studies of Mosquite larvae and ecological mosquito management studies.

  3. Smart actuators for active vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourboghrat, Farzad; Daneshdoost, Morteza

    1998-07-01

    In this paper, the design and implementation of smart actuators for active vibration control of mechanical systems are considered. A smart actuator is composed of one or several layers of piezo-electric materials which work both as sensors and actuators. Such a system also includes micro- electronic or power electronic amplifiers, depending on the power requirements and applications, as well as digital signal processing systems for digital control implementation. In addition, PWM type micro/power amplifiers are used for control implementation. Such amplifiers utilize electronic switching components that allow for miniaturization, thermal efficiency, cost reduction, and precision controls that are robust to disturbances and modeling errors. An adaptive control strategy is then developed for vibration damping and motion control of cantilever beams using the proposed smart self-sensing actuators.

  4. Reduction of propeller noise by active noise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bschorr, O.; Kubanke, D.

    1992-04-01

    Active noise control, a method of cancelling noise by means of interference with a secondary anti-noise source, is now in full development. The first commercial application of this technique is in the case of active electronically controlled head sets. The next step will be the active noise cancellation in air ducts and in passenger cabins. The aim of this paper is to assess the possibilities of the anti-noise technique for reducing propeller noise. First, by a mathematical simulation the theoretical noise reduction on the ground was calculated and found to be promising for further investigations. In the case of the periodic engine and propeller noise, for example, with only a single anti-noise source, the noise foot prints of the lower propeller harmonics can be reduced by up to 10 dB. In laboratory tests the theoretical values will be confirmed experimentally. For cancellation of the periodic noise one can use synchronous anti-noise generators. Compared with the engine and propeller noise the reduction of jet noise by the anti-noise technique is much more difficult. Therefore a sensor and controlling unit are necessary because of the stochastic nature of jet noise. Since aircraft noise is a severe problem, all methods are to be considered.

  5. Actively Controlling Buffet-Induced Excitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Robert W.; Pototzky, Anthony S.; Henderson, Douglas A.; Galea, Stephen C.; Manokaran, Donald S.; Zimcik, David G.; Wickramasinghe, Viresh; Pitt, Dale M.; Gamble, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    High performance aircraft, especially those with twin vertical tails, encounter unsteady buffet loads when flying at high angles of attack. These loads result in significant random stresses, which may cause fatigue damage leading to restricted capabilities and availability of the aircraft. An international collaborative research activity among Australia, Canada and the United States, conducted under the auspices of The Technical Cooperation Program (TTCP) contributed resources toward a program that coalesced a broad range of technical knowledge and expertise into a single investigation to demonstrate the enhanced performance and capability of the advanced active BLA control system in preparation for a flight test demonstration. The research team investigated the use of active structural control to alleviate the damaging structural response to these loads by applying advanced directional piezoelectric actuators, the aircraft rudder, switch mode amplifiers, and advanced control strategies on an F/A-18 aircraft empennage. Some results of the full-scale investigation are presented herein.

  6. The evolution of tooling, techniques, and quality control for accelerator dipole magnet cables

    SciTech Connect

    Scanlan, R.M.

    1992-08-01

    The present generation of particle accelerators are utilizing the flattened, compacted, single layer cable design introduced nearly 20 years ago at Rutherford Laboratory. However, the requirements for current density, filament size, dimensional control long lengths, and low current degradation are much more stringent for the present accelerators compared with the earlier Tevatron and HERA accelerators. Also, in order to achieve higher field strengths with efficient use of superconductor, the new designs require wider cables with more strands. These requirements have stimulated an active research effort which has led to significant improvements in critical current density and conductor manufacturing. In addition they have stimulated the development of new cabling techniques, improved tooling, and better measurement techniques. The need to produce over 20 million meters of cable has led to the development of high speed cabling machines and on-line quality assurance measurements. These new developments will be discussed, and areas still requiring improvement will be identified.

  7. Application of optimization techniques to the design of a flutter suppression control law for the DAST ARW-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, W. M., Jr.; Tiffany, S. H.

    1984-01-01

    The design of a candidate flutter suppression (FS) control law for the symmetric degrees of freedom for the DAST ARW-2 aircraft is discussed. The results illustrate the application of several currently employed control law design techniques. Subsequent designs, obtained as the mathematical model of the ARW-2 is updated, are expected to employ similar methods and to provide a control law whose performance will be flight tested. This study represents one of the steps necessary to provide an assessment of the validity of applying current control law synthesis and analysis techniques in the design of actively controlled aircraft. Mathematical models employed in the control law design and evaluation phases are described. The control problem is specified by presenting the flutter boundary predicted for the uncontrolled aircraft and by defining objectives and constraints that the controller should satisfy. A full-order controller is obtained by using Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) techniques. The process of obtaining an implementable reduced-order controller is described. One example is also shown in which constrained optimization techniques are utilized to explicitly include robustness criteria within the design algorithm.

  8. Experimental Study of Active Techniques for Blade/Vortex Interaction Noise Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobiki, Noboru; Murashige, Atsushi; Tsuchihashi, Akihiko; Yamakawa, Eiichi

    This paper presents the experimental results of the effect of Higher Harmonic Control (HHC) and Active Flap on the Blade/Vortex Interaction (BVI) noise. Wind tunnel tests were performed with a 1-bladed rotor system to evaluate the simplified BVI phenomenon avoiding the complicated aerodynamic interference which is characteristically and inevitably caused by a multi-bladed rotor. Another merit to use this 1-bladed rotor system is that the several objective active techniques can be evaluated under the same condition installed in the same rotor system. The effects of the active techniques on the BVI noise reduction were evaluated comprehensively by the sound pressure, the blade/vortex miss distance obtained by Laser light Sheet (LLS), the blade surface pressure distribution and the tip vortex structure by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The correlation among these quantities to describe the effect of the active techniques on the BVI conditions is well obtained. The experiments show that the blade/vortex miss distance is more dominant for BVI noise than the other two BVI governing factors, such as blade lift and vortex strength at the moment of BVI.

  9. Active Flow Control Stator With Coanda Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guendogdu; Vorreiter; Seume

    2010-01-01

    Active Flow Control increases the permissible aerodynamic loading. Curved surface near the trailing edge ("Coanda surface"): a) increases turning -> higher pressure ratio. b) controls boundary layer separation -> increased surge margin. Objective: Reduce the number of vanes or compressor stages. Constraints: 1. In a real compressor, the vane must still function entirely without blowing. 2. Maintain the flow exit angle of the reference stator despite the resulting increase in stator loading.

  10. Realization of tin freezing point using a loop heat pipe-based hydraulic temperature control technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joung, Wukchul; Gam, Kee Sool; Kim, Yong-Gyoo

    2015-10-01

    In this work, the freezing point of tin (Sn FP) was realized by inside nucleation where the supercooling of tin and the reheating of the sample after the nucleation were achieved without extracting the cell from an isothermal apparatus. To this end, a novel hydraulic temperature control technique, which was based on the thermo-hydraulic characteristics of a pressure-controlled loop heat pipe (LHP), was employed to provide a slow cooling of the sample for deep supercooling and fast reheating after nucleation to minimize the amount of initial freeze of the sample. The required temperature controls were achieved by the active pressure control of a control gas inside the compensation chamber of the pressure-controlled LHP, and slow cooling at  -0.05 K min-1 for the deep supercooling of tin and fast heating at 2 K min-1 for reheating the sample after nucleation was attained. Based on this hydraulic temperature control technique, the nucleation of tin was realized at supercooling of around 19 K, and a satisfactorily fast reheating of the sample to the plateau-producing temperature (i.e. 0.5 K below the Sn FP) was achieved without any temperature overshoots of the isothermal region. The inside-nucleated Sn FP showed many desirable features compared to the Sn FP realized by the conventional outside nucleation method. The longer freezing plateaus and the better immersion characteristics of the Sn FP were obtained by inside nucleation, and the measured freezing temperature of the inside-nucleated Sn FP was as much as 0.37 mK higher than the outside-nucleated Sn FP with an expanded uncertainty of 0.19 mK. Details on the experiment are provided and explanations for the observed differences are discussed.

  11. Modeling and Control for an Asymmetric Hydraulic Active Suspension System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Wanil; Won, Sangchul

    In this paper we present a model for an automotive active suspension system which includes the dynamics of an asymmetric hydraulic actuator. In this model the force exerted by a single-rod cylinder is regarded as an internal state, and the sum of the oil flow rates through the orifice of a servo valve as the control input. We obtain a linear time-invariant (LTI) state state equation and propose a force-tracking-free one-step control method which can accept various linear control techniques. An optimal state-feedback control is applied as an example. Quarter car test rig experiment results show the effectiveness of the proposed approach in modeling and control.

  12. Active Control of Cryogenic Propellants in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notardonato, William

    2011-01-01

    A new era of space exploration is being planned. Exploration architectures under consideration require the long term storage of cryogenic propellants in space. This requires development of active control systems to mitigate the effect of heat leak. This work summarizes current state of the art, proposes operational design strategies and presents options for future architectures. Scaling and integration of active systems will be estimated. Ideal long range spacecraft systems will be proposed with Exploration architecture benefits considered.

  13. Techniques for increasing the reliability of accelerator control system electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Utterback, J.

    1993-09-01

    As the physical size of modern accelerators becomes larger and larger, the number of required control system circuit boards increases, and the probability of one of those circuit boards failing while in service also increases. In order to do physics, the experimenters need the accelerator to provide beam reliably with as little down time as possible. With the advent of colliding beams physics, reliability becomes even more important due to the fact that a control system failure can cause the loss of painstakingly produced antiprotons. These facts prove the importance of keeping reliability in mind when designing and maintaining accelerator control system electronics.

  14. Active control of nano dimers response using piezoelectric effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekkawy, Ahmed A.; Ali, Tamer A.; Badawi, Ashraf H.

    2016-09-01

    Nano devices can be used as building blocks for Internet of Nano-Things network devices, such as sensors/actuators, transceivers, and routers. Although nano particles response can be engineered to fit in different regimes, for such a nano particle to be used as an active nano device, its properties should be dynamically controlled. This controllability is a challenge, and there are many proposed techniques to tune nanoparticle response on the spot through a sort of control signal, wither that signal is optical (for all-optical systems) or electronic (for opto-electronic systems). This will allow the use of nano particles as nano-switches or as dynamic sensors that can pick different frequencies depending on surrounding conditions or depending on a smart decisions. In this work, we propose a piezoelectric substrate as an active control mediator to control plasmonic gaps in nano dimers. This method allows for integrating nano devices with regular electronics while communicating control signals to nano devices through applying electric signals to a piezoelectric material, in order to control the gaps between nano particles in a nano cluster. We do a full numerical study to the system, analyzing the piezoelectric control resolution (minimum gap change step) and its effect on a nanodimer response as a nanoantenna. This analysis considers the dielectric functions of materials within the visible frequencies range. The effects of different parameters, such as the piezoelectric geometrical structure and materials, on the gap control resolution and the operating frequency are studied.

  15. Characterization of an Actively Controlled Three-Dimensional Turret Wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, Patrick; Glauser, Mark

    2012-11-01

    Three-dimensional turrets are commonly used for housing optical systems on airborne platforms. As bluff bodies, these geometries generate highly turbulent wakes that decrease the performance of the optical systems and the aircraft. The current experimental study looked to use dynamic suction in both open and closed-loop control configurations to actively control the turret wake. The flow field was characterized using dynamic pressure and stereoscopic PIV measurements in the wake of the turret. Results showed that the suction system was able to manipulate the wake region of the turret and could alter not only the spatial structure of the wake, but also the temporal behavior of the wake flow field. Closed-loop, feedback control techniques were used to determine a more optimal control input for the flow control. Similar control effects were seen for both the steady open-loop control case and the closed-loop feedback control configuration with a 45% reduction in the suction levels when comparing the closed-loop to the open-loop case. These results provide unique information regarding the development of the baseline three-dimensional wake and the wake with three different active flow control configurations.

  16. Seismic active control by neutral networks

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yu

    1995-12-31

    A study on the application of artificial neural networks (ANNs) to active structural control under seismic loads is carried out. The structure considered is a single-degree-of-freedom (SDF) system with an active bracing device. The control force is computed by a trained neural network. The feedforward neural network architecture and an adaptive backpropagation training algorithm is used in the study. The neural net is trained to reproduce the function that represents the response-excitation relationship of the SDF system under seismic loads. The input-output training patterns are generated randomly. In the backpropagation training algorithm, the learning rate is determined by ensuring the decrease of the error function at each epoch. The computer program implemented is validated by solving the classification of the XOR problem. Then, the trained ANN is used to compute the control force according to the control strategy. If the control force exceeds the actuator`s capacity limit, it is set equal to that limit. The concept of the control strategy employed herein is to apply the control force at every time step to cancel the system velocity induced at the preceding time step so that the gradual rhythmic buildup of the response is destroyed. The ground motions considered in the numerical example are the 1940 El Centro earthquake and the 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake in California. The system responses with and without the control are calculated and compared. The feasibility and potential of applying ANNs to seismic active control is asserted by the promising results obtained from the numerical examples studied.

  17. Monitoring by Control Technique - Wet Scrubber For Particulate Matter

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page is about Wet Scrubber For Particulate Matter controls used to reduce pollutant emissions.

  18. Compliance Assurance Monitoring Technical Guidance Document Appendices by Control Technique

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Compliance assurance monitoring is intended to provide a reasonable assurance of compliance with applicable requirements under the Clean Air Act for large emission units that rely on pollution control device equipment to achieve compliance.

  19. A Model-Following Technique for Insensitive Aircraft Control Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    Harvey and Pope(131 and Vinkler[301 compared several different methods in their works, while Shenkar [261 and Ashkenazi[2i extended the most promising...Following for In- sensitive Control works, let us consider the simple, first-order system used by Shenkar [261. The plant is described by x -(1 + Ar)x + u...representative of the methods of Vinkler, Asikenazi, and Shenkar ), and Model Following for Insensitive Control (MrIC). For the LQR design, we assume that our

  20. Optical techniques for signal distribution and control in advanced radar and communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, J. R.

    1985-03-01

    It is concluded that optical techniques offer some advantages for signal distribution and control in advanced radar and communication systems. They are clearly ideal for transporting microwave signals over considerable distances, as in remote positioning of radar receivers, provided high dynamic range is not required and an enclosed transmission path is essential. They are an elegant means of distributing low level r.f. or i.f. signals around an active phased array where these signals are of relatively constant amplitude (as in mixer local oscillator applications). However, there is currently a rather restrictive limit on the size of distribution network possible. Optical techniques are obviously suitable for distributing digital control signals to phased array modules and confer considerable immunity to interference. They are less suitable for high dynamic range signals, such as the received radar returns, either at r.f. or when downcovered to i.f. Future developments in coherent optics or in fast optical A/D technology could, however, influence this conclusion. Currently, the optimum applications for optical techniques appear to be i.f. beamformers for multibeam communication satellite systems and in calibration/monitoring systems for phased arrays.

  1. Rolling maneuver load alleviation using active controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods-Vedeler, Jessica A.; Pototzky, Anthony S.

    1992-01-01

    Rolling Maneuver Load Alleviation (RMLA) was demonstrated on the Active Flexible Wing (AFW) wind tunnel model in the LaRC Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. The design objective was to develop a systematic approach for developing active control laws to alleviate wing incremental loads during roll maneuvers. Using linear load models for the AFW wind-tunnel model which were based on experimental measurements, two RMLA control laws were developed based on a single-degree-of-freedom roll model. The RMLA control laws utilized actuation of outboard control surface pairs to counteract incremental loads generated during rolling maneuvers and roll performance. To evaluate the RMLA control laws, roll maneuvers were performed in the wind tunnel at dynamic pressures of 150, 200, and 250 psf and Mach numbers of .33, .38, and .44, respectively. Loads obtained during these maneuvers were compared to baseline maneuver loads. For both RMLA controllers, the incremental torsion moments were reduced by up to 60 percent at all dynamic pressures and performance times. Results for bending moment load reductions during roll maneuvers varied. In addition, in a multiple function test, RMLA and flutter suppression system control laws were operated simultaneously during roll maneuvers at dynamic pressures 11 percent above the open-loop flutter dynamic pressure.

  2. Piezoelectric Power Requirements for Active Vibration Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennan, Matthew C.; McGowan, Anna-Maria Rivas

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a method for predicting the power consumption of piezoelectric actuators utilized for active vibration control. Analytical developments and experimental tests show that the maximum power required to control a structure using surface-bonded piezoelectric actuators is independent of the dynamics between the piezoelectric actuator and the host structure. The results demonstrate that for a perfectly-controlled system, the power consumption is a function of the quantity and type of piezoelectric actuators and the voltage and frequency of the control law output signal. Furthermore, as control effectiveness decreases, the power consumption of the piezoelectric actuators decreases. In addition, experimental results revealed a non-linear behavior in the material properties of piezoelectric actuators. The material non- linearity displayed a significant increase in capacitance with an increase in excitation voltage. Tests show that if the non-linearity of the capacitance was accounted for, a conservative estimate of the power can easily be determined.

  3. Closed-loop active optical system control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, T. E.

    1980-01-01

    A control system, based on a real-time lateral shear interferometer has been developed for use in control during thermal tests and static error compensation experiments. The minicomputer which controls the interferometer and provides its service functions also controls the active system, thereby giving flexibility to the algorithm. The minicomputer system contains 288 K bytes of memory and 15 M bytes of disk storage. The interferometer system employed is composed of the measuring head and its support electronics, a video display on which wavefront contour maps are generated, and a DECwriter operator console. The versatility provided by the use of a general purpose interferometer system allows for interactive control of the closed-loop process. Various arithmetic capabilities such as the addition of wavefronts, division by a constant, and fitting of wavefront data with Zernike polynomials, allow for measurements to be averaged and for removal of alignment errors before correction is performed.

  4. Actively Controlled Shaft Seals for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salant, Richard F.; Wolff, Paul

    1995-01-01

    This study experimentally investigates an actively controlled mechanical seal for aerospace applications. The seal of interest is a gas seal, which is considerably more compact than previous actively controlled mechanical seals that were developed for industrial use. In a mechanical seal, the radial convergence of the seal interface has a primary effect on the film thickness. Active control of the film thickness is established by controlling the radial convergence of the seal interface with a piezoelectric actuator. An actively controlled mechanical seal was initially designed and evaluated using a mathematical model. Based on these results, a seal was fabricated and tested under laboratory conditions. The seal was tested with both helium and air, at rotational speeds up to 3770 rad/sec, and at sealed pressures as high as 1.48 x 10(exp 6) Pa. The seal was operated with both manual control and with a closed-loop control system that used either the leakage rate or face temperature as the feedback. The output of the controller was the voltage applied to the piezoelectric actuator. The seal operated successfully for both short term tests (less than one hour) and for longer term tests (four hours) with a closed-loop control system. The leakage rates were typically 5-15 slm (standard liters per minute), and the face temperatures were generally maintained below 100C. When leakage rate was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint leakage rate was typically maintained within 1 slm. However, larger deviations occurred during sudden changes in sealed pressure. When face temperature was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint face temperature was generally maintained within 3 C, with larger deviations occurring when the sealed pressure changes suddenly. the experimental results were compared to the predictions from the mathematical model. The model was successful in predicting the trends in leakage rate that occurred as the balance ratio and sealed pressure changed

  5. Actively controlled shaft seals for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salant, Richard F.

    1995-07-01

    This study experimentally investigates an actively controlled mechanical seal for aerospace applications. The seal of interest is a gas seal, which is considerably more compact than previous actively controlled mechanical seals that were developed for industrial use. In a mechanical seal, the radial convergence of the seal interface has a primary effect on the film thickness. Active control of the film thickness is established by controlling the radial convergence of the seal interface with a piezoelectric actuator. An actively controlled mechanical seal was initially designed and evaluated using a mathematical model. Based on these results, a seal was fabricated and tested under laboratory conditions. The seal was tested with both helium and air, at rotational speeds up to 3770 rad/sec, and at sealed pressures as high as 1.48 x 10(exp 6) Pa. The seal was operated with both manual control and with a closed-loop control system that used either the leakage rate or face temperature as the feedback. The output of the controller was the voltage applied to the piezoelectric actuator. The seal operated successfully for both short term tests (less than one hour) and for longer term tests (four hours) with a closed-loop control system. The leakage rates were typically 5-15 slm (standard liters per minute), and the face temperatures were generally maintained below 100C. When leakage rate was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint leakage rate was typically maintained within 1 slm. However, larger deviations occurred during sudden changes in sealed pressure. When face temperature was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint face temperature was generally maintained within 3 C, with larger deviations occurring when the sealed pressure changes suddenly. the experimental results were compared to the predictions from the mathematical model. The model was successful in predicting the trends in leakage rate that occurred as the balance ratio and sealed pressure changed

  6. Snapshot of Active Flow Control Research at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, A. E.; Gorton, S. Althoff; Anders, S. G.

    2002-01-01

    NASA Langley is aggressively investigating the potential advantages of active flow control as opposed to more traditional aerodynamic techniques. Many of these techniques will be blended with advanced materials and structures to further enhance payoff. Therefore a multi-disciplinary approach to technology development is being attempted that includes researchers from the more historical disciplines of fluid mechanics. acoustics, material science, structural mechanics, and control theory. The overall goals of the topics presented are focused on advancing the state of knowledge and understanding of controllable fundamental mechanisms in fluids rather than on specific engineering problems. An organizational view of current research activities at NASA Langley in active flow control as supported by several programs such as the Morphing Project under Breakthrough Vehicle Technologies Program (BVT). the Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology Program (UEET), and the 21st Century Aircraft Technology Program (TCAT) is presented. On-center research as well as NASA Langley funded contracts and grants are discussed at a relatively high level. The products of this research, as part of the fundamental NASA R and D (research and development) program. will be demonstrated as either bench-top experiments, wind-tunnel investigations, or in flight tests. Later they will be transferred to more applied research programs within NASA, DOD (Department of Defense), and U.S. industry.

  7. MODELING MERCURY CONTROL WITH POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents a mathematical model of total mercury removed from the flue gas at coal-fired plants equipped with powdered activated carbon (PAC) injection for Mercury control. The developed algorithms account for mercury removal by both existing equipment and an added PAC in...

  8. 77 FR 45307 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans: Georgia; Control Techniques...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-31

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans: Georgia; Control Techniques Guidelines and Reasonably Available Control Technology AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency..., in the alternative, to conditionally approve that revision which relates to certain...

  9. DNA-based control of protein activity

    PubMed Central

    Engelen, W.; Janssen, B. M. G.

    2016-01-01

    DNA has emerged as a highly versatile construction material for nanometer-sized structures and sophisticated molecular machines and circuits. The successful application of nucleic acid based systems greatly relies on their ability to autonomously sense and act on their environment. In this feature article, the development of DNA-based strategies to dynamically control protein activity via oligonucleotide triggers is discussed. Depending on the desired application, protein activity can be controlled by directly conjugating them to an oligonucleotide handle, or expressing them as a fusion protein with DNA binding motifs. To control proteins without modifying them chemically or genetically, multivalent ligands and aptamers that reversibly inhibit their function provide valuable tools to regulate proteins in a noncovalent manner. The goal of this feature article is to give an overview of strategies developed to control protein activity via oligonucleotide-based triggers, as well as hurdles yet to be taken to obtain fully autonomous systems that interrogate, process and act on their environments by means of DNA-based protein control. PMID:26812623

  10. Active Noise Control for Dishwasher noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Nokhaeng; Park, Youngjin

    2016-09-01

    The dishwasher is a useful home appliance and continually used for automatically washing dishes. It's commonly placed in the kitchen with built-in style for practicality and better use of space. In this environment, people are easily exposed to dishwasher noise, so it is an important issue for the consumers, especially for the people living in open and narrow space. Recently, the sound power levels of the noise are about 40 - 50 dBA. It could be achieved by removal of noise sources and passive means of insulating acoustical path. For more reduction, such a quiet mode with the lower speed of cycle has been introduced, but this deteriorates the washing capacity. Under this background, we propose active noise control for dishwasher noise. It is observed that the noise is propagating mainly from the lower part of the front side. Control speakers are placed in the part for the collocation. Observation part of estimating sound field distribution and control part of generating the anti-noise are designed for active noise control. Simulation result shows proposed active noise control scheme could have a potential application for dishwasher noise reduction.

  11. Respiratory protective device design using control system techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, W. A.; Yankovich, D.

    1972-01-01

    The feasibility of a control system analysis approach to provide a design base for respiratory protective devices is considered. A system design approach requires that all functions and components of the system be mathematically identified in a model of the RPD. The mathematical notations describe the operation of the components as closely as possible. The individual component mathematical descriptions are then combined to describe the complete RPD. Finally, analysis of the mathematical notation by control system theory is used to derive compensating component values that force the system to operate in a stable and predictable manner.

  12. Active control of transmitted sound in buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompsett, Russell Harvey George

    The problem of noise from neighbours has increased dramatically over the last few years. Many of the noise complaints are due to the high level, low frequency noise from modern stereo equipment, and are often described in terms of the low frequency characteristics of the music; the repetitive, booming, bass beat. The objective of this research was to establish the feasibility of applying active noise control to alleviate this problem. The initial approach was to evaluate the possibility of exploiting the dominance of individual modes in the response of rooms at low frequency to effect global control. However, initial investigations using a modal model of the sound field revealed that this would be difficult due to the contribution of many acoustic modes excited off resonance. This conclusion was supported by measurements of acoustic room responses in typical buildings, illustrating a non-resonant characteristic. Consequently, attention was turned to the feasibility of using local active control systems to create zones of quiet by concentrating control at a specific location near the observers ears, for example in a seat headrest, or near the pillows of a bed. The lack of a reference signal in either approach requires the use of a feedback control strategy. With a typically non-resonant system, the predictability in the disturbance necessary for successful feedback control must be contained in the primary excitation, namely the music. Examples of different music styles were investigated and of those with the potential to be a nuisance surprisingly few were significantly more predictable than a random disturbance. As expected the most encouraging control performance simulations were found for modern dance music, with a strong repetitive beat. A real-time, local controller was demonstrated in the laboratory with such a disturbance signal and the properties of the quiet zone were measured. The subjective response when hearing the controller in operation was found to be

  13. Active control of multiple resistive wall modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Yadikin, D.; Gregoratto, D.; Paccagnella, R.; Liu, Y. Q.; Bolzonella, T.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.; Kuldkepp, M.; Manduchi, G.; Marchiori, G.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, P.; Menmuir, S.; Ortolani, S.; Rachlew, E.; Spizzo, G.; Zanca, P.

    2005-12-01

    A two-dimensional array of saddle coils at Mc poloidal and Nc toroidal positions is used on the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch (Brunsell P R et al 2001 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43 1457) to study active control of resistive wall modes (RWMs). Spontaneous growth of several RWMs with poloidal mode number m = 1 and different toroidal mode number n is observed experimentally, in agreement with linear MHD modelling. The measured plasma response to a controlled coil field and the plasma response computed using the linear circular cylinder MHD model are in quantitive agreement. Feedback control introduces a linear coupling of modes with toroidal mode numbers n, n' that fulfil the condition |n - n'| = Nc. Pairs of coupled unstable RWMs are present in feedback experiments with an array of Mc × Nc = 4 × 16 coils. Using intelligent shell feedback, the coupled modes are generally not controlled even though the field is suppressed at the active coils. A better suppression of coupled modes may be achieved in the case of rotating modes by using the mode control feedback scheme with individually set complex gains. In feedback with a larger array of Mc × Nc = 4 × 32 coils, the coupling effect largely disappears, and with this array, the main internal RWMs n = -11, -10, +5, +6 are all simultaneously suppressed throughout the discharge (7 8 wall times). With feedback there is a two-fold extension of the pulse length, compared to discharges without feedback.

  14. Beamline Control and Instrumentation System using Industrial Interface Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Enz, F.

    2010-06-23

    How should a beamline be designed, which satisfies the needs and requirements of scientists and is easy to build and operate? Today, most control and instrumentation systems for beamlines are based on scientific requirements. Scientific details of the beamline, e.g. vacuum and beam physics details; are usually extensively described. However, control system specifications are often reduced to few requirements, e.g. which beam-related device to use. Lots of these systems work perfectly from the physicist's point of view, but are hard to bring into service and operate and difficult to extend with additional equipment. To overcome this, the engineering company ENZ has developed components using industrial standard interfaces to guarantee high flexibility for equipment extension. Using special interface boards and galvanic isolation offers increased stability of motion control axes. This saves resources during commissioning and service. A control system was developed and installed at a Soft-X-ray beamline at ASP Melbourne. It is operated under EPICs on distributed embedded IOC's based on PC-hardware. Motion and vacuum systems, measurement devices, e.g. a Low-Current Monitor (LoCuM) for beam position monitoring, and parts of the equipment protection system were developed and most of them tested in cooperation with DELTA at the Technical University of Dortmund.

  15. An activated fluid stream--New techniques for cold water cleaning.

    PubMed

    Birkin, Peter R; Offin, Douglas G; Leighton, Timothy G

    2016-03-01

    Electrochemical, acoustic and imaging techniques are used to characterise surface cleaning with particular emphasis on the understanding of the key phenomena relevant to surface cleaning. A range of novel techniques designed to enhance and monitor the effective cleaning of a solid/liquid interface is presented. Among the techniques presented, mass transfer of material to a sensor embedded in a surface is demonstrated to be useful in the further exploration of ultrasonic cleaning of high aspect ratio micropores. In addition the effect of micropore size on the cleaning efficacy is demonstrated. The design and performance of a new cleaning system reliant on the activation of bubbles within a free flowing stream is presented. This device utilised acoustic activation of bubbles within the stream and at a variety of substrates. Finally, a controlled bubble swarm is generated in the stream using electrolysis, and its effect on both acoustic output and cleaning performance are compared to the case when no bubbles are added. This will demonstrate the active role that the electrochemically generated bubble swarm can have in extending the spatial zone over which cleaning is achieved.

