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Sample records for active crater lake

  1. Hazardous crater lakes studied

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusakabe, Minoru

    Crater lakes usually sit on top of volcanic conduits and act as condensers of magmatic vapor. Studies of crater lakes can therefore provide information on both deep magmatic activity and variations in the degassing state of a shallow magmatic body. The Lake Nyos gas disaster of August 1986 and a similar event in August 1984 at Lake Monoun, both in Cameroon, resulted from the accumulation of magmatic CO2 in the bottom layers of the lakes. Geochemical monitoring of crater lakes is a promising tool for forecasting not only limnic but also volcanic eruptions. Acid-mineralized waters formed by condensation of hot magmatic volatiles in crater lakes are thought to bear some resemblance to hydrothermal fluids acting in the genesis of acid-sulfate alteration and Au-Cu-Ag mineralization of volcanic-hosted precious metal deposits.

  2. Crater Lake revealed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramsey, David W.; Dartnell, Peter; Bacon, Charles R.; Robinson, Joel E.; Gardner, James V.

    2003-01-01

    Around 500,000 people each year visit Crater Lake National Park in the Cascade Range of southern Oregon. Volcanic peaks, evergreen forests, and Crater Lake’s incredibly blue water are the park’s main attractions. Crater Lake partially fills the caldera that formed approximately 7,700 years ago by the eruption and subsequent collapse of a 12,000-foot volcano called Mount Mazama. The caldera-forming or climactic eruption of Mount Mazama drastically changed the landscape all around the volcano and spread a blanket of volcanic ash at least as far away as southern Canada. Prior to the climactic event, Mount Mazama had a 400,000 year history of cone building activity like that of other Cascade volcanoes such as Mount Shasta. Since the climactic eruption, there have been several less violent, smaller postcaldera eruptions within the caldera itself. However, relatively little was known about the specifics of these eruptions because their products were obscured beneath Crater Lake’s surface. As the Crater Lake region is still potentially volcanically active, understanding past eruptive events is important to understanding future eruptions, which could threaten facilities and people at Crater Lake National Park and the major transportation corridor east of the Cascades. Recently, the lake bottom was mapped with a high-resolution multibeam echo sounder. The new bathymetric survey provides a 2m/pixel view of the lake floor from its deepest basins virtually to the shoreline. Using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) applications, the bathymetry data can be visualized and analyzed to shed light on the geology, geomorphology, and geologic history of Crater Lake.

  3. Leakage of active crater lake brine through the north flank at Rincon de la Vieja volcano, northwest Costa Rica, and implications for crater collapse

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kempter, K.A.; Rowe, G.L.

    2000-01-01

    The Active Crater at Rincon de la Vieja volcano, Costa Rica, reaches an elevation of 1750 m and contains a warm, hyper-acidic crater lake that probably formed soon after the eruption of the Rio Blanco tephra deposit approximately 3500 years before present. The Active Crater is buttressed by volcanic ridges and older craters on all sides except the north, which dips steeply toward the Caribbean coastal plains. Acidic, above-ambient-temperature streams are found along the Active Crater's north flank at elevations between 800 and 1000 m. A geochemical survey of thermal and non-thermal waters at Rincon de la Vieja was done in 1989 to determine whether hyper-acidic fluids are leaking from the Active Crater through the north flank, affecting the composition of north-flank streams. Results of the water-chemistry survey reveal that three distinct thermal waters are found on the flanks of Rincon de la Vieja volcano: acid chloride-sulfate (ACS), acid sulfate (AS), and neutral chloride (NC) waters. The most extreme ACS water was collected from the crater lake that fills the Active Crater. Chemical analyses of the lake water reveal a hyper-acidic (pH ~ 0) chloride-sulfate brine with elevated concentrations of calcium, magnesium, aluminum, iron, manganese, copper, zinc, fluorine, and boron. The composition of the brine reflects the combined effects of magmatic degassing from a shallow magma body beneath the Active Crater, dissolution of andesitic volcanic rock, and evaporative concentration of dissolved constituents at above-ambient temperatures. Similar cation and anion enrichments are found in the above-ambient-temperature streams draining the north flank of the Active Crater. The pH of north-flank thermal waters range from 3.6 to 4.1 and chloride:sulfate ratios (1.2-1.4) that are a factor of two greater than that of the lake brine (0.60). The waters have an ACS composition that is quite different from the AS and NC thermal waters that occur along the southern flank of Rincon

  4. Leakage of Active Crater lake brine through the north flank at Rincón de la Vieja volcano, northwest Costa Rica, and implications for crater collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempter, K. A.; Rowe, G. L.

    2000-04-01

    The Active Crater at Rincón de la Vieja volcano, Costa Rica, reaches an elevation of 1750 m and contains a warm, hyper-acidic crater lake that probably formed soon after the eruption of the Rio Blanco tephra deposit approximately 3500 years before present. The Active Crater is buttressed by volcanic ridges and older craters on all sides except the north, which dips steeply toward the Caribbean coastal plains. Acidic, above-ambient-temperature streams are found along the Active Crater's north flank at elevations between 800 and 1000 m. A geochemical survey of thermal and non-thermal waters at Rincón de la Vieja was done in 1989 to determine whether hyper-acidic fluids are leaking from the Active Crater through the north flank, affecting the composition of north-flank streams. Results of the water-chemistry survey reveal that three distinct thermal waters are found on the flanks of Rincón de la Vieja volcano: acid chloride-sulfate (ACS), acid sulfate (AS), and neutral chloride (NC) waters. The most extreme ACS water was collected from the crater lake that fills the Active Crater. Chemical analyses of the lake water reveal a hyper-acidic ( pH˜0) chloride-sulfate brine with elevated concentrations of calcium, magnesium, aluminum, iron, manganese, copper, zinc, fluorine, and boron. The composition of the brine reflects the combined effects of magmatic degassing from a shallow magma body beneath the Active Crater, dissolution of andesitic volcanic rock, and evaporative concentration of dissolved constituents at above-ambient temperatures. Similar cation and anion enrichments are found in the above-ambient-temperature streams draining the north flank of the Active Crater. The pH of north-flank thermal waters range from 3.6 to 4.1 and chloride:sulfate ratios (1.2-1.4) that are a factor of two greater than that of the lake brine (0.60). The waters have an ACS composition that is quite different from the AS and NC thermal waters that occur along the southern flank of

  5. Crater lake and post-eruption hydrothermal activity, El Chichón Volcano, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casadevall, Thomas J.; de la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Rose, William I.; Bagley, Susan; Finnegan, David L.; Zoller, William H.

    1984-01-01

    Explosive eruptions of Volcán El Chichón in Chiapas, Mexico on March 28 and April 3–4, 1982 removed 0.2 km3 of rock to form a 1-km-wide 300-m-deep summit crater. By late April 1982 a lake had begun to form on the crater floor, and by November 1982 it attained a maximum surface area of 1.4 × 105 m2 and a volume of 5 × 106 m3. Accumulation of 4–5 m of rainfall between July and October 1982 largely formed the lake. In January 1983, temperatures of fumaroles on the crater floor and lower crater walls ranged from 98 to 115°C; by October 1983 the maximum temperature of fumarole emissions was 99°C. In January 1983 fumarole gas emissions were greater than 99 vol. % H2O with traces of CO2, SO2, and H2S. The water of the lake was a hot (T = 52–58°C), acidic (pH = 0.5), dilute solution (34,046 mg L−1 dissolved solids; Cl/S = 20.5). Sediment from the lake contains the same silicate minerals as the rocks of the 1982 pyroclastic deposits, together with less than 1% of elemental sulfur. The composition and temperature of the lake water is attributed to: (1) solution of fumarole emissions; (2) reaction of lake water with hot rocks beneath the lake level; (3) sediments washed into the lake from the crater walls; (4) hydrothermal fluids leaching sediments and formational waters in sedimentary rocks of the basement; (5) evaporation; and (6) precipitation.

  6. Catalog of crater lakes from Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, C. J.; Mora-Amador, R.; González, G.

    2010-12-01

    Costa Rica has a diversity of volcanic crater lakes that can be classified into two groups: hot and cold lakes. The country contains at least 5% of the world's hot lakes. Costa Rica has 2 hot hyperacidic lakes, both of them on active volcanoes, the Rincón de la Vieja (38.0°C, pH = 0 - 1) and the Poás Laguna Caliente (36.1°C - 56°C, pH = 0.55 - 0.74), nowadays the Poás hot lake is the most active crater lake in the world, with more than 200 eruptions only on 2010. One of the most studied cold crater lakes is Irazú (13°C, pH = 3.5), that used to contain bubbling and clear areas of upwelling involving CO2 liberation and subaqueous fumaroles with temperatures up to 50°C, but since 2005 the lake presents an important descend until April 2010 when it disappeared. On February 9, 2003, Irazú's lake underwent a drastic change of color, from clear green to mustard with reddish loops, similar to the color of the waters of Lake Nyos after the gas burst of August 1986. Other studied cold lakes include Botos, Chato, and Tenorio, all at the summit of Quaternary volcanoes as well as Barva and Danta, located in recent pyroclastic cones. Some cold lakes are located in Holocene maar-type explosion craters, among them are Congo, Bosque Alegre, Hule, and Río Cuarto. These last two have undergone repeated rapid reddish color changes over the last 10 years, in association with fish kills and the liberation of apparently sulfurous scents. On March 2010, University of Costa Rica was the host of the 7th Workshop on Volcanic Lakes, part of the Commission of Volcanic Lakes of the IAVCEI, 51 participants from 14 countries attended the workshop; they presented 27 talks and 17 posters, also they visited and sample 4 of the lakes mentioned above (Botos, Irazú, Río Cuarto and Hule). Level of Study: 1: few or no data, 2: regular, 3: acceptable

  7. Interannual active layer thermal and dynamics evolution at the crater Lake CALM site, Deception Island (Antarctica).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Miguel; Vieira, Gonzalo; Ángel De Pablo, Miguel; Molina, Antonio; Abramov, Andrey

    2015-04-01

    Deception Island, is an active strato-volcano on South Shetland Archipelago of Antarctica (62° 55' 0″ S, 60° 37' 0″ W), is a cold region with harsh remote and hostile environmental conditions. The permafrost and active layer existence, and the cold climate conditions together with volcanic material with height water content inside made this region of the Earth a perfect site to study the active layer and permafrost evolution involved in the Circumpolar Active Layer South (CALM-S) program. The active layer is measured in late January or firs february (during the end of the thaw period) at the "Crater Lake" CALM site (62°58'06.7''; 60°40'44.8'') on Deception Island, Antarctica, at the period 2006 to 2014 we obtained a mean annual value of 29,7±2 cm. In this paper, we describe the spatial active layer thickness distribution and report the reduction on the mean thickness between February 2006 and 2014. Below the active layer, permafrost could be also reported (with a mean thickness of 4.5± 0.5 m.) based on the temperature data acquired by sensors installed at different depth inside the soil; three different shallow boreholes was drilled (1.0 m., 1.6 m., 4.5 m. in depth) and we have been registered its temperature gradient at the 2010 to 2013 period. Here we use all those data 1) to describe the thermal behavior of the permafrost at the CALM site, and 2) to describe its evolution (aggradation/degradation) along fourteen years of continuous measurements. We develop this study, to known the thermal behavior of the permafrost and the active layer related with the air/soil interaction being one of the most important factors the snow layer that was measured by the installation of termo-snowmeters with the complement of an automatic digital camera during the 2008 to 2014 period. On the other hand, the pyroclastics soil materials has a very high values of water content then the latent heat in the freezing/thawing process controls the active layer evolution and the

  8. Drainage systems of Lonar Crater, India: Contributions to Lonar Lake hydrology and crater degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Goro; Senthil Kumar, P.; Goto, Kazuhisa; Sekine, Yasuhito; Giri, Chaitanya; Matsui, Takafumi

    2014-05-01

    Lonar, a 1.8-km-diameter impact crater in India, is a rare example of terrestrial impact craters formed in basaltic bedrock. The estimated age of the crater ranges widely from less than 12 ka to over 600 ka, but the crater preserves a relatively pristine morphology. We conducted a study of various drainage systems of Lonar Crater. The crater floor hosts a shallow 5-m-deep lake, which fluctuates seasonally. Our investigation reveals that the lake level is influenced by surface runoff that is active during the monsoon and groundwater input effective during both the rainy and the dry seasons. The groundwater discharge is observed as springs on the inner rim walls corresponding to weathered vesicular basalt and/or proximal ejecta, which are underlain by thick massive basalt layers. This observation indicates that groundwater movement is lithologically controlled: it passes preferentially through permeable vesicular basalt or proximal ejecta but is hindered in less permeable massive basalt. It is hypothesized that groundwater is also structurally controlled by dipping of basalt layers, interconnectivity of the permeable lithologic units through fractures, and preferential pathways such as fractures within the permeable lithologic units. Investigation on hydrological processes at Lonar Crater and its lake could provide useful insights into purported paleo-crater lakes presumably formed in the basaltic crust of Mars. The Lonar Crater interior shows signs of degradation in the forms of gullies and debris flows, and the Dhar valley incising in the rim leading to form a fan delta. The ejecta surface is characterized by the presence of channels, originating from the rim area and extending radially away from the crater center. The channels probably resulted from surface runoff, and its erosion contributes to the removal of the ejecta. Lonar Crater is a valuable analog site for studying degradation processes with potential application to impact craters occurring on

  9. Volcano and earthquake hazards in the Crater Lake region, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, Charles R.; Mastin, Larry G.; Scott, Kevin M.; Nathenson, Manuel

    1997-01-01

    Crater Lake lies in a basin, or caldera, formed by collapse of the Cascade volcano known as Mount Mazama during a violent, climactic eruption about 7,700 years ago. This event dramatically changed the character of the volcano so that many potential types of future events have no precedent there. This potentially active volcanic center is contained within Crater Lake National Park, visited by 500,000 people per year, and is adjacent to the main transportation corridor east of the Cascade Range. Because a lake is now present within the most likely site of future volcanic activity, many of the hazards at Crater Lake are different from those at most other Cascade volcanoes. Also significant are many faults near Crater Lake that clearly have been active in the recent past. These faults, and historic seismicity, indicate that damaging earthquakes can occur there in the future. This report describes the various types of volcano and earthquake hazards in the Crater Lake area, estimates of the likelihood of future events, recommendations for mitigation, and a map of hazard zones. The main conclusions are summarized below.

  10. Crater Lake Revealed: Using GIS to Visualize and Analyze Postcaldera Volcanoes Beneath Crater Lake, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, D. W.; Robinson, J. E.; Dartnell, P.; Bacon, C. R.; Gardner, J. V.; Mayer, L. A.; Buktenica, M. W.

    2001-12-01

    formed at ~90, 250, and 480 years after the lake began to fill. Combining volume calculations determined with GIS and age information from the lake filling model, oldest to youngest Wizard Island minimum eruption rates are 8.4x106 m3/yr, 6.5x106 m3/yr, and 3.6x106 m3/yr. These are comparable to rates calculated for the central platform volcano using the same approach. The minimum eruption rate for the entire 4 km3 of postcaldera andesite erupted from ~90 to 480 years after caldera formation is 8.4x106 m3/yr, which is comparable to historic rates of lava effusion at arc volcanoes. The cessation of postcaldera volcanic activity at Crater Lake, ~4,900 years ago, is marked by subaqueous extrusion of a 0.074 km3 rhyodacite dome on the east flank of Wizard Island.\\J.V. Gardner et. al., 2001, USGS Water Resources Investigations Report 01-4046; http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/pacmaps\\M. Nathenson et. al., 2001, Models for the Filling of Crater Lake, Oregon (this meeting)

  11. The Lake Bosumtwi impact crater, Ghana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, William B.; Bacon, Michael; Hastings, David A.

    1981-01-01

    Analogy with better-known craters suggests that Bosumtwi has a central uplift rising to 200 m beneath the lake floor. An aeromagnetic anomaly of amplitude 50 nanotesla (nT) over the northern half of the lake is interpreted as due to a layer of magnetized fallback breccia beneath the lake sediments. The normal polarity of the breccia shows that the crater was formed during the normal Jaramillo event of 0.97 to 0.85 m.y. ago, which agrees with the magnetic stratigraphy of the related Ivory Coast microtektites. A regional gravity survey indicates a negative Bouguer anomaly over the crater. There is some geochemical evidence that the meteorite was an iron, and its mass and energy are suggested as about 108 tons and 3 × 1019 joules or 7.3 × 103 megatons.

  12. Gale Crater: An Amazonian Impact Crater Lake at the Plateau/Plain Boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabrol, N. A.; Grin, E. A.

    1998-01-01

    Elysium Basin. According to the Amazonian age of Gale's floor, and the erosion direction in the crater, a flood from Elysium Basin is the most likely event to explain the material observed in Gale, and the formation of the last lake. This last flood may have been important enough to flood the central deposit up to about 1400 m above the crater floor, leaving two islands (non stream lined features) at the center of the deposit. Terrace spacing suggests a regular drop of the lake level in time. Fractures in terraces perpendicular to the shoreline can be interpreted either as: (a) the result of the drainage systems during the waning of the lake, or (b) traces of the pressure of an ice-covered sheet associated with subglacial drainage. The presence of a lake of such volume during the Amazonian period is one more evidence that water was still active on Mars relatively recently. Gale crater offers the rare opportunity to unveil a key-period of the martian history. The Amazonian might proved not as cold and dry as previously thought. The presence of large lakes and basins (Elysium Basin is large as the Mediterranean Sea), reinforces the model of an extensive water activity during the Amazonian that has still to be understood in the context of an assumed cooling and drying planet. The sediments and rocks that were left of this period in Gale keep the record of the climatic conditions of the Amazonian and the clues that are missing to understand the climatic evolution of Mars. In addition, Gale crater presents the advantage to be located at the plateau/plain boundary, which has never been studied and contains information about the two main martian geological units. As a conclusion, we propose a table that summarizes the worthiness of a mission in Gale crater, and the expected science return relative to the objectives to be met by the Surveyor Program. Additional information contained in the original.

  13. The CO2 flux and the chemistry of the crater lake in 2013-2015 evidence for the enhanced activity of El Chichon volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jácome Paz, Mariana Patricia; Taran, Yuri; Inguaggiato, Salvatore; Collard, Nathalie

    2016-04-01

    During 2013-2015, four CO2 flux surveys were performed in the El Chichon crater both, from the lake surface and from the soil of the crater floor. The chemistry of the lake water, as well as its physical parameters (surface area, depth, temperature) were also determined. The CO2 flux in 2014-2015 compared to the 2007-2008 data (Mazot et al., 2011, BV, 73: 423-441) increased almost one order of magnitude (from ~ 140 t/d in 2008 to ~ 840 t/d in 2014). During the last two years the lake became the largest for the whole time of observations with the maximum surface area more than 18 ha covering completely the NE fumarolic field and all thermal springs feeding the lake with mineralized water. Despite the maximum volume of the lake it was characterized in 2015 by the highest since 2007 chloride content (~2500 ppm) and temperature (34°C). A large degassing spot in the middle of the lake for the first time was observed in April 2015 with more than 10,000 g m-2 d-1 of the CO2 flux. These observations evidence that the volcano-hydrothermal system of El Chichon volcano came into a new stage of activity associated most probably with changes in the magmatic activity at depth.

  14. Chemical hazards from acid crater lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bergen, M. J.; Sumarti, S.; Heikens, A.; Bogaard, T. A.; Hartiyatun, S.

    2003-04-01

    Acid crater lakes, which are hosted by a considerable number of active volcanoes, form a potential threat for local ecosystems and human health, as they commonly contain large amounts of dissolved chemicals. Subsurface seepage or overflow can lead to severe deterioration of the water quality of rivers and wells, as observations around several of these volcanoes have shown. The Ijen crater lake in East Java (Indonesia) is a striking example, as this reservoir of hyperacid (pH<0.5) sulphate, chloride and fluoride-rich water is the source of a ca. 50 km long acid river that transports substantial quantities of potentially toxic elements. A downstream trend of increasing pH from <1 to 2.5-4 is largely due to dilution with moderately acid springs (pH= ca. 4) and neutral tributaries (pH= ca. 7) inside the Ijen caldera. Geochemical controls that regulate element transport are subject to seasonal fluctuations in rainfall. Long-term monitoring has shown that fluoride levels pose some of the most severe environmental threats. Its concentration decreases from ca. 1300 mg/kg in the lake to ca. 10 mg/kg in a coastal area downstream, where virtually all of the river water is used for irrigating rice fields and other cropland. Apart from serious problems for agriculture, our survey of 55 drinking water wells in the irrigation area shows that 50% contain fluoride above the 1.5 ppm WHO limit, in line with the observation that dental fluorosis is widespread among the ca. 100,000 residents of the area. A conspicuous spatial correlation between fluoride concentrations and the irrigation system suggest that long-term (century) infiltration of irrigation water may have affected the quality of groundwater. Fluorosis is also a problem in some villages within the caldera, where well water sources may have a more direct subsurface connection with the lake system. From our observations we conclude that water-quality monitoring is especially needed for health reasons in volcanic areas where

  15. Water balance for Crater Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nathenson, Manuel

    1992-01-01

    A water balance for Crater Lake, Oregon, is calculated using measured lake levels and precipitation data measured at Park Headquarters and at a gage on the North Rim. Total water supply to the lake from precipitation and inflow from the crater walls is found to be 224 cm/y over the area of the lake. The ratio between water supply to the lake and precipitation at Park Headquarters is calculated as 1.325. Using leakage determined by Phillips (1968) and Redmond (1990), evaporation from the lake is approximately 85 cm/y. Calculations show that water balances with precipitation data only from Park Headquarters are unable to accurately define the water-level variation, whereas the addition of yearly precipitation data from the North Rim reduces the average absolute deviation between calculated and modeled water levels by one half. Daily precipitation and water-level data are modeled assuming that precipitation is stored on the rim as snow during fall and winter and released uniformly during the spring and early summer. Daily data do not accurately define the water balance, but they suggest that direct precipitation on the lake is about 10 % higher than that measured at Park Headquarters and that about 17 % of the water supply is from inflow from the rim.

  16. Overview of the limnology of crater lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, G.L.

    1996-01-01

    Crater Lake occupies the collapsed caldera of volcanic Mount Mazama in Crater Lake National Park, Oregon. It is the deepest lake (589 m) in the United States and the 7th deepest lake in the world. The water column mixes to a depth of about 200 m in winter and spring from wind energy and cooling. The deep lake is mixed in winter and early spring each year when relatively cold water near the surface sinks and exchanges positions with water in the deep basins of the lake. The lake becomes thermally stratified in summer and early fall. The metalimnion extends to a depth of about 100 m; thus most of the water column is a cold hypolimnion. Secchi disk clarity measurements typically are in the upper-20-m range to the low-30-m range in summer and early fall. Concentrations of nutrients are low, although conductivity is relatively high owing to the inflow of hydrothermal fluids. Total chlorophyll is low in concentration, but typically maximal at a depth of 120 m during periods of thermal stratification. Primary production also is low, with the maximum levels occurring between the depth of 40 and 80 m. Phytoplankton taxa are spatially segregated from each other within the water column to a depth of 200 m in summer and early fall. The same generalization applies to the Zooplankton taxa. Water level, clarity, concentrations of total chlorophyll, primary production, and abundances of zooplankton and introduced kokanee salmon exhibit long-term fluctuations. Based primarily on a recent 10-year study of the lake, the lake is considered to be pristine, except for the consequences of fish introductions. ?? 1996 by the Northwest Scientific Association. All rights reserved.

  17. Overview of the limnology of Crater Lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, Gary L.

    1996-01-01

    Crater Lake occupies the collapsed caldera of volcanic Mount Mazama in Crater Lake National Park, Oregon. It is the deepest lake (589 m) in the United States and the 7th deepest lake in the world. The water column mixes to a depth of about 200 m in winter and spring from wind energy and cooling. The deep lake is mixed in winter and early spring each year when relatively cold water near the surface sinks and exchanges positions with water in the deep basins of the lake. The lake becomes thermally stratified in summer and early fall. The metalimnion extends to a depth of about 100 m; thus most of the water column is a cold hypolimnion. Secchi disk clarity measurements typically are in the upper-20-m range to the low-30-m range in summer and early fall. Concentrations of nutrients are low, although conductivity is relatively high owing to the inflow of hydrothermal fluids. Total chlorophyll is low in concentration, but typically maximal at a depth of 120 m during periods of thermal stratification. Primary production also is low, with the maximum levels occurring between the depth of 40 and 80 m. Phytoplankton taxa are spatially segregated from each other within the water column to a depth of 200 m in summer and early fall. The same generalization applies to the zooplankton taxa. Water level, clarity, concentrations of total chlorophyll, primary production, and abundances of zooplankton and introduced kokanee salmon exhibit long-term fluctuations. Based primarily on a recent 10-year study of the lake, the lake is considered to be pristine, except for the consequences of fish introductions.

  18. Under trees and water at Crater Lake National Park, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Joel E.; Bacon, Charles R.; Wayne, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Crater Lake partially fills the caldera that formed approximately 7,700 years ago during the eruption of a 12,000-ft-high volcano known as Mount Mazama. The caldera-forming, or climactic, eruption of Mount Mazama devastated the surrounding landscape, left a thick deposit of pumice and ash in adjacent valleys, and spread a blanket of volcanic ash as far away as southern Canada. Prior to the climactic event, Mount Mazama had a 400,000-year history of volcanic activity similar to other large Cascade volcanoes such as Mounts Shasta, Hood, and Rainier. Since the caldera formed, many smaller, less violent eruptions occurred at volcanic vents below Crater Lake's surface, including Wizard Island. A survey of Crater Lake National Park with airborne LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) resulted in a digital elevation map of the ground surface beneath the forest canopy. The average resolution is 1.6 laser returns per square meter yielding vertical and horizontal accuracies of ±5 cm. The map of the floor beneath the surface of the 1,947-ft-deep (593-m-deep) Crater Lake was developed from a multibeam sonar bathymetric survey and was added to the map to provide a continuous view of the landscape from the highest peak on Mount Scott to the deepest part of Crater Lake. Four enlarged shaded-relief views provide a sampling of features that illustrate the resolution of the LiDAR survey and illustrate its utility in revealing volcanic landforms and subtle features of the climactic eruption deposits. LiDAR's high precision and ability to "see" through the forest canopy reveal features that may not be easily recognized-even when walked over-because their full extent is hidden by vegetation, such as the 1-m-tall arcuate scarp near Castle Creek.

  19. Subaqueous geology and a filling model for Crater Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nathenson, M.; Bacon, C.R.; Ramsey, D.W.

    2007-01-01

    Results of a detailed bathymetric survey of Crater Lake conducted in 2000, combined with previous results of submersible and dredge sampling, form the basis for a geologic map of the lake floor and a model for the filling of Crater Lake with water. The most prominent landforms beneath the surface of Crater Lake are andesite volcanoes that were active as the lake was filling with water, following caldera collapse during the climactic eruption of Mount Mazama 7700 cal. yr B.P. The Wizard Island volcano is the largest and probably was active longest, ceasing eruptions when the lake was 80 m lower than present. East of Wizard Island is the central platform volcano and related lava flow fields on the caldera floor. Merriam Cone is a symmetrical andesitic volcano that apparently was constructed subaqueously during the same period as the Wizard Island and central platform volcanoes. The youngest postcaldera volcanic feature is a small rhyodacite dome on the east flank of the Wizard Island edifice that dates from 4800 cal. yr B.P. The bathymetry also yields information on bedrock outcrops and talus/debris slopes of the caldera walls. Gravity flows transport sediment from wall sources to the deep basins of the lake. Several debris-avalanche deposits, containing blocks up to 280 m long, are present on the caldera floor and occur below major embayments in the caldera walls. Geothermal phenomena on the lake floor are bacterial mats, pools of solute-rich warm water, and fossil subaqueous hot spring deposits. Lake level is maintained by a balance between precipitation and inflow versus evaporation and leakage. High-resolution bathymetry reveals a series of up to nine drowned beaches in the upper 30 m of the lake that we propose reflect stillstands subsequent to filling of Crater Lake. A prominent wave-cut platform between 4 m depth and present lake level that commonly is up to 40 m wide suggests that the surface of Crater Lake has been at this elevation for a very long time

  20. Hydrology of Crater, East and Davis Lakes, Oregon; with section on Chemistry of the Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, Kenneth N.; Van Denburgh, A.S.

    1968-01-01

    Crater, East, and Davis Lakes are small bodies of fresh water that occupy topographically closed basins in Holocene volcanic terrane. Because the annual water supply exceeds annual evaporation, water must be lost by seepage from each lake. The seepage rates vary widely both in volume and in percentage of the total water supply. Crater Lake loses about 89 cfs (cubic feet per second), equivalent to about 72 percent of its average annual supply. East Lake loses about 2.3 cfs, or about 44 percent of its estimated supply. Davis Lake seepage varies greatly with lake level, but the average loss is about 150 cfs, more than 90 percent of its total supply. The destination of the seepage loss is not definitely known for any of the lakes. An approximate water budget was computed for stationary level for each lake, by using estimates 'by the writer to supplement the hydrologic data available. The three lake waters are dilute. Crater Lake contains about 80 ppm, (parts per million) of dissolved solids---mostly silica, sodium, and bicarbonate, and lesser amounts of calcium, sulfate, and chloride. Much of the dissolved-solids content of Crater Lake---especially the sulfate and chloride---may be related to fumarole and thermal-spring activity that presumably followed the collapse of Mount Mazama. Although Grater Lake loses an estimated 7,000 tons of its 1.5million-ton salt content each year by leakage, the chemical character of the lake did not change appreciably between 1912 and 1964. East Lake contains 200 ppm of dissolved solids, which includes major proportions of calcium, sodium, bicarbonate, and sulfate, but almost no chloride. The lake apparently receives much of its dissolved solids from subsurface thermal springs. Annual solute loss from East Lake by leakage is about 450 tons, or 3 percent of the lake's 15,000-ton estimated solute content. Davis Lake contains only 48 ppm of dissolved solids, much of which is silica and bicarbonate; chloride is almost completely absent

  1. 36 CFR 7.2 - Crater Lake National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Crater Lake National Park. 7.2 Section 7.2 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.2 Crater Lake National Park. (a)...

  2. 36 CFR 7.2 - Crater Lake National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Crater Lake National Park. 7.2 Section 7.2 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.2 Crater Lake National Park. (a)...

  3. 36 CFR 7.2 - Crater Lake National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Crater Lake National Park. 7.2 Section 7.2 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.2 Crater Lake National Park. (a)...

  4. 36 CFR 7.2 - Crater Lake National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Crater Lake National Park. 7.2 Section 7.2 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.2 Crater Lake National Park. (a)...

  5. 36 CFR 7.2 - Crater Lake National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Crater Lake National Park. 7.2 Section 7.2 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.2 Crater Lake National Park. (a)...

  6. CO2 flux and chemistry of El Chichón crater lake (México) in the period 2013-2015: Evidence for the enhanced volcano activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jácome Paz, Mariana P.; Taran, Yuri; Inguaggiato, Salvatore; Collard, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    The CO2 flux from El Chichón crater in the period from 2014 to 2015 increased by a factor of 3 (from ~260 t d-1 to ~800 t d-1) compared to the 2007-2008 data. The mechanism triggering the CO2 flux from the lake surface has changed from being dominantly diffusive to mainly advective (bubbling). The Cl concentration was steadily decreasing during the last two decades in the Na-Cl boiling springs feeding the lake. Since 2013, for both lake and SP springs, the Cl concentration has increased up to the 2005 Cl concentration levels. A large degassing spot in the middle of the lake was found in April 2015 with a CO2 flux of more than 10,000 g m-2 d-1. These observations are the evidence of the onset of a new stage of activity within the volcano-hydrothermal system of El Chichón volcano associated most probably with changes in the magmatic activity at depth.

  7. A Frozen Lake/Glaciolacustrine Model of Crater Greg (Mars)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargel, J. S.; Furfaro, R.

    2012-03-01

    Crater Greg (near Hellas, Mars) exhibits some of the most compelling evidence of glaciation on Mars. The depositional environment and paleoclimatic implications are not clear. Here we propose a frozen lake model of glacier-like flow formation.

  8. Unusual bacterioplankton community structure in ultra-oligotrophic Crater Lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Urbach, Ena; Vergin, Kevin L.; Morse, Ariel

    2001-01-01

    The bacterioplankton assemblage in Crater Lake, Oregon (U.S.A.), is different from communities found in other oxygenated lakes, as demonstrated by four small subunit ribosomal ribonucleic acid (SSU rRNA) gene clone libraries and oligonucleotide probe hybridization to RNA from lake water. Populations in the euphotic zone of this deep (589 m), oligotrophic caldera lake are dominated by two phylogenetic clusters of currently uncultivated bacteria: CL120-10, a newly identified cluster in the verrucomicrobiales, and ACK4 actinomycetes, known as a minor constituent of bacterioplankton in other lakes. Deep-water populations at 300 and 500 m are dominated by a different pair of uncultivated taxa: CL500-11, a novel cluster in the green nonsulfur bacteria, and group I marine crenarchaeota. b-Proteobacteria, dominant in most other freshwater environments, are relatively rare in Crater Lake (<=16% of nonchloroplast bacterial rRNA at all depths). Other taxa identified in Crater Lake libraries include a newly identified candidate bacterial division, ABY1, and a newly identified subcluster, CL0-1, within candidate division OP10. Probe analyses confirmed vertical stratification of several microbial groups, similar to patterns observed in open-ocean systems. Additional similarities between Crater Lake and ocean microbial populations include aphotic zone dominance of group I marine crenarchaeota and green nonsulfur bacteria. Comparison of Crater Lake to other lakes studied by rRNA methods suggests that selective factors structuring Crater Lake bacterioplankton populations may include low concentrations of available trace metals and dissolved organic matter, chemistry of infiltrating hydrothermal waters, and irradiation by high levels of ultraviolet light.

  9. Digital Data for Volcano Hazards in the Crater Lake Region, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, S.P.; Doelger, S.; Bacon, C.R.; Mastin, L.G.; Scott, K.E.; Nathenson, M.

    2008-01-01

    Crater Lake lies in a basin, or caldera, formed by collapse of the Cascade volcano known as Mount Mazama during a violent, climactic eruption about 7,700 years ago. This event dramatically changed the character of the volcano so that many potential types of future events have no precedent there. This potentially active volcanic center is contained within Crater Lake National Park, visited by 500,000 people per year, and is adjacent to the main transportation corridor east of the Cascade Range. Because a lake is now present within the most likely site of future volcanic activity, many of the hazards at Crater Lake are different from those at most other Cascade volcanoes. Also significant are many faults near Crater Lake that clearly have been active in the recent past. These faults, and historic seismicity, indicate that damaging earthquakes can occur there in the future. The USGS Open-File Report 97-487 (Bacon and others, 1997) describes the various types of volcano and earthquake hazards in the Crater Lake area, estimates of the likelihood of future events, recommendations for mitigation, and a map of hazard zones. The geographic information system (GIS) volcano hazard data layers used to produce the Crater Lake earthquake and volcano hazard map in USGS Open-File Report 97-487 are included in this data set. USGS scientists created one GIS data layer, c_faults, that delineates these faults and one layer, cballs, that depicts the downthrown side of the faults. Additional GIS layers chazline, chaz, and chazpoly were created to show 1)the extent of pumiceous pyroclastic-flow deposits of the caldera forming Mount Mazama eruption, 2)silicic and mafic vents in the Crater Lake region, and 3)the proximal hazard zone around the caldera rim, respectively.

  10. Clues to the Relative Timing of Lakes in Gale Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, W. E.; Palucis, M. C.; Parker, T.; Rubin, D.; Lewis, K.; Sumner, D.; Williams, R. M. E.

    2014-07-01

    In Gale Crater two higher deltas appear to record the deposition into lakes associated with the cutting of Farah Vallis. At the entrance canyon to Mt. Sharp a possible back stepping fan/delta sequence may record a later rising lake level.

  11. Morphology, volcanism, and mass wasting in Crater Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, C.R.; Gardner, J.V.; Mayer, L.A.; Buktenica, M.W.; Dartnell, P.; Ramsey, D.W.; Robinson, J.E.

    2002-01-01

    Crater Lake was surveyed nearly to its shoreline by high-resolution multibeam echo sounding in order to define its geologic history and provide an accurate base map for research and monitoring surveys. The bathymetry and acoustic backscatter reveal the character of landforms and lead to a chronology for the concurrent filling of the lake and volcanism within the ca. 7700 calibrated yr B.P. caldera. The andesitic Wizard Island and central-plattform volcanoes are composed of sequences of lava deltas that record former lake levels and demonstrate simultaneous activity at the two vents. Wizard Island eruptions ceased when the lake was ~80 m lower than at present. Lava streams from prominent channels on the surface of the central platform descended to feed extensive subaqueous flow fields on the caldera floor. The Wizard Island and central-platform volcanoes, andesitic Merriam Cone, and a newly discovered probable lava flow on the eastern floor of the lake apparently date from within a few hundred years of caldera collapse, whereas a small rhydacite dome was emplaced on the flank of Wizard Island at ca. 4800 cal. yr B.P. Bedrock outcrops on the submerged caldera walls are shown in detail and, in some cases, can be correlated with exposed geologic units of Mount Mazama. Fragmental debris making up the walls elsewhere consists of narrow talus cones forming a dendritic pattern that leads to fewer, wider ridges downslope. Hummocky topography and scattered blocks up to ~280 m long below many of the embayments in the caldera wall mark debris-avalanche deposits that probably formed in single events and commonly are affected by secondary failures. The flat-floored, deep basins contain relatively fine-grained sediment transported from the debris aprons by sheet-flow turbidity currents. Crater Lake apparently filled rapidly (ca. 400-750 yr) until reaching a permeable layer above glaciated lava identified by the new survey in the northeast caldera wall at ~1845 m elevation

  12. Geologic Map of Mount Mazama and Crater Lake Caldera, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, Charles R.

    2008-01-01

    Crater Lake partly fills one of the most spectacular calderas of the world, an 8-by-10-km basin more than 1 km deep formed by collapse of the volcano known as Mount Mazama (fig. 1) during a rapid series of explosive eruptions about 7,700 years ago. Having a maximum depth of 594 m, Crater Lake is the deepest lake in the United States. Crater Lake National Park, dedicated in 1902, encompasses 645 km2 of pristine forested and alpine terrain, including the lake itself, virtually all of Mount Mazama, and most of the area of the geologic map. The geology of the area was first described in detail by Diller and Patton (1902) and later by Williams (1942), whose vivid account led to international recognition of Crater Lake as the classic collapse caldera. Because of excellent preservation and access, Mount Mazama, Crater Lake caldera, and the deposits formed by the climactic eruption constitute a natural laboratory for study of volcanic and magmatic processes. For example, the climactic ejecta are renowned among volcanologists as evidence for systematic compositional zonation within a subterranean magma chamber. Mount Mazama's climactic eruption also is important as the source of the widespread Mazama ash, a useful Holocene stratigraphic marker throughout the Pacific Northwest, adjacent Canada, and offshore. A detailed bathymetric survey of the floor of Crater Lake in 2000 (Bacon and others, 2002) provides a unique record of postcaldera eruptions, the interplay between volcanism and filling of the lake, and sediment transport within this closed basin. Knowledge of the geology and eruptive history of the Mount Mazama edifice, greatly enhanced by the caldera wall exposures, gives exceptional insight into how large volcanoes of magmatic arcs grow and evolve. Lastly, the many smaller volcanoes of the High Cascades beyond the limits of Mount Mazama are a source of information on the flux of mantle-derived magma through the region. General principles of magmatic and eruptive

  13. Geologic map of Mount Mazama, Crater Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, Charles

    1990-01-01

    Crater Lake caldera collapsed about 6,850 yr B.P. during the climactic eruption of Mount Mazama, a High Cascade basaltic andesitic to dacitic volcanic center that was constructed during a period of about 400,000 yr. The caldera and the products of the climactic eruption are clear evidence for the presence of a shallow magma body that must have supported a hydrothermal system in the recent past. The geology of Mount Mazama has been mapped at a scale of 1:24,000 based on detailed study of the walls of Crater Lake caldera and mapping of the flanks of the volcano. The map shows lavas and fragmental deposits of Mount Mazama, lavas of nearby monogenetic volcanoes, pre-Mazama silicic volcanic rocks, products of the climactic eruption, and glacial deposits. Related topical studies of the volcanology, geochronology, petrology, and geochemistry of the Crater Lake area depend on field relations established by geologic mapping.

  14. Deglacial and postglacial evolution of the Pingualuit Crater Lake basin, northern Québec (Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desiage, Pierre-Arnaud; Lajeunesse, Patrick; St-Onge, Guillaume; Normandeau, Alexandre; Ledoux, Grégoire; Guyard, Hervé; Pienitz, Reinhard

    2015-11-01

    The Pingualuit Crater, located in the Ungava Peninsula (northern Québec, Canada) is a 1.4-Ma-old impact crater hosting a 245-m-deep lake. The lake has a great potential to preserve unique paleoclimatic and paleoecological sedimentary records of the last glacial/interglacial cycles in the terrestrial Canadian Arctic. In order to investigate the stratigraphy in the lake and the late Quaternary glacial history of the Pingualuit Crater, this study compiles data from three expeditions carried out in May 2007 ( 9-m-long sediment core), in August 2010 ( 50 km of seismic lines), and in September 2012 (high-resolution terrestrial LiDAR topography of the inner slopes). Despite the weak penetration ( 10 m) of the 3.5-kHz subbottom profiling caused by the presence of boulders in the sedimentary column, seismic data coupled with the stratigraphy established from the sediment core enabled the identification of two glaciolacustrine units deposited during the final stages of the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) retreat in the crater. Two episodes of postglacial mass wasting events were also identified on the slopes and in the deep basin of the crater. The high-resolution topography of the internal slopes of the crater generated from the LiDAR data permitted the confirmation of a paleolake level at 545 m and determination of the elevation of drainage outlets. Together with the mapping of glacial and deglacial landforms from air photographs, the LiDAR data allowed the development of a new deglaciation and drainage scenario for the Pingualuit Crater Lake and surrounding area. The model proposes three main phases of lake drainage, based on the activation of seven outlets following the retreat of the LIS front toward the southwest. Finally, as opposed to other high-latitude crater lake basins such as Lake El'gygytgyn or Laguna Potrok Aike where high-resolution paleoclimatic records were obtained owing to high sediment accumulation rates, the seismic data from the Pingualuit Crater Lake

  15. Groundwater transport of crater-lake brine at Poa´s Volcano, Costa Rica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanford, Ward E.; Konikow, Leonard F.; Rowe, Gary L.; Brantley, Susan L.

    1995-01-01

    Poa´s Volcano is an active stratovolcano in Costa Rica that has a lake in its active crater. The crater lake has high temperatures (50–90 °C), high acidity (pH ≈ 0.0), and a high dissolved-solids content (100 g/kg). The volcano has numerous freshwater springs on its flanks, but a few on the northwestern flank are highly acidic (pH = 1.6–2.5) and have high dissolved-solids concentrations (2–22 g/kg). This study analyzes the regional groundwater system at Poa´s and demonstrates the likelihood that the water discharging from the acidic springs in the Rio Agrio watershed originates at the acidic crater lake. Both heat and solute transport are analyzed on a regional scale through numerical simulations using the HST3D finite-difference model, which solves the coupled equations for fluid flow, heat transport, and solute transport. The code allows fluid viscosity and density to be functions of both temperature and solute concentration. The simulations use estimates for recharge to the mountain and a range of values and various distributions of permeability and porosity. Several sensitivity analyses are performed to test how the uncertainty in many of the model parameters affects the simulation results. These uncertainties yield an estimated range of travel times from the crater lake to the Rio Agrio springs of 1–30 years, which is in close agreement with the results of tritium analyses of the springs. Calculated groundwater fluxes into and out of the crater lake are both about several hundred kg/s. These fluxes must be accounted for in water budgets of the crater lake.

  16. Rapid sympatric ecological differentiation of crater lake cichlid fishes within historic times

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    .001). Conclusions This study provides empirical evidence of eco-morphological differentiation occurring very quickly after the colonization of a new and vacant habitat. Exceptionally low levels of neutral genetic diversity and inference from coalescence indicates that the Midas cichlid population in Apoyeque is much younger (ca. 100 years or generations old) than the crater itself (ca. 1 800 years old). This suggests either that the crater remained empty for many hundreds of years after its formation or that remnant volcanic activity prevented the establishment of a stable fish population during the early life of the crater lake. Based on our findings of eco-morphological variation in the Apoyeque Midas cichlids, and known patterns of adaptation in Midas cichlids in general, we suggest that this population may be in a very early stage of speciation (incipient species), promoted by disruptive selection and ecological diversification. PMID:20459869

  17. Models for the Filling of Crater Lake, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathenson, M.; Bacon, C. R.; Gardner, J. V.

    2001-12-01

    Crater Lake partially fills, to a depth of 593 m, the 10-km-diameter, 1200-m-deep caldera formed by collapse of Mount Mazama volcano. The lake receives water from direct precipitation and inflow from the caldera walls and loses water by surface evaporation and leakage. No streams flow from Crater Lake. A high-resolution multibeam echo sounding survey of the lake floor conducted in 2000 (Gardner et al., 2001) revealed seven drowned beaches between 1849 and 1878 m elevation (reference lake elevation is 1883 m). The beaches are thought to reflect drier periods in the lake's history since the climactic, caldera-forming eruption of Mount Mazama, approximately 7,700 years ago. The shallowest drowned beach at 1878 m represents the deepest part of a wave-cut platform up to 100 m wide, substantially wider than any of the beaches, where erodible talus or intensely altered rocks are present. The great width of the platform compared to the width of the drowned beaches indicates that the lake has mostly been near its current level during the lake's history. Unambiguous evidence of former highstands above 1883 m has not been reported. In order to explain the occurrence of the drowned beaches and their relatively narrow depth range, leakage through the caldera walls must vary with depth and cannot occur just at the lake bottom or at the modern lake level. A reasonable model is that leakage is proportional to elevation above the bottom of the lake. Recognition that there is a thick layer of relatively permeable debris resting on glaciated lava in the northeast caldera wall above an elevation of 1845 m suggests a variant of this model where leakage is proportional to elevation above 1845 m. Climate studies indicate that Crater Lake began to fill during a dry period. Assuming that precipitation at that time was 70% of modern and that the beach at 1853 m (the deeper beach is somewhat suspect) corresponds to this amount of precipitation, a combination of the above leakage models is

  18. The Geology and Petrography of Crater Lake National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diller, Joseph Silas; Patton, Horace Bushnell

    1902-01-01

    Origin of the name Mount Mazama - A great impetus to the spread of information concerning Crater Lake was given by the Mazamas of Portland, Oreg., who held a meeting at the lake in August, 1896, which attracted many visitors. The principal features in the history of the lake had previously been made out, and the Mazamas, recognizing the fact that the great peak which was nearly destroyed in preparing the pit for the lake had no name, gave it the name of their own society. Upon the rim of the lake are a number of small peaks, each having its own designation. The term Mount Mazama refers to the whole rim encircling the lake. It is but a mere remnant of the once lofty peak, the real Mount Mazama, which rose far into the region of eternal snow. To get a basis for reconstructing the original Mount Mazama it is necessary to study in detail the structure and composition of its foundation, now so attractively displayed in the encircling cliffs of Crater Lake.

  19. Detecting long-term hydrological patterns at Crater Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, D.L.; Silsbee, D.G.; Redmond, Kelly T.

    1999-01-01

    Tree-ring chronologies for mountain hemlock (Tsuga mertensiana) were used to reconstruct the water level of Crater Lake, a high-elevation lake in the southern Cascade Range of Oregon. Reconstructions indicate that lake level since the late 1980s has been lower than at any point in the last 300 years except the early 1930s to mid 1940s. Lake level was consistently higher during the Little Ice Age than during the late 20th century; during the late 17th century, lake level was up to 9 m higher than recent (1980s and 1990s) low levels, which is consistent with paleoclimalic reconstructions of regional precipitation and atmospheric pressure. Furthermore, instrumental data available for the 20th century suggest that there are strong teleconnections among atmospheric circulation (e.g., Pacific Decadal Oscillation), tree growth, and hydrology in southern Oregon. Crater Lake is sensitive to interannual, interdecadal and intercentenary variation in precipitation and atmospheric circulation, and can be expected to track both short-term and longterm variation in regional climatic patterns that may occur in the future.

  20. 2005 Crater Lake Formation, Lahar, Acidic Flood, and Gas Emission From Chiginagak Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, J. R.; Scott, W. E.; McGimsey, R. G.; Jorgenson, J.

    2005-12-01

    A 400-m-wide crater lake developed in the formerly snow-and-ice-filled crater of Mount Chiginagak volcano sometime between August 2004 and June 2005, presumably due to increased heat flux from the hydrothermal system. We are also evaluating the possible role of magma intrusion and degassing. In early summer 2005, clay-rich debris and an estimated 5.6 million cubic meters of acidic water from the crater exited through tunnels in the base of a glacier that breaches the south crater rim. Over 27 kilometers downstream, the acidic waters of the flood reached approximately 1.5 meters above current water levels and inundated an important salmon spawning drainage, acidifying at least the surface water of Mother Goose Lake (approximately 1 cubic kilometer in volume) and preventing the annual salmon run. No measurements of pH were taken until late August 2005. At that time the pH of water sampled from the Mother Goose Lake inlet, lake surface, and outlet stream (King Salmon River) was 3.2. Defoliation and leaf damage of vegetation along affected streams, in areas to heights of over 70 meters in elevation above flood level, indicates that a cloud of detrimental gas or aerosol accompanied the flood waters. Analysis of stream water, lake water, and vegetation samples is underway to better determine the agent responsible for the plant damage. This intriguing pattern of gas-damaged vegetation concentrated along and above the flood channels is cause for further investigation into potential hazards associated with Chiginagak's active crater lake. Anecdotal evidence from local lodge owners and aerial photographs from 1953 suggest that similar releases occurred in the mid-1970s and early 1950s.

  1. Evidence for a Noachian-Aged Ephemeral Lake in Gusev Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, S. W.; Niles, P. B.; Alfano, F.; Clarke, A. B.

    2014-01-01

    Gusev crater was selected as the landing site for the Spirit rover because of the likelihood that it contained an ancient lake. Although outcrops rich in Mg-Fe carbonate dubbed Comanche were discovered in the Noachian-aged Columbia Hills, they were inferred to result from volcanic hydrothermal activity. Spirit encountered other mineral and chemical indicators of aqueous activity, but none was recognized as definitive evidence for a former lake in part because none was associated with obvious lacustrine sedimentary deposits. However, water discharge into Martian crater basins like Gusev may have been episodic, producing only small amounts of sediment and shallow ephemeral lakes. Evaporative precipitation from such water bodies has been suggested as a way of producing the Mg- and Fe-rich carbonates found in ALH84001 and carbonates and salts in some nakhlites a hypothesis we examine for the Comanche carbonate.

  2. Effect of glacier ablation on the Snettisham Hydroelectric Project, Long Lake and Crater Lake Basins, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloan, C.E.; Emery, P.A.; Fair, Diana

    1986-01-01

    Long Lake Basin in the Snettisham Project Area southeast of Juneau, Alaska, yields water used for the production of hydroelectric power. Development of adjacent Crater Lake is planned to increase the Project 's generating capacity. Estimates of the hydroelectric potential of the lakes are based on streamflow records which are influenced by glaciers that cover 25% of the combined basins. Analysis of streamflow records shows that the quality and extent of records in the area are sufficient to predict flow from the Crater Creek basin with a fairly high degree of confidence. Comparison of aerial photographs indicates that glacier ablation and recession have been continuous since at least 1929. Estimates of ice-volume change from photogrammetric measurements indicate that less than 2.5% of the average runoff from the basins of Long and Crater Lakes has been from reduction in glacier-ice storage. (Author 's abstract)

  3. Late Quaternary slip rate and seismic hazards of the West Klamath Lake fault zone near Crater Lake, Oregon Cascades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, C.R.; Lanphere, M.A.; Champion, D.E.

    1999-01-01

    Crater Lake caldera is at the north end of the Klamath graben, where this N10??W-trending major Basin and Range structure impinges upon the north-south-trending High Cascades volcanic arc. East-facing normal faults, typically 10-15 km long, form the West Klamath Lake fault zone, which bounds the graben on its west side. The fault zone terminates on the south near the epicentral area of the September 1993 Klamath Falls earthquakes. It continues north past Crater Lake as the Annie Spring fault, which is within ~1 km of the west caldera rim, and Red Cone Spring fault. We have determined a long-term vertical slip rate of 0.3 mm/yr for these two faults using high-precision K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar age measurements on offset lava flows ranging in age from ca. 35 to 300 ka. Holocene offset reported by Hawkins et al. and epicenters of eight MW 2 earthquakes in 1994 and 1995 indicate that the West Klamath Lake fautl zone is active. Empirical relations between earthquake magnitudes and scarp heights or fault lengths suggest that the fault zone is capable of producing earthquakes as large as MW 7 1/4 . Earthquakes on these or other faults of the zone could trigger landslides and rockfalls from the walls of the caldera, possibly resulting in large waves on Crater Lake.

  4. Thermal, chemical, and optical properties of Crater Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, G.L.; Hoffman, R.L.; McIntire, D.C.; Buktenica, M.W.; Girdner, S.F.

    2007-01-01

    Crater Lake covers the floor of the Mount Mazama caldera that formed 7700 years ago. The lake has a surface area of 53 km2 and a maximum depth of 594 m. There is no outlet stream and surface inflow is limited to small streams and springs. Owing to its great volume and heat, the lake is not covered by snow and ice in winter unlike other lakes in the Cascade Range. The lake is isothermal in winter except for a slight increase in temperature in the deep lake from hyperadiabatic processes and inflow of hydrothermal fluids. During winter and spring the water column mixes to a depth of about 200-250 m from wind energy and convection. Circulation of the deep lake occurs periodically in winter and spring when cold, near-surface waters sink to the lake bottom; a process that results in the upwelling of nutrients, especially nitrate-N, into the upper strata of the lake. Thermal stratification occurs in late summer and fall. The maximum thickness of the epilimnion is about 20 m and the metalimnion extends to a depth of about 100 m. Thus, most of the lake volume is a cold hypolimnion. The year-round near-bottom temperature is about 3.5??C. Overall, hydrothermal fluids define and temporally maintain the basic water quality characteristics of the lake (e.g., pH, alkalinity and conductivity). Total phosphorus and orthophosphate-P concentrations are fairly uniform throughout the water column, where as total Kjeldahl-N and ammonia-N are highest in concentration in the upper lake. Concentrations of nitrate-N increase with depth below 200 m. No long-term changes in water quality have been detected. Secchi disk (20-cm) clarity varied seasonally and annually, but was typically highest in June and lowest in August. During the current study, August Secchi disk clarity readings averaged about 30 m. The maximum individual clarity reading was 41.5 m in June 1997. The lowest reading was 18.1 m in July 1995. From 1896 (white-dinner plate) to 2003, the average August Secchi disk reading was

  5. Analogue modeling of instabilities in crater lake hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandemeulebrouck, Jean; Stemmelen, Didier; Hurst, Tony; Grangeon, Jacques

    2005-02-01

    We carried out analogue experiments on two-phase boiling systems, using a porous vertical cylinder, saturated with water. The base of the cylinder was heated, and the top was cooled, as in a natural hydrothermal system. Previous work had shown that once the two-phase zone reached a certain level, thermal instabilities would develop. We made measurements of the acoustic energy related to boiling, and we found that high levels of acoustic noise were associated with the part of the cycle in which there was upward water movement. We repeated our experiments with a cooling water tank at the top of the system, representing a crater lake. This showed that periodic thermal instabilities still developed in this situation. We then compared our analogue measurements to two natural systems known to exhibit periodic behavior. There is good agreement between the thermal and acoustic cycling seen in our model and the observations made at Inferno Crater Lake in the Waimangu Geothermal area, New Zealand, whose level cycles by nearly 10 m, with a typical period of 38 days. Particularly notable is how in both systems high levels of acoustic noise are associated with rising water level. The much larger Ruapehu Crater Lake, also in New Zealand, cycled with a period of several months to a year for over a decade prior to the 1995 eruption. Strong acoustic and seismic energy usually occurred just before the lake temperature started to rise. This suggests a slightly different model, in which the increasing two-phase flow zone triggers more general convection once it reaches the base of the lake.

  6. The effects of hydrothermal eruptions and a tectonic earthquake on a cycling crater lake (Inferno Crater Lake, Waimangu, New Zealand)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandemeulebrouck, Jean; Hurst, A. W.; Scott, B. J.

    2008-12-01

    The lake level and temperature of Inferno Crater Lake, a hot lake in the Waimangu Geothermal Field, vary in quasi-regular cycles with a period of about 30 to 50 days. Between 1970 and 1991, several hydrothermal eruptions at other sites within the Waimangu system affected this cycling, especially the cycle period. This indicated that although the cycling was most evident in one small lake, it was sensitive to any changes in the surrounding geothermal system. After the Raupo Pond eruption, which produced the largest effects, the recovery of the temperature and cycle period was consistent with extra energy diffusing out of the previously proposed heat pipe system. The 1987 Edgecumbe earthquake, whose hypocenter was 50 km from Waimangu, also seems to have significantly affected the hydrothermal system, reducing the cycle period for at least a year afterwards.

  7. High Spatio-Temporal Resolution Observations of Crater-Lake Surface Temperatures at Kawah Ijen Volcano, East Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewicki, J. L.; Caudron, C.; van Hinsberg, V.; Bani, P.; Hilley, G. E.; Kelly, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Subaqueous volcanic eruptions comprise only 8% of all recorded eruptions in historical time, but have caused ~20% of fatalities associated with volcanic activity during this time (Mastin and Witter, 2000). Crater lakes, however, act as calorimeters, absorbing heat from intruding magma and integrating it over space and time and thus offer a unique opportunity to monitor volcanic activity. Kawah Ijen is a composite volcano located on east Java, Indonesia, whose crater hosts the largest natural hyperacidic lake (27 x 106 m3; pH <1) on Earth. As part of an international workshop on Kawah Ijen in September 2014, we tested a novel approach for mapping and monitoring variations in crater-lake apparent surface temperatures at high spatial (~30 cm) and temporal (every two minutes) resolution. We used a ground-based thermal infrared (TIR) camera from the crater rim to collect a set of visible imagery around the crater during the daytime and a time series of co-located visible and TIR imagery at one location from pre-dawn to daytime. We processed daytime visible imagery with the Structure-from-Motion photogrammetric method to create a digital elevation model onto which the time series of TIR imagery was orthorectified and georeferenced. Lake apparent surface temperatures typically ranged from ~21 to 28oC. At two locations, apparent surface temperatures were ~ 7 and 9 oC less than in-situ lake temperature measurements at 1.5 and 5 m depth, respectively. We observed large spatio-temporal variations in lake apparent surface temperatures, which were likely associated with wind-driven evaporative cooling of the lake surface. Our approach shows promise for continuous monitoring of crater-lake surface temperatures, particularly if the TIR camera is deployed as part of a permanent station with ancillary meteorological measurements to help distinguish temperature variations associated with atmospheric processes from those at depth within the lake and volcano.

  8. Hydrogeochemical surveillance at El Chichón volcano crater lake, Chiapas, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armienta, María Aurora; De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Ramos, Silvia; Ceniceros, Nora; Cruz, Olivia; Aguayo, Alejandra; Arcega-Cabrera, Flor

    2014-09-01

    El Chichón volcano has an eruptive record of at least 12 major eruptions in the Holocene, the latest one in March-April 1982 causing the worst volcanic disaster in the history of Mexico. After about 6 centuries of quiescence, this eruption destroyed a large dome and opened a 1 km wide crater. A lake, formed within the crater shortly after the eruption, has been an important source of information about the evolution of the post-eruptive processes. The fluctuations of the crater lake water physicochemical parameters, observed since 1983, have allowed in identifying hydrothermal waters and H2S-rich gases, influenced by tectonic and meteorological effects, as the main contributors to its composition. Here we propose some methods to help in assessing the state of the volcano derived from the relative contribution of these factors as an easy to implement volcanic surveillance method in potentially active volcanoes with crater lakes, or other volcano-influenced water sources.

  9. An Igneous Origin for Features of a Candidate Crater-Lake System in Western Memnonia, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leverington, D. W.; Maxwell, T. A.

    2004-01-01

    The association of channels, inner terraces, and delta-like features with Martian impact craters has previously been interpreted as evidence in favor of the past existence of crater lakes on Mars. However, examination of a candidate crater-lake system in western Memnonia suggests instead that its features may have formed through igneous processes involving the flow and ponding of lava. Accumulations of material in craters and other topographic lows throughout much of the study region have characteristics consistent with those of volcanic deposits, and terraces found along the inner flanks of some of these craters are interpreted as having formed through drainage or subsidence of volcanic materials. Channels previously identified as inlets and outlets of the crater-lake system are interpreted instead as volcanic rilles. These results challenge previous interpretations of terrace and channel features in the study region and suggest that candidate crater lakes located elsewhere should be reexamined.

  10. Ultraviolet radiation and bio-optics in Crater Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hargreaves, B.R.; Girdner, S.F.; Buktenica, M.W.; Collier, R.W.; Urbach, E.; Larson, G.L.

    2007-01-01

    Crater Lake, Oregon, is a mid-latitude caldera lake famous for its depth (594 m) and blue color. Recent underwater spectral measurements of solar radiation (300-800 nm) support earlier observations of unusual transparency and extend these to UV-B wavelengths. New data suggest that penetration of solar UVR into Crater Lake has a significant ecological impact. Evidence includes a correlation between water column chlorophyll-a and stratospheric ozone since 1984, the scarcity of organisms in the upper water column, and apparent UV screening pigments in phytoplankton that vary with depth. The lowest UV-B diffuse attenuation coefficients (K d,320) were similar to those reported for the clearest natural waters elsewhere, and were lower than estimates for pure water published in 1981. Optical proxies for UVR attenuation were correlated with chlorophyll-a concentration (0-30 m) during typical dry summer months from 1984 to 2002. Using all proxies and measurements of UV transparency, decadal and longer cycles were apparent but no long-term trend since the first optical measurement in 1896. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  11. Hydrochemical dynamics of the “lake spring” system in the crater of El Chichón volcano (Chiapas, Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouwet, D.; Taran, Y.; Inguaggiato, S.; Varley, N.; Santiago Santiago, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    El Chichón volcano (Chiapas, Mexico) erupted violently in March-April 1982, breaching through the former volcano-hydrothermal system. Since then, the 1982 crater has hosted a shallow (1-3.3 m, acidic (pH ˜ 2.2) and warm (˜ 30 °C) crater lake with a strongly varying chemistry (Cl/SO 4 = 0-79 molar ratio). The changes in crater lake chemistry and volume are not systematically related to the seasonal variation of rainfall, but rather to the activity of near-neutral geyser-like springs in the crater (Soap Pool). These Soap Pool springs are the only sources of Cl for the lake. Their geyser-like behaviour with a long-term (months to years) periodicity is due to a specific geometry of the shallow boiling aquifer beneath the lake, which is the remnant of the 1983 Cl-rich (24,000 mg/l) crater lake water. The Soap Pool springs decreased in Cl content over time. The zero-time extrapolation (1982, year of the eruption) approaches the Cl content in the initial crater lake, meanwhile the extrapolation towards the future indicates a zero-Cl content by 2009 ± 1. This particular situation offers the opportunity to calculate mass balance and Cl budget to quantify the lake-spring system in the El Chichón crater. These calculations show that the water balance without the input of SP springs is negative, implying that the lake should disappear during the dry season. The isotopic composition of lake waters (δD and δ 18O) coincide with this crater lake-SP dynamics, reflecting evaporation processes and mixing with SP geyser and meteoric water. Future dome growth, not observed yet in the post-1982 El Chichón crater, may be anticipated by changes in lake chemistry and dynamics.

  12. Seasonal variations in geochemistry of the hyperacidic Ijen Crater Lake, East Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumarti, S.; Sumarti, S.; van Bergen, M. J.; Takano, B.; Sukarnen, S.

    2001-12-01

    Kawah Ijen is a typical crater lake in a tropical climate where there is a balance between the volume of atmospheric precipitation and the level of water in the lake. The crater lake has a regular oval form (600 x 1000 m2), is 180 m deep, and contains about 36 million m3 of turquoise-green colored water (pH ~ 0.2). The water contains extremely high Cl, SO4, F concentrations, the maximum values being about 2,500 mg/kg, 80,000 mg/kg and 1,300 mg/kg respectively. Twenty-four samples of lake water taken during August 1996 (dry season) show most major elements to be homogeneously distributed throughout the lake at this time to a depth of 165 m within a standard deviation of less than 10 %. Homogeneity is most likely due to thorough mixing driven by thermal convection. However, iron and sulphur do not behave in the same way showing variations up to 14 % variation. Monthly monitoring of surface water (1997-2001) shows temporal fluctuations in acidity (pH 0 ~ 0.6) and water level, concentrations of major elements, temperature (20 ~ 45° C). Between 1976-1996, the water level varied by ~ 15 m; and from 1997-2001 by ~ 10 m. The onset of the wet season may coincide with an episodical decrease, a spike, in major element concentrations up to 70 % of their dry season value. This spike occurs annually at the lowest temperature and highest degree of dilution, indicates of the influence of rainfall. However, volcanic gases entering beneath the lake bottom may have added to these temporal changes in the lake especially during phreatic eruptions. Shallow earthquake records do not indicate correlations between seismic activity and chemical changes in the lake. Temporal variations of lake surface temperature show good agreement with major element variations in surface water. Crater lake surface water collected at three points on August 1996, March 2001, May 2001 revealed that the surface water was homogenous in the dry and rainy season within a standard deviation below 7 %. The

  13. Classification and analysis of candidate impact crater-hosted closed-basin lakes on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudge, Timothy A.; Aureli, Kelsey L.; Head, James W.; Fassett, Caleb I.; Mustard, John F.

    2015-11-01

    We present a new catalog of 205 candidate closed-basin lakes contained within impact craters across the surface of Mars. These basins have an inlet valley that incises the crater rim and flows into the basin but no visible outlet valley, and are considered candidate closed-basin lakes; the presence of a valley flowing into a basin does not necessitate the formation of a standing body of water. The major geomorphic distinction within our catalog of candidate paleolakes is the length of the inlet valley(s), with two major classes - basins with long (>20 km) inlet valleys (30 basins), and basins with short (<20 km) inlet valleys (175 basins). We identify 55 basins that contain sedimentary fan deposits at the mouths of their inlet valleys, of which nine are fed by long inlet valleys and 46 are fed by short inlet valleys. Analysis of the mineralogy of these fan deposits suggests that they are primarily composed of detrital material. Additionally, we find no evidence for widespread evaporite deposit formation within our catalog of candidate closed-basin lakes, which we conclude is indicative of a general transience for any lakes that did form within these basins. Morphometric characteristics for our catalog indicate that as an upper limit, these basins represent a volume of water equivalent to a ∼1.2 m global equivalent layer (GEL) of water spread evenly across the martian surface; this is a small fraction of the modern water ice reservoir on Mars. Our catalog offers a broader context within which results from the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover can be interpreted, as Gale crater is a candidate closed-basin lake contained within our catalog. Gale is also one of 12 closed-basin lakes fed by both long and short inlet valleys, and so in situ analyses by Curiosity can shed light on the relative importance of these two types of inlets for any lacustrine activity within the basin.

  14. Distribution and abundance of zooplankton populations in Crater Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, G.L.; McIntire, C.D.; Buktenica, M.W.; Girdner, S.F.; Truitt, R.E.

    2007-01-01

    The zooplankton assemblages in Crater Lake exhibited consistency in species richness and general taxonomic composition, but varied in density and biomass during the period between 1988 and 2000. Collectively, the assemblages included 2 cladoceran taxa and 10 rotifer taxa (excluding rare taxa). Vertical habitat partitioning of the water column to a depth of 200 m was observed for most species with similar food habits and/or feeding mechanisms. No congeneric replacement was observed. The dominant species in the assemblages were variable, switching primarily between periods of dominance of Polyarthra-Keratella cochlearis and Daphnia. The unexpected occurrence and dominance of Asplanchna in 1991 and 1992 resulted in a major change in this typical temporal shift between Polyarthra-K. cochlearis and Daphnia. Following a collapse of the zooplankton biomass in 1993 that was probably caused by predation from Asplanchna, Kellicottia dominated the zooplankton assemblage biomass between 1994 and 1997. The decline in biomass of Kellicottia by 1998 coincided with a dramatic increase in Daphnia biomass. When Daphnia biomass declined by 2000, Keratella biomass increased again. Thus, by 1998 the assemblage returned to the typical shift between Keratella-Polyarthra and Daphnia. Although these observations provided considerable insight about the interannual variability of the zooplankton assemblages in Crater Lake, little was discovered about mechanisms behind the variability. When abundant, kokanee salmon may have played an important role in the disappearance of Daphnia in 1990 and 2000 either through predation, inducing diapause, or both. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  15. Long-term limnological research and monitoring at Crater Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, G.L.; Collier, R.; Buktenica, M.

