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Sample records for active cool stars

  1. Chromospheric activity of cool giant stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steiman-Cameron, T. Y.

    1986-01-01

    During the seventh year of IUE twenty-six spectra of seventeen cool giant stars ranging in spectral type from K3 thru M6 were obtained. Together with spectra of fifteen stars observed during the sixth year of IUE, these low-resolution spectra have been used to: (1) examine chromospheric activity in the program stars and late type giants in general, and (2) evaluate the extent to which nonradiative heating affects the upper levels of cool giant photospheres. The stars observed in this study all have well determined TiO band strengths, angular diameters (determined from lunar occulations), bolometric fluxes, and effective temperatures. Chromospheric activity can therefore be related to effective temperatures providing a clearer picture of activity among cool giant stars than previously available. The stars observed are listed.

  2. Investigation of x ray variability in highly active cool stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    Ginga x ray observations of highly active cool star coronae were obtained and analyzed in an effort to better understand the nature of their time variability. The possible types of variability studied included x ray occultations via eclipses in a binary system, rotational modulation of x ray emission, flares, and a search for microflaring. Observation of both sigma(sup 2) CrB and Algol were performed successfully by Ginga. The sigma(sup 2) CrB observations occurred on 27 to 30 June 1988, and the Algol observations on 12 to 14 January 1989. In the sigma(sup 2) CrB observation, simultaneous IUE and Very Large Array (VLA) observations were obtained during part of the Ginga observation. Flaring activity was detected on sigma(sup 2) CrB in the Ginga 1.7 to 11 KeV band and in the IUE microwave region. A large flare on Algol which lasted well over 12 hours was detected, began with a maximum temperature of 65 MK which gradually decayed to 36 MK, and evidence was shown of highly ionized Fe line emission.

  3. GALEX Observes Nearby Cool Stars: Constraints on Ultraviolet Coronal Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatley, Jonathan; Welsh, Barry

    2016-01-01

    The GALEX ultraviolet mission (1350-2800A) has detected many late-type dwarf stars. Numerous M-type dwarf stars exhibit flaring and coronal activity; we use GALEX UV photometry to measure the variability of coronal emission in the GALEX NUV and FUV wavebands.

  4. Cooling of dense stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuruta, S.

    1972-01-01

    Cooling rates were calculated for neutron stars of about one solar mass and 10 km radius, with magnetic fields from zero to about 10 to the 14th power gauss, for extreme cases of maximum and zero superfluidity. The results show that most pulsars are so cold that thermal ionization of surface atoms would be negligible. Nucleon superfluidity and crystallization of heavy nuclei were treated quantitatively, and more realistic hadron star models were chosen. Cooling rates were calculated for a stable hyperon star near the maximum mass limit, a medium weight neutron star, and a light neutron star with neutron-rich heavy nuclei near the minimum mass limit. Results show that cooling rates are a sensitive function of density. The Crab and Vela pulsars are considered, as well as cooling of a massive white dwarf star.

  5. Cooling of neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pethick, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    It is at present impossible to predict the interior constitution of neutron stars based on theory and results from laboratory studies. It has been proposed that it is possible to obtain information on neutron star interiors by studying thermal radiation from their surfaces, because neutrino emission rates, and hence the temperature of the central part of a neutron star, depend on the properties of dense matter. The theory predicts that neutron stars cool relatively slowly if their cores are made up of nucleons, and cool faster if the matter is in an exotic state, such as a pion condensate, a kaon condensate, or quark matter. This view has recently been questioned by the discovery of a number of other processes that could lead to copious neutrino emission and rapid cooling.

  6. Upgrading the Solar-Stellar Connection: News about activity in Cool Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunther, H. M.; Poppenhaeger, K.; Testa, P.; Borgniet, S.; Brun, A. S.; Cegla, H. M.; Garraffo, C.; Kowalski, A.; Shapiro, A.; Shkolnik, E.; Spada, F.; Vidotto, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    In this splinter session, ten speakers presented results on solar and stellar activity and how the two fields are connected. This was followed by a lively discussion and supplemented by short, one-minute highlight talks. The talks presented new theoretical and observational results on mass accretion on the Sun, the activity rate of flare stars, the evolution of the stellar magnetic field on time scales of a single cycle and over the lifetime of a star, and two different approaches to model the radial-velocity jitter in cool stars that is due to the granulation on the surface. Talks and discussion showed how much the interpretation of stellar activity data relies on the sun and how the large number of objects available in stellar studies can extend the parameter range of activity models.

  7. Strong variable linear polarization in the cool active star II Peg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosén, Lisa; Kochukhov, Oleg; Wade, Gregg A.

    2014-08-01

    Magnetic fields of cool active stars are currently studied polarimetrically using only circular polarization observations. This provides limited information about the magnetic field geometry since circular polarization is only sensitive to the line-of-sight component of the magnetic field. Reconstructions of the magnetic field topology will therefore not be completely trustworthy when only circular polarization is used. On the other hand, linear polarization is sensitive to the transverse component of the magnetic field. By including linear polarization in the reconstruction the quality of the reconstructed magnetic map is dramatically improved. For that reason, we wanted to identify cool stars for which linear polarization could be detected at a level sufficient for magnetic imaging. Four active RS CVn binaries, II Peg, HR 1099, IM Peg, and σ Gem were observed with the ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeter at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. Mean polarization profiles in all four Stokes parameters were derived using the multi-line technique of least-squares deconvolution (LSD). Not only was linear polarization successfully detected in all four stars in at least one observation, but also, II Peg showed an extraordinarily strong linear polarization signature throughout all observations. This qualifies II Peg as the first promising target for magnetic Doppler imaging in all four Stokes parameters and, at the same time, suggests that other such targets can possibly be identified.

  8. Coronal Structures in Cool Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor); Dupree, Andrea K.

    2004-01-01

    Many papers have been published that further elucidate the structure of coronas in cool stars as determined from EUVE, HST, FUSE, Chandra, and XMM-Newton observations. In addition we are exploring the effects of coronas on the He I 1083081 transition that is observed in the infrared. Highlights of these are summarized below including publications during this reporting period and presentations. Ground-based magnetic Doppler imaging of cool stars suggests that active stars have active regions located at high latitudes on their surface. We have performed similar imaging in X-ray to locate the sites of enhanced activity using Chandra spectra. Chandra HETG observations of the bright eclipsing contact binary 44i Boo and Chandra LETG observations for the eclipsing binary VW Cep show X-ray line profiles that are Doppler-shifted by orbital motion. After careful analysis of the spectrum of each binary, a composite line-profile is constructed by adding the individual spectral lines. This high signal-to-noise ratio composite line-profile yields orbital velocities for these binaries that are accurate to 30 km/sec and allows their orbital motion to be studied at higher time resolutions. In conjunction with X-ray lightcurves, the phase-binned composite line-profiles constrain coronal structures to be small and located at high latitudes. These observations and techniques show the power of the Doppler Imaging Technique applied to X-ray line emission.

  9. Heavy Elements and Cool Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlgren, Glenn M.; Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Norris, Ryan P.

    2009-02-01

    We report on progress in the analysis of high-resolution near-IR spectra of α Orionis (M2 Iab) and other cool, luminous stars. Using synthetic spectrum techniques, we search for atomic absorption lines in the stellar spectra and evaluate the available line parameter data for use in our abundance analyses. Our study concentrates on the post iron-group elements copper through zirconium as a means of investigating the slow neutron-capture process of nucleosynthesis in massive stars and the mechanisms that transport recently processed material up into the photospheric region. We discuss problems with the atomic data and model atmospheres that need to be addressed before theoretically derived elemental abundances from pre-supernova nucleosynthesis calculations can be tested by comparison with abundances determined from observations of cool, massive stars.

  10. Heavy Elements and Cool Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahlgren, Glenn M.; Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Norris, Ryan P.

    2008-01-01

    We report on progress in the analysis of high-resolution near-IR spectra of alpha Orionis (M2 Iab) and other cool, luminous stars. Using synthetic spectrum techniques, we search for atomic absorption lines in the stellar spectra and evaluate the available line parameter data for use in our abundance analyses. Our study concentrates on the post iron-group elements copper through zirconium as a means of investigating the slow neutron-capture process of nucleosynthesis in massive stars and the mechanisms that transport recently processed material up into the photospheric region. We discuss problems with the atomic data and model atmospheres that need to be addressed before theoretically derived elemental abundances from pre-supernova nucleosynthesis calculations can be tested by comparison with abundances determined from observations of cool, massive stars.

  11. Weighing Ultra-Cool Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-05-01

    Large Ground-Based Telescopes and Hubble Team-Up to Perform First Direct Brown Dwarf Mass Measurement [1] Summary Using ESO's Very Large Telescope at Paranal and a suite of ground- and space-based telescopes in a four-year long study, an international team of astronomers has measured for the first time the mass of an ultra-cool star and its companion brown dwarf. The two stars form a binary system and orbit each other in about 10 years. The team obtained high-resolution near-infrared images; on the ground, they defeated the blurring effect of the terrestrial atmosphere by means of adaptive optics techniques. By precisely determining the orbit projected on the sky, the astronomers were able to measure the total mass of the stars. Additional data and comparison with stellar models then yield the mass of each of the components. The heavier of the two stars has a mass around 8.5% of the mass of the Sun and its brown dwarf companion is even lighter, only 6% of the solar mass. Both objects are relatively young with an age of about 500-1,000 million years. These observations represent a decisive step towards the still missing calibration of stellar evolution models for very-low mass stars. PR Photo 19a/04: Orbit of the ultra-cool stars in 2MASSW J0746425+2000321. PR Photo 19b/04: Animated Gif of the orbital motion. Telephone number star Even though astronomers have found several hundreds of very low mass stars and brown dwarfs, the fundamental properties of these extreme objects, such as masses and surface temperatures, are still not well known. Within the cosmic zoo, these ultra-cool stars represent a class of "intermediate" objects between giant planets - like Jupiter - and "normal" stars less massive than our Sun, and to understand them well is therefore crucial to the field of stellar astrophysics. The problem with these ultra-cool stars is that contrary to normal stars that burn hydrogen in their central core, no unique relation exists between the luminosity of the

  12. Chemical Soups Around Cool Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    This artist's conception shows a young, hypothetical planet around a cool star. A soupy mix of potentially life-forming chemicals can be seen pooling around the base of the jagged rocks. Observations from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope hint that planets around cool stars the so-called M-dwarfs and brown dwarfs that are widespread throughout our galaxy might possess a different mix of life-forming, or prebiotic, chemicals than our young Earth.

    Life on our planet is thought to have arisen out of a pond-scum-like mix of chemicals. Some of these chemicals are thought to have come from a planet-forming disk of gas and dust that swirled around our young sun. Meteorites carrying the chemicals might have crash-landed on Earth.

    Astronomers don't know if these same life-generating processes are taking place around stars that are cooler than our sun, but the Spitzer observations show their disk chemistry is different. Spitzer detected a prebiotic molecule, called hydrogen cyanide, in the disks around yellow stars like our sun, but found none around cooler, less massive, reddish stars. Hydrogen cyanide is a carbon-containing, or organic compound. Five hydrogen cyanide molecules can join up to make adenine a chemical element of the DNA molecule found in all living organisms on Earth.

  13. Coronal temperatures of selected active cool stars as derived from low resolution Einstein observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilhu, Osmi; Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    1990-01-01

    Mean coronal temperatures of some active G-K stars were derived from Rev1-processed Einstein-observatory's IPC-spectra. The combined X-ray and transition region emission line data are in rough agreement with static coronal loop models. Although the sample is too small to derive any statistically significant conclusions, it suggests that the mean coronal temperature depends linearly on the inverse Rossby-number, with saturation at short rotation periods.

  14. Cool Stars Sing the Blues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luttermoser, D. G.

    2005-12-01

    A high-dispersion spectral atlas of cool red giant stars in the blue and violet is presented. The spectra were obtained over a six-year time period with the stellar spectrograph of the McMath-Pierce Telescope on Kitt Peak. Both N-type carbon stars and M-type oxygen-rich stars are presented from 3900 to 4600 Å, with the M-type stars containing both semiregular and Mira-type variables. The dominant absorption features in these stars at these wavelength result primarily from neutral metals, especially iron, and the CH and CN diatomic molecules. The Miras also show strong emission lines during some of their pulsation cycle. Many of these emission lines result from fluorescence from the Mg II h & k lines in the UV. For these fluoresced features, comparisons are made between the Miras and the semiregular carbon-rich and oxygen-rich variables. Where the oxygen-rich semiregulars show no hint of fluorescence in these features, the carbon stars show a definite ``filling-in'' of the absorption lines.

  15. Weighing Ultra-Cool Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-05-01

    Large Ground-Based Telescopes and Hubble Team-Up to Perform First Direct Brown Dwarf Mass Measurement [1] Summary Using ESO's Very Large Telescope at Paranal and a suite of ground- and space-based telescopes in a four-year long study, an international team of astronomers has measured for the first time the mass of an ultra-cool star and its companion brown dwarf. The two stars form a binary system and orbit each other in about 10 years. The team obtained high-resolution near-infrared images; on the ground, they defeated the blurring effect of the terrestrial atmosphere by means of adaptive optics techniques. By precisely determining the orbit projected on the sky, the astronomers were able to measure the total mass of the stars. Additional data and comparison with stellar models then yield the mass of each of the components. The heavier of the two stars has a mass around 8.5% of the mass of the Sun and its brown dwarf companion is even lighter, only 6% of the solar mass. Both objects are relatively young with an age of about 500-1,000 million years. These observations represent a decisive step towards the still missing calibration of stellar evolution models for very-low mass stars. PR Photo 19a/04: Orbit of the ultra-cool stars in 2MASSW J0746425+2000321. PR Photo 19b/04: Animated Gif of the orbital motion. Telephone number star Even though astronomers have found several hundreds of very low mass stars and brown dwarfs, the fundamental properties of these extreme objects, such as masses and surface temperatures, are still not well known. Within the cosmic zoo, these ultra-cool stars represent a class of "intermediate" objects between giant planets - like Jupiter - and "normal" stars less massive than our Sun, and to understand them well is therefore crucial to the field of stellar astrophysics. The problem with these ultra-cool stars is that contrary to normal stars that burn hydrogen in their central core, no unique relation exists between the luminosity of the

  16. Cool Star Binaries with ALEXIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    We proposed to search for high-temperature, flare-produced Fe XXIII line emission from active cool star binary systems using the ALEXIS all-sky survey. Previous X-ray transient searches with ARIEL V and HEAO-1, and subsequent shorter duration monitoring with the GINGA and EXOSAT satellites demonstrated that active binaries can produce large (EM approximately equals 10(exp 55-56/cu cm) X-ray flares lasting several hours or longer. Hot plasma from these flares at temperatures of 10(exp 7)K or more should produce Fe XXIII line emission at lambda = 132.8 A, very near the peak response of ALEXIS telescopes 1A and 2A. Our primary goals were to estimate flare frequency for the largest flares in the active binary systems, and, if the data permitted, to derive a distribution of flare energy vs. frequency for the sample as a whole. After a long delay due to the initial problems with the ALEXIS attitude control, the heroic efforts on the part of the ALEXIS satellite team enabled us to carry out this survey. However, the combination of the higher than expected and variable background in the ALEXIS detectors, and the lower throughput of the ALEXIS telescopes resulted in no convincing detections of large flares from the active binary systems. In addition, vignetting-corrected effective exposure times from the ALEXIS aspect solution were not available prior to the end of this contract; therefore, we were unable to convert upper limits measured in ALEXIS counts to the equivalent L(sub EUV).

  17. Axion cooling of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedrakian, Armen

    2016-03-01

    Cooling simulations of neutron stars and their comparison with the data from thermally emitting x-ray sources put constraints on the properties of axions, and by extension, of any light pseudoscalar dark matter particles, whose existence has been postulated to solve the strong-C P problem of QCD. We incorporate the axion emission by pair-breaking and formation processes by S - and P -wave nucleonic condensates in a benchmark code for cooling simulations, as well as provide fit formulas for the rates of these processes. Axion cooling of neutron stars has been simulated for 24 models covering the mass range 1 to 1.8 solar masses, featuring nonaccreted iron and accreted light-element envelopes, and a range of nucleon-axion couplings. The models are based on an equation state predicting conservative physics of superdense nuclear matter that does not allow for the onset of fast cooling processes induced by phase transitions to non-nucleonic forms of matter or high proton concentration. The cooling tracks in the temperature vs age plane were confronted with the (time-averaged) measured surface temperature of the central compact object in the Cas A supernova remnant as well as surface temperatures of three nearby middle-aged thermally emitting pulsars. We find that the axion coupling is limited to fa/107 GeV ≥(5 - 10 ) , which translates into an upper bound on axion mass ma≤(0.06 - 0.12 ) eV for Peccei-Quinn charges of the neutron |Cn|˜0.04 and proton |Cp|˜0.4 characteristic for hadronic models of axions.

  18. Theory of cooling neutron stars versus observations

    SciTech Connect

    Yakovlev, D. G.; Gnedin, O. Y.; Kaminker, A. D.; Potekhin, A. Y.

    2008-02-27

    We review current state of neutron star cooling theory and discuss the prospects to constrain the equation of state, neutrino emission and superfluid properties of neutron star cores by comparing the cooling theory with observations of thermal radiation from isolated neutron stars.

  19. Chromospheres of Luminous Cool Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupree, Andrea K.; Avrett, Eugene

    2015-08-01

    Ultraviolet imaging of Alpha Orionis (Betelgeuse) reveals a complex variable chromospheric structure. Such atmospheres in luminous cool stars can affect features in the optical spectrum. Constructing semi-empiricalmodel atmospheres of luminous stars including the temperature rise due to a chromosphere allows us to predict potential effects on optical transitions. The radiative transfer code, PANDORA, calculates line strengths in a LTE or non-LTE formulation, spherical symmetry, and includes velocity fields when present. Various aspects of the line calculations and their impact on equivalent widths will be discussed including developing appropriate chromospheric models, comparison to a pure radiative equilibrium model, transitions sensitive to non-LTE and the effects of a realistic spherical non-LTE approximation as compared to a plane-parallel approximation. We discuss the extent to which a chromosphere can impact the determination of stellar abundances.

  20. Observation of winds in cool stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupree, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    Sufficient observational material - ultraviolet spectroscopic measures, quantitative optical spectroscopy, and X-ray photometry exists to enable discernment of the presence and character of mass loss in cool stars and to establish meaningful constraints on theoretical models. Two determinants of atmospheric wind structure - temperature and gravity - may suffice in a most superficial way to define the wind and atmospheric structure in a star; however more extensive observations demonstrate the importance of magnetic surface activity and its particular geometrical configuration. Successive observations of an active binary system and a supergiant star reveal that magnetic activity and perhaps mass loss occur on restricted regions of a stellar surface and that long lived structures are present in a wind.

  1. FUSE Observations of Luminous Cool Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupree, A. K.; Young, P. R.; Ake, T. B.

    2000-12-01

    Luminous cool stars can address the evolution of magnetic activity and the dynamics of stellar winds and mass loss. The region of yellow supergiants in the HR diagram contains stars of intermediate mass both with coronas and those possessing a hot outer atmosphere in the presence of a strong wind (the ``hybrid'' stars). These hybrid objects hold particular significance for evolution studies because they represent the physically important connection between solar-like stars (with coronas and fast winds of low-mass loss rate) and the cool supergiant stars (Alpha Ori-like) with cool outer atmospheres and massive winds. The Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) measured the chromospheric and transition region emissions of the bright G2 Ib supergiant Beta Draconis (HD 159181) on 9 May 2000. Two exposures through the large aperture totaled 7695 s and were obtained in all channels covering the region λ λ 912-1180. Emission from chromospheric and transition region ions (C III, O VI, Si III, S IV, S VI) is detected along with a number of low ion stages. Profiles of strong lines are asymmetric suggesting the presence of a wind. A short exposure (3260 s) of Alpha Aquarii (HD 209750), a hybrid supergiant also of spectral type G2 Ib was obtained June 29, 2000. Dynamics of the atmospheres can be inferred from line profiles. The atmospheric temperature distribution, densities, and scale sizes can be evaluated from line fluxes to characterize the differences between a coronal star and a hybrid supergiant. FUSE is a NASA Origins mission operated by The Johns Hopkins University. Funding for this research is provided through NASA Contract NAS-532985.

  2. Cooling, AGN Feedback and Star Formation in Cool-Core Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg; Ruszkowski, Mateusz

    2015-01-01

    The feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is widely considered to be the major heating source in cool-core galaxy clusters to prevent a classical cooling flow. Numerical simulations with AGN feedback have successfully suppressed radiative cooling, but generally fail to reproduce the right amount of cold gas and the expected cyclical AGN activities. We perform adaptive mesh simulations including both momentum-driven AGN feedback and star formation to study the interplay between cooling, AGN heating and star formation over ~ 6.5 Gyr time in an isolated cool-core cluster. Cold clumps first cool out of the ICM due to the non-liner perturbation driven by the AGN jets. These cold clumps feed both star formation and the supermassive black hole (SMBH), triggering an AGN outburst which increases the entropy of the ICM and reduces its cooling rate. Within 1-2 Gyr, star formation completely consumes the cold gas, which leads to a brief shutoff of the AGN. The ICM quickly cools and develops multiphase gas again, followed by another cycle of star formation/AGN outburst. Within 6.5 Gyr, we observe three such cycles. The average star formation rate is ~40 solar mass/yr. The black hole accretion rate shows a large scatter, but the average correlates well with the star formation rate and is roughly one order of magnitude lower.

  3. An Investigation of the Largest Flares in Active Cool Star Binaries with ALEXIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    After a long delay due to the initial problems with the ALEXIS attitude control, the heroic efforts on the part of the ALEXIS satellite team enabled us to carry out this survey. However, the combination of the higher than expected and variable background in the ALEXIS detectors, and the lower throughput of the ALEXIS telescopes resulted in no convincing detections of large flares from the active binary systems. In addition, vignetting-corrected effective exposure times from the ALEXIS aspect solution were not available prior to the end of this contract; therefore, we were unable to convert upper limits measured in ALEXIS counts to the equivalent.

  4. The structure, energy balance, and winds of cool stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    Solar magnetic field phenomena which occur in cool stars are summarized. Factors which can produce magnetic fields in stars are listed. Information on cool star atmospheres, provided by high dispersion spectra, is discussed. These spectra show that in Beta Dra (G2 Ib) the transition lines are red shifted (an antiwind), perhaps indicating downflows in closed magnetic flux tubes, as seen in the solar flux tubes above sunspots. The G and K giants and supergiants are classed as active, quiet, or hybrid, depending on whether their atmospheres are dominated by closed magnetic flux tubes, open field geometries, or a predominantly open geometry with a few closed flux tubes embedded.

  5. Activity and cool spots on the surfaces of G-type stars with superflares from observations with the Kepler Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savanov, I. S.; Dmitrienko, E. S.

    2015-09-01

    The properties of active regions (cool spots) on the surfaces of 279 G-type stars in which more than 1500 superflares with energies of 1033-1036 erg were detected are analyzed. Diagrams plotting the superflare energy against activity parameters of the stars (the area of their magnetic spots) are considered, and a more extensive study of the activity of two stars with the highest numbers of flares is presented. The range of variation of the superflare energies (up to two orders of magnitude) is realized over the entire interval of rotation periods. It is proposed that the plot of superflare energy vs. rotational period is bimodal. There are probably no appreciable differences in the maximum flare energies for the two groups of objects, which have rotational periods of more than and less than 10 days. Three groups of stars with different surface spottednesses can be distinguished in a plot of superflare energy vs. cool-spot area. The range of variation of the flare energy within a group is roughly the same for these three groups. Most of the points on this diagram lie to the right of the dependence corresponding to B = 3000Gand an inclination i = 90° (the first two groups of objects). It is confirmed that the flare activity is not related directly to circumpolar active regions, since the majority of the points on the diagram lie to the right of the dependence for B = 1000 G and i = 3°. Analysis of stars from the sample, including objects with more than 20 superflares, shows that large variations of the energy (by up to two orders of magnitude) can be reached with small variations of the spottedness parameter S for a single star. Appreciable variability of the spottedness (by factors of five to six) was detected for only two objects from the sample (KIC 10422252 and KIC 11764567). These stars displayed an increase in the flare energy by orders of magnitude for any spottedness level. The activity of KIC 11551430 and KIC 11764567 is analyzed in detail using all

  6. Cooling of neutron stars with diffusive envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beznogov, M. V.; Fortin, M.; Haensel, P.; Yakovlev, D. G.; Zdunik, J. L.

    2016-08-01

    We study the effects of heat blanketing envelopes of neutron stars on their cooling. To this aim, we perform cooling simulations using newly constructed models of the envelopes composed of binary ion mixtures (H-He, He-C, C-Fe) varying the mass of lighter ions (H, He or C) in the envelope. The results are compared with those calculated using the standard models of the envelopes which contain the layers of lighter (accreted) elements (H, He and C) on top of the Fe layer, varying the mass of accreted elements. The main effect is that the chemical composition of the envelopes influences their thermal conductivity and, hence, thermal insulation of the star. For illustration, we apply these results to estimate the internal temperature of the Vela pulsar and to study the cooling of neutron stars of ages of 105 - 106 yr at the photon cooling stage. The uncertainties of the cooling models associated with our poor knowledge of chemical composition of the heat insulating envelopes strongly complicate theoretical reconstruction of the internal structure of cooling neutron stars from observations of their thermal surface emission.

  7. Cooling, AGN Feedback, and Star Formation in Simulated Cool-core Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.; Ruszkowski, Mateusz; Voit, G. Mark; O'Shea, Brian W.; Donahue, Megan

    2015-10-01

    Numerical simulations of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) feedback in cool-core galaxy clusters have successfully avoided classical cooling flows, but often produce too much cold gas. We perform adaptive mesh simulations that include momentum-driven AGN feedback, self-gravity, star formation, and stellar feedback, focusing on the interplay between cooling, AGN heating, and star formation in an isolated cool-core cluster. Cold clumps triggered by AGN jets and turbulence form filamentary structures tens of kpc long. This cold gas feeds both star formation and the supermassive black hole (SMBH), triggering an AGN outburst that increases the entropy of the intracluster medium (ICM) and reduces its cooling rate. Within 1-2 Gyr, star formation completely consumes the cold gas, leading to a brief shutoff of the AGN. The ICM quickly cools and redevelops multiphase gas, followed by another cycle of star formation/AGN outburst. Within 6.5 Gyr, we observe three such cycles. There is good agreement between our simulated cluster and the observations of cool-core clusters. ICM cooling is dynamically balanced by AGN heating, and a cool-core appearance is preserved. The minimum cooling time to free-fall time ratio typically varies between a few and ≳ 20. The star formation rate (SFR) covers a wide range, from 0 to a few hundred {M}⊙ {{yr}}-1, with an average of ˜ 40 {M}⊙ {{yr}}-1. The instantaneous SMBH accretion rate shows large variations on short timescales, but the average value correlates well with the SFR. Simulations without stellar feedback or self-gravity produce qualitatively similar results, but a lower SMBH feedback efficiency (0.1% compared to 1%) results in too many stars.

  8. Spectroscopic observations of cool degenerate star candidates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintzen, P.

    1986-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations are reported for 23 Luyten Half-Second degenerate star candidates and for 13 Luyten-Palomar common proper-motion pairs containing possible degenerate star components. Twenty-five degenerate stars are identified, 20 of which lack previous spectroscopy. Most of these stars are cool - Luyten color class g or later. One star, LP 77-57, shows broad continuum depressions similar to those in LHS 1126, which Liebert and Dahn attributed to pressure-shifted C2. A second degenerate star, LHS 290, exhibits apparent strong Swan bands which are blueshifted about 75 A. Further observations, including polarimetry and photometry, are required to appraise the spectroscopic peculiarities of these stars. Finally, five cool, sharp-lined DA white dwarfs have been observed to detect lines of metals and to determine line strengths. None of these DAs show signs of Mg b or the G band, and four show no evidence of Ca II K. The attempt to detect Ca MI in the fifth star, G199-71, was inconclusive.

  9. Geminga: A cooling superfluid neutron star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, Dany

    1994-01-01

    We compare the recent temperature estimate for Geminga with neutron star cooling models. Because of its age (approximately 3.4 x 10(exp 5) yr), Geminga is in the photon cooling era. We show that its surface temperature (approximately 5.2 x 10(exp 5) K) can be understood by both types of neutrino cooling scenarios, i.e., slow neutrino cooling by the modified Urca process or fast neutrino cooling by the direct Urca process or by some exotic matter, and thus does not allow us to discriminate between these two competing schemes. However, for both types of scenarios, agreement with the observed temperature can only be obtained if baryon pairing is present in most, if not all, of the core of the star. Within the slow neutrino cooling scenario, early neutrino cooling is not sufficient to explain the observed low temperature, and extensive pairing in the core is necessary to reduce the specific heat and increase the cooling rate in the present photon cooling era. Within all the fast neutrino cooling scenarios, pairing is necessary throughout the whole core to control the enormous early neutrino emission which, without pairing suppression, would result in a surface temperature at the present time much lower than observed. We also comment on the recent temperature estimates for PSR 0656+14 and PSR 1055-52, which pertain to the same photon cooling era. If one assumes that all neutron stars undergo fast neutrino cooling, then these two objects also provide evidence for extensive baryon pairing in their core; but observational uncertainties also permit a more conservative interpretation, with slow neutrino emission and no pairing at all. We argue though that observational evidence for the slow neutrino cooling model (the 'standard' model) is in fact very dim and that the interpretation of the surface temperature of all neutron stars could be done with a reasonable theoretical a priori within the fast neutrino cooling scenarios only. In this case, Geminga, PSR 0656+14, and PSR

  10. Advanced Spectral Library (ASTRAL): Cool stars edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, T. R.

    2013-02-01

    ASTRAL is a project to create high-resolution, high-S/N UV (1150-3200 Å) atlases of bright stars utilizing {HST}/STIS. During Cycle 18 (2010-2011), eight cool star targets were observed, including key objects like Procyon and Betelgeuse, churning through 146 orbits in the process. The new spectral atlases are publically available through the project website. Data were obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope.

  11. Hot Jupiters and cool stars

    SciTech Connect

    Villaver, Eva; Mustill, Alexander J.; Livio, Mario; Siess, Lionel

    2014-10-10

    Close-in planets are in jeopardy, as their host stars evolve off the main sequence (MS) to the subgiant and red giant phases. In this paper, we explore the influences of the stellar mass (in the range 1.5-2 M {sub ☉}), mass-loss prescription, planet mass (from Neptune up to 10 Jupiter masses), and eccentricity on the orbital evolution of planets as their parent stars evolve to become subgiants and red giants. We find that planet engulfment along the red giant branch is not very sensitive to the stellar mass or mass-loss rates adopted in the calculations, but quite sensitive to the planetary mass. The range of initial separations for planet engulfment increases with decreasing mass-loss rates or stellar masses and increasing planetary masses. Regarding the planet's orbital eccentricity, we find that as the star evolves into the red giant phase, stellar tides start to dominate over planetary tides. As a consequence, a transient population of moderately eccentric close-in Jovian planets is created that otherwise would have been expected to be absent from MS stars. We find that very eccentric and distant planets do not experience much eccentricity decay, and that planet engulfment is primarily determined by the pericenter distance and the maximum stellar radius.

  12. Cool Carbon Stars in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gigoyan, K. S.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we report current status of search and study for Faint High Latitude Carbon Stars (FHLCs). Data for more than 1800 spectroscopically confirmed FHLCs are known, which are found thanks to objective prism surveys and photometric selections. More than half of the detected objects belongs to group of dwarf Carbon (dC) stars. Many-sided investigations based on modern astrophysical databases are necessary to study the space distribution of different groups of the FHLC stars and their possible origin in the Halo of our Galaxy. We report about the selection of FHLCs by the spectroscopic surveys: First Byurakan Survey (FBS), Hamburg/ESO Survey (HES), LAMOST Pilot Survey and SDSS, as well as by photometric selection: APM Survey for Cool Carbon Stars in the Galactic Halo, SDSS and 2MASS JHK colours.

  13. Rotation and cooling of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negreiros, R.; Schramm, S.; Weber, F.

    2014-09-01

    Driven by the loss of energy, isolated rotating neutron stars (pulsars) are gradually slowing down to lower frequencies, which increases the tremendous compression of the matter inside of them. This increase in compression changes both the global properties of rotating neutron stars as well as their hadronic core compositions. Both effects may register themselves observationally in the thermal evolution of such stars, as demonstrated in this work. The rotation-driven particle process which we consider here is the direct Urca (DU) process, which is known to become operative in neutron stars if the number of protons in the stellar core exceeds a critical limit of around 11 % to 15 %. We find that neutron stars spinning down from moderately high rotation rates of a few hundred Hertz may be creating just the right conditions where the DU process becomes operative, leading to an observable effect (enhanced cooling) in the temperature evolution of such neutron stars. We will also study the thermal evolution of neutron stars whose spherical symmetry has been broken due to non-zero rotation. For this we will derive the energy balance and transport equations, taking into account the metric of a rotating fluid distribution and solve these equations numerically.

  14. High resolution interferometry of cool stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    A description is given of results obtained in a program of infrared high resolution spectroscopy of cool stars. The nature of infrared stellar spectra is considered along with questions regarding astrophysics and stellar infrared spectroscopy. An abundance analysis for alpha Ori (Betelgeuse) is conducted. The C-12/C-13 abundance ratio is examined and attention is given to the O-16/O-18 and O-16/O-17 abundance ratios. M stars and SiO vibration-rotation bands are discussed and questions regarding the characteristics of the molecular hydrogen quadrupole vibration-rotation lines are explored.

  15. Neutron star cooling and pion condensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umeda, Hideyuki; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Tsuruta, Sachiko; Muto, Takumi; Tatsumi, Toshitaka

    1994-01-01

    The nonstandard cooling of a neutron star with the central pion core is explored. By adopting the latest results from the pion condensation theory, neutrino emissivity is calulated for both pure charged pions and a mixture of charged and neutral pions, and the equations of state are constructed for the pion condensate. The effect of superfluidity on cooling is investigated, adopting methods more realistic than in previous studies. Our theoretical models are compared with the currently updated observational data, and possible implications are explored.

  16. The structure, energy balance, and winds of cool stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    The phenomena associated with magnetic fields in the Sun are summarized and it is shown that similar phenomena occur in cool stars. High dispersion spectra are providing unique information concerning densities, atmospheric extension, and emission line widths. A recent unanticipated discovery is that the transition lines are redshifted (an antiwind) in beta Dra (G2 Ib) and perhaps other stars. This is interpreted as indicating downflows in closed magnetic flux tubes as are seen in the solar flux tubes above sunspots. The G and K giants and supergiants are classified as active stars, quiet stars, or hybrid stars depending on whether their atmospheres are dominated by closed magnetic flux tubes, open field geometries, or a predominately open geometry with a few closed flux tubes embedded.

  17. Surface magnetism of cool giant and supergiant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Heidi

    2014-08-01

    The existence of starspots on late-type giant stars in close binary systems, that exhibit rapid rotation due to tidal locking, has been known for more than five decades. Photometric monitoring spanning decades has allowed studying the long-term magnetic activity in these stars revealing complicated activity cycles. The development of observing and analysis techniques that has occurred during the past two decades has also enabled us to study the detailed starspot and magnetic field configurations on these active giants. In the recent years magnetic fields have also been detected on slowly rotating giants and supergiant stars. In this paper I review what is known of the surface magnetism in the cool giant and supergiant stars.

  18. Departures from LTE in Cool Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashonkina, L.

    2010-11-01

    Departures from LTE may significantly affect determinations of stellar parameters and chemical abundances of cool stars, in particular, metal-poor stars. We review the application of the non-LTE ionization equilibrium between Ca i and Ca ii to constrain the surface gravity of very metal-poor and hyper metal-poor stars spectroscopically. The few examples from Galactic chemical evolution studies show that our understanding of how nucleosynthesis proceeds throughout Galactic history depends on the accuracy of spectral line formation modelling. Problems of non-LTE modelling of Fe i- Fe ii are also discussed. This research was supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft with grant 436 RUS 17/13/07 and by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research with grant 05-02-39005-GFEN-a.

  19. Convection in Cool Stars, as Revealed through Stellar Brightness Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastien, Fabienne A.

    2015-08-01

    As a result of the high precision and cadence of surveys like MOST, CoRoT, and Kepler, we may now directly observe the very low-level light variations arising from stellar granulation in cool stars. We will discuss how this enables us to measure the physical properties of Sun-like stars, to understand the nature of surface convection and its connection to magnetic activity, and to better determine the properties of planets around cool stars. Indeed, such sensitive photometric "flicker" variations are now within reach for thousands of stars, and we estimate that ongoing and upcoming missions like K2, PLATO, and TESS will enable such measurements for >100 000 stars. We present recent results that tie “flicker” to granulation and enable a simple measurement of stellar surface gravity with a precision of ~0.1-0.2 dex. We use this, together and solely with two other simple ways of characterizing the stellar photometric variations in a high quality light curve, to construct an evolutionary diagram for Sun-like stars from the Main Sequence on towards the red giant branch. We discuss further work that correlates “flicker” with stellar density, allowing the application of astrodensity profiling techniques used in exoplanet characterization to many more stars. We also present results suggesting that the granulation of F stars must be magnetically suppressed in order to fit observations. Finally, we show that we may quantitatively predict a star's radial velocity jitter from its brightness variations, permitting the use of discovery light curves to help prioritize follow-up observations of transiting exoplanets.

  20. Physical Theories of Winds From Cool Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Cool stars in the late stages of their evolution generally lose mass at a prodigious rate. This includes low mass stars on the red giant branch, on the asymptotic giant branch, and those transiting from the asymptotic giant branch to the planetary nebula phase, as well as massive supergiants. All of these objects are surrounded by dense circumstellar gas and often dust envelopes. This mass loss is an important source of gas and dust for the interstellar medium. For some of these objects, the mass loss rate exceeds the nuclear burning rate and, hence, mass loss determines the subsequent evolution of the star. A variety processes have been invoked to explain the mass loss of these objects. A consensus has developed over the last decade: photospheric processes create an extended atmosphere which extends to several stellar radii. At this height above the photosphere, dust grains can form and radiation pressure drives the dust out. The gas is dragged along by friction. While the detailed processes involved, in particular those lifting the atmosphere, may differ from object to object, this paradigm seems applicable to all of these objects. The process of mass loss breaks up into three parts: 1) The formation of the extended atmosphere; 2) the nucleation and condensation of dust; and 3) The radiation pressure driven wind. Each of these processes will be discussed with an emphasis on those processes that play a role in the mass loss from asymptotic giant branch stars for which the most detailed theories have been developed.

  1. Multiplicity among chemically peculiar stars. II. Cool magnetic Ap stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrier, F.; North, P.; Udry, S.; Babel, J.

    2002-10-01

    We present new orbits for sixteen Ap spectroscopic binaries, four of which might in fact be Am stars, and give their orbital elements. Four of them are SB2 systems: HD 5550, HD 22128, HD 56495 and HD 98088. The twelve other stars are: HD 9996, HD 12288, HD 40711, HD 54908, HD 65339, HD 73709, HD 105680, HD 138426, HD 184471, HD 188854, HD 200405 and HD 216533. Rough estimates of the individual masses of the components of HD 65339 (53 Cam) are given, combining our radial velocities with the results of speckle interferometry and with Hipparcos parallaxes. Considering the mass functions of 74 spectroscopic binaries from this work and from the literature, we conclude that the distribution of the mass ratio is the same for cool Ap stars and for normal G dwarfs. Therefore, the only differences between binaries with normal stars and those hosting an Ap star lie in the period distribution: except for the case of HD 200405, all orbital periods are longer than (or equal to) 3 days. A consequence of this peculiar distribution is a deficit of null eccentricities. There is no indication that the secondary has a special nature, like e.g. a white dwarf. Based on observations collected at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence (CNRS), France. Tables 1 to 3 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/394/151 Appendix B is only available in electronic form at http://www.edpsciences.org

  2. Activity in F stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, Sidney C.; Boesgaard, Ann Merchant; Simon, Theodore

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of He I 5876 A and IUE measurements of chromospheric and transition region lines in a large sample of F-type stars are presented. The data show that activity is detectable in nearly all early F-type stars and differs in several of its characteristics from that typically seen in cooler stars with slow rotation and fully developed convective zones. The onset of activity occurs near B-V = 0.28, which corresponds approximately to spectral type F0 and T(eff) = 7300 K. There is no correlation between the level of activity and the abundances of lithium and beryllium in F stars hotter than T(eff) = 6600 K. All but one of the stars in the 6600-7300 K temperature interval are active. The levels of activity in these stars are independent of Rossby number.

  3. Radial velocity studies of cool stars.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hugh R A; Barnes, John; Tuomi, Mikko; Jenkins, James S; Anglada-Escude, Guillem

    2014-04-28

    Our current view of exoplanets is one derived primarily from solar-like stars with a strong focus on understanding our Solar System. Our knowledge about the properties of exoplanets around the dominant stellar population by number, the so-called low-mass stars or M dwarfs, is much more cursory. Based on radial velocity discoveries, we find that the semi-major axis distribution of M dwarf planets appears to be broadly similar to those around more massive stars and thus formation and migration processes might be similar to heavier stars. However, we find that the mass of M dwarf planets is relatively much lower than the expected mass dependency based on stellar mass and thus infer that planet formation efficiency around low-mass stars is relatively impaired. We consider techniques to overcome the practical issue of obtaining good quality radial velocity data for M dwarfs despite their faintness and sustained activity and emphasize (i) the wavelength sensitivity of radial velocity signals, (ii) the combination of radial velocity data from different experiments for robust detection of small amplitude signals, and (iii) the selection of targets and radial velocity interpretation of late-type M dwarfs should consider Hα behaviour. PMID:24664922

  4. Cool star X-ray variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzer, B.

    2016-06-01

    Variability is a key characteristic of late-type stars. In analogy to the Sun, late-type stars display a range of magnetic activity phenomena. These comprise strong radiation in the X-ray band emerging from the stellar corona as a result of magnetic heating. The time-scales of the observed X-ray variability associated with magnetic activity range from hours (for flares) to years (for dynamo cycles). Next to these activity-related variability features, in Young Stellar Objects (YSO) the mass accretion from a circumstellar disk and protostellar outflows can induce X-ray emission. The YSO circumstellar environment can give rise to variability either due to intrinsic changes in mass transfer or due to geometric effects as accretion streams or structures in the disk rotate in and out of the line-of-sight. Magnetic interaction between star and disk may play a role as well. I summarize recent developments in this research area and point out some directions for the possible contributions of XMM-Newton in the future.

  5. Activity Cycles in Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.

    2009-01-01

    Starspots and stellar activity can be detected in other stars using high precision photometric and spectrometric measurements. These observations have provided some surprises (starspots at the poles - sunspots are rarely seen poleward of 40 degrees) but more importantly they reveal behaviors that constrain our models of solar-stellar magnetic dynamos. The observations reveal variations in cycle characteristics that depend upon the stellar structure, convection zone dynamics, and rotation rate. In general, the more rapidly rotating stars are more active. However, for stars like the Sun, some are found to be inactive while nearly identical stars are found to be very active indicating that periods like the Sun's Maunder Minimum (an inactive period from 1645 to 1715) are characteristic of Sun-like stars.

  6. Be ABUNDANCES IN COOL MAIN-SEQUENCE STARS WITH EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado Mena, E.; Israelian, G.; Gonzalez Hernandez, J. I.; Rebolo, R.; Santos, N. C.

    2012-02-10

    We present new Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) spectra of a sample of 15 cool unevolved stars with and without detected planetary companions. Together with previous determinations, we study Be depletion and possible differences in Be abundances between the two groups of stars. We obtain a final sample of 89 and 40 stars with and without planets, respectively, which covers a wide range of effective temperatures, from 4700 K to 6400 K, and includes several cool dwarf stars for the first time. We determine Be abundances for these stars and find that for most of them (the coolest ones) the Be II resonance lines are often undetectable, implying significant Be depletion. While for hot stars Be abundances are approximately constant, with a slight fall as T{sub eff} decreases and the Li-Be gap around 6300 K, we find a steep drop of Be content as T{sub eff} decreases for T{sub eff} < 5500 K, confirming the results of previous papers. Therefore, for these stars there is an unknown mechanism destroying Be that is not reflected in current models of Be depletion. Moreover, this strong Be depletion in cool objects takes place for all the stars regardless of the presence of planets; thus, the effect of extra Li depletion in solar-type stars with planets when compared with stars without detected planets does not seem to be present for Be, although the number of stars at those temperatures is still small to reach a final conclusion.

  7. Heating and Cooling in Accreting Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumming, Andrew

    2015-10-01

    Neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries accrete enough mass over their lifetimes to replace their entire crust. The accreted matter undergoes a series of nuclear reactions in the crust as it is compressed by continued accretion to higher density. These reactions, which include electron captures, neutron emissions, and pycnonuclear reactions, heat the crust and core of the neutron star. In this talk I will discuss what we can learn from observations of transiently accreting neutron stars in quiescence, when accretion has turned off and we can see emission from the neutron star directly. The quiescent luminosity of these neutron stars constrains the neutrino emissivity in the neutron star core. In systems with long accretion outbursts, observations of thermal relaxation of the crust in quiescence enable, for the first time, constraints on the thermal conductivity and heat capacity of the crust. In this way, low mass X-ray binary neutron stars offer a remarkable chance to constrain the properties of dense neutron-rich matter, such as neutron superfluidity and pasta phases in the inner crust of neutron stars.

  8. The Radio-X-ray Relation in Cool Stars: Are We Headed Toward a Divorce?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbrich, J.; Wolk, S. J.; Güdel, M.; Benz, A.; Osten, R.; Linsky, J. L.; McLean, M.; Loinard, L.; Berger, E.

    2011-12-01

    This splinter session was devoted to reviewing our current knowledge of correlated X-ray and radio emission from cool stars in order to prepare for new large radio observatories such as the EVLA. A key interest was to discuss why the X-ray and radio luminosities of some cool stars are in clear breach of a correlation that holds for other active stars, the so-called Güdel-Benz relation. This article summarizes the contributions whereas the actual presentations can be accessed on the splinter website.

  9. Feedback Regulated Star Formation in Cool Core Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Grant Russell

    2011-07-01

    The classical "cooling flow" model historically associated with "cool core" clusters of galaxies fails in the absence of an external, non-gravitational heating mechanism needed to offset catastrophic radiative losses of the X-ray bright intracluster medium (ICM). Numerous proposed solutions exist, including feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN), which may elegantly calibrate fundamental relationships such as the coupled co-evolution of black holes and the stellar component of their host galaxies. AGN feedback cannot completely offset cooling at all times, however, as the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in cool core clusters harbor extensive warm (˜104 K) and cold (10 < T < 104 K) gas reservoirs whose physical properties are regulated by ongoing star formation and an unknown, non-stellar heating mechanism. We present a doctoral thesis broadly related to these issues, particularly as they pertain to cooling flows, the triggering of AGN activity, and the associated energetic feedback that may play a critical role in heating the ambient environment on tens to hundreds of kiloparsec scales. We begin with a summary of the relevant background material, and in Chapter 2 we present a multiwavelength study of effervescent AGN heating in the cool core cluster Abell 2597. Previously unpublished Chandra X-ray data show the central regions of the hot intracluster medium (ICM) to be highly anisotropic on the scale of the BCG, permeated by a network of kpc-scale X-ray cavities, the largest of which is cospatial in projection with extended 330 MHz radio emission. We present spectral maps of projected, modeled gas properties fit to the X-ray data. The X-ray temperature map reveals two discrete, "hard-edged'' structures, including a ˜15 kpc "cold filament'' and an arc of hot gas which in projection borders the inner edge of the large X-ray cavity. We interpret the latter in the context of the effervescent AGN heating model, in which cavity enthalpy is thermalized as the

  10. Mass loss from cool stars, facts, fads, and fallacies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupree, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    The accumulation of observational material (ultraviolet spectroscopic measures, quantitative optical spectroscopy, and X-ray photometry) and its use in discerning the presence and character of mass loss across the cool half of the H-R diagram and establishing constraints on theoretical models are discussed. Analogies with closed and open solar magnetic structures are found. Two determinants of atmospheric wind structure, temperature and gravity, may suffice in a most superficial way to define the wind and atmospheric structure in a star, however it is apparent that there is still a missing parameter which may stem from magnetic activity and its particular configuration. Theories that appear successful in reproducing observed line profiles, wind temperatures, and terminal velocities incorporate Alfven wave heating and momentum deposition. Successive observations of an active binary (lambda and G8III-IV) and a supergiant star, alpha Aqr (G2 Ib) revealed that magnetic activity and perhaps mass loss occur on restricted regions of a stellar surface and that long-term structures are present in the wind. These phenomena are present in the solar atmosphere and wind and may be considered a general characteristic of stellar winds.

  11. Flare Activity on Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskanian, V. S.

    A review of the existing flare data analyses indicates that most probably the flare phenomenon should be considered as one of the manifestation forms of solar-type chromospheric activity on stars and therefore has to be investigated in common with other phenomena specifying this activity. In order to estimate the reliability of such an approach different types of observational data are discussed. It could be shown that most of the phenomena specifying the solar chromospheric activity (BY Dra syndrome, indicating the spottedness of the stellar surface, long-term cyclic variations of emission line intensities, variable local magnetic fields, flares, coronal phenomena, etc.) are observable on a constantly growing number of stars of almost all spectral types and luminosity classes. This fact indicates that the proposed approach could be the right way to solve the problem of the flare phenomenon.

  12. Magnetic activity of planet-hosting stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppenhaeger, Katja

    2011-05-01

    Magnetic activity in cool stars is a widely observed phenomenon, however it is still far from being understood. How fundamental stellar parameters like mass and rotational period quantitatively cause a stellar magnetic field which manifests itself in features such as spots, flares and high-energy coronal emission is a lively area of research in solar and stellar astrophysics. Especially for planet-hosting stars, stellar activity profiles are very interesting as exoplanets are affected by high-energy radiation, both at the time of planet formation as well as during the further lifetime of a star-planet system. In extreme cases, the atmosphere of a planet very close to its host star can be strongly heated by the stellar X-ray and EUV emission and finally escape the planet's gravitational attraction, so that the atmosphere of the planet evaporates over time. Theoretically, planets can also affect their host star's magnetic activity. In analogy to processes in binary stars which lead to enhanced - both overall and periodically varying - activity levels, also giant planets might influence the stellar activity by tidal or magnetic interaction processes, however on a weaker level than in binaries. Some indications for such interactions exist from chromospheric measurements in stars with Hot Jupiters. In this thesis I investigate the magnetic activity of planet-hosting stars and especially possible effects from star-planet interactions with an emphasis on stellar coronae in X-rays. I tested a complete sample of all known planet-hosting stars within 30 pc distance from the Sun for correlations of stellar X-ray properties with planetary parameters. A significant correlation exists between the stellar X-ray luminosity and the product of planetary mass and inverse semimajor axis. However, this could be traced back to a selection effect introduced by planetary detection methods. For stars in the solar neighborhood, planets are mainly detected by radial velocity shifts in the

  13. Activity in A-type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balona, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    Kepler photometry shows that most A-type stars have low frequency variations which can be understood in terms of rotational modulation. Indeed, the distribution of equatorial velocities derived from the photometric periods agrees with the distribution of equatorial velocities of A-type stars in the general field. The amplitude of the rotational frequency varies by 20-30 percent as might be expected of star spots. From the light amplitudes we estimate that most spots are considerably larger than typical sunspots but generally smaller than the largest sunspots. The rotation peaks in the periodograms of a significant fraction of A-type stars have a peculiar structure which is not understood. Although peaks corresponding to the rotation frequency can be identified in many δ Scuti stars, the low frequency peaks in these stars are too numerous to be caused by rotational modulation. It thus appears that while the variability of non-pulsating A stars can be explained by rotation, the low-frequency variability in A-type δ Sct stars requires a new pulsation mechanism. We also find several γ Dor stars much hotter than the theoretical hot edge of the instability strip. We find 13 new A-type flare stars, which means that about 1.5 percent of A stars flare. Less dramatic flares may be common in all A-type stars. We show that these superflares cannot be attributed to normal flares on a cool companion. We conclude that A-type stars are active and, like cooler stars, have starspots and flares. Surprisingly, there does not seem to be a drop in activity as the granulation boundary is crossed.

  14. Imaging the cool stars in the interacting binaries AE Aqr, BV Cen and V426 Oph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, C. A.; Steeghs, D.; Dhillon, V. S.; Shahbaz, T.

    2007-10-01

    It is well known that magnetic activity in late-type stars increases with increasing rotation rate. Using inversion techniques akin to medical imaging, the rotationally broadened profiles from such stars can be used to reconstruct `Doppler images' of the distribution of cool, dark starspots on their stellar surfaces. Interacting binaries, however, contain some of the most rapidly rotating late-type stars known and thus provide important tests of stellar dynamo models. Furthermore, magnetic activity is thought to play a key role in their evolution, behaviour and accretion dynamics. Despite this, we know comparatively little about the magnetic activity and its influence on such binaries. In this review we summarise the concepts behind indirect imaging of these systems, and present movies of the starspot distributions on the cool stars in some interacting binaries. We conclude with a look at the future opportunities that such studies may provide.

  15. Cooling compact stars and phase transitions in dense QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedrakian, Armen

    2016-03-01

    We report new simulations of cooling of compact stars containing quark cores and updated fits to the Cas A fast cooling data. Our model is built on the assumption that the transient behaviour of the star in Cas A is due to a phase transition within the dense QCD matter in the core of the star. Specifically, the fast cooling is attributed to an enhancement in the neutrino emission triggered by a transition from a fully gapped, two-flavor, red-green color-superconducting quark condensate to a superconducting crystalline or an alternative gapless, color-superconducting phase. The blue-colored condensate is modeled as a Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS)-type color superconductor with spin-one pairing order parameter. We study the sensitivity of the fits to the phase transition temperature, the pairing gap of blue quarks and the timescale characterizing the phase transition (the latter modelled in terms of a width parameter). Relative variations in these parameter around their best-fit values larger than 10-3 spoil the fit to the data. We confirm the previous finding that the cooling curves show significant variations as a function of compact star mass, which allows one to account for dispersion in the data on the surface temperatures of thermally emitting neutron stars.

  16. Model atmospheres for cool stars. [varying chemical composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. R.

    1974-01-01

    This report contains an extensive series of model atmospheres for cool stars having a wide range in chemical composition. Model atmospheres (temperature, pressure, density, etc.) are tabulated, along with emergent energy flux distributions, limb darkening, and information on convection for selected models. The models are calculated under the usual assumptions of hydrostatic equilibrium, constancy of total energy flux (including transport both by radiation and convection) and local thermodynamic equilibrium. Some molecular and atomic line opacity is accounted for as a straight mean. While cool star atmospheres are regimes of complicated physical conditions, and these atmospheres are necessarily approximate, they should be useful for a number of kinds of spectral and atmospheric analysis.

  17. Star formation in cooling flows in clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnamara, Brian R.; O'Connell, Robert W.

    1989-01-01

    Spectrophotometry (wavelength = 3400-5100 A) has been obtained for the nuclei of 13 cD galaxies in cooling flows. Spectral anomalies are found in 8 of the objects, consisting of abnormally strong forbidden O II emission or excess flux effects. Consideration is given to metallicity effects, the relationship between UV excesses and the presence of massive OB stars formed from the cooling flows, and low-level effects related to accretion.

  18. An IUE's eye view of cool-star outer atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayres, T. R.

    1981-01-01

    Three topics are discussed which together demonstrate the power of the IUE to probe the occurrences of chromospheres and coronas in the cool half of the HR diagram. These are: (1) the complementary low dispersion and echelle observing modes; (2) Mg II h and k: chromospheric cooling and width luminosity correlation; and (3) empirical correlations among chromospheric, transition region, and coronal emission. The spectra of alpha Centauri (G2 V + K1 V) and Capella (G6 III + F9 III) are compared with that of the Sun and recent low dispersion surveys of cool star emission in the 1150 A to 2000 A short wavelength region are summarized.

  19. Infrared spectrum of an extremely cool white-dwarf star

    PubMed

    Hodgkin; Oppenheimer; Hambly; Jameson; Smartt; Steele

    2000-01-01

    White dwarfs are the remnant cores of stars that initially had masses of less than 8 solar masses. They cool gradually over billions of years, and have been suggested to make up much of the 'dark matter' in the halo of the Milky Way. But extremely cool white dwarfs have proved difficult to detect, owing to both their faintness and their anticipated similarity in colour to other classes of dwarf stars. Recent improved models indicate that white dwarfs are much more blue than previously supposed, suggesting that the earlier searches may have been looking for the wrong kinds of objects. Here we report an infrared spectrum of an extremely cool white dwarf that is consistent with the new models. We determine the star's temperature to be 3,500 +/- 200 K, making it the coolest known white dwarf. The kinematics of this star indicate that it is in the halo of the Milky Way, and the density of such objects implied by the serendipitous discovery of this star is consistent with white dwarfs dominating the dark matter in the halo. PMID:10638748

  20. Scanner observations of selected cool stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fay, T. D., Jr.; Stein, W. L.; Warren, W. H., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Photoelectric spectral scans at 30-A resolution of 9 dwarfs, 10 giants and 6 supergiants with spectral types GO to M5 were presented. All stars were observed every 4 A from wavelength 3300 to wavelength 7000. Absorption features at this resolution coincide with: strong atomic lines of Fe 1,11, Ca 1,11, Mg 1, and Na 1; vibrational bands of the electronic transitions of TiO, MgH, CaH, SiH, AlH, Cn, Ch, C2, OH, and NH. The dependence of the wavelength 3740 Fe 1 blend and the wavelength 3440 depression on temperature is discussed.

  1. Advanced Spectral Library (ASTRAL): Cool Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas R.; Co-Investigators, ASTRAL

    2011-05-01

    The Advanced Spectral Library (ASTRAL) is a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cycle 18 (2010-2011) Large Treasury Project, whose aim is to collect high-quality ultraviolet echelle spectra of bright stars utilizing the high-performance Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). In Cycle 18, ASTRAL focuses on eight iconic late-type objects -- all well-known bright stars with vaguely unpronounceable names like Procyon and Betelgeuse -- and will devote 146 HST orbits for the purpose. The objective is to record each of the targets with broad uninterrupted UV coverage (1150-3100 Angstroms) at the highest signal-to-noise and highest spectral resolution achievable within the available spacecraft time, and given a variety of observing constraints. The broad ultraviolet coverage will be achieved by splicing together echellegrams taken in multiple FUV and NUV prime echelle settings of STIS. The observing strategy was designed to maximize S/N, ensure accurate wavelength scales, and preserve the radiometric level of the UV spectral energy distribution. This is a progress report on the observational status of ASTRAL. Up-to-date information can be found at the project website:http://casa.colorado.edu/ ayres/ASTRAL/. Supported by grants from the Space Telescope Science Institute, operated by AURA for NASA.

  2. Isotopes of titanium in cool stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clegg, R. E. S.; Lambert, D. L.; Bell, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    A program of stellar Ti isotopic-abundance determinations is described and related to changes that may have occurred in the Ti isotopic abundance ratios during the chemical evolution of the Galaxy, and to whether the abundance ratios are perturbed in the S and MS stars having atmospheres with enhanced abundances of s-process nuclei resulting from convective mixing after internal exposure to neutrons. High-resolution (0.07 A) Reticon spectra of portions of the TiO gamma (0,0), gamma (0,1), and delta (0,0) bands were the source material, and particular emphasis was placed on the definition of the continuum level. The isotopic abundance ratios are terrestrial in all of the sample, and errors in the (Ti-i)/(Ti-48) ratio are typically plus or minus 25% for the dwarfs and plus or minus 50% for the giants. The observations show that the magic nucleus Ti-50 is not enhanced in S and MS stars.

  3. Theoretical studies of chromospheres and winds in cool stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupree, A. K.

    1981-01-01

    Calculated radiative losses from H, H-, Ca II, and Mg II show that cooling for the chromosphere of the supergiant epsilon Gem do not differ greatly from the solar law, although there are differences at approximately 6000K due to ionization effects. With a rough standard law for computation of stellar winds using the Hartmann-MacGregor theory and standard stellar evolutionary calculations, the wind velocities and temperatures in the HR diagram were systematically explored. Results show that cool winds with tempratures 1,000,00K are not possible for log g or = 2. Predicted wind velocities are approximately 1.5 to 2 x larger than observed, particularly for the most luminous cool stars. The ionization balance for the wind of alpha ORI and the hydrogen profile lines for T Tauri stars were computed using the PANDORA computer program.

  4. HUBBLE SPIES A REALLY COOL STAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a Hubble Space Telescope picture of one of the least massive and coolest stars even seen (upper right). It is a diminutive companion to the K dwarf star called GL 105A (also known as HD 16160) seen at lower left. The binary pair is located 27 light-years away in the constellation Cetus. Based on the Hubble observation, astronomers calculate that the companion, called GL 105C, is 25,000 times fainter than GL 105A in visible light. If the dim companion were at the distance of our Sun, it would be only four times brighter than the full moon. The Hubble observations confirm the detection of GL 105C last year by David Golimowski and his collaborators at Palomar Observatory in California. Although GL 105C was identified before, the Hubble view allows a more precise measurement of the separation between the binary components. Future Hubble observations of the binary orbit will allow the masses of both stars to be determined accurately. The Palomar group estimates that the companion's mass is 8-9 percent of the Sun's mass, which places it near the theoretical lower limit for stable hydrogen burning. Objects below this limit, called brown dwarfs, still 'shine' -- not by thermonuclear energy, but by the energy released through gravitational contraction. Two pictures, taken with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (in PC mode) through different filters (in visible and near-infrared light) show that GL 105C is redder, hence cooler than GL 105A. The surface temperature of GL 105C is not precisely known, but may be as low as 2,600 degrees Kelvin (4,200 degrees Fahrenheit). This image was taken in near-infrared light, on January 5, 1995. GL 105C is located 3.4 arc seconds to the west-northwest of the larger GL 105A. (One arc second equals 1/3600 of a degree.) The bright spikes are caused by diffraction of light within the telescope's optical system, and the brighter white bar is an artifact of the CCD camera, which bleeds along a CCD column when a relatively bright

  5. Superfluid Heat Conduction and the Cooling of Magnetized Neutron Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilera, Deborah N.; Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Reddy, Sanjay; Sharma, Rishi; Pons, Jose A.

    2009-03-06

    We report on a new mechanism for heat conduction in the neutron star crust. We find that collective modes of superfluid neutron matter, called superfluid phonons, can influence heat conduction in magnetized neutron stars. They can dominate the heat conduction transverse to the magnetic field when the magnetic field B > or approx. 10{sup 13} G. At a density of {rho}{approx_equal}10{sup 12}-10{sup 14} g/cm{sup 3}, the conductivity due to superfluid phonons is significantly larger than that due to lattice phonons and is comparable to electron conductivity when the temperature {approx_equal}10{sup 8} K. This new mode of heat conduction can limit the surface anisotropy in highly magnetized neutron stars. Cooling curves of magnetized neutron stars with and without superfluid heat conduction could show observationally discernible differences.

  6. STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCY IN THE COOL CORES OF GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Michael; Veilleux, Sylvain; Mushotzky, Richard; Reynolds, Christopher; Rupke, David S. N. E-mail: veilleux@astro.umd.edu

    2011-06-20

    We have assembled a sample of high spatial resolution far-UV (Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys/Solar Blind Channel) and H{alpha} (Maryland-Magellan Tunable Filter) imaging for 15 cool core galaxy clusters. These data provide a detailed view of the thin, extended filaments in the cores of these clusters. Based on the ratio of the far-UV to H{alpha} luminosity, the UV spectral energy distribution, and the far-UV and H{alpha} morphology, we conclude that the warm, ionized gas in the cluster cores is photoionized by massive, young stars in all but a few (A1991, A2052, A2580) systems. We show that the extended filaments, when considered separately, appear to be star forming in the majority of cases, while the nuclei tend to have slightly lower far-UV luminosity for a given H{alpha} luminosity, suggesting a harder ionization source or higher extinction. We observe a slight offset in the UV/H{alpha} ratio from the expected value for continuous star formation which can be modeled by assuming intrinsic extinction by modest amounts of dust (E(B - V) {approx} 0.2) or a top-heavy initial mass function in the extended filaments. The measured star formation rates vary from {approx}0.05 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} in the nuclei of non-cooling systems, consistent with passive, red ellipticals, to {approx}5 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} in systems with complex, extended, optical filaments. Comparing the estimates of the star formation rate based on UV, H{alpha}, and infrared luminosities to the spectroscopically determined X-ray cooling rate suggests a star formation efficiency of 14{sup +18}{sub -8}%. This value represents the time-averaged fraction, by mass, of gas cooling out of the intracluster medium, which turns into stars and agrees well with the global fraction of baryons in stars required by simulations to reproduce the stellar mass function for galaxies. This result provides a new constraint on the efficiency of star formation in accreting systems.

  7. Russell Lecture: Dark Star Formation and Cooling Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynden-Bell, D.; Tout, C. A.

    2001-09-01

    Optically thin cooling gas at most temperatures above 30 K will make condensations by pressure, pushing material into cool, dense regions. This works without gravity. Cooling condensations will flatten and become planar/similarity solutions. Most star formation may start from cooling condensations, where gravity is only important in the later stages. The idea that some of the dark matter could be pristine white dwarfs that condensed slowly onto planetary-sized seeds without firing nuclear reactions is found lacking. However, recent observations indicate 50 times more halo white dwarfs than have previously been acknowledged, enough to make the halo fraction observed as MACHOs. A cosmological census shows that only 1% of the mass of the universe is of known constitution.

  8. Magnetic flux generation and transport in cool stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Işık, E.; Schmitt, D.; Schüssler, M.

    2011-04-01

    Context. The Sun and other cool stars harbouring outer convection zones manifest magnetic activity in their atmospheres. The connection between this activity and the properties of a deep-seated dynamo generating the magnetic flux is not well understood. Aims: By employing physical models, we study the spatial and temporal characteristics of the observable surface field for various stellar parameters. Methods: We combine models for magnetic flux generation, buoyancy instability, and transport, which encompass the entire convection zone. The model components are: (i) a thin-layer αΩ dynamo at the base of the convection zone; (ii) buoyancy instabilities and the rise of flux tubes through the convection zone in 3D, which provides a physically consistent determination of emergence latitudes and tilt angles; and (iii) horizontal flux transport at the surface. Results: For solar-type stars and rotation periods longer than about 10 days, the latitudinal dynamo waves generated by the deep-seated αΩ dynamo are faithfully reflected by the surface distribution of magnetic flux. For rotation periods of the order of two days, however, Coriolis acceleration of rising flux loops leads to surface flux emergence at much higher latitudes than the dynamo waves at the bottom of the convection zone reach. A similar result is found for a K0V star with a rotation period of two days. In the case of a rapidly rotating K1 subgiant, overlapping dynamo waves lead to noisy activity cycles and mixed-polarity fields at high latitudes. Conclusions: The combined model reproduces the basic observed features of the solar cycle. The differences between the latitude distributions of the magnetic field at the bottom of the convection zone and the emerging surface flux grow with increasing rotation rate and convection zone depth, becoming quite substantial for rapidly rotating dwarfs and subgiants. The dynamical evolution of buoyantly rising magnetic flux should be considered as an essential

  9. Cool Stars May Have Different Prebiotic Chemical Mix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope detected a prebiotic, or potentially life-forming, molecule called hydrogen cyanide (HCN) in the planet-forming disks around yellow stars like our sun, but not in the disks around cooler, reddish stars.

    The observations are plotted in this graph, called a spectrum, in which light from the gas in the disks around the stars has been split up into its basic components, or wavelengths. Data from stars like our sun are yellow, and data from cool stars are orange. Light wavelengths are shown on the X-axis, and the relative brightness of disk emission is shown on the Y-axis. The signature of a baseline molecule, called acetylene (C2H2), was seen for both types of stars, but hydrogen cyanide was seen only around stars like our sun.

    Hydrogen cyanide is an organic, nitrogen-containing molecule. Five hydrogen cyanide molecules can link up to form adenine, one of the four chemical bases of DNA.

  10. Cool circumstellar matter around nearby main-sequence stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, H. J.; Wolstencroft, R. D.

    1988-01-01

    Stars are presented which have characteristics similar to Vega and other main-sequence stars with cool dust disks, based on the IRAS Point Source Catalog fluxes. The objects are selected to have a 60-micron/100-micron ratio similar to Vega, Beta Pic, Alpha PsA, and Epsilon Eri, and they are also required to show evidence of extension in the IRAS Working Survey Database. The fluxes are modeled using a blackbody energy distribution. The temperatures derived range from 50 to 650 K. The diameters of the dust disks observed by IRAS are estimated.

  11. Spectropolarimetric study of the cool RV Tauri star R Scuti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessore, B.; Lèbre, A.; Morin, J.

    2015-12-01

    With the spectropolarimeter Narval at TBL we have initiated in spring 2015 a 2-year campaign dedicated to a sample of cool and evolved stars including pulsating RV Tauri stars. We monitor net circular and linear polarisation in the spectral lines of R Scuti, the brightest of such variable targets. Our aim is to study the surface magnetic field and the linear polarisation associated with specific spectral lines. We confirm a definite detection of the surface magnetic field of R Sct, with an average longitudinal component {B_ℓ = 0.9 ± 0.5 G}. We also unveil our first results on linear polarisation.

  12. The Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) Spectral Library: Cool Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayner, John T.; Cushing, Michael C.; Vacca, William D.

    2009-12-01

    We present a 0.8-5 μm spectral library of 210 cool stars observed at a resolving power of R ≡ λ/Δλ ~ 2000 with the medium-resolution infrared spectrograph, SpeX, at the 3.0 m NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The stars have well-established MK spectral classifications and are mostly restricted to near-solar metallicities. The sample not only contains the F, G, K, and M spectral types with luminosity classes between I and V, but also includes some AGB, carbon, and S stars. In contrast to some other spectral libraries, the continuum shape of the spectra is measured and preserved in the data reduction process. The spectra are absolutely flux calibrated using the Two Micron All Sky Survey photometry. Potential uses of the library include studying the physics of cool stars, classifying and studying embedded young clusters and optically obscured regions of the Galaxy, evolutionary population synthesis to study unresolved stellar populations in optically obscured regions of galaxies and synthetic photometry. The library is available in digital form from the IRTF Web site.