  16. Drug-induced sleep endoscopy: conventional versus target controlled infusion techniques--a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    De Vito, Andrea; Agnoletti, Vanni; Berrettini, Stefano; Piraccini, Emanuele; Criscuolo, Armando; Corso, Ruggero; Campanini, Aldo; Gambale, Giorgio; Vicini, Claudio

    2011-03-01

    Understanding the sites of pharyngeal collapse is mandatory for surgical treatment decision-making in obstructive sleep-apnea-hypopnea syndrome patients. Drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) allows for the direct observation of the upper airway during sedative-induced sleep. In order to re-create snoring and apnea patterns related to a spontaneous sleep situation, the authors used a target-controlled infusion (TCI) sleep endoscopy (DISE-TCI), comparing this technique to conventional DISE, in which sedation was reached by a manual bolus injection. The authors conducted a prospective, randomized, unicenter study. The apneic event observation and its correlation with pharyngeal collapse patterns is the primary endpoint; secondary endpoints are defined as stability and safety of sedation plans of DISE-TCI technique. From January 2009 to June 2009, 40 OSAHS patients were included in the study and randomized allocated in two groups: the bolus injection conventional DISE group and the DISE-TCI group. We recorded the complete apnea event at the oropharynx and hypopharynx levels in 4 patients of the conventional DISE group (20%) and in 17 patients of the DISE-TCI group (85%) (P < 0.0001). Two patients needed oxygen in the conventional DISE group because of severe desaturation that resulted from the first bolus of propofol (1 mg/kg) (P = 0.4872 ns). We recorded the instability of the sedation plan in 13 patients from the conventional DISE group (65%) and 1 patient from the DISE-TCI group (5%) (P = 0.0001). Our results suggest that the DISE-TCI technique should be the first choice in performing sleep endoscopy because of its increased accuracy, stability and safety.

  17. A study of poultry processing plant noise control techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyvill, J. C.; Morrison, W. G., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A number of techniques can be used to reduce noise in poultry processing plants. In general, covering the ceiling with a noise-absorbing medium is a practical first step. Once the reflected noise levels are abated, treatment of specific identifiable noise courses can take place. The development, flammability, and mechanical properties of acoustic panels to be vertically suspended from the ceiling are discussed as well as the covers need to comply with USDA cleanability requirements. The isolation of drive motors and pumps from large expansive areas, the muffling of pneumatic devices, and the insulation of ice chutes are methods of source quieting. Proper maintenance of machinery and vibration monitoring are also needed to reduce hearing damage risk and to improve worker productivity and employee/supervisor relations.

  18. Controlling contagion processes in activity driven networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Suyu; Perra, Nicola; Karsai, Márton; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2014-03-21

    The vast majority of strategies aimed at controlling contagion processes on networks consider the connectivity pattern of the system either quenched or annealed. However, in the real world, many networks are highly dynamical and evolve, in time, concurrently with the contagion process. Here, we derive an analytical framework for the study of control strategies specifically devised for a class of time-varying networks, namely activity-driven networks. We develop a block variable mean-field approach that allows the derivation of the equations describing the coevolution of the contagion process and the network dynamic. We derive the critical immunization threshold and assess the effectiveness of three different control strategies. Finally, we validate the theoretical picture by simulating numerically the spreading process and control strategies in both synthetic networks and a large-scale, real-world, mobile telephone call data set.

  19. Control Systems Cyber Security Standards Support Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Evans

    2009-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security’s Control Systems Security Program (CSSP) is working with industry to secure critical infrastructure sectors from cyber intrusions that could compromise control systems. This document describes CSSP’s current activities with industry organizations in developing cyber security standards for control systems. In addition, it summarizes the standards work being conducted by organizations within the sector and provides a brief listing of sector meetings and conferences that might be of interest for each sector. Control systems cyber security standards are part of a rapidly changing environment. The participation of CSSP in the development effort for these standards has provided consistency in the technical content of the standards while ensuring that information developed by CSSP is included.

  20. Actively controlled vibration welding system and method

    DOEpatents

    Cai, Wayne W.; Kang, Bongsu; Tan, Chin-An

    2013-04-02

    A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an active material element, and anvil assembly. The assembly may include an anvil body connected to a back plate and support member. The element, e.g., a piezoelectric stack or shape memory alloy, is positioned with respect to the assembly. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction to form a weld on a work piece. The element controls any vibrations in a second direction by applying calibrated response to the anvil body in the second direction. A method for controlling undesirable vibrations in the system includes positioning the element with respect to the anvil assembly, connecting the anvil body to the support member through the back plate, vibrating the horn in a desirable first direction, and transmitting an input signal to the element to control vibration in an undesirable second direction.

  1. Safe microburst penetration techniques: A deterministic, nonlinear, optimal control approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Psiaki, Mark L.

    1987-01-01

    A relatively large amount of computer time was used for the calculation of a optimal trajectory, but it is subject to reduction with moderate effort. The Deterministic, Nonlinear, Optimal Control algorithm yielded excellent aircraft performance in trajectory tracking for the given microburst. It did so by varying the angle of attack to counteract the lift effects of microburst induced airspeed variations. Throttle saturation and aerodynamic stall limits were not a problem for the case considered, proving that the aircraft's performance capabilities were not violated by the given wind field. All closed loop control laws previously considered performed very poorly in comparison, and therefore do not come near to taking full advantage of aircraft performance.

  2. A Compilation of Common Algal Control and Management Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    early developmental stages , with most studies being conducted in the laboratory. Additional information is needed in all areas of biological control...of the colonial flagellates (green algae). An examination of the filtrate on the rate of photo- synthesis (as measured by oxygen evolution) in Volvox ...C-14 studies of the feeding and food requirements of the white and mot- tled varieties of H. molitrix at different stages of development are

  3. Exploring Young Women's Perceptions of the Effectiveness and Safety of Maladaptive Weight Control Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tylka, Tracy L.; Subich, Linda Mezydlo

    2002-01-01

    Despite emerging awareness that maladaptive perceptions regarding weight control techniques may be important in the development of women's disturbed eating behaviors, no research has examined perceptions of weight control techniques as a function of women's placement on the eating disorder continuum. Study examines perceptions of the effectiveness…

  4. An Information-Centric Approach to Autonomous Trajectory Planning Utilizing Optimal Control Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    INFORMATION-CENTRIC APPROACH TO AUTONOMOUS TRAJECTORY PLANNING UTILIZING OPTIMAL CONTROL TECHNIQUES by Michael A. Hurni September 2009...Dissertation 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE: An Information-centric Approach to Autonomous Trajectory Planning Utilizing Optimal Control Techniques 6...then finding a time- optimal time scaling for the path subject to the actuator limits. The direct approach searches for the trajectory directly

  5. Auto Bias Control technique for optical 16-QAM transmitter with asymmetric bias dithering.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Hiroto; Kobayashi, Takayuki; Yoshida, Eiji; Miyamoto, Yutaka

    2011-12-12

    ABC (Auto Bias Control) technique for QAM (Quadrature Amplitude Modulation) transmitter is demonstrated. 16-QAM (10G baud) is generated and controlled using a single IQ modulator and asymmetric bias dithering technique. Measured penalty is 0.3 dB.

  6. Active noise control: A tutorial for HVAC designers

    SciTech Connect

    Gelin, L.J.

    1997-08-01

    This article will identify the capabilities and limitations of ANC in its application to HVAC noise control. ANC can be used in ducted HVAC systems to cancel ductborne, low-frequency fan noise by injecting sound waves of equal amplitude and opposite phase into an air duct, as close as possible to the source of the unwanted noise. Destructive interference of the fan noise and injected noise results in sound cancellation. The noise problems that it solves are typically described as rumble, roar or throb, all of which are difficult to address using traditional noise control methods. This article will also contrast the use of active against passive noise control techniques. The main differences between the two noise control measures are acoustic performance, energy consumption, and design flexibility. The article will first present the fundamentals and basic physics of ANC. The application to real HVAC systems will follow.

  7. Active vibration control using DEAP actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarban, Rahimullah; Jones, Richard W.

    2010-04-01

    Dielectric electro-active polymer (DEAP) is a new type of smart material, which has the potential to be used to provide effective actuation for a wide range of applications. The properties of DEAP material place it somewhere between those of piezoceramics and shape memory alloys. Of the range of DEAP-based actuators that have been developed those having a cylindrical configuration are among the most promising. This contribution introduces the use of a tubular type DEAP actuator for active vibration control purposes. Initially the DEAP-based tubular actuator to be used in this study, produced by Danfoss PolyPower A/S, is introduced along with the static and dynamic characteristics. Secondly an electromechanical model of the tubular actuator is briefly reviewed and its ability to model the actuator's hysteresis characteristics for a range of periodic input signals at different frequencies demonstrated. The model will be used to provide hysteresis compensation in future vibration isolation studies. Experimental active vibration control using the actuator is then examined, specifically active vibration isolation of a 250 g mass subject to shaker generated 'ground vibration'. An adaptive feedforward control strategy is used to achieve this. The ability of the tubular actuator to reject both tonal and broadband random vibratory disturbances is then demonstrated.

  8. Successful Application of Active Learning Techniques to Introductory Microbiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Elizabeth A.

    2001-01-01

    Points out the low student achievement in microbiology courses and presents an active learning method applied in an introductory microbiology course which features daily quizzes, cooperative learning activities, and group projects. (Contains 30 references.) (YDS)

  9. Vehicle active suspension system using skyhook adaptive neuro active force control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyandoko, G.; Mailah, M.; Jamaluddin, H.

    2009-04-01

    This paper aims to highlight the practical viability of a new and novel hybrid control technique applied to a vehicle active suspension system of a quarter car model using skyhook and adaptive neuro active force control (SANAFC). The overall control system essentially comprises four feedback control loops, namely the innermost proportional-integral (PI) control loop for the force tracking of the pneumatic actuator, the intermediate skyhook and active force control (AFC) control loops for the compensation of the disturbances and the outermost proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control loop for the computation of the optimum target/commanded force. A neural network (NN) with a modified adaptive Levenberg-Marquardt learning algorithm was used to approximate the estimated mass and inverse dynamics of the pneumatic actuator in the AFC loop. A number of experiments were carried out on a physical test rig using a hardware-in-the-loop configuration that fully incorporates the theoretical elements. The performance of the proposed control method was evaluated and compared to examine the effectiveness of the system in suppressing the vibration effect on the suspension system. It was found that the simulation and experimental results were in good agreement, particularly for the sprung mass displacement and acceleration behaviours in which the proposed SANAFC scheme is found to outperform the PID and passive counterparts.

  10. Hybrid Architecture Active Wavefront Sensing and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Dean, Bruce; Hyde, Tupper

    2010-01-01

    A method was developed for performing relatively high-speed wavefront sensing and control to overcome thermal instabilities in a segmented primary mirror telescope [e.g., James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) at L2], by using the onboard fine guidance sensor (FGS) to minimize expense and complexity. This FGS performs centroiding on a bright star to feed the information to the pointing and control system. The proposed concept is to beam split the image of the guide star (or use a single defocused guide star image) to perform wavefront sensing using phase retrieval techniques. Using the fine guidance sensor star image for guiding and fine phasing eliminates the need for other, more complex ways of achieving very accurate sensing and control that is needed for UV-optical applications. The phase retrieval occurs nearly constantly, so passive thermal stability over fourteen days is not required. Using the FGS as the sensor, one can feed segment update information to actuators on the primary mirror that can update the primary mirror segment fine phasing with this frequency. Because the thermal time constants of the primary mirror are very slow compared to this duration, the mirror will appear extremely stable during observations (to the level of accuracy of the sensing and control). The sensing can use the same phase retrieval techniques as the JWST by employing an additional beam splitter, and having each channel go through a weak lens (one positive and one negative). The channels can use common or separate detectors. Phase retrieval can be performed onboard. The actuation scheme would include a coarse stage able to achieve initial alignment of several millimeters of range (similar to JWST and can use a JWST heritage sensing approach in the science camera) and a fine stage capable of continual updates.

  11. Control Techniques for Industrial Electrodeposition from Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, T. N.; Kerby, R. C.; O'Keefe, T. J.

    1985-01-01

    Over the years, the basic aspects of electrodeposition have remained relatively unchanged. However, the need to make improved and purer metals at a more competitive price is forcing reevaluation of many existing practices. The advantages offered by electrolysis are fully realized only if the process is optimized for maximum efficiency and the highest quality products. The critical factors in obtaining process improvements are (1) cathode quality and (2) the primary and secondary reactions occurring at the electrodes. Thus, monitoring these factors more effectively while comprehensively improving on-line control during processing have emerged as major challenges in electrometallurgy.

  12. Active control of sound transmission through partitions composed of discretely controlled modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leishman, Timothy W.

    This thesis provides a detailed theoretical and experimental investigation of active segmented partitions (ASPs) for the control of sound transmission. ASPs are physically segmented arrays of interconnected acoustically and structurally small modules that are discretely controlled using electronic controllers. Theoretical analyses of the thesis first address physical principles fundamental to ASP modeling and experimental measurement techniques. Next, they explore specific module configurations, primarily using equivalent circuits. Measured normal-incidence transmission losses and related properties of experimental ASPs are determined using plane wave tubes and the two-microphone transfer function technique. A scanning laser vibrometer is also used to evaluate distributed transmitting surface vibrations. ASPs have the inherent potential to provide excellent active sound transmission control (ASTC) through lightweight structures, using very practical control strategies. The thesis analyzes several unique ASP configurations and evaluates their abilities to produce high transmission losses via global minimization of normal transmitting surface vibrations. A novel dual diaphragm configuration is shown to employ this strategy particularly well. It uses an important combination of acoustical actuation and mechano-acoustical segmentation to produce exceptionally high transmission loss (e.g., 50 to 80 dB) over a broad frequency range-including lower audible frequencies. Such performance is shown to be comparable to that produced by much more massive partitions composed of thick layers of steel or concrete and sand. The configuration uses only simple localized error sensors and actuators, permitting effective use of independent single-channel controllers in a decentralized format. This work counteracts the commonly accepted notion that active vibration control of partitions is an ineffective means of controlling sound transmission. With appropriate construction, actuation

  13. Distributed Energy Communications & Controls, Lab Activities - Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Rizy, D Tom

    2010-01-01

    The purpose is to develop controls for inverter-based renewable and non-renewable distributed energy systems to provide local voltage, power and power quality support for loads and the power grid. The objectives are to (1) develop adaptive controls for inverter-based distributed energy (DE) systems when there are multiple inverters on the same feeder and (2) determine the impact of high penetration high seasonal energy efficiency ratio (SEER) air conditioning (A/C) units on power systems during sub-transmission faults which can result in an A/C compressor motor stall and assess how inverter-based DE can help to mitigate the stall event. The Distributed Energy Communications & Controls Laboratory (DECC) is a unique facility for studying dynamic voltage, active power (P), non-active power (Q) and power factor control from inverter-based renewable distributed energy (DE) resources. Conventionally, inverter-based DE systems have been designed to provide constant, close to unity power factor and thus not provide any voltage support. The DECC Lab interfaces with the ORNL campus distribution system to provide actual power system testing of the controls approach. Using mathematical software tools and the DECC Lab environment, we are developing and testing local, autonomous and adaptive controls for local voltage control and P & Q control for inverter-based DE. We successfully tested our active and non-active power (P,Q) controls at the DECC laboratory along with voltage regulation controls. The new PQ control along with current limiter controls has been tested on our existing inverter test system. We have tested both non-adaptive and adaptive control modes for the PQ control. We have completed several technical papers on the approaches and results. Electric power distribution systems are experiencing outages due to a phenomenon known as fault induced delayed voltage recovery (FIDVR) due to air conditioning (A/C) compressor motor stall. Local voltage collapse from FIDVR is

  14. Unsteady aerodynamic modeling for arbitrary motions. [for active control techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Results indicating that unsteady aerodynamic loads derived under the assumption of simple harmonic motions executed by airfoil or wing can be extended to arbitrary motions are summarized. The generalized Theodorsen (1953) function referable to loads due to simple harmonic oscillations of a wing section in incompressible flow, the Laplace inversion integral for unsteady aerodynamic loads, calculations of root loci of aeroelastic loads, and analysis of generalized compressible transient airloads are discussed.

  15. [Evaluation of vector control techniques: an economic approach].

    PubMed

    Audibert, M

    2009-04-01

    Programs of disease control must be evaluated. Evaluation of these programs in terms of public health is straightforward but should be carried out in conjunction with economic evaluation to measure the cost effectiveness and cost-benefit ratio. The purpose of this report is to clarify the importance of economic evaluation by explaining why it is necessary, when it should be carried out, and what methods should be used. Program evaluation is a process with several steps. Each step is associated with specific indicators. Determining these indicators is a prerequisite for construction of the database needed for evaluation. Two methods are proposed for data analysis, i.e., a simple one for cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit analysis and a more sophisticated one for impact analysis that must take into consideration treated and non-treated groups. Economic evaluation of disease control programs is as important as epidemiologic evaluation. However this evaluation cannot be carried out as a standalone procedure but only within a multidisciplinary framework.

  16. Introducing Social Stratification and Inequality: An Active Learning Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCammon, Lucy

    1999-01-01

    Summarizes literature on techniques for teaching social stratification. Describes the three parts of an exercise that enables students to understand economic and political inequality: students are given a family scenario, create household budgets, and finally rework the national budget with their family scenario groups. Discusses student…

  17. Photocathode transfer and storage techniques using alkali vapor feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, R. W.; Cameron, B. J.

    1991-12-01

    Photocathodes of quantum efficiency above 1 percent at the doubled YAG frequency of 532 nM are very sensitive to the local vacuum environment. These cathodes must have a band gap of less than 2.3 eV, and a work function that is also on the order of approximately 2 volts or less. As such, these surfaces are very reactive as they provide many surface states for the residual gases that have positive electron affinities such as oxygen and omnipotent water. Attendant to this problem is that the optimal operating point for some of these cesium based cathodes is unstable. Three of the cesium series were tried, the Cs-Ag-Bi-O, the Cs3Sb and the K2CsSb. The most stable material found is the K2CsSb. The vacuum conditions can be met by a variety of pumping schemes. The vacuum is achieved by using sputter ion diode pumps, and baking at 250 C or less for whatever time is required to reduce the pump currents to below 1 uA at room temperature. To obtain the required partial pressure of cesium, a simple very sensitive diagnostic gauge has been developed that can discriminate between free alkali and other gases present. This Pressure Alkali Monitor (PAM) can be used on cesium sources to provide a low partial pressure using standard feedback techniques. Photocathodes of arbitrary composition have been transferred to a separate vacuum system and preserved for over 10 days with less than a 25 percent loss to the QE at 543.5 nM.

  18. Photocathode transfer and storage techniques using alkali vapor feedback control

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, R.W.; Cameron, B.J.

    1991-12-20

    Photocathodes of quantum efficiency above 1% at the doubled YAG frequency of 532 nM are very sensitive to the local vacuum environment. These cathodes must have a band gap of less than 2.3 eV, and a work function that is also on the order of {approximately}2 volts or less. As such, these surfaces are very reactive as they provide many surface states for the residual gases that have positive electron affinities such as oxygen and omnipotent water. Attendant to this problem is that the optimal operating point for some of these cesium based cathodes is unstable. Three of the cesium series were tried, the Cs-Ag-Bi-O, the Cs{sub 3}Sb and the K{sub 2}CsSb. The most stable material found is the K{sub 2}CsSb. The vacuum conditions can be met by a variety of pumping schemes. The vacuum is achieved by using sputter ion diode pumps, and baking at 250{degrees}C or less for whatever time is required to reduce the pump currents to below 1 uA at room temperature. To obtain the required partial pressure of cesium, a simple very sensitive diagnostic gauge has been developed that can discriminate between free alkali and other gases present. This Pressure Alkali Monitor (PAM) can be used cesium sources to provide a low partial pressure using standard feedback techniques. Photocathodes of arbitrary composition have been transferred to a separate vacuum system and preserved for over 10 days with less than a 25% loss to the QE at 543.5 nM.

  19. Beaconless adaptive-optics technique for HEL beam control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khizhnyak, Anatoliy; Markov, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    Effective performance of forthcoming laser systems capable of power delivery on a distant target requires an adaptive optics system to correct atmospheric perturbations on the laser beam. The turbulence-induced effects are responsible for beam wobbling, wandering, and intensity scintillation, resulting in degradation of the beam quality and power density on the target. Adaptive optics methods are used to compensate for these negative effects. In its turn, operation of the AOS system requires a reference wave that can be generated by the beacon on the target. This report discusses a beaconless approach for wavefront correction with its performance based on the detection of the target-scattered light. Postprocessing of the beacon-generated light field enables retrieval and detailed characterization of the turbulence-perturbed wavefront -data that is essential to control the adaptive optics module of a high-power laser system.

  20. Investigation of Vibrational Control of the Bridgman Crystal Growth Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedoseyev, Alexandre I.; Alexander, J. I. D.; Feigelson, R. S.; Zharikov, E. V.; Ostrogorsky, A. G.; Marin, C.; Volz, M. P.; Kansa, E. J.; Friedman, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    The character of natural buoyant convection in rigidly contained inhomogeneous fluids can be drastically altered by vibrating the container. Vibrations are expected to play a crucial influence on heat and mass transfer onboard the International Space Station (ISS). It is becoming evident that substantial vibrations will exist on the ISS in the wide frequency spectrum. In general, vibrational flows are very complex and governed by many parameters. In many terrestrial crystal growth situations, convective transport of heat and constituent components is dominated by buoyancy driven convection arising from compositional and thermal gradients. Thus, it may be concluded that vibro-convective flow can potentially be used to influence and even control transport in some crystal growth situations.

  1. Optimal Control Technique for Many-Body Quantum Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doria, Patrick; Calarco, Tommaso; Montangero, Simone

    2011-05-01

    We present an efficient strategy for controlling a vast range of nonintegrable quantum many-body one-dimensional systems that can be merged with state-of-the-art tensor network simulation methods such as the density matrix renormalization group. To demonstrate its potential, we employ it to solve a major issue in current optical-lattice physics with ultracold atoms: we show how to reduce by about 2 orders of magnitude the time needed to bring a superfluid gas into a Mott insulator state, while suppressing defects by more than 1 order of magnitude as compared to current experiments [T. Stöferle , Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 130403 (2004)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.92.130403]. Finally, we show that the optimal pulse is robust against atom number fluctuations.

  2. Process control techniques for the Sidmar blast furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Vandenberghe, D.; Bonte, L.; Nieuwerburgh, H. van

    1995-12-01

    The major challenge for modern blast furnace operation is the achievement of a very high productivity, excellent hot metal quality, low fuel consumption and longer blast furnace campaigns. The introduction of predictive models, decision supporting software and expert systems has reduced the standard deviation of the hot metal silicon content. The production loss due to the thermal state of the blast furnace has decreased three times since 1990. An appropriate control of the heat losses with high pulverized coal injection rates, is of the utmost importance for the life of the blast furnace. Different rules for the burden distribution of both blast furnaces are given. At blast furnace A, a peripheral gas flow is promoted, while at blast furnace B a more central gas flow is promoted.

  3. Actively controlled multiple-sensor system for feature extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, Michael J.; Silberberg, Teresa M.

    1991-08-01

    Typical vision systems which attempt to extract features from a visual image of the world for the purposes of object recognition and navigation are limited by the use of a single sensor and no active sensor control capability. To overcome limitations and deficiencies of rigid single sensor systems, more and more researchers are investigating actively controlled, multisensor systems. To address these problems, we have developed a self-calibrating system which uses active multiple sensor control to extract features of moving objects. A key problem in such systems is registering the images, that is, finding correspondences between images from cameras of differing focal lengths, lens characteristics, and positions and orientations. The authors first propose a technique which uses correlation of edge magnitudes for continuously calibrating pan and tilt angles of several different cameras relative to a single camera with a wide angle field of view, which encompasses the views of every other sensor. A simulation of a world of planar surfaces, visual sensors, and a robot platform used to test active control for feature extraction is then described. Motion in the field of view of at least one sensor is used to center the moving object for several sensors, which then extract object features such as color, boundary, and velocity from the appropriate sensors. Results are presented from real cameras and from the simulated world.

  4. Advanced Active Thermal Control Systems Architecture Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanford, Anthony J.; Ewert, Michael K.

    1996-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) initiated a dynamic study to determine possible improvements available through advanced technologies (not used on previous or current human vehicles), identify promising development initiatives for advanced active thermal control systems (ATCS's), and help prioritize funding and personnel distribution among many research projects by providing a common basis to compare several diverse technologies. Some technologies included were two-phase thermal control systems, light-weight radiators, phase-change thermal storage, rotary fluid coupler, and heat pumps. JSC designed the study to estimate potential benefits from these various proposed and under-development thermal control technologies for five possible human missions early in the next century. The study compared all the technologies to a baseline mission using mass as a basis. Each baseline mission assumed an internal thermal control system; an external thermal control system; and aluminum, flow-through radiators. Solar vapor compression heat pumps and light-weight radiators showed the greatest promise as general advanced thermal technologies which can be applied across a range of missions. This initial study identified several other promising ATCS technologies which offer mass savings and other savings compared to traditional thermal control systems. Because the study format compares various architectures with a commonly defined baseline, it is versatile and expandable, and is expected to be updated as needed.

  5. Technique for inferring sizes of stellar-active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson-Hockey, A.K.; Radick, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    Inspection of spectroheliograms showing large, well-developed active regions generally show the sunspots to lead the associated plage, in the sense of the solar rotation. Measurements have been made from spectroheliograms of spot-plage offsets and compared with nearly contemporaneous integrated disk observations. Larger active regions generally show larger spot leads; however, information regarding active-region sizes and spot-plage offsets is not readily obtainable form stellar-type observations of the Sun.

  6. Active Thermal Control System Development for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westheimer, David

    2007-01-01

    All space vehicles or habitats require thermal management to maintain a safe and operational environment for both crew and hardware. Active Thermal Control Systems (ATCS) perform the functions of acquiring heat from both crew and hardware within a vehicle, transporting that heat throughout the vehicle, and finally rejecting that energy into space. Almost all of the energy used in a space vehicle eventually turns into heat, which must be rejected in order to maintain an energy balance and temperature control of the vehicle. For crewed vehicles, Active Thermal Control Systems are pumped fluid loops that are made up of components designed to perform these functions. NASA has been actively developing technologies that will enable future missions or will provide significant improvements over the state of the art technologies. These technologies have are targeted for application on the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), or Orion, and a Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM). The technologies that have been selected and are currently under development include: fluids that enable single loop ATCS architectures, a gravity insensitive vapor compression cycle heat pump, a sublimator with reduced sensitivity to feedwater contamination, an evaporative heat sink that can operate in multiple ambient pressure environments, a compact spray evaporator, and lightweight radiators that take advantage of carbon composites and advanced optical coatings.

  7. Spherical crystallization: A technique use to reform solubility and flow property of active pharmaceutical ingredients

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Arindam; Gupta, Madan Mohan; Srivastava, Birendra

    2017-01-01

    Tablets have been choice of manufacturers over the years due to their comparatively low cost of manufacturing, packaging, shipping, and ease of administration; also have better stability and can be considered virtually tamper proof. A major challenge in formulation development of the tablets extends from lower solubility of the active agent to the elaborated manufacturing procedures for obtaining a compressible granular material. Moreover, the validation and documentation increases, as the numbers of steps increases for an industrially acceptable granulation process. Spherical crystallization (SC) is a promising technique, which encompass the crystallization, agglomeration, and spheronization phenomenon in a single step. Initially, two methods, spherical agglomeration, and emulsion solvent diffusion, were suggested to get a desired result. Later on, the introduction of modified methods such as crystallo-co-agglomeration, ammonia diffusion system, and neutralization techniques overcame the limitations of the older techniques. Under controlled conditions such as solvent composition, mixing rate and temperature, spherical dense agglomerates cluster from particles. Application of the SC technique includes production of compacted spherical particles of drug having improved uniformity in shape and size of particles, good bulk density, better flow properties as well as better solubility so SC when used on commercial scale will bring down the production costs of pharmaceutical tablet and will increase revenue for the pharmaceutical industries in the competitive market. This review summarizes the technologies available for SC and also suggests the parameters for evaluation of a viable product.

  8. Active sway control of a gantry crane using hybrid input shaping and PID control schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Tumari, M. Z.; Shabudin, L.; Zawawi, M. A.; Shah, L. H. Ahmad

    2013-12-01

    This project presents investigations into the development of hybrid input-shaping and PID control schemes for active sway control of a gantry crane system. The application of positive input shaping involves a technique that can reduce the sway by creating a common signal that cancels its own vibration and used as a feed-forward control which is for controlling the sway angle of the pendulum, while the proportional integral derivative (PID) controller is used as a feedback control which is for controlling the crane position. The PID controller was tuned using Ziegler-Nichols method to get the best performance of the system. The hybrid input-shaping and PID control schemes guarantee a fast input tracking capability, precise payload positioning and very minimal sway motion. The modeling of gantry crane is used to simulate the system using MATLAB/SIMULINK software. The results of the response with the controllers are presented in time domains and frequency domains. The performances of control schemes are examined in terms of level of input tracking capability, sway angle reduction and time response specification.

  9. The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, David W.; Sepe, Raymond B.; Rey, Daniel; Saarmaa, Erik; Crawley, Edward F.