    2007-01-01

    Crater Lake is located in the caldera of Mount Mazama in Crater Lake National Park, Oregon. The lake has a surface area of about 53 km2at an elevation of 1882 m and a maximum depth of 594 m. Limited studies of this ultraoligotrophic lake conducted between 1896 and 1981, lead to a 10-year limnological study to evaluate any potential degradation of water quality. No long-term variations in water quality were observed that could be attributed to anthropogenic activity. Building on the success of this study, a permanent limnological program has been established with a long-term monitoring program to insure a reliable data base for use in the future. Of equal importance, this program serves as a research platform to develop and communicate to the public a better understanding of the coupled biological, physical, and geochemical processes in the lake and its surrounding environment. This special volume represents our current state of knowledge of the status of this pristine ecosystem including its special optical properties, algal nutrient limitations, pelagic bacteria, and models of the inter-relationships of thermal properties, nutrients, phytoplankton, deep-water mixing, and water budgets. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  16. High spatio-temporal resolution observations of crater lake temperatures at Kawah Ijen volcano, East Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Caudron, Corentin; van Hinsberg, Vincent J.; Hilley, George E.

    2016-08-01

    The crater lake of Kawah Ijen volcano, East Java, Indonesia, has displayed large and rapid changes in temperature at point locations during periods of unrest, but measurement techniques employed to date have not resolved how the lake's thermal regime has evolved over both space and time. We applied a novel approach for mapping and monitoring variations in crater lake apparent surface ("skin") temperatures at high spatial (˜32 cm) and temporal (every 2 min) resolution at Kawah Ijen on 18 September 2014. We used a ground-based FLIR T650sc camera with digital and thermal infrared (TIR) sensors from the crater rim to collect (1) a set of visible imagery around the crater during the daytime and (2) a time series of co-located visible and TIR imagery at one location from pre-dawn to daytime. We processed daytime visible imagery with the Structure-from-Motion photogrammetric method to create a digital elevation model onto which the time series of TIR imagery was orthorectified and georeferenced. Lake apparent skin temperatures typically ranged from ˜21 to 33 °C. At two locations, apparent skin temperatures were ˜4 and 7 °C less than in situ lake temperature measurements at 1.5 and 5-m depth, respectively. These differences, as well as the large spatio-temporal variations observed in skin temperatures, were likely largely associated with atmospheric effects such as the evaporative cooling of the lake surface and infrared absorption by water vapor and SO2. Calculations based on orthorectified TIR imagery thus yielded underestimates of volcanic heat fluxes into the lake, whereas volcanic heat fluxes estimated based on in situ temperature measurements (68 to 111 MW) were likely more representative of Kawah Ijen in a quiescent state. The ground-based imaging technique should provide a valuable tool to continuously monitor crater lake temperatures and contribute insight into the spatio-temporal evolution of these temperatures associated with volcanic activity.

  17. Seismic tremor and gravity measurements at Inferno Crater Lake, Waimangu Geothermal Field, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, J. F.; Jolly, A. D.; Fournier, N.; Cole-Baker, J.; Hurst, T.; Roman, D. C.

    2011-12-01

    Volcanic crater lakes are often associated with active hydrothermal systems that induce cyclic behavior in the lake's level, temperature, and chemistry. Inferno Crater Lake, located in the Waimangu geothermal field within the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) on the North Island of New Zealand exhibits lake level fluctuations of >7m, and temperature fluctuations >40°C with a highly variable periodicity. Seismic and gravity monitoring of Inferno Lake was carried out from December, 2009 - March, 2010 and captured a full cycle of lake fluctuation. Results indicate that this cycle consisted of ~5 smaller fluctuations of ~3m in lake level followed by a larger fluctuation of ~7m. A broadband seismometer recorded strong seismic tremor in the hours leading up to each of the minor and major high stands in lake level. Spectral analysis of the tremor shows dominant frequencies in the range of ~10Hz and a fundamental harmonic frequency located in the 1Hz range. The 1Hz frequency band exhibits gliding spectral lines which increase in frequency at the end of each tremor period. Particle motion analysis of harmonic tremor waveforms indicate a ~100m upward migration of the source location from the onset of tremor until it ceases at the peak of each lake level high stand. Particle motions also indicate an azimuthal migration of the source by ~30° from the overflow outlet region of the lake toward the central vent location during the course of the tremor and lake level increase. Lake water temperature has a direct relationship with lake level and ranges between ~40°C - ~80°C. Gravity fluctuations were also continuously monitored using a Micro-g-LaCoste gPhone relative gravity meter with a 1Hz sampling rate and precision of 1 microgal. These data indicate a direct relationship between lake level and gravity showing a net increase of ~100 microgals between lake level low and high stands. A piezometer located beside the lake indicates an inflow of ground water into the subsoil during

  18. Remarkable geochemical changes and degassing at Voui crater lake, Ambae volcano, Vanuatu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bani, Philipson; Oppenheimer, Clive; Varekamp, Johan C.; Quinou, Thomas; Lardy, Michel; Carn, Simon

    2009-12-01

    Ambae (also known as Aoba), is a 38 × 16 km 2 lozenge-shaped island volcano with a coastal population of around 10 000. At the summit of the volcano is lake Voui — one of the largest active crater lakes worldwide, with 40 × 10 6 m 3 of acidic water perched 1400 m a.s.l. After more than 300 years of dormancy, Ambae volcano reawakened with phreatic eruptions through Voui in 1995, and culminating in a series of surtseyan eruptions in 2005, followed by a rapid and spectacular colour change of the lake from light blue to red in 2006. Integrating lake water chemistry with new measurements of SO 2 emissions from the volcano during the 2005-2006 eruptive period helps to explain the unusual and spectacular volcanic activity of Ambae — initially, a degassed magma approached the lake bed and triggered the surtseyan eruption. Depressurization of the conduit facilitated ascent of volatile-rich magma from the deeper plumbing system. The construction of a cone during eruption and the high degassing destabilised the equilibrium of lake stratification leading to a limnic event and subsequently the spectacular colour change.

  19. Deposition, exhumation, and paleoclimate of an ancient lake deposit, Gale crater, Mars.

    PubMed

    Grotzinger, J P; Gupta, S; Malin, M C; Rubin, D M; Schieber, J; Siebach, K; Sumner, D Y; Stack, K M; Vasavada, A R; Arvidson, R E; Calef, F; Edgar, L; Fischer, W F; Grant, J A; Griffes, J; Kah, L C; Lamb, M P; Lewis, K W; Mangold, N; Minitti, M E; Palucis, M; Rice, M; Williams, R M E; Yingst, R A; Blake, D; Blaney, D; Conrad, P; Crisp, J; Dietrich, W E; Dromart, G; Edgett, K S; Ewing, R C; Gellert, R; Hurowitz, J A; Kocurek, G; Mahaffy, P; McBride, M J; McLennan, S M; Mischna, M; Ming, D; Milliken, R; Newsom, H; Oehler, D; Parker, T J; Vaniman, D; Wiens, R C; Wilson, S A

    2015-10-09

    The landforms of northern Gale crater on Mars expose thick sequences of sedimentary rocks. Based on images obtained by the Curiosity rover, we interpret these outcrops as evidence for past fluvial, deltaic, and lacustrine environments. Degradation of the crater wall and rim probably supplied these sediments, which advanced inward from the wall, infilling both the crater and an internal lake basin to a thickness of at least 75 meters. This intracrater lake system probably existed intermittently for thousands to millions of years, implying a relatively wet climate that supplied moisture to the crater rim and transported sediment via streams into the lake basin. The deposits in Gale crater were then exhumed, probably by wind-driven erosion, creating Aeolis Mons (Mount Sharp).

  20. Deposition, exhumation, and paleoclimate of an ancient lake deposit, Gale crater, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grotzinger, J.P.; Gupta, S.; Malin, M.C.; Rubin, D.M.; Schieber, J.; Siebach, K.; Sumner, D.Y.; Stack, K.M.; Vasavada, A.R.; Arvidson, R.E.; Calef, F.; Edgar, Lauren; Fischer, W.F.; Grant, J.A.; Griffes, J.L.; Kah, L.C.; Lamb, M.P.; Lewis, K.W.; Mangold, N.; Minitti, M.E.; Palucis, M.C.; Rice, M.; Williams, R.M.E.; Yingst, R.A.; Blake, D.; Blaney, D.; Conrad, P.; Crisp, J.A.; Dietrich, W.E.; Dromart, G.; Edgett, K.S.; Ewing, R.C.; Gellert, R.; Hurowitz, J.A.; Kocurek, G.; Mahaffy, P.G.; McBride, M.J.; McLennan, S.M.; Mischna, M.A.; Ming, D.; Milliken, R.E.; Newsom, H.; Oehler, D.; Parker, T.J.; Vaniman, D.; Wiens, R.C.; Wilson, S.A.

    2015-01-01

    The landforms of northern Gale crater on Mars expose thick sequences of sedimentary rocks. Based on images obtained by the Curiosity rover, we interpret these outcrops as evidence for past fluvial, deltaic, and lacustrine environments. Degradation of the crater wall and rim probably supplied these sediments, which advanced inward from the wall, infilling both the crater and an internal lake basin to a thickness of at least 75 meters. This intracrater lake system probably existed intermittently for thousands to millions of years, implying a relatively wet climate that supplied moisture to the crater rim and transported sediment via streams into the lake basin. The deposits in Gale crater were then exhumed, probably by wind-driven erosion, creating Aeolis Mons (Mount Sharp).

  1. Deposition, exhumation, and paleoclimate of an ancient lake deposit, Gale crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotzinger, J. P.; Gupta, S.; Malin, M. C.; Rubin, D. M.; Schieber, J.; Siebach, K.; Sumner, D. Y.; Stack, K. M.; Vasavada, A. R.; Arvidson, R. E.; Calef, F.; Edgar, L.; Fischer, W. F.; Grant, J. A.; Griffes, J.; Kah, L. C.; Lamb, M. P.; Lewis, K. W.; Mangold, N.; Minitti, M. E.; Palucis, M.; Rice, M.; Williams, R. M. E.; Yingst, R. A.; Blake, D.; Blaney, D.; Conrad, P.; Crisp, J.; Dietrich, W. E.; Dromart, G.; Edgett, K. S.; Ewing, R. C.; Gellert, R.; Hurowitz, J. A.; Kocurek, G.; Mahaffy, P.; McBride, M. J.; McLennan, S. M.; Mischna, M.; Ming, D.; Milliken, R.; Newsom, H.; Oehler, D.; Parker, T. J.; Vaniman, D.; Wiens, R. C.; Wilson, S. A.

    2015-10-01

    The landforms of northern Gale crater on Mars expose thick sequences of sedimentary rocks. Based on images obtained by the Curiosity rover, we interpret these outcrops as evidence for past fluvial, deltaic, and lacustrine environments. Degradation of the crater wall and rim probably supplied these sediments, which advanced inward from the wall, infilling both the crater and an internal lake basin to a thickness of at least 75 meters. This intracrater lake system probably existed intermittently for thousands to millions of years, implying a relatively wet climate that supplied moisture to the crater rim and transported sediment via streams into the lake basin. The deposits in Gale crater were then exhumed, probably by wind-driven erosion, creating Aeolis Mons (Mount Sharp).

  2. Convective heat discharge of Wood River group of springs in the vicinity of Crater Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nathenson, Manuel; Mariner, Robert H.; Thompson, J. Michael

    1994-01-01

    Data sets for spring and stream chemistry are combined to estimate convective heat discharge and discharge anomalous amounts of sodium and chloride for the Wood River group of springs south of Crater Lake. The best estimate of heat discharge is 87 MWt based on chloride inventory; this value is 3-5 times the heat input to Crater Lake itself. Anomalous discharges of sodium and chloride are also larger that into Crater Lake. Difference between the chemical and thermal characteristics of the discharge into Crater Lake and those from the Wood River group of springs suggest that the heat sources for the two systems may be different, although both ultimately related to the volcanic system.

  3. Lonar Lake, India: An impact Crater in basalt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fredriksson, K.; Dube, A.; Milton, D.J.; Balasundaram, M.S.

    1973-01-01

    Discovery of shock-metamorphosed material establishes the impact origin of Lonar Crater. Coarse breccia with shatter coning and microbreccia with moderately shocked fragments containing maskelynite were found in drill holes through the crater floor. Trenches on the rim yield strongly shocked fragments in which plagioclase has melted and vesiculated, and bombs and spherules of homogeneous rock melt. As the only known terrestrial impact crater in basalt, Lonar Crater provides unique opportunities for comparison with lunar craters. In particular, microbreccias and glass spherules from Lonar Crater have close analogs among the Apollo specimens.

  4. Gas flushing through hyper-acidic crater lakes: the next steps within a reframed monitoring time window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouwet, Dmitri

    2016-04-01

    Tracking variations in the chemical composition, water temperature and pH of brines from peak-activity crater lakes is the most obvious way to forecast phreatic activity. Volcano monitoring intrinsically implies a time window of observation that should be synchronised with the kinetics of magmatic processes, such as degassing and magma intrusion. To decipher "how much time ago" a variation in degassing regime actually occurred before eventually being detected in a crater lake is key, and depends on the lake water residence time. The above reasoning assumes that gas is preserved as anions in the lake water (SO4, Cl, F anions), in other words, that scrubbing of acid gases is complete and irreversible. Less is true. Recent work has confirmed, by direct MultiGas measurement from evaporative plumes, that even the strongest acid in liquid medium (i.e. SO2) degasses from hyper-acidic crater lakes. The less strong acid HCl has long been recognised as being more volatile than hydrophyle in extremely acidic solutions (pH near 0), through a long-term steady increase in SO4/Cl ratios in the vigorously evaporating crater lake of Poás volcano. We now know that acidic gases flush through hyper-acidic crater lake brines, but we don't know to which extend (completely or partially?), and with which speed. The chemical composition hence only reflects a transient phase of the gas flushing through the lake. In terms of volcanic surveillance this brings the advantage that the monitoring time window is definitely shorter than defined by the water chemistry, but yet, we do not know how much shorter. Empirical experiments by Capaccioni et al. (in press) have tried to tackle this kinetic problem for HCl degassing from a "lab-lake" on the short-term (2 days). With this state of the art in mind, two new monitoring strategies can be proposed to seek for precursory signals of phreatic eruptions from crater lakes: (1) Tracking variations in gas compositions, fluxes and ratios between species in

  5. El Chichón crater lake dynamic based on continuous physical data and mass-heat budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peiffer, L.; Taran, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The March-April 1982 Plinian eruption of El Chichón volcano destroyed the summit domes system and created a new 200 m deep crater. Since then, a shallow lake (~3 m) with acidic pH (~2.3), and temperature around 30°C appeared in the crater. This lake has never disappeared until now although its volume has suffered important variations from 40,000 m3 to 160,000 m3. Chemical composition of the lake is also highly variable (Cl/SO4 = 0-79 molar ratio), alternating between acid-sulfate and acid-chloride-sulfate composition. These variations can occur very fast within few weeks and are not directly correlated with precipitation. Due to its shallow depth and small volume, El Chichón crater lake is probably one of the most dynamic crater lake on earth. These rapid changes in chemistry and volume reflect the dynamic of one group of geyser-type springs ('Soap Pools springs, SP') located offshore and the input of hydrothermal steam underneath the crater. The SP springs discharge sporadically to the lake neutral waters with Cl content currently around 3000 mg/l, while the condensed steam feeds the lake with Cl-free and SO4-rich acid water. In this study, we present for the first time continuous physical data of the crater lake (temperature, depth, meteoric precipitation, wind velocity, solar radiation, air humidity). These data were registered by a meteorological station and two dataloggers installed inside and outside the lake. Using a mass and heat budget model constrained with these data, we were able to estimate the flux of 'hydrothermal' fluid entering the lake through the sub-lacustrian fumaroles and SP springs. Tracing the variations of the input flux in time can be help to understand the dynamic of the 'crater lake-SP springs-fumaroles' system but also can provide an efficient way of monitoring the volcanic activity. During the observation period, the mean mass flux entering the lake (Min) was respectively of 12 ± 2 kg/s, corresponding to a total heat flux (Ein) of

  6. Ice-Covered Lakes in Gale Crater Mars: The Cold and Wet Hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kling, A. M.; Haberle, R. M.; Mckay, C. P.; Bristow, T. F.

    2016-01-01

    Recent geological discoveries from the Mars Science Laboratory provide evidence that Gale crater may have intermittently hosted a fluvio-lacustine environment during the Hesperian, with individual lakes lasting for a period of tens to hundreds of thousands of years. (Grotzinger et al., Science, 350 (6257), 2015). Estimates of the CO2 content of the atmosphere at the time the Gale sediments formed are far less than needed by any climate model to warm early Mars (Bristow et al., Geology, submitted), given the low solar energy input available at Mars 3.5 Gya. We have therefore explored the possibility that the lakes in Gale during the Hesperian were perennially covered with ice using the Antarctic Lakes as an analog. Using our best estimate for the annual mean surface temperature at Gale at this time (approx. 230K) we computed the thickness of an ice-covered lake. These thickness range from 10-30 meters depending on the ablation rate and ice transparency and would likely inhibit sediments from entering the lake. Thus, a first conclusion is that the ice must not be too cold. Raising the mean temperature to 245K is challenging, but not quite as hard as reaching 273K. We found that a mean annual temperature of 245K ice thicknesses range from 3-10 meters. These values are comparable to the range of those for the Antarctic lakes (3-6 m), and are not implausible. And they are not so thick that sediments cannot penetrate the ice. For the ice-covered lake hypothesis to work, however, a melt water source is needed. This could come from subaqueous melting of a glacial dam in contact with the lakes (as is the case for Lake Untersee) or from seasonal melt water from nearby glaciers (as is the case for the Dry Valley lakes). More work is needed to better assess these possibilities. However, the main advantage of the ice-covered lake model (and the main reason we pursued it) is that it relaxes the requirement for a long-lived active hydrological cycle involving rainfall and runoff

  7. Ice-Covered Lakes in Gale Crater Mars: The Cold and Wet Hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kling, Alexandre; Haberle, Robert; McKay, Christopher P.; Bristow, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Recent geological discoveries from the Mars Science Laboratory provide evidence that Gale crater may have intermittently hosted a fluvio-lacustine environment during the Hesperian, with individual lakes lasting for a period of tens to hundreds of thousands of years. (Grotzinger et al., Science, 350 (6257), 2015). Estimates of the CO2 content of the atmosphere at the time the Gale sediments formed are far less than needed by any climate model to warm early Mars (Bristow et al., Geology, submitted), given the low solar energy input available at Mars 3.5 Gya. We have therefore explored the possibility that the lakes in Gale during the Hesperian were perennially covered with ice using the Antarctic Lakes as an analog. Using our best estimate for the annual mean surface temperature at Gale at this time (~230K) we computed the thickness of an ice-covered lake. These thickness range from 10-30 meters depending on the ablation rate and ice transparency and would likely inhibit sediments from entering the lake. Thus, a first conclusion is that the ice must not be too cold. Raising the mean temperature to 245K is challenging, but not quite as hard as reaching 273K. We found that a mean annual temperature of 245K ice thicknesses range from 3-10 meters. These values are comparable to the range of those for the Antarctic lakes (3-6 m), and are not implausible. And they are not so thick that sediments cannot penetrate the ice. For the ice-covered lake hypothesis to work, however, a melt water source is needed. This could come from subaqueous melting of a glacial dam in contact with the lakes (as is the case for Lake Untersee) or from seasonal melt water from nearby glaciers (as is the case for the Dry Valley lakes). More work is needed to better assess these possibilities. However, the main advantage of the ice-covered lake model (and the main reason we pursued it) is that it relaxes the requirement for a long-lived active hydrological cycle involving rainfall and runoff, which

  8. CO2 emission from lake-filled Katanuma crater, Narugo volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padron, E.; Hernandez Perez, P. A.; Mori, T.; Perez, N.

    2010-12-01

    Narugo volcano is composed by four dacitic Holocene age lava domes surrounding the 400 m wide lake-filled Katanuma crater. A large caldera, 5.5 x 7 km NW of the city of Sendai was formed by paroxysmal eruptions 45 ka ago and after this activity, lava flows and lava domes were formed in the inner part of the caldera. The only known eruption at Narugo in historical time occurred in 837 AD. Katanuma is known as one of the most acidic lakes in the world and boiling springs, water vapour and volcanic gases are discharged from the lake botton. As a result of this degassing, a relatively intense volcanic gas emission is observed along the lake surface in the form of gas bubbles. To compute the total CO2 degassing rate through Katanuma water lake surface, a CO2 emission survey was carried out on August 2010. CO2 efflux measurements were performed on the water surface by means of a portable NDIR sensor at 86 sampling sites, following a modified floating device of the accumulation chamber method.CO2 efflux values ranged between 16 and 14300 g m-2 d-1. CO2 efflux map was constructed using sequential Gaussian simulation. An important CO2 degassing structure was observed at the water surface, located on its west half part, with a N-S trending. An averaged map of 200 equiprobable simulations allowed us to compute 35.2 ± 4.1 t/d of CO2 released to the atmosphere through the water surface on a area of 0.14 km2. These results suggest clearly that monitoring CO2 emission rate from lake-filled Katanuma crater will contribute to improve the Narugo volcano surveillance program as well as our knowledge on the global CO2 emission from volcanic lakes, which is actually estimated about 136 Mt year-1 (Pérez et al., 2010). Reference: Pérez et al., 2010. CVL 7 Workshop Costa Rica, March 2010.

  9. Water Quality and optical properties of Crater Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, Gary L.; Hoffman, Robert L.; McIntire, C.D.; Buktenica, M.W.; Girdner, Scott

    2007-01-01

    We examine observations of key limnological properties (primarily temperature, salinity, and dissolved oxygen), measured over a 14-year period in Crater Lake, Oregon, and discuss variability in the hypolimnion on time scales of days to a decade. During some years (e.g., 1994a??1995), higher-than-average wintertime deep convection and ventilation led to the removal of significant amounts of heat and salt from the hypolimnion, while dissolved oxygen concentrations increase. In other years, such as the winter of 1996a??1997, heat and salt concentrations increase throughout the year and dissolved oxygen levels drop, indicating conditions were dominated by the background geothermal inputs and dissolved oxygen consumption by bacteria (i.e., minimal deep convection). Over the entire 14 year period, no statistically significant trend was observed in the annual hypolimnetic heat and salt content. Measurements from several thermistors moored in the hypolimnion provide new insight into the time and space scales of the deep convection events. For some events, cool water intrusions are observed sequentially, from shallower depths to deeper depths, suggesting vertical mixing or advection from above. For other events, the cooling is observed first at the deepest sensors, suggesting a thin, cold water pulse that flows along the bottom and mixes more slowly upwards into the basin. In both cases, the source waters must originate from the epilimnion. Conditions during a strong ventilation year (1994a??1995) and a weak ventilation year (1996a??1997) were compared. The results suggest the major difference between these 2 years was the evolution of the stratification in the epilimnion during the first few weeks of reverse stratification such that thermobaric instabilities were easier to form during 1995 thana?#1997. Thus, the details of surface cooling and wind-driven mixing during the early stages ofa?#reverse stratification may determine the neta?#amount of ventilation possible during

  10. Vertical distribution of a deep-water moss and associated epiphytes in Crater Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McIntire, C.D.; Phinney, H.K.; Larson, Gary L.; Buktenica, M.W.

    1994-01-01

    A one-person submersible was used to examine the vertical distribution of the deep-water moss Drepanocladus aduncus (Hedw.) Warnst in Crater Lake (Oregon). Living specimens were found attached to sediment and rocks at depths between 25 m and 140 m. Dense beds of the moss were observed at depths between 30 m and 80 m, a region that corresponded roughly to the zone of maximum primary production by phytoplankton. The moss population supported a diverse assemblage of epiphytic algae, of which the most abundant genera included Cladophora,Oedogonium, Rhizoclonium, Tribonema, Vaucheria, and the diatoms Cocconeis, Cymbella, Epithemia, Fragilaria, Gomphonema, Melosira, Navicula, and Synedra. Chemical and physical data supported the hypothesis that the lower limit of distribution of the moss is determined by light limitation, whereas the upper limit is related to the availability of nutrients, particularly nitrate-nitrogen and trace elements. Deep-water videotapes of the moss population indicated that D. aduncus with its epiphytic algae was abundant enough in regions associated with the metalimnion and upper hypolimnion to have a potential influence on the nutrient dynamics of the Crater Lake ecosystem. Although the maximum depth at which living bryophytes occur in Crater Lake is similar to that found for Lake Tahoe, conditions in Lake Tahoe allow the growth and survival of a much more diverse assemblage of bryophytes and charophytes than is present in Crater Lake.

  11. High rate of schistosomiasis in travelers after a brief exposure to the high-altitude Nyinambuga crater lake, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Lachish, Tamar; Tandlich, Moshik; Grossman, Tamar; Schwartz, Eli

    2013-11-01

    Travel-related schistosomiasis is usually associated with prolonged freshwater exposure. Until recently, Uganda's crater lakes were considered schistosomiasis free due to their high-altitude location. We describe an outbreak of acute schistosomiasis after a brief exposure (mean, 22 ± 9.5 minutes) to a high-altitude crater lake.

  12. High spatio-temporal resolution observations of crater-lake temperatures at Kawah Ijen volcano, East Java, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Corentin Caudron,; Vincent van Hinsberg,; George Hilley,

    2016-01-01

    The crater lake of Kawah Ijen volcano, East Java, Indonesia, has displayed large and rapid changes in temperature at point locations during periods of unrest, but measurement techniques employed to-date have not resolved how the lake’s thermal regime has evolved over both space and time. We applied a novel approach for mapping and monitoring variations in crater-lake apparent surface (“skin”) temperatures at high spatial (~32 cm) and temporal (every two minutes) resolution at Kawah Ijen on 18 September 2014. We used a ground-based FLIR T650sc camera with digital and thermal infrared (TIR) sensors from the crater rim to collect (1) a set of visible imagery around the crater during the daytime and (2) a time series of co-located visible and TIR imagery at one location from pre-dawn to daytime. We processed daytime visible imagery with the Structure-from-Motion photogrammetric method to create a digital elevation model onto which the time series of TIR imagery was orthorectified and georeferenced. Lake apparent skin temperatures typically ranged from ~21 to 33oC. At two locations, apparent skin temperatures were ~ 4 and 7 oC less than in-situ lake temperature measurements at 1.5 and 5 m depth, respectively. These differences, as well as the large spatio-temporal variations observed in skin temperatures, were likely largely associated with atmospheric effects such as evaporative cooling of the lake surface and infrared absorption by water vapor and SO2. Calculations based on orthorectified TIR imagery thus yielded underestimates of volcanic heat fluxes into the lake, whereas volcanic heat fluxes estimated based on in-situ temperature measurements (68 to 111 MW) were likely more representative of Kawah Ijen in a quiescent state. The ground-based imaging technique should provide a valuable tool to continuously monitor crater-lake temperatures and contribute insight into the spatio-temporal evolution of these temperatures associated with volcanic activity.

  13. Shifts in morphology and diet of non-native sticklebacks introduced into Japanese crater lakes

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Tatsuya; Ishikawa, Asano; Mori, Seiichi; Makino, Wataru; Kume, Manabu; Kawata, Masakado; Kitano, Jun

    2012-01-01

    An increasing number of exotic animals are causing ecological problems. Therefore, for better ecosystem management, it is important to understand how exotic species colonize and adapt to novel environments. The threespine sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) can be a good vertebrate model system to explore the ecological and genetic mechanisms of adaptation not only in natural populations, but also in non-native populations. Although morphological changes have been documented in several introduced populations of stickleback, little is known about the dietary changes during colonization into novel environments. Here, we investigated the morphological and dietary changes of exotic threespine stickleback populations introduced into three Japanese crater lakes (Lake Towada, Lake Kussharo, and Lake Shikotsu). Sticklebacks were introduced into the crater lakes likely along with salmonids transplanted for aquaculture. The stickleback population in Lake Kussharo had multiple mitochondrial haplotypes and had larger phenotypic variances than other crater lake stickleback populations that had only one mitochondrial haplotype. Compilation of historical data on the morphology and stomach contents of the Lake Towada stickleback population showed that substantial shifts in body size and stomach contents occurred after colonization. Some of these changes may be related to an outbreak of the Schistocephalus parasite. These results suggest that sticklebacks can change their morphology and trophic ecology when they colonize novel environments. Therefore, extreme care should be taken when salmonids are transported between watersheds for aquaculture and that long-term monitoring of exotic species is essential for ecosystem management. In addition, further genetic studies on phenotypic changes in crater lake sticklebacks would help elucidate the genetic mechanisms underlying the adaptation of exotic fishes to novel environments. PMID:22833786

  14. Snettisham Hydroelectric Project, Alaska second stage development, Crater lake. Final foundation report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-04

    The important geologic features and methods used to construct the Crater Lake stage of the Snettisham Hydroelectric project, built between 1985 and 1989, are discussed. The project added 31 megawatts of non-polluting, renewable electric power for Juneau, Alaska and the surrounding area. Features of the report include the power tunnel and access adits, penstock excavation, surge shaft, gate shaft and lake top. Construction aspects include the general geology, design features, construction methods, geologic conditions encountered, ground support requirements, grouting, instrumentation and tunnel filling. Foundation conditions for the Crater Lake status were excellent, permitting the power and penstock tunnel and shafts to be constructed essentially unlined. The basic rock type throughout the project is a high-quality, quartz diorite gneiss with randomly spaced, subparallel basalt dikes.... Unlined rock tunnels, Power tunnel, Penstocks, Lake tap, Surge shaft.

  15. Temporal evolution of micro-eruptions within the crater lake of White Island (Whakaari) during January/February 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Matt; Kennedy, Ben; Jolly, Art; Scheu, Bettina; Taddeucci, Jacopo; Jousset, Philippe; Schmid, Di

    2015-04-01

    Micro-eruptions are potentially modulated by hydrothermal systems and crater lakes but to date have not been well studied. In January/February 2013 White Island (Whakaari), New Zealand, experienced an about three week long period of atypical, frequent micro-eruptions within its crater lake. Many of these micro-eruptions were recorded by tour operators and GNS personnel monitoring the lake activity. Analysis of this video footage reveals an increasingly energetic eruption style. Deformation of the muddy lake surface by ascending bubbles begins as irregularly shaped bursts, producing liquid strings of mud ejected to heights of less than 10m at 10-15m/s. As the episode progresses, eruption frequency is maintained at semi-regular <10s intervals. Each eruption however starts with an increasingly hemispheric surface deformation ~6m in diameter, and bursts occur as "star-bursts" with ejection of less fluidal ash/mud clots. In addition, these bursts are commonly followed within 2s by a more vertical and energetic secondary ejection of material, which occasionally ejects through the deformed hemispheric surface up to >100m high, and reaches ejection velocities up to 45m/s. The period of frequent "star-bursts" is then followed by a two day phase of constant ~30-75m high ash ejection resulting in the formation of a tuff cone with a central open conduit of 6m within the former crater lake. We theorise that this behaviour is influenced by evolving bubble overpressure/volume, including the presence or absence of a trailing wake of smaller bubbles and is modulated over the eruption episode by the viscosity of the crater lake. In the early stages of the episode a lower viscosity lake provides little resistance to rising gas/ash mixtures. Bubble coalescence and/or overpressure development is therefore minimised, resulting in low energy bursts. Over the course of this episode the viscosity of the lake increases due to addition of ash from ash-carrying gas flux and fluid loss by

  16. Sequence and relative timing of large lakes in Gale crater (Mars) after the formation of Mount Sharp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palucis, Marisa C.; Dietrich, William E.; Williams, Rebecca M. E.; Hayes, Alexander G.; Parker, Tim; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Mangold, Nicolas; Lewis, Kevin; Newsom, Horton

    2016-03-01

    The quantification of lake levels in Gale crater is important to define the hydrologic and climatic history experienced by the sedimentary deposits found by Curiosity. We propose that there were at least three major lake stands within Gale, each persisted >1000 years, and all occurred after Mount Sharp reached close to its current topographic form. Deltaic deposits off the southern rim of Gale, derived from incision of Farah Vallis, and corresponding deposits off the southern flank of Mount Sharp define the highest lake level, which had a mean depth of 700 m. Canyons similar in form to Farah Vallis enter into craters and/or the crustal dichotomy near Gale from the south, suggesting that the highest lake was supplied by a large-scale flow system. The next lake level, established after a period of drying and rewetting, is defined by four deltaic features, three sourced from Mount Sharp and one from the western rim of Gale, as well as the termination of gullies around the northern rim of Gale. This second lake level had a mean depth of 300 m. The presence of the gullies suggests more locally sourced water. Lake levels then rose another 100 m, as evidenced by two deltaic deposits derived from the rim of Gale and the termination of a second set of gullies. Post-lake, reduced hydrologic activity continued, evidenced by a time of fan building (including Peace Vallis). The sequence of events suggests an episodic shift through time from relatively wet regional conditions to a drier environment with local runoff.

  17. Phylogeography, colonization and population history of the Midas cichlid species complex (Amphilophus spp.) in the Nicaraguan crater lakes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Elucidation of the mechanisms driving speciation requires detailed knowledge about the phylogenetic relationships and phylogeography of the incipient species within their entire ranges as well as their colonization history. The Midas cichlid species complex Amphilophus spp. has been proven to be a powerful model system for the study of ecological specialization, sexual selection and the mechanisms of sympatric speciation. Here we present a comprehensive and integrative phylogeographic analysis of the complete Midas Cichlid species complex in Nicaragua (> 2000 individuals) covering the entire distributional range, using two types of molecular markers (the mitochondrial DNA control region and 15 microsatellites). We investigated the majority of known lake populations of this species complex and reconstructed their colonization history in order to distinguish between alternative speciation scenarios. Results We found that the large lakes contain older and more diverse Midas Cichlid populations, while all crater lakes hold younger and genetically less variable species assemblages. The large lakes appear to have repeatedly acted as source populations for all crater lakes, and our data indicate that faunal exchange among crater lakes is extremely unlikely. Despite their very recent (often only a few thousand years old) and common origin from the two large Nicaraguan lakes, all crater lake Midas Cichlid radiations underwent independent, but parallel, evolution, and comprise distinct genetic units. Indeed several of these crater lakes contain multiple genetically distinct incipient species that most likely arose through sympatric speciation. Several crater lake radiations can be traced back to a single ancestral line, but some appear to have more than one founding lineage. The timing of the colonization(s) of each crater lake differs, although most of them occurred more (probably much more) recently than 20,000 years ago. Conclusion The genetic differentiation

  18. Slope activity in Gale crater, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dundas, Colin M.; McEwen, Alfred S.

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution repeat imaging of Aeolis Mons, the central mound in Gale crater, reveals active slope processes within tens of kilometers of the Curiosity rover. At one location near the base of northeastern Aeolis Mons, dozens of transient narrow lineae were observed, resembling features (Recurring Slope Lineae) that are potentially due to liquid water. However, the lineae faded and have not recurred in subsequent Mars years. Other small-scale slope activity is common, but has different spatial and temporal characteristics. We have not identified confirmed RSL, which Rummel et al. (Rummel, J.D. et al. [2014]. Astrobiology 14, 887–968) recommended be treated as potential special regions for planetary protection. Repeat images acquired as Curiosity approaches the base of Aeolis Mons could detect changes due to active slope processes, which could enable the rover to examine recently exposed material.

  19. Groundwater transport of crater-lake brine at Poas Volcano, Costa Rica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanford, W.E.; Konikow, L.F.; Rowe, G.L.; Brantley, S.L.

    1995-01-01

    This study analyzes the regional groundwater system at Poas and demonstrates the likelihood that the water discharging from the acidic springs in the Rio Agrio watershed originates at the acidic crater lake. Both heat and solute transport are analyzed on a regional scale through numerical simulations using the HST3D finite-difference model, which solves the coupled equations for fluid flow, heat transport, and solute transport. The code allows fluid viscosity and density to be functions of both temperature and solute concentration. The simulations use estimates for recharge to the mountain and a range of values and various distributions of permeability and porosity. Several sensitivity analyses are performed to test how the uncertainty in many of the model parameters affects the simulation results. These uncertainties yield an estimated range of travel times from the crater lake to the Rio Agrio springs of 1-30 yr, which is in close agreement with the results of tritium analyses of the springs. Calculated groundwater fluxes into and out of the crater lake are both about several hundred kg/s. These fluxes must be accounted for in water budgets of the crater lake. -from Authors

  20. Local variation and parallel evolution: morphological and genetic diversity across a species complex of neotropical crater lake cichlid fishes

    PubMed Central

    Elmer, Kathryn R.; Kusche, Henrik; Lehtonen, Topi K.; Meyer, Axel

    2010-01-01

    The polychromatic and trophically polymorphic Midas cichlid fish species complex (Amphilophus cf. citrinellus) is an excellent model system for studying the mechanisms of speciation and patterns of phenotypic diversification in allopatry and in sympatry. Here, we first review research to date on the species complex and the geological history of its habitat. We analyse body shape variation from all currently described species in the complex, sampled from six crater lakes (maximally 1.2–23.9 kyr old) and both great lakes in Nicaragua. We find that Midas cichlid populations in each lake have their own characteristic body shape. In lakes with multiple sympatric species of Midas cichlid, each species has a distinct body shape. Across the species complex, most body shape change relates to body depth, head, snout and mouth shape and caudal peduncle length. There is independent parallel evolution of an elongate limnetic species in at least two crater lakes. Mitochondrial genetic diversity is higher in crater lakes with multiple species. Midas cichlid species richness increases with the size and age of the crater lakes, though no such relationship exists for the other syntopic fishes. We suggest that crater lake Midas cichlids follow the predicted pattern of an adaptive radiation, with early divergence of each crater lake colonization, followed by intralacustrine diversification and speciation by ecological adaptation and sexual selection. PMID:20439280

  1. Incipient speciation in sympatric Nicaraguan crater lake cichlid fishes: sexual selection versus ecological diversification.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, A B; Noack-Kunnmann, K; Meyer, A

    2000-01-01

    The growing body of empirical evidence for sympatric speciation has been complemented by recent theoretical treatments that have identified evolutionary conditions conducive to speciation in sympatry. The Neotropical Midas cichlid (Amphilophus citrinellum) fits both of the key characteristics of these models, with strong assortative mating on the basis of a colour polymorphism coupled with trophic and ecological differentiation derived from a polymorphism in their pharyngeal jaws. We used microsatellite markers and a 480 bp fragment of the mitochondrial DNA control region to study four polymorphic populations of the Midas cichlid from three crater lakes and one large lake in Nicaragua in an investigation of incipient sympatric speciation. All populations were strongly genetically differentiated on the basis of geography. We identified strong genetic separation based on colour polymorphism for populations from Lake Nicaragua and one crater lake (Lake Apoyo), but failed to find significant genetic structuring based on trophic differences and ecological niche separation in any of the four populations studied. These data support the idea that sexual selection through assortative mating contributes more strongly or earlier during speciation in sympatry than ecological separation in these cichlids. The long-term persistence of divergent cichlid ecotypes (as measured by the percentage sequence divergence between populations) in Central American crater lakes, despite a lack of fixed genetic differentiation, differs strikingly from the patterns of extremely rapid speciation in the cichlids in Africa, including its crater lakes. It is unclear whether extrinsic environmental factors or intrinsic biological differences, e.g. in the degree of phenotypic plasticity, promote different mechanisms and thereby rates of speciation of cichlid fishes from the Old and New Worlds. PMID:11413624

  2. Measurements of spectral optical properties and their relation to biogeochemical variables and processes in Crater Lake, Crater Lake National Park, OR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boss, E.S.; Collier, R.; Larson, G.; Fennel, K.; Pegau, W.S.

    2007-01-01

    Spectral inherent optical properties (IOPs) have been measured at Crater Lake, OR, an extremely clear sub-alpine lake. Indeed Pure water IOPs are major contributors to the total IOPs, and thus to the color of the lake. Variations in the spatial distribution of IOPs were observed in June and September 2001, and reflect biogeochemical processes in the lake. Absorption by colored dissolved organic material increases with depth and between June and September in the upper 300 m. This pattern is consistent with a net release of dissolved organic materials from primary and secondary production through the summer and its photo-oxidation near the surface. Waters fed by a tributary near the lake's rim exhibited low levels of absorption by dissolved organic materials. Scattering is mostly dominated by organic particulate material, though inorganic material is found to enter the lake from the rim following a rain storm. Several similarities to oceanic oligotrophic regions are observed: (a) The Beam attenuation correlates well with particulate organic material (POM) and the relationship is similar to that observed in the open ocean. (b) The specific absorption of colored dissolved organic material has a value similar to that of open ocean humic material. (c) The distribution of chlorophyll with depth does not follow the distribution of particulate organic material due to photo-acclimation resulting in a subsurface pigment maximum located about 50 m below the POM maximum. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  3. The 2005 catastrophic acid crater lake drainage, lahar, and acidic aerosol formation at Mount Chiginagak volcano, Alaska, USA: Field observations and preliminary water and vegetation chemistry results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Janet R.; Scott, William E.; Evans, William C.; Jorgenson, Janet; McGimsey, Robert G.; Wang, Bronwen

    2008-07-01

    crater lake has important implications for the study of hazards associated with active volcanic crater lakes.

  4. The 2005 catastrophic acid crater lake drainage, lahar, and acidic aerosol formation at Mount Chiginagak volcano, Alaska, USA: Field observations and preliminary water and vegetation chemistry results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaefer, J.R.; Scott, W.E.; Evans, William C.; Jorgenson, J.; McGimsey, R.G.; Wang, B.

    2008-01-01

    lake has important implications for the study of hazards associated with active volcanic crater lakes. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Crater lake cichlids individually specialize along the benthic–limnetic axis

    PubMed Central

    Kusche, Henrik; Recknagel, Hans; Elmer, Kathryn Rebecca; Meyer, Axel

    2014-01-01

    A common pattern of adaptive diversification in freshwater fishes is the repeated evolution of elongated open water (limnetic) species and high-bodied shore (benthic) species from generalist ancestors. Studies on phenotype-diet correlations have suggested that population-wide individual specialization occurs at an early evolutionary and ecological stage of divergence and niche partitioning. This variable restricted niche use across individuals can provide the raw material for earliest stages of sympatric divergence. We investigated variation in morphology and diet as well as their correlations along the benthic-limnetic axis in an extremely young Midas cichlid species, Amphilophus tolteca, endemic to the Nicaraguan crater lake Asososca Managua. We found that A. tolteca varied continuously in ecologically relevant traits such as body shape and lower pharyngeal jaw morphology. The correlation of these phenotypes with niche suggested that individuals are specialized along the benthic-limnetic axis. No genetic differentiation within the crater lake was detected based on genotypes from 13 microsatellite loci. Overall, we found that individual specialization in this young crater lake species encompasses the limnetic-as well as the benthic macro-habitat. Yet there is no evidence for any diversification within the species, making this a candidate system for studying what might be the early stages preceding sympatric divergence. A common pattern of adaptive diversification in freshwater fishes is the repeated evolution of open water (limnetic) species and of shore (benthic) species. Individual specialization can reflect earliest stages of evolutionary and ecological divergence. We here demonstrate individual specialization along the benthic–limnetic axis in a young adaptive radiation of crater lake cichlid fishes. PMID:24772288

  6. The Ice-Covered Lakes Hypothesis in Gale Crater: Implications for the Early Hesperian Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kling, Alexandre M.; Haberle, Robert M.; McKay, Christopher P.; Bristow, Thomas F.; Rivera-Hernandez, Frances

    2017-01-01

    Recent geological discoveries from the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), including stream and lake sedimentary deposits, provide evidence that Gale crater may have intermittently hosted a fluviol-acustine environment during the Hesperian, with individual lakes lasting for a period of tens to hundreds of thousands of years. Estimates of the CO2 content of the atmosphere at the time the Gale sediments formed are far less than needed by any climate model to warm early Mars, given the low solar energy input available at Mars 3.5 Gya. We have therefore explored the possibility that the lakes in Gale during the Hesperian were perennially covered with ice using the Antarctic lakes as analogs.

  7. Crater Lake Apoyo Revisited - Population Genetics of an Emerging Species Flock

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, Matthias F.; McCrary, Jeffrey K.; Schliewen, Ulrich K.

    2013-01-01

    The polytypic Nicaraguan Midas cichlids (Amphilophus cf. citrinellus) have been established as a model system for studying the mechanisms of speciation and patterns of diversification in allopatry and sympatry. The species assemblage in Crater Lake Apoyo has been accepted as a textbook example for sympatric speciation. Here, we present a first comprehensive data set of population genetic (mtDNA & AFLPs) proxies of species level differentiation for a representative set of individuals of all six endemic Amphilophus species occurring in Crater Lake Apoyo. AFLP genetic differentiation was partitioned into a neutral and non-neutral component based on outlier-loci detection approaches, and patterns of species divergence were explored with Bayesian clustering methods. Substantial levels of admixture between species were detected, indicating different levels of reproductive isolation between the six species. Analysis of neutral genetic variation revealed several A. zaliosus as being introgressed by an unknown contributor, hereby rendering the sympatrically evolving L. Apoyo flock polyphyletic. This is contrasted by the mtDNA analysis delivering a clear monophyly signal with Crater Lake Apoyo private haplotypes characterising all six described species, but also demonstrating different demographic histories as inferred from pairwise mismatch distributions. PMID:24086393

  8. Geochemistry, mineralogy, and chemical modeling of the acid crater lake of Kawah Ijen Volcano, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmelle, Pierre; Bernard, Alain

    1994-06-01

    The Kawah Ijen volcano—with a record of phreatic eruptions—has its 1000 m wide crater filled with a lake that has existed for at least one century. At present, the lake waters are hot ( T ≈ 37° C), strongly mineralized (TDS = 105 g/L) and extremely acidic ( pH ≈ 0.4). By its volume, the Javanese lake is probably the largest accumulation in the world of such acidic waters. Mineralogy of the suspended solids within the lake waters suggests that concentrations of Si, Ca, Ti, and Ba are controlled by precipitation of silica, gypsum, anatase, and barite. Lake sediment is composed of chemical precipitates with composition similar to the suspended solids. Thermodynamic calculations predict that the lake waters have reached equilibrium with respect to α-cristobalite, barite, gypsum, anglesite, celestite, and amorphous silica, in agreement with the analytical observations. Significant concentrations of ferric iron suggest that the current lake waters are fairly oxidized. Sulfides are absent in the water column but are always present in the native S spherules that form porous aggregates which float on the lake. The presence of native S provides direct evidence of more reduced conditions at the lake floor where H 2S is probably being injected into the lake. With progressive addition of H 2S to the acid waters, native S, pyrite, and enargite are theoretically predicted to be saturated. Reactions between upward streaming H 2S-bearing gases discharged by subaqueous fumaroles, and metals dissolved in the acidic waters could initiate precipitation of these sulfides. A model of direct absorption of hot magmatic gases into cool water accounts for the extreme acidity of the crater lake. Results show that strongly acidic, sulfate-rich solutions are formed under oxidizing conditions at high gas/water ratios. Reactions between the acidic fluids and the Ijen andesite were modeled to account for elevated cation concentrations in lake water. Current concentrations of conservative

  9. Exploration of Microbial Diversity and Community Structure of Lonar Lake: The Only Hypersaline Meteorite Crater Lake within Basalt Rock

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Dhiraj; Kumbhare, Shreyas V.; Mhatre, Snehit S.; Chowdhury, Somak P.; Shetty, Sudarshan A.; Marathe, Nachiket P.; Bhute, Shrikant; Shouche, Yogesh S.

    2016-01-01

    Lonar Lake is a hypersaline and hyperalkaline soda lake and the only meteorite impact crater in the world situated in basalt rocks. Although culture-dependent studies have been reported, a comprehensive understanding of microbial community composition and structure in Lonar Lake remains elusive. In the present study, microbial community structure associated with Lonar Lake sediment and water samples was investigated using high-throughput sequencing. Microbial diversity analysis revealed the existence of diverse, yet largely consistent communities. Proteobacteria (30%), Actinobacteria (24%), Firmicutes (11%), and Cyanobacteria (5%) predominated in the sequencing survey, whereas Bacteroidetes (1.12%), BD1-5 (0.5%), Nitrospirae (0.41%), and Verrucomicrobia (0.28%) were detected in relatively minor abundances in the Lonar Lake ecosystem. Within the Proteobacteria phylum, the Gammaproteobacteria represented the most abundantly detected class (21–47%) within sediment samples, but only a minor population in the water samples. Proteobacteria and Firmicutes were found at significantly higher abundance (p ≥ 0.05) in sediment samples, whereas members of Actinobacteria, Candidate division TM7 and Cyanobacteria (p ≥ 0.05) were significantly abundant in water samples. Compared to the microbial communities of other hypersaline soda lakes, those of Lonar Lake formed a distinct cluster, suggesting a different microbial community composition and structure. Here we report for the first time, the difference in composition of indigenous microbial communities between the sediment and water samples of Lonar Lake. An improved census of microbial community structure in this Lake ecosystem provides a foundation for exploring microbial biogeochemical cycling and microbial function in hypersaline lake environments. PMID:26834712

  10. Exploration of Microbial Diversity and Community Structure of Lonar Lake: The Only Hypersaline Meteorite Crater Lake within Basalt Rock.

    PubMed

    Paul, Dhiraj; Kumbhare, Shreyas V; Mhatre, Snehit S; Chowdhury, Somak P; Shetty, Sudarshan A; Marathe, Nachiket P; Bhute, Shrikant; Shouche, Yogesh S

    2015-01-01

    Lonar Lake is a hypersaline and hyperalkaline soda lake and the only meteorite impact crater in the world situated in basalt rocks. Although culture-dependent studies have been reported, a comprehensive understanding of microbial community composition and structure in Lonar Lake remains elusive. In the present study, microbial community structure associated with Lonar Lake sediment and water samples was investigated using high-throughput sequencing. Microbial diversity analysis revealed the existence of diverse, yet largely consistent communities. Proteobacteria (30%), Actinobacteria (24%), Firmicutes (11%), and Cyanobacteria (5%) predominated in the sequencing survey, whereas Bacteroidetes (1.12%), BD1-5 (0.5%), Nitrospirae (0.41%), and Verrucomicrobia (0.28%) were detected in relatively minor abundances in the Lonar Lake ecosystem. Within the Proteobacteria phylum, the Gammaproteobacteria represented the most abundantly detected class (21-47%) within sediment samples, but only a minor population in the water samples. Proteobacteria and Firmicutes were found at significantly higher abundance (p ≥ 0.05) in sediment samples, whereas members of Actinobacteria, Candidate division TM7 and Cyanobacteria (p ≥ 0.05) were significantly abundant in water samples. Compared to the microbial communities of other hypersaline soda lakes, those of Lonar Lake formed a distinct cluster, suggesting a different microbial community composition and structure. Here we report for the first time, the difference in composition of indigenous microbial communities between the sediment and water samples of Lonar Lake. An improved census of microbial community structure in this Lake ecosystem provides a foundation for exploring microbial biogeochemical cycling and microbial function in hypersaline lake environments.

  11. Microbial Diversity and Cyanobacterial Production in Dziani Dzaha Crater Lake, a Unique Tropical Thalassohaline Environment

    PubMed Central

    Carré, Claire; Cellamare, Maria; Duval, Charlotte; Intertaglia, Laurent; Lavergne, Céline; Roques, Cécile

    2017-01-01

    This study describes, for the first time, the water chemistry and microbial diversity in Dziani Dzaha, a tropical crater lake located on Mayotte Island (Comoros archipelago, Western Indian Ocean). The lake water had a high level of dissolved matter and high alkalinity (10.6–14.5 g L-1 eq. CO32-, i.e. 160–220 mM compare to around 2–2.5 in seawater), with salinity up to 52 psu, 1.5 higher than seawater. Hierarchical clustering discriminated Dziani Dzaha water from other alkaline, saline lakes, highlighting its thalassohaline nature. The phytoplankton biomass was very high, with a total chlorophyll a concentration of 524 to 875 μg chl a L-1 depending on the survey, homogeneously distributed from surface to bottom (4 m). Throughout the whole water column the photosynthetic biomass was dominated (>97% of total biovolume) by the filamentous cyanobacteria Arthrospira sp. with a straight morphotype. In situ daily photosynthetic oxygen production ranged from 17.3 to 22.2 g O2 m-2 d-1, consistent with experimental production / irradiance measurements and modeling. Heterotrophic bacterioplankton was extremely abundant, with cell densities up to 1.5 108 cells mL-1 in the whole water column. Isolation and culture of 59 Eubacteria strains revealed the prevalence of alkaliphilic and halophilic organisms together with taxa unknown to date, based on 16S rRNA gene analysis. A single cloning-sequencing approach using archaeal 16S rDNA gene primers unveiled the presence of diverse extremophilic Euryarchaeota. The water chemistry of Dziani Dzaha Lake supports the hypothesis that it was derived from seawater and strongly modified by geological conditions and microbial activities that increased the alkalinity. Dziani Dzaha has a unique consortium of cyanobacteria, phytoplankton, heterotrophic Eubacteria and Archaea, with very few unicellular protozoa, that will deserve further deep analysis to unravel its uncommon diversity. A single taxon, belonging to the genus Arthrospira, was

  12. Small changes in climate can profoundly alter the dynamics and ecosystem services of tropical crater lakes.

    PubMed

    Saulnier-Talbot, Émilie; Gregory-Eaves, Irene; Simpson, Kyle G; Efitre, Jackson; Nowlan, Tobias E; Taranu, Zofia E; Chapman, Lauren J

    2014-01-01

    African tropical lakes provide vital ecosystem services including food and water to some of the fastest growing human populations, yet they are among the most understudied ecosystems in the world. The consequences of climate change and other stressors on the tropical lakes of Africa have been informed by long-term analyses, but these studies have largely focused on the massive Great Rift Valley lakes. Our objective was to evaluate how recent climate change has altered the functioning and services of smaller tropical lakes, which are far more abundant on the landscape. Based on a paired analysis of 20 years of high-resolution water column data and a paleolimnological record from a small crater lake in western Uganda, we present evidence that even a modest warming of the air (∼0.9°C increase over 20 years) and changes in the timing and intensity of rainfall can have significant consequences on the dynamics of this common tropical lake type. For example, we observed a significant nonlinear increase (R(2) adj  = 0.23, e.d.f. = 7, p<0.0001) in thermal stability over the past 20 years. This resulted in the expansion of anoxic waters and consequent deterioration of fish habitat and appears to have abated primary production; processes that may impair ecosystem services for a vulnerable human population. This study on a system representative of small tropical crater lakes highlights the far-reaching effects of global climatic change on tropical waters. Increased research efforts into tropical aquatic ecosystem health and the development of sound management practices are necessary in order to strengthen adaptive capabilities in tropical regions.

  13. Small Changes in Climate Can Profoundly Alter the Dynamics and Ecosystem Services of Tropical Crater Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Saulnier-Talbot, Émilie; Gregory-Eaves, Irene; Simpson, Kyle G.; Efitre, Jackson; Nowlan, Tobias E.; Taranu, Zofia E.; Chapman, Lauren J.

    2014-01-01

    African tropical lakes provide vital ecosystem services including food and water to some of the fastest growing human populations, yet they are among the most understudied ecosystems in the world. The consequences of climate change and other stressors on the tropical lakes of Africa have been informed by long-term analyses, but these studies have largely focused on the massive Great Rift Valley lakes. Our objective was to evaluate how recent climate change has altered the functioning and services of smaller tropical lakes, which are far more abundant on the landscape. Based on a paired analysis of 20 years of high-resolution water column data and a paleolimnological record from a small crater lake in western Uganda, we present evidence that even a modest warming of the air (∼0.9°C increase over 20 years) and changes in the timing and intensity of rainfall can have significant consequences on the dynamics of this common tropical lake type. For example, we observed a significant nonlinear increase (R2adj = 0.23, e.d.f. = 7, p<0.0001) in thermal stability over the past 20 years. This resulted in the expansion of anoxic waters and consequent deterioration of fish habitat and appears to have abated primary production; processes that may impair ecosystem services for a vulnerable human population. This study on a system representative of small tropical crater lakes highlights the far-reaching effects of global climatic change on tropical waters. Increased research efforts into tropical aquatic ecosystem health and the development of sound management practices are necessary in order to strengthen adaptive capabilities in tropical regions. PMID:24497954

  14. The enigmatic Zerelia twin-lakes (Thessaly, Central Greece): two potential meteorite impact Craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, V. J.; Lagios, E.; Reusser, E.; Sakkas, V.; Gartzos, E.; Kyriakopoulos, K.

    2013-09-01

    Two circular permanent lakes of 150 and 250 m diameter and 6-8 m depth to an unconsolidated muddy bottom occur 250 m apart from each other in the agricultural fields SW of the town of Almiros (Thessaly, central Greece). The age of the lakes is assumed to be Late Pliocene to Early Holocene with a minimum age of approx. 7000 yr BP. The abundant polymict, quartz-rich carbonate breccia and clasts with a clay rich matrix in the shallow embankments of the lakes show weak stratification but no volcanic structures. The carbonate clasts and particles often display spheroidal shapes and consist of calcite aggregates with feathery, arborescent, variolitic to micro-sparitic textures and spheroidal fabrics, recrystallized and deformed glass-shaped fragments, calcite globules in quartz; thus indications of possible carbonate melting, quenching and devitrification. The carbonatic matrix includes small xenomorphic phases, such as chromspinel, zircon with blurred granular and skeletal textures, skeletal rutile and ilmenite, which are interpreted as relicts of partial melting and quenching under high temperatures of 1240-1800 °C. Only a few quartz fragments exhibit indistinct planar fractures. In several cases they include exotic Al-Si- and sulfur bearing Fe-phases, < 1-10 μm as globules. The modeled "Residual Gravity" profiles through the lakes indicate negative gravity anomalies of bowl-type structures down to 150 m for the eastern lake and down to 250 m for the larger western lake. Several hypotheses can be drawn upon to explain the origin of these enigmatic twin-lakes: (a) Maar-type volcanic craters; (b) hydrothermal or CO2/hydrocarbon gas explosion craters; (c) and (d) doline holes due to karstification; or (e) small meteorite impact craters, the latter being a plausible explanation due to geologic, petrologic, and geophysical evidence. The morphology and dimensions of the lakes as well as the density contrast tomography of the bedrock favor a meteorite impact hypothesis of a

  15. Sulfur speciation with high performance liquid chromatography as a tool for El Chichón volcano, crater lake monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas, Ana Silvia; Armienta, María Aurora; Ramos, Silvia

    2016-12-01

    The monitoring of sulfur species in crater lakes has proven to be useful for forecasting episodes of volcanic unrest in certain active volcanoes, including Poás, Costa Rica; Kusatsu-Shirane, Japan; and Mt. Ruapehu, New Zealand. In this study, we have improved the current geochemical monitoring of El Chichón volcano through the setting of optimal high-performance liquid chromatography conditions (HPLC) for the analysis of S2-, SO32-, S2O32-, S4O62- and SO42- using a common chromatographic system. The procedure was applied to the analysis of lake samples taken in March, July and October of 2014 and April of 2015. The results were promising, since nearly all species were detected (with the exception of S2O32-) in measurable amounts, including S2- (<0.85-5.05 mg/L), SO32- (<2.77-26.1 mg/L), S4O62- (108.27-303.82 mg/L) and SO42- (489.58-676.26 mg/L). The spatial distribution of these species along the lakeshore showed zones of increased concentrations to the east and southeast of the lake, which provides information on the distribution of faults or cracks that feed hydrothermal fluids to the lake. This method thus provides additional information linked to the volcanic and hydrothermal activity of the volcano.

  16. Expressions of climate perturbations in western Ugandan crater lake sediment records during the last 1000 yr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, K.; Ryves, D. B.; Anderson, N. J.; Bryant, C. L.; Tyler, J. J.

    2013-09-01

    Equatorial East Africa has a complex, regional patchwork of climate regimes, with multiple interacting drivers. Recent studies have focussed on large lakes and reveal signals that are smoothed in both space and time, and, whilst useful at a continental scale, are of less relevance when understanding short-term, abrupt or immediate impacts of climate and environmental changes. Smaller-scale studies have highlighted spatial complexity and regional heterogeneity of tropical palaeoenvironments in terms of responses to climatic forcing (e.g. the Little Ice Age [LIA]) and questions remain over the spatial extent and synchroneity of climatic changes seen in East African records. Sediment cores from paired crater lakes in western Uganda were examined to assess ecosystem response to long-term climate and environmental change as well as testing responses to multiple drivers using redundancy analysis. These archives provide annual to sub-decadal records of environmental change. The records from the two lakes demonstrate an individualistic response to external (e.g. climatic) drivers, however, some of the broader patterns observed across East Africa suggest that the lakes are indeed sensitive to climatic perturbations such as a dry Mediaeval Climate Anomaly (MCA; 1000-1200 AD) and a relatively drier climate during the main phase of the LIA (1500-1800 AD); though lake levels in western Uganda do fluctuate. The relationship of Ugandan lakes to regional climate drivers breaks down c. 1800 AD, when major changes in the ecosystems appear to be a response to sediment and nutrient influxes as a result of increasing cultural impacts within the lake catchments. The data highlight the complexity of individual lake response to climate forcing, indicating shifting drivers through time. This research also highlights the importance of using multi-lake studies within a landscape to allow for rigorous testing of climate reconstructions, forcing and ecosystem response.

  17. Expressions of climate perturbations in western Ugandan crater lake sediment records during the last 1000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, K.; Ryves, D. B.; Anderson, N. J.; Bryant, C. L.; Tyler, J. J.

    2014-08-01

    Equatorial East Africa has a complex regional patchwork of climate regimes, sensitive to climate fluctuations over a variety of temporal and spatial scales during the late Holocene. Understanding how these changes are recorded in and interpreted from biological and geochemical proxies in lake sedimentary records remains a key challenge to answering fundamental questions regarding the nature, spatial extent and synchroneity of climatic changes seen in East African palaeo-records. Using a paired lake approach, where neighbouring lakes share the same geology, climate and landscape, it might be expected that the systems will respond similarly to external climate forcing. Sediment cores from two crater lakes in western Uganda spanning the last ~1000 years were examined to assess diatom community responses to late Holocene climate and environmental changes, and to test responses to multiple drivers using redundancy analysis (RDA). These archives provide annual to sub-decadal records of environmental change. Lakes Nyamogusingiri and Kyasanduka appear to operate as independent systems in their recording of a similar hydrological response signal via distinct diatom records. However, whilst their fossil diatom records demonstrate an individualistic, indirect response to external (e.g. climatic) drivers, the inferred lake levels show similar overall trends and reflect the broader patterns observed in Uganda and across East Africa. The lakes appear to be sensitive to large-scale climatic perturbations, with evidence of a dry Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA; ca. AD 1000-1200). The diatom record from Lake Nyamogusingiri suggests a drying climate during the main phase of the Little Ice Age (LIA) (ca. AD 1600-1800), whereas the diatom response from the shallower Lake Kyasanduka is more complex (with groundwater likely playing a key role), and may be driven more by changes in silica and other nutrients, rather than by lake level. The sensitivity of these two Ugandan lakes to regional

  18. Cruise report R/V Surf Surveyor cruise S1-00-CL, mapping the bathymetry of Crater Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, James V.; Mayer, Larry A.; Buktenica, Mark W.

    2000-01-01

    During the Spring of 1999, the US Geological Survey (USGS) Pacific Seafloor Mapping Project (PSMP) was contacted by the US National Park Service Crater Lake National Park (CLNP) to inquire about the plausibility of producing a high-resolution multibeam bathymetric map of Crater Lake. The purpose was to generate a much higher-resolution and more geographically accurate bathymetric map than was produced in 1959, the last time the lake had been surveyed. Scientific interest in various aspects of Crater Lake (aquatic biology, geochemistry, volcanic processes, etc.) has increased during the past decade but the basemap of bathymetry was woefully inadequate. Funds were gathered during the early part of 2000 and the mapping began in late July, 2000. Crater Lake (see fig. 1 in report) is located in south central Oregon (see fig. 2 in report) within the Cascades Range, a chain of volcanoes that stretches from northern California to southern British Columbia. Crater Lake is the collapsed caldera of Mt. Mazama from a climatic eruption about 7700-yr ago (Nelson et al., 1988; Bacon and Lanphere, 1990; Bacon et al., 1997). The floor of Crater Lake has only been mapped three times since the lake was first stumbled upon by gold prospectors in the 1853. The first survey was carried by out by William G. Steel during a joint USGS-US Army expedition under the direction of Maj. Clarence E. Dutton in 1886 (Dutton, 1889). Steel�s mapping survey collected 186 soundings using a Millers lead-line sounding machine (see fig.3 in report). The resulting map (see fig.4 in report) shows only soundings and no attempts were made to generate contours. The second survey, conducted in 1959 by the US Coast and Geodetic Survey, mapped the bathymetry of Crater Lake with an acoustic echo sounder using radar navigation and collected 4000 soundings. The data were contoured by Williams (1961) and Byrne (1962) and the result is a fairly detailed map of the large-scale features of Crater Lake (see fig. 5

  19. Introduced Predator Elicits Deficient Brood Defence Behaviour in a Crater Lake Fish

    PubMed Central

    Lehtonen, Topi K.; McCrary, Jeffrey K.; Meyer, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Introduced species represent one of the most serious global threats to biodiversity. In this field-based study, we assessed behavioural responses of brood tending cichlid fish to an invasive predator of their offspring. This was achieved by comparing parental defence responses of the endangered arrow cichlid (Amphilophus zaliosus), a fish species endemic to the crater lake Apoyo in Nicaragua, towards the bigmouth sleeper (Gobiomorus dormitor), a formidable predator of cichlid fry, and all other potential fish predators of offspring. The bigmouth sleeper was recently introduced into Apoyo but naturally co-exists with cichlids in a few other Nicaraguan lakes. Arrow cichlid parents allowed bigmouth sleepers to advance much closer to their fry than other predators before initiating aggressive brood defence behaviours. Interestingly, parents of a very closely related species, A. sagittae, which has coevolved with bigmouth sleepers in crater lake Xiloá, reacted to approaching bigmouth sleepers at comparable distances as to other predators of cichlid fry. These results provide a novel demonstration of the specific mechanism (i.e. naive parental behaviour) by which invasive predators may negatively affect species that lack the adequate behavioural repertoire. PMID:22253881

  20. Nitrincola nitratireducens sp. nov. isolated from a haloalkaline crater lake.

    PubMed

    Singh, Aditya; Vaidya, Bhumika; Tanuku, Naga Radha Srinivas; Pinnaka, Anil Kumar

    2015-12-01

    The novel, cream coloured, Gram-negative-staining, rod-shaped, motile bacteria, designated strains AK23(T) and AK28, were isolated from sediment samples collected from Lonar Lake, Buldhana district, India. The predominant fatty acids were C18:1ω7c, C16:0, C10:0 3OH and C16:1ω7c and/or iso-C15:0 2OH (summed feature 3). Polar lipid content of strains AK23(T) and AK28 were found to be phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphotidylserine (PS), one unidentified phospholipid (PL) and two unidentified lipids (L1 and L2). The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated strains AK23(T) and AK28 as the members of the genus Nitrincola and closely related to the type strain Nitrincola lacisaponensis with pair-wise sequence similarity of 97.67% and 97.62% respectively. DNA-DNA hybridization between strain AK23(T) and AK28 showed a relatedness of 91%. Genome of strains AK23(T) and N. lacisaponensis DSM 16316(T) were sequenced. A comparative genomics approach was used to study strains AK23(T), N. lacisaponensis DSM 16316(T) and five other phylogenetic neighbours. The genome size of N. lacisaponensis DSM 16316(T) was found to be 614,784bp smaller than that of the strain AK23(T). This variation could be due to multiple reasons, gene uptake, evolution, mutation, genome reduction phenomenon and draft nature of sequencing. Based on data from the current polyphasic study, strains AK23(T) and AK28 are proposed as novel species of the genus Nitrincola, for which the name Nitrincola nitratireducens sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of N. nitratireducens is AK23(T) (=JCM 18788(T)=MTCC 11628(T)).

  1. Temporal variation of phytoplankton in a small tropical crater lake, Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Umaña-Villalobos, Gerardo

    2010-12-01

    The temporal variation in lake's phytoplankton is important to understand its general biodiversity. For tropical lakes, it has been hypothesized that they follow a similar pattern as temperate ones, on a much accelerated pace; nevertheless, few case studies have tried to elucidate this. Most studies in Costa Rica have used a monthly sampling scheme and failed in showing the expected changes. In this study, the phytoplankton of the small Barvas's crater lake was followed for more than three years, first with monthly and later with weekly samplings, that covered almost two years. Additional information on temperature and oxygen vertical profiles was obtained on a monthly basis, and surface temperature was measured during weekly samplings around noon. Results showed that in spite of its shallow condition (max. depth: 7m) and low surface temperature (11 to 19 degrees C), the lake stratifies at least for brief periods. The phytoplankton showed both, rapid change periods, and prolonged ones of relative stasis. The plankton composition fluctuated between three main phases, one characterized by the abundance of small sized desmids (Staurastrum paradoxum, Cosmarium asphaerosporum), a second phase dominated by equally small cryptomonads (Chryptochrysis minor, Chroomonas sp.) and a third phase dominated by the green alga Eutetramorus tetrasporus. Although data evidenced that monthly sampling could miss short term events, the temporal variation did not follow the typical dry and rainy seasons of the region, or any particular annual pattern. Year to year variation was high. As this small lake is located at the summit of Barva Volcano and receives the influence from both the Caribbean and the Pacific weather, seasonality at the lake is not clearly defined as in the rest of the country and short term variations in the local weather might have a stronger effect than broad seasonal trends. The occurrence of this short term changes in the phytoplankton of small tropical lakes in

  2. 2000 Multibeam Sonar Survey of Crater Lake, Oregon - Data, GIS, Images, and Movies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, James V.; Dartnell, Peter

    2001-01-01

    In the summer of 2000, the U.S. Geological Survey, Pacific Seafloor Mapping Project in cooperation with the National Park Service, and the Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping, University of New Hampshire used a state-of-the-art multibeam sonar system to collect high-resolution bathymetry and calibrated, co-registered acoustic backscatter to support both biological and geological research in the Crater Lake area. This interactive CD-ROM contains the multibeam bathymetry and acoustic backscatter data, along with an ESRI ArcExplorer project (and software), images, and movies.

