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Sample records for active crustal deformation

  1. Crustal deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Kristine M.

    1995-07-01

    Geodetic measurements of crustal deformation provide direct tests of geophysical models which are used to describe the dynamics of the Earth. Although geodetic observations have been made throughout history, only in the last several hundred years have they been sufficiently precise for geophysical studies. In the 19th century, these techniques included leveling and triangulation. Approximately 25 years ago, trilateration measurements were initiated by the USGS (United States Geological Survey) to monitor active faults in the United States. Several years later, NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) begin an effort to measure plate tectonic motions on a global scale, using space geodetic techniques, VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometry) and SLR (Satellite Laser Ranging). The period covered by this report to the IUGG, 1991-1994, was a transition period in the field of crustal deformation. Trilateration measurements (previously the backbone of measurements across plate boundaries in the western United States and Alaska) have been abandoned. This system was labor-intensive, involved highly trained crews to carry out the observations, and only measured the length between sites. In addition, NASA drastically cut the budgets for VLBI and SLR during this period. Fixed site VLBI systems are still operational, but mobile VLBI measurements in North America have ceased. SLR measurements continue on a global scale, but the remaining crustal deformation measurements are now being made with the Global Positioning System (GPS). Nonetheless, because of the time scales involved, older geodetic data (including leveling, triangulation, and trilateration) continue to be important for many geophysical studies.

  2. Crustal deformation and volcanism at active plate boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geirsson, Halldor

    Most of Earth's volcanoes are located near active tectonic plate boundaries, where the tectonic plates move relative to each other resulting in deformation. Likewise, subsurface magma movement and pressure changes in magmatic systems can cause measurable deformation of the Earth's surface. The study of the shape of Earth and therefore studies of surface deformation is called geodesy. Modern geodetic techniques allow precise measurements (˜1 mm accuracy) of deformation of tectonic and magmatic systems. Because of the spatial correlation between tectonic boundaries and volcanism, the tectonic and volcanic deformation signals can become intertwined. Thus it is often important to study both tectonic and volcanic deformation processes simultaneously, when one is trying to study one of the systems individually. In this thesis, I present research on crustal deformation and magmatic processes at active plate boundaries. The study areas cover divergent and transform plate boundaries in south Iceland and convergent and transform plate boundaries in Central America, specifically Nicaragua and El Salvador. The study is composed of four main chapters: two of the chapters focus on the magma plumbing system of Hekla volcano, Iceland and the plate boundary in south Iceland; one chapter focuses on shallow controls of explosive volcanism at Telica volcano, Nicaragua; and the fourth chapter focuses on co- and post-seismic deformation from a Mw = 7.3 earthquake which occurred offshore El Salvador in 2012. Hekla volcano is located at the intersection of a transform zone and a rift zone in Iceland and thus is affected by a combination of shear and extensional strains, in addition to co-seismic and co-rifting deformation. The inter-eruptive deformation signal from Hekla is subtle, as observed by a decade (2000-2010) of GPS data in south Iceland. A simultaneous inversion of this data for parameters describing the geometry and source characteristics of the magma chamber at Hekla, and

  3. Crustal deformation and earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    The manner in which the Earth's surface deforms during the cycle of stress accumulation and release along major faults is investigated. In an investigation of the crustal deformation associated with a thin channel asthenosphere displacements are reduced from those computed for a half space asthenosphere. A previous finding by other workers that displacements are enhanced when flow is confined to a thin channel is based on several invalid approximations. The major predictions of the finite element model are that the near field postseismic displacements and strain rates are less than those for a half space asthenosphere and that the postseismic strain rates at intermediate distances are greater (in magnitude). The finite width of the asthenosphere ceases to have a significant impact on the crustal deformation pattern when its magnitude exceeds about three lithosphere thicknesses.

  4. Evidence of ongoing crustal deformation related to magmatic activity near Socorro, New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, S.; Brown, L.; Reilinger, R.

    1986-01-01

    Leveling measurements conducted in 1980-1981 by the National Geodetic Survey in the Socorro area of the Rio Grande rift are analyzed. Crustal uplift related to magma inflation in the midcrustal magma body is detected; an uplift of 0.18 cm/yr is measured for the time between 1951-1980. The survey data of 1911 and 1959 are compared to the present data and good correlation is observed. The systematic leveling errors including height-dependence and refraction errors are studied. The 30-km-wide subsidence in the area is examined. The spatial correlation between seismic activity, the Socorro magma body, and crustal deformation in Socorro is investigated. The crustal movement from magma reservior activities is modeled using the formulations of Dieterich and Decker (1975). The modeling of the deformation reveals that the movement in the Socorro area is associated with the 19-km deep Socorro magma body.

  5. Evolution of fault activity reflecting the crustal deformation: Insights from crustal stress and fault orientations in the northeast-southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakawa, A.; Otsubo, M.

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated fault activity in northeast- southwest Japan based on the regional stress and the fault orientation field for both active faults and inactive faults (here, an inactive fault is a fault which activity has not been identified in Quaternary). The regional stress field was calculated using the stress inversion method [Hardebeck and Michael, 2006] applied to earthquake focal mechanisms in the northeast-southwest Japan. The locations and orientations (i.e., strike and dip, assuming a planar fault geometry) of active faults in the study area were obtained from the Active Fault Database of Japan and inactive faults from a database compiled by Kosaka et al. [2011]. We employed slip tendency analysis [Morris et al., 1996] to evaluate the likelihood of fault slip. The values of the slip tendency is generally higher along active faults than along inactive faults. The difference between the slip tendencies of active and inactive faults reflects the difference in their activities. Furthermore the high slip tendency observed for some inactive faults suggests their high activity. These high slip tendencies imply that they have potential to be active. We propose the temporal evolution from inactive to active faulting during long-term crustal deformation to explain the potential for fault activity along inactive faults. When a region undergoes the transition from inactive to active faulting, potential active faults are observed as inactive faults with a high Part of this findig have been submitted to Tectonics (AGU Journal) (2015-07-27). We will presentate some new findings.slip tendency. The average slip tendency of inactive faults gradually increases from northeast to southwest Japan, because a relatively large number of inactive faults in southwest Japan have a high slip tendency. The representative deformation zones in Japan shows a relationship with the observed spatial variations in the evolution from inactive to active faulting. This study was supported by MEXT

  6. Crustal deformation: Earth vs Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turcotte, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    It is timely to consider the possible tectonic regimes on Venus both in terms of what is known about Venus and in terms of deformation mechanisms operative on the earth. Plate tectonic phenomena dominate tectonics on the earth. Horizontal displacements are associated with the creation of new crust at ridges and destruction of crust at trenches. The presence of plate tectonics on Venus is debated, but there is certainly no evidence for the trenches associated with subduction on the earth. An essential question is what kind of tectonics can be expected if there is no plate tectonics on Venus. Mars and the Moon are reference examples. Volcanic constructs appear to play a dominant role on Mars but their role on Venus is not clear. On single plate planets and satellites, tectonic structures are often associated with thermal stresses. Cooling of a planet leads to thermal contraction and surface compressive features. Delamination has been propsed for Venus by several authors. Delamination is associated with the subduction of the mantle lithosphere and possibly the lower crust but not the upper crust. The surface manifestations of delamination are unclear. There is some evidence that delamination is occurring beneath the Transverse Ranges in California. Delamination will certainly lead to lithospheric thinning and is likely to lead to uplift and crustal thinning.

  7. Faults Activities And Crustal Deformation near Hualien City, eastern Taiwan Analysed By Persistent Scatterer InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, C.; Lin, M.; Yen, J.; Chang, C.

    2008-12-01

    Hualien is located in eastern part of Taiwan, and is the collision boundary in the northern of Huatung Longitudinal Valley between the Philippine Sea tectonic plate and Eurasian tectonic plate(Biq, 1981; Barrier and Angelier, 1986). There are several active faults, such as Milun fault, Beipu fault and Minyi fault, pass through the Hualien city, and create many crustal deformation. According to previous researches (Hsu, 1956; Lin, 1962; Yu, 1997) we know Milun fault is a thrust and left lateral fault, and the fault plane incline to east. Minyi fault also is a left lateral and a slight reverse fault, but it's fault plane incline to west. (Chang, 1994; Yu, 1997) We applied the Persistent Scatterer Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PSInSAR, Hooper, 2007) to observe temporally-variable processes of Hualien city between 2004 to 2008. At the same time, precise leveling and GPS data were taken for the auxiliary data to verify the deformation rate and pattern in this area. In the Hualien city area, our observation showed that the active faults separate this area into several distinct blocks. Most of the blocks moved slowly, but the hanging wall of the Milun fault decreases 5- 8mm in line of sight (LOS) direction between 15 May 2004 to 24 Feb 2007, then increases 3-6mm in LOS between 1 Dec 2007 to 5 Jan 2008. The deformation reversed its direction in 2007. The western surface of Hualien City displays continuous deformation about 1.5-2mm/yr , which spread along the Beipu fault. Our preliminary investigation indicated that between late 2004 and middle 2005 there had been an abrupt increase in seismicity, which coincided with PSInSAR observation of a large displacement. The distribution of shallow source earthquakes correlate with the area with large deformation. Our following works include continuing observation of the Hualien City, and decipher the relationship between earthquakes and surface deformation, and model the fault action in Hualien City with time series.

  8. Modeling crustal deformation near active faults and volcanic centers: a catalog of deformation models and modeling approaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglia, Maurizio; ,; Peter, F.; Murray, Jessica R.

    2013-01-01

    This manual provides the physical and mathematical concepts for selected models used to interpret deformation measurements near active faults and volcanic centers. The emphasis is on analytical models of deformation that can be compared with data from the Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), leveling surveys, tiltmeters and strainmeters. Source models include pressurized spherical, ellipsoidal, and horizontal penny-shaped geometries in an elastic, homogeneous, flat half-space. Vertical dikes and faults are described following the mathematical notation for rectangular dislocations in an elastic, homogeneous, flat half-space. All the analytical expressions were verified against numerical models developed by use of COMSOL Multyphics, a Finite Element Analysis software (http://www.comsol.com). In this way, typographical errors present were identified and corrected. Matlab scripts are also provided to facilitate the application of these models.

  9. Active crustal deformation of the El Salvador Fault Zone (ESFZ) using GPS data: Implications in seismic hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staller, Alejandra; Benito, Belen; Jesús Martínez-Díaz, José; Hernández, Douglas; Hernández-Rey, Román; Alonso-Henar, Jorge

    2014-05-01

    El Salvador, Central America, is part of the Chortis block in the northwestern boundary of the Caribbean plate. This block is interacting with a diffuse triple junction point with the Cocos and North American plates. Among the structures that cut the Miocene to Pleistocene volcanic deposits stands out the El Salvador Fault Zone (ESFZ): It is oriented in N90º-100ºE direction, and it is composed of several structural segments that deform Quaternary deposits with right-lateral and oblique slip motions. The ESFZ is seismically active and capable of producing earthquakes such as the February 13, 2001 with Mw 6.6 (Martínez-Díaz et al., 2004), that seriously affected the population, leaving many casualties. This structure plays an important role in the tectonics of the Chortis block, since its motion is directly related to the drift of the Caribbean plate to the east and not with the partitioning of the deformation of the Cocos subduction (here not coupled) (Álvarez-Gómez et al., 2008). Together with the volcanic arc of El Salvador, this zone constitutes a weakness area that allows the motion of forearc block toward the NW. The geometry and the degree of activity of the ESFZ are not studied enough. However their knowledge is essential to understand the seismic hazard associated to this important seismogenic structure. For this reason, since 2007 a GPS dense network was established along the ESFZ (ZFESNet) in order to obtain GPS velocity measurements which are later used to explain the nature of strain accumulation on major faults along the ESFZ. The current work aims at understanding active crustal deformation of the ESFZ through kinematic model. The results provide significant information to be included in a new estimation of seismic hazard taking into account the major structures in ESFZ.

  10. Reports on crustal movements and deformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.; Peck, T.

    1981-01-01

    Studies of tectonic plate motions, regional crustal deformations, strain accumulation and release, deformations associated with earthquakes and fault motion, and micro-plate motion, were collected and are summarized. To a limited extent, papers dealing with global models of current plate motions and crustal stress are included. The data base is restricted to articles appearing in reveiwed technical journals during the years 1970-1980. The major journals searched include: Journal of Geophysical Research (solid earth), Tectonophysics, Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, Geological Society of America Bulletin, Geophysical Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society, and the Journal of Geology.

  11. Recent plate motions and crustal deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Lisowski, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Reports by U.S. workers on geodetic measurements of recent plate motions or crustal deformation published in 1987-1990 are reviewed. The review begins with global plate motions, proceeds through plate boundaries in California, Alaska, and the Pacific Northwest, and finishes with volcanic phenomena, monument stability and longevity, and GPS relative position measurements. 184 refs.

  12. Reports on crustal movements and deformations. [bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.; Peck, T.

    1983-01-01

    This Catalog of Reports on Crustal Movements and Deformation is a structured bibliography of scientific papers on the movements of the Earth crust. The catalog summarizes by various subjects papers containing data on the movement of the Earth's surface due to tectonic processes. In preparing the catalog we have included studies of tectonic plate motions, spreading and convergence, microplate rotation, regional crustal deformation strain accumulation and deformations associated with the earthquake cycle, and fault motion. We have also included several papers dealing with models of tectonic plate motion and with crustal stress. Papers which discuss tectonic and geologic history but which do not present rates of movements or deformations and papers which are primarily theoretical analyses have been excluded from the catalog. An index of authors cross-referenced to their publications also appears in the catalog. The catalog covers articles appearing in reviewed technical journals during the years 1970-1981. Although there are citations from about twenty journals most of the items come from the following publications: Journal of Geophysical Research, Tectonophysics, Geological Society of America Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, Nature, Science, Geophysical Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, and Geology.

  13. Crustal deformation along the San Andreas, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Victor C.

    1992-03-01

    The goal is to achieve a better understanding of the regional and local deformation and crustal straining processes in western North America, particularly the effects of the San Andreas and nearby faults on the spatial and temporal crustal deformation behavior. Construction of theoretical models based on the mechanics of coupled elastic plate, viscoelastic foundation and large scale crack mechanics provide a rational basis for the interpretation of seismic and aseismic anomalies and expedite efforts in forecasting the stability of plate boundary deformation. Special focus is placed on the three dimensional time dependent surface deformation due to localized slippage in a elastic layer coupled to a visco-elastic substrate. The numerical analysis is based on a 3-D boundary element technique. Extension to visco-elastic coupling demands the derivation of 3-D time dependent Green's function. This method was applied to analyze the viscoelastic surface displacements due to a dislocated embedded patch. Surface uplift as a function of time and position are obtained. Comparisons between surface uplift for long and short dislocated patches are made.

  14. Crustal deformation along the San Andreas, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Victor C.

    1992-01-01

    The goal is to achieve a better understanding of the regional and local deformation and crustal straining processes in western North America, particularly the effects of the San Andreas and nearby faults on the spatial and temporal crustal deformation behavior. Construction of theoretical models based on the mechanics of coupled elastic plate, viscoelastic foundation and large scale crack mechanics provide a rational basis for the interpretation of seismic and aseismic anomalies and expedite efforts in forecasting the stability of plate boundary deformation. Special focus is placed on the three dimensional time dependent surface deformation due to localized slippage in a elastic layer coupled to a visco-elastic substrate. The numerical analysis is based on a 3-D boundary element technique. Extension to visco-elastic coupling demands the derivation of 3-D time dependent Green's function. This method was applied to analyze the viscoelastic surface displacements due to a dislocated embedded patch. Surface uplift as a function of time and position are obtained. Comparisons between surface uplift for long and short dislocated patches are made.

  15. An algorithmic approach to crustal deformation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iz, Huseyin Baki

    1987-01-01

    In recent years the analysis of crustal deformation measurements has become important as a result of current improvements in geodetic methods and an increasing amount of theoretical and observational data provided by several earth sciences. A first-generation data analysis algorithm which combines a priori information with current geodetic measurements was proposed. Relevant methods which can be used in the algorithm were discussed. Prior information is the unifying feature of this algorithm. Some of the problems which may arise through the use of a priori information in the analysis were indicated and preventive measures were demonstrated. The first step in the algorithm is the optimal design of deformation networks. The second step in the algorithm identifies the descriptive model of the deformation field. The final step in the algorithm is the improved estimation of deformation parameters. Although deformation parameters are estimated in the process of model discrimination, they can further be improved by the use of a priori information about them. According to the proposed algorithm this information must first be tested against the estimates calculated using the sample data only. Null-hypothesis testing procedures were developed for this purpose. Six different estimators which employ a priori information were examined. Emphasis was put on the case when the prior information is wrong and analytical expressions for possible improvements under incompatible prior information were derived.

  16. Crustal deformation measurements in Guerrero, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, K.M.; Lowry, A.R.; Kostoglodov, V.; Hutton, W.; Sanchez, O.; Hudnut, K.; Suarez, G.

    2004-01-01

    GPS measurements of crustal deformation in Guerrero, southern Mexico, include surveys collected between 1992 and 2001 as well as continuous GPS measurements at a few sites. These geodetic observations are used to calculate interseismic deformation rates and assess the presence and possible location of transient deformation during the period encompassing 1992.25 to 2001.75. The data are used to examine transient deformation in 1998 previously described from data at a single site by Lowry et al. [2001]. Survey measurements and continuous data from a site near Popocate??petl volcano confirm the 1998 transient, and survey data also suggest another transient occurred following the 14 September 1995 (Mw = 7.3) Copala earthquake. All of the available GPS position estimates have been inverted for a combined model of slip during each event plus the steady state slip on the plate interface. Modeling of the steady state deformation rates confirms that the Guerrero seismic gap is partially frictionally locked at depths shallower than about 25 km and accumulating strain that may eventually be released in a great earthquake. The data also suggest that there is frictional coupling to much greater (>40 km) depths, which releases more frequently in aseismic slip events. The locations and sizes of the transient events are only partially constrained by the available data. However, the transient models which best fit the GPS coordinate time series suggest that aseismic slip was centered downdip of the seismogenic portion of the plate-bounding thrust in both events, and the moment release had equivalent magnitudes Mw = 7.1 + 1.3/-1.0 in 1995-1996 and 7.1 + 0.4/-0.1 in 1998. Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Reports on block rotations, fault domains and crustal deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nur, Amos

    1990-01-01

    Studies of block rotations, fault domains and crustal deformation in the western United States, Israel, and China are discussed. Topics include a three-dimensional model of crustal fracture by distributed fault sets, distributed deformation and block rotation in 3D, stress field rotation, and multiple strike slip fault sets.

  18. Crustal deformation in great California earthquake cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Victor C.; Rice, James R.

    1986-01-01

    Periodic crustal deformation associated with repeated strike slip earthquakes is computed for the following model: A depth L (less than or similiar to H) extending downward from the Earth's surface at a transform boundary between uniform elastic lithospheric plates of thickness H is locked between earthquakes. It slips an amount consistent with remote plate velocity V sub pl after each lapse of earthquake cycle time T sub cy. Lower portions of the fault zone at the boundary slip continuously so as to maintain constant resistive shear stress. The plates are coupled at their base to a Maxwellian viscoelastic asthenosphere through which steady deep seated mantle motions, compatible with plate velocity, are transmitted to the surface plates. The coupling is described approximately through a generalized Elsasser model. It is argued that the model gives a more realistic physical description of tectonic loading, including the time dependence of deep slip and crustal stress build up throughout the earthquake cycle, than do simpler kinematic models in which loading is represented as imposed uniform dislocation slip on the fault below the locked zone.

  19. Diffuse Crustal Deformation in Asia: From Kinematics to Geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Zhang, H.; Yang, Y.; Wang, S.

    2005-12-01

    Asian continent is a classical example of broadly diffuse crustal deformation that defies the prediction of the plate tectonics theory. The kinematics of Asian crust delineated by extensive neotectonics studies and GPS measurements are now sufficient to constrain the cause of the diffuse deformation. Using these constraints, we have developed a 3D viscous shell model to explore the dynamic interplay of major driving forces and lithospheric structure in controlling Asian tectonics. Calculated on parallel computers, the finite element model has nearly one million nodes, allowing inclusion of most major faults and lithospheric structures. Our preliminary results indicate that the effects of the plate boundary force from the Indian indenter are largely limited to the Tibetan Plateau and surrounding regions; active crustal deformation in much of the east and southeast Asia is mainly driven by the gravitational potential energy from the Tibetan Plateau and other uplifted landmasses in central Asia. Subduction along the eastern margin of the Eurasian plate has only secondary impact on active tectonics in east Asia, but may be important during the early Cenozoic. The large lateral heterogeneity of lithospheric structure causes strain to localize within narrow deforming zones marked by active fault systems. The predicted deviatoric stress is relatively high in the North China block but low in the South China block, consistent with the contrasting seismicity between these regions. The total seismic energy released in the past two thousand years is comparable to the predicted long-term spatial pattern of strain energy in China.

  20. On radon emanation as a possible indicator of crustal deformation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, C.-Y.

    1979-01-01

    Radon emanation has been monitored in shallow capped holes by a Tracketch method along several active faults and in the vicinity of some volcanoes and underground nuclear explosions. The measured emanation shows large temporal variations that appear to be partly related to crustal strain changes. This paper proposes a model that may explain the observed tectonic variations in radon emanation, and explores the possibility of using radon emanation as an indicator of crustal deformation. In this model the emanation variation is assumed to be due to the perturbation of near-surface profile of radon concentration in the soil gas caused by a change in the vertical flow rate of the soil gas which, in turn, is caused by the crustal deformation. It is shown that, for a typical soil, a small change in the flow rate (3 ?? 10-4 cm sec-1) can effect a significant change (a factor of 2) in radon emanation detected at a fixed shallow depth (0.7 m). The radon concentration profile has been monitored at several depths at a selected site to test the model. The results appear to be in satisfactory agreement. ?? 1979.

  1. Plate tectonics and crustal deformation around the Japanese Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashimoto, Manabu; Jackson, David D.

    1993-01-01

    We analyze over a century of geodetic data to study crustal deformation and plate motion around the Japanese Islands, using the block-fault model for crustal deformation developed by Matsu'ura et al. (1986). We model the area including the Japanese Islands with 19 crustal blocks and 104 faults based on the distribution of active faults and seismicity. Geodetic data are used to obtain block motions and average slip rates of faults. This geodetic model predicts that the Pacific plate moves N deg 69 +/- 2 deg W at about 80 +/- 3 mm/yr relative to the Eurasian plate which is much lower than that predicted in geologic models. Substantial aseismic slip occurs on the subduction boundaries. The block containing the Izu Peninsula may be separated from the rigid part of the Philippine Sea plate. The faults on the coast of Japan Sea and the western part of the Median Tectonic Line have slip rates exceeding 4 mm/yr, while the Fossa Magna does not play an important role in the tectonics of the central Japan. The geodetic model requires the division of northeastern Japan, contrary to the hypothesis that northeastern Japan is a part of the North American plate. Owing to rapid convergence, the seismic risk in the Nankai trough may be larger than that of the Tokai gap.

  2. Permanent GPS and crustal deformation in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, S. A.

    2003-12-01

    The National Survey and Cadastre - Denmark (KMS) is responsible for the geodetic definition of the reference network in Greenland. Permanent GPS plays an important role in the monitoring and maintenance of the geodetic network. Furthermore, KMS supports the international GPS infrastructure and research by supporting IGS. In October 1998 KMS has established a permanent GPS station THU2 at Thule Airbase. Besides THU2 the old permanent station THU1 is also running. The Thule stations are important because they are two of the few northernmost stations in the IGS network. THU2 has been operating since March 1999, and it is now a high quality and high performance station contributing to the IGS Low-Earth Orbiters (LEO) network. Besides the GPS stations in Thule, KMS is also running a permanent GPS station SCOB in Scoresbysund, which was established in August 1997, and in October 2001 a permanent station QAQ1 was established in Qaqortoq. This station is registered at IGS. Furthermore, University of Colorado operates the IGS station Kellyville near Kangerlussuaq and a station in Kulusuk. Using the BERNESE software, we have calculated daily baseline solutions between the GPS sites. The time series of the 3D crustal movements are analyzed due to post glacial rebound, plate tectonic and seasonal deformations (e.g. atmosphere loading). In addition, we have used the GIPSY OASIS II software to obtain similar time series. The results are compared with modeled estimates of the glacial rebound.

  3. Glacio-Seismotectonics: Ice Sheets, Crustal Deformation and Seismicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauber, Jeanne; Stewart, Iain S.; Rose, James

    2000-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed a significant growth in our understanding of the past and continuing effects of ice sheets and glaciers on contemporary crustal deformation and seismicity. This growth has been driven largely by the emergence of postglacial rebound models (PGM) constrained by new field observations that incorporate increasingly realistic rheological, mechanical, and glacial parameters. In this paper, we highlight some of these recent field-based investigations and new PGMs, and examine their implications for understanding crustal deformation and seismicity during glaciation and following deglaciation. The emerging glacial rebound models outlined in the paper support the view that both tectonic stresses and glacial rebound stresses are needed to explain the distribution and style of contemporary earthquake activity in former glaciated shields of eastern Canada and Fennoscandia. However, many of these models neglect important parameters, such as topography, lateral variations in lithospheric strength and tectonic strain built up during glaciation. In glaciated mountainous terrains, glacial erosion may directly modulate tectonic deformation by resetting the orogenic topography and thereby providing an additional compensatory uplift mechanism. Such effects are likely to be important both in tectonically active orogens and in the mountainous regions of glaciated shields.

  4. dMODELS: A MATLAB software package for modeling crustal deformation near active faults and volcanic centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Maurizio; Cervelli, Peter F.; Murray, Jessica R.

    2013-03-01

    We have developed a MATLAB software package for the most common models used to interpret deformation measurements near faults and active volcanic centers. The emphasis is on analytical models of deformation that can be compared with data from the Global Positioning System (GPS), InSAR, tiltmeters and strainmeters. Source models include pressurized spherical, ellipsoidal and sill-like magma chambers in an elastic, homogeneous, flat half-space. Dikes and faults are described following the mathematical notation for rectangular dislocations in an elastic, homogeneous, flat half-space. All the expressions have been checked for typographical errors that might have been present in the original literature, extended to include deformation and strain within the Earth's crust (as opposed to only the Earth's surface) and verified against finite element models. A set of GPS measurements from the 2006 eruption at Augustine Volcano (Alaska) is used to test the software package. The results show that the best fit source to the GPS data is a spherical intrusion (ΔV=5×10 km3), about 880 m beneath the volcano's summit.

  5. Active crustal deformation in the Jalisco block, Mexico: evidence for a great historical earthquake in the 16th century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez, Gerardo; García-Acosta, Virginia; Gaulon, Roland

    1994-06-01

    On December 27th, 1568, a large earthquake occurred to the southwest of Guadalajara, Mexico, near the northeastern corner of the Jalisco block, in an area where no great earthquakes have been reported before. It caused heavy damage in the region where the Colima and Tepic-Zacoalco grabens intersect. Many churches, houses and convents in the neighboring towns collapsed and severe deformation of the ground was observed in the area. Landslides apparently dammed the Ameca River for several days and the opening of large cracks was reported in the lowlands. The flow of natural springs and the level of Lake Zacoalco changed dramatically after the earthquake. All of these reports strongly suggest that a local fault was the source of this large and destructive earthquake. Based on the intensity data inferred from the historical reports, the 1568 event is perhaps the largest earthquake to date in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. Compared to other well documented, large earthquakes that occurred in the volcanic belt in 1875, 1912 and 1920, the magnitude appears to be greater than 7.0 ( MW). The Jalisco block is presumed to be rifting away from the North American plate. The Colima and Tepic-Zacoalco grabens, which bound the Jalisco block to the east and north, respectively, are apparently the boundaries where rifting is taking place in a complex and highly faulted environment. Based on the data available, it is impossible to identify the specific fault ruptured during the earthquake unequivocally. However, the occurrence of this large event in 1568 confirms that active deformation is still taking place in the Jalisco block. The apparently long recurrence times of these large events suggest that tectonic deformation is slow.

  6. Marginal deformation of crustal plates as key to crustal motion, crustal spirals, and the driving force

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, B.G.M.

    1986-07-01

    Present plate tectonic models concentrate on compressive- and extensive-type plate margins, often incorporating shear margins as a subtype of compressive margins. However, if a single moving plate is considered, it becomes apparent that the leading edge is a compressive margin, the trailing edge is an extensive margin, and the lateral edges are shear margins. Conversely, if a plate's margin can be recognized by identifying areas of subduction (compression), rifting (extension), and strike slip and buckle folding (shearing), then not only can a plate be identified but its motion can also be inferred. The Pacific plate provides an excellent example. It is bounded by subduction trenches along its west-northwest margin, extension rifts along its east-southeast margin, and shear and buckle-fold complexes along its south-southwest and north-northeast margins. A west-northwest motion is inferred. As other major plates are examined, two striking features are revealed. A west-northwest to northwest motion is consistently identified, and the plates line up end to end forming a northwest-spiraling segmented band encircling the globe. The lateral margins of this band form the well-known Tethyan shear system. The plates comprising this band are of varying sizes and composition, and the extent of deformation along a plate margin is directly related to plate size. The Pacific and Eurasian plates dominate in size and marginal deformation. The tail of this north-spiraling ribbon of crustal plates is deformed in the Southern Hemisphere, most notably in the area of the African, Indian, and Australian plates. Each southern plate has a strong north component of motion as well as a counterclockwise spiraling action. The plates appear to have rotated in response to drag along the southern margin of the Pacific and Eurasian plates.

  7. Faults Activities And Crustal Deformation Along The Arc-Continent Collision Boundary, Eastern Taiwan - Observed From Persistent Scatterer SAR Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Jiun-Yee; Chang, Chung-Pai; Hooper, Andrew; Chang, Yo-Ho; Liang, Wen-Tzong; Chang, Tsui-Yu

    2010-05-01

    Located in the southeastern periphery of the Eurasian plate, eastern Taiwan marks the collional boundary between the Eurasian plate and the Philippine Sea plate. These two plates converge at about 8 cm/yr near Taiwan and nearly half of the shortening is consumed in eastern Taiwan. There have been many studies in this area about the dynamics of the plate convergence, however, most of the geodetic studies focused on small area (strainmeter), with very few data points (GPS), or only gather data along a specific profile (leveling). We applied the Persistent Scatterer SAR Interferometry in the Longitudinal Valley of eastern Taiwan to observe temporally-variable processes using both ERS and Envisat data. At the same time, leveling and GPS data were measured for the auxiliary tool to verify the deformation rate in this area. Our result indicated that although the area is under active collision, faults do not move in the same fashion along the boundary. In the very northern part of the collided arc, small subsidence has been detected, while in the north-central part very few activity is observed. In the central and southern part of the collisional boundary, patches of faults are moving as rapidly as 15 mm/yr along radar line-of-sight. In addition. between late 2004 and middle 2005 there had been an earthquake swarm consists of shallow earthquakes, which coincided with PSI observation of a large vertical displacement. The comparison between our leveling data and PS results indicated PSI is a reliable tool even in the highly vegetated area in eastern Taiwan.

  8. The Mw4.8 Norris Geyser Basin Earthquake of 30 March, 2014 and its Relationship to Crustal Deformation and Seismic Activity of the Yellowstone Volcanic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, J.; Shelly, D. R.; Smith, R. B.; Puskas, C. M.; Chang, W. L.

    2014-12-01

    The largest earthquake to be recorded in Yellowstone in over 30 years, a magnitude 4.8 earthquake, occurred on March 30, 2014 near the Norris Geyser Basin on the NW side of the 0.64 Ma Yellowstone caldera. The earthquake was felt throughout Yellowstone and the surrounding region. We analyze this unusual event using data from the Yellowstone Seismic and Geodetic networks in the context of active volcanic-tectonic processes of the Yellowstone volcanic system and its relationship to regional swarm seismicity and crustal deformation. Moment tensor analysis of the March 30 earthquake revealed a strike-slip, double-couple source mechanism with no isotropic contribution. This earthquake was part of a larger sequence of earthquake swarm activity in the Norris Geyser Basin area that began in September 2013 and continued into June 2014. During that period, 50-60% of the total seismicity recorded in Yellowstone, including nearly all of the swarm seismicity (earthquakes clustered in time and space), occurred in the Norris Geyser Basin area. In addition, GPS derived deformation data revealed unusually high uplift rates at ~15 cm/yr in the Norris area prior to the MW4.8 event, while a dramatic reversal to subsidence at rates of ~20 cm/yr occurred after the event. Regionally, the much larger Yellowstone caldera had experienced subsidence since January 2010 at rates of ~1.5 cm/yr prior to the MW4.8 event. After March 30, 2014 the caldera reversed to regional uplift at rates of ~10 cm/yr, similar to accelerated uplift rates observed in mid-2004.

  9. Crustal deformation across the Southern Patagonian Icefield observed by GNSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, A.; Ivins, E.; Lange, H.; Mendoza, L.; Schröder, L.; Hormaechea, J. L.; Casassa, G.; Marderwald, E.; Fritsche, M.; Perdomo, R.; Horwath, M.; Dietrich, R.

    2016-10-01

    Geodetic GNSS observations at 43 sites well distributed over the Southern Patagonian Icefield region yield site velocities with a mean accuracy of 1 mm/a and 6 mm/a for the horizontal and vertical components, respectively. These velocities are analyzed to reveal the magnitudes and patterns of vertical and horizontal present-day crustal deformation as well as their primary driving processes. The observed vertical velocities confirm a rapid uplift, with rates peaking at 41 mm/a, causally related to glacial-isostatic adjustment (GIA). They yield now an unambiguous preference between two competing GIA models. Remaining discrepancies between the preferred model and our observations point toward an effective upper mantle viscosity even lower than 1.6 ṡ1018 Pas and effects of lateral rheological heterogeneities. An analysis of the horizontal strain and strain-rate fields reveals some complex superposition, with compression dominating in the west and extension in the east. This deformation field suggests significant contributions from three processes: GIA, a western interseismic tectonic deformation field related to plate subduction, and an extensional strain-rate field related to active Patagonian slab window tectonics.

  10. Seismicity and GPS -derived Crustal Deformation In Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, S. M.

    Studies of crustal deformation in Egypt started as early as 1983 following the occurrence of Aswan earthquake in 1981. Several publications were published and presented in local and international meetings. on November 14, 1981 an earthquake with magnitude 5.6 occurred at kalabsha fault, 70-Km southwest of Aswan City. This earthquake is considered as an important event as it is located not far from the Aswan High Dam. Therefore, the first program for monitoring crustal deformation has been started in Kalabsha area during the winter of 1983 with the cooperation between the National Research Institute of Astronomy and Geophysics (NRIAG) and the Aswan &High Dam Authority. A local network of 18 terrestrial geodetic points was established at kalabsha area in 1983 in order to monitor the horizontal and vertical crustal movements along Kalabsha fault. The initial measurements were carried out in December 1984. These measurements were repeated twice a year till December 1994.An other terrestrial network were established at seiyal fault, 15 km to the north of kalabsha fault. The initial measurements of seiyal network were carried out in March 1989 and repeated twice a year till August 1992. Analysis of the terrestrial horizontal measurements from both networks for the epoch from December 1984 till December 1994 indicated significant deformations varying from 3x10-6 to 7x10-6. Since the year of 1994 till now, the geodetic observations by means of Space Techniques which known as Global Positioning System (GPS) were applied instead of the Terrestrial ones to cover some other regions of the country. Data adjustment and analysis of the reapted GPS campaigns from the different networks prevailed significant movements which helps in more understanding the geodynamics of these regions and in creating seismic hazard assessments. In this paper, the main characteristics of the seismotectonics of Egypt, which are necessary to a reliable evaluation of the seismic risk, are discussed. The

  11. Recent crustal deformation in west-central South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, Matthew Earl

    I use interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) to create maps of crustal deformation along the coast and within the volcanic arc of central South America. I image deformation associated with six subduction zone earthquakes, four volcanic centers, at least one shallow crustal earthquake, and several salt flats. In addition, I constrain the magnitude and location of post-seismic deformation from the aforementioned subduction zone earthquakes. I combine InSAR observations with data from the Global Positioning System (GPS) and teleseismic data to explore each source of deformation. I use the observations to constrain earthquake and volcanic processes of this subduction zone, including the plumbing system of the volcanoes and the decadal along strike variations in the subduction zone earthquake cycle. I created interferograms of over 900 volcanoes in the central Andes spanning 1992--2002, and found four areas of deformation. I constrained the temporal variability of the deformation, the depth of the sources of deformation assuming a variety of source geometries and crustal structures, and the possible cause of the deformation. I do not observe deformation associated with eruptions at several volcanoes, and I discuss the possible explanations for this lack of deformation. In addition, I constrain the amount of co-seismic and post-seismic slip on the subduction zone fault interface from the following earthquakes: 1995 Mw 8.1 Antofagasta, Chile; 1996 Mw 7.7 Nazca, Peru; 1998 Mw 7.1 Antofagasta, Chile; and 2001 Mw 8.4 Arequipa, Peru. In northern Chile, I compare the location and magnitude of co-seismic slip from 5 Mw > 7 earthquakes during the past 15 years with the post-seismic slip distribution. There is little post-seismic slip from the 1995 and 1996 earthquakes relative to the 2001 event and other recent subduction zone earthquakes.

  12. New buoy observation system for tsunami and crustal deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Narumi; Ishihara, Yasuhisa; Ochi, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Tatsuya; Tahara, Jun'ichiro; Maeda, Yosaku; Kido, Motoyuki; Ohta, Yusaku; Mutoh, Katsuhiko; Hashimoto, Gosei; Kogure, Satoshi; Kaneda, Yoshiyuki

    2014-09-01

    We have developed a new system for real-time observation of tsunamis and crustal deformation using a seafloor pressure sensor, an array of seafloor transponders and a Precise Point Positioning (PPP ) system on a buoy. The seafloor pressure sensor and the PPP system detect tsunamis, and the pressure sensor and the transponder array measure crustal deformation. The system is designed to be capable of detecting tsunami and vertical crustal deformation of ±8 m with a resolution of less than 5 mm. A noteworthy innovation in our system is its resistance to disturbance by strong ocean currents. Seismogenic zones near Japan lie in areas of strong currents like the Kuroshio, which reaches speeds of approximately 5.5 kt (2.8 m/s) around the Nankai Trough. Our techniques include slack mooring and new acoustic transmission methods using double pulses for sending tsunami data. The slack ratio can be specified for the environment of the deployment location. We can adjust slack ratios, rope lengths, anchor weights and buoy sizes to control the ability of the buoy system to maintain freeboard. The measured pressure data is converted to time difference of a double pulse and this simple method is effective to save battery to transmit data. The time difference of the double pulse has error due to move of the buoy and fluctuation of the seawater environment. We set a wire-end station 1,000 m beneath the buoy to minimize the error. The crustal deformation data is measured by acoustic ranging between the buoy and six transponders on the seafloor. All pressure and crustal deformation data are sent to land station in real-time using iridium communication.

  13. Measuring Crustal Deformation in the American West.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Thomas H.; Minster, J. Bernard

    1988-01-01

    Suggests that there is a close relationship between deformation in the western United States and the large-scale motions of tectonic plates. Introduces very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) as one of the space-geodetic techniques, vector addition of the VLBI data and geological data, and a new geodetic network. (YP)

  14. Surface Deformation and Lower Crustal Flow in Eastern Tibet

    PubMed

    Royden; Burchfiel; King; Wang; Chen; Shen; Liu

    1997-05-01

    Field observations and satellite geodesy indicate that little crustal shortening has occurred along the central to southern margin of the eastern Tibetan plateau since about 4 million years ago. Instead, central eastern Tibet has been nearly stationary relative to southeastern China, southeastern Tibet has rotated clockwise without major crustal shortening, and the crust along portions of the eastern plateau margin has been extended. Modeling suggests that these phenomena are the result of continental convergence where the lower crust is so weak that upper crustal deformation is decoupled from the motion of the underlying mantle. This model also predicts east-west extension on the high plateau without convective removal of Tibetan lithosphere and without eastward movement of the crust east of the plateau.

  15. Measuring crustal deformation in the American West

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, T.H.; Minster, J.B.

    1988-08-01

    The crust of the western US is deforming as the Pacific and North American plates slide past each other along the San Andreas Fault, the Great Basin is spreading apart, and mountains are being thrust up along the California coast. Monitoring of these processes over the years has resulted in the San Andreas discrepancy, the mismatch between the rate and direction of horizontal slippage along the fault and the relative motion of the Pacific and North American plates.This process will soon be measured directly using the new developed technique of space geodesy, which uses radio waves from quasars or satellites to measure between fixed stations with an accuracy of a few centimeters.

  16. System for near real-time crustal deformation monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdoran, P. F. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A system is described for use in detecting earth crustal deformation using an RF interferometer technique for such purposes as earthquake predictive research and eventual operational predictions. A lunar based RF transmission or transmissions from earth orbiting satellites are received at two locations on Earth, and a precise time dependent phase measurement is made of the RF signal as received at the two locations to determine two or three spatial parameters of the antenna relative positions. The received data are precisely time tagged and land-line routed to a central station for real-time phase comparison and analysis. By monitoring the antenna relative positions over an extended period of months or years, crustal deformation of the Earth can be detected.

  17. Geoid, topography, and convection-driven crustal deformation on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Mark; Hager, Bradford H.; Solomon, Sean C.

    1993-01-01

    High-resolution Magellan images and altimetry of Venus reveal a wide range of styles and scales of surface deformation that cannot readily be explained within the classical terrestrial plate tectonic paradigm. The high correlation of long-wavelength topography and gravity and the large apparent depths of compensation suggest that Venus lacks an upper-mantle low-viscosity zone. A key difference between Earth and Venus may be the degree of coupling between the convecting mantle and the overlying lithosphere. Mantle flow should then have recognizable signatures in the relationships between the observed surface topography, crustal deformation, and the gravity field. Therefore, comparison of model results with observational data can help to constrain such parameters as crustal and thermal boundary layer thicknesses as well as the character of mantle flow below different Venusian features. We explore in this paper the effects of this coupling by means of a finite element modelling technique.

  18. Geoid, topography, and convection-driven crustal deformation on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Mark; Hager, Bradford H.; Solomon, Sean C.

    1992-01-01

    High-resolution Magellan images and altimetry of Venus reveal a wide range of styles and scales of surface deformation that cannot readily be explained within the classical terrestrial plate tectonic paradigm. The high correlation of long-wavelength topography and gravity and the large apparent depths of compensation suggest that Venus lacks an upper-mantle low-viscosity zone. A key difference between Earth and Venus may be the degree of coupling between the convecting mantle and the overlying lithosphere. Mantle flow should then have recognizable signatures in the relationships between surface topography, crustal deformation, and the observed gravity field.

  19. The role of crustal quartz in controlling Cordilleran deformation.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Anthony R; Pérez-Gussinyé, Marta

    2011-03-17

    Large-scale deformation of continents remains poorly understood more than 40 years after the plate tectonic revolution. Rock flow strength and mass density variations both contribute to stress, so both are certain to be important, but these depend (somewhat nebulously) on rock type, temperature and whether or not unbound water is present. Hence, it is unclear precisely how Earth material properties translate to continental deformation zones ranging from tens to thousands of kilometres in width, why deforming zones are sometimes interspersed with non-deforming blocks and why large earthquakes occasionally rupture in otherwise stable continental interiors. An important clue comes from observations that mountain belts and rift zones cyclically form at the same locations despite separation across vast gulfs of time (dubbed the Wilson tectonic cycle), accompanied by inversion of extensional basins and reactivation of faults and other structures formed in previous deformation events. Here we show that the abundance of crustal quartz, the weakest mineral in continental rocks, may strongly condition continental temperature and deformation. We use EarthScope seismic receiver functions, gravity and surface heat flow measurements to estimate thickness and seismic velocity ratio, v(P)/v(S), of continental crust in the western United States. The ratio v(P)/v(S) is relatively insensitive to temperature but very sensitive to quartz abundance. Our results demonstrate a surprising correlation of low crustal v(P)/v(S) with both higher lithospheric temperature and deformation of the Cordillera, the mountainous region of the western United States. The most plausible explanation for the relationship to temperature is a robust dynamical feedback, in which ductile strain first localizes in relatively weak, quartz-rich crust, and then initiates processes that promote advective warming, hydration and further weakening. The feedback mechanism proposed here would not only explain

  20. The role of crustal quartz in controlling Cordilleran deformation.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Anthony R; Pérez-Gussinyé, Marta

    2011-03-17

    Large-scale deformation of continents remains poorly understood more than 40 years after the plate tectonic revolution. Rock flow strength and mass density variations both contribute to stress, so both are certain to be important, but these depend (somewhat nebulously) on rock type, temperature and whether or not unbound water is present. Hence, it is unclear precisely how Earth material properties translate to continental deformation zones ranging from tens to thousands of kilometres in width, why deforming zones are sometimes interspersed with non-deforming blocks and why large earthquakes occasionally rupture in otherwise stable continental interiors. An important clue comes from observations that mountain belts and rift zones cyclically form at the same locations despite separation across vast gulfs of time (dubbed the Wilson tectonic cycle), accompanied by inversion of extensional basins and reactivation of faults and other structures formed in previous deformation events. Here we show that the abundance of crustal quartz, the weakest mineral in continental rocks, may strongly condition continental temperature and deformation. We use EarthScope seismic receiver functions, gravity and surface heat flow measurements to estimate thickness and seismic velocity ratio, v(P)/v(S), of continental crust in the western United States. The ratio v(P)/v(S) is relatively insensitive to temperature but very sensitive to quartz abundance. Our results demonstrate a surprising correlation of low crustal v(P)/v(S) with both higher lithospheric temperature and deformation of the Cordillera, the mountainous region of the western United States. The most plausible explanation for the relationship to temperature is a robust dynamical feedback, in which ductile strain first localizes in relatively weak, quartz-rich crust, and then initiates processes that promote advective warming, hydration and further weakening. The feedback mechanism proposed here would not only explain

  1. Implications of very long baseline interferometry measurements on North American intra-plate crustal deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allenby, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    Very Long Baseline Interferometry experiments over the last 1-3/4 years between Owens Valley, CA and Haystack, MA Radio Observatories suggest an upper limit of east-west crustal deformation between the two sites of about 1 cm/yr. In view of the fact that the baseline between the two sites traverses most of the major geological provinces of the United States, this low rate of crustal deformation has direct relevance to intra-plate crustal tectonics. The most active region traversed by this baseline is the Basin and Range province, which was estimated by various researchers to be expanding in an east-west direction at rates of .3 to 1.5 cm/yr. The Colorado Plateau and Rocky Mountain system also appear to be expanding, but at a somewhat lower rate, while east of the Rocky Mountains, the predominant stress appears to be compressional, nearly horizontal, and east to northeast trending.

  2. Seismotectonics and crustal deformation in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayadi, Abdelhakim

    2016-04-01

    We present the Seismotectonic Map of Africa based on a geological, geophysical and geodetic database including the instrumental seismicity and re-appraisal of large historical events, and harmonization and homogenization of earthquake parameters in catalogues. Although the seismotectonic framework of the African continent is a difficult task, several previous and ongoing projects provide a wealth of data and outstanding results. The database of large and moderate earthquakes in different geological domains includes the coseismic and Quaternary faulting that reveals the complex nature of the active tectonics in Africa. The map benefits from previous works on local and regional seismotectonic maps that needed to be integrated with the lithospheric and upper mantle structures, seismic anisotropy tomography and gravity anomaly, into a continental framework. The synthesis of earthquake and volcanic studies obtained from the analysis of late Quaternary faulting and geodetic data will serve as a basis for hazard calculations and the reduction of seismic risks. The map will be useful for the seismic hazard assessment and earthquake risk mitigation for significant infrastructures and their socio-economic implications in Africa. The constant population increase and infrastructure growth in the continent that exacerbate the earthquake risk justify the necessity for a continuous updating of this map. The database and related map are prepared in the framework of the IGC Project-601 "Seismotectonics and Seismic Hazards in Africa" of UNESCO-IUGS, funded by the Swedish International Development Agency and UNESCO-Nairobi for a period of 4 years (2011 - 2014, now extended to 2016).

  3. Crustal Deformation Analysis at CGPS Sites Spanning Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, G. E.; Bennett, R. A.; Spinler, J. C.; Grejner-Brzezinska, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    We conducted a study using data from continuous Global Positioning System (CGPS) stations throughout Mexico to understand a variety of factors that may have an impact on crustal deformation of Mexico—a research topic investigated for many years. This arises from the fact that Mexico is directly influenced by the interactions between the North American, Pacific, Cocos, Caribbean and Rivera tectonic plates. We analyzed CGPS data originating from several networks covering Mexico. These stations have been installed to serve diverse purposes and applications, and are administered by diverse organizations that include government agencies and public universities. We evaluated a total of 80 CGPS stations operating in Mexico; where dual-frequency geodetic-grade GPS receivers collected data continuously during periods between 1994 and 2014.5, in order to provide a synoptic view of the crustal velocity field of Mexico. The CGPS sites located in the Mexican territory were processed with respect to 133 sites outside of Mexico (i.e., Caribbean, Pacific, South and North American plates) in order to evaluate crustal deformation in Mexico in the context of the relative motions among these tectonic plates. Given the heterogeneous nature of the available GPS networks, we performed an analysis of time-series in terms of their duration and precision, finding generally high precision. From the estimated crustal velocities, we observe that these are very comparable (± 1 mm) with respect to previously derived values for stations located at the Baja Peninsula and the Oaxaca—Guerrero region. In general, the behavior of the northern CGPS spanning Mexico are very consistent with North American plate motion.

  4. Gravitational radiation from neutron stars deformed by crustal Hall drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suvorov, A. G.; Mastrano, A.; Geppert, U.

    2016-07-01

    A precondition for the radio emission of pulsars is the existence of strong, small-scale magnetic field structures (`magnetic spots') in the polar cap region. Their creation can proceed via crustal Hall drift out of two qualitatively and quantitatively different initial magnetic field configurations: a field confined completely to the crust and another which penetrates the whole star. The aim of this study is to explore whether these magnetic structures in the crust can deform the star sufficiently to make it an observable source of gravitational waves. We model the evolution of these field configurations, which can develop, within ˜104-105 yr, magnetic spots with local surface field strengths ˜1014 G maintained over ≳106 yr. Deformations caused by the magnetic forces are calculated. We show that, under favourable initial conditions, a star undergoing crustal Hall drift can have ellipticity ɛ ˜ 10-6, even with sub-magnetar polar field strengths, after ˜105 yr. A pulsar rotating at ˜102 Hz with such ɛ is a promising gravitational wave source candidate. Since such large deformations can be caused only by a particular magnetic field configuration that penetrates the whole star and whose maximum magnetic energy is concentrated in the outer core region, gravitational wave emission observed from radio pulsars can thus inform us about the internal field structures of young neutron stars.

  5. Detection, Measurement, Visualization, and Analysis of Seismic Crustal Deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crippen, R.; Blom, R.

    1995-01-01

    Remote sensing plays a key role in the analysis of seismic crustal deformation. Recently radar interferometry has been used to measure one dimension of the strain fields of earthquakes at a resolution of centimeters. Optical imagery is useful in measuring the strain fields in both geographic dimensions of the strain field down to 1/20 of pixel size, and soon will be capable of high resolution. Visual observation of fault motion from space can also be used to detect fault motion from aerial photographs.

  6. Crustal Structure of Salton Trough using Deformable Layer Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, F.

    2012-12-01

    Salton Trough is an important geologic structure to understand the active rift between Imperial Fault and San Andreas Fault. To determine the underground geometry of Salton Trough and its nearby faults, we analyzed seismic phase data recorded by Southern California Earthquake Data Center (SCEDC). Both 2-D and 3-D models have been made to refine the velocity model so as to determine the basin and moho geometry beneath Salton Trough region. Here three inline and five cross-line velocity profiles were built by using 2D Deformable Layer Tomography (DLT) method. From these 2D profiles, we can see that the velocity gradient is very small in the low velocity zone. The low velocity anomaly can be detected beneath the axis of the Salton Trough around the depth of 19-21 km, and the relatively high velocity can be seen beneath the San Andreas faults. Within 100*150*40 km3 model volume, 90,180 P-wave and S-wave first arrival picks from 27,663 local events (from 2001 to 2012), which were obtained from 44 stations, were used to build 3D seismic velocity model of the crust. During the iterations of velocity updating, full 3-D ray tracing is implemented. From these 3-D velocity models with different sizes of grids, low velocity anomalies are present under the southwest of Salton Sea, while high velocity zone is present across Southern San Andreas Fault throughout all the depths. Profiles from 2-D velocity models compared to 3-D velocity models show similar geometry. 3-D crustal structure, which is determined from 3-D DLT, helps to better understand the divergent boundary between the North American and the Pacific tectonic plates

  7. Crust-mantle interactions and crustal deformations, some geological observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, Laurent; Clerc, Camille; Sternai, Pietro; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Faccenna, Claudio; Ringenbach, Jean-Claude; Gorini, Christian; Leroy, Sylvie; Pik, Raphaël

    2015-04-01

    Crustal deformations at plate boundaries or intracontinental are governed by the relative movements of plates, and most published models consider the lithosphere as the main stress guide in extensional or compressional contexts. The possible contribution of the underlying asthenospheric flow to crustal deformation through viscous coupling is often neglected. Since the early days of plate tectonics, and even earlier, two schools of thought have been developed in parallel whether mantle convection is considered or not. This reflects nowadays in the difficulty of reconciling lithospheric-scale models and global-scale convection models to explain tectonic features observed at the surface. Still, recent studies reemphasized the role of mantle convection in shaping mountain belts or rifts and the consequences of different styles of convection on the geometry and kinematics of mountain belts. We present here a number of geological observations in convergent or divergent contexts that may suggest a strong coupling between asthenospheric flow and crustal deformation. Several of these examples, especially in extensional contexts, show a deformation distributed over wide zones, accommodated by shallow-dipping shear zones and with a constant asymmetry over large distances. This is the case of the Mediterranean back-arc basins, such as the Aegean Sea, the northern Tyrrhenian Sea or the Alboran domain, where extension is taken up by shallow-dipping extensional shear zones and normal faults with a constant asymmetry. A similar image is also observed across the Gulf of Lion passive margin that also belongs to the Mediterranean back-arc basins. Such is also the case of some of the Atlantic passive margins where shallow-dipping normal faults and extensional shear zones control the extraction of the lower crust and the mantle with a constant asymmetry across the entire margin. Finally, the distribution and geometry of normal faults across the Afar region also show a constant

  8. Determination of Scotia - South America Relative Plate Motion and Crustal Deformation From GPS Geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalley, R.; Bevis, M.; Kendrick, E.; Dalziel, I.; Taylor, F.; Laurã, E.; Barriga, R.; Casassa, G.; Olivero, E.; Piana, E.

    2001-12-01

    We use Global Positioning System measurements to determine relative plate movements and crustal deformation across the Scotia - South America plate boundary. Our results clearly show active crustal deformation along the South America - Scotia transform boundary in eastern Tierra del Fuego. The 160 km subaerial section of the plate boundary there, to first order, is concentrated on a narrow region best modeled by a simple east-west oriented strike-slip plate boundary. We find no evidence for a significant component of active transpression or transtension between the South America and Scotia plates along this section of the plate boundary. The GPS data also enable us to estimate the first South America -Scotia pole that does not depend on closure for determination of the rotation rate.

  9. Geodynamics of crustal deformation and seismotectonic block movements in central Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. S.

    1984-01-01

    Geological observations reveal the style of neotectonic near-surface stresses and deformations in central Europe. Seismic activity, focal depths and fault plane solutions of earthquakes indicate kinematic reactions within the crust. A crustal deformation model which may account for the Rhine graben systems and the associated seismotectonic block movements in Europe is presented. A computer aided tomography to gravity anomalies is used in determining the crustal stresses in central Europe. Tomographical interpretations of gravity data with respect to seismic stresses are discussed. Kinematics and dynamics are integrated to show that the measured regional stresses in central Europe are derivable from the convection generated traction on the boundary of the elastic spherical shell of the crust as inferred from satellite derived gravity data.

  10. An assessment of the crustal remelting hypothesis for volcanism in the Freyja Montes deformation zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namiki, Noriyuki; Solomon, Sean C.

    1991-01-01

    The linear mountain belts of Ishtar Terra on Venus are notable for their topographic relief and slope and for the intensity of surface deformation. The mountains surround the highland plain Lakshmi Planum, the site of two major paterae and numerous other volcanic features and deposits, and evidence is widespread for volcanism within the mountains and in terrain immediately outward of the mountain belt units. While two hypotheses for magmatism can be distinguished on the basis of the chemistry of the melts, chemical data are presently lacking for the Ishtar region. The competing hypotheses for magmatism in Western Ishtar Terra can also be tested with thermal models, given a kinematic or dynamic model for the evolution of the region. The crustal remelting hypothesis is assessed, using the kinematic scenario of Head for the evolution of Freyja Montes. In that scenario, Freyja Montes formed by a sequence of large scale underthrusts of the lithosphere of the North Polar Plains beneath Ishtar Terra, with successive blocks of underthrust crust sutured in imbricate fashion onto the thickened crust of Lakshmi Planum and the mantle portion of underthrusting lithosphere episodically detached. The numerical experiments thus show that volcanic activity associated with the formation of the Frejya Montes deformation zone can be explained by crustal melting, due either to direct contact of crustal material with the hot asthenosphere or to heat generation in a thickened crustal layer.

  11. Active crustal deformation across the Basin and Range province, western United States, measured with the Global Positioning System, 1992-2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, W.; Thatcher, W.

    2003-04-01

    The Basin and Range province of the western United States is a region of active tectonic extension and dextral shear, accommodating roughly 25% of the motion between non-deforming North America (NA) and the Pacific Plate (PA). The orientation of dextral shear is consistent with that of NA/PA relative plate motion, suggesting that this high elevation interior province is an important part of the plate boundary system. We present an analysis of Global Positioning System (GPS) data collected from 1992 to 2002. An 800 km long network of campaign-style geodetic benchmarks extends from east of the Wasatch fault zone (WFZ) in central Utah to west of the Genoa fault zone and Lake Tahoe in the northern Sierra Nevada mountains. From the new data collected in September 2002 and from data collected in 1992, 1996, and 1998, velocities have been estimated at 92 GPS sites, nearly double the number previously presented by Thatcher et al. [1999]. This new data reduces the uncertainty in site velocities and increases the spatial detail compared to earlier results, and now allows resolution of distinct domains in the tensor strain rate field. To process the data we use the GIPSY/OASIS and Quasi-Observation Combination Analysis (Dong et al. [1998]) software packages and incorporate data from continuously recording GPS stations in California and Nevada. The results show that most of the approximately 12 mm/yr of Sierra Nevada block motion is accommodated by right lateral shear and extensional deformation concentrated in the westernmost 200 km of Nevada, in the vicinity of the Walker Lane (WL). A lesser amount of velocity variation (roughly 3 mm/yr) is localized at the easternmost edge of the network, in the vicinity of the Wasatch Fault Zone (WFZ). Estimates of tensor strain rates show transitions in the style of deformation. Near the WFZ only uniaxial, roughly east-west extension can be resolved. Between longitude -112 and -117.5 no deformation is resolvable. Near longitude -118, in

  12. The behavior of a convergent plate boundary - Crustal deformation in the South Kanto district, Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholz, C. H.; Kato, T.

    1978-01-01

    The northwesternmost part of the Sagami trough, a part of the Philippine Sea-Eurasian plate boundary, was ruptured during the great South Kanto earthquake in 1923. Very extensive and frequent geodetic measurements of crustal deformation have been made in the South Kanto district since the 1890's, and these constitute the most complete data set on crustal movements in the world. These data were reanalyzed and interpreted and according to our interpretation indicate the following sequence of events. The coseismic movements were due to oblique thrust and right lateral slip of about 8 m on a fault outcropping at the base of the Sagami trough. This was followed by postseismic deformation resulting from reversed afterslip of 20-60 cm that occurred at an exponentially decaying rate in time. The interseismic deformation is produced by steady subduction at a rate of about 1.8 cm/yr. During subduction the top 10-15 km of the plate boundary is apparently locked, while deeper parts slip aseismically at an irregular rate. No significant precursory deformation was observed. The recurrence time for 1923 type earthquakes is 200-300 years. The Boso and Miura peninsulas are broken into a series of fault-bound blocks that move semi-independently of the surrounding region. The subduction zone itself, where it is exposed on land, is shown to be a wide zone encompassing several faults that are active at different times.

  13. JERS-1 Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry Applications: Mapping of Rain Forest Environments and Crustal Deformation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, P.; Hensley, S.; Peltzer, G.; Rignot, E.; Werner, C.

    1999-01-01

    This research using JERS-1 SAR data has been very fruitful, resulting in a strong collaboration with geodesists and geophysicists in Japan, and several important papers characterizing crustal deformation, and the capabilities and limitations of JERS data for these studies.

  14. Crustal Seismic Anisotropy Produced by Rock Fabric Terranes in the Taiwan Central Range Deformational Orogen: Integrative Study Combining Rock Physics, Structural Geology, and Passive/Active-Source Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okaya, D. A.; Ross, Z.; Christensen, N. I.; Wu, F. T.; Byrne, T. B.

    2014-12-01

    The island of Taiwan is currently under construction due to the collision of the northwestern corner of the Philippine Sea plate and the embedded Luzon island arc with the larger continental Eurasian plate. This collision is responsible for the current growth of the Central Range that dominates the eastern half of the island. An international collaboration involving several USA and Taiwan universities and academic institutions was formed to study how the orogen evolves through time and to understand the role of a colliding island arc in mountain building. The project, Taiwan Integrated Geodynamics Research (TAIGER), was funded by NSF-Continental Dynamics and Taiwan National Science Council. The Central Range grows at one of the most rapid rates of uplift in the world, exposing metamorphic rocks that were once at least 10 km deep. The range offers unique opportunities for studies of crustal seismic anisotropy for two major reasons: (1) its geological makeup is conducive for producing crustal seismic anisotropy; that is, the rocks are highly foliated; and (2) a seismological data volume of significant breadth offers extensive coverage of sources and recording stations throughout the region. We carried out a crustal shear wave splitting study by data mining 3300 local earthquakes collected in the TAIGER 2009 sea-land experiment. We used an automated P and S wave arrival time picking method (Ross and Ben-Zion, 2014) applied to over 100,000 event-station pairs. These data were analyzed for shear-wave splitting using the MFAST automated package (Savage et al., 2010), producing 3300 quality shear wave split measurements. The splitting results were then station-averaged. The results show NNE to NE orientation trends that are consistent with regional cleavage strikes. Average crustal shear wave split time is 0.244 sec. These measurements are consistent with rock physics measurements of Central Range slate and metamorphic acoustic velocities. The splits exhibit orientations

  15. New GPS Constrains on Crustal Deformation within the Puerto Rico-Virgin Islands Microplate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solares, M. M.; Lopez, A. M.; Jansma, P. E.; Mattioli, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    Over twenty years of Global Positioning System (GPS) observations along the northeastern region of the Caribbean plate boundary zone have been used to evaluate crustal deformation in the Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands (PRVI) microplate, which generally translates westward relative to the Caribbean plate. New data from continuous GPS stations (cGPS) and re-occupied campaign GPS stations (eGPS) obtained between 2014 and 2015 allowed us to update the velocity field of the PRVI GPS Network and redefine the existing plate kinematics model of the PRVI microplate from previous measurements (Jansma et al., 2000; Jansma & Mattioli, 2005). Geodetic datasets for this epoch were processed with GIPSY/OASIS II (v.6.2) using an absolute point positioning strategy with final, precise orbits and clocks from JPL (IGS08). Results of sites velocity in the PRVI block are presented with respect to North America and Caribbean reference frames in ITRF08. The horizontal velocity components were used to calculate baseline lengths changes between selected GPS stations that span on-land faults and microplate boundaries, thus allowing quantification of internal deformation within the PRVI block. This enables us to locate zones of active deformation and faulting in order to understand how the relative motion between geological structures is accommodated. Our updated velocity field constrains intraplate deformation to 1-3 mm/yr across the PRVI microplate and active extension of 1-2 mm/yr in the Anegada passage eastern boundary. In addition, counterclockwise rotation has been observed and may be related to the deformation in southwestern Puerto Rico continuing offshore to the Muertos Trough along PRVI's southern boundary. Despite the PRVI microplate slow motion and small deformation, increasing velocities from east to west coincides with the most active microseismic zone and ongoing deformation in southwestern Puerto Rico suggesting independent motion along this segment of the PRVI block.

  16. Determining the cause of crustal deformation from observations of crustal tilt and extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, I.

    1983-09-01

    Observations of tilt, horizontal extensions and vertical extension of the crust have been performed in the Osakayama tunnel. The study seeks to identify the cause of crustal movements and to estimate the equivalent magnitude of associated earthquakes.

  17. Seasonal Loads, Crustal Deformation, and Seismicity in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heki, K.

    2001-12-01

    Heki (2001) found that snow loads over the Japan Sea side of the backbone range is responsible for the seasonal crustal deformation in northeastern Japan found by the Global Positioning System (Murakami and Miyazaki, 2001). It is known that earthquakes in and around Japan have a clear seasonality (Mogi, 1969). Ohtake & Nakahara (1999) confirmed statistical significance of the seasonality of interplate earthquakes at the Nankai-Suruga Trough (M>7.9) they concentrate in autumn/winter. Okada (1982) compiled inland historic earthquakes (M>7.0) and found that shallow earthquakes in the snow covered region preferentially occur in spring and summer. The latter may simply reflect the Coulomb failure function (CFF) increase in spring due to the unclamping of the fault by the removal of the snow load whose maximum reaches 10 kPa in February/March. Heki (2001), however, failed to verify the causal relation between snow loads and the seasonalily of the offshore interplate earthquake since a 10 kPa snow load could increase the CFF at plate interface by only 0.1 kPa. Stress for a typical interplate earthquake with 1 MPa stress drop and 100 yr recurrence interval, would be built up by 10 kPa/yr (Ohtake and Nakahara, 1999). A simple calculation shows that annual stress perturbation of a 1 kPa amplitude to this secular increase could cause a seasonality such that earthquakes occur > 4 times more frequently in the maximum month than in the minimum month, and that the maximum comes three months earlier than the CFF peak. Sea surface along the Pacific coast of Japan becomes highest in August-September, whose amplitude is > 10 cm even after thermal steric correction (Sato et al., 2001). This would cause a CFF increase of about 1 kPa in February-March (due mainly to the decrease in normal stress), which might be responsible for the observed maximum seismicity approximately three months earlier (Ohtake & Nakahara, 1999).

  18. Detection of crustal deformation from the Landers earthquake sequence using continuous geodetic measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bock, Y.; Agnew, D.C.; Fang, P.; Genrich, J.F.; Hager, B.H.; Herring, T.A.; Hudnut, K.W.; King, R.W.; Larsen, S.; Minster, J.-B.; Stark, K.; Wdowinski, S.; Wyatt, F.K.

    1993-01-01

    The measurement of crustal motions in technically active regions is being performed increasingly by the satellite-based Global Positioning System (GPS)1,2, which offers considerable advantages over conventional geodetic techniques3,4. Continuously operating GPS arrays with ground-based receivers spaced tens of kilometres apart have been established in central Japan5,6 and southern California to monitor the spatial and temporal details of crustal deformation. Here we report the first measurements for a major earthquake by a continuously operating GPS network, the Permanent GPS Geodetic Array (PGGA)7,9 in southern California. The Landers (magnitude Mw of 7.3) and Big Bear (Mw 6.2) earthquakes of 28 June 1992 were monitored by daily observations. Ten weeks of measurements, centred on the earthquake events, indicate significant coseismic motion at all PGGA sites, significant post-seismic motion at one site for two weeks after the earthquakes, and no significant preseismic motion. These measurements demonstrate the potential of GPS monitoring for precise detection of precursory and aftershock seismic deformation in the near and far field.

  19. Seismic evidence for widespread western-US deep-crustal deformation caused by extension

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moschetti, M.P.; Ritzwoller, M.H.; Lin, F.; Yang, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have established that many of the materials comprising the Earth are strongly anisotropic in terms of seismic-wave speeds. Observations of azimuthal and radial anisotropy in the upper mantle are attributed to the lattice-preferred orientation of olivine caused by the shear strains associated with deformation, and provide some of the most direct evidence for deformation and flow within the Earths interior. Although observations of crustal radial anisotropy would improve our understanding of crustal deformation and flow patterns resulting from tectonic processes, large-scale observations have been limited to regions of particularly thick crust. Here we show that observations from ambient noise tomography in the western United States reveal strong deep (middle to lower)-crustal radial anisotropy that is confined mainly to the geological provinces that have undergone significant extension during the Cenozoic Era (since 65 Myr ago). The coincidence of crustal radial anisotropy with the extensional provinces of the western United States suggests that the radial anisotropy results from the lattice-preferred orientation of anisotropic crustal minerals caused by extensional deformation. These observations also provide support for the hypothesis that the deep crust within these regions has undergone widespread and relatively uniform strain in response to crustal thinning and extension. ?? 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  20. Crustal wedge deformation in an internally-driven, numerical subduction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dinther, Ylona; Morra, Gabriele; Funiciello, Francesca; Rossetti, Federico; Faccenna, Claudio

    2010-05-01

    The Earth's active convergent margins are characterized by dynamic feedback mechanisms that interact to form an intricate system in which a crustal wedge is shaped and metamorphosed at the will of two large, converging plates. This framework is accompanied by complicated processes, such as seismogenesis and the exhumation of high pressure rocks. To honor the dynamic interaction between different entities and advance on these persisting issues, we model the interaction between the subducting and overriding lithospheres, the mantle and the crustal wedge explicitly, and observe how a crustal wedge evolves in detail within a set of rigid, internally-driven boundary conditions. We model crustal wedge evolution in an intra-oceanic subduction setting by using a plane-strain implicit solid-mechanical Finite Element Model, in which the mechanical conservation equations are solved using the software package ABAQUS. The crustal wedge is modeled as a thick-skinned accretionary wedge of inter-mediate thickness with a linear visco-elastic bulk rheology. The dynamic interaction between the subducting plate, the overriding plate, and crustal wedge is implemented using a Coulomb frictional algorithm. The interaction with the mantle is incorporated using a computationally favorable mantle drag formulation that simulates induced three-dimensional mantle flow. This results in a quasi-static framework with a freely moving slab, trench, and fault, where a weaker wedge deforms in response to self-regulating, rigid boundary conditions formed by single, frictional bounding faults. The self-regulating evolution of crustal wedge architecture follows three phases; 1) initial vertical growth, 2) coeval compression and extension leading to internal corner flow, and 3) a steady-state taper with continuous corner flow. Particle trajectories show that, as shortening continues throughout the second phase, wedge material is constantly forced upward against the backstop, while extension and ocean

  1. Detection of crustal deformation prior to the 2014 Mt. Ontake eruption by the stacking method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyaoka, Kazuki; Takagi, Akimichi

    2016-04-01

    The phreatic eruption of Mt. Ontake in central Japan occurred in September 27, 2014. No obvious crustal deformation was observed prior to the eruption, and the magnitudes of other precursor phenomena were very small. In this study, we used the stacking method to detect crustal deformation prior to the eruption. The stacking method is a technique to improve the signal-to-noise ratio by stacking multiple records of crustal deformation. We succeeded in detecting a slight crustal deformation caused by a volume change in the shallow region beneath the volcano's summit from 1 month prior to the eruption. We also detected a slight crustal deformation that may have been caused by a volume increase in the deep region from one and a half months before the eruption. The magnitude of the volume change in the shallow region did not differ significantly in the 2014 eruption compared to the volume change during the small Mt. Ontake eruption in 2007, and the volume change in the deep region was rather smaller in 2014 than in 2007.

  2. Active mantle flow and crustal dynamics in southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fay, N.; Bennett, R.; Spinler, J.

    2007-12-01

    We present numerical modeling analysis of active upper mantle flow and its role in driving crustal deformation in southern California. The forces driving lithospheric deformation at tectonic plate boundaries can be thought of as the sum from two sources: (1) forces transmitted from the far-field by rigid tectonic plates, and (2) forces created locally at the plate boundary by heterogeneous density distribution. Here we quantify the latter by estimating the stresses acting on the base of the crust caused by density-driven flow of the upper mantle. Anomalous density structure is derived from shear wave velocity models (Yang & Forsyth, 2006) and is used to drive instantaneous incompressible viscous upper mantle flow relative to a fixed crust; this allows isolation of stresses acting on the crust. Comparison of results with the finite element codes Abaqus (commercial) and GALE (community- developed) is good. We find that horizontal tractions range from 0 to ~3 MPa and vertical tractions range between approximately -15 to 15 MPa (negative indicating downward, positive upward); Absolute magnitudes depend on the assumed velocity-density scaling relationship but the overall patterns of flow are more robust. Anomalous density beneath the Transverse Ranges, in particular beneath the San Bernardino Mountains and offshore beneath the Channel Islands, drives convergent horizontal tractions and negative vertical tractions on the base of the crust there. Anomalous buoyancy beneath the southern Walker Lane Belt and anomalous density beneath the southern Great Valley create a small convective cell (the Sierra Nevada "drip"), which promotes extension on the eastern edge of the Sierra Nevada block and subsidence of the Great Valley. Favorable comparison with contemporary crustal thickness, heat flow, and surface strain rate indicates that upper mantle flow plays a very important role in active crustal deformation in southern California and much of the non-ideal behavior of this

  3. GPS measurements of crustal deformation across the northern Apennines, northern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, R. A.; Elosegui, P.; Normandeau, J. E.; Serpelloni, E.

    2003-12-01

    Continuous GPS stations within and around the northern Apennines, northern Italy, provide sparse but very precise constraints on crustal deformation associated with Africa, Eurasia, and Adriatic plate interactions. We analyzed data acquired by these stations during the time period of 1996 to 2003.5, finding distributed northwest range-parallel crustal shortening, totaling some 2 mm/yr, and northeast directed crustal extension across the Apennines hinterland, totaling 2.5--3.0 mm/yr or more. Extensional strain rates vary as a function of latitude within the northern Apennines, with higher strain rates across a narrow belt in the central part of the northern Apennines (latitude ˜43N) and lower strain rates across a broader zone further north (latitude ˜44N). Northeast directed crustal extension is prominent in the geology and seismicity of the Apennines hinterland, and forms an important observational basis for contemporary geodynamical models describing present-day deformation processes in northern Italy. Range-parallel crustal shortening is less well understood, however, because there are very few geological or seismological indicators of northwest directed crustal shortening for the northern Apennines. On the other hand, combined paleomagnetic and tomographic inferences suggest that the northern Apennines is an orocline, achieving its arcuate shape as a result of progressive bending of an originally straight orogen. The rates and patterns of range-parallel deformation may thus provide important new constraints on geodynamical models for this complex region.

  4. Active Crustal Deformation in the Area of San Carlos, Baja California Sur, Mexico as Shown by Data of Local Earthquake Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munguía, Luis; González-Escobar, Mario; Navarro, Miguel; Valdez, Tito; Mayer, Sergio; Aguirre, Alfredo; Wong, Victor; Luna, Manuel

    2015-12-01

    earthquakes can occur along the coastline of Baja California, at 60 km east of the Tosco-Abreojos fault system. We conclude that transtensional deformation is taking place across a wide zone of the Pacific margin of Baja California. Finally, we point out that although the studied earthquakes were of small magnitude, they might serve as a reminder of the danger that future larger events pose to San Carlos.

  5. Active Crustal Deformation in the Area of San Carlos, Baja California Sur, Mexico as Shown by Data of Local Earthquake Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munguía, Luis; González-Escobar, Mario; Navarro, Miguel; Valdez, Tito; Mayer, Sergio; Aguirre, Alfredo; Wong, Victor; Luna, Manuel

    2016-10-01

    earthquakes can occur along the coastline of Baja California, at 60 km east of the Tosco-Abreojos fault system. We conclude that transtensional deformation is taking place across a wide zone of the Pacific margin of Baja California. Finally, we point out that although the studied earthquakes were of small magnitude, they might serve as a reminder of the danger that future larger events pose to San Carlos.

  6. Crustal deformation in southern California using SAR interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peltzer, G.; Rosen, P.; Rogez, F.; Hudnut, K.

