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Sample records for active convergent plate

  1. Stress fields of the overriding plate at convergent margins and beneath active volcanic arcs.

    PubMed

    Apperson, K D

    1991-11-01

    Tectonic stress fields in the overriding plate at convergent plate margins are complex and vary on local to regional scales. Volcanic arcs are a common element of overriding plates. Stress fields in the volcanic arc region are related to deformation generated by subduction and to magma generation and ascent processes. Analysis of moment tensors of shallow and intermediate depth earthquakes in volcanic arcs indicates that the seismic strain field in the arc region of many convergent margins is subhorizontal extension oriented nearly perpendicular to the arc. A process capable of generating such a globally consistent strain field is induced asthenospheric corner flow below the arc region. PMID:17774792

  2. Vertical crustal motion of active plate convergence in Taiwan derived from tide gauge, altimetry, and GPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Emmy T. Y.; Chao, Benjamin F.; Chiang, Chieh-Chung; Hwang, Cheinway

    2012-11-01

    Located at the converging junction between the Eurasian and Philippine Sea plates, the island of Taiwan is subject to an active lithospheric deformation as well as seismicity. Taking the difference between the satellite altimetry data (ALT) that give the absolute sea level variation and the tide gauge data (TG) that record the relative sea level variation, we obtain the absolute vertical crustal motion of the tide gauge sites. We use 20 TG stations along the west and east coasts of Taiwan along with the ALT measurements from the TOPEX/Poseidon-Jason satellites in the nearby waters. The ALT-TG results are compared with vertical GPS measurements in discussing vertical motion. We find a general subsidence of the entire Taiwan coast during the past two decades. The west coast sees no prominent vertical motion but with a severe local subsidence due to the over-withdrawal of groundwater. On the east coast, the ALT-TG results in the northern section demonstrate a northward dipping motion. The elastic thickness of the neighboring oceanic lithosphere modeled as an elastic plate with the flexure of the subducting plate shows that the adjacent Philippine Sea plate should be an old, thick oceanic plate, which could drag the slab into the mantle as manifested in a gentle northward subsidence in the northeast Taiwan. In the southern section of the east coast, the ALT-TG results reveal a segmented or undulating pattern in the vertical-motion rates. Judging from the different behaviors between the co-seismic and interseismic vertical motions marked by the major earthquakes during the studied period, we postulate a temporal saw-tooth scenario for the deformation in phases. It demonstrates the opposite motions under different mechanisms in the frontal sections of the subduction zone, which can be understood with lateral collision and slab dragging subject to varied temporal and spatial dependences.

  3. Flat plate puncture test convergence study.

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, Spencer; Ammerman, Douglas James; Molitoris, David; Tso, Chi-Fung; Yaksh, Mike

    2010-10-01

    The ASME Task Group on Computational Mechanics for Explicit Dynamics is investigating the types of finite element models needed to accurately solve various problems that occur frequently in cask design. One type of problem is the 1-meter impact onto a puncture spike. The work described in this paper considers this impact for a relatively thin-walled shell, represented as a flat plate. The effects of mesh refinement, friction coefficient, material models, and finite element code will be discussed. The actual punch, as defined in the transport regulations, is 15 cm in diameter with a corner radius of no more than 6 mm. The punch used in the initial part of this study has the same diameter, but has a corner radius of 25 mm. This more rounded punch was used to allow convergence of the solution with a coarser mesh. A future task will be to investigate the effect of having a punch with a smaller corner radius. The 25-cm thick type 304 stainless steel plate that represents the cask wall is 1 meter in diameter and has added mass on the edge to represent the remainder of the cask. The amount of added mass to use was calculated using Nelm's equation, an empirically derived relationship between weight, wall thickness, and ultimate strength that prevents punch through. The outer edge of the plate is restrained so that it can only move in the direction parallel to the axis of the punch. Results that are compared include the deflection at the edge of the plate, the deflection at the center of the plate, the plastic strains at radius r=50 cm and r=100 cm , and qualitatively, the distribution of plastic strains. The strains of interest are those on the surface of the plate, not the integration point strains. Because cask designers are using analyses of this type to determine if shell will puncture, a failure theory, including the effect of the tri-axial nature of the stress state, is also discussed. The results of this study will help to determine what constitutes an adequate

  4. Composite transform-convergent plate boundaries: description and discussion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryan, H.F.; Coleman, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    The leading edge of the overriding plate at an obliquely convergent boundary is commonly sliced by a system of strike-slip faults. This fault system is often structurally complex, and may show correspondingly uneven strain effects, with great vertical and translational shifts of the component blocks of the fault system. The stress pattern and strain effects vary along the length of the system and change through time. These margins are considered to be composite transform-convergent (CTC) plate boundaries. Examples are given of structures formed along three CTC boundaries: the Aleutian Ridge, the Solomon Islands, and the Philippines. The dynamism of the fault system along a CTC boundary can enhance vertical tectonism and basin formation. This concept provides a framework for the evaluation of petroleum resources related to basin formation, and mineral exploration related to igneous activity associated with transtensional processes. ?? 1992.

  5. Origin of production gases from convergent plate margins

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey, A.W.A.; Poreda, R.J.; Gwilliam, W.J.; Kaplan, I.R.; Craig, H.

    1987-05-01

    Molecular and isotopic composition of hydrocarbon production gases from four convergent plate margins have been measured. New Zealand is represented by two gases from the Taranaki basin in the back arc of the active Tonga-Kermadec subduction system. Gases from Barbados and Taiwan are from forearc locations in the active Lesser Antilles system and relict northern Manila Trench system. Philippine gases from offshore Palawan are associated with the Palawan Trough. Gases from Taiwan, the Maiu field in New Zealand, and the Nido field in Palawan have very high /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratios, indicating considerable mantle input of helium to the gas reservoirs. Variations in /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratios in neighboring fields are quite striking and suggest localized sources for the mantle components. Possible sources include shallow igneous bodies and fractures or faults tapping a direct mantle source. Measurements of helium isotope ratios in hydrocarbon production gases have been compiled and show a striking association of mantle helium with gases from subduction zones in contrast to deep subsided or rifted sedimentary basins. The dynamics of the subduction process, involving the interaction of upper mantle and crustal rocks, is apparently responsible for the injection of volatile mantle components into reservoired gases. Current exploration techniques are based on maturation and gas migration theories developed from the study of subsiding sedimentary basins. At convergent margins, such technique may have to be amended to include the effects of subduction dynamics on the source, maturation, and migration of hydrocarbons.

  6. The proximity of hotspots to convergent and divergent plate boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Stuart A.; Olson, Peter L.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis of four different hotspot distributions, ranging from Morgan's (1972) original list of 19 to Vogt's (1981) list of 117 reveals that the hotspots are preferentially located near divergent plate boundaries. The probability of this proximity occurring by chance alone is quite remote, less than 0.01 for all four hotspot distributions. The same analysis also reveals that the hotspots are preferentially excluded from regions near convergent plate boundaries. The probability of this exclusion occurring by chance alone is 0.1 or less for three out of the four distributions examined. We interpret this behavior as being a consequence of the effects of large scale convective circulation on ascending mantle plumes. Mantle thermal plumes, the most probable source of hotspots, arise from instabilities in a basal thermal boundary layer. Plumes are suppressed from regions beneath convergent boundaries by descending flow and are entrained into the upwelling flow beneath spreading centers. Plate-scale convective circulation driven by subduction may also advect mantle thermal plumes toward spreading centers.

  7. Convergent Plate Boundary Processes in the Archean: Evidence from Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polat, A.

    2014-12-01

    The structural, magmatic and metamorphic characteristics of Archean greenstone belts and associated TTG (tonalite, trondhjemite and granodiorite) gneisses in southern West Greenland are comparable to those of Phanerozoic convergent plate margins, suggesting that Archean continents grew mainly at subduction zones. These greenstone belts are composed mainly of tectonically juxtaposed fragments of oceanic crust including mafic to ultramafic rocks, with minor sedimentary rocks. Volcanic rocks in the greenstone belts are characterized mainly by island arc tholeiitic basalts, picrites, and boninites. The style of deformation and geometry of folds in 10 cm to 5 m wide shear zones are comparable to those occur on 1 to 50 km scale in the greenstone belts and TTG gneisses, suggesting that compressional tectonic processes operating at convergent plate boundaries were the driving force of Archean crustal accretion and growth. Field observations and trace element data suggest that Archean continental crust grew through accretion of mainly island arcs and melting of metamorphosed mafic rocks (amphibolites) in thickened arcs during multiple tectonothermal events. Fold patterns on cm to km scale are consistent with at least three phases of deformation and multiple melting events generating TTG melts that intruded mainly along shear zones in accretionary prism and magmatic arcs. It is suggested that Archean TTGs were produced by three main processes: (1) melting of thickened oceanic island arcs; (2) melting of subducted oceanic crust; and (3) differentiation of basaltic melts originating from metasomatized sub-arc mantle wedge peridotites.

  8. Numerical comparison of different convergent plate contacts: subduction channel and subduction fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Franco, Roberta; Govers, Rob; Wortel, Rinus

    2007-10-01

    At convergent plate boundaries, the properties of the actual plate contact are important for the overall dynamics. Convergent plate boundaries both mechanically decouple and link tectonic plates and accommodate large amounts of strain. We investigate two fundamental physical states of the subduction contact: one based on a fault and the other based on a subduction channel. Using a finite element method, we determine the specific signatures of both states of the subduction contact. We pay particular attention to the overriding plate. In a tectonic setting of converging plates, where the subducting plate is freely moving, the subduction channel reduces compression relative to the fault model. In a land-locked basin setting, where the relative motion between the far field of the plates is zero, the subduction channel model produces tensile stress regime in the overriding plate, even though the amount of slab roll-back is small. The fault model shows a stronger development of slab roll-back and a compressive stress regime in the upper plate. Based on a consistent comparison of fault and channel numerical models, we find that the nature of the plate contact is one of the controlling factors in developing or not of backarc extension. We conclude that, the type of plate contact plays a decisive role in controlling the backarc state of stress. To obtain backarc extension, roll-back is required as an underling geodynamic process, but it is not always a sufficient condition.

  9. The role of near-trench extension at convergent plate boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannucchi, P.

    2009-04-01

    occur approaching the fault core. Recent drilling at Nankai has confirmed sub-horizontal extension in the upper plate there by observation of core-scale normal faulting (Lewis et al., 2008) and anelastic strain recovery determination (Byrne et al., 2008). In the fossil erosive megathrust system preserved in the Apennines, two décollements are simultaneously active at the roof and base of the subduction channel. The uppermost (nonseismogenic) portion of the megathrust appears to alternate between tensional and compressional modes of failure during the seismic cycle along the deeper portions of the megathrust. The presence of extensional strain along the plate boundary of convergent margins indicates that the décollements are able to transmit lithostatic loads. This implies their weak nature until at least intermediate (~3 km) depths where, in the fossil example, the basal décollement became partially locked. Fluid pressure cycles have not yet been well established at the frontmost part of convergent margins. Where the coexistence of extensional and shear fracturing is present, it seems to be best explained by fluid pressure variations in response to variations of the compressional regime during the seismic cycle. Byrne ,T., et al. (2008), In Situ Stress Determinations from Anelastic Strain Recovery (ASR): Preliminary Results and Comparisons to Borehole Breakout and Core-scale Fault Data from IODP Expeditions 314, 315 and 316 to the Nankai Trough, Eos Trans. AGU, 89(53), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract T22B-05 Lewis, J. et al. (2008), Subhorizontal Extension of the Upper Plate at NantroSEIZE Sites C0001 and C0002, Eos Trans. AGU, 89(53), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract T31B-2005

  10. Seismicity at the convergent plate boundary offshore Crete, Greece, observed by an amphibian network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, D.; Meier, T.; Bohnhoff, M.; Harjes, H.-P.

    2010-04-01

    We investigate microseismic activity at the convergent plate boundary of the Hellenic subduction zone on- and offshore south-eastern Crete with unprecedented precision using recordings from an amphibian seismic network. The network configuration consisted of up to eight ocean bottom seismometers as well as five temporary short-period and six permanent broadband stations on Crete and surrounding islands. More than 2,500 local and regional events with magnitudes up to M L = 4.5 were recorded during the time period July 2003-June 2004. The magnitude of completeness varies between 1.5 on Crete and adjacent areas and increases to 2.5 in the vicinity of the Strabo trench 100 km south of Crete. Tests with different localization schemes and velocity models showed that the best results were obtained from a probabilistic earthquake localization using a 1-D velocity model and corresponding station corrections obtained by simultaneous inversion. Most of the seismic activity is located offshore of central and eastern Crete and interpreted to be associated with the intracrustal graben system (Ptolemy and Pliny trenches). Furthermore, a significant portion of events represents interplate seismicity along the NNE-ward dipping plate interface. The concentration of seismicity along the Ptolemy and Pliny trenches extends from shallow depths down to the plate interface and indicates active movement. We propose that both trenches form transtensional structures within the Aegean plate. The Aegean continental crust between these two trenches is interpreted as a forearc sliver as it exhibits only low microseismic activity during the observation period and little or no internal deformation. Interplate seismicity between the Aegean and African plates forms a 100-km wide zone along dip from the Strabo trench in the south to the southern shore-line of Crete in the north. The seismicity at the plate contact is randomly distributed and no indications for locked zones were observed. The plate

  11. Convergence of intense aerial acoustic waves radiated by a rectangular transverse vibrating plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, Tomoki; Asami, Takuya; Miura, Hikaru

    2016-07-01

    A stripe-mode rectangular transverse vibrating plate can be used as a sound source that emits intense ultrasonic waves in air by placing a jut driving point outside the vibrating plate. The aim of this research was to use this vibrating plate to focus sound waves in the direction perpendicular to the nodal lines of the vibrating plate, which differs from the conventional direction. In this study, we investigated new methods for focusing the emitted sound waves by arranging reflective plates around the vibrating plate, using a design equation for each node between nodes in the vibrating plate, and placing additional reflective plates at an outer position beyond the convergence point, and found that a powerful acoustic field can be formed at an arbitrary position.

  12. Plate convergence, transcurrent faults and internal deformation adjacent to Southeast Asia and the western Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitch, T. J.

    1971-01-01

    A model for oblique convergence between plates of lithosphere is proposed in which at least a fraction of slip parallel to the plate margin results in transcurrent movements on a nearly vertical fault which is located on the continental side of a zone of plate consumption. In an extreme case of complete decoupling only the component of slip normal to the plate margin can be inferred from underthrusting. Recent movements in the western Sunda region provide the most convincing evidence for decoupling of slip, which in this region is thought to be oblique to the plate margin. A speculative model for convergence along the margins of the Philippine Sea is constructed from an inferred direction of oblique slip in the Philippine region. This model requires that the triple point formed by the junction of the Japanese and Izu-Bonin trenches and the Nankai trough migrate along the Sagami trough.

  13. Long-distance multistep sediment transfer at convergent plate margins (Barbados, Lesser Antilles)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limonta, Mara; Garzanti, Eduardo; Resentini, Alberto; Andò, Sergio; Boni, Maria; Bechstädt, Thilo

    2015-04-01

    We present a regional provenance study of the compositional variability and long distance multicyclic transport of terrigenous sediments along the convergent and transform plate boundaries of Central America, from the northern termination of the Andes to the Lesser Antilles arc-trench system. We focus on high-resolution bulk-petrography and heavy-mineral analyses of modern beach and fluvial sediments and Cenozoic sandstones of Barbados island, one of the places in the world where an active accretionary prism is subaerially exposed (Speed et al., 2012). The main source of siliciclastic sediment in the Barbados accretionary prism is off-scraped quartzose to feldspatho-litho-quartzose metasedimentaclastic turbidites, ultimately supplied from South America chiefly via the Orinoco fluvio-deltaic system. Modern sand on Barbados island is either quartzose with depleted heavy-mineral suites recycled from Cenozoic turbidites and including epidote, zircon, tourmaline, andalusite, garnet, staurolite and chloritoid, or calcareous and derived from Pleistocene coral reefs. The ubiquitous occurrence of clinopyroxene and hypersthene, associated with green-brown kaersutitic hornblende in the north or olivine in the south, points to reworking of ash-fall tephra erupted from andesitic (St. Lucia) and basaltic (St. Vincent) volcanic centers in the Lesser Antilles arc transported by the prevailing anti-trade winds in the upper troposphere. Modern sediments on Barbados island and those shed by other accretionary prisms such as the Indo- Burman Ranges and Andaman-Nicobar Ridge (Garzanti et al., 2013) define the distinctive mineralogical signature of Subduction Complex Provenance, which is invariably composite. Detritus recycled dominantly from accreted turbidites and oceanic mudrocks is mixed in various proportions with detritus from the adjacent volcanic arc or carbonate reefs widely developed at tropical latitudes. Ophiolitic detritus may be locally prominent. Quantitative provenance

  14. Seismotectonic constraints on the convergence rate between the Rivera and North American plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostoglodov, Vladimir; Bandy, William

    1995-09-01

    There are two significantly different types of models for the convergence rate between the Rivera and North American plates. The first type, the high-rate model (Bandy, 1992), predicts convergence rates of approximately 5.0 cm/yr near the southern end of the Rivera-North America subduction zone and between 2.0 and 3.0 cm/yr at its northern end. In contrast, the second type, the low-rate model (e.g., DeMets and Stein, 1990), predicts convergence rates of between 2.0 and 3.3 cm/yr near the southern end of the Rivera-North America subduction zone and between 0.6 and 1.7 cm/yr at its northern end. Seismotectonic relationships, which relate seismic characteristics of subduction zones (maximum magnitudes, maximum seismic depths, etc.) to plate tectonic parameters (convergence rates, age of the oceanic lithosphere, etc.) provide a means of distinguishing between the two different models. Three such relationships suggest that the Rivera-North American and Cocos-North American convergence rates should be roughly equal across the Rivera-Cocos plate boundary, favoring the high-rate model. Employing the high-rate model, one can evaluate the magnitude and distribution of the strike-slip component of forearc motion, Vss, produced by oblique convergence between the Rivera and North American plates. The analysis indicates both a progressive increase and clockwise reorientation of Vss northwestward along the plate contact zone of the Rivera-North America subduction zone. Such a distribution in Vss should produce a northwestward movement of and NW-SE oriented extension within the interior of the Jalisco Block, consistent with previous proposals of Jalisco Block motions. Also, such a distribution in Vss should produce a slight clockwise rotation of the Jalisco Block in the vicinity of Bahia de Banderas, consistent with paleomagnetic data.

  15. Locking, mass flux and topographic response at convergent plate boundaries - the Chilean case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oncken, Onno

    2016-04-01

    On the long term, convergent plate boundaries have been shown to be controlled by either accretion/underplating or by subduction erosion. Vertical surface motion is coupled to convergence rate - typically with an uplift rate of the coastal area ranging from 0 to +50% of convergence rate in accretive systems, and -20 to +30% in erosive systems. Vertical kinematics, however, are not necessarily linked to horizontal strain mode, i.e. upper plate shortening or extension, in a simple way. This range of kinematic behaviors - as well as their acceleration where forearcs collide with oceanic ridges/plateau - is well expressed along the Chilean plate margin. Towards the short end of the time scale, deformation appears to exhibit a close correlation with the frictional properties and geodetic locking at the plate interface. Corroborating analogue experiments of strain accumulation during multiple earthquake cycles, forearc deformation and uplift focus above the downdip and updip end of seismic coupling and slip and are each related to a particular stage of the seismic cycle, but with opposite trends for both domains. Similarly, barriers separating locked domains along strike appear to accumulate most upper plate faulting interseismically. Hence, locking patters are reflected in topography. From the long-term memory contained in the forearc topography the relief of the Chilean forearc seems to reflect long term stability of the observed heterogeneity of locking at the plate interface. This has fundamental implications for spatial and temporal distribution of seismic hazard. Finally, the nature of locking at the plate interface controlling the above kinematic behavior appears to be strongly controlled by the degree of fluid overpressuring at the plate interface suggesting that the hydraulic system at the interface takes a key role for the forearc response.

  16. Western Irian Jaya: The end-product of oblique plate convergence in the late tertiary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dow, D. B.; Sukamto, R.

    1984-06-01

    The island of New Guinea is the surface expression of the deformed northern margin of the Australian continental block: to the south undeformed continental crust is overlain by flat-lying platform sediments that form a conformable sequence from late Palaeozoic to late Tertiary. Along the New Guinea Cordillera these platform sediments have been tightly folded and overthrust to the south as a result of crustal shortening caused by convergence between the Australian Plate and the Pacific Plate. The earth movements resulting from this convergence started at the end of the Miocene and continue to the present day. It is postulated that all the major structures of western Irian Jaya were caused by this orogeny and can be explained by the convergence directed southwest-northeast, between the Australian and Pacific plates. It is further postulated that the convergence has remained essentially constant since the start of the earth movements. This convergence is consistent with that postulated in the Circum-Pacific Plate Tectonic Map (AAPG, 1981) of 12.5 cm/yr directed about 15° south of west, only if the effects of the Sorong-Yapen fault system are taken into account. This complex, east-west-trending fault system forms the southern boundary of the Pacific Plate and has responded to the convergence by left-lateral strike-slip displacement of at least 370 km since the late Miocene. As a consequence, south of the Sorong-Yapen fault system the convergence has been directed more to the south i.e. at least 45° south of west. In this region south of the fault zones, the north-south component of the convergence has been accommodated in the east by folding and overthrusting over a wide zone of interaction called the New Guinea Mobile Belt (Dow, 1977). In the west on the other hand, the Australian continental crust has been a stable buttress (Kepala Burung, Fig. 2) which, following convergence, has protruded into the Pacific Plate. Its northeastern margin has therefore been exposed

  17. Plate convergence measured by GPS across the Sundaland/Philippine Sea Plate deformed boundary: the Philippines and eastern Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangin, C.; Le Pichon, X.; Mazzotti, S.; Pubellier, M.; Chamot-Rooke, N.; Aurelio, M.; Walpersdorf, Andrea; Quebral, R.

    1999-11-01

    The western boundary of the Philippine Sea (PH) Plate in the Philippines and eastern Indonesia corresponds to a wide deformation zone that includes the stretched continental margin of Sundaland, the Philippine Mobile Belt (PMB), extending from Luzon to the Molucca Sea, and a mosaic of continental blocks around the PH/Australia/Sunda triple junction. The GPS GEODYSSEA data are used to decipher the present kinematics of this complex area. In the Philippines, the overall scheme is quite simple: two opposing rotations on either side of the left-lateral Philippine Fault, clockwise to the southwest and counterclockwise to the northeast, transfer 55 per cent of the PH/Sundaland convergence from the Manila Trench to the northwest to the Philippine Trench to the southeast. Further south, 80 per cent of the PH/Sunda convergence is absorbed in the double subduction system of the Molucca Sea and less than 20 per cent along both continental margins of northern Borneo. Finally, within the triple junction area between the Sundaland, PH and Australia plates, from Sulawesi to Irian Jaya, preferential subduction of the Celebes Sea induces clockwise rotation of the Sulu block, which is escaping toward the diminishing Celebes Sea oceanic space from the eastward-advancing PH Plate. To the south, we identify an undeformed Banda block that rotates counterclockwise with respect to Australia and clockwise with respect to Sundaland. The kinematics of this block can be defined and enable us to compute the rates of southward subduction of the Banda block within the Flores Trench and of eastward convergence of the Makassar Straits with the Banda block. The analysis made in this paper confirms that this deformation is compatible with the eastward motion of Sundaland with respect to Eurasia determined by the GEODYSSEA programme but is not compatible with the assumption that Sundaland belongs to Eurasia, as was often assumed prior to this study.

  18. Holocene turbidites reveal earthquake supercycles at a slow convergence plate boundary (Northern Algeria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratzov, Gueorgui; Cattaneo, Antonio; Babonneau, Nathalie; Yelles, Karim; Bracene, Rabah; Lateb, Tassadite; Déverchere, Jacques

    2014-05-01

    Ongoing evidence for earthquake clustering calls upon records over numerous earthquake cycles to improve seismic hazard assessments, especially at places where recurrence times overstep historical records. Here, we show that meaningful information of large earthquakes recurrence intervals over several seismic cycles may be obtained using turbidite record offshore the Algerian margin. The Africa-Eurasia plate boundary is slowly convergent (~3mm/yr), with deformation in the investigated margin segment accommodated mainly onland, along thrusts and strike-slip faults. Historically, two relatively large earthquakes stroke the area in 1954 (Orléansville M6.7) and 1980 (El Asnam M7.3). Holocene turbidites emplaced offshore are triggered by thirteen earthquakes. Most of them tune to paleoseismic record of the El Asnam fault onland, whereas two are slightly diachronous (<100 yrs), and likely result from bursts of activity on nearby faults. Turbidites depict a bimodal distribution over ~8 kyrs that support the concepts of earthquake supercycles and rupture synchronization between nearby faults. Thirteen coastal paleoquakes underpin clusters of 3 to 6 events with mean recurrence intervals of ~300-600 years, separated by two periods of quiescence of ~1.7 ka without major events on any fault. They imply alternation of broad phases of strain loading and shorter phases of strain release along the fault network. More generally, our results demonstrate that fault slip rates are time-dependent and that earthquake occurrence might be strain-predictable rather than time- or slip-predictable. Turbidite paleoseismology investigation is ongoing on an adjacent margin segment where the Boumerdes M6.9 earthquake occurred in 2003. Preliminary results retrieved the traces of historical earthquakes, and established Holocene time-series. They support a similar bimodal seismic distribution, suggesting that earthquake supercycling should be a major strain release process along the Africa

  19. Viscoelastic Postseismic Rebound to Strike-Slip Earthquakes in Regions of Oblique Plate Convergence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Steven C.

    1999-01-01

    According to the slip partitioning concept, the trench parallel component of relative plate motion in regions of oblique convergence is accommodated by strike-slip faulting in the overriding continental lithosphere. The pattern of postseismic surface deformation due to viscoelastic flow in the lower crust and asthenosphere following a major earthquake on such a fault is modified from that predicted from the conventual elastic layer over viscoelastic halfspace model by the presence of the subducting slab. The predicted effects, such as a partial suppression of the postseismic velocities by 1 cm/yr or more immediately following a moderate to great earthquake, are potentially detectable using contemporary geodetic techniques.

  20. Continental Collision and the STEP-wise Evolution of Convergent Plate Boundaries: The Mediterranean Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wortel, M. J.; Govers, R.; Spakman, W.

    2008-12-01

    This contribution focusses on terminal stage subduction, often triggered by continent-continent or arc- continent collision. The landlocked basin setting of the Mediterranean region provides unique opportunities to study terminal stage subduction and its consequences. We use seismic tomography results on lithosphere and upper mantle structure as a source of information on plate boundary structure, and concentrate on the lithospheric scale aspects. Combining this structural information with process-oriented numerical modelling studies and regional observations, we present a 3D model for convergent plate boundary evolution after collision, in which slab detachment and the formation of tear or STEP (Subduction-Transform-Edge-Propagator; see R. Govers and M.J.R. Wortel, EPSL, 236, 505- 523, 2005) faults are key elements. A STEP fault laterally decouples subducting lithosphere from non- subducting lithosphere in a scissor type of fashion. It enhances the ability of a slab to retreat through the mantle flow around the edge of the subducted slab. In this way collision and back-arc extension may occur in close proximity. In our study area this specifically pertains to collision along the north African margin, STEP formation in easterly direction, CCW rotation of the southern Apennines slab and the opening of the Tyrrhenian Sea. Vertical tearing of subducted lithosphere may play an important role as well, but is probably not crucial. Similar processes are likely to have occurred in the eastern Mediterranean. On the basis of the good agreement between the Mediterranean-based model and the evolution of the Tonga-Fiji region we expect that the model may shed light on other complex convergent plate boundary regions, as well. In summary: Upon continental (or arc-continent) collision, along-trench variations in lithospheric properties of the subducting lithosphere may lead to disruption and segmentation of the subduction system. Following slab detachment along limited segments of

  1. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-09-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) invites submissions to a special issue on Convergence. Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and

  2. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-09-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) invites submissions to a special issue on Convergence. Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and

  3. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-08-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) invites submissions to a special issue on Convergence. Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and

  4. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-06-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) invites submissions to a special issue on Convergence. Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and

  5. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-05-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) invites submissions to a special issue on Convergence. Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and

  6. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-04-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) invites submissions to a special issue on Convergence. Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and

  7. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-01-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence

    Guest Editors: Thomas E. Darcie, University of Victoria Robert Doverspike, AT&T Martin Zirngibl, Lucent Technologies

    Coordinating Associate Editor: Steven K. Korotky, Lucent Technologies

    The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) invites submissions to a special issue on Convergence. Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly

  8. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2004-12-01

    Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and data, video and data, private-line and virtual private-line, fixed and mobile, and local and long-haul services. These

  9. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2004-12-01

    Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and data, video and data, private-line and virtual private-line, fixed and mobile, and local and long-haul services. These

  10. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-03-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and data, video and data, private-line and virtual private-line, fixed and mobile, and local and

  11. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-02-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly within an evolved but backward-compatible SDH/SONET (synchronous digital hierarchy and synchronous optical network) multiplexing hierarchy. From this common underlying theme follow many specific instantiations. Examples include the convergence at the physical, logical, and operational levels of voice and data, video and data, private-line and virtual private-line, fixed and mobile, and local and

  12. Interplay of plate convergence and arc migration in the central Mediterranean (Sicily and Calabria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nijholt, Nicolai; Govers, Rob; Wortel, Rinus

    2016-04-01

    Key components in the current geodynamic setting of the central Mediterranean are continuous, slow Africa-Eurasia plate convergence (~5 mm/yr) and arc migration. This combination encompasses roll-back, tearing and detachment of slabs, and leads to back-arc opening and orogeny. Since ~30 Ma the Apennnines-Calabrian and Gibraltar subduction zones have shaped the western-central Mediterranean region. Lithospheric tearing near slab edges and the accompanying surface expressions (STEP faults) are key in explaining surface dynamics as observed in geologic, geophysical and geodetic data. In the central Mediterranean, both the narrow Calabrian subduction zone and the Sicily-Tyrrhenian offshore thrust front show convergence, with a transfer (shear) zone connecting the distinct SW edge of the former with the less distinct, eastern limit of the latter (similar, albeit on a smaller scale, to the situation in New Zealand with oppositely verging subduction zones and the Alpine fault as the transfer shear zone). The ~NNW-SSE oriented transfer zone (Aeolian-Sisifo-Tindari(-Ionian) fault system) shows transtensive-to-strike slip motion. Recent seismicity, geological data and GPS vectors in the central Mediterranean indicate that the region can be subdivided into several distinct domains, both on- and offshore, delineated by deformation zones and faults. However, there is discussion about the (relative) importance of some of these faults on the lithospheric scale. We focus on finding the best-fitting assembly of faults for the transfer zone connecting subduction beneath Calabria and convergence north of Sicily in the Sicily-Tyrrhenian offshore thrust front. This includes determining whether the Alfeo-Etna fault, Malta Escarpment and/or Ionian fault, which have all been suggested to represent the STEP fault of the Calabrian subduction zone, are key in describing the observed deformation patterns. We first focus on the present-day. We use geodynamic models to reproduce observed GPS

  13. Obliquely convergent plate motion and its relation with forearc sliver movement, El Salvador volcanic arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikoff, B.; DeMets, C.; Garibaldi, N.; Hernandez, W.; Hernandez, D.

    2012-12-01

    The magmatic arc in El Salvador is interpreted to result from the subduction of the Cocos plate underneath the Caribbean plate along the Middle America trench. In addition, El Salvador contains a fore-arc sliver that moves 11 mm/yr westward relative to the back-arc. Well-defined strike-slip faults along the magmatic arc accommodate forearc sliver motion, but are offset at several locations by en echelon pull-apart step-overs with abundant normal faults. All basaltic-andesitic magmatic centers (San Miguel, San Vincente, San Salvador, Santa Ana) are located within these step-overs, while the two major rhyolitic calderas (Ilopango, Coatepeque) occur directly along the strike-slip faults. There are two puzzling aspects about the strike-slip tectonism. First, a silicic, shallow magma body that intrudes the San Miguel fault zone (part of the El Salvador fault system) was emplaced syn-tectonically (sigmoidal field and magnetic foliations, subhorizontally plunging magnetic lineations and dextral shear at the microscale). Within the dextrally sheared portion of the intrusion, an obsidian band with a 40Ar/39Ar age of 7.46 Ma indicates that dextral strike-slip tectonism in the Salvadoran arc has been an ongoing process for ~7.5 Ma. This casts significant doubt on whether Cocos ridge subduction (that started ~1 Ma ago) is the cause of the ongoing forearc movement. The potentially more significant problem is that the fore-arc sliver in El Salvador moves 11 mm/yr westward relative to the back-arc despite a nearly orthogonal angle of convergence (with a convergence rate of ~77 mm/yr) near El Salvador and absence of significant frictional coupling along the subduction interface. Further, GPS indicates that the Nicaraguan and Salvadoran forearcs define a semi-rigid sliver moving at nearly the same trench-parallel rates despite along-trench changes in the subduction angle. Consequently, it is tempting to attribute the movement of both forearc slivers to Cocos ridge subduction

  14. Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darcie, Thomas E.; Doverspike, Robert; Zirngibl, Martin; Korotky, Steven K.

    2005-01-01

    Call for Papers: Convergence

    Guest Editors: Thomas E. Darcie, University of Victoria Robert Doverspike, AT&T Martin Zirngibl, Lucent Technologies

    Coordinating Associate Editor: Steven K. Korotky, Lucent Technologies

    The Journal of Optical Networking (JON) invites submissions to a special issue on Convergence. Convergence has become a popular theme in telecommunications, one that has broad implications across all segments of the industry. Continual evolution of technology and applications continues to erase lines between traditionally separate lines of business, with dramatic consequences for vendors, service providers, and consumers. Spectacular advances in all layers of optical networking-leading to abundant, dynamic, cost-effective, and reliable wide-area and local-area connections-have been essential drivers of this evolution. As services and networks continue to evolve towards some notion of convergence, the continued role of optical networks must be explored. One vision of convergence renders all information in a common packet (especially IP) format. This vision is driven by the proliferation of data services. For example, time-division multiplexed (TDM) voice becomes VoIP. Analog cable-television signals become MPEG bits streamed to digital set-top boxes. T1 or OC-N private lines migrate to Ethernet virtual private networks (VPNs). All these packets coexist peacefully within a single packet-routing methodology built on an optical transport layer that combines the flexibility and cost of data networks with telecom-grade reliability. While this vision is appealing in its simplicity and shared widely, specifics of implementation raise many challenges and differences of opinion. For example, many seek to expand the role of Ethernet in these transport networks, while massive efforts are underway to make traditional TDM networks more data friendly

  15. Effect of time-evolving age and convergence rate of the subducting plate on the Cenozoic adakites and boninites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoon-Mi; Lee, Changyeol

    2014-12-01

    Partial melting of subducting oceanic crust expressed as high-Mg volcanic rocks such as adakites and boninites has been actively studied for decades, and Lee and King (2010) reported that time-evolving subduction parameters such as the age and the subduction rate of the converging oceanic plate play important roles in transient partial melting of the subducting oceanic crust (e.g., Aleutians). However, few subduction model experiments have considered time-evolving subduction parameters, posing problems for studies of transient partial melting of subducting oceanic crust in many subduction zones. Therefore, we constructed two-dimensional kinematic-dynamic subduction models for the Izu-Bonin, Mariana, Northeast Japan, Kuril, Tonga, Java-Sunda, and Aleutian subduction zones that account for the last 50 Myr of their evolution. The models include the time-evolving age and convergence rate of the incoming oceanic plate, so the effect of time-evolving subduction parameters on transient partial melting of oceanic crust can be evaluated. Our model calculations revealed that adakites and boninites in the Izu-Bonin and Aleutian subduction zones resulted from transient partial melting of oceanic crust. However, the steady-state subduction model using current subduction parameters did not produce any partial melting of oceanic crust in the aforementioned subduction zones, indicating that time-evolving subduction parameters are crucial for modeling transient eruption of adakites and boninites. Our model calculations confirm that other geological processes such as forearc extension, back-arc opening, mantle plumes and ridge subduction are required for partial melting of the oceanic crust in the Mariana, Northeast Japan, Tonga, and southeastern Java-Sunda subduction zones.

  16. Isla del Coco, on Cocos Plate, Converges with Isla de San Andrés, on the Caribbean Plate, at 78 mm/yr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protti, M.; Gonzalez, V. M.; Freymueller, J. T.; Doelger, S.

    2013-05-01

    Isla del Coco is the only land mass of the Cocos Plate that emerges above sea level. This makes it the only place where Cocos Plate motion can be measured using Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) monitoring. Global Positioning System (GPS) observations have been carried out sporadically over more than two decades on Isla del Coco, allowing precise measurement of the motion of the Cocos Plate. Recently, in May 2011, a continuous GPS station was built and instrumented at Isla del Coco, in Wafer Bay, by OVSICORI UNA and UNAVCO, as part of the COCONet regional GNSS network. Position time series from this CGPS station (ISCO: Isla del Coco) show a steady motion of Isla del Coco at a speed of 90.9±1.5mm/yr in the N35oE direction in ITRF2008 and convergence with the Caribbean Plate at 78±1mm/yr. This result is consistent with the findings of the earliest GPS studies, and agrees within uncertainty with the estimated convergence rate of 76.4±2.6 mm/yr of the MORVEL plate motion model. MORVEL is based on an average over the last 780,000 years, and our result suggests that Cocos Caribbean plate motions have been constant over that time interval.

  17. Active NE-SW Compressional Strain Within the Arabian Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floyd, M. A.; ArRajehi, A.; King, R. W.; McClusky, S.; Reilinger, R. E.; Douad, M.; Sholan, J.; Bou-Rabee, F.

    2012-12-01

    Motion of the Arabian plate with respect to Eurasia has been remarkably steady over more than 25 Myr as revealed by comparison of geodetic and plate tectonic reconstructions (e.g., McQuarrie et al., 2003, GRL; ArRajehi et al., 2010, Tectonics). While internal plate deformation is small in comparison to the rate of Arabia-Eurasia convergence, the improved resolution of GPS observations indicate ~ NE-SW compressional strain that appears to affect much of the plate south of latitude ~ 30°N. Seven ~ NE-SW oriented inter-station baselines all indicated shortening at rates in the range of 0.5-2 mm/yr, for the most part with 1-sigma velocity uncertainties < 0.4 mm/yr. Plate-scale strain rates exceed 2×10-9/yr. The spatial distribution of strain can not be resolved from the sparse available data, but strain appears to extend at least to Riyadh, KSA, ~ 600 km west of the Zagros Fold and Thrust Belt that forms the eastern, collisional boundary of the Arabian plate with Eurasia (Iran). Geodetic velocities in the plate tectonic reference frame for Arabia, derived from magnetic anomalies in the Red Sea (Chu and Gordon, 1998, GJI), show no significant E-W motion for GPS stations located along the Red Sea coast (i.e., geodetic and plate tectonic spreading rates across the Red Sea agree within their resolution), in contrast to sites in the plate interior and along the east side of the plate that indicate east-directed motions. In addition, NE-SW contraction is roughly normal to ~ N-S striking major structural folds in the sedimentary rocks within the Arabian Platform. These relationships suggest that geodetically observed contraction has characterized the plate for at least the past ~ 3 Myr. Broad-scale contraction of the Arabian plate seems intuitively reasonable given that the east and north sides of the plate are dominated by active continental collision (Zagros, E Turkey/Caucasus) while the west and south sides are bordered by mid-ocean ridge spreading (Red Sea and Gulf of

  18. Quantitative assessment of growth plate activity

    SciTech Connect

    Harcke, H.T.; Macy, N.J.; Mandell, G.A.; MacEwen, G.D.

    1984-01-01

    In the immature skeleton the physis or growth plate is the area of bone least able to withstand external forces and is therefore prone to trauma. Such trauma often leads to premature closure of the plate and results in limb shortening and/or angular deformity (varus or valgus). Active localization of bone seeking tracers in the physis makes bone scintigraphy an excellent method for assessing growth plate physiology. To be most effective, however, physeal activity should be quantified so that serial evaluations are accurate and comparable. The authors have developed a quantitative method for assessing physeal activity and have applied it ot the hip and knee. Using computer acquired pinhole images of the abnormal and contralateral normal joints, ten regions of interest are placed at key locations around each joint and comparative ratios are generated to form a growth plate profile. The ratios compare segmental physeal activity to total growth plate activity on both ipsilateral and contralateral sides and to adjacent bone. In 25 patients, ages 2 to 15 years, with angular deformities of the legs secondary to trauma, Blount's disease, and Perthes disease, this technique is able to differentiate abnormal segmental physeal activity. This is important since plate closure does not usually occur uniformly across the physis. The technique may permit the use of scintigraphy in the prediction of early closure through the quantitative analysis of serial studies.

  19. Links between crustal melting, plate boundary forces, and syn-convergent exhumation in the Sierras Pampeanas, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulcahy, S. R.; Roeske, S.; McClelland, W.; Jourdan, F.; Renne, P. R.; Vervoort, J. D.; Vujovich, G. I.

    2011-12-01

    Transitions from convergence to extension during an orogenic cycle result from the dynamic interaction between plate bounding forces, the thermal and rheologic evolution of the lithosphere, and contrasts in gravitational potential energy within an orogen. The presence of melt in the middle and lower crust, in particular, exerts a profound effect on the rheology of orogenic belts and in facilitating a change from convergence to extension and orogenic collapse. Determining whether or not melting was as an effective driving mechanism of extension within a given orogen requires accurately constraining the timing and duration of melting in the crust with respect to plate convergence, crustal thickening, and lithospheric extension. The Sierras Pampeanas of northwest Argentina record the transition from a Cambrian convergent margin to an Ordovician collisional orogen with the accretion of the allochthonous Precordillera terrane. Regional convergence associated with Famatina arc magmatism initiated as a result of east dipping subduction by ˜515-495 Ma and the majority of arc magmatism occurred from ˜485 to 465 Ma. Initial collision of the Precordillera terrane with the Famatina arc margin began by ~470 Ma and the terrane had fully collided by the Late Ordovician (˜458-449 Ma). Syn-convergent extension within the Sierra de Pie de Palo initiated at middle to lower crustal depths at ~436 Ma and continued through ~417 Ma. We present new U-Pb zircon and sphene, Lu-Hf garnet, and 40Ar/39Ar amphibole and mica ages and thermobarometry from lower crustal granulite facies migmatites of the Loma de Las Charcas. These data, coupled with existing regional isotopic ages and one-dimensional thermal modeling, suggest that: 1) regional peak granulite facies metamorphism occurred at ~465 Ma with near isothermal temperatures of ~850° C from ~5-12 kb within the Famatina arc; 2) Ordovician melts remained at temperatures above their solidus for 20-30 million years following peak granulite

  20. The behavior of a convergent plate boundary - Crustal deformation in the South Kanto district, Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholz, C. H.; Kato, T.

    1978-01-01

    The northwesternmost part of the Sagami trough, a part of the Philippine Sea-Eurasian plate boundary, was ruptured during the great South Kanto earthquake in 1923. Very extensive and frequent geodetic measurements of crustal deformation have been made in the South Kanto district since the 1890's, and these constitute the most complete data set on crustal movements in the world. These data were reanalyzed and interpreted and according to our interpretation indicate the following sequence of events. The coseismic movements were due to oblique thrust and right lateral slip of about 8 m on a fault outcropping at the base of the Sagami trough. This was followed by postseismic deformation resulting from reversed afterslip of 20-60 cm that occurred at an exponentially decaying rate in time. The interseismic deformation is produced by steady subduction at a rate of about 1.8 cm/yr. During subduction the top 10-15 km of the plate boundary is apparently locked, while deeper parts slip aseismically at an irregular rate. No significant precursory deformation was observed. The recurrence time for 1923 type earthquakes is 200-300 years. The Boso and Miura peninsulas are broken into a series of fault-bound blocks that move semi-independently of the surrounding region. The subduction zone itself, where it is exposed on land, is shown to be a wide zone encompassing several faults that are active at different times.

  1. Upper Plate Tectonics and Fluid Flow Along the Middle America Convergent Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huguen, C.; Ranero, C. R.; Weinrebe, W.; Sahling, H.; Borhmann, G.; Klaucke, I.

    2002-12-01

    We present new multibeam bathymetry, side scan sonar, sub-bottom profiling, deep towed video camera images and sampling from active structures related to tectonics and fluid flow at the overriding plate of the Middle America subduction zone. Data were collected during SONNE 163-1 cruise at key locations based on full bathymetric coverage of the margin with a ~ 100 m grid. We surveyed normal faults along the middle-upper continental slope and associated mounds. Also, the locus of seamount subduction was investigated. The new bathymetry has been gridded at ~ 25 m. Deep towed side scan sonar data have a resolution of ~ 1 m. Subbottom high resolution profiling images the upper ~ 100 m of slope sediment. Deep towed camera observations and sampling were used to ground truth the geophysical data. The canyon system present in the upper slope terminates abruptly at the ~ mid slope where normal faulting develops. Roughly coincident with the faulting development, groups of small mounds (few 100s m to 1 km long and < 100 m to 150 m high) occur along the upper-middle slope. These mounds, previously interpreted as mud volcanoes, do not show evidence of mud flows in the side scan data. Deep towed camera and dredging at numerous locations indicate that the surface of the mounds is made of chemoherm carbonates that yield a characteristic high reflectivity in back scatter images. The mounds seem to be areas of fluid discharge and chemosynthetic fauna was observed locally in all of the structures investigated. The mounds are spatially coincident and may be associated to the development of the faults. Their fate may also be related to the faulting: mounds disappear downslope as the fault throw increases. Data from the areas of active seamount subduction show clear evidence for recent/ongoing tectonism at the uplifted overriding plate. The largest deformation occurs at the summit of the uplift and at the trail of the seamount where sliding and slumping are active. Areas of the summit

  2. Improved Convergence for Two-Component Activity Expansions

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, H E; Rogers, F J; Sonnad, V

    2007-03-06

    It is well known that an activity expansion of the grand canonical partition function works well for attractive interactions, but works poorly for repulsive interactions, such as occur between atoms and molecules. The virial expansion of the canonical partition function shows just the opposite behavior. This poses a problem for applications that involve both types of interactions, such as occur in the outer layers of low-mass stars. We show that it is possible to obtain expansions for repulsive systems that convert the poorly performing Mayer activity expansion into a series of rational polynomials that converge uniformly to the virial expansion. In the current work we limit our discussion to the second virial approximation. In contrast to the Mayer activity expansion the activity expansion presented herein converges for both attractive and repulsive systems.

  3. A model of convergent plate margins based on the recent tectonics of Shikoku, Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bischke, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    A viscoelastic finite element plate tectonic model is applied to displacement data for the island of Shikoku, Japan. The flow properties and geometry of the upper portions of the earth are assumed known from geophysical evidence, and the loading characteristics are determined from the model. The nature of the forces acting on the Philippine Sea plate, particularly in the vicinity of the Nankai trough, is determined. Seismic displacement data related to the 1946 Nankaido earthquake are modeled in terms of a thick elastic plate overlying a fluidlike substratum. The sequence of preseismic and seismic displacements can be explained in terms of two independent processes operating on elastic lithospheric plates: a strain accumulation process caused by vertical downward forces acting on or within the lithosphere in the vicinity of the trench, and a strain release process caused by plate failure along a preexisting zone on weakness. This is a restatement of Reid's elastic rebound theory in terms of elastic lithospheric plates.

  4. Geodynamics of flat-slab subduction, sedimentary basin development, and hydrocarbon systems along the southern Alaska convergent plate margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finzel, Emily S.

    Combining field-based geologic studies and numerical modeling provides a robust tool for evaluating the geodynamics of convergent margins. Southern Alaska is arguably the most tectonically active part of the convergent margin of western North America. This conceptual approach has been used to interpret the modern basin dynamics, as well as key stages in the Cenozoic development of this region, including spreading-ridge and flat-slab subduction. New macrofossil, palynological, and lithostratigraphic data for the Bear Lake Formation in the Bristol Bay retroarc basin allow us to construct the first chronostratigraphic framework for this formation, and indicate deposition during Middle and Late Miocene time in a regional transgressive estuarine depositional system. In the Cook Inlet forearc basin, new detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology, rare earth element geochemistry, and clast compositional data from middle Eocene-Pliocene strata demonstrate the importance of sediment sources located in the retroarc region and along strike within the basin. The Yakutat microplate has recently been reinterpreted to represent buoyant crust that is presently subducting at a shallow angle beneath southern Alaska. Integration of stratigraphic, geochronologic, and thermochronologic data indicate that in the flat-slab region, exhumation initiated ca. 43 Ma and migrated inboard, magmatism ceased at ca. 32 Ma, and deposition in sedimentary basins ended by ca. 23 Ma. Sedimentary basins positioned along the western and northern perimeter of the flat-slab region record enhanced subsidence and sediment delivery from the flat-slab region beginning in late Oligocene and middle Miocene time respectively. The discrete contributions of unique driving forces for lithospheric deformation in western Canada and Alaska have not been quantified in detail, so their relative role in influencing deformation has remained unresolved. Using finite element models, we calculate a continuous strain rate and velocity

  5. Fluid budgets at convergent plate margins: Implications for the extent and duration of fault-zone dilation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saffer, D.M.; Bekins, B.A.

    1999-01-01

    Faults at convergent plate boundaries are important conduits for fluid escape, and recent evidence suggests that fluid expulsion along them is both transient and heterogeneous. For the Nankai and Barbados convergent margins, we have used numerical models to investigate the long-term partitioning of expelled fluids between diffuse flow and flow along connected high-permeability fault conduits. For a simple case of spatial heterogeneity, we estimated the extent of high-permeability conduits necessary to maintain a balance between incoming and expelled fluids. For the case of transient expulsion, we constrained the duration of elevated permeability required to balance the fluid budgets. Comparison of modeled and observed geochemical profiles suggests that the initiation of connected flow conduits is delayed with respect to the time of accretion into each accretionary complex and may be related to burial below a critical depth, either where the overlying wedge is sufficiently thick to prevent fluid escape to the sea floor or where sediments behave brittlely.

  6. The giant coastal landslides of Northern Chile: Tectonic and climate interactions on a classic convergent plate margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mather, Anne E.; Hartley, Adrian J.; Griffiths, James S.

    2014-02-01

    Documented for the first time are an extensive suite of late Neogene giant terrestrial coastal landslides along the classic convergent margin of western South America (18° to 24° south). These are remarkable in terms of their unusual abundance and atypical setting, such failures previously being linked with oceanic volcanic edifices or over-steepened glaciated coastlines. Located within the hyper-arid Coastal Cordillera of the Atacama Desert of Northern Chile we report the presence of more than 60 individual large-scale landslides with individual volumes up to 9 km3 developed over a horizontal coastline distance of some 650 km. These landslides were emplaced as a combination of rock avalanches and multiple rotational failures. The majority terminated directly into the Pacific - likely generating significant tsunami hazard to the Chilean and south Peruvian coastline in a region which is today considered to be part of a notorious seismic gap. The proliferation and scale of these Late Neogene giant landslides in this actively uplifting, hyperarid terrain suggests they are the main geomorphic agent for relief reduction, probably triggered by megathrust earthquakes and potentially providing a unique palaeoseismic archive. The temporal and spatial distribution of these giant landslides corresponds with a period of surface steepening of the forearc wedge in the Central Andes and south to north differential uplift associated with factors such as aseismic ridge subduction. The resulting surface gradient increases, combined with the persistent climatic aridity of the region, have served to limit effective relief-reducing geomorphic processes in this oversteepened terrain to large-scale landsliding. The phenomena documented here geospatially link previously recognised large-scale slope failures from the off-shore environment and higher altitude areas of the Andean forearc, suggesting that large-scale landsliding is capable of transferring sediment on a regional scale to the

  7. Late Miocene to recent plate tectonic history of the southern Central America convergent margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morell, Kristin D.

    2015-10-01

    New plate reconstructions constrain the tectonic evolution of the subducting Cocos and Nazca plates across the southern Central American subduction zone from late Miocene to recent. Because of the strong relationships between lower and upper (Caribbean) plate dynamics along this margin, these constraints have wide-ranging implications for the timing and growth of upper plate deformation and volcanism in southern Central America. The reconstructions outline three important events in the Neogene history of this margin: (1) the coeval development of the Panama Triple Junction with the initiation of oblique subduction of the Nazca plate at ˜8.5 Ma; (2) the initiation of seamount and rough crust subduction beginning at ˜3-4 Ma; and (3) Cocos Ridge subduction from ˜2 to 3 Ma. A comparison of these events with independent geologic, geomorphic, volcanic, and stratigraphic data sets reveals that the timing, rates, and origin of subducting crust directly impacted the Neogene growth of upper plate deformation and volcanism in southern Central America. These analyses constrain the timing, geometry, and causes of a number of significant tectonic and volcanic processes, including rapid Plio-Quaternary arc-fore arc contraction due to Cocos Ridge subduction, the detachment of the Panama microplate at ˜1-3 Ma, and the late Miocene cessation of mantle-wedge-derived volcanism across ˜300 km of the subduction zone.

  8. Late Neogene geohistory analysis of the Humboldt Basin and its relationship to convergence of the Juan de Fuca Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrory, Patricia A.

    1989-03-01

    Geohistory analysis of Neogene Humboldt basin strata provides important constraints for hypotheses of the tectonic evolution of the southern Cascadia subduction margin, leading up to the arrival of the Mendocino triple junction. This analysis suggests that the tectonic evolution of the Humboldt basin area was dominated by coupling between the downgoing Juan de Fuca plate and the continental margin. This coupling is reflected in the timing of major hiatuses within the basin sedimentary sequence and margin uplift and subsidence which occur during periods of tectonic plate adjustment. Stratigraphic evidence indicates that Humboldt basin originated at the base of the continental slope in early Miocene time. Syndepositional uplift of basin strata began in the late Pliocene and was both thermal isostatic and tectonic in origin. Isostatic uplift was a function of an increasingly more buoyant slab being subducted, whereas tectonic uplift was due to imbricated thrusting of the accretionary complex and underplating of offscraped sediment during subduction. A component of margin uplift is postulated to have been caused by a change in the rate of convergence between the Juan de Fuca and North American plates. Coeval with late Pliocene uplift documented onshore was a sharp decrease in covergence rate ˜3 Ma. A reduction in rate of tectonic uplift, observed in the Eel River section, in early Pleistocene time was coeval with a marked increase in relative motion parallel to the continental margin. This localized subsidence may have been caused by syndepositional folding.

  9. Long-offset and multi-fold ocean bottom seismographic survey for imaging lithospheric scale structures in plate convergent margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodaira, S.; Takahashi, N.; Nakanishi, A.; Fujie, G.; Ito, A.; Miura, S.; Sato, T.; Tsuru, T.; Park, J.; Kaneda, Y.

    2005-05-01

    Recent availability of a large number of ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs), a large volume of air-gun array and a long streamer cable for academics provide several new findings of lithospheric scale structures in plate convergent margins. Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) has acquired long-offset seismic data using a super-densely deploy OBS (i.e. 1 - 5 km spacing OBSs along 100 - 500 km long profiles) since 1999. Long-offset multichannel seismic (MCS) data by a two-ship experiment, as well as conventional 2D MCS data, have been also acquired at a part of the profiles. Some of those profiles have been designed as combined onshore - offshore profiles for imaging a land-ocean transition zone. In a plate convergent margin, an oceanic plate subducts deep into a lithosphere and an island arc crust grows due to an accretion of melts welling up from subducted materials. Our obtained long-offset and multi-fold seismic data successfully provide fine images of subducting and overriding plates, which had not been imaged by conventional type of wide-angle seismic survey, in those complicated tectonic setting. One of the most striking findings is an image of several scales of subducted seamounts/ridges in the Nankai trough seismogenic zone, the SW Japan. We detected the subducted seamount/ridges, which are 50 - 100 km wide, distributing from near trough axis to ~ 40 km deep beneath the Japanese island. An important aspect, from a point of view of a geodynamic process, those structures are strongly correlated with slip zones of magnitude 8-class earthquakes, i.e.; subducted seamounts/ridge control the rupture propagations. We have also acquired very long offset seismic data (more than 500 km long) along and across the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) subduction zone in which ongoing crustal accretion process is proposed. Although the data is still processing, we expect, from our data, new and important information for the crustal accretion process at the IBM

  10. Actively controlling coolant-cooled cold plate configuration

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Parida, Pritish R.

    2016-04-26

    Cooling apparatuses are provided to facilitate active control of thermal and fluid dynamic performance of a coolant-cooled cold plate. The cooling apparatus includes the cold plate and a controller. The cold plate couples to one or more electronic components to be cooled, and includes an adjustable physical configuration. The controller dynamically varies the adjustable physical configuration of the cold plate based on a monitored variable associated with the cold plate or the electronic component(s) being cooled by the cold plate. By dynamically varying the physical configuration, the thermal and fluid dynamic performance of the cold plate are adjusted to, for example, optimally cool the electronic component(s), and at the same time, reduce cooling power consumption used in cooling the electronic component(s). The physical configuration can be adjusted by providing one or more adjustable plates within the cold plate, the positioning of which may be adjusted based on the monitored variable.

  11. Focal Mechanisms at the convergent plate boundary in Southern Aegean, Greece.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshou, Alexandra; Papadimitriou, Eleftheria; Drakatos, George; Evangelidis, Christos; Karakostas, Vasilios; Vallianatos, Filippos; Makropoulos, Konstantinos

    2014-05-01

    Greece is characterized by high seismicity, mainly due to the collision between the European and the African lithospheric plates and the dextral strike slip motion along the North Anatolia Fault zone and North Aegean Trough. The subduction of the Eastern Mediterranean oceanic plate along the Hellenic Arc under the Aegean microplate along with the accompanied roll back of the descending slab is considered the main tectonic feature of the region (Papazachos and Comninakis 1971; Makropoulos and Burton 1984; Papazachos et al. 2000a, b). The divergent motion between the Aegean block and mainland Europe is indicated by an extension zone in the northern Aegean, with Crete and Aegean diverging from mainland Europe at a rate of about 3.5 cm yr-1 with Africa moving northward relative to Europe at a rate of about 1 cm yr-1 (Dewey et al., 1989; Papazachos et al., 1998; Mc-Clusky et al., 2000; Reilinger et al., 2006). In this tectonically complicated area diverge types of deformation are manifested, in addition to the dominant subduction processes. Aiming to shed more light in the seismotectonic properties and faulting seismological data from the Hellenic Unified Seismological Network (HUSN) were selected and analyzed for determining focal mechanisms using the method of moment tensor inversion, additional to the ones being available from the routine moment tensor solutions and several publications. Thus, 31 new fault plane solutions for events with magnitude M>4.0, are presented in this study, by using the software of Ammon (Randall et al., 1995). For this scope the data from at least 4 stations were used with an adequate azimuthal coverage and with an epicentral distance not more than 350 km. The preparation of the data includes the deconvolution of instruments response, then the velocity was integrated to displacement and finally the horizontal components were rotated to radial and transverse. Following, the signal was inverted using the reflectivity method of Kennett (1983

  12. Crustal deformation and volcanism at active plate boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geirsson, Halldor

    Most of Earth's volcanoes are located near active tectonic plate boundaries, where the tectonic plates move relative to each other resulting in deformation. Likewise, subsurface magma movement and pressure changes in magmatic systems can cause measurable deformation of the Earth's surface. The study of the shape of Earth and therefore studies of surface deformation is called geodesy. Modern geodetic techniques allow precise measurements (˜1 mm accuracy) of deformation of tectonic and magmatic systems. Because of the spatial correlation between tectonic boundaries and volcanism, the tectonic and volcanic deformation signals can become intertwined. Thus it is often important to study both tectonic and volcanic deformation processes simultaneously, when one is trying to study one of the systems individually. In this thesis, I present research on crustal deformation and magmatic processes at active plate boundaries. The study areas cover divergent and transform plate boundaries in south Iceland and convergent and transform plate boundaries in Central America, specifically Nicaragua and El Salvador. The study is composed of four main chapters: two of the chapters focus on the magma plumbing system of Hekla volcano, Iceland and the plate boundary in south Iceland; one chapter focuses on shallow controls of explosive volcanism at Telica volcano, Nicaragua; and the fourth chapter focuses on co- and post-seismic deformation from a Mw = 7.3 earthquake which occurred offshore El Salvador in 2012. Hekla volcano is located at the intersection of a transform zone and a rift zone in Iceland and thus is affected by a combination of shear and extensional strains, in addition to co-seismic and co-rifting deformation. The inter-eruptive deformation signal from Hekla is subtle, as observed by a decade (2000-2010) of GPS data in south Iceland. A simultaneous inversion of this data for parameters describing the geometry and source characteristics of the magma chamber at Hekla, and

  13. Active Wave Propagation and Sensing in Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghoshal, Anindya; Martin, William N.; Sundaresan, Mannur J.; Schulz, Mark J.; Ferguson, Frederick

    2001-01-01

    Health monitoring of aerospace structures can be done using an active interrogation approach with diagnostic Lamb waves. Piezoelectric patches are often used to generate the waves, and it is helpful to understand how these waves propagate through a structure. To give a basic understanding of the actual physical process of wave propagation, a model is developed to simulate asymmetric wave propagation in a panel and to produce a movie of the wave motion. The waves can be generated using piezoceramic patches of any size or shape. The propagation, reflection, and interference of the waves are represented in the model. Measuring the wave propagation is the second important aspect of damage detection. Continuous sensors are useful for measuring waves because of the distributed nature of the sensor and the wave. Two sensor designs are modeled, and their effectiveness in measuring acoustic waves is studied. The simulation model developed is useful to understand wave propagation and to optimize the type of sensors that might be used for health monitoring of plate-like structures.

  14. Actively controlling coolant-cooled cold plate configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Parida, Pritish R.

    2015-07-28

    A method is provided to facilitate active control of thermal and fluid dynamic performance of a coolant-cooled cold plate. The method includes: monitoring a variable associated with at least one of the coolant-cooled cold plate or one or more electronic components being cooled by the cold plate; and dynamically varying, based on the monitored variable, a physical configuration of the cold plate. By dynamically varying the physical configuration, the thermal and fluid dynamic performance of the cold plate are adjusted to, for example, optimally cool the one or more electronic components, and at the same time, reduce cooling power consumption used in cooling the electronic component(s). The physical configuration can be adjusted by providing one or more adjustable plates within the coolant-cooled cold plate, the positioning of which may be adjusted based on the monitored variable.

  15. Thrace basin: An extensional Tertiary sedimentary basin in an area of major plate convergences, northwest Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Turgut, S.; Atalik, E.

    1988-08-01

    The Thrace basin forms one of the largest Tertiary basins in Turkey. Paleontological and sedimentological evidence suggests sedimentation and basin formation commenced by a major transgression from the southwest in the middle to late middle Eocene. The basin formed over an extremely deformed crustal block. It straddles an Upper Cretaceous suture zone which later became a major mobile belt in Turkey. Syndepositional fault patterns and sedimentary thickness indicate the basin was evolved tectonically by north-south extension. Large listric normal faults and east-west depositional axis are evidence of this extension. Early marine sedimentation in the basin was accompanied by an intense volcanism which poured large quantities of ash into the depositional environment. Normal basement faults were active and great thicknesses of clastic sediments accumulated along faults. Reefal to shallow marine carbonates were deposited on shelves and over intrabasinal paleohighs. Sedimentation became regressive in the early Oligocene. Alternation of marine and nonmarine clastic deposition continued without interruption until the end of the Oligocene. By the late Oligocene to early Miocene, the whole basin was subjected to intense tectonism that caused uplift and faulting. Seismic reflection profiles reveal a very complex tectonic style in the basin. Fault-related inversion and flowage structures involving shale diapirism are quite common. Eocene and Oligocene shales are mature enough to generate economical quantities of hydrocarbons. Their source quality is fair to poor. Sand bodies in the Eocene-Oligocene series and reefal carbonates form the reservoir facies, and they are targets for exploration.

  16. The Influence of Climate Change in Active Convergent Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarselli, S.; Simpson, G. H.; Allen, P. A.; Minelli, G.

    2006-12-01

    The link between tectonics, surface erosion, and climate in the evolution of mountain belts has been observed in several natural systems (Sinclair & Allen, 1992; Norris & Cooper, 1997; Pavlis et al., 1997; Willett et al., 2006) and numerous theoretical and applied studies have been carried out in the last several years ( Willett et al., 2002; Simpson, 2004 a, c). This relation is particularly sensitive in active convergent orogenic wedges where the efficiency of surface mass transport and climatic change controls the spatial distribution of deformation and sedimentation and degree of crustal thickening (Beaumont et al., 1992; Willett, 1999; Simpson, 2006). This study focus on the effect of climatic changes, leading to palaeogeographic changes, in an active convergent system. In particular, the effects produced by relative sea-level changes and efficiency of the erosional processes have been tested using a two dimensional mechanical model (Simpson, 2006). The model is suited to study deformation, erosion and sedimentation in fold-thrust belts and foreland basins. Two effects of the relative sea-level changes, and in particular in the case of the relative sea-level drop occurring during deformation, can be potentially important for the mechanical behavior of the surrounding crust. Firstly, gravitational water loads above the deforming rocks could be decreased. Secondly, the replacement of submarine with subaerial conditions could probably increase erosion rates, especially within the river system. Both effects would tend to amplify local deformation rates leading to a major pulse of deformation (Simpson, 2006) and to the formation of complex three dimensional deformation patterns (Simpson, 2004). Finally, this model has been used to evaluate the effect of the Messinian salinity crisis in the Mediterranean basin and in particular in the Northern Apennines evolution (Italy). References: Beaumont, C.; Fullsack, P. & Hamilton J., (1992). In: Thrust Tectonics (Ed by K

  17. Summary of the stratigraphy and structural elements related to plate convergence of the Quetta-Muslim Bagh-Sibi region, Balochistan, west-central Pakistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maldonado, Florian; Mengal, Jan M.; Khan, Shahid H.; Warwick, Peter D.

    2011-01-01

    The four major faults that bound the structural terrane are the Frontal (F), Ghazaband-Zhob (GZ), Gwal-Bagh (GB), and Chaman (C) faults. Four major periods of deformation are recognized: (1) emplacement of ophiolitic rocks onto the continental margin of the India plate; (2) convergence of the India-Eurasia plates; (3) deposition of Tertiary-Quaternary molasse units followed by major folding and thrusting, and formation of strike-slip faults; and (4) deposition of Pleistocene molasse units with subsequent folding, thrusting, and strike-slip motion that continues to the present.

  18. Late Cretaceous to Present evolution of the NW Africa peri-cratonic in the Africa-Eurasia plate convergence context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorbal, B.; Bertotti, G.; Andriessen, P. A. M.

    2009-04-01

    Africa-Eurasia plate convergence is the main mechanism to explain topographic evolution and patterns of Tertiary vertical motions recorded around the entire Mediterranean and even further east. However, most of the studies are concentrated on the Eurasian side of the Mediterranean Realm. Along the NW Africa pericratonic zone (western Mediterranean side) extending longitudinally from the Anti-Atlas to the Rif Mountains, the highest topography is observed in the High Atlas intracontinental belt and in the Pan-African Anti-Atlas belt, and not in the youngest belt, the Rif. The combination of AFT and (U-Th)/He low-thermal dating, performed on pre-Cenozoic basement rocks along the Moroccan pericratonic transect (500km) yield ages ranging respectively between 90-9Ma and 65-7Ma, documenting vertical motions of subsidence and exhumation in between Late Cretaceous and Present. Time-Temperature models show that vertical movements are spatially zoned through Morocco, with the highest amplitude of vertical movements in the High Atlas (>4-5km) and more modest amounts in the Anti-Atlas and the Western Meseta (<2.5km) from Late Cretaceous onward. Precious information provided by the AFT and AHe ages indicates that the entire NW African peri-cratonic zone including the Western Meseta and the Anti-Atlas in addition to the Atlas and the Rif systems experienced Tertiary deformation. Two stages of folding are distinguished on the basis of low-thermal dating results along the pericratonic transect. The first is a lithospherical folding of ~500km in the Late Cretaceous (confirming that this process is a primary response to recently induced compressional stress fields) and the second is a crustal folding of ~100-150km wavelength in the Late Eocene that occurred independently to the mantle, requiring therefore the existence of a decoupling in between the base of the crust and the high mantle.

  19. Active faults and minor plates in NE Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhurin, Andrey I.; Zelenin, Egor A.

    2014-05-01

    Stated nearly 40 yr ago the uncertainty with plate boundaries location in NE Asia (Chapman, Solomon, 1976) still remains unresolved. Based on the prepositions that a plate boundary must, first, reveal itself in linear sets of active structures, and, second, be continuous and closed, we have undertaken interpretation of medium-resolution KH-9 Hexagon satellite imageries, mostly in stereoscopic regime, for nearly the entire region of NE Asia. Main findings are as follows. There are two major active fault zones in the region north of the Bering Sea. One of them, the Khatyrka-Vyvenka zone, stretches NE to ENE skirting the Bering Sea from the Kamchatka isthmus to the Navarin Cape. Judging by the kinematics of the Olyutorsky 2006 earthquake fault, the fault zones move both right-laterally and reversely. The second active fault zone, the Lankovaya-Omolon zone, starts close to the NE margin of the Okhotsk Sea and extends NE up to nearly the margin of the Chukcha Sea. The fault zone is mostly right-lateral, with topographically expressed cumulative horizontal offsets amounting to 2.5-2.6 km. There may be a third NE-SW zone between the major two coinciding with the Penzhina Range as several active faults found in the southern termination of the Range indicate. The two active fault zones divide the NE Asia area into two large domains, which both could be parts of the Bering Sea plate internally broken and with uncertain western limit. Another variant implies the Khatyrka-Vyvenka zone as the Bering Sea plate northern limit, and the Lankovaya-Omolon zone as separating an additional minor plate from the North-American plate. The choice is actually not crucial, and more important is that both variants leave the question of where the Bering Sea plate boundary is in Alaska. The Lankovaya-Omolon zone stretches just across the proposed northern boundary of the Okhorsk Sea plate. NW of the zone, there is a prominent left-lateral Ulakhan fault, which is commonly interpreted to be a

  20. Investigating the deformation of upper crustal faults at the N-Chilean convergent plate boundary at different scales using high-resolution topography datasets and creepmeter measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewiak, O.; Victor, P.; Ziegenhagen, T.; Oncken, O.