  3. A symbiotic view of the origin of life at hydrothermal impact crater-lakes.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sankar

    2016-07-27

    Submarine hydrothermal vents are generally considered as the likely habitats for the origin and evolution of early life on Earth. The theory suffers from the 'concentration problem' of cosmic and terrestrial biomolecules because of the vastness of the Eoarchean global ocean. An attractive alternative site would be highly sequestered, small, hydrothermal crater-lakes that might have cradled life on early Earth. A new symbiotic model for the origin of life at hydrothermal crater-lakes is proposed here. Meteoritic impacts on the Eoarchean crust at the tail end of the Heavy Bombardment period might have played important roles in the origin of life. Impacts and collisions that created hydrothermal crater lakes on the Eoarchean crust inadvertently became the perfect crucibles for prebiotic chemistry with building blocks of life, which ultimately led to the first organisms by prebiotic synthesis. In this scenario, life arose through four hierarchical stages of increasing molecular complexity in multiple niches of crater basins. In the cosmic stage (≥4.6 Ga), the building blocks of life had their beginnings in the interstellar space during the explosion of a nearby star. Both comets and carbonaceous chondrites delivered building blocks of life and ice to early Earth, which were accumulated in hydrothermal impact crater-lakes. In the geologic stage (∼4 Ga), crater basins contained an assortment of cosmic and terrestrial organic compounds, powered by hydrothermal, solar, tidal, and chemical energies, which drove the prebiotic synthesis. At the water surface, self-assembled primitive lipid membranes floated as a thick oil slick. Archean Greenstone belts in Greenland, Australia, and South Africa possibly represent the relics of these Archean craters, where the oldest fossils of thermophilic life (∼3.5 Ga) have been detected. In the chemical stage, monomers such as nucleotides and amino acids were selected from random assemblies of the prebiotic soup; they were

  4. Holocene palaeoecology of the Golan Heights (Near East): investigation of lacustrine sediments from Birkat Ram crater lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, Markus J.; Neumann, Frank; Litt, Thomas; Negendank, Jorg F. W.; Stein, Mordechai

    2004-09-01

    Lacustrine deposits of the crater lake Birkat Ram located in the northern Golan Heights have been used as a paleoecological archive. Preliminary sedimentological and palynological investigations based on a composite profile allow the reconstruction of the environmental history of the last 6500 years. Fluctuations of the pollen composition (trees and shrubs versus herbs, values of oak and olive tree) correspond to changes in different sediment parameters (total organic carbon, magnetic susceptibility) which can be interpreted as the effects of human impact on the geo-biosphere. Four phases with strong settlement activities can be identified for the Northern Golan Heights: (1) during the Chalcolithic period/Early Bronze Age, (2) during the Hellenistic-Roman-Byzantine periods, (3) during the Crusader period, and finally during modern time. These periods were interrupted by wooded regeneration phases with low anthropogenic activities.

  5. Genomic islands of speciation separate cichlid ecomorphs in an East African crater lake*

    PubMed Central

    Tyers, Alexandra M.; Schiffels, Stephan; Terai, Yohey; Ngatunga, Benjamin P.; Miska, Eric A.; Durbin, Richard; Genner, Martin J.; Turner, George F.

    2015-01-01

    The genomic causes and effects of divergent ecological selection during speciation are still poorly understood. Here, we report the discovery and detailed characterization of early-stage adaptive divergence of two cichlid fish ecomorphs in a small (700m diameter) isolated crater lake in Tanzania. The ecomorphs differ in depth preference, male breeding color, body shape, diet and trophic morphology. With whole genome sequences of 146 fish, we identify 98 clearly demarcated genomic ‘islands’ of high differentiation and demonstrate association of genotypes across these islands to divergent mate preferences. The islands contain candidate adaptive genes enriched for functions in sensory perception (including rhodopsin and other twilight vision associated genes), hormone signaling and morphogenesis. Our study suggests mechanisms and genomic regions that may play a role in the closely related mega-radiation of Lake Malawi. PMID:26680190

  6. Eruptive history of Mount Mazama and Crater Lake Caldera, Cascade Range, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, Charles R.

    1983-10-01

    New investigations of the geology of Crater Lake National Park necessitate a reinterpretation of the eruptive history of Mount Mazama and of the formation of Crater Lake caldera. Mount Mazama consisted of a glaciated complex of overlapping shields and stratovolcanoes, each of which was probably active for a comparatively short interval. All the Mazama magmas apparently evolved within thermally and compositionally zoned crustal magma reservoirs, which reached their maximum volume and degree of differentiation in the climactic magma chamber ˜ 7000 yr B.P. The history displayed in the caldera walls begins with construction of the andesitic Phantom Cone ˜ 400,000 yr B.P. Subsequently, at least 6 major centers erupted combinations of mafic andesite, andesite, or dacite before initiation of the Wisconsin Glaciation ˜ 75,000 yr B.P. Eruption of andesitic and dacitic lavas from 5 or more discrete centers, as well as an episode of dacitic pyroclastic activity, occurred until ˜ 50,000 yr B.P.; by that time, intermediate lava had been erupted at several short-lived vents. Concurrently, and probably during much of the Pleistocene, basaltic to mafic andesitic monogenetic vents built cinder cones and erupted local lava flows low on the flanks of Mount Mazama. Basaltic magma from one of these vents, Forgotten Crater, intercepted the margin of the zoned intermediate to silicic magmatic system and caused eruption of commingled andesitic and dacitic lava along a radial trend sometime between ˜ 22,000 and ˜ 30,000 yr B.P. Dacitic deposits between 22,000 and 50,000 yr old appear to record emplacement of domes high on the south slope. A line of silicic domes that may be between 22,000 and 30,000 yr old, northeast of and radial to the caldera, and a single dome on the north wall were probably fed by the same developing magma chamber as the dacitic lavas of the Forgotten Crater complex. The dacitic Palisade flow on the northeast wall is ˜ 25,000 yr old. These relatively silicic

  7. Eruptive history of Mount Mazama and Crater Lake Caldera, Cascade Range, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, C.R.

    1983-01-01

    New investigations of the geology of Crater Lake National Park necessitate a reinterpretation of the eruptive history of Mount Mazama and of the formation of Crater Lake caldera. Mount Mazama consisted of a glaciated complex of overlapping shields and stratovolcanoes, each of which was probably active for a comparatively short interval. All the Mazama magmas apparently evolved within thermally and compositionally zoned crustal magma reservoirs, which reached their maximum volume and degree of differentiation in the climactic magma chamber ??? 7000 yr B.P. The history displayed in the caldera walls begins with construction of the andesitic Phantom Cone ??? 400,000 yr B.P. Subsequently, at least 6 major centers erupted combinations of mafic andesite, andesite, or dacite before initiation of the Wisconsin Glaciation ??? 75,000 yr B.P. Eruption of andesitic and dacitic lavas from 5 or more discrete centers, as well as an episode of dacitic pyroclastic activity, occurred until ??? 50,000 yr B.P.; by that time, intermediate lava had been erupted at several short-lived vents. Concurrently, and probably during much of the Pleistocene, basaltic to mafic andesitic monogenetic vents built cinder cones and erupted local lava flows low on the flanks of Mount Mazama. Basaltic magma from one of these vents, Forgotten Crater, intercepted the margin of the zoned intermediate to silicic magmatic system and caused eruption of commingled andesitic and dacitic lava along a radial trend sometime between ??? 22,000 and ??? 30,000 yr B.P. Dacitic deposits between 22,000 and 50,000 yr old appear to record emplacement of domes high on the south slope. A line of silicic domes that may be between 22,000 and 30,000 yr old, northeast of and radial to the caldera, and a single dome on the north wall were probably fed by the same developing magma chamber as the dacitic lavas of the Forgotten Crater complex. The dacitic Palisade flow on the northeast wall is ??? 25,000 yr old. These relatively

  8. Fine-scale ignimbrite morphology revealed in LiDAR at Crater Lake, OR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, J. E.; Bacon, C. R.; Wright, H. M.

    2011-12-01

    Mount Mazama erupted ~7,700 years ago resulting in the collapse of Crater Lake caldera, ash fall across the Pacific Northwest, and emplacement of compositionally zoned ignimbrite. Early climactic ignimbrite contains uniform rhyodacitic pumice and traveled far from the vent, whereas late, less mobile ignimbrite is dominated by crystal-rich andesitic scoria and mafic crystal mush. Funded by the USGS, NPS, and FHWA, the DOGAMI-led Oregon LiDAR Consortium contracted with Watershed Services to collect ~800 km2 of LiDAR over Crater Lake National Park from Aug 2010 to Sept 2010. Ground laser returns have an average density of 1.63 returns/m2 over the heavily forested area of interest. The data have a lateral RMSE and vertical accuracy of 0.05 m. A bare earth terrain model allows a virtual removal of the forest, revealing fine-scale surface morphology, notably in the climactic ignimbrite. Secondary pyroclastic flows, explosion craters, erosion by water, and compaction-related deformation modified the originally smooth ignimbrite surface. Distinct pyroclastic flow fronts are evident in the LiDAR in Annie Creek valley. Leveed flows stand approximately 5 m above the lower ignimbrite surface, and individual toes are about 1-2 m high. Preliminary field checking indicates that rhyodacitic pumice dominates the lower ignimbrite surface, but the leveed flows are a subequal mix of locally oxidized rhyodacitic pumice and andesitic scoria. We hypothesize that these deposits were secondary pyroclastic flows formed by gravitational failure of late ignimbrite. In the Castle Creek valley, is a 2-meter collapse scarp that may have spawned a small secondary pyroclastic flow; several such headwall scarps are present in Sand Creek valley. Differential compaction features are common in many thick ignimbrites. We suggest this caused the deformation of the ignimbrite apparent in the LiDAR. In Annie Creek valley are a series of flow parallel asymmetric ridges, with shallower slopes toward the

  9. Simulation of deep ventilation in Crater Lake, Oregon, 1951–2099

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Tamara M.; Wherry, Susan A.; Piccolroaz, Sebastiano; Girdner, Scott F

    2016-05-04

    The frequency of deep ventilation events in Crater Lake, a caldera lake in the Oregon Cascade Mountains, was simulated in six future climate scenarios, using a 1-dimensional deep ventilation model (1DDV) that was developed to simulate the ventilation of deep water initiated by reverse stratification and subsequent thermobaric instability. The model was calibrated and validated with lake temperature data collected from 1994 to 2011. Wind and air temperature data from three general circulation models and two representative concentration pathways were used to simulate the change in lake temperature and the frequency of deep ventilation events in possible future climates. The lumped model air2water was used to project lake surface temperature, a required boundary condition for the lake model, based on air temperature in the future climates.The 1DDV model was used to simulate daily water temperature profiles through 2099. All future climate scenarios projected increased water temperature throughout the water column and a substantive reduction in the frequency of deep ventilation events. The least extreme scenario projected the frequency of deep ventilation events to decrease from about 1 in 2 years in current conditions to about 1 in 3 years by 2100. The most extreme scenario considered projected the frequency of deep ventilation events to be about 1 in 7.7 years by 2100. All scenarios predicted that the temperature of the entire water column will be greater than 4 °C for increasing lengths of time in the future and that the conditions required for thermobaric instability induced mixing will become rare or non-existent.The disruption of deep ventilation by itself does not provide a complete picture of the potential ecological and water quality consequences of warming climate to Crater Lake. Estimating the effect of warming climate on deep water oxygen depletion and water clarity will require careful modeling studies to combine the physical mixing processes affected by

  10. Geochemistry of End-Permian Crater Lake Sediments in the Tunguska Basin, Siberia, and the Implications for Extinction Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fristad, K. E.; Svensen, H.; Planke, S.; Polozov, A. G.

    2008-12-01

    The end of the Permian period is marked by global warming and the largest known mass extinction on Earth. The crisis is commonly attributed to the formation of the Siberian Traps Large Igneous Province although the causal mechanisms remain disputed. One of the proposed mechanisms is the generation of carbon gases and halocarbons in contact aureoles in the Tunguska Basin and subsequent gas venting to the atmosphere. We are testing this hypothesis by performing detailed geochemistry and biostratigraphy on crater lake deposits overlying an end-Permian phreatomagmatic pipe in the southern parts of the Tunguska Basin. During an expedition to the Bratsk region in 2006 we sampled a 1300 meter long core drilled through the center of a crater lake and the underlying brecciated pipe. The core consists of 550 meters of fine to coarse grained clastic lake deposits and 750 meters of sedimentary and volcanic breccias. Preliminary biostratigraphy results show that the sediments contain abundant and exceptionally well preserved end- Permian and early-Triassic palynomorphs, supporting a causal link between the formation of the breccia pipe and the crater lake and the end-Permian extinction. Ongoing isotope stratigraphy aims at documenting the exact timing between the crater lake formation and the initial Triassic carbon isotope excursion.

  11. Connections between hyper-acid crater lakes and flank springs: new evidence from Rincón de la Vieja volcano (Costa Rica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, M.; Fernández, E.; Sáenz, W.; van Bergen, M. J.; Ayres, G.; Pacheco, J. F.; Brenes, J.; Avard, G.; Malavassi, E.

    2012-04-01

    Rincón de la Vieja, a complex andesitic stratovolcano in NW Costa Rica, shows various hydrothermal surface manifestations that comprise: (1) A hyper-acid crater lake and subaerial fumaroles receiving direct input of fluids of magmatic origin, (2) Acid thermal discharges along the northeastern slopes of the volcano that feed the headwaters of the Cucaracho river, and (3) Small lakes and a geothermal field with bubbling-boiling mud pools, acid-sulfate springs, steaming ground and fumarolic emissions in a region on the western flank. Here the streams are of relatively low flow rate and their chemical signatures correspond to that of deep fluids from an extensive geothermal reservoir mixed with shallow meteoric water. Physico-chemical properties of the sulfate-chloride hyper-acid lake (T=28-58 °C; pH between 1.2 and <0, high TDS of 24,000-160,000 mg/kg) are consistent with a meteoric water body supplied by a significant input of chemical components derived from hydrolysis of magmatic volatiles and from intense rock leaching. The Cucaracho catchment receives input from warm acid brines with no free-gas phase but carrying a high load of hydrolyzed magmatic volatiles and rock-forming elements. One of these brines (Spring 4) is characterized by a sulfate-chloride chemical signature, medium temperatures of 27-38 °C, pH between 2 and 4 and TDS values between 780 and 1300 mg/L. Based on water and heat-balance considerations, chemical and stable-isotope signatures and groundwater transport modeling, it has been proposed that these acid springs represent brine water from the lake-hydrothermal system that is diluted by shallow groundwater permeating tephra layers (Kempter and Rowe, 2000). Since Rincóńs latest phreatomagmatic activity in 1983, episodes of phreatic eruptions from the crater lake have been registered in 1983-87, 1991, 1995, 1998 and 2011. Some of these eruptions (VEI 1) have expelled large quantities of lake water, triggering small to medium- sized fast

  12. Multibeam Sonar Mapping and Modeling of a Submerged Bryophyte Mat in Crater Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dartnell, Peter; Collier, Robert; Buktenica, Mark; Jessup, Steven; Girdner, Scott; Triezenberg, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Traditionally, multibeam data have been used to map sea floor or lake floor morphology as well as the distribution of surficial facies in order to characterize the geologic component of benthic habitats. In addition to using multibeam data for geologic studies, we want to determine if these data can also be used directly to map the distribution of biota. Multibeam bathymetry and acoustic backscatter data collected in Crater Lake, Oregon, in 2000 are used to map the distribution of a deep-water bryophyte mat, which will be extremely useful for understanding the overall ecology of the lake. To map the bryophyte's distribution, depth range, acoustic backscatter intensity, and derived bathymetric index grids are used as inputs into a hierarchical decision-tree classification model. Observations of the bryophyte mat from over 23 line kilometers of lake-floor video collected in the summer of 2006 are used as controls for the model. The resulting map matches well with ground-truth information and shows that the bryophyte mat covers most of the platform surrounding Wizard Island as well as on outcrops around the caldera wall.

  13. Simulation of Deep Water Renewal in Crater Lake, Oregon, USA under Current and Future Climate Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccolroaz, S.; Wood, T. M.; Wherry, S.; Girdner, S.

    2015-12-01

    We applied a 1-dimensional lake model developed to simulate deep mixing related to thermobaric instabilities in temperate lakes to Crater Lake, a 590-m deep caldera lake in Oregon's Cascade Range known for its stunning deep blue color and extremely clear water, in order to determine the frequency of deep water renewal in future climate conditions. The lake model was calibrated with 6 years of water temperature profiles, and then simulated 10 years of validation data with an RMSE ranging from 0.81°C at 50 m depth to 0.04°C at 350-460 m depth. The simulated time series of heat content in the deep lake accurately captured extreme years characterized by weak and strong deep water renewal. The lake model uses wind speed and lake surface temperature (LST) as boundary conditions. LST projections under six climate scenarios from the CMIP5 intermodel comparison project (2 representative concentration pathways X 3 general circulation models) were evaluated with air2water, a simple lumped model that only requires daily values of downscaled air temperature. air2water was calibrated with data from 1993-2011, resulting in a RMSE between simulated and observed daily LST values of 0.68°C. All future climate scenarios project increased water temperature throughout the water column and a substantive reduction in the frequency of deepwater renewal events. The least extreme scenario (CNRM-CM5, RCP4.5) projects the frequency of deepwater renewal events to decrease from about 1 in 2 years in the present to about 1 in 3 years by 2100. The most extreme scenario (HadGEM2-ES, RCP8.5) projects the frequency of deepwater renewal events to be less than 1 in 7 years by 2100 and lake surface temperatures never cooling to less than 4°C after 2050. In all RCP4.5 simulations the temperature of the entire water column is greater than 4°C for increasing periods of time. In the RCP8.5 simulations, the temperature of the entire water column is greater than 4°C year round by the year 2060 (HadGEM2

  14. High-resolution digital elevation dataset for Crater Lake National Park and vicinity, Oregon, based on LiDAR survey of August-September 2010 and bathymetric survey of July 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Joel E.

    2012-01-01

    Crater Lake partially fills the caldera that formed approximately 7,700 years ago during the eruption of a 12,000-foot volcano known as Mount Mazama. The caldera-forming or climactic eruption of Mount Mazama devastated the surrounding landscape, left a thick deposit of pumice and ash in adjacent valleys, and spread a blanket of volcanic ash as far away as southern Canada. Because the Crater Lake region is potentially volcanically active, knowledge of past events is important to understanding hazards from future eruptions. Similarly, because the area is seismically active, documenting and evaluating geologic faults is critical to assessing hazards from earthquakes. As part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey was awarded funding for high-precision airborne LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) data collection at several volcanoes in the Cascade Range through the Oregon LiDAR Consortium, administered by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI). The Oregon LiDAR Consortium contracted with Watershed Sciences, Inc., to conduct the data collection surveys. Collaborating agencies participating with the Oregon LiDAR Consortium for data collection in the Crater Lake region include Crater Lake National Park (National Park Service) and the Federal Highway Administration. In the immediate vicinity of Crater Lake National Park, 798 square kilometers of LiDAR data were collected, providing a digital elevation dataset of the ground surface beneath forest cover with an average resolution of 1.6 laser returns/m2 and both vertical and horizontal accuracies of ±5 cm. The LiDAR data were mosaicked in this report with bathymetry of the lake floor of Crater Lake, collected in 2000 using high-resolution multibeam sonar in a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey, Crater Lake National Park, and the Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping at the University of New Hampshire. The bathymetric survey

  15. Hydrothermal and tectonic activity in northern Yellowstone Lake, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, S.Y.; Stephenson, W.J.; Morgan, L.A.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Pierce, K.L.

    2003-01-01

    Yellowstone National Park is the site of one of the world's largest calderas. The abundance of geothermal and tectonic activity in and around the caldera, including historic uplift and subsidence, makes it necessary to understand active geologic processes and their associated hazards. To that end, we here use an extensive grid of high-resolution seismic reflection profiles (???450 km) to document hydrothermal and tectonic features and deposits in northern Yellowstone Lake. Sublacustrine geothermal features in northern Yellowstone Lake include two of the largest known hydrothermal explosion craters, Mary Bay and Elliott's. Mary Bay explosion breccia is distributed uniformly around the crater, whereas Elliott's crater breccia has an asymmetric distribution and forms a distinctive, ???2-km-long, hummocky lobe on the lake floor. Hydrothermal vents and low-relief domes are abundant on the lake floor; their greatest abundance is in and near explosion craters and along linear fissures. Domed areas on the lake floor that are relatively unbreached (by vents) are considered the most likely sites of future large hydrothermal explosions. Four submerged shoreline terraces along the margins of northern Yellowstone Lake add to the Holocene record or postglacial lake-level fluctuations attributed to "heavy breathing" of the Yellowstone magma reservoir and associated geothermal system. The Lake Hotel fault cuts through northwestern Yellowstone Lake and represents part of a 25-km-long distributed extensional deformation zone. Three postglacial ruptures indicate a slip rate of ???0.27 to 0.34 mm/yr. The largest (3.0 m slip) and most recent event occurred in the past ???2100 yr. Although high heat flow in the crust limits the rupture area of this fault zone, future earthquakes of magnitude ???5.3 to 6.5 are possible. Earthquakes and hydrothermal explosions have probably triggered landslides, common features around the lake margins. Few high-resolution seismic reflection surveys have

  16. Shallow outgassing changes disrupt steady lava lake activity, Kilauea Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, M. R.; Orr, T. R.; Swanson, D. A.; Lev, E.

    2015-12-01

    Persistent lava lakes are a testament to sustained magma supply and outgassing in basaltic systems, and the surface activity of lava lakes has been used to infer processes in the underlying magmatic system. At Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i, the lava lake in Halema`uma`u Crater has been closely studied for several years with webcam imagery, geophysical, petrological and gas emission techniques. The lava lake in Halema`uma`u is now the second largest on Earth, and provides an unprecedented opportunity for detailed observations of lava lake outgassing processes. We observe that steady activity is characterized by continuous southward motion of the lake's surface and slow changes in lava level, seismic tremor and gas emissions. This normal, steady activity can be abruptly interrupted by the appearance of spattering - sometimes triggered by rockfalls - on the lake surface, which abruptly shifts the lake surface motion, lava level and gas emissions to a more variable, unstable regime. The lake commonly alternates between this a) normal, steady activity and b) unstable behavior several times per day. The spattering represents outgassing of shallowly accumulated gas in the lake. Therefore, although steady lava lake behavior at Halema`uma`u may be deeply driven by upwelling of magma, we argue that the sporadic interruptions to this behavior are the result of shallow processes occurring near the lake surface. These observations provide a cautionary note that some lava lake behavior is not representative of deep-seated processes. This behavior also highlights the complex and dynamic nature of lava lake activity.

  17. Faults, Post-1720 Explosion Craters, and the Remains of a Lava Lake at Castro Bank Seamount (E Azores)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunderman, R.; Barriga, F. J.; Nishimura, C.; Pacheco, J. M.; Vogt, P. R.; Gaspar, J. L.; Queiroz, G.; Santos, R.

    2003-12-01

    During 25-28 July 2003 the US Navy submarine NR-1 dove on the seamount D. Joao de Castro Bank, compiling reconnaissance sonar and visual data. Castro Bank sits along strike and between the eastern Azorian islands of Terceira and S. Miguel, occupying a seismically active region ˜60 km from each of these islands and apparently controlled by the same underlying tectonics as other islands found along the Azores' northern margin. Castro Bank's last recorded eruptions built a ˜1 km diameter ephemeral island in the 1720s. The bathimetry of the uppermost 40 m or so of the Bank is rather well known via single beam sonar, scuba diving and AUV surveys (IH, DOP/UA and ISR/IST, unpublished work). Our dives compiled data in concentric rings along contours, collecting side- and forward-looking sonar along an overall track length of ˜20 km, with the deepest ring approaching ˜200 m depth. To document key features we came near the sea floor and took videos in water with typical visibility of ˜10-15 m. This is the first progress report on our work, which found the edifice morphologically complex and irregular. We noted that the seamount was often covered by aerially extensive yellow-brown hyaloclastic tuffs that were presumably products of the 1720s eruption, but also cut by faults and fissures (with offsets of ten's of meters) exposing abundant areas of older edifice. The faults typically lacked sediment cover, and in one case a very fresh, sediment-free fault trended along the base of a steep cliff. This suggested the faults were much younger than the 1720 eruption, an observation in accord with intense seismicity recorded in this area. The faults provided exposures of older rocks, which included abundant breccia and lesser clearly identified pillows or thick lava flows. The NW quadrant contains two small, shallow, elliptical craters. These lie side-by-side and crosscut inferred 1720s-age tuffs. One crater held a lava lake, the body of which apparently withdrew or subsided

  18. Pleistocene Lake Bonneville and Eberswalde Crater of Mars: Quantitative Methods for Recognizing Poorly Developed Lacustrine Shorelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, P. W.

    2014-12-01

    The ability to quantify shoreline features on Earth has been aided by advances in acquisition of high-resolution topography through laser imaging and photogrammetry. Well-defined and well-documented features such as the Bonneville, Provo, and Stansbury shorelines of Late Pleistocene Lake Bonneville are recognizable to the untrained eye and easily mappable on aerial photos. The continuity and correlation of lesser shorelines must rely quantitative algorithms for processing high-resolution data in order to gain widespread scientific acceptance. Using Savitsky-Golay filters and the geomorphic methods and criteria described by Hare et al. [2001], minor, transgressive, erosional shorelines of Lake Bonneville have been identified and correlated across the basin with varying degrees of statistical confidence. Results solve one of the key paradoxes of Lake Bonneville first described by G. K. Gilbert in the late 19th century and point the way for understanding climatically driven oscillations of the Last Glacial Maximum in the Great Basin of the United States. Similar techniques have been applied to the Eberswalde Crater area of Mars using HRiSE DEMs (1 m horizontal resolution) where a paleolake is hypothesized to have existed. Results illustrate the challenges of identifying shorelines where long term aeolian processes have degraded the shorelines and field validation is not possible. The work illustrates the promises and challenges of indentifying remnants of a global ocean elsewhere on the red planet.

  19. A year of convective vortex activity at Gale crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steakley, Kathryn; Murphy, James

    2016-11-01

    Atmospheric convective vortices, which become dust devils when they entrain dust from the surface, are prominent features within Mars' atmosphere which are thought to be a primary contributor to the planet's background dust opacity. Buoyantly produced in convectively unstable layers at a planet's surface, these vertically aligned vortices possess rapidly rotating and ascending near-surface warm air and are readily identified by temporal signatures of reduced atmospheric surface pressure measured within the vortex as it passes by. We investigate such signatures in surface pressure measurements acquired by the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station aboard the Mars Science Laboratory rover located within Gale crater. During the first 707 sols of the mission, 245 convective vortices are identified with pressure drops in the range of 0.30-2.86 Pa with a median value of 0.67 Pa. The cumulative distribution of their pressure drops follows a power law of slope -2.77 and we observe seasonal and diurnal trends in their activity. The vast majority of these pressure signatures lack corresponding reductions in REMS-measured UV flux, suggesting that these vortices rarely cast shadows upon the rover and therefore are most often dust-free. The relatively weak-magnitude, dustless vortices at Gale crater are consistent with predictions from mesoscale modeling indicating that the planetary boundary layer is suppressed within the crater and are also consistent with the almost complete absence of both dust devils within Mars Science Laboratory camera images and Gale crater surface dust devil streaks within orbiter images.

  20. Geochemical monitoring of Chichón volcano (México) trough sulfur speciation of the crater lake's water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas, Ana Silvia; Aurora Armienta, Maria; Guadalupe Ramos, Silvia

    2015-04-01

    Monitoring of El Chichón volcanic activity is a very important given its eruption of March 28th, 1982 that was the worst volcanic disaster of the modern era in Mexico. To help mitigation of volcanic risk, we intend the establishment of an analytical methodology for the determining various sulfur species (S2-, SO3 2-, S4O6 2-, SO4 2-) occurring in the crater lake which was formed after the 1982 eruption. These species were determined through HPL Chromatography with the aim of establishing links between their presence and concentrations, the general physical and chemical characteristics of the lake, seasonal variations and the activity of El Chichón volcano. Besides, knowledge of sulfur species behavior will contribute to have a better knowledge of the state the hydrothermal system, and the internal dynamics of the volcano, and provide more information to determine periods of increasing hazard. This paper presents advances in the development of the methodologies for the analysis of the above mentioned sulfur species. We have identified the analytical procedures for sampling and analysis of these species (preservation, operating conditions of the equipment, number of samples, dilution, etc.) according to various studies in different volcanoes with crater lakes (Volcano Poas, Costa Rica; Kusatsu-Shirane, Japan). Water samples collected at various locations of the lake on March 29th, and July 11th and October 3rd, 2014, have been analyzed for major ions and sulfur species. Results are being related to the volcanic behavior. Results obtained: Average concentrations (mg/L) at one sampling site: • Sulphide: 1.75 in March, 1.82 in July and 4.99 in October • Sulphite: 4.16 in March, 1.89 in July and 25.23 in October • Tetrathionate: 236.88 in March, 247.46 in July and 152.96 in October • Sulphate: 618.51 in March, 609.91 in July and 620.18 in October Preliminary conclusions: • The proposed Chromatographic method has been successful to separate these sulfur

  1. Origin of phenocrysts and compositional diversity in pre-Mazama rhyodacite lavas, Crater Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nakada, S.; Bacon, C.R.; Gartner, A.E.

    1994-01-01

    Phenocrysts in porphyritic volcanic rocks may originate in a variety of ways in addition to nucleation and growth in the matrix in which they are found. Porphyritic rhyodacite lavas that underlie the eastern half of Mount Mazama, the High Cascade andesite/dacite volcano that contains Crater Lake caldera, contain evidence that bears on the general problem of phenocryst origin. Phenocrysts in these lavas apparently formed by crystallization near the margins of a magma chamber and were admixed into convecting magma before eruption. About 20 km3 of pre-Mazama rhyodacite magma erupted during a relatively short period between ~400 and 500 ka; exposed pre-Mazama dacites are older and less voluminous. The rhyodacites formed as many as 40 lava domes and flows that can be assigned to three eruptive groups on the basis of composition and phenocryst content. -from Authors

  2. Chromate reduction by Burkholderia cepacia MCMB-821, isolated from the pristine habitat of alkaline crater lake.

    PubMed

    Wani, Revati; Kodam, K M; Gawai, K R; Dhakephalkar, P K

    2007-06-01

    The Cr(VI)-reducing bacterial strain MCMB-821 was isolated from the alkaline crater lake of Lonar and was identified as Burkholderia cepacia. MCMB-821 was resistant to 1,000-ppm Cr(VI) and reduced 98% of the 75 ppm Cr(VI) within 36 h at pH 9.0 in the presence of 2% salt and lactose as the electron donor. The chromate-reducing efficiency of MCMB-821 was comparable under both aerobic as well as anaerobic conditions. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy data suggested that MCMB-821 reduced Cr(VI) to Cr(III) via the formation of transient Cr(V) intermediate. The chromate-reducing ability of MCMB-821 was suppressed in the presence of membrane inhibitors and enhanced in the presence of 2,4-dinitrophenol, suggesting the involvement of electron transport chain in the Cr(VI) bioreduction.

  3. Multiple isotopic components in Quaternary volcanic rocks of the Cascade Arc near Crater lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, C.R.; Gunn, S.H.; Lanphere, M.A.; Wooden, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Quaternary lavas and pyroclastic rocks of Mount Mazama, Crater lake caldera, and the surrounding area have variable Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions. High-alumina olivine tholeiites have 87Ar/86Ar ratios of 0.70346-0.70364; basaltic andesite, 0.70349-0.70372; shoshonitic basaltic andesite, 0.70374-0.70388; and andesite, 0.70324-0.70383. Dacites of Mount Mazama have 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios of 0.70348-0.70373. Most rhyodacites converge on 0.7037. Andesitic to mafic-cumulate scoriae of the climatic eruption, and enclaves in pre-climactic rhyodacites, cluster in two groups but show nearly the entire 87Sr/86Sr range of the data set, confirming previously suggested introduction of diverse parental magmas into the growing climactic chamber. Magma evolution is described. -from Authors

  4. Genetic linkage of distinct adaptive traits in sympatrically speciating crater lake cichlid fish

    PubMed Central

    Fruciano, Carmelo; Franchini, Paolo; Kovacova, Viera; Elmer, Kathryn R.; Henning, Frederico; Meyer, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of how biological diversity arises is limited, especially in the case of speciation in the face of gene flow. Here we investigate the genomic basis of adaptive traits, focusing on a sympatrically diverging species pair of crater lake cichlid fishes. We identify the main quantitative trait loci (QTL) for two eco-morphological traits: body shape and pharyngeal jaw morphology. These traits diverge in parallel between benthic and limnetic species in the repeated adaptive radiations of this and other fish lineages. Remarkably, a single chromosomal region contains the highest effect size QTL for both traits. Transcriptomic data show that the QTL regions contain genes putatively under selection. Independent population genomic data corroborate QTL regions as areas of high differentiation between the sympatric sister species. Our results provide empirical support for current theoretical models that emphasize the importance of genetic linkage and pleiotropy in facilitating rapid divergence in sympatry. PMID:27597183

  5. Lake evolution during the Early Danian Dan-C2 hyperthermal, Boltysh impact crater, Ukraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebinghaus, Alena; Jolley, David W.

    2016-04-01

    Lacustrine facies record complex relationships between lake evolution and environmental conditions and provide proxies for climate changes. However, lacustrine successions formed during past hyperthermals as recorded from negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) are of limited availability and thus less well understood. Here, we present a complete lacustrine record of the Early Danian Dan-C2 hyperthermal at c. 65.2 Ma from a core drilled in the K-Pg Boltysh impact crater, Ukraine. This borehole allows a detailed facies analysis and reconstruction of lake evolution and associated plant ecosystem in correspondence with rapid climate change. The Boltysh borehole reveals a c. 400 m thick siliciclastic and organic-rich succession overlying impact melt-breccia dated at 65.17 ± 0.64 Ma. Based on detailed core logging, 8 distinctive facies associations are identified, including 1) littoral mudstones, 2) siliciclastic shoreline deposits, 3) siliciclastic littoral to sublittoral deposits, 4) mudstone laminites, 5) organic-rich mudstones, and deposits of 6) coarse-grained, 7) fine-grained density currents, and 8) debris flows. Based on the occurrence of these facies associations 3 major phases of lake evolution are distinguished: 1) an initial pre-CIE rising clastic-dominated lake phase characterised by the presence of coarse-grained density and debris flow deposits, 2) an organic-rich fluctuating shallow lake phase during the main phase of the CIE, characterised by alternating packages of the mudstone laminites and organic-rich mudstones; and 3) a rising clastic-dominated lake during and post-CIE recovery phase, which shows a high presence of siliciclastic shoreline and littoral to sublittoral deposits. This study provides a full record of lacustrine response to climate change during the Dan-C2 hyperthermal, and subsequently allows us to infer lake formation and environmental conditions at different stages during climate warming. The high resolution sedimentary record

  6. Monitoring direct and indirect climate effects on whitebark pine ecosystems at Crater Lake National park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, S.B.; Odion, D.C.; Sarr, D.A.; Irvine, K.M.

    2011-01-01

    Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) is the distinctive, often stunted, and picturesque tree line species in the American West. As a result of climate change, mountain pine beetles (Dendroctonus ponderosae) have moved up in elevation, adding to nonnative blister rust (Cronartium ribicola) disease as a major cause of mortality in whitebark pine. At Crater Lake National Park, Oregon, whitebark pine is declining at the rate of 1% per year. The Klamath Network, National Park Service, has elected to monitor whitebark pine and associated high-elevation vegetation. This program is designed to sample whitebark pine throughout the park to look for geographic patterns in its exposure to and mortality from disease and beetles. First-year monitoring has uncovered interesting patterns in blister rust distribution. Incidence of rust disease was higher on the west side of the park, where conditions are wetter and more humid than on the east side. However, correlating climate alone with rust disease is not straightforward. On the east side of the park, the odds of blister rust infection were much greater in plots having Ribes spp., shrubs that act as the alternate host for a portion of the rust's life cycle. However, on the park's west side, there was not a statistically significant increase in blister rust in plots with Ribes. This suggests that different species of Ribes associated with whitebark pine can increase pine exposure to blister rust disease. There is also convincing evidence of an association between total tree density and the incidence of blister rust. Warmer temperatures and possibly increased precipitation will affect both whitebark pine and Ribes physiology as well as tree density and mountain pine beetle numbers, all of which may interact with blister rust to cause future changes in tree line communities at Crater Lake. The Klamath Network monitoring program plans to document and study these ongoing changes.

  7. Lithic breccia and ignimbrite erupted during the collapse of Crater Lake Caldera, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Druitt, T.H.; Bacon, C.R.

    1986-01-01

    The climactic eruption of Mount Mazama (6845 y.B.P.) vented a total of ???50 km3 of compositionally zoned rhyodacitic to basaltic magma from: (a) a single vent as a Plinian pumice fall deposit and the overlying Wineglass Welded Tuff, and (b) ring vents as ignimbrite and coignimbrite lithic breccia accompanying the collapse of Crater Lake caldera. New field and grain-size data for the ring-vent products are presented in this report. The coarse-grained, poorly bedded, clast-supported lithic breccia extends as far as 18 km from the caldera center. Like the associated ignimbrite, the breccia is compositionally zoned both radially and vertically, and silicic, mixed, and mafic types can be recognized, based on the proportion of rhyodacitic pumice. Matrix fractions in silicic breccias are depleted of fines and are lithic- and crystal-enriched relative to silicic ignimbrite due to vigorous gas sorting during emplacement. Ignimbrite occurs as a proximal veneer deposit overlying the breccia, a medial (??? 8 to ??? 25 km from the caldera center), compositionally zoned valley fill as much as > 110 m thick, and an unzoned distal ({slanted equal to or greater-than} 20 km) facies which extends as far as 55 km from the caldera. Breccia within ??? 9 km of the caldera center is interpreted as a coignimbrite lag breccia formed within the deflation zone of the collapsing ring-vent eruption columns. Expanded pyroclastic flows of the deflation zone were probably vertically graded in both size and concentration of blocks, as recently postulated for some turbidity currents. An inflection in the rate of falloff of lithic-clast size within the lithic breccia at ??? 9 km may mark the outer edge of the deflation zone or may be an artifact of incomplete exposure. The onset of ring-vent activity at Mt. Mazama was accompanied by a marked increase in eruptive discharge. Pyroclastic flows were emplaced as a semicontinuous stream, as few ignimbrite flow-unit boundaries are evident. As eruption from

  8. Geochemistry of the Albano and Nemi crater lakes in the volcanic district of Alban Hills (Rome, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carapezza, M. L.; Lelli, M.; Tarchini, L.

    2008-12-01

    Lake Albano, located 20 km to the SE of Rome, is hosted within the most recent crater of the quiescent Alban Hills volcanic complex that produced hydromagmatic eruptions in Holocene times. Stratigraphic, archaeological and historical evidence indicates that the lake level underwent important variations in the Bronze Age. Before the IV century B.C. several lahars were generated by water overflows from the lake and in the IV century B.C. Romans excavated a drainage tunnel. The lake is located above a buried carbonate horst that contains a pressurized medium-enthalpy geothermal reservoir from which fluids escape to the surface to produce many important gas manifestations of mostly CO 2. Previous studies recognized the presence of gas emissions also from the crater bottom. In 1997 the possibility of a Nyos-type event triggered by a lake rollover was considered very low, because the CO 2 water concentration at depth was found to be far from saturation. However, considering the high population density nearby, the Italian Civil Protection Department recommended that periodical monitoring be carried out. To this scope we initiated in 2001 a systematic geochemical study of the lake. Thirteen vertical profiles have been repeatedly carried out in 2001-2006, especially in the deepest part of the lake (167 m in 2006), measuring T, pH, dissolved O 2 and electrical conductivity. Water samples were collected from various depths and chemically and isotopically analysed. Two similar profiles have been measured also in the nearby Nemi crater lake. Results indicate that in the 4.5 years of monitoring the pressure of gas dissolved in the Lake Albano deep waters remained much lower than the hydrostatic pressure. A CO 2 soil survey carried out on the borders of the two lakes, indicates the presence of some zones of anomalous degassing of likely magmatic origin. A water overturn or a heavy mixing of deep and shallow waters likely occurred in winter 2003-2004, when cold rainfall cooled the

  9. Lidar Mapping Documents Post-glacial Faulting West of the High Cascades Axis at Crater Lake National Park, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, C. R.; Robinson, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    The Cascades magmatic arc lies mainly within the High Cascades graben system in the state of Oregon. Normal faults of the Klamath graben trend north into Mount Mazama, the volcano whose catastrophic eruption ~7700 cal y BP resulted in collapse of 8x10 km Crater Lake caldera. Geologic mapping of Mount Mazama (Bacon, USGS SIM 2832, 2008) delineated faults of the West Klamath Lake fault zone (WKLFZ) and their northern extensions through Crater Lake National Park west of the caldera. Outcrop patterns implied presence of normal faults farther west but dense conifer forest made discovery of subtle scarps impractical. Closer to the Cascades axis, successively decreasing offsets of mapped Mazama lava flows with decreasing age yielded a long-term vertical slip rate of ~0.3 mm/y on the principal fault segments of the WKLFZ near Crater Lake, where the youngest offset lavas are 35 ka in age. Other workers have found offset lateral moraine crests where Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) valley glaciers crossed the WKLFZ south of Crater Lake. A lidar survey of Crater Lake National Park in 2010 supported by the Oregon Lidar Consortium (Robinson, USGS Data Series 716, 2012) revealed meter-scale, dominantly N-S trending fault scarps with down-to-the-east displacement west of most previously mapped faults at the latitude of Crater Lake, increasing the known width of the fault zone there to as much as 11 km. Fault segments as long as 7-16 km form a semi-continuous system for virtually the entire 32 km N-S extent of lidar coverage. Along the western part of the fault zone, scarp height is as great as ~20 m. Scarp length and height imply that several M>6-7 earthquakes have occurred in late Pleistocene-Holocene time. Field observations show that the ignimbrite of the Mazama climactic eruption banks against or covers scarps. One fault vertically displaces a lateral moraine ~3 m. The moraine contains clasts of ~50 ka andesite and therefore likely dates from the LGM so that the most recent

  10. Breccia Formation at a Complex Impact Crater: Slate Islands, Lake Superior, Ontario, Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dressler, B. O.; Sharpton, V. L.

    1997-01-01

    The Slate Islands impact structure is the eroded remnant of a approximately 30-32 km-diameter complex impact structure located in northern Lake Superior, Ontario, Canada. Target rocks are Archean supracrustal and igneous rocks and Proterozoic metavolcanics, metasediments, and diabase. A wide variety of breccias occurs on the islands, many of which contain fragments exhibiting shock metamorphic features. Aphanitic, narrow and inclusion-poor pseudotachylite veins, commonly with more or less parallel boundaries and apophyses branching off them, represent the earliest breccias formed during the compression stage of the impact process. Coarse-grained, polymictic elastic matrix breccias form small to very large, inclusion-rich dikes and irregularly shaped bodies that may contain altered glass fragments. These breccias have sharp contacts with their host rocks and include a wide range of fragment types some of which were transported over minimum distances of approximately 2 km away from the center of the structure. They cut across pseudotachylite veins and contain inclusions of them. Field and petrographic evidence indicate that these polymictic breccias formed predominantly during the excavation and central uplift stages of the impact process. Monomictic breccias, characterized by angular fragments and transitional contacts with their host rocks, occur in parautochthonous target rocks, mainly on the outlying islands of the Slate Islands archipelago. A few contain fragmented and disrupted, coarse-grained, polymictic clastic matrix breccia dikes. This is an indication that at least some of these monomictic breccias formed late in the impact process and that they are probably related to a late crater modification stage. A small number of relatively large occurrences of glass-poor, suevitic breccias occur at the flanks of the central uplift and along the inner flank of the outer ring of the Slate Islands complex crater. A coarse, glass-free, allogenic breccia, containing

  11. Summit crater lake observations, and the location, chemistry, and pH of water samples near Mount Chiginagak volcano, Alaska: 2004-2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaefer, Janet R.; Scott, William E.; Evans, William C.; Wang, Bronwen; McGimsey, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Mount Chiginagak is a hydrothermally active volcano on the Alaska Peninsula, approximately 170 km south–southwest of King Salmon, Alaska (fig. 1). This small stratovolcano, approximately 8 km in diameter, has erupted through Tertiary to Permian sedimentary and igneous rocks (Detterman and others, 1987). The highest peak is at an elevation of 2,135 m, and the upper ~1,000 m of the volcano are covered with snow and ice. Holocene activity consists of debris avalanches, lahars, and lava flows. Pleistocene pyroclastic flows and block-and-ash flows, interlayered with andesitic lava flows, dominate the edifice rocks on the northern and western flanks. Historical reports of activity are limited and generally describe “steaming” and “smoking” (Coats, 1950; Powers, 1958). Proximal tephra collected during recent fieldwork suggests there may have been limited Holocene explosive activity that resulted in localized ash fall. A cluster of fumaroles on the north flank, at an elevation of ~1,750 m, commonly referred to as the “north flank fumarole” have been emitting gas throughout historical time (location shown in fig. 2). The only other thermal feature at the volcano is the Mother Goose hot springs located at the base of the edifice on the northwestern flank in upper Volcano Creek, at an elevation of ~160 m (fig. 2, near sites H1, H3, and H4). Sometime between November 2004 and May 2005, a ~400-m-wide, 100-m-deep lake developed in the snow- and ice-filled summit crater of the volcano (Schaefer and others, 2008). In early May 2005, an estimated 3 million cubic meters (3×106 m3) of sulfurous, clay-rich debris and acidic water exited the crater through tunnels at the base of a glacier that breaches the south crater rim. More than 27 km downstream, these acidic flood waters reached approximately 1.3 m above normal water levels and inundated a fertile, salmon-spawning drainage, acidifying the entire water column of Mother Goose Lake from its surface waters to its

  12. Vernal Crater, SW Arabia Terra: MSL Candidate with Extensively Layered Sediments, Possible Lake Deposits, and a Long History of Subsurface Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oehler, Dorothy Z.; Allen, Carlton C.

    2007-01-01

    Vernal Crater is a Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) landing site candidate providing relatively easy access to extensively layered sediments as well as potential lake deposits. Sediments of Vernal Crater are 400-1200 m below those being investigated by Opportunity in Meridiani Planum, and as such would allow study of significantly older geologic units, if Vernal Crater were selected for MSL. The location of Vernal Crater in SW Arabia Terra provides exceptional scientific interest, as rampart craters and gamma-ray spectrometer (GRS) data from the region suggest a long history of ice/fluids in the subsurface. The potential value of this MSL candidate is further enhanced by reports of atmospheric methane over Arabia, as any insight into the source of that methane would significantly increase our understanding of Mars. Finally, should MSL survive beyond its prime mission, the gentle slope within Vernal Crater would provide a route out of the crater for study of the once ice/fluid-rich plains.

  13. Sedimentary Record of the Last two Interglacials in the Terrestrial Canadian Arctic (Pingualuit Crater Lake, Nunavik)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St-Onge, G.; Guyard, H.; Pienitz, R.; Hausmann, S.; Francus, P.; Salonen, V.; Luoto, T.; Black, J.; Lamothe, M.; Zolitschka, B.; Larocque, I.

    2009-05-01

    The Pingualuit crater lake (Nunavik, Canada) resulted from a meteoritic impact that occurred ca. 1.4 million years ago. Due to its unique morphometry (depth and shape), the lake bottom may have escaped glacial erosion. Based on a punctual seismic profile acquired using a 12 kHz Knudsen echosounder and using both gravity and piston corers, we recovered the uppermost 8.5 m of sediments. High-resolution physical (CAT- Scan, Multi Sensor Core Logger, diffuse spectral reflectance), geochemical (ITRAX core scanner, carbon and nitrogen contents, δ13C of the organic matter) and magnetic (magnetic susceptibility, natural, anhysteretic, isothermal and saturation isothermal remanent magnetizations) analyses were performed. Two main lithofacies were clearly identified by the different measurements and likely represent successive interglacial/glacial cycles. Most of the sediment consists of light grey silts containing several angular rock fragments, that is characterized by very low organic carbon content, relatively high density and magnetic susceptibility values, suggesting a deposition during glacial conditions. Interbedded between this facies are at least two decimetre-thick, organic-rich and finely laminated intervals likely representing ice free periods. The presence of diatoms, chrysophytes and chironomid head capsules in smear and microscope slides from these two intervals supports this hypothesis. In addition, preliminary Infrared Stimulated Luminescence (IRSL) measurements indicate that the upper organic-rich layer has an age coeval with the last interglacial (Oxygen Isotope Stage 5), while the age of the lower organic-rich layer is consistent with an older interglacial, likely the Oxygen Isotope Stage 7. The sedimentary infill thus constitutes a unique long-term terrestrial record of environmental and climatic conditions in the Canadian Arctic. Furthermore, because these sediments escaped glacial erosion, it suggests the presence of a subglacial lake during the last

  14. Lava Lake Level Drop and Related Ground Subsidence in the Nyiragongo Main Crater (D.R.Congo) Measured by Close-Range Photogrammetry and InSAR Time-Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smets, B.; d'Oreye, N.; Samsonov, S. V.; Nobile, A.; Geirsson, H.; Kervyn, F.

    2015-12-01

    Nyiragongo volcano is the most active African volcano and among the most active volcanoes on Earth. It is also among the infrequent volcanoes that host a long-lived lava lake. The morphology of the Nyiragongo main crater is characterized by 2 levels of remnant platforms partly preserved and attached to its inner flanks, which correspond to former lava lake levels, and by a bottom "active" platform, which delimits the current active lava lake. The elevation of the bottom platform increases through time, with successive lava lake overflows. After a period of low level between late 2010 and August 2011, the lava lake next came back to its highest level. However, on September 30, 2011, it started a long and progressive fall, reaching ~70 m below the bottom platform in July 2014. This recent evolution of the lava lake, which occurred at the same time period as eruptive events at the neighboring Nyamulagira volcano, was accompanied by a ground subsidence of the bottom platform, leading to the appearance of ring fissures. This ground deformation is restricted to the bottom platform and, hence, suggests a very shallow source for the observed movement. All these changes in the Nyiragongo main crater were recorded by time-series of photographs, allowing the 3D reconstruction of the crater using close-range photogrammetric techniques and, hence, a detailed measurement of the observed changes. The ground subsidence was also recorded by time-series of RADARSAT-2 and CosmoSky-Med SAR interferograms, providing more detailed information on the velocity of deformation. Based on field data and the photogrammetric and InSAR time-series measurements, several hypotheses on the cause(s) of these changes in the Nyiragongo crater are discussed. The present work also highlights the potential of close-range photogrammetry and high-resolution InSAR to study and monitor active volcanoes in Equatorial environment.

  15. Evaluation, Proposed Solution and Current Status of the Crater Lake Breakout Problem, Mount Pinatubo, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornas, M. A.

    2001-12-01

    Rapid rise of Mount Pinatubo's crater lake and recent geological assessments of the crater's lowest point, the Maraunot Notch, raised concern about a breakout lahar down the northwestern slope of the volcano. Three factors indicated a serious hazard. First, the lake rose about 50 m from May 98-August 2001 and was expected to overtop the Maraunot Notch within the last trimester 2001. Overtopping might well have occurred at the height of a strong typhoon or under heavy monsoonal rainstorms. Second, the uppermost 10-20 m of "dam" was erodible ash and poorly indurated coarse breccia, susceptible to failure by overtopping and erosion as at many landslide and other natural dams. Third, the volumes of lake discharge corresponding to 10 and 20 m of erosion would have been 28 and 55 million m3; peak discharges at a breach could have been as high as 3,200 m3/sec to 11,000 m3/sec, respectively. These discharges would have eroded 1991 pyroclastic and lahar material on the volcano's slopes, increased the flow volume by 3-6x, and entered the Bucao River as a large-magnitude lahar. The Municipality of Botolan (pop. ca. 40,000) lies on the delta of the Bucao River valley some 40 km downriver from the notch, and could have been at great risk. Given this potential risk, the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PHIVOLCS) in early August 2001 advocated three actions. (1) An intentional breaching of the Maraunot Notch by the construction of a spillway or canal, by the Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH). Early breaching would limit further rise of the lake and thus reduce the magnitude of potential flood. Also, breaching would be scheduled during good weather to eliminate the danger of overtopping at an unknown time and/or under typhoon/rainstorm conditions. (2) An information campaign in Botolan in order to educate and prepare residents for breaching. (3) Evacuation of people at risk, one day before the scheduled breaching. A spillway was excavated by as many

  16. Circulation patterns in active lava lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redmond, T. C.; Lev, E.

    2014-12-01

    Active lava lakes provide a unique window into magmatic conduit processes. We investigated circulation patterns of 4 active lava lakes: Kilauea's Halemaumau crater, Mount Erebus, Erta Ale and Nyiragongo, and in an artificial "lava lake" constructed at the Syracuse University Lava Lab. We employed visual and thermal video recordings collected at these volcanoes and use computer vision techniques to extract time-dependent, two-dimensional surface velocity maps. The large amount of data available from Halemaumau enabled us to identify several characteristic circulation patterns. One such pattern is a rapid acceleration followed by rapid deceleration, often to a level lower than the pre-acceleration level, and then a slow recovery. Another pattern is periodic asymmetric peaks of gradual acceleration and rapid deceleration, or vice versa, previously explained by gas pistoning. Using spectral analysis, we find that the dominant period of circulation cycles at approximately 30 minutes, 3 times longer than the dominant period identified previously for Mount Erebus. Measuring a complete surface velocity field allowed us to map and follow locations of divergence and convergence, therefore upwelling and downwelling, thus connecting the surface flow with that at depth. At Nyiragongo, the location of main upwelling shifts gradually, yet is usually at the interior of the lake, for Erebus it is usually along the perimeter yet often there is catastrophic downwelling at the interior; For Halemaumau upwelling/downwelling position is almost always on the perimeter. In addition to velocity fields, we developed an automated tool for counting crustal plates at the surface of the lava lakes, and found a correlation, and a lag time, between changes if circulation vigor and the average size of crustal plates. Circulation in the artificial basaltic lava "lake" was limited by its size and degree of foaming, yet we measured surface velocities and identify patterns. Maximum surface velocity

  17. Water in the Oceanic Lithosphere: Salt Lake Crater Xenoliths, Oahu, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peslier, Anne H.; Bizimis, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Water can be present in nominally anhydrous minerals of peridotites in the form of hydrogen bonded to structural oxygen. Such water in the oceanic upper mantle could have a significant effect on its physical and chemical properties. However, the water content of the MORB source has been inferred indirectly from the compositions of basalts. Direct determinations on abyssal peridotites are scarce because they have been heavily hydrothermally altered. Here we present the first water analyses of minerals from spinel peridotite xenoliths of Salt Lake Crater, Oahu, Hawaii, which are exceptionally fresh. These peridotites are thought to represent fragments of the Pacific oceanic lithosphere that was refertilized by alkalic Hawaiian melts. A few have unradiogenic Os and radiogenic Hf isotopes and may be fragments of an ancient (2 Ga) depleted and recycled lithosphere. Water contents in olivine (Ol), orthopyroxene (Opx), and clinopyroxene (Cpx) were determined by FTIR spectrometry. Preliminary H_{2}O contents show ranges of 8-10 ppm for Ol, 151-277 ppm for Opx, and 337-603 ppm for Cpx. Reconstructed bulk rock H_{2}O contents range from 88-131 ppm overlapping estimates for the MORB source. Water contents between Ol minerals of the same xenolith are heterogeneous and individual OH infrared bands vary within a mineral with lower 3230 cm^{-1} and higher 3650-3400 cm^{-1} band heights from core to edge. This observation suggests disturbance of the hydrogen in Ol likely occurring during xenolith entrainment to the surface. Pyroxene water contents are higher than most water contents in pyroxenes from continental peridotite xenoliths and higher than those of abyssal peridotites. Cpx water contents decrease with increasing degree of depletion (e.g. increasing Fo in Ol and Cr# in spinel) consistent with an incompatible behavior of water. However Cpx water contents also show a positive correlation with LREE/HREE ratios and LREE concentrations consistent with refertilization. Opx water

  18. Magnetic and seismic reflection study of Lake Cheko, a possible impact crater for the 1908 Tunguska Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasperini, L.; Cocchi, L.; Stanghellini, C.; Stanghellini, G.; Del Bianco, F.; Serrazanetti, M.; Carmisciano, C.

    2012-05-01

    A major explosion occurred on 30 June 1908 in the Tunguska region of Siberia, causing the destruction of over 2,000 km2 of taiga; pressure and seismic waves detected as far as 1,000 km away; bright luminescence in the night skies of Northern Europe and Central Asia; and other unusual phenomena. This "Tunguska Event" is probably related to the impact with the Earth of a cosmic body that exploded about 5-10 km above ground, releasing in the atmosphere 10-15 Mton of energy. Fragments of the impacting body have never been found, and its nature (comet or asteroid) is still a matter of debate. We report here results from a magnetic and seismic reflection study of a small (˜500 m diameter) lake, Lake Cheko, located about 8 km NW of the inferred explosion epicenter, that was proposed to be an impact crater left by a fragment of the Tunguska Cosmic Body. Seismic reflection and magnetic data revealed a P wave velocity/magnetic anomaly close to the lake center, about 10 m below the lake floor; this anomaly is compatible with the presence of a buried stony object and supports the impact crater origin for Lake Cheko.

  19. Survey and assessment of post volcanic activities of a young caldera lake, Lake Cuicocha, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunkel, G.; Beulker, C.; Grupe, B.; Viteri, F.

    2009-05-01

    Cuicocha is a young volcano adjacent to the inactive Pleistocene Cotacachi volcano complex, located in the western cordilleras of the Ecuadorian Andes. A series of eruptions with intensive ash emission and collapse of the caldera occurred around 4500-3000 y BP. A crater 3.2 km in diameter and a maximum depth of 450 m was formed. Further eruptions of the volcano occurred 1300 y BP and formed four smaller domes within the caldera. Over the last few hundred years, a caldera lake has developed, with a maximum depth of 148 m. The lake water is characterized by sodium carbonate with elevated concentrations of manganese, calcium and chloride. Nowadays, an emission of gases, mainly CO2, and an input of warm spring water occur in Lake Cuicocha. The zone of high activity is in the western basin of the lake at a depth of 78 m, and continuous gas emissions with sediment resuspension were observed using sonar. In the hypolimnion of the lake, CO2 accumulation occurs up to 0.2% saturation, but the risk of a limnic eruption can be excluded at present. The lake possesses monomictic stratification behaviour, and during overturn an intensive gas exchange with the atmosphere occurs. Investigations concerning the sedimentation processes of the lake suggest only a thin sediment layer of up to 10-20 cm in the deeper lake basin; in the western bay, in the area of gas emissions, the lake bottom is partly depleted of sediment in the form of holes, and no lake colmation exists. Decreases in the lake water level of about 30 cm y-1 indicate a percolation of water into fractures and fissures of the volcano, triggered by a nearby earthquake in 1987.

  20. Building a large magma chamber at Mount Mazama, Crater Lake, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, H. M.; Karlstrom, L.; Bacon, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    Crater Lake caldera, Oregon, a structure produced by the 50 km3 eruption of Mount Mazama ~7.7 ka, is one of only three identified Quaternary calderas in the Cascades volcanic chain (Hildreth 2007). What were the conditions necessary to build a large volume magma chamber capable of producing this caldera-forming eruption at Mount Mazama? Using the well-documented >400,000 year volcanic history at Mazama (Bacon and Lanphere 2006), an approximation of vent locations for each eruptive unit (Bacon 2008), and a compilation of over 900 whole-rock compositions from Mount Mazama and regional volcanic rocks, we examine questions of magma chamber assembly in an active volcanic arc. These questions include: (1) is magmatic input approximately constant in composition between Mazama and regional monogenetic volcanic centers? (2) how did melt evolution differ in the two cases (Mazama vs. regional volcanism)? (3) is there spatiotemporal evidence in eruption data (including eruptive volume and chemistry) for a growing magma chamber at depth? and (4) does stability of that chamber require pre-warming of the surrounding country rock? An assumption of approximately constant major-element composition magmatic input is consistent with observed compositional overlap between basaltic to basaltic andesitic eruptive products at Mount Mazama and its vicinity (within 15 km of the volcano). MELTS modeling (Ghiorso and Sack 1995) from an initial composition of magnesian basaltic andesite of monogenetic Red Cone (erupted at a distance of ~8 km from the climactic vent) is consistent with water-saturated magmatic evolution at relatively shallow depths (<500 MPa, with the caveat that shallow pressure calibration data are largely lacking from MELTS models). Within this pressure range, differences in whole-rock compositions indicate that regional magmatic rocks evolved at shallower depths and/or drier conditions than those at the Mazama center. Observations of eruptive ages, compositions, vent

  1. Late Pleistocene granodiorite beneath Crater Lake caldera, Oregon, dated by ion microprobe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, C.R.; Persing, H.M.; Wooden, J.L.; Ireland, T.R.

    2000-01-01

    Variably melted granodiorite blocks ejected during the Holocene caldera-forming eruption of Mount Mazama were plucked from the walls of the climactic magma chamber ~15 km depth. Ion-microprobe U-Pb dating of zircons from two unmelted granodiorite blocks with SHRIMP RG (sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe-reverse geometry) gives a nominal 238U/206Pb age of 101+78-80 ka, or 174+89-115 ka when adjusted for an initial 230Th deficit. SHRIMP RG U-Th measurements on a subset of the zircons yield a 230Th/238U isochron age of 112 ?? 24 ka, considered to be the best estimate of the time of solidification of the pluton. These results suggest that the granodiorite is related to andesite and dacite of Mount Mazama and not to magmas of the climactic eruption. The unexposed granodiorite has an area of at least 28 km2. This young, shallow pluton was emplaced in virtually the same location where a similarly large magma body accumulated and powered violent explosive eruptions ~7700 yr ago, resulting in collapse of Crater Lake caldera.

  2. Microbial community dynamics in Inferno Crater Lake, a thermally fluctuating geothermal spring.

    PubMed

    Ward, Laura; Taylor, Michael W; Power, Jean F; Scott, Bradley J; McDonald, Ian R; Stott, Matthew B

    2017-01-10

    Understanding how microbial communities respond and adjust to ecosystem perturbation is often difficult to interpret due to multiple and often simultaneous variations in observed conditions. In this research, we investigated the microbial community dynamics of Inferno Crater Lake, an acidic geothermal spring in New Zealand with a unique thermal cycle that varies between 30 and 80 °C over a period of 40-60 days. Using a combination of next-generation sequencing, geochemical analysis and quantitative PCR we found that the microbial community composition was predominantly chemolithotrophic and strongly associated with the thermal cycle. At temperatures >65 °C, the microbial community was dominated almost exclusively by sulphur-oxidising archaea (Sulfolobus-like spp.). By contrast, at mesophilic temperatures the community structure was more mixed, comprising both archaea and bacteria but dominated primarily by chemolithotrophic sulphur and hydrogen oxidisers. Multivariate analysis of physicochemical data confirmed that temperature was the only significant variable associated with community turnover. This research contributes to our understanding of microbial community dynamics in variable environments, using a naturally alternating system as a model and extends our limited knowledge of acidophile ecology in geothermal habitats.The ISME Journal advance online publication, 10 January 2017; doi:10.1038/ismej.2016.193.

  3. Deformation of the Wineglass Welded Tuff and the timing of caldera collapse at Crater Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kamata, H.; Suzuki-Kamata, K.; Bacon, C.R.

    1993-01-01

    Four types of deformation occur in the Wineglass Welded Tuff on the northeast caldera rim of Crater Lake: (a) vertical tension fractures; (b) ooze-outs of fiamme: (c) squeeze-outs of fiamme; and (d) horizontal pull-apart structures. The three types of plastic deformation (b-d) developed in the lower part of the Wineglass Welded Tuff where degree of welding and density are maximum. Deformation originated from concentric normal faulting and landsliding as the caldera collapsed. The degree of deformation of the Wineglass Welded Tuff increases toward the northeast part of the caldera, where plastic deformation occurred more easily because of a higher emplacement temperature probably due to proximity to the vent. The probable glass transition temperature of the Wineglass Welded Tuff suggests that its emplacement temperature was ???750??C where the tuff is densely welded. Calculation of the conductive cooling history of the Wineglass Welded Tuff and the preclimactic Cleetwood (lava) flow under assumptions of a initially isothermal sheet and uniform properties suggests that (a) caldera collapse occurred a maximum of 9 days after emplacement of the Wineglass Welded Tuff, and that (b) the period between effusion of the Cleetwood (lava) flow and onset of the climactic eruption was <100 years. If cooling is controlled more by precipitation during quiescent periods than by conduction, these intervals must be shorter than the calculated times. ?? 1993.

  4. Digital Geologic Map of Mount Mazama and Crater Lake Caldera, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, C. R.; Ramsey, D. W.

    2002-12-01

    Crater Lake caldera formed ~7700 cal yr B.P. by the eruption of 50 km3 of mainly rhyodacitic magma and the resulting collapse of Mount Mazama. A new 1:24,000-scale digital geologic map compiled in ArcInfo depicts the geology of this volcanic center, peripheral volcanoes, the caldera walls and floor, and superjacent pyroclastic, talus, and glacial deposits. The geology of the caldera walls was mapped in the field on photographs taken from the lake (see accompanying abstract and poster, "Geologic panoramas of the walls of Crater Lake caldera,Oregon"); the geology of the flanks of Mount Mazama and the surrounding area was mapped on aerial photographs; and features of the caldera floor were mapped on a multibeam echo-sounding bathymetric map (Gardner et al., 2001; Bacon et al., 2002). Volcanic map units are defined on the basis of chemical composition and petrographic characteristics. Map unit colors were chosen to indicate the compositions of volcanic rocks, cooler colors for mafic units and warmer colors for silicic units. Map unit color intensity indicates age, with more intense coloring for younger units. Ages of many units have been determined by K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar dating by M.A. Lanphere. Several undated units have been correlated using paleomagnetic secular variation measurements by D.E. Champion. Crystallization facies of some of the larger lava flows are mapped separately (e.g., vitrophyre, felsite, carapace), as are breccia and lava facies of submerged postcaldera volcanoes. Also shown on the caldera floor are landslide (debris avalanche) and sediment gravity-flow deposits. A major north-south normal fault system traverses the map area west of the caldera and displaces dated late Pleistocene lava flows, allowing determination of a long-term slip rate of ~0.3 mm/yr (Bacon et al., 1999). Faults bounding large downdropped blocks of the south caldera wall are also shown. Where practical, lava flow margins are represented as intra-unit contacts. A number of small

  5. A case study of resistivity and self-potential signatures of hydrothermal instabilities, Inferno Crater Lake, Waimangu, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legaz, A.; Vandemeulebrouck, J.; Revil, A.; Kemna, A.; Hurst, A. W.; Reeves, R.; Papasin, R.

    2009-06-01

    Inferno Crater Lake, Waimangu, one of the largest hot springs in New Zealand, displays vigorous cyclic behavior in lake level and temperature. It provides a natural small-scale laboratory for investigating the geo-electrical signature of fluid flows. We measured self-potential and electrical resistivity to see whether the huge variations of fluid volume, approximately 60,000 m3 during a mean cycle period of 40 days, could be detected. Electrical resistivity measurements revealed spectacular changes over time, with the medium becoming more conductive as the lake receded. This result is consistent with analog models, where the vapor phase is replaced by liquid at recession. The self-potential survey did not detect temporal changes related to fluid movements. This can be explained by the pH of the pore water (˜2.3), which is close to the point of zero charge of silica.

  6. Multispecies Outcomes of Sympatric Speciation after Admixture with the Source Population in Two Radiations of Nicaraguan Crater Lake Cichlids.