    1997-01-01

    By combining pairs of ERS-1/2 SAR images of Southern California spanning long time intervals (1-4 years), we were able to measure the rate of slow deformation processes along faults activated during the Landers 1992 earthquake. Interferograms revealed several centimeters of post-seismic rebound in step-overs of the 1992 break, with a characteristic decay rate of -280 days. We interpreted this process as due to pore fluid flow as pore pressure gradients caused by coseismic stress changes dissipate. The data also revealed evidence of after-slip on different sections of the fault. The southern branches of the 1992 break experienced surface creep producing sharp phase cuts hi the interferometric maps. The same approach was used in the Los Angeles basin, which is currently undergoing NS shortening at a rate of ???8 mm/yr. The tectonic signal in imerferograms of the Los Angeles basin is intermingled with signals due to other sources such as ground subsidence caused by oil and water withdrawal.

  7. Crustal deformation in the eastern margin of Tibet: Implications for earthquake generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.

    2015-12-01

    The Longmen-Shan fault zone, at the eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau, is one of the most extensively studied areas in the world, yet the deformation model and earthquake-generating mechanism remain subjects of vigorous debate. We present the three-dimensional (3-D) velocity models determined using a large volume of seismic data, together with the crustal stress and GPS data analysis, to investigate the nuclei of crustal deformation and earthquake generation along the reverse-thrust and strike-slip fault zone. It has been observed that anomalously low velocity, with low resistivity related to the Sichuan foreland basin, is in sharp contrast to high-velocity and high-resistivity anomalies in the Songpan-Ganze block in the upper crust. The tomographic models presented here reveal two crustal bodies with anomalously low velocity and high conductivity in the fault zone, separated into three contrasting segments by the two crustal bodies. The two low-velocity and low-resistivity bodies have been interpreted as being associated with extrusion of either fluids or products of partial melting from the lower crust and/or the upper mantle from Tibet. Our seismic imaging, crustal stress and GPS data analysis indicates that the 2008 Wenchuan and 2013 Lushan earthquakes occurred in the distinct areas with high-velocity, low-Poisson's ratio and high crustal stress. The high velocity seismogenic layer that enables the accumulation of high crustal stress for large zone at the hypocenter sources may reflect the earthquake generation. We consider that the slow velocity gap zone is associated with fluid-bearing ductile flow from the lower crustal materials of Tibet being pushed into the weakened segment of the Longmen-Shan fault zone, which suggests strong variations in the rheological strength of the rock in the eastern margin of Tibet. This finding implies that coupling between these presumably fluid-bearing bodies and earthquake generation could be extremely complex.

  8. Subduction Related Crustal and Mantle Deformations and Their Implications for Plate Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okeler, Ahmet

    Ocean-continent convergence and subsequent continental collision are responsible for continental growth, mountain building, and severe tectonic events including volcanic eruptions and earthquake activity. They are also key driving forces behind the extensive thermal and compositional heterogeneities at crustal and mantle depths. Active subduction along the Calabrian Arc in southern Italy and the Hellenic Arc are examples of such collisional tectonics. The first part of this thesis examines the subduction related deformations within the crust beneath the southern Apennines. By modeling regional surface wave recordings of the largest temporary deployment in the southern Apennines, a lower-crustal/upper-mantle low-velocity volume extending down to 50 km beneath the mountain chain is identified. The magnitude (˜ 0.4 km/s slower) and anisotropic nature (˜ 10%) of the anomaly suggest the presence of hot and partially molten emplacement that may extend into the upper-crust towards Mt. Vulture, a once active volcano. Since the Apulian basement units are deformed during the compressional and consequent extensional events, our observations favor the "thick-skin" tectonic growth model for the region. In the deeper mantle, active processes are thermodynamically imprinted on the depth and strength of the phase transitions. This thesis examines more than 15000 SS precursors and provides the present-day reflectivity structure and topography associated with these phase transitions. Through case studies I present ample evidence for both slab penetration into the lower mantle (beneath the Hellenic Arc, Kurile Island and South America) and slab stagnation at the bottom of the Mantle Transition Zone (beneath the Tyrrhenian Sea and eastern China). Key findings include (1) thermal anomalies (˜ 200 K) at the base of the MTZ, which represent the deep source for Cenozoic European Rift Zone, Mount Etna and Mount Cameroon volcanism, (2) significant depressions (by 20-40 km) at the bottom

  9. Crustal Deformation and Seismicity in Southern Bavaria revealed by GNSS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Völksen, C.; Hackl, M.

    2012-04-01

    A geodetic network consisting of approximately 30 GNSS stations in Southern Bavaria, bordered by the Alps and the river Danube within Bavaria, has been analysed over the past 5 years. The network itself consists of several GNSS stations that have been installed for crustal deformation studies in the Bavarian Alps, some sites of the EUREF Permanent Network (EPN) and mainly stations of the GNSS network of the Bavarian Office for Surveying and Geographic Information. The later stations mainly serve for real-time positioning at the 1 cm level for engineering surveys, land register, aerial imagery and other surveying applications. For these sites it is crucial that the data are permanently available, reliable, integrity monitored and well maintained. Since the focus of these sites is not crustal deformation monitoring they are continuously modernized and the equipment is regularly exchanged to fulfil the most recent real-time standards, which in turn provokes frequent coordinate jumps due to the systematic biases caused by the different GNSS antennas or receivers. It is therefore necessary to analyse the time series of the coordinate changes very carefully in order to estimate a reliable mean velocity along with the uncertainty for each site with frequent position shifts within the entire observation period. The derived geodetic velocity models can be used to identify rotations of the continental crust or even active geological features. In addition 2-D strain rate tensors have been derived based on the geodetic velocity model. The analysis of the tensors provide strain characteristics like dilatation and shear strain rates, which in turn support the seismic hazard assessment. Based on the analysed data, two areas of high strain rates have been identified that agree very well with the observed seismicity in Bavaria.

  10. Crustal Deformation in the Southwestern Gulf of Mexico: Underthrusting of the Gulf of Mexico beneath Tehuantepec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, Gerardo; Aguilar, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    An array of 45 broad band sensors were installed along the Isthmus of Tehuantepec in southeastern. This experiment, called VEOX, was implemented on August 2007 to March 2009. Data were registered continuously during the whole period. In order to search in the seismic records of the data obtained for crustal events in the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, To this purpose, an STA/LTA algorithm was designed to detect earthquakes with S-P times indicating they occurred close the seismic stations, at crustal or upper mantle depths. During the 18 months that the experiment lasted, about 40 crustal earthquakes were recorded in more than three stations, allowing us to determine a hypo central location. All earthquakes occurring at depths greater than 120 km, within the subjected slab, were discarded. The majority of this crustal or upper mantle activity occurred in the northern part of the Isthmus, along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico or just inland from it. No velocity model exists in the area. Therefore, we tested three different velocity models, including one obtained in an adjacent region and based on seismic refraction data. One of these three models rendered the more stable solutions and smaller errors in the hypocentral locations and was used as the local seismic velocity model. In order to improve the quality of the locations, we experimented using a double difference hypocentral algorithm (HYPODD). There was no noticeable improvement in the quality of the hypocenters using this technique. The best located events suggest a southwestern-dipping zone of seismic seismicity, deepening from the Gulf of Mexico towards the interior of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec. The focal mechanisms of the earthquakes indicate the maximum axis of compresion (P axis) is oriented nearly horizontally and in a southwest-northeast direction. These mechanisms are similar to those observed for earthquakes previously studied in the region on the basis of teleseismic data, such as the Mw 6.9, 29 August

  11. Contrasted terrace systems of the lower Moulouya valley as indicator of crustal deformation in NE Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rixhon, Gilles; Bartz, Melanie; El Ouahabi, Meriam; Szemkus, Nina; Brueckner, Helmut

    2016-04-01

    The Moulouya river has the largest catchment in Morocco and drains an area which is characterized by active crustal deformation during the Late Cenozoic due to the convergence between the African and Eurasian plates. As yet, its Pleistocene terrace sequence remains poorly documented. Our study focuses on the lowermost reach of the river in NE Morocco, which drains the Triffa sedimentary basin directly upstream of the estuary. New field observations, measurements and sedimentological data reveal contrasted fluvial environments on either side of a newly identified thrust zone, which disrupts the whole sedimentary basin and is associated with N-S compressive shortening in this region (Barcos et al., 2014). Long-lasting fluvial aggradation, materialized by ≥37 m-thick stacked fill terraces, and the development of a well-preserved terrace staircase, with (at least) three Pleistocene terrace levels, occur in the footwall and the hanging wall of the thrust, respectively. Same as for the Pleistocene terrace sediments of the middle Moulouya, a recurrent sedimentary pattern, characterized by fining-upward sequences was observed in the studied terrace profiles. Assessing the rates of crustal deformation along this main thrust zone requires age estimations for these Pleistocene terrace deposits of the lower Moulouya on each side of the thrust. Samples for luminescence (OSL/IRSL), electron spin resonance (ESR, on quartz) and cosmogenic nuclide dating (26Al/10Be, burial dating) were collected in terrace deposits located both in the foot- and hanging walls. Sample preparation and analysis as well as age determination are in progress. The preliminary data mentioned above, soon to be completed by chronological data, agree well with morphometric indicators stating that the whole Moulouya catchment is at disequilibrium state (Barcos et al., 2014). This is confirmed by several knickpoints in its longitudinal profile. Late Cenozoic uplift associated with crustal shortening, which

  12. Groundwater pressure changes and crustal deformation before and after the 2007 and 2014 eruptions of Mt. Ontake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Naoji; Sato, Tsutomu; Kitagawa, Yuichi; Ochi, Tadafumi

    2016-03-01

    Volcanic activity generally causes crustal deformation, which sometimes induces groundwater changes, and both of these phenomena are sometimes detected before volcanic eruptions. Therefore, investigations of crustal deformation and groundwater changes can be useful for predicting volcanic eruptions. The Geological Survey of Japan, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, has been observing groundwater pressure at Ohtaki observatory (GOT) since 1998. GOT is about 10 km southeast of the summit of Mt. Ontake. During this observation period, Mt. Ontake has erupted twice, in 2007 and in 2014. Before the 2007 eruption, the groundwater pressure at GOT clearly dropped, but it did not change before or after the 2014 eruption. These observations are consistent with the crustal deformation observed by Global Navigation Satellite System stations of the Geospatial Information Authority of Japan. The difference between the 2007 and 2014 eruptions can be explained if a relatively large magma intrusion occurred before the 2007 eruption but no or a small magma intrusion before the 2014 eruption.

  13. Models for rupture mechanics of plate boundaries and crustal deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nur, A.

    1983-01-01

    The role of pull aparts and pushups in transcurrent systems, the rotation of faults and blocks within transcurrent fault systems, the role of accretion tectonics in plate boundary deformation, and power law creep behavior and the yielding at plate boundaries were investigated.

  14. Measuring Crustal Deformation Caused by the Nepal (Gorkha) Earthquake Using ALOS-2 SAR Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishita, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Yarai, H.

    2015-12-01

    A huge earthquake (Mw 7.8, USGS) occurred on 25 April, 2015 in Nepal, followed by the largest aftershock (Mw 7.3, USGS) on 12 May. We applied an InSAR technique to detect crustal deformation caused by the earthquakes using L-band SAR data acquired by ALOS-2. One of the advantages of ALOS-2 over ALOS is ScanSAR interferometry. Beam synchronization, which is a critical factor for ScanSAR interferometry, is always tuned among ALOS-2 observations. While a width of 350 km is covered by a ScanSAR acquisition, the provided data is divided into five swaths with each width of 70 km. Adjacent swaths have an overlapping area with a width of several kilometers, where interferometric phases for two swaths are basically comparable. We processed each swath independently. Preliminary interferograms are contaminated by noises with long wavelength, which makes it difficult to measure the amount of the crustal deformation accurately. We reduce the noises by following steps. First, pseudo reference points with no displacement are put at intervals of 40-100 km outside of the possible deforming area. The differential phase at the points are assumed to be due to the noises. The curved surface of the noises is estimated by smoothly interpolating the differential phase at the points. Note that the pseudo reference points should be located in a high coherence area where the phases can be unwrapped. Furthermore the points in the overlapping area between adjacent swaths allow to preserve consistency of the phases between adjacent swaths. The interferograms show the clear and detailed crustal deformation (published on http://www.gsi.go.jp/cais/topic150429-index-e.html). The maximum of a quasi up-down component of the deformation estimated from the interferograms with different beam directions reaches over 1.4 m uplift at 20 km northeast from Kathmandu and 0.6 m subsidence at a northern part of the deforming area.

  15. Comparing tiltmeters for crustal deformation measurement--a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, F; Bilham, R; Beavan, J; Sylvester, A G; Owen, T; Harvey, A; Macdonald, C; Jackson, D D; Agnew, D C

    1984-10-01

    A collection of high-precision tiltmeters is being operated at Pinon Flat Observatory, southern California, both to compare instruments and to measure tectonic deformation. We report on 1.2 years of data from four of these: two Michelson-Gale long fluid tiltmeters, one long center-pressure tiltmeter, and a shallow borehole tiltmeter. The three long-base instruments are all located on the same baseline, with a precise leveling line running between their end-monuments. At nontidal frequencies, only the two Michelson-Gale instruments show some coherence (gamma 2 = .3 for periods of 2 to 4 days), while the center-pressure instrument is correlated with air temperature at periods from a few days to a few weeks. The most stable tilt record shows a secular rate of 0.28 mu rad/a, which may be real. Over much longer times, leveling to specially stabilized bench-marks should confirm this. Comparing instruments has identified more and less successful measurement techniques; it appears that low-noise data will most probably be produced only by relatively complex and expensive instruments, though even for these, the operating costs over any reasonable lifetime will exceed the capital cost. Even the best existing sensors must be improved to measure continuous tectonic motions. PMID:11541998

  16. Comparing tiltmeters for crustal deformation measurement--a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, F; Bilham, R; Beavan, J; Sylvester, A G; Owen, T; Harvey, A; Macdonald, C; Jackson, D D; Agnew, D C

    1984-10-01

    A collection of high-precision tiltmeters is being operated at Pinon Flat Observatory, southern California, both to compare instruments and to measure tectonic deformation. We report on 1.2 years of data from four of these: two Michelson-Gale long fluid tiltmeters, one long center-pressure tiltmeter, and a shallow borehole tiltmeter. The three long-base instruments are all located on the same baseline, with a precise leveling line running between their end-monuments. At nontidal frequencies, only the two Michelson-Gale instruments show some coherence (gamma 2 = .3 for periods of 2 to 4 days), while the center-pressure instrument is correlated with air temperature at periods from a few days to a few weeks. The most stable tilt record shows a secular rate of 0.28 mu rad/a, which may be real. Over much longer times, leveling to specially stabilized bench-marks should confirm this. Comparing instruments has identified more and less successful measurement techniques; it appears that low-noise data will most probably be produced only by relatively complex and expensive instruments, though even for these, the operating costs over any reasonable lifetime will exceed the capital cost. Even the best existing sensors must be improved to measure continuous tectonic motions.

  17. Surface effects of Rayleigh-Taylor instability: Feedback between drip dynamics and crustal deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Currie, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    For many continental plates, significant vertical motion of Earth's surface has occurred within the plate interior which can not be clearly linked to plate tectonic processes. For example, several craton areas exhibit anomalous basins, e.g., the Williston basin, Illinois basin and Michigan basin in North America. In orogenic belts, there are examples of local areas (~100 km wide) where the surface has undergone subsidence and then uplift of >1 km, such as the Arizaro basin (central Andes) and Wallowa Mountains (northeast Oregon). Given the near-circular shape of the surface deflection, it has been suggested that they may be related to gravitational foundering of dense lower lithosphere, i.e., Rayleigh-Taylor instability (or 'RT drip'). In order to investigate the surface effects of an RT drip, we use two methods: (1) 2D thermal-mechanical numerical models to study links between drip dynamics and crustal deformation and (2) a theoretical analysis of the crustal deformation induced by stresses from the RT drip. The numerical models consist of a continental lithosphere overlying a sublithospheric mantle. A high-density material is placed in the mantle lithosphere or lower crust to initiate a drip event, and a stress-free boundary condition allows the development of surface topography during model evolution. A reasonable range of crustal viscosity and thickness is tested to study the RT drip in different tectonic settings, from a cold craton to a hot orogen with thick crust. Four types of surface deflection are observed: (1) subsidence; (2) subsidence followed by uplift; (3) uplift; and (4) little deflection. When the crust is relatively strong or thin, the surface has a negative elevation, forming a basin. For a weak or thick crust, the RT drip induces crustal flow, leading to crustal thickening that can uplift the surface; an extremely weak crust decouples the surface and RT drip and the surface is unperturbed. Our theoretical analysis considers the surface

  18. Block rotations, fault domains and crustal deformation in the western US

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nur, Amos

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the project was to develop a 3D model of crustal deformation by distributed fault sets and to test the model results in the field. In the first part of the project, Nur's 2D model (1986) was generalized to 3D. In Nur's model the frictional strength of rocks and faults of a domain provides a tight constraint on the amount of rotation that a fault set can undergo during block rotation. Domains of fault sets are commonly found in regions where the deformation is distributed across a region. The interaction of each fault set causes the fault bounded blocks to rotate. The work that has been done towards quantifying the rotation of fault sets in a 3D stress field is briefly summarized. In the second part of the project, field studies were carried out in Israel, Nevada and China. These studies combined both paleomagnetic and structural information necessary to test the block rotation model results. In accordance with the model, field studies demonstrate that faults and attending fault bounded blocks slip and rotate away from the direction of maximum compression when deformation is distributed across fault sets. Slip and rotation of fault sets may continue as long as the earth's crustal strength is not exceeded. More optimally oriented faults must form, for subsequent deformation to occur. Eventually the block rotation mechanism may create a complex pattern of intersecting generations of faults.

  19. The GIS of the Central Apennines Geodetic Network (CA-GeoNet): Database Description and Application for Crustal Deformation Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristofoletti, P.; Esposito, A.; Anzidei, M.; Galvani, A.; Baldi, P.; Pesci, A.; Casula, G.; Serpelloni, E.; Basili, R.

    2002-12-01

    During the last few years we set up and surveyed a GPS geodetic network to investigate the active tectonic areas of the Central Apennine, using a combination of permanent and not-permanent geodetic stations. The final goal is to evaluate the geodetic strain rate and the coseismic deformations of this seismically active area. For an optimal management and mapping of the CA-GeoNet (Central Apennine Geodetic Network) a Geographical Information System (GIS) has been developed. The GIS is used to analyze geodetic sources and improve the analysis of crustal deformations and has been realized on PC platform using MapInfo 6.0 and ArcGIS8.1 software. The GIS manages an SQL database consisting of different classes (Geodesy, Topography, Geography, Seismicity and Geology) administrated according to Thematic Layers. A GIS is required for the multidisciplinary approach and management of large multi-scaled data set, geographically referenced and with continuos or discrete coverage; it is particularly designed to analyze GPS sources and to improve crustal deformation analysis related with tectonic structures and seismicity. Through GIS we can display site displacements, strain rate maps and create new layers gained by numerical and spatial analysis. A tailor-made application to support co-seismic deformation scenarios related with historical and instrumental earthquakes and seismic sources, has been created. Our procedures can be successfully applied to design new geodetic networks in seismically active areas with respect to the known seismotectonic features. This dynamic approach in planning and managing GPS networks for geodynamic applications provides a useful tool for geophysical research, earthquake impact and civil protection management.

  20. Interseismic Crustal Deformation in and around the Atotsugawa Fault System, Central Japan, Detected by InSAR and GNSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Y.; Sagiya, T.; Nishimura, T.

    2015-12-01

    Interseismic crustal deformation of active faults provides crucial information to understand the stress accumulation process on the fault planes. Recently, the interseismic surface movements are detected with very high spatial resolution using combination of InSAR and GNSS survey. Most of the successful reports, however, addressed the fault creep in less vegetated area which enables C-band SAR interferometry. In this study, we report the interseismic crustal deformation in and around the Atotsugawa fault system, a strike-slip active fault in central Japan. This area is covered with dense vegetation in summer and with heavy snow in winter. We created a series of InSAR images acquired by ALOS/PALSAR and applied SBAS based time-series analysis (Berardino et al., 2002) to extract small deformation. Next, we corrected the long wave-length phase trend by GNSS network maintained by Japanese University Group (e.g, Ohzono et al., 2011) and GSI, Japan. The mean velocity field thus obtained shows a strain concentration zone along the Ushikubi fault, a major strand of the Atotsugawa fault system. The Ushikubi fault is seismically less active than the Atotsugawa fault, but it shows good correlation with a zone of large spatial gradient of Bouguer gravity anomaly. We further discuss on the deformation style at the junction between the Atotsugawa fault and the Hida mountain range (Tateyama volcano). Acknowledgement: The PALSAR level 1.0 data were provided by JAXA via the PALSAR Interferometry Consortium to Study our Evolving Land surface (PIXEL) based on a cooperative research contract between JAXA and the ERI, the University of Tokyo. The PALSAR product is owned by JAXA and METI.

  1. Analysis of crustal deformation and strain characteristics in the Tianshan Mountains with least-squares collocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S. P.; Chen, G.; Li, J. W.

    2015-11-01

    By fitting the observed velocity field of the Tianshan Mountains from 1992 to 2006 with least-squares collocation, we established a velocity field model in this region. The velocity field model reflects the crustal deformation characteristics of the Tianshan reasonably well. From the Tarim Basin to the Junggar Basin and Kazakh platform, the crustal deformation decreases gradually. Divided at 82° E, the convergence rates in the west are obviously higher than those in the east. We also calculated the parameter values for crustal strain in the Tianshan Mountains. The results for maximum shear strain exhibited a concentration of significantly high values at Wuqia and its western regions, and the values reached a maxima of 4.4×10-8 a-1. According to isogram distributions for the surface expansion rate, we found evidence that the Tianshan Mountains have been suffering from strong lateral extrusion by the basin on both sides. Combining this analysis with existing results for focal mechanism solutions from 1976 to 2014, we conclude that it should be easy for a concentration of earthquake events to occur in regions where maximum shear strains accumulate or mutate. For the Tianshan Mountains, the possibility of strong earthquakes in Wuqia-Jiashi and Lake Issyk-Kul will persist over the long term.

  2. Changes in crustal seismic deformation rates associated with the 1964 Great Alaska earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doser, D.I.; Ratchkovski, N.A.; Haeussler, P.J.; Saltus, R.

    2004-01-01

    We calculated seismic moment rates from crustal earthquake information for the upper Cook Inlet region, including Anchorage, Alaska, for the 30 yr prior to and 36 yr following the 1964 Great Alaska earthquake. Our results suggest over a factor of 1000 decrease in seismic moment rate (in units of dyne centimeters per year) following the 1964 mainshock. We used geologic information on structures within the Cook Inlet basin to estimate a regional geologic moment rate, assuming the structures extend to 30 km depth and have near-vertical dips. The geologic moment rates could underestimate the true rates by up to 70% since it is difficult determine the amount of horizontal offset that has occurred along many structures within the basin. Nevertheless, the geologic moment rate is only 3-7 times lower than the pre-1964 seismic moment rate, suggesting the 1964 mainshock has significantly slowed regional crustal deformation. If we compare the geologic moment rate to the post-1964 seismic moment rate, the moment rate deficit over the past 36 yr is equivalent to a moment magnitude 6.6-7.0 earthquake. These observed differences in moment rates highlight the difficulty in using seismicity in the decades following a large megathrust earthquake to adequately characterize long-term crustal deformation.

  3. The 10 April 2014 Earthquake in Central Nicaragua: Evidence of Complex Crustal Deformation in Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, G.; Muñoz, A.; Talavera, E.; Tenorio, V.; Farraz, I.; Novelo-Casanova, D. A.; Sánchez, A.

    2014-12-01

    On 10 April 2014 a magnitude Mw 6.1 struck central Nicaragua. The main event and the aftershocks were clearly recorded by the Nicaraguan seismic network. These crustal earthquakes were strongly felt but caused relatively little damage to the city of Managua and to the surrounding cities and towns. This is in sharp contrast to the destructive effects of the 1972 earthquake in the capital city of Managua. The differences in damage stem from the fact that in 1972, the earthquake occurred on a fault beneath the city; in contrast, the 2014 event lies offshore, under Lake Managua. The distribution of aftershocks shows two clusters of seismic activity. In the northwestern part of Lake Managua, an alignment of aftershocks suggests a southeast trending fault. The reported source mechanism suggests right-lateral strike slip motion on a plane with the same azimuth as the aftershock sequence. A second cluster of seismic activity occurred simultaneously, but spatially separated, beneath Apoyeque volcano. There is no clear alignment of the epicenters in this cluster. Seismic scaling relations between magnitude and the fault length predict a length of approximately 10 km for an earthquake of this magnitude. This is in agreement with the extent of the fault defined by the aftershock sequence. The northeast - southwest trending Tiscapa and Ciudad Jardín faults that broke during the 1972 and 1931 Managua earthquakes are orthogonal to the fault where the 10 April earthquake occurred. This set of conjugate faults confirms that Central Nicaragua is being deformed in a complex tectonic style of deformation. The forearc sliver between the trench and the volcanic arc moves to the northwest relative to the Caribbean plate. This deformation, however, does not take place on a single set of faults. The motion is apparently accommodated by a system of conjugate faults: right lateral, strike-slip faults oriented parallel to the volcanic arc and another set of faults trending northeast

  4. Spectral comparison of continuous Global Positioning System and strainmeter measurements of crustal deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tralli, David M.

    1991-01-01

    Temporal power spectral density models of noise in continuous crustal deformation measurements obtained with the Global Positioning System (GPS) and high-quality strainmeters are compared. The crossover frequency at which GPS measurement noise is less than that of strainmeters is determined. Assuming GPS precision of 0.1 to 1 cm in horizontal components for baselines up to 100 km in length, local deformation monitoring with GPS may be preferable to strainmeters for observations of short-term deformation in under 6 months of continuous (at least daily) measurements. Short-period tropospheric path delays and multipath effects, which may obscure GPS-determined strain signals in local network measurements, also are discussed.

  5. Evidence of Crustal Faulting and Deformation in the Muckleshoot Basin, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, J.; Wolf, L. W.

    2015-12-01

    The Muckleshoot basin of western Washington, sandwiched between the Seattle Uplift on the west and the Cascade Range on the east, is deforming under north-south shortening and clockwise rotation of the north Cascadia forearc. Accommodating the regional strain are crustal faults in the Puget Lowland that cluster around three azimuths: east-west, northwest-southeast, and north-northwest-south-southeast. Evidence for all three groups appears on the periphery of the Muckleshoot basin. In this study, we add gravity measurements to an existing database to better define the geometry of the Muckleshoot basin and its relation to previously mapped faults appearing on the basin margins. A northwest-trending gravity high bisects the basin into two sub-basins, a larger one to the south and a smaller one to the north. We suggest that the gravity high is associated with a deep basement structure and its orientation is consistent with northward-directed crustal shortening. Regional-residual separation methods and derivative maps show pronounced magnetic lineations that extend faults expressed along the basin margins to east-west trending faults that cross the Puget Sound. Three intersecting cross-sectional models produced for this study are consistent with the following hypotheses: (1) the northwest-trending White River and Green River faults mapped on the eastern basin margin appear as south-verging, steeply dipping reverse faults in the central basin; (2) the north-northwest trending Franklin fault, mapped previously as a strike-slip fault, projects into the basin and shows little vertical offset in the single profile it crosses, and (3) the northwest trajectory of both the White River and Green River faults appears to curve southward as the faults traverse the Muckleshoot basin, following east-west oriented gravity and magnetic anomalies that cross the Puget Sound. Results from the study suggest that the faults and folds in Muckleshoot basin are actively interacting with other

  6. Seasonal Mass Changes and Crustal Vertical Deformations Constrained by GPS and GRACE in Northeastern Tibet.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yuanjin; Shen, Wen-Bin; Hwang, Cheinway; Liao, Chaoming; Zhang, Tengxu; Zhang, Guoqing

    2016-01-01

    Surface vertical deformation includes the Earth's elastic response to mass loading on or near the surface. Continuous Global Positioning System (CGPS) stations record such deformations to estimate seasonal and secular mass changes. We used 41 CGPS stations to construct a time series of coordinate changes, which are decomposed by empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs), in northeastern Tibet. The first common mode shows clear seasonal changes, indicating seasonal surface mass re-distribution around northeastern Tibet. The GPS-derived result is then assessed in terms of the mass changes observed in northeastern Tibet. The GPS-derived common mode vertical change and the stacked Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mass change are consistent, suggesting that the seasonal surface mass variation is caused by changes in the hydrological, atmospheric and non-tidal ocean loads. The annual peak-to-peak surface mass changes derived from GPS and GRACE results show seasonal oscillations in mass loads, and the corresponding amplitudes are between 3 and 35 mm/year. There is an apparent gradually increasing gravity between 0.1 and 0.9 μGal/year in northeast Tibet. Crustal vertical deformation is determined after eliminating the surface load effects from GRACE, without considering Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) contribution. It reveals crustal uplift around northeastern Tibet from the corrected GPS vertical velocity. The unusual uplift of the Longmen Shan fault indicates tectonically sophisticated processes in northeastern Tibet. PMID:27490550

  7. Seasonal Mass Changes and Crustal Vertical Deformations Constrained by GPS and GRACE in Northeastern Tibet

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yuanjin; Shen, Wen-Bin; Hwang, Cheinway; Liao, Chaoming; Zhang, Tengxu; Zhang, Guoqing

    2016-01-01

    Surface vertical deformation includes the Earth’s elastic response to mass loading on or near the surface. Continuous Global Positioning System (CGPS) stations record such deformations to estimate seasonal and secular mass changes. We used 41 CGPS stations to construct a time series of coordinate changes, which are decomposed by empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs), in northeastern Tibet. The first common mode shows clear seasonal changes, indicating seasonal surface mass re-distribution around northeastern Tibet. The GPS-derived result is then assessed in terms of the mass changes observed in northeastern Tibet. The GPS-derived common mode vertical change and the stacked Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mass change are consistent, suggesting that the seasonal surface mass variation is caused by changes in the hydrological, atmospheric and non-tidal ocean loads. The annual peak-to-peak surface mass changes derived from GPS and GRACE results show seasonal oscillations in mass loads, and the corresponding amplitudes are between 3 and 35 mm/year. There is an apparent gradually increasing gravity between 0.1 and 0.9 μGal/year in northeast Tibet. Crustal vertical deformation is determined after eliminating the surface load effects from GRACE, without considering Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) contribution. It reveals crustal uplift around northeastern Tibet from the corrected GPS vertical velocity. The unusual uplift of the Longmen Shan fault indicates tectonically sophisticated processes in northeastern Tibet. PMID:27490550

  8. Seasonal Mass Changes and Crustal Vertical Deformations Constrained by GPS and GRACE in Northeastern Tibet.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yuanjin; Shen, Wen-Bin; Hwang, Cheinway; Liao, Chaoming; Zhang, Tengxu; Zhang, Guoqing

    2016-01-01

    Surface vertical deformation includes the Earth's elastic response to mass loading on or near the surface. Continuous Global Positioning System (CGPS) stations record such deformations to estimate seasonal and secular mass changes. We used 41 CGPS stations to construct a time series of coordinate changes, which are decomposed by empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs), in northeastern Tibet. The first common mode shows clear seasonal changes, indicating seasonal surface mass re-distribution around northeastern Tibet. The GPS-derived result is then assessed in terms of the mass changes observed in northeastern Tibet. The GPS-derived common mode vertical change and the stacked Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mass change are consistent, suggesting that the seasonal surface mass variation is caused by changes in the hydrological, atmospheric and non-tidal ocean loads. The annual peak-to-peak surface mass changes derived from GPS and GRACE results show seasonal oscillations in mass loads, and the corresponding amplitudes are between 3 and 35 mm/year. There is an apparent gradually increasing gravity between 0.1 and 0.9 μGal/year in northeast Tibet. Crustal vertical deformation is determined after eliminating the surface load effects from GRACE, without considering Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) contribution. It reveals crustal uplift around northeastern Tibet from the corrected GPS vertical velocity. The unusual uplift of the Longmen Shan fault indicates tectonically sophisticated processes in northeastern Tibet.

  9. Fault locking, block rotation and crustal deformation in the Pacific Northwest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCaffrey, R.; Qamar, A.I.; King, R.W.; Wells, R.; Khazaradze, G.; Williams, C.A.; Stevens, C.W.; Vollick, J.J.; Zwick, P.C.

    2007-01-01

    We interpret Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements in the northwestern United States and adjacent parts of western Canada to describe relative motions of crustal blocks, locking on faults and permanent deformation associated with convergence between the Juan de Fuca and North American plates. To estimate angular velocities of the oceanic Juan de Fuca and Explorer plates and several continental crustal blocks, we invert the GPS velocities together with seafloor spreading rates, earthquake slip vector azimuths and fault slip azimuths and rates. We also determine the degree to which faults are either creeping aseismically or, alternatively, locked on the block-bounding faults. The Cascadia subduction thrust is locked mainly offshore, except in central Oregon, where locking extends inland. Most of Oregon and southwest Washington rotate clockwise relative to North America at rates of 0.4-1.0?? Myr-1. No shear or extension along the Cascades volcanic arc has occurred at the mm/yr level during the past decade, suggesting that the shear deformation extending northward from the Walker Lane and eastern California shear zone south of Oregon is largely accommodated by block rotation in Oregon. The general agreement of vertical axis rotation rates derived from GPS velocities with those estimated from palaeomagnetic declination anomalies suggests that the rotations have been relatively steady for 10-15 Ma. Additional permanent dextral shear is indicated within the Oregon Coast Range near the coast. Block rotations in the Pacific Northwest do not result in net westward flux of crustal material - the crust is simply spinning and not escaping. On Vancouver Island, where the convergence obliquity is less than in Oregon and Washington, the contractional strain at the coast is more aligned with Juan de Fuca-North America motion. GPS velocities are fit significantly better when Vancouver Island and the southern Coast Mountains move relative to North America in a block

  10. Quaternary crustal deformation along a major branch of the San Andreas fault in central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weber, G.E.; Lajoie, K.R.; Wehmiller, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    Deformed marine terraces and alluvial deposits record Quaternary crustal deformation along segments of a major, seismically active branch of the San Andreas fault which extends 190 km SSE roughly parallel to the California coastline from Bolinas Lagoon to the Point Sur area. Most of this complex fault zone lies offshore (mapped by others using acoustical techniques), but a 4-km segment (Seal Cove fault) near Half Moon Bay and a 26-km segment (San Gregorio fault) between San Gregorio and Point Ano Nuevo lie onshore. At Half Moon Bay, right-lateral slip and N-S horizontal compression are expressed by a broad, synclinal warp in the first (lowest: 125 ka?) and second marine terraces on the NE side of the Seal Cove fault. This structure plunges to the west at an oblique angle into the fault plane. Linear, joint0controlled stream courses draining the coastal uplands are deflected toward the topographic depression along the synclinal axis where they emerge from the hills to cross the lowest terrace. Streams crossing the downwarped part of this terrace adjacent to Half Moon Bay are depositing alluvial fans, whereas streams crossing the uplifted southern limb of the syncline southwest of the bay are deeply incised. Minimum crustal shortening across this syncline parallel to the fault is 0.7% over the past 125 ka, based on deformation of the shoreline angle of the first terrace. Between San Gregorio and Point Ano Nuevo the entire fault zone is 2.5-3.0 km wide and has three primary traces or zones of faulting consisting of numerous en-echelon and anastomozing secondary fault traces. Lateral discontinuities and variable deformation of well-preserved marine terrace sequences help define major structural blocks and document differential motions in this area and south to Santa Cruz. Vertical displacement occurs on all of the fault traces, but is small compared to horizontal displacement. Some blocks within the fault zone are intensely faulted and steeply tilted. One major block 0

  11. Crustal deformation measurements in central Japan determined by a Global Positioning System fixed-point network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimada, Seiichi; Bock, Yehuda

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented from temporally dense measurements of crustal deformation associated with the convergence of the Eurasian (EUR), Pacific, North American, and Philippine Sea (PHS) plates, carried out in April 1988 by a 10-station GPS fixed-point network established in central Japan. Using regional orbit relaxation methods, the analysis of the first 17-month data revealed significant horizontal deformation across the Suruga trough. Namely, it was found that a site in the northern tip of PHS plate moved nearly westward with a velocity of 28 +/-5 mm per year, and a site at the southeastern tip of EUR plate moved south-southwestward with a velocity of 18 +/-5 mm per year. A significant vertical uplift with a velocity of 20 mm/yr was detected at a site inland of the Tokai district located in the Akaishi uplift zone and at a site on the Hatsushima Island in Sagami Bay.

  12. Late Cenozoic crustal deformation of the north-central Basin and Range

    SciTech Connect

    Eyal, Y. . Dept. of Geology); Ron, H. )

    1993-04-01

    Late Cenozoic deformation of Basin and Range in north-central Nevada is examined by small fault analysis. Consistency between fault types, fault trends and sense of displacement was found for this area in which normal faults strike N-S, and right-lateral and left-lateral faults strike NNW and NNE respectively. The existence of strike-slip faulting, mainly right-lateral, is consistent with horizontal counter clockwise rotation suggested by paleomagnetic declination data. The results of this analysis indicate that crustal deformation of this area did not occur by only simple E-W uniaxial extension but also by N-S compression and shortening, and that the contribution of strike slip faulting to the extension of this area is substantial almost similar to that of normal faulting.

  13. Studies of crustal deformation due to hydrological loading on GPS height estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajner, Marcin; Liwosz, Tomasz

    2011-01-01

    The paper deals with large-scale crustal deformation due to hydrological surface loads and its influence on seasonal variation of GPS estimated heights. The research was concentrated on the area of Poland. The deformation caused by continental water storage has been computed on the basis of WaterGAP Hydrological Model data by applying convolution of water masses with appropriate Green's function. Obtained site displacements were compared with height changes estimated from GPS observations using the Precise Point Positioning (PPP) method. Long time series of the solutions for 4 stations were used for evaluation of surface loading phenomena. Good agreement both in amplitude and phase was found, however some discrepancies remain which are assigned to single point positioning technique deficiencies. Annual repeatability of water cycle and demanding procedure for computing site displacements for each site, allowed to develop a simple model for Poland which could be applied to remove (or highly reduce) seasonal hydrological signal from time series of GPS solutions.

  14. Seismicity and Seismic Hazards in Eastern Canada: Needs from Crustal Deformation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, J.

    2004-05-01

    events are the most important for deciding the hazard and also contribute almost all of the seismic deformation. The pattern of contemporary crustal deformation could be definitive, and furthermore its rates could constrain the frequency of large earthquakes and their maximum size, both key factors in assessing the seismic hazard.

  15. Short note: Crustal deformation in the key stone network detected by satellite laser ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillak, S.; Wnuk, E.; Kunimori, H.; Yoshino, T.

    2006-03-01

    The paper presents the results of crustal deformation, as evidenced by changed station coordinates, in the Tokyo metropolitan area detected by the satellite laser ranging (SLR) technique. The coordinates of two Key Stone SLR stations, Tateyama and Kashima, were determined from 4 weeks of orbital arcs of the LAGEOS-1 and LAGEOS-2 satellites with respect to 16 SLR stations kept fixed in the ITRF2000 reference frame. The station coordinates were calculated using the NASA GEODYN-II orbital program. The orbital RMS-of-fit for both satellites was 16 mm. The standard deviation of the estimated positions was 3 mm. A jump of about 5 cm in the baseline length between the Kashima and Tateyama stations was detected in June August 2000 by VLBI and GPS techniques. This work confirms this crustal deformation as determined by SLR and vice versa. Analysis of coordinates of these stations shows that this effect was caused by a 4.5-cm displacement of the Tateyama station in the north-east direction. The change in the vertical component was not significant.

  16. Viscoelastic deformation near active plate boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, S. N.

    1986-01-01

    Model deformations near the active plate boundaries of Western North America using space-based geodetic measurements as constraints are discussed. The first six months of this project were spent gaining familarity with space-based measurements, accessing the Crustal Dynamics Data Information Computer, and building time independent deformation models. The initial goal was to see how well the simplest elastic models can reproduce very long base interferometry (VLBI) baseline data. From the Crustal Dynamics Data Information Service, a total of 18 VLBI baselines are available which have been surveyed on four or more occasions. These data were fed into weighted and unweighted inversions to obtain baseline closure rates. Four of the better quality lines are illustrated. The deformation model assumes that the observed baseline rates result from a combination of rigid plate tectonic motions plus a component resulting from elastic strain build up due to a failure of the plate boundary to slip at the full plate tectonic rate. The elastic deformation resulting from the locked plate boundary is meant to portray interseismic strain accumulation. During and shortly after a large interplate earthquake, these strains are largely released, and points near the fault which were previously retarded suddenly catch up to the positions predicted by rigid plate models. Researchers judge the quality of fit by the sum squares of weighted residuals, termed total variance. The observed baseline closures have a total variance of 99 (cm/y)squared. When the RM2 velocities are assumed to model the data, the total variance increases to 154 (cm/y)squared.

  17. 4-D crustal structure of the conterminous U.S.: Continental assembly, crustal growth, and deformation history from receiver functions, xenoliths, and structural mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte-Pelkum, V.; Mahan, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate seismic and geological features related to the tectonic evolution of the crust on a continent-wide scale. We present continent-wide features using Transportable Array data receiver function analysis, followed by regional comparisons to tie to ground truth from xenolith studies and structural mapping. We stress that the Transportable Array, at ~75 km station spacing, only offers a collection of point measurements of the crust due to the lack of crossing raypaths. 7.x layers (lower crust with high seismic velocities) can be created during crustal growth processes such as magmatic or mechanical underplating and during crustal modification such as large-scale melting. We present receiver function results and a compilation of previous regional studies using refraction data or receiver functions from regional dense networks. 7.x layers appear predominantly in parts of the northern U.S. Cordillera and across the southeastern U.S. We compare the seismic results with a xenolith study in Montana that details incremental growth of the 7.x layer from the Archean on. Hydration of a granulitic lower crust can destroy the 7.x layer and has the potential to cause epirogenic uplift. We interpret the pattern seen across the Transportable Array in the light of this hypothesis. Ductile deformation of the deep crust generates shear fabrics that can be detected seismically. Receiver functions detect shear zones via contrasts in foliation to the surrounding material. We map foliation strikes and depths in the crust across the Transportable Array using azimuthal analysis of receiver functions. Strikes from receiver functions typically align with surface fault traces in tectonically active regions, with depths of the converters exceeding the brittle zone. We discuss continent-wide strikes mapped with receiver functions. Contrasting orientations of Proterozoic shear zones and pervasive surrounding foliations in basement exposures in Colorado are reflected in seismic results

  18. Evidence for Along-Strike Variations in the Crustal Deformation beneath the Bhutan Himalaya from Receiver Function Imaging and Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, J.; Kissling, E. H.; Diehl, T.; Hetényi, G.

    2015-12-01

    In the Bhutan Himalaya seismicity and geologic surface features like the Kuru Chu Spur (an embayment of the Main Central Thrust) or the Paro window indicate along-strike variations in the collisional structure. The deeper structure of the orogenic wedge and associated deformation processes, however, are poorly understood partly due to the lack of seismic images of the crust. To better understand these differences in structure and deformation, we use data of a temporary seismic broadband network in Bhutan to image the crustal structure with receiver functions (RF). We apply an iterative 3D wave-based migration scheme including a high-frequency ray approximation, which satisfies Snell's law for dipping interfaces. With this approach we image variably dipping intra-crustal interfaces and the Moho topography across the Bhutan Himalaya, and identify lateral variations in the orogenic structure, which we interpret jointly with a new local earthquake catalog. In West Bhutan, RF imaging depicts a northward dipping Moho at ~50 km depth. The low-angle dip steepens north of ~27.6°N which matches well observations by wide-angle seismics in South Tibet and the hypocenter of a deep crustal earthquake recorded by our network. We also identify the Main Himalayan Thrust (MHT) at ~14 km depth in West Bhutan with a ramp-like structure north of ~27.6°N. The ramp is characterized by a negative impedance contrast in the RF signals and coincides with a concentration of seismicity. In the East, the Moho appears to be almost flat at a depth of ~50 km without clear indications of steepening towards north. Beneath the Kuru Chu Spur in East Bhutan, we observe listric-shaped structures reaching from the upper crust beneath the Lesser Himalaya down to the Moho beneath the Greater Himalaya, which we interpret as a stack of crustal material typical for an accretionary wedge. While these structures appear aseismic, a horizontal alignment of seismicity at ~12 km depth suggests an active MHT in

  19. Crustal deformation at the Nankai Trough estimated from seafloor geodetic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, T.; Tadokoro, K.; Ikuta, R.; Okuda, T.; Nagai, S.; Kuno, M.

    2012-12-01

    The Philippine Sea plate subducts beneath the southwest Japan along the Nankai Trough with a rate of about 4-6 cm/yr, where megathrust earthquakes have repeatedly occurred every 100-150 years. Because the region expected to be the hypocentral area of next Nankai and Tonankai earthquakes is almost located in offshore area, it is important to know the spatio-temporal variation of crustal deformation accompanied with plate interaction in high precision. For this issue, we have conducted seafloor geodetic observation at the Nankai Trough using a GPS/Acoustic technique since 2004. In this system, we estimate the position of a surveying vessel by Kinematic GPS analysis and measure the distance between the vessel and the benchmark on the seafloor by Acoustic measurements. Next we determine the location of the benchmark. For the repeatability of this observation, the location of benchmark is determined within a precision of 2-3 cm at horizontal components. Several seafloor benchmarks are located at the Nankai Trough, which are individually operated by Japan Coast Guard, Tohoku University, and Nagoya University. In the Kumano Basin, we have three seafloor benchmarks located about 60-80 km away from the deformation front of the Nankai Trough. The observations from 2005 to 2011 have illustrated that those benchmarks are moving at rates of about 4 cm/yr toward west-northwest with velocity uncertainties of about 2 cm/yr relative to the Amurian plate. In this study, to explain the crustal deformation derived from seafloor geodetic observations especially at the shallower part of the Nankai Trough, we conduct numerical simulations using finite element method and then discuss the interplate coupling at the Nankai Trough.

  20. A Simulation of crustal deformation around sourthwest Japan using 3D Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oma, T.; Ito, T.; Sasajima, R.

    2015-12-01

    In southwest Japan, the Philippine Sea plate is subducting beneath the Amurian plate at the Nankai Trough. Megathrust earthquakes have been occurred with recurrence intervals of about 100-150 years. Previous studies have estimated co-seismic slip distribution at the 1944 Tokankai and the 1946 Nankai earthquakes and interplate plate coupling along the Nankai Trough. Many of previous studies employed a homogeneous elastic half space or elastic and viscoelastic layers structure. However, these assumptions as mentioned above are inadequate, since inhomogeneous structure is exceled in the real earth result from subducting plate. Therefore, in order to estimate the effect of inhomogeneous structure on the crustal deformation, we calculate crustal deformation due to Megathrust earthquake using 3-dimensional Finite Element Method (FEM). We use FEM software PyLith v2.1. In this study, we construct a finite element mesh with the region of 3000km(SW) × 2300km(NS) × 400km(depth) cover Japanese Islands, using Cubit 13.0. This mesh is considered topography, the Philippine Sea plate, the Pacific plate, Moho discontinuity, and curvature of the earth. In order to examine differences of surface displacement between inhomogeneous and homogeneous structures, we use co-seismic slip distribution of the 1944 and 1946 earthquakes estimated by Sagiya and Thatcher (1999). In result, surface elastic response under inhomogeneous structure becomes 30% larger than it's homogeneous structure at the Muroto cape. This difference indicates that co-seismic slip or plate coupling distribution estimated from Green's function under an assumption of homogeneous structure is overestimated. Then, we calculate viscoelastic response assuming Maxwell rheology model and viscosity as 1×1019. As a result, predicted horizontal velocity of viscoelastic response due to the events corresponds to 10 % of observed present deformation. It suggest that spatial pattern of plate coupling might be change when we

  1. Mapping Shear Zones, Faults, and Crustal Deformation Fabric With Receiver Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte-Pelkum, V.; Mahan, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    Dipping faults, shear zones, and pervasive anisotropic crustal fabric due to deformation are all capable of generating strong near-station mode conversions of teleseismic body waves, even for weak (a few percent) velocity anisotropy. These conversions can be found using the receiver function technique. Dipping foliation and dipping isotropic velocity contrasts can occur in isolation or together in deformed crust. Both generate receiver function arrivals that have a characteristic periodicity with azimuth. Different fixed azimuthal phase shifts between radial and tangential component receiver functions distinguish dipping or tilted structure and fabric from horizontal axis anisotropy. We demonstrate a method that uses these characteristics to map geologically relevant information such as strike and depth of foliation of dipping isotropic velocity contrasts and of horizontal symmetry axis anisotropy contrasts. The method uses waveforms without matching them via forward modeling, which makes choices such as slow versus fast axis symmetry and isotropic dip versus anisotropic axis tilt unnecessary. It also does not use shear wave splitting of the converted waves, which is more difficult to isolate. We show results from the continental U.S. and Canada and from the collision zones in the Himalaya and Tibetan Plateau and Taiwan. We discuss interpretation of our results in the light of recent laboratory measurements of deformed crustal rocks and contributions to the seismic signal from individual minerals such as micas, amphiboles, and quartz. Our observations are connected to geological ground truth by using structural maps and sample anisotropy determined using electron backscatter diffraction from exhumed deep crust in the Athabasca granulite province to predict the seismic signal from present-day deep crust. We also discuss the reconciliation of measurements from anisotropic receiver functions, surface waves, and split shear waves.

  2. Involving Undergraduates and K-14 Teachers in Research: Measuring and Modeling Crustal Deformation in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryxell, J. E.; Hams, J.; Barley, M.; Hobart, K.; Ramirez, J.; McGill, S.; Lyzenga, G.

    2003-12-01

    With funding from the NSF OEDG, we initiated a project to: (1) involve undergraduate students and K-14 teachers to research in geology, and (2) use GPS to monitor deformation across the plate boundary zone in southern California, and to model partitioning on specific faults that account for that deformation in the upper crust. Starting in July 2002, we collected campaign-style GPS data twice a year from 13 sites along a line across the San Andreas and San Jacinto faults near CSUSB. Our field crews have included 43 students and teachers in our three campaigns to date. These include 30 undergraduate and 3 graduate students, 1 middle school and 8 high school teachers, and 1 community college professor. We are also modeling site velocities from the SCEC Crustal Deformation Velocity Map. Our preliminary results are presented in session ED14 at this meeting. Our most recent campaign (June 2003) was expanded to include workshops. As before, the field crews got one day of hands-on training in setup and operation of the geodetic-quality receivers and antennae. In addition, we held a one-day workshop before the campaign on the active tectonics of southern California, elastic rebound theory, and the scientific goals of the project. After the campaign another one-day workshop was held to plot GPS position results from previous campaigns for a station crew members had occupied during the campaign, and to estimate a velocity for that station. Participants also tried modeling SCEC site velocity data from a transect across the San Andreas, San Jacinto and Elsinore faults. Four of the co-authors on this abstract were campaign participants, and have continued to work with faculty on processing our data and on modeling SCEC data. Students (geology and other majors) felt that participation in the campaign stimulated their interest in geology, and that their participation was a worthwhile experience. Most students are interested in participating in upcoming campaigns, and would

  3. Interaction between crustal tectonics and salt deformation in the Eastern Sardinian margin, Western Tyrrhenian Sea: seismic data and analogue modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vendeville, Bruno; Lymer, Gael; Gaullier, Virginie; Chanier, Frank; Maillard, Agnes; Sage, Françoise; Lofi, Johanna; Thinon, Isabelle

    2014-05-01

    The Tyrrhenian Basin opened by eastward migration of the Apennine subduction system. Rifting along the Eastern Sardinian margin started during the middle to late Miocene times and hence this timing partly overlapped the Messinian Salinity Crisis. The two "METYSS" cruises were conducted to use the deformation of the Messinian salt and its Plio-Quaternary overburden as a proxy for better delineating the tectonic history of the sub-salt basement. Many parts of the study area contain two of the most typical Messinian series of the Western Mediterranean: the Mobile Unit (MU; salt, mainly halite), overlain by the more competent Upper Unit (UU: alternating dolomitic marls and anhydrite). The brittle Plio-Quaternary cover overlies the UU. Usually, the presence of mobile salt is viewed as a nuisance for understanding crustal tectonics because salt's ability to act as a structural buffer between the basement and the cover. However, we illustrate, using examples from the Cornaglia Terrace, how we can use thin-skinned salt tectonics as indicators of vertical movements in the sub-salt, pre-Messinian basement. There, slip along N-S-trending crustal normal faults bounding basement troughs has been recorded by salt and overburden in two different manners: - First, post-salt basement faulting (typically after deposition of the Upper Unit and the early Pliocene), and some crustal-scale southward tilting, triggered along-strike (southward) thin-skinned, gliding of salt and overburden recorded by upslope extension and downslope shortening. - Second, and less obvious at first glance, there was some crustal activity along another basement trough, located East of the Baronie Ridge after deposition of the Messinian salt. This trough is narrow, trends N-S and is bounded by crustal faults. The narrow width of the trough allowed for only minor across-strike (E-W) gliding. The resulting geometry would suggest that nothing happened after Messinian times, but some structural features (confirmed

  4. Deformation Partitioning Processes in a Mid-crustal Detachment System, the Ketilidian Orogen, South Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffrey, K.; Grocott, J.; Garde, A.; Hamilton, M.; Chadwick, B.

    2001-12-01

    The upper crust in convergent margins is commonly segmented into fault-bounded blocks or terranes. The mechanism(s) by which orogen-parallel movement and/or rotation of these blocks takes place in convergent margins remains an open question. Models require sub-horizontal detachments within or at the base of the lithosphere in addition to vertical strike-parallel boundaries. We present an example of an exposed mid-crustal detachment system in which vertical and lateral deformation partitioning can be demonstrated. We present a model of how the detachment system developed and suggest that it provides one possible mechanism for decoupling in cordilleran-style orogenic belts. Continental growth by juvenile magmatic arc processes is typified by the Palaeoproterozoic (c.1800 Ma) Ketilidian orogen which formed in response to oblique convergence between an oceanic plate and an Archaean craton. The core of this orogen is a 100-200 km wide, NE-trending continental magmatic arc, the Julianehaab batholith (JB), that was constructed by calc-alkaline magmas emplaced between c.1855-1795 Ma. To the south-east beyond the outboard margin of the batholith, the Psammite (PsZ) and Pelite Zones (PeZ) with a minimum width of c. 100 km, comprise deformed and metamorphosed arkosic, calcareous, semipelitic, pelitic and minor metavolcanic rocks, with an estimated pre-erosional thickness of over 15 km. These zones are collectively interpreted as the relics of a forearc basin. Transpression during early deformation (D1) was partitioned into sinistral strike-slip in the magmatic arc rocks of the JB and SE-directed thrusting in the sedimentary and volcaniclastic sequences of the proximal forearc (PsZ). Subsequently, D1 fabrics in the PsZ were overprinted and transposed in an intense, flat-lying, D2 ductile shear zone with arc-parallel stretching lineations and top-ENE kinematic indicators. The D2 shear zone is interpreted as a mid-crustal partitioning detachment that lay beneath a domain of

  5. Extraction of Crustal Deformation from Seafloor Hydraulic Pressure Gauges: A trial collaboration study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyoshi, Keisuke; Nagano, Akira; Hasegawa, Takuya; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Kido, Motoyuki; Igarashi, Toshihiro; Uchida, Naoki; Nakata, Ryoko; Yamashita, Yusuke

    2016-04-01

    , we propose a new interpretation of seismic plate coupling around the Tonankai region along the Nankai Trough, and discuss how to detect it by using the DONET data effectively. In the future, we have to extract the crustal deformation component by separating other components such as instrumental drift and oceanic changes as an integral study collaborated by seismology, geodesy, physical oceanography, and mechanical engineering.

  6. The InSAR Italy portal for open access to crustal deformation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvi, Stefano; Tolomei, Cristiano; Pezzo, Giuseppe; Lanari, Riccardo; Pepe, Antonio; Marchetti, Pier Giorgio; Della Vecchia, Andrea; Mantovani, Simone

    2014-05-01

    InSAR Italy is a web portal devised to provide open access services to crustal deformation data measured using multitemporal SAR Interferometry techniques over the Italian territory. It is an evolution of the VELISAR initiative, promoted in 2006 by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, and originally participated by IREA-CNR and TRE srl. InSAR Italy was developed tailoring the Multi-sensor Evolution Analysis (MEA) environment, an Earth Observation and geospatial data analysis tool empowered with OGC standard interfaces. The web interface allows an easy browsing of the ground deformation maps obtained for each satellite image dataset, leading to a clear picture and improved analysis of the displacement time series over single pixels or large areas. Web Coverage Service (WCS) and Web Coverage Processing Service (WCPS) are used to access and process the maps, respectively. The crustal deformation data are provided by INGV and IREA-CNR as products of publicly-funded research projects, and are disseminated in compliance with the national legislation on the Open Data Access; metadata associated to the products are published according to the INSPIRE specifications. The information provided through InSAR Italy is mainly based on InSAR data maintained in the ESA archives, in particular from the ERS satellites for the 1992-2000 period, and ENVISAT for the period 2003-2010, however, ground velocity maps obtained from COSMO-SkyMed data will also be released in the near future. The InSAR Italy deformation maps consist of time series of ground displacement at resolution varying between 5 and 80 m, and the relative mean velocity values. The data sets can be queried and mean velocities can be recalculated over user-defined time periods, to account for possible non-linear displacement trends. The MEA spatiotemporal data analysis capability allows to investigate deformation phenomena occurring at very different spatial scales, from single buildings to entire regions

  7. Crustal deformation, the earthquake cycle, and models of viscoelastic flow in the asthenosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.; Kramer, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    The crustal deformation patterns associated with the earthquake cycle can depend strongly on the rheological properties of subcrustal material. Substantial deviations from the simple patterns for a uniformly elastic earth are expected when viscoelastic flow of subcrustal material is considered. The detailed description of the deformation pattern and in particular the surface displacements, displacement rates, strains, and strain rates depend on the structure and geometry of the material near the seismogenic zone. The origin of some of these differences are resolved by analyzing several different linear viscoelastic models with a common finite element computational technique. The models involve strike-slip faulting and include a thin channel asthenosphere model, a model with a varying thickness lithosphere, and a model with a viscoelastic inclusion below the brittle slip plane. The calculations reveal that the surface deformation pattern is most sensitive to the rheology of the material that lies below the slip plane in a volume whose extent is a few times the fault depth. If this material is viscoelastic, the surface deformation pattern resembles that of an elastic layer lying over a viscoelastic half-space. When the thickness or breath of the viscoelastic material is less than a few times the fault depth, then the surface deformation pattern is altered and geodetic measurements are potentially useful for studying the details of subsurface geometry and structure. Distinguishing among the various models is best accomplished by making geodetic measurements not only near the fault but out to distances equal to several times the fault depth. This is where the model differences are greatest; these differences will be most readily detected shortly after an earthquake when viscoelastic effects are most pronounced.

  8. GPS-based crustal deformations in Azerbaijan and their influence on seismicity and mud volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadirov, F. A.; Guliyev, I. S.; Feyzullayev, A. A.; Safarov, R. T.; Mammadov, S. K.; Babayev, G. R.; Rashidov, T. M.

    2014-11-01

    Using Shen's method (Shen et al., 1996), deformations of the Earth's crust in Azerbaijan were studied based on GPS measurements. For estimating the rate of deformation, we used the field of velocity vectors for Azerbaijan, Iran, Georgia, and Armenia that were derived from GPS measurements during 1998-2012. It is established that compression is observable along the Greater Caucasus, in Gobustan, the Kura depression, Nakhchyvan Autonomous Republic, and adjacent areas of Iran. The axes of compression/contraction of the crust in the Greater Caucasus region are oriented in the S-NE direction. The maximum strain rate (approximately 200 × 10-9 per annum) is documented in the zone of mud volcanism at the SHIK site (Shykhlar), which is marked by a sharp change in the direction of the compression axes (SW-NE). It is revealed that the deformation field also includes the zones where strain rates are very low approximating 5 × 10-9 per annum. These zones include the Caspian-Guba and northern Gobustan areas, characterized by extensive development of mud volcanism. The extension zones are confined to the Lesser Caucasus and are revealed in the Gedabek (GEDA) and Shusha (SHOU) areas, as well as in the zone located between the DAMO and PIRM sites (Iran), where the deformation rate amounts to 100 × 10-9 per annum. It is concluded that the predominant factor responsible for the eruption of mud volcanoes is the intensity of gas-generation processes in the earth's interior, while deformation processes play the role of a trigger. The zone of the epicenters of strong earthquakes is correlated to the gradient zone in the crustal strain rates.

  9. Optimal combination of InSAR and GPS for measuring interseismic crustal deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Meng; Sandwell, David; Smith-Konter, Bridget

    2010-07-01

    High spatial resolution measurements of interseismic deformation along major faults are critical for understanding the earthquake cycle and for assessing earthquake hazard. We propose a new remove/filter/restore technique to optimally combine GPS and InSAR data to measure interseismic crustal deformation, considering the spacing of GPS stations in California and the characteristics of interseismic signal and noise using InSAR. To constrain the longer wavelengths (>40 km) we use GPS measurements, combined with a dislocation model, and for the shorter wavelength information we rely on InSAR measurements. Expanding the standard techniques, which use a planar ramp to remove long wavelength error, we use a Gaussian filter technique. Our method has the advantage of increasing the signal-to-noise ratio, controlling the variance of atmosphere error, and being isotropic. Our theoretical analysis indicates this technique can improve the signal-to-noise ratio by up to 20%. We test this method along three segments of the San Andreas Fault (Southern section near Salton Sea, Creeping section near Parkfield and Mojave/Big Bend section near Los Angeles), and find improvements of 26%, 11% and 8% in these areas, respectively. Our data shows a zone of uplift to the west of the Creeping section of the San Andreas Fault and an area of subsidence near the city of Lancaster. This work suggests that after only 5 years of data collection, ALOS interferograms will provide a major improvement in measuring details of interseismic deformation.

  10. Present-day crustal deformation in China constrained by global positioning system measurements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q; Zhang, P Z; Freymueller, J T; Bilham, R; Larson, K M; Lai, X; You, X; Niu, Z; Wu, J; Li, Y; Liu, J; Yang, Z; Chen, Q

    2001-10-19

    Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements in China indicate that crustal shortening accommodates most of India's penetration into Eurasia. Deformation within the Tibetan Plateau and its margins, the Himalaya, the Altyn Tagh, and the Qilian Shan, absorbs more than 90% of the relative motion between the Indian and Eurasian plates. Internal shortening of the Tibetan plateau itself accounts for more than one-third of the total convergence. However, the Tibetan plateau south of the Kunlun and Ganzi-Mani faults is moving eastward relative to both India and Eurasia. This movement is accommodated through rotation of material around the eastern Syntaxis. The North China and South China blocks, east of the Tibetan Plateau, move coherently east-southeastward at rates of 2 to 8 millimeters per year and 6 to 11 millimeters per year, respectively, with respect to the stable Eurasia. PMID:11641493

  11. Synchronous b-value change and crustal deformation following the 2007 Noto Peninsula Earthquake, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, T.

    2013-12-01

    Although a large number of studies have been made on temporal (and/or spatial) change in earthquake size distribution, the physical mechanics of the change is still unclear. This study shows the results of the analysis of the temporal variation in the b-value of the aftershock sequence of the 2007 Noto Peninsula Earthquake, Japan, and its relationship with the crustal deformation observed near the focal region. The method to estimate the temporal variation in the b-value is the same as Iwata[2008, 2012]. In this method, the statistical model representing a magnitude-frequency distribution of earthquakes covering the entire magnitude range [Ogata & Katsura, 1993, GJI] is introduced. The distribution model is represented as the product of the Gutenberg-Richter (GR) law and a detection rate function q(M), which is assumed to be the cumulative distribution function of the normal distribution [Ringdal, 1977]. In total, this statistical model has three parameters, and one of them is the b-value of the GR law. The temporal variations in the model parameters are estimated by adopting a Bayesian approach with a piecewise linear approximation and smoothness constraint. As a result of the Bayesian analysis, the b-value was low and was around 0.8 in the early stage of the aftershock activity. Then, it increased up to around 1.1 gradually, and the trend of the increase was terminated at the beginning of 2010. To explore the origin of the termination, geodetic records provided by GSI, Japan, were examined. Using cubic B-splines and a Bayesian approach with smoothness constraint, the trend and seasonality were extracted from the observed time-series and were decomposed. Consequently, we found that the trend obtained from the data at TOGI, which is the closest station to the main fault of the Noto earthquake, changed at the beginning of 2010. This change suggests that the direction and/or magnitude of the afterslip vector after the beginning of that year was different from before

  12. Crustal deformation in the Western Solomon Islands revealed by GPS observation during 2009 - 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Y.; Lin, K.; Ku, C.; Taylor, F. W.; Chen, Y.; Huang, B.

    2012-12-01

    The plate boundary along the southern margin of the Solomon Islands, southwestern Pacific, is characterized by convergent tectonic processes between the Indo-Australian Plate and Pacific Plate. The horizontal convergence rate between two plates is 135 mm/yr in the direction of N45°E. In terms of the structure, this subduction zone is relatively complicated because large seamounts are involved in subduction of extremely young lithosphere generated by the Woodlark spreading system. Hence, the crustal deformation is essential to reconstructing the structural model that constitutes and operates the entire subduction system. For the purpose of monitoring crustal motion, we began to deploy continuous mode GPS stations in September 2009. All of them have been working for 1-3 yr. The total horizontal rates are 95±1, 52±3, 78±7, 120±14, 114±7, and 114±7 mm/yr for Sibo, Nusu, Lale, Husu, Tepa, and Sege respectively. However, the moving directions are N23°E, N63°W, N10°W, N65°W, N63°W, and N69°W. During 2009, the uplift rates are -31±8 and 50±17 mm/yr for Sibo and Nusu, but during 2010, the rate are 2±2 and 13±9 mm/yr. The larger slips may cause of the postseismic deformation of 2007 Mw8.1 Solomon Earthquake. It also shows the large uplift rates on Husu (98±36 mm/yr), Tepa (60±11 mm/yr) and Sege (33±10 mm/yr) after the 2010 Mw7.1 Solomon Earthquake; however, it still needs longer measuring time to confirm the tectonic behavior.

  13. Crustal deformation at the Nankai subduction zone inferred from onshore GPS velocities and seafloor geodetic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, T.; Tadokoro, K.; Ikuta, R.; Okuda, T.; Nagai, S.; Kuno, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Philippine Sea plate (PH) subducts beneath the southwest Japan along the Nankai Trough with a rate of about 4-6 cm/yr, where megathrust earthquakes have repeatedly occurred every 100-150 years. The probability of earthquake occurrence within 30 years from January 1st, 2011 are estimated to be 87 %, 70 %, and 60 % for the next Tokai, Tonankai, and Nankai earthquakes, respectively. We are concerned about the expansion of earthquake damage because these earthquakes have possibilities of interlocking with adjacent segments according to the historical record. Thus, it is important to know the spatio-temporal variation of crustal deformation accompanied with plate interaction. For this issue, we have conducted seafloor geodetic observation at the Nankai Trough using a GPS/Acoustic technique since 2004. In this system, we estimate the position of a surveying vessel by Kinematic GPS analysis and measure the distance between the vessel and the benchmark on the seafloor by Acoustic measurements. Next we determine the location of the benchmark. For the repeatability of this observation, the location of benchmark is determined within a precision of 2-3 cm at horizontal components. Recently, a number of research institutes have conducted seafloor geodetic observation using this technique before and after earthquakes occurred in offshore area, and then they have provided significant achievement to understand inter-, co-, and post-seismic crustal deformation. Several seafloor benchmarks are located at the Nankai subduction zone, which are individually operated by Japan Coast Guard, Tohoku University, and Nagoya University. In the Kumano Basin, we have three seafloor benchmarks located about 60-80 km away from the deformation front of the Nankai Trough. The observations from 2005 to 2010 have illustrated that those benchmarks are moving at rates of about 3-4 cm/yr toward west-northwest with velocity uncertainties of about 2 cm/yr relative to the Amurian plate (AM). In this

  14. A numerical simulation of magma motion, crustal deformation, and seismic radiation associated with volcanic eruptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nishimura, T.; Chouet, B.

    2003-01-01

    The finite difference method is used to calculate the magma dynamics, seismic radiation, and crustal deformation associated with a volcanic eruption. The model geometry consists of a cylindrical reservoir and narrow cylindrical conduit embedded in a homogeneous crust. We consider two models of eruption. In the first model, a lid caps the vent and the magma is overpressurized prior to the eruption. The eruption is triggered by the instantaneous removal of the lid, at which point the exit pressure becomes equal to the atmospheric pressure. In the second model, a plug at the reservoir outlet allows pressurization of only the magmatic fluid in the reservoir before the eruption. Magma transfer between the reservoir and conduit is triggered by the instantaneous removal of the plug, and the eruption occurs when the pressure at the conduit orifice exceeds the material strength of the lid capping the vent. In both models, magma dynamics are expressed by the equations of mass and momentum conservation in a compressible fluid, in which fluid expansion associated with depressurization is accounted for by a constitutive law relating pressure and density. Crustal motions are calculated from the equations of elastodynamics. The fluid and solid are dynamically coupled by applying the continuity of wall velocities and normal stresses across the conduit and reservoir boundaries. Free slip is allowed at the fluid-solid boundary. Both models predict the gradual depletion of the magma reservoir, which causes crustal deformation observed as a long-duration dilatational signal. Superimposed on this very-long-period (VLP) signal generated by mass transport are long-period (LP) oscillations of the magma reservoir and conduit excited by the acoustic resonance of the reservoir-conduit system during the eruption. The volume of the reservoir, vent size, and magma properties control the duration of VLP waves and dominant periods of LP oscillations. The second model predicts that when the

  15. Indian National GNSS Programme: Crustal deformation measurements in the Indian Sub-continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Mithila; Bansal, Brijesh K.

    2012-05-01

    The Indian National GNSS Programme was launched about one and half decades ago with a view to provide a boost to crustal deformation measurements for constraining the movement of Indian plate, identifying the regions of strain accumulation, and to estimate the convergence rates across some identified faults/boundaries. Under this programme, a network of 50 permanent GPS receivers has been established, which is fully functional for the last about 8 yrs. The network has generated very important data sets, which in turn have helped in the estimation of Indian plate motion, regions and rate of strain accumulation, rate of convergence across some identified faults, etc. The measurements have also been utilized in monitoring co-seismic and postseismic deformation related to recent earthquakes that occurred in India and adjoining regions, such as the 2001 Bhuj, 2004 Sumatra-Andaman and 2005 Kashmir earthquake. This article presents some salient results obtained for specific corridors in the Himalaya, Indo-Burmese arc region, Andaman-Nicobar Island region and Indian plate interior region.

  16. Monitoring crustal deformation in The Geysers-Clear Lake geothermal area, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lofgren, Ben Elder

    1978-01-01

    Geodetic surveys since 1972-73 reveal significant crustal deformation in The Geysers-Clear Lake region. Resurveys of precise control networks are measuring both vertical and horizontal ground movement, with most of the change continuing in the area of geothermal fluid withdrawal. Preliminary evidence suggests right-lateral horizontal movement on northwest-trending fault systems and vertical and horizontal compression of the deep geothermal reservoir system. A direct correlation is suggested between ground-surface deformation and subsurface pressure changes in the reservoir system. Although surface changes appear too small to be of environmental concern in The Geysers-Clear Lake region, they indicate hydrodynamic changes in the reservoir of significant import. Two types of vertical changes in The Geysers production area are indicated in the 1973-77 data--(a) a regional subsidence between the Collayomi and Mercuryville fault zones and (b) local subsidence directly related to the area of principal steam production. Maximum subsidence of 13 centimeters in 4? years occurred in the area of most concentrated steam withdrawals and where fluid-pressure declines were near maximum. Subsidence rates throughout the production area from 1973 to 1975 were about half the 1975-77 rates in apparent correlation with pressure changes measured in the reservoir system. Horizontal ground movement as great as 2.0 centimeters per year, generally inward toward the center of production, was measured around the perimeter of the steam production area.

  17. Present-day crustal deformation along the El Salvador Fault Zone from ZFESNet GPS network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staller, Alejandra; Martínez-Díaz, José Jesús; Benito, Belén; Alonso-Henar, Jorge; Hernández, Douglas; Hernández-Rey, Román; Díaz, Manuel

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the results and conclusions obtained from new GPS data compiled along the El Salvador Fault Zone (ESFZ). We calculated a GPS-derived horizontal velocity field representing the present-day crustal deformation rates in the ESFZ based on the analysis of 30 GPS campaign stations of the ZFESNet network, measured over a 4.5 year period from 2007 to 2012. The velocity field and subsequent strain rate analysis clearly indicate dextral strike-slip tectonics with extensional component throughout the ESFZ. Our results suggest that the boundary between the Salvadoran forearc and Caribbean blocks is a deformation zone which varies along the fault zone. We estimate that the movement between the two blocks is at least ~ 12 mm yr- 1. From west to east, this movement is variably distributed between faults or segments of the ESFZ. We propose a kinematic model with three main blocks; the Western, Central and Eastern blocks delimited by major faults. For the first time, we were able to provide a quantitative measure of the present-day horizontal geodetic slip rate of the main segments of ESFZ, ranging from ~ 2 mm yr- 1 in the east segment to ~ 8 mm yr- 1, in the west and central segments. This study contributes new kinematic and slip rate data that should be used to update and improve the seismic hazard assessments in northern Central America.

  18. Monitoring and understanding crustal deformation by means of GPS and InSAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerbini, Susanna; Prati, Claudio; Bruni, Sara; Errico, Maddalena; Musicò, Elvira; Novali, Fabrizio; Santi, Efisio

    2014-05-01

    Monitoring deformation of the Earth's crust by using data acquired by both the GNSS and SAR techniques allows describing crustal movements with high spatial and temporal resolution. This is a key contribution for achieving a deeper and better insight of geodynamic processes. Combination of the two techniques provides a very powerful means, however, before combing the different data sets it is important to properly understand their respective contribution. For this purpose, strictly simultaneous and long time series would be necessary. This is not, in general, a common case due to the relatively long SAR satellites revisit time. A positive exception is represented by the data set of COSMO SKYMed (CSK) images made available for this study by the Italian Space Agency (ASI). The flyover area encompass the city of Bologna and the smaller nearby town of Medicina where permanent GPS stations are operational. At the times of the CSK flyovers, we compared the GPS and SAR Up and East coordinates of a few stations as well as differential tropospheric delays derived by both techniques. The GPS time series were carefully screened and corrected for the presence of discontinuities by adopting a dedicated statistical procedure. The comparisons of both the estimated deformation and the tropospheric delays are encouraging and highlight the need for having available a more evenly sampled SAR data set.

  19. The Gis of The Central Apennines Geodetic Network (ca-geonet): Database Description and Application For Crustal Deformation Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristofoletti, P.; Esposito, A.; Anzidei, M.; Baldi, P.; Basili, R.; Casula, G.; Galvani, A.; Pesci, A.; Serpelloni, E.

    During the last few years we set up and surveyed a GPS geodetic network to inves- tigate the active tectonic areas of the Central Apennine, using a combination of per- manent and not-permanent geodetic stations. The final goal is to evaluate the geodetic strain rate and the coseismic deformations of this seismically active area. For an op- timal management and mapping of the CA-GeoNet (Central Apennine Geodetic Net- work) a Geographical Information System (GIS) has been developed. It has been real- ized on PC platform using MapInfo 6.0 and ArcGIS8.1 software. The GIS manages a database consisting of different classes (Geodesy, Topography, Geography, Seismicity and Geology) administrated according to Thematic Layers. A GIS is required for the multidisciplinary approach and management of large multi-scaled data set, geographi- cally referenced and with continuos or discrete coverage; it is particularly designed to analyze GPS sources and to improve crustal deformation analysis related with tectonic structures and seismicity. Through GIS we can display site displacements, strain rate maps and create new layers gained by numerical and spatial analysis. A tailor-made application to support co-seismic deformation scenarios related with historical and instrumental earthquakes and seismic sources, has been created. Our procedures can be successfully applied to design new geodetic networks in seismically active areas with respect to the known seismotectonic features. This dynamic approach in plan- ning and managing GPS networks for geodynamic applications provides a useful tool for geophysical research, earthquake impact and civil protection management.