  13. THE INFRARED TELESCOPE FACILITY (IRTF) SPECTRAL LIBRARY: COOL STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Rayner, John T.; Cushing, Michael C.; Vacca, William D. E-mail: michael.cushing@gmail.com

    2009-12-01

    We present a 0.8-5 {mu}m spectral library of 210 cool stars observed at a resolving power of R {identical_to} {lambda}/{delta}{lambda} {approx} 2000 with the medium-resolution infrared spectrograph, SpeX, at the 3.0 m NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The stars have well-established MK spectral classifications and are mostly restricted to near-solar metallicities. The sample not only contains the F, G, K, and M spectral types with luminosity classes between I and V, but also includes some AGB, carbon, and S stars. In contrast to some other spectral libraries, the continuum shape of the spectra is measured and preserved in the data reduction process. The spectra are absolutely flux calibrated using the Two Micron All Sky Survey photometry. Potential uses of the library include studying the physics of cool stars, classifying and studying embedded young clusters and optically obscured regions of the Galaxy, evolutionary population synthesis to study unresolved stellar populations in optically obscured regions of galaxies and synthetic photometry. The library is available in digital form from the IRTF Web site.

  14. Me 1-1: A PN containing a cool star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Z.-X.; Liu, X.-W.; Danziger, I. J.

    2004-08-01

    We report the detection of a cool stellar component at the center of the planetary nebula (PN) Me 1-1 and present optical spectra of the system. From measurements of nebular emission lines, we have derived electron temperature, density and chemical composition. Heavy elemental abundances deduced from collisionally excited lines (CELs) are compared with those derived from optical recombination lines (ORLs). The electron temperature and density deduced from the nebular analysis were used to calculate the nebular continuum emission, which was then subtracted from the observed spectrum in order to obtain the spectrum of the cool stellar component apparent in the observed spectrum. We calculate B and V magnitudes of the cool companion and obtain a color index of B-V=1.20. By comparing the spectrum of the cool star with standard spectra in Pickles's 1998 Stellar Flux Library, we find that the cool component has the spectral type of a K3-4 bright giant. Our analysis suggests that Me 1-1 is probably a yellow symbiotic system.

  15. The structure and energy balance of cool star atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    The atmospheric structure and energy balance phenomena associated with magnetic fields in the Sun are reviewed and it is shown that similar phenomena occur in cool stars. The evidence for the weakening or disappearance of transition regions and coronae is discussed together with the appearance of extended cool chromospheres with large mass loss, near V-R = 0.80 in the H-R diagram. Like the solar atmosphere, these atmospheres are not homogeneous and there is considerable evidence for plage regions with bright TR emission lines that overlie dark (presumably magnetic) star spots. The IUE observations are providing important information on the energy balance in these atmospheres that should guide theoretical calculations of the nonradiative heating rate. Recent high dispersion spectra are providing unique information concerning which components of close binary systems are the dominant contributors to the observed emission. A recent unanticipated discovery is that the transition lines are redshifted (an antiwind) in DRa (G2 Ib) and perhaps other stars. Finally, the G and K giants and supergiants are classified into three groups depending on whether their atmospheres are dominated by closed magnetic flux tubes, open field geometries, or a predominately open geometry with a few closed flux tubes embedded.

  16. An Exo-Venus Around a Cool, Nearby Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelo, Isabel; Rowe, Jason F.; Howell, Steve B.

    2015-11-01

    We present the discovery and planetary confirmation of KOI-3138, a likely Earth-sized (1.08 Earth radii ) planet in a 9-day orbit around a nearby M Dwarf star. A planet transit was detected around KOI-3138 with the Kepler spacecraft and confirmed via false positive analysis using data from the UK Infrared telescope, Digital Sky Survey, and DSSI Speckle imaging. The planet’s short orbital period places it close to its host star, making it an interesting Venus analog around a cool star.It remains possible, although unlikely, that KOI-3138.01 instead orbits a bound, undetected binary companion to KOI-3138. Under these conditions, the planet becomes a mini-Neptune-sized planet orbiting a brown dwarf with a mass of ~0.05 solar mass. Follow-up radial velocity measurements on the host star are required in order to accurately assess the likelihood of this possibility. Specifically, detection of a significant radial velocity ( ~725 m/s) upon observation of KOI-3138 will indicate the presence of a bound companion that was not detected by our false positive analysis procedures. Such a companion, if detected, cannot be ruled out as the host star around which KOI-3138.01 orbits.KOI-3138.01 is too small to induce a detectable “wobble" in its host star. We therefore make no conclusions about mass or composition. However, there is reasonable incentive to determine these properties in the hopes of understanding the nature of habitable zones around M-type stars. Kepler-186f, a previously discovered Earth-like exoplanet, is similar in size to KOI-3138.01 and orbits the outer reaches of its star’s conservative habitable zone. KOI-3138.01, also Earth-sized, orbits a similar star but resides much closer in. The two planets together span the range of distances within the habitable zones of M Dwarfs. Determining the composition and atmosphere of KOI-3138.01 is therefore useful in understanding the nature of habitable zone boundaries of such star types. This task may in fact be

  17. Cool stars in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodorus van Loon, Jacco

    2015-08-01

    I have been invited to present an introductory review talk about cool stars in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, for the Focus meeting on "Stellar Behemoths: Red Supergiants across the local Universe." With the theme of the meeting in mind, I will concentrate on the evolution and behaviour of stars more massive than about 8 solar masses and cooler than about 10,000 Kelvin. I will concentrate on the effects of metal content, rotation, and mass loss on the observable properties and evolution of red and yellow supergiants. I will discuss their roles as supernova progenitors, as well as their roles in the evolution of the galaxies they inhabit. I will attempt to identify the most pressing questions and to suggest strategies to answer them.

  18. Cool stars, stellar systems, and the sun; Proceedings of the 6th Cambridge Workshop, Seattle, WA, Sept. 18-21, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallerstein, George (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The present conference on cool stars, stellar systems, and the sun encompasses stellar chromospheres and coronae, binary stars, the stellar evolution of contracting stars and red giants, stellar evolution abundances of the elements, mass loss and envelopes, and stellar pulsation. Specific issues addressed include theories regarding the acoustic and magnetic heating of stellar chromospheres and coronae, stellar granulation, wave heating in magnetic flux tubes, observations of the solar Ca-II lines, longitudinal-transverse magnetic tube waves in the solar atmosphere, radio emission from rapidly rotating cool giant stars, and spot temperatures and area coverages on active dwarf stars. Also addressed are the optical and UV spectra of RS-CVn stars, emission lines from T-Tauri stars, the spectroscopy of HR1614 group stars, red giants in external galaxies, the rotation of evolved stars, the transition from red giant to planetary nebula, and radiative transfer in the dynamic atmospheres of variable stars.

  19. The radius distribution of planets around cool stars

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, Timothy D.; Swift, Jonathan

    2014-08-10

    We calculate an empirical, non-parametric estimate of the shape of the period-marginalized radius distribution of planets with periods less than 150 days using the small yet well-characterized sample of cool (T{sub eff} < 4000 K) dwarf stars in the Kepler catalog. In particular, we present and validate a new procedure, based on weighted kernel density estimation, to reconstruct the shape of the planet radius function down to radii smaller than the completeness limit of the survey at the longest periods. Under the assumption that the period distribution of planets does not change dramatically with planet radius, we show that the occurrence of planets around these stars continues to increase to below 1 R{sub ⊕}, and that there is no strong evidence for a turnover in the planet radius function. In fact, we demonstrate using many iterations of simulated data that a spurious turnover may be inferred from data even when the true distribution continues to rise toward smaller radii. Finally, the sharp rise in the radius distribution below ∼3 R{sub ⊕} implies that a large number of planets await discovery around cool dwarfs as the sensitivities of ground-based transit surveys increase.

  20. Activity-Induced Radial Velocity Variation of M Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Jan Marie; Korhonen, Heidi

    2014-04-01

    Stellar magnetic activity manifests itself in a variety of ways including starspots-cool, dark regions on the stellar surface. Starspots can cause variations (`jitter') in spectral line-profiles which can mimic the radial velocity (RV) variations caused by an orbiting planet, or create RV noise that can drown out a planetary signature. Cool, low-mass M dwarf stars can be highly active, which can make detection of potentially habitable planets around these stars difficult. We investigate radial velocity variations caused by different activity (spot) patterns on M dwarf stars in order to determine the limits of detectability for small planets orbiting active M dwarfs. We report on our progress toward the aim of answering the following questions: What types of spot patterns are realistic for M dwarf stars? What effect will spots have on M dwarf RV measurements? Can jitter from M dwarf spots mimic planetary signals? What is the ideal observing wavelength to reduce M dwarf jitter?

  1. Atomic collision processes for modelling cool star spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barklem, Paul

    2015-05-01

    The abundances of chemical elements in cool stars are very important in many problems in modern astrophysics. They provide unique insight into the chemical and dynamical evolution of the Galaxy, stellar processes such as mixing and gravitational settling, the Sun and its place in the Galaxy, and planet formation, to name a just few examples. Modern telescopes and spectrographs measure stellar spectral lines with precision of order 1 per cent, and planned surveys will provide such spectra for millions of stars. However, systematic errors in the interpretation of observed spectral lines leads to abundances with uncertainties greater than 20 per cent. Greater precision in the interpreted abundances should reasonably be expected to lead to significant discoveries, and improvements in atomic data used in stellar atmosphere models play a key role in achieving such advances in precision. In particular, departures from the classical assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) represent a significant uncertainty in the modelling of stellar spectra and thus derived chemical abundances. Non-LTE modelling requires large amounts of radiative and collisional data for the atomic species of interest. I will focus on inelastic collision processes due to electron and hydrogen atom impacts, the important perturbers in cool stars, and the progress that has been made. I will discuss the impact on non-LTE modelling, and what the modelling tells us about the types of collision processes that are important and the accuracy required. More specifically, processes of fundamentally quantum mechanical nature such as spin-changing collisions and charge transfer have been found to be very important in the non-LTE modelling of spectral lines of lithium, oxygen, sodium and magnesium.

  2. Modelling cool star spectra with inadequate input physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Karin

    2015-08-01

    The analysis of cool star spectra has a century-long successful history, but the recent explosion in the quality and quantity of spectra has made it clear to us that the state-of-the-art analysis do not do justice to the information content of the data and cannot extract stellar parameters and element abundances to the accuracy that the broader context requires. To progress, the long-standing assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium in the line formation must be lifted, a development that is hindered by gaps in our knowledge of radiative and collisional transition rates. I will exemplify how stellar abundances are affected by missing input physics and discuss various calibration techniques that have been used to circumvent the problem.

  3. Neutrinos from SN 1987A and cooling of the nascent neutron star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, D. Q.; Loredo, Thomas J.; Melia, Fulvio

    1988-01-01

    The implications of the detection of neutrinos from SN 1987A for the cooling of the nascent neutron star are considered. The nu-bar(e) number N, the apparent temperature, the cooling time scale measured by the Kamioka and IMB detectors, and the inferred neutron star apparent radius and binding energy are all found to provide striking verification of current supernova theory.

  4. Far-ultraviolet morphology of star-forming filaments in cool core brightest cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, G. R.; O'Dea, C. P.; Baum, S. A.; Mittal, R.; McDonald, M. A.; Combes, F.; Li, Y.; McNamara, B. R.; Bremer, M. N.; Clarke, T. E.; Donahue, M.; Edge, A. C.; Fabian, A. C.; Hamer, S. L.; Hogan, M. T.; Oonk, J. B. R.; Quillen, A. C.; Sanders, J. S.; Salomé, P.; Voit, G. M.

    2015-08-01

    We present a multiwavelength morphological analysis of star-forming clouds and filaments in the central (≲50 kpc) regions of 16 low-redshift (z < 0.3) cool core brightest cluster galaxies. New Hubble Space Telescope imaging of far-ultraviolet continuum emission from young (≲10 Myr), massive (≳5 M⊙) stars reveals filamentary and clumpy morphologies, which we quantify by means of structural indices. The FUV data are compared with X-ray, Lyα, narrow-band Hα, broad-band optical/IR, and radio maps, providing a high spatial resolution atlas of star formation locales relative to the ambient hot (˜107-8 K) and warm ionized (˜104 K) gas phases, as well as the old stellar population and radio-bright active galactic nucleus (AGN) outflows. Nearly half of the sample possesses kpc-scale filaments that, in projection, extend towards and around radio lobes and/or X-ray cavities. These filaments may have been uplifted by the propagating jet or buoyant X-ray bubble, or may have formed in situ by cloud collapse at the interface of a radio lobe or rapid cooling in a cavity's compressed shell. The morphological diversity of nearly the entire FUV sample is reproduced by recent hydrodynamical simulations in which the AGN powers a self-regulating rain of thermally unstable star-forming clouds that precipitate from the hot atmosphere. In this model, precipitation triggers where the cooling-to-free-fall time ratio is tcool/tff ˜ 10. This condition is roughly met at the maximal projected FUV radius for more than half of our sample, and clustering about this ratio is stronger for sources with higher star formation rates.

  5. Unified stellar models and convection in cool stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernkopf, Jan

    1998-04-01

    The formulation of boundary conditions can have a significant influence on the solution of a system of differential equations. It is therefore important to apply a most realistic representation of the surface boundary conditions to the equations of stellar structure and evolution. With respect to previous models that usually employ some estimate of the surface temperature drawn from the Eddington approximation, a significant improvement of the outer boundary conditions is achieved by connecting models of stellar atmospheres to stellar structure models. Up to now stellar evolution calculations for late-type stars are calibrated using the well-observed properties of the present Sun. Including the physics of a plane-parallel atmospheric stratification it is necessary to account for a consistent description of the convective energy transfer in the outer layers of a cool star. At this step an apparent contradiction of the observations must be resolved: spectroscopic analysis of the Balmer lines emerging from solar-type stars using line-blanketed model atmospheres are usually carried out with reference to the Bohm-Vitense convection theory. To fit simultaneously the profiles of Hα and Hβ as well as higher series members a small mixing-length parameter alpha =3D l/H_p =3D 0.5 is required. Models calibrated to the present Sun instead imply that the internal structure of the Sun follows a substantially higher value of alpha =3D 1.5. This discrepancy cannot be removed in the context of Bohm-Vitense's convection theory. It is shown that the convection model of Canuto & Mazzitelli fits both the observed present Sun and the Balmer lines with a single common mixing-length parameter. The convection theory of Canuto & Mazzitelli thus offers for the first time a unified physical model of the Sun that is valid from the center to the upper photosphere.

  6. The magnetic activity sunlike stars.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, A H

    1984-08-24

    Sunspots, flares, and the myriad time-varying "events" observable in the Sun-the only star whose surface we can examine in detail-are testimony that the Sun is a magnetically variable or active star. Its magnetic field, carried into interplanetary space by the solar wind, produces observable changes in Earth's magnetosphere and variations in the flux of galactic cosmic-ray particles incident upon Earth's upper atmosphere. Centuries of observation have enabled solar scientists to recognize that the Sun's magnetism exists and varies in a globally organized pattern that is somehow coupled to the Sun's rotation. Within the past decade O. C. Wilson demonstrated that analogs of solar activity exist and can be studied in many other dwarf stars. From the continuing study, knowledge of the precise rates of rotation of the stars under investigation is being gained for the first time. The results are expected to increase our understanding of the origin of solar activity and stellar activity in general. PMID:17801135

  7. Exploring the Early FUV History of Cool Stars: Transition Regions at 30 Myr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saar, Steven

    2007-07-01

    Stellar magnetic activity derives from the so-called "dynamo," a hydromagnetic interplay between overturning plasma motions and differential rotation in stars cool enough to support significant surface convection zones. The magnetic fields resulting from dynamo action are in turn are responsible for a wide range of high-energy emissions, including the spectacular outbursts called flares. Dynamo powered magnetic activity is not confined solely to stars, but also must occur, for example, in accretion disks of all descriptions, and in some planets. A great deal is known about magnetic activity in middle-aged G dwarfs like our Sun, thanks to its proximity. Less is known, however, about the much younger stars, newly emerged from the T-Tauri stage. Yet, it is during this phase that they reach the peak of their magnetic activity, and subsidiary influences, such as the impact of ionizing radiation and strong coronal winds on developing solar systems, also are maximum. One of the key missing ingredients in our current understanding are measurements of FUV emissions of such stars, to complement the extensive collections of coronal {1-10 MK} X-ray measurements, particularly from recent ROSAT, Chandra and XMM-Newton surveys. We propose to conduct sensitive ACS/SBC prism ultraviolet spectroscopy of selected fields in two young {30 Myr} Galactic clusters-IC 2391 and IC 2602-to inventory the key C IV emission index { 0.1 MK} over a much larger and more diverse sample of coeval objects than has been possible hitherto. A key question is whether the FUV emissions also suffer the "saturation" and "super-saturation" at short rotation periods seen in coronal X-rays, or whether they continue to rise in the fastest rotating stars. The saturation behavior of the different temperature regimes holds important clues to the organization of the surface active regions on these very young stars, and should allow us to distinguish among several competing models.

  8. WHITE-LIGHT FLARES ON COOL STARS IN THE KEPLER QUARTER 1 DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Walkowicz, Lucianne M.; Basri, Gibor; Batalha, Natalie; Jenkins, Jon; Borucki, William J.; Koch, David; Caldwell, Doug; Bryson, Steve; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Dupree, Andrea K.; Latham, David W.; Meibom, Soeren; Howell, Steve; Brown, Timothy M.

    2011-02-15

    We present the results of a search for white-light flares on {approx}23,000 cool dwarfs in the Kepler Quarter 1 long cadence data. We have identified 373 flaring stars, some of which flare multiple times during the observation period. We calculate relative flare energies, flare rates, and durations and compare these with the quiescent photometric variability of our sample. We find that M dwarfs tend to flare more frequently but for shorter durations than K dwarfs and that they emit more energy relative to their quiescent luminosity in a given flare than K dwarfs. Stars that are more photometrically variable in quiescence tend to emit relatively more energy during flares, but variability is only weakly correlated with flare frequency. We estimate distances for our sample of flare stars and find that the flaring fraction agrees well with other observations of flare statistics for stars within 300 pc above the Galactic plane. These observations provide a more rounded view of stellar flares by sampling stars that have not been pre-selected by their activity, and are informative for understanding the influence of these flares on planetary habitability.

  9. Analysing neutron star in HESS J1731-347 from thermal emission and cooling theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofengeim, D. D.; Kaminker, A. D.; Klochkov, D.; Suleimanov, V.; Yakovlev, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    The central compact object in the supernova remnant HESS J1731-347 appears to be the hottest observed isolated cooling neutron star. The cooling theory of neutron stars enables one to explain observations of this star by assuming the presence of strong proton superfluidity in the stellar core and the existence of the surface heat blanketing envelope which almost fully consists of carbon. The cooling model of this star is elaborated to take proper account of the neutrino emission due to neutron-neutron collisions which is not suppressed by proton superfluidity. Using the results of spectral fits of observed thermal spectra for the distance of 3.2 kpc and the cooling theory for the neutron star of age 27 kyr, new constraints on the stellar mass and radius are obtained which are more stringent than those derived from the spectral fits alone.

  10. Cool and luminous transients from mass-losing binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejcha, Ondřej; Metzger, Brian D.; Tomida, Kengo

    2016-02-01

    We study transients produced by equatorial disc-like outflows from catastrophically mass-losing binary stars with an asymptotic velocity and energy deposition rate near the inner edge which are proportional to the binary escape velocity vesc. As a test case, we present the first smoothed-particle radiation-hydrodynamics calculations of the mass loss from the outer Lagrange point with realistic equation of state and opacities. The resulting spiral stream becomes unbound for binary mass ratios 0.06 ≲ q ≲ 0.8. For synchronous binaries with non-degenerate components, the spiral-stream arms merge at a radius of ˜10a, where a is the binary semi-major axis, and the accompanying shock thermalizes about 10 per cent of the kinetic power of the outflow. The mass-losing binary outflows produce luminosities reaching up to ˜106 L⊙ and effective temperatures spanning 500 ≲ Teff ≲ 6000 K, which is compatible with many of the class of recently discovered red transients such as V838 Mon and V1309 Sco. Dust readily forms in the outflow, potentially in a catastrophic global cooling transition. The appearance of the transient is viewing angle-dependent due to vastly different optical depths parallel and perpendicular to the binary plane. We predict a correlation between the peak luminosity and the outflow velocity, which is roughly obeyed by the known red transients. Outflows from mass-losing binaries can produce luminous (105 L⊙) and cool (Teff ≲ 1500 K) transients lasting a year or longer, as has potentially been detected by Spitzer surveys of nearby galaxies.

  11. COOLING OF COMPACT STARS WITH COLOR SUPERCONDUCTING PHASE IN QUARK-HADRON MIXED PHASE

    SciTech Connect

    Noda, Tsuneo; Hashimoto, Masa-aki; Yasutake, Nobutoshi; Maruyama, Toshiki; Tatsumi, Toshitaka; Fujimoto, Masayuki E-mail: hashimoto@phys.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2013-03-01

    We present a new scenario for the cooling of compact stars considering the central source of Cassiopeia A (Cas A). The Cas A observation shows that the central source is a compact star that has high effective temperature, and it is consistent with the cooling without exotic phases. The observation also gives the mass range of M {>=} 1.5 M {sub Sun }, which may conflict with the current plausible cooling scenario of compact stars. There are some cooled compact stars such as Vela or 3C58, which can barely be explained by the minimal cooling scenario, which includes the neutrino emission by nucleon superfluidity (PBF). Therefore, we invoke the exotic cooling processes, where a heavier star cools faster than lighter one. However, the scenario seems to be inconsistent with the observation of Cas A. Therefore, we present a new cooling scenario to explain the observation of Cas A by constructing models that include a quark color superconducting (CSC) phase with a large energy gap; this phase appears at ultrahigh density regions and reduces neutrino emissivity. In our model, a compact star has a CSC quark core with a low neutrino emissivity surrounded by high emissivity region made by normal quarks. We present cooling curves obtained from the evolutionary calculations of compact stars: while heavier stars cool slowly, and lighter ones indicate the opposite tendency without considering nucleon superfluidity. Furthermore, we show that our scenario is consistent with the recent observations of the effective temperature of Cas A during the last 10 years, including nucleon superfluidity.

  12. Cool and Luminous Transients from Mass-Losing Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejcha, Ondrej; Metzger, Brian D.; Tomida, Kengo

    2016-01-01

    We study transients produced by equatorial disk-like outflows from catastrophically mass-losing binary stars with an asymptotic velocity and energy deposition rate near the inner edge which are proportional to the binary escape velocity. As a test case, we present the first smoothed-particle radiation-hydrodynamics calculations of the mass loss from the outer Lagrange point with realistic equation of state and opacities. The mass-losing binary outflows produce luminosities reaching up to 106 L⊙ and the effective temperatures are between 500 and 6000 K, which is compatible with those of many of the class of recently-discovered red transients such as V838 Mon and V1309 Sco. Dust readily forms in the outflow, potentially in a catastrophic global cooling transition. The appearance of the transient is viewing angle-dependent due to vastly different optical depths parallel and perpendicular to the binary plane. We predict a correlation between the peak luminosity and the outflow velocity, which is roughly obeyed by the known red transients.

  13. Neutron star crust cooling in the Terzan 5 X-ray transient Swift J174805.3-244637

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degenaar, N.; Wijnands, R.; Bahramian, A.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Heinke, C. O.; Brown, E. F.; Fridriksson, J. K.; Homan, J.; Cackett, E. M.; Cumming, A.; Miller, J. M.; Altamirano, D.; Pooley, D.

    2015-08-01

    When neutron stars reside in transient X-ray binaries, their crustal layers become heated during accretion outbursts and subsequently cool in quiescence. Observing and modelling this thermal response has yielded valuable insight into the physics of neutron star crusts. However, one unresolved problem is the evidence in several neutron stars for an extra energy source, located at shallow depth in the crust, that is not accounted for by standard heating models. Its origin remains puzzling, and it is currently unclear whether this additional heating occurs in all neutron stars, and if the magnitude is always the same. Here, we report on Chandra observations that cover two years after the 2012 outburst of the transient neutron star X-ray binary Swift J174805.3-244637 in the globular cluster Terzan 5. The temperature of the neutron star was elevated during the first two months following its ≃8 week accretion episode, but had decayed to the pre-outburst level within ≃100 d. Interpreting this as rapid cooling of the accretion-heated crust, we model the observed temperature curve with a thermal evolution code. We find that there is no need to invoke shallow heating for this neutron star, although an extra energy release up to ≃1.4 MeV nucleon-1 is allowed by the current data (2σ confidence). We also present two new data points on the crust-cooling curve of the 11-Hz X-ray pulsar IGR J17480-2446 in Terzan 5, which was active in 2010. The temperature of this neutron star remains significantly above the pre-outburst level, but we detect no change in the thermal emission since the previous measurements of 2013 February. This is consistent with the slow crust cooling expected several years post-outburst.

  14. Neutron star cooling: A challenge to the nuclear mean field

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang Sy Than; Nguyen Van Giai

    2009-12-15

    The two recent density-dependent versions of the finite-range M3Y interaction (CDM3Yn and M3Y-Pn) have been probed against the bulk properties of asymmetric nuclear matter (NM) in the nonrelativistic Hartree-Fock (HF) formalism. The same HF study has also been done with the famous Skyrme (SLy4) and Gogny (D1S and D1N) interactions that were well tested in the nuclear structure calculations. Our HF results are compared with those given by other many-body calculations like the Dirac-Brueckner Hartree-Fock approach or ab initio variational calculations using free nucleon-nucleon interaction and by both the nonrelativistic and relativistic mean-field studies using different model parameters. Although the two considered density-dependent versions of the M3Y interaction were proven to be quite realistic in the nuclear structure or reaction studies, they give two distinct behaviors of the NM symmetry energy at high densities, like the Asy-soft and Asy-stiff scenarios found earlier with other mean-field interactions. As a consequence, we obtain two different behaviors of the proton fraction in the {beta}-equilibrium that in turn can imply two drastically different mechanisms for the neutron star cooling. While some preference of the Asy-stiff scenario was found based on predictions of the latest microscopic many-body calculations or empirical NM pressure and isospin diffusion data deduced from heavy-ion collisions, a consistent mean-field description of nuclear structure database is more often given by some Asy-soft type interaction like the Gogny or M3Y-Pn ones. Such a dilemma poses an interesting challenge to the modern mean-field approaches.

  15. A SIGNATURE OF CHEMICAL SEPARATION IN THE COOLING LIGHT CURVES OF TRANSIENTLY ACCRETING NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Medin, Zach; Cumming, Andrew E-mail: cumming@physics.mcgill.ca

    2014-03-01

    We show that convection driven by chemical separation can significantly affect the cooling light curves of accreting neutron stars after they go into quiescence. We calculate the thermal relaxation of the neutron star ocean and crust including the thermal and compositional fluxes due to convection. After the inward propagating cooling wave reaches the base of the neutron star ocean, the ocean begins to freeze, driving chemical separation. The resulting convection transports heat inward, giving much faster cooling of the surface layers than found assuming the ocean cools passively. The light curves including convection show a rapid drop in temperature weeks after outburst. Identifying this signature in observed cooling curves would constrain the temperature and composition of the ocean as well as offer a real time probe of the freezing of a classical multicomponent plasma.

  16. A fuselage/tank structure study for actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles: Active cooling system analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of fuselage cross section and structural arrangement on the performance of actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles are investigated. An active cooling system which maintains the aircraft's entire surface area at temperatures below 394 K at Mach 6 is developed along with a hydrogen fuel tankage thermal protection system. Thermodynamic characteristics of the actively cooled thermal protection systems established are summarized. Design heat loads and coolant flowrate requirements are defined for each major structural section and for the total system. Cooling system weights are summarized at the major component level. Conclusions and recommendations are included.

  17. The influence of H2O line blanketing on the spectra of cool dwarf stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allard, F.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Miller, S.; Tennyson, J.

    1994-01-01

    We present our initial results of model atmosphere calculations for cool M dwarfs using an opacity sampling method and a new list of H2O lines. We obtain significantly improved fits to the infrared spectrum of the M dwarf VB10 when compared to earlier models. H2O is by far the dominant opacity source in cool stars. To illustrate this, we show the Rosseland mean of the total extinction under various assumptions. Our calculations demonstrate the importance of a good treatment of the water opacities in cool stars and the improvements possible by using up-to-date data for the water line absorption.

  18. The formation process of the He I lambda 10830 line in cool giant stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luttermoser, Donald G.

    1993-01-01

    The Final Report on the formation process of the He I lambda 10830 line in cool giant stars is presented. The research involves observing a sample of cool giant stars with ROSAT. These stars were selected from the list of bright stars which display He I lambda 10830 in absorption or emission and lie on the cool side of the coronal dividing line. With measured x ray fluxes or upper limits measured by the Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC), the role x rays play in the formation of this important line was investigated using the non-LTE radiative transfer code PANDORA. Hydrodynamic calculations were performed to investigate the contributions of acoustic wave heating in the formation of this line as well.

  19. Search for white dwarf companions of cool stars with peculiar element abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, E.

    1984-01-01

    A search for a white dwarf companions of cool stars with peculiar element abundances was undertaken. One additional star the xi Cet, was found with a white dwarf companion. It was found that HR 1016, 56Uma, 16 Ser, have high excitation emission lines which indicate a high temperature object in the system. It is suggested that since these indications for high temperature companions were seen for all nearby Ba stars, it is highly probable that all Ba stars have white dwarf companions, and that the peculiar element abundances seen in the Ba stars are due to mass transfer. Observations, arguments and conclusions are presented. White dwarf companions were not found. Together with the Li and Be abundances and the chromospheric emission line spectra in these stars were studied. No white dwarf companions were seen for subgiant CH stars.

  20. The sign of four: a new class of cool non-radially pulsating stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krisciunas, K.

    The author discusses four early F-type stars whose periods are an order of magnitude slower than known pulsators of comparable luminosity. They cannot be stars undergoing simple radial pulsations. For most of these stars, one can discount the possibility that the variability is due to rotational modulation of star spots, interactions with (or tidal distortions by) a close companion, or obscuration by a rotating lumpy ring of dust orbiting the star. They are certainly not eclipsing binaries. The only possibility left seems to be non-radial pulsations, though this explanation involves difficulties of its own. If they are indeed pulsating stars exhibiting non-radial gravity modes, they would be the first stars on the cool side of the Cepheid instability strip in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram to be so identified.

  1. COOL YOUNG STARS IN THE NORTHERN HEMISPHERE: {beta} PICTORIS AND AB DORADUS MOVING GROUP CANDIDATES

    SciTech Connect

    Schlieder, Joshua E.; Simon, Michal; Lepine, Sebastien E-mail: schlieder@mpia-hd.mpg.de

    2012-04-15

    As part of our continuing effort to identify new, low-mass members of nearby, young moving groups (NYMGs), we present a list of young, low-mass candidates in the northern hemisphere. We used our proven proper-motion selection procedure and ROSAT X-ray and GALEX-UV activity indicators to identify 204 young stars as candidate members of the {beta} Pictoris and AB Doradus NYMGs. Definitive membership assignment of a given candidate will require a measurement of its radial velocity and distance. We present a simple system of indices to characterize the young candidates and help prioritize follow-up observations. New group members identified in this candidate list will be high priority targets for (1) exoplanet direct imaging searches, (2) the study of post-T-Tauri astrophysics, (3) understanding recent local star formation, and (4) the study of local galactic kinematics. Information available now allows us to identify eight likely new members in the list. Two of these, a late-K and an early-M dwarf, we find to be likely members of the {beta} Pic group. The other six stars are likely members of the AB Dor moving group. These include an M dwarf triple system, and three very cool objects that may be young brown dwarfs, making them the lowest-mass, isolated objects proposed in the AB Dor moving group to date.

  2. Dust Production and Mass Loss in Cool Evolved Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    Following the red giant branch phase and the subsequent core He-burning phase, the low- to intermediate-mass stars (0.8star. I will briefly review the current status of models that include AGB mass loss and relate them to recent observations of AGB stars from the Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (SAGE) Spitzer surveys of the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds, including measures of the total dust input to the interstellar medium from AGB stars.

  3. Multiphysics Simulation of Active Hypersonic Lip Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melis, Matthew E.; Wang, Wen-Ping

    1999-01-01

    This article describes the application of the Multidisciplinary Analysis (MDA) solver, Spectrum, in analyzing a hydrogen-cooled hypersonic cowl leading-edge structure. Spectrum, a multiphysics simulation code based on the finite element method, addresses compressible and incompressible fluid flow, structural, and thermal modeling, as well as the interactions between these disciplines. Fluid-solid-thermal interactions in a hydrogen impingement-cooled leading edge are predicted using Spectrum. Two- and semi-three-dimensional models are considered for a leading edge impingement coolant, concept under either specified external heat flux or aerothermodynamic heating from a Mach 5 external flow interaction. The solution accuracy is demonstrated from mesh refinement analysis. With active cooling, the leading edge surface temperature is drastically reduced from 1807 K of the adiabatic condition to 418 K. The internal coolant temperature profile exhibits a sharp gradient near channel/solid interface. Results from two different cooling channel configurations are also presented to illustrate the different behavior of alternative active cooling schemes.

  4. Fluorescence processes and line identifications in the UV spectra of cool stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Johansson, Sveneric

    1988-01-01

    Fluorescence processes active in the outer atmospheres of noncoronal cool stars and the UV lines they produce are summarized. Eight pumping processes and 21 fluorescent line products are discussed. The processes, which produce 12 lines, involves energy levels not previously known to be radiatively populated. Four of these are examples of self-fluorescence, whereby one or more lines of Fe II photo-excite through coincident lines the upper levels of other Fe II lines lines seen in emission, while two others explain the selective excitation of solitary Ni II and Si I lines. Nine of the line products are decays from levels in Fe I and Fe II already known to be radiatively populated.

  5. Hα/Pδ Lines of Hydrogen in Cool Luminous Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W.; Wallerstein, G.

    2011-12-01

    We have been assembling Hα/Pδ (P for Paschen) line profiles for a wide range of spectral types. The lines are at 6563 and 10049 Å. The data have been obtained with the Coude spectrograph of the 1.2-m telescope of the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory (DAO). In this presentation we concentrate on stars of type F, G, K, and M. The advantage of using Pδ to verify models of stellar atmosphere is that departures from LTE are mainly due to the meta-stability of the 2s level. Stars of high luminosity illustrate the differences between LTE and NLTE since collisional effects are reduced as compared with main sequence stars. Profile difference between the Pδ and Hα lines and the synthesized LTE line profiles are shown.

  6. Ultraviolet observations of cool stars. VIII - Interstellar matter toward Procyon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. C.; Henry, R. C.; Moos, H. W.; Linsky, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    The profile of the chromospheric L-alpha emission line of the F5 IV-V star Procyon (Alpha CMi, d = 3.5 pc) has been measured using the high-resolution Princeton spectrometer aboard NASA's Copernicus satellite. L-alpha absorption lines of interstellar deuterium and hydrogen are distinctly present. The average number density of interstellar hydrogen along the line of sight is found to be 0.11 + or - 0.02 per cu cm, similar to the densities that have been found in the directions of the stars Epsilon Eri, Epsilon Ind, and Alpha Cen A. These stars are all within 3.5 pc of the earth. The ratio of deuterium to hydrogen in the direction of Procyon is found to be 1.3 (+1.2, -0.5) x 10 to the -5th.

  7. THE DIFFERENT EVOLUTION OF GAS AND DUST IN DISKS AROUND SUN-LIKE AND COOL STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Pascucci, I.; Apai, D.; Luhman, K.; Henning, Th.; Bouwman, J.; Meyer, M. R.; Lahuis, F.; Natta, A.

    2009-05-01

    Planet formation is profoundly impacted by the properties of protoplanetary disks and their central star. However, how disk properties vary with stellar parameters remains poorly known. Here, we present the first comprehensive, comparative Spitzer/IRS study of the dust and gas properties of disks around young Sun-like stars (K1-M5) and cool stars/brown dwarfs (M5-M9). The comparison of these two large samples of over 60 sources reveal major differences in the evolution of both the dust and gas components. We report the first detection of organic molecules in disks around brown dwarfs. The detection rate statistics and the line flux ratios of HCN and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} show a striking difference between the two samples, demonstrating a significant underabundance of HCN relative to C{sub 2}H{sub 2} in the disk surface of cool stars. We propose this to originate from the large difference in the UV irradiation around the two types of sources. The statistical comparison of the 10 {mu}m silicate emission features also reveals a difference between the two samples. Cool stars and brown dwarfs show weaker features arising from more processed silicate grains in the disk atmosphere. These findings complement previous indications of flatter disk structures and longer disk lifetimes around cool stars. Our results highlight important differences in the chemical and physical evolution of protoplanetary disks as a function of stellar mass, temperature, and radiation field which should be taken into account in planet formation models. We note that the different chemistry of preplanetary materials in the disk may also influence the bulk composition and volatile content of the forming planets. In particular, if exogenous HCN has played a key role in the synthesis of prebiotic molecules on Earth as proposed, then prebiotic chemistry may unfold differently on planets around cool stars.

  8. GT1_cdedes_1: Heating and cooling mechanics in massive star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedes, C.

    2010-03-01

    Massive stars are important constituents of the interstellar medium (ISM) in our Galaxy and beyond. Their strong feedback processes influence the dynamics, energetics and chemistry of the surrounding interstellar medium both locally and on large scales. An important question to be answered is the one of cooling and heating mechanisms in regions of massive star formation. In the vicinity of massive stars, heating is provided mostly by far-UV (FUV) and infra-red radiation. Cooling is mostly provided by emission in the fine structure lines of CII. There are however other atomic and molecular lines such as OI, CO, OH and H_2O which can become significant coolants in the dense, embedded regions of massive star formation. This early phase when the forming massive star is still deeply embedded in its natal envelope, yet already interacting with, and potentially destroying, its environment through copious amounts of UV radiation, massive outflows and ultra compact HII (UCHII) regions, is an important phase in the star formation process. To understand the heating and cooling balance in this phase, one has to consider the contributions of various radiative and dynamical processes such as the FUV radiation from the young star itself, shocks created by strong stellar winds and the photon dominated regions (PDRs) where the radiation impinges on the molecular material. The tracers of these processes can be observed in the far-infrared, a wavelength range that is now accessible at unprecedented high spectral and spatial resolution with the Herschel Space Observatory. We propose to observe the aformentioned tracers of cooling and heating in the massive star forming region IRAS 12326-6245 to obtain a complete picture of the different processes, the regions they originate from and how they interact. This proposal is for time granted to the HIFI hardware team (PI: Frank Helmich) and to be accounted as part of the Swiss guaranteed time (Lead-Co-I: Arnold O. Benz).

  9. PSR J1840-1419: A VERY COOL NEUTRON STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Keane, E. F.; Kramer, M.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Stappers, B. W.; Bassa, C. G.; Purver, M. B.; Weltevrede, P.

    2013-02-20

    We present upper limits on the X-ray emission for three neutron stars. For PSR J1840-1419, with a characteristic age of 16.5 Myr, we calculate a blackbody temperature upper limit (at 99% confidence) of kT {sup {infinity}} {sub bb} < 24{sup +17} {sub -10} eV, making this one of the coolest neutron stars known. PSRs J1814-1744 and J1847-0130 are both high magnetic field pulsars, with inferred surface dipole magnetic field strengths of 5.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} and 9.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} G, respectively. Our temperature upper limits for these stars are kT {sup {infinity}} {sub bb} < 123{sup +20} {sub -33} eV and kT {sup {infinity}} {sub bb} < 115{sup +16} {sub -33} eV, showing that these high magnetic field pulsars are not significantly hotter than those with lower magnetic fields. Finally, we put these limits into context by summarizing all temperature measurements and limits for rotation-driven neutron stars.

  10. PCM Passive Cooling System Containing Active Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanding, David E.; Bass, David I.

    2005-01-01

    A multistage system has been proposed for cooling a circulating fluid that is subject to intermittent intense heating. The system would be both flexible and redundant in that it could operate in a basic passive mode, either sequentially or simultaneously with operation of a first, active cooling subsystem, and either sequentially or simultaneously with a second cooling subsystem that could be active, passive, or a combination of both. This flexibility and redundancy, in combination with the passive nature of at least one of the modes of operation, would make the system more reliable, relative to a conventional cooling system. The system would include a tube-in-shell heat exchanger, within which the space between the tubes would be filled with a phase-change material (PCM). The circulating hot fluid would flow along the tubes in the heat exchanger. In the basic passive mode of operation, heat would be conducted from the hot fluid into the PCM, wherein the heat would be stored temporarily by virtue of the phase change.

  11. Cryogenic Cooling for Myriad Applications-A STAR Is Born

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Cryogenics, the science of generating extremely low temperatures, has wide applicability throughout NASA. The Agency employs cryogenics for rocket propulsion, high-pressure gas supply, breathable air in space, life support equipment, electricity, water, food preservation and packaging, medicine, imaging devices, and electronics. Cryogenic liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen systems are also replacing solid rocket motor propulsion systems in most of the proposed launch systems, a reversion to old-style liquid propellants. In the late 1980s, NASA wanted a compact linear alternator/motor with reduced size and mass, as well as high efficiency, that had unlimited service life for use in a thermally driven power generator for space power applications. Prior development work with free-piston Stirling converters (a Stirling engine integrated with a linear actuator that produces electrical power output) had shown the promise of that technology for high-power space applications. A dual use for terrestrial applications exists for compact Stirling converters for onsite combined heat and power units. The Stirling cycle is also usable in reverse as a refrigeration cycle suitable for cryogenic cooling, so this Stirling converter work promised double benefits as well as dual uses. The uses for cryogenic coolers within NASA abound; commercial applications are similarly wide-ranging, from cooling liquid oxygen and nitrogen, to cryobiology and bio-storage, cryosurgery, instrument and detector cooling, semiconductor manufacturing, and support service for cooled superconducting power systems.

  12. 3-D reconstructions of active stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Heidi

    2015-03-01

    Stars are usually faint point sources and investigating their surfaces and interiors observationally is very demanding. Here I give a review on the state-of-the-art observing techniques and recent results on studying interiors and surface features of active stars.

  13. Collision--induced absorption in dense atmospheres of cool stars

    SciTech Connect

    Borysow, Aleksandra; Joergensen, Uffe Graae

    1999-04-01

    In the atmosphere of the Sun the major interaction between the matter and the radiation is through light absorption by ions (predominantly the negative ion of hydrogen atoms), neutral atoms and a small amount of polar molecules. The majority of stars in the universe are, however, cooler and denser than our Sun, and for a large fraction of these, the above absorption processes are very weak. Here, collision-induced absorption (CIA) becomes the dominant opacity source. The radiation is absorbed during very short mutual passages ('collisions') of two non-polar molecules (and/or atoms), while their electric charge distributions are temporarily distorted which gives rise to a transient dipole moment. We present here a review of the present-day knowledge about the impact of collision-induced absorption processes on the structure and the spectrum of such stars.

  14. Hydrogen-deficient atmospheres for cool carbon stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. R.; Bower, C. D.; Lemke, D. A.; Luttermoser, D. G.; Petrakis, J. P.; Reinhart, M. D.; Welch, K. A.; Alexander, D. R.; Goebel, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    Motivated by recent work which hints at a possible deficiency of hydrogen in non-Mira N-type carbon stars and to further explore the parameter space of chemical composition, computations have been made of a series of hydrogen-deficient models for carbon stars. For these models Teff = 3000 K, and log g = 0.0. Solar abundances are used for all elements except for carbon (which is enhanced to give C/O = 1.05), hydrogen, and helium. As the fractional abundance of hydrogen is decreased, being replaced by helium, the temperature-optical depth relation is affected only slightly, but the temperature-pressure relation is changed. The most striking change in the emergent flux is the decrease of the H(-) peak at 1.65 micron compared with the blackbody peak at 1.00 micron.

  15. The wavelength dependence of broadband linear polarization in cool stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saar, Steven H.; Huovelin, Juhani

    1990-01-01

    A model is developed to investigate the effect of wavelength dependence of magnetically generated broadband linear polarization (BLP) in late-type stars as a function of line blanketing, observation filters, and other variables. Linear polarization is assumed to be a single 'average' line and the line opacity, magnetic area filling factor, and continuum intensity are incorporated to establish an equation for disk-generated BLP. The method is investigated by computing special models for the flare star BY Dra and the sun which are compared to previous calculations. The model is shown to agree with the calculations of BLP, and the magnetic BLP dependent on wavelengths varies significantly from the simple power law dependences on wavelength. The model sets lower limits to the area occupied by magnetic regions, and an upper limit to the expected BLP also results from the formulation.

  16. Observational results from cooling neutron stars in X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degenaar, Nathalie

    2016-07-01

    The composition and structure of the ~1 km thick, solid crust of neutron stars is responsible for many of their observable properties, and plays a fundamental role in the emission of gravitational waves and the evolution of their magnetic field. When residing in an X-ray binary, a neutron star accretes gas from a companion star. As matter accumulates on the neutron star surface, the underlying crust is compressed and heated due to nuclear reactions induced by this compression. Once accretion switches off, sensitive X-ray satellites can be employed to observe how the heated crust cools. Comparing these observations with theoretical simulations provides very valuable insight into the structure and composition of the crusts of neutron stars. I will present the latest observational results and challenges in this research field.

  17. Thermonuclear reactions in cool accreting neutron stars and burst phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyaji, S.; Nomoto, K.

    1985-01-01

    The ignition of accreting materials on neutron stars is explored using strongly coupled plasma analytical techniques. The calculations cover the ignition temperature and density at the bottom of the accreted envelope of a neutron star. Emphasis is placed on low-temperature ignitions which take place at high densities. The investigation is extended to the accretion of material from a white dwarf in the form of pure He, C + O, or O + Ne + Mg. It is shown that electrons are strongly degenerate in low-temperature flashes, where the ignition is more dependent on density than on temperature. Precursor flashes 0.4-0.7 the intensity of the main burst will appear before the main bursts. The intensity relationship indicates that the appropriate model for an X-ray burst from a neutron star accreting from a white dwarf is a He shell flash in the presence of a hydrogen-rich atmosphere. The flash will have a maximum energy of 2 x 10 to the 43 ergs and could last as long as 40,000 sec.

  18. Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer Right Angle Program observations of cool stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, D. J.; Drake, J. J.; Mathioudakis, M.

    1998-01-01

    The Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) Right Angle Program (RAP) obtains photometric data in four bands centered at 100 (Lexan/B), 200 (Al/Ti/C), 400 (Ti/Sb/Al), and 550 (Sn/SiO) during pointed spectroscopic observations. RAP observations are up to 20 times more sensitive than those in the EUVE all-sky survey. We present RAP observations of two dozen late-type stars. We derive surface fluxes from the Lexan/B and Al/Ti/C count rates and cataloged ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) data. The EUVE surface fluxes are reasonably correlated with surface fluxes calculated from PSPC measurements. The time variability of the sources has been examined. Most of the sources show no significant variability at the 99 percent confidence level. Flares were detected from the K7 V star Melotte 25 VA 334, the K3 V star V834 Tau (HD 29697), and the K3 + K8 Hyades binary BD +22669. The BD +22669 count rate at the peak of the flare is a factor of 6 higher than the quiescent count rate, with a peak Lexan/B luminosity of 7.9 1029 ergs/s. The V834 Tau flare was detected in both Lexan/B and Al/Ti/C bands. The peak luminosity of the flare is 1.6 1029 and 8 1028 ergs/s for Lexan/B and Al/Ti/C, respectively.

  19. Theoretical studies of chromospheres and winds in cool stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupree, A.

    1983-01-01

    The formation of spectral lines in expanding spherical atmospheres was determined in a physically realistic way, taking into account multilevel atomic processes, partial frequency redistribution, and other non-LTE transfer effects that affect the formation of optically thick lines. The formation of MgII and Ca II circumstellar absorption lines in late type giants and supergiants is investigated. The radiative cooling rate as a function of density and temperature was calculated from the results of plane parallel chromospheric models and these results were used to approximate the radiative cooling in an extended wind. The run of temperature was calculated along with the density and velocity profiles. The most important prediction of these models is that a warm zone in the wind must exist as a result of the wave heating. Within this zone, the Ca II and Mg II atoms can be ionized to Ca III and Mg III, so that the gas is transparent in the resonance transitions.

  20. Criteria for spectral classification of cool stars using high-resolution spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, David; Martínez-Arnáiz, Raquel M.; Maldonado, Jesus; Roa-Llamazares, Juan; López-Santiago, Javier; Crespo-Chacón, Inés; Solano, Enrique

    2007-08-01

    We have compiled a large number of optical spectra of cool stars taken with different high-resolution echelle spectrographs (R 40 000). Many of those are available as spectral libraries (Montes et al. 1997, 1998, 1999, .

  1. Cooling of young neutron stars and the Einstein X-ray observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nomoto, K.; Tsuruta, S.

    1981-01-01

    Cooling of neutron stars is calculated using an exact stellar evolution code. The full general relativistic version of the stellar structure equations are solved, with the best physical input available. For neutron stars with a stiff equation of state, it is found that the deviation from the isothermality in the interior is significant and that it takes at least a few thousand years to reach the isothermal state. By comparing theoretical and observational results, it is concluded that for Cas A, SN1006, and probably Tycho, standard cooling is inconsistent with the results from the Einstein Observatory, if neutron stars are assumed to be present in these objects. On the other hand, the detection points for RCW103 and the Crab are consistent with these theoretical results.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Cool Galactic Carbon Stars, 2nd Edition (Stephenson 1989)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, C. B.

    1996-06-01

    The catalog is intended to list all 5987 cool carbon stars having known positions of at least roughly the precision of The Henry Draper Catalogue. Cool carbon stars are defined as stars whose spectra at low dispersion (say a resolution no better than 1-2 angstroms) are known to show bands of the Swan system of the C2 molecule; or, if the spectral region of the Swan system is inadequately observed, they show the red or infrared bands of CN in strength adequate to infer that the Swan bands almost certainly would be seen if their presence could be tested. The closing date for literature search was 1989 June 30, defined by literature received in the author's library by that date. The catalog includes equatorial coordinates (B1900.0); photographic, visual, and infrared magnitudes; spectral types, galactic coordinates, and cross identifications to various other designation systems. (4 data files).

  3. Cool and luminous transients from mass-losing binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejcha, Ondřej; Metzger, Brian D.; Tomida, Kengo

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by the recently established link between luminous red novae (LRN) and catastrophic phases of binary star evolution, we perform smoothed particle hydrodynamic calculations of outflows from binary stars with realistic equation of state and opacities. We focus on the case of mass loss from the outer Lagrangian point (L2), where the resulting spiral stream experiences tidal torques from the binary and becomes unbound. As the individual spiral arms merge and collide near the binary, the outflow thermalizes about 5% of its kinetic energy. For reasonable binary parameters, the outflow can produce luminosities up to 106 L ⨀ with effective temperatures between 500 and 6000 K, depending on the optical depth through the outflow. This is compatible with many examples of the LRN such as V838 Mon and V1309 Sco. The luminosity and the expansion velocity are correlated, as is roughly observed in the known LRN. The outflow readily forms dust, leading to great variations of the appearance of the transient as a function of the viewing angle. Our results are relevant for a more general class of equatorial outflows with asymptotic velocity and heating rate near the binary proportional to its orbital speed.

  4. ON THE INITIAL MASS FUNCTION OF LOW-METALLICITY STARS: THE IMPORTANCE OF DUST COOLING

    SciTech Connect

    Dopcke, Gustavo; Glover, Simon C. O.; Clark, Paul C.; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2013-04-01

    The first stars to form in the universe are believed to have distribution of masses biased toward massive stars. This contrasts with the present-day initial mass function, which has a predominance of stars with masses lower than 1 M{sub Sun }. Therefore, the mode of star formation must have changed as the universe evolved. Such a transition is attributed to a more efficient cooling provided by increasing metallicity. Especially dust cooling can overcome the compressional heating, which lowers the gas temperature thus increasing its instability to fragmentation. The purpose of this paper is to verify if dust cooling can efficiently cool the gas, and enhance the fragmentation of gas clouds at the early stages of the universe. To confirm that, we calculate a set of hydrodynamic simulations that include sink particles, which represent contracting protostars. The thermal evolution of the gas during the collapse is followed by making use of a primordial chemical network and also a recipe for dust cooling. We model four clouds with different amounts of metals (10{sup -4}, 10{sup -5}, 10-6 Z{sub Sun }, and 0), and analyze how this property affect the fragmentation of star-forming clouds. We find evidence for fragmentation in all four cases, and hence conclude that there is no critical metallicity below which fragmentation is impossible. Nevertheless, there is a clear change in the behavior of the clouds at Z {approx}< 10{sup -5} Z{sub Sun }, caused by the fact that at this metallicity, fragmentation takes longer to occur than accretion, leading to a flat mass function at lower metallicities.

  5. The outer layers of cool, non-Mira carbon stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. R.

    1991-01-01

    The outer layers and near circumstellar envelope (CSE) of a typical carbon star have been studied using available data from theoretical and empirical models. An attempt is made to match the density-velocity structure of the photosphere-chromosphere region to values from the radio CO observations, which arise from the outer CSE. It is concluded that the stellar atmosphere includes a relatively thin high-temperature region close to hydrostatic equilibrium and a much more extended cooler region of outflowing gas and dust. To extend the outer photosphere and chromosphere to match the mass loss density appears to require an injection of energy and momentum by some mechanism rather close to the stellar surface.

  6. Using infrared spectral features to probe circumstellar dust shells around cool stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, Michael P.; Leung, Chun Ming

    1989-01-01

    IRAS observations of cool stars provide low resolution spectra in the mid-infrared and also give fluxes at four wavelength bands from which color-color diagrams are constructed. The later have been used to study the evolution of these stars: as an O-rich star evolves to become a C-rich star and its detached dust shell moves further away, its evolution can be tracked on a color-color diagram. A major factor in determining the position of either C-rich or O-rich stars on the 12-25-60 micron color-color diagram is the presence of spectral features in the mid-IR. O-rich stars show a 9.8 micron silicate feature, while C-rich stars have a SiC feature at 11.2 microns. IRAS observations indicate that the SiC feature is quite narrow and uniform in shape showing little variation from star to star. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) is 1.6 + or - 0.15 microns. On the other hand, the shape of the silicate feature varies widely among the O-rich stars, with a FWHM ranging from 2 to 3 microns. The characteristics of circumstellar dust shells should manifest themselves both in the flux spectrum and in the details of the spectral features. To provide a coherent interpretation for these IRAS observations, models were constructed (using a radiative transfer code) of dust shells around O-rich and C-rich stars. Realistic grain opacities were used which include spectral features of varying intrinsic widths (e.g., Gaussian features at 10 microns with half width at half maximum of 0.5 and 1.0 microns).

  7. Suppression of cooling by strong magnetic fields in white dwarf stars.

    PubMed

    Valyavin, G; Shulyak, D; Wade, G A; Antonyuk, K; Zharikov, S V; Galazutdinov, G A; Plachinda, S; Bagnulo, S; Machado, L Fox; Alvarez, M; Clark, D M; Lopez, J M; Hiriart, D; Han, Inwoo; Jeon, Young-Beom; Zurita, C; Mujica, R; Burlakova, T; Szeifert, T; Burenkov, A

    2014-11-01

    Isolated cool white dwarf stars more often have strong magnetic fields than young, hotter white dwarfs, which has been a puzzle because magnetic fields are expected to decay with time but a cool surface suggests that the star is old. In addition, some white dwarfs with strong fields vary in brightness as they rotate, which has been variously attributed to surface brightness inhomogeneities similar to sunspots, chemical inhomogeneities and other magneto-optical effects. Here we describe optical observations of the brightness and magnetic field of the cool white dwarf WD 1953-011 taken over about eight years, and the results of an analysis of its surface temperature and magnetic field distribution. We find that the magnetic field suppresses atmospheric convection, leading to dark spots in the most magnetized areas. We also find that strong fields are sufficient to suppress convection over the entire surface in cool magnetic white dwarfs, which inhibits their cooling evolution relative to weakly magnetic and non-magnetic white dwarfs, making them appear younger than they truly are. This explains the long-standing mystery of why magnetic fields are more common amongst cool white dwarfs, and implies that the currently accepted ages of strongly magnetic white dwarfs are systematically too young. PMID:25327247

  8. A spin-down clock for cool stars from observations of a 2.5-billion-year-old cluster.

    PubMed

    Meibom, Søren; Barnes, Sydney A; Platais, Imants; Gilliland, Ronald L; Latham, David W; Mathieu, Robert D

    2015-01-29

    The ages of the most common stars--low-mass (cool) stars like the Sun, and smaller--are difficult to derive because traditional dating methods use stellar properties that either change little as the stars age or are hard to measure. The rotation rates of all cool stars decrease substantially with time as the stars steadily lose their angular momenta. If properly calibrated, rotation therefore can act as a reliable determinant of their ages based on the method of gyrochronology. To calibrate gyrochronology, the relationship between rotation period and age must be determined for cool stars of different masses, which is best accomplished with rotation period measurements for stars in clusters with well-known ages. Hitherto, such measurements have been possible only in clusters with ages of less than about one billion years, and gyrochronology ages for older stars have been inferred from model predictions. Here we report rotation period measurements for 30 cool stars in the 2.5-billion-year-old cluster NGC 6819. The periods reveal a well-defined relationship between rotation period and stellar mass at the cluster age, suggesting that ages with a precision of order 10 per cent can be derived for large numbers of cool Galactic field stars. PMID:25539085

  9. A spin-down clock for cool stars from observations of a 2.5-billion-year-old cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meibom, Søren; Barnes, Sydney A.; Platais, Imants; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Latham, David W.; Mathieu, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    The ages of the most common stars--low-mass (cool) stars like the Sun, and smaller--are difficult to derive because traditional dating methods use stellar properties that either change little as the stars age or are hard to measure. The rotation rates of all cool stars decrease substantially with time as the stars steadily lose their angular momenta. If properly calibrated, rotation therefore can act as a reliable determinant of their ages based on the method of gyrochronology. To calibrate gyrochronology, the relationship between rotation period and age must be determined for cool stars of different masses, which is best accomplished with rotation period measurements for stars in clusters with well-known ages. Hitherto, such measurements have been possible only in clusters with ages of less than about one billion years, and gyrochronology ages for older stars have been inferred from model predictions. Here we report rotation period measurements for 30 cool stars in the 2.5-billion-year-old cluster NGC 6819. The periods reveal a well-defined relationship between rotation period and stellar mass at the cluster age, suggesting that ages with a precision of order 10 per cent can be derived for large numbers of cool Galactic field stars.

  10. Definition and empirical structure of the range of stellar chromospheres-coronae across the H-R diagram: Cool stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Major advances in our understanding of non-radiative heating and other activity in stars cooler than T sub eff = 10,000K has occured in the last few years. This observational evidence is reviewed and the trends that are now becoming apparent are discussed. The evidence for non-radiatively heated outer atmospheric layers (chromospheres, transition regions, and coronae) in dwarf stars cooler than spectral type A7, in F and G giants, pre-main sequence stars, and close bindary systems is unambiguous, as is the evidence for chromospheres in the K and M giants and supergiants. The existence of non-radiative heating in the outer layers of the A stars remains undetermined despite repeated searches at all wavelengths. Two important trends in the data are the decrease in plasma emission measure with age on the main sequence and decreasing rotational velocity. Variability and atmospheric inhomogeneity are commonly seen, and there is considerable evidence that magnetic fields define the geometry and control the energy balance in the outer atmospheric layers. In addition, the microwave observations imply that non-thermal electrons are confined in coronal magnetic flux tubes in at least the cool dwarfs and RS CVn systems. The chromospheres in the K and M giants and supergiants are geometrically extended, as are the coronae in the RS CVn systems and probably also in other stars.

  11. Dating the Stars Next Door: Ages and Coronal X-Ray Activities of Local K-Type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katynski, Marcus; Guinan, Edward F.; Engle, Scott G.

    2016-01-01

    Age is one of the most difficult (but important) basic stellar physical property to determine. One possible means to estimate stellar age is from rotational period; it is known that as cool stars age, they lose angular momentum from magnetic braking and slow-down. Thus, good Rotation-Age relationships exist, which are calibrated with stars possessing reliable ages from: evolutionary tracks and/or memberships in clusters/moving groups or binary star systems. Further, ages of older stars can be estimated from (low) metal abundances and kinematics (high space motions). More recently, age determinations from asteroseismology are also becoming more reliable. Except for the many G, K, M stars in the Kepler/K2 fields, rotational periods are difficult to measure photometrically for older, less active stars since star spots and active regions are smaller & less prominent. Thus measuring the coronal X-ray activity of a star is an appealing alternative. Coronal X-ray emission is generated by the stellar dynamo, and so is directly related to the stars' rotation (and age). Measurement of X-ray fluxes (or upper limits) have been made for most of the nearby stars (within ~20 pc) with data available in the HEASARC archives. During the 1990's the ROSAT X-Ray Satellite carried out an all-sky survey of thousands of X-ray sources, including hundreds of nearby stars, producing a large archival database. Using these and other available X-ray data from XMM-Newton & Chandra, we explore the relation between coronal X-ray activity and stellar age of all stars within 10 pc (32.6 LY), with special emphasis on dK and early dM stars that make up ~85% of the sample. Here we report the progress made in determination the ages these nearby stars. We focused on nearby dK-stars, due to their long lifetimes (>20 Gyr) and habitable zones that lie ~0.5 -1.5 AU from their host stars. They appear to be ideal candidates for hosting potentially habitable planets, making them interesting targets. We present

  12. Kinematics and Velocity Ellipsoid Parameters of Stellar Groups and Open Star Clusters: II Cool Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsanhoury, W. H.

    2016-06-01

    Based on the galactic space velocity components (U, V, W) and with aid of the vector and matrix analyses, we computed the velocity ellipsoid parameters for 790 late-type stars from CoRoT (Convection, Rotation and Transits) observations and 290 L dwarf stars. We ran the calculations for spectral types F, G, and K for late-type stars and L0, L1, L2, and L3 for L dwarf stars. We found that the ratio of the middle to the major axis in the galaxy ranged from 0.35 to 0.73. The vertex deviation from the galactic center was very small for the samples under investigation, which agrees well with earlier calculations.

  13. The far-ultraviolet spectra of "cool" PG 1159 stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, K.; Rauch, T.; Kruk, J. W.

    2015-10-01

    We present a comprehensive study of Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) spectra (912-1190 Å) of two members of the PG 1159 spectral class, which consists of hydrogen-deficient (pre-) white dwarfs with effective temperatures in the range Teff = 75 000-200 000 K. As two representatives of the cooler objects, we have selected PG 1707+427 (Teff = 85 000 K) and PG 1424+535 (Teff = 110 000 K), complementing a previous study of the hotter prototype PG 1159-035 (Teff = 140 000 K). The helium-dominated atmospheres are strongly enriched in carbon and oxygen, therefore, their spectra are dominated by lines from C iii-iv and O iii-vi, many of which were never observed before in hot stars. In addition, lines of many other metals (N, F, Ne, Si, P, S, Ar, Fe) are detectable, demonstrating that observations in this spectral region are most rewarding when compared to the near-ultraviolet and optical wavelength bands. We perform abundance analyses of these species and derive upper limits for several undetected light and heavy metals including iron-group and trans-iron elements. The results are compared to predictions of stellar evolution models for neutron-capture nucleosynthesis and good agreement is found. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  14. Cool Active Binaries Recently Studied in the CAAM Stellar Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciçek, C.; Erdem, A.; Soydugan, F.; Doǧru, D.; Özkardeş, B.; Erkan, N.; Budding, E.; Demircan, O.

    2010-12-01

    We summarize recent work on cool active stars in our programme. We carried out photometry at the Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University (COMU) observatory, and high-resolution spectroscopy at Mt John University Observatory, as well as collecting data from other facilties. A combination of analysis methods, including our information limit optimization technique (ILOT) with physically realistic fitting functions, as well as other public-domain software packages, have been used to find reliable parameters. Stars in our recent programme include V1430 Aql, V1034 Her, V340 Gem, SAO 62042, FI Cnc, V2075 Cyg, FG UMa and BM CVn. Light variations, sometimes over numerous consecutive cycles, were analysed. For AB Dor and CF Tuc, we compared broadband (B and V) maculation effects with emission features in the Ca II K and Hα lines. Broadband light curves typically show one or two outstanding maculae. These appear correlated with the main chromospheric activity sites (‘faculae’), that occur at similar latitudes and with comparable size to the photometric umbrae, but sometimes with significant displacements in longitude. The possibility of large-scale bipolar surface structure is considered, keeping in mind solar analogies. Such optical work forms part of broader multiwavelength studies, involving X-ray and microwave observations, also mentioned.

  15. Effects of neutrino emissivity on the cooling of neutron stars in the presence of a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, Eduardo Lenho; Chiapparini, Marcelo; Negreiros, Rodrigo Picanço

    2015-12-01

    One of the most interesting kind of neutron stars are the pulsars, which are highly magnetized neutron stars with fields up to 1014 G at the surface. The strength of magnetic field in the center of a neutron star remains unknown. According to the scalar virial theorem, magnetic field in the core could be as large as 1018 G. In this work we study the influence of strong magnetic fields on the cooling of neutron stars coming from direct Urca process. Direct Urca process is an extremely efficient mechanism for cooling a neutron star after its formation. The matter is described using a relativistic mean-field model at zero temperature with eight baryons (baryon octet), electrons and muons. We obtain the relative population of each species of particles as function of baryon density for different magnetic fields. We calculate numerically the cooling of neutron stars for a parametrized magnetic field and compare the results for the case without a magnetic field.

  16. Spot temperatures and area coverages on active dwarf stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarr, Steven H.; Neff, James E.

    1990-01-01

    Two active K dwarfs are examined to determine the temperatures of the stars and to estimate the locations and sizes of cool spots on the stellar surfaces. Two wavelength regions with TiO absorption bands at different temperature sensitivities are modeled simultaneously using the method developed by Huenemoerder and Ramsey (1987). The spectrum of BD +26deg730 shows excess absorption in the TiO band, and the absence of the 8860 A band in HD 82558 indicates that its spots are warmer than those of BD +26deg730.

  17. Rotation, differential rotation, and gyrochronology of active Kepler stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhold, Timo; Gizon, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    most reliable. Explaining the bimodality in the age distribution is challenging, and limits accurate stellar age predictions. The relation between activity and age is interesting, and requires further investigation. The existence of cool stars with almost constant rotation period over more than three years of observation might be explained by synchronization with stellar companions, or a dynamo mechanism keeping the spot configurations extremely stable. Full Tables 2 and 4 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/583/A65

  18. Disordered Nuclear Pasta, Magnetic Field Decay, and Crust Cooling in Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, C. J.; Berry, D. K.; Briggs, C. M.; Caplan, M. E.; Cumming, A.; Schneider, A. S.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear pasta, with nonspherical shapes, is expected near the base of the crust in neutron stars. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of pasta show long lived topological defects that could increase electron scattering and reduce both the thermal and electrical conductivities. We model a possible low-conductivity pasta layer by increasing an impurity parameter Qimp . Predictions of light curves for the low-mass x-ray binary MXB 1659-29, assuming a large Qimp, find continued late time cooling that is consistent with Chandra observations. The electrical and thermal conductivities are likely related. Therefore, observations of late time crust cooling can provide insight on the electrical conductivity and the possible decay of neutron star magnetic fields (assuming these are supported by currents in the crust).

  19. Disordered nuclear pasta, magnetic field decay, and crust cooling in neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, C. J.; Berry, D. K.; Briggs, C. M.; Caplan, M. E.; Cumming, A.; Schneider, A. S.

    2015-04-01

    Nuclear pasta, with non-spherical shapes, is expected near the base of the crust in neutron stars. Large scale molecular dynamics simulations of pasta show long lived topological defects that could increase electron scattering and reduce both the thermal and electrical conductivities. We model a possible low conductivity pasta layer by increasing an impurity parameter Qimp. Predictions of light curves for the low mass X-ray binary MXB 1659-29, assuming a large Qimp, find continued late time cooling that is consistent with Chandra observations. The electrical and thermal conductivities are likely related. Therefore observations of late time crust cooling can provide insight on the electrical conductivity and the possible decay of neutron star magnetic fields (assuming these are supported by currents in the crust). This research was supported in part by DOE Grants DE-FG02-87ER40365 (Indiana University) and DE-SC0008808 (NUCLEI SciDAC Collaboration).

  20. The crucial role of cooling in the making of molecular clouds and stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tohline, Joel E.; Bodenheimer, Peter H.; Christodoulou, Dimitris M.

    1987-01-01

    The role that velocity or pressure fluctuations in the H I clouds medium can play in initiating compression of sub-Jeans mass diffuse clouds is outlined. The frequently discussed idea is reviewed that substantial overpressures arising in the warm, medium and/or highly supersonic compressions of H I clouds can push sub-Jeans mass clumps to densities where gravity can take over and complete the star formation process. A nonequilibrium model is used to analyze the impact of external disturbances on gas clouds, and estimates of the required disturbance amplitudes are substantially reduced from previous estimates based on equilibrium arguments. The results reveal that a cloud which cools under compression is particularly sensitive to mild disturbances from its environment. Furthermore, the specific energy required to trigger effective compressions in a cooling medium is nearly independent of the cloud's mass. It is proposed that mildly nonlinear disturbances play a primary role in the formation of molecular cloud and stars.

  1. Characterizing Nearby Stars: Age and Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderblom, David

    2001-01-01

    The funds in this grant were used to support costs for observing and data analysis over the past two years. During this time I have been obtaining low-resolution (R-2,000) spectra for about 5,000 solar-type stars (late-F and G dwarfs) that are within 60 parsecs of the Sun. The sample was defined with results from the Hipparcos mission, and the spectra were obtained at Kitt Peak National Observatory, using the Coude Feed telescope, and at Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory, using their 1.5 m telescopes for stars below -40 declination. Nearly all the observed spectra have been reduced and analyzed. What is determined is R-prime, an index of the chromospheric emission in the cores of the Ca II H and K lines relative to the nearby continuum, and normalized for the color of the star. Chromospheric emission arises from magnetic activity on the star, and that is turn is driven by rotation. Solar-type stars spin down as they age, and so they get weaker in their chromospheric emission as well. Thus this R-prime index can be used to estimate the ages of stars. A few stars remain to be observed at Kitt Peak, and follow-up high-resolution spectra are being obtained of the most active stars seen, but the majority of the starting sample have been completed. The spectra obtained are also being analyzed to yield an index of overall metallicity for each star, and this will be used to study Galactic evolution questions. These metallicities will form the first large dataset of high and consistent quality. Initial results from this work have been used to define targets for a SIRTF Legacy program, for stars to study for planetary transits, and for SETI efforts. Because of the large number of stars involved, most of the data will be made available on the web, although some specific papers about the results are in preparation. The web database is being constructed.

