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Sample records for active cutaneous vasodilation

  1. Muscle metaboreceptor modulation of cutaneous active vasodilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, C. G.; Stephens, D. P.; Johnson, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: Isometric handgrip exercise in hyperthermia has been shown to reduce cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) by inhibiting the cutaneous active vasodilator system. METHODS: To identify whether this response was initiated by muscle metaboreceptors, in seven subjects two 3-min bouts of isometric handgrip exercise in hyperthermia were performed, followed by 2 min of postexercise ischemia (PEI). An index of forearm skin blood flow (laser-Doppler flowmetry) was measured on the contralateral arm at an unblocked site and at a site at which adrenergic vasoconstrictor function was blocked via bretylium iontophoresis to reveal active cutaneous vasodilator function unambiguously. Sweat rate was measured via capacitance hygrometry, CVC was indexed from the ratio of skin blood flow to mean arterial pressure and was expressed as a percentage of maximal CVC at that site. In normothermia, neither isometric exercise nor PEI affected CVC (P > 0.05). RESULTS: The first bout of isometric handgrip exercise in hyperthermia reduced CVC at control sites and this reduction persisted through PEI (pre-exercise: 59.8 +/- 5.4, exercise: 49.8 +/- 4.9, PEI: 49.7 +/- 5.3% of maximum; both P < 0.05), whereas there were no significant changes in CVC at the bretylium treated sites. The succeeding bout of isometric exercise in hyperthermia significantly reduced CVC at both untreated (pre-exercise: 59.0 +/- 4.8, exercise: 47.3 +/- 4.0, PEI: 50.1 +/- 4.1% of maximum; both P < 0.05) and bretylium treated sites (pre-exercise: 61.4 +/- 7.3, exercise: 50.6 +/- 5.1, PEI: 53.9 +/- 6.0% of maximum, both P < 0.05). At both sites, CVC during PEI was lower than during the pre-exercise period (P < 0.05). Sweat rate rose significantly during both bouts of isometric exercise and remained elevated during PEI. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that the reduction in CVC during isometric exercise in hyperthermia, including the inhibition of the active vasodilator system, is primarily mediated by muscle

  2. Prostanoids contribute to cutaneous active vasodilation in humans.

    PubMed

    McCord, Gregg R; Cracowski, Jean-Luc; Minson, Christopher T

    2006-09-01

    The specific mechanisms by which skin blood flow increases in response to a rise in core body temperature via cutaneous active vasodilation are poorly understood. The primary purpose of this study was to determine whether the cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway contributes to active vasodilation during whole body heat stress (protocol 1; n = 9). A secondary goal was to verify that the COX pathway does not contribute to the cutaneous hyperemic response during local heating (protocol 2; n = 4). For both protocols, four microdialysis fibers were placed in forearm skin. Sites were randomly assigned and perfused with 1) Ringer solution (control site); 2) ketorolac (KETO), a COX-1/COX-2 pathway inhibitor; 3) NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor; and 4) a combination of KETO and L-NAME. During the first protocol, active vasodilation was induced using whole body heating with water-perfused suits. The second protocol used local heaters to induce a local hyperemic response. Red blood cell flux (RBC flux) was indexed at all sites using laser-Doppler flowmetry, and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; RBC flux/mean arterial pressure) was normalized to maximal vasodilation at each site. During whole body heating, CVC values at sites perfused with KETO (43 +/- 9% CVCmax), L-NAME (35 +/- 9% CVCmax), and combined KETO/L-NAME (22 +/- 8% CVCmax) were significantly decreased with respect to the control site (59 +/- 7% CVCmax) (P < 0.05). Additionally, CVC at the combined KETO/L-NAME site was significantly decreased compared with sites infused with KETO or L-NAME alone (P < 0.05). In the second protocol, the hyperemic response to local heating did not differ between the control site and KETO site or between the L-NAME and KETO/L-NAME site. These data suggest that prostanoids contribute to active vasodilation, but do not play a role during local thermal hyperemia.

  3. Folic acid supplementation increases cutaneous vasodilator sensitivity to sympathetic nerve activity in older adults.

    PubMed

    Stanhewicz, Anna E; Greaney, Jody L; Alexander, Lacy M; Kenney, W Larry

    2017-02-22

    During heat stress, blunted increases in skin sympathetic nervous system activity (SSNA) and reductions in end-organ vascular responsiveness contribute to the age-related reduction in reflex cutaneous vasodilation. In older adults, folic acid supplementation improves the cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) response to passive heating; however, the influence of folic acid supplementation on SSNA:CVC transduction is unknown. Fourteen older adults (66±1yrs, 8M/6F) ingested folic acid (5mg·day(-1)) or placebo for 6 weeks in a randomized, double-blind, crossover design. In protocol 1, esophageal temperature (Tes) was increased by 1.0ºC (water-perfused suit) while SSNA (peroneal microneurography) and red cell flux in the innervated dermatome (laser Doppler flowmetry; dorsum of the foot) were continuously measured. In protocol 2, two intradermal microdialysis fibers were placed in the skin of the lateral calf for graded infusions of acetylcholine (ACh; 10(-10) to 10(-1)M) with and without nitric oxide synthase (NOS) blockade (20mM L-NAME). Folic acid improved reflex vasodilation (46±4% vs. 31±3 %CVCmax for placebo; P<0.001) without affecting the increase in SSNA (Δ506±104% vs. Δ415±73% for placebo; NS). Folic acid increased the slope of the SSNA:CVC relation (0.08±0.02 vs. 0.05±0.01 for placebo; P<0.05) and extended the response range. Folic acid augmented ACh-induced vasodilation (83±3% vs. 66±4 %CVCmax for placebo; P=0.002); however there was no difference between treatments at the NOS-inhibited site (53±4% vs. 52±4% CVCmax for placebo; NS). These data demonstrate that folic acid supplementation enhances reflex vasodilation by increasing the sensitivity of skin arterioles to central sympathetic nerve outflow during hyperthermia in aged human subjects.

  4. No independent, but an interactive, role of calcium-activated potassium channels in human cutaneous active vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Brunt, Vienna E; Fujii, Naoto; Minson, Christopher T

    2013-11-01

    In human cutaneous microvasculature, endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factors (EDHFs) account for a large portion of vasodilation associated with local stimuli. Thus we sought to determine the role of EDHFs in active vasodilation (AVD) to passive heating in two protocols. Whole body heating was achieved using water-perfused suits (core temperature increase of 0.8-1.0°C), and skin blood flow was measured using laser-Doppler flowmetry. In the first protocol, four sites were perfused continuously via microdialysis with: 1) control; 2) tetraethylammonium (TEA) to block calcium-activated potassium (KCa) channels, and thus the actions of EDHFs; 3) N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) to inhibit nitric oxide synthase (NOS); and 4) TEA + l-NAME (n = 8). Data are presented as percent maximal cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC). TEA had no effect on AVD (CVC during heated plateau: control 57.4 ± 4.9% vs. TEA 63.2 ± 5.2%, P = 0.27), indicating EDHFs are not obligatory. l-NAME attenuated plateau CVC to 33.7 ± 5.4% (P < 0.01 vs. control); while TEA + l-NAME augmented plateau CVC compared with l-NAME alone (49.7 ± 5.3%, P = 0.02). From these data, it appears combined blockade of EDHFs and NOS necessitates dilation through other means, possibly through inward rectifier (KIR) and/or ATP-sensitive (KATP) potassium channels. To test this second hypothesis, we measured AVD at the following sites (n = 8): 1) control, 2) l-NAME, 3) l-NAME + TEA, and 4) l-NAME + TEA + barium chloride (BaCl2; KIR and KATP blocker). The addition of BaCl2 to l-NAME + TEA reduced plateau CVC to 32.7 ± 6.6% (P = 0.02 vs. l-NAME + TEA), which did not differ from the l-NAME site. These data combined demonstrate a complex interplay between vasodilatory pathways, with cross-talk between NO, KCa channels, and KIR and/or KATP channels.

  5. Nitric oxide and receptors for VIP and PACAP in cutaneous active vasodilation during heat stress in humans.

    PubMed

    Kellogg, Dean L; Zhao, Joan L; Wu, Yubo; Johnson, John M

    2012-11-01

    VPAC2 receptors sensitive to vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and pituitary adenylyl cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP), PAC1 receptors sensitive to PACAP, and nitric oxide (NO) generation by NO synthase (NOS) are all implicated in cutaneous active vasodilation (AVD) through incompletely defined mechanisms. We hypothesized that VPAC2/PAC1 receptor activation and NO are synergistic and interdependent in AVD and tested our hypothesis by examining the effects of VPAC2/PAC1 receptor blockade with and without NOS inhibition during heat stress. The VPAC2/PAC1 antagonist, pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide 6-38 (PACAP6-38) and the NOS inhibitor, N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) were administered by intradermal microdialysis. PACAP6-38, l-NAME, a combination of PACAP6-38 and l-NAME, or Ringer's solution alone were perfused at four separate sites. Skin blood flow was monitored by laser-Doppler flowmetry at each site. Body temperature was controlled with water-perfused suits. Blood pressure was monitored by Finapres, and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) calculated (CVC = laser-Doppler flowmetry/mean arterial pressure). The protocol began with a 5- to 10-min baseline period without antagonist perfusion, followed by perfusion of PACAP6-38, l-NAME, or combined PACAP6-38 and l-NAME at the different sites in normothermia (45 min), followed by 3 min of whole body cooling. Whole body heating was then performed to induce heat stress and activate AVD. Finally, 58 mM sodium nitroprusside were perfused at all sites to effect maximal vasodilation for normalization of blood flow data. No significant differences in CVC (normalized to maximum) were found among Ringer's PACAP6-38, l-NAME, or combined antagonist sites during normothermia (P > 0.05 among sites) or cold stress (P > 0.05 among sites). CVC responses at all treated sites were attenuated during AVD (P < 0.05 vs. Ringer's). Attenuation was greater at l-NAME and combined PACAP6-38- and l

  6. Cutaneous Vasodilation during Local Heating: Role of Local Cutaneous Thermosensation

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Gary W.; Foote, Kristopher M.; Nelson, W. Bradley

    2016-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that cutaneous vasodilation during local skin heating in humans could be manipulated based upon the ability to desensitize TRPV4 ion channels by applying the thermal stimuli in a series of pulses. Each subject was instrumented with intradermal microdialysis probes in the dorsal forearm skin and perfused with 0.9% saline at 1.5 μl/min with local skin temperature controlled with a Peltier unit (9 cm2) at 34°C. Local skin temperature was manipulated for 50 min in two classic ways: a step increase to 38°C (0.1°C/s, n = 10), and a step increase to 42°C (n = 10). To desensitize TRPV4 ion channels local skin temperature was manipulated in the following way: pulsed increase to 38°C (1 pulse per min, 30 s duration, 1.0°C/s, n = 10), and 4) pulsed increase to 42°C (1.0°C/s, n = 9). Skin blood flow (SkBF, laser Doppler) was recorded directly over the middle microdialysis probe and the dialysate from all three probes were collected during baseline (34°C) and each skin heating period. The overall cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) response to local heating was estimated from the area under the % CVCmax-time curve. The appearance of the neuropeptide calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) in dialysate did not change with skin heating in any protocol. For the skin temperature challenge of 34 to 38°C, the area under the % CVCmax-time curve averaged 1196 ± 295 (SD) % CVCmax•min, which was larger than the 656 ± 282% CVCmax•min during pulsed heating (p < 0.05). For the skin temperature challenge of 34 to 42°C, the area under the % CVCmax-time curve averaged 2678 ± 458% CVCmax•min, which was larger than the 1954 ± 533% CVCmax•min during pulsed heating (p < 0.05). The area under the % CVCmax•min curve, was directly proportional to the accumulated local skin thermal stress (in °C•min) (r2 = 0.62, p < 0.05, n = 39). This association indicates a critical role of local integration of thermosensitive receptors in mediating the cutaneous

  7. The influence of internal and skin temperatures on active cutaneous vasodilation under different levels of exercise and ambient temperatures in humans.

    PubMed

    Demachi, Koichi; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Kume, Masashi; Tsuji, Michio; Tsuneoka, Hideyuki

    2013-07-01

    To clarify the influence of internal and skin temperature on the active cutaneous vasodilation during exercise, the body temperature thresholds for the onset of active vasodilation during light or moderate exercise under different ambient temperature conditions were compared. Seven male subjects performed 30 min of a cycling exercise at 20 % or 50 % of peak oxygen uptake in a room maintained at 20, 24, or 28 °C. Esophageal (Tes) and mean skin temperature (Tsk) as measured by a thermocouple, deep thigh temperature (Tdt) by the zero-heat-flow (ZHF) method, and forearm skin blood flow by laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) were monitored. The mean arterial pressure (MAP) was also monitored non-invasively, and the cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated as the LDF/MAP. Throughout the experiment, the Tsk at ambient temperatures of 20, 24, and 28 °C were approximately 30, 32, and 34 °C, respectively, for both 20 % and 50 % exercise. During 50 % exercise, the Tes or Tdt thresholds for the onset of the increase in CVC were observed to be similar among the 20, 24, and 28 °C ambient conditions. During 20 % exercise, the increase in Tes and Tdt was significantly lower than those found at 50 %, and the onset of the increase in CVC was only observed at 28 °C. These results suggest that the onset of active vasodilation was affected more strongly by the internal or exercising tissue temperatures than by the skin temperatures during exercise performed at a moderate load in comparison to a light load under Tsk variations ranging from 30 °C to 34 °C. Therefore, the modification by skin temperature of the central control on cutaneous vasomotor tone during exercise may differ between different exercise loads.

  8. The influence of internal and skin temperatures on active cutaneous vasodilation under different levels of exercise and ambient temperatures in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demachi, Koichi; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Kume, Masashi; Tsuji, Michio; Tsuneoka, Hideyuki

    2013-07-01

    To clarify the influence of internal and skin temperature on the active cutaneous vasodilation during exercise, the body temperature thresholds for the onset of active vasodilation during light or moderate exercise under different ambient temperature conditions were compared. Seven male subjects performed 30 min of a cycling exercise at 20 % or 50 % of peak oxygen uptake in a room maintained at 20, 24, or 28 °C. Esophageal (Tes) and mean skin temperature (Tsk) as measured by a thermocouple, deep thigh temperature (Tdt) by the zero-heat-flow (ZHF) method, and forearm skin blood flow by laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) were monitored. The mean arterial pressure (MAP) was also monitored non-invasively, and the cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated as the LDF/MAP. Throughout the experiment, the Tsk at ambient temperatures of 20, 24, and 28 °C were approximately 30, 32, and 34 °C, respectively, for both 20 % and 50 % exercise. During 50 % exercise, the Tes or Tdt thresholds for the onset of the increase in CVC were observed to be similar among the 20, 24, and 28 °C ambient conditions. During 20 % exercise, the increase in Tes and Tdt was significantly lower than those found at 50 %, and the onset of the increase in CVC was only observed at 28 °C. These results suggest that the onset of active vasodilation was affected more strongly by the internal or exercising tissue temperatures than by the skin temperatures during exercise performed at a moderate load in comparison to a light load under Tsk variations ranging from 30 °C to 34 °C. Therefore, the modification by skin temperature of the central control on cutaneous vasomotor tone during exercise may differ between different exercise loads.

  9. Cutaneous vasodilator and vasoconstrictor mechanisms in temperature regulation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, John M; Minson, Christopher T; Kellogg, Dean L

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we focus on significant developments in our understanding of the mechanisms that control the cutaneous vasculature in humans, with emphasis on the literature of the last half-century. To provide a background for subsequent sections, we review methods of measurement and techniques of importance in elucidating control mechanisms for studying skin blood flow. In addition, the anatomy of the skin relevant to its thermoregulatory function is outlined. The mechanisms by which sympathetic nerves mediate cutaneous active vasodilation during whole body heating and cutaneous vasoconstriction during whole body cooling are reviewed, including discussions of mechanisms involving cotransmission, NO, and other effectors. Current concepts for the mechanisms that effect local cutaneous vascular responses to local skin warming and cooling are examined, including the roles of temperature sensitive afferent neurons as well as NO and other mediators. Factors that can modulate control mechanisms of the cutaneous vasculature, such as gender, aging, and clinical conditions, are discussed, as are nonthermoregulatory reflex modifiers of thermoregulatory cutaneous vascular responses.

  10. Current concepts of active vasodilation in human skin

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Brett J.; Hollowed, Casey G.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT In humans, an increase in internal core temperature elicits large increases in skin blood flow and sweating. The increase in skin blood flow serves to transfer heat via convection from the body core to the skin surface while sweating results in evaporative cooling of the skin. Cutaneous vasodilation and sudomotor activity are controlled by a sympathetic cholinergic active vasodilator system that is hypothesized to operate through a co-transmission mechanism. To date, mechanisms of cutaneous active vasodilation remain equivocal despite many years of research by several productive laboratory groups. The purpose of this review is to highlight recent advancements in the field of cutaneous active vasodilation framed in the context of some of the historical findings that laid the groundwork for our current understanding of cutaneous active vasodilation. PMID:28349094

  11. Sex differences in postsynaptic sweating and cutaneous vasodilation

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Daniel; Crandall, Craig G.

    2013-01-01

    The current study aimed to determine whether a peripheral modulation of sweating contributes to the lower sudomotor thermosensitivity previously observed in females during exercise. We examined dose-response relationships in 12 males and 12 females to incremental doses of acetylcholine (ACh) and methylcholine (MCh) for sweating (ventilated capsule), as well as to ACh and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) for cutaneous vasodilation (laser-Doppler). All drugs were infused using intradermal microdialysis. On a separate day, potential sex differences in the onset threshold and/or thermosensitivity of heat loss responses were assessed during progressive increases in mean body temperature elicited by passive heating. Increases in sweating as a function of increasing concentration of ACh (P = 0.008) and MCh (P = 0.046) significantly differed between males and females. Although the concentration eliciting 50% of the maximal sweating response did not differ between sexes for either agonist (P > 0.1), maximum values were lower in females in response to ACh (0.34 ± 0.12 vs. 0.59 ± 0.19 mg·min−1·cm−2, P = 0.04) and MCh (0.48 ± 0.12 vs. 0.78 ± 0.26 mg·min−1·cm−2, P = 0.05). This observation was paralleled by a lower thermosensitivity of sudomotor activity in females during passive heating (1.29 ± 0.34 vs. 1.83 ± 0.33 mg·min−1·cm−2·°C−1, P = 0.03), with no significant differences in the change in mean body temperature at which onset of sweating occurred (0.85 ± 0.19 vs. 0.67 ± 0.13°C, P = 0.10). No sex differences in cutaneous vasodilation were observed in response to ACh and SNP, as well as during passive heating (all P > 0.1). These findings provide direct evidence for a peripheral modulation of sudomotor activity in females. In contrast, sex does not modulate cutaneous vasodilation. PMID:23154992

  12. Mechanisms and time course of menthol-induced cutaneous vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Craighead, Daniel H; McCartney, Nathaniel B; Tumlinson, James H; Alexander, Lacy M

    2017-03-01

    Menthol is a vasoactive compound that is widely used in topical analgesic agents. Menthol induces cutaneous vasodilation, however the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Determining the rates of appearance and clearance of menthol in the skin is important for optimizing topical treatment formulation and dosing. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanisms contributing to menthol-mediated cutaneous vasodilation and to establish a time course for menthol appearance/clearance in the skin. Ten young (23±1years, 5 males 5 females) subjects participated in two protocols. In study 1, four intradermal microdialysis fibers were perfused with increasing doses of menthol (0.1-500mM) and inhibitors for nitric oxide (NO), endothelium derived hyperpolarizing factors (EDHFs), and sensory nerves. Skin blood flow was measured with laser Doppler flowmetry and normalized to %CVCmax. In study 2, two intradermal microdialysis fibers were perfused with lactated Ringer's solution. 0.017mL·cm(-2) of a 4% menthol gel was placed over each fiber. 5μL samples of dialysate from the microdialysis fibers were collected every 30min and analyzed for the presence of menthol with high performance gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Skin blood flow (laser speckle contrast imaging) and subjective ratings of menthol sensation were simultaneously obtained with dialysate samples. In study 1, menthol induced cutaneous vasodilation at all doses ≥100mM (all p<0.05). However, inhibition of either NO, EDHFs, or sensory nerves fully inhibited menthol-mediated vasodilation (all p>0.05). In study 2, significant menthol was detected in dialysate 30min post menthol application (0.89ng, p=0.0002). Relative to baseline, cutaneous vasodilation was elevated from minutes 15-45 and ratings of menthol sensation were elevated from minute 5-60 post menthol application (all p<0.05). Menthol induces cutaneous vasodilation in the skin through multiple vasodilator pathways, including NO, EDHF, and sensory

  13. Atropine-Induced Cutaneous Vasodilation Decreases Body Temperature during Exercise,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-01

    during exercise in a cool environment after atropine treatment decreased body temperature and resulted in further suppression of eccrine sweating , thereby...block nsumber) FIEL GRUP SB-GOUP cholinergic blockage, skin blood flow, sweating , temperature regulation, vasodilation * 19. ABSTRACT (Contine on...revese sf neceury and Ilentify by block number) Jil ystemic atropine enhances forearm cutaneous blood flow (FBF) but depresses forearm sweating (Ia5) in

  14. Acetylcholine released from cholinergic nerves contributes to cutaneous vasodilation during heat stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibasaki, Manabu; Wilson, Thad E.; Cui, Jian; Crandall, Craig G.

    2002-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) contributes to active cutaneous vasodilation during a heat stress in humans. Given that acetylcholine is released from cholinergic nerves during whole body heating, coupled with evidence that acetylcholine causes vasodilation via NO mechanisms, it is possible that release of acetylcholine in the dermal space contributes to cutaneous vasodilation during a heat stress. To test this hypothesis, in seven subjects skin blood flow (SkBF) and sweat rate were simultaneously monitored over three microdialysis membranes placed in the dermal space of dorsal forearm skin. One membrane was perfused with the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor neostigmine (10 microM), the second membrane was perfused with the NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME; 10 mM) dissolved in the aforementioned neostigmine solution (l-NAME(Neo)), and the third membrane was perfused with Ringer solution as a control site. Each subject was exposed to approximately 20 min of whole body heating via a water-perfused suit, which increased mean body temperature from 36.4 +/- 0.1 to 37.5 +/- 0.1 degrees C (P < 0.05). After the heat stress, SkBF at each site was normalized to its maximum value, identified by administration of 28 mM sodium nitroprusside. Mean body temperature threshold for cutaneous vasodilation was significantly lower at the neostigmine-treated site relative to the other sites (neostigmine: 36.6 +/- 0.1 degrees C, l-NAME(Neo): 37.1 +/- 0.1 degrees C, control: 36.9 +/- 0.1 degrees C), whereas no significant threshold difference was observed between the l-NAME(Neo)-treated and control sites. At the end of the heat stress, SkBF was not different between the neostigmine-treated and control sites, whereas SkBF at the l-NAME(Neo)-treated site was significantly lower than the other sites. These results suggest that acetylcholine released from cholinergic nerves is capable of modulating cutaneous vasodilation via NO synthase mechanisms early in the heat stress but

  15. Sensory nerves contribute to cutaneous vasodilator response to cathodal stimulation in healthy rats.

    PubMed

    Gohin, Stéphanie; Decorps, Johanna; Sigaudo-Roussel, Dominique; Fromy, Bérengère

    2015-09-01

    Cutaneous current-induced vasodilation (CIV) in response to galvanic current application is an integrative model of neurovascular interaction that relies on capsaicin-sensitive fiber activation. The upstream and downstream mechanisms related to the activation of the capsaicin-sensitive fibers involved in CIV are not elucidated. In particular, the activation of cutaneous transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channels and/or acid-sensing ion channels (ASIC) (activators mechanisms) and the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP) (effector mechanisms) have been tested. To assess cathodal CIV, we measured cutaneous blood flow using laser Doppler flowmetry for 20min following cathodal current application (240s, 100μA) on the skin of the thigh in anesthetized healthy rats for 20min. CIV was studied in rats treated with capsazepine and amiloride to inhibit TRPV1 and ASIC channels, respectively; CGRP8-37 and SR140333 to antagonize CGRP and neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptors, respectively; compared to their respective controls. Cathodal CIV was attenuated by capsazepine (12±2% vs 54±6%, P<0.001), amiloride (19±8% vs 61±6%, P<0.01), CGRP8-37 (15±6% vs 61±6%, P<0.001) and SR140333 (9±5% vs 54±6%, P<0.001) without changing local acidification. This is the first integrative study performed in healthy rats showing that cutaneous vasodilation in response to cathodal stimulation is initiated by activation of cutaneous TRPV1 and ASIC channels likely through local acidification. The involvement of CGRP and NK1 receptors suggests that cathodal CIV is the result of CGRP and SP released through activated capsaicin-sensitive fibers. Therefore cathodal CIV could be a valuable method to assess sensory neurovascular function in the skin, which would be particularly relevant to evaluate the presence of small nerve fiber disorders and the effectiveness of treatments.

  16. TRPV1 channels are involved in niacin-induced cutaneous vasodilation in mice.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Heather L; Inceoglu, Bora; Ma, Linlin; Zheng, Jie; Schaefer, Saul

    2015-02-01

    Niacin is effective in treating dyslipidemias but causes cutaneous vasodilation or flushing, a side effect that limits its clinical use. Blocking prostaglandins in humans reduces but does not consistently eliminate flushing, indicating additional mechanisms may contribute to flushing. The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel, when activated, causes cutaneous vasodilation and undergoes tachyphylaxis similar to that seen with niacin. Using a murine model, early phase niacin-induced flushing was examined and TRPV1 channel involvement demonstrated using pharmacologic blockade, desensitization, and genetic knockouts (TRPV1 KO). The TRPV1 antagonist AMG9810 reduced the magnitude of the initial and secondary peaks and the rapidity of the vasodilatory response (slope). TRPV1 desensitization by chronic capsaicin reduced the initial peak and slope. TRPV1 KO mice had a lower initial peak, secondary peak, and slope compared with wild-type mice. Chronic niacin reduced the initial peak, secondary peak, and slope in wild-type mice but had no effect in knockout mice. Furthermore, chronic niacin diminished the response to capsaicin in wild-type mice. Overall, these data demonstrate an important role for TRPV1 channels in niacin-induced flushing, both in the acute response and with chronic administration. That niacin-induced flushing is a complex cascade of events, which should inform pharmacological intervention against this side effect.

  17. iNOS-dependent sweating and eNOS-dependent cutaneous vasodilation are evident in younger adults, but are diminished in older adults exercising in the heat.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Naoto; Meade, Robert D; Alexander, Lacy M; Akbari, Pegah; Foudil-Bey, Imane; Louie, Jeffrey C; Boulay, Pierre; Kenny, Glen P

    2016-02-01

    Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) contributes to sweating and cutaneous vasodilation during exercise in younger adults. We hypothesized that endothelial NOS (eNOS) and neuronal NOS (nNOS) mediate NOS-dependent sweating, whereas eNOS induces NOS-dependent cutaneous vasodilation in younger adults exercising in the heat. Further, aging may upregulate inducible NOS (iNOS), which may attenuate sweating and cutaneous vasodilator responses. We hypothesized that iNOS inhibition would augment sweating and cutaneous vasodilation in exercising older adults. Physically active younger (n = 12, 23 ± 4 yr) and older (n = 12, 60 ± 6 yr) adults performed two 30-min bouts of cycling at a fixed rate of metabolic heat production (400 W) in the heat (35°C). Sweat rate and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) were evaluated at four intradermal microdialysis sites with: 1) lactated Ringer (control), 2) nNOS inhibitor (nNOS-I, NPLA), 3) iNOS inhibitor (iNOS-I, 1400W), or 4) eNOS inhibitor (eNOS-I, LNAA). In younger adults during both exercise bouts, all inhibitors decreased sweating relative to control, albeit a lower sweat rate was observed at iNOS-I compared with eNOS-I and nNOS-I sites (all P < 0.05). CVC at the eNOS-I site was lower than control in younger adults throughout the intermittent exercise protocol (all P < 0.05). In older adults, there were no differences between control and iNOS-I sites for sweating and CVC during both exercise bouts (all P > 0.05). We show that iNOS and eNOS are the main contributors to NOS-dependent sweating and cutaneous vasodilation, respectively, in physically active younger adults exercising in the heat, and that iNOS inhibition does not alter sweating or cutaneous vasodilation in exercising physically active older adults.

  18. iNOS-dependent sweating and eNOS-dependent cutaneous vasodilation are evident in younger adults, but are diminished in older adults exercising in the heat

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Naoto; Meade, Robert D.; Alexander, Lacy M.; Akbari, Pegah; Foudil-bey, Imane; Louie, Jeffrey C.; Boulay, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) contributes to sweating and cutaneous vasodilation during exercise in younger adults. We hypothesized that endothelial NOS (eNOS) and neuronal NOS (nNOS) mediate NOS-dependent sweating, whereas eNOS induces NOS-dependent cutaneous vasodilation in younger adults exercising in the heat. Further, aging may upregulate inducible NOS (iNOS), which may attenuate sweating and cutaneous vasodilator responses. We hypothesized that iNOS inhibition would augment sweating and cutaneous vasodilation in exercising older adults. Physically active younger (n = 12, 23 ± 4 yr) and older (n = 12, 60 ± 6 yr) adults performed two 30-min bouts of cycling at a fixed rate of metabolic heat production (400 W) in the heat (35°C). Sweat rate and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) were evaluated at four intradermal microdialysis sites with: 1) lactated Ringer (control), 2) nNOS inhibitor (nNOS-I, NPLA), 3) iNOS inhibitor (iNOS-I, 1400W), or 4) eNOS inhibitor (eNOS-I, LNAA). In younger adults during both exercise bouts, all inhibitors decreased sweating relative to control, albeit a lower sweat rate was observed at iNOS-I compared with eNOS-I and nNOS-I sites (all P < 0.05). CVC at the eNOS-I site was lower than control in younger adults throughout the intermittent exercise protocol (all P < 0.05). In older adults, there were no differences between control and iNOS-I sites for sweating and CVC during both exercise bouts (all P > 0.05). We show that iNOS and eNOS are the main contributors to NOS-dependent sweating and cutaneous vasodilation, respectively, in physically active younger adults exercising in the heat, and that iNOS inhibition does not alter sweating or cutaneous vasodilation in exercising physically active older adults. PMID:26586908

  19. Sensory nerves and nitric oxide contribute to reflex cutaneous vasodilation in humans.

    PubMed

    Wong, Brett J

    2013-04-15

    We tested the hypothesis that inhibition of cutaneous sensory nerves would attenuate reflex cutaneous vasodilation in response to an increase in core temperature. Nine subjects were equipped with four microdialysis fibers on the forearm. Two sites were treated with topical anesthetic EMLA cream for 120 min. Sensory nerve inhibition was verified by lack of sensation to a pinprick. Microdialysis fibers were randomly assigned as 1) lactated Ringer (control); 2) 10 mM nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) to inhibit nitric oxide synthase; 3) EMLA + lactated Ringer; and 4) EMLA + L-NAME. Laser-Doppler flowmetry was used as an index of skin blood flow, and blood pressure was measured via brachial auscultation. Subjects wore a water-perfused suit, and oral temperature was monitored as an index of core temperature. The suit was perfused with 50°C water to initiate whole body heat stress to raise oral temperature 0.8°C above baseline. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated and normalized to maximal vasodilation (%CVC(max)). There was no difference in CVC between control and EMLA sites (67 ± 5 vs. 69 ± 6% CVC(max)), but the onset of vasodilation was delayed at EMLA compared with control sites. The L-NAME site was significantly attenuated compared with control and EMLA sites (45 ± 5% CVC(max); P < 0.01). Combined EMLA + L-NAME site (25 ± 6% CVC(max)) was attenuated compared with control and EMLA (P < 0.001) and L-NAME only (P < 0.01). These data suggest cutaneous sensory nerves contribute to reflex cutaneous vasodilation during the early, but not latter, stages of heat stress, and full expression of reflex cutaneous vasodilation requires functional sensory nerves and NOS.

  20. Attenuated thermoregulatory sweating and cutaneous vasodilation after 14-day bed rest in humans.

    PubMed

    Michikami, Daisaku; Kamiya, Atsunori; Fu, Qi; Iwase, Satoshi; Mano, Tadaaki; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the effect of head-down bed rest (HDBR) for 14 days on thermoregulatory sweating and cutaneous vasodilation in humans. Fluid intake was ad libitum during HDBR. We induced whole body heating by increasing skin temperature for 1 h with a water-perfused blanket through which hot water (42 degrees C) was circulated. The experimental room was air-conditioned (27 degrees C, 30-40% relative humidity). We measured skin blood flow (chest and forearm), skin temperatures (chest, upper arm, forearm, thigh, and calf), and tympanic temperature. We also measured sweat rate by the ventilated capsule method in which the skin area for measurement was drained by dry air conditioned at 27 degrees C under similar skin temperatures in both trials. We calculated cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) from the ratio of skin blood flow to mean blood pressure. From tympanic temperature-sweat rate and -CVC relationships, we assessed the threshold temperature and sensitivity as the slope response of variables to a given change in tympanic temperature. HDBR increased the threshold temperature for sweating by 0.31 degrees C at the chest and 0.32 degrees C at the forearm, whereas it reduced sensitivity by 40% at the chest and 31% at the forearm. HDBR increased the threshold temperature for cutaneous vasodilation, whereas it decreased sensitivity. HDBR reduced plasma volume by 11%, whereas it did not change plasma osmolarity. The increase in the threshold temperature for sweating correlated with that for cutaneous vasodilation. In conclusion, HDBR attenuated thermoregulatory sweating and cutaneous vasodilation by increasing the threshold temperature and decreasing sensitivity. HDBR increased the threshold temperature for sweating and cutaneous vasodilation by similar magnitudes, whereas it decreased their sensitivity by different magnitudes.

  1. Oral atorvastatin therapy increases nitric oxide-dependent cutaneous vasodilation in humans by decreasing ascorbate-sensitive oxidants.

    PubMed

    Holowatz, Lacy A; Kenney, W Larry

    2011-09-01

    Elevated low-density lipoproteins (LDL) are associated with cutaneous microvascular dysfunction partially mediated by increased arginase activity, which is decreased following a systemic atorvastatin therapy. We hypothesized that increased ascorbate-sensitive oxidant stress, partially mediated through uncoupled nitric oxide synthase (NOS) induced by upregulated arginase, contributes to cutaneous microvascular dysfunction in hypercholesterolemic (HC) humans. Four microdialysis fibers were placed in the skin of nine HC (LDL = 177 ± 6 mg/dl) men and women before and after 3 mo of a systemic atorvastatin intervention and at baseline in nine normocholesterolemic (NC) (LDL = 95 ± 4 mg/dl) subjects. Sites served as control, NOS inhibited, L-ascorbate, and arginase-inhibited+L-ascorbate. Skin blood flow was measured while local skin heating (42°C) induced NO-dependent vasodilation. After the established plateau in all sites, 20 mM ≪ngname≫ was infused to quantify NO-dependent vasodilation. Data were normalized to maximum cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) (sodium nitroprusside + 43°C). The plateau in vasodilation during local heating (HC: 78 ± 4 vs. NC: 96 ± 2% CVC(max), P < 0.01) and NO-dependent vasodilation (HC: 40 ± 4 vs. NC: 54 ± 4% CVC(max), P < 0.01) was reduced in the HC group. Acute L-ascorbate alone (91 ± 5% CVC(max), P < 0.001) or combined with arginase inhibition (96 ± 3% CVC(max), P < 0.001) augmented the plateau in vasodilation in the HC group but not the NC group (ascorbate: 96 ± 2; combo: 93 ± 4% CVC(max), both P > 0.05). After the atorvastatin intervention NO-dependent vasodilation was augmented in the HC group (HC postatorvastatin: 64 ± 4% CVC(max), P < 0.01), and there was no further effect of ascorbate alone (58 ± 4% CVC(max,) P > 0.05) or combined with arginase inhibition (67 ± 4% CVC(max,) P > 0.05). Increased ascorbate-sensitive oxidants contribute to hypercholesteromic associated cutaneous microvascular dysfunction which is

  2. Relationship between mean body temperature calculated by two- or three-compartment models and active cutaneous vasodilation in humans: a comparison between cool and warm environments during leg exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demachi, Koichi; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Tsuneoka, Hideyuki

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether the three-compartment model of mean body temperature (Tb3) calculated from the esophageal temperature (Tes), temperature in deep tissue of exercising muscle (Tdt), and mean skin temperature (Tsk) has the potential to provide a better match with the thermoregulatory responses than the two-component model of mean body temperature (Tb2) calculated from Tes and Tsk. Seven male subjects performed 40 min of a prolonged cycling exercise at 30% maximal oxygen uptake at 21°C or 31°C (50% relative humidity). Throughout the experiment, Tsk, Tb2, Tb3, and Tdt were significantly ( P < 0.01) lower at 21°C than at 31°C temperature conditions, while Tes was similar under both conditions. During exercise, an increase in cutaneous vascular conductance (skin blood flow / mean arterial pressure) over the chest (%CVCc) was observed at both 21°C and 31°C, while no increase was observed at the forearm at 21°C. Furthermore, the Tb3 and Tdt threshold for the onset of the increase in %CVCc was similar, but the Tes and Tb2 threshold differed significantly ( P < 0.05) between the conditions tested. These results suggest that active cutaneous vasodilation at the chest is related more closely to Tb3 or Tdt than that measured by Tes or Tb2 calculated by Tes and Tsk during exercise at both 21°C and 31°C.

  3. Vasodilators

    MedlinePlus

    ... as: High blood pressure High blood pressure during pregnancy or childbirth (preeclampsia or eclampsia) Heart failure High blood pressure that affects the arteries in your lungs (pulmonary hypertension) Direct vasodilators are strong medications that generally are ...

  4. Regional differences in the effect of exercise intensity on thermoregulatory sweating and cutaneous vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Kondo, N; Takano, S; Aoki, K; Shibasaki, M; Tominaga, H; Inoue, Y

    1998-09-01

    To investigate regional body differences in the effect of exercise intensity on the thermoregulatory sweating response, nine healthy male subjects (23.2 +/- 0.4 year) cycled at 35, 50 and 65% of their maximal O2 uptake (VO2max) for 30 min at an ambient temperature of 28.3 +/- 0.2 degrees C and a relative humidity of 42.6 +/- 2.4%. Local sweating rate (msw) on the forehead, chest, back, forearm and thigh increased significantly with increases in the exercise intensity from 35 to 50% VO2max and from 50 to 65% VO2max (P < 0.05). The mean values for the density of activated sweat glands (ASG) at 50 and 65% VO2max at the five sites were significantly greater than at 35% VO2max. The mean value of the sweat output per gland (SGO) also increased significantly with the increase in exercise intensity (P < 0.05). The patterns of changes in ASG and SGO with an increase in exercise intensity differed from one region of the body to another. Although esophageal temperature (Tes) threshold for the onset of sweating at each site was not altered by exercise intensity, the sensitivity of the sweating response on the forehead increased significantly from 35 to 50 and 65% VO2max (P < 0.05). The threshold for cutaneous vasodilation tend to increase with exercise intensity, although the exercise intensity did not affect the sensitivity (the slope in the relationship Tes vs. percentage of the maximal skin blood flow) at each site. Tes threshold for cutaneous vasodilation on the forearm was significantly higher at 65% VO2max than at either 35 or 50% VO2max, but this was not observed at the other sites, such as on the forehead and chest. These results suggest that the increase in msw seen with an increasing intensity of exercise depends first on ASG, and then on SGO, and the dependence of ASG and SGO on the increase in msw differs for different body sites. In addition, there are regional differences in the Tes threshold for vasodilation in response to an increase in exercise intensity.

  5. Acute dairy milk ingestion does not improve nitric oxide-dependent vasodilation in the cutaneous microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Alba, Billie K; Stanhewicz, Anna E; Kenney, W Larry; Alexander, Lacy M

    2016-07-01

    In epidemiological studies, chronic dairy milk consumption is associated with improved vascular health and reduced age-related increases in blood pressure. Although milk protein supplementation augments conduit artery flow-mediated dilation, whether or not acute dairy milk intake may improve microvascular function remains unclear. We hypothesised that dairy milk would increase direct measurement of endothelial nitric oxide (NO)-dependent cutaneous vasodilation in response to local skin heating. Eleven men and women (61 (sem 2) years) ingested two or four servings (473 and 946 ml) of 1 % dairy milk or a rice beverage on each of 4 separate study days. In a subset of five subjects, an additional protocol was completed after 473 ml of water ingestion. Once a stable blood flow occurred, 15 mm-N G -nitro-l-arginine methyl ester was perfused (intradermal microdialysis) to quantify NO-dependent vasodilation. Red-blood-cell flux (RBF) was measured by laser-Doppler flowmetry, and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC=RBF/mean arterial pressure) was calculated and normalised to maximum (%CVCmax; 28 mm-sodium nitroprusside). Full expression of cutaneous vasodilation was not different among dairy milk, rice beverage and water, and there was no effect of serving size on the total vasodilatory response. Contrary to our hypothesis, NO-dependent vasodilation was lower for dairy milk than rice beverage (D: 49 (sem 5), R: 55 (sem 5) %CVCmax; P<0·01). Acute dairy milk ingestion does not augment NO-dependent vasodilation in the cutaneous microcirculation compared with a rice beverage control.

  6. Prolonged head-down tilt exposure reduces maximal cutaneous vasodilator and sweating capacity in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, C. G.; Shibasaki, M.; Wilson, T. E.; Cui, J.; Levine, B. D.

    2003-01-01

    Cutaneous vasodilation and sweat rate are reduced during a thermal challenge after simulated and actual microgravity exposure. The effects of microgravity exposure on cutaneous vasodilator capacity and on sweat gland function are unknown. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that simulated microgravity exposure, using the 6 degrees head-down tilt (HDT) bed rest model, reduces maximal forearm cutaneous vascular conductance (FVC) and sweat gland function and that exercise during HDT preserves these responses. To test these hypotheses, 20 subjects were exposed to 14 days of strict HDT bed rest. Twelve of those subjects exercised (supine cycle ergometry) at 75% of pre-bed rest heart rate maximum for 90 min/day throughout HDT bed rest. Before and after HDT bed rest, maximal FVC was measured, via plethysmography, by heating the entire forearm to 42 degrees C for 45 min. Sweat gland function was assessed by administering 1 x 10(-6) to 2 M acetylcholine (9 doses) via intradermal microdialysis while simultaneously monitoring sweat rate over the microdialysis membranes. In the nonexercise group, maximal FVC and maximal stimulated sweat rate were significantly reduced after HDT bed rest. In contrast, these responses were unchanged in the exercise group. These data suggest that 14 days of simulated microgravity exposure, using the HDT bed rest model, reduces cutaneous vasodilator and sweating capacity, whereas aerobic exercise training during HDT bed rest preserves these responses.

  7. Impaired endothelium independent vasodilation in the cutaneous microvasculature of young obese adults.

    PubMed

    Patik, Jordan C; Christmas, Kevin M; Hurr, Chansol; Brothers, R Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Microvascular dysfunction contributes to the development of cardiovascular and metabolic disease. This study tested the hypothesis that young obese (BMI>30 kg m(-2)), otherwise healthy, adults (N=15) have impaired microvascular function relative to age and sex matched, lean (BMI<25 kg m(-2)) individuals (N=14). Participants were instrumented with two microdialysis probes in the cutaneous vasculature of one forearm; one for a wide dose range of infusions of the endothelium-dependent vasodilator methacholine (MCh) and the other for the endothelium-independent vasodilator sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Local temperature at each site was clamped at 33 °C and cutaneous blood flow was indexed by laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). LDF was recorded while 7 doses of each drug (MCh: 10(-6)-1M; SNP: 5 × 10(-8)-5 × 10(-2)M) were infused at a rate of 2 μl/min for 8 min per dose. Both sites finished with heating to 43 °C and 5 × 10(-2)M SNP to achieve site specific maximal vasodilation. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) was assessed in the last minute of each dose and was used for subsequent calculation of cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; LDF/MAP) and responses were normalized to each individual site's maximal response (%CVCmax). Group four-parameter dose response curves were compared with an extra sum of squares F-test. SNP EC50 was greater in obese relative to lean (-2.931 ± 0.10 vs -3.746 ± 0.18 Log[SNP]M, P<0.001); however, there was no difference in MCh EC50 between groups (-3.796 ± 0.23 vs -3.852 ± 0.25 Log[MCh]M, P=0.81). Additionally, baseline and maximal CVC in both sites were similar between groups (all P>0.05). These results suggest attenuated endothelium-independent response to nitric oxide while endothelium-dependent vasodilation function is maintained.

  8. Nitric oxide synthase inhibition attenuates cutaneous vasodilation during the post-menopausal hot flash

    PubMed Central

    Hubing, Kimberly A.; Wingo, Jonathan E.; Brothers, R. Matthew; Coso, Juan Del; Low, David A.; Crandall, Craig G.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that local inhibition of nitric oxide and prostaglandin synthesis attenuates cutaneous vasodilator responses during post-menopausal hot flashes. Methods Four microdialysis membranes were inserted into forearm skin (dorsal surface) of 8 post-menopausal women (mean ± SD, 51±7 y). Ringers solution (control), 10mM Ketorolac (Keto) to inhibit prostaglandin synthesis, 10mM NG-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) to inhibit nitric oxide synthase, and a combination of 10mM Keto + 10mM L-NAME were each infused at the separate sites. Skin blood flow at each site was indexed using laser-Doppler flowmetry. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated as laser-Doppler flux/mean arterial blood pressure and was expressed as a percentage of the maximal calculated CVC (CVCmax) obtained following infusion of 50mM sodium nitropruside at all sites at the end of the study. Data from 13 hot flashes were analyzed. Results At the control site, the mean ± SD peak increase in CVC was 15.5±6% CVCmax units. This value was not different relative to the peak increase in CVC at the Keto site (13.0±5 % CVCmax units, P = 0.09). However, the peak increase in CVC during the flash was attenuated at the L-NAME and L-NAME + Keto sites (7.4±4 % CVCmax units and 8.7±7 % CVCmax units, respectively) relative to both the control and the Keto sites (P<0.05 for both comparisons). There were no significant differences in the peak increases in sweat rate between any of the sites (P = 0.24). Conclusions These data demonstrate that cutaneous vasodilation during a hot flash has a nitric oxide component. Increases in CVC despite the inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis suggest prostaglandins do not contribute to cutaneous vasodilation during a hot flash. PMID:20505548

  9. Sex- and limb-specific differences in the nitric oxide-dependent cutaneous vasodilation in response to local heating.

    PubMed

    Stanhewicz, Anna E; Greaney, Jody L; Kenney, W Larry; Alexander, Lacy M

    2014-10-01

    Local heating of the skin is commonly used to assess cutaneous microvasculature function. Controversy exists as to whether there are limb or sex differences in the nitric oxide (NO)-dependent contribution to this vasodilation, as well as the NO synthase (NOS) isoform mediating the responses. We tested the hypotheses that 1) NO-dependent vasodilation would be greater in the calf compared with the forearm; 2) total NO-dependent dilation would not be different between sexes within limb; and 3) women would exhibit greater neuronal NOS (nNOS)-dependent vasodilation in the calf. Two microdialysis fibers were placed in the skin of the ventral forearm and the calf of 19 (10 male and 9 female) young (23 ± 1 yr) adults for the local delivery of Ringer solution (control) or 5 mM N(ω)-propyl-l-arginine (NPLA; nNOS inhibition). Vasodilation was induced by local heating (42°C) at each site, after which 20 mM N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) was perfused for within-site assessment of NO-dependent vasodilation. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated as laser-Doppler flux/mean arterial pressure and normalized to maximum (28 mM sodium nitroprusside, 43°C). Total NO-dependent vasodilation in the calf was lower compared with the forearm in both sexes (Ringer: 42 ± 5 vs. 62 ± 4%; P < 0.05; NPLA: 37 ± 3 vs. 59 ± 5%; P < 0.05) and total NO-dependent vasodilation was lower in the forearm for women (Ringer: 52 ± 6 vs. 71 ± 4%; P < 0.05; NPLA: 47 ± 6 vs. 68 ± 5%; P < 0.05). NPLA did not affect total or NO-dependent vasodilation across limbs in either sex (P > 0.05). These data suggest that the NO-dependent component of local heating-induced cutaneous vasodilation is lower in the calf compared with the forearm. Contrary to our original hypothesis, there was no contribution of nNOS to NO-dependent vasodilation in either limb during local heating.

  10. Antagonism of soluble guanylyl cyclase attenuates cutaneous vasodilation during whole body heat stress and local warming in humans.

    PubMed

    Kellogg, Dean L; Zhao, Joan L; Wu, Yubo; Johnson, John M

    2011-05-01

    We hypothesized that nitric oxide activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) participates in cutaneous vasodilation during whole body heat stress and local skin warming. We examined the effects of the sGC inhibitor, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), on reflex skin blood flow responses to whole body heat stress and on nonreflex responses to increased local skin temperature. Blood flow was monitored by laser-Doppler flowmetry, and blood pressure by Finapres to calculate cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC). Intradermal microdialysis was used to treat one site with 1 mM ODQ in 2% DMSO and Ringer, a second site with 2% DMSO in Ringer, and a third site received Ringer. In protocol 1, after a period of normothermia, whole body heat stress was induced. In protocol 2, local heating units warmed local skin temperature from 34 to 41°C to cause local vasodilation. In protocol 1, in normothermia, CVC did not differ among sites [ODQ, 15 ± 3% maximum CVC (CVC(max)); DMSO, 14 ± 3% CVC(max); Ringer, 17 ± 6% CVC(max); P > 0.05]. During heat stress, ODQ attenuated CVC increases (ODQ, 54 ± 4% CVC(max); DMSO, 64 ± 4% CVC(max); Ringer, 63 ± 4% CVC(max); P < 0.05, ODQ vs. DMSO or Ringer). In protocol 2, at 34°C local temperature, CVC did not differ among sites (ODQ, 17 ± 2% CVC(max); DMSO, 18 ± 4% CVC(max); Ringer, 18 ± 3% CVC(max); P > 0.05). ODQ attenuated CVC increases at 41°C local temperature (ODQ, 54 ± 5% CVC(max); DMSO, 86 ± 4% CVC(max); Ringer, 90 ± 2% CVC(max); P < 0.05 ODQ vs. DMSO or Ringer). sGC participates in neurogenic active vasodilation during heat stress and in the local response to direct skin warming.

  11. Impaired acetylcholine-induced cutaneous vasodilation in young smokers: roles of nitric oxide and prostanoids.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Naoto; Reinke, Maggie C; Brunt, Vienna E; Minson, Christopher T

    2013-03-01

    Cigarette smoking attenuates acetylcholine (ACh)-induced cutaneous vasodilation in humans, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that smokers have impaired nitric oxide (NO)- and cyclooxygenase (COX)-dependent cutaneous vasodilation to ACh infusion. Twelve young smokers, who have smoked more than 5.2 ± 0.7 yr with an average daily consumption of 11.4 ± 1.2 cigarettes, and 12 nonsmokers were tested. Age, body mass index, and resting mean arterial pressure were similar between the groups. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was evaluated as laser-Doppler flux divided by mean arterial pressure, normalized to maximal CVC (local heating to 43.0°C plus sodium nitroprusside administration). We evaluated the increase in CVC from baseline to peak (CVCΔpeak) and area under the curve of CVC (CVCAUC) during a bolus infusion (1 min) of 137.5 μM ACh at four intradermal microdialysis sites: 1) Ringer (control), 2) 10 mM N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME; NO synthase inhibitor), 3) 10 mM ketorolac (COX inhibitor), and 4) combination of l-NAME + ketorolac. CVCΔpeak and CVCAUC at the Ringer site in nonsmokers were greater than in smokers (CVCΔpeak, 42.9 ± 5.1 vs. 22.3 ± 3.5%max, P < 0.05; and CVCAUC, 8,085 ± 1,055 vs. 3,145 ± 539%max·s, P < 0.05). In nonsmokers, CVCΔpeak and CVCAUC at the l-NAME site were lower than the Ringer site (CVCΔpeak, 29.5 ± 6.2%max, P < 0.05; and CVCAUC, 5,377 ± 1,109%max·s, P < 0.05), but in smokers, there were no differences between the Ringer and l-NAME sites (CVCΔpeak, 16.8 ± 4.3%max, P = 0.11; and CVCAUC, 2,679 ± 785%max·s, P = 0.30). CVCΔpeak and CVCAUC were reduced with ketorolac in nonsmokers (CVCΔpeak, 13.3 ± 3.6%max, P < 0.05; and CVCAUC, 1,967 ± 527%max·s, P < 0.05) and smokers (CVCΔpeak, 7.8 ± 1.8%max, P < 0.05; and CVCAUC, 1,246 ± 305%max·s, P < 0.05) and at the combination site in nonsmokers (CVCΔpeak, 15.9 ± 3.1%max, P < 0.05; and CVCAUC, 2,660 ± 512%max·s, P < 0

  12. Sensory and sympathetic nerve contributions to the cutaneous vasodilator response from a noxious heat stimulus.

    PubMed

    Carter, Stephen J; Hodges, Gary J

    2011-11-01

    We investigated the roles of sensory and noradrenergic sympathetic nerves on the cutaneous vasodilator response to a localized noxious heating stimulus. In two separate studies, four forearm skin sites were instrumented with microdialysis fibres, local heaters and laser-Doppler probes. Skin sites were locally heated from 33 to 42 °C or rapidly to 44 °C (noxious). In the first study, we tested sensory nerve involvement using EMLA cream. Treatments were as follows: (1) control 42 °C; (2) EMLA 42 °C; (3) control 44°C; and (4) EMLA 44 °C. At the EMLA-treated sites, the axon reflex was reduced compared with the control sites during heating to 42 °C (P < 0.05). There were no differences during the plateau phase (P > 0.05). At both the sites heated to 44 °C, the initial peak and nadir became indistinguishable, and the EMLA-treated sites were lower compared with the control sites during the plateau phase (P < 0.05). In the second study, we tested the involvement of noradrenergic sympathetic nerves in response to the noxious heating using bretylium tosylate (BT). Treatments were as follows: (1) control 42 °C; (2) BT 42 °C; (3) control 44 °C; and (4) BT 44 °C. Treatment with BT at the 42 °C sites resulted in a marked reduction in both the axon reflex and the secondary plateau (P < 0.05). At the 44 °C sites, there was no apparent initial peak or nadir, but the plateau phase was reduced at the BT-treated sites (P < 0.05). These data suggest that both sympathetic nerves and sensory nerves are involved during the vasodilator response to a noxious heat stimulus.

  13. Aging and aerobic fitness affect the contribution of noradrenergic sympathetic nerves to the rapid cutaneous vasodilator response to local heating.

    PubMed

    Tew, Garry A; Saxton, John M; Klonizakis, Markos; Moss, James; Ruddock, Alan D; Hodges, Gary J

    2011-05-01

    Sedentary aging results in a diminished rapid cutaneous vasodilator response to local heating. We investigated whether this diminished response was due to altered contributions of noradrenergic sympathetic nerves by assessing 1) the age-related decline and 2) the effect of aerobic fitness. Using laser-Doppler flowmetry, we measured skin blood flow (SkBF) in young (24 ± 1 yr) and older (64 ± 1 yr) endurance-trained and sedentary men (n = 7 per group) at baseline and during 35 min of local skin heating to 42°C at 1) untreated forearm sites, 2) forearm sites treated with bretylium tosylate (BT), which prevents neurotransmitter release from noradrenergic sympathetic nerves, and 3) forearm sites treated with yohimbine + propranolol (YP), which antagonizes α- and β-adrenergic receptors. SkBF was converted to cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC = SkBF/mean arterial pressure) and normalized to maximal CVC (%CVC(max)) achieved by skin heating to 44°C. Pharmacological agents were administered using microdialysis. In the young trained group, the rapid vasodilator response was reduced at BT and YP sites (P < 0.05); by contrast, in the young sedentary and older trained groups, YP had no effect (P > 0.05), but BT did (P > 0.05). Neither BT nor YP affected the rapid vasodilator response in the older sedentary group (P > 0.05). These data suggest that the age-related reduction in the rapid vasodilator response is due to an impairment of sympathetic-dependent mechanisms, which can be partly attenuated with habitual aerobic exercise. Rapid vasodilation involves noradrenergic neurotransmitters in young trained men and nonadrenergic sympathetic cotransmitters (e.g., neuropeptide Y) in young sedentary and older trained men, possibly as a compensatory mechanism. Finally, in older sedentary men, the rapid vasodilation appears not to involve the sympathetic system.

  14. Intradermal administration of ATP augments methacholine-induced cutaneous vasodilation but not sweating in young males and females.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Naoto; Halili, Lyra; Singh, Maya Sarah; Meade, Robert D; Kenny, Glen P

    2015-10-15

    Acetylcholine released from cholinergic nerves is a key neurotransmitter contributing to heat stress-induced cutaneous vasodilation and sweating. Given that sympathetic cholinergic nerves also release ATP, ATP may play an important role in modulating cholinergic cutaneous vasodilation and sweating. However, the pattern of response may differ between males and females given reports of sex-related differences in the peripheral mechanisms governing these heat loss responses. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC, laser-Doppler perfusion units/mean arterial pressure) and sweat rate (ventilated capsule) were evaluated in 17 young adults (8 males, 9 females) at four intradermal microdialysis skin sites continuously perfused with: 1) lactated Ringer (Control), 2) 0.3 mM ATP, 3) 3 mM ATP, or 4) 30 mM ATP. At all skin sites, methacholine was coadministered in a concentration-dependent manner (0.0125, 0.25, 5, 100, 2,000 mM, each for 25 min). In both males and females, CVC was elevated with the lone infusion of 30 mM ATP (both P < 0.05), but not with 0.3 and 3 mM ATP compared with control (all P >0.27). However, 0.3 mM ATP induced a greater increase in CVC compared with control in response to 100 mM methacholine infusion in males (P < 0.05). In females, 0.3 mM ATP infusion resulted in a lower concentration of methacholine required to elicit a half-maximal response (EC50) (P < 0.05). In both males and females, methacholine-induced sweating was unaffected by any concentration of ATP (all P > 0.44). We demonstrate that ATP enhances cholinergic cutaneous vasodilation albeit the pattern of response differs between males and females. Furthermore, we show that ATP does not modulate cholinergic sweating.

  15. Hypoxic cutaneous vasodilation is sustained during brief cold stress and is not affected by changes in CO2.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Grant H; Fieger, Sarah M; Minson, Christopher T; Halliwill, John R

    2010-04-01

    Hypoxia decreases core body temperature in animals and humans during cold exposure. In addition, hypoxia increases skin blood flow in thermoneutral conditions, but the impact of hypoxic vasodilation on vasoconstriction during cold exposure is unknown. In this study, skin blood flow was assessed using laser-Doppler flowmetry, and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated as red blood cell flux/mean arterial pressure and normalized to baseline (n = 7). Subjects were exposed to four different conditions in the steady state (normoxia and poikilocapnic, isocapnic, and hypercapnic hypoxia) and were cooled for 10 min using a water-perfused suit in each condition. CVC increased during all three hypoxic exposures (all P < 0.05 vs. baseline), and the magnitude of these steady-state responses was not affected by changes in end-tidal CO(2) levels. During poikilocapnic and hypercapnic hypoxia, cold exposure reduced CVC to the same levels observed during normoxic cooling (P > 0.05 vs. normoxia), whereas CVC remained elevated throughout cold exposure during isocapnic hypoxia (P < 0.05 vs. normoxia). The magnitude of vasoconstriction during cold stress was similar in all conditions (P > 0.05). Thus the magnitude of cutaneous vasodilation during steady-state hypoxia is not affected by CO(2) responses. In addition, the magnitude of reflex vasoconstriction is not altered by hypoxia, such that the upward shift in skin blood flow (hypoxic vasodilation) is maintained during whole body cooling.

  16. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase mediates cutaneous vasodilation during local heating and is attenuated in middle-aged human skin.

    PubMed

    Bruning, Rebecca S; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Stanhewicz, Anna E; Smith, Caroline J; Berkowitz, Dan E; Kenney, W Larry; Holowatz, Lacy A

    2012-06-01

    Local skin heating is used to assess microvascular function in clinical populations because NO is required for full expression of the response; however, controversy exists as to the precise NO synthase (NOS) isoform producing NO. Human aging is associated with attenuated cutaneous vasodilation but little is known about the middle aged, an age cohort used for comparison with clinical populations. We hypothesized that endothelial NOS (eNOS) is the primary isoform mediating NO production during local heating, and eNOS-dependent vasodilation would be reduced in middle-aged skin. Vasodilation was induced by local heating (42°C) and during acetylcholine dose-response (ACh-DR: 0.01, 0.1, 1.0, 5.0, 10.0, 50.0, 100.0 mmol/l) protocols. Four microdialysis fibers were placed in the skin of 24 men and women; age cohorts were 12 middle-aged (53 ± 1 yr) and 12 young (23 ± 1 yr). Sites served as control, nonselective NOS inhibited [N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME)], inducible NOS (iNOS) inhibited (1400W), and neuronal NOS (nNOS) inhibited (N(ω)-propyl-l-arginine). After full expression of the local heating response, l-NAME was perfused at all sites. Cutaneous vascular conductance was measured and normalized to maximum (%CVC(max): Nitropress). l-NAME reduced %CVCmax at baseline, all phases of the local heating response, and at all ACh concentrations compared with all other sites. iNOS inhibition reduced the initial peak (53 ± 2 vs. 60 ± 2%CVC(max); P < 0.001); however, there were no other differences between control, nNOS-, and iNOS-inhibited sites during the phases of local heating or ACh-DR. When age cohorts were compared, NO-dependent vasodilation during local heating (52 ± 6 vs. 68 ± 4%CVC(max); P = 0.013) and ACh perfusion (50 mmol/l: 83 ± 3 vs. 93 ± 2%CVC(max); 100 mmol/l: 83 ± 4 vs. 92 ± 3%CVC(max); both P = 0.03) were reduced in middle-aged skin. There were no differences in NOS isoform expression obtained from skin biopsy samples between groups (all

  17. Local tetrahydrobiopterin administration augments reflex cutaneous vasodilation through nitric oxide-dependent mechanisms in aged human skin.

    PubMed

    Stanhewicz, Anna E; Bruning, Rebecca S; Smith, Caroline J; Kenney, W Larry; Holowatz, Lacy A

    2012-03-01

    Functional constitutive nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is required for full expression of reflex cutaneous vasodilation that is attenuated in aged skin. Both the essential cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) and adequate substrate concentrations are necessary for the functional synthesis of nitric oxide (NO) through NOS, both of which are reduced in aged vasculature through increased oxidant stress and upregulated arginase, respectively. We hypothesized that acute local BH(4) administration or arginase inhibition would similarly augment reflex vasodilation in aged skin during passive whole body heat stress. Four intradermal microdialysis fibers were placed in the forearm skin of 11 young (22 ± 1 yr) and 11 older (73 ± 2 yr) men and women for local infusion of 1) lactated Ringer, 2) 10 mM BH(4), 3) 5 mM (S)-(2-boronoethyl)-l-cysteine + 5 mM N(ω)-hydroxy-nor-l-arginine to inhibit arginase, and 4) 20 mM N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) to inhibit NOS. Red cell flux was measured at each site by laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) as reflex vasodilation was induced. After a 1.0°C rise in oral temperature (T(or)), mean body temperature was clamped and 20 mM l-NAME was perfused at each site. Cutaneous vascular conductance was calculated (CVC = LDF/mean arterial pressure) and expressed as a percentage of maximum (%CVC(max); 28 mM sodium nitroprusside and local heat, 43°C). Vasodilation was attenuated at the control site of the older subjects compared with young beginning at a 0.3°C rise in T(or). BH(4) and arginase inhibition both increased vasodilation in older (BH(4): 55 ± 5%; arginase-inhibited: 47 ± 5% vs. control: 37 ± 3%, both P < 0.01) but not young subjects compared with control (BH(4): 51 ± 4%CVC(max); arginase-inhibited: 55 ± 4%CVC(max) vs. control: 56 ± 6%CVC(max), both P > 0.05) at a 1°C rise in T(or). With a 1°C rise in T(or), local BH(4) increased NO-dependent vasodilation in the older (BH(4): 31.8 ± 2.4%CVC(max) vs. control: 11.7 ± 2.0%CVC

  18. The effect of 48 weeks of aerobic exercise training on cutaneous vasodilator function in post-menopausal females.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Gary J; Sharp, Lisa; Stephenson, Claire; Patwala, Ashish Y; George, Keith P; Goldspink, David F; Tim Cable, N

    2010-04-01

    Skin blood flow (SkBF) and endothelial-dependent vasodilatation decline with ageing and can be reversed with exercise training. We tested whether 48 weeks of training could improve SkBF and endothelial function in post-menopausal females; 20 post-menopausal subjects completed the study. SkBF was measured by laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated as LDF/blood pressure. Resting CVC was measured at 32 degrees C and peak CVC at 42 degrees C. Cutaneous endothelial-dependent and -independent vasodilatations were determined by the iontophoresis of acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP), respectively. All assessments described were performed at entry (week 0), and after 6, 12, 24, 36, and 48 weeks of training. Resting CVC measures did not change (P > 0.05) throughout the study. Peak CVC increased (P < 0.05) after 24 weeks (7.2 +/- 1.2 vs. 11.6 +/- 1.4 AU mmHg(-1)) and at the 36- and 48-week assessments (13.0 +/- 1.7 and 14.9 +/- 2.1 AU mmHg(-1), respectively). Responses to ACh also increased (P < 0.05) at the 24-week assessment (5.1 +/- 2.1 vs. 8.55 +/- 2.3 AU mmHg(-1)) and increased further at the 36 and 48-week assessments (11.6 +/- 3.7 and 13.2 +/- 3.9 AU mmHg(-1), respectively). Cutaneous responses to SNP increased (P < 0.05) after 36 weeks (8.7 +/- 2.1 vs. 13.02 +/- 2.23 AU mmHg(-1) at 36 weeks). VO(2max) increased after 12 weeks (23.5 +/- 0.7 vs. 25.4 +/- 0.9 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) and improved (P < 0.05) further throughout the study (31.6 +/- 1.8 ml kg(-1) min(-1) at week 48). Aerobic exercise produces positive adaptations in the cutaneous vasodilator function to local heating as well as in cutaneous endothelial and endothelial-independent vasodilator mechanisms. Aerobic capacity was also significantly improved. These adaptations were further enhanced with progressive increases in exercise intensity.