    1993-01-01

    The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE) is a NASA In-Step and Control Structure Interaction (CSI) Office funded Shuttle middeck experiment. The objective is to investigate the extent to which closed-loop behavior of flexible spacecraft in zero-gravity (0-g) can be predicted. This prediction becomes particularly difficult when dynamic behavior during ground testing exhibits extensive suspension and direct gravity coupling. On-orbit system identification and control reconfiguration is investigated to improve performance which would otherwise be limited due to errors in prediction. The program is presently in its preliminary design phase with launch expected in the summer of 1994. The MACE test article consists of three attitude control torque wheels, a two axis gimballing payload, inertial sensors and a flexible support structure. With the acquisition of a second payload, this will represent a multiple payload platform with significant structural flexibility. This paper presents on-going work in the areas of modelling and control of the MACE test article in the zero and one-gravity environments. Finite element models, which include suspension and gravity effects, and measurement models, derived from experimental data, are used as the basis for Linear Quadratic Gaussian controller designs. Finite element based controllers are analytically used to study the differences in closed-loop performance as the test article transitions between the 0-g and 1-g environments. Measurement based controllers are experimentally applied to the MACE test article in the 1-g environment and achieve over an order of magnitude improvement in payload pointing accuracy when disturbed by a broadband torque disturbance. The various aspects of the flight portion of the experiment are also discussed.

  10. Evaluation of scheduling techniques for payload activity planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullington, Stanley F.

    1991-01-01

    Two tasks related to payload activity planning and scheduling were performed. The first task involved making a comparison of space mission activity scheduling problems with production scheduling problems. The second task consisted of a statistical analysis of the output of runs of the Experiment Scheduling Program (ESP). Details of the work which was performed on these two tasks are presented.

  11. Carbon Nanotube Materials for Substrate Enhanced Control of Catalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Heben, M.; Dillon, A. C.; Engtrakul, C.; Lee, S.-H.; Kelley, R. D.; Kini, A. M.

    2007-05-01

    Carbon SWNTs are attractive materials for supporting electrocatalysts. The properties of SWNTs are highly tunable and controlled by the nanotube's circumferential periodicity and their surface chemistry. These unique characteristics suggest that architectures constructed from these types of carbon support materials would exhibit interesting and useful properties. Here, we expect that the structure of the carbon nanotube support will play a major role in stabilizing metal electrocatalysts under extreme operating conditions and suppress both catalyst and support degradation. Furthermore, the chemical modification of the carbon nanotube surfaces can be expected to alter the interface between the catalyst and support, thus, enhancing the activity and utilization of the electrocatalysts. We plan to incorporate discrete reaction sites into the carbon nanotube lattice to create intimate electrical contacts with the catalyst particles to increase the metal catalyst activity and utilization. The work involves materials synthesis, design of electrode architectures on the nanoscale, control of the electronic, ionic, and mass fluxes, and use of advanced optical spectroscopy techniques.

  12. Application of thermal analysis techniques in activated carbon production

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnals, G.L.; DeBarr, J.A.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Lizzio, A.A.; Brady, T.A.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal analysis techniques have been used at the ISGS as an aid in the development and characterization of carbon adsorbents. Promising adsorbents from fly ash, tires, and Illinois coals have been produced for various applications. Process conditions determined in the preparation of gram quantities of carbons were used as guides in the preparation of larger samples. TG techniques developed to characterize the carbon adsorbents included the measurement of the kinetics of SO2 adsorption, the performance of rapid proximate analyses, and the determination of equilibrium methane adsorption capacities. Thermal regeneration of carbons was assessed by TG to predict the life cycle of carbon adsorbents in different applications. TPD was used to determine the nature of surface functional groups and their effect on a carbon's adsorption properties.

  13. The influence of curricular and extracurricular learning activities on students' choice of chiropractic technique

    PubMed Central

    Sikorski, David M.; KizhakkeVeettil, Anupama; Tobias, Gene S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Surveys for the National Board of Chiropractic Examiners indicate that diversified chiropractic technique is the most commonly used chiropractic manipulation method. The study objective was to investigate the influences of our diversified core technique curriculum, a technique survey course, and extracurricular technique activities on students' future practice technique preferences. Methods: We conducted an anonymous, voluntary survey of 1st, 2nd, and 3rd year chiropractic students at our institution. Surveys were pretested for face validity, and data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results: We had 164 students (78% response rate) participate in the survey. Diversified was the most preferred technique for future practice by students, and more than half who completed the chiropractic technique survey course reported changing their future practice technique choice as a result. The students surveyed agreed that the chiropractic technique curriculum and their experiences with chiropractic practitioners were the two greatest bases for their current practice technique preference, and that their participation in extracurricular technique clubs and seminars was less influential. Conclusions: Students appear to have the same practice technique preferences as practicing chiropractors. The chiropractic technique curriculum and the students' experience with chiropractic practitioners seem to have the greatest influence on their choice of chiropractic technique for future practice. Extracurricular activities, including technique clubs and seminars, although well attended, showed a lesser influence on students' practice technique preferences. PMID:26655282

  14. Exploratory Studies in Generalized Predictive Control for Active Aeroelastic Control of Tiltrotor Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternik, Raymond G.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Bennett, Richard L.

    2000-01-01

    The Aeroelasticity Branch at NASA Langley Research Center has a long and substantive history of tiltrotor aeroelastic research. That research has included a broad range of experimental investigations in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) using a variety of scale models and the development of essential analyses. Since 1994, the tiltrotor research program has been using a 1/5-scale, semispan aeroelastic model of the V-22 designed and built by Bell Helicopter Textron Inc. (BHTI) in 1981. That model has been refurbished to form a tiltrotor research testbed called the Wing and Rotor Aeroelastic Test System (WRATS) for use in the TDT. In collaboration with BHTI, studies under the current tiltrotor research program are focused on aeroelastic technology areas having the potential for enhancing the commercial and military viability of tiltrotor aircraft. Among the areas being addressed, considerable emphasis is being directed to the evaluation of modern adaptive multi-input multi- output (MIMO) control techniques for active stability augmentation and vibration control of tiltrotor aircraft. As part of this investigation, a predictive control technique known as Generalized Predictive Control (GPC) is being studied to assess its potential for actively controlling the swashplate of tiltrotor aircraft to enhance aeroelastic stability in both helicopter and airplane modes of flight. This paper summarizes the exploratory numerical and experimental studies that were conducted as part of that investigation.

  15. Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE), phase A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Deluis, Javier; Miller, David W.

    1989-01-01

    A rationale to determine which structural experiments are sufficient to verify the design of structures employing Controlled Structures Technology was derived. A survey of proposed NASA missions was undertaken to identify candidate test articles for use in the Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE). The survey revealed that potential test articles could be classified into one of three roles: development, demonstration, and qualification, depending on the maturity of the technology and the mission the structure must fulfill. A set of criteria was derived that allowed determination of which role a potential test article must fulfill. A review of the capabilities and limitations of the STS middeck was conducted. A reference design for the MACE test article was presented. Computing requirements for running typical closed-loop controllers was determined, and various computer configurations were studied. The various components required to manufacture the structure were identified. A management plan was established for the remainder of the program experiment development, flight and ground systems development, and integration to the carrier. Procedures for configuration control, fiscal control, and safety, reliabilty, and quality assurance were developed.

  16. Longitudinal vortex control - Techniques and applications (The 32nd Lanchester Lecture)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.

    1992-01-01

    A summary is presented of vortex control applications and current techniques for the control of longitudinal vortices produced by bodies, leading edges, tips and intersections. Vortex control has up till now been performed by many approaches in an empirical fashion, assisted by the essentially inviscid nature of much of longitudinal vortex behavior. Attention is given to Reynolds number sensitivities, vortex breakdown and interactions, vortex control on highly swept wings, and vortex control in juncture flows.

  17. A Signal Transmission Technique for Stability Analysis of Multivariable Non-Linear Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Mark; Zimpfer, Doug; Adams, Neil; Lindsey, K. L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Among the difficulties associated with multivariable, non-linear control systems is the problem of assessing closed-loop stability. Of particular interest is the class of non-linear systems controlled with on/off actuators, such as spacecraft thrusters or electrical relays. With such systems, standard describing function techniques are typically too conservative, and time-domain simulation analysis is prohibitively extensive, This paper presents an open-loop analysis technique for this class of non-linear systems. The technique is centered around an innovative use of multivariable signal transmission theory to quantify the plant response to worst case control commands. The technique has been applied to assess stability of thruster controlled flexible space structures. Examples are provided for Space Shuttle attitude control with attached flexible payloads.

  18. A novel technique for examining human brain activity associated with pedaling using fMRI.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Jay P; Verber, Matthew D; Wieser, Jon A; Schmit, Brian D; Schindler-Ivens, Sheila M

    2009-05-15

    Advances in neural imaging technologies, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), have made it possible to obtain images of human brain activity during motor tasks. However, technical challenges have made it difficult to image the brain during multijoint lower limb movements like those involved in locomotion. We developed an MR compatible pedaling device and recorded human brain activity associated with rhythmic, alternating flexion and extension of the lower extremities. Ten volunteers pedaled at 30 RPM while recording fMRI signals in a GE 3T short bore MR scanner. We utilized a block design consisting of 3 runs of pedaling, each lasting 4 min. In a single run, subjects pedaled for 30 s and then rested for 30 s. This sequence was repeated 4 times. Conventional fMRI processing techniques, that correlate the entire BOLD signal with standard model, did not extract physiologically meaningful signal, likely due to magnetic field distortion caused by leg movement. Hence, we examined only the portion of the blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal during movement-free periods. This technique takes advantage of the delayed nature of the BOLD signal and fits the falling portion of the signal after movement has stopped with a standard model. Using this approach, we observed physiologically plausible brain activity patterns associated with pedaling in the primary and secondary sensory and motor cortices and the cerebellum. To our knowledge, this is the first time that human brain activity associated with pedaling has been recorded with fMRI. This technique may be useful for advancing our understanding of supraspinal control of locomotor-like movements in health and disease.

  19. Biomagnetic Techniques for Assessing Gastric and Small Bowel Electrical Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, L. Alan

    2004-09-01

    Recent advances in electrophysiology of the gastrointestinal tract have emphasized the need for methods of noninvasive assessment of gastric and small intestinal electrical activity (GEA and IEA). While the cutaneous electrogastrogram (EGG) may reveal the frequency dynamics of gastric electrical activity, other parameters important for characterizing the propagating electrical activity are not available from EGG recordings. Recent studies on the electroenterogram (EENG) are promising, but low-conductivity abdominal layers have complicated the identification of small intestinal electrical rhythms in cutaneous recordings. The magnetogastrogram (MGG) and magnetoenterogram (MENG) are able to characterize gastric and intestinal electrical activity noninvasively in terms of its frequency, power and characteristics of its propagation. Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers are used to detect the minute magnetic fields associated with electrical activity of the gastrointestinal syncytium formed by interstitial cells of Cajal and smooth muscle networks. Changes in GEA and IEA that occur in response to disease or abnormal conditions are reflected in MGG and MENG signals. Magnetic methods for assessing the electrical activity of the stomach and small bowel thus show great clinical promise.

  20. Cell-level battery charge/discharge protection system. [electronic control techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donovan, R. L.; Imamura, M. S.

    1977-01-01

    The paper describes three design approaches to individual cell monitoring and control for sealed secondary battery cells. One technique involves a modular strap-on single cell protector which contains all the electronics required for monitoring cell voltage, responding to external commands, and forming a bypass circuit for the cell. A second technique, the multiplexed cell protector, uses common circuitry to monitor and control each cell in a battery pack. The third technique, the computerized cell protector, by replacing the hard-wired logic of the multiplexed cell protector with a microprocessor, achieves greatest control flexibility and inherent computational capability with a minimum parts count implementation.

  1. Studies of human dynamic space orientation using techniques of control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, L. R.

    1974-01-01

    Studies of human orientation and manual control in high order systems are summarized. Data cover techniques for measuring and altering orientation perception, role of non-visual motion sensors, particularly the vestibular and tactile sensors, use of motion cues in closed loop control of simple stable and unstable systems, and advanced computer controlled display systems.

  2. ALTERNATE VOC CONTROL TECHNIQUE OPTIONS FOR SMALL ROTOGRAVURE AND FLEXOGRAPHY FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report identifies Available Control Techniques (ACTs) for states to use as a referenec when implementing Reasonable Available Control Technilogy (RACT) for graphic arts facilities that are covered by the Control Technologies Guidelines (CTGs), but emit less than 91 tonnes of ...

  3. Active AC/DC control for wideband piezoelectric energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel, A.; Grézaud, R.; Pillonnet, G.; Gasnier, P.; Despesse, G.; Badel, A.

    2016-11-01

    This paper proposes a simple interface circuit enabling resonant frequency tuning of highly coupled piezoelectric harvesters. This work relies on an active AC/DC architecture that introduces a tunable short-circuit sequence in order to control the phase between the piezoelectric current and voltage, allowing the emulation of a capacitive load. It is notably shown that this short-circuit time increases the harvested power when the piezoelectric operates outside of resonance. Measurements on a piezoelectric harvester exhibiting a large global coupling coefficient (k2 = 15.3%) have been realized and have proven the efficiency and potential of this technique.

  4. Quadratic Optimization in the Problems of Active Control of Sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loncaric, J.; Tsynkov, S. V.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We analyze the problem of suppressing the unwanted component of a time-harmonic acoustic field (noise) on a predetermined region of interest. The suppression is rendered by active means, i.e., by introducing the additional acoustic sources called controls that generate the appropriate anti-sound. Previously, we have obtained general solutions for active controls in both continuous and discrete formulations of the problem. We have also obtained optimal solutions that minimize the overall absolute acoustic source strength of active control sources. These optimal solutions happen to be particular layers of monopoles on the perimeter of the protected region. Mathematically, minimization of acoustic source strength is equivalent to minimization in the sense of L(sub 1). By contrast. in the current paper we formulate and study optimization problems that involve quadratic functions of merit. Specifically, we minimize the L(sub 2) norm of the control sources, and we consider both the unconstrained and constrained minimization. The unconstrained L(sub 2) minimization is certainly the easiest problem to address numerically. On the other hand, the constrained approach allows one to analyze sophisticated geometries. In a special case, we call compare our finite-difference optimal solutions to the continuous optimal solutions obtained previously using a semi-analytic technique. We also show that the optima obtained in the sense of L(sub 2) differ drastically from those obtained in the sense of L(sub 1).

  5. Active control of multi-input hydraulic journal bearing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Jen-Chen; Chen, Chi-Yin; Tu, Jia-Ying

    2016-09-01

    Because of the advantages of high accuracy, high capacity, and low friction, the development of hydrostatic bearing for machine tool receives significant attention in the last decades. The mechanics and mechanical design of hydrostatic journal bearing with capillary restrictors has been discussed in literature. However, pragmatically, the undesired loading effects of cutting force tend to result in resonance and instability of the rotor and damage the shaft during operation. Therefore, multi-input, active flow control using state feedback design is proposed in this paper. To this purpose, the proportional pressure valves are added to the hydraulic system as active control devices, and the linearised models of the bearing and valve are discussed and identified. Simulation and experimental work is conducted to verify the proposed active control and parameter identification techniques. The results show that the unbalance responses of the rotor are reduced by the proposed state feedback controller, which is able to regulate the flow pressure effectively, thus enhancing the stability and accuracy of the hydraulic journal bearing.

  6. Assessment of platelet activation in myeloproliferative disorders with complementary techniques.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Emilse; Alberto, Maria F; Meschengieser, Susana S; Lazzari, Maria A

    2004-04-01

    Bleeding and thrombosis in myeloproliferative disorders (MPD) are common events, sometimes both are present in the same patient during the course of the disease. Platelet activation in patients with MPD is often suggested. The present study analyses the presence of circulating activated platelets, using simultaneously flow cytometry and aggregometric studies in MPD. We studied 28 patients: 13 with polycythaemia vera, seven with essential thrombocythaemia, and eight chronic myeloid leukaemia. We performed functional tests, aggregation and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and flow cytometric assays (mepacrine staining and platelet activation markers CD62, CD63 and fibrinogen binding (B-FG)). Twenty-one MPD samples (75%) had reduced aggregation and ATP release. Acquired delta-SPD was detected in 11 of 28 MPD patients (39%), and we found no association between reduced mepacrine labelling and abnormal ATP release. High levels of activation markers were obtained: CD62 in 19 of 28 patients (68%), CD63 in 13 of 28 patients (46%) and B-FG in 19 of 28 patients (68%). The most prevalent abnormality was a reduced aggregation and ATP release. The lack of association between ATP release and mepacrine labelling suggests that other mechanisms, besides the deficit of intraplatelet ATP/adenosine diphosphate, might occur. High levels of activation markers were also observed. We conclude that both tests are complementary and necessary to understand the functional status of platelets in MPD.

  7. Unusual well control techniques pay off. [Well drilling techniques in the Elgin gas condensate field, North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Idelovici, J.L.

    1993-07-01

    Well control and completion operations were seriously complicated by an unusual pressure phenomena encountered while drilling an appraisal well through Jurassic sandstones in a high-pressure, high-temperature (HPHT), gas and condensate field located in the United Kingdom continental shelf. The HPHT sandstone reservoir is located in the Upper Jurassic Franklin formation. Unorthodox well-control techniques were used because it was determined that the abnormally high pressure was generated by a mechanical reaction of the rock under the effect of heavy mud and equivalent circulating density, rather than by entry into the wellbore of formation fluids. This paper reviews the complex drilling fluid control procedures which had to be utilized to maintain an open bore hole during drilling.

  8. Relations Between Autonomous Motivation and Leisure-Time Physical Activity Participation: The Mediating Role of Self-Regulation Techniques.

    PubMed

    Nurmi, Johanna; Hagger, Martin S; Haukkala, Ari; Araújo-Soares, Vera; Hankonen, Nelli

    2016-04-01

    This study tested the predictive validity of a multitheory process model in which the effect of autonomous motivation from self-determination theory on physical activity participation is mediated by the adoption of self-regulatory techniques based on control theory. Finnish adolescents (N = 411, aged 17-19) completed a prospective survey including validated measures of the predictors and physical activity, at baseline and after one month (N = 177). A subsample used an accelerometer to objectively measure physical activity and further validate the physical activity self-report assessment tool (n = 44). Autonomous motivation statistically significantly predicted action planning, coping planning, and self-monitoring. Coping planning and self-monitoring mediated the effect of autonomous motivation on physical activity, although self-monitoring was the most prominent. Controlled motivation had no effect on self-regulation techniques or physical activity. Developing interventions that support autonomous motivation for physical activity may foster increased engagement in self-regulation techniques and positively affect physical activity behavior.

  9. High-speed reference-beam-angle control technique for holographic memory drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Ken-ichiro; Ogata, Takeshi; Hosaka, Makoto; Fujita, Koji; Okuyama, Atsushi

    2016-09-01

    We developed a holographic memory drive for next-generation optical memory. In this study, we present the key technology for achieving a high-speed transfer rate for reproduction, that is, a high-speed control technique for the reference beam angle. In reproduction in a holographic memory drive, there is the issue that the optimum reference beam angle during reproduction varies owing to distortion of the medium. The distortion is caused by, for example, temperature variation, beam irradiation, and moisture absorption. Therefore, a reference-beam-angle control technique to position the reference beam at the optimum angle is crucial. We developed a new optical system that generates an angle-error-signal to detect the optimum reference beam angle. To achieve the high-speed control technique using the new optical system, we developed a new control technique called adaptive final-state control (AFSC) that adds a second control input to the first one derived from conventional final-state control (FSC) at the time of angle-error-signal detection. We established an actual experimental system employing AFSC to achieve moving control between each page (Page Seek) within 300 µs. In sequential multiple Page Seeks, we were able to realize positioning to the optimum angles of the reference beam that maximize the diffracted beam intensity. We expect that applying the new control technique to the holographic memory drive will enable a giga-bit/s-class transfer rate.

  10. Understanding the brain by controlling neural activity

    PubMed Central

    Krug, Kristine; Salzman, C. Daniel; Waddell, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Causal methods to interrogate brain function have been employed since the advent of modern neuroscience in the nineteenth century. Initially, randomly placed electrodes and stimulation of parts of the living brain were used to localize specific functions to these areas. Recent technical developments have rejuvenated this approach by providing more precise tools to dissect the neural circuits underlying behaviour, perception and cognition. Carefully controlled behavioural experiments have been combined with electrical devices, targeted genetically encoded tools and neurochemical approaches to manipulate information processing in the brain. The ability to control brain activity in these ways not only deepens our understanding of brain function but also provides new avenues for clinical intervention, particularly in conditions where brain processing has gone awry. PMID:26240417

  11. Control concepts for active magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegwart, Roland; Vischer, D.; Larsonneur, R.; Herzog, R.; Traxler, Alfons; Bleuler, H.; Schweitzer, G.

    1992-01-01

    Active Magnetic Bearings (AMB) are becoming increasingly significant for various industrial applications. Examples are turbo-compressors, centrifuges, high speed milling and grinding spindles, vibration isolation, linear guides, magnetically levitated trains, vacuum and space applications. Thanks to the rapid progress and drastic cost reduction in power- and micro-electronics, the number of AMB applications is growing very rapidly. Industrial uses of AMBs leads to new requirements for AMB-actuators, sensor systems, and rotor dynamics. Especially desirable are new and better control concepts to meet demand such as low cost AMB, high stiffness, high performance, high robustness, high damping up to several kHz, vibration isolation, force-free rotation, and unbalance cancellation. This paper surveys various control concepts for AMBs and discusses their advantages and disadvantages. Theoretical and experimental results are presented.

  12. Active Displacement Control of Active Magnetic Bearing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertész, Milan; Kozakovič, Radko; Magdolen, Luboš; Masaryk, Michal

    2014-12-01

    The worldwide energy production nowadays is over 3400 GW while storage systems have a capacity of only 90 GW [1]. There is a good solution for additional storage capacity in flywheel energy storage systems (FES). The main advantage of FES is its relatively high efficiency especially with using the active magnetic bearing system. Therefore there exist good reasons for appropriate simulations and for creating a suitable magneto-structural control system. The magnetic bearing, including actuation, is simulated in the ANSYS parametric design language (APDL). APDL is used to create the loops of transient simulations where boundary conditions (BC) are updated based upon a "gap sensor" which controls the nodal position values of the centroid of the shaft and the current density inputs onto the copper windings.

  13. Fuzzy Controller Design Using Evolutionary Techniques for Twin Rotor MIMO System: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Hashim, H A; Abido, M A

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative study of fuzzy controller design for the twin rotor multi-input multioutput (MIMO) system (TRMS) considering most promising evolutionary techniques. These are gravitational search algorithm (GSA), particle swarm optimization (PSO), artificial bee colony (ABC), and differential evolution (DE). In this study, the gains of four fuzzy proportional derivative (PD) controllers for TRMS have been optimized using the considered techniques. The optimization techniques are developed to identify the optimal control parameters for system stability enhancement, to cancel high nonlinearities in the model, to reduce the coupling effect, and to drive TRMS pitch and yaw angles into the desired tracking trajectory efficiently and accurately. The most effective technique in terms of system response due to different disturbances has been investigated. In this work, it is observed that GSA is the most effective technique in terms of solution quality and convergence speed.

  14. Fuzzy Controller Design Using Evolutionary Techniques for Twin Rotor MIMO System: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Hashim, H. A.; Abido, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative study of fuzzy controller design for the twin rotor multi-input multioutput (MIMO) system (TRMS) considering most promising evolutionary techniques. These are gravitational search algorithm (GSA), particle swarm optimization (PSO), artificial bee colony (ABC), and differential evolution (DE). In this study, the gains of four fuzzy proportional derivative (PD) controllers for TRMS have been optimized using the considered techniques. The optimization techniques are developed to identify the optimal control parameters for system stability enhancement, to cancel high nonlinearities in the model, to reduce the coupling effect, and to drive TRMS pitch and yaw angles into the desired tracking trajectory efficiently and accurately. The most effective technique in terms of system response due to different disturbances has been investigated. In this work, it is observed that GSA is the most effective technique in terms of solution quality and convergence speed. PMID:25960738

  15. Active Aircraft Pylon Noise Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H. (Inventor); Czech, Michael J (Inventor); Elmiligui, Alaa A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An active pylon noise control system for an aircraft includes a pylon structure connecting an engine system with an airframe surface of the aircraft and having at least one aperture to supply a gas or fluid therethrough, an intake portion attached to the pylon structure to intake a gas or fluid, a regulator connected with the intake portion via a plurality of pipes, to regulate a pressure of the gas or fluid, a plenum chamber formed within the pylon structure and connected with the regulator, and configured to receive the gas or fluid as regulated by the regulator, and a plurality of injectors in communication with the plenum chamber to actively inject the gas or fluid through the plurality of apertures of the pylon structure.

  16. Active noise control for infant incubators.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xun; Gujjula, Shruthi; Kuo, Sen M

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an active noise control system for infant incubators. Experimental results show that global noise reduction can be achieved for infant incubator ANC systems. An audio-integration algorithm is presented to introduce a healthy audio (intrauterine) sound with the ANC system to mask the residual noise and soothe the infant. Carbon nanotube based transparent thin film speaker is also introduced in this paper as the actuator for the ANC system to generate the destructive secondary sound, which can significantly save the congested incubator space and without blocking the view of doctors and nurses.

  17. The Protest as a Teaching Technique for Promoting Feminist Activism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Suzanna

    An assignment about protesting was given to students in an upper-level undergraduate women's studies course to provide them with experience and skills in political protesting and to promote feminist activism. The students selected for their assignments: (1) a letter writing campaign against Robert Bork's Supreme Court nomination; (2) a picket…

  18. Application of activation techniques to biological analysis. [813 references

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, H.J.M.

    1981-12-01

    Applications of activation analysis in the biological sciences are reviewed for the period of 1970 to 1979. The stages and characteristics of activation analysis are described, and its advantages and disadvantages enumerated. Most applications involve activation by thermal neutrons followed by either radiochemical or instrumental determination. Relatively little use has been made of activation by fast neutrons, photons, or charged particles. In vivo analyses are included, but those based on prompt gamma or x-ray emission are not. Major applications include studies of reference materials, and the elemental analysis of plants, marine biota, animal and human tissues, diets, and excreta. Relatively little use of it has been made in biochemistry, microbiology, and entomology, but it has become important in toxicology and environmental science. The elements most often determined are Ag, As, Au, Br, Ca, Cd, Cl, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, Hg, I, K, Mn, Mo, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, and Zn, while few or no determinations of B, Be, Bi, Ga, Gd, Ge, H, In, Ir, Li, Nd, Os, Pd, Pr, Pt, Re, Rh, Ru, Te, Tl, or Y have been made in biological materials.

  19. Techniques for active embodiment of participants in virtual environments

    SciTech Connect

    Hightower, R.; Stansfield, S.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents preliminary work in the development of an avatar driver. An avatar is the graphical embodiment of a user in a virtual world. In applications such as small team, close quarters training and mission planning and rehearsal, it is important that the user`s avatar reproduce his or her motions naturally and with high fidelity. This paper presents a set of special purpose algorithms for driving the motion of the avatar with minimal information about the posture and position of the user. These algorithms utilize information about natural human motion and posture to produce solutions quickly and accurately without the need for complex general-purpose kinematics algorithms. Several examples illustrating the successful applications of these techniques are included.

  20. Selected applications of photothermal and photoluminescence heterodyne techniques for process control in silicon wafer manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlert, Andreas; Kerstan, Michael; Lundt, Holger; Huber, Anton; Helmreich, Dieter; Geiler, Hans-Dieter; Karge, Harald; Wagner, Matthias

    1997-02-01

    Two noncontact laser-based heterodyne techniques, photothermal heterodyne (PTH) and photoluminescence heterodyne (PLH), are introduced and applied to processing and quality control in silicon wafer manufacturing. The crystallographic characteristics of process-induced defects in silicon wafers are suitable for the application of PTH and PLH techniques, which are demonstrated on selected examples from different steps of silicon wafer production. Both PLH and PTH techniques meet the demand for nondestructive and on-line-suitable measurement in the semiconductor industry.

  1. Fact Sheet: Control Techniques Guidelines (CTG) for Shipbuilding and Ship Repair Facilities Operation (Surface Coating)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page contains an August 1996 fact sheet with information regarding the CTG and Alternative Control Techniques (ACT) for Surface Coating at Shipbuilding and Ship Repair Facilities Operations. This document provides a summary of this guidance

  2. Technical management techniques for identification and control of industrial safety and pollution hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, R.; Dyer, M. K.; Hoard, E. G.; Little, D. G.; Taylor, A. C.

    1972-01-01

    Constructive recommendations are suggested for pollution problems from offshore energy resources industries on outer continental shelf. Technical management techniques for pollution identification and control offer possible applications to space engineering and management.

  3. 75 FR 59180 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Control Technique...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-27

    ... Technique Guidelines for Paper, Film, and Foil Coatings AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... adopting the requirements of EPA's Control Technique Guidelines (CTG) for paper, film, and foil coatings..., Film, and Foil Coatings,'' that is located in the ``Rules and Regulations'' section of this...

  4. Optimizaton of corrosion control for lead in drinking water using computational modeling techniques

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computational modeling techniques have been used to very good effect in the UK in the optimization of corrosion control for lead in drinking water. A “proof-of-concept” project with three US/CA case studies sought to demonstrate that such techniques could work equally well in the...

  5. The Effectiveness of Active and Traditional Teaching Techniques in the Orthopedic Assessment Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nottingham, Sara; Verscheure, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Active learning is a teaching methodology with a focus on student-centered learning that engages students in the educational process. This study implemented active learning techniques in an orthopedic assessment laboratory, and the effects of these teaching techniques. Mean scores from written exams, practical exams, and final course evaluations…

  6. Figure Analysis: A Teaching Technique to Promote Visual Literacy and Active Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiles, Amy M.

    2016-01-01

    Learning often improves when active learning techniques are used in place of traditional lectures. For many of these techniques, however, students are expected to apply concepts that they have already grasped. A challenge, therefore, is how to incorporate active learning into the classroom of courses with heavy content, such as molecular-based…

  7. Application of a sensitivity analysis technique to high-order digital flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paduano, James D.; Downing, David R.