    PubMed

    Kautt, Andreas F; Machado-Schiaffino, Gonzalo; Meyer, Axel

    2016-06-01

    The formation of species in the absence of geographic barriers (i.e. sympatric speciation) remains one of the most controversial topics in evolutionary biology. While theoretical models have shown that this most extreme case of primary divergence-with-gene-flow is possible, only a handful of accepted empirical examples exist. And even for the most convincing examples uncertainties remain; complex histories of isolation and secondary contact can make species falsely appear to have originated by sympatric speciation. This alternative scenario is notoriously difficult to rule out. Midas cichlids inhabiting small and remote crater lakes in Nicaragua are traditionally considered to be one of the best examples of sympatric speciation and lend themselves to test the different evolutionary scenarios that could lead to apparent sympatric speciation since the system is relatively small and the source populations known. Here we reconstruct the evolutionary history of two small-scale radiations of Midas cichlids inhabiting crater lakes Apoyo and Xiloá through a comprehensive genomic data set. We find no signs of differential admixture of any of the sympatric species in the respective radiations. Together with coalescent simulations of different demographic models our results support a scenario of speciation that was initiated in sympatry and does not result from secondary contact of already partly diverged populations. Furthermore, several species seem to have diverged simultaneously, making Midas cichlids an empirical example of multispecies outcomes of sympatric speciation. Importantly, however, the demographic models strongly support an admixture event from the source population into both crater lakes shortly before the onset of the radiations within the lakes. This opens the possibility that the formation of reproductive barriers involved in sympatric speciation was facilitated by genetic variants that evolved in a period of isolation between the initial founding

  7. Multispecies Outcomes of Sympatric Speciation after Admixture with the Source Population in Two Radiations of Nicaraguan Crater Lake Cichlids

    PubMed Central

    Kautt, Andreas F.; Machado-Schiaffino, Gonzalo; Meyer, Axel

    2016-01-01

    The formation of species in the absence of geographic barriers (i.e. sympatric speciation) remains one of the most controversial topics in evolutionary biology. While theoretical models have shown that this most extreme case of primary divergence-with-gene-flow is possible, only a handful of accepted empirical examples exist. And even for the most convincing examples uncertainties remain; complex histories of isolation and secondary contact can make species falsely appear to have originated by sympatric speciation. This alternative scenario is notoriously difficult to rule out. Midas cichlids inhabiting small and remote crater lakes in Nicaragua are traditionally considered to be one of the best examples of sympatric speciation and lend themselves to test the different evolutionary scenarios that could lead to apparent sympatric speciation since the system is relatively small and the source populations known. Here we reconstruct the evolutionary history of two small-scale radiations of Midas cichlids inhabiting crater lakes Apoyo and Xiloá through a comprehensive genomic data set. We find no signs of differential admixture of any of the sympatric species in the respective radiations. Together with coalescent simulations of different demographic models our results support a scenario of speciation that was initiated in sympatry and does not result from secondary contact of already partly diverged populations. Furthermore, several species seem to have diverged simultaneously, making Midas cichlids an empirical example of multispecies outcomes of sympatric speciation. Importantly, however, the demographic models strongly support an admixture event from the source population into both crater lakes shortly before the onset of the radiations within the lakes. This opens the possibility that the formation of reproductive barriers involved in sympatric speciation was facilitated by genetic variants that evolved in a period of isolation between the initial founding

  8. Eruptive history and geochronology of Mount Mazama and the Crater Lake region, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, Charles R.; Lanphere, Marvin A.

    2006-01-01

    Geologic mapping, K-Ar, and 40Ar/39Ar age determinations, supplemented by paleomagnetic measurements and geochemical data, are used to quantify the Quaternary volcanic history of the Crater Lake region in order to define processes and conditions that led to voluminous explosive eruptions. The Cascade arc volcano known as Mount Mazama collapsed during its climactic eruption of ∼50 km3 of mainly rhyodacitic magma ∼7700 yr ago to form Crater Lake caldera. The Mazama edifice was constructed on a Pleistocene silicic lava field, amidst monogenetic and shield volcanoes ranging from basalt to andesite similar to parental magmas for Mount Mazama. Between 420 ka and 35 ka, Mazama produced medium-K andesite and dacite in 2:1 proportion. The edifice was built in many episodes; some of the more voluminous occurred approximately coeval with volcanic pulses in the surrounding region, and some were possibly related to deglaciation following marine oxygen isotope stages (MIS) 12, 10, 8, 6, 5.2, and 2. Magmas as evolved as dacite erupted many times, commonly associated with or following voluminous andesite effusion. Establishment of the climactic magma chamber was under way when the first preclimactic rhyodacites vented ca. 27 ka. The silicic melt volume then grew incrementally at an average rate of 2.5 km3 k.y.−1 for nearly 20 k.y. The climactic eruption exhausted the rhyodacitic magma and brought up crystal-rich andesitic magma, mafic cumulate mush, and wall-rock granodiorite. Postcaldera volcanism produced 4 km3 of andesite during the first 200–500 yr after collapse, followed at ca. 4800 yr B.P. by 0.07 km3 of rhyodacite. The average eruption rate for all Mazama products was ∼0.4 km3 k.y.−1, but major edifice construction episodes had rates of ∼0.8 km3 k.y.−1. The long-term eruption rate for regional monogenetic and shield volcanoes was d∼0.07 km3 k.y.−1, but only ∼0.02 km3 k.y.−1 when the two major shields are excluded. Plutonic xenoliths and evidence for

  9. Geochemistry of Apatite in Climactic and Pre-Climactic Tephra from Mt. Mazama, Crater Lake, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandeville, C. W.; Langstaff, M.

    2007-12-01

    predict that most Mazama apatites in Cleetwood and climactic pumices should contain 0.4 wt.% or more SO3. Most apatites in Cleetwood and climactic rhyodacites contain less than 0.20 wt.% SO3 indicating crystallization from rhyodacitic melt that exsolved a sulfur-rich vapor prior to eruption that drastically reduced melt sulfur concentration. Apatites with SO3 greater than 0.60 wt.% most probably were derived from more mafic oxidized magmas with dissolved sulfur contents of 2000 ppm or more that have been measured in high-Sr andesitic scoria melt inclusions. Mole fraction fluorapatite in Mazama apatites ranges from 0.20 to 0.96 and based on comparison to recent experimental data predicts melt F concentrations of 200 to 1800 ppm that agrees with measured F in melt inclusions of 200 to 1300 ppm. Mole fraction chlorapatite ranges from 0.11 to 0.19 and based on recent experimental data predicts Cl concentrations in rhyodacitic melt of 0.3 to 0.4 wt.% in reasonable agreement with Cl concentrations in melt inclusions ranging from 0.18 to 0.39 wt.%. References Bacon C.R., and Druitt T.H. (1988) Compositional evolution of the zoned calcalkaline magma chamber of Mount Mazama, Crater Lake, Oregon. Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 98:224-256. Druitt T.H., and Bacon C.R. (1989) Petrology of the zoned calcalkaline magma chamber of Mount Mazama, Crater Lake, Oregon. Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 101:245-259. Peng G., Luhr J.F. and McGee J.J. (1997) Factors controlling sulfur concentrations in volcanic apatite. Am. Mineral. 82:1210-1224.

  10. Late Pleistocene granodiorite source for recycled zircon and phenocrysts in rhyodacite lava at Crater Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, C.R.; Lowenstern, J. B.

    2005-01-01

    Rhyodacite tephra and three lavas erupted ???27 ka, interpreted to be early leaks from the climactic magma chamber of Mount Mazama, contain ubiquitous resorbed crystals (antecrysts) that were recycled from young granodiorite and related plutonic rocks of the same magmatic system. The shallow composite pluton is represented by blocks ejected in the 7.7-ka climactic eruption that formed Crater Lake caldera. Plagioclase crystals in both rhyodacite and granodiorites commonly have cores with crystallographically oriented Fe-oxide needles exsolved at subsolidus conditions. At least 80% of plagioclase crystals in the rhyodacite are antecrysts derived from plutonic rocks. Other crystals in the rhyodacite, notably zircon, also were recycled. SIMS 238U- 230Th dating indicates that zircons in 4 granodiorite blocks crystallized at various times between ???20 ka and ???300 ka with concentrations of analyses near 50-70, ???110, and ???200 ka that correspond to periods of dacitic volcanism dated by K- Ar. U-Th ages of zircon from a rhyodacite sample yield similar results. No analyzed zircons from the granodiorite or rhyodacite are pre-Quaternary. Zircon minimum ages in blocks from different locations around the caldera reflect ages of nearby volcanic vents and may map the distribution of intrusions within a composite pluton. Survival of zircon in zircon-undersaturated hydrous magma and of Fe-oxide needles in plagioclase suggests that little time elapsed from entrainment of antecrysts to the ???27-ka eruption of the rhyodacite. The ???27-ka rhyodacite is an example of young silicic magma that preserved unstable antecrysts from a known source early during growth of a large high-level magma chamber. In contrast, the voluminous 7.7-ka climactic rhyodacite pumice is virtually lacking in zircon, indicating dissolution of any granodioritic debris in the intervening period. Mineralogical evidence of assimilation may be destroyed in hot, vigorously growing silicic magma bodies such as

  11. Seasonal nutrient and plankton dynamics in a physical-biological model of Crater Lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fennel, K.; Collier, R.; Larson, G.; Crawford, G.; Boss, E.

    2007-01-01

    A coupled 1D physical-biological model of Crater Lake is presented. The model simulates the seasonal evolution of two functional phytoplankton groups, total chlorophyll, and zooplankton in good quantitative agreement with observations from a 10-year monitoring study. During the stratified period in summer and early fall the model displays a marked vertical structure: the phytoplankton biomass of the functional group 1, which represents diatoms and dinoflagellates, has its highest concentration in the upper 40 m; the phytoplankton biomass of group 2, which represents chlorophyta, chrysophyta, cryptomonads and cyanobacteria, has its highest concentrations between 50 and 80 m, and phytoplankton chlorophyll has its maximum at 120 m depth. A similar vertical structure is a reoccurring feature in the available data. In the model the key process allowing a vertical separation between biomass and chlorophyll is photoacclimation. Vertical light attenuation (i.e., water clarity) and the physiological ability of phytoplankton to increase their cellular chlorophyll-to-biomass ratio are ultimately determining the location of the chlorophyll maximum. The location of the particle maxima on the other hand is determined by the balance between growth and losses and occurs where growth and losses equal. The vertical particle flux simulated by our model agrees well with flux measurements from a sediment trap. This motivated us to revisit a previously published study by Dymond et al. (1996). Dymond et al. used a box model to estimate the vertical particle flux and found a discrepancy by a factor 2.5-10 between their model-derived flux and measured fluxes from a sediment trap. Their box model neglected the exchange flux of dissolved and suspended organic matter, which, as our model and available data suggests is significant for the vertical exchange of nitrogen. Adjustment of Dymond et al.'s assumptions to account for dissolved and suspended nitrogen yields a flux estimate that is

  12. Os and U-Th isotope signatures of arc magmatism near Mount Mazama, Crater Lake, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankney, Meagan E.; Shirey, Steven B.; Hart, Garret L.; Bacon, Charles R.; Johnson, Clark M.

    2016-03-01

    Interaction of mantle melts with the continental crust can have significant effects on the composition of the resulting melts as well as on the crust itself, and tracing this interaction is key to our understanding of arc magmatism. Lava flows and pyroclastic deposits erupted from ∼50 to 7.7 ka at Mt. Mazama (Crater Lake, Oregon) were analyzed for their Re/Os and U-Th isotopic compositions. Mafic lavas from monogenetic vents around Mt. Mazama that erupted during the buildup to its climactic eruption have lower 187Os/188Os ratios (0.1394 to 0.1956) and high 230Th excess ((230Th/238U)0 of 1.180 to 1.302), whereas dacites and rhyodacites tend to have higher 187Os/188Os ratios (0.2292 to 0.2788) and significant 238U excess ((230Th/238U)0 of 0.975 to 0.989). The less radiogenic Os isotope compositions of the mafic lavas can be modeled by assimilation of young (∼2.5 to 7 Ma), mafic lower crust that was modified during regional extension, whereas the more radiogenic Os isotope compositions of the dacites and rhyodacites can be attributed to assimilation of older (∼10 to 16 Ma), mid to upper crust that acquired its composition during an earlier period of Cascade magmatism. Production of Th excesses in the lower crust requires very young garnet formation accompanying dehydration melting in the lower crust at less than a few 100 ka by heat from recent basaltic magma injection. The results from this study suggest that the combination of Os and Th isotopes may be used to provide insights into the timescales of evolution of the continental crust in arc settings, as well as the influence of the crust on erupted magmas, and suggest a link between the age and composition of the lower and upper crust to regional tectonic extension and/or earlier Cascade magmatism.

  13. Structure and physical characteristics of pumice from the climactic eruption of Mount Mazama (Crater Lake), Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klug, C.; Cashman, K.; Bacon, C.

    2002-01-01

    The vesicularity, permeability, and structure of pumice clasts provide insight into conditions of vesiculation and fragmentation during Plinian fall and pyroclastic flow-producing phases of the ???7,700 cal. year B.P. climactic eruption of Mount Mazama (Crater Lake), Oregon. We show that bulk properties (vesicularity and permeability) can be correlated with internal textures and that the clast structure can be related to inferred changes in eruption conditions. The vesicularity of all pumice clasts is 75-88%, with >90% interconnected pore volume. However, pumice clasts from the Plinian fall deposits exhibit a wider vesicularity range and higher volume percentage of interconnected vesicles than do clasts from pyroclastic-flow deposits. Pumice permeabilities also differ between the two clast types, with pumice from the fall deposit having higher minimum permeabilities (???5??10-13 m2) and a narrower permeability range (5-50??10-13 m2) than clasts from pyroclastic-flow deposits (0.2-330??10-13 m2). The observed permeability can be modeled to estimate average vesicle aperture radii of 1-5 ??m for the fall deposit clasts and 0.25-1 ??m for clasts from the pyroclastic flows. High vesicle number densities (???109 cm-3) in all clasts suggest that bubble nucleation occured rapidly and at high supersaturations. Post-nucleation modifications to bubble populations include both bubble growth and coalescence. A single stage of bubble nucleation and growth can account for 35-60% of the vesicle population in clasts from the fall deposits, and 65-80% in pumice from pyroclastic flows. Large vesicles form a separate population which defines a power law distribution with fractal dimension D=3.3 (range 3.0-3.5). The large D.value, coupled with textural evidence, suggests that the large vesicles formed primarily by coalescence. When viewed together, the bulk properties (vesicularity, permeability) and textural characteristics of all clasts indicate rapid bubble nucleation followed by

  14. Hydrothermal activity recorded in post Noachian-aged impact craters on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Stuart M. R.; Bridges, John C.; Grebby, Stephen; Ehlmann, Bethany L.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrothermal systems have previously been reported in ancient Noachian and Hesperian-aged craters on Mars using CRISM but not in Amazonian-aged impact craters. However, the nakhlite meteorites do provide evidence of Amazonian hydrothermal activity. This study uses CRISM data of 144 impact craters of ≥7 km diameter and 14 smaller craters (3-7 km diameter) within terrain mapped as Amazonian to search for minerals that may have formed as a result of impact-induced hydrothermal alteration or show excavation of ancient altered crust. No evidence indicating the presence of hydrated minerals was found in the 3-7 km impact craters. Hydrated minerals were identified in three complex impact craters, located at 52.42°N, 39.86°E in the Ismenius Lacus quadrangle, at 8.93°N, 141.28°E in Elysium, and within the previously studied Stokes crater. These three craters have diameters 20 km, 62 km, and 51 km. The locations of the hydrated mineral outcrops and their associated morphology indicate that two of these three impact craters—the unnamed Ismenius Lacus Crater and Stokes Crater—possibly hosted impact-induced hydrothermal systems, as they contain alteration assemblages on their central uplifts that are not apparent in their ejecta. Chlorite and Fe serpentine are identified within alluvial fans in the central uplift and rim of the Ismenius Lacus crater, whereas Stokes crater contains a host of Fe/Mg/Al phyllosilicates. However, excavation origin cannot be precluded. Our work suggests that impact-induced hydrothermalism was rare in the Amazonian and/or that impact-induced hydrothermal alteration was not sufficiently pervasive or spatially widespread for detection by CRISM.

  15. Distribution of Glycerol Diakyl Glycerol Tetraethers in Surface Soil and Crater Lake Sediments from Mount Kenya, East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omuombo, C.; Huguet, A.; Olago, D.; Williamson, D.

    2013-12-01

    Glycerol diakyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs), a palaeoclimate proxy based on the relative abundance of lipids produced by archaea and bacteria, is gaining wide acceptance for the determination of past temperature and pH conditions. This study looks at the spatial distribution and abundance of GDGTs in soil and sediment samples along an altitudinal transect from 3 crater lakes of Mt. Kenya (Lake Nkunga, Sacred Lake and Lake Rutundu) ranging in elevation from 1700m - 3080m above sea level. GDGTs were extracted with solvents and then analysed using high performance liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (HPLC/APCI-MS). Mean annual air temperature and pH were estimated based on the relative abundance of the different branched GDGTs, i.e. on the MBT (Methylation index of Branched Tetraethers) and CBT (Cyclization ratio of Branched Tetraethers) indices. Substantial amount of GDGTs were detected in both soil and sediment samples. In addition, branched GDGT distribution was observed to vary with altitude. These results highlight the importance of quantifying the branched GDGTs to understand the environmental parameters controlling the distribution of these lipids. The MBT/CBT proxy is a promising tool to infer palaeotemperatures and characterize the climate events of the past millennia in equatorial east Africa.

  16. Morpho-Bathymetry of the Specchio di Venere Crater Lake, Pantelleria Island, Italy: Integration of GPS Surveys with non-GPS Data and Evidence of Sedimentary Control on Lake Bottom Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madonia, P.; Cangemi, M.; Bellanca, A.; D'Alessandro, W.; Neri, R.; Failla, A.

    2009-12-01

    Pantelleria is a Pleistocene strato-volcano island located in the Sicily Channel Rift Zone, about 100 km south-west of Sicily and 70 km north-east of Tunisia. Specchio di Venere is an endorheic lake located inside a calderic depression (Caldera Cinque Denti), showing a sub-circular shape (being ca 450 m long and ca 350 m wide) and a maximum depth of 12.5 m, with steeper slopes in its north-eastern area. The south-western sector of the lake is characterized by a diffused hydrothermal activity (low temperature fumarole vents and hydrothermal springs). Several morpho-bathymetric surveys, based on both direct sounding and echo-sounding methods, have been carried out into the lake, using different techniques for the planar positioning of the measure points: takeometers, metric ropes tightened on the opposite sides of the lake and, finally, differential single frequency GPS. A comparison between the different surveys clearly indicates that the low number of bathymetric measures carried out in pre-GPS surveys, due to difficulties of a precise and fast positioning of the measure points, heavily influenced the map of the lake floor. In particular, the interpretation of the lake floor morphology was the result of the archetypal idea of a lake, with parallel, iso-spaced bathymetric curves, merely reproducing the shape of the lake shoreline. After the advent of GPS techniques, in the framework of a research project financed by the Italian Civil Defence Department, a new survey was carried out on May 2007, further integrated by another measuring campaign on May 2009. The new bathymetric map, based on 445 depth points, not aligned along transects to avoid the generation of pseudo-structures due to the geometry of the measure points, revealed a quite different structure of the low-depth (maximum 2 m) south-western sector of the lake, whose morphology is probably to be related to interaction of the hydrothermal vent field with sedimentary processes, resulting in the formation of

  17. Compositional evolution of the zoned calcalkaline magma chamber of Mount Mazama, Crater Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, C.R.; Druitt, T.H.

    1988-01-01

    The climactic eruption of Mount Mazama has long been recognized as a classic example of rapid eruption of a substantial fraction of a zoned magma body. Increased knowledge of eruptive history and new chemical analyses of ???350 wholerock and glass samples of the climactic ejecta, preclimactic rhyodacite flows and their inclusions, postcaldera lavas, and lavas of nearby monogenetic vents are used here to infer processes of chemical evolution of this late Pleistocene - Holocene magmatic system. The 6845??50 BP climactic eruption vented ???50 km3 of magma to form: (1) rhyodacite fall deposit; (2) welded rhyodacite ignimbrite; and (3) lithic breccia and zoned ignimbrite, these during collapse of Crater Lake caldera. Climactic ejecta were dominantly homogeneous rhyodacite (70.4??0.3% SiO2), followed by subordinate andesite and cumulate scoriae (48-61% SiO2). The gap in wholerock composition reflects mainly a step in crystal content because glass compositions are virtually continuous. Two types of scoriae are distinguished by different LREE, Rb, Th, and Zr, but principally by a twofold contrast in Sr content: High-Sr (HSr) and low-Sr (LSr) scoriae. HSr scoriae were erupted first. Trace element abundances indicate that HSr and LSr scoriae had different calcalkaline andesite parents; basalt was parental to some mafic cumulate scoriae. Parental magma compositions reconstructed from scoria wholerock and glass data are similar to those of inclusions in preclimactic rhyodacites and of aphyric lavas of nearby monogenetic vents. Preclimactic rhyodacite flows and their magmatic inclusions give insight into evolution of the climactic chamber. Evolved rhyodacite flows containing LSr andesite inclusions were emplaced between ???30000 and ???25000 BP. At 7015??45 BP, the Llao Rock vent produced a zoned rhyodacite pumice fall, then rhyodacite lava with HSr andesite inclusions. The Cleetwood rhyodacite flow, emplaced immediately before the climactic eruption and compositionally

  18. A viable microbial community in a subglacial volcanic crater lake, Iceland.

    PubMed

    Gaidos, Eric; Lanoil, Brian; Thorsteinsson, Thorsteinn; Graham, Andrew; Skidmore, Mark; Han, Suk-Kyun; Rust, Terri; Popp, Brian

    2004-01-01

    We describe a viable microbial community in a subglacial lake within the Grímsvötn volcanic caldera, Iceland. We used a hot water drill to penetrate the 300-m ice shelf and retrieved lake water and volcanic tephra sediments. We also acquired samples of borehole water before and after penetration to the lake, overlying glacial ice and snow, and water from a nearby subaerial geothermal lake for comparative analyses. Lake water is at the freezing point and fresh (total dissolved solids = 260 mg L(-1)). Detectable numbers of cells were found in samples of the lake water column and tephra sediments: 2 x 10(4) ml(-1) and 4 x 10(7) g(-1), respectively. Plate counts document abundant cold-adapted cultivable organisms in the lake water, but not in the borehole (before penetration) or glacial ice. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rRNA gene fragments amplified from genomic DNA extracted from Grímsvötn samples indicates that the lake community is distinct from the assemblages of organisms in borehole water (before penetration) and the overlying ice and snow. Sequencing of selected DGGE bands revealed that many sequences are highly similar to known psychrophilic organisms or cloned DNA from other cold environments. Significant uptake of 14C-labeled bicarbonate occurred in dark, low-temperature incubations of lake water samples, indicating the presence of autotrophs. Acetylene reduction assays under similar incubation conditions showed no significant nitrogen fixation potential by lake water samples. This may be a consequence of the inhibition of diazotrophy by nitrogen in the lake.

  19. Construction and interpretation of a digital inertia image. [of Pisgah Crater and Lavic Lake in Southern California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, A. R.; Kahle, A. B.

    1977-01-01

    An image representing the thermal inertia in the vicinity of Pisgah Crater and Lavic Lake in Southern California has been generated from visible, near IR, and thermal images taken from aircraft. Construction of the thermal inertia image required radiometric calibration and geometric rectification of the acquired images as well as registration to a topographic map. The Kahle thermal model used in the construction of the thermal inertia image requires specification of albedo, topographic slope and slope azimuth, diurnal temperature range and local meteorological conditions. Albedo information was derived from the visible image; digital topographic information was computed from digitized stereo aerial photographs; and thermal ranges were calculated by subtracting the predawn from the afternoon thermal image data. Our computed values of thermal inertia were in close agreement with published values for similar surface materials. Thermal inertia provides complementary information to conventional images of reflected solar radiation for use in lithologic mapping.

  20. A detailed geologic characterization of Eberswalde crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, M. S.; BellI, J. F., III; Gupta, S.; Warner, N. H.; Goddard, K.; Anderson, R. B.

    Background: Eberswalde crater, selected as one of four finalist landing sites for the Mars Science Laboratory mission, is best known for the spectacularly preserved, inverted, fan-shaped deposit along its western margin. This feature has been interpreted as a lacustrine delta, although the timing and duration of an Eberswalde crater lake is poorly understood. The aim of this study is to place more broadly observed fluvio-lacustrine activity throughout the crater's floor within the larger context of Eberswalde's geologic history, and to infer the sequence of deposition and erosion of the observed stratigraphic and geomorphic units. Method: We have identified and mapped stratigraphic and geomorphic units within all of Eberswalde crater using orbital imagery from the HiRISE, MOC and CTX cameras, and we have calculated crater statistics to infer the relative ages of crater floor materials. Using topographic datasets derived from HiRISE, CTX and MOLA, we determine the unit associations, successions, and geometries and develop a model for the depositional and erosional history within the crater. Conclusion: We have produced maps of ten stratigraphic and seven geomorphic units identified within Eberswalde crater. Our observations of the stratigraphy, geomorphology, topography and crater densities imply a complex relationship between deposition and exhumation within Eberswalde crater, and we infer the following sequence of major events: (1) Eberswalde crater forms in the Noachian (> 3.6 Ga); (2) Holden crater forms southwest of Eberswalde crater in the late Noachian to Early Hesperian, and its associated ejecta blanket covers the floor of Eberswalde crater and heavily modifies the southern rim; (3) Extensive faulting from regional stresses creates the first-order topography within the crater, and vein-like features form in some units from fracturing, fluid circulation, and cementation; (4) Valley features are carved in the crater walls as water flows into the crater

  1. Isotope hydrology of El Chichón volcano-hydrothermal system; a coupled system of crater lake and hot springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peiffer, L.; Taran, Y.; Rouwet, D.

    2010-12-01

    The catastrophic 1982 eruption of El Chichón (>1.5 km3 of erupted material) opened the upper hundred meters of the existing volcano-hydrothermal system. In the new formed 200m-deep crater a large shallow crater lake and numerous hot springs were formed. The lake existence and its salinity depend on the precipitation (~4000 mm/y) as well as a group of geyser-like neutral saline springs (source of Cl and SO4) and hydrothermal steam vents discharging into the lake (source of SO4). The chemistry of these “Soap Pool” (SP) springs evolved from >13,000 ppm of Cl in 1995 to ~2000-3000 ppm of Cl in 2006. Since 2006, this Cl-concentration in SP waters is constant. Similar concentrations of Cl are observed in most flank hot springs located at altitudes of ~ 600 m asl, 2-3 km from the crater. Therefore, it can be suggested that the flank springs, crater lake and crater hot springs are manifestations of the upper, relatively shallow volcano-hydrothermal system developed beneath the crater in the volcano edifice. Water isotopic composition of all types of thermal and fresh waters including fumarolic steam condensates (>100 samples collected in 1995-2010) allow to classify and distinguish different processes of shallow mixing, boiling, evaporation and water-rock isotope exchange. All spring waters from the upper system have meteoric origin, with the isotopic composition plotting close to the meteoric water line. Crater waters are strongly evolved due to shallow boiling and loss of steam. Isotopic composition of water from the lower, deep hydrothermal system is characterized by a significant positive oxygen isotopic shift and a strong Cl-d18O linear correlation. Waters from numerous cold springs that drain pyroclastic deposits demonstrate a clear negative oxygen shift. Some problems related to water isotopic composition are still remain unresolved: (1) we cannot find any traces of the infiltrated isotopically heavy lake waters, i.e., the seepage from the lake at the volcano

  2. Crater Lakes on Mars: Development of Quantitative Thermal and Geomorphic Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnhart, C. J.; Tulaczyk, S.; Asphaug, E.; Kraal, E. R.; Moore, J.

    2005-01-01

    Impact craters on Mars have served as catchments for channel-eroding surface fluids, and hundreds of examples of candidate paleolakes are documented [1,2] (see Figure 1). Because these features show similarity to terrestrial shorelines, wave action has been hypothesized as the geomorphic agent responsible for the generation of these features [3]. Recent efforts have examined the potential for shoreline formation by wind-driven waves, in order to turn an important but controversial idea into a quantitative, falsifiable hypothesis. These studies have concluded that significant wave-action shorelines are unlikely to have formed commonly within craters on Mars, barring Earth-like weather for approx.1000 years [4,5,6].

  3. Water chemistry of lakes related to active and inactive Mexican volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armienta, María Aurora; Vilaclara, Gloria; De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Ramos, Silvia; Ceniceros, Nora; Cruz, Olivia; Aguayo, Alejandra; Arcega-Cabrera, Flor

    2008-12-01

    Water chemistry of crater lakes, maars and water reservoirs linked to some Mexican volcanoes within and outside the Mexican Volcanic Belt has been determined for several years and examined regarding environmental and volcanic factors. All the analyzed lakes are relatively small with a maximum depth of 65 m, and are located in regions with different climates, from semi-arid to very humid, with altitudes ranging from 100 to more than 4000 m a.s.l. Crater lakes in active volcanoes (El Chichón, Popocatépetl) have very low pH, moderate to high temperatures and major ion concentrations varying with the level of volcanic unrest. Lakes in sub-arid and temperate-arid regions (like maars in Puebla and Guanajuato states) show high alkalinity and pH, with bicarbonate/carbonate, chloride, sodium and magnesium as predominant ions. Lakes located in humid climates (Central Michoacán and Veracruz state) have low mineralization and near-neutral pH values. In general, conservative dissolved ions and conductivity appear to be mostly controlled by precipitation/evaporation and by the ionic concentration of groundwater inputs. Calcium, magnesium, sulfate concentrations and pH are strongly influenced by volcanic-rock or volcanic gas interactions with water. The influence of low-level volcanic activity on crater lakes may be obscured by water-rock interactions, and climatic factors. One of the aims of this paper is to define the relative influence of these factors searching for a reference frame to recognize the early volcanic precursors in volcano-related lakes.

  4. Impact-generated Hydrothermal Activity at the Chicxulub Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kring, D. A.; Zurcher, L.; Abramov, O.

    2007-05-01

    Borehole samples recovered from PEMEX exploration boreholes and an ICDP scientific borehole indicate the Chicxulub impact event generated hydrothermal alteration throughout a large volume of the Maya Block beneath the crater floor and extending across the bulk of the ~180 km diameter crater. The first indications of hydrothermal alteration were observed in the crater discovery samples from the Yucatan-6 borehole and manifest itself in the form of anhydrite and quartz veins. Continuous core from the Yaxcopoil-1 borehole reveal a more complex and temporally extensive alteration sequence: following a brief period at high temperatures, impact- melt-bearing polymict breccias and a thin, underlying unit of impact melt were subjected to metasomatism, producing alkali feldspar, sphene, apatite, and magnetite. As the system continued to cool, smectite-series phyllosilicates appeared. A saline solution was involved. Stable isotopes suggest the fluid was dominated by a basinal brine created mostly from existing groundwater of the Yucatan Peninsula, although contributions from down-welling water also occurred in some parts of the system. Numerical modeling of the hydrothermal system suggests circulation occurred for 1.5 to 2.3 Myr, depending on the permeability of the system. Our understanding of the hydrothermal system, however, is still crude. Additional core recovery projects, particularly into the central melt sheet, are needed to better evaluate the extent and duration of hydrothermal alteration.

  5. Molecular analyses of microbial diversity associated with the Lonar soda lake in India: an impact crater in a basalt area.

    PubMed

    Wani, Aijaz Ahmad; Surakasi, Venkata Prasad; Siddharth, Jay; Raghavan, Raamesh Gowri; Patole, Milind S; Ranade, Dilip; Shouche, Yogesh S

    2006-12-01

    The prokaryotic diversity associated with an Indian soda lake (Lonar Crater Lake) located in a basaltic soil area was investigated using a culture-independent approach. Community DNA was extracted directly from four sediment samples obtained by coring to depths of 10-20 cm. Small subunit rRNA genes (16S rDNA) were amplified by PCR using primers specific to the domains Bacteria and Archaea. The PCR products were cloned and sequenced. For the bacterial rDNA clone library, 500 clones were randomly selected for further analysis. After restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and subsequent sequencing, a total of 44 unique phylotypes were obtained. These phylotypes spanned a wide range within the domain Bacteria, occupying eight major lineages/phyla. 34% of the clones were classified as firmicutes. The other clones were grouped into proteobacteria (29.5%), actinobacteria (6.8%), deinococcus-thermus (4.5%), cytophages-flavobacterium-bacteroidetes (13.3%), planctomycetes (6.8%), cyanobacteria (4.5%) and spirochetes (2.27%). In the case of the archaeal 16S rDNA library, analysis of 250 randomly selected clones revealed the presence of 13 distinct phylotypes; 5 phylotypes were associated with Crenarchaeota and 8 with Euryarchaeota. Most of the euryarchaeota sequences were related to methanogens. Findings from this molecular study of a site investigated for the first time have revealed the presence of a highly diverse bacterial population and a comparatively less diverse archaeal population. The majority ( approximately 80%) of the cloned sequences show little affiliation with known taxa (<97% sequence similarity) and may represent novel taxa/sequences and organisms specifically adapted to this basaltic soda lake environment. Diversity analyses demonstrate greater diversity and evenness of bacterial species compared to a skewed representation of species for Archaea.

  6. Pyroclastic activity at home plate in Gusev crater, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Squyres, S. W.; Aharonson, O.; Clark, B. C.; Cohen, B. A.; Crumpler, L.; de Souza, P.A.; Farrand, W. H.; Gellert, Ralf; Grant, J.; Grotzinger, J.P.; Haldemann, A.F.C.; Johnson, J. R.; Klingelhofer, G.; Lewis, K.W.; Li, R.; McCoy, T.; McEwen, A.S.; McSween, H.Y.; Ming, D. W.; Moore, Johnnie N.; Morris, R.V.; Parker, T.J.; Rice, J. W.; Ruff, S.; Schmidt, M.; Schroder, C.; Soderblom, L.A.; Yen, A.

    2007-01-01

    Home Plate is a layered plateau in Gusev crater on Mars. It is composed of clastic rocks of moderately altered alkali basalt composition, enriched in some highly volatile elements. A coarse-grained lower unit lies under a finer-grained upper unit. Textural observations indicate that the lower strata were emplaced in an explosive event, and geochemical considerations favor an explosive volcanic origin over an impact origin. The lower unit likely represents accumulation of pyroclastic materials, whereas the upper unit may represent eolian reworking of the same pyroclastic materials.

  7. Pyroclastic Activity at Home Plate in Gusev Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squyres, S. W.; Aharonson, O.; Clark, B. S.; Cohen, B.; Crumpler, L.; deSouza, P. A.; Farrand, W. H.; Gellert, R.; Grant, J.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Haldemann, A. F. C.; Johnson, J. R.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Lewis, K. W.; Li, R.; McCoy, T.; McEwen, A. S.; McSween, H. Y.; Ming, D. W.; Moore, J. M.; Morris, R. V.; Parker. T. J.; Rice, J. W., Jr.; Ruff, S.; Schmidt, M.

    2007-01-01

    Home Plate is a layered plateau in Gusev crater on Mars. It is composed of clastic rocks of moderately altered alkali basalt composition, enriched in some highly volatile elements. A coarse-grained lower unit is overlain by a finer-grained upper unit. Textural observations indicate that the lower strata were emplaced in an explosive event, and geochemical considerations favor an explosive volcanic origin over an impact origin. The lower unit likely represents accumulation of pyroclastic materials, while the upper unit may represent eolian reworking of the same pyroclastic materials.

  8. Duration of eruption at the Giant Crater lava field, Medicine Lake volcano, California, based on paleomagnetic secular variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champion, Duane E.; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.

    1994-08-01

    Nearly 500 cores were collected from the postglacial Giant Crater lava field on the south flank of Medicine Lake volcano. The basaltic lavas form a continuous set of lava flows which display strong chemical zonation from initially erupted calc-alkaline basaltic andesite to final primitive basalt of tholeiitic affinity. Six chemical-stratigraphic groups have been recognized and mapped. The eruptive sequence was sampled at numerous sites both to determine the characteristic paleomagnetic direction of each chemical group and to estimate the duration of the eruption inferred from secular variation of the geomagnetic field. Well-grouped mean directions of magnetization were obtained for 41 sites in the Giant Crater lava field. Mean directions of magnetization determined for the lava field are nearly identical. The likelihood of any extended time interval for the eruption of the different lava types is extremely small, and the data suggest an eruptive event of less than 30 years duration, analogous to historic Hawaiian eruptions. However, the average of groups 1-4, which cannot be distinguished paleomagnetically from each other, is slightly different statistically from that of the average of groups 5 and 6, which have similar directions. A time gap of 10 +/- 5 years is inferred between eruption of group 4 and 5 lavas based on analysis of the probability of the observed angular difference of 1.27 deg +/- 0.84 deg between their mean directions and by comparison of this angular difference to calculated filed directions with similar declination and inclination determined from spherical harmonic models of the geomagnetic field for the time period 1945-1990. About 200 oriented cores were also collected from predecessor and successor basaltic lava flows on the upper flanks of the volcano. Together with remanent directions from lavas of the Snake River Plain the data define a clockwise loop of secular variation.

  9. Water-quality effects on Baker Lake of recent volcanic activity at Mount Baker, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bortleson, Gilbert Carl; Wilson, Reed T.; Foxworthy, B.L.

    1976-01-01

    Increased volcanic activity on Mount Baker, which began in March 1975, represents the greatest known activity of a Cascade Range volcano since eruptions at Lassen Peak, Calif. during 1914-17. Emissions of dust and increased emanations of steam, other gases, and heat from the Sherman Crater area of the mountain focused attention on the possibility of hazardous events, including lava flows, pyroclastic eruptions, avalanches, and mudflows. However, the greatest undesirable natural results that have been observed after one year of the increased activity are an increase in local atmospheric pollution and a decrease in the quality of some local water resources, including Baker Lake. Baker Lake, a hydropower reservoir behind Upper Baker Dam, supports a valuable fishery resource and also is used for recreation. The lake's feedwater is from Baker River and many smaller streams, some of which, like Boulder Creek, drain parts of Mount Baker. Boulder Creek receives water from Sherman Crater, and its channel is a likely route for avalanches or mudflows that might originate in the crater area. Boulder Creek drains only about 5 percent of the total drainage area of Baker Lake, but during 1975 carried sizeable but variable loads of acid and dissolved minerals into the lake. Sulfurous gases and the fumarole dust from Sherman Crater are the main sources for these materials, which are brought into upper Boulder Creek by meltwater from the crater. In September 1973, before the increased volcanic activity, Boulder Creek near the lake had a pH of 6.0-6.6; after the increase the pH ranged as low as about 3.5. Most nearby streams had pH values near 7. On April 29, in Boulder Creek the dissolved sulfate concentration was 6 to 29 times greater than in nearby creeks or in Baker River; total iron was 18-53 times greater than in nearby creeks; and other major dissolved constituents generally 2 to 7 times greater than in the other streams. The short-term effects on Baker Lake of the acidic

  10. Nano-Diamonds in melt inclusions in ortho- and clinopyropxene from mantle xenoliths, Salt Lake Crater, Hawaii.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, R.; Rocholl, A.

    2002-12-01

    We observed nanocrystalline diamonds in magmatic rocks from Hawaii (Salt Lake Crater). They occur in mantle xenoliths (Ga-pyroxenites) in melt inclusions in ortho- and clinopyroxene. The xenoliths are incorporated in the host lava and have been transported from the Earth's interior to the surface by volcanic eruptions. Consequently, such xenoliths allow an insight into the structure, the chemical composition and the P-T conditions of the Earth's mantle. Salt Lake Crater pyroxenites are interpreted as high-pressure basaltic cumulates trapped and adiabatically cooled within the Hawaiian lithosphere at 1000o - 1150oC and 1.6 - 2.5 GPa (50-80 km). The melt inclusions were investigated by using TEM and AEM. Specimen preparation was performed by focused ion beam technique (FIB) at the GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (GFZ). Promising melt inclusions in pyroxene have been selected from thin sections. FIB technique uses oil-free vacuum to avoid contamination of the foil. The resulting TEM foil has the dimensions 20 μm x 10 μm x 100 nm. Coating of the TEM ready foil with carbon was not necessary. Nanocrystalline diamonds are embedded in melt droplets, which are enclosed in pyroxene crystals. The melt inclusions with an average diameter of about 5 æm are always associated with a fluid phase or gas. The matrix of the melt inclusion consists of amorphous material (basaltic glass) containing very small inclusions of e.g. ZnS, Fe-Pd-S, Ag and In-rich minerals, native nanocrystalline iron and copper. Most of the diamonds occur in approximately rectangular shaped aggregates of polycrystalline diamonds, between 20 and 500 nm in size. The grain size of individual diamonds within each aggregate varies from 5 to 50 nm. The diamonds have been identified by X-ray analysis, electron diffraction and by EELS. The carbon K-edge in the EEL spectra allows to discriminate diamond, graphite and amorphous carbon. Some of the diamonds are single crystals; most of them are polycrystalline. Electron

  11. Ground Penetrating Radar Images of Tephra Deposits Within the Active Crater and on the Crater Rim of Irazú Volcano, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, R.; Kruse, S.; Alvarado, G.; Ramirez, C.

    2006-12-01

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) is a proven tool in a variety of volcanic settings, and offers the promise of imaging strata inaccessible to outcrops or trenching. Here we examine the imaging capabilities of GPR in the complex sequence of surge and fall deposits from the 1963-1963 eruption sequence of Irazú volcano, Costa Rica. We compare radar profiles within the active crater and on the crater rim with field observations and the generalized stratigraphic section of this eruption sequence described by Alvarado (1993). The Irazú GPR transects on the active crater, collected with 100 and 200 MHz antennas, show a strong reflector that correlates well with the base of the 1963 tephra deposits. The spectral characteristics of the traces from deposits within the active crater suggest the presence of laminated zones in which layers are too fine to be resolved individually. The profiles on the crater rim illuminate changing bed thicknesses as a function of distance from the vent, as well as the patterns of post-depositional sediment transport. The diffractions associated with volcanic blocks indicate many blocks are associated with sag features in which adjacent strata are depressed more than the height of the block.

  12. Complex Explosive Volcanic Activity on the Moon in Oppenheimer Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horgan, B. H. N.; Bennett, K. A.; Gaddis, L. R.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Allen, C.; Hayne, P. O.; Bell, J. F., III; Paige, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Oppenheimer is a floor-fractured crater located within the South Pole-Aitken basin on the Moon, and exhibits more than a dozen localized pyroclastic deposits associated with the fractures. Localized pyroclastic deposits on the Moon are thought to form as a result of intermittently explosive Vulcanian eruptions under low effusion rates, in contrast to the higher-effusion rates and Hawaiian-style fire fountaining inferred to form larger regional deposits. However, using new methods to derive iron mineralogy from Chandrayaan-1 Moon Mineralogy Mapper near-infrared spectra, we find that the mineralogy of the Oppenheimer pyroclastics is not consistent with a simple Vulcanian eruption mechanism. The Oppenheimer pyroclastic deposits are mixtures of pyroxene sourced from the crater floor, juvenile clinopyroxene (CPX), and juvenile iron-rich glass. A Vulcanian (plugged conduit) eruption should cause significant country rock to be incorporated into the pyroclastic deposit. However, large areas within many of the deposits exhibit spectra consistent with high abundances of juvenile phases (glass or CPX mixed with glass) and very little floor material. Thus, we propose that at least some portion of these deposits must have erupted via a Strombolian or more continuous fire fountaining eruption at higher effusion rates. Significant along-fracture mineralogical variations within many of the deposits suggest multiple eruptions and that eruption styles may have been variable in time and space. Diviner mid-infrared spectra also indicate that these local deposits may be much more iron-rich than regional pyroclastic deposits, and thus are valuable resource targets. These results suggest that local lunar pyroclastic deposits may have a more complex origin and mode of emplacement than previously thought.

  13. The Lake Nyos gas disaster: chemical and isotopic evidence in waters and dissolved gases from three Cameroonian crater lakes, Nyos, Monoun and Wum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusakabe, Minoru; Ohsumi, Takashi; Aramaki, Shigeo

    1989-11-01

    To better understand the cause of the Nyos gas disaster of August 21, 1986, we conducted geochemical and limnological surveys in October 1986, of three lakes (Nyos, Monoun and Wum) which are located in the Cameroon volcanic zone that is characterized by a prevalence of young alkaline basalts and basanitoids. Lake Wum was studied as a non-active control: CO 2 is dissolved in significant concentrations (about {1}/{5} of saturation) in gas-active lakes (Nyos and Monoun), but is virtually absent in Lake Wum. Stable isotopic ratios of total dissolved carbon ( δ13C= -3% for Nyos and -5.5% for Monoun) and of helium (5.7 Ratm for Nyos and 3.6 Ratm for Monoun) indicate a mantle origin of these gases. However, SO 42- and Cl concentrations are found to be very low. Concentrations of dissolved chemical species like Fe 2+, Mg 2+, Ca 2+, and HCO 3- are high in the two gas-active lakes, whereas they are very low in the gas-inactive lake. High salinities in the gas-active lakes are probably due to dissolution of indigenous mafic rocks and transported lateritic soil in acidic CO 2-rich, warm water. The gas-active lakes are characterized by increasing temperature and salinity with increasing depth, indicating an active influx of heat and dissolved materials at the bottom. Density estimates show that the lake water is stably stratified in spite of the inverse temperature profile of the lakes, on account of dissolved chemical species. The concentrations of dissolved carbonate species (CO 2(aq) and HCO 3-) are positively correlated with those of ionic dissolved species, indicating their common occurrence in the bottom water. The August 1986 gas bursts from Lake Nyos were most likely caused by rapid exsolution of dissolved CO 2 within the lake; an explosive process such as a phreatic eruption or a CO 2 gas-jetting from beneath the bottom is unlikely because of low concentrations of Cl - and SO 42-, no oxygen isotopic shift, low turbidity, and no reported perturbation of the bottom

  14. Bacterioplankton communities of Crater Lake, OR: Dynamic changes with euphotic zone food web structure and stable deep water populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Urbach, E.; Vergin, K.L.; Larson, G.L.; Giovannoni, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    The distribution of bacterial and archaeal species in Crater Lake plankton varies dramatically over depth and with time, as assessed by hybridization of group-specific oligonucleotides to RNA extracted from lakewater. Nonmetric, multidimensional scaling (MDS) analysis of relative bacterial phylotype densities revealed complex relationships among assemblages sampled from depth profiles in July, August and September of 1997 through 1999. CL500-11 green nonsulfur bacteria (Phylum Chloroflexi) and marine Group I crenarchaeota are consistently dominant groups in the oxygenated deep waters at 300 and 500 m. Other phylotypes found in the deep waters are similar to surface and mid-depth populations and vary with time. Euphotic zone assemblages are dominated either by ??-proteobacteria or CL120-10 verrucomicrobia, and ACK4 actinomycetes. MDS analyses of euphotic zone populations in relation to environmental variables and phytoplankton and zooplankton population structures reveal apparent links between Daphnia pulicaria zooplankton population densities and microbial community structure. These patterns may reflect food web interactions that link kokanee salmon population densities to community structure of the bacterioplankton, via fish predation on Daphnia with cascading consequences to Daphnia bacterivory and predation on bacterivorous protists. These results demonstrate a stable bottom-water microbial community. They also extend previous observations of food web-driven changes in euphotic zone bacterioplankton community structure to an oligotrophic setting. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  15. Subsurface geology, ancient hydrothermal systems and crater excavation processes beneath Lake Rotomahana: Evidence from lithic clasts of the 1886 AD Rotomahana Pyroclastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittari, A.; Briggs, R. M.; Bowyer, D. A.

    2016-03-01

    The craters associated with the 1886 AD phreatomagmatic Rotomahana eruption, Okataina Volcanic Centre, New Zealand, and the near-vent geology are now hidden beneath Lake Rotomahana and its post-eruptive sediment fill. Lithic clasts from the near-vent lithic lapilli ash deposits of the Rotomahana Pyroclastics are used in this study to trace geological and geothermal conditions before the eruption, as well as vent excavation dynamics. Near-vent deposit characteristics were described in the field, representative lithic clasts were documented petrographically, and unaltered clasts were analysed for major and trace element compositions. The majority of the lithic clasts were rhyolites with subordinate ignimbrites and hydrothermally altered clasts, and trace siltstone and silicified clasts. The rhyolites were classified into four petrographic groups according to phenocryst content and assemblage and were more diverse with respect to geochemical compositions. Most of the rhyolite lithics in the Rotomahana Pyroclastics did not match the rhyolite domes exposed subaerially around the lake, but did have affinities with the pre-Matahina caldera Wairua Rhyolite, and potentially other older non-exposed domes. Ignimbrites most likely correlated either to the Matahina ignimbrite or older non-exposed units. Hydrothermally altered rhyolite and ignimbrite lithic clasts are common and suggest that there has been a long-lived hydrothermal system in this sector, possibly dating back to early activity of the Okataina Volcanic Centre. The diversity in lithic types indicate a spatial variation in country rock lithology and strength, which probably contributed to the vent position and morphology along the Rotomahana fissure.

  16. A Fluorescein Tracer Release Experiment in the Hydrothermally Active Crater of Vailulu'u Volcano, Samoa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, S. R.; Staudigel, H.; Workman, R.; Koppers, A.; Girard, A.

    2001-12-01

    Vailulu'u (Rockne) volcano marks the active end of the Samoa hotspot chain. The volcano is 4400 meters high, with a summit crater 2000 meters wide by 400 meters deep and summit peaks reaching to within 600 meters of the sea surface. The crater is hydrothermally active, as witnessed by intense particulate concentrations in the water column (values to 1.4 NTU's), a particulate smog ``halo'' surrounding the summit and extending out many kilometers, high Mn concentrations and 3He/4He ratios (values to 3.8 ppb and 8.6 Ra, respectively), and bottom-water temperature anomalies of 0.5oC. Basalts from the crater have been dated in the range 5-50 years, and likely reflect eruptions associated with a 1995 earthquake swarm. On April 3, 2001, we released a 20 kg point-source charge of fluorescein dye 30 meters above the 975m deep crater floor. The dye was dissolved in a 180 liter mixture of propanol and water, adjusted to a density 1.3 per mil heavier than the ambient water at the release depth. Released from a rubberized bag by means of a galvanic link. First detection of the released dye was 39 hours after the deployment; the dye was in a 50 meter thick layer, with a concentration peak at 900 meters (relative to the release depth of 945m). Tracking was carried out by a CTD-based fluorometer operated in tow-yo mode from the U.S.C.G. Icebreaker Polar Sea. The detection limit was 25 picograms/gram, and the maximum detected concentration was 18,000 pg/g (if evenly dispersed in the lower 150 meters of water in the crater, the expected concentration would be approx. 130 pg/g). While the dye pool was only surveyed for 4 days due to ship-transit constraints, significant horizontal and vertical dispersion was apparent. Vertical dispersion velocities were typically 0.05 cm/sec; horizontal velocities were typically higher by a factor of 10. An approximate diapycnal or eddy diffusivity, K, can be calculated from the rate of vertical spreading of the dye layer: K = Z2/2(t-t0), where Z is

  17. Ages of calderas, large explosive craters and active volcanoes in the Kuril-Kamchatka region, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braitseva, O. A.; Melekestsev, I. V.; Ponomareva, V. V.; Sulerzhitsky, L. D.

    1995-12-01

    The ages of most of calderas, large explosive craters and active volcanoes in the Kuril-Kamchatka region have been determined by extensive geological, geomorphological, tephrochronological and isotopic geochronological studies, including more than 600 14C dates. Eight ‘Krakatoa-type’ and three ‘Hawaiian-type’ calderas and no less than three large explosive craters formed here during the Holocene. Most of the Late Pleistocene Krakatoa-type calderas were established around 30 000 40 000 years ago. The active volcanoes are geologically very young, with maximum ages of about 40 000 50 000 years. The overwhelming majority of recently active volcanic cones originated at the very end of the Late Pleistocene or in the Holocene. These studies show that all Holocene stratovolcanoes in Kamchatka were emplaced in the Holocene only in the Eastern volcanic belt. Periods of synchronous, intensified Holocene volcanic activity occurred within the time intervals of 7500 7800 and 1300 1800 14C years BP.

  18. Uranium and minor-element partitioning in Fe-Ti oxides and zircon from partially melted granodiorite, Crater Lake, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    La Tourrette, T.Z.; Burnett, D.S. ); Bacon C.R. )

    1991-02-01

    Crystal-liquid partitioning in Fe-Ti oxides and zircon was studied in partially melted granodiorite blocks ejected during the climactic eruption of Mt. Mazama (Crater Lake), Oregon. The blocks, which contain up to 33% rhyolite glass (75 wt% SiO{sub 2}), are interpreted to be portions of the magma chamber walls that were torn off during eruption. The glass is clear and well homogenized for all measured elements except Zr. Results for Fe-Ti oxides give D{sub U}{sup oxide/liq} {approx} 0.1. Partitioning of Mg, Mn, Al, Si, V, and Cr in Fe-Ti oxides indicates that grains surrounded by glass are modestly well equilibrated with the melt for many of the minor elements, while those that are inclusions in relict plagioclase are not. Uranium and ytterbium inhomogeneities in zircons indicate that the zircons have only partially equilibrated with the melt and that uranium appears to have been diffusing out of the zircons have only partially equilibrated with the melt and that uranium appears to have been diffusing out of the zircons faster that the zircons were dissolving. Based on the authors measurements and given their low abundances in most rocks, Fe-Ti oxides probably do not play a major role in U-Th fractional during partial melting. The partial melts were undersaturated with zircon and apatite, but both phases are present in the authors samples. This demonstrates an actual case of nonequilibrium source retention of accessory phases, which in general could be an important trace element fractionation mechanism. Their results do not support the hypothesis that liquid structure is the dominant factor controlling trace-element partitioning in high-silica rhyolites.

  19. Impact of acid effluent from Kawah Ijen crater lake on irrigated agricultural soils: Soil chemical processes and plant uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rotterdam-Los, A. M. D.; Heikens, A.; Vriend, S. P.; van Bergen, M. J.; van Gaans, P. F. M.

    2008-12-01

    Volcanogenic contamination of irrigation water, caused by effluent from the hyperacid Ijen crater lake, has severely affected the properties of agricultural soils in East Java, Indonesia. From a comparison of acidified topsoil with subsoil and with top- and subsoil in a reference area, we identified processes responsible for changes in soil and soil solution chemistry induced by acid irrigation water, with emphasis on the nutrients Ca, Mg, Fe, and Mn, and on Al, which may become phytotoxic under acid conditions in soils. Compositional data for bulk soil composition and selective extractions with 1 M KCl and 0.2 M acid ammonium oxalate are used in a mass balance approach to specify element fluxes, including uptake by rice plants. The results show that input via irrigation water has produced an increase in the total aluminum content in the affected topsoil, which is of the same order of magnitude as the increase in labile Al. High bioavailability of Al, as reflected by concentrations in KCl extracts, is consistent with elevated concentrations observed in rice plants. In contrast, and despite the high input via irrigation water, Ca and Mg concentrations have decreased in all measured soil fractions through dissolution of amorphous phases and minerals, and through competition of Al for adsorption sites on the exchange complex and plant roots. Strong leaching is also evident for Fe and especially Mn. In terms of the overall mass balance of the topsoil, plant uptake of Al, Ca, Fe, Mg and Mn is negligible. If the use of acid irrigation would be stopped and the soil pH were to increase to values above 4.5, the observed phytotoxicity of Al will be halted. However, crops may then become fully dependent on the input from irrigation water or fertilizer for essential elements, due to the previous removal from the topsoil through leaching.

  20. Uranium and minor-element partitioning in Fe-Ti oxides and zircon from partially melted granodiorite, Crater Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tourrette, T.Z.L.; Burnett, D.S.; Bacon, C.R.

    1991-01-01

    Crystal-liquid partitioning in Fe-Ti oxides and zircon was studied in partially melted granodiorite blocks ejected during the climactic eruption of Mt. Mazama (Crater Lake), Oregon. The blocks, which contain up to 33% rhyolite glass (75 wt% SiO2), are interpreted to be portions of the magma chamber walls that were torn off during eruption. The glass is clear and well homogenized for all measured elements except Zr. Results for Fe-Ti oxides give DUoxide/liq ??? 0.1. Partitioning of Mg, Mn, Al, Si, V, and Cr in Fe-Ti oxides indicates that grains surrounded by glass are moderately well equilibrated with the melt for many of the minor elements, while those that are inclusions in relict plagioclase are not. Uranium and ytterbium inhomogeneities in zircons indicate that the zircons have only partially equilibrated with the melt and that uranium appears to have been diffusing out of the zircons faster than the zircons were dissolving. Minimum U, Y, and P concentrations in zircons give maximum DUzrc/liq = 13,DYzrc/liq = 23, and DPzrc/liq = 1, but these are considerably lower than reported by other workers for U and Y. Based on our measurements and given their low abundances in most rocks, Fe-Ti oxides probably do not play a major role in U-Th fractionation during partial melting. The partial melts were undersaturated with zircon and apatite, but both phases are present in our samples. This demonstrates an actual case of non-equilibrium source retention of accessory phases, which in general could be an important trace-element fractionation mechanism. Our results do not support the hypothesis that liquid structure is the dominant factor controlling trace-element partitioning in high-silica rhyolites. Rough calculations based on Zr gradients in the glass indicate that the samples could have been partially molten for 800 to 8000 years. ?? 1991.

  1. Hydrothermal activity and subsurface soil complexity: implication for outgassing processes at Solfatara crater, Campi Flegrei caldera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanaro, Cristian; Mayer, Klaus; Scheu, Bettina; Isaia, Roberto; Mangiacapra, Annarita; Gresse, Marceau; Vandemeulebrouck, Jean; Moretti, Roberto; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-04-01

    The Solfatara area and its fumaroles are the main surface phenomena of the vigorous hydrothermal activity within the active Campi Flegrei caldera system. The existing fault system appears to have a major control on outgassing which in turn leads to a strong alteration of the volcanic products. Moreover the maar-nature of the crater, and its filling by more recent volcanic deposits, resulted in a complex fractured and multilayered cap to the rising gases. As a consequence the hydrothermal alteration differently affects the rocks within the crater, including pyroclastic fallout ash beds, pyroclastic density current deposits, breccias and lavas. The induced changes in both original microstructure and physical and mechanical properties of the rocks control the outgassing behavior. Here, we report results from a measurement survey conducted in July 2015, and aimed to characterize the in-situ physical (temperature, humidity) and mechanical (permeability, strength, stiffness) properties. The survey also included a mapping of the surficial hydrothermal features and their distributions. Chemical analyses and laboratory measurements (porosity, granulometry) of selected samples were additionally performed. Results show that the crater floor area comprises very different kinds of soils, from fine grained, thin laminated deposits around the two bubbling Fangaia mud pools, to crusted hummock formations along the SE and NE border of the crater. Dry and solid alunite-rich deposits are present in the western and southern part. Furthermore we observed evidences of a beginning of crust formation within the central part of the crater. A large range of surface temperatures, from boiling point to ambient temperature, were measured throughout the surveyed area. Outgassing occurs mainly along the crack system, which has also generated the crusted hummocks. Elsewhere the fluid circulation in the subsoil is favored by the presence of coarse and highly porous sulfur-hardened levels, whereas

  2. Control of the geomorphic evolution of an active crater: Popocatpetl (Mexico) 1994-2003.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés, N.; Zamorano, J. J.; Palacios, D.; Macias, J. L.; Sanjosé, J. J.

    2009-04-01

    Volcanic activity often causes intense and successive geomorphic changes to occur inside a crater. In terms of hazard mitigation, it is important to understand the cause of these changes whether they be exterior lava spills, sequences of explosions or massive glacier melt. Access to an active crater, however, is very difficult and dangerous, so analytical approaches involving remote study must substitute actual fieldwork. Several studies done at Popocatepetl volcano during its most recent eruptive phase that began in December 1994, use remote techniques and are described in Cruz-Reyna et al. (1998), Wright et al. (2002), Martín-Del Pozo et al. (2003), Tanarro et al. (2005), Matiella et al. (2008), and Zamorano et al. (1996,1998), among others. The compendium of results reveals that recent volcanic activity on Popocatépetl is characterized by successive dome growth and destruction inside the crater. Macias and Siebe (2005) even suggest that the walls of the crater may no longer withstand future dome growth. The purpose of this study is to understand the morphologic evolution of the interior of the crater during the most active period of the present eruptive phase on Popocatepetl from 1994 to 2003. The methodology is based on photogrammetry techniques that have been used successfully at volcanic sites by Donnadieu et al. (2003), and on a GIS to organize information, draft maps and 3-D images, and to calculate spatial variations in landforms (Procter et al., 2006; Schilling et al., 2006). Traditional aerial photo interpretation was used for 22 triplets selected from a collection of photos taken by the Mexican Highway and Transport Secretariat, from 1982 to 2003, and enabled us to draft geomorphic maps of the interior of the crater. The photos and maps were rectified and georeferenced with ArcGis software, and then the maps were digitized. The areas containing morphologic units associated with a date (exterior crater walls, colluvial ramps and recent volcanic complex

  3. A comparative Study of Circulation Patterns at Active Lava Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Einat; Oppenheimer, Clive; Spampinato, Letizia; Hernandez, Pedro; Unglert, Kathi

    2016-04-01

    Lava lakes present a rare opportunity to study magma dynamics in a large scaled-up "crucible" and provide a unique natural laboratory to ground-truth dynamic models of magma circulation. The persistence of lava lakes allows for long-term observations of flow dynamics and of lava properties, especially compared to surface lava flows. There are currently five persistent lava lakes in the world: Halemaumau in Kilauea (Hawaii, USA), Erta Ale (Ethiopia), Nyiragongo (Congo), Erebus (Antarctica), and Villarica (Chile). Marum and Benbow craters of Ambrym volcano (Vanuatu) and Masaya (Nicaragua) have often hosted lava lakes as well. We use visible-light and thermal infrared time-lapse and video footage collected at all above lakes (except Villarica, where the lake is difficult to observe), and compare the circulation patterns recorded. We calculate lake surface motion from the footage using the optical flow method (Lev et al., 2012) to produce 2D velocity fields. We mined both the surface temperature field and the surface velocity field for patterns using machine learning techniques such as "self-organizing maps (SOMs)" and "principle component analysis (PCA)". We use automatic detection technique to study the configuration of crustal plates at the lakes' surface. We find striking differences among the lakes, in flow direction, flow speed, frequency of changes in flow direction and speed, location and consistency of upwelling and downwelling, and crustal plate configuration. We relate the differences to lake size, shallow conduit geometry, lava viscosity, crystal and gas content, and crust integrity.

  4. The effect of pressurized magma chamber growth on melt migration and pre-caldera vent locations through time at Mount Mazama, Crater Lake, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlstrom, Leif; Wright, Heather M.; Bacon, Charles R.

    2015-02-01

    The pattern of eruptions at long-lived volcanic centers provides a window into the co-evolution of crustal magma transport, tectonic stresses, and unsteady magma generation at depth. Mount Mazama in the Oregon Cascades has seen variable activity over the last 400 ky, including the 50 km3 climactic eruption at ca. 7.7 ka that produced Crater Lake caldera. The physical mechanisms responsible for the assembly of silicic magma reservoirs that are the precursors to caldera-forming eruptions are poorly understood. Here we argue that the spatial and temporal distribution of geographically clustered volcanic vents near Mazama reflects the development of a centralized magma chamber that fed the climactic eruption. Time-averaged eruption rates at Mount Mazama imply an order of magnitude increase in deep magma influx prior to the caldera-forming event, suggesting that unsteady mantle melting triggered a chamber growth episode that culminated in caldera formation. We model magma chamber-dike interactions over ∼50 ky preceding the climactic eruption to fit the observed distribution of surface eruptive vents in space and time, as well as petrologically estimated deep influx rates. Best fitting models predict an expanding zone of dike capture caused by a growing, oblate spheroidal magma chamber with 10-30 MPa of overpressure. This growing zone of chamber influence causes closest approaching regional mafic vent locations as well as more compositionally evolved Mazama eruptions to migrate away from the climactic eruptive center, returning as observed to the center after the chamber drains during the caldera-forming eruption.

  5. The effect of pressurized magma chamber growth on melt migration and pre-caldera vent locations through time at Mount Mazama, Crater Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karlstrom, Leif; Wright, Heather M.; Bacon, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    The pattern of eruptions at long-lived volcanic centers provides a window into the co-evolution of crustal magma transport, tectonic stresses, and unsteady magma generation at depth. Mount Mazama in the Oregon Cascades has seen variable activity over the last 400 ky, including the 50 km3 climactic eruption at ca. 7.7 ka that produced Crater Lake caldera. The physical mechanisms responsible for the assembly of silicic magma reservoirs that are the precursors to caldera-forming eruptions are poorly understood. Here we argue that the spatial and temporal distribution of geographically clustered volcanic vents near Mazama reflects the development of a centralized magma chamber that fed the climactic eruption. Time-averaged eruption rates at Mount Mazama imply an order of magnitude increase in deep magma influx prior to the caldera-forming event, suggesting that unsteady mantle melting triggered a chamber growth episode that culminated in caldera formation. We model magma chamber–dike interactions over ∼50 ky preceding the climactic eruption to fit the observed distribution of surface eruptive vents in space and time, as well as petrologically estimated deep influx rates. Best fitting models predict an expanding zone of dike capture caused by a growing, oblate spheroidal magma chamber with 10–30 MPa of overpressure. This growing zone of chamber influence causes closest approaching regional mafic vent locations as well as more compositionally evolved Mazama eruptions to migrate away from the climactic eruptive center, returning as observed to the center after the chamber drains during the caldera-forming eruption.

  6. Anomalous quartz from the Roter Kamm impact crater, Namibia: Evidence for post-impact hydrothermal activity

    SciTech Connect

    Koeberl, C. Univ. of Vienna ); Fredriksson, K. ); Goetzinger, M. ); Reimold, W.U. )

    1989-08-01

    Centimeter-sized quartz pebbles have been found on the rim of the Roter Kamm impact crater. The Roter Kamm crater has a diameter of about 2.5 km and is situated in the Namib Desert, SWA/Namibia. Because of the sand coverage, impact products are exposed exclusively in the form of ejecta on the crater rim. The quartz pebbles were found close to the main deposits of the impact breccias and show signs of wind abrasion. Thin sections revealed that the pebbles consist of individual quartz domains that are up to 1 mm in size. Under crossed nicols (polarized light), all individual domains show extinction almost simultaneously within {plus minus}2{degree}, which is a rare phenomenon. Microprobe studies, neutron activation analyses, and X-ray diffractometry confirmed that the material consists of pure quartz. The quartz contains three different types of fluid inclusions: primary inclusions that record the formation conditions of the quartz, very small (<1 {mu}m) secondary inclusions associated with the grain boundaries, and late inclusions of irregular size. Freezing point depression measurements of the primary inclusions indicate fluid salinities between 18.3 and 19.6 wt% NaCl. Homogenization temperatures (T{sub h}) for the primary inclusions range from 165 to 250{degree}C. The quartz and the primary inclusions may provide evidence for a post-impact phase of extensive hydrothermal activity, generated by the residual heat from the kinetic energy of the impact.

  7. Infrasound tremor from bubble burst eruptions in the viscous shallow crater lake of White Island, New Zealand, and its implications for interpreting volcanic source processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, Arthur; Kennedy, Ben; Edwards, Matt; Jousset, Philippe; Scheu, Bettina

    2016-11-01

    White Island volcano, New Zealand, produced two periods (January-February and July 2013) of episodic and persistent eruptions through a viscous shallow mud/sulphur pool. The eruptions included an initial hemispherical bubble burst, which was intermittently followed by an up-channel gas jet, and finally a late stage heaving of a mud/sulphur/water suspension. The late stage heave was systematically directed south-eastward as far as 30-40 m from the vent. The associated infrasound time-series included harmonic tremor on permanent stations WIZ and WSRZ. Detailed inspection showed that the tremor was composed of numerous discrete double pulse events without a strong periodic event repetition. The first pulse had highly similar waveforms event-to-event and a notable distortion of the waveform period between the two infrasound stations located on opposites sides from the directed eruption source. The second pulse occurred about 1.5-2.5 s later and was weakly observed on station WSRZ. Where the video can be rigorously linked to the double pulse infrasound signals we interpret aspects of the distinctive eruptive regimes. For this case, the regime dynamics are driven by the propagation of numerous discrete gas slugs though the shallow viscous muddy crater lake, each generating a distinct bubble burst with subsequent eruption heave and associated double pulse infrasound events. The double pulse events are the source of the persistent harmonic tremor having fundamental and overtone spectral frequencies but are not interpreted as related to cavity resonance or a repetitious comb function. Instead the activity is produced by a single event producing a specific two pulse source time function. The observed distortion in the first pulse wave period at WIZ and WSRZ may be ascribed to a Doppler shift associated with the directivity observed in the initial jet/heave eruption process. We surmise that double pulse source dynamics and directivity effects may be generically extended to

  8. Complex histories of repeated gene flow in Cameroon crater lake cichlids cast doubt on one of the clearest examples of sympatric speciation.