  19. Heat Exchange through Cutaneous Vasodilation After Atropine Treatment in Two Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-01

    anticholinergic effect of systemic atropine treatment on the eccrine sweat gland is well known and the inhibition of sweat secretion during exercise and heat...anticholinergic, dry heat exchange, sweating , I thermoregulation, vasodilation 19 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block...local sweating rate (-60%) occurred in both environments in the atropine treated subjects.’ During exercise, FBF was 85% greater at 30C and 95% greater at

  20. New approach to measure cutaneous microvascular function: an improved test of NO-mediated vasodilation by thermal hyperemia.

    PubMed

    Choi, Patricia J; Brunt, Vienna E; Fujii, Naoto; Minson, Christopher T

    2014-08-01

    Cutaneous hyperemia in response to rapid skin local heating to 42°C has been used extensively to assess microvascular function. However, the response is dependent on both nitric oxide (NO) and endothelial-derived hyperpolarizing factors (EDHFs), and increases cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) to ∼90-95% maximum in healthy subjects, preventing the study of potential means to improve cutaneous function. We sought to identify an improved protocol for isolating NO-dependent dilation. We compared nine heating protocols (combinations of three target temperatures: 36°C, 39°C, and 42°C, and three rates of heating: 0.1°C/s, 0.1°C/10 s, 0.1°C/min) in order to select two protocols to study in more depth (protocol 1; N = 6). Then, CVC was measured at four microdialysis sites receiving: 1) lactated Ringer solution (Control), 2) 50-mM tetraethylammonium (TEA) to inhibit EDHFs, 3) 20-mM nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) to inhibit NO synthase, and 4) TEA+L-NAME, in response to local heating either to 39°C at 0.1°C/s (protocol 2; N = 10) or 42°C at 0.1°C/min (protocol 3; N = 8). Rapid heating to 39°C increased CVC to 43.1 ± 5.2%CVCmax (Control), which was attenuated by L-NAME (11.4 ± 2.8%CVCmax; P < 0.001) such that 82.8 ± 4.2% of the plateau was attributable to NO. During gradual heating, 81.5 ± 3.3% of vasodilation was attributable to NO at 40°C, but at 42°C only 32.7 ± 7.8% of vasodilation was attributable to NO. TEA+L-NAME attenuated CVC beyond L-NAME at temperatures >40°C (43.4 ± 4.5%CVCmax at 42°C, P < 0.001 vs. L-NAME), suggesting a role of EDHFs at higher temperatures. Our findings suggest local heating to 39°C offers an improved approach for isolating NO-dependent dilation and/or assessing perturbations that may improve microvascular function.

  1. Effect of hypohydration on hyperthermic hyperpnea and cutaneous vasodilation during exercise in men.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Naoto; Honda, Yasushi; Hayashi, Keiji; Kondo, Narihiko; Nishiyasu, Takeshi

    2008-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that, in humans, hypohydration attenuates hyperthermic hyperpnea during exercise in the heat. On two separate occasions, thirteen male subjects performed a fluid replacement (FR) and a no-fluid replacement (NFR) trial in random order. The subjects performed two bouts of cycle exercise (Ex1 and Ex2, 30-60 min) at 50% peak oxygen uptake (Vo2 peak) in 35 degrees C separated by a 70- to 80-min rest period, during which they drank water containing 25 mosmol/l sodium in the FR trial but not the NFR trial. The drinking in the FR trial nearly restored the body fluid to the euhydrated condition, so that the body fluid status differed between the trials before Ex2 (the difference in plasma osmolality before Ex2 was 9.4 mosmol/kgH2O; plasma volume was 7.6%, and body weight was 2.5%). The slopes of the linear relationships between ventilatory variables (minute ventilation, ventilatory equivalents for oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide output, tidal volume, respiratory frequency, and end-tidal CO2 pressure) and esophageal temperature (Tes) did not significantly differ between Ex1 and Ex2, or between the FR and NFR trials. On the other hand, during Ex2 in the NFR trial, the Tes threshold for the onset of increased forearm vascular conductance (FVC) was higher, and the slope and peak values of the relationship between FVC and Tes were lower than during Ex1 in the NFR trial and during Ex2 in the FR trial. These findings suggest that hypohydration does not affect the hyperthermic hyperpnea during exercise, although it markedly attenuates the cutaneous vasodilatory response.

  2. Mechanisms of nicotine-induced cutaneous vasodilation and sweating in young adults: roles for KCa, KATP, and KV channels, nitric oxide, and prostanoids.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Naoto; Louie, Jeffrey C; McNeely, Brendan D; Amano, Tatsuro; Nishiyasu, Takeshi; Kenny, Glen P

    2017-01-10

    We evaluated the influence of K+ channels [i.e., Ca2+-activated K+ (KCa), ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP), and voltage-gated K+ (KV) channels] and key enzymes [(nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)] on nicotine-induced cutaneous vasodilation and sweating. Using intradermal microdialysis, we evaluated forearm cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) and sweat rate in two separate protocols. In protocol 1 (n=10), four separate sites were infused with 1) lactated Ringer (Control), 2) 50mM tetraethylammonium (KCa channel blocker), 3) 5mM glybenclamide (KATP channel blocker), and 4) 10mM 4-aminopyridine (KV channel blocker). In protocol 2 (n=10), four sites were infused with 1) lactated Ringer (Control), 2) 10mM Nω-nitro-L-arginine (NOS inhibitor), 3) 10mM ketorolac (COX inhibitor), or 4) a combination of NOS+COX inhibitors. At all sites, nicotine was infused in a dose-dependent manner (1.2, 3.6, 11, 33, and 100mM; each for 25 min). Nicotine-induced increase in CVC was attenuated by the KCa, KATP, and KV channel blockers, whereas nicotine-induced increase in sweat rate was reduced by the KCa and KV channel blockers (P≤0.05). COX inhibitor augmented nicotine-induced increase in CVC (P≤0.05), which was absent when NOS inhibitor was co-administered (P>0.05). In addition, our secondrary experiment (n=7) demonstrated that muscarinic receptor blockade with 58μM atropine sulfate salt monohydrate abolished nicotine-induced increases in CVC (1.2-11mM) and sweating (all doses). We show that under a normothermic resting state: 1) KCa, KATP, and KV channels contribute to nicotinic cutaneous vasodilation, 2) inhibition of COX augments nicotinic cutaneous vasodilation likely through NOS-dependent mechanism(s), and 3) KCa and K

  3. Antioxidant and Vasodilator Activity of Ugni molinae Turcz. (Murtilla) and Its Modulatory Mechanism in Hypotensive Response

    PubMed Central

    Jofré, Ignacio; Pezoa, Cesar; Scheuermann, Erick; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz; Romero, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is a systemic condition with high morbidity and mortality rates worldwide, which poses an increased risk for cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we demonstrated the antioxidant and vasodilator activity of Ugni molinae Turcz. (Murtilla) fruit, a berry native to Chile and proposed models to explain its modulatory mechanism in hypotensive response. Murtilla fruits were cultivated in a germplasm bank and submitted to chemical and biological analyses. The phenolic compounds gallic acid, Catechin, Quercetin-3-β-D-glucoside, Myricetin, Quercetin, and Kaempferol were identified. Murtilla extract did not generate toxic effects on human endothelial cells and had significant antioxidant activity against ROS production, lipid peroxidation, and superoxide anion production. Furthermore, it showed dose-dependent vasodilator activity in aortic rings in the presence of endothelium, whose hypotensive mechanism is partially mediated by nitric oxide synthase/guanylate cyclase and large-conductance calcium-dependent potassium channels. Murtilla fruits might potentially have beneficial effects on the management of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27688827

  4. Reduced hyperthermia-induced cutaneous vasodilation and enhanced exercise-induced plasma water loss at simulated high altitude (3,200 m) in humans.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Ken; Kamijo, Yoshi-Ichiro; Ikegawa, Shigeki; Goto, Masaki; Nose, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    We examined whether less convective heat loss during exercise at high altitude than at sea level was partially caused by reduced cutaneous vasodilation due to enhanced plasma water loss into contracting muscles and whether it was caused by hypoxia rather than by hypobaria. Seven young men performed cycling exercise for 40 min at 50% peak aerobic power in normoxia at (710 mmHg) 610 m, determined before the experiments, in three trials: 1) normobaric normoxia at 610 m (CNT), 2) hypobaric hypoxia [low pressure and low oxygen (LPLO)] at 3,200 m (510 mmHg), 3) normobaric hypoxia [normal pressure and low oxygen (NPLO)] at 610 m, in an artificial climate chamber where atmospheric temperature and relative humidity were maintained at 30°C and 50%, respectively. Subjects in CNT and LPLO breathed room air, whereas those in NPLO breathed a mixed gas of 14% O₂ balanced N₂, equivalent to the gas composition in LPLO. We measured change in PV (ΔPV), oxygen consumption rate (Vo₂), mean arterial blood pressure (MBP), esophageal temperature (T(es)), mean skin temperature (T(sk)), forearm skin blood flow (FBF), and sweat rate (SR) during exercise. Although Vo₂, MBP, T(sk), and SR responses during exercise were similar between trials (P > 0.05), the sensitivity of forearm vascular conductance (FBF/MBP) in response to increased T(es) was lower in LPLO and NPLO than in CNT (P < 0.05), whereas that of SR was not, resulting in a greater increase in T(es) from minute 5 to 40 of exercise in LPLO and NPLO than in CNT (P = 0.026 and P = 0.011, respectively). ΔPV during exercise was twofold greater in LPLO and NPLO than in CNT. These variables were not significantly different between LPLO and NPLO. Thus reduced convective heat loss during exercise at 3,200 m was partially caused by reduced cutaneous vasodilation due to enhanced PV loss. Moreover, this may be caused by hypoxia rather than by hypobaria.

  5. Pharmacological evidence that 5-HT1D activation induces renal vasodilation by NO pathway in rats.

    PubMed

    García-Pedraza, José-Ángel; García, Mónica; Martín, María-Luisa; Morán, Asunción

    2015-06-01

    5-HT is a powerful vasoconstrictor substance in renal vasculature (mainly by 5-HT₂ activation). Nevertheless, 5-HT is notable for its dual cardiovascular effects, producing both vasodilator and vasoconstrictor actions. This study aimed to investigate whether, behind the predominant serotonergic vasoconstrictor action, THE 5-HT system may exert renal vasodilator actions, and, if so, characterize the 5-HT receptors and possible indirect pathways. Renal perfusion pressure (PP), systemic blood pressure (SBP) and heart rate (HR) measurement in in situ autoperfused rat kidney was determined in phenylephrine infused rats. Intra arterial (i.a.) bolus administration of 5-HT (0.00000125-0.1 μg/kg) decreased renal PP in the presence of a phenylephrine continuous infusion (phenylephrine-infusion group), without modifying SBP or HR. These vasodilator responses were potentiated by 5-HT₂ antagonism (ritanserin, 1 mg/kg i.v.), whereas the responses were abolished by 5-HT₁ /₇ antagonist (methiothepin, 100 μg/kg i.v.) or 5-HT1D antagonist (LY310762, 1 mg/kg i.v.). The i.a. administration (0.00000125 to 0.1 μg/kg) of 5-CT or L-694,247 (5-HT1D agonist) mimicked 5-HT vasodilator effect, while other agonists (1-PBG, α-methyl-5-HT, AS-19 (5-HT₇), 8-OH-DPAT (5-HT1A) or CGS-12066B (5-HT1B)) did not alter baseline haemodynamic variables. L-694,247 vasodilation was abolished by i.v. bolus of antagonists LY310762 (5-HT1D, 1 mg/kg) or L-NAME (nitric oxide, 10 mg/kg), but not by i.v. bolus of indomethacin (cyclooxygenase, 2 mg/kg) or glibenclamide (ATP-dependent K(+) channel, 20 mg/kg). These outcomes suggest that 5-HT1D activation produces a vasodilator effect in the in situ autoperfused kidney of phenylephrine-infusion rats mediated by the NO pathway.

  6. Bronchodilator, vasodilator and spasmolytic activities of Cymbopogon martinii.

    PubMed

    Janbaz, K H; Qayyum, A; Saqib, F; Imran, I; Zia-Ul-Haq, M; de Feo, V

    2014-12-01

    Cymbopogon martinii (Cm.Cr) is traditionally used in south Asian communities for the management of multiple ailments including gastrointestinal, respiratory and vascular disorders and the present study was undertaken to validate these folkloric uses. The application of a methanol extract of the plant (Cm.Cr) to isolated rabbit jejunum preparation exhibited relaxation through decrease in magnitude and frequency of spontaneous contractions. The Cm.Cr also exerted relaxant effect on high K(+) (80 mM) induced contractions in isolated rabbit jejunum preparations. The Cm.Cr and its dichloromethane (Cm.Dcm) and aqueous (Cm.Aq) fractions also caused concentration-dependent relaxation in spontaneous and K(+) (80 mM) induced contractions which are comparables to effects produced by verapamil. Cm.Cr caused shifting of the Ca(2+)-curves toward right, suggesting the presence of a Ca(2+) channel blocking activity. Subsequently, Cm.Cr, Cm.Dcm and Cm.Aq caused relaxation of CCh (1 μM) and K(+) (80 mM) induced contractions in isolated rabbit tracheal preparations, suggesting that the observed relaxant effect can be mediated through antimuscarinic and/or Ca(2+) channel blocking activities. Cm.Cr tested against phenylephrine (PE; 1 μM) and K(+) (80 mM) induced contractions exhibited partial relaxation of isolated rabbit aortic preparations. The above-mentioned studies provided a scientific basis for the folkloric use of Cymbopogon martini in the management of multiple ailments in traditional systems of medicines.

  7. Role of sensory nerves in the rapid cutaneous vasodilator response to local heating in young and older endurance-trained and untrained men.

    PubMed

    Tew, Garry A; Klonizakis, Markos; Moss, James; Ruddock, Alan D; Saxton, John M; Hodges, Gary J

    2011-02-01

    The ability to increase skin blood flow (SkBF) rapidly in response to local heating is diminished with advanced age; however, the mechanisms are unclear. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the role of sensory nerves in this age-related change. A secondary aim was to investigate the effect of aerobic fitness on sensory nerve-mediated vasodilatation in young and aged skin. We measured SkBF (using laser Doppler flowmetry) in young and older endurance-trained and untrained men (n= 7 in each group) at baseline and during 35 min of local skin heating to 42°C at two sites on the ventral forearm. One site was pretreated with topical anaesthetic cream to block local sensory nerve function. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated as SkBF divided by mean arterial pressure and normalized to maximal values (CVC(max)) achieved during local heating to 44°C. At the untreated site, the rapid vasodilatation during the first ~5 min of local heating (initial peak) was lower in the older untrained group (68 ± 3%CVC(max)) compared with all other groups (young trained, 76 ± 4%CVC(max); young untrained, 75 ± 5%CVC(max); and older trained, 81 ± 3%CVC(max); P < 0.05). Sensory nerve blockade abolished these differences among the groups (P > 0.05). The contribution of sensory nerve-mediated vasodilatation was lower in the older untrained group compared with all other groups (P< 0.05). Our results suggest that the age-related decline in the rapid vasodilator response to local heating in human skin is explained by diminished sensory nerve-mediated vasodilatation. These findings also indicate that this age-related change can be prevented through participation in regular aerobic exercise.

  8. Influence of constriction, wall tension, smooth muscle activation and cellular deformation on rat resistance artery vasodilator reactivity.

    PubMed

    Colton, Ilsley; Mandalà, Maurizio; Morton, Jude; Davidge, Sandra T; Osol, George

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated how vasoconstriction (tone), wall tension, smooth muscle activation, and vascular wall deformation influence resistance artery vasodilator reactivity. Resistance arteries, from two different regional circulations (splanchnic, uterine) and from pregnant and non-pregnant rats, were cannulated and pressurized, or mounted on a wire myograph under isometric conditions prior to being exposed to both endothelium-dependent (acetylcholine, ACh) and -independent (sodium nitroprusside, SNP) vasodilator agonists. A consistent pattern of reduced vasodilator sensitivity was noted as a function of extent of preconstriction for both agonists noted in pressurized arteries. A similar pattern regarding activation was noted in wire-mounted arteries in response to SNP but not ACh. Wall tension proved to be a major determinant of vascular smooth muscle vasodilator reactivity and its normalization reversed this pattern, as more constricted vessels were more sensitive to ACh relaxation without any change in SNP sensitivity, suggesting that endothelial deformation secondary to vasoconstriction augments its vasodilator output. To our knowledge, this is the first study to dissect out the complex interplay between biophysical forces impinging on VSM (pressure, wall tension), the ambient level of tone (vasoconstriction, smooth muscle cell activation), and consequences of cellular (particularly endothelial) deformation secondary to constriction in determining resistance artery vasodilatory reactivity.

  9. Affinin (Spilanthol), Isolated from Heliopsis longipes, Induces Vasodilation via Activation of Gasotransmitters and Prostacyclin Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Ruiz, Jesús Eduardo; Rojas-Molina, Alejandra; Luna-Vázquez, Francisco J.; Rivero-Cruz, Fausto; García-Gasca, Teresa; Ibarra-Alvarado, César

    2017-01-01

    Heliopsis longipes roots have been widely used in Mexican traditional medicine to relieve pain, mainly, toothaches. Previous studies have shown that affinin, the major alkamide of these roots, induces potent antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the effect of H. longipes root extracts and affinin on the cardiovascular system have not been investigated so far. In the present study, we demonstrated that the dichloromethane and ethanolic extracts of H. longipes roots, and affinin, isolated from these roots, produce a concentration-dependent vasodilation of rat aorta. Affinin-induced vasorelaxation was partly dependent on the presence of endothelium and was significantly blocked in the presence of inhibitors of NO, H2S, and CO synthesis (NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME), dl-propargylglycine (PAG), and chromium mesoporphyrin (CrMP), respectively); K+ channel blockers (glibenclamide (Gli) and tetraethyl ammonium (TEA)), and guanylate cyclase and cyclooxygenase inhibitors (1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) and indomethacin (INDO), respectively). Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that affinin induces vasodilation by mechanisms that involve gasotransmitters, and prostacyclin signaling pathways. These findings indicate that this natural alkamide has therapeutic potential in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:28117739

  10. Modulation of muscle metaboreceptor activation upon sweating and cutaneous vascular responses to rising core temperature in humans.

    PubMed

    Amano, Tatsuro; Ichinose, Masashi; Inoue, Yoshimitsu; Nishiyasu, Takeshi; Koga, Shunsaku; Kondo, Narihiko

    2015-06-15

    The present study investigated the role of muscle metaboreceptor activation on human thermoregulation by measuring core temperature thresholds and slopes for sweating and cutaneous vascular responses during passive heating associated with central and peripheral mechanisms. Six male and eight female subjects inserted their lower legs into hot water (43°C) while wearing a water perfusion suit on the upper body (34°C). One minute after immersion, an isometric handgrip exercise--40% of maximum voluntary contraction-was conducted for 1.5 min in both control and experimental conditions, while postexercise occlusion was performed in the experimental condition only for 9 min. The postexercise forearm occlusion during passive heating consistently stimulated muscle metaboreceptors, as implicated by significantly elevated mean arterial blood pressure throughout the experimental period (P <0.05). Stimulation of the forearm muscle metaboreceptors increased sweating and cutaneous vascular responses during passive heating, and was associated with significant reductions in esophageal temperature threshold of sweating and cutaneous vasodilation (Δ threshold, sweating: 0.33 ± 0.05 and 0.16 ± 0.04°C, cutaneous vascular conductance: 0.38 ± 0.08 and 0.16 ± 0.05°C for control and experimental groups, respectively, P < 0.05). The slopes of these responses were not different between the conditions. These results suggest that muscle metaboreceptor activation in the forearm accelerates sweating and cutaneous vasodilation during passive heating associated with a reduction in core temperature thresholds and may be related to central mechanisms controlling heat loss responses.

  11. Constitutive nitric oxide synthase activation is a significant route for nitroglycerin-mediated vasodilation

    PubMed Central

    Bonini, Marcelo G.; Stadler, Krisztian; de Oliveira Silva, Sueli; Corbett, Jean; Dore, Michael; Petranka, John; Fernandes, Denise C.; Tanaka, Leonardo Y.; Duma, Danielle; Laurindo, Francisco R. M.; Mason, Ronald P.

    2008-01-01

    The physiological effects of nitroglycerin as a potent vasodilator have long been documented. However, the molecular mechanisms by which nitroglycerin exerts its biological functions are still a matter of intense debate. Enzymatic pathways converting nitroglycerin to vasoactive compounds have been identified, but none of them seems to fully account for the reported clinical observations. Here, we demonstrate that nitroglycerin triggers constitutive nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activation, which is a major source of NO responsible for low-dose (1–10 nM) nitroglycerin-induced vasorelaxation. Our studies in cell cultures, isolated vessels, and whole animals identified endothelial NOS activation as a fundamental requirement for nitroglycerin action at pharmacologically relevant concentrations in WT animals. PMID:18562300

  12. Bronchodilator, vasodilator and spasmolytic activities of methanolic extract of Myrtus communis L.

    PubMed

    Janbaz, K H; Nisa, M; Saqib, F; Imran, I; Zia-Ul-Haq, M; De Feo, V

    2013-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to validate some of the folkloric claims about the effectiveness of the use of a Myrtus communis L. crude methanol extract (Mc.Cr) in gastrointestinal, respiratory and vascular diseases. Mc.Cr caused complete relaxation of spontaneous and K⁺ (80 mM)-induced contractions in isolated rabbit jejunum. It caused right ward parallel shift of calcium concentration response curves. Mc.Cr exhibited relaxant effect on CCh- and K⁺ (80 mM)-induced contractions in isolated rabbit tracheal preparations. Furthermore, Mc.Cr caused relaxation of phenylephrine (1 μM)- and K⁺ (80 mM)-induced contractions in isolated rabbit aorta preparations. These effects were similar to verapamil, a standard calcium channel blocker. These findings could be the basis for explaining the spasmolytic, bronchodilator and vasodilator activities of the extract, through a possible calcium channel blocking activity.

  13. Hypothalamic orexin’s role in exacerbated cutaneous vasodilation responses to an anxiogenic stimulus in a surgical menopause model

    PubMed Central

    Federici, Lauren M.; Caliman, Izabela Facco; Molosh, Andrei I.; Fitz, Stephanie D.; Truitt, William A.; Bonaventure, Pascal; Carpenter, Janet S.; Shekhar, Anantha; Johnson, Philip L.

    2016-01-01

    Distressing symptoms such as hot flashes and sleep disturbances affect over 70% of women approaching menopause for an average of 4–7 years, and recent large cohort studies have shown that anxiety and stress are strongly associated with more severe and persistent hot flashes and can induce hot flashes. Although high estrogen doses alleviate symptoms, extended use increases health risks, and current non-hormonal therapies are marginally better than placebo. The lack of effective non-hormonal treatments is largely due to the limited understanding of the mechanisms that underlie menopausal symptoms. One mechanistic pathway that has not been explored is the wake-promoting orexin neuropeptide system. Orexin is exclusively synthesized in the estrogen receptor rich perifornical hypothalamic region, and has an emerging role in anxiety and thermoregulation. In female rodents, estrogens tonically inhibit expression of orexin, and estrogen replacement normalizes severely elevated central orexin levels in postmenopausal women. Using an ovariectomy menopause model, we demonstrated that an anxiogenic compound elicited exacerbated hot flash-associated increases in tail skin temperature (TST, that is blocked with estrogen), and cellular responses in orexin neurons and efferent targets. Furthermore, systemic administration of centrally active, selective orexin 1 or 2 and dual receptor antagonists attenuated or blocked TST responses, respectively. This included the reformulated Suvorexant, which was recently FDA-approved for treating insomnia. Collectively, our data support the hypothesis that dramatic loss of estrogen tone during menopausal states leads to a hyperactive orexin system that contributes to symptoms such as anxiety, insomnia, and more severe hot flashes. Additionally, orexin receptor antagonists may represent a novel non-hormonal therapy for treating menopausal symptoms, with minimal side effects. PMID:26765933

  14. Enhanced Nitric Oxide Synthase Activation via Protease-Activated Receptor 2 Is Involved in the Preserved Vasodilation in Aortas from Metabolic Syndrome Rats.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Kana; Kagota, Satomi; McGuire, John J; Wakuda, Hirokazu; Yoshikawa, Noriko; Nakamura, Kazuki; Shinozuka, Kazumasa

    2015-01-01

    Endothelium-dependent vasodilation via protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is preserved in mesenteric arteries from SHRSP.Z-Leprfa/IzmDmcr rats (SHRSP.ZF) with metabolic syndrome even though nitric oxide (NO)-mediated vasodilation is attenuated. Therefore, we examined the PAR2 mechanisms underlying metabolic syndrome-resistant vasodilation in SHRSP.ZF aortas with ageing. In isolated aortas, the PAR2 agonist 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-amide (2fly) caused vasodilation that was sustained in male SHRSP.ZF until 18 weeks of age, but was attenuated afterwards compared with age-matched Wistar-Kyoto rats (controls) at 23 weeks. In contrast, acetylcholine-induced vasodilation was impaired in SHRSP.ZF already at 18 weeks of age. Treatments of aortas with inhibitors of NO synthase and soluble guanylate cyclase abolished the sustained 2fly- and residual acetylcholine-induced vasodilation in SHRSP.ZF at 18 weeks of age. In the aortas of SHRSP.ZF, 8-bromo-cGMP-induced vasodilation, NO production and cGMP accumulation elicited by 2fly were not different from in the controls. PAR2 agonist increased phospho-Ser1177-eNOS protein content only in SHRSP.ZF aortas. These results indicate that vasodilation mediated by PAR2 is sustained even though NO-dependent relaxation is attenuated with ageing/exposure to metabolic disorders in large-caliber arteries from SHRSP.ZF. PAR2 stimulation of NO production via an additional pathway that targets phosphorylation of Ser1177-eNOS suggests a regulatory mechanism for sustaining agonist-mediated vasodilation in metabolic syndrome.

  15. Muscle metaboreflex activation during dynamic exercise evokes epinephrine release resulting in β2-mediated vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Jasdeep; Spranger, Marty D; Hammond, Robert L; Krishnan, Abhinav C; Alvarez, Alberto; Augustyniak, Robert A; O'Leary, Donal S

    2015-03-01

    Muscle metaboreflex-induced increases in mean arterial pressure (MAP) during submaximal dynamic exercise are mediated principally by increases in cardiac output. To what extent, if any, the peripheral vasculature contributes to this rise in MAP is debatable. In several studies, we observed that in response to muscle metaboreflex activation (MMA; induced by partial hindlimb ischemia) a small but significant increase in vascular conductance occurred within the nonischemic areas (calculated as cardiac output minus hindlimb blood flow and termed nonischemic vascular conductance; NIVC). We hypothesized that these increases in NIVC may stem from a metaboreflex-induced release of epinephrine, resulting in β2-mediated dilation. We measured NIVC and arterial plasma epinephrine levels in chronically instrumented dogs during rest, mild exercise (3.2 km/h), and MMA before and after β-blockade (propranolol; 2 mg/kg), α1-blockade (prazosin; 50 μg/kg), and α1 + β-blockade. Both epinephrine and NIVC increased significantly from exercise to MMA: 81.9 ± 18.6 to 141.3 ± 22.8 pg/ml and 33.8 ± 1.5 to 37.6 ± 1.6 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1), respectively. These metaboreflex-induced increases in NIVC were abolished after β-blockade (27.6 ± 1.8 to 27.5 ± 1.7 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1)) and potentiated after α1-blockade (36.6 ± 2.0 to 49.7 ± 2.9 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1)), while α1 + β-blockade also abolished any vasodilation (33.7 ± 2.9 to 30.4 ± 1.9 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1)). We conclude that MMA during mild dynamic exercise induces epinephrine release causing β2-mediated vasodilation.

  16. Melanoma inhibitory activity in Brazilian patients with cutaneous melanoma*

    PubMed Central

    Odashiro, Macanori; Hans Filho, Gunter; Pereira, Patricia Rusa; Castro, Ana Rita Coimbra Motta; Stief, Alcione Cavalheiro; Pontes, Elenir Rose Jardim Cury; Odashiro, Alexandre Nakao

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Melanoma inhibitory activity is a protein secreted by melanoma cells and has been used as a tumor marker. Increased Melanoma inhibitory activity serum levels are related to metastatic disease or tumor recurrence. Currently there are no studies on Melanoma inhibitory activity and cutaneous melanoma involving Brazilian patients. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the performance and feasibility of measuring Melanoma inhibitory activity levels in Brazilian patients with cutaneous melanoma. METHODS: Blood was obtained from ten patients with proved metastatic cutaneous melanoma (Group 1), 15 patients resected for cutaneous melanoma without metastasis (Group 2) and 5 healthy donors (Group 3). Melanoma inhibitory activity was measured using a commercially available ELISA kit. RESULTS: There was a statistically significant difference of Melanoma inhibitory activity levels between patients with and without metastasis (p=0.002), and between patients with metastasis and healthy donors (p=0.002). There was no difference between patients without metastasis and healthy donors (p=0.443). CONCLUSION: Melanoma inhibitory activity is a tumor marker for cutaneous melanoma and the Melanoma inhibitory activity-ELISA test can be easily performed. Patients with metastasis have increased Melanoma inhibitory activity serum levels when compared to patients without metastasis and healthy donors. PMID:26131861

  17. Vasodilator-Stimulated Phosphoprotein Activity Is Required for Coxiella burnetii Growth in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Colonne, Punsiri M.; Winchell, Caylin G.; Graham, Joseph G.; Onyilagha, Frances I.; MacDonald, Laura J.; Doeppler, Heike R.; Storz, Peter; Kurten, Richard C.; Beare, Paul A.; Voth, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes human Q fever, an acute flu-like illness that can progress to chronic endocarditis and liver and bone infections. Humans are typically infected by aerosol-mediated transmission, and C. burnetii initially targets alveolar macrophages wherein the pathogen replicates in a phagolysosome-like niche known as the parasitophorous vacuole (PV). C. burnetii manipulates host cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) signaling to promote PV formation, cell survival, and bacterial replication. In this study, we identified the actin regulatory protein vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) as a PKA substrate that is increasingly phosphorylated at S157 and S239 during C. burnetii infection. Avirulent and virulent C. burnetii triggered increased levels of phosphorylated VASP in macrophage-like THP-1 cells and primary human alveolar macrophages, and this event required the Cα subunit of PKA. VASP phosphorylation also required bacterial protein synthesis and secretion of effector proteins via a type IV secretion system, indicating the pathogen actively triggers prolonged VASP phosphorylation. Optimal PV formation and intracellular bacterial replication required VASP activity, as siRNA-mediated depletion of VASP reduced PV size and bacterial growth. Interestingly, ectopic expression of a phospho-mimetic VASP (S239E) mutant protein prevented optimal PV formation, whereas VASP (S157E) mutant expression had no effect. VASP (S239E) expression also prevented trafficking of bead-containing phagosomes to the PV, indicating proper VASP activity is critical for heterotypic fusion events that control PV expansion in macrophages. Finally, expression of dominant negative VASP (S157A) in C. burnetii-infected cells impaired PV formation, confirming importance of the protein for proper infection. This study provides the first evidence of VASP manipulation by an intravacuolar bacterial pathogen via activation of PKA in human

  18. Distinct vasodilation, without reflex neurohormonal activation, induced by barnidipine in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Argenziano, L; Izzo, R; Iovino, G; De Luca, N; Parrella, L; Morisco, C; Trimarco, B

    1998-01-01

    Barnidipine is a new 1,4-dihydropyridine calcium antagonist with a strong and long-lasting vasodilatory effect. In order to assess the haemodynamic profile of the antihypertensive effect of barnidipine, a randomized, double-blind study of barnidipine vs nitrendipine was performed in 24 patients with mild to moderate essential hypertension. Following an initial 4-week placebo period, patients whose sitting diastolic blood pressure (SiDBP) was between 95 and 114 mm Hg, and whose sitting systolic blood pressure was between 150 and 219 mm Hg, were randomized (2:1 ratio) to receive either barnidipine (10 mg) or nitrendipine (10 mg) once daily, for a 6-week double-blind period. Subsequently, patients with an SiDBP of less than 90 mm Hg continued for a second 6-week period with the same monotherapy, while patients with an SiDBP of 90 mm Hg or above received double the dose of antihypertensive treatment for the next 6 weeks. Two-dimensional M- and B-mode echocardiography with Doppler flowmetry was performed at the end of both the placebo and active treatment phases. Barnidipine and nitrendipine reduced blood pressure by the same degree (barnidipine: from 165 +/- 2/100 +/- 1 to 145 +/- 2/89 +/- 1 mm Hg, p < 0.01; nitrendipine: from 163 +/- 3/100 +/- 2 to 143 +/- 7/90 +/- 3 mm Hg, p < 0.01) as a result of peripheral vasodilation. This was not accompanied by reflex neurohormonal activation. Moreover, only in the group receiving barnidipine was a significant decrease in plasma noradrenaline observed, both when the patients were in the supine position (from 298 +/- 27 to 214 +/- 21 pg/ml, p < 0.05) and when they were upright (from 472 +/- 37 to 348 +/- 38 pg/ml, p < 0.05).

  19. Subtype-Specific Estrogen Receptor-Mediated Vasodilator Activity in the Cephalic, Thoracic and Abdominal Vasculature of Female Rat

    PubMed Central

    Reslan, Ossama M.; Yin, Zongzhi; do Nascimento, Graciliano R. A.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen receptors (ERs) mediate genomic and nongenomic vasodilator effects, but estrogen therapy may not provide systemic vascular protection. To test whether this is due to regional differences in ER distribution or vasodilator activity, cephalic (carotid), thoracic (thoracic aorta, pulmonary) and abdominal arteries (abdominal aorta, mesenteric, renal) from female Sprague-Dawley rats were prepared to measure contraction to phenylephrine (Phe), and relaxation to acetylcholine (ACh) and the ER activators 17β-estradiol (E2) (all ERs), PPT (ERα), DPN (ERβ) and G1 (GPR30). Phe caused contraction that was enhanced in endothelium-denuded aorta, supporting endothelial release of vasodilators. In cephalic and thoracic arteries, ACh relaxation was abolished by the NOS inhibitor L-NAME, suggesting a role of NO. In mesenteric vessels, ACh-induced relaxation was partly inhibited by L-NAME+COX inhibitor indomethacin and blocked by the K+ channel blocker tetraethylammonium (TEA), suggesting a hyperpolarization pathway. E2 and PPT caused similar relaxation in all vessels. DPN and G1 caused smaller relaxation that was more prominent in abdominal vessels. RT-PCR revealed variable ERα mRNA expression, and increased ERβ in carotid artery and GPR30 in abdominal arteries. Western blots revealed greater amounts of ERα, ERβ and GPR30 in abdominal arteries. In thoracic aorta, E2, PPT and DPN-induced relaxation was blocked by L-NAME, and was associated with increased nitrite/nitrate production, suggesting a role of NO. In abdominal vessels, E2, PPT, DPN and G1-induced relaxation persisted in L-NAME+indomethacin+TEA-treated or endothelium-denuded arteries, suggesting direct effect on vascular smooth muscle (VSM). E2, PPT, DPN, and G1 caused greater relaxation of KCl-induced contraction in abdominal vessels, suggesting inhibitory effects on Ca2+ entry. Thus, E2 and ERα stimulation produce similar relaxation of the cephalic, thoracic and abdominal arteries. In the cephalic and

  20. Calycosin and Formononetin Induce Endothelium-Dependent Vasodilation by the Activation of Large-Conductance Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels (BKCa)

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Hisa Hui Ling; Vong, Chi Teng; Leung, George Pak-Heng; Seto, Sai Wang; Lee, Simon Ming-Yuen

    2016-01-01

    Calycosin and formononetin are two structurally similar isoflavonoids that have been shown to induce vasodilation in aorta and conduit arteries, but study of their actions on endothelial functions is lacking. Here, we demonstrated that both isoflavonoids relaxed rat mesenteric resistance arteries in a concentration-dependent manner, which was reduced by endothelial disruption and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition, indicating the involvement of both endothelium and vascular smooth muscle. In addition, the endothelium-dependent vasodilation, but not the endothelium-independent vasodilation, was blocked by BKCa inhibitor iberiotoxin (IbTX). Using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) as a model, we showed calycosin and formononetin induced dose-dependent outwardly rectifying K+ currents using whole cell patch clamp. These currents were blocked by tetraethylammonium chloride (TEACl), charybdotoxin (ChTX), or IbTX, but not apamin. We further demonstrated that both isoflavonoids significantly increased nitric oxide (NO) production and upregulated the activities and expressions of endothelial NOS (eNOS) and neuronal NOS (nNOS). These results suggested that calycosin and formononetin act as endothelial BKCa activators for mediating endothelium-dependent vasodilation through enhancing endothelium hyperpolarization and NO production. Since activation of BKCa plays a role in improving behavioral and cognitive disorders, we suggested that these two isoflavonoids could provide beneficial effects to cognitive disorders through vascular regulation. PMID:27994632

  1. Dynamic characteristics of the cutaneous vasodilator response to a local external pressure application detected by the laser Doppler flowmetry technique on anesthetized rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humeau, Anne; Koitka, Audrey; Saumet, Jean-Louis; L'Huillier, Jean-Pierre

    2003-10-01

    The laser Doppler flowmetry technique has recently been used to report a significant transient increase of the cutaneous blood flow signal when a local non-noxious pressure is applied progressively on the skin (11.1 Pa/s). The present work analyses the dynamic characteristics of this vasodilatory reflex response on anaesthetised rats. A de-noising algorithm using wavelets is proposed to obtain accurate values of these dynamic characteristics. The blood flow peak and the time to reach this peak are computed on the de-noised recordings. The results show that the mean time to reach the peak of perfusion is 85.3 s (time t = 0 at the beginning of the pressure application). The mean peak value is 188.3 arbitrary units (a.u.), whereas the mean value of the perfusion before the pressure application is 113.4 a.u. The mean minimum value obtained at the end of the experiment is 60.7 a.u. This latter value is, on the average, reached 841.3 s after the beginning of the pressure application. The comparison of the dynamic characteristics, computed with the de-noising algorithm on signals obtained in other situations, will give a better understanding on some cutaneous lesions such as those present on diabetic people.

  2. Cilostazol induces vasodilation through the activation of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels in aortic smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongliang; Hong, Da Hye; Son, Youn Kyoung; Na, Sung Hun; Jung, Won-Kyo; Bae, Young Min; Seo, Eun Young; Kim, Sung Joon; Choi, Il-Whan; Park, Won Sun

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the vasorelaxant effect of cilostazol and related signaling pathways in phenylephrine (Phe)-induced pre-contracted aortic rings. Cilostazol induced vasorelaxation in a concentration-dependent manner when aortic rings were pre-contracted with Phe. Application of the voltage-dependent K(+) (Kv) channel inhibitor 4-AP, the ATP-sensitive K(+) (K(ATP)) channel inhibitor glibenclamide, and the inwardly rectifying K(+) (Kir) channel inhibitor Ba(2+) did not alter the vasorelaxant effect of cilostazol; however, pre- and post-treatment with the big-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK(Ca)) channel inhibitor paxilline inhibited the vasorelaxant effect of cilostazol. This vasorelaxant effect of cilostazol was reduced in the presence of an adenylyl cyclase or a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, but not a protein kinase G inhibitor. Inside-out single channel recordings revealed that cilostazol induced the activation of BK(Ca) channel activity. The vasorelaxant effect of cilostazol was not affected by removal of the endothelium. In addition, application of a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor and a small-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (SK(Ca)) channel inhibitor did not affect cilostazol-induced vasorelaxation. We conclude that cilostazol induced vasorelaxation of the aorta through activation of BK(Ca) channel via a PKA-dependent signaling mechanism independent of endothelium.

  3. Cutaneous wound healing through paradoxical MAPK activation by BRAF inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Escuin-Ordinas, Helena; Li, Shuoran; Xie, Michael W.; Sun, Lu; Hugo, Willy; Huang, Rong Rong; Jiao, Jing; de-Faria, Felipe Meira; Realegeno, Susan; Krystofinski, Paige; Azhdam, Ariel; Komenan, Sara Marie D.; Atefi, Mohammad; Comin-Anduix, Begoña; Pellegrini, Matteo; Cochran, Alistair J.; Modlin, Robert L.; Herschman, Harvey R.; Lo, Roger S.; McBride, William H.; Segura, Tatiana; Ribas, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    BRAF inhibitors are highly effective therapies for the treatment of BRAFV600-mutated melanoma, with the main toxicity being a variety of hyperproliferative skin conditions due to paradoxical activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in BRAF wild-type cells. Most of these hyperproliferative skin changes improve when a MEK inhibitor is co-administered, as it blocks paradoxical MAPK activation. Here we show how the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib accelerates skin wound healing by inducing the proliferation and migration of human keratinocytes through extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation and cell cycle progression. Topical treatment with vemurafenib in two wound-healing mice models accelerates cutaneous wound healing through paradoxical MAPK activation; addition of a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor reverses the benefit of vemurafenib-accelerated wound healing. The same dosing regimen of topical BRAF inhibitor does not increase the incidence of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas in mice. Therefore, topical BRAF inhibitors may have clinical applications in accelerating the healing of skin wounds. PMID:27476449

  4. The furoxan system: design of selective nitric oxide (NO) donor inhibitors of COX-2 endowed with anti-aggregatory and vasodilating activities.

    PubMed

    Del Grosso, Erika; Boschi, Donatella; Lazzarato, Loretta; Cena, Clara; Di Stilo, Antonella; Fruttero, Roberta; Moro, Stefano; Gasco, Alberto

    2005-07-01

    Several NO donor 3,4-diphenylfuroxan (= 3,4-diphenyl-1,2,5-oxadiazole 2-oxide) derivatives were synthesized and tested for their COX-inhibiting activities. The products were found to be selective COX-2 inhibitors, similar to the structurally related furazans (3,4-diphenyl-1,2,5-oxadiazole), devoid of the NO release property. This behavior was confirmed by a molecular-docking study. The NO-dependent platelet anti-aggregatory and vasodilating activities of the new furoxans 5-7 were studied in vitro. These properties can be modulated by inserting an appropriate spacer between the 4-phenyl group and the furoxan ring, giving rise to new, selective COX-2 furoxan derivatives endowed with anti-aggregatory and vasodilating activities, and with potentially reduced cardiotoxicities.

  5. Adaptive increases in expression and vasodilator activity of estrogen receptor subtypes in a blood vessel-specific pattern during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Mata, Karina M.; Li, Wei; Reslan, Ossama M.; Siddiqui, Waleed T.; Opsasnick, Lauren A.

    2015-01-01

    Normal pregnancy is associated with adaptive hemodynamic, hormonal, and vascular changes, and estrogen (E2) may promote vasodilation during pregnancy; however, the specific E2 receptor (ER) subtype, post-ER signaling mechanism, and vascular bed involved are unclear. We tested whether pregnancy-associated vascular adaptations involve changes in the expression/distribution/activity of distinct ER subtypes in a blood vessel-specific manner. Blood pressure (BP) and plasma E2 were measured in virgin and pregnant (day 19) rats, and the thoracic aorta, carotid artery, mesenteric artery, and renal artery were isolated for measurements of ERα, ERβ, and G protein-coupled receptor 30 [G protein-coupled ER (GPER)] expression and tissue distribution in parallel with relaxation responses to E2 (all ERs) and the specific ER agonist 4,4′,4″-(4-propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl)-tris-phenol (PPT; ERα), diarylpropionitrile (DPN; ERβ), and G1 (GPER). BP was slightly lower and plasma E2 was higher in pregnant versus virgin rats. Western blots revealed increased ERα and ERβ in the aorta and mesenteric artery and GPER in the aorta of pregnant versus virgin rats. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the increases in ERs were mainly in the intima and media. In phenylephrine-precontracted vessels, E2 and PPT caused relaxation that was greater in the aorta and mesenteric artery but similar in the carotid and renal artery of pregnant versus virgin rats. DPN- and G1-induced relaxation was greater in the mesenteric and renal artery than in the aorta and carotid artery, and aortic relaxation to G1 was greater in pregnant versus virgin rats. The nitric oxide synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester with or without the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin with or without the EDHF blocker tetraethylammonium or endothelium removal reduced E2, PPT, and G1-induced relaxation in the aorta of pregnant rats, suggesting an endothelium-dependent mechanism, but did not affect E2-, PPT

  6. Adaptive increases in expression and vasodilator activity of estrogen receptor subtypes in a blood vessel-specific pattern during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mata, Karina M; Li, Wei; Reslan, Ossama M; Siddiqui, Waleed T; Opsasnick, Lauren A; Khalil, Raouf A

    2015-11-15

    Normal pregnancy is associated with adaptive hemodynamic, hormonal, and vascular changes, and estrogen (E2) may promote vasodilation during pregnancy; however, the specific E2 receptor (ER) subtype, post-ER signaling mechanism, and vascular bed involved are unclear. We tested whether pregnancy-associated vascular adaptations involve changes in the expression/distribution/activity of distinct ER subtypes in a blood vessel-specific manner. Blood pressure (BP) and plasma E2 were measured in virgin and pregnant (day 19) rats, and the thoracic aorta, carotid artery, mesenteric artery, and renal artery were isolated for measurements of ERα, ERβ, and G protein-coupled receptor 30 [G protein-coupled ER (GPER)] expression and tissue distribution in parallel with relaxation responses to E2 (all ERs) and the specific ER agonist 4,4',4″-(4-propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl)-tris-phenol (PPT; ERα), diarylpropionitrile (DPN; ERβ), and G1 (GPER). BP was slightly lower and plasma E2 was higher in pregnant versus virgin rats. Western blots revealed increased ERα and ERβ in the aorta and mesenteric artery and GPER in the aorta of pregnant versus virgin rats. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the increases in ERs were mainly in the intima and media. In phenylephrine-precontracted vessels, E2 and PPT caused relaxation that was greater in the aorta and mesenteric artery but similar in the carotid and renal artery of pregnant versus virgin rats. DPN- and G1-induced relaxation was greater in the mesenteric and renal artery than in the aorta and carotid artery, and aortic relaxation to G1 was greater in pregnant versus virgin rats. The nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester with or without the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin with or without the EDHF blocker tetraethylammonium or endothelium removal reduced E2, PPT, and G1-induced relaxation in the aorta of pregnant rats, suggesting an endothelium-dependent mechanism, but did not affect E2-, PPT

  7. Selective renal vasodilation and active renal artery perfusion improve renal function in dogs with acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Suehiro, K; Shimizu, J; Yi, G H; Gu, A; Wang, J; Keren, G; Burkhoff, D

    2001-09-01

    Renal failure is common in heart failure due to renovascular constriction and hypotension. We tested whether selective pharmacological renal artery vasodilation and active renal artery perfusion (ARP) could improve renal function without adverse effects on systemic blood pressure in a canine model of acute heart failure (AHF). AHF was induced by coronary microembolization in 16 adult mongrel dogs. In five dogs, selective intrarenal (IR) papaverine (1, 2, and 4 mg/min) was administered into the left renal artery. In six dogs, ARP was performed in the left renal artery to normalize mean renal arterial pressure followed by administration of IR papaverine (2 mg/min). In five dogs, ARP plus intravenous furosemide was tested. Urine output (UO) and cortical renal blood flow decreased during AHF and were restored by 2 mg/min IR papaverine (UO: baseline 4.2 +/- 0.6, AHF 1.6 +/- 1.3, IR papaverine 5.8 +/- 1.1 ml/15 min; cortical blood flow: baseline 4.3 +/- 0.2, AHF 2.4 +/- 0.6, IR papaverine 4.2 +/- 1.2 ml/min/g) with no significant change in aortic pressure. ARP also increased urine output and cortical renal blood flow (UO: baseline 5.0 +/- 1.1, AHF 0.5 +/- 0.4, ARP 3.8 +/- 3.1 ml/15 min; cortical blood flow: baseline 4.0 +/- 0.5, AHF 2.0 +/- 0.8, ARP 3.52 +/- 1.1 ml/min/g). A combination of these methods in AHF further increased urine output to twice the normal baseline (10.5 +/- 7.5 ml/15 min). Addition of furosemide synergistically increased UO above that achieved with ARP alone (5.5 +/- 2.6 versus 40.3 +/- 24.7 ml/15 min, p = 0.03). In conclusion, ARP and selective renal vasodilation may effectively promote salt and water excretion in the setting of heart failure, particularly when systemic blood pressure is low.

  8. Disturbance of vasodilation via protease-activated receptor 2 in SHRSP.Z-Lepr fa/IzmDmcr rats with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kagota, Satomi; Maruyama, Kana; Wakuda, Hirokazu; McGuire, John J; Yoshikawa, Noriko; Nakamura, Kazuki; Shinozuka, Kazumasa

    2014-10-01

    Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) activation causes vascular inflammation and vasodilation, but its role in metabolic syndrome (MetS) remains uncertain. Therefore, we examined whether the PAR2-induced vasodilation of SHRSP.Z-Lepr(fa)/IzmDmcr rats (SHRSP.ZF) is impaired and if so, whether administering telmisartan is protective. PAR2-activating peptide, 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-amide (2fly), relaxed the isolated superior and first-order branches of mesenteric arteries (MAs) from Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) and SHRSP.ZF. Superior-MA relaxation by 2fly was less in SHRSP.ZF than in WKY. Relaxation of first-order MAs by 2fly was the same in SHRSP.ZF and WKY. NO synthase inhibitor partially reduced 2fly-induced relaxation of superior and first-order MAs in SHRSP.ZF and WKY; inhibition of relaxation was proportionately larger in SHRSP.ZF. In SHRSP.ZF, nitroprusside-induced relaxation and the expression of soluble guanylyl cyclase decreased. In SHRSP.ZF, telmisartan reversed these abnormalities, and decreased blood pressure and serum levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, an index of oxidative stress. Vasodilation via PAR2 activation was preserved in small-caliber MAs, in contrast to large-caliber MAs, even when MetS reduced NO-dependent relaxation mechanisms. NO and non-NO relaxing factor(s) contributed to PAR2-mediated relaxation in MAs, and the balance between factors may be altered to preserve vasodilation in MetS. Telmisartan prevented vascular dysfunction in MetS by protecting arteries against oxidative stress.

  9. Graminone B, a novel lignan with vasodilative activity from Imperata cylindrica.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, K; Shibuya, M; Ohizumi, Y

    1994-12-01

    Two novel lignans, graminones A [1] and B [2] have been isolated from Imperata cylindrica and their structures have been elucidated on the basis of their spectral data. Graminone B [2] showed inhibitory activity on the contraction of the rabbit aorta.

  10. Enhanced vasodilator activity of nitrite in hypertension: critical role for erythrocytic xanthine oxidoreductase and translational potential.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Suborno M; Kapil, Vikas; Fuentes-Calvo, Isabel; Bubb, Kristen J; Pearl, Vanessa; Milsom, Alexandra B; Khambata, Rayomand; Maleki-Toyserkani, Sheiva; Yousuf, Mubeen; Benjamin, Nigel; Webb, Andrew J; Caulfield, Mark J; Hobbs, Adrian J; Ahluwalia, Amrita

    2013-05-01

    Elevation of circulating nitrite (NO2(-)) levels causes vasodilatation and lowers blood pressure in healthy volunteers. Whether these effects and the underpinning mechanisms persist in hypertension is unknown. Therefore, we investigated the consequences of systemic nitrite elevation in spontaneously hypertensive rats and conducted proof-of-principle studies in patients. Nitrite caused dose-dependent blood pressure-lowering that was profoundly enhanced in spontaneously hypertensive rats versus normotensive Wistar Kyoto controls. This effect was virtually abolished by the xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) inhibitor, allopurinol, and associated with hypertension-specific XOR-dependent nitrite reductase activity localized to the erythrocyte but not the blood vessel wall. To determine whether these pathways translate to human hypertension, we investigated the effects of elevation of circulating nitrite levels in 15 drug naïve grade 1 hypertensives. To elevate nitrite, we used a dose of dietary nitrate (≈ 3.5 mmol) that elevated nitrite levels ≈ 1.5-fold (P<0.01); a rise shown previously to exert no significant blood pressure-lowering effects in normotensives. This dose caused substantial reductions in systolic (≈ 12 mm Hg) and diastolic blood pressures (P<0.001) and pulse wave velocity (P<0.05); effects associated with elevations in erythrocytic XOR expression and XOR-dependent nitrite reductase activity. Our observations demonstrate the improved efficacy of inorganic nitrate and nitrite in hypertension as a consequence of increased erythrocytic XOR nitrite reductase activity and support the concept of dietary nitrate supplementation as an effective, but simple and inexpensive, antihypertensive strategy.

  11. Malassezia globosa tends to grow actively in summer conditions more than other cutaneous Malassezia species.

    PubMed

    Akaza, Narifumi; Akamatsu, Hirohiko; Takeoka, Shiori; Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Mizutani, Hiroshi; Nakata, Satoru; Matsunaga, Kayoko

    2012-07-01

    Malassezia globosa is a major pathogen of Malassezia folliculitis (MF) and the predominant species on human skin. The aim of this study was to clarify the differences between M. globosa and other cutaneous Malassezia species, M. restricta, M. dermatis, M. sympodialis and M. furfur. The optimum growth temperature, effects of compounds of sweat and free fatty acids on growth, and lipase activities of five cutaneous Malassezia species were determined. The growth of M. globosa was promoted strongly by the compounds of sweat and high temperature unlike that of other cutaneous Malassezia species. This result clarified that M. globosa tended to grow actively in summer conditions more than other cutaneous Malassezia species. Furthermore, M. globosa showed high lipase activity. We consider these characteristics of M. globosa to relate to the pathogenesis of MF.

  12. Nobiletin, a citrus flavonoid, activates vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein in human platelets through non-cyclic nucleotide-related mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Jayakumar, Thanasekaran; Lin, Kao-Chang; Lu, Wan-Jung; Lin, Chia-Ying; Pitchairaj, Geraldine; Li, Jiun-Yi; Sheu, Joen-Rong

    2017-01-01

    Nobiletin, a bioactive polymethoxylated flavone, has been described to possess a diversity of biological effects through its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) is a common substrate for cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP-regulated protein kinases [i.e., cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA; also known as protein kinase A) and cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG; also known as protein kinase G)] and it has been shown to be directly phosphorylated by protein kinase C (PKC). In the present study, we demonstrate that VASP is phosphorylated by nobiletin in human platelets via a non-cyclic nucleotide-related mechanism. This was confirmed by the use of inhibitors of adenylate cyclase (SQ22536) and guanylate cyclase [1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ)], since they prevented VASP phosphorylation induced by nobiletin. Furthormore, this event was also not affected by specific inhibitors of PKA (H-89), PKG (KT5823) and PKC (Ro318220), representing cyclic nucleotide-dependent pathways upon nobiletin-induced VASP phosphorylation. Similarly, inhibitors of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK; SB203580), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2; PD98059), c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1; SP600125), Akt (LY294002) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB; Bay11-7082) did not affect nobiletin-induced VASP phosphorylation. Moreover, electron spin resonance, dichlorofluorescein fluorescence and western blotting techniques revealed that nobiletin did not affect hydroxyl radicals (OH•), intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and on protein carbonylation, respectively. Furthermore, the nobiletin-induced VASP phosphorylation was surprisingly reversed by the intracellular antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), but not by the inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI). It was surprising to observe the differential effects of nobiletin and NAC on VASP phosphorylation in human platelets, since

  13. The effect of endothelin A and B receptor blockade on cutaneous vascular and sweating responses in young men during and following exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Naoto; Singh, Maya S; Halili, Lyra; Louie, Jeffrey C; Kenny, Glen P

    2016-12-01

    During exercise, cutaneous vasodilation and sweating responses occur, whereas these responses rapidly decrease during postexercise recovery. We hypothesized that the activation of endothelin A (ETA) receptors, but not endothelin B (ETB) receptors, attenuate cutaneous vasodilation during high-intensity exercise and contribute to the subsequent postexercise suppression of cutaneous vasodilation. We also hypothesized that both receptors increase sweating during and following high-intensity exercise. Eleven men (24 ± 4 yr) performed an intermittent cycling protocol consisting of two 30-min bouts of moderate- (40% V̇o2peak) and high-intensity (75% V̇o2peak) exercise in the heat (35°C), each separated by a 20- and 40-min recovery period, respectively. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) and sweat rate were evaluated at four intradermal microdialysis skin sites: 1) lactated Ringer (control), 2) 500 nM BQ123 (a selective ETA receptor blocker), 3) 300 nM BQ788 (a selective ETB receptor blocker), or 4) a combination of BQ123 + BQ788. There were no between-site differences in CVC during each exercise bout (all P > 0.05); however, CVC following high-intensity exercise was greater at BQ123 (56 ± 9%max) and BQ123 + BQ788 (55 ± 14%max) sites relative to the control site (43 ± 12%max) (all P ≤ 0.05). Sweat rate did not differ between sites throughout the protocol (all P > 0.05). We show that neither ETA nor ETB receptors modulate cutaneous vasodilation and sweating responses during and following moderate- and high-intensity exercise in the heat, with the exception that ETA receptors may partly contribute to the suppression of cutaneous vasodilation following high-intensity exercise.

  14. Vasodilator efficiency of endogenous prostanoids, Ca²⁺-activated K⁺ channels and nitric oxide in rats with spontaneous, salt-dependent or NO-deficient hypertension.

    PubMed

    Behuliak, Michal; Pintérová, Mária; Kuneš, Jaroslav; Zicha, Josef

    2011-08-01

    Hypertension is associated with the imbalance of vasoconstrictor and vasodilator systems. Vasodilation is usually evaluated in isolated blood vessels, but except for nitric oxide (NO), relatively little attention is given to the in vivo efficiency of particular vasodilator mechanisms. The aim of our study was to evaluate the contribution of endogenous vasodilator prostanoids, Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels and NO to blood pressure (BP) maintenance in rats with three different forms of experimental hypertension. Both principal vasopressor systems (the renin-angiotensin system and the sympathetic nervous system) were blocked by captopril and pentolinium in conscious spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs), Dahl salt-hypertensive (DS-HS) rats and rats with NO-deficient hypertension, as well as in their normotensive controls. Thereafter, we monitored BP changes in rats subjected to either a sequential or an isolated blockade of prostanoid synthesis by the non-selective cyclooxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin, of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels by tetraethylammonium and of NO formation by N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. All three forms of experimental hypertension were characterized by augmented sympathetic vasoconstriction. The vasodilatation exerted by endogenous prostanoids and Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels was enhanced in all forms of hypertension, almost proportionally to BP elevation. On the contrary, NO-dependent vasodilatation was not enhanced in any form of experimental hypertension, and there was a severe relative NO deficiency in both, SHRs and DS-HS rats. In conclusion, our data suggested that there is a compensatory activation of vasodilator prostanoids and Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels in rats with experimental hypertension, whereas NO-dependent vasodilatation is not augmented. Thus, the overall activity of vasodilator systems failed to compensate for augmented sympathetic vasoconstriction in hypertensive animals.

  15. Use-dependent loss of active sympathetic neurogenic vasodilation after nitric oxide synthase inhibition in conscious rats. Evidence for the presence of preformed stores of nitric oxide-containing factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davisson, R. L.; Shaffer, R. A.; Johnson, A. K.; Lewis, S. J.

    1996-01-01

    In this study, we examined whether air-jet stress-induced active sympathetic hindlimb vasodilation in conscious rats involves the release of preformed stores of nitric oxide-containing factors. We determined the effects of repeated episodes of air-jet stress (six episodes given 5 minutes apart) on mean arterial pressure and vascular resistances in the mesenteric bed and intact and sympathetically denervated hindlimb beds of conscious rats treated with saline or the nitric oxide synthesis inhibitor N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 25 mumol/kg IV). In saline-treated rats, air-jet stress produced alerting behavior, minor changes in blood pressure, pronounced mesenteric vaso-constriction, and immediate and marked vasodilation in the sympathetically intact hindlimb but a minor vasodilation in the sympathetically denervated hindlimb. Each air-jet stress produced virtually identical responses. In L-NAME-treated rats, the first air-jet stress produced vasodilator responses in the sympathetically intact and sympathetically denervated hindlimbs that were similar to those in the saline-treated rats. However, each subsequent air-jet stress produced progressively smaller vasodilator responses in the sympathetically intact but not the sympathetically denervated hindlimb. There was no loss of air-jet stress-induced alerting behavior or mesenteric vasoconstriction, suggesting that L-NAME did not interfere with the central processing of the air-jet or the resultant changes in autonomic nerve activity. The progressive diminution of air-jet stress-induced vasodilation in the intact hindlimb of L-NAME-treated rats may be due to the use-dependent depletion of preformed stores of nitric oxide-containing factors that cannot be replenished in the absence of nitric oxide synthesis.

  16. Activation of mTOR/p70S6 kinase by ANG II inhibits insulin-stimulated endothelial nitric oxide synthase and vasodilation

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyun-Ju; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A.; Sowers, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Elevated tissue levels of angiotensin II (ANG II) are associated with impairment of insulin actions in metabolic and cardiovascular tissues. ANG II-stimulated activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)/p70 S6 kinase (p70S6K) in cardiovascular tissues is implicated in cardiac hypertrophy and vascular remodeling. However, the role of ANG II-stimulated mTOR/p70S6K in vascular endothelium is poorly understood. In the present study, we observed that ANG II stimulated p70S6K in bovine aortic endothelial cells. ANG II increased phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) at Ser636/639 and inhibited the insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). An inhibitor of mTOR, rapamycin, attenuated the ANG II-stimulated phosphorylation of p70S6K and phosphorylation of IRS-1 (Ser636/639) and blocked the ability of ANG II to impair insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of eNOS, nitric oxide production, and mesenteric-arteriole vasodilation. Moreover, point mutations of IRS-1 at Ser636/639 to Ala prevented the ANG II-mediated inhibition of insulin signaling. From these results, we conclude that activation of mTOR/p70S6K by ANG II in vascular endothelium may contribute to impairment of insulin-stimulated vasodilation through phosphorylation of IRS-1 at Ser636/639. This ANG II-mediated impairment of vascular actions of insulin may help explain the role of ANG II as a link between insulin resistance and hypertension. PMID:22028412

  17. Vasodilator compounds derived from plants and their mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Luna-Vázquez, Francisco J; Ibarra-Alvarado, César; Rojas-Molina, Alejandra; Rojas-Molina, Isela; Zavala-Sánchez, Miguel Angel

    2013-05-17

    The present paper reviews vasodilator compounds isolated from plants that were reported in the past 22 years (1990 to 2012) and the different mechanisms of action involved in their vasodilator effects. The search for reports was conducted in a comprehensive manner, intending to encompass those metabolites with a vasodilator effect whose mechanism of action involved both vascular endothelium and arterial smooth muscle. The results obtained from our bibliographic search showed that over half of the isolated compounds have a mechanism of action involving the endothelium. Most of these bioactive metabolites cause vasodilation either by activating the nitric oxide/cGMP pathway or by blocking voltage-dependent calcium channels. Moreover, it was found that many compounds induced vasodilation by more than one mechanism. This review confirms that secondary metabolites, which include a significant group of compounds with extensive chemical diversity, are a valuable source of new pharmaceuticals useful for the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular diseases.