    1987-01-01

    A sensitivity analysis technique for multiloop flight control systems is studied. This technique uses the scaled singular values of the return difference matrix as a measure of the relative stability of a control system. It then uses the gradients of these singular values with respect to system and controller parameters to judge sensitivity. The sensitivity analysis technique is first reviewed; then it is extended to include digital systems, through the derivation of singular-value gradient equations. Gradients with respect to parameters which do not appear explicitly as control-system matrix elements are also derived, so that high-order systems can be studied. A complete review of the integrated technique is given by way of a simple example: the inverted pendulum problem. The technique is then demonstrated on the X-29 control laws. Results show linear models of real systems can be analyzed by this sensitivity technique, if it is applied with care. A computer program called SVA was written to accomplish the singular-value sensitivity analysis techniques. Thus computational methods and considerations form an integral part of many of the discussions. A user's guide to the program is included. The SVA is a fully public domain program, running on the NASA/Dryden Elxsi computer.

  8. Successful Application of Active Learning Techniques to Introductory Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    HOFFMAN, ELIZABETH A.

    2001-01-01

    While the traditional lecture format may be a successful way to teach microbiology to both medical and nursing students, it was not an effective means of learning for many prenursing and preprofessional students enrolled in either of the introductory microbiology courses at Ashland Community College, an open enrollment institution. The structure of both Medical Microbiology and Principles of Microbiology was redesigned to allow students to address the material in an active manner. Daily quizzes, student group discussions, scrapbooks, lab project presentations and papers, and extra credit projects were all added in order to allow students maximum exposure to the course material in a manner compatible with various methods of learning. Student knowledge, course evaluations, and student success rates have all improved with the active learning format. PMID:23653538

  9. The application of emulation techniques in the analysis of highly reliable, guidance and control computer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Migneault, Gerard E.

    1987-01-01

    Emulation techniques can be a solution to a difficulty that arises in the analysis of the reliability of guidance and control computer systems for future commercial aircraft. Described here is the difficulty, the lack of credibility of reliability estimates obtained by analytical modeling techniques. The difficulty is an unavoidable consequence of the following: (1) a reliability requirement so demanding as to make system evaluation by use testing infeasible; (2) a complex system design technique, fault tolerance; (3) system reliability dominated by errors due to flaws in the system definition; and (4) elaborate analytical modeling techniques whose precision outputs are quite sensitive to errors of approximation in their input data. Use of emulation techniques for pseudo-testing systems to evaluate bounds on the parameter values needed for the analytical techniques is then discussed. Finally several examples of the application of emulation techniques are described.

  10. Aerial monitoring in active mud volcano by UAV technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisciotta, Antonino; Capasso, Giorgio; Madonia, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    UAV photogrammetry opens various new applications in the close range domain, combining aerial and terrestrial photogrammetry, but also introduces low-cost alternatives to the classical manned aerial photogrammetry. Between 2014 and 2015 tree aerial surveys have been carried out. Using a quadrotor drone, equipped with a compact camera, it was possible to generate high resolution elevation models and orthoimages of The "Salinelle", an active mud volcanoes area, located in territory of Paternò (South Italy). The main risks are related to the damages produced by paroxysmal events. Mud volcanoes show different cyclic phases of activity, including catastrophic events and periods of relative quiescence characterized by moderate activity. Ejected materials often are a mud slurry of fine solids suspended in liquids which may include water and hydrocarbon fluids, the bulk of released gases are carbon dioxide, with some methane and nitrogen, usually pond-shaped of variable dimension (from centimeters to meters in diameter). The scope of the presented work is the performance evaluation of a UAV system that was built to rapidly and autonomously acquire mobile three-dimensional (3D) mapping data in a volcanic monitoring scenario.

  11. Control of the olive fruit fly using genetics-enhanced sterile insect technique

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae, is the major arthropod pest of commercial olive production, causing extensive damage to olive crops worldwide. Current control techniques rely on spraying of chemical insecticides. The sterile insect technique (SIT) presents an alternative, environmentally friendly and species-specific method of population control. Although SIT has been very successful against other tephritid pests, previous SIT trials on olive fly have produced disappointing results. Key problems included altered diurnal mating rhythms of the laboratory-reared insects, resulting in asynchronous mating activity between the wild and released sterile populations, and low competitiveness of the radiation-sterilised mass-reared flies. Consequently, the production of competitive, male-only release cohorts is considered an essential prerequisite for successful olive fly SIT. Results We developed a set of conditional female-lethal strains of olive fly (named Release of Insects carrying a Dominant Lethal; RIDL®), providing highly penetrant female-specific lethality, dominant fluorescent marking, and genetic sterility. We found that males of the lead strain, OX3097D-Bol, 1) are strongly sexually competitive with wild olive flies, 2) display synchronous mating activity with wild females, and 3) induce appropriate refractoriness to wild female re-mating. Furthermore, we showed, through a large proof-of-principle experiment, that weekly releases of OX3097D-Bol males into stable populations of caged wild-type olive fly could cause rapid population collapse and eventual eradication. Conclusions The observed mating characteristics strongly suggest that an approach based on the release of OX3097D-Bol males will overcome the key difficulties encountered in previous olive fly SIT attempts. Although field confirmation is required, the proof-of-principle suppression and elimination of caged wild-type olive fly populations through OX3097D-Bol male releases provides

  12. An industrial application of a performance assessment and retuning technique for PI controllers.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Massimiliano; Visioli, Antonio

    2010-04-01

    In this paper we show how a simple methodology for the set-point following performance assessment and automatic tuning of a PI controller can be employed effectively in a real industrial application. In particular, a flow control loop in a pharmaceutical plant is considered. Practical issues related to the implementation in a Distributed Control System are discussed. Results show that the technique is capable of significantly improving the performance of the controller.

  13. Satellite cascade attitude control via fuzzy PD controller with active force control under momentum dumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Z.; Varatharajoo, R.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, fuzzy proportional-derivative (PD) controller with active force control (AFC) scheme is studied and employed in the satellite attitude control system equipped with reaction wheels. The momentum dumping is enabled via proportional integral (PI) controller as the system is impractical without momentum dumping control. The attitude controllers are developed together with their governing equations and evaluated through numerical treatment with respect to a reference satellite mission. From the results, it is evident that the three axis attitudes accuracies can be improved up to ±0.001 degree through the fuzzy PD controller with AFC scheme for the attitude control. In addition, the three-axis wheel angular momentums are well maintained during the attitude control tasks.

  14. Characterization of Deep Tunneling Activity through Remote-Sensing Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    R. G. Best, P. J. Etzler, and J. D. Bloom

    1997-10-01

    This work is a case study demonstrating the uses of multispectral and multi-temporal imagery to characterize deep tunneling activity. A drainage tunnel excavation in Quincy, MA is the case locality. Data used are aerial photographs (digitized) and Daedalus 3600 MSS image data that were collected in July and October of 1994. Analysis of the data includes thermal characterization, spectral characterization, multi-temporal analysis, and volume estimation using digital DEM generation. The results demonstrate the type of information that could be generated by multispectral, multi-temporal data if the study locality were a clandestine excavation site with restricted surface access.

  15. Active control: an investigation method for combustion instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poinsot, T.; Yip, B.; Veynante, D.; Trouvé, A.; Samaniego, J. M.; Candel, S.

    1992-07-01

    Closed-loop active control methods and their application to combustion instabilities are discussed. In these methods the instability development is impeded with a feedback control loop: the signal provided by a sensor monitoring the flame or pressure oscillations is processed and sent back to actuators mounted on the combustor or on the feeding system. Different active control systems tested on a non-premixed multiple-flame turbulent combustor are described. These systems can suppress all unstable plane modes of oscillation (i.e. low frequency modes). The active instability control (AIC) also constitutes an original and powerful technique for studies of mechanisms leading to instability or resulting from the instability. Two basic applications of this kind are described. In the first case the flame is initially controlled with AIC, the feedback loop is then switched off and the growth of the instability is analysed through high speed Schlieren cinematography and simultaneous sound pressure and reaction rate measurements. Three phases are identified during th growth of the oscillations: (1) a linear phase where acoustic waves induce a flapping motion of the flame sheets without interaction between sheets, (2) a modulation phase, where flame sheets interact randomly and (3) a nonlinear phase where the flame sheets are broken and a limit cycle is reached. In the second case we investigate different types of flame extinctions associated with combustion instability. It is shown that pressure oscillations may lead to partial or total extinctions. Extinctions occur in various forms but usually follow a rapid growth of pressure oscillations. The flame is extinguished during the modulation phase observed in the initiation experiments. In these studies devoted to transient instability phenomena, the control system constitutes a unique investigation tool because it is difficult to obtain the same information by other means. Implications for modelling and prediction of

  16. Experimental Comparison of two Active Vibration Control Approaches: Velocity Feedback and Negative Capacitance Shunt Damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Benjamin; Schiller, Noah

    2013-01-01

    This paper outlines a direct, experimental comparison between two established active vibration control techniques. Active vibration control methods, many of which rely upon piezoelectric patches as actuators and/or sensors, have been widely studied, showing many advantages over passive techniques. However, few direct comparisons between different active vibration control methods have been made to determine the performance benefit of one method over another. For the comparison here, the first control method, velocity feedback, is implemented using four accelerometers that act as sensors along with an analog control circuit which drives a piezoelectric actuator. The second method, negative capacitance shunt damping, consists of a basic analog circuit which utilizes a single piezoelectric patch as both a sensor and actuator. Both of these control methods are implemented individually using the same piezoelectric actuator attached to a clamped Plexiglas window. To assess the performance of each control method, the spatially averaged velocity of the window is compared to an uncontrolled response.

  17. Active control of sound fields in elastic cylinders by vibrational inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. D.; Fuller, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    An experiment is performed to study the mechanisms of active control of sound fields in elastic cylinders via vibrational outputs. In the present method of control, a vibrational force input was used as the secondary control input to reduce the radiated acoustic field. For the frequencies considered, the active vibration technique provided good global reduction of interior sound even though only one actuator was used.

  18. Smart actuators: a novel technique for active damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muth, Michael; Moldovan, Klaus; Goetz, Bernt

    1995-05-01

    Sensors are important components for any automatic process. Their function is to measure physical variables, and thus to allow automatic actions in a technical process, for example in a manufacturing sequence or a measurement. Selecting a sensor for a process, it is mostly overlooked that actuators used in a process also have sensory properties. The reactions of actuators to the state of a process give the possibility to extract relevant information out of the process with actuators. In using the sensory properties of actuators the costs for additional sensors can be saved. Even more important, under some circumstances it may not even be possible to place a special sensor directly at the location of interest: In that case the information about the physical variable is only accessible by analyzing the return signal of the actuator. An example of such a smart actuator combining active and sensory properties is demonstrated in a simple experiment. This experiment shows a steel ball supported as a pendulum. The steel ball can be pushed off, and on swinging back it can be caught in a single pass without any bounce. The actuator uses the piezoelectric effect which shows the underlying principle most clearly: Application of the reversibility of physical effects. In this case mechanical energy can either be produced or absorbed. This experiment is means as a demonstration model for students. It is also used for preliminary investigations developing a fast, actively damped tipping mechanism (optical scanner).

  19. Experimental techniques for screening of antiosteoporotic activity in postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Satpathy, Swaha; Patra, Arjun; Ahirwar, Bharti

    2015-12-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis, a silent epidemic, has become a major health hazard, afflicting about 50% of postmenopausal women worldwide and is thought to be a disease with one of the highest incidences in senile people. It is a chronic, progressive condition associated with micro-architectural deterioration of bone tissue that results in low bone mass, decreased bone strength that predisposes to an increased risk of fracture. Women are more likely to develop osteoporosis than men due to reduction in estrogen during menopause which leads to decline in bone formation and increase in bone resorption activity. Estrogen is able to suppress the production of proinflammatory cytokines like interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, IL-7 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α). This is why these cytokines are elevated in postmenopausal women. In this review article we have made an attempt to collate the various methods and parameters most frequently used for screening of antiosteoporotic activity in postmenopausal osteoporosis. Pertaining to ovariectomized animal model, this is the most appropriate model for studying the efficacy of different drugs to prevent bone loss in postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  20. Stable adaptive PI control for permanent magnet synchronous motor drive based on improved JITL technique.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shiqi; Tang, Xiaoqi; Song, Bao; Lu, Shaowu; Ye, Bosheng

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, a stable adaptive PI control strategy based on the improved just-in-time learning (IJITL) technique is proposed for permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) drive. Firstly, the traditional JITL technique is improved. The new IJITL technique has less computational burden and is more suitable for online identification of the PMSM drive system which is highly real-time compared to traditional JITL. In this way, the PMSM drive system is identified by IJITL technique, which provides information to an adaptive PI controller. Secondly, the adaptive PI controller is designed in discrete time domain which is composed of a PI controller and a supervisory controller. The PI controller is capable of automatically online tuning the control gains based on the gradient descent method and the supervisory controller is developed to eliminate the effect of the approximation error introduced by the PI controller upon the system stability in the Lyapunov sense. Finally, experimental results on the PMSM drive system show accurate identification and favorable tracking performance.

  1. Antenna pointing system for satellite tracking based on Kalman filtering and model predictive control techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, André L. G.; Ishihara, João Y.; Ferreira, Henrique C.; Borges, Renato A.; Borges, Geovany A.

    2016-12-01

    The present work proposes a new approach for an antenna pointing system for satellite tracking. Such a system uses the received signal to estimate the beam pointing deviation and then adjusts the antenna pointing. The present work has two contributions. First, the estimation is performed by a Kalman filter based conical scan technique. This technique uses the Kalman filter avoiding the batch estimator and applies a mathematical manipulation avoiding the linearization approximations. Secondly, a control technique based on the model predictive control together with an explicit state feedback solution are obtained in order to reduce the computational burden. Numerical examples illustrate the results.

  2. [Research and development of technique of regenerative environmental control and life support system].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kang-han; Fu, Lan; Han, Yong-qiang; Li, Jun-rong

    2003-01-01

    Environmental control and life support system (ECLSS) is a critical subsystem of manned spacecraft that has the most typical characteristics of manned space flight. It is an indispensable safeguard for the life of astronaut in space. This article reviewed the main techniques and developments of oxygen and water closed loop recycling in regenerative environmental control and life support system. Through comparing and analyzing the current state of its space application as well as the strong and weak points of different technique routes, the directions of research and development of oxygen and water recycling technique for space station are proposed.

  3. Energy management and control of active distribution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shariatzadeh, Farshid

    Advancements in the communication, control, computation and information technologies have driven the transition to the next generation active power distribution systems. Novel control techniques and management strategies are required to achieve the efficient, economic and reliable grid. The focus of this work is energy management and control of active distribution systems (ADS) with integrated renewable energy sources (RESs) and demand response (DR). Here, ADS mean automated distribution system with remotely operated controllers and distributed energy resources (DERs). DER as active part of the next generation future distribution system includes: distributed generations (DGs), RESs, energy storage system (ESS), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) and DR. Integration of DR and RESs into ADS is critical to realize the vision of sustainability. The objective of this dissertation is the development of management architecture to control and operate ADS in the presence of DR and RES. One of the most challenging issues for operating ADS is the inherent uncertainty of DR and RES as well as conflicting objective of DER and electric utilities. ADS can consist of different layers such as system layer and building layer and coordination between these layers is essential. In order to address these challenges, multi-layer energy management and control architecture is proposed with robust algorithms in this work. First layer of proposed multi-layer architecture have been implemented at the system layer. Developed AC optimal power flow (AC-OPF) generates fair price for all DR and non-DR loads which is used as a control signal for second layer. Second layer controls DR load at buildings using a developed look-ahead robust controller. Load aggregator collects information from all buildings and send aggregated load to the system optimizer. Due to the different time scale at these two management layers, time coordination scheme is developed. Robust and deterministic controllers

  4. Improving the vibration suppression capabilities of a magneto-rheological damper using hybrid active and semi-active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah Khan, Irfan; Wagg, David; Sims, Neil D.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a new hybrid active and semi-active control method for vibration suppression in flexible structures. The method uses a combination of a semi-active device and an active control actuator situated elsewhere in the structure to suppress vibrations. The key novelty is to use the hybrid controller to enable the magneto-rheological damper to achieve a performance as close to a fully active device as possible. This is achieved by ensuring that the active actuator can assist the magneto-rheological damper in the regions where energy is required. In addition, the hybrid active and semi-active controller is designed to minimize the switching of the semi-active controller. The control framework used is the immersion and invariance control technique in combination with sliding mode control. A two degree-of-freedom system with lightly damped resonances is used as an example system. Both numerical and experimental results are generated for this system, and then compared as part of a validation study. The experimental system uses hardware-in-the-loop to simulate the effect of both the degrees-of-freedom. The results show that the concept is viable both numerically and experimentally, and improved vibration suppression results can be obtained for the magneto-rheological damper that approach the performance of an active device.

  5. Floating-point scaling technique for sources separation automatic gain control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermas, A.; Belouchrani, A.; Ait-Mohamed, O.

    2012-07-01

    Based on the floating-point representation and taking advantage of scaling factor indetermination in blind source separation (BSS) processing, we propose a scaling technique applied to the separation matrix, to avoid the saturation or the weakness in the recovered source signals. This technique performs an automatic gain control in an on-line BSS environment. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this technique by using the implementation of a division-free BSS algorithm with two inputs, two outputs. The proposed technique is computationally cheaper and efficient for a hardware implementation compared to the Euclidean normalisation.

  6. A quality control technique based on UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy for tequila distillery factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa Garcia, O.; Ramos Ortiz, G.; Maldonado, J. L.; Pichardo Molina, J.; Meneses Nava, M. A.; Landgrave, Enrique; Cervantes, M. J.

    2006-02-01

    A low cost technique based on the UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy is presented for the quality control of the spirit drink known as tequila. It is shown that such spectra offer enough information to discriminate a given spirit drink from a group of bottled commercial tequilas. The technique was applied to white tequilas. Contrary to the reference analytic methods, such as chromatography, for this technique neither special personal training nor sophisticated instrumentations is required. By using hand-held instrumentation this technique can be applied in situ during the production process.

  7. Monolithic active pixel radiation detector with shielding techniques

    DOEpatents

    Deptuch, Grzegorz W.

    2016-09-06

    A monolithic active pixel radiation detector including a method of fabricating thereof. The disclosed radiation detector can include a substrate comprising a silicon layer upon which electronics are configured. A plurality of channels can be formed on the silicon layer, wherein the plurality of channels are connected to sources of signals located in a bulk part of the substrate, and wherein the signals flow through electrically conducting vias established in an isolation oxide on the substrate. One or more nested wells can be configured from the substrate, wherein the nested wells assist in collecting charge carriers released in interaction with radiation and wherein the nested wells further separate the electronics from the sensing portion of the detector substrate. The detector can also be configured according to a thick SOA method of fabrication.

  8. History, progress and prospect for controlled ecological life support technique in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shuangsheng

    2016-07-01

    Constructing controlled ecological life support system is an important supporting condition for carrying out manned deep-space exploration and extraterrestrial inhabitation and development in the future. In China, the controlled ecological life support technique has gone through a developmental process of more than twenty years, undergoing the course of from conceptual research, to key unit-level technique and key system-level integrated technique, and from ground-based simulated tests to spaceflight demonstrating test, and gained many important stagy harvests. In this paper, the present status, subsistent problems and next plans in the domain of CELSS techniques in China are introduced briefly, so as to play a referential role for promoting development of the techniques internationally.

  9. An Investigation into Techniques for the Determination of Moisture Content on Activated Carbon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    Activated carbon (or charcoal ) is a universal adsorbent for the removal of a variety of organic/inorganic contaminants, in both gaseous and aqueous phase...AD-A245 938 i * *~fl Nadoni Waren AN INVESTIGATION INTO TECHNIQUES FOR THE DETERMNATION OF MOISTURE CONTENT ON ACTIVATED CARBON (U) by L.E. Cameron...INVESTIGATION INTO TECHNIQUES FOR THE DETERMINATION OF MOISTURE CONTENT ON ACTIVATED CARBON (U) by L.E. Cameron and S.H.C. Liang Chemical Protecti

  10. Hepatitis C virus transmission in hemodialysis units: importance of infection control practices and aseptic technique.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Nicola D; Novak, Ryan T; Datta, Deblina; Cotter, Susanne; Arduino, Matthew J; Patel, Priti R; Williams, Ian T; Bialek, Stephanie R

    2009-09-01

    We investigated 4 hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection outbreaks at hemodialysis units to identify practices associated with transmission. Apparent failures to follow recommended infection control precautions resulted in patient-to-patient HCV transmission, through cross-contamination of the environment or intravenous medication vials. Fastidious attention to aseptic technique and infection control precautions are essential to prevent HCV transmission.

  11. [A standardized technique for ultrasound controlled placement of a central venous catheter].

    PubMed

    Mergelsberg, M

    1991-12-01

    To reduce the rate of complications and failures in central venous catheterisation a technique for ultrasonically controlled puncture of the internal jugular vein was standardised. The puncture procedure, including the application of local anaesthesia, is continuously observed and guided by real-time ultrasound. Imaging, control and practising of the puncture are described and discussed.

  12. Amplitude Scaling of Active Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalnov, Oksana; Seifert, Avraham

    2010-01-01

    Three existing and two new excitation magnitude scaling options for active separation control at Reynolds numbers below one Million. The physical background for the scaling options was discussed and their relevance was evaluated using two different sets of experimental data. For F+ approx. 1, 2D excitation: a) The traditional VR and C(mu) - do not scale the data. b) Only the Re*C(mu) is valid. This conclusion is also limited for positive lift increment.. For F+ > 10, 3D excitation, the Re corrected C(mu), the St corrected velocity ratio and the vorticity flux coefficient, all scale the amplitudes equally well. Therefore, the Reynolds weighted C(mu) is the preferred choice, relevant to both excitation modes. Incidence also considered, using Ue from local Cp.

  13. Space Station Active Thermal Control System modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hye, Abdul; Lin, Chin H.

    1988-01-01

    The Space Station Active Thermal Control System (ATCS) has been modeled using modified SINDA/SINFLO programs to solve two-phase Thermo-fluid problems. The modifications include changes in several subroutines to incorporate implicit solution which allows larger time step as compared to that for explicit solutions. Larger time step saves computer time but involves larger computational error. Several runs were made using various time steps for the ATCS model. It has been found that for a reasonable approach, three times larger time step as compared to that used in explicit method is a good value which will reduce the computer time by approximately 50 percent and still maintain the accuracy of the output data to within 90 percent of the explicit values.

  14. Innovative techniques to analyze time series of geomagnetic activity indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasis, Georgios; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Daglis, Ioannis A.; Potirakis, Stelios M.; Eftaxias, Konstantinos

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic storms are undoubtedly among the most important phenomena in space physics and also a central subject of space weather. The non-extensive Tsallis entropy has been recently introduced, as an effective complexity measure for the analysis of the geomagnetic activity Dst index. The Tsallis entropy sensitively shows the complexity dissimilarity among different "physiological" (normal) and "pathological" states (intense magnetic storms). More precisely, the Tsallis entropy implies the emergence of two distinct patterns: (i) a pattern associated with the intense magnetic storms, which is characterized by a higher degree of organization, and (ii) a pattern associated with normal periods, which is characterized by a lower degree of organization. Other entropy measures such as Block Entropy, T-Complexity, Approximate Entropy, Sample Entropy and Fuzzy Entropy verify the above mentioned result. Importantly, the wavelet spectral analysis in terms of Hurst exponent, H, also shows the existence of two different patterns: (i) a pattern associated with the intense magnetic storms, which is characterized by a fractional Brownian persistent behavior (ii) a pattern associated with normal periods, which is characterized by a fractional Brownian anti-persistent behavior. Finally, we observe universality in the magnetic storm and earthquake dynamics, on a basis of a modified form of the Gutenberg-Richter law for the Tsallis statistics. This finding suggests a common approach to the interpretation of both phenomena in terms of the same driving physical mechanism. Signatures of discrete scale invariance in Dst time series further supports the aforementioned proposal.

  15. Ribosome-dependent activation of stringent control

    PubMed Central

    Gordiyenko, Yuliya; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2016-01-01

    In order to survive, bacteria continually sense, and respond to, environmental fluctuations. Stringent control represents a key bacterial stress response to nutrient starvation1,2 that leads to a rapid and comprehensive reprogramming of metabolic and transcriptional patterns3. In general, transcription of genes for growth and proliferation are down-regulated, while those important for survival and virulence are favored4. Amino acid starvation is sensed by depletion of the aminoacyl-tRNA pools5, which results in accumulation of ribosomes stalled with non-aminoacylated (uncharged) tRNA in the ribosomal A-site6,7. RelA is recruited to stalled ribosomes, and activated to synthesize a hyperphosphorylated guanosine analog, (p)ppGpp8, which acts as a pleiotropic second messenger. However, structural information for how RelA recognizes stalled ribosomes and discriminates against aminoacylated tRNAs is missing. Here, we present the electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of RelA bound to the bacterial ribosome stalled with uncharged tRNA. The structure reveals that RelA utilizes a distinct binding site compared to the translational factors, with a multi-domain architecture that wraps around a highly distorted A-site tRNA. The TGS domain of RelA binds the CCA tail to orient the free 3’ hydroxyl group of the terminal adenosine towards a β-strand, such that an aminoacylated tRNA at this position would be sterically precluded. The structure supports a model where association of RelA with the ribosome suppresses auto-inhibition to activate synthesis of (p)ppGpp and initiate the stringent response. Since stringent control is responsible for the survival of pathogenic bacteria under stress conditions, and contributes to chronic infections and antibiotic tolerance, RelA represents a good target for the development of novel antibacterial therapeutics. PMID:27279228

  16. An example of requirements for Advanced Subsonic Civil Transport (ASCT) flight control system using structured techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclees, Robert E.; Cohen, Gerald C.

    1991-01-01

    The requirements are presented for an Advanced Subsonic Civil Transport (ASCT) flight control system generated using structured techniques. The requirements definition starts from initially performing a mission analysis to identify the high level control system requirements and functions necessary to satisfy the mission flight. The result of the study is an example set of control system requirements partially represented using a derivative of Yourdon's structured techniques. Also provided is a research focus for studying structured design methodologies and in particular design-for-validation philosophies.

  17. Manipulating epileptiform bursting in the rat hippocampus using chaos control and adaptive techniques.

    PubMed

    Slutzky, Marc W; Cvitanovic, Predrag; Mogul, David J

    2003-05-01

    Epilepsy is a relatively common disease, afflicting 1%-2% of the population, yet many epileptic patients are not sufficiently helped by current pharmacological therapies. Recent reports have suggested that chaos control techniques may be useful for electrically manipulating epileptiform bursting behavior in vitro and could possibly lead to an alternative method for preventing seizures. We implemented chaos control of spontaneous bursting in the rat hippocampal slice using robust control techniques: stable manifold placement (SMP) and an adaptive tracking (AT) algorithm designed to overcome nonstationarity. We examined the effect of several factors, including control radius size and synaptic plasticity, on control efficacy. AT improved control efficacy over basic SMP control, but relatively frequent stimulation was still necessary and very tight control was only achieved for brief stretches. A novel technique was developed for validating period-1 orbit detection in noisy systems by forcing the system directly onto the period-1 orbit. This forcing analysis suggested that period-1 orbits were indeed present but that control would be difficult because of high noise levels and nonstationarity. Noise might actually be lower in vivo, where regulatory inputs to the hippocampus are still intact. Thus, it may still be feasible to use chaos control algorithms for preventing epileptic seizures.

  18. Active Control of Instabilities in Laminar Boundary-Layer Flow. Part 2; Use of Sensors and Spectral Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.; Nicolaides, R. A.; Erlebacher, Gordon; Hussaini, M. Yousuff; Gunzburger, Max D.

    1994-01-01

    This study focuses on the suppression of instability growth using an automated active-control technique. The evolution of 2D disturbances that are spatially growing in a flat-plate boundary layer are computed with a spatial DNS code. A controller receives wall sensor information (pressure or shear) as input and provides a signal that controls an actuator response as output. The control law assumes that wave cancellation is valid. The results indicate that a measure of wave cancellation can be obtained for small- and large-amplitude instabilities without feedback; however, feedback is required to optimize the control amplitude and phase for exact wave cancellation.

  19. Microfluidic on-chip fluorescence-activated interface control system.

    PubMed

    Haiwang, Li; Nguyen, N T; Wong, T N; Ng, S L

    2010-11-22

    A microfluidic dynamic fluorescence-activated interface control system was developed for lab-on-a-chip applications. The system consists of a straight rectangular microchannel, a fluorescence excitation source, a detection sensor, a signal conversion circuit, and a high-voltage feedback system. Aqueous NaCl as conducting fluid and aqueous glycerol as nonconducting fluid were introduced to flow side by side into the straight rectangular microchannel. Fluorescent dye was added to the aqueous NaCl to work as a signal representing the interface position. Automatic control of the liquid interface was achieved by controlling the electroosmotic effect that exists only in the conducting fluid using a high-voltage feedback system. A LABVIEW program was developed to control the output of high-voltage power supply according the actual interface position, and then the interface position is modified as the output of high-voltage power supply. At last, the interface can be moved to the desired position automatically using this feedback system. The results show that the system presented in this paper can control an arbitrary interface location in real time. The effects of viscosity ratio, flow rates, and polarity of electric field were discussed. This technique can be extended to switch the sample flow and droplets automatically.

  20. Some experiences using wind-tunnel models in active control studies. [minimization of aeroelastic response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, R. V., Jr.; Abel, I.; Ruhlin, C. L.

    1976-01-01

    A status report and review of wind tunnel model experimental techniques that have been developed to study and validate the use of active control technology for the minimization of aeroelastic response are presented. Modeling techniques, test procedures, and data analysis methods used in three model studies are described. The studies include flutter mode suppression on a delta-wing model, flutter mode suppression and ride quality control on a 1/30-size model of the B-52 CCV airplane, and an active lift distribution control system on a 1/22 size C-5A model.