    PubMed

    Martin, Christopher H; Cutler, Joseph S; Friel, John P; Dening Touokong, Cyrille; Coop, Graham; Wainwright, Peter C

    2015-06-01

    One of the most celebrated examples of sympatric speciation in nature are monophyletic radiations of cichlid fishes endemic to Cameroon crater lakes. However, phylogenetic inference of monophyly may not detect complex colonization histories involving some allopatric isolation, such as double invasions obscured by genome-wide gene flow. Population genomic approaches are better suited to test hypotheses of sympatric speciation in these cases. Here, we use comprehensive sampling from all four sympatric crater lake cichlid radiations in Cameroon and outgroups across Africa combined with next-generation sequencing to genotype tens of thousands of SNPs. We find considerable evidence of gene flow between all four radiations and neighboring riverine populations after initial colonization. In a few cases, some sympatric species are more closely related to outgroups than others, consistent with secondary gene flow facilitating their speciation. Our results do not rule out sympatric speciation in Cameroon cichlids, but rather reveal a complex history of speciation with gene flow, including allopatric and sympatric phases, resulting in both reproductively isolated species and incipient species complexes. The best remaining non-cichlid examples of sympatric speciation all involve assortative mating within microhabitats. We speculate that this feature may be necessary to complete the process of sympatric speciation in nature.

  9. Location and sampling of aqueous and hydrothermal deposits in martian impact craters.

    PubMed

    Newsom, H E; Hagerty, J J; Thorsos, I E

    2001-01-01

    Do large craters on Mars represent sites that contain aqueous and hydrothermal deposits that provide clues to astrobiological processes? Are these materials available for sampling in large craters? Several lines of evidence strongly support the exploration of large impact craters to study deposits important for astrobiology. The great depth of impact craters, up to several kilometers relative to the surrounding terrain, can allow the breaching of local aquifers, providing a source of water for lakes and hydrothermal systems. Craters can also be filled with water from outflow channels and valley networks to form large lakes with accompanying sedimentation. Impact melt and uplifted basement heat sources in craters > 50 km in diameter should be sufficient to drive substantial hydrothermal activity and keep crater lakes from freezing for thousands of years, even under cold climatic conditions. Fluid flow in hydrothermal systems is focused at the edges of large planar impact melt sheets, suggesting that the edge of the melt sheets will have experienced substantial hydrothermal alteration and mineral deposition. Hydrothermal deposits, fine-grained lacustrine sediments, and playa evaporite deposits may preserve evidence for biogeochemical processes that occurred in the aquifers and craters. Therefore, large craters may represent giant Petri dishes for culturing preexisting life on Mars and promoting biogeochemical processes. Landing sites must be identified in craters where access to the buried lacustrine sediments and impact melt deposits is provided by processes such as erosion from outflow channels, faulting, aeolian erosion, or excavation by later superimposed cratering events. Very recent gully formation and small impacts within craters may allow surface sampling of organic materials exposed only recently to the harsh oxidizing surface environment.

  10. Measurements of slope distances and vertical angles at Mount Baker and Mount Rainier, Washington, Mount Hood and Crater Lake, Oregon, and Mount Shasta and Lassen Peak, California, 1980-1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chadwick, W.W.

    1985-01-01

    Personnel of the U.S.Geological Survey's Cascades Volcano Observatory established trilateration networks at Mount Baker, Mount Rainier, Mount Hood, Crater Lake, Mount Shasta, and Lassen Peak in 1980-1984. These networks are capable of detecting changes in slope distance of several centimeters or more. The networks were established to provide baseline information on potentially active volcanoes and were designed along guidelines found useful at Mount St. Helens. Periodic reoccupation of the networks is planned as part of the overall monitoring program of Cascades volcanoes. Methodology, slope distance and vertical angle data, maps of the networks, and benchmark descriptions are presented in this report. Written benchmark descriptions are augmented by photographs, which we have found by experience to very useful in relocating the marks. All repeat measurements at the six volcanoes are probably within measurement error.

  11. Monitoring Morphological Changes at Colima Volcano Crater and Explosive Activity in 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez-Plascencia, C.; Nunez-Cornu, F.; Reyes-Davila, G.

    2003-12-01

    The Colima Volcano is located in the West of the Volcanic Mexican Belt, since February 10 1999 has presented an alternated efusive and explosive activity, which has generated constant morphological changes at the summit. As result of the several explosions occurred in 1999, 2000 and at the beginning of the year 2001, a new crater was formed with dimensions of 260 for 225 meters, and an average depth of 40 m. This crater began to be filled by the end of October 31, 2001 by a extrusion dome that reach an approximate volume 2 x 106 m3. In the first week of February 2002 this dome reach the edge of the crater, beginning to form lava flows by the western, northeastern, and south flanks. This effusive activity continued in 2002, and small gas emission and explosions were observed. In April 2003 the number of explosions and degassings became more frequent in the dome, this activity was registred by the seismic networks (RESCO and RESJAL) and recorded by video cameras located at Jalisco Civil Defense Nevado Base, 5 km away of the volcano. Aerial reconnaissance carried out in May 16 showed a complete change in the morphology of the dome as was observed in February 2002, identifying a new crater with a elipsoidal concave shape with approximate dimensions of 140 x 110 m and a depth in its central part of 15 mts. In the SE flank we observed another crater with similar form to the previous one whose dimensions are of 30 x 20 m with depth of 15 m, where continuous explosions have been appraised. At dawn of June 17, August 2 and 28, 2003 explosions happened that reached an altitude between 2000 and 3000 m, which were of smaller magnitude than happened the 22 of February of the 2000. These explosions were preceded of prolonged periods of tremor reported by RESCO. This explosive activity also present gas emission gas in form of jets, with duration from some seconds until more a than minute and altitude of approximate 500 meters, like the occurred on June 7, its point of emission

  12. Variability of passive gas emissions, seismicity, and deformation during crater lake growth at White Island Volcano, New Zealand, 2002-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Werner, C.; Hurst, T.; Scott, B.; Sherburn, S.; Christenson, B.W.; Britten, K.; Cole-Baker, J.; Mullan, B.

    2008-01-01

    We report on 4 years of airborne measurements of CO2, SO2, and H2S emission rates during a quiescent period at White Island volcano, New Zealand, beginning in 2003. During this time a significant crater lake emerged, allowing scrubbig processes to be investigated. CO2 emissions varied from a baseline of 250 to >2000 t d-1 and demonstrated clear annual cycling that was consistent with numbers of earthquake detections and annual changes in sea level. The annual variability was found to be most likely related to increases in the strain on the volcano during sea level highs, temporarily causing fractures to reduce in size in the upper conduit. SO2 emissions varied from 0 to >400 t d-1 and were clearly affected by scrubbing processes within the first year of take development. Scrubbing caused increases of SO42- and Cl- in lake waters, and the ratio of carbon to total sulphur suggested that elemental sulphur deposition was also significant in the lake during the first year. Careful measurements of the lake level and chemistry allowed estimates of the rate of H2O(g) and HCl(g) input into the lake and suggested that the molar abundances of major gas species (H2O, CO2, SO2, and HCl) during this quiescent phase were similar to fumarolic ratios observed between earlier eruptive periods. The volume of magma estimated from CO2 emissions (0.0 15-0.04 km3) was validated by Cl- increases in the lake, suggesting that the gas and magma are transported from deep to shallow depths as a closed system and likely become open in the upper conduit region. The absence of surface deformation further leads to a necessity of magma convection to supply and remove magma from the degassing depths. Two models of convection configurations are discussed. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Complex explosive volcanic activity on the Moon within Oppenheimer crater, Icarus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, Kristen A; Horgan, Briony H N; Gaddis, Lisa R.; Greenhagen, Benjamin T; Allen, Carlton C.; Hayne, Paul O; Bell, James F III; Paige, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Oppenheimer Crater is a floor-fractured crater located within the South Pole-Aitken basin on the Moon, and exhibits more than a dozen localized pyroclastic deposits associated with the fractures. Localized pyroclastic volcanism on the Moon is thought to form as a result of intermittently explosive Vulcanian eruptions under low effusion rates, in contrast to the higher-effusion rate, Hawaiian-style fire fountaining inferred to form larger regional deposits. We use Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera images and Diviner Radiometer mid-infrared data, Chandrayaan-1 orbiter Moon Mineralogy Mapper near-infrared spectra, and Clementine orbiter Ultraviolet/Visible camera images to test the hypothesis that the pyroclastic deposits in Oppenheimer crater were emplaced via Vulcanian activity by constraining their composition and mineralogy. Mineralogically, we find that the deposits are variable mixtures of orthopyroxene and minor clinopyroxene sourced from the crater floor, juvenile clinopyroxene, and juvenile iron-rich glass, and that the mineralogy of the pyroclastics varies both across the Oppenheimer deposits as a whole and within individual deposits. We observe similar variability in the inferred iron content of pyroclastic glasses, and note in particular that the northwest deposit, associated with Oppenheimer U crater, contains the most iron-rich volcanic glass thus far identified on the Moon, which could be a useful future resource. We propose that this variability in mineralogy indicates variability in eruption style, and that it cannot be explained by a simple Vulcanian eruption. A Vulcanian eruption should cause significant country rock to be incorporated into the pyroclastic deposit; however, large areas within many of the deposits exhibit spectra consistent with high abundances of juvenile phases and very little floor material. Thus, we propose that at least the most recent portion of these deposits must have erupted via a Strombolian or more continuous fire

  14. Sixty thousand years of magmatic volatile history before the caldera-forming eruption of Mount Mazama, Crater Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Heather M.; Bacon, Charles R.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Sisson, Thomas W.

    2012-01-01

    The well-documented eruptive history of Mount Mazama, Oregon, provides an excellent opportunity to use pre-eruptive volatile concentrations to study the growth of an explosive silicic magmatic system. Melt inclusions (MI) hosted in pyroxene and plagioclase crystals from eight dacitic–rhyodacitic eruptive deposits (71–7.7 ka) were analyzed to determine variations in volatile-element concentrations and changes in magma storage conditions leading up to and including the climactic eruption of Crater Lake caldera. Temperatures (Fe–Ti oxides) increased through the series of dacites, then decreased, and increased again through the rhyodacites (918–968 to ~950 to 845–895 °C). Oxygen fugacity began at nickel–nickel-oxide buffer (NNO) +0.8 (71 ka), dropped slightly to NNO +0.3, and then climbed to its highest value with the climactic eruption (7.7 ka) at NNO +1.1 log units. In parallel with oxidation state, maximum MI sulfur concentrations were high early in the eruptive sequence (~500 ppm), decreased (to ~200 ppm), and then increased again with the climactic eruption (~500 ppm). Maximum MI sulfur correlates with the Sr content (as a proxy for LREE, Ba, Rb, P2O5) of recharge magmas, represented by basaltic andesitic to andesitic enclaves and similar-aged lavas. These results suggest that oxidized Sr-rich recharge magmas dominated early and late in the development of the pre-climactic dacite–rhyodacite system. Dissolved H2O concentrations in MI do not, however, correlate with these changes in dominant recharge magma, instead recording vapor solubility relations in the developing shallow magma storage and conduit region. Dissolved H2O concentrations form two populations through time: the first at 3–4.6 wt% (with a few extreme values up to 6.1 wt%) and the second at ≤2.4 wt%. CO2 concentrations measured in a subset of these inclusions reach up to 240 ppm in early-erupted deposits (71 ka) and are below detection in climactic deposits (7.7 ka). Combined H2O and

  15. Possible seasonal activity of gullies on an sand dune (Russell crater, Mars)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouannic, Gwénaël.; Gargani, Julien; Costard, François

    2010-05-01

    Recent work has shown that gullies are among the most youthful features on Mars (Malin and Edgett, 2000; Costard et al., 2002; Reiss and Jaumann, 2003, Malin et al., 2006). Here we show that the gullies located on the Russell Crater dune are not only extremely youthful but also seem to be still actives. Various geomorphological features consistent with a seasonal activity suggest reactivated flows over the last three terrestrial years. Moreover, using an assemblage of 26 HiRISE images over a 31 month period (November 2006-May 2009) and superposed with MOLA tracks, we performed a quantitative analysis of the sinuosity and branching of the gullies on the shallow slope of the Russell crater. These geomorphologicals features suggest that debris flow have been formed by a fluid flow. As pure water generally is not thought to be stable on the surface of Mars under current conditions, these gullies could be indicative of a highly localized zone of meta-stability heretofore unidentified in the literature or by a highly mineralized water. Equally, the occurrence of the gullies on a dune may point to a near-surface source, i.e. near surface permafrost (Vedie et al. 2008), that could have been emplaced under conditions associated with late Amazonian obliquity excursions (Costard et al., 2002). Nevertheless, the precise composition of the fluid (CO2, mineralized water,…) is still unknown. Costard, F., Forget, F., Mangold, N., Peulvast, J.P., 2002. Formation of recent martian debris flow by melting of near-surface ground ice at high obliquity. Science, 295, 110-113. Malin, M.C., Edgett, K.E., 2000. Evidence for recent groundwater seepage and surface runoff on Mars. Science, 288, 2330-2335. Malin, M.C., Edgett, K.E., Posiolova, L.V., McColley, S.M., Dobrea, E.Z., 2006. Present day impact crater rate and contemporary gully activity on Mars. Science, 314, 1573-1577. Reiss, D., Jaumann, R., 2003. Recent debris flows on Mars : Seasonal observations of the Russell Crater dune field

  16. Patterned ground as an indicator of periglacial activity in and around Lomonosov Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Alex; Balme, Matt; Patel, Manish; Hagermann, Axel

    2014-05-01

    A survey of the northern plains of Mars has been conducted to catalogue the distribution of possible periglacial landforms across several large study areas in Acidalia, Utopia and Arcadia Planitiae.. Several hundred HiRISE and CTX images have been surveyed, looking for features indicative of a periglacial environment; patterned ground, solifluction features and scalloped depressions. Non-sorted patterned ground is fairly common across the Northern Plains of Mars where nets of fracture polygons are common at mid to high latitudes. These features are most likely the result of contraction cracking due to temperature changes. The occurrence of fracture polygons is in keeping with the cold, dry environment of Mars. Analogous features on Earth are found in some of the coldest and driest regions of the planet. However other types of patterned ground, such as sorted circles and stripes, tend to occur in warmer and wetter environments as sorted patterned ground is the result of the repeated freezing and thawing of the permafrost active layer. These features require the action of liquid water during the warmer months of the year and are characteristic of a periglacial environment. Such features would not be expected to be as common on Mars, where the surface temperature is only warm enough for water to exist in a liquid state for short periods of time in isolated areas which receive high levels of insolation. Prior studies (e.g. Gallagher et al., 2011, Icarus.) have observed features which appear to be morphologically similar to sorted patterned ground. It is possible that unusual sites where boulders appear organised into stripes and networks could be analogous to these terrestrial periglacial features. Determining where such features occur on Mars could have important implications for understanding the martian environment. Lomonosov Crater, located at 64.9 degrees N, 9.3 degrees W in the northern reaches of Acidalia Planitia, is a 150 km diameter crater surrounded by the

  17. Anomalous quartz from the Roter Kamm impact crater, Namibia - Evidence for post-impact hydrothermal activity?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koeberl, Christian; Fredriksson, Kurt; Goetzinger, Michael; Reimold, Wolf Uwe

    1989-01-01

    Quartz pebbles from the Roter Kamm impact crater (the Namib Desert, SWA/Namibia) were examined for evidence of impact-induced hydrothermal activity, using results from microprobe analyses, neutron activation analyses, transmission IR spectroscopy, and X-ray diffractometry. It was found that the pebbles consisted of pure quartz, which contains three different types of fluid inclusions. These were identified as primary inclusions (5-10 microns) that record the formation conditions of the quartz, very small (less than 1 micron) secondary inclusions associated with the grain boundaries, and late inclusions of irregular size. It is concluded that the quartz and the primary inclusions may provide evidence for a postimpact phase of extensive hydrothermal activity, generated by the residual heat from the kinetic energy of the impact.

  18. Meteoritic material at four Canadian impact craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, R.; Woodrow, A. B.; Grieve, R. A. F.

    1980-01-01

    Eleven impact melt and six basement rock samples from four craters were analyzed by neutron activation for Au, Co, Cr, Fe, Ge, Ir, Ni, Os, Pd, Re and Se. Wanapitei Lake, Ontario: the impact melts show uniform enrichments corresponding to 1-2% C1-chondrite material. Interelement ratios (Co/Cr, Ni/Cr, Ni/Ir) suggest that the impacting body was a C1-, C2-, or LL-chondrite. Nicholson Lake, North West Territory: Ni, Cr and Co are distinctly more enriched than Ir and Au which tentatively suggests an olivine-rich achondrite (nakhlite or ureilite). Gow Lake, Saskatchewan and Mistastin, Labrador: small enrichments in Ir and Ni; both the low Ir/Ni ratios and low Cr content suggest iron meteorites, but the signals are too weak for conclusive identification. A tentative comparison of meteoritic signatures at 10 large, greater than or equal to 4 km craters and their presumed celestial counterparts (13 Apollo and Amor asteroids) shows more irons and achondrites among known projectile types, and a preponderance of S-type objects, having no known meteoritic equivalent, among asteroids. It is not yet clear that these differences are significant, in view of the tentative nature of the crater identifications and the limited statistics.

  19. Oxygen isotopes as tracers of tektite source rocks: An example from the Ivory Coast tektites and Lake Bosumtwi Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, Joel D.; Koeberl, Christian; Chamberlain, C. Page

    1993-01-01

    Oxygen isotope studies of tektites and impact glasses provide an important tool to help in identifying the target lithologies for terrestrial impacts, including the K-T boundary impact. However, such studies may be complicated by modification of the original oxygen isotope values of some source rocks during the tektite formation process either by vapor fractionation or incorporation of meteoric water. To further investigate the relationship between the oxygen isotopic composition of tektites and their source rocks, Ivory Coast tektites and samples of impact glasses and bedrock lithologies from the Bosumtwi Crater in Ghana--which is widely believed to be the source crater for the Ivory Coast tektites--were studied. Our preliminary results suggest that the phyllites and metagraywackes from the Bosumtwi Crater were the predominant source materials for the impact glasses and tektites and that no significant oxygen isotope modification (less than 1 percent delta(O-18)) took place during impact melting. This contrasts with previous studies of moldavites and Australasian tektites and their sedimentary source materials which suggests a 4 to 5 percent lowering of delta(O-18) due to meteoric water incorporation during impact melting.

  20. Cratering mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, B. A.

    1986-01-01

    Main concepts and theoretical models which are used for studying the mechanics of cratering are discussed. Numerical two-dimensional calculations are made of explosions near a surface and high-speed impact. Models are given for the motion of a medium during cratering. Data from laboratory modeling are given. The effect of gravitational force and scales of cratering phenomena is analyzed.

  1. Pleistocene Paleoclimatic Features at Mount Mazama Volcano and the Crater Lake Region, Oregon, Dated by Ar Geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, C. R.; Lanphere, M. A.

    2005-12-01

    Fifteen examples of the interplay between glacial ice and magma or volcanic rock in the Crater Lake region have been dated by K-Ar or 40Ar/39Ar. Ages of glacial features compare well with times of extensive ice presence implied by marine oxygen isotope stages (MIS; Bassinot et al. 1994 EPSL 126:91-108). Prior to the 7.7-ka caldera-forming eruption, the summit of Mount Mazama was 3700 m asl. Moraines of the last glacial maximum (LGM) reached as low as 1400 m. Late MIS 10 glaciation is recorded at 1900-2000 m: in the SE caldera wall, glaciated andesite (340±6, 341±8 ka; 1σ) is overlain by intracanyon dacite (306±5 ka); in the E wall, similar glaciated andesite underlies till capped by dacite (336±6 ka); on the SW lakeshore, glaciated dacite (351±12 ka) is overlain by andesite (302±10 ka). Early MIS 8 is represented 276±11-ka dacite of Munson Ridge that implies >170 m of ice at 2040 m. In late MIS 8 or in MIS 7.4, voluminous andesite of Applegate Peak (7 ages 269±12 to 211±16 ka) chilled against thick ice along the E edge of Sun Creek valley at 1850 m and higher. Andesite of Garfield Peak (224±9 ka; 2100-2400 m) flowed over andesite (269±12 ka) glaciated during MIS 8.0 or 7.4. North of Castle Creek at 1740 m dacite (216±4 ka) lies on andesite (258±7 ka) glaciated in MIS 7.4 or 8.0. Andesite of Roundtop (159±13 ka) extending 3 km NE of the caldera rim is an MIS 6 ice-bounded lava flow. At Pumice Point, polygonal jointing and breccia occur in thick andesite (117±3 ka) that rests on glaciated (1900 m) mafic andesite (122±20 ka); the andesite is overlain by subaerial dacite (116±5 ka). Although the mafic andesite could have been glaciated in MIS 6, ice-contact/meltwater chilling of the overlying andesite probably dates from MIS 5.4. Below Llao Rock, andesite (70±4 ka) caps sediments deposited on dacite (116±9 ka) during MIS 5.4-4. Andesite (87±15 ka) from a subaerial cone (base 1900 m) ESE of Mazama flowed into ice-free Scott Creek during MIS 5

  2. Temporal variation of mass-wasting activity in Mount St. Helens crater, Washington, U. S. A. indicated by seismic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, H.H. )

    1991-11-01

    In the crater of Mount St. Helens, formed during the eruption of 18 May 1980, thousands of rockfalls may occur in a single day, and some rock and dirty-snow avalanches have traveled more than 1 km from their source. Because most seismic activity in the crater is produced by mass wasting, the former can be used to monitor the latter. The number and amplitude of seismic events per unit time provide a generalized measure of mass-wasting activity. In this study 1-min averages of seismic amplitudes were used as an index of rockfall activity during summer and early fall. Plots of this index show the diurnal cycle of rockfall activity and establish that the peak in activity occurs in mid to late afternoon. A correlation coefficient of 0.61 was found between daily maximum temperature and average seismic amplitude, although this value increases to 0.72 if a composite temperature variable that includes the maximum temperature of 1 to 3 preceding days as well as the present day is used. Correlation with precipitation is much weaker.

  3. Impact cratering in H2O-bearing targets on Mars: Thermal field under craters as starting conditions for hydrothermal activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Boris A.; Pierazzo, Elisabetta

    2011-04-01

    We present a case modeling study of impact crater formation in H2O-bearing targets. The main goal of this work was to investigate the postimpact thermal state of the rock layers modified in the formation of hypervelocity impact craters. We present model results for a target consisting of a mixture of H2O-ice and rock, assuming an ice/water content variable with depth. Our model results, combined with results from previous work using dry targets, indicate that for craters larger than about 30 km in diameter, the onset of postimpact hydrothermal circulation is characterized by two stages: first, the formation of a mostly dry, hot central uplift followed by water beginning to flow in and circulate through the initially dry and hot uplifted crustal rocks. The postimpact thermal field in the periphery of the crater is dependent on crater size: in midsize craters, 30-50 km in diameter, crater walls are not strongly heated in the impact event, and even though ice present in the rock may initially be heated enough to melt, overall temperatures in the rock remain below melting, undermining the development of a crater-wide hydrothermal circulation. In large craters (with diameters more than 100 km or so), the region underneath the crater floor and walls is heated well above the melting point of ice, thus facilitating the onset of an extended hydrothermal circulation. These results provide preliminary constraints in characterizing the many water-related features, both morphologic and spectroscopic, that high-resolution images of Mars are now detecting within many Martian craters.

  4. Life in the Great Lakes. Earth Systems - Education Activities for Great Lakes Schools (ES-EAGLS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheaffer, Amy L., Ed.

    This activity book is part of a series designed to take a concept or idea from the existing school curriculum and develop it in the context of the Great Lakes using teaching approaches and materials appropriate for students in middle and high school. The theme of this book is life in the Great Lakes. Students learn about shorebird adaptations,…

  5. Great Lakes Environmental Issues. Earth Systems - Education Activities for Great Lakes Schools (ES-EAGLS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheaffer, Amy L., Ed.

    This activity book is part of a series designed to take a concept or idea from the existing school curriculum and develop it in the context of the Great Lakes using teaching approaches and materials appropriate for students in middle and high school. The subject of this book is environmental issues in the Great Lakes. Students learn about the…

  6. Craters in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArdle, Heather K.

    1997-01-01

    Details an activity in which students create and study miniature impact craters in the classroom. Engages students in making detailed, meaningful observations, drawing inferences, reaching conclusions based on scientific evidence, and designing experiments to test selected variables. (DDR)

  7. hemium signature and seismotectonic activity in lake vostok

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean Baptiste, P.; Petit, J. R.; Raynaud, D.; Jouzel, J.; Bulat, S.

    2003-04-01

    Lake Vostok (LV) is an extreme environment which may content life. Absence of solar light makes energy supply an important issue. He isotopes have been measured in ice samples from glacier and lake ice of Vostok deep ice core. The deep glacier ice shows a ^3He/^4He ratio with respect to atmospheric value close to 1 and similar to value for shallow depth samples. In contrary lake ice displays a significant drop in ratio down to ˜0.27, due to an input of ^4He. ^3He concentrations are almost constant and exclude contribution from the mantle to the lake and black smokers-type manifestations within lake Vostok. We suggest that ^4He excess, originates from the degassing of the rock basement of the lake under local fault activity. ^4He is a by-product of uranium decay, and usually entrapped within the rock. ^4He may be released from the rock by crushing under seismotectonic and canalised into the lake through the faults. The lake ice samples accreted ˜15000 years ago and they cover a ˜4000 years period. Helium diffusion through the ice smoothes the signal but does not significantly affect the magnitude of the observed excess. Our ^4He data suggests lake faults were active at least during this time of the past. Since seismic events allow water rock reactions, chemical contributions and energy supply for life could have been possible within the faults and the lake.

  8. Exhumed Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    5 July 2004 Burial and exhumation is a theme that repeats itself, all over the surface of Mars. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows several north mid-latitude meteor impact craters with bouldery ejecta deposits. Each of the craters was once buried and later exhumed. Mesas on the floors of these craters are remnants of the materials that once filled and covered them. The craters are located near 39.7oN, 206.0oW. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide; sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  9. Determination of the mineral stability field of evolving groundwater in the Lake Bosumtwi impact crater and surrounding areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Yvonne Sena Akosua; Yidana, Sandow Mark; Banoeng-Yakubo, Bruce; Sakyi, Patrick Asamoah; Addai, Millicent Obeng; Asiedu, Daniel Kwadwo

    2016-09-01

    Conventional graphical techniques, mass balance geochemical modelling, and multivariate statistical methods were jointly applied to hydrogeochemical data of groundwater from the fractured rock aquifer system, and surface water in the Bosumtwi and surrounding areas to reveal evolutionary trends and the characteristics of evolving groundwater in the area. Four clusters distinguished from the Q-mode hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) comprised three main groundwater associations and one surface water group (lake water). Although both water resources are of low mineralization (TDS < 1000 mg/l), it was observed that the groundwater from the upper catchment with hydrochemical facies dominated by Nasbnd Mgsbnd HCO3-, evolves to Casbnd Mgsbnd and mixed cations HCO3- water types at the lower reaches. The lake water on the other hand is Nasbnd HCO3- water type. Results from principal component analyses (PCA) and other geochemical interpretations distinguished three sources of variations in the hydrochemistry. Saturation indices of possible reactive mineral phases show groundwater undersaturation relative to albite, anorthite, aragonite, barite, calcite, chlorite, chrysotile, dolomite, gypsum, k-felspar and talc, and supersaturation with respect to gibbsite, kaolinite, Ca-montmorillonite and k-mica in the area. The PCA and other geochemical interpretation identify weathering of feldspars and carbonate mineral dissolution as predominantly influencing the hydrochemistry of the groundwater. Hydrolysis of the aluminosilicates causes the groundwater to reach equilibrium with kaolinite. In addition to dissolution of silicates, the chemical composition of the lake water has been influenced by evaporation and consequent carbonate saturation.

  10. Dreissenid mussels from the Great Lakes contain elevated thiaminase activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tillitt, D.E.; Riley, S.C.; Evans, A.N.; Nichols, S.J.; Zajicek, J.L.; Rinchard, J.; Richter, C.A.; Krueger, C.C.

    2009-01-01

    We examined thiaminase activity in dreissenid mussels collected at different depths and seasons, and from various locations in Lakes Michigan, Ontario, and Huron. Here we present evidence that two dreissenid mussel species (Dreissena bugensis and D. polymorpha) contain thiaminase activity that is 5-100 fold greater than observed in Great Lakes fishes. Thiaminase activity in zebra mussels ranged from 10,600 to 47,900??pmol g- 1??min- 1 and activities in quagga mussels ranged from 19,500 to 223,800??pmol g- 1??min- 1. Activity in the mussels was greatest in spring, less in summer, and least in fall. Additionally, we observed greater thiaminase activity in dreissenid mussels collected at shallow depths compared to mussels collected at deeper depths. Dreissenids constitute a significant and previously unknown pool of thiaminase in the Great Lakes food web compared to other known sources of this thiamine (vitamin B1)-degrading enzyme. Thiaminase in forage fish of the Great Lakes has been causally linked to thiamine deficiency in salmonines. We currently do not know whether linkages exist between thiaminase activities observed in dreissenids and the thiaminase activities in higher trophic levels of the Great Lakes food web. However, the extreme thiaminase activities observed in dreissenids from the Great Lakes may represent a serious unanticipated negative effect of these exotic species on Great Lakes ecosystems.

  11. Meteorite craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, B. A.; Bazilevskiy, A. T.

    1986-01-01

    The origin and formation of various types of craters, both on the Earth and on other planetary bodies, are discussed. Various models are utilized to depict various potential causes of the types and forms of meteorite craters in our solar system, and the geological structures are also discussed.

  12. A cold hydrological system in Gale crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairén, Alberto G.; Stokes, Chris R.; Davies, Neil S.; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk; Rodríguez, J. Alexis P.; Davila, Alfonso F.; Uceda, Esther R.; Dohm, James M.; Baker, Victor R.; Clifford, Stephen M.; McKay, Christopher P.; Squyres, Steven W.

    2014-04-01

    Gale crater is a ~154-km-diameter impact crater formed during the Late Noachian/Early Hesperian at the dichotomy boundary on Mars. Here we describe potential evidence for ancient glacial, periglacial and fluvial (including glacio-fluvial) activity within Gale crater, and the former presence of ground ice and lakes. Our interpretations are derived from morphological observations using high-resolution datasets, particularly HiRISE and HRSC. We highlight a potential ancient lobate rock-glacier complex in parts of the northern central mound, with further suggestions of glacial activity in the large valley systems towards the southeast central mound. Wide expanses of ancient ground ice may be indicated by evidence for very cohesive ancient river banks and for the polygonal patterned ground common on the crater floor west of the central mound. We extend the interpretation to fluvial and lacustrine activity to the west of the central mound, as recorded by a series of interconnected canyons, channels and a possible lake basin. The emerging picture from our regional landscape analyses is the hypothesis that rock glaciers may have formerly occupied the central mound. The glaciers would have provided the liquid water required for carving the canyons and channels. Associated glaciofluvial activity could have led to liquid water running over ground ice-rich areas on the basin floor, with resultant formation of partially and/or totally ice-covered lakes in parts of the western crater floor. All this hydrologic activity is Hesperian or younger. Following this, we envisage a time of drying, with the generation of polygonal patterned ground and dune development subsequent to the disappearance of the surface liquid and frozen water.

  13. Present-day impact cratering rate and contemporary gully activity on Mars.

    PubMed

    Malin, Michael C; Edgett, Kenneth S; Posiolova, Liliya V; McColley, Shawn M; Dobrea, Eldar Z Noe

    2006-12-08

    The Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera has acquired data that establish the present-day impact cratering rate and document new deposits formed by downslope movement of material in mid-latitude gullies on Mars. Twenty impacts created craters 2 to 150 meters in diameter within an area of 21.5 x 10(6) square kilometers between May 1999 and March 2006. The values predicted by models that scale the lunar cratering rate to Mars are close to the observed rate, implying that surfaces devoid of craters are truly young and that as yet unrecognized processes of denudation must be operating. The new gully deposits, formed since August 1999, are light toned and exhibit attributes expected from emplacement aided by a fluid with the properties of liquid water: relatively long, extended, digitate distal and marginal branches, diversion around obstacles, and low relief. The observations suggest that liquid water flowed on the surface of Mars during the past decade.

  14. Eastern Floor of Holden Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 15 April 2002) The Science Today's THEMIS image covers territory on the eastern floor of Holden Crater, which is located in region of the southern hemisphere called Noachis Terra. Holden Crater is 154 km in diameter and named after American Astronomer Edward Holden (1846-1914). This image shows a mottled surface with channels, hills, ridges and impact craters. The largest crater seen in this image is 5 km in diameter. This crater has gullies and what appears to be horizontal layers in its walls. The Story With its beautiful symmetry and gullies radially streaming down to the floor, the dominant crater in this image is an impressive focal point. Yet, it is really just a small crater within a much larger one named Holden Crater. Take a look at the context image to the right to see just how much bigger Holden Crater is. Then come back to the image strip that shows the mottled surface of Holden Crater's eastern floor in greater detail, and count how many hills, ridges, channels, and small impact craters can be seen. No perfectly smooth terrain abounds there, that's for sure. The textured terrain of Holden Crater has been particularly intriguing ever since the Mars Orbital Camera on the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft found evidence of sedimentary rock layers there that might have formed in lakes or shallow seas in Mars' ancient past. This finding suggests that Mars may have been more like Earth long ago, with water on its surface. Holden Crater might even have held a lake long ago. No one knows for sure, but it's an exciting possibility. Why? If water was once on the surface of Mars long enough to form sedimentary materials, maybe it was there long enough for microbial life to have developed too. (Life as we know it just isn't possible without the long-term presence of liquid water.) The question of life on the red planet is certainly tantalizing, but scientists will need to engage in a huge amount of further investigation to begin to know the answer. That

  15. Hydrological Evolution and Chemical Structure of the Hyper-acidic Spring-lake System on White Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christenson, B. W.; Britten, K.; Mazot, A.

    2015-12-01

    White Island has a long and varied history of acid spring discharge and shallow ephemeral lake formation on the Main Crater floor. In the 12 months prior to the onset of the 1976-2000 eruptive episode, mass discharge from the spring system increased ca. 10-fold, pointing to a strong coupling of the hydrothermal environment to the evolving magmatic system. However, between 1976-1978 the formation of numerous eruption vents to 200 m depth in the Western Sub-crater abruptly changed the hydrostatic regime of the volcano, resulting in the reversal of groundwater flow in the massif towards the newly-formed crater(s). This affected not only the style of volcanic activity (leading to phreatic-phreatomagmatic-magmatic eruption cycles), but also led to the demise of the spring system, with total flow from the crater declining by a factor > 100 by 1979. Eruptive activity came to a close soon after moderate Strombolian activity in mid-2000, by which time ephemeral lakes had already started to form in the eruption crater complex. Since 2003 there have been two complete lake filling and evaporative cycles, reflecting varying heat flow through the conduit system beneath the lake. Over these cycles, lake water concentrations of Cl and SO4 varied between ca. 35-150 and 5-45 g/L respectively, with pH values ranging between +1.5 and -1. Springs reappeared on the Main Crater floor in 2004, and their discharges varied with lake level, pointing to the lake level being a primary control over the piezometric surface in the crater area. Springs closest to the crater complex show direct evidence of crater lake water infiltration into the crater floor aquifer, whereas distal spring discharges show compositional variations reflecting vertical displacement of the interface between shallow, dilute condensate and an underlying acidic brine fluid. Evidence suggests that this acidic brine presently contains a significant component of altered seawater. Volcanic unrest in 2012, which included

  16. Ultra-high Resolution Mapping of the Inner Crater of the Active Kick'em Jenny Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, L.; Scott, C.; Tominaga, M.; Smart, C.; Vaughn, I.; Roman, C.; Carey, S.; German, C. R.; Participants, T.

    2015-12-01

    We conducted high-resolution geological characterization of a 0.015km^2 region of the inner crater of the most active submarine volcano in the Caribbean, Kick'em Jenny, located 8 km off Grenada in the Lesser Antilles Island Arc. We obtained digital still images and microbathymetery at an altitude of 3 m from the seafloor by using stereo cameras and a BlueView system mounted on Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) Hercules during the NA054 cruise on E/V Nautilus (Sept. - Oct. 2014). The seafloor images were processed to construct 2-D photo mosaics of the survey area using Standard Hercules Imaging Suite. We systematically classified the photographed seafloor geology based on the distribution of seafloor morphology and the observable rock fragment and outcrop sizes. The center of the crater floor shows a smooth, coherent texture with little variation in sea floor morphology. From immediately outside this area toward the crater rim, we observe an extensive area covered with outcrops, small rocks, and sediment: and within this area, (1) the north section is partially covered by uneven outcrops with elongated lineaments and a course, rugged seafloor with individual rock fragments observable; (2) the middle section contains high variability and heterogeneity in seafloor morphology in a non-systematic manner; and (3) overall, the southern most section displays subdued seafloor features both in space and variability compared to the other areas. The distributions of rock fragments were classified into four distinct sizes. We observe: (i) little variation in size distribution near the center of the crater floor; and (ii) rock fragment size increasing toward the rim of the crater. To obtain a better understanding of the link between variation in seafloor morphology, rock size distribution, and other in situ processes, we compare our observations on the digital photo mosaic to bathymetry data and ROV visuals (e.g. vents and bacterial mats).

  17. Active dust devils in Gusev crater, Mars: Observations from the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greeley, R.; Whelley, P.L.; Arvidson, R. E.; Cabrol, N.A.; Foley, D.J.; Franklin, B.J.; Geissler, P.G.; Golombek, M.P.; Kuzmin, R.O.; Landis, G.A.; Lemmon, M.T.; Neakrase, L.D.V.; Squyres, S. W.; Thompson, S.D.

    2006-01-01

    A full dust devil "season" was observed from Spirit from 10 March 2005 (sol 421, first active dust devil observed) to 12 December 2005 (sol 691, last dust devil seen); this corresponds to the period Ls 173.2?? to 339.5??, or the southern spring and summer on Mars. Thermal Emission Spectrometer data suggest a correlation between high surface temperatures and a positive thermal gradient with active dust devils in Gusev and that Spirit landed in the waning stages of a dust devil season as temperatures decreased. 533 active dust devils were observed, enabling new characterizations; they ranged in diameter from 2 to 276 m, with most in the range of 10-20 m in diameter, and occurred from about 0930 to 1630 hours local true solar time (with the maximum forming around 1300 hours) and a peak occurrence in southern late spring (Ls ??? 250??). Horizontal speeds of the dust devils ranged from <1 to 21 m/s, while vertical wind speeds within the dust devils ranged from 0.2 to 8.8 m/s. These data, when combined with estimates of the dust content within the dust devils, yield dust fluxes of 3.95 ?? 10-9 to 4.59-4 kg/m2/s. Analysis of the dust devil frequency distribution over the inferred dust devil zone within Gusev crater yields ???50 active dust devils/km2/sol, suggesting a dust loading into the atmosphere of ???19 kg/km2/sol. This value is less than one tenth the estimates by Cantor et al. (2001) for regional dust storms on Mars. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Clouds Near Mie Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-572, 12 December 2003

    Mie Crater, a large basin formed by asteroid or comet impact in Utopia Planitia, lies at the center of this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) red wide angle image. The crater is approximately 104 km (65 mi) across. To the east and southeast (toward the lower right) of Mie, in this 5 December 2003 view, are clouds of dust and water ice kicked up by local dust storm activity. It is mid-winter in the northern hemisphere of Mars, a time when passing storms are common on the northern plains of the red planet. Sunlight illuminates this image from the lower left; Mie Crater is located at 48.5oN, 220.3oW. Viking 2 landed west/southwest of Mie Crater, off the left edge of this image, in September 1976.

  19. A novel heat flux study of a geothermally active lake - Lake Rotomahana, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tivey, Maurice A.; de Ronde, Cornel E. J.; Tontini, Fabio Caratori; Walker, Sharon L.; Fornari, Daniel J.

    2016-03-01

    A new technique for measuring conductive heat flux in a lake was adapted from the marine environment to allow for multiple measurements to be made in areas where bottom sediment cover is sparse, or even absent. This thermal blanket technique, pioneered in the deep ocean for use in volcanic mid-ocean rift environments, was recently used in the geothermally active Lake Rotomahana, New Zealand. Heat flow from the lake floor propagates into the 0.5 m diameter blanket and establishes a thermal gradient across the known blanket thickness and thereby provides an estimate of the conductive heat flux of the underlying terrain. This approach allows conductive heat flux to be measured over a spatially dense set of stations in a relatively short period of time. We used 10 blankets and deployed them for 1 day each to complete 110 stations over an 11-day program in the 6 × 3 km lake. Results show that Lake Rotomahana has a total conductive heat flux of about 47 MW averaging 6 W/m2 over the geothermally active lake. The western half of the lake has two main areas of high heat flux; 1) a high heat flux area averaging 21.3 W/m2 along the western shoreline, which is likely the location of the pre-existing geothermal system that fed the famous Pink Terraces, mostly destroyed during the 1886 eruption 2) a region southwest of Patiti Island with a heat flux averaging 13.1 W/m2 that appears to be related to the explosive rift that formed the lake in the 1886 Tarawera eruption. A small rise in bottom water temperature over the survey period of 0.01 °C/day suggests the total thermal output of the lake is ~ 112-132 MW and when compared to the conductive heat output suggests that 18-42% of the total thermal energy is by conductive heat transfer.

  20. Palaeoenvironmental Fluctuations Identified by Diatoms, Ostracode, Geochemistry and Sedimentary Facies from a Tropical Crater Lake on Western Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, M.; Rodriguez, A.; Vazquez, G.; Ortega, B.; Lozano, M.; Vilaclara, G.

    2007-05-01

    A ca. 2500 cal. yr record from Santa Maria del Oro (SMO) was studied for its diatoms, ostracodes, magnetic mineralogy, geochemestry, organic matter and carbonate content to document climatic and limnological trends over western Mexico, a site sensitive to the intensity of monsoon circulation and to any latitudinal shifts of the high pressure subtropical cells as it is currently located on a transition zone between the temperate climates of central Mexico highlands and the arid climates of northern Mexico. The sediment sequence (8.8 m) has a chronology is based on 7 AMS dates. The sequence shows an irregular sequence of four distinctive facies (laminations). Data derived from the analysis of easch facies and of modern sediments supports the interpretation that sand and peaty layers are mostly alloctonous in origin while the silty layers (ochre, brown and greenish silt) are mostly autigenic. Ochre layers represent times of anoxic bottom lake conditions favoured by a warmer environment. Long term trends are also present along the sequence. Warm and relatively humid conditions change to a drier climate by ca. AD 600, with the driest and warmest stage recorded at AD 990. This dry period is consistent with records of arid phases at other sites in Mesoamerica. From AD 990 to AD 1260 there is evidence of a sudden transition to warm-humid conditions and dilution of lake water coeval with the Medieval Warm Period. From AD 1260 to AD 1480 climatic conditions were unstable and afterwards the onset of drier climates is recorded until the present. Due to its geographical position, moisture availability fluctuations are responding to atmospheric circulation changes such as latitudinal shifts of the Intertropical Convergence Zone and Subtropical High- Pressure Cells resulting in the strengthening or weakening of the summer monsoon, which is the main moisture source for western Mexico. This sequence records environmental and climatic variability for western central Mexico and

  1. Stratigraphy and Evolution of Delta Channel Deposits, Jezero Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goudge, T. A.; Mohrig, D.; Cardenas, B. T.; Hughes, C. M.; Fassett, C. I.

    2017-01-01

    The Jezero impact crater hosted an open-basin lake that was active during the valley network forming era on early Mars. This basin contains a well exposed delta deposit at the mouth of the western inlet valley. The fluvial stratigraphy of this deposit provides a record of the channels that built the delta over time. Here we describe observations of the stratigraphy of the channel deposits of the Jezero western delta to help reconstruct its evolution.

  2. Shackleton Crater

    NASA Video Gallery

    This visualization, created using Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter laser altimeter data, offers a view of Shackleton Crater located in the south pole of the moon. Thanks to these measurements, we now h...

  3. Degradation of Victoria crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, John A.; Wilson, Sharon A.; Cohen, Barbara A.; Golombek, Matthew P.; Geissler, Paul E.; Sullivan, Robert J.; Kirk, Randolph L.; Parker, Timothy J.

    2008-11-01

    The ~750 m diameter and ~75 m deep Victoria crater in Meridiani Planum, Mars, is a degraded primary impact structure retaining a ~5 m raised rim consisting of 1-2 m of uplifted rocks overlain by ~3 m of ejecta at the rim crest. The rim is 120-220 m wide and is surrounded by a dark annulus reaching an average of 590 m beyond the raised rim. Comparison between observed morphology and that expected for pristine craters 500-750 m across indicates that the original, pristine crater was close to 600 m in diameter. Hence, the crater has been erosionally widened by ~150 m and infilled by ~50 m of sediments. Eolian processes are responsible for most crater modification, but lesser mass wasting or gully activity contributions cannot be ruled out. Erosion by prevailing winds is most significant along the exposed rim and upper walls and accounts for ~50 m widening across a WNW-ESE diameter. The volume of material eroded from the crater walls and rim is ~20% less than the volume of sediments partially filling the crater, indicating eolian infilling from sources outside the crater over time. The annulus formed when ~1 m deflation of the ejecta created a lag of more resistant hematite spherules that trapped <10-20 cm of darker, regional basaltic sands. Greater relief along the rim enabled meters of erosion. Comparison between Victoria and regional craters leads to definition of a crater degradation sequence dominated by eolian erosion and infilling over time.

  4. A New Two-phase Flow Model Applied to the 2007 Crater Lake Break-out Lahar, Mt. Ruapehu, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, M. F.; Cordoba, G.; Pitman, E.; Cronin, S. J.; Procter, J.

    2010-12-01

    The 2007 Crater Lake break-out lahar, Mt. Ruapehu, New Zealand, is a complex but well-characterized natural debris flow that follows an intricate course over an array of topographic features (see Manville et al., this conference). Detailed digital terrain data (DEM) and accurate flow characterization allow us to test our computational model with an unusually high level of control for such a large natural flood wave. The new two-phase flow code is imbedded within the TITAN2D framework (Patra et al. 2005) that is widely used in hazard assessment for both dry (granular) and wet (debris flow) flows (Murcia et al., 2010). Because TITAN2D is actually valid for dry flows (avalanches) we developed a new two-phase model based on balance laws for mass and momentum for each phase. The granular material is assumed to obey a Coulomb constitutive relation and the fluid is assumed to be inviscid. The Darcy-Weisbach formulation is used to account for bed friction, and a phenomenological drag coefficient mediates the momentum exchange between phases. The resulting system of 6 partial differential equations are depth averaged and correspond to the Savage and Hutter model in the limit of no fluid, and to the typical shallow water solutions (Ortiz, et al., 2005) for pure water. This model is capable of simulating particle volumetric fractions as dilute as 0.001 and as concentrated as 0.55. To confirm the usefulness of the new code for complex flows we used data from four observation stations at Ruapehu located at runout distances of 2 km, 5 km, 7 km and 9 km. The specific flow data that we compare with the model outcomes include: 1) arrival time of the flood front, 2) maximum flood depth, and 3) flow velocity. The computed values for these flow characteristics are all within about ± 10% of the observed figures. References: Manville, V., et al., 2010, Anatomy of a basin break-out flood: The 2007 Crater Lake break-out lahar, Mt. Ruapehu, New Zealand, this conference. Murcia, H

  5. Granular Crater Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Abe; Behringer, Robert; Brandenburg, John

    2009-11-01

    This project characterizes crater formation in a granular material by a jet of gas impinging on a granular material, such as a retro-rocket landing on the moon. We have constructed a 2D model of a planetary surface, which consists of a thin, clear box partially filled with granular materials (sand, lunar and Mars simulants...). A metal pipe connected to a tank of nitrogen gas via a solenoid valve is inserted into the top of the box to model the rocket. The results are recorded using high-speed video. We process these images and videos in order to test existing models and develop new ones for describing crater formation. A similar set-up has been used by Metzger et al.footnotetextP. T. Metzger et al. Journal of Aerospace Engineering (2009) We find that the long-time shape of the crater is consistent with a predicted catenary shape (Brandenburg). The depth and width of the crater both evolve logarithmically in time, suggesting an analogy to a description in terms of an activated process: dD/dt = A (-aD) (D is the crater depth, a and A constants). This model provides a useful context to understand the role of the jet speed, as characterized by the pressure used to drive the flow. The box width also plays an important role in setting the width of the crater.

  6. Methylophaga lonarensis sp. nov., a moderately haloalkaliphilic methylotroph isolated from the soda lake sediments of a meteorite impact crater.

    PubMed

    Antony, Chakkiath Paul; Doronina, Nina V; Boden, Rich; Trotsenko, Yuri A; Shouche, Yogesh S; Murrell, J Colin

    2012-07-01

    A moderately haloalkaliphilic methylotrophic bacterium possessing the ribulose monophosphate pathway for carbon assimilation, designated MPL(T), was isolated from Lonar Lake sediment microcosms that were oxidizing methane for two weeks. The isolate utilized methanol and was an aerobic, Gram-negative, asporogenous, motile, short rod that multiplied by binary fission. The isolate required NaHCO(3) or NaCl for growth and, although not auxotrophic for vitamin B(12), had enhanced growth with vitamin B(12). Optimal growth occurred with 0.5-2% (w/v) NaCl, at 28-30 °C and at pH 9.0-10.0. The cellular fatty acid profile consisted primarily of straight-chain saturated C(16:0) and unsaturated C(16:1)ω7c and C(18:1)ω7c. The major ubiquinone was Q-8. The dominant phospholipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and diphosphatidylglycerol. Cells accumulated ectoine as the main compatible solute. The DNA G+C content was 50.0 mol%. The isolate exhibited 94.0-95.4% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with the type strains of methylotrophs belonging to the genus Methylophaga and 31% DNA-DNA relatedness with the reference strain, Methylophaga alcalica VKM B-2251(T). It is proposed that strain MPL(T) represents a novel species, Methylophaga lonarensis sp. nov. (type strain MPL(T)=VKM B-2684(T)=MCC 1002(T)).

  7. Oudemans Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image of the interior of Oudemans Crater was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) at 1800 UTC (1:00 p.m. EDT) on October 2, 2006, near 9.8 degrees south latitude, 268.5 degrees east longitude. CRISM's image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 20 meters (66 feet) across.

    Oudemans Crater is located at the extreme western end of Valles Marineris in the Sinai Planum region of Mars. The crater measures some 124 kilometers (77 miles) across and sports a large central peak.

    Complex craters like Oudemans are formed when an object, such as an asteroid or comet, impacts the planet. The size, speed and angle at which the object hits all determine the type of crater that forms. The initial impact creates a bowl-shaped crater and flings material (known as ejecta) out in all directions along and beyond the margins of the bowl forming an ejecta blanket. As the initial crater cavity succumbs to gravity, it rebounds to form a central peak while material along the bowl's rim slumps back into the crater forming terraces along the inner wall. If the force of the impact is strong enough, a central peak forms and begins to collapse back into the crater basin, forming a central peak ring.

    The uppermost image in the montage above shows the location of CRISM data on a mosaic taken by the Mars Odyssey spacecraft's Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS). The CRISM data was taken inside the crater, on the northeast slope of the central peak.

    The lower left image is an infrared false-color image that reveals several distinctive deposits. The center of the image holds a ruddy-brown deposit that appears to correlates with a ridge running southwest to northeast. Lighter, buff-colored deposits occupy low areas interspersed within the ruddy-brown deposit. The southeast corner holds small hills that form part of the central peak complex.

    The lower right image shows spectral

  8. Monitoring for volcano-hydrothermal activity using continuous gravity and local ground acceleration measurements: New deployments at Inferno Crater, Waimangu and White Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, Arthur; Fournier, Nico; Cole-Baker, Jeremy; Miller, Craig

    2010-05-01

    Volcanoes with crater lakes are often characterised by shallow hydrothermal systems which display cyclic behaviour (temperature, lake level, chemistry, etc.) and shallow seismic tremor. Present monitoring programmes in New Zealand include routine collection of these observables, but the associated shallow sub-surface processes are still inadequately modelled and poorly understood. Models would be better constrained with the incorporation of additional geophysical parameters. To this end, we have established a new test programme to continuously monitor for micro-gravity variations at New Zealand volcanoes. We utilise a Micro-g-LaCoste gPhone relative gravity meter having 1 Hz sample rate and a measurement precision of 1 microgal to test the viability of gravity monitoring for volcano-hydrothermal systems. We have initially tested the new sensor in a short term deployment (~2 months) at Inferno Crater, Waimangu, New Zealand. Inferno shows dramatic variations in crater lake level (> 7 m range), temperature (>40o C range) and hydrothermally derived tremor, all over a period of ~5 weeks. The amplitude and period of these observables are ideal for testing gravity variations associated with a cycling hydrothermal system because several cycles can be obtained in a relatively short campaign. We have deployed the gravity sensor into a buried vault having a stable concrete base to minimise local environmental influences. This vault is located ~20 meters from Inferno Lake edge (at high stand) and offers sufficient noise reduction to measure the gravitational effects associated with lake level changes. We will show results for the new gravity meter including raw relative gravity measurements and first order corrections (earth-tide, ocean loading, sensor level, temperature, and barometric pressure) to obtain both residual gravity and overprinted local ground accelerations (earthquakes and local tremor). To examine the effects of local ground vibrations on the gravity meter, we

  9. Authentication controversies and impactite petrography of the New Quebec Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, Ursula B.; Kring, David A.

    1992-01-01

    The literature reports that led to the current acceptance of New Quebec Crater (Chubb Crater) as an authentic impact crater are reviewed, and it is noted that, for reasons that are not entirely clear, a meteoritic origin for the New Quebec Crater achieved wider acceptance at an earlier data than for the Lake Bosumtwi Crater, for which petrographic and chemical evidence is more abundant and compelling. The petrography of two impact melt samples from the New Quebec Crater was investigated, and new evidence is obtained on the degrees of shock metamorphism affecting the accessory minerals such as apatite, sphene, magnetite, and zircon.

  10. Urea and ureolytic activity in lakes of different trophic status.

    PubMed

    Siuda, Waldemar; Chróst, Ryszard J

    2006-01-01

    Urea and uraease (U-ase) activity were determined in water samples taken from the surface layers of 17 lakes of different trophic status. Urea concentrations were inversely correlated with the trophic status of the studied lakes and varied from below the detection limit to 25 micromol l(-1). Maximal potential ureolytic activity (V(max)) ranged from 0.2 to 7.0 micromol l(-1) h(-1). The highest urea concentrations and the lowest U-ase activities were recorded in the spring, whereas the lowest urea concentrations and the highest rates of urea hydrolysis were observed late in summer, during heavy phytoplankton blooms. Since in the majority of the Great Mazurian Lakes microplankton growth was limited by nitrogen supply, urea was an important N source for both auto- and heterotrophic planktonic microorganisms throughout the growth period. U-ase activity was mainly related to the seston. Only up to 25% of total activity could be attributed to free enzymes dissolved in lake water. In epilimnetic water samples the bulk of the ureolytic activity originated from seston-attached bacteria. However, a positive, statistically significant correlation between ureolytic activity and chlorophyll a (Chl(a)) concentrations suggests that phytoplankton may also be responsible for at least a some of the observed ureolytic activity in the highly eutrophic Great Mazurian Lakes.

  11. Lake sediment records on climate change and human activities in the Xingyun Lake catchment, SW China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenxiang; Ming, Qingzhong; Shi, Zhengtao; Chen, Guangjie; Niu, Jie; Lei, Guoliang; Chang, Fengqin; Zhang, Hucai

    2014-01-01

    Sediments from Xinyun Lake in central Yunnan, southwest China, provide a record of environmental history since the Holocene. With the application of multi-proxy indicators (total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN), δ13C and δ15N isotopes, C/N ratio, grain size, magnetic susceptibility (MS) and CaCO3 content), as well as accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) 14C datings, four major climatic stages during the Holocene have been identified in Xingyun's catchment. A marked increase in lacustrine palaeoproductivity occurred from 11.06 to 9.98 cal. ka BP, which likely resulted from an enhanced Asian southwest monsoon and warm-humid climate. Between 9.98 and 5.93 cal. ka BP, a gradually increased lake level might have reached the optimum water depth, causing a marked decline in coverage by aquatic plants and lake productivity of the lake. This was caused by strong Asian southwest monsoon, and coincided with the global Holocene Optimum. During the period of 5.60-1.35 cal. ka BP, it resulted in a warm and dry climate at this stage, which is comparable to the aridification of India during the mid- and late Holocene. The intensifying human activity and land-use in the lake catchment since the early Tang Dynasty (∼1.35 cal. ka BP) were associated with the ancient Dian culture within Xingyun's catchment. The extensive deforestation and development of agriculture in the lake catchment caused heavy soil loss. Our study clearly shows that long-term human activities and land-use change have strongly impacted the evolution of the lake environment and therefore modulated the sediment records of the regional climate in central Yunnan for more than one thousand years.

  12. Lake Sediment Records on Climate Change and Human Activities in the Xingyun Lake Catchment, SW China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenxiang; Ming, Qingzhong; Shi, Zhengtao; Chen, Guangjie; Niu, Jie; Lei, Guoliang; Chang, Fengqin; Zhang, Hucai

    2014-01-01

    Sediments from Xinyun Lake in central Yunnan, southwest China, provide a record of environmental history since the Holocene. With the application of multi-proxy indicators (total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN), δ13C and δ15N isotopes, C/N ratio, grain size, magnetic susceptibility (MS) and CaCO3 content), as well as accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) 14C datings, four major climatic stages during the Holocene have been identified in Xingyun′s catchment. A marked increase in lacustrine palaeoproductivity occurred from 11.06 to 9.98 cal. ka BP, which likely resulted from an enhanced Asian southwest monsoon and warm-humid climate. Between 9.98 and 5.93 cal. ka BP, a gradually increased lake level might have reached the optimum water depth, causing a marked decline in coverage by aquatic plants and lake productivity of the lake. This was caused by strong Asian southwest monsoon, and coincided with the global Holocene Optimum. During the period of 5.60–1.35 cal. ka BP, it resulted in a warm and dry climate at this stage, which is comparable to the aridification of India during the mid- and late Holocene. The intensifying human activity and land-use in the lake catchment since the early Tang Dynasty (∼1.35 cal. ka BP) were associated with the ancient Dian culture within Xingyun’s catchment. The extensive deforestation and development of agriculture in the lake catchment caused heavy soil loss. Our study clearly shows that long-term human activities and land-use change have strongly impacted the evolution of the lake environment and therefore modulated the sediment records of the regional climate in central Yunnan for more than one thousand years. PMID:25033404

  13. Active and Fossil Geothermal Activity at Lake Chapala, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zârate-del Vall, P.

    2002-12-01

    Geothermal systems are very abundant in the tectonically active zones of the earth's crust and the Citala rift, where Lake Chapala is located, is not the exception. The Lake Chapala basin is characterized by its paleo- and actual geothermal activity that includes: thermal springs, fossil sinter deposits and hydrothermal petroleum manifestations. Thermal springs occur both inside and outside the lake. The spring water in out-shore thermal springs around Lake Chapala is carbonate (Medina-Heredia A, 1986). To the NE area is San Luis Agua Caliente (69°C; ~ 240 mg L-1 [HCO3]1) in the NW at Jocotepec (36°C; ~263mg L-1 [HCO3]-); in the South we find Tuxcueca and Tizap n El Alto (30°C; 193 mg L-1 [HCO3]-). However, there is an exception, the spring water at the San Juan Cosal sector (North), which is sulfate (64-83°C; ~479 mg L-1, [SO4]-2). Examples of in-shore thermal springs are "Los Gorgos" (near South shore) and "El Fuerte" (near East shore and temporary "out-shore" because of actual severe drought); the characterisation of water of this in-shore sites is in progress. On the SE shore and five km NW from Regules village, outcrops a carbonate deposit named "La Calera". This carbonate fossil sinter outcrops 2 km in E-W direction and 600 m in N-S direction and overlays andesitic rock. With a thickness of approximately 5m and a roughly horizontal attitude, the carbonated sinter material is characterized by both massive and banded structure. When massive, it is colored in yellow brownish and grey and elsewhere it shows a pseudo-brecciated structure and when banded, alternated of yellow and dark millimetre bands can be seen; is characterized by vuggy porosity and silica (quartz and chalcedony) vein lets. Under microscope a pseudo-micritic texture is observed; vugs coated by iron oxides, are filled with calcite, and/or quartz, chalcedony and clay minerals. Six samples of carbonate of "La Calera" deposit were analysed for their stable isotopes (LODC-UParis VI). From δ 13

  14. Impact Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Today marks the 45th anniversary of the dawn of the Space Age (October 4, 1957). On this date the former Soviet Union launched the world's first satellite, Sputnik 1. Sputnik means fellow traveler. For comparison Sputnik 1 weighed only 83.6 kg (184 pounds) while Mars Odyssey weighs in at 758 kg (1,671 pounds).

    This scene shows several interesting geologic features associated with impact craters on Mars. The continuous lobes of material that make up the ejecta blanket of the large impact crater are evidence that the crater ejecta were fluidized upon impact of the meteor that formed the crater. Volatiles within the surface mixed with the ejecta upon impact thus creating the fluidized form. Several smaller impact craters are also observed within the ejecta blanket of the larger impact crater giving a relative timing of events. Layering of geologic units is also observed within the large impact crater walls and floor and may represent different compositional units that erode at variable rates. Cliff faces, dissected gullies, and heavily eroded impact craters are observed in the bottom half of the image at the terminus of a flat-topped plateau.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS

  15. Geomorphic constraints on the geologic history of Gale Crater (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palucis, M. C.; Dietrich, W. E.; Hayes, A. G.; Williams, R. M.; Calef, F. J.; Sumner, D. Y.; Parker, T. J.; Bridges, N. T.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    On August 5, 2012, the Curiosity rover landed in Gale Crater near the Peace Vallis (PV) alluvial fan system. Gale is located on the crustal dichotomy of Mars between the heavily cratered southern highlands and the smoother northern lowlands. Recent crater counts on Gale's ejecta give an age estimate of ~3.6 Ga, corresponding to the Early Hesperian or possibly the Late Noachian (Le Deit et al., 2012). In the region to the south of Gale are similarly-sized craters (e.g. Hershel and Wien) that appear substantially more degraded, are partially to nearly buried, and have subtle rims, indicating that they likely pre-date Gale. Farah Vallis (FV), a large v-shaped channel incised into the southwestern rim of Gale, may have been part of a large regional drainage system (~270,000 km2) originating near Hershel Crater. Ejecta from Gale appear to have partly buried this valley network, implying it was active before the formation of Gale itself (Irwin et al., 2005). Gale also contains an ~5 km high central mound composed of layered material, whose age based on crater counts and superposition relationships, is ~3.6 to 3.8 Ga (Thomson et al., 2011). Here, we use crater counting and geomorphological relationships from mapped features within Gale to extend the work of others in providing a chronology of Gale's multi-stage geologic history. Using CTX imagery we have identified several large fan/delta features within Gale, in addition to those previously identified. These features, combined with topographic benches and morphologic changes from canyons to local fan deposition, suggest a series of large lakes. The largest (-2100 m) would have filled Gale entirely, and the smallest would have been a shallow lake at the distal end of the PV fan. The simplest interpretation, and the one supported by the geomorphology, is that Gale was sourced in part with water from FV and then progressively fell, creating weak shoreline features at several elevations. In addition, we performed a crater

  16. Stable isotope and petrologic evidence for open-system degassing during the climactic and pre-climactic eruptions of Mt. Mazama, Crater Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mandeville, C.W.; Webster, J.D.; Tappen, C.; Taylor, B.E.; Timbal, A.; Sasaki, A.; Hauri, E.; Bacon, C.R.

    2009-01-01

    Evaluation of the extent of volatile element recycling in convergent margin volcanism requires delineating likely source(s) of magmatic volatiles through stable isotopic characterization of sulfur, hydrogen and oxygen in erupted tephra with appropriate assessment of modification by degassing. The climactic eruption of Mt. Mazama ejected approximately 50 km3 of rhyodacitic magma into the atmosphere and resulted in formation of a 10-km diameter caldera now occupied by Crater Lake, Oregon (lat. 43??N, long. 122??W). Isotopic compositions of whole-rocks, matrix glasses and minerals from Mt. Mazama climactic, pre-climactic and postcaldera tephra were determined to identify the likely source(s) of H2O and S. Integration of stable isotopic data with petrologic data from melt inclusions has allowed for estimation of pre-eruptive dissolved volatile concentrations and placed constraints on the extent, conditions and style of degassing. Sulfur isotope analyses of climactic rhyodacitic whole rocks yield ??34S values of 2.8-14.8??? with corresponding matrix glass values of 2.4-13.2???. ??34S tends to increase with stratigraphic height through climactic eruptive units, consistent with open-system degassing. Dissolved sulfur concentrations in melt inclusions (MIs) from pre-climactic and climactic rhyodacitic pumices varies from 80 to 330 ppm, with highest concentrations in inclusions with 4.8-5.2 wt% H2O (by FTIR). Up to 50% of the initial S may have been lost through pre-eruptive degassing at depths of 4-5 km. Ion microprobe analyses of pyrrhotite in climactic rhyodacitic tephra and andesitic scoria indicate a range in ??34S from -0.4??? to 5.8??? and from -0.1??? to 3.5???, respectively. Initial ??34S values of rhyodacitic and andesitic magmas were likely near the mantle value of 0???. Hydrogen isotope (??D) and total H2O analyses of rhyodacitic obsidian (and vitrophyre) from the climactic fall deposit yielded values ??f -103 to -53??? and 0.23-1.74 wt%, respectively. Values of

  17. Geomorphological dynamics of Deception Island (Maritime Antarctic): a GIS based analysis of the Cerro de la Cruz - Crater Lake area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melo, R.; Vieira, G.; Rocha, J.; Caselli, A.; Batista, V.; Ramos, M.

    2009-04-01

    This study, based on field surveying from the austral summer of 2007-2008, presents the first results of the detailed geomorphological mapping of Deception Island (South Shetlands, Antarctic Peninsula). The main objective is to provide new geomorphological observations aiming to understand: i) how climate change is affecting permafrost, ii) the interactions between volcanoes and permafrost and also, iii) the present-day geomorphological dynamics in an area of high environmental sensitivity. The detailed geomorphological mapping was made in the area between the Argentinean base of Decepción and the Spanish Base Gabriel de Castilla, corresponding to 4 km2, as well as in the vicinity of the ruins of the Chilean Refuge. Mapping focused on landforms and deposits that may be indicators of permafrost dynamics, such as rockfalls, gullies, debris flows, thermokarst depressions and lag surfaces. Active layer thickness was monitored during the summer in two sites with different topographic conditions using mechanical probing. The spatial distribution of the geomorphological processes and landforms was studied using a GIS, with the objective to study the controls of several independent variables, such as altitude, aspect, slope, topographical parameters and net summer radiation.

  18. Exhuming Craters in a Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    12 December 2004 Burial and exhumation of impact craters, and their destruction by erosion, are common and repeated themes all over the surface of Mars. Many craters in western Arabia Terra exhibit light-toned, layered outcrops of ancient sedimentary rock. Like the sedimentary rocks explored further to the south in Meridiani Planum by the Opportunity Mars Exploration Rover (MER-B), these intracrater sedimentary rocks may have been deposited in water. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an example of light-toned sedimentary rocks outcropping in a crater that is much farther north than most of the similar examples in western Arabia. This one is located near 36.6oN, 1.4oW, and shows several old impact craters in various states of erosion and exhumation from beneath and within the sedimentary rock materials. The image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  19. Galle Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 19 June 2002) The Science This image is of part of Galle Crater, located at 51.9S, 29.5W. This image was taken far enough south and late enough into the southern hemisphere fall to catch observe water ice clouds partially obscuring the surface. The most striking aspect of the surface is the dissected layered unit to the left in the image. Other areas also appear to have layering, but they are either more obscured by clouds or are less well defined on the surface. The layers appear to be mostly flat lying and layer boundaries appear as topographic lines would on a map, but there are a few areas where it appears that these layers have been deformed to some level. Other areas of the image contain rugged, mountainous terrain as well as a separate pitted terrain where the surface appears to be a separate unit from the mountains and the layered terrain. The Story Galle Crater is officially named after a German astronomer who, in 1846, was the first to observe the planet Neptune. It is better known, however, as the 'Happy Face Crater.' The image above focuses on too small an area of the crater to see its beguiling grin, but you can catch the rocky line of a 'half-smile' in the context image to the right (to the left of the red box). While water ice clouds make some of the surface harder to see, nothing detracts from the fabulous layering at the center left-hand edge of the image. If you click on the above image, the scalloped layers almost look as if a giant knife has swirled through a landscape of cake frosting. These layers, the rugged, mountains near them, and pits on the surface (upper to middle section of the image on the right-hand side) all create varying textures on the crater floor. With such different features in the same place, geologists have a lot to study to figure out what has happened in the crater since it formed.

  20. Centrifuge impact cratering experiment 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Transient crates motions, cratering flow fields, crates dynamics, determining impact conditions from total crater welt, centrifuge quarter-space cratering, and impact cratering mechanics research is documented.