  20. Crustal structure and active tectonics in the Eastern Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brückl, E.; Behm, M.; Decker, K.; Grad, M.; Guterch, A.; Keller, G. R.; Thybo, H.

    2010-04-01

    During the last decade, a series of controlled source seismic experiments brought new insight into the crustal and lithospheric structure of the Eastern Alps and their adjacent tectonic provinces. A fragmentation of the lithosphere into three blocks, Europe (EU), Adria (AD), and the new Pannonian fragment (PA), was interpreted and a triple junction was inferred. The goal of this study has been to relate these deep crustal structures to active tectonics. We used elastic plate modeling to reconsider the Moho fragmentation. We interpret subduction of EU below AD and PA from north to south and underthusting of AD mantle below PA from southwest to northeast. The Moho fragmentation correlates well with major upper crustal structures and is supported by gravity, seismic, and geodetic data. An analysis of crustal thickening suggests that active convergence is associated with continued thrusting and lateral extrusion in the central Eastern Alps and thickening of the Adriatic indenter under the Southern Alps. According to the velocity relations at the triple junction, PA moves relative to EU and AD along ENE and SE striking faults, mainly by strike slip. An eastward directed extensional component is compensated by the lateral extrusion of the central Eastern Alps. The Periadriatic (Insubric) line east of the triple junction and the mid-Hungarian fault zone have relatively recently lost their role as first-order active structures. We favor the idea that the Pannonian fragment and the TISZA block merged to a "soft" microplate surrounded by the Eastern and Southern Alpine, Carpathian, and Dinaric orogens.

  1. Geodetic observation of sea-level change and crustal deformation in the Baltic Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, A.; Groh, A.; Dietrich, R.

    Based on tide gauge observations spanning almost 200 years, homogeneous time series of the mean relative sea level were derived for nine sites at the southern coast of the Baltic Sea. Our regionally concentrated data were complemented by long-term relative sea-level records retrieved from the data base of the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL). From these records relative sea-level change rates were derived at 51 tide gauge stations for the period between 1908 and 2007. A minimum observation time of 60 years is required for the determination of reliable sea-level rates. At present, no anthropogenic acceleration in sea-level rise is detected in the tide gauge observations in the southern Baltic. The spatial variation of the relative sea-level rates reflects the fingerprint of GIA-induced crustal uplift. Time series of extreme sea levels were also inferred from the tide gauge records. They were complemented by water level information from historic storm surge marks preserved along the German Baltic coast. Based on this combined dataset the incidence and spatial variation of extreme sea levels induced by storm surges were analysed yielding important information for hazard assessments. Permanent GPS observations were used to determine recent crustal deformation rates for 44 stations in the Baltic Sea region. The GPS derived height change rates were applied to reduce the relative sea-level changes observed by tide gauges yielding an estimate for the eustatic sea-level change. For 13 tide gauge-GPS colocation sites a mean eustatic sea-level trend of 1.3 mm/a was derived for the last 100 years.

  2. Crustal Deformation in Southcentral Alaska: The 1964 Prince William Sound Earthquake Subduction Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Steven C.; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.

    2003-01-01

    This article, for Advances in Geophysics, is a summary of crustal deformation studies in southcentral Alaska. In 1964, southcentral Alaska was struck by the largest earthquake (moment magnitude 9.2) occurring in historical times in North America and the second largest earthquake occurring in the world during the past century. Conventional and space-based geodetic measurements have revealed a complex temporal-spatial pattern of crustal movement. Numerical models suggest that ongoing convergence between the North America and Pacific Plates, viscoelastic rebound, aseismic creep along the tectonic plate interface, and variable plate coupling all play important roles in controlling both the surface and subsurface movements. The geodetic data sets include tide-gauge observations that in some cases provide records back to the decades preceding the earthquake, leveling data that span a few decades around the earthquake, VLBI data from the late 1980s, and GPS data since the mid-1990s. Geologic data provide additional estimates of vertical movements and a chronology of large seismic events. Some of the important features that are revealed by the ensemble of studies that are reviewed in this paper include: (1) Crustal uplift in the region that subsided by up 2 m at the time of the earthquake is as much as 1 m since the earthquake. In the Turnagain Arm and Kenai Peninsula regions of southcentral Alaska, uplift rates in the immediate aftermath of the earthquake reached 150 mm/yr , but this rapid uplift decayed rapidly after the first few years following the earthquake. (2) At some other locales, notably those away the middle of the coseismic rupture zone, postseismic uplift rates were initially slower but the rates decay over a longer time interval. At Kodiak Island, for example, the uplift rates have been decreasing at a rate of about 7mm/yr per decade. At yet other locations, the uplift rates have shown little time dependence so far, but are thought not to be sustainable

  3. CRUSDE: A plug-in based simulation framework for composable CRUstal DEformation studies using Green's functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grapenthin, R.

    2014-01-01

    CRUSDE is a plug-in based simulation framework written in C/C++ for Linux platforms (installation information, download and test cases: http://www.grapenthin.org/crusde). It utilizes Green's functions for simulations of the Earth's response to changes in surface loads. Such changes could involve, for example, melting glaciers, oscillating snow loads, or lava flow emplacement. The focus in the simulation could be the response of the Earth's crust in terms of stress changes, changes in strain rates, or simply uplift or subsidence and the respective horizontal displacements of the crust (over time). Rather than implementing a variety of specific models, CRUSDE approaches crustal deformation problems from a general formulation in which model elements (Green's function, load function, relaxation function, load history), operators, pre- and postprocessors, as well as input and output routines are independent, exchangeable, and reusable on the basis of a plug-in approach (shared libraries loaded at runtime). We derive the general formulation CRUSDE is based on, describe its architecture and use, and demonstrate its capabilities in a test case. With CRUSDE users can: (1) dynamically select software components to participate in a simulation (through XML experiment definitions), (2) extend the framework independently with new software components and reuse existing ones, and (3) exchange software components and experiment definitions with other users. CRUSDE's plug-in mechanism aims for straightforward extendability allowing modelers to add new Earth models/response functions. Current Green's function implementations include surface displacements due to the elastic response, final relaxed response, and pure thick plate response for a flat Earth. These can be combined to express exponential decay from elastic to final relaxed response, displacement rates due to one or multiple disks, irregular loads, or a combination of these. Each load can have its own load history and

  4. Crustal deformation pattern of the Morocco-Iberian area: constraints from 14 years of GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palano, Mimmo; González, Pablo; Fernandez, Josè

    2014-05-01

    We present an improved rendition of crustal motion field of the Morocco-Iberian area, based on an extensive GPS dataset covering about 14 years of observations from 1999.00 up to 2013.79 in order to provide a detailed spatial resolution of geodetic velocity and strain-rate fields. In particular, we included all available data from public continuous GPS stations, considering also data coming from networks developed mainly for mapping, engineering and cadastre purposes. In addition to continuous GPS sites, we included data from 31 episodic GPS sites located in Morocco with surveys spanning the 1999-2006 time interval, whose data are available through the UNAVCO archive (www.unavco.org). All GPS data were processed by using the GAMIT/GLOBK software, taking into account precise ephemerides from the IGS (International GNSS Service; http://igscb.jpl.nasa.gov) and Earth orientation parameters from the International Earth Rotation Service (http://www.iers.org). To improve the overall configuration of the network and tie the regional measurements to an external global reference frame, data coming from more than 25 continuously operating global tracking stations, largely from the IGS and EUREF permanent networks, were introduced in the processing. All stations were organized (and processed) into seven sub-networks of about 40-50 sites each, on average, sharing a few common sites to provide ties between them. Finally, by using the GLORG module of GLOBK, the GAMIT-solutions and their full covariance matrices were combined to estimated a consistent set of positions and velocities in the ITRF2008 reference frame by minimizing the horizontal velocity of the continuously operating global tracking stations mentioned above. To adequately investigate the crustal deformation pattern over the study area, we aligned our estimated GPS velocities to an Eurasian and a Nubian fixed reference frames. In addition, by taking into account the observed GPS horizontal velocity field and

  5. Timing of Deformation and Crustal Structure of the North Himalaya Constrained by 45 Ma Granitoid Plutonism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikman, A. B.; Harrison, T. M.; Lin, D.

    2005-12-01

    Models for the development of the Himalayan fold and thrust belt (HFTB) depend on knowledge of the timing and style of deformation within and between major litho-tectonic units. Furthermore, hypotheses for the evolution of the Indo-Asia collision make widely varying predictions about the structure of the Himalayan crust. A persistent obstacle in assessing such models has been the paucity of data in the ca. 55-25 Ma period following initiation of collision. Studies of North Himalayan granitoid plutons constrain the timing of deformation in the structurally highest and inferred earliest accreted surface- outcropping segment of the HFTB and provide insight into the crustal structure of the northern Himalaya. The North Himalaya (NH) comprise a sequence of predominantly low-grade metasediments that originated as passive margin deposits north of the Indian Shield prior to closure of the Tethys Ocean. The sequence is bounded to the south by the South Tibetan Detachment (STD), a segmented normal- sense movement zone cropping out along the peaks of the high Himalaya, and to the north by the Indus Tsangpo Suture (ITS), which marks the surface boundary between rocks of Indian and Eurasian continental affinity. The Dala granites (DG) outcrop in elliptical patterns within greenschist facies metasediments of the central NH at ca. E92°. Structural mapping indicates the surrounding country rocks experienced at least 50% strain in the form of east-west trending folds prior to intrusion of the DG. Crystallization of the DG has been dated by SHRIMP U-Pb geochronology of zircon at 45±2.9 Ma (MSWD = 2.7). Biotite K-Ar and K-feldspar 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology indicate that the DG cooled to ambient upper crustal temperatures (ca. 300°C) by ≤slant42 Ma, and remained isothermal until their rapid exhumation at ca. 15 Ma. Neither the DG, nor their andalusite-hornfels contact aureoles show evidence of significant deformation. To our knowledge, the DG are the largest known Eocene

  6. Crustal Velocity Field from InSAR and GPS reveals Internal Deformation of Western Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Wright, T. J.

    2010-12-01

    Two contrasting views continue to dominate the debate about continental tectonics - do the continents behave like the oceans, with a few large plates (blocks) separated by major faults (e.g. Tapponnier et al., 1982, 2001; Thatcher, 2007; Meade, 2007), or is a smooth continuum a more appropriate and compact description (e.g. England and Molnar, 1997, 2005). The Tibetan plateau has long been the testing ground for this debate and despite decades of research it has yet to be put to bed. Existing observations of crustal deformation in Tibet are largely derived from the Global Positioning System (GPS). Because large gaps in the GPS coverage exist, particularly in central and Western Tibet, the data have been used to support both the models (e.g. England and Molnar, 2005; Thatcher, 2007; Meade, 2007). On the other hand, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) offers an independent means of measuring present-day crustal deformation with a spatial resolution of a few tens of meters and an accuracy comparable to with GPS (e.g., Wright et al., 2001, 2004; Wang et al 2009). We have used InSAR data from multiple tracks in conjunction with available GPS to constrain a 2D velocity field model for the Tibetan plateau. About 300 ERS/Envisat interferograms are produced spanning 6 tracks (five descending and one ascending), covering ~200,000 km2 of Western Tibet. Each track is analysed using a network approach which yields line-of-sight deformation rates and realistic uncertainties (Biggs et al., 2007; Elliott et al., 2008; Wang et al., 2009). These are combined with the GPS, using full covariances, by adapting the velocity field method of England and Molnar (1997) to incorporate InSAR observations. Initially, we set up a triangular mesh spanning the target area; we then solve for the horizontal velocities on each node, as well as additional orbital and atmospheric terms for the InSAR data. The solution is regularised using Laplacian smoothing, whose weight is determined as

  7. Pointwise functions for flexible implementation of crustal deformation physics in PyLith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aagaard, B.; Knepley, M.; Williams, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    The next stage of development for PyLith, a flexible, open-source finite-element code (http://geodynamics.org/cig/software/pylith/) for modeling quasi-static and dynamic crustal deformation with an emphasis earthquake faulting, focuses on refactoring the code to provide greater flexibility in support of a broader range of physics, discretizations, and optimizations for a variety of computer hardware. We separate the finite-element integration into a discretization-specific portion and discretization-independent pointwise functions associated with the governing equations. The discretization-specific portion is designed to accommodate arbitrary order finite elements and multiple implementations for optimization targeting specific hardware (e.g., CPU and GPU). The pointwise functions encapsulate the physics, including the governing equations and rheologies. Users can easily extend the code by adding new pointwise functions to implement different rheologies and/or governing equations. PyLith currently includes pointwise functions for quasi-static and dynamic elasticity for several elastic, viscoelastic, and elastoplastic rheologies. We plan to add pointwise functions for coupling of elasticity with fluid flow and incompressible elasticity. Tight integration with the Portable, Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation (PETSc) provides support for a wide range of linear and nonlinear solvers and time-stepping algorithms.

  8. Jurassic crustal deformation in west-central part of Colorado Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, F.

    1985-05-01

    Although the Jurassic Period is commonly thought of as a time of tectonic quiescence, updated isopach maps and new sedimentologic information indicate that it was a time of notable crustal deformation on the Colorado Plateau. A significant change in structural style occurred in Middle Jurassic time, especially during the erosion interval that produced the J-3 unconformity. Prior to late Middle Jurassic time, the region had been tilted westward and structural troughs formed in the area of the present-day Circle Cliffs uplift and in the vicinity of the Circle Cliffs and Black Mesa regions were uplifted and the nearby Henry and Kaiparowits regions began to be downwarped as troughs or basins. It cannot be determined if or how the present-day monoclines flexed during the Jurassic. However, the direction of structural tilt across these areas changed from west side down to east side down during the late Middle and early Late Jurassic. The Monument region, the largest and most persistent structural element in the region, changed from a structural bench to a positive structure in the early Late Jurassic. In most cases the positive structures subsided more slowly than adjacent downwarps. Two exceptions during the Late Jurassic are the Black Mesa and Emery uplifts. These are the only uplifts that actually rose above the level of sediment accumulation. Jurassic rocks are not known to contain significant hydrocarbon resources in this region, but their tectonic history may offer clues to the structural history of underlying Paleozoic strata, which are the primary hydrocarbon exploration targets.

  9. Crustal Deformation Across the Basin and Range Province, Western United States, Measured with the Global Positioning System, 1992-2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, W. C.; Thatcher, W.

    2002-12-01

    The Basin and Range province of the western United States lies east of the Sierra Nevada mountains and accommodates roughly 25% of the motion between the North American and Pacific Plates in this region. It is experiencing both active extension and dextral shear, whose orientation is consistent with relative plate motion, suggesting that the province is an important part of the overall plate boundary system. We present results from recent measurement of Basin and Range crustal motion using the Global Positioning System (GPS). As of September 2002, ten years of deformation will have been observed with GPS measurements in 1992,1996, 1998 and 2002. The 800 km long east-to-west line of campaign-style geodetic benchmarks extends from east of the Wasatch fault zone in Utah to west of the Genoa fault zone and Lake Tahoe in California's Northern Sierra Nevada mountains, primarily along Interstate Highway 50. In all there are velocities at 91 GPS sites, nearly double the number previously presented (Thatcher et al. [1999]), all of which will be measured in September 2002. Incorporating this new data is expected to reduce the uncertainty in earlier measurements that show the motion of the Sierra Nevada block with respect to non-deforming North America to be accommodated by right lateral shear and extensional deformation in Nevada and Utah. Velocity variation of about 9 mm/yr is concentrated in the western one-third of the network, with a lesser amount (roughly 3 mm/yr) localized to the easternmost edge of the network, in the vicinity of the Wasatch fault zone. Recent densification of the GPS network across these two zones will also improve the spatial resolution of the deformation in these regions. The greatest rate of present-day deformation occurs near the ruptures of the Fairview Peak and Rainbow Mountain earthquakes in the Central Nevada Seismic Zone, extending west past the Genoa fault into the Sierra Nevada. This strain rate pattern is correlated with the concentration

  10. The development of space geodetic observations of crustal kinematics and deformation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. E.

    2012-12-01

    Space geodesy for crustal dynamics studies reached maturity around the time of the Apollo landings. The techniques of laser ranging to earth satellites (SLR) and the Moon (LLR), and very long baseline interferometry (VLBY) all started to approach a viable quality. This enabled each technique to start the process of demonstrating on a regular and consistent basis that they could make observations that would enable earth scientists to better understand the movements along active fault lines, the rotation of the Earth, and improve the model of the Earth's gravity field. Much of the early years were consumed with understanding the strengths of each technique for various approaches and it was not until a decade later that the space agencies felt comfortable in establishing funded long-term programs. In the US it was the Crustal Dynamics Project and about the same time the WEGENER program in Europe under the auspices if the IAG were established. Together these programs eventually established SLR, LLR, and VLBI sites on almost all the major tectonic blocks and the real kinematics of the present-day geological blocks became known. While this was happening the Global Positioning System (GPS) emerged as the technique of choice for many local observations, complementing the other techniques, and together bringing the world this remarkable capability to understand dynamics of planet earth.

  11. Metamorphic reactions, grain size reduction and deformation of mafic lower crustal rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degli Alessandrini, Giulia; Menegon, Luca; Beltrando, Marco; Dijkstra, Arjan; Anderson, Mark

    2016-04-01

    and their relative abundance in the layers are believed to influence the deformation of the layers themselves. In symplectite-rich layers (domains 1, 4) deformation is localised, grain-size is below 30μm and phases are well mixed. On the other hand, in pyroxene or plagioclase-rich layers, deformation is less localised, the phases are less mixed and the grain size is larger (domain 2, 3). These preliminary results suggest that syn-kinematic metamorphic reactions forming symplectites played an essential role in grain size reduction, phase mixing and strain localization. We speculate that the compositional domains with symplectites localized deformation more efficiently, by activation of grain size sensitive creep, most likely because those domains were originally more hydrated than the others. On the contrary, domains without symplectites accommodated deformation less efficiently, either through fracturing (clinopyroxene, garnet) or dislocation creep + recrystallization (orthopyroxene, plagioclase).

  12. Crustal deformation associated with an M8.1 earthquake in the Solomon Islands, detected by ALOS/PALSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyagi, Yousuke; Ozawa, Taku; Shimada, Masanobu

    2009-10-01

    On April 1, 2007 (UTC), a large Mw 8.1 interplate earthquake struck the Solomon Islands subduction zone where complicated tectonics result from the subduction of four plates. Extensive ground movements and a large tsunami occurred in the epicentral area causing severe damage over a wide area. Using ALOS/PALSAR data and the DInSAR technique, we detected crustal deformation exceeding 2 m in islands close to the epicenter. A slip distribution of the inferred seismic fault was estimated using geodetic information derived from DInSAR processing and field investigations. The result indicates large slip areas around the hypocenter and the centroid. It is possible that the largest slip area is related to subduction of the plate boundary between the Woodlark and Australian plates. A small slip area between those large slip areas may indicate weak coupling due to thermal activity related to volcanic activity on Simbo Island. The 2007 earthquake struck an area where large earthquake has not occurred since 1970. Most of this seismic gap was filled by the 2007 events, however a small seismic gap still remains in the southeastern region of the 2007 earthquake.

  13. Crustal dynamics project: The interpretation of crustal dynamics data in terms of plate motions and regional deformation near plate boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, Sean C.

    1990-01-01

    The focus of the research was in two broad areas: (1) the nature and dynamics of time-dependent deformation and stress along major seismic zones, and (2) the nature of long-wavelength oceanic geoid anomalies in terms of lateral variations in upper mantle temperature and composition. The principal findings are described in the appendices.

  14. Crustal deformation evidences for viscous coupling and fragmented lithosphere at the Nubia-Iberia plate boundary (Western Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palano, Mimmo; González, Pablo J.; Fernández, José

    2016-04-01

    A spatially dense crustal velocity field, based on up to 15 years of GNSS observations at more than 380 sites and extensively covering the Iberian Peninsula and Northern Africa, allow us to provide new insights into two main tectonic processes currently occurring in this area. We detected a slow large-scale clockwise rotation of the Iberian Peninsula with respect to a local pole located closely to the northwestern sector of the Pyrenean mountain range (Palano et al., 2015). Although this crustal deformation pattern could suggest a rigid rotating lithosphere block, this model would predict significant shortening along the Western (off-shore Lisbon) and North Iberian margin which cannot totally ruled out but currently is not clearly observed. Conversely, we favour the interpretation that this pattern reflects the quasi-continuous straining of the ductile lithosphere in some sectors of South and Western Iberia in response to viscous coupling of the NW Nubia and Iberian plate boundary in the Gulf of Cádiz. Furthermore, the western Mediterranean basin appears fragmented into independent crustal tectonic blocks, which delimited by inherited lithospheric shear structures and trapped within the Nubia-Eurasia collision, are currently accommodating most of the plate convergence rate. Among these blocks, an (oceanic-like western) Algerian one is currently transferring a significant fraction of the Nubia-Eurasia convergence rate into the Eastern Betics (SE Iberia) and likely causing the eastward motion of the Baleares Promontory. Most of the observed crustal ground deformation can be attributed to processes driven by spatially variable lithospheric plate forces imposed along the Nubia-Eurasia convergence boundary. Nevertheless, the observed deformation field infers a very low convergence rates as observed also at the eastern side of the western Mediterranean, along the Calabro Peloritan Arc, by space geodesy (e.g. Palano, 2015). References Palano M. (2015). On the present

  15. Ocean contribution to co-seismic crustal deformation and geoid anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broerse, T.; Vermeersen, B. L.; Riva, R. E.; Van Der Wal, W.

    2011-12-01

    Satellite gravity missions such as GRACE have been used in recent years to study the change in the Earth's gravity field due to very large earthquakes like the 2004 Sumatra, 2010 Chile and 2011 Japan earthquakes. These gravity observations can, together with the help of solid earth models, serve as an additional method to constrain the total displaced crustal mass or seismic moment. Since satellite gravity can be observed globally, these observations are supplementary to land-based techniques such as teleseismic, GPS or InSAR measurements. Given that large earthquakes heavily deform the crust in the vicinity of the fault, the associated mass displacement in the solid earth changes the gravity field and consequently the mean ocean surface. Models that simulate these deformations assist in interpreting observations of gravity changes through time. For this purpose we model the solid earth response by means of a spherically layered, compressible normal mode model. Over the continents, the pattern of the change in geoid height is represented by a smoothed version of the pattern of the vertical deformation. However, when the earthquake occurs beneath an ocean, the displacement of water mass, due to the uplift and subsidence of the ocean floor, causes first order gravity changes with respect to an ocean-free model. To quantitatively model these effects we adapt the sea-level equation for modeling the effect of co-seismic and post-seismic water displacement on gravity. For the case of the 2004 Sumatra earthquake our models show that the ocean effect results in a decrease of 50% for the maximum positive and a decrease of 10% for the maximum negative co-seismic geoid height change. However, the ocean effect is not identical at all resolutions; at the GRACE resolution we model a 65% decrease for the maximum positive and a 35% increase for the maximum negative co-seismic geoid height change due to the presence of an ocean. This implies that at the GRACE resolution the ocean

  16. Status of the TOUGH-FLAC simulator and recent applications related to coupled fluid flow and crustal deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, J.

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents recent advancement in and applications of TOUGH-FLAC, a simulator for multiphase fluid flow and geomechanics. The TOUGH-FLAC simulator links the TOUGH family multiphase fluid and heat transport codes with the commercial FLAC{sup 3D} geomechanical simulator. The most significant new TOUGH-FLAC development in the past few years is a revised architecture, enabling a more rigorous and tight coupling procedure with improved computational efficiency. The applications presented in this paper are related to modeling of crustal deformations caused by deep underground fluid movements and pressure changes as a result of both industrial activities (the In Salah CO{sub 2} Storage Project and the Geysers Geothermal Field) and natural events (the 1960s Matsushiro Earthquake Swarm). Finally, the paper provides some perspectives on the future of TOUGH-FLAC in light of its applicability to practical problems and the need for high-performance computing capabilities for field-scale problems, such as industrial-scale CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced geothermal systems. It is concluded that despite some limitations to fully adapting a commercial code such as FLAC{sup 3D} for some specialized research and computational needs, TOUGH-FLAC is likely to remain a pragmatic simulation approach, with an increasing number of users in both academia and industry.

  17. Impact of acoustic velocity structure to measurement of ocean bottom crustal deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikuta, R.; Tadokoro, K.; Okuda, T.; Sugimoto, S.; Watanabe, T.; Eto, S.; Ando, M.

    2010-12-01

    We are developing a geodetic method of monitoring crustal deformation under the ocean using kinematic GPS and acoustic ranging. The goal of our research is to achieve sub-centimeter accuracy in measuring oceanic crustal deformation by a very short-time measurement like 10 hours. In this study, we focused on lateral variation of acoustic velocity structure in seawater and introduced an inclined acoustic velocity structure model to improve accuracy of the measurement. We have a few measurement sites along Nankai trough, Japan. In each sites, we deployed a trio of transponders on ocean floor (seafloor benchmark units) within distance comparable with the depth. An ultrasonic signal is generated from a surface vessel drifting over the benchmark unit, which is received and replied by the benchmark unit. In this system, both acoustic velocity structure and the benchmark unit positions were determined simultaneously for the each measurement using a tomographic technique. This tomographic technique was adopted on an assumption that the acoustic velocity structure is horizontally layered and changes only in time, not in space. Ikuta et al., (AGU fall meeting 2009) reported an approach to improve accuracy of benchmark positioning using a new additional assumption. The additional assumption was that the configuration of the transponders trio constituting one benchmark unit does not change. They determined the time evolution of weight center for the fixed transponder triangle between different measurements using all repetitively obtained data sets at once. This is contrasting to the previous method in which each data set for different measurement was solved independently. This assumption worked well in reducing number of unknown parameters. As a result, repeatability of benchmark positioning improved from 5 cm to 3 cm. We conducted numerical experiments synthesizing acoustic travel-time data to evaluate the robustness of this new approach. When acoustic travel-time data is

  18. Tracing the evolution of crustal-scale, transient permeability in a tectonically active, mid-crustal, low-permeability environment by means of quartz veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sintubin, M.

    2013-12-01

    In mid-crustal, low-permeability environments pervasive fluid flow is primarily driven by the production of internally-derived metamorphic fluids, causing a near permanent state of near-lithostatic fluid-pressure conditions. In a tectonically active crust, these overpressured fluids will generate intermittently an enhanced permeability that will facilitate fluid flow through the crust. The High-Ardenne slate belt (Belgium, France, Germany) can be considered as a fossil (late Palaeozoic) analogue of such mid-crustal, low-permeability environment at the brittle-plastic transition (depth range from 7 to 15 km). Low-grade metamorphic (250°C-350°C), predominantly fine-grained, siliciclastic metasediments were affected by a contraction-dominated deformation, materialized by a pervasive slaty cleavage. Quartz veins, abundantly present in the slate belt, are used as a proxy for the enhanced permeability. Detailed structural, petrographical, mineralogical and geochemical studies of different quartz-vein occurrences has enabled to reconstruct the evolution of the crustal-scale permeability , as well as to constrain the coupled fluid-pressure and stress-state evolution throughout the orogenic history. Extensive veining on a regional scale seems confined to periods of tectonic stress inversion, both at the onset (compressional stress inversion) and in the final stages (extensional stress inversion) of orogeny. Firstly, compressional stress inversion is expressed by pre-orogenic bedding-normal extension veins, consistently arranged in parallel arrays, followed by early orogenic bedding-parallel hybrid veins. Fluid-inclusion studies demonstrate near-lithostatic to supralithostatic fluid pressures, respectively. Secondly, discordant veins, transecting the pre-existing cleavage fabric, are interpreted to be initiated shortly after the extensional stress inversion, reflecting the late-orogenic extensional destabilisation of the slate belt. Veining again occurred at high fluid

  19. Finite element modelling of stress field perturbations and interseismic crustal deformation in the Val d'Agri region, southern Apennines, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candela, Stefania; Mazzoli, Stefano; Megna, Antonella; Santini, Stefano

    2015-08-01

    The Val d'Agri area provides the opportunity to analyse active structures in a seismic region for which a large amount of subsurface data is available. This area, which was struck in 1857 by one of the most destructive earthquakes in Italy (MW = 7.03), represents a unique natural laboratory to gain new insights into geometry, modes and rates of faulting controlling crustal deformation in an actively extending orogen. In this study, a crustal geological section through the southern Apennines is discretized into a finite element model (FEM). We present a 2D elastoplastic FEM that reproduces stress perturbations and strain field around the Val d'Agri active fault system. The influence of fault strand activity on interseismic crustal deformation is tested by a series of computer models, whose predictions are compared with the horizontal velocity components of continuous GPS sites in the region and with stress directions and geological data. The best fit with available geological and geophysical constraints is obtained with a 300 km long, 29 km deep model formed by a multilayer including three components having different rheological characteristics and including several shallow, locked fault segments, which branch into a freely slipping major basement fault at depth. Finite element modelling provides new insights into the controversial and widely debated active tectonic setting of the study area, pointing out the fundamental role played by a structural reactivation process involving inherited, long-lived, mature fault systems at depth. Our FEM, reconciling apparently contrasting geological and geophysical constraints from the study area, points to maximum stress build up and strain accumulation at a depth of 15 ± 5 km. Such a depth range is suggested as the most likely one for the nucleation of large events such as the 1857 Val d'Agri earthquake.

  20. Tectonic Escape and Present-Day Crustal Deformation in Northernmost Longitudinal Valley, Hualien Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. C.; Chen, C. Y.; Chen, Y. G.; Chen, R. F.; Chen, H. Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Longitudinal Valley in Eastern Taiwan sits at the collision suture between the Eurasian and Philippine Sea plates. Based on repeated GPS campaigned measurements from 25 stations six times in 2007-2014 and 10 continuous GPS single-frequency stations recorded in 2011-2014, we characterize the surface deformation in the northernmost Longitudinal Valley where the Coastal Range of the Philippine Sea plate turns northward diving under the Eurasian plate producing two major active faults: the Milun fault and the Longitudinal Valley fault. We reconstructed a GPS velocity field and conducted strain analyses and elastic block modeling. Our results suggest a clockwise rotation at a rate of 33° M/yr and an eastward tectonic escape in the small Hualien City block (HUAL) area of ~10 × 10 km, which is apparently detached from the regional rotating RYUK block (~ 100 x 100 km) defined by previous studies. Combining the levelling data that indicated the Coastal Range is going down toward the north, we interpret the tectonic escape of the northernmost Longitudinal Valley as being initiated locally by the northwest indentation of the Coastal Range, which pushed the HUAL block to move upward and eastward. According to our strain analyses, the HUAL block shows a significant internal elastic strain inside the Milun Tableland, the hanging wall of the Milun fault. No significant deformation was observed across the surface trace of the fault, indicating that the Milun fault is now probably locked in the near surface. The deformation in the footwall of the fault was accommodated by pure-shear strain with a major NNW-compression and a minor ENE-extension. The deformation in the hanging wall is characterized by simple-shear strain with ENE-extension in its northern part and little deformation in the southern part, separated by a little known NW-trending active fault zone (Dongmingyi fault), which needs further investigation.

  1. Deformation of Granulite at 1-2 GPa: Implications for Deep Crustal Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, H. W.; Zhang, J.

    2006-12-01

    The eclogitic pseudotachylytes from western Norway demonstrate unambiguously that faulting took place in deep-seated lower crustal rock °C dry granulite, perhaps at pressures approaching 3 GPa. However, the corresponding faulting mechanism remains unclear. It is questionable whether earthquakes can occur by unassisted brittle shear fracture or frictional sliding at such depths, a fluid source is prerequisite for dehydration embrittlement and the transformation-induced faulting mechanism can only operate during polymorphic phase changes with a significant ΔV. Runaway shear heating is also problematic due to lack of evidence of large strains or rapid strain rates in the granulite. Therefore, all these potential high- pressure faulting mechanisms are unlikely to operate alone in the dry Norwegian granulites. We have conducted preliminary deformation experiments on synthetic granulite (+/- added serpentinite for fault trigger) prepared from Norway granulite kindly provided by T. M. Boundy. Rheological experiments on granulite alone show plastic flow with very high strength within and outside its stability field; no evidence was found for a faulting instability. The eclogitization process is extremely sluggish within the dry experimental samples. Most permanent strain is partitioned into feldspar; pyroxene and garnet remain almost rigid. In contrast, experiments with a short specimen of serpentinite on top of a short specimen of granulite showed that faults generated in serpentinite by dehydration propagated into granulite. The fault zones consist of fine- grained (< 1 μm) angular fragments likely to be eclogitic phase transformation products together with water. Based upon such observations, we hypothesize that pseudotachylyte formation occurs during deceleration of fault propagation rather than during acceleration as is generally assumed. Such hypothesis also has potentially important implications for fault propagation into otherwise stable materials at great

  2. Deformation of quaternary strata and its relationship to crustal folds and faults, south-central Puget Lowland, Washington State

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Booth, D.B.; Troost, K.G.; Hagstrum, J.T.

    2004-01-01

    Folded Quaternary deposits across the south-central Puget Lowland, an area just south of the Seattle fault that extends across the Seattle uplift and its boundary with the adjacent Tacoma basin, provide increased resolution of the character and rate of crustal deformation. They also constrain alternative, and partly incompatible, views of crustal structure previously suggested by geophysical investigations. Tectonic deformation has been progressive for at least the past few hundred thousand years: older sediments display greater deformation than the youngest exposed deposits in the study area. Strain rates across the Seattle uplift have probably been between 0.25 and 1.0 mm/yr during this period, accounting for ???10% of the total strain shortening of the western Washington crust. The Seattle uplift displays Quaternary deformation across its full north-south extent and has structural discontinuities at both its northern and southern boundaries. Previous workers have already established the faulted nature of its northern boundary; exposed Quaternary strata across its southern boundary display intense folding, the location of which generally corresponds to the projection of a "Tacoma fault" suggested by prior geophysical studies. ?? 2004 Geological Society of America.

  3. Syncollisional extension along the India-Asia suture zone, south-central Tibet: Implications for crustal deformation of Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, M. A.; Sanchez, V.; Taylor, M. H.

    2010-02-01

    Crustal deformation models of the Tibetan plateau are assessed by investigating the nature of Neogene deformation along the India-Asia suture zone through geologic mapping in south-central Tibet (84°30'E). Our mapping shows that the suture zone is dominated by a system of 3 to 4 ENE-striking, south-dipping thrust faults, rather than strike-slip faults as predicted by models calling upon eastward extrusion of the Tibetan plateau. Faults along the suture zone are not active, as they are cut by a system of NNW-striking oblique slip normal faults, referred to herein as the Lopukangri fault system. Fault-slip data from the Lopukangri fault system shows that the mean slip direction of its hanging wall is N36W. We estimate the net slip on the Lopukangri fault by restoring components of the thrust system. We estimate that the fault has accommodated ˜ 7 km of right-slip and ˜ 8 km of normal dip-slip, yielding a net slip of ˜ 10.5 km, and 6 km of horizontal east-west extension. The Lopukangri fault system is active and geomorphic offsets indicate right separations and westside-down dip-separation. The mapview curviplanar geometry and geomorphic expression of the Lopukangri fault system is similar to faults and rift basins to its east and west. These extensional faults are en echelon in map view and encompass a region that is 200 km long (east-west) and 95 km wide (north-south). Assuming our results for the Lopukangri fault are applicable to the entire system, we estimate a maximum of 18% extension across the zone. All active faults in the system terminate southward adjacent to the India-Asia suture zone. Because the individual rift geometries are similar and suggest a common kinematic relationship, we propose that the extensional system formed as a trailing extensional imbricate fan at the southern termination of the central Tibet conjugate fault zone. Alternatively, the extensional system may terminate to the north and represent a group of isolated crustal tears. Both

  4. The 10 April 2014 Nicaraguan Crustal Earthquake: Evidence of Complex Deformation of the Central American Volcanic Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez, Gerardo; Muñoz, Angélica; Farraz, Isaac A.; Talavera, Emilio; Tenorio, Virginia; Novelo-Casanova, David A.; Sánchez, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    On 10 April 2014, an M w 6.1 earthquake struck central Nicaragua. The main event and the aftershocks were clearly recorded by the Nicaraguan national seismic network and other regional seismic stations. These crustal earthquakes were strongly felt in central Nicaragua but caused relatively little damage. This is in sharp contrast to the destructive effects of the 1972 earthquake in the capital city of Managua. The differences in damage stem from the fact that the 1972 earthquake occurred on a fault beneath the city; in contrast, the 2014 event lies offshore, under Lake Managua. The distribution of aftershocks of the 2014 event shows two clusters of seismic activity. In the northwestern part of Lake Managua, an alignment of aftershocks suggests a northwest to southeast striking fault, parallel to the volcanic arc. The source mechanism agrees with this right-lateral, strike-slip motion on a plane with the same orientation as the aftershock sequence. For an earthquake of this magnitude, seismic scaling relations between fault length and magnitude predict a sub-surface fault length of approximately 16 km. This length is in good agreement with the extent of the fault defined by the aftershock sequence. A second cluster of aftershocks beneath Apoyeque volcano occurred simultaneously, but spatially separated from the first. There is no clear alignment of the epicenters in this cluster. Nevertheless, the decay of the number of earthquakes beneath Apoyeque as a function of time shows the typical behavior of an aftershock sequence and not of a volcanic swarm. The northeast-southwest striking Tiscapa/Ciudad Jardín and Estadio faults that broke during the 1972 and 1931 Managua earthquakes are orthogonal to the fault where the 10 April earthquake occurred. These orthogonal faults in close geographic proximity show that Central Nicaragua is being deformed in a complex tectonic setting. The Nicaraguan forearc sliver, between the trench and the volcanic arc, moves to the

  5. The 10 April 2014 Nicaraguan Crustal Earthquake: Evidence of Complex Deformation of the Central American Volcanic Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez, Gerardo; Muñoz, Angélica; Farraz, Isaac A.; Talavera, Emilio; Tenorio, Virginia; Novelo-Casanova, David A.; Sánchez, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    On 10 April 2014, an M w 6.1 earthquake struck central Nicaragua. The main event and the aftershocks were clearly recorded by the Nicaraguan national seismic network and other regional seismic stations. These crustal earthquakes were strongly felt in central Nicaragua but caused relatively little damage. This is in sharp contrast to the destructive effects of the 1972 earthquake in the capital city of Managua. The differences in damage stem from the fact that the 1972 earthquake occurred on a fault beneath the city; in contrast, the 2014 event lies offshore, under Lake Managua. The distribution of aftershocks of the 2014 event shows two clusters of seismic activity. In the northwestern part of Lake Managua, an alignment of aftershocks suggests a northwest to southeast striking fault, parallel to the volcanic arc. The source mechanism agrees with this right-lateral, strike-slip motion on a plane with the same orientation as the aftershock sequence. For an earthquake of this magnitude, seismic scaling relations between fault length and magnitude predict a sub-surface fault length of approximately 16 km. This length is in good agreement with the extent of the fault defined by the aftershock sequence. A second cluster of aftershocks beneath Apoyeque volcano occurred simultaneously, but spatially separated from the first. There is no clear alignment of the epicenters in this cluster. Nevertheless, the decay of the number of earthquakes beneath Apoyeque as a function of time shows the typical behavior of an aftershock sequence and not of a volcanic swarm. The northeast-southwest striking Tiscapa/Ciudad Jardín and Estadio faults that broke during the 1972 and 1931 Managua earthquakes are orthogonal to the fault where the 10 April earthquake occurred. These orthogonal faults in close geographic proximity show that Central Nicaragua is being deformed in a complex tectonic setting. The Nicaraguan forearc sliver, between the trench and the volcanic arc, moves to the

  6. Crustal Deformation at the Arabian Plate-Boundary observed by InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsson, S.; Cavalié, O.; Akoglu, A. M.; Wang, T.; Xu, W.; Feng, G.; Dutta, R.; Abdullin, A. K.

    2013-12-01

    The Arabian plate is bounded by a variety of active plate boundaries, with extension in the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden to the south, compression in Turkey and Iran to the north, and transform faults to the west and to the east. Internally, however, the Arabian plate has been shown to be tectonically rather stable, despite evidence of recent volcanism and earthquake faulting. We use InSAR observations to study recent tectonic and volcanic activity at several locations at the Arabian plate boundary as well within the plate itself. The region near the triple junction between the Arabian, Eurasian, and Anatolian plates has often been the focus of studies on continental deformation behavior and interseismic deformation. Here we use large-scale InSAR data processing to map the deformation near the triple junction and find the deformation to be focused on major faults with little intra-plate deformation. The eastern part of the East Anatolian Fault appears to have a very shallow locking depth with limited fault-normal deformation. Several major earthquakes that have occurred in recent years on the Arabian plate boundary, including the 2011 magnitude 7.1 Van earthquake in eastern Turkey. It occurred as a result of convergence of the Arabian plate towards Eurasia and caused significant surface deformation that we have analyzed with multiple coseismic InSAR, GPS, and coastal uplift observations. We use high-resolution Cosmo-Skymed and TerraSAR-X data to derive 3D coseismic displacements from offsets alone, as some of the interferograms are almost completely incoherent. By identifying point-like targets within the images, we were able to derive accurate pixel offsets between SAR sub-images containing such targets, which we used to estimate the 3D coseismic displacements. The derived 3D displacement field helped in constraining the causative northward dipping thrust-fault. The Qadimah fault is a recently discovered fault located on the Red Sea coast north of Jeddah and under the

  7. Intrusion Triggering of Explosive Eruptions: Lessons Learned from EYJAFJALLAJÖKULL 2010 Eruptions and Crustal Deformation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmundsson, F.; Hreinsdottir, S.; Hooper, A. J.; Arnadottir, T.; Pedersen, R.; Roberts, M. J.; Oskarsson, N.; Auriac, A.; Decriem, J.; Einarsson, P.; Geirsson, H.; Hensch, M.; Ofeigsson, B. G.; Sturkell, E. C.; Sveinbjornsson, H.; Feigl, K.

    2010-12-01

    Gradual inflation of magma chambers often precedes eruptions at highly active volcanoes. During eruptions, rapid deflation occurs as magma flows out and pressure is reduced. Less is known about the deformation style at moderately active volcanoes, such as Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland, where an explosive summit eruption of trachyandesite beginning on 14 April 2010 caused exceptional disruption to air traffic. This eruption was preceded by an effusive flank eruption of olivine basalt from 20 March - 12 April 2010. Geodetic and seismic observations revealed the growth of an intrusive complex in the roots of the volcano during three months prior to eruptions. After initial horizontal growth, modelling indicates both horizontal and sub-vertical growth in three weeks prior the first eruption. The behaviour is attributed to subsurface variations in crustal stress and strength originating from complicated volcano foundations. A low-density layer may capture magma allowing pressure to build before an intrusion can ascend towards higher levels. The intrusive complex was formed by olivine basalt as erupted on the volcano flank 20 March - 12 April; the intrusive growth halted at the onset of this eruption. Deformation associated with the eruption onset was minor as the dike had reached close to the surface in the days before. Isolated eruptive vents opening on long-dormant volcanoes may represent magma leaking upwards from extensive pre-eruptive intrusions formed at depth. A deflation source activated during the summit eruption of trachyandesite is distinct from, and adjacent to, all documented sources of inflation in the volcano roots. Olivine basalt magma which recharged the volcano appears to have triggered the summit eruption, although the exact mode of triggering is uncertain. Scenarios include stress triggering or propagation of olivine basalt into more evolved magma. The trachyandesite includes crystals that can be remnants of minor recent intrusion of olivine basalt

  8. CrusDe: A plug-in based simulation framework for composable CRUStal DEformation simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grapenthin, R.

    2008-12-01

    Within geoscience, Green's method is an established mathematical tool to analyze the dynamics of the Earth's crust in response to the application of a mass force, e.g. a surface load. Different abstractions from the Earth's interior as well as the particular effects caused by such a force are expressed by means of a Green's function, G, which is a particular solution to an inhomogeneous differential equation with boundary conditions. Surface loads, L, are defined by real data or as analytical expressions. The response of the crust to a surface load is gained by a 2D-convolution (**) of the Green's function with this load. The crustal response can be thought of as an instantaneous displacement which is followed by a gradual transition towards the final relaxed state of displacement. A relaxation function, R, describing such a transition depends on the rheological model for the ductile layer of the crust. The 1D-convolution (*) of the relaxation function with a load history, H, allows to include the temporal evolution of the surface load into a model. The product of the two convolution results expresses the displacement (rate) of the crust, U, at a certain time t: Ut = (R * H)t · (G ** L) Rather than implementing a variety of specific models, approaching crustal deformation problems from the general formulation in equation~1 opens the opportunity to consider reuse of model building blocks within a more flexible simulation framework. Model elements (Green's function, load function, etc.), operators, pre- and postprocessing, and even input and output routines could be part of a framework that enables a user to freely compose software components to resemble equation~1. The simulation framework CrusDe implements equation~1 in the proposed way. CrusDe's architecture defines interfaces for generic communication between the simulation core and the model elements. Thus, exchangeability of the particular model element implementations is possible. In the presented plug

  9. Investigating crustal deformation associated with the North America-Pacific plate boundary in southern California with GPS geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinler, Joshua C.

    determining the slip-rates on each of the major crustal faults prior to the earthquake, we are able to model the pre-earthquake velocity field for comparison with velocities measured using sites constructed post-earthquake. We then determine how individual site velocities have changed in the 3 years following the earthquake, with implications for the rate at which the lower crust and upper mantle viscously relax through time. We find that the viscosity of the lower crust is at least an order of magnitude higher than that of the uppermost mantle, and hypothesize that this is due to mafic material emplaced at the base of the crust as the spreading center developed beneath the Salton Trough since about 6 Ma. The final study investigates crustal deformation and fault slip rates for faults in the northern Mojave and southern Walker Lane regions of the ECSZ. Previous geodetic studies estimated slip-rates roughly double those inferred via geological dating methods in this region for NW striking strike-slip faults, but significantly smaller than geologic estimates for the Garlock fault. Through construction of a detailed elastic block model, which selects only active fault structures, and applying a new, dense GPS velocity field in this region, we are able to estimate slip-rates for the strike-slip faults in the ECSZ that are much closer to those reported from geology.

  10. Aseismic Slips Preceding Ruptures Assumed for Anomalous Seismicities and Crustal Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Y.

    2007-12-01

    If aseismic slips occurs on a fault or its deeper extension, both seismicity and geodetic records around the source should be affected. Such anomalies are revealed to have occurred during the last several years leading up to the October 2004 Chuetsu Earthquake of M6.8, the March 2007 Noto Peninsula Earthquake of M6.9, and the July 2007 Chuetsu-Oki Earthquake of M6.8, which occurred successively in the near-field, central Japan. Seismic zones of negative and positive increments of the Coulomb failure stress, assuming such slips, show seismic quiescence and activation, respectively, relative to the predicted rate by the ETAS model. These are further supported by transient crustal movement around the source preceding the rupture. Namely, time series of the baseline distance records between a numbers of the permanent GPS stations deviated from the predicted trend, with the trend of different slope that is basically consistent with the horizontal displacements of the stations due to the assumed slips. References Ogata, Y. (2007) Seismicity and geodetic anomalies in a wide area preceding the Niigata-Ken-Chuetsu Earthquake of October 23, 2004, central Japan, J. Geophys. Res. 112, in press.

  11. Crustal deformation and gas emission from the Krýsuvík high temperature geothermal system, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakel Gudjonsdottir, Sylvia; Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Hreinsdottir, Sigrun; Michakczewska, Karolina; Bergsson, Baldur; Auippa, Alessandro; Agla Oladottir, Audur; Rut Hjartardottir, Asta

    2016-04-01

    The Krýsuvík volcanic system is located at the oblique spreading Reykjanes Peninsula, Iceland. Since early 2009 the region has been undergoing episodes of localized ground uplift and subsidence. From March 2011 to the end of 2012 the region inflated by over 7 cm, triggering upper crustal earthquakes at the plate boundary. From 2012 to present the region has been subsiding at a relatively steady rate, reaching the pre inflation state by the end of 2015. GPS measurements indicate that the deflation source is located at 3 km depth coinciding with a previously mapped low resistivity zone from MT measurements suggesting the presence of water, magma or conductive minerals. In April 2013, near-real time monitoring of gas emissions started in Krýsuvík using a MultiGAS sensor system to collect data gas composition. Gas emissions are correlated with crustal deformation and seismicity within the Krýsuvík geothermal system. The dataset comprises near-continuous gas composition time series (MultiGAS); quantification of diffuse CO2 gas flux; direct samples of dry gas; seismic records; and GPS dataset. The gas emissions from the Krýsuvík system are H2O dominated with CO2 as the most abundant dry gas species, followed by lesser amounts of H2S. The subsurface equilibrium temperature is calculated as 278°C. This is consistent with previous observations made through sporadical sampling campaigns (e.g. Arnórsson, 1987). In addition, the semi-continuous MultiGAS dataset reveals higher variations of gas composition than previously reported by spot sampling. The diffuse CO2 soil flux is found to be variable between the three degassing areas in Krýsuvík ranging from 10.9-70.9 T/day with the highest flux in Hveradalir where the MultiGAS station is located. The total flux was calculated as 101.4 T/day. Correlation of the MultiGAS data with the geophysical data shows that peaks of H2O-rich emissions follow events of crustal movements. Coinciding with the H2O-rich peaks, SO2 is

  12. Crustal Deformation and the Seismic Cycle across the Kodiak Islands, Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauber, Jeanne; Carver, G.; Cohen, Steven C.; King, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The Kodiak Islands are located approximately 130 to 250 km from the Alaska-Aleutian Trench where the Pacific plate is underthrusting the North American plate at a rate of about 57 mm/yr. The southern extent of the 1964 Prince William Sound (${M-w}$ = 9.2) earthquake rupture occurred offshore and beneath the eastern portion of the Kodiak Islands. Here we report GPS results (1993-2001) from northern Kodiak Island that span the transition between the 1964 uplift region along the eastern coast and the region of coseismic subsidence further inland. The horizontal velocity vectors range from 22.9 $\\pm$ 2.2 mm/yr at N26.3$\\deg$W $\\pm$ 2.5$\\deg$, about 150 km from the trench, to 5.9 $\\pm$ 1.3 mm/yr at N65.9$\\deg$W $\\pm$ 6.6$\\deg$, about 190 km from the trench. Near the northeastern coast of Kodiak the velocity vector above the shallow, locked main thrust zone is between the orientation of PCFC-NOAM plate motion (N22$/deg$W) and the trench-normal (N3O$\\deg$W). Further west, our geodetic results suggest the accumulation of shear strain that will be released eventually as left-lateral motion on upper plate faults such as the Kodiak Island fault. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the difference between the Pacific-North American plate motion and the orientation of the down going slab would lead to 4-8 mm/yr of left-lateral slip. Short-term geodetic uplift rates range from 2 - 14 mm/yr, with the maximum uplift located near the axis of maximum subsidence during the 1964 earthquake. We evaluated alternate interseismic models for Kodiak to test the importance of various mechanisms responsible for crustal deformation rates. These models are based on the plate interface slip history inferred from earlier modeling of coseismic and post-seismic geodetic results. The horizontal (trench perpendicular) and vertical deformation rates across Kodiak are consistent with a model that includes the viscoelastic response to : (1) a downgoing Pacific plate interface

  13. Application of the Global Positioning System to crustal deformation measurement. II - The influence of errors in orbit determination networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Kristine M.; Webb, Frank H.; Agnew, Duncan C.

    1991-01-01

    The errors introduced into GPS measurements of a geodetic network by means of adopting different sets of stations in central and southern California as fixed points (termed fiducial stations) were investigated. Solutions for a crustal deformation network spanning distances up to 350 km were computed with a variety of fiducial networks, using fiducial coordinates determined from VLBI. Results showed that three receivers collocated with VLBI sites provide a stable reference system at a few millimeter level in the horizontal components and at 10 mm in the vertical components, indicating that local survey errors between VLBI and GPS markers at fiducial sites do not severely affect the estimates of interstation vectors.

  14. Application of an ultra-high-resolution FBG strain sensor for crustal deformation measurements at the Aburatsubo Bay, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokunaga, T.; Liu, Q.; He, Z.; Mogi, K.; Matsui, H.; Wang, H. F.; Kato, T.

    2011-12-01

    For crustal deformation measurements, high-resolution strain sensors on the order of tens of nano-strains are desirable. Current sensors for this purpose include quartz-tube extensometers, free-space laser interferometers, and borehole strainmeters. The former two sensors show quite high strain resolution, however, these are large in size, from tens to hundreds of meter long, and hence, are difficult to measure spatial strain distribution. The optical fiber strain sensors have advantages of multiplexing capability and relatively low cost, and are widely adopted in the applications for structural health monitoring of civil structures such as bridges and buildings. Thus, as long as the strain resolution can be high enough to meet the requirement of crustal deformation measurements, fiber strain sensors can be an attractive tool. We have been developing an ultra-high strain-resolution fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor for static strain measurement, interrogated by a narrow line-width tunable laser. The sensor consists of a pair of FBGs, one for strain sensing and the other for temperature compensation. The Bragg wavelength difference between the two FBGs is evaluated using a cross-correlation algorithm. We already demonstrated that an ultra-high resolution corresponding to 2.6 nano-strain was obtained in the case where no strain was applied to the sensor, which was considered to be the ultimate performance of our measurement system. By directly applying variable strains to the developed sensor with a piezo-stage, a resolution of 17.6 nano-strain was demonstrated. This time, the sensor was installed into the vault at Aburatsubo, Japan, to measure crustal deformation caused by ocean tide, and the measured data were compared with the results obtained by a quartz-tube extensometer at the site, which has been measured by the University of Tokyo's Earthquake Research Institute. The deformation induced by oceanic tide was measured by the FBG sensor with the resolution about

  15. NASA plan for international crustal dynamics studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The international activities being planned as part of the NASA geodynamics program are described. Methods of studying the Earth's crustal movements and deformation characteristics are discussed. The significance of the eventual formalations of earthquake predictions methods is also discussed.

  16. Co-Seismic and Post-Seismic Crustal Deformation of Sumitra-Andaman Islands Earthquake from GPS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, C.; Prajapati, S.

    2005-05-01

    In view of the devastating Sumitra-Andaman Islands earthquake and tsunami on December, 26th 2004, understating the Indian lithosphere beneath the Andaman Islands has gained great importance. This region is a transition zone between India & Burmese plates possessing high strain rate distribution. To estimate the co-seismic and post-seismic deformation, GPS data from IGS sites IISC, HYDE, LHAS, KUNM, PIMO, NTUS, DGAR, BAKO, COCO, MALE and a network of nine GPS sites in Andaman and Nicobar Islands have been analyzed using GAMIT/GLOBK software. Time series of the baselines and position coordinates indicate significant crustal deformation. The GPS results are discussed in conjunction with the litho-tectonics of the Andaman region.

  17. Present-Day Kinematics of Crustal Deformation of the Walker Lane and Central Nevada, Derived From GPS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyst, M. C.; Hammond, W. C.

    2002-12-01

    The Walker Lane (WL) is a zone of tectonic deformation located between the western edge of the Basin and Range province (BR) in Nevada and the Sierra Nevada in California. It extends from ~36o in California to ~41o latitude in western Nevada and eastern California. The WL is of great interest for the study of intra-plate deformation because it accommodates the transfer of NW directed motion of the Sierra Nevada block to roughly E-W extension in the eastern BR. In addition, by connecting the Eastern California Shear Zone (ECSZ) with more northern zones of dextral shear such as the Central Nevada Seismic Zone (CNSZ) the WL plays an important role in the accommodation of motion between the Pacific and North America plates. Previous studies of the present-day crustal deformation in this area focused on sub-regions of the WL. We study the whole WL and utilize a relatively dense GPS velocity set (of 121 stations with data from 1992 to 2002) to model crustal deformation. The GPS data set consists of the western Nevada data of Svarc et al. (JGR, 2002), the BR data of Thatcher et al. (Science, 1999) and the ECSZ data of Gan et al. (JGR, 2000). Principal strain rates derived from data subsets agree with those of previous studies: In the northern WL WNW-ESE extension averages ~24 nstrain/yr and NNE-SSW contraction averages ~9 nstrain/yr. Since the average fault trend is NNW, the resulting strain rates may be indicative for dextral transtensional slip. In the central WL WNW-ESE extension (~27 nstrain/yr) and NNE-SSW contraction (~11 nstrain/yr) together with the predominantly ENE trending faults suggest sinistral transtensional slip. In the southern WL ENE-WSW extension (~25 nstrain/yr), NNW-SSE contraction (~30 nstrain/yr) and NNW trending faults correspond to dextral slip. To determine the spatial variation of the crustal deformation field we solve for a self-consistent continuous velocity gradient field from which both strain and rotation rate fields are derived. In general

  18. The role of hornblende in deep crustal seismic anisotropy: an investigation of the importance of deformation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condit, C.; Orlandini, O.; Mahan, K. H.; Schulte-Pelkum, V.; Rattanasith, D. T.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral deformation plays a key role in the creation of seismic anisotropy, an important tool used to understand the structure and nature of deep continental crust. Hornblende is a common anisotropic mineral that may account for much of the seismic anisotropy observed at deep crustal levels. Recent studies demonstrate a large range in the amount of seismic anisotropy produced by amphibole-rich tectonites (P-wave anisotropy values from 3-17%) without a systematic correlation between amphibole mode and anisotropy magnitude. We investigate this variation by studying two exhumed deep crustal shear zones where tectonites have similar mineralogy and foliation strength but contrasting anisotropy magnitude. The structures are the km-scale Grease River shear zone (SZ1) in the Athabasca granulite terrane in northern Saskatchewan and a series of cm-scale shear zones (SZ2) in and near Gallatin Canyon in SW Montana. SZ1 reworked a deep crustal meta-granodiorite at conditions of 0.7-0.5 GPa and 600-700 °C, overprinting an earlier developed granulite facies assemblage and deformation fabric. SZ2 structures are characterized by strain gradients from undeformed meta-gabbro with igneous textures to a laminated ultramylonite at metamorphic conditions of uppermost amphibolite facies (1.1 GPa, 800° C). Both structures developed during fluid infiltration and involved significant growth and subsequent recrystallization of new hornblende, from less than 10% in the host rock to near 50% in the mylonite, at the expense of earlier pyroxene-rich assemblages. SZ1 mylonite has a strongly developed hornblende crystallographically preferred orientation (CPO) resulting in a moderately high P-wave anisotropy of 6.7%, whereas SZ2 ultramylonite exhibits a weak CPO and a low P-wave anisotropy of 2.1%, despite containing a well-developed hornblende shape-preferred orientation. We hypothesize that these contrasting microstructural and anisotropy patterns are due to deformation achieved through

  19. Structural style, deformation mechanisms and paleodifferential stress along an exposed crustal section: constraints on the rheology of quartzofeldspathic rocks at supra- and infrastructural levels (Bohemian Massif)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulauf, G.

    2001-03-01

    between mica- and quartz-rich layers were sufficiently high for buckle folding. Strain-protected intercalated metagranitoids, on the other hand, do not show pervasive deformation fabrics. The amphibolite-facies part forms an infrastructure characterized by pervasive mylonitic shearing of both Cambrian granitoids and metagreywackes. It is suggested that the combination of the following processes has contributed to weaken the amphibolite-facies level making nonlocalized flow possible: (1) increased recrystallization of feldspar; (2) crystal-plastic softening of quartz due to high-temperature grain boundary migration and activity of prism slip; and (3) enhanced diffusive mass transfer in the form of metamorphic reactions. The structural breaks at the semibrittle crustal level and at the greenschist-/amphibolite-facies boundary supports the view that rheological boundaries are prone to form major detachment horizons in the continental crust.

  20. Temporal evolution of continental lithospheric strength in actively deforming regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thatcher, W.; Pollitz, F.F.

    2008-01-01

    It has been agreed for nearly a century that a strong, load-bearing outer layer of earth is required to support mountain ranges, transmit stresses to deform active regions and store elastic strain to generate earthquakes. However the dept and extent of this strong layer remain controversial. Here we use a variety of observations to infer the distribution of lithospheric strength in the active western United States from seismic to steady-state time scales. We use evidence from post-seismic transient and earthquake cycle deformation reservoir loading glacio-isostatic adjustment, and lithosphere isostatic adjustment to large surface and subsurface loads. The nearly perfectly elastic behavior of Earth's crust and mantle at the time scale of seismic wave propagation evolves to that of a strong, elastic crust and weak, ductile upper mantle lithosphere at both earthquake cycle (EC, ???10?? to 103 yr) and glacio-isostatic adjustment (GIA, ???103 to 104 yr) time scales. Topography and gravity field correlations indicate that lithosphere isostatic adjustment (LIA) on ???106-107 yr time scales occurs with most lithospheric stress supported by an upper crust overlying a much weaker ductile subtrate. These comparisons suggest that the upper mantle lithosphere is weaker than the crust at all time scales longer than seismic. In contrast, the lower crust has a chameleon-like behavior, strong at EC and GIA time scales and weak for LIA and steady-state deformation processes. The lower crust might even take on a third identity in regions of rapid crustal extension or continental collision, where anomalously high temperatures may lead to large-scale ductile flow in a lower crustal layer that is locally weaker than the upper mantle. Modeling of lithospheric processes in active regions thus cannot use a one-size-fits-all prescription of rheological layering (relation between applied stress and deformation as a function of depth) but must be tailored to the time scale and tectonic

  1. Crustal deformation study in the Canary Archipelago by the analysis of GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín, Adriana; Sevilla, Miguel; Zurutuza, Joaquín

    2014-06-01

    The Canary Archipelago is an active volcanic region located in the African plate, at 100 Km of the northwest coast of Africa. The Complutense University of Madrid, Institute of Astronomy and Geodesy (CSIC-UCM) and University of Jaén, established a GPS Network in this region and carried out six observations campaigns from 2002 to 2009. The focus of thiswork is processing and analyzing these observations to study the geodynamic behavior of the stations of this network. The data have been computed with the Bernese GPS Software Version 5.0 obtaining individual solutions of coordinates for each session and campaign, the coordinate velocities of the stations and the time series of baselines formed between them. Results show consistency of station velocities compared to behaviour of areas permanent stations and baselines stability. No deformations could be detected.

  2. High-Frequency CTD Measurements for Accurate GPS/acoustic Sea-floor Crustal Deformation Measurement System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadokoro, K.; Yasuda, K.; Taniguchi, S.; Uemura, Y.; Matsuhiro, K.

    2015-12-01

    The GPS/acoustic sea-floor crustal deformation measurement system has developed as a useful tool to observe tectonic deformation especially at subduction zones. One of the factors preventing accurate GPS/acoustic sea-floor crustal deformation measurement is horizontal heterogeneity of sound speed in the ocean. It is therefore necessary to measure the gradient directly from sound speed structure. We report results of high-frequency CTD measurements using Underway CTD (UCTD) in the Kuroshio region. We perform the UCTD measurements on May 2nd, 2015 at two stations (TCA and TOA) above the sea-floor benchmarks installed across the Nankai Trough, off the south-east of Kii Peninsula, middle Japan. The number of measurement points is six at each station along circles with a diameter of 1.8 nautical miles around the sea-floor benchmark. The stations TCA and TOA are located on the edge and the interior of the Kuroshio current, respectively, judging from difference in sea water density measured at the two stations, as well as a satellite image of sea-surface temperature distribution. We detect a sound speed gradient of high speeds in the southern part and low speeds in the northern part at the two stations. At the TCA station, the gradient is noticeable down to 300 m in depth; the maximum difference in sound speed is +/- 5 m/s. The sound speed difference is as small as +/- 1.3 m/s at depths below 300 m, which causes seafloor benchmark positioning error as large as 1 m. At the TOA station, the gradient is extremely small down to 100 m in depth. The maximum difference in sound speed is less than +/- 0.3 m/s that is negligible small for seafloor benchmark positioning error. Clear gradient of high speed is observed to the depths; the maximum difference in sound speed is +/- 0.8-0.9 m/s, causing seafloor benchmark positioning error of several tens centimeters. The UCTD measurement is effective tool to detect sound speed gradient. We establish a method for accurate sea

  3. Present-day Crustal Deformation and Neotectonics in Northern Hualien, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Lee, J.; Chen, R.; Chen, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Eastern Taiwan has long been well-known as the collision suture between the Eurasian plate and the Philippine Sea plate and thus characterized by dense earthquakes and active faults. Hualien is located at the transition point where the Philippine Sea plate westward obducts upon the Eurasian plate in the south, while dives under the Eurasian plate from the latitude of Hualien northwards. Two active structures have been reported in Hualien area. One is the Milun thrust fault, the surface rupture of 1951 M=7.1 Hualien earthquake. It has been mapped running through the city of Hualien, showing coseismic slips of 1.2 and 2 m for its vertical and sinistral strike slip respectively. The second one is the Beipu structure identified by relevant geomorphic features. This study used Taiwan 40m-DTM to identify the coverage of above two structure related geomorphic features and further used RTK-GPS to construct high-resolution topography for the detailed analyses. A dense network of GPS is also deployed to monitor recent horizontal crustal displacement. The D-InSAR is additionally applied to target on recent vertical displacement. The GPS results show that Hualien area moves northwestward relative to the stable reference of the station S01R at Penghu, located in Taiwan Strait. Our GPS results demonstrate the hanging wall of the Milun fault is moving northward faster than the footwall with a left-lateral strike slip. This implies this fault acts as an oblique thrust fault in both of the interseismic and coseismic period. On the other hand, by characterized topography shape the Beipu structure can be interpreted as a flower structure consistent with left-lateral en echelon array. To our surprise, the GPS velocities show a possible left-lateral but extensional movement in Beipu area. Our D-InSAR results show uneven vertical displacements in the study area, but still can see hanging wall of the Meilun fault is uplifting relative to its footwall.

  4. PyLith: A Finite-Element Code for Modeling Quasi-Static and Dynamic Crustal Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aagaard, B.; Williams, C.; Knepley, M.

    2008-12-01

    We have developed open-source finite-element software for 2-D and 3-D dynamic and quasi-static modeling of crustal deformation. This software, PyLith (current release is version 1.3), combines the quasi-static viscoelastic modeling functionality of PyLith 0.8 and its predecessors (LithoMop and Tecton) and the wave propagation modeling functionality of EqSim. The target applications contain spatial scales ranging from tens of meters to hundreds of kilometers with temporal scales for dynamic modeling ranging from milliseconds to minutes and temporal scales for quasi-static modeling ranging from minutes to hundreds of years. PyLith is part of the NSF funded Computational Infrastructure for Geodynamics (CIG) and runs on a wide variety of platforms (laptops, workstations, and Beowulf clusters). It uses a suite of general, parallel, graph data structures called Sieve for storing and manipulating finite-element meshes. This permits use of a variety of 2-D and 3-D cell types including triangles, quadrilaterals, hexahedra, and tetrahedra. Current features include kinematic fault ruptures, Dirichlet (displacement or velocity), Neumann (traction), and absorbing boundary conditions, linear elastic, generalized Maxwell, and Maxwell linear viscoelastic materials, gravitational body forces, and automatic time step selection for quasi-static problems. Future releases will add dynamic fault interface conditions (employing fault constitutive models), additional viscoelastic and viscoplastic materials, and automated calculation of suites of Green's functions. We also plan to extend PyLith to allow coupling multiple simultaneous simulations. For example, this could include (1) coupling an interseismic deformation simulation to a spontaneous earthquake rupture simulation (each using subsets of the software), (2) coupling a spontaneous earthquake rupture simulation to a global wave propagation simulation, or (3) coupling a short-term crustal deformation simulation to a mantle convection

  5. PyLith: A Finite-Element Code for Modeling Quasi-Static and Dynamic Crustal Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aagaard, B.; Williams, C.; Knepley, M.

    2007-12-01

    We have developed open-source finite-element software for 2-D and 3-D dynamic and quasi-static modeling of crustal deformation. This software, PyLith version 1.1, combines the quasi-static viscoelastic modeling functionality of PyLith 0.8 and its predecessors (LithoMop and Tecton) and the wave propagation and spontaneous rupture modeling functionality of EqSim. The target applications contain spatial scales ranging from tens of meters to hundreds of kilometers with temporal scales for dynamic modeling ranging from milliseconds to minutes and temporal scales for quasi-static modeling ranging from minutes to hundreds of years. PyLith is part of the NSF funded Computational Infrastructure for Geodynamics (CIG) and runs on a wide variety of platforms, from laptops to Beowulf clusters. It uses a suite of general, parallel, graph data structures called Sieve for storing and manipulating finite-element meshes. This permits use of a variety of 2-D and 3-D cell types including triangles, quadrilaterals, hexahedra, and tetrahedra. Current features include kinematic fault interface conditions, Dirichlet (displacement or velocity), Neumann (traction), and absorbing boundary conditions, linear elastic, generalized Maxwell, and Maxwell linear viscoelastic materials, and quasi-static and dynamic time-stepping. Future releases will add dynamic fault interface conditions (employing fault constitutive models), additional viscoelastic and viscoplastic materials, and automated calculation of suites of Green's functions. We also plan to extend PyLith to allow coupling multiple simultaneous simulations. For example, this could include (1) coupling an interseismic deformation simulation to a spontaneous earthquake rupture simulation (each using subsets of the software), (2) coupling a spontaneous earthquake rupture simulation to a global wave propagation simulation, or (3) coupling a short-term crustal deformation simulation to a mantle convection simulation and an orogenesis and basin

  6. Numerical modeling of forceful pluton emplacement and associated deformation at different crustal levels - instantaneous, continuous or episodic intrusion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Nabelek, P. I.

    2015-12-01

    The Papoose Flat pluton in the White-Inyo Range, California, is one of the best examples of forceful magma emplacement at mid-crustal levels that is revealed by a highly strained aureole. A thermo-rheological 2-D model of the pluton and its aureole is proposed. We explored how the frequency of magma input, from instantaneous to continuous to the bottom of the laccolith, affects the ductile width of the aureole and the crystallinity of the pluton, which has implications for eruption of magma. We modeled these aspects at mid- and upper-crustal levels. The pluton was assumed to be 5 km thick in the middle and 13 km wide. Except for instantaneous growth, pluton was assumed to grow over 5 m.y. The aureole was assumed to have power-law rheology of quartz with dependence on H2O fugacity, which was calculated using the CORK equation (Holland & Powell, 1991) Our result shows that the bottom of the Papoose Flat pluton was emplaced at the brittle-ductile transition zone of the crust. The crustal rheology profile assisted the softening of rocks around the pluton. The simulated temperature and strength profiles confirm that ductile deformation was related to thermal weakening (Saint-Blanquat et al., 2001). Results of incremental growth calculations show that the pluton remains hot and only partially crystalline for millions of years when it grows by frequent input of small batches of liquid. At the mid-crustal level, the ductile region around the pluton is much wider and exists longer than at the shallow crustal level. Brittle rheology is dominant during the late stage growth at the shallow depth. When the pluton grows instantly or by only few episodes of large batches of input, the mobile part of the pluton is thin and the ductile aureole is narrower. High-frequency incremental growth by smaller magma batches produces a large volume of mobile magma that has the potential to induce internal magmatic layering that may be reflected in aligned acquired magnetic susceptibility (AMS

  7. Improved sea level monitors for measuring vertical crustal deformation in the Shumagin seismic gap, Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurst, Ken; Beavan, John

    1987-01-01

    The relative vertical deformation detection capability of a network of sea level gauges in the Shumagin seismic gap, Alaska has been improved. An examination of the present noise levels suggests that the network is now capable of providing relative deformation data that is quieter than data from leveling, GPS, VLBI, or satellite laser ranging.

  8. Crustal Deformation Caused by an M8.1 Earthquake in the Solomon Islands, Detected by ALOS/PALSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyagi, Y.; Ozawa, T.; Shimada, M.

    2009-12-01

    On April 1, 2007 (UTC), a large Mw 8.1 interplate earthquake occurred in the Solomon Islands subduction zone where Pacific, Australian, Solomon Sea, and Woodlark Plates produce complicated tectonics. This earthquake was accompanied by a large tsunami and caused considerable damage in the epicentral area. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) performed emergency observations using the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS). A remote-sensing technique has the advantage of being able to observe and monitor a disaster in a remote location like the Solomon Islands that is difficult to access and receives few geophysical observations. Especially the Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Rader (PALSAR) can observe the target and get high coherence even under cloudy conditions in heavily-vegetated tropical region. We applied Differential Interferometric SAR (DInSAR) technique using data from the PALSAR installed on ALOS, and detected significant crustal deformation over wide area associated with the earthquake. Then we inverted the geodetic information from DInSAR result jointly with the field investigation data (Tomita et al., 2008), and estimated a slip distribution on the inferred seismic fault (Miyagi et al., 2009). The modeling result shows large slip areas around the hypocenter and the centroid, and the estimated slip pattern was corresponding to those deduced from teleseismic data (e.g. Yagi, 2007). It can be interpreted that the large slip area around the centroid is consistent with a strong coupling area due to a subduction of the plate boundary between the Woodlark and Australian plates, and that the small slip area is consistent with the weak coupling area under the Simbo Island caused by thermal activities related to volcanic activity of Simbo Island. The 2007 earthquake occurred in the area where has occurred no M7- or larger-sized earthquake since 1970. Although a part of the seismic gap was filled in the 2007 events, small seismic gap

  9. Present-day crustal deformation in central Alborz (Iran) inferred from GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernant, P.; Nilforoushan, F.; Bayer, R.; Sedighi, M.; Chery, J.; Tavakoli, F.; Masson, F.

    2003-04-01

    The Alborz range is an active mountain belt south of the Caspian sea. The main tectonic structures of Alborz are generally overthrusting range-parallel faults northward dipping in the south and southward dipping in the north. The regular occurrence of large historical earthquakes in this range suggests an important activity of the faults. To study the internal deformation (horizontal and vertical movements) of the Alborz range, we have installed a GPS network of 12 sites crossing the Alborz range 50 km east of Tehran. Three epochs of measurements have been recorded during the falls 2000, 2001 and 2002. A previous study using a network covering the whole country has suggested that the central Alborz is accommodating ~8 mm/yr of the ~21 mm/yr of the north-south convergence between Arabia and Eurasia. Our new data processed with GAMIT and GLOBK provide a velocity field consistent with the shortening rate in Alborz. The mean repeatability values obtained for the network baselines are about 1-1.5 mm for north and east Component for each surveys. The three epochs of measurements allow to closely define the errors associated to the sites, they are about 1.5-2 mm/yr. Most of the shortening seems to be accommodated by the southern and northern frontal parts of the range which may absorb ~4 and ~3 mm/yr respectively. Deformation in the central part remains poorly sampled due to a landslide affecting a point at about 200 mm/yr to the SE. However, the shortening of the inner part of the range appears to be modest (~1 mm/yr). Because left lateral displacements are known in central Alborz, we have tried to interpret our results in order to define the long term velocities of these faults. Assuming that most of the strike-slip motion occurs on the Mosha fault which is orientated N100°E, GPS results suggest an interseismic left lateral slip rate of about 4mm/yr between sites north and south of the fault. This is consistent with the geological slip rate proposed by Ritz et al

  10. Detecting deep crustal magma movement: Exploring linkages between increased gas emission, deep seismicity, and deformation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, C. A.; Poland, M. P.; Power, J. A.; Sutton, A. J.; Elias, T.; Grapenthin, R.; Thelen, W. A.