  1. Techniques for monitoring and controlling yaw attitude of a GPS satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichten, Stephen M. (Inventor); Bar-Sever, Yoaz (Inventor); Zumberge, James (Inventor); Bertiger, William I. (Inventor); Muellerschoen, Ronald J. (Inventor); Wu, Sien-Chong (Inventor); Hurst, Kenneth (Inventor); Blewitt, Geoff (Inventor); Yunck, Thomas (Inventor); Thornton, Catherine (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Techniques for monitoring and controlling yawing of a GPS satellite in an orbit that has an eclipsing portion out of the sunlight based on the orbital conditions of the GPS satellite. In one embodiment, a constant yaw bias is generated in the attitude control system of the GPS satellite to control the yawing of the GPS satellite when it is in the shadow of the earth.

  2. A Review of Emerging Analytical Techniques for Objective Physical Activity Measurement in Humans.

    PubMed

    Clark, Cain C T; Barnes, Claire M; Stratton, Gareth; McNarry, Melitta A; Mackintosh, Kelly A; Summers, Huw D

    2017-03-01

    Physical inactivity is one of the most prevalent risk factors for non-communicable diseases in the world. A fundamental barrier to enhancing physical activity levels and decreasing sedentary behavior is limited by our understanding of associated measurement and analytical techniques. The number of analytical techniques for physical activity measurement has grown significantly, and although emerging techniques may advance analyses, little consensus is presently available and further synthesis is therefore required. The objective of this review was to identify the accuracy of emerging analytical techniques used for physical activity measurement in humans. We conducted a search of electronic databases using Web of Science, PubMed, and Google Scholar. This review included studies written in English and published between January 2010 and December 2014 that assessed physical activity using emerging analytical techniques and reported technique accuracy. A total of 2064 papers were initially retrieved from three databases. After duplicates were removed and remaining articles screened, 50 full-text articles were reviewed, resulting in the inclusion of 11 articles that met the eligibility criteria. Despite the diverse nature and the range in accuracy associated with some of the analytic techniques, the rapid development of analytics has demonstrated that more sensitive information about physical activity may be attained. However, further refinement of these techniques is needed.

  3. Active control of shocks and sonic boom ground signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagiz, Bedri

    The manipulation of a flow field to obtain a desired change is a much heightened subject. Active flow control has been the subject of the major research areas in fluid mechanics for the past two decades. It offers new solutions for mitigation of shock strength, sonic boom alleviation, drag minimization, reducing blade-vortex interaction noise in helicopters, stall control and the performance maximization of existing designs to meet the increasing requirements of the aircraft industries. Despite the wide variety of the potential applications of active flow control, the majority of studies have been performed at subsonic speeds. The active flow control cases were investigated in transonic speed in this study. Although the active flow control provides significant improvements, the sensibility of aerodynamic performance to design parameters makes it a nontrivial and expensive problem, so the designer has to optimize a number of different parameters. For the purpose of gaining understanding of the active flow control concepts, an automated optimization cycle process was generated. Also, the optimization cycle reduces cost and turnaround time. The mass flow coefficient, location, width and angle were chosen as design parameters to maximize the aerodynamic performance of an aircraft. As the main contribution of this study, a detailed parametric study and optimization process were presented. The second step is to appraise the practicability of weakening the shock wave and thereby reducing the wave drag in transonic flight regime using flow control devices such as two dimensional contour bump, individual jet actuator, and also the hybrid control which includes both control devices together, thereby gaining the desired improvements in aerodynamic performance of the air-vehicle. After this study, to improve the aerodynamic performance, the flow control and shape parameters are optimized separately, combined, and in a serial combination. The remarkable part of all these

  4. Synchronization of Rossler and Chen chaotic dynamical systems using active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agiza, H. N.; Yassen, M. T.

    2001-01-01

    This Letter presents chaos synchronization of two identical Rossler and Chen systems by using active control. The proposed technique is applied to achieve chaos synchronization for the Rossler and Chen dynamical systems. We demonstrate that a coupled Rossler and Chen systems can be synchronized. Numerical simulations are used to show the effectiveness of the proposed control method.

  5. Neural Detection of Malicious Network Activities Using a New Direct Parsing and Feature Extraction Technique

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    NETWORK ACTIVITIES USING A NEW DIRECT PARSING AND FEATURE EXTRACTION TECHNIQUE by Cheng Hong Low September 2015 Thesis Advisor: Phillip Pace Co...FEATURE EXTRACTION TECHNIQUE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Low, Cheng Hong 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Center for...FEATURE EXTRACTION TECHNIQUE Cheng Hong Low Civlian, ST Aerospace, Singapore M.Sc., National University of Singapore, 2012 Submitted in

  6. System identification and control of the JPL active structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanson, J. L.; Lurie, B. J.; O'Brien, J. F.; Chu, C.-C.; Smith, R. S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes recent advances in structural quieting technology as applied to active truss structures intended for high precision space based optics applications. Collocated active damping control loops are designed in order to impedance match piezoelectric active members to the structure. Noncollocated control loops are also studied in relation to controlling lightly damped structures.

  7. Nonlinear control techniques for the heart rate regulation in treadmill exercises.

    PubMed

    Scalzi, Stefano; Tomei, Patrizio; Verrelli, Cristiano Maria

    2012-03-01

    It has been recently shown in the literature that a robust output feedback controller for the heart rate regulation can be designed for an experimentally validated second order nonlinear model of the human heart rate response during long-duration treadmill exercises: It is based on piecewise linear approximations of the original nonlinear model and involves (local) robust linear control techniques. In this letter, we resort to recent nonlinear advanced control techniques in order to illustrate the existence of a nonlocal and nonswitching control which guarantees heart rate regulation with no exact knowledge of model parameters and nonlinearities: It simply generalizes to the nonlinear framework the classical proportional-integral control design for linear models of heart rate response during treadmill exercises. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach in typical training exercises involving warm up/holding/cool down phases.

  8. A three-dimensional muscle activity imaging technique for assessing pelvic muscle function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yingchun; Wang, Dan; Timm, Gerald W.

    2010-11-01

    A novel multi-channel surface electromyography (EMG)-based three-dimensional muscle activity imaging (MAI) technique has been developed by combining the bioelectrical source reconstruction approach and subject-specific finite element modeling approach. Internal muscle activities are modeled by a current density distribution and estimated from the intra-vaginal surface EMG signals with the aid of a weighted minimum norm estimation algorithm. The MAI technique was employed to minimally invasively reconstruct electrical activity in the pelvic floor muscles and urethral sphincter from multi-channel intra-vaginal surface EMG recordings. A series of computer simulations were conducted to evaluate the performance of the present MAI technique. With appropriate numerical modeling and inverse estimation techniques, we have demonstrated the capability of the MAI technique to accurately reconstruct internal muscle activities from surface EMG recordings. This MAI technique combined with traditional EMG signal analysis techniques is being used to study etiologic factors associated with stress urinary incontinence in women by correlating functional status of muscles characterized from the intra-vaginal surface EMG measurements with the specific pelvic muscle groups that generated these signals. The developed MAI technique described herein holds promise for eliminating the need to place needle electrodes into muscles to obtain accurate EMG recordings in some clinical applications.

  9. Active-Adaptive Control of Inlet Separation Using Supersonic Microjets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvi, Farrukh S.

    2007-01-01

    Flow separation in internal and external flows generally results in a significant degradation in aircraft performance. For internal flows, such as inlets and transmission ducts in aircraft propulsion systems, separation is undesirable as it reduces the overall system performance. The aim of this research has been to understand the nature of separation and more importantly, to explore techniques to actively control it. In this research, we extended our investigation of active separation control (under a previous NASA grant) where we explored the use of microjets for the control of boundary layer separation. The geometry used for the initial study was a simple diverging Stratford ramp, equipped with arrays of microjets. These early results clearly show that the activation of microjets eliminated flow separation. Furthermore, the velocity-field measurements, using PIV, also demonstrate that the gain in momentum due to the elimination of separation is at least an order of magnitude larger (two orders of magnitude larger in most cases) than the momentum injected by the microjets and is accomplished with very little mass flow through the microjets. Based on our initial promising results this research was continued under the present grant, using a more flexible model. This model allows for the magnitude and extent of separation as well as the microjet parameters to be independently varied. The results, using this model were even more encouraging and demonstrated that microjet control completely eliminated significant regions of flow separation over a wide range of conditions with almost negligible mass flow. Detailed studies of the flowfield and its response to microjets were further examined using 3-component PIV and unsteady pressure measurements, among others. As the results presented this report will show, microjets were successfully used to control the separation of a much larger extent and magnitude than demonstrated in our earlier experiments. In fact, using the

  10. SYSTEMATIC SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY TECHNIQUE FOR EVALUATING COMBINED BIOLOIGCAL/GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON TREATMENT PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A systematic scanning election microscope analytical technique has been developed to examine granular activated carbon used a a medium for biomass attachment in liquid waste treatment. The procedure allows for the objective monitoring, comparing, and trouble shooting of combined ...

  11. Improving general flexibility with a mind-body approach: a randomized, controlled trial using neuro emotional Technique®.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Anne M; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Hall, Michael W

    2012-08-01

    General flexibility is a key component of health, well-being, and general physical conditioning. Reduced flexibility has both physical and mental/emotional etiologies and can lead to musculoskeletal injuries and athletic underperformance. Few studies have tested the effectiveness of a mind-body therapy on general flexibility. The aim of this study was to investigate if Neuro Emotional Technique® (NET), a mind-body technique shown to be effective in reducing stress, can also improve general flexibility. The sit-and-reach test (SR) score was used as a measure of general flexibility. Forty-five healthy participants were recruited from the general population and assessed for their initial SR score before being randomly allocated to receive (a) two 20-minute sessions of NET (experimental group); (b) two 20-minute sessions of stretching instruction (active control group); or (c) no intervention or instruction (passive control group). After intervention, the participants were reassessed in a similar manner by the same blind assessor. The participants also answered questions about demographics, usual water and caffeine consumption, and activity level, and they completed an anxiety/mood psychometric preintervention and postintervention. The mean (SD) change in the SR score was +3.1 cm (2.5) in the NET group, +1.2 cm (2.3) in the active control group and +1.0 cm (2.6) in the passive control group. Although all the 3 groups showed some improvement, the improvement in the NET group was statistically significant when compared with that of either the passive controls (p = 0.015) or the active controls (p = 0.021). This study suggests that NET could provide an effective treatment in improving general flexibility. A larger study is required to confirm these findings and also to assess longer term effectiveness of this therapy on general flexibility.

  12. Performance comparison of five frequency domain system identification techniques for helicopter higher harmonic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacklin, Stephen A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a computer simulation comparing the performance of five system identification techniques currently proposed for use with helicopter, frequency domain, higher harmonic vibration control algorithms. The system identification techniques studied were: (1) the weighted least squares method in moving block format, (2) the classical Kalman filter, (3) a generalized Kalman filter, (4) the classical least mean square (LMS) filter, and (5) a generalized LMS filter. The generalized Kalman and LMS filters were derived by allowing for multistep operation, rather than the single-step update approach used by their classical versions. Both open-loop and closed-loop (vibration control mode) identification results are presented in the paper. The algorithms are evaluated in terms of their accuracy, stability, convergence properties, computation speeds, and the relative ease with which these techniques may be directly applied to the helicopter vibration control problem.

  13. Aerodynamic Control using Distributed Active Bleed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, John; Glezer, Ari

    2015-11-01

    The global aerodynamic loads on a stationary and pitching airfoil at angles of attack beyond the static and dynamic stall margins, respectively are controlled in wind tunnel experiments using regulated distributed bleed driven by surface pressure differences. High-speed PIV and proper orthogonal decomposition of the vorticity flux on the static airfoil show that the bleed engenders trains of discrete vortices that advect along the surface and are associated with a local instability that is manifested by a time-averaged bifurcation of the vorticity layer near the bleed outlets and alters the vorticity flux over the airfoil and thereby the aerodynamic loads. Active bleed is used on a dynamically pitching airfoil (at reduced frequencies up to k = 0.42) to modulate the evolution of vorticity concentrations during dynamic stall. Time-periodic bleed improved the pitch stability by reducing adverse pitching moment (``negative damping'') that can precipitate structural instabilities. At the same time, the maintains the cycle-average loads to within 5% of the base flow levels by segmenting the vorticity layer during upstroke and promoting early flow attachment during downstroke segments of the pitch cycle. Supported by Georgia Tech VLRCOE.

  14. Time domain and frequency domain design techniques for model reference adaptive control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boland, J. S., III

    1971-01-01

    Some problems associated with the design of model-reference adaptive control systems are considered and solutions to these problems are advanced. The stability of the adapted system is a primary consideration in the development of both the time-domain and the frequency-domain design techniques. Consequentially, the use of Liapunov's direct method forms an integral part of the derivation of the design procedures. The application of sensitivity coefficients to the design of model-reference adaptive control systems is considered. An application of the design techniques is also presented.

  15. Nonlinear Raman Techniques in Femtosecond Time Resolved Spectroscopy for the Analysis and Control of Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Materny, Arnulf; Konradi, Jakow; Namboodiri, Vinu; Namboodiri, Mahesh; Scaria, Abraham

    2008-11-01

    The use of four-wave mixing techniques in femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy has considerable advantages. Due to the many degrees of freedom offered e.g. by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), the dynamics even of complex systems can be analyzed in detail. Using pulse shaping techniques in combination with a self-learning loop approach, molecular mode excitation can be controlled very efficiently in a multi-photon excitation process. Results obtained from the optimal control of CARS on β-carotene are discussed.

  16. Nonlinear Raman Techniques in Femtosecond Time Resolved Spectroscopy for the Analysis and Control of Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Materny, Arnulf; Konradi, Jakow; Namboodiri, Vinu; Namboodiri, Mahesh; Scaria, Abraham

    2008-11-14

    The use of four-wave mixing techniques in femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy has considerable advantages. Due to the many degrees of freedom offered e.g. by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), the dynamics even of complex systems can be analyzed in detail. Using pulse shaping techniques in combination with a self-learning loop approach, molecular mode excitation can be controlled very efficiently in a multi-photon excitation process. Results obtained from the optimal control of CARS on {beta}-carotene are discussed.

  17. Control-system techniques for improved departure/spin resistance for fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, L. T.; Gilbert, W. P.; Ogburn, M. E.

    1980-01-01

    Some fundamental information on control system effects on controllability of highly maneuverable aircraft at high angles of attack are summarized as well as techniques for enhancing fighter aircraft departure/spin resistance using control system design. The discussion includes: (1) a brief review of pertinent high angle of attack phenomena including aerodynamics, inertia coupling, and kinematic coupling; (2) effects of conventional stability augmentation systems at high angles of attack; (3) high angle of attack control system concepts designed to enhance departure/spin resistance; and (4) the outlook for applications of these concepts to future fighters, particularly those designs which incorporate relaxed static stability.

  18. A VLF-based technique in applications to digital control of nonlinear hybrid multirate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassilyev, Stanislav; Ulyanov, Sergey; Maksimkin, Nikolay

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a technique for rigorous analysis and design of nonlinear multirate digital control systems on the basis of the reduction method and sublinear vector Lyapunov functions is proposed. The control system model under consideration incorporates continuous-time dynamics of the plant and discrete-time dynamics of the controller and takes into account uncertainties of the plant, bounded disturbances, nonlinear characteristics of sensors and actuators. We consider a class of multirate systems where the control update rate is slower than the measurement sampling rates and periodic non-uniform sampling is admitted. The proposed technique does not use the preliminary discretization of the system, and, hence, allows one to eliminate the errors associated with the discretization and improve the accuracy of analysis. The technique is applied to synthesis of digital controller for a flexible spacecraft in the fine stabilization mode and decentralized controller for a formation of autonomous underwater vehicles. Simulation results are provided to validate the good performance of the designed controllers.

  19. LaRC controls activity for LSST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    Math models were developed for various types of large flexible structures. These models were used to study the uncontrolled dynamic characteristics of the structures in orbit and to devise control concepts in order to control their orientation and geometrical shape. Reduced order decoupled control of the 100 meter long free free beam were studied. The inplane orientation and shape of the beam was controlled in a decoupled manner with as few actuators as possible. Using two controllers, near each end of the beam, to produce a 0.01 radian pitch change, perfect decoupled control was achieved for the rigid body pitch theta mode and the first flexible mode A sub 1.

  20. Active Control of Inlet Noise on the JT15D Turbofan Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jerome P.; Hutcheson, Florence V.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Fuller, Chris R.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the key results obtained by the Vibration and Acoustics Laboratories at Virginia Tech over the year from November 1997 to December 1998 on the Active Noise Control of Turbofan Engines research project funded by NASA Langley Research Center. The concept of implementing active noise control techniques with fuselage-mounted error sensors is investigated both analytically and experimentally. The analytical part of the project involves the continued development of an advanced modeling technique to provide prediction and design guidelines for application of active noise control techniques to large, realistic high bypass engines of the type on which active control methods are expected to be applied. Results from the advanced analytical model are presented that show the effectiveness of the control strategies, and the analytical results presented for fuselage error sensors show good agreement with the experimentally observed results and provide additional insight into the control phenomena. Additional analytical results are presented for active noise control used in conjunction with a wavenumber sensing technique. The experimental work is carried out on a running JT15D turbofan jet engine in a test stand at Virginia Tech. The control strategy used in these tests was the feedforward Filtered-X LMS algorithm. The control inputs were supplied by single and multiple circumferential arrays of acoustic sources equipped with neodymium iron cobalt magnets mounted upstream of the fan. The reference signal was obtained from an inlet mounted eddy current probe. The error signals were obtained from a number of pressure transducers flush-mounted in a simulated fuselage section mounted in the engine test cell. The active control methods are investigated when implemented with the control sources embedded within the acoustically absorptive material on a passively-lined inlet. The experimental results show that the combination of active control techniques with fuselage

  1. Optoelectrophysiological stimulation of the human eye using fundus-controlled silent substitution technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klee, Sascha; Link, Dietmar; Bessler, Patrick; Haueisen, Jens

    2011-01-01

    We design, characterize, and apply a novel optoelectrophysiological setup for a fundus-controlled silent substitution technique that accounts for interindividual variability in retina morphology and simultaneously monitors the stimulation site under investigation. We connect a digital color liquid crystal on silicon projector, an electron-multiplying imager, and a light-emitting diode to a fundus camera. The temporal and spatial characterization reveal a maximal contrast loss of 7% for the highest stimulation frequency (30 Hz) and maximum cutoff spatial frequencies of ~120 cycles/deg. Two silent substitution flash sequences are applied to modulate selective activity in the short-wavelength-sensitive cone (S-cone) and combined long- and middle-wavelength-sensitive cone (LM-cone) pathways. Simultaneously, the visual evoked potentials are recorded. The data are compared to the grand average responses from a previous study that employed standard computer-screen presentation and showed very good latency matches. All the volunteers in the present examination exhibit differences between the S-cone and LM-cone evoked potentials (parameters mean values: peak-to-peak amplitude, N1 latency, and P1 latency for S-cone/LM-cone responses: 8 μV/15 μV, 113 ms/89 ms, 170 ms/143 ms). We demonstrate that the developed optoelectrophysiological setup simultaneously provides imaging, functional stimulation, and electrophysiological investigation of the retina.

  2. First Attempts at using Active Halo Control at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Joschka; Bruce, Roderik; Garcia Morales, Hector; Höfle, Wolfgang; Kotzian, Gerd; Kwee-Hinzmann, Regina; Langner, Andy; Mereghetti, Alessio; Quaranta, Elena; Redaelli, Stefano; Rossi, Adriana; Salvachua, Belen; Stancari, Giulio; Tomás, Rogelio; Valentino, Gianluca; Valuch, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    The beam halo population is a non-negligible factor for the performance of the LHC collimation system and the machine protection. In particular this could become crucial for aiming at stored beam energies of 700 MJ in the High Luminosity (HL-LHC) project, in order to avoid beam dumps caused by orbit jitter and to ensure safety during a crab cavity failure. Therefore several techniques to safely deplete the halo, i.e. active halo control, are under development. In a first attempt a novel way for safe halo depletion was tested with particle narrow-band excitation employing the LHC Transverse Damper (ADT). At an energy of 450 GeV a bunch selective beam tail scraping without affecting the core distribution was attempted. This paper presents the first measurement results, as well as a simple simulation to model the underlying dynamics.

  3. Active controllers and the time duration to learn a task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repperger, D. W.; Goodyear, C.

    1986-01-01

    An active controller was used to help train naive subjects involved in a compensatory tracking task. The controller is called active in this context because it moves the subject's hand in a direction to improve tracking. It is of interest here to question whether the active controller helps the subject to learn a task more rapidly than the passive controller. Six subjects, inexperienced to compensatory tracking, were run to asymptote root mean square error tracking levels with an active controller or a passive controller. The time required to learn the task was defined several different ways. The results of the different measures of learning were examined across pools of subjects and across controllers using statistical tests. The comparison between the active controller and the passive controller as to their ability to accelerate the learning process as well as reduce levels of asymptotic tracking error is reported here.

  4. Active Control of Complex Physical Systems: An Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    release; distribution is unlimited. 13. ABSTRACT (Maxtmum 200 words) Active control of complex systems imposes unique requirements for physical models and...months after the meeting, SPrinte In USA. Acceslon For NTIS CRA&W DTIC TAB Unlannounced ] Active Control of Complex Physical Systems Justificatton An...control strategies. Physical models This work on the active control of which are adequate to predict the influence of specific physical systems has been

  5. Integrated flight/propulsion control design for a STOVL aircraft using H-infinity control design techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay; Ouzts, Peter J.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented from an application of H-infinity control design methodology to a centralized integrated flight propulsion control (IFPC) system design for a supersonic Short Takeoff and Vertical Landing (STOVL) fighter aircraft in transition flight. The emphasis is on formulating the H-infinity control design problem such that the resulting controller provides robustness to modeling uncertainties and model parameter variations with flight condition. Experience gained from a preliminary H-infinity based IFPC design study performed earlier is used as the basis to formulate the robust H-infinity control design problem and improve upon the previous design. Detailed evaluation results are presented for a reduced order controller obtained from the improved H-infinity control design showing that the control design meets the specified nominal performance objectives as well as provides stability robustness for variations in plant system dynamics with changes in aircraft trim speed within the transition flight envelope. A controller scheduling technique which accounts for changes in plant control effectiveness with variation in trim conditions is developed and off design model performance results are presented.

  6. Evaluation of Eurasian Watermilfoil Control Techniques Using Aquatic Herbicides in Fort Peck Lake, Montana

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    most likely to support spring growth of Eurasian watermilfoil and other invasive aquatic ERDC/EL TR-15-6 38 plants and to target areas that are...river that could support year-round or year-season growth of Eurasian watermilfoil or other invasive aquatic plants . • Increase boater awareness...ER D C/ EL T R- 15 -6 Aquatic Plant Control Research Program Evaluation of Eurasian Watermilfoil Control Techniques Using Aquatic

  7. Regenerable thermal control and carbon dioxide control techniques for use in advanced extravehicular protective systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. L.; Copeland, R. J.; Nebbon, B. W.

    1972-01-01

    The most promising closed CO2 control concept identified by this study is the solid pellet, Mg(OH2)2 system. Two promising approaches to closed thermal control were identified. The AHS system uses modular fusible heat sinks, with a contingency evaporative mode, to allow maximum EVA mobility. The AHS/refrigerator top-off subsystem requires an umbilical to minimize expendables, but less EVA time is used to operate the system, since there is no requirement to change modules. Both of these subsystems are thought to be practical solutions to the problem of providing closed heat rejection for an EVA system.

  8. Characterization of controlled bone defects using 2D and 3D ultrasound imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Biren J; Longsine, Whitney; Sabonghy, Eric P; Han, Arum; Tasciotti, Ennio; Weiner, Bradley K; Ferrari, Mauro; Righetti, Raffaella

    2010-08-21

    Ultrasound is emerging as an attractive alternative modality to standard x-ray and CT methods for bone assessment applications. As of today, however, there is a lack of systematic studies that investigate the performance of diagnostic ultrasound techniques in bone imaging applications. This study aims at understanding the performance limitations of new ultrasound techniques for imaging bones in controlled experiments in vitro. Experiments are performed on samples of mammalian and non-mammalian bones with controlled defects with size ranging from 400 microm to 5 mm. Ultrasound findings are statistically compared with those obtained from the same samples using standard x-ray imaging modalities and optical microscopy. The results of this study demonstrate that it is feasible to use diagnostic ultrasound imaging techniques to assess sub-millimeter bone defects in real time and with high accuracy and precision. These results also demonstrate that ultrasound imaging techniques perform comparably better than x-ray imaging and optical imaging methods, in the assessment of a wide range of controlled defects both in mammalian and non-mammalian bones. In the future, ultrasound imaging techniques might provide a cost-effective, real-time, safe and portable diagnostic tool for bone imaging applications.

  9. Quasi-modal vibration control by means of active control bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonami, K.; Fleming, D. P.

    1986-01-01

    This paper investigates a design method of an active control bearing system with only velocity feedback. The study provides a new quasi-modal control method for a control system design of an active control bearing system in which feedback coefficients are determined on the basis of a modal analysis. Although the number of sensors and actuators is small, this quasi-modal control method produces a control effect close to an ideal modal control.

  10. Power System Control Study. Phase I. Integrated Control Techniques. Phase II. Detail Design and System Modeling.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    reliable and fault tolerant system. The advanced control technologies integrated include:electric engine start, automatic load manage- ment...Generation System Study .............................. 104 5.2 Reliability Assessment of Power System .................... 119 5.3 EMUX Processor...132 30 Best Main Power System Configuration Based on Reliability Assessment ..................................... 133 31 Main and Emergency Power

  11. PI and fuzzy logic controllers for shunt Active Power Filter--a report.

    PubMed

    Karuppanan, P; Mahapatra, Kamala Kanta

    2012-09-01

    The authors acknowledge certain errors in their recently published paper titled "PI and fuzzy logic controllers for shunt active power filter--A report.The ambiguity in band width calculation of adaptive hysteresis controller and control aspects of dc-link voltage issues are addressed. The shunt APF system is validated through extensive simulation and the results are support features of the proposed technique.

  12. A technique for brain temperature control during ischemia, suitable for measurements with ion-sensitive microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Ekholm, A; Siesjö, B K

    1992-10-01

    A technique is described for maintaining rat brain temperature constant during ischemia, a technique that also allows measurements with, and calibration of, ion-sensitive microelectrodes under defined temperature conditions. The brain temperature is controlled by a stream of air of defined temperature and humidity, which is perfused through a box enclosing the animal's head. A device for calibration of ion-sensitive microelectrodes is temperature controlled by similar principles. The air stream is delivered by a heater/humidifier that is standard in many commercial respirators/ventilators. When the relative humidity of the air stream is greater than 98%, the neocortical temperature can be maintained within less than 0.5 degrees C during 15 min of ischemia. The biological applicability of the technique is discussed.

  13. A technique for optimizing electrode placement for electromyographic control of prostheses.

    PubMed

    Walbran, Scott H; Calius, Emilio P; Dunlop, G; Anderson, Iain A

    2009-01-01

    We present a technique that enables optimization of Electromyographic (EMG) electrode placement for grasp recognition. Previous works have shown that sophisticated control techniques for prosthetic devices are becoming available; however the issue of electrode placement has yet to be addressed. By processing a rich field of data, it is possible to determine which of the data sets will allow for greatest accuracy in prosthetic control. Data has been collected and processed from 128 sites on a human forearm while two different grasps were performed. Using two different feature extraction techniques - integral of absolute value and differential absolute value - the difference in means between performing each grasp type has been analyzed. This resulted in several regions around the wrist and the elbow that would be optimal for this particular setup. While the optimization process has been used here for discrimination between two particular grasps, it has the potential to extend to any desired actuation pattern.

  14. Active member vibration control for a 4 meter primary reflector support structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umland, J. W.; Chen, G.-S.

    1992-01-01

    The design and testing of a new low voltage piezoelectric active member with integrated load cell and displacement sensor is described. This active member is intended for micron level vibration and structural shape control of the Precision Segmented Reflector test-bed. The test-bed is an erectable 4 meter diameter backup support truss for a 2.4 meter focal length parabolic reflector. Active damping of the test-bed is then demonstrated using the newly developed active members. The control technique used is referred to as bridge feedback. With this technique the internal sensors are used in a local feedback loop to match the active member's input impedance to the structure's load impedance, which then maximizes vibrational energy dissipation. The active damping effectiveness is then evaluated from closed loop frequency responses.

  15. Application of Guided Inquiry System Technique (GIST) to Controlled Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aroeste, H.

    1982-01-01

    Guided Inquiry System Technique, a global approach to problem solving, was applied to the subject of Controlled Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS). Nutrition, food processing, and the use of higher plants in a CELSS were considered by a panel of experts. Specific ideas and recommendations gleaned from discussions with panel members are presented.

  16. Monitoring by Control Technique - Compliant (Low/No VOC/HAP) Inks and Coatings

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page is about Compliant (Low/No VOC/HAP) Inks and Coatings control techniques used to reduce pollutant emissions.

  17. Use of Reciprocal Peer Tutoring Technique in an Environmental Control Systems Course at an Undergraduate Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choudhury, I.

    2002-01-01

    Construction science students in an environmental control course (n=153) engaged in reciprocal peer tutoring. The technique had a significant positive effect on performance, and students felt that it forced them to apply content and provided review and practice opportunities. (Contains 12 references.) (SK)

  18. YS knot: A new technique for a tension-controlled slip knot using a trocar

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoon Hee; Kim, Mi Jeong; Chong, Gun Oh; Hong, Dae Gy; Lee, Juhun

    2015-01-01

    The Yoon Soon (YS) knot is a laparoscopic extracorporeal slip knot that is easy to learn and apply. Our new technique, which uses the trocar as a knot pusher, is simpler, faster, and has more tension than conventional knot methods. The YS knot will help surgeons save operative time and perform tension-controlled knot-tying during laparoscopic surgery. PMID:25798432

  19. Theatre Techniques for Language Learning: Assumptions and Suggested Progression of Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Martha L.