    2012-04-01

    The Chilean convergent plate boundary is one of the tectonically most active regions on earth and prone to large megathrust earthquakes as e. g. the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake which ruptured a mature seismic gap in south-central Chile. In northern Chile historical data suggests the existence of a seismic gap between Arica and Mejillones Peninsula (MP), which has not ruptured since 1877. Further south, the 1995 Mw 8.0 Antofagasta earthquake ruptured the subduction interface between MP and Taltal. In this study we investigate the deformation at four active upper plate faults (dip-slip and strike-slip) located above the coupling zone of the subduction interface. The target faults (Mejillones Fault - MF, Salar del Carmen Fault - SCF, Cerro Fortuna Fault - CFF, Chomache Fault - CF) are situated in forearc segments, which are in different stages of the megathrust seismic cycle. The main question of this study is how strain is accumulated in the overriding plate, what is the response of the target faults to the megathrust seismic cycle and what are the mechanisms / processes involved. The hyper arid conditions of the Atacama desert and the extremely low erosion rates enable us to investigate geomorphic markers, e .g. fault scarps and knickpoints, which serve as a record for upper crustal deformation and fault activity about ten thousands years into the past. Fault scarp data has been acquired with Differential-GPS by measuring high-resolution topographic profiles perpendicular to the fault scarps and along incised gullies. The topographic data show clear variations between the target faults which possibly result from their position within the forearc. The surveyed faults, e. g. the SCF, exhibit clear along strike variations in the morphology of surface ruptures attributed to seismic events and can be subdivided into individual segments. The data allows us to distinguish single, composite and multiple fault scarps and thus to detect differences in fault growth initiated

  1. An optimal approach to active damping of nonlinear vibrations in composite plates using piezoelectric patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saviz, M. R.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper a nonlinear approach to studying the vibration characteristic of laminated composite plate with surface-bonded piezoelectric layer/patch is formulated, based on the Green Lagrange type of strain-displacements relations, by incorporating higher-order terms arising from nonlinear relations of kinematics into mathematical formulations. The equations of motion are obtained through the energy method, based on Lagrange equations and by using higher-order shear deformation theories with von Karman-type nonlinearities, so that transverse shear strains vanish at the top and bottom surfaces of the plate. An isoparametric finite element model is provided to model the nonlinear dynamics of the smart plate with piezoelectric layer/ patch. Different boundary conditions are investigated. Optimal locations of piezoelectric patches are found using a genetic algorithm to maximize spatial controllability/observability and considering the effect of residual modes to reduce spillover effect. Active attenuation of vibration of laminated composite plate is achieved through an optimal control law with inequality constraint, which is related to the maximum and minimum values of allowable voltage in the piezoelectric elements. To keep the voltages of actuator pairs in an allowable limit, the Pontryagin’s minimum principle is implemented in a system with multi-inequality constraint of control inputs. The results are compared with similar ones, proving the accuracy of the model especially for the structures undergoing large deformations. The convergence is studied and nonlinear frequencies are obtained for different thickness ratios. The structural coupling between plate and piezoelectric actuators is analyzed. Some examples with new features are presented, indicating that the piezo-patches significantly improve the damping characteristics of the plate for suppressing the geometrically nonlinear transient vibrations.

  2. Study provides data on active plate tectonics in southeast Asia region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, P.; Rais, J.; Reigber, Ch.; Reinhart, E.; Ambrosius, B. A. C.; Le Pichon, X.; Kasser, M.; Suharto, P.; Majid, Dato'Abdul; Yaakub, Dato'Paduka Awang Haji Othman Bin Haji; Almeda, R.; Boonphakdee, C.

    A major geodynamic study has provided significant new information about the location of active plate boundaries in and around Southeast Asia, as well as deformation processes in the Sulawesi region of Indonesia and tectonic activity in the Philippine archipelago. Results also have confirmed the existence of the so-called Sunda Block, which appears to be rotating with respect to adjacent plates.The study, known as the Geodynamics of South and South-East Asia (GEODYSSEA) project, has been a joint venture of the European Commission and the Association of South- East Asian Nations. It began in 1991 and involved a large team of European and Asian scientists and technicians studying the complex geodynamic processes and natural hazards of the region from the Southeast Asia mainland to the Philippines to northern Australia. Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, tsunamis, and tectonically induced landslides endanger the lives of millions of people in the region, and the tectonic activity behind these natural hazards results from the convergence and collision of the Eurasian, Philippine, and Indo-Australian Plates at relative velocities of up to 10 cm per year.

  3. The seismicity of Ethiopia; active plate tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mohr, P.

    1981-01-01

    Ethiopia, descended from the semimythical Kingdom of Punt, lies at the strategic intersection of Schmidt's jigsaw puzzle where the Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, and the African Rift System meet. Because of geologically recent uplift combined with rapid downcutting erosion by rivers, notably the Blue Nile (Abbay), Ethiopia is the most mountainous country in Africa. It is also the most volcanically active, while its historical seismicity matches that of the midocean ridges. And, in a sense, Ethiopia is host to an evoloving ocean ridge system. 

  4. WGEF activates Rho in the Wnt–PCP pathway and controls convergent extension in Xenopus gastrulation

    PubMed Central

    Tanegashima, Kosuke; Zhao, Hui; Dawid, Igor B

    2008-01-01

    The Wnt–PCP (planar cell polarity, PCP) pathway regulates cell polarity and convergent extension movements during axis formation in vertebrates by activation of Rho and Rac, leading to the re-organization of the actin cytoskeleton. Rho and Rac activation require guanine nucleotide-exchange factors (GEFs), but the identity of the GEF involved in Wnt–PCP-mediated convergent extension is unknown. Here we report the identification of the weak-similarity GEF (WGEF) gene by a microarray-based screen for notochord enriched genes, and show that WGEF is involved in Wnt-regulated convergent extension. Overexpression of WGEF activated RhoA and rescued the suppression of convergent extension by dominant-negative Wnt-11, whereas depletion of WGEF led to suppression of convergent extension that could be rescued by RhoA or Rho-associated kinase activation. WGEF protein preferentially localized at the plasma membrane, and Frizzled-7 induced colocalization of Dishevelled and WGEF. WGEF protein can bind to Dishevelled and Daam-1, and deletion of the Dishevelled-binding domain generates a hyperactive from of WGEF. These results indicate that WGEF is a component of the Wnt–PCP pathway that connects Dishevelled to Rho activation. PMID:18256687

  5. WGEF activates Rho in the Wnt-PCP pathway and controls convergent extension in Xenopus gastrulation.

    PubMed

    Tanegashima, Kosuke; Zhao, Hui; Dawid, Igor B

    2008-02-20

    The Wnt-PCP (planar cell polarity, PCP) pathway regulates cell polarity and convergent extension movements during axis formation in vertebrates by activation of Rho and Rac, leading to the re-organization of the actin cytoskeleton. Rho and Rac activation require guanine nucleotide-exchange factors (GEFs), but the identity of the GEF involved in Wnt-PCP-mediated convergent extension is unknown. Here we report the identification of the weak-similarity GEF (WGEF) gene by a microarray-based screen for notochord enriched genes, and show that WGEF is involved in Wnt-regulated convergent extension. Overexpression of WGEF activated RhoA and rescued the suppression of convergent extension by dominant-negative Wnt-11, whereas depletion of WGEF led to suppression of convergent extension that could be rescued by RhoA or Rho-associated kinase activation. WGEF protein preferentially localized at the plasma membrane, and Frizzled-7 induced colocalization of Dishevelled and WGEF. WGEF protein can bind to Dishevelled and Daam-1, and deletion of the Dishevelled-binding domain generates a hyperactive from of WGEF. These results indicate that WGEF is a component of the Wnt-PCP pathway that connects Dishevelled to Rho activation. PMID:18256687

  6. Ancient plate kinematics derived from the deformation pattern of continental crust: Paleo- and Neo-Tethys opening coeval with prolonged Gondwana-Laurussia convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroner, Uwe; Roscher, Marco; Romer, Rolf L.

    2016-06-01

    The formation and destruction of supercontinents requires prolonged convergent tectonics between particular plates, followed by intra-continental extension during subsequent breakup stages. A specific feature of the Late Paleozoic supercontinent Pangea is the prolonged and diachronous formation of the collisional belts of the Rheic suture zone coeval with recurrent continental breakup and subsequent formation of the mid-ocean ridge systems of the Paleo- and Neo-Tethys oceans at the Devonian and Permian margins of the Gondwana plate, respectively. To decide whether these processes are causally related or not, it is necessary to accurately reconstruct the plate motion of Gondwana relative to Laurussia. Here we propose that the strain pattern preserved in the continental crust can be used for the reconstruction of ancient plate kinematics. We present Euler pole locations for the three fundamental stages of the Late Paleozoic assembly of Pangea and closure of the Rheic Ocean: (I) Early Devonian (ca. 400 Ma) collisional tectonics affected Gondwana at the Armorican Spur north of western Africa and at the promontory of the South China block/Australia of eastern Gondwana, resulting in the Variscan and the Qinling orogenies, respectively. The Euler pole of the rotational axis between Gondwana and Laurussia is positioned east of Gondwana close to Australia. (II) Continued subduction of the western Rheic Ocean initiates the clockwise rotation of Gondwana that is responsible for the separation of the South China block from Gondwana and the opening of Paleo-Tethys during the Late Devonian. The position of the rotational axis north of Africa reveals a shift of the Euler pole to the west. (III) The terminal closure of the Rheic Ocean resulted in the final tectonics of the Alleghanides, the Mauritanides and the Ouachita-Sonora-Marathon belt, occurred after the cessation of the Variscan orogeny in Central Europe, and is coeval with the formation of the Central European Extensional

  7. Assessing Physical Activity in Children with Asthma: Convergent Validity between Accelerometer and Electronic Diary Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floro, Josh N.; Dunton, Genevieve F.; Delfino, Ralph J.

    2009-01-01

    Convergent validity of accelerometer and electronic diary physical activity data was assessed in children with asthma. Sixty-two participants, ages 9-18 years, wore an accelerometer and reported their physical activity level in quarter-hour segments every 2 hr using the Ambulatory Diary Assessment (ADA). Moderate validity was found between…

  8. Motor nucleus activity fails to predict extraocular muscle forces in ocular convergence.

    PubMed

    Miller, Joel M; Davison, Ryan C; Gamlin, Paul D

    2011-06-01

    For a given eye position, firing rates of abducens neurons (ABNs) generally (Mays et al. 1984), and lateral rectus (LR) motoneurons (MNs) in particular (Gamlin et al. 1989a), are higher in converged gaze than when convergence is relaxed, whereas LR and medial rectus (MR) muscle forces are slightly lower (Miller et al. 2002). Here, we confirm this finding for ABNs, report a similarly paradoxical finding for neurons in the MR subdivision of the oculomotor nucleus (MRNs), and, for the first time, simultaneously confirm the opposing sides of these paradoxes by recording physiological LR and MR forces. Four trained rhesus monkeys with binocular eye coils and custom muscle force transducers on the horizontal recti of one eye fixated near and far targets, making conjugate saccades and symmetric and asymmetric vergence movements of 16-27°. Consistent with earlier findings, we found in 44 ABNs that the slope of the rate-position relationship for symmetric vergence (k(V)) was lower than that for conjugate movement (k(C)) at distance, i.e., mean k(V)/k(C) = 0.50, which implies stronger LR innervation in convergence. We also found in 39 MRNs that mean k(V)/k(C) = 1.53, implying stronger MR innervation in convergence as well. Despite there being stronger innervation in convergence at a given eye position, we found both LR and MR muscle forces to be slightly lower in convergence, -0.40 and -0.20 g, respectively. We conclude that the relationship of ensemble MN activity to total oculorotary muscle force is different in converged gaze than when convergence is relaxed. We conjecture that LRMNs with k(V) < k(C) and MRMNs with k(V) > k(C) innervate muscle fibers that are weak, have mechanical coupling that attenuates their effective oculorotary force, or serve some nonoculorotary, regulatory function. PMID:21451064

  9. Tectono-magmatic response to major convergence changes in the North Patagonian suprasubduction system; the Paleogene subduction-transcurrent plate margin transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragón, Eugenio; D'Eramo, Fernando; Castro, Antonio; Pinotti, Lucio; Brunelli, Daniele; Rabbia, Osvaldo; Rivalenti, Giorgio; Varela, Ricardo; Spakman, Wim; Demartis, Manuel; Cavarozzi, Claudia E.; Aguilera, Yolanda E.; Mazzucchelli, Maurizio; Ribot, Alejandro

    2011-08-01

    The southern and central Andes reflect significant along-strike differences of tectonic activity, including shortening, alternating flat-to-normal subduction styles and magmatism. In northern Patagonia, the subduction/supra-subduction system, fore arc, arc and back arc basins developed in an extensional setting during the Paleogene. This was accompanied by landward migration of calc-alkalic magmatism which changed to synextensional bimodal volcanism of rhyolitic ignimbrites and interbedded tholeiitic and alkalic basalts. These Paleogene events occurred during a time when the Farallon-Aluk active ridge reached the South American plate, and the Farallon plate subduction was interrupted. They represent a new tectonic regime, characterized by a transcurrent plate margin. The presence in the back arc of a rigid lithospheric block of 100,000 km 2 represented by the North Patagonian Massif focused the rotation of the coastal blocks. This resulted in the development of two Paleogene extensional regions to the north and south, respectively, of the Massif and replaced the former back arc. Plate rearrangement caused by the inauguration of the Nazca plate and its regime of orthogonal subduction at the beginning of the Miocene, re-established typical calc-alkaline arc magmatism at the former upper Cretaceous arc locus. Present seismic activity in the subducted plate and tomographic modeling of p-wave velocity anomalies in the upper mantle also suggest the presence of a subduction gap that lasted for most of the Paleogene in northern Patagonia.

  10. Active cloaking of flexural waves in thin plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futhazar, Gregory; Parnell, William J.; Norris, Andrew N.

    2015-11-01

    An active cloak consists of a set of discrete multipole sources distributed in space. When the source positions and amplitudes are carefully specified the active field destructively interferes with an incident time harmonic wave so as to nullify the total field in some finite domain and ensure that in the far field only the incident wave is present, i.e. the active field is non-radiating. Here it is shown how to efficiently determine the source coefficients explicitly in the context of flexural waves in thin plates. The work is carried out in the context of Kirchhoff plate theory, using the Rayleigh-Green theorem to derive the unique source amplitudes for a given incident flexural wave.

  11. Free Vibration Analysis of Patch Repaired Plates with a Through Crack by p-Convergent Layerwise Element

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jae S.; Yang, Seung H.; Woo, Kwang S.

    2014-01-01

    The high-order layerwise element models have been used for damaged plates and shells in the presence of singularities such as crack, cutout, and delamination. In this study, the extension of a proposed finite element model has been tested for free vibration analysis of composite laminated systems. For the elements, three-dimensional displacement fields can be captured by layer-by-layer representation. For the elements, higher-order shape functions are derived by combination of one- and two-dimensional shape functions based on higher-order Lobatto shape functions, not using pure higher-order three-dimensional shape functions. The present model can relieve difficulty of aspect ratios in modeling very thin thickness of bonding layer. For verification of the model, natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes are calculated and then compared with reference values for uncracked and cracked plates. Also, the vibration characteristics of one-sided patch repaired plates with a through internal crack are investigated with respect to variation of crack length, size and thickness of patch, and shear modulus of adhesive, respectively. PMID:25215321

  12. Study of plate-fin heat exchanger and cold plate for the active thermal control system of Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chyu, MING-C.

    1992-01-01

    Plate-fin heat exchangers will be employed in the Active Thermal Control System of Space Station Freedom. During ground testing of prototypic heat exchangers, certain anomalous behaviors have been observed. Diagnosis has been conducted to determine the cause of the observed behaviors, including a scrutiny of temperature, pressure, and flow rate test data, and verification calculations based on such data and more data collected during the ambient and thermal/vacuum tests participated by the author. The test data of a plate-fin cold plate have been also analyzed. Recommendation was made with regard to further tests providing more useful information of the cold plate performance.

  13. Overriding plate structure of the Nicaragua convergent margin: Constraints on the limits of the seismogenic zone and the 1992 tsunami earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallarès, V.; Meléndez, A.; Prada, M.; Ranero, C. R.; McIntosh, K.; Grevemeyer, I.

    2012-04-01

    We present 2D P-wave velocity models of the Nicaragua convergent margin along two perpendicular wide-angle seismic profiles acquired in the rupture area of the 1992 tsunami earthquake. The models focus on the structure of the overriding plate and the geometry of the inter-plate boundary. In the trench-perpendicular profile, the basement shows increasing velocity reflecting a progressive decrease in the degree of rock fracturing of the igneous basement. Upper mantle-like velocities are obtained at a depth of ~10 km beneath the fore-arc Sandino basin, indicating that the mantle wedge is shallow and located close to the trench. A mismatch between the inter-plate reflector in the velocity models and along coincident multi-channel seismic profiles is best explained by a ~15% velocity anisotropy, suggesting locally-enhanced rock fracturing which is related with the presence of a prominent subducted seamount. The frontal part of the overriding plate is probably too fractured to store elastic energy, unless the presence of local asperities such as the subducted seamount makes it conditionally stable by locally increasing the normal stress. The downdip limit of the seismogenic zone occurs near the tip of the mantle wedge, indicating that it is probably controlled by the presence of a weak, serpentinized mantle wedge beneath the Sandino basin. The hypocenter of the 1992 main shock is not particularly shallow (20-22 km), but seismological data indicate that it triggered sub-events near the trench, the main of which coincides with the subducted seamount. We show that the slow propagation velocity and long duration of the 1992 earthquake could be explained by rupture propagating within the fractured basement rocks and not into the sediments.

  14. Earthquake activity and crustal stresses in stable plate interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camelbeeck, Thierry; Calais, Eric; Mazzotti, Stéphane; Stein, Seth

    2016-04-01

    Unlike plate-boundary earthquakes that are explained by plate motions and their recurrence interval inferred from the rate at which these motions are released seismically, we have a limited understanding on the triggering causes of earthquakes in stable plate interiors as well as on the mechanisms explaining their apparent episodic, clustered, and migrating nature. An alternative model explaining those characteristics of the seismic activity in those regions where no discernable strain is building up today is that earthquakes result from the release of strain from a long-term pre-stressed lithosphere, triggered by processes weakening fault zones, like fluid circulation, or modifying applied normal stress on well oriented faults, like regional or more local erosion, water or ice loadings. In this talk, we present examples of three complementary approaches that should permit better understanding the mechanisms of this intraplate earthquake activity. They rely on studying their possible triggering factors and regional stresses controlling their mechanism, and also on modelling the possible strain rates of geological domains in relationship to their geological history and their fabrics. Among other things, we question whether the spatial variations of the short wavelengths gravitational potential energy associated to lateral variations of surface topography and crustal density can induce local stress perturbations explaining the complexity of the present-day tectonics in Western Europe and its possible relationship to earthquake activity.

  15. Rhyolitic components of the Michipicoten greenstone belt, Ontario: Evidence for late Archaen intracontinental rifts or convergent plate margins in the Canadian Shield?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sylvester, P. J.; Attoh, K.; Schulz, K. J.

    1986-01-01

    Rhyolitic rocks often are the dominant felsic end member of the biomodal volcanic suites that characterize many late Archean greenstone belts of the Canadian Shield. The rhyolites primarily are pyroclastic flows (ash flow tuffs) emplaced following plinian eruptions, although deposits formed by laval flows and phreatomagmatic eruptions also are presented. Based both on measured tectono-stratigraphic sections and provenance studies of greenstone belt sedimentary sequences, the rhyolites are believed to have been equal in abundance to associated basaltic rocks. In many recent discussions of the tectonic setting of late Archean Canadian greenstone belts, rhyolites have been interpreted as products of intracontinental rifting . A study of the tectono-stratigraphic relationships, rock associations and chemical characteristics of the particularly ell-exposed late Archean rhyolites of the Michipicoten greenstone belt, suggests that convergent plate margin models are more appropriate.

  16. Upper Plate Deformation in Response to Aseismic Ridge Subduction along a Convergent Margin - the Piano Player Model: Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, T. W.; Fisher, D. M.; Morell, K. D.; Cupper, M. L.

    2008-12-01

    The Osa Peninsula, an outer forearc high ~20 km inboard of the Middle America Trench, is deforming in response to short wavelength variations in the bathymetry on the subducting aseismic Cocos Ridge, an elongate region of thickened crust ( up to 40% thicker) created by motion of the Cocos plate across the Galapagos Hotspot. Plate convergence is nearly orthogonal to the trench at ~90 mm/yr and the plate interface occurs at a depth ~5 km under the peninsula. Relief on the Cocos Ridge locally exceeds 1 km with the dominant topography expressed as two nearly parallel, but locally offset ridges separated by an axial graben. The strike of these features is sub-parallel to the convergence vector. Modern topography of the Osa Peninsula, elevation of the basement rocks (Early to Middle Tertiary Osa Mélange), elevations of late Quaternary marine deposits, and distribution of late Quaternary deformation rates directly mirror the bathymetry on the Cocos Ridge just outboard of the MAT. New geologic mapping, radiometric dating and fission track analysis constrain distribution and rates of deformation on the Osa Peninsula. The Osa Peninsula is fragmented into a complex set of blocks that vary in size from several kms on a side to <10 kms on a side. These blocks, which closely match the size, distribution and shape of bathymetric features on the incoming Cocos Ridge, are bounded by trench parallel and trench perpendicular, high angle, normal and reverse faults that extend to the plate interface, allowing for grossly different deformation histories over short distances. Fission track analyses of 4 sandstone samples from the Osa Mélange suggest that the basement rocks reached maximum burial temperatures of 60-80 ° C indicating burial depths of ~3-4 kms assuming a reasonable geothermal gradient of ~20 °/km. This suggests a very thin margin wedge prior to late Neogene unroofing. Rates of late Quaternary deformation are constrained by over 30 radiocarbon and 5 Optically Stimulated

  17. Diverse activation pathways in class A GPCRs converge near the G-protein-coupling region.

    PubMed

    Venkatakrishnan, A J; Deupi, Xavier; Lebon, Guillaume; Heydenreich, Franziska M; Flock, Tilman; Miljus, Tamara; Balaji, Santhanam; Bouvier, Michel; Veprintsev, Dmitry B; Tate, Christopher G; Schertler, Gebhard F X; Babu, M Madan

    2016-08-25

    Class A G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a large family of membrane proteins that mediate a wide variety of physiological functions, including vision, neurotransmission and immune responses. They are the targets of nearly one-third of all prescribed medicinal drugs such as beta blockers and antipsychotics. GPCR activation is facilitated by extracellular ligands and leads to the recruitment of intracellular G proteins. Structural rearrangements of residue contacts in the transmembrane domain serve as 'activation pathways' that connect the ligand-binding pocket to the G-protein-coupling region within the receptor. In order to investigate the similarities in activation pathways across class A GPCRs, we analysed 27 GPCRs from diverse subgroups for which structures of active, inactive or both states were available. Here we show that, despite the diversity in activation pathways between receptors, the pathways converge near the G-protein-coupling region. This convergence is mediated by a highly conserved structural rearrangement of residue contacts between transmembrane helices 3, 6 and 7 that releases G-protein-contacting residues. The convergence of activation pathways may explain how the activation steps initiated by diverse ligands enable GPCRs to bind a common repertoire of G proteins. PMID:27525504

  18. Continental Subduction and Subduction Initiation Leading to Extensional Exhumation of Ultra-High Pressure Rocks During Ongoing Plate Convergence in Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, W. R.; Petersen, K. D.

    2014-12-01

    Subduction of continental rocks is necessary to produce ultra-high pressure (UHP) rocks but the mechanism bringing them to the surface is disputed. A major question is whether this involves fairly small diapirs of crust that move up through the mantle or it involves an entire subducted plate that undergoes coherent 'reverse subduction' (sometimes called 'eduction'). Both mechanisms have been invoked to explain the only known region of on-going exhumation of UHP rocks, on the D'Entrecasteaux Islands of Papua New Guinea. Ductile flow fabrics in the island rocks have been used to argue for a diapiric model while constraints on the plate kinematics of the region require relatively large (>100 km) amounts of recent (>6 Myr) extension, supporting eduction as a primary mechanism. A self-consistent thermo-mechanical model of continental subduction shows that eduction can be accompanied by some ductile flow within the crust. Also we show, that subduction and stacking of continental crust can cause a subduction zone to lock up and lead to subduction initiation elsewhere. When this happens the region of earlier continental subduction can reverse direction causing exhumation of rocks from depth of ~100 km followed by localized extension and plate spreading. This can occur even if a region is in overall convergence. Applied to New Guinea our results are consistent with earlier suggestions that extension of the Woodlark Basin was caused by the initiation of the New Britain Trench, as indicated on the attached figure. We suggest that this subduction initiation event triggered eduction that led to exposure of the D'Entrcasteaux Islands and exhumation of the UHP rocks there. Our numerical results are broadly consistent with the recently refined seismic structure of the region around the islands. The model implies that the present-day basement of the ~70 km wide Goodenough Bay, south of the islands, was subducted then exhumed. This can be tested by drilling.

  19. The Role of Serpentinites at Convergent Plate Boundaries: Using New Discoveries to Facilitate the Learning of Major Earth Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, J. G.

    2010-12-01

    A benefit of integrating a vital educational enterprise into a cutting-edge funded research initiative is the ability to bring new scientific discoveries quickly into the classroom without being bound to the textbook publication cycle. A key objective the MARGINS Data in the Classroom project was to facilitate the discovery-to-the-classroom transition of knowledge through the development of Web-deliverable, modular MARGINS “Mini-Lessons”. Some 34 Mini-Lessons are available for classroom use at http://serc.carleton.edu/margins/collection.html, and the development of new Mini-Lessons is a listed Education/Outreach priority of the successor GeoPRISMS Program. An important discovery that arose from the MARGINS Subduction Factory Initiative was the recognition that serpentinites - metamorphically hydrated products of ultramafic rocks rich in serpentine group minerals - are significant constituents of both the mantle wedge and downgoing plate. Serpentines are interesting mineralogically because of their distinctive physical properties, habits and appearance; and for their close affinities with olivine and Mg-rich pyroxenes. Given that serpentines primarily form through the hydration of olivine or Mg-rich pyroxenes, serpentinites constitute a reservoir of subduction-related H2O and entrained trace species in modified mantle rocks of the wedge or slab. As well, serpentine group minerals are interesting rheologically because, as sheet silicates, they can behave in a plastic fashion in rocks that are undergoing deformation, and can thus flow along faults in response to deforming stresses, or be easily entrained in fault rock assemblages along a subduction thrust. Two different MARGINS Mini-Lessons address the issue of serpentinite in subduction zone settings, focusing primarily on the observed occurrences of serpentinite seamounts in the forearc regions of the Mariana subduction system, a MARGINS Subduction Factory Focus Site, and their geochemical and geodynamic

  20. Mismatch repair enhances convergent transcription-induced cell death at trinucleotide repeats by activating ATR.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Lin, Yunfu; Wilson, John H

    2016-06-01

    Trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansion beyond a certain threshold results in some 20 incurable neurodegenerative disorders where disease anticipation positively correlates with repeat length. Long TNRs typically display a bias toward further expansion during germinal transmission from parents to offspring, and then are highly unstable in somatic tissues of affected individuals. Understanding mechanisms of TNR instability will provide insights into disease pathogenesis. Previously, we showed that enhanced convergent transcription at long CAG repeat tracks induces TNR instability and cell death via ATR activation. Components of TC-NER (transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair) and RNaseH enzymes that resolve RNA/DNA hybrids oppose cell death, whereas the MSH2 component of MMR (mismatch repair) enhances cell death. The exact role of the MMR pathway during convergent transcription-induced cell death at CAG repeats is not well understood. In this study, we show that siRNA knockdowns of MMR components-MSH2, MSH3, MLHI, PMS2, and PCNA-reduce DNA toxicity. Furthermore, knockdown of MSH2, MLH1, and PMS2 significantly reduces the frequency of ATR foci formation. These observations suggest that MMR proteins activate DNA toxicity by modulating ATR foci formation during convergent transcription. PMID:27131875

  1. Deformation record of 4-d accommodation of strain in the transition from transform to oblique convergent plate margin, southern Alaska (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeske, S.; Benowitz, J.; Enkelmann, E.; Pavlis, T. L.

    2013-12-01

    Crustal deformation at the transition from a dextral transform to subduction in the northern Cordillera is complicated by both the bend of the margin and the presence of low-angle subduction of an oceanic plateau, the Yakutat microplate, into the 'corner'. The dextral Denali Fault system located ~400 km inboard of the plate margin shows a similar transition from a dominantly strike-slip to transpressional regime as it curves to the west. Thermochronologic and structural studies in both areas indicate crustal response through the transition region is highly varied along and across strike. Previous thermochronology along the Fairweather fault SE of the St. Elias bend shows the most rapid exhumation occurs in close proximity to the fault, decreasing rapidly away from it. Enkelmann et al. (2010) and more recent detrital zircon FT (Falkowski et al., 2013 AGU abstract) show rapid and deep exhumation concentrated in the syntaxis, but over a fairly broad area continuing north beyond the Fairweather fault. Although the region is dominantly under ice, borders of the rapidly exhuming region appear to be previously identified major high-angle faults. This suggests that structures controlling the extreme exhumation may have significant oblique slip component, or, if flower structure, are reverse faults, and the region may be exhuming by transpression, with a significant component of pure shear. Southwest of the syntaxis, where convergence dominates over strike-slip, thin-skinned fold-and-thrust belts in the Yakutat microplate strata account for the shortening. The long-term record of convergence in this area is more cryptic due to sediment recycling through deep underplating and/or limited exhumation by upper crustal shortening, but a wide range of thermochronologic studies suggests that initial exhumation in the region began ~ 30 Ma and most rapid exhumation in the syntaxis began ~ 5 Ma. In the eastern Alaska Range a significant component of strike-slip, in addition to

  2. Reliability and Convergent Validity of the Cutaneous Sarcoidosis Activity and Morphology Instrument for Assessing Cutaneous Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Emily Y.; Kim, Ellen J.; Payne, Aimee S.; Takeshita, Junko; Vittorio, Carmela C.; Wanat, Karolyn A.; Werth, Victoria P.; Gelfand, Joel M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the reliability and convergent validity of two outcome instruments for assessing cutaneous sarcoidosis: Cutaneous Sarcoidosis Activity and Morphology Instrument (CSAMI) and Sarcoidosis Activity and Severity Index (SASI). Design Cross-sectional study evaluating cutaneous sarcoidosis disease severity using CSAMI, SASI, and Physician's Global Assessment (PGA) as reference. Setting Cutaneous sarcoidosis clinic. Participants 8 dermatologists evaluated 11 patients with cutaneous sarcoidosis. Main Outcome Measures Primary outcomes: Inter- and intra-rater reliability and convergent validity. Secondary outcomes: Correlation with quality of life measures and time required for completion. Results All instruments demonstrated good to excellent intra-rater reliability. Inter-rater reliability was excellent for CSAMI Activity scores (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC], 0.82; 95% CI, 0.66-0.94), and fair to poor for CSAMI Damage (0.42; 0.21-0.72), modified Facial SASI (0.40; 0.17-0.72), and PGA scores (0.40; 0.18-0.70). CSAMI Activity, Damage, and modified Facial SASI scores all demonstrated convergent validity with statistically significant correlations with PGA scores. Trends for correlations were seen between CSAMI scores and specific Skindex-29 quality of life domains. While CSAMI required longer time to complete than SASI, both were scored within adequate time for use in clinical trials. Conclusions CSAMI appears to be a reliable and valid outcome instrument to measure cutaneous sarcoidosis and may capture a wide range of body surface and cutaneous morphologies. Future research is necessary to demonstrate its sensitivity to change and to confirm its correlation with quality of life measures. PMID:23677081

  3. Convergence dynamics of the Bak Sneppen model: Activity rate and waiting time distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirnakli, Ugur; Lyra, Marcelo L.

    2007-02-01

    In this work, we study the convergence dynamics of two independent random configurations of the Bak-Sneppen model of self-organized criticality evolving under the same external noise. A recently proposed measure of the Hamming distance which considers the minimum difference between displaced configurations is used. The displacement evolves in time intermittently. We compute the jump activity rate and waiting time distribution and report on their asymptotic power-law scaling which characterizes the slow relaxation and the absence of typical length and time scales typical of critical dynamical systems.

  4. Stability of active mantle upwelling revealed by net characteristics of plate tectonics.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Clinton P; Steinberger, Bernhard; Torsvik, Trond H

    2013-06-27

    Viscous convection within the mantle is linked to tectonic plate motions and deforms Earth's surface across wide areas. Such close links between surface geology and deep mantle dynamics presumably operated throughout Earth's history, but are difficult to investigate for past times because the history of mantle flow is poorly known. Here we show that the time dependence of global-scale mantle flow can be deduced from the net behaviour of surface plate motions. In particular, we tracked the geographic locations of net convergence and divergence for harmonic degrees 1 and 2 by computing the dipole and quadrupole moments of plate motions from tectonic reconstructions extended back to the early Mesozoic era. For present-day plate motions, we find dipole convergence in eastern Asia and quadrupole divergence in both central Africa and the central Pacific. These orientations are nearly identical to the dipole and quadrupole orientations of underlying mantle flow, which indicates that these 'net characteristics' of plate motions reveal deeper flow patterns. The positions of quadrupole divergence have not moved significantly during the past 250 million years, which suggests long-term stability of mantle upwelling beneath Africa and the Pacific Ocean. These upwelling locations are positioned above two compositionally and seismologically distinct regions of the lowermost mantle, which may organize global mantle flow as they remain stationary over geologic time. PMID:23803848

  5. Exploiting information geometry to improve the convergence of nonparametric active contours.

    PubMed

    Pereyra, Marcelo; Batatia, Hadj; McLaughlin, Steve

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a fast converging Riemannian steepest descent method for nonparametric statistical active contour models, with application to image segmentation. Unlike other fast algorithms, the proposed method is general and can be applied to any statistical active contour model from the exponential family, which comprises most of the models considered in the literature. This is achieved by first identifying the intrinsic statistical manifold associated with this class of active contours, and then constructing a steepest descent on that manifold. A key contribution of this paper is to derive a general and tractable closed-form analytic expression for the manifold's Riemannian metric tensor, which allows computing discrete gradient flows efficiently. The proposed methodology is demonstrated empirically and compared with other state of the art approaches on several standard test images, a phantom positron-emission-tomography scan and a B-mode echography of in-vivo human dermis. PMID:25532177

  6. Buckling of Dielectric Elastomeric Plates for Electrically Active Microfludic Pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Douglas; Tavakol, Behrouz; Bozlar, Michael; Froehlicher, Guillaume; Stone, Howard; Aksay, Ilhan

    2013-11-01

    Fluid flow can be directed and controlled by a variety of mechanisms within industrial and biological environments. Advances in microfluidic technology have required innovative ways to control fluid flow on a small scale, and the ability to actively control fluid flow within microfluidic devices is crucial for advancements in nanofluidics, biomedical fluidic devices, and digital microfluidics. In this work, we present a means for microfluidic control via the electrical actuation of thin, flexible valves within microfluidic channels. These structures consist of a dielectric elastomer confined between two compliant electrodes that can be actively and reversibly buckle out of plane to pump fluids from an applied voltage. The out-of-plane deformation can be quantified using two parameters: net change in surface area and the shape of deformation. Change in surface area depends on the voltage, while the deformation shape, which significantly affects the flow rate, is a function of voltage, and the pressure and volume of the chambers on each side of the thin plate. The use of solid electrodes enables a robust and reversible pumping mechanism that will have will enable advancements in rapid microfluidic diagnostics, adaptive materials, and artificial muscles.

  7. Plio-Quaternary paleostresses in the Atlantic passive margin of the Moroccan Meseta: Influence of the Central Rif escape tectonics related to Eurasian-African plate convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabli, Ahmed; Chalouan, Ahmed; Akil, Mostapha; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Ruano, Patricia; Sanz de Galdeano, Carlos; López-Garrido, Angel Carlos; Marín-Lechado, Carlos; Pedrera, Antonio

    2014-07-01

    The Atlantic Moroccan Meseta margin is affected by far field recent tectonic stresses. The basement belongs to the variscan orogen and was deformed by hercynian folding and metamorphism followed by a post-Permian erosional stage, producing the flat paleorelief of the region. Tabular Mesozoic and Mio-Plio-Quaternary deposits locally cover the Meseta, which has undergone recent uplift, while north of Rabat the subsidence continues in the Gharb basin, constituting the foreland basin of the Rif Cordillera. The Plio-Quaternary sedimentary cover of the Moroccan Meseta, mainly formed by aeolian and marine terraces deposits, is affected by brittle deformations (joints and small-scale faults) that evidence that this region - considered up to date as stable - is affected by the far field stresses. Striated faults are recognized in the oldest Plio-Quaternary deposits and show strike-slip and normal kinematics, while joints affect up to the most recent sediments. Paleostress may be sorted into extensional, only affecting Rabat sector, and three main compressive groups deforming whole the region: (1) ENE-WSW to ESE-WNW compression; (2) NNW-SSE to NE-SW compression and (3) NNE-SSW compression. These stresses can be attributed mainly to the NW-SE oriented Eurasian-African plate convergence in the western Mediterranean and the escape toward the SW of the Rif Cordillera. Local paleostress deviations may be related to basement fault reactivation. These new results reveal the tectonic instability during Plio-Quaternary of the Moroccan Meseta margin in contrast to the standard passive margins, generally considered stable.

  8. Cratonic platform and foredeep response to plate margin convergence: Devonian through Mississippian subsidence history in western Montana and east-central Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Dorobek, S.L.; Reid, S.K. ); Elrich, M. ); Bond, G.C. ); Kominz, M.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Devonian and Mississippian sedimentary rocks of western Montana and east-central Idaho were deposited on a cratonic platform that faced a northern extension of the Antler foredeep. Subsidence analyses of this sequence and isopach maps illustrate regional patterns of subsidence related to convergence along the western North American plate margin. Tectonic stresses affected deposition on platform areas which were hundreds of kilometers inboard from the ancient continental margin. Wavelengths of paleostructural elements, tectonic inversion of these structures (i.e., transition of a paleohigh into a depocenter), and time scales involved in the inversion process cannot be attributed solely to flexure or to vertical displacements by in-plane stresses but suggest reactivation of Precambrian structural trends. Late Devonian (Frasnian) platform sedimentation began during a brief interval of increased subsidence across western Montana. This interval of increased platform subsidence is greater than a Late Devonian eustatic sea level rise (determined from subsidence analyses of Devonian strata from stable cratonic areas) and suggests some tectonic event must have influenced subsidence in Montana. Thin uppermost Devonian Strata contain numerous unconformities that may be related to flexure of the platform plus eustatic sea level fluctuations. Rapid subsidence across Montana during the Early Mississippian (Kinderhookian) resulted in a condensed platform sequence, which is overlain by deep water shaly carbonates. Rapid subsidence continued into the Osagean then slowed, allowing progradation of carbonate platform facies across Montana. A regional karst surface on top of the Meramecian platform coincides with conglomerate deposition and increased subsidence rates in the foredeep; unconformity durations on the platform also increase to the east.

  9. Effect of plate preparation on active-material utilization and cycleability of positive plates in automotive lead/acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozgun, H.; Lam, L. T.; Rand, D. A. J.; Bhargava, S. K.

    The power demands from automotive lead/acid batteries are rising steadily with the increasing number of electronic accessories that are being fitted to modern vehicles. In order to meet new levels of performance, automotive batteries have been redesigned to use low-ohmic microporous separators, as well as thinner plates (to increase the number of plates per cell) that are made with a low paste density. This approach, however, has led to a separate problem, namely, an appreciable reduction in battery service life. To redress this situation, a research programme has been implemented in our laboratories to examine, in detail, the effect of plate preparation on the active-material utilization and cycleability of automotive positive plates with grids made from low-antimony alloy. The cycleability is evaluated in terms of repetitive reserve-capacity. The results suggest that a paste formula with a combination of high density and low acid-to-oxide ratio is the most appropriate technology for the production of the thin positive plates that are required in advanced designs of automotive batteries.

  10. Reverse evolution leads to genotypic incompatibility despite functional and active site convergence.

    PubMed

    Kaltenbach, Miriam; Jackson, Colin J; Campbell, Eleanor C; Hollfelder, Florian; Tokuriki, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the extent to which enzyme evolution is reversible can shed light on the fundamental relationship between protein sequence, structure, and function. Here, we perform an experimental test of evolutionary reversibility using directed evolution from a phosphotriesterase to an arylesterase, and back, and examine the underlying molecular basis. We find that wild-type phosphotriesterase function could be restored (>10(4)-fold activity increase), but via an alternative set of mutations. The enzyme active site converged towards its original state, indicating evolutionary constraints imposed by catalytic requirements. We reveal that extensive epistasis prevents reversions and necessitates fixation of new mutations, leading to a functionally identical sequence. Many amino acid exchanges between the new and original enzyme are not tolerated, implying sequence incompatibility. Therefore, the evolution was phenotypically reversible but genotypically irreversible. Our study illustrates that the enzyme's adaptive landscape is highly rugged, and different functional sequences may constitute separate fitness peaks. PMID:26274563

  11. Sonic images of submarine landscape evolution on an active convergent margin, Poverty re-entrant, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, K.; Orpin, A.

    2003-04-01

    Seabed bathymetric and backscatter images were collected using a Simrad EM300 multibeam from the Poverty indentation off Gisborne, on the active convergent margin of the New Zealand East Coast. The 1,500 km square Poverty indentation is a major depression of continental margin extending from a re-entrant in the deformation front at the Hikurangi Trough, which coincides with the mouth of the Poverty Canyon. The indentation outlines a triangular, enclosed depression, bounded along its landward flank by a high scarp incised by more than a dozen regularly-spaced, V-shaped, upper slope gullies that cut into the shelf break. The indentation has been partly in-filled by debris flow and avalanche deposits, which range from a few hundred metres to more than 25 km down-slope. At some places, cracks and scarps in the slopes indicate incipient avalanches. The indentation has been simultaneously eroded by a canyon system that exhibits many of the complexities of incised river systems onshore, including offset, capture and slump dams. At the mouth of the Poverty Canyon, scour holes are visible where hydraulic jumps have eroded the sea floor. A new canyon system appears to be in the process of forming a separate northern route to the Hikurangi Trough. On the lower slope, slumping seaward of a bulge indicates collapse in the wake of a small, subducting seamount. There is little evidence of sediment escaping the slope to form fan deposits along the Hikurangi Trough. These data are currently being used to assist in the structural and stratigraphic analysis of the margin. The high-resolution maps produced prompt a thorough re-interpretation of the Late Pleistocene "landscape evolution" of the Poverty indentation and highlight the complex interaction of tectonics and deformation with sea floor morphology along active plate boundaries in general.

  12. Ror2 signaling is required for local upregulation of GFD6 and activation of BMP signaling at the neural plate border.

    PubMed

    Schille, Carolin; Bayerlová, Michaela; Bleckmann, Annalen; Schambony, Alexandra

    2016-09-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase Ror2 is a major Wnt receptor that activates β-catenin-independent signaling and plays a conserved role in the regulation of convergent extension movements and planar cell polarity in vertebrates. Mutations in the ROR2 gene cause recessive Robinow syndrome in humans, a short-limbed dwarfism associated with craniofacial malformations. Here, we show that Ror2 is required for local upregulation of gdf6 at the neural plate border in Xenopus embryos. Ror2 morphant embryos fail to upregulate neural plate border genes and show defects in the induction of neural crest cell fate. These embryos lack the spatially restricted activation of BMP signaling at the neural plate border at early neurula stages, which is required for neural crest induction. Ror2-dependent planar cell polarity signaling is required in the dorsolateral marginal zone during gastrulation indirectly to upregulate the BMP ligand Gdf6 at the neural plate border and Gdf6 is sufficient to rescue neural plate border specification in Ror2 morphant embryos. Thereby, Ror2 links Wnt/planar cell polarity signaling to BMP signaling in neural plate border specification and neural crest induction. PMID:27578181

  13. Convergence Insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Terms Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Convergence Insufficiency En Español Read in Chinese What is convergence insufficiency? Convergence insufficiency is the ...

  14. Manganese formations in the accretionary belts of Japan: Implications for subduction-accretion process in an active convergent margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, M.; Santosh, M.; Maruyama, S.

    2011-08-01

    In the accretionary complexes of Japan, many bedded manganese and iron-manganese ore deposits occur, especially in the Jurassic complexes such as the Chichibu, Tamba, Mino, Ashio and Northern Kitakami belts. The manganese ores in these Jurassic accretionary complexes probably formed from manganese nodule/crust-bearing siliceous sediments on deep-sea floor and were subsequently converted to the manganese ores by metamorphism during the subduction-accretion process. Some of the deposits also show the signatures of younger granitic intrusions. The manganese formations now incorporated within these belts are marker beds of accretionary tectonics associated with plate tectonic processes in convergent margins.

  15. Diabatic heating profiles over the continental convergence zone during the monsoon active spells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Rajib; Sur, Sharmila; Joseph, Susmitha; Sahai, A. K.

    2013-07-01

    The present paper aims to bring out the robust common aspects of spatio-temporal evolution of diabatic heating during the monsoon intraseasonal active phases over the continental tropical convergence zone (CTCZ). The robustness of spatio-temporal features is determined by comparing the two state-of-the art reanalyses: NCEP Climate Forecast System reanalysis and Modern ERA Retrospective Analysis. The inter-comparison is based on a study period of 26 years (1984-2009). The study confirms the development of deep heating over the CTCZ region during the active phase and is consistent between the two datasets. However, the detailed temporal evolution of the vertical structure (e.g., vertical tilts) of heating differs at times. The most important common feature from both the datasets is the significant vertical redistribution of heating with the development of shallow (low level) heating and circulation over the CTCZ region 3-7 days after the peak active phase. The shallow circulation is found to be associated with increased vertical shear and relative vorticity over certain regions in the subcontinent. This increased vertical shear and relative vorticity in the lower levels could be crucial in the sustenance of rainfall after the peak active phase. Model experiments with linear dynamics affirm the role of shallow convection in increasing the lower level circulation as observed.

  16. Converging shear rheometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Hyung M.; Mix, Adam W.; Giacomin, A. Jeffrey

    2014-05-01

    For highly viscous fluids that slip in parallel sliding plate rheometers, we want to use a slightly converging flow to suppress this wall slip. In this work, we first attack the steady shear flow of a highly viscous Newtonian fluid between two gently converging plates with no slip boundaries using the equation of motion in cylindrical coordinates, which yields no analytical solution. Then we treat the same problem using the lubrication approximation in Cartesian coordinates to yield exact, explicit solutions for dimensionless velocity, pressure and shear stress. This work deepens our understanding of a drag flow through a gently converging slit of arbitrary convergence angle. We also employ the corotational Maxwell model to explore the role of viscoelasticity in this converging shear flow. We then compare these analytical solutions to finite element calculations for both Newtonian and corotational Maxwell cases. A worked example for determining the Newtonian viscosity using a converging shear rheometer is also included. With this work, we provide the framework for exploring other constitutive equations or other boundary conditions in future work. Our results can also be used to design the linear bearings used for the parallel sliding plate rheometer (SPR). This work can also be used to evaluate the error in the shear stress that is caused by bearing misalignment and specify the parallelism tolerance for the linear bearings incorporated into a SPR.

  17. Method and apparatus for actively controlling a micro-scale flexural plate wave device

    DOEpatents

    Dohner, Jeffrey L.

    2001-01-01

    An actively controlled flexural plate wave device provides a micro-scale pump. A method of actively controlling a flexural plate wave device produces traveling waves in the device by coordinating the interaction of a magnetic field with actively controlled currents. An actively-controlled flexural plate wave device can be placed in a fluid channel and adapted for use as a micro-scale fluid pump to cool or drive micro-scale systems, for example, micro-chips, micro-electrical-mechanical devices, micro-fluid circuits, or micro-scale chemical analysis devices.

  18. Mitotic activation: a convergent mechanism for a cohort of neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Husseman, J W; Nochlin, D; Vincent, I

    2000-01-01

    Previous evidence from our lab and others has implicated the mitotic cdc2/cyclin B1 kinase in the neurofibrillary degeneration of Alzheimer's disease. To examine the specificity of this relationship, and define conditions leading to atypical activation of mitotic kinase in postmitotic neurons, we have applied antibodies specific for the cdc2 kinase, its activator, cyclin B1, and three cdc2 produced phosphoepitopes: the TG-3 phosphoepitope in tau and nucleolin, the MPM-2 phosphoepitope in a variety of substrates, and the H5 phosphoepitope in RNA polymerase II, to affected brain regions from a spectrum of neurodegenerative disorders. Our results demonstrate that neurons containing characteristic lesions in a subset of diseases including Down Syndrome (DS), Frontotemporal Dementia linked to chromosome 17 (FTD-17), Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP), Corticobasal Degeneration (CBD), Parkinson-Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis of Guam (GP-ALS), Niemann Pick disease type C (NPDC), and Pick's disease, display mitotic indices, implicating diverse etiologies in mitotic activation. The convergence of various degenerative schemes into a unified mitotic kinase-driven pathway provides a common target for therapeutic treatment of these different disorders. PMID:11124425

  19. Convergent Adaptation in Small Groups: Understanding Professional Development Activities through a Complex Systems Lens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoon, Susan; Liu, Lei; Goh, Sao-Ee

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of individual or group adaptation can provide valuable information for constructing professional development strategies to increase chances of instructional success. This paper reports on an exploratory study that identifies indicators of convergent vs. non-convergent adaptation in two cases of teachers working together…

  20. Reverse evolution leads to genotypic incompatibility despite functional and active site convergence

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenbach, Miriam; Jackson, Colin J; Campbell, Eleanor C; Hollfelder, Florian; Tokuriki, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the extent to which enzyme evolution is reversible can shed light on the fundamental relationship between protein sequence, structure, and function. Here, we perform an experimental test of evolutionary reversibility using directed evolution from a phosphotriesterase to an arylesterase, and back, and examine the underlying molecular basis. We find that wild-type phosphotriesterase function could be restored (>104-fold activity increase), but via an alternative set of mutations. The enzyme active site converged towards its original state, indicating evolutionary constraints imposed by catalytic requirements. We reveal that extensive epistasis prevents reversions and necessitates fixation of new mutations, leading to a functionally identical sequence. Many amino acid exchanges between the new and original enzyme are not tolerated, implying sequence incompatibility. Therefore, the evolution was phenotypically reversible but genotypically irreversible. Our study illustrates that the enzyme's adaptive landscape is highly rugged, and different functional sequences may constitute separate fitness peaks. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06492.001 PMID:26274563

  1. The interpretation of crustal dynamics data in terms of plate interactions and active tectonics of the Anatolian plate and surrounding regions in the Middle East

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toksoz, M. Nafi; Reilinger, Robert

    1992-01-01

    A detailed study was made of the consequences of the Arabian plate convergence against Eurasia and its effects on the tectonics of Anatolia and surrounding regions of the eastern Mediterranean. A primary source of information is time rates of change of baseline lengths and relative heights determined by repeated SLR measurements. These SLR observations are augmented by a network of GPS stations in Anatolia, Aegea, and Greece, established and twice surveyed since 1988. The existing SLR and GPS networks provide the spatial resolution necessary to reveal the details of ongoing tectonic processes in this area of continental collision. The effort has involved examining the state of stress in the lithosphere and relative plate motions as revealed by these space based geodetic measurements, seismicity, and earthquake mechanisms as well as the aseismic deformations of the plates from conventional geodetic data and geological evidence. These observations are used to constrain theoretical calculations of the relative effects of: (1) the push of the Arabian plate; (2) high topography of Eastern Anatolia; (3) the geometry and properties of African-Eurasian plate boundary; (4) subduction under the Hellenic Arc and southwestern Turkey; and (5) internal deformation and rotation of the Anatolian plate.

  2. A convergent diffusion and social marketing approach for disseminating proven approaches to physical activity promotion.

    PubMed

    Dearing, James W; Maibach, Edward W; Buller, David B

    2006-10-01

    Approaches from diffusion of innovations and social marketing are used here to propose efficient means to promote and enhance the dissemination of evidence-based physical activity programs. While both approaches have traditionally been conceptualized as top-down, center-to-periphery, centralized efforts at social change, their operational methods have usually differed. The operational methods of diffusion theory have a strong relational emphasis, while the operational methods of social marketing have a strong transactional emphasis. Here, we argue for a convergence of diffusion of innovation and social marketing principles to stimulate the efficient dissemination of proven-effective programs. In general terms, we are encouraging a focus on societal sectors as a logical and efficient means for enhancing the impact of dissemination efforts. This requires an understanding of complex organizations and the functional roles played by different individuals in such organizations. In specific terms, ten principles are provided for working effectively within societal sectors and enhancing user involvement in the processes of adoption and implementation. PMID:16979466

  3. Comparative analysis of geodynamic activity of the Caucasian and Eastern Mediterranean segments of the Alpine-Himalayan convergence zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelidze, Tamaz; Eppelbaum, Lev

    2013-04-01

    The Alpine-Himalayan convergence zone (AHCZ) underwent recent transverse shortening under the effect of collisional compression. The process was accompanied by rotation of separate microplates. The Caucasian and Eastern Mediterranean regions are segments of the of the AHCZ and are characterized by intensive endogenous and exogenous geodynamic processes, which manifest themselves in occurrence of powerful (with magnitude of 8-9) earthquakes accompanied by development of secondary catastrophic processes. Large landslides, rock falls, avalanches, mud flows, etc. cause human deaths and great material losses. The development of the aforesaid endogenous processes is set forth by peculiarities of the deep structure of the region and an impact of deep geological processes. The Caucasus is divided into several main tectonic terranes: platform (sub-platform, quasi-platform) and fold-thrust units. Existing data enable to perform a division of the Caucasian region into two large-scale geological provinces: southern Tethyan and northern Tethyan located to the south of and to the north of the Lesser Caucasian ophiolite suture, respectively. The recent investigations show that the assessments of the seismic hazard in these regions are not quite correct - for example in the West Caucasus the seismic hazard can be significantly underestimated, which affects the corresponding risk assessments. Integrated analysis of gravity, magnetic, seismic and thermal data enables to refine the assessment of the seismic hazard of the region, taking into account real rates of the geodynamic movements. Important role play the last rheological constructions. According to Reilinger et al. (2006) tectonic scheme, the West flanking of the Arabian Plate manifests strike-slip motion, when the East Caucasian block is converging and shortening. The Eastern Mediterranean is a tectonically complex region located in the midst of the progressive Afro-Eurasian collision. The recent increasing geotectonic

  4. Pyroclastic activity at home plate in Gusev crater, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Squyres, S. W.; Aharonson, O.; Clark, B. C.; Cohen, B. A.; Crumpler, L.; de Souza, P.A.; Farrand, W. H.; Gellert, Ralf; Grant, J.; Grotzinger, J.P.; Haldemann, A.F.C.; Johnson, J. R.; Klingelhofer, G.; Lewis, K.W.; Li, R.; McCoy, T.; McEwen, A.S.; McSween, H.Y.; Ming, D. W.; Moore, Johnnie N.; Morris, R.V.; Parker, T.J.; Rice, J. W., Jr.; Ruff, S.; Schmidt, M.; Schroder, C.; Soderblom, L.A.; Yen, A.

    2007-01-01

    Home Plate is a layered plateau in Gusev crater on Mars. It is composed of clastic rocks of moderately altered alkali basalt composition, enriched in some highly volatile elements. A coarse-grained lower unit lies under a finer-grained upper unit. Textural observations indicate that the lower strata were emplaced in an explosive event, and geochemical considerations favor an explosive volcanic origin over an impact origin. The lower unit likely represents accumulation of pyroclastic materials, whereas the upper unit may represent eolian reworking of the same pyroclastic materials.

  5. Pyroclastic Activity at Home Plate in Gusev Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squyres, S. W.; Aharonson, O.; Clark, B. S.; Cohen, B.; Crumpler, L.; deSouza, P. A.; Farrand, W. H.; Gellert, R.; Grant, J.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Haldemann, A. F. C.; Johnson, J. R.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Lewis, K. W.; Li, R.; McCoy, T.; McEwen, A. S.; McSween, H. Y.; Ming, D. W.; Moore, J. M.; Morris, R. V.; Parker. T. J.; Rice, J. W., Jr.; Ruff, S.; Schmidt, M.

    2007-01-01

    Home Plate is a layered plateau in Gusev crater on Mars. It is composed of clastic rocks of moderately altered alkali basalt composition, enriched in some highly volatile elements. A coarse-grained lower unit is overlain by a finer-grained upper unit. Textural observations indicate that the lower strata were emplaced in an explosive event, and geochemical considerations favor an explosive volcanic origin over an impact origin. The lower unit likely represents accumulation of pyroclastic materials, while the upper unit may represent eolian reworking of the same pyroclastic materials.

  6. HP and UHT metamorphic associations in the Day Nui Con Voi,northwestern Vietnam: The consequence of convergence between the Indian and the Eurasian plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Liu, J.; Tran, M. D.; Nguyen, Q. L.

    2014-12-01

    The Red River shear zone (RRSZ) is the most significant geologic discontinuity in Southeast Asia. The Day Nui Con Voi (DNCV) massif at the southernmost part of the shear zone bears records of Cenozoic RRSZ activity. The DNCV in northwestern Vietnam predominantly consists of HP granulite facies metapelites, and lenticular enclaves of HP mafic granulites, calc-silicate granulites and UHT aluminum-rich rocks in the metapelites. HP granulites are characterized by the key associations of garnet-kyanite-ternary feldspar (in metapelites) and garnet-clinopyroxene-plagioclase-quartz (in mafic granulites). In the latter case, rocks are typically orthopyroxene-free. The peak assemblage of the HP metapelites includes garnet + kyanite + ternary feldspar + quartz + rutile. The peak assemblage of the HP mafic granulites is garnet + clinopyroxene + plagioclase + quartz. Meanwhile, the peak assemblage of the calc-silicate granulites is high-Ca garnet (Grs>50) + diopside + scapolite + quartz. On the other hand, characteristic UHT metamorphic assemblage occur as the coexistence of spinel and quartz which indicates the metamorphic temperature is higher than 900℃. The peak assemblage of the UHT rocks in DNCV is corundum + spinel + garnet + sillimanite + quartz. P-T conditions of peak metamorphism within HP granulite facies are: T = 750~850℃, P = 12.5~14kbar. The temperature of UHT metamorphism is higher than 900℃, the pressure is higher than 9~9.4 kbar. SHRIMP U-Pb dating of zircons from the HP mafic granulites and UHT rocks gave minimum ages of ca. 59 Ma and 40 Ma, respectively. HP metapelites gave ca. 60~50Ma and 30Ma. The above facts suggest the DNCV massif experienced HP granulite facies at its peak metamorphism at ˜59 Ma. Thermal disturbance on the local scale to UHT metamorphism occurred at ˜40 Ma. Then isothermal decompression to medium-pressure granulite facies occurred at ˜30Ma, which may reflect a rapid exhumation. The HP rocks are interpreted to be resulted

  7. Combinatorial activity of Flamingo proteins directs convergence and extension within the early zebrafish embryo via the planar cell polarity pathway.

    PubMed

    Formstone, Caroline J; Mason, Ivor

    2005-06-15

    The seven-transmembrane protocadherin, Flamingo, functions in a number of processes during Drosophila development, including planar cell polarity (PCP). To assess the role(s) of Flamingo1/Celsr1 (Fmi1) during vertebrate embryogenesis we have exploited the zebrafish system, identifying two Fmi1 orthologues (zFmi1a and zFmi1b) and employing morpholinos to induce mis-splicing of zebrafish fmi1 mRNAs, to both imitate mutations identified in Drosophila flamingo and generate novel aberrant Flamingo proteins. We demonstrate that in the zebrafish gastrula, Fmi1 proteins function in concert with each other and with the vertebrate PCP proteins, Wnt11 and Strabismus, to mediate convergence and extension during gastrulation, without altering early dorso-ventral patterning. We show that zebrafish Fmi1a promotes extension of the entire antero-posterior axis of the zebrafish gastrula including prechordal plate and ventral diencephalic precursors. However, while we show that control over axial extension is autonomous, we find that Fmi1a is not required within lateral cells undergoing dorsal convergence. PMID:15882862

  8. Synergistic neuroprotection by epicatechin and quercetin: Activation of convergent mitochondrial signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Nichols, M; Zhang, J; Polster, B M; Elustondo, P A; Thirumaran, A; Pavlov, E V; Robertson, G S

    2015-11-12

    In view of evidence that increased consumption of epicatechin (E) and quercetin (Q) may reduce the risk of stroke, we have measured the effects of combining E and Q on mitochondrial function and neuronal survival following oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). Relative to mouse cortical neuron cultures pretreated (24h) with either E or Q (0.1-10μM), E+Q synergistically attenuated OGD-induced neuronal cell death. E, Q and E+Q (0.3μM) increased spare respiratory capacity but only E+Q (0.3μM) preserved this crucial parameter of neuronal mitochondrial function after OGD. These improvements were accompanied by corresponding increases in cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and the expression of CREB-target genes that promote neuronal survival (Bcl-2) and mitochondrial biogenesis (PGC-1α). Consistent with these findings, E+Q (0.1 and 1.0μM) elevated mitochondrial gene expression (MT-ND2 and MT-ATP6) to a greater extent than E or Q after OGD. Q (0.3-3.0μM), but not E (3.0μM), elevated cytosolic calcium (Ca(2+)) spikes and the mitochondrial membrane potential. Conversely, E and E+Q (0.1 and 0.3μM), but not Q (0.1 and 0.3μM), activated protein kinase B (Akt). Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition with L-N(G)-nitroarginine methyl ester (1.0μM) blocked neuroprotection by E (0.3μM) or Q (1.0μM). Oral administration of E+Q (75mg/kg; once daily for 5days) reduced hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. These findings suggest E and Q activate Akt- and Ca(2+)-mediated signaling pathways that converge on NOS and CREB resulting in synergistic improvements in neuronal mitochondrial performance which confer profound protection against ischemic injury. PMID:26363153

  9. Convergent Institutional Logics in Public Higher Education: State Policymaking and Governing Board Activism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastedo, Michael N.

    2009-01-01

    This article investigates the convergent institutional logics driving decision making at an activist governing board in higher education. Through a case study of policymaking by a state-level coordinating board in Massachusetts, the article identifies four primary logics of action: mission differentiation, student opportunity, managerialism, and…

  10. Understanding the antimicrobial activity behind thin- and thick-rolled copper plates.

    PubMed

    Yousuf, Basit; Ahire, Jayesh J; Dicks, Leon M T

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the antibacterial properties of the surfaces of copper plates that were rolled to a thickness of 25 and 100 μm. Differences in topology of 25- and 100-μm-thick copper plates were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Antibacterial activity of the copper surfaces was tested against strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella typhimurium, Streptococcus sp. BY1, Enterococcus sp. BY2, and Bacillus cereus BY3. Changes in viable cell numbers were determined by plating onto optimal growth media and staining with LIVE/DEAD BacLight™. Changes in metabolic activity were recorded by expression of the luciferase (lux) gene. Cell morphology was studied using SEM. Accumulation and diffusion of copper from cells were recorded using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). Lipid and protein oxidation were recorded spectrophotometrically. Surfaces of 25-μm-thick copper plates were rough compared to that of 100-μm-thick copper plates. For most species, a five-log reduction in cell numbers, cell membrane instability, and a decline in metabolic activity were recorded after 15 min of exposure to 25-μm-thick copper plates. Copper accumulated in the cells, and lipids and proteins were oxidized. The rough surface of thinner copper plates (25 μm thick) released more copper and was more antimicrobial compared to thicker (100 μm) copper plates. Cell death was attributed to destabilization of the cell membrane, lipid peroxidation, and protein oxidation. PMID:26860943

  11. Identification of the immunoglobulin class active in the Rose Bengal plate test for bovine brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Corbel, M. J.

    1972-01-01

    The antibodies active in the Rose Bengal plate test (RBPT) for bovine brucellosis have been studied. The results of fractionation experiments showed that RBPT activity was associated with fractions containing immunoglobulin of the IgG1 class; other immunoglobulin classes were inactive in this respect although active in other tests. These results were confirmed by inhibition tests with specific antisera and by elution of the antibody from agglutinated RBPT antigen. The major proportion of the serum complement-fixing activity was also present in the IgG1 fraction and it is suggested that the RBPT and CF reactions are probably mediated by the same antibodies. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Plate 2Plate 2 PMID:4630606

  12. Implications for the active form of human insulin based on the structural convergence of highly active hormone analogues

    PubMed Central

    Jiráček, Jiří; Žáková, Lenka; Antolíková, Emília; Watson, Christopher J.; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Dodson, Guy G.; Brzozowski, Andrzej M.

    2010-01-01

    Insulin is a key protein hormone that regulates blood glucose levels and, thus, has widespread impact on lipid and protein metabolism. Insulin action is manifested through binding of its monomeric form to the Insulin Receptor (IR). At present, however, our knowledge about the structural behavior of insulin is based upon inactive, multimeric, and storage-like states. The active monomeric structure, when in complex with the receptor, must be different as the residues crucial for the interactions are buried within the multimeric forms. Although the exact nature of the insulin’s induced-fit is unknown, there is strong evidence that the C-terminal part of the B-chain is a dynamic element in insulin activation and receptor binding. Here, we present the design and analysis of highly active (200–500%) insulin analogues that are truncated at residue 26 of the B-chain (B26). They show a structural convergence in the form of a new β-turn at B24-B26. We propose that the key element in insulin’s transition, from an inactive to an active state, may be the formation of the β-turn at B24-B26 associated with a trans to cis isomerisation at the B25-B26 peptide bond. Here, this turn is achieved with N-methylated L-amino acids adjacent to the trans to cis switch at the B25-B26 peptide bond or by the insertion of certain D-amino acids at B26. The resultant conformational changes unmask previously buried amino acids that are implicated in IR binding and provide structural details for new approaches in rational design of ligands effective in combating diabetes. PMID:20133841

  13. Nickel-plating for active metal dissolution resistance in molten fluoride salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Luke; Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark; Allen, Todd

    2011-04-01

    Ni electroplating of Incoloy-800H was investigated with the goal of mitigating Cr dissolution from this alloy into molten 46.5%LiF-11.5%NaF-42%KF eutectic salt, commonly referred to as FLiNaK. Tests were conducted in graphite crucibles at a molten salt temperature of 850 °C. The crucible material graphite accelerates the corrosion process due to the large activity difference between the graphite and the alloy. For the purposes of providing a baseline for this study, un-plated Incoloy-800H and a nearly pure Ni-alloy, Ni-201 were also tested. Results indicate that Ni-plating has the potential to significantly improve the corrosion resistance of Incoloy-800H in molten fluoride salts. Diffusion of Cr from the alloy through the Ni-plating does occur and if the Ni-plating is thin enough this Cr eventually dissolves into the molten salt. The post-corrosion test microstructure of the Ni-plating, particularly void formation was also observed to depend on the plating thickness. Diffusion anneals in a helium environment of Ni-plated Incoloy-800H and an Fe-Ni-Cr model alloy were also investigated to understand Cr diffusion through the Ni-plating. Further enhancements in the efficacy of the Ni-plating as a protective barrier against Cr dissolution from the alloy into molten fluoride salts can be achieved by thermally forming a Cr 2O 3 barrier film on the surface of the alloy prior to Ni electroplating.

  14. Effect of mechanical restraint on weldability of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel thick plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serizawa, Hisashi; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Tanaka, Manabu; Kawahito, Yousuke; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Katayama, Seiji

    2011-10-01

    As one of the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels, the weldability of thick F82H plate was experimentally examined using new heat sources in order to minimize the total heat input energy in comparison with TIG welding. A full penetration of 32 mm thick plate could be produced as a combination of a 12 mm deep first layer generated by a 10 kW fiber laser beam and upper layers deposited by a plasma MIG hybrid welding with Ar + 2%O shielding gas. Also, the effect of mechanical restraint on the weldability under EB welding of thick F82H plate was studied by using FEM to select an appropriate specimen size for the basic test. The appropriate and minimum size for the basic test of weldability under EB welding of 90 mm thick plate might be 200 mm in length and 400 mm in width where the welding length should be about 180 mm.

  15. Active control of sound transmission/radiation from elastic plates by vibration inputs. II - Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, V. L.; Fuller, C. R.; Silcox, R. J.; Brown, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    Actively controlled harmonic force inputs were applied experimentally to reduce the sound transmitted through an elastic circular plate. The control implementation used a time domain least mean square adaptive algorithm with two error sensors. The control forces were applied directly to the plate by point force vibration inputs, while the error information and performance were measured in the radiated acoustic field by microphones. Test cases were also performed in which the error sensors were accelerometers mounted on the plate. When accelerometers were used as error sensors, the controller performance was degraded; leading to the conclusion that minimizing plate motion does not necessarily lead to an associated decrease in radiated sound levels. In contrast, the results show excellent attenuation of the transmitted sound field when microphone error sensors were used. This result was consistent over a range of frequencies. In addition, the experimental results are compared to previously derived analytical results and the effect of using a point or global minimization scheme is discussed.

  16. Active vibration control of flexible cantilever plates using piezoelectric materials and artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdeljaber, Osama; Avci, Onur; Inman, Daniel J.

    2016-02-01

    The study presented in this paper introduces a new intelligent methodology to mitigate the vibration response of flexible cantilever plates. The use of the piezoelectric sensor/actuator pairs for active control of plates is discussed. An intelligent neural network based controller is designed to control the optimal voltage applied on the piezoelectric patches. The control technique utilizes a neurocontroller along with a Kalman Filter to compute the appropriate actuator command. The neurocontroller is trained based on an algorithm that incorporates a set of emulator neural networks which are also trained to predict the future response of the cantilever plate. Then, the neurocontroller is evaluated by comparing the uncontrolled and controlled responses under several types of dynamic excitations. It is observed that the neurocontroller reduced the vibration response of the flexible cantilever plate significantly; the results demonstrated the success and robustness of the neurocontroller independent of the type and distribution of the excitation force.

  17. Evidence of left-lateral active motion at the North America-Caribbean plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, S. D.; Ellouz, N.; Corbeau, J.; Rolandone, F.; Mercier De Lepinay, B. F.; Meyer, B.; Momplaisir, R.; Granja, J. L.; Battani, A.; Burov, E. B.; Clouard, V.; Deschamps, R.; Gorini, C.; Hamon, Y.; LE Pourhiet, L.; Loget, N.; Lucazeau, F.; Pillot, D.; Poort, J.; Tankoo, K.; Cuevas, J. L.; Alcaide, J.; Poix, C. J.; Mitton, S.; Rodriguez, Y.; Schmitz, J.; Munoz Martin, A.

    2014-12-01

    The North America-Caribbean plate boundary is one of the least-known among large plate boundaries. Although it was identified early on as an example of a strike-slip fault in the north of Hispaniola, its structure and rate of motion remains poorly constrained. We present the first direct evidence for active sinistral strike-slip motion along this fault, based on swath seafloor mapping of the northern Haiti area. There is evidence for ~16.5 km of apparent strike-slip motion along the mapped segment of the Septentrional fault zone off Cap Haitien town which is terminated to the east onland Dominican republic and in the west to southern Cuban margin. By evaluating these new constraints within the context of geodetic models of global plate motions, we estimate an activity of the fault since 2 Ma with an angular velocity for the Caribbean plate relative to the North America predicted 6-12 mmyr-1 sinistral motion along the Septentrional fault zone. This transform fault was initiated around 20 million years ago in its western segment and since 2 Ma in its eastern segment in response to a regional reorganization of plate velocities and directions, which induced a change in configuration of plate boundaries.

  18. Active vibration reduction by optimally placed sensors and actuators with application to stiffened plates by beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daraji, A. H.; Hale, J. M.