  2. Diagnostics for the NBETF actively cooled beamdump

    SciTech Connect

    Theil, E.; Jacobson, V.

    1984-09-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility is currently testing multi-megawatt beams with pulse durations of up to 30 seconds. For this purpose, an actively cooled beam dump composed of heat-absorbing panels tht dissipate the beam energy via high speed water flow has been installed and tested. The panels are mounted in a complex assembly necessary to accommodate the variety of ion sources to be tested. The beam dump required new diagnostics of two kinds: beam diagnostics that provide graphic and quantitative information about the beam, as inferred from energy transferred to the water, and panel diagnostics that provide graphic and quantitative information about the beam dump itself. In this paper we describe our response to these requirements, including new algorithms for beam profiles, and we compare this work to our earlier results for inertial beam dumps. Principal differences are that the power densities on the water-cooled panels can be only indirectly inferred from measurements of the transferred beam energy, and that the acquisition and preparation of raw data is much more complex.

  3. Ninth Cambridge Workshop on Cool Stars, Stellar Systems and the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupree, Andrea K.

    1998-01-01

    This Grant was used to publish the Proceedings from the Ninth Cambridge Workshop on Cool Stars, Stellar Systems, and the Sun held in Florence, Italy from 3 to 6 October 1995. The Proceedings were published by the Astronomical Society of the Pacific in their Conference Series, Volume 109 in 1996. This volume was edited by Roberto Pallavicini and Andrea K. Dupree. A copy of the title page and the Table of Contents of the volume is appended.

  4. Spectral Properties of Cool Stars: Extended Abundance Analysis of 1,617 Planet-search Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, John M.; Fischer, Debra A.; Valenti, Jeff A.; Piskunov, Nikolai

    2016-08-01

    We present a catalog of uniformly determined stellar properties and abundances for 1,617 F, G, and K stars using an automated spectral synthesis modeling procedure. All stars were observed using the HIRES spectrograph at Keck Observatory. Our procedure used a single line list to fit model spectra to observations of all stars to determine effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, projected rotational velocity, and the abundances of 15 elements (C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, and Y). Sixty percent of the sample had Hipparcos parallaxes and V-band photometry, which we combined with the spectroscopic results to obtain mass, radius, and luminosity. Additionally, we used the luminosity, effective temperature, metallicity and α-element enhancement to interpolate in the Yonsei–Yale isochrones to derive mass, radius, gravity, and age ranges for those stars. Finally, we determined new relations between effective temperature and macroturbulence for dwarfs and subgiants. Our analysis achieved precisions of 25 K in {T}{eff}, 0.01 dex in [M/H], 0.028 dex for {log}g, and 0.5 km s‑1 in v\\sin i based on multiple observations of the same stars. The abundance results were similarly precise, between ∼0.01 and ∼0.04 dex, though trends with respect to {T}{eff} remained for which we derived empirical corrections. The trends, though small, were much larger than our uncertainties and are shared with published abundances. We show that changing our model atmosphere grid accounts for most of the trend in [M/H] between 5000 and 5500 K, indicating a possible problem with the atmosphere models or opacities.

  5. Spectral Properties of Cool Stars: Extended Abundance Analysis of 1,617 Planet-search Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, John M.; Fischer, Debra A.; Valenti, Jeff A.; Piskunov, Nikolai

    2016-08-01

    We present a catalog of uniformly determined stellar properties and abundances for 1,617 F, G, and K stars using an automated spectral synthesis modeling procedure. All stars were observed using the HIRES spectrograph at Keck Observatory. Our procedure used a single line list to fit model spectra to observations of all stars to determine effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, projected rotational velocity, and the abundances of 15 elements (C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, and Y). Sixty percent of the sample had Hipparcos parallaxes and V-band photometry, which we combined with the spectroscopic results to obtain mass, radius, and luminosity. Additionally, we used the luminosity, effective temperature, metallicity and α-element enhancement to interpolate in the Yonsei–Yale isochrones to derive mass, radius, gravity, and age ranges for those stars. Finally, we determined new relations between effective temperature and macroturbulence for dwarfs and subgiants. Our analysis achieved precisions of 25 K in {T}{eff}, 0.01 dex in [M/H], 0.028 dex for {log}g, and 0.5 km s‑1 in v\\sin i based on multiple observations of the same stars. The abundance results were similarly precise, between ˜0.01 and ˜0.04 dex, though trends with respect to {T}{eff} remained for which we derived empirical corrections. The trends, though small, were much larger than our uncertainties and are shared with published abundances. We show that changing our model atmosphere grid accounts for most of the trend in [M/H] between 5000 and 5500 K, indicating a possible problem with the atmosphere models or opacities.

  6. Elemental abundances in atmospheres of cool dwarfs with solar-like activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipova, L. I.; Boyarchuk, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    The elemental abundances in the atmosphere of the red dwarf HD 32147, which belongs to the HR 1614 moving groups, are analyzed. The atmospheric parameters determined from spectroscopic data (the condition of equal abundances for neutral and ionized atoms of a given element) differ considerably from those derived from photometry and parallax data. The abundances of several elements are also anomalous, with the anomaly increasing with decreasing ionization potential. It is concluded that this star is a red dwarf displaying solar-like activity; i.e., having dark (cool) spots on its surface, which may sometimes be considerable in size. Modeling synthetic spectra of stars with cool spots on their surfaces, with the spectral lines consisting of two components formed in media with different temperatures, indicate that the spectroscopic atmospheric parameters derived in such cases are incorrect; this can also explain the observed dependence of the elemental abundances on the corresponding ionization potentials. This leads to the conclusion thatHD32147 is indeed a star with solar-like activity. Several other such stars considered as examples display the same anomalies as those of HD 32147. These modeling results are also valid for Ap and Am stars, and are able to explain short-wavelength observations of the Sun and some stars (the FIP effect).

  7. Hubble Space Telescope observations of cool white dwarf stars: Detection of new species of heavy elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shipman, Harry; Barnhill, Maurice; Provencal, Judi; Roby, Scott; Bues, Irmela; Cordova, France; Hammond, Gordon; Hintzen, Paul; Koester, Detlev; Liebert, James

    1995-01-01

    Observations of cool white dwarf stars with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has uncovered a number of spectral features from previouslly unobserved species. In this paper we present the data on four cool white dwarfs. We present identifications, equivalent width measurements, and brief summaries of the significance of our findings. The four stars observed are GD 40 (DBZ3, G 74-7 (DAZ), L 745-46A (DZ), and LDS 749B (DBA). Many additional species of heavey elements were detected in GD 40 and G 74-7. In L 745-46A, while the detections are limited to Fe 1, Fe II, and Mg II, the quality of the Mg II h and K line profiles should permit a test of the line broadening theories, which are so crucial to abundance determinations. The clear detection of Mg II h and k in LDS 749 B should, once an abundance determination is made, provide a clear test of the hypothesis that the DBA stars are the result of accretion from the interstellar medium. This star contains no other clear features other than a tantalizing hint of C II 1335 with a P Cygni profile, and some expected He 1 lines.

  8. Strong neutrino cooling by cycles of electron capture and β- decay in neutron star crusts.

    PubMed

    Schatz, H; Gupta, S; Möller, P; Beard, M; Brown, E F; Deibel, A T; Gasques, L R; Hix, W R; Keek, L; Lau, R; Steiner, A W; Wiescher, M

    2014-01-01

    The temperature in the crust of an accreting neutron star, which comprises its outermost kilometre, is set by heating from nuclear reactions at large densities, neutrino cooling and heat transport from the interior. The heated crust has been thought to affect observable phenomena at shallower depths, such as thermonuclear bursts in the accreted envelope. Here we report that cycles of electron capture and its inverse, β(-) decay, involving neutron-rich nuclei at a typical depth of about 150 metres, cool the outer neutron star crust by emitting neutrinos while also thermally decoupling the surface layers from the deeper crust. This 'Urca' mechanism has been studied in the context of white dwarfs and type Ia supernovae, but hitherto was not considered in neutron stars, because previous models computed the crust reactions using a zero-temperature approximation and assumed that only a single nuclear species was present at any given depth. The thermal decoupling means that X-ray bursts and other surface phenomena are largely independent of the strength of deep crustal heating. The unexpectedly short recurrence times, of the order of years, observed for very energetic thermonuclear superbursts are therefore not an indicator of a hot crust, but may point instead to an unknown local heating mechanism near the neutron star surface. PMID:24291788

  9. Strong neutrino cooling by cycles of electron capture and decay in neutron star crusts

    SciTech Connect

    Schatz, Hendrik; Gupta, Sanjib; Moeller, Peter; Beard, Mary; Brown, Edward; Deibel, A. T.; Gasques, Leandro; Hix, William Raphael; Keek, Laurens; Lau, Rita; Steiner, Andrew M; Wiescher, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The temperature in the crust of an accreting neutron star, which comprises its outermost kilometre, is set by heating from nuclear reactions at large densities, neutrino cooling and heat transport from the interior. The heated crust has been thought to affect observable phenomena at shallower depths, such as thermonuclear bursts in the accreted envelope. Here we report that cycles of electron capture and its inverse, decay, involving neutron-rich nuclei at a typical depth of about 150 metres, cool the outer neutron star crust by emitting neutrinos while also thermally decoupling the surface layers from the deeper crust. This Urca mechanism has been studied in the context of white dwarfs13 and type Ia supernovae, but hitherto was not considered in neutron stars, because previous models1, 2 computed the crust reactions using a zero-temperature approximation and assumed that only a single nuclear species was present at any given depth. The thermal decoupling means that X-ray bursts and other surface phenomena are largely independent of the strength of deep crustal heating. The unexpectedly short recurrence times, of the order of years, observed for very energetic thermonuclear superbursts are therefore not an indicator of a hot crust, but may point instead to an unknown local heating mechanism near the neutron star surface.

  10. Annual DOE Active Solar Heating and Cooling Contractors Review meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-09-01

    Ninety three project summaries dicussing the following aspects of active solar heating and cooling are presented: Rankine solar cooling systems; absorption solar cooling systems; desiccant solar cooling systems; solar heat pump systems; solar hot water systems; special projects (such as the National Solar Data Network, hybrid solar thermal/photovoltaic applications, and heat transfer and water migration in soils); administrative/management support; and solar collector, storage, controls, analysis, and materials technology.

  11. Effects of Cooling and Star Formation on the Baryon Fractions in Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Nagai, Daisuke; Vikhlinin, Alexey A.

    2005-06-01

    We study the effects of radiative cooling and galaxy formation on the baryon fractions in clusters using high-resolution cosmological simulations that resolve formation of cluster galaxies. The simulations of nine individual clusters spanning a decade in mass are performed with the shock-capturing Eulerian adaptive mesh refinement N-body+gasdynamical Adaptive Refinement Tree code. For each cluster the simulations were done in the adiabatic regime (without dissipation) and with radiative cooling and several physical processes critical to various aspects of galaxy formation: star formation, metal enrichment, and stellar feedback. We show that radiative cooling of gas and associated star formation increase the total baryon fractions within radii as large as the virial radius. The effect is strongest within cluster cores, where the simulations with cooling have baryon fractions larger than the universal value, in contrast to the adiabatic simulations in which the fraction of baryons is substantially smaller than the universal value. At larger radii (r>~r500) the cumulative baryon fractions in simulations with cooling are close to the universal value. The gas fractions in simulations with dissipation are reduced by ~20%-40% at r<0.3rvir and ~10% at larger radii compared to the adiabatic runs, because a fraction of gas is converted into stars. There is an indication that gas fractions within different radii increase with increasing cluster mass as fgas~M0.2vir. We find that the total baryon fraction within the cluster virial radius does not evolve with time in both adiabatic simulations and in simulations with cooling. The gas fractions in the latter decrease slightly from z=1 to 0 due to ongoing star formation. Finally, to evaluate systematic uncertainties in the baryon fraction in cosmological simulations we present a comparison of gas fractions in our adiabatic simulations to resimulations of the same objects with the entropy-conserving smoothed particle hydrodynamics

  12. Extended, Dusty Star Formation Fueled by a Residual Cooling Flow in the Cluster of Galaxies Sérsic 159-03

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, M.; Werner, N.; Oonk, J. B. R.; Veilleux, S.

    2015-05-01

    While the cooling of the hot intracluster medium (ICM) in the cores of galaxy clusters is mostly counteracted by heating from the central active galactic nucleus (AGN), the balance is not perfect. This can lead to residual cooling flows and low-level star formation, the physics of which is not well understood. Here we present a detailed study of the residual cooling flow in the center of the low mass galaxy cluster Sérsic 159-03 (A S1101; z = 0.058) using far-ultraviolet imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope and far-IR (FIR) spectroscopy and photometry from the Herschel Space Observatory, along with a wealth of archival data. We detect extended emission at UV, FIR, and [C ii], indicating a star formation rate of ˜1-3 {{M}⊙ } yr-1, depending on the indicator and assumptions made. The most recently formed stars (as indicated by high Hα/UV ratios) appear spatially coincident with the lowest entropy ICM. We speculate that this low-entropy gas has been displaced by the central AGN ˜7.5 kpc north of the cD galaxy. These data suggest that the displacement of the cooling core from the direct vicinity of the central AGN can temporarily break the feedback cycle and lead to cooling and star formation that is offset from the center of the galaxy. We find an abundance (˜107 {{M}⊙ }) of cold (20 K) dust in the center of the cluster and a second FIR peak ˜30 kpc to the north of the central galaxy. If confirmed to be associated with the cooling filaments, this would be the most extended complex of dust yet found in a cool core cluster.

  13. Theoretical studies of mass loss and shock phenomena in cool star envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Lee

    1988-01-01

    To show the difficulty of producing the blue-shifted emission of (O I) and (S II) from T Tauri stars directly in the stellar wind, an element of gas in a radially expanding stellar wind was followed as it cooled and recombined. Results indicate that T Tauri winds must be heated at large distances from the star to produce the (S II) emission. A shock between the wind and the disk is an attractive mechanism to produce this heating. When the theory is applied to a simple disk model, a number of predictions and implications are evident, for example, that some T Tauri stars eject mass near the equatorial plane. In a second study, spectral energy distributions of T Tauri stars were analyzed to place limits on the amount of accretion which might occur during the early phase of stellar evolution. The best match to H-alpha line profiles is for models in which the turbulent velocity dominates close to the star, while expansion dominates farther out. Such a model predicts, for instance, that a mass loss rate of 1/10,000,000 solar masses per year is required to account for the blue-shifted Na I absorption of some objects.

  14. Far-infrared observations of optical emission-line stars - Evidence for extensive cool dust clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, P. M.; Thronson, H. A., Jr.; Gatley, I.

    1979-01-01

    Far-infrared observations (40-160 microns) of eight optical emission-line stars are presented. Six of these stars, LkH-alpha 198, T Tau, LkH-alpha 101, V380 Ori, R Mon, and MWC 1080, show substantially more far-infrared emission than would be expected on the basis of a blackbody extrapolation of their 10-20-micron fluxes. Additionally, in three cases, the far-infrared emission is shown to be spatially extended (greater than 40 arcsec). A simple model of the thermal emission from cool circumstellar dust (30-70 K) shows that these stars are surrounded by material left over from the star formation process; this result confirms the extreme youth of these stars. MWC 349 was detected at a level consistent with the expected free-free flux from its surrounding H II region, and RY Tau was not detected in the far-infrared; there is little circumstellar dust with temperatures of 20-100 K in these objects.

  15. Actively controlling coolant-cooled cold plate configuration

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Parida, Pritish R.

    2016-04-26

    Cooling apparatuses are provided to facilitate active control of thermal and fluid dynamic performance of a coolant-cooled cold plate. The cooling apparatus includes the cold plate and a controller. The cold plate couples to one or more electronic components to be cooled, and includes an adjustable physical configuration. The controller dynamically varies the adjustable physical configuration of the cold plate based on a monitored variable associated with the cold plate or the electronic component(s) being cooled by the cold plate. By dynamically varying the physical configuration, the thermal and fluid dynamic performance of the cold plate are adjusted to, for example, optimally cool the electronic component(s), and at the same time, reduce cooling power consumption used in cooling the electronic component(s). The physical configuration can be adjusted by providing one or more adjustable plates within the cold plate, the positioning of which may be adjusted based on the monitored variable.

  16. The cool giant HD 77361—a super Li-rich star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubimkov, L. S.; Kaminsky, B. M.; Metlov, V. G.; Pavlenko, Ya. V.; Poklad, D. B.; Rachkovskaya, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Super Li-rich stars form a very small and enigmatic group whose existence cannot be explained in terms of the standard stellar evolution theory. The goal of our study is to check the reality of this group of cool giants based on an independent technique. We have carried out such a check using the K giant HD 77361 (HR 3597), which has previously been assigned to this rare type, as an example. We have redetermined the effective temperature T eff and surface gravity log g for this star. We have applied two different methods, photometric and spectroscopic, to estimate T eff (the accuracy of the Li-abundance determination depends significantly on this parameter). The value of log g has been found from the highly accurate parallax of this nearby star. To apply the photometric method of determining T eff, we have performed U BV observations of the star, which yielded V = 6.18 ± 0.03, B - V = 1.13 ± 0.01, and U - B = 1.18±0.05. The following parameters of the star have been found: effective temperature T eff = 4370± 100 K, surface gravity log g = 2.30 ± 0.10, iron abundance log ɛ(Fe) = 7.49 ± 0.14, microturbulence V t = 1.1 ± 0.2 km s-1, rotational velocity V sin i = 4.5 km s-1, and mass M = 1.3 ± 0.2 M ⊙ The lithium abundance has been determined from a non-LTE analysis of three Li I lines: the resonance line at 6707.8 Å and the subordinate lines at 6103.6 and 8126.4 Å (the latter in a blend with a CN molecular line). We have found a high lithium abundance, log ɛ(Li) = 3.75 ± 0.11, which exceeds considerably the initial abundance log ɛ(Li) = 3.2 ± 0.1 for young stars in the solar neighborhood. Thus, we have confirmed that the K giant HD 77361 actually belongs to the type of super Li-rich stars. It is noted that a high lithium abundance in such cool giants is inconsistent with predictions of the standard stellar evolution theory and may suggest a recent synthesis of lithium in these stars.

  17. CONTINUED NEUTRON STAR CRUST COOLING OF THE 11 Hz X-RAY PULSAR IN TERZAN 5: A CHALLENGE TO HEATING AND COOLING MODELS?

    SciTech Connect

    Degenaar, N.; Miller, J. M.; Wijnands, R.; Altamirano, D.; Fridriksson, J.; Brown, E. F.; Cackett, E. M.; Homan, J.; Heinke, C. O.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Pooley, D.

    2013-09-20

    The transient neutron star low-mass X-ray binary and 11 Hz X-ray pulsar IGR J17480-2446 in the globular cluster Terzan 5 exhibited an 11 week accretion outburst in 2010. Chandra observations performed within five months after the end of the outburst revealed evidence that the crust of the neutron star became substantially heated during the accretion episode and was subsequently cooling in quiescence. This provides the rare opportunity to probe the structure and composition of the crust. Here, we report on new Chandra observations of Terzan 5 that extend the monitoring to ≅2.2 yr into quiescence. We find that the thermal flux and neutron star temperature have continued to decrease, but remain significantly above the values that were measured before the 2010 accretion phase. This suggests that the crust has not thermally relaxed yet, and may continue to cool. Such behavior is difficult to explain within our current understanding of heating and cooling of transiently accreting neutron stars. Alternatively, the quiescent emission may have settled at a higher observed equilibrium level (for the same interior temperature), in which case the neutron star crust may have fully cooled.

  18. Black hole-neutron star mergers with a hot equation of state and neutrino cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucart, Francois

    2014-03-01

    Black hole-neutron star (BHNS) and neutron star-neutron star mergers will be prime candidates for the joint detection of gravitational wave and electromagnetic (EM) signals once the Advanced LIGO/VIRGO/KAGRA detectors come online. For BHNS binaries, the result of the merger strongly depends on the parameters of the system. EM emissions from a post-merger disk (e.g. gamma-ray bursts) are only possible for low mass or high spin black holes. The amount of ejected neutron-rich material, which has important consequences for the emission of more isotropic EM signals and the production of r-process elements, can also vary by a few orders of magnitudes - with high mass, high spin black holes ejecting more than 0 . 1M⊙ of unbound material. I will describe recent simulations of BHNS mergers performed by the SXS collaboration, which explore the parameter space dependence of these mergers while using a hot nuclear equation of state (LS220) and approximate neutrino cooling of the post-merger accretion disk. I will discuss the qualitative differences between these mergers and earlier simulations performed with polytropic equations of state, as well as the effect of neutrino cooling on the post-merger evolution and the general properties of the neutrino radiation.

  19. Photometric Amplitude Distribution of Stellar Rotation of KOIs—Indication for Spin-Orbit Alignment of Cool Stars and High Obliquity for Hot Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazeh, Tsevi; Perets, Hagai B.; McQuillan, Amy; Goldstein, Eyal S.

    2015-03-01

    The observed amplitude of the rotational photometric modulation of a star with spots should depend on the inclination of its rotational axis relative to our line of sight. Therefore, the distribution of observed rotational amplitudes of a large sample of stars depends on the distribution of their projected axes of rotation. Thus, comparison of the stellar rotational amplitudes of the Kepler objects of interest (KOIs) with those of Kepler single stars can provide a measure to indirectly infer the properties of the spin-orbit obliquity of Kepler planets. We apply this technique to the large samples of 993 KOIs and 33,614 single Kepler stars in temperature range of 3500-6500 K. We find with high significance that the amplitudes of cool KOIs are larger, on the order of 10%, than those of the single stars. In contrast, the amplitudes of hot KOIs are systematically lower. After correcting for an observational bias, we estimate that the amplitudes of the hot KOIs are smaller than the single stars by about the same factor of 10%. The border line between the relatively larger and smaller amplitudes, relative to the amplitudes of the single stars, occurs at about 6000 K. Our results suggest that the cool stars have their planets aligned with their stellar rotation, while the planets around hot stars have large obliquities, consistent with the findings of Winn et al. and Albrecht et al. We show that the low obliquity of the planets around cool stars extends up to at least 50 days, a feature that is not expected in the framework of a model that assumes the low obliquity is due to planet-star tidal realignment.

  20. Detection of EUV emission from the low activity dwarf HD 4628: Evidence for a cool corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathioudakis, M.; Drake, J. J.; Vedder, P. W.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Bowyer, S

    1994-01-01

    We present observations of low activity late-type stars obtained with the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE). These stars are the slowest rotators, and acoustic heating may dominate their outer atmospheric heating process. We report detection of EUV emission from the low acitivity K dwarf HD 4628 during the EUVE Deep Survey in the Lexan/boran band. This detection, in conjunction with the non-detection of this object in the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) all-sky survey, suggests the existence of a cool corona with a characteristic temperature of less than 10(exp 6) K. The flux and spectral signature are consistent with current theories of acoustic heating.

  1. Heat-activated cooling devices: A guidebook for general audiences

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltsee, G.

    1994-02-01

    Heat-activated cooling is refrigeration or air conditioning driven by heat instead of electricity. A mill or processing facility can us its waste fuel to air condition its offices or plant; using waste fuel in this way can save money. The four basic types of heat-activated cooling systems available today are absorption cycle, desiccant system, steam jet ejector, and steam turbine drive. Each is discussed, along with cool storage and biomass boilers. Steps in determining the feasibility of heat-activated cooling are discussed, as are biomass conversion, system cost and integration, permits, and contractor selection. Case studies are given.

  2. Activity Cycles in Stars with Highly Active Chromospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward F.

    The extended lifetime of the IUE satellite has provided an unique and unanticipated opportunity to examine the long-term evolution of magnetic activity on active chromospheric stars. We propose to obtain further IUE observations of the highly active RS CVn stars V711 Tauri, lambda Andromedae, II Pegasi, and UX Arietis in conjunction with groundbased optical and radio observations, and possibly ROSAT X-ray observations. In addition we would continue IUE observations of the unusual rapidly rotating early G giant, FK Comae, which, although not in the RS CVn category, shares a similarly high level of magnetic activity. These five stars have the most extensive IUE archival coverage for stars of their type and have almost continuous ground-based photometric coverage from about 1975 onward. We aim to trace the long-term development of magnetic activity on these stars: a detailed study of the UV emission-like fluxes will enable us to follow the variations in chromospheric and transition-region activity over an interval of 12-16 years. Optical observations reveal variations in photospheric (starspot) activity: the starspot regions are large (up to 30% of the stellar surface) and vary significantly with time. The main aim of the proposed research is to examine the relationship between chromospheric, transition-region, and photospheric active regions. Elucidation of the role of white-light faculae vis-a-vis spots in effecting stellar irradiance changes is also desirable.

  3. A search for rapid pulsations in the magnetic cool chemically peculiar star HD3980

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkin, V. G.; Kurtz, D. W.; Freyhammer, L. M.; Hubrig, S.; Mathys, G.

    2008-11-01

    The Ap star HD3980 appears to be a promising roAp candidate based on its fundamental parameters, leading us to search for rapid pulsations with the VLT UV-Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES). A precise Hipparcos parallax and estimated temperature of 8100K place HD3980 in the middle of the theoretical instability strip for rapidly oscillating Ap stars, about halfway through its main-sequence evolution stage. The star has a strong, variable magnetic field, as is typical of the cool magnetic Ap stars. Dipole model parameters were determined from VLT observations using Focal Reducer and low Dispersion Spectrograph (FORS)1. From Doppler shift measurements for individual spectral lines of rare-earth elements and the Hα line core, we find no pulsations above 20-30ms-1. This result is corroborated by the inspection of lines of several other chemical elements, as well as with cross-correlation for long spectral regions with the average spectrum as a template. Abundances of chemical elements were determined and show larger than solar abundances of rare-earth elements. Further, ionization disequilibria for the first two ionized states of Nd and Pr are detected. We also find that the star has a strong overabundance of manganese, which is typical for much hotter HgMn and other Bp stars. Line profile variability with the rotation period was detected for the majority of chemical species. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory (ESO), Paranal, Chile, as part of programme 077.D-0150(A) and part of programmes 074.D-0392(A) and 076.D-0535(A) in the ESO archive. E-mail: velkin@uclan.ac.uk

  4. IUE observations of cool stars - Alpha Aurigae, HR1099, Lambda Andromedae, and Epsilon Eridani

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, J. L.; Ayres, T. R.; Basri, G. S.; Morrison, N. D.; Boggess, A.; Schiffer, F. H., III; Holm, A.; Cassatella, A.; Heck, A.; Macchetto, F.

    1978-01-01

    Initial IUE observations of four cool stars are reported. Observed fluxes and surface fluxes are given for several UV emission lines in the spectral range 1175-2000 A, obtained at low and high dispersion with the short-wavelength spectrograph and camera. These lines are formed in the outer atmospheres of these stars, in regions presumably analogous to the solar chromosphere and transition region. The surface fluxes in the lines increase along the sequence: quiet sun, Epsilon Eri, Lambda And, Alpha Aur, and HR1099. The 2.8-d RS CVn-type binary HR1099, observed on 1 March 1978 near the end of a major flaring episode, has line surface fluxes roughly 100 times that of the quiet sun, similar to those seen in solar flares. Line profiles and flux ratios in multiplets for Capella are presented, and comments given on the opacity of the lines and on a tendency of line width to increase with temperature of formation.

  5. Actively controlling coolant-cooled cold plate configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Parida, Pritish R.

    2015-07-28

    A method is provided to facilitate active control of thermal and fluid dynamic performance of a coolant-cooled cold plate. The method includes: monitoring a variable associated with at least one of the coolant-cooled cold plate or one or more electronic components being cooled by the cold plate; and dynamically varying, based on the monitored variable, a physical configuration of the cold plate. By dynamically varying the physical configuration, the thermal and fluid dynamic performance of the cold plate are adjusted to, for example, optimally cool the one or more electronic components, and at the same time, reduce cooling power consumption used in cooling the electronic component(s). The physical configuration can be adjusted by providing one or more adjustable plates within the coolant-cooled cold plate, the positioning of which may be adjusted based on the monitored variable.

  6. Star formation around active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keel, William C.

    1987-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (Seyfert nuclei and their relatives) and intense star formation can both deliver substantial amounts of energy to the vicinity of a galactic nucleus. Many luminous nuclei have energetics dominated by one of these mechanisms, but detailed observations show that some have a mixture. Seeing both phenomena at once raises several interesting questions: (1) Is this a general property of some kinds of nuclei? How many AGNs have surround starbursts, and vice versa? (2) As in 1, how many undiscovered AGNs or starbursts are hidden by a more luminous instance of the other? (3) Does one cause the other, and by what means, or do both reflect common influences such as potential well shape or level of gas flow? (4) Can surrounding star formation tell us anything about the central active nuclei, such as lifetimes, kinetic energy output, or mechanical disturbance of the ISM? These are important points in the understanding of activity and star formation in galactic nuclei. Unfortunately, the observational ways of addressing them are as yet not well formulated. Some preliminary studies are reported, aimed at clarifying the issues involved in study of the relationships between stellar and nonstellar excitement in galactic nuclei.

  7. Active feedback cooling of massive electromechanical quartz resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Jahng, Junghoon; Lee, Manhee; Stambaugh, Corey; Bak, Wan; Jhe, Wonho

    2011-08-15

    We present a general active feedback cooling scheme for massive electromechanical quartz resonators. We cool down two kinds of macrosized quartz tuning forks and find several characteristic constants for this massive quartz-resonator feedback cooling, in good agreement with theoretical calculations. When combined with conventional cryogenic techniques and low-noise devices, one may reach the quantum sensitivity for macroscopic sensors. This may be useful for high sensitivity measurements and for quantum information studies.

  8. Study of active cooling for supersonic transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, G. D.; Morris, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The potential benefits of using the fuel heat sink of hydrogen fueled supersonic transports for cooling large portions of the aircraft wing and fuselage are examined. The heat transfer would be accomplished by using an intermediate fluid such as an ethylene glycol-water solution. Some of the advantages of the system are: (1) reduced costs by using aluminum in place of titanium, (2) reduced cabin heat loads, and (3) more favorable environmental conditions for the aircraft systems. A liquid hydrogen fueled, Mach 2.7 supersonic transport aircraft design was used for the reference uncooled vehicle. The cooled aircraft designs were analyzed to determine their heat sink capability, the extent and location of feasible cooled surfaces, and the coolant passage size and spacing.

  9. Active cooling from the sixties to NASP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, H. Neale; Blosser, Max L.

    1992-01-01

    Vehicles, such as the X-15 or National Aero-Space Plane, traveling at hypersonic speeds through the earth's atmosphere experience aerodynamic heating. The heating can be severe enough that a thermal protection system is required to limit the temperature of the vehicle structure. Although several categories of thermal protection systems are mentioned briefly, the majority of this paper describes convectively cooled structures for large areas. Convective cooling is a method of limiting structural temperatures by circulating a coolant through the vehicle structure. Efforts to develop convectively cooled structures during the past 30 years--from early engine structures, which were intended to be tested on the X-15, to structural--are described. Many of the lessons learned from these research efforts are presented.

  10. Active cooling from the sixties to NASP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, H. Neale; Blosser, Max L.

    1994-01-01

    Vehicles, such as the X-15 or the National Aerospace Plane (NASP), traveling at hypersonic speeds through the earth's atmosphere experience aerodynamic heating. The heating can be severe enough that a thermal protection system is required to limit the temperature of the vehicle structure. Although several categories of thermal protection systems are mentioned briefly, the majority of the present paper describes convectively cooled structures for large areas. Convective cooling is a method of limiting structural temperatures by circulating a coolant through the vehicle structure. Efforts to develop convectively cooled structures during the past 30 years, from early engine structures which were intended to be tested on the X-15 to structural panels fabricated and tested under the NASP program, are described. Many of the lessons learned from these research efforts are presented.

  11. Star Formation Activity in CLASH Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogarty, Kevin; Postman, Marc; Connor, Thomas; Donahue, Megan; Moustakas, John

    2015-11-01

    The CLASH X-ray selected sample of 20 galaxy clusters contains 10 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) that exhibit significant (>5σ) extinction-corrected star formation rates (SFRs). Star formation activity is inferred from photometric estimates of UV and Hα+[N ii] emission in knots and filaments detected in CLASH Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFC3 observations. UV-derived SFRs in these BCGs span two orders of magnitude, including two with a SFR ≳ 100 M⊙ yr-1. These measurements are supplemented with [O ii], [O iii], and Hβ fluxes measured from spectra obtained with the SOAR telescope. We confirm that photoionization from ongoing star formation powers the line emission nebulae in these BCGs, although in many BCGs there is also evidence of a LINER-like contribution to the line emission. Coupling these data with Chandra X-ray measurements, we infer that the star formation occurs exclusively in low-entropy cluster cores and exhibits a correlation with gas properties related to cooling. We also perform an in-depth study of the starburst history of the BCG in the cluster RXJ1532.9+3021, and create 2D maps of stellar properties on scales down to ˜350 pc. These maps reveal evidence for an ongoing burst occurring in elongated filaments, generally on ˜0.5-1.0 Gyr timescales, although some filaments are consistent with much younger (≲100 Myr) burst timescales and may be correlated with recent activity from the active galactic nucleus. The relationship between BCG SFRs and the surrounding intracluster medium gas properties provide new support for the process of feedback-regulated cooling in galaxy clusters and is consistent with recent theoretical predictions. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel

  12. CONTINUED COOLING OF THE CRUST IN THE NEUTRON STAR LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY KS 1731-260

    SciTech Connect

    Cackett, Edward M.; Miller, Jon M.; Brown, Edward F.; Cumming, Andrew; Degenaar, Nathalie; Wijnands, Rudy

    2010-10-20

    Some neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries have very long outbursts (lasting several years) which can generate a significant amount of heat in the neutron star crust. After the system has returned to quiescence, the crust then thermally relaxes. This provides a rare opportunity to study the thermal properties of neutron star crusts, putting constraints on the thermal conductivity and hence the structure and composition of the crust. KS 1731-260 is one of only four systems where this crustal cooling has been observed. Here, we present a new Chandra observation of this source approximately eight years after the end of the last outburst and four years since the last observation. We find that the source has continued to cool, with the cooling curve displaying a simple power-law decay. This suggests that the crust has not fully thermally relaxed yet and may continue to cool further. A simple power-law decay is in contrast to theoretical cooling models of the crust, which predict that the crust should now have cooled to the same temperature as the neutron star core.

  13. Chromospherically active stars. I - HD 136905

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fekel, F. C.; Hall, D. S.; Africano, J. L.; Gillies, K.; Quigley, R.

    1985-01-01

    The variable star HD 136905, recently designated GX Librae, is a chromospherically active K1 III single-lined spectroscopic binary with a period of 11.1345 days. It has moderate strength Ca II H and K and ultraviolet emission features, while H-alpha is strongly in absorption. The inclination of the system is 58 + or - 17 deg and the unseen secondary is most likely a G or K dwarf. The v sin i of the primary, 32 + or - 2 km/s, results in a minimum radius of 7.0 + or - 0.4 solar radii. Since the star fills a substantial fracture of its Roche lab, the double-peaked limit curve seen by photometric observers is predominantly ellipsoidal in nature. Both the photometry and the spectroscopy yield values for the period and the time of conjunction that are identical within their uncertainties.

  14. The effects of TiO opacity on the atmospheric structure of cool stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krupp, B. M.; Collins, J. G.; Johnson, H. R.

    1978-01-01

    A quantitative investigation is conducted concerning the effect of TiO opacities on the atmospheric temperature structure in late-type stars. Model atmospheres are computed, taking into account opacity-sampling (OS) or straight-mean (SM) opacities for three singlet and three triplet band systems of TiO. Model atmospheres using OS and SM opacities for TiO are compared with models having no TiO, giving attention to the effects of TiO opacities on the temperature structures of various atmospheres and the usefulness of straight-mean TiO opacities in model atmosphere calculations. The results of the model-atmosphere calculations are presented in two graphs. TiO opacities produce a global atmospheric heating which may reach several hundred kelvins. It is shown quantitatively that the TiO molecule is an important source of atmospheric opacity in cool stars of solar composition. The relative importance of TiO opacities to the thermal structure of a stellar atmosphere is influenced in the outer layers by CO and H2O cooling effects and in the deeper layers by CO, CN, and metal line absorption.

  15. Accretion influences cooling of neutron star atmospheres during type-I X-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajava, J.; N"attil"a, J.; Latvala, O.; Pursiainen, M.; Poutanen, J.; Suleimanov, V.; Revnivtsev, M.; Kuulkers, E.; Galloway, D.

    2014-07-01

    Observations of type-I X-ray bursts provide a way of measuring neutron star (NS) masses and radii. The derived mass-radius values depend on the colour-correction factor of the NS photosphere, the photospheric chemical composition and the distance. We have studied 11 bursting low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXB) with RXTE/PCA. We find a correlation between the time evolution of the apparent NS radii during the early cooling phases of X-ray bursts and the spectral properties of the persistent emission before the bursts. NS atmosphere models predict that the colour-correction factor decreases in the early cooling phases when the emitted luminosity drops from the Eddington value. Therefore, the apparent NS radii should be variable during this phase as it depends on this factor. We find that the model predictions agree with the data only when X-ray bursts occur during the hard (island) state of LMXBs. We take this as evidence that the accretion flow - that surrounds the NS - changes the photospheric colour-correction factor during the soft (banana) states, where the atmosphere model predictions never agree with the data. This finding is important as even slight variations in the colour-correction factors cause large errors in the derived neutron star radii.

  16. Modelling an actively-cooled CPV system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonomano, A.; Mittelman, G.; Faiman, D.; Biryukov, S.; Melnichak, V.; Bukobza, D.; Kabalo, S.

    2012-10-01

    We have constructed a 7-node, 1-dimensional model of the heat flow in a water-cooled CPV receiver. The model is validated against data from a module exposed to solar irradiance at various concentrations up to 1,000X at the PETAL solar dish facility at Sede Boqer.

  17. C-SiC Composite Structures for Active Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, D. B.; Cox, B. N.; Berbon, M. Z.; Porter, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of research being conducted on the use of C-SiC composite structures for actively cooling rocket nozzles. Potential payoffs and design constraints are discussed. Other topics covered include: testing parameters, material selection, thermal analysis of joined tube structure, pressure containment, H2O2 combustion testing, and cooled re-entry.

  18. Modeling a Transient Pressurization with Active Cooling Sizing Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzik, Monica C.; Plachta, David W.; Elchert, Justin P.

    2011-01-01

    As interest in the area of in-space zero boil-off cryogenic propellant storage develops, the need to visualize and quantify cryogen behavior during ventless tank self-pressurization and subsequent cool-down with active thermal control has become apparent. During the course of a mission, such as the launch ascent phase, there are periods that power to the active cooling system will be unavailable. In addition, because it is not feasible to install vacuum jackets on large propellant tanks, as is typically done for in-space cryogenic applications for science payloads, instances like the launch ascent heating phase are important to study. Numerous efforts have been made to characterize cryogenic tank pressurization during ventless cryogen storage without active cooling, but few tools exist to model this behavior in a user-friendly environment for general use, and none exist that quantify the marginal active cooling system size needed for power down periods to manage tank pressure response once active cooling is resumed. This paper describes the Transient pressurization with Active Cooling Tool (TACT), which is based on a ventless three-lump homogeneous thermodynamic self-pressurization model1 coupled with an active cooling system estimator. TACT has been designed to estimate the pressurization of a heated but unvented cryogenic tank, assuming an unavailable power period followed by a given cryocooler heat removal rate. By receiving input data on the tank material and geometry, propellant initial conditions, and passive and transient heating rates, a pressurization and recovery profile can be found, which establishes the time needed to return to a designated pressure. This provides the ability to understand the effect that launch ascent and unpowered mission segments have on the size of an active cooling system. A sample of the trends found show that an active cooling system sized for twice the steady state heating rate would results in a reasonable time for tank

  19. Hubble space telescope high-resolution imaging of Kepler small and cool exoplanet host stars

    SciTech Connect

    Gilliland, Ronald L.; Cartier, Kimberly M. S.; Wright, Jason T.; Adams, Elisabeth R.; Ciardi, David R.

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution imaging is an important tool for follow-up study of exoplanet candidates found via transit detection with the Kepler mission. We discuss here Hubble Space Telescope imaging with the WFC3 of 23 stars that host particularly interesting Kepler planet candidates based on their small size and cool equilibrium temperature estimates. Results include detections, exclusion of background stars that could be a source of false positives for the transits, and detection of physically associated companions in a number of cases providing dilution measures necessary for planet parameter refinement. For six Kepler objects of interest, we find that there is ambiguity regarding which star hosts the transiting planet(s), with potentially strong implications for planetary characteristics. Our sample is evenly distributed in G, K, and M spectral types. Albeit with a small sample size, we find that physically associated binaries are more common than expected at each spectral type, reaching a factor of 10 frequency excess in M. We document the program detection sensitivities, detections, and deliverables to the Kepler follow-up program archive.

  20. Influence of molecular opacities on the generation of cool star winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helling, Ch.; Woitke, P.; Winters, J. M.; Sedlmayr, E.

    The possible influence of radiation pressure on molecules on the generation of winds of cool late-type stars is investigated. Strong molecular absorption may levitate the outer atmosphere of the star and improve the conditions for dust formation, or it might even drive a considerable outflow of matter alone. Our investigations are performed in the framework of the time-dependent hydrodynamical models developed by Fleischer et al. In these models, the radiation pressure on molecules is described in the grey approximation, where the flux weighted opacity is replaced by a certain pre-tabulated mean opacity. We have computed new mean gas opacities on the basis of molecular line and continuum opacity data (Jorgensen et al.), and calculated hydrodynamical models by using Planck and Rosseland means, which should provide an upper and lower limit for the effects of molecular absorption, respectively. The response of the circumstellar shell to strong molecular absorption is found to be complex concerning both the hydrodynamical and thermodynamical structure and the properties of the wind. In models computed with Planck mean opacities, the gas density is usually found to be smaller such that the conditions for effective dust formation are worsened. However, a mainly molecular driven wind may occur for particular ranges of stellar parameters. A further interesting feature of these models is the occurrence of pressure inversions at small radial distances from the star. Such inversions already appear in the static initial model and are preserved in the dynamic calculations.

  1. Optical studies of X-ray peculiar chromosphereically active stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, J. C.

    2006-02-01

    , for HD 81032 these properties suggest that it being an evolved RS! CVn binary of the long-period type Correlations between various physical quantities (Lx, Lrad, P and B-V) of active stars have been re-examined using a sample containing 248 active stars (101 dwarfs, 65 subgiants and 82 giants). It is a largest sample investigated so far. We did not find any appreciable changes in the correlations reported in previous studies. In addition to above, an Imaging Polarimeter has been fabricated for use with liquid-N2 cooled CCD camera and is designed to suit 104-cm Sampurnanand telescope with an f/13 focus at ARIES, Naini Tal. The instrument measures the linear polarization in broad B, V and R band, and has a field of view 2' x 2'.

  2. Activity and Kinematics of Cool and Ultracool Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Sarah Jane

    The ages of cool and ultracool dwarfs are particularly important. For cool M dwarfs, accurate ages combined with their ubiquity in the stellar disk could lead to a new level of precision in age dating the Galaxy. A better understanding of the chromospheres of M dwarfs could provide important clues about the relationship between activity and age in these low mass stars. Ultracool (late-M and L) dwarfs have the distinction of including both warm, young brown dwarfs and stars with mean ages more representative of the stellar disk. Kinematics are a source of mean ages and could provide or confirm discriminating features between stars and brown dwarfs. This thesis is composed of several different projects, each investigating the activity or kinematics of cool or ultracool dwarfs. First, a sample of nearly 500 L dwarfs selected from SDSS DR7 photometry and spectroscopy is examined; we discovered 200 new L dwarfs and found evidence of a bias towards red J - KS colors in the entire population of previously known L dwarfs. Using the three-dimensional kinematics of 300 SDSS DR7 L dwarfs, we find that their kinematics are consistent with those of the stellar disk and include a previously undetected thick disk component. We also confirmed a relationship between age and J - KS color (due to our large sample of UVW motions and unbiased J - KS colors), with blue L dwarfs having hotter kinematics (consistent with older ages) and redder L dwarfs having colder, younger kinematics. The DR7 L dwarf sample showed no distinct kinematic difference between young brown dwarfs and disk-age stars, perhaps due to a bias towards early spectral types. In order to probe the kinematic distribution of L dwarfs in a volume-limited sample, we began a survey of radial velocities of nearby (d<20pc) L dwarfs using the TripleSpec instrument on the ARC 3.5-m telescope at APO. While several reduction packages were tested on the TripleSpec data, none were found to provide reductions of sufficient quality

  3. DIRECT OBSERVATION OF THE COOLING OF THE CASSIOPEIA A NEUTRON STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Heinke, Craig O.; Ho, Wynn C. G. E-mail: wynnho@slac.stanford.ed

    2010-08-20

    The cooling rate of young neutron stars (NSs) gives direct insight into their internal makeup. Although the temperatures of several young NSs have been measured, until now a young NS has never been observed to decrease in temperature over time. We fit nine years of archival Chandra ACIS spectra of the likely NS in the {approx}330 yr old Cassiopeia A supernova remnant with our non-magnetic carbon atmosphere model. Our fits show a relative decline in the surface temperature by 4% (5.4{sigma}, from (2.12 {+-} 0.01) x 10{sup 6} K in 2000 to (2.04 {+-} 0.01) x 10{sup 6} K in 2009) and the observed flux by 21%. Using a simple model for NS cooling, we show that this temperature decline could indicate that the NS became isothermal sometime between 1965 and 1980, and constrains some combinations of neutrino emission mechanisms and envelope compositions. However, the NS is likely to have become isothermal soon after formation, in which case the temperature history suggests episodes of additional heating or more rapid cooling. Observations over the next few years will allow us to test possible explanations for the temperature evolution.

  4. Semi-empirical models of the wind in cool supergiant stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuin, N. P. M.; Ahmad, Imad A.

    1988-01-01

    A self-consistent semi-empirical model for the wind of the supergiant in zeta Aurigae type systems is proposed. The damping of the Alfven waves which are assumed to drive the wind is derived from the observed velocity profile. Solution of the ionization balance and energy equation gives the temperature structure for given stellar magnetic field and wave flux. Physically acceptable solutions of the temperature structure place limits on the stellar magnetic field. A crude formula for a critical mass loss rate is derived. For a mass loss rate below the critical value the wind cannot be cool. Comparison between the observed and the critical mass loss rate suggests that the proposed theory may provide an explanation for the coronal dividing line in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. The physical explanation may be that the atmosphere has a cool wind, unless it is physically impossible to have one. Stars which cannot have a cool wind release their nonthermal energy in an outer atmosphere at coronal temperatures. It is possible that in the absence of a substantial stellar wind the magnetic field has less incentive to extend radially outward, and coronal loop structures may become more dominant.

  5. Cool stars, stellar systems, and the sun; Proceedings of the 7th Cambridge Workshop, Tucson, AZ, Oct. 9-12, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giampapa, Mark S. (Editor); Bookbinder, Jay A. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Consideration is given to HST observations of late-type stars, molecular absorption in the UV spectrum of Alpha Ori, EUV emission from late-type stars, Rosat observations of the Pleiades cluster, a deep ROSAT observation of the Hyades cluster, optical spectroscopy detected by EXOSAT, stellar photospheric convection, a structure of the solar X-ray corona, magnetic surface images of the BY Dra Star HD 82558, a Zebra interpretatin of BY Dra stars, optical flares on II Peg, a low-resolution spectroscopic survey of post-T tauri candidates, millimeter and sub-millimeter emission from flare stars, and activity in tidally interacting binaries. Attention is also given to modeling stellar angular momentum evolution, extended 60-micron emission from nearby Mira variables, the PANDORA atmosphere program, the global properties of active regions, oscillations in a stratified atmosphere, lithium abundances in northern RS CVn binaries, a new catalog of cool dwarf stars, the Far UV Spectrograph Explorer, and development of reflecting coronagraphs.

  6. Star Formation Rates in Cooling Flow Clusters: A UV Pilot Study with Archival XMM-Newton Optical Monitor Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, A. K.; Mushotzky, R.

    2006-01-01

    We have analyzed XMM-Newton Optical Monitor (OM) UV (180-400 nm) data for a sample of 33 galaxies. 30 are cluster member galaxies, and nine of these are central cluster galaxies (CCGs) in cooling flow clusters having mass deposition rates which span a range of 8 - 525 Solar Mass/yr. By comparing the ratio of UV to 2MASS J band fluxes, we find a significant UV excess in many, but not all, cooling flow CCGs, a finding consistent with the outcome of previous studies based on optical imaging data (McNamara & O'Connell 1989; Cardiel, Gorgas, & Aragon-Salamanca 1998; Crawford et al. 1999). This UV excess is a direct indication of the presence of young massive stars, and therefore recent star formation, in these galaxies. Using the Starburst99 spectral energy distribution (SED) model of continuous star formation over a 900 Myr period, we derive star formation rates of 0.2 - 219 solar Mass/yr for the cooling flow sample. For 2/3 of this sample it is possible to equate Chandra/XMM cooling flow mass deposition rates with UV inferred star formation rates, for a combination of starburst lifetime and IMF slope. This is a pilot study of the well populated XMM UV cluster archive and a more extensive follow up study is currently underway.

  7. Star Formation Rates in Cooling Flow Clusters: A UV Pilot Study with Archival XMM-Newton Optical Monitor Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, A. K.; Mushotzky, R.

    2005-01-01

    We have analyzed XMM-Newton Optical Monitor (OM) UV (180-400 nm) data for a sample of 33 galaxies. 30 are cluster member galaxies, and nine of these are central cluster galaxies (CCGs) in cooling flow clusters having mass deposition rates which span a range of 8 - 525 solar mass per year. By comparing the ratio of UV to 2MASS J band fluxes, we find a significant UV excess in many, but not all, cooling flow CCGs, a finding consistent with the outcome of previous studies based on optical imaging data (McNamara & O Connell 1989; Cardiel, Gorgas, & Aragon-Salamanca 1998; Crawford et al. 1999). This UV excess is a direct indication of the presence of young massive stars, and therefore recent star formation, in these galaxies. Using the Starburst99 spectral energy distribution (SED) model of continuous star formation over a 900 Myr period, we derive star formation rates of 0.2 - 219 solar mass per year for the cooling flow sample. For 2/3 of this sample it is possible to equate Chandra/XMM cooling flow mass deposition rates with UV inferred star formation rates, for a combination of starburst lifetime and IMF slope. This is a pilot study of the well populated XMM UV cluster archive and a more extensive follow up study is currently underway.

  8. Cooling of neutron stars and emissivity of neutrinos by the direct Urca process under influence of a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, E. L.; Chiapparini, M.; Negreiros, R. P.

    2016-04-01

    Neutron stars are born with high temperatures and during a few seconds suffer rapid cooling by emission of neutrinos. The direct Urca process is the main mechanism to explain this loss of energy. In this work we study the influence of a strong magnetic field on the composition of nuclear matter at high densities and zero temperature. We describe the matter through a relativistic mean-field model with eight light baryons (baryon octet), electrons, muons magnetic field. As output of the numerical calculations, we obtain the relative population for a parametrized magnetic field. We calculate the cooling of neutron stars with different mass and magnetic fields due to direct Urca process.

  9. THE COOLING OF THE CASSIOPEIA A NEUTRON STAR AS A PROBE OF THE NUCLEAR SYMMETRY ENERGY AND NUCLEAR PASTA

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, William G.; Hooker, Joshua; Li, Bao-An; Murphy, Kyleah

    2013-12-10

    X-ray observations of the neutron star (NS) in the Cas A supernova remnant over the past decade suggest the star is undergoing a rapid drop in surface temperature of ≈2%-5.5%. One explanation suggests the rapid cooling is triggered by the onset of neutron superfluidity in the core of the star, causing enhanced neutrino emission from neutron Cooper pair breaking and formation (PBF). Using consistent NS crust and core equations of state (EOSs) and compositions, we explore the sensitivity of this interpretation to the density dependence of the symmetry energy L of the EOS used, and to the presence of enhanced neutrino cooling in the bubble phases of crustal ''nuclear pasta''. Modeling cooling over a conservative range of NS masses and envelope compositions, we find L ≲ 70 MeV, competitive with terrestrial experimental constraints and other astrophysical observations. For masses near the most likely mass of M ≳ 1.65 M {sub ☉}, the constraint becomes more restrictive 35 ≲ L ≲ 55 MeV. The inclusion of the bubble cooling processes decreases the cooling rate of the star during the PBF phase, matching the observed rate only when L ≲ 45 MeV, taking all masses into consideration, corresponding to NS radii ≲ 11 km.

  10. Connecting Star Formation Quenching with Galaxy Structure and Supermassive Black Holes through Gravitational Heating of Cooling Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fulai

    2014-12-01

    Recent observations suggested that star formation quenching in galaxies is related to galaxy structure. Here we propose a new mechanism to explain the physical origin of this correlation. We assume that while quenching is maintained in quiescent galaxies by a feedback mechanism, cooling flows in the hot halo gas can still develop intermittently. We study cooling flows in a large suite of around 90 hydrodynamic simulations of an isolated galaxy group, and find that the flow development depends significantly on the gravitational potential well in the central galaxy. If the galaxy's gravity is not strong enough, cooling flows result in a central cooling catastrophe, supplying cold gas and feeding star formation to galactic bulges. When the bulge grows prominent enough, compressional heating starts to offset radiative cooling and maintains cooling flows in a long-term hot mode without producing a cooling catastrophe. Our model thus describes a self-limited growth channel for galaxy bulges and naturally explains the connection between quenching and bulge prominence. In particular, we explicitly demonstrate that M*/R_eff1.5 is a good structural predictor of quenching. We further find that the gravity from the central supermassive black hole also affects the bimodal fate of cooling flows, and we predict a more general quenching predictor to be M_bh1.6M*/R_eff1.5, which may be tested in future observational studies.

  11. CONNECTING STAR FORMATION QUENCHING WITH GALAXY STRUCTURE AND SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES THROUGH GRAVITATIONAL HEATING OF COOLING FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Fulai

    2014-12-20

    Recent observations suggested that star formation quenching in galaxies is related to galaxy structure. Here we propose a new mechanism to explain the physical origin of this correlation. We assume that while quenching is maintained in quiescent galaxies by a feedback mechanism, cooling flows in the hot halo gas can still develop intermittently. We study cooling flows in a large suite of around 90 hydrodynamic simulations of an isolated galaxy group, and find that the flow development depends significantly on the gravitational potential well in the central galaxy. If the galaxy's gravity is not strong enough, cooling flows result in a central cooling catastrophe, supplying cold gas and feeding star formation to galactic bulges. When the bulge grows prominent enough, compressional heating starts to offset radiative cooling and maintains cooling flows in a long-term hot mode without producing a cooling catastrophe. Our model thus describes a self-limited growth channel for galaxy bulges and naturally explains the connection between quenching and bulge prominence. In particular, we explicitly demonstrate that M{sub ∗}/R{sub eff}{sup 1.5} is a good structural predictor of quenching. We further find that the gravity from the central supermassive black hole also affects the bimodal fate of cooling flows, and we predict a more general quenching predictor to be M{sub bh}{sup 1.6}M{sub ∗}/R{sub eff}{sup 1.5}, which may be tested in future observational studies.

  12. Effects of neutrino emissivity on the cooling of neutron stars in the presence of a strong magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Coelho, Eduardo Lenho; Chiapparini, Marcelo; Negreiros, Rodrigo Picanço

    2015-12-17

    One of the most interesting kind of neutron stars are the pulsars, which are highly magnetized neutron stars with fields up to 10{sup 14} G at the surface. The strength of magnetic field in the center of a neutron star remains unknown. According to the scalar virial theorem, magnetic field in the core could be as large as 10{sup 18} G. In this work we study the influence of strong magnetic fields on the cooling of neutron stars coming from direct Urca process. Direct Urca process is an extremely efficient mechanism for cooling a neutron star after its formation. The matter is described using a relativistic mean-field model at zero temperature with eight baryons (baryon octet), electrons and muons. We obtain the relative population of each species of particles as function of baryon density for different magnetic fields. We calculate numerically the cooling of neutron stars for a parametrized magnetic field and compare the results for the case without a magnetic field.

  13. Preliminary design activities for solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Information on the development of solar heating and cooling systems is presented. The major emphasis is placed on program organization, system size definition, site identification, system approaches, heat pump and equipment design, collector procurement, and other preliminary design activities.

  14. Effect of weak interaction on kaon condensation and cooling of neutron stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, H.; Muto, T.; Tatsumi, T.; Tamagaki, R.

    1994-05-01

    Kaon condensation and its implication in the cooling mechanism in neutron stars are investigated within a framework of current algebra and PCAC. The weak interaction, nýp+K-, is shown to play a significant role in determining not only the critical density but also the equation of state of the K- condensed phase. The chemical equilibrium for the weak interaction leads to large proton-admixture. In connection with this result, the possibility of the direct URCA process, n→p+e-+ν¯e, p+e-→n+νe, is investigted. It is shown that, within a simple treatment without the nuclear interactions such as the symmetry energy, the kinematical condition for the direct URCA process is not satified despite the large proton-mixing, due to the resulting small electron Fermi momentum. The physical content of the K- condensation from a viewpoint of strangeness degrees of freedom is also discussed.

  15. Effects of weak interaction on kaon condensation and cooling of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirotsugu, Fujii; Takumi, Muto; Toshitaka, Tatsumi; Ryozo, Tamagaki

    1994-05-01

    Kaon condensation and its implication in the cooling mechanism in neutron stars are investigated within a framework of current algebra and PCAC. The weak interaction, n ⇌ p + K -, is shown to play a significant role in determining not only the critical density but also the equation of state of the K - condensed phase. The chemical equilibrium for the weak interaction leads to large proton-admixture. In connection with this result, the possibility of the direct URCA process, n → p + e- + v¯e, p + e- → n + v e, is investigated. It is shown that, within a simple treatment without the nuclear interactions such as the symmetry energy, the kinematical condition for the direct URCA process is not satisfied despite the large proton-mixing, due to the resulting small electron Fermi momentum. The physical content of the K - condensation from a viewpoint of strangeness degrees of freedom is also discussed.

  16. Three very cool degenerate stars in Luyten common proper motion binaries - Implications for the age of the galactic disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintzen, Paul; Oswalt, Terry D.; Liebert, James; Sion, Edward M.

    1989-01-01

    During the course of a spectroscopic study of Luyten common proper motion (CPM) stars, spectrophotometric observations have been obtained of three binaries containing degenerate stars with estimated absolute magnitudes M(V) of about 16. Each of the three pairs consists of a yellow degenerate star primary and a DC 13 + secondary 1.4-2.3 mag fainter. One of the primary stars is spectral class DC 7, another is a sharp-lined DA 8, and the third shows peculiar broad absorption features which we interpret as pressure-shifted C2 Swan bands. The LP 701 - 69/70 system has survived for over 8 billion years without disruption by passing stars, despite its 1500 a.u. orbital major axis. The three cool degenerate companions nearly double the available sample of stars at the low-luminosity terminus of the white dwarf cooling sequence. These findings appear consistent with the conclusion that degenerate stars in the old disk population have not had time to evolve to a luminosity fainter than M(V) about 16.2.

  17. Three very cool degenerate stars in Luyten common proper motion binaries - Implications for the age of the galactic disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintzen, Paul; Oswalt, Terry D.; Liebert, James; Sion, Edward M.

    1989-11-01

    During the course of a spectroscopic study of Luyten common proper motion (CPM) stars, spectrophotometric observations have been obtained of three binaries containing degenerate stars with estimated absolute magnitudes M(V) of about 16. Each of the three pairs consists of a yellow degenerate star primary and a DC 13 + secondary 1.4-2.3 mag fainter. One of the primary stars is spectral class DC 7, another is a sharp-lined DA 8, and the third shows peculiar broad absorption features which we interpret as pressure-shifted C2 Swan bands. The LP 701 - 69/70 system has survived for over 8 billion years without disruption by passing stars, despite its 1500 a.u. orbital major axis. The three cool degenerate companions nearly double the available sample of stars at the low-luminosity terminus of the white dwarf cooling sequence. These findings appear consistent with the conclusion that degenerate stars in the old disk population have not had time to evolve to a luminosity fainter than M(V) about 16.2.

  18. Radiative Transfer Modeling of the Winds and Circumstellar Environments of Hot and Cool Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobel, A.

    2010-06-01

    We present modeling research work of the winds and circumstellar environments of a variety of prototypical hot and cool massive stars using advanced radiative-transfer calculations. This research aims at unraveling the detailed physics of various mass-loss mechanisms of luminous stars in the upper portion of the H-R diagram. Very recent 3D radiative-transfer calculations, combined with hydrodynamic simulations, show that radiatively-driven winds of OB supergiants are structured due to large-scale density and velocity fields caused by rotating bright spots at the stellar equator. The mass-loss rates computed from matching Discrete Absorption Components (DACs) in IUE observations of HD 64760 (B Ib) do not reveal appreciable changes from the rates of unstructured (smooth) wind models. Intermediate yellow supergiants (such as the yellow hypergiant ρ Cas, F-G Ia0), on the other hand, show prominent spectroscopic signatures of strongly increased mass-loss rates during episodic outbursts that cause dramatic changes of the stellar photospheric conditions. Long-term high-resolution spectroscopic monitoring of cool hypergiants near the Yellow Evolutionary Void reveals that their mass-loss rates and wind-structure are dominated by photospheric eruptions and large-amplitude pulsations that impart mechanical momentum to the circumstellar environment by propagating acoustic (shock) waves. In massive red supergiants, however, clear evidence for mechanical wave propagation from the sub-photospheric convection zones is lacking, despite their frequently observed spectroscopic and photometric variability. Recent spatially resolved HST-STIS observations inside Betelgeuse's (M Iab) very extended chromosphere and dust envelope show evidence of warm chromospheric gas far beyond the dust-condensation radius of radiative-transfer models. Models for these long-term spectroscopic observations demonstrate that the chromospheric pulsations are not spherically symmetric. The STIS observations

  19. New atmospheric parameters and spectral interpolator for the MILES cool stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Kaushal; Prugniel, Philippe; Singh, Harinder P.

    2016-01-01

    Context. The full spectrum fitting of stellar spectra against a library of empirical spectra is a well-established approach to measure the atmospheric parameters of FGK stars with a high internal consistency. Extending it towards cooler stars still remains a challenge. Aims: We address this question by improving the interpolator of the Medium-resolution INT Library of Empirical Spectra (MILES) library in the low effective temperature regime (Teff < 4800 K), and we refine the determination of the parameters of the cool MILES stars. Methods: We use the ULySS package to determine the atmospheric parameters (Teff, log g and [Fe/H]), and measure the biases of the results with respect to our updated compilation of parameters calibrated against theoretical spectra. After correcting some systematic effects, we compute a new interpolator that we finally use to redetermine the atmospheric parameters homogeneously and assess the biases. Results: Based on an updated literature compilation, we determine Teff in a more accurate and unbiased manner compared to those determined with the original interpolator. The validity range is extended downwards to about Teff= 2900 K compared to 3500 K previously. The mean residual biases on Teff, log g, and [Fe/H], with respect to the literature compilation for the coolest stars (Teff ≤ 3800 K) computed using the new interpolator, are -15 K, -0.02 dex, and 0.02 dex respectively. The corresponding estimations of the external precision are 63 K, 0.23 dex, and 0.15 dex respectively. For the stars with Teff in the range 3800-4200 K, the determinations of Teff and [Fe/H] have been slightly improved. At higher temperatures, the new interpolator is comparable to the original one. The new version of the interpolator is publicly available. The model as a FITS file is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/585/A64

  20. HST-COS SPECTROSCOPY OF THE COOLING FLOW IN A1795—EVIDENCE FOR INEFFICIENT STAR FORMATION IN CONDENSING INTRACLUSTER GAS

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Michael; Ehlert, Steven; Roediger, Joel; Veilleux, Sylvain

    2014-08-20

    We present far-UV spectroscopy from the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope of a cool, star-forming filament in the core of A1795. These data, which span 1025 Å < λ{sub rest} < 1700 Å, allow for the simultaneous modeling of the young stellar populations and the intermediate-temperature (10{sup 5.5} K) gas in this filament, which is far removed (∼30 kpc) from the direct influence of the central active galactic nucleus. Using a combination of UV absorption line indices and stellar population synthesis modeling, we find evidence for ongoing star formation, with the youngest stars having ages of 7.5{sub −2.0}{sup +2.5} Myr and metallicities of 0.4{sub −0.1}{sup +0.2} Z {sub ☉}. The latter is consistent with the local metallicity of the intracluster medium. We detect the O VI λ1038 line, measuring a flux of f {sub O} {sub VI,} {sub 1038} = 4.0 ± 0.9 × 10{sup –17} erg s{sup –1} cm{sup –2}. The O VI λ1032 line is redshifted such that it is coincident with a strong Galactic H{sub 2} absorption feature, and is not detected. The measured O VI λ1038 flux corresponds to a cooling rate of 0.85 ± 0.2 (stat) ± 0.15 (sys) M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} at ∼10{sup 5.5} K, assuming that the cooling proceeds isochorically, which is consistent with the classical X-ray luminosity-derived cooling rate in the same region. We measure a star formation rate of 0.11 ± 0.02 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} from the UV continuum, suggesting that star formation is proceeding at 13{sub −2}{sup +3}% efficiency in this filament. We propose that this inefficient star formation represents a significant contribution to the larger-scale cooling flow problem.

  1. Active cooling requirements for propellant storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    Recent NASA and DOD mission models have indicated future needs for orbital cryogenic storage and supply systems. Two thermal control systems which show the greatest promise for improving propellant storage life were evaluated. One system was an open cycle thermodynamic vent type with a refrigeration system for partial hydrogen reliquefaction located at the LH2 tank and a vapor cooled shield for integrated and non-integrated tank designs to reduce boiloff. The other was a closed system with direct refrigeration at the LH2 tank. A reversed Brayton cycle unit was baselined for the propellant processor. It is concluded that: (1) reliquefaction systems are not attractive for minimizing propellant boiloff; (2) open cycle systems may not be economically attractive for long term storage; (3) a number of refrigeration systems are available to assist in the long term storage of cryogenic propellants; and (4) shields can significantly improve the performance of mechanical coolers.

  2. Formation of starspots in self-consistent global dynamo models: Polar spots on cool stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Rakesh K.; Gastine, Thomas; Christensen, Ulrich R.; Reiners, Ansgar

    2015-01-01

    Context. Observations of cool stars reveal dark spot-like features on their surfaces. These starspots can be more extended than sunspots and cover a large area of the stellar surface. While sunspots appear only at low latitudes, starspots are also found in polar regions, in particular on rapidly rotating stars. Conventional flux-tube models have been invoked to explain starspot properties. However, these models use several simplifications, and so far, neither sunspots nor starspots have been generated in a self-consistent simulation of stellar magnetic convection. Aims: We aim to clarify the conditions necessary for the spontaneous formation of dark spots in numerical models of convection-driven stellar dynamos. Methods: We simulated convection and magnetic field generation in rapidly rotating spherical shells assuming anelastic approximation. The high-resolution simulations were performed using a fully spectral magnetohydrodynamic code. Results: We demonstrate for the first time that a self-consistent distributed dynamo can spontaneously generate high-latitude dark spots. Dark spots are generated when a large-scale magnetic field, generated in the bulk of the convection zone, interacts with and locally quenches flow near the surface. Sufficiently strong density stratification and rapid rotation are prerequisites for the formation of sizeable dark spots in the model. Conclusions: Our models present an alternative scenario for starspot formation by distributed dynamo action. Our results also lend strong support to the idea that dynamos in the interiors of rapidly rotating stars might be fundamentally different from the solar one. Two movies are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. FLUCTUATIONS AND FLARES IN THE ULTRAVIOLET LINE EMISSION OF COOL STARS: IMPLICATIONS FOR EXOPLANET TRANSIT OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Loyd, R. O. Parke; France, Kevin

    2014-03-01

    Variations in stellar flux can potentially overwhelm the photometric signal of a transiting planet. Such variability has not previously been well-characterized in the ultraviolet lines used to probe the inflated atmospheres surrounding hot Jupiters. Therefore, we surveyed 38 F-M stars for intensity variations in four narrow spectroscopic bands: two enclosing strong lines from species known to inhabit hot Jupiter atmospheres, C II λλ1334, 1335 and Si III λ1206; one enclosing Si IV λλ1393, 1402; and 36.5 Å of interspersed continuum. For each star/band combination, we generated 60 s cadence lightcurves from archival Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph time-tagged photon data. Within these lightcurves, we characterized flares and stochastic fluctuations as separate forms of variability. Flares: we used a cross-correlation approach to detect 116 flares. These events occur in the time-series an average of once per 2.5 hr, over 50% last 4 minutes or less, and most produce the strongest response in Si IV. If the flare occurred during a transit measurement integrated for 60 minutes, 90/116 would destroy the signal of an Earth, 27/116 Neptune, and 7/116 Jupiter, with the upward bias in flux ranging from 1% to 109% of quiescent levels. Fluctuations: photon noise and underlying stellar fluctuations produce scatter in the quiescent data. We model the stellar fluctuations as Gaussian white noise with standard deviation σ {sub x}. Maximum likelihood values of σ {sub x} range from 1% to 41% for 60 s measurements. These values suggest that many cool stars will only permit a transit detection to high confidence in ultraviolet resonance lines if the radius of the occulting disk is ≳1 R{sub J} . However, for some M dwarfs this limit can be as low as several R {sub ⊕}.

  4. Molecular Cooling as a Probe of Star Formation: Spitzer Looking Forward to Herschel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergin, Edwin A.; Maret, Sebastien; Yuan, Yuan; Sonnentrucker, Paule; Green, Joel D.; Watson, Dan M.; Harwit, Martin O.; Kristensen, Lars E.; Melnick, Gary J.; Tolls, Volker; Werner, Michael W.; Willacy, Karen

    2009-01-01

    We explore here the question of how cloud physics can be more directly probed when one observes the majority of cooling emissions from molecular gas. For this purpose we use results from a recent Spitzer Space Telescope study of the young cluster of embedded objects in NGC1333. For this study we mapped the emission from eight pure H2 rotational lines, from S(0) to S(7). The H2 emission appears to be associated with the warm gas shocked by the multiple outflows present in the region. The H2 lines are found to contribute to 25 - 50% of the total outflow luminosity, and can be used to more directly ascertain the importance of star formation feedback on the natal cloud. From these lines, we determine the outflow mass loss rate and, indirectly, the stellar infall rate, the outflow momentum and the kinetic energy injected into the cloud over the embedded phase. The latter is found to exceed the binding energy of individual cores, suggesting that outflows could be the main mechanism for cores disruption. Given the recent launch of Herschel and the upcoming operational lifetime of SOFIA we discuss how studies of molecular cooling can take a step beyond understanding thermal balance to exploring the origin, receipt, and transfer of energy in atomic and molecular gas in a wide range of physical situations.