  1. Active methylotrophs in the sediments of Lonar Lake, a saline and alkaline ecosystem formed by meteor impact.

    PubMed

    Antony, Chakkiath Paul; Kumaresan, Deepak; Ferrando, Lucia; Boden, Rich; Moussard, Hélène; Scavino, Ana Fernández; Shouche, Yogesh S; Murrell, J Colin

    2010-11-01

    Lonar Lake is a unique saline and alkaline ecosystem formed by meteor impact in the Deccan basalts in India around 52,000 years ago. To investigate the role of methylotrophy in the cycling of carbon in this unusual environment, stable-isotope probing (SIP) was carried out using the one-carbon compounds methane, methanol and methylamine. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting analyses performed with heavy (13)C-labelled DNA retrieved from sediment microcosms confirmed the enrichment and labelling of active methylotrophic communities. Clone libraries were constructed using PCR primers targeting 16S rRNA genes and functional genes. Methylomicrobium, Methylophaga and Bacillus spp. were identified as the predominant active methylotrophs in methane, methanol and methylamine SIP microcosms, respectively. Absence of mauA gene amplification in the methylamine SIP heavy fraction also indicated that methylamine metabolism in Lonar Lake sediments may not be mediated by the methylamine dehydrogenase enzyme pathway. Many gene sequences retrieved in this study were not affiliated with extant methanotrophs or methylotrophs. These sequences may represent hitherto uncharacterized novel methylotrophs or heterotrophic organisms that may have been cross-feeding on methylotrophic metabolites or biomass. This study represents an essential first step towards understanding the relevance of methylotrophy in the soda lake sediments of an unusual impact crater structure.

  2. Buried Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    With a location roughly equidistant between two of the largest volcanic constructs on the planet, the fate of the 50 km impact crater in this image was sealed. It has been buried to the rim by lava flows. The MOLA context image shows pronounced flow lobes surrounding the crater, a clear indication of the most recent episode of volcanism that could have contributed to its infilling. Breaches in the rim are clearly evident in the image and suggest locations through which lavas could have flowed. These openings appear to be limited to the west side of the crater. Other craters in the area are nearly obliterated by the voluminous lava flows, further demonstrating one of the means by which Mars renews its surface.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  3. Lessons from studies of impact crater hydrothermal processes in terrestrial analogs and their implications for impact craters on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newsom, H. E.

    2011-12-01

    Studying hydrothermal processes in terrestrial impact craters as martian analogs has sometimes been fraught with objections, including the Earth's greater abundance of water, the neutral instead of acidic aqueous environments and the composition of the targets. Although recent discoveries have dispelled many objections, some misconceptions remain. For example, the relevance of the Chicxulub crater as a martian analog is sometimes questioned because the target was covered with sediments, including carbonates and sulfates. However the impactites at the Yaxcopoil-1 drill site are derived from the underlying silicate basement. Comparisons can also be difficult because of scale issues, as many terrestrial craters with evidence of hydrothermal activity, e.g. Lonar, Haughton, Ries etc., are smaller than the Martian craters with phyllosilicate signatures (Ehlmann et al., 2010). Summarizing, the results of many studies of terrestrial craters show that: 1) Most terrestrial craters larger than 1.8 km diameter have at least some evidence of aqueous or hydrothermal processes in the form of alteration minerals (e.g., Naumov, 2005). 2) Impact melts in crater fill and ejecta blankets provide heat that can produce hydrothermal alteration if water is available (Newsom, 1980). 3) The uplifted geothermal gradient can be as important a heat source as shock effects. 4) Mineralogical evidence for high-temperature fluids (> 350 oC) is present in the central uplift of the Manson structure, and in the ejecta from the Chicxulub impact, where precipitation of phyllosilicates from hydrothermal fluids has also been described (Newsom et al., 2010). 5) Impact deposits begin hot, but have an extended cooling period during which alteration phases can back react to low temperature phases with corresponding stable isotope signatures. 5) Hydrothermal fluids can travel long distances from their sources (e.g., Chicxulub, Yaxcopoil site) and are often localized to faults or porous breccias (e.g. Sudbury

  4. Cydonia Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Eroded mesas and secondary craters dot the landscape in this area of the Cydonia Mensae region. The single oval-shaped crater displays a 'butterfly' ejecta pattern, indicating that the crater formed from a low-angle impact.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 32.9, Longitude 343.8 East (16.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  5. Crater Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA06085 Crater Clouds

    The crater on the right side of this image is affecting the local wind regime. Note the bright line of clouds streaming off the north rim of the crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -78.8N, Longitude 320.0E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  6. Impact Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The fluidized impact crater ejecta and flat crater floors observed in this THEMIS image suggest near surface volatiles once played an important role in modifying the martian surface. Gullies observed in crater walls could possibly point to more recent volatile-rock interactions.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 13.9, Longitude 297.3 East (62.7 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  7. Crater Landslide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA06088 Crater Landslide

    This landslide occurs in an unnamed crater southeast of Millochau Crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -24.4N, Longitude 87.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  8. Indications of human activity from amino acid and amino sugar analyses on Holocene sediments from lake Lonar, central India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, P.; Gaye, B.; Wiesner, M.; Prasad, S.; Basavaiah, N.; Stebich, M.; Anoop, A.; Riedel, N.; Brauer, A.

    2012-04-01

    The DFG funded HIMPAC (Himalaya: Modern and Past Climates) programme aims to reconstruct Holocene Indian Monsoon climate using a multi-proxy and multi-archive approach. First investigations made on sediments from a ca. 10 m long core covering the whole Holocene taken from the lake Lonar in central India's state Maharashtra, Buldhana District, serve to identify changes in sedimentation, lake chemistry, local vegetation and regional to supra-regional climate patterns. Lake Lonar occupies the floor of an impact crater that formed on the ~ 65 Ma old basalt flows of the Deccan Traps. It covers an area of ca. 1 km2 and is situated in India's core monsoon area. The modern lake has a maximum depth of about 5 m, is highly alkaline, and hyposaline, grouped in the Na-Cl-CO3 subtype of saline lakes. No out-flowing stream is present and only three small streams feed the lake, resulting in a lake level highly sensitive to precipitation and evaporation. The lake is eutrophic and stratified throughout most of the year with sub- to anoxic waters below 2 m depth. In this study the core sediments were analysed for their total amino acid (AA) and amino sugar (AS) content, the amino acid bound C and N percentage of organic C and total N in the sediment and the distribution of individual amino acids. The results roughly show three zones within the core separated by distinct changes in their AA content and distribution. (i) The bottom part of the core from ca. 12000 cal a BP to 11400 cal a BP with very low AA and AS percentage indicating high lithogenic contribution, most probably related to dry conditions. (ii) From 11400 cal a BP to 1200 cal a BP the sediments show moderate AA and AS percentages and low values for the ratios of proteinogenic AAs to their non-proteinogenic degradation products (e.g. ASP/β-ALA; GLU/γ-ABA). (iii) The top part of the core (< 1200 cal a BP) is characterised by an intense increase in total AA and AS, AA-C/Corg and AA-N/Ntotas well as in the ratio of

  9. Methane transport from the active layer to lakes in the Arctic using Toolik Lake, Alaska, as a case study.

    PubMed

    Paytan, Adina; Lecher, Alanna L; Dimova, Natasha; Sparrow, Katy J; Kodovska, Fenix Garcia-Tigreros; Murray, Joseph; Tulaczyk, Slawomir; Kessler, John D

    2015-03-24

    Methane emissions in the Arctic are important, and may be contributing to global warming. While methane emission rates from Arctic lakes are well documented, methods are needed to quantify the relative contribution of active layer groundwater to the overall lake methane budget. Here we report measurements of natural tracers of soil/groundwater, radon, and radium, along with methane concentration in Toolik Lake, Alaska, to evaluate the role active layer water plays as an exogenous source for lake methane. Average concentrations of methane, radium, and radon were all elevated in the active layer compared with lake water (1.6 × 10(4) nM, 61.6 dpm⋅m(-3), and 4.5 × 10(5) dpm⋅m(-3) compared with 1.3 × 10(2) nM, 5.7 dpm⋅m(-3), and 4.4 × 10(3) dpm⋅m(-3), respectively). Methane transport from the active layer to Toolik Lake based on the geochemical tracer radon (up to 2.9 g⋅m(-2)⋅y(-1)) can account for a large fraction of methane emissions from this lake. Strong but spatially and temporally variable correlations between radon activity and methane concentrations (r(2) > 0.69) in lake water suggest that the parameters that control methane discharge from the active layer also vary. Warming in the Arctic may expand the active layer and increase the discharge, thereby increasing the methane flux to lakes and from lakes to the atmosphere, exacerbating global warming. More work is needed to quantify and elucidate the processes that control methane fluxes from the active layer to predict how this flux might change in the future and to evaluate the regional and global contribution of active layer water associated methane inputs.

  10. Methane transport from the active layer to lakes in the Arctic using Toolik Lake, Alaska, as a case study

    PubMed Central

    Paytan, Adina; Lecher, Alanna L.; Dimova, Natasha; Sparrow, Katy J.; Kodovska, Fenix Garcia-Tigreros; Murray, Joseph; Tulaczyk, Slawomir; Kessler, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Methane emissions in the Arctic are important, and may be contributing to global warming. While methane emission rates from Arctic lakes are well documented, methods are needed to quantify the relative contribution of active layer groundwater to the overall lake methane budget. Here we report measurements of natural tracers of soil/groundwater, radon, and radium, along with methane concentration in Toolik Lake, Alaska, to evaluate the role active layer water plays as an exogenous source for lake methane. Average concentrations of methane, radium, and radon were all elevated in the active layer compared with lake water (1.6 × 104 nM, 61.6 dpm⋅m−3, and 4.5 × 105 dpm⋅m−3 compared with 1.3 × 102 nM, 5.7 dpm⋅m−3, and 4.4 × 103 dpm⋅m−3, respectively). Methane transport from the active layer to Toolik Lake based on the geochemical tracer radon (up to 2.9 g⋅m−2⋅y−1) can account for a large fraction of methane emissions from this lake. Strong but spatially and temporally variable correlations between radon activity and methane concentrations (r2 > 0.69) in lake water suggest that the parameters that control methane discharge from the active layer also vary. Warming in the Arctic may expand the active layer and increase the discharge, thereby increasing the methane flux to lakes and from lakes to the atmosphere, exacerbating global warming. More work is needed to quantify and elucidate the processes that control methane fluxes from the active layer to predict how this flux might change in the future and to evaluate the regional and global contribution of active layer water associated methane inputs. PMID:25775530

  11. Degradation of Victoria crater, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grant, J. A.; Wilson, S.A.; Cohen, B. A.; Golombek, M.P.; Geissler, P.E.; Sullivan, R.J.; Kirk, R.L.; Parker, T.J.

    2008-01-01

    The ???750 m diameter and ???75 m deep Victoria crater in Meridiani Planum, Mars, is a degraded primary impact structure retaining a ???5 m raised rim consisting of 1-2 m of uplifted rocks overlain by ???3 m of ejecta at the rim crest. The rim is 120-220 m wide and is surrounded by a dark annulus reaching an average of 590 m beyond the raised rim. Comparison between observed morphology and that expected for pristine craters 500-750 m across indicates that the original, pristine crater was close to 600 m in diameter. Hence, the crater has been erosionally widened by ???150 m and infilled by ???50 m of sediments. Eolian processes are responsible for most crater modification, but lesser mass wasting or gully activity contributions cannot be ruled out. Erosion by prevailing winds is most significant along the exposed rim and upper walls and accounts for ???50 m widening across a WNW-ESE diameter. The volume of material eroded from the crater walls and rim is ???20% less than the volume of sediments partially filling the crater, indicating eolian infilling from sources outside the crater over time. The annulus formed when ???1 m deflation of the ejecta created a lag of more resistant hematite spherules that trapped <10-20 cm of darker, regional basaltic sands. Greater relief along the rim enabled meters of erosion. Comparison between Victoria and regional craters leads to definition of a crater degradation sequence dominated by eolian erosion and infilling over time. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Lake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wien, Carol Anne

    2008-01-01

    The lake is blue black and deep. It is a glaciated finger lake, clawed out of rock when ice retracted across Nova Scotia in a northerly direction during the last ice age. The lake is narrow, a little over a mile long, and deep, 90 to 190 feet in places according to local lore, off the charts in others. The author loves to swim there, with a sense…

  13. Stable isotope and petrologic evidence for open-system degassing during the climactic and pre-climactic eruptions of Mt. Mazama, Crater Lake, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandeville, Charles W.; Webster, James D.; Tappen, Christine; Taylor, Bruce E.; Timbal, Adrian; Sasaki, Akira; Hauri, Erik; Bacon, Charles R.

    2009-05-01

    Evaluation of the extent of volatile element recycling in convergent margin volcanism requires delineating likely source(s) of magmatic volatiles through stable isotopic characterization of sulfur, hydrogen and oxygen in erupted tephra with appropriate assessment of modification by degassing. The climactic eruption of Mt. Mazama ejected approximately 50 km 3 of rhyodacitic magma into the atmosphere and resulted in formation of a 10-km diameter caldera now occupied by Crater Lake, Oregon (lat. 43°N, long. 122°W). Isotopic compositions of whole-rocks, matrix glasses and minerals from Mt. Mazama climactic, pre-climactic and postcaldera tephra were determined to identify the likely source(s) of H 2O and S. Integration of stable isotopic data with petrologic data from melt inclusions has allowed for estimation of pre-eruptive dissolved volatile concentrations and placed constraints on the extent, conditions and style of degassing. Sulfur isotope analyses of climactic rhyodacitic whole rocks yield δ 34S values of 2.8-14.8‰ with corresponding matrix glass values of 2.4-13.2‰. δ 34S tends to increase with stratigraphic height through climactic eruptive units, consistent with open-system degassing. Dissolved sulfur concentrations in melt inclusions (MIs) from pre-climactic and climactic rhyodacitic pumices varies from 80 to 330 ppm, with highest concentrations in inclusions with 4.8-5.2 wt% H 2O (by FTIR). Up to 50% of the initial S may have been lost through pre-eruptive degassing at depths of 4-5 km. Ion microprobe analyses of pyrrhotite in climactic rhyodacitic tephra and andesitic scoria indicate a range in δ 34S from -0.4‰ to 5.8‰ and from -0.1‰ to 3.5‰, respectively. Initial δ 34S values of rhyodacitic and andesitic magmas were likely near the mantle value of 0‰. Hydrogen isotope (δD) and total H 2O analyses of rhyodacitic obsidian (and vitrophyre) from the climactic fall deposit yielded values οf -103 to -53‰ and 0.23-1.74 wt%, respectively

  14. Cutting Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 12 November 2003

    The rims of two old and degraded impact craters are intersected by a graben in this THEMIS image taken near Mangala Fossa. Yardangs and low-albedo wind streaks are observed at the top of the image as well as interesting small grooves on the crater floor. The origin of these enigmatic grooves may be the result of mud or lava and volatile interactions. Variable surface textures observed in the bottom crater floor are the result of different aged lava flows.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -15.2, Longitude 219.2 East (140.8 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  15. Great Lakes Climate and Water Movement. Earth Systems - Education Activities for Great Lakes Schools (ES-EAGLS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Heidi, Ed.; Sheaffer, Amy L., Ed.

    This activity book is part of a series designed to take a concept or idea from the existing school curriculum and develop it in the context of the Great Lakes using teaching approaches and materials appropriate for students in middle and high school. The theme of this book is Great Lakes climate and water movement. Students learn about land-sea…

  16. Land & Water Interactions in the Great Lakes. Earth Systems - Education Activities for Great Lakes Schools (ES-EAGLS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheaffer, Amy L., Ed.

    This activity book is part of a series designed to take a concept or idea from the existing school curriculum and develop it in the context of the Great Lakes using teaching approaches and materials appropriate for students in middle and high school. The subject of this book is land and water interactions. Students examine how the Great Lakes were…

  17. Xenobiotics in gametes of Lake Michigan lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) induce hepatic monooxygenase activity in their offspring

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, R.L.; Lech, J.J.

    1984-12-01

    Eggs spawned from Lake Michigan lake trout contain a number of xenobiotic compounds, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). To assess whether this contamination is sufficient to induce hepatic cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenase (MO) activity during early development, the hepatic MO systems of laboratory-cultured offspring of Lake Michigan, Green Bay, and Marquette Hatchery lake trout were compared. Additionally, the induction of hepatic cytochrome P-450 systems in developing lake trout by the commercial PCB mixture, Aroclor 1254 (A1254), was characterized. During late embryonic development and at the swim-up stage, the hepatic MO systems of the feral lake trout offspring appeared induced, based on levels of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) activity that were 3.5- to 8.6-fold higher than the hatchery control levels. Furthermore, at the swim-up stage the feral trout offspring resembled A1254-treated hatchery fry with regard to the degree of inhibition of hepatic AHH activity by alpha-naphthoflavone, and the presence of an inducible Mr . 58,000 polypeptide in hepatic microsomes. The levels of aminopyrine N-demethylase activity, which was relatively unresponsive to inducers, were moderately lower in the Lake Michigan and Green Bay swim-up fry compared to the hatchery control levels. After 7 months of posthatching laboratory culture, when residues of xenobiotics present at fertilization were greatly diluted by growth, the hepatic MO systems of the Lake Michigan and hatchery trout offspring appeared essentially indistinguishable with regard to a number of parameters.

  18. Buried Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    26 December 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows two circular features on the plains of northern Utopia. A common sight on the martian northern plains, these rings indicate the locations of buried impact craters.

    Location near: 65.1oN, 261.2oW Image width: 2 km (1.2 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Summer

  19. The recent activity of the lake Albano (Castelgandolfo, Italy) maar.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funiciello, Renato; Giordano, Guido; de Rita, Donatella; Carapezza, Maria Luisa; Barberi, Franco

    Lake Albano is a complex maar that fed the last phases of Colli Albani volcanic activity. The study of several new stratigraphic sections opened by archeological excavations and civil works has revealed the existence of two previously unknown, primary explosive volcanic deposits, and of several lahar deposits, distributed mainly in the Ciampino plain. Morphological analysis, radiometric dating, the distribution of the early human settlements in the area and the revision of the ancient history and myths of Roma, are coherent in indicating that the activity of lake Albano is much younger than previously believed and extends into Holocene. Until the 4th century B.C. catastrophic exondations have occurred from the lowest rim of the lake, with lahar emplacement on the northern slope. The repetition of these phenomena was prevented by a drain-tunnel dug by the Romans. The overflows were possibly triggered by sudden injections, in the lake bottom, of hot and CO2-rich fluids that are certainly present underneath the volcano. The presence of several gas emission sites, the high CO2 flux in zones corresponding to structural highs of the carbonate basement, the existence of pressurised aquifers also at shallow depth and the reported sudden increase of water temperature and gas release in relation to earthquakes, indicate that a similar hazard persists nowadays.

  20. Impact Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The relatively flat floor and terrace walls of this impact crater suggest the crater was partly infilled with sediment and subsequently eroded to its present day form. This type of observation is evidence for environmental change throughout the geologic history of Mars.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 18.1, Longitude 136.3 East (223.7 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  1. Small Rayed Crater Ejecta Retention Age Calculated from Current Crater Production Rates on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calef, F. J. III; Herrick, R. R.; Sharpton, V. L.

    2011-01-01

    Ejecta from impact craters, while extant, records erosive and depositional processes on their surfaces. Estimating ejecta retention age (Eret), the time span when ejecta remains recognizable around a crater, can be applied to estimate the timescale that surface processes operate on, thereby obtaining a history of geologic activity. However, the abundance of sub-kilometer diameter (D) craters identifiable in high resolution Mars imagery has led to questions of accuracy in absolute crater dating and hence ejecta retention ages (Eret). This research calculates the maximum Eret for small rayed impact craters (SRC) on Mars using estimates of the Martian impactor flux adjusted for meteorite ablation losses in the atmosphere. In addition, we utilize the diameter-distance relationship of secondary cratering to adjust crater counts in the vicinity of the large primary crater Zunil.

  2. Maunder Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 24 May 2002) The Science This image is of a portion of Maunder Crater located at about 49 S and 358 W (2 E). There are a number of interesting features in this image. The lower left portion of the image shows a series of barchan dunes that are traveling from right to left. The sand does not always form dunes as can be seen in the dark and diffuse areas surrounding the dune field. The other interesting item in this image are the gullies that can be seen streaming down from just beneath a number of sharp ridgelines in the upper portion of the image. These gullies were first seen by the MOC camera on the MGS spacecraft and it is though that they formed by groundwater leaking out of the rock layers on the walls of craters. The water runs down the slope and forms the fluvial features seen in the image. Other researchers think that these features could be formed by other fluids, such as CO2. These features are typically seen on south facing slopes in the southern hemisphere, though this image has gullies on north facing slopes as well. The Story Little black squigglies seem to worm their way down the left-hand side of this image. These land features are called barchan (crescent-shaped) dunes. Barchan dunes are found in sandy deserts on Earth, so it's no surprise the Martian wind makes them a common site on the red planet too. They were first named by a Russian scientist named Alexander von Middendorf, who studied the inland desert dunes of Turkistan. The barchan dunes in this image occur in the basin of Maunder crater on Mars, and are traveling from right to left. The sand does not always form dunes, though, as can be seen in the dark areas of scattered sand surrounding the dune field. Look for the streaming gullies that appear just beneath a number of sharp ridgelines in the upper portion of the image. These gullies were first discovered by the Mars Orbital Camera on the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft. While most crater gullies are found on south

  3. Gale Crater Mound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The eroded, layered deposit in Gale Crater is a mound of material rising 3 km above the crater floor. It has been sculpted by wind and possibly water to produce the dramatic landforms seen today. The origin of the sedimentary material that composes the mound remains a contested issue: was it produced from sedimentation in an ancient crater lake or by airfall onto dry land?

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -5.1, Longitude 137.5 East (222.5 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  4. The Explorer's Guide to Impact Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, F.; Pierazzo, E.; Osinski, G.

    2005-01-01

    Impact cratering is a fundamental geologic process of our solar system. It competes with other processes, such as plate tectonics, volcanism, fluvial, glacial and eolian activity, in shaping the surfaces of planetary bodies. In some cases, like the Moon and Mercury, impact craters are the dominant landform. On other planetary bodies impact craters are being continuously erased by the action of other geological processes, like volcanism on Io, erosion and plate tectonics on the Earth, tectonic and volcanic resurfacing on Venus, or ancient erosion periods on Mars. The study of crater populations is one of the principal tools for understanding the geologic history of a planetary surface. Among the general public, impact cratering has drawn wide attention through its portrayal in several Hollywood movies. Questions that are raised after watching these movies include: How do scientists learn about impact cratering? , and What information do impact craters provide in understanding the evolution of a planetary surface? Fundamental approaches used by scientists to learn about impact cratering include field work at known terrestrial craters, remote sensing studies of craters on various solid surfaces of solar system bodies, and theoretical and laboratory studies using the known physics of impact cratering.

  5. Late Holocene hydrous mafic magmatism at the Paint Pot Crater and Callahan flows, Medicine Lake Volcano, N. California and the influence of H2O in the generation of silicic magmas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinzler, R.J.; Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Grove, T.L.

    2000-01-01

    This paper characterizes late Holocene basalts and basaltic andesites at Medicine Lake volcano that contain high pre-eruptive H2O contents inherited from a subduction related hydrous component in the mantle. The basaltic andesite of Paint Pot Crater and the compositionally zoned basaltic to andesitic lavas of the Callahan flow erupted approximately 1000 14C years Before Present (14C years B.P.). Petrologic, geochemical and isotopic evidence indicates that this late Holocene mafic magmatism was characterized by H2O contents of 3 to 6 wt% H2O and elevated abundances of large ion lithophile elements (LILE). These hydrous mafic inputs contrast with the preceding episodes of mafic magmatism (from 10,600 to ~3000 14C years B.P.) that was characterized by the eruption of primitive high alumina olivine tholeiite (HAOT) with low H2O (< 0.2 wt%), lower LILE abundance and different isotopic characteristics. Thus, the mantle-derived inputs into the Medicine Lake system have not always been low H2O, primitive HAOT, but have alternated between HAOT and hydrous subduction related, calc-alkaline basalt. This influx of hydrous mafic magma coincides temporally and spatially with rhyolite eruption at Glass Mountain and Little Glass Mountain. The rhyolites contain quenched magmatic inclusions similar in character to the mafic lavas at Callahan and Paint Pot Crater. The influence of H2O on fractional crystallization of hydrous mafic magma and melting of pre-existing granite crust beneath the volcano combined to produce the rhyolite. Fractionation under hydrous conditions at upper crustal pressures leads to the early crystallization of Fe-Mg silicates and the suppression of plagioclase as an early crystallizing phase. In addition, H2O lowers the saturation temperature of Fe and Mg silicates, and brings the temperature of oxide crystallization closer to the liquidus. These combined effects generate SiO2-enrichment that leads to rhyodacitic differentiated lavas. In contrast, low H2O HAOT

  6. Meteor Crater: An Analog for Using Landforms to Reconstruct Past Hydrologic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palucis, M. C.; Dietrich, W. E.; Howard, A. D.; Nishiizumi, K.; Caffee, M. W.; Kring, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Recent work suggests that debris flow activity has occurred on Mars in the last few million years during high orbital obliquities, but estimating the amount and frequency of liquid water needed to generate these types of flows is still poorly constrained. While it is relatively common to estimate water amounts needed to produce landforms on Mars, such as gullies or alluvial fans, this is something rarely done on Earth. Consequently, there is little field data on the linkage between climate (snowmelt or rainfall events) and the amount of runoff needed to produce specific volumes of sediment in a landform. Here, we present field and modeling data from Meteor Crater, which is a ~50,000 year old impact crater in northern Arizona (USA). Though it is very well preserved, it has developed gullies along its inner wall, similar in form to many gullies on Mars. Meteor Crater, similar to many Martian craters, has also gone through a change in a climate based on the ~30 m of lake sediments on its now dry floor, and what has eroded from its walls has deposited on its floor, making it a closed system. We show using LiDAR-derived topographic data and field observations that debris flows, likely generated by runoff entrainment into talus bordering bedrock cliffs of the crater walls, drove erosion and deposition processes at Meteor Crater. Cosmogenic dating of levee deposits indicates that debris flows ceased in the early Holocene, synchronous with regional drying. For a water-to-rock ratio of 0.3 at the time of transport, which is based on data from rotating drum experiments, it would have taken ~150,000 m3 of water to transport the estimated ~500,000 m3 of debris flow deposits found at the surface of the crater floor. This extensive erosion would require less than 0.4 m of total runoff over the 0.35 km2 upslope source area of the crater, or ~26 mm of runoff per debris flow event. Much more runoff did occur however, as evidenced by lake deposits on the crater floor and Holocene

  7. Gusev Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 25 July 2003

    Wrinkle ridges deform the plains in the bottom of Gusev crater, destination of the MER 'Spirit' rover. The plains were likely created from a flood basalt with ridges forming where there were compressional forces. Dark wind streaks come together to form a dark spot at the bottom of the image where the wind has removed a thin layer of bright dust off a dark surface. On the left side of the image a portion of a lobe of material is visible, which may have resulted from a mud or debris flow. This feature was recently identified by the THEMIS team and may represent the most recent deposit in the crater involving water.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -13.9, Longitude 175.4 East (184.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  8. Arkhangelsky Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 12 September 2003

    Arkhangelsky crater is just to the northeast of the giant Argyre impact basin in the southern hemisphere of Mars. This THEMIS visible image shows the floor of this crater with a few dark barchan dunes. Dunes form when wind blows sand across a surface. The barchan dunes shown here form when there isn't a whole lot of sand to start with. If there were, other dune forms would be visible.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -41.2, Longitude 334.9 East (25.1 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  9. Monitoring and assessment of anthropogenic activities in mountain lakes: a case of the Fifth Triglav Lake in the Julian Alps.

    PubMed

    Ravnikar, Tina; Bohanec, Marko; Muri, Gregor

    2016-04-01

    The Fifth Triglav Lake is a remote mountain lake in the Julian Alps. The area of the Julian Alps where the lake is situated is protected by law and lies within the Triglav National Park. Mountain lakes in Slovenia were considered for a long time as pristine, unpolluted lakes, but analyses in the last decade revealed considerable human impact even in such remote places. Eutrophication or excessive accumulation of nutrients is the main problem of most lakes in the temperate climatic zone, also in Slovenia. Since the introduction of fish in 1991, the lake is going through a series of changes for which we do not know exactly where they lead, so the monitoring and assessment of anthropogenic activities are of great importance. For this purpose, a qualitative multiattribute decision model was developed with DEX method to assess ecological effects on the lake. The extent of the ecological effects on the lake is assessed using four main parameters: the trophic state, lake characteristics, environmental parameters, and anthropogenic stressors. Dependence of environmental impact on various external factors beyond human control, such as temperature, precipitation, retention time, and factors on which we have influence, such as the amount of wastewater and the presence of fish in the lake, were also evaluated. The following data were measured: chlorophyll a, nutrients, TP, oxygen, C/N ratio, nutrients in sediment, temperature, precipitation, retention time, and volume. We made assumptions about fish and wastewater, which we could not measure. The main contributions of this work are the designed model and the obtained findings for the Fifth Triglav Lake that can help not only scientists in understanding the complexity of lake-watershed systems and interactions among system components but also local authorities to manage and monitor the lake aquatic environment in an effective and efficient way. The model is flexible and can be also used for other lakes, assuming that the used

  10. Open Access Discovery of alunite in Cross crater, Terra Sirenum, Mars: Evidence for acidic, sulfurous waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ehlmann, Bethany L.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Milliken, Ralph E.; Mustard, John F.; Clark, Roger N.; Murchie, Scott L.; Breit, George N.; Wray, James J.; Gondet, Brigitte; Poulet, Francois; Carter, John; Calvin, Wendy M.; Benzel, William M.; Seelos, Kimberly D.

    2016-01-01

    Cross crater is a 65 km impact crater, located in the Noachian highlands of the Terra Sirenum region of Mars (30°S, 158°W), which hosts aluminum phyllosilicate deposits first detected by the Observatoire pour la Minéralogie, L’Eau, les Glaces et l’Activitié (OMEGA) imaging spectrometer on Mars Express. Using high-resolution data from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, we examine Cross crater’s basin-filling sedimentary deposits. Visible/shortwave infrared (VSWIR) spectra from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) show absorptions diagnostic of alunite. Combining spectral data with high-resolution images, we map a large (10 km × 5 km) alunite-bearing deposit in southwest Cross crater, widespread kaolin-bearing sediments with variable amounts of alunite that are layered in <10 m scale beds, and silica- and/or montmorillonite-bearing deposits that occupy topographically lower, heavily fractured units. The secondary minerals are found at elevations ranging from 700 to 1550 m, forming a discontinuous ring along the crater wall beneath darker capping materials. The mineralogy inside Cross crater is different from that of the surrounding terrains and other martian basins, where Fe/Mg-phyllosilicates and Ca/Mg-sulfates are commonly found. Alunite in Cross crater indicates acidic, sulfurous waters at the time of its formation. Waters in Cross crater were likely supplied by regionally upwelling groundwaters as well as through an inlet valley from a small adjacent depression to the east, perhaps occasionally forming a lake or series of shallow playa lakes in the closed basin. Like nearby Columbus crater, Cross crater exhibits evidence for acid sulfate alteration, but the alteration in Cross is more extensive/complete. The large but localized occurrence of alunite suggests a localized, high-volume source of acidic waters or vapors, possibly supplied by sulfurous (H2S- and/or SO2-bearing) waters in contact with a magmatic source, upwelling

  11. Pollack Crater's White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image of White Rock in Pollack crater was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on February 3, 2007 at 1750 UTC (12:50 p.m. EST), near 8 degrees south latitude, 25 degrees east longitude. The CRISM image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 40 meters (132 feet) across. The region covered is roughly 20 kilometers (12 miles) long and 10 kilometers (6 miles) wide at its narrowest point.

    First imaged by the Mariner 9 spacecraft in 1972, the enigmatic group of wind-eroded ridges known as White Rock has been the subject of many subsequent investigations. White Rock is located on the floor of Pollack Crater in the Sinus Sabaeus region of Mars. It measures some 15 by 18 kilometers (9 by 11 miles) and was named for its light-colored appearance. In contrast-enhanced images, the feature's higher albedo or reflectivity compared with the darker material on the floor of the crater makes it appear white. In reality, White Rock has a dull, reddish color more akin to Martian dust. This higher albedo as well as its location in a topographic low suggested to some researchers that White Rock may be an eroded remnant of an ancient lake deposit. As water in a desert lake on Earth evaporates, it leaves behind white-colored salts that it leached or dissolved out of the surrounding terrain. These salt deposits may include carbonates, sulfates, and chlorides.

    In 2001, the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor measured White Rock and found no obvious signature of carbonates or sulfates, or any other indication that White Rock holds evaporite minerals. Instead, it found Martian dust.

    CRISM's challenge was to obtain greater detail of White Rock's mineralogical composition and how it formed. The instrument operates at a different wavelength range than TES, giving it greater sensitivity to carbonate, sulfate and phyllosilicate (clay-like) minerals. It also

  12. Geologic investigation of layered mound of Henry Crater, Mars: Implications for history of ancient hydrological activities in the region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Samarpita; Sinha, Rishitosh Kumar; Banerjee, Debabrata; Vijayan, S.

    2016-07-01

    Craters around the Schiaparelli Basin (sim460 km diameter; 2.71^circS 16.77^circE) on Mars are distributed in a unique combination that includes infilled craters with mound on their floors. The mounds have preserved intriguing layers in stratigraphy that has exposed pristine sets of geomorphic and geochemical signatures bearing strong implications towards understanding geological history of Mars. With a view to avail the maximum scientific benefit from this unique geological assemblage on Mars, we have carried out remote analysis of stratigraphy of layers exposed over Henry crater's (sim150 km diameter; 10.79^circN 23.45^circE) mound (rising sim2km from floor) to infer the origin and episodes of geological events occurred in the region. Henry crater is situated approximately 500 km northeast of Schiaparelli Basin. Using crater counting technique the age of the topmost surface of the crater mound is found to be sim3.64 Ga since the exposure of this strata post complete infilling. The stratigraphy of consistent and conformable layers in the crater interior acts as a proxy of the long-lived event of sediment deposition in a rather quiescent condition. Distinct layering can be traced across the crater from the mound to the crater wall across the floor. Evidence for differential erosion of deposited materials, wherein local geological setup developed in the different parts of the crater interior is preserved. Using MRO HiRISE & CTX images, distinct spatial distribution of morphological features distributed in stratigraphy is observed that reveals the dominant geological agents behind their formation, viz. temporal hydrological and eolian processes. The morphological features were aided with an understanding of the composition of the exposed sedimentary succession. MRO CRISM based mineralogical investigation reveals diagnostic signature of the hydrated sulfate mineral Kieserite. Based on the thermodynamic properties of Kieserite and apparent lack of desiccation cracks in

  13. Hydrothermal Alteration at Lonar Crater, India and Elemental Variations in Impact Crater Clays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, H. E.; Nelson, M. J.; Shearer, C. K.; Misra, S.; Narasimham, V.

    2005-01-01

    The role of hydrothermal alteration and chemical transport involving impact craters could have occurred on Mars, the poles of Mercury and the Moon, and other small bodies. We are studying terrestrial craters of various sizes in different environments to better understand aqueous alteration and chemical transport processes. The Lonar crater in India (1.8 km diameter) is particularly interesting being the only impact crater in basalt. In January of 2004, during fieldwork in the ejecta blanket around the rim of the Lonar crater we discovered alteration zones not previously described at this crater. The alteration of the ejecta blanket could represent evidence of localized hydrothermal activity. Such activity is consistent with the presence of large amounts of impact melt in the ejecta blanket. Map of one area on the north rim of the crater containing highly altered zones at least 3 m deep is shown.

  14. Future volcanic lake research: revealing secrets from poorly studied lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouwet, D.; Tassi, F.; Mora-Amador, R. A.

    2012-04-01

    Volcanic lake research boosted after the 1986 Lake Nyos lethal gas burst, a limnic rather than volcanic event. This led to the formation of the IAVCEI-Commission on Volcanic Lakes, which grew out into a multi-disciplinary scientific community since the 1990's. At Lake Nyos, a degassing pipe is functional since 2001, and two additional pipes were added in 2011, aimed to prevent further limnic eruption events. There are between 150 and 200 volcanic lakes on Earth. Some acidic crater lakes topping active magmatic-hydrothermal systems are monitored continuously or discontinuously. Such detailed studies have shown their usefulness in volcanic surveillance (e.g. Ruapehu, Yugama-Kusatsu-Shiran, Poás). Others are "Nyos-type" lakes, with possible gas accumulation in bottom waters and thus potentially hazardous. "Nyos-type" lakes tend to remain stably stratified in tropical and sub-tropical climates (meromictic), leading to long-term gas build-up and thus higher potential risk. In temperate climates, such lakes tend to turn over in winter (monomictic), and thus liberating its gas charge yearly. We line out research strategies for the different types of lakes. We believe a complementary, multi-disciplinary approach (geochemistry, geophysics, limnology, biology, statistics, etc.) will lead to new insights and ideas, which can be the base for future following-up and monitoring. After 25 years of pioneering studies on rather few lakes, the scientific community should be challenged to study the many poorly studied volcanic lakes, in order to better constrain the related hazard, based on probabilistic approaches.

  15. Floor Fractured Craters around Syrtis Major, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamberg, M.; Jaumann, R.; Asche, H.

    2012-04-01

    Craters around Syrtis Major are eroded and/or refilled. Syrtis Major is one of the large Hesperian-aged volcanic regions on Mars. Basaltic deposits originating from nearby Syrtis Major cover the floor of impact craters. In particular some craters exhibit a fractured floor. Floor Fractured Craters can be divided in types. The grade of erosion and the geologic process, which formed the crater, can be different. Type 1: Crater floor affected by pit chains or narrow crevices which are sometimes discontinuous. Type 2: More developed and dense networks of crevices as type 1. Crevices are wide and deep enough to be detected. A circular moat starts to develop as crevices concentrate along the rim. Type 3: Mainly distinguished from type 2 by the presence of a fully developed circular moat. The flat central part is divided into several blocks by crevices. Type 4: They show also a continuous moat along the rim but the central part consists of many flat-top blocks and small conical mounds. Type 5: Crater floor has many mounds of irregular sizes, but the flattop blocks are absent. It should be noted that the knobby surface shows typical characteristics of chaotic terrains and could be alternatively classified as such. Type 6: Crater without a circular moat, crevices are not fully developed, flat-top blocks are present. Fractured floor could have been reshaped through geologic processes. Floor fractured craters can be found in three different areas. The first area is located in the south-eastern part of Syrtis Major, bordering to the highlands. Volcanic features like lava flow fronts, lava flows and wrinkle ridges dominate this region. The crater floor is separated in sharp-edged plates and the interior seems to be flooded by basaltic material. The second area is in the north of Syrtis Major and transcend to the chaotic terrain further north. Near the martian dichotomy boundary fluvial activity was the decisive process. The crater rims are highly eroded, channels are cutting

  16. Rampart Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Rampart crater in Utopia Planitia west of the Viking 2 landing site.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  17. Crater-lake Santa Maria del Oro as a Pristine Reference for Persistent Organic Pollutants (POP' s) and Heavy Metals Content in Environmental Investigations in Western Mexico (Project Conacyt-Semarnat 2002-C01-0463, in Progress).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarate-Del Valle, P. F.; Gomez-Hermosillo, C. M.; Venegas-Garcia, D. J.

    2007-12-01

    Santa Maria del Oro Lake ( SMO) (21.37° N, 104.57° W; 750 m a.s.l.) is a quaternary crater-lake located at western Mexico in the natural border between two geological provinces: the plio-quaternary Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt and the oligo-miocenic silicic volcanic province Sierra Madre Occidental. SMO, a tropical freshwater lake, is a warm-monomictic lake having a diameter of ca. 2 km and a mean depth at the depocenter of ca. 60 m, where three benthos cores were recovered. Contents of POP' s, total inorganic carbon (TIC), total organic carbon (TOC) and heavy metals were analyzed. Geochemistry and mineralogy also were studied in shallow sediments which corresponded to the decade of 50-60's, otherwise the beginning of industrial development of central Mexico; which is considered the possible source of emission of POP' s and heavy metals. Dioxin, furan, plaguicides and PCB' s contents were analyzed by a GC-MS applying USEPA methods. In the first 40 cm (n= 20) of the sedimentary column ( SC) the absence of POP' s was evidenced, applying a method detection limit ( MDL) of 5 μ g/ml for dioxin, furan and PCB' s. For plaguicides like chlordane and toxaphene the MDL was 0.5 μ g/ml and for plaguicides like DDT, aldrin, endrin, dieldrin, heptachlore and mirex the MDL was 5 μ g/ml. The MDL for HCB was 1 μ g/ml. The average (n= 30) for TIC, TOC and total carbon (TC) for the first 40 cm of the SC is as follows: TIC 2.4 %, TOC 3.7 % and TC 6.12 %. The average (n= 20) content (in ppm) of heavy metals for the first 20 cm of the SC is as follows: As 5.97, Cr 27.54, Cu 16.31, Ni 12.29, Pb 21.35 and Zn 82.46. These contents are roughly similar to the clarke of these metals in volcanic rocks. After the criteria of severe effect level ( SEL) of heavy metal in sediments, the content of these metals is below SEL levels. These results permit us to conclude that the sediments of SMO can be considered in unaffected state with respect to antropogenic contamination like POP' s and heavy

  18. Comments on cladocerans of crater lakes of the Nevado de Toluca Volcano (Central Mexico), with the description of a new species, Alona manueli sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Sinev, Artem Y; Zawisza, Edyta

    2013-01-01

    Cladoceran communities of two lakes of Nevado de Toluca Volcano, Central Mexico, were studied. A new species of Aloninae, Alona manueli sp. nov., is described. It was previously confused with Palearctic Alona intermedia Sars, 1862, but clearly differs from it in the morphology of postabdomen, head shield and head pores, and thoracic limbs. Position of Alona manueli sp. nov. within the genus is unclear, it did not belong to any species-group within Alona s. lato. Other species recorded in the studied lakes are Alona ossiani Sinev, 1998, Alonella pulchella Herrick, 1884, Chydorus belonging to sphaericus-group, Eurycercus longirostris Hann, 1982 and Pleuroxus cf. denticulatus Birge, 1879.

  19. Martian Meteor Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    20 February 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a fairly young meteor impact crater on Mars that is about the same size ( 1 kilometer; 0.62 miles) as the famous Meteor Crater in northern Arizona, U.S.A. Like the Arizona crater, boulders of ejected bedrock can be seen on the crater's ejecta blanket and in the crater itself. This crater is located in the Aethiopis region of Mars near 4.7oN, 224.1oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  20. Past, present and future of volcanic lake monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouwet, Dmitri; Tassi, Franco; Mora-Amador, Raúl; Sandri, Laura; Chiarini, Veronica

    2014-02-01

    Volcanic lake research boosted after lethal gas burst occurred at Lake Nyos (Cameroon) in 1986, a limnic rather than a volcanic event. This led to the foundation of the IAVCEI-Commission on Volcanic Lakes, which grew out into a multi-disciplinary scientific community since the 1990s. We here introduce the first data base of volcanic lakes VOLADA, containing 474 lakes, a number that, in our opinion, is surprisingly high. VOLADA could become an interactive, open-access working tool where our community can rely on in the future. Many of the compiled lakes were almost unknown, or at least unstudied to date, whereas there are acidic crater lakes topping active magmatic-hydrothermal systems that are continuously or discontinuously monitored, providing useful information for volcanic surveillance (e.g., Ruapehu, Yugama, Poás). Nyos-type lakes, i.e. those hosted in quiescent volcanoes and characterized by significant gas accumulation in bottom waters, are potentially hazardous. These lakes tend to remain stably stratified in tropical and sub-tropical climates (meromictic), leading to long-term build-up of gas, which can be released after a trigger. Some of the unstudied lakes are possibly in the latter situation. Acidic crater lakes are easily recognized as active, whereas Nyos-type lakes can only be recognized as potentially hazardous if bottom waters are investigated, a less obvious operation. In this review, research strategies are lined out, especially for the “active crater lakes”. We make suggestions for monitoring frequency based on the principle of the “residence time dependent monitoring time window”. A complementary, multi-disciplinary (geochemistry, geophysics, limnology, statistics) approach is considered to provide new ideas, which can be the bases for future volcanic lake monitoring. More profound deterministic knowledge (e.g., precursory signals for phreatic eruptions, or lake roll-over events) should not only serve to enhance conceptual models of

  1. Ground-based thermal imaging of lava lakes at Erebus volcano, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calkins, J.; Oppenheimer, C.; Kyle, P. R.

    2008-11-01

    Mount Erebus, a large intraplate stratovolcano dominating Ross Island, Antarctica, hosts the world's only active phonolite lava lakes. The main manifestation of activity at Erebus volcano in December 2004 was as the presence of two convecting lava lakes within an inner crater. The long-lived Ray Lake, ~ 1400 m 2 in area, was the site of up to 10 small Strombolian eruptions per day. A new but short-lived, ~ 1000-1200 m 2 lake formed at Werner vent in December 2004 sourced by lava flowing from a crater formed in 1993 by a phreatic eruption. We measured the radiative heat flux from the two lakes in December 2004 using a compact infrared (IR) imaging camera. Daily thermal IR surveys from the Main Crater rim provide images of the lava lake surface temperatures and identify sites of upwelling and downwelling. The radiative heat outputs calculated for the Ray and Werner Lakes are 30-35 MW and 20 MW, respectively. We estimate that the magma flux needed to sustain the combined heat loss is ~ 250-710 kg s - 1 , that the minimum volume of the magma reservoir is 2 km 3, and that the radius of the conduit feeding the Ray lake is ~ 2 m.

  2. A Rare Window Into Magmatic Conduit Processes: Time Series Observations From Active Lava Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, E.; Ruprecht, P.; Patrick, M.; Oppenheimer, C.; Peters, N.; Spampinato, L.; Hernandez Perez, P. A.; Unglert, K.; Barreyre, T.

    2015-12-01

    Time-lapse thermal images of the lake surface are used to investigate the circulation and cooling patterns of three lava lakes: Kilauea's Halema'uma'u crater, Mount Erebus, and Nyiragongo. We report results for the time-dependent, two-dimensional velocity and temperature fields of the lake surface. These data sets constrain the locations of flow divergence (upwelling) and convergence (downwelling), the distribution of distinct "plates" and "rifts", the dominant time scales for changes in flow pattern at each lake, and the physical properties of the magma. Upwelling and downwelling locations are strikingly different between the three lakes. Upwelling at Nyiragongo and Erebus occurs dominantly in the interior of the lake, where it is occasionally interrupted by catastrophic downwellings. At Halema'uma'u upwelling and downwelling occur consistently along the perimeter. It remains to be seen whether these differences are dictated merely by the system's geometry or are indicative of intrinsic factors such as melt viscosity, temperature and volatile and crystal content, or of conduit processes such as gas pistoning or slug flow. The availability of high resolution data at Halema'uma'u allows as us to document the evolution of crustal plates and rifts and to investigate the physical properties of the lava and the crust. The physical properties of the lake's surface control lake cooling rates, and thus need to be included in lake circulation and thermal evolution models. We produce time-temperature cooling curves from surface temperature profiles normal to surface rifts and by tracking the cooling of intra-plate bubble bursts. By comparing observations to analytical cooling models, we estimate a porosity of > 80% during the high stand of the lake, slightly higher than estimates of 70% for the upper 120 meters based on gravity data, and close to the porosity of clasts ejected from the lake during recent minor explosions. Furthermore,we find that the number of surface plates

  3. Iturralde Crater, Bolivia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA scientists will venture into an isolated part of the Bolivian Amazon to try and uncover the origin of a 5 mile (8 kilometer) diameter crater there known as the Iturralde Crater. Traveling to this inhospitable forest setting, the Iturralde Crater Expedition 2002 will seek to determine if the unusual circular crater was created by a meteor or comet. Organized by Dr. Peter Wasilewski of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., the Iturralde Crater Expedition 2002 will be led by Dr. Tim Killeen of Conservation International, which is based in Bolivia. Killeen will be assisted by Dr. Compton Tucker of Goddard. The team intends to collect and analyze rocks and soil, look for glass particles that develop from meteor impacts and study magnetic properties in the area to determine if the Iturralde site was indeed created by a meteor.

    This image was acquired on June 29, 2001 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation

  4. Changes in HTO and OBT activity concentrations in the Perch Lake aquatic ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Kim, S B; Farrow, F; Bredlaw, M; Stuart, M

    2016-12-01

    Perch Lake, a small shallow shield lake located on the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) site, contains elevated levels of tritium due to inputs from a nearby nuclear waste management area. The releases have been going on for many years but tritium levels in Perch Lake have been gradually decreasing since about year 2000. Lake water, sediments, aquatic plants, clams and fish were collected during the summer and fall of 2003 and 2013 at three locations in the lake. HTO activity concentrations were measured in all samples and OBT activity concentrations were measured in sediments, plants, clams and fish. In 2003, 2013, HTO activity concentrations in lake water were roughly uniform in time and space, except close to the shoreline where concentrations were fluctuating according to stream water and groundwater tritium levels in streams entering the lake. HTO activity concentrations of biota were similar to concentrations in lake water at the site where they were collected. OBT activity concentrations in biota were not always correlating with the lake water HTO levels. OBT to HTO ratios were found to be less than 1 for aquatic plants, around 1 for clams and fish and above 1 for birds reared on the shore of the lake.

  5. Carbon sources and biogeochemical processes in Monticchio maar lakes, Mt Vulture volcano (southern Italy): New geochemical constrains of active degassing of mantle derived fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caracausi, A.; Nuccio, P. M.; Favara, R.; Grassa, F.

    2012-04-01

    Since the catastrophic releases of carbon dioxide from the African volcanic lakes Nyos and Monoun in the 1980s, the scientific community draw attention towards all those crater lakes able to accumulate massive amount of CO2, which could be catastrophically released following overturn of their deep waters. This implies a quantification of the gas accumulation rate into the lakes and the knowledge of recharge processes and their evolution in time. In fact the gaseous recharge in a lake occurs at alarming rates, when an active degassing of hazardous nature volatiles occurs into the lakes and the structure and dynamic of the lake permit the accumulation of gases into the water. The Monticchio lakes, LPM and LGM, occupies two maar craters formed during the last volcanic activity of Mt. Vulture occurred ˜ 140 000 years ago. LPM is a permanently stratified lake, with a thick deep volume of stagnant water and a shallower layer affected by seasonal overturn. On the contrary LGM is a monomittic lake with a complete overturn of the water during winter time. The major dissolved volatiles are methane and CO2. Dissolved helium is in trace amounts and its isotopic signature ranges between 6.1 and 5.3 Ra (Ra is the atmospheric 3He/4He isotopic ratio). These values are within the range of those measured in the olivine fluid inclusions (both of mantle xenoliths and dispersed in the pyroclastics) of LPM maar ejecta. During three years of investigations we observed that dissolved methane in the deep waters of LGM drastically decreases in wintertime as consequence of the complete overturn of the water. The isotopic signature of methane in the deepest portions of LGM (both sediment and water) is quite stable with time and highlights a biogenic origin, being produced both by acetate fermentation and by CO2-reduction in variable proportions. In contrast, a higher contribution of methane produced via CO2 reduction characterizes sediments at shallower depths. At LPM, there is a great

  6. The Explorer's Guide to Impact Craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierazzo, E.; Osinski, G.; Chuang, F.

    2004-12-01

    Impact cratering is a fundamental geologic process of our solar system. It competes with other processes, such as plate tectonics, volcanism, or fluvial, glacial and eolian activity, in shaping the surfaces of planetary bodies. In some cases, like the Moon and Mercury, impact craters are the dominant landform. On other planetary bodies impact craters are being continuously erased by the action of other geological processes, like volcanism on Io, erosion and plate tectonics on the Earth, tectonic and volcanic resurfacing on Venus, or ancient erosion periods on Mars. The study of crater populations is one of the principal tools for understanding the geologic history of a planetary surface. Among the general public, impact cratering has drawn wide attention through its portrayal in several Hollywood movies. Questions that are raised after watching these movies include: ``How do scientists learn about impact cratering?'', and ``What information do impact craters provide in understanding the evolution of a planetary surface?'' Fundamental approaches used by scientists to learn about impact cratering include field work at known terrestrial craters, remote sensing studies of craters on various solid surfaces of solar system bodies, and theoretical and laboratory studies using the known physics of impact cratering. We will provide students, science teachers, and the general public an opportunity to experience the scientific endeavor of understanding and exploring impact craters through a multi-level approach including images, videos, and rock samples. This type of interactive learning can also be made available to the general public in the form of a website, which can be addressed worldwide at any time.

  7. Automated Crater Delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, J. S.; Pina, P.

    2015-05-01

    An algorithm to delineate impact craters based on Edge Maps and Dynamic Programming is presented. The global performance obtained on 1045 craters from Mars (5 m to about 200 km in diameter), achieved 96% of correct contour delineations.

  8. Active fault and water loading are important factors in triggering earthquake activity around Aswan Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kebeasy, R. M.; Gharib, A. A.

    Aswan Lake started impounding in 1964 and reached the highest water level so far in 1978 with a capacity of 133.8 km 3, thus forming the second largest man-made lake in the world. An earthquake of magnitude 5.3 (Ms) took place on 14 November 1981 along the most active part of the E-W Kalabsha fault beneath the Kalabsha bay (the largest bay of the lake). This earthquake was followed by a tremendous number of smaller events that continue till now. A radio-telemetry network of 13 seismic short period stations and a piezometer network of six wells were established around the northern part of the lake. Epicenters were found to cluster around active faults near the lake. The space-time distribution and the relation of the seismicity with the lake water level fluctuations were studied. Six years after flooding the eastern segment of the Kalabsha fault, strong seismicity began following the main shock of 14 November 1981. It occurred four days after the reservoir had reached its seasonal max level. The effect of the North African drought (1982 to present) is clearly seen in the reservoir water level. As it decreased and left the most active fault segments uncovered, the activity (Gebel Marawa area) decreased sharply. Also, the shallow activity was found to be more sensitive to rapid discharging than to the filling. This study indicates that geology, topography, lineations in seismicity, offsets in the faults, changes in fault trends and focal mechanisms are closely related. No relation was found between earthquake activity and both-ground water table fluctuations and water temperatures measured in wells located around the Kalabsha area.

  9. A discussion of 'Anomalous quartz from the Roter Kamm impact crater, Namibia - Evidence for post-impact hydrothermal activity?'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roedder, Edwin

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents arguments against the statement made by Koeberl et al. (1989) to the effect that various differences between the quartz of the three quartz pebbles from the Roter Kamm impact crater (Namibia) and the quartz of the pegmatites present in the basement rocks of this crater can be best interpreted as evidence that the pebbles were formed (or 'recrystallized') by a post-impact hydrothermal system. Arguments are presented that suggest that the three quartz pebbles are, most likely, fragments of a preimpact vein quartz of hydrothermal origin.

  10. Distribution of Dehalococcoidia in the Anaerobic Deep Water of a Remote Meromictic Crater Lake and Detection of Dehalococcoidia-Derived Reductive Dehalogenase Homologous Genes

    PubMed Central

    Biderre-Petit, Corinne; Dugat-Bony, Eric; Mege, Mickaël; Parisot, Nicolas; Adrian, Lorenz; Moné, Anne; Denonfoux, Jérémie; Peyretaillade, Eric; Debroas, Didier; Boucher, Delphine; Peyret, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe the natural occurrence of bacteria of the class Dehalococcoidia (DEH) and their diversity at different depths in anoxic waters of a remote meromictic lake (Lake Pavin) using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and quantitative PCR. Detected DEH are phylogenetically diverse and the majority of 16S rRNA sequences have less than 91% similarity to previously isolated DEH 16S rRNA sequences. To predict the metabolic potential of detected DEH subgroups and to assess if they encode genes to transform halogenated compounds, we enriched DEH-affiliated genomic DNA by using a specific-gene capture method and probes against DEH-derived 16S rRNA genes, reductive dehalogenase genes and known insertion sequences. Two reductive dehalogenase homologous sequences were identified from DEH-enriched genomic DNA, and marker genes in the direct vicinity confirm that gene fragments were derived from DEH. The low sequence similarity with known reductive dehalogenase genes suggests yet-unknown catabolic potential in the anoxic zone of Lake Pavin. PMID:26734727

  11. Impact craters on Titan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Charles A.; Lorenz, Ralph; Kirk, Randy; Lopes, Rosaly; Mitchell, Karl; Stofan, Ellen; ,

    2010-01-01

    Five certain impact craters and 44 additional nearly certain and probable ones have been identified on the 22% of Titan's surface imaged by Cassini's high-resolution radar through December 2007. The certain craters have morphologies similar to impact craters on rocky planets, as well as two with radar bright, jagged rims. The less certain craters often appear to be eroded versions of the certain ones. Titan's craters are modified by a variety of processes including fluvial erosion, mass wasting, burial by dunes and submergence in seas, but there is no compelling evidence of isostatic adjustments as on other icy moons, nor draping by thick atmospheric deposits. The paucity of craters implies that Titan's surface is quite young, but the modeled age depends on which published crater production rate is assumed. Using the model of Artemieva and Lunine (2005) suggests that craters with diameters smaller than about 35 km are younger than 200 million years old, and larger craters are older. Craters are not distributed uniformly; Xanadu has a crater density 2-9 times greater than the rest of Titan, and the density on equatorial dune areas is much lower than average. There is a small excess of craters on the leading hemisphere, and craters are deficient in the north polar region compared to the rest of the world. The youthful age of Titan overall, and the various erosional states of its likely impact craters, demonstrate that dynamic processes have destroyed most of the early history of the moon, and that multiple processes continue to strongly modify its surface. The existence of 24 possible impact craters with diameters less than 20 km appears consistent with the Ivanov, Basilevsky and Neukum (1997) model of the effectiveness of Titan's atmosphere in destroying most but not all small projectiles.

  12. Impact craters on Titan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, C.A.; Lorenz, R.; Kirk, R.; Lopes, R.; Mitchell, Ken; Stofan, E.

    2010-01-01

    Five certain impact craters and 44 additional nearly certain and probable ones have been identified on the 22% of Titan's surface imaged by Cassini's high-resolution radar through December 2007. The certain craters have morphologies similar to impact craters on rocky planets, as well as two with radar bright, jagged rims. The less certain craters often appear to be eroded versions of the certain ones. Titan's craters are modified by a variety of processes including fluvial erosion, mass wasting, burial by dunes and submergence in seas, but there is no compelling evidence of isostatic adjustments as on other icy moons, nor draping by thick atmospheric deposits. The paucity of craters implies that Titan's surface is quite young, but the modeled age depends on which published crater production rate is assumed. Using the model of Artemieva and Lunine (2005) suggests that craters with diameters smaller than about 35 km are younger than 200 million years old, and larger craters are older. Craters are not distributed uniformly; Xanadu has a crater density 2-9 times greater than the rest of Titan, and the density on equatorial dune areas is much lower than average. There is a small excess of craters on the leading hemisphere, and craters are deficient in the north polar region compared to the rest of the world. The youthful age of Titan overall, and the various erosional states of its likely impact craters, demonstrate that dynamic processes have destroyed most of the early history of the moon, and that multiple processes continue to strongly modify its surface. The existence of 24 possible impact craters with diameters less than 20 km appears consistent with the Ivanov, Basilevsky and Neukum (1997) model of the effectiveness of Titan's atmosphere in destroying most but not all small projectiles. ?? 2009 Elsevier Inc.

  13. Degraded Crater Rim

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 3 May 2002) The Science The eastern rim of this unnamed crater in Southern Arabia Terra is very degraded (beaten up). This indicates that this crater is very ancient and has been subjected to erosion and subsequent bombardment from other impactors such as asteroids and comets. One of these later (younger) craters is seen in the upper right of this image superimposed upon the older crater rim material. Note that this smaller younger crater rim is sharper and more intact than the older crater rim. This region is also mantled with a blanket of dust. This dust mantle causes the underlying topography to take on a more subdued appearance. The Story When you think of Arabia, you probably think of hot deserts and a lot of profitable oil reserves. On Mars, however, Southern Arabia Terra is a cold place of cratered terrain. This almost frothy-looking image is the badly battered edge of an ancient crater, which has suffered both erosion and bombardment from asteroids, comets, or other impacting bodies over the long course of its existence. A blanket of dust has also settled over the region, which gives the otherwise rugged landscape a soft and more subdued appearance. The small, round crater (upper left) seems almost gemlike in its setting against the larger crater ring. But this companionship is no easy romance. Whatever formed the small crater clearly whammed into the larger crater rim at some point, obliterating part of its edge. You can tell the small crater was formed after the first and more devastating impact, because it is laid over the other larger crater. How much younger is the small one? Well, its rim is also much sharper and more intact, which gives a sense that it is probably far more youthful than the very degraded, ancient crater.

  14. Exploding lakes and maleficent water in Grassfields legends and myth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanklin, Eugenia

    1989-11-01

    In August 1984 Lake Manoun 'exploded', killing 37 people. In August 1986 Lake Nyos 'exploded', killing more than 1700 people. Both explosions occurred in the rainy season, two years and six days apart. Have there been similar explosions in the Cameroon Grassfields in the past? This paper argues that such explosions have occurred, and have been recorded in area folklore in the form of migration stories that point unmistakably to the 'maleficent' activities of lakes and other bodies of water. Two migration stories are considered and compared: an ephemeral exploding lake that destroys the Bamessi people in the Kom story, and a crater lake in the Oku story, in which the lake is said to have 'left its bed' to destroy the people of Kijem. In examining the category of 'maleficent water', several types of potentially maleficent water are considered, including indigenous classifications of lakes as 'good' or 'bad', and stories about devils or witches associated with water. All suggest that the folklore motif of dangerous, destructive water may have its basis in observed fact. While this evidence is not conclusive, it is highly suggestive and, in combination with evidence that the area around Nyos is very recently settled, it lends credence to the supposition that the crater lakes of the area may have a 'life cycle' that involves changes of sometimes stupendous, often dangerous, proportions.

  15. Putative crater-floor pingos, paleolakes and periglacial landscapes in north Utopia Planitia, Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soare, R. J.; Conway, S. J.; Dohm, J. M.

    2012-04-01

    Pingos are perennial ice-cored (but non-glacial) hills or mounds. They evolve and persist only in continuous and deep permafrost, i.e. ground that is frozen for periods of no less than two years. In periglacial (or cold-climate, non-glacial) regions such as the Tuktoyaktuk Coastlands of northern Canada closed-system pingos originate where thermokarst lakes either have lost or are losing their water by drainage, evaporation or sublimation. Closed-system pingos form as a result of freeze-thaw cycling, permafrost aggradation and pore-water migration. If closed-system pingos were identified on Mars, particularly on late Amazonian terrain at near-polar latitudes, this would point to boundary-conditions of pressure and temperature at or above the triple point of water having occurred much more recently and closer to the polar regions than many workers have thought possible. In 2005, we found two crater-floor landscapes in northern Utopia Planitia with mounds that seemed to share a suite of morphological characteristics and landform associations with closed-system pingos on Earth (Soare et al. 2005). Since this study the HiRISE and CTX cameras on-board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter have provided better coverage and higher resolution images of the area, allowing us to refine our previous work. We have identified two additional craters with similar assemblages and have verified the absence of such assemblages in other craters across a circum-global longitudinal transect spanning 20 degrees (~52°-72° N) of latitude. This allows us to evaluate the closed-system pingo hypothesis anew. Interestingly, the four principal mound-bearing craters occur within a tight latitudinal band from ~64°-71° N. This could be a marker of active albeit highly localised hydrological and freeze-thaw cycling. Conway et al. (2011) have identified perennial ice-domes on impact-crater floors at latitudes (~70° N) that are adjacent to the mound-bearing craters. They hypothesise that the ice domes

  16. Marine-target craters on Mars? An assessment study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ormo, J.; Dohm, J.M.; Ferris, J.C.; Lepinette, A.; Fairen, A.G.

    2004-01-01

    Observations of impact craters on Earth show that a water column at the target strongly influences lithology and morphology of the resultant crater. The degree of influence varies with the target water depth and impactor diameter. Morphological features detectable in satellite imagery include a concentric shape with an inner crater inset within a shallower outer crater, which is cut by gullies excavated by the resurge of water. In this study, we show that if oceans, large seas, and lakes existed on Mars for periods of time, marine-target craters must have formed. We make an assessment of the minimum and maximum amounts of such craters based on published data on water depths, extent, and duration of putative oceans within "contacts 1 and 2," cratering rate during the different oceanic phases, and computer modeling of minimum impactor diameters required to form long-lasting craters in the seafloor of the oceans. We also discuss the influence of erosion and sedimentation on the preservation and exposure of the craters. For an ocean within the smaller "contact 2" with a duration of 100,000 yr and the low present crater formation rate, only ???1-2 detectable marine-target craters would have formed. In a maximum estimate with a duration of 0.8 Gyr, as many as 1400 craters may have formed. An ocean within the larger "contact 1-Meridiani," with a duration of 100,000 yr, would not have received any seafloor craters despite the higher crater formation rate estimated before 3.5 Gyr. On the other hand, with a maximum duration of 0.8 Gyr, about 160 seafloor craters may have formed. However, terrestrial examples show that most marine-target craters may be covered by thick sediments. Ground penetrating radar surveys planned for the ESA Mars Express and NASA 2005 missions may reveal buried craters, though it is uncertain if the resolution will allow the detection of diagnostic features of marine-target craters. The implications regarding the discovery of marine-target craters on

  17. Becquerel Crater Deposit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 28 May 2002) The finely layered deposit in Becquerel crater, seen in the center of this THEMIS image, is slowly being eroded away by the action of windblown sand. Dark sand from a source north of the bright deposit is collecting along its northern edge, forming impressive barchan style dunes. These vaguely boomerang-shaped dunes form with their two points extending in the downwind direction, demonstrating that the winds capable of moving sand grains come from the north. Grains that leave the dunes climb the eroding stair-stepped layers, collecting along the cliff faces before reaching the crest of the deposit. Once there, the sand grains are unimpeded and continue down the south side of the deposit without any significant accumulation until they fall off the steep cliffs of the southern margin. The boat-hull shaped mounds and ridges of bright material called yardangs form in response to the scouring action of the migrating sand. To the west, the deposit has thinned enough that the barchan dunes extend well into the deeply eroded north-south trending canyons. Sand that reaches the south side collects and reforms barchan dunes with the same orientation as those on the north side of the deposit. Note the abrupt transition between the bright material and the dark crater floor on the southern margin. Steep cliffs are present with no indication of rubble from the obvious erosion that produced them. The lack of debris at the base of the cliffs is evidence that the bright material is readily broken up into particles that can be transported away by the wind. The geological processes that are destroying the Becquerel crater deposit appear active today. But it is also possible that they are dormant, awaiting a particular set of climatic conditions that produces the right winds and perhaps even temperatures to allow the erosion to continue.

  18. Impact Crater Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melosh, H. J.; Ivanov, B. A.

    The detailed morphology of impact craters is now believed to be mainly caused by the collapse of a geometrically simple, bowl-shaped "transient crater." The transient crater forms immediately after the impact. In small craters, those less than approximately 15 km diameter on the Moon, the steepest part of the rim collapses into the crater bowl to produce a lens of broken rock in an otherwise unmodified transient crater. Such craters are called "simple" and have a depth-to-diameter ratio near 1:5. Large craters collapse more spectacularly, giving rise to central peaks, wall terraces, and internal rings in still larger craters. These are called "complex" craters. The transition between simple and complex craters depends on 1/g, suggesting that the collapse occurs when a strength threshold is exceeded. The apparent strength, however, is very low: only a few bars, and with little or no internal friction. This behavior requires a mechanism for temporary strength degradation in the rocks surrounding the impact site. Several models for this process, including acoustic fluidization and shock weakening, have been considered by recent investigations. Acoustic fluidization, in particular, appears to produce results in good agreement with observations, although better understanding is still needed.

  19. Gradational evolution of young, simple impact craters on the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, J. A.; Schultz, P. H.

    1991-01-01

    From these three craters, a first order gradational evolutionary sequence can be proposed. As crater rims are reduced by backwasting and downwasting through fluvial and mass wasting processes, craters are enlarged by approx. 10 pct. Enlargement of drainages inside the crater eventually forms rim breaches, thereby capturing headward portions of exterior drainages. At the same time, the relative importance of gradational processes may reverse on the ejecta: aeolian activity may supersede fluvial incisement and fan formation at late stages of modification. Despite actual high drainage densities on the crater exterior during early stages of gradation, the subtle scale of these systems results in low density estimates from air photos and satellite images. Because signatures developed on surfaces around all three craters appear to be mostly gradient dependent, they may not be unique to simple crater morphologies. Similar signatures may develop on portions of complex craters as well; however, important differences may also occur.

  20. Erosion Effects of Liquid Water and Volatiles in a Former Lacustrine Environment - From Gale Crater to Death Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacob, R. H.; Bonaccorsi, R.; Iacob, C. E.