    2013-12-01

    Typically in the weeks to days before a volcanic eruption there are indisputable signals of unrest that can be identified in geophysical and geochemical data. Detection of signals of volcanic unrest months to years prior to an eruption, however, relies on our ability to recognize and link more subtle changes. Deep long-period earthquakes, typically 10-45 km beneath volcanoes, are thought to represent magma movement and may indicate near future unrest. Carbon dioxide (CO2 ) exsolves from most magmas at similar depths and increases in CO2 discharge may also provide a months-to-years precursor as it emits at the surface in advance of the magma from which it exsolved. Without the use of sensitive monitoring equipment and routine measurements, changes in CO2 can easily go undetected. Finally, inflation of the surface, through use of InSAR or GPS stations (especially at sites tens of km from the volcano) can also indicate accumulation of magma in the deep crust. Here we present three recent examples, from Redoubt, Kilauea, and Mammoth Mountain volcanoes, where increases in CO2 emission, deep long-period earthquakes, and surface deformation data indicate either the intrusion of magma into the deep crust in the months to years preceding volcanic eruptions or a change in ongoing volcanic unrest. At Redoubt volcano, Alaska, elevated CO2 emission (~ 1200 t/d, or roughly 20 times the background emission) was measured in October, 2008, over 5 months prior to the first magmatic eruption in March, 2009. In addition to CO2 release, deep long-period earthquakes were first recorded in December, 2008, and a deep deformation signal was detected starting in May 2008, albeit retrospectively. At Kilauea, Hawaii, increases in CO2 emissions from the summit (up to nearly 25 kt/d, over three times the background emission) were measured mid-2004, roughly coincident with a change in deformation behavior from deflation to inflation. Nearly 3 years later, a change in eruptive activity occurred

  11. An elastic/viscoelastic finite element analysis method for crustal deformation using a 3-D island-scale high-fidelity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichimura, Tsuyoshi; Agata, Ryoichiro; Hori, Takane; Hirahara, Kazuro; Hashimoto, Chihiro; Hori, Muneo; Fukahata, Yukitoshi

    2016-07-01

    As a result of the accumulation of high-resolution observation data, 3-D high-fidelity crustal structure data for large domains are becoming available. However, it has been difficult to use such data to perform elastic/viscoelastic crustal deformation analyses in large domains with quality assurance of the numerical simulation that guarantees convergence of the numerical solution with respect to the discretization size because the costs of analysis are significantly high. This paper proposes a method of constructing a high-fidelity crustal structure finite element (FE) model using high-fidelity crustal structure data and fast FE analysis to reduce the costs of analysis (based on automatic FE model generation for parallel computation, OpenMP/MPI hybrid parallel computation on distributed memory computers, a geometric multigrid, variable preconditioning and multiple precision arithmetic). Using the proposed methods, we construct 10 billion degree-of-freedom high-fidelity crustal structure FE models for the entire Japan, and conduct elastic/viscoelastic crustal deformation analysis using this model with enough high accuracy of the numerical simulation.

  12. Tectonic evolution of the Lachlan Fold Belt, southeastern Australia: constraints from coupled numerical models of crustal deformation and surface erosion driven by subduction of the underlying mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Jean; Pauselli, Cristina

    2004-04-01

    We have used a coupled thermo-mechanical finite-element (FE) model of crustal deformation driven by mantle/oceanic subduction to demonstrate that the tectonic evolution of the Lachlan Fold Belt (LFB) during the Mid-Palaeozoic (Late Ordovician to Early Carboniferous) can be linked to continuous subduction along a single subduction zone. This contrasts with most models proposed to date which assume that separate subduction zones were active beneath the western, central and eastern sections of the Lachlan Orogen. We demonstrate how the existing data on the structural, volcanic and erosional evolution of the Lachlan Fold Belt can be accounted for by our model. We focus particularly on the timing of fault movement in the various sectors of the orogen. We demonstrate that the presence of the weak basal decollement on which most of the Lachlan Fold Belt is constructed effectively decouples crustal structures from those in the underlying mantle. The patterns of faulting in the upper crust appears therefore to be controlled by lateral strength contrasts inherited from previous orogenic events rather than the location of one or several subduction zones. The model also predicts that the uplift and deep exhumation of the Wagga-Omeo Metamorphic Belt (WOMB) is associated with the advection of this terrane above the subduction point and is the only tectonic event that gives us direct constraints on the location of the subduction zone. We also discuss the implications of our model for the nature of the basement underlying the present-day orogen.

  13. Block modeling of crustal deformation in Tierra del Fuego from GNSS velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, L.; Richter, A.; Fritsche, M.; Hormaechea, J. L.; Perdomo, R.; Dietrich, R.

    2015-05-01

    The Tierra del Fuego (TDF) main island is divided by a major transform boundary between the South America and Scotia tectonic plates. Using a block model, we infer slip rates, locking depths and inclinations of active faults in TDF from inversion of site velocities derived from Global Navigation Satellite System observations. We use interseismic velocities from 48 sites, obtained from field measurements spanning 20 years. Euler vectors consistent with a simple seismic cycle are estimated for each block. In addition, we introduce far-field information into the modeling by applying constraints on Euler vectors of major tectonic plates. The difference between model and observed surface deformation near the Magallanes Fagnano Fault System (MFS) is reduced by considering finite dip in the forward model. For this tectonic boundary global plate circuits models predict relative movements between 7 and 9 mm yr- 1, while our regional model indicates that a strike-slip rate of 5.9 ± 0.2 mm yr- 1 is accommodated across the MFS. Our results indicate faults dipping 66- 4+ 6° southward, locked to a depth of 11- 5+ 5 km, which are consistent with geological models for the MFS. However, normal slip also dominates the fault perpendicular motion throughout the eastern MFS, with a maximum rate along the Fagnano Lake.

  14. Crustal deformation and interplate coupling from GPS observation in the West-Java Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meilano, Irwan; Abidin, Hasanuddin A.; Subarya, Cecep; Andreas, Heri; Kato, Teruyuki; Harjono, Hery; Anggreni, Dina; Kimata, Fumiaki

    2010-05-01

    The Sunda trench plate boundaries along Sumatra have the potential to generate large thrust-type earthquakes. While less frequent and smaller events occur along Java where subduction of older seafloor takes place relatively aseismically. This latest need further investigation since 3 deadly earthquakes occurred for the last 4 years. The first once is the Yogyakarta May 2006 Earthquake then the Pangandaran July 2006 tsunami earthquake and the last one West Java 2009 earthquake. Java trench might have a unique earthquake potential. Therefore, more research is needed related to the 2009 earthquake in West Java to obtain a deep understanding of the mechanisms of subduction beneath the Java Island and its surrounding areas. We have conducted four times GPS campaign observation in West Java, 2006 (December), 2007 (August), 2008 (August) and 2009 (June and August). The activity of local fault; sinistral motion of Cimandiri fault and Lembang fault control the deformation pattern in West Java. Using simple elastic half-space model we estimate geodetic slip-rate of Cimandiri fault is 5mm/yr and 3mm/yr for Lembang fault. By assuming BAKO station as a fixed station, almost all GPS stations move to the north with velocity less than 1 cm/yr. This suggests that the interplate coupling is very weak or if any it only extend at very shallow portion.

  15. Secular crustal deformation and interplate coupling of the Japanese Islands as deduced from continuous GPS array, 1996 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Fiky, Gamal; Kato, Teruyuki

    2006-08-01

    Data from the nation-wide GPS continuous tracking network that has been operated by the Geographical Survey Institute of Japan since April 1996 were used to study crustal deformation in the Japanese Islands. We first extracted site coordinate from daily SINEX files for the period from April 1, 1996 to February 24, 2001. Since raw time series of station coordinates include coseismic and postseismic displacements as well as seasonal variation, we model each time series as a combination of linear and trigonometric functions and jumps for episodic events. Estimated velocities were converted into a kinematic reference frame [Heki, K., 1996. Horizontal and vertical crustal movements from three-dimensional very long baseline interferometry kinematic reference frame: implication for reversal timescale revision. J. Geophys. Res., 101: 3187-3198.] to discuss the crustal deformation relative to the stable interior of the Eurasian plate. A Least-Squares Prediction technique has been used to segregate the signal and noise in horizontal as well as vertical velocities. Estimated horizontal signals (horizontal displacement rates) were then differentiated in space to calculate principal components of strain. Dilatations, maximum shear strains, and principal axes of strain clearly portray tectonic environments of the Japanese Islands. On the other hand, the interseismic vertical deformation field of the Japanese islands is derived for the same GPS data interval. The GPS vertical velocities are combined with 31 year tide gage records to estimate absolute vertical velocity. The results of vertical deformation show that (1) the existence of clear uplift of about 6 mm/yr in Shikoku and Kii Peninsula, whereas pattern of subsidence is observed in the coast of Kyushu district. This might reflect strong coupling between the Philippine Sea plate and overriding plate at the Nankai Trough and weak coupling off Kyushu, (2) no clear vertical deformation pattern exists along the Pacific coast of

  16. Crustal Deformation Measurements Using Repeat-pass JERS 1 SAR Interferometry Near the Izu Peninsula, Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujiwara, Satoshi; Rosen, Paul A.; Tobita, Mikio; Murakami, Makoto

    1997-01-01

    We have examined the precision of interferometric SAR measurements of surface deformation of the Earth using 24-cm wavelength data acqured by the Japanese Earth Resources Satellite 1 (JERS 1) spacecraft, over the Izu Peninsula, Japan.

  17. Distance corrections for single- and dual-color lasers by ray tracing. [for earth crustal deformation and strain measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, E.; Carter, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    The physical arc length difference between the red and blue beam of a dual-color laser generates an error term in determining Delta-n as well as n (the refractive index) and D (the line length). Numerical ray trace examples and theoretical approximations show that the resulting relative error Delta-D/D increases as D-squared. Error reduction by a factor of nearly 10 is possible by using the pressure, temperature, and humidity of both endpoints to calculate n. The present study results from a desire to improve the precision of monitoring the local and regional position of the Lunar Laser Ranging Observatory atop Haleakala, Maui, Hawaii; the monitoring of the earth's crustal deformation and strain is a primary concern of the study.

  18. Mid-clysmic event, Gulf of Suez rotational deformation associated with a deep crustal detachment fault

    SciTech Connect

    Vigano, P.L.; Patton, T.L. )

    1988-08-01

    Dip relationships at the boundaries of three stratigraphic packages (one prerift and two synrift) in the Gulf of Suez suggest that the early stages of structural development in the Gulf of Suez can be subdivided into two phases. Synrift sediments deposited in the first phase of deformation (prerotation units) demonstrate only minor angular discordance with the underlying pre-Miocene (prerift stratigraphy). Synrift sediments deposited in the second phase of deformation (rotation units) show marked angular discordance and onlapping relationships with underlying units. The authors propose that the prerotation units were deposited during a period of basin-wide, generally vertical subsidence which was accommodated by slip on numerous, oppositely dipping normal faults. As subsidence continued, faults with similar dip directions began to work in unison and dominate the deformation of portions of the rift, causing faults with other orientations to play a lesser role or to become inactive. Minor rotations occurred during this phase of deformation. The rotational phase of deformation initiated as major faults propagated downward to and merged with a major detachment surface at depth. As extension continued, rotation of large, fault-bound blocks along deep seated listric faults resulted in the exposure and erosion of both pre-Miocene and prerotation units along the updip segments of the blocks. Sediments deposited during the rotational phase of deformation transgressed the backs of these rotated blocks and were laid down in angular discordance with the underlying units.

  19. The interpretation of crustal dynamics data in terms of plate motions and regional deformation near plate boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Sean C.

    During our participation in the NASA Crustal Dynamics Project under NASA contract NAS-27339 and grant NAG5-814 for the period 1982-1991, we published or submitted for publication 30 research papers and 52 abstracts of presentations at scientific meetings. In addition, five M.I.T. Ph.D. students (Eric Bergman, Steven Bratt, Dan Davis, Jeanne Sauber, Anne Sheehan) were supported wholly or in part by this project during their thesis research. Highlights of our research progress during this period include the following: application of geodetic data to determine rates of strain in the Mojave block and in central California and to clarify the relation of such strain to the San Andreas fault and Pacific-North American plate motions; application of geodetic data to infer post seismic deformation associated with large earthquakes in the Imperial Valley, Hebgen Lake, Argentina, and Chile; determination of the state of stress in oceanic lithosphere from a systematic study of the centroid depths and source mechanisms of oceanic intraplate earthquakes; development of models for the state of stress in young oceanic regions arising from the differential cooling of the lithosphere; determination of the depth extent and rupture characteristics of oceanic transform earthquakes; improved determination of earthquake slip vectors in the Gulf of California, an important data set for the estimation of Pacific-North American plate motions; development of models for the state of stress and mechanics of fold-and-thrust belts and accretionary wedges; development of procedures to invert geoid height, residual bathymetry, and differential body wave travel time residuals for lateral variations in the characteristic temperature and bulk composition of the oceanic upper mantle; and initial GPS measurements of crustal deformation associated with the Imperial-Cerro Prieto fault system in southern California and northern Mexico. Full descriptions of the research conducted on these topics may be

  20. Effect of distributed inelastic deformation on fault slip profiles and fault interaction under mid-crustal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevitt, J. M.; Pollard, D. D.

    2015-12-01

    Under mid-crustal conditions, faults commonly are associated with distributed inelastic deformation (i.e., ductile fabrics). The effect of such inelastic deformation on fault slip profiles and fault interaction remains poorly understood, though it likely plays a significant role in the earthquake cycle. We have investigated meter-scale strike-slip faults exhumed from ~10 km depth in the Lake Edison granodiorite (Sierra Nevada, CA). These faults are characterized by slip-to-length ratios and slip gradients near fault tips that greatly exceed what is measured for faults in the brittle upper crust, or produced by linear elastic models. Using Abaqus, we construct elastoplastic finite element models to evaluate the impact of off-fault plasticity on the resulting slip profiles for both continuous and discontinuous faults. Elastoplastic models show that plastic strain near fault tips effectively lengthens faults, allowing for greater overall slip and increased slip gradients near fault tips. In the field, regions adjacent to fault tips contain mylonitized granodiorite and ductilely sheared dikes and schlieren, consistent with the model results. In addition, distributed plastic strain facilitates slip transfer between echelon fault segments, particularly for contractional step geometries. Relative to an isolated fault, fault segments adjacent to contractional steps are asymmetric, with the maximum slip shifted in the direction of the step. Immediately adjacent to the contractional step, fault slip is significantly reduced because shear offset is accommodated by distributed plastic shearing within the step, rather than by discrete slip on the faults. Although slip is locally reduced on each fault segment directly adjacent to a contractional step, overall slip transfer between discontinuous fault segments is most efficient for this step geometry. That is, faults segmented by contractional steps produce greater maximum slip than do those separated by extensional steps

  1. Topographic growth around the Orange River valley, southern Africa: A Cenozoic record of crustal deformation and climatic change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauteuil, Olivier; Bessin, Paul; Guillocheau, François

    2015-03-01

    We reconstruct the history of topographic growth in southern Africa on both sides of the Orange River valley from an integrated analysis of erosion surfaces, crustal deformation and climate change. First, we propose an inventory of erosion surfaces observed in the study area and classify them according to their most likely formative process, i.e. chemical weathering or mechanical erosion. Among the various land units observed we define a new class of landform: the pedivalley, which corresponds to a wide valley with a flat erosional floor. In the Orange River valley, we mapped three low-relief erosion surfaces, each bevelling a variety of lithologies. The oldest and most elevated is (1) a stripped etchplain evolving laterally into (2) a stepped pediplain bearing residual inselbergs; (3) a younger pediplain later formed in response to a more recent event of crustal deformation. These are all Cenozoic landforms: the etchplain is associated with a late Palaeocene to middle Eocene weathering event, and the two pediplains are older than the middle Miocene alluvial terraces of the Orange River. Landscape evolution was first driven by slow uplift (10 m/Ma), followed by a second interval of uplift involving a cumulative magnitude of at least 200 m. This event shaped the transition between the two pediplains and modified the drainage pattern. A final phase of uplift (magnitude: 60 m) occurred after the Middle Miocene and drove the incision of the lower terraces of the Orange River. Climate exerted a major control over the denudation process, and involved very humid conditions responsible for lateritic weathering, followed by more arid conditions, which promoted the formation of pedivalleys. Collectively, these produce pediplains.

  2. The interpretation of crustal dynamics data in terms of plate motions and regional deformation near plate boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, Sean C.

    1991-01-01

    During our participation in the NASA Crustal Dynamics Project under NASA contract NAS-27339 and grant NAG5-814 for the period 1982-1991, we published or submitted for publication 30 research papers and 52 abstracts of presentations at scientific meetings. In addition, five M.I.T. Ph.D. students (Eric Bergman, Steven Bratt, Dan Davis, Jeanne Sauber, Anne Sheehan) were supported wholly or in part by this project during their thesis research. Highlights of our research progress during this period include the following: application of geodetic data to determine rates of strain in the Mojave block and in central California and to clarify the relation of such strain to the San Andreas fault and Pacific-North American plate motions; application of geodetic data to infer post seismic deformation associated with large earthquakes in the Imperial Valley, Hebgen Lake, Argentina, and Chile; determination of the state of stress in oceanic lithosphere from a systematic study of the centroid depths and source mechanisms of oceanic intraplate earthquakes; development of models for the state of stress in young oceanic regions arising from the differential cooling of the lithosphere; determination of the depth extent and rupture characteristics of oceanic transform earthquakes; improved determination of earthquake slip vectors in the Gulf of California, an important data set for the estimation of Pacific-North American plate motions; development of models for the state of stress and mechanics of fold-and-thrust belts and accretionary wedges; development of procedures to invert geoid height, residual bathymetry, and differential body wave travel time residuals for lateral variations in the characteristic temperature and bulk composition of the oceanic upper mantle; and initial GPS measurements of crustal deformation associated with the Imperial-Cerro Prieto fault system in southern California and northern Mexico. Full descriptions of the research conducted on these topics may be

  3. PyLith: A Finite-Element Code for Modeling Quasi-Static and Dynamic Crustal Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, C. A.; Aagaard, B.; Knepley, M. G.

    2009-12-01

    We have developed open-source finite-element software for 2-D and 3-D dynamic and quasi-static modeling of crustal deformation. This software, PyLith (current release is version 1.4), combines the quasi-static viscoelastic modeling functionality of PyLith 0.8 and its predecessors (LithoMop and Tecton) and the wave propagation modeling functionality of EqSim. The target applications contain spatial scales ranging from tens of meters to hundreds of kilometers with temporal scales for dynamic modeling ranging from milliseconds to minutes and temporal scales for quasi-static modeling ranging from minutes to thousands of years. PyLith development is part of the NSF funded Computational Infrastructure for Geodynamics (CIG) and the software runs on a wide variety of platforms (laptops, workstations, and Beowulf clusters). Binaries and source code are available from geodynamics.org. It uses a suite of general, parallel, graph data structures called Sieve for storing and manipulating finite-element meshes. This permits use of a variety of 2-D and 3-D cell types including triangles, quadrilaterals, hexahedra, and tetrahedra. Current features include kinematic fault ruptures with multiple sequential earthquakes and aseismic creep, time-dependent Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions, absorbing boundary conditions, time-dependent point forces, linear elastic rheologies, generalized Maxwell and Maxwell linear viscoelastic rheologies, power-law rheologies, and gravitational body forces. Current development focuses on implementing dynamic fault interface conditions (employing fault constitutive models) and additional viscoelastic and viscoplastic materials. Future development plans include support for large deformation and automated calculation of suites of Green's functions. We also plan to extend PyLith to allow coupling multiple simultaneous simulations. For example, this could include (1) coupling an interseismic deformation simulation to a spontaneous earthquake rupture

  4. Review of crustal seismicity in the Aleutian Arc and implications for arc deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruppert, Natalia A.; Kozyreva, Natalia P.; Hansen, Roger A.

    2012-02-01

    Central and eastern Aleutian Arc is characterized by oblique convergence between the subducting Pacific and overriding Bering Plates. This results in westward arc translation and formation of rotating crustal blocks in the forearc. In 2006-2010 several moderate, shallow crustal earthquakes (up to magnitude 6.7) occurred in the region. These events are located about 150 km away from the trench, on the volcanic axis, and have either strike-slip (west of 174°W) or normal (east of 174°W) faulting mechanisms. We improve aftershock locations by applying precise relocation methods to aid in identifying preferred fault planes. We also review similar earthquakes that occurred prior to 2006. For the central Aleutian Arc we conclude that, while some of these events occurred along the boundaries of the rotating blocks, the majority are left-lateral strike-slip events on NW- to N-oriented fault planes in the unrotated Bering massif. These manifest Riedel shearing in response slip partitioning due to the oblique convergence. Normal faulting events in eastern Aleutian Arc reflect along-arc extension.

  5. Distribution of contemporary crustal deformation and mechanisms for extension in the Woodlark Rift: insights from GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, L. M.; Ellis, S. M.; Tregoning, P.; Little, T. A.; Palmer, N.

    2012-12-01

    The Woodlark Rift, southeastern Papua New Guinea, is a classic example of a rift transitioning from continental rifting to seafloor spreading, and is also the site of exhumation of the world's youngest Ultra-High Pressure (UHP) terranes. Prior to now, very little GPS data existed to constrain the kinematics of contemporary rifting, and the relationship of modern-day rifting to exhumation of the young UHP terranes. We present results from GPS campaign measurements at ~45 sites throughout the southeastern Papua New Guinea region, from GPS campaigns conducted in 2009, 2010, and 2012. Our results suggest that most of the modern-day extensional deformation has shifted southward towards the north coast of the PNG mainland, away from the locus of UHP exhumation in the D'Entrecasteaux Islands, although a few mm/yr of active extension remains in the region of UHP rock exhumation. This is consistent with modelling studies that predict a shift in the locus of extension away from the locus of UHP exhumation during the final, waning stages of UHP exhumation. Rates of total extension in the Woodlark Rift increase from west to east from several mm/yr (in the far western Woodlark Rift) to >20 mm/yr further east, due to clockwise rotation of microplates in the region about nearby poles of rotation. We will discuss the implications that our kinematic modelling of the GPS data, earthquake slip vector data, and geological data have for the large-scale driving mechanisms behind rifting in southeast PNG. Our results favour a model where rapid microplate rotation (at 2-3 degrees/Myr) and rifting in the Woodlark Basin is a consequence of strong slab pull forces from extremely rapid subduction (6-13 cm/yr) at the New Britain and San Cristobal trenches further to the north.

  6. Spatiotemporal model for crustal deformation around the focal area of the 2008 Iwate-Miyagi Inland Earthquake, northeastern Japan, estimated by GPS and InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohzono, M.; McCaffrey, R.; Ohta, Y.; Miura, S.; Iinuma, T.; Tachibana, K.; Sato, T.

    2009-12-01

    Applying the program tDEFNODE [McCaffrey, GRL09] to model elastic lithospheric block rotations and strains, and locking or coseismic slip on block-bounding faults, we model GPS and InSAR data of crustal deformation before and after the 2008 M7.2 Iwate-Miyagi Inland Earthquake (IMEQ). The epicenter of the IMEQ is located in a high strain rate zone along the Ou Backbone Range (OBR) in northeastern Japan, where volcanic front runs subparallel to the Japan Trench. Along eastern and western margin of the OBR, major inland active faults have been growing. In order to clarify detailed strain field around these active faults, Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) installed 7 new continuous GPS sites with ~5 km spacing across the Dedana Fault (DF), which is a part of the eastern marginal active faults, in October 2007. Because the DF is located at only ~20 km northeast from the hypocenter of the IMEQ, the detailed coseismic and postseismic crustal deformation was obtained at these GPS sites [Ohta et al., EPS08; Iinuma et al., GRL09]. Takada et al. [EPS09] also estimated coseismic faults from InSAR with pixel-offset method. These studies, however, handled each data independently. We unify both GPS and InSAR data to model crustal deformation over inter-, co-, and post-seismic period using tDEFNODE. This code interprets geodetic timeseries data by assuming elastic block rotation, transient phenomena such as slow slip, and coseismic slip, on the block boundary faults. We use timeseries data obtained by continuous GPS networks conducted by JNES, Tohoku University, Geographical Survey Institute (GSI), National Astronomical Observatory (NAO), and IGS from 2006 to June 2009, together with a temporal network for postseismic deformation installed by Japanese University Consortium for GPS Research (JUNCO). InSAR data is obtained by analyzing images of ALOS/PALSAR mission. We presumed three blocks in the study area divided by two boundary faults. We expressed the time

  7. Modeling crustal deformation and rupture processes related to upwelling of deep CO2-rich fluids during the 1965-1967 Matsushiro Earthquake Swarm in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Cappa, F.; Rutqvist, J.; Yamamoto, K.

    2009-05-15

    In Matsushiro, central Japan, a series of more than 700,000 earthquakes occurred over a 2-year period (1965-1967) associated with a strike-slip faulting sequence. This swarm of earthquakes resulted in ground surface deformations, cracking of the topsoil, and enhanced spring-outflows with changes in chemical compositions as well as carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) degassing. Previous investigations of the Matsushiro earthquake swarm have suggested that migration of underground water and/or magma may have had a strong influence on the swarm activity. In this study, employing coupled multiphase flow and geomechanical modelling, we show that observed crustal deformations and seismicity can have been driven by upwelling of deep CO{sub 2}-rich fluids around the intersection of two fault zones - the regional East Nagano earthquake fault and the conjugate Matsushiro fault. We show that the observed spatial evolution of seismicity along the two faults and magnitudes surface uplift, are convincingly explained by a few MPa of pressurization from the upwelling fluid within the critically stressed crust - a crust under a strike-slip stress regime near the frictional strength limit. Our analysis indicates that the most important cause for triggering of seismicity during the Matsushiro swarm was the fluid pressurization with the associated reduction in effective stress and strength in fault segments that were initially near critically stressed for shear failure. Moreover, our analysis indicates that a two order of magnitude permeability enhancement in ruptured fault segments may be necessary to match the observed time evolution of surface uplift. We conclude that our hydromechanical modelling study of the Matsushiro earthquake swarm shows a clear connection between earthquake rupture, deformation, stress, and permeability changes, as well as large-scale fluid flow related to degassing of CO{sub 2} in the shallow seismogenic crust. Thus, our study provides further evidence of the

  8. (abstract) GPS Monitoring of Crustal Deformation and the Earthquake Cycle in Costa Rica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgren, Paul R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper will discuss the objectives, approach, and anticipated results of a study of earthquakes in Costa Rica. GPS measurements will be taken and field surveys will be made. Assessments of seismic strain accumulation and post-seismic deformation will be made in an effort to understand the effect these processes have on regional tectonic models.

  9. Inversion for sources of crustal deformation and gravity change at the Yellowstone caldera

    SciTech Connect

    Vasco, D.W.; Taylor, C.L. ); Smith, R.B. )

    1990-11-10

    The Yellowstone caldera was formed in the latest of three explosive eruptions of rhyolites and ash flow tuffs totaling 3,700 km{sup 3} at 2, 1.2, and 0.6 m.y. before present. Its youthful volcanic history, widespread hydrothermal activity, intense seismicity, and extremely high heat flow, in excess of 30 times the continental average, marks the Yellowstone volcanic system as a giant caldera at unrest. Orthometric height increases of the caldera of up to 76 cm, measured from precise leveling surveys from 1923 to 1975-1977, were inverted to determine volume expansion source models for the caldera-wide deformation. For the 1923 to 1977 uplift episode, two regions of expansion were found: (1) in the northern part of the caldera near the Sour Creek resurgent dome of {approximately}0.37 km{sub 3}, and (2) in the southern part of the caldera, near the Mallard Lake resurgent dome of {approximately}0.41 km{sub 3}. Both bodies occur in the upper crust from near-surface depths to 6.0 km, but the largest volume expansions were found in the 3.0-6.0 km depth range. The southern caldera source volume, near the Mallard Lake dome, may extend down to 9.0 km. From 1976 to 1987, nearly simultaneous measurements of elevation and gravity changes were made on a profile across the northern caldera during a period of net uplift. Models of the temporal gravity variation infer that the volume increase for the northern caldera source must lie above 9.0 km and involved a density perturbation greater than +0.002 g/cm{sup 3}. The modeled volumetric sources are in the same general locations as bodies of low P wave velocities, high seismic attenuation, and large negative Bouguer gravity anomalies. It is likely that the modeled volumetric increases were caused by migration of magmas and/or the introduction of large volumes of hydrothermal fluids into the upper crust.

  10. The observation of crustal deformation derived from Taiwan Continuous GPS Array (2007-2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min-Chien, Tsai; Shui-Beih, Yu; Tzay-Chyn, Shin

    2015-04-01

    Data collected by 281 sites of Taiwan Continuous GPS Array from 2007 to 2013 are processed with GAMIT/GLOBK software. The acquired GPS position time series are described by model parameters such as linear rate, annual and semi-annual periodic motions, coseismic offsets, postseismic rate change, and exponential decay after earthquakes. Stacking of power spectral densities from 281 continuous GPS data in Taiwan, we found the slopes of spectra (spectral index) are -0.72, -0.77, and -0.57 for the E, N, U components, respectively. It indicates the errors of continuous GPS data can be described as a combination of white noise and flicker noise. The common-mode errors are removed by stacking data from 50 continuous GPS sites with data period more than 5 years. By removing common-mode errors, the precision of GPS data is further improved to 2.3 mm, 1.9 mm, and 6.9 mm in the E, N, U components, respectively. After strictly data quality control, time series analysis and noise analysis, we derive a new ITRF2008 velocity field and velocity field relative to Penghu using GPS data from 2007 to 2013 in the Taiwan area. The general pattern of the newly derived 2007-2013 velocity field is quite similar with that from previous studies, but the station density is much larger and spatial coverage is better, too. About 80 mm/yr plate convergence rate is observed, approximately half of plate convergence rate is accommodated on the fold and thrust belt of western Taiwan and another half is taken up in the Longitudinal Valley and the Coastal Range in eastern Taiwan. The velocities in western Taiwan generally show a fan-shaped pattern, consistent with the direction of maximum compression tectonic stress. In northern Taiwan, the velocity vectors reveal clockwise rotation, indicating the on-going extensional deformation related to the back-arc extension of the Okinawa Trough. In southern Taiwan, the horizontal velocity increases from about 40 mm/yr at Chiayi-Tainan to 55 mm/yr in the

  11. Crustal composition in southern Norway from active and passive source seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratford, W. R.; Frassetto, A. M.; Thybo, H.

    2010-12-01

    Crustal composition and structure beneath the Fennoscandian shield are highly variable due to the method of crustal accretion and the long history of extensional and compressional tectonics. In southern Norway, the Moho and crust are inferred to be the youngest of the shield, however, it is likely that a large discrepancy between crustal age and Moho age exists beneath the high southern Scandes where the Caledonian orogeny was in effect and beneath the Oslo Graben where 60 million years of rifting and magmatism has altered the crust. Crustal structure in southern Norway was targeted with a multi-disciplinary seismic study (Magnus-Rex - Mantle investigations of Norwegian uplift Structure). Three ~400 km long active source seismic profiles across the southern Norway and a region wide array of broadband seismometers were deployed. P and S-wave arrivals were recorded in the Magnus-Rex project, from which Poisson ratios for the crust in southern Norway are calculated from both active source profiling and receiver functions. Unusually strong S-wave arrivals allow rare insight into crustal Poisson’s ratio structure, within crustal layers, that is not normally available from active source data and are usually determined by earthquake tomography studies where only bulk crustal values are available. An average Poisson’s ratio of 0.25 is calculated for the crust in southern Norway, suggesting it is predominantly of felsic-intermediate composition and lacks any significant mafic lower crust. This differs significantly from the adjacent crust in the Svecofennian domain of the Fennoscandian shield where Moho depths reach ~50 km and an up to 20 km thick mafic lower crust is present. The vast difference in Moho depths in the Fennoscandian shield are, therefore, mostly due to the variation in thickness of the high Vp lower crust. Estimates of crustal composition and the effect of Magma intrusion within the Oslo Graben, and possible delamination of the lowermost crust beneath

  12. Reply [to “Comment on ‘Crustal deformation measured in Southern California’”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zheng-kang; Jackson, David D.; Sung, Li-yu

    1998-06-01

    Rydelek and Sacks do not dispute the correctness of our method and results. Rather they question whether our result is a new discovery, and whether we have given enough review to the previous literature on the phenomena and modeling of post-seismic viscoelastic relaxation. We agree that others before us found evidence for non-elastic deformation following earthquakes. We cited Thatcher [1983] as an example of such previous studies. Because Eos policy allows no more than 10 references per article, we never set out to do an extensive review on any subject our article covered, including post-seismic deformation. Had we intended to write a review, there would have been many other relevant papers besides those mentioned by Rydelek and Sacks. Instead, we reported newly available data, remarkable because of their precision, consistency, and spatial resolution, and because the measurements span nearly the entire width of the plate boundary.

  13. Crustal deformation due to fluid extraction and re-injection in the Hengill geothermal area in Southwest Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juncu, D.; Arnadottir, T.; Budzińska, K.; Hooper, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    doing so, we hope to learn more about parameters that we don't have a priori knowledge about, e.g. hydraulic conductivity and elastic properties of the crust. Furthermore, we hope to gain a better understanding of what are the key mechanisms that drive crustal deformation in areas of geothermal energy production.

  14. Crustal deformation styles along the reprocessed deep seismic reflection transect of the Central Iberian Zone (Iberian Peninsula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehsan, Siddique Akhtar; Carbonell, Ramon; Ayarza, Puy; Martí, David; Pérez-Estaún, Andrés; Martínez-Poyatos, David Jesús; Simancas, Jose Fernando; Azor, Antonio; Mansilla, Luis

    2014-05-01

    The multichannel normal incidence (230 km long) deep seismic reflection profile ALCUDIA was acquired in summer 2007. This transect samples an intracontinental Variscan orogenic crust going across, from north to south, the major crustal domain (the Central Iberian Zone) and its suture zone with the Ossa-Morena Zone (the Central Unit) both build up most of the southwestern part of the Iberian Peninsula basement. This high resolution (60-90 fold) profile images about 70 km depth (20 s TWTT) of the continental lithosphere. A new data processing flow provides better structural constraints on the shallow and deep structures resulting in an image that reveals indentation features which strongly suggest horizontal tectonics. The ALCUDIA seismic image shows an upper crust c. 13 km thick decoupled from the comparatively reflective lower crust. The shallow reflectivity of the upper crust can be correlated with surface geological features mapped in the field whereas the deep reflectivity represents inferred imbricate thrust systems and listric extensional faults. The reflectivity of the mid-lower crust is continuous, high amplitude, and horizontal to arcuate though evidences of deformation are present as ductile boudinage structures, thrusting and an upper mantle wedge, suggesting a transpressional flower structure. The image reveals a laminated c. 1.5 km thick, subhorizontal to flat Moho indicating an average crustal thickness of 31-33 km. The Moho shows laterally variable signature, being highly reflective beneath the Central Iberian Zone, but discontinuous and diffuse below the Ossa-Morena Zone. The gravity response suggests relatively high density bodies in the mid-lower crust of the southern half of the transect. The seismic results suggest two major horizontal limits, a horizontal discontinuity at c. 13-15 km (corresponding to the brittle-ductile transition) and the Moho boundary both suggested to act as decoupling surfaces.

  15. The BIFROST project: 21 years of search for the true crustal deformation in Fennoscandia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Jan; Kierulf, Halfdan; Kristiansen, Oddgeir; Lidberg, Martin; Steffen, Holger

    2015-04-01

    in activities like BIFROST are issues regarding reference frames, which are especially important while searching for true vertical velocities, as well as long-term stability in the observation system including new generation of satellites and changes in the ground seg-ment. These issues will also be discussed in the presentation. References Johansson, J.M., Davis, J.L., Scherneck, H.-G., Milne, G.A., Vermeer, M., Mitrovica, J.X., Bennett, R.A., Jonsson, B., Elgered, G., Elósegui, P., Koivula, H., Poutanen, M., Rönnäng, B.O., Shapiro, I.I., 2002. Continuous GPS measurements of postglacial adjustment in Fen-noscandia 1. Geodetic results. J. Geophys. Res. 107 (B8), doi:10.1029/2001B000400. Lidberg, M., J.M. Johansson, H.-G. Scherneck, and G.A. Milne. 2010. Recent results based on continuous GPS observations of the GIA process in Fennoscandia from BIFROST. J. Geodyn. 50: 8-18. Milne, G.A., Mitrovica, J.X., Scherneck, H.-G., Davis, J.L., Johansson, J.M., Koivula, H., Vermeer, M., 2004. Continuous GPS measurements of postglacial adjustment in Fennoscandia. 2. Model-ing results. J. Geophys. Res. 109, B02412, doi:10.1029/2003JB002619. Scherneck, H.-G., Johansson, J.M., Elgered, G., Davis, J.L., Jonsson, B., Hedling, G., Koivula, H., Ollikainen, M., Poutanen, M., Vermeer, M.,Mitrovica, J.X., Milne, G.A., 2002. BIFROST: observ-ing the three-dimensional deformation of Fennoscandia. In: Ice Sheets, Sea Level and the Dy-namic Earth; Geodynamic Series 29. American Geophysical Union.

  16. Characteristics of the Cenozoic crustal deformations in SE Korea and its vicinity due to major tectonic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, M.; Kim, J.; Song, C.; Sohn, Y.; Kim, I.

    2010-12-01

    The southeastern Korean Peninsula has experienced multiple crustal deformations according to changes of global tectonic setting during the Cenozoic. Characteristics of the crustal deformations in relation to major Cenozoic tectonic events are summarized as follows. (1) Collision of Indian and Eurasian continents and abrupt change of movement direction of the Pacific plate (50 ~ 43 Ma): The collision of Indian and Eurasian continents caused the eastward extrusion of East Asia block as a trench-rollback, and then the movement direction of the Pacific plate was abruptly changed from NNW to WNW. As a result, the strong suction-force along the plate boundary produced a tensional stress field trending EW or WNW-ESE in southeastern Korea, which resultantly induced the passive intrusion of NS or NNE trending mafic dike swarm pervasively. (2) Opening of the East Sea (25 ~ 16 Ma): The NS or NNW-SSE trending opening of the East Sea generated a dextral shear stress regime trending NNW-SSE along the eastern coast line of the Korean Peninsula. As a result, pull-apart basins were developed in right bending and overstepping parts along major dextral strike slip faults trending NNW-SSE in southeastern Korea. The basins can be divided into two types on the basis of geometry and kinematics: Parallelogram-shaped basin (rhombochasm) and wedged-shaped basin (sphenochasm), respectively. At that time, the basins and adjacent basement blocks experienced clockwise rotation and northwestward tilting, and the eastward propagating rifting also occurred. At about 17 Ma, the Yeonil Tectonic Line, which is the westernmost border fault of the Miocene crustal deformation in southeastern Korea, began to move as a major dextral strike slip fault. (3) Clockwise rotation of southeastern Japan Island (16~15 Ma): The collision of the Izu-Bonin Arc and southeastern Japan Island, as a result of northward movement of the Philippine sea-plate, induced the clockwise rotation of southeastern Japan Islands. The

  17. Detection of crustal deformation from the Landers earthquake sequence using continuous geodetic measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bock, Yehuda; Agnew, Duncan C.; Fang, Peng; Genrich, Joachim F.; Hager, Bradford H.; Herring, Thomas A.; Hudnut, Kenneth W.; King, Robert W.; Larsen, Shawn; Minster, J.-B.

    1993-01-01

    The first measurements are reported for a major earthquake by a continuously operating GPS network, the permanent GPS Genetic ARRY (PGGA) in southern California. The Landers and Big Bear earthquakes of June 28, 1992 were monitored by daily observations. Ten weeks of measurements indicate significant coseismic motion at all PGGA sites, significant postseismic motion at one site for two weeks after the earthquakes, and no significant preseismic motion. These measurements demonstrate the potential of GPS monitoring for precise detection of precursory and aftershock seismic deformation in the near and far field.

  18. Utilization of temperature and pressure simulator for ocean-bottom and bore-hole observatories for quantitative crustal deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Y.; Matsumoto, H.; Araki, E.; Kimura, T.; Nishida, S.; Kawaguchi, K.

    2015-12-01

    JAMSTEC has developed temperature and pressure simulator for ocean-bottom and bore-hole observatories in 2010, which is mainly composed of temperature chamber and hydraulic pressure standard. We call this equipment "environment simulator". Temperature chamber is capable to control its target temperature from -10 to 180 ℃, hence it is supposed for ocean-bottom to bore-hole environment. Pressure standard in which the dead weight is mounded on the piston-cylinder module produces the reference pressure up to 100 MPa (ca. 10,000 meters deep), which makes it possible to apply the constant pressure to the pressure sensors via the hydraulic pressure tube. Thus, our environment simulator can demonstrate ocean-bottom or bore-hole environment in the laboratory. The main purpose of the pressure simulator is to evaluate long-term pressure sensor's stability, i.e., sensor's drift by applying the constant pressure under the constant temperature. Here, we introduce two applications of our environment simulator. The first application is to evaluate the initial behavior of pressure sensors to be used in the Dense Ocean-floor Network system for Earthquakes and Tsunamis (DONET) in the Nankai Trough, Japan. DONET pressure sensors have been deployed in order for detection of not only tsunami but also crustal deformation. We applied 20 MPa pressure under 2 ℃ temperature to the pressure sensors for one month before deploying into the deep-sea. As a result, the initial sensor drift of 5 hPa per month in maximum was measured. The second application is to provide the reference pressure to the mobile pressure sensor which is designed for the in-situ calibration for the pressure sensors being in operation. We have developed the in-situ pressure calibration tool equipped with the high precision pressure sensor. The concept is that we carry the reference pressure to the on-site to calibrate the pressure sensor. Before carrying it to the deep-sea, the reference pressure is given to the mobile

  19. Upper plate deformation, magmatism and mineralization illuminating crustal and mantle dynamics in the eastern Mediterranean region: kinematic reconstructions and numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menant, Armel; Jolivet, Laurent; Sternai, Pietro; Guillou-Frottier, Laurent; Gerya, Taras

    2015-04-01

    , besides the general southward migration of this magmatic-hydrothermal activity since the late Cretaceous, a secondary westward migration is observed during the Miocene from the Menderes massif to the Cyclades. This feature is a possible consequence of a slab tearing event and related asthenospheric flow, as suggested notably by tomographic models below western Anatolia. Using 3D high-resolution thermo-mechanical numerical models, we test the effects of slab retreat and tearing on asthenospheric flow and its consequences on crustal deformation and magmatic activity. Results suggest that this asthenospheric flow partly controls both the crustal deformation in hot regions (such as in the back-arc domain) and the lateral migration of partially molten materials stored at the base of the stretched crust.

  20. Deep crustal deformation by sheath folding in the Adirondack Mountains, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclelland, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    As described by McLelland and Isachsen, the southern half of the Adirondacks are underlain by major isoclinal (F sub 1) and open-upright (F sub 2) folds whose axes are parallel, trend approximately E-W, and plunge gently about the horizontal. These large structures are themselves folded by open upright folds trending NNE (F sub 3). It is pointed out that elongation lineations in these rocks are parallel to X of the finite strain ellipsoid developed during progressive rotational strain. The parallelism between F sub 1 and F sub 2 fold axes and elongation lineations led to the hypothesis that progressive rotational strain, with a west-directed tectonic transport, rotated earlier F sub 1-folds into parallelism with the evolving elongation lineation. Rotation is accomplished by ductile, passive flow of F sub 1-axes into extremely arcuate, E-W hinges. In order to test these hypotheses a number of large folds were mapped in the eastern Adirondacks. Other evidence supporting the existence of sheath folds in the Adirondacks is the presence, on a map scale, of synforms whose limbs pass through the vertical and into antiforms. This type of outcrop pattern is best explained by intersecting a horizontal plane with the double curvature of sheath folds. It is proposed that sheath folding is a common response of hot, ductile rocks to rotational strain at deep crustal levels. The recognition of sheath folds in the Adirondacks reconciles the E-W orientation of fold axes with an E-W elongation lineation.

  1. Crustal deformation in the New Madrid seismic zone and the role of postseismic processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyd, Oliver; Robert Smalley, Jr; Zeng, Yuehua

    2015-01-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System data across the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) in the central United States over the period from 2000 through 2014 are analyzed and modeled with several deformation mechanisms including the following: (1) creep on subsurface dislocations, (2) postseismic frictional afterslip and viscoelastic relaxation from the 1811–1812 and 1450 earthquakes in the NMSZ, and (3) regional strain. In agreement with previous studies, a dislocation creeping at about 4 mm/yr between 12 and 20 km depth along the downdip extension of the Reelfoot fault reproduces the observations well. We find that a dynamic model of postseismic frictional afterslip from the 1450 and February 1812 Reelfoot fault events can explain this creep. Kinematic and dynamic models involving the Cottonwood Grove fault provide minimal predictive power. This is likely due to the smaller size of the December 1811 event on the Cottonwood Grove fault and a distribution of stations better suited to constrain localized strain across the Reelfoot fault. Regional compressive strain across the NMSZ is found to be less than 3 × 10−9/yr. If much of the present-day surface deformation results from afterslip, it is likely that many of the earthquakes we see today in the NMSZ are aftershocks from the 1811–1812 New Madrid earthquakes. Despite this conclusion, our results are consistent with observations and models of intraplate earthquake clustering. Given this and the recent paleoseismic history of the region, we suggest that seismic hazard is likely to remain significant.

  2. Crustal deformation in the New Madrid seismic zone and the role of postseismic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Oliver S.; Smalley, Robert; Zeng, Yuehua

    2015-08-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System data across the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) in the central United States over the period from 2000 through 2014 are analyzed and modeled with several deformation mechanisms including the following: (1) creep on subsurface dislocations, (2) postseismic frictional afterslip and viscoelastic relaxation from the 1811-1812 and 1450 earthquakes in the NMSZ, and (3) regional strain. In agreement with previous studies, a dislocation creeping at about 4 mm/yr between 12 and 20 km depth along the downdip extension of the Reelfoot fault reproduces the observations well. We find that a dynamic model of postseismic frictional afterslip from the 1450 and February 1812 Reelfoot fault events can explain this creep. Kinematic and dynamic models involving the Cottonwood Grove fault provide minimal predictive power. This is likely due to the smaller size of the December 1811 event on the Cottonwood Grove fault and a distribution of stations better suited to constrain localized strain across the Reelfoot fault. Regional compressive strain across the NMSZ is found to be less than 3 × 10-9/yr. If much of the present-day surface deformation results from afterslip, it is likely that many of the earthquakes we see today in the NMSZ are aftershocks from the 1811-1812 New Madrid earthquakes. Despite this conclusion, our results are consistent with observations and models of intraplate earthquake clustering. Given this and the recent paleoseismic history of the region, we suggest that seismic hazard is likely to remain significant.

  3. The crustal structure, deformation from GPS, and seismicity related to oblique convergence along the Queen Charlotte margin, British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustin, Amanda M. M.

    Tectonic processes and seismic hazard along the west coast of British Columbia result from oblique convergence between the continental North America plate and the oceanic Pacific and Juan de Fuca plates. This dissertation integrates seismic and geodetic techniques to examine the tectonic interaction along these plate boundaries. The Queen Charlotte Fault zone is the transpressive boundary between the North America and Pacific plates along the northwestern margin of British Columbia. Two models have been suggested for the accommodation of the ˜20 mm/yr of convergence along the fault boundary: (1) underthrusting; (2) internal crustal deformation. Strong evidence supporting an underthrusting model is provided in this dissertation by a teleseismic receiver function analysis that defines the underthrusting slab. Forward and inverse modelling techniques were applied to receiver function data calculated at two permanent and six temporary seismic stations within the Islands. The modelling reveals a ˜10 km thick low-velocity zone dipping eastward at 28° interpreted to be underthrusting oceanic crust. The oceanic crust, which may be anisotropic, is located beneath a thin (28 km) westward shallowing (10°) continental margin. The majority of seismicity along the Queen Charlotte Fault zone plots within the modelled underthrusting crust, suggesting that these earthquakes are occurring on faults that extend down into the slab or they might be intraslab events. None of the earthquakes within the Queen Charlotte Basin have occurred deep enough to be intraslab earthquakes. The Wadati-Benioff seismicity may be inhibited beneath the basin by the hot young oceanic crust or by the short distance of underthrusting. GPS measurements have been recorded within the Queen Charlotte Islands during 8 years of campaign surveys. The crustal velocity field derived from the GPS data indicates northward margin-oblique motion of 10--15 mm/yr. Comparisons of the observed velocities with elastic

  4. Crustal deformation at long Valley Caldera, eastern California, 1992-1996 inferred from satellite radar interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thatcher, W.; Massonnet, D.

    1997-01-01

    Satellite radar interferometric images of Long Valley caldera show a pattern of surface deformation that resembles that expected from analysis of an extensive suite of ground-based geodetic data. Images from 2 and 4 year intervals respectively, are consistent with uniform movement rates determined from leveling surveys. Synthetic interferograms generated from ellipsoidal-inclusion source models based on inversion of the ground-based data show generally good agreement with the observed images. Two interferograms show evidence for a magmatic source southwest of the caldera in a region not covered by ground measurements. Poorer image quality in the 4 year interferogram indicates that temporal decorrelation of surface radar reflectors is progressively degrading the fringe pattern in the Long Valley region. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. The 2011-2012 Santorini unrest: Swarms of micro-seismicity, crustal deformation and magma pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltogianni, Vasso; Stiros, Stathis; Newman, Andrew; Papazachos, Costas; Moschas, Fanis

    2014-05-01

    In 2011-2012 swarms of micro-seismicity were observed in Santorini caldera for the first probably time since its last eruption 60 years ago. This seismicity was along a major extensional lineament (Kammeni Line), in which all post-Minoan eruptions were confined and was characterized by extensional focal mechanisms. GPS observations provided evidence of a somewhat radial deformation, which was assigned to a spherical magma source ~4km deep in the north part of the caldera, about 2km away from the Kammeni Line. Because such a source cannot explain extensional seismicity observed along the Kammeni Line, we investigated alternative intrusion models. On the basis of seismicity and deformation rates, the unrest period was divided into five intervals each 3-6 months long. Then, using a new inversion method/software we modeled each interval separately for one or two sources. No solution was found possible for the fifth interval, while for the other four there was evidence of a shallow, relative small source at the north part of the caldera; this source tends to overshadow other deeper sources. During intervals of seismicity, the deeper source is identified inside or beneath the Kammeni Line and has the potential to produce the deviatoric stresses and explain the observed seismicity swarms. During the fourth interval, this source was found much smaller and at some distance from the Kammeni Line, in a position not permitting to trigger seismicity. The northern source seems to be systematically arrested by the upper most layers of sediments, as is also derived by marine geophysical surveys. The variability in space and time of intrusions in 2011-2012 is consistent with the hypothesis of composite pulses of magma from deeper sources.

  6. PyLith: A Finite-Element Code for Modeling Quasi-Static and Dynamic Crustal Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aagaard, B.; Williams, C. A.; Knepley, M. G.

    2011-12-01

    We have developed open-source finite-element software for 2-D and 3-D dynamic and quasi-static modeling of crustal deformation. This software, PyLith (current release is version 1.6) can be used for quasi-static viscoelastic modeling, dynamic spontaneous rupture and/or ground-motion modeling. Unstructured and structured finite-element discretizations allow for spatial scales ranging from tens of meters to hundreds of kilometers with temporal scales in dynamic problems ranging from milliseconds to minutes and temporal scales in quasi-static problems ranging from minutes to thousands of years. PyLith development is part of the NSF funded Computational Infrastructure for Geodynamics (CIG) and the software runs on a wide variety of platforms (laptops, workstations, and Beowulf clusters). Binaries (Linux, Darwin, and Windows systems) and source code are available from geodynamics.org. PyLith uses a suite of general, parallel, graph data structures called Sieve for storing and manipulating finite-element meshes. This permits use of a variety of 2-D and 3-D cell types including triangles, quadrilaterals, hexahedra, and tetrahedra. Current PyLith features include prescribed fault ruptures with multiple earthquakes and aseismic creep, spontaneous fault ruptures with a variety of fault constitutive models, time-dependent Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions, absorbing boundary conditions, time-dependent point forces, and gravitational body forces. PyLith supports infinitesimal and small strain formulations for linear elastic rheologies, linear and generalized Maxwell viscoelastic rheologies, power-law viscoelastic rheologies, and Drucker-Prager elastoplastic rheologies. Current software development focuses on coupling quasi-static and dynamic simulations to resolve multi-scale deformation across the entire seismic cycle and the coupling of elasticity to heat and/or fluid flow.

  7. Deep seismic structure and tectonics of northern Alaska: Crustal-scale duplexing with deformation extending into the upper mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuis, G.S.; Murphy, J.M.; Lutter, W.J.; Moore, T.E.; Bird, K.J.; Christensen, N.I.

    1997-01-01

    Seismic reflection and refraction and laboratory velocity data collected along a transect of northern Alaska (including the east edge of the Koyukuk basin, the Brooks Range, and the North Slope) yield a composite picture of the crustal and upper mantle structure of this Mesozoic and Cenozoic compressional orogen. The following observations are made: (1) Northern Alaska is underlain by nested tectonic wedges, most with northward vergence (i.e., with their tips pointed north). (2) High reflectivity throughout the crust above a basal decollement, which deepens southward from about 10 km depth beneath the northern front of the Brooks Range to about 30 km depth beneath the southern Brooks Range, is interpreted as structural complexity due to the presence of these tectonic wedges, or duplexes. (3) Low reflectivity throughout the crust below the decollement is interpreted as minimal deformation, which appears to involve chiefly bending of a relatively rigid plate consisting of the parautochthonous North Slope crust and a 10- to 15-km-thick section of mantle material. (4) This plate is interpreted as a southward verging tectonic wedge, with its tip in the lower crust or at the Moho beneath the southern Brooks Range. In this interpretation the middle and upper crust, or all of the crust, is detached in the southern Brooks Range by the tectonic wedge, or indentor: as a result, crust is uplifted and deformed above the wedge, and mantle is depressed and underthrust beneath this wedge. (5) Underthrusting has juxtaposed mantle of two different origins (and seismic velocities), giving rise to a prominent sub-Moho reflector. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Southern California Permanent GPS Geodetic Array: Continuous measurements of regional crustal deformation between the 1992 Landers and 1994 Northridge earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bock, Y.; Wdowinski, S.; Fang, P.; Zhang, Jiahua; Williams, S.; Johnson, H.; Behr, J.; Genrich, J.; Dean, J.; Van Domselaar, M.; Agnew, D.; Wyatt, F.; Stark, K.; Oral, B.; Hudnut, K.; King, R.; Herring, T.; Dinardo, S.; Young, W.; Jackson, D.; Gurtner, W.

    1997-01-01

    The southern California Permanent GPS Geodetic Array (PGGA) was established in 1990 across the Pacific-North America plate boundary to continuously monitor crustal deformation. We describe the development of the array and the time series of daily positions estimated for its first 10 sites in the 19-month period between the June 28, 1992 (Mw=7.3), Landers and January 17, 1994 (Mw=6.7), Northridge earthquakes. We compare displacement rates at four site locations with those reported by Feigl et al. [1993], which were derived from an independent set of Global Positioning System (GPS) and very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) measurements collected over nearly a decade prior to the Landers earthquake. The velocity differences for three sites 65-100 km from the earthquake's epicenter are of order of 3-5 mm/yr and are systematically coupled with the corresponding directions of coseismic displacement. The fourth site, 300 km from the epicenter, shows no significant velocity difference. These observations suggest large-scale postseismic deformation with a relaxation time of at least 800 days. The statistical significance of our observations is complicated by our incomplete knowledge of the noise properties of the two data sets; two possible noise models fit the PGGA data equally well as described in the companion paper by Zhang et al. [this issue]; the pre-Landers data are too sparse and heterogeneous to derive a reliable noise model. Under a fractal white noise model for the PGGA data we find that the velocity differences for all three sites are statistically different at the 99% significance level. A white noise plus flicker noise model results in significance levels of only 94%, 43%, and 88%. Additional investigations of the pre-Landers data, and analysis of longer spans of PGGA data, could have an important effect on the significance of these results and will be addressed in future work. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Crustal deformation in the Western Solomon Islands revealed by GPS observation and D_InSAR during 2009 - 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Y. T.; Ku, C. S.; Wang, Y.; Lin, Y. N. N. N.; Chen, Y. G.; Lin, K. C.; Huang, B. S.; Hsu, Y. J.; Taylor, F. W.

    2014-12-01

    The Solomon Islands are located in the southwestern Pacific, where the Australian Plate underthrusts the Solomon Plate towards ~N70 E at a rate of ~100 mm/yr. The Coleman seamount on the Australian plate is impinging on the forearc at Rendova Island and may cause both the seismicity and tectonic behavior to be more complicated than usual. Hence, an understanding o f the ongoing crustal deformation is essential to reconstructing the structural framework that controls the entire subduction system, particularly earthquake generation on the megathrust fault and possible subsidiary faults. Based on the results from GPS and D_InSAR, the horizontal velocity profiles across the trench for areas of the forearc to the west and to the east of the impinging Coleman seamount show different characteristics. The eastern profile shows convergence rates of ~100 mm/yr only 10 km from the trench at the western end of the Tetepare Island, and the western profile reaches 70 mm/yr at 30 km from the trench. This difference might be caused by the shallow locked depth consistent with co-seismic slip located extremely close to the trench during the Mw 7.1 Solomon Earthquake on 3rd January, 2010. We have a hypothesis to argue that the behavior of the fault geometry should be very different on the two sides of the seamount. However, the coupling ratio could be realized by further detailed analysis.

  10. Crustal deformation in the south-central Andes backarc terranes as viewed from regional broad-band seismic waveform modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, Patricia; Beck, Susan; Zandt, George; Araujo, Mario; Triep, Enrique

    2005-11-01

    The convergence between the Nazca and South America tectonic plates generates a seismically active backarc region near 31°S. Earthquake locations define the subhorizontal subducted oceanic Nazca plate at depths of 90-120 km. Another seismic region is located within the continental upper plate with events at depths <35 km. This seismicity is related to the Precordillera and Sierras Pampeanas and is responsible for the large earthquakes that have caused major human and economic losses in Argentina. South of 33°S, the intense shallow continental seismicity is more restricted to the main cordillera over a region where the subducted Nazca plate starts to incline more steeply, and there is an active volcanic arc. We operated a portable broad-band seismic network as part of the Chile-Argentina Geophysical Experiment (CHARGE) from 2000 December to 2002 May. We have studied crustal earthquakes that occurred in the back arc and under the main cordillera in the south-central Andes (29°S-36°S) recorded by the CHARGE network. We obtained the focal mechanisms and source depths for 27 (3.5 < Mw < 5.3) crustal earthquakes using a moment tensor inversion method. Our results indicate mainly reverse focal mechanism solutions in the region during the CHARGE recording period. 88 per cent of the earthquakes are located north of 33°S and at middle-to-lower crustal depths. The region around San Juan, located in the western Sierras Pampeanas, over the flat-slab segment is dominated by reverse and thrust fault-plane solutions located at an average source depth of 20 km. One moderate-sized earthquake (event 02-117) is very likely related to the northern part of the Precordillera and the Sierras Pampeanas terrane boundary. Another event located near Mendoza at a greater depth (~26 km) (event 02-005) could also be associated with the same ancient suture. We found strike-slip focal mechanisms in the eastern Sierras Pampeanas and under the main cordillera with shallower focal depths of ~5

  11. Sources of crustal deformation associated with the Krafla, Iceland, eruption of September 1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arnadottir, T.; Sigmundsson, F.; Delaney, P.T.

    1998-01-01

    A decade-long plate-boundary rifting episode in northern Iceland ended with the September 1984 fissure eruption of Krafla volcano. We apply a nonlinear inversion method to geodetic data collected before and after the eruption to infer the location, geometry, and strngths of deformation sources associated with the eruption. The net outflow of magma from a 3-km-deep magma chamber beneath the Krafa caldera was 30-120 ?? 106 m3. A similar volume of magma, 50-70 ?? 106 m3, was emplaced in a l-meter-wide, ~9-km-long dike extending from the surface to ~7 km depth. Furthermore, at least 110 ?? 106 m3 of magma erupted. Accordingly, a surplus of magma must have been expelled from a second reservoir, the location of which, although uncertain, is likely to lie at depths greater than ~5 km beneath Krafla volcano. It would be difficult to detect this deeper source because of the narrow aperture of the geodetic networks.A decade-long plate-boundary rifting episode in northern Iceland ended with the September 1984 fissure eruption of Krafla volcano. We apply a nonlinear inversion method to geodetic data collected before and after the eruption to infer the location, geometry, and strengths of deformation sources associated with the eruption. The net outflow of magma from a 3-km-deep magma chamber beneath the Krafla caldera was 30-120??106 m3. A similar volume of magma, 50-70??106 m3, was emplaced in a 1-meter-wide, approximately 9-km-long dike extending from the surface to approximately 7 km depth. Furthermore, at least 110??106 m3 of magma erupted. Accordingly, a surplus of magma must have been expelled from a second reservoir, the location of which, although uncertain, is likely to lie at depths greater than approximately 5 km beneath Krafla volcano. It would be difficult to detect this deeper source because of the narrow aperture of the geodetic networks.

  12. Observing crustal deformation and atmospheric signals from COSMO-SKYMED and GPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerbini, S.; Prati, C.; Cappello, G.; Errico, M.; Novali, F.

    2012-04-01

    The combined use of InSAR and GPS allows for the full exploitation of the complementary aspects of the two techniques by overcoming the limitations inherent in the use of each technique alone. Additionally, GPS-based estimates of tropospheric delays may contribute in obtaining better corrections of the wet tropospheric path delay in InSAR signals. This will enhance the coherence and will allow the application of InSAR in a wider range of applications. We have compared the InSAR and GPS data at Bologna (urbanized area) and Medicina (agricultural area), in northeastern Italy, where two permanent GPS stations of the University of Bologna are operational since mid 1999 and 1996 respectively. The InSAR data used are the COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) images made available by the Italian Space Agency (ASI) in the framework of the research contract AO-1140. The Permanent Scatterers (PS) technique was applied to a number of repeated CSK strip map SAR images acquired over a 40x40 square km area encompassing the two towns mentioned above. The results of this work demonstrate on the one hand the CSK capabilities to operate in a repeated interferometric survey mode for measuring ground deformation with millimeter accuracy in different environments. On the other, the comparison of the differential height between the two stations derived with the GPS and the InSAR data, using both acquisition geometries, is satisfactory. Elevation, ground deformation and atmospheric artifacts were estimated in correspondence of the identified PS and compared with the GPS measurements carried out at the same acquisition time by the permanent stations at Bologna and Medicina. The comparison of the differential height between the two stations shows the sensitivity of the GPS height solution to the length of the observation interval. The vertical dispersion achieved by GPS is higher than that achieved by PS InSAR, as expected; however, a similar linear trend appears in the results of both techniques. The

  13. A Fault-based Crustal Deformation Model for UCERF3 and Its Implication to Seismic Hazard Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Y.; Shen, Z.

    2012-12-01

    We invert GPS data to determine slip rates on major California faults using a fault-based crustal deformation model with geological slip rate constraints. The model assumes buried elastic dislocations across the region using fault geometries defined by the Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast version 3 (UCERF3) project with fault segments slipping beneath their locking depths. GPS observations across California and neighboring states were obtained from the UNAVCO western US GPS velocity model and edited by the SCEC UCERF3 geodetic deformation working group. The geologic slip rates and fault style constraints were compiled by the SCEC UCERF3 geologic deformation working group. Continuity constraints are imposed on slips among adjacent fault segments to regulate slip variability and to simulate block-like motion. Our least-squares inversion shows that slip rates along the northern San Andreas fault system agree well with the geologic estimates provided by UCERF3, and slip rates for the Calaveras-Hayward-Maacama fault branch and the Greenville-Great Valley fault branch are slightly higher than that of the UCERF3 geologic model. The total slip rates across transects of the three fault branches in Northern California amount to 39 mm/yr. Slip rates determined for the Garlock fault closely match geologic rates. Slip rates for the Coachella Valley and Brawley segment of the San Andreas are nearly twice that of the San Jacinto fault branch. For the off-coast faults along the San Gregorio, Hosgri, Catalina, and San Clemente faults, slip rates are near their geologic lower bounds. Comparing with the regional geologic slip rate estimates, the GPS based model shows a significant decrease of 6-14 mm/yr in slip rates along the San Andreas fault system from the central California creeping section through the Mojave to the San Bernardino Mountain segments, whereas the model indicates significant increase of 1-3 mm/yr in slip-rates for faults along the east California

  14. A fault-based model for crustal deformation, fault slip-rates and off-fault strain rate in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zeng, Yuehua; Shen, Zheng-Kang

    2016-01-01

    We invert Global Positioning System (GPS) velocity data to estimate fault slip rates in California using a fault‐based crustal deformation model with geologic constraints. The model assumes buried elastic dislocations across the region using Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast Version 3 (UCERF3) fault geometries. New GPS velocity and geologic slip‐rate data were compiled by the UCERF3 deformation working group. The result of least‐squares inversion shows that the San Andreas fault slips at 19–22  mm/yr along Santa Cruz to the North Coast, 25–28  mm/yr along the central California creeping segment to the Carrizo Plain, 20–22  mm/yr along the Mojave, and 20–24  mm/yr along the Coachella to the Imperial Valley. Modeled slip rates are 7–16  mm/yr lower than the preferred geologic rates from the central California creeping section to the San Bernardino North section. For the Bartlett Springs section, fault slip rates of 7–9  mm/yr fall within the geologic bounds but are twice the preferred geologic rates. For the central and eastern Garlock, inverted slip rates of 7.5 and 4.9  mm/yr, respectively, match closely with the geologic rates. For the western Garlock, however, our result suggests a low slip rate of 1.7  mm/yr. Along the eastern California shear zone and southern Walker Lane, our model shows a cumulative slip rate of 6.2–6.9  mm/yr across its east–west transects, which is ∼1  mm/yr increase of the geologic estimates. For the off‐coast faults of central California, from Hosgri to San Gregorio, fault slips are modeled at 1–5  mm/yr, similar to the lower geologic bounds. For the off‐fault deformation, the total moment rate amounts to 0.88×1019  N·m/yr, with fast straining regions found around the Mendocino triple junction, Transverse Ranges and Garlock fault zones, Landers and Brawley seismic zones, and farther south. The overall California moment rate is 2.76×1019

  15. Three-Dimensional Numerical Modeling of Crustal Growth at Active Continental Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, G.; Gerya, T.; Tackley, P. J.

    2011-12-01

    Active margins are important sites of new continental crust formation by magmatic processes related to the subduction of oceanic plates. We investigate these phenomena using a three-dimensional coupled petrological-geochemical-thermomechanical numerical model, which combines a finite-difference flow solver with a non-diffusive marker-in-cell technique for advection (I3ELVIS code, Gerya and Yuen, PEPI,2007). The model includes mantle flow associated with the subducting plate, water release from the slab, fluid propagation that triggers partial melting at the slab surface, melt extraction and the resulting volcanic crustal growth at the surface. The model also accounts for variations in physical properties (mainly density and viscosity) of both fluids and rocks as a function of local conditions in temperature, pressure, deformation, nature of the rocks, and chemical exchanges. Our results show different patterns of crustal growth and surface topography, which are comparable to nature, during subduction at active continental margins. Often, two trench-parallel lines of magmatic activity, which reflect two maxima of melt production atop the slab, are formed on the surface. The melt extraction rate controls the patterns of new crust at different ages. Moving free water reflects the path of fluids, and the velocity of free water shows the trend of two parallel lines of magmatic activity. The formation of new crust in particular time intervals is distributed in finger-like shapes, corresponding to finger-like and ridge-like cold plumes developed atop the subducting slabs (Zhu et al., G-cubed,2009; PEPI,2011). Most of the new crust is basaltic, formed from peridotitic mantle. Granitic crust extracted from melted sediment and upper crust forms in a line closer to the trench, and its distribution reflects the finger-like cold plumes. Dacitic crust extracted from the melted lower crust forms in a line farther away from the trench, and its distribution is anticorrelated with

  16. Present-day crustal deformation along the Magallanes-Fagnano Fault System in Tierra del Fuego from repeated GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, L.; Perdomo, R.; Hormaechea, J. L.; Del Cogliano, D.; Fritsche, M.; Richter, A.; Dietrich, R.

    2011-03-01

    The present-day deformation of the earth crust in the Argentine part of Tierra del Fuego main island (southernmost South America) is here investigated based on repeated geodetic GPS observations. The island is traversed by the active transform boundary between the South American and Scotia tectonic plates, represented by the Magallanes-Fagnano fault system. Since 1993 a regional network comprising to date 29 GPS sites has been observed almost every year. The complete set of accumulated observations was processed using the Bernese GPS software and state-of-the-art processing strategies and models. The utilization of homogeneous GPS products resulting from a reprocessing of the global IGS network warrants a stable realization of a global reference frame. For each GPS site 3-D positions and linear velocities with error estimates were obtained. A strain analysis of the horizontal velocity components revealed the zones of major deformation activity. A 30-km-wide deformation belt centred on the main trace of the fault system was identified. This belt is bordered to the north (South America) and south (Scotia) by geodynamically stable zones, which move horizontally with a relative average velocity of 4.4 ± 0.6 (east) and -0.3 ± 0.4 (north) mm a-1. Within the deformation belt a maximum strain rate in the order of 0.25 μstrain per year has been detected. A pronounced change in the deformation style from transtension (east) to transpression (west) is observed. The area of predominating shortening of the crust coincides with a local rotation minimum and relative uplift. Throughout the period covered by the GPS observations the displacements and deformations occurred to be linear with time.

  17. The SCEC 3D Community Fault Model (CFM-v5): An updated and expanded fault set of oblique crustal deformation and complex fault interaction for southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, C.; Plesch, A.; Sorlien, C. C.; Shaw, J. H.; Hauksson, E.

    2014-12-01

    Southern California represents an ideal natural laboratory to investigate oblique deformation in 3D owing to its comprehensive datasets, complex tectonic history, evolving components of oblique slip, and continued crustal rotations about horizontal and vertical axes. As the SCEC Community Fault Model (CFM) aims to accurately reflect this 3D deformation, we present the results of an extensive update to the model by using primarily detailed fault trace, seismic reflection, relocated hypocenter and focal mechanism nodal plane data to generate improved, more realistic digital 3D fault surfaces. The results document a wide variety of oblique strain accommodation, including various aspects of strain partitioning and fault-related folding, sets of both high-angle and low-angle faults that mutually interact, significant non-planar, multi-stranded faults with variable dip along strike and with depth, and active mid-crustal detachments. In places, closely-spaced fault strands or fault systems can remain surprisingly subparallel to seismogenic depths, while in other areas, major strike-slip to oblique-slip faults can merge, such as the S-dipping Arroyo Parida-Mission Ridge and Santa Ynez faults with the N-dipping North Channel-Pitas Point-Red Mountain fault system, or diverge with depth. Examples of the latter include the steep-to-west-dipping Laguna Salada-Indiviso faults with the steep-to-east-dipping Sierra Cucapah faults, and the steep southern San Andreas fault with the adjacent NE-dipping Mecca Hills-Hidden Springs fault system. In addition, overprinting by steep predominantly strike-slip faulting can segment which parts of intersecting inherited low-angle faults are reactivated, or result in mutual cross-cutting relationships. The updated CFM 3D fault surfaces thus help characterize a more complex pattern of fault interactions at depth between various fault sets and linked fault systems, and a more complex fault geometry than typically inferred or expected from

  18. Late Quaternary tectonic activity and crustal shortening rate of the Bogda mountain area, eastern Tian Shan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chuanyong; Wu, Guodong; Shen, Jun; Dai, Xunye; Chen, Jianbo; Song, Heping

    2016-04-01

    The Bogda mountain range is the highest range among the northern Tian Shan mountains. Based on geologic and geomorphologic field surveys, trench excavation and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating, we targeted the active Fukang fault along the Bogda mountain range and identified the late Quaternary deformation characteristics of this area. We found that the Fukang fault dislocated different geomorphic surfaces of the northern Bogda piedmont. The vertical fault displacement corresponds to the topographic relief of the Bogda over long time scales. Since the late Quaternary, the crustal shortening rate was estimated to be 0.90 ± 0.20 mm/yr, which is less than that of the western segment of the northern Tian Shan. We interpret the Bogda fold and thrust belt to be a thick-skinned structure, since a high angle thrust fault bounds the Bogda mountain range and the foreland basin. The deformation characteristics of this region have been dominated by vertical uplift, and the component of propagation toward the basin has been very limited. This tectonic deformation is evidenced as vertical growth. Although the deformation rate is small, the uplift amplitude is very significant in this region.

  19. Crustal deformation associated with glacial fluctuations in the eastern Chugach Mountains, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sauber, Jeanne; Plafker, George; Molnia, Bruce F.; Bryant, Mark A.

    2000-01-01

    The changes of the solid Earth in south central Alaska in response to two major glacial fluctuations on different temporal and spatial scales have been estimated and we evaluated their influence on the stress state and ongoing tectonic deformation of the region. During the recent (1993–1995) Bering Glacier surge, a large transfer of ice from the Bagley Ice Field to the Bering Glacier terminus region occurred. We estimated the elastic displacement of the solid Earth due to ice mass redistribution from Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements at sites near the surging glacier. We can account for these displacements by transfer of an ice volume of about 14 km3 from the surge reservoir area to the terminus region. We examined the background seismicity (ML ≥ 2.5) before, during, and after the surge. We found that the occurrence of small earthquakes (ML ≤ 4.0) in the surge reservoir region increased during the surge time interval possibly in response to a decrease in ice mass. This suggests that a small decrease in the vertical stress, σ3, could be enough to modulate the occurrence of small, shallow earthquakes in this dominantly thrust fault setting. During this century the southern Alaska coastal glaciers have been undergoing an overall decrease in volume. Based on our compilation of changes in the extent and thickness of the coastal glaciers between the Malaspina and Bering, we calculated surface displacements due to the Earth's viscoelastic response to annual thinning and to the cumulative retreat over the last 100 years. The uplift of the region due to an average annual thinning rate of 1–6 m/yr in the ablation region is 1–12 mm/yr. For our reference model with a viscosity of 5×1019 Pa s for depths between ≈ 40 and 200 km the total viscoelastic response due to the retreat over the last century may be as much as a couple of meters within the coastal ablation zone near Icy Bay. The maximum decrease in σv between 0 and 10 km was ≈ 1.0 MPa, which is

  20. Crustal Deformation Associated with Glacial Fluctuations in the Eastern Chugach Mountains, Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauber, Jeanne; Plafker, George; Molnia, Bruce F.; Bryant, Mark A.

    2000-01-01

    The changes of the solid Earth in south central Alaska in response to two major glacial fluctuations on different temporal and spatial scales have been estimated and we evaluated their influence on the stress state and ongoing tectonic deformation of the region. During the recent (1993-1995) Bering Glacier surge, a large transfer of ice from the Bagley Ice Field to the Bering Glacier terminus region occurred. We estimated the elastic displacement of the solid Earth due to ice mass redistribution from Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements at sites near the surging glacier. We can account for these displacements by transfer of an ice volume of about 14 cubic km from the surge reservoir area to the terminus region. We examined the background seismicity (M(sub L) > 2.5) before, during, and after the surge. We found that the occurrence of small earthquakes (M(sub L) < 4.0) in the surge reservoir region increased during the surge time interval possibly in response to a decrease in ice mass. This suggests that a small decrease in the vertical stress, o,3, could be enough to modulate the occurrence of small, shallow earthquakes in this dominantly thrust fault setting. During this century the southern Alaska coastal glaciers have been undergoing an overall decrease in volume. Based on our compilation of changes in the extent and thickness of the coastal glaciers between the Malaspina and Bering, we calculated surface displacements due to the Earth's viscoelastic response to annual thinning and to the cumulative retreat over the last 100 years. The uplift of the region due to an average annual thinning rate of 1-6 m/yr in the ablation region is 1-12 mm/yr. For our reference model with a viscosity of 5 x 10(exp 19) Pa s for depths between approximately equal 40 and 200 km the total viscoelastic response due to the retreat over the last century may be as much as a couple of meters within the coastal ablation zone near Icy Bay. The maximum decrease in sigma(sub V

  1. The interpretation of crustal dynamics data in terms of plate motions and regional deformation near plate boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, Sean C.

    1989-01-01

    A particularly detailed set of observations in the vicinity of an intraplate, thrust earthquake (M 7.4) in Argentina, indicate a cyclic pattern of deformation very similar to that reported previously for interplate earthquakes. This deformation cycle, which may be characteristic of many seismically active areas, consists of: (1) steady strain accumulation, possibly punctuated by strain reversals; (2) coseismic strain release; (3) a period of continued strain release due to afterslip (persisting for perhaps a year or so); and (4) rapid postseismic strain accumulation which decreases exponentially and grades into steady strain accumulation. Deformation associated with three earthquakes in the U.S. (1940, M7.1 Imperial Valley California; 1964, M8.4 Alaska; 1959, M7.5 Hebgen Lake, Montana) are interpreted in light of this general earthquake cycle and are used to investigate the mechanics of strain release for these events. These examples indicate that large postseismic movements can occur for strike-slip, thrust, and normal fault events, and both viscoelastic relaxation and postseismic after-slip must be incorporated in models of earthquake related deformation. The mechanics of the strain release process revealed by these examples has implications for estimating earthquake repeat times from geodetic observations near active faults.