  5. Cooling neutron star in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant: evidence for superfluidity in the core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shternin, Peter S.; Yakovlev, Dmitry G.; Heinke, Craig O.; Ho, Wynn C. G.; Patnaude, Daniel J.

    2011-03-01

    According to recent results of Ho & Heinke, the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant contains a young (≈330-yr-old) neutron star (NS) which has carbon atmosphere and shows notable decline of the effective surface temperature. We report a new (2010 November) Chandra observation which confirms the previously reported decline rate. The decline is naturally explained if neutrons have recently become superfluid (in triplet state) in the NS core, producing a splash of neutrino emission due to Cooper pair formation (CPF) process that currently accelerates the cooling. This scenario puts stringent constraints on poorly known properties of NS cores: on density dependence of the temperature Tcn(ρ) for the onset of neutron superfluidity [Tcn(ρ) should have a wide peak with maximum ≈ (7-9) × 108 K]; on the reduction factor q of CPF process by collective effects in superfluid matter (q > 0.4) and on the intensity of neutrino emission before the onset of neutron superfluidity (30-100 times weaker than the standard modified Urca process). This is serious evidence for nucleon superfluidity in NS cores that comes from observations of cooling NSs.

  6. Activity in X-ray-selected late-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takalo, Leo O.; Nousek, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    A spectroscopic study has been conducted of nine X-ray bright late-type stars selected from two Einstein X-ray surveys: the Columbia Astrophysical Laboratory Survey (five stars) and the CFA Medium Sensitivity Survey (MSS; four stars). Spectral classes were determined and radial and V sin(i) velocities were measured for the stars. Four of the Columbia Survey stars were found to be new RS CVn-type binaries. The fifth Columbia survey star was found to be an active G dwarf star without evidence for binarity. None of the four MSS stars were found to be either binaries or optically active stars. Activity in these stars was assessed by measuring the excess emission in H-alpha and the Ca II IRT (8498, 8542) lines in comparison with inactive stars of similar spectral types. A correlation was found between X-ray luminosity and V sin(i) and H-alpha line excess. The measured excess line emission in H-alpha was also correlated with V sin(i) but not with the IRT line excess.

  7. Physical properties of simulated galaxy populations at z = 2 - I. Effect of metal-line cooling and feedback from star formation and AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Marcel R.; Schaye, Joop; Booth, C. M.; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Springel, Volker; Theuns, Tom; Wiersma, Robert P. C.

    2013-11-01

    We use hydrodynamical simulations from the OverWhelmingly Large Simulations (OWLS) project to investigate the dependence of the physical properties of galaxy populations at redshift 2 on metal-line cooling and feedback from star formation and active galactic nuclei (AGN). We find that if the sub-grid feedback from star formation is implemented kinetically, the feedback is only efficient if the initial wind velocity exceeds a critical value. This critical velocity increases with galaxy mass and also if metal-line cooling is included. This suggests that radiative losses quench the winds if their initial velocity is too low. If the feedback is efficient, then the star formation rate is inversely proportional to the amount of energy injected per unit stellar mass formed (which is proportional to the initial mass loading for a fixed wind velocity). This can be understood if the star formation is self-regulating, i.e. if the star formation rate (and thus the gas fraction) increases until the outflow rate balances the inflow rate. Feedback from AGN is efficient at high masses, while increasing the initial wind velocity with gas pressure or halo mass allows one to generate galaxy-wide outflows at all masses. Matching the observed galaxy mass function requires efficient feedback. In particular, the predicted faint-end slope is too steep unless we resort to highly mass loaded winds for low-mass objects. Such efficient feedback from low-mass galaxies (M* ≪ 1010 M⊙) also reduces the discrepancy with the observed specific star formation rates, which are higher than predicted unless the feedback transitions from highly efficient to inefficient just below M* ˜ 5 × 109 M⊙.

  8. Neutron star-black hole mergers with a nuclear equation of state and neutrino cooling: Dependence in the binary parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucart, Francois; Deaton, M. Brett; Duez, Matthew D.; O'Connor, Evan; Ott, Christian D.; Haas, Roland; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Pfeiffer, Harald P.; Scheel, Mark A.; Szilagyi, Bela

    2014-07-01

    We present a first exploration of the results of neutron star-black hole mergers using black hole masses in the most likely range of 7M⊙-10M⊙, a neutrino leakage scheme, and a modeling of the neutron star material through a finite-temperature nuclear-theory based equation of state. In the range of black hole spins in which the neutron star is tidally disrupted (χBH≳0.7), we show that the merger consistently produces large amounts of cool (T ≲1 MeV), unbound, neutron-rich material (Mej˜0.05M⊙-0.20M⊙). A comparable amount of bound matter is initially divided between a hot disk (Tmax˜15 MeV) with typical neutrino luminosity of Lν˜1053 erg /s, and a cooler tidal tail. After a short period of rapid protonization of the disk lasting ˜10 ms, the accretion disk cools down under the combined effects of the fall-back of cool material from the tail, continued accretion of the hottest material onto the black hole, and neutrino emission. As the temperature decreases, the disk progressively becomes more neutron rich, with dimmer neutrino emission. This cooling process should stop once the viscous heating in the disk (not included in our simulations) balances the cooling. These mergers of neutron star-black hole binaries with black hole masses of MBH˜7M⊙-10M⊙, and black hole spins high enough for the neutron star to disrupt provide promising candidates for the production of short gamma-ray bursts, of bright infrared postmerger signals due to the radioactive decay of unbound material, and of large amounts of r-process nuclei.

  9. Modeling active galactic nucleus feedback in cool-core clusters: The balance between heating and cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-07-01

    We study the long-term evolution of an idealized cool-core galaxy cluster under the influence of momentum-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback using three-dimensional high-resolution (60 pc) adaptive mesh refinement simulations. The feedback is modeled with a pair of precessing jets whose power is calculated based on the accretion rate of the cold gas surrounding the supermassive black hole (SMBH). The intracluster medium first cools into clumps along the propagation direction of the jets. As the jet power increases, gas condensation occurs isotropically, forming spatially extended structures that resemble the observed Hα filaments in Perseus and many other cool-core clusters. Jet heating elevates the gas entropy, halting clump formation. The cold gas that is not accreted onto the SMBH settles into a rotating disk of ∼10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}. The hot gas cools directly onto the disk while the SMBH accretes from its innermost region, powering the AGN that maintains a thermally balanced state for a few Gyr. The mass cooling rate averaged over 7 Gyr is ∼30 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, an order of magnitude lower than the classic cooling flow value. Medium resolution simulations produce similar results, while in low resolution runs, the cluster experiences cycles of gas condensation and AGN outbursts. Owing to its self-regulating mechanism, AGN feedback can successfully balance cooling with a wide range of model parameters. Our model also produces cold structures in early stages that are in good agreement with the observations. However, the long-lived massive cold disk is unrealistic, suggesting that additional physical processes are still needed.

  10. Cooling Panel Optimization for the Active Cooling System of a Hypersonic Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youn, B.; Mills, A. F.

    1995-01-01

    Optimization of cooling panels for an active cooling system of a hypersonic aircraft is explored. The flow passages are of rectangular cross section with one wall heated. An analytical fin-type model for incompressible flow in smooth-wall rectangular ducts with coupled wall conduction is proposed. Based on this model, the a flow rate of coolant to each design minimum mass flow rate or coolant for a single cooling panel is obtained by satisfying hydrodynamic, thermal, and Mach number constraints. Also, the sensitivity of the optimal mass flow rate of coolant to each design variable is investigated. In addition, numerical solutions for constant property flow in rectangular ducts, with one side rib-roughened and coupled wall conduction, are obtained using a k-epsilon and wall function turbulence model, these results are compared with predictions of the analytical model.

  11. Structural active cooling applications for the Space Shuttle.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masek, R. V.; Niblock, G. A.; Huneidi, F.

    1972-01-01

    Analytic and experimental studies have been conducted to evaluate a number of active cooling approaches to structural thermal protection for the Space Shuttle. The primary emphasis was directed toward the thermal protection system. Trade study results are presented for various heat shield material and TPS arrangements. Both metallic and reusable surface insulation (RSI) concepts were considered. Active systems heat sinks consisted of hydrogen, phase change materials, and expendable water. If consideration is given only to controlling the surface temperature, passive TPS was found to provide the most efficient system. Use of active cooling which incorporates some interior temperature control made the thermally less efficient RSI system more attractive.

  12. Hydroxyl 1.563 Micron Absorption from Starspots on Active Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neal, Douglas; Neff, James E.; Saar, Steven H.; Mines, Jonathan K.

    2001-10-01

    We present results from a study of starspots on active stars using a pair of vibrational-rotational absorption lines of the OH molecule near 1.563 μm. We detect excess OH absorption due to dark, cool starspots on several active stars of the RS CVn and BY Dra classes. Our results for the single-lined spectroscopic binaries II Pegasi, V1762 Cygni, and λ Andromedae augment those from a previous study that used a less sensitive detector. In this study, we were able for the first time to use molecular absorption features to measure starspot properties on double-lined spectroscopic binaries. Measuring the equivalent widths of these OH lines in inactive giant and dwarf stars of spectral types G, K, and M, we find that the total equivalent width of the line pair increases approximately linearly as effective temperature decreases from 5000 to 3000 K. We measure starspot filling factors by fitting the spectra of active stars with linear combinations of comparison star spectra representing the spot and nonspot regions of the star.

  13. An Atlas of K-Line Spectra for Cool Magnetic CP Stars: The Wing-Nib Anomaly (WNA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowley, C. R.; Hubrig, S.; Kamp, I.

    2006-04-01

    We present a short atlas illustrating the unusual Ca II K-line profiles in upper main-sequence stars with anomalous abundances. Slopes of the profiles for 10 cool, magnetic chemically peculiar (CP) stars change abruptly at the very core, forming a deep ``nib.'' The nibs show the same or nearly the same radial velocity as the other atomic lines. The near wings are generally more shallow than in normal stars. In three magnetic CP stars, the K lines are too weak to show this shape, although the nibs themselves are arguably present. The Ca II H lines also show deep nibs, but the profiles are complicated by the nearby, strong Hɛ absorption. The K-line structure is nearly unchanged with phase in β CrB and α Cir. Calculations, including NLTE, show that other possibilities in addition to chemical stratification may yield niblike cores.

  14. BI Vulpeculae: A Siamese Twin with Two Very Similar Cool Stars in Shallow Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, S.-B.; Liu, N.-P.; Li, K.; He, J.-J.; Zhu, L.-Y.; Zhao, E. G.; Wang, J.-J.; Li, L.-J.; Jiang, L.-Q.

    2013-11-01

    BI Vul is a cool eclipsing binary star (Sp. = K3 V) with a short period of 0.2518 days. The first charge-coupled device (CCD) light curves of the binary in the BVRI obtained on 2012 August 21 are presented and are analyzed using the Wilson-Devinney code. It is discovered that BI Vul is a marginal contact binary system (f = 8.7%) that contains two very similar cool components (q = 1.037). Both the marginal contact configuration and the extremely high mass ratio suggest that it is presently evolving into contact with little mass transfer between the components and it is at the beginning stage of contact evolution. By using all available times of minimum light, the variations in the orbital period are investigated for the first time. We find that the observed - calculated (O - C) curve of BI Vul shows a cyclic change with a period of 10.8 yr and an amplitude of 0.0057 days, while it undergoes a downward parabolic variation. The cyclic oscillation is analyzed for the light-travel time effect that arises from the gravitational influence of a possible third stellar object. The mass and orbital separation of the third body are estimated as M 3 ~ 0.30 M ⊙ and ~4.9 AU, respectively. The downward parabolic change reveals a long-term period decrease at a rate of \\dot{P}=-9.5\\times {10^{-8}} days yr-1. The period decrease may be caused by angular momentum loss via magnetic stellar wind and/or it is only a part of a long-period (longer than 32 yr) cyclic variation, which may reveal the presence of another stellar companion in a wider orbit. These observational properties indicate that the formation of the Siamese twin is driven by magnetic braking and the third stellar companion should play an important role by removing angular momentum from the central binary.

  15. Physiologic Responses Produced by Active and Passive Personal Cooling Vests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Yu-Tsuan E.; Lee, Hank C.; Montgomery, Leslie D.; Luna, Bernadette

    2000-01-01

    Personal thermoregulatory systems which provide chest cooling are used in the industrial and aerospace environments to alleviate thermal stress. However, little information is available regarding the physiologic and circulatory changes produced by routine operation of these systems. The objectives of this study were to document and compare the subjects' response to three cooling vests in their recommended configurations. The Life Enhancement Tech (LET) lightweight active cooling vest with cap, the MicroClimate Systems Change of Phase garment (MCS), and the Steele Vest were each used to cool the chest regions of 12 male and 8 female Healthy subjects (21 to 69 yr.) in this study. The subjects, seated in an upright position at normal room temperature (approx. 22 C), were tested for 60 min. with one of the cooling garments. The LET active garment had an initial coolant fluid inlet temperature of 60 F, and was ramped down to 50 F. Oral, right and left ear canal temperatures were logged manually every 5 min. Arm, leg, chest and rectal temperatures; heart rate; and respiration were recorded continuously on a U.F.I., Inc. Biolog ambulatory monitor. For men, all three vests had similar, significant cooling effects. Decreases in the average rectal temperature, oral temperature, and ear canal temperatures were approximately 0.2 C, 0.2 C and 0.1 C, respectively. In contrast to the men, the female subjects wearing the MCS and Steel vests had similar cooling responses in which the core temperature remained elevated and oral and ear canal temperatures did not drop. The LET active garment cooled most of the female subjects in this study; rectal, oral and ear temperature decreased about 0.2 C, 0.3 C and 0.3 C, respectively. These results show that the garment configurations tested do not elicit a similar thermal response in all subjects. A gender difference is evident. The LET active garment configuration was most effective in decreasing temperatures of the female subjects; the MCS

  16. The ACS LCID project. X. the star formation history of IC 1613: Revisiting the over-cooling problem

    SciTech Connect

    Skillman, Evan D.; Hidalgo, Sebastian L.; Monelli, Matteo; Gallart, Carme; Aparicio, Antonio E-mail: shidalgo@iac.es E-mail: carme@iac.es [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Vía Láctea s and others

    2014-05-01

    We present an analysis of the star formation history (SFH) of a field near the half-light radius in the Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy IC 1613 based on deep Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging. Our observations reach the oldest main sequence turn-off, allowing a time resolution at the oldest ages of ∼1 Gyr. Our analysis shows that the SFH of the observed field in IC 1613 is consistent with being constant over the entire lifetime of the galaxy. These observations rule out an early dominant episode of star formation in IC 1613. We compare the SFH of IC 1613 with expectations from cosmological models. Since most of the mass is in place at early times for low-mass halos, a naive expectation is that most of the star formation should have taken place at early times. Models in which star formation follows mass accretion result in too many stars formed early and gas mass fractions that are too low today (the 'over-cooling problem'). The depth of the present photometry of IC 1613 shows that, at a resolution of ∼1 Gyr, the star formation rate is consistent with being constant, at even the earliest times, which is difficult to achieve in models where star formation follows mass assembly.

  17. Observational evidence for enhanced magnetic activity of superflare stars

    PubMed Central

    Karoff, Christoffer; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou; De Cat, Peter; Bonanno, Alfio; Fogtmann-Schulz, Alexandra; Fu, Jianning; Frasca, Antonio; Inceoglu, Fadil; Olsen, Jesper; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei; Shi, Jianrong; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Superflares are large explosive events on stellar surfaces one to six orders-of-magnitude larger than the largest flares observed on the Sun throughout the space age. Due to the huge amount of energy released in these superflares, it has been speculated if the underlying mechanism is the same as for solar flares, which are caused by magnetic reconnection in the solar corona. Here, we analyse observations made with the LAMOST telescope of 5,648 solar-like stars, including 48 superflare stars. These observations show that superflare stars are generally characterized by larger chromospheric emissions than other stars, including the Sun. However, superflare stars with activity levels lower than, or comparable to, the Sun do exist, suggesting that solar flares and superflares most likely share the same origin. The very large ensemble of solar-like stars included in this study enables detailed and robust estimates of the relation between chromospheric activity and the occurrence of superflares. PMID:27009381

  18. Observational evidence for enhanced magnetic activity of superflare stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karoff, Christoffer; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou; De Cat, Peter; Bonanno, Alfio; Fogtmann-Schulz, Alexandra; Fu, Jianning; Frasca, Antonio; Inceoglu, Fadil; Olsen, Jesper; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei; Shi, Jianrong; Zhang, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Superflares are large explosive events on stellar surfaces one to six orders-of-magnitude larger than the largest flares observed on the Sun throughout the space age. Due to the huge amount of energy released in these superflares, it has been speculated if the underlying mechanism is the same as for solar flares, which are caused by magnetic reconnection in the solar corona. Here, we analyse observations made with the LAMOST telescope of 5,648 solar-like stars, including 48 superflare stars. These observations show that superflare stars are generally characterized by larger chromospheric emissions than other stars, including the Sun. However, superflare stars with activity levels lower than, or comparable to, the Sun do exist, suggesting that solar flares and superflares most likely share the same origin. The very large ensemble of solar-like stars included in this study enables detailed and robust estimates of the relation between chromospheric activity and the occurrence of superflares.

  19. Observational evidence for enhanced magnetic activity of superflare stars.

    PubMed

    Karoff, Christoffer; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou; De Cat, Peter; Bonanno, Alfio; Fogtmann-Schulz, Alexandra; Fu, Jianning; Frasca, Antonio; Inceoglu, Fadil; Olsen, Jesper; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei; Shi, Jianrong; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Superflares are large explosive events on stellar surfaces one to six orders-of-magnitude larger than the largest flares observed on the Sun throughout the space age. Due to the huge amount of energy released in these superflares, it has been speculated if the underlying mechanism is the same as for solar flares, which are caused by magnetic reconnection in the solar corona. Here, we analyse observations made with the LAMOST telescope of 5,648 solar-like stars, including 48 superflare stars. These observations show that superflare stars are generally characterized by larger chromospheric emissions than other stars, including the Sun. However, superflare stars with activity levels lower than, or comparable to, the Sun do exist, suggesting that solar flares and superflares most likely share the same origin. The very large ensemble of solar-like stars included in this study enables detailed and robust estimates of the relation between chromospheric activity and the occurrence of superflares. PMID:27009381

  20. Cool stars: spectral library of high-resolution echelle spectra and database of stellar parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, D.

    2013-05-01

    During the last years our group have undertake several high resolution spectroscopic surveys of nearby FGKM stars with different spectrographs (FOCES, SARG, SOFIN, FIES, HERMES). A large number of stars have been already observed and we have already determined spectral types, rotational velocities as well as radial velocities, Lithium abundance and several chromospheric activity indicators. We are working now in a homogeneous determination of the fundamental stellar parameters (T_{eff}, log{g}, ξ and [Fe/H]) and chemical abundances of many elements of all these stars. Some fully reduced spectra in FITS format have been available via ftp and in the {http://www.ucm.es/info/Astrof/invest/actividad/spectra.html}{Worl Wide Web} (Montes et al. 1997, A&AS, 123, 473; Montes et al. 1998, A&AS, 128, 485; and Montes et al. 1999, ApJS, 123, 283) and some particular spectral regions of the echelle spectra are available at VizieR by López-Santiago et al. 2010, A&A, 514, A97. We are now working in made accessible all the spectra of our different surveys in a Virtual Observatory ({http://svo.cab.inta-csic.es/}{VO}) compliant library and database accessible using a common web interface following the standards of the International Virtual Observatory Alliance ({http://www.ivoa.net/}{IVOA}). The spectral library includes F, G, K and M field stars, from dwarfs to giants. The spectral coverage is from 3800 to 10000 Å, with spectral resolution ranging from 40000 to 80000. The database will provide in addition the stellar parameters determined for these spectra using {http://cdsads.u-strasbg.fr/abs/2012arXiv1205.4879T}{StePar} (Tabernero et al. 2012, A&A, 547, A13).

  1. No first ionization potential fractionation in the active stars AR Piscium and AY Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz-Forcada, J.; Affer, L.; Micela, G.

    2009-10-01

    Context: The comparison of coronal and photospheric abundances in cool stars is an essential question to resolve. In the Sun an enhancement of the elements with low first ionization potential (FIP) is observed in the corona with respect to the photosphere. Stars with high levels of activity seem to show a depletion of elements with low FIP when compared to solar standard values; however, the few cases of active stars in which photospheric values are available for comparison lead to confusing results, and an enlargement of the sample is mandatory for solving this longstanding problem. Aims: We calculate in this paper the photospheric and coronal abundances of two well known active binary systems, AR Psc and AY Cet, to get further insight into the complications of coronal abundances. Methods: Coronal abundances of 9 elements were calculated by means of the reconstruction of a detailed emission measure distribution, using a line-based method that considers the lines from different elements separately. Photospheric abundances of 8 elements were calculated using high-resolution optical spectra of the stars. Results: The results once again show a lack of any FIP-related effect in the coronal abundances of the stars. The presence of metal abundance depletion (MAD) or inverse FIP effects in some stars could stem from a mistaken comparison to solar photospheric values or from a deficient calculation of photospheric abundances in fast-rotating stars. Conclusions: The lack of FIP fractionation seems to confirm that Alfvén waves combined with pondermotive forces are dominant in the corona of active stars. Tables 2 and 3 are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  2. OH 1.563 micron Absorption from Starspots on Active Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neal, Douglas; Neff, James E.

    1997-03-01

    We present results from a study of starspots on active stars using a pair of vibrational-rotational absorption lines of the OH molecule near 1.563mu m. We detect excess OH absorption due to dark, cool starspots on the RS CVn binaries II Pegasi, V1762 Cygni, and lambda Andromedae. This is the first detection of OH absorption from spots on stars other than the Sun. We have measured absorption equivalent widths of these OH lines (which are blended at the resolution of our observations) in inactive giant and dwarf stars of spectral types G, K, and M. We find that the total equivalent width of the line pair increases approximately linearly as effective temperature decreases from 5000 K to 3000 K. This greatly extends the temperature range over which starspots can be detected through molecular absorption features. We measure starspot filling factors by fitting the spectra of active stars with linear combinations of comparison star spectra representing the spot and non-spot regions of the star. Fitting only one spectral feature, we cannot derive independent constraints on starspot area and temperature. Assuming spot temperatures based on previous analyses, we find (for one epoch) spot filling factors between 35% and 48% for II Peg, 22% and 26% for lambda And, and 27% and 32% for V1762 Cyg.

  3. Ultraviolet emission lines of Si II in cool star and solar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, Sibasish; Keenan, Francis P.; Ferland, Gary J.; Ramsbottom, Catherine A.; Aggarwal, Kanti M.; Ayres, Thomas R.; Chatzikos, Marios; van Hoof, Peter A. M.; Williams, Robin J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent atomic physics calculations for Si II are employed within the CLOUDY modelling code to analyse Hubble Space Telescope (HST) STIS ultraviolet spectra of three cool stars, β Geminorum, α Centauri A and B, as well as previously published HST/GHRS observations of α Tau, plus solar quiet Sun data from the High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph. Discrepancies found previously between theory and observation for line intensity ratios involving the 3s23p 2PJ-3s3p2 4P_{J^' }} intercombination multiplet of Si II at ˜ 2335 Å are significantly reduced, as are those for ratios containing the 3s23p 2PJ-3s3p2 2D_{J^' }} transitions at ˜1816 Å. This is primarily due to the effect of the new Si II transition probabilities. However, these atomic data are not only very different from previous calculations, but also show large disagreements with measurements, specifically those of Calamai et al. for the intercombination lines. New measurements of transition probabilities for Si II are hence urgently required to confirm (or otherwise) the accuracy of the recently calculated values. If the new calculations are confirmed, then a long-standing discrepancy between theory and observation will have finally been resolved. However, if the older measurements are found to be correct, then the agreement between theory and observation is simply a coincidence and the existing discrepancies remain.

  4. Active Longitudes and Flip-Flops in Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Heidi; Järvinen, Silva P.

    2007-08-01

    In many active stars the spots concentrate on two permanent active longitudes which are 180 degrees apart. In some of these stars the dominant part of the spot activity changes the longitude every few years. This so-called flip-flop phenomenon was first reported in the early 1990's in the single, late type giant FK Com. Since then flip-flops have been reported also on binary stars, young solar type stars and the Sun itself. Even though this phenomenon has been detected on many different kinds of active stars, still less than ten stars are known to exhibit this effect. Therefore no statistically significant correlation between the stellar parameters and the flip-flop phenomenon can be carried out. Here we present results from investigation where we have studied the long-term photometry of several magnetically active RS CVn binaries to see whether or not they show permanent active longitudes and the flip-flop phenomenon. We find that it is very common for the active regions to occur on permanent active longitudes, and some of these stars also show clear flip-flop phenomenon.

  5. Nearby Galaxy is a Hotbed of Star Birth Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This new image taken with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is of the nearby dwarf galaxy NGC 1569. This galaxy is a hotbed of vigorous star birth activity which blows huge bubbles that riddle its main body. The bubble structure is sculpted by the galactic super-winds and outflows caused by a colossal input of energy from collective supernova explosions that are linked with a massive episode of star birth. The bubbles seen in this image are made of hydrogen gas that glows when hit by the fierce wind and radiation from hot young stars and is racked by supernova shocks. Its 'star factories' are also manufacturing brilliant blue star clusters. NGC 1569 had a sudden onset of star birth about 25 million years ago, which subsided about the time the very earliest human ancestors appeared on Earth. The Marshall Space Flight Center had responsibility for the design, development, and construction of the HST.

  6. Actively Cooled SLMS(TM) Technology for HEL Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacoby, Marc T.; Goodman, William A.; Reily, Jack C.; Kegley, Jeffrey R.; Haight, Harlan J.; Tucker, John; Wright, Ernest R.; Hogue, William D.

    2005-01-01

    Mr. Jacoby is the Chief Scientist for Schafer's Lightweight Optical Systems business area with twenty four years experience in laser and optical systems for space and military applications. He and colleague Dr. Goodman conceived and developed Silicon Lightweight Mirrors (SLMS(TM)) technologies for space applications from the extreme UV to FAR IR wavelengths. Schafer has demonstrated two different methods for actively cooling our Silicon Lightweight Mirrors (SLMS(TM)) technology. Direct internal cooling was accomplished by flowing liquid nitrogen through the continuous open cell core of the SLMS(TM) mirror. Indirect external cooling was accomplished by flowing liquid nitrogen through a CTE matched Cesic square-tube manifold that was bonded to the back of the mirror in the center. Testing was done in the small 4-foot thermal/vacuum chamber located at the NASA/MSFC X-Ray Calibration Facility. Seven thermal diodes were located over the front side of the 5 inch diameter mirror and one was placed on the outlet side of the Cesic manifold. Results indicate that the mirror reaches steady state at 82K in less than four minutes for both cooling methods. The maximum temperature difference of the eight diodes was less than 200 mK when the mirror was internally cooled and covered with MLI to insulate it from the large 300 K aluminum plate that was used to mount it.

  7. The Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) spectral library:. Spectral diagnostics for cool stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesetti, M.; Pizzella, A.; Ivanov, V. D.; Morelli, L.; Corsini, E. M.; Dalla Bontà, E.

    2013-01-01

    Context. The near-infrared (NIR) wavelength range offers some unique spectral features, and it is less prone to the extinction than the optical one. Recently, the first flux calibrated NIR library of cool stars from the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) have become available, and it has not been fully exploited yet. Aims: We want to develop spectroscopic diagnostics for stellar physical parameters based on features in the wavelength range 1-5 μm. In this work we test the technique in the I and K bands. The study of the Y, J, H, and L bands will be presented in the following paper. Methods: An objective method for semi-empirical definition of spectral features sensitive to various physical parameters is applied to the spectra. It is based on sensitivity map - i.e., derivative of the flux in the spectra with respect to the stellar parameters at a fixed wavelength. New optimized indices are defined and their equivalent widths (EWs) are measured. Results: The method is applied in the I- and K-band windows of the IRTF stellar spectra to verify the new technique by comparing the results with the known behavior of well-studied spectral features. A number of sensitive features to the effective temperature and surface gravity are re-identified or newly identified clearly showing the reliability of the sensitivity map analysis. Conclusions: The sensitivity map allows to identify the best bandpass limits for the line and nearby continuum. It reliably predicts the trends of spectral features with respect to a given physical parameter but not their absolute strengths. Line blends are easy to recognize when blended features have different behavior with respect to some physical stellar parameter. The use of sensitivity map is therefore complementary to the use of indices. We give the EWs of the new indices measured for the IRTF star sample. This new and homogeneous set of EWs will be useful for stellar population synthesis models and can be used to get element

  8. BI VULPECULAE: A SIAMESE TWIN WITH TWO VERY SIMILAR COOL STARS IN SHALLOW CONTACT

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, S.-B.; Liu, N.-P.; He, J.-J.; Zhu, L.-Y.; Zhao, E. G.; Wang, J.-J.; Li, L.-J.; Jiang, L.-Q.; Li, K.

    2013-11-01

    BI Vul is a cool eclipsing binary star (Sp. = K3 V) with a short period of 0.2518 days. The first charge-coupled device (CCD) light curves of the binary in the BVRI obtained on 2012 August 21 are presented and are analyzed using the Wilson-Devinney code. It is discovered that BI Vul is a marginal contact binary system (f = 8.7%) that contains two very similar cool components (q = 1.037). Both the marginal contact configuration and the extremely high mass ratio suggest that it is presently evolving into contact with little mass transfer between the components and it is at the beginning stage of contact evolution. By using all available times of minimum light, the variations in the orbital period are investigated for the first time. We find that the observed – calculated (O – C) curve of BI Vul shows a cyclic change with a period of 10.8 yr and an amplitude of 0.0057 days, while it undergoes a downward parabolic variation. The cyclic oscillation is analyzed for the light-travel time effect that arises from the gravitational influence of a possible third stellar object. The mass and orbital separation of the third body are estimated as M {sub 3} ∼ 0.30 M {sub ☉} and ∼4.9 AU, respectively. The downward parabolic change reveals a long-term period decrease at a rate of P-dot = -9.5 x 10{sup -8} days yr{sup –1}. The period decrease may be caused by angular momentum loss via magnetic stellar wind and/or it is only a part of a long-period (longer than 32 yr) cyclic variation, which may reveal the presence of another stellar companion in a wider orbit. These observational properties indicate that the formation of the Siamese twin is driven by magnetic braking and the third stellar companion should play an important role by removing angular momentum from the central binary.

  9. A CORRELATION BETWEEN HOST STAR ACTIVITY AND PLANET MASS FOR CLOSE-IN EXTRASOLAR PLANETS?

    SciTech Connect

    Poppenhaeger, K.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2011-07-01

    The activity levels of stars are influenced by several stellar properties, such as stellar rotation, spectral type, and the presence of stellar companions. Analogous to binaries, planetary companions are also thought to be able to cause higher activity levels in their host stars, although at lower levels. Especially in X-rays, such influences are hard to detect because coronae of cool stars exhibit a considerable amount of intrinsic variability. Recently, a correlation between the mass of close-in exoplanets and their host star's X-ray luminosity has been detected, based on archival X-ray data from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. This finding has been interpreted as evidence for star-planet interactions. We show in our analysis that this correlation is caused by selection effects due to the flux limit of the X-ray data used and due to the intrinsic planet detectability of the radial velocity method, and thus does not trace possible planet-induced effects. We also show that the correlation is not present in a corresponding complete sample derived from combined XMM-Newton and ROSAT data.

  10. FUV Emission from AGB Stars: Modeling Accretion Activity Associated with a Binary Companion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Alyx Catherine; Sahai, Raghvendra

    2012-01-01

    It is widely believed that the late stages of evolution for Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars are influenced by the presence of binary companions. Unfortunately, there is a lack of direct observational evidence of binarity. However, more recently, strong indirect evidence comes from the discovery of UV emission in a subsample of these objects (fuvAGB stars). AGB stars are comparatively cool objects (< or =3000 K), thus their fluxes falls off drastically for wavelengths 3000 Angstroms and shorter. Therefore, ultraviolet observations offer an important, new technique for detecting the binary companions and/or associated accretion activity. We develop new models of UV emission from fuvAGB stars constrained by GALEX photometry and spectroscopy of these objects. We compare the GALEX UV grism spectra of the AGB M7 star EY Hya to predictions using the spectral synthesis code Cloudy, specifically investigating the ultraviolet wavelength range (1344-2831 Angstroms). We investigate models composed of contributions from a photoionized "hot spot" due to accretion activity around the companion, and "chromospheric" emission from collisionally ionized plasma, to fit the UV observations.

  11. 77 FR 46089 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; EPA's ENERGY STAR...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-02

    ... AGENCY Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; EPA's ENERGY STAR... this action are participants in EPA's ENERGY STAR Program in the Commercial and Industrial Sectors. Title: Information Collection Activities Associated with EPA's ENERGY STAR Program in the Commercial...

  12. CMOS Active Pixel Sensor Star Tracker with Regional Electronic Shutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yadid-Pecht, Orly; Pain, Bedabrata; Staller, Craig; Clark, Christopher; Fossum, Eric

    1996-01-01

    The guidance system in a spacecraft determines spacecraft attitude by matching an observed star field to a star catalog....An APS(active pixel sensor)-based system can reduce mass and power consumption and radiation effects compared to a CCD(charge-coupled device)-based system...This paper reports an APS (active pixel sensor) with locally variable times, achieved through individual pixel reset (IPR).

  13. Experimental and numerical study of open-air active cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Fifi, Salman Amsari

    The topic of my thesis is Experimental and Numerical Study of Open Air Active Cooling. The present research is intended to investigate experimentally and Numerically the effectiveness of cooling large open areas like stadiums, shopping malls, national gardens, amusement parks, zoos, transportation facilities and government facilities or even in buildings outdoor gardens and patios. Our cooling systems are simple cooling fans with different diameters and a mist system. This type of cooling systems has been chosen among the others to guarantee less energy consumption, which will make it the most favorable and applicable for cooling such places mentioned above. In the experiments, the main focus is to study the temperature domain as a function of different fan diameters aerodynamically similar in different heights till we come up with an empirical relationship that can determine the temperature domain for different fan diameters and for different heights of these fans. The experimental part has two stages. The first stage is devoted to investigate the maximum range of airspeed and profile for three different fan diameters and for different heights without mist, while the second stage is devoted to investigate the maximum range of temperature and profile for the three different diameter fans and for different heights with mist. The computational study is devoted to built an experimentally verified mathematical model to be used in the design and optimization of water mist cooling systems, and to compare the mathematical results to the experimental results and to get an insight of how to apply such evaporative mist cooling for different places for different conditions. In this study, numerical solution is presented based on experimental conditions, such dry bulb temperature, wet bulb temperature, relative humidity, operating pressure and fan airspeed. In the computational study, all experimental conditions are kept the same for the three fans except the fan airspeed

  14. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE FAR-ULTRAVIOLET OBSERVATIONS OF BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES: THE ROLE OF STAR FORMATION IN COOLING FLOWS AND BCG EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    O'Dea, Kieran P.; Quillen, Alice C.; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Tremblay, Grant R.; Snios, Bradford T.; Baum, Stefi A.; Christiansen, Kevin; Noel-Storr, Jacob; Edge, Alastair C.; Donahue, Megan; Voit, G. Mark

    2010-08-20

    Quillen et al. and O'Dea et al. carried out a Spitzer study of a sample of 62 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) from the ROSAT brightest cluster sample, which were chosen based on their elevated H{alpha} flux. We present Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys far-ultraviolet (FUV) images of the Ly{alpha} and continuum emission of the luminous emission-line nebulae in seven BCGs found to have an infrared (IR) excess. We confirm that the BCGs are actively forming stars which suggests that the IR excess seen in these BCGs is indeed associated with star formation. Our observations are consistent with a scenario in which gas that cools from the intracluster medium fuels the star formation. The FUV continuum emission extends over a region {approx}7-28 kpc (largest linear size) and even larger in Ly{alpha}. The young stellar population required by the FUV observations would produce a significant fraction of the ionizing photons required to power the emission-line nebulae. Star formation rates estimated from the FUV continuum range from {approx}3 to {approx}14 times lower than those estimated from the IR, however, both the Balmer decrements in the central few arcseconds and detection of CO in most of these galaxies imply that there are regions of high extinction that could have absorbed much of the FUV continuum. Analysis of archival Very Large Array observations reveals compact radio sources in all seven BCGs and kpc scale jets in A-1835 and RXJ 2129+00. The four galaxies with archival deep Chandra observations exhibit asymmetric X-ray emission, the peaks of which are offset from the center of the BCG by {approx}10 kpc on average. A low feedback state for the active galactic nucleus could allow increased condensation of the hot gas into the center of the galaxy and the feeding of star formation.

  15. High quality actively cooled plasma facing components for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nygren, R.

    1993-12-31

    This paper interweaves some suggestions for developing actively-cooled PFCs (plasma facing components) for future fusion devices with supporting examples taken from the design, fabrication and operation of Tore Supra`s Phase III Outboard Pump Limiter (OPL). This actively-cooled midplane limiter, designed for heat and particle removal during long pulse operation, has been operated in essentially thermally steady state conditions. From experience with testing to identify braze flaws in the OPL, recommendations are made to analyze the impact of joining flaws on thermal-hydraulic performance of PFCs and to validate a method of inspection for such flaws early in the design development. Capability for extensive in-service monitoring of future PFCs is also recommended and the extensive calorimetry and IR thermography used to confirm and update safe operating limits for power handling of the OPL are reviewed.

  16. Actively cooled plate fin sandwich structural panels for hypersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. M.; Beuyukian, C. S.

    1979-01-01

    An unshielded actively cooled structural panel was designed for application to a hypersonic aircraft. The design was an all aluminum stringer-stiffened platefin sandwich structure which used a 60/40 mixture of ethylene glycol/water as the coolant. Eight small test specimens of the basic platefin sandwich concept and three fatigue specimens from critical areas of the panel design was fabricated and tested (at room temperature). A test panel representative of all features of the panel design was fabricated and tested to determine the combined thermal/mechanical performance and structural integrity of the system. The overall findings are that; (1) the stringer-stiffened platefin sandwich actively cooling concept results in a low mass design that is an excellent contender for application to a hypersonic vehicle, and (2) the fabrication processes are state of the art but new or modified facilities are required to support full scale panel fabrication.

  17. Influence of the stiffness of the equation of state and in-medium effects on the cooling of compact stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorian, H.; Voskresensky, D. N.; Blaschke, D.

    2016-03-01

    Measurements of the low masses for the pulsar PSR J0737-3039B, for the companion of PSR J1756-2251 and for the companion of PSR J0453+1559, on the one hand, and of the high masses for the pulsars PSR J1614-2230 and PSR J0348-0432, on the other, demonstrate the existence of compact stars with masses in a broad range from 1.2 to 2M_{odot}. The most massive ones of these objects might be hybrid stars. To fulfill the constraint M_{max} > 2M_{odot} with a reserve, we exploit the stiff DD2 hadronic equation of state (EoS) without and with excluded volume (DD2vex) correction, which produce maximum neutron star masses of M_{max} = 2.43 M_{odot} and 2.70 M_{odot}, respectively. We show that the stiffness of the EoS does not preclude an explanation of the whole set of cooling data within "nuclear medium cooling" scenario for compact stars by a variation of the star masses. We select appropriate proton gap profiles from those exploited in the literature and allow for a variation of the effective pion gap controlling the efficiency of the medium modified Urca process. However, we suppress the possibility of pion condensation. In general, the stiffer the EoS the steeper a decrease with density of the effective pion gap is required. Results are compared with previously obtained ones for the HDD EoS for which M_{max} = 2.06 M_{odot}. The cooling of the compact star in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A) is explained mainly by an efficient medium modified Urca process. To explain a gtrsim 2.5% decline of the cooling curve for Cas A, as motivated by an analysis of the ACIS-S instrument data, together with other cooling data exploiting the DD2 EoS a large proton gap at densities n lesssim 2n0 is required vanishing for ngtrsim 2.5 n0, where n0 is the saturation nuclear density. A smaller decline, as it follows from an analysis of the HRC-S instrument data, is explained with many choices of parameters. With the DD2vex EoS and using an effective pion gap steeper decreasing with

  18. Magnetic activity of the star Corot-Exo-2a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savanov, I. S.

    2010-05-01

    Continuous photometric observations of the young active solar-type star Corot-Exo-2a using the “Corot” space telescope obtained over 142 days were used to analyze the star’s surface temperature inhomogeneities and to monitor their continuous evolution. This analysis was based on the iPH code, which reconstructs the distribution of temperature inhomogeneities on the surface of a star based on its light curve in a two-temperature approximation. We identified five time intervals in the positions of active areas, with corresponding flip-flop events, interpreted as activity periods. Their durations were between 55 and 15 days. The time scale for the active-longitude flip-flops of Corot-Exo-2a is a few tens of days, rather than years, as for other stars studied earlier. We detected motions of the active longitudes, possibly indicating differential rotation of the star. The phenomenon of flip-flops in the positions of active longitudes has a complex character. This is the first case apart fromthe Sun where we are able to follow the appearance and development of temperature inhomogeneities on a stellar surface in such detail. We determined typical timescales for variations of the activity parameter of the star in the ranges 17-20, 28-32, 33-38, and 51-55 days, which characterize changes of the brightness variation amplitude, the spotted surface area, positions of active areas, and brightness variations.

  19. Two peculiar subclasses of cool DB stars - The DBA's and the DBZ's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shipman, Harry L.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reviews several recent observational investigations which have demonstrated that a significant number of white dwarfs with He-dominated photospheres contain trace hydrogen. In addition, follow-up work on the Case Blue Star survey has uncovered an analog of GD 40 - another DBZ star. Various scenarios for their origin are discussed. The paper concludes with a brief synopsis of a discussion of how many more subclasses of white dwarf stars might exist and what it would take to discover them.

  20. Effects of the microphysical equation of state in the mergers of magnetized neutron stars with neutrino cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palenzuela, Carlos; Liebling, Steven L.; Neilsen, David; Lehner, Luis; Caballero, O. L.; O'Connor, Evan; Anderson, Matthew

    2015-08-01

    We study the merger of binary neutron stars using different realistic, microphysical nuclear equations of state, as well as incorporating magnetic field and neutrino cooling effects. In particular, we concentrate on the influence of the equation of state on the gravitational wave signature and also on its role, in combination with cooling and electromagnetic effects, in determining the properties of the hypermassive neutron star resulting from the merger, the production of neutrinos, and the characteristics of ejecta from the system. The ejecta we find are consistent with other recent studies that find soft equations of state produce more ejecta than stiffer equations of state. Moreover, the degree of neutron richness increases for softer equations of state. In light of reported kilonova observations (associated to GRB 130603B and GRB 060614) and the discovery of relatively low abundances of heavy, radioactive elements in deep sea deposits (with respect to possible production via supernovae), we speculate that a soft equation of state (EOS) might be preferred—because of its significant production of sufficiently neutron rich ejecta—if such events are driven by binary neutron star mergers. We also find that realistic magnetic field strengths, obtained with a subgrid model tuned to capture magnetic amplification via the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at merger, are generally too weak to affect the gravitational wave signature postmerger within a time scale of ≈10 ms but can have subtle effects on the postmerger dynamics.

  1. On the spectroscopic nature of the cool evolved Am star HD151878

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freyhammer, L. M.; Elkin, V. G.; Kurtz, D. W.

    2008-10-01

    Recently, Tiwari, Chaubey & Pandey detected the bright component of the visual binary HD151878 to exhibit rapid photometric oscillations through a Johnson B filter with a period of 6min (2.78mHz) and a high, modulated amplitude up to 22mmag peak-to-peak, making this star by far the highest amplitude rapidly oscillating Ap (roAp) star known. As a new roAp star, HD151878 is of additional particular interest as a scarce example of the class in the northern sky, and only the second known case of an evolved roAp star - the other being HD116114. We used the FIbre-fed Echelle Spectrograph at the Nordic Optical Telescope to obtain high time-resolution spectra at high dispersion to attempt to verify the rapid oscillations. We show here that the star at this epoch is spectroscopically stable to rapid oscillations of no more than a few tens of ms-1. The high-resolution spectra furthermore show the star to be of type Am rather than Ap and we show the star lacks most of the known characteristics for roAp stars. We conclude that this is an Am star that does not pulsate with a 6-min period. The original discovery of pulsation is likely to be an instrumental artefact. Based on observations collected at the Nordic Optical Telescope as part of programme 36-418. E-mail: lfreyham@gmail.com

  2. Division Iv/v Working Group on Active B Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Geraldine J.; Jones, Carol E.; Townsend, Richard D.; Fabregat, Juan; Bjorkman, Karen S.; McSwain, M. Virginia; Mennickent, Ronald E.; Neiner, Coralie; Stee, Philippe; Fabregat, Juan

    2010-05-01

    The meeting of the Working Group on Active B Stars consisted of a business session followed by a scientific session containing nine talks. The titles of the talks and their presenters are listed below. We plan to publish a series of articles containing summaries of these talks in Issue No. 40 of the Be Star Newsletter. This report contains an account of the announcements made during the business session, an update on a forthcoming IAU Symposium on active B stars, a report on the status of the Be Star Newsletter, the results of the 2009 election of the SOC for the Working Group for 2009-12, a listing of the Working Group bylaws that were recently adopted, and a list of the scientific talks that we presented at the meeting.

  3. A quest for activity cycles in low-mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vida, K.; Kriskovics, L.; Oláh, K.

    2013-11-01

    Long-term photometric measurements in a sample of ultrashort-period (P≈0.5 days or less) single and binary stars of different interior structures are analysed. A loose correlation exists between the rotational rate and cycle lengths of active stars, regardless of their evolutionary state and the corresponding physical parameters. The shortest cycles are expected for the fastest rotators of the order of 1-2 years, which is reported in this paper.

  4. EUV spectroscopy of cool stars. III. Interpretation of EUVE spectra in terms of quasi-static loops.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Oord, G. H. J.; Schrijver, C. J.; Camphens, M.; Mewe, R.; Kaastra, J. S.

    1997-10-01

    We discuss the limitations of coronal spectroscopy to derive physical parameters of stellar magnetic loops. We distinguish between the intrinsic non-uniqueness of emitted spectra for models of quasi-static coronal loops, and the supplemental ambiguity introduced by both instrumental effects and spectral line formation. We demonstrate that the spectrum emitted by loops with constant cross-sections is the same for a large range of values of the conductive flux at the base when the apex temperature is fixed. Because it is impossible to estimate the conductive flux at the base from observations, it is also impossible to determine the volume heating rate and the loop length uniquely. For geometrically expanding (tapered) loops, the emitted spectrum depends on the expansion and on the conductive flux at the base, and there is a trade off between them without significant changes in the spectrum. We show that loop length and heating rate can only be derived if the density is known, but that even then a large intrinsic uncertainty remains for these loop parameters. We conclude that there is no unambiguous relationship between loop parameters and emitted spectra: modeling the spectra as the sum of spectra from discrete loops cannot result in a unique determination of coronal structure. Based on spectra observed with the Extreme Ultra Violet Explorer (EUVE) we find that quasi-static loop models allow adequate modeling of stellar coronal spectra. We show that coronal loops on active cool stars must expand with height. The minimum required areal expansion between base and apex is not very large, lying between 2 and 5. For three stars (α Cen, Capella and ξ UMa) the observations suggest the presence of two distinct, dominant loop populations, while for χ^1^ Ori a single population, characterized by a single apex temperature, suffices. The high electron densities (10^12^-10^13^cm^-3^) for coronal components on Capella and ξ UMa require abnormally large heating rates. It is

  5. Zeeman-Doppler imaging of active young solar-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackman, T.; Lehtinen, J.; Rosén, L.; Kochukhov, O.; Käpylä, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Context. By studying young magnetically active late-type stars, i.e. analogues to the young Sun, we can draw conclusions on the evolution of the solar dynamo. Aims: We determine the topology of the surface magnetic field and study the relation between the magnetic field and cool photospheric spots in three young late-type stars. Methods: High-resolution spectropolarimetry of the targets was obtained with the HARPSpol instrument mounted at the ESO 3.6 m telescope. The signal-to-noise ratios of the Stokes IV measurements were boosted by combining the signal from a large number of spectroscopic absorption lines through the least squares deconvolution technique. Surface brightness and magnetic field maps were calculated using the Zeeman-Doppler imaging technique. Results: All three targets show clear signs of magnetic fields and cool spots. Only one of the targets, V1358 Ori, shows evidence of the dominance of non-axisymmetric modes. In two of the targets, the poloidal field is significantly stronger than the toroidal one, indicative of an α2-type dynamo, in which convective turbulence effects dominate over the weak differential rotation. In two of the cases there is a slight anti-correlation between the cool spots and the strength of the radial magnetic field. However, even in these cases the correlation is much weaker than in the case of sunspots. Conclusions: The weak correlation between the measured radial magnetic field and cool spots may indicate a more complex magnetic field structure in the spots or spot groups involving mixed magnetic polarities. Comparison with a previously published magnetic field map shows that on one of the stars, HD 29615, the underlying magnetic field changed its polarity between 2009 and 2013. Based on observations made with the HARPSpol instrument on the ESO 3.6 m telescope at La Silla (Chile), under the program ID 091.D-0836.

  6. The (Phased?) Activity of Stars Hosting Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillitteri, Ignazio; Wolk, Scott J.; Lopez-Santiago, J.; Sciortino, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    The activity of stars harboring hot Jupiters could be influenced by their close-in planets. Cases of enhanced chromospheric activity are reported in literature, suggesting magnetic interaction at well determined planetary phases. In X-rays and FUV, we have studied star-planet interaction (SPI) occurring in the system of HD 189733. In X-rays, HD 189733 shows features of high activity that can be ascribed to the influence of the magnetic field of its planetary companion. Through a wavelet analysis of a flare, we inferred a long magnetic loop of 2 R_* to 4 R_*, and a local magnetic field of strength in 40-100 G. The size of the flaring loop suggests a role of the hot Jupiter in triggering this kind of X-ray variability. In FUV, HST-COS spectra of HD 189733 shows temporal variations in intensity and Doppler shifts of Si III and Si IV lines that can be ascribed to plasma flowing from the planetary atmosphere and accreting onto the star under the action of the combined magnetic field of star and planet. The material from the planetary atmosphere can flow onto the parent star as predicted by MHD models. The foot point of the accretion on the stellar surface results in phased variability observed in X-rays and FUV, when the point, comoving with the planet, emerges at the limb of the star.

  7. Broad-band linear polarization in cool stars. II - Amplitude and wavelength dependence for magnetic and scattering regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saar, Steven H.; Huovelin, Juhani

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a model to estimate the amplitude and wavelength dependence of broad-band linear polarization (BLP) from magnetic regions on cool stars. The model includes corrections both for line blends and for the partial cancellation of polarization in the vector sum over the stellar disk. Our results agree with recent calculations of BLP in the red, but show larger amplitudes and a different wavelength dependence in the blue. We find that the detailed wavelength dependence of the polarization is complex and varies with effective temperature and gravity due to changes in line blanketing. The BLP amplitudes depend strongly on field strength, blanketing, and magnetic region filling factor and geometry. We make rough estimates of the maximum BLP for stars of various spectral types and demonstrate a method for deriving a lower limit to the filling factor from the maximum observed BLP. This lower limit is related to the fractional area covered by the spatially asymmetric component of magnetic regions.

  8. Neutrinos from SN 1987A - Implications for cooling of the nascent neutron star and the mass of the electron antineutrino

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loredo, Thomas J.; Lamb, Don Q.

    1989-01-01

    Data on neutrinos from SN 1987A are compared here with parameterized models of the neutrino emission using a consistent and straightforward statistical methodology. The empirically measured detector background spectra are included in the analysis, and the data are compared with a much wider variety of neutrino emission models than was explored previously. It is shown that the inferred neutrino emission model parameters are strongly correlated. The analysis confirms that simple models of the neutrino cooling of the nascent neutron star formed by the SN adequately explain the data. The inferred radius and binding energy of the neutron star are in excellent agreement with model calculations based on a wide range of equations of state. The results also raise the upper limit of the electron antineutrino rest mass to roughly 25 eV at the 95 percent confidence level, roughly 1.5-5 times higher than found previously.

  9. Trumpeting M dwarfs with CONCH-SHELL: a catalogue of nearby cool host-stars for habitable exoplanets and life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidos, E.; Mann, A. W.; Lépine, S.; Buccino, A.; James, D.; Ansdell, M.; Petrucci, R.; Mauas, P.; Hilton, E. J.

    2014-09-01

    We present an all-sky catalogue of 2970 nearby (d ≲ 50 pc), bright (J < 9) M- or late K-type dwarf stars, 86 per cent of which have been confirmed by spectroscopy. This catalogue will be useful for searches for Earth-size and possibly Earth-like planets by future space-based transit missions and ground-based infrared Doppler radial velocity surveys. Stars were selected from the SUPERBLINK proper motion catalogue according to absolute magnitudes, spectra, or a combination of reduced proper motions and photometric colours. From our spectra, we determined gravity-sensitive indices, and identified and removed 0.2 per cent of these as interloping hotter or evolved stars. 13 per cent of the stars exhibit Hα emission, an indication of stellar magnetic activity and possible youth. The mean metallicity is [Fe/H] = -0.07 with a standard deviation of 0.22 dex, similar to nearby solar-type stars. We determined stellar effective temperatures by least-squares fitting of spectra to model predictions calibrated by fits to stars with established bolometric temperatures, and estimated radii, luminosities, and masses using empirical relations. Six per cent of stars with images from integral field spectra are resolved doubles. We inferred the planet population around M dwarfs using Kepler data and applied this to our catalogue to predict detections by future exoplanet surveys.

  10. The Suppression of Star Formation by Powerful Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, E.

    2012-01-01

    The old, red stars that constitute the bulges of galaxies, and the massive black holes at their centres, are the relics of a period in cosmic history when galaxies formed stars at remarkable rates and active galactic nuclei (AGN) shone brightly as a result of accretion onto black holes. It is widely suspected, but unproved, that the tight corre1ation between the mass of the black hole and the mas. of the stellar bulge results from the AGN quenching the surrounding star formation as it approaches its peak luminosity. X-rays trace emission from AGN unambiguously, whereas powerful star-forming ga1axies are usually dust-obscured and are brightest at infrared and submillimeter wavelengths. Here we report submillimetre and X-ray observations that show that rapid star formation was common in the host galaxies of AGN when the Universe was 2-6 billion years old, but that the most vigorous star formation is not observed around black holes above an X-ray luminosity of 10(exp 44) ergs per second. This suppression of star formation in the host galaxy of a powerful AGN is a key prediction of models in which the AGN drives an outflow, expe11ing the interstellar medium of its host and transforming the galaxy's properties in a brief period of cosmic time.

  11. The suppression of star formation by powerful active galactic nuclei.

    PubMed

    Page, M J; Symeonidis, M; Vieira, J D; Altieri, B; Amblard, A; Arumugam, V; Aussel, H; Babbedge, T; Blain, A; Bock, J; Boselli, A; Buat, V; Castro-Rodríguez, N; Cava, A; Chanial, P; Clements, D L; Conley, A; Conversi, L; Cooray, A; Dowell, C D; Dubois, E N; Dunlop, J S; Dwek, E; Dye, S; Eales, S; Elbaz, D; Farrah, D; Fox, M; Franceschini, A; Gear, W; Glenn, J; Griffin, M; Halpern, M; Hatziminaoglou, E; Ibar, E; Isaak, K; Ivison, R J; Lagache, G; Levenson, L; Lu, N; Madden, S; Maffei, B; Mainetti, G; Marchetti, L; Nguyen, H T; O'Halloran, B; Oliver, S J; Omont, A; Panuzzo, P; Papageorgiou, A; Pearson, C P; Pérez-Fournon, I; Pohlen, M; Rawlings, J I; Rigopoulou, D; Riguccini, L; Rizzo, D; Rodighiero, G; Roseboom, I G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Sánchez Portal, M; Schulz, B; Scott, D; Seymour, N; Shupe, D L; Smith, A J; Stevens, J A; Trichas, M; Tugwell, K E; Vaccari, M; Valtchanov, I; Viero, M; Vigroux, L; Wang, L; Ward, R; Wright, G; Xu, C K; Zemcov, M

    2012-05-10

    The old, red stars that constitute the bulges of galaxies, and the massive black holes at their centres, are the relics of a period in cosmic history when galaxies formed stars at remarkable rates and active galactic nuclei (AGN) shone brightly as a result of accretion onto black holes. It is widely suspected, but unproved, that the tight correlation between the mass of the black hole and the mass of the stellar bulge results from the AGN quenching the surrounding star formation as it approaches its peak luminosity. X-rays trace emission from AGN unambiguously, whereas powerful star-forming galaxies are usually dust-obscured and are brightest at infrared and submillimetre wavelengths. Here we report submillimetre and X-ray observations that show that rapid star formation was common in the host galaxies of AGN when the Universe was 2-6 billion years old, but that the most vigorous star formation is not observed around black holes above an X-ray luminosity of 10(44) ergs per second. This suppression of star formation in the host galaxy of a powerful AGN is a key prediction of models in which the AGN drives an outflow, expelling the interstellar medium of its host and transforming the galaxy's properties in a brief period of cosmic time. PMID:22575961

  12. Characterization of AN Actively Cooled Metal Foil Thermal Radiation Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feller, J. R.; Kashani, A.; Helvensteijn, B. P. M.; Salerno, L. J.

    2010-04-01

    Zero boil-off (ZBO) or reduced boil-off (RBO) systems that involve active cooling of large cryogenic propellant tanks will most likely be required for future space exploration missions. For liquid oxygen or methane, such systems could be implemented using existing high technology readiness level (TRL) cryocoolers. However, for liquid hydrogen temperatures (˜20 K) no such coolers exist. In order to partially circumvent this technology gap, the concept of broad area cooling (BAC) has been developed, whereby a low mass thermal radiation shield could be maintained at temperatures around 100 K by steady circulation of cold pressurized gas through a network of narrow tubes. By this method it is possible to dramatically reduce the radiative heat leak to the 20 K tank. A series of experiments, designed to investigate the heat transfer capabilities of BAC systems, have been conducted at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). Results of the final experiment in this series, investigating heat transfer from a metal foil film to a distributed cooling line, are presented here.

  13. CHARACTERIZATION OF AN ACTIVELY COOLED METAL FOIL THERMAL RADIATION SHIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Feller, J. R.; Salerno, L. J.; Kashani, A.; Helvensteijn, B. P. M.

    2010-04-09

    Zero boil-off (ZBO) or reduced boil-off (RBO) systems that involve active cooling of large cryogenic propellant tanks will most likely be required for future space exploration missions. For liquid oxygen or methane, such systems could be implemented using existing high technology readiness level (TRL) cryocoolers. However, for liquid hydrogen temperatures (approx20 K) no such coolers exist. In order to partially circumvent this technology gap, the concept of broad area cooling (BAC) has been developed, whereby a low mass thermal radiation shield could be maintained at temperatures around 100 K by steady circulation of cold pressurized gas through a network of narrow tubes. By this method it is possible to dramatically reduce the radiative heat leak to the 20 K tank. A series of experiments, designed to investigate the heat transfer capabilities of BAC systems, have been conducted at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). Results of the final experiment in this series, investigating heat transfer from a metal foil film to a distributed cooling line, are presented here.

  14. Equation of state constraints for the cold dense matter inside neutron stars using the cooling tail method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nättilä, J.; Steiner, A. W.; Kajava, J. J. E.; Suleimanov, V. F.; Poutanen, J.

    2016-06-01

    The cooling phase of thermonuclear (type-I) X-ray bursts can be used to constrain neutron star (NS) compactness by comparing the observed cooling tracks of bursts to accurate theoretical atmosphere model calculations. By applying the so-called cooling tail method, where the information from the whole cooling track is used, we constrain the mass, radius, and distance for three different NSs in low-mass X-ray binaries 4U 1702-429, 4U 1724-307, and SAX J1810.8-260. Care is taken to use only the hard state bursts where it is thought that the NS surface alone is emitting. We then use a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm within a Bayesian framework to obtain a parameterized equation of state (EoS) of cold dense matter from our initial mass and radius constraints. This allows us to set limits on various nuclear parameters and to constrain an empirical pressure-density relationship for the dense matter. Our predicted EoS results in NS a radius between 10.5-12.8 km (95% confidence limits) for a mass of 1.4 M⊙, depending slightly on the assumed composition. Because of systematic errors and uncertainty in the composition, these results should be interpreted as lower limits for the radius.

  15. Signatures of cool gas fueling a star-forming galaxy at redshift 2.3.

    PubMed

    Bouché, N; Murphy, M T; Kacprzak, G G; Péroux, C; Contini, T; Martin, C L; Dessauges-Zavadsky, M

    2013-07-01

    Galaxies are thought to be fed by the continuous accretion of intergalactic gas, but direct observational evidence has been elusive. The accreted gas is expected to orbit about the galaxy's halo, delivering not just fuel for star formation but also angular momentum to the galaxy, leading to distinct kinematic signatures. We report observations showing these distinct signatures near a typical distant star-forming galaxy, where the gas is detected using a background quasar passing 26 kiloparsecs from the host. Our observations indicate that gas accretion plays a major role in galaxy growth because the estimated accretion rate is comparable to the star-formation rate. PMID:23828935

  16. No Sun-like dynamo on the active star ζ Andromedae from starspot asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roettenbacher, R. M.; Monnier, J. D.; Korhonen, H.; Aarnio, A. N.; Baron, F.; Che, X.; Harmon, R. O.; Kővári, Zs.; Kraus, S.; Schaefer, G. H.; Torres, G.; Zhao, M.; Ten Brummelaar, T. A.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.

    2016-05-01

    Sunspots are cool areas caused by strong surface magnetic fields that inhibit convection. Moreover, strong magnetic fields can alter the average atmospheric structure, degrading our ability to measure stellar masses and ages. Stars that are more active than the Sun have more and stronger dark spots than does the Sun, including on the rotational pole. Doppler imaging, which has so far produced the most detailed images of surface structures on other stars, cannot always distinguish the hemisphere in which the starspots are located, especially in the equatorial region and if the data quality is not optimal. This leads to problems in investigating the north–south distribution of starspot active latitudes (those latitudes with more starspot activity); this distribution is a crucial constraint of dynamo theory. Polar spots, whose existence is inferred from Doppler tomography, could plausibly be observational artefacts. Here we report imaging of the old, magnetically active star ζ Andromedae using long-baseline infrared interferometry. In our data, a dark polar spot is seen in each of two observation epochs, whereas lower-latitude spot structures in both hemispheres do not persist between observations, revealing global starspot asymmetries. The north–south symmetry of active latitudes observed on the Sun is absent on ζ And, which hosts global spot patterns that cannot be produced by solar-type dynamos.

  17. No Sun-like dynamo on the active star ζ Andromedae from starspot asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Roettenbacher, R M; Monnier, J D; Korhonen, H; Aarnio, A N; Baron, F; Che, X; Harmon, R O; Kővári, Zs; Kraus, S; Schaefer, G H; Torres, G; Zhao, M; ten Brummelaar, T A; Sturmann, J; Sturmann, L

    2016-05-12

    Sunspots are cool areas caused by strong surface magnetic fields that inhibit convection. Moreover, strong magnetic fields can alter the average atmospheric structure, degrading our ability to measure stellar masses and ages. Stars that are more active than the Sun have more and stronger dark spots than does the Sun, including on the rotational pole. Doppler imaging, which has so far produced the most detailed images of surface structures on other stars, cannot always distinguish the hemisphere in which the starspots are located, especially in the equatorial region and if the data quality is not optimal. This leads to problems in investigating the north-south distribution of starspot active latitudes (those latitudes with more starspot activity); this distribution is a crucial constraint of dynamo theory. Polar spots, whose existence is inferred from Doppler tomography, could plausibly be observational artefacts. Here we report imaging of the old, magnetically active star ζ Andromedae using long-baseline infrared interferometry. In our data, a dark polar spot is seen in each of two observation epochs, whereas lower-latitude spot structures in both hemispheres do not persist between observations, revealing global starspot asymmetries. The north-south symmetry of active latitudes observed on the Sun is absent on ζ And, which hosts global spot patterns that cannot be produced by solar-type dynamos. PMID:27144357

  18. The Star Formation Activity in the Shapley Supercluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, P.-L.; Chen, L.-W.

    2013-10-01

    The Shapley supercluster (SSC) is the densest region in the local universe (z < 0.1)(Zucca et al. 1993), it hosts a wide variety of environments from massive clusters to filamentary structure. A total of 81 clusters and groups are identified in this region. In this study, a sample of 208 star-forming galaxies (SFGs) are used to study the effects of local galaxy density and cluster dynamic state on galaxy star formation activity. Our results show that the SFG fraction is highly suppressed in denser regions, for early type SFGs, they especially prefer the low density regions. As for the star formation activity in clusters/groups environment, higher SFG fractions are only detected in clusters/groups with velocity dispersion lower than ˜400 km sec-1, no matter the clusters/groups show merging evidence or not. These results may imply that the gas supply for star formation activity in denser and richer cluster/group regions has been removed by some cluster-specific processes, such as strangulation, ram pressure stripping and harassment, and thus the star formation activity is reduced.

  19. Stellar activity as noise in exoplanet detection - I. Methods and application to solar-like stars and activity cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, H.; Andersen, J. M.; Piskunov, N.; Hackman, T.; Juncher, D.; Järvinen, S. P.; Jørgensen, U. G.

    2015-04-01

    The detection of exoplanets using any method is prone to confusion due to the intrinsic variability of the host star. We investigate the effect of cool starspots on the detectability of the exoplanets around solar-like stars using the radial velocity method. For investigating this activity-caused `jitter' we calculate synthetic spectra using radiative transfer, known stellar atomic and molecular lines, different surface spot configurations and an added planetary signal. Here, the methods are described in detail, tested and compared to previously published studies. The methods are also applied to investigate the activity jitter in old and young solar-like stars, and over a solar-like activity cycles. We find that the mean full jitter amplitude obtained from the spot surfaces mimicking the solar activity varies during the cycle approximately between 1 and 9 m s-1. With a realistic observing frequency a Neptune-mass planet on a 1-yr orbit can be reliably recovered. On the other hand, the recovery of an Earth-mass planet on a similar orbit is not feasible with high significance. The methods developed in this study have a great potential for doing statistical studies of planet detectability, and also for investigating the effect of stellar activity on recovered planetary parameters.

  20. Wide cool and ultracool companions to nearby stars from Pan-STARRS 1

    SciTech Connect

    Deacon, Niall R.; Liu, Michael C.; Magnier, Eugene A.; Aller, Kimberly M.; Best, William M. J.; Bowler, Brendan P.; Burgett, William S.; Chambers, Kenneth C.; Flewelling, H.; Kaiser, Nick; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Morgan, Jeff S.; Tonry, John L.; Dupuy, Trent; Mann, Andrew W.; Redstone, Joshua A.; Draper, Peter W.; Metcalfe, Nigel; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Price, Paul A.; and others

    2014-09-10

    We present the discovery of 57 wide (>5'') separation, low-mass (stellar and substellar) companions to stars in the solar neighborhood identified from Pan-STARRS 1 (PS1) data and the spectral classification of 31 previously known companions. Our companions represent a selective subsample of promising candidates and span a range in spectral type of K7-L9 with the addition of one DA white dwarf. These were identified primarily from a dedicated common proper motion search around nearby stars, along with a few as serendipitous discoveries from our Pan-STARRS 1 brown dwarf search. Our discoveries include 23 new L dwarf companions and one known L dwarf not previously identified as a companion. The primary stars around which we searched for companions come from a list of bright stars with well-measured parallaxes and large proper motions from the Hipparcos catalog (8583 stars, mostly A-K dwarfs) and fainter stars from other proper motion catalogs (79170 stars, mostly M dwarfs). We examine the likelihood that our companions are chance alignments between unrelated stars and conclude that this is unlikely for the majority of the objects that we have followed-up spectroscopically. We also examine the entire population of ultracool (>M7) dwarf companions and conclude that while some are loosely bound, most are unlikely to be disrupted over the course of ∼10 Gyr. Our search increases the number of ultracool M dwarf companions wider than 300 AU by 88% and increases the number of L dwarf companions in the same separation range by 82%. Finally, we resolve our new L dwarf companion to HIP 6407 into a tight (0.''13, 7.4 AU) L1+T3 binary, making the system a hierarchical triple. Our search for these key benchmarks against which brown dwarf and exoplanet atmosphere models are tested has yielded the largest number of discoveries to date.

  1. Protoneutron star cooling with convection: the effect of the symmetry energy.

    PubMed

    Roberts, L F; Shen, G; Cirigliano, V; Pons, J A; Reddy, S; Woosley, S E

    2012-02-10

    We model neutrino emission from a newly born neutron star subsequent to a supernova explosion to study its sensitivity to the equation of state, neutrino opacities, and convective instabilities at high baryon density. We find the time period and spatial extent over which convection operates is sensitive to the behavior of the nuclear symmetry energy at and above nuclear density. When convection ends within the protoneutron star, there is a break in the predicted neutrino emission that may be clearly observable. PMID:22401050

  2. Wide Cool and Ultracool Companions to Nearby Stars from Pan-STARRS 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deacon, Niall R.; Liu, Michael C.; Magnier, Eugene A.; Aller, Kimberly M.; Best, William M. J.; Dupuy, Trent; Bowler, Brendan P.; Mann, Andrew W.; Redstone, Joshua A.; Burgett, William S.; Chambers, Kenneth C.; Draper, Peter W.; Flewelling, H.; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Kaiser, Nick; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Morgan, Jeff S.; Metcalfe, Nigel; Price, Paul A.; Tonry, John L.; Wainscoat, Richard J.