  18. Design, synthesis, and antihypertensive activity of curcumin-inspired compounds via ACE inhibition and vasodilation, along with a bioavailability study for possible benefit in cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Xiao-dong; Liao, Li-zhen; Dong, Xiao-bian; Hu, Xun; Guo, Yue; Du, Zhi-min; Liao, Xin-xue; Wang, Li-chun

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the synthesis of a novel series of curcumin-inspired compounds via a facile synthetic route. The structures of these derivatives were ascertained using various spectroscopic and analytic techniques. The pharmacological effects of the target analogs were assessed by assaying their inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). All of the synthesized derivatives exhibited considerable inhibition of ACE, with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations ranging from 1.23 to 120.32 μM. In a docking analysis with testicular ACE (tACE), the most promising inhibitor (4j) was efficiently accommodated in the deep cleft of the protein cavity, making close interatomic contacts with Glu162, His353, and Ala356, comparable with lisinopril. Compounds 4i, 4j, 4k, and 4l were further selected for determination of their vasodilator activity (cardiac output and stroke volume) on isolated rat hearts using the Langendorff technique. The bioavailability of compound 4j was determined in experimental mice. PMID:26792980

  19. Local arginase 1 activity is required for cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Laura; Saville, Charis R; Murray, Peter J; Cruickshank, Sheena M; Hardman, Matthew J

    2013-10-01

    Chronic nonhealing wounds in the elderly population are associated with a prolonged and excessive inflammatory response, which is widely hypothesized to impede healing. Previous studies have linked alterations in local L-arginine metabolism, principally mediated by the enzymes arginase (Arg) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), to pathological wound healing. Over subsequent years, interest in Arg/iNOS has focused on the classical versus alternatively activated (M1/M2) macrophage paradigm. Although the role of iNOS during healing has been studied, Arg contribution to healing remains unclear. Here, we report that Arg is dynamically regulated during acute wound healing. Pharmacological inhibition of local Arg activity directly perturbed healing, as did Tie2-cre-mediated deletion of Arg1, revealing the importance of Arg1 during healing. Inhibition or depletion of Arg did not alter alternatively activated macrophage numbers but instead was associated with increased inflammation, including increased influx of iNOS(+) cells and defects in matrix deposition. Finally, we reveal that in preclinical murine models reduced Arg expression directly correlates with delayed healing, and as such may represent an important future therapeutic target.

  20. Stellera chamaejasme and its constituents induce cutaneous wound healing and anti-inflammatory activities

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myungsuk; Lee, Hee Ju; Randy, Ahmad; Yun, Ji Ho; Oh, Sang-Rok; Nho, Chu Won

    2017-01-01

    Stellera chamaejasme L. (Thymelaeaceae) is a perennial herb that is widely used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat tumours, tuberculosis and psoriasis. S. chamaejasme extract (SCE) possesses anti-inflammatory, analgesic and wound healing activities; however, the effect of S. chamaejasme and its active compounds on cutaneous wound healing has not been investigated. We assessed full-thickness wounds of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and topically applied SCE for 2 weeks. In vitro studies were performed using HaCaT keratinocytes, Hs68 dermal fibroblasts and RAW 264.7 macrophages to determine cell viability (MTT assay), cell migration, collagen expression, nitric oxide (NO) production, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production, inflammatory cytokine expression and β-catenin activation. In vivo, wound size was reduced and epithelisation was improved in SCE-treated SD rats. In vitro, SCE and its active compounds induced keratinocyte migration by regulating the β-catenin, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and Akt signalling pathways. Furthermore, SCE and its active compounds increased mRNA expression of type I and III collagen in Hs68 fibroblasts. SCE and chamechromone inhibited NO and PGE2 release and mRNA expression of inflammatory mediators in RAW 264.7 macrophages. SCE enhances the motility of HaCaT keratinocytes and improves cutaneous wound healing in SD rats. PMID:28220834

  1. Stellera chamaejasme and its constituents induce cutaneous wound healing and anti-inflammatory activities.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myungsuk; Lee, Hee Ju; Randy, Ahmad; Yun, Ji Ho; Oh, Sang-Rok; Nho, Chu Won

    2017-02-21

    Stellera chamaejasme L. (Thymelaeaceae) is a perennial herb that is widely used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat tumours, tuberculosis and psoriasis. S. chamaejasme extract (SCE) possesses anti-inflammatory, analgesic and wound healing activities; however, the effect of S. chamaejasme and its active compounds on cutaneous wound healing has not been investigated. We assessed full-thickness wounds of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and topically applied SCE for 2 weeks. In vitro studies were performed using HaCaT keratinocytes, Hs68 dermal fibroblasts and RAW 264.7 macrophages to determine cell viability (MTT assay), cell migration, collagen expression, nitric oxide (NO) production, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production, inflammatory cytokine expression and β-catenin activation. In vivo, wound size was reduced and epithelisation was improved in SCE-treated SD rats. In vitro, SCE and its active compounds induced keratinocyte migration by regulating the β-catenin, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and Akt signalling pathways. Furthermore, SCE and its active compounds increased mRNA expression of type I and III collagen in Hs68 fibroblasts. SCE and chamechromone inhibited NO and PGE2 release and mRNA expression of inflammatory mediators in RAW 264.7 macrophages. SCE enhances the motility of HaCaT keratinocytes and improves cutaneous wound healing in SD rats.

  2. Antagonism of the prostaglandin D2 receptor 1 suppresses nicotinic acid-induced vasodilation in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kang; Wu, Tsuei-Ju; Wu, Kenneth K; Sturino, Claudio; Metters, Kathleen; Gottesdiener, Keith; Wright, Samuel D; Wang, Zhaoyin; O'Neill, Gary; Lai, Eseng; Waters, M Gerard

    2006-04-25

    Nicotinic acid (NA) is commonly used to treat dyslipidemia, but it elicits an adverse effect, termed flushing, which consists of cutaneous vasodilation with associated discomfort. An animal model of NA-induced flushing has been established in mice. As in humans, NA stimulated vasodilation in a dose-dependent manner, was associated with an increase of the vasodilatory prostaglandin (PG) D2 in plasma and could be blocked by pretreatment with aspirin. Two PGD2 receptors have been identified: PGD2 receptor 1 (DP1, also called DP) and PGD2 receptor 2 (DP2, sometimes termed CRTH2). DP2 does not mediate NA-induced vasodilation; the DP2-specific agonist DK-PGD2 (13,14-dihydro-15-keto-PGD2) did not induce cutaneous vasodilation, and DP2-/- mice had a normal vasodilatory response to NA. By contrast, BW245C, a DP1-selective agonist, induced vasodilation in mice, and MK-0524, a DP1-selective antagonist, blocked both PGD2- and NA-induced vasodilation. NA-induced vasodilation was also studied in DP1+/+, DP1+/-, and DP1-/- mice; although NA-induced vasodilation depended almost completely on DP1 in female mice, it depended only partially on DP1 in male mice. The residual NA-induced vasodilation in male DP-/- mice was aspirin-sensitive. Thus, in the mouse, DP1 appears to be an important component involved in NA-induced vasodilation, but other cyclooxygenase-dependent mechanisms also may be involved. A clinical study in healthy men and women demonstrated that treatment with MK-0524 reduced the symptoms of flushing and the increase in skin perfusion after the administration of NA. These studies suggest that DP1 receptor antagonism may be an effective means to suppress NA-induced flushing in humans.

  3. Nocturnal activity of phlebotomine sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae) in a cutaneous leishmaniasis focus in Chichaoua, Morocco.

    PubMed

    Guernaoui, S; Boussaa, S; Pesson, B; Boumezzough, A

    2006-02-01

    The nocturnal activity of phlebotomine sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae) was studied "at an epidemic focus" on human cutaneous leishmaniasis due to Leishmania tropica Wright in Chichaoua province, in Morocco. Sandflies were collected using light and sticky-paper traps changed at 2-h intervals, inside and around houses, in August and October 2004. Overall, 633 sandflies, belonging to six species of Phlebotomus and three of Sergentomyia, were collected. Sandfly activity was nocturnal and higher at twilight. Several activity patterns were observed according to the species. Phlebotomus (Paraphlebotomus) sergenti Parrot, 1917, the suspected vector of L. tropica in this focus, was caught during each collection performed from 1900 to 0500 hours, the numbers of species caught peaked at 1900-2100 hours. There were seasonal variations of the nocturnal activity, which could be related to the variations in temperature and relative humidity.

  4. Ectopic activity in cutaneous regenerating afferent nerve fibers following nerve lesion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Gorodetskaya, Natalia; Constantin, Cristina; Jänig, Wilfrid

    2003-11-01

    Spontaneous activity, and mechanical and thermal sensitivity were investigated in regenerating afferent nerve fibers within 4-21 days post sural nerve lesion (crush or transection and resuturing) in anaesthetized rats. About 33-40% of the myelinated (A) and 22-27% of the unmyelinated (C) fibers excited by electrical nerve stimulation exhibited at least one of these ectopic discharge properties. In total 177 A- and 169 C-fibers with ectopic activity were analysed. Most A-fibers (161/177) were mechanosensitive. Spontaneous activity (median 1 imp/s) was present in 23/177 and thermosensitivity in 14/177 A-fibers (13 of them being activated by heat stimuli). Almost all A-fibers (159/177) exhibited only one type of ectopic discharge property. Most C-fibers (94/169) were thermosensitive responding either to cold (n = 45) or to heat stimuli (n = 33) or to both (n = 16). Eighty-four of 169 C-fibers were spontaneously active (median 0.3 imp/s) and 75/169 C-fibers were mechanosensitive. Both the proportion and the discharge rate of spontaneously active C-fibers were significantly higher after crush than after section and resuturing of the nerve. About 60% of the C-fibers (101/169) had only one ectopic discharge property and 40% two or three. In conclusion, regenerating cutaneous afferent A- and C-fibers may develop mechano- and/or thermosensitivity as well as spontaneous activity. We suggest that spontaneous and evoked ectopic activity in regenerating cutaneous afferents are a function of the intrinsic functional properties of these neurons and of the interaction between the regenerating nerve fibers and non-neural cells during Wallerian degeneration in the nerve distal to the nerve lesion.

  5. Modulation of cutaneous reflexes in human upper limb muscles during arm cycling is independent of activity in the contralateral arm.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Timothy J; Zehr, E Paul; Collins, David F

    2005-02-01

    The amplitudes and signs of cutaneous reflexes are modulated during rhythmic movements of the arms and legs (during walking and arm or leg cycling for instance). This reflex modulation is frequently independent of the background muscle activity and may involve central pattern generator (CPG) circuits. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the nature and degree of coupling between the upper limbs during arm cycling, with regard to the regulation of cutaneous reflexes. Responses to electrical stimulations of the right, superficial radial nerve (five 1 ms pulses, 300 Hz) were recorded bilaterally in six arm muscles of eight participants during arm cycling involving only the limb ipsilateral to the stimulation, only the limb contralateral to the stimulation, and bilateral movement when the limbs were both in-phase and 180 degrees out of phase. The pattern of cutaneous reflex modulation throughout the arm cycle was independent of the functional state of the limb contralateral to the recording site, irrespective of whether recordings were made ipsilateral or contralateral to the stimulation. Furthermore, cutaneous reflexes were significantly (p<0.05) modulated with arm position in only 8% of cases in which the limb containing the responding muscle was either stationary or being moved passively by the experimenter. The results show that there is relatively weak coupling between the arms with regard to the regulation of cutaneous reflexes during rhythmic, cyclical arm movements. This suggests a loose connection between the CPGs for each arm that regulate muscle activity and reflex amplitude during rhythmic movement.

  6. Regular physical activity alters the postocclusive reactive hyperemia of the cutaneous microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Lenasi, Helena; Strucl, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Regular physical activity leads to increased endothelium-dependent vasodilatation. Postocclusive reactive hyperemia (PRH) is a transient increase of blood flow after the release of an arterial occlusion and has been used as a clinical tool to estimate endothelial function. The aim of our study was to assess the potential effect of regular physical training on PRH of skin microcirculation. Skin blood flux was estimated by laser-Doppler fluxmetry (LDF) in two groups of subjects: 12 highly trained athletes and 12 age-matched sedentary controls. LDF was measured on two specific skin sites: volar aspect of the forearm (nonglabrous area) and finger pulp of the middle finger (glabrous area). After the release of a 3-min occlusion of the brachial artery, we determined the following indices of PRH: the time to peak (tpeak), the maximal LDF (LDFpeak), the recovery time (trec), the area under the PRH curve (AUC). Baseline LDF did not differ between the trained and sedentary subjects in either site. On the forearm, we found no significant differences in either PRH parameter. On the contrary, on the finger pulp, there were statistically significant differences in the tpeak and the AUC (p < or = 0.05). The results show an altered PRH response of skin microcirculation in the finger pulp in the trained subjects. We may speculate that this could be the result of an increased endothelial vasodilator capacity. Further, the potential adaptations of the endothelium differ between the glabrous and nonglabrous skin sites.

  7. IL-33 accelerates cutaneous wound healing involved in upregulation of alternatively activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hui; Li, Xiangyong; Hu, Shilian; Liu, Tao; Yuan, Baohong; Gu, Hongbiao; Ni, Qian; Zhang, Xiaofan; Zheng, Fang

    2013-12-01

    IL-33 is a recently recognized member of the IL-1 family and has been best identified as a potent inducer of Th2-type immune responses. Increasing evidence, however, indicates that IL-33 also represents an important mediator of mucosal healing and epithelial restoration and repair. In this study, we further explore the potential effect of IL-33 in cutaneous wound healing. A full-thickness skin wound was generated on the back of mice and treated with IL-33 or vehicle intraperitoneally. Our results revealed that the levels of IL-33 mRNA and protein were significantly enhanced in incisional wound skin. Meantime, administration of IL-33 obviously accelerated wound healing with wounds gaping narrower and exhibiting enhanced reepithelialization. IL-33 upregulation also promoted the collagen deposition and the expression of extracellular matrix (ECM)-associated genes such as fibronectin and collagen IIIa, which implies a direct effect of IL-33 on matrix synthesis. Furthermore, IL-33 facilitated the development of alternatively activated macrophages (AAM) in incisional wound tissue, which closely related to resolution of inflammation and promotion of wound repair. Taken together, these findings suggest that IL-33 may play a pivotal role in maintenance of cutaneous homeostasis and acceleration of normal wound healing.

  8. Vasodilator Therapy: Nitrates and Nicorandil.

    PubMed

    Tarkin, Jason M; Kaski, Juan Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Nitrates have been used to treat symptoms of chronic stable angina for over 135 years. These drugs are known to activate nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine-3',-5'-monophasphate (cGMP) signaling pathways underlying vascular smooth muscle cell relaxation, albeit many questions relating to how nitrates work at the cellular level remain unanswered. Physiologically, the anti-angina effects of nitrates are mostly due to peripheral venous dilatation leading to reduction in preload and therefore left ventricular wall stress, and, to a lesser extent, epicardial coronary artery dilatation and lowering of systemic blood pressure. By counteracting ischemic mechanisms, short-acting nitrates offer rapid relief following an angina attack. Long-acting nitrates, used commonly for angina prophylaxis are recommended second-line, after beta-blockers and calcium channel antagonists. Nicorandil is a balanced vasodilator that acts as both NO donor and arterial K(+) ATP channel opener. Nicorandil might also exhibit cardioprotective properties via mitochondrial ischemic preconditioning. While nitrates and nicorandil are effective pharmacological agents for prevention of angina symptoms, when prescribing these drugs it is important to consider that unwanted and poorly tolerated hemodynamic side-effects such as headache and orthostatic hypotension can often occur owing to systemic vasodilatation. It is also necessary to ensure that a dosing regime is followed that avoids nitrate tolerance, which not only results in loss of drug efficacy, but might also cause endothelial dysfunction and increase long-term cardiovascular risk. Here we provide an update on the pharmacological management of chronic stable angina using nitrates and nicorandil.

  9. Sympathetic, sensory, and nonneuronal contributions to the cutaneous vasoconstrictor response to local cooling.

    PubMed

    Johnson, John M; Yen, Tony C; Zhao, Kun; Kosiba, Wojciech A

    2005-04-01

    Previous work indicates that sympathetic nerves participate in the vascular responses to direct cooling of the skin in humans. We evaluated this hypothesis further in a four-part series by measuring changes in cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) from forearm skin locally cooled from 34 to 29 degrees C for 30 min. In part 1, bretylium tosylate reversed the initial vasoconstriction (-14 +/- 6.6% control CVC, first 5 min) to one of vasodilation (+19.7 +/- 7.7%) but did not affect the response at 30 min (-30.6 +/- 9% control, -38.9 +/- 6.9% bretylium; both P < 0.05, P > 0.05 between treatments). In part 2, yohimbine and propranolol (YP) also reversed the initial vasoconstriction (-14.3 +/- 4.2% control) to vasodilation (+26.3 +/- 12.1% YP), without a significant effect on the 30-min response (-26.7 +/- 6.1% YP, -43.2 +/- 6.5% control; both P < 0.05, P > 0.05 between sites). In part 3, the NPY Y1 receptor antagonist BIBP 3226 had no significant effect on either phase of vasoconstriction (P > 0.05 between sites both times). In part 4, sensory nerve blockade by anesthetic cream (Emla) also reversed the initial vasoconstriction (-20.1 +/- 6.4% control) to one of vasodilation (+213.4 +/- 87.0% Emla), whereas the final levels did not differ significantly (-37.7 +/- 10.1% control, -37.2 +/- 8.7% Emla; both P < 0.05, P > 0.05 between treatments). These results indicate that local cooling causes cold-sensitive afferents to activate sympathetic nerves to release norepinephrine, leading to a local cutaneous vasoconstriction that masks a nonneurogenic vasodilation. Later, a vasoconstriction develops with or without functional sensory or sympathetic nerves.

  10. Minocycline inhibits the enhancement of antidromic primary afferent stimulation-evoked vasodilation following intradermal capsaicin injection.

    PubMed

    Gong, Kerui; Yue, Yue; Zou, Xiaoju; Li, Dingge; Lin, Qing

    2010-09-27

    Neurogenic inflammation is induced by inflammatory mediators released in peripheral tissue from primary afferent nociceptors. Our previous studies suggest that neurogenic inflammation induced by intradermal injection of capsaicin results from the enhancement of dorsal root reflexes (DRRs), which involve antidromic activation of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Numerous studies have reported the important role of glial modulation in pain. However, it remains unclear whether glial cells participate in the process of neurogenic inflammation-induced pain. Here we tested the role of DRG satellite glial cells (SGCs) in this process in anesthetized rats by administration of a glial inhibitor, minocycline. Electrical stimuli (ES, frequency 10 Hz; duration 1 ms; strength 3 mA) were applied to the cut distal ends of the L4-5 dorsal roots. The stimuli evoked antidromic action potentials designed to mimic DRRs. Local cutaneous blood flow in the hindpaw was measured using a Doppler flow meter. Antidromic ES for 10 min evoked a significant vasodilation that could be inhibited dose-dependently by local administration of the calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonist, CGRP8-37. Pretreatment with capsaicin intradermally injected into the hindpaw 2h before the ES enhanced greatly the vasodilation evoked by antidromic ES, and this enhancement could be reversed by minocycline pretreatment. Our findings support the view that neurogenic inflammation following capsaicin injection involves antidromic activation of DRG neurons via the generation of DRRs. Inhibition of neurogenic inflammation by minocycline is suggested to be associated with its inhibitory effect on SGCs that are possibly activated following capsaicin injection.

  11. Increased KGF expression promotes fibroblast activation in a double paracrine manner resulting in cutaneous fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Canady, Johanna; Arndt, Stephanie; Karrer, Sigrid; Bosserhoff, Anja K

    2013-03-01

    Fibrotic disorders of the skin share the characteristic features of increased production and deposition of extracellular matrix components by activated fibroblasts. Their clinical course ranges from benign with localized cutaneous involvement to a systemic, life-threatening disease. The molecular cause for fibroblast activation remains unknown, yet epithelial-mesenchymal interactions draw mounting attention in the research field of fibrogenesis. We examined keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), a crucial molecule in fibroblast-keratinocyte cross talk, exemplarily in keloid and scleroderma, and found its expression to be increased in disease-derived fibroblasts and tissues compared with healthy controls. This overexpression induces fibroblast activation through a double paracrine mode of action. Upon KGF stimulation, the keratinocytes produced and secreted OSM (oncostatin M). Fibroblasts were in turn activated by OSM reacting with the increased expression of collagen type I-α1, fibroblast activation protein, and enhanced migration. The observed increase in collagen expression and fibroblast migration can be traced back to OSM-regulated STAT3 phosphorylation, leading to enhanced urokinase plasminogen activator expression. Hence, we propose a causative loop in the pathogenesis of fibrosing disorders of the skin mediated by the overexpression of KGF in mesenchymal cells.

  12. Hourly activity of Lutzomyia ovallesi and L. gomezi (Diptera:Psychodidae), Vectors of cutaneous leishmaniasis in northcentral Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Feliciangeli, M D

    1997-03-01

    The comparative hourly activity of Lutzomyia ovallesi (Ortiz) and L. gomezi (Nitzulescu), vectors of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Miranda State, Venezuela, was studied between November and March during 1991-1994 using a Shannon trap with a fluorescent light. Female abundance of L. ovallesi increased from 1800 to 2000 hours, plateaued from 2000 to 2400 hours, then decreased progressively. L. gomezi always exhibited maximum activity between 1900 and 2000 hours, then declined abruptly. The importance of these activity patterns in Leishmania transmission is discussed.

  13. Frequent detection of transcriptionally active Felis catus papillomavirus 2 in feline cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Neroli A; Munday, John S; Dittmer, Keren E

    2016-05-01

    Felis catus papillomavirus 2 (FcaPV-2) causes premalignant skin lesions in cats and has also been found in a proportion of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) - a common and potentially fatal cancer of cats. Whilst this could suggest a role of the virus in cancer development, FcaPV-2 has also been detected in skin swabs of normal cats, making it difficult to discern whether the papillomavirus is causing the cancer or merely an 'innocent bystander'. To distinguish between these two possibilities, real-time PCR was used to determine the viral copy number and the transcriptional activity of FcaPV-2 infections present in 70 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded skin lesions including 10 papillomavirus-induced premalignant lesions and 60 SCCs. FcaPV-2 gene expression was found in 21 of 60 (35 %) SCCs, all 10 premalignant lesions and none of 10 normal skin samples. The results showed two distinct subsets of SCCs. The majority of the SCCs had low copy numbers of FcaPV-2 DNA (mean of 17 copies per copy of reference gene DNA) and no FcaPV-2 gene expression, suggesting the virus was an incidental finding. In contrast, 20 SCCs had detectable FcaPV-2 E6/E7 gene expression and very high copy numbers of FcaPV-2 DNA, with a mean of 32 930 copies per copy of reference gene DNA. The relative quantity of E6/E7 gene expression and the viral copy number in this group were similar to those found in the papillomavirus-induced premalignant lesions, suggesting that FcaPV-2 may play a role in the development of a subset of feline cutaneous SCCs.

  14. Enhanced CCR5+/CCR3+ T helper cell ratio in patients with active cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Freutel, S; Gaffal, E; Zahn, S; Bieber, T; Tüting, T; Wenzel, J

    2011-10-01

    Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) is characterized by enhanced interferon α (IFNα) levels in serum and in tissue. Since IFNα promotes a Th1-biased immune response, we hypothesized that a Th1-associated chemokine receptor profile should be a typical finding in patients with active CLE. Therefore, peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from patients with different CLE subsets (n = 15), healthy controls (n = 13) and patients under immunotherapy with IFNα (n = 7). T helper cells were analysed by flow cytometry for the expression of the chemokines receptor CCR5, indicative for Th1 cells, and of CCR3, indicating Th2. In addition, intracellular levels of the type I IFN-inducible MxA protein were measured. Patients with widespread active CLE skin lesions had a significantly increased expression of CCR5, whereas expression of CCR3 was decreased when compared with healthy controls. MxA expression was significantly enhanced in all investigated CLE subtypes, with the highest levels in patients with widespread skin lesions. The enhanced CCR5/CCR3 ratio closely correlated with the MxA levels in peripheral lymphocytes and with disease activity. Our analyses revealed that active CLE is associated with a systemic type I IFN effect that appears to induce a shift towards a Th1-associated chemokine receptor profile. The CCR5/CCR3 T-helper cell ratio might therefore represent an indirect marker for the disease activity in CLE.

  15. Cutaneous immune activity varies with physiological state in female house sparrows (Passer domesticus).

    PubMed

    Martin, L B; Han, P; Kwong, J; Hau, M

    2006-01-01

    Many vertebrates show seasonality in immune defenses, perhaps because of trade-offs with other physiological processes. Trade-offs between reproduction and immune function have been well studied, but how other life cycle events such as molt affect immune function remains unclear. Here, we hypothesize that one possible explanation is that accumulative dissociated processes (e.g., resource deficits generated over the long term by physiological processes) can have delayed effects on immune activity. To test this hypothesis, we compared cutaneous immune responses in groups of captive female house sparrows (Passer domesticus) photoperiodically induced into six different life cycle stages. We predicted that if delayed trade-offs occur, immune activity would be reduced after a mature life state was reached (e.g., postmolt) and not just compromised when other tissues were actively growing (instantaneous trade-off). We found evidence for both types of trade-offs: immune responses were weakest in sparrows that had just completed postnuptial molt, but they were also weak in birds growing reproductive tissues or feathers. Birds in mature reproductive states or light molt had strong immune responses comparable with birds in a nonbreeding/nonmolting state. Altogether, our results indicate that immune activity in female house sparrows can be influenced by both instantaneous and delayed trade-offs.

  16. Novel locally active estrogens accelerate cutaneous wound healing. A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Brufani, Mario; Ceccacci, Francesca; Filocamo, Luigi; Garofalo, Barbara; Joudioux, Roberta; La Bella, Angela; Leonelli, Francesca; Migneco, Luisa M; Bettolo, Rinaldo Marini; Farina, Paolo M; Ashcroft, Gillian S; Routley, Claire; Hardman, Matthew; Meda, Clara; Rando, Gianpaolo; Maggi, Adriana

    2009-01-01

    New 17beta-estradiol (E2) derivatives 1-11 were synthesized from an estrone derivative by addition of organometallic reagents prepared from protected alpha,omega-alkynols and further elaboration of the addition products. The estrogenic activity of these novel compounds was determined using in vitro binding competition assay and transactivation analysis. Among the E2 derivatives synthesized, compound 2 showed the highest transactivation potency and was therefore tested for its ability to modulate cutaneous wound healing in vivo. Compound 2's ability to accelerate wound healing in ovariectomized mice and decrease the production of inflammatory molecules was comparable to that of E2. However, the activity of compound 2 was not superimposable to E2 with regard to the cells involved in the wound repairing process. When locally administered, compound 2 did not show any systemic activity on ER. This class of compounds with clear beneficial effects on wound healing and suitable for topical administration may lead to the generation of innovative drugs for an area of unmet clinical need.

  17. Cerebral, subcortical, and cerebellar activation evoked by selective stimulation of muscle and cutaneous afferents: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Wardman, Daniel L; Gandevia, Simon C; Colebatch, James G

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We compared the brain areas that showed significant flow changes induced by selective stimulation of muscle and cutaneous afferents using fMRI BOLD imaging. Afferents arising from the right hand were studied in eight volunteers with electrical stimulation of the digital nerve of the index finger and over the motor point of the FDI muscle. Both methods evoked areas of significant activation cortically, subcortically, and in the cerebellum. Selective muscle afferent stimulation caused significant activation in motor-related areas. It also caused significantly greater activation within the contralateral precentral gyrus, insula, and within the ipsilateral cerebellum as well as greater areas of reduced blood flow when compared to the cutaneous stimuli. We demonstrated separate precentral and postcentral foci of excitation with muscle afferent stimulation. We conclude, contrary to the findings with evoked potentials, that muscle afferents evoke more widespread cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar activation than do cutaneous afferents. This emphasizes the importance, for studies of movement, of matching the kinematic aspects in order to avoid the results being confounded by alterations in muscle afferent activation. The findings are consistent with clinical observations of the movement consequences of sensory loss and may also be the basis for the contribution of disturbed sensorimotor processing to disorders of movement.

  18. Cerebral, subcortical, and cerebellar activation evoked by selective stimulation of muscle and cutaneous afferents: an fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Wardman, Daniel L.; Gandevia, Simon C.; Colebatch, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We compared the brain areas that showed significant flow changes induced by selective stimulation of muscle and cutaneous afferents using fMRI BOLD imaging. Afferents arising from the right hand were studied in eight volunteers with electrical stimulation of the digital nerve of the index finger and over the motor point of the FDI muscle. Both methods evoked areas of significant activation cortically, subcortically, and in the cerebellum. Selective muscle afferent stimulation caused significant activation in motor‐related areas. It also caused significantly greater activation within the contralateral precentral gyrus, insula, and within the ipsilateral cerebellum as well as greater areas of reduced blood flow when compared to the cutaneous stimuli. We demonstrated separate precentral and postcentral foci of excitation with muscle afferent stimulation. We conclude, contrary to the findings with evoked potentials, that muscle afferents evoke more widespread cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar activation than do cutaneous afferents. This emphasizes the importance, for studies of movement, of matching the kinematic aspects in order to avoid the results being confounded by alterations in muscle afferent activation. The findings are consistent with clinical observations of the movement consequences of sensory loss and may also be the basis for the contribution of disturbed sensorimotor processing to disorders of movement. PMID:24771687

  19. Peroxynitrite mediates testosterone-induced vasodilation of microvascular resistance vessels.

    PubMed

    Puttabyatappa, Yashoda; Stallone, John N; Ergul, Adviye; El-Remessy, Azza B; Kumar, Sanjiv; Black, Stephen; Johnson, Maribeth; Owen, Mary P; White, Richard E

    2013-04-01

    Our knowledge of how androgens influence the cardiovascular system is far from complete, and this lack of understanding is especially true of how androgens affect resistance vessels. Our aim was to identify the signaling mechanisms stimulated by testosterone (TES) in microvascular arteries and to understand how these mechanisms mediate TES-induced vasodilation. Mesenteric microvessels were isolated from male Sprague-Dawley rats. Tension studies demonstrated a rapid, concentration-dependent, vasodilatory response to TES that did not involve protein synthesis or aromatization to 17β-estradiol. Dichlorofluorescein fluorescence and nitrotyrosine immunoblot experiments indicated that TES stimulated peroxynitrite formation in microvessels, and functional studies demonstrated that TES-induced vasodilation was inhibited by scavenging peroxynitrite. As predicted, TES enhanced the production of both peroxynitrite precursors (i.e., superoxide and nitic oxide), and xanthine oxidase was identified as the likely source of TES-stimulated superoxide production. Functional and biochemical studies indicated that TES signaling involved activity of the phosphoinositide 3 (PI3) kinase-protein kinase B (Akt) cascade initiated by activation of the androgen receptor and culminated in enhanced production of cGMP and microvascular vasodilation. These findings, derived from a variety of analytical and functional approaches, provide evidence for a novel nongenomic signaling mechanism for androgen action in the microvasculature: TES-stimulated vasodilation mediated primarily by peroxynitrite formed from xanthine oxidase-generated superoxide and NO. This response was associated with activation of the PI3 kinase-Akt signaling cascade initiated by activation of the androgen receptor. We propose this mechanism could account for TES-stimulated cGMP production in microvessels and, ultimately, vasodilation.

  20. Inhibition of midbrain-evoked tonic and rhythmic motor activity by cutaneous stimulation in decerebrate cats.

    PubMed

    Beyaert, C A; Haouzi, P; Marchal, F

    2003-03-01

    The effect of mechanical and electrical stimulation of cervical cutaneous afferents was analysed on both the centrally induced tonic and rhythmic activities in hindlimb antagonist muscle nerves of 16 decerebrate paralysed cats. Electrical stimulation of dorsal midbrain evoked in the nerve to the tibialis anterior muscle (TAn) either rhythmic discharges (n=14), associated with tonic discharges in ten cats, or only tonic discharges (n=4). Centrally induced activity in the ipsilateral nerve to gastrocnemius medialis (GMn) occurred in fewer cats (n=12) and displayed similar patterns as in TAn. Manual traction of the scruff of the neck reduced the TAn tonic and rhythmic discharges (n=6) by 73% (P<0.05) and 71% (P<0.05), respectively, and reduced only the tonic component of GMn discharges (by 41%, n=3). Electrical stimulation (impulses 0.1-0.5 ms, 50 Hz) of cervical nerves belonging to C5 or C6 dermatomes, the intensity (0.4-4 mA) of which induced minimal inhibition of both TAn and GMn discharges, reduced significantly the tonic component of TAn discharges (by 39%, n=4). At higher intensities of electrical cervical nerve stimulation (2-6 mA) inducing maximal inhibitory effect, both tonic and rhythmic activities in TAn and GMn were both significantly reduced by, respectively, 81% and 94% in TAn (n=7), and by 49% and 43% in GMn (n=7). Electrical cervical nerve stimulation consistently reduced the isolated tonic discharge in TAn by 66% (n=4, P<0.05) and in GMn by 23% (n=3) when present. Thus the tonic component was more sensitive to inhibition than the rhythmic component of hindlimb muscle nerve activity.

  1. Outbreak of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Peruvian Military Personnel Undertaking Training Activities in the Amazon Basin, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Oré, Marianela; Sáenz, Eliana; Cabrera, Rufino; Sanchez, Juan F.; De Los Santos, Maxy B.; Lucas, Carmen M.; Núñez, Jorge H.; Edgel, Kimberly A.; Sopan, Justino; Fernández, Jorge; Carnero, Andres M.; Baldeviano, G. Christian; Arrasco, Juan C.; Graf, Paul C. F.; Lescano, Andres G.

    2015-01-01

    Military personnel deployed to the Amazon Basin are at high risk for cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). We responded to an outbreak among Peruvian Army personnel returning from short-term training in the Amazon, conducting active case detection, lesion sample collection, and risk factor assessment. The attack rate was 25% (76/303); the incubation period was 2–36 weeks (median = 8). Most cases had one lesion (66%), primarily ulcerative (49%), and in the legs (57%). Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) identified Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis (59/61 = 97%) and L. (V.) guyanensis (2/61 = 3%). Being male (risk ratio [RR] = 4.01; P = 0.034), not wearing long-sleeve clothes (RR = 1.71; P = 0.005), and sleeping in open rooms (RR = 1.80; P = 0.009) were associated with CL. Sodium stibogluconate therapy had a 41% cure rate, less than previously reported in Peru (∼ 70%; P < 0.001). After emphasizing pre-deployment education and other basic prevention measures, trainees in the following year had lower incidence (1/278 = 0.4%; P < 0.001). Basic prevention can reduce CL risk in deployed militaries. PMID:26078320

  2. Cutaneous retinal activation and neural entrainment in transcranial alternating current stimulation: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Schutter, Dennis J L G

    2016-10-15

    Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) applies exogenous oscillatory electric field potentials to entrain neural rhythms and is used to investigate brain-function relationships and its potential to enhance perceptual and cognitive performance. However, due to current spread tACS can cause cutaneous activation of the retina and phosphenes. Several lines of evidence suggest that retinal phosphenes are capable of inducing neural entrainment, making the contributions of central and peripheral stimulation to the effects in the brain difficult to disentangle. In this literature review, the importance of this issue is further illustrated by the fact that photic stimulation can have a direct impact on perceptual and cognitive performance. This leaves open the possibility that peripheral photic stimulation can at least in part explain the central effects that are attributed to tACS. The extent to which phosphene perception contributes to the effects of exogenous oscillatory electric fields in the brain and influence perception and cognitive performance needs to be examined to understand the working mechanisms of tACS in neurophysiology and behaviour.

  3. Outbreak of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Peruvian Military Personnel Undertaking Training Activities in the Amazon Basin, 2010.

    PubMed

    Oré, Marianela; Sáenz, Eliana; Cabrera, Rufino; Sanchez, Juan F; De Los Santos, Maxy B; Lucas, Carmen M; Núñez, Jorge H; Edgel, Kimberly A; Sopan, Justino; Fernández, Jorge; Carnero, Andres M; Baldeviano, G Christian; Arrasco, Juan C; Graf, Paul C F; Lescano, Andres G

    2015-08-01

    Military personnel deployed to the Amazon Basin are at high risk for cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). We responded to an outbreak among Peruvian Army personnel returning from short-term training in the Amazon, conducting active case detection, lesion sample collection, and risk factor assessment. The attack rate was 25% (76/303); the incubation period was 2-36 weeks (median = 8). Most cases had one lesion (66%), primarily ulcerative (49%), and in the legs (57%). Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) identified Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis (59/61 = 97%) and L. (V.) guyanensis (2/61 = 3%). Being male (risk ratio [RR] = 4.01; P = 0.034), not wearing long-sleeve clothes (RR = 1.71; P = 0.005), and sleeping in open rooms (RR = 1.80; P = 0.009) were associated with CL. Sodium stibogluconate therapy had a 41% cure rate, less than previously reported in Peru (~70%; P < 0.001). After emphasizing pre-deployment education and other basic prevention measures, trainees in the following year had lower incidence (1/278 = 0.4%; P < 0.001). Basic prevention can reduce CL risk in deployed militaries.

  4. Skeletal muscle vasodilation during systemic hypoxia in humans.

    PubMed

    Dinenno, Frank A

    2016-01-15

    In humans, the net effect of acute systemic hypoxia in quiescent skeletal muscle is vasodilation despite significant reflex increases in muscle sympathetic vasoconstrictor nerve activity. This vasodilation increases tissue perfusion and oxygen delivery to maintain tissue oxygen consumption. Although several mechanisms may be involved, we recently tested the roles of two endothelial-derived substances during conditions of sympathoadrenal blockade to isolate local vascular control mechanisms: nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandins (PGs). Our findings indicate that 1) NO normally plays a role in regulating vascular tone during hypoxia independent of the PG pathway; 2) PGs do not normally contribute to vascular tone during hypoxia, however, they do affect vascular tone when NO is inhibited; 3) NO and PGs are not independently obligatory to observe hypoxic vasodilation when assessed as a response from rest to steady-state hypoxia; and 4) combined NO and PG inhibition abolishes hypoxic vasodilation in human skeletal muscle. When the stimulus is exacerbated via combined submaximal rhythmic exercise and systemic hypoxia to cause further red blood cell (RBC) deoxygenation, skeletal muscle blood flow is augmented compared with normoxic exercise via local dilator mechanisms to maintain oxygen delivery to active tissue. Data obtained in a follow-up study indicate that combined NO and PG inhibition during hypoxic exercise blunts augmented vasodilation and hyperemia compared with control (normoxic) conditions by ∼50%; however, in contrast to hypoxia alone, the response is not abolished, suggesting that other local substances are involved. Factors associated with greater RBC deoxygenation such as ATP release, or nitrite reduction to NO, or both likely play a role in regulating this response.

  5. Integrins mediate mechanical compression-induced endothelium-dependent vasodilation through endothelial nitric oxide pathway.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2015-09-01

    Cardiac and skeletal muscle contraction lead to compression of intramuscular arterioles, which, in turn, leads to their vasodilation (a process that may enhance blood flow during muscle activity). Although endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated in compression-induced vasodilation, the mechanism whereby arterial compression elicits NO production is unclear. We cannulated isolated swine (n = 39) myocardial (n = 69) and skeletal muscle (n = 60) arteriole segments and exposed them to cyclic transmural pressure generated by either intraluminal or extraluminal pressure pulses to simulate compression in contracting muscle. We found that the vasodilation elicited by internal or external pressure pulses was equivalent; moreover, vasodilation in response to pressure depended on changes in arteriole diameter. Agonist-induced endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilation was used to verify endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell viability. Vasodilation in response to cyclic changes in transmural pressure was smaller than that elicited by pharmacological activation of the NO signaling pathway. It was attenuated by inhibition of NO synthase and by mechanical removal of the endothelium. Stemming from previous observations that endothelial integrin is implicated in vasodilation in response to shear stress, we found that function-blocking integrin α5β1 or αvβ3 antibodies attenuated cyclic compression-induced vasodilation and NOx (NO(-)2 and NO(-)3) production, as did an RGD peptide that competitively inhibits ligand binding to some integrins. We therefore conclude that integrin plays a role in cyclic compression-induced endothelial NO production and thereby in the vasodilation of small arteries during cyclic transmural pressure loading.

  6. Integrins mediate mechanical compression–induced endothelium-dependent vasodilation through endothelial nitric oxide pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac and skeletal muscle contraction lead to compression of intramuscular arterioles, which, in turn, leads to their vasodilation (a process that may enhance blood flow during muscle activity). Although endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated in compression-induced vasodilation, the mechanism whereby arterial compression elicits NO production is unclear. We cannulated isolated swine (n = 39) myocardial (n = 69) and skeletal muscle (n = 60) arteriole segments and exposed them to cyclic transmural pressure generated by either intraluminal or extraluminal pressure pulses to simulate compression in contracting muscle. We found that the vasodilation elicited by internal or external pressure pulses was equivalent; moreover, vasodilation in response to pressure depended on changes in arteriole diameter. Agonist-induced endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilation was used to verify endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell viability. Vasodilation in response to cyclic changes in transmural pressure was smaller than that elicited by pharmacological activation of the NO signaling pathway. It was attenuated by inhibition of NO synthase and by mechanical removal of the endothelium. Stemming from previous observations that endothelial integrin is implicated in vasodilation in response to shear stress, we found that function-blocking integrin α5β1 or αvβ3 antibodies attenuated cyclic compression–induced vasodilation and NOx (NO−2 and NO−3) production, as did an RGD peptide that competitively inhibits ligand binding to some integrins. We therefore conclude that integrin plays a role in cyclic compression–induced endothelial NO production and thereby in the vasodilation of small arteries during cyclic transmural pressure loading. PMID:26324675

  7. Familial hypercholesterolemia impairs exercise-induced systemic vasodilation due to reduced NO bioavailability.

    PubMed

    de Beer, Vincent J; Merkus, Daphne; Bender, Shawn B; Tharp, Darla L; Bowles, Douglas K; Duncker, Dirk J; Laughlin, M Harold

    2013-12-01

    Hypercholesterolemia impairs endothelial function [e.g., the nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic GMP-phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) pathway], limits shear stress-induced vasodilation, and is therefore expected to reduce exercise-induced vasodilation. To assess the actual effects of hypercholesterolemia on endothelial function and exercise-induced vasodilation, we compared the effects of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and PDE5 inhibition in chronically instrumented Yucatan (Control) and Rapacz familial hypercholesterolemic (FH) swine, at rest and during treadmill exercise. The increases in systemic vascular conductance produced by ATP (relative to nitroprusside) and exercise were blunted in FH compared with Control swine. The vasoconstrictor response to eNOS inhibition, with nitro-l-arginine (NLA), was attenuated in FH compared with Control swine, both at rest and during exercise. Furthermore, whereas the vasodilator response to nitroprusside was enhanced slightly, the vasodilator response to PDE5 inhibition, with EMD360527, was reduced in FH compared with Control swine. Finally, in the pulmonary circulation, FH resulted in attenuated vasodilator responses to ATP, while maintaining the responses to both NLA and EMD360527. In conclusion, hypercholesterolemia reduces exercise-induced vasodilation in the systemic but not the pulmonary circulation. This reduction appears to be the principal result of a decrease in NO bioavailability, which is mitigated by a lower PDE5 activity.

  8. Cutaneous Pseudolymphomas.

    PubMed

    Romero-Pérez, D; Blanes Martínez, M; Encabo-Durán, B

    2016-10-01

    The term cutaneous pseudolymphoma refers to benign reactive lymphoid proliferations in the skin that simulate cutaneous lymphomas. It is a purely descriptive term that encompasses various reactive conditions with a varied etiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, histology, and behavior. We present a review of the different types of cutaneous pseudolymphoma. To reach a correct diagnosis, it is necessary to contrast clinical, histologic, immunophenotypic, and molecular findings. Even with these data, in some cases only the clinical course will confirm the diagnosis, making follow-up essential.

  9. Cutaneous Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, Amylynne; Penrose, Carolin

    2009-01-01

    Cutaneous tuberculosis occurs rarely, despite a high and increasing prevalence of tuberculosis worldwide. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterrium bovis, and the Bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccine can cause tuberculosis involving the skin. Cutaneous tuberculosis can be acquired exogenously or endogenously and present as a multitude of differing clinical morphologies. Diagnosis of these lesions can be difficult, as they resemble many other dermatological conditions that are often primarily considered. Further, microbiological confirmation is poor, despite scientific advances, such as the more frequent use of polymerase chain reaction. The authors report a case that illustrates the challenges faced by dermatologists when considering a diagnosis of cutaneous tuberculosis. PMID:20725570

  10. Prolonged aspirin inhibition of anodal vasodilation is not due to the trafficking delay of neural mediators.

    PubMed

    Durand, S; Fromy, B; Tartas, M; Jardel, A; Saumet, J L; Abraham, P

    2003-07-01

    We previously reported that forearm vasodilation to a delivered all-at-once over 5 min or a 1-min repeated monopolar anodal 0.10-mA current application is aspirin sensitive and that a single high-dose aspirin exerts a long-lived effect in the former case. We hypothesized that 1) in the latter case, the effect of aspirin would also be long lived and 2) the time required to resupply nerve endings with unblocked cyclooxygenase through axonal transport could explain this phenomenon. We studied the time course for the recovery of vasodilation to repeated current application after placebo or 1-g aspirin treatment. We then searched for a difference at a proximal vs. distal site in the recovery of the response. Aspirin abolished current-induced vasodilation at 2 h, 10 h, and 3 days, with a progressive recovery thereafter, but no difference between distal and proximal site was observed for the recovery of the response. This suggests that, although neural cyclooxygenase could participate in the response, the time course of aspirin inhibition of current-induced cutaneous vasodilation is not due to the time required through neural transport to resupply nerve endings with unblocked proteins.

  11. Role of vasodilators in regurgitant valve disease.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Artur; Tornos, Pilar; Sambola, Antonia; Permayer-Miralda, Gaieta

    2006-12-01

    Vasodilator therapy is designed to reduce regurgitant volume and improve left ventricular function. Acute administration reduces vascular resistance and decreases regurgitant volume and left ventricular filling pressure. These effects may be clinically useful in acute regurgitations, but less consistent results have been reported in long-term therapy. In chronic mitral functional regurgitation, vasodilator therapy has proved to have clinical or prognostic benefit only when heart failure or poor ventricular function is present. The indication of vasodilator treatment in aortic regurgitation has raised significant controversy. Several studies with small series have shown beneficial effects on regurgitant volume, ejection fraction, and mass of the left ventricle. Nevertheless, in the only two randomized long-term follow-up studies, results differed completely. In our experience, both nifedipine and enalapril failed to reduce the need for valvular surgery or show benefits in echocardiographic parameters. Vasodilator therapy would be indicated only in patients with severe aortic regurgitation and systemic hypertension, or when surgery is contraindicated.

  12. Seasonal and hourly activity of Rhombomys opimus in the endemic focus of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis in Isfahan, Iran.

    PubMed

    Sahabi, Z; Goodarzian, P; Nadim, A

    1983-01-01

    For the study of the seasonal and hourly activity of the great gerbil, Rhombomys opimus in an endemic focus of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (Isfahan), two colonies were selected in which the number of gerbils was counted by visual sighting. The study shows that the gerbils are quite active from August through December. After a decrease in January and February, once again they become active but not as much as early Autumn. In the hot months of the year the gerbils are active only early in the morning and late in the afternoon. In the cooler months, they are active in the middle of the day. In cold parts of the year the activity of gerbils decreases very considerably.

  13. Cutaneous Mechanoreceptor Feedback from the Hand and Foot Can Modulate Muscle Sympathetic Nerve Activity

    PubMed Central

    Strzalkowski, Nicholas D. J.; Incognito, Anthony V.; Bent, Leah R.; Millar, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    Stimulation of high threshold mechanical nociceptors on the skin can modulate efferent sympathetic outflow. Whether low threshold mechanoreceptors from glabrous skin are similarly capable of modulating autonomic outflow is unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the effects of cutaneous afferent feedback from the hand palm and foot sole on efferent muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). Fifteen healthy young participants (9 male; 25 ± 3 years [range: 22–29]) underwent microneurographic recording of multi-unit MSNA from the right fibular nerve during 2 min of baseline and 2 min of mechanical vibration (150 Hz, 220 μm peak-to-peak) applied to the left hand or foot. Each participant completed three trials of both hand and foot stimulation, each separated by 5 min. MSNA burst frequency decreased similarly during the 2 min of both hand (20.8 ± 8.9 vs. 19.3 ± 8.6 bursts/minute [Δ −8%], p = 0.035) and foot (21.0 ± 8.3 vs. 19.5 ± 8.3 bursts/minute [Δ −8%], p = 0.048) vibration but did not alter normalized mean burst amplitude or area (All p > 0.05). Larger reductions in burst frequency were observed during the first 10 s (onset) of both hand (20.8 ± 8.9 vs. 17.0 ± 10.4 [Δ −25%], p < 0.001) and foot (21.0 ± 8.3 vs. 18.3 ± 9.4 [Δ −16%], p = 0.035) vibration, in parallel with decreases in normalized mean burst amplitude (hand: 0.45 ± 0.06 vs. 0.36 ± 0.14% [Δ −19%], p = 0.03; foot: 0.47 ± 0.07 vs. 0.34 ± 0.19% [Δ −27%], p = 0.02) and normalized mean burst area (hand: 0.42 ± 0.05 vs. 0.32 ± 0.12% [Δ −25%], p = 0.003; foot: 0.47 ± 0.05 vs. 0.34 ± 0.16% [Δ −28%], p = 0.01). These results demonstrate that tactile feedback from the hands and feet can influence efferent sympathetic outflow to skeletal muscle. PMID:28008306

  14. A comparison of vasodilation mode among selexipag (NS-304; [2-{4-[(5,6-diphenylpyrazin-2-yl)(isopropyl)amino]butoxy}-N-(methylsulfonyl)acetamide]), its active metabolite MRE-269 and various prostacyclin receptor agonists in rat, porcine and human pulmonary arteries.

    PubMed

    Fuchikami, Chiaki; Murakami, Kohji; Tajima, Koyuki; Homan, Junko; Kosugi, Keiji; Kuramoto, Kazuya; Oka, Michiko; Kuwano, Keiichi

    2017-01-15

    Selexipag (NS-304; [2-{4-[(5,6-diphenylpyrazin-2-yl)(isopropyl)amino]butoxy}-N- (methylsulfonyl)acetamide]) is a novel, orally available non-prostanoid prostacyclin receptor (IP receptor) agonist that has recently been approved for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). We examined the effect of the active metabolite of selexipag, MRE-269, and IP receptor agonists that are currently available as PAH therapeutic drugs on the relaxation of rat, porcine and human pulmonary artery. cAMP formation in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells was induced by all test compounds (MRE-269, epoprostenol, iloprost, treprostinil and beraprost sodium) and suppressed by IP receptor antagonists (CAY10441 and 2-[4-(1H-indol-4-yloxymethyl)-benzyloxycarbonylamino]-3-phenyl-propionic acid). MRE-269 induced endothelium-independent vasodilation of rat extralobar pulmonary artery (EPA). In contrast, endothelial denudation or the addition of a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor markedly attenuated the vasodilation of EPA induced by epoprostenol, treprostinil and beraprost sodium but not iloprost. The vasorelaxant effects of MRE-269 on rat small intralobar pulmonary artery (SIPA) and EPA were the same, while the other IP receptor agonists induced less vasodilation in SIPA than in EPA. Furthermore, a prostaglandin E receptor 3 antagonist enhanced the vasodilation induced by all IP receptor agonists tested except MRE-269. We also investigated the relaxation induced by IP receptor agonists in pulmonary arteries from non-rodent species and found similar vasodilation modes in porcine and human as in rat preparations. These results suggest that MRE-269, in contrast to other IP receptor agonists, works as a selective IP receptor agonist, thus leading to pronounced vasorelaxation of rat, porcine and human pulmonary artery.

  15. Pregnancy-induced remodelling and enhanced endothelium-derived hyperpolarization-type vasodilator activity in rat uterine radial artery: transient receptor potential vanilloid type 4 channels, caveolae and myoendothelial gap junctions

    PubMed Central

    Senadheera, Sevvandi; Bertrand, Paul P; Grayson, T Hilton; Leader, Leo; Murphy, Timothy V; Sandow, Shaun L

    2013-01-01

    In pregnancy, the vasculature of the uterus undergoes rapid remodelling to increase blood flow and maintain perfusion to the fetus. The present study determines the distribution and density of caveolae, transient receptor potential vanilloid type 4 channels (TRPV4) and myoendothelial gap junctions, and the relative contribution of related endothelium-dependent vasodilator components in uterine radial arteries of control virgin non-pregnant and 20-day late-pregnant rats. The hypothesis examined is that specific components of endothelium-dependent vasodilator mechanisms are altered in pregnancy-related uterine radial artery remodelling. Conventional and serial section electron microscopy were used to determine the morphological characteristics of uterine radial arteries from control and pregnant rats. TRPV4 distribution and expression was examined using conventional confocal immunohistochemistry, and the contribution of endothelial TRPV4, nitric oxide (NO) and endothelium-derived hyperpolarization (EDH)-type activity determined using pressure myography with pharmacological intervention. Data show outward hypertrophic remodelling occurs in uterine radial arteries in pregnancy. Further, caveolae density in radial artery endothelium and smooth muscle from pregnant rats was significantly increased by ∼94% and ∼31%, respectively, compared with control, whereas caveolae density did not differ in endothelium compared with smooth muscle from control. Caveolae density was significantly higher by ∼59% on the abluminal compared with the luminal surface of the endothelium in uterine radial artery of pregnant rats but did not differ at those surfaces in control. TRPV4 was present in endothelium and smooth muscle, but not associated with internal elastic lamina hole sites in radial arteries. TRPV4 fluorescence intensity was significantly increased in the endothelium and smooth muscle of radial artery of pregnant compared with control rats by ∼2.6- and 5.5-fold

  16. Rho kinase activation and ROS production contributes to the cooling enhanced contraction in cutaneous equine digital veins.

    PubMed

    Zerpa, H; Berhane, Y; Woodcock, H; Elliott, J; Bailey, S R

    2010-07-01

    A decrease in environmental temperature can directly affect the contractility of cutaneous vasculature, mediated in part by alpha(2)-adrenoceptors. Most of the cellular mechanisms underlying the cooling-enhanced contractility to alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists have been reported in cutaneous arteries but little information is available on cutaneous veins. To investigate the cellular mechanisms associated with the cooling-enhanced contraction to UK-14304 (alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist), isolated equine digital veins (EDVs) were studied at 30 degrees C and 22 degrees C. The effects of inhibitors were studied on the contractile response to UK-14304 (0.1 microM). The cooling-enhanced responses were inhibited by Rho kinase inhibitors [maximum response to UK-14304 95.2 +/- 8% of response to depolarizing Krebs solution (DKS) in control vessels cooled to 22 degrees C, compared with 31.4 +/- 6% in the presence of fasudil 1 microM and 75.8 +/- 6% with Y-27632 0.1 microM] and the effects of these inhibitors were considerably less at 30 degrees C (control response 56.4 +/- 5% of DKS; 34.9 +/- 6% with fasudil 1 microM and 50.6 +/- 9% with Y-27632 0.1 microM). Furthermore, Western blotting showed that one of the downstream targets for Rho kinase activity, ezrin/radixin/moesin, was phosphorylated after cooling and reduced by fasudil (1 microM) only at 22 degrees C. The activation of protein kinase C contributed to the contractile response, but predominantly at 30 degrees C (maximum response 82.3 +/- 9% of DKS for control; 57.7 +/- 10% in the presence of chelerythrine 10 microM) with no significant effect at 22 degrees C. The reduction of the response at 22 degrees C by antioxidants, rotenone (14% reduction), and tempol (21% reduction) suggested the contribution of reactive oxygen species (ROS). No evidence was obtained to support the participation of tyrosine kinase. These data demonstrate that Rho kinase activation and the production of ROS contributes to the cooling

  17. Oral sapropterin acutely augments reflex vasodilation in aged human skin through nitric oxide-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Stanhewicz, Anna E; Alexander, Lacy M; Kenney, W Larry

    2013-10-01

    Functional constitutive nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and its cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) are required for full reflex cutaneous vasodilation and are attenuated in primary aging. Acute, locally administered BH4 increases reflex vasodilation through NO-dependent mechanisms in aged skin. We hypothesized that oral sapropterin (Kuvan, shelf-stable pharmaceutical formulation of BH4) would augment reflex vasodilation in aged human skin during hyperthermia. Nine healthy human subjects (76 ± 1 yr) ingested sapropterin (10 mg/kg) or placebo in a randomized double-blind crossover design. Venous blood samples were collected prior to, and 3 h following, ingestion of sapropterin for measurement of plasma BH4. Three intradermal microdialysis fibers were placed in the forearm skin for local delivery of 1) lactated Ringer's solution, 2) 10 mM BH4, and 3) 20 mM N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) to inhibit NOS. Red cell flux was measured at each site by laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) as reflex vasodilation was induced using a water-perfused suit. At 1°C rise in oral temperature, mean body temperature was clamped and 20 mM l-NAME was perfused at each site. Cutaneous vascular conductance was calculated (CVC = LDF/MAP) and expressed as a percentage of maximum (%CVCmax 28 mM sodium nitroprusside and local heat 43°C). Plasma concentrations of BH4 were significantly elevated 3 h after ingestion of sapropterin (0 h: 19.1 ± 2 pmol/ml vs. 3 h: 43.8 ± 3 pmol/ml; P < 0.001). Sapropterin increased NO-dependent vasodilation at control site (placebo: 14 ± 1 %CVCmax vs. sapropterin: 25 ± 4 %CVCmax; P = 0.004). Local BH4 administration increased NO-dependent vasodilation compared with control in placebo trials only (control: 14 ± 1 %CVCmax vs. BH4-treated: 24 ± 3 %CVCmax; P = 0.02). These data suggest oral sapropterin increases bioavailable BH4 in aged skin microvasculature sufficiently to increase NO synthesis through NOS and that sapropterin may be a viable intervention to

  18. Cutaneous zygomycosis.

    PubMed

    Bonifaz, Alexandro; Vázquez-González, Denisse; Tirado-Sánchez, Andrés; Ponce-Olivera, Rosa María

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous zygomycosis is a fungal infection caused by zygomycetes that affects the skin. It occurs in uncontrolled diabetic patients and immunosuppressed individuals. It has 2 clinical forms: primary cutaneous zygomycosis and secondary cutaneous zygomycosis. The first is characterized by necrotic lesions and the fungus is usually inoculated by trauma. If diagnosed early, it generally has a good prognosis. Secondary zygomycosis is usually a complication and extension of the rhinocerebral variety that starts as a palpebral fistula and progresses to a necrotic lesion with a poor prognosis. The diagnosis is made by identification of the fungus by direct KOH examination, culture, and biopsy. Treatment for the primary disease is surgical debridement plus amphotericin B. The secondary type is treated with amphotericin B and/or posaconazole.

  19. Hourly activity of Lutzomyia neivai in the endemic zone of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Tucumán, Argentina: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Fuenzalida, Ana Denise; Quintana, María Gabriela; Salomón, Oscar Daniel; de Grosso, Mercedes Sara Lizarralde

    2011-08-01

    In the present work, the hourly activity of Lutzomyia neivai was studied in the southern part of the province of Tucumán, Argentina, in an area of transmission of cutaneous leishmaniasis during two months of higher activity. In addition, the variables that influenced the abundance of Lu. neivai were evaluated. A total of 1,146 individuals belonging to Lu. neivai (97%) and Lutzomyia migonei (3%) were captured. The hourly activity of Lu. neivai was mainly nocturnal, with a bimodal pattern in both months. In January, the variable that most influenced the abundance of Lu. neivai was the temperature, whereas in April, that variable was humidity. These results may contribute to the design of anti-vectorial control measures at a micro-focal scale.

  20. Exogenous Tryptophan Promotes Cutaneous Wound Healing of Chronically Stressed Mice through Inhibition of TNF-α and IDO Activation

    PubMed Central

    Bandeira, Luana Graziella; Bortolot, Beatriz Salari; Cecatto, Matheus Jorand; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa; Romana-Souza, Bruna

    2015-01-01

    Stress prolongs the inflammatory response compromising the dermal reconstruction and wound closure. Acute stress-induced inflammation increases indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase-stimulated tryptophan catabolism. To investigate the role of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase expression and tryptophan administration in adverse effects of stress on cutaneous wound healing, mice were submitted to chronic restraint stress and treated with tryptophan daily until euthanasia. Excisional lesions were created on each mouse and 5 or 7 days later, the lesions were analyzed. In addition, murine skin fibroblasts were exposed to elevated epinephrine levels plus tryptophan, and fibroblast activity was evaluated. Tryptophan administration reversed the reduction of the plasma tryptophan levels and the increase in the plasma normetanephrine levels induced by stress 5 and 7 days after wounding. Five days after wounding, stress-induced increase in the protein levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase, and this was inhibited by tryptophan. Stress-induced increase in the lipid peroxidation and the amount of the neutrophils, macrophages and T cells number was reversed by tryptophan 5 days after wounding. Tryptophan administration inhibited the reduction of myofibroblast density, collagen deposition, re-epithelialization and wound contraction induced by stress 5 days after wounding. In dermal fibroblast culture, the tryptophan administration increased the cell migration and AKT phosphorylation in cells treated with high epinephrine levels. In conclusion, tryptophan-induced reduction of inflammatory response and indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase expression may have accelerated cutaneous wound healing of chronically stressed mice. PMID:26057238

  1. Exogenous Tryptophan Promotes Cutaneous Wound Healing of Chronically Stressed Mice through Inhibition of TNF-α and IDO Activation.

    PubMed

    Bandeira, Luana Graziella; Bortolot, Beatriz Salari; Cecatto, Matheus Jorand; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa; Romana-Souza, Bruna

    2015-01-01

    Stress prolongs the inflammatory response compromising the dermal reconstruction and wound closure. Acute stress-induced inflammation increases indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase-stimulated tryptophan catabolism. To investigate the role of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase expression and tryptophan administration in adverse effects of stress on cutaneous wound healing, mice were submitted to chronic restraint stress and treated with tryptophan daily until euthanasia. Excisional lesions were created on each mouse and 5 or 7 days later, the lesions were analyzed. In addition, murine skin fibroblasts were exposed to elevated epinephrine levels plus tryptophan, and fibroblast activity was evaluated. Tryptophan administration reversed the reduction of the plasma tryptophan levels and the increase in the plasma normetanephrine levels induced by stress 5 and 7 days after wounding. Five days after wounding, stress-induced increase in the protein levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase, and this was inhibited by tryptophan. Stress-induced increase in the lipid peroxidation and the amount of the neutrophils, macrophages and T cells number was reversed by tryptophan 5 days after wounding. Tryptophan administration inhibited the reduction of myofibroblast density, collagen deposition, re-epithelialization and wound contraction induced by stress 5 days after wounding. In dermal fibroblast culture, the tryptophan administration increased the cell migration and AKT phosphorylation in cells treated with high epinephrine levels. In conclusion, tryptophan-induced reduction of inflammatory response and indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase expression may have accelerated cutaneous wound healing of chronically stressed mice.

  2. [Niacin deficiency and cutaneous immunity].

    PubMed

    Ikenouchi-Sugita, Atsuko; Sugita, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    Niacin, also known as vitamin B3, is required for the synthesis of coenzymes, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP). Niacin binds with G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 109A on cutaneous Langerhans cells and causes vasodilation with flushing in head and neck area. Niacin deficiency due to excessive alcohol consumption, certain drugs or inadequate uptake in diet causes pellagra, a photosensitivity dermatitis. Recently several studies have revealed the mechanism of photosensitivity in niacin deficiency, which may pave a way for new therapeutic approaches. The expression level of prostaglandin E synthase (PTGES) is up-regulated in the skin of both pellagra patients and niacin deficient pellagra mouse models. In addition, pellagra is mediated through prostaglandin E₂-EP4 (PGE₂-EP4) signaling via reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in keratinocytes. In this article, we have reviewed the role of niacin in immunity and the mechanism of niacin deficiency-induced photosensitivity.