    A discussion of the use of drama activities in Second Language instruction looks at the rationale for using such techniques in the language classroom, describes a progression of drama activities used for an intensive course in intermediate English as a Second Language, and examines other considerations in the use of drama in language teaching.…

  20. Teaching Tip: Using Activity Diagrams to Model Systems Analysis Techniques: Teaching What We Preach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lending, Diane; May, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Activity diagrams are used in Systems Analysis and Design classes as a visual tool to model the business processes of "as-is" and "to-be" systems. This paper presents the idea of using these same activity diagrams in the classroom to model the actual processes (practices and techniques) of Systems Analysis and Design. This tip…

  1. Preliminary experiments on active control of fan noise from a turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. H.; Burdisso, R. A.; Fuller, C. R.; O'Brien, W. F.

    1993-01-01

    In the preliminary experiments reported here, active acoustic sources positioned around the circumference of a turbofan engine were used to control the fan noise radiated forward through the inlet. The main objective was to demonstrate the potential of active techniques to alleviate the noise pollution that will be produced by the next generation of larger engines. A reduction of up to 19 dB in the radiation directivity was demonstrated in a zone that encompasses a 30-deg angle, near the error sensor, while spillover effects were observed toward the lateral direction. The simultaneous control of two tones was also demonstrated using two identical controllers in a parallel control configuration.

  2. New Technique of High-Performance Torque Control Developed for Induction Machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Barbara H.

    2003-01-01

    Two forms of high-performance torque control for motor drives have been described in the literature: field orientation control and direct torque control. Field orientation control has been the method of choice for previous NASA electromechanical actuator research efforts with induction motors. Direct torque control has the potential to offer some advantages over field orientation, including ease of implementation and faster response. However, the most common form of direct torque control is not suitable for the highspeed, low-stator-flux linkage induction machines designed for electromechanical actuators with the presently available sample rates of digital control systems (higher sample rates are required). In addition, this form of direct torque control is not suitable for the addition of a high-frequency carrier signal necessary for the "self-sensing" (sensorless) position estimation technique. This technique enables low- and zero-speed position sensorless operation of the machine. Sensorless operation is desirable to reduce the number of necessary feedback signals and transducers, thus improving the reliability and reducing the mass and volume of the system. This research was directed at developing an alternative form of direct torque control known as a "deadbeat," or inverse model, solution. This form uses pulse-width modulation of the voltage applied to the machine, thus reducing the necessary sample and switching frequency for the high-speed NASA motor. In addition, the structure of the deadbeat form allows the addition of the high-frequency carrier signal so that low- and zero-speed sensorless operation is possible. The new deadbeat solution is based on using the stator and rotor flux as state variables. This choice of state variables leads to a simple graphical representation of the solution as the intersection of a constant torque line with a constant stator flux circle. Previous solutions have been expressed only in complex mathematical terms without a

  3. Simulation Study on Active Noise Control for a 4 Tesla MRI Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingfeng; Lim, Teik C.; Lee, Jing-Huei

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to study computationally the possibility of the application of a hybrid active noise control technique for MRI acoustic noise reduction. A hybrid control system combined with both feedforward and feedback loops embedded is proposed for potential application on active MRI noise reduction. A set of computational simulation studies were performed. Sets of MRI acoustic noise emissions measured at the patient's left ear location were recorded and used in the simulation study. By comparing three different control systems, namely the feedback, the feedforward and the hybrid control, our results revealed that the hybrid control system is the most effective. The hybrid control system achieved approximately a 20 dB reduction at the principal frequency component. We concluded that the proposed hybrid active control scheme could have a potential application for MRI scanner noise reduction. PMID:18060719

  4. Simulation study on active noise control for a 4-T MRI scanner.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingfeng; Lim, Teik C; Lee, Jing-Huei

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to study computationally the possibility of the application of a hybrid active noise control technique for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acoustic noise reduction. A hybrid control system combined with both feedforward and feedback loops embedded is proposed for potential application on active MRI noise reduction. A set of computational simulation studies were performed. Sets of MRI acoustic noise emissions measured at the patient's left ear location were recorded and used in the simulation study. By comparing three different control systems, namely, the feedback, the feedforward and the hybrid control, our results revealed that the hybrid control system is the most effective. The hybrid control system achieved approximately a 20-dB reduction at the principal frequency component. We concluded that the proposed hybrid active control scheme could have a potential application for MRI scanner noise reduction.

  5. Fabrication of enzyme-degradable and size-controlled protein nanowires using single particle nano-fabrication technique

    PubMed Central

    Omichi, Masaaki; Asano, Atsushi; Tsukuda, Satoshi; Takano, Katsuyoshi; Sugimoto, Masaki; Saeki, Akinori; Sakamaki, Daisuke; Onoda, Akira; Hayashi, Takashi; Seki, Shu

    2014-01-01

    Protein nanowires exhibiting specific biological activities hold promise for interacting with living cells and controlling and predicting biological responses such as apoptosis, endocytosis and cell adhesion. Here we report the result of the interaction of a single high-energy charged particle with protein molecules, giving size-controlled protein nanowires with an ultra-high aspect ratio of over 1,000. Degradation of the human serum albumin nanowires was examined using trypsin. The biotinylated human serum albumin nanowires bound avidin, demonstrating the high affinity of the nanowires. Human serum albumin–avidin hybrid nanowires were also fabricated from a solid state mixture and exhibited good mechanical strength in phosphate-buffered saline. The biotinylated human serum albumin nanowires can be transformed into nanowires exhibiting a biological function such as avidin–biotinyl interactions and peroxidase activity. The present technique is a versatile platform for functionalizing the surface of any protein molecule with an extremely large surface area. PMID:24770668

  6. 40 CFR 194.41 - Active institutional controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... controls and their effectiveness in terms of preventing or reducing radionuclide releases shall be... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Active institutional controls. 194.41... Assurance Requirements § 194.41 Active institutional controls. (a) Any compliance application shall...

  7. Active parallel redundancy for electronic integrator-type control circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, R. A.

    1971-01-01

    Circuit extends concept of redundant feedback control from type-0 to type-1 control systems. Inactive channels are slaves to the active channel, if latter fails, it is rejected and slave channel is activated. High reliability and elimination of single-component catastrophic failure are important in closed-loop control systems.

  8. MAG4 Versus Alternative Techniques for Forecasting Active-Region Flare Productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, David A.; Moore, Ronald L.; Barghouty, Abdulnasser F.; Khazanov, Igor

    2014-01-01

    MAG4 is a technique of forecasting an active region's rate of production of major flares in the coming few days from a free-magnetic-energy proxy. We present a statistical method of measuring the difference in performance between MAG4 and comparable alternative techniques that forecast an active region's major-flare productivity from alternative observed aspects of the active region. We demonstrate the method by measuring the difference in performance between the "Present MAG4" technique and each of three alternative techniques, called "McIntosh Active-Region Class," "Total Magnetic Flux," and "Next MAG4." We do this by using (1) the MAG4 database of magnetograms and major-flare histories of sunspot active regions, (2) the NOAA table of the major-flare productivity of each of 60 McIntosh active-region classes of sunspot active regions, and (3) five technique-performance metrics (Heidke Skill Score, True Skill Score, Percent Correct, Probability of Detection, and False Alarm Rate) evaluated from 2000 random two-by-two contingency tables obtained from the databases. We find that (1) Present MAG4 far outperforms both McIntosh Active-Region Class and Total Magnetic Flux, (2) Next MAG4 significantly outperforms Present MAG4, (3) the performance of Next MAG4 is insensitive to the forward and backward temporal windows used, in the range of one to a few days, and (4) forecasting from the free-energy proxy in combination with either any broad category of McIntosh active-region classes or any Mount Wilson active-region class gives no significant performance improvement over forecasting from the free-energy proxy alone (Present MAG4).

  9. Multivariable Adaptive Closed-Loop Control of an Artificial Pancreas Without Meal and Activity Announcement

    PubMed Central

    Turksoy, Kamuran; Bayrak, Elif Seyma; Quinn, Lauretta; Littlejohn, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Accurate closed-loop control is essential for developing artificial pancreas (AP) systems that adjust insulin infusion rates from insulin pumps. Glucose concentration information from continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems is the most important information for the control system. Additional physiological measurements can provide valuable information that can enhance the accuracy of the control system. Proportional-integral-derivative control and model predictive control have been popular in AP development. Their implementations to date rely on meal announcements (e.g., bolus insulin dose based on insulin:carbohydrate ratios) by the user. Adaptive control techniques provide a powerful alternative that do not necessitate any meal or activity announcements. Materials and Methods Adaptive control systems based on the generalized predictive control framework are developed by extending the recursive modeling techniques. Physiological signals such as energy expenditure and galvanic skin response are used along with glucose measurements to generate a multiple-input–single-output model for predicting future glucose concentrations used by the controller. Insulin-on-board (IOB) is also estimated and used in control decisions. The controllers were tested with clinical studies that include seven cases with three different patients with type 1 diabetes for 32 or 60 h without any meal or activity announcements. Results The adaptive control system kept glucose concentration in the normal preprandial and postprandial range (70–180 mg/dL) without any meal or activity announcements during the test period. After IOB estimation was added to the control system, mild hypoglycemic episodes were observed only in one of the four experiments. This was reflected in a plasma glucose value of 56 mg/dL (YSI 2300 STAT; Yellow Springs Instrument, Yellow Springs, OH) and a CGM value of 63 mg/dL). Conclusions Regulation of blood glucose concentration with an AP

  10. Development of a sensitivity analysis technique for multiloop flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaillard, A. H.; Paduano, J.; Downing, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    This report presents the development and application of a sensitivity analysis technique for multiloop flight control systems. This analysis yields very useful information on the sensitivity of the relative-stability criteria of the control system, with variations or uncertainties in the system and controller elements. The sensitivity analysis technique developed is based on the computation of the singular values and singular-value gradients of a feedback-control system. The method is applicable to single-input/single-output as well as multiloop continuous-control systems. Application to sampled-data systems is also explored. The sensitivity analysis technique was applied to a continuous yaw/roll damper stability augmentation system of a typical business jet, and the results show that the analysis is very useful in determining the system elements which have the largest effect on the relative stability of the closed-loop system. As a secondary product of the research reported here, the relative stability criteria based on the concept of singular values were explored.

  11. An assessment of PERT as a technique for schedule planning and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibbers, C. W.

    1982-01-01

    The PERT technique including the types of reports which can be computer generated using the NASA/LaRC PPARS System is described. An assessment is made of the effectiveness of PERT on various types of efforts as well as for specific purposes, namely, schedule planning, schedule analysis, schedule control, monitoring contractor schedule performance, and management reporting. This assessment is based primarily on the author's knowledge of the usage of PERT by NASA/LaRC personnel since the early 1960's. Both strengths and weaknesses of the technique for various applications are discussed. It is intended to serve as a reference guide for personnel performing project planning and control functions and technical personnel whose responsibilities either include schedule planning and control or require a general knowledge of the subject.

  12. Wide-area Power System Oscillation Damping using Model Predictive Control Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Tarek Hassan; Abdel-Rahim, Abdel-Moamen Mohammed; Hassan, Ahmed Abd-Eltawwab; Hiyama, Takashi

    This paper presents a new approach to deal with the problem of robust tuning of power system stabilizer (PSS) and automatic voltage regulator (AVR) in multi-machine power systems. The proposed method is based on a model predictive control (MPC) technique, for improvement stability of the wide-area power system with multiple generators and distribution systems including dispersed generations. The proposed method provides better damping of power system oscillations under small and large disturbances even with the inclusion of local PSSs. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is demonstrated through a two areas, four machines power system. A performance comparison between the proposed controller and some of other controllers is carried out confirming the superiority of the proposed technique. It has also been observed that the proposed algorithm can be successfully applied to larger multiarea power systems and do not suffer with computational difficulties. The proposed algorithm carried out using MATLAB/SIMULINK software package.

  13. Adaptive data rate control TDMA systems as a rain attenuation compensation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, Masaki; Wakana, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Takashi; Takeuchi, Makoto; Yamamoto, Minoru

    1993-01-01

    Rainfall attenuation has a severe effect on signal strength and impairs communication links for future mobile and personal satellite communications using Ka-band and millimeter wave frequencies. As rain attenuation compensation techniques, several methods such as uplink power control, site diversity, and adaptive control of data rate or forward error correction have been proposed. In this paper, we propose a TDMA system that can compensate rain attenuation by adaptive control of transmission rates. To evaluate the performance of this TDMA terminal, we carried out three types of experiments: experiments using a Japanese CS-3 satellite with Ka-band transponders, in house IF loop-back experiments, and computer simulations. Experimental results show that this TDMA system has advantages over the conventional constant-rate TDMA systems, as resource sharing technique, in both bit error rate and total TDMA burst lengths required for transmitting given information.

  14. Moisture Management in an Active Sportswear: Techniques and Evaluation—A Review Article

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthilkumar, Mani; Sampath, M. B.; Ramachandran, T.

    2013-07-01

    Moisture management property is an important aspect of any fabric meant for active sportswear, which decides the comfort level of that fabric. Every human being sweats during different kinds of activities. An important feature of any fabric is how it transports this water out of the body, so as to make the wearer feel comfortable. This paper reports the concept of moisture management, various production techniques and evaluation of the moisture management characteristics on fabrics for active sportswear.

  15. Numerical simulation about orthogonal single frequency dithering technique used in tilt control of fiber laser array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhixin; Zhi, Dong; Ma, Yanxing; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu; Si, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Beam combination of fiber laser array is an effective technique contributed to improve the brightness of fiber lasers. In order to realize high-efficiency CBC, challenges like phase distortion (mainly including piston and tilt phase aberrations) should be taken into consideration. Resent years, tilt phase aberrations control has been come true by adaptive fiber optics collimator using the stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm. However, the convergence rate of tilt control system still cannot satisfy the needs of practical application. In order to increase the tilt control bandwidth, a new idea is put forward that applying the orthogonal single frequency dithering (OSFD) technique into tilt control, and numerical simulation has been completed. A hexagonal laser array with 7 elements has been simulated, and each element has a pair of initial tilt angles in horizontal and vertical direction. The initial tilt angles comply with normal distribution. In the same condition, tilt phase control has been realized through SPGD and OSFD individually, and the convergence steps (defined as the iteration steps that improve the normalized PIB above 0.9) with appropriate parameters are respectively about 20 (SPGD) and 7 (OSFD). Furthermore, tilt phase control of large number hexagonal array is simulated, and the results are as follows: for 19/37 elements, the least convergence steps are about 80/160(SPGD) and 19/55(OSFD). Comparing with SPGD algorithm, it is obvious that the OSFD has higher convergence rate and greater potential for tilt control application in large number coherent fiber laser array.

  16. Hip Labral Reconstruction: The "Kite Technique" for Improved Efficiency and Graft Control.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Sanjeev; Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S; Ellman, Michael B

    2016-04-01

    Although the merits of labral reconstruction have been well established, the technical difficulty of presently used reconstruction techniques-particularly with graft passage and fixation-limit its efficacy and potentiates the risk of iatrogenic damage within the hip joint. The unwieldy nature of a floating labral graft anchored on one end may impede accurate fixation of the other end, which is critical for restoration of the fluid hip seal and preservation of graft integrity. In this technique narrative, we present a "kite technique" for introduction, control, and efficient fixation of a labral reconstruction graft. The principles of this method are founded on the belief that a soft-tissue graft in an arthroscopic environment is much easier to guide into position with 2 control sutures using a pulley system similar to flying a kite with 2 fly lines. Although we herein detail the technique as it applies to labral reconstruction in the hip, the concept of the kite technique may also be employed in arthroscopic-assisted soft-tissue reconstructions of other joints.

  17. Fish erythrocytes are bicarbonate permeable: problems with determining carbonic anhydrase activity using the modified boat technique.

    PubMed

    Heming, T A; Randall, D J

    1982-01-10

    Effects of foaming agents (blood plasma, bovine serum albumin, polyvinyl-pyrrolidinone) and defoaming agents (octanol, n-foam) on manometric determination of carbonic anhydrase activity in intact erythrocytes of fish were examined. Foaming agents abolished the activity of red cells. Defoaming agents increased the activity and negated any differences in carbonic anhydrase activity between whole blood (red cells in plasma) and "Cortland" blood (red cells in saline). It is concluded that effects of plasma on the carbonic anhydrase activity of intact erythrocytes of fish measured using the modified boat technique are largely nonspecific and related to reagent foaming during mixing, rather than to the action of a specific enzyme inhibitor.

  18. A nonlinear OPC technique for laser beam control in turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markov, V.; Khizhnyak, A.; Sprangle, P.; Ting, A.; DeSandre, L.; Hafizi, B.

    2013-05-01

    A viable beam control technique is critical for effective laser beam transmission through turbulent atmosphere. Most of the established approaches require information on the impact of perturbations on wavefront propagated waves. Such information can be acquired by measuring the characteristics of the target-scattered light arriving from a small, preferably diffraction-limited, beacon. This paper discusses an innovative beam control approach that can support formation of a tight laser beacon in deep turbulence conditions. The technique employs Brillouin enhanced fourwave mixing (BEFWM) to generate a localized beacon spot on a remote image-resolved target. Formation of the tight beacon doesn't require a wavefront sensor, AO system, or predictive feedback algorithm. Unlike conventional adaptive optics methods which allow wavefront conjugation, the proposed total field conjugation technique is critical for beam control in the presence of strong turbulence and can be achieved by using this non-linear BEFWM technique. The phase information retrieved from the established beacon beam can then be used in conjunction with an AO system to propagate laser beams in deep turbulence.

  19. Active Combustion Control for Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLaat, John C.; Breisacher, Kevin J.; Saus, Joseph R.; Paxson, Daniel E.

    2000-01-01

    Lean-burning combustors are susceptible to combustion instabilities. Additionally, due to non-uniformities in the fuel-air mixing and in the combustion process, there typically exist hot areas in the combustor exit plane. These hot areas limit the operating temperature at the turbine inlet and thus constrain performance and efficiency. Finally, it is necessary to optimize the fuel-air ratio and flame temperature throughout the combustor to minimize the production of pollutants. In recent years, there has been considerable activity addressing Active Combustion Control. NASA Glenn Research Center's Active Combustion Control Technology effort aims to demonstrate active control in a realistic environment relevant to aircraft engines. Analysis and experiments are tied to aircraft gas turbine combustors. Considerable progress has been shown in demonstrating technologies for Combustion Instability Control, Pattern Factor Control, and Emissions Minimizing Control. Future plans are to advance the maturity of active combustion control technology to eventual demonstration in an engine environment.

  20. Open abdomen in gastrointestinal surgery: Which technique is the best for temporary closure during damage control?

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro Junior, Marcelo A F; Barros, Emily Alves; de Carvalho, Sabrina Marques; Nascimento, Vinicius Pereira; Cruvinel Neto, José; Fonseca, Alexandre Zanchenko

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare the 3 main techniques of temporary closure of the abdominal cavity, vacuum assisted closure (vacuum-assisted closure therapy - VAC), Bogota bag and Barker technique, in damage control surgery. METHODS After systematic review of the literature, 33 articles were selected to compare the efficiency of the three procedures. Criteria such as cost, infections, capacity of reconstruction of the abdominal wall, diseases associated with the technique, among others were analyzed. RESULTS The Bogota bag and Barker techniques present as advantage the availability of material and low cost, what is not observed in the VAC procedure. The VAC technique is the most efficient, not only because it reduces the tension on the boarders of the lesion, but also removes stagnant fluids and debris and acts at cellular level increasing cell proliferation and division. Bogota bag presents the higher rates of skin laceration and evisceration, greater need for a stent for draining fluids and wash-ups, higher rates of intestinal adhesion to the abdominal wall. The Barker technique presents lack of efficiency in closing the abdominal wall and difficulty on maintaining pressure on the dressing. The VAC dressing can generate irritation and dermatitis when the drape is applied, in addition to pain, infection and bleeding, as well as toxic shock syndrome, anaerobic sepsis and thrombosis. CONCLUSION The VAC technique, showed to be superior allowing a better control of liquid on the third space, avoiding complications such as fistula with small mortality, low infection rate, and easier capability on primary closure of the abdominal cavity. PMID:27648164

  1. Actively controlled shaft seals for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salant, Richard F.

    1991-01-01

    The main objective is to determine the feasibility of utilizing controllable mechanical seals for aerospace applications. A potential application was selected as a demonstration case: the buffer gas seal in a LOX (liquid oxygen) turbopump. Currently, floating ring seals are used in this application. Their replacement with controllable mechanical seals would result in substantially reduced leakage rates. This would reduce the required amount of stored buffer gas, and therefore increase the vehicle payload. For such an application, a suitable controllable mechanical seal was designed and analyzed.

  2. Robust control for a biaxial servo with time delay system based on adaptive tuning technique.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tien-Chi; Yu, Chih-Hsien

    2009-07-01

    A robust control method for synchronizing a biaxial servo system motion is proposed in this paper. A new network based cross-coupled control and adaptive tuning techniques are used together to cancel out the skew error. The conventional fixed gain PID cross-coupled controller (CCC) is replaced with the adaptive cross-coupled controller (ACCC) in the proposed control scheme to maintain biaxial servo system synchronization motion. Adaptive-tuning PID (APID) position and velocity controllers provide the necessary control actions to maintain synchronization while following a variable command trajectory. A delay-time compensator (DTC) with an adaptive controller was augmented to set the time delay element, effectively moving it outside the closed loop, enhancing the stability of the robust controlled system. This scheme provides strong robustness with respect to uncertain dynamics and disturbances. The simulation and experimental results reveal that the proposed control structure adapts to a wide range of operating conditions and provides promising results under parameter variations and load changes.

  3. Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis (PGAA): Technique of choice for nondestructive bulk analysis of returned comet samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, David J.; Lindstrom, Richard M.

    1989-01-01

    Prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) is a well-developed analytical technique. The technique involves irradiation of samples in an external neutron beam from a nuclear reactor, with simultaneous counting of gamma rays produced in the sample by neutron capture. Capture of neutrons leads to excited nuclei which decay immediately with the emission of energetic gamma rays to the ground state. PGAA has several advantages over other techniques for the analysis of cometary materials: (1) It is nondestructive; (2) It can be used to determine abundances of a wide variety of elements, including most major and minor elements (Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni), volatiles (H, C, N, F, Cl, S), and some trace elements (those with high neutron capture cross sections, including B, Cd, Nd, Sm, and Gd); and (3) It is a true bulk analysis technique. Recent developments should improve the technique's sensitivity and accuracy considerably.

  4. [Applications of molecular biology techniques for the control of aflatoxin contamination].

    PubMed

    Sanchis, V

    1993-02-01

    Aflatoxins are mycotoxins produced by species of Aspergillus flavus group. These toxins have received increased attention from the food industry and the general public because they shown a high toxicity against humans and animal. Different methods are applying to control the aflatoxin contamination. But these conventional methods do not seem to resolve the problem. So, new methods using techniques in biotechnology are now being developed: a) Inhibit the biosynthetic and secretory process responsible for aflatoxin contamination. b) Using biocompetitive agents that replace aflatoxigenic strains with non aflatoxigenic strains in the field. c) Using genetic engineering techniques to incorporate antifungal genes into specific plant species.

  5. Advanced statistics: applying statistical process control techniques to emergency medicine: a primer for providers.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Charles D; Griffen, David L

    2003-08-01

    Emergency medicine faces unique challenges in the effort to improve efficiency and effectiveness. Increased patient volumes, decreased emergency department (ED) supply, and an increased emphasis on the ED as a diagnostic center have contributed to poor customer satisfaction and process failures such as diversion/bypass. Statistical process control (SPC) techniques developed in industry offer an empirically based means to understand our work processes and manage by fact. Emphasizing that meaningful quality improvement can occur only when it is exercised by "front-line" providers, this primer presents robust yet accessible SPC concepts and techniques for use in today's ED.

  6. Advanced combustion techniques for controlling NO sub x emissions of high altitude cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudey, R. A.; Reck, G. M.

    1976-01-01

    An array of experiments designed to explore the potential of advanced combustion techniques for controlling the emissions of aircraft into the upper atmosphere was discussed. Of particular concern are the oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions into the stratosphere. The experiments utilize a wide variety of approaches varying from advanced combustor concepts to fundamental flame tube experiments. Results are presented which indicate that substantial reductions in cruise NOx emissions should be achievable in future aircraft engines. A major NASA program is described which focuses the many fundamental experiments into a planned evolution and demonstration of the prevaporized-premixed combustion technique in a full-scale engine.

  7. Acceleration-augmented LQG control of an active magnetic bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feeley, Joseph J.

    A linear-quadratic-gaussian (LQG) regulator controller design for an acceleration-augmented active magnetic bearing (AMB) is outlined. Acceleration augmentation is a key feature in providing improved dynamic performance of the controller. The optimal control formulation provides a convenient method of trading-off fast transient response and force attenuation as control objectives.

  8. Acceleration-Augmented LQG Control of an Active Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeley, Joseph J.

    1993-01-01

    A linear-quadratic-gaussian (LQG) regulator controller design for an acceleration-augmented active magnetic bearing (AMB) is outlined. Acceleration augmentation is a key feature in providing improved dynamic performance of the controller. The optimal control formulation provides a convenient method of trading-off fast transient response and force attenuation as control objectives.

  9. PARTICULATE EMISSION MEASUREMENTS FROM CONTROLLED CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarized the results of field testing of the effectiveness of control measures for sources of fugitive particulate emissions found at construction sites. The effectiveness of watering temporary, unpaved travel surfaces on emissions of particulate matter with aerodyna...

  10. Semi-automated identification of white blood cell using active contour technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzuki, Nurhanis Izzati Binti Che; Mahmood, Nasrul Humaimi Bin; Razak, Mohd Azhar Bin Abdul

    2015-05-01

    Manual and automated diagnosis can be used to identify the morphology of blood cells. However, the manual diagnosis of the blood cells is time consuming and need hematologist and pathologist experts in order to diagnose diseases. Recently, the automated diagnosis which is require image processing technique are often been used in this area. This paper focuses on image processing technique to do segmentation on the nucleus of white blood cells (WBC). To identify the nucleus region, there are several image processing techniques applied besides the active contour method. The results obtained show that the detection on the edge of the nucleus is almost same as the original image of the nucleus.

  11. Active control of flexural vibrations in beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of using piezoelectric actuators to control the flexural oscillations of large structures in space is investigated. Flexural oscillations are excited by impulsive loads. The vibratory response can degrade the pointing accuracy of cameras and antennae, and can cause high stresses at structural node points. Piezoelectric actuators have the advantage of exerting localized bending moments. In this way, vibration is controlled without exciting rigid body modes. The actuators are used in collocated sensor/driver pairs to form a feedback control system. The sensor produces a voltage that is proportional to the dynamic stress at the sensor location, and the driver produces a force that is proportional to the voltage applied to it. The analog control system amplifies and phase shifts the sensor signal to produce the voltage signal that is applied to the driver. The feedback control is demonstrated to increase the first mode damping in a cantilever beam by up to 100 percent, depending on the amplifier gain. The damping efficiency of the control system when the piezoelectrics are not optimally positioned at points of high stress in the beam is evaluated.

  12. Digitally Controlled ’Programmable’ Active Filters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    Mitra, S. K., Analysis and Synthesis of Linear Active .. Networks, Wiley, New York, 1969. * 6. Sedra , A. S. and Smith , K. C., "A Second-Generation...Current Conveyor and its Applications," IEEE Trans. Circuit Theory, Vol. CT-17, pp. 132-134, 1970. 7. Sedra , A. S., "A New Approach to Active Network...CT-18, pp. 358-361, May 1971. 27. Hamilton, T. A., and Sedra , A. S., "Some New IJ Configurations for Active Filters," IEEE Trans. Circuit Tehory, Vol

  13. Interference Mitigation Technique Using Active Spaceborne Sensor Antenna in EESS (Active) and Space Research Service (Active) for Use in 500 MHz Bandwidth Near 9.6 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huneycutt, Bryan L.

    2005-01-01

    This document presents an interference mitigation technique using the active spaceborne sensor SAR3 antenna in the Earth Exploration-Satellite Service (active) and Space Research Service (active) for use in a 500 MHz bandwidth near 9.6 GHz. The purpose of the document is present antenna designs which offer lower sidelobes and faster rolloff in the sidelobes which in turn mitigates the interference to other services from the EESS (active) and SRS (active) sensors.

  14. Active Noise and Vibration Control Literature Survey: Controller Technologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-11-01

    control exclusively, but mathematical languages ( Matlab [The MathWorks, 1999], Matrix [Integrated Systems Inc, 1999) and, more recently, languages using...more efficient design process" [The Math Works, 1999]. Matlab and Simulink are powerful tools for dynamic systems identification. So, it is possible...to quickly obtain a numerical model of the physical system with Matlab . Moreover, Simulink enables the user to easily and quickly transpose the

  15. The Trojan female technique: a novel, effective and humane approach for pest population control.

    PubMed

    Gemmell, Neil J; Jalilzadeh, Aidin; Didham, Raphael K; Soboleva, Tanya; Tompkins, Daniel M

    2013-12-22

    Humankind's ongoing battle with pest species spans millennia. Pests cause or carry disease, damage or consume food crops and other resources, and drive global environmental change. Conventional approaches to pest management usually involve lethal control, but such approaches are costly, of varying efficiency and often have ethical issues. Thus, pest management via control of reproductive output is increasingly considered an optimal solution. One of the most successful such 'fertility control' strategies developed to date is the sterile male technique (SMT), in which large numbers of sterile males are released into a population each generation. However, this approach is time-consuming, labour-intensive and costly. We use mathematical models to test a new twist on the SMT, using maternally inherited mitochondrial (mtDNA) mutations that affect male, but not female reproductive fitness. 'Trojan females' carrying such mutations, and their female descendants, produce 'sterile-male'-equivalents under natural conditions over multiple generations. We find that the Trojan female technique (TFT) has the potential to be a novel humane approach for pest control. Single large releases and relatively few small repeat releases of Trojan females both provided effective and persistent control within relatively few generations. Although greatest efficacy was predicted for high-turnover species, the additive nature of multiple releases made the TFT applicable to the full range of life histories modelled. The extensive conservation of mtDNA among eukaryotes suggests this approach could have broad utility for pest control.