    2014-09-01

    We present the discovery of 57 wide (>5'') separation, low-mass (stellar and substellar) companions to stars in the solar neighborhood identified from Pan-STARRS 1 (PS1) data and the spectral classification of 31 previously known companions. Our companions represent a selective subsample of promising candidates and span a range in spectral type of K7-L9 with the addition of one DA white dwarf. These were identified primarily from a dedicated common proper motion search around nearby stars, along with a few as serendipitous discoveries from our Pan-STARRS 1 brown dwarf search. Our discoveries include 23 new L dwarf companions and one known L dwarf not previously identified as a companion. The primary stars around which we searched for companions come from a list of bright stars with well-measured parallaxes and large proper motions from the Hipparcos catalog (8583 stars, mostly A-K dwarfs) and fainter stars from other proper motion catalogs (79170 stars, mostly M dwarfs). We examine the likelihood that our companions are chance alignments between unrelated stars and conclude that this is unlikely for the majority of the objects that we have followed-up spectroscopically. We also examine the entire population of ultracool (>M7) dwarf companions and conclude that while some are loosely bound, most are unlikely to be disrupted over the course of ~10 Gyr. Our search increases the number of ultracool M dwarf companions wider than 300 AU by 88% and increases the number of L dwarf companions in the same separation range by 82%. Finally, we resolve our new L dwarf companion to HIP 6407 into a tight (0.''13, 7.4 AU) L1+T3 binary, making the system a hierarchical triple. Our search for these key benchmarks against which brown dwarf and exoplanet atmosphere models are tested has yielded the largest number of discoveries to date.

  3. MyGIsFOS: an automated code for parameter determination and detailed abundance analysis in cool stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sbordone, L.; Caffau, E.; Bonifacio, P.; Duffau, S.

    2014-04-01

    Context. The current and planned high-resolution, high-multiplexity stellar spectroscopic surveys, as well as the swelling amount of underutilized data present in public archives, have led to an increasing number of efforts to automate the crucial but slow process of retrieving stellar parameters and chemical abundances from spectra. Aims: We present MyGIsFOS1, a code designed to derive atmospheric parameters and detailed stellar abundances from medium- to high-resolution spectra of cool (FGK) stars. We describe the general structure and workings of the code, present analyses of a number of well-studied stars representative of the parameter space MyGIsFOS is designed to cover, and give examples of the exploitation of MyGIsFOS very fast analysis to assess uncertainties through Monte Carlo tests. Methods: MyGIsFOS aims to reproduce a "traditional" manual analysis by fitting spectral features for different elements against a precomputed grid of synthetic spectra. The lines of Fe i and Fe ii can be employed to determine temperature, gravity, microturbulence, and metallicity by iteratively minimizing the dependence of Fe i abundance from line lower energy and equivalent width, and imposing Fe i-Fe ii ionization equilibrium. Once parameters are retrieved, detailed chemical abundances are measured from lines of other elements. Results: MyGIsFOS replicates closely the results obtained in similar analyses on a set of well-known stars. It is also quite fast, performing a full parameter determination and detailed abundance analysis in about two minutes per star on a mainstream desktop computer. Currently, its preferred field of application are high-resolution and/or large spectral coverage data (e.g., UVES, X-shooter, HARPS, Sophie). My God It's Full Of Stars, http://mygisfos.obspm.fr

  4. AN ULTRAVIOLET INVESTIGATION OF ACTIVITY ON EXOPLANET HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L.

    2013-03-20

    Using the far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) photometry from the NASA Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), we searched for evidence of increased stellar activity due to tidal and/or magnetic star-planet interactions (SPI) in the 272 known FGK planetary hosts observed by GALEX. With the increased sensitivity of GALEX, we are able probe systems with lower activity levels and at larger distances than what has been done to date with X-ray satellites. We compared samples of stars with close-in planets (a < 0.1 AU) to those with far-out planets (a > 0.5 AU) and looked for correlations of excess activity with other system parameters. This statistical investigation found no clear correlations with a, M{sub p} , or M{sub p} /a, in contrast to some X-ray and Ca II studies. However, there is tentative evidence (at a level of 1.8{sigma}) that stars with radial-velocity-(RV)-detected close-in planets are more FUV-active than stars with far-out planets, in agreement with several published X-ray and Ca II results. The case is strengthened to a level of significance to 2.3{sigma} when transit-detected close-in planets are included. This is most likely because the RV-selected sample of stars is significantly less active than the field population of comparable stars, while the transit-selected sample is similarly active. Given the factor of 2-3 scatter in fractional FUV luminosity for a given stellar effective temperature, it is necessary to conduct a time-resolved study of the planet hosts in order to better characterize their UV variability and generate a firmer statistical result.

  5. A survey of stellar X-ray flares from the XMM-Newton serendipitous source catalogue: HIPPARCOS-Tycho cool stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pye, J. P.; Rosen, S.; Fyfe, D.; Schröder, A. C.

    2015-09-01

    Context. The X-ray emission from flares on cool (i.e. spectral-type F-M) stars is indicative of very energetic, transient phenomena, associated with energy release via magnetic reconnection. Aims: We present a uniform, large-scale survey of X-ray flare emission. The XMM-Newton Serendipitous Source Catalogue and its associated data products provide an excellent basis for a comprehensive and sensitive survey of stellar flares - both from targeted active stars and from those observed serendipitously in the half-degree diameter field-of-view of each observation. Methods: The 2XMM Catalogue and the associated time-series ("light-curve") data products have been used as the basis for a survey of X-ray flares from cool stars in the Hipparcos-Tycho-2 catalogue. In addition, we have generated and analysed spectrally-resolved (i.e. hardness-ratio), X-ray light-curves. Where available, we have compared XMM OM UV/optical data with the X-ray light-curves. Results: Our sample contains ~130 flares with well-observed profiles; they originate from ~70 stars. The flares range in duration from ~103 to ~104 s, have peak X-ray fluxes from ~10-13 to ~10-11erg cm-2 s-1, peak X-ray luminosities from ~1029 to ~1032erg s-1, and X-ray energy output from ~1032 to ~1035 erg. Most of the ~30 serendipitously-observed stars have little previously reported information. The hardness-ratio plots clearly illustrate the spectral (and hence inferred temperature) variations characteristic of many flares, and provide an easily accessible overview of the data. We present flare frequency distributions from both target and serendipitous observations. The latter provide an unbiased (with respect to stellar activity) study of flare energetics; in addition, they allow us to predict numbers of stellar flares that may be detected in future X-ray wide-field surveys. The serendipitous sample demonstrates the need for care when calculating flaring rates, especially when normalising the number of flares to a total

  6. The Morphology and Star Formation Distribution in a Big Cool Spiral LIRG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigby, Jane

    2013-10-01

    Evidence from both the SEDs and morphologies of vigorous starbursts at z 1 compared to local templates shows that the mode of star formation in these galaxies is distinctly different in the past compared to the present day. Locally these objects {luminous infrared galaxies - LIRGs} show compact nuclear star forming regions with hot dusty SEDs; distant objects of similar luminosity appear much cooler and show signs of star formation over much larger regions. At z 1 these galaxies dominate the star formation rate density; they are where most stars are being formed, and so studying these sources is critical to understanding the overall picture of galaxy evolution. In a recent paper we detail the discovery of SGAS1438+1454, a lensed LIRG at z=0.816 that allows us to confirm this evolution of the mode of star formation in distant LIRGS in unprecedented detail. The lensed galaxy is a typical z 1 LIRG. With imaging data from g-band to 500 microns, and both optical and near-IR spectra in hand, we now seek to cap these extensive observations with a modest 3 orbit observation with HST. From the proposed data we will confirm the morphology and exent of the source with multi-band imaging, and directly measure the detailed distribution of star formation with an H-alpha grism observation. Extensive work shows that z 1 LIRGS are very different than today; with this lensed {but otherwise typical} LIRG and HST we will begin to illuminate how and why this difference exists.

  7. The WFCAM Transit Survey: A Search for Rocky Planets Around Cool Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkby, J.; Hodgkin, S.; Pinfield, D.; WTS Consortium

    2011-12-01

    We report on the WFCAM Transit Survey which is a near-infrared photometric monitoring campaign designed primarily to test the predictions of planet formation theory. We monitor a statisically significant sample of ˜6,000 M-dwarfs (M<0.6M⊙) across 6 sq. deg of the sky, by taking advantage of the highly-efficient queue-scheduled operational mode of the 3.8m United Kingdom Infrared Telescope. Our light curves have RMS < 1% between 13 < J < 16 magnitudes and preliminary simulations indicate the survey is sensitive to at least Jupiter-like transits of M-dwarfs. The survey is approximately 25% complete and within this dataset we find i) no planet-like transit events, despite thorough and extensive follow-up this summer and ii) 32 new M-dwarf eclipsing binaries. We do not speculate on the planet fraction of M-dwarfs at this incomplete stage of our survey, but once we achieve 1,000 epochs of observation on our entire M-dwarf sample, we will have a significant observational constraint to place on occurrence of planets around M-dwarfs. We report masses and radii for three of our newly discovered eclipsing binary, with errors of 3-7%, which all show inflated radii when compared to stellar evolution models (e.g. Baraffe et al. (1998)). Our results support the growing body of observations with inflated M-dwarf radii, which may be caused by increased magnetic activity inhibiting the convection efficiency or increased star spot coverage (e.g. Chabrier et al. (2007); Jackson et al. (2009)). Finally, we present preliminary mass and radius estimates of a fourth new eclipsing binary, which is one of the lowest mass binary systems ever discovered and will provide a calibrating point in the desert of observations between 0.1-0.2M⊙.

  8. The symbiotic star TX CVn has entered an active state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munari, U.; Castellani, F.; Valisa, P.; Dallaporta, S.; Cherini, G.; Vagnozzi, A.; Righetti, G. L.; Belligoli, R.

    2014-01-01

    After the last active phase that begun in 2003, the symbiotic star TX CVn has now entered a new active phase. In 2003, TX CVn rose to B=10.5 and there it remained until the end of 2007 (Skopal 2007, AN 328, 909), when we started monitoring the variable with various ANS Collaboration telescopes in BVRI bands. Our observations show that the star has spent the following 6 years on a steady decline at a rate of 0.084 mag per year in the B band, that took it from B=10.55 on December 2007 to B=11.02 on September 2013, when the star begun a rapid brightening, reaching B=10.65 by early December 2013.

  9. The role of mitochondrial fusion and StAR phosphorylation in the regulation of StAR activity and steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Ana F; Orlando, Ulises; Helfenberger, Katia E; Poderoso, Cecilia; Podesta, Ernesto J

    2015-06-15

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein regulates the rate-limiting step in steroidogenesis, i.e. the delivery of cholesterol from the outer (OMM) to the inner (IMM) mitochondrial membrane. StAR is a 37-kDa protein with an N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence that is cleaved off during mitochondrial import to yield 30-kDa intramitochondrial StAR. StAR acts exclusively on the OMM and its activity is proportional to how long it remains on the OMM. However, the precise fashion and the molecular mechanism in which StAR remains on the OMM have not been elucidated yet. In this work we will discuss the role of mitochondrial fusion and StAR phosphorylation by the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) as part of the mechanism that regulates StAR retention on the OMM and activity. PMID:25540920

  10. A cool stellar companion to the δ Scuti variable star GW UMa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.-M.; Qian, S.-B.; Li, L.-J.; Zhu, L.-Y.; Zhao, E.-G.; Zhou, X.

    2015-01-01

    GW UMa is a new high-amplitude δ Scuti variable star with a period of 0d.20319367. By using a few new determined times of light maximum together with those collected from the literature, the changes in Observed-Calculated (O-C) diagram were analyzed. It is discovered that the O-C curve of GW UMa shows a cyclic variation with a period of 13.2 years and a semi-amplitude of 0.0023 days. The periodic variation was analyzed for the light-travel time effect that may be due to the presence of a stellar companion. The mass of the stellar companion is determined to be M2 sin i=0.11(±0.01)M⊙ when a mass of 1.76 M⊙ for GW UMa is adopted. The two component stars in the binary system are orbiting each other at an orbital separation about 6.5(±0.8) AU. For orbital inclinations i⩾22.6°, the mass of the companion star would be M2<0.3M⊙ and it is a fully convective star. The detection suggests that hidden stellar companions to bright stars may be not unusual.

  11. A NEW APPROACH TO DETERMINE OPTICALLY THICK H{sub 2} COOLING AND ITS EFFECT ON PRIMORDIAL STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwig, Tilman; Clark, Paul C.; Glover, Simon C. O.; Klessen, Ralf S.; Sasaki, Mei E-mail: p.clark@uni-heidelberg.de E-mail: klessen@uni-heidelberg.de

    2015-02-01

    We present a new method for estimating the H{sub 2} cooling rate in the optically thick regime in simulations of primordial star formation. Our new approach is based on the TreeCol algorithm, which projects matter distributions onto a spherical grid to create maps of column densities for each fluid element in the computational domain. We have improved this algorithm by using the relative gas velocities to weight the individual matter contributions with the relative spectral line overlaps, in order to properly account for the Doppler effect. We compare our new method to the widely used Sobolev approximation, which yields an estimate for the column density based on the local velocity gradient and the thermal velocity. This approach generally underestimates the photon escape probability because it neglects the density gradient and the actual shape of the cloud. We present a correction factor for the true line overlap in the Sobolev approximation and a new method based on local quantities, which fits the exact results reasonably well during the collapse of the cloud, with the error in the cooling rates always being less than 10%. Analytical fitting formulae fail at determining the photon escape probability after formation of the first protostar (error of ∼40%) because they are based on the assumption of spherical symmetry and therefore break down once a protostellar accretion disk has formed. Our method yields lower temperatures and hence promotes fragmentation for densities above ∼10{sup 10} cm{sup –3} at a distance of ∼200 AU from the first protostar. Since the overall accretion rates are hardly affected by the cooling implementation, we expect Pop III stars to have lower masses in our simulations, compared to the results of previous simulations that used the Sobolev approximation.

  12. A New Approach to Determine Optically Thick H2 Cooling and its Effect on Primordial Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, Tilman; Clark, Paul C.; Glover, Simon C. O.; Klessen, Ralf S.; Sasaki, Mei

    2015-02-01

    We present a new method for estimating the H2 cooling rate in the optically thick regime in simulations of primordial star formation. Our new approach is based on the TreeCol algorithm, which projects matter distributions onto a spherical grid to create maps of column densities for each fluid element in the computational domain. We have improved this algorithm by using the relative gas velocities to weight the individual matter contributions with the relative spectral line overlaps, in order to properly account for the Doppler effect. We compare our new method to the widely used Sobolev approximation, which yields an estimate for the column density based on the local velocity gradient and the thermal velocity. This approach generally underestimates the photon escape probability because it neglects the density gradient and the actual shape of the cloud. We present a correction factor for the true line overlap in the Sobolev approximation and a new method based on local quantities, which fits the exact results reasonably well during the collapse of the cloud, with the error in the cooling rates always being less than 10%. Analytical fitting formulae fail at determining the photon escape probability after formation of the first protostar (error of ~40%) because they are based on the assumption of spherical symmetry and therefore break down once a protostellar accretion disk has formed. Our method yields lower temperatures and hence promotes fragmentation for densities above ~1010 cm-3 at a distance of ~200 AU from the first protostar. Since the overall accretion rates are hardly affected by the cooling implementation, we expect Pop III stars to have lower masses in our simulations, compared to the results of previous simulations that used the Sobolev approximation.

  13. An Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of a cool star.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Elisa V; Barclay, Thomas; Raymond, Sean N; Rowe, Jason F; Bolmont, Emeline; Caldwell, Douglas A; Howell, Steve B; Kane, Stephen R; Huber, Daniel; Crepp, Justin R; Lissauer, Jack J; Ciardi, David R; Coughlin, Jeffrey L; Everett, Mark E; Henze, Christopher E; Horch, Elliott; Isaacson, Howard; Ford, Eric B; Adams, Fred C; Still, Martin; Hunter, Roger C; Quarles, Billy; Selsis, Franck

    2014-04-18

    The quest for Earth-like planets is a major focus of current exoplanet research. Although planets that are Earth-sized and smaller have been detected, these planets reside in orbits that are too close to their host star to allow liquid water on their surfaces. We present the detection of Kepler-186f, a 1.11 ± 0.14 Earth-radius planet that is the outermost of five planets, all roughly Earth-sized, that transit a 0.47 ± 0.05 solar-radius star. The intensity and spectrum of the star's radiation place Kepler-186f in the stellar habitable zone, implying that if Kepler-186f has an Earth-like atmosphere and water at its surface, then some of this water is likely to be in liquid form. PMID:24744370

  14. Stellar Winda: Observational Evidence for a Hot-cool Star Connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldron, W. L.

    1985-01-01

    Stellar wind data was collected for a total of 272 stars representing all spectral types including Wolf-Rayet stars. Two significant correlations are found relating the wind luminosity (L sub w = 1/2 MV sub infinity squared) to the bolometric luminosity and the terminal velocity of the stellar wind to the stellar effective temperature. Least-squared fits to the data suggest that the wind luminosity is approximately the bolometric luminosity squared and the terminal velocity is approximately the effective temperature to the 1.8 power. The surprising result is that all spectral types throughout the HR diagram are represented in these correlations.

  15. Fluid flow and heat convection studies for actively cooled airframes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, A. F.

    1993-01-01

    This report details progress made on the jet impingement - liquid crystal - digital imaging experiment. With the design phase complete, the experiment is currently in the construction phase. In order to reach this phase two design related issues were resolved. The first issue was to determine NASP leading edge active cooling design parameters. Meetings were arranged with personnel at SAIC International, Torrance, CA in order to obtain recent publications that characterized expected leading edge heat fluxes as well as other details of NASP operating conditions. The information in these publications was used to estimate minimum and maximum jet Reynolds numbers needed to accomplish the required leading edge cooling, and to determine the parameters of the experiment. The details of this analysis are shown in Appendix A. One of the concerns for the NASP design is that of thermal stress due to large surface temperature gradients. Using a series of circular jets to cool the leading edge will cause a non-uniform temperature distribution and potentially large thermal stresses. Therefore it was decided to explore the feasibility of using a slot jet to cool the leading edge. The literature contains many investigations into circular jet heat transfer but few investigations of slot jet heat transfer. The first experiments will be done on circular jets impinging on a fiat plate and results compared to previously published data to establish the accuracy of the method. Subsequent experiments will be slot jets impinging on full scale models of the NASP leading edge. Table 1 shows the range of parameters to be explored. Next a preliminary design of the experiment was done. Previous papers which used a similar experimental technique were studied and elements of those experiments adapted to the jet impingement study. Trade-off studies were conducted to determine which design was the least expensive, easy to construct, and easy to use. Once the final design was settled, vendors were

  16. The relation between star formation and active nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieke, G. H.

    1987-01-01

    Three questions relevant to the relation between an active nucleus and surrounding star formation are discussed. The infrared stellar CO absorption bands can be used to identify galaxies with large populations of young, massive stars and thus can identify strong starburst unambiguously, such as in NGC 6240, and can help identify composite active/starburst systems such as Arp 220. An active nucleus is probably not required for LINER spectral characteristics; dusty starburst galaxies, particularly if they are nearly edge-on, can produce LINER spectra through the shock heating of their interstellar media by supernovae combined with the obscuration of their nuclei in the optical. The Galactic Center would be an ideal laboratory for studying the interaction of starbursts and active nuclei, if both could be demonstrated to occur there. Failure to detect a cusp in the stellar distribution raises questions about the presence of an active nucleus, which should be answered by additional observations in the near future.

  17. Activity trends in young solar-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtinen, J.; Jetsu, L.; Hackman, T.; Kajatkari, P.; Henry, G. W.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We study a sample of 21 young and active solar-type stars with spectral types ranging from late F to mid K and characterize the behaviour of their activity. Methods: We apply the continuous period search (CPS) time series analysis method on Johnson B- and V-band photometry of the sample stars, collected over a period of 16 to 27 years. Using the CPS method, we estimate the surface differential rotation and determine the existence and behaviour of active longitudes and activity cycles on the stars. We supplement the time series results by calculating new log R'HK = log F'HK/σTeff4 emission indices for the stars from high resolution spectroscopy. Results: The measurements of the photometric rotation period variations reveal a positive correlation between the relative differential rotation coefficient and the rotation period as k ∝ Prot1.36, but do not reveal any dependence of the differential rotation on the effective temperature of the stars. Secondary period searches reveal activity cycles in 18 of the stars and temporary or persistent active longitudes in 11 of them. The activity cycles fall into specific activity branches when examined in the log Prot/Pcyc vs. log Ro-1, where Ro-1 = 2Ωτc, or log Prot/Pcyc vs. log R'HK diagram. We find a new split into sub-branches within this diagram, indicating multiple simultaneously present cycle modes. Active longitudes appear to be present only on the more active stars. There is a sharp break at approximately log R'HK = -4.46 separating the less active stars with long-term axisymmetric spot distributions from the more active ones with non-axisymmetric configurations. In seven out of eleven of our stars with clearly detected long-term non-axisymmetric spot activity the estimated active longitude periods are significantly shorter than the mean photometric rotation periods. This systematic trend can be interpreted either as a sign of the active longitudes being sustained from a deeper level in the stellar interior

  18. On the determination of oxygen abundances in chromospherically active stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel, T.; Micela, G.

    2004-08-01

    We discuss oxygen abundances derived from [O I] λ6300s and the O I triplet in stars spanning a wide range in chromospheric activity level, and show that these two indicators yield increasingly discrepant results with higher chromospheric/coronal activity measures. While the forbidden and permitted lines give fairly consistent results for solar-type disk dwarfs, spuriously high O I triplet abundances are observed in young Hyades and Pleiades stars, as well as in individual components of RS CVn binaries (up to 1.8 dex). The distinct behaviour of the [O I]-based abundances which consistently remain near-solar suggests that this phenomenon mostly results from large departures from LTE affecting the O I triplet at high activity level that are currently unaccounted for, but also possibly from a failure to adequately model the atmospheres of K-type stars. These results suggest that some caution should be exercised when interpreting oxygen abundances in active binaries or young open cluster stars. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile (Proposals 64.L-0249 and 071.D-0260). Table \\ref{tab_data} is only available in electronic form at http://www.edpsciences.org

  19. Periods of activity cycles in late-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kliorin, N. I.; Ruzmaykin, A. A.; Sokolov, D. D.

    1983-01-01

    The mean magnetic field dynamo theory is utilized to obtain the qualitative dependence of the period of activity on the angular velocity of rotation for stars with sufficiently extensive convective shells. The dependence of the cycle period on the spectral class is also discussed.

  20. Identification of new fluorescence processes in the UV spectra of cool stars from new energy levels of Fe II and Cr II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansson, Sveneric; Carpenter, Kenneth G.

    1988-01-01

    Two fluorescence processes operating in atmospheres of cool stars, symbiotic stars, and the Sun are presented. Two emission lines, at 1347.03 and 1360.17 A, are identified as fluorescence lines of Cr II and Fe II. The lines are due to transitions from highly excited levels, which are populated radiatively by the hydrogen Lyman alpha line due to accidental wavelength coincidences. Three energy levels, one in Cr II and two in Fe II, are reported.

  1. STRONG VARIABLE ULTRAVIOLET EMISSION FROM Y GEM: ACCRETION ACTIVITY IN AN ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STAR WITH A BINARY COMPANION?

    SciTech Connect

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Neill, James D.; Gil de Paz, Armando; Sanchez Contreras, Carmen

    2011-10-20

    Binarity is believed to dramatically affect the history and geometry of mass loss in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and post-AGB stars, but observational evidence of binarity is sorely lacking. As part of a project to look for hot binary companions to cool AGB stars using the Galaxy Evolution Explorer archive, we have discovered a late-M star, Y Gem, to be a source of strong and variable UV emission. Y Gem is a prime example of the success of our technique of UV imaging of AGB stars in order to search for binary companions. Y Gem's large and variable UV flux makes it one of the most prominent examples of a late-AGB star with a mass accreting binary companion. The UV emission is most likely due to emission associated with accretion activity and a disk around a main-sequence companion star. The physical mechanism generating the UV emission is extremely energetic, with an integrated luminosity of a few x L{sub sun} at its peak. We also find weak CO J = 2-1 emission from Y Gem with a very narrow line profile (FWHM of 3.4 km s{sup -1}). Such a narrow line is unlikely to arise in an outflow and is consistent with emission from an orbiting, molecular reservoir of radius 300 AU. Y Gem may be the progenitor of the class of post-AGB stars which are binaries and possess disks but no outflows.

  2. Modeling the winds and magnetospheres of active OB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Richard H. D.

    2011-07-01

    After briefly reviewing the theory behind the radiative line-driven winds of OB stars, I examine the processes that can generate structure in them; these include both intrinsic instabilities, and surface perturbations such as pulsation and rotation. I then delve into wind channeling and confinement by magnetic fields as a mechanism for forming longer-lived circumstellar structures. With a narrative that largely follows the historical progression of the field, I introduce the key insights and results that link the first detection of a magnetosphere, over three decades ago, to the recent direct measurement of magnetic braking in a number of active OB stars.

  3. Thermal instabilities in cooling galactic coronae: fuelling star formation in galactic discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Alexander; Read, Justin; Power, Chris; Cole, David

    2013-09-01

    We investigate the means by which cold gas can accrete on to Milky Way mass galaxies from a hot corona of gas, using a new smoothed particle hydrodynamics code, `SPHS'. We find that the `cold clumps' seen in many classic SPH simulations in the literature are not present in our SPHS simulations. Instead, cold gas condenses from the halo along filaments that form at the intersection of supernovae-driven bubbles from previous phases of star formation. This positive feedback feeds cold gas to the galactic disc directly, fuelling further star formation. The resulting galaxies in the SPH and SPHS simulations differ greatly in their morphology, gas phase diagrams and stellar content. We show that the classic SPH cold clumps owe to a numerical thermal instability caused by an inability for cold gas to mix in the hot halo. The improved treatment of mixing in SPHS suppresses this instability leading to a dramatically different physical outcome. In our highest resolution SPHS simulation, we find that the cold filaments break up into bound, physically motivated clumps that form stars. The filaments are overdense by a factor of 10-100 compared to the surrounding gas, suggesting that the fragmentation results from a physical non-linear instability driven by the overdensity. This `fragmenting filament' mode of disc growth has important implications for galaxy formation, in particular the role of star formation in bringing cold gas into disc galaxies.

  4. Photometric study of the active binary star V1430 Aquilae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, A.; Sürgit, D.

    2006-05-01

    New BVR light curves and a photometric analysis of the eclipsing binary star V1430 Aql are presented. The light curves were obtained at the Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University Observatory in 2004. The light curves are generally those of detached eclipsing binaries, but there are large asymmetries between maxima. New BVR light curves were analysed with an ILOT procedure. Light curve asymmetries of the system were explained in terms of large dark starspots on the primary component. The primary star shows a long-lived and quasi-poloidal spot distribution with active longitudes in opposite hemispheres. Absolute parameters of the system were derived. We also discuss the evolution of the system: the components are likely to be pre-main sequence stars, but a post-main sequence stage cannot be ruled out. More observations are needed to decide this point.

  5. Chromospherically active stars. 6: Giants with compact hot companions and the barium star scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fekel, Francis C.; Henry, Gregory W.; Busby, Michael R.; Eitter, Joseph J.

    1993-01-01

    We have determined spectroscopic orbits for three chromospherically active giants that have hot compact companions. They are HD 160538 (K0 III + wd, P = 904 days), HD 165141 (G8 III + wd, P approximately 5200 days), and HD 185510 (K0 III + sdB, P = 20.6619 days). By fitting an IUE spectrum with theoretical models, we find the white dwarf companion of HD 165141 has a temperature of about 35000 K. Spectral types and rotational velocities have been determined for the three giants and distances have been estimated. These three systems and 39 Ceti are compared with the barium star mass-transfer scenario. The long-period mild barium giant HD 165141 as well as HD 185510 and 39 Ceti, which have relatively short periods and normal abundance giants, appear to be consistent with this scenario. The last binary, HD 160538, a system with apparently near solar abundances, a white dwarf companion, and orbital characteristics similar to many barium stars, demonstrates that the existence of a white-dwarf companion is insufficient to produce a barium star. The paucity of systems with confirmed white-dwarf companions makes abundance analyses of HD 160538 and HD 165141 of great value in examining the role of metallicity in barium star formation.

  6. Chromospherically active stars. 11: Giant with compact hot companions and the barium star scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fekel, Francis C.; Henry, Gregory W.; Busby, Michael R.; Eitter, Joseph J.

    1993-01-01

    We have determined spectroscopic orbits for three chromsopherically active giants that have hot compact companions. They are HD 160538 (KO III + wd, P = 904 days), HD 165141 (G8 III + wd, P approximately 5200 days), and HD 185510 (KO III + sdB, P = 20.6619 days). By fitting an IUE spectrum with theoretical models, we find the white dwarf companion of HD 165141 has a temperature of about 35,000 K. Spectral types and rotational velocities have been determined for the three giants and distances have been estimated. These three systems and 39 Ceti are compared with the barium star mass-transfer scenario. The long-period mild barium giant HD 165141 as well as HD 185510 and 39 Ceti, which have relatively short periods and normal abundance giants, appear to be consistent with this scenario. The last binary, HD 160538, a system with apparently near solar abundances, a white dwarf companion, and orbital characteristics similar to many barium stars, demonstrates that the existence of a white dwarf companion is insufficient to produce a barium star. The paucity of systems with confirmed white dwarf companions makes abundance analyses of HD 160538 and HD 165141 of great value in examining the role of metallicity in barium star formation.

  7. Li abundance in the stars with solar-type activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishenina, T. V.; Soubiran, C.; Kovtyukh, V. V.; Katsova, M. M.; Livshits, M. A.

    Li abundances, atmospheric parameters and rotational velocities for 150 dwarfs have been determined from the high resolution, high signal to noise echelle spectra, obtained with the ELODIE spectrograph at the OHP (France). Among them, there are 101 stars with a determined level of activity, a large part of them being of the BY Dra type. The level of chromospheric and coronal activity of the targets has been evaluated through the logR'_HK index and X-ray flux. We examined the Li abundance behavior with T_eff, vsini and level of the activity. Some correlations between the Li abundances, level of the chromospheric activity and rotational velocities vsini are confirmed. The correlation between the Li abundances and index of the chromospheric activity logR'_HK was found, especially for dwarfs with 5700>T_eff> 5200 K. Those correlations mainly demonstrate that measurable values of the lithium content (higher than the upper limit) refer to the stars with large spot areas in their photospheres. Considering the wider set of stars with high activity levels one can affirm that such a conclusion is valid also for the cooler, earlier K dwarfs. Our results confirm that basic factors of formation of detectable Li abundance and high activity are determined principally by smaller age and fast axial rotation, respectively; and apparently by the depth of the convective zone.

  8. Active cooling for downhole instrumentation: Preliminary analysis and system selection

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.A.

    1988-03-01

    A feasibility study and a series of preliminary designs and analyses were done to identify candidate processes or cycles for use in active cooling systems for downhole electronic instruments. A matrix of energy types and their possible combinations was developed and the energy conversion process for each pari was identified. The feasibility study revealed conventional as well as unconventional processes and possible refrigerants and identified parameters needing further clarifications. A conceptual design or series od oesigns for each system was formulated and a preliminary analysis of each design was completed. The resulting coefficient of performance for each system was compared with the Carnot COP and all systems were ranked by decreasing COP. The system showing the best combination of COP, exchangeability to other operating conditions, failure mode, and system serviceability is chosen for use as a downhole refrigerator. 85 refs., 48 figs., 33 tabs.

  9. Active solar heating and cooling information user study

    SciTech Connect

    Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marle, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a series of telephone interviews with groups of users of information on active solar heating and cooling (SHAC). An earlier study identified the information user groups in the solar community and the priority (to accelerate solar energy commercialization) of getting information to each group. In the current study only high-priority groups were examined. Results from 19 SHAC groups respondents are analyzed in this report: DOE-Funded Researchers, Non-DOE-Funded Researchers, Representatives of Manufacturers (4 groups), Distributors, Installers, Architects, Builders, Planners, Engineers (2 groups), Representatives of Utilities, Educators, Cooperative Extension Service County Agents, Building Owners/Managers, and Homeowners (2 groups). The data will be used as input to the determination of information products and services the Solar Energy Research Institute, the Solar Energy Information Data Bank Network, and the entire information outreach community should be preparing and disseminating.

  10. Coronal Diagnostics of Intermediate Activity Star XI Boo A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Jeremy

    2005-01-01

    The analysis of Xi Boo A proved difficult to adapt to our line-by-line approach because of the strong wings of the RGS instrumental profile, as has been detailed in earlier reports. While progress was also delayed because of problems in using SAS v4, we succeeded in the past year or so to bring the analysis to conclusion. Abundances have been derived using both EPIC and RGS data, confirming earlier EUVE findings of a mild solar-like FIP effect, though with some evidence of a turn-up in abundances of elements with higher FIP. Plasma densities appear normal for a moderately active stellar corona. Xi Boo A nicely bridges the gap between the very active stars and stars like the Sun, and it indeed does appear that these are the stars in which the solar-like FIP effects begins to change to the "inverse FIP" type of effect seen in the very active stars. Probing this divide was the main goal of the proposal. These results are in the process of being prepared for publication, though we have not decided the target journal as yet.

  11. Solar activity: The Sun as an X-ray star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, L.

    1981-01-01

    The existence and constant activity of the Sun's outer atmosphere are thought to be due to the continual emergence of magnetic fields from the Solar interior and the stressing of these fields at or near the surface layers of the Sun. The structure and activity of the corona are thus symptomatic of the underlying magnetic dynamo and the existence of an outer turbulent convective zone on the Sun. A sufficient condition for the existence of coronal activity on other stars would be the existence of a magnetic dynamo and an outer convective zone. The theoretical relationship between magnetic fields and coronal activity can be tested by Solar observations, for which the individual loop structures can be resolved. A number of parameters however, which enter into the alternative theoretical formulations remain fixed in all Solar observations. To determine whether these are truly parameters of the theory observations need to be extended to nearby stars on which suitable conditions may occur.

  12. Improving fold activation of small transcription activating RNAs (STARs) with rational RNA engineering strategies.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Sarai; Chappell, James; Sankar, Sitara; Chew, Rebecca; Lucks, Julius B

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory RNAs have become integral components of the synthetic biology and bioengineering toolbox for controlling gene expression. We recently expanded this toolbox by creating small transcription activating RNAs (STARs) that act by disrupting the formation of a target transcriptional terminator hairpin placed upstream of a gene. While STARs are a promising addition to the repertoire of RNA regulators, much work remains to be done to optimize the fold activation of these systems. Here we apply rational RNA engineering strategies to improve the fold activation of two STAR regulators. We demonstrate that a combination of promoter strength tuning and multiple RNA engineering strategies can improve fold activation from 5.4-fold to 13.4-fold for a STAR regulator derived from the pbuE riboswitch terminator. We then validate the generality of our approach and show that these same strategies improve fold activation from 2.1-fold to 14.6-fold for an unrelated STAR regulator, opening the door to creating a range of additional STARs to use in a broad array of biotechnologies. We also establish that the optimizations preserve the orthogonality of these STARs between themselves and a set of RNA transcriptional repressors, enabling these optimized STARs to be used in sophisticated circuits. PMID:26134708

  13. NUCLEAR ACTIVITY IS MORE PREVALENT IN STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Rosario, D. J.; Lutz, D.; Berta, S.; Popesso, P.; Genzel, R.; Saintonge, A.; Tacconi, L.; Wuyts, S. E-mail: lutz@mpe.mpg.de E-mail: popesso@mpe.mpg.de E-mail: amelie@mpe.mpg.de E-mail: swuyts@mpe.mpg.de; and others

    2013-07-01

    We explore the question of whether low and moderate luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are preferentially found in galaxies that are undergoing a transition from active star formation (SF) to quiescence. This notion has been suggested by studies of the UV-optical colors of AGN hosts, which find them to be common among galaxies in the so-called Green Valley, a region of galaxy color space believed to be composed mostly of galaxies undergoing SF quenching. Combining the deepest current X-ray and Herschel/PACS far-infrared (FIR) observations of the two Chandra Deep Fields with redshifts, stellar masses, and rest-frame photometry derived from the extensive and uniform multi-wavelength data in these fields, we compare the rest-frame U - V color distributions and star formation rate distributions of AGNs and carefully constructed samples of inactive control galaxies. The UV-to-optical colors of AGNs are consistent with equally massive inactive galaxies at redshifts out to z {approx} 2, but we show that such colors are poor tracers of SF. While the FIR distributions of both star-forming AGNs and star-forming inactive galaxies are statistically similar, we show that AGNs are preferentially found in star-forming host galaxies, or, in other words, AGNs are less likely to be found in weakly star-forming or quenched galaxies. We postulate that, among X-ray-selected AGNs of low and moderate accretion luminosities, the supply of cold gas primarily determines the accretion rate distribution of the nuclear black holes.

  14. Performance of active solar space-cooling systems: The 1980 cooling season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, D.; Frock, S.; Logee, T.; Missal, D.; Wetzel, P.

    1980-12-01

    Solar cooling by an absorption chiller is not a cost effective method to use solar heat. This statement is substantiated by careful analysis of each subsystem and equipment component. Good designs and operating procedures are identified. The problems which reduce cost effectiveness are pointed out. There are specific suggestions for improvements. Finally, there is a comparison of solar cooling by absorption chilling and using photovoltaic cells.

  15. Morphology, star formation, and nuclear activity in void galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedmann, Sophia; Miller, Brendan; Gallo, Elena; Pazar, Beni; Alfvin, Erik

    2015-01-01

    We report on new Chandra observations of six early-type galaxies located within cosmic voids, from a program examining the influence of Mpc-scale environment upon star formation and low-level supermassive black hole activity. Simple feedback prescriptions are predicted to operate independently of the surrounding density once outside the dark matter halo, and further link star formation quenching to black hole activity. Alternatively, mediation of the cold gas supply by the large-scale environment, for example through increased cold-stream accretion and reduced harassment or stripping within more isolated regions, could mutually enhance star formation and (perhaps indirectly) low-level supermassive black hole activity. The six targeted early-type galaxies have comparable stellar masses of 6-9e10 solar, chosen to be near the predicted "critical value" for efficient feedback, but span a wide range of star-formation rates. Specifically, they have SFRs of 6.5, 1.4, 0.45, 0.10, 0.04, and 0.03 solar masses per year. All galaxies are detected in the Chandra ACIS-S observations with 0.3-8 keV X-ray luminosities ranging from 2e39 to 1e41 erg/s. Specifically, they have log Lx values of 40.4, 41.1, 41.1, 39.3, 39.2, and 39.2, again ordered by decreasing SFR. The three galaxies with moderate-to-high star formation rates have nuclear X-ray luminosities that are significantly greater than those of the three galaxies with low star formation rates. This result is more consistent with a symbiotic relationship between current low-level star formation and supermassive black hole activity than with simple feedback quenching models. We additionally situate these galaxies in the context of void and cluster galaxies in the local universe, model their optical surface brightness profiles and color gradients, discuss caveats including the possibility of X-ray binary contamination, and consider other supermassive black hole activity indicators.

  16. Ultraviolet observations of cool stars. VII - Local interstellar hydrogen and deuterium Lyman-alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclintock, W.; Henry, R. C.; Linsky, J. L.; Moos, H. W.

    1978-01-01

    High-resolution Copernicus spectra of Epsilon Eri and Epsilon Ind containing interstellar hydrogen and deuterium L-alpha absorption lines are presented, reduced, and analyzed. Parameters of the interstellar hydrogen and deuterium toward these two stars are derived independently, without any assumptions concerning the D/H ratio. Copernicus spectra of Alpha Aur and Alpha Cen A are reanalyzed, and limits on the D/H number-density ratio consistent with the data for all four stars are considered. A comparison of the present estimates for the parameters of the local interstellar medium with those obtained by other techniques shows that there is no compelling evidence for significant variations in the hydrogen density and D/H ratio in the local interstellar medium. On this basis the hypothesis of an approaching local interstellar cloud proposed by Vidal-Madjar et al. (1978) is rejected

  17. Annual DOE active solar heating and cooling contractors' review meeting. Premeeting proceedings and project summaries

    SciTech Connect

    None,

    1981-09-01

    Ninety-three project summaries are presented which discuss the following aspects of active solar heating and cooling: Rankine solar cooling systems; absorption solar cooling systems; desiccant solar cooling systems; solar heat pump systems; solar hot water systems; special projects (such as the National Solar Data Network, hybrid solar thermal/photovoltaic applications, and heat transfer and water migration in soils); administrative/management support; and solar collector, storage, controls, analysis, and materials technology. (LEW)

  18. Two Transiting Earth-size Planets Near Resonance Orbiting a Nearby Cool Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petigura, Erik A.; Schlieder, Joshua E.; Crossfield, Ian J. M.; Howard, Andrew W.; Deck, Katherine M.; Ciardi, David R.; Sinukoff, Evan; Allers, Katelyn N.; Best, William M. J.; Liu, Michael C.; Beichman, Charles A.; Isaacson, Howard; Hansen, Brad M. S.; Lépine, Sébastien

    2015-10-01

    Discoveries from the prime Kepler mission demonstrated that small planets (<3 {R}\\oplus ) are common outcomes of planet formation. While Kepler detected many such planets, all but a handful orbit faint, distant stars and are not amenable to precise follow up measurements. Here, we report the discovery of two small planets transiting K2-21, a bright (K = 9.4) M0 dwarf located 65+/- 6 pc from Earth. We detected the transiting planets in photometry collected during Campaign 3 of NASA’s K2 mission. Analysis of transit light curves reveals that the planets have small radii compared to their host star, {R}P/{R}\\star = 2.60+/- 0.14% and 3.15+/- 0.20%, respectively. We obtained follow up NIR spectroscopy of K2-21 to constrain host star properties, which imply planet sizes of 1.59 ± 0.43 {R}\\oplus and 1.92 ± 0.53 {R}\\oplus , respectively, straddling the boundary between high-density, rocky planets and low-density planets with thick gaseous envelopes. The planets have orbital periods of 9.32414 days and 15.50120 days, respectively, and a period ratio {P}c/{P}b = 1.6624, very near to the 5:3 mean motion resonance, which may be a record of the system’s formation history. Transit timing variations due to gravitational interactions between the planets may be detectable using ground-based telescopes. Finally, this system offers a convenient laboratory for studying the bulk composition and atmospheric properties of small planets with low equilibrium temperatures.

  19. Photon-dominated regions around cool stars: The effects of the color temperature of the radiation field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaans, Marco; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Dishoeck, Ewine F. Van; Bakes, E. L. O.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the influence of the color temperature of the illuminating radiation field on the chemical and thermal structure of photon-dominated regions (PDRs). We present the results of a study of the photoelectric efficiency of heating by large molecules such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and very small grains for radiation fields characterized by different effective temperatures. We show that the efficiency for cooler (T(sub eff) approximately = 6000-10,000 K) stars is at most an order of magnitude smaller than that for hotter (T(sub eff) approximately = 20,000-30,000 K) stars. While cooler radiation fields result in less ultraviolet photons capable of heating, the efficiency per absorbed photon is higher, because the grains become less positively charged. We also present detailed calculations of the chemistry and thermal balance for generic PDRs (n(sub 0) approximately = 10(exp 3), G(sub 0) approximately = 10(exp 3)). For cooler radiation fields, the H/H2 and C(+)/C/CO transition layers shift toward the surface of the PDR, because fewer photons are available to photodissociate H2 and CO and to ionize C. The dominant cooling lines are the (C II) 158 micron and the (O I) 63 micron lines for the hotter radiation fields, but cooling by CO becomes dominant for a color temperature of 6000 K or lower. The (C II)/CO and (O I)/CO ratios are found to be very good diagnostics for the color temperature of the radiation field.

  20. MAGNETIC ACTIVITY CYCLES IN THE EXOPLANET HOST STAR {epsilon} ERIDANI

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe, T. S.; Mathur, S.; Buccino, A. P.; Mauas, P. J. D.; Petrucci, R.; Brown, B. P.; Soderblom, D. R.; Henry, T. J.; Hall, J. C.; Basu, S.

    2013-02-01

    The active K2 dwarf {epsilon} Eri has been extensively characterized both as a young solar analog and more recently as an exoplanet host star. As one of the nearest and brightest stars in the sky, it provides an unparalleled opportunity to constrain stellar dynamo theory beyond the Sun. We confirm and document the 3-year magnetic activity cycle in {epsilon} Eri originally reported by Hatzes and coworkers, and we examine the archival data from previous observations spanning 45 years. The data show coexisting 3-year and 13-year periods leading into a broad activity minimum that resembles a Maunder minimum-like state, followed by the resurgence of a coherent 3-year cycle. The nearly continuous activity record suggests the simultaneous operation of two stellar dynamos with cycle periods of 2.95 {+-} 0.03 years and 12.7 {+-} 0.3 years, which, by analogy with the solar case, suggests a revised identification of the dynamo mechanisms that are responsible for the so-called 'active' and 'inactive' sequences as proposed by Boehm-Vitense. Finally, based on the observed properties of {epsilon} Eri, we argue that the rotational history of the Sun is what makes it an outlier in the context of magnetic cycles observed in other stars (as also suggested by its Li depletion), and that a Jovian-mass companion cannot be the universal explanation for the solar peculiarities.

  1. Fearsome Flashes: A Study Of The Evolution Of Flaring Rates In Cool Stars Using Kepler Cluster Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saar, Steven

    Strong solar flares can damage power grids, satellites, interrupt communications and GPS information, and threaten astronauts and high latitude air travelers. Despite the potential cost, their frequency is poorly determined. Beyond purely current terrestrial concerns, how the rate of large flares (and associated coronal mass ejections [CMEs], high-energy particle fluxes and far UV emission) varies over the stellar lifetime holds considerable astrophysical interest. These include: the contributions of flares to coronal energy budgets; the importance of flares and CMEs to terrestrial and exoplanet atmospheric and biological evolution; and importance of CME mass loss for angular momentum evolution. We will explore the rate of strong flares and its variation with stellar age, mass and rotation by studying Kepler data of cool stars in two open clusters NGC 6811 (age ~ 1 Gyr) and NGC 6819 (~2.5 Gyr). We will use two flare analysis methods to build white-light flare distributions for cluster stars. One subtracts a low-pass filtered version of the data and analyzes the residue for positive flux deviations, the other does a statistical analysis of the flux deviations vs. time lags compared with a model. For near- solar stars, a known solar relation can then be used to estimate X-ray production by the white-light flares. For stars much hotter or cooler or with significantly different chromospheric density, we will use particle code flare models including bombardment effects to estimate how the X-ray to white light scaling changes. With the X-ray values, we can estimate far UV fluxes and CME rates, building a picture of the flare effects; with the two cluster ages, we can make a first estimate of the solar rate (by projecting to the Sun's age) and begin to build up an understanding of flare rate evolution with mass and age. Our proposal falls squarely in the "Stellar Astrophysics and Exoplanets" research area, and is relevant to NASA astrophysics goals in promoting better

  2. Estimation of Mass-Loss Rates from Emission Line Profiles in the UV Spectra of Cool Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, K. G.; Robinson, R. D.; Harper, G. M.

    1999-01-01

    The photon-scattering winds of cool, low-gravity stars (K-M giants and supergiants) produce absorption features in the strong chromospheric emission lines. This provides us with an opportunity to assess important parameters of the wind, including flow and turbulent velocities, the optical depth of the wind above the region of photon creation, and the star's mass-loss rate. We have used the Lamers et al. Sobolev with Exact Integration (SEI) radiative transfer code along with simple models of the outer atmospheric structure to compute synthetic line profiles for comparison with the observed line profiles. The SEI code has the advantage of being computationally fast and allows a great number of possible wind models to be examined. We therefore use it here to obtain initial first-order estimates of the wind parameters. More sophisticated, but more time-consuming and resource intensive calculations will be performed at a later date, using the SEI-deduced wind parameters as a starting point. A comparison of the profiles over a range of wind velocity laws, turbulence values, and line opacities allows us to constrain the wind parameters, and to estimate the mass-loss rates. We have applied this analysis technique (using lines of Mg II, 0 I, and Fe II) so far to four stars: the normal K5-giant alpha Tau, the hybrid K-giant gamma Dra, the K5 supergiant lambda Vel, and the M-giant gamma Cru. We present in this paper a description of the technique, including the assumptions which go into its use, an assessment of its robustness, and the results of our analysis.

  3. Temperatures Achieved in Human and Canine Neocortex During Intraoperative Passive or Active Focal Cooling

    PubMed Central

    Han, Rowland H.; Yarbrough, Chester K.; Patterson, Edward E.; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Miller, John W.; Rothman, Steven M.; D'Ambrosio, Raimondo

    2015-01-01

    Focal cortical cooling inhibits seizures and prevents acquired epileptogenesis in rodents. To investigate the potential clinical utility of this treatment modality, we examined the thermal characteristics of canine and human brain undergoing active and passive surface cooling in intraoperative settings. Four patients with intractable epilepsy were treated in a standard manner. Before the resection of a neocortical epileptogenic focus, multiple intraoperative studies of active (custom-made cooled irrigation-perfused grid) and passive (stainless steel probe) cooling were performed. We also actively cooled the neocortices of two dogs with perfused grids implanted for 2 hours. Focal surface cooling of the human brain causes predictable depth-dependent cooling of the underlying brain tissue. Cooling of 0.6–2°C was achieved both actively and passively to a depth of 10–15 mm from the cortical surface. The perfused grid permitted comparable and persistent cooling of canine neocortex when the craniotomy was closed. Thus, the human cortex can easily be cooled with the use of simple devices such as a cooling grid or a small passive probe. These techniques provide pilot data for the design of a permanently implantable device to control intractable epilepsy. PMID:25902001

  4. Temperatures achieved in human and canine neocortex during intraoperative passive or active focal cooling.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Matthew D; Han, Rowland H; Yarbrough, Chester K; Patterson, Edward E; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Miller, John W; Rothman, Steven M; D'Ambrosio, Raimondo

    2015-06-01

    Focal cortical cooling inhibits seizures and prevents acquired epileptogenesis in rodents. To investigate the potential clinical utility of this treatment modality, we examined the thermal characteristics of canine and human brain undergoing active and passive surface cooling in intraoperative settings. Four patients with intractable epilepsy were treated in a standard manner. Before the resection of a neocortical epileptogenic focus, multiple intraoperative studies of active (custom-made cooled irrigation-perfused grid) and passive (stainless steel probe) cooling were performed. We also actively cooled the neocortices of two dogs with perfused grids implanted for 2 hours. Focal surface cooling of the human brain causes predictable depth-dependent cooling of the underlying brain tissue. Cooling of 0.6-2°C was achieved both actively and passively to a depth of 10-15 mm from the cortical surface. The perfused grid permitted comparable and persistent cooling of canine neocortex when the craniotomy was closed. Thus, the human cortex can easily be cooled with the use of simple devices such as a cooling grid or a small passive probe. These techniques provide pilot data for the design of a permanently implantable device to control intractable epilepsy. PMID:25902001

  5. ACTIVITY ON THE M STAR OF QS Vir

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro, T.; Baptista, R.; Kafka, S.; Tappert, C.

    2010-03-15

    We report analysis of VRIJH photometry and phase-resolved optical spectroscopy of the eclipsing DA white dwarf (WD) plus dMe dwarf binary QS Vir. Modeling of the photometric data yields an inclination of i = 74.9 {+-} 0.6 and a mass ratio of q = M {sub 2}/M {sub 1} = 0.50 {+-} 0.05. Our Doppler maps indicate the presence of material in the Roche lobe of the WD, at a location near the M star, likely due to accretion from the stellar wind of the M star (as opposed to Roche-lobe overflow accretion). We also constructed images of the brightness distribution of the M star at different epochs which reveal the location of two stable active regions. Doppler tomography shows that the majority of the hydrogen and Ca II H and K emission originates on the active M dwarf, likely distributed in two preferred activity longitudes, similar to active regions on BY Dra and FK Comae systems.

  6. The Life Cycles of Stars: An Information & Activity Booklet Grades K-8, 1997-1998. Star-Child--A Learning Center for Young Astronomers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truelove, Elizabeth; Dejoie, Joyce

    This booklet contains information and activities on the life cycle of stars. Materials can be adapted for kindergarten through grade 8 classrooms. Background information on massive stars and medium stars and activities with subjects such as star life, constellation shapes, nebula terminology, astronomical distances, and pulsars is included. The 12…

  7. SURVEYING THE AGENTS OF GALAXY EVOLUTION IN THE TIDALLY STRIPPED, LOW METALLICITY SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD (SAGE-SMC). II. COOL EVOLVED STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, Martha L.; Meixner, Margaret; Gordon, Karl D.; Shiao, Bernie; Srinivasan, Sundar; Van Loon, Jacco Th.; McDonald, Iain; Kemper, F.; Zaritsky, Dennis; Block, Miwa; Engelbracht, Charles W.; Misselt, Karl; Babler, Brian; Bracker, Steve; Meade, Marilyn; Whitney, Barbara; Hora, Joe; Robitaille, Thomas; Indebetouw, Remy; Sewilo, Marta

    2011-10-15

    We investigate the infrared (IR) properties of cool, evolved stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), including the red giant branch (RGB) stars and the dust-producing red supergiant (RSG) and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars using observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope Legacy program entitled 'Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution in the Tidally Stripped, Low Metallicity SMC', or SAGE-SMC. The survey includes, for the first time, full spatial coverage of the SMC bar, wing, and tail regions at IR wavelengths (3.6-160 {mu}m). We identify evolved stars using a combination of near-IR and mid-IR photometry and point out a new feature in the mid-IR color-magnitude diagram that may be due to particularly dusty O-rich AGB stars. We find that the RSG and AGB stars each contribute {approx}20% of the global SMC flux (extended + point-source) at 3.6 {mu}m, which emphasizes the importance of both stellar types to the integrated flux of distant metal-poor galaxies. The equivalent SAGE survey of the higher-metallicity Large Magellanic Cloud (SAGE-LMC) allows us to explore the influence of metallicity on dust production. We find that the SMC RSG stars are less likely to produce a large amount of dust (as indicated by the [3.6] - [8] color). There is a higher fraction of carbon-rich stars in the SMC, and these stars appear to reach colors as red as their LMC counterparts, indicating that C-rich dust forms efficiently in both galaxies. A preliminary estimate of the dust production in AGB and RSG stars reveals that the extreme C-rich AGB stars dominate the dust input in both galaxies, and that the O-rich stars may play a larger role in the LMC than in the SMC.

  8. Onset of rapid mass loss in cool giant stars - Magnetic field effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    The possibility that closed magnetic field loops exist in steady state in stellar atmospheres in the HR diagram is examined. A model derived by Pneuman (1968) for helmet streamers in the solar corona is applied using a semi-empirical technique, to find that long-lived closed loops exist only below a certain boundary in the HR diagram. The region below this boundary is occupied by stars which are known to have hot coronae and slow mass loss. It is suggested that rapid mass loss sets in when closed field loops can no longer exist in steady state in the atmosphere.

  9. Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelato, Hugo Vicente

    1999-01-01

    We will begin our study with a more or less superficial inspection of the "forest" of stars that we see in the skies. The first thing we notice is that, as sources of light, they are much weaker than the Sun. Second, their apparent colors vary; from a bluish-white in most of them to a reddish-yellow, which is rarer. There is also a third aspect, though it is not very obvious to the naked eye: most of the stars group themselves in small families of two, three or more members. A good example is the Alpha Centauri, the closest star to us, which, in fact, is a triple system of stars. Another is the group of 7 stars that make up the Pleiades, which will be discussed later on. In fact, almost half of the stars are double systems with only two members, called binary stars. Most of these double stars, though together, are separated by several astronomical units (one astronomical unit, AU, is the distance from Earth to the sun: see Chapter 1), and revolve around each other over periods of several years. And yet the revolutions of some binary stars, separated by much smaller distances, occur in only a few hours! These stars are so close to each other that they can share enveloping material. Often this exchange occurs in a somewhat violent manner. Local explosions may occur, expelling matter away from the system. In other binary systems, where one of the components is a very compact, dense star, companion material flows more calmly, making up a light disk around the compact star.

  10. Mass Loss from Hypergiant Stars: Searching for Cool Dust in the Near-to-Mid IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, Dinesh; Humphreys, Roberta M.; Jones, Terry Jay; Marengo, Massimo; Gehrz, Robert D.; Helton, L. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The final fate of the most massive stars depends on their mass loss histories during their lifetimes. Hypergiant stars residing near the empircal upper limit of luminosity on the HR Diagram shed mass during brief, intense periods of enhanced mass loss, with amounts as high as 10-3 M⊙ in a single event. Their circumstellar environments show extensive and complex ejecta at visual wavelengths. To further probe their mass-loss histories for evidence of earlier mass loss we have extended the search of hypergiants' circumstellar enviroments into the mid-to-far infrared for four famous objects: the yellow hypergiants IRC +10420 and rho Cas and the red hypergiants VY CMa and mu Ceph. We present high-resolution adaptive optics imaging from LBT/LMIRCam (2 - 5 µm) and MMT/MIRAC (8 - 12 µm), combined with recently obtained far-IR imaging from 11 - 37 µm obtained with SOFIA/FORCAST (Cycle 2). We also discuss their long wavelength SEDs.

  11. The optical flares of active star II Pegasi in 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Shenghong; Kim, Kang Min; Lee, Byeong-Cheol

    2015-08-01

    We observed the active star II Peg using high-resolution spectrographs of 2.16m telescope at Xinglong station of NAOC and 1.8m telescope at BOAO of KASI from November to December, 2005. By means of spectral subtraction technique, the chromospheric activities of II Peg are analyzed at several activity indicators, including CaII IRT, Hα, NaI D1D2 and HeI D3 lines. The results demonstrate that the magnetic activity of II Peg is very strong, and its chromospheric activities show rotational modulations which imply there are active regions in its chromosphere. Two flare events were hunted during the observations, which were identified by HeI D3 line emission above the continuum. The first flare was happened in November 2005, the second one in December 2005, and they were located in different hemisphere of the star. This may indicate the evolution of active regions. Considering the photospheric spot activities, the possible origin of the detected flares is discussed.

  12. Feedback in the local Universe: Relation between star formation and AGN activity in early type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaddi, Sravani; O'Dea, Christopher; Baum, Stefi; Jones, Christine; Forman, William; Whitmore, Samantha; Ahmed, Rabeea; Pierce, Katherine; Leary, Sara

    2015-08-01

    several orders of magnitude between radio power and SFR. These results indicate that, galaxies in the current epoch are rarely powerful AGNs and they do not have profound impact on the star formation in the galaxy. There may be a threshold radio power (P ~ 1023 WHz-1) that is needed for AGN to affect the star formation in the galaxies. We notice that our galaxy sample and the BCGs follow similar trend in radio power versus SFR. One possible explanation is that there is a common source of gas supply through cooling flows. However, the spread in the relation suggests alternate gas supply mechanisms such as galaxy mergers, tidal interactions or secular evolution. In this case, the correlation could result if, both star formation and radio AGN activity scale roughly with the amount of gas in the galaxy, regardless of it's origin.

  13. EXTREME ENHANCEMENTS OF r-PROCESS ELEMENTS IN THE COOL METAL-POOR MAIN-SEQUENCE STAR SDSS J2357-0052

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Wako; Beers, Timothy C.; Honda, Satoshi; Carollo, Daniela E-mail: beers@pa.msu.ed E-mail: carollo@mso.anu.edu.a

    2010-11-10

    We report the discovery of a cool metal-poor, main-sequence star exhibiting large excesses of r-process elements. This star is one of the two newly discovered cool subdwarfs (effective temperatures of 5000 K) with extremely low metallicity ([Fe/H] < -3) identified from follow-up high-resolution spectroscopy of metal-poor candidates from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. SDSS J2357-0052 has [Fe/H] = -3.4 and [Eu/Fe] = +1.9, and exhibits a scaled solar r-process abundance pattern of heavy neutron-capture elements. This is the first example of an extremely metal-poor, main-sequence star showing large excesses of r-process elements; all previous examples of the large r-process-enhancement phenomena have been associated with metal-poor giants. The metallicity of this object is the lowest, and the excess of Eu ([Eu/Fe]) is the highest, among the r-process-enhanced stars found so far. We consider possible scenarios to account for the detection of such a star and discuss techniques to enable searches for similar stars in the future.

  14. Design and evaluation of active cooling systems for Mach 6 cruise vehicle wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconarty, W. A.; Anthony, F. M.

    1971-01-01

    Active cooling systems, which included transpiration, film, and convective cooling concepts, are examined. Coolants included hydrogen, helium, air, and water. Heat shields, radiation barriers, and thermal insulation are considered to reduce heat flow to the cooling systems. Wing sweep angles are varied from 0 deg to 75 deg and wing leading edge radii of 0.05 inch and 2.0 inches are examined. Structural temperatures are varied to allow comparison of aluminum alloy, titanium alloy, and superalloy structural materials. Cooled wing concepts are compared among themselves, and with the uncooled concept on the basis of structural weight, cooling system weight, and coolant weight.

  15. UV Observations of Prominence Activation and Cool Loop Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucera, Therese A.; Landi, Enrico

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the thermal and dynamic properties of dynamic structures in and around a prominence channel observed on the limb on 17 April 2003. Observations were taken with the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory's Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SOHO/SUMER) in lines formed at temperatures from 80,000 to 1.6 MK. The instrument was pointed to a single location and took a series of 90 s exposures. Two-dimensional context was provided by the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) in the UV and EUV and the Kanzelhohe Solar Observatory in H-alpha. Two dynamic features were studied in depth: an activated prominence and repeated motions in a loop near the prominence. We calculated three-dimensional geometries and trajectories, differential emission measure, and limits on the mass, pressure, average density, and kinetic and thermal energies. These observations provide important tests for models of dynamics in prominences and cool (approx. 10(exp 5) K)loops, which will ultimately lead to a better understanding the mechanism(s) leading to energy and mass flow in these solar features.

  16. Simulation of an active cooling system for photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelhakim, Lotfi

    2016-06-01

    Photovoltaic cells are devices that convert solar radiation directly into electricity. However, solar radiation increases the photovoltaic cells temperature [1] [2]. The temperature has an influence on the degradation of the cell efficiency and the lifetime of a PV cell. This work reports on a water cooling technique for photovoltaic panel, whereby the cooling system was placed at the front surface of the cells to dissipate excess heat away and to block unwanted radiation. By using water as a cooling medium for the photovoltaic solar cells, the overheating of closed panel is greatly reduced without prejudicing luminosity. The water also acts as a filter to remove a portion of solar spectrum in the infrared band but allows transmission of the visible spectrum most useful for the PV operation. To improve the cooling system efficiency and electrical efficiency, uniform flow rate among the cooling system is required to ensure uniform distribution of the operating temperature of the PV cells. The aims of this study are to develop a 3D thermal model to simulate the cooling and heat transfer in Photovoltaic panel and to recommend a cooling technique for the PV panel. The velocity, pressure and temperature distribution of the three-dimensional flow across the cooling block were determined using the commercial package, Fluent. The second objective of this work is to study the influence of the geometrical dimensions of the panel, water mass flow rate and water inlet temperature on the flow distribution and the solar panel temperature. The results obtained by the model are compared with experimental results from testing the prototype of the cooling device.

  17. Ionization and excitation in cool giant stars. I - Hydrogen and helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luttermoser, Donald G.; Johnson, Hollis R.

    1992-01-01

    The influence that non-LTE radiative transfer has on the electron density, ionization equilibrium, and excitation equilibrium in model atmospheres representative of both oxygen-rich and carbon-rich red giant stars is demonstrated. The radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations are solved self-consistently for H, H(-), H2, He I, C I, C II, Na I, Mg I, Mg II, Ca I, and Ca II in a plane-parallel static medium. Calculations are made for both radiative-equilibrium model photospheres alone and model photospheres with attached chromospheric models as determined semiempirically with IUE spectra of g Her (M6 III) and TX Psc (C6, 2). The excitation and ionization results for hydrogen and helium are reported.

  18. Wissler Simulations of a Liquid Cooled and Ventilation Garment (LCVG) for Extravehicular Activity (EVA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kesterson, Matthew; Bue, Grant; Trevino, Luis

    2006-01-01

    In order to provide effective cooling for astronauts during extravehicular activities (EVAs), a liquid cooling and ventilation garment (LCVG) is used to remove heat by a series off tubes through which cooling water is circulated. To better predict the effectiveness of the LCG and determine possible modifications to improve performance, computer simulations dealing with the interaction of the cooling garment with the human body have been run using the Wissler Human Model. Simulations have been conducted to predict the heat removal rate for various liquid cooled garment configurations. The current LCVG uses 48 cooling tubes woven into a fabric with cooling water flowing through the tubes. The purpose of the current project is to decrease the overall weight of the LCVG system. In order to achieve this weight reduction, advances in the garment heat removal rates need to be obtained. Currently, increasing the fabric s thermal conductivity along with also examining an increase in the cooling tube conductivity to more efficiently remove the excess heat generated during EVA is being simulated. Initial trials varied cooling water temperature, water flow rate, garment conductivity, tube conductivity, and total number of cooling tubes in the LCVG. Results indicate that the total number of cooling tubes could be reduced to 22 and still achieve the desired heat removal rate of 361 W. Further improvements are being made to the garment network used in the model to account for temperature gradients associated with the spacing of the cooling tubes over the surface of the garment

  19. MEMS Device Being Developed for Active Cooling and Temperature Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Matthew E.

    2001-01-01

    High-capacity cooling options remain limited for many small-scale applications such as microelectronic components, miniature sensors, and microsystems. A microelectromechanical system (MEMS) is currently under development at the NASA Glenn Research Center to meet this need. It uses a thermodynamic cycle to provide cooling or heating directly to a thermally loaded surface. The device can be used strictly in the cooling mode, or it can be switched between cooling and heating modes in milliseconds for precise temperature control. Fabrication and assembly are accomplished by wet etching and wafer bonding techniques routinely used in the semiconductor processing industry. Benefits of the MEMS cooler include scalability to fractions of a millimeter, modularity for increased capacity and staging to low temperatures, simple interfaces and limited failure modes, and minimal induced vibration.

  20. Active cooling design for scramjet engines using optimization methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J.; Martin, Carl J.; Lucas, Stephen H.

    1988-01-01

    A methodology for using optimization in designing metallic cooling jackets for scramjet engines is presented. The optimal design minimizes the required coolant flow rate subject to temperature, mechanical-stress, and thermal-fatigue-life constraints on the cooling-jacket panels, and Mach-number and pressure constraints on the coolant exiting the panel. The analytical basis for the methodology is presented, and results for the optimal design of panels are shown to demonstrate its utility.

  1. Active cooling design for scramjet engines using optimization methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J.; Martin, Carl J.; Lucas, Stephen H.

    1988-01-01

    A methodology for using optimization in designing metallic cooling jackets for scramjet engines is presented. The optimal design minimizes the required coolant flow rate subject to temperature, mechanical-stress, and thermal-fatigue-life constraints on the cooling-jacket panels, and Mach-number and pressure contraints on the coolant exiting the panel. The analytical basis for the methodology is presented, and results for the optimal design of panels are shown to demonstrate its utility.

  2. Chromospheric activity and rotation of FGK stars in the solar vicinity. An estimation of the radial velocity jitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Arnáiz, R.; Maldonado, J.; Montes, D.; Eiroa, C.; Montesinos, B.

    2010-09-01

    Context. Chromospheric activity produces both photometric and spectroscopic variations that can be mistaken as planets. Large spots crossing the stellar disc can produce planet-like periodic variations in the light curve of a star. These spots clearly affect the spectral line profiles, and their perturbations alter the line centroids creating a radial velocity jitter that might “contaminate” the variations induced by a planet. Precise chromospheric activity measurements are needed to estimate the activity-induced noise that should be expected for a given star. Aims: We obtain precise chromospheric activity measurements and projected rotational velocities for nearby (d ≤ 25 pc) cool (spectral types F to K) stars, to estimate their expected activity-related jitter. As a complementary objective, we attempt to obtain relationships between fluxes in different activity indicator lines, that permit a transformation of traditional activity indicators, i.e., Ca ii H & K lines, to others that hold noteworthy advantages. Methods: We used high resolution (~50 000) echelle optical spectra. Standard data reduction was performed using the IRAF echelle package. To determine the chromospheric emission of the stars in the sample, we used the spectral subtraction technique. We measured the equivalent widths of the chromospheric emission lines in the subtracted spectrum and transformed them into fluxes by applying empirical equivalent width and flux relationships. Rotational velocities were determined using the cross-correlation technique. To infer activity-related radial velocity (RV) jitter, we used empirical relationships between this jitter and the R'_HK index. Results: We measured chromospheric activity, as given by different indicators throughout the optical spectra, and projected rotational velocities for 371 nearby cool stars. We have built empirical relationships among the most important chromospheric emission lines. Finally, we used the measured chromospheric activity

  3. Second Cambridge Workshop on Cool Stars, Stellar Systems, and the Sun, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giampapa, M. S. (Editor); Golub, L. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    Solar and stellar atmospheric phenomena and their fundamental physical properties such as gravity, effective temperature and rotation rate, which provides the range in parameter space required to test various theoretical models were investigated. The similarity between solar activity and stellar activity is documented. Some of the topics discussed are: atmospheric structure, magnetic fields, solar and stellar activity, and evolution.

  4. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy of Active Binary Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    This NASA grant covered EUVE observing and data analysis programs during EUVE Cycle 5 GO observing. The research involved a single Guest Observer project 97-EUVE-061 "Time-Resolved Spectroscopy of Active Binary Stars". The grant provided funding that covered 1.25 months of the PI's salary. The activities undertaken included observation planning and data analysis (both temporal and spectral). This project was awarded 910 ksec of observing time to study seven active binary stars, all but one of which were actually observed. Lambda-And was observed on 1997 Jul 30 - Aug 3 and Aug 7-14 for a total of 297 ksec; these observations showed two large complex flares that were analyzed by Osten & Brown (1999). AR Psc, observed for 350 ksec on 1997 Aug 27 - Sep 13, showed only relatively small flares that were also discussed by Osten & Brown (1999). EUVE observations of El Eri were obtained on 1994 August 24-28, simultaneous with ASCA X-ray spectra. Four flares were detected by EUVE with one of these also observed simultaneously, by ASCA. The other three EUVE observations were of the stars BY Dra (1997 Sep 22-28), V478 Lyr (1998 May 18-27), and sigma Gem (1998 Dec 10-22). The first two stars showed a few small flares. The sigma Gem data shows a beautiful complete flare with a factor of ten peak brightness compared to quiescence. The flare rise and almost all the decay phase are observed. Unfortunately no observations in other spectral regions were obtained for these stars. Analysis of the lambda-And and AR Psc observations is complete and the results were published in Osten & Brown (1999). Analysis of the BY Dra, V478 Lyr and sigma Gem EUVE data is complete and will be published in Osten (2000, in prep.). The El Eri EUV analysis is also completed and the simultaneous EUV/X-ray study will be published in Osten et al. (2000, in prep.). Both these latter papers will be submitted in summer 2000. All these results will form part of Rachel Osten's PhD thesis.