    2014-12-01

    During its first two years of exploration, Curiosity rover provided strong evidence of water activity at Gale Crater on Mars. While liquid water is not commonly present on the surface of Mars, large depressions such as Gale Crater hold evidence that water was collected in impact craters on Mars in the distant past. Specific features such as alluvial fans, inverted riverbeds, moat areas, and sedimentary formations, demonstrate strong water activity on low elevation regions of Mars. While surface water (gradually) disappeared as the climate and atmosphere of Mars changed, important water deposits formed underground, either as sub-surface ice shelves, or in the form of hydrated minerals, as demonstrated by MER and MSL. Although the presence of water ice under the ancient lake bed at the foothills of Mount Sharp is still to be determined, the area explored so far by Curiosity exhibits erosion features that can help describe the history of water activity along billions of years, e.g., river streams, lacustrine sedimentation, and later cycles of evaporation, frosting and sublimation. This presentation features a comparative study of water erosion processes at Gale Crater on Mars and Death Valley (DV) on Earth, from ancient water flows and lacustrine environments, through evaporation, dryness, and cyclic frosting and sublimation. Groundwater deposits in Death Valley offer best opportunities to study the process of minerals hydration, as well as landforms related to underground water percolation and evaporation, similar to those discovered by Curiosity at Yellowknife Bay. Furthermore, sedimentary processes in lacustrine proximal settings similar to those argued for Mount Sharp, or seen at Gale Crater's floor, have been studied in several locations of DV. These include, but are not limited to, younger dry lake beds of former lakes Manly and Panamint, carved badland formations of Furnace Creek Lake (Zabriskie Point) and older Tertiary lacustrine and fanglomeratic deposits

  1. 238U-230Th crystallization ages for the oldest domes of the Mono Craters, eastern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcaida, M.; Vazquez, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Mono Craters volcanic chain is one of the youngest areas of rhyolitic volcanism in the Mono Lake-Long Valley region of eastern California. Located just south of Mono Lake, the Mono Craters comprise at least 28 individual domes and flows (numbered 3-30, north to south); however, the timing and frequency of eruptions remain poorly resolved. The earliest signs of volcanic activity are preserved as numerous tephra layers (Ashes 1-19, top to bottom) in the late Pleistocene Wilson Creek formation of ancestral Mono Lake, which indicate that rhyolitic volcanism from Mono Craters began by at least ca. 62 ka [1]. Although the current chronology indicates that most of the Mono Craters are younger than ca. 20 ka [2-4], similar compositions of titanomagnetite from both pumice and lava potentially correlate several Wilson Creek tephras to porphyritic biotite-bearing domes 11, 24, and 19 of the Mono Craters [5], suggesting that multiple domes in the Mono Craters chain reflect volcanism older than ca. 20 ka. Ash 3 is correlated to dome 11 based on similar ca. 20 ka ages and titanomagnetite compositions [6]. More recently, we performed ion microprobe 238U-230Th dating of unpolished rims of allanite and zircon from domes 24 and 19, yielding isochron ages of ca. 38 ka and ca. 42 ka, respectively. The age of dome 24 is consistent with the ca. 38 ka age of its potential correlative tephra layers [1, 5], indicating that dome 24 is likely the extrusive equivalent of Ashes 9-10. Dome 19 has titanomagnetite crystals with similar bimodal chemistry to titanomagnetites from Ash 15 [5]. The age of dome 19 is indistinguishable from the 238U-230Th age of Ash 15 [1], which erupted during a prominent geomagnetic excursion, originally designated as the "Mono Lake" excursion. Combining geochronological and titanomagnetite compositional data confirms that Ash 15 and its extrusive equivalent, dome 19, erupted during the Laschamp excursion. [1] Vazquez, J.A. and Lidzbarski, M.I. (2012) EPSL 357

  2. Impact cratering: A geologic process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melosh, H. J.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in the formation of impact craters are examined theoretically, reviewing the results of recent investigations. Topics addressed include crater morphology, stress waves in solids, the contact and compression stage, the excavation stage, and ejecta deposits. Consideration is given to the scaling of crater dimensions, the crater modification stage, multiring basins, cratered landscapes, atmospheric interactions, and the implications of impact cratering for planetary evolution. Extensive diagrams, graphs, tables, and images of typical craters are provided.

  3. Impact cratering: A geologic process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melosh, H. J.

    The mechanisms involved in the formation of impact craters are examined theoretically, reviewing the results of recent investigations. Topics addressed include crater morphology, stress waves in solids, the contact and compression stage, the excavation stage, and ejecta deposits. Consideration is given to the scaling of crater dimensions, the crater modification stage, multiring basins, cratered landscapes, atmospheric interactions, and the implications of impact cratering for planetary evolution. Extensive diagrams, graphs, tables, and images of typical craters are provided.

  4. Using quantitative topographic analysis to understand the role of water on transport and deposition processes on crater walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palucis, Marisa Christina

    that crisscrossed on the lower slopes. We hypothesize that the fine material, likely generated in the impact, and deposited with the coarse debris on the lower portion of the crater wall, is key to this bulking up process as flows cut across the deposits. Fluvial processes following the debris flow gullies extended alluvial deposits to the crater floor and contributed to lake infilling. Cosmogenic dating confirms that most of the modification of the crater walls occurred before the early Holocene. To account for the 75 distinct deposits currently lying on the crater floor, debris flow frequency would be about 1 event every 17 years, assuming debris flow activity terminated ˜10,000 years ago. Assuming a water-to-rock ratio of 0.2 at the time of transport, it would have taken ˜100,000 m3 of water to transport the ˜500,000 m3 of debris flow deposits on the crater floor. Given the 4.5 km2 size of the crater, this extensive erosion would require less than 0.02 m of total runoff, or the equivalent of just 0.001 mm/year over a 40,000 year period. This insignificant amount of water was likely packaged into short-lived storm or snow-melt events when debris flows were generated. Much more runoff did occur, as evidenced by the lake and fluvial deposits, as well as the likely cool, wet conditions of the late Pleistocene. This suggests only a small fraction of the total runoff is needed to do considerable geomorphic evolution, producing strongly gully-scared crater walls. Currently, only minor fluvial modification of the gully networks occurs. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  5. Strong assortative mating by diet, color, size, and morphology but limited progress toward sympatric speciation in a classic example: Cameroon crater lake cichlids.

    PubMed

    Martin, Christopher H

    2013-07-01

    Models predict that sympatric speciation depends on restrictive parameter ranges, such as sufficiently strong disruptive selection and assortative mating, but compelling examples in nature have rarely been used to test these predictions. I measured the strength of assortative mating within a species complex of Tilapia in Lake Ejagham, Cameroon, a celebrated example of incipient sympatric adaptive radiation. This species complex is in the earliest stages of speciation: morphological and ecological divergence are incomplete, species differ primarily in breeding coloration, and introgression is common. I captured 27 mated pairs in situ and measured the diet, color, size, and morphology of each individual. I found strong assortative mating by color, size, head depth, and dietary source of benthic or pelagic prey along two independent dimensions of assortment. Thus, Ejagham Tilapia showed strong assortative mating most conducive to sympatric speciation. Nonetheless, in contrast to a morphologically bimodal Sarotherodon cichlid species pair in the lake, Ejagham Tilapia show more limited progress toward speciation, likely due to insufficient strength of disruptive selection on morphology estimated in a previous study (γ = 0.16). This supports the predicted dependence of sympatric speciation on strong assortment and strong disruptive selection by examining a potentially stalled example in nature.

  6. A Relationship Between Microbial Activity in Soils and Phosphate Levels in Tributaries to Lake Champlain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larose, R.; Lee, S.; Lane, T.

    2015-12-01

    Lake Champlain is a large natural freshwater lake. It forms the western boundary of Vermont and drains over half of the state. It is bordered by the state of New York on its western side and drains to the north into Quebec, Canada. Lake Champlain is the source of fresh drinking water for over quarter of a million people and provides for the livelihoods and recreational opportunities of many well beyond its borders. The health of this lake is important. During the summer month's algae blooms plague the lake. These unsightly growths, which affect other aquatic organisms, are the result of excess phosphate flowing into the lake from many sources. Examining whether there is a relationship between microbial activity in the soils bordering tributaries to Lake Champlain and phosphate levels in those tributaries sheds insight into the origins and paths by which phosphate moves into Lake Champlain. Understanding the how phosphate moves into the water system may assist in mitigation efforts.Total Phosphate levels and Total Suspended Solids were measured in second and third order streams in the Lake Champlain Basin over a three-year period. In addition microbial activity was measured within the toe, bank and upland riparian zone areas of these streams during the summer months. In general in areas showing greater microbial activity in the soil(s) there were increased levels of phosphate in the streams.

  7. Lake Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohrn, Deborah Gore, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This quarterly publication of the State Historical Society of Iowa features articles and activities for elementary school students. This summer issue focuses on the topic of lake life. The issue includes the following features: (1) "Where the Lakes Are Map"; (2) "Letter from the Lake"; (3) "Lake People"; (4)…

  8. Gas-emission crater in Central Yamal, West Siberia, Russia, a new permafrost feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibman, Marina; Kizyakov, Alexandr; Khomutov, Artem; Dvornikov, Yury; Streletskaya, Irina; Gubarkov, Anatoly

    2016-04-01

    The Yamal crater is a hole funnel-shaped on top and cylinder-shaped down to the bottom, surrounded by a parapet. Field study of the crater included size measurements, photo- video-documentation of the feature and the surrounding environment, and geochemical sampling. The upper part of the geological section within the crater consisted of stratified icy sediments, underlain by almost pure stratified ice of nearly vertical orientation of the layers. The volume of discharged material (volume of the void of the crater) was 6 times larger than the volume of material in the parapet. The difference was due to a significant amount of ice exposed in the walls of the crater, emitted to the surface and melted there. Remote sensing data was processes and validated by field observations to reveal the date of crater formation, previous state of the surface, evolution of the crater and environmental conditions of the surrounding area. Crater formed between 9 October and 1 November 2013. The initial size derived from Digital Elevation Model (DEM) had diameter of the vegetated rim 25-29 m. It turned through a sharp bend into a cylinder with close to vertical sides and diameter 15-16 m. Depth of the hole was impossible to estimate from DEM because of no light reaching walls in the narrow hole. By the time of initial observation in July 2014, water was found at the depth exceeding 50 m below the rim. In November 2014 this depth was 26 m. By September 2015 almost all the crater was flooded, with water surface about 5 m below the rim. The plan dimensions of the crater increased dramatically from initial 25-29 to 47-54 m in 2015. Thus, it took two warm seasons to almost entirely fill in the crater. We suppose that during the next 1-2 years parapet will be entirely destroyed, and as a result the crater will look like an ordinary tundra lake. Excluding impossible and improbable versions of the crater's development, the authors conclude that the origin of this crater can be attributed to

  9. Simulated Craters on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, Kevin; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The thick atmosphere of Venus prevents all but the largest impactors from cratering the surface. The number of small craters on Venus provides an interesting, and statistically significant test of models for the disruption and deceleration of impacting bodies. Here we compare Monte Carlo simulated crater distributions to the observed crater distribution on Venus. The simulation assumes: (1) a power law mass distribution for impactors of the form N(sub cum) alpha m (exp-b) where b=0.8; (2) isotropic incidence angles; (3) velocity at the top of the atmosphere of 20 kilometers per second (more realistic velocity distributions are also considered); (4) Schmidt-Housen crater scaling, modified such that only the normal component of the impact velocity contributes to cratering, and using crater slumping as parameterized (5) and modern populations (60% carbonaceous, 40% stone, 3% iron) and fluxes of asteroids. We use our previously developed model for the disruption and deceleration of large bodies striking thick planetary atmospheres to calculate the impact velocity at the surface as a function of impactor mass, incident velocity, and incident angle. We use a drag coefficient c(sub d) =1; other parameters are as described in Chyba et al. We set a low velocity cutoff of 500 meters per second on crater-forming impacts. Venus's craters are nicely matched by the simulated craters produced by 700 million years of striking asteroids. Shown for comparison are the simulated craters produced by incident comets over the same period, where for comets we have assumed b=0.7 and a flux at 10(exp 14) g 30% that of asteroids. Systematic uncertainties in crater scaling and crater slumping may make the surface age uncertain by a factor of two.

  10. Phylogenetic and ecological characteristics associated with thiaminase activity in Laurentian Great Lakes fishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riley, S.C.; Evans, A.N.

    2008-01-01

    Thiamine deficiency complex (TDC) causes mortality and sublethal effects in Great Lakes salmonines and results from low concentrations of egg thiamine that are thought to be caused by thiaminolytic enzymes (i.e., thiaminase) present in the diet. This complex has the potential to undermine efforts to restore lake trout Salvelinus namaycush and severely restrict salmonid production in the Great Lakes. Although thiaminase has been found in a variety of Great Lakes fishes, the ultimate source of thiaminase in Great Lakes fishes is currently unknown. We used logistic regression analysis to investigate relationships between thiaminase activity and phylogenetic or ecological characteristics of 39 Great Lakes fish species. The taxonomically more ancestral species were more likely to show thiaminase activity than the more derived species. Species that feed at lower trophic levels and occupy benthic habitats also appeared to be more likely to show thiaminase activity; these variables were correlated with taxonomy, which was the most important predictor of thiaminase activity. Further analyses of the relationship between quantitative measures of thiaminase activity and ecological characteristics of Great Lakes fish species would provide greater insight into potential sources and pathways of thiaminase in Great Lakes food webs. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

  11. LAKERS (Lake-Aware Kids Engaged in Relevant Science) Observe Coastweeks: A Manual of Classroom & Coastal Activities for Middle Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortner, Rosanne W.; Jax, Daniel W.

    The purpose of the activities presented in this guide is to develop awareness among middle school students of the Great Lakes, particularly Lake Erie. Activity topics include Lake Awareness, Human Activities, Shore Processes, and Shoreline Clean-up. The appendix includes Coastweek 1995 Reference Information. (YDS)

  12. Late Holocene Sediment Study From Santa María del Oro Crater Lake, Nayarit, México, Using Environmental Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, G.; Ortega, B.; Rodriguez, A.

    2007-05-01

    The lake is located near the Pacific coast of Mexico, at the western end of the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt. It is a deep lake (ca. 65 m) with steep sides and only a small bay (Agua Caliente) has shallower water (ca. 12 m). Four parallel cores between 4 and 9 m long were recovered in March 2002 from this shallower area. Sediments are characterized by alternated laminations (few millimeters to 2 cm) of sand, brown silt, green silt, reddish silt, ochre silt, and peat. The 14-C dated sequence spans the last ca. 2,600 yrs. Given this age, it is possible that each set of laminations represent annual sedimentation cycles. The record is a potential high- resolution archive of environmental and climatic variability for western Mexico for late Holocene. Magnetic measurements of susceptibility along the cores show a high variability in the concentration of magnetic mineralogy. Different magnetic and non-magnetic properties show two sets of facies in relation to its magnetic mineralogy; one group composed by sand, brown silt, green silt and peat has the magnetite and Ti-magnetite as the principal magnetic phase; the second group, composed by reddish and ochre silt, has a low Ti magnetite component and siderite, as the principal paramagnetic component. The effects of climatic variations such as the drought occurred in the archeological Classic period (100 - 900 dC), the Medieval Warm Period (950 - 1350 dC), the Little Ice Age (1400 - 1800 dC), and the droughts over the last 700 years, documented in sites along central Mexico, are recognized in the magnetic mineralogy of Santa Maria del Oro.

  13. Centennial Scale Variations in Lake Productivity Linked to Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englebrecht, A.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Guilderson, T. P.; Ingram, L.; Byrne, R.

    2012-12-01

    Solar variations on both decadal and centennial timescales have been associated with climate phenomena (van Loon et al., 2004; Hodell et al., 2001; White et al., 1997). The energy received by the Earth at the peak of the solar cycle increases by <0.1%; so the question has remained of how this could be amplified to produce an observable climate response. Recent modeling shows that the response of the Earth's climate system to the 11-year solar cycle may be amplified through stratosphere and ocean feedbacks and has the potential to impact climate variability on a multidecadal to centennial timescales (Meehl et al., 2009). Here, we report a 1000-year record of changes in the stratigraphy and carbon isotope composition of varved lake sediment from Isla Isabela (22°N, 106°W) in the subtropical northeast Pacific. Stable carbon isotopes and carbonate stratigraphy can be used to infer surface productivity in the lake. Our analysis shows variations in primary productivity on centennial timescales and suggests that solar activity may be an important component of Pacific climate variability. A possible response during solar maxima acts to keep the eastern equatorial Pacific cooler and drier than usual, producing conditions similar to a La Niña event. In the region around Isla Isabela peak solar years were characterized by decreased surface temperatures and suppressed precipitation (Meehl et al., 2009), which enhance productivity at Isabela (Kienel et al. 2011). In the future, we plan to analyze the data using advanced time series analysis techniques like the wavelets together with techniques to handle irregularly spaced time series data. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-571672

  14. Terrestrial laser scanning observations of geomorphic changes and varying lava lake levels at Erebus volcano, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Laura K.; Kyle, Philip R.; Oppenheimer, Clive; Frechette, Jedediah D.; Okal, Marianne H.

    2015-03-01

    A Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) instrument was used to image the topography of the Main Crater at Erebus volcano each December in 2008, 2009, and 2010. Our high-spatial resolution TLS scans provide unique insights into annual and decadal scale geomorphic evolution of the summit area when integrated with comparable data collected by an airborne instrument in 2001. We observe both a pattern of subsidence within the Inner Crater of the volcano and an ~ 3 m per-year drop in the lava lake level over the same time period that are suggestive of decreasing overpressure in an underlying magma reservoir. We also scanned the active phonolite lava lake hosted within the Inner Crater, and recorded rapid cyclic fluctuations in the level of the lake. These were sporadically interrupted by minor explosions by bursting gas bubbles at the lake surface. The TLS data permit calculation of lake level rise and fall speeds and associated rates of volumetric change within the lake. These new observations, when considered with prior determinations of rates of lake surface motion and gas output, are indicative of unsteady magma flow in the conduit and its associated variability in gas volume fraction.

  15. The relative influences of climate and volcanic activity on Holocene lake development inferred from a mountain lake in central Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Self, A. E.; Klimaschewski, A.; Solovieva, N.; Jones, V. J.; Andrén, E.; Andreev, A. A.; Hammarlund, D.; Brooks, S. J.

    2015-11-01

    A sediment sequence was taken from a closed, high altitude lake (informal name Olive-backed Lake) in the central mountain range of Kamchatka, in the Russian Far East. The sequence was dated by radiocarbon and tephrochronology and used for multi-proxy analyses (chironomids, pollen, diatoms). Although the evolution of Beringian climate through the Holocene is primarily driven by global forcing mechanisms, regional controls, such as volcanic activity or vegetation dynamics, lead to a spatial heterogeneous response. This study aims to reconstruct past changes in the aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems and to separate the climate-driven response from a response to regional or localised environmental change. Radiocarbon dates from plant macrophytes gave a basal date of 7800 cal yr BP. Coring terminated in a tephra layer, so sedimentation at the lake started prior to this date, possibly in the early Holocene following local glacier retreat. Initially the catchment vegetation was dominated by Betula and Alnus woodland with a mosaic of open, wet, aquatic and semi-aquatic habitats. Between 7800 and 6000 cal yr BP the diatom-inferred lake water was pH 4.4-5.3 and chironomid and diatom assemblages in the lake were initially dominated by a small number of acidophilic/acid tolerant taxa. The frequency of Pinus pumila (Siberian dwarf pine) pollen increased from 5000 cal yr BP and threshold analysis indicates that P. pumila arrived in the catchment between 4200 and 3000 cal yr BP. Its range expansion was probably mediated by strengthening of the Aleutian Low pressure system and increased winter snowfall. The diatom-inferred pH reconstructions show that after an initial period of low pH, pH gradually increased from 5500 cal yr BP to pH 5.8 at 1500 cal yr BP. This trend of increasing pH through the Holocene is unusual in lake records, but the initially low pH may have resulted directly or indirectly from intense regional volcanic activity during the mid-Holocene. The chironomid

  16. Microbial activity and phylogeny in ice cores retrieved from Lake Paula, a newly detected freshwater lake in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattler, Birgit I.; Waldhuber, Sebastian; Fischer, Helgard; Semmler, Hans; Sipiera, Paul P.; Psenner, Roland

    2004-11-01

    A permanent ice covered water body, called Lake Paula, was detected in Patriot Hills in the West Antarctic and sampled for the first time ever for microbial life. The ice sheet measured approximately 2,5m thickness and the water body has a depth of about 10m. The lake is situated near a moraine which partly ablates from snow and provides meltwater from the slopes to the lake during austral summer. These running waters which are kept liquid by the heating up of the dark soil are penetrating the lower ice cover and thus softening up the lakeside part if the ice core. It is inoculated by nutrients, active microbes and diatoms of terrestrial origin. A distinct gradient concerning bacterial numbers, biomass and production which is 10 fold at the ice-water interface compared to the exposed part is observable. Temperature sensitivity of the embedded microbes reflect the gradient as well: Bacteria isolated from the upper part showed growth optima at 10°C, the lower part at 25°C, phylogenetic properties done by 16s rDNA reveal distinct communities depending on their vertical position, some clones are similar to those retrieved in Lake Vostok ice cores. These results offer the conclusion that even in this harsh environment like the Antarctic continent a dynamic system like microbial ice aggregates can be sustained as long as the supply of liquid water which is essential for an active bacterial metabolism is provided at least for a small time frame.

  17. Crater Rays on Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This mosaic of Voyager 2 images taken July 9, 1979, shows a prominent rayed crater on Jupiter's icy moon, Ganymede. The view on the left is a monochrome image, and that on the right is the same scene shown in false color designed to accentuate the icy ejecta rays splashed out by the impact. This crater is about 150 km (93 miles) across. Like several other large craters in this scene, the rayed one has a central pit, whose origins remain speculative but may involve impact melting or solid-state fluidization of the icy crust. Bright crater rays on Ganymede, like those on our own Moon, are useful to geologists because they constitute a set of features that were laid across the moon's surface at a discrete point in time--thus they serve as time markers that can be used to establish the sequence of events that shaped Ganymede's surface. For instance, the crater rays appear to be painted over, hence are younger than, areas of grooved terrain (lower left quadrant), whereas a somewhat smaller crater at the center of the scene has icy ejecta that appears to bury (hence, post-dates) the large crater ray system. One can conclude that the grooved terrain formed first, then the large crater and its rays, and then the smaller crater and its fresh icy ejecta deposits.

  18. Hydrological Modeling of the Jezero Crater Outlet-Forming Flood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fassett, Caleb I.; Goudge, Timothy A.

    2017-01-01

    Jezero crater is a site of prime scientific interest because it was a lake early in Mars history. Preserved clay- and carbonate-bearing sedimentary fans on Jezero's western and northwestern margin (Fig. 2) are accessible to future exploration. Geologic context [1] and stratigraphic analysis of the western fan strongly support the interpretation that these fans were deposited as deltas into the lake. This has helped establish Jezero as one of the final candidate landing sites for Mars 2020. The high level of certainty that Jezero was a lake results from the existence of its outlet valley, which required filling of the crater to form [e.g., 1,4]. Here, we specifically focus on how this outlet valley was carved by the dam breach flood that eroded the eastern crater rim. We have completed preliminary modeling in both 1D and 2D of the outlet's formation.

  19. The Magma Transport System of the Mono Craters, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, M. R.; Putirka, K. D.

    2013-12-01

    The Mono Craters are a series of 28 volcanic domes, coulees, and craters, just 16 km north of Long Valley. The magmatic products of the Mono Craters include mostly small magmatic bodies, sills, and dikes set in a transtensional tectonic setting. New high-density sampling of the domes reveals a wider range of magma compositions than heretofore recognized, and thus reveals what is likely a more complex magmatic system, involving a greater number of batches of magma and a more complex magma storage/delivery system. Here, we present a model for the magma plumbing system based on space-composition patterns and preliminary estimates of crystallization temperatures and pressures based on olivine-, feldspar- and clinopyroxene-liquid equilibria. Whole rock analyses show three compositionally distinct batches of magma within the Mono Craters proper: a felsic (73-78.4% SiO2), intermediate (64.4-68% SiO2) and mafic (52.7-61% SiO2) group. The Mono Lake Islands (Paoha and Negit) fall into the intermediate group, but contain distinctly lower TiO2 and Fe2O3 at a given SiO2 compared to all other Mono Craters; on this basis, we surmise that the Paoha and Negit eruptions represent a distinct episode of magmatism that is not directly related to the magmatic activity that created the Mono Craters proper. The discontinuous nature of the three groups indicates that magma mixing, while evident to some degree within and between certain domes, did not encompass the entire range of compositions at any given time. The three groups, however, do form a rough linear trend, and some subsets of domes have compositions that fall on distinctly linear (if still discontinuous) trends that cannot be reproduced by fractional crystallization, but rather are indicative of magma mixing. Our high-density sampling also reveals interesting geographical patterns: for example, felsic magmas erupt throughout the entire Mono Craters chain, erupting at a wide range of temperatures, ranging from 650-995°C, but

  20. Intense magmatic degassing through the lake of Copahue volcano, 2013-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamburello, G.; Agusto, M.; Caselli, A.; Tassi, F.; Vaselli, O.; Calabrese, S.; Rouwet, D.; Capaccioni, B.; Di Napoli, R.; Cardellini, C.; Chiodini, G.; Bitetto, M.; Brusca, L.; Bellomo, S.; Aiuppa, A.

    2015-09-01

    Here we report on the first assessment of volatile fluxes from the hyperacid crater lake hosted within the summit crater of Copahue, a very active volcano on the Argentina-Chile border. Our observations were performed using a variety of in situ and remote sensing techniques during field campaigns in March 2013, when the crater hosted an active fumarole field, and in March 2014, when an acidic volcanic lake covered the fumarole field. In the latter campaign, we found that 566 to 1373 t d-1 of SO2 were being emitted from the lake in a plume that appeared largely invisible. This, combined with our derived bulk plume composition, was converted into flux of other volcanic species (H2O ~ 10989 t d-1, CO2 ~ 638 t d-1, HCl ~ 66 t d-1, H2 ~ 3.3 t d-1, and HBr ~ 0.05 t d-1). These levels of degassing, comparable to those seen at many open-vent degassing arc volcanoes, were surprisingly high for a volcano hosting a crater lake. Copahue's unusual degassing regime was also confirmed by the chemical composition of the plume that, although issuing from a hot (65°C) lake, preserves a close-to-magmatic signature. EQ3/6 models of gas-water-rock interaction in the lake were able to match observed compositions and demonstrated that magmatic gases emitted to the atmosphere were virtually unaffected by scrubbing of soluble (S and Cl) species. Finally, the derived large H2O flux (10,988 t d-1) suggested a mechanism in which magmatic gas stripping drove enhanced lake water evaporation, a process likely common to many degassing volcanic lakes worldwide.

  1. Anthropogenic activities affecting Arreo Lake (N Spain) during the last 2500 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corella, J.; Valero-Garces, B. L.; Stefanova, I.; El Amrani, A.; Morellón, M.; Rico, E.; González-Sampériz, P.; Moreno-Caballud, A.; Giralt, S.; Sigro, J.

    2010-12-01

    Arreo Lake is a small (288 ha surface area) karstic lake 25 m deep located at the northwestern edge of the Ebro Basin (NE Spain). The integration of sedimentary facies, element geochemistry, mineralogy, and biological proxies (pollen and diatoms), together with a robust chronological model provided by 15 AMS radiocarbon dating, 137Cs analyses, and varve counting, permitted a reconstruction of the main phases of anthropogenic activity affecting the Arreo Lake dynamic in the context of the climate variability in the Iberian Peninsula during the last two millennia. A high-resolution study of the lacustrine facies and diatoms, combined with their detailed comparison with recent regional instrumental climatic data (1952-2007), limnological monitoring of the lake (1992-2008), and recent land-use changes affecting the lake watershed show the strong influence of human activities in lake dynamics during the last 60 years. The main impacts are a large increase in sediment delivery to the lake after the 1980s, fluctuations in lake level caused by water extraction for irrigation, and changes in the mixing status of the lake. Littoral and distal sediment cores record the long history of the use of natural resources (salt, water, forest and farming) and their significant impacts in the lake during the last 2500 years. Periods of higher anthropogenic activities linked to increased salt production in the nearby Salinas de Añana during the Roman Period and the Early Middle Ages were coincident with deforestation and increased sediment delivery to the lake. The Modern period was characterized by an abrupt increase in the sedimentation rate. Forest expansion and reduced clastic input to the lake were synchronous with documented depopulation of the area during the Late Middle Ages and the 20th century. The synergy between climate and human activities is shown by the correspondence of increased human pressure and more favourable climate conditions, such as it is recorded during the

  2. Degradation of selected terrestrial and Martian impact craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, J. A.; Schultz, P. H.

    1993-06-01

    The history of degradation of 50,000-yr-old 1.2-km-diam Meteor Crater in Arizona is defined using field mapping, and the degradation states of the progressively more degraded 68,000-yr-old 1.8-km-diam Lonar Crater in Indiana and 0.5-3.0 Myr old 1.75-km-diam Talemzane Crater in Algeria are assessed using air photos. The results on these terrestrial craters are then compared with the gradational morphology associated with craters in southern Ismenius Lacus on Mars, in order to develop first-order constraints on gradational activity. Common degradation signatures associated with craters on both planets are described. These signatures are used to assemble a first-order degradational sequence for the terrestrial craters that is then compared with the Martian degradational signatures to infer past processes and climate.

  3. Buried Craters of Utopia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-365, 19 May 2003

    Beneath the northern plains of Mars are numerous buried meteor impact craters. One of the most heavily-cratered areas, although buried, occurs in Utopia Planitia, as shown in this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image. The history of Mars is complex; impact craters provide a tool by which to understand some of that history. In this case, a very ancient, cratered surface was thinly-buried by younger material that is not cratered at all. This area is near 48.1oN, 228.2oW; less than 180 km (112 mi) west of the Viking 2 lander site. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  4. A history of the Lonar crater, India: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayak, V. K.

    1992-01-01

    The origin of the circular structure at Lonar, India, described variously as cauldron, pit, hollow, depression, and crater, has been a controversial subject since the early nineteenth century. A history of its origin and other aspects from 1823 to 1990 are overviewed. The structure in the Deccan Trap Basalt is nearly circular with a breach in the northeast, 1830 m in diameter, 150 m deep, with a saline lake in the crater floor. Over the years, the origin of the Lonar structure has risen from volcanism, subsidence, and cryptovolcanism to an authentic meteorite impact crater. Lonar is unique because it is probably the only terrestrial crater in basalt and is the closest analog with the Moon's craters. Some unresolved questions are suggested. The proposal is made that the young Lonar impact crater, which is less than 50,000 years old, should be considered as the best crater laboratory analogous to those of the Moon, be treated as a global monument, and preserved for scientists to comprehend more about the mysteries of nature and impact cratering, which is now emerging as a fundamental ubiquitous geological process in the evolution of the planets.

  5. Magmatic storage conditions along the Mono Craters chain, Eastern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, M.; Befus, K.; Gardner, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    We employ a variety of petrologic tools to characterize the pre-eruptive storage conditions of individual units erupted from Mono Craters. The Mono Craters chain represents one of the systems within the Long Valley volcanic field in Eastern California, which has been a regional center for effusive to cataclysmic volcanism from 800 ka until recent times. The Long Valley system has been the focus of much research; however, there are little published petrologic data for the Mono Craters chain. Understanding the Mono Craters chain is critical because it was the center for the most recent eruptions in the region. Eruptions along the chain occurred from 20 ka to ~660 years ago, and it is the most likely focus for future volcanic activity in the Long Valley region. Thus, petrologic data from Mono Craters must provide excellent constraints on the development and nature of the existing magmatic system. The Mono Craters chain contains 27 high silica rhyolite domes and flows and 1 dacite dome that were erupted along a gently arcuate trend that extends for ~15 km south of Mono Lake. The high silica rhyolites can be subdivided based on phenocryst assemblages into the following groups: biotite-bearing rhyolite, orthopyroxene-bearing rhyolite, fayalite-bearing rhyolite, sparsely porphyritic rhyolite, and aphyric rhyolite. We collected samples from 14 of the domes and flows within the Mono Craters chain, obtaining samples from each of the groups except the orthopyroxene-bearing rhyolite. We examined the composition of the mineral phases using electron microprobe analyses. Biotite-bearing rhyolites contain phenocrysts of quartz, plagioclase (Ab74-77), sanidine (Or66-68), Fe-rich hornblende, Ti-rich biotite, pyroxene, and magnetite with lamellae of ilmenite. Fayalite-bearing rhyolites contain phenocrysts of quartz, plagioclase (Ab75-80), sanidine (Or61-69), fayalite (Fa92-93), Fe-rich hornblende, Ti-rich biotite, pyroxene, magnetite and ilmenite. Sparsely porphyritic rhyolites

  6. Cold-Active, Heterotrophic Bacteria from the Highly Oligotrophic Waters of Lake Vanda, Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Vander Schaaf, Nicole A.; Cunningham, Anna M. G.; Cluff, Brandon P.; Kraemer, CodyJo K.; Reeves, Chelsea L.; Riester, Carli J.; Slater, Lauren K.; Madigan, Michael T.; Sattley, W. Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The permanently ice-covered lakes of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica are distinctive ecosystems that consist strictly of microbial communities. In this study, water samples were collected from Lake Vanda, a stratified Dry Valley lake whose upper waters (from just below the ice cover to nearly 60 m) are highly oligotrophic, and used to establish enrichment cultures. Six strains of psychrotolerant, heterotrophic bacteria were isolated from lake water samples from a depth of 50 or 55 m. Phylogenetic analyses showed the Lake Vanda strains to be species of Nocardiaceae, Caulobacteraceae, Sphingomonadaceae, and Bradyrhizobiaceae. All Lake Vanda strains grew at temperatures near or below 0 °C, but optimal growth occurred from 18 to 24 °C. Some strains showed significant halotolerance, but no strains required NaCl for growth. The isolates described herein include cold-active species not previously reported from Dry Valley lakes, and their physiological and phylogenetic characterization broadens our understanding of these limnologically unique lakes. PMID:27682095

  7. Eagle Crater Traverse Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image shows an overhead view of the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity landing site at Meridiani Planum, nicknamed 'Eagle Crater.' Scientists are conducting a soil survey here to see how the soils in this crater relate to the soils near the Meridiani Planum rock outcrop, as well as on the plains outside the crater. Scientists have studied the soils in great detail on the north and west sides of the crater, and plan to study five more locations before Opportunity exits the crater. As of sol 54 of Opportunity's journey (March 18, 2004), the rover is stationed at the sol 53 stop, located in the bottom right quadrant of this image. Scientists are examining light and dark soil targets at this spot, dubbed 'Neopolitan' because it is a triple boundary between light soil, dark soil, and an airbag bounce mark.

    This 3-D visualization was displayed using software developed by NASA's Ames Research Center and images from Opportunity's panoramic camera, taken while the rover was still on the lander.

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    Eagle Crater Traverse Map Figure 1 shows an overhead view of the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity landing site at Meridiani Planum, nicknamed 'Eagle Crater.' Scientists are conducting a soil survey here to see how the soils in this crater relate to the soils by the Meridiani Planum rock outcrop, as well as on the plains outside the crater. They have studied the soils in great detail on the north and west sides of the crater. Locations within the crater where scientists have taken microscopic images of the soil are shown in blue.

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 2

    Sampling 'Eagle Crater' Scientists have studied five unique target soil patches on the south and east sides of the crater using the microscopic imager and Moessbauer spectrometer. 'Goal 5' is a wind-rippled spot on the upper part of the crater, which the miniature thermal emission spectrometer shows is

  8. Prolonged Ponding Episode in C-Newton Crater in Recent Geological Times on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grin, E. A.; Cabrol, N. A.; Wynn-Williams, D. D.

    2001-01-01

    We present the morphological evidence that supports the existence of a lake in a recent past in C-Newton crater. We assess the astrobiological potential of this environment. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. USGS Activities at Lake Roosevelt and the Upper Columbia River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barton, Cynthia; Turney, Gary L.

    2010-01-01

    Lake Roosevelt (Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake) is the impoundment of the upper Columbia River behind Grand Coulee Dam, and is the largest reservoir within the Bureau of Reclamation's Columbia Basin Project (CBP). The reservoir is located in northeastern Washington, and stretches 151 miles from Grand Coulee Dam north to the Canadian border. The 15-20 miles of the Columbia River downstream of the border are riverine and are under small backwater effects from the dam. Grand Coulee Dam is located on the mainstem of the Columbia River about 90 miles northwest of Spokane. Since the late 1980s, trace-element contamination has been known to be widely present in Lake Roosevelt. Trace elements of concern include arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, and zinc. Contaminated sediment carried by the Columbia River is the primary source of the widespread occurrence of trace-element enrichment present in Lake Roosevelt. In 2001, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) initiated a preliminary assessment of environmental contamination of the Lake Roosevelt area (also referred to as Upper Columbia River, UCR site, or UCR/LR site) and has subsequently begun remedial investigations of the UCR site.

  10. Venus - Impact Crater 'Jeanne

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This Magellan full-resolution image shows Jeanne crater, a 19.5 kilometer (12 mile) diameter impact crater. Jeanne crater is located at 40.0 degrees north latitude and 331.4 degrees longitude. The distinctive triangular shape of the ejecta indicates that the impacting body probably hit obliquely, traveling from southwest to northeast. The crater is surrounded by dark material of two types. The dark area on the southwest side of the crater is covered by smooth (radar-dark) lava flows which have a strongly digitate contact with surrounding brighter flows. The very dark area on the northeast side of the crater is probably covered by smooth material such as fine-grained sediment. This dark halo is asymmetric, mimicking the asymmetric shape of the ejecta blanket. The dark halo may have been caused by an atmospheric shock or pressure wave produced by the incoming body. Jeanne crater also displays several outflow lobes on the northwest side. These flow-like features may have formed by fine-grained ejecta transported by a hot, turbulent flow created by the arrival of the impacting object. Alternatively, they may have formed by flow of impact melt.

  11. Impact Crater with Peak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 14 June 2002) The Science This THEMIS visible image shows a classic example of a martian impact crater with a central peak. Central peaks are common in large, fresh craters on both Mars and the Moon. This peak formed during the extremely high-energy impact cratering event. In many martian craters the central peak has been either eroded or buried by later sedimentary processes, so the presence of a peak in this crater indicates that the crater is relatively young and has experienced little degradation. Observations of large craters on the Earth and the Moon, as well as computer modeling of the impact process, show that the central peak contains material brought from deep beneath the surface. The material exposed in these peaks will provide an excellent opportunity to study the composition of the martian interior using THEMIS multi-spectral infrared observations. The ejecta material around the crater can is well preserved, again indicating relatively little modification of this landform since its initial creation. The inner walls of this approximately 18 km diameter crater show complex slumping that likely occurred during the impact event. Since that time there has been some downslope movement of material to form the small chutes and gullies that can be seen on the inner crater wall. Small (50-100 m) mega-ripples composed of mobile material can be seen on the floor of the crater. Much of this material may have come from the walls of the crater itself, or may have been blown into the crater by the wind. The Story When a meteor smacked into the surface of Mars with extremely high energy, pow! Not only did it punch an 11-mile-wide crater in the smoother terrain, it created a central peak in the middle of the crater. This peak forms kind of on the 'rebound.' You can see this same effect if you drop a single drop of milk into a glass of milk. With craters, in the heat and fury of the impact, some of the land material can even liquefy. Central peaks like the one

  12. Doublet craters on Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Cheryl M.; Melosh, H. Jay; Bottke, William F.

    2003-09-01

    Of the impact craters on Earth larger than 20 km in diameter, 10-15% (3 out of 28) are doublets, having been formed by the simultaneous impact of two well-separated projectiles. The most likely scenario for their formation is the impact of well-separated binary asteroids. If a population of binary asteroids is capable of striking the Earth, it should also be able to hit the other terrestrial planets as well. Venus is a promising planet to search for doublet craters because its surface is young, erosion is nearly nonexistent, and its crater population is significantly larger than the Earth's. After a detailed investigation of single craters separated by less than 150 km and "multiple" craters having diameters greater than 10 km, we found that the proportion of doublet craters on Venus is at most 2.2%, significantly smaller than Earth's, although several nearly incontrovertible doublets were recognized. We believe this apparent deficit relative to the Earth's doublet population is a consequence of atmospheric screening of small projectiles on Venus rather than a real difference in the population of impacting bodies. We also examined "splotches," circular radar reflectance features in the Magellan data. Projectiles that are too small to form craters probably formed these features. After a careful study of these patterns, we believe that the proportion of doublet splotches on Venus (14%) is comparable to the proportion of doublet craters found on Earth (10-15%). Thus, given the uncertainties of interpretation and the statistics of small numbers, it appears that the doublet crater population on Venus is consistent with that of the Earth.

  13. Lunar secondary craters, part K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Overbeck, V. R.; Morrison, R. H.; Wedekind, J.

    1972-01-01

    Formation of V-shaped structures surrounding the fresh Copernicus Crater and its secondary craters are reviewed, and preliminary observations of the more extensively eroded secondary crater field of Theophilus are presented. Results of laboratory simulation of secondary lunar craters to examine their effects on V-shaped ridges are also described.

  14. Crater in Utopia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    23 March 2004 Craters of the martian northern plains tend to be somewhat shallow because material has filled them in. Their ejecta blankets, too, are often covered by younger materials. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an example--a crater in Utopia Planitia near 43.7oN, 227.3oW. Erosion has roughened some of the surfaces of the material that filled the crater and covered its ejecta deposit. The picture covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  15. Venus - Crater Aurelia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This Magellan image shows a complex crater, 31.9 kilometers (20 miles) in diameter with a circular rim, terraced walls, and central peaks, located at 20.3 degrees north latitude and 331.8 degrees east longitude. Several unusual features are evidenced in this image: large dark surface up range from the crater; lobate flows emanating from crater ejecta, and very radar-bright ejecta and floor. Aurelia has been proposed to the International Astronomical Union, Subcommittee of Planetary Nomenclature as a candidate name. Aurelia is the mother of Julius Caesar.

  16. Activities and geochronology of (137)Cs in lake sediments resulting from sediment resuspension.

    PubMed

    Matisoff, Gerald

    2017-02-01

    In lakes with a large surface area to watershed ratio (137)Cs delivery is primarily by direct atmospheric fallout to the lake surface, where its activity in the sediments has been used to estimate the exposure to organisms and sediment mass deposition rates. Comparison of (137)Cs in the historical atmospheric fallout record with (137)Cs activity profiles in sediment cores reveals that although the general features of a maxima in the fallout deposition can be matched to activity peaks in the core, the general shape of the (137)Cs profile is not an exact replica of the fallout history. Instead, the sediment reflects post-depositional processes such as resuspension, bioturbation, partitioning of (137)Cs between the sediment solids and the pore fluids, and molecular diffusion of (137)Cs through the pore fluids. Presented here is a model that couples these processes to a system time averaging (STA) model that accounts for the time history of (137)Cs fallout and the particle residence time in the water column or in the 'active' surface sediment subject to resuspension. Sediment profiles are examined by comparing reasonable ranges of each of the coefficients of each of these major processes and by applying the model to cores collected from two large, shallow lakes, Lake Erie (USA/Canada) and Lake Winnipeg (Canada). The results indicate that the STA model with molecular diffusion and sediment resuspension best describes the data from these large, shallow lakes.

  17. Degradation of Victoria Crater, Meridiani Planum, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, J. A.; Wilson, S. A.; Cohen, B. A.; Golombek, M. P.; Geissler, P. E.; Sullivan, R. J.

    2007-12-01

    by aeolian erosion; thereby leading to mass wasting and accumulation of the large angular blocks observed on the slopes below By contrast, the shallow slope in the bays implies mass wasting is currently limited. Most likely, early mass wasting and aeolian stripping of the walls was gradually superseded by aeolian activity that proceeded most quickly along structural weaknesses and resulted in formation of the bays. Redistributed wall material contributes to crater infilling and/or was transported out of the crater. Occurrence of dark basaltic sands in the crater and in wind streaks along the north rim indicates additional transport into and out of the crater from other sources. The diminished expression of the rim, planed-off appearance of the ejecta blanket, paucity of exposed blocks, and dark wind streaks outside the crater imply efficient aeolian modification of Victoria crater, likely contributing to down-wasting and sediment transport that may be responsible for thin, local outcrops of finely bedded sediments capping the ejecta. The annulus appears to have resulted from combined erosion and planing of the ejecta, leading to evolution of a resistant lag of hematite concretions along with infilling and covering by the basaltic sand. There is no evidence for water-related erosional contributions to the present form of Victoria crater.

  18. The complex filling of alae crater, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swanson, D.A.; Duffield, W.A.; Jackson, D.B.; Peterson, D.W.

    1972-01-01

    Since February 1969 Alae Crater, a 165-m-deep pit crater on the east rift of Kilauea Volcano, has been completely filled with about 18 million m3 of lava. The filling was episodic and complex. It involved 13 major periods of addition of lava to the crater, including spectacular lava falls as high as 100 m, and three major periods of draining of lava from the crater. Alae was nearly filled by August 3, 1969, largely drained during a violent ground-cracking event on August 4, 1969, and then filled to the low point on its rim on October 10, 1969. From August 1970 to May 1971, the crater acted as a reservoir for lava that entered through subsurface tubes leading from the vent fissure 150 m away. Another tube system drained the crater and carried lava as far as the sea, 11 km to the south. Much of the lava entered Alae by invading the lava lake beneath its crust and buoying the crust upward. This process, together with the overall complexity of the filling, results in a highly complicated lava lake that would doubtless be misinterpreted if found in the fossil record. ?? 1972 Stabilimento Tipografico Francesco Giannini & Figli.

  19. Hydrothermal vents of Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplinski, M.A.; Morgan, P. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-04-01

    Hydrothermal vent systems within Yellowstone Lake are located within the Yellowstone caldera in the northeastern and West Thumb sections of the lake. The vent systems lie within areas of extremely high geothermal gradients (< 1,000 C/km) in the lake sediments and occur as clusters of individual vents that expel both hydrothermal fluids and gas. Regions surrounding the vents are colonized by unique, chemotropic biologic communities and suggest that hydrothermal input plays an important role in the nutrient dynamics of the lake's ecosystem. The main concentration of hydrothermal activity occurs in the northeast region of the main lake body in a number of locations including: (1) along the shoreline from the southern edge of Sedge Bay to the inlet of Pelican Creek; (2) the central portion of the partially submerged Mary Bay phreatic explosion crater, within deep (30--50 m) fissures; (3) along the top of a 3 km long, steep-sided ridge that extends from the southern border of Mary Bay, south-southeast into the main lake basin; and (4) east of Stevenson Island along the lower portion of the slope (50--107 m) into the lake basin, within an anastomosing series of north to northwest trending, narrow troughs or fissures. Hydrothermal vents were also located within, and surrounding the West Thumb of Yellowstone Lake, with the main concentration occurring the offshore of the West Thumb and Potts Geyser Basin. Hydrothermal vents in Yellowstone Lake occur along fractures that have penetrated the lake sediments or along the tops of ridges and near shore areas. Underneath the lake, rising hydrothermal fluids encounter a semi-permeable cap of lake sediments. Upwardly convecting hydrothermal fluid flow may be diverted by the impermeable lake sediments along the buried, pre-existing topography. These fluids may continue to rise along topography until fractures are encountered, or the lake sediment cover is thinned sufficiently to allow egress of the fluids.

  20. The Water Volume Changes of Lake Manas and Its Response to Climate Change and Human Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Suning; Yang, Jingchun; Li, Youli

    2014-05-01

    The water volume changes of the lake basin in China's arid northwest region can sensitively reflect the impact of climate change and human activities in upper stream area. Lake Manas is a terminal lake of Manas Valley, a typical Valley in Northern Xinjiang. Just like other lakes, tectonic activities, such as water conservancy projects and agriculture irrigation projects, have great impacts on its evolution and change. We have a research on the response to climate change and human activities since 1950s, taking the Lake Manas for example. Collect aerial photographs and satellite imagery in year of 1958,1964,1979,1989,1999,2001,2003, with 1:50,000 topographic maps, 1:10000 DEM and other types of Figure and data of Lake Manas, we calculate the changes of the water volume of the Lake in 7different time period. According to the analysis of weather and hydrology records in the past 50 years, this author construct the correlation curves among the flow rate of Manas River, the temperature and precipitation in its upper steam area. This study shows that the development of contemporary Lake Manas could be divided to three stages: high-water period (in late the 1950s), extinct period (between 1970s and 1990s), and recovering season (in the early 21st century). The high-water period in late 1950s and the recovering season in early 21st century are mostly the results of excessive wet climate in the drainage basin, while the extinct period between the 1970s and the 1990s is mostly the result of man-made water projects in its upper stream area.The impact of climate change mainly in: the impact of climate change on runoff upstream determine the inflows of Lake Manas; the impact of downstream climate on the combination of water and heat determine the evaporation. The impact of human activities mainly in: the water conservancy projects upstream and agriculture irrigation projects since 1954 result in the extinct period between 1970s and 1990s in Lake Manas. Key Words: Lake Manas

  1. The origin of lunar craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegener, A.

    1975-01-01

    A review is presented of four hypotheses concerning the origin of lunar craters, taking into account the bubble hypothesis, the tide hypothesis, the volcanic hypothesis, and the impact hypothesis. A description is given of a series of experiments on impact craters and studies of a meteorite crater in Arizona are considered. It is concluded that the typical lunar craters can best be interpreted as impact craters.

  2. Depth-related gradients of viral activity in Lake Pavin.

    PubMed

    Colombet, J; Sime-Ngando, T; Cauchie, H M; Fonty, G; Hoffmann, L; Demeure, G

    2006-06-01

    High-resolution vertical sampling and determination of viral and prokaryotic parameters in a deep volcanic lake shows that in the absence of thermal stratification but within light, oxygen, and chlorophyll gradients, host availability empirically is prevalent over the physical and chemical environments and favors lytic over lysogenic "viral life cycles."

  3. Secondary crater fields from 24 large primary craters on Mars: Insights into nearby secondary crater production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, Stuart J.; Hynek, Brian M.

    2011-10-01

    Crater statistics are used across a wide variety of applications on planetary surfaces, one of the most notable being estimating relative and absolute ages of those surfaces. This requires an assumed cratering rate over time and that craters be randomly distributed. Secondary craters - craters that form from the ejecta of an impact event - belie this assumption by creating greater crater density in a local area at a single time, significantly affecting crater statistics. There has been substantial debate over the relative importance of secondary craters, and our findings in this Mars study indicate that these events can be very significant and cannot be ignored when age-dating surfaces. We have analyzed secondary crater fields found close to 24 primary craters on Mars. Among other findings such as terrain control over secondary crater field characteristics, we conclude that a single large impact event (>100 km) can significantly affect crater statistics at the ˜1-5-km-diameter level over a non-trivial fraction of a planetary surface (minimum secondary crater diameters examined were ˜0.9 km; the minimum primary crater diameter was ˜20 km). We also suggest a potential way to avoid significant contamination by the majority of secondary craters that occur close to the primary impact event without the need to manually classify every crater as primary or secondary. Our findings are specific to Mars, but further work may show the patterns are applicable to other solid bodies.

  4. Exhumed Craters near Kaiser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    24 August 2004 The upper left (northwest) corner of this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a crater within which are several layers of eroded material. This crater, and probably all of its degraded neighbors, was once filled and buried, and was later exhumed. The burial and exhumation theme is one that repeats all over the surface of Mars, as ancient rocks are eroded to expose previously filled and buried craters, valleys, and landscapes. This particular image is located near the northwest rim of Kaiser Crater, in Noachis Terra, near 45.2oS, 342.7oW. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  5. Shackleton Crater Illumination

    NASA Video Gallery

    Simulated illumination conditions near the lunar South Pole. The 30km x 30km region highlights the Shackleton crater. The movie runs for 28 days, centered on the LCROSS impact date on October 9th, ...

  6. Zhamanshin meteor crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florenskiy, P. V.; Dabizha, A. I.

    1987-01-01

    A historical survey and geographic, geologic and geophysical characteristics, the results of many years of study of the Zhamanshin meteor crater in the Northern Aral region, are reported. From this data the likely initial configuration and cause of formation of the crater are reconstructed. Petrographic and mineralogical analyses are given of the brecciated and remelted rocks, of the zhamanshinites and irgizite tektites in particular. The impact melting, dispersion and quenching processes resulting in tektite formation are discussed.

  7. Patterns in benthic biodiversity link lake trophic status to structure and potential function of three large, deep lakes.

    PubMed

    Hayford, Barbara L; Caires, Andrea M; Chandra, Sudeep; Girdner, Scott F

    2015-01-01

    Relative to their scarcity, large, deep lakes support a large proportion of the world's freshwater species. This biodiversity is threatened by human development and is in need of conservation. Direct comparison of biodiversity is the basis of biological monitoring for conservation but is difficult to conduct between large, insular ecosystems. The objective of our study was to conduct such a comparison of benthic biodiversity between three of the world's largest lakes: Lake Tahoe, USA; Lake Hövsgöl, Mongolia; and Crater Lake, USA. We examined biodiversity of common benthic organism, the non-biting midges (Chironomidae) and determined lake trophic status using chironomid-based lake typology, tested whether community structure was similar between the three lakes despite geographic distance; and tested whether chironomid diversity would show significant variation within and between lakes. Typology analysis indicated that Lake Hövsgöl was ultra-oligotrophic, Crater Lake was oligotrophic, and Lake Tahoe was borderline oligotrophic/mesotrophic. These results were similar to traditional pelagic measures of lake trophic status for Lake Hövsgöl and Crater Lake but differed for Lake Tahoe, which has been designated as ultra-oligotrophic by traditional pelagic measures such as transparency found in the literature. Analysis of similarity showed that Lake Tahoe and Lake Hövsgöl chironomid communities were more similar to each other than either was to Crater Lake communities. Diversity varied between the three lakes and spatially within each lake. This research shows that chironomid communities from these large lakes were sensitive to trophic conditions. Chironomid communities were similar between the deep environments of Lake Hövsgöl and Lake Tahoe, indicating that chironomid communities from these lakes may be useful in comparing trophic state changes in large lakes. Spatial variation in Lake Tahoe's diversity is indicative of differential response of chironomid

  8. Reconstruction of the geology and structure of Lake Rotomahana and its hydrothermal systems from high-resolution multibeam mapping and seismic surveys: Effects of the 1886 Tarawera Rift eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ronde, C. E. J.; Walker, S. L.; LeBlanc, C.; Davy, B. W.; Fornari, D. J.; Tontini, F. Caratori; Scott, B. J.; Seebeck, H.; Stewart, T. J.; Mazot, A.; Nicol, A.; Tivey, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    Present-day Lake Rotomahana is one of the two focal points of the most destructive eruption in New Zealand's historical record, i.e., that of Mt. Tarawera on 10 June 1886, with devastating loss of life and presumed destruction of the iconic Pink and White Terraces that adorned the margins of the lake. Basaltic dikes are considered to have ascended near surface in the area, intruding into hydrothermally altered and water-saturated ground beneath the existing lake. The consequential hydrothermal and phreatomagmatic eruptions ejected 0.5325 km3 of material from the lakefloor and below, plastering the nearby landscape for several kilometers with mud and other debris. The eruption buried the natural outlet of the lake, with the bottom of the craters becoming filled by water within months and completely concealed from view within years; today Lake Rotomahana has depths up to 118 m. High-resolution (0.5 m) bathymetric mapping, when combined with a 2-D seismic reflection survey, enables us to 'see' details of the maar craters on the lakefloor, including those parts subsequently buried by sediment. The large Rotomahana Crater described by workers immediately after the eruption measures ~ 2.5 km in diameter near its southwestern end, and excavated ground to 155 m below present-day lake level. The vent system, as revealed by the present study, forms an array of right-stepping (dextral) craters, with the main crater being host to two sub-craters Rotomahana West Crater and Rotomahana East Crater today buried beneath the lakefloor, and which are in-filled by 36 and 37 m of sediment, respectively. Subordinate craters along the same 057° Tarawera Rift trace include Hochstetter Crater (11 m of infill), Waingongongongo Crater (14 m) and Rotomakariri Crater (26 m). These craters host a total 0.0268 km3 of sediment. Other features highlighted by the bathymetric data include; craters not filled by sediment, sediment fan deltas, volcanic ridges and dikes, submerged wave-cut terraces

  9. Multivariate analyses of crater parameters and the classification of craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegal, B. S.; Griffiths, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    Multivariate analyses were performed on certain linear dimensions of six genetic types of craters. A total of 320 craters, consisting of laboratory fluidization craters, craters formed by chemical and nuclear explosives, terrestrial maars and other volcanic craters, and terrestrial meteorite impact craters, authenticated and probable, were analyzed in the first data set in terms of their mean rim crest diameter, mean interior relief, rim height, and mean exterior rim width. The second data set contained an additional 91 terrestrial craters of which 19 were of experimental percussive impact and 28 of volcanic collapse origin, and which was analyzed in terms of mean rim crest diameter, mean interior relief, and rim height. Principal component analyses were performed on the six genetic types of craters. Ninety per cent of the variation in the variables can be accounted for by two components. Ninety-nine per cent of the variation in the craters formed by chemical and nuclear explosives is explained by the first component alone.

  10. Mercury's Densely Cratered Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Mariner 10 took this picture (FDS 27465) of the densely cratered surface of Mercury when the spacecraft was 18,200 kilometers (8085 miles) from the planet on March 29. The dark line across top of picture is a 'dropout' of a few TV lines of data. At lower left, a portion of a 61 kilometer (38 mile) crater shows a flow front extending across the crater floor and filling more than half of the crater. The smaller, fresh crater at center is about 25 kilometers (15 miles) in diameter. Craters as small as one kilometer (about one-half mile) across are visible in the picture.

    The Mariner 10 mission, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science, explored Venus in February 1974 on the way to three encounters with Mercury-in March and September 1974 and in March 1975. The spacecraft took more than 7,000 photos of Mercury, Venus, the Earth and the Moon.

    Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Northwestern University

  11. Heavy metals in surface sediments of the shallow lakes in eastern China: their relations with environmental factors and anthropogenic activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenqiang; Jin, Xin; Di, Zhenzhen; Zhu, Xiaolei; Shan, Baoqing

    2016-12-01

    The aquatic environment is affected by heavy metal pollution. This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that environmental factors and anthropogenic activities influence the distributions and the risks posed by heavy metals in surface sediments in shallow lakes in eastern China, which is an area affected by rapid urbanization, industrialization, and population growth. Total Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Se, and Zn concentrations in sediment samples were determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The I geo showed that sediments in the lakes were moderately polluted with Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn, and the EF method showed that Cd and Se were significantly enriched in lakes. The heavy metals were found to pose moderate risks in most of the lakes, except for Gaoyou Lake, Honghu Lake, Poyang Lake, and Weishan Lake. The RI method indicated that very high risks were posed in Dongting Lake and Poyang Lake. Cd was found to pose much higher levels of risk than the other metals. Significant correlations were found between the heavy metal concentrations and the total carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur concentrations. The gross domestic product represented anthropogenic activities well. The gross domestic product of an area and the gross domestic products of primary and secondary industries in an area all had significant relationships with the concentrations of Cu and Pb, indicating that anthropogenic activities have different impacts on pollution with different heavy metals. The gross domestic product index was found to be a driving force behind the pollution of lakes with heavy metals.

  12. Living at the border: A community and single-cell assessment of lake bacterioneuston activity

    PubMed Central

    Hörtnagl, Paul; Pérez, María Teresa; Sommaruga, Ruben

    2010-01-01

    We assessed the physicochemical properties of the surface microlayer (SML: first 900 μm) and its underlying water (ULW: 0.2–0.5-m depth) and compared the composition and activity of their bacterial communities in six lakes located across an altitude gradient. Activity was assessed at both the community level, by measuring leucine bulk incorporation, and at the single-cell level, by using microautoradiography. Catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to quantitatively assess the structure of the bacterial assemblage. Dissolved organic matter at the SML was significantly enriched in small-size molecules as compared to the ULW. Bacterial abundance in the SML ranged from 3.2 × 105 cells mL−1 to 3.2 × 106 cells mL−1 and was enriched in four out of six lakes when compared to the ULW. The SML and ULW showed lake-specific differences in bacterial community composition, although in most cases, both layers were dominated by Betaproteobacteria. This group also contributed the most to total activity in both layers in all lakes, followed by Actinobacteria. Despite large differences in environmental conditions among lakes, the fraction of active neustonic bacteria was very similar in most of them. Both bulk and single-cell activities are not necessarily lower in the SML than in the ULW, and well-adapted bacteria exist in the extreme conditions found in this habitat. PMID:20401318

  13. Geology of McLaughlin Crater, Mars: A Unique Lacustrine Setting with Implications for Astrobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalski, J. R.; Niles, P. B.; Rogers, A. D.; Johnson, S. S.; Ashley, J. W.; Golombek, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    McLaughlin crater is a 92-kmdiameter Martian impact crater that contained an ancient carbonate- and clay mineral-bearing lake in the Late Noachian. Detailed analysis of the geology within this crater reveals a complex history with important implications for astrobiology [1]. The basin contains evidence for, among other deposits, hydrothermally altered rocks, delta deposits, deep water (>400 m) sediments, and potentially turbidites. The geology of this basin stands in stark contrast to that of some ancient basins that contain evidence for transient aqueous processes and airfall sediments (e.g. Gale Crater [2-3]).

  14. Walker Lake, Nevada: sedimentation in an active, strike-slip related basin

    SciTech Connect

    Link, M.H.; Roberts, M.T.

    1984-04-01

    Walker Lake, Nevada, is in an active fault-controlled basin related to the right-lateral, northwest-trending Walker Lane Shear Zone on the western side of the Basin and Range province. The lake occurs in a half graben bounded on its west side by a high-angle normal fault zone along the Wassuk Range front. This fault zone may merge to the north into the Walker Lane fault system, which forms the northeast boundary of the basin. To the south of Walker Lake, the Wassuk front fault merges with an east-northeast trending left-lateral fault. The Walker Lake basin is interpreted to be a pull-apart basin formed within the triangular zone bounded by the Wassuk front, the Walker Lane, and left-lateral faults. The Walker River drainage basin occupies about 10,000 km/sup 2/ (3800 mi/sup 2/) in western Nevada and parts of California and is essentially a closed hydrologic system that drains from the crest of the Sierra Nevada in California and terminates in Walker Lake. Walker Lake trends north-northwest and is 27.4 km (17 mi) long and 8 km (5 mi) wide with water depths exceeding 30 m (100 ft). Lake Lahontan (Wisconsinian) shorelines ring Walker Lake and suggest water depths of 150 m (500 ft) above the present lake level. The lake is situated in an asymmetric basin with steep alluvial fans flanking the western shoreline (Wassuk Range) and gentle, areally more extensive fans flanking the eastern shoreline (Gillis Range). The Walker River delta enters the lake from the north and is a major sediment point source for the basin. Older dissected shoreline, alluvial fan, Gilbert delta, and beach ridge deposits were built largely of coarse-grained, locally derived materials. Stromatolites, oncolites, and tufas formed along the shorelines, whereas mud and organic sediments accumulated in the lake on the west side of the basin. Extensive submerged sand flats and local sand dunes occur on the east side of the basin.

  15. Exploration and discovery in Yellowstone Lake: Results from high-resolution sonar imaging, seismic reflection profiling, and submersible studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, L.A.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Lovalvo, D.A.; Johnson, S.Y.; Stephenson, W.J.; Pierce, K.L.; Harlan, S.S.; Finn, C.A.; Lee, G.; Webring, M.; Schulze, B.; Duhn, J.; Sweeney, R.; Balistrieri, L.

    2003-01-01

    Discoveries from multi-beam sonar mapping and seismic reflection surveys of the northern, central, and West Thumb basins of Yellowstone Lake provide new insight into the extent of post-collapse volcanism and active hydrothermal processes occurring in a large lake environment above a large magma chamber. Yellowstone Lake has an irregular bottom covered with dozens of features directly related to hydrothermal, tectonic, volcanic, and sedimentary processes. Detailed bathymetric, seismic reflection, and magnetic evidence reveals that rhyolitic lava flows underlie much of Yellowstone Lake and exert fundamental control on lake bathymetry and localization of hydrothermal activity. Many previously unknown features have been identified and include over 250 hydrothermal vents, several very large (>500 m diameter) hydrothermal explosion craters, many small hydrothermal vent craters (???1-200 m diameter), domed lacustrine sediments related to hydrothermal activity, elongate fissures cutting post-glacial sediments, siliceous hydrothermal spire structures, sublacustrine landslide deposits, submerged former shorelines, and a recently active graben. Sampling and observations with a submersible remotely operated vehicle confirm and extend our understanding of the identified features. Faults, fissures, hydrothermally inflated domal structures, hydrothermal explosion craters, and sublacustrine landslides constitute potentially significant geologic hazards. Toxic elements derived from hydrothermal processes also may significantly affect the Yellowstone ecosystem. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  16. Exploration and discovery in Yellowstone Lake: results from high-resolution sonar imaging, seismic reflection profiling, and submersible studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, L. A.; Shanks, W. C.; Lovalvo, D. A.; Johnson, S. Y.; Stephenson, W. J.; Pierce, K. L.; Harlan, S. S.; Finn, C. A.; Lee, G.; Webring, M.; Schulze, B.; Dühn, J.; Sweeney, R.; Balistrieri, L.

    2003-04-01

    'No portion of the American continent is perhaps so rich in wonders as the Yellow Stone' (F.V. Hayden, September 2, 1874) Discoveries from multi-beam sonar mapping and seismic reflection surveys of the northern, central, and West Thumb basins of Yellowstone Lake provide new insight into the extent of post-collapse volcanism and active hydrothermal processes occurring in a large lake environment above a large magma chamber. Yellowstone Lake has an irregular bottom covered with dozens of features directly related to hydrothermal, tectonic, volcanic, and sedimentary processes. Detailed bathymetric, seismic reflection, and magnetic evidence reveals that rhyolitic lava flows underlie much of Yellowstone Lake and exert fundamental control on lake bathymetry and localization of hydrothermal activity. Many previously unknown features have been identified and include over 250 hydrothermal vents, several very large (>500 m diameter) hydrothermal explosion craters, many small hydrothermal vent craters (˜1-200 m diameter), domed lacustrine sediments related to hydrothermal activity, elongate fissures cutting post-glacial sediments, siliceous hydrothermal spire structures, sublacustrine landslide deposits, submerged former shorelines, and a recently active graben. Sampling and observations with a submersible remotely operated vehicle confirm and extend our understanding of the identified features. Faults, fissures, hydrothermally inflated domal structures, hydrothermal explosion craters, and sublacustrine landslides constitute potentially significant geologic hazards. Toxic elements derived from hydrothermal processes also may significantly affect the Yellowstone ecosystem.

  17. Diversity of active aerobic methanotrophs along depth profiles of arctic and subarctic lake water column and sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    He, Ruo; Wooller, Matthew J.; Pohlman, John W.; Quensen, John; Tiedje, James M.; Leigh, Mary Beth

    2012-01-01

    Methane (CH4) emitted from high-latitude lakes accounts for 2–6% of the global atmospheric CH4 budget. Methanotrophs in lake sediments and water columns mitigate the amount of CH4 that enters the atmosphere, yet their identity and activity in arctic and subarctic lakes are poorly understood. We used stable isotope probing (SIP), quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), pyrosequencing and enrichment cultures to determine the identity and diversity of active aerobic methanotrophs in the water columns and sediments (0–25 cm) from an arctic tundra lake (Lake Qalluuraq) on the north slope of Alaska and a subarctic taiga lake (Lake Killarney) in Alaska's interior. The water column CH4 oxidation potential for these shallow (~2m deep) lakes was greatest in hypoxic bottom water from the subarctic lake. The type II methanotroph, Methylocystis, was prevalent in enrichment cultures of planktonic methanotrophs from the water columns. In the sediments, type I methanotrophs (Methylobacter, Methylosoma and Methylomonas) at the sediment-water interface (0–1 cm) were most active in assimilating CH4, whereas the type I methanotroph Methylobacter and/or type II methanotroph Methylocystis contributed substantially to carbon acquisition in the deeper (15–20 cm) sediments. In addition to methanotrophs, an unexpectedly high abundance of methylotrophs also actively utilized CH4-derived carbon. This study provides new insight into the identity and activity of methanotrophs in the sediments and water from high-latitude lakes.

  18. A Sourcebook of Marine Activities Developed in the Milwaukee Great Lakes Summer Education Program, 1977 and 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haney, Richard E., Ed.