  16. Tailoring controlled-release oral dosage forms by combining inkjet and flexographic printing techniques.

    PubMed

    Genina, Natalja; Fors, Daniela; Vakili, Hossein; Ihalainen, Petri; Pohjala, Leena; Ehlers, Henrik; Kassamakov, Ivan; Haeggström, Edward; Vuorela, Pia; Peltonen, Jouko; Sandler, Niklas

    2012-10-09

    We combined conventional inkjet printing technology with flexographic printing to fabricate drug delivery systems with accurate doses and tailored drug release. Riboflavin sodium phosphate (RSP) and propranolol hydrochloride (PH) were used as water-soluble model drugs. Three different paper substrates: A (uncoated woodfree paper), B (triple-coated inkjet paper) and C (double-coated sheet fed offset paper) were used as porous model carriers for drug delivery. Active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) containing solutions were printed onto 1 cm × 1 cm substrate areas using an inkjet printer. The printed APIs were coated with water insoluble polymeric films of different thickness using flexographic printing. All substrates were characterized with respect to wettability, surface roughness, air permeability, and cell toxicity. In addition, content uniformity and release profiles of the produced solid dosage forms before and after coating were studied. The substrates were nontoxic for the human cell line assayed. Substrate B was smoothest and least porous. The properties of substrates B and C were similar, whereas those of substrate A differed significantly from those of B, C. The release kinetics of both printed APIs was slowest from substrate B before and after coating with the water insoluble polymer film, following by substrate C, whereas substrate A showed the fastest release. The release rate decreased with increasing polymer coating film thickness. The printed solid dosage forms showed excellent content uniformity. So, combining the two printing technologies allowed fabricating controlled-release oral dosage forms that are challenging to produce using a single technique. The approach opens up new perspectives in the manufacture of flexible doses and tailored drug-delivery systems.

  17. Automatic weight determination in nonlinear model predictive control of wind turbines using swarm optimization technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tofighi, Elham; Mahdizadeh, Amin

    2016-09-01

    This paper addresses the problem of automatic tuning of weighting coefficients for the nonlinear model predictive control (NMPC) of wind turbines. The choice of weighting coefficients in NMPC is critical due to their explicit impact on efficiency of the wind turbine control. Classically, these weights are selected based on intuitive understanding of the system dynamics and control objectives. The empirical methods, however, may not yield optimal solutions especially when the number of parameters to be tuned and the nonlinearity of the system increase. In this paper, the problem of determining weighting coefficients for the cost function of the NMPC controller is formulated as a two-level optimization process in which the upper- level PSO-based optimization computes the weighting coefficients for the lower-level NMPC controller which generates control signals for the wind turbine. The proposed method is implemented to tune the weighting coefficients of a NMPC controller which drives the NREL 5-MW wind turbine. The results are compared with similar simulations for a manually tuned NMPC controller. Comparison verify the improved performance of the controller for weights computed with the PSO-based technique.

  18. Decoupled control techniques for dual flying capacitor bridge power supplies of large superconductive magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Ehsani, M.; Hozhabri, A.; Kustom, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The dual flying capacitor (DFC) was developed in 1976 as a method of supplying efficient bilateral power to large superconductive magnets. This power supply concept uses a second superconductive coil for energy storage. Large reversible power demands of the load magnet are met by energy exchange between the storage and load coils, through the DFC bridge. This paper will show that the DFC circuit can be decomposed into two elementary single flying capacitor (SLC) circuits which can be controlled independently. The discovery of this decoupled control concept is the origin of several new control strategies which significantly improve the performance of DFC power supplies. Microcomputer controllers containing the decoupled control algorithm were tested on a DFC system simulator. The results show that time optimal load coil current and voltage control is now achievable by a robust bang-bang control technique. Furthermore, load coil current ripple and voltage spectrum can be independently controlled, while following an arbitrary reference signal. The DFC bridge, with the decoupled controllers, is a high performance power supply candidate for superconductive magnets of fusion reactors, particle accelerators and other systems.

  19. Performance of active vibration control technology: the ACTEX flight experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nye, T. W.; Manning, R. A.; Qassim, K.

    1999-12-01

    This paper discusses the development and results of two intelligent structures space-flight experiments, each of which could affect architecture designs of future spacecraft. The first, the advanced controls technology experiment I (ACTEX I), is a variable stiffness tripod structure riding as a secondary payload on a classified spacecraft. It has been operating well past its expected life since becoming operational in 1996. Over 60 on-orbit experiments have been run on the ACTEX I flight experiment. These experiments form the basis for in-space controller design problems and for concluding lifetime/reliability data on the active control components. Transfer functions taken during the life of ACTEX I have shown consistent predictability and stability in structural behavior, including consistency with those measurements taken on the ground prior to a three year storage period and the launch event. ACTEX I can change its modal characteristics by employing its dynamic change mechanism that varies preloads in portions of its structure. Active control experiments have demonstrated maximum vibration reductions of 29 dB and 16 dB in the first two variable modes of the system, while operating over a remarkable on-orbit temperature range of -80 °C to 129 °C. The second experiment, ACTEX II, was successfully designed, ground-tested, and integrated on an experimental Department of Defense satellite prior to its loss during a launch vehicle failure in 1995. ACTEX II also had variable modal behavior by virtue of a two-axis gimbal and added challenges of structural flexibility by being a large deployable appendage. Although the loss of ACTEX II did not provide space environment experience, ground testing resulted in space qualifying the hardware and demonstrated 21 dB, 14 dB, and 8 dB reductions in amplitude of the first three primary structural modes. ACTEX II could use either active and/or passive techniques to affect vibration suppression. Both experiments trailblazed

  20. Techniques for optimal crop selection in a controlled ecological life support system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormack, Ann; Finn, Cory; Dunsky, Betsy

    1992-01-01

    A Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) utilizes a plant's natural ability to regenerate air and water while being grown as a food source in a closed life support system. Current plant research is directed toward obtaining quantitative empirical data on the regenerative ability of each species of plant and the system volume and power requirements. Two techniques were adapted to optimize crop species selection while at the same time minimizing the system volume and power requirements. Each allows the level of life support supplied by the plants to be selected, as well as other system parameters. The first technique uses decision analysis in the form of a spreadsheet. The second method, which is used as a comparison with and validation of the first, utilizes standard design optimization techniques. Simple models of plant processes are used in the development of these methods.

  1. Techniques for optimal crop selection in a controlled ecological life support system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormack, Ann; Finn, Cory; Dunsky, Betsy

    1993-01-01

    A Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) utilizes a plant's natural ability to regenerate air and water while being grown as a food source in a closed life support system. Current plant research is directed toward obtaining quantitative empirical data on the regenerative ability of each species of plant and the system volume and power requirements. Two techniques were adapted to optimize crop species selection while at the same time minimizing the system volume and power requirements. Each allows the level of life support supplied by the plants to be selected, as well as other system parameters. The first technique uses decision analysis in the form of a spreadsheet. The second method, which is used as a comparison with and validation of the first, utilizes standard design optimization techniques. Simple models of plant processes are used in the development of these methods.

  2. Actively controlled shaft seals for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salant, Richard F.

    1993-01-01

    An electronically controlled mechanical seal for use as the purge gas seal in a liquid oxygen turbo pump has been fabricated and tested under transient operating conditions. The thickness of the lubricating film is controlled by adjusting the coning of the carbon face. This is accomplished by applying a voltage to a piezoelectric actuator to which the carbon face is bonded. The seal has been operated with a closed-loop control system that utilizes either the leakage rate or the seal face temperature as the feedback. Both speed and pressure transients have been imposed on the seal. The transient tests have demonstrated that the seal is capable of maintaining low leakage rates while limiting the face temperatures.

  3. Broadband radiation modes: estimation and active control.

    PubMed

    Berkhoff, Arthur P

    2002-03-01

    In this paper we give a formulation of the most efficiently radiating vibration patterns of a vibrating body, the radiation modes, in the time domain. The radiation modes can be used to arrive at efficient weighting schemes for an array of sensors in order to reduce the controller dimensionality. Because these particular radiation modes are optimum in a broadband sense, they are termed broadband radiation modes. Methods are given to obtain these modes from measured data. The broadband radiation modes are used for the design of an actuator array in a feedback control system to reduce the sound power radiated from a plate. Three methods for the design of the actuator are compared, taking into account the reduction of radiated sound power in the controlled frequency range, but also the possible increase of radiated sound power in the uncontrolled frequency range.

  4. Active Control of Magnetically Levitated Bearings

    SciTech Connect

    BARNEY, PATRICK S.; LAUFFER, JAMES P.; REDMOND, JAMES M.; SULLIVAN, WILLIAM N.

    2001-03-01

    This report summarizes experimental and test results from a two year LDRD project entitled Real Time Error Correction Using Electromagnetic Bearing Spindles. This project was designed to explore various control schemes for levitating magnetic bearings with the goal of obtaining high precision location of the spindle and exceptionally high rotational speeds. As part of this work, several adaptive control schemes were devised, analyzed, and implemented on an experimental magnetic bearing system. Measured results, which indicated precision positional control of the spindle was possible, agreed reasonably well with simulations. Testing also indicated that the magnetic bearing systems were capable of very high rotational speeds but were still not immune to traditional structural dynamic limitations caused by spindle flexibility effects.

  5. ACOSS Twelve (Active Control of Space Structures)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    Analysis 10 1-VII Controller Robustness Investigation 12 I 1-VIII Robustness Definitions 12 1-lX Loop Transfer Recover on 2-Mode Example 15 I- X ...Results 2-V Correlation of Test and Analysis 67 2-VI Model Sensitivity 67 x 6. 1.0 ANALYTICAL RESEARCH FOR CONTROL METHODOLOGY DEVELOPMENT (TASK 1.0...include more modes than previously considered. The three I ’kA",PSD location Ix, V. 1I( ?.Is, 1 12 IV, Z) x * V. i Z is. 1 9. 9 (Y. 21 a I?. Iz 1

  6. A comparison of maximal bioenergetic enzyme activities obtained with commonly used homogenization techniques.

    PubMed

    Grace, M; Fletcher, L; Powers, S K; Hughes, M; Coombes, J

    1996-12-01

    Homogenization of tissue for analysis of bioenergetic enzyme activities is a common practice in studies examining metabolic properties of skeletal muscle adaptation to disease, aging, inactivity or exercise. While numerous homogenization techniques are in use today, limited information exists concerning the efficacy of specific homogenization protocols. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of four commonly used approaches to homogenizing skeletal muscle for analysis of bioenergetic enzyme activity. The maximal enzyme activity (Vmax) of citrate synthase (CS) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were measured from homogenous muscle samples (N = 48 per homogenization technique) and used as indicators to determine which protocol had the highest efficacy. The homogenization techniques were: (1) glass-on-glass pestle; (2) a combination of a mechanical blender and a teflon pestle (Potter-Elvehjem); (3) a combination of the mechanical blender and a biological detergent; and (4) the combined use of a mechanical blender and a sonicator. The glass-on-glass pestle homogenization protocol produced significantly higher (P < 0.05) enzyme activities compared to all other protocols for both enzymes. Of the four protocols examined, the data demonstrate that the glass-on-glass pestle homogenization protocol is the technique of choice for studying bioenergetic enzyme activity in skeletal muscle.

  7. Exploring techniques for vision based human activity recognition: methods, systems, and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xin; Tang, Jinshan; Zhang, Xiaolong; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Hong; Qiu, Yimin

    2013-01-25

    With the wide applications of vision based intelligent systems, image and video analysis technologies have attracted the attention of researchers in the computer vision field. In image and video analysis, human activity recognition is an important research direction. By interpreting and understanding human activity, we can recognize and predict the occurrence of crimes and help the police or other agencies react immediately. In the past, a large number of papers have been published on human activity recognition in video and image sequences. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive survey of the recent development of the techniques, including methods, systems, and quantitative evaluation towards the performance of human activity recognition.

  8. The use of object-oriented techniques and CORBA in astronomical instrumentation control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dipper, Nigel A.; Blackburn, Colin

    2004-09-01

    Control software for astronomy matches the ever increasing complexity of new large instrumentation projects. In order to speed the development cycle, object-oriented techniques have been used to generate loosely coupled software objects and larger scale components that can be reused in future projects. Such object-oriented systems provide for short development cycles which can respond to changing requirements and allow for extension. The Unified Modeling Language (UML) has been used for the analysis, design and implementation of this software. A distributed system is supported by the use of an object broker such as CORBA. These techniques are being applied to the development of an instrument control system for the UK spectrograph within FMOS (Fiber-fed Multi-Object Spectrograph). This is a second generation instrument for the Subaru Telescope of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  9. Physical and chemical properties of gels. Application to protein nucleation control in the gel acupuncture technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Abel; Juárez-Martínez, Gabriela; Hernández-Pérez, Tomás; Batina, Nikola; Mundo, Manuel; McPherson, Alexander

    1999-09-01

    In this work, we present a new approach using analytical and optical techniques in order to determine the physical and chemical properties of silica gel, as well as the measurement of the pore size in the network of the gel by scanning electron microscopy. The gel acupuncture technique developed by Garcı´a-Ruiz et al. (Mater. Res. Bull 28 (1993) 541) Garcı´a-Ruiz and Moreno (Acta Crystallogr. D 50 (1994) 484) was used throughout the history of crystal growth. Several experiments were done in order to evaluate the nucleation control of model proteins (thaumatin I from Thaumatococcus daniellii, lysozyme from hen egg white and catalase from bovine liver) by the porous network of the gel. Finally, it is shown how the number and the size of the crystals obtained inside X-ray capillaries is controlled by the size of the porous structure of the gel.

  10. Development of Demand-Controlled Deep Brain Stimulation Techniques Based on Stochastic Phase Resetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tass, Peter A.

    2003-05-01

    Stimulation techniques are discussed here which make it possible to effectively desynchronize a synchronized cluster of globally coupled phase oscillators in the presence of noise. To this end composite stimuli are used which consist of a first, stronger stimulus followed by a second, weaker stimulus after a constant time delay. The first stimulus controls the dynamics of the cluster by resetting it, whereas the second stimulus desynchronizes the cluster by hitting it in a vulnerable state. The first, resetting stimulus can be a strong single pulse, a high-frequency pulse train or a low-frequency pulse train. The cluster's resynchronization can effectively be blocked by repeated administration of a composite stimulus. Demand controlled deep brain stimulation with these desynchronizing stimulation techniques is suggested for the therapy of patients suffering from tremor-dominant Parkinson's disease or essential tremor as a milder and more efficient therapy compared to the standard permanent high-frequency deep brain stimulation.

  11. Position and Speed Control of Brushless DC Motors Using Sensorless Techniques and Application Trends

    PubMed Central

    Gamazo-Real, José Carlos; Vázquez-Sánchez, Ernesto; Gómez-Gil, Jaime

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a technical review of position and speed sensorless methods for controlling Brushless Direct Current (BLDC) motor drives, including the background analysis using sensors, limitations and advances. The performance and reliability of BLDC motor drivers have been improved because the conventional control and sensing techniques have been improved through sensorless technology. Then, in this paper sensorless advances are reviewed and recent developments in this area are introduced with their inherent advantages and drawbacks, including the analysis of practical implementation issues and applications. The study includes a deep overview of state-of-the-art back-EMF sensing methods, which includes Terminal Voltage Sensing, Third Harmonic Voltage Integration, Terminal Current Sensing, Back-EMF Integration and PWM strategies. Also, the most relevant techniques based on estimation and models are briefly analysed, such as Sliding-mode Observer, Extended Kalman Filter, Model Reference Adaptive System, Adaptive observers (Full-order and Pseudoreduced-order) and Artificial Neural Networks. PMID:22163582

  12. Position and speed control of brushless DC motors using sensorless techniques and application trends.

    PubMed

    Gamazo-Real, José Carlos; Vázquez-Sánchez, Ernesto; Gómez-Gil, Jaime

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a technical review of position and speed sensorless methods for controlling Brushless Direct Current (BLDC) motor drives, including the background analysis using sensors, limitations and advances. The performance and reliability of BLDC motor drivers have been improved because the conventional control and sensing techniques have been improved through sensorless technology. Then, in this paper sensorless advances are reviewed and recent developments in this area are introduced with their inherent advantages and drawbacks, including the analysis of practical implementation issues and applications. The study includes a deep overview of state-of-the-art back-EMF sensing methods, which includes Terminal Voltage Sensing, Third Harmonic Voltage Integration, Terminal Current Sensing, Back-EMF Integration and PWM strategies. Also, the most relevant techniques based on estimation and models are briefly analysed, such as Sliding-mode Observer, Extended Kalman Filter, Model Reference Adaptive System, Adaptive observers (Full-order and Pseudoreduced-order) and Artificial Neural Networks.

  13. Intelligibility improvement of analog communication systems using an amplitude control technique.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wishna, S.

    1973-01-01

    An amplitude control technique has been employed for use with analog voice communication systems, which improves low-level phoneme reception and eliminates the received noise between words and syllables. Tests were conducted on a narrow-band frequency-modulation simplex voice communication channel employing the amplitude control technique. Presented for both the modified rhyme word tests and the phonetically balanced word tests are a series of graphical plots of the tests' score distribution, mean, and standard deviation as a function of received carrier-to-noise power density ratio. At low received carrier-to-noise power density ratios, a significant improvement in the intelligibility was obtained. A voice intelligibility improvement of more than 2 dB was obtained for the modified rhyme test words, and a voice intelligibility improvement in excess of 4 dB was obtained for the phonetically balanced word tests.

  14. A Controlled Field Pilot for Testing Near Surface CO2 Detection Techniques and Transport Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, L. H.; Dobeck, L.

    2007-12-01

    A field facility has been developed to allow controlled studies of near surface CO2transport and detection technologies. The key component of the facility is a shallow horizontal, well slotted over 70m of its length and divided into seven zones via packers with mass flow control in each individual zone. The scale and fluxes were designed to address large scale CO2 storage projects and desired retention rates for those projects and those design parameters will be discussed. A wide variety of detection techniques were deployed by collaborators from Los Alamos National Lab, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, the National Energy Technology Lab, Pacific Northwest National Lab, Lawrence Livermore National Lab and West Virginia University. Techniques included eddy covariance, soil gas measurements, hyperspectral imaging for plant stress detection, differential absorption LIDAR (both free space atmospheric and below surface soil gas), tracer studies, water sampling, stable isotope studies, and soil flux chambers. An overview of these results will be presented.

  15. Active Flap Control of the SMART Rotor for Vibration Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Steven R.; Anand, R. Vaidyanathan; Straub, Friedrich K.; Lau, Benton H.

    2009-01-01

    Active control methodologies were applied to a full-scale active flap rotor obtained during a joint Boeing/ DARPA/NASA/Army test in the Air Force National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex 40- by 80-foot anechoic wind tunnel. The active flap rotor is a full-scale MD 900 helicopter main rotor with each of its five blades modified to include an on-blade piezoelectric actuator-driven flap with a span of 18% of radius, 25% of chord, and located at 83% radius. Vibration control demonstrated the potential of active flaps for effective control of vibratory loads, especially normal force loads. Active control of normal force vibratory loads using active flaps and a continuous-time higher harmonic control algorithm was very effective, reducing harmonic (1-5P) normal force vibratory loads by 95% in both cruise and approach conditions. Control of vibratory roll and pitch moments was also demonstrated, although moment control was less effective than normal force control. Finally, active control was used to precisely control blade flap position for correlation with pretest predictions of rotor aeroacoustics. Flap displacements were commanded to follow specific harmonic profiles of 2 deg or more in amplitude, and the flap deflection errors obtained were less than 0.2 deg r.m.s.

  16. Total combining power: Technique for the evaluation of the quality control process of clostridiosis vaccines.

    PubMed

    Brandi, Igor Viana; Santos, Eliane Macedo Sobrinho; Carvalho, Bruna Mara Aparecida de; Durães, Carla Adriana Ferreira; Farias, Paula Karoline Soares; Sari, Roger Shoji; Cangussu, Alex Sander Rodrigues; Pessoa, Adalberto

    2016-11-01

    An efficient technique for evaluation of the quality control of vaccines against clostridiosis is described in this study. This technique is capable of quantifying the toxoid of the bacterium Clostridium perfringens Type D, which is commonly found within these vaccines. The described method is performed in vivo to quantify the toxoid, replacing the current predominant approaches that use the titration of toxins before the inactivation process. This method is based on the partial neutralization of a determined dose of antitoxin by testing different doses of the toxoid. In order to guarantee its reliability, it is essential for the technique to be validated. Thus, the technique was tested using the following validation parameters: specificity and selectivity, detection limit, linear correlation, precision and robustness, in agreement with the requirements of regulatory agencies and international committees from around the world. The method was found to be specific, selective, robust, precise, and linear inside a specific concentration range. Therefore, it could be applied to the quality control of clostridiosis vaccines with satisfactory results.

  17. Active vibration control of Flexible Joint Manipulator using Input Shaping and Adaptive Parameter Auto Disturbance Rejection Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W. P.; Luo, B.; Huang, H.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a vibration control strategy for a two-link Flexible Joint Manipulator (FJM) with a Hexapod Active Manipulator (HAM). A dynamic model of the multi-body, rigid-flexible system composed of an FJM, a HAM and a spacecraft was built. A hybrid controller was proposed by combining the Input Shaping (IS) technique with an Adaptive-Parameter Auto Disturbance Rejection Controller (APADRC). The controller was used to suppress the vibration caused by external disturbances and input motions. Parameters of the APADRC were adaptively adjusted to ensure the characteristic of the closed loop system to be a given reference system, even if the configuration of the manipulator significantly changes during motion. Because precise parameters of the flexible manipulator are not required in the IS system, the operation of the controller was sufficiently robust to accommodate uncertainties in system parameters. Simulations results verified the effectiveness of the HAM scheme and controller in the vibration suppression of FJM during operation.

  18. Pulley With Active Antifriction Actuator And Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ih, Che-Hang C.; Vivian, Howard C.

    1994-01-01

    Torque actuator and associated control system minimizes effective friction of rotary bearing. Motor exerts compensating torque in response to feedback from external optical sensor. Compensation torque nearly cancels frictional torque of shaft bearings. Also useful in reducing bearing friction in gyro-scopes, galvanometers, torquemeters, accelerometers, earth-motion detectors, and balances.

  19. Selective Activation and Disengagement of Moral Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bandura, Albert

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes psychological mechanisms by which moral control is selectively disengaged from inhumane conduct in ordinary and unusual circumstances. Explores the symptoms of moral exclusion as described in the literature. Presents categories that unify theory on moral exclusion and contribute practical classifications for use in empirical studies. (JS)

  20. Parameter identification of aggregated thermostatically controlled loads for smart grids using PDE techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura, Scott; Bendtsen, Jan; Ruiz, Victor

    2014-07-01

    This paper develops methods for model identification of aggregated thermostatically controlled loads (TCLs) in smart grids, via partial differential equation (PDE) techniques. Control of aggregated TCLs provides a promising opportunity to mitigate the mismatch between power generation and demand, thus enhancing grid reliability and enabling renewable energy penetration. To this end, this paper focuses on developing parameter identification algorithms for a PDE-based model of aggregated TCLs. First, a two-state boundary-coupled hyperbolic PDE model for homogenous TCL populations is derived. This model is extended to heterogeneous populations by including a diffusive term, which provides an elegant control-oriented model. Next, a passive parameter identification scheme and a swapping-based identification scheme are derived for the PDE model structure. Simulation results demonstrate the efficacy of each method under various autonomous and non-autonomous scenarios. The proposed models can subsequently be employed to provide system critical information for power system monitoring and control.

  1. Limited Investigation of Active Feel Control Stick System (Active Stick)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    at VCORNER .............. 15 Figure 12: Pitch Rate Response to 1.5 g Commanded Force PTI at VHI ......................... 16 Figure 13: Pitch Angle...Response to 1.5 g Commanded Force PTI at VHI ...................... 17 Figure 14: Flight Control System Stick Attributes at VLO...23 Figure 19: Cooper-Harper Ratings for Head Down Display Task ( VHI ) ......................... 24 Figure 20: Fine

  2. Behavior Change Techniques Implemented in Electronic Lifestyle Activity Monitors: A Systematic Content Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Zakkoyya H; Mayrsohn, Brian G; Rowland, Jennifer L

    2014-01-01

    Background Electronic activity monitors (such as those manufactured by Fitbit, Jawbone, and Nike) improve on standard pedometers by providing automated feedback and interactive behavior change tools via mobile device or personal computer. These monitors are commercially popular and show promise for use in public health interventions. However, little is known about the content of their feedback applications and how individual monitors may differ from one another. Objective The purpose of this study was to describe the behavior change techniques implemented in commercially available electronic activity monitors. Methods Electronic activity monitors (N=13) were systematically identified and tested by 3 trained coders for at least 1 week each. All monitors measured lifestyle physical activity and provided feedback via an app (computer or mobile). Coding was based on a hierarchical list of 93 behavior change techniques. Further coding of potentially effective techniques and adherence to theory-based recommendations were based on findings from meta-analyses and meta-regressions in the research literature. Results All monitors provided tools for self-monitoring, feedback, and environmental change by definition. The next most prevalent techniques (13 out of 13 monitors) were goal-setting and emphasizing discrepancy between current and goal behavior. Review of behavioral goals, social support, social comparison, prompts/cues, rewards, and a focus on past success were found in more than half of the systems. The monitors included a range of 5-10 of 14 total techniques identified from the research literature as potentially effective. Most of the monitors included goal-setting, self-monitoring, and feedback content that closely matched recommendations from social cognitive theory. Conclusions Electronic activity monitors contain a wide range of behavior change techniques typically used in clinical behavioral interventions. Thus, the monitors may represent a medium by which

  3. New techniques for the analysis of manual control systems. [mathematical models of human operator behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekey, G. A.

    1971-01-01

    Studies are summarized on the application of advanced analytical and computational methods to the development of mathematical models of human controllers in multiaxis manual control systems. Specific accomplishments include the following: (1) The development of analytical and computer methods for the measurement of random parameters in linear models of human operators. (2) Discrete models of human operator behavior in a multiple display situation were developed. (3) Sensitivity techniques were developed which make possible the identification of unknown sampling intervals in linear systems. (4) The adaptive behavior of human operators following particular classes of vehicle failures was studied and a model structure proposed.

  4. An indirect sensing technique for diesel fuel quantity control. Progress report, April 1--June 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    MacCarley, C.A.

    1998-08-31

    This reports on a project to develop an indirect sensing technique for diesel fuel quantity control. Development has continued on a vehicle-installed prototype for EPA certification and demonstration. Focus of development is on the use of this technology for retrofitting existing diesel vehicles to reduce emissions rather than exclusively upon deployment in the OEM market. Technical obstacles that have been encountered and their solutions and remaining project tasks are described.

  5. The Trojan female technique: a novel, effective and humane approach for pest population control

    PubMed Central

    Gemmell, Neil J.; Jalilzadeh, Aidin; Didham, Raphael K.; Soboleva, Tanya; Tompkins, Daniel M.

    2013-01-01

    Humankind's ongoing battle with pest species spans millennia. Pests cause or carry disease, damage or consume food crops and other resources, and drive global environmental change. Conventional approaches to pest management usually involve lethal control, but such approaches are costly, of varying efficiency and often have ethical issues. Thus, pest management via control of reproductive output is increasingly considered an optimal solution. One of the most successful such ‘fertility control’ strategies developed to date is the sterile male technique (SMT), in which large numbers of sterile males are released into a population each generation. However, this approach is time-consuming, labour-intensive and costly. We use mathematical models to test a new twist on the SMT, using maternally inherited mitochondrial (mtDNA) mutations that affect male, but not female reproductive fitness. ‘Trojan females’ carrying such mutations, and their female descendants, produce ‘sterile-male’-equivalents under natural conditions over multiple generations. We find that the Trojan female technique (TFT) has the potential to be a novel humane approach for pest control. Single large releases and relatively few small repeat releases of Trojan females both provided effective and persistent control within relatively few generations. Although greatest efficacy was predicted for high-turnover species, the additive nature of multiple releases made the TFT applicable to the full range of life histories modelled. The extensive conservation of mtDNA among eukaryotes suggests this approach could have broad utility for pest control. PMID:24174117

  6. Comparative study of different control techniques for the regulation of blood glucose level in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Ibbini, Mohammed S

    2009-01-01

    Blood glucose regulation is of a great concern for insulin-dependant patients with excessive glucose in blood (hyperglycaemia), or low glucose profile (hypoglycaemia) due to excess insulin delivery. Both conditions can cause dangerous complications for diabetic patients, and hence glucose regulation in blood is of prime importance. Insulin pumps are used to deliver insulin in small quantities, allowing the glucose level to remain as close as possible to that of non-diabetics (near 100 mg dl(-1)). Different control techniques are used to maintain the glucose level and most of them depend on an exact mathematical or empirical model of insulin-glucose interaction. Recently, we have proposed different controllers that are based on fuzzy logic and so do not use mathematical modelling, which in general is nonlinear, complex and suffers from uncertainties. PI fuzzy controllers are physically related to classical PI and PID controllers, which are extremely popular. The parameter settings of classical and fuzzy logic controllers are based on deep common physical background. In this manuscript, a comparative study is proposed to evaluate the use of fuzzy logic controllers over other conventional controllers such as PI and PID controllers to maintain the blood glucose level within a normoglycaemic average especially when a diabetic patient is subjected to different conditions.