  3. Influence of the Plantar Cutaneous Information in Postural Regulation Depending on the Age and the Physical Activity Status

    PubMed Central

    Maitre, Julien; Paillard, Thierry P.

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to compare the balance control adaptation to different supporting surfaces depending on the age and the physical activity status. The balance control of two groups of young (n = 17) and old (n = 17) participants who practiced regular physical activity (active groups) and two groups of young (n = 17) and old (n = 17) participants who did not practice physical activity (non-active groups) was compared on a firm surface and on a foam surface. The parameters of the center of foot pressure (COP) displacement were compared between the groups. The two older groups were more disturbed than the two younger groups when they stood on a foam surface and there was no difference between active and non-active groups. This result may be linked to the structural and functional involutions of the plantar cutaneous sole and foot that occur with age advancement. The participants’ physical activity practice might be not specific enough to generate a more efficient postural adaption to the foam condition for the active groups than the non-active groups within their respective age groups. PMID:27582699

  4. Hemoglobin Effects on Nitric Oxide Mediated Hypoxic Vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Rong, Zimei; Cooper, Chris E

    2016-01-01

    The brain responds to hypoxia with an increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF). However, such an increase is generally believed to start only after the oxygen tension decreases to a certain threshold level. Although many mechanisms (different vasodilator and different generation and metabolism mechanisms of the vasodilator) have been proposed at the molecular level, none of them has gained universal acceptance. Nitric oxide (NO) has been proposed to play a central role in the regulation of oxygen supply since it is a vasodilator whose production and metabolism are both oxygen dependent. We have used a computational model that simulates blood flow and oxygen metabolism in the brain (BRAINSIGNALS) to test mechanism by which NO may elucidate hypoxic vasodilation. The first model proposed that NO was produced by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and metabolized by the mitochondrial enzyme cytochrome c oxidase (CCO). NO production declined with decreasing oxygen concentration given that oxygen is a substrate for nitric oxide synthase (NOS). However, this was balanced by NO metabolism by CCO, which also declined with decreasing oxygen concentration. However, the NOS effect was dominant; the resulting model profiles of hypoxic vasodilation only approximated the experimental curves when an unfeasibly low K m for oxygen for NOS was input into the model. We therefore modified the model such that NO generation was via the nitrite reductase activity of deoxyhemoglobin instead of NOS, whilst keeping the metabolism of NO by CCO the same. NO production increased with decreasing oxygen concentration, leading to an improved reproduction of the experimental CBF versus PaO2 curve. However, the threshold phenomenon was not perfectly reproduced. In this present work, we incorporated a wider variety of oxygen dependent and independent NO production and removal mechanisms. We found that the addition of NO removal via oxidation to nitrate mediated by oxyhemoglobin resulted in the

  5. Apomorphine can increase cutaneous inhibition of motor activity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Clouston, P D; Lim, C L; Sue, C; Morris, J G; Yiannikas, C

    1996-02-01

    We studied the effect of non-nociceptive ipsilateral digital stimulation on EMG recorded from a small hand muscle before and after the administration of subcutaneous apomorphine in 6 patients with Parkinson's disease. All were receiving the drug to control ¿on-off¿ fluctuations in motor performance. Averaged rectified EMG was recorded from tonically contracted abductor pollicis brevis (APB) following index finger stimulation using a brief stimulus train. In 5 patients motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were also recorded from APB during tonic contraction. A conditioning stimulus train was applied to the index finger at intervals between 15 and 65 msec prior to the transcranial magnetic stimulus. After apomorphine administration the patient group showed a significant increase in both EMG and MEP inhibition induced by digital stimulation. In patients with Parkinson's disease who have marked motor fluctuations, the inhibitory response of upper limb motor neurones to low level digital cutaneous stimulation can be altered by dopamine agonists.

  6. Hyperosmolality-mediated peritoneal microvascular vasodilation is linked to aquaporin function.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, El Rasheid; Althani, Asma; Fawzi, Ashraf A; Fituri, Omar M

    2014-01-01

    Glucose-based peritoneal dialysis (PD) solutions dilate the parietal and visceral peritoneal microvasculature by endothelium-dependent mechanisms that primarily involve hyperosmolality. This PD-mediated dilation occurs by active intracellular glucose uptake and adenosine Al receptor activation, and by hyperosmolality-stimulated glibenclamide-sensitive potassium channels. Both pathways invoke NO as a second messenger for vasodilation. We hypothesized that during crystalloid-induced osmosis, the osmotic water flux through the transendothelial water-exclusive aquaporin 1 (AQP1) channels is the primary mechanism whereby the endothelium is being stimulated to instigate hyperosmolality-driven vasodilation. Four microvascular levels (diameters in the range 6 - 100 microm) were visualized by intravital videomicroscopy of the terminal ileum in anesthetized rats. Microvascular diameters and flow were measured after topical exposure to a 5% hypertonic mannitol or 2.5% glucose-based PD solution, at baseline and after brief tissue pre-treatment (with 0.1% glutaraldehyde for 10 seconds) or after combined tissue pre-treatment and pharmacologic blockade of AQP1 with HgCl2 (100 micromol/L). Vascular endothelial integrity was verified by the response to acetylcholine (10(-4) mol/L) and sodium nitroprusside (10(-4) mol/L). The hyperosmolar solutions both caused rapid and sustained vasodilation at all microvascular levels, which was not altered by tissue pre-treatment. Inhibition of AQP1 completely abolished the mannitol-induced vasodilation and markedly attenuated the PD fluid-mediated vasodilation. Neither glutaraldehyde pre-treatment nor HgCl2 affected tissue integrity or endothelial cell function. We conclude that the peritoneal microvascular vasodilation caused by hyperosmolar PD fluid is instigated by the osmotic water flux through AQP1. Clinical PD solutions have components other than hyperosmolality that can induce endothelium-dependent peritoneal microvascular vasodilation

  7. Rapid and slow nitric oxide responses during conducted vasodilation in the in vivo intestine and brain cortex microvasculatures.

    PubMed

    Bohlen, H Glenn

    2011-11-01

    Conduction of arteriolar vasodilation is initiated by activation of nitric oxide (NO) mechanisms, but dependent on conduction of hyperpolarization. Most studies have used brief (<1 second) activation of the initial vasodilation to evaluate the fast conduction processes. However, most arteriolar mechanisms involving NO production persist for minutes. In this study, fast and slower components of arteriolar conduction in the in vivo rat brain and small intestine were compared using three-minute stimulation of NO-dependent vasodilation and measurement of [NO] at the distal sites. Within 10-15 seconds, both vasculatures had a rapidly conducted vasodilation and dilation at distance had a fast but small [NO] component. A slower but larger distal vasodilation occurred after 60-90 seconds in the intestine, but not the brain, and was associated with a substantial increase in [NO]. This slowly developed dilation appeared to be caused by flow mediated responses of larger arterioles as smaller arterioles dilated to lower downstream resistance. These results indicate while the intestinal and cerebral arterioles have a fast conducted vasodilation system, the intestinal arterioles also have a slower but larger dilation of major arterioles that is NO related and dependent on the conduction of vasodilation between small arterioles.

  8. Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Porter, Christopher J W; Januszkiewicz, Janek S

    2002-03-01

    Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma is a rare soft-tissue sarcoma with negligible metastatic potential, but local recurrence rates after surgical excision have ranged from 14 percent to 42 percent. Unlike other sarcomas, guidelines for the optimal surgical excision margin of cutaneous leiomyosarcoma are not clearly defined in the existing literature. A review of local experience with this condition revealed eight patients over 12 years, none of whom developed local recurrence or distant metastases. This is despite poor prognostic factors in seven patients and excision margins ranging from 1 to 27 mm. These findings are compared with previously published data, and conclusions are drawn based on analysis of the collective results. Complete surgical excision with a narrow margin is recommended, and patients should be observed for a minimum of 5 years after surgery.

  9. Cutaneous ectoparasites.

    PubMed

    Nordlund, James J

    2009-01-01

    Parasites inhabit many places in the world. Some of these can inhabit the human skin or body. Many of these have been eradicated in the developed countries but persist in some tropical environments that are fun places to visit. Visitors can bring such parasites home with them such as scabies, cutaneous larva migrans, tungiasis and myiasis. Their clinical manifestations and treatment are presented for physicians evaluating and treating travelers from exotic places.

  10. A Critical Role for Astrocytes in Hypercapnic Vasodilation in Brain

    PubMed Central

    Lind, Barbara Lykke; LeDue, Jeffrey M.; Ellis-Davies, Graham; Sibson, Nicola R.

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is controlled by arterial blood pressure, arterial CO2, arterial O2, and brain activity and is largely constant in the awake state. Although small changes in arterial CO2 are particularly potent to change CBF (1 mmHg variation in arterial CO2 changes CBF by 3%–4%), the coupling mechanism is incompletely understood. We tested the hypothesis that astrocytic prostaglandin E2 (PgE2) plays a key role for cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity, and that preserved synthesis of glutathione is essential for the full development of this response. We combined two-photon imaging microscopy in brain slices with in vivo work in rats and C57BL/6J mice to examine the hemodynamic responses to CO2 and somatosensory stimulation before and after inhibition of astrocytic glutathione and PgE2 synthesis. We demonstrate that hypercapnia (increased CO2) evokes an increase in astrocyte [Ca2+]i and stimulates COX-1 activity. The enzyme downstream of COX-1 that synthesizes PgE2 (microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1) depends critically for its vasodilator activity on the level of glutathione in the brain. We show that, when glutathione levels are reduced, astrocyte calcium-evoked release of PgE2 is decreased and vasodilation triggered by increased astrocyte [Ca2+]i in vitro and by hypercapnia in vivo is inhibited. Astrocyte synthetic pathways, dependent on glutathione, are involved in cerebrovascular reactivity to CO2. Reductions in glutathione levels in aging, stroke, or schizophrenia could lead to dysfunctional regulation of CBF and subsequent neuronal damage. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neuronal activity leads to the generation of CO2, which has previously been shown to evoke cerebral blood flow (CBF) increases via the release of the vasodilator PgE2. We demonstrate that hypercapnia (increased CO2) evokes increases in astrocyte calcium signaling, which in turn stimulates COX-1 activity and generates downstream PgE2 production. We demonstrate that astrocyte calcium

  11. Maternal vasodilation in pregnancy: the emerging role of relaxin.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Kirk P

    2011-08-01

    Pregnancy is a unique physiological condition of profound maternal renal and systemic vasodilation. Our goal has been to unveil the reproductive hormones mediating this remarkable vasodilatory state and the underlying molecular mechanisms. In addition to advancing our knowledge of pregnancy physiology, reaching this goal may translate into therapeutics for pregnancy pathologies such as preeclampsia and for diseases associated with vasoconstriction and arterial stiffness in nonpregnant women and men. An emerging player is the 6 kDa corpus luteal hormone relaxin, which circulates during pregnancy. Relaxin administration to rats and humans induces systemic and renal vasodilation regardless of sex, thus mimicking the pregnant condition. Immunoneutralization or elimination of the source of circulating relaxin prevents renal and systemic vasodilation in midterm pregnant rats. Infertile women who become pregnant by donor eggs (IVF with embryo transfer) lack a corpus luteum and circulating relaxin, and they show a markedly subdued gestational increase in glomerular filtration rate. These data implicate relaxin as one of the vasodilatory reproductive hormones of pregnancy. There are different molecular mechanisms underlying the so-called rapid and sustained vasodilatory actions of relaxin. The former is mediated by Gα(i/o) protein coupling to phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/Akt (protein kinase B)-dependent phosphorylation and activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, the latter by vascular endothelial and placental growth factors, and increases in arterial gelatinase(s) activity. The gelatinases, in turn, hydrolyze big endothelin (ET) at a gly-leu bond to form ET(1-32), which activates the endothelial ET(B) receptor/nitric oxide vasodilatory pathway.

  12. Chronic Compression of the Dorsal Root Ganglion Enhances Mechanically Evoked Pain Behavior and the Activity of Cutaneous Nociceptors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Hurwitz, Olivia; Shimada, Steven G.; Qu, Lintao; Fu, Kai; Zhang, Pu; Ma, Chao; LaMotte, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Radicular pain in humans is usually caused by intraforaminal stenosis and other diseases affecting the spinal nerve, root, or dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Previous studies discovered that a chronic compression of the DRG (CCD) induced mechanical allodynia in rats and mice, with enhanced excitability of DRG neurons. We investigated whether CCD altered the pain-like behavior and also the responses of cutaneous nociceptors with unmyelinated axons (C-fibers) to a normally aversive punctate mechanical stimulus delivered to the hairy skin of the hind limb of the mouse. The incidence of a foot shaking evoked by indentation of the dorsum of foot with an aversive von Frey filament (tip diameter 200 μm, bending force 20 mN) was significantly higher in the foot ipsilateral to the CCD surgery as compared to the contralateral side on post-operative days 2 to 8. Mechanically-evoked action potentials were electrophysiologically recorded from the L3 DRG, in vivo, from cell bodies visually identified as expressing a transgenically labeled fluorescent marker (neurons expressing either the receptor MrgprA3 or MrgprD). After CCD, 26.7% of MrgprA3+ and 32.1% MrgprD+ neurons exhibited spontaneous activity (SA), while none of the unoperated control neurons had SA. MrgprA3+ and MrgprD+ neurons in the compressed DRG exhibited, in comparison with neurons from unoperated control mice, an increased response to the punctate mechanical stimuli for each force applied (6, 20, 40, and 80 mN). We conclude that CCD produced both a behavioral hyperalgesia and an enhanced response of cutaneous C-nociceptors to aversive punctate mechanical stimuli. PMID:26356638

  13. Reduced estradiol-induced vasodilation and poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activity in the aortas of rats with experimental polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

    PubMed

    Masszi, Gabriella; Horvath, Eszter Maria; Tarszabo, Robert; Benko, Rita; Novak, Agnes; Buday, Anna; Tokes, Anna-Maria; Nadasy, Gyorgy L; Hamar, Peter; Benyó, Zoltán; Varbiro, Szabolcs

    2013-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a complex endocrine disorder characterized by hyperandrogenism and insulin resistance, both of which have been connected to atherosclerosis. Indeed, an increased risk of clinical manifestations of arterial vascular diseases has been described in PCOS. On the other hand endothelial dysfunction can be detected early on, before atherosclerosis develops. Thus we assumed that vascular dysfunction is also related directly to the hormonal imbalance rather than to its metabolic consequences. To detect early functional changes, we applied a novel rodent model of PCOS: rats were either sham operated or hyperandrogenism was achieved by implanting subcutaneous pellets of dihydrotestosterone (DHT). After ten weeks, myograph measurements were performed on isolated aortic rings. Previously we described an increased contractility to norepinephrine (NE). Here we found a reduced immediate relaxation to estradiol treatment in pre-contracted aortic rings from hyperandrogenic rats. Although the administration of vitamin D3 along with DHT reduced responsiveness to NE, it did not restore relaxation to estradiol. Poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activity was assessed by poly-ADP-ribose immunostaining. Increased PAR staining in ovaries and circulating leukocytes from DHT rats showed enhanced DNA damage, which was reduced by concomitant vitamin D3 treatment. Surprisingly, PAR staining was reduced in both the endothelium and vascular smooth muscle cells of the aorta rings from hyperandrogenic rats. Thus in the early phase of PCOS, vascular tone is already shifted towards vasoconstriction, characterized by reduced vasorelaxation and vascular dysfunction is concomitant with altered PARP activity. Based on our findings, PARP inhibitors might have a future perspective in restoring metabolic disorders in PCOS.

  14. Profound alteration in cutaneous primary afferent activity produced by inflammatory mediators

    PubMed Central

    Smith-Edwards, Kristen M; DeBerry, Jennifer J; Saloman, Jami L; Davis, Brian M; Woodbury, C Jeffery

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory pain is thought to arise from increased transmission from nociceptors and recruitment of 'silent' afferents. To evaluate inflammation-induced changes, mice expressing GCaMP3 in cutaneous sensory neurons were generated and neuronal responses to mechanical stimulation in vivo before and after subcutaneous infusion of an 'inflammatory soup' (IS) were imaged in an unanesthetized preparation. Infusion of IS rapidly altered mechanical responsiveness in the majority of neurons. Surprisingly, more cells lost, rather than gained, sensitivity and 'silent' afferents that were mechanically insensitive and gained mechanosensitivity after IS exposure were rare. However, the number of formerly 'silent' afferents that became mechanosensitive was increased five fold when the skin was heated briefly prior to infusion of IS. These findings suggest that pain arising from inflamed skin reflects a dramatic shift in the balance of sensory input, where gains and losses in neuronal populations results in novel output that is ultimately interpreted by the CNS as pain. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20527.001 PMID:27805567

  15. Sodium humate accelerates cutaneous wound healing by activating TGF-β/Smads signaling pathway in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Aijun; Chen, Xiaobin; Che, Xiaoxia; Zhou, Kai; Wang, Zhidong

    2016-01-01

    Sodium humate (HA-Na) has been topically used as a wound healing and anti-inflammatory agent in folk medicine. In the present study, HA-Na was investigated for cutaneous wound healing in Sprague–Dawley rats. HA-Na solution (1.0%, w/v) was topically administered to rats undergoing excision wound models. Healing was assessed with a recombinant bovine basic fibroblast growth factor for external use as positive control. Wound healing rates were calculated on Day 3, 6, 9, 14 and 21 after injury, and tissues were also harvested after the same intervals for histological analysis. In addition, tissue hydroxyproline levels were measured. Furthermore, mRNA levels and protein expressions of transforming growth factor-β1, 2, 3 (TGF-β1, 2, 3) were determined by RT-PCR and western blot. Protein expression levels of Smad-2, -3, -4 and -7 were also detected by western blot. Our study demonstrates that HA-Na has the capacity to promote wound healing in rats via accelerated wound contraction and increased hydroxyproline content. More importantly, these wound healing effects of HA-Na might be mediated through the TGF-β/Smad signaling pathway. HA-Na may be an effective agent for enhanced wound healing. PMID:27006897

  16. Transcriptome Sequencing Demonstrates that Human Papillomavirus is not Active in Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Arron, Sarah Tuttleton; Ruby, J. Graham; Dybbro, Eric; Ganem, Don; DeRisi, Joseph L.

    2011-01-01

    Beta-papillomavirus (β-HPV) DNA is present in some cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (cuSCC), but no mechanism of carcinogenesis has been determined. We used ultra-high throughput sequencing of the cancer transcriptome to assess whether papillomavirus transcripts are present in these cancers. Sixty-seven cuSCC samples were assayed for β-HPV DNA by PCR, and viral loads were measured with type-specific qPCR. Thirty-one SCCs were selected for whole transcriptome sequencing. Transcriptome libraries were prepared in parallel from the HPV18 positive HeLa cervical cancer cell line and HPV16 positive primary cervical and periungual SCC. Thirty percent (20/67) of the tumors were positive for β-HPV DNA, but there was no difference in β-HPV viral load between tumor and normal tissue (p=0.310). Immunosuppression and age were significantly associated with higher viral load (p=0.016 for immunosuppression; p=0.0004 for age). Transcriptome sequencing failed to identify papillomavirus expression in any of the skin tumors. In contrast, HPV 16 and 18 mRNA transcripts were readily identified in primary cervical and periungual cancers and HeLa cells. These data demonstrate that papillomavirus mRNA expression is not a factor in the maintenance of cuSCC. PMID:21490616

  17. Evaluation of cutaneous wound healing activity of Malva sylvestris aqueous extract in BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Mohammad; Ravarian, Behdad; Zardast, Mahmoud; Moallem, Seyed Adel; Fard, Mohammad Hasanpour; Valavi, Masoomeh

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of Malva sylvestris aqueous extract on cutaneous wound healing in BALB/c mice. Materials and Methods: Twenty seven male BALB/c mice (2.5 months of age) were used. A cut wound (superficial fascia depth) was made locally. The mice were then divided into three groups: the first, second and third groups received topical administration of M. sylvestris 1% aqueous extract, silver sulfadiazine topical cream and cold cream (positive and negative control groups), respectively. On days 4, 7 and 10 excisional biopsies were performed and wound healing was evaluated histopathologically. The data were analyzed by the ANOVA and Tukey statistical tests. Results: On days 4 and 7, the numbers of inflammatory cells in the silver sulfadiazine and M. sylvestris-treated groups were significantly lower than the control group and keratinization at the edges of the wound in both groups was significantly higher than the control group. On the tenth day of the study, the Malva-treated mice showed better healing features and less fibrosis and scar formation, and also fewer hair follicles were damaged in this group. On the tenth day of the study, the numbers of inflammatory cells in M. sylvestris and silver sulfadiazine-treated groups were significantly lower than the control group. Conclusion: The present study supports the beneficial effects of M. sylvestris on the wound healing process and suggests a potential clinical application. PMID:26221487

  18. Metabolic forearm vasodilation is enhanced following Bier block with phentolamine.

    PubMed

    Moradkhan, Raman; McQuillan, Patrick; Hogeman, Cynthia; Leuenberger, Andrea; Linton-Frazier, Latoya; Leuenberger, Urs A

    2007-10-01

    The extent to which sympathetic nerve activity restrains metabolic vasodilation in skeletal muscle remains unclear. We determined forearm blood flow (FBF; ultrasound/Doppler) and vascular conductance (FVC) responses to 10 min of ischemia [reactive hyperemic blood flow (RHBF)] and 10 min of systemic hypoxia (inspired O(2) fraction = 0.1) before and after regional sympathetic blockade with the alpha-receptor antagonist phentolamine via Bier block in healthy humans. In a control group, we performed sham Bier block with saline. Consistent with alpha- receptor inhibition, post-phentolamine, basal FVC (FBF/mean arterial pressure) increased (pre vs. post: 0.42 +/- 0.05 vs. 1.03 +/- 0.21 units; P < 0.01; n = 12) but did not change in the saline controls (pre vs. post: 0.56 +/- 0.14 vs. 0.53 +/- 0.08 units; P = not significant; n = 5). Post-phentolamine, total RHBF (over 3 min) increased substantially (pre vs. post: 628 +/- 75 vs. 826 +/- 92 ml/min; P < 0.01) but did not change in the controls (pre vs. post: 618 +/- 66 vs. 661 +/- 35 ml/min; P = not significant). In all conditions, compared with peak RHBF, peak skin reactive hyperemia was markedly delayed. Furthermore, post-phentolamine (pre vs. post: 0.43 +/- 0.06 vs. 1.16 +/- 0.17 units; P < 0.01; n = 8) but not post-saline (pre vs. post: 0.93 +/- 0.16 vs. 0.87 +/- 0.19 ml/min; P = not significant; n = 5), the FVC response to hypoxia (arterial O(2) saturation = 77 +/- 1%) was markedly enhanced. These data suggest that sympathetic vasoconstrictor nerve activity markedly restrains skeletal muscle vasodilation induced by local (forearm ischemia) and systemic (hypoxia) vasodilator stimuli.

  19. NO-donor phenols: a new class of products endowed with antioxidant and vasodilator properties.

    PubMed

    Boschi, Donatella; Tron, Gian Cesare; Lazzarato, Loretta; Chegaev, Konstantin; Cena, Clara; Di Stilo, Antonella; Giorgis, Marta; Bertinaria, Massimo; Fruttero, Roberta; Gasco, Alberto

    2006-05-18

    The synthesis and study of the antioxidant and vasodilator properties of a new class of phenols able to release nitric oxide are described. The products were designed through a symbiotic approach using selected phenols and selected nitrooxy and furoxan NO-donors as reference models. The antioxidant activities of the hybrid products were assessed by detecting the 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) produced in the ferrous salt/ascorbate-induced autoxidation of lipids present in microsomial membranes of rat hepatocytes. The vasodilator activity was assessed on rat aortic strips precontracted with phenylephrine. Some of the products (13, 35, 37, 60-62, 64) behave principally as vasodilators and others as antioxidants (24, 32, 72), and the two properties are relatively balanced in 19, 41, and 68. Further in vivo studies should clarify whether some of these products may become preclinical candidates for the treatment of cardiovascular disease underpinned by atheroma.

  20. Selected Cutaneous Disorders in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Walker, James D.

    1988-01-01

    The author discusses selected cutaneous diseases seen in the athlete. These diseases may be caused by interaction with the elements, the playing surface, other athletes, or the clothing or equipment worn during sport. All of these dermatological conditions are relatively common, but the physically active individual can suffer from these maladies and their complications more often than the inactive person. The emphasis in caring for the participant is on prevention, early recognition and practical aspects of management of cutaneous diseases. PMID:21264034

  1. The Gatekeepers in the Mouse Ophthalmic Artery: Endothelium-Dependent Mechanisms of Cholinergic Vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Manicam, Caroline; Staubitz, Julia; Brochhausen, Christoph; Grus, Franz H; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Gericke, Adrian

    2016-02-02

    Cholinergic regulation of arterial luminal diameter involves intricate network of intercellular communication between the endothelial and smooth muscle cells that is highly dependent on the molecular mediators released by the endothelium. Albeit the well-recognized contribution of nitric oxide (NO) towards vasodilation, the identity of compensatory mechanisms that maintain vasomotor tone when NO synthesis is deranged remain largely unknown in the ophthalmic artery. This is the first study to identify the vasodilatory signalling mechanisms of the ophthalmic artery employing wild type mice. Acetylcholine (ACh)-induced vasodilation was only partially attenuated when NO synthesis was inhibited. Intriguingly, the combined blocking of cytochrome P450 oxygenase (CYP450) and lipoxygenase (LOX), as well as CYP450 and gap junctions, abolished vasodilation; demonstrating that the key compensatory mechanisms comprise arachidonic acid metabolites which, work in concert with gap junctions for downstream signal transmission. Furthermore, the voltage-gated potassium ion channel, Kv1.6, was functionally relevant in mediating vasodilation. Its localization was found exclusively in the smooth muscle. In conclusion, ACh-induced vasodilation of mouse ophthalmic artery is mediated in part by NO and predominantly via arachidonic acid metabolites, with active involvement of gap junctions. Particularly, the Kv1.6 channel represents an attractive therapeutic target in ophthalmopathologies when NO synthesis is compromised.

  2. Regulation of blood flow in the microcirculation: Role of conducted vasodilation

    PubMed Central

    Bagher, Pooneh; Segal, Steven S.

    2010-01-01

    This review is concerned with understanding how vasodilation initiated from local sites in the tissue can spread to encompass multiple branches of the resistance vasculature. Within tissues, arteriolar networks control the distribution and magnitude of capillary perfusion. Vasodilation arising from the microcirculation can ‘ascend’ into feed arteries that control blood flow into arteriolar networks. Thus distal segments of the resistance network signal proximal segments to dilate and thereby increase total oxygen supply to parenchymal cells. August Krogh proposed that innervation of capillaries provided the mechanism for a spreading vasodilatory response. With greater understanding of the ultrastructural organization of resistance networks, an alternative explanation has emerged: Electrical signaling from cell to cell along the vessel wall through gap junctions. Hyperpolarization originates from ion channel activation at the site of stimulation with the endothelium serving as the predominant cellular pathway for signal conduction along the vessel wall. As hyperpolarization travels, it is transmitted into surrounding smooth muscle cells through myoendothelial coupling to promote relaxation. Conducted vasodilation encompasses greater distances than can be explained by passive decay and understanding such behavior is the focus of current research efforts. In the context of athletic performance, the ability of vasodilation to ascend into feed arteries is essential to achieving peak levels of muscle blood flow. Conducted vasodilation is tempered by sympathetic neuroeffector signaling when governing muscle blood flow at rest and during exercise. Impairment of conduction during aging and in diseased states can limit physical work capacity by restricting muscle blood flow. PMID:21199397

  3. Activation of rostral ventromedial medulla neurons by noxious stimulation of cutaneous and deep craniofacial tissues.

    PubMed

    Khasabov, Sergey G; Malecha, Patrick; Noack, Joseph; Tabakov, Janneta; Okamoto, Keiichiro; Bereiter, David A; Simone, Donald A

    2015-01-01

    The rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) projects to the medullary and spinal dorsal horns and is a major source of descending modulation of nociceptive transmission. Traditionally, neurons in the RVM are classified functionally as on, off, and neutral cells on the basis of responses to noxious cutaneous stimulation of the tail or hind paw. On cells facilitate nociceptive transmission, off cells are inhibitory, whereas neutral cells are unresponsive to noxious stimuli and their role in pain modulation is unclear. Classification of RVM neurons with respect to stimulation of craniofacial tissues is not well defined. In isoflurane-anesthetized male rats, RVM neurons first were classified as on (25.5%), off (25.5%), or neutral (49%) cells by noxious pinch applied to the hind paw. Pinching the skin overlying the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) altered the proportions of on (39.2%), off (42.2%), and neutral (19.6%) cells. To assess the response of RVM cells to specialized craniofacial inputs, adenosine triphosphate (ATP; 0.01-1 mM) was injected into the TMJ and capsaicin (0.1%) was applied to the ocular surface. TMJ and ocular surface stimulation also resulted in a reduced proportion of neutral cells compared with hind paw pinch. Dose-effect analyses revealed that on and off cells encoded the intra-TMJ concentration of ATP. These results suggest that somatotopy plays a significant role in the functional classification of RVM cells and support the notion that neutral cells likely are subgroups of on and off cells. It is suggested that a portion of RVM neurons serve different functions in modulating craniofacial and spinal pain conditions.

  4. Activation of rostral ventromedial medulla neurons by noxious stimulation of cutaneous and deep craniofacial tissues

    PubMed Central

    Khasabov, Sergey G.; Malecha, Patrick; Noack, Joseph; Tabakov, Janneta; Okamoto, Keiichiro; Bereiter, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) projects to the medullary and spinal dorsal horns and is a major source of descending modulation of nociceptive transmission. Traditionally, neurons in the RVM are classified functionally as ON, OFF, and NEUTRAL cells on the basis of responses to noxious cutaneous stimulation of the tail or hind paw. ON cells facilitate nociceptive transmission, OFF cells are inhibitory, whereas NEUTRAL cells are unresponsive to noxious stimuli and their role in pain modulation is unclear. Classification of RVM neurons with respect to stimulation of craniofacial tissues is not well defined. In isoflurane-anesthetized male rats, RVM neurons first were classified as ON (25.5%), OFF (25.5%), or NEUTRAL (49%) cells by noxious pinch applied to the hind paw. Pinching the skin overlying the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) altered the proportions of ON (39.2%), OFF (42.2%), and NEUTRAL (19.6%) cells. To assess the response of RVM cells to specialized craniofacial inputs, adenosine triphosphate (ATP; 0.01–1 mM) was injected into the TMJ and capsaicin (0.1%) was applied to the ocular surface. TMJ and ocular surface stimulation also resulted in a reduced proportion of NEUTRAL cells compared with hind paw pinch. Dose-effect analyses revealed that ON and OFF cells encoded the intra-TMJ concentration of ATP. These results suggest that somatotopy plays a significant role in the functional classification of RVM cells and support the notion that NEUTRAL cells likely are subgroups of ON and OFF cells. It is suggested that a portion of RVM neurons serve different functions in modulating craniofacial and spinal pain conditions. PMID:25185804

  5. Electrogastrography in Adults and Children: The Strength, Pitfalls, and Clinical Significance of the Cutaneous Recording of the Gastric Electrical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Indrio, Flavia

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous electrogastrography (EGG) is a non-invasive technique to record gastric myoelectrical activity from the abdominal surface. Although the recent rapid increase in the development of electrocardiography, EGG still suffers from several limitations. Currently, computer analysis of EGG provides few reliable parameters, such as frequency and the percentage of normal and altered slow wave activity (bradygastria and tachygastria). New EGG hardware and software, along with an appropriate arrangement of abdominal electrodes, could detect the coupling of the gastric slow wave from the EGG. At present, EGG does not diagnose a specific disease, but it puts in evidence stomach motor dysfunctions in different pathological conditions as gastroparesis and functional dyspepsia. Despite the current pitfalls of EGG, a multitasking diagnostic protocol could involve the EGG and the 13C-breath testing for the evaluation of the gastric emptying time—along with validated gastrointestinal questionnaires and biochemical evaluations of the main gastrointestinal peptides—to identify dyspeptic subgroups. The present review tries to report the state of the art about the pathophysiological background of the gastric electrical activity, the recording and processing methodology of the EGG with particular attention to multichannel recording, and the possible clinical application of the EGG in adult and children. PMID:23762836

  6. Improvement of Acetylcholine-Induced Vasodilation by Acute Exercise in Ovariectomized Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tsung-Lin; Lin, Yi-Yuan; Su, Chia-Ting; Hu, Chun-Che; Yang, Ai-Lun

    2016-06-30

    Postmenopause is associated with the development of cardiovascular disease, such as hypertension. However, limited information is available regarding effects of exercise on cardiovascular responses and its underlying mechanisms in the simultaneous postmenopausal and hypertensive status. We aimed to investigate whether acute exercise could enhance vasodilation mediated by acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) in ovariectomized hypertensive rats. The fifteen-week-old female spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were bilaterally ovariectomized, at the age of twenty-four weeks, and randomly divided into sedentary (SHR-O) and acute exercise (SHR-OE) groups. Age-matched WKY rats were used as the normotensive control group. The SHR-OE group ran on a motor-driven treadmill at a speed of 24 m/min for one hour in a moderate-intensity program. Following a single bout of exercise, rat aortas were isolated for the evaluation of the endothelium-dependent (ACh-induced) and endothelium-independent (SNP-induced) vasodilation by the organ bath system. Also, the serum levels of oxidative stress and antioxidant activities, including malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase, were measured after acute exercise among the three groups. We found that acute exercise significantly enhanced the ACh-induced vasodilation, but not the SNP-induced vasodilation, in ovariectomized hypertensive rats. This increased vasodilation was eliminated after the inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Also, the activities of SOD and catalase were significantly increased after acute exercise, whereas the level of MDA was comparable among the three groups. These results indicated that acute exercise improved the endothelium-dependent vasodilating response to ACh through the NOS-related pathway in ovariectomized hypertensive rats, which might be associated with increased serum antioxidant activities.

  7. Cutaneous sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Marchell, Richard M; Judson, Marc A

    2010-08-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic disease with skin manifestations. Skin manifestations are classified as nonspecific if they are not characterized by granulomatous inflammation and specific if the lesions have granulomas histologically. Erythema nodosum is the most common nonspecific skin manifestation, and it portends a good prognosis. Specific skin lesions have a varied clinical appearance, although often they can be distinguished by their yellow translucent character. Despite the potential variable appearance, there are common clinical presentations. Lupus pernio lesions are nodular violaceous specific skin lesions found predominantly on the face associated with scarring and a poor prognosis. Treatment of cutaneous sarcoidosis is primarily done to avoid scarring and cosmetic disfigurement. Local and systemic corticosteroids are the mainstay of treatment for the disease. Corticosteroid-sparing agents used to manage the disease include antimalarials, methotrexate, and tetracycline antibiotics. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) antagonists such as infliximab may have a role in cutaneous sarcoidosis, especially in refractory cases that are resistant to the standard regimens.

  8. Cutaneous pseudovasculitis.

    PubMed

    Carlson, J Andrew; Chen, Ko-Ron

    2007-02-01

    Cutaneous pseudovasculitis represents a heterogeneous collection of disorders that are capable of simulating cutaneous vasculitis and can be broadly classified into diseases that produce hemorrhage (petechiae, purpura, and ecchymoses) or vessel occlusion with resultant livedo, cyanosis, ulcers, digital necrosis, and/or gangrene. Overlap is not uncommon, but if present, one mechanism dominates. Hemorrhagic pseudovasculitis is due to vessel wall dysfunction (incompetence), which can be related to diverse factors that include vessel wall deposition of metabolic substances (amyloid, calcium), nutritional deficiencies (scurvy), nonvasculitic inflammatory purpura (pigmented purpuric dermatitis, arthropod, viral and drug reactions), degeneration of the vessel wall and supporting stroma (senile/solar purpura), direct vessel wall invasion of infective organisms, coagulation-fibrinolytic disorders (eg, thrombocytopenia), and vessel wall trauma. Cyanotic-infarctive pseudovasculitis is due vaso-occlusion by emboli, thrombi, or fibrointimal hyperplasia (endarteritis obliterans) and includes varied conditions such as purpura fulminans, Coumadin necrosis, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, cardiac myxoma, cholesterol embolization, calciphylaxis, and radiation arteritis. Delayed and inappropriate diagnosis of pseudovasculitis leads to incorrect management and exposure to potentially deleterious treatment modalities such as corticosteroids and cytotoxic agents. The diagnosis of a pseudovasculitic disorder requires a high index of suspicion and should always be part of the differential diagnosis of vasculitis. Skin biopsy is a crucial step in differentiating pseudovasculitis from authentic vasculitis; absence of histologic evidence of vasculitis, particularly after multiple biopsies, should direct evaluation and diagnosis towards pseudovasculitis.

  9. Topical delivery and in vivo antileishmanial activity of paromomycin-loaded liposomes for treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Guilherme; Santos, Delia C M; Oliveira, Monica C; Fernandes, Ana P; Ferreira, Luciana S; Ramaldes, Gilson A; Nunan, Elziria A; Ferreira, Lucas A M

    2010-03-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the potential of liposomes loaded with paromomycin (PA), an aminoglycoside antibiotic associated with poor skin penetration, for the topical treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). Fluid liposomes were prepared and characterized for particle size, zeta potential, and drug entrapment. Permeation studies were performed with two in vitro models: intact and stripped skin. The antileishmanial activity of free and liposomal PA was evaluated in BALB/c mice infected by Leishmania (L.) major. Drug entrapment ranged from 10 to 14%, and the type of vesicle had little influence on this parameter. Particle size and polydispersity index of the vesicles composed by phosphatidylcholine (PC) and PC/cholesterol (Chol) ranged from of 516 to 362 nm and 0.7 to 0.4, respectively. PA permeation across intact skin was low, regardless of the formulation tested, while drug penetration into skin (percent of the applied dose) from PC (7.2 +/- 0.2%) and PC/Chol (4.8 +/- 0.2%) liposomes was higher than solution (1.9 +/- 0.1%). PA-loaded liposomes enhanced in vitro drug permeation across stripped skin and improved the in vivo antileishmanial activity in experimentally infected mice. Our findings suggest that the liposomes represent a promising alternative for the topical treatment of CL using PA.

  10. Antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activity of chitosan-alginate nanoparticles: a targeted therapy for cutaneous pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Adam J; Phan, Jenny; Schairer, David; Champer, Jackson; Qin, Min; Pirouz, Aslan; Blecher, Karin; Oren, Ami; Liu, Phil; Modlin, Robert L; Kim, Jenny

    2012-01-01

    Advances in nanotechnology have demonstrated potential application of nanoparticles for effective and targeted drug delivery. Here, we investigated the antimicrobial and immunological properties and the feasibility of using nanoparticles to deliver antimicrobial agents to treat a cutaneous pathogen. Nanoparticles synthesized with chitosan and alginate demonstrated a direct antimicrobial activity in vitro against Propionibacterium acnes, the bacterium linked to the pathogenesis of acne. By electron microscopy imaging, chitosan-alginate nanoparticles were found to induce disruption of the P. acnes cell membrane, providing a mechanism for the bactericidal effect. The chitosan-alginate nanoparticles also exhibited anti-inflammatory properties as they inhibited P. acnes induced inflammatory cytokine production in human monocytes and keratinocytes. Furthermore, benzoyl peroxide, a commonly used anti-acne drug, was effectively encapsulated in the chitosan-alginate nanoparticles and demonstrated superior antimicrobial activity against P. acnes compared to benzoyl peroxide alone while demonstrating less toxicity to eukaryotic cells. Together, these data suggest the potential utility of topical delivery of chitosan-alginate nanoparticle encapsulated drug therapy for the treatment of dermatologic conditions with infectious and inflammatory components. PMID:23190896

  11. Improved functional vasodilation in obese Zucker rats following exercise training.

    PubMed

    Sebai, Mohamad; Lu, Silu; Xiang, Lusha; Hester, Robert L

    2011-09-01

    Obese individuals exhibit impaired functional vasodilation and exercise performance. We have demonstrated in obese Zucker rats (OZ), a model of morbid obesity, that insulin resistance impairs functional vasodilation via an increased thromboxane receptor (TP)-mediated vasoconstriction. Chronic treadmill exercise training improves functional vasodilation in the spinotrapezius muscle of the OZ, but the mechanisms responsible for the improvement in functional vasodilation are not clear. Based on evidence that exercise training improves insulin resistance, we hypothesized that, in the OZ, exercise training increases functional vasodilation and exercise capability due to decreases TP-mediated vasoconstriction associated with improved insulin sensitivity. Six-week-old lean Zucker rats (LZ) and OZ were exercised on a treadmill (24 m/min, 30 min/day, 5 days/wk) for 6 wk. An oral glucose tolerance test was performed at the end of the training period. We measured functional vasodilation in both exercise trained (spinotrapezius) and nonexercise trained (cremaster) muscles to determine whether the improved functional vasodilation following exercise training in OZ is due to a systemic improved insulin resistance. Compared with LZ, the sedentary OZ exhibited impairments in glucose tolerance and functional vasodilation in both muscles. The TP antagonist SQ-29548 improved the vasodilator responses in the sedentary OZ with no effect in the LZ. Exercising training of the LZ increased the functional vasodilation in spinotrapezius muscle, with no effect in the cremaster muscle. Exercising training of the OZ improved glucose tolerance, along with increased functional vasodilation, in both the spinotrapezius and cremaster muscles. SQ-29548 treatment had no effect on the vasodilator responses in either cremaster or spinotrapezius muscles of the exercise-trained OZ. These results suggest that, in the OZ, there is a global effect of exercising training to improve insulin resistance and

  12. Effect of postprandial thermogenesis on the cutaneous vasodilatory response during exercise.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Keiji; Ito, Nozomi; Ichikawa, Yoko; Suzuki, Yuichi

    2014-08-01

    To examine the effect of postprandial thermogenesis on the cutaneous vasodilatory response, 10 healthy male subjects exercised for 30 min on a cycle ergometer at 50% of peak oxygen uptake, with and without food intake. Mean skin temperature, mean body temperature (Tb), heart rate, oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide elimination, and respiratory quotient were all significantly higher at baseline in the session with food intake than in the session without food intake. To evaluate the cutaneous vasodilatory response, relative laser Doppler flowmetry values were plotted against esophageal temperature (Tes) and Tb. Regression analysis revealed that the [Formula: see text] threshold for cutaneous vasodilation tended to be higher with food intake than without it, but there were no significant differences in the sensitivity. To clarify the effect of postprandial thermogenesis on the threshold for cutaneous vasodilation, the between-session difference in the Tes threshold and the Tb threshold were plotted against the between-session difference in baseline Tes and baseline Tb, respectively. Linear regression analysis of the resultant plot showed significant positive linear relationships (Tes: r = 0.85, P < 0.01; Tb: r = 0.67, P < 0.05). These results suggest that postprandial thermogenesis increases baseline body temperature, which raises the body temperature threshold for cutaneous vasodilation during exercise.

  13. Antileishmanial Activity of Ezetimibe: Inhibition of Sterol Biosynthesis, In Vitro Synergy with Azoles, and Efficacy in Experimental Cutaneous Leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Neto, Valter Viana; Cunha-Júnior, Edézio Ferreira; Canto-Cavalheiro, Marilene Marcuzzo do; Atella, Geórgia Correa; Fernandes, Talita de Almeida; Costa, Paulo Roberto Ribeiro; Torres-Santos, Eduardo Caio

    2016-11-01

    Leishmaniasis affects mainly low-income populations in tropical regions. Radical innovation in drug discovery is time-consuming and expensive, imposing severe restrictions on the ability to launch new chemical entities for the treatment of neglected diseases. Drug repositioning is an attractive strategy for addressing a specific demand more easily. In this project, we have evaluated the antileishmanial activities of 30 drugs currently in clinical use for various morbidities. Ezetimibe, clinically used to reduce intestinal cholesterol absorption in dyslipidemic patients, killed Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 30 μM. Morphological analysis revealed that ezetimibe caused the parasites to become rounded, with multiple nuclei and flagella. Analysis by gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (MS) showed that promastigotes treated with ezetimibe had smaller amounts of C-14-demethylated sterols, and accumulated more cholesterol and lanosterol, than untreated promastigotes. We then evaluated the combination of ezetimibe with well-known antileishmanial azoles. The fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) indicated synergy when ezetimibe was combined with ketoconazole or miconazole. The activity of ezetimibe against intracellular amastigotes was confirmed, with an IC50 of 20 μM, and ezetimibe reduced the IC90s of ketoconazole and miconazole from 11.3 and 11.5 μM to 4.14 and 8.25 μM, respectively. Subsequently, we confirmed the activity of ezetimibe in vivo, showing that it decreased lesion development and parasite loads in murine cutaneous leishmaniasis. We concluded that ezetimibe has promising antileishmanial activity and should be considered in combination with azoles in further preclinical and clinical studies.

  14. [Cutaneous leishmaniasis].

    PubMed

    Enk, C D; Gardlo, K; Hochberg, M; Ingber, A; Ruzicka, T

    2003-06-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease caused by an obligate intracellular protozoa, Leishmania, which resides in macrophages. The parasite is transmitted by an infected female sandfly. The incidence of cutaneous leishmaniasis approaches 2 million new cases per year with 90% of the cases occurring in the "Old World", while the "New World" accounts for the rest. Infection may be restricted to the skin with development of characteristic ulcers, or may affect the mucous membranes in its mucocutaneous form. The clinical diagnosis is verified by the presence of amastigotes in slit-skin smears. Therapeutic modalities include systemic treatments such as the pentavalent antimony compound sodium stibogluconate, liposomal formulations of amphotericin B, oral ketoconazole or itraconazole, as well as topical paromomycin sulphate, local heat, freezing with liquid nitrogen, or photodynamic therapy. An effective vaccine is not available.

  15. Convergence in Reflex Pathways from Multiple Cutaneous Nerves Innervating the Foot Depends upon the Number of Rhythmically Active Limbs during Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Mezzarane, Rinaldo A.; Hundza, Sandra R.; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi; Zehr, E. Paul

    2014-01-01

    Neural output from the locomotor system for each arm and leg influences the spinal motoneuronal pools directly and indirectly through interneuronal (IN) reflex networks. While well documented in other species, less is known about the functions and features of convergence in common IN reflex system from cutaneous afferents innervating different foot regions during remote arm and leg movement in humans. The purpose of the present study was to use spatial facilitation to examine possible convergence in common reflex pathways during rhythmic locomotor limb movements. Cutaneous reflexes were evoked in ipsilateral tibialis anterior muscle by stimulating (in random order) the sural nerve (SUR), the distal tibial nerve (TIB), and combined simultaneous stimulation of both nerves (TIB&SUR). Reflexes were evoked while participants performed rhythmic stepping and arm swinging movement with both arms and the leg contralateral to stimulation (ARM&LEG), with just arm movement (ARM) and with just contralateral leg movement (LEG). Stimulation intensities were just below threshold for evoking early latency (<80 ms to peak) reflexes. For each stimulus condition, rectified EMG signals were averaged while participants held static contractions in the stationary (stimulated) leg. During ARM&LEG movement, amplitudes of cutaneous reflexes evoked by combined TIB&SUR stimulation were significantly larger than simple mathematical summation of the amplitudes evoked by SUR or TIB alone. Interestingly, this extra facilitation seen during combined nerve stimulation was significantly reduced when performing ARM or LEG compared to ARM&LEG. We conclude that locomotor rhythmic limb movement induces excitation of common IN reflex pathways from cutaneous afferents innervating different foot regions. Importantly, activity in this pathway is most facilitated during ARM&LEG movement. These results suggest that transmission in IN reflex pathways is weighted according to the number of limbs directly engaged

  16. Convergence in reflex pathways from multiple cutaneous nerves innervating the foot depends upon the number of rhythmically active limbs during locomotion.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Mezzarane, Rinaldo A; Hundza, Sandra R; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi; Zehr, E Paul

    2014-01-01

    Neural output from the locomotor system for each arm and leg influences the spinal motoneuronal pools directly and indirectly through interneuronal (IN) reflex networks. While well documented in other species, less is known about the functions and features of convergence in common IN reflex system from cutaneous afferents innervating different foot regions during remote arm and leg movement in humans. The purpose of the present study was to use spatial facilitation to examine possible convergence in common reflex pathways during rhythmic locomotor limb movements. Cutaneous reflexes were evoked in ipsilateral tibialis anterior muscle by stimulating (in random order) the sural nerve (SUR), the distal tibial nerve (TIB), and combined simultaneous stimulation of both nerves (TIB&SUR). Reflexes were evoked while participants performed rhythmic stepping and arm swinging movement with both arms and the leg contralateral to stimulation (ARM&LEG), with just arm movement (ARM) and with just contralateral leg movement (LEG). Stimulation intensities were just below threshold for evoking early latency (<80 ms to peak) reflexes. For each stimulus condition, rectified EMG signals were averaged while participants held static contractions in the stationary (stimulated) leg. During ARM&LEG movement, amplitudes of cutaneous reflexes evoked by combined TIB&SUR stimulation were significantly larger than simple mathematical summation of the amplitudes evoked by SUR or TIB alone. Interestingly, this extra facilitation seen during combined nerve stimulation was significantly reduced when performing ARM or LEG compared to ARM&LEG. We conclude that locomotor rhythmic limb movement induces excitation of common IN reflex pathways from cutaneous afferents innervating different foot regions. Importantly, activity in this pathway is most facilitated during ARM&LEG movement. These results suggest that transmission in IN reflex pathways is weighted according to the number of limbs directly engaged

  17. Cutaneous mucormycosis.

    PubMed

    Skiada, Anna; Petrikkos, George

    2013-01-01

    Mucormycosis is an invasive fungal infection caused by fungi of the order Mucorales, mainly affecting immunocompromised patients. Cutaneous mucormycosis is the third most common clinical form of the disease, after pulmonary and rhino-cerebral. The usual factors predisposing to this infection are hematological malignancies and diabetes mellitus, but a significant proportion of patients are immunocompetent. The agents of mucormycosis are ubiquitous in nature and are transmitted to the skin by direct inoculation, as a result of various types of trauma. These include needle sticks, stings and bites by animals, motor vehicle accidents, natural disasters, and burn injuries. The typical presentation of mucormycosis is the necrotic eschar, but it can present with various other signs. The infection can be locally invasive and penetrate into the adjacent fat, muscle, fascia, and bone, or become disseminated. Diagnosis is difficult because of the nonspecific findings of mucormycosis. Biopsy and culture should be performed. The treatment of mucormycosis is multimodal and consists of surgical debridement, use of antifungal drugs (amphotericin B and posaconazole), and reversal of underlying risk factors, when possible. Mortality rates, although lower than in other forms of the disease, are significant, ranging from 4% to 10% when the infection is localized.

  18. RNase 7 in Cutaneous Defense

    PubMed Central

    Rademacher, Franziska; Simanski, Maren; Harder, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    RNase 7 belongs to the RNase A superfamily and exhibits a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity against various microorganisms. RNase 7 is expressed in human skin, and expression in keratinocytes can be induced by cytokines and microbes. These properties suggest that RNase 7 participates in innate cutaneous defense. In this review, we provide an overview about the role of RNase 7 in cutaneous defense with focus on the molecular mechanism of the antimicrobial activity of RNase 7, the regulation of RNase 7 expression, and the role of RNase 7 in skin diseases. PMID:27089327

  19. Activation of the δ-opioid receptor promotes cutaneous wound healing by affecting keratinocyte intercellular adhesion and migration

    PubMed Central

    Bigliardi, P L; Neumann, C; Teo, Y L; Pant, A; Bigliardi-Qi, M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE In addition to its analgesic functions, the peripheral opioid receptor system affects skin homeostasis by influencing cell differentiation, migration and adhesion; also, wound healing is altered in δ-opioid receptor knockout mice (DOPr–/–). Hence, we investigated δ-opioid receptor effects on the expression of several proteins of the desmosomal junction complex and on the migratory behaviour of keratinocytes. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Expression levels of desmosomal cadherins in wild-type and DOPr–/– mice, and the morphology of intercellular adhesion in human keratinocytes were analysed by immunofluorescence. To investigate the δ-opioid receptor activation pathway, protein expression was studied using Western blot and its effect on cellular migration determined by in vitro live cell migration recordings from human keratinocytes. KEY RESULTS Expression of the desmosomal cadherins, desmogleins 1 and 4, was up-regulated in skin from DOPr–/– mice, and down-regulated in δ-opioid receptor-overexpressing human keratinocytes. The localization of desmoplakin expression was rearranged from linear arrays emanating from cell borders to puncta in cell periphery, resulting in less stable intercellular adhesion. Migration and wound recovery were enhanced in human keratinocyte monolayers overexpressing δ-opioid receptors in vitro. These δ-opioid receptor effects were antagonized by specific PKCα/β inhibition indicating they were mediated through the PKC signalling pathway. Finally, cells overexpressing δ-opioid receptors developed characteristically long but undirected protrusions containing filamentous actin and δ-opioid receptors, indicating an enhanced migratory phenotype. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Opioid receptors affect intercellular adhesion and wound healing mechanisms, underlining the importance of a cutaneous neuroendocrine system in wound healing and skin homeostasis. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on

  20. Inhibition by ketamine and amphetamine analogs of the neurogenic nitrergic vasodilations in porcine basilar arteries.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Fang; Lai, Su-Yu; Kung, Po-Cheng; Lin, Yo-Cheng; Yang, Hui-I; Chen, Po-Yi; Liu, Ingrid Y; Lua, Ahai Chang; Lee, Tony Jer-Fu

    2016-08-15

    The abuse of ketamine and amphetamine analogs is associated with incidence of hypertension and strokes involving activation of sympathetic activities. Large cerebral arteries at the base of the brain from several species receive dense sympathetic innervation which upon activation causes parasympathetic-nitrergic vasodilation with increased regional blood flow via axo-axonal interaction mechanism, serving as a protective mechanism to meet O2 demand in an acutely stressful situation. The present study was designed to examine effects of ketamine and amphetamine analogs on axo-axonal interaction-mediated neurogenic nitrergic vasodilation in porcine basilar arteries using techniques of blood-vessel myography, patch clamp and two-electrode voltage clamp, and calcium imaging. In U46619-contracted basilar arterial rings, nicotine (100μM) and electrical depolarization of nitrergic nerves by transmural nerve stimulation (TNS, 8Hz) elicited neurogenic nitrergic vasodilations. Ketamine and amphetamine analogs concentration-dependently inhibited nicotine-induced parasympathetic-nitrergic vasodilation without affecting that induced by TNS, nitroprusside or isoproterenol. Ketamine and amphetamine analogs also concentration-dependently blocked nicotine-induced inward currents in Xenopus oocytes expressing α3β2-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), and nicotine-induced inward currents as well as calcium influxes in rat superior cervical ganglion neurons. The potency in inhibiting both inward-currents and calcium influxes is ketamine>methamphetamine>hydroxyamphetamine. These results indicate that ketamine and amphetamine analogs, by blocking nAChRs located on cerebral perivascular sympathetic nerves, reduce nicotine-induced, axo-axonal interaction mechanism-mediated neurogenic dilation of the basilar arteries. Chronic abuse of these drugs, therefore, may interfere with normal sympathetic-parasympathetic interaction mechanism resulting in diminished neurogenic vasodilation

  1. Differential effects of TRPV channel block on polymodal activation of rat cutaneous nociceptors in vitro.

    PubMed

    St Pierre, Michael; Reeh, Peter W; Zimmermann, Katharina

    2009-06-01

    The capsaicin receptor TRPV1 is a polymodal sensory transducer molecule in the pain pathway. TRPV1 integrates noxious heat, tissue acidosis and chemical stimuli which are all known to cause pain. Studies on TRPV1-deficient mice suggest that TRPV1 is essential for acid sensing by nociceptors and for thermal hyperalgesia in inflammation of the skin, but not for transducing noxious heat. After TRPV1, other TRPV channels were cloned with polymodal properties and sensitivity to noxious heat, named TRPV2, TRPV3 and TRPV4. While TRPV3 and TRPV4 are predominantly warm sensors, TRPV2's threshold is in the noxious range (>52 degrees C). However, mice deficient of TRPV2 and TRPV1 or TRPV3 or TRPV4 show no major impairment of noxious heat sensing. Ruthenium red, a water soluble polycationic dye, was found to block the pore of the capsaicin-operated cation channel TRPV1 thus interfering with all polymodal ways of TRPV1 activation. Antagonistic effects of the dye were subsequently described on many other TRP-channels, especially on the heat-sensitive ones of the vanilloid family, TRPV2, TRPV3 and TRPV4. In this study, we used the rat skin-nerve preparation to define the possible actions of ruthenium red on the proton, capsaicin and noxious heat activation of native polymodal nociceptors. Ruthenium red was found to suppress only the capsaicin-induced excitation and desensitization of these nerve endings. On the contrary, the proton and heat-induced discharge responses of the single fibres were not influenced. Additionally, we found that the dye concentration dependently increases the excitability of the neurons resulting in ongoing activity and burstlike discharge. These differential results are discussed in the light of recent findings from transgenic mouse models, and they point once more to major (pharmacological) differences between cellular models of nociception, including spinal ganglion neuron and transfected cell lines, and the real native nerve endings.

  2. [Spontaneous activity of cutaneous nociceptors in patients with painful polyneuropathy. Report of three patients].

    PubMed

    Campero, Mario; Campero, Sebastián

    2012-11-01

    Painful polyneuropathy may result from selective impairment of small diameter nerve fibers, while tactile and motor functions are preserved. In these patients clinical and electrophysiological assessment is usually unrevealing. We report three patients with a pure painful polyneuropathy. One of them had neurogenic pruritus additionally. Quantitative sensory analysis disclosed a slight warm hypoesthesia (3/3) and paradoxical hot sensation (2/3) in the feet. Intraneural recordings from the peroneal nerve demonstrated abnormal spontaneous activity in 8 of 17 nociceptive afferents. One of them displayed double firing reflecting impulse multiplication. These results support the notion that patients with pain or pruritus with a distal distribution similar to a polyneuropathy, could have small diameter afferent fiber damage, despite normal function of large diameter fibers.

  3. Endurance training enhances vasodilation induced by nitric oxide in human skin.

    PubMed

    Boegli, Yann; Gremion, Gerald; Golay, Sandrine; Kubli, Sandrine; Liaudet, Lucas; Leyvraz, Pierre-François; Waeber, Bernard; Feihl, François

    2003-11-01

    Endurance training modifies the thermoregulatory control of skin blood flow, as manifested by a greater augmentation of skin perfusion for the same increase in core temperature in athletes, in comparison with sedentary subjects. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that a component of this adaptation might reside in a higher ability of cutaneous blood vessels to respond to vasodilatory stimuli. We recruited healthy nonsmoking males, either endurance trained or sedentary, in two different age ranges (18-35 y and >50 y). Skin blood flow was measured in the forearm skin, using a laser Doppler imager, allowing to record the vasodilatory responses to the following stimuli: iontophoresis of acetylcholine (an endothelium-dependent vasodilator), iontophoresis of sodium nitroprusside (a nitric oxide donor), and release of a temporary interruption of arterial inflow (reactive hyperemia). There was no effect of training on reactive hyperemia or the response to acetylcholine. In contrast, the increase in perfusion following the iontophoresis of sodium nitroprusside, expressed in perfusion units, was larger in trained than in sedentary subjects (younger: 398 +/- 54 vs 350 +/- 87, p < 0.05; older 339 +/- 72 vs 307 +/- 66, p < 0.05). In conclusion, endurance training enhances the vasodilatory effects of nitric oxide in the human dermal microcirculation, at least in forearm skin. These observations have considerable physiologic interest in view of recent data indicating that nitric oxide mediates in part the cutaneous vasodilation induced by heat stress in humans. Therefore, the augmentation of nitric oxide bioactivity in the dermal microcirculation might be one mechanism whereby endurance training modifies the thermoregulatory control of skin blood flow.

  4. Cutaneous HPV and skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Accardi, Rosita; Gheit, Tarik

    2014-12-01

    Papillomaviruses (HPVs) are small non-enveloped icosahedral viruses that infect the keratinocytes of skin and mucosa. The cutaneous HPV types are represented mainly by the beta and gamma genera, which are widely present in the skin of normal individuals. More than 40 beta-HPV types and 50 gamma-HPV types have been isolated, and these numbers are continuously growing. The main cause of non-melanoma skin cancer is exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR). However, cutaneous HPVs that belong to the beta genus may act as a co-carcinogen with UVR. The association between beta-HPVs and skin cancer was first reported in patients with epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV), who frequently develop cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) on sun-exposed areas. Isolation of HPVs from the lesions suggested that HPVs might act as a co-carcinogen with UVR in EV patients. Beta-HPVs may also play a role in cutaneous SCC in immunocompromised non-EV and in immunocompetent individuals. Several studies have reported an association of viral DNA and/or antibodies to beta HPV types with SCC. Interestingly, HPV prevalence and viral load decrease during skin carcinogenesis, being significantly higher in actinic keratosis than in SCC, suggesting that the virus may play a role in the early stages of tumour development (the "hit-and-run" hypothesis). Concordantly, in vivo and in vitro studies have shown that E6 and E7 from certain cutaneous HPV types display transforming activities, further confirming their potential role in carcinogenesis.

  5. Treatment of Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Grace K.; Del Rosso, James Q.

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of cutaneous lupus erythematosus is centered upon formulating a regimen of topical and systemic therapies designed to reduce disease activity and minimize cosmetic damage. Sun avoidance and sunscreen are important preventative measures proven to minimize cutaneous lupus erythematosus exacerbations. Limited disease is typically managed with topical corticosteroids or calcineurin inhibitors. Antimalarial therapy is the gold standard of systemic therapy. Many other treatments have been studied in patients with recalcitrant cutaneous lupus erythematosus, and their use must be evaluated based on individual risk-benefit concerns. R-salbutamol and pulsed dye laser therapy have proven to be effective topical alternatives. Additional systemic agents include retinoids, immunosuppressants, immunomodulators, biologics, and other experimental therapies with novel modes of action. According to the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine criteria for evaluating the strength of evidence supporting an individual treatment measure, no therapy for cutaneous lupus erythematosus has achieved Level 1 status. This demonstrates the need for randomized, controlled trials and systematic reviews of all cutaneous lupus erythematosus interventions in order to meet increasing standards and demand for evidence-based practice. PMID:23320123

  6. Commensal bacteria and cutaneous immunity.

    PubMed

    Nakamizo, Satoshi; Egawa, Gyohei; Honda, Tetsuya; Nakajima, Saeko; Belkaid, Yasmine; Kabashima, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    The skin is the human body's largest organ and is home to a diverse and complex variety of innate and adaptive immune functions that protect against pathogenic invasion. Recent studies have demonstrated that cutaneous commensal bacteria modulated the host immune system. For example, Staphylococcus epidermidis, a skin commensal bacterium, has been demonstrated to induce cutaneous interferon (IFN)-γ- and interleukin (IL)-17A-producing T cells. In addition, cutaneous microbiota changes occur in the chronic inflammatory skin disorders, such as atopic dermatitis, and may influence the activity of skin diseases. In this article, we will review the recent findings related to the interactions of the commensal bacteria with skin homeostasis and discuss the role of the dysbiosis of these bacteria in the pathogenesis of skin diseases.

  7. Vasodilator and antioxidant effect of xanthones isolated from Brazilian medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Capettini, Luciano S; Campos, Lucas Vicente A; Dos Santos, Marcelo H; Nagem, Tanus J; Lemos, Virgínia S; Cortes, Steyner F

    2009-02-01

    Vasorelaxant and antioxidant activities are important in the therapy for cardiovascular diseases. We aimed at investigating the vasorelaxant and antioxidant activities of six xanthones isolated from Brazilian medicinal plants. Xanthone ( 1), 1-hydroxyxanthone ( 2), 4-hydroxyxanthone ( 3), 1-hydroxy-8-methoxyxanthone ( 4), 1,3-dihydroxy-7-methoxyxanthone ( 5) and 2,6,8-trihydroxy-1-methoxyxanthone ( 6) induced concentration-dependent vasorelaxant effects in endothelium-intact mice aortic rings. The presence of a hydroxy group in position 1 seemed to decrease the vasodilator effect while a hydroxy in position 4 and an increased number of hydroxy groups improved the vasorelaxatory potential of xanthones. All xanthones showed antioxidant activity but their potencies did not correlate with the vasodilator effect. Our results suggest that the tested xanthones are potentially vasorelaxant and antioxidant compounds but the two activities are not interrelated.