  5. The evolution of star formation activity in galaxy groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erfanianfar, G.; Popesso, P.; Finoguenov, A.; Wuyts, S.; Wilman, D.; Biviano, A.; Ziparo, F.; Salvato, M.; Nandra, K.; Lutz, D.; Elbaz, D.; Dickinson, M.; Tanaka, M.; Mirkazemi, M.; Balogh, M. L.; Altieri, M. B.; Aussel, H.; Bauer, F.; Berta, S.; Bielby, R. M.; Brandt, N.; Cappelluti, N.; Cimatti, A.; Cooper, M.; Fadda, D.; Ilbert, O.; Le Floch, E.; Magnelli, B.; Mulchaey, J. S.; Nordon, R.; Newman, J. A.; Poglitsch, A.; Pozzi, F.

    2014-12-01

    We study the evolution of the total star formation (SF) activity, total stellar mass (ΣM*) and halo occupation distribution (HOD) in massive haloes by using one of the largest X-ray selected sample of galaxy groups with secure spectroscopic identification in the major blank field surveys (ECDFS, CDFN, COSMOS, AEGIS). We provide an accurate measurement of star formation rate (SFR) for the bulk of the star-forming galaxies using very deep mid-infrared Spitzer MIPS and far-infrared Herschel PACS observations. For undetected IR sources, we provide a well-calibrated SFR from spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting. We observe a clear evolution in the level of SF activity in galaxy groups. The total SF activity in the high-redshift groups (0.5 < z < 1.1) is higher with respect to the low-redshift (0.15 < z < 0.5) sample at any mass by 0.8 ± 0.12 dex. A milder difference (0.35 ± 0.1 dex) is observed between the low-redshift bin and the groups at z ˜ 0. We show that the level of SF activity is declining more rapidly in the more massive haloes than in the more common lower mass haloes. We do not observe any evolution in the HOD and total stellar mass-halo mass relations in groups. The picture emerging from our findings suggests that the galaxy population in the most massive systems is evolving faster than galaxies in lower mass haloes, consistently with a `halo downsizing' scenario.

  6. Chromospherically active stars. X - Spectroscopy and photometry of HD 212280

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fekel, Francis C.; Browning, Jared C.; Henry, Gregory W.; Morton, Mary D.; Hall, Douglas S.

    1993-01-01

    The system HD 212280 is a chromospherically active double lined spectroscopic binary with an orbital period of 45.284 days and an eccentricity of 0.50. The spectrum is composite with spectral types of G8 IV and F5-8 V for the components. An estimated inclination of 78 +/- 8 deg results in masses of 1.7 and 1.4 solar mass for the G subgiant and mid-F star, respectively. The distance to the system is estimated to be 112 pc. Photometric observations obtained between 1987 November and 1992 June reveal that HD 212280 is a newly identified variable star with a V amplitude of about 0.15 mag and a mean period of 29.46 days. Our V data were divided into 11 sets and in all but one case two spots were required to fit the data. Lifetimes of 650 days and a minimum of 1350 days have been determined for two of the four spots. The differential rotation coefficient of 0.05 is relatively small. The age of the system is about 1.9 X 10 exp 9 yrs. The G subgiant is rotating slower than pseudosynchronously while the F-type star is rotating faster.

  7. Activity and Brightness Variations of Sun-Like Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Jeffrey C.

    2015-08-01

    Long-term observations of variations in Sun-like stars now span a half century. The Mount Wilson Observatory (MWO) HK Project operated from 1966 to 2003, and the Lowell Observatory Solar-Stellar Spectrograph (SSS) project has operated since 1994; together these programs provide a record of chromospheric activity over multiple stellar cycles for more than 100 stars of V < ~7.5. Long-term photometric monitoring of Sun-like stars, including many of the MWO and SSS targets, began in the early 1980s and continues today at the Fairborn Observatory south of Tucson. I will review progress to date in combining and interpreting the spectrosopic and photometric data sets, including some new results from the most recent years of SSS and Fairborn data. I will also review where deficiencies remain in reconciling and combining the major data sets, and will discuss efforts presently underway to remedy this and provide a long-term record for the benefit of the community.

  8. The 2006/2007 photometric activity of three chromospherically active stars: V2075 Cyg, FG UMa and BM CVn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, A.; Budding, E.; Soydugan, E.; Bakış, H.; Doğru, D.; Doğru, S. S.; Tüysüz, M.; Kaçar, Y.; Dönmez, A.; Soydugan, F.

    2009-08-01

    We present new multiband CCD photometric observations of three chromospherically active stars with long periods (V2075 Cyg, FG UMa and BM CVn). The observations were made at the Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University Observatory in 2006 and 2007. We analyzed BVRI (Bessell) CCD observations of these three RS CVn-type SB1 binaries with the following three steps: (i) Photometric rotation periods were obtained by analyzing their light variations with a differential corrections method and a Fourier transform technique. (ii) Light variations, observed over three or more consecutive orbital cycles, were investigated by using dark (cool) spot models with the program SPOT. (iii) Surface differential rotation coefficients for the primary components of these binaries were derived using our own photometric periods together with orbital periods taken from the literature.

  9. He II EMISSION IN Lyalpha NEBULAE: ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS OR COOLING RADIATION?

    SciTech Connect

    Scarlata, C.; Colbert, J.; Teplitz, H. I.; Bridge, C.; Francis, P.; Palunas, P.; Siana, B.; Williger, G. M.; Woodgate, B.

    2009-12-01

    We present a study of an extended Lyalpha nebula located in a known overdensity at z approx 2.38. The data include multiwavelength photometry covering the rest-frame spectral range from 0.1 to 250 mum, and deep optical spectra of the sources associated with the extended emission. Two galaxies are associated with the Lyalpha nebula. One of them is a dust enshrouded active galactic nucleus (AGN), while the other is a powerful starburst, forming stars at approx>400 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. We detect the He II emission line at 1640 A in the spectrum of the obscured AGN, but detect no emission from other highly ionized metals (C IV or N V) as is expected from an AGN. One scenario that simultaneously reproduces the width of the detected emission lines, the lack of C IV emission, and the geometry of the emitting gas, is that the He II and the Lyalpha emission are the result of cooling gas that is being accreted on the dark matter halo of the two galaxies, Ly1 and Ly2. Given the complexity of the environment associated with our Lyalpha nebula it is possible that various mechanisms of excitation are at work simultaneously.

  10. Subcontracted activities related to TES for building heating and cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J.

    1980-01-01

    The subcontract program elements related to thermal energy storage for building heating and cooling systems are outlined. The following factors are included: subcontracts in the utility load management application area; life and stability testing of packaged low cost energy storage materials; and development of thermal energy storage systems for residential space cooling. Resistance storage heater component development, demonstration of storage heater systems for residential applications, and simulation and evaluation of latent heat thermal energy storage (heat pump systems) are also discussed. Application of thermal energy storage for solar application and twin cities district heating are covered including an application analysis and technology assessment of thermal energy storage.

  11. Active Control of Jets in Cross-Flow for Film Cooling Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikitopoulos, Dimitris E.

    2003-01-01

    Jets in cross-flow have applications in film cooling of gas turbine vanes, blades and combustor liners. Their cooling effectiveness depends on the extent to which the cool jet-fluid adheres to the cooled component surface. Lift-off of the cooling jet flow or other mechanisms promoting mixing, cause loss of cooling effectiveness as they allow the hot "free-stream" fluid to come in contact with the component surface. The premise of this project is that cooling effectiveness can be improved by actively controlling (e.9. forcing, pulsing) the jet flow. Active control can be applied to prevent/delay lift-off and suppress mixing. Furthermore, an actively controlled film-cooling system coupled with appropriate sensory input (e.g. temperature or heat flux) can adapt to spatial and temporal variations of the hot-gas path. Thus, it is conceivable that the efficiency of film-cooling systems can be improved, resulting in coolant fluid economy. It is envisioned that Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) will play a role in the realization of such systems. As a first step, a feasibility study will be conducted to evaluate the concept, identify actuation and sensory elements and develop a control strategy. Part of this study will be the design of a proof-of-concept experiment and collection of necessary data.

  12. Stars of the Big Dipper: A 3-D Vector Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Vince H.; Beichner, Robert J.

    2006-03-01

    Most teachers of introductory physics will agree that many students have difficulty with vectors, so much so that we frequently spend a week at the beginning of the semester presenting material that students should know from previous mathematics courses. This review is often quite abstract, with little or no connection to familiar contexts, and seldom includes any motivation for students to "see it again." In this paper we present a vector activity that attempts to address both these issues using the stars of the Big Dipper, in the constellation Ursa Major, as a memorable context.

  13. A SIMPLE NONLINEAR MODEL FOR THE ROTATION OF MAIN-SEQUENCE COOL STARS. I. INTRODUCTION, IMPLICATIONS FOR GYROCHRONOLOGY, AND COLOR-PERIOD DIAGRAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Sydney A.

    2010-10-10

    We here introduce a simple nonlinear model to describe the rotational evolution of cool stars on the main sequence. It is formulated only in terms of the Rossby number (Ro = P/{tau}), its inverse, and two dimensionless constants which we specify using solar and open-cluster data. The model has two limiting cases of stellar rotation, previously called C and I, that correspond to two observed sequences of fast and slowly rotating stars in young open clusters. The model describes the evolution of stars from C-type, with particular mass and age dependencies, to I-type, with different mass and age dependencies, through the rotational gap, g, separating them. The proposed model explains various aspects of stellar rotation, and provides an exact expression for the age of a rotating cool star in terms of P and {tau}, thereby generalizing gyrochronology. Using it, we calculate the time interval required for stars to reach the rotational gap-a monotonically increasing, mildly nonlinear function of {tau}. Beginning with the range of initial periods indicated by observations, we show that the (mass-dependent) dispersion in rotation period initially increases, and then decreases rapidly with the passage of time. The initial dispersion in period contributes up to 128 Myr to the gyro-age errors of solar-mass field stars. Finally, we transform to color-period space, calculate appropriate isochrones, and show that this model explains some detailed features in the observed color-period diagrams of open clusters, including the positions and shapes of the sequences, and the observed density of stars across these diagrams.

  14. Active noise canceling system for mechanically cooled germanium radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Karl Einar; Burks, Morgan T

    2014-04-22

    A microphonics noise cancellation system and method for improving the energy resolution for mechanically cooled high-purity Germanium (HPGe) detector systems. A classical adaptive noise canceling digital processing system using an adaptive predictor is used in an MCA to attenuate the microphonics noise source making the system more deployable.

  15. Cool dust heating and temperature mixing in nearby star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, L. K.; Draine, B. T.; Bianchi, S.; Gordon, K. D.; Aniano, G.; Calzetti, D.; Dale, D. A.; Helou, G.; Hinz, J. L.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Roussel, H.; Wilson, C. D.; Bolatto, A.; Boquien, M.; Croxall, K. V.; Galametz, M.; Gil de Paz, A.; Koda, J.; Muñoz-Mateos, J. C.; Sandstrom, K. M.; Sauvage, M.; Vigroux, L.; Zibetti, S.

    2015-04-01

    Physical conditions of the interstellar medium in galaxies are closely linked to the ambient radiation field and the heating of dust grains. In order to characterize dust properties in galaxies over a wide range of physical conditions, we present here the radial surface brightness profiles of the entire sample of 61 galaxies from Key Insights into Nearby Galaxies: Far-Infrared Survey with Herschel (KINGFISH). The main goal of our work is the characterization of the grain emissivities, dust temperatures, and interstellar radiation fields (ISRFs) responsible for heating the dust. We first fit the radial profiles with exponential functions in order to compare stellar and cool-dust disk scalelengths, as measured by 3.6 μm and 250 μm surface brightnesses. Our results show thatthe stellar and dust scalelengths are comparable, with a mean ratio of 1.04, although several galaxies show dust-to-stellar scalelength ratios of 1.5 or more. We then fit the far-infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) in each annular region with single-temperature modified blackbodies using both variable (MBBV) and fixed (MBBF) emissivity indices β, as well as with physically motivated dust models. The KINGFISH profiles are well suited to examining trends of dust temperature Tdust and β because they span a factor of ~200 in the ISRF intensity heating the bulk of the dust mass, Umin. Results from fitting the profile SEDs suggest that, on average, Tdust, dust optical depth τdust, and Umin decrease with radius. The emissivity index β also decreases with radius in some galaxies, but in others is increasing, or rising in the inner regions and falling in the outer ones. Despite the fixed grain emissivity (average β ~ 2.1) of the physically-motivated models, they are well able to accommodate flat spectral slopes with β ≲ 1. An analysis of the wavelength variations of dust emissivities in both the data and the models shows that flatter slopes (β ≲ 1.5) are associated with cooler

  16. Spots and active longitudes on the star V815 Her

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savanov, I. S.

    2009-10-01

    An analysis of photometric observations for the starHD166181 (V815Her) is presented. B and V light curves were used to reconstruct temperature inhomogeneities on the stellar surface. The spots on the surface of V815 Her are concentrated at two preferred longitudes separated by 0.5 in phase (180° in longitude). The positions of more and less active regions quasi-periodically “flip-flop,” on time scales of about 600, 950, and 1250 days. The times of active-longitude switches coincide with the maxima and minima of the light curve and the amplitude of the brightness variations, as well as with the minima and maxima of the star’s spottedness.

  17. Strong far-infrared cooling lines, peculiar CO kinematics, and possible star-formation suppression in Hickson compact group 57

    SciTech Connect

    Alatalo, K.; Appleton, P. N.; Ogle, P. M.; Rich, J. A.; Xu, C. K.; Lisenfeld, U.; Bitsakis, T.; Guillard, P.; Charmandaris, V.; Cluver, M.; Jarrett, T.; Dopita, M. A.; Kewley, L. J.; Freeland, E.; Rasmussen, J.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.

    2014-11-10

    We present [C II] and [O I] observations from Herschel and CO(1-0) maps from the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy (CARMA) of the Hickson compact group HCG 57, focusing on the galaxies HCG 57a and HCG 57d. HCG 57a has been previously shown to contain enhanced quantities of warm molecular hydrogen consistent with shock or turbulent heating. Our observations show that HCG 57d has strong [C II] emission compared to L {sub FIR} and weak CO(1-0), while in HCG 57a, both the [C II] and CO(1-0) are strong. HCG 57a lies at the upper end of the normal distribution of the [C II]/CO and [C II]/FIR ratios, and its far-infrared (FIR) cooling supports a low-density, warm, diffuse gas that falls close to the boundary of acceptable models of a photon-dominated region. However, the power radiated in the [C II] and warm H{sub 2} emissions have similar magnitudes, as seen in other shock-dominated systems and predicted by recent models. We suggest that shock heating of the [C II] is a viable alternative to photoelectric heating in violently disturbed, diffuse gas. The existence of shocks is also consistent with the peculiar CO kinematics in the galaxy, indicating that highly noncircular motions are present. These kinematically disturbed CO regions also show evidence of suppressed star formation, falling a factor of 10-30 below normal galaxies on the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation. We suggest that the peculiar properties of both galaxies are consistent with a highly dissipative, off-center collisional encounter between HCG 57d and 57a, creating ring-like morphologies in both systems. Highly dissipative gas-on-gas collisions may be more common in dense groups because of the likelihood of repeated multiple encounters. The possibility of shock-induced star-formation suppression may explain why a subset of these HCG galaxies has been found previously to fall in the mid-infrared green valley.

  18. Strong Far-infrared Cooling Lines, Peculiar CO Kinematics, and Possible Star-formation Suppression in Hickson Compact Group 57

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alatalo, K.; Appleton, P. N.; Lisenfeld, U.; Bitsakis, T.; Guillard, P.; Charmandaris, V.; Cluver, M.; Dopita, M. A.; Freeland, E.; Jarrett, T.; Kewley, L. J.; Ogle, P. M.; Rasmussen, J.; Rich, J. A.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; Xu, C. K.; Yun, M.

    2014-11-01

    We present [C II] and [O I] observations from Herschel and CO(1-0) maps from the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy (CARMA) of the Hickson compact group HCG 57, focusing on the galaxies HCG 57a and HCG 57d. HCG 57a has been previously shown to contain enhanced quantities of warm molecular hydrogen consistent with shock or turbulent heating. Our observations show that HCG 57d has strong [C II] emission compared to L FIR and weak CO(1-0), while in HCG 57a, both the [C II] and CO(1-0) are strong. HCG 57a lies at the upper end of the normal distribution of the [C II]/CO and [C II]/FIR ratios, and its far-infrared (FIR) cooling supports a low-density, warm, diffuse gas that falls close to the boundary of acceptable models of a photon-dominated region. However, the power radiated in the [C II] and warm H2 emissions have similar magnitudes, as seen in other shock-dominated systems and predicted by recent models. We suggest that shock heating of the [C II] is a viable alternative to photoelectric heating in violently disturbed, diffuse gas. The existence of shocks is also consistent with the peculiar CO kinematics in the galaxy, indicating that highly noncircular motions are present. These kinematically disturbed CO regions also show evidence of suppressed star formation, falling a factor of 10-30 below normal galaxies on the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation. We suggest that the peculiar properties of both galaxies are consistent with a highly dissipative, off-center collisional encounter between HCG 57d and 57a, creating ring-like morphologies in both systems. Highly dissipative gas-on-gas collisions may be more common in dense groups because of the likelihood of repeated multiple encounters. The possibility of shock-induced star-formation suppression may explain why a subset of these HCG galaxies has been found previously to fall in the mid-infrared green valley.

  19. Chromospheric activity and lithium line variations in the spectra of the spotted star LQ Hydrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores Soriano, M.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Weber, M.

    2015-03-01

    Context. Although the relationship between lithium abundance in stars and their magnetic activity is commonly accepted, it is still unclear how the different phenomena related to it can increase the amount of Li, reduce its depletion, or be a source of bias for the measurements. Aims: We study the rotational modulation of chromospheric and photospheric parameters of the young, active, single K2 dwarf LQ Hya and their connection with the variability of the Li i 6708 Å line. Methods: A total of 199 high-resolution STELLA spectra and quasi-simultaneous photometry were used to compute effective temperature, gravity, and chromospheric activity indicators such as Hα and Hβ emission, Balmer decrement, and chromospheric electron density, as a function of the rotational phase. The variation of the Li i 6708 Å line was characterized in terms of equivalent width, abundance, and of 6Li/7Li isotopic ratio in the form of line shifts. Results: Photospheric and chromospheric parameters show clear rotational modulation. Effective temperatures and continuum variations reveal a higher concentration of cool spots on the side of the star on which we also detect stronger chromospheric activity. Increased electron densities and the modulation of the He i D3 line suggest that the source of this activity can be a combination of plages and repeated low-intensity flares. The Li line and other temperature-sensitive lines are clearly enhanced by the spots located on the most active side of the star. Li abundances calculated taking into account the temperature variations simultaneously show, although with high dispersion, a small overabundance of this element that correlates well with the surface magnetic activity. In addition, the Li line center is more intensely redshifted than in the other hemisphere, which might be interpreted as a weak enrichment of 6Li. Based on data obtained with the STELLA robotic telescope in Tenerife, an AIP facility jointly operated by AIP and IAC, and the Vienna

  20. Effects of Droplet-Vitrification Cryopreservation Based on Physiological and Antioxidant Enzyme Activities of Brassidium Shooting Star Orchid

    PubMed Central

    Rahmah, Safrina; Ahmad Mubbarakh, Safiah; Soo Ping, Khor

    2015-01-01

    Protocorm-like bodies (PLBs) of Brassidium Shooting Star orchid were successfully cryopreserved using droplet-vitrification method. Vitrification based cryopreservation protocol is comprised of preculture, osmoprotection, cryoprotection, cooling, rewarming, and growth recovery and each and every step contributes to the achievement of successful cryopreservation. In order to reveal the lethal and nonlethal damage produced by cryopreservation, histological observation, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and biochemical analysis were carried out in both cryopreserved and noncryopreserved PLBs of Brassidium Shooting Star orchid comparing with the control PLBs stock culture. Histological and scanning electron microscopy analyses displayed structural changes in cryopreserved PLBs due to the impact of cryoinjury during exposure to liquid nitrogen. Total soluble protein significantly increased throughout the dehydration process and the highest value was achieved when PLBs were stored in liquid nitrogen. Ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and catalase (CAT) showed the highest enzyme activities in both dehydration and cryostorage treatments indicating that stress level of PLBs was high during these stages. PMID:25861687

  1. Effects of droplet-vitrification cryopreservation based on physiological and antioxidant enzyme activities of Brassidium shooting star orchid.

    PubMed

    Rahmah, Safrina; Ahmad Mubbarakh, Safiah; Soo Ping, Khor; Subramaniam, Sreeramanan

    2015-01-01

    Protocorm-like bodies (PLBs) of Brassidium Shooting Star orchid were successfully cryopreserved using droplet-vitrification method. Vitrification based cryopreservation protocol is comprised of preculture, osmoprotection, cryoprotection, cooling, rewarming, and growth recovery and each and every step contributes to the achievement of successful cryopreservation. In order to reveal the lethal and nonlethal damage produced by cryopreservation, histological observation, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and biochemical analysis were carried out in both cryopreserved and noncryopreserved PLBs of Brassidium Shooting Star orchid comparing with the control PLBs stock culture. Histological and scanning electron microscopy analyses displayed structural changes in cryopreserved PLBs due to the impact of cryoinjury during exposure to liquid nitrogen. Total soluble protein significantly increased throughout the dehydration process and the highest value was achieved when PLBs were stored in liquid nitrogen. Ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and catalase (CAT) showed the highest enzyme activities in both dehydration and cryostorage treatments indicating that stress level of PLBs was high during these stages. PMID:25861687

  2. Development and testing of heat transport fluids for use in active solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    Work on heat transport fluids for use with active solar heating and cooling systems is described. Program objectives and how they were accomplished including problems encountered during testing are discussed.

  3. Chemical Fingerprints of Star Forming Regions and Active Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Beaupuits, Juan-Pablo

    2010-10-01

    This thesis is devoted to the study of the physical conditions of the interstellar medium (ISM) in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and Galactic star-forming regions, using mostly single-dish millimeter observations. I first study the excitation conditions of dense gas in a group of Seyfert galaxies using radiative transfer models (Chapter 2). I then study the galaxy NGC 1068, and try to distinguish signatures of the contributions from the AGN and the starburst ring by incorporating observations of high-J transitions of dense gas tracers (Chapter 3). Later, I venture into the mid-infrared spectral region to study different aspects of the AGN and starburst components in the galaxy NGC 4945 (Chapter 4). In Chapter 5 I delve into theoretical aspects of the dynamical evolution of gas in an AGN torus. I use a 3D hydrodynamic simulation with chemical abundances driven by X-rays. The aim is to understand the effects of X-ray irradiation by the AGN on the temperature, formation and destruction of the molecular gas. I finally explore a Galactic star-forming region, the Omega Nebula, with high resolution single dish observations, to study the properties of the warm gas and to constrain chemical models (Chapters 6 and 7).

  4. The star formation rates of active galactic nuclei host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Sara L.; Teimoorinia, Hossen; Rosario, David J.; Mendel, J. Trevor

    2016-05-01

    Using artificial neural network predictions of total infrared luminosities (LIR), we compare the host galaxy star formation rates (SFRs) of ˜21 000 optically selected active galactic nuclei (AGN), 466 low-excitation radio galaxies (LERGs) and 721 mid-IR-selected AGN. SFR offsets (ΔSFR) relative to a sample of star-forming `main-sequence' galaxies (matched in M⋆, z and local environment) are computed for the AGN hosts. Optically selected AGN exhibit a wide range of ΔSFR, with a distribution skewed to low SFRs and a median ΔSFR = -0.06 dex. The LERGs have SFRs that are shifted to even lower values with a median ΔSFR = -0.5 dex. In contrast, mid-IR-selected AGN have, on average, SFRs enhanced by a factor of ˜1.5. We interpret the different distributions of ΔSFR amongst the different AGN classes in the context of the relative contribution of triggering by galaxy mergers. Whereas the LERGs are predominantly fuelled through low accretion rate secular processes which are not accompanied by enhancements in SFR, mergers, which can simultaneously boost SFRs, most frequently lead to powerful, obscured AGN.

  5. Active Pixel Sensor Characterization for the STAR Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jake

    2004-10-01

    The STAR collaboration is studying matter at high temperatures and densities. If a significant improvement to the measurement of particle trajectories can be made, charmed mesons that decay away from the primary collision point could be identified. To achieve this goal, STAR is building a vertex detector consisting of a new technology Â- active pixel sensors. (APS) An APS is an implementation of standard CMOS technology in which each pixel has a photodiode directly above the epitaxial layer. Incident particles produce electron-hole pairs in the epitaxial layer, and these electrons accumulate on the photodiode. Charge from the photodiode is digitized to identify the position of the incident particle. It is important to characterize the signal to noise, readout time, and resolution on several different pixel sizes so that the vertex detector can be optimized for cost and speed. Larger pixels result in a faster data acquisition, while smaller pixels have better resolution. We will present studies of 5, 10, 20 and 30μm square pixel geometries that measure charge distribution and collection. We will also display the results of using a field emission scanning electron microscope with energies from 1 to 30 keV. This tool has the potential to probe regions of the APS integrated circuit and contribute to understanding its properties.

  6. High heat flux actively cooled honeycomb sandwich structural panel for a hypersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, L. C.; Pagel, L. L.

    1978-01-01

    The results of a program to design and fabricate an unshielded actively cooled structural panel for a hypersonic aircraft are presented. The design is an all-aluminum honeycomb sandwich with embedded cooling passages soldered to the inside of the outer moldline skin. The overall finding is that an actively cooled structure appears feasible for application on a hypersonic aircraft, but the fabrication process is complex and some material and manufacturing technology developments are required. Results from the program are summarized and supporting details are presented.

  7. Flightweight radiantly and actively cooled panel: Thermal and structural performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shore, C. P.; Nowak, R. J.; Kelly, H. N.

    1982-01-01

    A 2- by 4-ft flightweight panel was subjected to thermal/structural tests representative of design flight conditions for a Mach 6.7 transport and to off-design conditions simulating flight maneuvers and cooling system failures. The panel utilized Rene 41 heat shields backed by a thin layer of insulation to radiate away most of the 12 Btu/ft2-sec incident heating. A solution of ethylene glycol in water circulating through tubes in an aluminum-honeycomb-sandwich panel absorbed the remainder of the incident heating (0.8 Btu/sq ft-sec). The panel successfully withstood (1) 46.7 hr of radiant heating which included 53 thermal cycles and 5000 cycles of uniaxial inplane loading of + or - 1200 lfb/in; (2) simulated 2g-maneuver heating conditions and simulated cooling system failures without excessive temperatures on the structural panel; and (3) the extensive thermal/structural tests and the aerothermal tests reported in NASA TP-1595 without significant damage to the structural panel, coolant leaks, or hot-gas ingress to the structural panel.

  8. Active beam shaping in multiple laser guide stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Katharine J.

    2012-10-01

    Adaptive beam shaping is a critical part of multiple Laser Guide Stars (LGS) for Multiple Conjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO) for ground-based astronomical telescopes. There are two kinds of Laser Guide Stars: Na Laser Guide Stars (at 589 nm and 92 km altitude) and Rayleigh Laser Guide Stars (at 532 nm and 20 km altitude). Multiple Conjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO) corrects for each "layer" of atmosphere independently. Multiple Laser Guide Stars are being developed to achieve a measure of tilt and increase the isoplanatic patch. Multiple Laser Guide Stars are being combined with Multiple Conjugate Optics in the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT): more than one Laser Guide Star (4-5) and two different wavelengths: 589 nm and 532 nm. Other observatories have multiple Laser Guide Stars but only one wavelength: 589 nm or 532 nm. Because Laser Guide Stars are launched into the atmosphere, adaptive beam shaping will be carried out before the laser is launched and will be different depending on which laser is being used, presumably to effect the tightest beam which can be achieved at the power level which is required to provide the requisite return to gound-based wavefront sensors. A complete range of devices are used. Beam attenuation and divergnece will take place. Multiple Laser Guide Stars of major observatories (SOR, LBT, MMT, ESO VLT and Gemini South) will be evaluated for effective adaptive beam shaping and impact on performance

  9. Brazing of the Tore Supra actively cooled Phase III Limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Nygren, R.E.; Walker, C.A.; Lutz, T.J.; Hosking, F.M.; McGrath, R.T.

    1993-12-31

    The head of the water-cooled Tore Supra Phase 3 Limiter is a bank of 14 round OFHC copper tubes, curved to fit the plasma radius, onto which several hundred pyrolytic graphite (PG) tiles and a lesser number of carbon fiber composite tiles are brazed. The small allowable tolerances for fitting the tiles to the tubes and mating of compound curvatures made the brazing and fabrication extremely challenging. The paper describes the fabrication process with emphasis on the procedure for brazing. In the fixturing for vacuum furnace brazing, the tiles were each independently clamped to the tube with an elaborate set of window frame clamps. Braze quality was evaluated with transient heating tests. Some rebrazing was necessary.

  10. HITCAN for actively cooled hot-composite thermostructural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Singhal, S. N.; Lackney, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    A computer code, high temperature composite analyzer (HITCAN), was developed to analyze/design hot metal matrix composite structures. HITCAN is a general purpose code for predicting the global structural and local stress-strain response of multilayered (arbitrarily oriented) metal matrix structures both at the constituent (fiber, matrix, and interphase) and the structural level, including the fabrication process effects. The thermomechanical properties of the constituents are considered to be nonlinearly dependent on several parameters, including temperature, stress, and stress rate. The computational procedure employs an incremental iterative nonlinear approach utilizing a multifactor-interaction material behavior model, i.e., the material properties are expressed in terms of a product of several factors that affect the properties. HITCAN structural analysis capabilities (static, load stepping - a multistep static analysis with material properties updated at each step, modal, and buckling) for cooled hot structures are demonstrated through a specific example problem.

  11. HITCAN for actively cooled hot-composite thermostructural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Singhal, S. N.; Lackney, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    A computer code, high temperature composite analyzer (HITCAN), was developed to analyze/design hot metal matrix composite structures. HITCAN is a general purpose code for predicting the global structural and local stress-strain response of multilayered (arbitrarily oriented) metal matrix structures both at the constituent (fiber, matrix, and interphase) and the structural level, including the fabrication process effects. The thermomechanical properties of the constituents are considered to be nonlinearly dependent on several parameters, including temperature, stress, and stress rate. The computational procedure employs an incremental iterative nonlinear approach utilizing a multifactor-interaction material behavior model, i.e., the material properties are expressed in terms of a product of several factors that affect the properties. HITCAN structural analysis capabilities (static, load stepping - a multistep static analysis with material properties updated at each step, modal, and buckling) for cooled hot structures are demonstrated through a specific example problem.

  12. Strange stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcock, Charles; Farhi, Edward; Olinto, Angela

    1986-01-01

    Strange matter, a form of quark matter that is postulated to be absolute stable, may be the true ground stage of the hadrons. If this hypothesis is correct, neutron stars may convert to 'strange stars'. The mass-radius relation for strange stars is very different from that of neutron stars; there is no minimum mass, and for mass of 1 solar mass or less, mass is proportional to the cube of the radius. For masses between 1 solar mass and 2 solar masses, the radii of strange stars are about 10 km, as for neutron stars. Strange stars may have an exposed quark surface, which is capable of radiating at rates greatly exceeding the Eddington limit, but has a low emissivity for X-ray photons. The stars may have a thin crust with the same composition as the preneutron drip outer layer of a conventional neutron star crust. Strange stars cool efficiently via neutrino emission.

  13. The evolution of galaxy star formation activity in massive haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popesso, P.; Biviano, A.; Finoguenov, A.; Wilman, D.; Salvato, M.; Magnelli, B.; Gruppioni, C.; Pozzi, F.; Rodighiero, G.; Ziparo, F.; Berta, S.; Elbaz, D.; Dickinson, M.; Lutz, D.; Altieri, B.; Aussel, H.; Cimatti, A.; Fadda, D.; Ilbert, O.; Le Floch, E.; Nordon, R.; Poglitsch, A.; Xu, C. K.

    2015-02-01

    Context. There is now a large consensus that the current epoch of the cosmic star formation history (CSFH) is dominated by low mass galaxies while the most active phase, between redshifts 1 and 2, is dominated by more massive galaxies, which evolve more quickly. Aims: Massive galaxies tend to inhabit very massive haloes, such as galaxy groups and clusters. We aim to understand whether the observed "galaxy downsizing" could be interpreted as a "halo downsizing", whereas the most massive haloes, and their galaxy populations, evolve more rapidly than the haloes with lower mass. Methods: We studied the contribution to the CSFH of galaxies inhabiting group-sized haloes. This is done through the study of the evolution of the infra-red (IR) luminosity function of group galaxies from redshift 0 to redshift ~1.6. We used a sample of 39 X-ray-selected groups in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS), the Chandra Deep Field North (CDFN), and the COSMOS field, where the deepest available mid- and far-IR surveys have been conducted with Spitzer MIPS and with the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) on board the Herschel satellite. Results: Groups at low redshift lack the brightest, rarest, and most star forming IR-emitting galaxies observed in the field. Their IR-emitting galaxies contribute ≤10% of the comoving volume density of the whole IR galaxy population in the local Universe. At redshift ≳1, the most IR-luminous galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs) are mainly located in groups, and this is consistent with a reversal of the star formation rate (SFR) vs. density anti-correlation observed in the nearby Universe. At these redshifts, group galaxies contribute 60-80% of the CSFH, i.e. much more than at lower redshifts. Below z ~ 1, the comoving number and SFR densities of IR-emitting galaxies in groups decline significantly faster than those of all IR-emitting galaxies. Conclusions: Our results are consistent with a "halo downsizing" scenario and highlight the

  14. CHARACTERIZING THE COOL KEPLER OBJECTS OF INTERESTS. NEW EFFECTIVE TEMPERATURES, METALLICITIES, MASSES, AND RADII OF LOW-MASS KEPLER PLANET-CANDIDATE HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Muirhead, Philip S.; Hamren, Katherine; Schlawin, Everett; Lloyd, James P.; Rojas-Ayala, Barbara; Covey, Kevin R.

    2012-05-10

    We report stellar parameters for late-K and M-type planet-candidate host stars announced by the Kepler Mission. We obtained medium-resolution, K-band spectra of 84 cool (T{sub eff} {approx}< 4400 K) Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) from Borucki et al. We identified one object as a giant (KOI 977); for the remaining dwarfs, we measured effective temperatures (T{sub eff}) and metallicities [M/H] using the K-band spectral indices of Rojas-Ayala et al. We determine the masses (M{sub *}) and radii (R{sub *}) of the cool KOIs by interpolation onto the Dartmouth evolutionary isochrones. The resultant stellar radii are significantly less than the values reported in the Kepler Input Catalog and, by construction, correlate better with T{sub eff}. Applying the published KOI transit parameters to our stellar radius measurements, we report new physical radii for the planet candidates. Recalculating the equilibrium temperatures of the planet-candidates assuming Earth's albedo and re-radiation fraction, we find that three of the planet-candidates are terrestrial sized with orbital semimajor axes that lie within the habitable zones of their host stars (KOI 463.01, KOI 812.03, and KOI 854.01). The stellar parameters presented in this Letter serve as a resource for prioritization of future follow-up efforts to validate and characterize the cool KOI planet candidates.

  15. Fail-safe system for activity cooled supersonic and hypersonic aircraft. [using liquid hydrogen fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. A.; Braswell, D. O.; Richie, C. B.

    1975-01-01

    A fail-safe-system concept was studied as an alternative to a redundant active cooling system for supersonic and hypersonic aircraft which use the heat sink of liquid-hydrogen fuel for cooling the aircraft structure. This concept consists of an abort maneuver by the aircraft and a passive thermal protection system (TPS) for the aircraft skin. The abort manuever provides a low-heat-load descent from normal cruise speed to a lower speed at which cooling is unnecessary, and the passive TPS allows the aircraft skin to absorb the abort heat load without exceeding critical skin temperature. On the basis of results obtained, it appears that this fail-safe-system concept warrants further consideration, inasmuch as a fail-safe system could possibly replace a redundant active cooling system with no increase in weight and would offer other potential advantages.

  16. MEASURING THE COOLING OF THE NEUTRON STAR IN CASSIOPEIA A WITH ALL CHANDRA X-RAY OBSERVATORY DETECTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Elshamouty, K. G.; Heinke, C. O.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Ho, W. C. G.; Shternin, P. S.; Yakovlev, D. G.; Patnaude, D. J.; David, L.

    2013-11-01

    The thermal evolution of young neutron stars (NSs) reflects the neutrino emission properties of their cores. Heinke and Ho measured a 3.6% ± 0.6% decay in the surface temperature of the Cassiopeia A (Cas A) NS between 2000 and 2009, using archival data from the Chandra X-ray Observatory ACIS-S detector in Graded mode. Page et al. and Shternin et al. attributed this decay to enhanced neutrino emission from a superfluid neutron transition in the core. Here we test this decline, combining analysis of the Cas A NS using all Chandra X-ray detectors and modes (HRC-S, HRC-I, ACIS-I, ACIS-S in Faint mode, and ACIS-S in Graded mode) and adding a 2012 May ACIS-S Graded mode observation, using the most current calibrations (CALDB 4.5.5.1). We measure the temperature changes from each detector separately and test for systematic effects due to the nearby filaments of the supernova remnant. We find a 0.92%-2.0% decay over 10 yr in the effective temperature, inferred from HRC-S data, depending on the choice of source and background extraction regions, with a best-fit decay of 1.0% ± 0.7%. In comparison, the ACIS-S Graded data indicate a temperature decay of 3.1%-5.0% over 10 yr, with a best-fit decay of 3.5% ± 0.4%. Shallower observations using the other detectors yield temperature decays of 2.6% ± 1.9% (ACIS-I), 2.1% ± 1.0% (HRC-I), and 2.1% ± 1.9% (ACIS-S Faint mode) over 10 yr. Our best estimate indicates a decline of 2.9% ± 0.5%{sub stat} ± 1.0{sub sys}% over 10 yr. The complexity of the bright and varying supernova remnant background makes a definitive interpretation of archival Cas A Chandra observations difficult. A temperature decline of 1%-3.5% over 10 yr would indicate extraordinarily fast cooling of the NS that can be regulated by superfluidity of nucleons in the stellar core.

  17. A CATALOG OF ROTATION AND ACTIVITY IN EARLY-M STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Reiners, Ansgar; Joshi, Nandan; Goldman, Bertrand

    2012-04-15

    We present a catalog of rotation and chromospheric activity in a sample of 334 M dwarfs of spectral types M0-M4.5 populating the parameter space around the boundary to full convection. We obtain high-resolution optical spectra for 206 targets and determine projected rotational velocity, vsin i, and H{alpha} emission. The data are combined with measurements of vsin i in field stars of the same spectral type from the literature. Our sample adds 157 new rotation measurements to the existing literature and almost doubles the sample of available vsin i. The final sample provides a statistically meaningful picture of rotation and activity at the transition to full convection in the solar neighborhood. We confirm a steep rise in the fraction of active stars at the transition to full convection known from earlier work. In addition, we see a clear rise in rotational velocity in the same stars. In very few stars, no chromospheric activity but a detection of rotational broadening is reported. We argue that all of them are probably spurious detections; we conclude that in our sample all significantly rotating stars are active, and all active stars are significantly rotating. The rotation-activity relation is valid in partially and in fully convective stars. Thus, we do not observe any evidence for a transition from a rotationally dominated dynamo in partially convective stars to a rotation-independent turbulent dynamo in fully convective stars; turbulent dynamos in fully convective stars of spectral types around M4 are still driven by rotation. Finally, we compare projected rotational velocities of 33 stars to rotational periods derived from photometry in the literature and determine inclinations for a few of them.

  18. Stars and Planets: A New Set of Middle School Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urquhart, M. L.

    2002-01-01

    A set of lesson plans for grades 6-8 which deal with the sizes and distances of stars and planets using a scale factor of 1 to 10 billion, the life cycle of stars, and the search for planets beyond the solar system. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  19. System and method of active vibration control for an electro-mechanically cooled device

    DOEpatents

    Lavietes, Anthony D.; Mauger, Joseph; Anderson, Eric H.

    2000-01-01

    A system and method of active vibration control of an electro-mechanically cooled device is disclosed. A cryogenic cooling system is located within an environment. The cooling system is characterized by a vibration transfer function, which requires vibration transfer function coefficients. A vibration controller generates the vibration transfer function coefficients in response to various triggering events. The environments may differ by mounting apparatus, by proximity to vibration generating devices, or by temperature. The triggering event may be powering on the cooling system, reaching an operating temperature, or a reset action. A counterbalance responds to a drive signal generated by the vibration controller, based on the vibration signal and the vibration transfer function, which adjusts vibrations. The method first places a cryogenic cooling system within a first environment and then generates a first set of vibration transfer function coefficients, for a vibration transfer function of the cooling system. Next, the cryogenic cooling system is placed within a second environment and a second set of vibration transfer function coefficients are generated. Then, a counterbalance is driven, based on the vibration transfer function, to reduce vibrations received by a vibration sensitive element.

  20. Comparison of active cooling devices to passive cooling for rehabilitation of firefighters performing exercise in thermal protective clothing: A report from the Fireground Rehab Evaluation (FIRE) trial

    PubMed Central

    Hostler, David; Reis, Steven E; Bednez, James C; Kerin, Sarah; Suyama, Joe

    2010-01-01

    Background Thermal protective clothing (TPC) worn by firefighters provides considerable protection from the external environment during structural fire suppression. However, TPC is associated with physiological derangements that may have adverse cardiovascular consequences. These derangements should be treated during on-scene rehabilitation periods. Objective The present study examined heart rate and core temperature responses during the application of four active cooling devices, currently being marketed to the fire service for on-scene rehab, and compared them to passive cooling in a moderate temperature (approximately 24°C) and to an infusion of cold (4°C) saline. Methods Subjects exercised in TPC in a heated room. Following an initial exercise period (BOUT 1) the subjects exited the room, removed TPC, and for 20 minutes cooled passively at room temperature, received an infusion of cold normal saline, or were cooled by one of four devices (fan, forearm immersion in water, hand cooling, water perfused cooling vest). After cooling, subjects donned TPC and entered the heated room for another 50-minute exercise period (BOUT 2). Results Subjects were not able to fully recover core temperature during a 20-minute rehab period when provided rehydration and the opportunity to completely remove TPC. Exercise duration was shorter during BOUT 2 when compared to BOUT 1 but did not differ by cooling intervention. The overall magnitude and rate of cooling and heart rate recovery did not differ by intervention. Conclusions No clear advantage was identified when active cooling devices and cold intravenous saline were compared to passive cooling in a moderate temperature after treadmill exercise in TPC. PMID:20397868

  1. A practical cooling strategy for reducing the physiological strain associated with firefighting activity in the heat.

    PubMed

    Barr, D; Gregson, W; Sutton, L; Reilly, T

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to establish whether a practical cooling strategy reduces the physiological strain during simulated firefighting activity in the heat. On two separate occasions under high ambient temperatures (49.6 +/- 1.8 degrees C, relative humidity (RH) 13 +/- 2%), nine male firefighters wearing protective clothing completed two 20-min bouts of treadmill walking (5 km/h, 7.5% gradient) separated by a 15-min recovery period, during which firefighters were either cooled (cool) via application of an ice vest and hand and forearm water immersion ( approximately 19 degrees C) or remained seated without cooling (control). There was no significant difference between trials in any of the dependent variables during the first bout of exercise. Core body temperature (37.72 +/- 0.34 vs. 38.21 +/- 0.17 degrees C), heart rate (HR) (81 +/- 9 vs. 96 +/- 17 beats/min) and mean skin temperature (31.22 +/- 1.04 degrees C vs. 33.31 +/- 1 degrees C) were significantly lower following the recovery period in cool compared with control (p < 0.05). Core body temperature remained consistently lower (0.49 +/- 0.02 degrees C; p < 0.01) throughout the second bout of activity in cool compared to control. Mean skin temperature, HR and thermal sensation were significantly lower during bout 2 in cool compared with control (p < 0.05). It is concluded that this practical cooling strategy is effective at reducing the physiological strain associated with demanding firefighting activity under high ambient temperatures. PMID:19401892

  2. The SEEDS High-Contrast Imaging Survey: Exoplanet and Brown Dwarf Survey for Nearby Young Stars Dated with Gyrochronology and Activity Age Indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Tamura, Motohide; Helminiak, Kris; Mede, Kyle; Brandt, Timothy; Janson, Markus; Kandori, Ryo; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Hashimoto, Jun

    2015-12-01

    The SEEDS campaign has successfully discovered and characterized exoplanets, brown dwarfs, and circumstellar disks since it began in 2009, via the direct imaging technique. The survey has targeted nearby young stars, as well as stars associated to star-forming regions, the Pleiades open cluster, moving groups, and debris disks. We selected the nearby young stars that have been dated with age indicators based on stellar rotation periods (i.e., gyrochronology) and chromoshperic/coronal activities. Of these, nearly 40 were observed, with ages mainly between 100 and 1000 Myr and distances less than 40 pc. Our observations typically attain the contrast of ~6 x 10-6 at 1'' and better than ~1 x 10-6 beyond 2'', enabling us to detect a planetary-mass companion even around such old stars. Indeed, the SEEDS team reported the discovery that the nearby Sun-like star GJ 504 hosts a Jovian companion GJ 504b, which has a mass of 3-8.5 Jupiter masses that is inferred according to the hot-start cooling models and our estimated system age of 100-510 Myr. The remaining observations out of the selected ~40 stars have resulted in no detection of additional planets or brown dwarf companions. Meanwhile, we have newly imaged a low-mass stellar companion orbiting the G-type star HIP 10321, for which the presence of companion was previously announced via radial velocity technique. The astrometry and radial velocity measurements are simultaneously analyzed to determine the orbit, providing constraints on the dynamical mass of both objects and stellar evolution models. Here we summarize our direct imaging observations for the nearby young stars dated with gyrochrolorogy and activity age indicators. Furthermore, we report the analysis for the HIP 10321 system with the imaged low-mass companion.

  3. Meridional flow velocities on solar-like stars with known activity cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baklanova, Dilyara; Plachinda, Sergei

    2015-02-01

    The direct measurements of the meridional flow velocities on stars are impossible today. To evaluate the meridional flow velocities on solar-like stars with stable activity periods, we supposed that during the stellar Hale cycle the matter on surfaces of stars passes the meridional way equivalent to 2 πR★ . We present here the dependence of the mean meridional flow velocity on Rossby number, which is an effective parameter of the stellar magnetic dynamo.

  4. GOODS-HERSCHEL: IMPACT OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AND STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY ON INFRARED SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, Allison; Pope, Alexandra; Alexander, David M.; Charmandaris, Vassilis; Daddi, Emmanuele; Elbaz, David; Gabor, Jared; Mullaney, James; Pannella, Maurilio; Aussel, Herve; Bournaud, Frederic; Dasyra, Kalliopi; Hwang, Ho Seong; Ivison, Rob; Scott, Douglas; Altieri, Bruno; Coia, Daniela; Buat, Veronique; Dannerbauer, Helmut; and others

    2012-11-10

    We explore the effects of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and star formation activity on the infrared (0.3-1000 {mu}m) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of luminous infrared galaxies from z = 0.5 to 4.0. We have compiled a large sample of 151 galaxies selected at 24 {mu}m (S {sub 24} {approx}> 100 {mu}Jy) in the GOODS-N and ECDFS fields for which we have deep Spitzer IRS spectroscopy, allowing us to decompose the mid-IR spectrum into contributions from star formation and AGN activity. A significant portion ({approx}25%) of our sample is dominated by an AGN (>50% of the mid-IR luminosity) in the mid-IR. Based on the mid-IR classification, we divide our full sample into four sub-samples: z {approx} 1 star-forming (SF) sources, z {approx} 2 SF sources, AGNs with clear 9.7 {mu}m silicate absorption, and AGNs with featureless mid-IR spectra. From our large spectroscopic sample and wealth of multi-wavelength data, including deep Herschel imaging at 100, 160, 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m, we use 95 galaxies with complete spectral coverage to create a composite SED for each sub-sample. We then fit a two-temperature component modified blackbody to the SEDs. We find that the IR SEDs have similar cold dust temperatures, regardless of the mid-IR power source, but display a marked difference in the warmer dust temperatures. We calculate the average effective temperature of the dust in each sub-sample and find a significant ({approx}20 K) difference between the SF and AGN systems. We compare our composite SEDs to local templates and find that local templates do not accurately reproduce the mid-IR features and dust temperatures of our high-redshift systems. High-redshift IR luminous galaxies contain significantly more cool dust than their local counterparts. We find that a full suite of photometry spanning the IR peak is necessary to accurately account for the dominant dust temperature components in high-redshift IR luminous galaxies.

  5. Experimental study on active cooling systems used for thermal management of high-power multichip light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop suitable cooling systems for high-power multichip LEDs. To this end, three different active cooling systems were investigated to control the heat generated by the powering of high-power multichip LEDs in two different configurations (30 and 2 × 15 W). The following cooling systems were used in the study: an integrated multi-fin heat sink design with a fan, a cooling system with a thermoelectric cooler (TEC), and a heat pipe cooling device. According to the results, all three systems were observed to be sufficient for cooling high-power LEDs. Furthermore, it was observed that the integrated multifin heat sink design with a fan was the most efficient cooling system for a 30 W high-power multichip LED. The cooling system with a TEC and 46 W input power was the most efficient cooling system for 2 × 15 W high-power multichip LEDs. PMID:25162058

  6. A HIFI view on circumstellar H2O in M-type AGB stars: radiative transfer, velocity profiles, and H2O line cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maercker, M.; Danilovich, T.; Olofsson, H.; De Beck, E.; Justtanont, K.; Lombaert, R.; Royer, P.

    2016-06-01

    Aims: We aim to constrain the temperature and velocity structures, and H2O abundances in the winds of a sample of M-type asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. We further aim to determine the effect of H2O line cooling on the energy balance in the inner circumstellar envelope. Methods: We use two radiative-transfer codes to model molecular emission lines of CO and H2O towards four M-type AGB stars. We focus on spectrally resolved observations of CO and H2O from HIFI aboard the Herschel Space Observatory. The observations are complemented by ground-based CO observations, and spectrally unresolved CO and H2O observations with PACS aboard Herschel. The observed line profiles constrain the velocity structure throughout the circumstellar envelopes (CSEs), while the CO intensities constrain the temperature structure in the CSEs. The H2O observations constrain the o-H2O and p-H2O abundances relative to H2. Finally, the radiative-transfer modelling allows to solve the energy balance in the CSE, in principle including also H2O line cooling. Results: The fits to the line profiles only set moderate constraints on the velocity profile, indicating shallower acceleration profiles in the winds of M-type AGB stars than predicted by dynamical models, while the CO observations effectively constrain the temperature structure. Including H2O line cooling in the energy balance was only possible for the low-mass-loss-rate objects in the sample, and required an ad hoc adjustment of the dust velocity profile in order to counteract extreme cooling in the inner CSE. H2O line cooling was therefore excluded from the models. The constraints set on the temperature profile by the CO lines nevertheless allowed us to derive H2O abundances. The derived H2O abundances confirm previous estimates and are consistent with chemical models. However, the uncertainties in the derived abundances are relatively large, in particular for p-H2O, and consequently the derived o/p-H2O ratios are not well constrained.

  7. Effect of cooling on supraoptic neurohypophysial neuronal activity and on urine flow in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, A V; Pittman, Q J; Riphagen, C L

    1984-01-01

    The activity of antidromically identified supraoptic neurosecretory neurones was recorded in Sprague-Dawley rats under urethane or sodium pentobarbitone anaesthesia during cooling of the body with a cold pack. Of twelve phasic neurones studied during a complete cooling and rewarming cycle, six displayed an initial increase, followed by a depression in activity during the period of reduced body temperature. The remaining six phasic neurones did not alter their activity during cooling. Non-phasic neurohypophysial neurones displayed a reversible reduction (n = 8), or increase (n = 6) in activity during cooling, while seven neurones were unaffected by changes in body temperature. In four other anaesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats, urine flow was reduced by approximately 50% during cooling; this was followed by a diuresis after removal of the cold pack and return of body temperature to normal. The antidiuresis did not occur in homozygous Brattleboro rats which lack arginine vasopressin. The electrophysiological data from a proportion of the supraoptic neurohypophysial neurones correlate with the observed changes in urine flow. PMID:6747884

  8. Models of symbiotic stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedjung, Michael

    1993-01-01

    One of the most important features of symbiotic stars is the coexistence of a cool spectral component that is apparently very similar to the spectrum of a cool giant, with at least one hot continuum, and emission lines from very different stages of ionization. The cool component dominates the infrared spectrum of S-type symbiotics; it tends to be veiled in this wavelength range by what appears to be excess emission in D-type symbiotics, this excess usually being attributed to circumstellar dust. The hot continuum (or continua) dominates the ultraviolet. X-rays have sometimes also been observed. Another important feature of symbiotic stars that needs to be explained is the variability. Different forms occur, some variability being periodic. This type of variability can, in a few cases, strongly suggest the presence of eclipses of a binary system. One of the most characteristic forms of variability is that characterizing the active phases. This basic form of variation is traditionally associated in the optical with the veiling of the cool spectrum and the disappearance of high-ionization emission lines, the latter progressively appearing (in classical cases, reappearing) later. Such spectral changes recall those of novae, but spectroscopic signatures of the high-ejection velocities observed for novae are not usually detected in symbiotic stars. However, the light curves of the 'symbiotic nova' subclass recall those of novae. We may also mention in this connection that radio observations (or, in a few cases, optical observations) of nebulae indicate ejection from symbiotic stars, with deviations from spherical symmetry. We shall give a historical overview of the proposed models for symbiotic stars and make a critical analysis in the light of the observations of symbiotic stars. We describe the empirical approach to models and use the observational data to diagnose the physical conditions in the symbiotics stars. Finally, we compare the results of this empirical

  9. Daybreak Star Preschool Activities Book: A Teacher's "How-to" Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patacsil, Sharon; And Others

    The culturally-based educational materials contained in the Daybreak Star Preschool Activities Book are used with the Native American children in the United Indians of All Tribes Foundation's Daybreak Star Preschool. These educational materials reflect the cultures of the children in the Preschool. The Preschool's primary focus is to create a…

  10. Are passive red spirals truly passive?. The current star formation activity of optically red disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortese, L.

    2012-07-01

    We used GALEX ultraviolet and WISE 22 μm observations to investigate the current star formation activity of the optically red spirals recently identified as part of the Galaxy Zoo project. These galaxies were accurately selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey as pure discs with low or no current star formation activity, representing one of the best optically selected samples of candidate passive spirals. However, we show that these galaxies are not only still forming stars at a significant rate (≳1 M⊙ yr-1) but, more importantly, their star formation activity is not different from that of normal star-forming discs of the same stellar mass (M∗ ≳ 1010.2 M⊙). Indeed, these systems lie on the UV-optical blue sequence, even without any corrections for internal dust attenuation, and they follow the same specific star formation rate vs. stellar mass relation of star-forming galaxies. Our findings clearly show that at high stellar masses, optical colours do not allow to distinguish between actively star-forming and truly quiescent systems.

  11. Thermal design for areas of interference heating on actively cooled hypersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, R. L.; Stone, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    Numerous actively cooled panel design alternatives for application in regions on high speed aircraft that are subject to interference heating effects were studied. Candidate design concepts were evaluated using mass, producibility, reliability and inspectability/maintainability as figures of merit. Three design approaches were identified as superior within certain regimes of the matrix of design heating conditions considered. Only minor modifications to basic actively cooled panel design are required to withstand minor interference heating effects. Designs incorporating internally finned coolant tubes to augment heat transfer are recommended for moderate design heating conditions. At severe heating conditions, an insulated panel concept is required.

  12. Study of fail-safe abort system for an actively cooled hypersonic aircraft, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peeples, M. E.; Herring, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    Conceptual designs of a fail-safe abort system for hydrogen fueled actively cooled high speed aircraft are examined. The fail-safe concept depends on basically three factors: (1) a reliable method of detecting a failure or malfunction in the active cooling system, (2) the optimization of abort trajectories which minimize the descent heat load to the aircraft, and (3) fail-safe thermostructural concepts to minimize both the weight and the maximum temperature the structure will reach during descent. These factors are examined and promising approaches are evaluated based on weight, reliability, ease of manufacture and cost.

  13. Design and fabrication of a skin stringer discrete tube actively cooled structural panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, F. M.

    1978-01-01

    The design optimization and practical implementation of actively cooled structural panel concepts was investigated. The desired actively cooled structural panel consisted of the cooled skin and a substructure. The primary load carrying components were fabricated from 2024-T3 aliminum alloy. The 3003-H14 coolant passage tubing was chosen because of its excellent corrosion resistance, workability needed to obtain the desired cross sectional shape, and strength. The Epon 951 adhesive was selected for its excellent structural properties and is the thinnest of available films, 0.064 mm. The Eccobond 58C silver filled epoxy was chosen because of its high thermal conductivity, and the alumina filled Epon 828 was chosen for structural and expansion characteristics.

  14. BAR EFFECTS ON CENTRAL STAR FORMATION AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Seulhee; Oh, Kyuseok; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2012-01-01

    Galactic bars are often suspected to be channels of gas inflow to the galactic center and to trigger central star formation and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity. However, the current status on this issue based on empirical studies is unsettling, especially regarding AGNs. We investigate this question based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. From the nearby (0.01 < z < 0.05) bright (M{sub r} < -19) database, we have constructed a sample of 6658 relatively face-on late-type galaxies through visual inspection. We found 36% of them to have a bar. Bars are found to be more common in galaxies with earlier morphology. This makes sample selection critical. Parameter-based selections would miss a large fraction of barred galaxies of early morphology. Bar effects on star formation or AGNs are difficult to understand properly because multiple factors (bar frequency, stellar mass, black hole mass, gas contents, etc.) seem to contribute to them in intricate manners. In the hope of breaking these degeneracies, we inspect bar effects for fixed galaxy properties. Bar effects on central star formation seem higher in redder galaxies. Bar effects on AGNs on the other hand are higher in bluer and less massive galaxies. These effects seem more pronounced with increasing bar length. We discuss possible implications in terms of gas contents, bar strength, bar evolution, fueling timescale, and the dynamical role of supermassive black hole.

  15. Evidence for Widespread Cooling in an Active Region Observed with the SDO Atmospheric Imaging Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viall, Nicholeen M.; Klimchuk, James A.

    2012-01-01

    A well known behavior of EUV light curves of discrete coronal loops is that the peak intensities of cooler channels or spectral lines are reached at progressively later times. This time lag is understood to be the result of hot coronal loop plasma cooling through these lower respective temperatures. However, loops typically comprise only a minority of the total emission in active regions. Is this cooling pattern a common property of active region coronal plasma, or does it only occur in unique circumstances, locations, and times? The new SDO/AIA data provide a wonderful opportunity to answer this question systematically for an entire active region. We measure the time lag between pairs of SDO/AIA EUV channels using 24 hours of images of AR 11082 observed on 19 June 2010. We find that there is a time-lag signal consistent with cooling plasma, just as is usually found for loops, throughout the active region including the diffuse emission between loops for the entire 24 hour duration. The pattern persists consistently for all channel pairs and choice of window length within the 24 hour time period, giving us confidence that the plasma is cooling from temperatures of greater than 3 MK, and sometimes exceeding 7 MK, down to temperatures lower than approx. 0.8 MK. This suggests that the bulk of the emitting coronal plasma in this active region is not steady; rather, it is dynamic and constantly evolving. These measurements provide crucial constraints on any model which seeks to describe coronal heating.

  16. Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) Device Being Developed for Active Cooling and Temperature Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, Duane E.

    2003-01-01

    High-capacity cooling options remain limited for many small-scale applications such as microelectronic components, miniature sensors, and microsystems. A microelectromechanical system (MEMS) using a Stirling thermodynamic cycle to provide cooling or heating directly to a thermally loaded surface is being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to meet this need. The device can be used strictly in the cooling mode or can be switched between cooling and heating modes in milliseconds for precise temperature control. Fabrication and assembly employ techniques routinely used in the semiconductor processing industry. Benefits of the MEMS cooler include scalability to fractions of a millimeter, modularity for increased capacity and staging to low temperatures, simple interfaces, limited failure modes, and minimal induced vibration. The MEMS cooler has potential applications across a broad range of industries such as the biomedical, computer, automotive, and aerospace industries. The basic capabilities it provides can be categorized into four key areas: 1) Extended environmental temperature range in harsh environments; 2) Lower operating temperatures for electronics and other components; 3) Precision spatial and temporal thermal control for temperature-sensitive devices; and 4) The enabling of microsystem devices that require active cooling and/or temperature control. The rapidly expanding capabilities of semiconductor processing in general, and microsystems packaging in particular, present a new opportunity to extend Stirling-cycle cooling to the MEMS domain. The comparatively high capacity and efficiency possible with a MEMS Stirling cooler provides a level of active cooling that is impossible at the microscale with current state-of-the-art techniques. The MEMS cooler technology builds on decades of research at Glenn on Stirling-cycle machines, and capitalizes on Glenn s emerging microsystems capabilities.

  17. Venus Mobile Explorer with RPS for Active Cooling: A Feasibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leifer, Stephanie D.; Green, Jacklyn R.; Balint, Tibor S.; Manvi, Ram

    2009-01-01

    We present our findings from a study to evaluate the feasibility of a radioisotope power system (RPS) combined with active cooling to enable a long-duration Venus surface mission. On-board power with active cooling technology featured prominently in both the National Research Council's Decadal Survey and in the 2006 NASA Solar System Exploration Roadmap as mission-enabling for the exploration of Venus. Power and cooling system options were reviewed and the most promising concepts modeled to develop an assessment tool for Venus mission planners considering a variety of future potential missions to Venus, including a Venus Mobile Explorer (either a balloon or rover concept), a long-lived Venus static lander, or a Venus Geophysical Network. The concepts modeled were based on the integration of General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules with different types of Stirling cycle heat engines for power and cooling. Unlike prior investigations which reported on single point design concepts, this assessment tool allows the user to generate either a point design or parametric curves of approximate power and cooling system mass, power level, and number of GPHS modules needed for a "black box" payload housed in a spherical pressure vessel.

  18. Star Formation Activity in a z>4 Protocluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menéndez-Delmestre, Karín; Capak, Peter; Sheth, Kartik

    2015-08-01

    Local studies show that galaxy properties are linked to the galaxy number density within their local environment. Galaxy clusters represent the most extreme density environments and are ideal laboratories to investigate the interplay between galaxy evolution and the environment. However, to understand the origin of the galaxy-environment relation, one needs to look back at the epoch of galaxy formation (z > 1), where the local high-density environments of well-established, virialized clusters give way to looser large-scale structures (LSS) extending over regions of several megaparsecs in size (protoclusters). Clustering analysis indicate that at z~2 submm-selected galaxies (SMGs) reside in very massive halos, suggesting that these may trace high-density environments that likely evolve into rich clusters of galaxies. Conversely, recent work has suggests that SMGs are tracers of a broader range of environments, including structures with more modest masses caught in highly active periods. This suggests that since galaxies in these structures are likely caught during episodes of peak starbursts, SMGs may be tracers of a wider range of environments beyond the progenitors of today’s very rich clusters, opening a window for a more complete exploration of the details underpinning the process of galaxy evolution in concert with the assembly of LSS. We undertook a large observing program comprising deep narrow-band Ly-alpha imaging and multi-object spectroscopy using the IMACS camera on Magellan (Las Campanas) to probe for the presence of a galaxy overdensity in the vicinity of a 4-member group of SMGs at z>4. With ~100 spectroscopically-confirmed Ly-alpha emitters, we are in a position to gauge the level of galaxy overdensity in this region. Furthermore, we have initiated a detailed follow-up study of these Ly-alpha emitters to obtain star-formation rates based on the IRAC and MIPS Spitzer archives, in an effort to probe for trends in the intra-LSS distribution.

  19. Spitzer SAGE-Spec: Near infrared spectroscopy, dust shells, and cool envelopes in extreme Large Magellanic Cloud asymptotic giant branch stars

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, R. D.; Srinivasan, S.; Kemper, F.; Ling, B.

    2014-11-01

    K-band spectra are presented for a sample of 39 Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) SAGE-Spec sources in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The spectra exhibit characteristics in very good agreement with their positions in the near-infrared—Spitzer color-magnitude diagrams and their properties as deduced from the Spitzer IRS spectra. Specifically, the near-infrared spectra show strong atomic and molecular features representative of oxygen-rich and carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch stars, respectively. A small subset of stars was chosen from the luminous and red extreme ''tip'' of the color-magnitude diagram. These objects have properties consistent with dusty envelopes but also cool, carbon-rich ''stellar'' cores. Modest amounts of dust mass loss combine with the stellar spectral energy distribution to make these objects appear extreme in their near-infrared and mid-infrared colors. One object in our sample, HV 915, a known post-asymptotic giant branch star of the RV Tau type, exhibits CO 2.3 μm band head emission consistent with previous work that demonstrates that the object has a circumstellar disk.

  20. Performance evaluation of an active solar cooling system utilizing low cost plastic collectors and an evaporatively-cooled absorption chiller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lof, G. O.; Westhoff, M. A.; Karaki, S.

    1984-02-01

    During the summer of 1982, air conditioning in Solar House 3 at Colorado State University was provided by an evaporatively-cooled absorption chiller. The single-effect lithium bromide chiller is an experimental three-ton unit from which heat is rejected by direct evaporative cooling of the condenser and absorber walls, thereby eliminating the need for a separate cooling tower. Domestic hot water was also provided by use of a double-walled heat exchanger and 80-gal hot water tank. A schematic of the system is given. Objectives of the project were: (1) evaluation of system performance over the course of one cooling season in Fort Collins, Colorado; (2) optimization of system operation and control; (3) development of a TRNSYS compatible model of the chiller; and (4) determination of cooling system performance in several U.S. climates by use of the model.

  1. Spitzer SAGE-Spec: Near Infrared Spectroscopy, Dust Shells, and Cool Envelopes in Extreme Large Magellanic Cloud Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, R. D.; Srinivasan, S.; Kemper, F.; Ling, B.; Volk, K.

    2014-11-01

    K-band spectra are presented for a sample of 39 Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) SAGE-Spec sources in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The spectra exhibit characteristics in very good agreement with their positions in the near-infrared—Spitzer color-magnitude diagrams and their properties as deduced from the Spitzer IRS spectra. Specifically, the near-infrared spectra show strong atomic and molecular features representative of oxygen-rich and carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch stars, respectively. A small subset of stars was chosen from the luminous and red extreme ``tip" of the color-magnitude diagram. These objects have properties consistent with dusty envelopes but also cool, carbon-rich ``stellar" cores. Modest amounts of dust mass loss combine with the stellar spectral energy distribution to make these objects appear extreme in their near-infrared and mid-infrared colors. One object in our sample, HV 915, a known post-asymptotic giant branch star of the RV Tau type, exhibits CO 2.3 μm band head emission consistent with previous work that demonstrates that the object has a circumstellar disk. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and Michigan State University (MSU).

  2. Absolute Optical Photometry and a Photometric Metallicity Relation for the Nearby Cool Stars from the MEarth Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmann, Jason; Irwin, Jonathan; Charbonneau, David; Newton, Elisabeth R.

    2015-01-01

    There is renewed interest in understanding the low mass stars and brown dwarfs of the solar neighborhood. Since M dwarfs make up the vast majority of stars in the universe, it is essential that we understand their fundamental physical properties. Their ubiquitousness makes them excellent kinematic and chemical probes of the Galaxy, provided we can accurately measure their distances, absolute magnitudes, and metallicities. Additionally, current and future exoplanet surveys that are focused on M dwarfs, such as SPIRou, CARMENES, and the Habitable Zone Planet Finder will uncover a plethora of planetary systems around these stars. Unfortunately, many of the nearby low mass stars are poorly characterized with current data. The MEarth survey has been monitoring approximately 1800 mid-to-late M dwarfs since 2008 and each night also observes a set of Landolt standard stars. We measure a precise optical magnitude in our MEarth bandpass, a red broadband filter similar to the Bessel I filter, for 1500 of these systems. By combining this work with our recent work measuring the trigonometric parallaxes and metallicities of a subset of these M dwarfs, we construct a photometric metallicity relation. We then apply it to the full sample of MEarth-North M dwarfs.The MEarth project gratefully acknowledges funding from the David and Lucile Packard Fellowship for Science and Engineering, the National Science Foundation under grants AST-0807690, AST-1109468, and AST-1004488, and the John Templeton Foundation.

  3. Small Spacecraft Active Thermal Control: Micro-Vascular Composites Enable Small Satellite Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The Small Spacecraft Integrated Power System with Active Thermal Control project endeavors to achieve active thermal control for small spacecraft in a practical and lightweight structure by circulating a coolant through embedded micro-vascular channels in deployable composite panels. Typically, small spacecraft rely on small body mounted passive radiators to discard heat. This limits cooling capacity and leads to the necessity to design for limited mission operations. These restrictions severely limit the ability of the system to dissipate large amounts of heat from radios, propulsion systems, etc. An actively pumped cooling system combined with a large deployable radiator brings two key advantages over the state of the art for small spacecraft: capacity and flexibility. The use of a large deployable radiator increases the surface area of the spacecraft and allows the radiation surface to be pointed in a direction allowing the most cooling, drastically increasing cooling capacity. With active coolant circulation, throttling of the coolant flow can enable high heat transfer rates during periods of increased heat load, or isolate the radiator during periods of low heat dissipation.

  4. The regulation and function of the striated muscle activator of rho signaling (STARS) protein

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Marita A.; Lamon, Séverine; Russell, Aaron P.

    2012-01-01

    Healthy living throughout the lifespan requires continual growth and repair of cardiac, smooth, and skeletal muscle. To effectively maintain these processes muscle cells detect extracellular stress signals and efficiently transmit them to activate appropriate intracellular transcriptional programs. The striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS) protein, also known as Myocyte Stress-1 (MS1) protein and Actin-binding Rho-activating protein (ABRA) is highly enriched in cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle. STARS binds actin, co-localizes to the sarcomere and is able to stabilize the actin cytoskeleton. By regulating actin polymerization, STARS also controls an intracellular signaling cascade that stimulates the serum response factor (SRF) transcriptional pathway; a pathway controlling genes involved in muscle cell proliferation, differentiation, and growth. Understanding the activation, transcriptional control and biological roles of STARS in cardiac, smooth, and skeletal muscle, will improve our understanding of physiological and pathophysiological muscle development and function. PMID:23248604

  5. The missing compact star of SN1987A: a solid quark star?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. W.; Liang, J. D.; Xu, R. X.; Han, J. L.; Qiao, G. J.