  7. Modelling Aedes aegypti mosquito control via transgenic and sterile insect techniques: endemics and emerging outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Seirin Lee, S; Baker, R E; Gaffney, E A; White, S M

    2013-08-21

    The invasion of pest insects often changes or destroys a native ecosystem, and can result in food shortages and disease endemics. Issues such as the environmental effects of chemical control methods, the economic burden of maintaining control strategies and the risk of pest resistance still remain, and mosquito-borne diseases such as malaria and dengue fever prevail in many countries, infecting over 100 million worldwide in 2010. One environmentally friendly method for mosquito control is the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT). This species-specific method of insect control relies on the mass rearing, sterilization and release of large numbers of sterile insects. An alternative transgenic method is the Release of Insects carrying a Dominant Lethal (RIDL). Our objective is to consider contrasting control strategies for two invasive scenarios via SIT and RIDL: an endemic case and an emerging outbreak. We investigate how the release rate and size of release region influence both the potential for control success and the resources needed to achieve it, under a range of conditions and control strategies, and we discuss advantageous strategies with respect to reducing the release resources and strategy costs (in terms of control mosquito numbers) required to achieve complete eradication of wild-type mosquitoes.

  8. An integrated approach to the biomechanics and motor control of cricket fast bowling techniques.

    PubMed

    Glazier, Paul S; Wheat, Jonathan S

    2014-01-01

    To date, scientific investigations into the biomechanical aspects of cricket fast bowling techniques have predominantly focused on identifying the mechanical factors that may predispose fast bowlers to lower back injury with a relative paucity of research being conducted on the technical features that underpin proficient fast bowling performance. In this review paper, we critique the scientific literature examining fast bowling performance. We argue that, although many published investigations have provided some useful insights into the biomechanical factors that contribute to a high ball release speed and, to a lesser extent, bowling accuracy, this research has not made a substantive contribution to knowledge enhancement and has only had a very minor influence on coaching practice. To significantly enhance understanding of cricket fast bowling techniques and, therefore, have greater impact on practice, we recommend that future scientific research adopts an interdisciplinary focus, integrating biomechanical measurements with the analytical tools and concepts of dynamical systems motor control theory. The use of qualitative (topological) analysis techniques, in particular, promises to increase understanding of the coordinative movement patterns that define 'technique' in cricket fast bowling and potentially help distinguish between functional and dysfunctional aspects of technique for individual fast bowlers.

  9. A technique for large-area position-controlled growth of GaAs nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauppinen, Christoffer; Haggren, Tuomas; Kravchenko, Aleksandr; Jiang, Hua; Huhtio, Teppo; Kauppinen, Esko; Dhaka, Veer; Suihkonen, Sami; Kaivola, Matti; Lipsanen, Harri; Sopanen, Markku

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate a technique for fabricating position-controlled, large-area arrays of vertical semiconductor nanowires (NWs) with adjustable periods and NW diameters. In our approach, a Au-covered GaAs substrate is first coated with a thin film of photoresponsive azopolymer, which is exposed twice to a laser interference pattern forming a 2D surface relief grating. After dry etching, an array of polymer islands is formed, which is used as a mask to fabricate a matrix of gold particles. The Au particles are then used as seeds in vapour-liquid-solid growth to create arrays of vertical GaAs NWs using metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy. The presented technique enables producing NWs of uniform size distribution with high throughput and potentially on large wafer sizes without relying on expensive lithography techniques. The feasibility of the technique is demonstrated by arrays of vertical NWs with periods of 255-1000 nm and diameters of 50-80 nm on a 2 × 2 cm area. The grown NWs exhibit high long range order and good crystalline quality. Although only GaAs NWs were grown in this study, in principle, the presented technique is suitable for any material available for Au seeded NW growth.

  10. An Evaluation of Techniques to Control Problem Bird Species on Landfill Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Aonghais; Rushton, Steven; Allan, John; Baxter, Andrew

    2008-06-01

    Birds feeding on landfill sites cause problems in terms of nuisance to neighbors, flight safety, a threat to public health, and affecting the day to day site operation. A number of control measures exist to deter problem species; however, research into their effectiveness across sites and for multiple species has been limited. We use a modeling approach in order to assess the effectiveness of nine techniques — pyrotechnics, hand-held distress calls, static distress calls, blank ammunition, a combination of blank and lethal use of ammunition, the use of falcons, the use of hawks, wailers and helium-filled bird-scaring kites — at deterring three commonly recorded species — the Black-headed Gull ( Larus ridibundus), the Herring Gull ( Larus argentatus) and the Lesser Black-backed Gull ( Larus fuscus) — from six landfill sites across the United Kingdom. The use of distress calls, falconry, and combinations of lethal and nonlethal use of ammunition were the most effective techniques for initially deterring birds from these sites. However, when habituation is considered, there is a clear difference between techniques such as falconry, which have a lethal aspect and may act to reinforce the deterrence, and the use of techniques such as distress calls, which do not. However there are problems related to legislation and public perception when lethal techniques are used.

  11. MAG4 versus alternative techniques for forecasting active region flare productivity

    PubMed Central

    Falconer, David A; Moore, Ronald L; Barghouty, Abdulnasser F; Khazanov, Igor

    2014-01-01

    MAG4 is a technique of forecasting an active region's rate of production of major flares in the coming few days from a free magnetic energy proxy. We present a statistical method of measuring the difference in performance between MAG4 and comparable alternative techniques that forecast an active region's major-flare productivity from alternative observed aspects of the active region. We demonstrate the method by measuring the difference in performance between the “Present MAG4” technique and each of three alternative techniques, called “McIntosh Active-Region Class,” “Total Magnetic Flux,” and “Next MAG4.” We do this by using (1) the MAG4 database of magnetograms and major flare histories of sunspot active regions, (2) the NOAA table of the major-flare productivity of each of 60 McIntosh active-region classes of sunspot active regions, and (3) five technique performance metrics (Heidke Skill Score, True Skill Score, Percent Correct, Probability of Detection, and False Alarm Rate) evaluated from 2000 random two-by-two contingency tables obtained from the databases. We find that (1) Present MAG4 far outperforms both McIntosh Active-Region Class and Total Magnetic Flux, (2) Next MAG4 significantly outperforms Present MAG4, (3) the performance of Next MAG4 is insensitive to the forward and backward temporal windows used, in the range of one to a few days, and (4) forecasting from the free-energy proxy in combination with either any broad category of McIntosh active-region classes or any Mount Wilson active-region class gives no significant performance improvement over forecasting from the free-energy proxy alone (Present MAG4). Key Points Quantitative comparison of performance of pairs of forecasting techniques Next MAG4 forecasts major flares more accurately than Present MAG4 Present MAG4 forecast outperforms McIntosh AR Class and total magnetic flux PMID:26213517

  12. Active vibration control of a full scale aircraft wing using a reconfigurable controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Shashikala; Renjith Kumar, T. G.; Raja, S.; Dwarakanathan, D.; Subramani, H.; Karthikeyan, C.

    2016-01-01

    This work highlights the design of a Reconfigurable Active Vibration Control (AVC) System for aircraft structures using adaptive techniques. The AVC system with a multichannel capability is realized using Filtered-X Least Mean Square algorithm (FxLMS) on Xilinx Virtex-4 Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) platform in Very High Speed Integrated Circuits Hardware Description Language, (VHDL). The HDL design is made based on Finite State Machine (FSM) model with Floating point Intellectual Property (IP) cores for arithmetic operations. The use of FPGA facilitates to modify the system parameters even during runtime depending on the changes in user's requirements. The locations of the control actuators are optimized based on dynamic modal strain approach using genetic algorithm (GA). The developed system has been successfully deployed for the AVC testing of the full-scale wing of an all composite two seater transport aircraft. Several closed loop configurations like single channel and multi-channel control have been tested. The experimental results from the studies presented here are very encouraging. They demonstrate the usefulness of the system's reconfigurability for real time applications.

  13. Recognition of human activity characteristics based on state transitions modeling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elangovan, Vinayak; Shirkhodaie, Amir

    2012-06-01

    Human Activity Discovery & Recognition (HADR) is a complex, diverse and challenging task but yet an active area of ongoing research in the Department of Defense. By detecting, tracking, and characterizing cohesive Human interactional activity patterns, potential threats can be identified which can significantly improve situation awareness, particularly, in Persistent Surveillance Systems (PSS). Understanding the nature of such dynamic activities, inevitably involves interpretation of a collection of spatiotemporally correlated activities with respect to a known context. In this paper, we present a State Transition model for recognizing the characteristics of human activities with a link to a prior contextbased ontology. Modeling the state transitions between successive evidential events determines the activities' temperament. The proposed state transition model poses six categories of state transitions including: Human state transitions of Object handling, Visibility, Entity-entity relation, Human Postures, Human Kinematics and Distance to Target. The proposed state transition model generates semantic annotations describing the human interactional activities via a technique called Casual Event State Inference (CESI). The proposed approach uses a low cost kinect depth camera for indoor and normal optical camera for outdoor monitoring activities. Experimental results are presented here to demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed technique.

  14. Nonlinear techniques for forecasting solar activity directly from its time series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashrafi, S.; Roszman, L.; Cooley, J.

    1992-01-01

    Numerical techniques for constructing nonlinear predictive models to forecast solar flux directly from its time series are presented. This approach makes it possible to extract dynamical invariants of our system without reference to any underlying solar physics. We consider the dynamical evolution of solar activity in a reconstructed phase space that captures the attractor (strange), given a procedure for constructing a predictor of future solar activity, and discuss extraction of dynamical invariants such as Lyapunov exponents and attractor dimension.

  15. Nonlinear techniques for forecasting solar activity directly from its time series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashrafi, S.; Roszman, L.; Cooley, J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents numerical techniques for constructing nonlinear predictive models to forecast solar flux directly from its time series. This approach makes it possible to extract dynamical in variants of our system without reference to any underlying solar physics. We consider the dynamical evolution of solar activity in a reconstructed phase space that captures the attractor (strange), give a procedure for constructing a predictor of future solar activity, and discuss extraction of dynamical invariants such as Lyapunov exponents and attractor dimension.

  16. Biomimetic propulsion under random heaving conditions, using active pitch control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Politis, Gerasimos; Politis, Konstantinos

    2014-05-01

    Marine mammals travel long distances by utilizing and transforming wave energy to thrust through proper control of their caudal fin. On the other hand, manmade ships traveling in a wavy sea store large amounts of wave energy in the form of kinetic energy for heaving, pitching, rolling and other ship motions. A natural way to extract this energy and transform it to useful propulsive thrust is by using a biomimetic wing. The aim of this paper is to show how an actively pitched biomimetic wing could achieve this goal when it performs a random heaving motion. More specifically, we consider a biomimetic wing traveling with a given translational velocity in an infinitely extended fluid and performing a random heaving motion with a given energy spectrum which corresponds to a given sea state. A formula is invented by which the instantaneous pitch angle of the wing is determined using the heaving data of the current and past time steps. Simulations are then performed for a biomimetic wing at different heave energy spectra, using an indirect Source-Doublet 3-D-BEM, together with a time stepping algorithm capable to track the random motion of the wing. A nonlinear pressure type Kutta condition is applied at the trailing edge of the wing. With a mollifier-based filtering technique, the 3-D unsteady rollup pattern created by the random motion of the wing is calculated without any simplifying assumptions regarding its geometry. Calculated unsteady forces, moments and useful power, show that the proposed active pitch control always results in thrust producing motions, with significant propulsive power production and considerable beneficial stabilizing action to ship motions. Calculation of the power required to set the pitch angle prove it to be a very small percentage of the useful power and thus making the practical application of the device very tractable.

  17. Controlled nucleation and growth of thin hydroxyapatite layers on titanium implants by using induction heating technique.

    PubMed

    Gómez Morales, J; Rodríguez Clemente, R; Armas, B; Combescure, C; Berjoan, R; Cubo, J; Martínez, E; García Carmona, J; Garelik, S; Murtra, J; Muraviev, D N

    2004-06-22

    This paper reports the results obtained by the development of a new wet method of hydroxyapatite (HA) thin layer deposition. The method is based on the localized precipitation of HA on metallic substrates activated by induction heating. The technique developed has been shown to allow for the complete coating of substrates with micrometric thin films of HA within a low processing time. The method has been successfully applied to coat Ti plaques and Ti-6A1-4V cylinders.

  18. Advanced Study for Active Noise Control in Aircraft (ASANCA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borchers, Ingo U.; Emborg, Urban; Sollo, Antonio; Waterman, Elly H.; Paillard, Jacques; Larsen, Peter N.; Venet, Gerard; Goeransson, Peter; Martin, Vincent

    1992-01-01

    Aircraft interior noise and vibration measurements are included in this paper from ground and flight tests. In addition, related initial noise calculations with and without active noise control are conducted. The results obtained to date indicate that active noise control may be an effective means for reducing the critical low frequency aircraft noise.

  19. An electronic control for an electrohydraulic active control landing gear for the F-4 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, I.

    1982-01-01

    A controller for an electrohydraulic active control landing gear was developed for the F-4 aircraft. A controller was modified for this application. Simulation results indicate that during landing and rollout over repaired bomb craters the active gear effects a force reduction, relative to the passive gear, or approximately 70%.

  20. An active noise control algorithm for controlling multiple sinusoids.

    PubMed

    Lee, S M; Lee, H J; Yoo, C H; Youn, D H; Cha, I W

    1998-07-01

    The filtered-x LMS algorithm and its modified versions have been successfully applied in suppressing acoustic noise such as single and multiple tones and broadband random noise. This paper presents an adaptive algorithm based on the filtered-x LMS algorithm which may be applied in attenuating tonal acoustic noise. In the proposed method, the weights of the adaptive filter and estimation of the phase shift due to the acoustic path from a loudspeaker to a microphone are computed simultaneously for optimal control. The algorithm possesses advantages over other filtered-x LMS approaches in three aspects: (1) each frequency component is processed separately using an adaptive filter with two coefficients, (2) the convergence parameter for each sinusoid can be selected independently, and (3) the computational load can be reduced by eliminating the convolution process required to obtain the filtered reference signal. Simulation results for a single-input/single-output (SISO) environment demonstrate that the proposed method is robust to the changes of the acoustic path between the actuator and the microphone and outperforms the filtered-x LMS algorithm in simplicity and convergence speed.

  1. Behavior Change Techniques Present in Wearable Activity Trackers: A Critical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Kathryn; Li, Melissa; Giangregorio, Lora; Burns, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Background Wearable activity trackers are promising as interventions that offer guidance and support for increasing physical activity and health-focused tracking. Most adults do not meet their recommended daily activity guidelines, and wearable fitness trackers are increasingly cited as having great potential to improve the physical activity levels of adults. Objective The objective of this study was to use the Coventry, Aberdeen, and London-Refined (CALO-RE) taxonomy to examine if the design of wearable activity trackers incorporates behavior change techniques (BCTs). A secondary objective was to critically analyze whether the BCTs present relate to known drivers of behavior change, such as self-efficacy, with the intention of extending applicability to older adults in addition to the overall population. Methods Wearing each device for a period of 1 week, two independent raters used CALO-RE taxonomy to code the BCTs of the seven wearable activity trackers available in Canada as of March 2014. These included Fitbit Flex, Misfit Shine, Withings Pulse, Jawbone UP24, Spark Activity Tracker by SparkPeople, Nike+ FuelBand SE, and Polar Loop. We calculated interrater reliability using Cohen's kappa. Results The average number of BCTs identified was 16.3/40. Withings Pulse had the highest number of BCTs and Misfit Shine had the lowest. Most techniques centered around self-monitoring and self-regulation, all of which have been associated with improved physical activity in older adults. Techniques related to planning and providing instructions were scarce. Conclusions Overall, wearable activity trackers contain several BCTs that have been shown to increase physical activity in older adults. Although more research and development must be done to fully understand the potential of wearables as health interventions, the current wearable trackers offer significant potential with regard to BCTs relevant to uptake by all populations, including older adults. PMID:27122452

  2. An Active Self-Determination Technique: Involving Students in Effective Career Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denison, Grace L.

    This paper discusses creating story boards to help students with disabilities to develop effective career plans. It describes storyboarding as a technique for project planning which requires active involvement of both hemispheres of the brain. A group of 6-8 people, including students, teachers, counselors, and vocational rehabilitation…

  3. RADON REDUCTION TECHNIQUES FOR EXISTING DETACHED HOUSES - TECHNICAL GUIDANCE (THIRD EDITION) FOR ACTIVE SOIL DEPRESSURIZATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This technical guidance document is designed to aid in the selection, design, installation and operation of indoor radon reduction techniques using soil depressurization in existing houses. Its emphasis is on active soil depressurization; i.e., on systems that use a fan to depre...

  4. Status of the Usage of Active Learning and Teaching Method and Techniques by Social Studies Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akman, Özkan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the active learning and teaching methods and techniques which are employed by the social studies teachers working in state schools of Turkey. This usage status was assessed using different variables. This was a case study, wherein the research was limited to 241 social studies teachers. These teachers…

  5. Flutter suppression and gust alleviation using active controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.

    1975-01-01

    Application of the aerodynamic energy approach to some problems of flutter suppression and gust alleviation were considered. A simple modification of the control-law is suggested for achieving the required pitch control in the use of a leading edge - trailing edge activated strip. The possible replacement of the leading edge - trailing edge activated strip by a trailing edge - tab strip is also considered as an alternate solution. Parameters affecting the performance of the activated leading edge - trailing edge strip were tested on the Arava STOL Transport and the Westwind Executive Jet Transport and include strip location, control-law gains and a variation in the control-law itself.

  6. Controllability and hippocampal activation during pain expectation in fibromyalgia syndrome.

    PubMed

    González-Roldán, Ana María; Bomba, Isabelle C; Diesch, Eugen; Montoya, Pedro; Flor, Herta; Kamping, Sandra

    2016-12-01

    To examine the role of perceived control in pain perception, fibromyalgia patients and healthy controls participated in a reaction time experiment under different conditions of pain controllability. No significant differences between groups were found in pain intensity and unpleasantness ratings. However, during the expectation of uncontrollable pain, patients compared to controls showed higher hippocampal activation. In addition, hippocampal activity during the pain expectation period predicted activation of the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), precuneus and hippocampus during pain stimulation in fibromyalgia patients. The increased activation of the hippocampus during pain expectation and subsequent activation of the PCC/precuneus during the lack of control phase points towards an influence of pain perception through heightening of alertness and anxiety responses to pain in fibromyalgia patients.

  7. A reduced energy supply strategy in active vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichchou, M. N.; Loukil, T.; Bareille, O.; Chamberland, G.; Qiu, J.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, a control strategy is presented and numerically tested. This strategy aims to achieve the potential performance of fully active systems with a reduced energy supply. These energy needs are expected to be comparable to the power demands of semi-active systems, while system performance is intended to be comparable to that of a fully active configuration. The underlying strategy is called 'global semi-active control'. This control approach results from an energy investigation based on management of the optimal control process. Energy management encompasses storage and convenient restitution. The proposed strategy monitors a given active law without any external energy supply by considering purely dissipative and energy-demanding phases. Such a control law is offered here along with an analysis of its properties. A suboptimal form, well adapted for practical implementation steps, is also given. Moreover, a number of numerical experiments are proposed in order to validate test findings.

  8. Elements of active vibration control for rotating machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, Heinz

    1990-01-01

    The success or failure of active vibration control is determined by the availability of suitable actuators, modeling of the entire system including all active elements, positioning of the actuators and sensors, and implementation of problem-adapted control concepts. All of these topics are outlined and their special problems are discussed in detail. Special attention is given to efficient modeling of systems, especially for considering the active elements. Finally, design methods for and the application of active vibration control on rotating machinery are demonstrated by several real applications.

  9. Control surface spanwise placement in active flutter suppression systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.; Burken, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    All flutter suppression systems require sensors to detect the movement of the lifting surface and to activate a control surface according to a synthesized control law. Most of the work performed to date relates to the development of control laws based on predetermined locations of sensors and control surfaces. These locations of sensors and control surfaces are determined either arbitrarily, or by means of a trial and error procedure. The aerodynamic energy concept indicates that the sensors should be located within the activated strip. Furthermore, the best chordwise location of a sensor activating a T.E. control surface is around the 65 percent chord location. The best chordwise location for a sensor activating a L.E. surface is shown to lie upstream of the wing (around 20 percent upstream of the leading edge), or alternatively, two sensors located along the same chord should be used.

  10. Advanced Autonomous Formation Control and Trajectory Management Techniques for Multiple Micro UAV Applications (Controle d’une formation autonome evoluee, et gestion des trajectoires. Techniques d’applications pour micro UAV multiples)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    Formation Control and Trajectory Management Techniques for Multiple Micro UAV Applications ( Contrôle d’une formation autonome évoluée, et gestion des...EN-SCI-195 Advanced Autonomous Formation Control and Trajectory Management Techniques for Multiple Micro UAV Applications ( Contrôle d’une formation...autonome évoluée, et gestion des trajectoires. Techniques d’applications pour micro UAV multiples) The material in this publication was

  11. A Hybrid Nonlinear Control Scheme for Active Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xia, F.; Albritton, N. G.; Hung, J. Y.; Nelms, R. M.

    1996-01-01

    A nonlinear control scheme for active magnetic bearings is presented in this work. Magnet winding currents are chosen as control inputs for the electromechanical dynamics, which are linearized using feedback linearization. Then, the desired magnet currents are enforced by sliding mode control design of the electromagnetic dynamics. The overall control scheme is described by a multiple loop block diagram; the approach also falls in the class of nonlinear controls that are collectively known as the 'integrator backstepping' method. Control system hardware and new switching power electronics for implementing the controller are described. Various experiments and simulation results are presented to demonstrate the concepts' potentials.

  12. Optimal Control of Active Recoil Mechanisms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-02-01

    forces from 25 to 2.5% for lower zones and cavitation was avoided for zone 8. Tachometer feedback was shown to be effective for low zones. The...concept of feedback control system coupled with optimization procedure to design recoil mechanisms was demonstrated to be an efficient and very effective ...122o •nl260 .01300 .01340 .01380 • ouzo #01460 •01500 •01540 •01580 •0162" .0166 i 309o,6 504P.6 9964.5 10075,9 39121.5 75397.3

  13. On large-scale nonlinear programming techniques for solving optimal control problems

    SciTech Connect

    Faco, J.L.D.

    1994-12-31

    The formulation of decision problems by Optimal Control Theory allows the consideration of their dynamic structure and parameters estimation. This paper deals with techniques for choosing directions in the iterative solution of discrete-time optimal control problems. A unified formulation incorporates nonlinear performance criteria and dynamic equations, time delays, bounded state and control variables, free planning horizon and variable initial state vector. In general they are characterized by a large number of variables, mostly when arising from discretization of continuous-time optimal control or calculus of variations problems. In a GRG context the staircase structure of the jacobian matrix of the dynamic equations is exploited in the choice of basic and super basic variables and when changes of basis occur along the process. The search directions of the bound constrained nonlinear programming problem in the reduced space of the super basic variables are computed by large-scale NLP techniques. A modified Polak-Ribiere conjugate gradient method and a limited storage quasi-Newton BFGS method are analyzed and modifications to deal with the bounds on the variables are suggested based on projected gradient devices with specific linesearches. Some practical models are presented for electric generation planning and fishery management, and the application of the code GRECO - Gradient REduit pour la Commande Optimale - is discussed.

  14. A model-based technique for integrated real-time profile control in the JET tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laborde, L.; Mazon, D.; Moreau, D.; Murari, A.; Felton, R.; Zabeo, L.; Albanese, R.; Ariola, M.; Bucalossi, J.; Crisanti, F.; de Baar, M.; de Tommasi, G.; de Vries, P.; Joffrin, E.; Lennholm, M.; Litaudon, X.; Pironti, A.; Tala, T.; Tuccillo, A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a new technique which has been implemented on the JET tokamak to investigate integrated real-time control of several plasma profiles simultaneously (such as current, temperature and pressure) and reports the results of the first experimental tests. The profiles are handled through their projection on a suitable basis of functions according to the Galerkin scheme. Their response to three actuators (heating and current drive powers injected in the plasma) is linearized in an experimentally deduced multi-input multi-output model. The singular value decomposition of this model operator allows us to design a distributed-parameter real-time controller which maximizes the steady state decoupling of the multiple feedback loops. It enables us to control several coupled profiles simultaneously, with some degree of fuzziness to let the plasma evolve towards an accessible non-linear state which is the closest to the requested one, despite a limited number of actuators. The first experiments using these techniques show that different current and electron temperature profiles can be obtained and sustained by the controller during a closed-loop operation time window. Future improvements and perspectives are briefly mentioned.

  15. Development of a complex experimental system for controlled ecological life support technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, S.; Tang, Y.; Zhu, J.; Wang, X.; Feng, H.; Ai, W.; Qin, L.; Deng, Y.

    A complex experimental system for controlled ecological life support technique can be used as a test platform for plant-man integrated experiments and material close-loop experiments of the controlled ecological life support system CELSS Based on lots of plan investigation plan design and drawing design the system was built through the steps of processing installation and joined debugging The system contains a volume of about 40 0m 3 its interior atmospheric parameters such as temperature relative humidity oxygen concentration carbon dioxide concentration total pressure lighting intensity photoperiod water content in the growing-matrix and ethylene concentration are all monitored and controlled automatically and effectively Its growing system consists of two rows of racks along its left-and-right sides separately and each of which holds two up-and-down layers eight growing beds hold a total area of about 8 4m 2 and their vertical distance can be adjusted automatically and independently lighting sources consist of both red and blue light-emitting diodes Successful development of the test platform will necessarily create an essential condition for next large-scale integrated study of controlled ecological life support technique

  16. Active control of compressible flows on a curved surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.; Parikh, P.; Bayliss, A.; Turkel, E.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of localized, time periodic surface heating and cooling over a curved surface is studied. This is a mechanism for the active control of unstable disturbances by phase cancellation and reinforcement. It is shown that the pressure gradient induced by the curvature significantly enhances the effectiveness of this form of active control. In particular, by appropriate choice of phase, active surface heating can completely stabilize and unstable wave.

  17. Active control of compressible flows on a curved surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.; Bayliss, A.; Parikh, P.; Turkel, E.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of localized, time periodic surface heating and cooling over a curved surface is studied. This is a mechanism for the active control of unstable disturbances by phase cancellation and reinforcement. It is shown that the pressure gradient induced by the curvature significantly enhances the effectiveness of this form of active control. In particular, by appropriate choice of phase, active surface heating can completely stabilize an unstable wave.

  18. Semi Active Control of Civil Structures, Analytical and Numerical Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerboua, M.; Benguediab, M.; Megnounif, A.; Benrahou, K. H.; Kaoulala, F.

    Structural control for civil structures was born out of a need to provide safer and more efficient designs with the reality of limited resources. The purpose of structural control is to absorb and to reflect the energy introduced by dynamic loads such as winds, waves, earthquakes, and traffic. Today, the protection of civil structures from severe dynamic loading is typically achieved by allowing the structures to be damaged. Semi-active control devices, also called "smart" control devices, assume the positive aspects of both the passive and active control devices. A semi-active control strategy is similar to the active control strategy. Only here, the control actuator does not directly apply force to the structure, but instead it is used to control the properties of a passive energy device, a controllable passive damper. Semi-active control strategies can be used in many of the same civil applications as passive and active control. One method of operating smart cable dampers is in a purely passive capacity, supplying the dampers with constant optimal voltage. The advantages to this strategy are the relative simplicity of implementing the control strategy as compared to a smart or active control strategy and that the dampers are more easily optimally tuned in- place, eliminating the need to have passive dampers with unique optimal damping coefficients. This research investigated semi-active control of civil structures for natural hazard mitigation. The research has two components, the seismic protection of buildings and the mitigation of wind-induced vibration in structures. An ideal semi-active motion equation of a composite beam that consists of a cantilever beam bonded with a PZT patch using Hamilton's principle and Galerkin's method was treated. A series R-L and a parallel R-L shunt circuits are coupled into the motion equation respectively by means of the constitutive relation of piezoelectric material and Kirchhoff's law to control the beam vibration. A

  19. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Current and advanced act control system definition study. Volume 2: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanks, G. W.; Shomber, H. A.; Dethman, H. A.; Gratzer, L. B.; Maeshiro, A.; Gangsaas, D.; Blight, J. D.; Buchan, S. M.; Crumb, C. B.; Dorwart, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The current status of the Active Controls Technology (ACT) for the advanced subsonic transport project is investigated through analysis of the systems technical data. Control systems technologies under examination include computerized reliability analysis, pitch axis fly by wire actuator, flaperon actuation system design trade study, control law synthesis and analysis, flutter mode control and gust load alleviation analysis, and implementation of alternative ACT systems. Extensive analysis of the computer techniques involved in each system is included.

  20. New Diagnostic, Launch and Model Control Techniques in the NASA Ames HFFAF Ballistic Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, David W.

    2012-01-01

    This report presents new diagnostic, launch and model control techniques used in the NASA Ames HFFAF ballistic range. High speed movies were used to view the sabot separation process and the passage of the model through the model splap paper. Cavities in the rear of the sabot, to catch the muzzle blast of the gun, were used to control sabot finger separation angles and distances. Inserts were installed in the powder chamber to greatly reduce the ullage volume (empty space) in the chamber. This resulted in much more complete and repeatable combustion of the powder and hence, in much more repeatable muzzle velocities. Sheets of paper or cardstock, impacting one half of the model, were used to control the amplitudes of the model pitch oscillations.