  8. Mechanisms of acetylcholine-mediated vasodilation in systemic arteries from mourning doves (Zenaida macroura).

    PubMed

    Jarrett, Catherine; Lekic, Mateja; Smith, Christina L; Pusec, Carolina M; Sweazea, Karen L

    2013-10-01

    For mammals, acetylcholine (ACh) promotes endothelium-dependent vasodilation primarily through nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin-mediated pathways, with varying reliance on endothelial-derived hyperpolarizing factors. Currently, no studies have been conducted on small systemic arteries from wild birds. We hypothesized that ACh-mediated vasodilation of isolated small arteries from mourning doves (Zenaida macroura) would likewise depend on endothelial-derived factors. Small resistance mesenteric and cranial tibial (c. tibial) arteries (80-150 μm, inner diameter) were cannulated and pre-constricted to 50 % of resting inner diameter with phenylephrine then exposed to increasing concentrations of ACh (10(-9)-10(-5) M) or the NO donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 10(-12)-10(-3) M). For mesenteric arteries, ACh-mediated vasodilation was significantly blunted with the potassium channel antagonist tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA, 10 mM); whereas responses were only moderately impaired with endothelial disruption or inhibition of prostaglandins (indomethacin, 10 μM). In contrast, endothelial disruption as well as exposure to TEA largely abolished vasodilatory responses to ACh in c. tibial arteries while no effect of prostaglandin inhibition was observed. For both vascular beds, responses to ACh were moderately dependent on the NO signaling pathway. Inhibition of NO synthase had no impact, despite complete reversal of phenylephrine-mediated tone with SNP, whereas inhibition of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) caused minor impairments. Endothelium-independent vasodilation also relied on potassium channels. In summary, ACh-mediated vasodilation of mesenteric and c. tibial arteries occurs through the activation of potassium channels to induce hyperpolarization with moderate reliance on sGC. Prostaglandins likewise play a small role in the vasodilatory response to ACh in mesenteric arteries.

  9. Endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor contributes to hypoxia-induced skeletal muscle vasodilation in humans.

    PubMed

    Spilk, Samson; Herr, Michael D; Sinoway, Lawrence I; Leuenberger, Urs A

    2013-12-01

    Systemic hypoxia causes skeletal muscle vasodilation, thereby preserving O2 delivery to active tissues. Nitric oxide (NO), adenosine, and prostaglandins contribute to this vasodilation, but other factors may also play a role. We tested the hypothesis that regional inhibition of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor with the cytochrome P-450 2C9 antagonist fluconazole, alone or combined with the NO synthase antagonist N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), attenuates hypoxia-induced vasodilation. We compared forearm blood flow (FBF) and skin blood flow before and during brachial artery infusion of fluconazole (0.3 mg/min; trial 1) or fluconazole + L-NMMA (50 mg over 10 min; trial 2) and during systemic hypoxia (10 min, arterial Po2 ~37 mmHg) in infused (experimental) and control forearms of 12 healthy humans. During normoxia, fluconazole and fluconazole + L-NMMA reduced (P < 0.05) forearm vascular conductance (FVC) by ~10% and ~18%, respectively. During hypoxia and fluconazole (trial 1), FVC increased by 1.76 ± 0.37 and 0.95 ± 0.35 units in control and experimental forearms, respectively (P < 0.05). During hypoxia and fluconazole + L-NMMA (trial 2), FVC increased by 2.32 ± 0.51 and 0.72 ± 0.22 units in control and experimental forearms, respectively (P < 0.05). Similarly, during hypoxia with L-NMMA alone (trial 3; n = 8) FVC increased by 1.51 ± 0.46 and 0.45 ± 0.32 units in control and experimental forearms, respectively (P < 0.05). These effects were not due to altered skin blood flow. We conclude that endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor contributes to basal vascular tone and to hypoxia-induced skeletal muscle vasodilation and could be particularly relevant when other vasodilator systems are impaired.

  10. β-Adrenergic-mediated vasodilation in young men and women: cyclooxygenase restrains nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Limberg, Jacqueline K; Johansson, Rebecca E; Peltonen, Garrett L; Harrell, John W; Kellawan, J Mikhail; Eldridge, Marlowe W; Sebranek, Joshua J; Schrage, William G

    2016-03-15

    We tested the hypothesis that women exhibit greater vasodilator responses to β-adrenoceptor stimulation compared with men. We further hypothesized women exhibit a greater contribution of nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase to β-adrenergic-mediated vasodilation compared with men. Forearm blood flow (Doppler ultrasound) was measured in young men (n = 29, 26 ± 1 yr) and women (n = 33, 25 ± 1 yr) during intra-arterial infusion of isoproterenol (β-adrenergic agonist). In subset of subjects, isoproterenol responses were examined before and after local inhibition of nitric oxide synthase [N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA); 6 male/10 female] and/or cyclooxygenase (ketorolac; 5 male/5 female). Vascular conductance (blood flow ÷ mean arterial pressure) was calculated to assess vasodilation. Vascular conductance increased with isoproterenol infusion (P < 0.01), and this effect was not different between men and women (P = 0.41). l-NMMA infusion had no effect on isoproterenol-mediated dilation in men (P > 0.99) or women (P = 0.21). In contrast, ketorolac infusion markedly increased isoproterenol-mediated responses in both men (P < 0.01) and women (P = 0.04) and this rise was lost with subsequent l-NMMA infusion (men, P < 0.01; women, P < 0.05). β-Adrenergic vasodilation is not different between men and women and sex differences in the independent contribution of nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase to β-mediated vasodilation are not present. However, these data are the first to demonstrate β-adrenoceptor activation of cyclooxygenase suppresses nitric oxide synthase signaling in human forearm microcirculation and may have important implications for neurovascular control in both health and disease.

  11. Pycnogenol, French maritime pine bark extract, augments endothelium-dependent vasodilation in humans.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Kenji; Hidaka, Takayuki; Nakamura, Shuji; Umemura, Takashi; Jitsuiki, Daisuke; Soga, Junko; Goto, Chikara; Chayama, Kazuaki; Yoshizumi, Masao; Higashi, Yukihito

    2007-09-01

    Pycnogenol, an extract of bark from the French maritime pine, Pinus pinaster Ait., consists of a concentrate of water-soluble polyphenols. Pycnogenol contains the bioflavonoids catechin and taxifolin as well as phenolcarbonic acids. Antioxidants, such as bioflavonoids, enhance endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase expression and subsequent NO release from endothelial cells. The purpose of this study was to determine Pycnogenol's effects on endothelium-dependent vasodilation in humans. This was a double-blind, randomized, placebo and active drug study. We evaluated forearm blood flow (FBF) responses to acetylcholine (ACh), an endothelium-dependent vasodilator, and to sodium nitroprusside (SNP), an endothelium-independent vasodilator, in healthy young men before and after 2 weeks of daily oral administration of Pycnogenol (180 mg/day) (n=8) or placebo (n=8). FBF was measured by using strain-gauge plethysmography. Neither the placebo nor Pycnogenol altered forearm or systemic hemodynamics. Pycnogenol, but not placebo, augmented FBF response to ACh, from 13.1 +/- 7.0 to 18.5 +/- 4.0 mL/min per 100 mL tissue (p<0.05). SNP-stimulated vasodilation was similar before and after 2 weeks of treatment in the control and Pycnogenol groups. The administration of N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine, an NO synthase inhibitor, completely abolished Pycnogenol-induced augmentation of the FBF response to ACh. These findings suggest that Pycnogenol augments endothelium-dependent vasodilation by increasing in NO production. Pycnogenol would be useful for treating various diseases whose pathogeneses involve endothelial dysfunction.

  12. Cannabinoid-induced mesenteric vasodilation through an endothelial site distinct from CB1 or CB2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Járai, Zoltán; Wagner, Jens A.; Varga, Károly; Lake, Kristy D.; Compton, David R.; Martin, Billy R.; Zimmer, Anne M.; Bonner, Tom I.; Buckley, Nancy E.; Mezey, Eva; Razdan, Raj K.; Zimmer, Andreas; Kunos, George

    1999-01-01

    Cannabinoids, including the endogenous ligand arachidonyl ethanolamide (anandamide), elicit not only neurobehavioral but also cardiovascular effects. Two cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2, have been cloned, and studies with the selective CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A have implicated peripherally located CB1 receptors in the hypotensive action of cannabinoids. In rat mesenteric arteries, anandamide-induced vasodilation is inhibited by SR141716A, but other potent CB1 receptor agonists, such as HU-210, do not cause vasodilation, which implicates an as-yet-unidentified receptor in this effect. Here we show that “abnormal cannabidiol” (Abn-cbd) is a neurobehaviorally inactive cannabinoid that does not bind to CB1 receptors, yet causes SR141716A-sensitive hypotension and mesenteric vasodilation in wild-type mice and in mice lacking CB1 receptors or both CB1 and CB2 receptors. Hypotension by Abn-cbd is also inhibited by cannabidiol (20 μg/g), which does not influence anandamide- or HU-210-induced hypotension. In the rat mesenteric arterial bed, Abn-cbd-induced vasodilation is unaffected by blockade of endothelial NO synthase, cyclooxygenase, or capsaicin receptors, but it is abolished by endothelial denudation. Mesenteric vasodilation by Abn-cbd, but not by acetylcholine, sodium nitroprusside, or capsaicine, is blocked by SR141716A (1 μM) or by cannabidiol (10 μM). Abn-cbd-induced vasodilation is also blocked in the presence of charybdotoxin (100 nM) plus apamin (100 nM), a combination of K+-channel toxins reported to block the release of an endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). These findings suggest that Abn-cbd and cannabidiol are a selective agonist and antagonist, respectively, of an as-yet-unidentified endothelial receptor for anandamide, activation of which elicits NO-independent mesenteric vasodilation, possibly by means of the release of EDHF. PMID:10570211

  13. Toll-like receptor 4-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress contributes to impairment of vasodilator action of insulin

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyun-Ju; Hwang, Daniel H.

    2015-01-01

    Impairment of vasodilator action of insulin is associated with endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance. Activation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) induces proinflammatory response and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Saturated fatty acids (SFA) activate TLR4, which induces ER stress and endothelial dysfunction. Therefore, we determined whether TLR4-mediated ER stress is an obligatory step mediating SFA-induced endothelial dysfunction. Palmitate stimulated proinflammatory responses and ER stress, and this was suppressed by knockdown of TLR4 in primary human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC). Next, we examined the role of TLR4 in vasodilatory responses in intact vessels isolated from wild-type (WT, C57BL/6) and TLR4-KO mice after feeding high-fat (HFD) or normal chow diet (NCD) for 12 wk. Arterioles isolated from HFD WT mice exhibited impaired insulin-stimulated vasodilation compared with arterioles isolated from NCD WT mice. Deficiency of TLR4 was protective from HFD-induced impairment of insulin-stimulated vasodilation. There were no differences in acetylcholine (Ach)- or sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-stimulated vasodilation between the two groups. Furthermore, we examined whether ER stress is involved in SFA-induced impairment of vasodilator actions of insulin. Infusion of palmitate showed the impairment of vasodilatory response to insulin, which was ameliorated by coinfusion with tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), an ER stress suppressor. Taken together, the results suggest that TLR4-induced ER stress may be an obligatory step mediating the SFA-mediated endothelial dysfunction. PMID:26522062

  14. Zosteriform cutaneous leiomyoma: a rare cutaneous neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Arfan-ul-Bari

    2013-08-01

    Cutaneous leiomyomas are firm, round to oval, skin-coloured to brownish papules and nodules that may present as a solitary, few discrete or multiple clustered lesions. Different uncommon patterns of multiple leiomyoma distribution have been noted as bilateral, symmetrical, linear, zosteriform, or dermatomal-like arrangement. One such rare presentation was seen in a 23-year-old patient who presented with zosteriform skin coloured, occasionally painful cutaneous lesions over left shoulder region. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of cutaneous leiomyoma. He was symptomatically managed with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents and topical capcicum cream. Case is reported here due to rare occurrence of this benign cutaneous neoplasm in an atypical pattern and on uncommon site.

  15. The antihistamines clemastine and desloratadine inhibit STAT3 and c-Myc activities and induce apoptosis in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Döbbeling, Udo; Waeckerle-Men, Ying; Zabel, Franziska; Graf, Nicole; Kündig, Thomas M; Johansen, Pål

    2013-02-01

    Mycosis fungoides and its leukaemic counterpart Sézary syndrome are the most frequent cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL), and there is no cure for these diseases. We evaluated the effect of clinically approved antihistamines on the growth of CTCL cell lines. CTCL cell lines as well as blood lymphocytes from patients with Sézary syndrome were cultured with antihistamines, and the cell were analysed for proliferation, apoptosis and expression of programmed death molecules and transcription factors. The two antihistamines clemastine and desloratadine, currently used for symptom alleviation in allergy, induced potent reduction of the activities of the constitutively active transcription factors c-Myc, STAT3, STAT5a and STAT5b in mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome cell lines. This inhibition was followed by apoptosis and cell death, especially in the Sézary syndrome-derived cell line Hut78 that also showed increased expression of the programmed death-1 (PD-1) after clemastine treatment. In lymphocytes isolated from Sézary syndrome patients, the CD4-positive fraction underwent apoptosis after clemastine treatment, while CD4-negative lymphocytes were little affected. Because both c-Myc and STAT transcription factors are highly expressed in proliferating tumours, their inhibition by clemastine, desloratadine and other inhibitors could complement established chemotherapies not only for cutaneous T-cell lymphomas but perhaps also other cancers.

  16. Pharmacological mechanisms involved in the vasodilator effects of extracts from Echinodorus grandiflorus.

    PubMed

    Tibiriçá, Eduardo; Almeida, Andressa; Caillleaux, Solange; Pimenta, Daniel; Kaplan, Maria Auxiliadora; Lessa, Marcos Adriano; Figueiredo, Maria Raquel

    2007-04-20

    We investigated the vascular effects of a crude aqueous extract (AEEG) of Echinodorus grandiflorus (Alismataceae) using the in vitro experimental models of the rabbit isolated aorta and perfused kidney. Echinodorus grandiflorus, a native semi-aquatic plant widely distributed in Brazil, has been extensively used in Brazilian folk medicine for the treatment of high blood pressure and inflammatory diseases. The bolus injection of AEEG (0.1-10 mg) into the rabbit renal circulation pre-contracted with norepinephrine induced marked and dose-dependent vasodilator responses (maximum of 37+/-4%; n=6; P<0.001), which was similar to that induced by injection of 10 mmol acetylcholine (41+/-3%). Moreover, AEEG elicited a significant and concentration-dependent relaxation in the endothelium-intact, but not endothelium-denuded aortic rings, reaching the maximum of 81+/-5% (n=7, P<0.001). Inhibition of the nitric oxide-cGMP pathway with L-NAME (100 microM) or Methylene Blue (20 microM) reduced maximum relaxation induced by AEEG from 81+/-5% to 46+/-3 and 45+/-3%, respectively (n=7, P<0.001). A similar reduction was obtained with the incubation of the aortic rings with the selective PAF receptor antagonist WEB 2086 (10 microM) (from 81+/-5% to 55+/-3%; n=7; P<0.01). Conversely, blockade of muscarinic receptors with atropine (10 microM) did not affect the vasodilator effects of AEEG, while inhibition of the enzyme cyclooxigenase not only did not block, but rather potentiated vasodilation induced by AEEG (n=7, P<0.001). Finally, blockade of Ca(2+)- and ATP-activated K(+) channels using the specific blockers charydbotoxin (100 nM) and glibenclamide (3 microM), respectively, did not modify aortic relaxation induced by AEEG. We conclude that water-soluble extracts from leaves of Echinodorus grandiflorus elicit an endothelium-dependent, nitric oxide and PAF receptor-mediated vasodilation in rabbit aortic rings, which does not appear to involve the generation of vasodilating

  17. Nocturnal activity rhythms of Lutzomyia intermedia and Lutzomyia whitmani (Diptera: Psychodidae) in a transmission area of American cutaneous leishmaniasis in Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Souza, Nataly A; Andrade-Coelho, Cláudia A; Peixoto, Alexandre A; Rangel, Elizabeth F

    2005-11-01

    The phlebotomine sand flies Lutzomyia (Nyssomyia) intermedia (Lutz & Neiva) and Lutzomyia (Nyssomyia) whitmani (Coutinho & Antunes) are important vectors of Leishmania (Vianna) braziliensis, the etiological agent of American cutaneous leishmaniasis. In some areas, both species occur in sympatry, and their relative roles as vectors in these areas are not clear. We studied the nocturnal activity and biting rhythms of both species in Posse, a locality in Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Our results show differences between the activity patterns of Lu. intermedia and Lu. whitmani that might be epidemiologically important. Although the activity profiles vary between seasons and microhabitats (peridomestic versus forest), the two species show marked differences in their tendencies to bite humans in the early morning (0400-0600 hours), with Lu. whitmani showing higher feeding rates than Lu. intermedia.

  18. Mechanisms of magnesium-induced vasodilation in cerebral penetrating arterioles.

    PubMed

    Murata, Takahiro; Dietrich, Hans H; Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Hongo, Kazuhiro; Dacey, Ralph G

    2016-06-01

    We investigated in cerebral penetrating arterioles the signaling mechanisms and dose-dependency of extracellular magnesium-induced vasodilation and also its vasodilatory effects in vessels preconstricted with agonists associated with delayed cerebral vasospasm following SAH. Male rat penetrating arterioles were cannulated. Their internal diameters were monitored. To investigate mechanisms of magnesium-induced vasodilation, inhibitors of endothelial function, potassium channels and endothelial impairment were tested. To simulate cerebral vasospasm we applied several spasmogenic agonists. Increased extracellular magnesium concentration produced concentration-dependent vasodilation, which was partially attenuated by non-specific calcium-sensitive potassium channel inhibitor tetraethylammonium, but not by other potassium channel inhibitors. Neither the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NNA nor endothelial impairment induced by air embolism reduced the dilation. Although the magnesium-induced vasodilation was slightly attenuated by the spasmogen ET-1, neither application of PF2α nor TXA2 analog effect the vasodilation. Magnesium induced a concentration- and smooth muscle cell-dependent dilation in cerebral penetrating arterioles. Calcium-sensitive potassium channels of smooth muscle cells may play a key role in magnesium-induced vasodilation. Magnesium also dilated endothelium-impaired vessels as well as vessels preconstricted with spasmogenic agonists. These results provide a fundamental background for the clinical use of magnesium, especially in treatment against delayed cerebral ischemia or vasospasm following SAH.

  19. Induced vasodilation as treatment for Raynaud's disease.

    PubMed

    Jobe, J B; Sampson, J B; Roberts, D E; Beetham, W P

    1982-11-01

    We examined the efficacy of induced vasodilation as a treatment of idiopathic Raynaud's disease. Eight persons with Raynaud's disease and seven normal persons each received 27 simultaneous pairings of hand immersion in warm water (43 degrees C) for 10 minutes with exposure of the whole body to cold (0 degrees C). A second group of seven normal persons and nine persons with Raynaud's disease received no treatments. All subjects had cold test exposures (0 degrees C) at the start and end of the study. Subjects with Raynaud's disease who received treatments showed significant increases in digital temperatures (2.2 degrees C) during the cold test compared with the values of untreated subjects with Raynaud's disease (p less than 0.05); normal subjects who had received treatments showed no difference from those who had not. Digital temperatures of subjects with Raynaud's disease after treatment increased to levels approaching those of normal subjects, although they showed lower digital temperatures during initial exposure to cold (p less than 0.01). This therapy offers a practical alternative to traditional treatments.

  20. Acute Thermotherapy Prevents Impairments in Cutaneous Microvascular Function Induced by a High Fat Meal

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Jennifer C.; Roseguini, Bruno T.; Goerger, Benjamin M.; Fallon, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that a high fat meal (HFM) would impair cutaneous vasodilation, while thermotherapy (TT) would reverse the detrimental effects. Eight participants were instrumented with skin heaters and laser-Doppler (LD) probes and tested in three trials: control, HFM, and HFM + TT. Participants wore a water-perfused suit perfused with 33°C (control and HFM) or 50°C (HFM + TT) water. Participants consumed 1 g fat/kg body weight. Blood samples were taken at baseline and two hours post-HFM. Blood pressure was measured every 5–10 minutes. Microvascular function was assessed via skin local heating from 33°C to 39°C two hours after HFM. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated and normalized to maximal vasodilation (%CVCmax). HFM had no effect on initial peak (48 ± 4 %CVCmax) compared to control (49 ± 4 %CVCmax) but attenuated the plateau (51 ± 4 %CVCmax) compared to control (63 ± 4 %CVCmax, P < 0.001). Initial peak was augmented in HFM + TT (66 ± 4 %CVCmax) compared to control and HFM (P < 0.05), while plateau (73 ± 3 % CVCmax) was augmented only compared to the HFM trial (P < 0.001). These data suggest that HFM negatively affects cutaneous vasodilation but can be minimized by TT. PMID:27595112

  1. Soluble guanylate cyclase is required for systemic vasodilation but not positive inotropy induced by nitroxyl in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guangshuo; Groneberg, Dieter; Sikka, Gautam; Hori, Daijiro; Ranek, Mark J; Nakamura, Taishi; Takimoto, Eiki; Paolocci, Nazareno; Berkowitz, Dan E; Friebe, Andreas; Kass, David A

    2015-02-01

    Nitroxyl (HNO), the reduced and protonated form of nitric oxide (NO·), confers unique physiological effects including vasorelaxation and enhanced cardiac contractility. These features have spawned current pharmaceutical development of HNO donors as heart failure therapeutics. HNO interacts with selective redox sensitive cysteines to effect signaling but is also proposed to activate soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) in vitro to induce vasodilation and potentially enhance contractility. Here, we tested whether sGC stimulation is required for these HNO effects in vivo and if HNO also modifies a redox-sensitive cysteine (C42) in protein kinase G-1α to control vasorelaxation. Intact mice and isolated arteries lacking the sGC-β subunit (sGCKO, results in full sGC deficiency) or expressing solely a redox-dead C42S mutant protein kinase G-1α were exposed to the pure HNO donor, CXL-1020. CXL-1020 induced dose-dependent systemic vasodilation while increasing contractility in controls; however, vasodilator effects were absent in sGCKO mice whereas contractility response remained. The CXL-1020 dose reversing 50% of preconstricted force in aortic rings was ≈400-fold greater in sGCKO than controls. Cyclic-GMP and cAMP levels were unaltered in myocardium exposed to CXL-1020, despite its inotropic-vasodilator activity. In protein kinase G-1α(C42S) mice, CXL-1020 induced identical vasorelaxation in vivo and in isolated aortic and mesenteric vessels as in littermate controls. In both groups, dilation was near fully blocked by pharmacologically inhibiting sGC. Thus, sGC and cGMP-dependent signaling are necessary and sufficient for HNO-induced vasodilation in vivo but are not required for positive inotropic action. Redox modulation of protein kinase G-1α is not a mechanism for HNO-mediated vasodilation.

  2. Polyunsaturated fatty acids are cerebral vasodilators via the TREK-1 potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Blondeau, Nicolas; Pétrault, Olivier; Manta, Stella; Giordanengo, Valérie; Gounon, Pierre; Bordet, Régis; Lazdunski, Michel; Heurteaux, Catherine

    2007-07-20

    Vessel occlusion is the most frequent cause for impairment of local blood flow within the brain resulting in neuronal damage and is a leading cause of disability and death worldwide. Polyunsaturated fatty acids and especially alpha-linolenic acid improve brain resistance against cerebral ischemia. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids and particularly alpha-linolenic acid on the cerebral blood flow and on the tone of vessels that regulate brain perfusion. alpha-Linolenic acid injections increased cerebral blood flow and induced vasodilation of the basilar artery but not of the carotid artery. The saturated fatty acid palmitic acid did not produce vasodilation. This suggested that the target of the polyunsaturated fatty acids effect was the TREK-1 potassium channel. We demonstrate the presence of this channel in basilar but not in carotid arteries. We show that vasodilations induced by the polyunsaturated fatty acid in the basilar artery as well as the laser-Doppler flow increase are abolished in TREK-1(-/-) mice. Altogether these data indicate that TREK-1 activation elicits a robust dilation that probably accounts for the increase of cerebral blood flow induced by polyunsaturated fatty acids such as alpha-linolenic acid or docosahexanoic acid. They suggest that the selective expression and activation of TREK-1 in brain collaterals could play a significant role in the protective mechanisms of polyunsaturated fatty acids against stroke by providing residual circulation during ischemia.

  3. Greater Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Mediated Vasodilation in Women Using Oral Contraceptives

    PubMed Central

    Limberg, Jacqueline K.; Peltonen, Garrett L.; Johansson, Rebecca E.; Harrell, John W.; Kellawan, Jeremy M.; Eldridge, Marlowe W.; Sebranek, Joshua J.; Walker, Benjamin J.; Schrage, William G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: β-adrenergic receptors play an important role in mitigating the pressor effects of sympathetic nervous system activity in young women. Based on recent data showing oral contraceptive use in women abolishes the relationship between muscle sympathetic nervous system activity and blood pressure, we hypothesized forearm blood flow responses to a β-adrenergic receptor agonist would be greater in young women currently using oral contraceptives (OC+, n = 13) when compared to those not using oral contraceptives (OC–, n = 10). Methods: Women (18–35 years) were studied during the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle (days 1–5) or placebo phase of oral contraceptive use. Forearm blood flow (FBF, Doppler ultrasound) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP, brachial arterial catheter) were measured at baseline and during graded brachial artery infusion of the β-adrenergic receptor agonist, Isoproterenol (ISO), as well as Acetylcholine (ACH, endothelium-dependent vasodilation) and Nitroprusside (NTP, endothelium-independent vasodilation). Forearm vascular conductance was calculated (FVC = FBF/MAP, ml/min/100 mmHg) and the rise in FVC from baseline during infusion quantified vasodilation (ΔFVC = FVCinfusion − FVCbaseline). Results: ISO increased FVC in both groups (p < 0.01) and ISO-mediated ΔFVC was greater in OC+ compared to OC– (Main effect of group, p = 0.02). Expressing data as FVC and FBF resulted in similar conclusions. FVC responses to both ACH and NTP were also greater in OC+ compared to OC–. Conclusions: These data are the first to demonstrate greater β-adrenergic receptor-mediated vasodilation in the forearm of women currently using oral contraceptives (placebo phase) when compared to those not using oral contraceptives (early follicular phase), and suggest oral contraceptive use influences neurovascular control. PMID:27375493

  4. Age-Associated Induction of Cell Membrane CD47 Limits Basal and Temperature-Induced Changes in Cutaneous Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Natasha M.; Roberts, David D.; Isenberg, Jeffrey S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective We tested the hypothesis that the matricellular protein thrombospondin-1 (TSP1), through binding to and activation of the cell receptor CD47, inhibits basal and thermal-mediated cutaneous blood flow. Background Data Abnormal and decreased cutaneous blood flow in response to temperature changes or vasoactive agents is a feature of cardiovascular disease and aging. The reasons for decreased cutaneous blood flow remain incompletely understood. Further, a role for matricellular proteins in the regulation skin blood flow has never been proposed. Methods C57BL/6 wild type, TSP1- and CD47-null 12 and 72 week old male mice underwent analysis of skin blood flow (SkBF) via laser Doppler in response to thermal stress and vasoactive challenge. Results Young and aged TSP1- and CD47-null mice displayed enhanced basal and thermal sensitive SkFB changes compared to age matched wild type controls. Nitric oxide-mediated increases in SkBF were also greater in null mice. TSP1 and CD47 were expressed in skin from young wild type mice, and both were significantly upregulated in aged animals. Tissue 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), a potent vasodilator, was greater in skin samples from null mice compared to wild type regardless of age. Finally, treating wild type animals with a CD47 monoclonal antibody, that inhibits TSP1 activation of CD47, enhanced SkBF in both young and aged animals. Conclusions The above results suggest that secreted TSP1, via its cognate receptor CD47, acutely modulates SkBF. These data further support therapeutically targeting CD47 to mitigate age-associated loss of SkBF and maximize wound healing. PMID:23275312

  5. The vascular renin-angiotensin system contributes to blunted vasodilation induced by transient high pressure in human adipose microvessels.

    PubMed

    Durand, Matthew J; Phillips, Shane A; Widlansky, Michael E; Otterson, Mary F; Gutterman, David D

    2014-07-01

    Increased intraluminal pressure can reduce endothelial function in resistance arterioles; however, the mechanism of this impairment is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of local renin-angiotensin system inhibition on the pressure-induced blunting of endothelium-dependent vasodilation in human adipose arterioles. Arterioles (100-200 μm) were dissected from fresh adipose surgical specimens, cannulated onto glass micropipettes, pressurized to an intraluminal pressure of 60 mmHg, and constricted with endothelin-1. Vasodilation to ACh was assessed at 60 mmHg and again after a 30-min exposure to an intraluminal pressure of 150 mmHg. The vasodilator response to ACh was significantly reduced in vessels exposed to 150 mmHg. Exposure of the vessels to the superoxide scavenger polyethylene glycol-SOD (100 U/ml), the ANG II type 1 receptor antagonist losartan (10(-6) mol/l), or the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor captopril (10(-5) mol/l) prevented the pressure-induced reduction in ACh-dependent vasodilation observed in untreated vessels. High intraluminal pressure had no effect on papaverine-induced vasodilation or ANG II sensitivity. Increased intraluminal pressure increased dihydroethidium fluorescence in cannulated vessels, which could be prevented by polyethylene glycol-SOD or losartan treatment and endothelial denudation. These data indicate that high intraluminal pressure can increase vascular superoxide and reduce nitric oxide-mediated vasodilation via activation of the vascular renin-angiotensin system. This study provides evidence showing that the local renin-angiotensin system in the human microvasculature may be pressure sensitive and contribute to endothelial dysfunction after acute bouts of hypertension.

  6. Clinically occult cutaneous metastases.

    PubMed

    Resnik, Kenneth S; DiLeonardo, Mario; Gibbons, George

    2006-12-01

    Cutaneous metastases present themselves in a variety of clinical patterns and tend to be manifested as indurated papules/nodules/tumors. Some of those clinical expressions are unique for certain types of metastases. This report describes an entirely different phenomenon of clinically incognito cutaneous metastases that were only apparent histopathologically as an incidental finding.

  7. Cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa*

    PubMed Central

    Matteoda, María Alejandra; Stefano, Paola Cecilia; Bocián, Marcela; Katsicas, María Marta; Sala, Josefina; Cervini, Andrea Bettina

    2015-01-01

    Polyarteritis nodosa is a rare vasculitis in children characterized by necrotizing inflammation in small and medium size arteries. It is classified into systemic and cutaneous PAN according to the presence of systemic symptoms or visceral involvement. We describe the case of a 14-year-old girl with cutaneous Polyarteritis nodosa with an atypical clinical presentation. PMID:26312712

  8. Involvement of peripheral ionotropic glutamate receptors in activation of cutaneous branches of spinal dorsal rami following antidromic electrical stimulation of adjacent afferent nerves in rats.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dong-Yuan; You, Hao-Jun; Zhao, Yan; Guo, Yuan; Wang, Hui-Sheng; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Wang, Hui-Ling; Zhang, Qi

    2007-04-02

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of peripheral ionotropic glutamate receptors in the process of signal transmission between adjacent different peripheral sensory nerves. The T9 and T10 cutaneous branches of spinal dorsal rami were dissociated and cut proximally in pentobarbital anesthetized rats. Eighty-seven single afferents from T10 nerve filaments were recorded and characterized by assessing their spontaneous activities. Following 30 s antidromic electrical stimulation (intensity: 1 mA; duration: 0.5 ms; frequency: 20 Hz) of T9 cutaneous branches, the spontaneous activities of Abeta, Adelta and C fibers of T10 nerve were significantly enhanced from 2.00+/-0.34, 2.42+/-0.33, and 2.19+/-0.32 impulses/min to 4.31+/-0.58, 5.22+/-0.55, and 5.27+/-0.69 impulses/min, respectively (n=29 for each type, P<0.05). These enhanced spontaneous discharges of T10 nerve were significantly blocked by local treatment of its receptive field with either N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist MK-801 or non-NMDA receptor antagonist DNQX (0.1 mM, 10 microl for each drug) (P<0.05). These results suggest that peripheral ionotropic glutamate receptors are involved in the activation of peripheral nerves following the antidromic stimulation of adjacent afferents from different spinal segments. We further provide the direct evidence that neurotransmitters released from adjacent peripheral nerves may also contribute to the occurrence of allodynia as well as secondary hyperalgesia during the pathological nociception.

  9. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide: Key Regulator of Cutaneous Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Granstein, Richard D.; Wagner, John A.; Stohl, Lori L.; Ding, Wanhong

    2014-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) has been viewed as a neuropeptide and vasodilator. However, CGRP is more appropriately thought of as a pleiotropic signaling molecule. Indeed, CGRP has key regulatory functions on immune and inflammatory processes within the skin. CGRP-containing nerves are intimately associated with epidermal LCs and CGRP has profound regulatory effects on Langerhans cell antigen-presenting capability. When LCs are exposed to CGRP in vitro, their ability to present antigen for in vivo priming of naïve mice or elicitation of delayed-type hypersensitivity is inhibited in at least some situations. Administration of CGRP intradermally inhibits acquisition of immunity to Th1-dominant haptens applied to the injected site while augmenting immunity to Th2-dominant haptens, although the cellular targets of activity in these experiments remains unclear. Although CGRP can be a pro-inflammatory agent, several studies have demonstrated that administration of CGRP can inhibit the elicitation of inflammation by inflammatory stimuli in vivo. In this regard, CGRP inhibits the release of certain chemokines by stimulated endothelial cells. This is likely to be physiologically relevant since cutaneous blood vessels are innervated by sensory nerves. Exciting new studies suggest a significant role for CGRP in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and, most strikingly, that CGRP inhibit the ability of LCs to transmit the human immunodeficiency virus 1 to T lymphocytes. A more complete understanding of the role of CGRP in the skin immune system may lead to new and novel approaches for the therapy of immune mediated skin disorders. PMID:25534428

  10. Lipid Emulsion Inhibits Vasodilation Induced by a Toxic Dose of Bupivacaine via Attenuated Dephosphorylation of Myosin Phosphatase Target Subunit 1 in Isolated Rat Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Ok, Seong-Ho; Byon, Hyo-Jin; Kwon, Seong-Chun; Park, Jungchul; Lee, Youngju; Hwang, Yeran; Baik, Jiseok; Choi, Mun-Jeoung; Sohn, Ju-Tae

    2015-01-01

    Lipid emulsions are widely used for the treatment of systemic toxicity that arises from local anesthetics. The goal of this in vitro study was to examine the cellular mechanism associated with the lipid emulsion-mediated attenuation of vasodilation induced by a toxic dose of bupivacaine in isolated endothelium-denuded rat aorta. The effects of lipid emulsion on vasodilation induced by bupivacaine, mepivacaine, and verapamil were assessed in isolated aorta precontracted with phenylephrine, the Rho kinase stimulant NaF, and the protein kinase C activator phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu). The effects of Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 on contraction induced by phenylephrine or NaF were assessed. The effects of bupivacaine on intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]i) and tension induced by NaF were simultaneously measured. The effects of bupivacaine alone and lipid emulsion plus bupivacaine on myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT1) phosphorylation induced by NaF were examined in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. In precontracted aorta, the lipid emulsion attenuated bupivacaine-induced vasodilation but had no effect on mepivacaine-induced vasodilation. Y-27632 attenuated contraction induced by either phenylephrine or NaF. The lipid emulsion attenuated verapamil-induced vasodilation. Compared with phenylephrine-induced precontracted aorta, bupivacaine-induced vasodilation was slightly attenuated in NaF-induced precontracted aorta. The magnitude of the bupivacaine-induced vasodilation was higher than that of a bupivacaine-induced decrease in [Ca2+]i. Bupivacaine attenuated NaF-induced MYPT1 phosphorylation, whereas lipid emulsion pretreatment attenuated the bupivacaine-induced inhibition of MYPT1 phosphorylation induced by NaF. Taken together, these results suggest that lipid emulsions attenuate bupivacaine-induced vasodilation via the attenuation of inhibition of MYPT1 phosphorylation evoked by NaF. PMID:26664257

  11. Lipid Emulsion Inhibits Vasodilation Induced by a Toxic Dose of Bupivacaine via Attenuated Dephosphorylation of Myosin Phosphatase Target Subunit 1 in Isolated Rat Aorta.

    PubMed

    Ok, Seong-Ho; Byon, Hyo-Jin; Kwon, Seong-Chun; Park, Jungchul; Lee, Youngju; Hwang, Yeran; Baik, Jiseok; Choi, Mun-Jeoung; Sohn, Ju-Tae

    2015-01-01

    Lipid emulsions are widely used for the treatment of systemic toxicity that arises from local anesthetics. The goal of this in vitro study was to examine the cellular mechanism associated with the lipid emulsion-mediated attenuation of vasodilation induced by a toxic dose of bupivacaine in isolated endothelium-denuded rat aorta. The effects of lipid emulsion on vasodilation induced by bupivacaine, mepivacaine, and verapamil were assessed in isolated aorta precontracted with phenylephrine, the Rho kinase stimulant NaF, and the protein kinase C activator phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu). The effects of Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 on contraction induced by phenylephrine or NaF were assessed. The effects of bupivacaine on intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca(2+)]i) and tension induced by NaF were simultaneously measured. The effects of bupivacaine alone and lipid emulsion plus bupivacaine on myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT1) phosphorylation induced by NaF were examined in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. In precontracted aorta, the lipid emulsion attenuated bupivacaine-induced vasodilation but had no effect on mepivacaine-induced vasodilation. Y-27632 attenuated contraction induced by either phenylephrine or NaF. The lipid emulsion attenuated verapamil-induced vasodilation. Compared with phenylephrine-induced precontracted aorta, bupivacaine-induced vasodilation was slightly attenuated in NaF-induced precontracted aorta. The magnitude of the bupivacaine-induced vasodilation was higher than that of a bupivacaine-induced decrease in [Ca(2+)]i. Bupivacaine attenuated NaF-induced MYPT1 phosphorylation, whereas lipid emulsion pretreatment attenuated the bupivacaine-induced inhibition of MYPT1 phosphorylation induced by NaF. Taken together, these results suggest that lipid emulsions attenuate bupivacaine-induced vasodilation via the attenuation of inhibition of MYPT1 phosphorylation evoked by NaF.

  12. Exenatide induces aortic vasodilation increasing hydrogen sulphide, carbon monoxide and nitric oxide production

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It has been reported that GLP-1 agonist exenatide (exendin-4) decreases blood pressure. The dose-dependent vasodilator effect of exendin-4 has previously been demonstrated, although the precise mechanism is not thoroughly described. Here we have aimed to provide in vitro evidence for the hypothesis that exenatide may decrease central (aortic) blood pressure involving three gasotransmitters, namely nitric oxide (NO) carbon monoxide (CO), and hydrogen sulphide (H2S). Methods We determined the vasoactive effect of exenatide on isolated thoracic aortic rings of adult rats. Two millimetre-long vessel segments were placed in a wire myograph and preincubated with inhibitors of the enzymes producing the three gasotransmitters, with inhibitors of reactive oxygen species formation, prostaglandin synthesis, inhibitors of protein kinases, potassium channels or with an inhibitor of the Na+/Ca2+-exchanger. Results Exenatide caused dose-dependent relaxation of rat thoracic aorta, which was evoked via the GLP-1 receptor and was mediated mainly by H2S but also by NO and CO. Prostaglandins and superoxide free radical also play a part in the relaxation. Inhibition of soluble guanylyl cyclase significantly diminished vasorelaxation. We found that ATP-sensitive-, voltage-gated- and calcium-activated large-conductance potassium channels are also involved in the vasodilation, but that seemingly the inhibition of the KCNQ-type voltage-gated potassium channels resulted in the most remarkable decrease in the rate of vasorelaxation. Inhibition of the Na+/Ca2+-exchanger abolished most of the vasodilation. Conclusions Exenatide induces vasodilation in rat thoracic aorta with the contribution of all three gasotransmitters. We provide in vitro evidence for the potential ability of exenatide to lower central (aortic) blood pressure, which could have relevant clinical importance. PMID:24693878

  13. Cholinergic vasodilative system in the cerebral cortex: effects of acupuncture and aging.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Sae

    2014-08-01

    This article presents a review of our studies on the cholinergic vasodilative system in the cerebral cortex in relation to the effects of acupuncture and aging. In anesthetized rats, manual acupuncture-like stimulation of the cheek, forepaw, upper arm, and hindpaw increases the cortical cerebral blood flow (CBF). The mechanism for the increased response of CBF due to forepaw stimulation has been found to be a reflex response whose afferents are Groups III and IV somatic afferent fibers and whose efferents are cholinergic fibers that originate in the nucleus basalis of Meynert. Although the cholinergic cortical vasodilation to nucleus basalis of Meynert stimulation at high intensities declines with age, the increased response of CBF induced by natural somatic afferent stimulation, such as an acupuncture-like stimulation of a forepaw, is well maintained even in very old rats (approximately 3 years of age). These findings in anesthetized rats may support the application of acupuncture to elderly people and patients with disturbances in the CBF by activating the intracranial cholinergic vasodilative system.

  14. Mechanisms of decompensation and organ failure in cirrhosis: From peripheral arterial vasodilation to systemic inflammation hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Mauro; Moreau, Richard; Angeli, Paolo; Schnabl, Bernd; Arroyo, Vicente

    2015-11-01

    The peripheral arterial vasodilation hypothesis has been most influential in the field of cirrhosis and its complications. It has given rise to hundreds of pathophysiological studies in experimental and human cirrhosis and is the theoretical basis of life-saving treatments. It is undisputed that splanchnic arterial vasodilation contributes to portal hypertension and is the basis for manifestations such as ascites and hepatorenal syndrome, but the body of research generated by the hypothesis has revealed gaps in the original pathophysiological interpretation of these complications. The expansion of our knowledge on the mechanisms regulating vascular tone, inflammation and the host-microbiota interaction require a broader approach to advanced cirrhosis encompassing the whole spectrum of its manifestations. Indeed, multiorgan dysfunction and failure likely result from a complex interplay where the systemic spread of bacterial products represents the primary event. The consequent activation of the host innate immune response triggers endothelial molecular mechanisms responsible for arterial vasodilation, and also jeopardizes organ integrity with a storm of pro-inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Thus, the picture of advanced cirrhosis could be seen as the result of an inflammatory syndrome in contradiction with a simple hemodynamic disturbance.

  15. The Anti-Inflammatory and Vasodilating Effects of Three Selected Dietary Organic Sulfur Compounds from Allium Species

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chin-Chen; Wu, Wen-Shiann; Shieh, Ja-Ping; Chu, Heuy-Ling; Lee, Chia-Pu; Duh, Pin-Der

    2017-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory and vasodilating effects of three selected dietary organic sulfur compounds (OSC), including diallyl disulfide (DADS), dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), and propyl disulfide (PDS), from Allium species were investigated. In the anti-inflammatory activity assay, the three OSC demonstrated significant inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in LPS-induced RAW 264.7 cells. The expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX-2) in activated RAW 264.7 cells was inhibited by the three OSC, indicating that the three OSC prevented the LPS-induced inflammatory response in RAW 264.7 cells. For the vasodilative assay, the three OSC were ineffective in producing NO in SVEC4-10 cells, but they did enhance prostacyclin (PGI2) production. The expression of COX-2 in SVEC4-10 cells was activated by DADS and DMDS. Pretreatment of SVEC4-10 cells with the three OSC decreased ROS generation in H2O2-induced SVEC4-10 cells. In addition, the three OSC significantly inhibited angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE). The up-regulation of PGI2 production and COX-2 expression by DADS and DMDS and the reduction of ROS generation by DADS, DMDS, and PDS in SVEC4-10 cells contributed to the vasodilative effect of the three OSC. Collectively, these findings suggest that DADS, DMDS, and PDS are potential anti-inflammatory and vasodilative mediators. PMID:28134777

  16. Evidence for dopaminergic vasodilator innervation of the canine paw pad.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, C.; Lang, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    1 In chloralose-anaesthetized dogs pretreated with guanethidine and pancuronium, electrical stimulation (0.2 to 5 Hz) of the peripheral end of the cut tibial nerve caused a frequency-dependent increase in femoral blood flow which was restricted to the paw pads. 2 This neurogenic vasodilatation was not attenuated by atropine, mepyramine plus burimamide, indomethacin or propranolol. It was, however, attenuated in a dose-dependent manner by intra-arterial administration of the dopamine receptor antagonist, ergometrine (0.05 to 0.5 mg). 3 The effect of ergometrine could not be explained by non-specific effects on axonal conduction or transmission or by vasospasm of the blood vessels of the paw-pads. 4 In dogs with intact tibial nerves, a pharmacologically similar dilator response localized to the paw-pads could be elicited by electrical stimulation of loci in the ipsilateral diencephalon and midbrain. This response was not due to inhibition of adrenergic vasomotor tone and was abolished by systemic ganglion blockade or by tibial nerve section as well as by femoral arterial administration of ergometrine. 5 It is suggested that the vasculature of the canine paw pads is innervated by a population of autonomic axons which utilize dopamine or a related substance as a transmitter substance and activation of which causes vasodilation. PMID:40651

  17. The selective PAC1 receptor agonist maxadilan inhibits neurogenic vasodilation and edema formation in the mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Banki, E; Hajna, Zs; Kemeny, A; Botz, B; Nagy, P; Bolcskei, K; Toth, G; Reglodi, D; Helyes, Zs

    2014-10-01

    We have earlier shown that PACAP-38 decreases neurogenic inflammation. However, there were no data on its receptorial mechanism and the involvement of its PAC1 and VPAC1/2 receptors (PAC1R, VPAC1/2R) in this inhibitory effect. Neurogenic inflammation in the mouse ear was induced by topical application of the Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) receptor activator mustard oil (MO). Consequent neurogenic edema, vasodilation and plasma leakage were assessed by measuring ear thickness with engineer's micrometer, detecting tissue perfusion by laser Doppler scanning and Evans blue or indocyanine green extravasation by intravital videomicroscopy or fluorescence imaging, respectively. Myeloperoxidase activity, an indicator of neutrophil infiltration, was measured from the ear homogenates with spectrophotometry. The selective PAC1R agonist maxadilan, the VPAC1/2R agonist vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) or the vehicle were administered i.p. 15 min before MO. Substance P (SP) concentration of the ear was assessed by radioimmunoassay. Maxadilan significantly diminished MO-induced neurogenic edema, increase of vascular permeability and vasodilation. These inhibitory effects of maxadilan may be partially due to the decreased substance P (SP) levels. In contrast, inhibitory effect of VIP on ear swelling was moderate, without any effect on MO-induced plasma leakage or SP release, however, activation of VPAC1/2R inhibited the increased microcirculation caused by the early arteriolar vasodilation. Neither the PAC1R, nor the VPAC1/2R agonist influenced the MO-evoked increase in tissue myeloperoxidase activity. These results clearly show that PAC1R activation inhibits acute neurogenic arterial vasodilation and plasma protein leakage from the venules, while VPAC1/2R stimulation is only involved in the attenuation of vasodilation.

  18. Arterial and venous vasodilator actions of RS-1893, a novel cardiotonic agent, in the hindlimb preparation of the dog.

    PubMed

    Miyake, S; Shiga, H; Koike, H

    1989-10-01

    RS-1893, an orally active cardiotonic agent, has been suggested to dilate venous blood vessels, because it markedly decreases central venous pressure in anesthetized dogs. In order to evaluate venous vasodilator action of the agent, we measured hindlimb volume (HLV) in anesthetized dogs using a plethysmographic technique. RS-1893 (1-10 micrograms/kg, i.v.) produced dose-dependent increases in HLV, femoral blood flow, and left ventricular (LV)dP/dt, and a decrease in central venous pressure (CVP). In another series of experiments, we autoperfused the hindlimb with a constant flow and injected the drugs intraarterially (i.a.) to separately evaluate arterial and venous vasodilator actions. In this preparation, a decrease in perfusion pressure and an increase in HLV were considered to reflect arterial vasodilatation and venous vasodilatation, respectively. RS-1893 (0.3-3 micrograms i.a.) produced a dose-dependent increase in HLV and a decrease in perfusion pressure. Comparison of doses which increased HLV by 0.3 ml revealed that RS-1893 was about 20 times more potent than milrinone. The arterial vasodilator action of RS-1893 was about 15 times more potent than that of milrinone. We conclude that RS-1893 is a potent venous and arterial vasodilator with cardiotonic activity.

  19. Vasodilators in Acute Heart Failure: Review of the Latest Studies

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Phillip D.; Laribi, Said; Mebazaa, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Vasodilators play an important role in the management of acute heart failure, particularly when increased afterload is the precipitating cause of decompensation. The time-honored approach to afterload reduction has been largely focused on use of intravenous nitrovasodilators and, when properly dosed, this class of agents does provide substantial symptom relief for patients with acute hypertensive heart failure. Despite this, nitrovasodilators have never been shown to diminish mortality or provide any post-discharge outcome benefit leading to an on-going search for viable and more effective alternatives. While no new vasodilators have been approved for use in acute heart failure since nesiritide more than a decade ago, a number of novel agents have been developed, with some showing significant promise in recent clinical trials. In this review, we summarize the latest study data as it relates to vasodilator therapy and provide a glimpse into the not too distant future state of acute heart failure care. PMID:24855585

  20. Disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shurong; Hersh, Andrew M; Naughton, Greg; Mullins, Kevin; Fung, Maxwell A; Sharon, Victoria R

    2013-11-15

    The dimorphic fungus Sporothrix schenckii commonly causes localized cutaneous disease with lymphocutaneous distribution. However, disseminated sporotrichosis occurs predominantly in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis in a patient with newly diagnosed HIV with a CD4 count of 208. The patient presented with multiple cutaneous and subcutaneous nodules as well as fever and malaise. Tissue culture and skin biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of sporotrichosis. He was started on itraconazole 200mg twice a day with rapid resolution of fever along with cessation of the development of new lesions.

  1. Cutaneous tuberculosis in children.

    PubMed

    Sethuraman, Gomathy; Ramesh, Venkatesh

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous tuberculosis is a rare form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis that accounts for 1% to 2% of cases. Childhood skin tuberculosis represents 18% to 82% of all cutaneous tuberculosis cases. Scrofuloderma and lupus vulgaris are the two most common clinical forms in children. An increase in the number of tuberculids, especially lichen scrofulosorum, has been observed in the last several years. Cutaneous tuberculosis in children can be severe and have a protracted course. Multiplicity of lesions and multifocal disseminated involvement in scrofuloderma and lupus vulgaris is common. Scrofuloderma progressing to gummatous lesions (scrofulous gumma) is mostly described in children. Morbidities and deformities are more severe in children.

  2. Spatial Analyses of the Relation between Rodent's Active Burrows and Incidence of Zoonotic Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Golestan Province, Northeastern of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Sofizadeh, Aioub; Vatandoost, Hassan; Rassi, Yavar; Hanafi-Bojd, Ahmad Ali; Rafizadeh, Sayena

    2016-01-01

    Background: Zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL) is one of the most important vector-borne diseases in Iran. Wild Rodents play as a reservoir. The main aim of this study was to determine spatial analyses of the relationship between rodent's active burrows and Incidence of ZCL in Golestan Province, north east of Iran. Methods: The cross-sectional study was conducted in 59 rural districts in Golestan Province. Spatial distribution of rodent's active burrows, human cases of ZCL and Incidence of disease were collected, using Geographical Information Systems (GIS). The relationship of them were analyzed by Sperman test, SPSS software version No.13. Results: The most number of rodents’ active burrows, human positive cases (100 persons) and high Incidence of disease (35/1000) were observed in Korand rural district of Gonbad-e Kavoos County. There was significant correlation between the number of rodents active burrows with Incidence rate of disease (0.470, P< 0.001) as well as the number of cases in each districts (0.465, P< 0.001), There is high correlation between higher Incidence rate and human positive cases in districts with number of rodents’ active burrows. Conclusion: Vicinity of wild rodents’ burrows to villages plays an important role in transmission of ZCL to humans. PMID:28032109

  3. Nocturnal lowering of thresholds for sweating and vasodilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenger, C. B.; Roberts, M. F.; Stolwijk, J. A. J.; Nadel, E. R.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of the time of day on the relation of the heat-dissipating responses (sweating and vasodilation) to esophageal and mean skin temperatures was investigated. These parameters were measured in six subjects exercised at 60-70% of maximal aerobic power in a 25 deg C ambient. Results indicate that a circadian rhythm in the thresholds for sweating and vasodilation can account for much of the rhythm of internal body temperature. The circadian rhythm in the operation of the thermoregulatory system seems to be expressed through a reference point shared by vasomotor and sudomotor controls.

  4. Mastocytosis, diffuse cutaneous (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This is a picture of diffuse, cutaneous mastocytosis. Abnormal collections of cells in the skin (mast cells) produce this rash. Unlike bullous mastocytosis, rubbing will not lead to formation of blisters ( ...

  5. Lipid emulsion inhibits vasodilation induced by a toxic dose of bupivacaine by suppressing bupivacaine-induced PKC and CPI-17 dephosphorylation but has no effect on vasodilation induced by a toxic dose of mepivacaine

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyunhoo; Ok, Seong Ho; Kwon, Seong Chun; Lee, Soo Hee; Baik, Jiseok; Kang, Sebin; Oh, Jiah

    2016-01-01

    Background The goal of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of lipid emulsion on vasodilation caused by toxic doses of bupivacaine and mepivacaine during contraction induced by a protein kinase C (PKC) activator, phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu), in an isolated endothelium-denuded rat aorta. Methods The effects of lipid emulsion on the dose-response curves induced by bupivacaine or mepivacaine in an isolated aorta precontracted with PDBu were assessed. In addition, the effects of bupivacaine on the increased intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) and contraction induced by PDBu were investigated using fura-2 loaded aortic strips. Further, the effects of bupivacaine, the PKC inhibitor GF109203X and lipid emulsion, alone or in combination, on PDBu-induced PKC and phosphorylation-dependent inhibitory protein of myosin phosphatase (CPI-17) phosphorylation in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) was examined by western blotting. Results Lipid emulsion attenuated the vasodilation induced by bupivacaine, whereas it had no effect on that induced by mepivacaine. Lipid emulsion had no effect on PDBu-induced contraction. The magnitude of bupivacaine-induced vasodilation was higher than that of the bupivacaine-induced decrease in [Ca2+]i. PDBu promoted PKC and CPI-17 phosphorylation in aortic VSMCs. Bupivacaine and GF109203X attenuated PDBu-induced PKC and CPI-17 phosphorylation, whereas lipid emulsion attenuated bupivacaine-mediated inhibition of PDBu-induced PKC and CPI-17 phosphorylation. Conclusions These results suggest that lipid emulsion attenuates the vasodilation induced by a toxic dose of bupivacaine via inhibition of bupivacaine-induced PKC and CPI-17 dephosphorylation. This lipid emulsion-mediated inhibition of vasodilation may be partly associated with the lipid solubility of local anesthetics. PMID:27738501

  6. Targeted therapies for cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Kee, Damien; McArthur, Grant

    2014-06-01

    Melanoma is resistant to cytotoxic therapy, and treatment options for advanced disease have been limited historically. However, improved understanding of melanoma driver mutations, particularly those involving the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, has led to the development of targeted therapies that are effective in this previously treatment-refractory disease. In cutaneous melanomas with BRAF V600 mutations the selective RAF inhibitors, vemurafenib and dabrafenib, and the MEK inhibitor, trametinib, have demonstrated survival benefits. Early signals of efficacy have also been demonstrated with MEK inhibitors in melanomas with NRAS mutations, and KIT inhibitors offer promise in melanomas driven through activation of their target receptor.

  7. Adenosine receptor antagonist and augmented vasodilation during hypoxic exercise.

    PubMed

    Casey, Darren P; Madery, Brandon D; Pike, Tasha L; Eisenach, John H; Dietz, Niki M; Joyner, Michael J; Wilkins, Brad W

    2009-10-01

    We tested the hypothesis that adenosine contributes to augmented skeletal muscle vasodilation during hypoxic exercise. In separate protocols, subjects performed incremental rhythmic forearm exercise (10% and 20% of maximum) during normoxia and normocapnic hypoxia (80% arterial O2 saturation). In protocol 1 (n = 8), subjects received an intra-arterial administration of saline (control) and aminophylline (adenosine receptor antagonist). In protocol 2 (n = 10), subjects received intra-arterial phentolamine (alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist) and combined phentolamine and aminophylline administration. Forearm vascular conductance (FVC; in ml x min(-1).100 mmHg(-1)) was calculated from forearm blood flow (in ml/min) and blood pressure (in mmHg). In protocol 1, the change in FVC (DeltaFVC; change from normoxic baseline) during hypoxic exercise with saline was 172 +/- 29 and 314 +/- 34 ml x min(-1) x 100 mmHg(-1) (10% and 20%, respectively). Aminophylline administration did not affect DeltaFVC during hypoxic exercise at 10% (190 +/- 29 ml x min(-1)x100 mmHg(-1), P = 0.4) or 20% (287 +/- 48 ml x min(-1) x 100 mmHg(-1), P = 0.3). In protocol 2, DeltaFVC due to hypoxic exercise with phentolamine infusion was 313 +/- 30 and 453 +/- 41 ml x min(-1) x 100 mmHg(-1) (10% and 20% respectively). DeltaFVC was similar at 10% (352 +/- 39 ml min(-1) x 100 mmHg(-1), P = 0.8) and 20% (528 +/- 45 ml x min(-1) x 100 mmHg(-1), P = 0.2) hypoxic exercise with combined phentolamine and aminophylline. In contrast, DeltaFVC to exogenous adenosine was reduced by aminophylline administration in both protocols (P < 0.05 for both). These observations suggest that adenosine receptor activation is not obligatory for the augmented hyperemia during hypoxic exercise in humans.

  8. Genotyping of cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Glitza, Isabella C; Davies, Michael A

    2014-09-01

    Until recently, treatment options for patients with metastatic melanoma were very limited. This landscape has evolved dramatically since the discovery of activating mutations in the BRAF gene in ~45% of cutaneous melanomas. Vemurafenib, dabrafenib, and trametinib have all received regulatory approval for the treatment of metastatic melanoma patients with a BRAF(V600) mutation. Based on the necessity to document the presence of a BRAF(V600) mutation to prescribe these agents, molecular testing is now the standard of care in this disease. However, the options and rationale for testing are evolving rapidly due to an improved understanding of the molecular drivers and heterogeneity of melanoma. Such testing may identify rational combinatorial approaches to prevent or overcome resistance for the approved BRAF inhibitors. In addition, new clinical strategies have been identified for a number of other molecular changes that are detected in this disease, including somatic changes in NRAS, PTEN, CDKN2A, and c-KIT, among others. This review summarizes the current understanding of the genetic landscape of mutations in melanoma, their associations with clinicopathological features, and their implications for clinical testing and treatment.

  9. The activity of sodium cromoglycate analogues in human lung in vitro: a comparison with rat passive cutaneous anaphylaxis and clinical efficacy.

    PubMed Central

    Church, M. K.; Gradidge, C. F.

    1980-01-01

    1 Eleven analogues of sodium cromoglycate have been tested for their ability to suppress histamine release induced by anti-IgE from passively sensitized human lung fragments in vitro. 2 With the exception of WY 16922, which released histamine at high concentrations, all inhibited histamine release in a linear dose-related manner. 3 The analogues were 30 to 1500 times more potent than sodium cromoglycate. However, their regression slopes of activity upon log-concentration were only one-third as steep as that for sodium cromoglycate, indicating a possible difference in their mechanism of action. 4 In comparison with sodium cromoglycate, the analogues were more potent in human lung than in rat passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA); there was no quantitative correlation between potencies in the two tests. 5 The human lung model is not predictive of anti-asthmatic activity in man as the six analogues tested clinically are less effective than sodium cromoglycate. 6 These results throw doubt on the use of models of mast cell degranulation in the search for anti-allergic drugs and, possibly, on the relative importance of mast cell degranulation in the pathogenesis of asthma. PMID:6159030

  10. Activation of κ Opioid Receptors in Cutaneous Nerve Endings by Conorphin-1, a Novel Subtype-Selective Conopeptide, Does Not Mediate Peripheral Analgesia.

    PubMed

    Deuis, Jennifer R; Whately, Ella; Brust, Andreas; Inserra, Marco C; Asvadi, Naghmeh H; Lewis, Richard J; Alewood, Paul F; Cabot, Peter J; Vetter, Irina

    2015-10-21

    Selective activation of peripheral κ opioid receptors (KORs) may overcome the dose-limiting adverse effects of conventional opioid analgesics. We recently developed a vicinal disulfide-stabilized class of peptides with subnanomolar potency at the KOR. The aim of this study was to assess the analgesic effects of one of these peptides, named conorphin-1, in comparison with the prototypical KOR-selective small molecule agonist U-50488, in several rodent pain models. Surprisingly, neither conorphin-1 nor U-50488 were analgesic when delivered peripherally by intraplantar injection at local concentrations expected to fully activate the KOR at cutaneous nerve endings. While U-50488 was analgesic when delivered at high local concentrations, this effect could not be reversed by coadministration with the selective KOR antagonist ML190 or the nonselective opioid antagonist naloxone. Instead, U-50488 likely mediated its peripheral analgesic effect through nonselective inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels, including peripheral sensory neuron isoforms NaV1.8 and NaV1.7. Our study suggests that targeting the KOR in peripheral sensory nerve endings innervating the skin is not an alternative analgesic approach.

  11. c-CBL E3 Ubiquitin Ligase is Over-Expressed in Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma: Its Inhibition Promotes Activation Induced Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianqiang; Salva, Katrin A.; Wood, Gary S.

    2014-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sezary syndrome (SS) are two major forms of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) characterized by resistance to apoptosis. A central pathway for T-cell apoptosis is activation-induced cell death (AICD) which is triggered through the T-cell receptor (TCR). This results in upregulation of FAS-ligand (FASL) and subsequent apoptosis through the FAS death receptor pathway. It has been known for more than a decade that TCR signaling is defective in CTCL; however, the underlying mechanism has not been apparent. In this report, we show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase, c-CBL, is over-expressed in CTCL and that its knockdown overcomes defective TCR signaling resulting in phosphorylation of PLCg1, calcium influx, ROS generation, up-regulation of FASL and extrinsic pathway apoptosis in CTCL cells expressing adequate FAS. In CTCL cells with suboptimal FAS expression, FAS can be upregulated epigenetically by derepression of the FAS promoter using methotrexate (MTX) which we showed previously has activity as a DNA methylation inhibitor. Using these combined strategies, FAS-low as well as FAS-high CTCL cells can be killed effectively. PMID:25140833

  12. Fisetin inhibits UVB-induced cutaneous inflammation and activation of PI3K/AKT/NFκB signaling pathways in SKH-1 hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Pal, Harish Chandra; Athar, Mohammad; Elmets, Craig A; Afaq, Farrukh

    2015-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation has been shown to induce inflammation, DNA damage, p53 mutations and alterations in signaling pathways eventually leading to skin cancer. In this study, we investigated whether fisetin reduces inflammatory responses and modulates PI3K/AKT/NFκB cell survival signaling pathways in UVB-exposed SKH-1 hairless mouse skin. Mice were exposed to 180 mJ cm(-2) of UVB radiation on alternate days for a total of seven exposures, and fisetin (250 and 500 nmol) was applied topically after 15 min of each UVB exposure. Fisetin treatment to UVB-exposed mice resulted in decreased hyperplasia and reduced infiltration of inflammatory cells. Fisetin treatment also reduced inflammatory mediators such as COX-2, PGE2 as well as its receptors (EP1-EP4) and MPO activity. Furthermore, fisetin reduced the level of inflammatory cytokines TNFα, IL-1β and IL-6 in UVB-exposed skin. Fisetin treatment also reduced cell proliferation markers as well as DNA damage as evidenced by increased expression of p53 and p21 proteins. Further studies revealed that fisetin inhibited UVB-induced expression of PI3K, phosphorylation of AKT and activation of the NFκB signaling pathway in mouse skin. Overall, these data suggest that fisetin may be useful against UVB-induced cutaneous inflammation and DNA damage.