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the missing compact star of Supernova 1987A, we analyzed the cooling and heating processes of a possible compact star based on the upper limit of observational X-ray luminosity. From the cooling process, we found that a solid quark-cluster star (SQS), having a stiffer equation of state than that of a conventional liquid quark star, has a heat capacity much smaller than a neutron star. The SQS can cool down quickly, naturally explaining the non-detection of a point source in X-ray wavelengths. On the other hand, we considered the heating processes due to magnetospheric activity and possible accretion and obtained some constraints on the parameters of a possible pulsar. Therefore, we concluded that a SQS can explain the observational limit in a confident parameter space. As a possible central compact object, the pulsar parameter constraints can be tested for SN1987A with advanced, future facilities.

  6. Feasibility of Actively Cooled Silicon Nitride Airfoil for Turbine Applications Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    2001-01-01

    Nickel-base superalloys currently limit gas turbine engine performance. Active cooling has extended the temperature range of service of nickel-base superalloys in current gas turbine engines, but the margin for further improvement appears modest. Therefore, significant advancements in materials technology are needed to raise turbine inlet temperatures above 2400 F to increase engine specific thrust and operating efficiency. Because of their low density and high-temperature strength and thermal conductivity, in situ toughened silicon nitride ceramics have received a great deal of attention for cooled structures. However, the high processing costs and low impact resistance of silicon nitride ceramics have proven to be major obstacles for widespread applications. Advanced rapid prototyping technology in combination with conventional gel casting and sintering can reduce high processing costs and may offer an affordable manufacturing approach. Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center, in cooperation with a local university and an aerospace company, are developing actively cooled and functionally graded ceramic structures. The objective of this program is to develop cost-effective manufacturing technology and experimental and analytical capabilities for environmentally stable, aerodynamically efficient, foreign-object-damage-resistant, in situ toughened silicon nitride turbine nozzle vanes, and to test these vanes under simulated engine conditions. Starting with computer aided design (CAD) files of an airfoil and a flat plate with internal cooling passages, the permanent and removable mold components for gel casting ceramic slips were made by stereolithography and Sanders machines, respectively. The gel-cast part was dried and sintered to final shape. Several in situ toughened silicon nitride generic airfoils with internal cooling passages have been fabricated. The uncoated and thermal barrier coated airfoils and flat plates were burner rig tested for 30 min without

  7. Potent inhibition by star fruit of human cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) activity.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Muneaki; Fujita, Ken-ichi; Ogikubo, Tetsuya; Yamasaki, Keishi; Iwakiri, Tomomi; Okumura, Manabu; Kodama, Hirofumi; Arimori, Kazuhiko

    2004-06-01

    There has been very limited information on the capacities of tropical fruits to inhibit human cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) activity. Thus, the inhibitory effects of tropical fruits on midazolam 1'-hydroxylase activity of CYP3A in human liver microsomes were evaluated. Eight tropical fruits such as common papaw, dragon fruit, kiwi fruit, mango, passion fruit, pomegranate, rambutan, and star fruit were tested. We also examined the inhibition of CYP3A activity by grapefruit (white) and Valencia orange as controls. The juice of star fruit showed the most potent inhibition of CYP3A. The addition of a star fruit juice (5.0%, v/v) resulted in the almost complete inhibition of midazolam 1'-hydroxylase activity (residual activity of 0.1%). In the case of grape-fruit, the residual activity was 14.7%. The inhibition depended on the amount of fruit juice added to the incubation mixture (0.2-6.0%, v/v). The elongation of the preincubation period of a juice from star fruit (1.25 or 2.5%, v/v) with the microsomal fraction did not alter the CYP3A inhibition, suggesting that the star fruit did not contain a mechanism-based inhibitor. Thus, we discovered filtered extracts of star fruit juice to be inhibitors of human CYP3A activity in vitro. PMID:15155547

  8. Shuttle active thermal control system development testing. Volume 5: Integrated radiator/expendable cooling system tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheps, P. B.

    1974-01-01

    Tests were conducted to gather data on a space shuttle active control system (ATCS) incorporating both radiators and an expendable cooling device to provide vehicle heat removal. Two systems were tested and design information was provided for both nominal and limit conditions. The tests verified the concept that an integrated radiator/expendable cooling system can adequately maintain desired water quantities while responding to variations in heat loads and environments. In addition, the need for duct heating was demonstrated, while exhaust nozzle heating was also shown to be unnecessary.

  9. Current Status of Joint AFRL/NASA Microgravity Spray Cooling Research Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalak, Travis; Yerkes,Kirk; McQuillen, John; Golliher, Eric

    2004-01-01

    The Air Force Research Lab and the NASA Glenn Research Center are cooperatively examining spray cooling in a low and a variable gravity environment by conducting experiments principally aboard the NASA Reduced Gravity Aircraft. The objective of these research activities is to examine an effective high-heat flux, high-power thermal management technology using spray cooling for both aircraft and space-based platforms. Previous studies have demonstrated that two phase heat transfer and fluid management are issues that need to be examined. This effort has obtained preliminary results which confirm these concerns. More research is planned.

  10. The quiescent chromospheres and transition regions of active dwarf stars - What are we learning from recent observations and models?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    Progress in understanding active dwarf stars based on recent IUE, Einstein, and ground-based observations is reviewed. The extent of magnetic field control over nonflare phenomena in active dwarf stars is considered, and the spatial homogeneity and time variability of active dwarf atmospheres is discussed. The possibility that solar like flux tubes can explain enhanced heating in active dwarf stars in examined, and the roles of systematic flows in active dwarf star atmospheres are considered. The relation between heating rates in different layers of active dwarf stars is summarized, and the mechanism of chromosphere and transition region heating in these stars are discussed. The results of one-component and two-component models of active dwarf stars are addressed.

  11. The mass, radius, distance and cooling of the neutron star in EXO 0748-676 in quiescence with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zheng; Mendez, Mariano; Costantini, Elisa; Diaz Trigo, Maria

    2016-07-01

    We present the spectral analysis of four XMM-Newton observations of the neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary EXO 0748-676 in quiescence, taken between 2009 and 2013. We fit the spectra with an absorbed neutron-star atmosphere model, without the need for a high-energy (power-law) component, with a 95 per cent confidence upper limit of 1 per cent to the contribution of the power law to the total flux of the source in the 0.2-10.0 keV band. We find a significant emission line at around 0.5 keV in the spectra of the three CCD cameras on board XMM-Newton of all four observations; the line, which we tentatively identify as Lyα emission from NVII, is moderately broad, σ ≈ 0.17 keV, and contributes ˜10-14 per cent of the total flux in the 0.2-10 keV band. The temperature of the neutron star in EXO 0748-676 has decreased significantly compared to the previous XMM-Newton observation, with the cooling curve being consistent with either an exponential decay plus a constant, a power law or a broken power-law. We fitted the spectra with a neutron-star atmosphere model that takes into account the observed peak flux of photospheric radius expansion (PRE) bursts to constrain the neutron-star mass, radius and distance self-consistently. Using this model we carried out MCMC simulations assuming a uniform prior for the inclination angle of the system (which accounts for anisotropy in the emission at the peak of the bursts) and for the hydrogen fraction of the fuel during the PRE bursts. We find that M _{ns} = 1.87 ^{+0.69}_{-0.32} M⊙, R_{ns} = 8.5^{+3.2}_{-1.3} km and D = 5.4^{+2.4}_{-1.2} kpc (99% confidence level), which is inconsistent with quark-bearing equations of state for this neutron star.

  12. HuDo 1 and HuBi 1: two planetary nebulae ionized by cool [WC] central stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña, M.

    2005-10-01

    As part of our spectroscopic survey of planetary nebulae with [WC] nuclei (Peña et al. 2001), low- and high-resolution spectra of the planetary nebulae HuDo 1 (PNG 060.4+01.5, PM1-310) and HuBi 1 (PNG 012.2+04.9, PM1-188) were secured and analyzed. Both objects are ionized by very late [WC] central stars. We found that the objects belong to the galactic disk, with heliocentric radial velocities of -12 km s-1 (HuDo 1) and 57 km s-1 (HuBi1). Both objects are heavily extinguished showing a logarithmic reddening, c(Hβ), of 2.04 for HuDo 1 and 1.22 for HuBi 1. Our data cover a wide wavelength range; therefore we obtained several plasma line ratios to estimate physical conditions and abundances. The derived electron temperature and density for HuBi 1 are 9,400±1,500 K and 800 cm-3. This density is very low for a nebula around a [WC]-late star. HuDo 1 has Ne = 3300 cm-3. We find log(O/H)+12 = 8.43 and 8.57, and N/O = 0.2 and 0.1 for HuDo 1 and HuBi 1 respectively, typical of disk PNe. Intense nebular He I recombination lines are detected for HuBi 1, this being the only PN excited by a very late [WC] star showing such an emission. The He+ abundance derived for HuBi 1 is 0.11, which is indicating a large He enhancement in HuBi 1. >From the analysis of the stellar emission lines a [WC 10] spectral type is derived for both stars. This is consistent with a stellar temperature of about 30,000 K, although the HuBi 1 central star should be slightly hotter for providing the large amount of He0 ionizing photons required to explain the nebular He I lines. Nebular and stellar parameters of HuDo 1 and HuBi 1 can be compared with those of other [WC 10] objects, such as M 4-18, He 2-113 and CPD-5608031. >From this, we can conclude that, in spite of the fact that all the objects have the same spectral type, the central stars of HuDo 1 and HuBi 1 should be intrinsically fainter, and consequently of lower mass. This is an additional evidence showing that stars of different masses can go

  13. Photometric Variations in Spotted Pleiades Stars as Probes of Long-Term Activity Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardenett, E.; Milingo, J. B.; Marschall, L. A.; Backman, D. E.

    2004-12-01

    Through the collaborative efforts of undergraduates and faculty at Franklin & Marshall and Gettysburg Colleges, we present new photometric data for 3 K-type stars in the Pleiades. Continuing 8+ years of observations, this data contributes to the long-term study of photometric variations in these stars. These young stars have rotational light curves with V-band amplitudes of a few percent (up to 10% in the most active stars) due to large photospheric active regions or "starspots". Quantifying the level of starspot activity from year to year allows us to look for long-term trends analogous to the solar sunspot cycle. These observations were acquired with the National Undergraduate Research Observatory's (NURO) 31" telescope, which is operated by Lowell Observatory and Northern Arizona University. This work is supported by Franklin & Marshall College, the Delaware Space Grant Consortium, and Arizona Space Grant (NASA Space Grant programs).

  14. Coupling hydrodynamics and radiation calculations for star-jet interactions in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Cita, V. M.; Bosch-Ramon, V.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Khangulyan, D.; Perucho, M.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Stars and their winds can contribute to the non-thermal emission in extragalactic jets. Because of the complexity of jet-star interactions, the properties of the resulting emission are closely linked to those of the emitting flows. Aims: We simulate the interaction between a stellar wind and a relativistic extragalactic jet and use the hydrodynamic results to compute the non-thermal emission under different conditions. Methods: We performed relativistic axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulations of a relativistic jet interacting with a supersonic, non-relativistic stellar wind. We computed the corresponding streamlines out of the simulation results and calculated the injection, evolution, and emission of non-thermal particles accelerated in the jet shock, focusing on electrons or e±-pairs. Several cases were explored, considering different jet-star interaction locations, magnetic fields, and observer lines of sight. The jet luminosity and star properties were fixed, but the results are easily scalable when these parameters are changed. Results: Individual jet-star interactions produce synchrotron and inverse Compton emission that peaks from X-rays to MeV energies (depending on the magnetic field), and at ~100-1000 GeV (depending on the stellar type), respectively. The radiation spectrum is hard in the scenarios explored here as a result of non-radiative cooling dominance, as low-energy electrons are efficiently advected even under relatively high magnetic fields. Interactions of jets with cold stars lead to an even harder inverse Compton spectrum because of the Klein-Nishina effect in the cross section. Doppler boosting has a strong effect on the observer luminosity. Conclusions: The emission levels for individual interactions found here are in the line of previous, more approximate, estimates, strengthening the hypothesis that collective jet-star interactions could significantly contribute at high energies under efficient particle acceleration.

  15. Variable X-Ray and UV emission from AGB stars: Accretion activity associated with binarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Sanz-Forcada, Jorge; Sánchez Contreras, Carmen

    2016-07-01

    Almost all of our current understanding of the late evolutionary stages of (1 — 8) Mʘ stars is based on single-star models. However, binarity can drastically affect late stellar evolution, producing dramatic changes in the history and geometry of mass loss that occurs in stars as they evolve off the AGB to become planetary nebulae (PNe). A variety of binary models have been proposed, which can lead to the generation of accretion disks and magnetic fields, which in turn produce the highly collimated jets that have been proposed as the primary agents for the formation of bipolar and multipolar PNe. However, observational evidence of binarity in AGB stars is sorely lacking simply these stars are very luminous and variable, invalidating standard techniques for binary detection. Using an innovative technique of searching for UV emission from AGB stars with GALEX, we have identified a class of AGB stars with far- ultraviolet excesses (fuvAGB stars), that are likely candidates for active accretion associated with a binary companion. We have carried out a pilot survey for X-ray emission from fuvAGB stars. The X-ray fluxes are found to vary in a stochastic or quasi-periodic manner on roughly hour-long times-scales, and simultaneous UV observations show similar variations in the UV fluxes. We discuss several models for the X-ray emission and its variability and find that the most likely scenario for the origin of the X-ray (and FUV) emission involves accretion activity around a main-sequence companion star, with confinement by strong magnetic fields associated with the companion and/or an accretion disk around it.

  16. Definition of the Active Cooling System for the Space Instrument CIVA/Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamartinie, Sujit; Bibring, Jean-Pierre; Soufflot, Alain

    2003-03-01

    CIVA/Mars is a space miniaturized spectral imaging microscope. It is designed to in-situ analyze samples on Mars surface. It requires the use of a double cooling system : a passive cooling for the global instrument which will be maintained at a temperature higher than 160 K and an active cooling system for the IR MCT detector matrix which must be maintained at a temperature lower than 140 K. Taking into account the mission constraints, a trade-off analysis of available active cooling systems led to the choice of a thermoelectrical cooler (TEC). Space validation tests of standard multi-stage TECs were performed. Performances did not meet the technical specifications of the instrument. Two types of customized TEC modules were then designed and manufactured : mechanical prototypes from RMT Ltd. and optimized modules from Marlow Ind. A first RMT prototype passed the vibration &shock qualification tests and a second passed the low temperatures vacuum qualification tests with few margins. A Marlow optimized module passed the low temperatures vacuum qualification tests; its characteristics and performances make it compatible with CIVA/Mars. In this paper, the instrument mission and characteristics are first presented. Then TEC design studies are discussed. Finally, optimized TEC space qualification tests are detailed, and the performances analyzed.

  17. The effect of heating and cooling on the velocity fluctuations in the ISM induced by the system of stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deiss, B. M.; Kegel, W. H.

    1986-06-01

    Dissipative thermal effects are taken into account in the expressions for interstellar gas velocity fluctuations (due to the gravitational interaction with stars) derived by Kegel and Volk (1983), with application to the interpretation of interstellar lines, the large scale flow of the interstellar matter, and the collapse of interstellar clouds. Results indicate a decrease in the critical wavelength for gravitational instability, which value is prevented by thermal effects from becoming zero when the relative velocity approaches the velocity of sound, in contradiction with the results of Kegel and Volk, and of Niimi (1970). The velocity fluctuations in the gas derived by Kegel and Volk are shown to be reduced considerably, though velocity fluctuations many times the velocity of sound, which increase with increasing relative motion between gas and stars, are found, principally in molecular clouds.

  18. Deactivation of the inferior colliculus by cooling demonstrates intercollicular modulation of neuronal activity

    PubMed Central

    Orton, Llwyd D.; Poon, Paul W. F.; Rees, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    The auditory pathways coursing through the brainstem are organized bilaterally in mirror image about the midline and at several levels the two sides are interconnected. One of the most prominent points of interconnection is the commissure of the inferior colliculus (CoIC). Anatomical studies have revealed that these fibers make reciprocal connections which follow the tonotopic organization of the inferior colliculus (IC), and that the commissure contains both excitatory and, albeit fewer, inhibitory fibers. The role of these connections in sound processing is largely unknown. Here we describe a method to address this question in the anaesthetized guinea pig. We used a cryoloop placed on one IC to produce reversible deactivation while recording electrophysiological responses to sounds in both ICs. We recorded single units, multi-unit clusters and local field potentials (LFPs) before, during and after cooling. The degree and spread of cooling was measured with a thermocouple placed in the IC and other auditory structures. Cooling sufficient to eliminate firing was restricted to the IC contacted by the cryoloop. The temperature of other auditory brainstem structures, including the contralateral IC and the cochlea were minimally affected. Cooling below 20°C reduced or eliminated the firing of action potentials in frequency laminae at depths corresponding to characteristic frequencies up to ~8 kHz. Modulation of neural activity also occurred in the un-cooled IC with changes in single unit firing and LFPs. Components of LFPs signaling lemniscal afferent input to the IC showed little change in amplitude or latency with cooling, whereas the later components, which likely reflect inter- and intra-collicular processing, showed marked changes in form and amplitude. We conclude that the cryoloop is an effective method of selectively deactivating one IC in guinea pig, and demonstrate that auditory processing in the IC is strongly influenced by the other. PMID:23248587

  19. Hydrogen Atom Collision Processes in Cool Stellar Atmospheres: Effects on Spectral Line Strengths and Measured Chemical Abundances in Old Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barklem, Paul S.

    2012-12-01

    The precise measurement of the chemical composition of stars is a fundamental problem relevant to many areas of astrophysics. State-of-the-art approaches attempt to unite accurate descriptions of microphysics, non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) line formation and 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres. In this paper I review progress in understanding inelastic collisions of hydrogen atoms with other species and their influence on spectral line formation and derived abundances in stellar atmospheres. These collisions are a major source of uncertainty in non-LTE modelling of spectral lines and abundance determinations, especially for old, metal-poor stars, which are unique tracers of the early evolution of our galaxy. Full quantum scattering calculations of direct excitation processes X(nl) + H leftrightarrow X(n'l') + H and charge transfer processes X(nl) + H leftrightarrow X+ + H- have been done for Li, Na and Mg [1,2,3] based on detailed quantum chemical data, e.g. [4]. Rate coefficients have been calculated and applied to non-LTE modelling of spectral lines in stellar atmospheres [5,6,7,8,9]. In all cases we find that charge transfer processes from the first excited S-state are very important, and the processes affect measured abundances for Li, Na and Mg in some stars by as much as 60%. Effects vary with stellar parameters (e.g. temperature, luminosity, metal content) and so these processes are important not only for accurate absolute abundances, but also for relative abundances among dissimilar stars.

  20. CHARACTERIZING THE COOL KOIs. III. KOI 961: A SMALL STAR WITH LARGE PROPER MOTION AND THREE SMALL PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Muirhead, Philip S.; Johnson, John Asher; Morton, Timothy D.; Pineda, John Sebastian; Bottom, Michael; Crepp, Justin R.; Kirby, Evan N.; Apps, Kevin; Carter, Joshua A.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Hamren, Katherine; Schlawin, Everett; Covey, Kevin R.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Pepper, Joshua; Hebb, Leslie; Howard, Andrew W.; Isaacson, Howard T.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; and others

    2012-03-10

    We characterize the star KOI 961, an M dwarf with transit signals indicative of three short-period exoplanets discovered by the Kepler mission. We proceed by comparing KOI 961 to Barnard's Star, a nearby, well-characterized mid-M dwarf. We compare colors, optical and near-infrared spectra, and find remarkable agreement between the two, implying similar effective temperatures and metallicities. Both are metal-poor compared to the Solar neighborhood, have low projected rotational velocity, high absolute radial velocity, large proper motion, and no quiescent H{alpha} emission-all of which are consistent with being old M dwarfs. We combine empirical measurements of Barnard's Star and expectations from evolutionary isochrones to estimate KOI 961's mass (0.13 {+-} 0.05 M{sub Sun }), radius (0.17 {+-} 0.04 R{sub Sun }), and luminosity (2.40 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3.0{+-}0.3} L{sub Sun }). We calculate KOI 961's distance (38.7 {+-} 6.3 pc) and space motions, which, like Barnard's Star, are consistent with a high scale-height population in the Milky Way. We perform an independent multi-transit fit to the public Kepler light curve and significantly revise the transit parameters for the three planets. We calculate the false-positive probability for each planet candidate, and find a less than 1% chance that any one of the transiting signals is due to a background or hierarchical eclipsing binary, validating the planetary nature of the transits. The best-fitting radii for all three planets are less than 1 R{sub Circled-Plus }, with KOI 961.03 being Mars-sized (R{sub P} = 0.57 {+-} 0.18 R{sub Circled-Plus }), and they represent some of the smallest exoplanets detected to date.

  1. BLACK HOLE-NEUTRON STAR MERGERS WITH A HOT NUCLEAR EQUATION OF STATE: OUTFLOW AND NEUTRINO-COOLED DISK FOR A LOW-MASS, HIGH-SPIN CASE

    SciTech Connect

    Deaton, M. Brett; Duez, Matthew D.; Foucart, Francois; O'Connor, Evan; Ott, Christian D.; Scheel, Mark A.; Szilagyi, Bela; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Muhlberger, Curran D. E-mail: m.duez@wsu.edu

    2013-10-10

    Neutrino emission significantly affects the evolution of the accretion tori formed in black hole-neutron star mergers. It removes energy from the disk, alters its composition, and provides a potential power source for a gamma-ray burst. To study these effects, simulations in general relativity with a hot microphysical equation of state (EOS) and neutrino feedback are needed. We present the first such simulation, using a neutrino leakage scheme for cooling to capture the most essential effects and considering a moderate mass (1.4 M{sub ☉} neutron star, 5.6 M{sub ☉} black hole), high-spin (black hole J/M {sup 2} = 0.9) system with the K{sub 0} = 220 MeV Lattimer-Swesty EOS. We find that about 0.08 M{sub ☉} of nuclear matter is ejected from the system, while another 0.3 M{sub ☉} forms a hot, compact accretion disk. The primary effects of the escaping neutrinos are (1) to make the disk much denser and more compact, (2) to cause the average electron fraction Y{sub e} of the disk to rise to about 0.2 and then gradually decrease again, and (3) to gradually cool the disk. The disk is initially hot (T ∼ 6 MeV) and luminous in neutrinos (L{sub ν} ∼ 10{sup 54} erg s{sup –1}), but the neutrino luminosity decreases by an order of magnitude over 50 ms of post-merger evolution.

  2. Rotation and activity among solar-type stars of the Ursa Major Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderblom, David R.; Mayor, Michel

    1993-01-01

    We examine rotation and chromospheric activity among G and K dwarfs recently shown to be members of the Ursa Major Group (UMaG). Rotation periods for UMaG stars are smaller than for stars of the same colors in the Hyades, and by an amount corresponding to the Skumanich relation. Most UMaG stars have about the same level of Ca II and K emission, implying that they also have nearly uniform intrinsic rotation rates. That means that the diversity of rotation rates and levels of activity seen among solar-type stars in the Alpha Persei and Pleiades clusters has largely converged by the age of UMaG (0.3 Gyr).

  3. Intelligent error correction method applied on an active pixel sensor based star tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Uwe

    2005-10-01

    Star trackers are opto-electronic sensors used on-board of satellites for the autonomous inertial attitude determination. During the last years star trackers became more and more important in the field of the attitude and orbit control system (AOCS) sensors. High performance star trackers are based up today on charge coupled device (CCD) optical camera heads. The active pixel sensor (APS) technology, introduced in the early 90-ties, allows now the beneficial replacement of CCD detectors by APS detectors with respect to performance, reliability, power, mass and cost. The company's heritage in star tracker design started in the early 80-ties with the launch of the worldwide first fully autonomous star tracker system ASTRO1 to the Russian MIR space station. Jena-Optronik recently developed an active pixel sensor based autonomous star tracker "ASTRO APS" as successor of the CCD based star tracker product series ASTRO1, ASTRO5, ASTRO10 and ASTRO15. Key features of the APS detector technology are, a true xy-address random access, the multiple windowing read out and the on-chip signal processing including the analogue to digital conversion. These features can be used for robust star tracking at high slew rates and under worse conditions like stray light and solar flare induced single event upsets. A special algorithm have been developed to manage the typical APS detector error contributors like fixed pattern noise (FPN), dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU) and white spots. The algorithm works fully autonomous and adapts to e.g. increasing DSNU and up-coming white spots automatically without ground maintenance or re-calibration. In contrast to conventional correction methods the described algorithm does not need calibration data memory like full image sized calibration data sets. The application of the presented algorithm managing the typical APS detector error contributors is a key element for the design of star trackers for long term satellite applications like

  4. The Gaia-ESO Survey: Extracting diffuse interstellar bands from cool star spectra. DIB-based interstellar medium line-of-sight structures at the kpc scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puspitarini, L.; Lallement, R.; Babusiaux, C.; Chen, H.-C.; Bonifacio, P.; Sbordone, L.; Caffau, E.; Duffau, S.; Hill, V.; Monreal-Ibero, A.; Royer, F.; Arenou, F.; Peralta, R.; Drew, J. E.; Bonito, R.; Lopez-Santiago, J.; Alfaro, E. J.; Bensby, T.; Bragaglia, A.; Flaccomio, E.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Pancino, E.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Smiljanic, R.; Costado, M. T.; Lardo, C.; de Laverny, P.; Zwitter, T.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: We study how diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) measured toward distance-distributed target stars can be used to locate dense interstellar (IS) clouds in the Galaxy and probe a line-of-sight (LOS) kinematical structure, a potentially useful tool when gaseous absorption lines are saturated or not available in the spectral range. Cool target stars are numerous enough for this purpose. Methods: We devised automated DIB-fitting methods appropriate for cool star spectra and multiple IS components. The data were fitted with a combination of a synthetic stellar spectrum, a synthetic telluric transmission, and empirical DIB profiles. The initial number of DIB components and their radial velocity were guided by HI 21 cm emission spectra, or, when available in the spectral range, IS neutral sodium absorption lines. For NaI, radial velocities of NaI lines and DIBs were maintained linked during a global simultaneous fit. In parallel, stellar distances and extinctions were estimated self-consistently by means of a 2D Bayesian method from spectroscopically-derived stellar parameters and photometric data. Results: We have analyzed Gaia-ESO Survey (GES) spectra of 225 stars that probe between ~2 and 10 kpc long LOS in five different regions of the Milky Way. The targets are the two CoRoT fields, two open clusters (NGC 4815 and γ Vel), and the Galactic bulge. Two OGLE fields toward the bulge observed before the GES are also included (205 target stars). Depending on the observed spectral intervals, we extracted one or more of the following DIBs: λλ 6283.8, 6613.6, and 8620.4. For each field, we compared the DIB strengths with the Bayesian distances and extinctions, and the DIB Doppler velocities with the HI emission spectra. Conclusions: For all fields, the DIB strength and the target extinction are well correlated. For targets that are widely distributed in distance, marked steps in DIBs and extinction radial distance profiles match each other and broadly correspond to the

  5. Active cooling-based surface confinement system for thermal soil treatment

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.; Newmark, Robin L.

    1997-01-01

    A thermal barrier is disclosed for surface confinement with active cooling to control subsurface pressures during thermal remediation of shallow (5-20 feet) underground contaminants. If steam injection is used for underground heating, the actively cooled thermal barrier allows the steam to be injected into soil at pressures much higher (20-60 psi) than the confining strength of the soil, while preventing steam breakthrough. The rising steam is condensed to liquid water at the thermal barrier-ground surface interface. The rapid temperature drop forced by the thermal barrier drops the subsurface pressure to below atmospheric pressure. The steam and contaminant vapors are contained by the thermal blanket, which can be made of a variety of materials such as steel plates, concrete slabs, membranes, fabric bags, or rubber bladders.

  6. Active cooling-based surface confinement system for thermal soil treatment

    DOEpatents

    Aines, R.D.; Newmark, R.L.

    1997-10-28

    A thermal barrier is disclosed for surface confinement with active cooling to control subsurface pressures during thermal remediation of shallow (5-20 feet) underground contaminants. If steam injection is used for underground heating, the actively cooled thermal barrier allows the steam to be injected into soil at pressures much higher (20-60 psi) than the confining strength of the soil, while preventing steam breakthrough. The rising steam is condensed to liquid water at the thermal barrier-ground surface interface. The rapid temperature drop forced by the thermal barrier drops the subsurface pressure to below atmospheric pressure. The steam and contaminant vapors are contained by the thermal blanket, which can be made of a variety of materials such as steel plates, concrete slabs, membranes, fabric bags, or rubber bladders. 1 fig.

  7. Design and analysis of a plate-fin sandwich actively cooled structural panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. M.

    1978-01-01

    The skin structure of hydrogen fueled hypersonic transport vehicles traveling at Mach 6 and above must be designed to withstand, for relatively long periods of time, the aerodynamic heating effects which are far more severe than those encountered by the supersonic aircraft of today. The use of conventional aircraft materials such as aluminum in combination with forced convection active cooling to accommodate aerodynamic heating is addressed. The basic active cooling concept consists of a stringer stiffened plate-fin sandwich. The sandwich surface is subjected to the aerodynamic heat flux which is transferred, via convection, to a coolant that is forced through the sandwich under pressure. The coolant, in turn, circulates in a closed loop through a hydrogen heat exchanger and back through the skin panel.

  8. Lightweight, Actively Cooled Ceramic Matrix Composite Thrustcells Successfully Tested in Rocket Combustion Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.; Elam, Sandra K.; Effinger, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    In a joint effort between the NASA Glenn Research Center and the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, regeneratively cooled ceramic matrix composite (CMC) thrustcells were developed and successfully tested in Glenn's Rocket Combustion Lab. Cooled CMC's offer the potential for substantial weight savings over more traditional metallic parts. Two CMC concepts were investigated. In the first of these concepts, an innovative processing approach utilized by Hyper-Therm, Inc., allowed woven CMC coolant containment tubes to be incorporated into the complex thruster design. In this unique design, the coolant passages had varying cross-sectional shapes but maintained a constant cross-sectional area along the length of the thruster. These thrusters were silicon carbide matrix composites reinforced with silicon carbide fibers. The second concept, which was supplied by Ceramic Composites, Inc., utilized copper cooling coils surrounding a carbon-fiber-reinforced carbon matrix composite. In this design, a protective gradient coating was applied to the inner thruster wall. Ceramic Composites, Inc.'s, method of incorporating the coating into the fiber and matrix eliminated the spallation problem often observed with thermal barrier coatings during hotfire testing. The focus of the testing effort was on screening the CMC material's capabilities as well as evaluating the performance of the thermal barrier or fiber-matrix interfacial coatings. Both concepts were hot-fire tested in gaseous O2/H2 environments. The test matrix included oxygen-to-fuel ratios ranging from 1.5 to 7 with chamber pressures to 400 psi. Steady-state internal wall temperatures in excess of 4300 F were measured in situ for successful 30-sec test runs. Photograph of actively cooled composite thrustcell fabricated by Hyper-Therm is shown. The thrustcell is a silicon-carbide-fiber-reinforced silicon carbide matrix composite with woven cooling channels. The matrix is formed via chemical vapor infiltration. Photograph of

  9. Thermally Activated Cooling: A Regional Approach for EstimatingBuilding Adoption

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

    2005-06-01

    This paper examines the economic potential for thermally-activated cooling (TAC) technologies as a component of distributed energy resource (DER) systems in California. A geographic information system (GIS) is used to assess the regional variation of TAC potential and to visualize the geographic pattern of potential adoption. The economic potential and feasibility of DER systems in general, and especially TAC, is highly dependent on regional factors such as retail electricity rates, building cooling loads, and building heating loads. Each of these factors varies with location, and their geographic overlap at different sites is an important determinant in a market assessment of DER and TAC. This analysis uses system payback period as the metric to show the regional variation of TAC potential in California office buildings. The DER system payback with and without TAC is calculated for different regions in California using localized values of retail electricity rates and the weather-dependent variation in building cooling and heating loads. This GIS-based method has numerous applications in building efficiency studies where geographically dependent variables, such as space cooling and heating energy use, play an important role.

  10. Ambient temperature fatigue tests of elements of an actively cooled honeycomb sandwich structural panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, E. L.; Elber, W.

    1977-01-01

    Elements of an actively cooled structural panel for a hypersonic aircraft have been investigated for fatigue characteristics. The study involved a bonded honeycomb sandwich panel with d-shaped coolant tubes. The curved portion of these tubes was embedded in the honeycomb, and the flat portion was bonded or soldered to the inner surface of the outer skin. The elements examined were two plain skin specimens (aluminum alloy); two specimens with skins attached to manifolds and tubes (one specimen was bonded, the other soldered); and a specimen representative of a corner section of the complete cooled sandwich. Sinusoidal loads were applied to all specimens. The honeycomb sandwich specimen was loaded in both tension and compression; the other specimens were loaded in tension only. The cooling tubes were pressurized with oil throughout the fatigue tests. The most significant results of these tests follow: All specimens exceeded their design life of 20,000 cycles without damage. Crack growth rates obtained in the plain skin specimens were used to determine the crack growth characteristics of aluminum alloy. Cracks in skins either bonded or soldered to cooling tubes propagated past the tubes without penetration. The coolant tubes served as crack arresters and temporarily stopped crack growth when a crack reached a tube-skin interface. The honeycomb core demonstrated that it could contain leakage from a tube.

  11. Sub-kiloparsec Imaging of Cool Molecular Gas in Two Strongly Lensed Dusty, Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, J. S.; Aravena, M.; Marrone, D. P.; Béthermin, M.; Bothwell, M. S.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chapman, S. C.; Collier, J. D.; de Breuck, C.; Fassnacht, C. D.; Galvin, T.; Gonzalez, A. H.; González-López, J.; Grieve, K.; Hezaveh, Y.; Ma, J.; Malkan, M.; O'Brien, A.; Rotermund, K. M.; Strandet, M.; Vieira, J. D.; Weiss, A.; Wong, G. F.

    2015-10-01

    We present spatially resolved imaging obtained with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) of three CO lines in two high-redshift gravitationally lensed dusty star-forming galaxies, discovered by the South Pole Telescope. Strong lensing allows us to probe the structure and dynamics of the molecular gas in these two objects, at z = 2.78 and z = 5.66, with effective source-plane resolution of less than 1 kpc. We model the lensed emission from multiple CO transitions and the dust continuum in a consistent manner, finding that the cold molecular gas as traced by low-J CO always has a larger half-light radius than the 870 μm dust continuum emission. This size difference leads to up to 50% differences in the magnification factor for the cold gas compared to dust. In the z = 2.78 galaxy, these CO observations confirm that the background source is undergoing a major merger, while the velocity field of the other source is more complex. We use the ATCA CO observations and comparable resolution Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array dust continuum imaging of the same objects to constrain the CO-H2 conversion factor with three different procedures, finding good agreement between the methods and values consistent with those found for rapidly star-forming systems. We discuss these galaxies in the context of the star formation—gas mass surface density relation, noting that the change in emitting area with observed CO transition must be accounted for when comparing high-redshift galaxies to their lower redshift counterparts.

  12. Hot and cool: two emission-line stars with constrasting behaviours in the same XMM-Newton field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazé, Y.; Rauw, G.; Ud-Doula, A.

    2010-02-01

    High-energy emissions are good indicators of peculiar behaviours in stars. We have therefore obtained an XMM-Newton observation of HD 155806 and 1RXS J171502.4-333344, and derived their spectral properties for the first time. The X-ray spectrum of HD 155806 appears soft, even slightly softer than usual for O-type stars (as shown by a comparison with the O9 star HD 155889 in the same XMM-Newton field). It is well-fitted with a two-component thermal model with low temperatures (0.2 and 0.6 keV), and it shows no overluminosity (log[L_X/L_BOL] = -6.75). The high-resolution spectrum, though noisy, reveals a few broad, symmetric X-ray lines (FWHM˜2500 km s-1). The X-ray emission is compatible with the wind-shock model and therefore appears unaffected by the putative dense equatorial regions at the origin of the Oe classification. 1RXS J171502.4-333344 is a nearby flaring source of moderate X-ray luminosity (log[L_X/L_BOL] = -3), with a soft thermal spectrum composed of narrow lines and presenting a larger abundance of elements (e.g. Ne) with a high first ionization potential (FIP) compared to lower-FIP elements. All the evidence indicates a coronal origin for the X-ray emission, in agreement with the dMe classification of this source. Based on observations collected with XMM-Newton, an ESA Science Mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and the USA (NASA).Research Associate FNRS.

  13. Magnetic activity and hot Jupiters of young Suns: the weak-line T Tauri stars V819 Tau and V830 Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donati, J.-F.; Hébrard, E.; Hussain, G. A. J.; Moutou, C.; Malo, L.; Grankin, K.; Vidotto, A. A.; Alencar, S. H. P.; Gregory, S. G.; Jardine, M. M.; Herczeg, G.; Morin, J.; Fares, R.; Ménard, F.; Bouvier, J.; Delfosse, X.; Doyon, R.; Takami, M.; Figueira, P.; Petit, P.; Boisse, I.; MaTYSSE Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    We report results of a spectropolarimetric and photometric monitoring of the weak-line T Tauri stars (wTTSs) V819 Tau and V830 Tau within the MaTYSSE (Magnetic Topologies of Young Stars and the Survival of close-in giant Exoplanets) programme, involving the ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeter at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. At ≃3 Myr, both stars dissipated their discs recently and are interesting objects for probing star and planet formation. Profile distortions and Zeeman signatures are detected in the unpolarized and circularly polarized lines, whose rotational modulation we modelled using tomographic imaging, yielding brightness and magnetic maps for both stars. We find that the large-scale magnetic fields of V819 Tau and V830 Tau are mostly poloidal and can be approximated at large radii by 350-400 G dipoles tilted at ≃30° to the rotation axis. They are significantly weaker than the field of GQ Lup, an accreting classical T Tauri star (cTTS) with similar mass and age which can be used to compare the magnetic properties of wTTSs and cTTSs. The reconstructed brightness maps of both stars include cool spots and warm plages. Surface differential rotation is small, typically ≃4.4 times smaller than on the Sun, in agreement with previous results on wTTSs. Using our Doppler images to model the activity jitter and filter it out from the radial velocity (RV) curves, we obtain RV residuals with dispersions of 0.033 and 0.104 km s-1 for V819 Tau and V830 Tau, respectively. RV residuals suggest that a hot Jupiter may be orbiting V830 Tau, though additional data are needed to confirm this preliminary result. We find no evidence for close-in giant planet around V819 Tau.

  14. METAL-POOR, COOL GAS IN THE CIRCUMGALACTIC MEDIUM OF A z = 2.4 STAR-FORMING GALAXY: DIRECT EVIDENCE FOR COLD ACCRETION?

    SciTech Connect

    Crighton, Neil H. M.; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Prochaska, J. Xavier

    2013-10-20

    In our current galaxy formation paradigm, high-redshift galaxies are predominantly fueled by accretion of cool, metal-poor gas from the intergalactic medium. Hydrodynamical simulations predict that this material should be observable in absorption against background sightlines within a galaxy's virial radius, as optically thick Lyman limit systems (LLSs) with low metallicities. Here we report the discovery of exactly such a strong metal-poor absorber at an impact parameter R = 58 kpc from a star-forming galaxy at z = 2.44. Besides strong neutral hydrogen (N{sub H{sup 0}}=10{sup 19.50±0.16} cm{sup -2}) we detect neutral deuterium and oxygen, allowing a precise measurement of the metallicity: log{sub 10}(Z/Z {sub ☉}) = –2.0 ± 0.17, or (7-15) × 10{sup –3} solar. Furthermore, the narrow deuterium linewidth requires a cool temperature <20,000 K. Given the striking similarities between this system and the predictions of simulations, we argue that it represents the direct detection of a high-redshift cold-accretion stream. The low-metallicity gas cloud is a single component of an absorption system exhibiting a complex velocity, ionization, and enrichment structure. Two other components have metallicities >0.1 solar, 10 times larger than the metal-poor component. We conclude that the photoionized circumgalactic medium (CGM) of this galaxy is highly inhomogeneous: the majority of the gas is in a cool, metal-poor and predominantly neutral phase, but the majority of the metals are in a highly ionized phase exhibiting weak neutral hydrogen absorption but strong metal absorption. If such inhomogeneity is common, then high-resolution spectra and detailed ionization modeling are critical to accurately appraise the distribution of metals in the high-redshift CGM.

  15. Fast H-alpha variations on a rapidly rotating, cool main-sequence star. II - Cloud formation and ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier Cameron, A.; Robinson, R. D.

    1989-05-01

    Time resolved H-alpha spectra of AB Doradus are presented that confirm a model in which large prominence-like condensations of neutral material are trapped in corotation with the stellar magnetic field. The results suggest that the entire confining field is deformed outward by the increasing centrifugal force acting on the corotating cloud materials as the cloud density increases. The angular momentum loss rate from the cloud ejections is shown to be sufficient to brake the rotation of the star's convective envelope on a time-scale of no more than 10 to the 8th yr.

  16. Search for cool giant exoplanets around young and nearby stars. VLT/NaCo near-infrared phase-coronagraphic and differential imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maire, A.-L.; Boccaletti, A.; Rameau, J.; Chauvin, G.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Bonnefoy, M.; Desidera, S.; Sylvestre, M.; Baudoz, P.; Galicher, R.; Mouillet, D.

    2014-06-01

    Context. Spectral differential imaging (SDI) is part of the observing strategy of current and future high-contrast imaging instruments. It aims to reduce the stellar speckles that prevent the detection of cool planets by using in/out methane-band images. It attenuates the signature of off-axis companions to the star, such as angular differential imaging (ADI). However, this attenuation depends on the spectral properties of the low-mass companions we are searching for. The implications of this particularity on estimating the detection limits have been poorly explored so far. Aims: We perform an imaging survey to search for cool (Teff< 1000-1300 K) giant planets at separations as close as 5-10 AU. We also aim to assess the sensitivity limits in SDI data taking the photometric bias into account. This will lead to a better view of the SDI performance. Methods: We observed a selected sample of 16 stars (age <200 Myr, distance <25 pc) with the phase-mask coronagraph, SDI, and ADI modes of VLT/NaCo. Results: We do not detect any companions. As for the estimation of the sensitivity limits, we argue that the SDI residual noise cannot be converted into mass limits because it represents a differential flux, unlike what is done for single-band images, in which fluxes are measured. This results in degeneracies for the mass limits, which may be removed with the use of single-band constraints. We instead employ a method of directly determining the mass limits and compare the results from a combined processing SDI-ADI (ASDI) and ADI. The SDI flux ratio of a planet is the critical parameter for the ASDI performance at close-in separations (≲1''). The survey is sensitive to cool giant planets beyond 10 AU for 65% and 30 AU for 100% of the sample. Conclusions: For close-in separations, the optimal regime for SDI corresponds to SDI flux ratios higher than ~2. According to the BT-Settl model, this translates into Teff ≲ 800 K, which is significantly lower than the methane

  17. Rapid cooling rates at an active mid-ocean ridge from zircon thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Axel K.; Perfit, Michael R.; Rubin, Kenneth H.; Stockli, Daniel F.; Smith, Matthew C.; Cotsonika, Laurie A.; Zellmer, Georg F.; Ridley, W. Ian; Lovera, Oscar M.

    2011-02-01

    Oceanic spreading ridges are Earth's most productive crust generating environment, but mechanisms and rates of crustal accretion and heat loss are debated. Existing observations on cooling rates are ambiguous regarding the prevalence of conductive vs. convective cooling of lower oceanic crust. Here, we report the discovery and dating of zircon in mid-ocean ridge dacite lavas that constrain magmatic differentiation and cooling rates at an active spreading center. Dacitic lavas erupted on the southern Cleft segment of the Juan de Fuca ridge, an intermediate-rate spreading center, near the intersection with the Blanco transform fault. Their U-Th zircon crystallization ages (29.3 - 4.6 + 4.8 ka; 1σ standard error s.e.) overlap with the (U-Th)/He zircon eruption age (32.7 ± 1.6 ka) within uncertainty. Based on similar 238U- 230Th disequilibria between southern Cleft dacite glass separates and young mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) erupted nearby, differentiation must have occurred rapidly, within ~ 10-20 ka at most. Ti-in-zircon thermometry indicates crystallization at 850-900 °C and pressures > 70-150 MPa are calculated from H 2O solubility models. These time-temperature constraints translate into a magma cooling rate of ~ 2 × 10 - 2 °C/a. This rate is at least one order-of-magnitude faster than those calculated for zircon-bearing plutonic rocks from slow spreading ridges. Such short intervals for differentiation and cooling can only be resolved through uranium-series ( 238U- 230Th) decay in young lavas, and are best explained by dissipating heat convectively at high crustal permeability.

  18. Red Dwarf Stars: Ages, Rotation, Magnetic Dynamo Activity and the Habitability of Hosted Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, S. G.; Guinan, E. F.

    2011-12-01

    We report on our continued efforts to understand and delineate the magnetic dynamo-induced behavior/variability of red dwarf (K5 V - M6 V) stars over their long lifetimes. These properties include: rotation, light variations (from star spots), coronal-chromospheric XUV activity and flares. This study is being carried out as part of the NSF-sponsored Living with a Red Dwarf program. The Living with a Red Dwarf program's database of dM stars with photometrically determined rotation rates (from starspot modulations) continues to expand, as does the inventory of archival XUV observations. Recently, the photometric properties of several hundred dM stars from the Kepler database are being analyzed to determine the rotation rates, starspot areal coverage/distributions and stellar flare rates. When all data setsare combined with ages from cluster/population memberships and kinematics, the determination of Age-Rotation-Activity relationships is possible. Such relationships have broad impacts not only on the studies of magnetic dynamo theory and angular momentum loss of low-mass stars with deep convective zones, but also on the suitability of planets hosted by red dwarfs to support life. With intrinsically low luminosities (L< 0.02L⊙), the liquid water habitable zones (HZs) for hosted planets are very close to their host stars - typically at ˜0.1 AU < HZ < 0.4 AU. Planets located close to their host stars risk damage and atmospheric loss from coronal & chromospheric XUV radiation, flares and plasma blasts via strong winds and coronal mass ejections. In addition, our relationships permit the stellar ages to be determined through measures of either the stars' rotation periods (best way) or XUV activity levels. This also permits a determination of the ages of their hosted planets. We illustrate this with examples of age determinations of the exoplanet systems: GJ 581 and HD 85512 (both with large Earth-size planets within the host star's HZ), GJ 1214 (hot, close

  19. Activity and cold spots on the surface of G-type superflare stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savanov, I. S.

    2015-07-01

    Based on the high precision photometric observations of the Kepler space telescope, we have investigated the properties of the active regions (cold spots) on the surface of 279 stars of the spectral class G, for which 1547 superflares with energies in the range of 1033-1036 erg have been revealed. The main conclusion of our study is the quantitative estimation of the increased surface spottedness of superflare stars, which indicates enhancedmagnetic activity of these objects. The increased spottedness on the surfaces of the studied stars was confirmed based on two independent estimations of stellar brightness variations. In addition, it was concluded that superflare stars do not stand out in the common dataset of differential rotation parameters. Based on the data considered, no correlation was found of the spottedness parameters or the differential rotation parameters with the characteristics of these objects—their Rossby numbers and superflare energy. Additionally, the correlation between the superflare energy and the inverse Rossby number was considered. None of these comparisons gave an indication for the presence of any obvious correlation. The results of the analysis of five stars with a few dozen flares registered indicate that for the same star whereas spottedness S variations are small, significant changes in the superflare energy can be achieved. On the example of KIC 10422252, we show that at sixfold S variations, the flare energy varies by orders of magnitude at any given S value.

  20. The Evolution of Cyclic Activity of the Sun in the Context of Physical Processes on Late-Type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsova, Maria M.

    Features of the solar cycle in the context of stellar activity are investigated. We discovered reliably differential rotation in chromospheres of some stars and presented the first stellar butterfly diagrams. These stars possess less regular variability and do not demonstrate excellent cycles. This is the first evidence for differences of the solar activity from processes on stars with Excellent cycles. We compare indices of the chromospheric activity of the Sun with that for above 1,300 northern and southern stars whose activity revealed during planet search programs. We argue the matter pro and con for two possible ways of an evolution of activity from a contraction phase to 10Gyrs. When a young star brakes down, the chromospheric and the coronal activity weaken synchronously. The solar-like activity of the most main sequence F and early G stars does evolve by this path. The activity of the later stars from G5 to K7 after a definite level evolves by another way: the chromospheric activity diminishes up to the solar level, while coronae stay stronger than the solar one. Two possible paths of the evolution of activity are associated with the different depth of the convective zone of these stars. Physically this means that the relative input of small- and large-scale of magnetic fields differs for F-G and K stars.

  1. The Cooling Rate of an Active Aa Lava Flow Determined Using an Orbital Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Robert; Garbeil, Harold

    2010-05-01

    The surface temperature of an active lava flow is an important physical property to measure. Through its influence on lava crystallinity, cooling exerts a fundamental control on lava rheology. Remotely sensed thermal radiance data acquired by multispectral sensors such as Landsat Thematic Mapper and the Terra Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer, are of insufficient spectral and radiometric fidelity to allow for realistic determination of lava surface temperatures from Earth orbit. This paper presents results obtained from the analysis of active lava flows using hyperspectral data acquired by NASA's Earth Observing-1 Hyperion imaging spectrometer. The contiguous nature of the measured radiance spectrum in the 0.4-2.5 micron region means that, although sensor saturation most certainly occurs, unsaturated radiance data are always available from even the hottest, and most radiant, active lava flow surfaces. The increased number of wavebands available allows for the assumption of more complex flow surface temperature distributions in the radiance-to-temperature inversion processes. The technique is illustrated by using a hyperspectral image of the active lava lake at Erta Ale volcano, Ethiopia, a well characterized calibration target. We then go on to demonstrate how this approach can be used to constrain the surface cooling rate of an active lava flow at Mount Etna, Sicily, using three images acquired during a four day period in September 2004. The cooling rate of the active channel as determined from space falls within the limits commonly assumed in numerical lava flow models. The results provide insights into the temperature-radiance mixture modeling problem that will aid in the analysis of data acquired by future hyperspectral remote sensing missions, such as NASA's proposed HyspIRI mission.

  2. Passively cooled 405 W ytterbium fibre laser utilising a novel metal coated active fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Jae M. O.; Simakov, Nikita; Hemming, Alexander; Clarkson, W. Andrew; Haub, John

    2016-03-01

    We present a novel metal coated triple clad active fibre design, utilising an all glass inner cladding structure and aluminium outer coating. This metal coated active fibre enables a number of benefits to high power laser design, such as increase robustness and extended operating temperature range. As a demonstration of the advantages of this design a passively cooled ytterbium fibre laser is presented. A 20 m length of active fibre was coiled into a planar arrangement and mounted onto a high emissivity heatsink. Up to 405 W of output power was achieved without the need for active water or forced air cooling. The slope efficiency of this source was 74 % and maximum outer heat sink temperature was ~140°C. This arrangement allowed for significant weight and size savings to be achieved with the active fibre laser head weighing less than 100 g. We will discuss the design choices and trade-offs of metal coated active fibre on high power fibre laser systems as well as the prospects for further power scaling to the kW level.

  3. Exploring the Connection Between Star Formation and AGN Activity in the Local Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Heckman. T. M.; Ptak, Andrew; Schiminovich, D.; O'Dowd, M.; Bertincourt, B.

    2012-01-01

    We study a combined sample of 264 star-forming, 51 composite, and 73 active galaxies using optical spectra from SDSS and mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectra from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph. We examine optical and mid-IR spectroscopic diagnostics that probe the amount of star formation and relative energetic con- tributions from star formation and an active galactic nucleus (AGN). Overall we find good agreement between optical and mid-IR diagnostics. Misclassifications of galaxies based on the SDSS spectra are rare despite the presence of dust obscuration. The luminosity of the [NeII] 12.8 micron emission-line is well correlated with the star formation rate (SFR) measured from the SDSS spectra, and this holds for the star forming, composite, and AGN-dominated systems. AGN show a clear excess of [NeIII] 15.6 micron emission relative to star forming and composite systems. We find good qualitative agreement between various parameters that probe the relative contributions of the AGN and star formation, including: the mid-IR spectral slope, the ratio of the [NeV] 14.3 micron to [NeII] micron 12.8 fluxes, the equivalent widths of the 7.7, 11.3, and 17 micron PAH features, and the optical "D" parameter which measures the distance a source lies from the locus of star forming galaxies in the optical BPT emission-line diagnostic diagram. We also consider the behavior of the three individual PAH features by examining how their flux ratios depend upon the degree of AGN-dominance. We find that the PAH 11.3 micron feature is significantly suppressed in the most AGN-dominated systems.

  4. Ultraviolet and X-ray Activity and Flaring on Low-Mass Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Kevin; Parke Loyd, R. O.; Brown, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    The spectral and temporal behavior of exoplanet host stars is a critical input to models of the chemistry and evolution of planetary atmospheres. High-energy photons (X-ray to NUV) from these stars regulate the atmospheric temperature profiles and photochemistry on orbiting planets, influencing the production of potential “biomarker” gases. We present results from the MUSCLES Treasury Survey, an ongoing study of time-resolved UV and X-ray spectroscopy of nearby M and K dwarf exoplanet host stars. This program uses contemporaneous Hubble Space Telescope and Chandra (or XMM) observations to characterize the time variability of the energetic radiation field incident on the habitable zones planetary systems at d < 15 pc. We find that all exoplanet host stars observed to date exhibit significant levels of chromospheric and transition region UV emission. M dwarf exoplanet host stars display 30 - 2000% UV emission line amplitude variations on timescales of minutes-to-hours. The relative flare/quiescent UV flux amplitudes on old (age > 1 Gyr) planet-hosting M dwarfs are comparable to active flare stars (e.g., AD Leo), despite their lack of flare activity at visible wavelengths. We also detect similar UV flare behavior on a subset of our K dwarf exoplanet host stars. We conclude that strong flares and stochastic variability are common, even on “optically inactive” M dwarfs hosting planetary systems. These results argue that the traditional assumption of weak UV fields and low flare rates on older low-mass stars needs to be revised.

  5. Star formation and black hole accretion activity in rich local clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, Matteo; Marleau, Francine R.; Fadda, Dario

    2016-04-01

    Context. We present a study of star formation and central black hole accretion activity of galaxies that are hosted in the two nearby (z ~ 0.2) rich galaxy clusters Abell 983 and 1731. Aims: We aim to quantify both the obscured and unobscured star formation rates, as well as the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGN) as a function of the environment in which the galaxy is located. Methods: We targeted the clusters with unprecedented deep infrared Spitzer observations (0.2 mJy at 24 micron), near-IR Palomar imaging and optical WIYN spectroscopy. The extent of our observations (~3 virial radii) covers the vast range of possible environments, from the very dense cluster centre to the very rarefied cluster outskirts and accretion regions. Results: The star-forming members of the two clusters present star formation rates that are comparable with those measured in coeval field galaxies. Analysis of the spatial arrangement of the spectroscopically confirmed members reveals an elongated distribution for A1731 with respect to the more uniform distribution of A983. The emerging picture is compatible with A983 being a fully evolved cluster, in contrast with the still actively accreting A1731. Conclusions: Analysis of the specific star formation rate reveals evidence of ongoing galaxy pre-processing along A1731's filament-like structure. Furthermore, the decrease in the number of star-forming galaxies and AGN towards the cluster cores suggests that the cluster environment is accelerating the ageing process of the galaxies and blocking further accretion of the cold gas that fuels both star formation and black hole accretion activity. The catalogue and the reduced images (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/588/A105

  6. The onset of chromospheric activity among the A- and F- type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Theodore; Landsman, Wayne

    1987-01-01

    IUE observations of C II lambda1335 and C IV lambda1549 and ground-based observations of He I lambda5876 have previously discovered intense levels of chromospheric activity among early F type stars. Virtually all F dwarfs show stronger chromospheric and transition region emission than do the cooler and more deeply convective dwarf stars like the Sun. The IUE spectra and those of He lambda5876 place the onset of stellar activity along the main sequence near a color B - V = 0.28, which corresponds approximately to spectral type FO and an effective temperature of 7300 K. However, existing X-ray observations of A and F stars suggest that coronal activity may reach a peak blueward of this high temperature boundary at B - V = 0.28 before vanishing among the early and mid A-type stars. Discussed are preliminary results of a new effort to refine the location of the high temperature boundary to chromospheric activity among A- and F- type stars, making use of low dispersion short-wavelength spectra from the IUE archives from which the strengths of C IV, C II, and Lyman alpha emission have been measured.

  7. Evaluation of a large capacity heat pump concept for active cooling of hypersonic aircraft structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagel, L. L.; Herring, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Results of engineering analyses assessing the conceptual feasibility of a large capacity heat pump for enhancing active cooling of hypersonic aircraft structure are presented. A unique heat pump arrangement which permits cooling the structure of a Mach 6 transport to aluminum temperatures without the aid of thermal shielding is described. The selected concept is compatible with the use of conventional refrigerants, with Freon R-11 selected as the preferred refrigerant. Condenser temperatures were limited to levels compatible with the use of conventional refrigerants by incorporating a unique multipass condenser design, which extracts mechanical energy from the hydrogen fuel, prior to each subsequent pass through the condenser. Results show that it is technically feasible to use a large capacity heat pump in lieu of external shielding. Additional analyses are required to optimally apply this concept.

  8. Design and fabrication of an actively cooled Langmuir probe for long pulse applications

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, J.A.; Biagi, L.A.; Ehlers, K.W.; Koehler, G.W.

    1985-11-01

    The details of the mechanical design and fabrication for a Langmuir Probe for the continuous monitoring of plasma density are given. The probe was designed for use as a diagnostic tool in the development of long pulse positive ion plasma sources for use on neutral beam systems. The essential design feature of this probe is the incorporation of two electrically isolated cooling water circuits which actively cool the probe tip and probe jacket. The electrical isolation is required to prevent drain currents from the probe body disturbing the measurement of the probe tip current and thereby the plasma density measurement. The successful realization of the design requires precision components and vacuum tight ceramic to refractory metal brazes. To date this design has successfully operated in steady-state in plasma densities up to 250 mA/cmS and surface heat fluxes of 25 W/cmS.

  9. Mitigation of Autoignition Due to Premixing in a Hypervelocity Flow Using Active Wall Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axdahl, Erik; Kumar, Ajay; Wilhite, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Preinjection of fuel on the forebody of an airbreathing vehicle is a proposed method to gain access to hypervelocity flight Mach numbers. However, this creates the possibility of autoignition either near the wall or in the core of the flow, thereby consuming fuel prematurely as well as increasing the amount of pressure drag on the vehicle. The computational fluid dynamics code VULCAN was used to conduct three dimensional simulations of the reacting flow in the vicinity of hydrogen injectors on a flat plate at conditions relevant to a Mach 12 notional flight vehicle forebody to determine the location where autoignition occurs. Active wall cooling strategies were formulated and simulated in response to regions of autoignition. It was found that tangential film cooling using hydrogen or helium were both able to nearly or completely eliminate wall autoignition in the flow domain of interest.

  10. THERMAL AND RADIATIVE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK HAVE A LIMITED IMPACT ON STAR FORMATION IN HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, Orianne; Juneau, Stéphanie; Bournaud, Frédéric; Gabor, Jared M.

    2015-02-10

    The effects of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) on their host galaxies depend on the coupling between the injected energy and the interstellar medium (ISM). Here, we model and quantify the impact of long-range AGN ionizing radiation—in addition to the often considered small-scale energy deposition—on the physical state of the multi-phase ISM of the host galaxy and on its total star formation rate (SFR). We formulate an AGN spectral energy distribution matched with observations, which we use with the radiative transfer (RT) code Cloudy to compute AGN ionization in a simulated high-redshift disk galaxy. We use a high-resolution (∼6 pc) simulation including standard thermal AGN feedback and calculate RT in post-processing. Surprisingly, while these models produce significant AGN-driven outflows, we find that AGN ionizing radiation and heating reduce the SFR by a few percent at most for a quasar luminosity (L {sub bol} = 10{sup 46.5} erg s{sup –1}). Although the circumgalactic gaseous halo can be kept almost entirely ionized by the AGN, most star-forming clouds (n ≳ 10{sup 2} {sup –} {sup 3} cm{sup –3}) and even the reservoirs of cool atomic gas (n ∼ 0.3-10 cm{sup –3})—which are the sites of future star formation (SF; 100-200 Myr), are generally too dense to be significantly affected. Our analysis ignores any absorption from a putative torus, making our results upper limits on the effects of ionizing radiation. Therefore, while the AGN-driven outflows can remove substantial amounts of gas in the long term, the impact of AGN feedback on the SF efficiency in the interstellar gas in high-redshift galaxies is marginal, even when long-range radiative effects are accounted for.

  11. Warm dust around cool stars: field M dwarfs with Wise 12 or 22 μm excess emission

    SciTech Connect

    Theissen, Christopher A.; West, Andrew A.

    2014-10-20

    Using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS DR7) spectroscopic catalog, we searched the WISE AllWISE catalog to investigate the occurrence of warm dust, as inferred from IR excesses, around field M dwarfs (dMs). We developed SDSS/WISE color selection criteria to identify 175 dMs (from 70,841) that show IR flux greater than the typical dM photosphere levels at 12 and/or 22 μm, including seven new stars within the Orion OB1 footprint. We characterize the dust populations inferred from each IR excess and investigate the possibility that these excesses could arise from ultracool binary companions by modeling combined spectral energy distributions. Our observed IR fluxes are greater than levels expected from ultracool companions (>3σ). We also estimate that the probability the observed IR excesses are due to chance alignments with extragalactic sources is <0.1%. Using SDSS spectra we measure surface gravity-dependent features (K, Na, and CaH 3) and find <15% of our sample indicates low surface gravities. Examining tracers of youth (Hα, UV fluxes, and Li absorption), we find <3% of our sample appear young, indicating we are observing a population of field stars ≳1 Gyr, likely harboring circumstellar material. We investigate age-dependent properties probed by this sample, studying the disk fraction as a function of Galactic height. The fraction remains small and constant to |Z| ∼ 700 pc and then drops, indicating little to no trend with age. Possible explanations for disks around field dMs include (1) collisions of planetary bodies, (2) tidal disruption of planetary bodies, or (3) failed planet formation.

  12. A Mid-infrared Census of Star Formation Activity in Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunham, Miranda K.; Robitaille, Thomas P.; Evans, Neal J., II; Schlingman, Wayne M.; Cyganowski, Claudia J.; Urquhart, James

    2011-04-01

    We present the results of a search for mid-infrared signs of star formation activity in the 1.1 mm sources in the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS). We have correlated the BGPS catalog with available mid-IR Galactic plane catalogs based on the Spitzer Space Telescope GLIMPSE legacy survey and the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) Galactic plane survey. We find that 44% (3712 of 8358) of the BGPS sources contain at least one mid-IR source, including 2457 of 5067 (49%) within the area where all surveys overlap (10° < ell < 65°). Accounting for chance alignments between the BGPS and mid-IR sources, we conservatively estimate that 20% of the BPGS sources within the area where all surveys overlap show signs of active star formation. We separate the BGPS sources into four groups based on their probability of star formation activity. Extended Green Objects and Red MSX Sources make up the highest probability group, while the lowest probability group is comprised of "starless" BGPS sources which were not matched to any mid-IR sources. The mean 1.1 mm flux of each group increases with increasing probability of active star formation. We also find that the "starless" BGPS sources are the most compact, while the sources with the highest probability of star formation activity are on average more extended with large skirts of emission. A subsample of 280 BGPS sources with known distances demonstrates that mass and mean H2 column density also increase with probability of star formation activity.

  13. SPECTRA OF TYPE II CEPHEID CANDIDATES AND RELATED STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, E. G.; Rogalla, Danielle; Thacker-Lynn, Lauren E-mail: drogall1@bigred.unl.edu

    2011-02-15

    We present low-resolution spectra for variable stars in the Cepheid period range from the ROTSE-I Demonstration Project and the All Sky Automated Survey, some of which were previously identified as type II Cepheid candidates. We have derived effective temperatures, gravities, and metallicities from the spectra. Based on this, three types of variables were identified: Cepheid strip stars, cool stars that lie along the red subgiant and giant branch, and cool main-sequence stars. Many fewer type II Cepheids were found than expected and most have amplitudes less than 0.4 mag. The cool variables include many likely binaries as well as intrinsic variables. Variation among the main-sequence stars is likely to be mostly due to binarity or stellar activity.

  14. Chromospherically active stars. II - HD 82558, a young single BY Draconis variable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fekel, Francis C.; Bopp, Bernard W.; Africano, John L.; Goodrich, Bret D.; Palmer, Leigh Hunter

    1986-01-01

    It is presently noted that the HD 82558 chromospherically active star is a young and rapidly rotating K2 V single BY Draconis variable with very strong far-UV emission features and an H-alpha line filled to the continuum level by emission. HD 82558 has constant velocity and is not a member of the Hyades Supercluster. Its light curve behavior, which appears to have been stable for several hundred rotation cycles, is reminiscent of that of the young, rapidly rotating, single K V variable H II 1883 in the Pleiades; this stability may be characteristic of young, single, chromospherically active stars.

  15. Exploring wind-driving dust species in cool luminous giants. III. Wind models for M-type AGB stars: dynamic and photometric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bladh, S.; Höfner, S.; Aringer, B.; Eriksson, K.

    2015-03-01

    Context. Stellar winds observed in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are usually attributed to a combination of stellar pulsations and radiation pressure on dust. Shock waves triggered by pulsations propagate through the atmosphere, compressing the gas and lifting it to cooler regions which creates favourable conditions for grain growth. If sufficient radiative acceleration is exerted on the newly formed grains through absorption or scattering of stellar photons, an outflow can be triggered. Strong candidates for wind-driving dust species in M-type AGB stars are magnesium silicates (Mg2SiO4 and MgSiO3). Such grains can form close to the stellar surface, they consist of abundant materials and, if they grow to sizes comparable to the wavelength of the stellar flux maximum, they experience strong acceleration by photon scattering. Aims: The purpose of this study is to investigate if photon scattering on Mg2SiO4 grains can produce realistic outflows for a wide range of stellar parameters in M-type AGB stars. Methods: We use a frequency-dependent radiation-hydrodynamics code with a detailed description for the growth of Mg2SiO4 grains to calculate the first extensive set of time-dependent wind models for M-type AGB stars. This set includes 139 solar-mass models, with three different luminosities (5000 L⊙, 7000 L⊙, and 10 000 L⊙) and effective temperatures ranging from 2600 K to 3200 K. The resulting wind properties, visual and near-IR photometry and mid-IR spectra are compared with observations. Results: We show that the models can produce outflows for a wide range of stellar parameters. We also demonstrate that they reproduce observed mass-loss rates and wind velocities, as well as visual and near-IR photometry. However, the current models do not show the characteristic silicate features at 10 and 18 μm as a result of the cool temperature of Mg2SiO4 grains in the wind. Including a small amount of Fe in the grains further out in the circumstellar envelope will

  16. Modelling of Hot Jupiter thermospheres and ionospheres under irradiation from active stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadney, J.; Galand, M.; Unruh, Y.; Koskinen, T.; Sanz-Forcada, J.

    2014-04-01

    Upper atmospheres of Hot Jupiters are subject to extreme radiation conditions that can result in atmospheric escape. The composition and structure of the thermosphere and ionosphere of these planets are affected by the high-energy spectrum of the host star. This emission depends on stellar type and age, which are thus important factors in understanding the behaviour of exoplanetary atmospheres. In this study, we focus on Hot Jupiter planets orbiting K and M dwarf stars. As an example, XUV spectra for three different stars - ɛ Eridani, AD Leonis and AU Microscopii - are constructed using a coronal model. Neutral density and temperature profiles in the thermosphere of hypothetical, Hot Jupiters orbiting these stars are then obtained from a fluid model of the upper atmosphere, incorporating atmospheric chemistry and taking atmospheric escape into account. Using these models of both the host star and the planetary atmosphere, we have derived a method to scale the X-ray and EUV regions of the solar spectrum to produce a very similar outcome in terms of the planet's neutral thermosphere as using a detailed coronal model of the host star. We also calculate ion production rates and densities in the ionospheres of such planets, considering ionisation through both photo-ionisation and electronimpact processes. We find that in planets subjected to radiation from more active stars, the transition to a regime of hydrodynamic escape from the top of the atmosphere occurs at larger orbital distances. A greater X-ray to EUV flux ratio in these stars compared with the solar case also produces ionospheres that extend to lower altitudes and are significantly more pronounced.

  17. Magnetic cycles of Sun-like stars with different levels of coronal and chromospheric activity — comparison with the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimanovskaya, Elena; Bruevich, Vasiliy; Bruevich, Elena

    2016-09-01

    The atmospheric activity of the Sun and Sun-like stars is analyzed involving observations from the HK-project at the Mount Wilson Observatory, the California and Carnegie Planet Search Program at the Keck and Lick Observatories and the Magellan Planet Search Program at the Las Campanas Observatory. We show that for stars of F, G and K spectral classes, the cyclic activity, similar to the 11-yr solar cycle, is different: it becomes more prominent in K-stars. Comparative study of Sun-like stars with different levels of chromospheric and coronal activity confirms that the Sun belongs to stars with a low level of chromospheric activity and stands apart among these stars by its minimum level of coronal radiation and minimum level of variations in photospheric flux.