  2. Interpretation of Crustal Deformation following the 2011 Tohoku-oki Megathrust Earthquake by the Combined Effect of Afterslip and Viscoelastic Stress Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, A.; Takahama, T.; Ohba, M.; Ito, T.; Matsu'ura, M.

    2015-12-01

    Crustal deformation following the 2011 Tohoku-oki megathrust earthquake, occurred at the North American-Pacific plate interface, has been revealed by GPS measurement on land (Geospatial Information Authority of Japan) and GPS/Acoustic measurement on seafloor (Japan Coast Guard). The essential causes of the postseismic crustal deformation are considered to be slow afterslip at the downdip extension of the main rupture zone and viscoelastic relaxation of stress changes induced in the asthenosphere. Crustal responses to the afterslip and the viscoelastic relaxation are different in both space and time. So, given proper plate interface geometry and proper crust-mantle rheological structure, we can estimate unbiased spatiotemporal distribution of afterslip through the inversion analysis of observed geodetic data. In the present analysis, we used a 3-D realistic model developed by Hashimoto et al. (2004) for plate interface geometry and a standard elastic-viscoelastic layered model, consisting of a 60 km-thick elastic surface layer and a Maxwell-type viscoelastic substratum with the viscosity of 1019 Pa s, for crust-mantle rheological structure. First, following Noda et al. (2013), we transformed the GPS displacement data on land into the average strains of triangular elements composed of adjacent three GPS stations. Then, by applying a sequential method of stepwise (every two months) inversion to the strain data, we estimated the spatiotemporal distribution of afterslip together with coseismic slip distribution. The estimated results show that significant afterslip has proceeded for the first one and a half years at the downdip extension of the main rupture zone off Iwate and Miyagi with decaying its rate. Finally, based on the estimated results, we computed postseismic offshore crustal movements by using the same elastic-viscoelastic structure model and compared them with seafloor geodetic observations (Watanabe et al., 2014). The good agreement between the computed

  3. Development of a GPS buoy system for monitoring tsunami, sea waves, ocean bottom crustal deformation and atmospheric water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Teruyuki; Terada, Yukihiro; Nagai, Toshihiko; Koshimura, Shun'ichi

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a GPS buoy system for monitoring tsunami for over 12 years. The idea was that a buoy equipped with a GPS antenna and placed offshore may be an effective way of monitoring tsunami before its arrival to the coast and to give warning to the coastal residents. The key technology for the system is real-time kinematic (RTK) GPS technology. We have successfully developed the system; we have detected tsunamis of about 10cm in height for three large earthquakes, namely, the 23 June 2001 Peru earthquake (Mw8.4), the 26 September 2003 Tokachi earthquake (Mw8.3) and the 5 September 2004 earthquake (Mw7.4). The developed GPS buoy system is also capable of monitoring sea waves that are mainly caused by winds. Only the difference between tsunami and sea waves is their frequency range and can be segregated each other by a simple filtering technique. Given the success of GPS buoy experiments, the system has been adopted as a part of the Nationwide Ocean Wave information system for Port and HArborS (NOWPHAS) by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism of Japan. They have established more than eight GPS buoys along the Japanese coasts and the system has been operated by the Port and Airport Research Institute. As a future scope, we are now planning to implement some other additional facilities for the GPS buoy system. The first application is a so-called GPS/Acoustic system for monitoring ocean bottom crustal deformation. The system requires acoustic waves to detect ocean bottom reference position, which is the geometrical center of an array of transponders, by measuring distances between a position at the sea surface (vessel) and ocean bottom equipments to return the received sonic wave. The position of the vessel is measured using GPS. The system was first proposed by a research group at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in early 1980's. The system was extensively developed by Japanese researchers and is now capable of detecting ocean

  4. Reciprocating motion of active deformable particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarama, M.; Ohta, T.

    2016-05-01

    Reciprocating motion of an active deformable particle in a homogeneous medium is studied theoretically. For generality, we employ a simple model derived from symmetry considerations for the center-of-mass velocity and elliptical and triangular deformations in two dimensions. We carry out, for the first time, a systematic investigation of the reciprocating motion of a self-propelled particle. It is clarified that spontaneous breaking of the front-rear asymmetry is essential for the reciprocating motion. Moreover, two routes are found for the formation of the reciprocating motion. One is a bifurcation from a motionless stationary state. The other is destabilisation of an oscillatory rectilinear motion.

  5. Lower crustal deformation beneath the central Transverse Ranges, southern California: Results from the Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godfrey, N.J.; Fuis, G.S.; Langenheim, V.; Okaya, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    We present a P wave velocity model derived from active source seismic data collected during the 1994 Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment. Our model extends previously published upper crustal velocity models to mantle depths. Our model was developed by both ray tracing through a layered model and calculating travel times through a gridded model. It includes an 8-km-thick crustal root centered beneath the surface trace of the San Andreas fault, north of the highest topography in the San Gabriel Mountains. A simple mass balance calculation suggests that ???36 km of north-south shortening across the San Andreas fault in the central Transverse Ranges could have formed this root. If north-south compression began when the "Big Bend" in the San Andreas fault formed at ???5 Ma, 36 km of shortening implies a north-south contraction rate of ???7.1 mm/yr across the central Transverse Ranges. If, instead, north-south compression began when the Transverse Ranges formed at 3.4-3.9 Ma, 36 km of shortening implies a contraction rate of 9.2-10.6 mm/yr. North of the San Andreas fault, the Mojave Desert crust has a low-velocity (6.3 km/s) mid and lower crust and a 28-km-deep Moho. South of the San Andreas fault, beneath the Los Angeles and San Gabriel Valley basins, there is a fast (6.6-6.8 km/s), thick (10-12 km) lower crust with a 27-km-deep Moho. Farther south still, the lower crust of the Continental Borderland is fast (6.6-6.8 km/s) and thin (5 km) with a shallow (22 km deep) Moho.

  6. Crustal deformation of Miyakejima volcano, Japan since the eruption of 2000 using dense GPS campaign observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, M.; Matsushima, T.; Oikawa, J.; Watanabe, A.; Okuda, T.; Ozawa, T.; Kohno, Y.; Miyagi, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Miyakejima is an active volcanic Island located about 175 km south of Tokyo, Japan. Miyakejima volcano erupted approximately every 20 years in the past 100 years. The latest eruptive activities since 2000 was different from those of the last 100 years, in that the activities included a caldera formation for the first time in 2500 years and gigantic volcanic gas emission that forced islander to evacuate over four and half years. In 2000, a dense GPS observation campaign had detected the magma intrusion in detail (e.g., Irwan et al., 2003; Murase et al., 2006). However, this campaign observation ceased from 2002 to 2010 because a large amount of volcanic gas prevented from entering to the island. Since 2011, we restarted the campaign observation by the dense GPS network, and examined the ongoing magma accumulation process beneath Miyakejima volcano to get insights about the future activity. In this analysis, we combined the data of our campaign observations, the data of the University Union in 2000, and the GEONET data. The observation data were analyzed by RTK-LIB (Takasu et al., 2007) using GPS precise ephemeris from IGS. We estimated the locations and volumes of the pressure sources beneth Miyakejima using an elevation-modified Mogi model (Fukui et al., 2003) and open crack model (Okada, 1992) during the two periods (2000 ~ 2012 and 2011 ~ 2012). We used the software of Magnetic and Geodetic data Computer Analysis Program for Volcano (MaGCAP-V) (Fukui et al., 2010), and estimated the source parameters by trial and error. During 2000 and 2012, a contracting spherical source and contracting dyke were estimated beneath the caldera and at the southwestern part of the island, respectively. In contrast, during 2011 and 2012, an spherical inflation source was estimated a few km beneath the caldera. This result suggest that Miyakejima is now storing new magma for the next eruption. Geospatial Information Authority of Japan (GSI) (2011) suggested that the inflation started

  7. Incipient Crustal Stretching across AN Active Collision Belt: the Case of the Siculo-Calabrian Rift Zone (central Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, S.; Tortorici, G.; Romagnoli, G.; Pavano, F.

    2012-12-01

    increase in the elevation of the marine terraces of the last 600 ka. In the two analysed crustal blocks, the crustal doming with the related basin collapses and the concurrent tectonic motion without any back-stop can be respectively related to the thermal anomalies and to the drag forces exerted by a hot Mantle flow, triggered by the opening of a vertical slab windows at the southern edge of the Calabrian arc. This process has favored the migration of hot Mantle material towards the sectors of larger rollback of the subduction hinge, producing the spectacular tectonic uplift and active magmatism of the region. The increase of the volume of the Mantle wedged in the subduction zone of the Calabrian arc has been also effective to accommodate the differential roll-back between the adjacent segments of Nubia Plate, thus replacing the motion along the pre-existing transform faults dissecting the orogenic belt. In this frame, the deformation of the Hyblean-Etnean and the Peloritani-Aeolian blocks heralded the development of the two Sicily branches of the SCRZ. The delayed crustal stretching responsible for the propagation of the rift zone across the orogenic belt can be framed in the dynamic of a still active convergent margin if interpreted as the result of the sliding of the crust along the Ionian flank of the Mantle flow.

  8. Exploratory results from a new rotary shear designed to reproduce the extreme deformation conditions of crustal earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Toro, G.; Nielsen, S. B.; Spagnuolo, E.; Smith, S.; Violay, M. E.; Niemeijer, A. R.; Di Felice, F.; Di Stefano, G.; Romeo, G.; Scarlato, P.

    2011-12-01

    A challenging goal in experimental rock deformation is to reproduce the extreme deformation conditions typical of coseismic slip in crustal earthquakes: large slip (up to 50 m), slip rates (0.1-10 m/s), accelerations (> 10 m/s2) and normal stress (> 50 MPa). Moreover, fault zones usually contain non-cohesive rocks (gouges) and fluids. The integration of all these deformation conditions is such a technical challenge that there is currently no apparatus in the world that can reproduce seismic slip. Yet, the determination of rock friction at seismic slip rates remains one of the main unknowns in earthquake physics, as it cannot be determined (or very approximately) by seismic wave inversion analysis. In the last thirty years, rotary shear apparatus were designed that combine large normal stresses and slip but low slip rates (high-pressure rotary shears first designed by Tullis) or low normal stresses but large slip rates and slip (rotary shears first designed by Shimamoto). Here we present the results of experiments using a newly-constructed Slow to HIgh Velocity Apparatus (SHIVA), installed at INGV in Rome, which extends the combination of normal stress, slip and slip rate achieved by previous apparatus and reproduces the conditions likely to occur during an earthquake in the shallow crust. SHIVA uses two brushless engines (max power 300 kW, max torque 930 Nm) and an air actuator (thrust 5 tons) in a rotary shear configuration (nominally infinite displacement) to slide hollow rock cylinders (30/50 mm int./ext. diameter) at slip rates ranging from 10 micron/s up to 6.5 m/s, accelerations up to 80 m/s2 and normal stresses up to 50 MPa. SHIVA can also perform experiments in which the torque on the sample (rather than the slip rate) is progressively increased until spontaneous failure occurs: this experimental capability should better reproduce natural conditions. The apparatus is equipped with a sample chamber to carry out experiments in the presence of fluids (up to 15

  9. Crustal deformation around the Kamishiro fault, northern Itoigawa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line and its relation to the 2014 Northern Nagano earthquake (Mw6.3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagiya, T.; Teratani, N.; Matsuhiro, K.; Okuda, T.; Horikawa, S.; Matsuta, N.; Nishimura, T.; Yarai, H.; Suito, H.

    2015-12-01

    The Itoigawa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line (ISTL) is a major geologic boundary intersecting the Japanese mainland into the northeastern and the southwestern parts. It is also an active fault system that is supposed to have a high seismic potential. We have conducted dense GPS observation and identified a highly localized E-W contraction around the Kamishiro fault at the northern ISTL. Kinematic modeling of this deformation pattern suggests that the fault is shallowly dipping to the east and accommodating the E-W contraction by aseismic faulting below the depth of 2-4 km. This aseismic fault is consistent with the base of the Neogene basin fill, which has accommodated E-W shortening over 10km. On November 22, 2014, a Mw 6.3 earthquake occurred at the Kamishiro fault. The hypocenter is located at the 5km depth and a 9km long surface rupture appeared along the fault trace. GPS observation and InSAR analysis with ALOS-2 data revealed northwestward displacement and uplift (max. 90cm) on the east, and southeastward displacement with subsidence (max. 30cm) on the west, indicating a rupture of the Kamishiro fault. The coseismic crustal deformation pattern is modeled by a faulting on a high-angle reverse fault from the surface to 7km depth, extending ~20km along the fault trace. A large fault slip is estimated at the shallowest (depth<2km) part corresponding to the surface rupture. The geodetic fault model is also consistent with the aftershock distribution. On the other hand, the source fault implies a rupture of the pre-Neogene basement below the basin fill, not the shallow-dipping fault estimated from interseismic deformation. Thus the relationship between the interseismic aseismic faulting and the coseismic fault is not totally clear. The large interseismic contraction mainly reflects inelastic process and only a small portion, if any, contributes to the stress accumulation of the main shock fault. This example demonstrates complexity of the earthquake cycle at a thrust fault

  10. Locating Active Plate Boundaries by Earthquake Data. Crustal Evaluation Education Project. Teacher's Guide [and] Student Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoever, Edward C., Jr.

    Crustal Evolution Education Project (CEEP) modules were designed to: (1) provide students with the methods and results of continuing investigations into the composition, history, and processes of the earth's crust and the application of this knowledge to man's activities and (2) to be used by teachers with little or no previous background in the…

  11. Crustal versus asthenospheric relaxation and post-seismic deformation for shallow normal faulting earthquakes:the Umbria-Marche (central Italy) case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, R.; Aoudia, A.; Vermeersen, L. L. A.; Sabadini, R.; Panza, G. F.

    2000-06-01

    Following a normal mode approach for a stratified viscoelastic earth, we investigate the effects induced by shallow normal faulting earthquakes, on surface post-seismic vertical displacement and velocity at the surface, when stress relaxation occurs in the crust or in the asthenosphere. The modelled earthquake is a moderate one characteristic of some slowly deforming plate boundaries in the central Mediterranean region. We focus on the Umbria-Marche (central Italy) region where deep seismic reflection studies (CROP03) and the 1997 earthquake sequence clearly show a seismogenic layer decoupled from the lower crust by a sizeable transition zone. Accordingly, the crust is subdivided into three layers: an elastic upper crust, a transition zone and a low-viscosity lower crust. The fault is embedded in the upper crust. The layered viscoelastic structure of the crust and mantle imposes a pattern and scale on the modelled coseismic and post-seismic deformation with a major contribution from the transition crustal zone and low-viscosity lower crust, stress relaxation in the mantle being negligible. We show that significant vertical deformation rates of the order of 1mmyr-1 could be expected for a shallow and moderate event such as the recent Umbria-Marche earthquake for viscosity values of 1019 and 1018Pas in the crustal transition zone and lower crust, respectively.

  12. Modeling of Crustal Deformation in SW Japan using GPS Data -Simultaneous Estimation of Interplate Coupling and Block Rotation-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyao, K.; Miura, S.; Ohta, Y.; Wallace, L.; Nakao, S.; Hasegawa, A.

    2007-12-01

    We applied a new method devised by McCaffery [2002] to estimate both slip deficit and block rotation simultaneously to SW Japan where the tectonics is complex and the crustal deformation is not uniform. We estimated the distribution of the slip deficit on the subducting Philippine Sea Plate and other assumed block boundaries in SW Japan together with block rotation parameters simultaneously. As a result we can clarify the along-arc variation of the slip deficit on subduction zone, and relative block motion derived from block rotation. We assume some geological faults, grabens and linearly-aligned hypocenters as block boundaries. We also considered the Okinawa micro-plate (ON) proposed by Bird [2003]. The data used in the analysis is the GPS site velocities obtained from GEONET. The results show the larger slip deficit of the subducting slab in the northern Hyuga-nada and off Shikoku, while smaller in the southern Hyuga-nada. The coupling across the Median Tectonic Line (MTL) and Beppu-Shimabara Graben is very shallow (~10km depth), however, Amurian plate (AM) and Mid-Kyushu block (MK) couple strongly across the other part inland Kyushu on the contrary. The Euler poles of AM-ON and AM-MK are located at long. 133°E, and lat. 29°N with an angular velocity of 3.1°/Ma and at long. 126°E, and lat. 40°N with 0.5°/Ma, respectively. The AM-ON angular velocity obtained in this study is about 1/5 of that estimated by Kodama [1995] and shows fair agreement. It is necessary to perform more detailed analyses by adding more data from the Nansei Islands and Shikoku area. The long-term relative motions between adjacent blocks are also estimated. The result shows grabens inland Kyushu are opening, the blocks across the MTL are moving right-laterally, and the MK and the southernmost Kyushu blocks are also moving right-laterally in long term.

  13. Deformation Monitoring of AN Active Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostapchuk, A.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of low frequency earthquakes, slow slip events and other deformation phenomena, new for geophysics, change our understanding of how the energy accumulated in the Earth's crust do release. The new geophysical data make one revise the underlying mechanism of geomechanical processes taking place in fault zones. Conditions for generating different slip modes are still unclear. The most vital question is whether a certain slip mode is intrinsic for a fault or may be controlled by external factors. This work presents the results of two and a half year deformation monitoring of a discontinuity in the zone of the Main Sayanskiy Fault. Main Sayanskiy Fault is right-lateral strike-slip fault. Observations were performed in the tunnel of Talaya seismic station (TLY), Irkutsk region, Russia. Measurements were carried out 70 m away from the entrance of the tunnel, the thickness of overlying rock was about 30 m. Inductive sensors of displacement were mounted at the both sides of a discontinuity, which recorded three components of relative fault side displacement with the accuracy of 0.2 mcm. Temperature variation inside the tunnel didn't exceed 0.5oC during the all period of observations. Important information about deformation properties of an active fault was obtained. A pronounced seasonality of deformation characteristics of discontinuity is observed in the investigated segment of rock. A great number of slow slip events with durations from several hours to several weeks were registered. Besides that alterations of fault deformation characteristics before the megathrust earthquake M9.0 Tohoku Oki 11 March 2011 and reaction to the event itself were detected. The work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation (grant no. 14-17-00719).

  14. Global Positioning System constraints on crustal deformation before and during the 21 February 2008 Wells, Nevada M6.0 earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammond, William C.; Blewitt, Geoffrey; Kreemer, Corné; Murray-Moraleda, Jessica R.; Svarc, Jerry L.; dePolo, Craig M.; LaPointe, Daphne D.

    2011-01-01

    Using Global Positioning System (GPS) data from permanent sites and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) campaign data we have estimated co-seismic displacements and secular background crustal deformation patterns associated with the 21 February 2008 Wells Nevada earthquake. Estimated displacements at nearby permanent GPS sites ELKO (84 km distant) and GOSH (81 km distant) are 1.0±0.2 mm and 1.1±0.3 mm, respectively. The magnitude and direction are in agreement with those predicted from a rupture model based on InSAR measurements of the near-field co-seismic surface displacement. Analysis of long GPS time series (>10 years) from the permanent sites within 250 km of the epicenter indicate the eastern Nevada Basin and Range undergoes steady tectonic transtension with rates on the order of 1 mm/year over approximately 250 km. The azimuth of maximum horizontal crustal extension is consistent with the azimuth of the Wells earthquake co-seismic slip vector. The orientation of crustal shear is consistent with deformation associated with Pacific/North America plate boundary relative motion seen elsewhere in the Basin and Range. In response to the event, we deployed a new GPS site with the capability to telemeter high rate, low latency data that will in the future allow for rapid estimation of surface displacement should aftershocks or postseismic deformations occur. We estimated co-seismic displacements using campaign GPS data collected before and after the event, however in most cases their uncertainties were larger than the offsets. Better precision in co-seismic displacement could have been achieved for the campaign sites if they had been surveyed more times or over a longer interval to better estimate their pre-event velocity.

  15. The use of baseline measurements and geophysical models for the estimation of crustal deformations and the terrestrial reference system. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bock, Y.

    1982-01-01

    Four possible estimators are investigated for the monitoring of crustal deformations from a combination of repeated baseline length measurements and adopted geophysical models, particularly an absolute motion plate model. The first estimator is an extension of the familiar free adjustment. The next two are Bayesian type estimators, one weak and one strong. Finally, a weighted constraint estimator is presented. The properties of these four estimators are outlined and their physical interpretations discussed. A series of simulations are performed to test the four estimators and to determine whether or not to incorporate a plate model for the monitoring of deformations. The application of these estimations to the maintenance of a new conventional terrestrial reference system is discussed.

  16. A domain decomposition approach to implementing fault slip in finite-element models of quasi-static and dynamic crustal deformation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aagaard, B.T.; Knepley, M.G.; Williams, C.A.

    2013-01-01

    We employ a domain decomposition approach with Lagrange multipliers to implement fault slip in a finite-element code, PyLith, for use in both quasi-static and dynamic crustal deformation applications. This integrated approach to solving both quasi-static and dynamic simulations leverages common finite-element data structures and implementations of various boundary conditions, discretization schemes, and bulk and fault rheologies. We have developed a custom preconditioner for the Lagrange multiplier portion of the system of equations that provides excellent scalability with problem size compared to conventional additive Schwarz methods. We demonstrate application of this approach using benchmarks for both quasi-static viscoelastic deformation and dynamic spontaneous rupture propagation that verify the numerical implementation in PyLith.

  17. A proposal of monitoring and forecasting system for crustal activity in and around Japan using a large-scale high-fidelity finite element simulation codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, T.; Ichimura, T.

    2015-12-01

    Here we propose a system for monitoring and forecasting of crustal activity, especially great interplate earthquake generation and its preparation processes in subduction zone. Basically, we model great earthquake generation as frictional instability on the subjecting plate boundary. So, spatio-temporal variation in slip velocity on the plate interface should be monitored and forecasted. Although, we can obtain continuous dense surface deformation data on land and partly at the sea bottom, the data obtained are not fully utilized for monitoring and forecasting. It is necessary to develop a physics-based data analysis system including (1) a structural model with the 3D geometry of the plate interface and the material property such as elasticity and viscosity, (2) calculation code for crustal deformation and seismic wave propagation using (1), (3) inverse analysis or data assimilation code both for structure and fault slip using (1)&(2). To accomplish this, it is at least necessary to develop highly reliable large-scale simulation code to calculate crustal deformation and seismic wave propagation for 3D heterogeneous structure. Actually, Ichimura et al. (2014, SC14) has developed unstructured FE non-linear seismic wave simulation code, which achieved physics-based urban earthquake simulation enhanced by 10.7 BlnDOF x 30 K time-step. Ichimura et al. (2013, GJI) has developed high fidelity FEM simulation code with mesh generator to calculate crustal deformation in and around Japan with complicated surface topography and subducting plate geometry for 1km mesh. Further, for inverse analyses, Errol et al. (2012, BSSA) has developed waveform inversion code for modeling 3D crustal structure, and Agata et al. (2015, this meeting) has improved the high fidelity FEM code to apply an adjoint method for estimating fault slip and asthenosphere viscosity. Hence, we have large-scale simulation and analysis tools for monitoring. Furthermore, we are developing the methods for

  18. Quantifying crustal response to deep active intrusions with geodesy-based finite element modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, S. T.; Pritchard, M. E.; Elliott, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Altiplano-Puna Volcanic Complex (APVC, 21-24 S, 66-69 W) is a first order feature of the Central Andes Volcanic Arc. The APVC consists of over 10,000 km^3 of dacitic ignimbrites deposited in the late Miocene, making it one of the largest concentrations of silicic volcanism in the world. The persistent and intense magmatic flux in this region has likely contributed to the thickened crust (50-70 km), elevated geotherm (>50 C/km) and extensive partial melt (<20 %) inferred under the APVC in modern times. Furthermore, satellite geodetic measurements show surface deformation centered on Uturuncu Volcano (22.27 S, 67.22 W) that is consistent with an ongoing magmatic intrusion in the middle to lower crust. The unique geologic setting and availability of multiple geophysical datasets provide an exceptional opportunity to locate fluid accumulation depths and model the resulting crustal mechanical response. InSAR data between 05/1992 and 01/2011 show that the deformation anomaly is characterized by axis-symmetric constant vertical uplift of 1-10 mm/yr over a radius of 35 km, which is surrounded by 1-4 mm/yr subsidence out to 75 km. One possible explanation for such a signal is diapiric rise of melt from the middle crust. We seek to determine if observed deformation can be alternatively explained by vertical ascent of magma from the lower (~70 km) to middle crust (~20 km). Such a model would be consistent with the short duration of deformation from geomorphic studies (less than 2200 years) and the potential abrupt cessation of uplift seen in a single continuous GPS station starting in 04/2010 near the center of deformation. We therefore test multiple finite element models that match spatial and temporal surface deformation, achieve mass balance between source and sink reservoirs, and require physically realistic rheological parameters of the crust. Modeling is performed with Pylith finite element software on a cylindrical three dimensional domain with a radius of 300 km

  19. Active Beam Shaping System and Method Using Sequential Deformable Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Colin A. (Inventor); Pueyo, Laurent A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An active optical beam shaping system includes a first deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept an entrance beam of light and to provide a first reflected beam of light, a second deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept the first reflected beam of light from the first deformable mirror and to provide a second reflected beam of light, and a signal processing and control system configured to communicate with the first and second deformable mirrors. The first deformable mirror, the second deformable mirror and the signal processing and control system together provide a large amplitude light modulation range to provide an actively shaped optical beam.

  20. The Assumed Aseismic Subduction and the Necessity of Ocean-Bottom Crustal Deformation Measurements at the Ryukyus, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, M.; Ando, M.; Matsumoto, T.; Furukawa, M.; Tadokoro, K.; Furumoto, M.

    2006-12-01

    trench that could lead to a large earthquake(s). Moreover, since the focal area is located in the shallow layers near the trench, it is very likely to generate a disproportionately large tsunami with respect to the magnitude of the earthquake source. The magnitude could reach M9 or more and, in such a case, would be the largest event in Japan. Considering the location of the Ryukyus, we suggest that the observation technique using the ocean-bottom crustal deformation system (kinematic-GPS and acoustic ranging techniques) can solve the current question of whether or not the Ryukyus plate boundary is coupled. The present accuracy of our observation system is 5 +-1cm with at least 3 years of observations. The initial year would focus on the installation of ocean-bottom transponders near the trench axis and 60 towards the shore. Baseline data would also be established on the first year of observations. Observations during the second year would produce the preliminary image of the locked condition at the plate interface while the third year would give enough time to validate and ascertain whether or not the plate interface is locked. For each observation, a 3- or 4-day observation period is sufficient for an accurate location because the ocean current offshore of Okinawa is stable on summer seasons.

  1. Mesozoic fault systems, deformation and fault block rotation in the Andean forearc: a crustal scale strike-slip duplex in the Coastal Cordillera of northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. K.; Grocott, J.; Pope, A.; Randall, D. E.

    1998-12-01

    In this paper we discuss the evolution and tectonic significance of the Mesozoic trench-parallel fault systems which affected the Coastal Cordillera and their relation to magmatism and crustal rotation. The oldest, extensional, fault system separates basement from rift-related Late Triassic and younger sedimentary units. This system [I] subsequently developed into a wider extensional fault system which acted as the locus of magma ascent and emplacement of the Coastal Batholith during much of the Jurassic to earliest Cretaceous period. This extensional fault system defined the forearc sliver during this period and was the consequence of a retreating subduction boundary. During the Early Cretaceous (c. 132-125 Ma) the kinematics of this fault system changed to transtension [II] and accommodated a major component of left-lateral strike-slip motion, the principal fault being the Atacama Fault Zone along which plutons continued to be emplaced. The final phase of pluton emplacement within the Coastal Cordillera appears to be c. 106 Ma, after which this magmatic arc and fault system was abandoned. An Late Cretaceous arc and fault system [III] developed some 20 Ma later and located some 50 km to the east in what is now the Central Valley of northern Chile. This paper seeks to show that the Coastal Cordillera was deformed as a whole by this Late Cretaceous fault system [III] which formed a crustal-scale left-lateral transpressional duplex. During this deformation the thermally weakened crust was dissected into a series of large-scale blocks bounded by NW-trending left-lateral strike-slip faults which merge into a NNE-SSW fault zone which forms the eastern boundary to the duplex. We term this eastern boundary zone the Central Valley Fault Zone (CVFZ) and this together with the NW-trending faults defines the duplex system which we refer to as a whole as the Coastal Cordillera Fault System (CCFS) [III]. We have traced the CCFS duplex between 25°S and 29°S and suspect that it

  2. Variation in Crustal Structure and Deformation along the Tonga-Kermadec Forearc: Temporal and Spatial Changes in the Structure and Morphology of the Subducting Pacific Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funnell, M.

    2015-12-01

    Pacific oceanic lithosphere has been subducting along the Tonga-Kermadec Trench for at least 28 Myr. Variations in the sediment thickness, subduction angle and roughness of the subducting plate over this time have controlled deformation along the forearc. This constant process of forearc evolution has been punctuated since at least 7 Ma by the subduction of seamounts, as the trench-oblique Louisville Seamount Chain (LSC) migrates southward along the trench. The subduction of these seamounts is associated with accelerated tectonic erosion, the tilting of sedimentary units and 80 km of forearc shortening north of the present-day collision zone at 26°S. South of this collision zone, the overriding and subducting plates exhibit structures expected of normal Pacific plate subduction. In 2011, a series of integrated geophysical profiles were acquired to image the crustal and upper mantle structure along the Tonga-Kermadec subduction system and LSC, with the aim of: a) establishing the nature of major structural variations along the forearc; b) resolving the flexural state of the overriding and underthrusting plates in regions of normal subduction and at the point of LSC-collision; and from these c) determining the primary influences on the flexural behaviour and nature of deformation in the underthrusting and overriding plates along the Tonga-Kermadec subduction system. From the 2011 acquisition, we present multichannel reflection and wide-angle refraction seismic data that reveal the dominant structural differences between the Kermadec forearc and the raised Tonga Platform. Superimposed on these are structures associated with differing modes and extents of tectonic deformation that have occurred more recently along the margin. Most notably, the increased crustal strength around the seamounts results in an ~2 km shallowing of the trench and the development of an ~100 km-wide complex network of faulting on the overriding plate in the area of seamount collision.

  3. Quaternary deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.D. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Displaced or deformed rock units and landforms record the past 2 m.y. of faulting, folding, uplift, and subsidence in California. Properly interpreted, such evidence provides a quantitative basis for predicting future earthquake activity and for relating many diverse structures and landforms to the 5 cm/yr of horizontal motion at the boundary between the North American and Pacific plates. Modern techniques of geologic dating and expanded research on earthquake hazards have greatly improved our knowledge of the San Andreas fault system. Much of this new knowledge has been gained since 1965, and that part which concerns crustal deformation during the past 2 m.y. is briefly summarized here.

  4. Crustal deformation and seismic measurements in the region of McDonald Observatory, West Texas. [Texas and Northern Chihuahua, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorman, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    The arrival times of regional and local earthquakes and located earthquakes in the Basin and Range province of Texas and in the adjacent areas of Chihuahua, Mexico from January 1976 to August 1980 at the UT'NASA seismic array are summarized. The August 1931 Texas earthquake is reevaluated and the seismicity and crustal structure of West Texas is examined. A table of seismic stations is included.

  5. A Non-Rigid Block Extrusion Induced by Arc-Continent Collision Corner: Present-day Crustal Deformation and Neotectonics in Northern Hualien, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Lee, J.; Chen, Y.; Chen, R.

    2009-12-01

    Eastern Taiwan has long been well-known as sitting at the collision suture between the Eurasian and Philippine Sea plates which is characterized by numerous earthquakes and several active faults. The Hualien City is located at the transition point at the northern end of the Longitudinal Valley, whereas the Philippine Sea plate was westward thrust upon the Eurasian plate in the past, while is diving right now under the Eurasian plate from the latitude of Hualien northwards. At least one major active fault has been documented in this relatively complex area of transition zone, in addition to the Coastal Range fault on the northwestern side of the Coastal Range. The Milun fault has been mapped running along the western margin of the Milun Tableland, showing coseismic slips of 1.2 and 2 m for its vertical and sinistral slip respectively during the 1951 M=7.3 Hualien earthquake. Based on (1) repeated GPS campaign measurements for five times during April 2007 to July 2009, (2) D-InSAR analysis and (3) repeated leveling and total station measurements at a near-fault network, we obtained the horizontal and vertical crustal deformation in this area. The results suggest an eastward extrusion in the northern Hualien area. We tend to interpret it as being initiated by the northwest indentation of the Coastal Range under the sea to push the northeastern Hualien not only move upward but also eastward because of free space in the up and east directions. On the other hand, the strain analyses of GPS data indicate that the northern Hualien is far from a rigid block, as revealed by inhomogeneous GPS velocity field. Our measurements also indicate that the Milun fault probably is now locked. No significant horizontal or vertical offset was observed across the fault, although local network showed a contraction strain in the surface fault zone. We tend to interpret the Milun fault as a high-angle sinistral fault that was formed within the extrusion block, that allow the Milun Tableland

  6. Late Cenozoic regional uplift and localised crustal deformation within the northern Arabian Platform in southeast Turkey: Investigation of the Euphrates terrace staircase using multidisciplinary techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Tuncer; Seyrek, Ali; Westaway, Rob; Guillou, Hervé; Scaillet, Stéphane; Beck, Ant; Bridgland, David R.

    2012-09-01

    We present the results of detailed field investigations of the fluvial succession exposed along the Euphrates valley adjoining the Atatürk Dam in the northern part of the Arabian Platform within SE Turkey. This work, which has used Differential GPS surveying to obtain accurate heights of deposits and Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission imagery for location purposes, has included documentation of many fresh sections exposed by quarrying. The work has been supplemented by unspiked Ksbnd Ar dating of late Middle Miocene to Late Miocene basalt flows, which are widespread in the region, providing a chronology for the early stages of development of this river system following regional emergence above sea-level in the early Middle Miocene. For example, beside the Atatürk Dam Lake at Siverek İskelesi, basalt dated to 10.24 ± 0.22 Ma (± 2σ) caps a polymict Euphrates gravel some 80 m above the modern river; this is the oldest Euphrates terrace currently recognised. However, amounts and rates of fluvial incision are shown to vary across the northern Arabian Platform in a complex manner, due to the interaction between regional uplift and localised vertical crustal motions caused by slip on active reverse faults beneath anticlines. The study reach downstream of the Atatürk Dam includes the footwall of one such fault, beneath the Bozova Anticline; we estimate that the resulting rate of localised subsidence, superimposed onto the regional uplift that has also been occurring, has been ~ 0.01 mm a- 1 during the present phase of crustal deformation, which began at ~ 3.7-3.6 Ma, but was higher, maybe ~ 0.03 mm a- 1, during the previous phase, which began at ~ 6 Ma, when the pattern of plate motions in the surrounding region was different. A large palaeo-lake centred north of the present study region around the city of Adıyaman is inferred to have existed during this ~ 6 Ma to ~ 3.7-3.6 Ma phase of plate motion, apparently because the relatively rapid localised hanging

  7. Active and long-lived permanent forearc deformation driven by the subduction seismic cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aron Melo, Felipe Alejandro

    I have used geological, geophysical and engineering methods to explore mechanisms of upper plate, brittle deformation at active forearc regions. My dissertation particularly addresses the permanent deformation style experienced by the forearc following great subduction ruptures, such as the 2010 M w8.8 Maule, Chile and 2011 Mw9.0 Tohoku, Japan earthquakes. These events triggered large, shallow seismicity on upper plate normal faults above the rupture reaching Mw7.0. First I present new structural data from the Chilean Coastal Cordillera over the rupture zone of the Maule earthquake. The study area contains the Pichilemu normal fault, which produced the large crustal aftershocks of the megathrust event. Normal faults are the major neotectonic structural elements but reverse faults also exist. Crustal seismicity and GPS surface displacements show that the forearc experiences pulses of rapid coseismic extension, parallel to the heave of the megathrust, and slow interseismic, convergence-parallel shortening. These cycles, over geologic time, build the forearc structural grain, reactivating structures properly-oriented respect to the deformation field of each stage of the interplate cycle. Great subduction events may play a fundamental role in constructing the crustal architecture of extensional forearc regions. Static mechanical models of coseismic and interseismic upper plate deformation are used to explore for distinct features that could result from brittle fracturing over the two stages of the interplate cycle. I show that the semi-elliptical outline of the first-order normal faults along the Coastal Cordillera may define the location of a characteristic, long-lived megathrust segment. Finally, using data from the Global CMT catalog I analyzed the seismic behavior through time of forearc regions that have experienced great subduction ruptures >Mw7.7 worldwide. Between 61% and 83% of the cases where upper plate earthquakes exhibited periods of increased seismicity

  8. Rapid, Repeat-sample Monitoring of Crustal Deformations and Environmental Phenomena with the Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert C.

    2006-01-01

    The Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) is a precision repeat-pass Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) mission being developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Dryden Flight Research Center in support of NASA s Science Mission Directorate. UAVSAR's unique ability to fly a repeatable flight path, along with an electronically steerable array, allows interferometric data to be obtained with accuracies measured in millimeters. Deploying the radar on an airborne platform will also allow for radar images to be collected and compared with images from the same area taken hours or even years later - providing for long-term trending and near real-time notification of changes and deformations. UAVSAR s data processing algorithms will provide for near-real time data reduction providing disaster planning and response teams with highly accurate data to aid in the prediction of, and response to, natural phenomena. UAVSAR data can be applied to increasing our understanding of the processes behind solid earth, cryosphere, carbon cycle and other areas of interest in earth science. Technologies developed for UAVSAR may also be applicable to a future earth-orbiting InSAR mission and possibly for missions to the Moon or Mars. The UAVSAR is expected to fly on a Gulfstream III aircraft this winter, followed by a flight test program lasting until the second half of 2007. Following radar calibration and data reduction activities, the platform will be ready for science users in the summer of 2008.

  9. Crustal Thickness Variations Along the Southeastern Caribbean Plate Boundary From Teleseismic and Active Source Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezada, M. J.; Niu, F.; Baldwin, T. K.; Pavlis, G.; Vernon, F.; Rendón, H.; Zelt, C. A.; Schmitz, M.; Levander, A.

    2006-12-01

    Insight into the topography of the Moho discontinuity beneath Venezuela has been progressively gained since the 1990's through seismic refraction studies carried out in the south and east of the country. More recently, both active and passive, land and marine seismic data were acquired by the U.S. BOLIVAR and Venezuelan GEODINOS projects to understand accretion processes and mechanisms for continental growth. The passive component includes an 18-month deployment of 27 PASSCAL broadband seismographs, a 12-month deployment of 15 OBSIP broadband instruments and an ongoing deployment of 8 Rice broadband seismometers. Additionally, data from the 34 BB stations of the national seismic network of Venezuela and the GSN SDV station, give a seismic dataset from 84 stations covering an area of ~750,000 km2. The active component includes 4 onshore-offshore refraction/wide angle reflection profiles as well as the recording of airgun blasts from offshore seismic lines by BB stations in mainland Venezuela and the Leeward Antilles. This abundance of datasets allows us to estimate Moho depths using different methods such as receiver functions, and forward and inverse modeling of wide-angle datasets, but also poses the challenge of reconciling the different values obtained to achieve robust results. Generally the active source and receiver function estimates are close to one another. We present a composite crustal thickness map showing a highly variable crustal thicknesses ranging from 15 km beneath the Caribbean LIP, to ~55 km beneath eastern Venezuela. Crustal thickness is strongly correlated with geologic terranes, but not always as expected. The thickest crust is found to exist in the east of the country, beneath the sedimentary basins north of the Orinoco River where depth to Moho exceeds 50 km. Crustal thickness beneath most of the Precambrian Guayana Shield is fairly constant at ~38 km . In contrast, we observe relatively thin (~25-30 km) crust in the eastern and western

  10. Crustal deformation at very long baseline interferometry sites due to seasonal air-mass and ground water variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolz, A.; Larden, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    The seasonal deformation normal to the Earth's surface was calculated at stations involved or interested in very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) geodesy and at hypothetical sites in Australia and Brazil using global atmospheric pressure data, values for groundwater storage, and load Love numbers deduced from current Earth models. It was found that the annual range of deformation approached the centimeter level measuring potential of the VLBI technqiue at Greenbank, Haystack, and the Brazil site.

  11. Upper crustal emplacement and deformation of granitoids inside the Uppermost Unit of the Cretan nappe stack: constraints from U-Pb zircon dating, microfabrics and paleostress analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneuker, Tilo; Dörr, Wolfgang; Petschick, Rainer; Zulauf, Gernold

    2015-03-01

    The present study is dealing with the emplacement and deformation of diorite and quartz diorite exposed along new road cuts between Agios Nikolaos and Sitia (Uppermost Unit, eastern Crete). Mingling of both melt types is indicated by enclaves of diorite inside quartz diorite and vice versa. The diorite and quartz diorite intruded into coarse-grained white marble, which is in lateral contact to, but also forms the roof of, the intrusive body. Evidence for contact metamorphism is indicated by increasing grain size of calcite in the marble with decreasing distance from the diorite. U-Pb (TIMS) dating of zircons, separated from quartz diorite, yielded a concordant age at 74.0 ± 0.25 Ma, which is interpreted as emplacement age. As this age is close to published K-Ar cooling ages of hornblende and biotite, the melt should have intruded and cooled down rapidly at upper structural levels, which is not common for granitoids of the Uppermost Unit of Crete. Upper crustal melt emplacement is also documented by stoped blocks and by the lack of any ductile (viscous) deformation. The diorite and quartz diorite, however, are affected by strong post-Oligocene brittle faulting. Paleostress analysis, based on these faults, revealed a change in stress field from N-S and NNW-SSE shortening by thrusting (convergence between African and European plates) to NNE-SSW and NE-SW shortening accommodated by strike-slip (SW-ward extrusion of the Anatolian microplate). Calcite-twin density indicates high differential stress (260 ± 20 MPa) related to these phases of crustal shortening.

  12. Earth rheology in Iceland: new constraints from InSAR observations and models of crustal deformation induced by glacial surge and GIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auriac, Amandine; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Hooper, Andy; Spaans, Karsten; Björnsson, Helgi; Pálsson, Finnur; Pinel, Virginie; Feigl, Kurt L.

    2014-05-01

    About 11% of Iceland is covered by glaciers. The largest ice cap, Vatnajökull, has an area of ~8100 km² with an average ice thickness of ~380 m. Climate changes since the late 19th century has induced significant ice loss at Icelandic glaciers, resulting in a broad Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) uplift signal in the country. Furthermore, many of the major outlets from Icelandic ice caps are known to surge with a quiescent period of a few to up to ~10 decades. During a surge (lasting only a few months) large quantities of ice are transported to the glacier and terminal region from the interior zone of the ice caps. Due to this large scale mass transport, a surge implies a local crustal subsidence. In 1993 to 1995, the major outlets from SW-Vatnajökull surged. Deformation due both to GIA and the surges was observed and used to infer the properties of the crust and mantle beneath Iceland through modelling. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data from 1992-2002, providing high resolution ground observations, were used to measure the GIA uplift and surge-induced subsidence with mm to cm accuracy. InSAR time series and velocity estimates reveal a GIA signal of up to 25-28 mm/yr close to the ice cap. We disentangled the near instantaneous surge-induced crustal signal from the long-term GIA by inverting for a step function at the time of the surge, superimposed on the assumed linear GIA deformation rate. This yielded a surge-induced deformation signal reaching up to 75 mm at the ice edge. Finite element modelling is performed to reproduce each signal and infer some of the Earth properties. Each model is compared to the observations and a probability distribution of our free parameters is obtained using a Bayesian approach. For the surge-induced deformation, we use elastic modelling with one or two elastic layers and a digital map of the ice mass distribution after the surge, created from surface elevation measurements and glacier surface DEMs prior to

  13. Recent Crustal Deformations In Kii Peninsula, Southwest Japan Derived From Dense GPS Observations: Interplate Coupling And 2004 Earthquake Sequence SE Off Kii Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, M.; Onoue, K.; Ohya, F.; Hoso, Y.; Sato, K.; Segawa, K.; Fujita, Y.

    2004-12-01

    Kii peninsula, southwest Japan is located close to the Nankai trough and suffers from the subduction of the Philippine Sea plate. Deeper part of the source region of interplate earthquakes, such as 1946 Nankai is beneath this peninsula. Therefore it is important to reveal detailed crustal deformations in this area for the purpose of understanding of generation process of interplate earthquakes and long-term forecast of their occurrence. We established 10 GPS observation sites filling the gaps of the GEONET operated by GSI along two lines nearly parallel to the relative motion between the Philippine Sea and Amurian plates. Resultant average spacing is 5~10km. We have repeated the campaign survey of this traverse using dual-frequency receivers since March 2001. So far, we have collected data from 4 campaigns done every March and can discuss displacement/velocity field during the recent 3 years. We calculate coordinates of our campaign sites with GSI_fs permanent sites in ITRF2000. We use the GIPSY/OASIS II software with JPL precise ephemeredes in the analysis. Velocity of each site is calculated referring to the first campaign and converted to the relative velocity to the Amurian plate using the Euler vector by Heki et al. (1999). Velocities derived from 2001 and 2002 campaigns are about 20mm/yr in the middle part of Kii peninsula and 35mm/yr at its southern tip, respectively, relative to the Amurian plate. Their directions are WNW. The gradient is almost linear up to 33.8N and there is no significant change in gradient in northern part. Velocities along the eastern line are a little smaller than those on the western line. We apply a model with multiple fault segments to this velocity field and estimate their slip deficit rates. We adopt the 9 segments around Kii peninsula from the fault model of Sagiya and Thatcher (1999). Estimated slip deficit rates are as large as 70 mm/yr that is slightly larger than the relative plate motion. If we add deeper extension to the

  14. Batholith Construction In Actively Deforming Crust, Coast Mountains Batholith, British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusmore, M. E.; Woodsworth, G. J.; Gehrels, G. E.

    2011-12-01

    Stikinia east of the YTT. Western Stikinia has NE-directed thrust faults, dextral faults and a >100 km long dextral reverse fault. Metamorphism locally produced amphibolite gneiss and NW-trending folds. This phase of transpression ended ~ca 74 Ma, marking the end of orogen-wide deformation. Subsequent deformation and magmatism are restricted to western Stikinia, coincident with the magmatic front. Between 69 and 55 Ma, N-directed shortening and exhumation of gneiss took place in restraining bend on a dextral shear zone. From ~65-53 Ma, the Coast shear zone was the locus of magmatism and reverse slip. Overall, the history of this part of the batholith shows: 1) the batholith formed in actively deforming and thickening crust within a contractional to transpressive setting. 2) Deformation and magmatism are widespread ~100-75 Ma, becoming more focused from 70-55 Ma. Crustal thickening was broadly coeval with magmatic fluxes at 120-88 and 65-55 Ma. 3) major crustal extension (55-50 Ma) and voluminous 52-48 Ma plutons present farther north are absent, suggesting a link between this magmatism and crustal extension.

  15. Crustal Deformation Styles Along the Reprocessed Deep Seismic Reflection Transect of the Central Iberian Zone (Iberian Peninsula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehsan, Siddique Akhtar; Carbonell, Ramon; Ayarza, Puy; Marti, David; Martinez-Poyatos, David; Simancas, Jose Fernando; Azor, Antonio; Marzan, Ignacio; Mansilla, Luis; Perez-Estaun, Andres

    2014-05-01

    The multichannel normal incidence deep seismic reflection profile ALCUDIA was acquired in summer 2007 and is 230 km long. This transect samples an intracontinental Variscan orogenic crust going across, from north to south, the major crustal domain (the Central Iberian Zone) and a suture zone with the Ossa-Morena Zone (the Central Unit) that build up the southwestern part of the Iberian Peninsula basement. The multichannel deep seismic high resolution (60-90 fold) profile images 20 s (TWTT), about 70 km depth. The reassessment of this data aims to provide better structural constraints on the shallow and deep structures. The ALCUDIA seismic image shows an upper crust c. 13 km thick decoupled from the comparatively reflective lower crust. The shallow reflectivity of the upper crust can be correlated with surface geological features mapped in the field whereas the deep reflectivity suggests imbricate thrust systems and listric extensional faults. The reflectivity of the mid-lower crust is relatively continuous, revealing high amplitude, and horizontal to arcuate reflection events delineating boudinage shaped geometries. A transpressional flower structure can be interpreted from the seismic image which involves a subcrustal mantle wedge. The ALCUDIA seismic image reveals a laminated c. 1.5 km thick, subhorizontal to flat Moho indicating an average crustal thickness of 31-33 km. The seismic signature of the Moho varies along the transect being highly reflective beneath the Central Iberian Zone (CIZ) and discontinuous and diffuse below the Ossa-Morena Zone (OMZ). The gravity response across the ALCUDIA transect suggests relatively high density bodies in the mid-lower crust of the southern half of the transect. The seismic results suggest two major horizontal limits/discontinuities, a horizontal discontinuity at c. 13-15 km (the Conrad discontinuity) and the Moho discontinuity located at a depth of c. 31 km.

  16. The interpretation of crustal dynamics data in terms of plate motions and regional deformation near plate boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, Sean C.

    1987-01-01

    The nature and dynamics of time-dependent deformation along major seismic zones including the influence of irregularities in fault geometry on the earthquake cycle, and the processes contributing to the state of stress and rates of strain in plate interior regions were studied. The principle findings of the research are discussed.

  17. The interpretation of crustal dynamics data in terms of plate motions and regional deformation near plate boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soloman, Sean C.

    1991-01-01

    The focus was in two broad areas during the most recent 6-month period: (1) the nature and dynamics of time dependent deformation and stress along major seismic zones; and (2) the nature of long-wavelength oceanic geoid anomalies in terms of lateral variations in upper mantle temperature and composition. The principle findings are described in the accompanying appendices.

  18. Active Deformation of Etna Volcano Combing IFSAR and GPS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgren, Paul

    1997-01-01

    The surface deformation of an active volcano is an important indicator of its eruptive state and its hazard potential. Mount Etna volcano in Sicily is a very active volcano with well documented eruption episodes.

  19. Coupled interactions between volatile activity and Fe oxidation state during arc crustal processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Humphreys, Madeleine C.S.; Brooker, R; Fraser, D.C.; Burgisser, A; Mangan, Margaret T.; McCammon, C

    2015-01-01

    Arc magmas erupted at the Earth’s surface are commonly more oxidized than those produced at mid-ocean ridges. Possible explanations for this high oxidation state are that the transfer of fluids during the subduction process results in direct oxidation of the sub-arc mantle wedge, or that oxidation is caused by the effect of later crustal processes, including protracted fractionation and degassing of volatile-rich magmas. This study sets out to investigate the effect of disequilibrium crustal processes that may involve coupled changes in H2O content and Fe oxidation state, by examining the degassing and hydration of sulphur-free rhyolites. We show that experimentally hydrated melts record strong increases in Fe3+/∑Fe with increasing H2O concentration as a result of changes in water activity. This is relevant for the passage of H2O-undersaturated melts from the deep crust towards shallow crustal storage regions, and raises the possibility that vertical variations in fO2 might develop within arc crust. Conversely, degassing experiments produce an increase in Fe3+/∑Fe with decreasing H2O concentration. In this case the oxidation is explained by loss of H2 as well as H2O into bubbles during decompression, consistent with thermodynamic modelling, and is relevant for magmas undergoing shallow degassing en route to the surface. We discuss these results in the context of the possible controls on fO2 during the generation, storage and ascent of magmas in arc settings, in particular considering the timescales of equilibration relative to observation as this affects the quality of the petrological record of magmatic fO2.

  20. Constraints on crustal rheology and age of deformation from models of gravitational spreading in Ishtar Terra, Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smrekar, Suzanne E.; Soloman, Sean C.

    1992-01-01

    Gravitational spreading is expected to lead to rapid relaxation of high relief due to the high surface temperature and associated weak crust on Venus. In this study, we use new Magellan radar and altimetry data to determine the extent of gravitational relaxation in Ishtar Terra, which contains the highest relief on Venus as well as areas of extremely high topographic slope. Within Ishtar Terra the only mountain belts found on Venus, Akna, Danu, Freyja, and Maxwell Montes, nearly encircle the smooth, high (3-4 km) plateau of Lakshmi Planum. Finite-element models of this process give expected timescales for relaxation of relief and failure at the surface. From these modeling results we attempt to constrain the strength of the crust and timescales of deformation in Ishtar Terra. Below we discuss observational evidence for gravitational spreading in Ishtar Terra, results from the finite-element modeling, independent age constraints, and implications for the rheology and timing of deformation.

  1. The interpretation of crustal dynamics data in terms of plate motions and regional deformation near plate boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, Sean C.

    1987-01-01

    The focus of the research was in two broad areas during the most recent 6 month period: the nature and dynamics of time-dependent deformation along major seismic zones, including the influence of irregularities in fault geometry on the earthquake cycles, and the processes contributing to the state of stress and rates of strain in plate interior regions. The principal findings of the research to date are described.

  2. Progressive deformation and superposed fabrics related to Cretaceous crustal underthrusting in western Arizona, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laubach, S.E.; Reynolds, S.J.; Spencer, J.E.; Marshak, S.

    1989-01-01

    In the Maria fold and thrust belt, a newly recognized E-trending Cretaceous orogenic belt in the southwestern United States, ductile thrusts, large folds and superposed cleavages record discordant emplacement of crystalline thrust sheets across previously tilted sections of crust. Style of deformation and direction of thrusting are in sharp contrast to those of the foreland fold-thrust belt in adjacent segments of the Cordillera. The net effect of polyphase deformation in the Maria belt was underthrusting of Paleozoic and Mesozoic metasedimentary rocks under the Proterozoic crystalline basement of North America. The structure of the Maria belt is illustrated by the Granite Wash Mountains in west-central Arizona, where at least four non-coaxial deformation events (D1-D4) occurred during the Cretaceous. SSE-facing D1 folds are associated with S-directed thrusts and a low-grade slaty cleavage. D1 structures are truncated by the gently-dipping Hercules thrust zone (D2), a regional SW-vergent shear zone that placed Proterozoic and Jurassic crystalline rocks over upturned Paleozoic and Mesozoic supracrustal rocks. Exposures across the footwall margin of the Hercules thrust zone show the progressive development of folds, cleavage and metamorphism related to thrusting. D3 and D4 structures include open folds and spaced cleavages that refold or transect D1 and D2 folds. The D2 Hercules thrust zone and a D3 shear zone are discordantly crosscut by late Cretaceous plutons. ?? 1989.

  3. Three-dimensional crustal structure in the Southern Alps region of New Zealand from inversion of local earthquake and active source data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhart-Phillips, Donna; Bannister, Stephen

    2002-10-01

    P and S-P arrival time data from 311 earthquakes and several thousand offshore and onshore shots have been used in simultaneous inversion for hypocenters, three-dimensional (3-D) Vp and Vp/Vs models in the Southern Alps region, New Zealand. The combined data result in a highly nonuniform ray path distribution, and linked nodes are used in sparsely sampled areas. Gravity data are used to improve the model below 20-km depth, where it is poorly sampled by local earthquakes. The crustal Vp from 5 to 25 km depth is fairly uniform, generally ranging from 5.5 to 6.5 km/s, typical of graywacke and schist. Active fault zones tend to be correlated with low-velocity zones. Where the Alpine fault is primarily strike slip, it is characterized by a vertical low-velocity zone, to at least 15-km depth. Where the fault is dipping and has a large dip-slip component, it is characterized by a large region of low velocity above and southeast of the fault, to at least 14-km depth, consistent with fluids and fracture density from active deformation. A large high-velocity, high-resistivity feature in the eastern Southern Alps may represent Mesozoic schist of higher metamorphic grade than its surroundings, which is relatively rigid and serves to both reduce deformation in the overlying basin and concentrate deformation in the adjoining low-velocity region. The imaged crustal root is deepest 80-km south of Mt. Cook and is asymmetric with a sharper gradient on the northwestern side. The approximate Moho shows regional variation, with 5-10 km thicker crust in Otago than Canterbury.

  4. Exploring Subduction, Slab Breakoff, and Upper-Plate Deformation in the Georgian Greater Caucasus: Shortening Estimates from Area- and Line-Balanced Crustal Scale Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trexler, C. C.; Cowgill, E.; Niemi, N. A.; Godoladze, T.

    2015-12-01

    Between the Black and Caspian Seas, the Greater Caucasus Mountains (GC) delineate the northern margin of the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone. The role of subduction in formation of the GC is not widely recognized, despite patterns of subcrustal seismicity attesting to its importance at the E end of the range. The GC currently absorbs most orogen-perpendicular plate convergence (11 mm/yr, 70% of total), but its tectonic evolution relation to subduction remain unclear. Proposed models include 1) subduction of an ~400 km wide backarc ocean basin followed by slab breakoff under the W end of the range; 2) loss of a lithospheric root followed by buoyancy-driven uplift; and 3) closure of a small (~100 km?) basin with no/minimal subduction. Patterns of modern seismicity, exhumation, and shortening are most consistent with the subduction/slab breakoff model, suggesting the western GC may capture the surface expression of processes associated with recent slab breakoff. Each model of the GC makes specific predictions for the amount of shortening within the orogen, with the subduction/breakoff model predicting large magnitudes of convergence. Here we estimate orogenic shortening by balancing mass along several, orogen-perpendicular, crustal-scale cross sections across the GC. First we estimate the original length of undeformed crust by comparing the modern deformed volume (determined from modern topography and moho depth and assuming no net erosional loss) with hypothesized end-member original crustal thicknesses (based on seismic data in the Eastern Black Sea and Scythian platform). These end-member assumptions allow shortening magnitudes as great as ~700 km (12 km-thick oceanic crust), and as small as ~100 km (39 km-thick Scythian margin). Second, we use line-length balanced crustal-scale geologic cross sections to estimate shortening in the western and central GC. We generated these sections using previously published 1:200k geologic maps and our own focused field

  5. Tectonics of the Jurassic-Early Cretaceous magmatic arc of the north Chilean Coastal Cordillera (22°-26°S): A story of crustal deformation along a convergent plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuber, Ekkehard; Gonzalez, Gabriel

    1999-10-01

    The tectonic evolution of a continental magmatic arc that was active in the north Chilean Coastal Cordillera in Jurassic-Early Cretaceous times is described in order to show the relationship between arc deformation and plate convergence. During stage I (circa 195-155 Ma) a variety of structures formed at deep to shallow crustal levels, indicating sinistral arc-parallel strike-slip movements. From deep crustal levels a sequence of structures is described, starting with the formation of a broad belt of plutonic rocks which were sheared under granulite to amphibolite facies conditions (Bolfin Complex). The high-grade deformation was followed by the formation of two sets of conjugate greenschist facies shear zones showing strike-slip and thrust kinematics with a NW-SE directed maximum horizontal shortening, i.e., parallel to the probable Late Jurassic vector of plate convergence. A kinematic pattern compatible to this plate convergence is displayed by nonmetamorphic folds, thrusts, and high-angle normal faults which formed during the same time interval as the discrete shear zones. During stage II (160-150 Ma), strong arc-normal extension is revealed by brittle low-angle normal faults at shallow levels and some ductile normal faults and the intrusion of extended plutons at deeper levels. During stage III (155-147 Ma), two reversals in the stress regime took place indicated by two generations of dikes, an older one trending NE-SW and a younger one trending NW-SE. Sinistral strike-slip movements also prevailed during stage IV (until ˜125 Ma) when the Atacama Fault Zone originated as a sinistral trench-linked strike-slip fault. The tectonic evolution of the magmatic arc is interpreted in terms of coupling and decoupling between the downgoing and overriding plates. The structures of stages I and IV suggest that stress transmission due to seismic coupling between the plates was probably responsible for these deformations. However, decoupling of the plates occurred possibly

  6. The interpretation of crustal dynamics data in terms of plate motions and regional deformation near plate boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soloman, Sean C.

    1991-01-01

    The focus of the research was in two broad areas: (1) the nature and dynamics of time dependent deformation and stress along major seismic zones; and (2) the nature of long wavelength oceanic geoid anomalies in terms of lateral variations in upper mantle temperature and composition. The principle findings of the research are described in the accompanying appendices. The first two and the fourth appendices are reprints of papers recently submitted for publication, and the third is the abstract of a recently completed thesis supported by this project.

  7. Application of the Global Positioning System to crustal deformation measurements. 3: Result from the southern California borderlands

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, K.M.

    1993-12-01

    Five years of measurements from the Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites collected between 1986 and 1991 are used to investigate deformation in the offshore regions of southern California. GPS provides the first practical technique to make precise geodetic measurements in the region. The geodetic network is situated along the California coastline from Vandenberg (120.6 deg W, 34.6 deg N) to San Diego, with additional sites on Santa Cruz, San Nicolas, Santa Catalina, Santa Rosa, and San Clemente Islands. The precision of horizontal interstation vectors is subcentimeter, and the interstation vector rate between Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO) and Vandenberg agrees with the very long baseline interferometry derived rate to within one standard deviation. No significant motion is observed in th e western Santa Barbara Channel between Vandenberg and Santa Rosa Island, 0.5 +/- 1.6 mm/yr, where the quoted uncertainties are one standard deviation. Motions in the eastern Santa Barbara Channel are consistent with compressional deformation of 6 +/- 1 mm/yr at N16 +/- 3 deg E. This motion is in agreement with seismicity and an independent geodetic analysis for the period 1971-1987 (Larsen, 1991). San Clemente Island is moving relative to San Diego at the rate of 5.9 +/- 1.8/yr at a direction of N38 +/- 20 deg W. The motion between San Nicolas Island and San Clemente Island, 0.8 +/- 1.5 mm/yr, is insignificant.

  8. An approximately 9-yr-period variation in seismicity and crustal deformation near the Japan Trench and a consideration of its origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Yoshiyuki

    2014-02-01

    It is well known that the statistical probability of earthquake occurrence changes over the course of a day due to periodic variations in the tidal stress acting on faults. However, periodicity on a decadal scale has been studied by relatively few researchers. It has been reported that an approximately 10-yr periodicity is observed globally for the seismicity of M-8-class large earthquakes. However, the mechanism underlying this periodicity has not yet been revealed. In this study, the decadal-scale periodicity of earthquakes along the Japan Trench is investigated. A new finding is presented that in northeast Japan, the probability of the occurrence of historical earthquakes with an M ≥ 6 that have occurred during the past 1000 yr has increased approximately every 9 yr. Periodicity becomes even more apparent for large earthquakes with an M > 7.5 and approximately half the recorded events intensively occurred within two successive years on a cycle of approximately 9 yr. This implies the presence of a periodic stress disturbance at an appreciably regular interval. The past strain and tilt observations conducted in Japan during the 1950s through the 1970s indicate that, nationwide, gradual compression repeated every 8-10 yr in the direction of relative plate motion. These compression periods are in accordance with the periods of higher seismic activity discussed above. As a first step in investigating the origin of earthquake periodicity, periods associated with lunar motion are considered. It is shown that long-term motion primarily governed by the period of the lunar perigee is synchronized with the cyclic variation in seismicity and crustal deformation described above. Decadal changes in tidal stress, as calculated using an ordinary theory of solid Earth tides, are too small to cause periodic variations in seismicity. Therefore, the conditions by which tidal stress is sufficiently amplified to trigger an earthquake are investigated. The results show that, if one

  9. Crustal deformation and magmatic processes at Laguna del Maule volcanic field (Chile): Geodetic measurements and numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Mével, Hélène

    The Laguna del Maule (LdM) volcanic field in Chile is an exceptional example of postglacial rhyolitic volcanism in the Southern Volcanic Zone of the Andes. Since 2007, LdM has experienced an unrest episode characterized by high rates of deformation measured by interferometric analysis of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images acquired between 2007 and 2016, and data from the Global Positioning System (GPS) recorded since 2012 at five stations. The inflating region includes most of the 16--km-by--14--km ring of rhyolitic domes and coulees. The fastest-moving GPS station (MAU2) has a velocity vector of [[special character omited]72 +/- 4, 19 +/- 1, 194 +/- 3] mm/yr between 2012 and 2016 for the eastward, northward, and upward components, respectively. First, we model the InSAR observations assuming a rectangular dislocation in a half space with uniform elastic properties. The best time function for modeling the InSAR data set is a double exponential model with rates increasing from 2007 through 2010 and decreasing slowly since 2011. Modeling of historical uplift at Yellowstone, Long Valley, and Three Sisters volcanic fields suggests a common temporal evolution of vertical displacement rates. We hypothesize that magma intruding into an existing silicic magma reservoir is driving the surface deformation and present a new dynamic model to describe this process. A Newtonian fluid characterized by its viscosity, density, and pressure flows through a vertical conduit, intruding into a reservoir embedded in an elastic domain and leading to time-dependent surface deformation. Using a grid-search optimization, we minimize the misfit to the InSAR displacement data by varying the three parameters governing the analytical solution: the characteristic timescale tauP for magma propagation, the injection pressure, and the inflection time when the acceleration switches from positive to negative. For a spheroid with semi-major axis a = 6200 m, semi-minor axis c = 100 m, located at a

  10. Crustal deformation in northwestern Arabia from GPS measurements in Syria: Slow slip rate along the northern Dead Sea Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alchalbi, Abdulmutaleb; Daoud, Mohamad; Gomez, Francisco; McClusky, Simon; Reilinger, Robert; Romeyeh, Mohamad Abu; Alsouod, Adham; Yassminh, Rayan; Ballani, Basel; Darawcheh, Ryad; Sbeinati, Reda; Radwan, Youssef; Masri, Riad Al; Bayerly, Mazhar; Ghazzi, Riad Al; Barazangi, Muawia

    2010-01-01

    New Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements in NW Syria provide the first direct observations of near-field deformation associated with the northern Dead Sea fault system (DSFS) and demonstrate that the kinematics of the northern section of this transform plate boundary between the Arabian and Sinai plates deviate significantly from plate model predictions. Velocity estimates based on GPS survey campaigns in 2000, 2007 and 2008, demonstrate left-lateral shear along the northern DSFS with 1σ uncertainties less than 0.7 mm yr-1. These velocities are consistent with an elastic dislocation model with a slip rate of 1.8-3.3 mm yr-1 and a locking depth of 5-16 km. This geodetically determined slip rate is about half of that reported farther south along the central section (Lebanese restraining bend) and the southern section (Jordan Valley and Wadi Araba) of the transform and consequently requires some deformation to occur away from the transform along other geological structures. The factor of two difference in slip rates along the transform is also consistent with differing estimates of total fault slip that have occurred since the mid Miocene: 20-25 km along the northern DSFS (in NW Syria) versus about 45 km along the southern DSFS segment. Some of the strain deficit may be accommodated by north-south shortening within the southwestern segment of the Palmyride fold belt of central Syria. Additionally, a distinct change in velocity occurs within the Sinai plate itself. These new GPS measurements, when viewed alongside the palaeoseismic record and the modest level of present-day seismicity, suggest that the reported estimates of recurrence time of large earthquakes (M > 7) along the northern section of the DSFS may be underestimated owing to temporal clustering of such large historical earthquakes. Hence, a revised estimate of the earthquake hazard may be needed for NW Syria.

  11. Analytical modeling of gravity changes and crustal deformation at volcanoes: The Long Valley caldera, California, case study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglia, Maurizio; Hill, D.P.

    2009-01-01

    Joint measurements of ground deformation and micro-gravity changes are an indispensable component for any volcano monitoring strategy. A number of analytical mathematical models are available in the literature that can be used to fit geodetic data and infer source location, depth and density. Bootstrap statistical methods allow estimations of the range of the inferred parameters. Although analytical models often assume that the crust is elastic, homogenous and isotropic, they can take into account different source geometries, the influence of topography, and gravity background noise. The careful use of analytical models, together with high quality data sets, can produce valuable insights into the nature of the deformation/gravity source. Here we present a review of various modeling methods, and use the historical unrest at Long Valley caldera (California) from 1982 to 1999 to illustrate the practical application of analytical modeling and bootstrap to constrain the source of unrest. A key question is whether the unrest at Long Valley since the late 1970s can be explained without calling upon an intrusion of magma. The answer, apparently, is no. Our modeling indicates that the inflation source is a slightly tilted prolate ellipsoid (dip angle between 91?? and 105??) at a depth of 6.5 to 7.9??km beneath the caldera resurgent dome with an aspect ratio between 0.44 and 0.60, a volume change from 0.161 to 0.173??km3 and a density of 1241 to 2093??kg/m3. The larger uncertainty of the density estimate reflects the higher noise of gravity measurements. These results are consistent with the intrusion of silicic magma with a significant amount of volatiles beneath the caldera resurgent dome. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  12. Crustal root beneath the Rif Cordillera as imaged from both active seismic data and teleseismic receiver functions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Jordi; Gil, Alba; Gallart, Josep; Carbonell, Ramon; Harnafi, Mimoun; Levander, Alan

    2015-04-01

    The Rif cordillera forms, together with the Betic ranges, one of the tightest orogenic arcs on Earth. This continental boundary zone is dominated now by the slow convergence between Nubia and Eurasia, but with clear evidences of extensional tectonics. One of the missing elements to constrain the complex geodynamics of the Gibraltar Arc System is the knowledge of the crustal architecture beneath northern Morocco. In the last decade a major effort has been done in this sense, from active and passive seismics. We compile here the recent results available from the Rif domains. Two 330 km long wide angle DSS profiles were recorded end of 2011 across the Rif in NS and EW transects within the Rifsis project, complemented by onshore recordings of the Gassis-WestMed marine profiles. At the same period, BB seismic arrays were deployed in the area within Topo-Iberia and Picasso projects, allowing receiver function analyses of crustal depths. The ray-tracing modeling of the Rifsis profiles reveal a large Moho step and an area of crustal thickening both in EW and NS directions, grossly coincident with the Bouguer gravity anomalies. The deployment logistics allowed that all the stations recorded all the shots, thus providing useful offline data. We will use here all available in-line and offline data to provide a map of the crustal thickness in northern Morocco. We combined two approaches: i) a hyperbolic time reduction applied to the seismic data, resulting in low-fold stacks in which the reflections from the Moho should appear as subhorizontal lines; ii) the arrival times of the observed PmP phases allow, assuming a mean crustal velocity, to assign a midpoint crustal thickness to each lecture. Although some uncertainties may be inherent to those approaches, a large crustal root, reaching more than 50 km, is well documented in the central part of the Rif Cordillera, close to the zone where the Alboran slab may still be attached to the lithosphere. We also compared these results

  13. Interseismic deformations along Ecuador active fault systems: Contribution of space-borne SAR Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champenois, J.; Audin, L.; Baize, S.; Nocquet, J.; Alvarado, A.

    2013-05-01

    Located in the Northern Andes along the active subduction zone of the Nazca plate beneath the South American continent, Ecuador is highly exposed to seismic hazard. Up to now, numerous multidisciplinary studies for the last ten years focused on the seismicity related to the subduction, whereas few investigations concentrated on the crustal seismicity in the upper plate (through few strong events like the 1797 Riobamba earthquake, ML 8.3, 12.000 deaths). The faults that are responsible of these earthquakes are poorly known in term of slip rate and in some cases are even not identified yet. To address this issue and compare the interseismic data to the geomorphological long term signature of active faulting we propose to use multi-temporal Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) methods.Using these cost-effective techniques, we are able to investigate surface interseismic deformation with an unprecedented spatial density of measurements (highly superior to Global Positioning System network density). This study presents preliminary results of tectonic surface deformation using ERS (1993-2000) and Envisat (2002-2010) SAR data in the Inter Andean Valley and along the eastern border of the North Andean Block, where is accommodated the relative displacement between the North Andean Block and South America plate (~ 8 mm/yr). We generated average velocity maps and consistent time-series of displacements with values measured along the line of sight of the radar. Resulting maps of ground displacements are calibrated by GPS data in order to provide a homogeneous database. These preliminary results show large scale deformation localized on some major fault systems in the Inter Andean Valley (from Quito to north of Cuenca) and allow an updating of the active faults map. Moreover, these InSAR results permit detecting and quantifying ground deformation due to volcanic unrest.

  14. New design deforming controlling system of the active stressed lap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Li; Wang, Daxing

    2008-07-01

    A 450mm diameter active stressed lap has been developed in NIAOT by 2003. We design a new lap in 2007. This paper puts on emphases on introducing the new deforming control system of the lap. Aiming at the control characteristic of the lap, a new kind of digital deforming controller is designed. The controller consists of 3 parts: computer signal disposing, motor driving and force sensor signal disposing. Intelligent numeral PID method is applied in the controller instead of traditional PID. In the end, the result of new deformation are given.

  15. Experimental dynamic deformation analysis of active stressed lap.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongshen; Li, Xiaojin; Fan, Bin; Zeng, Zhige

    2016-02-20

    We introduce a method to measure the dynamic surface deformation of an active stressed lap for fabricating a 4  mf/1.5  mirror. Lap surface accuracy working in some typical deformation velocities is put forward. Experimental results indicate that dynamic lap surface accuracy is worse than that of a static surface, and dynamic surface accuracy gets worse if deformation velocity increases, while the difference of lap surface error RMS is less than 1 μm. An optimization of the processing strategy is feasible through changing the deformation velocity of the active stressed lap depending on the processing schedule. After optimizing the grinding and polishing strategy, efficiency is expected to have a significant increase. PMID:26906568

  16. Active Crustal Faults in the Forearc Region, Guerrero Sector of the Mexican Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidzik, Krzysztof; Ramírez-Herrera, Maria Teresa; Kostoglodov, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    This work explores the characteristics and the seismogenic potential of crustal faults on the overriding plate in an area of high seismic hazard associated with the occurrence of subduction earthquakes and shallow earthquakes of the overriding plate. We present the results of geomorphic, structural, and fault kinematic analyses conducted on the convergent margin between the Cocos plate and the forearc region of the overriding North American plate, within the Guerrero sector of the Mexican subduction zone. We aim to determine the active tectonic processes in the forearc region of the subduction zone, using the river network pattern, topography, and structural data. We suggest that in the studied forearc region, both strike-slip and normal crustal faults sub-parallel to the subduction zone show evidence of activity. The left-lateral offsets of the main stream courses of the largest river basins, GPS measurements, and obliquity of plate convergence along the Cocos subduction zone in the Guerrero sector suggest the activity of sub-latitudinal left-lateral strike-slip faults. Notably, the regional left-lateral strike-slip fault that offsets the Papagayo River near the town of La Venta named "La Venta Fault" shows evidence of recent activity, corroborated also by GPS measurements (4-5 mm/year of sinistral motion). Assuming that during a probable earthquake the whole mapped length of this fault would rupture, it would produce an event of maximum moment magnitude Mw = 7.7. Even though only a few focal mechanism solutions indicate a stress regime relevant for reactivation of these strike-slip structures, we hypothesize that these faults are active and suggest two probable explanations: (1) these faults are characterized by long recurrence period, i.e., beyond the instrumental record, or (2) they experience slow slip events and/or associated fault creep. The analysis of focal mechanism solutions of small magnitude earthquakes in the upper plate, for the period between 1995

  17. Active compressive intraoceanic deformation: early stages of ophiolites emplacement?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamot-Rooke, Nicolas; Delescluse, Matthias; Montési, Laurent

    2010-05-01

    Oceanic lithosphere is strong and continental lithosphere is weak. As a result, there is relatively little deformation in the oceanic domain away from plate boundaries. However, the interior of oceanic lithosphere does deform when highly stressed. We review here places where intraoceanic compression is at work. In the more than 30 years since the first observations of active compressive intraplate deformation in the Central Indian Ocean through seismic profiling (Eittreim et al., 1972), compressive deformation has been identified in a variety of other oceanic tectonic settings: as a result of small differential motion between large plates (between North America and South America in the Central Atlantic; between Eurasia and Nubia offshore Gibraltar; between Macquarie and Australia plates in the Southern Ocean), within back-arcs (northwest Celebes Sea, Okushiri Ridge in the Japan Sea, on the eastern border of the Caroline plate), and ahead of subduction (Zenisu Ridge off Nankai Trough). Deformation appears to be more diffuse when larger plates are involved, and more localized for younger plates, perhaps in relation with the increasing rigidity of oceanic plates with age. The best example of diffuse deformation studied so far remains the Central Indian Ocean. Numerous marine data have been collected in this area, including shallow and deep seismic, heat flow measurements, multibeam bathymetry. The present-day deformation field has been modeled using GPS and earthquakes as far field and near field constraints respectively. Reactivation of the oceanic fabric (including for portions of the Indo-Australian plate which are now in subduction as evidenced by the September 2009 Padang earthquake), selective fault abandonment (Delescluse et al., 2008) and serpentinization (Delescluse and Chamot-Rooke, 2008) are some of the important processes that shape the present-day pattern of deformation. These rare intraplate deformation areas constitute excellent natural laboratories to

  18. The Evolution of Deformation-Induced Grain-Boundary Porosity and Dynamic Permeability in Crustal Fault Zones: Insights From the Alpine Fault, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, K. M.; Toy, V.