    2014-10-01

    This study concerns new investigation of active vibration reduction of a stiffened plate bonded with discrete sensor/actuator pairs located optimally using genetic algorithms based on a developed finite element modeling. An isotropic plate element stiffened by a number of beam elements on its edges and having a piezoelectric sensor and actuator pair bonded to its surfaces is modeled using the finite element method and Hamilton’s principle, taking into account the effects of piezoelectric mass, stiffness and electromechanical coupling. The modeling is based on the first order shear deformation theory taking into account the effects of bending, membrane and shear deformation for the plate, the stiffening beam and the piezoelectric patches. A Matlab finite element program has been built for the stiffened plate model and verified with ANSYS and also experimentally. Optimal placement of ten piezoelectric sensor/actuator pairs and optimal feedback gain for active vibration reduction are investigated for a plate stiffened by two beams arranged in the form of a cross. The genetic algorithm was set up for optimization of sensor/actuator placement and feedback gain based on the minimization of the optimal linear quadratic index as an objective function to suppress the first six modes of vibration. Comparison study is presented for active vibration reduction of a square cantilever plate stiffened by crossed beams with two sensor/actuator configurations: firstly, ten piezoelectric sensor/actuator pairs are located in optimal positions; secondly, a piezoelectric layer of single sensor/actuator pair covering the whole of the stiffened plate as a SISO system.

  19. Voluntary access to a warm plate reduces hyperactivity in activity-based anorexia.

    PubMed

    Hillebrand, Jacquelien J G; de Rijke, Corine E; Brakkee, Jan H; Kas, Martien J H; Adan, Roger A H

    2005-06-01

    Activity-based anorexia (ABA) is considered an animal model of anorexia nervosa. In ABA, scheduled feeding in combination with voluntary wheel running leads to hyperactivity, reduced food intake, severe body weight loss and hypothermia. In this study it was investigated whether hyperactivity in ABA could be reduced by introducing a warm plate (which was voluntary accessible and did not influence ambient temperature) into a part of the cage. In ad libitum fed rats, the presence of the warm plate did not influence body temperature, running wheel activity (RWA), body weight or food intake. During ABA, however, rats preferred the warm plate and hypothermia was prevented, while hyperactivity and body weight loss were significantly reduced when compared to ABA rats without a plate. Correlation analysis revealed a significant association between basal body temperature and RWA during the light phase in ABA rats. However, there was no evidence that initiation of light phase RWA was a result of hypothermia. These data suggest that ABA rats prefer to prevent hypothermia passively by choosing a warm plate rather than actively regulating body temperature by hyperactivity. PMID:15924912

  20. Accelerated plate tectonics.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D L

    1975-03-21

    The concept of a stressed elastic lithospheric plate riding on a viscous asthenosphere is used to calculate the recurrence interval of great earthquakes at convergent plate boundaries, the separation of decoupling and lithospheric earthquakes, and the migration pattern of large earthquakes along an arc. It is proposed that plate motions accelerate after great decoupling earthquakes and that most of the observed plate motions occur during short periods of time, separated by periods of relative quiescence. PMID:17799689

  1. Actively cooled plate fin sandwich structural panels for hypersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. M.; Beuyukian, C. S.

    1979-01-01

    An unshielded actively cooled structural panel was designed for application to a hypersonic aircraft. The design was an all aluminum stringer-stiffened platefin sandwich structure which used a 60/40 mixture of ethylene glycol/water as the coolant. Eight small test specimens of the basic platefin sandwich concept and three fatigue specimens from critical areas of the panel design was fabricated and tested (at room temperature). A test panel representative of all features of the panel design was fabricated and tested to determine the combined thermal/mechanical performance and structural integrity of the system. The overall findings are that; (1) the stringer-stiffened platefin sandwich actively cooling concept results in a low mass design that is an excellent contender for application to a hypersonic vehicle, and (2) the fabrication processes are state of the art but new or modified facilities are required to support full scale panel fabrication.

  2. A 14-year-long Measurement of the Convergence Rate of the Juan de Fuca and North America Plates Offshore Central Oregon using GPS-Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwell, C. D.; Webb, S. C.; Nooner, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    The motion of the sea floor was measured at a 3000-m-deep site approximately 120 km offshore Central Oregon using the GPS-Acoustic technique in 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003 and 2014. The GPS-Acoustic derived motion relative to the interior of North America agrees with the geomagnetically-derived value within their measurement uncertainties. The time series from the early 2000's was resurrected using two new innovations. The first innovation, a permanent benchmark that has locating channels and mating pins, allows reoccupation of an established benchmark at any later date using an ROV to replace the transponder on the benchmark. The second innovation: an autonomous platform based on a Waveglider that carries a GPS navigated acoustic transponder interrogation system that is wave and solar powered. This enables measurements to be obtained over a GPSA site without requiring a large ship, greatly reducing the cost of a GPSA measurement. Combining data at this site with data from two other GPS-Acoustic seafloor sites on the Juan de Fuca plate, makes it possible to determine a present-day Euler Pole for the Juan de Fuca - North America plates using GPS-Acoustics seafloor geodesy.

  3. Active faulting south of the Himalayan Front: Establishing a new plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeats, Robert S.; Thakur, V. C.

    2008-06-01

    New tectonic uplifts south of the Salt Range Thrust and Himalayan Front Thrust (HFT) represent an outward step of the plate boundary from the principal tectonic displacement zone into the Indo-Gangetic Plain. In Pakistan, the Lilla Anticline deforms fine-grained overbank deposits of the Jhelum River floodplain 15 km south of the Salt Range. The anticline is overpressured in Eocambrian non-marine strata. In northwest India south of Dehra Dun, the Piedmont Fault (PF) lies 15 km south of the HFT. Coalescing fans derived from the Himalaya form a piedmont (Old Piedmont Zone) 15-20 km wide east of the Yamuna River. This zone is uplifted as much as 15-20 m near the PF, and bedding is tilted 5-7° northeast. Holocene thermoluminescence-optically-stimulated luminescence dates for sediments in the Old Piedmont Zone suggest that the uplift rate might be as high as several mm/a. The Old Piedmont Zone is traced northwest 200 km and southeast another 200 km to the Nepal border. These structures, analogous to protothrusts in subduction zones, indicate that the Himalayan plate boundary is not a single structure but a series of structures across strike, including reactivated parts of the Main Boundary Thrust north of the range front, the HFT sensu stricto, and stepout structures on the Indo-Gangetic Plain. Displacement rates on all these structures must be added to determine the local India-Himalaya convergence rate.

  4. Quality assurance guidance for laboratory assessment plates in support of EM environmental sampling and analysis activities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This document is one of several guidance documents developed to support the EM (DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management) Analytical Services program. Its purpose is to introduce assessment plates that can be used to conduct performance assessments of an organization`s or project`s ability to meet quality goals for analytical laboratory activities. These assessment plates are provided as non-prescriptive guidance to EM-support organizations responsible for collection of environmental data for remediation and waste management programs at DOE facilities. The assessments evaluate objectively all components of the analytical laboratory process to determine their proper selection and use.

  5. Convergence Insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... insufficiency? Symptoms of convergence insufficiency include diplopia (double vision) and headaches when reading. Many patients will complain that they have difficulty concentrating on near work (computer, reading, etc.) and that the written word blurs ...

  6. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 effects on proliferation and telomerase activity in sheep growth plate chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) inhibits growth-plate chondrocyte proliferation and limits bone elongation. Gain-of-function FGFR3 mutations cause dwarfism, reduced telomerase activity and shorter telomeres in growth plate chondroyctes suggesting that FGFR3 reduces proliferative capacity, inhibits telomerase, and enhances senescence. Thyroid hormone (T3) plays a role in cellular maturation of growth plate chondrocytes and a known target of T3 is FGFR3. The present study addressed whether reduced FGFR3 expression enhanced telomerase activity, mRNA expression of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and RNA component of telomerase (TR), and chondrocyte proliferation, and whether the stimulation of FGFR3 by T3 evoked the opposite response. Results Sheep growth-plate proliferative zone chondrocytes were cultured and transfected with siRNA to reduce FGFR3 expression; FGFR3 siRNA reduced chondrocyte FGFR3 mRNA and protein resulting in greater proliferation and increased TERT mRNA expression and telomerase activity (p < 0.05). Chondrocytes treated with T3 significantly enhanced FGFR3 mRNA and protein expression and reduced telomerase activity (p < 0.05); TERT and TR were not significantly reduced. The action of T3 at the growth plate may be partially mediated through the FGFR3 pathway. Conclusions The results suggest that FGFR3 inhibits chondrocyte proliferation by down-regulating TERT expression and reducing telomerase activity indicating an important role for telomerase in sustaining chondrocyte proliferative capacity during bone elongation. PMID:23216972

  7. Validation of the plate-out model in the RADAX code used for plate-out and dust activity calculations at PBMR

    SciTech Connect

    Stassen, L.

    2006-07-01

    The two main sources of deposited activities in the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor's (PBMR) Main Power System (MPS), are plate-out of the small fraction of fission product activities released from the PBMR core, and deposition of these activities adsorbed on graphite dust generated during abrasion of the fuel spheres. PBMR uses the German code RADAX for the calculation of fission product transport, plate-out and dust deposition. In this paper a brief overview is given of the plate-out and dust deposition models implemented in the RADAX code. The results of testing activities that were performed for validation of the plate-out model in the RADAX code are also described. These tests form only part of the overall effort to fully verify and validate RADAX. For validation of the plate-out model, results from past experiments in the out-of-pile loop experiment LAMINAR, as well as the two reactor bypass loop experiments VAMPYR-II of the AVR and the DRAGON Hot Gas Duct, were used as test cases. In this paper, the approach used to set up and execute the test cases is briefly described, examples of the test results are given and discussed, and an evaluation of the ability of the results to validate the RADAX code is provided. (authors)

  8. Active control of sound transmission/radiation from elastic plates by vibration inputs. I - Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    Active control of sound radiation from vibrating plates by oscillating forces applied directly to the structure is analytically studied. The model consists of a plane acoustic wave incident on a clamped elastic circular thin plate. Control is achieved by point forces, and quadratic optimization is used to calculate the optimal control gains necessary to minimize a cost function proportional to the radiated acoustic power (the transmitted field). The results show that global attenuation of broadband radiated sound levels for low to mid-range frequencies can be achieved with one or two control forces, irrespective of whether the system is on or off resonance. The efficiency of the control strategy is demonstrated to be related to the nature of the coupling between the plate modes of response and the radiated field.

  9. The origin of spontaneous electrical activity at the end-plate zone.

    PubMed

    Brown, W F; Varkey, G P

    1981-12-01

    Two types of spontaneous electrical activity are present at the end-plate zone: low-voltage negative potentials that correspond to miniature end-plate potentials, and larger voltage negative-positive potentials. The electrogenic origin of the latter has been uncertain. The origin of these larger potentials was investigated in the rat phrenic nerve diaphragm preparation and in human gastrocnemius muscle just prior to intubation during administration of preoperative anesthesia. In the hemidiaphragm the larger voltage negative-positive potentials were rarely triggered by intracellular or tungsten microelectrodes. The negative-positive potentials, however, were clearly triggered by contact of the concentric needle electrode with muscle hemidiaphragm at the end-plate region. The potentials were abolished by curare. Likewise, the equivalent potentials observed at the human gastrocnemius end-plate zone were blocked by neuromuscular blocking agents. Therefore, these positive-negative discharges represent postsynaptic muscle fiber action potentials and not nerve fiber activity. They were probably presynaptically activated by mechanical irritation of the motor axon terminal and preterminal branches. PMID:6275771

  10. Microwave-assisted activation for electroless nickel plating on PMMA microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yen-Chung; Liu, Robert Lian-Huey; Chen, Xin-Liang; Shu, Hsiou-Jeng; Ger, Ming-Der

    2011-05-01

    A novel microwave-assisted activation method for electroless plating on PMMA microspheres is presented in this study. When the microwave irradiation was applied during the activation step, the amount of the Pd species adsorbed on PMMA surfaces was much higher than that of sample pretreated with a conventional activation process without microwave irradiation. With this activation method, it was also shown that the adsorbed Pd species with a size of 4-6 nm were uniformly distributed on the surfaces of the PMMA microspheres, thus a smooth and uniform nickel-phosphorus coating on the PMMA microspheres was obtained by subsequent electroless plating. The samples after each step were characterized by XPS, TEM, ICP and SEM.

  11. Effects of Cycling Conditions of Active Material From Discharged Ni Positive Plates Studied by Inelastic Neutron Scattering Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, Juergen; Varma, Ravi; Diebolt, Lisa; Reid, Margaret

    1998-01-01

    The objectives of this presentation are: identify atomic-level signatures of electrochemical activity of the active material on the Ni positive plates of Ni-H2 batteries, relate finding to cycling conditions and histories, and develop INS spectroscopy as a non-destructive testing technique for the evaluation of Ni-positive plates of Ni-H2 batteries.

  12. The Cell Cycle: An Activity Using Paper Plates to Represent Time Spent in Phases of the Cell Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherer, Yvette D.

    2014-01-01

    In this activity, students are given the opportunity to combine skills in math and geometry for a biology lesson in the cell cycle. Students utilize the data they collect and analyze from an online onion-root-tip activity to create a paper-plate time clock representing a 24-hour cell cycle. By dividing the paper plate into appropriate phases of…

  13. Continuous monitoring of an active fault in a plate suture zone: a creepmeter study of the Chihshang Fault, eastern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.-C.; Angelier, J.; Chu, H.-T.; Hu, J.-C.; Jeng, F.-S.

    2001-04-01

    Data from continuously monitored creepmeters across the active Chihshang Fault in eastern Taiwan are presented. The Chihshang Fault is an active segment of the Longitudinal Valley Fault, the main suture between the converging Philippine and Eurasian plates in Taiwan. Since the 1951 earthquake (Mw=7.0), no earthquake larger than magnitude 6.0 occurred in the Chihshang area. At least during the last 20 years, the Chihshang Fault underwent a steady creep movement, resulting in numerous fractures at the surface. Five creepmeters were installed in 1998 at two sites, Tapo and Chinyuan, within the Chihshang active fault zone. One-year results (from August 1998 to July 1999) show a horizontal shortening of 19.4±0.3 mm and 17.3±0.7 mm, at Tapo and Chinyuan, respectively. These annual shortening rates are in a good agreement with other estimates of strain rate independently obtained from geodetic measurements and geological site investigation. The creepmeter measurements were made on a daily basis, providing accurate information on the previously unknown evolution of creep during the year. The records of fault creep at the Tapo site thus revealed close seasonal correlation with average rainfall: the period of high creep rate coincides with the wet season, whereas that of low creep rate coincides with the dry season. Also, in comparison with the Tapo site, the creep behaviour as a function of time is complex at the Chinyuan site. Possible factors of irregularity are under investigation (thermal effect acting on the concrete basement of the creepmeters, earth tide effect, water table variations in a nearby rice field, and rainfall). The comparison between GPS measurements across the Longitudinal Valley (31 mm/year of horizontal displacement) and the creepmeter measurement across the Chihshang Fault zone (17-19 mm/year of horizontal displacement) suggests that there exists other shortening deformation across the active fault zone in addition to those we have measured from the

  14. Seismic activity of Tokyo area and Philippine Sea plate under Japanese Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, S.; Nakagawa, S.; Nanjo, K.; Kasahara, K.; Panayotopoulos, Y.; Tsuruoka, H.; Kurashimo, E.; Obara, K.; Hirata, N.; Kimura, H.; Honda, R.

    2012-12-01

    The Japanese government has estimated the probability of earthquake occurrence with magnitude 7-class during the next 30 years as 70 %. This estimation is based on five earthquakes that occurred in this area in the late 120 years. However, it has been revealed that this region is lying on more complicated tectonic condition due to the two subducted plates and the various types of earthquakes which have been caused by. Therefore, it is necessary to classify these earthquakes into inter-plate earthquakes and intra-plate ones. Then, we have been constructing a seismic observation network since 5 years ago. Tokyo Metropolitan area is a densely populated region of about 40 million people. It is the center of Japan both in politics and in economy. So that human activities have been conducting quite busily, this region is unsuitable for seismic observation. Then, we have decided to make an ultra high dense seismic observation network. We named it the Metropolitan Seismometer Observation Network; MeSO-net. MeSO-net consists of 296 seismic stations. Minimum interval is about 2km and average interval is about 5km.We picked the P- and S-wave arrival times manually. We applied double-difference tomography method to the dataset and estimated the velocity structure. We depicted the plate boundaries from the newly developed velocity model. And, we referred to the locations of the repeating earthquakes, the distributions of normal hypocenters and the focal mechanisms. Our plate model became relatively flat and a little shallower than previous one.Seismicity of Metropolitan area after the M9 event was compared to the one before M9 event. The seismic activity is about 4 times as high as before the M9 event occurred. We examined spatial distribution of the activated seismicity with respect to the newly developed plate configuration. The activated events are located on upper boundaries and they have almost thrust type mechanisms. Recently, a slow slip event has occurred on October in

  15. Comparison of heat transfer distributions on a flat plate impinged by under-expanded jets from a convergent nozzle and a circular orifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limaye, M. D.; Vedula, R. P.; Prabhu, S. V.

    2013-03-01

    Experiments are carried out for a circular orifice and a nozzle for the same contraction ratio to explore the heat transfer characteristics. The pressure ratios covered in this study are 2.36, 3.04, 3.72, 4.4 and 5.08 for jet to plate distances ( z/d) of 2, 4, 6 and 8. The presence of vena contracta and absence of the stagnation bubble in the orifice flow are confirmed from the surface pressure distributions. It is found that higher Nusselt number for the orifice than the nozzle are due to different shock structures and shear layer dynamics. Peak Nusselt number is found as high as 84 % than that for the nozzle. In the wall jet region, the heat transfer rates for the orifice and nozzle are almost of the same order, thus producing steeper temperature gradients under similar operating conditions. The average heat transfer rates are almost 25 % higher for the orifice than that of the nozzle. The recovery factors are in general higher in case of orifice than the nozzle. However, this has not resulted in decreasing the heat transfer rates due to shear layer dynamics.

  16. Juan de Fuca Plate Ridge-to-Trench Experiment: initial results from active source seismic imaging of the Juan de Fuca plate and Cascadia fore-arc (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbotte, S. M.; Canales, J.; Carton, H. D.; Han, S.; Gibson, J. C.; Janiszewski, H. A.; Horning, G.; Nedimovic, M. R.; Abers, G. A.; Trehu, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Active source seismic data were acquired during the Juan de Fuca Ridge-to-Trench experiment (June-July 2012) to characterize the evolution and structure of the Juan de Fuca plate from formation at the ridge, through evolution in the plate interior, to subduction at the Cascadia trench. The survey provides plate-scale images of the sediments, crust, and shallowest mantle along two ridge-perpendicular transects, one extending from Axial seamount to the Oregon margin near Hydrate Ridge and the other from near Endeavour segment to Grays Harbor offshore Washington. In addition, a 450 km long trench-parallel line ~10 km seaward of the Cascadia deformation front was acquired to characterize variations in plate structure along the margin. Coincident long-streamer (8 km) multi-channel seismic (MCS) and wide-angle ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) data were collected along each transect. Using these data, our current investigations focus on the properties of the thick sediment blanket covering the Juan de Fuca plate and evidence for fluid flow at the deformation front, crustal structure within the plate interior and near the deformation front, and tracking the downgoing plate beneath the margin. Highlights include the discovery of numerous pockmarks on the seafloor providing evidence of active fluid flow up to 60 km west of the deformation front. Along the Oregon transect, a bright decollement horizon is imaged at ~1sec twtt above basement whereas at the Washington margin, protothrusts of the deformation front reach to the top of the oceanic crust. Variations in sediment properties are documented within the margin-parallel transect with changes in the stratigraphic level of decollement. While crustal thickness is quite uniform along the margin (~ 6 km), variations in crustal reflectivity and in shallowest mantle velocities are observed over ~30-50 km length scales that could be related to structural variations in the Cascadia subduction zone. Further landward, the top of the

  17. New GPS constraints on active deformation along the Africa-Iberia plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulali, A.; Ouazar, D.; Tahayt, A.; King, R. W.; Vernant, P.; Reilinger, R. E.; McClusky, S.; Mourabit, T.; Davila, J. M.; Amraoui, N.

    2011-08-01

    We use velocities from 65 continuous stations and 31 survey-mode GPS sites as well as kinematic modeling to investigate present day deformation along the Africa-Iberia plate boundary zone in the western Mediterranean region. The GPS velocity field shows southwestward motion of the central part of the Rif Mountains in northern Morocco with respect to Africa varying between 3.5 and 4.0 mm/yr, consistent with prior published results. Stations in the southwestern part of the Betic Mountains of southern Spain move west-southwest with respect to Eurasia (˜ 2-3 mm/yr). The western component of Betics motion is consistent with partial transfer of Nubia-Eurasia plate motion into the southern Betics. The southward component of Betics motion with respect to Iberia is kinematically consistent with south to southwest motion of the Rif Mountains with respect to Africa. We use block modeling, constrained by mapped surface faults and seismicity to estimate the geometry and rates of strain accumulation on plate boundary structures. Our preferred plate boundary geometry includes one block between Iberia and Africa including the SW Betics, Alboran Sea, and central Rif. This geometry provides a good fit to the observed motions, suggesting a wide transpressive boundary in the westernmost Mediterranean, with deformation mainly accommodated by the Gloria-Azores fault system to the West and the Rif-Tell lineament to the East. Block boundaries encompass aspects of earlier interpretations suggesting three main deformation styles: (i) extension along the NE-SW trending Trans-Alboran shear zone, (ii) dextral strike-slip in the Betics corresponding to a well defined E-W seismic lineament, and (iii) right lateral strike-slip motion extending West to the Azores and right-lateral motion with compression extending East along the Algerian Tell. We interpret differential motion in the Rif-Alboran-Betic system to be driven both by surface processes related the Africa-Eurasia oblique convergence and

  18. Discrete-Layer Piezoelectric Plate and Shell Models for Active Tip-Clearance Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyliger, P. R.; Ramirez, G.; Pei, K. C.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of this work were to develop computational tools for the analysis of active-sensory composite structures with added or embedded piezoelectric layers. The targeted application for this class of smart composite laminates and the analytical development is the accomplishment of active tip-clearance control in turbomachinery components. Two distinct theories and analytical models were developed and explored under this contract: (1) a discrete-layer plate theory and corresponding computational models, and (2) a three dimensional general discrete-layer element generated in curvilinear coordinates for modeling laminated composite piezoelectric shells. Both models were developed from the complete electromechanical constitutive relations of piezoelectric materials, and incorporate both displacements and potentials as state variables. This report describes the development and results of these models. The discrete-layer theories imply that the displacement field and electrostatic potential through-the-thickness of the laminate are described over an individual layer rather than as a smeared function over the thickness of the entire plate or shell thickness. This is especially crucial for composites with embedded piezoelectric layers, as the actuating and sensing elements within these layers are poorly represented by effective or smeared properties. Linear Lagrange interpolation polynomials were used to describe the through-thickness laminate behavior. Both analytic and finite element approximations were used in the plane or surface of the structure. In this context, theoretical developments are presented for the discrete-layer plate theory, the discrete-layer shell theory, and the formulation of an exact solution for simply-supported piezoelectric plates. Finally, evaluations and results from a number of separate examples are presented for the static and dynamic analysis of the plate geometry. Comparisons between the different approaches are provided when

  19. Active upper plate thrust faulting in regions of low plate interface coupling, repeated slow slip events, and coastal uplift: Example from the Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountjoy, Joshu J.; Barnes, Philip M.

    2011-01-01

    Contractional fore-arc faulting and deformation is a characteristic feature of many subduction systems. Definition of the three-dimensional geometry and displacement rates of active, upper plate, out-of-sequence thrust faults along ˜250 km of the upper Hikurangi Margin enables us to examine the relationship between fore-arc deformation and the subduction interface in light of interseismic coupling estimates and distribution of slow slip events, both modeled from GPS measurements. These mid-fore-arc structures include the seaward vergent, outer shelf Lachlan and Ariel faults, with vertical separation rates up to 5 mm/yr, and several other major inner shelf faults with rates that are up to 3.8 mm/yr and comparable with Holocene coastal uplift rates. Seismic reflection imaging and geometric projection of these faults at depth indicate that they splay from the region of the plate interface where geodetic inversions for interseismic coupling and slow slip events suggest that the plate boundary undergoes aseismic slip. This observation may indicate either (1) that frictional properties and interseismic coupling on the plate interface are independent and unrelated to the active splay fault deformation in the inner-middle fore arc or (2) that the active splay faulting reflects long-term mechanical coupling related to higher shear stress, or the relative yield strength of the plate interface to the overriding plate, and that the current pattern of interseismic coupling may not be persistent over geological time scales of 20 ka. We compare structure and processes on the northern Hikurangi and Costa Rican margins and find similarities and significant differences astride these subduction systems.

  20. Comparing the Effectiveness of Traditional and Active Learning Methods in Business Statistics: Convergence to the Mean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weltman, David; Whiteside, Mary

    2010-01-01

    This research shows that active learning is not universally effective and, in fact, may inhibit learning for certain types of students. The results of this study show that as increased levels of active learning are utilized, student test scores decrease for those with a high grade point average. In contrast, test scores increase as active learning…

  1. Direct tests of micro channel plates as the active element of a new shower maximum detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ronzhin, A.; Los, S.; Ramberg, E.; Apresyan, A.; Xie, S.; Spiropulu, M.; Kim, H.

    2015-05-22

    We continue the study of micro channel plates (MCP) as the active element of a shower maximum (SM) detector. We present below test beam results obtained with MCPs detecting directly secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. The MCP efficiency to shower particles is close to 100%. Furthermore, the time resolution obtained for this new type of the SM detector is at the level of 40 ps.

  2. Direct tests of micro channel plates as the active element of a new shower maximum detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronzhin, A.; Los, S.; Ramberg, E.; Apresyan, A.; Xie, S.; Spiropulu, M.; Kim, H.

    2015-09-01

    We continue the study of micro channel plates (MCP) as the active element of a shower maximum (SM) detector. We present below test beam results obtained with MCPs detecting directly secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. The MCP efficiency to shower particles is close to 100%. The time resolution obtained for this new type of the SM detector is at the level of 40 ps.

  3. GSK3β-Activation is a Point of Convergence for HIV-1 and Opiate-Mediated Interactive Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Masvekar, Ruturaj R.; El-Hage, Nazira; Hauser, Kurt F.; Knapp, Pamela E.

    2015-01-01

    Infection of the CNS with HIV-1 occurs rapidly after primary peripheral infection. HIV-1 can induce a wide range of neurological deficits, collectively known as HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders. Our previous work has shown that the selected neurotoxic effects induced by individual viral proteins, Tat and gp120, and by HIV+ supernatant are enhanced by co-exposure to morphine. This mimics co-morbid neurological effects observed in opiate-abusing HIV+ patients. Although there is a correlation between opiate drug abuse and progression of HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders, the mechanisms underlie interactions between HIV-1 and opiates remain obscure. Previous studies have shown that HIV-1 induces neurotoxic effects through abnormal activation of GSK3β. Interestingly, expression of GSK3β has shown to be elevated in brains of young opiate abusers indicating that GSK3β is also linked to neuropathology seen with opiate abusing patients. Thus, we hypothesize that GSK3β activation is a point of convergence for HIV- and opiate-mediated interactive neurotoxic effects. Neuronal cultures were treated with supernatant from HIV-1SF162-infected THP-1 cells, in the presence or absence of morphine and GSK3β inhibitors. Our results show that GSK3β inhibitors, including valproate and small molecule inhibitors, significantly reduce HIV-1-mediated neurotoxic outcomes, and also negate interactions with morphine that result in cell death, suggesting that GSK3β-activation is an important point of convergence and a potential therapeutic target for HIV- and opiate-mediated neurocognitive deficits. PMID:25616162

  4. Reliability and Convergent Validity of the National College Health Risk Behavior Survey Physical Activity Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinger, Mary K.

    2003-01-01

    This study examined the reliability and validity of the National College Health Risk Behavior Survey (NCHRBS) vigorous physical activity (VPA), moderate physical activity (MPA), flexibility (FLEX), and muscular strength and/or endurance (MSE) questions. Twenty college students completed the four items twice during the same day. During the next 7…

  5. Promoting physical activity and healthy eating: convergence in framing the role of industry.

    PubMed

    Dorfman, Lori; Yancey, Antronette K

    2009-10-01

    This commentary addresses a little explored aspect of prevention, namely, how public health practitioners conceptualize the roles of industries whose business interests may be at odds with physical activity and eating nutrient-rich foods. Taking their cues from successful campaigns in tobacco control, many public health advocates have framed obesity as a battle with the food industry. Such framing presents problems when it exacerbates existing tensions between practitioners in nutrition and physical activity, and alienates potential fitness industry partners. Creating healthy environments requires reframing expectations of all industries that influence physical activity and inactivity. A broader view of the influence of corporate practices on physical and social environments will help both physical activity and nutrition advocates identify what they can do together, and in partnership with the business sector, to create environments that promote activity and nutritious eating. PMID:19576928

  6. New and simple plate test for screening relative transfructosylation activity of fungi.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Ana; Santos, Isabel M; Teixeira, José A; Lima, Nelson

    2006-09-01

    Several microorganisms are reported to have transfructosylation activity due to fructosyltransferase and/or fructofuranosidase activities. However, the search for other fungi with higher transfructosylation activity remains a challenge. So, a presumptive and indirect colorimetric plate assay for the evaluation of transfructosylation activity in fungi was developed which involved the simultaneous determination in the same plate of glucose and fructose released from sucrose. The method entailed the (a) glucose oxidase-peroxidase coupled reaction using phenol and 4-aminoantipyrine for determination of glucose; and (b) fructose dehydrogenase oxidation in the presence of a tetrazolium salt for determination of fructose. The presence of enzymes with transfructosylation activity was identified by the formation of pink (presence of glucose) and blue (presence of fructose) halos around the fungal colony. In conclusion, the results showed that the method is suitable for screening a large number of fungi due to its simplicity, reproducibility and rapidity and also gives a relative quantitative idea of the transfructosylation activity of different fungi species. PMID:17196028

  7. Real-time GPS Networks on Active Convergent Margins, Updates From Cascadia and Elsewhere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, K.; Enders, M.; Feaux, K.; Mattioli, G.; Mencin, D.; Meertens, C. M.; Walls, C. P.; Borsa, A. A.

    2012-12-01

    The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), through a NSF-ARRA supplement, has enhanced geophysical infrastructure in in the Pacific Northwest by upgrading 232 Cascadia GPS stations to high-rate (1 Hz), low-latency (<1 s) data streams (Real Time-GPS (RT-GPS). These upgraded sites are in addition to the original 100 RT-GPS sites, which were part of PBO. By blanketing the Pacific Northwest with real-time GPS coverage, the NSF has created a natural laboratory in an area of great scientific interest and high geophysical hazard in order to spur new volcano and earthquake research opportunities. Streaming high-rate GPS data in real-time will enable researchers to investigate strong ground motion during large geophysical events, which has implications for earthquake hazard mitigation. Because of efficiency in upgrading the original 232 RT-GPS sites, there is funding for an additional 40 sites to be added to the real time caster, including 20, which expand the Cascadia footprint, as well as 20 backbone stations. UNAVCO in collaboration with NOAA will stream RT-GPS and met data from select PBO stations equipped with WXT520 meteorological sensors and high rate data communications. These streams support watershed and flood analyses for regional early-warning systems related to NOAA's work with California Department of Water Resources. NOAA receives a total of 54 streams to support its objectives, including stations in Cascadia. Approximately 20 additional met instruments are currently being added with the expansion of the Cascadia footprint extention. While communications continue to be a major obstacle in streaming high rate data in Alaska, progress has been made. Currently, a cluster of stations on Unimak Island is streaming real-time data through the PBO data acquisition system, and recent upgrades in communications have opened the possibility of streaming additional sites on Augustine volcano. In addition, the expansion of cellular networks in Alaska is opening the

  8. Polycarbonate activation for electroless plating by dimethylaminoborane absorption and subsequent nanoparticle deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muench, Falk; Bohn, Sebastian; Rauber, Markus; Seidl, Tim; Radetinac, Aldin; Kunz, Ulrike; Lauterbach, Stefan; Kleebe, Hans-Joachim; Trautmann, Christina; Ensinger, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    Electroless plating of metal films on polymer substrates usually requires the presence of metal particles acting as catalytically active nuclei for the deposition reaction. Herein, we present a novel and versatile approach towards the activation of polycarbonate substrates with metal nanoparticles. It is based on the diffusion of dimethylaminoborane into the polymer matrix, followed by reaction of the sensitized substrates with metal salt solutions. The reducing agent uptake was controlled by changing the duration of the sensitization and the dimethylaminoborane concentration in the sensitization solution. Different seed types (Ag, Au, Pd, Pt and Rh) were deposited by variation of the activation solution. The proposed mechanism was confirmed with FTIR and TEM measurements. In addition, AFM revealed that apart from a slight roughening in the nanometer range, the surface morphology of the polymer remained unchanged, rendering the method viable for template-based nanomaterial fabrication. Due to its pronounced variability, the new technique allows to tailor the activity of polymer substrates for consecutive electroless plating. The feasibility and nanoscale homogeneity of the process were proven by the electroless fabrication of well-defined Au and Pt nanotubes in ion-track etched polycarbonate templates. The combination of features (use of simple and easily scalable wet-chemical processes, facile seed variation, high activation quality on complex surfaces) renders the outlined technique promising for the fabrication of intricate nanomaterials as well as for the metallization of macroscopic work pieces.

  9. Opposing activities of the Ras and Hippo pathways converge on regulation of YAP protein turnover.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xin; Nguyen, Hung Thanh; Chen, Qingfeng; Zhang, Rui; Hagman, Zandra; Voorhoeve, P Mathijs; Cohen, Stephen M

    2014-11-01

    Cancer genomes accumulate numerous genetic and epigenetic modifications. Yet, human cellular transformation can be accomplished by a few genetically defined elements. These elements activate key pathways required to support replicative immortality and anchorage independent growth, a predictor of tumorigenesis in vivo. Here, we provide evidence that the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway is a key barrier to Ras-mediated cellular transformation. The Hippo pathway targets YAP1 for degradation via the βTrCP-SCF ubiquitin ligase complex. In contrast, the Ras pathway acts oppositely, to promote YAP1 stability through downregulation of the ubiquitin ligase complex substrate recognition factors SOCS5/6. Depletion of SOCS5/6 or upregulation of YAP1 can bypass the requirement for oncogenic Ras in anchorage independent growth in vitro and tumor formation in vivo. Through the YAP1 target, Amphiregulin, Ras activates the endogenous EGFR pathway, which is required for transformation. Thus, the oncogenic activity of Ras(V12) depends on its ability to counteract Hippo pathway activity, creating a positive feedback loop, which depends on stabilization of YAP1. PMID:25180228

  10. Opposing activities of the Ras and Hippo pathways converge on regulation of YAP protein turnover

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Xin; Nguyen, Hung Thanh; Chen, Qingfeng; Zhang, Rui; Hagman, Zandra; Voorhoeve, P Mathijs; Cohen, Stephen M

    2014-01-01

    Cancer genomes accumulate numerous genetic and epigenetic modifications. Yet, human cellular transformation can be accomplished by a few genetically defined elements. These elements activate key pathways required to support replicative immortality and anchorage independent growth, a predictor of tumorigenesis in vivo. Here, we provide evidence that the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway is a key barrier to Ras-mediated cellular transformation. The Hippo pathway targets YAP1 for degradation via the βTrCP-SCF ubiquitin ligase complex. In contrast, the Ras pathway acts oppositely, to promote YAP1 stability through downregulation of the ubiquitin ligase complex substrate recognition factors SOCS5/6. Depletion of SOCS5/6 or upregulation of YAP1 can bypass the requirement for oncogenic Ras in anchorage independent growth in vitro and tumor formation in vivo. Through the YAP1 target, Amphiregulin, Ras activates the endogenous EGFR pathway, which is required for transformation. Thus, the oncogenic activity of RasV12 depends on its ability to counteract Hippo pathway activity, creating a positive feedback loop, which depends on stabilization of YAP1. PMID:25180228

  11. Foreland segmentation along an active convergent margin: New constraints in southeastern Sicily (Italy) from seismic and geodetic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musumeci, Carla; Scarfì, Luciano; Palano, Mimmo; Patanè, Domenico

    2014-09-01

    We performed an in-depth analysis of the ongoing tectonics of a large sector of southern Sicily, including the Hyblean Foreland and the front of the Maghrebian Chain, as well as the Ionian Sea offshore, through the integration of seismic and GPS observations collected in the nearly two decades. In particular, a dataset consisting of more than 1100 small-to moderate-magnitude earthquakes (1.0 ≤ ML ≤ 4.6) has been used for local earthquake tomography in order to trace the characteristics of the faulting systems, and for focal mechanisms computation to resolve the current local stress field and to characterise the faulting regime of the investigated area. In addition, GPS measurements, carried out on both episodic and continuous stations, allowed us to infer the main features of the current crustal deformation pattern. Main results evidence that the Hyblean Plateau is subject to a general strike-slip faulting regime, with a maximum horizontal stress axis NW-SE to NNW-SSE oriented, in agreement with the Eurasia-Nubia direction of convergence. The Plateau is separated into two different tectonic crustal blocks by the left-lateral strike-slip Scicli-Ragusa Fault System. The western block moves in agreement with central Sicily while the eastern one accommodates part of the contraction arising from the main Eurasia-Nubia convergence. Furthermore, we provided evidences leading to consider the Hyblean-Maltese Escarpment Fault System as an active boundary characterised by a left-lateral strike-slip motion, separating the eastern block of the Plateau from the Ionian basin. All these evidences lend credit to a crustal segmentation of the southeastern Sicily.

  12. Switchable Ultrathin Quarter-wave Plate in Terahertz Using Active Phase-change Metasurface

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dacheng; Zhang, Lingchao; Gu, Yinghong; Mehmood, M. Q.; Gong, Yandong; Srivastava, Amar; Jian, Linke; Venkatesan, T.; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Hong, Minghui

    2015-01-01

    Metamaterials open up various exotic means to control electromagnetic waves and among them polarization manipulations with metamaterials have attracted intense attention. As of today, static responses of resonators in metamaterials lead to a narrow-band and single-function operation. Extension of the working frequency relies on multilayer metamaterials or different unit cells, which hinder the development of ultra-compact optical systems. In this work, we demonstrate a switchable ultrathin terahertz quarter-wave plate by hybridizing a phase change material, vanadium dioxide (VO2), with a metasurface. Before the phase transition, VO2 behaves as a semiconductor and the metasurface operates as a quarter-wave plate at 0.468 THz. After the transition to metal phase, the quarter-wave plate operates at 0.502 THz. At the corresponding operating frequencies, the metasurface converts a linearly polarized light into a circularly polarized light. This work reveals the feasibility to realize tunable/active and extremely low-profile polarization manipulation devices in the terahertz regime through the incorporation of such phase-change metasurfaces, enabling novel applications of ultrathin terahertz meta-devices. PMID:26442614

  13. Switchable Ultrathin Quarter-wave Plate in Terahertz Using Active Phase-change Metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dacheng; Zhang, Lingchao; Gu, Yinghong; Mehmood, M. Q.; Gong, Yandong; Srivastava, Amar; Jian, Linke; Venkatesan, T.; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Hong, Minghui

    2015-10-01

    Metamaterials open up various exotic means to control electromagnetic waves and among them polarization manipulations with metamaterials have attracted intense attention. As of today, static responses of resonators in metamaterials lead to a narrow-band and single-function operation. Extension of the working frequency relies on multilayer metamaterials or different unit cells, which hinder the development of ultra-compact optical systems. In this work, we demonstrate a switchable ultrathin terahertz quarter-wave plate by hybridizing a phase change material, vanadium dioxide (VO2), with a metasurface. Before the phase transition, VO2 behaves as a semiconductor and the metasurface operates as a quarter-wave plate at 0.468 THz. After the transition to metal phase, the quarter-wave plate operates at 0.502 THz. At the corresponding operating frequencies, the metasurface converts a linearly polarized light into a circularly polarized light. This work reveals the feasibility to realize tunable/active and extremely low-profile polarization manipulation devices in the terahertz regime through the incorporation of such phase-change metasurfaces, enabling novel applications of ultrathin terahertz meta-devices.

  14. Switchable Ultrathin Quarter-wave Plate in Terahertz Using Active Phase-change Metasurface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dacheng; Zhang, Lingchao; Gu, Yinghong; Mehmood, M Q; Gong, Yandong; Srivastava, Amar; Jian, Linke; Venkatesan, T; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Hong, Minghui

    2015-01-01

    Metamaterials open up various exotic means to control electromagnetic waves and among them polarization manipulations with metamaterials have attracted intense attention. As of today, static responses of resonators in metamaterials lead to a narrow-band and single-function operation. Extension of the working frequency relies on multilayer metamaterials or different unit cells, which hinder the development of ultra-compact optical systems. In this work, we demonstrate a switchable ultrathin terahertz quarter-wave plate by hybridizing a phase change material, vanadium dioxide (VO2), with a metasurface. Before the phase transition, VO2 behaves as a semiconductor and the metasurface operates as a quarter-wave plate at 0.468 THz. After the transition to metal phase, the quarter-wave plate operates at 0.502 THz. At the corresponding operating frequencies, the metasurface converts a linearly polarized light into a circularly polarized light. This work reveals the feasibility to realize tunable/active and extremely low-profile polarization manipulation devices in the terahertz regime through the incorporation of such phase-change metasurfaces, enabling novel applications of ultrathin terahertz meta-devices. PMID:26442614

  15. Convergent mutations and kinase fusions lead to oncogenic STAT3 activation in anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Crescenzo, Ramona; Abate, Francesco; Lasorsa, Elena; Tabbo', Fabrizio; Gaudiano, Marcello; Chiesa, Nicoletta; Di Giacomo, Filomena; Spaccarotella, Elisa; Barbarossa, Luigi; Ercole, Elisabetta; Todaro, Maria; Boi, Michela; Acquaviva, Andrea; Ficarra, Elisa; Novero, Domenico; Rinaldi, Andrea; Tousseyn, Thomas; Rosenwald, Andreas; Kenner, Lukas; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Tzankov, Alexander; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Paulli, Marco; Weisenburger, Dennis; Chan, Wing C; Iqbal, Javeed; Piris, Miguel A; Zamo', Alberto; Ciardullo, Carmela; Rossi, Davide; Gaidano, Gianluca; Pileri, Stefano; Tiacci, Enrico; Falini, Brunangelo; Shultz, Leonard D; Mevellec, Laurence; Vialard, Jorge E; Piva, Roberto; Bertoni, Francesco; Rabadan, Raul; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2015-04-13

    A systematic characterization of the genetic alterations driving ALCLs has not been performed. By integrating massive sequencing strategies, we provide a comprehensive characterization of driver genetic alterations (somatic point mutations, copy number alterations, and gene fusions) in ALK(-) ALCLs. We identified activating mutations of JAK1 and/or STAT3 genes in ∼20% of 88 [corrected] ALK(-) ALCLs and demonstrated that 38% of systemic ALK(-) ALCLs displayed double lesions. Recurrent chimeras combining a transcription factor (NFkB2 or NCOR2) with a tyrosine kinase (ROS1 or TYK2) were also discovered in WT JAK1/STAT3 ALK(-) ALCL. All these aberrations lead to the constitutive activation of the JAK/STAT3 pathway, which was proved oncogenic. Consistently, JAK/STAT3 pathway inhibition impaired cell growth in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25873174

  16. Geomorphological analysis of the drainage system on the active convergent system in Azerbaijan, NW Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaveh Firouz, Amaneh; Burg, Jean-Pierre; Giachetta, Emanuele

    2016-04-01

    Rivers are important landforms to reconstruct recent tectonic history because they are sensitive to surface movements, especially uplift and tilting. The most important drainage basins of NW Iran are, from north to south, the Arax River, the Urmia Lake and the Ghezel Ozan River catchment. The morphology of the two adjacent catchments draining into the Caspian Sea, the Arax and Ghezel Ozan were studied to better understand the active tectonics and the effect of fault activity on morphology and erosion rate of NW Iran. We performed a quantitative analysis of channel steepness and concavity, from slope-area plots calculated from digital elevation model. This information has been combined with GPS velocity vectors and seismicity. Both catchments developed under uniform climate conditions. Results show that the two rivers are in morphological disequilibrium; they exhibit profiles with prominent convexities and knickpoints. The Arax River shows higher channel steepness and concavity index in downstream part of the profile. Distribution of knickpoints show scattered elevation between 700m and 3000m. GPS rates display shortening 10 ± 2 mma‑1 and 14 ± 2 mma‑1 in upstream and downstream, respectively. The river profiles of Ghezel Ozan River and its tributaries reveal more disequilibrium downstream where channel steepness and concavity index are higher than upstream. Most knickpoints occur between 1000m and 2000m. The amount of shortening by GPS measurement changes from upstream 13 ± 2 mma‑1to downstream 14 ± 2 mma‑1. Recorded earthquakes, such as Rudbar earthquake (Mw=7.3, 1990), are more frequent downstream. The Urmia Lake is surrounded by many small and large catchments. Only major catchments were considered for the analysis. One of the most active faults, the north Tabriz fault, corresponds to a major knickpoints on the Talkhe rud River. Concordance between river profile analysis, GPS and seismotectonic records suggests that the characteristics of the river

  17. Epigenetic activation of Sox2 gene in the developing vertebrate neural plate

    PubMed Central

    Bouzas, Santiago O.; Marini, Melisa S.; Torres Zelada, Eliana; Buzzi, Ailín L.; Morales Vicente, David A.; Strobl-Mazzulla, Pablo H.

    2016-01-01

    One of the earliest manifestations of neural induction is onset of expression of the neural marker Sox2, mediated by the activation of the enhancers N1 and N2. By using loss and gain of function, we find that Sox2 expression requires the activity of JmjD2A and the Msk1 kinase, which can respectively demethylate the repressive H3K9me3 mark and phosphorylate the activating H3S10 (H3S10ph) mark. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation reveals that the adaptor protein 14-3-3, known to bind to H3S10ph, interacts with JMJD2A and may be involved in its recruitment to regulatory regions of the Sox2 gene. Chromatin immunoprecipitation reveals dynamic binding of JMJD2A to the Sox2 promoter and N-1 enhancer at the time of neural plate induction. Finally, we show a clear temporal antagonism on the occupancy of H3K9me3 and H3S10ph modifications at the promoter of the Sox2 locus before and after the neural plate induction. Taken together, our results propose a series of epigenetic events necessary for the early activation of the Sox2 gene in neural progenitor cells. PMID:27099369

  18. Epigenetic activation of Sox2 gene in the developing vertebrate neural plate.

    PubMed

    Bouzas, Santiago O; Marini, Melisa S; Torres Zelada, Eliana; Buzzi, Ailín L; Morales Vicente, David A; Strobl-Mazzulla, Pablo H

    2016-06-15

    One of the earliest manifestations of neural induction is onset of expression of the neural marker Sox2, mediated by the activation of the enhancers N1 and N2. By using loss and gain of function, we find that Sox2 expression requires the activity of JmjD2A and the Msk1 kinase, which can respectively demethylate the repressive H3K9me3 mark and phosphorylate the activating H3S10 (H3S10ph) mark. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation reveals that the adaptor protein 14-3-3, known to bind to H3S10ph, interacts with JMJD2A and may be involved in its recruitment to regulatory regions of the Sox2 gene. Chromatin immunoprecipitation reveals dynamic binding of JMJD2A to the Sox2 promoter and N-1 enhancer at the time of neural plate induction. Finally, we show a clear temporal antagonism on the occupancy of H3K9me3 and H3S10ph modifications at the promoter of the Sox2 locus before and after the neural plate induction. Taken together, our results propose a series of epigenetic events necessary for the early activation of the Sox2 gene in neural progenitor cells. PMID:27099369

  19. Active vibration control of a sandwich plate by non-collocated positive position feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Giovanni; Amabili, Marco

    2015-04-01

    The active vibration control of a free rectangular sandwich plate by using the Positive Position Feedback (PPF) algorithm was experimentally investigated in a previous study. Four normal modes were controlled by four nearly collocated couples of piezoelectric sensors and actuators. The experimental results of the control showed some limitation, especially in the Multi-Input Multi-Output (MIMO) configuration. This was attributed to the specific type of sensors and their conditioning, as well as to the phase shifts present in the vibration at different points of the structure. An alternative approach is here undertaken by abandoning the configuration of quasi-perfect collocation between sensor and actuator. The positioning of the piezoelectric patches is still led by the strain energy value distribution on the plate; each couple of sensor and actuator is now placed on the same face of the plate but in two distinct positions, opposed and symmetrical with respect to the geometric center of the plate. Single-Input Single-Output (SISO) PPF is tested and the transfer function parameters of the controller are tuned according to the measured values of modal damping. Then the participation matrices necessary for the MIMO control algorithm are determined by means of a completely experimental procedure. PPF is able to mitigate the vibration of the first four natural modes, in spite of the rigid body motions due to the free boundary conditions. The amplitude reduction achieved with the non-collocated configuration is much larger than the one obtained with the nearby collocated one. The phase lags were addressed in the MIMO algorithm by correction phase delays, further increasing the performance of the controller.

  20. Convergence of dopamine and glutamate signaling onto striatal ERK activation in response to drugs of abuse

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, Emma; Salery, Marine; Vanhoutte, Peter; Caboche, Jocelyne

    2014-01-01

    Despite their distinct targets, all addictive drugs commonly abused by humans evoke increases in dopamine (DA) concentration within the striatum. The main DA Guanine nucleotide binding protein couple receptors (GPCRs) expressed by medium-sized spiny neurons of the striatum are the D1R and D2R, which are positively and negatively coupled to cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling, respectively. These two DA GPCRs are largely segregated into distinct neuronal populations, where they are co-expressed with glutamate receptors in dendritic spines. Direct and indirect interactions between DA GPCRs and glutamate receptors are the molecular basis by which DA modulates glutamate transmission and controls striatal plasticity and behavior induced by drugs of abuse. A major downstream target of striatal D1R is the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase pathway. ERK activation by drugs of abuse behaves as a key integrator of D1R and glutamate NMDAR signaling. Once activated, ERK can trigger chromatin remodeling and induce gene expression that permits long-term cellular alterations and drug-induced morphological and behavioral changes. Besides the classical cAMP/PKA pathway, downstream of D1R, recent evidence implicates a cAMP-independent crosstalk mechanism by which the D1R potentiates NMDAR-mediated calcium influx and ERK activation. The mounting evidence of reciprocal modulation of DA and glutamate receptors adds further intricacy to striatal synaptic signaling and is liable to prove relevant for addictive drug-induced signaling, plasticity, and behavior. Herein, we review the evidence that built our understanding of the consequences of this synergistic signaling for the actions of drugs of abuse. PMID:24409148

  1. The Interpretation of Crustal Dynamics Data in Terms of Plate Interactions and Active Tectonics of the Anatolian Plate and Surrounding Regions in the Middle East

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toksoz, M. Nafi; Reilinger, Robert E.

    1990-01-01

    During the past 6 months, efforts were concentrated on the following areas: (1) Continued development of realistic, finite element modeling of plate interactions and associated deformation in the Eastern Mediterranean; (2) Neotectonic field investigations of seismic faulting along the active fault systems in Turkey with emphasis on identifying seismic gaps along the North Anatolian fault; and (3) Establishment of a GPS regional monitoring network in the zone of ongoing continental collision in eastern Turkey (supported in part by NSF).

  2. Multiple Active Compounds from Viscum album L. Synergistically Converge to Promote Apoptosis in Ewing Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Twardziok, Monika; Kleinsimon, Susann; Rolff, Jana; Jäger, Sebastian; Eggert, Angelika; Seifert, Georg; Delebinski, Catharina I

    2016-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma is the second most common bone cancer in children and adolescents, with poor prognosis and outcome in ~70% of initial diagnoses and 10-15% of relapses. Hydrophobic triterpene acids and hydrophilic lectins and viscotoxins from European mistletoe (Viscum album L.) demonstrate anticancer properties, but have not yet been investigated for Ewing sarcoma. Commercial Viscum album L. extracts are aqueous, excluding the insoluble triterpenes. We recreated a total mistletoe effect by combining an aqueous extract (viscum) and a triterpene extract (TT) solubilized with cyclodextrins. Ewing sarcoma cells were treated with viscum, TT and viscumTT in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. In vitro and ex vivo treatment of Ewing sarcoma cells with viscum inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent fashion, while viscumTT combination treatment generated a synergistic effect. Apoptosis occurred via intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways, evidenced by activation of both CASP8 and CASP9. We show that viscumTT treatment shifts the balance of apoptotic regulatory proteins towards apoptosis, mainly via CLSPN, MCL1, BIRC5 and XIAP downregulation. ViscumTT also demonstrated strong antitumor activity in a cell line- and patient-derived mouse model, and may be considered an adjuvant therapy option for pediatric patients with Ewing sarcoma. PMID:27589063

  3. Geophysical constraints on geodynamic processes at convergent margins: A global perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemieva, Irina; Thybo, Hans; Shulgin, Alexey

    2016-04-01

    Convergent margins, being the boundaries between colliding lithospheric plates, form the most disastrous areas in the world due to intensive, strong seismicity and volcanism. We review global geophysical data in order to illustrate the effects of the plate tectonic processes at convergent margins on the crustal and upper mantle structure, seismicity, and geometry of subducting slab. We present global maps of free-air and Bouguer gravity anomalies, heat flow, seismicity, seismic Vs anomalies in the upper mantle, and plate convergence rate, as well as 20 profiles across different convergent margins. A global analysis of these data for three types of convergent margins, formed by ocean-ocean, ocean-continent, and continent-continent collisions, allows us to recognize the following patterns. (1) Plate convergence rate depends on the type of convergent margins and it is significantly larger when, at least, one of the plates is oceanic. However, the oldest oceanic plate in the Pacific ocean has the smallest convergence rate. (2) The presence of an oceanic plate is, in general, required for generation of high-magnitude (M N 8.0) earthquakes and for generating intermediate and deep seismicity along the convergent margins. When oceanic slabs subduct beneath a continent, a gap in the seismogenic zone exists at depths between ca. 250 km and 500 km. Given that the seismogenic zone terminates at ca. 200 km depth in case of continent-continent collision, we propose oceanic origin of subducting slabs beneath the Zagros, the Pamir, and the Vrancea zone. (3) Dip angle of the subducting slab in continent-ocean collision does not correlate neither with the age of subducting oceanic slab, nor with the convergence rate. For ocean-ocean subduction, clear trends are recognized: steeply dipping slabs are characteristic of young subducting plates and of oceanic plates with high convergence rate, with slab rotation towards a near-vertical dip angle at depths below ca. 500 km at very high

  4. Why does continental convergence stop

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, A.

    1985-01-01

    Convergence between India and Asia slowed at 45 Ma when they collided, but continues today. This requires that substantial proportions of the Indian and/or Asian lithospheric mantle are still being subducted. The resulting slab-pull is probably comparable with that from complete lithospheric slabs and may promote continued continental convergence even after collision. Since descending lithospheric slabs are present at all collision zones at the time of collision such continued convergence may be general after continental collisions. It may cease only when there is a major (global) plate reorganization which results in new forces on the convergent continents that may counteract the slab-pull. These inferences may be tested on the late Paleozoic collision between Gondwanaland and Laurasia. This is generally considered to have been complete by mid-Permian time (250 Ma). However, this may be only the time of docking of Gondwanaland with North America, not that of the cessation of convergence. Paleomagnetic polar-wander paths for the Gondwanide continents exhibit consistently greater latitudinal shifts from 250 Ma to 200 Ma than those of Laurasia when corrected for post-Triassic drift, suggesting that convergence continued through late Permian well into the Triassic. It may have been accommodated by crustal thickening under what is now the US Coastal Plain, or by strike-slip faulting. Convergence may have ceased only when Pangea began to fragment again, in which case the cause for its cessation may be related to the cause of continental fragmentation.

  5. Convergent phosphomodulation of the major neuronal dendritic potassium channel Kv4.2 by pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Gupte, Raeesa P; Kadunganattil, Suraj; Shepherd, Andrew J; Merrill, Ronald; Planer, William; Bruchas, Michael R; Strack, Stefan; Mohapatra, Durga P

    2016-02-01

    The endogenous neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is secreted by both neuronal and non-neuronal cells in the brain and spinal cord, in response to pathological conditions such as stroke, seizures, chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain. PACAP has been shown to exert various neuromodulatory and neuroprotective effects. However, direct influence of PACAP on the function of intrinsically excitable ion channels that are critical to both hyperexcitation as well as cell death, remain largely unexplored. The major dendritic K(+) channel Kv4.2 is a critical regulator of neuronal excitability, back-propagating action potentials in the dendrites, and modulation of synaptic inputs. We identified, cloned and characterized the downstream signaling originating from the activation of three PACAP receptor (PAC1) isoforms that are expressed in rodent hippocampal neurons that also exhibit abundant expression of Kv4.2 protein. Activation of PAC1 by PACAP leads to phosphorylation of Kv4.2 and downregulation of channel currents, which can be attenuated by inhibition of either PKA or ERK1/2 activity. Mechanistically, this dynamic downregulation of Kv4.2 function is a consequence of reduction in the density of surface channels, without any influence on the voltage-dependence of channel activation. Interestingly, PKA-induced effects on Kv4.2 were mediated by ERK1/2 phosphorylation of the channel at two critical residues, but not by direct channel phosphorylation by PKA, suggesting a convergent phosphomodulatory signaling cascade. Altogether, our findings suggest a novel GPCR-channel signaling crosstalk between PACAP/PAC1 and Kv4.2 channel in a manner that could lead to neuronal hyperexcitability. PMID:26456351

  6. Regulation of a protein phosphatase cascade allows convergent dopamine and glutamate signals to activate ERK in the striatum.

    PubMed

    Valjent, Emmanuel; Pascoli, Vincent; Svenningsson, Per; Paul, Surojit; Enslen, Hervé; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Stipanovich, Alexandre; Caboche, Jocelyne; Lombroso, Paul J; Nairn, Angus C; Greengard, Paul; Hervé, Denis; Girault, Jean-Antoine

    2005-01-11

    Many drugs of abuse exert their addictive effects by increasing extracellular dopamine in the nucleus accumbens, where they likely alter the plasticity of corticostriatal glutamatergic transmission. This mechanism implies key molecular alterations in neurons in which both dopamine and glutamate inputs are activated. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), an enzyme important for long-term synaptic plasticity, is a good candidate for playing such a role. Here, we show in mouse that d-amphetamine activates ERK in a subset of medium-size spiny neurons of the dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens, through the combined action of glutamate NMDA and D1-dopamine receptors. Activation of ERK by d-amphetamine or by widely abused drugs, including cocaine, nicotine, morphine, and Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol was absent in mice lacking dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of M(r) 32,000 (DARPP-32). The effects of d-amphetamine or cocaine on ERK activation in the striatum, but not in the prefrontal cortex, were prevented by point mutation of Thr-34, a DARPP-32 residue specifically involved in protein phosphatase-1 inhibition. Regulation by DARPP-32 occurred both upstream of ERK and at the level of striatal-enriched tyrosine phosphatase (STEP). Blockade of the ERK pathway or mutation of DARPP-32 altered locomotor sensitization induced by a single injection of psychostimulants, demonstrating the functional relevance of this regulation. Thus, activation of ERK, by a multilevel protein phosphatase-controlled mechanism, functions as a detector of coincidence of dopamine and glutamate signals converging on medium-size striatal neurons and is critical for long-lasting effects of drugs of abuse. PMID:15608059

  7. Active flexural-slip faulting: A study from the Pamir-Tian Shan convergent zone, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Chen, Jie; Thompson, Jessica A.; Burbank, Douglas W.; Yang, Xiaodong

    2015-06-01

    The flexural-slip fault (FSF), a type of secondary fault generated by bed-parallel slip, occurs commonly and plays an important role in accommodating fold growth. Although the kinematics and mechanics of FSFs are well studied, relatively few field observations or geometric models explore its geomorphic expression. In the Pamir-Tian Shan convergent zone, NW China, suites of well-preserved FSF scarps displace fluvial terraces in the Mingyaole and Wulagen folds. Integrating interpretations of Google Earth images, detailed geologic and geomorphic mapping, and differential GPS measurements of terrace surfaces, we summarize geomorphic features that typify these faults and create kinematic models of active flexural-slip faulting. Our study indicates the following: (i) FSF scarps commonly occur near synclinal hinges, irrespective of whether (a) the dip direction of beds on either side of the hinge is unidirectional or in opposite directions, (b) the hinge is migrating or fixed, or (c) the hinge shape is narrow and angular or wide and curved. (ii) Active FSFs are likely to produce higher scarps on steeper beds, whereas lower or no topographic scarps typify gentler beds. (iii) Tilt angles of the terrace surface displaced above FSFs progressively decrease farther away from the hinge, with abrupt changes in slope coinciding with FSF scarps; the changes in tilt angle and scarp height have a predictable geometric relationship. (iv) Active FSFs can accommodate a significant fraction of total slip and play a significant role in folding deformation. (v) Active FSFs may be used to assess seismic hazards associated with active folds and associated blind thrusts.

  8. Congruence between muscle activity and kinematics in a convergently derived prey-processing behavior.

    PubMed

    Konow, Nicolai; Camp, Ariel L; Sanford, Christopher P J

    2008-08-01

    Quantification of anatomical and physiological characteristics of the function of a musculoskeletal system may yield a detailed understanding of how the organizational levels of morphology, biomechanics, kinematics, and muscle activity patterns (MAPs) influence behavioral diversity. Using separate analyses of these organizational levels in representative study taxa, we sought patterns of congruence in how organizational levels drive behavioral modulation in a novel raking prey-processing behavior found in teleosts belonging to two evolutionarily distinct lineages. Biomechanically divergent prey (elusive, robust goldfish and sedentary, malleable earthworms) were fed to knifefish, Chitala ornata (Osteoglossomorpha) and brook trout, Salvelinus fontinalis (Salmoniformes). Electromyography recorded MAPs from the hyoid protractor, jaw adductor, sternohyoideus, epaxialis, and hypaxialis musculature, while sonomicrometry sampled deep basihyal kinesis and contractile length dynamics in the basihyal protractor and retractor muscles. Syntheses of our results with recent analyses of cranial morphology and raking kinematics showed that raking in Salvelinus relies on an elongated cranial out lever, extensive cranial elevation and a curved cleithrobranchial ligament (CBL), and that both raking MAPs and kinematics remain entirely unmodulated-a highly unusual trait, particularly among feeding generalists. Chitala had a shorter CBL and a raking power stroke involving increased retraction of the elongated pectoral girdle during raking on goldfish. The raking MAP was also modulated in Chitala, involving an extensive overlap between muscle activity of the preparatory and power stroke phases, driven by shifts in hypaxial timing and recruitment of the hyoid protractor muscle. Sonomicrometry revealed that the protractor hyoideus muscle stored energy from retraction of the pectoral girdle for ca. 5-20 ms after onset of the power stroke and then hyper-extended. This mechanism of elastic

  9. PLD1 regulates Xenopus convergent extension movements by mediating Frizzled7 endocytosis for Wnt/PCP signal activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeyoon; Lee, Seung Joon; Kim, Gun-Hwa; Yeo, Inchul; Han, Jin-Kwan

    2016-03-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is involved in the regulation of receptor-associated signaling, cell movement, cell adhesion and endocytosis. However, its physiological role in vertebrate development remains poorly understood. In this study, we show that PLD1 is required for the convergent extension (CE) movements during Xenopus gastrulation by activating Wnt/PCP signaling. Xenopus PLD1 protein is specifically enriched in the dorsal region of Xenopus gastrula embryo and loss or gain-of-function of PLD1 induce defects in gastrulation and CE movements. These defective phenotypes are due to impaired regulation of Wnt/PCP signaling pathway. Biochemical and imaging analysis using Xenopus tissues reveal that PLD1 is required for Fz7 receptor endocytosis upon Wnt11 stimulation. Moreover, we show that Fz7 endocytosis depends on dynamin and regulation of GAP activity of dynamin by PLD1 via its PX domain is crucial for this process. Taken together, our results suggest that PLD1 acts as a new positive mediator of Wnt/PCP signaling by promoting Wnt11-induced Fz7 endocytosis for precise regulation of Xenopus CE movements. PMID:26806705

  10. Unusual transglycosylation activity of Flavobacterium meningosepticum endoglycosidases enables convergent chemoenzymatic synthesis of core fucosylated complex N-glycopeptides

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Li, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Structurally well-defined, homogeneous glycopeptides and glycoproteins are indispensable tools for functional glycomics studies. By screening of various endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidases using an appropriate synthetic donor and acceptor substrates, we have found that the Flavobacterium meningosepticum endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidases glycosidases (GH family 18), including Endo-F2 and Endo-F3, were able to glycosylate α-1,6-fucosylated GlcNAc derivative to provide natural, core-fucosylated complex type N-glycopeptides. The Endo-F2 and Endo-F3 were efficient for transferring both sialylated and asialylated glycans and were highly specific for an α-1,6-fucosyllated GlcNAc-peptide as acceptor for transglycosylation, as they showed only marginal activity on non-fucosylated GlcNAc-peptide. In contrast, we found that the commonly used endoglycosidases such as Endo-A and Endo-M, which belong to GH family 85, were unable to take α-1,6-fucosyl-GlcNAc derivative as acceptor for transglycosylation. The novel activity of Endo-F2 and Endo-F3 was successfully applied for a highly convergent chemoenzymatic synthesis of a full-size CD52 glycopeptide antigen carrying both terminal sialic acid and core fucose. This is the first report on endoglycosidases that are able to glycosylate α-1,6-fucosylated GlcNAc derivatives to form natural core-fucosylated glycopeptides. PMID:21374780

  11. Fabrication of a metal membrane on a perforated polymer substrate by palladium aerosol activation and subsequent electroless plating.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Jeong Hoon; Hwang, Jungho

    2009-02-01

    Fabrication of a metal membrane on a perforated flexible poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) substrate was developed by employing spark-generated palladium (Pd) aerosol activation and the subsequent electroless plating of Pd. After aerosol activation, Pd agglomerates of spark-generated primary particles (approximately 2.6 nm in diameter) with a face-centered-cubic structure were deposited uniformly on the PTFE substrate. Homogeneous Pd particles with an average size of 188 nm were tightly packed together to form a Pd membrane after Pd plating. The average plating rate of Pd during 30 min of plating at an activation intensity of 25 microg/cm(2) was 14.2 microg/cm(2) x min. PMID:20353212

  12. Protein synthesis inhibitors reveal differential regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and stress-activated protein kinase pathways that converge on Elk-1.

    PubMed Central

    Zinck, R; Cahill, M A; Kracht, M; Sachsenmaier, C; Hipskind, R A; Nordheim, A

    1995-01-01

    Inhibitors of protein synthesis, such as anisomycin and cycloheximide, lead to superinduction of immediate-early genes. We demonstrate that these two drugs activate intracellular signaling pathways involving both the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) cascades. The activation of either pathway correlates with phosphorylation of the c-fos regulatory transcription factor Elk-1. In HeLa cells, anisomycin stabilizes c-fos mRNA when protein synthesis is inhibited to only 50%. Under these conditions, anisomycin, in contrast to cycloheximide, rapidly induces kinase activation and efficient Elk-1 phosphorylation. However, full inhibition of translation by either drug leads to prolonged activation of SAPK activity, while MAPK induction is transient. This correlates with prolonged Elk-1 phosphorylation and c-fos transcription. Elk-1 induction and c-fos activation are also observed in KB cells, in which anisomycin strongly induces SAPKs but not MAPKs. Purified p54 SAPK alpha efficiently phosphorylates the Elk-1 C-terminal domain in vitro and comigrates with anisomycin-activated kinases in in-gel kinase assays. Thus, Elk-1 provides a potential convergence point for the MAPK and SAPK signaling pathways. The activation of signal cascades and control of transcription factor function therefore represent prominent processes in immediate-early gene superinduction. PMID:7651411

  13. A review of structural patterns and melting processes in the Archean craton of West Greenland: Evidence for crustal growth at convergent plate margins as opposed to non-uniformitarian models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polat, Ali; Wang, Lu; Appel, Peter W. U.

    2015-11-01

    The Archean craton of West Greenland consists of many fault-bounded Eoarchean to Neoarchean tectonic terranes (crustal blocks). These tectonic terranes are composed mainly of tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) gneisses, granitic gneisses, metavolcanic-dominated supracrustal belts, layered anorthositic complexes, and late- to post-tectonic granites. Rock assemblages and geochemical signatures in these terranes suggest that they represent fragments of dismembered oceanic island arcs, consisting mainly of TTG plutons, tholeiitic to calc-alkaline basalts, boninites, picrites, and cumulate layers of ultramafic rocks, gabbros, leucogabbros and anorthosites, with minor sedimentary rocks. The structural characteristics of the terrane boundaries are consistent with the assembly of these island arcs through modern style of horizontal tectonics, suggesting that the Archean craton of West Greenland grew at convergent plate margins. Several supracrustal belts that occur at or near the terrane boundaries are interpreted as relict accretionary prisms. The terranes display fold and thrust structures and contain numerous 10 cm to 20 m wide bifurcating, ductile shear zones that are characterized by a variety of structures including transposed and redistributed isoclinal folds. Geometrically these structures are similar to those occurring on regional scales, suggesting that the Archean craton of West Greenland can be interpreted as a continental scale accretionary complex, such as the Paleozoic Altaids. Melting of metavolcanic rocks during tectonic thickening in the arcs played an important role in the generation of TTGs. Non-uniformitarian models proposed for the origin of Archean terranes have no analogs in the geologic record and are inconsistent with structural, lithological, petrological and geochemical data collected from Archean terranes over the last four decades. The style of deformation and generation of felsic rocks on outcrop scales in the Archean craton of West

  14. Converging or Diverging Lens?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branca, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Why does a lens magnify? Why does it shrink objects? Why does this happen? The activities that we propose here are useful in helping us to understand how lenses work, and they show that the same lens can have different magnification capabilities. A converging lens can also act as a diverging lens. (Contains 4 figures.)

  15. Direct tests of a pixelated microchannel plate as the active element of a shower maximum detector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Apresyan, A.; Los, S.; Pena, C.; Presutti, F.; Ronzhin, A.; Spiropulu, M.; Xie, S.

    2016-05-07

    One possibility to make a fast and radiation resistant shower maximum detector is to use a secondary emitter as an active element. We report our studies of microchannel plate photomultipliers (MCPs) as the active element of a shower-maximum detector. We present test beam results obtained using Photonis XP85011 to detect secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. We focus on the use of the multiple pixels on the Photonis MCP in order to find a transverse two-dimensional shower distribution. A spatial resolution of 0.8 mm was obtained with an 8 GeV electron beam. As a result, a method for measuring themore » arrival time resolution for electromagnetic showers is presented, and we show that time resolution better than 40 ps can be achieved.« less

  16. Design and analysis of a plate-fin sandwich actively cooled structural panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. M.