  13. Chronic oxidative-nitrosative stress impairs coronary vasodilation in metabolic syndrome model rats.

    PubMed

    Kagota, Satomi; Maruyama, Kana; Tada, Yukari; Fukushima, Kazuhito; Umetani, Keiji; Wakuda, Hirokazu; Shinozuka, Kazumasa

    2013-07-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a combination of clinical disorders that together increase the risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. SHRSP.Z-Lepr(fa)/IzmDmcr (SHRSP.ZF) rats with MetS show impaired nitric oxide-mediated relaxation in coronary and mesenteric arteries, and angiotensin II receptor type 1 blockers protect against dysfunction and oxidative-nitrosative stress independently of metabolic effects. We hypothesize that superoxide contributes to functional deterioration in SHRSP.ZF rats. To test our hypothesis, we studied effects of treatment with tempol, a membrane-permeable radical scavenger, on impaired vasodilation in SHRSP.ZF rats. Tempol did not alter body weight, high blood pressure, or metabolic abnormalities, but prevented impairment of acetylcholine-induced and nitroprusside-induced vasodilation in the coronary and mesenteric arteries. Furthermore, tempol reduced the levels of serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) and 3-nitrotyrosine content in mesenteric arteries. Systemic administration of tempol elevated the expression of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) above basal levels in mesenteric arteries of SHRSP.ZF rats. However, acute treatment with tempol or ebselen, a peroxynitrite scavenger, did not ameliorate impaired relaxation of isolated mesenteric arteries. No nitration of tyrosine residues in sGC was observed; however, sGC mRNA expression levels in the arteries of SHRSP.ZF rats were lower than those in the arteries of Wistar-Kyoto rats. Levels of Thr(496)- and Ser(1177)-phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were lower in arteries of SHRSP.ZF rats, and acetylcholine decreased Thr(496)-phosphorylated eNOS levels. These results indicated that prolonged superoxide production, leading to oxidative-nitrosative stress, was associated with impaired vasodilation in SHRSP.ZF rats with MetS. Down-regulated sGC expression may be linked to dysfunction, while reduced NO bioavailability/eNOS activity and modified s

  14. Hypoxia-induced vasodilation and effects of regional phentolamine in awake patients with sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Moradkhan, Raman; Spitnale, Brett; McQuillan, Patrick; Hogeman, Cynthia; Gray, Kristen S; Leuenberger, Urs A

    2010-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with increased sympathetic nerve activity, endothelial dysfunction, and premature cardiovascular disease. To determine whether hypoxia is associated with impaired skeletal muscle vasodilation, we compared femoral artery blood flow (ultrasound) and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (peroneal microneurography) during exposure to acute systemic hypoxia (fraction of inspired oxygen 0.1) in awake patients with OSA (n=10) and controls (n=8). To assess the role of elevated sympathetic nerve activity, in a separate group of patients with OSA (n=10) and controls (n=10) we measured brachial artery blood flow during hypoxia before and after regional alpha-adrenergic block with phentolamine. Despite elevated sympathetic activity, in OSA the vascular responses to hypoxia in the leg did not differ significantly from those in controls [P=not significant (NS)]. Following regional phentolamine, in both groups the hypoxia-induced increase in brachial blood flow was markedly enhanced (OSA pre vs. post, 84+/-13 vs. 201+/-34 ml/min, P<0.002; controls pre vs. post 62+/-8 vs. 140+/-26 ml/min, P<0.01). At end hypoxia after phentolamine, the increase of brachial blood flow above baseline was similar (OSA vs. controls +61+/-16 vs. +48+/-6%; P=NS). We conclude that despite high sympathetic vasoconstrictor tone and prominent sympathetic responses to acute hypoxia, hypoxia-induced limb vasodilation is preserved in OSA.

  15. Nitric oxide and Kir6.1 potassium channel mediate isoquercitrin-induced endothelium-dependent and independent vasodilation in the mesenteric arterial bed of rats.

    PubMed

    Gasparotto Junior, Arquimedes; Dos Reis Piornedo, Renê; Assreuy, Jamil; Da Silva-Santos, José Eduardo

    2016-10-05

    The vascular effect of flavonoid isoquercitrin was investigated in the perfused mesenteric vascular bed of rats. In preparations with functional endothelium isoquercitrin (100, 300 and 1000nmol) dose-dependently reduced the perfusion pressure by 13±2.2, 33±3.9, and 58±3.7mm Hg, respectively. Endothelium removal or inhibition of the nitric oxide synthase enzymes by l-NAME did not change the effects of 100 and 300 nmol isoquercitrin, but reduced by 30-40% the vasodilation induced by 1000 nmol isoquercitrin. Perfusion with nutritive solution containing 40mM KCl abolished the vasodilatory effect of all isoquercitrin doses. Treatment with glibenclamide, a Kir6.1 (ATP-sensitive) potassium channel blocker, inhibited vasodilation induced by 100 and 300 nmol isoquercitrin, but only partially reduced the effect of 1000 nmol isoquercitrin. The non-selective KCa (calcium-activated) potassium channel blocker tetraethylammonium, but not the selective KCa1.1 channel blocker iberiotoxin, reduced by around 60% vasodilation induced by all isoquercitrin doses. In addition, association of tetraethylammonium and glibenclamide, or l-NAME and glibenclamide, fully inhibited isoquercitrin-induced vasodilation. Our study shows that isoquercitrin induces vasodilation in resistance arteries, an effect mediated by K(+) channel opening and endothelial nitric oxide production.

  16. Short-term hypoxic vasodilation in vivo is mediated by bioactive nitric oxide metabolites, rather than free nitric oxide derived from haemoglobin-mediated nitrite reduction.

    PubMed

    Umbrello, Michele; Dyson, Alex; Pinto, Bernardo Bollen; Fernandez, Bernadette O; Simon, Verena; Feelisch, Martin; Singer, Mervyn

    2014-03-01

    Local increases in blood flow--'hypoxic vasodilation'--confer cellular protection in the face of reduced oxygen delivery. The physiological relevance of this response is well established, yet ongoing controversy surrounds its underlying mechanisms. We sought to confirm that early hypoxic vasodilation is a nitric oxide (NO)-mediated phenomenon and to study putative pathways for increased levels of NO, namely production from NO synthases, intravascular nitrite reduction, release from preformed stores and reduced deactivation by cytochrome c oxidase. Experiments were performed on spontaneously breathing, anaesthetized, male Wistar rats undergoing short-term systemic hypoxaemia, who received pharmacological inhibitors and activators of the various NO pathways. Arterial blood pressure, cardiac output, tissue oxygen tension and the circulating pool of NO metabolites (oxidation, nitrosation and nitrosylation products) were measured in plasma and erythrocytes. Hypoxaemia caused a rapid and sustained vasodilation, which was only partially reversed by non-selective NO synthase inhibition. This was associated with significantly lower plasma nitrite, and marginally elevated nitrate levels, suggestive of nitrite bioinactivation. Administration of sodium nitrite had little effect in normoxia, but produced significant vasodilation and increased nitrosylation during hypoxaemia that could not be reversed by NO scavenging. Methodological issues prevented assessment of the contribution, if any, of reduced deactivation of NO by cytochrome c oxidase. In conclusion, acute hypoxic vasodilation is an adaptive NO-mediated response conferred through bioactive metabolites rather than free NO from haemoglobin-mediated reduction of nitrite.

  17. Cutaneous photosensitivity in dermatomyositis.

    PubMed

    Cheong, W K; Hughes, G R; Norris, P G; Hawk, J L

    1994-08-01

    The incidence and nature of cutaneous photosensitivity were studied in 10 patients suffering from dermatomyositis. Five reported an abnormality, which consisted of photoaggravation of preexisting cutaneous lesions in three, and abnormal transient erythemal responses in two. Monochromatic irradiation testing of all 10 patients demonstrated reduced minimal erythemal doses in two, at 307.5 nm, and at 340 and 360 nm, respectively; only the latter individual had clinical light sensitivity. Exposure to low-dose, solar-simulated radiation of the unaffected skin of the former patient, and five others who agreed to the procedure, three of whom complained of light sensitivity, induced a lesion with the clinical and immunofluorescence characteristics of dermatomyositis in only the first one. Four other patients replied to a mailed questionnaire, and three of these reported aggravation of their rash and provocation of new lesions by sunlight. Photosensitivity may thus be an important cutaneous feature of dermatomyositis.

  18. Update on Cutaneous Calciphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Wollina, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    Calciphylaxis is a devastating disorder with a mortality rate of 80% due to sepsis and organ failure. Hallmarks of this rare disease are arteriolar media calcification, thrombotic cutaneous ischemia, and necrotic ulcerations. Different mechanisms of vascular calcification can lead to calciphylaxis. Early diagnosis by deep cutaneous ulcer biopsy is most important for prognosis. Here, dermatologists play a significant role although treatment usually needs an interdisciplinary approach. Surgical procedures had been the cornerstone of treatment in the past including parathyroidectomy, but recently new medical treatments emerged aiming to normalize disturbances of minerals to reduce the serum concentration of sodium phosphate and to prevent precipitation and calcification. Multimodal therapy is warranted but only aggressive surgical debridement of cutaneous ulcers has shown significant outcome improvement. PMID:23716795

  19. Overexpression of Glucocorticoid-induced Leucine Zipper (GILZ) increases susceptibility to Imiquimod-induced psoriasis and involves cutaneous activation of TGF-β1

    PubMed Central

    Carceller, Elena; Ballegeer, Marlies; Deckers, Julie; Riccardi, Carlo; Bruscoli, Stefano; Hochepied, Tino; Libert, Claude; Pérez, Paloma

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris is a chronic inflammatory skin disease affecting millions of people. Its pathophysiology is complex and involves a skin compartment with epidermal and immune cells which produce cytokines, e.g. belonging to the IL-23–Th17-cell axis. Glucocorticoids (GCs) are the most common therapeutics used in cutaneous inflammatory disorders and GC-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) has emerged as a mediator of GCs due to its anti-inflammatory actions, theoretically lacking GC side-effects. We evaluated whether GILZ may provide a better therapeutic index in comparison to GCs during the onset and progression of psoriasis by generating and characterizing a mouse model with generalized overexpression of this protein (GILZ-Tg mice) and the imiquimod (IMQ) psoriasis model. Unexpectedly, in GILZ-Tg mice, the severity of IMQ-induced psoriasis-like skin lesions as well as induction of cytokines commonly up-regulated in human psoriasis (Il-17, Il-22, Il-23, Il-6, S100a8/a9, and Stat3) was significantly more pronounced relative to GILZ-Wt mice. The increased susceptibility to IMQ-induced psoriasis of GILZ-Tg mice was significantly associated with skin-specific over-activation of TGF-β1-mediated signaling via SMAD2/3. Our findings demonstrate that GILZ may behave as pro-inflammatory protein in certain tissues and that, similar to prolonged GC therapy, GILZ as an alternative treatment for psoriasis may also have adverse effects. PMID:27934944

  20. Exosomes derived from platelet-rich plasma promote the re-epithelization of chronic cutaneous wounds via activation of YAP in a diabetic rat model

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shang-Chun; Tao, Shi-Cong; Yin, Wen-Jing; Qi, Xin; Yuan, Ting; Zhang, Chang-Qing

    2017-01-01

    Chronic wounds have become an economic, social, and public health burden and need advanced treatment. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been used extensively in treatment of chronic wounds because it contains an abundance of growth factors secreted by platelets. The exosomes derived from PRP (PRP-Exos) have been proven to encapsulate principal growth factors from platelets. This study is the first to show that these exosomes may exert the function of PRP. PRP-Exos can effectively induce proliferation and migration of endothelial cells and fibroblasts to improve angiogenesis and re-epithelialization in chronic wounds. We regulated YAP to verify the PRP-Exos-dependent effect on fibroblast proliferation and migration through YAP activation. In vivo, we observed the cutaneous healing process in chronic wounds treated with PRP-Exos in a diabetic rat model. We provide evidence of the probable molecular mechanisms underlying the PRP effect on healing of chronic ulcers and describe a promising resource of growth factors from exosomes without species restriction. PMID:28042318

  1. Somatostatin inhibits activation of dorsal cutaneous primary afferents induced by antidromic stimulation of primary afferents from an adjacent thoracic segment in the rat.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuan; Yao, Fan-Rong; Cao, Dong-Yuan; Pickar, Joel G; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Hui-Sheng; Zhao, Yan

    2008-09-10

    To investigate the effect of somatostatin on the cross-excitation between adjacent primary afferent terminals in the rats, we recorded single unit activity from distal cut ends of dorsal cutaneous branches of the T10 and T12 spinal nerves in response to antidromic stimulation of the distal cut end of the T11 dorsal root in the presence and absence of somatostatin and its receptor antagonist applied to the receptive field of the recorded nerve. Afferent fibers were classified based upon their conduction velocity. Mean mechanical thresholds decreased and spontaneous discharge rates increased significantly in C and Adelta but not Abeta fibers of the T10 and T12 spinal nerves in both male and female rats following antidromic electrical stimulation (ADES) of the dorsal root from adjacent spinal segment (DRASS) indicating cross-excitation of thin fiber afferents. The cross-excitation was not significantly different between male and female rats. Microinjection of somatostatin into the receptive field of recorded units inhibited the cross-excitation. This inhibitory effect, in turn, was reversed by the somatostation receptor antagonist cyclo-somatostatin (c-SOM). Application of c-SOM alone followed by ADES of DRASS significantly decreased the mechanical thresholds and increased the discharge rates of C and Adelta fibers, indicating that endogenous release of somatostatin plays a tonic inhibitory role on the cross-excitation between peripheral nerves. These results suggest that somatostatin could inhibit the cross-excitation involved in peripheral hyperalgesia and have a peripheral analgesic effect.

  2. Transpulmonary flux of S-nitrosothiols and pulmonary vasodilation during nitric oxide inhalation: role of transport.

    PubMed

    Torok, Jordan A; Brahmajothi, Mulugu V; Zhu, Hongmei; Tinch, Brian T; Auten, Richard L; McMahon, Timothy J

    2012-07-01

    Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) is used to treat pulmonary hypertension and is being investigated for prevention of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in neonates. Extrapulmonary effects of iNO are widely recognized, but the underlying chemistry and pharmacology are poorly understood. Growing evidence suggests that, in addition to acting via diffusion, NO can be converted into nitrosants capable of reacting with endogenous L-cysteine (L-Cys) in the alveolar lining fluid, forming S-nitrosothiol (SNO)-L-cysteine (CSNO). CSNO can then enter cells via the type L amino acid transporter (LAT). To determine the influence of LAT and supplemental L-Cys on the functional activity of iNO and transpulmonary movement of SNOs or other related species, we exposed C57Bl6 mice to nebulized L-Cys or D-cysteine (D-Cys) and/or LAT competitors. Isolated lungs were then perfused with physiologic buffer while effluent was collected to assay perfusate SNOs. Nebulized L-Cys, but not D-Cys, augmented the iNO-induced increase in circulating SNOs in the effluent without altering iNO-induced pulmonary vasodilation. Addition to the perfusate of either L-leucine (L-Leu) or 2-amino-2-norborane carboxylic acid, two distinct LAT competitors, inhibited appearance in the perfusate of SNOs in L-Cys-exposed lungs; a higher concentration of L-Leu significantly inhibited the iNO-induced pulmonary vasodilation as well as SNO accumulation. We conclude that iNO-induced pulmonary vasodilation and the transpulmonary movement of iNO-derived SNOs are mediated in part by formation of extracellular CSNO, uptake by alveolar epithelial LAT, and/or export by LAT from the pulmonary endothelium into the circulation. Therapies that exploit and optimize LAT-dependent SNO transport might improve the efficacy of and clinical outcomes with NO-based therapy by improving systemic SNO delivery.

  3. Nevus lipomatosus cutaneous superficialis*

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Gustavo de Sá Menezes; Cavalcanti, Silvana Maria de Morais; Herênio, Alzinira Souza; Teixeira, Márcia Almeida Galvão; de Alencar, Eliane Ruth Barbosa; Gonçalves, Sergio Paulo Mendes

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of nevus lipomatosus cutaneous superficialis of Hoffman-Zurhelle (NCLS), with multiple lesions, in a ten-year-old child. The NLCS is considered rare. The classical clinical presentation is characterized by multiple skin-colored or yellowish papules and nodules, which can have a linear distribution. Histologically, it is characterized by the presence of mature ectopic adipocytes in the dermis. The main therapeutic option is surgical excision. The classical Nevus lipomatosus cutaneous superficialis is reported in this case. PMID:28300914

  4. The cutaneous porphyrias.

    PubMed

    Schulenburg-Brand, Danja; Katugampola, Ruwani; Anstey, Alexander V; Badminton, Michael N

    2014-07-01

    The porphyrias are a group of mainly inherited disorders of heme biosynthesis where accumulation of porphyrins and/or porphyrin precursors gives rise to 2 types of clinical presentation: cutaneous photosensitivity and/or acute neurovisceral attacks. The cutaneous porphyrias present with either bullous skin fragility or nonbullous acute photosensitivity. This review discusses the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, laboratory diagnosis, complications, and current approach to porphyria management. Although focusing mainly on their dermatological aspects, the article also covers the management of acute porphyria, which by virtue of its association with variegate porphyria and hereditary coproporphyria, may become the responsibility of the clinical dermatologist.

  5. Contribution of nitric oxide to cutaneous microvascular dilation in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sokolnicki, Lynn A; Roberts, Shelly K; Wilkins, Bradley W; Basu, Ananda; Charkoudian, Nisha

    2007-01-01

    Microvascular pathophysiology associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) contributes to several aspects of the morbidity associated with the disease. We quantified the contribution of nitric oxide (NO) to the cutaneous vasodilator response to nonpainful local warming in subjects with T2DM (average duration of diabetes mellitus 7 +/- 1 yr) and in age-matched control subjects. We measured skin blood flow in conjunction with intradermal microdialysis of N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME; NO synthase inhibitor) or vehicle during 35 min of local warming to 42 degrees C. Microdialysis of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was used for assessment of maximum cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC). Resting CVC was higher in T2DM subjects at vehicle sites (T2DM: 19 +/- 2 vs. control: 11 +/- 3%maxCVC; P < 0.05); this difference was abolished by l-NAME (T2DM: 10 +/- 1 vs. control: 8 +/- 1%maxCVC; P > 0.05). The relative contribution of NO to the vasodilator response to local warming was not different between groups (T2DM: 46 +/- 4 vs. control: 44 +/- 6%maxCVC; P > 0.05). However, absolute CVC during local warming was approximately 25% lower in T2DM subjects (T2DM: 1.79 +/- 0.15 AU/mmHg; controls: 2.42 +/- 0.20 AU/mmHg; P < 0.01), and absolute CVC during SNP was approximately 20% lower (T2DM: 1.91 +/- 0.12 vs. control: 2.38 +/- 0.13 AU/mmHg; P < 0.01). We conclude that the relative contribution of NO to vasodilation during local warming is similar between subjects with T2DM and control subjects, although T2DM was associated with a lower absolute maximum vasodilation.

  6. Current approach to cutaneous mastocytosis in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Tamay, Zeynep; Özçeker, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    Mastocytosis is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by clonal proliferation and accumulation of mast cells in one of more organs which may lead to different clinical pictures. Pathological increase and activation of mast cells in various tissues can cause different clinical pictures. Cutaneous mastocytosis limited to the skin is the most typical clinical picture observed in children and systemic mastocytosis is very rare in the pediatric age group. The diagnosis of cutaneous mastocytosis is based on clinical findings, but is often delayed due to lack of clinical awareness of the disease and lack of its consideration in the differential diagnosis. This article focuses on the current diagnosis, management and treatment of cutaneous mastocytosis in children in order to increase awareness about this issue. PMID:27738395

  7. Important cutaneous manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Trost, L; McDonnell, J

    2005-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has many extraintestinal manifestations. Cutaneous manifestations are usually related to the activity of the bowel disease but may have an independent course. Anyone presenting with IBD should be examined for cutaneous manifestations. Pyoderma gangrenosum is a severe painful ulcerating disease that requires moist wound management and, in the absence of secondary infection, systemic corticosteroids, cyclosporine, or both. Infliximab may also be used. Erythema nodosum is a common cause of tender red nodules of the shins. Management includes leg elevation, NSAIDs, and potassium iodide. Oral manifestations of IBD include aphthous stomatitis, mucosal nodularity (cobblestoning), and pyostomatitis vegetans. Treatment should be directed both at the cutaneous lesions and at the underlying systemic condition. PMID:16143688

  8. Vasodilator factors in the systemic and local adaptations to pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Valdes, Gloria; Kaufmann, Peter; Corthorn, Jenny; Erices, Rafaela; Brosnihan, K Bridget; Joyner-Grantham, JaNae

    2009-01-01

    We postulate that an orchestrated network composed of various vasodilatory systems participates in the systemic and local hemodynamic adaptations in pregnancy. The temporal patterns of increase in the circulating and urinary levels of five vasodilator factors/systems, prostacyclin, nitric oxide, kallikrein, angiotensin-(1–7) and VEGF, in normal pregnant women and animals, as well as the changes observed in preeclamptic pregnancies support their functional role in maintaining normotension by opposing the vasoconstrictor systems. In addition, the expression of these vasodilators in the different trophoblastic subtypes in various species supports their role in the transformation of the uterine arteries. Moreover, their expression in the fetal endothelium and in the syncytiotrophoblast in humans, rats and guinea-pigs, favour their participation in maintaining the uteroplacental circulation. The findings that sustain the functional associations of the various vasodilators, and their participation by endocrine, paracrine and autocrine regulation of the systemic and local vasoactive changes of pregnancy are abundant and compelling. However, further elucidation of the role of the various players is hampered by methodological problems. Among these difficulties is the complexity of the interactions between the different factors, the likelihood that experimental alterations induced in one system may be compensated by the other players of the network, and the possibility that data obtained by manipulating single factors in vitro or in animal studies may be difficult to translate to the human. In addition, the impossibility of sampling the uteroplacental interface along normal pregnancy precludes obtaining longitudinal profiles of the various players. Nevertheless, the possibility of improving maternal blood pressure regulation, trophoblast invasion and uteroplacental flow by enhancing vasodilation (e.g. L-arginine, NO donors, VEGF transfection) deserves unravelling the

  9. Peripheral Vasodilation Responses to Prevent Local Cold Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    Arteritis • Raynaud Syndrome • Vasospastic disorders • Anaemia • Sickle cell disease • Diabetes • Shock • Vasoconstrictors Another...SUBTITLE Peripheral Vasodilation Responses to Prevent Local Cold Injuries 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ...5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) Thermal and Mountain Medicine Division

  10. Cell Permeable Peptide Conjugated Nanoerythrosomes of Fasudil Prolong Pulmonary Arterial Vasodilation in PAH Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nilesh; Patel, Brijeshkumar; Nahar, Kamrun; Ahsan, Fakhrul

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that a cell permeable peptide, CARSKNKDC (CAR), conjugated nanoerythrosomes (NERs) containing fasudil, a rho-kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, produces prolonged pulmonary preferential vasodilation. CAR conjugated NERs containing fasudil were prepared by hypotonic lysis and extrusion method, optimized for various physicochemical properties in-vitro. The formulations were then used to study the hemodynamic efficacy in a monocrotaline-induced rodent model of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). CAR-NERs-Fasudil was spherical in shape with an average vesicle size and entrapment efficiency of 161.3±1.37nm and 48.81±1.96%, respectively. Formulations were stable for ~3 weeks when stored at 4°C and the drug was released in a controlled fashion for >48 hrs. The uptake of CAR-NERs-Fasudil by TGF-β activated pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell was ~1.5 fold greater than the uptake of NERs-Fasudil. CAR-NERs-Fasudil inhibited ROCK activity and 5-hydroxytryptamine induced cell proliferation. In terms of reduction of pulmonary arterial pressure, intratracheal administration of CAR-NERs-Fasudil was ~2-fold more specific to the lungs compared with plain fasudil. Overall, CAR peptide grafted nanoerythrosomes offers a new platform for improving the therapeutic efficacy of a rho-kinase inhibitor, fasudil, without affecting peripheral vasodilation. PMID:25460151

  11. Activity levels of 137Cs and 40K in the skin and the cutaneous organs of a cow.

    PubMed

    Pichl, Elke; Rabitsch, Herbert

    2003-08-01

    We have performed an extensive study to determine the activity distributions of radiocesium (137Cs) and of the radioisotope 40K of potassium in the whole body of a cow. ICRP assumes that cesium and potassium are distributed homogeneously throughout the whole body of an organism. The current investigation measured concentrations of 137Cs and 40K in components of the skin, horns, and hooves of a cow. Activity levels of 137Cs were caused by the long-term ingestion following the Chernobyl fallout, whereas the naturally occurring potassium (40K) is an essential part of cow's normal diet. The cow was born at the time of the fallout following the Chernobyl accident and had ingested heavily contaminated forage during its entire lifetime. Activities of 137Cs and 40K were determined simultaneously by gamma spectrometry. All activities are related to the day of slaughter and include also corrections for self attenuation of photons caused by the different densities of the samples. Radionuclide concentrations in samples were corrected for moisture losses incurred during freezing and sample preparation. Surface contamination on the skin was estimated by rinsing it in heated water followed by removal of the epidermis and hair. In comparison with the activities of the components of the skin we observed a considerable amount of external contamination on the surface of the skin. But with respect to whole body countings of the animal this amount of external contamination appears to be negligible. It was found that activity ratios of 137Cs to 40K are greater than 1 in all measured components. The average activity concentrations of 137Cs and 40K in the common integument are 23.3 Bq kg(-1) and 13.3 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The highest activity concentrations of 137Cs and 40K were measured in clean hair and hypodermis. Despite being its largest organ, the cow's skin contains probably less than 1% of the animal's whole body 137Cs activity.

  12. The Cutaneous Rabbit Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flach, Rudiger; Haggard, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    In the cutaneous rabbit effect (CRE), a tactile event (so-called attractee tap) is mislocalized toward an adjacent attractor tap. The effect depends on the time interval between the taps. The authors delivered sequences of taps to the forearm and asked participants to report the location of one of the taps. The authors replicated the original CRE…

  13. [Cutaneous manifestations of sarcoidosis].

    PubMed

    Amschler, K; Seitz, C S

    2017-03-17

    Skin manifestations of sarcoidosis occur in up to 30% of cases. This review summarizes and illustrates in detail the differences between specific and unspecific skin manifestations of sarcoidosis. Important differential diagnoses, such as tuberculosis, cutaneous lymphoma and syphilis have to be excluded. The indications for systemic treatment are primarily determined by the extent of organ involvement and also by the cosmetic impairment.

  14. Cutaneous Infections in Wrestlers

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Eugene K.; deWeber, Kevin; Berry, James W.; Wilckens, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Cutaneous infections are common in wrestlers. Although many are simply a nuisance in the everyday population, they can be problematic to wrestlers because such infections may result in disqualification from practice or competition. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are therefore important. Evidence Acquisition: Medline and PubMed databases, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and UpToDate were searched through 2012 with the following keywords in various combinations: skin infections, cutaneous infections, wrestlers, athletes, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, skin and soft tissue infections, tinea corporis, tinea capitis, herpes simplex, varicella zoster, molluscum contagiosum, verruca vulgaris, warts, scabies, and pediculosis. Relevant articles found in the primary search, and selected references from those articles were reviewed for pertinent clinical information. Results: The most commonly reported cutaneous infections in wrestlers are herpes simplex virus infections (herpes gladiatorum), bacterial skin and soft tissue infections, and dermatophyte infections (tinea gladiatorum). The clinical appearance of these infections can be different in wrestlers than in the community at large. Conclusion: For most cutaneous infections, diagnosis and management options in wrestlers are similar to those in the community at large. With atypical presentations, testing methods are recommended to confirm the diagnosis of herpes gladiatorum and tinea gladiatorum. There is evidence to support the use of prophylactic medications to prevent recurrence of herpes simplex virus and reduce the incidence of dermatophyte infections in wrestlers. PMID:24427413

  15. [Cutaneous surgery workshop].

    PubMed

    Purim, Kátia Sheylla Malta

    2010-08-01

    The training of physician request knowledge, skills and attitudes for the effective exercise of professional practice. The training of basic surgical techniques, used in outpatient procedures, will prepare students to work in different scenarios. This work presents a proposal for teaching through workshops for cutaneous surgery in an experimental model.

  16. Constitutive activation of B-Raf in the mouse germ line provides a model for human cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Urosevic, Jelena; Sauzeau, Vincent; Soto-Montenegro, María L.; Reig, Santiago; Desco, Manuel; Wright, Emma M. Burkitt; Cañamero, Marta; Mulero, Francisca; Ortega, Sagrario; Bustelo, Xosé R.; Barbacid, Mariano

    2011-01-01

    RASopathies are a class of developmental syndromes that result from congenital mutations in key elements of the RAS/RAF/MEK signaling pathway. A well-recognized RASopathy is the cardio-facio-cutaneous (CFC) syndrome characterized by a distinctive facial appearance, heart defects, and mental retardation. Clinically diagnosed CFC patients carry germ-line mutations in four different genes, B-RAF, MEK1, MEK2, and K-RAS. B-RAF is by far the most commonly mutated locus, displaying mutations that most often result in constitutive activation of the B-RAF kinase. Here, we describe a mouse model for CFC generated by germ-line expression of a B-RafLSLV600E allele. This targeted allele allows low levels of expression of B-RafV600E, a constitutively active B-Raf kinase first identified in human melanoma. B-Raf+/LSLV600E mice are viable and display several of the characteristic features observed in CFC patients, including reduced life span, small size, facial dysmorphism, cardiomegaly, and epileptic seizures. These mice also show up-regulation of specific catecholamines and cataracts, two features detected in a low percentage of CFC patients. In addition, B-Raf+/LSLV600E mice develop neuroendocrine tumors, a pathology not observed in CFC patients. These mice may provide a means of better understanding the pathophysiology of at least some of the clinical features present in CFC patients. Moreover, they may serve as a tool to evaluate the potential therapeutic efficacy of B-RAF inhibitors and establish the precise window at which they could be effective against this congenital syndrome. PMID:21383153

  17. Impact of nitric-oxide-mediated vasodilation and oxidative stress on renal medullary oxygenation: a modeling study

    PubMed Central

    Fry, Brendan C.; Edwards, Aurélie

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of nitric oxide (NO)-mediated vasodilation in preventing medullary hypoxia, as well as the likely pathways by which superoxide (O2−) conversely enhances medullary hypoxia. To do so, we expanded a previously developed mathematical model of solute transport in the renal medulla that accounts for the reciprocal interactions among oxygen (O2), NO, and O2− to include the vasoactive effects of NO on medullary descending vasa recta. The model represents the radial organization of the vessels and tubules, centered around vascular bundles in the outer medulla and collecting ducts in the inner medulla. Model simulations suggest that NO helps to prevent medullary hypoxia both by inducing vasodilation of the descending vasa recta (thus increasing O2 supply) and by reducing the active sodium transport rate (thus reducing O2 consumption). That is, the vasodilative properties of NO significantly contribute to maintaining sufficient medullary oxygenation. The model further predicts that a reduction in tubular transport efficiency (i.e., the ratio of active sodium transport per O2 consumption) is the main factor by which increased O2− levels lead to hypoxia, whereas hyperfiltration is not a likely pathway to medullary hypoxia due to oxidative stress. Finally, our results suggest that further increasing the radial separation between vessels and tubules would reduce the diffusion of NO towards descending vasa recta in the inner medulla, thereby diminishing its vasoactive effects therein and reducing O2 delivery to the papillary tip. PMID:26831340

  18. 2-methoxyestradiol induces vasodilation by stimulating NO release via PPARγ/PI3K/Akt pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiyu; Cui, Yuhong; Zheng, Shuhui; Huang, Jinghe; Li, Ping; Simoncini, Tommaso; Zhang, Yongfu; Fu, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    The endogenous estradiol metabolite 2-methoxyestradiol (2-ME) reduces atherosclerotic lesion formation, while the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. In this work, we investigated the vasodilatory effect of 2-ME and the role of nitric oxide (NO) involved. In vivo studies using noninvasive tail-cuff methods showed that 2-ME decreased blood pressure in Sprague Dawley rats. Furthermore, in vitro studies showed that cumulative addition of 2-ME to the aorta caused a dose- and endothelium-dependent vasodilation. This effect was unaffected by the pretreatment with the pure estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780, but was largely impaired by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) or by phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor wortmannin (WM). Moreover, 2-ME(10-7 ∼10-5 M)enhanced phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS and promoted NO release from cultured human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVECs). These effects were blocked by PI3K inhibitor WM, or by the transfection with Akt specific siRNA, indicating that endothelial Akt/eNOS/NO cascade plays a crucial role in 2-ME-induced vasodilation. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) mRNA and protein expression were detected in HUVECs and the antagonist GW9662 or the transfection with specific PPARγ siRNA inhibited 2-ME-induced eNOS and Akt phosphorylation, leading to the impairment of NO production and vasodilation. In conclusion, 2-ME induces vasodilation by stimulating NO release. These actions may be mediated by PPARγ and the subsequent activation of Akt/eNOS cascade in vascular endothelial cells.

  19. Synthesis of some novel organic nitrates and comparative in vitro study of their vasodilator profile.

    PubMed

    Chegaev, Konstantin; Lazzarato, Loretta; Marcarino, Paolo; Di Stilo, Antonella; Fruttero, Roberta; Vanthuyne, Nicolas; Roussel, Christian; Gasco, Alberto

    2009-07-09

    Synthesis and structural characterization of the 4-phenylbutane-1,2-diyl dinitrate and of the erythro and threo diastereoisomers of 4-phenylbutane-1,2,3-triyl trinitrate as well as the HPLC chiral separation of the corresponding racemic mixtures are reported. Vasodilator activity of the single enantiomers of these products, of 4-phenylbutyl nitrate, and of the previously described phenylpropyl analogues were assessed on rat aorta strips precontracted with phenylephrine. The compounds were able to relax the contracted tissue in a concentration dependent manner. In the couples of antipodes, a complete lack of enantioselectivity was observed as far as the vasodilator potency is concerned. The concentration response curves of the products, with the exception of those of all the trinitrooxy substituted models, were rightward shifted in the presence of ALDH-2 inhibitors. Mono and dinitrates, but not trinitrates, displayed in vitro cross-tolerance with GTN. This new series of nitric acid esters is an interesting tool that can help to shed light on the unresolved puzzle of nitrate pharmacology. Selected members are worthy of additional study as potential drugs.

  20. Blood pressure lowering, vasodilator and cardiac-modulatory potential of Carum roxburghianum seed extract.

    PubMed

    Khan, Munasib; Khan, Arif-ullah; Najeeb-ur-Rehman; Gilani, Anwarul-Hassan

    2015-01-01

    In current study, we describe blood pressure (BP)-lowering, endothelium-dependent, and independent vasodilator and cardio-modulatory actions of Carum roxburghianum seed. The crude extract of C. roxburghianum seed (Cr.Cr) induced dose-dependent (10-100 mg/kg) fall in arterial BP of anaesthetized rats. In isolated rabbit aorta, Cr.Cr (0.3-10 mg/mL) inhibited high K+ (80 mM) and phenylephrine (PE, 1 µM)-induced contractions, like verapamil and papaverine. In endothelium-intact rat aortic preparations, Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride-sensitive vasodilator activity was observed with Cr.Cr, which also relaxed endothelium-denuded aorta tissues. In guinea-pig atria, Cr.Cr initially caused mild cardiac stimulation, followed by inhibition, as shown by papaverine. These results reveal that cardiovascular effects of C. roxburghianum seed extract are mediated possibly through combination of Ca++ antagonist, nitric oxide modulating and phosphodiesterase inhibitory mechanisms, though further in-depth studies are required for elucidating precise mode of action.

  1. Differential Effect of Amylin on Endothelial-Dependent Vasodilation in Mesenteric Arteries from Control and Insulin Resistant Rats

    PubMed Central

    El Assar, Mariam; Angulo, Javier; Santos-Ruiz, Marta; Moreno, Paola; Novials, Anna; Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, María Luisa; Rodríguez-Mañas, Leocadio

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is frequently associated with endothelial dysfunction and has been proposed to play a major role in cardiovascular disease (CVD). On the other hand, amylin has long been related to IR. However the role of amylin in the vascular dysfunction associated to IR is not well addressed. Therefore, the aim of the study was to assess the effect of acute treatment with amylin on endothelium-dependent vasodilation of isolated mesenteric arteries from control (CR) and insulin resistant (IRR) rats and to evaluate the possible mechanisms involved. Five week-old male Wistar rats received 20% D-fructose dissolved in drinking water for 8 weeks and were compared with age-matched CR. Plasmatic levels of glucose, insulin and amylin were measured. Mesenteric microvessels were dissected and mounted in wire myographs to evaluate endothelium-dependent vasodilation to acetylcholine. IRR displayed a significant increase in plasmatic levels of glucose, insulin and amylin and reduced endothelium-dependent relaxation when compared to CR. Acute treatment of mesenteric arteries with r-amylin (40 pM) deteriorated endothelium-dependent responses in CR. Amylin-induced reduction of endothelial responses was unaffected by the H2O2 scavenger, catalase, but was prevented by the extracellular superoxide scavenger, superoxide dismutase (SOD) or the NADPH oxidase inhibitor (VAS2870). By opposite, amylin failed to further inhibit the impaired relaxation in mesenteric arteries of IRR. SOD, or VAS2870, but not catalase, ameliorated the impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxation in IRR. At concentrations present in insulin resistance conditions, amylin impairs endothelium-dependent vasodilation in mircrovessels from rats with preserved vascular function and low levels of endogenous amylin. In IRR with established endothelial dysfunction and elevated levels of amylin, additional exposure to this peptide has no effect on endothelial vasodilation. Increased superoxide generation

  2. Cutaneous Melanoma in Asians

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Yub

    2016-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is a rare disease in Asians but potentially the most aggressive form of skin cancer worldwide. It can occur in any melanocyte-containing anatomic site. Four main cutaneous melanoma subtypes are recognized: lentigo maligna melanoma, superficial spreading melanoma, acral lentiginous melanoma (ALM), and nodular melanoma. Generally, excessive exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation increases the risk of melanoma. The exception is ALM, which is the most common melanoma subtype in Asians and is not associated with UV radiation. ALM presents as dark brownish to black, irregular maculopatches, nodules, or ulcers on the palms, soles, and nails. The lesions may be misdiagnosed as more benign lesions, such as warts, ulcers, hematomas, foreign bodies, or fungal infections, especially in amelanotic acral melanomas where black pigments are absent. The aim of this brief review is to improve understanding and the rate of early detection thereby reducing mortality, especially regarding cutaneous melanoma in Asians. PMID:27689028

  3. Update on cutaneous tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Maria Fernanda Reis Gavazzoni; Bernardes Filho, Fred; Quaresma, Maria Victória; do Nascimento, Leninha Valério; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Azulay, David Rubem

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis continues to draw special attention from health care professionals and society in general. Cutaneous tuberculosis is an infection caused by M. tuberculosis complex, M. bovis and bacillus Calmette-Guérin. Depending on individual immunity, environmental factors and the type of inoculum, it may present varied clinical and evolutionary aspects. Patients with HIV and those using immunobiological drugs are more prone to infection, which is a great concern in centers where the disease is considered endemic. This paper aims to review the current situation of cutaneous tuberculosis in light of this new scenario, highlighting the emergence of new and more specific methods of diagnosis, and the molecular and cellular mechanisms that regulate the parasite-host interaction. PMID:25387498

  4. Benign cutaneous Degos' disease.

    PubMed

    Ojeda Cuchillero, R M; Sánchez Regaña, M; Umbert Millet, P

    2003-03-01

    Malignant atrophic papulosis is a rare systemic vaso-occlusive disorder characterized by thrombosis of vessels of the dermis, gastrointestinal tract, central nervous system and, occasionally, other organs. Cutaneous lesions consist of erythematous, dome-shaped papules that develop a central area of necrosis to leave a porcelain-like scar. The most accepted theory of pathogenesis is based on endothelial cell damage. There is no effective treatment of the disease. We describe a 26-year-old man with Degos' disease, a diagnosis based on the clinical and histologic pattern of skin lesions. The good response to antiplatelet therapy and the absence of systemic involvement over 8 years' follow-up is noteworthy. We believe that this case represents the benign form of the disease, typically referred to as benign cutaneous Degos' disease.

  5. Assessment of the effect of vasodilators on the distribution of cardiac output by whole-body Thallium imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Juni, J.E.; Wallis, J.; Diltz, E.; Nicholas, J.; Lahti, D.; Pitt, B.

    1985-05-01

    Vasodilator therapy (tx) of congestive heart failure (CHF) has been shown to be effective in increasing cardiac output (CO) and lowering vascular resistance. Unfortunately, these hemodynamic effects are not usually accompanied by improved peripheral circulation of exercise capacity. To assess the effect of a new vasodilator, Cl-914, on the redistribution of CO to the peripheral circulation, the authors performed testing whole-body thallium scanning (WB-Th) on 6 patients (pts) with severe CHF. Immediately following i.v. injection of 1.5 mCi Th-201, WB scanning was performed from anterior and posterior views. Regions of interest were defined for the peripheral (P) muscles (legs and arms), central torso (C), and splanchnic bed (S). The geometric mean of activity in these regions was calculated from both views. Each pt was studied before tx and again, after 1 week on tx. Invasive measurements revealed that all pts had significant improvements in resting cardiac output (mean increase 49%) and vascular resistance (mean decrease 30%). Unlike other vasodilators, all CI-914 pts had a significant improvement in treadmill exercise capacity (mean increase 54%). WB-Th revealed a significant shift in CO to the peripheral circulation with P:C increased 33.2% (rho= .001) and P:S increased 29% (rho=.01). Vasoactive drugs may significantly alter the relative distribution of cardiac output. WB-Th scanning provides a simple quantitative means of following such changes.

  6. Chemotherapy of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    bacterial emerging diseases. 43rd Annual Commonwealth Caribbean Medical Research Council Meeting. Ocho Rios, Jamaica, April, 1998. Palmer, C.J., J...1 Award Number: W81XWH-10-2-0196 TITLE: CHEMOTHERAPY OF CUTANEOUS LEISHMANIASIS PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: DR. ARBA AGER CONTRACTING ...Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law , no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a

  7. Ultrastructural patterns of secretory activity in poison cutaneous glands of larval and juvenile Dendrobates auratus (Amphibia, Anura).

    PubMed

    Angel, R; Delfino, G; Parra, G J

    2003-01-01

    A transmission electron-microscope study has been performed on larval and juvenile skin of the Central American arrow-frog Dendrobates auratus to investigate early secretory processes and maturational changes in the serous (poison) glands. Poison biosynthesis involves the endoplasmic reticulum (both smooth and rough types), as well as Golgi stacks which release early serous product as secretory vesicles (or pre-granules). These vesicles contain fine-grained material, along with single electron-opaque bodies, spheroidal in shape, that accompany the grained product throughout its post-Gogian, maturational change. The first steps of this process involve condensation and lead to the formation of secretory granules with a glomerular-like substructure, resulting from a thick, random aggregation of rods (secretory granule subunits). Advanced maturational activity causes the loss of peculiar granule substructure: the dense bodies split into fragments, whereas the thick glomerular arrangement becomes looser, until the secretory product changes into a dispersed material. This ultrastructural study revealed biosynthesis and maturation processes in close sequence, suggesting the poison of D. auratus contains proteins and/or peptides as well as lipophilic compounds. Molecules of both these classes are known to perform several roles relevant to survival strategies in extant anurans. Furthermore, the ephemeral granules with a glomerular-like substructure detected in tadpoles and froglets exhibit the complex patterns of mature poisons in adult specimens of other anurans: Hylidae and related families. This agrees with current trends in the taxonomy of these advanced frogs and underlines the pertinence of an ontogenetic approach in investigating anuran phylogenesis.

  8. Early experiences of vasodilators and hypotensive anesthesia in children.

    PubMed

    Brown, T C K

    2012-07-01

    The physiological application of OHMS LAW explains the basis of hypotensive anesthesia. V = IR translates into: Pressure = Flow × Resistance or Blood pressure = Cardiac Output × Peripheral Resistance. If peripheral resistance is reduced by a vasodilator such as sodium nitroprusside (a short acting, vascular smooth muscle relaxant) or phenoxybenzamine (a long acting α adrenoreceptor antagonist), blood pressure will fall and vasoconstriction and bleeding will be reduced. A less desirable alternative to lowering blood pressure could be to reduce cardiac output by suppressing myocardial contractility using a ß(1) adrenoceptor antagonist or an inhalational agent such as isoflurane.

  9. Topical anaesthesia does not affect cutaneous vasomotor or sudomotor responses in human skin.

    PubMed

    Metzler-Wilson, K; Wilson, T E

    2013-10-01

    (1) The effects of local sensory blockade (topical anaesthesia) on eccrine sweat glands and cutaneous circulation are not well understood. This study aimed to determine whether topical lidocaine/prilocaine alters eccrine sweat gland and cutaneous blood vessel responses. (2) Sweating (capacitance hygrometry) was induced via forearm intradermal microdialysis of five acetylcholine (ACh) doses (1 × 10(-4) to 1 × 10(0) m, 10-fold increments) in control and treated forearm sites in six healthy subjects. Nitric oxide-mediated vasodilatory (sodium nitroprusside) and adrenergic vasoconstrictor (noradrenaline) agonists were iontophoresed in lidocaine/prilocaine-treated and control forearm skin in nine healthy subjects during blood flow assessment (laser Doppler flowmetry, expressed as% from baseline cutaneous vascular conductance; CVC; flux/mean arterial pressure). (3) Non-linear regression curve fitting identified no change in the ED50 of ACh-induced sweating after sensory blockade (-1.42 ± 0.23 logM) compared to control (-1.27 ± 0.23 logM; P > .05) or in Emax (0.43 ± 0.08 with, 0.53 ± 0.16 mg cm(-2) min(-1) without lidocaine/prilocaine; P > .05). Sensory blockade did not alter the vasodilator response to sodium nitroprusside (1280 ± 548% change from baseline CVC with, 1204 ± 247% without lidocaine/prilocaine) or vasoconstrictor response to noradrenaline (-14 ± 4% change from baseline CVC with, -22 ± 14% without lidocaine/prilocaine; P > 0.05). (4) Cutaneous sensory blockade does not appear to alter nitric oxide-mediated vasodilation, adrenergic vasoconstriction, or cholinergic eccrine sweating dose-response sensitivity or responsiveness to maximal dose. Thus, lidocaine/prilocaine treatment should not affect sweat gland function or have blood flow implications for subsequent research protocols or clinical procedures.

  10. Cutaneous manifestations of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Antoinette R

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer may present with cutaneous symptoms. The skin manifestations of breast cancer are varied. Some of the more common clinical presentations of metastatic cutaneous lesions from breast cancer will be described. Paraneoplastic cutaneous dermatoses have been reported as markers of breast malignancy and include erythema gyratum repens, acquired ichthyosis, dermatomyositis, multicentric reticulohistiocytosis, and hypertrichosis lanuginosa acquisita. Mammary Paget's disease, often associated with an underlying breast cancer, and Cowden syndrome, which has an increased risk of breast malignancy, each have specific dermatologic findings. Recognition of these distinct cutaneous signs is important in the investigation of either newly diagnosed or recurrent breast cancer.

  11. [Hepatic porphyrias with cutaneous symptoms].

    PubMed

    Timonen, Kaisa; Nuutinen, Pauliina; Raili, Kauppinen

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic porphyrias with cutaneous symptoms Cutaneous symptoms of porphyrias are initiated from a phototoxic reaction caused by sunlight and circulating porphyrins in the vascular walls of the skin. This leads in fragility, blistering and scarring of the skin on light-exposed areas. There are approximately 200 patients having hepatic porphyrias with cutaneous symptoms in Finland. Cutaneous symptoms of variegate porphyria and porphyria cutanea tarda are indistinguishable, but an effective treatment is available only for the latter. Differential diagnosis is important due to acute episodes occurring in variegate porphyria.

  12. Cyclooxygenase-derived vasoconstriction restrains hypoxia-mediated cerebral vasodilation in young adults with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Harrell, John W; Schrage, William G

    2014-01-15

    Poor cerebrovascular function in metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) likely contributes to elevated risk of cerebrovascular disease in this growing clinical population. Younger MetSyn adults without clinical evidence of cerebrovascular disease exhibit preserved hypercapnic vasodilation yet markedly impaired hypoxic vasodilation, but the mechanisms behind reduced hypoxic vasodilation are unknown. Based on data from rats, we tested the hypothesis that younger adults with MetSyn exhibit reduced cerebral hypoxic vasodilation due to loss of vasodilating prostaglandins. Middle cerebral artery velocity (MCAv) was measured with transcranial Doppler ultrasound in adults with MetSyn (n = 13, 33 ± 3 yr) and healthy controls (n = 15, 31 ± 2 yr). Isocapnic hypoxia was induced by titrating inspired oxygen to lower arterial saturation to 90% and 80% for 5 min each. Separately, hypercapnia was induced by increasing end-tidal CO2 10 mmHg above baseline levels. Cyclooxygenase inhibition (100 mg indomethacin) was conducted in a randomized double-blind, placebo controlled design. MCAv was normalized for group differences in blood pressure (healthy: 89 ± 2 mmHg vs. MetSyn: 102 ± 2 mmHg) as cerebrovascular conductance index (CVCi), and used to assess cerebral vasodilation. Hypoxia increased CVCi in both groups; however, vasodilation was ∼55% lower in MetSyn at SpO2 = 80% (P < 0.05). Indomethacin tended to decrease hypoxic vasodilation in healthy controls, and unexpectedly increased dilation in MetSyn (P < 0.05). In contrast to hypoxia, hypercapnia-mediated vasodilation was similar between groups, as was the decrease in vasodilation with indomethacin. These data indicate increased production of vasoconstrictor prostaglandins restrains hypoxic cerebral vasodilation in MetSyn, preventing them from responding appropriately to this important physiological stressor.

  13. Experimental comparison of bone revascularization by musculocutaneous and cutaneous flaps

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, J.; Wood, M.B.

    1987-01-01

    Revascularization, one of the major components of bone healing, was examined in an experimental model. The radioactive microsphere technique demonstrated that after 4 weeks beneath a musculocutaneous flap, isolated bone segments had significant blood flow, whereas bone beneath a cutaneous flap did not. The muscle flap bone had a blood flow approximately half that of normal control bone. The muscle of the musculocutaneous flap had a blood flow three times that of the skin of the cutaneous flap. The bipedicle cutaneous flap used was designed to have a healthy blood supply, and at 4 weeks it had a blood flow twice that of control skin. Despite this, there was essentially no demonstrable blood flow in the cutaneous flap bone segments at 4 weeks. Only 3 of 17 bone segments underneath cutaneous flaps showed medullary vascularization, whereas 10 of 11 muscle flap bones did. All bone segments underneath muscle flaps showed osteoblasts and osteoclasts at 4 weeks; neither were seen in the cutaneous bone segments. The process of revascularization occurred through an intact cortex and penetrated into the cancellous bone. Because the bone segments were surrounded by an impervious barrier except for one cortical surface, the cellular activity seen is attributed to revascularization by the overlying flap. In this model, a muscle flap was superior to a cutaneous flap in revascularizing isolated bone segments at 4 weeks. This was documented by blood flow measured by the radioactive microsphere technique and by bone histology.

  14. Augmented supraorbital skin sympathetic nerve activity responses to symptom trigger events in rosacea patients

    PubMed Central

    Metzler-Wilson, Kristen; Toma, Kumika; Sammons, Dawn L.; Mann, Sarah; Jurovcik, Andrew J.; Demidova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Facial flushing in rosacea is often induced by trigger events. However, trigger causation mechanisms are currently unclear. This study tested the central hypothesis that rosacea causes sympathetic and axon reflex-mediated alterations resulting in trigger-induced symptomatology. Twenty rosacea patients and age/sex-matched controls participated in one or a combination of symptom triggering stressors. In protocol 1, forehead skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA; supraorbital microneurography) was measured during sympathoexcitatory mental (2-min serial subtraction of novel numbers) and physical (2-min isometric handgrip) stress. In protocol 2, forehead skin blood flow (laser-Doppler flowmetry) and transepithelial water loss/sweat rate (capacitance hygrometry) were measured during sympathoexcitatory heat stress (whole body heating by perfusing 50°C water through a tube-lined suit). In protocol 3, cheek, forehead, forearm, and palm skin blood flow were measured during nonpainful local heating to induce axon reflex vasodilation. Heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were recorded via finger photoplethysmography to calculate cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; flux·100/MAP). Higher patient transepithelial water loss was observed (rosacea 0.20 ± 0.02 vs. control 0.10 ± 0.01 mg·cm−2·min−1, P < 0.05). HR and MAP changes were not different between groups during sympathoexcitatory stressors or local heating. SSNA during early mental (32 ± 9 and 9 ± 4% increase) and physical (25 ± 4 and 5 ± 1% increase, rosacea and controls, respectively) stress was augmented in rosacea (both P < 0.05). Heat stress induced more rapid sweating and cutaneous vasodilation onset in rosacea compared with controls. No axon reflex vasodilation differences were observed between groups. These data indicate that rosacea affects SSNA and that hyperresponsiveness to trigger events appears to have a sympathetic component. PMID:26133800

  15. Augmented supraorbital skin sympathetic nerve activity responses to symptom trigger events in rosacea patients.

    PubMed

    Metzler-Wilson, Kristen; Toma, Kumika; Sammons, Dawn L; Mann, Sarah; Jurovcik, Andrew J; Demidova, Olga; Wilson, Thad E

    2015-09-01

    Facial flushing in rosacea is often induced by trigger events. However, trigger causation mechanisms are currently unclear. This study tested the central hypothesis that rosacea causes sympathetic and axon reflex-mediated alterations resulting in trigger-induced symptomatology. Twenty rosacea patients and age/sex-matched controls participated in one or a combination of symptom triggering stressors. In protocol 1, forehead skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA; supraorbital microneurography) was measured during sympathoexcitatory mental (2-min serial subtraction of novel numbers) and physical (2-min isometric handgrip) stress. In protocol 2, forehead skin blood flow (laser-Doppler flowmetry) and transepithelial water loss/sweat rate (capacitance hygrometry) were measured during sympathoexcitatory heat stress (whole body heating by perfusing 50°C water through a tube-lined suit). In protocol 3, cheek, forehead, forearm, and palm skin blood flow were measured during nonpainful local heating to induce axon reflex vasodilation. Heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were recorded via finger photoplethysmography to calculate cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; flux·100/MAP). Higher patient transepithelial water loss was observed (rosacea 0.20 ± 0.02 vs. control 0.10 ± 0.01 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1), P < 0.05). HR and MAP changes were not different between groups during sympathoexcitatory stressors or local heating. SSNA during early mental (32 ± 9 and 9 ± 4% increase) and physical (25 ± 4 and 5 ± 1% increase, rosacea and controls, respectively) stress was augmented in rosacea (both P < 0.05). Heat stress induced more rapid sweating and cutaneous vasodilation onset in rosacea compared with controls. No axon reflex vasodilation differences were observed between groups. These data indicate that rosacea affects SSNA and that hyperresponsiveness to trigger events appears to have a sympathetic component.

  16. Canine gastric mucosal vasodilation with prostaglandins and histamine analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, J.G.; Nies, A.S.

    1982-10-01

    The effect of direct intragastric artery infusion of prostaglandins E2 and I2, arachidonic acid, dimaprit (histamine H2 agonist), and 2',2'-pyridylethylamine (histamine H1 agonist) on gastric mucosal blood flow was examined in dogs to elucidate the relationship between gastric secretory state and mucosal blood flow in dogs. These compounds were chosen because of their diverse effect on gastric acid secretion. Gastric fundus blood flow was measured both electromagnetically with a flow probe around the left gastric artery which supplies the fundus almost exclusively, and by the radioactive microsphere technique. Intraarterial infusion of all the compounds resulted in gastric mucosal vasodilation even though PGE2, PGI2, and arachidonic acid inhibit gastric acid secretion, dimaprit stimulated gastric acid secretion, and 2',2'-pyridylethylamine does not affect gastric acid secretion. There was total agreement in the blood flow measurements by the two different techniques. Our data suggest that gastric acid secretion and gastric vasodilation are independently regulated. In addition, the validity of the studies in which the aminopyrine clearance indicates that prostaglandins are mucosal vasoconstrictors needs to be questioned because of the reliance of those measurements on the secretory state of the stomach.

  17. Clinical characteristics of cutaneous lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Szczęch, Justyna; Rutka, Maja; Samotij, Dominik; Zalewska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Lupus erythematosus (LE) shows a wide variety of clinical manifestations, skin involvement being one of the most important. Aim To analyze the clinical presentation of cutaneous variants of lupus erythematosus in terms of skin lesion spectrum and extracutaneous involvement. Material and methods A total of 64 patients with cutaneous LE (CLE) were included. The study was based on the “Core Set Questionnaire” developed by the European Society of Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus (EUSCLE). Clinical severity of skin lesions was evaluated with the Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus Disease Area and Severity Index (CLASI). All results were subjected to statistical analysis. Results Fifteen (23.4%) patients had an acute CLE (ACLE), 26 (40.6%) subacute CLE (SCLE) and 21 (32.8%) chronic CLE (CCLE). Two (3.2%) individuals only demonstrated urticarial vasculitis as a cutaneous manifestation of LE and these patients were excluded. Patients with ACLE were characterized by the earliest onset of the disease (mean age of 31.9 ±15.0 years; p < 0.001). On average, 4.8 ±1.8 criteria of systemic LE were found in the ACLE group compared to 2.7 ±1.3 criteria in SCLE and 2.5 ±1.5 criteria in CCLE (p < 0.001). The highest activity of skin lesions according to CLASI was found in the SCLE group (p = 0.002). On the other hand, the most severe skin damage was observed in CCLE (p < 0.01). Conclusions Each variant of CLE differs significantly from the others in respect of various aspects of clinical manifestations. Due to a number of different variants of LE skin lesions, a unified classification of CLE still remains a challenge. PMID:26985173

  18. Management of cutaneous erythrasma.

    PubMed

    Holdiness, Mack R

    2002-01-01

    Corynebacterium minutissimum is the bacteria that leads to cutaneous eruptions of erythrasma and is the most common cause of interdigital foot infections. It is found mostly in occluded intertriginous areas such as the axillae, inframammary areas, interspaces of the toes, intergluteal and crural folds, and is more common in individuals with diabetes mellitus than other clinical patients. This organism can be isolated from a cutaneous site along with a concurrent dermatophyte or Candida albicans infection. The differential diagnosis of erythrasma includes psoriasis, dermatophytosis, candidiasis and intertrigo, and methods for differentiating include Wood's light examination and bacterial and mycological cultures. Erythromycin 250mg four times daily for 14 days is the treatment of choice and other antibacterials include tetracycline and chloramphenicol; however, the use of chloramphenicol is limited by bone marrow suppression potentially leading to neutropenia, agranulocytosis and aplastic anaemia. Further studies are needed but clarithromycin may be an additional drug for use in the future. Where there is therapeutic failure or intertriginous involvement, topical solutions such as clindamycin, Whitfield's ointment, sodium fusidate ointment and antibacterial soaps may be required for both treatment and prophylaxis. Limited studies on the efficacy of these medications exist, however, systemic erythromycin demonstrates cure rates as high as 100%. Compared with tetracyclines, systemic erythromycin has greater efficacy in patients with involvement of the axillae and groin, and similar efficacy for interdigital infections. Whitfield's ointment has equal efficacy to systemic erythromycin in the axillae and groin, but shows greater efficacy in the interdigital areas and is comparable with 2% sodium fusidate ointment for treatment of all areas. Adverse drug effects and potential drug interactions need to be considered. No cost-effectiveness data are available but there are

  19. [Cutaneous adverse drug reactions].

    PubMed

    Lebrun-Vignes, B; Valeyrie-Allanore, L

    2015-04-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR) represent a heterogeneous field including various clinical patterns without specific features suggesting drug causality. Exanthematous eruptions, urticaria and vasculitis are the most common forms of CADR. Fixed eruption is uncommon in western countries. Serious reactions (fatal outcome, sequelae) represent 2% of CADR: bullous reactions (Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis), DRESS (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome) and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP). These forms must be quickly diagnosed to guide their management. The main risk factors are immunosuppression, autoimmunity and some HLA alleles in bullous reactions and DRESS. Most systemic drugs may induce cutaneous adverse reactions, especially antibiotics, anticonvulsivants, antineoplastic drugs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, allopurinol and contrast media. Pathogenesis includes immediate or delayed immunologic mechanism, usually not related to dose, and pharmacologic/toxic mechanism, commonly dose-dependent or time-dependent. In case of immunologic mechanism, allergologic exploration is possible to clarify drug causality, with a variable sensitivity according to the drug and to the CADR type. It includes epicutaneous patch testing, prick test and intradermal test. However, no in vivo or in vitro test can confirm the drug causality. To determine the cause of the eruption, a logical approach based on clinical characteristics, chronologic factors and elimination of differential diagnosis is required, completed with a literature search. A reporting to pharmacovigilance network is essential in case of a serious CADR whatever the suspected drug and in any case if the involved drug is a newly marketed one or unusually related to cutaneous reactions.

  20. Cutaneous mucormycosis postcosmetic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Al-Tarrah, Khaled; Abdelaty, Mahmoud; Behbahani, Ahmad; Mokaddas, Eman; Soliman, Helmy; Albader, Ahdi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Mucormycosis is a rare, aggressive, and life-threatening infection that is caused by organisms belonging to the order Mucorales. It is usually acquired through direct means and virtually always affects immunocompromised patients with the port of entry reflecting the site of infection, in this case, cutaneous. Unlike other mucormycoses, patients affected by Apophysomyces elegans (A elegans) are known to be immunocompetent. This locally aggressive disease penetrates through different tissue plains invading adjacent muscles, fascia, and even bone causing extensive morbidity and may prove fatal if treated inadequately. Cutaneous mucormycosis is associated with disruption of cutaneous barriers such as trauma. However, rarely, it may be iatrogenic. No cases have been previously reported postcosmetic surgery, especially one that is so commonly performed, lipofilling. Case Report: The patient is a, previously healthy, 41-year-old middle-eastern female who was admitted to the plastic surgery department 17 days after undergoing cosmetic surgery. She suffered from extensive tissue inflammation and necrosis in both gluteal regions. Following admission, she was initially started on empirical antimicrobial therapy which was changed to an antifungal agent, voriconazole, when preliminary microbiological results showed filamentous fungi. This was discontinued and liposomal amphotericin B was commenced when further mycological analysis identified A elegans. Furthermore, she underwent a total of 10 sessions of extensive debridement to the extent that portions of the sacrum and left femoral head became exposed. Her clinical status and wounds improved with the appropriate management and she remained an inpatient for 62 days. Subsequently, she had defects in both gluteal regions which required reconstructive surgery. Conclusion: A elegans is an uncommon cause of iatrogenic cutaneous mucormycosis. A high index of clinical suspicion is required, especially in the

  1. Cutaneous Manifestations of ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Antonia J.; Leslie, Kieron S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary A broad range of skin diseases occurs in patients with ESRD: from the benign and asymptomatic to the physically disabling and life-threatening. Many of them negatively impact on quality of life. Their early recognition and treatment are essential in reducing morbidity and mortality. The cutaneous manifestations can be divided into two main categories: nonspecific and specific. The nonspecific manifestations are commonly seen and include skin color changes, xerosis, half-and-half nails, and pruritus. The specific disorders include acquired perforating dermatosis, bullous dermatoses, metastatic calcification, and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. This review article describes these conditions and considers the underlying pathophysiology, clinical presentations, diagnosis, and treatment options. PMID:24115194

  2. A Lipid Emulsion Reverses Toxic-Dose Bupivacaine-Induced Vasodilation during Tyrosine Phosphorylation-Evoked Contraction in Isolated Rat Aortae

    PubMed Central

    Ok, Seong-Ho; Lee, Soo Hee; Kwon, Seong-Chun; Choi, Mun Hwan; Shin, Il-Woo; Kang, Sebin; Park, Miyeong; Hong, Jeong-Min; Sohn, Ju-Tae

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this in vitro study was to examine the effect of a lipid emulsion on toxic-dose bupivacaine-induced vasodilation in a model of tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor sodium orthovanadate-induced contraction in endothelium-denuded rat aortae and to elucidate the associated cellular mechanism. The effect of a lipid emulsion on vasodilation induced by a toxic dose of a local anesthetic during sodium orthovanadate-induced contraction was examined. In addition, the effects of various inhibitors, either bupivacaine alone or a lipid emulsion plus bupivacaine, on protein kinase phosphorylation induced by sodium orthovanadate in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells was examined. A lipid emulsion reversed the vasodilation induced by bupivacaine during sodium orthovanadate-induced contraction. The lipid emulsion attenuated the bupivacaine-mediated inhibition of the sodium orthovanadate-induced phosphorylation of protein tyrosine, c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT1), phospholipase C (PLC) γ-1 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). These results suggest that a lipid emulsion reverses toxic-dose bupivacaine-induced vasodilation during sodium orthovanadate-induced contraction via the activation of a pathway involving either tyrosine kinase, JNK, Rho-kinase and MYPT1 or tyrosine kinase, PLC γ-1 and ERK, and this reversal is associated with the lipid solubility of the local anesthetic and the induction of calcium sensitization. PMID:28208809

  3. Cutavirus in Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Fridholm, Helena; Vinner, Lasse; Kjartansdóttir, Kristín Rós; Friis-Nielsen, Jens; Asplund, Maria; Herrera, Jose A.R.; Steiniche, Torben; Mourier, Tobias; Brunak, Søren; Willerslev, Eske; Izarzugaza, Jose M.G.; Hansen, Anders J.; Nielsen, Lars P.