    2015-12-01

    Fluids and minor phases have an important influence on the bulk rheology of a deforming rock mass, but they are not uniformly distributed at any scale within fault zones. Additionally, exhumed ductile shear zones show little interconnected porosity or static permeability, requiring a dynamic process at depth to allow fluids to access the deforming rock mass. It was recently recognized that reactive fluids interact with high-strain sites to generate cavities on quartz grain boundaries, increasing the grain-scale porosity and dynamic permeability of the rock and allowing for additional fluids to infiltrate the shear zone along interlinking cavities, stimulating further reaction and cavitation. Grain-boundary cavities and fine-grained secondary phases impede grain-boundary mobility and cause a transition in deformation mechanisms from grain-size insensitive dislocation creep to grain-size sensitive creep, which is recognized as a weakening mechanism that promotes strain localisation. At present, it is unclear how the distribution of grain-boundary pores within fault rocks reflects the bulk mineralogy and phase arrangement, which is a function of shear strain. We have used micro-computed x-ray tomography (μ-CT), SEM imaging, and EDS analyses to examine how the distribution of grain-boundary pores varies in relation to the arrangement of secondary phases in exhumed protomylonites, mylonites, and ultramylonites within the actively-deforming Alpine Fault zone, and in samples acquired from the Deep Fault Drilling Project (DFDP). Additionally, EBSD is coupled with µ-CT and EDS analyses to characterise the evolution of microstructures in three dimensions across a finite strain gradient. Here we examine the relationship and competition between grain-boundary cavitation and microstructural processes during deformation in a high-strain shear zone, and discuss the implications of these grain-scale deformation processes on strain localisation and continental fault zone dynamics.

  19. Deformation invariant bounding spheres for dynamic active constraints in surgery.

    PubMed

    Bowyer, Stuart A; Rodriguez Y Baena, Ferdinando

    2014-04-01

    Active constraints are collaborative robot control strategies, which can be used to guide a surgeon or protect delicate tissue structures during robot-assisted surgery. Tissue structures of interest often move and deform throughout a surgical intervention, and therefore, dynamic active constraints, which adapt and conform to these changes, are required. A fundamental element of an active constraint controller is the computation of the geometric relationship between the constraint geometry and the surgical instrument. For a static active constraint, there are a variety of computationally efficient methods for computing this relative configuration; however, for a dynamic active constraint, it becomes significantly more challenging. Deformation invariant bounding spheres are a novel bounding volume formulation, which can be used within a hierarchy to allow efficient proximity queries within dynamic active constraints. These bounding spheres are constructed in such a way that as the surface deforms, they do not require time-consuming rebuilds or updates, rather they are implicitly updated and continue to represent the underlying geometry as it changes. Experimental results show that performing proximity queries with deformation invariant bounding sphere hierarchies is faster than common methods from the literature when the deformation rate is within the range expected from conventional imaging systems. PMID:24622983

  20. Active deformation in Western Turkey: new GPS observations and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocquet, J.; Aktug, B.; Parsons, B.; Cingoz, A.; England, P.; Erkan, Y.; Soyer, N.; Akdeniz, H.; Kilicoglu, A.

    2007-12-01

    How the continents deform remains a matter of debate. One view postulates that continental deforming zones are comprised of a limited numbers of rigid (elastic) microplates. If true, the surface motion can then be described by the relative rotation of blocks, and strain should be localized along the major faults separating the blocks. An alternative view is that the deformation at depth is distributed over wide areas, can be modelled by a viscous flow responding to boundary conditions applied on it and gravitational potential energy gradients related to variations in topography, and the surface strain simply reflects this deformation. Western Turkey is a region of crustal extension, part of the Nubia/Eurasia plate boundary. Its kinematics is often modelled by the relative motion of a small number of rigid blocks (Nyst & Thatcher, 2005, Reilinger et al., 2006). However, until now, the limited number of GPS velocity vectors available has prevented a detailed examination of which is the more appropriate description. We present a new geodetic velocity field including ~100 sites from the longitude the Central Anatolian plateau to the Aegean coast, derived from a combination of campaigns carried out between 1997 and 2006, and continuous GPS operating since 2003, which we use to test the different models. While the kinematics of the area can be correctly modelled by a block model, a good fit to the velocity field requires blocks with sizes smaller than 100 km and still fails to adequately predict the strain rate observed within blocks . Alternatively, we test an approach where the lithosphere is modelled as a thin viscous sheet, responding to the gravitational potentiel energy contrast between the high plateau of eastern Turkey to the east and the subduction along the Hellenic trench in the southwest. The simplistic model has only one free parameter (the force applied by the subducting oceanic lithosphere on the Aegean ), but provides a good agreement with the observed

  1. The gravity method and interpretive techniques for detecting vertical crustal movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jachens, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    Observations of temporal variations of gravity can be used as an inexpensive and rapid means of detecting, monitoring, and studying crustal deformation associated with many active geological processes. Such observations can yield qualitative or semiquantitative information on elevation changes and, when combined with independent elevation data, can yield information about changes of the subsurface density field arising from both subsurface displacements and temporal variations of the density of materials in the subsurface. The effectiveness of gravity techniques in specific cases of crustal deformation depends on the configuration of the local gravity field, the physical processes involved in the deformation, and the accuracy with which temporal gravity variations can be measured.

  2. Monocytic Cells Become Less Compressible but More Deformable upon Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ravetto, Agnese; Wyss, Hans M.; Anderson, Patrick D.; den Toonder, Jaap M. J.; Bouten, Carlijn V. C.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Monocytes play a significant role in the development of atherosclerosis. During the process of inflammation, circulating monocytes become activated in the blood stream. The consequent interactions of the activated monocytes with the blood flow and endothelial cells result in reorganization of cytoskeletal proteins, in particular of the microfilament structure, and concomitant changes in cell shape and mechanical behavior. Here we investigate the full elastic behavior of activated monocytes in relation to their cytoskeletal structure to obtain a better understanding of cell behavior during the progression of inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. Methods and Results The recently developed Capillary Micromechanics technique, based on exposing a cell to a pressure difference in a tapered glass microcapillary, was used to measure the deformation of activated and non-activated monocytic cells. Monitoring the elastic response of individual cells up to large deformations allowed us to obtain both the compressive and the shear modulus of a cell from a single experiment. Activation by inflammatory chemokines affected the cytoskeletal organization and increased the elastic compressive modulus of monocytes with 73–340%, while their resistance to shape deformation decreased, as indicated by a 25–88% drop in the cell’s shear modulus. This decrease in deformability is particularly pronounced at high strains, such as those that occur during diapedesis through the vascular wall. Conclusion Overall, monocytic cells become less compressible but more deformable upon activation. This change in mechanical response under different modes of deformation could be important in understanding the interplay between the mechanics and function of these cells. In addition, our data are of direct relevance for computational modeling and analysis of the distinct monocytic behavior in the circulation and the extravascular space. Lastly, an understanding of the changes of monocyte

  3. Recent development status of the quasi real-time crustal deformation monitoring based on the onshore real-time GNSS data and offshore GNSS/Acoustic measurement in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Y.; Hino, R.; Kido, M.; Imano, M.; Kawamoto, S.; Sato, Y.; Takahashi, N.

    2015-12-01

    The 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake and its associated tsunami clearly showed the need for an accurate tsunami early warning system. Real-time GNSS data have an advantage over the short-time seismograms because robust estimations of location and dimension of coseismic faults can be derived from spatial patterns of permanent coseismic displacement measured by real-time GNSS data. Based on these backgrounds, GSI and Tohoku University has been developed the real-time GNSS analysis system. GSI named this system as REGARD (real-time GEONET Analysis for Rapid Deformation Monitoring), which consists three subsystems: (1) Real-time GPS positioning for all of the GEONET site in every one second, (2) automated extraction of displacement fields due to the large earthquake, and (3) automated estimation of Mw by an approximated single rectangular fault or slip distribution in the assumed plated interface. In contrast, lack of the geodetic observation in the offshore region should cause the resolution degrading of the coseismic fault estimation or coseismic slip distribution. In fact, GNSS/Acoustic (GNSS/A) geodetic measurements have revealed the unexpectedly large extent of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake rupture near the Japan Trench (e.g., Kido et al. 2011). To reveal the earthquake mechanisms and occurrence, as well as co- and post-seismic behaviours, the observation of seafloor crustal deformation in the offshore region is very important. Thus, we are now developing a continuous horizontal and vertical crustal deformation and tsunami observation system based on the moored buoy by a slack cable. This system measures the horizontal and vertical coseismic displacement just after the large earthquake deduced from GNSS/Acoustic measurement and ocean bottom pressure measurement, respectively (Takahashi et al., 2014, 2015). We will introduce the current development status of the quasi real-time crustal deformation monitoring deduced from these onshore and offshore systems based on the

  4. Crustal recycling at active convergent margins and growth of the continents

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J. . Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences Carnegie Institution of Washington, DC ); Zheng, S.H. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    Subduction of continental materials at active convergent margins provides an opportunity to evaluate mechanisms and magnitude of subduction-driven crustal recycling and its potential role in continental growth. Continental materials, in the form of detrital sediments and elements adsorbed out of seawater onto settling sediment particles, are continuously supplied to subduction trenches. The sediments may be accreted and re-attached to the continental crust through collisional processes subducted to depth and subsequently involved in arc magma generation (magmatic recycling) or subducted past the arc into the deep mantle. Cosmogenic 10Be, which is strongly adsorbed onto settling sediment particles, may be used to investigate all aspects of sediment recycling. Because of its atmospheric source and short half-life, the high 10Be concentrations observed in many volcanic arc magmas require that the uppermost part of the sediment column be subducted to depth and some part of it returned to the surface in arc magmas within the measurable 10Be lifetime, effectively a few million years. In the Aleutians, Middle America and Marianas, 10Be is present only in the upper 12m, 100m and 25m, respectively of the subducting oceanic sediment column. Using von Huene and Scholl's 1991 estimate of oceanic sediment supply to trenches, the authors evidence for sediment bypassing of accretionary margins, and the limited recycling of most major elements in arc volcanism, estimates of sediment subduction are nearly equal to those required in a steady-state, recycling model for growth of the continents through time.

  5. Crustal Structure Across the Okavango Rift Zone, Botswana: Initial Results From the PRIDE-SEISORZ Active-Source Seismic Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canales, J. P.; Moffat, L.; Lizarralde, D.; Laletsang, K.; Harder, S. H.; Kaip, G.; Modisi, M.

    2015-12-01

    The PRIDE project aims to understand the processes of continental rift initiation and evolution by analyzing along-axis trends in the southern portion of the East Africa Rift System, from Botswana through Zambia and Malawi. The SEISORZ active-source seismic component of PRIDE focused on the Okavango Rift Zone (ORZ) in northwestern Botswana, with the main goal of imaging the crustal structure across the ORZ. This will allow us to estimate total crustal extension, determine the pattern and amount of thinning, assess the possible presence of melt within the rift zone, and assess the contrasts in crustal blocks across the rift, which closely follows the trend of a fold belt. In November 2014 we conducted a crustal-scale, 450-km-long seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection profile consisting of 19 sources (shots in 30-m-deep boreholes) spaced ~25 km apart from each other, and 900 receivers (IRIS/PASSCAL "Texan" dataloggers and 4.5Hz geophones) with ~500 m spacing. From NW to SE, the profile crosses several tectonic domains: the Congo craton, the Damara metamorphic belt and the Ghanzi-Chobe fold belt where the axis of the ORZ is located, and continues into the Kalahari craton. The record sections display clear crustal refraction (Pg) and wide-angle Moho reflection (PmP) phases for all 17 of the good-quality shots, and a mantle refraction arrival (Pn), with the Pg-PmP-Pn triplication appearing at 175 km offset. There are distinct changes in the traveltime and amplitude of these phases along the transect, and on either side of the axis, that seem to correlate with sharp transitions across tectonic terrains. Initial modeling suggests: (1) the presence of a sedimentary half-graben structure at the rift axis beneath the Okavango delta, bounded to the SE by the Kunyere-Thamalakane fault system; (2) faster crustal Vp in the domains to the NW of the ORZ; and (3) thicker crust (45-50 km) at both ends of the profile within the Congo and Kalahari craton domains than at the ORZ and

  6. A reduced crustal magnetization zone near the first observed active hydrothermal vent field on the Southwest Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian; Lin, Jian; Chen, Yongshun J.; Tao, Chunhui; German, Christopher R.; Yoerger, Dana R.; Tivey, Maurice A.

    2010-09-01

    Inversion of near-bottom magnetic data reveals a well-defined low crustal magnetization zone (LMZ) near a local topographic high (37°47‧S, 49°39‧E) on the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR). The magnetic data were collected by the autonomous underwater vehicle ABE on board R/V DaYangYiHao in February-March 2007. The first active hydrothermal vent field observed on the SWIR is located in Area A within and adjacent to the LMZ at the local topographic high, implying that this LMZ may be the result of hydrothermal alteration of magnetic minerals. The maximum reduction in crustal magnetization is 3 A/M. The spatial extent of the LMZ is estimated to be at least 6.7 × 104 m2, which is larger than that of the LMZs at the TAG vent field on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR), as well as the Relict Field, Bastille, Dante-Grotto, and New Field vent-sites on the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdF). The calculated magnetic moment, i.e., the product of the spatial extent and amplitude of crustal magnetization reduction is at least -3 × 107 Am2 for the LMZ on the SWIR, while that for the TAG field on the MAR is -8 × 107 Am2 and that for the four individual vent fields on the JdF range from -5 × 107 to -3 × 107 Am2. Together these results indicate that crustal demagnetization is a common feature of basalt-hosted hydrothermal vent fields at mid-ocean ridges of all spreading rates. Furthermore, the crustal demagnetization of the Area A on the ultraslow-spreading SWIR is comparable in strength to that of the TAG area on the slow-spreading MAR.

  7. Crustal Deformation Analysis Using a 3D FE High-fidelity Model with a Fast Computation Method and Its Application to Inversion Analysis of Fault Slip in the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agata, R.; Ichimura, T.; Hori, T.; Hirahara, K.; Hori, M.

    2012-12-01

    Crustal deformation analysis is important in order to understand the interplate coupling and coseismic fault slips. To perform it more accurately, we need a high-fidelity crustal structure model. However, in spite of accumulated crustal data, models with simplified flat shapes or relatively low resolution have been used, because the computation cost using high-fidelity models with a large degree-of-freedom (DOF) could be significantly high. Especially, estimation of the interplate coupling and coseismic fault slip requires the calculation of Green's function (the response displacement due to unit fault slip). To execute this computation in a realistic time, we need to reduce the computation cost. The objectives of our research is following: (1)To develop a method to generate 3D Finite Element (FE) models which represent heterogeneous crustal layers with the complex shape of crustal structure; (2)To develop a fast FE analysis method to perform crustal deformation analysis many times using single computation node, supposing the use of a small-scale computation environment. We developed an automatic FE model generation method using background grids with high quality meshes in a large area by extending the method of (Ichimura et al, 2009). We used Finite Element Method (FEM) because it has an advantage in representing the shape. Hybrid meshes consisting of tetrahedral and voxel elements are generated; the former is used when the interface surfaces and the grids intersect so that the shape of the crust is represented well, while the latter is used in the homogeneous areas. Also, we developed a method for crustal deformation analysis due to fault slip, which solves the FEM equation Ku=f assuming that the crust is an elastic body. To compute it fast, firstly we solved the problem by CG method with a simple preconditioning, parallelizing it by OpenMP. However, this computation took a long time, so we improved the method by introducing Multigrid Method (Saam, 2003) to the

  8. Nanocalorimetric Characterization of Microbial Activity in Deep Subsurface Oceanic Crustal Fluids.

    PubMed

    Robador, Alberto; LaRowe, Douglas E; Jungbluth, Sean P; Lin, Huei-Ting; Rappé, Michael S; Nealson, Kenneth H; Amend, Jan P

    2016-01-01

    Although fluids within the upper oceanic basaltic crust harbor a substantial fraction of the total prokaryotic cells on Earth, the energy needs of this microbial population are unknown. In this study, a nanocalorimeter (sensitivity down to 1.2 nW ml(-1)) was used to measure the enthalpy of microbially catalyzed reactions as a function of temperature in samples from two distinct crustal fluid aquifers. Microorganisms in unamended, warm (63°C) and geochemically altered anoxic fluids taken from 292 meters sub-basement (msb) near the Juan de Fuca Ridge produced 267.3 mJ of heat over the course of 97 h during a step-wise isothermal scan from 35.5 to 85.0°C. Most of this heat signal likely stems from the germination of thermophilic endospores (6.66 × 10(4) cells ml(-1) FLUID) and their subsequent metabolic activity at temperatures greater than 50°C. The average cellular energy consumption (5.68 pW cell(-1)) reveals the high metabolic potential of a dormant community transported by fluids circulating through the ocean crust. By contrast, samples taken from 293 msb from cooler (3.8°C), relatively unaltered oxic fluids, produced 12.8 mJ of heat over the course of 14 h as temperature ramped from 34.8 to 43.0°C. Corresponding cell-specific energy turnover rates (0.18 pW cell(-1)) were converted to oxygen uptake rates of 24.5 nmol O2 ml(-1) FLUID d(-1), validating previous model predictions of microbial activity in this environment. Given that the investigated fluids are characteristic of expansive areas of the upper oceanic crust, the measured metabolic heat rates can be used to constrain boundaries of habitability and microbial activity in the oceanic crust. PMID:27092118

  9. Nanocalorimetric Characterization of Microbial Activity in Deep Subsurface Oceanic Crustal Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Robador, Alberto; LaRowe, Douglas E.; Jungbluth, Sean P.; Lin, Huei-Ting; Rappé, Michael S.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Amend, Jan P.

    2016-01-01

    Although fluids within the upper oceanic basaltic crust harbor a substantial fraction of the total prokaryotic cells on Earth, the energy needs of this microbial population are unknown. In this study, a nanocalorimeter (sensitivity down to 1.2 nW ml-1) was used to measure the enthalpy of microbially catalyzed reactions as a function of temperature in samples from two distinct crustal fluid aquifers. Microorganisms in unamended, warm (63°C) and geochemically altered anoxic fluids taken from 292 meters sub-basement (msb) near the Juan de Fuca Ridge produced 267.3 mJ of heat over the course of 97 h during a step-wise isothermal scan from 35.5 to 85.0°C. Most of this heat signal likely stems from the germination of thermophilic endospores (6.66 × 104 cells ml-1FLUID) and their subsequent metabolic activity at temperatures greater than 50°C. The average cellular energy consumption (5.68 pW cell-1) reveals the high metabolic potential of a dormant community transported by fluids circulating through the ocean crust. By contrast, samples taken from 293 msb from cooler (3.8°C), relatively unaltered oxic fluids, produced 12.8 mJ of heat over the course of 14 h as temperature ramped from 34.8 to 43.0°C. Corresponding cell-specific energy turnover rates (0.18 pW cell-1) were converted to oxygen uptake rates of 24.5 nmol O2 ml-1FLUID d-1, validating previous model predictions of microbial activity in this environment. Given that the investigated fluids are characteristic of expansive areas of the upper oceanic crust, the measured metabolic heat rates can be used to constrain boundaries of habitability and microbial activity in the oceanic crust. PMID:27092118

  10. Nanocalorimetric Characterization of Microbial Activity in Deep Subsurface Oceanic Crustal Fluids.

    PubMed

    Robador, Alberto; LaRowe, Douglas E; Jungbluth, Sean P; Lin, Huei-Ting; Rappé, Michael S; Nealson, Kenneth H; Amend, Jan P

    2016-01-01

    Although fluids within the upper oceanic basaltic crust harbor a substantial fraction of the total prokaryotic cells on Earth, the energy needs of this microbial population are unknown. In this study, a nanocalorimeter (sensitivity down to 1.2 nW ml(-1)) was used to measure the enthalpy of microbially catalyzed reactions as a function of temperature in samples from two distinct crustal fluid aquifers. Microorganisms in unamended, warm (63°C) and geochemically altered anoxic fluids taken from 292 meters sub-basement (msb) near the Juan de Fuca Ridge produced 267.3 mJ of heat over the course of 97 h during a step-wise isothermal scan from 35.5 to 85.0°C. Most of this heat signal likely stems from the germination of thermophilic endospores (6.66 × 10(4) cells ml(-1) FLUID) and their subsequent metabolic activity at temperatures greater than 50°C. The average cellular energy consumption (5.68 pW cell(-1)) reveals the high metabolic potential of a dormant community transported by fluids circulating through the ocean crust. By contrast, samples taken from 293 msb from cooler (3.8°C), relatively unaltered oxic fluids, produced 12.8 mJ of heat over the course of 14 h as temperature ramped from 34.8 to 43.0°C. Corresponding cell-specific energy turnover rates (0.18 pW cell(-1)) were converted to oxygen uptake rates of 24.5 nmol O2 ml(-1) FLUID d(-1), validating previous model predictions of microbial activity in this environment. Given that the investigated fluids are characteristic of expansive areas of the upper oceanic crust, the measured metabolic heat rates can be used to constrain boundaries of habitability and microbial activity in the oceanic crust.

  11. Dynamics of a deformable active particle under shear flow.

    PubMed

    Tarama, Mitsusuke; Menzel, Andreas M; ten Hagen, Borge; Wittkowski, Raphael; Ohta, Takao; Löwen, Hartmut

    2013-09-14

    The motion of a deformable active particle in linear shear flow is explored theoretically. Based on symmetry considerations, we propose coupled nonlinear dynamical equations for the particle position, velocity, deformation, and rotation. In our model, both, passive rotations induced by the shear flow as well as active spinning motions, are taken into account. Our equations reduce to known models in the two limits of vanishing shear flow and vanishing particle deformability. For varied shear rate and particle propulsion speed, we solve the equations numerically in two spatial dimensions and obtain a manifold of different dynamical modes including active straight motion, periodic motions, motions on undulated cycloids, winding motions, as well as quasi-periodic and chaotic motions induced at high shear rates. The types of motion are distinguished by different characteristics in the real-space trajectories and in the dynamical behavior of the particle orientation and its deformation. Our predictions can be verified in experiments on self-propelled droplets exposed to a linear shear flow.

  12. New constraints on the active tectonic deformation of the Aegean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nyst, M.; Thatcher, W.

    2004-01-01

    Site velocities from six separate Global Positioning System (GPS) networks comprising 374 stations have been referred to a single common Eurasia-fixed reference frame to map the velocity distribution over the entire Aegean. We use the GPS velocity field to identify deforming regions, rigid elements, and potential microplate boundaries, and build upon previous work by others to initially specify rigid elements in central Greece, the South Aegean, Anatolia, and the Sea of Marmara. We apply an iterative approach, tentatively defining microplate boundaries, determining best fit rigid rotations, examining misfit patterns, and revising the boundaries to achieve a better match between model and data. Short-term seismic cycle effects are minor contaminants of the data that we remove when necessary to isolate the long-term kinematics. We find that present day Aegean deformation is due to the relative motions of four microplates and straining in several isolated zones internal to them. The RMS misfit of model to data is about 2-sigma, very good when compared to the typical match between coseismic fault models and GPS data. The simplicity of the microplate description of the deformation and its good fit to the GPS data are surprising and were not anticipated by previous work, which had suggested either many rigid elements or broad deforming zones that comprise much of the Aegean region. The isolated deforming zones are also unexpected and cannot be explained by the kinematics of the microplate motions. Strain rates within internally deforming zones are extensional and range from 30 to 50 nanostrain/year (nstrain/year, 10-9/year), 1 to 2 orders of magnitude lower than rates observed across the major microplate boundaries. Lower strain rates may exist elsewhere withi the microplates but are only resolved in Anatolia, where extension of 13 ?? 4 nstrain/ year is required by the data. Our results suggest that despite the detailed complexity of active continental deformation

  13. Relation of Volcanism to Crustal Deformation in Klamath Falls, Oregon: Transition from Calc-alkaline Basaltic Andesite to High Alumina Olivine Tholeiite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priest, G. R.; Hladky, F. R.; Murray, R. B.

    2009-12-01

    This paper is based on geologic mapping by Priest et al. (2008) at Klamath Falls, Oregon on the southernmost end of the Klamath Graben. Northeast-southwest extension across this area caused northeast tilting of fault blocks on the east side and southwest tilting of blocks on the west side of the Graben. Dominant strike of these Basin and Range fault blocks is N. 30-40° W. At Klamath Falls the two opposing groups of tilted blocks are separated not by a keystone graben but by a complex of bounding faults striking ~N. 65° W. The bounding faults appear to have components of right-lateral or reverse motion, cut rocks dated at ~4 Ma, and terminate to the northwest against northeast-striking faults at the southern boundary of the Graben. Normal faults within the study area cut basalt dated at 1.8 Ma on the west side of the Graben. Holocene talus is cut on the east side of the Graben immediately north of the study area. The 1993 magnitude 5.9 and 6.0 earthquakes on the west margin of the Klamath Graben are evidence that extensional deformation is continuing there. The youngest proven deformation in the map area south of the Graben boundary is offset Pleistocene alluvial fans at the base of Hogback Mountain. These fans are now preserved as discontinuous hills but once filled the local Altamont basin by up to 150 m higher than its present surface. Much of this sand and gravel has been eroded, possibly coincident with breaching of the basin at ~1 Ma by headward erosion of the Klamath River. Magmatic composition changed as crustal extension in the area progressed and the width of the Cascade volcanic arc decreased. Between ~6 and 4 Ma, calc-alkaline basaltic andesite and andesite from local volcanic centers of the volcanic arc flowed unimpeded across the area, thus the current Basin and Range topography had not developed. Angular unconformities within sequences of volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks dated at 4-2.7 Ma indicate contemporaneous tilting of fault blocks, but much

  14. Spectral damping scaling factors for shallow crustal earthquakes in active tectonic regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rezaeian, Sanaz; Bozorgnia, Yousef; Idriss, I.M.; Campbell, Kenneth; Abrahamson, Norman; Silva, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) for elastic response spectra, including the Next Generation Attenuation (NGA) models, are typically developed at a 5% viscous damping ratio. In reality, however, structural and non-structural systems can have damping ratios other than 5%, depending on various factors such as structural types, construction materials, level of ground motion excitations, among others. This report provides the findings of a comprehensive study to develop a new model for a Damping Scaling Factor (DSF) that can be used to adjust the 5% damped spectral ordinates predicted by a GMPE to spectral ordinates with damping ratios between 0.5 to 30%. Using the updated, 2011 version of the NGA database of ground motions recorded in worldwide shallow crustal earthquakes in active tectonic regions (i.e., the NGA-West2 database), dependencies of the DSF on variables including damping ratio, spectral period, moment magnitude, source-to-site distance, duration, and local site conditions are examined. The strong influence of duration is captured by inclusion of both magnitude and distance in the DSF model. Site conditions are found to have less significant influence on DSF and are not included in the model. The proposed model for DSF provides functional forms for the median value and the logarithmic standard deviation of DSF. This model is heteroscedastic, where the variance is a function of the damping ratio. Damping Scaling Factor models are developed for the “average” horizontal ground motion components, i.e., RotD50 and GMRotI50, as well as the vertical component of ground motion.

  15. Active Crustal Shortening Interpreted Through its Fluvial Signature: Santa Barbara, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melosh, B. L.; Keller, E. A.

    2008-12-01

    This study utilizes GIS based topographic analysis of three, ten, and 30-meter resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) in ArcGIS to investigate a fluvial system and determine fold growth direction, future and past channel abandonment locations, and stream incision rates. More specifically, the purpose of this study is to verify the hypothesis of westward fold growth, to test if surface uplift is occurring faster than channel denudation adjacent to faults, and to quantify maximum and minimum stream incision rates. The Santa Barbara Fold Belt (SBFB) is an area of active crustal shortening comprised of an east-west trending group of reverse faults and folds. This study focus in detail on three folds; the Mesa anticline, the Mission Ridge anticline, and More Ranch-Elwood anticline, and four streams; Atascadero Creek, Arroyo Burrow Creek, Mission Creek, and Sycamore Creek. Results demonstrate the hypothesis of westward fold propagation holds true based on westward diverted streams and increasing elevation of abandoned stream channels away from the fold nose. Three out of four streams investigated display one abrupt westward diversion along strike of Mission Ridge Fault as a response to topographic ridges located in the hanging wall adjacent the fault. Knick points found in long channel profiles also coincide with faults demonstrating present day surface uplift is greater than bedrock incision and future channel abandonment may occur at these locations. Maximum and minimum stream incision rates calculated based on previously dated debris flows and marine terraces provide rates of 5 and 0.72 mm/yr, respectively.

  16. A province-scale block model of Walker Lane and western Basin and Range crustal deformation constrained by GPS observations (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, W. C.; Bormann, J.; Blewitt, G.; Kreemer, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Walker Lane in the western Great Basin of the western United States is an 800 km long and 100 km wide zone of active intracontinental transtension that absorbs ~10 mm/yr, about 20% of the Pacific/North America plate boundary relative motion. Lying west of the Sierra Nevada/Great Valley microplate (SNGV) and adjoining the Basin and Range Province to the east, deformation is predominantly shear strain overprinted with a minor component of extension. The Walker Lane responds with faulting, block rotations, structural step-overs, and has distinct and varying partitioned domains of shear and extension. Resolving these complex deformation patterns requires a long term observation strategy with a dense network of GPS stations (spacing ~20 km). The University of Nevada, Reno operates the 373 station Mobile Array of GPS for Nevada transtension (MAGNET) semi-continuous network that supplements coverage by other networks such as EarthScope's Plate Boundary Observatory, which alone has insufficient density to resolve the deformation patterns. Uniform processing of data from these GPS mega-networks provides a synoptic view and new insights into the kinematics and mechanics of Walker Lane tectonics. We present velocities for thousands of stations with time series between 3 to 17 years in duration aligned to our new GPS-based North America fixed reference frame NA12. The velocity field shows a rate budget across the southern Walker Lane of ~10 mm/yr, decreasing northward to ~7 mm/yr at the latitude of the Mohawk Valley and Pyramid Lake. We model the data with a new block model that estimates rotations and slip rates of known active faults between the Mojave Desert and northern Nevada and northeast California. The density of active faults in the region requires including a relatively large number of blocks in the model to accurately estimate deformation patterns. With 49 blocks, our the model captures structural detail not represented in previous province-scale models, and

  17. Effects of Fault Segmentation, Mechanical Interaction, and Structural Complexity on Earthquake-Generated Deformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddad, David Elias

    2014-01-01

    Earth's topographic surface forms an interface across which the geodynamic and geomorphic engines interact. This interaction is best observed along crustal margins where topography is created by active faulting and sculpted by geomorphic processes. Crustal deformation manifests as earthquakes at centennial to millennial timescales. Given that…

  18. 3D crustal-scale heat-flow regimes at a developing active margin (Taranaki Basin, New Zealand)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroeger, K. F.; Funnell, R. H.; Nicol, A.; Fohrmann, M.; Bland, K. J.; King, P. R.

    2013-04-01

    The Taranaki Basin in the west of New Zealand's North Island has evolved from a rifted Mesozoic Gondwana margin to a basin straddling the Neogene convergent Australian-Pacific plate margin. However, given its proximity to the modern subduction front, Taranaki Basin is surprisingly cold when compared to other convergent margins. To investigate the effects of active margin evolution on the thermal regime of the Taranaki Basin we developed a 3D crustal-scale forward model using the petroleum industry-standard basin-modelling software Petromod™. The crustal structure inherited from Mesozoic Gondwana margin breakup and processes related to modern Hikurangi convergent margin initiation are identified to be the main controls on the thermal regime of the Taranaki Basin. Present-day surface heat flow across Taranaki on average is 59 mW/m2, but varies by as much as 30 mW/m2 due to the difference in crustal heat generation between mafic and felsic basement terranes alone. In addition, changes in mantle heat advection, tectonic subsidence, crustal thickening and basin inversion, together with related sedimentary processes result in variability of up to 10 mW/m2. Modelling suggests that increased heating of the upper crust due to additional mantle heat advection following the onset of subduction is an ongoing process and heating has only recently begun to reach the surface, explaining the relatively low surface heat flow. We propose that the depth of the subducted slab and related mantle convection processes control the thermal and structural regimes in the Taranaki Basin. The thermal effects of the subduction initiation process are modified and overprinted by the thickness, structure and composition of the lithosphere.

  19. Crustal Dynamics Project: Catalogue of site information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Carey E. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    This document represents a catalog of site information for the Crustal Dynamics Project. It contains information on and descriptions of those sites used by the Project as observing stations for making the precise geodetic measurements necessary for studies of the Earth's crustal movements and deformation.

  20. Crustal Dynamics Project: Catalogue of site information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    This document represents a catalogue of site information for the Crustal Dynamics Project. It contains information and descriptions of those sites used by the Project as observing stations for making the precise geodetic measurements useful for studies of the Earth's crustal movements and deformation.

  1. Evolution of Deformation Studies on Active Hawaiian Volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Decker, Robert; Okamura, Arnold; Miklius, Asta; Poland, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Everything responds to pressure, even rocks. Deformation studies involve measuring and interpreting the changes in elevations and horizontal positions of the land surface or sea floor. These studies are variously referred to as geodetic changes or ground-surface deformations and are sometimes indexed under the general heading of geodesy. Deformation studies have been particularly useful on active volcanoes and in active tectonic areas. A great amount of time and energy has been spent on measuring geodetic changes on Kilauea and Mauna Loa Volcanoes in Hawai`i. These changes include the build-up of the surface by the piling up and ponding of lava flows, the changes in the surface caused by erosion, and the uplift, subsidence, and horizontal displacements of the surface caused by internal processes acting beneath the surface. It is these latter changes that are the principal concern of this review. A complete and objective review of deformation studies on active Hawaiian volcanoes would take many volumes. Instead, we attempt to follow the evolution of the most significant observations and interpretations in a roughly chronological way. It is correct to say that this is a subjective review. We have spent years measuring and recording deformation changes on these great volcanoes and more years trying to understand what makes these changes occur. We attempt to make this a balanced as well as a subjective review; the references are also selective rather than exhaustive. Geodetic changes caused by internal geologic processes vary in magnitude from the nearly infinitesimal - one micron or less, to the very large - hundreds of meters. Their apparent causes also are varied and include changes in material properties and composition, atmospheric pressure, tidal stress, thermal stress, subsurface-fluid pressure (including magma pressure, magma intrusion, or magma removal), gravity, and tectonic stress. Deformation is measured in units of strain or displacement. For example, tilt

  2. Recent crustal deformation of İzmir, Western Anatolia and surrounding regions as deduced from repeated GPS measurements and strain field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktuğ, Bahadır; Kılıçoğlu, Ali

    2006-07-01

    To investigate contemporary neotectonic deformation in İzmir, Western Anatolia and in its neighborhood, a relatively dense Global Positioning System (GPS) monitoring network was established in 2001. Combination of three spatially dense GPS campaigns in 2001, 2003 and 2004 with temporally dense campaigns between 1992 and 2004 resulted in a combined velocity field representing active deformation rate in the region. We computed horizontal and vertical velocity fields with respect to Earth-centered, Earth-fixed ITRF2000, to Eurasia and to Anatolia as well. The rates of principal and shear strains along with rigid-body rotation rates were derived from velocity field. Results show east-west shortening between Karaburun Peninsula and northern part of İzmir Bay together with the extension of İzmir Bay in accordance with general extension regime of Western Anatolia and Eastern Agea. East-west shortening and north-south extension of Karaburun Peninsula are closely related to right-lateral faulting and a clockwise rotation. There exists a block in the middle of the peninsula with a differential motion at a rate of 3-5 ± 1 mm/year and 5-6 ± 1 mm/year to the east and south, respectively. As is in Western Anatolia, north-south extension is dominant in almost all parts of the region despite the fact that they exhibit significantly higher rates in the middle of the peninsula. Extensional rates along Tuzla Fault lying nearly perpendicular to İzmir Bay and in its west are maximum in the region with an extension rate of 300-500 ± 80-100 nanostrain/year and confirm its active state. Extensional rates in other parts of the region are at level of 50-150 nanostrain/year as expected in the other parts of Western Anatolia.

  3. InSAR analysis of the crustal deformation affecting the megacity of Istanbul: the results of the FP7 Marsite Project as a GEO Supersite Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solaro, Giuseppe; Bonano, Manuela; Manzo, Mariarosaria

    2016-04-01

    The North Anatolian Fault (NAF) is one of the most active faults worldwide, extending approximately 1,200 km from Eastern Turkey to the Northern Aegean Sea. During the 20th century series of damaging earthquakes occurred along the NAF, generally propagated westward towards Istanbul; the last one occurred in 1999 at Izmit, a city 80 km away from Istanbul. Within this scenario, the FP7 MARsite project (New Directions in Seismic Hazard assessment through Focused Earth Observation in Marmara Supersite), supported by EU, intends to collect, share and integrate multidisciplinary data (seismologic, geochemical, surveying, satellite, etc.) in order to carry out assessment, mitigation and management of seismic risk in the region of the Sea of Marmara. In the framework of the MARsite project, we performed the analysis and monitoring of the surface deformation affecting the Istanbul mega city by exploiting the large archives of X-band satellite SAR data, made available through the Supersites Initiatives, and by processing them via the advanced multi-temporal and multi-scale InSAR technique, known as the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) approach. In particular, we applied the SBAS technique to a dataset of 101 SAR images acquired by the TerraSAR-X constellation of the German Space Agency (DLR) over descending orbits and spanning the November 2010 - August 2014 time interval. From,these images, we generated 312 differential interferograms with a maximum spatial separation (perpendicular baseline) between the acquisition orbits of about 500 m., that were used to generate, via the SBAS approach, mean deformation velocity map and corresponding ground time series of the investigated area. The performed InSAR analysis reveals a generalized stability over the Istanbul area, except for some localized displacements, related to subsidence and slope instability phenomena. In particular, we identified: (i) a displacement pattern related to the Istanbul airport, showing a mostly linear

  4. Strain Partitioning During Continental Extension: Role Of Crustal Decoupling And Lower Crustal Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huismans, Ritske S.; Beaumont, Christopher

    Lithosphere extension is accommodated by localized deformation of brittle and vis- cous shear zones. Distributed lower crustal flow may also occur in response to the changing crustal and mantle lithosphere geometry during extension and the associated buoyancy forces. We investigate the relationship between the localised deformation and distributed flow in a series of model experiments. Successive experiments increase the decoupling of the upper crust from the upper mantle lithosphere by increasing the contribution of thermally activated creep in the lower crust. We use visco-plastic fully thermally coupled numerical experiments to simulate the thermo-mechanical evolu- tion of the extending lithosphere. In our first set of numerical models, crust and man- tle lithosphere have normal thickness and thermal conditions. In the reference model, strong coupling between crust and mantle is achieved by scaling up the crustal viscos- ity by a factor of 100. Subsequently, decoupling is achieved by allowing for thermally activated creep in the lower crust. The models suggest that strong coupling between crust and mantle lithosphere may result in relatively narrow rift basins bounded by nested conjugate fault systems. In contrast, the decoupled models show outward prop- agation of synthetic fault systems and the formation of multiple crustal necks, where the frictional shears sole out in the lower crustal decollement. In our second set of nu- merical models we investigate the effect of introducing a zone of thick and hot crust in the centre of the model. Under these circumstances, channel flow directed toward the rift in the middle and lower crust becomes increasingly important at the expense of the frictional plastic behaviour of the upper crust and upper mantle lithosphere. We test the sensitivity of the model results to the initial position in either crust or mantle where localisation first occurs. The thick crust models show a natural progression from core complex style of

  5. Crustal structures under the active volcanic areas of central and eastern Mediterranean (M-44)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasparini, P. (Principal Investigator); Mantovani, M. S. M.; Monaco, F.; Pierattini, D.; Fedi, M.

    1981-01-01

    Programs are being adapted to the UNIVAC 1000 computer and others are being developed for immediate utilization in processing MAGSAT data. stability intermediate for lower continental crust and to upper manele conditions. Attempts to residuate crustal anomalies from one selected profile passing through western mediterranean using procedures commonly used at NASA yielded dubious results because of uncertainties in the adoption of coefficients in the expression accounting for the effect of equatorial ring currents and the empirical approach used for other corrections. Instead, filtering techniques are to be applied to each profile once investigator B tapes relative to the whole planet are received.

  6. Active Printed Materials for Complex Self-Evolving Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raviv, Dan; Zhao, Wei; McKnelly, Carrie; Papadopoulou, Athina; Kadambi, Achuta; Shi, Boxin; Hirsch, Shai; Dikovsky, Daniel; Zyracki, Michael; Olguin, Carlos; Raskar, Ramesh; Tibbits, Skylar

    2014-12-01

    We propose a new design of complex self-evolving structures that vary over time due to environmental interaction. In conventional 3D printing systems, materials are meant to be stable rather than active and fabricated models are designed and printed as static objects. Here, we introduce a novel approach for simulating and fabricating self-evolving structures that transform into a predetermined shape, changing property and function after fabrication. The new locally coordinated bending primitives combine into a single system, allowing for a global deformation which can stretch, fold and bend given environmental stimulus.

  7. Active printed materials for complex self-evolving deformations.

    PubMed

    Raviv, Dan; Zhao, Wei; McKnelly, Carrie; Papadopoulou, Athina; Kadambi, Achuta; Shi, Boxin; Hirsch, Shai; Dikovsky, Daniel; Zyracki, Michael; Olguin, Carlos; Raskar, Ramesh; Tibbits, Skylar

    2014-12-18

    We propose a new design of complex self-evolving structures that vary over time due to environmental interaction. In conventional 3D printing systems, materials are meant to be stable rather than active and fabricated models are designed and printed as static objects. Here, we introduce a novel approach for simulating and fabricating self-evolving structures that transform into a predetermined shape, changing property and function after fabrication. The new locally coordinated bending primitives combine into a single system, allowing for a global deformation which can stretch, fold and bend given environmental stimulus.

  8. Crustal dynamics project observing plan for highly mobile systems 1981 - 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, H.

    1980-01-01

    Measurement of crustal motion in the western United States and other tectonically active regions makes use of fixed, movable and highly mobile satellite laser ranging and very long baseline interferometry systems. Measurement of the rotational dynamics of the Earth as well as regional deformation and plate motion are discussed.

  9. Active deformation of the northern front of the Eastern Great Caucasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niviere, Bertrand; Gagala, Lukasz; Callot, Jean-Paul; Regard, Vincent; Ringenbach, Jean-Claude

    2016-04-01

    The Arabia-Eurasia collision involved a mosaic of island arcs and microcontinents. Their accretion to the complex paleogeographic margin of Neotethys was marked by numerous collisional events. The Greater Caucasus constitute the northernmost tectonic element of this tectonic collage, developed as a back arc extensional zone now inverted, which relationships to the onset of Arabia-Eurasia continental collision and/or to the reorganization of the Arabia-Eurasia plate boundary at ˜5 Ma remain controversial. Structurally, the Greater Caucasus are a former continental back arc rift, now the locus of ongoing continental shortening. Modern geodetic observations suggest that in the west, the strain north of the Armenian Plateau is accommodated almost exclusively along the margins of the Greater Caucasus. This differs from regions further east where strain accommodation is distributed across both the Lesser and Greater Caucasus, and within the Greater Caucasus range, with a unique southward vergence. We question here the amount and mechanisms by which the Eastern Greater Caucasus accommodate part of the Arabia-Eurasia convergence. Morphostructural analysis of the folded late Pleistocene marine terrace along the northern slope of the Eastern Greater Caucasus evidences an on going tectonic activity in the area where GPS measurements record no motion. Most of the recent foreland deformation is accommodated by south-vergent folds and thrust, i. e. opposite to the vergence of the Caucasus frontal northern thrust. A progressive unconformity in the folded beds shows that it was already active during the late Pliocene. Cosmogenic dating of the terrace and kinematic restoration of the remnant terrace, linked to the subsurface geology allows for the estimation of a shortening rate ranging from a few mm/yr to 1 cm/yr over the last 5 Myr along the greater Caucasus northern front. Thus more than one third of the shortening between the Kura block / Lesser Caucasus domain and the Stable

  10. Recent crustal movements in the Sierra Nevada-Walker lane region of California-Nevada: Part i, rate and style of deformation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slemmons, D.B.; Wormer, D.V.; Bell, E.J.; Silberman, M.L.

    1979-01-01

    This review of geological, seismological, geochronological and paleobotanical data is made to compare historic and geologic rates and styles of deformation of the Sierra Nevada and western Basin and Range Provinces. The main uplift of this region began about 17 m.y. ago, with slow uplift of the central Sierra Nevada summit region at rates estimated at about 0.012 mm/yr and of western Basin and Range Province at about 0.01 mm/yr. Many Mesozoic faults of the Foothills fault system were reactivated with normal slip in mid-Tertiary time and have continued to be active with slow slip rates. Sparse data indicate acceleration of rates of uplift and faulting during the Late Cenozoic. The Basin and Range faulting appears to have extended westward during this period with a reduction in width of the Sierra Nevada. The eastern boundary zone of the Sierra Nevada has an irregular en-echelon pattern of normal and right-oblique faults. The area between the Sierra Nevada and the Walker Lane is a complex zone of irregular patterns of ho??rst and graben blocks and conjugate normal-to right- and left-slip faults of NW and NE trend, respectively. The Walker Lane has at least five main strands near Walker Lake, with total right-slip separation estimated at 48 km. The NE-trending left-slip faults are much shorter than the Walker Lane fault zone and have maximum separations of no more than a few kilometers. Examples include the 1948 and 1966 fault zone northeast of Truckee, California, the Olinghouse fault (Part III) and possibly the almost 200-km-long Carson Lineament. Historic geologic evidence of faulting, seismologic evidence for focal mechanisms, geodetic measurements and strain measurements confirm continued regional uplift and tilting of the Sierra Nevada, with minor internal local faulting and deformation, smaller uplift of the western Basin and Range Province, conjugate focal mechanisms for faults of diverse orientations and types, and a NS to NE-SW compression axis (??1) and an

  11. Thermally Induced Deformation in Metallic Glass: the Activations and Relaxations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yue; Iwashita, Takuya; Egami, Takeshi

    2015-03-01

    Thermally induced deformation in metallic glasses was investigated by sampling the potential energy landscape (PEL) and probing the changes in the atomic properties (e.g. energy, displacement, stress). The complete deformation processes consist of two stages: the activation (i.e. trigger, from initial minima to nearby saddle states on PEL), and relaxation (i.e. from saddle states to final minima on PEL). We show that the activation stages are triggered by local rearrangements of a small number of atoms, typically 5 atoms in average. Surprisingly, the individual triggers are invariant of the cooling history or elastic structure of the system. However, the organizations between different trigger centers can be varied and are related to the overall stability of the system. On the other hand, relaxation stages consist of two branches, a localized branch, and a cascade branch. While the localized branch is insensitive to the cooling history the system, the cascade branch is highly related with the processing conditions. In particular, for a faster quenched system, the cascade relaxation is found more prominent than in a slowly quenched system. The work is supported by Department of Energy.

  12. Correcting Thermal Deformations in an Active Composite Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Samuel C.; Agnes, Gregory S.; Wilkie, William K.

    2011-01-01

    Large, high-precision composite reflectors for future space missions are costly to manufacture, and heavy. An active composite reflector capable of adjusting shape in situ to maintain required tolerances can be lighter and cheaper to manufacture. An active composite reflector testbed was developed that uses an array of piezoelectric composite actuators embedded in the back face sheet of a 0.8-m reflector panel. Each individually addressable actuator can be commanded from 500 to +1,500 V, and the flatness of the panel can be controlled to tolerances of 100 nm. Measuring the surface flatness at this resolution required the use of a speckle holography interferometer system in the Precision Environmental Test Enclosure (PETE) at JPL. The existing testbed combines the PETE for test environment stability, the speckle holography system for measuring out-of-plane deformations, the active panel including an array of individually addressable actuators, a FLIR thermal camera to measure thermal profiles across the reflector, and a heat source. Use of an array of flat piezoelectric actuators to correct thermal deformations is a promising new application for these actuators, as is the use of this actuator technology for surface flatness and wavefront control. An isogrid of these actuators is moving one step closer to a fully active face sheet, with the significant advantage of ease in manufacturing. No extensive rib structure or other actuation backing structure is required, as these actuators can be applied directly to an easy-to-manufacture flat surface. Any mission with a surface flatness requirement for a panel or reflector structure could adopt this actuator array concept to create lighter structures and enable improved performance on orbit. The thermal environment on orbit tends to include variations in temperature during shadowing or changes in angle. Because of this, a purely passive system is not an effective way to maintain flatness at the scale of microns over several

  13. Perceiving Object Shape from Specular Highlight Deformation, Boundary Contour Deformation, and Active Haptic Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Cheeseman, Jacob R.; Thomason, Kelsey E.; Ronning, Cecilia; Behari, Kriti; Kleinman, Kayla; Calloway, Autum B.; Lamirande, Davora

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that motion facilitates the visual perception of solid object shape, particularly when surface texture or other identifiable features (e.g., corners) are present. Conventional models of structure-from-motion require the presence of texture or identifiable object features in order to recover 3-D structure. Is the facilitation in 3-D shape perception similar in magnitude when surface texture is absent? On any given trial in the current experiments, participants were presented with a single randomly-selected solid object (bell pepper or randomly-shaped “glaven”) for 12 seconds and were required to indicate which of 12 (for bell peppers) or 8 (for glavens) simultaneously visible objects possessed the same shape. The initial single object’s shape was defined either by boundary contours alone (i.e., presented as a silhouette), specular highlights alone, specular highlights combined with boundary contours, or texture. In addition, there was a haptic condition: in this condition, the participants haptically explored with both hands (but could not see) the initial single object for 12 seconds; they then performed the same shape-matching task used in the visual conditions. For both the visual and haptic conditions, motion (rotation in depth or active object manipulation) was present in half of the trials and was not present for the remaining trials. The effect of motion was quantitatively similar for all of the visual and haptic conditions–e.g., the participants’ performance in Experiment 1 was 93.5 percent higher in the motion or active haptic manipulation conditions (when compared to the static conditions). The current results demonstrate that deforming specular highlights or boundary contours facilitate 3-D shape perception as much as the motion of objects that possess texture. The current results also indicate that the improvement with motion that occurs for haptics is similar in magnitude to that which occurs for vision. PMID:26863531

  14. Perceiving Object Shape from Specular Highlight Deformation, Boundary Contour Deformation, and Active Haptic Manipulation.

    PubMed

    Norman, J Farley; Phillips, Flip; Cheeseman, Jacob R; Thomason, Kelsey E; Ronning, Cecilia; Behari, Kriti; Kleinman, Kayla; Calloway, Autum B; Lamirande, Davora

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that motion facilitates the visual perception of solid object shape, particularly when surface texture or other identifiable features (e.g., corners) are present. Conventional models of structure-from-motion require the presence of texture or identifiable object features in order to recover 3-D structure. Is the facilitation in 3-D shape perception similar in magnitude when surface texture is absent? On any given trial in the current experiments, participants were presented with a single randomly-selected solid object (bell pepper or randomly-shaped "glaven") for 12 seconds and were required to indicate which of 12 (for bell peppers) or 8 (for glavens) simultaneously visible objects possessed the same shape. The initial single object's shape was defined either by boundary contours alone (i.e., presented as a silhouette), specular highlights alone, specular highlights combined with boundary contours, or texture. In addition, there was a haptic condition: in this condition, the participants haptically explored with both hands (but could not see) the initial single object for 12 seconds; they then performed the same shape-matching task used in the visual conditions. For both the visual and haptic conditions, motion (rotation in depth or active object manipulation) was present in half of the trials and was not present for the remaining trials. The effect of motion was quantitatively similar for all of the visual and haptic conditions-e.g., the participants' performance in Experiment 1 was 93.5 percent higher in the motion or active haptic manipulation conditions (when compared to the static conditions). The current results demonstrate that deforming specular highlights or boundary contours facilitate 3-D shape perception as much as the motion of objects that possess texture. The current results also indicate that the improvement with motion that occurs for haptics is similar in magnitude to that which occurs for vision. PMID:26863531

  15. Bulk arc strain, crustal thickening, magma emplacement, and mass balances in the Mesozoic Sierra Nevada arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wenrong; Paterson, Scott; Saleeby, Jason; Zalunardo, Sean

    2016-03-01

    Quantifying crustal deformation is important for evaluating mass balance, material transfer, and the interplay between tectonism and magmatism in continental arcs. We present a dataset of >650 finite strain analyses compiled from published works and our own studies with associated structural, geochronologic, and geobarometric information in central and southern Sierra Nevada, California, to quantify the arc crust deformation. Our results show that Mesozoic tectonism results in 65% arc-perpendicular bulk crust shortening under a more or less plane strain condition. Mesozoic arc magmatism replaced ∼80% of this actively deforming arc crust with plutons requiring significantly greater crustal thickening. We suggest that by ∼85 Ma, the arc crust thickness was ∼80 km with a 30-km-thick arc root, resulting in a ∼5 km elevation. Most tectonic shortening and magma emplacement must be accommodated by downward displacements of crustal materials into growing crustal roots at the estimated downward transfer rate of 2-13 km/Myr. The downward transfer of crustal materials must occur in active magma channels, or in "escape channels" in between solidified plutons that decrease in size with time and depth resulting in an increase in the intensity of constrictional strain with depth. We argue that both tectonism and magmatism control the thickness of the crust and surface elevation with slight modification by surface erosion. The downward transported crustal materials initially fertilize the MASH zone thus enhancing to the generation of additional magmas. As the crustal root grows it may potentially pinch out and cool the mantle wedge and thus cause reduction of arc magmatism.

  16. The interpretation of crustal dynamics data in terms of plate interactions and active tectonics of the Anatolian Plate and surrounding regions in the Middle East

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toksoz, M. Nafi

    1988-01-01

    The long-term objective of this project is to interpret NASA's Crustal Dynamics measurements (SLR) in the Eastern Mediterranean region in terms of relative plate movements and intraplate deformation. The approach is to combine realistic modeling studies with analysis of available geophysical and geological observations to provide a framework for interpreting NASA's measurements. This semi-annual report concentrates on recent results regarding the tectonics of Anatolia and surrounding regions from ground based observations. Also reported on briefly is progress in the use of the Global Positioning System to densify SLR observations in the Eastern Mediterranean. Reference is made to the previous annual report for a discussion of modeling results.

  17. The interpretation of crustal dynamics data in terms of plate interactions and active tectonics of the Anatolian Plate and surrounding regions in the Middle East

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toksoz, M. Nafi

    1987-01-01

    The long term objective of this project is to interpret NASA's Crustal Dynamics measurements (SLR) in the Eastern Mediterranean region in terms of relative plate motions and intraplate deformation. The approach is to combine realistic modeling studies with an analysis of available geophysical and geological observations to provide a framework for interpreting NASA's measurements. This semi-annual report concentrates on recent results regarding the tectonics of Anatolia and surrounding regions from ground based observations. Also briefly reported on is progress made in using GPS measurements to densify SLR observations in the Eastern Mediterranean.

  18. Activities and source mechanisms of volcanic deep low-frequency earthquakes and its implication for deep crustal process in magmatic arc (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamichi, H.

    2013-12-01

    Rocks under upper mantle and lower crustal temperatures and pressures typically deform in a ductile manner, therefore it is difficult to accumulate enough deviatoric stress in rocks to generate brittle failure under this condition. However earthquakes occur at upper mantle and lower crust beneath active volcanoes, and are recognized as volcanic deep low-frequency earthquakes (VDLFs). VDLFs are characterized by mostly low-frequency energy (<5 Hz), emergent arrivals and long-duration codas. VDLF activity observed at depths of 10-50 km in Japan, the Philippines, Alaska and the Western US (Power et al., 2004; Ukawa, 2005; Nichols et al. 20011), has generally been attributed to magma transport in the mid-to-lower crustal and uppermost mantle regions. However because VDLF seismicity is infrequent, with relatively weak and emergent signals, the relationship between deep magma transport and seismic radiation remains poorly understood. Borehole dense seismic observation systems, such as the high-sensitivity seismograph network 'Hi-net' in Japan (Obara et al. 2005), are effective for detecting not only non-VDLFs (Obara, 2002) but also VDLFs. Since 1997 the Japan Meteorological Agency has routinely detected and located DLFs using the Hi-net dataset, and have identified DLFs in and around most quaternary volcanoes in Japan (Takahashi and Miyamura, 2009). Several studies have attempted to estimate source mechanisms of VDLFs in Japan. The first attempt by Ukawa and Ohtake (1987), obtained a single force as the source mechanism of a VDLF beneath Izu-Ohshima by using particle motions of S-waves. Following that work strike-slip type and non-double-couple source mechanisms were obtained using waveform inversions for VDLFs in Northeast Japan (Nishidomi and Takeo 1996; Okada and Hasegawa, 2000). Nakamichi et al. (2003; 2004) estimated the source mechanisms of Mts. Iwate and Fuji through the moment tensor inversion of spectral ratios of body waves from using data from a dense seismic

  19. Deep Continental Crustal Earthquakes and Lithospheric Structure: A Global Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devlin, S.; Isacks, B. L.

    2007-12-01

    measurements indicate that lower crustal earthquakes exist within continental regions experiencing youthful (generally Neogene to present) tectonism typically with < 15 % strain. We propose a model that describes relative continental deformation and corresponding seismogenic thickness. In stable seismogenic regions, earthquakes are limited to depths where near-surface derived fluids can induce activity and therefore TS < 25 km. As continental lithosphere passes into an intermediate state of deformation, fluids from the near surface and melts formed in situ or derived from the mantle can act to seismically activate the entire continental crust. As deformation continues, percent strains can reach 100 % or more, mantle lithosphere is typically thinned or absent, and the lower crust via heating and/or sufficient weakening becomes aseismic.

  20. Application of space technology to crustal dynamics and earthquake research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In cooperation with other Federal government agencies, and the governments of other countries, NASA is undertaking a program of research in geodynamics. The present program activities and plans for extension of these activities in the time period 1979-1985 are described. The program includes operation of observatories for laser ranging to the Moon and to artificial satellites, and radio observatories for very long baseline microwave interferometry (VLBI). These observatories are used to measure polar motion, earth rotation, and tectonic plate movement, and serve as base stations for mobile facilities. The mobile laser ranging and VLBI facilities are used to measure crustal deformation in tectonically active areas.

  1. Crustal-scale shear zones recording 400 m.y. of tectonic activity in the North Caribou greenstone belt, western Superior Province of Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalbfleisch, Netasha

    A series of crustal-scale shear zones demarcates the northern and eastern margins of the North Caribou greenstone belt (NCGB), proximal to a Mesoarchean terrane boundary in the core of the western Superior Province of Canada. The dominant deformation produced a pervasive steeply dipping fabric that trends broadly parallel to the doubly arcuate shape of the belt and was responsible for tight folding the banded iron formation host to Goldcorp's prolific gold deposit at Musselwhite mine. The shear zones in the North Caribou greenstone belt are of particular interest because of their ability to channel hydrothermal fluids with the potential to bear ore and cause alteration of the middle to shallow crust. Shear zones are commonly reactivated during subsequent tectonism, but exhibit a consistent and dominant dextral shear sense across the belt; fabric-forming micas and chlorite are generally Mg-rich. Although garnets samples from within the shear zones are dominantly almandine, they possess variable geochemical trends (HREEs of >2 orders of magnitude) and can be syn-, intra-, or post-tectonic in origin. In situ geochronological analysis of zircon (U-Pb) and monazite (total-Pb) in high strain rocks in and around the NCGB, interpreted in light of in situ geochemical analysis of garnet and fabric-forming micas and chlorite, reveals four relatively discrete events that span 400 million years. Metamorphism of the mid-crust was coeval with magmatism during docking of the Island Lake domain at c. 2.86 Ga and subsequent terrane accretion at the north and south margins of the North Caribou Superterrane from c. 2.75 to 2.71 Ga. Transpressive shear at c. 2.60 to 2.56 Ga and late re-activation of shear zones at c. 2.44 Ga produced a steeply-dipping pervasive fabric, and channeled fluids for late crystallization of garnet and monazite recorded in the Markop Lake deformation zone. These observations implicate a horizontal tectonic model similar to the modern eastern Pacific plate

  2. Investigation of the deep crustal structure and magmatic activity at the NW Hellenic Volcanic Arc with 3-D aeromagnetic inversion and seimotectonic analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efstathiou, Angeliki; Tzanis, Andreas; Chailas, Stylianos; Stamatakis, Michael

    2013-04-01

    We report the results of a joint analysis of geophysical (aeromagnetic) and seismotectonic data, applied to the investigation of the deep structure, magmatic activity and geothermal potential of the north-western stretches of the Hellenic Volcanic Arc (HVA). The HVA is usually considered to be a single arcuate entity stretching from Sousaki (near Corinth) at the NW, to Nisyros Island at the SE. However, different types of and their ages indicate the presence of two different volcanic groups. Our study focuses on the northern part of the west (older) volcanic group and includes the Crommyonian (Sousaki) volcanic field at the west end of Megaris peninsula (east margin on the contemporary Corinth Rift), the Aegina and Methana volcanic complex at the Saronic Gulf, where typical Quaternary calc-alkaline volcanics predominate, and the Argolid peninsula to the south and south-west. In addition to the rocks associated with Quaternary volcanism, the study area includes a series of Mesozoic ultramafic (ophiolitic) outcrops at the Megaris peninsula, to the north and north-east of the Crommyonian volcanic field, as well as throughout the Argolid. A major deep structural and tectonic feature of the study area, and one with profound influence on crustal deformation and the evolution of rapidly deforming extensional structures like the Corinth Rift and the Saronic Gulf, is the local geometry and dynamics of the African oceanic crust subducting beneath the Aegean plate. Locally, the subducting slab has a NNW strike and ENE plunge, with the dip angle changing rapidly (steepening) approx. beneath the Argolid. The aeromagnetic data was extracted from the recently (re)compiled aeromagnetic map of Greece (Chailas et al, 2010) and was inverted with the UBC-GIF magnetic inversion suite (Li and Oldenburg, 1996). The inversion included rigorous geological constraints introduced by means of numerous in-situ magnetic susceptibility measurements. The inversion has imaged several isolated

  3. Crustal rifting and magmatic underplating in the Izu-Ogasawara (Bonin) intra-oceanic arc detected by active source seismic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, N.; Kodaira, S.; Yamashita, M.; Miura, S.; Sato, T.; No, T.; Tatsumi, Y.; Kaneda, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) has carried out seismic experiments using a multichannel reflection system and ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs) in the Izu-Ogasawara (Bonin)-Mariana (IBM) arc region since 2002 to understand growth process of continental crust. The source was an airgun array with a total capacity of 12,000 cubic inches and the OBSs as the receiver were deployed with an interval of 5 km for all seismic refraction experiments. As the results, we obtained crustal structures across the whole IBM arc with an interval of 50 km and detected the structural characteristics showing the crustal growth process. The IBM arc is one of typical oceanic island arc, which crustal growth started from subduction of an oceanic crust beneath the other oceanic crust. The arc crust has developed through repeatedly magmatic accretion from subduction slab and backarc opening. The volcanism has activated in Eocene, Oligocene, Miocene and Quaternary (e.g., Taylor, 1992), however, these detailed locations of past volcanic arc has been remained as one of unknown issues. In addition, a role of crustal rifting for the crustal growth has also been still unknown issue yet. Our seismic structures show three rows of past volcanic arc crusts except current arc. A rear arc and a forearc side have one and two, respectively. The first one, which was already reported by Kodaira et al. (2008), distributes in northern side from 27 N of the rear arc region. The second one, which develops in the forearc region next to the recent volcanic front, distributes in whole of the Izu-Ogasawara arc having crustal variation along arc direction. Ones of them sometimes have thicker crust than that beneath current volcanic front and no clear topographic high. Last one in the forearc connects to the Ogasawara Ridge. However, thickest crust is not always located beneath these volcanic arcs. The initial rifting region like the northern end of the Mariana Trough and the Sumisu

  4. Crustal deformation of the Yellowstone-Snake River Plain volcano-tectonic system-Campaign and continuous GPS observations, 1987-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Puskas, C.M.; Smith, R.B.; Meertens, Charles M.; Chang, W. L.

    2007-01-01

    The Yellowstone-Snake River Plain tectonomagmatic province resulted from Late Tertiary volcanism in western North America, producing three large, caldera-forming eruptions at the Yellowstone Plateau in the last 2 Myr. To understand the kinematics and geodynamics of this volcanic system, the University of Utah conducted seven GPS campaigns at 140 sites between 1987 and 2003 and installed a network of 15 permanent stations. GPS deployments focused on the Yellowstone caldera, the Hebgen Lake and Teton faults, and the eastern Snake River Plain. The GPS data revealed periods of uplift and subsidence of the Yellowstone caldera at rates up to 15 mm/yr. From 1987 to 1995, the caldera subsided and contracted, implying volume loss. From 1995 to 2000, deformation shifted to inflation and extension northwest of the caldera. From 2000 to 2003, uplift continued to the northwest while caldera subsidence was renewed. The GPS observations also revealed extension across the Hebgen Lake fault and fault-normal contraction across the Teton fault. Deformation rates of the Yellowstone caldera and Hebgen Lake fault were converted to equivalent total moment rates, which exceeded historic seismic moment release and late Quaternary fault slip-derived moment release by an order of magnitude. The Yellowstone caldera deformation trends were superimposed on regional southwest extension of the Yellowstone Plateau at up to 4.3 ± 0.2 mm/yr, while the eastern Snake River Plain moved southwest as a slower rate at 2.1 ± 0.2 mm/yr. This southwest extension of the Yellowstone-Snake River Plain system merged into east-west extension of the Basin-Range province. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Sensing surface mechanical deformation using active probes driven by motor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Daisuke; Nitta, Takahiro; Kabir, Arif Md. Rashedul; Sada, Kazuki; Gong, Jian Ping; Konagaya, Akihiko; Kakugo, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Studying mechanical deformation at the surface of soft materials has been challenging due to the difficulty in separating surface deformation from the bulk elasticity of the materials. Here, we introduce a new approach for studying the surface mechanical deformation of a soft material by utilizing a large number of self-propelled microprobes driven by motor proteins on the surface of the material. Information about the surface mechanical deformation of the soft material is obtained through changes in mobility of the microprobes wandering across the surface of the soft material. The active microprobes respond to mechanical deformation of the surface and readily change their velocity and direction depending on the extent and mode of surface deformation. This highly parallel and reliable method of sensing mechanical deformation at the surface of soft materials is expected to find applications that explore surface mechanics of soft materials and consequently would greatly benefit the surface science. PMID:27694937

  6. Sensing surface mechanical deformation using active probes driven by motor proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Daisuke; Nitta, Takahiro; Kabir, Arif Md. Rashedul; Sada, Kazuki; Gong, Jian Ping; Konagaya, Akihiko; Kakugo, Akira

    2016-10-01

    Studying mechanical deformation at the surface of soft materials has been challenging due to the difficulty in separating surface deformation from the bulk elasticity of the materials. Here, we introduce a new approach for studying the surface mechanical deformation of a soft material by utilizing a large number of self-propelled microprobes driven by motor proteins on the surface of the material. Information about the surface mechanical deformation of the soft material is obtained through changes in mobility of the microprobes wandering across the surface of the soft material. The active microprobes respond to mechanical deformation of the surface and readily change their velocity and direction depending on the extent and mode of surface deformation. This highly parallel and reliable method of sensing mechanical deformation at the surface of soft materials is expected to find applications that explore surface mechanics of soft materials and consequently would greatly benefit the surface science.

  7. Crustal structure during active rifting in the central Salton Trough, California, constrained by the Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, L.; Hole, J. A.; Stock, J. M.; Fuis, G. S.; Driscoll, N. W.; Kell, A. M.; Kent, G.; Harding, A. J.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, A.; Lazaro-Mancilla, O.

    2013-12-01

    Seismic refraction and reflection travel times from the Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) were used to constrain crustal structure during active continental rifting in the central Salton Trough, California. SSIP, funded by NSF and USGS, acquired seismic data in and across the Salton Trough in 2011 to investigate rifting processes at the northern end of the Gulf of California extensional province and earthquake hazards at the southern end of the San Andreas Fault system. Seven lines of refraction and low-fold reflection data were acquired onshore, two lines and a grid of airgun and OBS data were acquired in the Salton Sea, and onshore-offshore data were recorded. North American lithosphere in the central Salton Trough appears to have been rifted apart and replaced by new crust added by magmatism from below and sedimentation from above. Ongoing active rifting of this new crust is manifested by shallow (<10km depth) seismicity in the oblique Brawley Seismic Zone (connecting the Imperial and San Andreas transform faults), the small Salton Buttes volcanoes, and very high heat flow that enables geothermal energy production. Analyses of the onshore-offshore seismic line that extends along the axis of the Salton Trough, parallel to the direction of plate motion, constrains rifted crustal structure. Crystalline basement (~5 km/s) generally occurs at ~4 km depth, but is at 2-3 km depth in a localized region beneath the Salton Buttes and Salton Sea geothermal field. This crystalline rock is interpreted to be late Pliocene to Quaternary Colorado River sediment that has been metamorphosed by high heat flow to a depth of at least 10km. The shallower basement under the volcanic and geothermal field is due to more intense metamorphism and hydrothermal alteration in this region of extreme heat flow. Faster velocity (6.2-6.4 km/s) observed at 10-13 km depth might be the remains of ruptured pre-existing crust or might be produced by deeper magmatism. Seismic travel times indicate

  8. Internal Structure of a Fault and Fracture System in Carbonates Deformed at Shallow Crustal Depth in the Jebel Hafeet Anticline, United Arab Emirates - Oman border.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanningen, E. H.; Holland, M.; Urai, J. L.; Rawnsley, K.; Loosveld, R.

    2006-12-01

    The Jebel Hafeet anticline is located in the foreland fold and thrust belt of the Oman mountains. It is 25x4 km in size, elevated up to 1000 m above the surrounding plains. The lithologies mainly consist of porous limestones and marls of Eocene to Miocene age. After burial to less than 1 km the anticline was formed above the thrusts in the underlying shales. Our study was based on detailed interpretation of a 0.7 m resolution Quickbird satellite image to obtain maps of lithologic units, faults, fractures and drainage patterns, integrated with field work which produced structural data, a large database of georeferenced photographs and detailed descriptions of the internal structure of faults and fractures. Analysis of the drainage pattern on Hafeet shows that the fold was formed in two phases: we interpret this as a first stage of buckling and a second stage between two high angle reverse faults. In the more competent units several sets of normal and strike-slip faults with offsets up to 50 m were formed throughout the anticline. Strike-slip faults in angles of 30 DEG to the fold axis have the largest offset. Along the crest oblique faults are parallel to the fold axis. Because of the high ratio of the rocks' compressive strength and the in-situ effective stress during deformation, all faults and fractures are highly dilatant. This is especially apparent in crestal mode I fractures parallel to the anticline axis, which can have openings of more than 1 m. These formed a cave system in the anticline which channelized groundwater flow and deposited several generations of red clay, alternating with phases of calcite cement. During the anticline's evolution these deposits were reworked, which results in tilted and deformed fracture fills covered by younger sediment and calcite cement. These processes produce a heterogeneous distribution of transport properties in this massively dilatant volume, between volumes plugged by clay and cement, and volumes which are not plugged

  9. Strain accumulation and fluid-rock interaction in a naturally deformed diamictite, Willard thrust system, Utah (USA): Implications for crustal rheology and strain softening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonkee, W. Adolph; Czeck, Dyanna M.; Nachbor, Amelia C.; Barszewski, Christine; Pantone, Spenser; Balgord, Elizabeth A.; Johnson, Kimberly R.

    2013-05-01

    Structural and geochemical patterns of heterogeneously deformed diamictite in northern Utah (USA) record interrelations between strain accumulation, fluid-rock interaction, and softening processes across a major fault (Willard thrust). Different clast types in the diamictite have varying shape fabrics related to competence contrasts with estimated effective viscosity ratios relative to micaceous matrix of: ˜6 and 8 for large quartzite clasts respectively in the Willard hanging wall and footwall; ˜5 and 2 for less altered and more altered granitic clasts respectively in the hanging wall and footwall; and ˜1 for micaceous clasts that approximate matrix strain. Within the footwall, matrix X-Z strain ratios increase from ˜2 to 8 westward along a distinct deformation gradient. Microstructures record widespread mass transfer, alteration of feldspar to mica, and dislocation creep of quartz within matrix and clasts. Fluid influx along microcracks and mesoscopic vein networks increased westward and led to reaction softening and hydrolytic weakening, in conjunction with textural softening from alignment of muscovite aggregates. Consistent Si, Al, and Ti concentrations between matrix, granitic clasts, and protoliths indicate limited volume change. Mg gain and Na loss reflect alteration of feldspar to phengitic muscovite. Within the hanging wall, strain is overall lower with matrix X-Z strain ratios of ˜2 to 4. Microstructures record mass transfer and dislocation creep concentrated in the matrix. Greater Al and Ti concentrations and lower Si concentrations in matrix indicate volume loss by quartz dissolution. Na gain in granitic clasts reflects albitization. Large granitic clasts have less mica alteration and greater competence compared to smaller clasts. Differences in strain and alteration patterns across the Willard thrust fault suggest overall downward (up-temperature) fluid flow in the hanging wall and upward (down-temperature) fluid flow in the footwall.

  10. Physical and Temporal Controls on Lower Crustal Melting and Mixing: Mass and Enthalpy Transport in Actively Growing Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufek, J. D.; Bergantz, G. W.

    2004-12-01

    The growth of continental crust in arc settings, as well as the thermal and compositional character of the crust, is ultimately dictated by the flux of basaltic magma from the mantle and the interaction between crustal and basaltic material. We present a quantitative assessment of the thermal and dynamic response of the lower crust to the intrusion of basaltic dike swarms in a two-dimensional, stochastic computational framework. We will examine the physical and temporal controls on crustal melting, mingling, and mixing as well as some of the major element, trace element, and U-series consequences of these lower crustal interactions. Distinct melting and mixing environments are predicted as a result of the crustal thickness, flux of basalt, and age of the arc system. Shallow crustal (approx. 30 km) environments and arc settings with low fluxes of mantle basalt are likely repositories of isolated pods of mantle and crustal melts in the lower crust, both converging on dacitic to rhyodacitic composition. These may be preferentially rejuvenated in subsequent intrusive episodes. Mature arc systems with thicker crust (approx. 50 km) produce higher crustal and residual basaltic melt fractions reaching approx. .4 for geologically reasonable basalt fluxes. The basaltic to basaltic-andesite composition of both crustal and mantle melts will readily mix as the network of dikes collapses and Reynolds numbers reach 10-4 to 1.0 in the interiors of dikes that have been breached by ascending crustal melts. This may provide one mechanism for MASH-like processes. Residual mineral assemblages of the crust thickened by repeated intrusion are predicted to be garnet pyroxenitic, which are denser than mantle peridotite and also generate convective instabilities where some of the crustal material is lost to the mantle. This reconciles the thinner than predicted crust in regions that have undergone flux of mantle basalt for a prolonged period of time, and helps explain the enrichment of

  11. Damping scaling factors for elastic response spectra for shallow crustal earthquakes in active tectonic regions: "average" horizontal component

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rezaeian, Sanaz; Bozorgnia, Yousef; Idriss, I.M.; Abrahamson, Norman; Campbell, Kenneth; Silva, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) for elastic response spectra are typically developed at a 5% viscous damping ratio. In reality, however, structural and nonstructural systems can have other damping ratios. This paper develops a new model for a damping scaling factor (DSF) that can be used to adjust the 5% damped spectral ordinates predicted by a GMPE for damping ratios between 0.5% to 30%. The model is developed based on empirical data from worldwide shallow crustal earthquakes in active tectonic regions. Dependencies of the DSF on potential predictor variables, such as the damping ratio, spectral period, ground motion duration, moment magnitude, source-to-site distance, and site conditions, are examined. The strong influence of duration is captured by the inclusion of both magnitude and distance in the DSF model. Site conditions show weak influence on the DSF. The proposed damping scaling model provides functional forms for the median and logarithmic standard deviation of DSF, and is developed for both RotD50 and GMRotI50 horizontal components. A follow-up paper develops a DSF model for vertical ground motion.