    1978-01-01

    The skin structure of hydrogen fueled hypersonic transport vehicles traveling at Mach 6 and above must be designed to withstand, for relatively long periods of time, the aerodynamic heating effects which are far more severe than those encountered by the supersonic aircraft of today. The use of conventional aircraft materials such as aluminum in combination with forced convection active cooling to accommodate aerodynamic heating is addressed. The basic active cooling concept consists of a stringer stiffened plate-fin sandwich. The sandwich surface is subjected to the aerodynamic heat flux which is transferred, via convection, to a coolant that is forced through the sandwich under pressure. The coolant, in turn, circulates in a closed loop through a hydrogen heat exchanger and back through the skin panel.

  17. Direct tests of a pixelated microchannel plate as the active element of a shower maximum detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apresyan, A.; Los, S.; Pena, C.; Presutti, F.; Ronzhin, A.; Spiropulu, M.; Xie, S.

    2016-08-01

    One possibility to make a fast and radiation resistant shower maximum detector is to use a secondary emitter as an active element. We report our studies of microchannel plate photomultipliers (MCPs) as the active element of a shower-maximum detector. We present test beam results obtained using Photonis XP85011 to detect secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. We focus on the use of the multiple pixels on the Photonis MCP in order to find a transverse two-dimensional shower distribution. A spatial resolution of 0.8 mm was obtained with an 8 GeV electron beam. A method for measuring the arrival time resolution for electromagnetic showers is presented, and we show that time resolution better than 40 ps can be achieved.

  18. Do convergent developmental mechanisms underlie convergent phenotypes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wray, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    Convergence is a pervasive evolutionary process, affecting many aspects of phenotype and even genotype. Relatively little is known about convergence in developmental processes, however, nor about the degree to which convergence in development underlies convergence in anatomy. A switch in the ecology of sea urchins from feeding to nonfeeding larvae illustrates how convergence in development can be associated with convergence in anatomy. Comparisons to more distantly related taxa, however, suggest that this association may be limited to relatively close phylogenetic comparisons. Similarities in gene expression during development provide another window into the association between convergence in developmental processes and convergence in anatomy. Several well-studied transcription factors exhibit likely cases of convergent gene expression in distantly related animal phyla. Convergence in regulatory gene expression domains is probably more common than generally acknowledged, and can arise for several different reasons. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Investigating Fault Slip Budget in the Cocos Subducting Plate from Characteristically Repeating Earthquake Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, L. A.; Taira, T.

    2013-12-01

    High-quality seismic and geodetic data from dense networks have revealed that the Cocos subducting plate in the Mesoamerican region has been experienced a rich variety of transient slip including earthquakes, slow slip events, and tectonic tremors. Detecting these transient deformation fields with estimations in the locations of responsible deformation areas is a fundamental first step in addressing the slip budget in the Mesoamerican region. We search for characteristically repenting earthquakes (CREs) in the Cocos subducting plate in the Mesoamerican region, by analyzing over 30 years of historical seismic data collected by the National Seismological Service (SSN). Spatiotemporal properties in the CRE activity would allow us to infer aseismic slip surrounding the CRE sequences. The seismic signatures in our target area show a remarkable resemblance to zones where repeating earthquakes have been previously identified. Namely, the flat segment of subducting slab shows a strongly couple zone followed wide creeping zone that extends up to ~250km inland. Our preliminary search for CREs was limited to analyze broadband seismic data (with a 1-8 Hz bandpass filter) recorded at two stations, we however identify a few candidate CRE sequences with a cross-correlation threshold of 0.90. We will extend our analysis to data collected from other stations and to examine smaller earthquakes to detect additional CREs and will evaluate aseismic slip rates from the identified CRE sequences.

  20. A wavelet approach for active-passive vibration control of laminated plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji-Zeng; Wang, Xiao-Min; Zhou, You-He

    2012-04-01

    As an extension of the wavelet approach to vibration control of piezoelectric beam-type plates developed earlier by the authors, this paper proposes a hybrid activepassive control strategy for suppressing vibrations of laminated rectangular plates bonded with distributed piezoelectric sensors and actuators via thin viscoelastic bonding layers. Owing to the low-pass filtering property of scaling function transform in orthogonal wavelet theory, this waveletbased control method has the ability to automatically filter out noise-like signal in the feedback control loop, hence reducing the risk of residual coupling effects which are usually the source of spillover instability. Moreover, the existence of thin viscoelastic bonding layers can further improve robustness and reliability of the system through dissipating the energy of any other possible noise induced partially by numerical errors during the control process. A simulation procedure based on an advanced wavelet-Galerkin technique is suggested to realize the hybrid active-passive control process. Numerical results demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed approach.

  1. Optimal placement of piezoelectric plates for active vibration control of gas turbine blades: experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, F.; Marx, N.; Gentili, S.; Schwingshackl, C. W.; Di Mare, L.; Cerri, G.; Dini, D.

    2012-04-01

    It is well known that the gas turbine blade vibrations can give rise to catastrophic failures and a reduction of the blades life because of fatigue related phenomena[1]-[3] . In last two decades, the adoption of piezoelectric elements, has received considerable attention by many researcher for its potential applicability to different areas of mechanical, aerospace, aeronautical and civil engineering. Recently, a number of studies of blades vibration control via piezoelectric plates and patches have been reported[4]-[6] . It was reported that the use of piezoelectric elements can be very effective in actively controlling vibrations. In one of their previous contributions[7] , the authors of the present manuscript studied a model to control the blade vibrations by piezoelectric elements and validated their results using a multi-physics finite elements package (COMSOL) and results from the literature. An optimal placement method of piezoelectric plate has been developed and applied to different loading scenarios for realistic configurations encountered in gas turbine blades. It has been demonstrated that the optimal placement depends on the spectrum of the load, so that segmented piezoelectric patches have been considered and, for different loads, an optimal combination of sequential and/or parallel actuation and control of the segments has been studied. In this paper, an experimental investigation carried out by the authors using a simplified beam configuration is reported and discussed. The test results obtained by the investigators are then compared with the numerical predictions [7] .

  2. Active Tectonics in the Tibetan Plateau Region as a Consequence of Plate-Scale Forces on the Eurasian Plate: a Model Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Sancho, C.; Govers, R. M. A.; Tesauro, M.

    2015-12-01

    We study the forces acting on the Eurasian plate and the resulting present-day deformation. We use mechanically balanced models based on plate contact forces (continental collision, plate boundary friction at transform faults and subduction contacts, and slab roll-back forces), lithospheric body forces (from lateral variations in topography, density structure) and mantle convective tractions including dynamic topography. These forces drive Eurasia in the direction of absolute motion and fit observed horizontal stress directions to first order. We employ plane stress spherical finite elements and linear visco-elastic rheology to compute the lithosphere-averaged mechanical response. We consider the influence of including the major active faults in these models. Here we focus on intra-plate deformation in the Tibetan Plateau. We assume five different compositions for the upper and lower crust and one for the upper mantle, and we use geotherms and crustal thickness maps to constrain depth-dependent rheology profiles and to estimate vertically averaged viscosities. Predicted velocities show to be very sensitive to the reference point: Eurasia consists of cratonic regions surrounded by more recently active "mobile belts". Using the Siberian or the East European craton as a reference gives significantly different deformation solutions. Best-matching velocities are obtained using Eurasia's "center of deformation", defined on the basis of force moments and located in the southeastern Siberian craton. Comparison with horizontal GPS velocities shows a good correlation in velocity directions and magnitudes in the Tibetan Plateau, Tarim Basin and Tien Shan. Strain rate and vertical axis rotation rates also provide a good fit. Velocity field and clockwise rotation pattern in Southeast Asia are highly dependent on the vertically averaged horizontal viscosity distribution contrast and its geometry. Faults do not significantly affect the predicted surface velocity field

  3. Active faulting in northern Chile: ramp stacking and lateral decoupling along a subduction plate boundary?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armijo, Rolando; Thiele, Ricardo

    1990-04-01

    Two large features parallel to the coastline of northern Chile have long been suspected to be the sites of young or active deformation: (1) The 700-km long Coastal Scarp, with average height (above sea level) of about 1000 m; (2) The Atacama Fault zone, that stretches linearly for about 1100 km at an average distance of 30-50 km from the coastline. New field observations combined with extensive analysis of aerial photographs demonstrate that both the Coastal Scarp and the Atacama Fault are zones of Quaternary and current fault activity. Little-degraded surface breaks observed in the field indicate that these fault zones have recently generated large earthquakes ( M = 7-8). Normal fault offsets observed in marine terraces in the Coastal Scarp (at Mejillones Peninsula) require tectonic extension roughly orthogonal to the compressional plate boundary. Strike-slip offsets of drainage observed along the Salar del Carmen and Cerro Moreno faults (Atacama Fault system) imply left-lateral displacements nearly parallel to the plate boundary. The left-lateral movement observed along the Atacama Fault zone may be a local consequence of E-W extension along the Coastal Scarp. But if also found everywhere along strike, left-lateral decoupling along the Atacama Fault zone would be in contradiction with the right lateral component of Nazca-South America motion predicted by models of present plate kinematics. Clockwise rotation with left-lateral slicing of the Andean orogen south of the Arica bend is one way to resolve this contradiction. The Coastal Scarp and the Atacama Fault zone are the most prominent features with clear traces of activity within the leading edge of continental South America. The great length and parallelism of these features with the subduction zone suggest that they may interact with the subduction interface at depth. We interpret the Coastal Scarp to be a west-dipping normal fault or flexure and propose that it is located over an east-dipping ramp stack at

  4. The interpretation of crustal dynamics data in terms of plate interactions and active tectonics of the Anatolian Plate and surrounding regions in the Middle East

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toksoz, M. Nafi

    1987-01-01

    The primary effort in this study during the past year has been directed along two separate lines: (1) expanding finite element models to include the entire Anatolian plate, the Aegean Sea and the Northeastern Mediterranean Sea, and (2) investigating the relationship between fault geometry and earthquake activity for the North Anatolian and similar strike-slip faults (e.g., San Andreas Fault). Both efforts are designed to provide an improved basis for interpreting the Crustal Dynamics measurements NASA has planned for this region. The initial phases of both investigations have been completed and the results are being prepared for publication. These investigations are described briefly.

  5. Active tectonics west of New Zealand's Alpine Fault: South Westland Fault Zone activity shows Australian Plate instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pascale, Gregory P.; Chandler-Yates, Nicholas; Dela Pena, Federico; Wilson, Pam; May, Elijah; Twiss, Amber; Cheng, Che

    2016-04-01

    The 300 km long South Westland Fault Zone (SWFZ) is within the footwall of the Central Alpine Fault (<20 km away) and has 3500 m of dip-slip displacement, but it has been unknown if the fault is active. Here the first evidence for SWFZ thrust faulting in the "stable" Australian Plate is shown with cumulative dip-slip displacements up to 5.9 m (with 3 m throw) on Pleistocene and Holocene sediments and gentle hanging wall anticlinal folding. Cone penetration test (CPT) stratigraphy shows repeated sequences within the fault scarp (consistent with thrusting). Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating constrains the most recent rupture post-12.1 ± 1.7 ka with evidence for three to four events during earthquakes of at least Mw 6.8. This study shows significant deformation is accommodated on poorly characterized Australian Plate structures northwest of the Alpine Fault and demonstrates that major active and seismogenic structures remain uncharacterized in densely forested regions on Earth.

  6. Fluxless Brazing and Heat Treatment of a Plate-Fin Sandwich Actively Cooled Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuyukian, C. S.

    1978-01-01

    The processes and techniques used to fabricate plate-fin sandwich actively cooled panels are presented. The materials were 6061 aluminum alloy and brazing sheet having clad brazing alloy. The panels consisted of small scale specimens, fatigue specimens, and a large 0.61 m by 1.22 m test panel. All panels were fluxless brazed in retorts in heated platen presses while exerting external pressure to assure intimate contact of details. Distortion and damage normally associated with that heat treatment were minimized by heat treating without fixtures and solution quenching in an organic polymer solution. The test panel is the largest fluxless brazed and heat treated panel of its configuration known to exist.

  7. Experimental active structural acoustic control of simply supported plates using a weighted sum of spatial gradients.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Daniel R; Johnson, William R; Sommerfeldt, Scott D; Blotter, Jonathan D

    2014-11-01

    A limitation currently facing active structural acoustic control (ASAC) researchers is that an ideal minimization quantity for use in the control algorithms has not been developed. A novel parameter termed the "weighted sum of spatial gradients" (WSSG) was recently developed for use in ASAC and shown to effectively attenuate acoustic radiation from a vibrating flat simply supported plate in computer simulations. This paper extends this research from computer simulations and provides experimental test results. The results presented show that WSSG is a viable control quantity and provides better results than the volume velocity approach. The paper also investigates several of the challenges presented by the use of WSSG. These include determining a method to measure WSSG experimentally, an analysis of the influence of noise on WSSG control results and complications presented when degenerate modes exist. Results are shown and discussed for several experimental configurations. PMID:25373961

  8. Tectonic activity evolution of the Scotia-Antarctic Plate boundary from mass transport deposit analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Lara F.; Bohoyo, Fernando; Hernández-Molina, F. Javier; Casas, David; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Ruano, Patricia; Maldonado, Andrés.

    2016-04-01

    The spatial distribution and temporal occurrence of mass transport deposits (MTDs) in the sedimentary infill of basins and submerged banks near the Scotia-Antarctic plate boundary allowed us to decode the evolution of the tectonic activity of the relevant structures in the region from the Oligocene to present day. The 1020 MTDs identified in the available data set of multichannel seismic reflection profiles in the region are subdivided according to the geographic and chronological distributions of these features. Their spatial distribution reveals a preferential location along the eastern margins of the eastern basins. This reflects local deformation due to the evolution of the Scotia-Antarctic transcurrent plate boundary and the impact of oceanic spreading along the East Scotia Ridge (ESR). The vertical distribution of the MTDs in the sedimentary record evidences intensified regional tectonic deformation from the middle Miocene to Quaternary. Intensified deformation started at about 15 Ma, when the ESR progressively replaces the West Scotia Ridge (WSR) as the main oceanic spreading center in the Scotia Sea. Coevally with the WSR demise at about 6.5 Ma, increased spreading rates of the ESR and numerous MTDs were formed. The high frequency of MTDs during the Pliocene, mainly along the western basins, is also related to greater tectonic activity due to uplift of the Shackleton Fracture Zone by tectonic inversion and extinction of the Antarctic-Phoenix Ridge and involved changes at late Pliocene. The presence of MTDs in the southern Scotia Sea basins is a relevant indicator of the interplay between sedimentary instability and regional tectonics.

  9. Anti-epidermal-cell-surface pemphigus antibody detaches viable epidermal cells from culture plates by activation of proteinase.

    PubMed Central

    Farb, R M; Dykes, R; Lazarus, G S

    1978-01-01

    Immunoglobulin from pemphigus patients binds to the surface of mouse epidermal cells in culture. Cells incubated with the pemphigus antibody are easily detached from culture plates whereas cells incubated with serum from normal patients remain on the plate. Pemphigus antibody-mediated cell detachment is blocked by the addition of the proteinase inhibitors soybean trypsin inhibitor and alpha2-macroglobulin to the culture media. Detachable cells are viable, and activation of the complement cascade is not necessary for cell detachment. The anti-cell-surface antibody of pemphigus appears to disrupt adhesion between viable epidermal cells by activation of proteinase. Images PMID:272663

  10. Enzyme activity deviates due to spatial and temporal temperature profiles in commercial microtiter plate readers.

    PubMed

    Grosch, Jan-Hendrik; Sieben, Michaela; Lattermann, Clemens; Kauffmann, Kira; Büchs, Jochen; Spieß, Antje C

    2016-03-01

    Microtiter plates (MTP) and automatized techniques are increasingly applied in the field of biotechnology. However, the susceptibility of MTPs to edge effects such as thermal gradients can lead to high variation of measured enzyme activities. In an effort to enhance experimental reliability, to quantify, and to minimize instrument-caused deviations in enzyme kinetics between two MTP-readers, we comprehensively quantified temperature distribution in 96-well MTPs. We demonstrated the robust application of the absorbance dye cresol red as easily applicable temperature indicator in cuvettes and MTPs and determined its accuracy to ±0.16°C. We then quantified temperature distributions in 96-well MTPs revealing temperature deviations over single MTP of up to 2.2°C and different patterns in two commercial devices (BioTek Synergy 4 and Synergy Mx). The obtained liquid temperature was shown to be substantially controlled by evaporation. The temperature-induced enzyme activity variation within MTPs amounted to about 20 %. Activity deviations between MTPs and to those in cuvettes were determined to 40 % due to deviations from the set temperature in MTPs. In conclusion, we propose a better control of experimental conditions in MTPs or alternative experimental systems for reliable determination of kinetic parameters for bioprocess development. PMID:26709721

  11. Numerical simulation of passive-active cells with microperforated plates or porous veils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermúdez, A.; Gamallo, P.; Hervella-Nieto, L.; Prieto, A.

    2010-08-01

    The main goal of this work consists in the numerical simulation of a multichannel passive-active noise control system based on devices involving a particular kind of cell. Each cell consists of a parallelepipedic box with all their faces rigid, except one of them, where a porous veil or a rigid micro-perforated plate (MPP) is placed. Firstly, the frequency response of a single passive cell is computed, when it is surrounded by an unbounded air domain (an anechoic room) and harmonic excitations are imposed. For the numerical solution of this three-dimensional problem, the original unbounded domain is truncated by using exact perfectly matched layers (PML) and the resulting partial differential equation (PDE) is discretized with a standard finite element method. Secondly, the passive cells are transformed into active by assuming that the opposite face to the passive one may vibrate like a piston in order to reduce noise. The corresponding multichannel active control problem is stated and analyzed in the framework of the optimal control theory. A numerical method is proposed to assess and compare different control configurations.

  12. Topology optimization of magnetorheological fluid layers in sandwich plates for semi-active vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaopeng; Kang, Zhan

    2015-08-01

    This paper investigates topology optimization of the magnetorheological (MR) fluid layer in a sandwich plate for improving the semi-active vibration control performance. Therein, a uniform magnetic field is applied across the MR fluid layer to provide a semi-active damping control effect. In the optimization model, the pseudo-densities describing the MR fluid material distribution are taken as design variables, and an artificial magneto-rheological fluid model (AMRF) with penalization is proposed to suppress intermediate density values. For reducing the vibration level under harmonic excitations, the dynamic compliance under a specific excitation frequency, or the frequency-aggregated dynamic compliance in a given frequency band, is taken as the objective function to be minimized. In this context, the adjoint-variable sensitivity analysis scheme is derived. The effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method are demonstrated by numerical examples, in which the structural dynamic performance can be remarkably improved through optimization. The influences of several key factors on the optimal designs are also explored. It is shown that the AMRF model is effective in yielding clear boundaries in the final optimal solutions without use of additional regularization techniques.

  13. Optimal placement and active vibration control for piezoelectric smart flexible cantilever plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhi-cheng; Zhang, Xian-min; Wu, Hong-xin; Zhang, Hong-hua

    2007-04-01

    Some flexible appendages of spacecraft are cantilever plate structures, such as sun plate and satellite antenna. Thus, vibration problem will be caused by parameter uncertainties and environmental disturbances. In this paper, piezoelectric ceramics patches are used as sensors and actuators to suppress the vibration of the smart flexible clamped plate. Firstly, modal equations and piezoelectric control equations of cantilever plate are derived. Secondly, an optimal placement method for the locations of piezoelectric actuators and sensors is developed based on the degree of observability and controllability indices for cantilever plate. The bending and torsional modes are decoupled by the proposed method using bandwidth Butterworth filter. Thirdly, an efficient control method by combining positive position feedback and proportional-derivative control is proposed for vibration reduction. The analytical results for modal frequencies, transient responses and control responses are carried out. Finally, an experimental setup of piezoelectric smart plate is designed and built up. The modal frequencies and damping ratios of the plate setup are obtained by identification method. Also, the experimental studies on vibration control of the cantilever plate including bending modes and torsional modes are conducted. The analytical and experimental results demonstrate that the presented control method is feasible, and the optimal placement method is effective.

  14. Evaluation of the antinociceptive activities of enaminone compounds on the formalin and hot plate tests in mice

    PubMed Central

    Masocha, Willias; Kombian, Samuel B.; Edafiogho, Ivan O.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we found that methyl 4-(4′-bromophenyl)aminocyclohex-3-en-6-methyl-2-oxo-1-oate (E139), an anticonvulsant enaminone, has antinociceptive activity in the hot plate test. In this study we evaluated the antinociceptive activity of five anilino enaminones E139, ethyl 4-(4′-chlorophenyl)amino-6-methyl-2-oxocyclohex-3-en-1-oate (E121), ethyl 4-(4′-bromophenyl)amino-6-methyl-2-oxocyclohex-3-en-1-oate (E122), methyl 4-(4′-chlorophenyl)amino-6-methyl-2-oxocyclohex-3-en-1-oate (E138) and ethyl 4-(4′-fluorophenyl)amino-6-methyl-2-oxocyclohex-3-en-1-oate (BRG 19) using the formalin and hot plate tests. E139 has been reported to exert its effects via enhancement of extracellular GABA levels, thus tiagabine, a GABA transporter inhibitor, was evaluated as a control together with indomethacin. Tiagabine had antinociceptive activity in both phase 1 (neurogenic pain) and phase 2 (inflammatory pain) of the formalin test, whereas indomethacin had activity only in phase 2. E139 and E138 had antinociceptive activity in both phases of the formalin test, whereas E121 had activity only in phase 1 and BRG 19 had activity only in phase 2. E122 had no significant activity in either phase. In the hot plate test only E139 had antinociceptive activity. Administration of either bicuculline, a GABAA receptor antagonist, or CGP 35348, a GABAB receptor antagonist, blocked the antinociceptive activity of E139. In conclusion our results indicate that E139 has antinociceptive activity in the formalin and hot plate tests that are dependent on GABA receptors. PMID:26916642

  15. Evaluation of the antinociceptive activities of enaminone compounds on the formalin and hot plate tests in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masocha, Willias; Kombian, Samuel B.; Edafiogho, Ivan O.

    2016-02-01

    Recently, we found that methyl 4-(4‧-bromophenyl)aminocyclohex-3-en-6-methyl-2-oxo-1-oate (E139), an anticonvulsant enaminone, has antinociceptive activity in the hot plate test. In this study we evaluated the antinociceptive activity of five anilino enaminones E139, ethyl 4-(4‧-chlorophenyl)amino-6-methyl-2-oxocyclohex-3-en-1-oate (E121), ethyl 4-(4‧-bromophenyl)amino-6-methyl-2-oxocyclohex-3-en-1-oate (E122), methyl 4-(4‧-chlorophenyl)amino-6-methyl-2-oxocyclohex-3-en-1-oate (E138) and ethyl 4-(4‧-fluorophenyl)amino-6-methyl-2-oxocyclohex-3-en-1-oate (BRG 19) using the formalin and hot plate tests. E139 has been reported to exert its effects via enhancement of extracellular GABA levels, thus tiagabine, a GABA transporter inhibitor, was evaluated as a control together with indomethacin. Tiagabine had antinociceptive activity in both phase 1 (neurogenic pain) and phase 2 (inflammatory pain) of the formalin test, whereas indomethacin had activity only in phase 2. E139 and E138 had antinociceptive activity in both phases of the formalin test, whereas E121 had activity only in phase 1 and BRG 19 had activity only in phase 2. E122 had no significant activity in either phase. In the hot plate test only E139 had antinociceptive activity. Administration of either bicuculline, a GABAA receptor antagonist, or CGP 35348, a GABAB receptor antagonist, blocked the antinociceptive activity of E139. In conclusion our results indicate that E139 has antinociceptive activity in the formalin and hot plate tests that are dependent on GABA receptors.

  16. Neotectonics across an active oblique-divergent plate margin, SW Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umhoefer, P.; Arrowsmith, R.; Kent, G.; Driscoll, N.; Martínez-Gutiérrez, G.; Malservisi, R.; Plattner, C.; Busch, M.; Maloney, S.; Buchanan, B.

    2008-12-01

    Onshore and offshore paleoseismology provides new constraints on late Quaternary to present deformation rates across the SW margin of the Gulf of California plate boundary at the latitude of La Paz, Baja California Sur, Mexico. The paleoseismology is being conducted in an innovative approach using traditional onshore techniques and CHIRP seismic data in the immediate offshore area on the same fault systems; the CHIRP survey was completed in August, 2008. From west to east the Carrizal, San Juan de los Planes (SJP), and La Gata faults are being studied in detail, and to date the San Jose del Cabo (SJC) fault is being studied in reconnaissance. GPS results suggest rates of motion across the whole array (including the offshore Espiritu Santo and Cerralvo faults) of 1-2 mm/year. Estimated slip rates in the late Quaternary on the Carrizal fault from uplifted marine terraces, mapping, dating units, and two trenches are 0.1 - 0.2 mm/yr. Estimated slip rates from the Los Planes fault is 0.1 to possibly as much as 1 mm/yr. Modern bathymetric data and earthquakes in 1969 (M=5.6) and 1995 (M=6.2) on the Cerralvo and Espiritu Santo faults, respectively, suggest that those faults are much more active than the Carrizal and Los Planes faults. Reconnaissance on the Cabo fault suggests that it was, and possibly remains, a more active fault, perhaps in the range of 0.5 mm/yr. We conclude from the ongoing project that the faulting pattern across the SW margin of the Gulf of California is dominated by a large step from the major Cerralvo and Cabo faults in the south to the NW to the Espiritu Santo fault on the east side of Espiritu Santo Island; these faults define the eastern edge of the narrow shallow marine shelf and the highest onshore mountain range in the southern Baja California peninsula suggesting that they were the major faults that produced the edge of the oblique rift for most or all of its history. The Los Planes - La Gata faults would be the southern splays of the

  17. Coincident Activity of Converging Pathways Enables Simultaneous Long-Term Potentiation and Long-Term Depression in Hippocampal CA1 Network In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jun; Zhang, Xia; Xu, Lin

    2008-01-01

    Memory is believed to depend on activity-dependent changes in the strength of synapses, e.g. long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD), which can be determined by the sequence of coincident pre- and postsynaptic activity, respectively. It remains unclear, however, whether and how coincident activity of converging efferent pathways can enable LTP and LTD in the pathways simultaneously. Here, we report that, in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats, stimulation (600 pulses, 5 Hz) to Schaffer preceding to commissural pathway within a 40-ms timing window induced similar magnitudes of LTP in both pathways onto synapses of CA1 neurons, with varied LTP magnitudes after reversal of the stimulation sequence. In contrast, in urethane-anesthetized or freely-moving rats, the stimulation to Schaffer preceding to commissural pathway induced Schaffer LTP and commissural LTD simultaneously within a 40-ms timing window, without affecting synaptic efficacy in the reversed stimulation sequence. Coincident activity of Schaffer pathways confirmed the above findings under pentobarbital and urethane anesthesia. Thus, coincident activity of converging afferent pathways tends to switch the pathways to be LTP only or LTP/LTD depending on the activity states of the hippocampus. This network rule strengthens the view that activity-dependent synaptic plasticity may well contribute to memory process of the hippocampal network with flexibility or stability from one state to another. PMID:18682723

  18. Sensitive and simple flow injection analysis of formaldehyde using an activated barrel plating nickel electrode.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Yen; Yangi, Hsueh-Hui; Zen, Jyh-Myng; Shih, Ying

    2011-01-01

    A flow injection analysis coupled with electrochemical detection at an activated barrel plating nickel electrode (Ni-BPE) was developed as a sensitive, simple, and low-cost formaldehyde sensor. The mechanism of Ni-BPE toward the electrocatalytic oxidation of formaldehyde in alkaline medium at ambient temperature was proposed to be based on the electrocatalytic oxidation of formaldehyde by Ni(III)O(OH) species. Under the optimized conditions (flow rate = 1.2 mL/min; detection potential = +0.5 V versus Ag/AgCl), a good linearity in the window of 0.037 to 10 microg/mL formaldehyde was observed, and the LOD of 0.23 microg/L was calculated. The RSDs of intraday (n = 10) and interday (n = 6) replicate measurements of 0.185-5 microg/mL formaldehyde ranged from 1.45 to 3.60%, indicating good reproducibility of the proposed method. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of formaldehyde in commercial nail polish samples and a drinking water sample. PMID:22165025

  19. Active buckling control of smart plate as diaphragm with PZT5 sensor/actuator patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viliani, N. S.; Pourrostami, H.; Mostafavi, S. M.; Hashemizadeh, F.; Safian, M. R.; Hashemi, M.

    2014-12-01

    In current study, buckling analyses of smart plate is presented. The various types of piezoelectric materials are under investigation for petrochemical industry and other applications. The PZT sensor output is used to determine the input to the PZT actuator using the feedback control algorithm for buckling control of FG plate. This study investigated the governing differential equations of motion of smart plate which includes FG plate as the membrane and PZT5 patches as actuator and sensor. The Fourier series method adopted to obtain the solution for the equation of motion. Also the effects of feedback gain and FGM volume fraction exponent on the critical buckling load for PZT-5A are studied. The potential application of current study can be found in optimal design of sensor's diaphragm. The variation of critical buckling load vs. feedback gain indicates that by increasing the feedback gain, the buckling load increases.

  20. Opponent activities of Shh and BMP signaling during floor plate induction in vivo.

    PubMed

    Patten, Iain; Placzek, Marysia

    2002-01-01

    We performed in vivo experiments in chick embryos that examined whether application of an exogenous source of Shh protein mimics the ability of the notochord to induce ectopic floor plate cells in the neural tube. Shh cannot act alone to induce a floor plate. However, coapplication of Shh and chordin, a BMP antagonist normally coexpressed with Shh in the notochord, results in a marked switch from dorsal to ventral cell fate, including a dramatic and widespread induction of floor plate cells. These data provide in vivo evidence that notochord-derived BMP antagonists may normally generate a permissive environment for the Shh-mediated induction of floor plate. Further experiments performed to address the source of BMPs that are inhibited by the action of chordin suggest that they derive specifically from the surface ectoderm and dorsal-most neuroepithelium. These data indicate that, at neural groove stages, dorsally derived BMPs affect ventral-most regions of the neural plate, suggesting a novel long-range action of BMPs. Together, these studies suggest that the balance of dorsally derived signals and notochord-derived signals determines the extent of floor plate cell induction. PMID:11790302

  1. Synthesis of Rh/Macro-Porous Alumina Over Micro-Channel Plate and Its Catalytic Activity Tests for Diesel Reforming.

    PubMed

    Seong, Yeon Baek; Kim, Yong Sul; Park, No-Kuk; Lee, Tae Jin

    2015-11-01

    Macro-porous Al2O3 as the catalytic support material was synthesized using colloidal polystyrene spheres over a micro-channel plate. The colloidal polystyrene spheres were used as a template for the production of an ordered macro porous material using an alumina nitrate solution as the precursor for Al2O3. The close-packed colloidal crystal array template method was applied to the formulation of ordered macro-porous Al2O3 used as a catalytic support material over a micro-channel plate. The solvent in the mixture solution, which also contained the colloidal polystyrene solution, aluminum nitrate solution and the precursor of the catalytic active materials (Rh), was evaporated in a vacuum oven at 50 degrees C. The ordered polystyrene spheres and aluminum salt of the solid state were deposited over a micro channel plate, and macro-porous Al2O3 was formed after calcination at 600 degrees C to remove the polystyrene spheres. The catalytic activity of the Rh/macro-porous alumina supported over the micro-channel plate was tested for diesel reforming. PMID:26726602

  2. Plate Margin Deformation and Active Tectonics Along the Northern Edge of the Yakutat Terrane in the Saint Elias Orogen, Alaska and Yukon, Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruhn, Ronald L.; Sauber, Jeanne; Cotton, Michele M.; Pavlis, Terry L.; Burgess, Evan; Ruppert, Natalia; Forster, Richard R.

    2012-01-01

    The northwest directed motion of the Pacific plate is accompanied by migration and collision of the Yakutat terrane into the cusp of southern Alaska. The nature and magnitude of accretion and translation on upper crustal faults and folds is poorly constrained, however, due to pervasive glaciation. In this study we used high-resolution topography, geodetic imaging, seismic, and geologic data to advance understanding of the transition from strike-slip motion on the Fairweather fault to plate margin deformation on the Bagley fault, which cuts through the upper plate of the collisional suture above the subduction megathrust. The Fairweather fault terminates by oblique-extensional splay faulting within a structural syntaxis, allowing rapid tectonic upwelling of rocks driven by thrust faulting and crustal contraction. Plate motion is partly transferred from the Fairweather to the Bagley fault, which extends 125 km farther west as a dextral shear zone that is partly reactivated by reverse faulting. The Bagley fault dips steeply through the upper plate to intersect the subduction megathrust at depth, forming a narrow fault-bounded crustal sliver in the obliquely convergent plate margin. Since . 20 Ma the Bagley fault has accommodated more than 50 km of dextral shearing and several kilometers of reverse motion along its southern flank during terrane accretion. The fault is considered capable of generating earthquakes because it is linked to faults that generated large historic earthquakes, suitably oriented for reactivation in the contemporary stress field, and locally marked by seismicity. The fault may generate earthquakes of Mw <= 7.5.

  3. Update on Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) Activities in the PNW Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, K.

    2005-12-01

    As of September 2005 The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), part of the larger NSF-funded EarthScope project, is completing year 2 in the installation phase of 875 continuously operating GPS instruments in the Western United States. The Pacific Northwest (PNW) region will install 149 continuous GPS stations by the end of 2008. These sites are distributed along the fore and back-arc of the Cascadia Subduction Zone and at Mt. St. Helens. At the end of year 2, the PNW Region of PBO reached its year two installation goal of 41 GPS stations. The scientific emphasis priority during year 2 was to capture Episodic Tremor And Slip (ETS) on the Cascadia Subduction Zone by installing GPS sites stations in southern Oregon, on the Olympic peninsula (where four strainmeters were also installed) and on Mt. St. Helens. Work on Mt. St. Helens volcano included the installation of five stations in October 2004. Data analyses showed that one of the PBO sites located high on the SE flank of the volcano moved 4 cm SE between mid-November 2004 and January 2005. This was most likely due to growth of the new lava dome against the SE crater wall. As a result of this activity, the PBO obtained two additional permits from the USFS, and these sites were installed at the beginning of February, 2005. PBO has continued to work with the USFS to complete the permitting process for nine more GPS locations on the flanks of the volcano. Due to required cultural and botanical surveys, these permits are not expected to be approved until at least June of 2006. The pace of installations will increase during year three of the project where scientific priortity will shift to installing stations in southern Oregon and the backarc/Basin and Range transition zone. For the PNW region, this translates into approximately 4 new GPS installations per month. In addition to continued construction, activities will focus on completing reconnaissance and permit submittal activities for all sites proposed to be located on

  4. Fault and graben growth along active magmatic divergent plate boundaries in Iceland and Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippanera, D.; Acocella, V.; Ruch, J.; Abebe, B.

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies highlight the importance of annual-scale dike-induced rifting episodes in developing normal faults and graben along the active axis of magmatic divergent plate boundaries (MDPB). However, the longer-term (102-105 years) role of diking on the cumulative surface deformation and evolution of MDPB is not yet well understood. To better understand the longer-term normal faults and graben along the axis of MDPB, we analyze fissure swarms in Iceland and Ethiopia. We first focus on the simplest case of immature fissure swarms, with single dike-fed eruptive fissures; these consist of a <1 km wide graben bordered by normal faults with displacement up to a few meters, consistent with theoretical models and geodetic data. A similar structural pattern is found, with asymmetric and multiple graben, within wider mature fissure swarms, formed by several dike-fed eruptive fissures. We then consider the lateral termination of normal faults along these grabens to detect their upward or downward propagation. Most faults terminate as open fractures on flat surface, suggesting downward fault propagation; this is consistent with recent experiments showing dike-induced normal faults propagating downward from the surface. However, some normal faults also terminate as open fractures on monoclines, which resemble fault propagation folds; this suggests upward propagation of reactivated buried faults, promoted by diking. These results suggest that fault growth and graben development, as well as the longer-term evolution of the axis of MDPB, may be explained only through dike emplacement and that any amagmatic faulting is not necessary.

  5. Structural and stratigraphic evolution of Aleutian convergent-margin basins - ridge crest to trench floor

    SciTech Connect

    Scholl, D.W.; Ryan, H.F.; Geist, E.L.; Vallier, T.L.; Stevenson, A.J.; Childs, J.R. )

    1988-02-01

    The Aleutian Ridge lies along nearly 2000 km of the north Pacific's obliquely converging plate boundary with North America. Since middle Eocene time, convergent-margin basins have repeatedly formed here, typically as summit basins along the ridge crest, and as forearc basins on the landward trench slope. Summit and forearc basins formed as a consequence of plate-boundary coupling and the application of compressional and right-lateral shear stresses to the arc massif. Basins typically evolved along shear zones in response to transtensional processes, and as trailing-edge grabens behind rotating blocks of arc massif. In the late Cenozoic, high rates of trench sedimentation led to the growth of an accretionary complex that underthrust forearc basement. Wedging and improved plate coupling elevated and laterally shifted blocks of outer forearc rocks, creating much of the structural framework of the regionally extensive Aleutian Terrace forearc basin. Changes in plate-boundary conditions that affected the ridge's volcanic activity and regional elevation importantly influenced basinal sedimentation. Changes of greatest significance were a major shift in convergence direction and rate about 42 Ma (reduced volcanism), ridge underthrusting by increasingly younger ocean crust in Oligocene and Miocene time (arc elevation), and the combination of more orthogonal underthrusting and the subduction of a dead spreading center 5-10 Ma (arc subsidence).

  6. Structural and stratigraphic evolution of Aleutian convergent-margin basins - Ridge crest to trench floor

    SciTech Connect

    Scholl, D.W.; Ryan, H.F.; Geist, E.L.; Vallier, T.L.

    1988-01-01

    The Aleutian Ridge lies along nearly 2,000 km of the north Pacific's obliquely converging plate boundary with North America. Since middle Eocene time, convergent-margin basins have repeatedly formed here, typically as summit basins along the ridge crest, and as forecarc basins on the landward trench slope. Thick (1-4 km) sequences of terrigenous, hemipelagic, and biogenic debris have accumulated in these depressions, which are mostly intra-arc structures floored by arc-basement rocks. Summit and forearc basins formed as a consequence of plate-boundary coupling and the application of compressional and right-lateral shear stresses to the arc massif. Basins typically evolved along shear zones in response to transtensional processes, and as trailing-edge grabens behind rotating blocks of arc massif. In the late Cenozoic, high rates of trench sedimentation led to the growth of an accretionary complex that underthrust forearc basement. Wedging and improved plate coupling elevated and laterally shifted blocks of outer forearc rocks, creating much of the structural framework of the regionally extensive Aleutian Terrace forearc basin. Changes in plate-boundary conditions that affected the ridge's volcanic activity and regional elevation importantly influenced basinal sedimentation. Changes of greatest significant were a major shift in convergence direction and rate about 42 Ma (reduced volcanism), ridge underthrusting by increasingly younger ocean crust in Oligocena and Miocene time (arc elevation), and the combination of more orthogonal underthrusting and the subduction of a dead spreading center 5-120 Ma (arc subsidence).

  7. Closure of the Africa-Eurasia-North America plate motion circuit and tectonics of the Gloria fault

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argus, Donald F.; Gordon, Richard G.; Demets, Charles; Stein, Seth

    1989-01-01

    The current motions of the African, Eurasian, and North American plates are examined. The problems addressed include whether there is resolvable motion of a Spitsbergen microplate, the direction of motion between the African and North American plates, whether the Gloria fault is an active transform fault, and the implications of plate circuit closures for rates of intraplate deformation. Marine geophysical data and magnetic profiles are used to construct a model which predicts about 4 mm/yr slip across the Azores-Gibraltar Ridge, and west-northwest convergence near Gibraltar. The analyzed data are consistent with a rigid plate model with the Gloria fault being a transform fault.

  8. Effects of parathyroid hormone and calcitonin on alkaline phosphatase activity and matrix calcification in rabbit growth-plate chondrocyte cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Y.; Shimazu, A.; Nakashima, K.; Suzuki, F.; Jikko, A.; Iwamoto, M. )

    1990-07-01

    The effects of PTH and calcitonin (CT) on the expression of mineralization-related phenotypes by chondrocytes were examined. In cultures of pelleted growth-plate chondrocytes. PTH caused 60-90% decreases in alkaline phosphatase activity, the incorporation of {sup 45}Ca into insoluble material, and the calcium content during the post-mitotic stage. These effects of PTH were dose-dependent and reversible. In contrast, CT increased alkaline phosphatase activity, {sup 45}Ca incorporation into insoluble material, and the calcium content by 1.4- to 1.8-fold. These observations suggest that PTH directly inhibits the expression of the mineralization-related phenotypes by growth-plate chondrocytes, and that CT has the opposite effects.

  9. A practical method to follow the evolution of electrochemically active areas during plate formation processes in lead acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alkaine, C. V.; de Andrade, J.; Impinnisi, P. R.

    A new method to follow the evolution of the plates of a battery during the formation processes is proposed and developed. The developed methodology can be used not only in research but also in the factory laboratories due to its simplicity. To exemplify the methodology, results for formation processes of tubular plates are presented using as precursor PbO or Pb 3O 4. The methodology gives access to the evolution, during its formation process, of the portions of the active material available for the discharge processes, the so called electrochemically active area. At the same time, the proposed technique permits the determination of the whole amount of PbO 2 during formation. Through the results it is pointed out what experimental conditions must be used during the application of the method and examples are given of the kinds of interpretation that can be made. Finally, information is presented which was deduced from the results presented.

  10. Transverse structural trends along the Oregon convergent margin: Implications for Cascadia earthquake potential and crustal rotations

    SciTech Connect

    Goldfinger, C.; Kulm, L.D.; Yeats, R.S. ); Applegate, B.; MacKay, M.E.; Moore, G.F. )

    1992-02-01

    A remarkable set of west-northwest-trending left-lateral strike-slip faults intersects the Cascadia subduction zone. Three of these faults have been mapped off northern and central Oregon by using seismic reflection, SeaMARC-1A sidescan sonar, and SeaBeam bathymetry. These faults are highly oblique to the north-south structural grain of the active accretionary wedge. One of them has 6 km of horizontal slip; the average slip rate is 7-10 mm/yr. The faults cut the subducting Juan de Fuca plate, and can be traced into the North American plate. Folds that deform late Pleistocene and Holocene sediments on the upper continental slope and shelf strike north-northwest to west-northwest. Some of the west-northwest-trending folds are associated with the throughgoing strike-slip faults, whereas other northwest-trending folds are approximately normal to the plate convergence direction. Many of these folds are mapped across the shelf, and several active shelf synclines project toward Oregon's coastal bays, where marsh subsidence events are inferred to be the result of great subduction-zone earthquakes. These subsidence events may actually record the growth of local synclines, possibly as secondary effects of slip on the megathrusts. The authors postulate that shortening of the forearc region by clockwise tectonic rotation, associated with movement of the left-lateral faults and folding of the upper plate, may accommodate a significant amount of plate convergence.

  11. Seismicity of the Earth 1900-2007, Nazca Plate and South America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rhea, Susan; Hayes, Gavin P.; Villaseñor, Antonio; Furlong, Kevin P.; Tarr, Arthur C.; Benz, Harley

    2010-01-01

    The South American arc extends over 7,000 km, from the Chilean triple junction offshore of southern Chile to its intersection with the Panama fracture zone, offshore the southern coast of Panama in Central America. It marks the plate boundary between the subducting Nazca plate and the South America plate, where the oceanic crust and lithosphere of the Nazca plate begin their decent into the mantle beneath South America. The convergence associated with this subduction process is responsible for the uplift of the Andes Mountains, and for the active volcanic chain present along much of this deformation front. Relative to a fixed South America plate the Nazca plate moves slightly north of eastwards at a rate varying from approximately 80 mm/yr in the south to approximately 70mm/yr in the north.

  12. North American plate dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Randall M.; Reding, Lynn M.

    1991-01-01

    Deformation within the North American plate in response to various tectonic processes is modeled using an elastic finite element analysis. The tectonic processes considered in the modeling include ridge forces associated with the normal thermal evolution of oceanic lithosphere, shear and normal stresses transmitted across transforms, normal stresses transmitted across convergent boundaries, stresses due to horizontal density contrasts within the continent, and shear tractions applied along the base of the plate. Model stresses are calculated with respect to a lithostatic reference stress state. Shear stresses transmitted across transform boundaries along the San Andreas and Caribbean are small, of the order of 5-10 MPa. Also, compressive stresses of the order of 5-10 MPa transmitted across the major transforms improve the fit to the data. Compressive stresses across convergent margins along the Aleutians and the Middle America trench are important.

  13. Geometrically nonlinear behavior of piezoelectric laminated plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovitch, Oded

    2005-08-01

    The geometrically nonlinear behavior of piezo-laminated plates actuated with isotropic or anisotropic piezoelectric layers is analytically investigated. The analytical model is derived using the variational principle of virtual work along with the lamination and plate theories, the von Karman large displacement and moderate rotation kinematic relations, and the anisotropic piezoelectric constitutive laws. A solution strategy that combines the approach of the method of lines, the advantages of the finite element concept, and the variational formulation is developed. This approach yields a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations with nonlinear boundary conditions, which are solved using the multiple-shooting method. Convergence and verification of the model are examined through comparison with linear and nonlinear results of other approximation methods. The nonlinear response of two active plate structures is investigated numerically. The first plate is actuated in bending using monolithic piezoceramic layers and the second one is actuated in twist using macro-fiber composites. The results quantitatively reveal the complicated in-plane stress state associated with the piezoelectric actuation and the geometrically nonlinear coupling of the in-plane and out-of-plane responses of the plate. The influence of the nonlinear effects ranges from significant stiffening in certain combinations of electrical loads and boundary conditions to amplifications of the induced deflections in others. The paper closes with a summary and conclusions.

  14. Active Control of Fan Noise-Feasibility Study. Volume 2: Canceling Noise Source-Design of an Acoustic Plate Radiator Using Piezoceramic Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, F. G.; Rajiyah, H.

    1995-01-01

    The feasibility of using acoustic plate radiators powered by piezoceramic thin sheets as canceling sources for active control of aircraft engine fan noise is demonstrated. Analytical and numerical models of actuated beams and plates are developed and validated. An optimization study is performed to identify the optimum combination of design parameters that maximizes the plate volume velocity for a given resonance frequency. Fifteen plates with various plate and actuator sizes, thicknesses, and bonding layers were fabricated and tested using results from the optimization study. A maximum equivalent piston displacement of 0.39 mm was achieved with the optimized plate samples tested with only one actuator powered, corresponding to a plate deflection at the center of over 1 millimeter. This is very close to the deflection required for a full size engine application and represents a 160-fold improvement over previous work. Experimental results further show that performance is limited by the critical stress of the piezoceramic actuator and bonding layer rather than by the maximum moment available from the actuator. Design enhancements are described in detail that will lead to a flight-worthy acoustic plate radiator by minimizing actuator tensile stresses and reducing nonlinear effects. Finally, several adaptive tuning methods designed to increase the bandwidth of acoustic plate radiators are analyzed including passive, active, and semi-active approaches. The back chamber pressurization and volume variation methods are investigated experimentally and shown to be simple and effective ways to obtain substantial control over the resonance frequency of a plate radiator. This study shows that piezoceramic-based plate radiators can be a viable acoustic source for active control of aircraft engine fan noise.

  15. 2011 Operations and Maintenance Activities in the East Region of UNAVCO's Plate Boundary Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmann, T.; Feaux, K.; Kasmer, D.; Jenkins, F.; Mencin, D.

    2011-12-01

    2011 marked Year 3 of Operations and Maintenance of the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO). In the East Region of PBO, it was a year characterized by several major projects as well as scheduled ongoing maintenance activities. The most significant major project was a USGS/ARRA funded communications upgrade in Yellowstone National Park. This upgrade consisted of bringing 8 existing PBO stations within the Yellowstone volcanic region to near real-time communications. This work will be completed on time and in collaboration with the National Park Service. The upgrade promises to provide much faster latency for invaluable data being recorded for one of the most geodetically critical regions of the current PBO network. Another significant ongoing project in the East Region has been supporting the community that continues to use PBO data. In particular, support of Kristine Larson (Univ of CO) both in installing webcams at PBO sites for monitoring snow depth as well as supporting vegetative surveys at current PBO sites. Similarly, the East Region responded promptly to the community with requests for data quality issues that are station hardware related, including replacing GPS antennae and receivers. With regards to ongoing operations and maintenance projects, reasons for site visits in 2011 were dominated by two significant situations: battery replacement and CDMA modem swaps. 83 site visits were required as part of the Operations and Maintenance strategic battery plan of 5 year battery replacements. This proved to be a considerable challenge due to the scale and geography of the scheduled replacements- the sites were spread throughout the entire network, east to west and north to south. 20 station visits were required due to a Verizon upgrade of the older Alltel network purchased by Verizon. These stations are predominantly in the Rocky Mountain region, but often times had limited access to due weather. Overall, despite record snowfalls throughout the west, state of health

  16. Convergence Is Real

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enyeart, Mike; Staman, E. Michael; Valdes, Jose J., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    The concept of convergence has evolved significantly during recent years. Today, "convergence" refers to the integration of the communications and computing resources and services that seamlessly traverse multiple infrastructures and deliver content to multiple platforms or appliances. Convergence is real. Those in higher education, and especially…

  17. Caribbean plate interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, M. )

    1993-02-01

    Vector analysis of plate motions, derived from studies of Atlantic magnetic lineations and fracture zone trends, indicates the following relative movements between the Caribbean, North American, and South American Plates. (1) During Early Jurassic to Early Cretaceous, the North American Plate moved 1900 km westward and 900 km northward relative to the South American Plate. A broad zone including the Caribbean region, i.e., the zone between the North and South America Plates, was a site of left-lateral shear and north-south extension. (2) During Early Cretaceous to Late Cretaceous, the North American Mate moved an additional 1200 km westward relative to South America across this zone. (3) During Late Cretaceous to the end of the Eocene, the North American Plate moved 200 km westward and 400 km northward relative to the South American Plate. (4) From the end of the Eocene to near the end of the Miocene, North America converged on South America some 200 km and moved 100 km eastward relative to it. Through the Mesozoic and earliest Tertiary history of the Caribbean, the region was a shear zone within which left-lateral displacement exceeded 3000 km and north-south extension exceeded 1300 km. In regard to time, 80% of the history of the Caribbean region is one of north-south extension and left-lateral shear. In terms of space, 97% of the shear is left-lateral and the ratio of divergence versus convergence is 7 to 1. Thus, characterizing the Caribbean region, and the Atlantic to its east, as a zone of north-south extension and left-lateral shear, is a fair generalization.

  18. Convergence between central segment of Greater and Lesser Caucasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokhadze, Giorgi; Floyd, Mike; Cowgill, Eric; Chen, Horng-Yue; Hu, Jyr-Ching

    2016-04-01

    Caucasus region is the relatively young part of the Alpine-Himalayan orogenic belt and represent northernmost edge of intracontinental collision of Arabia-Eurasia plates. Greater and Lesser Caucasus are major tectonic units and separated by west Rioni basin, Dzirula Massif and east Kura (Mtkvari) basin, with fold-thrust belt. During last decades, Instrumentally recorded earthquakes revealed, that Greater and Lesser Caucasus margins are active, where north dipping thrust earthquakes Racha(6,9Mw, 1991 year), Barisako(6.4Mw, 1992 year) and flank of Lesser Caucasus Gori(6.2Mw, 1920 year) and south dipping thrust Baghdati(5.3Mw, 2011 year) produced. Geodetic and Geologic observation Shows that major present-day crustal deformation are between lesser and greater Caucasus, where convergence rate increase from WNW to ESE (~2 to ~12 mm/yr). Deformation in the east part of Kura basin is accommodated to the north, foothill of the greater Caucasus, where north dipping thrust system presence, which is coherent with seismic activity. However in the west(42E - 44.5E) convergence not well constrained and slip distribution between Lesser and Greater Caucasus is ambiguous. In this study we present combined previously published and new geodetic observation for present-day surface motions and constrain convergence and position of locked fault in the central segment of Greater and Lesser Caucasus.

  19. Plate motion

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, R.G. )

    1991-01-01

    The motion of tectonic plates on the earth is characterized in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Topics addressed include the NUVEL-1 global model of current plate motions, diffuse plate boundaries and the oceanic lithosphere, the relation between plate motions and distributed deformations, accelerations and the steadiness of plate motions, the distribution of current Pacific-North America motion across western North America and its margin, plate reconstructions and their uncertainties, hotspots, and plate dynamics. A comprehensive bibliography is provided. 126 refs.

  20. The convergence of complete active space self-consistent-field configuration interaction including all single and double excitation energies to the complete basis set limit.

    PubMed

    Petersson, George A; Malick, David K; Frisch, Michael J; Braunstein, Matthew

    2006-07-28

    Examination of the convergence of full valence complete active space self-consistent-field configuration interaction including all single and double excitation (CASSCF-CISD) energies with expansion of the one-electron basis set reveals a pattern very similar to the convergence of single determinant energies. Calculations on the lowest four singlet states and the lowest four triplet states of N(2) with the sequence of n-tuple-zeta augmented polarized (nZaP) basis sets (n=2, 3, 4, 5, and 6) are used to establish the complete basis set limits. Full configuration-interaction (CI) and core electron contributions must be included for very accurate potential energy surfaces. However, a simple extrapolation scheme that has no adjustable parameters and requires nothing more demanding than CAS(10e(-),8orb)-CISD/3ZaP calculations gives the R(e), omega(e), omega(e)X(e), T(e), and D(e) for these eight states with rms errors of 0.0006 Angstrom, 4.43 cm(-1), 0.35 cm(-1), 0.063 eV, and 0.018 eV, respectively. PMID:16942134

  1. Tectonics of the Easter plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engeln, J. F.; Stein, S.

    1984-01-01

    A new model for the Easter plate is presented in which rift propagation has resulted in the formation of a rigid plate between the propagating and dying ridges. The distribution of earthquakes, eleven new focal mechanisms, and existing bathymetric and magnetic data are used to describe the tectonics of this area. Both the Easter-Nazca and Easter-Pacific Euler poles are sufficiently close to the Easter plate to cause rapid changes in rates and directions of motion along the boundaries. The east and west boundaries are propagating and dying ridges; the southwest boundary is a slow-spreading ridge and the northern boundary is a complex zone of convergent and transform motion. The Easter plate may reflect the tectonics of rift propagation on a large scale, where rigid plate tectonics requires boundary reorientation. Simple schematic models to illustrate the general features and processes which occur at plates resulting from large-scale rift propagation are used.

  2. Nonlinear dynamic response and active control of fiber metal laminated plates with piezoelectric actuators and sensors in unsteady temperature field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xuefei; Fu, Yiming; Chen, Yang

    2015-05-01

    Based on the higher order shear deformation theory and the geometric nonlinear theory, the nonlinear motion equations, to which the effects of the positive and negative piezoelectric and the thermal are introduced by piezoelectric fiber metal laminated (FML) plates in an unsteady temperature, are established by Hamilton’s variational principle. Then, the control algorithm of negative-velocity feedback is applied to realize the vibration control of the piezoelectric FML plates. During the solving process, firstly, the formal functions of the displacements that fulfilled the boundary conditions are proposed. Then, heat conduction equations and nonlinear differential equations are dealt with using the differential quadrature (DQ) and Galerkin methods, respectively. On the basis of the previous processing, the time domain is dispersed by the Newmark-β method. Finally, the whole problem can be investigated by the iterative method. In the numerical examples, the influence of the applied voltage, the temperature loading and geometric parameters on the nonlinear dynamic response of the piezoelectric FML plates is analyzed. Meanwhile, the effect of feedback control gain and the position of the piezoelectric layer, the initial deflection and the external temperature on the active control effect of the piezoelectric layers has been studied. The model development and the research results can serve as a basis for nonlinear vibration analysis of the FML structures.

  3. Upper plate contraction north of the migrating Mendocino triple junction, northern California: Implications for partitioning of strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrory, Patricia A.

    2000-12-01

    Geologic measurement of permanent contraction across the Cascadia subduction margin constrains one component of the tectonic deformation along the convergent plate boundary, the component critical for the seismic hazard assessment of crustal faults. A comprehensive survey of active faults in onshore subduction margin rocks at the southern end of the Cascadia subduction zone indicates that these thrust faults accommodate ˜10 mm/yr of convergence oriented 020°-045°. Seismotectonic models of subduction zones typically assign this upper plate strain to the estimate of aseismic slip on the megathrust. Geodetic models include this permanent crustal strain within estimates of elastic strain accumulation on the megathrust. Both types of models underestimate the seismic hazard associated with crustal faults. Subtracting the observed contraction from the plate convergence rate (40-50 mm/yr; directed 040°-055°) leaves 30-40 mm/yr of convergence to be partitioned between slip on the megathrust, contraction within the southern Juan de Fuca plate, and crustal contraction outside the subduction complex rocks. This simple estimate of slip partitioning neglects the discrepancy between the plate convergence and contraction directions in the vicinity of the Mendocino triple junction. The San Andreas and Cascadia limbs of the Mendocino triple junction are not collinear. The eastern edge of the broad San Andreas boundary is ˜85 km east of the Cascadia subduction boundary, and across this zone the Pacific plate converges directly with the North America plate. The skewed orientation of crustal structures just north of the leading edge of the Pacific plate suggests that they are deforming in a hybrid stress field resulting from both Juan de Fuca-North America motion and Pacific-North America motion. The composite convergence direction (50 mm/yr; directed 023°) is consistent with the compressive stress axis (020°) inferred from focal mechanisms of crustal earthquakes in the

  4. Upper plate contraction north of the migrating Mendocino triple junction northern California: Implications for partitioning of strain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCrory, P.A.

    2000-01-01

    Geologic measurement of permanent contraction across the Cascadia subduction margin constrains one component of the tectonic deformation along the convergent plate boundary, the component critical for the seismic hazard assessment of crustal faults. A comprehensive survey of active faults in onshore subduction margin rocks at the southern end of the Cascadia subduction zone indicates that these thrust faults accommodate ??10 mm/yr of convergence oriented 020??-045??. Seismotectonic models of subduction zones typically assign this upper plate strain to the estimate of aseismic slip on the megathrust. Geodetic models include this permanent crustal strain within estimates of elastic strain accumulation on the megathrust. Both types of models underestimate the seismic hazard associated with crustal faults. Subtracting the observed contraction from the plate convergence rate (40-50 mm/yr; directed 040??-055??) leaves 30-40 mm/yr of convergence to be partitioned between slip on the megathrust, contraction within the southern Juan de Fuca plate, and crustal contraction outside the subduction complex rocks. This simple estimate of slip partitioning neglects the discrepancy between the plate convergence and contraction directions in the vicinity of the Mendocino triple junction. The San Andreas and Cascadia limbs of the Mendocino triple junction are not collinear. The eastern edge of the broad San Andreas boundary is ??85 km east of the Cascadia subduction boundary, and across this zone the Pacific plate converges directly with the North America plate. The skewed orientation of crustal structures just north of the leading edge of the Pacific plate suggests that they are deforming in a hybrid stress field resulting from both Juan de Fuca-North America motion and Pacific-North America motion. The composite convergence direction (50 mm/yr: directed 023??) is consistent with the compressive stress axis (020??) inferred from focal mechanisms of crustal earthquakes in the

  5. Buckling of dielectric elastomeric plates for soft, electrically active microfluidic pumps.

    PubMed

    Tavakol, Behrouz; Bozlar, Michael; Punckt, Christian; Froehlicher, Guillaume; Stone, Howard A; Aksay, Ilhan A; Holmes, Douglas P

    2014-07-21

    Elastic instabilities, when properly implemented within soft, mechanical structures, can generate advanced functionality. In this work, we use the voltage-induced buckling of thin, flexible plates to pump fluids within a microfluidic channel. The soft electrodes that enable electrical actuation are compatible with fluids, and undergo large, reversible deformations. We quantified the onset of voltage-induced buckling, and measured the flow rate within the microchannel. This embeddable, flexible microfluidic pump will aid in the generation of new stand-alone microfluidic devices that require a tunable flow rate. PMID:24905688

  6. Convergent Validity of Four Accelerometer Cutpoints with Direct Observation of Preschool Children's Outdoor Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahan, David; Nicaise, Virginie; Reuben, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: More than one fifth of American preschool-aged children are classified as overweight/obese. Increasing physical activity is one means of slowing/reversing progression to overweight or obesity. Measurement of physical activity in this age group relies heavily on motion sensors such as accelerometers. Output is typically interpreted through…

  7. Moving Average Convergence Divergence filter preprocessing for real-time event-related peak activity onset detection : application to fNIRS signals.

    PubMed

    Durantin, Gautier; Scannella, Sebastien; Gateau, Thibault; Delorme, Arnaud; Dehais, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Real-time solutions for noise reduction and signal processing represent a central challenge for the development of Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI). In this paper, we introduce the Moving Average Convergence Divergence (MACD) filter, a tunable digital passband filter for online noise reduction and onset detection without preliminary learning phase, used in economic markets analysis. MACD performance was tested and benchmarked with other filters using data collected with functional Near Infrared Spectoscopy (fNIRS) during a digit sequence memorization task. This filter has a good performance on filtering and real-time peak activity onset detection, compared to other techniques. Therefore, MACD could be implemented for efficient BCI design using fNIRS. PMID:25570400

  8. Convergence in Multispecies Interactions.

    PubMed

    Bittleston, Leonora S; Pierce, Naomi E; Ellison, Aaron M; Pringle, Anne

    2016-04-01

    The concepts of convergent evolution and community convergence highlight how selective pressures can shape unrelated organisms or communities in similar ways. We propose a related concept, convergent interactions, to describe the independent evolution of multispecies interactions with similar physiological or ecological functions. A focus on convergent interactions clarifies how natural selection repeatedly favors particular kinds of associations among species. Characterizing convergent interactions in a comparative context is likely to facilitate prediction of the ecological roles of organisms (including microbes) in multispecies interactions and selective pressures acting in poorly understood or newly discovered multispecies systems. We illustrate the concept of convergent interactions with examples: vertebrates and their gut bacteria; ectomycorrhizae; insect-fungal-bacterial interactions; pitcher-plant food webs; and ants and ant-plants. PMID:26858111

  9. Convergence in Reflex Pathways from Multiple Cutaneous Nerves Innervating the Foot Depends upon the Number of Rhythmically Active Limbs during Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Mezzarane, Rinaldo A.; Hundza, Sandra R.; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi; Zehr, E. Paul

    2014-01-01

    Neural output from the locomotor system for each arm and leg influences the spinal motoneuronal pools directly and indirectly through interneuronal (IN) reflex networks. While well documented in other species, less is known about the functions and features of convergence in common IN reflex system from cutaneous afferents innervating different foot regions during remote arm and leg movement in humans. The purpose of the present study was to use spatial facilitation to examine possible convergence in common reflex pathways during rhythmic locomotor limb movements. Cutaneous reflexes were evoked in ipsilateral tibialis anterior muscle by stimulating (in random order) the sural nerve (SUR), the distal tibial nerve (TIB), and combined simultaneous stimulation of both nerves (TIB&SUR). Reflexes were evoked while participants performed rhythmic stepping and arm swinging movement with both arms and the leg contralateral to stimulation (ARM&LEG), with just arm movement (ARM) and with just contralateral leg movement (LEG). Stimulation intensities were just below threshold for evoking early latency (<80 ms to peak) reflexes. For each stimulus condition, rectified EMG signals were averaged while participants held static contractions in the stationary (stimulated) leg. During ARM&LEG movement, amplitudes of cutaneous reflexes evoked by combined TIB&SUR stimulation were significantly larger than simple mathematical summation of the amplitudes evoked by SUR or TIB alone. Interestingly, this extra facilitation seen during combined nerve stimulation was significantly reduced when performing ARM or LEG compared to ARM&LEG. We conclude that locomotor rhythmic limb movement induces excitation of common IN reflex pathways from cutaneous afferents innervating different foot regions. Importantly, activity in this pathway is most facilitated during ARM&LEG movement. These results suggest that transmission in IN reflex pathways is weighted according to the number of limbs directly engaged

  10. Broadband control of plate radiation using a piezoelectric, double-amplifier active-skin and structural acoustic sensing

    PubMed

    Johnson; Fuller

    2000-02-01

    The potential of a piezoelectric, double-amplifier active-skin with structural acoustic sensing (SAS) is demonstrated for the reduction of broadband acoustic radiation from a clamped, aluminum plate. The active-skin is a continuous covering of the vibrating portions of the plate with active, independently controllable piezoelectric, double-amplifier elements and is designed to affect control by altering the continuous structural radiation impedance rather than structural vibration. In simulation, acoustic models are sought for the primary and secondary sources that incorporate finite element methods. Simulation indicates that a total radiated power attenuation in excess of 10 dB may be achieved between 250 and 750 Hz with microphone error sensing, while under SAS the radiated power is reduced by nearly 8 dB in the same frequency range. In experiment, the adaptive feed forward filtered-x LMS (least mean square) algorithm, implemented on a Texas Instruments C40 DSP, was used in conjunction with the 6I6O control system. With microphone error sensing, 11.8-dB attenuation was achieved in the overall radiated power between 175 and 600 Hz, while inclusion of SAS resulted in a 7.3-dB overall power reduction in this frequency band. PMID:10687697

  11. Shaping frequency response of a vibrating plate for passive and active control applications by simultaneous optimization of arrangement of additional masses and ribs. Part I: Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrona, Stanislaw; Pawelczyk, Marek

    2016-03-01

    An ability to shape frequency response of a vibrating plate according to precisely defined demands has a very high practical potential. It can be applied to improve acoustic radiation of the plate for required frequencies or enhance acoustic isolation of noise barriers and device casings by using both passive and active control. The proposed method is based on mounting severaladditional ribs and masses (passive and/or active) to the plate surface at locations followed from an optimization process. This paper, Part I, concerns derivation of a mathematical model of the plate with attached elements in the function of their shape and placement. The model is validated by means of simulations and laboratory experiments, and compared with models known from the literature. This paper is followed by a companion paper, Part II, where the optimization process is described. It includes arrangement of passive elements as well as actuators and sensors to improve controllability and observability measures, if active control is concerned.

  12. Converging genetic and functional brain imaging evidence links neuronal excitability to working memory, psychiatric disease, and brain activity

    PubMed Central

    Heck, A.; Fastenrath, M.; Ackermann, S.; Auschra, B.; Bickel, H.; Coynel, D.; Gschwind, L.; Jessen, F.; Kaduszkiewicz, H.; Maier, W.; Milnik, A.; Pentzek, M.; Riedel-Heller, S.G.; Ripke, S.; Spalek, K.; Sullivan, P.; Vogler, C.; Wagner, M.; Weyerer, S.; Wolfsgruber, S.; de Quervain, D.; Papassotiropoulos, A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Working memory, the capacity of actively maintaining task-relevant information during a cognitive task, is a heritable trait. Working memory deficits are characteristic for many psychiatric disorders. We performed genome-wide gene-set enrichment analyses in multiple independent data sets of young and aged cognitively healthy subjects (n = 2’824), and in a large schizophrenia case-control sample (n = 32’143). The voltage-gated cation channel activity gene-set, consisting of genes related to neuronal excitability, was robustly linked to performance in working memory-related tasks across ages, and to schizophrenia. Functional brain imaging in 707 healthy participants linked this gene-set also to working memory-related activity in the parietal cortex and the cerebellum. Gene-set analyses may help to dissect the molecular underpinnings of cognitive dimensions, brain activity and psychopathology. PMID:24529980

  13. Converging genetic and functional brain imaging evidence links neuronal excitability to working memory, psychiatric disease, and brain activity.

    PubMed

    Heck, Angela; Fastenrath, Matthias; Ackermann, Sandra; Auschra, Bianca; Bickel, Horst; Coynel, David; Gschwind, Leo; Jessen, Frank; Kaduszkiewicz, Hanna; Maier, Wolfgang; Milnik, Annette; Pentzek, Michael; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G; Ripke, Stephan; Spalek, Klara; Sullivan, Patrick; Vogler, Christian; Wagner, Michael; Weyerer, Siegfried; Wolfsgruber, Steffen; de Quervain, Dominique J-F; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    Working memory, the capacity of actively maintaining task-relevant information during a cognitive task, is a heritable trait. Working memory deficits are characteristic for many psychiatric disorders. We performed genome-wide gene set enrichment analyses in multiple independent data sets of young and aged cognitively healthy subjects (n = 2,824) and in a large schizophrenia case-control sample (n = 32,143). The voltage-gated cation channel activity gene set, consisting of genes related to neuronal excitability, was robustly linked to performance in working memory-related tasks across ages and to schizophrenia. Functional brain imaging in 707 healthy participants linked this gene set also to working memory-related activity in the parietal cortex and the cerebellum. Gene set analyses may help to dissect the molecular underpinnings of cognitive dimensions, brain activity, and psychopathology. PMID:24529980

  14. Convergent evidences from human and animal studies implicate angiotensin I-converting enzyme activity in cognitive performance in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Gadelha, A; Vendramini, A M; Yonamine, C M; Nering, M; Berberian, A; Suiama, M A; Oliveira, V; Lima-Landman, M T; Breen, G; Bressan, R A; Abílio, V; Hayashi, M A F

    2015-01-01

    In schizophrenia (SCZ), higher angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) levels have been reported in patient's blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Hereby, we propose to explore whether the ACE activity levels are associated to cognitive performance in SCZ. Seventy-two patients with SCZ or schizoaffective disorder diagnosis, and 69 healthy controls (HCs) underwent a cognitive battery with parallel collection of peripheral blood samples to measure ACE activity. Significant higher ACE activity levels were confirmed in the plasma of SCZ patients compared with HCs (Student's t=-5.216; P<0.001). ACE activity significantly correlated to Hopkins delayed recall measures (r=-0.247; P=0.004) and Hopkins total (r=-0.214; P=0.012). Subjects grouped as high ACE activity (above average) had worse performance compared with low ACE activity level group for Hopkins delayed recall measure, even after correction for clinical condition, age, gender and years of education (P=0.029). The adjusted R squared for this final model was 0.343. This result was evident only comparing extreme groups for ACE activity, when splitting the sample in three groups with similar number of subjects. To clarify this finding, we performed an evaluation of the cognitive performance of transgenic mice with three copies of ACE gene in novel object recognition (NOR) test, which showed that such animals presented impairment in NOR (P<0.05) compared with two copies of wild-type animals. The results observed in SCZ patients and animal model suggest both the association of ACE to cognitive deficits in SCZ. This finding may support the evaluation of novel treatment protocols and/or of innovative drugs for specific intervention of cognitive deficits in SCZ envisioning concomitant ACE activity and behavior evaluations. PMID:26645626

  15. Rift basins of ocean-continent convergent margins

    SciTech Connect

    Forsythe, R.D.; Newcomb, K.R.