    2017-01-01

    A novel human protoparvovirus related to human bufavirus and preliminarily named cutavirus has been discovered. We detected cutavirus in a sample of cutaneous malignant melanoma by using viral enrichment and high-throughput sequencing. The role of cutaviruses in cutaneous cancers remains to be investigated. PMID:28098541

  4. Skeletal muscle beta-receptors and isoproterenol-stimulated vasodilation in canine heart failure

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, M.J.; Lanoce, V.; Molinoff, P.B.; Wilson, J.R. )

    1989-11-01

    To investigate whether heart failure alters beta-adrenergic receptors on skeletal muscle and its associated vasculature, the density of beta-adrenergic receptors, isoproterenol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity, and coupling of the guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein were compared in 18 control dogs and 16 dogs with heart failure induced by 5-8 wk of ventricular pacing at 260 beats/min. Hindlimb vascular responses to isoproterenol were compared in eight controls and eight of the dogs with heart failure. In dogs with heart failure, the density of beta-receptors on skeletal muscle was reduced in both gastrocnemius (control: 50 +/- 5; heart failure: 33 +/- 8 fmol/mg of protein) and semitendinosus muscle (control: 43 +/- 9; heart failure: 27 +/- 9 fmol/mg of protein, both P less than 0.05). Receptor coupling to the ternary complex, as determined by isoproterenol competition curves with and without guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP), was unchanged. Isoproterenol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was significantly decreased in semitendinosus muscle (control: 52.4 +/- 4.6; heart failure: 36.5 +/- 9.5 pmol.mg-1.min-1; P less than 0.05) and tended to be decreased in gastrocnemius muscle (control: 40.1 +/- 8.5; heart failure: 33.5 +/- 4.5 pmol.mg-1.min-1; P = NS). Isoproterenol-induced hindlimb vasodilation was not significantly different in controls and in dogs with heart failure. These findings suggest that heart failure causes downregulation of skeletal muscle beta-adrenergic receptors, probably due to receptor exposure to elevated catecholamine levels, but does not reduce beta-receptor-mediated vasodilation in muscle.

  5. Adverse cutaneous drug reaction.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Surajit; Acharjya, Basanti

    2008-01-01

    In everyday clinical practice, almost all physicians come across many instances of suspected adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDR) in different forms. Although such cutaneous reactions are common, comprehensive information regarding their incidence, severity and ultimate health effects are often not available as many cases go unreported. It is also a fact that in the present world, almost everyday a new drug enters market; therefore, a chance of a new drug reaction manifesting somewhere in some form in any corner of world is unknown or unreported. Although many a times, presentation is too trivial and benign, the early identification of the condition and identifying the culprit drug and omit it at earliest holds the keystone in management and prevention of a more severe drug rash. Therefore, not only the dermatologists, but all practicing physicians should be familiar with these conditions to diagnose them early and to be prepared to handle them adequately. However, we all know it is most challenging and practically difficult when patient is on multiple medicines because of myriad clinical symptoms, poorly understood multiple mechanisms of drug-host interaction, relative paucity of laboratory testing that is available for any definitive and confirmatory drug-specific testing. Therefore, in practice, the diagnosis of ACDR is purely based on clinical judgment. In this discussion, we will be primarily focusing on pathomechanism and approach to reach a diagnosis, which is the vital pillar to manage any case of ACDR.

  6. Reflex inhibition of cutaneous and muscle vasoconstrictor neurons during stimulation of cutaneous and muscle nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Kirillova-Woytke, Irina; Baron, Ralf; Jänig, Wilfrid

    2014-05-01

    Cutaneous (CVC) and muscle (MVC) vasoconstrictor neurons exhibit typical reflex patterns to physiological stimulation of somatic and visceral afferent neurons. Here we tested the hypothesis that CVC neurons are inhibited by stimulation of cutaneous nociceptors but not of muscle nociceptors and that MVC neurons are inhibited by stimulation of muscle nociceptors but not of cutaneous nociceptors. Activity in the vasoconstrictor neurons was recorded from postganglionic axons isolated from the sural nerve or the lateral gastrocnemius-soleus nerve in anesthetized rats. The nociceptive afferents were excited by mechanical stimulation of the toes of the ipsilateral hindpaw (skin), by hypertonic saline injected into the ipsi- or contralateral gastrocnemius-soleus muscle, or by heat or noxious cold stimuli applied to the axons in the common peroneal nerve or tibial nerve. The results show that CVC neurons are inhibited by noxious stimulation of skin but not by noxious stimulation of skeletal muscle and that MVC neurons are inhibited by noxious stimulation of skeletal muscle but not by noxious stimulation of skin. These inhibitory reflexes are mostly lateralized and are most likely organized in the spinal cord. Stimulation of nociceptive cold-sensitive afferents does not elicit inhibitory or excitatory reflexes in CVC or MVC neurons. The reflex inhibition of activity in CVC or MVC neurons generated by stimulation of nociceptive cutaneous or muscle afferents during tissue injury leads to local increase of blood flow, resulting in an increase of transport of immunocompetent cells, proteins, and oxygen to the site of injury and enhancing the processes of healing.

  7. Endothelial-dependent vasodilators preferentially increase subendocardial blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Pelc, L.R.; Gross, G.J.; Warltier, D.C.

    1986-03-05

    Interference with arachidonic acid metabolism on the effect of acetylcholine (Ach) or arachidonic acid (AA) to preferentially increase subendocardial perfusion was investigated in anesthetized dogs. Hemodynamics, regional myocardial blood flow (MBF (ml/min/g):radioactive microspheres) and the left ventricular transmural distribution of flow (endo/epi) were measured. Intracoronary infusion of Ach (10 ..mu..g/min) and AA (585 ..mu..g/min) significantly (P < .05*) increased myocardial perfusion and selectively redistributed flow to the subendocardium (increased endo/epi) without changes in systemic hemodynamics. Inhibition of phospholipase A/sub 2/ by quinacrine (Q; 600 ..mu..g/min, ic) attenuated the increase in myocardial perfusion produced by Ach but not by AA and inhibited the redistribution of flow to the subendocardium. The present results suggest that endothelium-dependent vasodilators produce a preferential increase in subendocardial perfusion via a product of AA metabolism.

  8. Cutaneous interstitial nitric oxide concentration does not increase during heat stress in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, C. G.; MacLean, D. A.

    2001-01-01

    Inhibition of cutaneous nitric oxide (NO) synthase reduces the magnitude of cutaneous vasodilation during whole body heating in humans. However, this observation is insufficient to conclude that NO concentration increases in the skin during a heat stress. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that whole body heating increases cutaneous interstitial NO concentration. This was accomplished by placing 2 microdialysis membranes in the forearm dermal space of 12 subjects. Both membranes were perfused with lactated Ringer solutions at a rate of 2 microl/min. In both normothermia and during whole body heating via a water perfused suit, dialysate from these membranes were obtained and analyzed for NO using the chemiluminescence technique. In six of these subjects, after the heat stress, the membranes were perfused with a 1 M solution of acetylcholine to stimulate NO release. Dialysate from these trials was also assayed to quantify cutaneous interstitial NO concentration. Whole body heating increased skin temperature from 34.6 +/- 0.2 to 38.8 +/- 0.2 degrees C (P < 0.05), which increased sublingual temperature (36.4 +/- 0.1 to 37.6 +/- 0.1 degrees C; P < 0.05), heart rate (63 +/- 5 to 93 +/- 5 beats/min; P < 0.05), and skin blood flow over the membranes (21 +/- 4 to 88 +/- 10 perfusion units; P < 0.05). NO concentration in the dialysate did not increase significantly during of the heat stress (7.6 +/- 0.7 to 8.6 +/- 0.8 microM; P > 0.05). After the heat stress, administration of acetylcholine in the perfusate significantly increased skin blood flow (128 +/- 6 perfusion units) relative to both normothermic and heat stress values and significantly increased NO concentration in the dialysate (15.8 +/- 2.4 microM). These data suggest that whole body heating does not increase cutaneous interstitial NO concentration in forearm skin. Rather, NO may serve in a permissive role in facilitating the effects of an unknown neurotransmitter, leading to cutaneous vasodilation

  9. Alpha-adrenergic receptor blockade by phentolamine increases the efficacy of vasodilators in penile corpus cavernosum.

    PubMed

    Kim, N N; Goldstein, I; Moreland, R B; Traish, A M

    2000-03-01

    Penile trabecular smooth muscle tone, a major determinant of erectile function, is highly regulated by numerous inter- and intracellular pathways. The interaction between pathways mediating contraction and relaxation has not been studied in detail. To this end, we investigated the functional effects of alpha adrenergic receptor blockade with phentolamine and its interaction with vasodilators (sildenafil, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and PGE1) that elevate cyclic nucleotides on penile cavernosal smooth muscle contractility. In organ bath preparations of cavernosal tissue strips contracted with phenylephrine, phentolamine significantly enhanced relaxation induced by sildenafil, VIP and PGE1. Sildenafil, VIP or PGE1 also significantly enhanced relaxation induced by phentolamine in cavernosal tissue strips contracted with phenylephrine. To study the effects of alpha adrenergic receptor blockade and modification of cyclic nucleotide metabolism during active neurogenic input, cavernosal tissue strips in organ bath preparations were contracted with the non-adrenergic agonist endothelin-1 and subjected to electrical field stimulation (EFS) in the absence or presence of phentolamine and/or sildenafil. EFS (5-40Hz) typically caused biphasic relaxation and contraction responses. Phentolamine alone enhanced relaxation and reduced or prevented contraction to EFS. Sildenafil enhanced relaxation to EFS at lower frequencies (< or = 5 Hz). The combination of phentolamine and sildenafil enhanced EFS-induced relaxation at all frequencies tested. EFS, in the presence of 10 nM phentolamine and 30 nM sildenafil, produced enhanced relaxation responses which were quantitatively similar to those obtained in the presence of 50 nM sildenafil alone. Thus, blockade of alpha-adrenergic receptors with phentolamine increases the efficacy of cyclic nucleotide-dependent vasodilators. Furthermore, phentolamine potentiates relaxation and attenuates contraction in response to endogenous

  10. Grape polyphenols reduce blood pressure and increase flow-mediated vasodilation in men with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Barona, Jacqueline; Aristizabal, Juan C; Blesso, Christopher N; Volek, Jeff S; Fernandez, Maria Luz

    2012-09-01

    We evaluated the effects of grape polyphenols in individuals classified with metabolic syndrome (MetS). Men (n = 24) aged 30-70 y were randomly assigned to consume either a freeze-dried grape polyphenol powder (GRAPE) or a placebo for 30 d in a double-blind, crossover design, separated by a 3-wk washout period. Participants were asked to maintain their usual diet and physical activity during the study and abstain from consuming polyphenol-rich foods. MetS criteria including blood pressure (BP) and markers of vascular endothelial function including brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD), plasma total nitrite + nitrate (NOx) to estimate NO production, plasma soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) were measured at the end of each dietary period. Systolic BP (P < 0.0025) and plasma sICAM-1 concentrations (P < 0.025) were lower, whereas the FMD response was higher (P < 0.0001), during the GRAPE compared with the placebo period. In addition, changes in sVCAM-1 concentrations between periods were positively correlated with changes in systolic BP (r = 0.45; P < 0.05). Although NOx concentrations did not differ between periods, changes in systolic BP were negatively correlated with changes in NOx concentrations (r = -0.44; P < 0.05), indicating the vasodilating properties of NO. Other MetS variables did not differ between the GRAPE and placebo periods. These results suggest that GRAPE polyphenols may potentiate vasorelaxation and reduce BP and circulating cell adhesion molecules, resulting in improvements in vascular function.

  11. Impact of local endothelial challenge with cytomegalovirus or glycoprotein B on vasodilation in intact pressurized arteries from nonpregnant and pregnant mice.

    PubMed

    Gombos, Randi B; Teefy, Jana; Lee, Albert; Hemmings, Denise G

    2012-10-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections are associated with vascular diseases in the human population. We have previously shown vascular dysfunction in systemic and uterine arteries dissected from nonpregnant (NP) mouse CMV (mCMV)-infected mice that was further impaired during late pregnancy (LP). CMV attachment alone through glycoprotein B (GB) can generate signals that impact vascular tone regulation. However, the contribution of direct virus interactions with endothelium to the vascular dysfunction we previously observed after in vivo mCMV infection is not known. We used a pressure myograph system to infuse GB or whole intact mCMV inside arteries dissected from uninfected mice and assessed vasodilation to methacholine infused inside pressurized arteries rather than applied abluminally. These results were compared to those observed after methacholine infusion into untreated arteries dissected from mCMV-infected mice. In mesenteric arteries, vasodilation to infused methacholine did not differ among treatments in NP or LP groups in contrast to previously published studies. However, increased vasoconstrictor activity was unmasked after blocking thromboxane receptors or prostaglandin production. Vasodilation in uterine arteries from uninfected NP mice to infused methacholine was increased by both GB and whole intact mCMV pretreatment. Untreated uterine arteries from mCMV-infected NP mice showed even greater vasodilation. There was no effect of GB or whole intact mCMV pretreatment in uterine arteries from uninfected LP mice, whereas vasodilation to infused methacholine was reduced in untreated uterine arteries from mCMV-infected LP mice. CMV exerts direct effects on vascular function which should be considered during viral reactivation leading to viremia and during GB-based vaccine administration.

  12. Renal Artery Vasodilation May Be An Indicator of Successful Sympathetic Nerve Damage During Renal Denervation Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weijie; Du, Huaan; Lu, Jiayi; Ling, Zhiyu; Long, Yi; Xu, Yanping; Xiao, Peilin; Gyawali, Laxman; Woo, Kamsang; Yin, Yuehui; Zrenner, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Autonomic nervous system plays a crucial role in maintaining and regulating vessel tension. Renal denervation (RDN) may induce renal artery vasodilation by damaging renal sympathetic fibers. We conducted this animal study to evaluate whether renal artery vasodilation could be a direct indicator of successful RDN. Twenty-eight Chinese Kunming dogs were randomly assigned into three groups and underwent RDN utilizing temperature-controlled catheter (group A, n = 11) or saline-irrigated catheter (group B, n = 11) or sham procedure (group C, n = 6). Renal angiography, blood pressure (BP) and renal artery vasodilation measurements were performed at baseline, 30-minute, 1-month, and 3-month after interventions. Plasma norepinephrine concentrations were tested at baseline and 3-month after intervention. Results showed that, in addition to significant BP reduction, RDN induced significant renal artery vasodilation. Correlation analyses showed that the induced renal artery vasodilation positively correlated with SBP reduction and plasma norepinephrine reduction over 3 months after ablation. Post hoc analyses showed that saline-irrigated catheter was superior to TC catheter in renal artery vasodilation, especially for the acute dilatation of renal artery at 30-minute after RDN. In conclusion, renal artery vasodilation, induced by RDN, may be a possible indicator of successful renal nerve damage and a predictor of blood pressure response to RDN. PMID:27849014

  13. Cutaneous inputs from the back abolish locomotor-like activity and reduce spastic-like activity in the adult cat following complete spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Frigon, Alain; Thibaudier, Yann; Johnson, Michael D; Heckman, C J; Hurteau, Marie-France

    2012-06-01

    Spasticity is a condition that can include increased muscle tone, clonus, spasms, and hyperreflexia. In this study, we report the effect of manually stimulating the dorsal lumbosacral skin on spontaneous locomotor-like activity and on a variety of reflex responses in 5 decerebrate chronic spinal cats treated with clonidine. Cats were spinalized 1 month before the terminal experiment. Stretch reflexes were evoked by stretching the left triceps surae muscles. Crossed reflexes were elicited by electrically stimulating the right tibial or superficial peroneal nerves. Wind-up of reflex responses was evoked by electrically stimulating the left tibial or superficial peroneal nerves. We found that pinching the skin of the back abolished spontaneous locomotor-like activity. We also found that back pinch abolished the rhythmic activity observed during reflex testing without eliminating the reflex responses. Some of the rhythmic episodes of activity observed during reflex testing were consistent with clonus with an oscillation frequency greater than 3 Hz. Pinching the skin of the back effectively abolished rhythmic activity occurring spontaneously or evoked during reflex testing, irrespective of oscillation frequency. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that locomotion and clonus are produced by common central pattern-generators. Stimulating the skin of the back could prove helpful in managing undesired rhythmic activity in spinal cord-injured humans.

  14. Cutaneous Melanoma in Women

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Mi Ryung; Eliades, Philip; Gupta, Sameer; Tsao, Hensin

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of cutaneous melanoma (CM) continues to increase in the Caucasian population in the United States. In 2014, women only accounted for 42% of the 76,100 new melanoma cases and only 33% of the 9,710 deaths associated with CM in the US.1 These trends are consistently observed in populations around the world. Indeed, gender disparity in melanoma outcome is so consistently observed that gender has been suggested as an important prognostic factor in melanoma, despite not being formerly incorporated in staging algorithms.2 The source of this gender disparity in melanoma remains unclear but likely represents both biological and behavioral etiologies. Herein, we review the current knowledge of how melanoma differs between men and women. PMID:25844396

  15. Early Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Sams, Wiley M.

    1966-01-01

    Cutaneous disorders which manifest themselves on the exposed parts are more likely than are hidden lesions to cause the patient to seek professional services promptly. Usually he consults his family physician or the community dermatologist. The physician who first sees the patient is dependent upon his own resources for management and diagnosis. A background of experience, a measure of energy and an inquisitive attitude are the necessary ingredients for successful management. The difficulties involved in differentiating early lupus erythematosus and polymorphic light eruptions cannot be invariably resolved even with the most complete review. The course of the disorder and the response to environmental factors supply important clues. Investigative work, especially in the field of immunology, offers hope for the solution of some of our problems. PMID:5909872

  16. Treatment of Cutaneous Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Aileen Y.; Werth, Victoria P.

    2011-01-01

    Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) is an autoimmune, inflammatory skin disease seen in patients with or without systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The management of CLE includes treatment and prevention of lesions, as well as routine assessment for systemic disease. Treatment options include both topical and systemic therapies. Topical therapies include corticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitors. Systemic therapies generally fall under one of three categories: antimalarials, immunomodulators, such as dapsone and thalidomide, and immunosuppressives, such as methotrexate and mycophenolate. Evidence for the treatment of CLE is limited by few prospective studies, as well as lack of a validated outcome measure up until recently. There is good evidence to support the use of topical steroids and calcineurin inhibitors, though most of these trials have not used placebo or vehicle controls. There have been no randomized placebo-controlled trials evaluating systemic therapies for the treatment of CLE. PMID:21503694

  17. Benign cutaneous Degos disease.

    PubMed

    Zamiri, Mozheh; Jarrett, Paul; Snow, John

    2005-08-01

    A 24-year-old woman presented with an 8-year history of a recurrent asymptomatic rash characterized by small erythematous papules which evolved to form atrophic porcelain white scars with a telangectatic rim. She had never had gastrointestinal or neurological symptoms. A short trial of aspirin did not alter the behavior of the disease. Histology confirmed the clinical diagnosis of Degos disease. Degos disease is a rare disorder that has been classified into the benign or malignant variety. The malignant type has a poor prognosis. Gastrointestinal involvement is the most frequent cause of death. The existence of patients with a prolonged, purely cutaneous or benign form has been increasingly recognized. It may be impossible to classify a patient at the time of initial presentation. Her progress is consistent with the benign form.

  18. Cystathionine γ-lyase, a H2S-generating enzyme, is a GPBAR1-regulated gene and contributes to vasodilation caused by secondary bile acids.

    PubMed

    Renga, Barbara; Bucci, Mariarosaria; Cipriani, Sabrina; Carino, Adriana; Monti, Maria Chiara; Zampella, Angela; Gargiulo, Antonella; d'Emmanuele di Villa Bianca, Roberta; Distrutti, Eleonora; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2015-07-01

    GPBAR1 is a bile acid-activated receptor (BAR) for secondary bile acids, lithocholic (LCA) and deoxycholic acid (DCA), expressed in the enterohepatic tissues and in the vasculature by endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Despite that bile acids cause vasodilation, it is unclear why these effects involve GPBAR1, and the vascular phenotype of GPBAR1 deficient mice remains poorly defined. Previous studies have suggested a role for nitric oxide (NO) in regulatory activity exerted by GPBAR1 in liver endothelial cells. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a vasodilatory agent generated in endothelial cells by cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE). Here we demonstrate that GPBAR1 null mice had increased levels of primary and secondary bile acids and impaired vasoconstriction to phenylephrine. In aortic ring preparations, vasodilation caused by chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), a weak GPBAR1 ligand and farnesoid-x-receptor agonist (FXR), was iberiotoxin-dependent and GPBAR1-independent. In contrast, vasodilation caused by LCA was GPBAR1 dependent and abrogated by propargyl-glycine, a CSE inhibitor, and by 5β-cholanic acid, a GPBAR1 antagonist, but not by N(5)-(1-iminoethyl)-l-ornithine (l-NIO), an endothelial NO synthase inhibitor, or iberiotoxin, a large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BKCa) channels antagonist. In venular and aortic endothelial (HUVEC and HAEC) cells GPBAR1 activation increases CSE expression/activity and H2S production. Two cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) sites (CREs) were identified in the CSE promoter. In addition, TLCA stimulates CSE phosphorylation on serine residues. In conclusion we demonstrate that GPBAR1 mediates the vasodilatory activity of LCA and regulates the expression/activity of CSE. Vasodilation caused by CDCA involves BKCa channels. The GPBAR1/CSE pathway might contribute to endothelial dysfunction and hyperdynamic circulation in liver cirrhosis.

  19. Skin Signs of Rheumatoid Arthritis and its Therapy-Induced Cutaneous Side Effects.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yun; Cohen, Jeffrey M; Wright, Natalie A; Merola, Joseph F

    2016-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disorder that primarily affects the joints, but may exhibit extra-articular, including cutaneous, manifestations such as rheumatoid nodules, rheumatoid vasculitis, granulomatous skin disorders, and neutrophilic dermatoses. A large burden of cutaneous disease may be an indication of RA disease activity and the need for more aggressive treatment. Many of the therapeutic agents used to treat RA can also result in cutaneous adverse effects, which pose their own diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Anti-TNFα agents, in particular, have a wide variety of adverse effects including psoraisiform eruptions, granulomatous conditions, and cutaneous connective tissue disorders. Herein we provide an update on the clinical presentations and management of RA-associated cutaneous findings as well as drug-induced cutaneous effects, with particular attention to the adverse effects of biologic disease-modifying agents.

  20. Cutaneous hamartoma with pagetoid cells.

    PubMed

    Piérard-Franchimont, C; Dosal, F L; Estrada, J A; Piérard, G E

    1991-04-01

    We report an unusual cutaneous hamartoma with pagetoid cells characterized by the presence of intraepidermal cells resembling Toker's cells of the nipple. These cells were EMA positive and could be related to the histogenesis of some Paget's disease.

  1. Cutaneous toxoplasmosis in two dogs.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Aline Rodrigues; Cadieu, Jennifer; Kiupel, Matti; Lim, Ailam; Bolin, Steve R; Mansell, Joanne

    2012-05-01

    Cutaneous toxoplasmosis has been previously reported in human beings, rarely reported in cats, and reported in 1 dog with systemic toxoplasmosis. The present report describes 2 cases of cutaneous toxoplasmosis in 2 dogs treated with immunosuppressive therapy. One of the dogs developed generalized cutaneous pustules and pruritus, and the other dog only had a single subcutaneous nodule. Microscopically, skin biopsies showed moderate to severe pyogranulomatous and necrotizing dermatitis and panniculitis, with multifocal vasculitis and vascular thrombosis. Single or aggregates of protozoal tachyzoites were mostly intracytoplasmic and occasionally extracellular. The etiology was confirmed in both cases by immunohistochemistry and by polymerase chain reaction assays, which were followed by nucleic acid sequencing. Both patients were treated with clindamycin. The dog with generalized lesions developed pulmonary and neurological signs and was euthanized. The dog with a single nodule recovered completely with no remission of cutaneous lesions.

  2. Cutaneous EBV-related lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Gru, Alejandro A; Jaffe, Elaine S

    2017-01-01

    This article will focus on the cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorders associated with EBV, with an emphasis on the upcoming changes in the revised 4th Edition of the WHO classification of tumors of the hematopoietic system, many of which deal with cutaneous disorders derived from NK-cells or T-cells. Extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma usually presents in the upper aerodigestive tract, but can involve the skin secondarily. EBV-associated T- and NK-cell lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) in the pediatric age group include the systemic diseases, chronic active EBV infection (CAEBV) and systemic EBV+ T-cell lymphoma of childhood. Hydroa vacciniforme (HV)-like LPD is a primarily cutaneous form of CAEBV and encompasses the lesions previously referred to as HV and HV-like lymphoma (HVLL). All the T/NK-cell-EBV-associated diseases occur with higher frequency in Asians, and indigenous populations from Central and South America and Mexico. Among the B-cell EBV-associated LPD two major changes have been introduced in the WHO. The previously designated EBV-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (EBV-DLBCL) of the elderly, has been changed to EBV-DLBCL with 'not otherwise specified' as a modifier (NOS). A new addition to the WHO system is the more recently identified EBV+ mucocutaneous ulcer, which involves skin and mucosal-associated sites.

  3. Systemic diseases with cutaneous manifestations.

    PubMed

    Merchant, S R; Taboada, J

    1995-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to briefly discuss the following cutaneous manifestations of selected systemic diseases: poxvirus; feline leukemia virus (FeLV); feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV); herpesvirus; calcivirus; pseudorabies; plague; tularemia; toxoplasmosis; leishmania; hypothyroidism; hyperthyroidism; hyperadrenocorticism; diabetes mellitus; acromegaly; thallium poisoning; pancreatic disease; hypereosinophilic syndrome; mucopolysaccharidosis; and pansteatitis. Recognition of these cutaneous signs may help alert the clinician to the possibility of an internal disorder so that the appropriate diagnostic tests can be considered.

  4. Cutaneous manifestations of child abuse.

    PubMed

    Kos, Liborka; Shwayder, Tor

    2006-01-01

    Dermatologists and child abuse are not frequently associated in the minds of most physicians. Yet the most common manifestations of child abuse are cutaneous. This article reviews cutaneous manifestations of physical abuse, including bruises, lacerations, abrasions, human bites, and burns. It also discusses ways that dermatologists can differentiate abusive injuries from accidental ones as well as from the many dermatologic conditions that can mimic child abuse. Finally, we review what actions the dermatologist should take when suspecting abuse in a patient.

  5. Simulated Microgravity Increases Cutaneous Blood Flow in the Head and Leg of Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stout, M. Shannon; Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Breit, Gregory A.; Hargens, Alan R.

    1995-01-01

    The cutaneous micro-circulation vasodilates during acute 6 deg. head-down tilt (HDT, simulated microgravity) relative to upright conditions, more in the lower body than in the upper body. We expected that relative magnitudes of and differences between upper and lower body cutaneous blood flow elevation would be sustained during initial acclimation to simulated microgravity. We measured cutaneous micro-vascular blood flow with laser-Doppler flowmetry at the leg (over the distal tibia) and cheek (over the zygomatic arch) of eight healthy men before, during, and after 24 h of HDT. Results were calculated as a percentage of baseline value (100% measured during pre-tilt upright sitting). Cutaneous blood flow in the cheek increased significantly to 165 +/- 37% (mean + SE, p less than 0.05) at 9-12 h HDT, then returned to near baseline values by 24 h HDT (114 +/- 29%, NSD), despite increased local arterial pressure. Microvascular flow in the leg remained significantly elevated above baseline throughout 24 h HDT (427 +/- 85% at 3 h HDT and 215 +/- 142% at 24 h HDT, p less than 0.05). During the 6-h upright sitting recovery period, cheek and leg blood flow levels returned to near pre-tilt baseline values. Because hydrostatic effects of HDT increase local arterial pressure at the carotid sinus, baroreflex-mediated withdrawal of sympathetic tone probably contributed to increased microvascular flows at the head and leg during HDT. In the leg, baroreflex effects combined with minimal stimulation of local veno-arteriolar and myogenic autoregulatory vasoconstriction to elicit relatively larger and more sustained increases in cutaneous flow during HDT. In the cheek, delayed myogenic vasoconstriction and/or humoral effects apparently compensated for flow elevation by 24 h of HDT. Therefore, localized vascular adaptations to gravity probably explain differences in acclimation of lower and upper body blood flow to HDT and actual microgravity.

  6. Minimal role for H1 and H2 histamine receptors in cutaneous thermal hyperemia to local heating in humans.

    PubMed

    Wong, Brett J; Williams, Sarah J; Minson, Christopher T

    2006-02-01

    The precise mechanism(s) underlying the thermal hyperemic response to local heating of human skin are not fully understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate a potential role for H1 and H2 histamine-receptor activation in this response. Two groups of six subjects participated in two separate protocols and were instrumented with three microdialysis fibers on the ventral forearm. In both protocols, sites were randomly assigned to receive one of three treatments. In protocol 1, sites received 1) 500 microM pyrilamine maleate (H1-receptor antagonist), 2) 10 mM L-NAME to inhibit nitric oxide synthase, and 3) 500 microM pyrilamine with 10 mM NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). In protocol 2, sites received 1) 2 mM cimetidine (H2 antagonist), 2) 10 mM L-NAME, and 3) 2 mM cimetidine with 10 mM L-NAME. A fourth site served as a control site (no microdialysis fiber). Skin sites were locally heated from a baseline of 33 to 42 degrees C at a rate of 0.5 degrees C/5 s, and skin blood flow was monitored using laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Cutaneous vascular conductance was calculated as LDF/mean arterial pressure. To normalize skin blood flow to maximal vasodilation, microdialysis sites were perfused with 28 mM sodium nitroprusside, and control sites were heated to 43 degrees C. In both H1 and H2 antagonist studies, no differences in initial peak or secondary plateau phase were observed between control and histamine-receptor antagonist only sites or between L-NAME and L-NAME with histamine receptor antagonist. There were no differences in nadir response between L-NAME and L-NAME with histamine-receptor antagonist. However, the nadir response in H1 antagonist sites was significantly reduced compared with control sites, but there was no effect of H2 antagonist on the nadir response. These data suggest only a modest role for H1-receptor activation in the cutaneous response to local heating as evidenced by a diminished nadir response and no role for H2-receptor

  7. Rapid onset vasodilation with single muscle contractions in the leg: influence of age

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, William E; Ueda, Kenichi; Treichler, David P; Casey, Darren P

    2015-01-01

    The influence of aging on contraction-induced rapid vasodilation has been well characterized in the forearm. We sought to examine the impact of aging on contraction-induced rapid vasodilation in the leg following single muscle contractions and determine whether potential age-related impairments were similar between limbs (leg vs. arm). Fourteen young (23 ± 1 years) and 16 older (66 ± 1 years) adults performed single leg knee extensions at 20%, 40%, and 60% of work rate maximum. Femoral artery diameter and blood velocity were measured using Doppler ultrasound. Limb vascular conductance (VC) was calculated using blood flow (mL·min−1) and mean arterial pressure (mmHg). Peak and total vasodilator responses in the leg (change [Δ] in VC from baseline) were blunted in older adults by 44–50% across exercise intensities (P < 0.05 for all). When normalized for muscle mass, age-related differences were still evident (P < 0.05). Comparing the rapid vasodilator responses between the arm and the leg of the same individuals at similar relative intensities (20% and 40%) reveals that aging influences peak and total vasodilation equally between the limbs (no significant age × limb interaction at either intensity, P = 0.28–0.80). Our data demonstrate that (1) older adults exhibit an attenuated rapid hyperemic and vasodilator response in the leg; and (2) the age-related reductions in rapid vasodilation are similar between the arm and the leg. The mechanisms contributing to the age-related differences in contraction-induced rapid vasodilation are perhaps similar to those seen with the forearm model, but have not been confirmed. PMID:26320213

  8. Contribution of nitric oxide to brachial artery vasodilation during progressive handgrip exercise in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Wray, D. Walter; Witman, Melissa A. H.; Layec, Gwenael; Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Ives, Stephen J.; Conklin, Jamie D.; Reese, Van; Richardson, Russell S.

    2013-01-01

    The reduction in nitric oxide (NO)-mediated vascular function with age has largely been determined by flow-mediated dilation (FMD). However, in light of recent uncertainty surrounding the NO dependency of FMD and the recognition that brachial artery (BA) vasodilation during handgrip exercise is predominantly NO-mediated in the young, we sought to determine the contribution of NO to BA vasodilation in the elderly using the handgrip paradigm. BA vasodilation during progressive dynamic (1 Hz) handgrip exercise performed at 3, 6, 9, and 12 kg was assessed with and without NO synthase (NOS) inhibition [intra-arterial NG-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA)] in seven healthy older subjects (69 ± 2 yr). Handgrip exercise in the control condition evoked significant BA vasodilation at 6 (4.7 ± 1.4%), 9 (6.5 ± 2.2%), and 12 kg (9.5 ± 2.7%). NOS inhibition attenuated BA vasodilation, as the first measurable increase in BA diameter did not occur until 9 kg (4.0 ± 1.8%), and the change in BA diameter at 12 kg was reduced by ∼30% (5.1 ± 2.2%), with unaltered shear rate (Control: 407 ± 57, l-NMMA: 427 ± 67 s−1). Although shifted downward, the slope of the relationship between BA diameter and shear rate during handgrip exercise was unchanged (Control: 0.0013 ± 0.0004, l-NMMA: 0.0011 ± 0.007, P = 0.6) as a consequence of NOS inhibition. Thus, progressive handgrip exercise in the elderly evokes a robust BA vasodilation, the magnitude of which was only minimally attenuated following NOS inhibition. This modest contribution of NO to BA vasodilation in the elderly supports the use of the handgrip exercise paradigm to assess NO-dependent vasodilation across the life span. PMID:23948773

  9. NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species contribute to impaired cutaneous microvascular function in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    DuPont, Jennifer J; Ramick, Meghan G; Farquhar, William B; Townsend, Raymond R; Edwards, David G

    2014-06-15

    Oxidative stress promotes vascular dysfunction in chronic kidney disease (CKD). We utilized the cutaneous circulation to test the hypothesis that reactive oxygen species derived from NADPH oxidase and xanthine oxidase impair nitric oxide (NO)-dependent cutaneous vasodilation in CKD. Twenty subjects, 10 stage 3 and 4 patients with CKD (61 ± 4 yr; 5 men/5 women; eGFR: 39 ± 4 ml·min(-1)·1.73 m(-2)) and 10 healthy controls (55 ± 2 yr; 4 men/6 women; eGFR: >60 ml·min(-1)·1.73 m(-2)) were instrumented with 4 intradermal microdialysis fibers for the delivery of 1) Ringer solution (Control), 2) 10 μM tempol (scavenge superoxide), 3) 100 μM apocynin (NAD(P)H oxidase inhibition), and 4) 10 μM allopurinol (xanthine oxidase inhibition). Skin blood flow was measured via laser-Doppler flowmetry during standardized local heating (42°C). N(g)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 10 mM) was infused to quantify the NO-dependent portion of the response. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated as a percentage of the maximum CVC achieved during sodium nitroprusside infusion at 43°C. Cutaneous vasodilation was attenuated in patients with CKD (77 ± 3 vs. 88 ± 3%, P = 0.01), but augmented with tempol and apocynin (tempol: 88 ± 2 (P = 0.03), apocynin: 91 ± 2% (P = 0.001). The NO-dependent portion of the response was reduced in patients with CKD (41 ± 4 vs. 58 ± 2%, P = 0.04), but improved with tempol and apocynin (tempol: 58 ± 3 (P = 0.03), apocynin: 58 ± 4% (P = 0.03). Inhibition of xanthine oxidase did not alter cutaneous vasodilation in either group (P > 0.05). These data suggest that NAD(P)H oxidase is a source of reactive oxygen species and contributes to microvascular dysfunction in patients with CKD.

  10. Plasma myeloperoxidase is inversely associated with endothelium-dependent vasodilation in elderly subjects with abnormal glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    van der Zwan, Leonard P; Teerlink, Tom; Dekker, Jacqueline M; Henry, Ronald M A; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Jakobs, Cornelis; Heine, Robert J; Scheffer, Peter G

    2010-12-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), a biomarker related to inflammation, oxidative stress, and nitric oxide scavenging, has been shown to impair endothelium-dependent vasodilation. Because elevated hydrogen peroxide concentrations in diabetic vessels may enhance MPO activity, we hypothesized that a stronger association of MPO with flow-mediated dilation (FMD) may be found in subjects with abnormal glucose metabolism. Myeloperoxidase concentrations were measured in EDTA plasma samples from participants of a population-based cohort study, including 230 subjects with normal glucose metabolism and 386 with abnormal glucose metabolism. Vascular function was expressed as FMD and nitroglycerin-mediated dilation of the brachial artery. In subjects with abnormal glucose metabolism, MPO was negatively associated with FMD (-20.9 [95% confidence interval {CI}, -41.7 to -0.2] -μm change in FMD per SD increment of MPO). This association remained significant after adjustment for nitroglycerin-mediated dilation (-31.1 [95% CI, -50.0 to -12.3]) and was not attenuated after further adjustment for established risk factors. In subjects with normal glucose metabolism, MPO was not significantly associated with FMD (2.0 [95% CI, -16.0 to 20.0]). In conclusion, in subjects with abnormal glucose metabolism, plasma levels of MPO are inversely associated with endothelium-dependent vasodilation, possibly reflecting enhancement of MPO activity by vascular oxidative stress.

  11. Medial prefrontal cortex acetylcholine injection-induced hypotension: the role of hindlimb vasodilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crippa, G. E.; Lewis, S. J.; Johnson, A. K.; Correa, F. M.

    2000-01-01

    The injection of acetylcholine (ACh) into the cingulate region of the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) causes a marked fall in arterial blood pressure which is not accompanied by changes in heart rate. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the hemodynamic basis for this stimulus-induced hypotension in Sprague-Dawley rats. The study was designed to determine whether a change in the vascular resistance of hindlimb, renal or mesenteric vascular beds contributes to the fall in arterial pressure in response to ACh injection into the cingulate cortex. Miniature pulsed-Doppler flow probes were used to measure changes in regional blood flow and vascular resistance. The results indicated that the hypotensive response was largely due to a consistent and marked vasodilation in the hindlimb vascular bed. On this basis, an additional experiment was then undertaken to determine the mechanisms that contribute to hindlimb vasodilation. The effect of interrupting the autonomic innervation of one leg on the hindlimb vasodilator response was tested. Unilateral transection of the lumbar sympathetic chain attenuated the cingulate ACh-induced vasodilation in the ipsilateral, but not in the contralateral hindlimb. These results suggest that the hypotensive response to cingulate cortex-ACh injection is caused by skeletal muscle vasodilation mediated by a sympathetic chain-related vasodilator system.

  12. Liposomal nanoparticles encapsulating iloprost exhibit enhanced vasodilation in pulmonary arteries

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Pritesh P; Leber, Regina; Nagaraj, Chandran; Leitinger, Gerd; Lehofer, Bernhard; Olschewski, Horst; Olschewski, Andrea; Prassl, Ruth; Marsh, Leigh M

    2014-01-01

    Prostacyclin analogues are standard therapeutic options for vasoconstrictive diseases, including pulmonary hypertension and Raynaud’s phenomenon. Although effective, these treatment strategies are expensive and have several side effects. To improve drug efficiency, we tested liposomal nanoparticles as carrier systems. In this study, we synthesized liposomal nanoparticles tailored for the prostacyclin analogue iloprost and evaluated their pharmacologic efficacy on mouse intrapulmonary arteries, using a wire myograph. The use of cationic lipids, stearylamine, or 1,2-di-(9Z-octadecenoyl)-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) in liposomes promoted iloprost encapsulation to at least 50%. The addition of cholesterol modestly reduced iloprost encapsulation. The liposomal nanoparticle formulations were tested for toxicity and pharmacologic efficacy in vivo and ex vivo, respectively. The liposomes did not affect the viability of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Compared with an equivalent concentration of free iloprost, four out of the six polymer-coated liposomal formulations exhibited significantly enhanced vasodilation of mouse pulmonary arteries. Iloprost that was encapsulated in liposomes containing the polymer polyethylene glycol exhibited concentration-dependent relaxation of arteries. Strikingly, half the concentration of iloprost in liposomes elicited similar pharmacologic efficacy as nonencapsulated iloprost. Cationic liposomes can encapsulate iloprost with high efficacy and can serve as potential iloprost carriers to improve its therapeutic efficacy. PMID:25045260

  13. Liposomal nanoparticles encapsulating iloprost exhibit enhanced vasodilation in pulmonary arteries.

    PubMed

    Jain, Pritesh P; Leber, Regina; Nagaraj, Chandran; Leitinger, Gerd; Lehofer, Bernhard; Olschewski, Horst; Olschewski, Andrea; Prassl, Ruth; Marsh, Leigh M

    2014-01-01

    Prostacyclin analogues are standard therapeutic options for vasoconstrictive diseases, including pulmonary hypertension and Raynaud's phenomenon. Although effective, these treatment strategies are expensive and have several side effects. To improve drug efficiency, we tested liposomal nanoparticles as carrier systems. In this study, we synthesized liposomal nanoparticles tailored for the prostacyclin analogue iloprost and evaluated their pharmacologic efficacy on mouse intrapulmonary arteries, using a wire myograph. The use of cationic lipids, stearylamine, or 1,2-di-(9Z-octadecenoyl)-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) in liposomes promoted iloprost encapsulation to at least 50%. The addition of cholesterol modestly reduced iloprost encapsulation. The liposomal nanoparticle formulations were tested for toxicity and pharmacologic efficacy in vivo and ex vivo, respectively. The liposomes did not affect the viability of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Compared with an equivalent concentration of free iloprost, four out of the six polymer-coated liposomal formulations exhibited significantly enhanced vasodilation of mouse pulmonary arteries. Iloprost that was encapsulated in liposomes containing the polymer polyethylene glycol exhibited concentration-dependent relaxation of arteries. Strikingly, half the concentration of iloprost in liposomes elicited similar pharmacologic efficacy as nonencapsulated iloprost. Cationic liposomes can encapsulate iloprost with high efficacy and can serve as potential iloprost carriers to improve its therapeutic efficacy.

  14. Imiquimod - Its role in the treatment of cutaneous malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Bubna, Aditya Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Imiquimod is a synthetic imidazoquinolone amine, which has potent immune response modifier activity, when topically used. This characteristic property of imiquimod has led to its use in a number of applications in dermatology, particularly in cutaneous malignancies, where it has been found to be effective and safe. Currently, additional mechanisms for its activity in actinic keratosis, basal cell carcinoma, and invasive squamous cell carcinoma have been elucidated. Its usage for cutaneous metastasis in breast cancer has been a further addition to its therapeutic armamentarium recently. PMID:26288465

  15. Assessment of the antihypertensive and vasodilator effects of ethanolic extracts of some Colombian medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, M F; Puebla, P; Carrón, R; Martín, M L; Arteaga, L; Román, L San

    2002-04-01

    The antihypertensive and vasodilator effects of ethanolic extracts prepared from Calea glomerata Klatt, Croton schiedeanus Schlecht, Curatella americana L., Lippia alba (Mill)n N.E.Br. and Lupinus amandus, which are medicinal plants used in Colombian folk medicine for the treatment of hypertension, were assayed both in SHR and Wistar rats and in rat isolated aortic rings. At a dose of 20 mg/kg, intravenous bolus administration of the ethanolic extracts, from C. schiedeanus, C. americana and L. amandus showed significant antihypertensive activity in SHR, C. schiedeanus being the most active. C. schiedeanus elicited dose-dependent decreases in mean arterial pressure and heart rate (5-100 mg/kg, i.v.) in SHR but 200 mg/kg administered orally did not show any significant effects, even after 3 h of observation. In intact rat aortic rings, ethanolic extracts from C. schiedeanus and Calea glomerata relaxed the contractions induced by KCl (80 mM) and phenylephrine (10(-6) M) in a concentration-dependent manner (10(-6)-3x10(-4) g/ml), with IC(50) of 6.5x10(-5) (7.3-5.8) g/ml and 7.1x10(-5) (7.9-6.4) g/ml, respectively. Bioguided phytochemical fractionation of the ethanolic extract from C. schiedeanus was started. More than one active principle seems to be present, flavonoids and terpenoids compounds were detected.

  16. Comparison of blood flow to the cutaneous temperature and redness after topical application of benzyl nicotinate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobi, Ute; Kaiser, Marco; Koscielny, Jürgen; Schuetz, Rijk; Meinke, Martina C.; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Jürgen

    2006-01-01

    The topical application of drugs, such as nicotinates, affects cutaneous blood flow. Such a biological response, which is dependent on the drug and the individual, can be measured noninvasively using laser Doppler flowmetry. We illustrate the kinetics of vasodilation caused by topically applied benzyl nicotinate using a new frequency-selective laser Doppler flowmeter. This flowmeter measures the blood flow in the superficial dermal plexus and the deeper lying larger capillaries simultaneously and indirectly by determining the flow velocity. Both sets of data are compared with the skin temperature and redness. Four biological parameters are measured consecutively on a skin area treated with gel containing benzyl nicotinate and on an untreated control area. A linear relationship between both blood flows is observed. However, no correlation is obtained between the microcirculation with either the cutaneous temperature or the redness. These results indicate the transport of the drug in the blood from the upper to the deeper capillaries. Cutaneous temperature and redness are unsuitable parameters to measure the kinetics of the blood flow after topical application of drugs.

  17. Elevated blood pressure in cytochrome P4501A1 knockout mice is associated with reduced vasodilation to omega − 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Agbor, Larry N.; Walsh, Mary T.; Boberg, Jason R.; Walker, Mary K.

    2012-11-01

    In vitro cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1) metabolizes omega − 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n − 3 PUFAs); eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), primarily to 17,18-epoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (17,18-EEQ) and 19,20-epoxydocosapentaenoic acid (19,20-EDP), respectively. These metabolites have been shown to mediate vasodilation via increases in nitric oxide (NO) and activation of potassium channels. We hypothesized that genetic deletion of CYP1A1 would reduce vasodilatory responses to n − 3 PUFAs, but not the metabolites, and increase blood pressure (BP) due to decreases in NO. We assessed BP by radiotelemetry in CYP1A1 wildtype (WT) and knockout (KO) mice ± NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor. We also assessed vasodilation to acetylcholine (ACh), EPA, DHA, 17,18-EEQ and 19,20-EDP in aorta and mesenteric arterioles. Further, we assessed vasodilation to an NO donor and to DHA ± inhibitors of potassium channels. CYP1A1 KO mice were hypertensive, compared to WT, (mean BP in mm Hg, WT 103 ± 1, KO 116 ± 1, n = 5/genotype, p < 0.05), and exhibited a reduced heart rate (beats per minute, WT 575 ± 5; KO 530 ± 7; p < 0.05). However, BP responses to NOS inhibition and vasorelaxation responses to ACh and an NO donor were normal in CYP1A1 KO mice, suggesting that NO bioavailability was not reduced. In contrast, CYP1A1 KO mice exhibited significantly attenuated vasorelaxation responses to EPA and DHA in both the aorta and mesenteric arterioles, but normal vasorelaxation responses to the CYP1A1 metabolites, 17,18-EEQ and 19,20-EDP, and normal responses to potassium channel inhibition. Taken together these data suggest that CYP1A1 metabolizes n − 3 PUFAs to vasodilators in vivo and the loss of these vasodilators may lead to increases in BP. -- Highlights: ► CYP1A1 KO mice are hypertensive. ► CYP1A1 KO mice exhibit reduced vasodilation responses to n-3 PUFAs. ► Constitutive CYP1A1 expression regulates blood pressure and vascular function.

  18. Derivatives of 1,3-disubstituted 2,4(1H,3H)-quinazolinediones as possible peripheral vasodilators or antihypertensive agents.

    PubMed

    Havera, H J; Vidrio, H

    1979-12-01

    A series of 1,3-disubstituted 2,4(1H,3H)-quinazolinediones was prepared from the 3-substituted 2,4(1H,3H)-quinazolinediones by treatment with sodium hydride and the desired alkyl halide in xylene. These compounds showed varying degrees of vasodilation and antihypertensive activity without significant blockade of alpha-adrenergic receptors. 1-[3-(N,N-Dimethylamino)propyl]-3-[3-(4-phenyl1-piperazinyl)propyl]-2,4(1H,3H)-quinazolinedione, which was selected for further studies, was more potent than papaverine in inducing vasodilation and induced a prolonged decrease in systolic blood pressure of hypertensive rats upon oral administration.

  19. Ultrasound findings in cutaneous sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Dybiec, Ewa; Pietrzak, Aldona; Kieszko, Robert; Kanitakis, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of cutaneous sarcoidosis relies mainly on the patient's history, presence of characteristic skin lesions and histological examination that shows a granulomatous, non-necrotizing dermal infiltration. The aim of the study was to assess the ultrasonographic features of cutaneous lesions of sarcoidosis before and after treatment. A 38-year-old woman with systemic sarcoidosis and specific cutaneous lesions was treated with systemic steroids followed by hydroxychloroquine. Ultrasonographic examination of the cutaneous sarcoidosis lesions was performed with a Philips iU 22 and Siemens Acuson S 2000 device, with the use of linear 15 MHz and 17 MHz transducers. Histological examination of skin lesions showed characteristic, naked, non-necrotizing granulomas in the upper dermis. Ultrasound examination revealed well-demarcated, hypoechogenic changes. Power-Doppler scan revealed increased vascularity within the lesions and the surrounding tissue. Clinical improvement of the skin lesions was confirmed by ultrasound examination, which showed a decrease in their size and normalization of dermal echogenicity and vascularity. Ultrasound examination can show cutaneous sarcoidosis lesions and their regression after appropriate treatment. PMID:25821428

  20. Platelet gel for healing cutaneous chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Crovetti, Giovanni; Martinelli, Giovanna; Issi, Marwan; Barone, Marilde; Guizzardi, Marco; Campanati, Barbara; Moroni, Marco; Carabelli, Angelo

    2004-04-01

    Wound healing is a specific host immune response for restoration of tissue integrity. Experimental studies demonstrated an alteration of growth factors activity due to their reduced synthesis, increased degradation and inactivation. In wound healing platelets play an essential role since they are rich of alpha-granules growth factors (platelet derived growth factor--PDGF; transforming growth factor-beta--TGF-beta; vascular endothelial growth factor--VEGF). Topical use of platelet gel (PG), hemocomponent obtained from mix of activated platelets and cryoprecipitate, gives the exogenous and in situ adding of growth factors (GF). The hemocomponents are of autologous or homologous origin. We performed a technique based on: multicomponent apheretic procedure to obtain plasma rich platelet and cryoprecipitate; manual processing in an open system, in sterile environment, for gel activation. Every step of the gel synthesis was checked by a quality control programme. The therapeutic protocol consists of the once-weekly application of PG. Progressive reduction of the wound size, granulation tissue forming, wound bed detersion, regression and absence of infective processes were considered for evaluating clinical response to hemotherapy. 24 patients were enrolled. They had single or multiple cutaneous ulcers with different ethiopathogenesis. Only 3 patients could perform autologous withdrawal; in the others homologous hemocomponent were used, always considering suitability and traceability criteria for transfusional use of blood. Complete response was observed in 9 patients, 2 were subjected to cutaneous graft, 4 stopped treatment, 9 had partial response and are still receiving the treatment. In each case granulation tissue forming increased following to the first PG applications, while complete re-epithelization was obtained later. Pain was reduced in every treated patient. Topical haemotherapy with PG may be considered as an adjuvant treatment of a multidisciplinary process

  1. Role of Nitric Oxide and Hydrogen Sulfide in the Vasodilator Effect of Ursolic Acid and Uvaol from Black Cherry Prunus serotina Fruits.

    PubMed

    Luna-Vázquez, Francisco J; Ibarra-Alvarado, César; Rojas-Molina, Alejandra; Romo-Mancillas, Antonio; López-Vallejo, Fabián H; Solís-Gutiérrez, Mariana; Rojas-Molina, Juana I; Rivero-Cruz, Fausto

    2016-01-12

    The present research aimed to isolate the non-polar secondary metabolites that produce the vasodilator effects induced by the dichloromethane extract of Prunus serotina (P. serotina) fruits and to determine whether the NO/cGMP and the H2S/KATP channel pathways are involved in their mechanism of action. A bioactivity-directed fractionation of the dichloromethane extract of P. serotina fruits led to the isolation of ursolic acid and uvaol as the main non-polar vasodilator compounds. These compounds showed significant relaxant effect on rat aortic rings in an endothelium- and concentration-dependent manner, which was inhibited by NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), DL-propargylglycine (PAG) and glibenclamide (Gli). Additionally, both triterpenes increased NO and H2S production in aortic tissue. Molecular docking studies showed that ursolic acid and uvaol are able to bind to endothelial NOS and CSE with high affinity for residues that form the oligomeric interface of both enzymes. These results suggest that the vasodilator effect produced by ursolic acid and uvaol contained in P. serotina fruits, involves activation of the NO/cGMP and H2S/KATP channel pathways, possibly through direct activation of NOS and CSE.

  2. [Cutaneous leishmaniasis in Turkey].

    PubMed

    Gürel, Mehmet Salih; Yeşilova, Yavuz; Olgen, M Kirami; Ozbel, Yusuf

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) caused by Leishmania protozoon parasites is a disease which is characterized by long-term nodulo-ulcerative lesions healing spontaneously with scarring. The disease has been well-known in Anatolia for centuries and has different names such as; Urfa boil, Antep boil, year boil, Halep boil, oriental sore and beauty scar. The causative agents are Leishmania tropica and Leishmania tropica/Leishmania infantum in Southeastern Anatolia and East Mediterranean, respectively. CL is a notifiable disease in Turkey and, according to the Ministry of Health official records, 46.003 new cases were reported between 1990 and 2010. Among those cases, 96% of them were reported from the Şanlıurfa, Adana, Osmaniye, Hatay, Diyarbakır, İçel and Kahramanmaraş provinces. Although 45% of cases were notified from Şanlıurfa in the past 20 years, its ratio is currently decreasing while other regions' ratios have been showing an increasing trend. Easier transportation between cities, increased travel migration of the population from rural areas to the peripheral suburbs with inadequate infrastructure and unhealthy housing are thought to be the main factors for spreading the disease from Southeastern Anatolia to other regions of Turkey. Lack of treatment of patients as reservoir hosts because of different reasons and ineffective and inadequate use of insecticides against vector sand flies have also played an important role in spreading the disease. Neglect of this disease by patients and health institutions can also be considered as other factors for the spreading. We believe that, after the strategic plan for leishmaniasis prepared by the Turkish Ministry of Health with the contribution of scientists in 2011 is put into practice, the control of the disease will be more effective.

  3. Angiotensin-(1-7)-induced renal vasodilation in hypertensive humans is attenuated by low sodium intake and angiotensin II co-infusion.

    PubMed

    van Twist, Daan J L; Houben, Alfons J H M; de Haan, Michiel W; Mostard, Guy J M; Kroon, Abraham A; de Leeuw, Peter W

    2013-10-01

    Current evidence suggests that angiotensin-(1-7) plays an important role in the regulation of tissue blood flow. This evidence, however, is restricted to studies in animals and human forearm. Therefore, we studied the effects of intrarenal angiotensin-(1-7) infusion on renal blood flow in hypertensive humans. To assess the influence of renin-angiotensin system activity, sodium intake was varied and co-infusion with angiotensin II was performed in a subgroup. In 57 hypertensive patients who were scheduled for renal angiography, renal blood flow was measured ((133)Xenon washout method) before and during intrarenal infusion of angiotensin-(1-7) (3 incremental doses: 0.27, 0.9, and 2.7 ng/kg per minute). Patients were randomized into low or high sodium intake. These 2 groups of patients received angiotensin-(1-7), with or without intrarenal co-infusion of angiotensin II (0.3 ng/kg per minute). Angiotensin-(1-7) infusion resulted in intrarenal vasodilation in patients adhering to a sodium-rich diet. This vasodilatory effect of angiotensin-(1-7) was clearly attenuated by low sodium intake, angiotensin II co-infusion, or both. Regression analyses showed that the prevailing renin concentration was the only independent predictor of angiotensin-(1-7)-induced renal vasodilation. In conclusion, angiotensin-(1-7) induces renal vasodilation in hypertensive humans, but the effect of angiotensin-(1-7) is clearly attenuated by low sodium intake and co-infusion of angiotensin II. This supports the hypothesis that angiotensin-(1-7) induced renal vasodilation depends on the degree of renin-angiotensin-system activation.

  4. Low K⁺ current in arterial myocytes with impaired K⁺-vasodilation and its recovery by exercise in hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Seo, Eun Yeong; Kim, Hae Jin; Zhao, Zai Hao; Jang, Ji Hyun; Jin, Chun Zi; Yoo, Hae Young; Zhang, Yin-Hua; Kim, Sung Joon

    2014-11-01

    K(+) channels determine the plasma membrane potential of vascular myocytes, influencing arterial tone. In many types of arteries, a moderate increase in [K(+)]e induces vasorelaxation by augmenting the inwardly rectifying K(+) channel current (I Kir). K(+)-vasodilation matches regional tissue activity and O2 supply. In chronic hypertension (HT), small arteries and arterioles undergo various changes; however, ion channel remodeling is poorly understood. Here, we investigated whether K(+) channels and K(+)-induced vasodilation are affected in deep femoral (DFA) and cerebral artery (CA) myocytes of angiotensin II-induced hypertensive rats (Ang-HT). Additionally, we tested whether regular exercise training (ET) restores HT-associated changes in K(+) channel activity. In Ang-HT, both the voltage-gated K(+) channel current (I Kv) and I Kir were decreased in DFA and CA myocytes, and were effectively restored and further increased by combined ET for 2 weeks (HT-ET). Consistently, K(+)-vasodilation of the DFA was impaired in Ang-HT, and recovered in HT-ET. Interestingly, ET did not reverse the decreased K(+)-vasodilation of CA. CA myocytes from the Ang-HT and HT-ET groups demonstrated, apart from K(+) channel changes, an increase in nonselective cationic current (I NSC). In contrast, DFA myocytes exhibited decreased I NSC in both the Ang-HT and HT-ET groups. Taken together, the decreased K(+) conductance in Ang-HT rats and its recovery by ET suggest increased peripheral arterial resistance in HT and the anti-hypertensive effects of ET, respectively. In addition, the common upregulation of I NSC in the CA in the Ang-HT and HT-ET groups might imply a protective adaptation preventing excessive cerebral blood flow under HT and strenuous exercise.

  5. [Effects of vasodilators on cyclic contraction induced by 3,4-diaminopyridine in isolated porcine coronary arteries].

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Y; Imai, S

    1987-06-01

    3,4-Diaminopyridine (3,4-DAP), which is known to decrease K conductance, produced spontaneous repetitive phasic contractions of a regular (28/60) and an irregular (15/60) cycle or tonic contraction (16/60) following a latent period of 5-100 min in isolated porcine coronary arteries. Effects of pinacidil, a newly-synthesized vasodilator, were investigated using the preparation in which 3,4-DAP produced phasic contractions of the regular cycle in comparison with those of various vasodilators. Pinacidil produced dose-dependent prolongation of the cycle and reduced the peak tension and the tension at the relaxation phase, a mode of action that closely resembles that of nicorandil, suggesting the increase in K conductance and hyperpolarization. Nifedipine (10(-8) M) and dilazep (10(-4) M) markedly reduced the peak tension, while adenosine, dipyridamole and nitroglycerin did not produce such effects. The latter three drugs produced a prolongation of the cycle and reduced the tension of the relaxation phase. These data suggest that reduction of K conductance and activation of the voltage-dependent Ca channel may play an important role in initiation of the spontaneous repetitive phasic contraction in porcine coronary artery.

  6. [Cutaneous lupus erythematosus, a multidimensional entity].

    PubMed

    Méndez-Flores, Silvia; Tinoco-Fragoso, Fátima; Hernández-Molina, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Skin lesions caused by systemic lupus erythematosus are among the most frequent manifestations of this disease. These lesions show great variability in both their clinical and histological expression, making their understanding and study difficult. Patients presenting with cutaneous lupus do not necessarily have serious systemic complications, but they do have significant morbidity from impact on quality of life given the extent of the lesions, chronic tendency, and the risk of scarring; hence the importance of establishing a fast and effective treatment. This paper addresses the different varieties of specific injuries attributed to lupus erythematosus, correlation with systemic activity, quality of life, and the treatments available.

  7. Recent advances in cutaneous lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Dummer, Reinhard; Asagoe, Kenji; Cozzio, Antonio; Burg, Günter; Doebbeling, Udo; Golling, Philippa; Fujii, Kazuyasu; Urosevic, Mirjana

    2007-12-01

    Cutaneous lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of extranodal lymphomas that are characterized by an initial accumulation of mononuclear, mostly lymphocytic cells in the skin. Recent discoveries of changes in molecular biology and immunology of these tumors have paved the way to a better understanding of the processes that govern lymphomagenesis in the skin and more importantly, they have contributed to the development of the new WHO-EORTC classification system. Only now has the field of cutaneous lymphomas gained a novel, long-awaited basis that may act as a new starting point in the collection of clinical as well molecular and immunological data on comparative basis. This review will try to highlight the newest findings in the pathogenesis of primary cutaneous T- and B-cell lymphomas, hematodermic neoplasm and HTLV-1 positive disorders as well as their translation into efficient therapeutic strategies.

  8. Reactive cutaneous cytophagocytosis in nocardiosis.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chi-Yeon; Kim, Tae-Heung; Lee, Won-Sup; Lee, Ai-Young

    2002-01-01

    Cutaneous nocardiosis, which usually manifests in the form of pustules, abscesses, or subcutaneous nodules, is occasionally found in immunocompromised patients. A 59-yr-old Korean man with myasthenia gravis and thymoma developed nodular skin lesions on his trunk. Histopathologically, abscess formation with a dense infiltrate of neutrophils and many cytophagic histiocytes were observed. Numerous filamentous organisms, which turned out to be Nocardia asteroides by culture, were also found. After sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim therapy, all of the skin lesions rapidly decreased in size, with a marked diminution of the number of cytophagic histiocytes, and cleared up within four months. On reporting a case of cutaneous nocardiosis showing unusual histopathologic findings, we considered that reactive conditions should be included in the differential diagnosis of the cutaneous cytophagocytosis, and that nocardiosis could be one of the diseases showing reactive cytophagocytosis. PMID:11961320

  9. Diving Response in Rats: Role of the Subthalamic Vasodilator Area

    PubMed Central

    Golanov, Eugene V.; Shiflett, James M.; Britz, Gavin W.