  12. Seismic evidence for an uplifted zone on regional mid-crustal ductile deformation beneath the Pinaleno Mountains core complex, Se Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, J.M. ); Johnson, R.A. . Dept. of Geosciences)

    1992-01-01

    An arch-like zone of seismic reflectivity is imaged below the Pinaleno Mountains (PM) core complex and adjacent basins in southeast Arizona. The apex of this reflective zone occurs at ca 1.9 s (4 km), and intersects the subsurface projection of a mylonite zone associated with a northeast-dipping detachment fault. The top of the reflective zone extends along the base of the interpreted detachment fault beneath the Safford basin to ca 5 s (15 km) below the Gila-Peloncillo Mountains, but separates from the detachment near the apex, dipping to the southwest and flattening at ca 4.8 s (13.5 km) beneath the relatively unextended upper crust of the Galiuro Mountains (GM). The top of the reflective zone is separated from the Eagle Pass detachment, which is interpreted to extend from a breakaway zone near the northeastern flank of the GM to exposures in the PM core complex. It is unclear where the base of the reflective zone occurs beneath the PM. The geometry of the top of the reflective zone near the apex appears similar to that of the mylonite front exposed in the Whipple Mountains of southeastern California and western Arizona. Thus, they may have a similar origin. The geometry and regional extent of the reflective zone, the location of its apex beneath the PM core complex, the position of the zone below the inferred detachment fault beneath the Safford basin, and the intersection of the zone with the subsurface projection of mylonites suggest that the zone of reflectivity represents a widespread, ductilely deformed region of middle and lower crust which probably originated below ca 4.8--5 s (13.5--15 km) as a result of mid-Tertiary and earlier deformation. Mid-Tertiary extension along a northeast-dipping detachment fault system may have thinned enough upper crust northeast of the GM to cause ca11 km of uplift of lower plate rocks when combined with other dynamic processes.

  13. Mechanics of dielectric elastomer-activated deformable transmission grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yin; Zhou, Jinxiong; Sun, Wenjie; Wu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Ling

    2014-09-01

    Laminating a thin layer of elastomeric grating on the surface of a prestretched dielectric elastomer (DE) membrane forms a basic design of electrically tunable transmission grating. We analyze the inhomogeneous deformation of a circular multiple-region configuration. Variation of the geometric and material parameters, as well as of the critical condition determined by loss of tension instability, is probed to aid the design of a DE-based deformable grating. The predicted changes in the grating period agree substantially with the experimental results reported by Aschwanden et al (Aschwanden et al 2007 IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 19 1090).

  14. Metamorphic Tectonites and Differential Exhumation Reveal 3D Nature of Extension and Lower Crustal Flow in the Active Woodlark Rift, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, T. A.; Baldwin, S. L.; Fitzgerald, P. G.; Monteleone, B. D.; Peters, K. J.

    2004-12-01

    The D'Entrecasteaux Islands metamorphic core complexes (MCCs) occur in the Woodlark rift, a continental region where ˜200 km of extension since ˜6 Ma has been focused into a relatively small number of normal faults, some dipping at <30° . Flow of a low viscosity lower crust on a time scale of <4 m.y. is evidenced by the narrow width of the rift zone, and the apparent large magnitude of extension (Beta ˜5) , as contrasted by observed relief on the Moho (<=10 km). Gneisses in the footwalls of MCCs, including retrogressed eclogites, have been exhumed from depths of ˜30 km since ˜3 Ma. Our structural and thermochronometric data covers parts of the D'Entrecasteaux MCCs, including Normanby Island. These are mantled by serpentinized ultramafic rocks of the Papuan ophiolite. Remnants of this upper plate are preserved along the margins of the MCCs. In underlying mylonites, exhumation-related fabrics, microstructures and quartz lattice preferred orientations reveal a regional pattern of lineations and top-north shear inconsistent with diapir tectonics. The gently dipping mylonites were later warped by uplift of the ˜30 km-wide domes, perhaps in response to magmatic underplating during intrusion of dolerite dikes and granodiorites at ˜2 Ma. Southward across Fergusson Island, muscovite Ar/Ar ages, increase by ˜2 m.y. along the detachment, suggesting footwall exhumation by top-to-the-north slip at >12 mm/yr. To the east, an MCC on eastern Normanby Island has top-north footwall mylonites that dip gently SW and that were exhumed during the Pliocene as part of a northward progression of normal faulting that did not arrive at the offshore Moresby Seamount until ˜1.2 Ma (ODP Leg 180 site), relationships that suggest a rolling-hinge style uplift. Importantly, its detachment exposes no rocks deeper than blueschist-facies. Ductile deformation fabrics in the MCCs reveal patterns of lower crustal motion that can be evaluated against seafloor spreading-derived plate motions

  15. Active Deformation in the Greater Himalayan Zone in Western Nepal from Inversion of New (U-Th)/He Cooling Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, J. E.; Burbank, D.

    2015-12-01

    Much of the central Himalaya features an abrupt rise in mean elevation from ~1.5 km in the Lesser Himalaya to ~4-5 km Greater Himalaya and Tibetan Plateau. This physiographic transition is known as PT2, and is often interpreted as the surface expression of transport over a ramp in the Main Himalayan Thrust (MHT). In western Nepal, however, the same rise in elevation occurs over two distinct topographic steps (PT2-N and PT2-S). In previous work, Harvey et al. (2015) argue that this anomalous topography is the result of recent southward-migration of mid-crustal deformation along the MHT. Due to the seismogenic potential of the MHT it is important to constrain its geometry in the western Nepal seismic gap, which has not had a large earthquake in over 600 years. To test the above hypothesis, we perform [U-Th]/He dating on 39 apatite and 47 zircon samples collected along seven relief transects throughout western Nepal. We constrain exhumation histories by inverting these new cooling ages with the 3-D thermo-kinematic model Pecube. Five transects collected from the Greater Himalaya north of PT2-N are best fit by relatively rapid exhumation rates (~1-2 km/Myr) since ~4 Ma. The other two, collected from farther south near PT2-S, require rapid (~1-2 km/Myr) exhumation until around 8-11 Ma, followed by much slower (~0.1-0.2 km/Myr) exhumation until at least the late Pliocene. Assuming that exhumation rates reflect uplift rates, the rapid Plio-Pleistocene exhumation in the Greater Himalaya north of PT2-N suggest that this physiographic transition is similar to that at the foot of the Greater Himalaya in central Nepal. It follows that active deformation is occurring along a NW-trend as much as 100 km farther north than would be expected if simply projecting PT2 across western Nepal. This finding is consistent with transport over a more northerly MHT ramp or perhaps oblique slip along the recently identified, surface-breaking WNFZ. Although the geomorphology and microseismicity

  16. Evolution of the Dharwar Craton: A terrain of early Archean crustal stability, long term orogenic cycles and large scale palaeobiological activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Naqvi, S. M.

    1988-01-01

    Traceable history of the Dharwar Craton goes back to approximately 3400 m.y. old tonalitic to trondhjemitic fundamental gneiss whose REE composition indicates its derivation from a preexisting basalt which apparently had very short time of crustal residence. The fundamental gneiss is preserved only as rare relicts in the vast gneissic complex of the Indian Peninsula (the Peninsular Gneiss), and as pebbles in the conglomerates of the Archean Dharwar sequence. Study of these relicts, shows evidence of a deformation episode prior to the deposition of the high- and low-grade Dharwar supracrustal sequence. The Dharwar supracrustal sequence is briefly described. Geochemistry of the volcanic and sedimentary rocks of the Dharwar supracrustal belts are examined.

  17. Shallow sediment and upper crustal structure beneath the Salton Sea as imaged by active source marine seismic refraction in conjunction with the Salton Seismic Imaging Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kell, A. M.; Sahakian, V. J.; Harding, A. J.; Kent, G.; Driscoll, N. W.

    2012-12-01

    In the spring of 2011 we expanded a campaign of marine seismic reflection efforts in the Salton Sea in conjunction with the Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) to collect active-source marine refraction data using Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBSs) and a marine airgun. The Salton Trough presents an opportunity to study rifting processes similar to those seen in the Gulf of California, as well as the seismic hazards associated with the southern terminus of the San Andreas Fault (SAF). An areal array, comprised of 78 OBS deployments, was focused in the southern part of the sea but also included a line parallel to the San Andreas Fault (SAF) , line 1, extending then length of the sea, and a line perpendicular to the SAF, crossing the northern basin, line 7. These lines are collinear with high-resolution reflection profiles and existing chirp profiles. The OBS array was concentrated in the southern Salton Sea to investigate the pull-apart deformation reported by Brothers et al. (2009). Using the methods of Van Avendonk (2004) we seek to constrain upper crustal velocities in this region by travel-time tomography. Beginning with P-wave arrival times we trace the ray paths through the model space and invert for seismic velocities. By iterating from the forward picking to the inversion, we reduce the chi-squared error to produce a 2D depth profile of the seismic velocities while maintaining a stable model. Line 1 uses 38 OBSs and 470 shots from a 210 cu. in. airgun to model the upper 4 km beneath the Salton Sea. Velocities vary from 1.5 km/s in the upper 1 km to an apparent 4 km deep basement velocity of 5.5 km/s. Velocity variations with depth agree with major boundaries in the co-linear seismic reflection profiles and the divergence toward the south/fault structure is also captured in these early models. Preliminary results for line 7 show similarly varying velocities - 1.5 to 3 km/s in the upper 2 kilometers of the crust, to slightly over 4 km/s at 4 km depth. Further

  18. Crustal Seismicity and Recent Faults in Southern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, C.; Comte, D.; Tavera, H.; Audin, L.; Herail, G.

    2004-12-01

    Most seismological studies in southern Peru have been focused on the downgoing slab seismicity in order to constrain the Wadati-Benioff zone. This study deals with the intra-continental seismicity of the southern Peru forearc (17,3° S - 18,5° S) in a post-seismic context (Arequipa thrust earthquake, Mw=8.4, 23 June, 2001). It is difficult to identify historical crustal earthquake from available catalogues, however some crustal events teleseismically recorded can be found since 1976; they exhibit normal focal mechanism solutions in the southern Peru volcanic arc and inverse focal mechanism solutions in the Central Depression. Following a notable increase of shallow crustal seismicity located close to the Western Cordillera after the 23 June 2001, a temporary seismic network was deployed between January and March 2003 in order to study the Wadati-Benioff zone and monitoring the crustal seismicity in southern Peru. From the about 1700 events locally recorded by the local network, 300 crustal earthquakes were identified in the Peruvian forearc between Tacna and Moquegua. This crustal seismicity is distributed along a lineament located at depths between 0 and 60 km, dipping at about 45° from the Western Cordillera towards the coast, almost perpendicular to the subducting slab; this behaviour was previously observed in northern Chile and in southern Peru, north of the study zone (16° S). In the Central Depression, seismic activity is not superficial occurring between 25-60 km depth and it is mostly characterized by inverse focal mechanism solutions. Superficial faults situated in the Central Depression and in the Coastal Cordillera can not be associated with the seismic activity observed in this area. However, in the Pre-Cordillera, crustal seismicity occurs at depths between 0-15 km and can be correlated with shallow fault systems recognized by satellite images and on the field. For examples, the Incapuquio fault system which was a transpressive system in Cretaceous

  19. Mouthpart deformities and nucleolus activity in field-collected Chironomus riparius larvae.

    PubMed

    Meregalli, G; Bettinetti, R; Pluymers, L; Vermeulen, A C; Rossaro, B; Ollevier, F

    2002-05-01

    Chironomid mouthpart deformities and aberrations of their polytenic chromosomes are sublethal responses to toxic stress. These endpoints have been used in several cases as bioindications for sediment pollution. In the present study we aimed to establish whether there was an association between mouthpart deformities and nucleolus activity in the polytenic chromosomes. Such information could be useful to gain insight into the mechanisms involved in the occurrence of mouthpart deformities and their consequences on the larvae. Third-instar larvae of Chironomus riparius were collected at a site downstream of a sewage treatment plant mostly contaminated by pesticides. Larvae were then raised in the laboratory in aquaria containing sediment and water from the study location. During a 16-day period, larvae ready to molt to the fourth instar were reared individually. Within a few hours of their molt, the larvae were preserved. The presence of mouthpart deformities (mentum, mandibles, and pecten epipharyngis) and the percentage of active nucleoli were assessed. Those larvae presenting mentum deformities had a significantly higher incidence of active nucleoli in their polytenic chromosomes than nondeformed larvae. Because a high number of active nucleoli generally indicates increased rRNA synthesis, deformed larvae seemed to exhibit a higher protein synthesis than normal individuals. The synthesis of additional proteins may increase deformed larva tolerance to toxicants. PMID:11994780

  20. Active fibers: matching deformable tract templates to diffusion tensor images.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Ilya; Shattuck, David W; Stein, Jason L; McMahon, Katie L; de Zubicaray, Greig; Wright, Margaret J; Thompson, Paul M; Toga, Arthur W

    2009-08-01

    Reliable quantitative analysis of white matter connectivity in the brain is an open problem in neuroimaging, with common solutions requiring tools for fiber tracking, tractography segmentation and estimation of intersubject correspondence. This paper proposes a novel, template matching approach to the problem. In the proposed method, a deformable fiber-bundle model is aligned directly with the subject tensor field, skipping the fiber tracking step. Furthermore, the use of a common template eliminates the need for tractography segmentation and defines intersubject shape correspondence. The method is validated using phantom DTI data and applications are presented, including automatic fiber-bundle reconstruction and tract-based morphometry.

  1. Creep cavitation bands control porosity and fluid flow in lower crustal shear zones

    SciTech Connect

    Menegon, Luca; Fusseis, Florian; Stunitz, Holger; Xiao, Xianghui

    2015-03-01

    Shear zones channelize fluid flow in Earth’s crust. However, little is known about deep crustal fluid migration and how fluids are channelized and distributed in a deforming lower crustal shear zone. This study investigates the deformation mechanisms, fluid-rock interaction, and development of porosity in a monzonite ultramylonite from Lofoten, northern Norway. The rock was deformed and transformed into an ultramylonite under lower crustal conditions (temperature = 700–730 °C, pressure = 0.65–0.8 GPa). The ultramylonite consists of feldspathic layers and domains of amphibole + quartz + calcite, which result from hydration reactions of magmatic clinopyroxene. The average grain size in both domains is <25 mm. Microstructural observations and electron backscatter diffraction analysis are consistent with diffusion creep as the dominant deformation mechanism in both domains. Festoons of isolated quartz grains define C'-type bands in feldspathic layers. These quartz grains do not show a crystallographic preferred orientation. The alignment of quartz grains is parallel to the preferred elongation of pores in the ultramylonites, as evidenced from synchrotron X-ray microtomography. Such C'-type bands are interpreted as creep cavitation bands resulting from diffusion creep deformation associated with grain boundary sliding. Mass-balance calculation indicates a 2% volume increase during the protolith-ultramylonite transformation, which is consistent with synkinematic formation of creep cavities producing dilatancy. Thus, this study presents evidence that creep cavitation bands may control deep crustal porosity and fluid flow. Nucleation of new phases in creep cavitation bands inhibits grain growth and enhances the activity of grain size–sensitive creep, thereby stabilizing strain localization in the polymineralic ultramylonites.

  2. Deformation of partially pumped active mirrors for high average-power diode-pumped solid-state lasers.

    PubMed

    Albach, Daniel; LeTouzé, Geoffroy; Chanteloup, Jean-Christophe

    2011-04-25

    We discuss the deformation of a partially pumped active mirror amplifier as a free standing disk, as implemented in several laser systems. We rely on the Lucia laser project to experimentally evaluate the analytical and numerical deformation models. PMID:21643092

  3. Crustal architecture and deep structure of the Ninetyeast Ridge hotspot trail from active-source ocean bottom seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevemeyer, I.; Flueh, E. R.; Reichert, C.; Bialas, J.; Kläschen, D.; Kopp, C.

    2001-02-01

    A 550-km-long transect across the Ninetyeast Ridge, a major Indian ocean hotspot trail, provided seismic refraction and wide-angle reflection data recorded on 60 ocean bottom instruments. About 24000 crustal and 15000 upper mantle arrivals have been picked and used to derive an image of the hotspot track. Two approaches have been chosen: (i) a first-arrival tomographic inversion yielding crustal properties; and (ii) forward modelling of mantle phases revealing the structure at the crust-mantle boundary region and of the uppermost mantle. Away from the volcanic edifice, seismic recordings show the typical phases from oceanic crust, that is, two crustal refraction branches (Pg), a wide-angle reflection from the crust-mantle boundary (PmP) and a wave group turning within the upper mantle (Pn). Approaching the edifice, three additional phases have been detected. We interpret these arrivals as a wide-angle reflection from the base of material trapped under the pre-hotspot crust (Pm2P) and as a wide-angle reflection (PnP) and its associated refraction branch (PN) from a layered upper mantle. The resulting models indicate normal oceanic crust to the west and east of the edifice. Crustal thickness averages 6.5-7km. Wide-angle reflections from both the pre-hotspot and the post-hotspot crust-mantle boundary suggest that the crust under the ridge has been bent downwards by loading the lithosphere, and hotspot volcanism has underplated the pre-existing crust with material characterized by seismic velocities intermediate between those of mafic lower crustal and ultramafic upper mantle rocks (7.5-7.6kms-1). In total, the crust is up to ~24km thick. The ratio between the volume of subcrustal plutonism forming the underplate and extrusive and intrusive volcanism forming the edifice is about 0.7. An important observation is that underplating continued to the east under the Wharton Basin. During the shield-building phase, however, Ninetyeast Ridge was located adjacent to the Broken

  4. Collaborative Research: Analysis and Interpretation of Multi-Scale Phenomena in Crustal Deformation Processes Using Numerical Simulations of Complex Nonlinear Earth Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rundle, John B.

    2004-12-31

    In both our past work and the work in progress we focused on understanding the physics and statistical patterns in earthquake faults and fault systems. Our approach had three key aspects. The first was to look for patterns of seismic activity in earthquake fault systems. The second was to understand the physics of a sequence of models for faults and fault systems that are increasingly more realistic. The third key element was to connect the two previous approaches by investigating specific properties found in models to see if they are indeed properties of real faults. A specific example of how this approach works can be seen in the following: In the papers discussed below, we demonstrated that the cellular automation (CA) versions of the slider block models with long range stress transfer are ergodic and could be described by a Boltzmann-Gibbs distribution in the meanfield limit. The ergodicity follows from the fact that the long range stress transfer makes the model meanfield. The meanfield nature of the CA models, generated by long range stress transfer, also allows a description of the CA models by a Langevin equation. The Langevin equation indicates that evolution of seismicity in the model over relatively short times is linear in time. This appears to be consistent with the success of a forecasting algorithm we have developed that is based on a linear evolution of seismicity patterns. This algorithm has had considerable success in that the regions of the Southern California fault system which have been predicted to have a higher probability of an event greater than magnitude 5 have consistently been the sites where such events occur. These two results have led to the question as to whether the Southern California fault system is ergodic and can be described by a Langevin equation like the model. To answer this question we ran a series of tests for ergodicity very much like the ones run on the models. Our results, which have been accepted for publication in

  5. An Integrated Crustal Dynamics Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, H. L.; Mora, P.

    2007-12-01

    Numerical modelling offers an outstanding opportunity to gain an understanding of the crustal dynamics and complex crustal system behaviour. This presentation provides our long-term and ongoing effort on finite element based computational model and software development to simulate the interacting fault system for earthquake forecasting. A R-minimum strategy based finite-element computational model and software tool, PANDAS, for modelling 3-dimensional nonlinear frictional contact behaviour between multiple deformable bodies with the arbitrarily-shaped contact element strategy has been developed by the authors, which builds up a virtual laboratory to simulate interacting fault systems including crustal boundary conditions and various nonlinearities (e.g. from frictional contact, materials, geometry and thermal coupling). It has been successfully applied to large scale computing of the complex nonlinear phenomena in the non-continuum media involving the nonlinear frictional instability, multiple material properties and complex geometries on supercomputers, such as the South Australia (SA) interacting fault system, South California fault model and Sumatra subduction model. It has been also extended and to simulate the hot fractured rock (HFR) geothermal reservoir system in collaboration of Geodynamics Ltd which is constructing the first geothermal reservoir system in Australia and to model the tsunami generation induced by earthquakes. Both are supported by Australian Research Council.

  6. Cyprus Crustal Study Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, James M.

    The Cyprus Crustal Study Project is a joint venture of the International Crustal Research Drilling Group (ICRDG) and the Government of Cyprus through its Geological Survey Department. The aim of the project is to carry out a detailed reexamination of the Troodos, Cyprus, ophiolite, using high speed diamond drilling combined with extensive surface geological and geophysical studies. The ICRDG group, comprising about 100 geoscientists from eight countries, includes many participants familiar with ophiolites and with in situ ocean crust through work from Glomar Challenger, thus allowing the ophiolite to be viewed from a new perspective.Studies are being concentrated on a section through the north flank of the ophiolite between the villages of Agrokipia and Palekhori. Research drilling and associated mapping in this segment are aimed at providing a continuous sample through the upper 4 km of the ophiolite and at sampling the stockworks beneath the sulfide deposits located within the extrusive section. The Troodos massive sulfide deposits are considered to be close analogs of the deposited being formed by active hydrothermal circulation on the crest of the East Pacific Rise.

  7. Preliminary atlas of active shallow tectonic deformation in the Puget Lowland, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnett, Elizabeth A.; Haugerud, Ralph A.; Sherrod, Brian L.; Weaver, Craig S.; Pratt, Thomas L.; Blakely, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    This atlas presents an up-to-date map compilation of the geological and geophysical observations that underpin interpretations of active, surface-deforming faults in the Puget Lowland, Washington. Shallow lowland faults are mapped where observations of deformation from paleoseismic, seismic-reflection, and potential-field investigations converge. Together, results from these studies strengthen the identification and characterization of regional faults and show that as many as a dozen shallow faults have been active during the Holocene. The suite of maps presented in our atlas identifies sites that have evidence of deformation attributed to these shallow faults. For example, the paleoseismic-investigations map shows where coseismic surface rupture and deformation produced geomorphic scarps and deformed shorelines. Other maps compile results of seismic-reflection and potential-field studies that demonstrate evidence of deformation along suspected fault structures in the subsurface. Summary maps show the fault traces derived from, and draped over, the datasets presented in the preceding maps. Overall, the atlas provides map users with a visual overview of the observations and interpretations that support the existence of active, shallow faults beneath the densely populated Puget Lowland.

  8. PMCA activity and membrane tubulin affect deformability of erythrocytes from normal and hypertensive human subjects.

    PubMed

    Monesterolo, Noelia E; Nigra, Ayelen D; Campetelli, Alexis N; Santander, Verónica S; Rivelli, Juan F; Arce, Carlos A; Casale, Cesar H

    2015-11-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated formation of a complex between acetylated tubulin and brain plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA), and the effect of the lipid environment on structure of this complex and on PMCA activity. Deformability of erythrocytes from hypertensive human subjects was reduced by an increase in membrane tubulin content. In the present study, we examined the regulation of PMCA activity by tubulin in normotensive and hypertensive erythrocytes, and the effect of exogenously added diacylglycerol (DAG) and phosphatidic acid (PA) on erythrocyte deformability. Some of the key findings were that: (i) PMCA was associated with tubulin in normotensive and hypertensive erythrocytes, (ii) PMCA enzyme activity was directly correlated with erythrocyte deformability, and (iii) when tubulin was present in the erythrocyte membrane, treatment with DAG or PA led to increased deformability and associated PMCA activity. Taken together, our findings indicate that PMCA activity is involved in deformability of both normotensive and hypertensive erythrocytes. This rheological property of erythrocytes is affected by acetylated tubulin and its lipid environment because both regulate PMCA activity.

  9. 2012 ROCK DEFORMATION: FEEDBACK PROCESSES IN ROCK DEFORMATION GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, AUGUST 19-24, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Kelemen, Peter

    2012-08-24

    Topics covered include: Failure At High Confining Pressure; Fluid-assisted Slip, Earthquakes & Fracture; Reaction-driven Cracking; Fluid Transport, Deformation And Reaction; Localized Fluid Transport And Deformation; Earthquake Mechanisms; Subduction Zone Dynamics And Crustal Growth.

  10. Active upper crust deformation pattern along the southern edge of the Tyrrhenian subduction zone (NE Sicily): Insights from a multidisciplinary approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palano, Mimmo; Schiavone, Domenico; Loddo, Mariano; Neri, Marco; Presti, Debora; Quarto, Ruggiero; Totaro, Cristina; Neri, Giancarlo

    2015-08-01

    Using a multidisciplinary dataset based on gravimetric, seismic, geodetic and geological observations, we provide an improved picture of the shallow structure and dynamics of the southern edge of the Tyrrhenian subduction zone. With a local earthquake tomography we clearly identify two main crustal domains in the upper 15 km characterized by different P-wave velocity values: a high-velocity domain comprising southeasternmost Tyrrhenian Sea, NE Sicily and Messina Straits, and a low-velocity domain comprising Mt. Etna and eastern Sicily. The transition between the two domains shows a good spatial correspondence with a wider set of faults including the Taormina Fault System (TFS) and the Aeolian-Tindari-Letojanni Fault System (ATLFS), two nearly SE-striking fault systems crossing northeastern Sicily and ending on the Ionian shoreline of Sicily according to many investigators. Within this set of faults, most of the deformation/seismicity occurs along the northern and central segments of ATLFS, compared to low activity along TFS. A lack of seismicity (both recent and historical) is observed in the southern sector of ATLFS where, however, geodetic data reveal significant deformation. Our multidisciplinary dataset including offshore observations suggests the southeastward continuation of the ATLFS into the Ionian Sea until joining with the faults cutting the Ionian accretionary wedge described in the recent literature. Our findings imply the existence of a highly segmented crustal shear zone extending from the Aeolian Islands to the Ionian Abyssal plain, that we believe plays the role of accommodating differential motion between the Southern Tyrrhenian unit and the western compressional domain of Sicily. The ATLFS, which is a main part of the inferred shear zone, behaves similarly to what often observed at the edges of retreating subduction slabs, where the overriding plate drifts with a highly non-uniform transform motion along the lateral borders.

  11. Tectonic activity as a significant source of crustal tetrafluoromethane emissions to the atmosphere: Observations in groundwaters along the San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeds, Daniel A.; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Mühle, Jens; Weiss, Ray F.

    2015-02-01

    Tetrafluoromethane (CF4) concentrations were measured in 14 groundwater samples from the Cuyama Valley, Mil Potrero and Cuddy Valley aquifers along the Big Bend section of the San Andreas Fault System (SAFS) in California to assess whether tectonic activity in this region is a significant source of crustal CF4 to the atmosphere. Dissolved CF4 concentrations in all groundwater samples but one were elevated with respect to estimated recharge concentrations including entrainment of excess air during recharge (Cre; ∼30 fmol kg-1 H2O), indicating subsurface addition of CF4 to these groundwaters. Groundwaters in the Cuyama Valley contain small CF4 excesses (0.1-9 times Cre), which may be attributed to an in situ release from weathering and a minor addition of deep crustal CF4 introduced to the shallow groundwater through nearby faults. CF4 excesses in groundwaters within 200 m of the SAFS are larger (10-980 times Cre) and indicate the presence of a deep crustal flux of CF4 that is likely associated with the physical alteration of silicate minerals in the shear zone of the SAFS. Extrapolating CF4 flux rates observed in this study to the full extent of the SAFS (1300 km × 20-100 km) suggests that the SAFS potentially emits (0.3- 1) ×10-1 kg CF4 yr-1 to the Earth's surface. For comparison, the chemical weathering of ∼ 7.5 ×104km2 of granitic rock in California is estimated to release (0.019- 3.2) ×10-1 kg CF4 yr-1. Tectonic activity is likely an important, and potentially the dominant, driver of natural emissions of CF4 to the atmosphere. Variations in preindustrial atmospheric CF4 as observed in paleo-archives such as ice cores may therefore represent changes in both continental weathering and tectonic activity, including changes driven by variations in continental ice cover during glacial-interglacial transitions.

  12. Preferred orientation in experimentally deformed stishovite: implications for deformation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaercher, P. M.; Zepeda-Alarcon, E.; Prakapenka, V.; Kanitpanyacharoen, W.; Smith, J.; Sinogeikin, S. V.; Wenk, H. R.

    2014-12-01

    The crystal structure of the high pressure SiO2 polymorph stishovite has been studied in detail, yet little is known about its deformation mechanisms. Information about how stishovite deforms under stress is important for understanding subduction of quartz-bearing crustal rocks into the mantle. Particularly, stishovite is elastically anisotropic and thus development of crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) during deformation may contribute to seismic anomalies in the mantle. We converted a natural sample of flint to stishovite in a laser heated diamond anvil cell and compressed the stishovite aggregate up to 38 GPa. Diffraction patterns were collected in situ in radial geometry at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and the Advanced Photon Source (APS) to examine development of CPO during deformation. We find that (001) poles preferentially align with the compression direction and infer deformation mechanisms leading to the observed CPO with visco-plastic self consistent (VPSC) polycrystal plasticity models. Our results show pyramidal and basal slip are most likely active at high pressure and ambient temperature, in agreement with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of rutile (TiO2) and paratellurite (TeO2), which are isostructural to stishovite. Conversely other TEM studies of stishovite done at higher temperature suggest dominant prismatic slip. This indicates that a variety of slip systems may be active in stishovite, depending on conditions. As a result, stishovite's contribution to the seismic signature in the mantle may vary as a function of pressure and temperature and thus depth.

  13. The interpretation of crustal dynamics data in terms of plate interactions and active tectonics of the Anatolian Plate and surrounding regions in the Middle East

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toksoz, M. Nafi

    1987-01-01

    The primary effort in this study during the past year has been directed along two separate lines: (1) expanding finite element models to include the entire Anatolian plate, the Aegean Sea and the Northeastern Mediterranean Sea, and (2) investigating the relationship between fault geometry and earthquake activity for the North Anatolian and similar strike-slip faults (e.g., San Andreas Fault). Both efforts are designed to provide an improved basis for interpreting the Crustal Dynamics measurements NASA has planned for this region. The initial phases of both investigations have been completed and the results are being prepared for publication. These investigations are described briefly.

  14. The role of mechanical heterogeneities in evaporite sequence during deformation initiated by basement fault activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamuszek, Marta; Dabrowski, Marcin; Burliga, Stanisław

    2016-04-01

    Kłodawa Salt Structure (KSS) situated in the centre of the Polish Zechstein Basin started to rise above a basement fault in the Early Triassic. Geological studies of the KSS revealed significant differences in the deformation patterns between the PZ1-PZ2 (intensely deformed) and PZ3-PZ4 (less deformed) cycle evaporites. These two older and two younger cycle evaporite complexes are separated by the thick Main Anhydrite (A3) bed. We use numerical simulations to assess the impact of a thick anhydrite bed on intrasalt deformation. In our models, the overburden consists of clastic sediments. A normal fault located in the rigid basement beneath the salt is activated due to model extension. At the same time, the sedimentation process takes place. The evaporites consist of a salt bed intercalated with a thick anhydrite layer of varying position and geometry. To understand the role of anhydrite layer, we run comparative simulations, in which no anhydrite layer is present. In the study, we use our own numerical codes implemented in MATLAB combined with the MILAMIN and MUTILS numerical packages. Our investigations revealed a significant influence of the anhydrite on deformation style in the evaporate series. The supra-anhydrite domain is characterized by weaker deformation and lower rates of salt flow in comparison to the sub-anhydrite domain. The highest contrast in the rate of salt flow between the two domains is observed in the case of the anhydrite layer situated close to the bottom of the salt complex. The thick anhydrite layer additionally diminishes the deformation rate in the supra-anhydrite domain and can lead to detachment of the basement deformation from its overlay. Our numerical simulations showed that the presence of the A3 Main Anhydrite bed could be the dominant factor responsible for the decoupling of deformation in the KSS salt complex.

  15. Identification and Active Exploration of Deformable Object Boundary Constraints through Robotic Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Boonvisut, Pasu; Cavusoglu, M. Cenk

    2014-01-01

    Robotic motion planning algorithms for manipulation of deformable objects, such as in medical robotics applications, rely on accurate estimations of object deformations that occur during manipulation. An estimation of the tissue response (for off-line planning or real-time on-line re-planning), in turn, requires knowledge of both object constitutive parameters and boundary constraints. In this paper, a novel algorithm for estimating boundary constraints of deformable objects from robotic manipulation data is presented. The proposed algorithm uses tissue deformation data collected with a vision system, and employs a multi-stage hill climbing procedure to estimate the boundary constraints of the object. An active exploration technique, which uses an information maximization approach, is also proposed to extend the identification algorithm. The effects of uncertainties on the proposed methods are analyzed in simulation. The results of experimental evaluation of the methods are also presented. PMID:25684836

  16. Crustal shear velocity structure in the Southern Lau Basin constrained by seafloor compliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Yang; Webb, Spahr C.

    2016-05-01

    Seafloor morphology and crustal structure vary significantly in the Lau back-arc basin, which contains regions of island arc formation, rifting, and seafloor spreading. We analyze seafloor compliance: deformation under long period ocean wave forcing, at 30 ocean bottom seismometers to constrain crustal shear wave velocity structure along and across the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC). Velocity models obtained through Monte Carlo inversion of compliance data show systematic variation of crustal structure in the basin. Sediment thicknesses range from zero thickness at the ridge axis to 1400 m near the volcanic arc. Sediment thickness increases faster to the east than to the west of the ELSC, suggesting a more abundant source of sediment near the active arc volcanoes. Along the ELSC, upper crustal velocities increase from the south to the north where the ridge has migrated farther away from the volcanic arc front. Along the axial ELSC, compliance analysis did not detect a crustal low-velocity body, indicating less melt in the ELSC crustal accretion zone compared to the fast spreading East Pacific Rise. Average upper crust shear velocities for the older ELSC crust produced when the ridge was near the volcanic arc are 0.5-0.8 km/s slower than crust produced at the present-day northern ELSC, consistent with a more porous extrusive layer. Crust in the western Lau Basin, which although thought to have been produced through extension and rifting of old arc crust, is found to have upper crustal velocities similar to older oceanic crust produced at the ELSC.

  17. Constraining deformation history and recent activity along the Tuz Gölü fault zone, Central Anatolia, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krystopowicz, N. J.; Schoenbohm, L. M.; Cosca, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    The 200 km long, dextral, transtensive Tuz Gölü fault zone is a prominent northwest-striking feature in Central Anatolia. It is one of the most significant structures in Central Anatolia in that it lies within the transition zone between the Western Anatolian Extensional Province and the Eastern Anatolian Contractional Province; its study therefore offers valuable insight into how Central Anatolia is affected by lateral extrusion related to collision in the east, and gravitational pull forces associated with subduction in the west. Proposals for the initiation of the Tuz Gölü fault zone range from Cretaceous to Neogene times, and the amount of recent activity along this fault system remains poorly constrained. Furthermore, potential basinward migration of deformation into the Tuz Gölü basin poses the question as to whether or not this fault system is active in the Holocene. Previous work suggests that migration of deformation towards the basin interior may be related to lithospheric-scale processes such as plateau development, microplate extrusion, or the onset of crustal thinning associated with slab-tear propagation in subducting African lithosphere. In this study, we use a combination of paleostress and morpho-tectonic analysis to further delineate the segmentation and present activity of the Tuz Gölü fault zone. Paleostress analysis offers insight into the deformation history of the region as well as the modern-day stress regime. We conducted a morphometric analysis of over 300 drainage basins along the range-front, which reveal variations that characterize the unique development of numerous fault strands in the region. Statistical analysis of hypsometric curves, systematic variation in basin morphology and orientation, as well as changes in mountain-front sinuosity reveal fault segmentation. Additionally, field mapping and Ar-Ar dating of offset lava flows from the Hasan Dag Volcano quantitatively constrain slip-rates in the southeastern portion of the

  18. Detection and Analysis of Deep Seated Gravitational Slope Deformation and Relations with the Active Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moro, M.; Saroli, M.; Lancia, M.; Albano, M.; Lo Sardo, L.; Stramondo, S.

    2015-12-01

    Modern geomorphological investigations focused on the definition of major factors conditioning the landscape evolution. The interaction of some of these factors as the litho-structural setting, the local relief, the tectonic activity, the climatic conditions and the seismicity plays a key-role in determining large scale slope instability phenomena which display the general morphological features of deep seated gravitational deformations (DSGD). The present work aims to detect the large scale gravitational deformation and relations with the active tectonics affecting the Abruzzo Region and to provide a description of the morphologic features of the deformations by means of aerial photograph interpretation, geological/geomorphological field surveys and DInSAR data. The investigated areas are morphologically characterized by significant elevation changes due to the presence of high mountain peaks, separated from surrounding depressed areas by steep escarpments, frequently represented by active faults. Consequently, relief energy favours the development of gravity-driven deformations. These deformations seem to be superimposed on and influenced by the inherited structural and tectonic pattern, related to the sin- and post-thrusting evolution. The morphological evidences of these phenomena, are represented by landslides, sackungen or rock-flows, lateral spreads and block slides. DInSAR analysis measured deformation of the large scale gravitative phenomena previously identified through aerial-photo analysis. DSGD may evolve in rapid, catastrophic mass movements and this paroxistic evolution of the deformations may be triggered by high magnitude seismic events. These assumptions point out the great importance of mapping in detail large scale slope instability phenomena in relation to the active faults, in a perspective of land-use planning such as the Abruzzo Region characterized by a high magnitude historical seismicity.

  19. Active zone impact on deformation state of non-rigid pavement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandula, Ján

    2014-06-01

    The paper deals with the design of non-rigid pavement, with emphasis on the effect of active zone on its deformation state. The concepts of determination of active zone are described. The results of numerical modelling of pavement laying on elastic subgrade are presented in the paper

  20. Two-layer Crustal Structure of the Contiguous United States from Joint Inversion of USArray Receiver Functions and Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, X.; Lowry, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    The composition and thickness of crustal layering is fundamental to understanding the evolution and dynamics of continental lithosphere. Lowry and Pérez-Gussinyé (2011) found that the western Cordillera of the United States, characterized by active deformation and high heat flow, is strongly correlated with low bulk crustal seismic velocity ratio. They interpreted this observation as evidence that quartz controls continental tectonism and deformation. We will present new imaging of two-layer crustal composition and structure from cross-correlation of observed receiver functions and model synthetics. The cross-correlation coefficient of the two-layer model increases significantly relative to an assumed one-layer model, and the lower crustal thickness map from raw two-layer modeling (prior to Bayesian filtering with gravity models and Optimal Interpolation) clearly shows Colorado plateau and Appalachian boundaries, which are not apparent in upper crustal models, and also the high vP/vS fill the most of middle continental region while low vP/vS are on the west and east continental edge. In the presentation, we will show results of a new algorithm for joint Bayesian inversion of thickness and vP/vS of two-layer continental crustal structure. Recent thermodynamical modeling of geophysical models based on lab experiment data (Guerri et al., 2015) found that a large impedance contrast can be expected in the midcrust due to a phase transition that decreases plagioclase and increases clinopyroxene, without invoking any change in crustal chemistry. The depth of the transition depends on pressure, temperature and hydration, and in this presentation we will compare predictions of layer thicknesses and vP/vS predicted by mineral thermodynamics to those we observe in the USArray footprint.

  1. Cyclic mechanical deformation stimulates human lung fibroblast proliferation and autocrine growth factor activity.

    PubMed

    Bishop, J E; Mitchell, J J; Absher, P M; Baldor, L; Geller, H A; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Hamblin, M J; Vacek, P; Low, R B

    1993-08-01

    Cellular hypertrophy and hyperplasia and increased extracellular matrix deposition are features of tissue hypertrophy resulting from increased work load. It is known, for example, that mechanical forces play a critical role in lung development, cardiovascular remodeling following pressure overload, and skeletal muscle growth. The mechanisms involved in these processes, however, remain unclear. Here we examined the effect of mechanical deformation on fibroblast function in vitro. IMR-90 human fetal lung fibroblasts grown on collagen-coated silastic membranes were subjected to cyclical mechanical deformation (10% increase in culture surface area; 1 Hz) for up to 5 days. Cell number was increased by 39% after 2 days of deformation (1.43 +/- .01 x 10(5) cells/membrane compared with control, 1.03 +/- 0.02 x 10(5) cells; mean +/- SEM; P < 0.02) increasing to 163% above control by 4 days (2.16 +/- 0.16 x 10(5) cells compared with 0.82 +/- 0.03 x 10(5) cells; P < 0.001). The medium from mechanically deformed cells was mitogenic for IMR-90 cells, with maximal activity in the medium from cells mechanically deformed for 2 days (stimulating cell replication by 35% compared with media control; P < 0.002). These data suggest that mechanical deformation stimulates human lung fibroblast replication and that this effect is mediated by the release of autocrine growth factors.

  2. Slip-rate Estimation of Active Fault by Luminescence Dating on Deformed River Terraces at Tsaotun, Central Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Chen, W.; Lee, C.

    2003-12-01

    This study carried out luminescence ages of the deformed terraces located at Tsaotun in central Taiwan. These terraces are considered as a result of crustal deformation caused by recent activity of the Chelungpu fault, 1999 surface rupture. Since this active fault runs through urban area, it is urgently needed to figure out its neotectonic behavior, including slip-rate and recurrence interval. Based on new ages, we also discuss the terrace correlation and its related structures. The study terraces are all strath terraces with only a few meters of veneered fluvial deposits on top. Due to the strong stream-power, nearly all the outcrops are dominated by fluvial cobbles, which is worst condition to preserve the syndepositional carbonaceous materials. Alternatively, optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating uses sandy quartz as the material and even has longer dating upper limit (up to several hundreds of years). Fortunately, sandy layer are found intercalated within the fluvial cobbles in studying terraces. We adopted the Single-Aliquot Regenerative (SAR) dose protocol on large aliquots of 90-150μ m quartz, which were cleaned using HCL, H2O2 and HF in the usual way. In case of incomplete bleaching during quick deposition, the OSL/TL ratio was adopted to approach the true De. Dosimetry is derived by ICP-MS and XRF analyses. For ascertainment of the initial bleaching of fluvial sediment, the modern samples collected in river bed of Wuhsi were also measured. Based on the results of modern samples, we believe that the residuals are inevitable in younger sediments, especially along the upper stream. On the contrary, the samples older than 10 kyr are little influenced due to the larger age error than the younger ones. The OSL age of the terrace samples in the hanging wall is dated ca. 13 kyr, which has been corrected for poorly-bleaching problem. Comparing to the ages collected down hole in the footwalls, we found out vertical displacements of ca. 67 and 37 m, has been

  3. Patterns of brittle deformation under extension on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neumann, G. A.; Zuber, M. T.

    1994-01-01

    The development of fractures at regular length scales is a widespread feature of Venusian tectonics. Models of lithospheric deformation under extension based on non-Newtonian viscous flow and brittle-plastic flow develop localized failure at preferred wavelengths that depend on lithospheric thickness and stratification. The characteristic wavelengths seen in rift zones and tessera can therefore provide constraints on crustal and thermal structure. Analytic solutions were obtained for growth rates in infinitesimal perturbations imposed on a one-dimensional, layered rheology. Brittle layers were approximated by perfectly-plastic, uniform strength, overlying ductile layers exhibiting thermally-activated power-law creep. This study investigates the formation of faults under finite amounts of extension, employing a finite-element approach. Our model incorporates non-linear viscous rheology and a Coulomb failure envelope. An initial perturbation in crustal thickness gives rise to necking instabilities. A small amount of velocity weakening serves to localize deformation into planar regions of high strain rate. Such planes are analogous to normal faults seen in terrestrial rift zones. These 'faults' evolve to low angle under finite extension. Fault spacing, orientation and location, and the depth to the brittle-ductile transition, depend in a complex way on lateral variations in crustal thickness. In general, we find that multiple wavelengths of deformation can arise from the interaction of crustal and mantle lithosphere.

  4. Continuous monitoring of soil CO2 flux in tectonic active area of Sicily: relationship between gas emissions and crustal stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camarda, Marco; De Gregorio, Sofia; Favara, Rocco; Di Martino, Roberto M. R.

    2015-04-01

    Tectonic active areas are subjected to continue modification of the stress fields as result of the relative movement of portions of the crust. In these areas the stress generated the seismogenetic processes and at same time produces detectable modifications in the shallower portion of the crust such as superficial deformation, increase or decrease of pore pressure and change in fluids circulation. As results a wide variety of changes can be recorded in several parameters due to stress field modifications. The aim of this study was to monitor in continuous soil gas emissions of selected tectonic active area of the Sicily in order to investigate the relation between changes on this parameter and stress field modifications linked to seismogenetic processes. For this reason, in cooperation with DPC Sicilia a network of 20 stations for continuous monitoring of soil CO2 flux in the main seismic area of Sicily was deployed. The selection of the monitoring sites was based on a detailed geological structural study aimed to recognize active tectonic structures and on geochemical survey for identifying areas of anomalous degassing along the structures. Time series of soil CO2 flux long from 1 to 3 years were obtained. The acquired series were filtered for removing atmospheric parameters induced variations by applying the fast Fourier transform (FFT) and regression analysis.The results of comparison of filtered signals showed as almost all the stations have a low coefficient correlation, indicating that the recorded variations are likely due to minor stress modification having small spatial scale. A discrete correlation was founded between the signals of three stations placed in the same tectonic context in northeastern sector of Sicily. Interesting these stations showed a contemporary steep increase few days before the onset of seismic sequence, with events of magnitude up to 4.4, occurred in August 2013 in the northeastern Sicily. The concomitance of change in soil CO2 flux

  5. Detection of crustal strains in Egypt using GPS networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, S. M.

    2003-04-01

    DETECTION OF CRUSTAL STRAINS IN EGYPT USING GPS NETWORKS S.M. Mahmoud National Research Institute of Astronomy and Geophysics (NRIAG), Helwan, Cairo, Egypt. Fax: 202 554 80 20 Email: salahm55@yahoo.com Abstract. Studies of crustal deformation in Egypt started as early as 1983 following the occurrence of Aswan earthquake in 1981. Several publications were published and presented in local and international meetings. On November 14, 1981 an earthquake with magnitude 5.6 occurred at kalabsha fault, 70-Km southwest of Aswan City. This earthquake is considered as an important event as it is located not far from the Aswan High Dam. Therefore, the first program for monitoring crustal deformation has been started in Kalabsha area during the winter of 1983 with the cooperation between the National Research Institute of Astronomy and Geophysics (NRIAG) and the Aswan &High Dam Authority. A local network of 18 terrestrial geodetic points was established at kalabsha area in 1983 in order to monitor the horizontal and vertical crustal movements along Kalabsha fault. The initial measurements were carried out in December 1984. These measurements were repeated twice a year till December 1994.An other terrestrial network were established at seiyal fault, 15 km to the north of kalabsha fault. The initial measurements of seiyal network were carried out in March 1989 and repeated twice a year till August 1992. Analysis of the terrestrial horizontal measurements from both networks for the epoch from December 1984 till December 1994 indicated significant deformations varying from 3x10-6 to 7x10-6. Since the year of 1994 till now, the geodetic observations by means of Space Techniques which known as Global Positioning System (GPS) were applied instead of the Terrestrial ones to cover some other regions of the country. Data adjustment and analysis of the reapted GPS campaigns from the different networks prevailed significant movements which helps in more understanding the geodynamics of

  6. Estimating Active Layer Thickness from Remotely Sensed Surface Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Schaefer, K. M.; Zhang, T.; Wahr, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    We estimate active layer thickness (ALT) from remotely sensed surface subsidence during thawing seasons derived from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) measurements. Ground ice takes up more volume than ground water, so as the soil thaws in summer and the active layer deepens, the ground subsides. The volume of melted ground water during the summer thaw determines seasonal subsidence. ALT is defined as the maximum thaw depth at the end of a thawing season. By using InSAR to measure surface subsidence between the start and end of summer season, one can estimate the depth of thaw over a large area (typically 100 km by 100 km). We developed an ALT retrieval algorithm integrating InSAR-derived surface subsidence, observed soil texture, organic matter content, and moisture content. We validated this algorithm in the continuous permafrost area on the North Slope of Alaska. Based on InSAR measurements using ERS-1/2 SAR data, our estimated values match in situ measurements of ALT within 1--10 cm at Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) sites within the study area. The active layer plays a key role in land surface processes in cold regions. Current measurements of ALT using mechanical probing, frost/thaw tubes, or inferred from temperature measurements are of high quality, but limited in spatial coverage. Using InSAR to estimate ALT greatly expands the spatial coverage of ALT observations.

  7. The Mendocino crustal conveyor: Making and breaking the California crust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Furlong, K.P.; Lock, J.; Guzofski, C.; Whitlock, J.; Benz, H.

    2003-01-01

    The northward migration of the Mendocino triple junction has resulted in a fundamental modification of the crust of coastal California. As a consequence of viscous coupling between the southern edge of the Gorda slab and the base of the North American crust beneath the Coast Ranges of central and northern California, the crust of coastal California was first thickened and then thinned. This viscous coupling and ephemeral crustal thickening has produced a distinctive pattern of uplift that allows us to map the three-dimensional extent of crustal modification. This pattern of crustal deformation has combined with the strain field of the developing San Andreas fault system to produce the observed pattern of near-surface deformation. The rapid rise in heat flow south of the triple junction observed in the northern Coast Ranges is a direct consequence of development and removal of the crustal welt that migrated with the triple junction.

  8. A deformable lung tumor tracking method in fluoroscopic video using active shape models: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qianyi; Hamilton, Russell J; Schowengerdt, Robert A; Jiang, Steve B

    2007-09-01

    A dynamic multi-leaf collimator (DMLC) can be used to track a moving target during radiotherapy. One of the major benefits for DMLC tumor tracking is that, in addition to the compensation for tumor translational motion, DMLC can also change the aperture shape to conform to a deforming tumor projection in the beam's eye view. This paper presents a method that can track a deforming lung tumor in fluoroscopic video using active shape models (ASM) (Cootes et al 1995 Comput. Vis. Image Underst. 61 38-59). The method was evaluated by comparing tracking results against tumor projection contours manually edited by an expert observer. The evaluation shows the feasibility of using this method for precise tracking of lung tumors with deformation, which is important for DMLC-based real-time tumor tracking.

  9. Active range of motion outcomes after reconstruction of burned wrist and hand deformities.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Ahmed M; Mahboub, Tarek A; Ibrahim Fouad, Amr; Azari, Kodi; Khalil, Haitham H; McCarthy, James E

    2016-06-01

    This works aim is to evaluate the efficacy of skin grafts and flaps in reconstruction of post-burn hand and wrist deformities. A prospective study of 57 burn contractures of the wrist and dorsum of the hand was performed. Flaps were used only if there was a non-vascularized structure after contracture release, otherwise a skin graft was used. Active range of motion (ROM) was used to assess hand function. The extension deformity cohort uniformly underwent skin graft following contracture release with a mean improvement of 71 degrees (p<0.0001). The flexion deformity cohort was treated with either skin grafts (8 patients) or flaps (9 patients) with a mean improvement of 44 degrees (p<0.0001). Skin grafts suffice for dorsal hand contractures to restore functional wrist ROM. For flexion contractures, flaps were more likely for contractures >6 months. Early release of burn contracture is advisable to avoid deep structure contracture.

  10. Use of polyurethane foam deformation sensor to record respiratory activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredov, V. I.; Baranov, V. S.

    1980-05-01

    The sensor developed has some substantial advantages over other known types. It is highly sensitive over a wide range of strain loads. The level of the output signal is linearly related to the force exerted on it, and it is sufficient for direct recording without using amplifiers of electric signals. The sensor is based on elastic, spongy material, polyurethane foam (porolon) with current-conducting material on the pore surface, current-conducting carbon black or electrode paste. The elastic properties of the sensor are built in the actual base of the strain-sensitive element, which simplifies the construction substantially and increases the reliability of the unit. In order to test the possibility of using this sensor to examine respiratory function, human pneumograms were recorded with the subject in a calm state along with the respiratory activity of experimental animals (dogs). Samples of the respiratory curve are shown. The simplicity of design of the sensor makes it possible to use it in various physiological experiments.

  11. Tectonic activity as a significant source of crustal tetrafluoromethane emissions to the atmosphere: observations in groundwaters along the San Andreas Fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deeds, Daniel A.; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Muhle, Jens; Weiss, Ray F.

    2015-01-01

    Tetrafluoromethane (CF4) concentrations were measured in 14 groundwater samples from the Cuyama Valley, Mil Potrero and Cuddy Valley aquifers along the Big Bend section of the San Andreas Fault System (SAFS) in California to assess whether tectonic activity in this region is a significant source of crustal CF4 to the atmosphere. Dissolved CF4 concentrations in all groundwater samples but one were elevated with respect to estimated recharge concentrations including entrainment of excess air during recharge (CreCre; ∼30 fmol kg−1 H2O), indicating subsurface addition of CF4 to these groundwaters. Groundwaters in the Cuyama Valley contain small CF4 excesses (0.1–9 times CreCre), which may be attributed to an in situ release from weathering and a minor addition of deep crustal CF4 introduced to the shallow groundwater through nearby faults. CF4 excesses in groundwaters within 200 m of the SAFS are larger (10–980 times CreCre) and indicate the presence of a deep crustal flux of CF4 that is likely associated with the physical alteration of silicate minerals in the shear zone of the SAFS. Extrapolating CF4 flux rates observed in this study to the full extent of the SAFS (1300 km × 20–100 km) suggests that the SAFS potentially emits (0.3–1)×10−1 kg(0.3–1)×10−1 kg CF4 yr−1 to the Earth's surface. For comparison, the chemical weathering of ∼7.5×104 km2∼7.5×104 km2 of granitic rock in California is estimated to release (0.019–3.2)×10−1 kg(0.019–3.2)×10−1 kg CF4 yr−1. Tectonic activity is likely an important, and potentially the dominant, driver of natural emissions of CF4 to the atmosphere. Variations in preindustrial atmospheric CF4 as observed in paleo-archives such as ice cores may therefore represent changes in both continental weathering and tectonic activity, including changes driven by variations in continental ice cover during glacial–interglacial transitions.

  12. Deformation of the Calabrian Arc subduction complex and its relation to STEP activity at depth.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polonia, Alina; Wortel, Rinus; Nijholt, Nicolai; Govers, Rob; Torelli, Luigi

    2015-04-01

    Propagating tear faults at the edge of subducted slabs ("Subduction transform edge propagator", STEP) are an intrinsic part of lithospheric plate dynamics. The surface expression of a STEP is generally not known yet, and is expected to vary significantly from one region to the other. We choose the Sicily -Calabria-Ionian Sea region, of which the lithosphere-upper mantle structure has the characteristics of a STEP zone, as a study area. The area has a very prominent accretionary wedge, the formation and subsequent deformation of which presumably were affected by the STEP activity at depth. In this contribution, we use seismic data on the near surface structure and deformation in combination with numerical model results to investigate the relation between deep STEP activity and near surface expression. Prominent features in the surface tectonics are the Malta escarpment (with predominantly normal faulting), the newly identified Ionian Fault and Alfeo-Etna fault system, and a distinct longitudinal division of the wedge into a western and an eastern lobe (Polonia et al., Tectonics, 2011). The two lobes are characterized by different structural style, deformation rates and basal detachment depths. Numerical model results indicate that the regional lithospheric structure, such as the orientation of the eastern passive (albeit subsequently activated) margin of Sicily relative to the Calabrian subduction zone, has a profound effect on possible fault activity along the Malta escarpment. Fault activity along the above primary fault structures may have varied in time, implying the possibility of intermittent activity. Interpreting seismicity in the context of a possible STEP, and the accompanying deformation zone at or near the surface, is not (yet) straightforward. Although direct evidence for recognizing all aspects of STEP activity is - as usual - lacking, a comparison with two well-known STEP regions, the northern part of the Tonga subduction zone and southern part of the

  13. Lower crustal mush generation and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakas, Ozge; Bachmann, Olivier; Dufek, Josef; Wright, Heather; Mangan, Margaret

    2016-04-01

    Recent seismic, field, and petrologic studies on several active and fossil volcanic settings provide important constraints on the time, volume, and melt fraction of their lower crustal magma bodies. However, these studies provide an incomplete picture of the time and length scales involved during their thermal and compositional evolution. What has been lacking is a thermal model that explains the temporal evolution and state of the lower crustal magma bodies during their growth. Here we use a two-dimensional thermal model and quantify the time and length scales involved in the long-term thermal and compositional evolution of the lower crustal mush regions underlying the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (USA), Mt St Helens (USA), and the Ivrea-Verbano Zone (North Italy). Although a number of seismic, tectonic, petrologic, and field studies explained the tectonic and magmatic evolution of these regions, controversy remains on their lower crustal heat sources, melt fraction, and origin of erupted magmas. Our thermal modeling results suggest that given a geologically reasonable range of basalt fluxes (~10^-3 to 10^-4 km3/yr), a long-lived (>105 yr) crystalline mush is formed in the lower crust. The state of the lower crustal mush is strongly influenced by the magma flux, crustal thickness, and water content of intruded basalt, giving an average melt fraction of <0.2 in thin crust with dry injections (Salton Sea Geothermal Field) and up to 0.4-0.5 in thicker crust with wet injections (Mt St Helens and Ivrea Zone). The melt in the lower crustal mush is mainly evolving through fractional crystallization of basalt with minor crustal assimilation in all regions, in agreement with isotopic studies. Quantification of the lower crustal mush regions is key to understanding the mass and heat balance in the crust, evolution of magma plumbing systems, and geothermal energy exploration.

  14. Kinematics of the crustal velocity field in the western US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollitz, F. F.

    2008-12-01

    GPS measurements embodied in PBO and PBO Nucleus allow the crustal velocity field of the western US to be constructed in unprecedented detail. Velocity and strain fields span the entire San Andreas fault system and Cascadia subduction zone from Baja California to northern Washington as well as the continental interior including the Great Basin and Wasatch Front. Rationalizing the GPS velocity field over the several tectonic regimes provides key tests of prevailing notions of interseismic crustal deformation. In our interpretation, we begin with the premise that the load-carrying portion of the lithosphere coincides with the (seismogenic) upper crust with an effective elastic thickness of ~20 km at the time scales of interseimic motions (Thatcher and Pollitz, 2008). End member kinematic models include (1) viscoelastic relaxation of the ductile lower crust and upper mantle following large earthquakes, and (2) slip in the lower elastic lithosphere, each of which serves to localize strain around major faults during interseismic periods. More detailed kinematic models emphasize the roles of lateral variations in rigidity and/or effective elastic plate thickness as well as distributed deformation. Our modeling of western US kinematics shows that the GPS velocity field is well explained with a range of models involving a combination of all of the above components; no single endmember suffices. Zones of inferred distributed deformation in the continental interior coincide with well-known seismic belts (Eastern California Shear Zone; Walker Lane; Interseismic Mountain Belt). Continued acquisition of vector constraints on crustal motions and study of available geodetic data are needed to clarify active deformation patterns in several areas. Some outstanding issues are: The nature of distributed faulting at the margins of the Great Basin (southern Nevada Transverse Zone, northern Walker Lane); understanding how dextral shear from the eastern boundary of the Sierra Nevada

  15. Evidence and models for lower crustal flow beneath the Galápagos platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orellana-Rovirosa, Felipe; Richards, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The volcanic Galápagos Islands are constructed upon a broad platform, with their active westernmost islands marking the current position of the hotspot. Built upon young oceanic lithosphere (<15 Ma), this platform exhibits unique morphologic features including a system of stepped terraces on the southwestern escarpment with 3 km relief, contrasting with gentle slopes off the eastern platform toward the Carnegie Ridge. Considering horizontal lithostatic pressure differences associated with this relief, along with high temperatures within the young, hotspot-affected lithosphere, it is likely that lower crustal flow contributes significantly to crustal deformation within the Galápagos platform. Using a 2-D, isostatic, thin-sheet approximation for the Stokes flow equation with (Newtonian) space-time-dependent viscosity, we suggest that the bathymetric rim along the eastern platform region (where gravimetry indicates Airy isostasy) near Española Island may be the expression of a mature lower crustal flow front developed over the last ˜3 Myr; horizontal mass displacements (˜50 km) associated with this crustal flow episode may have advected mantle plume geochemical signatures toward the southeast, and in directions not necessarily parallel to the hotspot track. Also, the stepped terraces along the southwestern platform may be explained by lower crustal flow-associated backward tilting of the bathymetric surface that, although resulting in small angular changes (˜0.1°), effectively hinders the horizontal flow of lava sheets. This backward-tilting process was likely restricted to the last ˜1 Ma or less, and may be a unique event involving extrusion of lavas from within the southwestward-marching lower-crustal flow front.

  16. Continental crustal composition and lower crustal models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, S. R.

    1983-01-01

    The composition of the upper crust is well established as being close to that of granodiorite. The upper crustal composition is reflected in the uniform REE abundances in shales which represent an homogenization of the various REE patterns. This composition can only persist to depths of 10-15 km, for heat flow and geochemical balance reasons. The composition of the total crust is model dependent. One constraint is that it should be capable of generating the upper granodioritic (S.L.) crust by partial melting within the crust. This composition is based on the andesite model, which assumes that the total crust has grown by accretion of island arc material. A representation of the growth rate of the continental crust is shown. The composition of the lower crust, which comprises 60-80% of the continental crust, remains a major unknown factor for models of terrestrial crustal evolution. Two approaches are used to model the lower crust.

  17. Joint influence of transmural heterogeneities and wall deformation on cardiac bioelectrical activity: A simulation study.

    PubMed

    Colli Franzone, P; Pavarino, L F; Scacchi, S

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate, by means of numerical simulations, the influence of myocardial deformation due to muscle contraction and relaxation on the cardiac repolarization process in presence of transmural intrinsic action potential duration (APD) heterogeneities. The three-dimensional electromechanical model considered consists of the following four coupled components: the quasi-static transversely isotropic finite elasticity equations for the deformation of the cardiac tissue; the active tension model for the intracellular calcium dynamics and cross-bridge binding; the anisotropic Bidomain model for the electrical current flow through the deforming cardiac tissue; the membrane model of ventricular myocytes, including stretch-activated channels. The numerical simulations are based on our finite element parallel solver, which employs Multilevel Additive Schwarz preconditioners for the solution of the discretized Bidomain equations and Newton-Krylov methods for the solution of the discretized non-linear finite elasticity equations. Our findings show that: (i) the presence of intrinsic transmural cellular APD heterogeneities is not fully masked by electrotonic current flow or by the presence of the mechanical deformation; (ii) despite the presence of transmural APD heterogeneities, the recovery process follows the activation sequence and there is no significant transmural repolarization gradient; (iii) with or without transmural APD heterogeneities, epicardial electrograms always display the same wave shape and discordance between the polarity of QRS complex and T-wave; (iv) the main effects of the mechanical deformation are an increase of the dispersion of repolarization time and APD, when computed over the total cardiac domain and over the endo- and epicardial surfaces, while there is a slight decrease along the transmural direction. PMID:27545966

  18. Active deformation analysis and evaluation of earthquake hazard in Gafsa region (Southern Atlas of Tunisia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrouni, Nejib; Bouaziz, Samir; Soumaya, Abdelkader; Ben Ayed, Noureddine; Attafi, Khereddine

    2013-04-01

    The Southern Atlas of Tunisia constitutes the transition between Atlas fold and the Northern edge of the Saharan platform. The general direction is near to E-W deflected to N060 whose structural style and geometry of deformation still complex. This domain is Southern part of the seismic zone bordering the Northern African plate as indicated by the large seismic events that occurred periodically. The Gafsa area, more particularly concerned by seismic risk, is bordered to the North by the NW-SE trending "Gafsa Fault" and has significant seismic. The most active tectonic are related to the reactivating of pre-existing NW-SE and E-W trending strike-slip faulting. We will set up the network in the active zone of Gafsa surroundings, in order to cover the area of aftershocks (co-seismic surface rupture) of May 22, 1972 and December 27, 1985 (Ms=4.2) in Gafsa and November 7, 1989 (Ms=4.4) in Metlaoui, December 8, 2010 and in Sidi Aich (Ms=3.66). Paleostress and calculated focal mechanism solutions for the earthquakes show that the active stress field is a NW-SE trending compression. Damage and surface effects of land and urban areas caused by these events demonstrate the vulnerability of cities in the region of Gafsa to seismic activities. The analyses of recent and active deformation in this region has allowed the assessment of urban seismic hazard and take stock seismic zones embedded in a distorted geographic information system (GIS) in close relationship with the regional tectonic setting. This assessment has provided crucial information on the neotectonic deformation and seismotectonics of Gafsa region and its surrounding which affects remote orogenic dynamics and the current state of the North African margin. In particular, the comparison between the deformations and quantified seismic activity has also assessed the risk and the regional seismic hazard and develop a seismotectonic zoning.

  19. Crustal structure of the Bighorn Mountains region: Precambrian influence on Laramide shortening and uplift in north-central Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worthington, Lindsay L.; Miller, Kate C.; Erslev, Eric A.; Anderson, Megan L.; Chamberlain, Kevin R.; Sheehan, Anne F.; Yeck, William L.; Harder, Steven H.; Siddoway, Christine S.

    2016-01-01

    The crustal structure of north-central Wyoming records a history of complex lithospheric evolution from Precambrian accretion to Cretaceous-Paleogene Laramide shortening. We present two active source P wave velocity model profiles collected as part of the Bighorn Arch Seismic Experiment in 2010. Analyses of these velocity models and single-fold reflection data, together with potential field modeling of regional gravity and magnetic signals, constrain crustal structure and thickness of the Bighorn region. We image a west dipping reflection boundary and model a sharp magnetic contact east of the Bighorn Arch that together may delineate a previously undetected Precambrian suture zone. Localized patches of a high-velocity, high-density lower crustal layer (the "7.× layer") occur across the study area but are largely absent beneath the Bighorn Arch culmination. Moho topography is relatively smooth with no large-scale offsets, with depths ranging from ~50 to 37 km, and is largely decoupled from Laramide basement topography. These observations suggest that (1) the edge of the Archean Wyoming craton lies just east of the Bighorn Mountains, approximately 300 km west of previous interpretations, and (2) Laramide deformation localized in an area with thin or absent 7.× layer, due to its relatively weak lower crust, leading to detachment faulting. Our findings show that Precambrian tectonics in northern Wyoming may be more complicated than previously determined and subsequent Laramide deformation may have been critically dependent on laterally heterogeneous crustal structure that can be linked to Precambrian origins.

  20. Active Deformation in the Zagros-Makran Transition Zone Inferred From GPS, Tectonic and Seismological Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, R.; Shabanian, E.; Regard, V.; Yaminifard, F.; Vernant, P.; Nilforoushan, F.; Abbassi, M.; Chery, J.; Tatar, M.; Doerflinger, E.; Peyret, M.; Daignières, M.; Bellier, O.; Hatzfeld, D.; Mokhtari, M.

    2002-12-01

    The present-day N-S convergence between the Arabian and the Eurasian plates is accommodated in Southern Iran along the Zagros fold and thrust belt (with a shortening of ~8 mm/yr)and by the subduction of the Oman oceanic lithosphere beneath the Makran (with a rate of 18mm/yr). The Bandar Abbas-Strait of Hormuz zone is considered as a transition between the Zagros continental collision and the Makran oceanic subduction. In this area, the strain is mainly accommodated along the NNW-SSE trending reverse right lateral Minab-Zendan-Palami faults and along the N-S trending faults of Sarduiyeh, Jiroft and Sabzevaran. We used GPS network measurements (carried out in 2000 and 2002) to better understand how the deformation is distributed between between the Zagros continental collision and the Makran oceanic subduction. The analysis of the velocities (together with the measurements of the global network of Iran) leads to the following conclusions : - The rate of shortening in the Eastern Zagros is < 8mm/yr. It is < 5 mm/yr between the coast and the Main Zagros Thrust. - The horizontal residual velocities of the coastal sites in Zagros relative to Musandan are < 3mm/yr, evidencing for a small deformation in the Persian Gulf. - Across the Minab-Zendan-Palami faults system GPS measurements are consistent with a N-S trending reverse right lateral motion at rate of ~ 10 mm/yr. - West of the Lut block at the latitude of Khanuj, the N-S trending Sarduiyeh-Jiroft-Sabzevaran fault system is characterized by a 2 mm/yr right strike slip motion. Local seismicity is located at an unusual depth down to 35 km. Little is associated with the Minab-Zendan-Palami faults strike slip faults. They rather suggest that they are associated with a complex transition between the Zagros collision and the Makran subduction. Times delays also suggest a large heterogeneity in the crust across the fault system. These measurements support the model that the convergence from the collision to the subduction is

  1. General characteristics of the recent horizontal crustal movement in Chinese mainland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Guo-Hua; Shen, Xu-Hui; Wang, Min; Zheng, Gui-Ming; Fang, Ying; Li, Peng

    2001-07-01

    In this paper, the horizontal crustal movement obtained from GPS observations in 1998 and 2000 at basic and fiducial stations in the Crustal Movement Observation Network of China (CMONOC) is introduced. A brief introduction of the field observations, the data processing with GAMIT/GLOBK software and the accuracy of the GPS observations is given. In average the accuracy of the results for each year is about 2 mm in the horizontal components and 5 mm in the vertical component, and the average accuracy of horizontal displacements at a station is about 3 mm. The results of crustal movement during the period from early September 1998 to mid June, 2000, including the displacements at each station with datum definition of a group of stable stations of insignificant relative movements among themselves in the eastern part of China, strains in different parts of the network and rotations in some parts, are obtained. Based on the crustal movement maps which are more complete and detailed than previous ones, the general characteristics of the recent crustal movement in Chinese mainland are discussed. During the above mentioned period of observations, the crustal deformation in the eastern part of China was relatively small and quite stable. With reference to a group of stable stations with small relative movement in the eastern part of China, the northeastern China block moved northward for about 10 mm, the South China block moved southeastward for about 9 mm. In reference to the eastern part the northwestern part of China moved northward for about 26 mm, the Tibetan area in southwestern part of China moved mainly northward for about 32 mm. The area in Yunnan and east Tibet showed significant clockwise tectonic rotation of 0.0045″ or average rotational displacement of 12 mm with the rotation center at 26.5°N and 95.5°E. The North-South Seismic Belt in the middle part of China is of active and complicated deformation. The observation results show that the northward pushing

  2. The Interpretation of Crustal Dynamics Data in Terms of Plate Interactions and Active Tectonics of the Anatolian Plate and Surrounding Regions in the Middle East

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toksoz, M. Nafi; Reilinger, Robert E.

    1990-01-01

    During the past 6 months, efforts were concentrated on the following areas: (1) Continued development of realistic, finite element modeling of plate interactions and associated deformation in the Eastern Mediterranean; (2) Neotectonic field investigations of seismic faulting along the active fault systems in Turkey with emphasis on identifying seismic gaps along the North Anatolian fault; and (3) Establishment of a GPS regional monitoring network in the zone of ongoing continental collision in eastern Turkey (supported in part by NSF).

  3. Monitoring Hippocampus Electrical Activity In Vitro on an Elastically Deformable Microelectrode Array

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhe; Graudejus, Oliver; Tsay, Candice; Lacour, Stéphanie P.; Wagner, Sigurd

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Interfacing electronics and recording electrophysiological activity in mechanically active biological tissues is challenging. This challenge extends to recording neural function of brain tissue in the setting of traumatic brain injury (TBI), which is caused by rapid (within hundreds of milliseconds) and large (greater than 5% strain) brain deformation. Interfacing electrodes must be biocompatible on multiple levels and should deform with the tissue to prevent additional mechanical damage. We describe an elastically stretchable microelectrode array (SMEA) that is capable of undergoing large, biaxial, 2-D stretch while remaining functional. The new SMEA consists of elastically stretchable thin metal films on a silicone membrane. It can stimulate and detect electrical activity from cultured brain tissue (hippocampal slices), before, during, and after large biaxial deformation. We have incorporated the SMEA into a well-characterized in vitro TBI research platform, which reproduces the biomechanics of TBI by stretching the SMEA and the adherent brain slice culture. Mechanical injury parameters, such as strain and strain rate, can be precisely controlled to generate specific levels of damage. The SMEA allowed for quantification of neuronal function both before and after injury, without breaking culture sterility or repositioning the electrodes for the injury event, thus enabling serial and long-term measurements. We report tests of the SMEA and an initial application to study the effect of mechanical stimuli on neuron function, which could be employed as a high-content, drug-screening platform for TBI. PMID:19594385

  4. Lithospheric Structure, Crustal Kinematics, and Earthquakes in North China: An Integrated Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Yang, Y.; Sandvol, E.; Chen, Y.; Wang, L.; Zhou, S.; Shen, Z.; Wang, Q.

    2007-12-01

    The North China block (NCB) is geologically part of the Archaean Sino-Korean craton. But unusual for a craton, it was thermally rejuvenated since late Mesozoic, and experienced widespread extension and volcanism through much of the Cenozoic. Today, the NCB is characterized by strong internal deformation and seismicity, including the 1976 Tangshan earthquake that killed ~250,000 people. We have started a multidisciplinary study to image the lithospheric and upper mantle structure using seismological methods, to delineate crustal kinematics and deformation via studies of neotectonics and space geodesy, and to investigate the driving forces, the stress states and evolution, and seismicity using geodynamic modeling. Both seismic imaging and GPS results indicate that the Ordos plateau, which is the western part of the NCB and a relic of the Sino-Korean craton, has been encroached around its southern margins by mantle flow and thus is experiencing active cratonic destruction. Some of the mantle flow may be driven by the Indo-Asian collision, although the cause of the broad mantle upwelling responsible for the Mesozoic thinning of the NCB lithosphere remains uncertain. At present, crustal deformation in the NCB is largely driven by gravitational spreading of the expanding Tibetan Plateau. Internal deformation within the NCB is further facilitated by the particular tectonic boundary conditions around the NCB, and the large lateral contrasts of lithospheric strength and rheology. Based on the crustal kinematics and lithospheric structure, we have developed a preliminary geodynamic model for stress states and strain energy in the crust of the NCB. The predicted long-term strain energy distribution is comparable with the spatial pattern of seismic energy release in the past 2000 years. We are exploring the cause of the spatiotemporal occurrence of large earthquakes in the NCB, especially the apparent migration of seismicity from the Weihe-Shanxi grabens around the Ordos to

  5. Active Fault Deformation Along the South Boundary of the Western Transverse Ranges Province, Point Dume to the Northern Channel Islands, Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, M. A.; Langenheim, V. E.; Sorlien, C. C.; Nicholson, C.; Sliter, R. W.