    1986-05-01

    Modern and ancient circum-Pacific convergent margins contain many examples of forearc basins where subsidence, occurring simultaneously with subduction of oceanic lithosphere, is controlled by rifting transverse to the margin. The elongate axes of these deep and narrow basins jut obliquely from the plate margin into the interior of the forearc. Similar to aulacogens, faulting and related subsidence appear greatest at their seaward limits and decreases inland. Examples from eastern Pacific forearcs suggest that localized rifting accommodates margin-parallel extension of forearc blocks that are kinetically linked to motions along major margin-parallel strike-slip fault systems. The most prominent examples of modern forearc rift basins are the Sanak and East Sanak basins of the western Alaska Peninsula subduction zone. In this region, the continental shelf is being rifted apart by a series of northwest- and northeast-trending faults. Basement-activated normal faults bounding the basins have listric geometries. Seismostratigraphic relationships within the basins indicate the protracted, synsedimentary, and active nature of faulting and basin subsidence. Along the Peru-Chile trench, two prominent rifted basins also occur: the Gulf of Guayaquil and the Gulf of Penas-Taitao basin of southern Chile. There, margin-parallel rifting controls subsidence in localized basins at the southern terminus to margin-parallel dextral fault systems. These and other examples suggest that strike-slip motion and transverse rifting of forearcs is a common phenomenon inadequately described by existing two-dimensional models of forearcs. Margin-parallel motions of forearc blocks can be related not only to oblique plate convergence, but also to the geometric and compositional nature of the overriding and subducted plates.

  16. Detecting bladder fullness through the ensemble activity patterns of the spinal cord unit population in a somatovisceral convergence environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae Hong; Kim, Chang-Eop; Shin, Jaewoo; Im, Changkyun; Koh, Chin Su; Seo, In Seok; Kim, Sang Jeong; Shin, Hyung-Cheul

    2013-10-01

    Objective. Chronic monitoring of the state of the bladder can be used to notify patients with urinary dysfunction when the bladder should be voided. Given that many spinal neurons respond both to somatic and visceral inputs, it is necessary to extract bladder information selectively from the spinal cord. Here, we hypothesize that sensory information with distinct modalities should be represented by the distinct ensemble activity patterns within the neuronal population and, therefore, analyzing the activity patterns of the neuronal population could distinguish bladder fullness from somatic stimuli. Approach. We simultaneously recorded 26-27 single unit activities in response to bladder distension or tactile stimuli in the dorsal spinal cord of each Sprague-Dawley rat. In order to discriminate between bladder fullness and tactile stimulus inputs, we analyzed the ensemble activity patterns of the entire neuronal population. A support vector machine (SVM) was employed as a classifier, and discrimination performance was measured by k-fold cross-validation tests. Main results. Most of the units responding to bladder fullness also responded to the tactile stimuli (88.9-100%). The SVM classifier precisely distinguished the bladder fullness from the somatic input (100%), indicating that the ensemble activity patterns of the unit population in the spinal cord are distinct enough to identify the current input modality. Moreover, our ensemble activity pattern-based classifier showed high robustness against random losses of signals. Significance. This study is the first to demonstrate that the two main issues of electroneurographic monitoring of bladder fullness, low signals and selectiveness, can be solved by an ensemble activity pattern-based approach, improving the feasibility of chronic monitoring of bladder fullness by neural recording.

  17. Synchronization of Converging Metabolic Pathways: Activation of the Cystathionine γ-Synthase of Neurospora crassa by Methyltetrahydrofolate

    PubMed Central

    Selhub, J.; Savin, M. A.; Sakami, W.; Flavin, M.

    1971-01-01

    Methyltetrahydrofolate synchronizes the activities of the two branches of the pathway of methionine biosynthesis in Neurospora crassa by serving as an essential activator of cystathionine γ-synthase and antagonizing the feedback inhibition of this enzyme by S-adenosylmethionine. Activation is specific for the methylated form of folate and increases with increasing glutamate content. The inability of extracts of me-1 and me-6 mutants to form cystathionine that has been previously reported is due to the absence of N5-methyltetrahydrofolate from these preparations. Extracts of me-1 mutants lack methyltetrahydrofolate because the organisms are deficient in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, and those of me-6 because their methyltetrahydrofolate is quantitatively removed by the procedure employed in the preparation of extracts. The folate of the me-6 organisms differs from that of wild type strains in consisting largely of the monoglutamate rather than higher conjugates. PMID:5277076

  18. Multibeam investigation of the active North Atlantic plate boundary reorganization tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hey, Richard; Martinez, Fernando; Höskuldsson, Ármann; Eason, Deborah E.; Sleeper, Jonathan; Thordarson, Sigvaldi; Benediktsdóttir, Ásdís; Merkuryev, Sergey

    2016-02-01

    The previous orthogonal ridge/transform staircase geometry south of Iceland is being progressively changed to the present continuous oblique Reykjanes Ridge spreading geometry as North America-Eurasia transform faults are successively eliminated from north to south. This reorganization is commonly interpreted as a thermal phenomenon, caused by warmer Iceland plume mantle progressively interacting with the ridge, although other diachronous seafloor spreading reorganizations are thought to result from tectonic rift propagation. New marine geophysical data covering our reinterpretation of the reorganization tip near 57°N show successive transform eliminations at a propagation velocity of ∼110 km/Myr, ten times the spreading half rate, followed by abrupt reorganization slowing at the Modred transform as it was converted to a migrating non-transform offset. Neither the simple thermal model nor the simple propagating rift model appears adequate to explain the complicated plate boundary reorganization process.

  19. Convergent BOLD and Beta-Band Activity in Superior Temporal Sulcus and Frontolimbic Circuitry Underpins Human Emotion Cognition.

    PubMed

    Jabbi, Mbemba; Kohn, Philip D; Nash, Tiffany; Ianni, Angela; Coutlee, Christopher; Holroyd, Tom; Carver, Frederick W; Chen, Qiang; Cropp, Brett; Kippenhan, J Shane; Robinson, Stephen E; Coppola, Richard; Berman, Karen F

    2015-07-01

    The processing of social information in the human brain is widely distributed neuroanatomically and finely orchestrated over time. However, a detailed account of the spatiotemporal organization of these key neural underpinnings of human social cognition remains to be elucidated. Here, we applied functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) in the same participants to investigate spatial and temporal neural patterns evoked by viewing videos of facial muscle configurations. We show that observing the emergence of expressions elicits sustained blood oxygenation level-dependent responses in the superior temporal sulcus (STS), a region implicated in processing meaningful biological motion. We also found corresponding event-related changes in sustained MEG beta-band (14-30 Hz) oscillatory activity in the STS, consistent with the possible role of beta-band activity in visual perception. Dynamically evolving fearful and happy expressions elicited early (0-400 ms) transient beta-band activity in sensorimotor cortex that persisted beyond 400 ms, at which time it became accompanied by a frontolimbic spread (400-1000 ms). In addition, individual differences in sustained STS beta-band activity correlated with speed of emotion recognition, substantiating the behavioral relevance of these signals. This STS beta-band activity showed valence-specific coupling with the time courses of facial movements as they emerged into full-blown fearful and happy expressions (negative and positive coupling, respectively). These data offer new insights into the perceptual relevance and orchestrated function of the STS and interconnected pathways in social-emotion cognition. PMID:24464944

  20. Controlling available active sites of Pt-loaded TiO2 nanotube-imprinted Ti plates for efficient dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lu-Yin; Yeh, Min-Hsin; Chen, Wei-Chieh; Ramamurthy, Vittal; Ho, Kuo-Chuan

    2015-02-25

    The counter electrode (CE) of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) plays an important role for transferring electrons and catalyzing the I-/I3- reduction. Active surface area of the substrate determines the reduction sites of the deposited catalyst as well as the catalytic ability of the CE. An effective method for enhancing and controlling the active surface area of metal plates is provided in this study. The Ti plates are imprinted by TiO2 nanotubes (TNT) via the technique of anodization along with the ultrasonic vibration process. The available active area of imprinted Ti plates is controlled by varying the anodization voltage to produce TNT imprints with different diameters and depths. A solar-to-electricity conversion efficiency (η) of 9.35% was obtained for the DSSC with a TNT-imprinted Ti plate as the CE substrate, while the cell with an imprint-free Ti plate shows an η of 7.81%. The enhanced η is due to the improved electrocatalytic ability of the CE by using the TNT-imprinted Ti plate as the substrate with higher active surface area. PMID:25642665

  1. Convergent Transcription of Interferon-stimulated Genes by TNF-α and IFN-α Augments Antiviral Activity against HCV and HEV

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenshi; Xu, Lei; Brandsma, Johannes H.; Wang, Yijin; Hakim, Mohamad S.; Zhou, Xinying; Yin, Yuebang; Fuhler, Gwenny M.; van der Laan, Luc J. W.; van der Woude, C. Janneke; Sprengers, Dave; Metselaar, Herold J.; Smits, Ron; Poot, Raymond A.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Pan, Qiuwei

    2016-01-01

    IFN-α has been used for decades to treat chronic hepatitis B and C, and as an off-label treatment for some cases of hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection. TNF-α is another important cytokine involved in inflammatory disease, which can interact with interferon signaling. Because interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) are the ultimate antiviral effectors of the interferon signaling, this study aimed to understand the regulation of ISG transcription and the antiviral activity by IFN-α and TNF-α. In this study, treatment of TNF-α inhibited replication of HCV by 71 ± 2.4% and HEV by 41 ± 4.9%. Interestingly, TNF-α induced the expression of a panel of antiviral ISGs (2-11 fold). Blocking the TNF-α signaling by Humira abrogated ISG induction and its antiviral activity. Chip-seq data analysis and mutagenesis assay further revealed that the NF-κB protein complex, a key downstream element of TNF-α signaling, directly binds to the ISRE motif in the ISG promoters and thereby drives their transcription. This process is independent of interferons and JAK-STAT cascade. Importantly, when combined with IFN-α, TNF-α works cooperatively on ISG induction, explaining their additive antiviral effects. Thus, our study reveals a novel mechanism of convergent transcription of ISGs by TNF-α and IFN-α, which augments their antiviral activity against HCV and HEV. PMID:27150018

  2. Convergent Transcription of Interferon-stimulated Genes by TNF-α and IFN-α Augments Antiviral Activity against HCV and HEV.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenshi; Xu, Lei; Brandsma, Johannes H; Wang, Yijin; Hakim, Mohamad S; Zhou, Xinying; Yin, Yuebang; Fuhler, Gwenny M; van der Laan, Luc J W; van der Woude, C Janneke; Sprengers, Dave; Metselaar, Herold J; Smits, Ron; Poot, Raymond A; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Pan, Qiuwei

    2016-01-01

    IFN-α has been used for decades to treat chronic hepatitis B and C, and as an off-label treatment for some cases of hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection. TNF-α is another important cytokine involved in inflammatory disease, which can interact with interferon signaling. Because interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) are the ultimate antiviral effectors of the interferon signaling, this study aimed to understand the regulation of ISG transcription and the antiviral activity by IFN-α and TNF-α. In this study, treatment of TNF-α inhibited replication of HCV by 71 ± 2.4% and HEV by 41 ± 4.9%. Interestingly, TNF-α induced the expression of a panel of antiviral ISGs (2-11 fold). Blocking the TNF-α signaling by Humira abrogated ISG induction and its antiviral activity. Chip-seq data analysis and mutagenesis assay further revealed that the NF-κB protein complex, a key downstream element of TNF-α signaling, directly binds to the ISRE motif in the ISG promoters and thereby drives their transcription. This process is independent of interferons and JAK-STAT cascade. Importantly, when combined with IFN-α, TNF-α works cooperatively on ISG induction, explaining their additive antiviral effects. Thus, our study reveals a novel mechanism of convergent transcription of ISGs by TNF-α and IFN-α, which augments their antiviral activity against HCV and HEV. PMID:27150018

  3. Serine- and threonine/valine-dependent activation of PDK and Tor orthologs converge on Sch9 to promote aging.

    PubMed

    Mirisola, Mario G; Taormina, Giusi; Fabrizio, Paola; Wei, Min; Hu, Jia; Longo, Valter D

    2014-02-01

    Dietary restriction extends longevity in organisms ranging from bacteria to mice and protects primates from a variety of diseases, but the contribution of each dietary component to aging is poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that glucose and specific amino acids promote stress sensitization and aging through the differential activation of the Ras/cAMP/PKA, PKH1/2 and Tor/S6K pathways. Whereas glucose sensitized cells through a Ras-dependent mechanism, threonine and valine promoted cellular sensitization and aging primarily by activating the Tor/S6K pathway and serine promoted sensitization via PDK1 orthologs Pkh1/2. Serine, threonine and valine activated a signaling network in which Sch9 integrates TORC1 and Pkh signaling via phosphorylation of threonines 570 and 737 and promoted intracellular relocalization and transcriptional inhibition of the stress resistance protein kinase Rim15. Because of the conserved pro-aging role of nutrient and growth signaling pathways in higher eukaryotes, these results raise the possibility that similar mechanisms contribute to aging in mammals. PMID:24516402

  4. Serine- and Threonine/Valine-Dependent Activation of PDK and Tor Orthologs Converge on Sch9 to Promote Aging

    PubMed Central

    Fabrizio, Paola; Wei, Min; Hu, Jia; Longo, Valter D.

    2014-01-01

    Dietary restriction extends longevity in organisms ranging from bacteria to mice and protects primates from a variety of diseases, but the contribution of each dietary component to aging is poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that glucose and specific amino acids promote stress sensitization and aging through the differential activation of the Ras/cAMP/PKA, PKH1/2 and Tor/S6K pathways. Whereas glucose sensitized cells through a Ras-dependent mechanism, threonine and valine promoted cellular sensitization and aging primarily by activating the Tor/S6K pathway and serine promoted sensitization via PDK1 orthologs Pkh1/2. Serine, threonine and valine activated a signaling network in which Sch9 integrates TORC1 and Pkh signaling via phosphorylation of threonines 570 and 737 and promoted intracellular relocalization and transcriptional inhibition of the stress resistance protein kinase Rim15. Because of the conserved pro-aging role of nutrient and growth signaling pathways in higher eukaryotes, these results raise the possibility that similar mechanisms contribute to aging in mammals. PMID:24516402

  5. What Are Growth Plate Injuries?

    MedlinePlus

    ... activities. Other reasons for growth plate injuries are:  Child abuse  Injury from extreme cold (for example, frostbite)  Radiation ( ... problems) treats most growth plate injuries. At other times, the child will see a pediatric orthopaedic surgeon (a doctor ...

  6. What Are Growth Plate Injuries?

    MedlinePlus

    ... activities. Other reasons for growth plate injuries are: Child abuse Injury from extreme cold (for example, frostbite) Radiation ( ... problems) treats most growth plate injuries. At other times, the child will see a pediatric orthopaedic surgeon (a doctor ...

  7. The transpressive tectonics and large earthquake distribution along the plate boundary in North Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meghraoui, Mustapha; Pondrelli, Silvia

    2010-05-01

    The Tell Atlas and Rif Mountains of northern Africa have been the site of several large and moderate seismic events in the last decades. However, the thrust and fold system of NW Algeria experienced the largest earthquakes in the last centuries along the Africa-Eurasia plate boundary. This shallow seismic activity was very often associated with surface faulting and deformation as for the Mw 7.3 El Asnam (10/10/1980) and the Mw 6.8 Zemmouri-Boumerdes (21/05/2003) earthquakes. We study the active tectonics along the plate boundary in North Africa from the seismicity database, individual large and moderate earthquakes, the seismic moment tensor summation, the geodetic measurements (GPS and InSAR) and the structural and kinematic of active faults. Neotectonic structures and significant seismicity (Mw>5) indicate that coeval east-west trending right-lateral faulting and NE-SW thrust-related folding result from the oblique convergence at the plate boundary. A simple modeling of block tectonics suggests that transpression and block rotation govern the mechanics of the Africa - Eurasia plate boundary in the Tell Atlas and Rif Mountains. The tectonic restraining bend of NW Algeria combined with the ~ 5 mm/yr convergence between Africa and Eurasia justify the large seismic activity on the thrust and fold system of the Tell Atlas and the relatively passive active deformation along the adjacent sections of the plate boundary.

  8. Development of a high-throughput assay for measuring lipase activity using natural triacylglycerols coated on microtiter plates.

    PubMed

    Serveau-Avesque, Carole; Verger, Robert; Rodriguez, Jorge A; Abousalham, Abdelkarim

    2013-09-21

    We have designed a convenient, specific, sensitive and continuous lipase assay based on the use of natural triacylglycerols (TAGs) from the Aleurites fordii seed oil which contains α-eleostearic acid (9,11,13,cis,trans,trans-octadecatrienoic acid) and which was coated in the wells of microtiter plates. The coated TAG film cannot be desorbed by the various buffers used during the lipase assay. Upon lipase action, α-eleostearic acid is liberated and desorbed from the interface and then solubilized into the micellar phase. Consequently, the UV absorbance of the α-eleostearic acid is considerably enhanced due to the transformation from an adsorbed to a water soluble state. The lipase activity can be measured continuously by recording the variations with time of the UV absorption spectra. The rate of lipolysis was monitored by measuring the increase of OD at 272 nm, which was found to be linear with time and directly proportional to the amount of added lipase. This microtiter plate lipase assay, based on coated TAGs, presents various advantages as compared to the classical systems: (i) coated TAGs on the microtiter plates could be stored for a long-time at 4 °C, (ii) higher sensitivity in lipase detection, (iii) good reproducibility, and (iv) increase of signal to noise ratio due to high UV absorption after transfer of α-eleostearic acid from an adsorbed to a soluble state. Low concentrations, down to 1 pg mL(-1) of pure Thermomyces lanuginosus or human pancreatic lipase, could be detected under standard assay conditions. The detection sensitivity of this coated method is around 1000 times higher as compared to those obtained with the classical emulsified systems. This continuous high throughput lipase assay could be used to screen new lipases and/or lipase inhibitors present in various biological samples. PMID:23851449

  9. Development of atomic layer deposition-activated microchannel plates for single particle detection at cryogenic temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelikov, Dmitry Sullivan, Neal; Rouffignac, Philippe de; Li, Huazhi; Narayanamoorthy, Jayasri; Tremsin, Anton S.

    2014-03-15

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) technology is used to nanoengineer functional films inside the pores of microchannel plate (MCP) electron multipliers, enabling a novel MCP manufacturing technology that substantially improves performance and opens novel applications. The authors have developed custom tools and recipes for the growth of conformal films, with optimized conductance and secondary electron emission inside very long channels (∼6–20 μm diameter and >600 μm length, with tens of millions of channels per single MCP) by ALD. The unique ability to tune the characteristics of these ALD films enables their optimization to applications where time-resolved single particle imaging can be performed in extreme conditions, such as high counting rates at cryogenic temperatures. Adhesion of the conductive and emissive nanofilms to the 20 μm pore MCP glass substrates and their mechanical stability over a very wide range of temperatures (10–700 K) were confirmed experimentally. Resistance of ALD MCPs was reproducible during multiple cool-down cycles with no film degradation observed. Optimizing resistance of novel MCPs for operation at cryogenic temperature should enable high count rate event detection at temperatures below 20 K.

  10. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide in stress-related disorders: data convergence from animal and human studies

    PubMed Central

    May, Victor

    2014-01-01

    The maladaptive expression and function of several stress-associated hormones have been implicated in pathological stress- and anxiety-related disorders. Among these, recent evidence has suggested that pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) has critical roles in central neurocircuits mediating stress-related emotional behaviors. We describe the PACAPergic systems, the data implicating PACAP in stress biology and how altered PACAP expression and signaling may result in psychopathologies. We include our work implicating PACAP signaling within the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) in mediating the consequences of stressor exposure and relatedly, describe more recent studies suggesting that PACAP in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) may impact the emotional aspects of chronic pain states. In aggregate, these results are consistent with data suggesting that PACAP dysregulation is associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in humans. PMID:25636177

  11. Multidisciplinary study of the Tindari Fault (Sicily, Italy) separating ongoing contractional and extensional compartments along the active Africa-Eurasia convergent boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Guidi, G.; Lanzafame, G.; Palano, M.; Puglisi, G.; Scaltrito, A.; Scarfì, L.

    2013-03-01

    The Africa-Eurasia convergence in Sicily and southern Calabria is currently expressed by two different tectonic and geodynamic domains: the western region, governed by a roughly N-S compression generated by a continental collision; the eastern one, controlled by a NW-SE extension related to the south-east-directed expansion of the Calabro-Peloritan Arc. The different deformation pattern of these two domains is accommodated by a right-lateral shear zone (Aeolian-Tindari-Letojanni fault system) which, from the Ionian Sea, north of Mt. Etna, extends across the Peloritani chain to the Aeolian Islands. In this work, we study the evidence of active tectonics characterizing this shear zone, through the analysis of seismic and geodetic data acquired by the INGV networks in the last 15 years. The study is completed by structural and morphological surveys carried out between Capo Tindari and the watershed of the chain. The results allowed defining a clear structural picture depicting the tectonic interferences between the two different geodynamic domains. The results indicate that, besides the regional ~ N130°E horizontal extensional stress field, another one, NE-SW-oriented, is active in the investigated area. Both tension axes are mutually independent and have been active up to the present at different times. The coexistence of these different active horizontal extensions is the result of complex interactions between several induced stresses: 1) the regional extension (NW-SE) related to the slab rollback and back-arc extension; 2) the strong uplift of the chain; 3) the accommodation between compressional and extensional tectonic regimes along the Aeolian-Tindari-Letojanni faults, through a SSE-NNW right-lateral transtensional displacement. In these conditions, the greater and recurring uplift activity is not able to induce a radial extensional dynamics, but, under the "directing" action of the shear system, it can only act on the regional extension (NW-SE) and produce the

  12. Convergent Margin Structure and a Unifying Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Huene, R.; Ranero, C. R.; Scholl, D. W.

    2008-12-01

    Marine observations of the past decade resolve 3 domains of different mechanics in space that probably respond differently from each other during an earthquake cycle. Accretion is common along thickly (>1 km) sedimented trenches and slowly (<50km/myr) converging margins. Erosion is common where convergence is greater which also reduces trench sediment thickness by rapid subduction. However erosion and accretion can be coeval, for instance, subducted seamounts erode the upper plate as adjacent sediment accretes. Trench sediment abundance appears to be a master control of tectonic erosion or accretion. Subducting plate relief and bending, fluid systems, input plate temperature, and material differences seem less important. From recent observations a unifying framework concept to aid interpretations of both accreting and eroding margins is proposed. Over a long term (Ma) the subduction channel accepts a finite amount of material. The excess amount will accrete and a shortage of trench sediment enhances erosion (Cloos and Shreve, 1988). If conditions remain consistent over ~1 Ma periods, the margin configuration becomes typically accretionary or erosional. In each margin segment the short term inter plate friction and material strength changes during the earthquake cycle as proposed by Wang and Hu, 2006. Mechanics probably changes locally during the cycle as well. K. Wang, Y. Hu, Accretionary prisms in subduction earthquake cycles: the theory of dynamic Coulomb wedge, J. Geophys. Res. 111 (2006) B06410, doi:10.1029/2005JB004094. Cloos, M., and R.L. Shreve, (1988), Subduction channel model of prism accretion, melange formation, sediment subduction, and subduction erosion at convergent plate margins: 2. Implications and discussion, Pageoph, v. 129, n. ¾ 501-545

  13. The interpretation of crustal dynamics data in terms of plate interactions and active tectonics of the Anatolian Plate and surrounding regions in the Middle East

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toksoz, M. Nafi

    1988-01-01

    The long-term objective of this project is to interpret NASA's Crustal Dynamics measurements (SLR) in the Eastern Mediterranean region in terms of relative plate movements and intraplate deformation. The approach is to combine realistic modeling studies with analysis of available geophysical and geological observations to provide a framework for interpreting NASA's measurements. This semi-annual report concentrates on recent results regarding the tectonics of Anatolia and surrounding regions from ground based observations. Also reported on briefly is progress in the use of the Global Positioning System to densify SLR observations in the Eastern Mediterranean. Reference is made to the previous annual report for a discussion of modeling results.

  14. The interpretation of crustal dynamics data in terms of plate interactions and active tectonics of the Anatolian Plate and surrounding regions in the Middle East

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toksoz, M. Nafi

    1987-01-01

    The long term objective of this project is to interpret NASA's Crustal Dynamics measurements (SLR) in the Eastern Mediterranean region in terms of relative plate motions and intraplate deformation. The approach is to combine realistic modeling studies with an analysis of available geophysical and geological observations to provide a framework for interpreting NASA's measurements. This semi-annual report concentrates on recent results regarding the tectonics of Anatolia and surrounding regions from ground based observations. Also briefly reported on is progress made in using GPS measurements to densify SLR observations in the Eastern Mediterranean.

  15. Origin of the oceanic basalt basement of the Solomon Islands arc and its relationship to the Ontong Java Plateau-insights from Cenozoic plate motion models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    Cenozoic global plate motion models based on a hotspot reference frame may provide a useful framework for analyzing the tectonic evolution of the Solomon Islands convergent margin. A postulated late Miocene collision of the Ontong Java Plateau (OJP) with a NE-facing arc is consistent with the predicted path of the OJP across the Pacific Basin and its Miocene arrival at the trench. Late-stage igneous activity (65-30 Ma) predicted for the OJP as it rode over the Samoan hotspot occurred in correlative stratigraphic sections on Malaita, the supposed accreted flake of OJP in the Solomon Islands arc. Convergence similar to the present velocities between Australia and the Pacific plates was characteristic of the last 43 million years. Prior to 43 Ma Pacific-Australia plate motions were divergent, seemingly at odds with geologic evidence for early Tertiary convergence, particularly in Papua New Guinea. A postulated South Pacific plate may have existed between Australia and the Pacific plate and would have allowed implied northward subduction along the northeastern Australia plate boundary that lasted into the early Eocene. Subsequent reorganization of plate motions in the middle Eocene correlates with middle Eocene marginal basin formation along ridges oblique to the main plate boundary. Cessation of spreading on the Pacific-South Pacific Ridge and its subsequent subduction beneath Asia followed the change in Pacific plate motion at 43 Ma. A trapped remnant of the extinct, NW-trending ridge may still lie beneath the western Philippine Sea. The terminal deformation, metamorphism and ophiolite obduction in the Eocene orogen of the southwest Pacific also correlates with the major change in Pacific plate motion at 43 Ma and the subsequent compression of the dying Eocene arc against outlying continental and oceanic crustal blocks of the Australian plate. The Solomon Islands oceanic basement may represent juxtaposition of oceanic plateaus of the Australian plate beneath

  16. The Pemali Formation of Central Java and equivalents: Indicators of sedimentation on an active plate margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunt, Peter; Burgon, Gerald; Baky, Alaa

    2009-01-01

    The Pemali Formation is revised from being the oldest known sedimentary unit in north Central Java to being almost the youngest. This, and a new examination of its composition, has implications for regional geological models and petroleum geology. The Pemali Formation was originally interpreted as "early Miocene" but is now shown to be latest Miocene through Pliocene in age, and characterised by both very high rates of sedimentation and a particularly high degree of reworking. The mid-Late Miocene tectonic event that initiated deposition of this formation created a new series of basins that were filled by erosion of new structural highs. Continuing constriction of the basins resulted in the uplift of older Pemali sediments on the basin margins, being reworked into the youngest Pemali strata. Neither the Pemali Formation nor the associated uplift and erosion are seen in the basins in the Java Sea a short distance to the north. Both the severe effects of the mid-Late Miocene tectonism and the Pemali-type sediments are restricted to a particular geologic zone, which is roughly the same as the modern island of Java. This may be above lithosphere of mixed terranes that forms a rim to the sialic Sunda Plate. The onshore Java area has a history of severe tectonism through the Tertiary and consequently a stratigraphy that greatly contrasts with that of the present-day Java Sea. The localised and thick Pemali deposition affected the burial history and the generation of hydrocarbons around the mid-Late Miocene basins, whilst the uplifted areas may include hydrocarbon traps. If basement composition influenced the location and thickness of the Pemali Formation then it is also likely to have fundamentally controlled deposition of older formations, including the unknown source rock for surface oil seeps. Likewise, these controls appear to contrast strongly with the better known rift-sag basins of the Java Sea.

  17. A comparison of plate assay methods for detecting extracellular cellulase and xylanase activity.

    PubMed

    Meddeb-Mouelhi, Fatma; Moisan, Jessica Kelly; Beauregard, Marc

    2014-11-01

    Identification of microorganisms for the production of carbohydrolytic enzymes is extremely important given the increased demand for these enzymes in many industries. To this end, dye-polysaccharide interactions which provide a visual indication of polymer hydrolysis (clear zones or halos) have been used for decades. For the detection of extracellular cellulase or xylanase activity many laboratories use Gram's iodine as the chromogenic dye, as it is a more rapid initial screening method compared to the use of other dyes. Here, we compared Gram's iodine and Congo red as indicators of polysaccharide hydrolysis. We attempted to detect cellulase activity using carboxymethylcellulose, and xylanase activity using birchwood xylan, in fourteen uncharacterized bacteria isolated from wood chips. Our results indicate that Gram's iodine may lead to identification of false positives in a typical screening protocol and that Congo red allows for avoidance of such pitfall. Congo red allowed detection of cellulase activity from live microbial colonies but not Gram's iodine. To confirm this, detection of enzymatic activity was also assessed using cell-free enzyme preparations. Congo red was found to be reliable in detecting cellulase activity with isolated enzymes preparations. Under the same conditions, neither of these dyes detected xylanase activity, despite independent evidence of xylanase activity for one of the preparations. We detected xylanase activity for this particular enzyme preparation using a coloured derivative of xylan (Remazol Brillant Blue R-xylan adduct) that respond to xylan hydrolysis. Our results suggest that methods that rely on interactions between a dye (Congo red or Gram's iodine) and a polymeric substrate (carboxymethylcellulose or birchwood xylan) for indirect detection of hydrolysis may require the use of relevant controls and independent confirmation of enzymatic activities. PMID:25248694

  18. Development of a New Fast Shower Maximum Detector Based on Microchannel Plates Photomultipliers (MCP-PMT) as an Active Element

    SciTech Connect

    Ronzhin, A.; Los, S.; Ramberg, E.; Spiropulu, M.; Apresyan, A.; Xie, S.; Kim, H.; Zatserklyaniy, A.

    2014-09-21

    One possibility to make a fast and radiation resistant shower maximum (SM) detector is to use a secondary emitter as an active element. We present below test beam results, obtained with different types of photodetectors based on microchannel plates (MCPs) as the secondary emitter. We performed the measurements at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility with 120GeV proton beam and 12GeV and 32GeV secondary beams. The goal of the measurement with 120GeV protons was to determine time resolution for minimum ionizing particles (MIPs). The SM time resolution we obtained for this new type of detector is at the level of 20-30ps. We estimate that a significant contribution to the detector response originates from secondary emission of the MCP. This work can be considered as the first step in building a new type of calorimeter based on this principle.

  19. A case report of suspected hepatopulmonary syndrome secondary to ductal plate malformation with chronic active hepatitis in a dog

    PubMed Central

    KANEKO, Yasuyuki; TORISU, Shidow; HAGIO, Mitsuyoshi; YAMAGUCHI, Ryoji; MIZUTANI, Shinya; NAGANOBU, Kiyokazu

    2015-01-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a respiratory complication of hepatic disease, that is well recognized in humans and defined by the presence of 1) liver disease, 2) hypoxemia and/or high alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient (AaDO2) and 3) intrapulmonary vasodilatation. The present report describes a similar case of HPS in a dog. A six-month-old Papillon was diagnosed with ductal plate malformation with chronic active hepatitis and showed progressive increases in AaDO2 over the course of the following six months. The presence of intrapulmonary vasodilatation was confirmed by agitated saline contrast transthoracic echocardiography. Also, the absence of congenital cardiac defect was confirmed by transthoracic echocardiography. From these results, we suspected that this dog had HPS. This is the first description of suspected canine HPS. PMID:26616155

  20. Development of a new fast shower maximum detector based on microchannel plates photomultipliers (MCP-PMT) as an active element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronzhin, A.; Los, S.; Ramberg, E.; Spiropulu, M.; Apresyan, A.; Xie, S.; Kim, H.; Zatserklyaniy, A.

    2014-09-01

    One possibility to make a fast and radiation resistant shower maximum (SM) detector is to use a secondary emitter as an active element. We present below test beam results, obtained with different types of photodetectors based on microchannel plates (MCPs) as the secondary emitter. We performed the measurements at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility with 120 GeV proton beam and 12 GeV and 32 GeV secondary beams. The goal of the measurement with 120 GeV protons was to determine time resolution for minimum ionizing particles (MIPs). The SM time resolution we obtained for this new type of detector is at the level of 20-30 ps. We estimate that a significant contribution to the detector response originates from secondary emission of the MCP. This work can be considered as the first step in building a new type of calorimeter based on this principle.

  1. Tectonic Plate Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landalf, Helen

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity that employs movement to enable students to understand concepts related to plate tectonics. Argues that movement brings topics to life in a concrete way and helps children retain knowledge. (DDR)

  2. Grid Convergence for Turbulent Flows(Invited)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Schwoppe, Axel

    2015-01-01

    A detailed grid convergence study has been conducted to establish accurate reference solutions corresponding to the one-equation linear eddy-viscosity Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model for two dimensional turbulent flows around the NACA 0012 airfoil and a flat plate. The study involved three widely used codes, CFL3D (NASA), FUN3D (NASA), and TAU (DLR), and families of uniformly refined structured grids that differ in the grid density patterns. Solutions computed by different codes on different grid families appear to converge to the same continuous limit, but exhibit different convergence characteristics. The grid resolution in the vicinity of geometric singularities, such as a sharp trailing edge, is found to be the major factor affecting accuracy and convergence of discrete solutions, more prominent than differences in discretization schemes and/or grid elements. The results reported for these relatively simple turbulent flows demonstrate that CFL3D, FUN3D, and TAU solutions are very accurate on the finest grids used in the study, but even those grids are not sufficient to conclusively establish an asymptotic convergence order.

  3. Teaching Plate Tectonic Concepts using GeoMapApp Learning Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwillie, A. M.; Kluge, S.

    2012-12-01

    GeoMapApp Learning Activities ( http://serc.carleton.edu/geomapapp/collection.html ) can help educators to expose undergraduate students to a range of earth science concepts using high-quality data sets in an easy-to-use map-based interface called GeoMapApp. GeoMapApp Learning Activities require students to interact with and analyse research-quality geoscience data as a means to explore and enhance their understanding of underlying content and concepts. Each activity is freely available through the SERC-Carleton web site and offers step-by-step student instructions and answer sheets. Also provided are annotated educator versions of the worksheets that include teaching tips, additional content and suggestions for further work. The activities can be used "off-the-shelf". Or, since the educator may require flexibility to tailor the activities, the documents are provided in Word format for easy modification. Examples of activities include one on the concept of seafloor spreading that requires students to analyse global seafloor crustal age data to calculate spreading rates in different ocean basins. Another activity has students explore hot spots using radiometric age dating of rocks along the Hawaiian-Emperor seamount chain. A third focusses upon the interactive use of contours and profiles to help students visualise 3-D topography on 2-D computer screens. A fourth activity provides a study of mass wasting as revealed through geomorphological evidence. The step-by-step instructions and guided inquiry approach reduce the need for teacher intervention whilst boosting the time that students can spend on productive exploration and learning. The activities can be used, for example, in a classroom lab with the educator present and as self-paced assignments in an out-of-class setting. GeoMapApp Learning Activities are funded through the NSF GeoEd program and are aimed at students in the introductory undergraduate, community college and high school levels. The activities are

  4. Observing active deformation of volcanoes in North America: Geodetic data from the Plate Boundary Observatory and associated networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puskas, C. M.; Phillips, D. A.; Mattioli, G. S.; Meertens, C. M.; Hodgkinson, K. M.; Crosby, C. J.; Enders, M.; Feaux, K.; Mencin, D.; Baker, S.; Lisowski, M.; Smith, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), operated by UNAVCO, records deformation of the geologically diverse North America western plate boundary, with subnetworks of instruments concentrated at selected active and potentially active volcanoes. These sensors record deformation and earthquakes and allow monitoring agencies and researchers to analyze changes in ground motion and seismicity. The intraplate volcanoes at Yellowstone and Long Valley are characterized by uplift/subsidence cycles, high seismicity, and hydrothermal activity but there have been no historic eruptions at either volcano. PBO maintains dense GPS networks of 20-25 stations at each of these volcanoes, with an additional 5 boreholes at Yellowstone containing tensor strainmeters, short-period seismometers, and borehole tiltmeters. Subduction zone volcanoes in the Aleutian Arc have had multiple historic eruptions, and PBO maintains equipment at Augustine (8 GPS), Akutan (8 GPS, 4 tiltmeters), and Unimak Island (14 GPS, 8 tiltmeters). The Unimak stations are at the active Westdahl and Shishaldin edifices and the nearby, inactive Isanotski volcano. In the Cascade Arc, PBO maintains networks at Mount St. Helens (15 GPS, 4 borehole strainmeters and seismometers, 8 borehole tiltmeters), Shasta (7 GPS, 1 borehole strainmeter and seismometer), and Lassen Peak (8 GPS). Data from many of these stations in the Pacific Northwest and California are also provided as realtime streams of raw and processed data. Real-time GPS data, along with high-rate GPS data, will be an important new resource for detecting and studying future rapid volcanic deformation events and earthquakes. UNAVCO works closely with the USGS Volcano Hazards Program, archiving data from USGS GPS stations in Alaska, Cascadia, and Long Valley. The PBO and USGS networks combined provide more comprehensive coverage than PBO alone, particularly of the Cascade Arc, where the USGS maintains a multiple instruments near each volcano. Ground

  5. Locating Active Plate Boundaries by Earthquake Data. Crustal Evaluation Education Project. Teacher's Guide [and] Student Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoever, Edward C., Jr.

    Crustal Evolution Education Project (CEEP) modules were designed to: (1) provide students with the methods and results of continuing investigations into the composition, history, and processes of the earth's crust and the application of this knowledge to man's activities and (2) to be used by teachers with little or no previous background in the…

  6. Searching for Active Faults in the Western Eurasia-Nubia plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunes, Veronica; Custodio, Susana; Arroucau, Pierre; Carrilho, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    The repeated occurrence of large magnitude earthquakes in southwest Iberia in historical and instrumental times suggests the presence of active faults in the region. However, the region undergoes slow deformation, which results in low rates of seismic activity, and the location, dimension and geometry of active structures remains unsettled. We recently developed a new algorithm for earthquake location in 3D complex media with laterally varying interface depths, which allowed us to relocate 2363 events that occurred from 2007 to 2013. The method takes as inputs P- and S-wave catalog arrival times obtained from the Portuguese Meteorological Institute (IPMA, Instituto Portugues do Mar e da Atmosfera), for a study area defined by 8.5°W < lon < 5°W and 36° < lat < 37.5°. After relocation, we obtain a lineation of events in the Guadalquivir bank region, in the northern Gulf of Cadiz. The lineation defines a low-angle northward-dipping plane rooted at the base of the crust, which could indicate the presence of a major fault. We provide seismological evidence for the existence of this seemingly active structure based on earthquake relocations, focal mechanisms and waveform similarity between neighboring events.

  7. Age, tectonic evolution and origin of the Aswa Shear Zone in Uganda: Activation of an oblique ramp during convergence in the East African Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saalmann, K.; Mänttäri, I.; Nyakecho, C.; Isabirye, E.

    2016-05-01

    Shear Zone activation is linked to underthrusting of the Congo Craton and coeval high-grade metamorphism and intense deformation in the orogen interior. During E-W convergence between ca. 690 and 650 Ma, the NE-dipping ASZ was activated as an oblique ramp leading to deflection of the transport direction and concentration of non-coaxial strain and sinistral shear along the shear zone system. During progressive convergence, between ca. 645 and 620 Ma, sinistral shearing along ASZ changed to ductile-brittle deformation mechanisms, while thrusting took place in Pan-African belts in eastern and western Uganda. Late-orogenic brittle sinistral reactivation of the ASZ can be regarded as the result of continent collision and closure of the Mozambique ocean further to the east, that potentially caused lateral escape manifested in NW-SE striking sinistral shear zones in Kenya and the southern Arabina-Nubian Shield between 620 and 570 Ma.

  8. Age, tectonic evolution and origin of the Aswa Shear Zone in Uganda: Activation of an oblique ramp during convergence in the East African Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saalmann, K.; Mänttäri, I.; Nyakecho, C.; Isabirye, E.

    2016-05-01

    . Early Aswa Shear Zone activation is linked to underthrusting of the Congo Craton and coeval high-grade metamorphism and intense deformation in the orogen interior. During E-W convergence between ca. 690 and 650 Ma, the NE-dipping ASZ was activated as an oblique ramp leading to deflection of the transport direction and concentration of non-coaxial strain and sinistral shear along the shear zone system. During progressive convergence, between ca. 645 and 620 Ma, sinistral shearing along ASZ changed to ductile-brittle deformation mechanisms, while thrusting took place in Pan-African belts in eastern and western Uganda. Late-orogenic brittle sinistral reactivation of the ASZ can be regarded as the result of continent collision and closure of the Mozambique ocean further to the east, that potentially caused lateral escape manifested in NW-SE striking sinistral shear zones in Kenya and the southern Arabina-Nubian Shield between 620 and 570 Ma.

  9. Interplate coupling at oblique subduction zones: influence on upper plate erosion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malatesta, Cristina; Gerya, Taras; Crispini, Laura; Federico, Laura; Scambelluri, Marco; Capponi, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    In active subduction zones, when the converging plates cannot slip freely past each other, "plate coupling" occurs. The moving subducting slab and therefore the coupling/decoupling relationship between plates control both short- and long-term deformation of the upper plate. Short-term deformation is dominantly elastic, occurs at human timescales and can be directly associated with earthquakes. Long-term deformation is cumulative, permanent and prevails at the geological timescale (Hoffman-Rothe et al., 2006, Springer Berlin Heidelberg). Here we used 3D numerical simulations to test oblique subduction zones and to investigate: 1) how long-term deformation and coupling relationship vary along the trench-axis; 2) how this relationship influences erosion and down-drag of upper plate material. Our models are based on thermo-mechanical equations solved with finite differences method and marker-in-cell techniques combined with a multigrid approach (Gerya, 2010, Cambridge Univ. Press). The reference model simulates an intraoceanic subduction close to the continental margin (Malatesta et al., 2013, Nature Communications, 4:2456 DOI:10.1038/ncomms3456). The oceanic crust is layered with a 5-km-thick layer of gabbro overlain by a 3-km-thick layer of basalt. The ocean floor is covered by 1-km-thick sediments. Plates move with a total velocity of 3.15 cm/yr; the oblique convergence is obtained using velocity vectors that form an angle of 45° with the initial starting point of subduction (weak zone in the lithosphere). After initiation of plate convergence, part of sediments on top of the incoming plate enters the subduction zone and is buried; another part is suddenly transferred along strike at shallow depths and along the subducting slab according to the direction of the along-trench velocity component of subduction. The lateral migration of sediment causes the evolution of the trench along its strike from sediment-poor to sediment-rich. As soon as subduction starts, where

  10. Metabolic activities of five botryticides against Botrytis cinerea examined using the Biolog FF MicroPlate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hancheng; Wang, Jin; Li, Licui; Hsiang, Tom; Wang, Maosheng; Shang, Shenghua; Yu, Zhihe

    2016-01-01

    Tobacco grey mold caused by Botrytis cinerea is an important fungal disease worldwide. Boscalid, carbendazim, iprodione, pyrimethanil and propiconazole are representative botryticides for grey mold management. This research investigated the sensitivities of B. cinerea from tobacco to these chemicals using the Biolog FF Microplate. All five chemicals showed inhibitory activity, with average EC50 values of 0.94, 0.05, 0.50, 0.61 and 0.31 μg ml(-1), respectively. B. cinerea metabolized 96.8% of tested carbon sources, including 29 effectively and 33 moderately, but the metabolic fingerprints differed under pressures imposed by these botryticides. For boscalid, B. cinerea was unable to metabolize many substrates related to tricarboxylic acid cycle. For carbendazim, carbon sources related to glycolysis were not metabolized. For iprodione, use of most carbon substrates was weakly inhibited, and the metabolic profile was similar to that of the control. For propiconazole, no carbon substrates were metabolized and the physiological and biochemical functions of the pathogen were totally inhibited. These findings provide useful information on metabolic activities of these botryticides, and may lead to future applications of the Biolog FF Microplate for examining metabolic effects of other fungicides on other fungi, as well as providing a metabolic fingerprint of B. cinerea that could be useful for identification. PMID:27491536

  11. Metabolic activities of five botryticides against Botrytis cinerea examined using the Biolog FF MicroPlate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hancheng; Wang, Jin; Li, Licui; Hsiang, Tom; Wang, Maosheng; Shang, Shenghua; Yu, Zhihe

    2016-01-01

    Tobacco grey mold caused by Botrytis cinerea is an important fungal disease worldwide. Boscalid, carbendazim, iprodione, pyrimethanil and propiconazole are representative botryticides for grey mold management. This research investigated the sensitivities of B. cinerea from tobacco to these chemicals using the Biolog FF Microplate. All five chemicals showed inhibitory activity, with average EC50 values of 0.94, 0.05, 0.50, 0.61 and 0.31 μg ml−1, respectively. B. cinerea metabolized 96.8% of tested carbon sources, including 29 effectively and 33 moderately, but the metabolic fingerprints differed under pressures imposed by these botryticides. For boscalid, B. cinerea was unable to metabolize many substrates related to tricarboxylic acid cycle. For carbendazim, carbon sources related to glycolysis were not metabolized. For iprodione, use of most carbon substrates was weakly inhibited, and the metabolic profile was similar to that of the control. For propiconazole, no carbon substrates were metabolized and the physiological and biochemical functions of the pathogen were totally inhibited. These findings provide useful information on metabolic activities of these botryticides, and may lead to future applications of the Biolog FF Microplate for examining metabolic effects of other fungicides on other fungi, as well as providing a metabolic fingerprint of B. cinerea that could be useful for identification. PMID:27491536

  12. The evil twin of Agenor: tectonic convergence on Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, Richard

    2004-02-01

    The dilemma of the surface-area budget on Europa is resolved by identification of sites of crustal convergence, which have balanced the continual and common creation of new surface along dilational bands and pull-aparts. Convergence bands are characterized by a distinctive, albeit subdued, morphology. The prominent, unusual lineament Agenor is one of several examples. We also find diametrically opposite Agenor a similar bright linear feature surrounded by markings that allow reconstruction, which shows it to be a convergence feature. Until recently, identification of convergence sites was difficult because these features are subtle and do not exhibit structures (like the Himalayas or plate subduction) familiar from convergence of thick solid crusts on terrestrial planets.

  13. Convenient microtiter plate-based, oxygen-independent activity assays for flavin-dependent oxidoreductases based on different redox dyes

    PubMed Central

    Brugger, Dagmar; Krondorfer, Iris; Zahma, Kawah; Stoisser, Thomas; Bolivar, Juan M; Nidetzky, Bernd; Peterbauer, Clemens K; Haltrich, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    Flavin-dependent oxidoreductases are increasingly recognized as important biocatalysts for various industrial applications. In order to identify novel activities and to improve these enzymes in engineering approaches, suitable screening methods are necessary. We developed novel microtiter-plate-based assays for flavin-dependent oxidases and dehydrogenases using redox dyes as electron acceptors for these enzymes. 2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol, methylene green, and thionine show absorption changes between their oxidized and reduced forms in the visible range, making it easy to judge visually changes in activity. A sample set of enzymes containing both flavoprotein oxidases and dehydrogenases – pyranose 2-oxidase, pyranose dehydrogenase, cellobiose dehydrogenase, d-amino acid oxidase, and l-lactate oxidase – was selected. Assays for these enzymes are based on a direct enzymatic reduction of the redox dyes and not on the coupled detection of a reaction product as in the frequently used assays based on hydrogen peroxide formation. The different flavoproteins show low Michaelis constants with these electron acceptor substrates, and therefore these dyes need to be added in only low concentrations to assure substrate saturation. In conclusion, these electron acceptors are useful in selective, reliable and cheap MTP-based screening assays for a range of flavin-dependent oxidoreductases, and offer a robust method for library screening, which could find applications in enzyme engineering programs. PMID:24376171

  14. [Activity of porcine anti-Brucella abortus immunoglobulins in the acid plate agglutination test (APAT)].

    PubMed

    Stryszak, A; Błaszczyk, B; Królak, M

    1987-01-01

    Serological activity of swine IgM and IgG against Brucella abortus in RBPT was determined in relation to four other reactions used in Poland for diagnosing brucellosis standard agglutination test, complement fixation test, antiglobulin test, 2-mercaptoethanol test). Isolation of IgG was performed by the method of filtration on Sephadex gel G-200 of swine sera raised against Brucella abortus S19 by double immunization with suspension of killed bacteria. The presence of a certain Ig class in the fractions thus obtained was confirmed by immunoelectrophoresis and immunodiffusion tests. RBPT revealed the reaction of antibodies of IgM and IgG class which proves usability of this reaction diagnosis both early (IgM) and chronic (IgG) infection with brucellosis. Both classes of antibodies mentioned above were active also in SAT and CTT. Also the results obtained in AGT and MET were found interesting. In one of the sera, the absence of incomplete antibodies was observed, whereas positive reaction in antiglobulin test was found in its fractions containing IgG. This phenomenon was determined as concealment of incomplete agglutinins through higher level of complete antibodies in normal serum. In swine (the results were different from those obtained for cattle), apart from incomplete antibodies in IgG class, the presence of these agglutinins in IgM class was noted. On the other hand, the results obtained in MET proved that IgM antibodies of swine were not totally reduced when affected by 2-mercaptoethanol. PMID:3137534

  15. First geodetic measurement of convergence across the Java Trench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tregoning, P.; Brunner, F. K.; Bock, Y.; Puntodewo, S. S. O.; Mccraffrey, R.; Genrich, J. F.; Calais, E.; Rais, J.; Subarya, C.

    1994-01-01

    Convergence across the Java Trench has been estimated for the first time, from annual Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements commencing in 1989. The directions of motion of Christmas and Cocos Island are within 1 deg of that predicted by the No-Net Rotation (NNR) NUVEL-1 plate motion model for the Australian plate although their rates are 25% and 37% less than predcited, respectively. The motion of West Java differs significantly from the NNR NUVEL-1 prediction for the Eurasian plate with a 1 deg difference in direction and a 40% increase in rate. We infer that either West Java moves with a distinct Southeast Asian plate or this region experiences plate margin deformation. The convergence of Christmas Island with respect to West Java is 67 +/- mm/yr in a direction N11 deg E +/- 4 deg which is orthogonal to the trench. The magnitude of convergence agrees well with rescaled NUVEL-1 relative plate model which predicts a value of 71 mm/yr between Australia and Eurasia. The direction of motion matches the direction inferred from earthquake slip vectors at the trench but may be more northerly than the N20 deg E +/- 3 deg predicted by NUVEL-1. On June 2, 1994, almost a year after the last GPS survey, an M(sub W) = 7.5 earthquake with slip vector direction N5 deg occurred south of central Java.

  16. Positive battery plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, John R. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    The power characteristics of a lead acid battery are improved by incorporating a dispersion of 1 to 10% by weight of a thermodynamically stable conductivity additive, such as conductive tin oxide coated glass fibers (34) of filamentary glass wool (42) in the positive active layer (32) carried on the grid (30) of the positive plate (16). Positive plate potential must be kept high enough to prevent reduction of the tin oxide to tin by utilizing an oversized, precharged positive paste.

  17. Fractal multifiber microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Lee M.; Feller, W. B.; Kenter, Almus T.; Chappell, Jon H.

    1992-01-01

    The construction and performance of microchannel plates (MCPs) made using fractal tiling mehtods are reviewed. MCPs with 40 mm active areas having near-perfect channel ordering were produced. These plates demonstrated electrical performance characteristics equivalent to conventionally constructed MCPs. These apparently are the first MCPs which have a sufficiently high degree of order to permit single channel addressability. Potential applications for these devices and the prospects for further development are discussed.

  18. A review of the plate convergence history of the East Anatolia-Transcaucasus region during the Variscan: Insights from the Georgian basement and its connection to the Eastern Pontides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolland, Y.; Hässig, M.; Bosch, D.; Meijers, M. J. M.; Sosson, M.; Bruguier, O.; Adamia, Sh.; Sadradze, N.

    2016-05-01

    This article summarizes the geodynamic evolution of the Variscan to Mesozoic Tethyan subduction history, based on a review of geochronological data from Eastern Anatolia and the Lesser Caucasus, and new isotopic ages for the Georgian crystalline basements. The geological history of the basements of Georgia (Transcaucasus) and NE Turkey (eastern Pontides) appears to be similar and provides evidence for a continuously active continental margin above a north-dipping subduction since at least the Lower Jurassic. New La-ICPMS U-Pb ages from the Georgian basement provide further evidence for the derivation of the Transcaucasus and its western continuation (the eastern Pontides) from Gondwana. A migmatized granodiorite provides preserved magmatic zircon cores with an age of 474 ± 3 Ma, while the age of migmatization is constrained by its 343 ± 2 Ma metamorphic rims. Metamorphism is synchronous with widespread I-type granites that were emplaced at 335 ± 8 Ma in the neighbouring Dzirula massif, and in the eastern Pontides. These U-Pb ages are in close agreement with recently obtained Ar/Ar ages from biotites and muscovites from metamorphic schists and U-Pb ages ranging from 340 to 330 Ma in the Georgian basement. The narrow range of ages suggests that the Variscan LP-HT metamorphic event in the eastern Pontides and Georgia was of short duration and likely related to mantle-derived intrusives. Furthermore, we suggest that (1) rifting of the Pontides-Transcaucasus block (PTB) from Gondwana at 450-350 Ma could have been driven by roll-back of the south-dipping Rheic slab, (2) that the main metamorphic and coeval magmatic events are related to the accretion of the PTB to the Eurasian margin at c. 350 Ma, while the source of magmatism is ascribed to slab detachment of the south-dipping slab at 340 Ma and that (3) three subduction zones may have been contemporaneously active in the Tethyan domain during the Jurassic: (i) the Lesser Caucasus South Armenian Block (SAB) shares a

  19. Plate tectonics and crustal deformation around the Japanese Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashimoto, Manabu; Jackson, David D.

    1993-01-01

    We analyze over a century of geodetic data to study crustal deformation and plate motion around the Japanese Islands, using the block-fault model for crustal deformation developed by Matsu'ura et al. (1986). We model the area including the Japanese Islands with 19 crustal blocks and 104 faults based on the distribution of active faults and seismicity. Geodetic data are used to obtain block motions and average slip rates of faults. This geodetic model predicts that the Pacific plate moves N deg 69 +/- 2 deg W at about 80 +/- 3 mm/yr relative to the Eurasian plate which is much lower than that predicted in geologic models. Substantial aseismic slip occurs on the subduction boundaries. The block containing the Izu Peninsula may be separated from the rigid part of the Philippine Sea plate. The faults on the coast of Japan Sea and the western part of the Median Tectonic Line have slip rates exceeding 4 mm/yr, while the Fossa Magna does not play an important role in the tectonics of the central Japan. The geodetic model requires the division of northeastern Japan, contrary to the hypothesis that northeastern Japan is a part of the North American plate. Owing to rapid convergence, the seismic risk in the Nankai trough may be larger than that of the Tokai gap.

  20. Peen plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babecki, A. J. (Inventor); Haehner, C. L.

    1973-01-01

    A process for metal plating which comprises spraying a mixture of metallic powder and small peening particles at high velocity against a surface is described. The velocity must be sufficient to impact and bond metallic powder onto the surface. In the case of metal surfaces, the process has as one of its advantages providing mechanical working (hardening) of the surface simultaneously with the metal plating.

  1. Anomalously fast convergence of India and Eurasia caused by double subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagoutz, Oliver; Royden, Leigh; Holt, Adam F.; Becker, Thorsten W.

    2015-06-01

    Before its collision with Eurasia, the Indian Plate moved rapidly, at rates exceeding 140 mm yr-1 for a period of 20 million years. This motion is 50 to 100% faster than the maximum sustained rate of convergence of the main tectonic plates today. The cause of such high rates of convergence is unclear and not reproduced by numerical models. Here we show that existing geological data support the existence of two, almost parallel, northward dipping subduction zones between the Indian and Eurasian plates, during the Early Cretaceous period. We use a quantitative model to show that the combined pull of two subducting slabs can generate anomalously rapid convergence between India and Eurasia. Furthermore, in our simulations a reduction in length of the southern subduction system, from about 10,000 to 3,000 km between 90 and 80 million years ago, reduced the viscous pressure between the subducting slabs and created a threefold increase in plate convergence rate between 80 and 65 million years ago. Rapid convergence ended 50 million years ago, when the Indian Plate collided with the southern subduction system. Collision of India with Eurasia and the northern subduction system had little effect on plate convergence rates before 40 million years ago. We conclude that the number and geometry of subduction systems has a strong influence on plate migration rates.

  2. Current density and catalyst-coated membrane resistance distribution of hydro-formed metallic bipolar plate fuel cell short stack with 250 cm2 active area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, S.; Moser, M.; Hirschfeld, J. A.; Jozwiak, K.

    2016-01-01

    An automotive fuel cell with an active area of 250 cm2 is investigated in a 4-cell short stack with a current and temperature distribution device next to the bipolar plate with 560 current and 140 temperature segments. The electrical conductivities of the bipolar plate and gas diffusion layer assembly are determined ex-situ with this current scan shunt module. The applied fuel cell consists of bipolar plates constructed of 75-μm-thick, welded stainless-steel foils and a graphitic coating. The electrical conductivities of the bipolar plate and gas diffusion layer assembly are determined ex-situ with this module with a 6% deviation in in-plane conductivity. The current density distribution is evaluated up to 2.4 A cm-2. The entire cell's investigated volumetric power density is 4.7 kW l-1, and its gravimetric power density is 4.3 kW kg-1 at an average cell voltage of 0.5 V. The current density distribution is determined without influencing the operating cell. In addition, the current density distribution in the catalyst-coated membrane and its effective resistivity distribution with a finite volume discretisation of Ohm's law are evaluated. The deviation between the current density distributions in the catalyst-coated membrane and the bipolar plate is determined.

  3. Earthquakes and plate tectonics.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.

    1982-01-01

    Earthquakes occur at the following three kinds of plate boundary: ocean ridges where the plates are pulled apart, margins where the plates scrape past one another, and margins where one plate is thrust under the other. Thus, we can predict the general regions on the earth's surface where we can expect large earthquakes in the future. We know that each year about 140 earthquakes of magnitude 6 or greater will occur within this area which is 10% of the earth's surface. But on a worldwide basis we cannot say with much accuracy when these events will occur. The reason is that the processes in plate tectonics have been going on for millions of years. Averaged over this interval, plate motions amount to several mm per year. But at any instant in geologic time, for example the year 1982, we do not know, exactly where we are in the worldwide cycle of strain build-up and strain release. Only by monitoring the stress and strain in small areas, for instance, the San Andreas fault, in great detail can we hope to predict when renewed activity in that part of the plate tectonics arena is likely to take place. -from Author

  4. Convergence of Arnoldi method

    SciTech Connect

    Nevanlinna, O.

    1994-12-31

    This note summarizes some results on (a monitored version of) the Arnoldi method in Hilbert spaces. The interest in working in infinite dimensional spaces comes partly from the fact that only then can one have meaningful asymptotical statements (which hopefully give some light to the convergence of Arnoldi in large dimensional problems with iteration indices far less than the dimension).

  5. The Convergence Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolodzy, Janet; Grant, August E.; DeMars, Tony R.; Wilkinson, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of the Internet, social media, and digital technologies in the twenty-first century accelerated an evolution in journalism and communication that fit under the broad term of convergence. That evolution changed the relationship between news producers and consumers. It broke down the geographical boundaries in defining our communities,…

  6. Twin Convergence Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's QuikSCAT satellite has confirmed a 30-year old largely unproven theory that there are two areas near the equator where the winds converge year after year and drive ocean circulation south of the equator. By analyzing winds, QuikSCAT has found a year-round southern and northern Intertropical Convergence Zone. This find is important to climate modelers and weather forecasters because it provides more detail on how the oceans and atmosphere interact near the equator. The Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) is the region that circles the Earth near the equator, where the trade winds of both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres come together. North of the equator, strong sun and warm water of the equator heats the air in the ITCZ, drawing air in from north and south and causing the air to rise. As the air rises it cools, releasing the accumulated moisture in an almost perpetual series of thunderstorms. Satellite data, however, has confirmed that there is an ITCZ north of the equator and a parallel ITCZ south of the equator. Variation in the location of the ITCZ is important to people around the world because it affects the north-south atmospheric circulation, which redistributes energy. It drastically affects rainfall in many equatorial nations, resulting in the wet and dry seasons of the tropics rather than the cold and warm seasons of higher latitudes. Longer term changes in the ITCZ can result in severe droughts or flooding in nearby areas. 'The double ITCZ is usually only identified in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans on a limited and seasonal basis,' said Timothy Liu, of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif., and lead researcher on the project. In the eastern Pacific Ocean, the southern ITCZ is usually seen springtime. In the western Atlantic Ocean, the southern ITCZ was recently clearly identified only in the summertime. However, QuikSCAT's wind data has seen the southern ITCZ in all seasons across the

  7. Changes in Student Knowledge and Views of Geohazards, Societal Risks, and Monitoring at Active Plate Boundaries Using a Data-Rich Curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selkin, P. A.; Goodell, L. P.; Teasdale, R.

    2015-12-01

    The "Living on the Edge: Building Resilient Societies on Active Plate Margins" curriculum consists of six data-rich activities, each intended for a 50-minute class, in which students assess risk at active plate boundaries due to earthquakes and volcanoes. Developed as part of the InTeGrate NSF STEP Center the peer-reviewed, publically available materials (http://serc.carleton.edu/104296) have been used at several institutions in diverse classroom settings including small laboratory sections, large lecture courses, medium-sized upper division courses and professional development programs for middle and high school teachers. Pre- and post-instruction surveys measured content knowledge and geoscience literacy, self-efficacy in using geologic data to assess hazards and risk, and attitudes towards the value of monitoring plate margins. The activities have overall positive effects on knowledge of geohazard concepts. Views about the value of scientific practice also became more positive: 74% of students indicated they "agree" or "strongly agree" that monitoring geologic activity has value to them personally (even if they don't live on an active plate margin) and 94% indicated that such monitoring is valuable to society. Most became more confident in evaluating geologic hazard and risk (>60% of students self-described increased confidence by one or more Likert levels). Student knowledge of both the types and limits of data in forecasting geological hazards and their effects also improved. However, attitudes toward sustainability and geoscience careers did not change. Learning and attitudinal improvements are true for all classroom types, but the degree of change varies with class size and the amount of time spent on activities. Learning data and instructor feedback suggest that interactive classroom activities that use real-world data to address societally relevant issues increase student learning and enhance students' ability to synthesize scientific information.

  8. Maps, Plates, and Mount Saint Helens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lary, Barbara E.; Krockover, Gerald H.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a laboratory activity on plate tectonics which focuses on the connection between plate tectonics and the different types of volcanoes. Provides questions for discussion and includes suggestions for extending the activity. (ML)

  9. ChooseMyPlate.gov

    MedlinePlus

    ... Day You don’t have to be an Olympic athlete to be active. Taking the stairs instead of the elevator, mowing the lawn, and gardening count too! TWITTER FEED 2 days ChooseMyPlate.gov @MyPlate Make family dinner more fun with a game or activity. Challenge kids to solve a riddle ...

  10. Rigid and non-rigid micro-plates: Philippines and Myanmar-Andaman case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangin, Claude

    2016-01-01

    Generally, tectonic plates are considered as rigid. Oblique plate convergence favors the development of micro-plates along the converging boundaries. The north-south-trending Philippines archipelago (here named Philippine Mobile Belt, PMB), a few hundreds kilometers wide, is one of such complex tectonic zones. We show here that it is composed of rigid rotating crustal blocks (here called platelets). In Myanmar, the northernmost tip of the Sumatra-Andaman subduction system is another complex zone made of various crustal blocks in-between convergent plates. Yet, contrary to PMB, it sustains internal deformation with platelet buckling, altogether indicative of a non-rigid behavior. Therefore, the two case studies, Philippine Mobile Belt and Myanmar-Andaman micro-plate (MAS), illustrate the complexity of micro-plate tectonics and kinematics at convergent plate boundaries.

  11. Transition from convergence to escape: Field evidence from the West Carpathians

    SciTech Connect

    Nemcok, M. ); Fleischmann, K.H.; Keith, J.F. Jr )

    1991-03-01

    A large data base of gravimetric, magnetic, seismic, paleomagnetic, lithostratigraphic, sedimentologic, fission-track, bore-hole, and structural information has been used to analyze the structural development of the West Carpathians. These data support a structural model for the evolution of this orogen from convergence to tectonic escape. The West Carpathians resulted from Cretaceous-Miocene convergence of the European and Apulian plates. Paleocene convergence was northeast directed. With progressive deformation, the central mountain front encountered a shallow wedge-shaped portion of the subducted European plate, which caused a sinistral deflection of convergence trajectories in the western portion of the chain. Beginning with Egerian/Eggenburgian collision and continuing to the present time, the orogen has consisted of two zones: a frontal shortening zone and an internal extensional/strike-slip zone. A cycle of deformation patterns is recognized along the frontal part of the orogen in which {sigma}{sub 1} remained normal to the West Carpathian front: orogen-vergent thrusting, intermediate back-thrusting, and strike-slip faulting. Tectonic escape along strike-slip fault sets oriented sub-parallel to the suture zone begun in early Badenian time in the westernmost West Carpathians. The final phase of thrusting becomes younger to the east. The principal compressive stress orientations in areas affected by escape were sub-horizontal and pointed to the location of the last thrust movements along the orogen front. With increased distance from the active collision-suture zone, the principal compressive stress orientations plunged more steeply, indicating a continuous change from a transtensional to an extensional stress regime.

  12. A High-Speed, Event-Driven, Active Pixel Sensor Readout for Photon-Counting Microchannel Plate Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Randy A.; Pain, Bedabrata; Norton, Timothy J.; Haas, J. Patrick; Oegerle, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Silicon array readouts for microchannel plate intensifiers offer several attractive features. In this class of detector, the electron cloud output of the MCP intensifier is converted to visible light by a phosphor; that light is then fiber-optically coupled to the silicon array. In photon-counting mode, the resulting light splashes on the silicon array are recognized and centroided to fractional pixel accuracy by off-chip electronics. This process can result in very high (MCP-limited) spatial resolution while operating at a modest MCP gain (desirable for dynamic range and long term stability). The principal limitation of intensified CCD systems of this type is their severely limited local dynamic range, as accurate photon counting is achieved only if there are not overlapping event splashes within the frame time of the device. This problem can be ameliorated somewhat by processing events only in pre-selected windows of interest of by using an addressable charge injection device (CID) for the readout array. We are currently pursuing the development of an intriguing alternative readout concept based on using an event-driven CMOS Active Pixel Sensor. APS technology permits the incorporation of discriminator circuitry within each pixel. When coupled with suitable CMOS logic outside the array area, the discriminator circuitry can be used to trigger the readout of small sub-array windows only when and where an event splash has been detected, completely eliminating the local dynamic range problem, while achieving a high global count rate capability and maintaining high spatial resolution. We elaborate on this concept and present our progress toward implementing an event-driven APS readout.

  13. A High-Speed, Event-Driven, Active Pixel Sensor Readout for Photon-Counting Microchannel Plate Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Randy A.; Pain, B.; Norton, T. J.; Haas, P.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Silicon array readouts for microchannel plate intensifiers offer several attractive features. In this class of detector, the electron cloud output of the MCP intensifier is converted to visible light by a phosphor; that light is then fiber-optically coupled to the silicon array. In photon-counting mode, the resulting light splashes on the silicon array are recognized and centroided to fractional pixel accuracy by off-chip electronics. This process can result in very high (MCP-limited) spatial resolution for the readout while operating at a modest MCP gain (desirable for dynamic range and long term stability). The principal limitation of intensified CCD systems of this type is their severely limited local dynamic range, as accurate photon counting is achieved only if there are not overlapping event splashes within the frame time of the device. This problem can be ameliorated somewhat by processing events only in pre-selected windows of interest or by using an addressable charge injection device (CID) for the readout array. We are currently pursuing the development of an intriguing alternative readout concept based on using an event-driven CMOS Active Pixel Sensor. APS technology permits the incorporation of discriminator circuitry within each pixel. When coupled with suitable CMOS logic outside the array area, the discriminator circuitry can be used to trigger the readout of small sub-array windows only when and where an event splash has been detected, completely eliminating the local dynamic range problem, while achieving a high global count rate capability and maintaining high spatial resolution. We elaborate on this concept and present our progress toward implementing an event-driven APS readout.

  14. Fault Population Analyses in the Eastern California Shear Zone: Insights into the Development of Young, Actively Evolving Plate Boundary Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.; Dawers, N. H.; Amer, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Relationships between cumulative fault displacement, slip rate and length, along with fault population statistics are analyzed for faults located within the Eastern California Shear Zone (ECSZ), focusing on areas north of the Garlock fault. Here many faults are geologically young and in an early stage of evolution, while many older and larger faults are also still active. We analyze scaling relationships for both strike-slip and normal faults in order to determine whether the two fault populations share the same properties or not. Cumulative displacement, slip rate and length data are collected from published maps and literature sources. The dataset spans fault lengths from tens of meters to hundreds of kilometers. Results of fault scaling analyses indicate that displacement has a linear relationship with fault length for normal faults in this area over the entire length span, whereas strike-slip faults do not have a clear displacement-length scaling relation. For a given length, the subset of strike-slip faults typically exhibits a much larger displacement than that for the normal faults. The slip rate versus length trends are similar but are considerably more scattered. In addition, we define a subpopulation of normal faults that are kinematically related to the right-lateral strike-slip faults; these have a maximum length set by the spacing between the right-lateral faults. Fault size-frequency distributions also indicate differences between the normal and strike-slip fault populations. Overall, the normal faults have higher ratios of cumulative number to fault length than the strike-slip population does, which we relate to different patterns of localization of faulting. We interpret these trends as reflecting different tectonic histories, with the majority of normal faults being intraplate faults associated with Basin and Range extension and the strike-slip faults being kinematically connected with plate boundary.

  15. The diffuse seismicity of the Sierra Nevada of Santa Marta, the Perijá Range, and south of the La Guajira peninsula, Colombia and Venezuela: Result of the convergence between Caribbean plate and the South American margin during the Late Neogene?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chicangana, G.; Pedraza, P.; Mora-paez, H.; Ordonez Aristizabal, C. O.; Vargas-Jimenez, C. A.; Kammer, A.