  18. Experimental Study on Active Cooling Systems Used for Thermal Management of High-Power Multichip Light-Emitting Diodes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop suitable cooling systems for high-power multichip LEDs. To this end, three different active cooling systems were investigated to control the heat generated by the powering of high-power multichip LEDs in two different configurations (30 and 2 × 15 W). The following cooling systems were used in the study: an integrated multi-fin heat sink design with a fan, a cooling system with a thermoelectric cooler (TEC), and a heat pipe cooling device. According to the results, all three systems were observed to be sufficient for cooling high-power LEDs. Furthermore, it was observed that the integrated multifin heat sink design with a fan was the most efficient cooling system for a 30 W high-power multichip LED. The cooling system with a TEC and 46 W input power was the most efficient cooling system for 2 × 15 W high-power multichip LEDs. PMID:25162058

  19. Modeling active galactic nucleus feedback in cool-core clusters: The formation of cold clumps

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-07-10

    We perform high-resolution (15-30 pc) adaptive mesh simulations to study the impact of momentum-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback in cool-core clusters, focusing in this paper on the formation of cold clumps. The feedback is jet-driven with an energy determined by the amount of cold gas within 500 pc of the super-massive black hole. When the intracluster medium in the core of the cluster becomes marginally stable to radiative cooling, with the thermal instability to the free-fall timescale ratio t{sub TI}/t{sub ff} < 3-10, cold clumps of gas start to form along the propagation direction of the AGN jets. By tracing the particles in the simulations, we find that these cold clumps originate from low entropy (but still hot) gas that is accelerated by the jet to outward radial velocities of a few hundred km s{sup –1}. This gas is out of hydrostatic equilibrium and so can cool. The clumps then grow larger as they decelerate and fall toward the center of the cluster, eventually being accreted onto the super-massive black hole. The general morphology, spatial distribution, and estimated Hα morphology of the clumps are in reasonable agreement with observations, although we do not fully replicate the filamentary morphology of the clumps seen in the observations, probably due to missing physics.

  20. Aerothermal performance of radiatively and actively cooled panel at Mach 6.6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shore, C. P.; Weinstein, I.

    1979-01-01

    A flight-weight radiative and actively cooled honeycomb sandwich panel (RACP) was subjected to multiple cycles of both radiant and aerothermal heating. The 0.61 m by 1.22 m test specimen incorporated essential features of a full scale 0.61 m by 6.10 m RACP designed to withstand a heat flux of 136 kW/sq m. The panel consisted of heat shields, a thin layer of high temperature insulation, and an aluminum honeycomb sandwich panel with coolant tubes next to the sandwich skin. A 60/40 mass solution of ethylene glycol/water was used to cool the panel which successfully withstood a total of 3.5 hr of radiant heating and 137 sec exposure to an M = 6.6 test stream. Heat shield temperatures reached 1080 K (1945 deg R), and cooled-panel temperatures reached 382 K (687 deg R) midway between coolant tubes. Simulation of the full scale panel indicated that the full scale RACP would perform as expected. The tests revealed no evidence of coolant leakage or hot gas ingress which would seriously degrade the RACP performance.

  1. Development and testing of thermal-energy-storage modules for use in active solar heating and cooling systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J.C.

    1981-04-01

    Additional development work on thermal-energy-storage modules for use with active solar heating and cooling systems is summarized. Performance testing, problems, and recommendations are discussed. Installation, operation, and maintenance instructions are included. (MHR)

  2. Mutagenic activity associated with cooling tower waters treated with a biocide containing 5-chloro-2-methyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one

    SciTech Connect

    Woodall, G.M.; Pancorbo, O.C.; Blevins, R.D.; Ferslew, K.E.

    1987-08-01

    With the Ames Salmonella-mammalian microsome test, significant mutagenic activity was detected in cooling tower water shortly (same day) after treatment with a biocide (CL2150) containing 5-chloro-2-methyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one(5-chloro-IT). Dose-related mutagenic responses with TA97 (-S9) and TA100 (-S9) were produced with the acid fraction (extracted at pH <2 with methylene chloride) of this cooling water sample (specific mutagenic activities of 281,000 and 188,000 net revertants/L equiv of water, respectively). This mutagenic activity detected in cooling water sampled in mid-summer did not persist beyond the first day of CL2150 treatment. The mutagenic activity displayed by the cooling waters with TA97 (-S9) exceeded that associated with the extractable 5-chloro-IT concentration (determined by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry). 24 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  3. CHROMOSPHERIC ACTIVITY OF SOUTHERN STARS FROM THE MAGELLAN PLANET SEARCH PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Arriagada, Pamela

    2011-06-10

    I present chromospheric-activity measurements of {approx}670 F, G, K, and M main-sequence stars in the Southern Hemisphere, from {approx}8000 archival high-resolution echelle spectra taken at Las Campanas Observatory since 2004. These stars were targets from the Old Magellan Planet Search, and are now potential targets for the New Magellan Planet Search that will look for rocky and habitable planets. Activity indices (S values) are derived from Ca II H and K line cores and then converted to the Mount Wilson system. From these measurements, chromospheric (log R'{sub HK}) indices are derived, which are then used as indicators of the level of radial-velocity jitter, age, and rotation periods these stars present.

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF OTHER GALAXY PROPERTIES FOR THE SAME STAR FORMATION ACTIVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Xinfa; Bei Yang; He Jizhou; Tang Xiaoxun

    2010-01-01

    Using two volume-limited Main galaxy samples of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 above and below the value of M*, we have investigated the environmental dependence of other galaxy properties for the same star formation activities. Only in the luminous passive class, a strong environmental dependence of the g - r color is observed, but the environmental dependence of other properties in this class is very weak. In other classes, we can conclude that the local density dependence of luminosity, g - r color, concentration index ci, and morphologies for star-forming galaxies and passive ones is much weaker than that obtained in the volume-limited Main galaxy samples. This suggests that star formation activity is a galaxy property very predictive of the local environment. In addition, we also note that passive galaxies are more luminous, redder, highly concentrated, and preferentially 'early type'.

  5. EVIDENCE FOR WIDESPREAD COOLING IN AN ACTIVE REGION OBSERVED WITH THE SDO ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY

    SciTech Connect

    Viall, Nicholeen M.; Klimchuk, James A.

    2012-07-01

    A well-known behavior of EUV light curves of discrete coronal loops is that the peak intensities of cooler channels or spectral lines are reached at progressively later times than hotter channels. This time lag is understood to be the result of hot coronal loop plasma cooling through these lower respective temperatures. However, loops typically comprise only a minority of the total emission in active regions (ARs). Is this cooling pattern a common property of AR coronal plasma, or does it only occur in unique circumstances, locations, and times? The new Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA) data provide a wonderful opportunity to answer this question systematically for an entire AR. We measure the time lag between pairs of SDO/AIA EUV channels using 24 hr of images of AR 11082 observed on 2010 June 19. We find that there is a time-lag signal consistent with cooling plasma, just as is usually found for loops, throughout the AR including the diffuse emission between loops for the entire 24 hr duration. The pattern persists consistently for all channel pairs and choice of window length within the 24 hr time period, giving us confidence that the plasma is cooling from temperatures of greater than 3 MK, and sometimes exceeding 7 MK, down to temperatures lower than {approx}0.8 MK. This suggests that the bulk of the emitting coronal plasma in this AR is not steady; rather, it is dynamic and constantly evolving. These measurements provide crucial constraints on any model which seeks to describe coronal heating.

  6. The Life Cycles of Stars: An Information and Activity Booklet, Grades 9-12, 1997-1998. Imagine the Universe! Probing the Structure & Evaluation of the Cosmos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitlock, Laura A.; Granger, Kara C.

    This booklet contains information and activities on the life cycle of stars. Materials can be adapted for grade 9 through grade 12 classrooms. Background information about star birth and life, black dwarfs, supernovae, white dwarfs, neutron stars, black holes, and the electromagnetic spectrum is included. The seven activities focus on star mass,…

  7. Stellar Activity Mimics a Habitable-zone Planet around Kapteyn's Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Paul; Roy, Arpita; Mahadevan, Suvrath

    2015-06-01

    Kapteyn’s star is an old M subdwarf believed to be a member of the Galactic halo population of stars. A recent study has claimed the existence of two super-Earth planets around the star based on radial velocity (RV) observations. The innermost of these candidate planets—Kapteyn b (P = 48 days)—resides within the circumstellar habitable zone (HZ). Given recent progress in understanding the impact of stellar activity in detecting planetary signals, we have analyzed the observed HARPS data for signatures of stellar activity. We find that while Kapteyn’s star is photometrically very stable, a suite of spectral activity indices reveal a large-amplitude rotation signal, and we determine the stellar rotation period to be 143 days. The spectral activity tracers are strongly correlated with the purported RV signal of “planet b,” and the 48-day period is an integer fraction (1/3) of the stellar rotation period. We conclude that Kapteyn b is not a planet in the HZ, but an artifact of stellar activity.

  8. Deriving Age-Activity Relations in M Dwarf Stars Using Clusters of Known Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, J. M.; West, A. A.; Covey, K. R.; McDonald, M.; Veilleux, S.; Seth, A.

    2011-12-01

    We present preliminary results from a study of M dwarf magnetic activity in clusters of known ages with the ultimate goal of constraining the age-activity relation. The age-activity relation provides clues to the mechanisms generating magnetic dynamos, especially in late-type dwarfs where their stellar interiors become fully convective. Broadband griz photometry was obtained for four clusters with ages ranging from ˜110 Myrs to 4 Gyrs. Narrowband images of each cluster were acquired with the Maryland Magellan Tunable Filter, tuned to the frequency of Hα, including a correction for the cluster's radial velocity, and a nearby, similarly sized bandpass sampling the stellar pseudo-continuum. This permits a "photometric" measurement of the Hα emission for each star, and thus a measure of activity. Cluster membership is determined from broadband photometry and comparison to stellar positions from previous studies. We report on our findings for the cluster NGC 2516. Hα measurements are stronger for cluster stars than for field stars of the same magnitude. A clear correlation is seen between our Hα strengths measured by narrowband imaging and previous spectroscopic activity measurements for stars where spectra have been obtained.

  9. A connection between star formation activity and cosmic rays in the starburst galaxy M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VERITAS Collaboration; Acciari, V. A.; Aliu, E.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Bautista, M.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Boltuch, D.; Bradbury, S. M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Celik, O.; Cesarini, A.; Chow, Y. C.; Ciupik, L.; Cogan, P.; Colin, P.; Cui, W.; Dickherber, R.; Duke, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Finley, J. P.; Finnegan, G.; Fortin, P.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gall, D.; Gibbs, K.; Gillanders, G. H.; Godambe, S.; Grube, J.; Guenette, R.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Horan, D.; Hui, C. M.; Humensky, T. B.; Imran, A.; Kaaret, P.; Karlsson, N.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Kildea, J.; Konopelko, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; Lebohec, S.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; McCutcheon, M.; Millis, J.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nagai, T.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Pandel, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pizlo, F.; Pohl, M.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Roache, E.; Rose, H. J.; Schroedter, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Smith, A. W.; Steele, D.; Swordy, S. P.; Theiling, M.; Thibadeau, S.; Varlotta, A.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Vincent, S.; Wagner, R. G.; Wakely, S. P.; Ward, J. E.; Weekes, T. C.; Weinstein, A.; Weisgarber, T.; Williams, D. A.; Wissel, S.; Wood, M.; Zitzer, B.

    2009-12-01

    Although Galactic cosmic rays (protons and nuclei) are widely believed to be mainly accelerated by the winds and supernovae of massive stars, definitive evidence of this origin remains elusive nearly a century after their discovery. The active regions of starburst galaxies have exceptionally high rates of star formation, and their large size-more than 50 times the diameter of similar Galactic regions-uniquely enables reliable calorimetric measurements of their potentially high cosmic-ray density. The cosmic rays produced in the formation, life and death of massive stars in these regions are expected to produce diffuse γ-ray emission through interactions with interstellar gas and radiation. M82, the prototype small starburst galaxy, is predicted to be the brightest starburst galaxy in terms of γ-ray emission. Here we report the detection of >700-GeV γ-rays from M82. From these data we determine a cosmic-ray density of 250eVcm-3 in the starburst core, which is about 500 times the average Galactic density. This links cosmic-ray acceleration to star formation activity, and suggests that supernovae and massive-star winds are the dominant accelerators.

  10. LITHIUM ABUNDANCE IN SOLAR-TYPE STARS WITH LOW CHROMOSPHERIC ACTIVITY: APPLICATION TO THE SEARCH FOR MAUNDER MINIMUM ANALOGS

    SciTech Connect

    Lubin, Dan; Tytler, David; Kirkman, David

    2010-06-10

    We use measurements of lithium abundance to examine the evolutionary history of stars frequently believed to be in a Maunder minimum (MM) state due to their low chromospheric activity. In a sample whose main-sequence membership has been verified using Hipparcos parallax data, we find that stars with very low chromospheric activity log R'{sub HK} {<=} -5.0 have substantially depleted lithium compared with the full sample, with half of these lithium abundances lying more than one standard deviation below the sample mean for their range of color index. One interpretation is that these stars are near the end of their main-sequence lifetime, and therefore their low activity does not necessarily signify a transient MM state in a solar-age star. Conversely, using information in published activity time series for some stars, and combined lithium and activity measurements from the Ursa Major moving group and M67, we find limited evidence that a low-activity star having lithium abundance in the normal range for its color index may be a viable MM candidate. Thus, lithium abundance, which can be readily observed or even retrieved from some of the spectroscopic data collected by recent planet-search surveys, may have value for expanding and refining the program star lists for long-term MM searches. Finally, we find that the use of Hipparcos parallax data to ascertain main-sequence membership sharpens the distinction in sample-mean lithium abundance between stars with planet detections and comparison stars.

  11. A fuselage/tank structure study for actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles: Structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of fuselage cross-section (circular and elliptical) and structural arrangement (integral and nonintegral tanks) on the performance of actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles was evaluated. It was found that integrally machined stiffening of the tank walls, while providing the most weight-efficient use of materials, results in higher production costs. Fatigue and fracture mechanics appeared to have little effect on the weight of the three study aircraft. The need for thermal strain relief through insulation is discussed. Aircraft size and magnitude of the internal pressure are seen to be significant factors in tank design.

  12. A nonventing cooling system for space environment extravehicular activity, using radiation and regenerable thermal storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayes, Stephen A.; Trevino, Luis A.; Dinsmore, Craig E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper outlines the selection, design, and testing of a prototype nonventing regenerable astronaut cooling system for extravehicular activity space suit applications, for mission durations of four hours or greater. The selected system consists of the following key elements: a radiator assembly which serves as the exterior shell of the portable life support subsystem backpack; a layer of phase change thermal storage material, n-hexadecane paraffin, which acts as a regenerable thermal capacitor; a thermoelectric heat pump; and an automatic temperature control system. The capability for regeneration of thermal storage capacity with and without the aid of electric power is provided.

  13. Inquiry-based Science Activities Using The Infrared Zoo and Infrared Yellowstone Resources at Cool Cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daou, D.; Gauthier, A.

    2003-12-01

    Inquiry-based activities that utilize the Cool Cosmos image galleries have been designed and developed by K12 teachers enrolled in The Invisible Universe Online for Teachers course. The exploration activities integrate the Our Infrared World Gallery (http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/image_galleries/our_ir_world_gallery.html) with either the Infrared Zoo gallery (http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/image_galleries/ir_zoo/index.html) or the Infrared Yellowstone image http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/image_galleries/ir_yellowstone/index.html) and video (http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/videos/ir_yellowstone/index.html) galleries. Complete instructor guides have been developed for the activities and will be presented by the authors in poster and CD form. Although the activities are written for middle and highschool learners, they can easily be adapted for college audiences. The Our Infrared World Gallery exploration helps learners think critically about visible light and infrared light as they compare sets of images (IR and visible light) of known objects. For example: by taking a regular photograph of a running faucet, can you tell if it is running hot or cold water? What new information does the IR image give you? The Infrared Zoo activities encourage learners to investigate the differences between warm and cold blooded animals by comparing sets of IR and visible images. In one activity, learners take on the role of a pit viper seeking prey in various desert and woodland settings. The main activities are extended into the real world by discussing and researching industrial, medical, and societal applications of infrared technologies. The Infrared Yellowstone lessons give learners a unique perspective on Yellowstone National Park and it's spectacular geologic and geothermal features. Infrared video technology is highlighted as learners make detailed observations about the visible and infrared views of the natural phenomena. The "Cool Cosmos" EPO activities are

  14. Spectroscopic Measurements of Starspot Area and Temperature on Magnetically Active Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neal, D.

    1996-12-01

    I describe spectroscopic techniques for studying starspots on late-type active stars. I develop an empirical spectral synthesis technique that independently measures starspot filling factor and temperature by fitting TiO absorption bands of different temperature sensitivities. Spectra of inactive G and K stars are used as proxies for the unspotted photospheres of the active stars, and spectra of M stars represent the spots. The set of TiO bands beginning at 7055 Angstroms and the band at 8860 Angstroms are most useful for this procedure; the starspots must be cooler than 4000 K. I apply this technique to spectra of seven RS CVn systems and one FK Comae star. Measured spot filling factors range from below the detection threshold ( ~ 8%) to nearly 60%. By comparing our measurements with contemporaneous photometry, we find, for some active stars, that the unspotted brightness of the star is significantly brighter than historical light maximum, and conclude that some starspot coverage has always been present. In some cases we find much higher spot filling factors than measured using other techniques, implying a uniform component to the starspot coverage. I extend this technique into the H band (where starspots contribute much more to the overall stellar spectrum than in the visible) by observing a pair of OH lines near 1.563mu m in three RS CVn systems. In inactive stars the equivalent width of these lines increases approximately linearly as temperature decreases from 5000 K to 3000 K; the OH lines greatly extend the temperature range over which starspots can be studied through molecular absorption features. Also, I apply TiO-band spectroscopy to the problem of Doppler imaging. Doppler imaging better constrains the sizes and shapes of starspots than their temperatures. TiO-band spectroscopy can supply the needed temperature constraint; the Doppler image is made to reproduce the observed depths of the TiO bands as well as the atomic line profiles. For the star II Pegasi

  15. Three-dimensional magnetic and abundance mapping of the cool Ap star HD 24712 . I. Spectropolarimetric observations in all four Stokes parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusomarov, N.; Kochukhov, O.; Piskunov, N.; Jeffers, S. V.; Johns-Krull, C. M.; Keller, C. U.; Makaganiuk, V.; Rodenhuis, M.; Snik, F.; Stempels, H. C.; Valenti, J. A.

    2013-10-01

    Context. High-resolution spectropolarimetric observations provide simultaneous information about stellar magnetic field topologies and three-dimensional distributions of chemical elements. High-quality spectra in the Stokes IQUV parameters are currently available for very few early-type magnetic chemically peculiar stars. Here we present analysis of a unique full Stokes vector spectropolarimetric data set, acquired for the cool magnetic Ap star HD 24712 with a recently commissioned spectropolarimeter. Aims: The goal of our work is to examine the circular and linear polarization signatures inside spectral lines and to study variation of the stellar spectrum and magnetic observables as a function of rotational phase. Methods: HD 24712 was observed with the HARPSpol instrument at the 3.6-m ESO telescope over a period of 2010-2011. We achieved full rotational phase coverage with 43 individual Stokes parameter observations. The resulting spectra have a signal-to-noise ratio of 300-600 and resolving power exceeding 105. The multiline technique of least-squares deconvolution (LSD) was applied to combine information from the spectral lines of Fe-peak and rare earth elements. Results: We used the HARPSPol spectra of HD 24712 to study the morphology of the Stokes profile shapes in individual spectral lines and in LSD Stokes profiles corresponding to different line masks. From the LSD Stokes V profiles we measured the longitudinal component of the magnetic field, ⟨Bz⟩, with an accuracy of 5-10 G. We also determined the net linear polarization from the LSD Stokes Q and U profiles. Combining previous ⟨Bz⟩ measurements with our data allowed us to determine an improved rotational period of the star, Prot = 12.45812 ± 0.00019 d. We also measured the longitudinal magnetic field from the cores of Hα and Hβ lines. The analysis of ⟨Bz⟩ measurements showed no evidence for a significant radial magnetic field gradient in the atmosphere of HD 24712. We used our ⟨Bz⟩ and

  16. Magnetic fields and activity of the sun and stars - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, R.

    1983-01-01

    Recent work on the observation and theory of solar and stellar magnetic field activity and its relation to stellar activity is reviewed, emphasizing those aspects relevant to the problem of activity of red dwarf stars. New observational facts relevant to understanding the root cause of stellar surface activity are summarized and theoretical questions concerning the underlying physical basis for the observed correlations between stellar activity, rotation, and magnetic fields are addressed. These include dyanamo theory and the rotation-activity connection as well as flux tube dynamics and plasma heating.

  17. Star Power: Providing for the Gifted & Talented. Module 5. Enrichment Activities for the Gifted/Talented.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallis, Jackie; Gilman, Sharlene

    The document presents Module 5, enrichment activities for the gifted/talented, of the Star Power modules developed for school personnel who have an interest in or a need to explore the area of gifted and talented education. It is explained in an introductory section that the modules can be used for independent study, for small group interaction,…

  18. Supersaturation and activity-rotation relation in PMS stars: the young cluster h Persei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argiroffi, C.; Caramazza, M.; Micela, G.; Sciortino, S.; Moraux, E.; Bouvier, J.; Flaccomio, E.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Several studies showed that the magnetic activity of late-type main-sequence (MS) stars is characterized by different regimes and that their activity levels are well described by the Rossby number, Ro, defined as the ratio between the rotational period Prot and the convective turnover time. Very young pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars show, similarly to MS stars, intense magnetic activity. However, they do not show clear activity-rotation trends, and it still debated which stellar parameters determine their magnetic activity levels. Aims: To bridge the gap between MS and PMS stars, we studied the activity-rotation relation in the young cluster h Persei, a ~13 Myr old cluster, that contains both fast and slow rotators. The cluster members have ended their accretion phase and have developed a radiative core. It therefore offers us the opportunity of studying the activity level of intermediate-age PMS stars with different rotational velocities, excluding any interactions with the circumstellar environment. Methods: We constrained the magnetic activity levels of h Per members by measuring their X-ray emission from a Chandra observation, while rotational periods were obtained previously in the framework of the MONITOR project. By cross-correlating these data, we collected a final catalog of 414 h Per members with known rotational period, effective temperature, and mass. In 169 of these, X-ray emission has also been detected. Results: We found that h Per members with 1.0 M⊙activity regimes: fast rotators clearly show supersaturation, while slower rotators have activity levels compatible to the non-saturated regime. At 13 Myr, h Per is therefore the youngest cluster showing activity-rotation regimes analogous to those of MS stars, indicating that at this age, magnetic field production is most likely regulated by the αΩ type dynamo. Moreover, we observed that supersaturation is better described by Prot than Ro, and that the

  19. Supersaturation and activity-rotation relation in PMS stars: the young cluster h Persei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argiroffi, C.; Caramazza, M.; Micela, G.; Sciortino, S.; Moraux, E.; Bouvier, J.; Flaccomio, E.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Several studies showed that the magnetic activity of late-type main-sequence (MS) stars is characterized by different regimes and that their activity levels are well described by the Rossby number, Ro, defined as the ratio between the rotational period Prot and the convective turnover time. Very young pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars show, similarly to MS stars, intense magnetic activity. However, they do not show clear activity-rotation trends, and it still debated which stellar parameters determine their magnetic activity levels. Aims: To bridge the gap between MS and PMS stars, we studied the activity-rotation relation in the young cluster h Persei, a ~13 Myr old cluster, that contains both fast and slow rotators. The cluster members have ended their accretion phase and have developed a radiative core. It therefore offers us the opportunity of studying the activity level of intermediate-age PMS stars with different rotational velocities, excluding any interactions with the circumstellar environment. Methods: We constrained the magnetic activity levels of h Per members by measuring their X-ray emission from a Chandra observation, while rotational periods were obtained previously in the framework of the MONITOR project. By cross-correlating these data, we collected a final catalog of 414 h Per members with known rotational period, effective temperature, and mass. In 169 of these, X-ray emission has also been detected. Results: We found that h Per members with 1.0 M⊙activity regimes: fast rotators clearly show supersaturation, while slower rotators have activity levels compatible to the non-saturated regime. At 13 Myr, h Per is therefore the youngest cluster showing activity-rotation regimes analogous to those of MS stars, indicating that at this age, magnetic field production is most likely regulated by the αΩ type dynamo. Moreover, we observed that supersaturation is better described by Prot than Ro, and that the

  20. HerMES: disentangling active galactic nuclei and star formation in the radio source population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawlings, J. I.; Page, M. J.; Symeonidis, M.; Bock, J.; Cooray, A.; Farrah, D.; Guo, K.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Ibar, E.; Oliver, S. J.; Roseboom, I. G.; Scott, Douglas; Seymour, N.; Vaccari, M.; Wardlow, J. L.

    2015-10-01

    We separate the extragalactic radio source population above ˜50 μJy into active galactic nuclei (AGN) and star-forming sources. The primary method of our approach is to fit the infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs), constructed using Spitzer/IRAC (Infrared Array Camera) and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) and Herschel/SPIRE photometry, of 380 radio sources in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South. From the fitted SEDs, we determine the relative AGN and star-forming contributions to their infrared emission. With the inclusion of other AGN diagnostics such as X-ray luminosity, Spitzer/IRAC colours, radio spectral index and the ratio of star-forming total infrared flux to k-corrected 1.4 GHz flux density, qIR, we determine whether the radio emission in these sources is powered by star formation or by an AGN. The majority of these radio sources (60 per cent) show the signature of an AGN at some wavelength. Of the sources with AGN signatures, 58 per cent are hybrid systems for which the radio emission is being powered by star formation. This implies that radio sources which have likely been selected on their star formation have a high AGN fraction. Below a 1.4 GHz flux density of 1 mJy, along with finding a strong contribution to the source counts from pure star-forming sources, we find that hybrid sources constitute 20-65 per cent of the sources. This result suggests that hybrid sources have a significant contribution, along with sources that do not host a detectable AGN, to the observed flattening of the source counts at ˜1 mJy for the extragalactic radio source population.

  1. X-ray cycles and magnetic activity of solar-like stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robrade, J.

    2016-06-01

    Since the beginning of its operation XMM-Newton carries out a monitoring program to study coronal cyclic behavior in stars similar to our Sun. I present highlights and recent results from the X-ray monitoring campaign, that observes neighboring stellar systems like Alpha Centauri and 61 Cygni. Cyclic activity phenomena and coronal properties are discussed and put into context of X-ray emission from the Sun and solar-type stars. As an outlook, future perspectives of stellar X-ray studies with a focus on the eROSITA all-sky survey are presented.

  2. Observation and modelling of main-sequence star chromospheres - XII. Two-component model chromospheres for five active dM1e stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houdebine, E. R.

    2009-08-01

    We aim to constrain the Hα, CaII H and CaII K profiles from quiescent and active regions on active dM1e stars. A preliminary analysis of all the data available for dM1e stars shows that the Hα/CaII equivalent width (EW) ratio varies by up to a factor of 7 for different stars in our sample. We find that spectroscopic binaries have a significantly smaller ratio than single dM1e stars. We also find that the pre-main-sequence stars Gl 616.2, GJ 1264 and Gl 803 have a ratio lower than main-sequence single dM1e stars. These differences imply that different chromospheric structures are present on different stars, notably the temperature minimum must decrease with an increasing Hα/CaII EW ratio. For these reasons, it is impossible to reproduce all observations with only one grid of model chromospheres. We show that the grid of model chromospheres of Paper VI is adequate to describe the physical conditions that prevail in the chromospheres of spectroscopic binaries and pre-main-sequence M1e stars, but not for the conditions in single dM1e stars. One or more additional grids of model chromospheres will be necessary to reproduce all observations. We use the method developed in Paper XI in this series, in order to build two-component model chromospheres for five M1e field stars: FF And A, FF And B, GJ 1264, AU Mic and Gl 815A. Our solutions provide an exact match of the Hα and the mean CaII H & K EWs within measurement uncertainties. We compare the theoretical profiles and the observed profiles of Hα and the CaII H & K resonance lines. On the one hand, our fits to the CaII lines are reasonably good. On the other hand, our models tend to produce Hα profiles with a central absorption that is too deep. This suggests that the column mass at the transition region for plages is underestimated, but this would imply that the contrast factor between quiescent and active regions in the CaII lines is larger than 5. We find that, except in the cases of FF And A and AU Mic, the total

  3. Chromospheric activity on late-type star LQ Hya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liyun; Pi, Qingfeng; Zhu, Zhongzhong; Zhang, Xiliang; Li, Zhongmu

    2014-10-01

    We present new high-resolution echelle spectra of LQ Hya to study its chromospheric activity. We analyzed our spectroscopic observations including several optical indicators of chromospheric activity (the He ID3 , Na I D1, D2, Hα, and Ca II infrared triplet lines), by means of the spectral subtraction technique. All the chromospheric activity indicators (the Na I D1, D2, Hα, and Ca II IRT lines) confirmed chromospheric emissions. The ratio of EW8542 /EW8498 for LQ Hya is around 1.5, which indicates that there is optically thick emission in a plage-like region. As for the Ca II IRT and Hα lines, it seems that there is also a weak rotation modulation of chromospheric activity in our data, which might be explained by the strong plage or flare. The contemporaneous monitoring of photospheric and chromospheric emissions for LQ Hya indicate chromospheric plages might spatially associated with the spots.

  4. FREQUENCY OF MAUNDER MINIMUM EVENTS IN SOLAR-TYPE STARS INFERRED FROM ACTIVITY AND METALLICITY OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lubin, Dan; Tytler, David; Kirkman, David

    2012-03-10

    We consider the common proposition that the fraction of chromospherically very inactive stars in a solar-type sample is analogous to the fraction of the Sun's main-sequence lifetime spent in a grand minimum state. In a new approach to this proposition, we examine chromospheric activity log R'{sub HK} in a stellar sample having Hipparcos parallax measurements, and having spectroscopically determined metallicity close to solar (-0.1 {<=} [Fe/H] {<=} 0.1). We evaluate height above the Hipparcos main sequence, and estimate age using isochrones, to identify the most Sun-like stars in this sample. As a threshold below which a star is labeled very inactive, we use the peak of the HK activity distribution mapped over the quiet Sun during the 1968 epoch. We estimate the fraction of Maunder Minimum (MM) analog candidates in our sample at 11.1%. Given the 70 yr duration of the historical MM, this suggests that in any given year there is a 1/630 chance of entering a similar grand minimum. There are three important cautions with this type of estimate. First, recent investigation using actual activity and photometric time series has suggested that very low activity may not be a necessary criterion for identifying a non-cycling MM analog candidate. Second, this type of estimate depends very strongly on the choice of very low activity threshold. Third, in instantaneous measurements of log R'{sub HK}, it is not always clear whether a star is a viable MM analog candidate or merely an older star nearing the end of its main-sequence lifetime.

  5. A maximum entropy approach to detect close-in giant planets around active stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, P.; Donati, J.-F.; Hébrard, E.; Morin, J.; Folsom, C. P.; Böhm, T.; Boisse, I.; Borgniet, S.; Bouvier, J.; Delfosse, X.; Hussain, G.; Jeffers, S. V.; Marsden, S. C.; Barnes, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Context. The high spot coverage of young active stars is responsible for distortions of spectral lines that hamper the detection of close-in planets through radial velocity methods. Aims: We aim to progress towards more efficient exoplanet detection around active stars by optimizing the use of Doppler imaging in radial velocity measurements. Methods: We propose a simple method to simultaneously extract a brightness map and a set of orbital parameters through a tomographic inversion technique derived from classical Doppler mapping. Based on the maximum entropy principle, the underlying idea is to determine the set of orbital parameters that minimizes the information content of the resulting Doppler map. We carry out a set of numerical simulations to perform a preliminary assessment of the robustness of our method, using an actual Doppler map of the very active star HR 1099 to produce a realistic synthetic data set for various sets of orbital parameters of a single planet in a circular orbit. Results: Using a simulated time series of 50 line profiles affected by a peak-to-peak activity jitter of 2.5 km s-1, in most cases we are able to recover the radial velocity amplitude, orbital phase, and orbital period of an artificial planet down to a radial velocity semi-amplitude of the order of the radial velocity scatter due to the photon noise alone (about 50 m s-1 in our case). One noticeable exception occurs when the planetary orbit is close to co-rotation, in which case significant biases are observed in the reconstructed radial velocity amplitude, while the orbital period and phase remain robustly recovered. Conclusions: The present method constitutes a very simple way to extract orbital parameters from heavily distorted line profiles of active stars, when more classical radial velocity detection methods generally fail. It is easily adaptable to most existing Doppler imaging codes, paving the way towards a systematic search for close-in planets orbiting young, rapidly

  6. The host stars of Kepler's habitable exoplanets: superflares, rotation and activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, D. J.; Pugh, C. E.; Broomhall, A.-M.; Brown, D. J. A.; Lund, M. N.; Osborn, H. P.; Pollacco, D. L.

    2016-01-01

    We embark on a detailed study of the light curves of Kepler's most Earth-like exoplanet host stars using the full length of Kepler data. We derive rotation periods, photometric activity indices, flaring energies, mass-loss rates, gyrochronological ages, X-ray luminosities and consider implications for the planetary magnetospheres and habitability. Furthermore, we present the detection of superflares in the light curve of Kepler-438, the exoplanet with the highest Earth Similarity Index to date. Kepler-438b orbits at a distance of 0.166 au to its host star, and hence may be susceptible to atmospheric stripping. Our sample is taken from the Habitable Exoplanet Catalogue, and consists of the stars Kepler-22, Kepler-61, Kepler-62, Kepler-174, Kepler-186, Kepler-283, Kepler-296, Kepler-298, Kepler-438, Kepler-440, Kepler-442, Kepler-443 and KOI-4427, between them hosting 15 of the most habitable transiting planets known to date from Kepler.

  7. Pre-irradiation testing of actively cooled Be-Cu divertor modules

    SciTech Connect

    Linke, J.; Duwe, R.; Kuehnlein, W.

    1995-09-01

    A set of neutron irradiation tests is prepared on different plasma facing materials (PFM) candidates and miniaturized components for ITER. Beside beryllium the irradiation program which will be performed in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten, includes different carbon fiber composites (CFQ) and tungsten alloys. The target values for the neutron irradiation will be 0.5 dpa at temperatures of 350{degrees}C and 700{degrees}C, resp.. The post irradiation examination (PIE) will cover a wide range of mechanical tests; in addition the degradation of thermal conductivity will be investigated. To determine the high heat flux (HHF) performance of actively cooled divertor modules, electron beam tests which simulate the expected heat loads during the operation of ITER, are scheduled in the hot cell electron beam facility JUDITH. These tests on a selection of different actively cooled beryllium-copper and CFC-copper divertor modules are performed before and after neutron irradiation; the pre-irradiation testing is an essential part of the program to quantify the zero-fluence high heat flux performance and to detect defects in the modules, in particular in the brazed joints.

  8. Cosmic web and star formation activity in galaxies at z ∼ 1

    SciTech Connect

    Darvish, B.; Mobasher, B.; Sales, L. V.; Sobral, D.; Scoville, N. Z.; Best, P.; Smail, I.

    2014-11-20

    We investigate the role of the delineated cosmic web/filaments on star formation activity by exploring a sample of 425 narrow-band selected Hα emitters, as well as 2846 color-color selected underlying star-forming galaxies for a large-scale structure at z = 0.84 in the COSMOS field from the HiZELS survey. Using the scale-independent Multi-scale Morphology Filter algorithm, we are able to quantitatively describe the density field and disentangle it into its major components: fields, filaments, and clusters. We show that the observed median star formation rate (SFR), stellar mass, specific SFR, the mean SFR-mass relation, and its scatter for both Hα emitters and underlying star-forming galaxies do not strongly depend on different classes of environment, in agreement with previous studies. However, the fraction of Hα emitters varies with environment and is enhanced in filamentary structures at z ∼ 1. We propose mild galaxy-galaxy interactions as the possible physical agent for the elevation of the fraction of Hα star-forming galaxies in filaments. Our results show that filaments are the likely physical environments that are often classed as the 'intermediate' densities and that the cosmic web likely plays a major role in galaxy formation and evolution which has so far been poorly investigated.

  9. Multiwavelength study of the magnetically active T Tauri star HD 283447

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Eric D.; Welty, Alan D.; Imhoff, Catherine; Hall, Jeffrey C.; Etzel, Paul B.; Phillips, Robert B.; Lonsdale, Colin J.

    1994-01-01

    We observed the luminous T Tauri star HD 283447 = V773 Tauri simultaneously at X-ray, ultraviolet, optical photometric and spectroscopic, and radio wavelengths for several hours on UT 1992 September 11. ROSAT, IUE, Very Large Array (VLA) and an intercontinental Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) network, and three optical observatories participated in the campaign. The star is known for its unusually high and variable nonthermal radio continuum emission. High levels of soft X-ray and Mg II line emission are discovered, with luminosity L(sub x) = 5.5 x 10(exp 30) ergs/s (0.2 - 2 keV) and L(sub Mg II) = 1 x 10(exp 29) ergs/s, respectively. Optically, the spectrum exhibits rather weak characteristics of `classical' T Tauri stars. A faint, broad emission line component, probably due to a collimated wind or infall, is present. During the campaign, the radio luminosity decreased by a factor of 4, while optical/UV lines and X-ray emission remained strong but constant. The large gyrosynchrotron-emitting regions are therefore decoupled from the chromospheric and coronal emission. Five models for the magnetic geometry around the star are discussed; solar-type activity, dipole magnetosphere, star-disk magnetic coupling, disk magnetic fields, and close binary interaction. The data suggest that two magnetic geometries are simultaneously present: complex multipolar fields like those on the Sun, and a large-scale field possibly associated with the circumstellar disk.

  10. Spectral characterization and differential rotation study of active CoRoT stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, E.; Czesla, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2016-05-01

    The CoRoT space telescope observed nearly 160 000 light curves. Among the most outstanding is that of the young, active planet host star CoRoT-2A. In addition to deep planetary transits, the light curve of CoRoT-2A shows strong rotational variability and a superimposed beating pattern. To study the stars that produce such an intriguing pattern of photometric variability, we identified a sample of eight stars with rotation periods between 0.8 and 11 days and photometric variability amplitudes of up to 7.5%, showing a similar CoRoT light curve. We also obtained high-resolution follow-up spectroscopy with TNG/SARG and carried out a spectral analysis with SME and MOOG. We find that the color dependence of the light curves is consistent with rotational modulation due to starspots and that latitudinal differential rotation provides a viable explanation for the light curves, although starspot evolution is also expected to play an important role. Our MOOG and SME spectral analyses provide consistent results, showing that the targets are dwarf stars with spectral types between F and mid-K. Detectable Li i absorption in four of the targets confirms a low age of 100-400 Myr also deduced from gyrochronology. Our study indicates that the photometric beating phenomenon is likely attributable to differential rotation in fast-rotating stars with outer convection zones.

  11. Antidotal activity of Averrhoa carambola (Star fruit) on fluoride induced toxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Vasant, Rupal A.

    2014-01-01

    Consumption of fluoride leads to several physiological disturbances in carbohydrate, lipid and antioxidant metabolisms. Averrhoa carambola L. fruit (Star fruit) is a commonly consumed fruit in tropical countries and is an ingredient in folklore medicines. As the fruits have high polyphenolic and antioxidant contents, the present study was undertaken to investigate the potential of star fruit as a dietary supplement in attenuating the fluoride induced hyperglycemia, hypercholesterolemia and oxidative stress in laboratory rats. A four-week exposure to fluoride caused sustained hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and oxidative stress and, when the diet was supplemented with star fruit powder, carbohydrate, lipid and antioxidant profiles were restored significantly. It is surmised that the antihyperglycemic, antihypercholesterolemic and antioxidant activities of star fruit in fluoride exposed rats could be due to the presence of polyphenols, flavonoids, saponins, phytosterols, ascorbic acid and fibers in the fruit, which are all well known regulators of carbohydrate, lipid and antioxidant metabolisms. These findings suggest that star fruit can be used as a dietary supplement in fluoride endemic regions to contain fluoride induced hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and oxidative stress. PMID:26109886

  12. Nondestructive test of brazed cooling tubes of prototype bolometer camera housing using active infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Tahiliani, Kumudni; Pandya, Santosh P; Pandya, Shwetang; Jha, Ratneshwar; Govindarajan, J

    2011-01-01

    The active infrared thermography technique is used for assessing the brazing quality of an actively cooled bolometer camera housing developed for steady state superconducting tokamak. The housing is a circular pipe, which has circular tubes vacuum brazed on the periphery. A unique method was adopted to monitor the temperature distribution on the internal surface of the pipe. A stainless steel mirror was placed inside the pipe and the reflected IR radiations were viewed using an IR camera. The heat stimulus was given by passing hot water through the tubes and the temperature distribution was monitored during the transient phase. The thermographs showed a significant nonuniformity in the brazing with a contact area of around 51%. The thermography results were compared with the x-ray radiographs and a good match between the two was observed. Benefits of thermography over x-ray radiography testing are emphasized. PMID:21280850

  13. Materials Property Profiles for Actively Cooled Panels: An Illustration for Scramjet Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermaak, N.; Valdevit, L.; Evans, A. G.

    2009-04-01

    A scheme for identifying and visualizing the material properties that limit the performance of candidate materials for actively cooled aerospace propulsion components is presented and illustrated for combustor panels for Mach 7 hypersonic vehicles. The method provides a framework for exploring the nonlinear interactions between design and materials optimization. By probing the active constraints along the border of feasible design space, the limiting properties have been elucidated for a representative group of candidate materials. Property vectors that enhance design options have also been determined. For one of the promising candidate alloys (the Ni-based superalloy, INCONEL X-750), the possibilities of reclaiming design space and lowering optimal combustor panel weight by tailoring its strength properties are assessed.

  14. Spots and activity cycles of the star FKCom—2013-2015 data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puzin, V. B.; Savanov, I. S.; Dmitrienko, E. S.; Romanyuk, I. I.; Semenko, E. A.; Yakunin, I. A.; Burdanov, A. Yu.

    2016-04-01

    We present an analysis of new photometric and spectropolarimetric observations of a chromospherically active star FKCom. Based on this observational data and the data from the literature sources, applying a common technique, we performed an analysis of a complete set of the available photometric data, which were divided into 218 individual light curves. For each of them a reverse problem of restoring largescale temperature irregularities on the surface of the star from its light curve was solved. We analyzed the time series for the brightness of the star in the U-, B-, and V-bands, the brightness variability amplitudes, the total area of the spots on the surface of the star, and the average brightness of each set considered. The analysis of determination results of the positions of active longitudes leads to the conclusion about the existence of two systems of active regions on the FKCom surface. It was determined that the positions of each of these systems undergo cyclic changes. This confirms the conclusion on the likely absence of a strongly pronounced regularity of the flip-flops in FKCom, earlier suggested by other researchers. The results of the new polarimetric observations FKCom in 2014-2015 are presented. These measurements evidence the legitimacy of the proposed interpretation the behavior of the longitudinal magnetic field strength < B z >, indicating the settling-in of a more symmetric distribution of magnetic region on the FKCom surface. An increasing activity of the star over the recent years, registered from the photometric observations is also consistent with the probable onset of growth in the < B z > parameter starting from 2014.

  15. A high-fat diet impairs cooling-evoked brown adipose tissue activation via a vagal afferent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Madden, Christopher J; Morrison, Shaun F

    2016-08-01

    In dramatic contrast to rats on a control diet, rats maintained on a high-fat diet (HFD) failed to activate brown adipose tissue (BAT) during cooling despite robust increases in their BAT activity following direct activation of their BAT sympathetic premotor neurons in the raphe pallidus. Cervical vagotomy or blockade of glutamate receptors in the nucleus of the tractus solitarii (NTS) reversed the HFD-induced inhibition of cold-evoked BAT activity. Thus, a HFD does not prevent rats from mounting a robust, centrally driven BAT thermogenesis; however, a HFD does alter a vagal afferent input to NTS neurons, thereby preventing the normal activation of BAT thermogenesis to cooling. These results, paralleling the absence of cooling-evoked glucose uptake in the BAT of obese humans, reveal a neural mechanism through which consumption of a HFD contributes to reduced energy expenditure and thus to weight gain. PMID:27354235

  16. A multiwavelength photometric census of AGN and star formation activity in the brightest cluster galaxies of X-ray selected clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, T. S.; Edge, A. C.; Stott, J. P.; Ebeling, H.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Draper, P. W.; Metcalfe, N.; Kaiser, N.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2016-09-01

    Despite their reputation as being `red and dead', the unique environment inhabited by brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) can often lead to a self-regulated feedback cycle between radiatively cooling intracluster gas and star formation and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in the BCG. However the prevalence of `active' BCGs, and details of the feedback involved, are still uncertain. We have performed an optical, UV and mid-IR photometric analysis of the BCGs in 981 clusters at 0.03 < z < 0.5, selected from the ROSAT All Sky Survey. Using Pan-STARRS PS1 3π, GALEX and WISE survey data we look for BCGs with photometric colours which deviate from that of the bulk population of passive BCGs - indicative of AGN and/or star formation activity within the BCG. We find that whilst the majority of BCGs are consistent with being passive, at least 14 per cent of our BCGs show a significant colour offset from passivity in at least one colour index. And, where available, supplementary spectroscopy reveals the majority of these particular BCGs show strong optical emission lines. On comparing BCG `activity' with the X-ray luminosity of the host cluster, we find that BCGs showing a colour offset are preferentially found in the more X-ray luminous clusters, indicative of the connection between BCG `activity' and the intracluster medium.

  17. MID-INFRARED SPECTRAL INDICATORS OF STAR FORMATION AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY IN NORMAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Treyer, Marie; Martin, Christopher D.; Wyder, Ted; Schiminovich, David; O'Dowd, Matt; Johnson, Benjamin D.; Charlot, Stephane; Heckman, Timothy; Martins, Lucimara; Seibert, Mark; Van der Hulst, J. M.

    2010-08-20

    We investigate the use of mid-infrared (MIR) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) bands, the continuum, and emission lines as probes of star formation (SF) and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in a sample of 100 'normal' and local (z {approx} 0.1) emission-line galaxies. The MIR spectra were obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph as part of the Spitzer-SDSS-GALEX Spectroscopic Survey, which includes multi-wavelength photometry from the ultraviolet to the far-infrared and optical spectroscopy. The continuum and features were extracted using PAHFIT, a decomposition code which we find to yield PAH equivalent widths (EWs) up to {approx}30 times larger than the commonly used spline methods. Despite the lack of extreme objects in our sample (such as strong AGNs, low-metallicity galaxies, or ULIRGs), we find significant variations in PAH, continuum, and emission-line properties, and systematic trends between these MIR properties and optically derived physical properties, such as age, metallicity, and radiation field hardness. We revisit the diagnostic diagram relating PAH EWs and [Ne II]12.8 {mu}m/[O IV]25.9 {mu}m line ratios and find it to be in much better agreement with the standard optical SF/AGN classification than when spline decompositions are used, while also potentially revealing obscured AGNs. The luminosity of individual PAH components, of the continuum, and, with poorer statistics, of the neon emission lines and molecular hydrogen lines are found to be tightly correlated to the total infrared (TIR) luminosity, making individual MIR components good gauges of the total dust emission in SF galaxies. Like the TIR luminosity, these individual components can be used to estimate dust attenuation in the UV and in H{alpha} lines based on energy balance arguments. We also propose average scaling relations between these components and dust-corrected, H{alpha}-derived SF rates.

  18. Gyrochronology of Low-mass Stars - Age-Rotation-Activity Relations for Young M Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidder, Benjamin; Shkolnik, E.; Skiff, B.

    2014-01-01

    New rotation periods for 34 young <300 Myr), early-M dwarfs within 25 parsecs were measured using photometric data collected with telescopes at Lowell Observatory during 2012 and 2013. An additional 25 rotation periods for members of the same sample were found in the literature. Ages were derived from Hα and X-ray emission, lithium absorption, surface gravity, and kinematic association of members of known young moving groups (YMGs). We compared rotation periods with the estimated ages as well as indicators of magnetic activity, with the intention of strengthening age-rotation-activity relations and assessing the possible use of gyrochronology in young, low-mass stars. We compared ages and rotation periods of our target stars to cluster members spanning 1-600 Myr. Rotation periods at every age exhibit a large scatter, with values typically ranging from 0.2 to 15 days. This suggests that gyrochronology for individual field stars will not be possible without a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms that govern angular momentum evolution. Yet, on average, the data still support the predicted trends for spin-up during contraction and spin-down on the main sequence, with the turnover occurring at around 150 Myr for early Ms. This suggests that rotation period distributions can be helpful in evaluating the ages of coeval groups of stars. Many thanks to the National Science Foundation for their support through the Research Experience for Undergraduates Grant AST- 1004107.

  19. Monitoring the Stellar Activity of Transit-Hosting Stars II: supporting HST exoplanet atmosphere observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Paul Anthony; Evans, Tom; Sing, David K.; Aigrain, Suzanne

    2012-02-01

    We propose to use the CTIO 1.3m telescope with ANDICAM to monitor 5 bright stars that host transiting exoplanets in an effort to characterise their activity. These observations will provide critical ground-based support for our large HST program that has been granted 124 orbits to perform a survey of UV-optical atmospheric transmission spectra for 8 hot Jupiters using the STIS instrument (Cycle 19, Prog 12473, PI D Sing). They are required because active stellar regions inevitably contaminate measured planetary light curves by causing the apparent planet-to-star radius to vary in a wavelength dependent manner. Regular ground-based photometric monitoring performed using the CTIO 1.3m telescope will allow us to determine the spot activity at the time of the HST observations, so that the stellar baseline flux can be accurately normalised for every transit observed, enabling transmission spectra from multiple visits to be combined.

  20. Experiments on FTU with an actively water cooled liquid lithium limiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzitelli, G.; Apicella, M. L.; Apruzzese, G.; Crescenzi, F.; Iannone, F.; Maddaluno, G.; Pericoli-Ridolfini, V.; Roccella, S.; Reale, M.; Viola, B.; Lyublinski, I.; Vertkov, A.

    2015-08-01

    In order to prevent the overheating of the liquid Li surface and the consequent Li evaporation for T > 500 °C, an advanced version of the liquid lithium limiter has been realized and installed on FTU. This new system, named Cooled Lithium Limiter (CLL), has been optimized to demonstrate the lithium limiter capability to sustain thermal loads as high as 10 MW/m2 with up to 5 s of plasma pulse duration. The CLL operates with an actively cooled system with water circulation at the temperature of about 200 °C, for heating lithium up to the melting point and for the heat removal during the plasma discharges. To characterize CLL during discharges, a fast infrared camera and the spectroscopic signals from Li and D atom emission have been used. The experiments analyzed so far and simulated by ANSYS code, point out that heat loads as high as 2 MW/m2 for 1.5 s have been withstood without problems.

  1. Study of structural active cooling and heat sink systems for space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This technology investigation was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of a number of thermal protection systems (TPS) concepts which are alternate candidates to the space shuttle baseline TPS. Four independent tasks were performed. Task 1 consisted of an in-depth evaluation of active structural cooling of the space shuttle orbiter. In Task 2, heat sink concepts for the booster were studied to identify and postulate solutions for design problems unique to heat sink TPS. Task 3 consisted of a feasibility demonstration test of a phase change material (PCM) incorporated into a reusable surface insulation (RSI) thermal protection system for the shuttle orbiter. In Task 4 the feasibility of heat pipes for stagnation region cooling was studied for the booster and the orbiter. Designs were developed for the orbiter leading edge and used in trade studies of leading edge concepts. At the time this program was initiated, a 2-stage fully reusable shuttle system was envisioned; therefore, the majority of the tasks were focused on the fully reusable system environments. Subsequently, a number of alternate shuttle system approaches, with potential for reduced shuttle system development funding requirements, were proposed. Where practicable, appropriate shifts in emphasis and task scoping were made to reflect these changes.

  2. Design and fabrication of a radiative actively cooled honeycomb sandwich structural panel for a hypersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, D. A.; Pagel, L. L.; Schaeffer, D. M.

    1978-01-01

    The panel assembly consisted of an external thermal protection system (metallic heat shields and insulation blankets) and an aluminum honeycomb structure. The structure was cooled to temperature 442K (300 F) by circulating a 60/40 mass solution of ethylene glycol and water through dee shaped coolant tubes nested in the honeycomb and adhesively bonded to the outer skin. Rene'41 heat shields were designed to sustain 5000 cycles of a uniform pressure of + or - 6.89kPa (+ or - 1.0 psi) and aerodynamic heating conditions equivalent to 136 kW sq m (12 Btu sq ft sec) to a 422K (300 F) surface temperature. High temperature flexible insulation blankets were encased in stainless steel foil to protect them from moisture and other potential contaminates. The aluminum actively cooled honeycomb sandwich structural panel was designed to sustain 5000 cycles of cyclic in-plane loading of + or - 210 kN/m (+ or - 1200 lbf/in.) combined with a uniform panel pressure of + or - 6.89 kPa (?1.0 psi).

  3. How Environment Affects Star Formation: Tracing Activity in High Redshift Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberts, Stacey; Pope, A.; Brodwin, M.; Atlee, D. W.; Lin, Y.; Chary, R.; Dey, A.; Eisenhardt, P. R.; Gettings, D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Jannuzi, B.; Mancone, C.; Moustakas, J.; Snyder, G. F.; Stanford, S. A.; Stern, D.; Weiner, B. J.; Zeimann, G.

    2014-01-01

    The emerging picture of the evolution of cluster galaxies indicates that the epoch of z>1 is a crucial period of active star formation and mass assembly in clusters. In this dissertation, I leverage a uniformly-selected cluster sample from the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey (ISCS) with Herschel imaging to analyse the star formation (SF) activity in cluster galaxies over the past ten billion years. This analysis is two-fold: 1) using 274 clusters across the 9 square degree Bootes field, I perform a stacking analysis of mass-limited samples of cluster and field galaxies using wide-field Herschel observations over a long redshift baseline, z=0.3-1.5. I find that the average SF activity in cluster galaxies is evolving faster than in the field, with field-like SF in the cluster cores and enhanced SF activity in the cluster outskirts at z>1.2. By further breaking down my analysis by galaxy mass and type, I determine which mechanisms are capable of driving this evolution. 2) I use unique, deep Herschel imaging of 11 spectroscopically-confirmed clusters from z=1.1-1.8 to study the properties of individual infrared bright cluster galaxies as a function of redshift and cluster-centric radius. Combined with ancillary data, I determine the star formation, dust, and AGN properties of the most active cluster galaxies and tie the evolution of these properties back to the environment by comparing to field populations. By combining these two approaches, I constrain cluster galaxy properties during a pivotal epoch of dust-obscured star formation activity and mass assembly in some of the most extreme structures in the Universe.

  4. A Multi-Wavelength Photometric Census of AGN and Star Formation Activity in the Brightest Cluster Galaxies of X-ray Selected Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, T. S.; Edge, A. C.; Stott, J. P.; Ebeling, H.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Draper, P. W.; Metcalfe, N.; Kaiser, N.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2016-06-01

    Despite their reputation as being "red and dead", the unique environment inhabited by Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) can often lead to a self-regulated feedback cycle between radiatively cooling intracluster gas and star formation and AGN activity in the BCG. However the prevalence of "active" BCGs, and details of the feedback involved, are still uncertain. We have performed an optical, UV and Mid-IR photometric analysis of the BCGs in 981 clusters at 0.03 < z < 0.5, selected from the ROSAT All Sky Survey. Using Pan-STARRS PS1 3π, GALEX and WISE survey data we look for BCGs with photometric colours which deviate from that of the bulk population of passive BCGs - indicative of AGN and/or star formation activity within the BCG. We find that whilst the majority of BCGs are consistent with being passive, at least 14% of our BCGs show a significant colour offset from passivity in at least one colour index. And, where available, supplementary spectroscopy reveals the majority of these particular BCGs show strong optical emission lines. On comparing BCG "activity" with the X-ray luminosity of the host cluster, we find that BCGs showing a colour offset are preferentially found in the more X-ray luminous clusters, indicative of the connection between BCG "activity" and the intracluster medium.

  5. EVIDENCE FOR LOW EXTINCTION IN ACTIVELY STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT z > 6.5

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, F.; Decarli, R.; Carilli, C.; Riechers, D.; Bertoldi, F.; Weiss, A.; Cox, P.; Neri, R.; Maiolino, R.; Ouchi, M.; Egami, E.

    2012-06-20

    We present a search for the [C II] 158 {mu}m fine structure line (a main cooling line of the interstellar medium) and the underlying far-infrared (FIR) continuum in three high-redshift (6.6 < z < 8.2) star-forming galaxies using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. We targeted two Ly{alpha}-selected galaxies (Ly{alpha} emitters, LAEs) with moderate UV-based star formation rates (SFRs {approx} 20 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}; Himiko at z = 6.6 and IOK-1 at z = 7.0) and a gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxy (GRB 090423 at z {approx} 8.2). Based on our 3{sigma} rest-frame FIR continuum limits, previous (rest-frame) UV continuum measurements and spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting, we rule out SED shapes similar to highly obscured galaxies (e.g., Arp 220, M 82) and less extreme dust-rich nearby spiral galaxies (e.g., M 51) for the LAEs. Conservatively assuming an SED shape typical of local spiral galaxies we derive upper limits for the FIR-based star formation rates (SFRs) of {approx}70 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, {approx}50 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, and {approx}40 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} for Himiko, IOK-1, and GRB 090423, respectively. For the LAEs these limits are only a factor {approx}3 higher than the published UV-based SFRs (uncorrected for extinction). This indicates that the dust obscuration in the z > 6 LAEs studied here is lower by a factor of a few than what has recently been found in some LAEs at lower redshift (2 < z < 3.5) with similar UV-based SFRs. A low obscuration in our z > 6 LAE sample is consistent with recent rest-frame UV studies of z {approx} 7 Lyman break galaxies.

  6. [Structure and biological activity of glycosphingolipids from starfish and feather stars].

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Masanori

    2008-08-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are contained in a various cell membranes and have recently been implicated in many physiologic functions. They are classified based on their sugar moieties into ceramides, cerebrosides, sulfatides, ceramide-oligohexosides, globosides, and gangliosides. A number of GSLs have been obtained from marine invertebrates such as echinoderms, poriferans, and mollusks and have unique biological activities. During the course of our search for biologically active GSLs from echinoderms, we conducted the isolation and structural elucidation of GSLs from starfish and feather stars and found numerous GSLs, some of which have unique structures. In particular, gangliosides from feather stars were unique in that the sialic acids bind to inositol-phosphoceramide. We also found that the GSLs from starfish and feather stars possess neuritogenic activity toward the rat pheochromocytoma cell line PC12, antihyperglycemic effects against type 2 diabetic BKS. Cg-m+/+Leprdb/J (db/db) mice, and antiosteoporosis effects toward the osteoporosis model mice (OVX mice). These biological activities are thought to be related to dementia, osteoporosis, and diabetes, which are becoming social problems, and are expected to become the seeds of preventive or therapeutic drugs for these illness. PMID:18670184

  7. Fluxless Brazing and Heat Treatment of a Plate-Fin Sandwich Actively Cooled Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuyukian, C. S.

    1978-01-01

    The processes and techniques used to fabricate plate-fin sandwich actively cooled panels are presented. The materials were 6061 aluminum alloy and brazing sheet having clad brazing alloy. The panels consisted of small scale specimens, fatigue specimens, and a large 0.61 m by 1.22 m test panel. All panels were fluxless brazed in retorts in heated platen presses while exerting external pressure to assure intimate contact of details. Distortion and damage normally associated with that heat treatment were minimized by heat treating without fixtures and solution quenching in an organic polymer solution. The test panel is the largest fluxless brazed and heat treated panel of its configuration known to exist.

  8. Signatures of Young Star Formation Activity within Two Parsecs of Sgr A*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Wardle, M.; Sewilo, M.; Roberts, D. A.; Smith, I.; Arendt, R.; Cotton, W.; Lacy, J.; Martin, S.; Pound, M. W.; Rickert, M.; Royster, M.

    2015-07-01

    We present radio and infrared observations indicating ongoing star formation activity inside the ˜2-5 pc circumnuclear ring at the Galactic center. Collectively these measurements suggest a continued disk-based mode of ongoing star formation has taken place near Sgr A* over the last few million years. First, Very Large Array observations with spatial resolution 2.″17 × 0.″81 reveal 13 water masers, several of which have multiple velocity components. The presence of interstellar water masers suggests gas densities that are sufficient for self-gravity to overcome the tidal shear of the 4× {10}6 {M}⊙ black hole. Second, spectral energy distribution modeling of stellar sources indicates massive young stellar object (YSO) candidates interior to the molecular ring, supporting in situ star formation near Sgr A* and appear to show a distribution similar to that of the counter-rotating disks of ˜100 OB stars orbiting Sgr A*. Some YSO candidates (e.g., IRS 5) have bow shock structures, suggesting that they have gaseous disks that are phototoevaporated and photoionized by the strong radiation field. Third, we detect clumps of SiO (2-1) and (5-4) line emission in the ring based on Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy and Sub-Millimeter Array observations. The FWHM and luminosity of the SiO emission is consistent with shocked protostellar outflows. Fourth, two linear ionized features with an extent of ˜0.8 pc show blue and redshifted velocities between +50 and -40 km s-1, suggesting protostellar jet driven outflows with mass-loss rates of ˜ 5× {10}-5 {M}⊙ yr-1. Finally, we present the imprint of radio dark clouds at 44 GHz, representing a reservoir of molecular gas that feeds star formation activity close to Sgr A*.

  9. Star-formation Activity in the Neighborhood of W–R 1503-160L Star in the Mid-infrared Bubble N46

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewangan, L. K.; Baug, T.; Ojha, D. K.; Janardhan, P.; Ninan, J. P.; Luna, A.; Zinchenko, I.

    2016-07-01

    In order to investigate star-formation (SF) processes in extreme environments, we have carried out a multi-wavelength analysis of the mid-infrared bubble N46, which hosts a WN7 Wolf–Rayet (W–R) star. We have used 13CO line data to trace an expanding shell surrounding the W–R star containing about five condensations within the molecular cloud associated with the bubble. The W–R star is associated with a powerful stellar wind having a mechanical luminosity of ˜4 × 1037 erg s‑1. A deviation of the H-band starlight mean polarization angles around the bubble has also been traced, indicating the impact of stellar wind on the surroundings. The Herschel temperature map shows a temperature range of ˜18–24 K toward the five molecular condensations. The photometric analysis reveals that these condensations are associated with the identified clusters of young stellar objects, revealing ongoing SF process. The densest among these five condensations (peak N(H2) ˜9.2 × 1022 cm‑2 and A V ˜ 98 mag) is associated with a 6.7 GHz methanol maser, an infrared dark cloud, and the CO outflow, tracing active massive SF within it. At least five compact radio sources (CRSs) are physically linked with the edges of the bubble, and each of them is consistent with the radio spectral class of a B0V–B0.5V-type star. The ages of the individual infrared counterparts of three CRSs (˜1–2 Myr) and a typical age of WN7 W–R star (˜4 Myr) indicate that the SF activities around the bubble are influenced by the feedback of the W–R star.

  10. Star-formation Activity in the Neighborhood of W–R 1503-160L Star in the Mid-infrared Bubble N46

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewangan, L. K.; Baug, T.; Ojha, D. K.; Janardhan, P.; Ninan, J. P.; Luna, A.; Zinchenko, I.

    2016-07-01

    In order to investigate star-formation (SF) processes in extreme environments, we have carried out a multi-wavelength analysis of the mid-infrared bubble N46, which hosts a WN7 Wolf–Rayet (W–R) star. We have used 13CO line data to trace an expanding shell surrounding the W–R star containing about five condensations within the molecular cloud associated with the bubble. The W–R star is associated with a powerful stellar wind having a mechanical luminosity of ∼4 × 1037 erg s‑1. A deviation of the H-band starlight mean polarization angles around the bubble has also been traced, indicating the impact of stellar wind on the surroundings. The Herschel temperature map shows a temperature range of ∼18–24 K toward the five molecular condensations. The photometric analysis reveals that these condensations are associated with the identified clusters of young stellar objects, revealing ongoing SF process. The densest among these five condensations (peak N(H2) ∼9.2 × 1022 cm‑2 and A V ∼ 98 mag) is associated with a 6.7 GHz methanol maser, an infrared dark cloud, and the CO outflow, tracing active massive SF within it. At least five compact radio sources (CRSs) are physically linked with the edges of the bubble, and each of them is consistent with the radio spectral class of a B0V–B0.5V-type star. The ages of the individual infrared counterparts of three CRSs (∼1–2 Myr) and a typical age of WN7 W–R star (∼4 Myr) indicate that the SF activities around the bubble are influenced by the feedback of the W–R star.

  11. Firefighter feedback during active cooling: a useful tool for heat stress management?

    PubMed

    Savage, Robbie J; Lord, Cara; Larsen, Brianna L; Knight, Teagan L; Langridge, Peter D; Aisbett, Brad

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring an individual's thermic state in the workplace requires reliable feedback of their core temperature. However, core temperature measurement technology is expensive, invasive and often impractical in operational environments, warranting investigation of surrogate measures which could be used to predict core temperature. This study examines an alternative measure of an individual's thermic state, thermal sensation, which presents a more manageable and practical solution for Australian firefighters operating on the fireground. Across three environmental conditions (cold, warm, hot & humid), 49 Australian volunteer firefighters performed a 20-min fire suppression activity, immediately followed by 20 min of active cooling using hand and forearm immersion techniques. Core temperature (Tc) and thermal sensation (TS) were measured across the rehabilitation period at five minute intervals. Despite the decline in Tc and TS throughout the rehabilitation period, there was little similarity in the magnitude or rate of decline between each measure in any of the ambient conditions. Moderate to strong correlations existed between Tc and TS in the cool (0.41, p<0.05) and hot & humid (0.57, p<0.05) conditions, however this was resultant in strong correlation during the earlier stages of rehabilitation (first five minutes), which were not evident in the latter stages. Linear regression revealed TS to be a poor predictor of Tc in all conditions (SEE=0.45-0.54°C) with a strong trend for TS to over-predict Tc (77-80% of the time). There is minimal evidence to suggest that ratings of thermal sensation, which represent a psychophysical assessment of an individual's thermal comfort, are an accurate reflection of the response of an individual's core temperature. Ratings of thermal sensation can be highly variable amongst individuals, likely moderated by local skin temperature. In account of these findings, fire managers require a more reliable source of information to guide

  12. Removing Cool Cores and Central Metallicity Peaks in Galaxy Clusters with Powerful Active Galactic Nucleus Outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fulai; Mathews, William G.

    2010-07-01

    Recent X-ray observations of galaxy clusters suggest that cluster populations are bimodally distributed according to central gas entropy and are separated into two distinct classes: cool core (CC) and non-cool core (NCC) clusters. While it is widely accepted that active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback plays a key role in offsetting radiative losses and maintaining many clusters in the CC state, the origin of NCC clusters is much less clear. At the same time, a handful of extremely powerful AGN outbursts have recently been detected in clusters, with a total energy ~1061-1062 erg. Using two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we show that if a large fraction of this energy is deposited near the centers of CC clusters, which is likely common due to dense cores, these AGN outbursts can completely remove CCs, transforming them to NCC clusters. Our model also has interesting implications for cluster abundance profiles, which usually show a central peak in CC systems. Our calculations indicate that during the CC to NCC transformation, AGN outbursts efficiently mix metals in cluster central regions and may even remove central abundance peaks if they are not broad enough. For CC clusters with broad central abundance peaks, AGN outbursts decrease peak abundances, but cannot effectively destroy the peaks. Our model may simultaneously explain the contradictory (possibly bimodal) results of abundance profiles in NCC clusters, some of which are nearly flat, while others have strong central peaks similar to those in CC clusters. A statistical analysis of the sizes of central abundance peaks and their redshift evolution may shed interesting insights on the origin of both types of NCC clusters and the evolution history of thermodynamics and AGN activity in clusters.

  13. EUV-driven ionospheres and electron transport on extrasolar giant planets orbiting active stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadney, J. M.; Galand, M.; Koskinen, T. T.; Miller, S.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Unruh, Y. C.; Yelle, R. V.

    2016-03-01

    The composition and structure of the upper atmospheres of extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) are affected by the high-energy spectrum of their host stars from soft X-rays to the extreme ultraviolet (EUV). This emission depends on the activity level of the star, which is primarily determined by its age. In this study, we focus upon EGPs orbiting K- and M-dwarf stars of different ages - ɛ Eridani, AD Leonis, AU Microscopii - and the Sun. X-ray and EUV (XUV) spectra for these stars are constructed using a coronal model. These spectra are used to drive both a thermospheric model and an ionospheric model, providing densities of neutral and ion species. Ionisation - as a result of stellar radiation deposition - is included through photo-ionisation and electron-impact processes. The former is calculated by solving the Lambert-Beer law, while the latter is calculated from a supra-thermal electron transport model. We find that EGP ionospheres at all orbital distances considered (0.1-1 AU) and around all stars selected are dominated by the long-lived H+ ion. In addition, planets with upper atmospheres where H2 is not substantially dissociated (at large orbital distances) have a layer in which H3+ is the major ion at the base of the ionosphere. For fast-rotating planets, densities of short-lived H3+ undergo significant diurnal variations, with the maximum value being driven by the stellar X-ray flux. In contrast, densities of longer-lived H+ show very little day/night variability and the magnitude is driven by the level of stellar EUV flux. The H3+ peak in EGPs with upper atmospheres where H2 is dissociated (orbiting close to their star) under strong stellar illumination is pushed to altitudes below the homopause, where this ion is likely to be destroyed through reactions with heavy species (e.g. hydrocarbons, water). The inclusion of secondary ionisation processes produces significantly enhanced ion and electron densities at altitudes below the main EUV ionisation peak, as

  14. Star Formation and AGN Activity in Luminous and Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartaltepe, Jeyhan

    2015-08-01

    In the local universe, Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs, L_IR > 10^12 L⊙) are all interacting and merging systems. We explore the evolution of the morphological and nuclear properties of (U)LIRGs over cosmic time using a large sample of galaxies from Her- schel observations of the CANDELS fields (including GOODS, COSMOS, and UDS). In particular, we investigate whether the role of galaxy mergers has changed between z ˜ 2 and now using the extensive visual classification catalogs produced by the CANDELS team. The combination of a selection from Herschel, near the peak of IR emission, and rest-frame optical morphologies from CANDELS, provides the ideal comparison to nearby (U)LIRGs. We also use rest-frame optical emission line diagnostics, X-ray luminosity, and MIR colors to separate AGN from star-formation dominated galaxies. We then study the how role of galaxy mergers and the presence of AGN activity correspond to the galaxy’s position in the star formation rate - stellar mass plane. Are galaxies that have specific star formation rates elevated above the main sequence more likely to be mergers? We investigate how AGN identified with different methods correspond to different morphologies and merger stages as well as position on the star formation rate - stellar mass plane.

  15. Measurements of Starspot Area and Temperature on Five Active, Evolved Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neal, Douglas; Saar, Steven H.; Neff, James E.

    1996-06-01

    We resent results from a study of starspot areas and temperatures on active stars using the 7055 and 8860 Å bands of the titanium oxide molecule. Because the two bands have different temperature sensitivities, the ratio of their strengths provides a measure of the spot temperature, while their absolute strengths are a function of total starspot area. We have anal