    2005-12-01

    The regional fault system forming the south boundary of the Western Transverse Ranges Province (WTRP) extends for about 200 km, from near the city of Los Angeles westward along the south flank of the Santa Monica Mountains and through the northern Channel Islands. Multichannel seismic-reflection data show that fault strands within the province-bounding system are active, and some have dip-slip displacements measured in kilometers. The left-oblique Dume fault is active and shows large displacement as far west as Sycamore knoll, but farther west, the fault tip and a superjacent fold are deeply buried. Thus during future earthquakes, the structural transition near the knoll could represent a boundary between earthquake-rupture segments. The east-west province-bounding fault system strikes at a high angle across and terminates the northwest-trending faults, basins and ridges of the California Continental Borderland. Borderland structures considered here form the western limit of intense middle Miocene oblique extension that accompanied rotation of the WTRP. The transition between extended and intact crust lies along the northwest-trending Santa Cruz-Catalina and Santa Rosa-Cortes Ridges. After the Miocene rotation, structures within these ridges became involved in regional transpression, such that northwestward along the Santa Cruz-Catalina Ridge, thrust faulting becomes increasingly more intense, and adjacent to the province boundary, thrust-faulted rocks completely override Miocene extensional structures. In contrast, rocks making up the Santa Rosa-Cortez Ridge are little deformed. The difference in deformation of the two ridges could result from a combination of: 1) eastward crustal thinning and consequent weakening that developed during the Miocene extension; 2) a difference in horizontal strain across the right-slip San Clemente fault near its termination at the WTRP boundary; 3) strain partitioning along this boundary; and 4) a contrast in bulk rheological

  6. Evolution of crustal thickening in the central Andes, Bolivia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, Nathan; McQuarrie, Nadine; Ryan, Jamie; Karimi, Bobak; Beck, Susan; Zandt, George

    2015-09-01

    Paleoelevation histories from the central Andes in Bolivia have suggested that the geodynamic evolution of the region has been punctuated by periods of large-scale lithospheric removal that drive rapid increases in elevation at the surface. Here, we evaluate viable times and locations of material loss using a map-view reconstruction of the Bolivian orocline displacement field to forward-model predicted crustal thicknesses. Two volumetric models are presented that test assumed pre-deformation crustal thicknesses of 35 km and 40 km. Both models predict that modern crustal thicknesses were achieved first in the northern Eastern Cordillera (EC) by 30-20 Ma but remained below modern in the southern EC until ≤10 Ma. The Altiplano is predicted to have achieved modern crustal thickness after 10 Ma but only with a pre-deformation thickness of 50 km, including 10 km of sediment. At the final stage, the models predict 8-25% regional excess crustal volume compared to modern thickness, largely concentrated in the northern EC. The excess predicted volume from 20 to 0 Ma can be accounted for by: 1) crustal flow to the WC and/or Peru, 2) localized removal of the lower crust, or 3) a combination of the two. Only models with initial crustal thicknesses >35 km predict excess volumes sufficient to account for potential crustal thickness deficits in Peru and allow for lower crustal loss. However, both initial thickness models predict that modern crustal thicknesses were achieved over the same time periods that paleoelevation histories indicate the development of modern elevations. Localized removal of lower crust is only necessary in the northern EC where crustal thickness exceeds modern by 20 Ma, prior to paleoelevation estimates of modern elevations by 15 Ma. In the Altiplano, crustal thicknesses match modern values at 10 Ma and can only exceed modern values by 5 Ma, post-dating when modern elevations were thought to have been established. Collectively, these models predict that

  7. Comparison of epicardial deformation in passive and active isolated rabbit hearts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Andrew; Tang, Liang; Chiang, Fu-Pen; Lin, Shien-Fong

    2007-02-01

    Mechanical deformation of isolated rabbit hearts through passive inflation techniques have been a viable form of replicating heart motion, but its relation to the heart's natural active contractions remain unclear. The mechanical properties of the myocardium may show diverse characteristics while in tension and compression. In this study, epicardial strain was measured with the assistance of computer-aided speckle interferometry (CASI)1. CASI tracks the movement of clusters of particles for measuring epicardial deformation. The heart was cannulated and perfused with Tyrode's solution. Silicon carbide particles were applied onto the myocardium to form random speckle pattern images while the heart was allowed to actively contract and stabilize. High resolution videos (1000x1000 pixels) of the left ventricle were taken with a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) camera as the heart was actively contracting through electrical pacing at various cycle lengths between 250-800 ms. A latex balloon was then inserted into the left ventricle via left atrium and videos were taken as the balloon was repeatedly inflated and deflated at controlled volumes (1-3 ml/cycle). The videos were broken down into frames and analyzed through CASI. Active contractions resulted in non-uniform circular epicardial and uniaxial contractions at different stages of the motion. In contrast, the passive heart demonstrated very uniform expansion and contraction originating from the source of the latex balloon. The motion of the active heart caused variations in deformation, but in comparison to the passive heart, had a more enigmatic displacement field. The active heart demonstrated areas of large displacement and others with relatively no displacement. Application of CASI was able to successfully distinguish the motions between the active and passive hearts.

  8. Crustal growth in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Katharina; Castro, Antonio; Gerya, Taras

    2015-04-01

    There is a broad interest in understanding the physical principles leading to arc magmatisim at active continental margins and different mechanisms have been proposed to account for the composition and evolution of the continental crust. It is widely accepted that water released from the subducting plate lowers the melting temperature of the overlying mantle allowing for "flux melting" of the hydrated mantle. However, relamination of subducted crustal material to the base of the continental crust has been recently suggested to account for the growth and composition of the continental crust. We use petrological-thermo-mechanical models of active subduction zones to demonstrate that subduction of crustal material to sublithospheric depth may result in the formation of a tectonic rock mélange composed of basalt, sediment and hydrated /serpentinized mantle. This rock mélange may evolve into a partially molten diapir at asthenospheric depth and rise through the mantle because of its intrinsic buoyancy prior to emplacement at crustal levels (relamination). This process can be episodic and long-lived, forming successive diapirs that represent multiple magma pulses. Recent laboratory experiments of Castro et al. (2013) have demonstrated that reactions between these crustal components (i.e. basalt and sediment) produce andesitic melt typical for rocks of the continental crust. However, melt derived from a composite diapir will inherit the geochemical characteristics of its source and show distinct temporal variations of radiogenic isotopes based on the proportions of basalt and sediment in the source (Vogt et al., 2013). Hence, partial melting of a composite diapir is expected to produce melt with a constant major element composition, but substantial changes in terms of radiogenic isotopes. However, crustal growth at active continental margins may also involve accretionary processes by which new material is added to the continental crust. Oceanic plateaus and other

  9. Projection Moire Interferometry for Rotorcraft Applications: Deformation Measurements of Active Twist Rotor Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Gary A.; Soto, Hector L.; South, Bruce W.

    2002-01-01

    Projection Moire Interferometry (PMI) has been used during wind tunnel tests to obtain azimuthally dependent blade bending and twist measurements for a 4-bladed Active Twist Rotor (ATR) system in simulated forward flight. The ATR concept offers a means to reduce rotor vibratory loads and noise by using piezoelectric active fiber composite actuators embedded in the blade structure to twist each blade as they rotate throughout the rotor azimuth. The twist imparted on the blades for blade control causes significant changes in blade loading, resulting in complex blade deformation consisting of coupled bending and twist. Measurement of this blade deformation is critical in understanding the overall behavior of the ATR system and the physical mechanisms causing the reduction in rotor loads and noise. PMI is a non-contacting, video-based optical measurement technique capable of obtaining spatially continuous structural deformation measurements over the entire object surface within the PMI system field-of-view. When applied to rotorcraft testing, PMI can be used to measure the azimuth-dependent blade bending and twist along the full span of the rotor blade. This paper presents the PMI technique as applied to rotorcraft testing, and provides results obtained during the ATR tests demonstrating the PMI system performance. PMI measurements acquired at select blade actuation conditions generating minimum and maximum rotor loads are provided to explore the interrelationship between rotor loads, blade bending, and twist.

  10. On interrelation between seismic activity and the Earth crust deformations of Vrancea zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dultsev, A.; Pronyshyn, R.; Siejka, Z.; Serant, O.; Tretyak, K.; Zablotskyj, F.

    2009-04-01

    An investigated territory covers the whole seismically active zone of Vrancea mountains (Romania). It is located between 43° and 47° parallels in latitude and 23° and 29° meridians in longitude. The weekly solutions of coordinates of six permanent stations (BACA, BAIA, BUCU, COST, DEVA, IGEO) allocated on the territories of Romania and Moldova have been used as the initial data for carrying out of the investigations. These initial data were obtained during 2007-2008. The results of determination of the earthquake parameters (coordinates, focal depth, magnitude and energy) have been obtained from a network of seismic stations. An analysis of the temporal earthquake distribution in 2007-2008 showed the alternation of the periods of seismic activity and its absence. The duration of these periods ranges from one to three weeks. The Earth crust deformation parameters between the recurrent periods of seismic activity and its absence have been calculated on basis of weekly solutions for the territory bounded by GPS-permanent stations. The accumulative values of the earthquake energy and magnitude were calculated for the periods of seismic activity. It had been ascertained that the territory of Vrancea zone undergoes the permanent stretching into northeast and southwest directions as well as the compressing into northwest and southeast ones. In fact, the more fast attenuation of the seismic waves occurs in the direction of the contraction axis and the slowest attenuation of ones occurs in the direction of the axis of elongation. The parameters of total amplitude and earthquake energy in the periods of seismic activity have high-degree correlation with difference of the deformations of next periods of seismic activity and its absence. It enables to predict a change of the deformation increment in the zone of earthquake focuses of Vrancea territory by means of the earthquake total force.

  11. Active faults in the deformation zone off Noto Peninsula, Japan, revealed by high- resolution seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, T.; Okamura, Y.; Murakami, F.; Kimura, H.; Ikehara, K.

    2008-12-01

    Recently, a lot of earthquakes occur in Japan. The deformation zone which many faults and folds have concentrated exists on the Japan Sea side of Japan. The 2007 Noto Hanto Earthquake (MJMA 6.9) and 2007 Chuetsu-oki Earthquake (MJMA 6.8) were caused by activity of parts of faults in this deformation zone. The Noto Hanto Earthquake occurred on 25 March, 2007 under the northwestern coast of Noto Peninsula, Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan. This earthquake is located in Quaternary deformation zone that is continued from northern margin of Noto Peninsula to southeast direction (Okamura, 2007a). National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) carried out high-resolution seismic survey using Boomer and 12 channels short streamer cable in the northern part off Noto Peninsula, in order to clarify distribution and activities of active faults in the deformation zone. A twelve channels short streamer cable with 2.5 meter channel spacing developed by AIST and private corporation is designed to get high resolution seismic profiles in shallow sea area. The multi-channel system is possible to equip on a small fishing boat, because the data acquisition system is based on PC and the length of the cable is short and easy to handle. Moreover, because the channel spacing is short, this cable is very effective for a high- resolution seismic profiling survey in the shallow sea, and seismic data obtained by multi-channel cable can be improved by velocity analysis and CDP stack. In the northern part off Noto Peninsula, seismic profiles depicting geologic structure up to 100 meters deep under sea floor were obtained. The most remarkable reflection surface recognized in the seismic profiles is erosion surface at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). In the western part, sediments about 30 meters (40 msec) thick cover the erosional surface that is distributed under the shelf shallower than 100m in depth and the sediments thin toward offshore and east. Flexures like deformation in

  12. New Insights into the Morphology of the Galapagos Platform from Lower Crustal Flow Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orellana Rovirosa, F.; Richards, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The volcanically-active Galapagos Islands are constructed upon a broad platform, with the westernmost islands being the most active, marking the present-day position of the Galapagos hotspot (mantle plume). This volcanic platform overlies relatively young oceanic lithosphere (<15 Myr) and exhibits unique morphologic features along its boundaries. The most spectacular of these features is a system of stepped terraces on the southwestern escarpment, with very large vertical relief (>3 km), and contrasting with relatively gentle slopes off the eastern platform edge toward the Carnegie ridge. Considering the horizontal lithostatic pressure differences associated with this bathymetric relief, along with the high temperatures within this young, hotspot-affected oceanic lithosphere and crust; it is likely that lower crustal flow contributes significantly, perhaps even dominantly, to lithospheric and crustal deformation within the Galapagos Platform. Using 2D numerical models that invoke a thin-sheet approximation for the Stokes' equation for a Newtonian fluid with space- and time-dependent viscosity, and assuming isostatic conditions, we show that: (1) the pronounced bathymetric rim along the Eastern platform region (where gravimetric studies indicate Airy isostasy) near Española Island may be the expression of a mature stage of a lower crustal flow front evolving asymptotically during the last ~3 Myr; (2) the spectacular system of stepped terraces along the southwestern edge of the platform may be explained by lower crustal flow-associated backward tilting of the bathymetric surface that, even with small amounts of angular change (~0.1 deg) and potentially occurring in non-isostatic regimes, effectively hinders the horizontal flow of lava. This process of backward-tilting may have been largely restricted to the last ~1 Myr of platform growth, and hence may be a unique event that may involve horizontal extrusion of large lava sheets from within the southwestward

  13. Crustal controls on the dynamics of collisional orogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, P.; Pysklywec, R. N.

    2013-12-01

    The role of extensional inheritance and crustal thickness in determining modes of colli- sional orogenesis is not well resolved. However, the wide variety of non-volcanic continental margin widths and continental moho depths observed implies that crustal geometry may play a first-order roll in the evolution of orogenesis. To elucidate the effect these parameters have on continental collision, a series of freely evolving 2D upper mantle numerical exper- iments were performed with systematically varied continental margin widths and crustal thicknesses. Results show that the 2D vertical geometry of subducting continental crust controls both crustal and lithosphere scale deformation. On both scales, deformational end-members can be identified, namely: breakoff vs. delamination of continental mantle lithosphere, and double vergence vs. single vergence crustal thrust fronts. We find that the subduction of upper crust to depths >100km promotes lithospheric delamination and is most easily achieved when a hyper-extended margin is present or continental crust is thin. Similarly, modelled orogens are singly vergent in cases of thinned or hyper-extended crustal subduction. An intermediate between lithospheric end-members is also observed with a ˜2Ma period of 'eduction' after breakoff followed by delamination. This interme- diate mode of subduction may present an analog of the Miocene-present evolution of the Northern Apennines and Dinarides. Corollaries can also be drawn between these model results and Phanerozoic orogens such as the Zargos, and Pyrenees.

  14. A three-dimensional Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs crustal structure in Fujian, Southeast China, from active- and passive-source experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Hui-Teng; Kuo-Chen, Hao; Jin, Xin; Wang, Chien-Ying; Huang, Bor-Shouh; Yen, Horng-Yuan

    2015-11-01

    Fujian, Southeastern China, has experienced multistage tectonic activities since the Neoproterozoic Era and is currently influenced by collision between the Eurasian and Philippine Sea plates. Topography, fault zones, and patterns of seismicity are the imprints of tectonic evolution. Historically, there have been several catastrophic earthquakes in the southeastern part of Fujian. To understand the crustal structure related to the fault zones, we performed Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs travel-time tomography using joint inversion of active and passive sources. A total of 75,827 and 31,044 arrivals of P and S waves, respectively, from 33 explosions and 2543 earthquakes are used in our study. As a result, seismicity has indicated that two NE strike seismogenic zones, the Zhenghe-Dapu and Changle-Zhaoan fault zones, are currently active. Low Vp/Vs ratios in inland Fujian imply that the crust is mainly composed of felsic rocks as part of the Eurasian continental crust, which is consistent with geological observations at the surface. Based on Vp tomography, the thickness of the crust along the coastline is shallower than that on land, which is related to higher heat flow and the Bouguer anomaly. This shallow crust phenomenon near the coastline could be related to the regional extensional stress: the remaining structure of the back-arc extension that stretched the continental crust during the Mesozoic Era or/and the Cenozoic extension due to South China sea opening in Taiwan Strait.

  15. Crustal Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Patrick T.; Ravat, D.; Frawley, James J.

    1999-01-01

    Cosmos 49, Polar Orbit Geophysical Observatory (POGO) (Orbiting Geophysical Observatory (OGO-2, 4 and 6)) and Magsat have been the only low-earth orbiting satellites to measure the crustal magnetic field on a global scale. These missions revealed the presence of long- wavelength (> 500 km) crustal anomalies predominantly located over continents. Ground based methods were, for the most part, unable to record these very large-scale features; no doubt due to the problems of assembling continental scale maps from numerous smaller surveys acquired over many years. Questions arose as to the source and nature of these long-wave length anomalies. As a result there was a great stimulant given to the study of the magnetic properties of the lower crust and upper mantle. Some indication as to the nature of these deep sources has been provided by the recent results from the deep crustal drilling programs. In addition, the mechanism of magnetization, induced or remanent, was largely unknown. For computational ease these anomalies were considered to result solely from induced magnetization. However, recent results from Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA), a magnetometer-bearing mission to Mars, have revealed crustal anomalies with dimensions similar to the largest anomalies on Earth. These Martian features could only have been produced by remanent magnetization, since Mars lacks an inducing field. The origin of long-wavelength crustal anomalies, however, has not been completely determined. Several large crustal magnetic anomalies (e.g., Bangui, Kursk, Kiruna and Central Europe) will be discussed and the role of future satellite magnetometer missions (Orsted, SUNSAT and Champ) in their interpretation evaluated.

  16. The surface geometry of inherited joint and fracture trace patterns resulting from active and passive deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podwysocki, M. H.; Gold, D. P.

    1974-01-01

    Hypothetical models are considered for detecting subsurface structure from the fracture or joint pattern, which may be influenced by the structure and propagated to the surface. Various patterns of an initially orthogonal fracture grid are modeled according to active and passive deformation mechanisms. In the active periclinal structure with a vertical axis, fracture frequency increased both over the dome and basin, and remained constant with decreasing depth to the structure. For passive periclinal features such as a reef or sand body, fracture frequency is determined by the arc of curvature and showed a reduction over the reefmound and increased over the basin.

  17. Removal of daytime thermal deformations in the GBT active surface via out-of-focus holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, T. R.; Mello, M.; Nikolic, B.; Mason, B. S.; Schwab, F. R.; Ghigo, F. D.; Dicker, S. R.

    2009-01-01

    The 100-m diameter Green Bank Telescope (GBT) was built with an active surface of 2209 actuators in order to achieve and maintain an accurate paraboloidal shape. While much of the large-scale gravitational deformation of the surface can be described by a finite element model, a significant uncompensated gravitational deformation exists. In recent years, the elevation-dependence of this residual deformation has been successfully measured during benign nighttime conditions using the out-of-focus (OOF) holography technique (Nikolic et al, 2007, A&A 465, 685). Parametrized by a set of Zernike polynomials, the OOF model correction was implemented into the active surface and has been applied during all high frequency observations since Fall 2006, yielding a consistent gain curve that is constant with elevation. However, large-scale thermal deformation of the surface has remained a problem for daytime high-frequency observations. OOF holography maps taken throughout a clear winter day indicate that surface deformations become significant whenever the Sun is above 10 degrees elevation, but that they change slowly while tracking a single source. In this paper, we describe a further improvement to the GBT active surface that allows an observer to measure and compensate for the thermal surface deformation using the OOF technique. In order to support high-frequency observers, "AutoOOF" is a new GBT Astrid procedure that acquires a quick set of in-focus and out-of-focus on-the-fly continuum maps on a quasar using the currently active receiver. Upon completion of the maps, the data analysis software is launched automatically which produces and displays the surface map along with a set of Zernike coefficients. These coefficients are then sent to the active surface manager which combines them with the existing gravitational Zernike terms and FEM in order to compute the total active surface correction. The end-to-end functionality has been tested on the sky at Q-Band and Ka

  18. Constraining fault activity by investigating tectonically-deformed Quaternary palaeoshorelines using a synchronous correlation method: the Capo D'Orlando Fault as a case study (NE Sicily, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschis, Marco; Roberts, Gerald P.; Robertson, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    Long-term curstal extension rates, accommodated by active normal faults, can be constrained by investigating Late Quaternary vertical movements. Sequences of marine terraces tectonically deformed by active faults mark the interaction between tectonic activity, sea-level changes and active faulting throughout the Quaternary (e.g. Armijo et al., 1996, Giunta et al, 2011, Roberts et al., 2013). Crustal deformation can be calculated over multiple seismic cycles by mapping Quaternary tectonically-deformed palaeoshorelines, both in the hangingwall and footwall of active normal faults (Roberts et al., 2013). Here we use a synchronous correlation method between palaeoshorelines elevations and the ages of sea-level highstands (see Roberts et al., 2013 for further details) which takes advantage of the facts that (i) sea-level highstands are not evenly-spaced in time, yet must correlate with palaeoshorelines that are commonly not evenly-spaced in elevation, and (ii) that older terraces may be destroyed and/or overprinted by younger highstands, so that the next higher or lower paleoshoreline does not necessarily correlate with the next older or younger sea-level highstand. We investigated a flight of Late Quaternary marine terraces deformed by normal faulting as a result of the Capo D'Orlando Fault in NE Sicily (e.g. Giunta et al., 2011). This fault lies within the Calabrian Arc which has experienced damaging seismic events such as the 1908 Messina Straits earthquake ~ Mw 7. Our mapping and previous mapping (Giunta et al. (2011) demonstrate that the elevations of marine terraces inner edges change along the strike the NE - SW oriented normal fault. This confirms active deformation on the Capo D'Orlando Fault, strongly suggesting that it should be added into the Database of Individual Seismogenic Sources (DISS, Basili et al., 2008). Giunta et al. (2011) suggested that uplift rates and hence faults lip-rates vary through time for this examples. We update the ages assigned to

  19. Deformation across the seismic cycle in tectonically active regions: Imaging, modeling, and interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhart, William Douglas

    Images of surface displacements in response to tectonic forces can provide independent, spatially dense observations that assist in understanding sub-surface processes. When considered independently or augmented with more traditional observations of active tectonics such as seismicity and ground mapping, these measurements provide constraints on spatially and temporally variable fault behavior across the seismic cycle. Models of fault behavior inferred from these observations in turn allow us to address topics in geologic hazards assessment, the long- and short-term character of strain in deforming regions, and the interactions between faults throughout the crust. In this dissertation, I use remotely sensed observations of ground displacements from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) to approach several problems related to earthquake and aseismic fault slip. I establish image processing and inverse methods for better detailing subsurface fault slip and apply these to the 2010-2011 Canterbury, New Zealand sequence. Then, I focus on the active tectonics of the Zagros Mountains in southern Iran. There, I show through orogen-wide InSAR time series analysis that active strain is accommodated across the width of the mountain belt. I also use a combination of InSAR, local seismicity, and structural modeling to demonstrate that strain is vertically partitioned within the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt, with earthquakes controlling deformation in the underlying basement while the overlying sedimentary section shortens in transient, earthquake-triggered aseismic slip events. In certain examples, these aseismic slip events directly contribute to the growth of fault-bend folds. I use these inferences to explore a previously noted discrepancy between observed shortening and that which is expected from known earthquakes. I show that the earthquakes and short-term aseismic slip cannot account for this discrepancy, and that additional deformation mechanisms must be

  20. Failure and deformation mechanisms at macro- and nano-scales of alkali activated clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekhar Das, Pradip; Bhattacharya, Manjima; Chanda, Dipak Kr; Dalui, Srikanta; Acharya, Saikat; Ghosh, Swapankumar; Mukhopadhyay, Anoop Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Here we report two qualitative models on failure and deformation mechanisms at macro- and nano-scales of alkali activated clay (AACL), a material of extraordinary importance as a low cost building material. The models were based on experimental data of compressive failure and nanoindentation response of the AACL materials. A 420% improvement in compressive strength (σ c) of the AACL was achieved after 28 days (d) of curing at room temperature and it correlated well with the decrements in the residual alkali and pH concentrations with the increase in curing time. Based on extensive post-mortem FE-SEM examinations, a schematic model for the compressive failure mechanism of AACL was proposed. In addition, the nanoindentation results of AACL provided the first ever experimental evidence of the presence of nano-scale plasticity and a nano-scale contact deformation resistance that increased with the applied load. These results meant the development of a unique strain tolerant microstructure in the AACL of Indian origin. The implications of these new observations were discussed in terms of a qualitative model based on the deformation of layered clay structure.

  1. Crustal signatures of the tectonic development of the North American midcontinent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGlannan, Austin J.; Gilbert, Hersh

    2016-01-01

    The stable eastern portion of the North American continent offers an excellent environment to study the tectonic development of intra-continental structures. The midcontinent of North America formed by the accretion of Proterozoic terranes, and has since experienced episodes of deformation during the subsidence of the Illinois Basin and uplift of the Ozark Plateau. Rifting also initiated in eastern North America, but extension did not continue and arms of failed rifts extend across the region. The New Madrid Seismic Zone, situated within a portion of the failed Reelfoot Rift, represents an active zone of intraplate seismicity. Analyzing the structure of the crust and upper mantle within the midcontinent will therefore provide insight into the factors that lead to intraplate deformation. Using data from over 180 Transportable Array seismic stations, we calculate receiver functions to investigate the crust and upper mantle of the midcontinent. At close to 40 km thick, the crust of the New Madrid Seismic Zone is thinner than in the surrounding areas outside of the Reelfoot Rift and Rough Creek Graben. The Illinois Basin cannot be characterized by a single crustal structure, as crust near 50 km thick in the central portion of the basin thins to between 40 and 45 km thick towards the northern and southern portions of the basin. Discontinuities within the crust and upper mantle are prominent in and around the New Madrid Seismic Zone and mark locations of crustal modification and underplating. Comparing changes in crustal structure to the distribution of Bouguer gravity anomalies, the presence of positive gravity anomalies suggests that higher density crust plays a role in maintaining low surface elevations within the Reelfoot Rift. Conversely, a negative gravity anomaly in an area of thinner crust within the Ozark Plateau supports the need for low-density crustal material to influence the uplift of the plateau.

  2. Assessment of Tungsten Content on Tertiary Creep Deformation Behavior of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanaja, J.; Laha, Kinkar

    2015-10-01

    Tertiary creep deformation behavior of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels having different tungsten contents has been assessed. Creep tests were carried out at 823 K (550 °C) over a stress range of 180 to 260 MPa on three heats of the RAFM steel (9Cr-W-0.06Ta-0.22V) with tungsten content of 1, 1.4, and 2.0 wt pct. With creep exposure, the steels exhibited minimum in creep rate followed by progressive increase in creep rate until fracture. The minimum creep rate decreased, rupture life increased, and the onset of tertiary stage of creep deformation delayed with the increase in tungsten content. The tertiary creep behavior has been assessed based on the relationship, , considering minimum creep rate () instead of steady-state creep rate. The increase in tungsten content was found to decrease the rate of acceleration of tertiary parameter ` p.' The relationships between (1) tertiary parameter `p' with minimum creep rate and time spent in tertiary creep deformation and (2) the final creep rate with minimum creep rate revealed that the same first-order reaction rate theory prevailed in the minimum creep rate as well as throughout the tertiary creep deformation behavior of the steel. A master tertiary creep curve of the steels has been developed. Scanning electron microscopic investigation revealed enhanced coarsening resistance of carbides in the steel on creep exposure with increase in tungsten content. The decrease in tertiary parameter ` p' with tungsten content with the consequent decrease in minimum creep rate and increase in rupture life has been attributed to the enhanced microstructural stability of the steel.

  3. Crustal Evolution Introduced.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoever, Edward C., Jr.; Korporaal, Arie R.

    1979-01-01

    Detailed are the origins, development, and implementation of the Crustal Evolution Education Project (CEEP). This group has produced, for use in earth science and other classes in grades 8-10, a series of instructional modules based on current scientific research in the composition, history, and processes of the earth's crust. (BT)

  4. Crustal motion in the Antarctic interior from a decade of Global Positioning System measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Michael J.

    A decade of Global Positioning System (GPS) data have been collected at bedrock sites in southern Victoria Land, Antarctica. Measured motions of the crust have been examined to determine if ongoing tectonic deformation occurs within the study area, across the structural boundary between East and West Antarctica. Crustal motions are used to test for activity over the offshore Terror Rift, where young faulting is documented, and to assess locally whether the active Erebus volcano deforms the crust. Bedrock motions caused by large scale ice-mass changes that have occurred in the area since the Last Glacial Maximum are also a major focus of the study. The horizontal GPS motions record Antarctic plate motion of ˜15 mm/yr to the southeast. No deformation is observed over the Transantarctic Mountains Front Zone. Very small amounts of deformation are observed along the Terror Rift, however the recorded direction of motions may be the result of Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA), rather than active tectonics. Recorded motions observed to the south of Ross Island suggest that the Terror Rift continues beneath the Ross Ice Shelf. No volcanic loading signal is observed. Vertical crustal motions exhibit a down-to-the-east tilt over the study area. A suite of earth models, including more than three hundred different mantle viscosity profiles, three different lithospheric thicknesses and three different ice histories, were used to model uplift due to Glacial Isostatic Adjustment driven by ice mass change. None replicate the observed tilt. Two Relative Sea Level curves for the region also could not be replicated by GIA models examined. Comparison of GPS vertical velocities and our GIA models produce well-constrained earth models for the study area, but suggest that current ice history models for the region must be revised to replicate measured crustal motions. We compare the output of our GPS-constrained models with published crustal uplift rates used in modern ice mass balance

  5. Active deformation in the northern Sierra de Valle Fértil, Sierras Pampeanas, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Gustavo; Alvarado, Patricia; Fosdick, Julie C.; Perucca, Laura; Saez, Mauro; Venerdini, Agostina

    2015-12-01

    The Western Sierras Pampeanas region in the San Juan Province is characterized by thick-skinned deformation with approximately N-S trending ranges of average heights of 2500 m and a high frequency occurrence of seismic activity. Its location to the east of the mainly thin-skinned tectonics of the Argentine Precordillera fold-and-thrust belt suggests that at 30°S, deformation is concentrated in a narrow zone involving these two morphostructural units. In this paper, we present new apatite (U-Th)/He results (AHe) across the northern part of the Sierra de Valle Fértil (around 30°S) and analyze them in a framework of thermochronologic available datasets. We found Pliocene AHe results for Carboniferous and Triassic strata in the northern Sierra de Valle Fértil consistent with the hypothesis of recent cooling and inferred erosional denudation concentrated along the northern end of this mountain range. Our analysis shows that this northern region may have evolved under different conditions than the central part of the Sierra de Valle Fértil. Previous studies have observed AHe ages consistent with Permian through Cretaceous cooling, indicating the middle part of the Sierra de Valle Fértil remained near surface before the Pampean slab subduction flattening process. Those studies also obtained ˜5 My cooling ages in the southern part of the Sierra de Valle Fértil, which are similar to our results in the northern end of the range. Taken together, these results suggest a pattern of young deformation in the northern and southern low elevation ends of the Sierra de Valle Fértil consistent with regions of high seismic activity, and Quaternary active faulting along the western-bounding thrust fault of the Sierra de Valle Fértil.

  6. PS-InSAR measurements at the most active volcanoes in Iceland: role of the GEO supersite initiative in deformation monitoring at Bárðarbunga, Askja, Hekla, Katla and Eyjafjallajökull volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, Michelle; Dumont, Stéphanie; Drouin, Vincent; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Spaans, Karsten; Hooper, Andrew; Ófeigsson, Benedikt; Árnadóttir, Þóra; Hreinsdóttir, Sigrún; Michalczewska, Karolina; Hjaltadóttir, Sigurlaug; María Friðriksdóttir, Hildur; Rut Hjartardóttir, Ásta; Magnússon, Eyjólfur; Vogfjörd, Kristín; Jónsdóttir, Kristín; Hensch, Martin; Guðmundsson, Gunnar; Geirsson, Halldór; Sturkell, Erik

    2015-04-01

    deformation studies utilising data spanning this eruption, have provided insight into the shallow plumbing system, which may explain the large reduction in eruption repose interval following the 1970 eruption. InSAR and GPS observations at Katla volcano prior to 2010 suggest no magma induced deformation. However, deformation associated with a small flood at Mýrdalsjökull in July 2011, followed by an increase in micro-seismic earthquakes, could be interpreted in relation to magma movements. Post-eruption deformation observations reveal inflation at Eyjafjallajökull possibly related to the influx of new melt or readjustment of crustal stresses following the 2010 eruption. Continued deflation at Askja caldera since 1983 may have led to crustal weakening and the triggering of a mega rockslide and subsequent tsunami occurring on the 21 July 2014. Interferograms spanning the recent unrest and eruption within the Bárðarbunga volcanic system display both pre-eruptive and co-eruptive deformation associated with the initial dyke emplacement and ongoing magma withdrawal from beneath the Bárðarbunga central volcano. Continued high-resolution geodetic observations at these volcanoes are essential for assessing changes in their behaviour and the associated hazards. Rapid analysis of interferograms combined with GPS and earthquake seismicity measurements assists in tracking the evolution of magmatic activity during volcanic unrest/eruption, and may facilitate the assessment of associated hazards.

  7. GPS constraints on active deformation in the Isparta Angle region of SW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiryakioğlu, İbrahim; Floyd, Michael; Erdoğan, Saffet; Gülal, Engin; Ergintav, Semih; McClusky, Simon; Reilinger, Robert

    2013-12-01

    We use survey and continuous GPS observations during the period 1997-2010 to investigate active deformation in the Isparta Angle region of SW Anatolia, Turkey. This region, bordered by the Fethiye Burdur Fault Zone (FBFZ) in the west and the SE extension of the Aksehir Simav Fault Zone (AKSFZ) in the east, accommodates a part of the active deformation of W Turkey. Our results show that the Isparta Angle region rotates counter-clockwise (CCW) with respect to Anatolia. Both the FBFZ and the AKSFZ are predominantly transtensional boundaries that accommodate southward motion of the Isparta region with respect to Anatolia. The FBFZ has left-lateral strike-slip behaviour along its SW segment that changes to right-lateral strike-slip along its NE extension. This change in the sense of strike-slip motion is accommodated by extension on a NW-SE striking normal fault system that is associated with the Menderes Graben system. Transtensional fault systems along the boundaries of the Isparta Angle with Anatolia are inconsistent with extrusion models for present-day southward motion. An increase in motion rates towards the Hellenic and Cyprus arc subduction systems, and CCW of the Isparta region, supports dynamic models involving active rollback of the subducting African Plate, toroidal mantle flow around the eastern edge of the subducting African slab near the Hellenic arc/Florence Rise junction, and/or gravitational collapse of the overriding Anatolia Plate.

  8. Attenuation Properties of Fontainebleau Sandstone During True-Triaxial Deformation using Active and Passive Ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodfellow, S. D.; Tisato, N.; Ghofranitabari, M.; Nasseri, M. H. B.; Young, R. P.

    2015-11-01

    Active and passive ultrasonic methods were used to study the evolution of attenuation properties in a sample of Fontainebleau sandstone during true-triaxial deformation. A cubic sample of Fontainebleau sandstone (80 mm × 80 mm × 80 mm) was deformed under true-triaxial stresses until failure. From the stress state: σ _3 = 5 MPa and σ _1 = σ _2 = 35 MPa, σ _1 was increased at a constant displacement rate until the specimen failed. Acoustic emission (AE) activity was monitored by 18 piezoelectric sensors and bandpass filtered between 100 kHz and 1 MHz. A source location analysis was performed on discrete AE data harvested from the continuous record where 48,502 events were locatable inside the sample volume. AE sensors were sequentially pulsed during periodic P-wave surveys among 135 raypaths. Analytical solutions for Biot, squirt flow, viscous shear, and scattering attenuation were used to discuss to observed attenuation at various stages of the experiment. We concluded that initial attenuation anisotropy was stress induced and resulted from friction and squirt flow. Later attenuation of the high-frequency spectrum was attributed to scattering as a result of the formation of large macroscopic vertical fractures. Passive (AE) ultrasonic data produced similar information to that from active data but with enhanced temporal and spacial resolution.

  9. Distribution of deformation on an active normal fault network, NW Corinth Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Mary; Meyer, Nicolas; Boiselet, Aurélien; Lambotte, Sophie; Scotti, Oona; Lyon-Caen, Hélène; Briole, Pierre; Caumon, Guillaume; Bernard, Pascal

    2013-04-01

    Over the last 20-25 years, geodetic measurements across the Gulf of Corinth have recorded high extension rates varying from 1.1 cm/a in the east to a maximum of 1.6 cm/a in the west. Geodetic studies also show that current deformation is confined between two relatively rigid blocks defined as Central Greece (to the north) and the Peloponnesus to the south. Active north dipping faults (<1 Ma) define the south coast of the subsiding Gulf, while high seismicity (major earthquakes and micro-seismicity) is concentrated at depth below and to the north of the westernmost Gulf. How is this intense deformation distributed in the upper crust? Our objectives here are (1) to propose two models for the distribution of deformation in the upper crust in the westernmost rift since 1 Ma, and (2) to place the tectonic behaviour of the western Gulf in the context of longer term rift evolution. Over 20 major active normal faults have been identified in the CRL area based specific characteristics (capable of generating earthquakes M> 5.5, active in the last 1 M yrs, slip rate >0.5 mm/a). Because of the uncertainty related to fault geometry at depth two models for 3D fault network geometry in the western rift down to 10 km were constructed using all available geophysical and geological data. The first model assumes planar fault geometries while the second uses listric geometries for major faults. A model for the distribution of geodetically-defined extension on faults is constructed along five NNE-SSW cross sections using a variety of data and timescales. We assume that the role of smaller faults in accommodating deformation is negligible so that extension is fully accommodated on the identified major faults. Uncertainties and implications are discussed. These models provide estimates of slip rate for each fault that can be used in seismic hazard models. A compilation of onshore and offshore data shows that the western Gulf is the youngest part of the Corinth rift having initiated

  10. Exhumed analogues of seismically active carbonate-bearing thrusts: fault architecture and deformation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesei, T.; Collettini, C.; Viti, C.; Barchi, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    In May 2012 a M = 5.9 earthquake followed by a long aftershock sequence struck the Northern Italy. The sequence occurred at 4-10 km depth within the active front of Northern Apennines Prism and the major events nucleate within, or propagate through, a thick sequence of carbonates. In an inner sector of the Northern Apennines, ancient carbonate-bearing thrusts exposed at the surface, represent exhumed analogues of structures generating seismicity in the active front. Here we document fault architecture and deformation mechanisms of three regional carbonate bearing thrusts with displacement of several kilometers and exhumation in the range of 1-4 km. Fault zone structure and deformation mechanisms are controlled by the lithology of the faulted rocks. In layered limestones and marly-limestones the fault zone is up to 200 m thick and is characterized by intense pressure solution. In massive limestones the deformation generally occurs along thin and sharp slip planes that are in contact with fault portions affected by either cataclasis or pressure solution. SEM and TEM observations show that pressure solution surfaces, made of smectite lamellae, with time tend to form an interconnected network affected by frictional sliding. Sharp slipping planes along massive limestones show localization along Y shear planes that separate an extremely comminuted cataclasites from an almost undeformed protolith. The comparison of the three shear zones depicts a fault zone structure extremely heterogeneous as the result of protolith lithology, geometrical complexities and the presence of inherited structures. We observe the competition between brittle (cataclasis, distributed frictional sliding along phyllosilicates and extremely localized slip within carbonates) and pressure solution processes, that suggest a multi-mode of slip behaviour. Extreme localization along carbonate-bearing Y shear planes is our favorite fault zone feature representing past seismic ruptures along the studied

  11. Microbial life in ridge flank crustal fluids.

    PubMed

    Huber, Julie A; Johnson, H Paul; Butterfield, David A; Baross, John A

    2006-01-01

    To determine the microbial community diversity within old oceanic crust, a novel sampling strategy was used to collect crustal fluids at Baby Bare Seamount, a 3.5 Ma old outcrop located in the north-east Pacific Ocean on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Stainless steel probes were driven directly into the igneous ocean crust to obtain samples of ridge flank crustal fluids. Genetic signatures and enrichment cultures of microorganisms demonstrate that these crustal fluids host a microbial community composed of species indigenous to the subseafloor, including anaerobic thermophiles, and species from other deep-sea habitats, such as seawater and sediments. Evidence using molecular techniques indicates the presence of a relatively small but active microbial population, dominated by bacteria. The microbial community diversity found in the crustal fluids may indicate habitat variability in old oceanic crust, with inputs of nutrients from seawater, sediment pore-water fluids and possibly hydrothermal sources. This report further supports the presence of an indigenous microbial community in ridge flank crustal fluids and advances our understanding of the potential physiological and phylogenetic diversity of this community.

  12. 10Be surface exposure dating reveals strong active deformation in the central Andean backarc interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Morabito, Ezequiel; Terrizzano, Carla; Zech, Roland; Willett, Sean; Yamin, Marcela; Haghipour, Negar; Wuethrich, Lorenz; Christl, Marcus; María Cortes, José; Ramos, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the deformation associated with active thrust wedges is essential to evaluate seismic hazard. How is active faulting distributed throughout the wedge, and how much deformation is taken up by individual structures? We address these questions for our study region, the central Andean backarc of Argentina. We combined a structural and geomorphological approach with surface exposure dating (10Be) of alluvial fans and strath terraces in two key localities at ~32° S: the Cerro Salinas, located in the active orogenic front of the Precordillera, and the Barreal block in the interior of the Andean mountain range. We analysed 22 surface samples and 6 depth profiles. At the thrust front, the oldest terrace (T1) yields an age of 100-130 ka, the intermediate terrace (T2) between 40-95 ka, and the youngest terrace (T3) an age of ~20 ka. In the Andean interior, T1´ dates to 117-146 ka, T2´ to ~70 ka, and T3´ to ~20 ka, all calculations assuming negligible erosion and using the scaling scheme for spallation based on Lal 1991, Stone 2000. Vertical slip rates of fault offsets are 0.3-0.5 mm/yr and of 0.6-1.2 mm/yr at the thrust front and in the Andean interior, respectively. Our results highlight: i) fault activity related to the growth of the Andean orogenic wedge is not only limited to a narrow thrust front zone. Internal structures have been active during the last 150 ka, ii) deformation rates in the Andean interior are comparable or even higher that those estimated and reported along the emerging thrust front, iii) distribution of active faulting seems to account for unsteady state conditions, and iv) seismic hazards may be more relevant in the internal parts of the Andean orogen than assumed so far. References Lal, D., 1991: Cosmic ray labeling of erosion surfaces: In situ nuclide production rates and erosion models. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 104: 424-439. Stone, J.O., 2000: Air pressure and cosmogenic isotope production. Journal of Geophysical

  13. Investigation of the Deformation Activation Volume of an Ultrafinegrained Ti50Ni50 Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunderov, D. V.; Churakova, A. A.; Lukianov, A. V.; Prokofiev, E. A.; Prokoshkin, S. D.; Kreizberg, A. Yu.; Raab, G. I.; Sabirov, I. N.

    2015-10-01

    The mechanical properties, strain rate sensitivity (m) and deformation activation volume (ΔV) are investigated at the experimental temperatures from 20 to 400°C in a Ti50Ni50 alloy in a coarse-grained (CG) state with the austenite grain size D = 200 μm and in an ultrafine-grained (UFG) state with D = 700 μm following an ECAP treatment. It is observed that this treatment improves the yield strength of the alloy compared to its CG-state. The strain rate sensitivity, m, is found to be by a factor of 1.5-2 higher than that of CG-specimens; it increases with the temperature in both states of the material. As the temperature of the material in tension increases up to Т = 150-250°C, parameter ΔV increases to its maximum and with a further growth of the experimental temperature to 400°C, parameter ΔV decreases. The deformation activation volume of the alloy in the UFG-state is by a factor of 2-4 larger than that in the CG-state for the same experimental temperatures.

  14. Active salt deformation and rapid, transient incision along the Colorado River near Moab, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochems, Andrew P.; Pederson, Joel L.

    2015-04-01

    In certain settings, erosion is driven by and balanced with tectonic uplift, but the evolution of many landscapes is dominated by other factors such as geologic substrate, drainage history, and transient incision. The Colorado Plateau is an example where these controls are debated and where salt deformation is hypothesized to be locally active and driven by differential unloading, although this is unconfirmed and unquantified in most places. We use luminescence-dated Colorado River terraces upstream of Moab, Utah, to quantify rates of salt-driven subsidence and uplift at the local scale. Active deformation in the study area is also supported by patterns of concavity along tributary drainages crossing salt structures. Subsidence in Professor Valley at a time-averaged rate of ~500 m/Myr (meters/million years) is superimposed upon rapid bedrock incision rates that increase from ~600 to ~900 m/Myr upstream through the study area. Such high rates are unexpected given the absence of sources of regional tectonic uplift here. Instead, the incision rate pattern across the greater area is consistent with a transient signal, perhaps still from ancient drainage integration through Grand Canyon far downstream, and then amplified by unloading at both the broad regional scale and at the local canyon scale.

  15. Martian sub-crustal stress from gravity and topographic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenzer, Robert; Eshagh, Mehdi; Jin, Shuanggen

    2015-09-01

    The latest Martian gravity and topographic models derived from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter and the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft tracking data are used to compute the sub-crustal stress field on Mars. For this purpose, we apply the method for a simultaneous determination of the horizontal sub-crustal stress component and the crustal thickness based on solving the Navier-Stokes problem and incorporating the Vening Meinesz-Moritz inverse problem of isostasy. Results reveal that most of the Martian sub-crustal stress is concentrated in the Tharsis region, with the most prominent signatures attributed to a formation of Tharsis major volcanoes followed by crustal loading. The stress distribution across the Valles Marineris rift valleys indicates extensional tectonism. This finding agrees with more recent theories of a tectonic origin of Valles Marineris caused, for instance, by a crustal loading of the Tharsis bulge that resulted in a regional trusting and folding. Aside from these features, the Martian stress field is relatively smooth with only a slightly enhanced pattern of major impact basins. The signatures of active global tectonics and polar ice load are absent. Whereas the signature of the hemispheric dichotomy is also missing, the long-wavelength spectrum of the stress field comprises the signature of additional dichotomy attributed to the isostatically uncompensated crustal load of Tharsis volcanic accumulations. These results suggest a different origin of the Earth's and Martian sub-crustal stress. Whereas the former is mainly related to active global tectonics, the latter is generated by a crustal loading and regional tectonism associated with a volcanic evolution on Mars. The additional sub-crustal stress around major impact basins is likely explained by a crustal extrusion after impact followed by a Moho uplift.

  16. Lunar Crustal Stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCallum, I. S.; O'Brien, H. E.

    1996-03-01

    Intense bombardment during the first 600 Ma of lunar history has rendered the task of reconstructing the stratigraphy of the lunar crust especially difficult. On a planetary scale, the distribution of lithologies around multi-ringed basins coupled with orbital geochemical data reveal that the lunar crust is heterogeneous both laterally and vertically. Ejecta from the large multi-ringed basins is exclusively of crustal origin since twenty five years of lunar sample study have failed to identify any unequivocal mantle samples. Given the most recent determination of crustal thickness, this implies an upper limit to the depth of excavation of around 60 km. In the younger multi-ringed basins (Orientale and Imbrium), the occurrence of anorthosites in inner rings is consistent with an anorthositic upper crust (Al2O3 = 26-28 wt.%). On the other hand, basin impact melts, most notably the low-K Fra Mauro (LKFM) composition associated with the Imbrium and Serenitatis basins, are distinctly more mafic with a composition corresponding to norite (Al2O3 ~ 20 wt.%). Cratering models suggest that such melts are generated at the lower to middle crustal depths (30 to 60 km). The paucity of unequivocal deep-seated crystalline plutonic rocks is also consistent with cratering models which suggest that unmelted rock fragments in ejecta blankets are most likely derived from the upper part of the crust. Consequently, the possibility exists that no crystalline lunar samples from deeper that ~30 km are present in the returned sample collection.

  17. Lithospheric and crustal thinning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moretti, I.

    1985-01-01

    In rift zones, both the crust and the lithosphere get thinner. The amplitude and the mechanism of these two thinning situations are different. The lithospheric thinning is a thermal phenomenon produced by an asthenospherical uprising under the rift zone. In some regions its amplitude can exceed 200%. This is observed under the Baikal rift where the crust is directly underlaid by the mantellic asthenosphere. The presence of hot material under rift zones induces a large negative gravity anomaly. A low seismic velocity zone linked to this thermal anomaly is also observed. During the rifting, the magmatic chambers get progressively closer from the ground surface. Simultaneously, the Moho reflector is found at shallow depth under rift zones. This crustal thinning does not exceed 50%. Tectonic stresses and vertical movements result from the two competing effects of the lithospheric and crustal thinning. On the one hand, the deep thermal anomaly induces a large doming and is associated with extensive deviatoric stresses. On the other hand, the crustal thinning involves the formation of a central valley. This subsidence is increased by the sediment loading. The purpose here is to quantify these two phenomena in order to explain the morphological and thermal evolution of rift zones.

  18. Deep structure beneath Lake Ontario: crustal-scale Greeneville subdivisions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forsyth, D. A.; Zelt, Colin A.; White, D. J.; Easton, R. M.; Hutchinson, Deborah R.

    1994-01-01

    Lake Ontario marine seismic data reveal major Grenville crustal subdivisions beneath central and southern Lake Ontario separated by interpreted shear zones that extend to the lower crust. A shear zone bounded transition between the Elzevir and Frontenac terranes exposed north of Lake Ontario is linked to a seismically defined shear zone beneath central Lake Ontario by prominent aeromagnetic and gravity anomalies, easterly dipping wide-angle reflections, and fractures in Paleozoic strata. We suggest the central Lake Ontario zone represents crustal-scale deformation along an Elzevir–Frontenac boundary zone that extends from outcrop to the south shore of Lake Ontario.Seismic images from Lake Ontario and the exposed western Central Metasedimentary Belt are dominated by crustal-scale shear zones and reflection geometries featuring arcuate reflections truncated at their bases by apparent east-dipping linear reflections. The images show that zones analogous to the interpreted Grenville Front Tectonic Zone are also present within the Central Metasedimentary Belt and support models of northwest-directed crustal shortening for Grenvillian deep crustal deformation beneath most of southeastern Ontario.A Precambrian basement high, the Iroquoian high, is defined by a thinning of generally horizontal Paleozoic strata over a crestal area above the basement shear zone beneath central Lake Ontario. The Iroquoian high helps explain the peninsular extension into Lake Ontario forming Prince Edward County, the occurrence of Precambrian inlier outcrops in Prince Edward County, and Paleozoic fractures forming the Clarendon–Linden structure in New York.

  19. The interplay between deformation and volcanic activity: new data from the central sector of the Campi Flegrei caldera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaia, Roberto; Sabatino, Ciarcia; Enrico, Iannuzzi; Ernesto, Prinzi; D'Assisi, Tramparulo Francesco; Stefano, Vitale

    2016-04-01

    The new excavation of a tunnel in the central sector of the Campi Flegrei caldera allowed us to collect new stratigraphic and structural data shedding light on the volcano-tectonic evolution of the last 10 ka. The analyzed sequences are composed by an alternation of volcanic, lacustrine, fluvial and marine sediments hosting several deformation structures such as faults, sedimentary dykes and fractures. A review of available well log togheter with the new data were used to perform a 3D reconstruction of paleo-surfaces resulted after the main volcanic and deformation episodes. Results show as the paleo-morphology was strictly controlled by faults and fractures that formed meso-scale channels and depressions subsequently filled by tephra and volcanoclastic sediments. The measured structures indicate an extensional deformation accompanying the ground uplift occurred in various stages of the caldera evolution. Stratigraphic relationships between structures and volcanic deposits further constrain the timing of the deformation phases. Presently an unrest phase of the Campi Flegrei caldera is marked by variations of different parameters such as ground deformation activities well recorded by GPS data, topographic leveling and satellite surveys. The results of this study provide further insight into the long term deformation pattern of the caldera and provide a key to interpret the ground deformation scenarios accompanying a possible resumption of volcanism.

  20. Tectonic Loading of Crustal Faults: How does the Lower Crust behave?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagiya, T.; Asahi, Y.; Ohzono, M.; Hashimoto, M.; Hoso, Y.; Wada, Y.; Hirahara, K.; Takeuchi, A.; Nishimura, T.

    2008-12-01

    Tectonic loading process of intraplate earthquakes is an important but unsolved problem. In particular, mechanical behavior of the lower crust is not well known and the role of the lower crust in stress build-up at crustal faults has not been well understood. We have been conducting a dense GPS observation around two active fault systems, the Atotsugawa Fault and the Itoigawa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line fault system (ISTL), in central Japan. For the Atotsugawa Fault and the Gofukuji Fault, the central segment of ISTL, GPS observation revealed a typical deformation pattern reflecting elastic loading of a strike slip fault system. In both cases, a transcurrent block motion with a locked zone at the top of about 15km reproduces the observed displacement pattern, which is roughly consistent with the seismogenic depth. At the Atotsugawa fault, the last large earthquake was the M7.1 Hietsu earthquake in 1858. Considering the earthquake repeat time, the fault is in the earlier stage during its earthquake cycle. On the other hand, no historical large earthquake is known to have occurred at the Gofukuji fault. The Gofukuji fault is in the late stage of its cycle. According to the elastic-viscoelastic coupling model by Thatcher (1983), the deformation pattern around the fault is expected to change in accordance with the lapse time from large earthquakes. However, two GPS results in central Japan do not match the model prediction. Asahi and Sagiya (2008) investigated the rheological structure of central Japan using postseismic deformation of the 1891 Nobi earthquake. Estimated lithospheric elastic thickness was 37km, corresponding to the whole crust. Thus the lower crust should behave elastically for the time scale of at least 30-40 years. Based on the above observation and consideration, we propose another mechanism for tectonic loading of crustal faults. In our model, the lower crust has a concentrated deformation at the deeper extension of active faults. This concentrated

  1. On the energy conservation during the active deformation in molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Zhong, Zheng

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we examined the energy conservation for the current schemes of applying active deformation in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Specifically, two methods are examined. One is scaling the dimension of the simulation box and the atom positions via an affine transformation, suitable for the periodic system. The other is moving the rigid walls that interact with the atoms in the system, suitable for the non-periodic system. Based on the calculation of the external work and the internal energy change, we present that the atom velocities also need to be updated in the first deformation method; otherwise the energy conservation cannot be satisfied. The classic updating scheme is examined, in which any atom crossing the periodic boundary experiences a velocity delta that is equal to the velocity difference between the opposite boundaries. In addition, a new scheme which scales the velocities of all the atoms according to the strain increment is proposed, which is more efficient and realistic than the classic scheme. It is also demonstrated that the Virial stress instead of its interaction part is the correct stress definition that corresponds to Cauchy stress in the continuum mechanics.

  2. Evaluation of the deformation parameters of the northern part of Eg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Abdel-Monem S.; Radwan, Ali M.; Sharf, Mohamed; Hamimi, Zakaria; Hegazy, Esraa E.; Abou Aly, Nadia; Gomaa, Mahmoud

    2016-06-01

    The northern part of Egypt is a rapidly growing development accompanied by the increased levels of standard living particularly in its urban areas. From tectonic and seismic point of views, the northern part of Egypt is one of the interested regions. It shows an active geologic structure attributed to the tectonic movements of the African and Eurasian plates from one side and the Arabian plate from the other side. From historical point of view and recent instrumental records, the northern part of Egypt is one of the seismo-active regions in Egypt. The investigations of the seismic events and their interpretations had led to evaluate the seismic hazard for disaster mitigation, for the safety of the densely populated regions and the vital projects. In addition to the monitoring of the seismic events, the most powerful technique of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) will be used in determining crustal deformation where a geodetic network covers the northern part of Egypt. Joining the GPS Permanent stations of the northern part of Egypt with the Southern part of Europe will give a clear picture about the recent crustal deformation and the African plate velocity. The results from the data sets are compared and combined in order to determine the main characteristics of the deformation and hazard estimation for specified regions. Final compiled output from the seismological and geodetic analysis will throw lights upon the geodynamical regime of these seismo-active regions. This work will throw lights upon the geodynamical regime and to delineate the crustal stress and strain fields in the study region. This also enables to evaluate the active tectonics and surface deformation with their directions from repeated geodetic observations. The results show that the area under study suffers from continuous seismic activity related to the crustal movements taken place along trends of major faults

  3. Present stage of recent crustal movements and seismicity within Greater Cairo area, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Abdel-Monem S.; Mohamed, Gad-Elkareem A.; Omar, Khaled; Nadia, Abou-Aly

    2014-01-01

    Greater Cairo and the Nile Delta are considered very important, high-density population areas. The subject of the research work is dealing with recent crustal movements and its relation to seismicity and tectonics setting. A Global Positioning System (GPS) network consisting of 11 benchmarks covering Greater Cairo and the southern part of the Nile Delta was established in 1996. Different campaigns surveyed the network. In this study, we used ten measurements collected during the period from 2004 to 2010. The data were processed using Bernese 5.0 software to derive velocity vectors and principal components of crustal strains. The horizontal velocity varies in average between 3 and 6 mm per year across the network. Rate of the accumulated strains in the southern part of Greater Cairo varies from low to moderate. The low strain rates and low level of earthquakes occurrence in the present interval in the Nile Delta area indicated that the rate of the deformation in this area is small. The result from coupling GPS and seismic data indicates that the southern part of the area is seismo-active area when compared with the other parts in the network areas. The paper gives information about the present state of the recent crustal movements within Greater Cairo area to understand the geodynamics of that area. This study is an attempt to build a basis for further development of seismic catastrophic risk management models to reduce a risk of large catastrophic losses within the important area.

  4. USArray receiver-function imaging of crustal lithology and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ma, X.

    2013-12-01

    three layer crust with 10% quartz content yields significant differences from a two-layer model, including 'splitting' of the converted amplitude peak arrivals, that are intriguingly similar to the behavior of observed receiver functions at some sites. In this presentation we will examine evidence for the α- to β-quartz phase transition in receiver functions and its implications. One significant implication would be the potential to estimate geothermal variations in the continental crust from receiver function modeling. A second implication would be the identification of quartz as a significant constituent of the lower crust. Lowry and Pérez-Gussinyé (2011) observed a strong correlation between low bulk-crustal vP/vS (indicating abundant quartz), steep geotherms and active deformation, and subsequent work establishes that quartz is also abundant in ancient orogens. Confirming significant quartz abundance in the lower crust would bolster their hypothesis that the abundance of crustal quartz may control continental deformation via a feedback between lower crustal rheology, advective heating and wetting of the lithosphere.

  5. Crustal structure and extension mode in the northwestern margin of the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jinwei; Wu, Shiguo; McIntosh, Kirk; Mi, Lijun; Liu, Zheng; Spence, George

    2016-06-01

    Combining multi-channel seismic reflection and gravity modeling, this study has investigated the crustal structure of the northwestern South China Sea margin. These data constrain a hyper-extended crustal area bounded by basin-bounding faults corresponding to an aborted rift below the Xisha Trough with a subparallel fossil ridge in the adjacent Northwest Sub-basin. The thinnest crust is located in the Xisha Trough, where it is remnant lower crust with a thickness of less than 3 km. Gravity modeling also revealed a hyper-extended crust across the Xisha Trough. The postrift magmatism is well developed and more active in the Xisha Trough and farther southeast than on the northwestern continental margin of the South China Sea; and the magmatic intrusion/extrusion was relatively active during the rifting of Xisha Trough and the Northwest Sub-basin. A narrow continent-ocean transition zone with a width of ˜65 km bounded seaward by a volcanic buried seamount is characterized by crustal thinning, rift depression, low gravity anomaly and the termination of the break-up unconformity seismic reflection. The aborted rift near the continental margin means that there may be no obvious detachment fault like that in the Iberia-Newfoundland type margin. The symmetric rift, extreme hyper-extended continental crust and hotter mantle materials indicate that continental crust underwent stretching phase (pure-shear deformation), thinning phase and breakup followed by onset of seafloor spreading and the mantle-lithosphere may break up before crustal-necking in the northwestern South China Sea margin.

  6. Quaternary grabens in southernmost Illinois: Deformation near an active intraplate seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, W.J.; Denny, F.B.; Follmer, L.R.; Masters, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Narrow grabens displace Quaternary sediments near the northern edge of the Mississippi Embayment in extreme southern Illinois, east-central United States. Grabens are part of the Fluorspar Area Fault Complex (FAFC), which has been recurrently active throughout Phanerozoic time. The FAFC strikes directly toward the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ), scene of some of the largest intra-plate earthquakes in history. The NMSZ and FAFC share origin in a failed Cambrian rift (Reelfoot Rift). Every major fault zone of the FAFC in Illinois exhibits Quaternary displacement. The structures appear to be strike-slip pull-apart grabens, but the magnitude and direction of horizontal slip and their relationship to the current stress field are unknown. Upper Tertiary strata are vertically displaced more than 100 m, Illinoian and older Pleistocene strata 10 to 30 m, and Wisconsinan deposits 1 m or less. No Holocene deformation has been observed. Average vertical slip rates are estimated at 0.01 to 0.03 mm/year, and recurrence intervals for earthquakes of magnitude 6 to 7 are on the order of 10,000s of years for any given fault. Previous authors remarked that the small amount of surface deformation in the New Madrid area implies that the NMSZ is a young feature. Our findings show that tectonic activity has shifted around throughout the Quaternary in the central Mississippi Valley. In addition to the NMSZ and southern Illinois, the Wabash Valley (Illinois-Indiana), Benton Hills (Missouri), Crowley's Ridge (Arkansas-Missouri), and possibly other sites have experienced Quaternary tectonism. The NMSZ may be only the latest manifestation of seismicity in an intensely fractured intra-plate region.

  7. Influence of thermally activated processes on the deformation behavior during low temperature ECAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, S.; Scholze, M.; F-X Wagner, M.

    2016-03-01

    High strength aluminum alloys are generally hard to deform. Therefore, the application of conventional severe plastic deformation methods to generate ultrafine-grained microstructures and to further increase strength is considerably limited. In this study, we consider low temperature deformation in a custom-built, cooled equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) tool (internal angle 90°) as an alternative approach to severely plastically deform a 7075 aluminum alloy. To document the maximum improvement of mechanical properties, these alloys are initially deformed from a solid solution heat-treated condition. We characterize the mechanical behavior and the microstructure of the coarse grained initial material at different low temperatures, and we analyze how a tendency for the PLC effect and the strain-hardening rate affect the formability during subsequent severe plastic deformation at low temperatures. We then discuss how the deformation temperature and velocity influence the occurrence of PLC effects and the homogeneity of the deformed ECAP billets. Besides the mechanical properties and these microstructural changes, we discuss technologically relevant processing parameters (such as pressing forces) and practical limitations, as well as changes in fracture behavior of the low temperature deformed materials as a function of deformation temperature.

  8. Active deformation processes of the Northern Caucasus deduced from the GPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milyukov, Vadim; Mironov, Alexey; Rogozhin, Eugeny; Steblov, Grigory; Gabsatarov, Yury

    2015-04-01

    The Northern Caucasus, as a part of the Alpine-Himalayan mobile belt, is a zone of complex tectonics associated with the interaction of the two major tectonic plates, Arabian and Eurasian. The first GPS study of the contemporary geodynamics of the Caucasus mountain system were launched in the early 1990s in the framework of the Russia-US joint project. Since 2005 observations of the modern tectonic motion of the Northern Caucasus are carried out using the continuous GPS network. This network encompasses the territory of three Northern Caucasian Republics of the Russian Federation: Karachay-Cherkessia, Kabardino-Balkaria, and North Ossetia. In the Ossetian part of the Northern Caucasus the network of GPS survey-mode sites has been deployed as well. The GPS velocities confirm weak general compression of the Northern Caucasus with at the rate of about 1-2 mm/year. This horizontal motion at the boundary of the Northern Caucasus with respect to the Eurasian plate causes the higher seismic and tectonic activity of this transition zone. This result confirms that the source of deformation of the Northern Caucasus is the sub-meridional drift of the Arabian plate towards the adjacent boundary of the Eastern European part of the Eurasian lithospheric plate. The concept of such convergence implies that the Caucasian segment of the Alpine-Himalayan mobile belt is under compression, the layers of sedimentary and volcanic rocks are folded, the basement blocks are subject to shifts in various directions, and the upper crust layers are ruptured by reverse faults and thrusts. Weak deviation of observed velocities from the pattern corresponding to homogeneous compression can also be revealed, and numerical modeling of deformations of major regional tectonic structures, such as the Main Caucasus Ridge, can explain this. The deformation tensor deduced from the velocity field also exhibits the sub-meridional direction of the major compressional axes which coincides with the direction of

  9. Crustal Strain Patterns in Magmatic and Amagmatic Early Stage Rifts: Border Faults, Magma Intrusion, and Volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebinger, C. J.; Keir, D.; Roecker, S. W.; Tiberi, C.; Aman, M.; Weinstein, A.; Lambert, C.; Drooff, C.; Oliva, S. J. C.; Peterson, K.; Bourke, J. R.; Rodzianko, A.; Gallacher, R. J.; Lavayssiere, A.; Shillington, D. J.; Khalfan, M.; Mulibo, G. D.; Ferdinand-Wambura, R.; Palardy, A.; Albaric, J.; Gautier, S.; Muirhead, J.; Lee, H.

    2015-12-01

    Rift initiation in thick, strong continental lithosphere challenges current models of continental lithospheric deformation, in part owing to gaps in our knowledge of strain patterns in the lower crust. New geophysical, geochemical, and structural data sets from youthful magmatic (Magadi-Natron, Kivu), weakly magmatic (Malawi, Manyara), and amagmatic (Tanganyika) sectors of the cratonic East African rift system provide new insights into the distribution of brittle strain, magma intrusion and storage, and time-averaged deformation. We compare and contrast time-space relations, seismogenic layer thickness variations, and fault kinematics using earthquakes recorded on local arrays and teleseisms in sectors of the Western and Eastern rifts, including the Natron-Manyara basins that developed in Archaean lithosphere. Lower crustal seismicity occurs in both the Western and Eastern rifts, including sectors on and off craton, and those with and without central rift volcanoes. In amagmatic sectors, lower crustal strain is accommodated by slip along relatively steep border faults, with oblique-slip faults linking opposing border faults that penetrate to different crustal levels. In magmatic sectors, seismicity spans surface to lower crust beneath both border faults and eruptive centers, with earthquake swarms around magma bodies. Our focal mechanisms and Global CMTs from a 2007 fault-dike episode show a local rotation from ~E-W extension to NE-SE extension in this linkage zone, consistent with time-averaged strain recorded in vent and eruptive chain alignments. These patterns suggest that strain localization via widespread magma intrusion can occur during the first 5 My of rifting in originally thick lithosphere. Lower crustal seismicity in magmatic sectors may be caused by high gas pressures and volatile migration from active metasomatism and magma degassing, consistent with high CO2 flux along fault zones, and widespread metasomatism of xenoliths. Volatile release and

  10. Structural deformation measurement via efficient tensor polynomial calibrated electro-active glass targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gugg, Christoph; Harker, Matthew; O'Leary, Paul

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes the physical setup and mathematical modelling of a device for the measurement of structural deformations over large scales, e.g., a mining shaft. Image processing techniques are used to determine the deformation by measuring the position of a target relative to a reference laser beam. A particular novelty is the incorporation of electro-active glass; the polymer dispersion liquid crystal shutters enable the simultaneous calibration of any number of consecutive measurement units without manual intervention, i.e., the process is fully automatic. It is necessary to compensate for optical distortion if high accuracy is to be achieved in a compact hardware design where lenses with short focal lengths are used. Wide-angle lenses exhibit significant distortion, which are typically characterized using Zernike polynomials. Radial distortion models assume that the lens is rotationally symmetric; such models are insufficient in the application at hand. This paper presents a new coordinate mapping procedure based on a tensor product of discrete orthogonal polynomials. Both lens distortion and the projection are compensated by a single linear transformation. Once calibrated, to acquire the measurement data, it is necessary to localize a single laser spot in the image. For this purpose, complete interpolation and rectification of the image is not required; hence, we have developed a new hierarchical approach based on a quad-tree subdivision. Cross-validation tests verify the validity, demonstrating that the proposed method accurately models both the optical distortion as well as the projection. The achievable accuracy is e <= +/-0.01 [mm] in a field of view of 150 [mm] x 150 [mm] at a distance of the laser source of 120 [m]. Finally, a Kolmogorov Smirnov test shows that the error distribution in localizing a laser spot is Gaussian. Consequently, due to the linearity of the proposed method, this also applies for the algorithm's output. Therefore, first

  11. Active anthropogenic and surface salt deformation measured by InSAR, northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colon, C.; Webb, A. G.; Lasserre, C.; Doin, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Despite the global occurrence of salt, very few salt bodies outcrop and are presently preserved at the surface. Because of this much of our knowledge on salt structures is sourced from subsurface imaging and modeling and less from field based studies. Using interferometry of synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) we monitor surface displacements across four surface salt outcrops in the western margin of the Kuqa fold-thrust belt of Xinjiang Province, China. An InSAR time series was constructed from 40 Envisat ASAR C-band images between June 2003 and October 2010. Interferometric processing was completed using the New Small Baseline Algorithm Subset (NSBAS). These poorly studied salt structures provide a fresh opportunity to study how salt behaves on the surface. The salt bodies outcrop along an active intracontinental thrust system between the Tian Shan and Tarim basin to the south. The four surface namakiers (salt glaciers) were analyzed in this study include: the Quele, Awate, Bozidun, and an unnamed structure referred to as the Western namakier. The ~35 km long Quele namakier is a line-sourced structure advancing along the Quele salt thrust. The other three namakiers range between ~1-3 km long and are point-sourced structures. The namakiers studied display non-steady deformation with rates of displacement varying between uplifts of up to +4 cm/yr and subsidence rates of -4 cm/yr. Additionally, the Kuqa fold-thrust belt hosts a number of hydrocarbon fields and InSAR measurements detect significant anthropogenic deformation associated with hydrocarbon extraction and fluid injection.

  12. Plate Margin Deformation and Active Tectonics Along the Northern Edge of the Yakutat Terrane in the Saint Elias Orogen, Alaska and Yukon, Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruhn, Ronald L.; Sauber, Jeanne; Cotton, Michele M.; Pavlis, Terry L.; Burgess, Evan; Ruppert, Natalia; Forster, Richard R.

    2012-01-01

    The northwest directed motion of the Pacific plate is accompanied by migration and collision of the Yakutat terrane into the cusp of southern Alaska. The nature and magnitude of accretion and translation on upper crustal faults and folds is poorly constrained, however, due to pervasive glaciation. In this study we used high-resolution topography, geodetic imaging, seismic, and geologic data to advance understanding of the transition from strike-slip motion on the Fairweather fault to plate margin deformation on the Bagley fault, which cuts through the upper plate of the collisional suture above the subduction megathrust. The Fairweather fault terminates by oblique-extensional splay faulting within a structural syntaxis, allowing rapid tectonic upwelling of rocks driven by thrust faulting and crustal contraction. Plate motion is partly transferred from the Fairweather to the Bagley fault, which extends 125 km farther west as a dextral shear zone that is partly reactivated by reverse faulting. The Bagley fault dips steeply through the upper plate to intersect the subduction megathrust at depth, forming a narrow fault-bounded crustal sliver in the obliquely convergent plate margin. Since . 20 Ma the Bagley fault has accommodated more than 50 km of dextral shearing and several kilometers of reverse motion along its southern flank during terrane accretion. The fault is considered capable of generating earthquakes because it is linked to faults that generated large historic earthquakes, suitably oriented for reactivation in the contemporary stress field, and locally marked by seismicity. The fault may generate earthquakes of Mw <= 7.5.

  13. Earth's continental crustal gold endowment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frimmel, H. E.

    2008-03-01

    The analysis of the temporal distribution of gold deposits, combined with gold production data as well as reserve and resource estimates for different genetic types of gold deposit, revealed that the bulk of the gold known to be concentrated in ore bodies was added to the continental crust during a giant Mesoarchaean gold event at a time (3 Ga) when the mantle temperature reached a maximum and the dominant style of tectonic movement changed from vertical, plume-related to subhorizontal plate tectonic. A magmatic derivation of the first generation of crustal gold from a relatively hot mantle that was characterized by a high degree of partial melting is inferred from the gold chemistry, specifically high Os contents. While a large proportion of that gold is still present in only marginally modified palaeoplacer deposits of the Mesoarchaean Witwatersrand Basin in South Africa, accounting for about 40% of all known gold, the remainder has been recycled repeatedly on a lithospheric scale, predominantly by plate-tectonically induced magmatic and hydrothermal fluid circulation, to produce the current variety of gold deposit types. Post-Archaean juvenile gold addition to the continental crust has been limited, but a mantle contribution to some of the largest orogenic or intrusion-related gold deposits is indicated, notably for the Late Palaeozoic Tien Shan gold province. Magmatic fluids in active plate margins seem to be the most effective transport medium for gold mobilization, giving rise to a large proportion of volcanic-arc related gold deposits. Due to their generally shallow crustal level of formation, they have a low preservation potential. In contrast, those gold deposits that form at greater depth are more widespread also in older rocks. This explains the high proportion of orogenic (including intrusion-related) gold (32%) amongst all known gold deposits. The overall proportion of gold concentrated in known ore bodies is only 7 × 10- 7 of the estimated total

  14. Heterogeneity within a deep crustal strike-slip shear zone with implications for lower crustal flow, Athabasca granulite terrane, western Canadian Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leslie, S. R.; Mahan, K. H.; Regan, S.; Williams, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Deep crustal strike-slip shear zones play a fundamental role in lower crustal flow. Although commonly modeled in two-dimensions, regional considerations suggest that large-scale crustal flow is a heterogeneous, three-dimensional process. The Athabasca granulite terrane, western Canadian Shield, exposes a large region of high-pressure tectonite (>20,000 km2) that provides a natural example of ancient lower crustal flow and an analog for similar processes active today in other regions. Regional heterogeneous deformation permits preservation of Neoarchean deformation fabrics and metamorphic textures. The Cora Lake shear zone (CLsz) is a NW-dipping km-scale mylonite to ultramylonite zone that forms a discrete tectonic discontinuity between two rheologically distinct Neoarchean lower-crustal domains. Northwest of the CLsz, the domain is primarily underlain by ~2.6 Ga felsic to mafic metaplutonic gneisses and interlayered ~2.55 Ga felsic granulite. Lithologies here preserve Neoarchean granulite-facies metamorphism coupled with partial melting and synkinematic melt-enhanced ESE-directed subhorizontal flow at ~0.9 GPa (~30 km paleodepths). Southeast of the CLsz, the Chipman domain is underlain by ~3.2 Ga metatonalite gneiss, an extensive ~1.9 Ga mafic dike swarm, and generally minor ~2.55 Ga mafic and felsic granulite. In contrast to the northwest, lithologies of the western Chipman domain document higher pressures at ~1.3 GPa (~40 km paleodepths) synchronous with development of a gently dipping Neoarchean gneissic fabric. Strong, anhydrous Chipman domain lithologies and melt-weakened lithologies to the northwest are juxtaposed by sinistral to sinistral-normal oblique shear along the CLsz, consistent with higher pressures (deeper paleodepths) documented in the footwall Chipman domain. A notable and pervasive feature along strike of the CLsz in the western Chipman domain is the marked increase in abundance of m-scale layers of mafic and felsic granulite westward with

  15. Deformation twinning activated α --> ω transformation in titanium under shock compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Hongxiang; Lookman, Turab

    Materials dynamics, especially the behavior of solids under extreme compression, is a topic of broad scientific and technological interest. However, less is known of the role of grain boundary structures on the shock response of hexagonal-close-packed metals. We use molecular dynamics simulations to study deformation mechanisms in shock compressed Ti bicrystals containing three types of grain boundary (GB) microstructures, i.e., coherent twin boundaries (CTBs), symmetric incoherent twin boundaries (ITB) and {1-210}asymmetric tilt grain boundaries. Our results show that both dislocation activity and the α -> ω phase transformation in Ti are sensitive to the GB characteristics. In particular, we find that the elastic shock wave can readily trigger the α -> ω transformation at CTBs but not at the other two GBs, and the activation of the α -> ω transformation at CTBs leads to considerable wave attenuation (i.e., the elastic precursor decay). Combined with first principle calculations, we find that CTBs can facilitate the overcoming of the energy barrier for the α -> ω transformation. Our findings have potential implications for interface engineering and materials design under extreme conditions.

  16. Microearthquake activity, lithospheric structure, and deformation modes at an amagmatic ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Florian; Schlindwein, Vera

    2016-07-01

    While nascent oceanic lithosphere at slow to fast spreading mid-ocean ridges (MOR) is relatively well studied, much less is known about the lithospheric structure and properties at ultraslow MORs. Here we present microearthquake data from a 1 year ocean bottom seismometer deployment at the amagmatic, oblique supersegment of the ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge. A refraction seismic experiment was performed to constrain upper lithosphere P-velocities and results were used to construct a 1D velocity model for earthquake location. Earthquake foci were located individually and subsequently relocated relative to each other to sharpen the image of seismically active structures. Frequent earthquake activity extends to 31 km beneath the seafloor, indicating an exceptionally thick brittle lithosphere and an undulating brittle-ductile transition that implies significant variations in the along-axis thermal structure of the lithosphere. We observe a strong relation between petrology, microseismicity distribution, and topography along the ridge axis: Peridotite-dominated areas associate with deepest hypocenters, vast volumes of lithosphere that deforms aseismically as a consequence of alteration, and the deepest axial rift valley. Areas of basalt exposure correspond to shallower hypocenters, shallower and more rugged axial seafloor. Focal mechanisms deviate from pure extension and are spatially variable. Earthquakes form an undulating band of background seismicity and do not delineate discrete detachment faults as common on slow spreading ridges. Instead, the seismicity band sharply terminates to the south, immediately beneath the rift boundary. Considering the deep alteration, large steep boundary faults might be present but are entirely aseismic.