    2012-12-01

    A diffuse low deep microseismicity located overall between the Guajira peninsula and the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta (SNSM) was registered with the recent installation (2008 to Present) of three seismological stations in northeastern Colombia by the Colombian Seismological Network (RSNC), but mainly with the Uribia station in (the) central region of La Guajira peninsula, The microseismicity is characterized by a great population of events with 1.2 < Ml < 3.0. and few events of 3.0 < Ml < 4.0 that sporadically occur. The poor number of seismological stations in this region of Colombia impedes to locate the origin of the local seismicity; however, this seismic activity is associated to the tectonic activity of the Oca fault because with the GPS displacement analysis, neotectonics evidence found in faults traces associated to the Oca fault and the historical earthquake that affected the Colombian city of Santa Marta in 1834, lead us to conclude this. This is a big cortical fault that sets the limit between La Guajira peninsula and the SNSM. Its cortical characteristics were verified from geological data together with gravimetric and seismic exploration. The SNSM limits toward the southeast with the Cesar - Ranchería basin, and this basin in turn limits with the Perijá Range that is localized in the Colombia - Venezuela border. The SNSM, Cesar - Ranchería basin and Perijá Range limit toward the southwest with the Bucaramanga - Santa Marta fault (BSMF), the Oca fault toward the north, and Perijá - El Tigre fault toward the southeast defining a pyramidal orogenic complex. Using remote sensing images data with geological and regional geophysical information, we proposed that this orogenic complex was originated as a result of the Panama arc with the northwestern South America accretion. The final adjustment of the Caribbean plate (CP) between North America and South America during the Late Neogene produced the big cortical faults systems activation like Oca - Moron

  16. The Break-up and Drifting of the Continental Plates in 2D Models of Convecting Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Zilio, L.; Faccenda, M.; Capitanio, F. A.

    2014-12-01

    Since the early theory of Wegener, the break-up and drift of continents have been controversial and hotly debated topics. To assist the interpretation of the break-up and drift mechanisms and its relation with mantle circulation patterns, we carried out a 2D numerical modelling of the dynamics of these processes. Different regimes of upper plate deformation are studied as consequence of stress coupling with convection patterns. Subduction of the oceanic plate and induced mantle flow propagate basal tractions to the upper plate. This mantle drag forces (FMD) can be subdivided in two types: (1) active mantle drag occurring when the flow drives plate motion (FAD), and (2) passive mantle drag (FPD), when the asthenosphere resists plate motion. The active traction generated by the convective cell is counterbalanced by passive mantle viscous drag away from it and therefore tension is generated within the continental plate. The shear stress profiles indicate that break-up conditions are met where the gradient of the basal shear stress is maximised, however the break-up location varies largely depending on the convection style primarily controlled by slab stagnation on the transition zone, avalanching through or subduction in the lower mantle. We found good correspondence between our models and the evolution of convergent margins on Earth, giving precious insights into the break-up and drifting mechanisms of some continental plates, such as the North and South American plates, Calabria and the Japan Arc.

  17. Tectonic Segmentation of the Cascadia Convergent Margin - An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, R. E.

    2006-12-01

    The Cascadia convergent margin, with its inherited accreted terranes (e.g., Siletzia) and old magmatic arcs, is a surviving remnant of a once larger subduction system along western North America. It is responding dynamically to its changing boundary conditions, as the margin is caught in the dextral shear couple between the much larger Pacific and North America plates. Cascadia is segmenting, or breaking up into clockwise rotating microplates and crustal blocks that are being dragged northward by the Pacific plate along with most of California and Nevada. The margin can be subdivided on the basis of its long-term kinematic behavior into: a domain dominated by clockwise rotation (most of OR), a domain characterized by margin-parallel shortening (most of WA), and a domain dominated by head-on convergence (BC). Variations in young arc volcanism and contemporary crustal seismicity along the margin have long been recognized as indicators of the changing tectonic regime along strike. In Oregon and N. CA, the Cascade extensional arc, with its numerous mafic vents, is erupting along the trailing edge of a forearc block rotating clockwise at about 1.2°/Ma, based on paleomagnetic and GPS data. This behavior contrasts with the arc north of Mt. Rainier, where isolated magmatic centers rest on an uplifted and folded basement. The compressional nature of the northern arc is also manifest in the E-W Yakima fold belt of the northern backarc and the seismically active Puget Lowland in the forearc. This margin-parallel shortening in the northern convergent margin results from the impingement of the rotating OR block against the slower moving buttress of the Canadian Cordillera. Transverse compressional structures are superimposed on all of the first order margin\\-parallel features, including the arc, inland sea, coast range, forearc basin, and accretionary prism. Examples include: the White River fault in the arc, Seattle uplift in the Georgia Strait-Puget Lowland, Columbia River

  18. Seismicity of the Earth 1900-2012 Philippine Sea plate and vicinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smoczyk, Gregory M.; Hayes, Gavin P.; Hamburger, Michael W.; Benz, Harley M.; Villaseñor, Antonio; Furlong, Kevin P.

    2013-01-01

    The complex tectonics surrounding the Philippine Islands are dominated by the interactions of the Pacific, Sunda, and Eurasia plates with the Philippine Sea plate (PSP). The latter is unique because it is almost exclusively surrounded by zones of plate convergence. At its eastern and southeastern edges, the Pacific plate is subducted beneath the PSP at the Izu-Bonin, Mariana, and Yap trenches. Here, the subduction zone exhibits high rates of seismic activity to depths of over 600 km, though no great earthquakes (M>8.0) have been observed, likely because of weak coupling along the plate interface. In the northeast, the PSP subducts beneath Japan and the eastern margin of the Eurasia plate at the Nankai and Ryukyu trenches, extending westward to Taiwan. The Nankai portion of this subduction zone has hosted some of the largest earthquakes along the margins of the PSP, including a pair of Mw8.1 megathrust events in 1944 and 1946. Along its western margin, the convergence of the PSP and the Sunda plate is responsible for a broad and active plate boundary system extending along both sides of the Philippine Islands chain. The region is characterized by opposite-facing subduction systems on the east and west sides of the islands, and the archipelago is cut by a major transform structure: the Philippine Fault. Subduction of the Philippine Sea plate occurs at the eastern margin of the islands along the Philippine Trench and its northern extension, the East Luzon Trough. On the west side of Luzon, the Sunda Plate subducts eastward along a series of trenches, including the Manila Trench in the north, the smaller Negros Trench in the central Philippines, and the Sulu and Cotabato trenches in the south. Twentieth and early twentyfirst century seismic activity along the boundaries of the Philippine Sea plate has produced seven great (M>8.0) earthquakes and 250 large (M>7) events. Among the most destructive events were the 1923 Kanto, the 1948 Fukui, and the 1995 Kobe, Japan

  19. Knowledge Convergence and Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeong, Heisawn; Chi, Michelene T. H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper operationalized the notion of knowledge convergence and assessed quantitatively how much knowledge convergence occurred during collaborative learning. Knowledge convergence was defined as an increase in common knowledge where common knowledge referred to the knowledge that all collaborating partners had. Twenty pairs of college students…

  20. Plate tectonics conserves angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowin, C.

    2009-03-01

    of seafloor spreading) are adjustment zones that accommodate strains in the lithosphere. Further, the interlocked pattern of the Australian and Pacific plates the past 42 Million years (with their absolute plate motions near 90° to each other) is taken as strong evidence that large thermally driven "roller" convection cells previously inferred as the driving mechanism in earlier interpretations of continental drift and plate tectonics, have not been active in the Earth's mantle the past 42 Million years, if ever. This report also presents estimates of the changes in location and magnitude of the Earth's axis of total plate tectonic angular momentum for the past 62 million years.

  1. Slab dragging and the recent geodynamic evolution of the western Mediterranean plate boundary region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spakman, Wim; Chertova, Maria V.; van den Berg, Arie P.; Thieulot, Cedric; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.

    2016-04-01

    The Tortonian-Present geodynamic evolution of the plate boundary between North Africa and Iberia is characterized by first-order enigmas. This concerns, e.g., the diffuse tectonic activity of the plate boundary; the crustal thickening below the Rif; the closing of the northern Moroccan marine gateways prior to the Messinian Salinity Crisis; crustal extension of the central to eastern Betics; the origin and sense of motion of the large left-lateral Trans Alboran Shear Zone (TASZ) and Eastern Betic Shear Zone (EBSZ); and lithosphere delamination of the North African continental edge. Many explanations have been given for each of these seemingly disparate tectonic features, which invariably have been addressed in the plate tectonic context of the NW-SE relative plate convergence between the major plates since the Tortonian, mostly independently from each other. Usually there is no clear role for the subducted slab underlying the region, except for presumed rollback, either to SW or to the W, depending on the type of observations that require explanation. Here we integrate the dynamic role of the slab with the NW-SE relative plate convergence by 3-D numerical modelling of the slab evolution constrained by absolute plate motions (Chertova et al., JGR,2014 & Gcubed 2014). By combining observations and predictions from seismology, geology, and geodesy, with our numerical 3-D slab-mantle dynamics modelling, we developed a new and promising geodynamic framework that provides explanations of all noted tectonic enigmas in a coherent and connected way. From the Tortonian until today, we propose that mantle-resisted slab dragging combines with the NW-SE plate convergence across the (largely) unbroken plate boundary to drive the crustal deformation of the region. Slab dragging is the lateral transport, pushing or pulling, of slab through the mantle by the absolute motion of the subducting plate (Chertova et al., Gcubed, 2014). Because the slab is connected to both the Iberian

  2. Fast events in single-channel currents activated by acetylcholine and its analogues at the frog muscle end-plate.

    PubMed Central

    Colquhoun, D; Sakmann, B

    1985-01-01

    The fine structure of ion-channel activations by junctional nicotinic receptors in adult frog muscle fibres has been investigated. The agonists used were acetylcholine (ACh), carbachol (CCh), suberyldicholine (SubCh) and decan-1,10-dicarboxylic acid dicholine ester (DecCh). Individual activations (bursts) were interrupted by short closed periods; the distribution of their durations showed a major fast component ('short gaps') and a minor slower component ('intermediate gaps'). The mean duration of both short and intermediate gaps was dependent on the nature of the agonist. For short gaps the mean durations (microseconds) were: ACh, 20; SubCh, 43; DecCh, 71; CCh, 13. The mean number of short gaps per burst were: ACh, 1.9; SubCh, 4.1; DecCh, 2.0. The mean number of short gaps per burst, and the mean number per unit open time, were dependent on the nature of the agonist, but showed little dependence on agonist concentration or membrane potential for ACh, SubCh and DecCh. The short gaps in CCh increased in frequency with agonist concentration and were mainly produced by channel blockages by CCh itself. Partially open channels (subconductance states) were clearly resolved rarely (0.4% of gaps within bursts) but regularly. Conductances of 18% (most commonly) and 71% of the main value were found. However, most short gaps were probably full closures. The distribution of burst lengths had two components. The faster component represented mainly isolated short openings that were much more common at low agonist concentrations. The slower component represented bursts of longer openings. Except at very low concentrations more than 85% of activations were of this type, which corresponds to the 'channel lifetime' found by noise analysis. The frequency of channel openings increased slightly with hyperpolarization. The short gaps during activations were little affected when (a) the [H+]o or [Ca2+]o were reduced to 1/10th of normal, (b) when extracellular Ca2+ was replaced by Mg2

  3. Interseismic Plate coupling and strain partitioning in the Northeastern Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manaker, D. M.; Calais, E.; Freed, A. M.; Ali, S. T.; Przybylski, P.; Mattioli, G.; Jansma, P.; Prépetit, C.; de Chabalier, J. B.

    2008-09-01

    The northeastern Caribbean provides a natural laboratory to investigate strain partitioning, its causes and its consequences on the stress regime and tectonic evolution of a subduction plate boundary. Here, we use GPS and earthquake slip vector data to produce a present-day kinematic model that accounts for secular block rotation and elastic strain accumulation, with variable interplate coupling, on active faults. We confirm that the oblique convergence between Caribbean and North America in Hispaniola is partitioned between plate boundary parallel motion on the Septentrional and Enriquillo faults in the overriding plate and plate-boundary normal motion at the plate interface on the Northern Hispaniola Fault. To the east, the Caribbean/North America plate motion is accommodated by oblique slip on the faults bounding the Puerto Rico block to the north (Puerto Rico subduction) and to the south (Muertos thrust), with no evidence for partitioning. The spatial correlation between interplate coupling, strain partitioning and the subduction of buoyant oceanic asperities suggests that the latter enhance the transfer of interplate shear stresses to the overriding plate, facilitating strike-slip faulting in the overriding plate. The model slip rate deficit, together with the dates of large historical earthquakes, indicates the potential for a large (Mw7.5 or greater) earthquake on the Septentrional fault in the Dominican Republic. Similarly, the Enriquillo fault in Haiti is currently capable of a Mw7.2 earthquake if the entire elastic strain accumulated since the last major earthquake was released in a single event today. The model results show that the Puerto Rico/Lesser Antilles subduction thrust is only partially coupled, meaning that the plate interface is accumulating elastic strain at rates slower than the total plate motion. This does not preclude the existence of isolated locked patches accumulating elastic strain to be released in future earthquakes, but whose

  4. Seismicity of the Earth 1900-2013, seismotectonics of South America (Nazca Plate Region)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, Gavin P.; Smoczyk, Gregory M.; Benz, Harley M.; Furlong, Kevin P.; Villaseñor, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The South American arc extends over 7,000 kilometers (km), from the Chilean margin triple junction offshore of southern Chile, to its intersection with the Panama fracture zone, offshore of the southern coast of Panama in Central America. It marks the plate boundary between the subducting Nazca plate and the South America plate, where the oceanic crust and lithosphere of the Nazca plate begin their descent into the mantle beneath South America. The convergence associated with this subduction process is responsible for the uplift of the Andes Mountains, and for the active volcanic chain present along much of this deformation front. Relative to a fixed South America plate, the Nazca plate moves slightly north of eastwards at a rate varying from approximately 80 millimeters/year (mm/yr) in the south, to approximately 65 mm/yr in the north. Although the rate of subduction varies little along the entire arc, there are complex changes in the geologic processes along the subduction zone that dramatically influence volcanic activity, crustal deformation, earthquake generation and occurrence all along the western edge of South America.

  5. Active Pacific North America Plate boundary tectonics as evidenced by seismicity in the oceanic lithosphere offshore Baja California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauksson, Egill; Kanamori, Hiroo; Stock, Joann; Cormier, Marie-Helene; Legg, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Pacific Ocean crust west of southwest North America was formed by Cenozoic seafloor spreading between the large Pacific Plate and smaller microplates. The eastern limit of this seafloor, the continent-ocean boundary, is the fossil trench along which the microplates subducted and were mostly destroyed in Miocene time. The Pacific-North America Plate boundary motion today is concentrated on continental fault systems well to the east, and this region of oceanic crust is generally thought to be within the rigid Pacific Plate. Yet, the 2012 December 14 Mw 6.3 earthquake that occurred about 275 km west of Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico, is evidence for continued tectonism in this oceanic part of the Pacific Plate. The preferred main shock centroid depth of 20 km was located close to the bottom of the seismogenic thickness of the young oceanic lithosphere. The focal mechanism, derived from both teleseismic P-wave inversion and W-phase analysis of the main shock waveforms, and the 12 aftershocks of M ˜3-4 are consistent with normal faulting on northeast striking nodal planes, which align with surface mapped extensional tectonic trends such as volcanic features in the region. Previous Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements on offshore islands in the California Continental Borderland had detected some distributed Pacific and North America relative plate motion strain that could extend into the epicentral region. The release of this lithospheric strain along existing zones of weakness is a more likely cause of this seismicity than current thermal contraction of the oceanic lithosphere or volcanism. The main shock caused weak to moderate ground shaking in the coastal zones of southern California, USA, and Baja California, Mexico, but the tsunami was negligible.

  6. SNW1 is a critical regulator of spatial BMP activity, neural plate border formation, and neural crest specification in vertebrate embryos.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mary Y; Ramel, Marie-Christine; Howell, Michael; Hill, Caroline S

    2011-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) gradients provide positional information to direct cell fate specification, such as patterning of the vertebrate ectoderm into neural, neural crest, and epidermal tissues, with precise borders segregating these domains. However, little is known about how BMP activity is regulated spatially and temporally during vertebrate development to contribute to embryonic patterning, and more specifically to neural crest formation. Through a large-scale in vivo functional screen in Xenopus for neural crest fate, we identified an essential regulator of BMP activity, SNW1. SNW1 is a nuclear protein known to regulate gene expression. Using antisense morpholinos to deplete SNW1 protein in both Xenopus and zebrafish embryos, we demonstrate that dorsally expressed SNW1 is required for neural crest specification, and this is independent of mesoderm formation and gastrulation morphogenetic movements. By exploiting a combination of immunostaining for phosphorylated Smad1 in Xenopus embryos and a BMP-dependent reporter transgenic zebrafish line, we show that SNW1 regulates a specific domain of BMP activity in the dorsal ectoderm at the neural plate border at post-gastrula stages. We use double in situ hybridizations and immunofluorescence to show how this domain of BMP activity is spatially positioned relative to the neural crest domain and that of SNW1 expression. Further in vivo and in vitro assays using cell culture and tissue explants allow us to conclude that SNW1 acts upstream of the BMP receptors. Finally, we show that the requirement of SNW1 for neural crest specification is through its ability to regulate BMP activity, as we demonstrate that targeted overexpression of BMP to the neural plate border is sufficient to restore neural crest formation in Xenopus SNW1 morphants. We conclude that through its ability to regulate a specific domain of BMP activity in the vertebrate embryo, SNW1 is a critical regulator of neural plate border formation and

  7. Collaborative Instructional Strategies to Enhance Knowledge Convergence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Darryl C.

    2015-01-01

    To promote knowledge convergence through collaborative learning activities in groups, this qualitative case study involved a layered approach for the design and delivery of a highly collaborative learning environment incorporating various instructional technologies grounded in learning theory. In a graduate-level instructional technology course,…

  8. Cycloid kinematics of relative plate motion

    SciTech Connect

    Cronin, V.S.

    1987-11-01

    The trajectory of a point on one plate as observed from another plate is generally a complex curve and not a small circle around a single axis of relative motion, as is commonly assumed. The shape of the relative-motion path is given the general name spherical cycloid because of its morphological similarity to cycloid planetary trajectories described by early astronomers. The cycloid relative-motion model predicts that the following phenomena occur during finite displacements: (1) the relative velocity and the curvature of the trajectory of a point on one plate relative to another plate varies systematically; (2) plates wobble relative to one another; and (3) the angle of convergence and/or divergence varies systematically along the length of any given transform fault. The small-circle relative-motion model, whereby transform faults have been considered lines of pure slip along which crust is conserved, is not generally valid for finite relative displacements.

  9. Volcanism in response to plate flexure.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Naoto; Takahashi, Eiichi; Yamamoto, Junji; Abe, Natsue; Ingle, Stephanie P; Kaneoka, Ichiro; Hirata, Takafumi; Kimura, Jun-Ichi; Ishii, Teruaki; Ogawa, Yujiro; Machida, Shiki; Suyehiro, Kiyoshi

    2006-09-01

    Volcanism on Earth is known to occur in three tectonic settings: divergent plate boundaries (such as mid-ocean ridges), convergent plate boundaries (such as island arcs), and hot spots. We report volcanism on the 135 million-year-old Pacific Plate not belonging to any of these categories. Small alkalic volcanoes form from small percent melts and originate in the asthenosphere, as implied by their trace element geochemistry and noble gas isotopic compositions. We propose that these small volcanoes erupt along lithospheric fractures in response to plate flexure during subduction. Minor extents of asthenospheric melting and the volcanoes' tectonic alignment and age progression in the direction opposite to that of plate motion provide evidence for the presence of a small percent melt in the asthenosphere. PMID:16873612

  10. Mechanism of action of electrochemically active carbons on the processes that take place at the negative plates of lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, D.; Rogachev, T.; Nikolov, P.; Petkova, G.

    It is known that negative plates of lead-acid batteries have low charge acceptance when cycled at high rates and progressively accumulate lead sulphate on high-rate partial-state-of-charge (HRPSoC) operation in hybrid-electric vehicle (HEV) applications. Addition of some carbon or graphite forms to the negative paste mix improves the charge efficiency and slows down sulfation of the negative plates. The present investigation aims to elucidate the contribution of electrochemically active carbon (EAC) additives to the mechanism of the electrochemical reactions of charge of the negative plates. Test cells are assembled with four types of EAC added to the negative paste mix in five different concentrations. Through analysis of the structure of NAM (including specific surface and pore radius measurements) and of the electrochemical parameters of the test cells on HRPSoC cycling, it is established that the electrochemical reaction of charge Pb 2+ + 2e - → Pb proceeds at 300-400 mV lower over-potentials on negative plates doped with EAC additives as compared to the charge potentials of cells with no carbon additives. Hence, electrochemically active carbons have a highly catalytic effect on the charge reaction and are directly involved in it. Consequently, the reversibility of the charge/discharge processes is improved, which eventually leads to longer battery cycle life. Thus, charging of the negative plates proceeds via a parallel mechanism on the surfaces of both Pb and EAC particles, at a higher rate on the EAC phase. Cells with EAC in NAM have the longest cycle life when their NAM specific surface is up to 4 m 2 g -1 against 0.5 m 2 g -1 for the lead surface. The proposed parallel mechanism of charge is verified experimentally on model Pb/EAC/PbSO 4 and Pb/EAC electrodes. During the charge and discharge cycles of the HRPSoC test, the EAC particles are involved in dynamic adsorption/desorption on the lead sulfate and lead surfaces. Another effect of electrochemically

  11. Shaping frequency response of a vibrating plate for passive and active control applications by simultaneous optimization of arrangement of additional masses and ribs. Part II: Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrona, Stanislaw; Pawelczyk, Marek

    2016-03-01

    It was shown in Part I that an ability to shape frequency response of a vibrating plate according to precisely defined demands has a very high practical potential. It can be used to improve acoustic radiation of the plate for required frequencies or enhance acoustic isolation of noise barriers and device casings. It can be used for both passive and active control. The proposed method is based on mounting several additional ribs and masses (passive and/or active) to the plate surface at locations followed from an optimisation process. In Part I a relevant model of such structure, as a function of arrangement of the additional elements was derived and validated. The model allows calculating natural frequencies and mode-shapes of the whole structure. The aim of this companion paper, Part II, is to present the second stage of the method. This is an optimization process that results in arrangement of the elements guaranteeing desired plate frequency response, and enhancement of controllability and observability measures. For that purpose appropriate cost functions, and constraints followed from technological feasibility are defined. Then, a memetic algorithm is employed to obtain a numerical solution with parameters of the arrangement. The optimization results are initially presented for simple cases to validate the method. Then, more complex scenarios are analysed with very special demands concerning the frequency response to present the full potential of the method. Subsequently, a laboratory experiment is presented and discussed. Finally, other areas of applications of the proposed method are shown and conclusions for future research are drawn.

  12. Analysis of active control with on-line system identification on sound transmission through an elastic plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshigoe, Shozo; Teagle, Allen; Tsay, Ching-Hsu

    1995-05-01

    An adaptive control algorithm with on-line system identification capability has been developed. One of the great advantages of this scheme is that an additional system identification mechanism such as an additional uncorrelated random signal generator as the source of system identification [Eriksson and Allie, Acoust. Soc. Am. 85, 797 - 802 (1989)] is not required. A time varying plate-cavity system is used to demonstrate the control performance of this algorithm. The time varying plate-cavity system is used to demonstrate the control performance of this algorithm. The time varying system consists of a stainless steel plate which is simply supported on a rigid cavity where the cavity temperature can depend on time. For a given externally located harmonic sound excitation, the system identification and the control are simultaneously executed to minimize the transmitted sound in the cavity. The control performance of the algorithm is examined for two cases. Keeping the cavity temperature constant for the first case, the external disturbance frequency is swept with 2 Hz/second from below to above a resonance frequency of the plate-cavity system. The simulation shows an excellent frequency tracking capability with cavity internal sound suppression of 40 dB. For the second case, the cavity temperature is lowered to a half of its original value in 60 seconds while the external sound excitation is fixed with a frequency. Hence, the cavity resonant frequency decreased and passes the external sound excitation frequency. The algorithm shows 40 dB transmitted noise suppression without compromising the system identification tracking capability.

  13. Alteration mineralogy of Home Plate and Columbia Hills—Formation conditions in context to impact, volcanism, and fluvial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filiberto, Justin; Schwenzer, Susanne P.

    2013-10-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Spirit investigated the igneous and alteration mineralogy and chemistry of Home Plate and its surrounding deposits. Here, we focus on using thermochemical modeling to understand the secondary alteration mineralogy at the Home Plate outcrop and surrounding Columbia Hills region in Gusev crater. At high temperatures (300 °C), magnetite occurs at very high W/R ratios, but the alteration assemblage is dominated by chlorite and serpentine over most of the W/R range. Quartz, epidote, and typical high-T phases such as feldspar, pyroxene, and garnet occur at low W/R. At epithermal temperatures (150 °C), hematite occurs at very high W/R. A range of phyllosilicates, including kaolinite, nontronite, chlorite, and serpentine are precipitated at specific W/R. Amphibole, with garnet, feldspar, and pyroxene occur at low W/R. If the CO2 content of the system is high, the assemblage is dominated by carbonate with increasing amounts of an SiO2-phase, kaolinite, carpholite, and chlorite with lower W/R. At temperatures of hydrous weathering (13 °C), the oxide phase is goethite, silicates are chlorite, nontronite, and talc, plus an SiO2-phase. In the presence of CO2, the mineral assemblage at high W/R remains the same, and only at low W/R, i.e., with increasing salinity, carbonate precipitates. The geochemical gradients observed at Home Plate are attributed to short-lived, initially high (300 °C) temperature, but fast cooling events, which are in agreement with our models and our interpretation of a multistage alteration scenario of Home Plate and Gusev in general. Alteration at various temperatures and during different geological processes within Gusev crater has two effects, both of which increase the habitability of the local environment: precipitation of hydrous sheet silicates, and formation of a brine, which might contain elements essential for life in diluted, easily accessible form.

  14. BOLIVAR & GEODINOS: Investigations of the Southern Caribbean Plate Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levander, A.; Schmitz, M.; Working Groups, B.

    2006-12-01

    The southern Caribbean-South American plate boundary has many similarities to California's San Andreas system: 1) The CAR-SA system consists of a series of strands of active right lateral strike-slip faults extending >1000 km from the Antilles subduction zone. This system has several names and includes the El Pilar, Coche, San Sebastian, Moron, and Oca faults. 2) The CAR-SA relative velocity has been about 20 mm/yr of mostly right lateral motion since about 55 Ma, giving a total displacement on the CAR-SA plate boundary similar to that of the San Andreas system. 3) The plate boundary has about 10% convergence in western SA, with less as one moves eastward due to relative convergence between North and South America. 4) The CAR-SA system has fold and thrust belts best developed continentward of the strike-slip faults, similar to the San Andreas. 5) There is a big bend in the CAR plate boundary at approximately the same distance from the Antilles trench as the big bend in Southern California is from the Cascadia subduction zone. The tectonic origins of the CAR-SA plate boundary and the San Andreas are very different, however, despite the similarities between the systems. Rather than impingement of a ridge on a trench, the CAR-SA system is thought to have resulted from a continuous oblique collision of the southern end of a Cretaceous island arc system with the northern edge of South America. During this process the CAR island arc and the modern CAR plate overrode a proto-Caribbean plate and destroyed a Mesozoic passive margin on the northern edge of SA. BOLIVAR and GEODINOS are multi-disciplinary investigations of the lithosphere and deeper structures associated with the diffuse CAR-SA plate boundary zone. We review a number of observations regarding the plate boundary obtained or confirmed from these studies: 1) The Caribbean Large Igneous Province, being overridden by the Maracaibo block in western Venezuela, can be identified beneath Aruba and coastal Venezuela

  15. Homology, convergence and parallelism.

    PubMed

    Ghiselin, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    Homology is a relation of correspondence between parts of parts of larger wholes. It is used when tracking objects of interest through space and time and in the context of explanatory historical narratives. Homologues can be traced through a genealogical nexus back to a common ancestral precursor. Homology being a transitive relation, homologues remain homologous however much they may come to differ. Analogy is a relationship of correspondence between parts of members of classes having no relationship of common ancestry. Although homology is often treated as an alternative to convergence, the latter is not a kind of correspondence: rather, it is one of a class of processes that also includes divergence and parallelism. These often give rise to misleading appearances (homoplasies). Parallelism can be particularly hard to detect, especially when not accompanied by divergences in some parts of the body. PMID:26598721

  16. Large scale deformation of incoming plates before subduction and implications for oceanic plate hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calahorrano Betancourt, A.; Ranero, C. R.; Barckhausen, U.; Reichert, C. J.; Grevemeyer, I.

    2009-12-01

    We present three multichannel seismic (MCS) lines, collected during the CINCA ‘95 experiment with German research vessel Sonne by the BGR. The data image the subduction zone of the North Chile, with 3 lines that extend 400-500 hundred km into the incoming plate. We focus on the deformation of the incoming 50 Myr old oceanic Nazca plate converging nearly orthogonally (N83 S) with the South American Plate at ~60-65 mm/yr. The 3 seismic profiles provide a detailed image of the crustal and uppermost mantle deformation structure across the underformed segment of plate, the entire outer rise, and extreme deformation at the trench slope just before underthusting. A compilation of multibeam bathymetry in the area, although not providing full seafloor coverage, shows the lateral extension of the deformation fabrics. Seawards from the trench slope, the seafloor morphology shows mainly the spreading ridge fabric with a NW lineation. At the trench slope, the spreading fabric is superimposed by a new fabric, oriented parallel to the trench axis, corresponding to the horst and graben pattern related to bending deformation of the incoming plate. Seismic cross sections image the incoming plate with a strong, continuous and irregular reflection characterizing the top of the oceanic crust. This roughness is related, locally to volcanic activity (p.e. Iquique Ridge), and to the spreading fabric and the horst-and-graben pattern observed in bathymetry. Sedimentary pelagic coverage is only about 100 m thick and only locally small turbidite accumulations are observed in grabens. The Moho reflection is fairly continuous typically at 2 seconds two way time (stwt) below the seafloor, but can be about 3 stwt locally indicating crustal thickening related to volcanism. Looking at its whole extent, these images illustrate the flexure of the downgoing plate as it reaches the subduction zone. This bending, characterizing the outer rise, is observed along 250 km seaward from the trench axis, and

  17. Neurotrophin-3 Induces BMP-2 and VEGF Activities and Promotes the Bony Repair of Injured Growth Plate Cartilage and Bone in Rats.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu-Wen; Chung, Rosa; Ruan, Chun-Sheng; Chim, Shek Man; Kuek, Vincent; Dwivedi, Prem P; Hassanshahi, Mohammadhossein; Chen, Ke-Ming; Xie, Yangli; Chen, Lin; Foster, Bruce K; Rosen, Vicki; Zhou, Xin-Fu; Xu, Jiake; Xian, Cory J

    2016-06-01

    Injured growth plate is often repaired by bony tissue causing bone growth defects, for which the mechanisms remain unclear. Because neurotrophins have been implicated in bone fracture repair, here we investigated their potential roles in growth plate bony repair in rats. After a drill-hole injury was made in the tibial growth plate and bone, increased injury site mRNA expression was observed for neurotrophins NGF, BDNF, NT-3, and NT-4 and their Trk receptors. NT-3 and its receptor TrkC showed the highest induction. NT-3 was localized to repairing cells, whereas TrkC was observed in stromal cells, osteoblasts, and blood vessel cells at the injury site. Moreover, systemic NT-3 immunoneutralization reduced bone volume at injury sites and also reduced vascularization at the injured growth plate, whereas recombinant NT-3 treatment promoted bony repair with elevated levels of mRNA for osteogenic markers and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP-2) and increased vascularization and mRNA for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and endothelial cell marker CD31 at the injured growth plate. When examined in vitro, NT-3 promoted osteogenesis in rat bone marrow stromal cells, induced Erk1/2 and Akt phosphorylation, and enhanced expression of BMPs (particularly BMP-2) and VEGF in the mineralizing cells. It also induced CD31 and VEGF mRNA in rat primary endothelial cell culture. BMP activity appears critical for NT-3 osteogenic effect in vitro because it can be almost completely abrogated by co-addition of the BMP inhibitor noggin. Consistent with its angiogenic effect in vivo, NT-3 promoted angiogenesis in metatarsal bone explants, an effect abolished by co-treatment with anti-VEGF. This study suggests that NT-3 may be an osteogenic and angiogenic factor upstream of BMP-2 and VEGF in bony repair, and further studies are required to investigate whether NT-3 may be a potential target for preventing growth plate faulty bony repair or for promoting bone fracture healing. © 2016

  18. Series that Converge Absolutely but Don't Converge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantrowitz, Robert; Schramm, Michael

    2012-01-01

    If a series of real numbers converges absolutely, then it converges. The usual proof requires completeness in the form of the Cauchy criterion. Failing completeness, the result is false. We provide examples of rational series that illustrate this point. The Cantor set appears in connection with one of the examples.

  19. Ultrasonic preparation of nano-nickel/activated carbon composite using spent electroless nickel plating bath and application in degradation of 2,6-dichlorophenol.

    PubMed

    Su, Jingyu; Jin, Guanping; Li, Changyong; Zhu, Xiaohui; Dou, Yan; Li, Yong; Wang, Xin; Wang, Kunwei; Gu, Qianqian

    2014-11-01

    Ni was effectively recovered from spent electroless nickel (EN) plating baths by forming a nano-nickel coated activated carbon composite. With the aid of ultrasonication, melamine-formaldehyde-tetraoxalyl-ethylenediamine chelating resins were grafted on activated carbon (MFT/AC). PdCl2 sol was adsorbed on MFT/AC, which was then immersed in spent electroless nickel plating bath; then nano-nickel could be reduced by ascorbic acid to form a nano-nickel coating on the activated carbon composite (Ni/AC) in situ. The materials present were carefully examined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and electrochemistry techniques. The resins were well distributed on the inside and outside surfaces of activated carbon with a size of 120 ± 30 nm in MFT/AC, and a great deal of nano-nickel particles were evenly deposited with a size of 3.8 ± 1.1 nm in Ni/MFT. Moreover, Ni/AC was successfully used as a catalyst for ultrasonic degradation of 2,6-dichlorophenol. PMID:25458692

  20. Real feature of seismicity around Palau trench region, western Pacific: Is Palau trench aseismic silent plate boundary?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Y.; Shito, A.; Tanaka, S.; Suetsugu, D.

    2012-12-01

    Palau islands locate around plate converging zone in the western Pacific region. In the east off the Palau islands, obvious trench topography is developed whose bathymetry reaches about 6000 meters. Palau trench locates at the west side of Yap trench. However tectonic activity is quite different in the both trenches. Yap trench has active seismic activity associate with subduction process. Plate motion model shows clear convergent relative motion between Pacific plate and Philippine Sea plate at Yap trench. On the other hand, Palau trench doesn't have active seismicity according to ISC catalogue. In ten years in 2000's, only three small earthquakes are reported in ISC catalogue. Historically any great earthquake also is not reported. Recent plate motion model shows very low convergent motion at Palau trench though developed trench structure. Our group operates broadband seismic station at Palau (station code: PALU) for about 15 years. In our instant monitoring, local earthquakes sometime are recognized. We operated additional stations in Palau islands for six months to detect local earthquake and to locate hypocenters. Our objective of the research is evaluation of real seismicity of Palau region and final major interest is to understand tectonic activity of Palau trench. We install minimum network for hypocenter locating in Koror and Babeldaob islands, Palau that its array dimension is about 20 km. We use broadband seismographs and high resolution data loggers with GPS clock and solar power generators. We succeeded continuous recording without any troubles and clips of mass position. By careful motoring, we pick up greater than 70 local earthquakes in only six months. And we also tried to read the P and S wave arrival times. We succeeded to locate 27 hypocenters. The number of seismic events is much higher than initial estimation. The hypocenters locate east coast side of Palau islands where is trench side. The overview of distribution is parallel to trench

  1. Unitary plate electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, John J. (Inventor); Clough, Thomas J. (Inventor); Josefowicz, Jack Y. (Inventor); Sibert, John W. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    The unitary electrode (10) comprises a porous sheet (12) of fiberglass the strands (14) of which contain a coating (16) of conductive tin oxide. The lower portion of the sheet contains a layer (18) of resin and the upper layer (20) contains lead dioxide forming a positive active electrode on an electrolyte-impervious layer. The strands (14) form a continuous conduction path through both layers (16, 18). Tin oxide is prevented from reduction by coating the surface of the plate facing the negative electrode with a conductive, impervious layer resistant to reduction such as a thin film (130) of lead or graphite filled resin adhered to the plate with a layer (31) of conductive adhesive. The plate (10) can be formed by casting a molten resin from kettle (60) onto a sheet of glass wool (56) overlying a sheet of lead foil and then applying positive active paste from hopper (64) into the upper layer (68). The plate can also be formed by passing an assembly of a sheet ( 80) of resin, a sheet (86) of sintered glass and a sheet (90) of lead between the nip (92) of heated rollers (93, 95) and then filling lead oxide into the pores (116) of the upper layer (118).

  2. Deep crust and mantle structure linked to subduction of the Pacific plate at a continental margin from an active seismic source study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, T. A.; Okaya, D. A.; Henrys, S. A.; Savage, M. K.; Sato, H.; Iwasaki, T.

    2013-12-01

    We present new results that bear on mantle structure in a subduction zone of both the down going and over-riding plates. Wellington region, New Zealand, sits on the Australian plate a mere ~ 15-25 km above the subducted Pacific plate. This is rare: most active continental margins have at least 30-50 km of free board above subduction zones (cf, Pacific NW, Honshu). Such a shallow setting offers unusually good conditions for making terrestrial observations of the subduction process. In 2010-11 an active source seismic experiment (SAHKE) was carried out across the Wellington region. Both active and passive seismic methods were used to establish a model of the crustal structure and upper mantle structure beneath SAHKE (Henrys et al , 2013). We recorded 12 x 500 kg dynamite shots on ~ 1000 recorders place at 100 m spacing from coast to coast. These data contain excellent returns from the subduction zone at two-way travel times of 7-15 s, but we also recorded coherent reflection energy down to 30 s two-way-travel-time on vertical recorders and 47 s on horizontal recorders. We performed a low-fold stack of these deep reflections and see two zones. The deepest reflections define a westward 17 degree-dipping zone at ~ 100 km deep that is possibly the base of the subducted Pacific plate. The westward dip on this 100 km deep reflector matches that for the top of the plate. Moreover, the total plate thickness implied is ~ 80 km, which matches that predicted for 100 my old oceanic lithosphere. The other deep reflection zone dips eastward across the shot gathers and is typically seen at two-way travel times of 18-25 s on the vertical phones. We also see the same event as a Vs arrival on horizontal phones at two-way travel times of 34-47s. When migrated these reflections define an east dipping reflector that is within the mantle of the overriding Australian plate, and the surface projection of the reflector is ~ 80 km west of SAHKE line. This finding raises the question of what

  3. Posttraumatic tibia valga: a case demonstrating asymmetric activity at the proximal growth plate on technetium bone scan

    SciTech Connect

    Zionts, L.E.; Harcke, H.T.; Brooks, K.M.; MacEwen, G.D.

    1987-07-01

    Posttraumatic tibia valga is a well-recognized complication following fracture of the upper tibial metaphysis in young children. We present a case of a child who developed a valgus deformity following fracture of the proximal tibia and fibula in which quantitative bone scintigraphy at 5 months after injury demonstrated increased uptake at the proximal tibial growth plate with proportionally greater uptake on the medial side. This finding suggests that the valgus deformity in this patient was due to a relative increase in vascularity and consequent overgrowth of the medial portion of the proximal tibial physis.

  4. Some Observations on Grid Convergence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salas, manuel D.

    2006-01-01

    It is claimed that current practices in grid convergence studies, particularly in the field of external aerodynamics, are flawed. The necessary conditions to properly establish grid convergence are presented. A theoretical model and a numerical example are used to demonstrate these ideas.

  5. Convergent ablator performance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, D. G.; Spears, B. K.; Braun, D. G.; Sorce, C. M.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Olson, R. E.

    2010-10-15

    The velocity and remaining ablator mass of an imploding capsule are critical metrics for assessing the progress toward ignition of an inertially confined fusion experiment. These and other convergent ablator performance parameters have been measured using a single streaked x-ray radiograph. Traditional Abel inversion of such a radiograph is ill-posed since backlighter intensity profiles and x-ray attenuation by the ablated plasma are unknown. To address this we have developed a regularization technique which allows the ablator density profile {rho}(r) and effective backlighter profile I{sub 0}(y) at each time step to be uniquely determined subject to the constraints that {rho}(r) is localized in radius space and I{sub 0}(y) is delocalized in object space. Moments of {rho}(r) then provide the time-resolved areal density, mass, and average radius (and thus velocity) of the remaining ablator material. These results are combined in the spherical rocket model to determine the ablation pressure and mass ablation rate during the implosion. The technique has been validated on simulated radiographs of implosions at the National Ignition Facility [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] and implemented on experiments at the OMEGA laser facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)].

  6. Convergent flow stove

    SciTech Connect

    Engblom, D.W.

    1986-02-25

    An apparatus for burning combustible solid organic material such as wood is described in a environment in which combustion is directed downwardly. The apparatus consists of: A. A fuel chamber having a closed upper portion and a major dimension in the vertical direction such that the fuel chamber is generally upright, B. A combustion zone in the lower portion of the fuel chamber defined by a convergent outflow passage at the bottom of the fuel chamber and a pair of walls on opposite sides of the lower portion, the walls being sloped inwardly toward one another at the outflow passage, and the outflow passage comprising a gap between the walls, C. A Hearth element forming each the sloping wall, the hearth element including I. At least one row of spaced slots extending into the interior of the hearth element and a lateral air inlet channel connected to the slots of each row and a source of combustion air, and II. A flue outlet communicating with the outflow passage, the flue outlet including spaced, parallel tubes in the hearth element, with the tubes being juxtaposed the slots and extending perpendicular to the air inlet channels, D. Means connected to the flue outlet to permit exhaustion of flue gases from the apparatus, and E. means for loading fuel into the fuel chamber.

  7. Convergent ablator performance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, D. G.; Spears, B. K.; Braun, D. G.; Olson, R. E.; Sorce, C. M.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.

    2010-10-01

    The velocity and remaining ablator mass of an imploding capsule are critical metrics for assessing the progress toward ignition of an inertially confined fusion experiment. These and other convergent ablator performance parameters have been measured using a single streaked x-ray radiograph. Traditional Abel inversion of such a radiograph is ill-posed since backlighter intensity profiles and x-ray attenuation by the ablated plasma are unknown. To address this we have developed a regularization technique which allows the ablator density profile ρ(r ) and effective backlighter profile I0(y) at each time step to be uniquely determined subject to the constraints that ρ(r ) is localized in radius space and I0(y) is delocalized in object space. Moments of ρ(r ) then provide the time-resolved areal density, mass, and average radius (and thus velocity) of the remaining ablator material. These results are combined in the spherical rocket model to determine the ablation pressure and mass ablation rate during the implosion. The technique has been validated on simulated radiographs of implosions at the National Ignition Facility [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] and implemented on experiments at the OMEGA laser facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)].

  8. Experimental Simulation of Active Control With On-line System Identification on Sound Transmission Through an Elastic Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    An adaptive control algorithm with on-line system identification capability has been developed. One of the great advantages of this scheme is that an additional system identification mechanism such as an additional uncorrelated random signal generator as the source of system identification is not required. A time-varying plate-cavity system is used to demonstrate the control performance of this algorithm. The time-varying system consists of a stainless-steel plate which is bolted down on a rigid cavity opening where the cavity depth was changed with respect to time. For a given externally located harmonic sound excitation, the system identification and the control are simultaneously executed to minimize the transmitted sound in the cavity. The control performance of the algorithm is examined for two cases. First, all the water was drained, the external disturbance frequency is swept with 1 Hz/sec. The result shows an excellent frequency tracking capability with cavity internal sound suppression of 40 dB. For the second case, the water level is initially empty and then raised to 3/20 full in 60 seconds while the external sound excitation is fixed with a frequency. Hence, the cavity resonant frequency decreases and passes the external sound excitation frequency. The algorithm shows 40 dB transmitted noise suppression without compromising the system identification tracking capability.

  9. Evolution and timing of tectonic events in the Arabia-Eurasia convergence zone as inferred from igneous geochemistry from the EarthChem database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieu, W. K.; Stern, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    The timing of tectonic events in the Anatolia-Iranian region can be inferred from analysis of igneous rocks. Magmatic activities in the region are generally associated with the convergence of the African-Arabian and Eurasian plates and the subduction of the Neotethys Ocean. Ancillary processes such as subduction of continental crust, delamination of upper plate lithosphere or lower crust, or asthenospheric decompression accompanying post-collisional relaxation also contribute to the composition of igneous rocks. Here we use geochemical data gathered from the EarthChem database to assess broad chemical implications of Cenozoic tectonic activities of the convergence region. We search for geochemical signal of the timing of first contact of the subducting Arabian and overriding Eurasian continental crust. Of particular interest is how igneous rock compositions vary during the transition from pre- to post-contact of the continental crusts. Also, is there a geographic variation along the convergence zone during this tectonic transition? We generate maps and geochemical plots for four different epochs and two different regions since Cenozoic time: Iran and Anatolia in the Eocene, Oligocene, Miocene and Plio-Quaternary. This board, region-scaled analysis of major and trace element patterns suggests the following tectonic events: Subduction-related medium K calc-alkaline igneous rocks reflect Eocene subduction of the Neo-Tethys oceanic lithosphere. Oligocene igneous rocks are characterized by K2O-SiO2 trends scattering to higher silica and alkaline content, which may reflect subduction of stretched continental margin lithosphere and sediments. A bimodal pattern of potash-silica trends during Miocene time may mark the transition from subduction-related to intra-plate magmatism, perhaps signaling contact between the continental crust of Arabia-Africa with Eurasia. Pliocene and younger igneous rocks show an intra-plate and ocean island basalt trend, as the region's activities

  10. Giant lobelias exemplify convergent evolution

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Giant lobeliads on tropical mountains in East Africa and Hawaii have highly unusual, giant-rosette growth forms that appear to be convergent on each other and on those of several independently evolved groups of Asteraceae and other families. A recent phylogenetic analysis by Antonelli, based on sequencing the widest selection of lobeliads to date, raises doubts about this paradigmatic example of convergent evolution. Here I address the kinds of evidence needed to test for convergent evolution and argue that the analysis by Antonelli fails on four points. Antonelli's analysis makes several important contributions to our understanding of lobeliad evolution and geographic spread, but his claim regarding convergence appears to be invalid. Giant lobeliads in Hawaii and Africa represent paradigmatic examples of convergent evolution. PMID:20074322

  11. Study of the timing performance of micro-channel plate photomultiplier for use as an active layer in a shower maximum detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronzhin, A.; Los, S.; Ramberg, E.; Apresyan, A.; Xie, S.; Spiropulu, M.; Kim, H.

    2015-09-01

    We continue the study of micro-channel plate photomultiplier (MCP-PMT) as the active element of a shower maximum (SM) detector. We present test beam results obtained with Photek 240 and Photonis XP85011 MCP-PMTs devices. For proton beams, we obtained a time resolution of 9.6 ps, representing a significant improvement over past results using the same time of flight system. For electron beams, the time resolution obtained for this new type of SM detector is measured to be at the level of 13 ps when we use Photek 240 as the active element of the SM. Using the Photonis XP85011 MCP-PMT as the active element of the SM, we performed time resolution measurements with pixel readout, and achieved a TR better than 30 ps, The pixel readout was observed to improve upon the TR compared to the case where the individual channels were summed.

  12. The Convergence of Intelligences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederich, Joachim

    Minsky (1985) argued an extraterrestrial intelligence may be similar to ours despite very different origins. ``Problem- solving'' offers evolutionary advantages and individuals who are part of a technical civilisation should have this capacity. On earth, the principles of problem-solving are the same for humans, some primates and machines based on Artificial Intelligence (AI) techniques. Intelligent systems use ``goals'' and ``sub-goals'' for problem-solving, with memories and representations of ``objects'' and ``sub-objects'' as well as knowledge of relations such as ``cause'' or ``difference.'' Some of these objects are generic and cannot easily be divided into parts. We must, therefore, assume that these objects and relations are universal, and a general property of intelligence. Minsky's arguments from 1985 are extended here. The last decade has seen the development of a general learning theory (``computational learning theory'' (CLT) or ``statistical learning theory'') which equally applies to humans, animals and machines. It is argued that basic learning laws will also apply to an evolved alien intelligence, and this includes limitations of what can be learned efficiently. An example from CLT is that the general learning problem for neural networks is intractable, i.e. it cannot be solved efficiently for all instances (it is ``NP-complete''). It is the objective of this paper to show that evolved intelligences will be constrained by general learning laws and will use task-decomposition for problem-solving. Since learning and problem-solving are core features of intelligence, it can be said that intelligences converge despite very different origins.

  13. Plate tectonics conserves angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowin, C.

    2010-03-01

    velocity on the crests of convection cells driven by rising heat. The magnitude of these sinking mass anomalies is inferred also to be sufficient to overcome basal plate and transform fault frictions. These results imply that spreading centers are primarily passive reactive features, and fracture zones (and wedge-shaped sites of seafloor spreading) are adjustment zones that accommodate strains in the lithosphere. Further, the interlocked pattern of the Australian and Pacific plates the past 42 Million years (with their absolute plate motions near 90° to each other) is taken as strong evidence that large thermally driven "roller" convection cells previously inferred as the driving mechanism in earlier interpretations of continental drift and plate tectonics, have not been active in the Earth's mantle the past 42 Million years, if ever. This report also presents estimates of the changes in location and magnitude of the Earth's axis of total plate tectonic angular momentum for the past 62 million years.

  14. Making More Efficient Use Of Battery-Plate Mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, John J.

    1990-01-01

    Improved active material for positive plate of lead/acid electric storage battery made with additional porosity to give electrolyte access to larger plate-surface area. 65 to 68 percent of active mass of plate used to generate electric current. Batteries with new plate material offer extremely long cycle life.

  15. The composite of nitrogen-doped anatase titania plates with exposed {001} facets/graphene nanosheets for enhanced visible-light photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jian-Wen; Ai, Hui-Ying; Chen, Jian-Wei; Cui, Hao-Jie; Fu, Ming-Lai

    2014-09-15

    Composite photocatalysts composed of nitrogen-doped anatase TiO2 plates with exposed {001} facets (NTS) and graphene nanosheets (G) were firstly synthesized by a facile one-pot hydrothermal process. The morphologies, structural properties, and photocatalytic activities of the resultant NTS/G composites were investigated in detail. Graphene nanosheets were demonstrated play three important roles in the NTS/G composites, as transporter of photo-excited electrons, extender of light absorption range and enhancer of adsorptive capacity, respectively. Due to the effective charge anti-recombination, the efficient utilization of the visible light and the high adsorptive capacity to target pollutants, the composites exhibited significant improvement in photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue under visible light irradiation. Based on the results, the mechanism of enhanced visible-light photocatalytic activity on NTS/G composites was proposed. PMID:24998060

  16. Novel solid-phase refolding method for preparation of scFv-immobilized polystyrene plates with high-antigen-binding activity.

    PubMed

    Kumada, Yoichi; Shiritani, Yuki; Hamasaki, Kyoko; Nakagawa, Aya; Sasaki, Eiju; Kishimoto, Michimasa

    2010-10-01

    In the present study, we demonstrated site-specific immobilization and solid-phase refolding of single-chain Fv antibodies on hydrophilic polystyrene (phi-PS) plates that was mediated by novel polystyrene binding peptides (PS-tags: RIIIRRIRR), which were originally isolated and optimized in previous studies. Three PS-tag-fused scFvs, namely scFv-PS, scFv-(PS), and scFv-PSII, which were over-expressed in the insoluble fraction of Escherichia coli cells were denatured and site-specifically immobilized onto hydrophilic PS plates in the presence of 0.5-4 M urea and 0.1% Tween 20. The antigen-binding activity of the scFvs was efficiently recovered by washing the surface of the plate with PBS that contained 0.1% Tween 20 (PBST). The solid-phase refolding mediated by PS-tag was successfully applied to several scFvs such as mouse anti-CRP antibodies and an anti-RNase antibody, although further investigation of the versatility of scFv-PSII is needed. The maximal density of PS-tag-fused scFvs was increased more than 15-fold compared with a whole monoclonal antibody (mAb) immobilized on Maxisorp and, consequently, the sensitivity of PS-tag-fused scFvs for CRP in a sandwich ELISA was increased 25-fold. Thus, the novel, solid-phase, refolding method mediated by a PS-tag will be very useful for preparation of solid supports coated with recombinant antibody fragments, which can be used in immunoassays and immuno-separation. PMID:20661728

  17. Plating on stainless steel alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dini, J.W.; Johnson, H.R.

    1981-09-11

    Quantitative adhesion data are presented for a variety of electroplated stainless steel type alloys. Results show that excellent adhesion can be obtained by using a Wood's nickel strike or a sulfamate nickel strike prior to final plating. Specimens plated after Wood's nickel striking failed in the deposit rather than at the interface between the substrate and the coating. Flyer plate quantitative tests showed that use of anodic treatment in sulfuric acid prior to Wood's nickel striking even further improved adhesion. In contrast activation of stainless steels by immersion or cathodic treatment in hydrochloric acid resulted in very reduced bond strengths with failure always occurring at the interface between the coating and substrate.

  18. Oblique convergence and deformation along the Kuril and Japan trenches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demets, Charles

    1992-01-01

    The hypothesis that present-day deformation within the southern Kuril forearc is driven by oblique subduction of the Pacific plate is tested using 397 horizontal slip directions derived from shallow-thrust earthquakes from the Kuril and Japan trenches for the period 1963-1991. A simple two-plate model fits the 397 slip vectors significantly worse than a model that permits strike-slip motion of the southern Kuril forearc relative to the overlying plate. Weighted, mean slip directions along the southern Kuril trench are systematically rotated toward the direction orthogonal to the trench, which implies that the net convergence is partitioned into less oblique subduction and trench-parallel displacement of the southern Kuril forearc. The angular discrepancy between the observed slip direction and the direction predicted by the NUVEL-1 Pacific-North America Euler vector implies that the southern Kuril forearc translates 6-11 mm/yr to the southwest relative to the overlying North American plate. These results are consistent with geologically, geodetically, and seismologically observed convergence at the leading edge of the forearc sliver in southern Kokkaido and with previously inferred extension at the trailing edge of the sliver, which is located at the Bussol Strait at 46 deg N.

  19. Bolivar: Crustal Structure of the Caribbean-South America plate boundary at 70W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedez, M. C.; Zelt, C. A.; Magnani, B. M.; Levander, A.

    2006-12-01

    The Caribbean-South America plate boundary is characterized by tectonic transpression with oblique convergence. The ~ 20 mm/yr eastward displacement of the Caribbean plate, with respect to a fixed South America causes the plate boundary to have a dominant right-lateral strike-slip component, accommodated by the San Sebastian-El Pilar fault system. To the west, relative plate motion is complicated by the northeastward tectonic escape of the Maracaibo block along the Bocono and Santa Marta strike-slip faults, and the shortening between North and South America. The convergence rate between the Maracaibo block and the Caribbean has been estimated to be ~ 2 mm/yr. The multidisciplinary BOLIVAR project seeks to understand the complex plate interaction of the Caribbean- South American diffuse plate boundary. We hypothesize that this may be a site of continental growth by island arc accretion of the Leeward Antilles onto South America. The active-seismic component of the project, completed in June 2004, concentrated along five main onshore-offshore profiles extending from the Caribbean basin to the front of the fold and thrust belts of Venezuela. Seismic refraction data were acquired as well as coincident multi-channel seismic (MCS) lines in the offshore sections. We present results from seismic reflection and wide-angle refraction data along a 450 km-long onshore- offshore north-south striking profile at 70 degrees west longitude. Refraction data were used to develop 2-D velocity models from independent and simultaneous traveltime inversion of first arrivals and PmP reflections from 40 Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) and about ~ 80 land recorders. A coincident MCS profile was processed and interpreted independently. Offshore western Venezuela the Caribbean plate is anomalously thick ~ 15 km. The velocity model from wide-angle data is well correlated with the structures interpreted in the reflection data; in particular in the upper and middle crust of the Southern

  20. Upper plate responses to active spreading ridge/transform subduction: The tectonics, basin evolution, and seismicity of the Taita area, Chile Triple Junction

    SciTech Connect

    Flint, S.; Prior, D. ); Styles, P.; Murdie, R. ); Agar, S.; Turner, P. )

    1993-02-01

    Integrated field geophysical, structural and stratigraphic studies are attempting to elucidate the mechanisms and consequences of the Late Miocene-present day subduction of the Chile Ridge triple junction system. Preliminary data indicate a shallow plane of seismicity at about 15 km to 20 km depth below the Taitao peninsula. The depths correspond to the predicted depth range of subducted upper ocean crust. The calculated Bouguer anomaly map cannot be explained by the upper plate geology, suggesting that gravity is influenced by heterogeneities in the subducting oceanic plate. Seismic data imply that a subducted transform system underlying the inner Taitao Peninsula is still an active structure. A series of Middle-Late Tertiary sedimentary basins lie inboard of the triple junction. Within the Cosmelli basin, abrupt marine to continental facies transitions give clear evidence of base level changes. The amount of basinward shift of facies across sequence boundaries gets progressively greater up stratigraphy, indicating progressively greater base level changes. The lower part of the basin fill is folded and then thrusted eastward as a series of imbricates, while the overlying, greater thickness of fluvial sediments are only gently tilted westwards. We provisionally interpret this geometry to indicate that the early basin fill was deforming due to contractional tectonics while the later basin fill was being deposited. This complex basin history may reflect initiation and development of triple junction subduction.

  1. Seismic Reflection Images of Deep Lithospheric Faults and Thin Crust at the Actively Deforming Indo-Australian Plate Boundary in the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. C.; Carton, H.; Chauhan, A.; Dyment, J.; Cannat, M.; Hananto, N.; Hartoyo, D.; Tapponnier, P.; Davaille, A.

    2007-12-01

    Recently, we acquired deep seismic reflection data using a state-of-the-art technology of Schlumberger having a powerful source (10,000 cubic inch) and a 12 km long streamer along a 250 km long trench parallel line offshore Sumatra in the Indian Ocean deformation zone that provides seismic reflection image down to 40 km depth over the old oceanic lithosphere formed at Wharton spreading centre about 55-57 Ma ago. We observe deep penetrating faults that go down to 37 km depth (~24 km in the oceanic mantle), providing the first direct evidence for full lithospheric-scale deformation in an intra-plate oceanic domain. These faults dip NE and have dips between 25 and 40 degrees. The majority of faults are present in the mantle and are spaced at about 5 km, and do not seem cut through the Moho. We have also imaged active strike-slip fault zones that seem to be associated with the re-activation of ancient fracture zones, which is consistent with previous seismological and seafloor observations. The geometries of the deep penetrating faults neither seem to correspond to faulting associated with the plate bending at the subduction front nor with the re-activation of fracture zone that initiated about 7.5 Ma ago, and therefore, we suggest that these deep mantle faults were formed due to compressive stress at the beginning of the hard collision between India and Eurasia, soon after the cessation of seafloor spreading in the Wharton basin. We also find that the crust generated at the fast Wharton spreading centre 55-57 Ma ago is only 3.5-4.5 km thick, the thinnest crust ever observed in a fast spreading environment. We suggest that this extremely thin crust is due to 40-50°C lower than normal mantle temperature in this part of the Indian Ocean during its formation.

  2. The nature and location of the plate boundary between the Anatolian and African plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    deǧer Özbakır, Ali; Wortel, Rinus; Govers, Rob

    2010-05-01

    Overall convergence of the African, Arabian and Eurasian plates, and the westward escape of Anatolia has resulted in an evolving plate boundary zone since the Miocene. In the Eastern Mediterranean, the current location and nature of the plate boundary between the Anatolian and the African plates is difficult to trace due to the scattered crustal earthquakes, and the absence of deeper earthquakes. In this study we aim to better constrain the nature and the location of the plate boundary. GPS-derived velocity field and stresses from earthquake mechanism solutions comprise the datasets which short time scale (elastic) models can be compared to. We model the stresses and deformation on the overriding plate by incorporating convergence of Africa and Arabia towards stable Eurasia, and rollback of the Hellenic trench. Investigation of the plate boundary consists of constraining the directions of motions over the segments which make up the boundary. We assume various types and locations for the plate boundary within the observational limits. We use a spherical plane stress finite element model to test these possibilities. We find that stresses and displacements are sensitive to both the location and the nature of the plate boundary. We obtain the minimum misfit with the data in a model where we assume the following: (1) the segment between Hellenic and the Cyprus arcs have both down-dip and fault parallel motions, (2) the connection between the Cyprus arc and Arabia--Eurasia collision zone is pure strike-slip. In all our models, an extra pull force on Anatolia is required to explain the high velocities in southwest Anatolia. This force may be related to return flow around the lateral edge of the Aegean slab.

  3. The Golosyiv plate archive digitisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeeva, T. P.; Sergeev, A. V.; Pakuliak, L. K.; Yatsenko, A. I.

    2007-08-01

    The plate archive of the Main Astronomical Observatory of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (Golosyiv, Kyiv) includes about 85 000 plates which have been taken in various observational projects during 1950-2005. Among them are about 25 000 of direct northern sky area plates and more than 600 000 plates containing stellar, planetary and active solar formations spectra. Direct plates have a limiting magnitude of 14.0-16.0 mag. Since 2002 we have been organising the storage, safeguarding, cataloguing and digitization of the plate archive. The very initial task was to create the automated system for detection of astronomical objects and phenomena, search of optical counterparts in the directions of gamma-ray bursts, research of long period, flare and other variable stars, search and rediscovery of asteroids, comets and other Solar System bodies to improve the elements of their orbits, informational support of CCD observations and space projects, etc. To provide higher efficiency of this work we have prepared computer readable catalogues and database for 250 000 direct wide field plates. Now the catalogues have been adapted to Wide Field Plate Database (WFPDB) format and integrated into this world database. The next step will be adaptation of our catalogues, database and images to standards of the IVOA. Some magnitude and positional accuracy estimations for Golosyiv archive plates have been done. The photometric characteristics of the images of NGC 6913 cluster stars on two plates of the Golosyiv's double wide angle astrograph have been determined. Very good conformity of the photometric characteristics obtained with external accuracies of 0.13 and 0.15 mag. has been found. The investigation of positional accuracy have been made with A3± format fixed bed scanner (Microtek ScanMaker 9800XL TMA). It shows that the scanner has non-detectable systematic errors on the X-axis, and errors of ± 15 μm on the Y-axis. The final positional errors are about ± 2 μm (

  4. Hierarchic plate and shell models based on p-extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, Barna A.; Sahrmann, Glenn J.

    1988-01-01

    Formulations of finite element models for beams, arches, plates and shells based on the principle of virtual work was studied. The focus is on computer implementation of hierarchic sequences of finite element models suitable for numerical solution of a large variety of practical problems which may concurrently contain thin and thick plates and shells, stiffeners, and regions where three dimensional representation is required. The approximate solutions corresponding to the hierarchic sequence of models converge to the exact solution of the fully three dimensional model. The stopping criterion is based on: (1) estimation of the relative error in energy norm; (2) equilibrium tests, and (3) observation of the convergence of quantities of interest.

  5. Modeling the Philippine Mobile Belt: Tectonic blocks in a deforming plate boundary zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galgana, G. A.; Hamburger, M. W.; McCaffrey, R.; Bacolcol, T. C.; Aurelio, M. A.

    2007-12-01

    The Philippine Mobile Belt, a seismically active, rapidly deforming plate boundary zone situated along the convergent Philippine Sea/Eurasian plate boundary, is examined using geodetic and seismological data. Oblique convergence between the Philippine Sea Plate and the Eurasian plate is accommodated by nearly orthogonal subduction along the Philippine Trench and the Manila Trench, as well as by strike-slip faulting along the Philippine Fault system. We develop a model of active plate boundary deformation in this region, using elastic block models constrained by known fault geometries, published GPS observations and focal mechanism solutions. We then present an estimate of block rotations, fault coupling, and intra-block deformation, based on the best-fit model that minimizes the misfit between observed and predicted geodetic vectors and earthquake slip vectors. Slip rates along the Philippine fault vary from ~22 - 36 mm/yr in the Central Visayas and about 10 to 40 mm/yr in Luzon, trending almost parallel to the fault trace. In northern Luzon, Philippine Fault splays accommodate transpressional strain. The Central Visayas block experiences convergence with the Sundaland block along the Negros Trench and the Mindoro-Palawan collision zone. On the eastern side of Central Visayas, sinistral strike-slip faulting occurs along the NNW-SSE-trending Philippine Fault. Mindanao Island in southern Philippines is dominated by east-verging subduction along the Cotabato Trench, and strain partitioning (strike- slip faulting with west-verging subduction) in eastern Mindanao along the southern Philippine Fault and Philippine Trench, respectively. Oblique active sinistral strike slip faults in Central and Eastern Mindanao that were hypothesized to be responsible for basin formation are obvious boundaries for tectonic blocks. Located south of Mindanao Island we define an adjoining oceanic block defined by the N-S trending complex dual subduction zone of Sangihe and Halmahera

  6. Trophic convergence drives morphological convergence in marine tetrapods.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Neil P; Motani, Ryosuke

    2015-01-01

    Marine tetrapod clades (e.g. seals, whales) independently adapted to marine life through the Mesozoic and Caenozoic, and provide iconic examples of convergent evolution. Apparent morphological convergence is often explained as the result of adaptation to similar ecological niches. However, quantitative tests of this hypothesis are uncommon. We use dietary data to classify the feeding ecology of extant marine tetrapods and identify patterns in skull and tooth morphology that discriminate trophic groups across clades. Mapping these patterns onto phylogeny reveals coordinated evolutionary shifts in diet and morphology in different marine tetrapod lineages. Similarities in morphology between species with similar diets-even across large phylogenetic distances-are consistent with previous hypotheses that shared functional constraints drive convergent evolution in marine tetrapods. PMID:25631228

  7. Trophic convergence drives morphological convergence in marine tetrapods

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Neil P.; Motani, Ryosuke

    2015-01-01

    Marine tetrapod clades (e.g. seals, whales) independently adapted to marine life through the Mesozoic and Caenozoic, and provide iconic examples of convergent evolution. Apparent morphological convergence is often explained as the result of adaptation to similar ecological niches. However, quantitative tests of this hypothesis are uncommon. We use dietary data to classify the feeding ecology of extant marine tetrapods and identify patterns in skull and tooth morphology that discriminate trophic groups across clades. Mapping these patterns onto phylogeny reveals coordinated evolutionary shifts in diet and morphology in different marine tetrapod lineages. Similarities in morphology between species with similar diets—even across large phylogenetic distances—are consistent with previous hypotheses that shared functional constraints drive convergent evolution in marine tetrapods. PMID:25631228

  8. A new plate boundary in the Ionian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polonia, Alina; Torelli, Luigi; Artoni, Andrea; Bortoluzzi, Giovanni; Faccenna, Claudio; Ferranti, Luigi; Gasperini, Luca; Govers, Rob; Monaco, Carmelo; Neri, Giancarlo; Orecchio, Barbara; Rinus Wortel, M. J.

    2014-05-01

    The Calabrian Arc (CA) is a narrow and arcuate subduction system resulting from Africa/Eurasia plate convergence and slab rollback in the Tyrrhenian region. The very slow present-day plate convergence suggests a decrease in subduction efficiency, but underplating may still be active in the central CA where GPS data suggests an outward motion of Calabria relative to Apulia. Shortening in the accretionary wedge is taken up along the outer deformation front and out-of-sequence thrust faults (splay faults). Transtensive deformation accounts for margin segmentation along transfer tectonics systems bounding different margin segments. Transfer faults represent the shallow expression of deeply rooted processes at the slab edge. One of these structures is the NNW-SSE trending transtensive STEP (Slab Transfer Edge Propagator) fault system located East of the Malta Escarpment from the Alfeo seamount to the Etna volcano. Margin segmentation occurs along a second NW-SE trending crustal discontinuity delimiting two distinct lobes of the subduction complex close to the Messina Straits region. The Western Lobe (WL) of the subduction complex, offshore Sicily, is a down-dropped and very low tapered (about 1.5° ) wedge detaching on the base of the Messinian evaporites. The Eastern Lobe (EL), in front of Central Calabria, shows a more elevated accretionary wedge, steeper topographic slopes, higher deformation rates and a deeper basal detachment. High resolution tomographic images suggest a strong interplay between structural development and slab dynamics: the WL corresponds to areas where the slab is detached, while beneath the EL the slab is continuous. Newly acquired geophysical data (Urania cruise, October 2013), reveal that the deformation zone between the two lobes of the accretionary wedge displays fresh seafloor scarps and mud volcanoes suggesting it represents an active tectonic boundary and a deep fluid/mud conduit. We propose that this discontinuity is a new plate boundary

  9. Plate Reconstructions And Mantle Structure In The Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafkenscheid, E.; Wortel, M. J. R.; Spakman, W.

    The subduction of the Tethys Ocean has dominated the history of large areas in the Mediterranean and Southern Asia. Tectonic reconstructions for these complex regions inevitably show significant differences. Also Greece and Turkey, at the western end of the Tethyan area, are relatively well studied but still not completely understood. For example, for the several suture zones in Turkey it is not clear whether they once have accommodated the convergence between the African and Eurasian plates, or just the convergence resulting from the closure of smaller back-arc basins. We incorporate independent tomographic images of the present mantle structure in our analysis to put further constraints on the geodynamic evolution here. From tectonic reconstructions, we calculate the Mesozoic-Cenozoic plate velocities and convergence. For the Greece-Turkey region, we use the Northeast-African and Eurasian plate rotations. The deformation of the Aegean trench system is added to these motions. The Volumes of subducted lithosphere estimated from the reconstruc- tions are then compared to those inferred from seismic tomography. Our first results suggest that the convergence between the Northeast African and Eurasian plates has been accommodated by one continuous process of subduction, in spite of the different trench systems that are proposed in the reconstructions. We also investigate whether the location and geometry of the subducted material within the mantle might allow us to assess the absolute motion of the plates involved.

  10. Finite circular plate on elastic foundation centrally loaded by rigid spherical indenter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadhwa, S. K.; Yang, P. P.

    1980-01-01

    The analytical solution of a finite circular plate on an elastic foundation centrally loaded by the rigid indenter is discussed. The procedure to use NASTRAN as a subroutine to iteratively converge to this solution numerically is described.

  11. Sputtering and ion plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference on sputtering and ion plating are presented. Subjects discussed are: (1) concepts and applications of ion plating, (2) sputtering for deposition of solid film lubricants, (3) commercial ion plating equipment, (4) industrial potential for ion plating and sputtering, and (5) fundamentals of RF and DC sputtering.

  12. Convergent Creativity: From Arthur Cropley (1935-) Onwards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Ai-Girl

    2015-01-01

    Arthur Cropley's view on convergent thinking is reviewed, with reflections on the relations of divergent and convergent processes and the roles of knowledge and convergent creativity. While divergence is about considering and generating multiplicity, possibility, difference, originality, and so on; convergence is about relating, associating,…

  13. The signalling pathways of interleukin-6 and gamma interferon converge by the activation of different transcription factors which bind to common responsive DNA elements.