    Twenty-seven activities dealing with the marine environment of the Great Lakes are presented. Designed for junior and senior high school students, these activities develop awareness of the biological, physical, social, economical, and aesthetic dimensions of the Great Lakes. Field trips, films, discussion, and hands-on activities are used to teach…

  19. Impact Cratering Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.

    2002-01-01

    Many Martian craters are surrounded by ejecta blankets which appear to have been fluidized forming lobate and layered deposits terminated by one or more continuous distal scarps, or ramparts. One of the first hypotheses for the formation of so-called rampart ejecta features was shock-melting of subsurface ice, entrainment of liquid water into the ejecta blanket, and subsequent fluidized flow. Our work quantifies this concept. Rampart ejecta found on all but the youngest volcanic and polar regions, and the different rampart ejecta morphologies are correlated with crater size and terrain. In addition, the minimum diameter of craters with rampart features decreases with increasing latitude indicating that ice laden crust resides closer to the surface as one goes poleward on Mars. Our second goal in was to determine what strength model(s) reproduce the faults and complex features found in large scale gravity driven craters. Collapse features found in large scale craters require that the rock strength weaken as a result of the shock processing of rock and the later cratering shear flows. In addition to the presence of molten silicate in the intensely shocked region, the presence of water, either ambient, or the result of shock melting of ice weakens rock. There are several other mechanisms for the reduction of strength in geologic materials including dynamic tensile and shear induced fracturing. Fracturing is a mechanism for large reductions in strength. We found that by incorporating damage into the models that we could in a single integrated impact calculation, starting in the atmosphere produce final crater profiles having the major features found in the field measurements (central uplifts, inner ring, terracing and faulting). This was accomplished with undamaged surface strengths (0.1 GPa) and in depth strengths (1.0 GPa).

  20. Mars cratering chronology: new estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, B.

    Many interpretations of Mars geologic evolution is making with the cratering chronology technique (e.g. Hartmann and Neukum, Space Sci. Rev. 96, 165-194, 2001). The core idea of the technique is that older planetary surfaces accumulate more impact craters of a given size than younger surfaces. Two issues are important for the cratering chronology: (i) the estimate of the Moon/Mars cratering ratio to transfer the absolute time scale form the Moon, studied with return sample missions, and (2) the relative importance of secondary impact craters in the interpretation of the available crater counts. In this presentation I describe a progress in both topics listed above. Modern impact rates on planets are defined by orbital evolution of small bodies under weak gravity and non-gravity forces, including resonances with large planets and effects of solar irradiation. In parallel with the celestial mechanics modeling we use the database of observed asteroids, converted into a planetary impact rate. The test of this technique is done for the Earth/moon cratering rate comparison with an independent verification with observed terrestrial atmospheric bursts of bolides and fireballs. For small craters (D<300 m) and young lunar surfaces (age < 100 Ma) the independent measurements of the lunar cratering rate and modern terrestrial bolide/fireball flux match pretty well, giving more confidence for the approach. However, for larger craters (300 m < D <3 km) one should assume the porous-like scaling law for lunar craters to match the astronomically estimated impact rate. This fact demands a reconsideration of Mars/moon cratering rate ratio, as the porosity of upper 1 km under Martian surface may be quite different from the lunar one due to larger Martian gravity and possible filling of porous space with ice/brine. The problem of secondary crater share among crater counts used for surface dating is analyzed by size-frequency distribution (SFD) of secondary and primary craters. The

  1. Physical properties of lunar craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Maitri P.; Bhatt, Kushal P.; Jain, Rajmal

    2017-02-01

    The surface of the Moon is highly cratered due to impacts of meteorites, asteroids, comets and other celestial objects. The origin, size, structure, age and composition vary among craters. We study a total of 339 craters observed by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC). Out of these 339 craters, 214 craters are known (named craters included in the IAU Gazetteer of Planetary Nomenclature) and 125 craters are unknown (craters that are not named and objects that are absent in the IAU Gazetteer). We employ images taken by LROC at the North and South Poles and near side of the Moon. We report for the first time the study of unknown craters, while we also review the study of known craters conducted earlier by previous researchers. Our study is focused on measurements of diameter, depth, latitude and longitude of each crater for both known and unknown craters. The diameter measurements are based on considering the Moon to be a spherical body. The LROC website also provides a plot which enables us to measure the depth and diameter. We found that out of 214 known craters, 161 craters follow a linear relationship between depth (d) and diameter (D), but 53 craters do not follow this linear relationship. We study physical dimensions of these 53 craters and found that either the depth does not change significantly with diameter or the depths are extremely high relative to diameter (conical). Similarly, out of 125 unknown craters, 78 craters follow the linear relationship between depth (d) and diameter (D) but 47 craters do not follow the linear relationship. We propose that the craters following the scaling law of depth and diameter, also popularly known as the linear relationship between d and D, are formed by the impact of meteorites having heavy metals with larger dimension, while those with larger diameter but less depth are formed by meteorites/celestial objects having low density material but larger diameter. The craters with very high depth and with very small

  2. Some implications of large impact craters and basins on Venus for terrestrial ringed craters and planetary evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinnon, W. B.; Alexopoulos, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    Approximately 950 impact craters have been identified on the surface of Venus, mainly in Magellan radar images. From a combination of Earth-based Arecibo, Venera 15/1, and Magellan radar images, we have interpreted 72 as unequivocal peak-ring craters and four as multiringed basins. The morphological and structural preservation of these craters is high owing to the low level of geologic activity on the venusian surface (which is in some ways similar to the terrestrial benthic environment). Thus these craters should prove crucial to understanding the mechanics of ringed crater formation. They are also the most direct analogs for craters formed on the Earth in Phanerozoic time, such as Chicxulub. We summarize our findings to date concerning these structures.

  3. Active subglacial lakes and channelized water flow beneath the Kamb Ice Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byeong-Hoon; Lee, Choon-Ki; Seo, Ki-Weon; Lee, Won Sang; Scambos, Ted

    2016-12-01

    We identify two previously unknown subglacial lakes beneath the stagnated trunk of the Kamb Ice Stream (KIS). Rapid fill-drain hydrologic events over several months are inferred from surface height changes measured by CryoSat-2 altimetry and indicate that the lakes are probably connected by a subglacial drainage network, whose structure is inferred from the regional hydraulic potential and probably links the lakes. The sequential fill-drain behavior of the subglacial lakes and concurrent rapid thinning in a channel-like topographic feature near the grounding line implies that the subglacial water repeatedly flows from the region above the trunk to the KIS grounding line and out beneath the Ross Ice Shelf. Ice shelf elevation near the hypothesized outlet is observed to decrease slowly during the study period. Our finding supports a previously published conceptual model of the KIS shutdown stemming from a transition from distributed flow to well-drained channelized flow of subglacial water. However, a water-piracy hypothesis in which the KIS subglacial water system is being starved by drainage in adjacent ice streams is also supported by the fact that the degree of KIS trunk subglacial lake activity is relatively weaker than those of the upstream lakes.

  4. Endeavour Crater in Context

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The largest crater in this mosaic of images taken by the Context Camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is Endeavour Crater, which is 22 kilometers (14 miles) in diameter.

    The team operating NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars chose to drive the rover toward Endeavour after Opportunity ascended out of smaller Victoria Crater in August 2008.

    Opportunity caught its first glimpse of Endeavour's rim on March 7, 2008, during the 1,820th Martian day, or sol, of the rover's mission on Mars. The rover was about 12 kilometers (7 miles) from the closest point of the crater.

    Annotations on Figure 1 show vectors from Opportunity's position on that date toward the portions of the rim seen in images that Opportunity's panoramic camera (Pancam) took from the Sol 1820 location. In addition to three portions of Endeavour's rim, the rim of a smaller, more distant crater, Iazu, appears faintly on the horizon in the Pancam images.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, is the prime contractor for the project and built the spacecraft. Malin Space Science Systems, San Diego, provided and operates the Context Camera.

  5. Bycatch, bait, anglers, and roads: quantifying vector activity and propagule introduction risk across lake ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Drake, D Andrew R; Mandrak, Nicholas E

    2014-06-01

    Long implicated in the invasion process, live-bait anglers are highly mobile species vectors with frequent overland transport of fishes. To test hypotheses about the role of anglers in propagule transport, we developed a social-ecological model quantifying the opportunity for species transport beyond the invaded range resulting from bycatch during commercial bait operations, incidental transport, and release to lake ecosystems by anglers. We combined a gravity model with a stochastic, agent-based simulation, representing a 1-yr iteration of live-bait angling and the dynamics of propagule transport at fine spatiotemporal scales (i.e., probability of introducing n propagules per lake per year). A baseline scenario involving round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) indicated that most angling trips were benign; irrespective of lake visitation, anglers failed to purchase and transport propagules (benign trips, median probability P = 0.99912). However, given the large number of probability trials (4.2 million live-bait angling events per year), even the rarest sequence of events (uptake, movement, and deposition of propagules) is anticipated to occur. Risky trips (modal P = 0.00088 trips per year; approximately 1 in 1136) were sufficient to introduce a substantial number of propagules (modal values, Poisson model = 3715 propagules among 1288 lakes per year; zero-inflated negative binomial model = 6722 propagules among 1292 lakes per year). Two patterns of lake-specific introduction risk emerged. Large lakes supporting substantial angling activity experienced propagule pressure likely to surpass demographic barriers to establishment (top 2.5% of lakes with modal outcomes of five to 76 propagules per year; 303 high-risk lakes with three or more propagules, per year). Small or remote lakes were less likely to receive propagules; however, most risk distributions were leptokurtic with a long right tail, indicating the rare occurrence of high propagule loads to most waterbodies

  6. The scaling of secondary craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, Steven K.

    1991-01-01

    Secondary craters are common features around fresh planetary-scale primary impact craters throughout most of the Solar System. They derive from the ejection phase of crater formation, thus secondary scaling relations provide constraints on parameters affecting ejection processes. Secondary crater fields typically begin at the edge of the continuous ejecta blankets (CEB) and extend out several crater radii. Secondaries tend to have rounded rims and bilateral symmetry about an axis through the primary crater's center. Prominent secondary chains can extend inward across the CEB close to the rim. A simple method for comparing secondary crater fields was employed: averaging the diameters and ranges from the center of the primary crater of the five largest craters in a secondary crater field. While not as much information is obtained about individual crater fields by this method as in more complete secondary field mapping, it facilitates rapid comparison of many secondary fields. Also, by quantifying a few specific aspects of the secondary crater field, this method can be used to construct scaling relations for secondary craters.

  7. Cratering Chronology and the Evolution of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, William K.; Neukum, Gerhard

    2001-04-01

    Results by Neukum et al. (2001) and Ivanov (2001) are combined with crater counts to estimate ages of Martian surfaces. These results are combined with studies of Martian meteorites (Nyquist et al., 2001) to establish a rough chronology of Martian history. High crater densities in some areas, together with the existence of a 4.5 Gyr rock from Mars (ALH84001), which was weathered at about 4.0 Gyr, affirm that some of the oldest surfaces involve primordial crustal materials, degraded by various processes including megaregolith formation and cementing of debris. Small craters have been lost by these processes, as shown by comparison with Phobos and with the production function, and by crater morphology distributions. Crater loss rates and survival lifetimes are estimated as a measure of average depositional/erosional rate of activity. We use our results to date the Martian epochs defined by Tanaka (1986). The high crater densities of the Noachian confine the entire Noachian Period to before about 3.5 Gyr. The Hesperian/Amazonian boundary is estimated to be about 2.9 to 3.3 Gyr ago, but with less probability could range from 2.0 to 3.4 Gyr. Mid-age dates are less well constrained due to uncertainties in the Martian cratering rate. Comparison of our ages with resurfacing data of Tanaka et al. (1987) gives a strong indication that volcanic, fluvial, and periglacial resurfacing rates were all much higher in approximately the first third of Martian history. We estimate that the Late Amazonian Epoch began a few hundred Myr ago (formal solutions 300 to 600 Myr ago). Our work supports Mariner 9 era suggestions of very young lavas on Mars, and is consistent with meteorite evidence for Martian igneous rocks 1.3 and 0.2 - 0.3 Gyr old. The youngest detected Martian lava flows give formal crater retention ages of the order 10 Myr or less. We note also that certain Martian meteorites indicate fluvial activity younger than the rock themselves, 700 Myr in one case, and this is

  8. Small Impact Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    22 June 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a small impact crater with a 'butterfly' ejecta pattern. The butterfly pattern results from an oblique impact. Not all oblique impacts result in an elliptical crater, but they can result in a non-radial pattern of ejecta distribution. The two-toned nature of the ejecta -- with dark material near the crater and brighter material further away -- might indicate the nature of subsurface materials. Below the surface, there may be a layer of lighter-toned material, underlain by a layer of darker material. The impact throws these materials out in a pattern that reflects the nature of the underlying layers.

    Location near: 3.7oN, 348.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  9. Crater Wall With Gullies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    8 June 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) picture shows gullies formed in the terraced wall of an impact crater on the floor of a larger crater near 39.1oS, 200.7oW. Gullies such as these are fairly common in craters and depressions at southern middle latitudes. They also occur in some areas at northern middle latitudes and in both polar regions. They may have formed by liquid water, or not--the Mars science community is still debating and discussing the issue. This picture covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  10. Craters! A Multi-Science Approach to Cratering and Impacts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartmann, William K.; Cain, Joe

    This book provides a complete Scope Sequence and Coordination teaching module. First, craters are introduced as a generally observable phenomena. Then, by making craters and by investigating the results, students gain close-up, hands-on experience with impact events and their products. Real crater examples from the Moon and elsewhere are included…

  11. Impact Materials of Takamatsu Crater in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Y.; Okamoto, M.; Fukuchi, T.

    1995-09-01

    Shocked quartz materials have been found in Japanese K.T boundary (Hokkaido) and mountains of middle main-islands of Japan, though there are few direct evidence of "natural circular structure" on the surface in Japan. However circular structure has been recently found as a buried crater(up to 150m deep) [1] which is ca. 4km in diameter with -10 mgal of Bouguer gravity anomaly from surrounding Rhyoke granitic region of the southern part of Takamatsu City, Kagawa Prefecture, northeast Shikoku, Japan [1,2,3]. Two boring cores of 300m deep near small mountains inside the crater could not reach the bottom of the crater so far. From model calculation of the negative gravity anomaly, the Takamatsu crater shows deep basin structure up to 1.4km. If the Takamatsu crater is considered to be only impact crater, it is difficult to discuss only surface materials on the crater. But anomalous minerals are found only around small volcanic intrusions inside the crater, which the mixed minerals are clearly different with those of other volcanic intrusions of the Yashima and Goshikidai outside the crater [1,2,3]. The small volcanic intrusions are not origin of large Takamatsu crater, because the small volcanic intrusions are found on whole areas of Kagawa Prefecture. Major different activity of the small intrusions inside the crater is to bring the brecciated materials of the interior (esp. crater sediments). The xenolith materials around only volcanic intrusion of andesite are divided into the following four major mineral materials:(a) round pebble fragments from the Rhyoke granitic basement (Sampling No.15), (b) rock fragments from intruded biotite andesites (Nos. 2,15), (c) impact-induced fragments of shocked Quartz grains (Nos. 2,3,6,15), diaplectic feldspars (Nos. 2,3,6,15), silica glasses (Nos. 2,15) and small Fe-Ni metallic grains (No.15), and (d) small sedimentary fragments of halite and mordenite, as listed in Table 1. Table I, showing the characterization of surface samples

  12. Impact cratering calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.; Okeefe, J. D.; Smither, C.; Takata, T.

    1991-01-01

    In the course of carrying out finite difference calculations, it was discovered that for large craters, a previously unrecognized type of crater (diameter) growth occurred which was called lip wave propagation. This type of growth is illustrated for an impact of a 1000 km (2a) silicate bolide at 12 km/sec (U) onto a silicate half-space at earth gravity (1 g). The von Misses crustal strength is 2.4 kbar. The motion at the crater lip associated with this wave type phenomena is up, outward, and then down, similar to the particle motion of a surface wave. It is shown that the crater diameter has grown d/a of approximately 25 to d/a of approximately 4 via lip propagation from Ut/a = 5.56 to 17.0 during the time when rebound occurs. A new code is being used to study partitioning of energy and momentum and cratering efficiency with self gravity for finite-sized objects rather than the previously discussed planetary half-space problems. These are important and fundamental subjects which can be addressed with smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) codes. The SPH method was used to model various problems in astrophysics and planetary physics. The initial work demonstrates that the energy budget for normal and oblique impacts are distinctly different than earlier calculations for silicate projectile impact on a silicate half space. Motivated by the first striking radar images of Venus obtained by Magellan, the effect of the atmosphere on impact cratering was studied. In order the further quantify the processes of meteor break-up and trajectory scattering upon break-up, the reentry physics of meteors striking Venus' atmosphere versus that of the Earth were studied.

  13. Craters Modified by Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 2 October 2003

    These craters, located in the southern highland heavily cratered terrain, show heavy degradation, most likely caused by the presence of water ice. A smaller crater is located in the floor of a larger crater, showing lobate ejecta thought to be created by water melted by the force of the impacting body. Gullies on the northern rim of the smaller crater may indicate accumulations of snow and subsequent melting. In the larger crater, the northern rim is greatly softened, with sinuous features suggestive of downslope flow, also potentially caused by creep of ground ice.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -40.4, Longitude 132.5 East (227.5 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  14. Khensu Crater on Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The dark-floored crater, Khensu, is the target of this image of Ganymede. The solid state imaging camera on NASA's Galileo spacecraft imaged this region as it passed Ganymede during its second orbit through the Jovian system. Khensu is located at 2 degrees latitude and 153 degrees longitude in a region of bright terrain known as Uruk Sulcus, and is about 13 kilometers (8 miles) in diameter. Like some other craters on Ganymede, it possesses an unusually dark floor and a bright ejecta blanket. The dark component may be residual material from the impactor that formed the crater. Another possibility is that the impactor may have punched through the bright surface to reveal a dark layer beneath.

    Another large crater named El is partly visible in the top-right corner of the image. This crater is 54 kilometers (34 miles) in diameter and has a small 'pit' in its center. Craters with such a 'central pit' are common across Ganymede and are especially intriguing since they may reveal secrets about the structure of the satellite's shallow subsurface.

    North is to the top-left of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from nearly overhead. The image covers an area about 100 kilometers (62 miles) by 86 kilometers (54 miles) across at a resolution of 111 meters (370 feet) per picture element. The image was taken on September 6, 1996 by the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  15. Surface age of venus: use of the terrestrial cratering record

    SciTech Connect

    Schaber, G.G.; Shoemaker, E.M.; Kozak, R.C.

    1987-10-01

    The average crater age of Venus' northern hemisphere may be less than 250 m.y. assuming equivalence between the recent terrestrial cratering rate and that on Venus for craters greater than or equal to 20 km in diameter. For craters larger than this threshold size, below which crater production is significantly affected by the Venusian atmosphere, there are fairly strong observational grounds for concluding that such an equivalence in cratering rates on Venus and Earth may exist. However, given the uncertainties in the role of both active and inactive comet nuclei in the cratering history of Earth, we conclude that the age of the observed surface in the northern hemisphere of Venus could be as great as the 450-m.y. mean age of the Earth's crust. The observed surface of Venus might be even older, but no evidence from the crater observations supports an age as great as 1 b.y. If the age of the observed Venusian surface were 1 b.y., it probably should bear the impact scars of a half dozen or more large comet nuclei that penetrated the atmosphere and formed craters well over 100 km in diameter. Venera 15/16 mapped only about 25% of Venus; the remaining 75% may tell us a completely different story.

  16. Gullies in Crater Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-388, 11 June 2003

    Many craters and troughs at polar and middle latitudes on Mars have gullies carved in their walls. These gullies may have formed by running water; others have suggested alternative, exotic fluids such as liquid or gaseous carbon dioxide. This view of martian gullies was acquired by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC). The image shows gullies in the wall of an old meteor impact crater near 39.0oS, 200.7oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  17. Gullied Crater Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-371, 25 May 2003

    Gullies are common in some regions on middle- and polar-latitude slopes, such as crater walls. This March 2003 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows gullies on the north wall of a crater in the Atlantis Chaos region near 34.3oS, 178.0oW. The gullies might have formed by flow of a fluid--perhaps liquid water--sometime in the geologically recent martian past. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  18. Regional environmental change and human activity over the past hundred years recorded in the sedimentary record of Lake Qinghai, China.

    PubMed

    Sha, ZhanJiang; Wang, Qiugui; Wang, Jinlong; Du, Jinzhou; Hu, Jufang; Ma, Yujun; Kong, Fancui; Wang, Zhuan

    2017-03-01

    Environmental change and human activity can be recorded in sediment cores in aquatic systems such as lakes. Information from such records may be useful for environmental governance in the future. Six sediment cores were collected from Lake Qinghai, China and its sublakes during 2012 and 2013. Measurements of sediment grain-size fractions indicate that sedimentation in the north and southwest of Lake Qinghai is dominated by river input, whereas that in Lake Gahai and Lake Erhai is dominated by dunes. The sedimentation rates in Lake Qinghai were calculated to be 0.101-0.159 cm/y, similar to the rates in other lakes on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. Using these data and sedimentation rates from the literature, we compiled the spatial distribution of sedimentation rates. Higher values were obtained in the three main areas of Lake Qinghai: two in river estuaries and one close to sand dunes. Lower values were measured in the center and south of the lake. Measurements of total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN), phosphorus concentrations, and TOC/TN ratios in three cores (QH01, QH02, and Z04) revealed four horizons corresponding to times of increased human activity. These anthropogenic events were (1) the development of large areas of cropland in the Lake Qinghai watershed in 1960, (2) the beginning of nationwide fertilizer use and increases in cropland area in the lake watershed after 1970, (3) the implementation of the national program "Grain to Green," and (4) the rapid increase in the tourism industry from 2000. Profiles of Rb, Sr concentrations, the Rb/Sr ratio, and grain-size fraction in core Z04 indicate that the climate has become drier over the past 100 years. Therefore, we suggest that lake sediments such as those in Lake Qinghai are useful media for high-resolution studies of regional environmental change and human activity.

  19. The first five years of Kīlauea’s summit eruption in Halema‘uma‘u Crater, 2008–2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patrick, Matthew R.; Orr, Tim R.; Sutton, A.J.; Elias, Tamar; Swanson, Donald A.

    2013-01-01

    The eruption in Halema‘uma‘u Crater that began in March 2008 is the longest summit eruption of Kīlauea Volcano, on the Island of Hawai‘i, since 1924. From the time the eruption began, the new "Overlook crater" inside Halema‘uma‘u has exhibited fluctuating lava lake activity, occasional small explosive events, and a persistent gas plume. The beautiful nighttime glow impresses and thrills visitors in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, but the continuous emission of sulfur dioxide gas produces "vog" (volcanic smog) that can severely affect communities and local agriculture downwind. U.S. Geological Survey scientists continue to closely monitor the eruption and assess ongoing hazards.

  20. Secrets of the Wabar craters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wynn, Jeffrey C.; Shoemaker, Eugene M.

    1997-01-01

    Focuses on the existence of craters in the Empty Quarter of Saudi Arabia created by the impact of meteors in early times. Mars Pathfinder and Mars Global Surveyor's encounter with impact craters; Elimination of craters in the Earth's surface by the action of natural elements; Impact sites' demand for careful scientific inspections; Location of the impact sites.

  1. Marine and land active-source seismic investigation of geothermal potential, tectonic structure, and earthquake hazards in Pyramid Lake, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisses, A.; Kell, A. M.; Kent, G.; Driscoll, N. W.; Karlin, R. E.; Baskin, R. L.; Louie, J. N.; Smith, K. D.; Pullammanappallil, S.

    2011-12-01

    Preliminary slip rates measured across the East Pyramid Lake fault, or the Lake Range fault, help provide new estimates of extension across the Pyramid Lake basin. Multiple stratigraphic horizons spanning 48 ka were tracked throughout the lake, with layer offsets measured across all significant faults in the basin. A chronstratigraphic framework acquired from four sediment cores allows slip rates of the Lake Range and other faults to be calculated accurately. This region of the northern Walker Lake, strategically placed between the right-lateral strike-slip faults of Honey and Eagle Lakes to the north, and the normal fault bounded basins to the southwest (e.g., Tahoe, Carson), is critical in understanding the underlying structural complexity that is not only necessary for geothermal exploration, but also earthquake hazard assessment due to the proximity of the Reno-Sparks metropolitan area. In addition, our seismic CHIRP imaging with submeter resolution allows the construction of the first fault map of Pyramid Lake. The Lake Range fault can be obviously traced west of Anahoe Island extending north along the east end of the lake in numerous CHIRP lines. Initial drafts of the fault map reveal active transtension through a series of numerous, small, northwest striking, oblique-slip faults in the north end of the lake. A previously field mapped northwest striking fault near Sutcliff can be extended into the west end of Pyramid Lake. This fault map, along with the calculated slip rate of the Lake Range, and potentially multiple other faults, gives a clearer picture into understanding the geothermal potential, tectonic regime and earthquake hazards in the Pyramid Lake basin and the northern Walker Lane. These new results have also been merged with seismicity maps, along with focal mechanisms for the larger events to begin to extend our fault map in depth.

  2. Tritium concentrations in the active Pu'u O'o crater, Kilauea volcano, Hawaii: implications for cold fusion in the Earth's interior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quick, J.E.; Hinkley, T.K.; Reimer, G.M.; Hedge, C.E.

    1991-01-01

    The assertion that deuterium-deuterium fusion may occur at low temperature suggests a potential new source of geothermal heat. If a cold-fusion-like process occurs within the Earth, then a test for its existence would be a search for anomalous tritium in volcanic emissions. The Pu'u O'o crater is the first point at which large amounts of water are degassed from the magma that feeds the Kilauea system. The magma is probably not contaminated by meteoric-source ground water prior to degassing at Pu'u O'o, although mixing of meteoric and magmatic H2O occurs within the crater. Tritium contents of samples from within the crater are lower than in samples taken simultaneously from the nearby upwind crater rim. These results provide no evidence in support of a cold-fusion-like process in the Earth's interior. ?? 1991.

  3. Constraining the activity of waves on Titan's polar lakes and seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderblom, Jason M.; Barnes, Jason W.; Brown, Robert H.; Soderblom, Laurence A.; Sotin, Christophe; Clark, Roger N.; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Baines, Kevin H.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Nicholson, Philip D.

    2015-04-01

    Saturn's moon Titan has an active hydrological cycle in which the primary working fluid, methane, is thought to transport between poles on seasonal timescales, driving much of the observed meteorology. Surface winds play a critical role in determining the evaporation rates of methane from Titan's polar lakes and seas. Observational constraints on these winds, however, are limited. Aeolian landforms, in particular sand dunes, characterize Titan's mid latitudes, providing evidence that winds at these latitudes have, at least in the geologically recent past, exceeded the threshold for saltation (which recent work has shown might be higher than previously predicted). The shoreline morphology of Titan's lone large southern lake, Ontario Lacus, has been interpreted as evidence for wave erosion. Evidence for wave activity on Titan's lakes and seas, however, has been notably absent in Cassini observations. Explanations that have been forwarded to explain the lack of waves include the possibility that the liquids that comprise Titan's lakes and seas are highly viscous or that seasonal winds have not exceeded the threshold for capillary wave formation (Hayes et al., 2012, Icarus 225). Only recently have Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) observations provided the first evidence of wave activity on Titan, in the north as Titan progresses towards northern summer (Barnes et al., 2014, Planetary Science 3). Herein, we use Cassini VIMS observations of the specular reflection of sunlight from Titan's lakes to infer the presence or absence of waves on Titan. We investigate observations acquired between 2012 and 2014. We find evidence for the presence of waves on Kraken Mare during a number of flybys, while specular reflections from the smaller Jingpo Lacus are more consistent with a smooth lake surface.

  4. Sediment History Preserved in Gale Crater Central Mound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    While many of the layered outcrops in craters and chasms on Mars are seen as stair-stepped series of cliffs and benches composed of similar materials with similar thicknesses, other layer outcrops are expressed on relatively smooth, rounded slopes as alternating light and dark bands. The best example of this variety of layered sedimentary material is found in southern Holden Crater. Holden is located at 26.5oS, 33.9oW, and has a diameter of 141 km (88 mi). The context picture above, shows that a valley, Uzboi Vallis, enters the crater on its southwestern side. Not too far from where Uzboi Vallis meets Holden Crater, rounded slopes and buttes consisting of alternating light and dark bands are seen. The origin of these layers is not known, but like those found in other craters on Mars, they might have resulted from deposition of sediment in a lake that would have occupied Holden Crater. Alternatively, these are materials deposited by falling out of the air, the same way that volcanic ash is deposited on Earth. The Viking mosaic (above) images are illuminated by sunlight from the upper right. The MOC image (top left) is illuminated from the upper left. North is up.

  5. A Periglacial Analog for Landforms in Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oehler, Dorothy Z.

    2013-01-01

    Several features in a high thermal inertia (TI) unit at Gale crater can be interpreted within a periglacial framework. These features include polygonally fractured terrain (cf. ice-wedge polygons), circumferential patterns of polygonal fractures (cf. relict pingos with ice-wedge polygons on their surfaces), irregularly-shaped and clustered depressions (cf. remnants of collapsed pingos and ephemeral lakes), and a general hummocky topography (cf. thermokarst). This interpretation would imply a major history of water and ice in Gale crater, involving permafrost, freeze-thaw cycles, and perhaps ponded surface water.

  6. Reading 'Endurance Crater'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    This image shows the area inside 'Endurance Crater' that the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has been examining. The rover is investigating the distinct layers of rock that make up this region. Each layer is defined by subtle color and texture variations and represents a separate chapter in Mars' history. The deeper the layer, the further back in time the rocks were formed. Scientists are 'reading' this history book by systematically studying each layer with the rover's scientific instruments. So far, data from the rover indicate that the top layers are sulfate-rich, like the rocks observed in 'Eagle Crater.' This implies that water processes were involved in forming the materials that make up these rocks.

    In figure 1, the layer labeled 'A' in this picture contains broken-up rocks that most closely resemble those of 'Eagle Crater.' Layers 'B,C and D' appear less broken up and more finely laminated. Layer 'E,' on the other hand, looks more like 'A.' At present, the rover is examining layer 'D.'

    So far, data from the rover indicates that the first four layers consist of sulfate-rich, jarosite-containing rocks like those observed in Eagle Crater. This implies that water processes were involved in forming the materials that make up these rocks, though the materials themselves may have been laid down by wind.

    This image was taken by Opportunity's navigation camera on sol 134 (June 9, 2004).

  7. Vesiculation Processes During Transient and Sustained Explosive Activity at Halema'uma'u Crater, Kīlauea in 2008-2013.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houghton, B. F.; Orr, T. R.; Taddeucci, J.; Carey, R.; Del Bello, E.; Scarlato, P.; Patrick, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    The 2008-2015 summit eruption within Halema'uma'u crater, Kilauea has been characterized by alternations of passive degassing with two styles of explosive activity, both frequently triggered by rock falls that perturb the free surface of magma in the vent. In the first, larger rock falls trigger second vesiculation of magma at depths up to 100 m below the free surface ejecting juvenile bomb and lapilli populations of very variable vesicularity. The second, the topic of this presentation, consists of intervals of minutes to tens-of-minutes duration of low fountaining activity often from multiple locations. Vents may migrate with time, first across the free surface to its margins, and then around the margins, in response to convection processes in the underlying melt. Analysis of short sequences of high-speed, high-resolution video footage shows that the sustained fountaining is maintained by not by a continuous discharge but rather by closely spaced bursting of two-to-five meter-wide bubbles. Bubbles accelerate through the free surface at velocities of 10 to 40 m/s disrupting the viscoelastic crust and forming large fall-back, lacework pyroclasts and smaller highly vesicular bombs and lapilli.

  8. OBJECTIVE ANALYSIS OF SPERM MOTILITY IN THE LAKE STURGEON, ACIPENSER FULVESCENS: ACTIVATION AND INHIBITION CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An objective analysis of the duration of motility of sperm from the lake sturgeon, Acipenser fulvescens, has been performed using computer-assisted sperm motion analysis at 200 frames/s. Motility was measured in both 1993 and 1994. The percentage of activated motile sperm and the...

  9. Water chemistry of Lake Quilotoa (Ecuador) and assessment of natural hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilera, E.; Chiodini, G.; Cioni, R.; Guidi, M.; Marini, L.; Raco, B.

    2000-04-01

    A geochemical survey carried out in November 1993 revealed that Lake Quilotoa was composed by a thin (˜14 m) oxic epilimnion overlying a ˜200 m-thick anoxic hypolimnion. Dissolved CO 2 concentrations reached 1000 mg/kg in the lower stratum. Loss of CO 2 from epilimnetic waters, followed by calcite precipitation and a consequent lowering in density, was the apparent cause of the stratification. The Cl, SO 4 and HCO 3 contents of Lake Quilotoa are intermediate between those of acid-SO 4-Cl Crater lakes and those of neutral-HCO 3 Crater lakes, indicating that Lake Quilotoa has a 'memory' of the inflow and absorption of HC1- and S-bearing volcanic (magmatic) gases. The Mg/Ca ratios of the lake waters are governed by dissolution of local volcanic rocks or magmas, but K/Na ratios were likely modified by precipitation of alunite, a typical mineral in acid-SO 4-Cl Crater lakes. The constant concentrations of several conservative chemical species from lake surface to lake bottom suggest that physical, chemical and biological processes did not have enough time, after the last overturn, to cause significant changes in the contents of these chemical species. This lapse of time might be relatively large, but it cannot be established on the basis of available data. Besides, the lake may not be close to steady state. Mixing of Lake Quilotoa waters could presently be triggered by either cooling epilimnetic waters by ˜4°C or providing heat to hypolimnetic waters or by seismic activity. Although Quilotoa lake contains a huge amount of dissolved CO 2(˜3×10 11 g), at present the risk of a dangerous limnic eruption seems to be nil even though some gas exsolution might occur if deep lake waters were brought to the surface. Carbon dioxide could build up to higher levels in deep waters than at present without any volcanic re-awakening, due to either a large inflow of relatively cool CO 2-rich gases, or possibly a long interval between overturns. Periodical geochemical surveys of

  10. Quantitation of microorganic compounds in waters of the Great Lakes by adsorption on activated carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daniels, Stacy L.; Kempe, Lloyd L.; Graham, E. S.; Beeton, Alfred M.

    1963-01-01

    Microorganic compounds in waters of Lakes Michigan and Huron have been sampled by adsorption on activated carbon in filters installed aboard the M/V Cisco and at the Hammond Bay Laboratory of the U.S. Bureau of Commercial Fisheries. The organic compounds were eluted from the carbon according to techniques developed at the U.S. Public Health Service. On the assumption that chloroform eluates represent less polar compounds from industrial sources and alcohol eluates the more polar varieties of natural origin, plots of chloroform eluates against alcohol eluates appear to be useful in judging water qualities. Based upon these criteria, the data in this paper indicate that both the waters of northern Lake Michigan and of Lake Huron, in the vicinity of Hammond Bay, Michigan, are relatively free from pollution. The limnetic waters of Lake Michigan showed a particularly high ratio of alcohol to chloroform eluates. Data for monthly samples indicated that this ratio fluctuated seasonally. The periodicity of the fluctuations was similar to those of lake levels and water temperatures.

  11. Crater Wall and Floor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    3D Projection onto MOLA data [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The impact crater observed in this THEMIS image taken in Terra Cimmeria suggests sediments have filled the crater due to the flat and smooth nature of the floor compared to rougher surfaces at higher elevations. The abundance of several smaller impact craters on the floor of the larger crater indicate however that the flat surface has been exposed for an extended period of time. The smooth surface of the crater floor and rougher surfaces at higher elevations are observed in the 3-D THEMIS image that is draped over MOLA topography (2X vertical exaggeration).

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -22.9, Longitude 155.7 East (204.3 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  12. Europa's Pwyll Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This view of the Pwyll impact crater on Jupiter's moon Europa taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft shows the interior structure and surrounding ejecta deposits. Pwyll's location is shown in the background global view taken by Galileo's camera on December 16, 1997. Bright rays seen radiating from Pwyll in the global image indicate that this crater is geologically young. The rim of Pwyll is about 26 kilometers (16 miles) in diameter, and a halo of dark material excavated from below the surface extends a few kilometers beyond the rim. Beyond this dark halo, the surface is bright and numerous secondary craters can be seen. The closeup view of Pwyll, which combines imaging data gathered during the December flyby and the flyby of February 20, 1997, indicates that unlike most fresh impact craters, which have much deeper floors, Pwyll's crater floor is at approximately the same level as the surrounding background terrain.

    North is to the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the northeast. This closeup image, centered at approximately 26 degrees south latitude and 271 degrees west longitude, covers an area approximately 125 by 75 kilometers (75 by 45 miles). The finest details that can be discerned in this picture are about 250 meters (800 feet) across. This image was taken on at a range of 12,400 kilometers (7,400 miles), with the green filter of Galileo's solid state imaging system.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  13. Impact cratering record of Fennoscandia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesonen, L. J.; Henkel, H.

    1992-01-01

    A compilation of circular topographic, morphological, or geophysical structures in Fennoscandia and adjacent areas reveals 62 craterform structures of which 15 appear to be of extraterrestrial origin due to meteorite impact. The majority of the structures are probable and possible impact craters for which there is not yet sufficient proof for impact origin. Four of the proven impact craters contain large volumes of impact melt and many other features of intense shock metamorphism. The age of recognized impact craters vary from prehistoric to late Precambrian. We review the Fennoscandian impact cratering record giving examples of geophysical signatures of impact craters.

  14. Extracellular enzyme activity at the air-water interface of an estuarine lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudryk, Z. J.; Skórczewski, P.

    2004-01-01

    Variations in hydrolytic activity of eight extracellular enzymes in surface and subsurface waters in estuarine Lake Gardno were measured. The ranking of potential activity rates of the assayed enzymes was the same in both surface and subsurface water, i.e. esterase > lipase > aminopeptidase > phosphatase > β-glucosidase > α-glucosidase > chitinase > β-lactosidase. The vertical activity profiles show that esterase, aminopeptidase, α-glucosidase, β-glucosidase and β-lactosidase reached the highest values in surface layer, whereas lipase, phosphatase and chitinase showed maximum activity in subsurface water. Significant differences in enzyme activity between different parts of the studied lake were demonstrated, with higher values in the seawater zone, and lower values in the freshwater zone.

  15. Cratering of the Uranian satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, William B.; Chapman, Clark R.; Housen, Kevin R.

    Available crater counts and their interpretations are reviewed, with emphasis on essential scaling considerations and comparisons with hypotheses developed for interpreting the cratering records on other planets and satellites. New approaches are employed to scaling based on new measurements of crater depths and morphology, which show craters in ice to be unexpectedly different from those in rock. It is found that the published crater counts on the Uranian satellites, despite mutual inconsistencies, can be interpreted as compatible with cratering by the heliocentric population of cometary bodies that was responsible for much of the cratering of the satellites of Jupiter and Saturn. Scaling arguments are applied to the catastrophic breakup of icy satellites and ring particles. The importance of large-scale collisions in disrupting the inner Uranian satellites is found to depend on the shape of the size distribution of cometary bodies at large sizes.

  16. Cratering of the Uranian satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinnon, William B.; Chapman, Clark R.; Housen, Kevin R.

    1991-01-01

    Available crater counts and their interpretations are reviewed, with emphasis on essential scaling considerations and comparisons with hypotheses developed for interpreting the cratering records on other planets and satellites. New approaches are employed to scaling based on new measurements of crater depths and morphology, which show craters in ice to be unexpectedly different from those in rock. It is found that the published crater counts on the Uranian satellites, despite mutual inconsistencies, can be interpreted as compatible with cratering by the heliocentric population of cometary bodies that was responsible for much of the cratering of the satellites of Jupiter and Saturn. Scaling arguments are applied to the catastrophic breakup of icy satellites and ring particles. The importance of large-scale collisions in disrupting the inner Uranian satellites is found to depend on the shape of the size distribution of cometary bodies at large sizes.

  17. Central pit craters on Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzate, Nathalia; Barlow, Nadine G.

    2011-02-01

    Central pit craters are common on Mars, Ganymede and Callisto, and thus are generally believed to require target volatiles in their formation. The purpose of this study is to identify the environmental conditions under which central pit craters form on Ganymede. We have conducted a study of 471 central pit craters with diameters between 5 and 150 km on Ganymede and compared the results to 1604 central pit craters on Mars (diameter range 5-160 km). Both floor and summit pits occur on Mars whereas floor pits dominate on Ganymede. Central peak craters are found in similar locations and diameter ranges as central pit craters on Mars and overlap in location and at diameters <60 km on Ganymede. Central pit craters show no regional variations on either Ganymede or Mars and are not concentrated on specific geologic units. Central pit craters show a range of preservation states, indicating that conditions favoring central pit formation have existed since crater-retaining surfaces have existed on Ganymede and Mars. Central pit craters on Ganymede are generally about three times larger than those on Mars, probably due to gravity scaling although target characteristics and resolution also may play a role. Central pits tend to be larger relative to their parent crater on Ganymede than on Mars, probably because of Ganymede's purer ice crust. A transition to different characteristics occurs in Ganymede's icy crust at depths of 4-7 km based on the larger pit-to-crater-diameter relationship for craters in the 70-130-km-diameter range and lack of central peaks in craters larger than 60-km-diameter. We use our results to constrain the proposed formation models for central pits on these two bodies. Our results are most consistent with the melt-drainage model for central pit formation.

  18. A Chronology Of Mars Climatic Evolution From Impact Crater Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangold, N.; Adeli, S.; Conway, S.; Ansan, V.; Langlais, B.

    2012-04-01

    Impact crater degradation provides a powerful tool to analyze past Martian hydrological evolution. Degraded craters are one of the main lines of evidence for a warmer climate on early Mars. Global altimetry and recent high resolution imagery enable us to revisit previous studies. In particular it allowed us to identify preserved impact ejecta, which is strong evidence for limited degradation, and fluvial landforms on rims. These details were particularly pertinent in the case of the craters with alluvial fans. We distinguished only three classes, using two main parameters: the presence of preserved ejecta and of fluvial activity: Type I: Craters with fluvial erosion on walls and rim but lacking an ejecta blanket. Type II: Craters with fluvial erosion on walls and rim and a preserved ejecta blanket. Type III: Fresh craters lacking any fluvial erosion on rim with a preserved ejecta blanket. Type II craters are those containing alluvial fans. A total of 283 craters in two main regions were able to be classified according to our scheme. We have extracted parameters such as diameter, depth, slope and concavity. Type III, which are the youngest craters have the deepest depths for a given diameter, and type I, the shallowest depths. Type II craters lay in-between these two other types. The fact that type II craters lay between types I and III, shows that this crater type is intermediate in the degradation series and therefore implies that this crater type is inter-mediate in age. The chronology of all the craters in this region can be performed using classical isochrons. All the craters together gives an isochron at 4.00±0.03 Gy, which corresponds to the age of the basement. The transition between type I and type II craters occurs at 3.70±0.06 Gy, an age corresponding to the middle of the Early Hesperian period in this model age system. This age pinpoints the period during which the strong fluvial degradation of Early Mars stopped. The transition between type II and

  19. Creation of High Resolution Terrain Models of Barringer Meteorite Crater (Meteor Crater) Using Photogrammetry and Terrestrial Laser Scanning Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Richard B.; Navard, Andrew R.; Holland, Donald E.; McKellip, Rodney D.; Brannon, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Barringer Meteorite Crater or Meteor Crater, AZ, has been a site of high interest for lunar and Mars analog crater and terrain studies since the early days of the Apollo-Saturn program. It continues to be a site of exceptional interest to lunar, Mars, and other planetary crater and impact analog studies because of its relatively young age (est. 50 thousand years) and well-preserved structure. High resolution (2 meter to 1 decimeter) digital terrain models of Meteor Crater in whole or in part were created at NASA Stennis Space Center to support several lunar surface analog modeling activities using photogrammetric and ground based laser scanning techniques. The dataset created by this activity provides new and highly accurate 3D models of the inside slope of the crater as well as the downslope rock distribution of the western ejecta field. The data are presented to the science community for possible use in furthering studies of Meteor Crater and impact craters in general as well as its current near term lunar exploration use in providing a beneficial test model for lunar surface analog modeling and surface operation studies.

  20. Decreased glutathione S-transferase expression and activity and altered sex steroids in Lake Apopka brown bullheads (Ameriurus nebulosus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gallagher, E.P.; Gross, T.S.; Sheehy, K.M.

    2001-01-01

    A number of freshwater lakes and reclaimed agricultural sites in Central Florida have been the receiving waters for agrochemical and municipal runoff. One of these sites, Lake Apopka, is also a eutrophic system that has been the focus of several case studies reporting altered reproductive activity linked to bioaccumulation of persistent organochlorine chemicals in aquatic species. The present study was initiated to determine if brown bullheads (Ameriurus nebulosus) from the north marsh of Lake Apopka (Lake Apopka Marsh) exhibit an altered capacity to detoxify environmental chemicals through hepatic glutathione S-transferase (GST)-mediated conjugation as compared with bullheads from a nearby reference site (Lake Woodruff). We also compared plasma sex hormone concentrations (testosterone, 17-?? estradiol, and 11 keto-testosterone) in bullheads from the two sites. Female bullheads from Lake Apopka had 40% lower initial rate GST conjugative activity toward 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB), 50% lower activity towards p-nitrobutyl chloride (NBC), 33% lower activity toward ethacrynic acid (ECA), and 43% lower activity toward ??5-androstene-3,17-dione (??5-ADI), as compared with female bullheads from Lake Woodruff. Enzyme kinetic analyses demonstrated that female bullheads from Lake Apopka had lower GST-catalyzed CDNB clearance than did female Lake Woodruff bullheads. Western blotting studies of bullhead liver cytosolic proteins demonstrated that the reduced GST catalytic activities in female Lake Apopka bullheads were accompanied by lower expression of hepatic GST protein. No site differences were observed with respect to GST activities or GST protein expression in male bullheads. Female Lake Apopka bullheads also had elevated concentrations of plasma androgens (testosterone and 11-ketotestosterone) as compared with females from Lake Woodruff. In contrast, male Lake Apopka bullheads had elevated levels of plasma estrogen but similar levels of androgens as compared with

  1. Impact craters on Venus: Initial analysis from Magellan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, R.J.; Arvidson, R. E.; Boyce, J.M.; Campbell, D.B.; Guest, J.E.; Schaber, G.G.; Soderblom, L.A.

    1991-01-01

    Magellan radar images of 15 percent of the planet show 135 craters of probable impact origin. Craters more than 15 km across tend to contain central peaks, multiple central peaks, and peak rings. Many craters smaller than 15 km exhibit multiple floors or appear in clusters; these phenomena are attributed to atmospheric breakup of incoming meteoroids. Additionally, the atmosphere appears to have prevented the formation of primary impact craters smaller than about 3 km and produced a deficiency in the number of craters smaller than about 25 km across. Ejecta is found at greater distances than that predicted by simple ballistic emplacement, and the distal ends of some ejecta deposits are lobate. These characteristics may represent surface flows of material initially entrained in the atmosphere. Many craters are surrounded by zones of low radar albedo whose origin may have been deformation of the surface by the shock or pressure wave associated with the incoming meteoroid. Craters are absent from several large areas such as a 5 million square kilometer region around Sappho Patera, where the most likely explanation for the dearth of craters is volcanic resurfacing, There is apparently a spectrum of surface ages on Venus ranging approximately from 0 to 800 million years, and therefore Venus must be a geologically active planet.

  2. Layered Rocks in Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    19 June 2004 Exposures of layered, sedimentary rock are common on Mars. From the rock outcrops examined by the Mars Exploration Rover, Opportunity, in Meridiani Planum to the sequence in Gale Crater's central mound that is twice the thickness of of the sedimentary rocks exposed by Arizona's Grand Canyon, Mars presents a world of sediment to study. This unusual example, imaged by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC), shows eroded layer outcrops in a crater in Terra Tyrrhena near 15.4oS, 270.5oW. Sedimentary rocks provide a record of past climates and events. Perhaps someday the story told by the rocks in this image will be known via careful field work. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the left.

  3. Northern Plains 'Crater'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    10 December 2004 The lower left (southwest) corner of this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the location of a somewhat filled and buried meteor impact crater on the northern plains of Mars. The dark dots are boulders. A portion of a similar feature is seen in the upper right (northeast) corner of the image. This picture, showing landforms (including the odd mound north/northeast of the crater) that are typical of the martian northern lowland plains, was obtained as part of the MGS MOC effort to support the search for a landing site for the Phoenix Mars Scout lander. Phoenix will launch in 2007 and land on the northern plains in 2008. This image is located near 68.0oN, 227.4oW, and covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  4. Cracked Plain, Buried Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    4 September 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a cracked plain in western Utopia Planitia. The three circular crack patterns indicate the location of three buried meteor impact craters. These landforms are located near 41.9oN, 275.9oW. The image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates this scene from the lower left.

  5. Trouvelot Crater Deposit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Like many of the craters in the Oxia Palus region of Mars, Trouvelot Crater hosts an eroded, light-toned, sedimentary deposit on its floor. Compared with the much larger example in Becquerel Crater to the NE, the Trouvelot deposit has been so eroded by the scouring action of dark, wind-blown sand that very little of it remains. Tiny outliers of bright material separated from the main mass attest to the once, more really extensive coverage by the deposit. A similar observation can be made for White Rock, the best known example of a bright, crater interior deposit. The origin of the sediments in these deposits remains enigmatic but they are likely the result of fallout from ash or dust carried by the thin martian atmosphere.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  6. Small Craters on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This high resolution view of the Conamara Chaos region on Jupiter's icy moon, Europa, reveals craters which range in size from about 30 meters to over 450 meters (slightly over a quarter of a mile) in diameter. The large number of craters seen here is unusual for Europa. This section of Conamara Chaos lies inside a bright ray of material which was ejected by the large impact crater, Pwyll, 1000 kilometers (620 miles) to the south. The presence of craters within the bright ray suggests that many are secondaries which formed from chunks of material that were thrown out by the enormous energy of the impact which formed Pwyll.

    North is to the upper right of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the east. The image, centered at 9 degrees latitude and 274 degrees longitude, covers an area approximately 8 by 4 kilometers (5 by 2.5 miles). The finest details that can be discerned in this picture are about 20 meters (66 feet) across. The images were taken on December 16, 1997 at a range of 960 kilometers (590 miles) by the Solid State Imaging (SSI) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  7. Impact Cratering Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.

    2001-01-01

    We examined the von Mises and Mohr-Coulomb strength models with and without damage effects and developed a model for dilatancy. The models and results are given in O'Keefe et al. We found that by incorporating damage into the models that we could in a single integrated impact calculation, starting with the bolide in the atmosphere produce final crater profiles having the major features found in the field measurements. These features included a central uplift, an inner ring, circular terracing and faulting. This was accomplished with undamaged surface strengths of approximately 0.1 GPa and at depth strengths of approximately 1.0 GPa. We modeled the damage in geologic materials using a phenomenological approach, which coupled the Johnson-Cook damage model with the CTH code geologic strength model. The objective here was not to determine the distribution of fragment sizes, but rather to determine the effect of brecciated and comminuted material on the crater evolution, fault production, ejecta distribution, and final crater morphology.

  8. Mare Chromium Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This crater, located in Mare Chromium, shows evidence of exterior modification, with little interior modification. While the rim is still visible, the ejecta blanket has been removed or covered. There is some material at the bottom of the crater, but the interior retains the bowl shape from the initial formation of the crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -34.4, Longitude 174.4 East (185.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  9. Fractured Craters on Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Two highly fractured craters are visible in this high resolution image of Jupiter's moon, Ganymede. NASA's Galileo spacecraft imaged this region as it passed Ganymede during its second orbit through the Jovian system. North is to the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the southeast. The two craters in the center of the image lie in the ancient dark terrain of Marius Regio, at 40 degrees latitude and 201 degrees longitude, at the border of a region of bright grooved terrain known as Byblus Sulcus (the eastern portion of which is visible on the left of this image). Pervasive fracturing has occurred in this area that has completely disrupted these craters and destroyed their southern and western walls. Such intense fracturing has occurred over much of Ganymede's surface and has commonly destroyed older features. The image covers an area approximately 26 kilometers (16 miles) by 18 kilometers (11 miles) across at a resolution of 86 meters (287 feet) per picture element. The image was taken on September 6, 1996 by the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  10. Terra Cimmeria Crater Landslide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The landslide in this VIS image is located inside an impact crater in the Terra Cimmeria region of Mars. The unnamed crater hosting this image is just east of Molesworth Crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -27.7, Longitude 152 East (208 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  11. Isidis Crater Landslide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The landslide in this VIS image is located inside an impact crater located south of the Isidis Planitia region of Mars. As with the previous unnamed crater landslide, this one formed due to slope failure of the inner crater rim.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -2.9, Longitude 90.8 East (269.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  12. Crater gradation in Gusev crater and Meridiani Planum, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grant, J. A.; Arvidson, R. E.; Crumpler, L.S.; Golombek, M.P.; Hahn, B.; Haldemann, A.F.C.; Li, R.; Soderblom, L.A.; Squyres, S. W.; Wright, S.P.; Watters, W.A.

    2006-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rovers investigated numerous craters in Gusev crater and Meridiani Planum during the first ???400 sols of their missions. Craters vary in size and preservation state but are mostly due to secondary impacts at Gusev and primary impacts at Meridiani. Craters at both locations are modified primarily by eolian erosion and infilling and lack evidence for modification by aqueous processes. Effects of gradation on crater form are dependent on size, local lithology, slopes, and availability of mobile sediments. At Gusev, impacts into basaltic rubble create shallow craters and ejecta composed of resistant rocks. Ejecta initially experience eolian stripping, which becomes weathering-limited as lags develop on ejecta surfaces and sediments are trapped within craters. Subsequent eolian gradation depends on the slow production of fines by weathering and impacts and is accompanied by minor mass wasting. At Meridiani the sulfate-rich bedrock is more susceptible to eolian erosion, and exposed crater rims, walls, and ejecta are eroded, while lower interiors and low-relief surfaces are increasingly infilled and buried by mostly basaltic sediments. Eolian processes outpace early mass wasting, often produce meters of erosion, and mantle some surfaces. Some small craters were likely completely eroded/buried. Craters >100 m in diameter on the Hesperian-aged floor of Gusev are generally more pristine than on the Amazonian-aged Meridiani plains. This conclusion contradicts interpretations from orbital views, which do not readily distinguish crater gradation state at Meridiani and reveal apparently subdued crater forms at Gusev that may suggest more gradation than has occurred. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Degradation studies of Martian impact craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, N. G.

    1991-01-01

    The amount of obliteration suffered by Martian impact craters is quantified by comparing measurable attributes of the current crater shape to those values expected for a fresh crater of identical size. Crater diameters are measured from profiles obtained using photoclinometry across the structure. The relationship between the diameter of a fresh crater and a crater depth, floor width, rim height, central peak height, etc. was determined by empirical studies performed on fresh Martian impact craters. We utilized the changes in crater depth and rim height to judge the degree of obliteration suffered by Martian impact craters.

  14. Combining Satellite and Ground-Based Radar Interferometry Data to Measure Surface Deformation Associated with EGS Pumping Activities at Newberry Crater, OR Geothermal Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, P.; Cladouhos, T. T.; Schultz, A.; Rose, K.; Urquhart, S.

    2013-12-01

    TerraSAR-X (TSX) satellite data are combined with data collected using a ground-based real aperture radar interferometer (GAMMA Remote Sensing AG Portable Radar Interferometer-2, GPRI2) to remotely image surface deformation arising from enhanced geothermal system (EGS) pumping activity at the geothermal site located off the western flank of Newberry Crater, OR. Due to the heavily forested area impeding the utility of interferometric measurements at X-band (TSX) and Ku-band (GPRI2) wavelengths, 100 aluminum radar corner reflectors (CRs) were fabricated and installed in pairs approximately 5-8 meters above the ground in 50 large trees for optimal visibility and wind stability. One CR in each pair was aimed up at the ascending orbit track look direction for TSX, and the other was simultaneously aimed at the descending orbit track look direction for TSX and to Paulina Peak 6 km to the southwest for line-of-sight to the GPRI2 antenna position. The combination of 11-day repeat orbit acquisitions from a near vertical look direction from TSX with on-demand (up to daily) acquisitions from a near horizontal look direction from the GPRI2 instrument allows for full 3D displacement vector determination for each target imaged. Standard and point-target processing techniques are used to maximize the utility of the data collected and the transient nature of the pumping activities and resulting surface deformation signals demand this high level of spatial-temporal sampling. Preliminary data quality and deformation signal results will be presented and put in context with well-log data such as pressure, volume and flow rate, as well as data from microseismic array, MT, and gravity surveys.

  15. Young populations of small craters on Mars: A case study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreslavsky, M.

    2008-09-01

    Introduction The HiRISE camera imaged the Mars surface at scales that had never been studied before. Beside a host of other fascinating features, these images revealed small (diameter D down to 1 m) impact craters. In planetary geology, impact craters and properties of their populations have been used as valuable sources of information about surface history and geological processes. Small craters on Mars can potentially give essential information about young terrains on this planet, resurfacing rates at small scales and the most recent events in the geological history, first of all, the most recent climate changes. Very young crater populations are thought to be unaffected by distal secondary craters, because they are formed after the most recent secondary-forming event. However, extracting this information is not simple or straightforward. Here I illustrate these difficulties and ways of overcoming them using a population of small craters on ejecta of crater Zunil as an example. Population of small craters on Zunil ejecta Terrain I used HiRISE images PSP_001764_1880 and PSP_002397_1880. In these images I outlined an area (totally 52.8 km2) to NE, NW and SW of the crater limited by the toes of the outer walls of Zunil and the image boundaries. Terrain texture within the area is diverse; however, the area is entirely within the proximal ejecta lobes. The ejecta material was obviously emplaced as a result of the Zunil-forming impact and has a uniform age. The morphology of the surface indicates later resurfacing of steep slopes (over a small total area) and minor eolian modification of the terrain; some sub-areas might be modified by the post-impact hydrothermal activity. Crater population I registered diameters and positions of all impact craters in the area, a total of 1025 craters with D > 1.5 m. The largest of them has D = 20 m. Craters usually have no visible ejecta, which indicates some minor (perhaps, eolian) modification of the surface. Almost all craters

  16. Mannann'an Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This composite view taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft shows the rim and interior of the impact crater, Mannann'an, on Jupiter's moon, Europa. A high resolution image (20 meters per picture element) was combined with lower resolution (80 meters per picture element) color images taken through violet, green and near-infrared filters, to produce this synthetic color composite image. The color data can be used to distinguish between regions of purer (clean) and more contaminated (dirty) ice on the surface, and also offers information on the size of the ice grains. The reddish brown material is thought to be dirty ice, while the bluish areas inside the crater are purer ice. The crater rim is on the left at the boundary between the reddish brown material and the gray material.

    The high resolution data show small features inside the crater, including concentric fractures and a spider-like set of fractures near the right (east) edge of the image. For a more regional perspective, the Mannann'an crater can be seen as a large circular feature with bright rays in the lower left corner of a regional image from Galileo's first orbit of Jupiter in June 1996.

    North is to the top of the picture and the Sun illuminates the scene from the east (right). The image, centered at 3 degrees north latitude and 240 degrees west longitude, covers an area approximately 18 by 4 kilometers (11 by 2.5 miles). The finest details that can be discerned in this picture are about 40 meters (44 yards) across. The images were taken by the spacecraft's onboard solid state imaging camera when Galileo flew by Europa on March 29th, 1998 at a distance of 1,934 kilometers (1,200 miles).

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo

  17. Accumulation of fossil fuels and metallic minerals in active and ancient rift lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, E.I.

    1983-01-01

    A study of active and ancient rift systems around the world suggests that accumulations of fossil fuels and metallic minerals are related to the interactions of processes that form rift valleys with those that take place in and around rift lakes. The deposition of the precursors of petroleum, gas, oil shale, coal, phosphate, barite, Cu-Pb-Zn sulfides, and uranium begins with erosion of uplifted areas, and the consequent input of abundant nutrients and solute loads into swamps and tectonic lakes. Hot springs and volcanism add other nutrients and solutes. The resulting high biological productivity creates oxidized/reduced interfaces, and anoxic and H2S-rich bottom waters which preserves metal-bearing organic tissues and horizons. In the depositional phases, the fine-grained lake deposits are in contact with coarse-grained beach, delta, river, talus, and alluvial fan deposits. Earthquake-induced turbidites also are common coarse-grained deposits of rift lakes. Postdepositional processes in rifts include high heat flow and a resulting concentration of the organic and metallic components that were dispersed throughout the lakebeds. Postdepositional faulting brings organic- and metal-rich sourcebeds in contact with coarse-grained host and reservoir rocks. A suite of potentially economic deposits is therefore a characteristic of rift valleys. ?? 1983.

  18. Algal and bacterial activities in acidic (pH 3) strip mine lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Gyure, R.A.; Konopka, A.; Brooks, A.; Doemel, W.

    1987-09-01

    Reservoir 29 and Lake B are extremely acid lakes (epilimnion pHs of 2.7 and 3.2, respectively), because they receive acidic discharges from coal refuse piles. They differ in that the pH of profundal sediments in Reservoir 29 increased from 2.7 to 3.8 during the period of thermal stratification, whereas permanently anoxic sediments in Lake B had a pH of 6.2. The pH rise in Reservoir 29 sediments was correlated with a temporal increase in H/sub 2/S concentration in the anaerobic hypolimnion from 0 to >1 mM. The chlorophyll a levels in the epilimnion of Reservoir 29 were low, and the rate of primary production was typical of an oligotrophic system. However, there was a dense 10-cm layer of algal biomass at the bottom of the metalimnion. Production by this layer was low owing to light limitation and possibly H/sub 2/S toxicity. The specific photosynthetic rates of epilimnetic algae were low, which suggests that nutrient availability is more important than pH in limiting production. The highest photosynthetic rates were obtained in water samples incubated at pH 2.7 to 4. Heterotrophic bacterial activity (measured by (/sup 14/C)glucose metabolism) was greatest at the sediment/water interface. Bacterial production (assayed by thymidine incorporation) was as high in Reservoir 29 as in a nonacid mesotrophic Indiana lake.

  19. Algal and Bacterial Activities in Acidic (pH 3) Strip Mine Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Gyure, Ruth A.; Konopka, Allan; Brooks, Austin; Doemel, William

    1987-01-01

    Reservoir 29 and Lake B are extremely acid lakes (epilimnion pHs of 2.7 and 3.2, respectively), because they receive acidic discharges from coal refuse piles. They differ in that the pH of profundal sediments in Reservoir 29 increased from 2.7 to 3.8 during the period of thermal stratification, whereas permanently anoxic sediments in Lake B had a pH of 6.2. The pH rise in Reservoir 29 sediments was correlated with a temporal increase in H2S concentration in the anaerobic hypolimnion from 0 to >1 mM. The chlorophyll a levels in the epilimnion of Reservoir 29 were low, and the rate of primary production was typical of an oligotrophic system. However, there was a dense 10-cm layer of algal biomass at the bottom of the metalimnion. Production by this layer was low owing to light limitation and possibly H2S toxicity. The specific photosynthetic rates of epilimnetic algae were low, which suggests that nutrient availability is more important than pH in limiting production. The highest photosynthetic rates were obtained in water samples incubated at pH 2.7 to 4. Heterotrophic bacterial activity (measured by [14C]glucose metabolism) was greatest at the sediment/water interface. Bacterial production (assayed by thymidine incorporation) was as high in Reservoir 29 as in a nonacid mesotrophic Indiana lake. PMID:16347430

  20. The Martian impact cratering record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strom, Robert G.; Croft, Steven K.; Barlow, Nadine G.

    1992-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the Martian impact cratering record is presented. The major differences in impact crater morphology and morphometry between Mars and the moon and Mercury are argued to be largely the result of subsurface volatiles on Mars. In general, the depth to these volatiles may decrease with increasing latitude in the southern hemisphere, but the base of this layer may be at a more or less constant depth. The Martial crustal dichotomy could have been the result of a very large impact near the end of the accretion of Mars. Monte Carlo computer simulations suggest that such an impact was not only possible, but likely. The Martian highland cratering record shows a marked paucity of craters less than about 30 km in diameter relative to the lunar highlands. This paucity of craters was probably the result of the obliteration of craters by an early period of intense erosion and deposition by aeolian, fluvial, and glacial processes.

  1. The Martian impact cratering record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strom, Robert G.; Croft, Steven K.; Barlow, Nadine G.

    A detailed analysis of the Martian impact cratering record is presented. The major differences in impact crater morphology and morphometry between Mars and the moon and Mercury are argued to be largely the result of subsurface volatiles on Mars. In general, the depth to these volatiles may decrease with increasing latitude in the southern hemisphere, but the base of this layer may be at a more or less constant depth. The Martial crustal dichotomy could have been the result of a very large impact near the end of the accretion of Mars. Monte Carlo computer simulations suggest that such an impact was not only possible, but likely. The Martian highland cratering record shows a marked paucity of craters less than about 30 km in diameter relative to the lunar highlands. This paucity of craters was probably the result of the obliteration of craters by an early period of intense erosion and deposition by aeolian, fluvial, and glacial processes.

  2. Fluidized Crater Ejecta Deposit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) onboard the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft continued to obtain high resolution images of the red planet into August 1998. At this time, each ground track (the portion of Mars available for MOC imaging on a given orbit) covers areas from about 40oN on the late afternoon side of the planet, up over the sunlit north polar cap, and down the early morning side of Mars to about 20oN latitude. Early morning and late afternoon views provide good shadowing to reveal subtle details on the martian surface. Views of Mars with such excellent lighting conditions will not be seen by MOC once MGS's Science Phasing Orbits end in mid-September 1998.

    The image shown here, MOC image 47903, was targeted on Friday afternoon (PDT), August 7, 1998. This picture of ejecta from a nameless 9.1 kilometer (5.7 mile)-diameter crater was designed to take full advantage of the present lighting conditions. When the image was taken (around 5:38 p.m. (PDT) on Saturday, August 8, 1998), the Sun had just risen and was only about 6o above the eastern horizon. With the Sun so low in the local sky, the contrast between sunlit and shadowed surfaces allowed new, subtle details to be revealed on the surface of the crater ejecta deposit.

    The crater shown here has ejecta of a type that was first identified in Mariner 9 and Viking Orbiter images as 'fluidized' ejecta. Ejecta is the material that is thrown out from the crater during the explosion that results when a meteor--piece of a comet or asteroid--collides with the planet. Fluidized ejecta is characterized by its lobate appearance, and sometimes by the presence of a ridge along the margin of the ejecta deposit. In the case of the crater shown here, there are two ridges that encircle the crater ejecta--this type of ejecta deposit is sometimes called a double-lobe rampart deposit. The MOC image shows that this particular crater also has 'normal' ejecta that occurs out on the plains, beyond the outermost ridge of

  3. BOOST H2O - Field Training Activities for Hydrologic Science near Lake Iznik, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derin, Y.; Hatipoglu, E.; Sunnetci, M. O.; Tanyas, H.; Unal Ercan, H.; Aktuna, Z.; Agouridis, C.; Fryar, A. E.; Milewski, A.; Schroeder, P.; Ece, O. I.; Yilmaz, K. K.

    2013-12-01

    Field activities are often the best pedagogy for reinforcing principles learned in the classroom. As part of the 'Building Opportunity Out of Science and Technology: Helping Hydrologic Outreach (BOOST H2O)' project, which is supported by the U.S. Department of State, six graduate students from three Turkish universities, four U.S. professors, and two Turkish professors participated in a week of training activities during May-June 2013. Field activities took place in the Lake Iznik region in western Turkey. The lake basin is geologically complex, with fault-controlled hydrogeology, and land use is dominated by agriculture, particularly olive cultivation. Professors trained the students (four females and two males) on concepts and techniques in surface-water and groundwater hydrology, water quality, and related computer software. Activities included stream gauging (using top-setting rods and a current meter), geomorphic assessment of streams (slope, cross-sections, and bed-clast size), measuring depth to water in wells, and collection of water samples from springs, wells, and the lake. Measurements of pH, temperature, electrical conductivity, and alkalinity were performed along with sampling for stable isotope (oxygen and hydrogen) analysis. The students visited local villages, farms, surface-water intakes, and recreational springs for a holistic approach towards integrated water resource management. Results were discussed in the context of lithology, tectonics, land use, and other human impacts.

  4. Microbial diversity and activity in seafloor brine lake sediments (Alaminos Canyon block 601, Gulf of Mexico).

    PubMed

    Crespo-Medina, M; Bowles, M W; Samarkin, V A; Hunter, K S; Joye, S B

    2016-09-01

    The microbial communities thriving in deep-sea brines are sustained largely by energy rich substrates supplied through active seepage. Geochemical, microbial activity, and microbial community composition data from different habitats at a Gulf of Mexico brine lake in Alaminos Canyon revealed habitat-linked variability in geochemistry that in turn drove patterns in microbial community composition and activity. The bottom of the brine lake was the most geochemically extreme (highest salinity and nutrient concentrations) habitat and its microbial community exhibited the highest diversity and richness indices. The habitat at the upper halocline of the lake hosted the highest rates of sulfate reduction and methane oxidation, and the largest inventories of dissolved inorganic carbon, particulate organic carbon, and hydrogen sulfide. Statistical analyses indicated a significant positive correlation between the bacterial and archaeal diversity in the bottom brine sample and NH4+ inventories. Other environmental factors with positive correlation with microbial diversity indices were DOC, H2 S, and DIC concentrations. The geochemical regime of different sites within this deep seafloor extreme environment exerts a clear selective force on microbial communities and on patterns of microbial activity.