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, J; Wegenka, U M; Lütticken, C; Buschmann, J; Decker, T; Schindler, C; Heinrich, P C; Horn, F

    1994-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) induce a partially overlapping set of genes, including the genes for interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1), intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), and the acute-phase protein alpha 2-macroglobulin. We report here that the rat alpha 2-macroglobulin promoter is activated by IFN-gamma in human hepatoma (HepG2) cells and that the IFN-gamma response element maps to the same site previously defined as the acute-phase response element (APRE), which binds the IL-6-activated transcription factor APRF (acute-phase response factor). As was reported for fibroblasts, the IFN-gamma-regulated transcription factor GAF is phosphorylated at tyrosine after IFN-gamma treatment of HepG2 cells. IFN-gamma posttranslationally activates a protein which specifically binds to the alpha 2-macroglobulin APRE. This protein is shown to be identical or closely related to GAF. Although APRF and GAF are shown to represent different proteins, their binding sequence specificities are very similar. APRF and GAF bind equally well to the APRE sequences of various acute-phase protein genes as well as to the IFN-gamma response elements of the IRF-1, ICAM-1, and other IFN-gamma-inducible genes. Transient transfection analysis revealed that the IFN-gamma response elements of the IRF-1 and ICAM-1 promoters are able to confer responsiveness to both IFN-gamma and IL-6 onto a heterologous promoter. Therefore, APRF and GAF are likely to be involved in the transcriptional induction of these immediate-early genes by IL-6 and IFN-gamma, respectively. Taken together, these results demonstrate that two functionally distinct hormones, IL-6 and IFN-gamma, act through common regulatory elements to which different transcription factors sharing almost the same sequence specificity bind. Images PMID:7509445

  14. Vibration of skewed cantilever plates and helicoidal shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beres, D. P.; Bailey, C. D.

    1975-01-01

    Theoretical vibration frequencies and mode shapes are obtained for skewed plates and helicoidal shells with a cantilever boundary. Using Hamilton's law of varying action, a power series solution is developed to obtain converged numerical results for the five lowest frequencies. Effects of geometrical variables such as aspect ratio, sweep angle and shell radius to thickness ratio are investigated. Accuracy of the solution method is substantiated by comparison with existing skewed plate spherical cap, and conical shell results.

  15. Inversion for the driving forces of plate tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    Inverse modeling techniques have been applied to the problem of determining the roles of various forces that may drive and resist plate tectonic motions. Separate linear inverse problems have been solved to find the best fitting pole of rotation for finite element grid point velocities and to find the best combination of force models to fit the observed relative plate velocities for the earth's twelve major plates using the generalized inverse operator. Variance-covariance data on plate motion have also been included. Results emphasize the relative importance of ridge push forces in the driving mechanism. Convergent margin forces are smaller by at least a factor of two, and perhaps by as much as a factor of twenty. Slab pull, apparently, is poorly transmitted to the surface plate as a driving force. Drag forces at the base of the plate are smaller than ridge push forces, although the sign of the force remains in question.

  16. Convergence demands by spectacle magnifiers.

    PubMed

    Katz, M

    1996-08-01

    A general equation, c delta = k1b + k2sF, for finding the binocular convergence demands by spectacle magnifiers to view images at any distance is presented. Factor k1 in the equation yields the accommodative demand to view the image; factor k2 determines the actual reduction in convergence demand provided by the vendors' incorporation of base-in prism. When magnifiers from virtual images at finite distances, such as at the least distance of distinct vision or 25 cm, the interpupiliary distance (b), the separation between the lenses and the eyes (d), and the distance between the optical centers of the lenses (s) are basic quantities, according to this equation. The fundamental datum that the vendors should specify is the distance (s) between the optical centers of the lenses, rather than base-in prism. The specification of base-in prism is unrellable when images are formed at finite distances and the frame PD is not equal to the distance IPD. When the image is formed at infinity, that is when the angular magnification M = F/4, the convergence demand by spectacle magnifiers only depends on the separation between the optical centers of the lenses and the lens power, that is, c delta = sF. It is independent of the interpupillary distance (b) and the separation between the lenses and the eyes (d). We also present an equation, to find the disparity of the accommodative/convergence relation caused by spectacle magnifiers. Knowing the demands on convergence and accommodation, the practitioner can probably evaluate the potential for successful adaptation to spectacle magnifiers from routine measurements of positive and negative relative convergence and accommodation. PMID:8869985

  17. Acute effects of ethanol or d-amphetamine on the locomotor activity of larval zebrafish in a microtiter plate format.

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of an effort to develop a rapid in vivo screen for EPA’s prioritization of toxic chemicals, we have begun to characterize the locomotor activity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae. We are assessing the acute effects of prototypic drugs that are known to act on the central ...

  18. Features of the Caucasian segment of the Alpine-Himalayan-Indonesian Convergence Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkov, E.

    2012-04-01

    anomalies (Artemiev, 1973; Artemieva et al., 2006). We suggest that the positive anomaly considers with ascending of a mantle plume and .negative anomalies - with descending mantle flows on each its side (Sharkov, 2011). The main feature of this segment of the AHICZ is a presence of two late Cenozoic andesite-latite volcanic arcs: Anatolian-Caucasian and Caucasian-Elbursian, which jointed in area of TCTU. Such type of volcanism is also traced to the south practically through the whole zone of the syntaxis till to Van Lake area in Turkey. These volcanics are close to subduction-related magmas on their petrological and geochemical features, however, there are no clear evidences of the present-day subduction in the area of Neogene-Quaternary volcanism: crustal-level earthquakes predominated here (Gugunava, 1981; Sandvol et al., 2003). It suggests that such type of magmatism appeared as a result of interaction of a mantle plume head with continental crust under condition of continental plates collision (Lebedev et al., 2011). So, the Caucasus is an area of the present-day active interaction of deep-seated mantle processes with shallow lithosphere under conditions of the largest modern convergence zone.

  19. Quality assurance guidance for field sampling and measurement assessment plates in support of EM environmental sampling and analysis activities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This document is one of several guidance documents developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). These documents support the EM Analytical Services Program (ASP) and are based on applicable regulatory requirements and DOE Orders. They address requirements in DOE Orders by providing guidance that pertains specifically to environmental restoration and waste management sampling and analysis activities. DOE 5700.6C Quality Assurance (QA) defines policy and requirements to establish QA programs ensuring that risks and environmental impacts are minimized and that safety, reliability, and performance are maximized. This is accomplished through the application of effective management systems commensurate with the risks imposed by the facility and the project. Every organization supporting EM`s environmental sampling and analysis activities must develop and document a QA program. Management of each organization is responsible for appropriate QA program implementation, assessment, and improvement. The collection of credible and cost-effective environmental data is critical to the long-term success of remedial and waste management actions performed at DOE facilities. Only well established and management supported assessment programs within each EM-support organization will enable DOE to demonstrate data quality. The purpose of this series of documents is to offer specific guidance for establishing an effective assessment program for EM`s environmental sampling and analysis (ESA) activities.

  20. Discontinuous Patterns of Brain Activation in the Psychotherapy Process of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Converging Results from Repeated fMRI and Daily Self-Reports

    PubMed Central

    Schiepek, Günter; Tominschek, Igor; Heinzel, Stephan; Aigner, Martin; Dold, Markus; Unger, Annemarie; Lenz, Gerhard; Windischberger, Christian; Moser, Ewald; Plöderl, Martin; Lutz, Jürgen; Meindl, Thomas; Zaudig, Michael; Pogarell, Oliver; Karch, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates neuronal activation patterns during the psychotherapeutic process, assuming that change dynamics undergo critical instabilities and discontinuous transitions. An internet-based system was used to collect daily self-assessments during inpatient therapies. A dynamic complexity measure was applied to the resulting time series. Critical phases of the change process were indicated by the maxima of the varying complexity. Repeated functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measurements were conducted over the course of the therapy. The study was realized with 9 patients suffering from obsessive-compulsive disorder (subtype: washing/contamination fear) and 9 matched healthy controls. For symptom-provocative stimulation individualized pictures from patients’ personal environments were used. The neuronal responses to these disease-specific pictures were compared to the responses during standardized disgust-provoking and neutral pictures. Considerably larger neuronal changes in therapy-relevant brain areas (cingulate cortex/supplementary motor cortex, bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, bilateral insula, bilateral parietal cortex, cuneus) were observed during critical phases (order transitions), as compared to non-critical phases, and also compared to healthy controls. The data indicate that non-stationary changes play a crucial role in the psychotherapeutic process supporting self-organization and complexity models of therapeutic change. PMID:23977168

  1. Plate-wide stress relaxation explains European Palaeocene basin inversions.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Søren B; Thomsen, Erik; Hansen, David L; Clausen, Ole R

    2005-05-12

    During Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic times, many Palaeozoic and Mesozoic rifts and basin structures in the interior of the European continent underwent several phases of inversion (the process of shortening a previously extensional basin). The main phases occurred during the Late Cretaceous and Middle Palaeocene, and have been previously explained by pulses of compression, mainly from the Alpine orogen. Here we show that the main phases differed both in structural style and cause. The Cretaceous phase was characterized by narrow uplift zones, reverse activation of faults, crustal shortening, and the formation of asymmetric marginal troughs. In contrast, the Middle Palaeocene phase was characterized by dome-like uplift of a wider area with only mild fault movements, and formation of more distal and shallow marginal troughs. A simple flexural model explains how domal, secondary inversion follows inevitably from primary, convergence-related inversion on relaxation of the in-plane tectonic stress. The onset of relaxation inversions was plate-wide and simultaneous, and may have been triggered by stress changes caused by elevation of the North Atlantic lithosphere by the Iceland plume or the drop in the north-south convergence rate between Africa and Europe. PMID:15889089

  2. Evolution: convergence in dinosaur crests.

    PubMed

    Hone, David W E

    2015-06-15

    The horned, ceratopsid dinosaurs can be easily split into two major groups based on their cranial structures, but now a new discovery shows that at least one genus 'switched sides' and convergently evolved the form of the other clade. PMID:26079078

  3. Beyond division: convergences between postmodern qualitative research and family therapy.

    PubMed

    De Haene, Lucia

    2010-01-01

    Starting from examples of postmodern research and therapeutic practice, we raise the question on the role of the research-therapy dichotomy within these approaches. The article aims to show the profound convergence between postmodern ethnographic research and constructionist, collaborative therapeutic approaches on a double, epistemological and practice level. First, we point out their converging development toward narrative and constructionist epistemologies. Second, an inquiry into the core features of these disciplinary activities' goal, process, and expert role reveals their profound convergence into a dialogical practice in which the boundaries between research and therapy are radically transgressed. We conclude by questioning the implications and acceptability of this convergence for researchers' and therapists' understanding of their practices. PMID:20074120

  4. Filopodial-Tension Model of Convergent-Extension of Tissues.

    PubMed

    Belmonte, Julio M; Swat, Maciej H; Glazier, James A

    2016-06-01

    In convergent-extension (CE), a planar-polarized epithelial tissue elongates (extends) in-plane in one direction while shortening (converging) in the perpendicular in-plane direction, with the cells both elongating and intercalating along the converging axis. CE occurs during the development of most multicellular organisms. Current CE models assume cell or tissue asymmetry, but neglect the preferential filopodial activity along the convergent axis observed in many tissues. We propose a cell-based CE model based on asymmetric filopodial tension forces between cells and investigate how cell-level filopodial interactions drive tissue-level CE. The final tissue geometry depends on the balance between external rounding forces and cell-intercalation traction. Filopodial-tension CE is robust to relatively high levels of planar cell polarity misalignment and to the presence of non-active cells. Addition of a simple mechanical feedback between cells fully rescues and even improves CE of tissues with high levels of polarity misalignments. Our model extends easily to three dimensions, with either one converging and two extending axes, or two converging and one extending axes, producing distinct tissue morphologies, as observed in vivo. PMID:27322528

  5. Filopodial-Tension Model of Convergent-Extension of Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Swat, Maciej H.; Glazier, James A.

    2016-01-01

    In convergent-extension (CE), a planar-polarized epithelial tissue elongates (extends) in-plane in one direction while shortening (converging) in the perpendicular in-plane direction, with the cells both elongating and intercalating along the converging axis. CE occurs during the development of most multicellular organisms. Current CE models assume cell or tissue asymmetry, but neglect the preferential filopodial activity along the convergent axis observed in many tissues. We propose a cell-based CE model based on asymmetric filopodial tension forces between cells and investigate how cell-level filopodial interactions drive tissue-level CE. The final tissue geometry depends on the balance between external rounding forces and cell-intercalation traction. Filopodial-tension CE is robust to relatively high levels of planar cell polarity misalignment and to the presence of non-active cells. Addition of a simple mechanical feedback between cells fully rescues and even improves CE of tissues with high levels of polarity misalignments. Our model extends easily to three dimensions, with either one converging and two extending axes, or two converging and one extending axes, producing distinct tissue morphologies, as observed in vivo. PMID:27322528

  6. Microporous microchannel plates and method of manufacturing same

    DOEpatents

    Beetz, Jr., Charles P.; Boerstler, Robert W.; Steinbeck, John; Winn, David R.

    2000-01-01

    A microchannel plate and method of manufacturing same is provided. The microchannel plate includes a plate consisting of an anodized material and a plurality of channels which are formed during the anodization of the material and extend between the two sides of the plate. Electrodes are also disposed on each side of the plate for generating an electrical field within the channels. Preferably, the material is alumina and the channels are activated such that the channel walls are conductive and highly secondary emissive.

  7. Crustal velocity model along the southern Cuban margin: implications for the tectonic regime at an active plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Bladimir; Grandison, Margaret; Atakan, Kuvvet

    2002-11-01

    A new 1-D velocity model along the southern Cuban margin has been determined using local earthquake data, which are the result of the merged Cuban and Jamaican catalogues. Simultaneous inversion using joint-hypocentre determination was applied to solve the coupled hypocentre-velocity model problem. We obtained a seven-layer model with an average Moho interface at 20 km. The average velocity was found to be 7.6 km s-1 on the top of the crust-mantle transition zone and 6.9 km s-1 in the basaltic layer of the crust. The improvement in the earthquake locations allowed us for the first time to use local seismicity to characterize the activity on local faults and the stress regime in the area. For this purpose, 34 earthquake focal mechanisms were determined along the eastern segments of the Oriente Fault. These solutions are consistent with the known left-lateral strike-slip motion along this major structure as well as with the stress regime of two local structures: (1) the Cabo Cruz Basin and (2) the Santiago deformed belt. The first structure is dominated by normal faults with minor strike-slip components and the second by reverse faults. The shallow seismicity in the Cabo Cruz Basin is associated with fault planes trending N55°-58°E and dipping 38°-45° to the north. The Santiago deformed belt, on the other hand, exhibits diverse fault plane orientations. These local structures account for most of the earthquake activity along the southern Cuban margin. Deep seismicity observed in the Santiago deformed belt, supported by focal mechanisms, suggests underthrusting of the Gonave Microplate beneath the Cuban Block in this area. The principal stress orientations obtained from stress inversion of earthquake focal mechanisms suggest a thrust faulting regime along the Southern Cuban margin. We obtained a nearly horizontal σ1 and nearly vertical σ3, which indicates active compressional deformation along the major Oriente transcurrent fault in agreement with the dominant

  8. Distinct perinatal features of the hyperpolarization-activated non-selective cation current Ih in the rat cortical plate

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background During neocortical development, multiple voltage- and ligand-gated ion channels are differentially expressed in neurons thereby shaping their intrinsic electrical properties. One of these voltage-gated ion channels, the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel and its current Ih, is an important regulator of neuronal excitability. Thus far, studies on an early Ih appearance in rodent neocortex are missing or conflicting. Therefore, we focused our study on perinatal neocortical Ih and its properties. Results In the perinatal rat neocortex we observed a rapid increase in the number of neurons exhibiting Ih. Perinatal Ih had unique properties: first, a pronounced cAMP sensitivity resulting in a marked shift of the voltage sufficient for half-maximum activation of the current towards depolarized voltages and second, an up to 10 times slower deactivation at physiological membrane potentials when compared to the one at postnatal day 30. The combination of these features was sufficient to suppress membrane resonance in our in silico and in vitro experiments. Although all four HCN subunits were present on the mRNA level we only detected HCN4, HCN3 and HCN1 on the protein level at P0. HCN1 protein at P0, however, appeared incompletely processed. At P30 glycosilated HCN1 and HCN2 dominated. By in silico simulations and heterologous co-expression experiments of a ‘slow’ and a ‘fast’ Ih conducting HCN channel subunit in HEK293 cells, we mimicked most characteristics of the native current, pointing to a functional combination of subunit homo- or heteromeres. Conclusion Taken together, these data indicate a HCN subunit shift initiated in the first 24 hours after birth and implicate a prominent perinatal role of the phylogenetically older HCN3 and/or HCN4 subunits in the developing neocortex. PMID:22694806

  9. Convergence rate controls seismicity styles in collision orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Zilio, Luca; van Dinther, Ylona; Gerya, Taras

    2016-04-01

    The 25 April 2015 Mw 7.8 Gorkha earthquake in Nepal resulted from the unzipping of the previously locked Main Himalayan Thrust (MHT) fault, along which the Himalayan wedge is thrust over India. Strong ground shaking caused the collapse of more than half a million homes, killing more than 8500 people. Can such a large magnitude event also occur within the populated European Alps? Or is there a distinctly different seismicity pattern in different orogens? We show that their long-term seismicity patterns are indeed different and that their differences can be explained by a single parameter: their convergence rate. To do so we present the first self-consistent seismic cycle model for continental collisional margins. We use the viscoelastoplastic continuum Seismo-Thermo-Mechanical model (STM) validated for seismic cycle applications against a laboratory model (van Dinther et al., 2013a) and natural observations (van Dinther et al., 2013b), which includes Drucker-Prager plasticity and spontaneous rupture events governed by strongly rate-dependent friction. The 2-D model setup consists of two continental plates separated by an oceanic plate, in which the incipient subduction phase is followed by collisional orogeny. Results show the physically consistent spontaneous emergence of complex rupture paths, both on and off the main frontal thrust. These off-main frontal thrust events within the upper and lower plate complement the main frontal thrust seismicity leading to a Gutenberg-Richter frequency-magnitude distribution. This is a key observational feature of seismicity, which is typically not reproduced in seismic cycle models. The range of simulated b-values agrees with natural ranges, as we observe values from 0.97 up to 1.25 for convergence rates decreasing from 5 to 1 cm/yr. Decreasing convergence rates thus lead to relatively larger amounts of smaller earthquakes (increasing b-value) and lower maximum magnitudes. This change in b-value also observed to corresponds to

  10. Divergence and Convergence in Enzyme Evolution*

    PubMed Central

    Galperin, Michael Y.; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2012-01-01

    Comparative analysis of the sequences of enzymes encoded in a variety of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes reveals convergence and divergence at several levels. Functional convergence can be inferred when structurally distinct and hence non-homologous enzymes show the ability to catalyze the same biochemical reaction. In contrast, as a result of functional diversification, many structurally similar enzyme molecules act on substantially distinct substrates and catalyze diverse biochemical reactions. Here, we present updates on the ATP-grasp, alkaline phosphatase, cupin, HD hydrolase, and N-terminal nucleophile (Ntn) hydrolase enzyme superfamilies and discuss the patterns of sequence and structural conservation and diversity within these superfamilies. Typically, enzymes within a superfamily possess common sequence motifs and key active site residues, as well as (predicted) reaction mechanisms. These observations suggest that the strained conformation (the entatic state) of the active site, which is responsible for the substrate binding and formation of the transition complex, tends to be conserved within enzyme superfamilies. The subsequent fate of the transition complex is not necessarily conserved and depends on the details of the structures of the enzyme and the substrate. This variability of reaction outcomes limits the ability of sequence analysis to predict the exact enzymatic activities of newly sequenced gene products. Nevertheless, sequence-based (super)family assignments and generic functional predictions, even if imprecise, provide valuable leads for experimental studies and remain the best approach to the functional annotation of uncharacterized proteins from new genomes. PMID:22069324

  11. Improved convergence of electromechanical transducer element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattler, Robert; Wachutka, Gerhard

    2002-04-01

    Electrostatic attraction is a favored principle of actuation in MEMS (e.g. mirrors, relays, membrane devices). In this work we use an electrostatically actuated membrane as demonstrator. Physically based device models require the coupling of the electrostatic and the two domains. One way to reduce this expense consists in reduced order modeling by introducing a local approximation of the electric field using the Differential-Plate-Capacitor-Approximation (DPCA). This semi-analytical approximation can be directly (matrix coupled transducer element) or sequentially (load vector coupling) coupled with the mechanical solver. Both approaches yield results which agree well with those of coupled 3D-field solvers. It turns out that the transducer element converges much faster than the sequentially coupled relaxation scheme, as ong as the voltage is not close to the pull-in voltage. If this is the case then the transducer element has problems to find the equilibrium state at all. To avoid this difficulty we propose the use of a homotopy method to give the transducer element the same accuracy and robustness in the stable and the unstable regions of the operating area. The electrostatic charge and the electrostatic force turn out to be proper homotopy parameters for the given example.

  12. Seismicity of the Earth 1900-2010 eastern margin of the Australia plate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benz, Harley M.; Herman, Matthew; Tarr, Arthur C.; Hayes, Gavin P.; Furlong, Kevin P.; Villaseñor, Antonio; Dart, Richard L.; Rhea, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The eastern margin of the Australia plate is one of the most seismically active areas of the world due to high rates of convergence between the Australia and Pacific plates. In the region of New Zealand, the 3,000 km long Australia-Pacific plate boundary extends from south of Macquarie Island to the southern Kermadec Island chain. It includes an oceanic transform (the Macquarie Ridge), two oppositely verging subduction zones (Puysegur and Hikurangi), and a transpressive continental transform, the Alpine Fault through South Island, New Zealand. Since 1900, there have been 15 M7.5+ earthquakes recorded near New Zealand. Nine of these, and the four largest, occurred along or near the Macquarie Ridge, including the 1989 M8.2 event on the ridge itself, and the 2004 M8.1 event 200 km to the west of the plate boundary, reflecting intraplate deformation. The largest recorded earthquake in New Zealand itself was the 1931 M7.8 Hawke's Bay earthquake, which killed 256 people. The last M7.5+ earthquake along the Alpine Fault was 170 years ago; studies of the faults' strain accumulation suggest that similar events are likely to occur again.

  13. Earth's Decelerating Tectonic Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Forte, A M; Moucha, R; Rowley, D B; Quere, S; Mitrovica, J X; Simmons, N A; Grand, S P

    2008-08-22

    Space geodetic and oceanic magnetic anomaly constraints on tectonic plate motions are employed to determine a new global map of present-day rates of change of plate velocities. This map shows that Earth's largest plate, the Pacific, is presently decelerating along with several other plates in the Pacific and Indo-Atlantic hemispheres. These plate decelerations contribute to an overall, globally averaged slowdown in tectonic plate speeds. The map of plate decelerations provides new and unique constraints on the dynamics of time-dependent convection in Earth's mantle. We employ a recently developed convection model constrained by seismic, geodynamic and mineral physics data to show that time-dependent changes in mantle buoyancy forces can explain the deceleration of the major plates in the Pacific and Indo-Atlantic hemispheres.

  14. Signatures of downgoing plate-buoyancy driven subduction in Cenozoic plate motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goes, S.; Capitanio, F. A.; Morra, G.; Seton, M.; Giardini, D.

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of plate tectonics are strongly related to those of subduction. To obtain a better understanding of the driving forces of subduction, we compare relations between Cenozoic subduction motions at major trenches with the trends expected for the simplest form of subduction. i.e., free subduction, driven solely by the buoyancy of the downgoing plate. In models with an Earth-like plate stiffness (corresponding to a plate-mantle viscosity contrast of 2-3 orders of magnitude), free plates subduct by a combination of downgoing plate motion and trench retreat, while the slab is draped and folded on top of the upper-lower mantle viscosity transition. In these models, the slabs sink according to their Stokes' velocities. Observed downgoing-plate motion-plate-age trends are compatible with >80% of the Cenozoic slabs sinking according to their upper-mantle Stokes' velocity, i.e., subducting-plate motion is largely driven by upper-mantle slab pull. Only in a few cases, do young plates move at velocities that require a higher driving force (possibly supplied by lower-mantle-slab induced flow). About 80% of the Cenozoic trenches retreat, with retreat accounting for about 10% of the total convergence. The few advancing trench sections are likely affected by regional factors. The low trench motions are likely encouraged by low asthenospheric drag (equivalent to that for effective asthenospheric viscosity 2-3 orders below the upper-mantle average), and low lithospheric strength (effective bending viscosity ˜2 orders of magnitude above the upper-mantle average). Total Cenozoic trench motions are often very oblique to the direction of downgoing-plate motion (mean angle of 73°). This indicates that other forces than slab buoyancy exert the main control on upper-plate/trench motion. However, the component of trench retreat in the direction of downgoing plate motion (≈ slab pull) correlates with downgoing-plate motion, and this component of retreat generally does not

  15. Inverse methods-based estimation of plate coupling in a plate motion model governed by mantle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnaswamy, V.; Stadler, G.; Gurnis, M.

    2013-12-01

    Plate motion is primarily controlled by buoyancy (slab pull) which occurs at convergent plate margins where oceanic plates undergo deformation near the seismogenic zone. Yielding within subducting plates, lateral variations in viscosity, and the strength of seismic coupling between plate margins likely have an important control on plate motion. Here, we wish to infer the inter-plate coupling for different subduction zones, and develop a method for inferring it as a PDE-constrained optimization problem, where the cost functional is the misfit in plate velocities and is constrained by the nonlinear Stokes equation. The inverse models have well resolved slabs, plates, and plate margins in addition to a power law rheology with yielding in the upper mantle. Additionally, a Newton method is used to solve the nonlinear Stokes equation with viscosity bounds. We infer plate boundary strength using an inexact Gauss-Newton method with line search for backtracking. Each inverse model is applied to two simple 2-D scenarios (each with three subduction zones), one with back-arc spreading and one without. For each case we examine the sensitivity of the inversion to the amount of surface velocity used: 1) full surface velocity data and 2) surface velocity data simplified using a single scalar average (2-D equivalent to an Euler pole) for each plate. We can recover plate boundary strength in each case, even in the presence of highly nonlinear flow with extreme variations in viscosity. Additionally, we ascribe an uncertainty in each plate's velocity and perform an uncertainty quantification (UQ) through the Hessian of the misfit in plate velocities. We find that as plate boundaries become strongly coupled, the uncertainty in the inferred plate boundary strength decreases. For very weak, uncoupled subduction zones, the uncertainty of inferred plate margin strength increases since there is little sensitivity between plate margin strength and plate velocity. This result is significant

  16. Creating Concepts from Converging Features in Human Cortex.

    PubMed

    Coutanche, Marc N; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L

    2015-09-01

    To make sense of the world around us, our brain must remember the overlapping features of millions of objects. Crucially, it must also represent each object's unique feature-convergence. Some theories propose that an integration area (or "convergence zone") binds together separate features. We report an investigation of our knowledge of objects' features and identity, and the link between them. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to record neural activity, as humans attempted to detect a cued fruit or vegetable in visual noise. Crucially, we analyzed brain activity before a fruit or vegetable was present, allowing us to interrogate top-down activity. We found that pattern-classification algorithms could be used to decode the detection target's identity in the left anterior temporal lobe (ATL), its shape in lateral occipital cortex, and its color in right V4. A novel decoding-dependency analysis revealed that identity information in left ATL was specifically predicted by the temporal convergence of shape and color codes in early visual regions. People with stronger feature-and-identity dependencies had more similar top-down and bottom-up activity patterns. These results fulfill three key requirements for a neural convergence zone: a convergence result (object identity), ingredients (color and shape), and the link between them. PMID:24692512

  17. Rapid assessment of induced cytochrome P4501A protein and catalytic activity in fish hepatoma cells grown in multiwell plates: Response to TCDD, TCDF, and two planar PCBs

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.E.; Woodward, B.L.; Stegeman, J.J.; Kennedy, S.W.

    1996-04-01

    Induction of cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) in cultured cells can be used to determine taxon-specific relative potencies of Ah receptor agonists. This report describes optimized methods for growth and treatment of PLHC-1 fish hepatoma cells in multiwell plates, in situ analysis of ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity, and measurement of CYP1A protein by immunoblotting of cell lysates. EROD activity was undetectable (< 1 pmol min{sup {minus}1} mg{sup {minus}1}) in untreated or dimethyl sulfoxide-treated cells, but was highly induced (up to 150 pmol min{sup {minus}1} mg{sup {minus}1}) in cells exposed to Ah receptor agonists such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran (TCDF), or plant chlorobiphenyls (CB). Addition of exogenous NADPH was not required for measurement of EROD activity in PLHC-1 cells. As inducers of EROD activity, TCDD, TCDF, 3,3{prime},4,4{prime},5-pentachlorobiphenyl (CB-126), and 3,3{prime},4,4{prime}-tetrachlorobiphenyl (CB-77) differed both in potency and in apparent efficacy (maximal level of induced activity). In each case, EROD induction was biphasic, with stronger induction at lower concentrations and an attenuated response at higher concentrations. In contrast, the content of immunodetectable CYP1A protein increased monotonically with dose of CB, and the maximum level achieved was similar for all inducers. The discrepancy in results obtained for EROD activity versus CYP1A protein may result from inhibition or inactivation of catalytic function at high concentrations of inducer. By reducing peak EROD values, this inhibition leads to lower apparent EC50 values and thus the overestimation of relative potencies or toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) for many inducers. These studies demonstrate the necessity of measuring both EROD activity and immunodetectable CYP1A protein for the accurate assessment of CYP1A induction and relative potencies in cultured cells.

  18. Asymmetric vs. symmetric deep lithospheric architecture of intra-plate continental orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calignano, Elisa; Sokoutis, Dimitrios; Willingshofer, Ernst; Gueydan, Frédéric; Cloetingh, Sierd

    2015-08-01

    The initiation and subsequent evolution of intra-plate orogens, resulting from continental plate interior deformation due to transmission of stresses over large distances from the active plate boundaries, is controlled by lateral and vertical strength contrasts in the lithosphere. We present lithospheric-scale analogue models combining 1) lateral strength variations in the continental lithosphere, and 2) different vertical rheological stratifications. The experimental continental lithosphere has a four-layer brittle-ductile rheological stratification. Lateral heterogeneity is implemented in all models by increased crustal strength in a central narrow block. The main investigated parameters are strain rate and strength of the lithospheric mantle, both playing an important role in crust-mantle coupling. The experiments show that the presence of a strong crustal domain is effective in localizing deformation along its boundaries. After deformation is localized, the evolution of the orogenic system is governed by the mechanical properties of the lithosphere such that the final geometry of the intra-plate mountain depends on the interplay between crust-mantle coupling and folding versus fracturing of the lithospheric mantle. Underthrusting is the main deformation mode in case of high convergence velocity and/or thick brittle mantle with a final asymmetric architecture of the deep lithosphere. In contrast, lithospheric folding is dominant in case of low convergence velocity and low strength brittle mantle, leading to the development of a symmetric lithospheric root. The presented analogue modelling results provide novel insights for 1) strain localization and 2) the development of the asymmetric architecture of the Pyrenees.

  19. ASSEMBLY OF PARALLEL PLATES

    DOEpatents

    Groh, E.F.; Lennox, D.H.

    1963-04-23

    This invention is concerned with a rigid assembly of parallel plates in which keyways are stamped out along the edges of the plates and a self-retaining key is inserted into aligned keyways. Spacers having similar keyways are included between adjacent plates. The entire assembly is locked into a rigid structure by fastening only the outermost plates to the ends of the keys. (AEC)

  20. Plating Tank Control Software

    1998-03-01

    The Plating Tank Control Software is a graphical user interface that controls and records plating process conditions for plating in high aspect ratio channels that require use of low current and long times. The software is written for a Pentium II PC with an 8 channel data acquisition card, and the necessary shunt resistors for measuring currents in the millampere range.

  1. Rotatable shear plate interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Duffus, Richard C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotatable shear plate interferometer comprises a transparent shear plate mounted obliquely in a tubular supporting member at 45.degree. with respect to its horizontal center axis. This tubular supporting member is supported rotatably around its center axis and a collimated laser beam is made incident on the shear plate along this center axis such that defocus in different directions can be easily measured.

  2. Lasting mantle scars lead to perennial plate tectonics

    PubMed Central

    Heron, Philip J.; Pysklywec, Russell N.; Stephenson, Randell

    2016-01-01

    Mid-ocean ridges, transform faults, subduction and continental collisions form the conventional theory of plate tectonics to explain non-rigid behaviour at plate boundaries. However, the theory does not explain directly the processes involved in intraplate deformation and seismicity. Recently, damage structures in the lithosphere have been linked to the origin of plate tectonics. Despite seismological imaging suggesting that inherited mantle lithosphere heterogeneities are ubiquitous, their plate tectonic role is rarely considered. Here we show that deep lithospheric anomalies can dominate shallow geological features in activating tectonics in plate interiors. In numerical experiments, we found that structures frozen into the mantle lithosphere through plate tectonic processes can behave as quasi-plate boundaries reactivated under far-field compressional forcing. Intraplate locations where proto-lithospheric plates have been scarred by earlier suturing could be regions where latent plate boundaries remain, and where plate tectonics processes are expressed as a ‘perennial' phenomenon. PMID:27282541

  3. Lasting mantle scars lead to perennial plate tectonics.

    PubMed

    Heron, Philip J; Pysklywec, Russell N; Stephenson, Randell

    2016-01-01

    Mid-ocean ridges, transform faults, subduction and continental collisions form the conventional theory of plate tectonics to explain non-rigid behaviour at plate boundaries. However, the theory does not explain directly the processes involved in intraplate deformation and seismicity. Recently, damage structures in the lithosphere have been linked to the origin of plate tectonics. Despite seismological imaging suggesting that inherited mantle lithosphere heterogeneities are ubiquitous, their plate tectonic role is rarely considered. Here we show that deep lithospheric anomalies can dominate shallow geological features in activating tectonics in plate interiors. In numerical experiments, we found that structures frozen into the mantle lithosphere through plate tectonic processes can behave as quasi-plate boundaries reactivated under far-field compressional forcing. Intraplate locations where proto-lithospheric plates have been scarred by earlier suturing could be regions where latent plate boundaries remain, and where plate tectonics processes are expressed as a 'perennial' phenomenon. PMID:27282541

  4. Lasting mantle scars lead to perennial plate tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, Philip J.; Pysklywec, Russell N.; Stephenson, Randell

    2016-06-01

    Mid-ocean ridges, transform faults, subduction and continental collisions form the conventional theory of plate tectonics to explain non-rigid behaviour at plate boundaries. However, the theory does not explain directly the processes involved in intraplate deformation and seismicity. Recently, damage structures in the lithosphere have been linked to the origin of plate tectonics. Despite seismological imaging suggesting that inherited mantle lithosphere heterogeneities are ubiquitous, their plate tectonic role is rarely considered. Here we show that deep lithospheric anomalies can dominate shallow geological features in activating tectonics in plate interiors. In numerical experiments, we found that structures frozen into the mantle lithosphere through plate tectonic processes can behave as quasi-plate boundaries reactivated under far-field compressional forcing. Intraplate locations where proto-lithospheric plates have been scarred by earlier suturing could be regions where latent plate boundaries remain, and where plate tectonics processes are expressed as a `perennial' phenomenon.

  5. Recent movements of the Juan de Fuca Plate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-08-01

    Analysis of the magnetic anomalies of the Juan de Fuca plate system allows instantaneous poles of rotation relative to the Pacific plate to be calculated from 7 Ma to the present. By combining these with global solutions for Pacific America and ``absolute'' (relative to hot spot) motions, a plate motion sequence can be constructed. This sequence shows that both absolute motions and motions relative to America are characterized by slower velocities where younger and more buoyant material enters the convergence zone: ``pivoting subduction.'' The resistance provided by the youngest portion of the Juan de Fuca plate apparently resulted in its detachment at 4 Ma as the independent Explorer plate. In relation to the hot spot framework, this plate almost immediately began to rotate clockwise around a pole close to itself such that its translational movement into the mantle virtually ceased. After 4 Ma the remainder of the Juan de Fuca plate adjusted its motion in response to the fact that the youngest material entering the subduction zone was not to the south. Differences in seismicity and recent uplift between northern and southern Vancourver Island may reflect a distinction in tectonic style between the ``normal'' subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate to the south and a complex ``underplating occurring as the Explorer plate is overridden by the continent. The history of the Explorer plate may exemplify the conditins under which the self-driving forces of small subducting plates are overcome by the influence of larger, adjacent plates. The recent rapid migration of the absolute pole of rotation of the Juan de Fuca plate toward the plate suggests that it, too, may be nearing this condition.

  6. Recent movements of the Juan de Fuca Plate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddihough, Robin

    1984-08-01

    Analysis of the magnetic anomalies of the Juan de Fuca plate system allows instantaneous poles of rotation relative to the Pacific plate to be calculated from 7 Ma to the present. By combining these with global solutions for Pacific/America and "absolute" (relative to hot spot) motions, a plate motion sequence can be constructed. This sequence shows that both absolute motions and motions relative to America are characterized by slower velocities where younger and more buoyant material enters the convergence zone: "pivoting subduction." The resistance provided by the youngest portion of the Juan de Fuca plate apparently resulted in its detachment at 4 Ma as the independent Explorer plate. In relation to the hot spot framework, this plate almost immediately began to rotate clockwise around a pole close to itself such that its translational movement into the mantle virtually ceased. After 4 Ma the remainder of the Juan de Fuca plate adjusted its motion in response to the fact that the youngest material entering the subduction zone was now to the south. Differences in seismicity and recent uplift between northern and southern Vancouver Island may reflect a distinction in tectonic style between the "normal" subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate to the south and a complex "underplating" occurring as the Explorer plate is overridden by the continent. The history of the Explorer plate may exemplify the conditions under which the self-driving forces of small subducting plates are overcome by the influence of larger, adjacent plates. The recent rapid migration of the absolute pole of rotation of the Juan de Fuca plate toward the plate suggests that it, too, may be nearing this condition.

  7. Battery plate containing filler with conductive coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, John J. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    The plate (10) comprises a matrix or binder resin phase (12) in which is dispersed particulate, conductive tin oxide such as tin oxide coated glass fibers (14). A monopolar plate (11) is prepared by coating a layer (18) of electrolytically active material onto a surface of the plate (10). Tin oxide is prevented from reduction by coating a surface of the plate (10) with a conductive, impervious layer resistant to reduction such as a thin film (22) of lead adhered to the plate with a layer (21) of conductive adhesive. The plate (10) can be formed by casting a molten dispersion from mixer (36) onto a sheet (30) of lead foil or by passing an assembly of a sheet (41) of resin, a sheet (43) of fiberglass and a sheet (45) of lead between the nip of heated rollers (48, 50).

  8. Battery plate containing filler with conductive coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, John J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    The plate (10) comprises a matrix or binder resin phase (12) in which is dispersed particulate, conductive tin oxide such as tin oxide coated glass fibers (14). A monopolar plate (11) is prepared by coating a layer (18) of electrolytically active material onto a surface of the plate (10). Tin oxide is prevented from reduction by coating a surface of the plate (10) with a conductive, impervious layer resistant to reduction such as a thin film (22) of lead adhered to the plate with a layer (21) of conductive adhesive. The plate (10) can be formed by casting a molten dispersion from mixer (36) onto a sheet (30) of lead foil or by passing an assembly of a sheet (41) of resin, a sheet (43) of fiberglass and a sheet (45) of lead between the nip of heated rollers (48, 50).

  9. Membrane- and plate-type acoustic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tai-Yun; Shen, Chen; Jing, Yun

    2016-06-01

    Over the past decade there has been a great amount of research effort devoted to the topic of acoustic metamaterials (AMMs). The recent development of AMMs has enlightened the way of manipulating sound waves. Several potential applications such as low-frequency noise reduction, cloaking, angular filtering, subwavelength imaging, and energy tunneling have been proposed and implemented by the so-called membrane- or plate-type AMMs. This paper aims to offer a thorough overview on the recent development of membrane- or plate-type AMMs. The underlying mechanism of these types of AMMs for tuning the effective density will be examined first. Four different groups of membrane- or plate-type AMMs (membranes with masses attached, plates with masses attached, membranes or plates without masses attached, and active AMMs) will be reviewed. The opportunities, limitations, and challenges of membrane- or plate-type AMMs will be also discussed. PMID:27369148

  10. Rapidly Moving Divertor Plates In A Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    S. Zweben

    2011-05-16

    It may be possible to replace conventional actively cooled tokamak divertor plates with a set of rapidly moving, passively cooled divertor plates on rails. These plates would absorb the plasma heat flux with their thermal inertia for ~10-30 sec, and would then be removed from the vessel for processing. When outside the tokamak, these plates could be cooled, cleaned, recoated, inspected, and then returned to the vessel in an automated loop. This scheme could provide nearoptimal divertor surfaces at all times, and avoid the need to stop machine operation for repair of damaged or eroded plates. We describe various possible divertor plate designs and access geometries, and discuss an initial design for a movable and removable divertor module for NSTX-U.

  11. A Simple Class Exercise on Plate Tectonic Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Denis E. B.

    1990-01-01

    Presented is an activity in which students construct a model of plate divergence with two sheets of paper to show the separation of two continental plates in a system of spreading ridges and faults. Diagrams and procedures are described. (CW)

  12. An improved plating process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Askew, John C.

    1994-01-01

    An alternative to the immersion process for the electrodeposition of chromium from aqueous solutions on the inside diameter (ID) of long tubes is described. The Vessel Plating Process eliminates the need for deep processing tanks, large volumes of solutions, and associated safety and environmental concerns. Vessel Plating allows the process to be monitored and controlled by computer thus increasing reliability, flexibility and quality. Elimination of the trivalent chromium accumulation normally associated with ID plating is intrinsic to the Vessel Plating Process. The construction and operation of a prototype Vessel Plating Facility with emphasis on materials of construction, engineered and operational safety and a unique system for rinse water recovery are described.

  13. Plates for vacuum thermal fusion

    DOEpatents

    Davidson, James C.; Balch, Joseph W.

    2002-01-01

    A process for effectively bonding arbitrary size or shape substrates. The process incorporates vacuum pull down techniques to ensure uniform surface contact during the bonding process. The essence of the process for bonding substrates, such as glass, plastic, or alloys, etc., which have a moderate melting point with a gradual softening point curve, involves the application of an active vacuum source to evacuate interstices between the substrates while at the same time providing a positive force to hold the parts to be bonded in contact. This enables increasing the temperature of the bonding process to ensure that the softening point has been reached and small void areas are filled and come in contact with the opposing substrate. The process is most effective where at least one of the two plates or substrates contain channels or grooves that can be used to apply vacuum between the plates or substrates during the thermal bonding cycle. Also, it is beneficial to provide a vacuum groove or channel near the perimeter of the plates or substrates to ensure bonding of the perimeter of the plates or substrates and reduce the unbonded regions inside the interior region of the plates or substrates.

  14. Converging shocks for DSD modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matignon, Christophe

    2013-06-01

    Modelling of pyrotechnic systems requires both, a good understanding and precise prediction capabilities of the dynamics of detonation. When using insensitive high explosives IHE (such as TATB-based explosives) the interaction of the detonation front with the confinement can lead to very different detonation velocities. One of the most popular engineering tools used to model this behaviour is the Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD). In the DSD assumption, the detonation front propagates at a normal shock velocity (Dn) which depends only on its local curvature (κ). For divergent detonations, the DSD limit is very well established both experimentally and theoretically and one can easily propose a model (which obeys the 1D quasi-steady weakly curved detonation theory) to reproduce this behavior. We propose to extend the DSD theory to slightly convergent detonation fronts and to validate it against experimental data. Two series of experiments were carried out. The first series was designed to collect precise information regarding converging detonation. Usually, in such configurations, the detonation is non steady, making precise and simultaneous measurements of velocity and curvature difficult to achieve. The originality of the proposed setup is to drive a self similar convergent detonation at constant speed in an IHE rod by an external explosive tube of greater detonation velocity (allowing an accurate recording of both velocity and curvature). A wide range EOS/reaction rate model (inspired from previous works of Wescott et al.) was then calibrated to reproduce both the strong shock initiation and the newly extended (Dn- κ) law. This model can be used to perform either direct numerical simulation (DNS) on fine resolved mesh grid, or its reduced PZR model (DSD based) on a much coarser grid. This model was then successfully validated against the second series of experiments involving a detonation propagating around an obstacle and exhibiting a non steady converging front

  15. Exploring the Image Types of Secondary School Students' Perception about the Talented Person in Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jun-Ki; Chung, Duk Ho

    2014-05-01

    This study aims to identify the image types of secondary school students' perception about the talented person in convergence and to find the differences in drawing images of the talented person in convergence among the students who have taken STEAM class and the ones who haven't. One hundred and eighty seven students in middle and high schools located in the southern part of South Korea participated in this study and they were asked to draw a picture of the talented person in convergence with a brief explanation. Based on students' pictures, researchers categorized their perception about convergence and talented person in convergence by using an inductive method. The result indicated that secondary school students' perceptions were categorized into convergence as individual cognitive processing and collective cognitive processing and convergence as outcomes. The image of the convergence in a talented person leaning toward individual cognitive processing was divided into the following seven types: idea banker type, various talented celebrity type, multi-tasking master type, multi-talented career type, active problem-solver type, creative developer type, and unrealistic ideal man type. Another image of collective cognitive processing was split into expert group type and interactive-mates group type. The other image was transformer type which is the subcategory of convergence as outcomes. From this study, it can be suggested that secondary school students express the various images of the talented person in convergence depending on experiencing STEAM or not. Keywords: talented person in convergence, secondary school students, STEAM, image types

  16. Paper microzone plates.

    PubMed

    Carrilho, Emanuel; Phillips, Scott T; Vella, Sarah J; Martinez, Andres W; Whitesides, George M

    2009-08-01

    This paper describes 96- and 384-microzone plates fabricated in paper as alternatives to conventional multiwell plates fabricated in molded polymers. Paper-based plates are functionally related to plastic well plates, but they offer new capabilities. For example, paper-microzone plates are thin (approximately 180 microm), require small volumes of sample (5 microL per zone), and can be manufactured from inexpensive materials ($0.05 per plate). The paper-based plates are fabricated by patterning sheets of paper, using photolithography, into hydrophilic zones surrounded by hydrophobic polymeric barriers. This photolithography used an inexpensive formulation photoresist that allows rapid (approximately 15 min) prototyping of paper-based plates. These plates are compatible with conventional microplate readers for quantitative absorbance and fluorescence measurements. The limit of detection per zone loaded for fluorescence was 125 fmol for fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled bovine serum albumin, and this level corresponds to 0.02 the quantity of analyte per well used to achieve comparable signal-to-noise in a 96-well plastic plate (using a solution of 25 nM labeled protein). The limits of detection for absorbance on paper was approximately 50 pmol per zone for both Coomassie Brilliant Blue and Amaranth dyes; these values were 0.4 that required for the plastic plate. Demonstration of quantitative colorimetric correlations using a scanner or camera to image the zones and to measure the intensity of color, makes it possible to conduct assays without a microplate reader. PMID:19572563

  17. Multicolor printing plate joining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, W. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An upper plate having ink flow channels and a lower plate having a multicolored pattern are joined. The joining is accomplished without clogging any ink flow paths. A pattern having different colored parts and apertures is formed in a lower plate. Ink flow channels each having respective ink input ports are formed in an upper plate. The ink flow channels are coated with solder mask and the bottom of the upper plate is then coated with solder. The upper and lower plates are pressed together at from 2 to 5 psi and heated to a temperature of from 295 F to 750 F or enough to melt the solder. After the plates have cooled and the pressure is released, the solder mask is removed from the interior passageways by means of a liquid solvent.

  18. Plio-Quaternary canyons evolution on South Colombian convergent margin : Tectonic causes and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratzov, Gueorgui; Sosson, Marc; Collot, Jean-Yves; Migeon, Sebastien

    2010-05-01

    Investigations of seafloor morphology and sediment deposits associated with the incision of the South Colombia active margin by a major submarine canyon system are used to reveal out-of-sequence fault activity at least since the Middle Pleistocene. The South Colombian convergent margin is located along Northwestern South America, where the Nazca plate underthrusts eastward the South America plate with a 58 mm.yr-1 convergence rate. The morphology and deep multichannel seismic reflection lines obtained across the margin reflect a frontal accretionnary wedge, as well as antiform and faulted internal structural highs that locally extend up to near the continental shelf, suggesting wide-spread Plio-Quaternary tectonic activity. The Amadeus cruise conduced in 2005 brought new seismic and sedimentary data together with 150m and 60m-resolution EM12D multibeam bathymetry. The newly mapped Mira and Patia canyons system incises the South Colombian margin slope over a distance of ~90 and ~150 km respectively, forming an unequivocal Z-shape in map view, breaching the deformation front and feeding a 30-km wide trench fan system. The morphology of the canyon exhibits meanders, steep over-incised walls (~25-30 degrees), alternation between concave-up and convex-up downstream profiles, slope failures scars, and buried channels. These features reflect interactions between tectonics, sedimentation and the canyon evolution. A synthesis of all the data reveals that: A) Uplifting structural highs control canyons path and incision stages. B) Canyons developed asynchronously across the upper, mid and lower margin slopes according to three main stages: a) upper slope incision by downward cutting during Pleistocene, and possibly by retrogressive headward erosion, b) infill of a mid-slope basin bounded by uplifting structural highs, and c) overspill of the slope basin, and breaching its seaward bounding ridge, and the accretionary prism ~150 kyr ago. These processes led to the construction

  19. "Nanoselves": NBIC and the Culture of Convergence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venkatesan, Priya

    2010-01-01

    The subject of this essay is NBIC convergence (nanotechnology, biotechnology, information technology and cognitive science convergence). NBIC convergence is a recurring trope that is dominated by the paradigm of integration of the sciences. It is largely influenced by the considerations of social and economic impact, and it assumes positivism in…

  20. Convergence analysis of combinations of different methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y.

    1994-12-31

    This paper provides a convergence analysis for combinations of different numerical methods for solving systems of differential equations. The author proves that combinations of two convergent linear multistep methods or Runge-Kutta methods produce a new convergent method of which the order is equal to the smaller order of the two original methods.

  1. Lithospheric-scale effects of a subduction-driven Alboran plate: improved neotectonic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neres, Marta; Carafa, Michele; Terrinha, Pedro; Fernandes, Rui; Matias, Luis; Duarte, João; Barba, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    The presence of a subducted slab under the Gibraltar arc is now widely accepted. However, discussion still remains on whether subduction is active and what is its influence in the lithospheric processes, in particular in the observed geodesy, deformation rates and seismicity. Aiming at bringing new insights into the discussion, we have performed a neotectonic numerical study of a segment of the Africa-Eurasia plate boundary, from the Gloria fault to the Northern Algerian margin. Specifically, we have tested the effect of including or excluding an independently driven Alboran plate, i.e. testing active subduction versus inactive subduction (2plates versus 3plates scenarios). We used the dynamic code SHELLS (Bird et al., 2008) to model the surface velocity field and the ongoing deformation, using a new up-to-date simplified tectonic map of the region, new available lithospheric data and boundary conditions determined from two alternative Africa-Eurasia angular velocities, respectively: SEGAL2013, a new pole based on stable Africa and stable Eurasia gps data (last decades); and MORVEL, a geological-scale pole (3.16 Ma). We also extensively studied the variation within the parametric space of fault friction coefficient, subduction resistance and surface velocities imposed to the Alboran plate. The final run comprised a total of 5240 experiments, and each generated model was scored against geodetic velocities, stress direction data and seismic strain rates. The preferred model corresponds to the 3plates scenario, SEGAL2013 pole and fault friction of 0.225, with scoring results: gps misfit of 0.78 mm/yr; SHmax misfit of 13.6° and correlation with seismic strain rate of 0.62, significantly better than previous models. We present predicted fault slip rates for the recognized active structures and off-faults permanent strain rates, which can be used for seismic and tsunami hazard calculations (the initial motivation for this work was contributing for calculation of

  2. A microELISA assay for detection of anti-HLA activity of mouse monoclonal antibodies using an Astroscan 2100 automated plate reader.

    PubMed

    Sadler, A M; Krausa, P; Marsh, S G; Heyes, J M; Bodmer, J G

    1992-04-27

    A microenzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (microELISA) method has been developed using an Astroscan 2100 system automated plate reader which was initially designed for tissue typing by a two colour fluorescent microcytotoxicity assay. A 96-well plate ELISA used for screening mouse monoclonal antibodies raised against surface HLA antigens has been modified for use with the Astroscan plate reader and 72-well typing trays. The existing substrate 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-galactoside (4MUG) has been replaced with fluorescein-di-beta-D-galactopyranoside (FDG), to provide a wavelength (530 nm) detectable by the Astroscan or other automated plate readers designed for reading microcytotoxicity assay plates. The assay volumes have also been reduced tenfold for use with Terasaki microtest plates. The assay now has the major advantage of requiring only 5 microliters of test supernatant allowing hybridomas to be screened earlier during a fusion and on a wider cell panel. The use of the large panel which includes B lymphoblastoid cell lines (B-LCL) and mouse L cell transfectants expressing HLA genes, reduces the length of time the hybridomas need to be kept in tissue culture before selection. Other advantages include the reduction in the number of target cells required, smaller volumes of reagents throughout the assay and the ability to screen cytotoxic as well as non-cytotoxic monoclonal antibodies. The sensitivity of this microELISA proved to be comparable with the original assay and so provides an efficient screening method for monoclonal antibodies. PMID:1583310

  3. Solitary Play and Convergent and Divergent Thinking Skills in Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Bronwen; Howe, Nina

    2003-01-01

    Examined the relationship between multiple forms of solitary play (solitary-active, solitary-passive, reticence) and convergent and divergent thinking in preschool children. Found that reticent behavior was more strongly negatively associated with convergent and divergent thinking than either solitary-active or solitary-passive play, whereas…

  4. Converging Intracranial Markers of Conscious Access

    PubMed Central

    Gaillard, Raphaël; Dehaene, Stanislas; Adam, Claude; Clémenceau, Stéphane; Hasboun, Dominique; Baulac, Michel; Cohen, Laurent; Naccache, Lionel

    2009-01-01

    We compared conscious and nonconscious processing of briefly flashed words using a visual masking procedure while recording intracranial electroencephalogram (iEEG) in ten patients. Nonconscious processing of masked words was observed in multiple cortical areas, mostly within an early time window (<300 ms), accompanied by induced gamma-band activity, but without coherent long-distance neural activity, suggesting a quickly dissipating feedforward wave. In contrast, conscious processing of unmasked words was characterized by the convergence of four distinct neurophysiological markers: sustained voltage changes, particularly in prefrontal cortex, large increases in spectral power in the gamma band, increases in long-distance phase synchrony in the beta range, and increases in long-range Granger causality. We argue that all of those measures provide distinct windows into the same distributed state of conscious processing. These results have a direct impact on current theoretical discussions concerning the neural correlates of conscious access. PMID:19296722

  5. International Convergence on Geoscience Cyberinfrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, M. L.; Atkinson, R.; Arctur, D. K.; Cox, S.; Jackson, I.; Nativi, S.; Wyborn, L. A.

    2012-04-01

    There is growing international consensus on addressing the challenges to cyber(e)-infrastructure for the geosciences. These challenges include: Creating common standards and protocols; Engaging the vast number of distributed data resources; Establishing practices for recognition of and respect for intellectual property; Developing simple data and resource discovery and access systems; Building mechanisms to encourage development of web service tools and workflows for data analysis; Brokering the diverse disciplinary service buses; Creating sustainable business models for maintenance and evolution of information resources; Integrating the data management life-cycle into the practice of science. Efforts around the world are converging towards de facto creation of an integrated global digital data network for the geosciences based on common standards and protocols for data discovery and access, and a shared vision of distributed, web-based, open source interoperable data access and integration. Commonalities include use of Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) and ISO specifications and standardized data interchange mechanisms. For multidisciplinarity, mediation, adaptation, and profiling services have been successfully introduced to leverage the geosciences standards which are commonly used by the different geoscience communities -introducing a brokering approach which extends the basic SOA archetype. Principal challenges are less technical than cultural, social, and organizational. Before we can make data interoperable, we must make people interoperable. These challenges are being met by increased coordination of development activities (technical, organizational, social) among leaders and practitioners in national and international efforts across the geosciences to foster commonalities across disparate networks. In doing so, we will 1) leverage and share resources, and developments, 2) facilitate and enhance emerging technical and structural advances, 3) promote

  6. Modeling Activities in Earth Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, Kathy

    2014-05-01

    Students usually find science to be quite abstract. This is especially true of disciplines like Earth Science where it is difficult for the students to conduct and design hands-on experiments in areas such as Plate Tectonics that would allow them to develop predictive models. In the United States the new Next Generation Science Standards explicitly requires students to experience the science disciplines via modeling based activities. This poster presentation will discuss an activity that demonstrates how modeling, plate tectonics and student discourse converge in the earth science classroom. The activities featured on the poster will include using cardboard and shaving cream to demonstrate convergent plate boundaries, a Milky Way candy bar to demonstrate divergent boundaries and silly putty to demonstrate a strike slip boundary. I will discuss how students report back to the group about the findings from the lab and the techniques that can be used to heighten the student discourse. The activities outlined in this poster were originally designed for a middle school Earth Science class by Suzi Shoemaker for a graduate thesis at Arizona State University.

  7. Activation of intracellular calcium by multiple Wnt ligands and translocation of β-catenin into the nucleus: a convergent model of Wnt/Ca2+ and Wnt/β-catenin pathways.

    PubMed

    Thrasivoulou, Christopher; Millar, Michael; Ahmed, Aamir

    2013-12-13

    Ca(2+) and β-catenin, a 92-kDa negatively charged transcription factor, transduce Wnt signaling via the non-canonical, Wnt/Ca(2+) and canonical, Wnt/β-catenin pathways independently. The nuclear envelope is a barrier to large protein entry, and this process is regulated by intracellular calcium [Ca(2+)]i and trans-nuclear potential. How β-catenin traverses the nuclear envelope is not well known. We hypothesized that Wnt/Ca(2+) and Wnt/β-catenin pathways act in a coordinated manner and that [Ca(2+)]i release facilitates β-catenin entry into the nucleus in mammalian cells. In a live assay using calcium dyes in PC3 prostate cancer cells, six Wnt peptides (3A, 4, 5A, 7A, 9B, and 10B) mobilized [Ca(2+)]i but Wnt11 did not. Based upon dwell time (range = 15-30 s) of the calcium waveform, these Wnts could be classified into three classes: short, 3A and 5A; long, 7A and 10B; and very long, 4 and 9B. Wnt-activated [Ca(2+)]i release was followed by an increase in intranuclear calcium and the depolarization of both the cell and nuclear membranes, determined by using FM4-64. In cells treated with Wnts 5A, 9B, and 10B, paradigm substrates for each Wnt class, increased [Ca(2+)]i was followed by β-catenin translocation into the nucleus in PC3, MCF7, and 253J, prostate, breast, and bladder cancer cell lines; both the increase in Wnt 5A, 9B, and 10B induced [Ca(2+)]i release and β-catenin translocation are suppressed by thapsigargin in PC3 cell line. We propose a convergent model of Wnt signaling network where Ca(2+) and β-catenin pathways may act in a coordinated, interdependent, rather than independent, manner. PMID:24158438

  8. Optimizing material properties of composite plates for sound transmission problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yu-Ting; Pawar, S. J.; Huang, Jin H.

    2015-01-01

    To calculate the specific transmission loss (TL) of a composite plate, the conjugate gradient optimization method is utilized to estimate and optimize material properties of the composite plate in this study. For an n-layer composite plate, a nonlinear dynamic stiffness matrix based on the thick plate theory is formulated. To avoid huge computational efforts due to the combination of different composite material plates, a transfer matrix approach is proposed to restrict the dynamic stiffness matrix of the composite plate to a 4×4 matrix. Moreover, the transfer matrix approach has also been used to simplify the complexity of the objective function gradient for the optimization method. Numerical simulations are performed to validate the present algorithm by comparing the TL of the optimal composite plate with that of the original plate. Small number of iterations required during convergence tests illustrates the efficiency of the optimization method. The results indicate that an excellent estimation for the composite plate can be obtained for the desired sound transmission.

  9. Mesozoic Plate Tectonic Evolution of the Northern Margin of Pangea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, E. L.

    2011-12-01

    Asia joined Laurentia and Baltica during the formation of the Urals in the Early Permian. Subsequently, the northern margin of Pangea shared a paleo-Pacific facing margin. Analysis of events along this (mostly active) margin provides insight into the plate tectonic setting and evolution of the Arctic basins and their temporal links to Pacific margin events. A 3-phase tectonic evolution characterizes the northern margin of Pangea during the Mesozoic: 1. Permo-Triassic rifting (Siberian Trap magmatism)was linked to rifting in a series of back-arc basins developed along the northern margin of Pangea. Triassic-Jurasic deep-water sedimentary seqences deposited in these basins were subsequently deformed during phase 2 events. 2. Lithospheric shortening/convergence across this margin deformed these basinal sediments and shed syn-orogenic deposits cratonward in the Jura-Cretaceous. Syn-orogenic basinal successions are widespread from the Verkoyansk margin of Siberia to the Brooks Range fold and thrust belt. Their sources are well-characterized by U-Pb ages of detrital zircon suites and include Pennsylvanian-Permian, Triassic and Jurassic magmatic belts, implying convergence and emplacement of a long-lived arc system onto the continental margin. 3. Structures related to phase 2 are cut and overprinted by voluminous, syn-extensional, slab-related magmatism that developed during southward or Pacific-ward migration of a N-dipping subducting slab. It is inferred that the earliest part of the Amerasia Basin likely opened during part of this magmatic event, 135 to 90 Ma. The final culmination of this magmatic event is the Ohotsk-Chukotsk volcanic belt, ~90-75 Ma;after this, magmatism continues to migrate Pacific-ward in a series of steps. Utilizing plate models of the Arctic by Lawver et al.(2002) it can be shown that some of the differences in the timing and style of Mesozoic orogenesis along the northern paleo-Pacific margin of Pangea (and especially the differences between the

  10. Weak {}^* convergence of operator means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanov, Alexandr V.

    2011-12-01

    For a linear operator U with \\Vert U^n\\Vert \\le \\operatorname{const} on a Banach space X we discuss conditions for the convergence of ergodic operator nets T_\\alpha corresponding to the adjoint operator U^* of U in the {W^*O}-topology of the space \\operatorname{End} X^*. The accumulation points of all possible nets of this kind form a compact convex set L in \\operatorname{End} X^*, which is the kernel of the operator semigroup G=\\overline{\\operatorname{co}}\\,\\Gamma_0, where \\Gamma_0=\\{U_n^*, n \\ge 0\\}. It is proved that all ergodic nets T_\\alpha weakly {}^* converge if and only if the kernel L consists of a single element. In the case of X=C(\\Omega) and the shift operator U generated by a continuous transformation \\varphi of a metrizable compactum \\Omega we trace the relationships among the ergodic properties of U, the structure of the operator semigroups L, G and \\Gamma=\\overline{\\Gamma}_0, and the dynamical characteristics of the semi-cascade (\\varphi,\\Omega). In particular, if \\operatorname{card}L=1, then a) for any \\omega \\in\\Omega the closure of the trajectory \\{\\varphi^n\\omega, n \\ge 0\\} contains precisely one minimal set m, and b) the restriction (\\varphi,m) is strictly ergodic. Condition a) implies the {W^*O}-convergence of any ergodic sequence of operators T_n \\in \\operatorname{End} X^* under the additional assumption that the kernel of the enveloping semigroup E(\\varphi,\\Omega) contains elements obtained from the `basis' family of transformations \\{\\varphi^n, n \\ge 0\\} of the compact set \\Omega by using some transfinite sequence of sequential passages to the limit.

  11. Ecomorphological convergence in planktivorous surgeonfishes.

    PubMed

    Friedman, S T; Price, S A; Hoey, A S; Wainwright, P C

    2016-05-01

    Morphological convergence plays a central role in the study of evolution. Often induced by shared ecological specialization, homoplasy hints at underlying selective pressures and adaptive constraints that deterministically shape the diversification of life. Although midwater zooplanktivory has arisen in adult surgeonfishes (family Acanthuridae) at least four independent times, it represents a clearly specialized state, requiring the capacity to swiftly swim in midwater locating and sucking small prey items. Whereas this diet has commonly been associated with specific functional adaptations in fishes, acanthurids present an interesting case study as all nonplanktivorous species feed by grazing on benthic algae and detritus, requiring a vastly different functional morphology that emphasizes biting behaviours. We examined the feeding morphology in 30 acanthurid species and, combined with a pre-existing phylogenetic tree, compared the fit of evolutionary models across two diet regimes: zooplanktivores and nonzooplanktivorous grazers. Accounting for phylogenetic relationships, the best-fitting model indicates that zooplanktivorous species are converging on a separate adaptive peak from their grazing relatives. Driving this bimodal landscape, zooplanktivorous acanthurids tend to develop a slender body, reduced facial features, smaller teeth and weakened jaw adductor muscles. However, despite these phenotypic changes, model fitting suggests that lineages have not yet reached the adaptive peak associated with plankton feeding even though some transitions appear to be over 10 million years old. These findings demonstrate that the selective demands of pelagic feeding promote repeated - albeit very gradual - ecomorphological convergence within surgeonfishes, while allowing local divergences between closely related species, contributing to the overall diversity of the clade. PMID:26809907

  12. Constraining Late Cretaceous to mid Eocene plate boundaries in the southwest Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, K. J.; Williams, S.; Whittaker, J. M.; Müller, D.; Clarke, G. L.; Seton, M.; Flament, N. E.

    2013-12-01

    The southwest Pacific has undergone a complex tectonic history since the Late Cretaceous, involving multiple episodes of subduction, back-arc spreading and continental deformation. Starkly contrasting reconstructions have been proposed for this period, ranging from tectonic quiescence with no plate boundary between the Lord Howe Rise (LHR) and Pacific, to widespread subduction and back-arc spreading, and this disparity reflects sparse and ambiguous data. Placing further constraints on these reconstructions is crucial for a variety of applications, from global-scale geodynamic studies using plate circuits to basin-scale studies of paleogeographic evolution and vertical motions. Geologic and kinematic data from the southwest Pacific are reviewed to better constrain the tectonic history of the region from the Late Cretaceous to mid Eocene, including the timing and location of plate boundary activity. This facilitates better constraints on the time-dependent evolution of the southwest Pacific plate circuit so that motion between plate pairs is consistent with geologic data and known tectonic regimes. The southwest Pacific comprised three spreading ridges during this time: in the Southeast Indian Ocean, Tasman Sea and Amundsen Sea. However, at least one, and possibly two other plate boundaries also accommodated relative motions: in the West Antarctic Rift System (WARS) and between the LHR and Pacific. Uncertainties in the timing and nature of plate boundaries prevent the construction of a robust reconstruction model and the implementation of a southwest Pacific plate circuit. Some previous plate models include continuous subduction east of the LHR throughout the Late Cretaceous-Cenozoic, while an alternative scenario involves the absence of plate boundaries between the LHR and Pacific until 45 Ma. Geologic observations suggests that subduction initiated to the east of New Caledonia at c. 55 Ma, including dyke emplacement and metamorphism in New Caledonia, and arc

  13. Fabrication of tunable plasmonic substrates using a table-top gold coater and a hot plate, their optical characterization, and surface enhanced Raman activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, A.; Krishnan, A.

    2015-10-01

    We present a simple scalable technique for repeatable fabrication of large area (cm2) electromagnetic hot spots using tunable Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR) substrates and their k-space microscopic imaging characterization. The substrates were fabricated simply using a low vacuum air plasma scanning electron microscope gold coater and annealing using a hot plate. The measured permittivity profile and optical transmission characteristics of such substrates showed large changes before and after annealing, with clear changes in the occurrence and position of the LSPR in the visible spectrum. Furthermore, the LSPR wavelength of these substrates was tuned from 537 nm to 630 nm using cyclic deposition and annealing. It was observed that every anneal step could be used to blue shift the resonance, while a deposition step could be used to red shift the resonance, thus giving rise to a wide tunability. We also present the k-space images of the substrates using narrowband fluorescence leakage radiation microscopy and broadband polarization microscopy. The enhanced scattering in these substrates was clearly imaged in the k-space, and the color content in the broadband k-space images correlates well with the spectral characteristics of these substrates that can be used in commercial quality testing without a spectrometer. The optical characteristics of the substrates were attributed to the morphology evolution verified using scanning probe microscopy. A single particle model based simulation was used to evaluate the optical response. The substrates were then tested for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) activity using control experiments involving Rhodamine 6G dye in PMMA matrix of different concentrations with analyte volumes of approximately 200 pl and analytical enhancements of >3 ×104 (net enhancement >1.8 ×107 ) were obtained. The limit of detection was ≈ 10-8 M in low volume (≈200 pl) analyte, reaching the regime of few molecule detection. To

  14. Hypervelocity plate acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.P.; Tan, T.H.

    1991-01-01

    Shock tubes have been used to accelerate 1.5-mm-thick stainless steel plates to high velocity while retaining their integrity. The fast shock tubes are 5.1-cm-diameter, 15.2-cm-long cylinders of PBX-9501 explosive containing a 1.1-cm-diameter cylindrical core of low-density polystyrene foam. The plates have been placed directly in contact with one face of the explosive system. Plane-wave detonation was initiated on the opposite face. A Mach disk was formed in the imploding styrofoam core, which provided the impulse required to accelerate the metal plate to high velocity. Parametric studies were made on this system to find the effect of varying plate metal, plate thickness, foam properties, and addition of a barrel. A maximum plate velocity of 9.0 km/s has been observed. 6 refs., 17 figs.

  15. WFPDB: European Plate Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, Milcho

    2007-08-01

    The Wide-Field Plate Database (WFPDB) gives an inventory of all wide-field (>~ 1 sq. deg) photographic observations archived in astronomical institutions over the world. So it facilitates and stimulates their use and preservation as a valuable source of information for future investigations in astronomy. At present WFPDB manages plate-index information for 25% of all existing plates providing on-line access from Sofia (http://www.skyarchive.org/search) and in CDS, Strasbourg. Here we present the new development of WFPDB as an instrument for searching of long term brightness variations of different sky objects stressing on the European photographic plate collections (from existing 2 million wide-field plates more than 55% are in Europe: Germany, Russia, Ukraine, Italy, Czech Republic, etc.). We comment examples of digitization (with flatbed scanners) of the European plate archives in Sonneberg, Pulkovo, Asiago, Byurakan, Bamberg, etc. and virtual links of WFPDB with European AVO, ADS, IBVS.

  16. Nonlinear vibrations of viscoelastic rectangular plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amabili, Marco

    2016-02-01

    Nonlinear vibrations of viscoelastic thin rectangular plates subjected to normal harmonic excitation in the spectral neighborhood of the lowest resonances are investigated. The von Kármán nonlinear strain-displacement relationships are used and geometric imperfections are taken into account. The material is modeled as a Kelvin-Voigt viscoelastic solid by retaining all the nonlinear terms. The discretized nonlinear equations of motion are studied by using the arclength continuation and collocation method. Numerical results are obtained for the fundamental mode of a simply supported square plate with immovable edges by using models with 16 and 22 degrees of freedom and investigating solution convergence. Comparison to viscous damping and the effect of neglecting nonlinear viscoelastic damping terms are shown. The change of the frequency-response with the retardation time parameter is also investigated as well as the effect of geometric imperfections.

  17. A New Spin: CDs as Printing Plates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Harriet

    2000-01-01

    Describes a printmaking activity for use in tenth- to twelfth-grade art classes. Students use compact discs as printing plates, on which they depict a musical theme with drypoint etching. Discusses the process in detail. (CMK)

  18. Virtual Research Expeditions along Plate Margins: Examples from an Online Oceanography Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, D. L.; Moore, G. F.; Bangs, N. L.; Tobin, H. J.

    2010-12-01

    An undergraduate online course in oceanography is based on the participation of each student in a series of virtual, at-sea, research expeditions, two of which are used to examine the tectonic processes at plate boundaries. The objective is to leverage the results of major federal research initiatives in the ocean sciences into effective learning tools with a long lifespan for use in undergraduate geoscience courses. These web-based expeditions examine: (1) hydrothermal vents along the divergent plate boundary at the Explorer Ridge and (2) the convergent plate boundary fault along the Nankai Trough, which is the objective of the multi-year NanTroSEIZE drilling program. Here we focus on the convergent plate boundary in NanTroSEIZE 3-D, which is based on a seismic survey supported through NSF-MARGINS, IODP and CDEX in Japan to study the properties of the plate boundary fault system in the upper limit of the seismogenic zone off Japan. The virtual voyage can be used in undergraduate classes at anytime, since it is not directly tied to the finite duration of a specific seagoing project, and comes in two versions, one that is being used in geoscience major courses and the other in non-major courses, such as the oceanography course mentioned above and a lower-division global studies course with a science emphasis. NanTroSEIZE in 3-D places undergraduate learning in an experiential framework as students participate on the expedition and carry out research on the structure of the plate boundary fault. Students learn the scientific background of the program, especially the critical role of international collaboration, and meet the chief scientists before joining the 3-D seismic imaging expedition to identify the active faults that were the likely sources of devastating earthquakes and tsunamis in Japan in 1944 and 1948. The initial results of phase I ODP drilling that began in 2007 are also reviewed. Students document their research on a worksheet that accompanies the

  19. Coupling, fluids and foreshocks - preparing megathrust ruptures at the Chilean plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oncken, O.; Moreno, M.; Schurr, B.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have suggested that geodetic locking at convergent plate boundaries is closely related to slip distribution of subsequent megathrust earthquakes. The nature of locking and its evolution towards rupture, however, remains a matter of debate. The international initiative IPOC (Integrated Plate Boundary Observatory Chile; ipoc-network.org) addresses these goals at the Chilean margin. We explore geophysical and geodetic data collected in the decade before an event to identify the petrophysical state as well as change along the plate interface leading up to a megathrust event. Seismological data exhibit well defined changes of reflectivity and Vp/Vs ratio along the plate interface that released the M=8.8Maule earthquake of 2010. High Vp/Vs domains, interpreted as zones of elevated pore fluid pressure, spatially correlate with lower locking degree, and exhibit higher background seismicity as expected for partly creeping domains. In turn, unstable slip associated to a higher degree of locking is promoted in lower pore fluid pressure domains. We speculate that hydraulic loading during the terminal stage of a seismic cycle to close to lithostatic pore pressure with an equivalent reduction of effective strength may be as relevant for earthquake triggering as stress loading from long-term plate convergence. In contrast to the Maule earthquake, the Pisagua Mw=8.1 earthquake of 2014, while also rupturing a geodetically well-defined major asperity, was preceded by a protracted series of foreshocks. Since July 2013 three seismic clusters hit this part of the plate boundary with increasing magnitudes in a domain that was transitional between a fully locked and a creeping portion. Leading up to this earthquake the b-value of the foreshocks gradually dropped during the years prior to the earthquake, reversing its trend a few days before the Pisagua earthquake. We conclude that gradual weakening of the central part of the Northern Chile seismic gap accentuated by the

  20. The North America - South America plate boundary zone: new elements for a geodynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roest, W. R.; Pichot, T.; Patriat, M.; Westbrook, G. K.; Gutscher, M.

    2011-12-01

    The location and functioning of the North America - South America plate boundary zone remain unknown, despite significant past efforts to decipher its precise position and the associated deformation. The Barracuda Ridge and the Tiburon Rise, two major oceanic basement ridges, are situated at the western end of this diffuse plate-boundary zone, where they enter the subduction zone beneath the Lesser Antilles island arc. The deformation of these features, and the intervening sedimentary basins and their stratigraphy record the history of NoAM-SoAM motion in this area. Kinematic studies based on reconstruction of past plate motions and GPS measurements predict small convergence during the Tertiary in the western part of this boundary zone, between the Marathon and Fifteen Twenty fracture zones. However, the differences between the different models remains too large to predict the NoAM-SoAM relative motions in this area confidently, as small changes in the postions of their rotation poles have major consequences for the expected distribution of deformation, because of their proximity to the area. Recent geophysical data acquired in this region has enabled us to locate the major structural features, and to propose an improved timing of the deformation. Seismic lines confirm the transpressional tectonic regime over a zone that is about 250 km wide, between the Barracuda Trough and the Tiburon Rise. The geodynamic situation is complicated by the fact that the deformation in the area of the Tiburon Rise and the Barracuda Ridge is clearly influenced by the flexural bulge of the active subduction zone, which uplifts the western ends of both ridges and provides a distinct western boundary to the Tiburon sedimentary basin, a trough situated between them. We have attempted to distinguish the influence of both the NoAM-SoAM convergence and the subduction process. In the North Atlantic west of Iberia, an apparently similar diffuse plate boundary zone between Europe and Africa

  1. GOLD PLATING PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Seegmiller, R.

    1957-08-01

    An improved bath is reported for plating gold on other metals. The composition of the plating bath is as follows: Gold cyanide from about 15 to about 50 grams, potassium cyanide from about 70 to about 125 grams, and sulfonated castor oil from about 0.1 to about 10 cc. The gold plate produced from this bath is smooth, semi-hard, and nonporous.

  2. Plating methods, a survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkowitz, J. B.; Emerson, N. H.

    1972-01-01

    Results are presented of a comprehensive search of the literature available, much of which has been generated by the research centers of NASA and its contractors, on plating and coating methods and techniques. Methods covered included: (1) electroplating from aqueous solutions; (2) electroplating from nonaqueous solutions; (3) electroplating from fused-salt baths; (4) electroforming; (5) electroless plating, immersion plating, and mirroring; (6) electroplating from gaseous plasmas; and (7) anodized films and conversion coatings.

  3. Shells on a Sphere: Tectonic Plate Motion and Plate Boundary Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apel, Edwin Victor, III

    Plate motion models have matured from being based only on geology and seismicity to incorporating space-based geodetic methods like GPS. I use a block modeling approach to incorporate both rigid block rotation and near-boundary elastic strain accumulation effects in a formal inversion of GPS velocities. Independent Okhotsk and Amurian microplate motions are tested using GPS velocities that constrain the plate kinematics of northeast Asia. Modeling favors scenarios with independent OKH and AMU motion, based on the application of F-test statistics. The plate-motion parameters of the independent plates are consistent with the kinematics inferred from earthquake focal mechanism solutions along their boundaries. GPS-measured velocities (15 from continuously recording stations within the stable India plate interior) geodetically constrain India plate motion, intraplate strain, and plate boundary deformation around the India plate. Dense station coverage from previously published studies allows rigorous testing of boundary parameterizations. I develop robust India plate motion parameters and see good agreement between predicted plate directions from the preferred model and the seismological data. Available GPS data in and around the Aegean region is combined and used to evaluate plate motion models, elastic plate boundary deformation and its relationship to seismogenic coupling along the Hellenic subduction zone. The A.D. 365 M ˜8.4, the A.D. 1303 M˜8 Crete suggest that portions of the plate interface must be locked. The primary focus of this study is to examine potential upper plate deformation resulting from a locked subduction interface, active hanging-wall extension, or both. I consider multiple model scenarios in an attempt to interpret the both the horizontal and vertical geodetic signals in the region and its implications for earthquake hazard assessment.

  4. CALUTRON FACE PLATE

    DOEpatents

    Brobeck, W.M.

    1959-08-25

    The construction of a removable cover plate for a calutron tank is described. The plate is fabricated of a rectangular frame member to which is welded a bowed or dished plate of thin steel, reinforced with transverse stiffening ribs. When the tank is placed between the poles of a magnet, the plate may be pivoted away from the tank and magnet and is adapted to support the ion separation mechanism secured to its inner side as well as the vacuum load within the tank.

  5. PLATES WITH OXIDE INSERTS

    DOEpatents

    West, J.M.; Schumar, J.F.

    1958-06-10

    Planar-type fuel assemblies for nuclear reactors are described, particularly those comprising fuel in the oxide form such as thoria and urania. The fuel assembly consists of a plurality of parallel spaced fuel plate mennbers having their longitudinal side edges attached to two parallel supporting side plates, thereby providing coolant flow channels between the opposite faces of adjacent fuel plates. The fuel plates are comprised of a plurality of longitudinally extending tubular sections connected by web portions, the tubular sections being filled with a plurality of pellets of the fuel material and the pellets being thermally bonded to the inside of the tubular section by lead.

  6. On Lamb and Rayleigh wave convergence in viscoelastic tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenadic, Ivan Z.; Urban, Matthew W.; Aristizabal, Sara; Mitchell, Scott A.; Humphrey, Tye C.; Greenleaf, James F.

    2011-10-01

    Characterization of the viscoelastic material properties of soft tissue has become an important area of research over the last two decades. Our group has been investigating the feasibility of using a shear wave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry (SDUV) method to excite Lamb waves in organs with plate-like geometry to estimate the viscoelasticity of the medium of interest. The use of Lamb wave dispersion ultrasound vibrometry to quantify the mechanical properties of viscoelastic solids has previously been reported. Two organs, the heart wall and the spleen, can be readily modeled using plate-like geometries. The elasticity of these two organs is important because they change in pathological conditions. Diastolic dysfunction is the inability of the left ventricle (LV) of the heart to supply sufficient stroke volumes into the systemic circulation and is accompanied by the loss of compliance and stiffening of the LV myocardium. It has been shown that there is a correlation between high splenic stiffness in patients with chronic liver disease and strong correlation between spleen and liver stiffness. Here, we investigate the use of the SDUV method to quantify the viscoelasticity of the LV free-wall myocardium and spleen by exciting Rayleigh waves on the organ's surface and measuring the wave dispersion (change of wave velocity as a function of frequency) in the frequency range 40-500 Hz. An equation for Rayleigh wave dispersion due to cylindrical excitation was derived by modeling the excised myocardium and spleen with a homogenous Voigt material plate immersed in a nonviscous fluid. Boundary conditions and wave potential functions were solved for the surface wave velocity. Analytical and experimental convergence between the Lamb and Rayleigh waves is reported in a finite element model of a plate in a fluid of similar density, gelatin plate and excised porcine spleen and left-ventricular free-wall myocardium.

  7. Thin-skinned salt tectonics as a response to crustal movements in a recent convergent setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vendeville, Bruno; Gaullier, Virginie; Deverchere, Jacques; Sage, Françoise

    2014-05-01

    Published data from the seismic survey "MARADJA 1" conducted in August and September 2003 offshore the Algerian coast have imaged the Messinian salt response to tectonic activity within the basement. This helps to understand how the vertical movements of basement blocks have been recorded by thin-skinned salt tectonics. The area is undergoing crustal convergence, as attested by the Boumerdes earthquake (magnitude 6.8), which happened in 2003. The seismic data have revealed the presence of an elevated plateau, forming a 3D promontory restricted to the area offshore Algiers and is absent west and east of that area. The promontory is likely related to the contractional reactivation of the margin, as was recorded by subsalt thrusts mapped by Domzig et al. (2006). The data provided additional information on the deformation of the Messinian mobile evaporite unit and its Plio-Quaternary overburden. Margin-perpendicular profiles show mostly compressional features (anticlines and synclines) that had little or no activity during Messinian times. By contrast, margin-parallel profiles clearly show that extensional, reactive salt diapiric ridges formed early, as early as the time of deposition of the Messinian Upper Unit, as recorded by fan-shaped strata. These ridges have recorded E-W, thin-skinned gravity gliding above the Messinian salt, as a response to the rise of the basement plateau. We tested this hypothesis using analogue models. Indeed, the rise of the plateau generated preferential E-W extension above the salt, rather than N-S, which was prevented by the compressional regional tectonic stresses related to the convergence of the African and European plates.

  8. A Numerical Study of Strain Partitioning and the Development of Forearc Slivers at Obliquely Convergent Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koster, K. L.; Haq, S. S.; Flesch, L. M.

    2012-12-01

    Oblique relative plate motion is common at convergent margins, often with a significant component of margin-parallel motion. At such margins, relative plate motion is often accommodated as spatially distinct margin-normal thrusting and margin-parallel shear, leading to the development of fore-arc slivers. These crustal slivers are bounded trench-ward by thrust faults and arc-ward by a well developed margin-parallel strike-slip fault and are observed in about half of all modern convergent boundaries. Some modestly oblique convergent settings are known to develop fore-arc slivers while some higher obliquity margins fail to effectively partition the margin-parallel component of plate motion in a distinct zone. Analog modeling has shown that pure frictional wedges only produce fore-arc like sliver motion at very high obliquities, however, the presence of ductile layers at depth can localize shear at lower obliquities. We have performed finite-element numerical simulations of oblique convergent wedges, over a wide range of obliquities, governed by viscous behavior at depth in which we solve force-balance equations for Stokes flow using COMSOL Multiphysics to quantify the magnitude and style of stress. Our numerical models reproduce topographic profiles and surface velocity fields of similarly parameterized analog experiments and demonstrate a progressive localization of margin-parallel shear with wedge growth. We also observe the onset and localization of shear in all wedges of non-zero obliquity, which we quantify by comparing the magnitudes of principal compressional and extensional stress tensor axes to constrain the timing of the transition between intermediate and high partitioning of strain in evolving wedges. These results suggest, in conjunction with analog models, that viscous behavior at depth and increase in topography during convergence both work to localize margin-parallel shear in obliquely convergent wedges and gives a mechanism for the development of

  9. Geodetic constraints on active tectonics of the Western Mediterranean: Implications for the kinematics and dynamics of the Nubia-Eurasia plate boundary zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernant, Philippe; Fadil, Abdelali; Mourabit, Taoufik; Ouazar, Driss; Koulali, Achraf; Davila, Jose Martin; Garate, Jorge; McClusky, Simon; Reilinger, Robert

    2010-04-01

    We present GPS observations in Morocco and adjacent areas of Spain from 15 continuous (CGPS) and 31 survey-mode (SGPS) sites extending from the stable part of the Nubian plate to central Spain. We determine a robust velocity field for the W Mediterranean that we use to constrain models for the Iberia-Nubia plate boundary. South of the High Atlas Mountain system, GPS motions are consistent with Nubia plate motions from prior geodetic studies. We constrain shortening in the Atlas system to <1.5 mm/yr, 95% confidence level. North of the Atlas Mountains, the GPS velocities indicate Nubia motion with respect to Eurasia, but also a component of motion normal to the direction of Nubia-Eurasia motion, consisting of southward translation of the Rif Mountains in N Morocco at rates exceeding 5 mm/yr. This southward motion appears to be directly related to Miocene opening of the Alboran Sea. The Betic Mountain system north of the Alboran Sea is characterized by WNW motion with respect to Eurasia at ˜1-2 mm/yr, paralleling Nubia-Eurasia relative motion. In addition, sites located in the Betics north of the southerly moving Rif Mountains also indicate a component of southerly motion with respect to Eurasia. We interpret this as indicating that deformation associated with Nubia-Eurasia plate motion extends into the southern Betics, but also that the Betic system may be affected by the same processes that are causing southward motion of the Rif Mountains south of the Alboran Sea. Kinematic modeling indicates that plate boundary geometries that include a boundary through the Straits of Gibraltar are most compatible with the component of motion in the direction of relative plate motion, but that two additional blocks (Alboran-Rif block, Betic Mountain block), independent of both Nubia and Eurasia are needed to account for the motions of the Rif and Betic Mountains normal to the direction of relative plate motion. We speculate that the southward motions of the Alboran-Rif and Betic

  10. Converging language streams in the human temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Spitsyna, Galina; Warren, Jane E; Scott, Sophie K; Turkheimer, Federico E; Wise, Richard J S

    2006-07-12

    There is general agreement that, after initial processing in unimodal sensory cortex, the processing pathways for spoken and written language converge to access verbal meaning. However, the existing literature provides conflicting accounts of the cortical location of this convergence. Most aphasic stroke studies localize verbal comprehension to posterior temporal and inferior parietal cortex (Wernicke's area), whereas evidence from focal cortical neurodegenerative syndromes instead implicates anterior temporal cortex. Previous functional imaging studies in normal subjects have failed to reconcile these opposing positions. Using a functional imaging paradigm in normal subjects that used spoken and written narratives and multiple baselines, we demonstrated common activation during implicit comprehension of spoken and written language in inferior and lateral regions of the left anterior temporal cortex and at the junction of temporal, occipital, and parietal cortex. These results indicate that verbal comprehension uses unimodal processing streams that converge in both anterior and posterior heteromodal cortical regions in the left temporal lobe. PMID:16837579

  11. Convergent Validity of the PUTS.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Valerie Cathérine; Beck, Christian; Sajin, Valeria; Anders, Silke; Münchau, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Premonitory urges are a cardinal feature in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. Severity of premonitory urges can be assessed with the "Premonitory Urge for Tic Disorders Scale" (PUTS). However, convergent validity of the measure has been difficult to assess due to the lack of other urge measures. We investigated the relationship between average real-time urge intensity assessed by an in-house developed real-time urge monitor (RUM), measuring urge intensity continuously for 5 min on a visual analog scale, and general urge intensity assessed by the PUTS in 22 adult Tourette patients (mean age 29.8 ± 10.3 SD, 19 males). Additionally, underlying factors of premonitory urges assessed by the PUTS were investigated in the adult sample using factor analysis and were replicated in 40 children and adolescents diagnosed with Tourette syndrome (mean age 12.05 ± 2.83 SD, 31 males). Cronbach's α for the PUTS 10 was acceptable (α = 0.79) in the adult sample. Convergent validity between average real-time urge intensity scores (as assessed with the RUM) and the 10-item version of the PUTS (r = 0.64) and the 9-item version of the PUTS (r = 0.66) was good. A factor analysis including the 10 items of the PUTS and average real-time urge intensity scores revealed three factors. One factor included the average real-time urge intensity score and appeared to measure urge intensity, whereas the other two factors can be assumed to reflect the (sensory) quality of urges and subjective control, respectively. The factor structure of the 10 PUTS items alone was replicated in a sample of children and adolescents. The results indicate that convergent validity between the PUTS and the real-time urge assessment monitor is good. Furthermore, the results suggest that the PUTS might assess more than one dimension of urges, and it may be worthwhile developing different subscales of the PUTS assessing premonitory urges in terms of intensity and quality, as well as subjectively

  12. Convergent Validity of the PUTS

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Valerie Cathérine; Beck, Christian; Sajin, Valeria; Anders, Silke; Münchau, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Premonitory urges are a cardinal feature in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. Severity of premonitory urges can be assessed with the “Premonitory Urge for Tic Disorders Scale” (PUTS). However, convergent validity of the measure has been difficult to assess due to the lack of other urge measures. We investigated the relationship between average real-time urge intensity assessed by an in-house developed real-time urge monitor (RUM), measuring urge intensity continuously for 5 min on a visual analog scale, and general urge intensity assessed by the PUTS in 22 adult Tourette patients (mean age 29.8 ± 10.3 SD, 19 males). Additionally, underlying factors of premonitory urges assessed by the PUTS were investigated in the adult sample using factor analysis and were replicated in 40 children and adolescents diagnosed with Tourette syndrome (mean age 12.05 ± 2.83 SD, 31 males). Cronbach’s α for the PUTS 10 was acceptable (α = 0.79) in the adult sample. Convergent validity between average real-time urge intensity scores (as assessed with the RUM) and the 10-item version of the PUTS (r = 0.64) and the 9-item version of the PUTS (r = 0.66) was good. A factor analysis including the 10 items of the PUTS and average real-time urge intensity scores revealed three factors. One factor included the average real-time urge intensity score and appeared to measure urge intensity, whereas the other two factors can be assumed to reflect the (sensory) quality of urges and subjective control, respectively. The factor structure of the 10 PUTS items alone was replicated in a sample of children and adolescents. The results indicate that convergent validity between the PUTS and the real-time urge assessment monitor is good. Furthermore, the results suggest that the PUTS might assess more than one dimension of urges, and it may be worthwhile developing different subscales of the PUTS assessing premonitory urges in terms of intensity and quality, as well as

  13. Crustal Structure across Rivera Plate and Jalisco Block (MEXICO): TsuJal Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuñez-Cornu, F. J.; Nunez, D.; Barba, D. C., Sr.; Trejo, E.; Escalona, F.; Danobeitia, J.; Gutierrez Pena, Q. J.

    2015-12-01

    Located on the western margin of Mexico, the collision zone between Rivera, Cocos and North American plates is a complex tectonic collage with high seismic hazards and potential tsunamigenic sources. During the spring of 2014, within the framework of TSUJAL project, Spanish and Mexican scientists investigated this region with the main objective of defining the crustal architecture of this active margin and recognizing potential structural sources that can trigger earthquakes and tsunamis at the convergence between Rivera plate-Jalisco block with the North American Plate. To achieve these goals, a wide-ranging of geophysical data was acquired in this region both offshore and onshore. In this paper, we present the preliminary results obtained from this project about bathymetric, structural geology and wide-angle seismic data of the southern coast of Bahía de Banderas. A crustal P-wave velocity model for the southern coast of Bahía de Banderas was obtained using WAS data recorded by OBS and land seismic stations for more than 150 km across Rivera Plate and Jalisco Block. The thickness of the slab in this area is about 10 km and presents a dip angle about 8º. Continental crustal thickness below Puerto Vallarta is about 20 km, no evidence of continental Moho was found in this study. This model support that due to the convergence of Rivera Plate against Jalisco Block, the region of Bahía de Banderas is under strong crustal stresses that generate structural lineaments and have the same trends offshore and inland. Most of the seismicity reported can be associated to the main structural lineaments. The Banderas Canyon apparently is in an opening process from west to east, which seems to continue through the Rio Pitillal river valley. There is no seismic or morphological evidence to consider that the Banderas Canyon is a continuation of Vallarta Graben.South of María Cleofas Island, the SC marks the limit between RP and JB, possibly being the result of the RP against JB

  14. Blue Willow Story Plates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontes, Kris

    2009-01-01

    In the December 1997 issue of "SchoolArts" is a lesson titled "Blue Willow Story Plates" by Susan Striker. In this article, the author shares how she used this lesson with her middle-school students many times over the years. Here, she describes a Blue Willow plate painting project that her students made.

  15. Earthquakes and plate tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.

    1977-01-01

    An explanation is to be found in plate tectonics, a concept which has revolutionized thinking in the Earth sciences in the last 10 years. The theory of plate tectonics combines many of the ideas about continental drift (originally proposed in 1912 by Alfred Wegener in Germany) and sea-floor spreading (suggested originally by Harry Hess of Princeton University). 

  16. Ion plated electronic tube device

    DOEpatents

    Meek, T.T.

    1983-10-18

    An electronic tube and associated circuitry which is produced by ion plating techniques. The process is carried out in an automated process whereby both active and passive devices are produced at very low cost. The circuitry is extremely reliable and is capable of functioning in both high radiation and high temperature environments. The size of the electronic tubes produced are more than an order of magnitude smaller than conventional electronic tubes.

  17. Waveform through the subducted plate under the Tokyo region in Japan observed by a ultra-dense seismic network (MeSO-net) and seismic activity around mega-thrust earthquakes area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, S.; Kasahara, K.; Nanjo, K.; Nakagawa, S.; Tsuruoka, H.; Morita, Y.; Kato, A.; Iidaka, T.; Hirata, N.; Tanada, T.; Obara, K.; Sekine, S.; Kurashimo, E.

    2009-12-01

    In central Japan, the Philippine Sea plate (PSP) subducts beneath the Tokyo Metropolitan area, the Kanto region, where it causes mega-thrust earthquakes, such as the 1703 Genroku earthquake (M8.0) and the 1923 Kanto earthquake (M7.9) which had 105,000 fatalities. A M7 or greater earthquake in this region at present has high potential to produce devastating loss of life and property with even greater global economic repercussions. The Central Disaster Management Council of Japan estimates the next great earthquake will cause 11,000 fatalities and 112 trillion yen (1 trillion US$) economic loss. This great earthquake is evaluated to occur with a probability of 70 % in 30 years by the Earthquake Research Committee of Japan. We had started the Special Project for Earthquake Disaster Mitigation in Tokyo Metropolitan area (2007-2012). Under this project, the construction of the Metropolitan Seismic Observation network (MeSO-net) that consists of about 400 observation sites was started [Kasahara et al., 2008; Nakagawa et al., 2008]. Now, we had 178 observation sites. The correlation of the wave is high because the observation point is deployed at about 2 km intervals, and the identification of the later phase is recognized easily thought artificial noise is very large. We also discuss the relation between a deformation of PSP and intra-plate M7+ earthquakes: the PSP is subducting beneath the Honshu arc and also colliding with the Pacific plate. The subduction and collision both contribute active seismicity in the Kanto region. We are going to present a high resolution tomographic image to show low velocity zone which suggests a possible internal failure of the plate; a source region of the M7+ intra-plate earthquake. Our study will contribute a new assessment of the seismic hazard at the Metropolitan area in Japan. Acknowledgement: This study was supported by the Earthquake Research Institute cooperative research program.

  18. Mosaic Convergence of Rodent Dentitions

    PubMed Central

    Lazzari, Vincent; Charles, Cyril; Tafforeau, Paul; Vianey-Liaud, Monique; Aguilar, Jean-Pierre; Jaeger, Jean-Jacques; Michaux, Jacques; Viriot, Laurent

    2008-01-01

    Background Understanding mechanisms responsible for changes in tooth morphology in the course of evolution is an area of investigation common to both paleontology and developmental biology. Detailed analyses of molar tooth crown shape have shown frequent homoplasia in mammalian evolution, which requires accurate investigation of the evolutionary pathways provided by the fossil record. The necessity of preservation of an effective occlusion has been hypothesized to functionally constrain crown morphological changes and to also facilitate convergent evolution. The Muroidea superfamily constitutes a relevant model for the study of molar crown diversification because it encompasses one third of the extant mammalian biodiversity. Methodology/Principal Findings Combined microwear and 3D-topographic analyses performed on fossil and extant muroid molars allow for a first quantification of the relationships between changes in crown morphology and functionality of occlusion. Based on an abundant fossil record and on a well resolved phylogeny, our results show that the most derived functional condition associates longitudinal chewing and non interlocking of cusps. This condition has been reached at least 7 times within muroids via two main types of evolutionary pathways each respecting functional continuity. In the first type, the flattening of tooth crown which induces the removal of cusp interlocking occurs before the rotation of the chewing movement. In the second type however, flattening is subsequent to rotation of the chewing movement which can be associated with certain changes in cusp morphology. Conclusion/Significance The reverse orders of the changes involved in these different pathways reveal a mosaic evolution of mammalian dentition in which direction of chewing and crown shape seem to be partly decoupled. Either can change in respect to strong functional constraints affecting occlusion which thereby limit the number of the possible pathways. Because convergent

  19. Cosmic Convergence: Art and Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, Elizabeth A.; Zisholtz, E.; Hilton, H.

    2010-01-01

    The I.P. Stanback Museum and Planetarium is a major educational and teaching resource for South Carolina State University, K-12 schools, other universities and the community of Orangeburg and well beyond. The concept of creating a museum with a planetarium on the campus of SC State was ahead of its time. Today scholars are writing about the unity of creative disciplines. Through its integration of the arts, humanities and sciences, the Stanback, the only art museum with a planetarium at any of the Historically Black Colleges and Universities and one of the few in the nation, stands in the forefront of modern thinking. Cosmic Convergence: Art and Science, opening at the I.P. Stanback Museum and Planetarium in February 2010, will feature the works of Mildred Thompson (1936-2003), a prominent African American artist who worked in the media of painting, drawing, print making, sculpture, and photography. Thompson’s artwork shows the strong influences of her interest in physics, astronomy, and metaphysics as well as music and spiritualism. “My work in the visual arts is, and has always been, a continuous search for understanding. It is an expression of purpose and reflects a personal interpretation of the Universe.” Cosmic Convergence will explore the meeting of Art and Science through Mildred Thompson's work and the scientific basis of that work. The paintings and sculptures of the exhibit will be combined with astronomical images showing both the reality and interpretation of the surrounding Universe. Support for this work was provided by the NSF PAARE program to South Carolina State University under award AST-0750814.

  20. Turbine vane plate assembly

    DOEpatents

    Schiavo Jr., Anthony L.

    2006-01-10

    A turbine vane assembly includes a turbine vane having first and second shrouds with an elongated airfoil extending between. Each end of the airfoil transitions into a shroud at a respective junction. Each of the shrouds has a plurality of cooling passages, and the airfoil has a plurality of cooling passages extending between the first and second shrouds. A substantially flat inner plate and an outer plate are coupled to each of the first and second shrouds so as to form inner and outer plenums. Each inner plenum is defined between at least the junction and the substantially flat inner plate; each outer plenum is defined between at least the substantially flat inner plate and the outer plate. Each inner plenum is in fluid communication with a respective outer plenum through at least one of the cooling passages in the respective shroud.

  1. Identifying active interplate and intraplate fault zones in the western Caribbean plate from seismic reflection data and the significance of the Pedro Bank fault zone in the tectonic history of the Nicaraguan Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, B.; Mann, P.

    2015-12-01

    The offshore Nicaraguan Rise in the western Caribbean Sea is an approximately 500,000 km2 area of Precambrian to Late Cretaceous tectonic terranes that have been assembled during the Late Cretaceous formation of the Caribbean plate and include: 1) the Chortis block, a continental fragment; 2) the Great Arc of the Caribbean, a deformed Cretaceous arc, and 3) the Caribbean large igneous province formed in late Cretaceous time. Middle Eocene to Recent eastward motion of the Caribbean plate has been largely controlled by strike-slip faulting along the northern Caribbean plate boundary zone that bounds the northern margin of the Nicaraguan Rise. These faults reactivate older rift structures near the island of Jamaica and form the transtensional basins of the Honduran Borderlands near Honduras. Recent GPS studies suggest that small amount of intraplate motion within the current margin of error of GPS measurements (1-3 mm/yr) may occur within the center of the western Caribbean plate at the Pedro Bank fault zone and Hess Escarpment. This study uses a database of over 54,000 km of modern and vintage 2D seismic data, combined with earthquake data and results from previous GPS studies to define the active areas of inter- and intraplate fault zones in the western Caribbean. Intraplate deformation occurs along the 700-km-long Pedro Bank fault zone that traverses the center of the Nicaraguan Rise and reactivates the paleo suture zone between the Great Arc of the Caribbean and the Caribbean large igneous province. The Pedro Bank fault zone also drives active extension at the 200-km-long San Andres rift along the southwest margin of the Nicaraguan Rise. Influence of the Cocos Ridge indentor may be contributing to reactivation of faulting along the southwesternmost, active segment of the Hess Escarpment.

  2. San Andres Rift, Nicaraguan Shelf: A 346-Km-Long, North-South Rift Zone Actively Extending the Interior of the "Stable" Caribbean Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvajal, L. C.; Mann, P.

    2015-12-01

    The San Andres rift (SAR) is an active, 015°-trending, bathymetric and structural rift basin that extends for 346 km across the Nicaraguan platform and varies in bathymetric width from 11-27 km and in water depth from 1,250 to 2,500 m. We used four 2D regional seismic lines tied to two offshore, industry wells located west of the SAR on the Nicaraguan platform to map normal faults, transfer faults, and possibly volcanic features with the rift. The Colombian islands of San Andres (26 km2) and Providencia (17 km2) are footwall uplifts along west-dipping, normal fault bounding the eastern margin of the rift. Mapping indicates the pre-rift section is Late Cretaceous to Oligocene in age and that the onset of rifting began in the early to middle Miocene as shown by wedging of the Miocene and younger sedimentary fill controlled by north-south-striking normal faults. Structural restorations at two locations across the rift shows that the basin opened mainly by dip-slip fault motions producing a total, east-west extension of 18 km in the north and 15 km in the south. Structural restoration shows the rift formed on a 37-km-wide, elongate basement high - possibly of late Cretaceous, volcanic origin and related to the Caribbean large igneous province. Previous workers have noted that the SAR is associated with province of Pliocene to Quaternary seamounts and volcanoes which range from non-alkaline to mildly alkaline, including volcanic rocks on Providencia described as andesites and rhyolites. The SAR forms one of the few recognizable belts of recorded seismicity within the Caribbean plate. The origin of the SAR is related to Miocene and younger left-lateral displacement along the Pedro Banks fault to the north and the southwestern Hess fault to the south. We propose that the amount of left-lateral displacement that created the rift is equivalent to the amount of extension that formed it: 18-20 km.

  3. Contrasting sedimentary processes along a convergent margin: the Lesser Antilles arc system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, Michel; Schneider, Jean-Luc; Boudon, Georges

    2006-12-01

    Sedimentation processes occurring in an active convergent setting are well illustrated in the Lesser Antilles island arc. The margin is related to westward subduction of the North and/or the South America plates beneath the Caribbean plate. From east to west, the arc can be subdivided into several tectono-sedimentary depositional domains: the accretionary prism, the fore-arc basin, the arc platform and inter-arc basin, and the Grenada back-arc basin. The Grenada back-arc basin, the fore-arc basin (Tobago Trough) and the accretionary prism on the east side of the volcanic arc constitute traps for particles derived from the arc platform and the South American continent. The arc is volcanically active, and provides large volumes of volcaniclastic sediments which accumulate mainly in the Grenada basin by volcaniclastic gravity flows (volcanic debris avalanches, debris flows, turbiditic flows) and minor amounts by fallout. By contrast, the eastern side of the margin is fed by ash fallout and minor volcaniclastic turbidites. In this area, the dominant component of the sediments is pelagic in origin, or derived from South America (siliciclastic turbidites). Insular shelves are the locations of carbonate sedimentation, such as large platforms which develop in the Limestone Caribbees in the northern part of the margin. Reworking of carbonate material by turbidity currents also delivers lesser amounts to eastern basins of the margin. This contrasting sedimentation on both sides of the arc platform along the margin is controlled by several interacting factors including basin morphology, volcanic productivity, wind and deep-sea current patterns, and sea-level changes. Basin morphology appears to be the most dominant factor. The western slopes of the arc platform are steeper than the eastern ones, thus favouring gravity flow processes.

  4. An Alternative Estimate of the Motion of the Capricorn Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burris, S. G.; Gordon, R. G.

    2013-12-01

    Diffuse plate boundaries cover ~15% of Earth's surface and can exceed 1000 km in across-strike width. Deforming oceanic lithosphere in the equatorial Indian Ocean accommodates the motion between the India and Capricorn plates and serves as their mutual diffuse plate boundary. This deforming lithosphere lies between the Central Indian Ridge to the west and the Sumatra trench to the east; the plates diverge to the west of ≈74°E and converge to the east of it. Many data have shown that the pole of rotation between the India and Capricorn plates lies within this diffuse plate boundary [1,2]. Surprisingly, however, the recently estimated angular velocity in the MORVEL global set of angular velocities [3] places this pole of rotation north of prior poles by several degrees, and north of the diffuse plate boundary. The motion between the India and Capricorn plates can only be estimated indirectly by differencing the motion of the India plate relative to the Somalia plate, on the one hand, and the motion of the Capricorn plate relative to Somalia plate, on the other. While the MORVEL India-Somalia angular velocity is similar to prior estimates, the MORVEL Capricorn-Somalia pole of rotation lies northwest of its predecessors. The difference is not caused by new transform azimuth data incorporated into MORVEL or by the new application of a correction to spreading rates for outward displacement. Instead the difference appears to be caused by a few anomalous spreading rates near the northern end of the Capricorn-Somalia plate boundary along the Central Indian Ridge. Rejecting these data leads to consistency with prior results. Implications for the motion of the Capricorn plate relative to Australia will be discussed. [1] DeMets, C., R. G. Gordon, and J.-Y. Royer, 2005. Motion between the Indian, Capricorn, and Somalian plates since 20 Ma: implications for the timing and magnitude of distributed deformation in the equatorial Indian ocean, Geophys. J. Int., 161, 445-468. [2

  5. Linkographic Evidence for Concurrent Divergent and Convergent Thinking in Creative Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldschmidt, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    For a long time, the creativity literature has stressed the role of divergent thinking in creative endeavor. More recently, it has been recognized that convergent thinking also has a role in creativity, and the design literature, which sees design as a creative activity a priori, has largely adopted this view: Divergent and convergent thinking are…

  6. Metaphor as a Possible Pathway to More Formal Understanding of the Definition of Sequence Convergence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawkins, Paul Christian

    2012-01-01

    This study presents how the introduction of a metaphor for sequence convergence constituted an experientially real context in which an undergraduate real analysis student developed a property-based definition of sequence convergence. I use elements from Zandieh and Rasmussen's (2010) Defining as a Mathematical Activity framework to trace the…

  7. Convergence of large-deviation estimators.

    PubMed

    Rohwer, Christian M; Angeletti, Florian; Touchette, Hugo

    2015-11-01

    We study the convergence of statistical estimators used in the estimation of large-deviation functions describing the fluctuations of equilibrium, nonequilibrium, and manmade stochastic systems. We give conditions for the convergence of these estimators with sample size, based on the boundedness or unboundedness of the quantity sampled, and discuss how statistical errors should be defined in different parts of the convergence region. Our results shed light on previous reports of "phase transitions" in the statistics of free energy estimators and establish a general framework for reliably estimating large-deviation functions from simulation and experimental data and identifying parameter regions where this estimation converges. PMID:26651644

  8. GPS measurements of crustal deformation within the Pacific-Australia plate boundary zone in Irian Jaya, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puntodewo, S. S. O.; McCaffrey, R.; Calais, E.; Bock, Y.; Rais, J.; Subarya, C.; Poewariardi, R.; Stevens, C.; Genrich, J.; Fauzi; Zwick, P.; Wdowinski, S.

    1994-10-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements made in 1991, 1992 and 1993 provide preliminary estimates of slip distribution between the Australian and Pacific plates in Irian Jaya, Indonesia. We interpret the GPS results with constraints from earthquake mechanisms and slip vectors, recent marine surveys, and geology. Three GPS sites in southeastern Irian Jaya show motions that are within 10 mm/yr of the expected motion of Australia. A coast-to-coast N-S baseline along 140.5°E crosses all known onland regions of active deformation but reveals no more than 15 mm/yr of shortening and 20 mm/yr of left-lateral shear in the 27-month period. The remaining 40 mm/yr of expected convergence between the Pacific and Australian plates probably occurs at the New Guinea trough. GPS sites on the island of Biak, at 136°E, and at Sorong, near the western tip of Bird's Head (at 131°E), both move 90-100 mm/yr in a WSW direction relative to Irian Jaya, but less than 15 mm/yr relative to each other. These sites are on either side of the Sorong fault and demonstrate that it is not presently the major boundary between the Australian and Pacific plates. Instead the plate boundary is now south of the Sorong and Biak sites. Earthquakes suggest possible structures that accomodate motion between Bird's Head and Australia but the relative importance of them remains uncertain.

  9. Hydrogeological system of erosional convergent margins and its influence on tectonics and interplate seismogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranero, C. R.; Grevemeyer, I.; Sahling, H.; Barckhausen, U.; Hensen, C.; Wallmann, K.; Weinrebe, W.; Vannucchi, P.; von Huene, R.; McIntosh, K.

    2008-03-01

    Fluid distribution in convergent margins is by most accounts closely related to tectonics. This association has been widely studied at accretionary prisms, but at half of the Earth's convergent margins, tectonic erosion grinds down overriding plates, and here fluid distribution and its relation to tectonics remain speculative. Here we present a new conceptual model for the hydrological system of erosional convergent margins. The model is based largely on new data and recently published observations from along the Middle America Trench offshore Nicaragua and Costa Rica, and it is consistent with observations from other erosional margins. The observations indicate that erosional margins possess previously unrecognized distinct hydrogeological systems: Most fluid contained in the sediment pores and liberated by early dehydration reactions drains from the plate boundary through a fractured upper plate to seep at the seafloor across the slope, rather than migrating along the décollement toward the deformation front as described for accretionary prisms. The observations indicate that the relative fluid abundance across the plate-boundary fault zone and fluid migration influence long-term tectonics and the transition from aseismic to seismogenic behavior. The segment of the plate boundary where fluid appears to be more abundant corresponds to the locus of long-term tectonic erosion, where tectonic thinning of the overriding plate causes subsidence and the formation of the continental slope. This correspondence between observations indicates that tectonic erosion is possibly linked to the migration of overpressured fluids into the overriding plate. The presence of overpressured fluids at the plate boundary is compatible with the highest flow rates estimated at slope seeps. The change from aseismic to seismogenic behavior along the plate boundary of the erosional margin begins where the amount of fluid at the fault declines with depth, indicating a control on interplate

  10. Lohse's historic plate archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, M.; Tsvetkova, K.; Richter, G.; Scholz, G.; Böhm, P.

    The description and the analysis of Oswald Lohse's astrophotographic plates, collected at the Astrophysical Observatory Potsdam in the period 1879 - 1889, are presented. 67 plates of the archive, taken with the greatest instrument of the observatory at that time - the refractor (D = 0.30 m, F = 5.40 m, scale = 38''/mm) and with the second heliographic objective (D = 0.13 m, F = 1.36 m, scale = 152''/mm) - - survived two world wars in relative good condition. The plate emulsions are from different manufacturers in the beginning of astrophotography (Gädicke, Schleussner, Beernaert, etc.). The sizes of the plates are usually 9x12 cm2, which corresponds to fields of 1.2deg and 5deg respectively for each instrument mentioned above. The average limiting magnitude is 13.0(pg). Besides of the plates received for technical experiments (work on photographic processes, testing of new instruments and methods of observations), the scientific observations follow programs for studies of planet surfaces, bright stars, some double stars, stellar clusters and nebulous objects. Lohse's archive is included into the Wide Field Plate Database (http://www.skyarchive.org) as the oldest systematic one, covering the fields of Orion (M42/43), Pleiades, h & chi Persei, M37, M3, M11, M13, M92, M31, etc. With the PDS 2020 GM+ microdensitometer of Münster University 10 archive plates were digitized.

  11. Screen test for cadmium and nickel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phan, Angie H.; Zimmerman, Albert H.

    1994-01-01

    A new procedure is described which was recently developed to quantify loading uniformity of nickel and cadmium plates and to screen finished electrodes prior to cell assembly. The technique utilizes the initial solubility rates of the active material in a standard chemical deloading solution at fixed conditions. The method can provide a reproducible indication of plate loading uniformity in situations where high surface loading limits the free flow of deloading solution into the internal porosity of the sinter plate. A preliminary study indicates that 'good' cell performance is associated with higher deloading rates.

  12. Vibration of Stiffened Plates Using Hierarchical Trigonometric Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrette, Michel; Berry, Alain; Beslin, Olivier

    2000-08-01

    The vibration analysis of stiffened plates using hierarchical finite elements with a set of local trigonometric interpolation functions is presented. The local functions extend on the plate domain comprised between consecutive stiffeners, thereby allowing a coarse discretization of the global structure. Convergence studies as well as comparison of the present approach with the literature and experimental results are presented. The great numerical stability of the trigonometric functions and their readiness for symbolic manipulations make them potentially attractive for vibration and sound radiation analysis in the mid-frequency range.

  13. Shear wave velocity and Poisson's ratio models across the southern Chile convergent margin at 38°15'S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, C.; Mechie, J.; Feng, M.

    2016-03-01

    Using active and passive seismology data we derive a shear (S) wave velocity model and a Poisson's ratio (σ) model across the Chilean convergent margin along a profile at 38°15'S, where the Mw 9.5 Valdivia earthquake occurred in 1960. The derived S-wave velocity model was constructed using three independently obtained velocity models that were merged together. In the upper part of the profile (0-2 km depth), controlled source data from explosions were used to obtain an S-wave traveltime tomogram. For the middle part (2-20 km depth), data from a temporary seismology array were used to carry out a dispersion analysis. The resulting dispersion curves were used to obtain a 3-D S-wave velocity model. In the lower part (20-75 km depth, depending on the longitude), an already existent local earthquake tomographic image was merged with the other two sections. This final S-wave velocity model and already existent compressional (P) wave velocity models along the same transect allowed us to obtain a Poisson's ratio model. The results of this study show that the velocities and Poisson's ratios in the continental crust of this part of the Chilean convergent margin are in agreement with geological features inferred from other studies and can be explained in terms of normal rock types. There is no requirement to call on the existence of measurable amounts of present-day fluids, in terms of seismic velocities, above the plate interface in the continental crust of the Coastal Cordillera and the Central Valley in this part of the Chilean convergent margin. This is in agreement with a recent model of water being transported down and released from the subduction zone.

  14. Lighting system with heat distribution face plate

    DOEpatents

    Arik, Mehmet; Weaver, Stanton Earl; Stecher, Thomas Elliot; Kuenzler, Glenn Howard; Wolfe, Jr., Charles Franklin; Li, Ri

    2013-09-10

    Lighting systems having a light source and a thermal management system are provided. The thermal management system includes synthetic jet devices, a heat sink and a heat distribution face plate. The synthetic jet devices are arranged in parallel to one and other and are configured to actively cool the lighting system. The heat distribution face plate is configured to radially transfer heat from the light source into the ambient air.

  15. Information and Communication: The New Convergence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beniger, James R.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the isolation of the field of communications from other disciplines and the inattention of communications to the increasing convergence on information and communication in other disciplines. Maps the convergence by surveying the authors commonly cited in the fields of cognitive science, humanities, and semiotics. (MS)

  16. New concurrent iterative methods with monotonic convergence

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Qingchuan

    1996-12-31

    This paper proposes the new concurrent iterative methods without using any derivatives for finding all zeros of polynomials simultaneously. The new methods are of monotonic convergence for both simple and multiple real-zeros of polynomials and are quadratically convergent. The corresponding accelerated concurrent iterative methods are obtained too. The new methods are good candidates for the application in solving symmetric eigenproblems.

  17. Converging finite-strength shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axford, R. A.; Holm, D. D.

    1981-01-01

    The converging shock problem was first solved by Guderley and later by Landau and Stanyukovich for infinitely strong shocks in an ideal gas with spherical and cylindrical symmetry. This problem is solved herein for finite-strength shocks and a non-ideal-gas equation of state with an adiabatic bulk modulus of the type Bs= {- v∂ p}/{∂ v| s} = ( p +B) f( v) , where B is a constant with the dimensions of pressure, and f(v) is an arbitrary function of the specific volume. Self-similar profiles of the particle velocity and thermodynamic variables are studied explicitly for two cases with constant specific heat at constant volume; the Tait-Kirkwood-Murnaghan equation, f(v) = constant, and the Walsh equation, f(v) = v/A, where A = constant. The first case reduces to the ideal gas when B = 0. In both cases the flow behind the shock front exhibits an unbalanced buoyant force instability at a critical Mach number which depends upon equation-of-state parameters.

  18. Active faulting and seismicity across the SW Gulf of California plate margin: anomalous rifting at slow geologic rates 2-3 m.y. after spreading initiated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrowsmith, R.; Busch, M. M.; Umhoefer, P. J.; Kent, G.; Driscoll, N.; Martínez-Gutiérrez, G.; Maloney, S. J.; Buchanan, B.

    2009-12-01

    Onshore and offshore paleoseismology provides new constraints on late Quaternary to Present deformation rates across the SW margin of the Gulf of California plate boundary at the latitude of La Paz, Baja California Sur, Mexico. Here we report the results of a 2008 CHIRP survey of offshore faults and what it tells us about the combined onshore - offshore faulting patterns. From west to east the Carrizal - Centenario, San Juan de los Planes (SJP) - La Gata to Espiritu Santo faults are being studied in detail, and to date the San Jose del Cabo (SJC) fault is being studied in reconnaissance. GPS results suggest rates of motion across the marginal fault array of ~1 mm/year while recent data from Alarcon rise suggests 46 mm/yr on the main plate boundary. Onshore studies suggest 0.1 - 0.3 mm/yr along the Carrizal and Los Planes faults in the late Quaternary from paleoseismic excavations, uplifted marine terraces, and geomorphic analysis. Geologic estimates and fault patterns with faults splaying and ending onshore to the south suggest that faulting rates may be higher to the north offshore. CHIRP and onshore data indicate three faults across La Paz Bay that form one system along the rift escarpment. Similar data suggest a second fault system including the onshore Los Planes and La Gata faults that form a complex step over to the NW to the Espiritu Santo fault, along which a M6.2 earthquake occurred in 1995. The third fault system in the transect across the plate margin are the Cerralvo trough faults along which the 1969 M5.6 earthquake probably occurred. It is not clear why the residual 1-2% of plate motion is being accomodated in the margin. The large topographic gradient across the plate boundary and dominantly down-to-Gulf normal faults suggest that potential gravitational energy may be a factor. Low sedimentation rates in the arid region are presumably even slower than faulting rates and result in relief being maintained and semi-starved basins.

  19. Flat plate solar oven

    SciTech Connect

    Parikh, M.

    1981-01-01

    The construction of an Indian Rs. 186 (US $20.33) flat-plate solar oven is described. Detailed drawings are provided and relevant information on cooking times and temperature for different foods is given.

  20. Plate tectonics: Metamorphic myth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korenaga, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Clear evidence for subduction-induced metamorphism, and thus the operation of plate tectonics on the ancient Earth has been lacking. Theoretical calculations indicate that we may have been looking for something that cannot exist.

  1. Violin plate modes.

    PubMed

    Gough, Colin

    2015-01-01

    As the first step toward developing a generic model for the acoustically radiating vibrational modes of the violin and related instruments, the modes of both freely supported and edge-constrained top and back plates have been investigated as functions of shape, arching height, elastic anisotropy, the f-holes and associated island area, thickness graduations, and the additional boundary constraints of the ribs, soundpost, and bass-bar present in the assembled instrument. Comsol shell structure finite element software has been used as a quasi-experimental tool, with physical and geometric properties varied smoothly, often over several orders of magnitude, allowing the development of the plate modes to be followed continuously from those of an initially square plate to those of doubly-arched, guitar-shaped, orthotropic plates and their dependence on all the above factors. PMID:25618046

  2. Methane Production In Forearc Sediments At The Costa Rican Convergent Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardace, D.; Morris, J. D.; Peacock, A.; White, D. C.

    2004-12-01

    Plate tectonics creates suitable habitats for deep biosphere organisms, affecting the distribution of biological communities on Earth. Subduction zones, where crustal materials return to the planetary interior through plate convergence, expose active microbial communities in subducting seafloor sediments to a fresh chemical inventory as diagenesis, metamorphic reactions, and tectonically-induced fluid flow alter sediments and surrounding porewaters. The plate interface (the decollement) experiences persistent geochemical flux of light hydrocarbon- and metal-bearing fluids from depth. This project (1) examines the habitability of the decollement zone at the Costa Rican convergent margin from a geochemical perspective, (2) uses lipid biomarkers to describe biomass distribution in sediment samples adjacent to and within the decollement, and (3) cites methanogenesis as a likely metabolic strategy employed by the resident microbial community. Sterile plugs of sediment were recovered from cores taken during Leg 205 of the Ocean Drilling Program, in the Middle America Trench off Costa Rica. Samples are from the incoming carbonate section of Site 1253 at 370-437 meters below seafloor (mbsf), in the forearc sedimentary wedge at Site 1255 at 134-145 mbsf, and around an upper fault (153-220 mbsf) and in the decollement zone (305-366 mbsf) at Site 1254. Drilling mud and fluid were sampled to monitor potential microbial contamination. Samples were immediately frozen at -80ºC. Prior to analysis, samples were freeze-dried in preparation for serial extraction of DNA and lipids. DNA was identified by fluorometry in 13 of 26 samples tested. The DNA was screened for methanogens by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), employing ME1 and ME2 primers that amplify a 0.75-kb region of the alpha-subunit gene for methyl coenzyme M reductase (MCR). Methanogen-specific genes were detected in DNA extracted from one Site 1253 sample (at 436.9 mbsf in the basal carbonates) and four Site

  3. Measuring phonetic convergence in speech production

    PubMed Central

    Pardo, Jennifer S.

    2013-01-01

    Phonetic convergence is defined as an increase in the similarity of acoustic-phonetic form between talkers. Previous research has demonstrated phonetic convergence both when a talker listens passively to speech and while talkers engage in social interaction. Much of this research has focused on a diverse array of acoustic-phonetic attributes, with fewer studies incorporating perceptual measures of phonetic convergence. The current paper reviews research on phonetic convergence in both non-interactive and conversational settings, and attempts to consolidate the diverse array of findings by proposing a paradigm that models perceptual and acoustic measures together. By modeling acoustic measures as predictors of perceived phonetic convergence, this paradigm has the potential to reconcile some of the diverse and inconsistent findings currently reported in the literature. PMID:23986738

  4. Formation of polarity convergences underlying shoot outgrowths.

    PubMed

    Abley, Katie; Sauret-Güeto, Susanna; Marée, Athanasius Fm; Coen, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    The development of outgrowths from plant shoots depends on formation of epidermal sites of cell polarity convergence with high intracellular auxin at their centre. A parsimonious model for generation of convergence sites is that cell polarity for the auxin transporter PIN1 orients up auxin gradients, as this spontaneously generates convergent alignments. Here we test predictions of this and other models for the patterns of auxin biosynthesis and import. Live imaging of outgrowths from kanadi1 kanadi2 Arabidopsis mutant leaves shows that they arise by formation of PIN1 convergence sites within a proximodistal polarity field. PIN1 polarities are oriented away from regions of high auxin biosynthesis enzyme expression, and towards regions of high auxin importer expression. Both expression patterns are required for normal outgrowth emergence, and may form part of a common module underlying shoot outgrowths. These findings are more consistent with models that spontaneously generate tandem rather than convergent alignments. PMID:27478985

  5. Nature of the plate contact and subduction zones diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Franco, Roberta; Govers, Rob; Wortel, Rinus

    2008-07-01

    In recent studies we showed that the nature of the plate contact in subduction zones is an important physical feature in both oceanic lithospheric subduction and continental collision. We investigated two fundamental states of the plate contact: one based on a fault and the other based on a subduction channel. Using geodynamic modeling, we determined the specific signatures of both states of the subduction contact. We established that the nature of the plate contact influences the dynamic response of the overriding and subducting plate, and is one of the controlling factors whether back-arc extension develops or not. In the present study, we combine results of our previous numerical experiments with a re-analysis of published observations. Overall, our synthesis connects seismic moment release with back-arc deformation and tectonic processes at the margin. It leads us to identify four classes of subduction zones. The first two classes result directly from our numerical experiments. In class 1, subduction zones are characterized by a plate contact that is largely fault-like with an accretionary margin. In class 2, the plate contacts are largely channel-type and have an erosive margin. Class 3, where the plate contact is entirely channel-like, consists of accretionary margins with a high sediment supply. Subduction zones of class 4, mostly characterized by an erosive convergent margin (northern Chile, Peru, Honshu and Kuril), are more complicated. They can be explained by incorporating regional observations.

  6. An extended field method solution for a pulse loaded thin plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donaldson, B. K.; Starkey, N. B.

    1980-01-01

    This paper deals with a new extension of a weighted residual method of analysis called the extended field method. The extended field method is applied for the first time to the problem of the transient vibration of a uniformly thin elastic plate. Numerical results have been obtained which validate the analysis procedure and show better solution convergence than is obtainable by standard methods of analysis for the same number of degrees of freedom. Further studies are necessary to obtain still better convergence.

  7. A kinematic model for the evolution of the Gorda Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoddard, Paul R.

    1987-01-01

    The magnetic lineation pattern produced by the Gorda Rise reflects a complex tectonic history marked by propagating ridges and nonrigid deformation of the Gorda plate. The Pacific-side lineation pattern is matched using a kinematic model which incorporates northward and southward propagating ridge segments and ridge rotation. By superimposing flexural-slip style deformation on the resulting Gorda-side lineations, and allowing convergent motion at the Mendocino Fracture Zone, the Gorda magnetic pattern is also successfully predicted. A similar model, but one which does not allow convergence at the Mendocino Fracture Zone, fails to produce the observed lineation pattern. Model predictions of the amount of material that would be 'obducted' at the Mendocino due to convergence between the Gorda and Pacific agree with bathymetric and density estimates of the amount of material located along the Mendocino Ridge.

  8. Phononic plate waves.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tsung-Tsong; Hsu, Jin-Chen; Sun, Jia-Hong

    2011-10-01

    In the past two decades, phononic crystals (PCs) which consist of periodically arranged media have attracted considerable interest because of the existence of complete frequency band gaps and maneuverable band structures. Recently, Lamb waves in thin plates with PC structures have started to receive increasing attention for their potential applications in filters, resonators, and waveguides. This paper presents a review of recent works related to phononic plate waves which have recently been published by the authors and coworkers. Theoretical and experimental studies of Lamb waves in 2-D PC plate structures are covered. On the theoretical side, analyses of Lamb waves in 2-D PC plates using the plane wave expansion (PWE) method, finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, and finite-element (FE) method are addressed. These methods were applied to study the complete band gaps of Lamb waves, characteristics of the propagating and localized wave modes, and behavior of anomalous refraction, called negative refraction, in the PC plates. The theoretical analyses demonstrated the effects of PC-based negative refraction, lens, waveguides, and resonant cavities. We also discuss the influences of geometrical parameters on the guiding and resonance efficiency and on the frequencies of waveguide and cavity modes. On the experimental side, the design and fabrication of a silicon-based Lamb wave resonator which utilizes PC plates as reflective gratings to form the resonant cavity are discussed. The measured results showed significant improvement of the insertion losses and quality factors of the resonators when the PCs were applied. PMID:21989878

  9. MAO NAS of Ukraine Plate Archives: Towards the WFPDB Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeeva, T. P.; Golovnya, V. V.; Yizhakevych, E. M.; Kizyun, L. N.; Pakuliak, L. K.; Shatokhina, S. V.; Tsvetkov, M. K.; Tsvetkova, K. P.; Sergeev, A. V.

    2006-04-01

    The plate archives of the Main Astronomical Observatory (Golosyiv, Kyiv) includes about 85 000 plates which were taken for various astronomical projects in the period 1950-2005. Among them there are more than 60 000 plates containing stellar, planetary and active solar formations spectra and more than 20 000 of direct northern sky area plates (mostly with wide-field). The catalogues of these direct wide-field plates have been prepared in computer-readable form. Now they are reduced in the WFPDB format and included into the database.

  10. Data Convergence - An Australian Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, S. S.; Howell, B.

    2012-12-01

    Coupled numerical physical, biogeochemical and sediment models are increasingly being used as integrators to help understand the cumulative or far field effects of change in the coastal environment. This reliance on modeling has forced observations to be delivered as data streams ingestible by modeling frameworks. This has made it easier to create near real-time or forecasting models than to try to recreate the past, and has lead in turn to the conversion of historical data into data streams to allow them to be ingested by the same frameworks. The model and observation frameworks under development within Australia's Commonwealth and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) are now feeding into the Australian Ocean Data Network's (AODN's) MARine Virtual Laboratory (MARVL) . The sensor, or data stream, brokering solution is centred around the "message" and all data flowing through the gateway is wrapped as a message. Messages consist of a topic and a data object and their routing through the gateway to pre-processors and listeners is determined by the topic. The Sensor Message Gateway (SMG) method is allowing data from different sensors measuring the same thing but with different temporal resolutions, units or spatial coverage to be ingested or visualized seamlessly. At the same time the model output as a virtual sensor is being explored, this again being enabled by the SMG. It is only for two way communications with sensor that rigorous adherence to standards is needed, by accepting existing data in less than ideal formats, but exposing them though the SMG we can move a step closer to the Internet Of Things by creating an Internet of Industries where each vested interest can continue with business as usual, contribute to data convergence and adopt more open standards when investment seems appropriate to that sector or business.Architecture Overview

  11. Pacific Rim and Pacific Plate Tectonism Associated With the Hawaiian Emperor Bend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, A.; Kroenke, L. W.; Wessel, P.; Harada, Y.

    2002-12-01

    Widespread Pacific Rim and Pacific plate tectonism both appear to be closely associated with a pronounced change in Pacific absolute plate motion (APM) that occurred about 43 Ma as revealed by the Hawaiian Emperor Bend. In the Western Pacific prior to the change, as the Pacific plate moved toward the north, Proto Izu -- Bonin -- Mariana (IBM) subduction was already occurring by 49 Ma, perhaps as early as 52 Ma near the northern end of the Proto IBM, evidenced by the emplacement of boninites in the forearc (Cosca et al., 1998). If the Philippine Basin -- Pacific plate circuit is traced though the Coral Sea basin after closing the Ayu and Sorel troughs, it is evident that the alignment of the Proto IBM (Kyushu -- Palau) subduction zone roughly paralleled the Pacific APM during the initiation of subduction. At ~ 43 Ma, Proto-IBM Trench subduction rapidly increased, possibly causing the major change in Pacific (and Australia) APM that produced the prominent bend in the Hawaiian-Emperor chain. This change also produced a the minor bend in the Louisville chain, as the Pacific plate began to move west-northwestward, as well as at least five more noticeable bends in other seamount chains across the Central Pacific. In the Northeastern Pacific, the expansive magmatic activity, which occurred during the early stage of Aleutian Arc growth between 55--50 Ma, began to wane between 45 and 40 Ma (Scholl et al., 1987). After the 43 Ma change in Pacific APM, the Aleutian subduction zone began to accommodate dextral slip at its western end, as well as continuing convergence at its eastern end. To the south, in the Eastern Pacific, Ridge propagation began about 43 Ma both north and south of the Murray FZ (extending southward to the Clarion FZ). Much farther to the south, changes are also apparent in the Pacific -- Antarctic spreading pattern at ~43 Ma. In the Central Pacific, following the 43 Ma change in Pacific plate motion, intraplate subduction began along the Manus -- North

  12. Paths of convergence for agriculture, health, and wealth.

    PubMed

    Dubé, Laurette; Pingali, Prabhu; Webb, Patrick

    2012-07-31

    This special feature calls for forward thinking around paths of convergence for agriculture, health, and wealth. Such convergence aims for a richer integration of smallholder farmers into national and global agricultural and food systems, health systems, value chains, and markets. The articles identify analytical innovation, where disciplines intersect, and cross-sectoral action where single, linear, and siloed approaches have traditionally dominated. The issues addressed are framed by three main themes: (i) lessons related to agricultural and food market growth since the 1960s; (ii) experiences related to the integration of smallholder agriculture into national and global business agendas; and (iii) insights into convergence-building institutional design and policy, including a review of complexity science methods that can inform such processes. In this introductory article, we first discuss the perspectives generated for more impactful policy and action when these three themes converge. We then push thematic boundaries to elaborate a roadmap for a broader, solution-oriented, and transdisciplinary approach to science, policies, and actions. As the global urban population crosses the 50% mark, both smallholder and nonsmallholder agriculture are keys in forging rural-urban links, where both farm and nonfarm activities contribute to sustainable nutrition security. The roadmaps would harness the power of business to reduce hunger and poverty for millions of families, contribute to a better alignment between human biology and modern lifestyles, and stem the spread of noncommunicable chronic diseases. PMID:22826252

  13. Paths of convergence for agriculture, health, and wealth

    PubMed Central

    Dubé, Laurette; Pingali, Prabhu; Webb, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    This special feature calls for forward thinking around paths of convergence for agriculture, health, and wealth. Such convergence aims for a richer integration of smallholder farmers into national and global agricultural and food systems, health systems, value chains, and markets. The articles identify analytical innovation, where disciplines intersect, and cross-sectoral action where single, linear, and siloed approaches have traditionally dominated. The issues addressed are framed by three main themes: (i) lessons related to agricultural and food market growth since the 1960s; (ii) experiences related to the integration of smallholder agriculture into national and global business agendas; and (iii) insights into convergence-building institutional design and policy, including a review of complexity science methods that can inform such processes. In this introductory article, we first discuss the perspectives generated for more impactful policy and action when these three themes converge. We then push thematic boundaries to elaborate a roadmap for a broader, solution-oriented, and transdisciplinary approach to science, policies, and actions. As the global urban population crosses the 50% mark, both smallholder and nonsmallholder agriculture are keys in forging rural–urban links, where both farm and nonfarm activities contribute to sustainable nutrition security. The roadmaps would harness the power of business to reduce hunger and poverty for millions of families, contribute to a better alignment between human biology and modern lifestyles, and stem the spread of noncommunicable chronic diseases. PMID:22826252

  14. Ridge push engine of plate tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swedan, N. H.

    2015-07-01

    Convection of the upper mantle drives the tectonic plates. This convection is a thermodynamic cycle that exchanges heat and mechanical work between mantle and tectonic plates. Thermodynamics and observations indicate that the energy of the geological activities resulting from plate tectonics is equal to the latent heat of melting, calculated at mantle's pressure, of the new ocean crust regenerated at midocean ridges. This energy varies with the temperature of ocean floor, which is correlated with surface temperature. The main objective of this manuscript is to demonstrate that plate tectonics is a thermodynamic engine and can be calculated as such. Unlike existing tectonic models, the thermodynamic model is very sensitive to variations of the temperature of ocean floor, which is correlated with surface temperature. Therefore, the observed increase of geological activities can be projected with surface temperature rise. Other objectives of the manuscript are to calculate the force that drives the tectonic plates, estimate the energy released, and validate the calculations based on experiments and observations. In addition to the scientific merit of projecting the geological activities, a good projection can have a broader impact at the societal and economical levels. Investment and insurance related decisions are affected by climate change, and our ability to project the geological activities is of paramount importance for the economy and public safety. This work can thus provide tools to assess the risks and hazards associated with the trend of geological activities with surface temperature rise.

  15. Episodic plate tectonics on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turcotte, Donald

    1992-01-01

    Studies of impact craters on Venus from the Magellan images have placed important constraints on surface volcanism. Some 840 impact craters have been identified with diameters ranging from 2 to 280 km. Correlations of this impact flux with craters on the Moon, Earth, and Mars indicate a mean surface age of 0.5 +/- 0.3 Ga. Another important observation is that 52 percent of the craters are slightly fractured and only 4.5 percent are embayed by lava flows. These observations led researchers to hypothesize that a pervasive resurfacing event occurred about 500 m.y. ago and that relatively little surface volcanism has occurred since. Other researchers have pointed out that a global resurfacing event that ceased about 500 MYBP is consistent with the results given by a recent study. These authors carried out a series of numerical calculations of mantle convection in Venus yielding thermal evolution results. Their model considered crustal recycling and gave rapid planetary cooling. They, in fact, suggested that prior to 500 MYBP plate tectonics was active in Venus and since 500 MYBP the lithosphere has stabilized and only hot-spot volcanism has reached the surface. We propose an alternative hypothesis for the inferred cessation of surface volcanism on Venus. We hypothesize that plate tectonics on Venus is episodic. Periods of rapid plate tectonics result in high rates of subduction that cool the interior resulting in more sluggish mantle convection.

  16. New observations of the active deformation along the oblique collision/subduction boundary zone between the North American and Caribbean plates (northern Hispaniola offshore margin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbó-Gorosabel, Andrés; Granja Bruña, José Luis; Rodríguez Zurrunero, Álvaro; Gómez de la Peña, Laura; Muñoz-Martín, Alfonso; Gómez Ballesteros, María; Gorosabel Araus, José Miguel; Espinosa, Salvador; Pazos, Anatonio; Catalán, Manuel; Yamil Rodríguez Asilis, Hector; Nuñez, José Luis; Muñoz, Santiago; ten Brink, Uri S.; Quijano, Jesús; Llanes Estrada, Pilar; Martín Dávila, José; Druet, María

    2015-04-01

    The Caribbean plate is moving relative to the North American plate at a rate of 20.0 ± 0.4 mm/y towards 074° ± 1°. This eastward motion has been taking place during most of the Cenozoic developing a 250 km-wide band of deformation, in which microplate and block tectonics take place. The eastward motion of the Hispaniola block is being impeded relative to the motion of the Caribbean plate's interior due to the collision with the Bahamas banks. This collision has resulted in the development of the Northern Hispaniola deformed belt along the northern Hispaniola offshore margin. A series of large (M6.2-M8.1) thrust earthquakes from 1943-1953, and two significant events in 1994 (M5.6) and 2003 (M6.4) occurred close to the city of Puerto Plata have been attributed to oblique collision/subduction of the North America plate and Bahamas banks beneath the northern Hispaniola. 300 km of 2D multi-channel seismic (MCS) reflection data and approximately 15000 km2 of high-resolution, systematic swath bathymetry data were recorded in the northern Hispaniola offshore margin as part of a larger survey carried out in November-December of 2013 aboard the Spanish R/V Sarmiento de Gamboa. MCS profiles were collected shooting a GI gun array (GGUN-II®) of 1750 ci. every 37.5 m and the signal recorded in a 3000 m-long streamer with 240 channels (Sentinel Sercel®). Differential GPS navigated high-resolution bathymetry data were collected using the hull-mounted Hydrosweep ATLAS DS echo-sounder system. Using new high-resolution multibeam bathymetry and MCS data, combined with previous 2D seismic data, we have studied the along- and across-strike variations of the geomorphology and shallower structure of the northern Hispaniola offshore margin. Here we present preliminary results focused on the identification and characterization of recent tectonic features in the region and provide well-defined targets to carry out future studies for seismic and tsunamigenic hazard assessment.

  17. Tectonics and Relative Plate Motions Around the Andaman Sea and Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguchi, T.; Murakoshi, T.

    2005-12-01

    There are several R-F-R models of the active back-arc opening system in the Andaman Sea proposed by authors, e.g., Curray et al. (1978), Eguchi et al. (1979), Eguchi (1991), Mantovani et al. (2001) and Nielsen et al. (2004). Most of the previous authors, except Eguchi et al. (1978) and Eguchi (1991), documented NW-SE or NNW-SSE striking relative plate motion at the Central Andaman Rift. Recent multi-beam bathymetry study by GEODYSSEA Project group confirmed the detailed configuration of the ENE-WSW striking Central Andaman Rift and adjacent transcurrent faults. All of data from the marine survey and recent shallow earthquakes as well as their strike-slip type focal mechanisms along the N-S striking fault segment at 95.2E from 11N to 12.5N support the approximate N-S opening at the adjacent Central Andaman Rift. The magnetic anomaly survey data of Curray et al. (1978) suggest that, in the case of N-S opening, the rate becomes 4.0 cm/y, although Curray et al. (1978) proposed the total rate of 3.7 cm/y in the case of NNW-SSE opening. We then studied th