    2016-01-01

    Diving response (DR) is a powerful integrative response targeted toward survival of the hypoxic/anoxic conditions. Being present in all animals and humans, it allows to survive adverse conditions like diving. Earlier, we discovered that forehead stimulation affords neuroprotective effect, decreasing infarction volume triggered by permanent occlusion of the middle cerebral artery in rats. We hypothesized that cold stimulation of the forehead induces DR in rats, which, in turn, exerts neuroprotection. We compared autonomic [AP, heart rate (HR), cerebral blood flow (CBF)] and EEG responses to the known DR-triggering stimulus, ammonia stimulation of the nasal mucosa, cold stimulation of the forehead, and cold stimulation of the glabrous skin of the tail base in anesthetized rats. Responses in AP, HR, CBF, and EEG to cold stimulation of the forehead and ammonia vapors instillation into the nasal cavity were comparable and differed significantly from responses to the cold stimulation of the tail base. Excitotoxic lesion of the subthalamic vasodilator area (SVA), which is known to participate in CBF regulation and to afford neuroprotection upon excitation, failed to affect autonomic components of the DR evoked by forehead cold stimulation or nasal mucosa ammonia stimulation. We conclude that cold stimulation of the forehead triggers physiological response comparable to the response evoked by ammonia vapor instillation into nasal cavity, which is considered as stimulus triggering protective DR. These observations may explain the neuroprotective effect of the forehead stimulation. Data demonstrate that SVA does not directly participate in the autonomic adjustments accompanying DR; however, it is involved in diving-evoked modulation of EEG. We suggest that forehead stimulation can be employed as a stimulus capable of triggering oxygen-conserving DR and can be used for neuroprotective therapy. PMID:27708614

  10. Effect of body temperature on cold induced vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Flouris, Andreas D; Westwood, David A; Mekjavic, Igor B; Cheung, Stephen S

    2008-10-01

    Cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD) is an acute increase in peripheral blood flow observed during cold exposures. It is hypothesized to protect against cold injuries, yet despite continuous research it remains an unexplained phenomenon. Contrary to the traditionally held view, we propose that CIVD is a thermoregulatory reflex mechanism contributing to heat loss. Ten adults (4 females; 23.8 +/- 2.0 years) randomly underwent three 130-min exposures to -20 degrees C incorporating a 10-min moderate exercise period at the 65th min, while wearing a liquid conditioning garment (LCG) and military arctic clothing. In the pre-warming condition, rectal temperature was increased by 0.5 degrees C via the LCG before the cold exposure. In the warming condition, participants regulated the LCG throughout the cold exposure to subjective comfort. In the control condition, the LCG was worn but was not operated either before or during the cold exposure. Results demonstrated that the majority of CIVD occurred during the warming condition when the thermometrically-estimated mean body temperature (T (b)) was at its highest. A thermoregulatory pattern was identified whereby CIVD occurred soon after T (b) increased past a threshold (approximately 36.65 degrees C in warming and pre-warming; approximately 36.4 degrees C in control). When CIVD occurred, T (b) was reduced and CIVD ceased when T (b) fell below the threshold. These findings were independent of extremity temperature since CIVD episodes occurred at a large range of finger temperatures (7.2-33.5 degrees C). These observations were statistically confirmed by auto-regressive integrated moving average analysis (t = 9.602, P < 0.001). We conclude that CIVD is triggered by increased T (b) supporting the hypothesis that CIVD is a thermoregulatory mechanism contributing to heat loss.

  11. The sandfly fauna, anthropophily and the seasonal activities of Pintomyia spinicrassa (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) in a focus of cutaneous leishmaniasis in northeastern Colombia.

    PubMed

    Ovallos, Fredy Galvis; Silva, Yanis Ricardo Espinosa; Fernandez, Nelson; Gutierrez, Reynaldo; Galati, Eunice Aparecida Bianchi; Sandoval, Claudia Magaly

    2013-05-01

    This study was conducted to identify the sandfly fauna and the anthropophilic species in a coffee-growing area of Villanueva, Norte de Santander, Colombia, a focus of American cutaneous leishmaniasis, and to analyse the relationship between the most frequent species and rainfall, relative humidity and temperature, with the aim of contributing to epidemiological surveillance in the area. Sandfly collections were performed fortnightly between February 2006-September 2007 using automatic light traps, Shannon traps, protected human bait and aspiration in resting places. A total of 7,051 sandflies belonging to 12 species were captured. Pintomyia spinicrassa (95.7%) predominated. Pintomyia oresbia and Lutzomyia sp. of Pichinde were found in the state of Norte de Santander for the first time. Pi. spinicrassa, Pintomyia nuneztovari, Micropygomyia venezuelensis, Lutzomyia (Helcocyrtomyia) scorzai and Lu. (Helcocyrtomyia) sp. were captured on the protected human bait. A significant association between Pi. spinicrassa abundance and the total rainfall and the average temperature and humidity 10 days before the collection was observed. The dominance of Pi. spinicrassa, a recognised vector of Leishmania braziliensis, especially during the dry periods, indicates that the risk of parasite transmission may increase.

  12. TRPV1 and TRPA1 in cutaneous neurogenic and chronic inflammation: pro-inflammatory response induced by their activation and their sensitization.

    PubMed

    Gouin, Olivier; L'Herondelle, Killian; Lebonvallet, Nicolas; Le Gall-Ianotto, Christelle; Sakka, Mehdi; Buhé, Virginie; Plée-Gautier, Emmanuelle; Carré, Jean-Luc; Lefeuvre, Luc; Misery, Laurent; Le Garrec, Raphaele

    2017-03-31

    Cutaneous neurogenic inflammation (CNI) is inflammation that is induced (or enhanced) in the skin by the release of neuropeptides from sensory nerve endings. Clinical manifestations are mainly sensory and vascular disorders such as pruritus and erythema. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 and ankyrin 1 (TRPV1 and TRPA1, respectively) are non-selective cation channels known to specifically participate in pain and CNI. Both TRPV1 and TRPA1 are co-expressed in a large subset of sensory nerves, where they integrate numerous noxious stimuli. It is now clear that the expression of both channels also extends far beyond the sensory nerves in the skin, occuring also in keratinocytes, mast cells, dendritic cells, and endothelial cells. In these non-neuronal cells, TRPV1 and TRPA1 also act as nociceptive sensors and potentiate the inflammatory process. This review discusses the role of TRPV1 and TRPA1 in the modulation of inflammatory genes that leads to or maintains CNI in sensory neurons and non-neuronal skin cells. In addition, this review provides a summary of current research on the intracellular sensitization pathways of both TRP channels by other endogenous inflammatory mediators that promote the self-maintenance of CNI.

  13. The sandfly fauna, anthropophily and the seasonal activities of Pintomyia spinicrassa (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) in a focus of cutaneous leishmaniasis in northeastern Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Ovallos, Fredy Galvis; Silva, Yanis Ricardo Espinosa; Fernandez, Nelson; Gutierrez, Reynaldo; Galati, Eunice Aparecida Bianchi; Sandoval, Claudia Magaly

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to identify the sandfly fauna and the anthropophilic species in a coffee-growing area of Villanueva, Norte de Santander, Colombia, a focus of American cutaneous leishmaniasis, and to analyse the relationship between the most frequent species and rainfall, relative humidity and temperature, with the aim of contributing to epidemiological surveillance in the area. Sandfly collections were performed fortnightly between February 2006-September 2007 using automatic light traps, Shannon traps, protected human bait and aspiration in resting places. A total of 7,051 sandflies belonging to 12 species were captured. Pintomyia spinicrassa (95.7%) predominated. Pintomyia oresbia and Lutzomyia sp. of Pichinde were found in the state of Norte de Santander for the first time. Pi. spinicrassa, Pintomyia nuneztovari, Micropygomyia venezuelensis, Lutzomyia (Helcocyrtomyia) scorzai and Lu. (Helcocyrtomyia) sp. were captured on the protected human bait. A significant association between Pi. spinicrassa abundance and the total rainfall and the average temperature and humidity 10 days before the collection was observed. The dominance of Pi. spinicrassa, a recognised vector of Leishmania braziliensis, especially during the dry periods, indicates that the risk of parasite transmission may increase. PMID:23778653

  14. Mechanisms of rapid vasodilation after a brief contraction in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Crecelius, Anne R; Kirby, Brett S; Luckasen, Gary J; Larson, Dennis G; Dinenno, Frank A

    2013-07-01

    A monophasic increase in skeletal muscle blood flow is observed after a brief single forearm contraction in humans, yet the underlying vascular signaling pathways remain largely undetermined. Evidence from experimental animals indicates an obligatory role of vasodilation via K⁺-mediated smooth muscle hyperpolarization, and human data suggest little to no independent role for nitric oxide (NO) or vasodilating prostaglandins (PGs). We tested the hypothesis that K⁺-mediated vascular hyperpolarization underlies the rapid vasodilation in humans and that combined inhibition of NO and PGs would have a minimal effect on this response. We measured forearm blood flow (Doppler ultrasound) and calculated vascular conductance 10 s before and for 30 s after a single 1-s dynamic forearm contraction at 10%, 20%, and 40% maximum voluntary contraction in 16 young adults. To inhibit K⁺-mediated vasodilation, BaCl₂ and ouabain were infused intra-arterially to inhibit inwardly rectifying K⁺ channels and Na⁺-K⁺-ATPase, respectively. Combined enzymatic inhibition of NO and PG synthesis occurred via NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA; NO synthase) and ketorolac (cyclooxygenase), respectively. In protocol 1 (n = 8), BaCl₂ + ouabain reduced peak vasodilation (range: 30-45%, P < 0.05) and total postcontraction vasodilation (area under the curve, ~55-75% from control) at all intensities. Contrary to our hypothesis, L-NMMA + ketorolac had a further impact (peak: ~60% and area under the curve: ~80% from control). In protocol 2 (n = 8), the order of inhibitors was reversed, and the findings were remarkably similar. We conclude that K⁺-mediated hyperpolarization and NO and PGs, in combination, significantly contribute to contraction-induced rapid vasodilation and that inhibition of these signaling pathways nearly abolishes this phenomenon in humans.

  15. 6-Gingerol alleviates exaggerated vasoconstriction in diabetic rat aorta through direct vasodilation and nitric oxide generation

    PubMed Central

    Ghareib, Salah A; El-Bassossy, Hany M; Elberry, Ahmed A; Azhar, Ahmad; Watson, Malcolm L; Banjar, Zainy Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect and potential mechanism of action of 6-gingerol on alterations of vascular reactivity in the isolated aorta from diabetic rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into two experimental groups, control and diabetics. Diabetes was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (50 mg kg−1), and the rats were left for 10 weeks to develop vascular complications. The effect of in vitro incubation with 6-gingerol (0.3–3 μM) on the vasoconstrictor response of the isolated diabetic aortae to phenylephrine and the vasodilator response to acetylcholine was examined. Effect of 6-gingerol was also examined on aortae incubated with methylglyoxal as an advanced glycation end product (AGE). To investigate the mechanism of action of 6-gingerol, the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (100 μM), guanylate cyclase inhibitor methylene blue (5 μM), calcium-activated potassium channel blocker tetraethylammonium chloride (10 mM), and cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin (5 μM) were added 30 minutes before assessing the direct vasorelaxant effect of 6-gingerol. Moreover, in vitro effects of 6-gingerol on NO release and the effect of 6-gingerol on AGE production were examined. Results showed that incubation of aortae with 6-gingerol (0.3–10 μM) alleviated the exaggerated vasoconstriction of diabetic aortae to phenylephrine in a concentration-dependent manner with no significant effect on the impaired relaxatory response to acetylcholine. Similar results were seen in the aortae exposed to methylglyoxal. In addition, 6-gingerol induced a direct vasodilation effect that was significantly inhibited by Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride and methylene blue. Furthermore, 6-gingerol stimulated aortic NO generation but had no effect on AGE formation. In conclusion, 6-gingerol ameliorates enhanced vascular contraction in diabetic aortae, which may be partially

  16. Cutaneous lesions of the nose

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Skin diseases on the nose are seen in a variety of medical disciplines. Dermatologists, otorhinolaryngologists, general practitioners and general plastic and dermatologic surgeons are regularly consulted regarding cutaneous lesions on the nose. This article is the second part of a review series dealing with cutaneous lesions on the head and face, which are frequently seen in daily practice by a dermatologic surgeon. In this review, we focus on those skin diseases on the nose where surgery or laser therapy is considered a possible treatment option or that can be surgically evaluated. PMID:20525327

  17. Cutaneous manifestation of gastrointestinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Kerstetter, Justin

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) and cutaneous systems are closely linked in origin. Skin manifestations are frequently seen as a part of different GI syndromes. Gastroenterologists play an important role in recognizing the symptoms, patient workup and arriving at appropriate diagnoses, often in consultation with dermatologists. This review discusses the diseases with both cutaneous and intestinal involvement. Hereditary polyposis GI cancers, hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancers (CRCs), hamartomatous disorders, and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are reviewed with emphasis on the genetic basis, diagnostic, histologic findings, screening modalities, and therapeutic options. PMID:27034812

  18. Cutaneous (non-HIV) infections.

    PubMed

    Callahan, E F; Adal, K A; Tomecki, K J

    2000-07-01

    Cutaneous infections continue to represent a large proportion of inpatient dermatology. Though most infectious skin diseases do not warrant hospitalization, some do and can rapidly become fatal if not treated promptly. A selected group of infections are reviewed--primary cutaneous infections, exotoxin-mediated syndromes, and systemic infections--that warrant hospitalization. Dermatologists play a critical role in the synthesis of patient history and appreciation of morphologic skin disease, which, when coupled with appropriate lab tests, may help to establish a diagnosis allowing for the timely implementation of effective and targeted therapy.

  19. Frontal cutaneous meningioma - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Leonor; Coutinho, Ines; Cardoso, José Carlos; Garcia, Helena; Cordeiro, Margarida Robalo

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous meningiomas are rare tumors most commonly located on the scalp. We report the case of a 55-year-old male who presented with a 2x3 cm tumoral lesion on the forehead. The lesion was hard, adherent and covered by normal skin. Incisional biopsy revelead a proliferation of monomorphic round cells, organized in nests and focally forming pseudovascular spaces. Immunohistochemical study revealed positivity for epithelial antigen membrane and vimentin. Vascular markers, cytokeratins and S100 protein were negative. A brain CT scan did not show any evidence of intracranial meningioma. The authors describe the case of a cutaneous frontal meningioma in probable relation with previous cranioencephalic trauma. PMID:26312695

  20. Cutaneous ectopic schistosomiasis: diagnostic challenge*

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Cláudia Renata Castro do Rêgo; Maia, Daniela Cristina Caetano; dos Santos, Josemir Belo; Medeiros, Camila Carolina Queiroz; de Araújo, Jessica Guido

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous schistosomiasis is a rare clinical manifestation of schistosomiasis, an infectious and parasitic disease, caused in Brazil by the trematode Schistosoma mansoni. The lesions are due to the deposition of eggs or, rarely, adult worms, usually involving the genital and groin areas. Extra-genital lesions occur mainly on the torso as papules of zosteriform appearance. The case of a patient with ectopic cutaneous schistosomiasis is reported in this article, due to the rarity of its occurrence and its difficult clinical diagnosis. PMID:26982792

  1. On a Rare Cutaneous Metastasis from a Sacrococcygeal Chordoma

    PubMed Central

    Brunelli, Matteo; Floccari, Federica; De Caro, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Chordomas are rare malignant tumors of notochordal origin and are rare locally aggressive ones with a metastatic potential. The skin rarely is seen as metastatic site. We describe a case of an adult woman with cutaneous metastasis of a primary sacral chordoma excised ten years before, which appeared as a painless cutaneous mass located in the dorsal region. Once removed, the surgical specimen was formalin fixed and in paraffin embedded. Sections were stained with haematoxylin-eosin, and histochemical and immunohistochemical investigations were performed. Histologically, the neoplasia was characterized by cords or single tumor cells with an abundant myxoid stroma, conspicuous pale vacuolated cytoplasm (the classic “physaliphorous cells”), and mild nuclear atypia. Mitotic activity was scanty. At immunohistochemistry, the tumor cells were diffusely positive for S-100 protein, pan-keratins, EMA, and vimentin. A diagnosis of cutaneous metastasis of chordoma was performed. This case illustrates a diagnostic challenge because of the unusual presentation of an already rare tumor.

  2. Disinhibition of neurons of the nucleus of solitary tract that project to the superior salivatory nucleus causes choroidal vasodilation: Implications for mechanisms underlying choroidal baroregulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunyan; Fitzgerald, Malinda E C; Del Mar, Nobel; Reiner, Anton

    2016-10-28

    Preganglionic neurons in the superior salivatory nucleus (SSN) that mediate parasympathetic vasodilation of choroidal blood vessels receive a major excitatory input from the baroresponsive part of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). This input appears likely to mediate choroidal vasodilation during systemic hypotension, which prevents decreases in choroidal blood flow (ChBF) due to reduced perfusion pressure. It is uncertain, however, how low blood pressure signals to NTS from the aortic depressor nerve (ADN), which fires at a low rate during systemic hypotension, could yield increased firing in the NTS output to SSN. The simplest hypothesis is that SSN-projecting NTS neurons are under the inhibitory control of ADN-receptive GABAergic NTS neurons. As part of evaluating this hypothesis, we assessed if SSN-projecting NTS neurons, in fact, receive prominent inhibitory input and if blocking GABAergic modulation of them increases ChBF. We found that SSN-projecting NTS neuronal perikarya identified by retrograde labeling are densely coated with GABAergic terminals, but lightly coated with excitatory terminals. We also found that, infusion of the GABA-A receptor antagonist GABAzine into NTS increased ChBF. Our results are consistent with the possibility that low blood pressure signals from the ADN produce vasodilation in choroid by causing diminished activity in ADN-receptive NTS neurons that tonically suppress SSN-projecting NTS neurons.

  3. Involvement of endothelium-dependent and -independent mechanisms in midazolam-induced vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Colussi, Gian Luca; Di Fabio, Alessandro; Catena, Cristiana; Chiuch, Alessandra; Sechi, Leonardo A

    2011-08-01

    Benzodiazepine (BDZ) infusion has been shown to reduce blood pressure in both humans and animals. Although the inhibitory effects of BDZ on the central nervous system have been well documented, less is known about the direct effects of BDZ on the vascular bed. The aims of this study were to assess the effects of the BDZ midazolam on the vascular system in C57/BL6 mouse aortic rings and to investigate the mechanisms of its direct vascular action. We found that midazolam induced reversible, dose-dependent vasodilation in potassium- and phenylephrine-precontracted rings. In rings that were precontracted with potassium or phenylephrine, treatment with 10 μmol l(-1) midazolam increased vasodilation by 15 and 60%, respectively, compared with baseline. Vasodilation increased by 80 and 87%, respectively, after treatment with 50 μmol l(-1) midazolam. Only the low concentration of midazolam (10 μmol l(-1)) induced endothelium-dependent vasodilation in phenylephrine-precontracted rings. Vasodilation increased by 60% in rings with endothelium and by 20% in rings without endothelium. Conversely, only the high concentration of midazolam (50 μmol l(-1)) reduced the CaCl(2)-induced vasoconstriction of aortic rings with EC(50) (the concentration giving 50% of the maximal effect) values of 1 and 6 mmol l(-1) for vehicle- and midazolam-treated rings, respectively. Furthermore, the incubation of phenylephrine-precontracted rings with an inhibitor of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester or the inhibitors of central or peripheral type BDZ receptors (flumazenil or PK 11195, respectively) produced no change in midazolam-induced vasodilation. Thus, low concentrations of midazolam induce vasodilation via an endothelium-dependent mechanism that does not involve NO production. In contrast, high concentrations of midazolam induce vasodilation via an endothelium-independent mechanism that implies reduced sensitivity of aortic rings to calcium ions. Additionally

  4. Endogenous nitric oxide attenuates neutrally mediated cutaneous vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki, Manabu; Durand, Sylvain; Davis, Scott L; Cui, Jian; Low, David A; Keller, David M; Crandall, Craig G

    2007-12-01

    Cutaneous vasoconstrictor responsiveness may be impaired by substance(s) directly or indirectly responsible for cutaneous active vasodilatation. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that endogenous nitric oxide (NO) attenuates the reduction in cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) during an orthostatic challenge combined with whole-body heating, as well as during whole-body cooling. In protocol 1, healthy subjects were pretreated with an intradermal injection of botulinum toxin A (BTX) to block the release of neurotransmitters from nerves responsible for cutaneous active vasodilatation. On the experimental day, a microdialysis probe was placed at the BTX-treated site as well as at two adjacent untreated sites. NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 10 mm) was perfused through the probe placed at the BTX-treated site and at one untreated site. After confirmation of the absence of cutaneous vasodilatation at the BTX site during whole-body heating, adenosine was infused through the microdialysis probe at this site to increase skin blood flow to a level similar to that at the untreated site. Subsequently, 30 and 40 mmHg lower-body negative pressures (LBNPs) were applied. The reduction in CVC to LBNP was greatest at the BTX-treated site (15.0 +/- 2.4% of the maximum level (% max)), followed by the L-NAME-treated site (11.3 +/- 2.6% max), and then the untreated site (3.8 +/- 3.0% max; P < 0.05 for all comparisons). In protocol 2, two microdialysis membranes were inserted in the dermal space of one forearm. Adenosine alone was infused at one site while the other site received adenosine and L-NAME. The reduction in CVC in response to whole-body cooling was significantly greater at the L-NAME-treated site than at the adjacent adenosine alone site. These results suggest that endogenous NO is capable of attenuating cutaneous vasoconstrictor responsiveness.

  5. Jabuticaba-Induced Endothelium-Independent Vasodilating Effect on Isolated Arteries

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Daniela Medeiros Lobo; Borges, Leonardo Luis; Torres, Ieda Maria Sapateiro; da Conceição, Edemilson Cardoso; Rocha, Matheus Lavorenti

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite the important biological effects of jabuticaba, its actions on the cardiovascular system have not been clarified. Objectives: To determine the effects of jabuticaba hydroalcoholic extract (JHE) on vascular smooth muscle (VSM) of isolated arteries. Methods: Endothelium-denuded aortic rings of rats were mounted in isolated organ bath to record isometric tension. The relaxant effect of JHE and the influence of K+ channels and Ca2+ intra- and extracellular sources on JHE-stimulated response were assessed. Results: Arteries pre-contracted with phenylephrine showed concentration-dependent relaxation (0.380 to 1.92 mg/mL). Treatment with K+ channel blockers (tetraethyl-ammonium, glibenclamide, 4-aminopyridine) hindered relaxation due to JHE. In addition, phenylephrine-stimulated contraction was hindered by previous treatment with JHE. Inhibition of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase did not change relaxation due to JHE. In addition, JHE inhibited the contraction caused by Ca2+ influx stimulated by phenylephrine and KCl (75 mM). Conclusion: JHE induces endothelium-independent vasodilation. Activation of K+ channels and inhibition of Ca2+ influx through the membrane are involved in the JHE relaxant effect. PMID:27533258

  6. Cardiac output and vasodilation in the vasovagal response: An analysis of the classic papers.

    PubMed

    Wieling, Wouter; Jardine, David L; de Lange, Frederik J; Brignole, Michele; Nielsen, Henning B; Stewart, Julian; Sutton, Richard

    2016-03-01

    The simple faint is secondary to hypotension and bradycardia resulting in transient loss of consciousness. According to Ohm's law applied to the circulation, BP = SVR × CO, hypotension can result from a decrease in systemic vascular resistance (SVR), cardiac output (CO), or both. It is important to understand that when blood pressure (BP) is falling, SVR and CO do not change reciprocally as they do in the steady state. In 1932, Lewis, assuming that decreased SVR alone accounted for hypotension, defined "the vasovagal response" along pathophysiologic lines to denote the association of vasodilation with vagal-induced bradycardia in simple faint. Studies performed by Barcroft and Sharpey-Schafer between 1940 and 1950 used volume-based plethysmography to demonstrate major forearm vasodilation during extreme hypotension and concluded that the main mechanism for hypotension was vasodilation. Plethysmographic measurements were intermittent and not frequent enough to capture rapid changes in blood flow during progressive hypotension. However, later investigations by Weissler, Murray, and Stevens performed between 1950 and 1970 used invasive beat-to-beat BP measurements and more frequent measurements of CO using the Fick principle. They demonstrated that CO significantly fell before syncope, and little vasodilation occurred until very late in the vasovagal reaction Thus, since the 1970s, decreasing cardiac output rather than vasodilation has been regarded as the principal mechanism for the hypotension of vasovagal syncope.

  7. Contribution of K(+) channels to endothelium-derived hypolarization-induced renal vasodilation in rats in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Kasper Moller Boje; Braunstein, Thomas Hartig; Salomonsson, Max; Brasen, Jens Christian; Sorensen, Charlotte Mehlin

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the mechanisms behind the endothelial-derived hyperpolarization (EDH)-induced renal vasodilation in vivo and in vitro in rats. We assessed the role of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels and whether K(+) released from the endothelial cells activates inward rectifier K(+) (Kir) channels and/or the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Also, involvement of renal myoendothelial gap junctions was evaluated in vitro. Isometric tension in rat renal interlobar arteries was measured using a wire myograph. Renal blood flow was measured in isoflurane anesthetized rats. The EDH response was defined as the ACh-induced vasodilation assessed after inhibition of nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase using L-NAME and indomethacin, respectively. After inhibition of small conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (SKCa) and intermediate conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (IKCa) (by apamin and TRAM-34, respectively), the EDH response in vitro was strongly attenuated whereas the EDH response in vivo was not significantly reduced. Inhibition of Kir channels and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPases (by ouabain and Ba(2+), respectively) significantly attenuated renal vasorelaxation in vitro but did not affect the response in vivo. Inhibition of gap junctions in vitro using carbenoxolone or 18α-glycyrrhetinic acid significantly reduced the endothelial-derived hyperpolarization-induced vasorelaxation. We conclude that SKCa and IKCa channels are important for EDH-induced renal vasorelaxation in vitro. Activation of Kir channels and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPases plays a significant role in the renal vascular EDH response in vitro but not in vivo. The renal EDH response in vivo is complex and may consist of several overlapping mechanisms some of which remain obscure.

  8. Parasitic Diseases With Cutaneous Manifestations.

    PubMed

    Ash, Mark M; Phillips, Charles M

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic diseases result in a significant global health burden. While often thought to be isolated to returning travelers, parasitic diseases can also be acquired locally in the United States. Therefore, clinicians must be aware of the cutaneous manifestations of parasitic diseases to allow for prompt recognition, effective management, and subsequent mitigation of complications. This commentary also reviews pharmacologic treatment options for several common diseases.

  9. Cutaneous vasculitis: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Carlson, J Andrew; Cavaliere, L Frank; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2006-01-01

    Vasculitis is histologically defined as inflammatory cell infiltration and destruction of blood vessels. Vasculitis is classified as primary (idiopathic, eg, cutaneous leukocytoclastic angiitis, Wegener's granulomatosis) or secondary, a manifestation of connective tissue diseases, infections, adverse drug eruptions, or a paraneoplastic phenomenon. Cutaneous vasculitis, manifested as urticaria, purpura, hemorrhagic vesicles, ulcers, nodules, livedo, infarcts, or digital gangrene, is a frequent and often significant component of many systemic vasculitic syndromes such as lupus or rheumatoid vasculitis and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated primary vasculitic syndromes such as Churg-Strauss syndrome. In most instances, cutaneous vasculitis represents a self-limited, single-episode phenomenon, the treatment of which consists of general measures such as leg elevation, warming, avoidance of standing, cold temperatures and tight fitting clothing, and therapy with antihistamines, aspirin, or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. More extensive therapy is indicated for symptomatic, recurrent, extensive, and persistent skin disease or coexistence of systemic disease. For mild recurrent or persistent disease, colchicine and dapsone are first-choice agents. Severe cutaneous and systemic disease requires more potent immunosuppression (prednisone plus azathioprine, methotrexate, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporine, or mycophenolate mofetil). In cases of refractory vasculitis, plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin are viable considerations. The new biologic therapies that work via cytokine blockade or lymphocyte depletion such as tumor alpha inhibitor infliximab and the anti-B-cell antibody rituximab, respectively, are showing benefit in certain settings such as Wegener's granulomatosis, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis, Behçet's disease, and cryoglobulinemic vasculitis.

  10. Vacuum Enhanced Cutaneous Biopsy Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Joseph

    1999-06-25

    A syringe-like disposable cutaneous biopsy instrument equipped with a tubular blade at its lower end, and designed so that a vacuum is created during use, said vacuum serving to retain undeformed a plug of tissue cut from a patient's skin.

  11. Cutaneous hazards of the coast.

    PubMed

    Burke, W A

    1997-06-01

    Through recreational and commercial pursuits, more people than ever before are coming in contact with coastal waters containing a variety of bacteria, aquatic flora, and sea creatures potentially harmful to the skin. It is important for dermatology nurses to be aware of some of the more common cutaneous hazards related to the coastal environment as well as the basic treatment of these problems.

  12. Vacuum enhanced cutaneous biopsy instrument

    DOEpatents

    Collins, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    A syringe-like disposable cutaneous biopsy instrument equipped with a tubular blade at its lower end, and designed so that a vacuum is created during use, said vacuum serving to retain undeformed a plug of tissue cut from a patient's skin.

  13. Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome: cutaneous manifestations*

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Stolf, Hamilton Ometto; Polizel, Juliana Ocanha; Munhoz, Tânia; Brandão, Marcela Calixto; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar

    2016-01-01

    Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome is the current name for clinical manifestations of diseases previously known as “infantile systemic hyalinosis” and “juvenile hyaline fibromatosis”. The authors report representative clinical cases of each one of the above subtypes with emphasis on cutaneous manifestations and difficulties for early diagnosis in this syndrome, essentially of multidisciplinary approach. PMID:27192526

  14. Molecular Bases of Cutaneous and Uveal Melanomas

    PubMed Central

    Gaudi, Sudeep; Messina, Jane L.

    2011-01-01

    Intensive research in recent years has begun to unlock the mysteries surrounding the molecular pathogenesis of melanoma, the deadliest of skin cancers. The high-penetrance, low-frequency susceptibility gene CDKN2A produces tumor suppressor proteins that function in concert with p53 and retinoblastoma protein to thwart melanomagenesis. Aberrant CDKN2A gene products have been implicated in a great many cases of familial cutaneous melanoma. Sporadic cases, on the other hand, often involve constitutive signal transduction along the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, with particular focus falling upon mutated RAS and RAF protooncogenes. The proliferative effects of the MAPK pathway may be complemented by the antiapoptotic signals of the PI3K/AKT pathway. After skin, melanoma most commonly affects the eye. Data for the constitutive activation of the MAPK pathway in uveal melanoma exists as well, however, not through mutations of RAS and RAF. Rather, evidence implicates the proto-oncogene GNAQ. In the following discussion, we review the major molecular pathways implicated in both familial and sporadic cutaneous melanomagenesis, the former accounting for approximately 10% of cases. Additionally, we discuss the molecular pathways for which preliminary evidence suggests a role in uveal melanomagenesis. PMID:21876842

  15. Wound Healing of Cutaneous Sulfur Mustard Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Graham, John S.; Chilcott, Robert P.; Rice, Paul; Milner, Stephen M.; Hurst, Charles G.; Maliner, Beverly I.

    2005-01-01

    Sulfur mustard is an alkylating chemical warfare agent that primarily affects the eyes, skin, and airways. Sulfur mustard injuries can take several months to heal, necessitate lengthy hospitalizations, and result in significant cosmetic and/or functional deficits. Historically, blister aspiration and/or deroofing (epidermal removal), physical debridement, irrigation, topical antibiotics, and sterile dressings have been the main courses of action in the medical management of cutaneous sulfur mustard injuries. Current treatment strategy consists of symptomatic management and is designed to relieve symptoms, prevent infections, and promote healing. There are currently no standardized or optimized methods of casualty management that prevent or minimize deficits and provide for speedy wound healing. Several laboratories are actively searching for improved therapies for cutaneous vesicant injury, with the aim of returning damaged skin to optimal appearance and normal function in the shortest time. Improved treatment will result in a better cosmetic and functional outcome for the patient, and will enable the casualty to return to normal activities sooner. This editorial gives brief overviews of sulfur mustard use, its toxicity, concepts for medical countermeasures, current treatments, and strategies for the development of improved therapies. PMID:16921406

  16. Simulated Microgravity Increases Cutaneous Blood Flow in the Head and Leg of Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stout, M. Shannon; Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Breit, Gregory A.; Hargens, Alan R.

    1995-01-01

    The cutaneous microcirculation vasodilates during acute 6 degree head-down tilt (HDT, simulated microgravity) relative to upright conditions, more in the lower body than in the upper body. Cutaneous microvascular blood flow was measured with laser-Doppler flowmetry at the leg (over the distal tibia) and cheek (over the zygomatic arch) of eight healthy men before, during, and after 24 h of HDT. Results were calculated as a percentage of baseline value (100% measured during pre-tilt upright sitting). Cutaneous blood flow in the cheek increased significantly to 165 +/- 37% (mean +/- SE, p less than 0.05) at 9-12 h HDT, then returned to near baseline values by 24 h HDT (114 +/- 29%, NSD), despite increased local arterial pressure. Microvascular flow in the leg remained significantly elevated above baseline througout 24 h HDT (427 +/- 85% at 3 h HDT and 215 +/- 142% at 24 h HDT, p less than 0.05). During the 6-h upright sitting recovery period, cheek and leg blood flow levels returned to near pre-tilt baseline values. Because hydrostatic effects of HDT increase local arterial pressure at the carotid sinus, baroreflex-mediated withdrawal of sympathetic tone probably contributed to increased microvascular flows at the head and leg during HDT. In the leg baroreflex effects combined with minimal stimulation of local veno-arteriolar and myogenic autoregulatory vasoconstriction to elicit relatively larger and more sustained increases in cutaneous flow during HDT. In the cheek, delayed myogenic vasoconstriction and/or hurmonal effects apparently compensated for flow elevation by 24 h of HDT. Therefore, localized vascular adaptations to gravity probably explain differences in acclimation of lower and upper body blood flow to HDT and actual microgravity.

  17. Prolonged (9 h) poikilocapnic hypoxia (12% O2) augments cutaneous thermal hyperaemia in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Lawley, Justin S; Oliver, Samuel J; Mullins, Paul G; Macdonald, Jamie H; Moore, Jonathan P

    2014-06-01

    The primary aim of this study was to investigate the effect of systemic poikilocapnic hypoxia on forearm cutaneous thermal hyperaemia. A secondary aim was to examine the relationship between the individual susceptibility to oxygen desaturation and cutaneous vasodilator capacity. Twelve healthy participants (seven male) were exposed to 9 h of normoxia and 12% poikilocapnic hypoxia in a temperature- and humidity-controlled environmental chamber. Skin blood flow was assessed at the ventral forearm using laser Doppler flowmetry combined with rapid local heating. After 6 min at baseline (skin temperature clamped at 33°C), local skin temperature was elevated at a rate of 0.5°C every 5 s up to 42°C to elicit a sensory axon response and then held constant for 30 min to cause a plateau. Skin blood flow was calculated as cutaneous vascular conductance [CVC; in perfusion units/mean arterial blood pressure (APU mmHg(-1))] and expressed in raw format and relative to heating at 44°C in normoxia (%CVC44). During hypoxaemia, vasodilatation was greater during the initial peak (raw, Δ0.35 APU mmHg(-1), P = 0.09; %CVC44, Δ18%, P = 0.05) and the plateau phase (raw, Δ0.55 APU mmHg(-1), P = 0.03; %CVC44, Δ26%, P = 0.02). The rate of rise in cutaneous blood flow during the initial peak was significantly greater during poikilocapnic hypoxia (P < 0.01). We observed a negative relationship between oxygen saturation in poikilocapnic hypoxia and the change in baseline (P = 0.06), initial peak (P = 0.01) and plateau phase of thermal hyperaemia (P = 0.01). Prolonged poikilocapnic hypoxia causes robust increases in CVC during both phases of thermal hyperaemia that are dependent on the oxygen saturation of the individual.

  18. Tempol improves cutaneous thermal hyperemia through increasing nitric oxide bioavailability in young smokers.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Naoto; Brunt, Vienna E; Minson, Christopher T

    2014-06-01

    We recently found that young cigarette smokers display cutaneous vascular dysfunction relative to nonsmokers, which is partially due to reduced nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS)-dependent vasodilation. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that reducing oxidative stress improves NO bioavailability, enhancing cutaneous vascular function in young smokers. Ten healthy young male smokers, who had smoked for 6.3 ± 0.7 yr with an average daily consumption of 9.1 ± 0.7 cigarettes, were tested. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) during local heating to 42°C at a rate of 0.1°C/s was evaluated as laser-Doppler flux divided by mean arterial blood pressure and normalized to maximal CVC, induced by local heating to 44°C plus sodium nitroprusside administration. We evaluated plateau CVC during local heating, which is known to be highly dependent on NO, at four intradermal microdialysis sites with 1) Ringer solution (control); 2) 10 μM 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (tempol), a superoxide dismutase mimetic; 3) 10 mM N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine (l-NNA), a nonspecific NOS inhibitor; and 4) a combination of 10 μM tempol and 10 mM l-NNA. Tempol increased plateau CVC compared with the Ringer solution site (90.0 ± 2.3 vs. 77.6 ± 3.9%maximum, P = 0.028). Plateau CVC at the combination site (56.8 ± 4.5%maximum) was lower than the Ringer solution site (P < 0.001) and was not different from the l-NNA site (55.1 ± 4.6%maximum, P = 0.978), indicating the tempol effect was exclusively NO dependent. These data suggest that in young smokers, reducing oxidative stress improves cutaneous thermal hyperemia to local heating by enhancing NO production.

  19. Robust Brain Hyperglycemia during General Anesthesia: Relationships with Metabolic Brain Inhibition and Vasodilation

    PubMed Central

    Bola, R. Aaron; Kiyatkin, Eugene A.

    2016-01-01

    Glucose is the main energetic substrate for the metabolic activity of brain cells and its proper delivery into the extracellular space is essential for maintaining normal neural functions. Under physiological conditions, glucose continuously enters the extracellular space from arterial blood via gradient-dependent facilitated diffusion governed by the GLUT-1 transporters. Due to this gradient-dependent mechanism, glucose levels rise in the brain after consumption of glucose-containing foods and drinks. Glucose entry is also accelerated due to local neuronal activation and neuro-vascular coupling, resulting in transient hyperglycemia to prevent any metabolic deficit. Here, we explored another mechanism that is activated during general anesthesia and results in significant brain hyperglycemia. By using enzyme-based glucose biosensors we demonstrate that glucose levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) strongly increase after iv injection of Equthesin, a mixture of chloral hydrate and sodium pentobarbital, which is often used for general anesthesia in rats. By combining electrochemical recordings with brain, muscle, and skin temperature monitoring, we show that the gradual increase in brain glucose occurring during the development of general anesthesia tightly correlate with decreases in brain-muscle temperature differentials, suggesting that this rise in glucose is related to metabolic inhibition. While the decreased consumption of glucose by brain cells could contribute to the development of hyperglycemia, an exceptionally strong positive correlation (r = 0.99) between glucose rise and increases in skin-muscle temperature differentials was also found, suggesting the strong vasodilation of cerebral vessels as the primary mechanism for accelerated entry of glucose into brain tissue. Our present data could explain drastic differences in basal glucose levels found in awake and anesthetized animal preparations. They also suggest that glucose entry into brain tissue could be

  20. CGRP, a vasodilator neuropeptide that stimulates neuromuscular transmission and EC coupling.

    PubMed

    Vega, Ana Victoria; Avila, Guillermo

    2010-05-01

    Calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) is a vasodilator; its plasma levels are altered in several human diseases, including migraine, hypertension and diabetes. CGRP is locally released by motor neurons, and is overexpressed in response to surgical or pharmacological blockage of neuromuscular transmission. Additionally to a brief discussion with regard to the clinical relevance of CGRP, this review focuses on the effects of CGRP on skeletal muscle excitation-contraction (EC) coupling, as well as the corresponding pathophysiological consequences. EC coupling involves activation of 2 different types of calcium channels: dihydropyridine receptors (DHPRs) located at the sarcolemma, and ryanodine receptors (RyR1s) located at the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). In response to electrical depolarization, DHPRs activate nearby and physically bound RyR1s, allowing Ca(2+) from the SR to move into the cytosol (termed voltage-gated Ca(2+) release, or VGCR). We recently found that CGRP stimulates VGCR by 350 % in as short as 1h. This effect, which lasts for at least 48 h, is due to activation of the CGRP receptor, and requires activation of the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. CGRP also increases the amplitude of caffeine-induced Ca(2+) release (400 %); suggesting increased SR Ca(2+) content underlies stimulation of VGCR. Interestingly, in the long-term CGRP also increases the density of sarcolemmal DHPRs (up to 30%, within 24-48 h). We propose that these CGRP effects may contribute to prevent and/or restore symptoms in central core disease (CCD); a congenital myopathy that is linked to mutations in the gene encoding RyR1.

  1. Vasodilator-Stimulated Phosphoprotein Deficiency Potentiates PAR-1-induced Increase in Endothelial Permeability in Mouse Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Profirovic, Jasmina; Han, Jingyan; Andreeva, Alexandra V.; Neamu, Radu F.; Pavlovic, Sasha; Vogel, Stephen M.; Walter, Ulrich; Voyno-Yasenetskaya, Tatyana A.

    2010-01-01

    Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) is implicated in the protection of the endothelial barrier in vitro and in vivo. VASP function in thrombin signaling in the endothelial cells (ECs) is not known. For the first time we studied the effects of VASP deficiency on EC permeability and pulmonary vascular permeability in response to thrombin receptor stimulation. We provided the evidence that VASP deficiency potentiates the increase in endothelial permeability induced by activation of thrombin receptor in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and isolated mouse lungs. Using transendothelial resistance measurement, we showed that siRNA-mediated VASP downregulation in HUVECs leads to a potentiation of thrombin- and protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1) agonist-induced increase in endothelial permeability. Compared to control cells, VASP-deficient HUVECs had delayed endothelial junctional reassembly and abrogated VE-cadherin cytoskeletal anchoring in the recovery phase after thrombin stimulation, as demonstrated by immunofluorescence studies and cell fractionation analysis, respectively. Measurement of the capillary filtration coefficient in isolated mouse lungs demonstrated that VASP−/− mice have increased microvascular permeability in response to infusion with PAR-1 agonist compared to wild type mice. Lack of VASP led to decreased Rac1 activation both in VASP-deficient HUVECs after thrombin stimulation and VASP−/− mouse lungs after PAR-1 agonist infusion, indicating that VASP effects on thrombin signaling may correlated with changes in Rac1 activity. This study demonstrates that VASP may play critical and complex role in the regulation of thrombin-dependent disruption of the endothelial barrier function. PMID:20945373

  2. Associations of resting heart rate with endothelium-dependent vasodilation and shear rate.

    PubMed

    Laosiripisan, Jitanan; Parkhurst, Kristin L; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2017-01-01

    Heart rate is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and a hemodynamic factor that can modulate blood flow as it affects the frequency of shear stimuli acting on the arterial wall. However, the association between heart rate and endothelium-dependent vasodilation remains highly controversial. We determined the association between heart rate at rest and endothelium-dependent vasodilation in 98 apparently healthy adults (18-63 years). The mild and positive association between heart rate and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was no longer significant when age and sex or baseline diameter were controlled for. The path analyses revealed that heart rate was not directly related to FMD but the association was indirectly mediated by shear rate, which was confirmed by a bias-corrected bootstrap 95% CIs (0.0157-0.1056). We concluded that even though heart rate and endothelium-dependent vasodilation were associated with shear rate, there was no independent relation between heart rate and FMD.

  3. Semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase: role in the vasculature and vasodilation after in situ inhibition.

    PubMed

    Vidrio, H

    2003-01-01

    1. The characteristics of semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO) are reviewed and the unknown physiological or pathological role of this enzyme emphasized. 2. The various mechanisms of action proposed for the vasodilator drug hydralazine are considered. In particular, the inhibitory action on various enzymes, related or not to cardiovascular function, are discussed. 3. Studies linking inhibition of SSAO to hydralazine hypotension are reviewed and a general hypothesis relating both actions is presented. The hypothesis postulates that (a). vascular SSAO is involved in the regulation of vascular tone, and (b). hydralazine vasodilation is the consequence of vascular SSAO inhibition. 4. Evidence supporting these postulates is presented and vascular SSAO inhibition is proposed as a novel mechanism of vasodilation.

  4. Lenalidomide for refractory cutaneous manifestations of pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Wu, E Y; Schanberg, L E; Wershba, E C; Rabinovich, C E

    2017-05-01

    Objective Cutaneous manifestations of pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus cause significant morbidity. Lenalidomide, a thalidomide analogue, has shown promise treating cutaneous lupus erythematosus in adults. Our objective was to evaluate lenalidomide's efficacy and safety in treating refractory cutaneous manifestations of pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods We performed a retrospective chart review of 10 adolescents who received lenalidomide for recalcitrant cutaneous lupus erythematosus. Information was gathered at drug initiation and 6-month follow-up. The Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test was used to assess change in quantitative parameters of disease activity. Results Nine subjects were girls and six were African-American. Indications for lenalidomide treatment included alopecia, nasal and oral ulcers, extensive malar rash, discoid lesions, bullous lesions, panniculitis, cutaneous vasculitis, and Raynaud's phenomenon with digital ulcerations. Within 6 months, all patients demonstrated complete or near resolution based on physician report. Prednisone dose decreased from a mean 23.5 mg (SD± 13.3) to 12.25 mg (SD± 9.2) ( P= 0.008). Sedimentation rate decreased from a mean 29 mm/hour (SD± 31.5) to 17 mm/hour (SD± 18.1) ( P= 0.004). Lenalidomide was well tolerated. Conclusion Lenalidomide is an effective and safe treatment for a spectrum of dermatological conditions in pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus. Its use may allow a reduction in prednisone dose and decreased disfigurement. Prospective study is needed to clarify lenalidomide's role in treating cutaneous manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus.

  5. Vasodilation effect of 2-benzyl-5-hydroxy-6-methoxy-3, 4-dihydroisoquinolin-1-one.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei-Qi; Xiong, Zhi-Zheng; Chen, Ting-Ting; Gao, Xiao-Yan; Yu, Hang; Zhang, San-Qi; Cao, Yong-Xiao

    2012-08-01

    A 2-Benzyl-5-hydroxy-6-methoxy-3, 4-dihydroisoquinolin-1-one (ZC2) is a newly synthesized isoquinolinone compound. Its effect on vasodilation was evaluated in the present study. Isometric tension of rat artery rings was recorded by a sensitive myography system in vitro. The results showed that ZC2 relaxed rat mesenteric arteries pre-contracted by KCl, phenylephrine and 9, 11- dideoxy- 11α, 9α-epoxymethano-prostaglandin F2α (U46619), and abdominal aorta pre-contracted by KCl in a concentration-dependent manner. The ZC2-induced vasodilation was not affected by an endothelium denudation. ZC2 rightwards shifted the concentration-contraction curves, induced by KCl, phenylephrine, and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in a non-parallel manner, which suggests that the vasodilation effects are most likely via voltage-dependent calcium channel (VDCC) and receptor-operated calcium channel (ROCC). Moreover, in Ca(2+)-free medium, ZC2 concentration-dependently depressed the vasoconstrictions induced by phenylephrine and CaCl(2), and decreased a contractile response induced by caffeine, which indicates a role of extracellular Ca(2+) influx inhibition through VDCC and ROCC, and intracellular Ca(2+) release from Ca(2+) store via the ryanodine receptors. Glibenclamide did not affect the vasodilation induced by ZC2, suggesting that ATP sensitive potassium channel is not involved in the vasodilation. The results indicate that ZC2 induces vasodilation by inhibiting the VDCC and ROCC, and receptormediated Ca(2+) influx and release. The inhibition of intracellular Ca(2+) release may be mediated via the ryanodine receptors.

  6. Acute dietary nitrate supplementation enhances compensatory vasodilation during hypoxic exercise in older adults.

    PubMed

    Casey, Darren P; Treichler, David P; Ganger, Charles T; Schneider, Aaron C; Ueda, Kenichi

    2015-01-15

    We have previously demonstrated that aging reduces the compensatory vasodilator response during hypoxic exercise due to blunted nitric oxide (NO) signaling. Recent evidence suggests that NO bioavailability can be augmented by dietary nitrate through the nitrate-nitrite pathway. Thus we tested the hypothesis that acute dietary nitrate supplementation increases the compensatory vasodilator response to hypoxic exercise, particularly in older adults. Thirteen young (25 ± 1 yr) and 12 older (64 ± 2 yr) adults performed rhythmic forearm exercise at 20% of maximum voluntary contraction during normoxia and hypoxia (∼80% O2 saturation); both before (control) and 3 h after beetroot juice (BR) consumption. Forearm vascular conductance (FVC; ml·min(-1)·100 mmHg(-1)) was calculated from forearm blood flow (ml/min) and blood pressure (mmHg). Compensatory vasodilation was defined as the relative increase in FVC due to hypoxic exercise (i.e., % increase compared with respective normoxic exercise trial). Plasma nitrite was determined from venous blood samples obtained before the control trials and each of the exercise trials (normoxia and hypoxia) after BR. Consumption of BR increased plasma nitrite in both young and older adults (P < 0.001). During the control condition, the compensatory vasodilator response to hypoxic exercise was attenuated in older compared with young adults (3.8 ± 1.7% vs. 14.2 ± 1.2%, P < 0.001). Following BR consumption, compensatory vasodilation did not change in young (13.7 ± 3.3%, P = 0.81) adults but was substantially augmented in older adults (11.4 ± 2.1%, P < 0.01). Our data suggest that acute dietary nitrate supplementation increases the compensatory vasodilator response to hypoxic exercise in older but not young adults.

  7. 4-Chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline inhibits activation of Syk kinase to suppress mast cells in vitro and mast cell-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Kui Lea; Ko, Na Young; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Do Kyun; Kim, Hyuk Soon; Kim, A-Ram; Her, Erk; Kim, Bokyung; Kim, Hyung Sik; Moon, Eun-Yi; Kim, Young Mi; Kim, Hang-Rae; Choi, Wahn Soo

    2011-12-15

    4-Chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline is a quinoxaline derivative. We aimed to study the effects of 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline on activation of mast cells in vitro and in mice. 4-Chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline reversibly inhibited degranulation of mast cells in a dose-dependent manner, and also suppressed the expression and secretion of TNF-{alpha} and IL-4 in mast cells. Mechanistically, 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline inhibited activating phosphorylation of Syk and LAT, which are crucial for early Fc{epsilon}RI-mediated signaling events, as well as Akt and MAP kinases, which play essential roles in the production of various pro-inflammatory cytokines in mast cells. Notably, although 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline inhibited the activation of Fyn and Syk, minimal inhibition was observed in mast cells in the case of Lyn. Furthermore, consistent with its in vitro activity, 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline significantly suppressed mast cell-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in mice. In summary, the results from this study demonstrate that 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline shows an inhibitory effect on mast cells in vitro and in vivo, and that this is mediated by inhibiting the activation of Syk in mast cells. Therefore, 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline could be useful in the treatment of mast cell-mediated allergic diseases. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline is a quinoxaline derivative. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline on mast cells was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline reversibly inhibited Syk activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 4-chlorotetrazolo[1,5-a]quinoxaline could be useful for IgE-mediated allergy.

  8. Reconstructive dosimetry for cutaneous radiation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lima, C.M.A.; Lima, A.R.; Degenhardt, Ä.L.; Valverde, N.J.; Da Silva, F.C.A.

    2015-01-01

    According to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a relatively significant number of radiological accidents have occurred in recent years mainly because of the practices referred to as potentially high-risk activities, such as radiotherapy, large irradiators and industrial radiography, especially in gammagraphy assays. In some instances, severe injuries have occurred in exposed persons due to high radiation doses. In industrial radiography, 80 cases involving a total of 120 radiation workers, 110 members of the public including 12 deaths have been recorded up to 2014. Radiological accidents in industrial practices in Brazil have mainly resulted in development of cutaneous radiation syndrome (CRS) in hands and fingers. Brazilian data include 5 serious cases related to industrial gammagraphy, affecting 7 radiation workers and 19 members of the public; however, none of them were fatal. Some methods of reconstructive dosimetry have been used to estimate the radiation dose to assist in prescribing medical treatment. The type and development of cutaneous manifestations in the exposed areas of a person is the first achievable gross dose estimation. This review article presents the state-of-the-art reconstructive dosimetry methods enabling estimation of local radiation doses and provides guidelines for medical handling of the exposed individuals. The review also presents the Chilean and Brazilian radiological accident cases to highlight the importance of reconstructive dosimetry. PMID:26445332

  9. Current clinical overview of cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Lens, Marko

    This article reviews current evidence on epidemiology, diagnosis and management of cutaneous melanoma. Incidence of cutaneous melanoma is rising in all Caucasian populations across the world; thus, melanoma represents a significant public health burden. Although, incidence of melanoma is in continuous increase, a decrease of mortality and improved survival has been observed in most western European populations. Clinical characteristics of four major types of melanoma (superficial spreading, nodular, lentigo maligna melanoma and acral lentiginous melanoma) have been described. Surgical removal of melanoma remains the standard care in all primary melanomas. Current evidence suggests use of 1 to 2 cm excision margins. Wider margins may be necessary in patients with thicker melanomas with higher risk for local recurrence. In the treatment of regional lymph nodes elective lymphadenectomy has been surpassed by the sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB). However, although prognostic value of SLNB has been confirmed, its therapeutical benefit still needs to be evaluated. Currently there is no standard adjuvant therapy for melanoma although interferon-alpha has been the most widely used treatment in the adjuvant setting. The role of metastasectomy (removal of distant metastases) is still controversial. Chemotherapeutic agents have a limited activity in patients with metastatic melanoma with response rates up to 25%. Although different vaccines have been tested in melanoma patients their role still remain to be established in phase III trials. Progresses in molecular biology and genetics of melanoma may lead to the development of novel melanoma therapies.

  10. Muscle pain inhibits cutaneous touch perception.

    PubMed

    Stohler, C S; Kowalski, C J; Lund, J P

    2001-06-01

    The processing of noxious and non-noxious sensations differs between chronic pain syndromes, and we believe that studies of sensory processing in the presence of pain will help to clarify the aetiology of the conditions. Here we measured in humans the threshold-level mechanosensitivity in tonic experimental muscle pain. We found (1) that muscle pain induced by hypertonic saline reduced cutaneous threshold-level mechanosensitivity at the site of pain and at the mirror site in the contralateral face, (2) that this effect outlasted the sensation of pain, (3) that it was more pronounced when the painful area was reported to be large, and (4) that the loss of mechanosensitivity was greater in males than females. Comparing our findings to results obtained with other pain models, all classes of nociceptors do not seem to have the same effect on cutaneous mechanosensitivity. The observed threshold-level hypoesthesia is consistent with the hypothesis that the increased mechanical thresholds found in clinic cases of temporomandibular disorders and cervicobrachialgia are a direct result of the activation of muscle nociceptors.

  11. Association of Piebaldism, multiple café-au-lait macules, and intertriginous freckling: clinical evidence of a common pathway between KIT and sprouty-related, ena/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein homology-1 domain containing protein 1 (SPRED1).

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yvonne E; Dugan, Stefanie; Basel, Donald; Siegel, Dawn H

    2013-01-01

    Piebaldism is a rare genodermatosis caused by KIT mutations. We report the case of a 5-year-old boy who had the white forelock and leukoderma of piebaldism, but the presence of many café-au-lait macules and axillary and inguinal freckling complicated the diagnosis. Patients with similar cutaneous findings have been previously reported, and their disorder has been attributed to an overlap of piebaldism and neurofibromatosis type 1. Legius syndrome is a recently described syndrome caused by Sprouty-related, Ena/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein homology-1 domain containing protein 1 (SPRED1) mutations that also has multiple café-au-lait macules and intertriginous freckling. Based on our current understanding of KIT and SPRED1 protein interactions, we propose that café-au-lait macules and freckling may be seen in some patients with piebaldism and does not necessarily represent coexistence of neurofibromatosis type 1.

  12. Influence of α-adrenergic vasoconstriction on the blunted skeletal muscle contraction-induced rapid vasodilation with aging.

    PubMed

    Casey, Darren P; Joyner, Michael J

    2012-10-15

    We tested the hypothesis that elevated sympathetic tone is responsible for lower peak vasodilation after single muscle contractions in older adults. Young (n = 13, 7 men and 6 women, age: 27 ± 1 yr) and older (n = 13, 7 men and 6 women, age: 69 ± 2 yr) adults performed single forearm contractions at 10%, 20%, and 40% of maximum during 1) control, 2) sympathetic activation via lower body negative pressure (LBNP; -20 mmHg), and 3) intra-arterial infusion of phentolamine (α-adrenergic antagonist). Brachial artery diameter and velocities were measured via Doppler ultrasound, and forearm vascular conductance (FVC; in ml·min(-1)·100 mmHg(-1)) was calculated from blood flow (in ml/min) and blood pressure (in mmHg). Peak vasodilator responses [change in (Δ) FVC from baseline] were attenuated in older adults at 20% and 40% of maximum (P < 0.05). LBNP reduced peak ΔFVC at 10% (98 ± 17 vs. 70 ± 12 ml·min(-1)·100 mmHg(-1)), 20% (144 ± 12 vs. 98 ± 3 ml·min(-1)·100 mmHg(-1)), and 40% (209 ± 20 vs. 161 ± 21 ml·min(-1)·100 mmHg(-1), P < 0.01 vs. control) in younger adults but not in older adults (71 ± 11 vs. 68 ± 11, 107 ± 13 vs. 106 ± 16, and 161 ± 22 vs. 144 ± 22 ml·min(-1)·100 mmHg(-1), respectively, P = 0.22-0.99). With phentolamine, peak ΔFVC was enhanced in older adults at each contraction intensity (100 ± 14, 147 ± 22, and 200 ± 26 ml·min(-1)·100 mmHg(-1), respectively, P < 0.01 vs. control) but not in younger adults (94 ± 13, 153 ± 13, and 224 ± 27 ml·min(-1)·100 mmHg(-1), respectively, P = 0.30-0.81 vs. control). Our data indicate that α-adrenergic vasoconstriction and/or blunted functional sympatholysis might contribute to the age-related decreases in skeletal muscle contraction-induced rapid vasodilation in humans.

  13. Topically applied vitamins and their cutaneous effects.

    PubMed

    Grammaticopoulos, George T; Furtunopoulos, Demetrios G; Zisova, Lilia G

    2004-01-01

    The number of cosmetic products which include vitamins as a constituent has increased three-fold since 1991. Vitamins are commonly used as ingredients of products designed to improve the appearance and health of the skin; for this reason the cutaneous benefits of such products are actively researched by dermatologists and chemists. The present study does a review of the action of topically applied vitamins for local use which improves the function of the skin. We specifically consider the biologic activity of topically applied vitamins, their stability and usefulness. Ways of stabilizing different kinds of vitamins, as well as their stability to oxygen, light, temperature, acids, and bases, are shown. The conclusion suggested by the review is that the efficiency of topically applied vitamins is dependent not only on their good stabilization and concentration but also on the clinical individual tests that can determine the best product for each particular patient.

  14. A new mathematical model to simulate AVA cold-induced vasodilation reaction to local cooling.

    PubMed

    Rida, Mohamad; Karaki, Wafaa; Ghaddar, Nesreen; Ghali, Kamel; Hoballah, Jamal

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to integrate a new mathematical model with a bioheat model, based on physiology and first principles, to predict thermoregulatory arterio-venous anastomoses (AVA) and cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD) reaction to local cooling. The transient energy balance equations of body segments constrained by thermoregulatory controls were solved numerically to predict segmental core and skin temperatures, and arterial blood flow for given metabolic rate and environmental conditions. Two similar AVA-CIVD mechanisms were incorporated. The first was activated during drop in local skin temperature (<32 °C). The second mechanism was activated at a minimum finger skin temperature, T(CIVD, min), where the AVA flow is dilated and constricted once the skin temperature reached a maximum value. The value of T(CIVD,min) was determined empirically from values reported in literature for hand immersions in cold fluid. When compared with published data, the model predicted accurately the onset time of CIVD at 25 min and T(CIVD,min) at 10 °C for hand exposure to still air at 0 °C. Good agreement was also obtained between predicted finger skin temperature and experimentally published values for repeated immersion in cold water at environmental conditions of 30, 25, and 20 °C. The CIVD thermal response was found related to core body temperature, finger skin temperature, and initial finger sensible heat loss rate upon exposure to cold fluid. The model captured central and local stimulations of the CIVD and accommodated observed variability reported in literature of onset time of CIVD reaction and T(CIVD,min).

  15. [Cutaneous ultrasound and dermal fillers].

    PubMed

    Villegas Fernández, C; Burón Álvarez, I; Fernández-Tresguerres Centeno, A; Alfageme Roldán, F; de Cabo Francés, F

    2015-11-01

    Requests for fillers or dermatological implants have dramatically increased in dermatology consultations in the last few years, either for the correction of superficial age-related wrinkles and cutaneous creases or to increase the volume of specific areas (cheeks, lips...). Dermatologists are often the first professionals to provide these treatments. Nevertheless, in other situations, the patients have already been treated, and many of them do not know the type of material that has been implanted or may even deny previous treatment, even when evident on clinical examination. In these occasions, cutaneous ultrasound is an effective and reliable tool for the real-time diagnosis of the kind of implant that has been used, its location, and the study of its possible complications.

  16. Cutaneous manifestations of human toxocariasis.

    PubMed

    Gavignet, Béatrice; Piarroux, Renaud; Aubin, François; Millon, Laurence; Humbert, Philippe

    2008-12-01

    Human toxocariasis is a parasitic disease characterized by the presence of larvae of the genus Toxocara in human tissues. T canis and T cati, the adult roundworms of which are found in dog and cat intestines, respectively, are the most common causative agents of the disease. Toxocaral larvae usually cause two severe syndromes: visceral larva migrans and ocular larva migrans, depending on the location of the larvae. Two other syndromes, covert toxocariasis and common toxocariasis, which are less typical and not as severe, have also been described. During the last two decades, cutaneous manifestations such as chronic urticaria, chronic pruritus, and miscellaneous eczema, in patients with Toxocara antibodies, have been studied by different authors. In some cases, these cutaneous manifestations are the only signs indicating the presence of the disease, and they are cured after antihelmintic treatment when there is good patient compliance. In this review, we focus on these particular skin manifestations regarding their clinical description, diagnosis, and treatment.

  17. Cutaneous melanoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Papachristou, D N; Kinne, D W; Rosen, P P; Ashikari, R; Fortner, J G

    1979-03-01

    A study of 115 cutaneous melanomas of the breast demonstrated that these neoplasms follow different metastatic patterns than do primary carcinomas of the breast and require a different therapuetic approach. Lesions located below a 3 cm from the clavicle metastasized exclusively to the axillary nodes regardless of location. None of 19 internal mammary node chains examined histologically contained tumor deposits. Microstaging of the primary lesion correlated closely with prognosis and lymph node metastasis. Treatment by mastectomy (radical, modified, extended radical) offered no advantage over local excision of the primary plus axillary dissection. The latter procedure is recommended for all cutaneous melanomas of the breast which require node dissection. Mastectomy is not indicated unless the breast is in the field of wide local excision. Internal mammary node dissections are not indicated.

  18. Cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa: an update.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Fukumi

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous symptoms are observed in 25%-60% of polyarteritis nodosa (PN) patients. On the other hand, cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa (CPN) is designated for the cutaneous limited form of PN and demonstrates benign prognosis. However, there has been much debate on whether or not CPN can progress to PN. Although CPN lesions are fundamentally limited to skin, some CPN cases show extracutaneous symptoms such as peripheral neuropathy and myalgia. According to PN diagnostic criteria, a disease with both cutaneous and at least one extracutaneous symptom with appropriate histopathological findings can be diagnosed as PN. The same is true according to diagnostic criteria established by American College of Rheumatology (ACR). In addition, there are no specific diagnostic criteria for CPN. In this study, CPN cases were retrospectively collected from multiple Japanese clinics, and analyzed for detailed clinical and histopathological manifestations, in order to redefine the clinical entity of CPN and to propose appropriate diagnostic criteria for CPN and PN. According to the CPN description in Rook's Textbook of Dermatology, one of global standard textbooks, we collected 22 cases with appropriate histopathological findings. Of the 22 cases, none progressed to PN or death during the follow-up period, 32% had peripheral neuropathy, and 27% had myalgia. Regarding extracutaneous symptoms with CPN, 17 dermatological specialists in vasculitis sustained the opinion that CPN can be accompanied by peripheral neuropathy and myalgia, but these symptoms are limited to the same area as skin lesions. Based on these results, we devised new drafts for CPN and PN diagnostic criteria. Our study shows the efficacy of these criteria, and most dermatologists recognized that our new diagnostic criteria for CPN and PN are appropriate at the present time. In conclusion, this study suggests that CPN does not progress to PN, and introduces new drafts for CPN and PN diagnostic criteria. (*English

  19. Newly recognized cutaneous drug eruptions.

    PubMed

    Callen, Jeffrey P

    2007-04-01

    Many new drugs are entering the marketplace and although some cutaneous reactions might be noted in the preclinical evaluation, some of the reactions, particularly those that are rare, will not be noted until the drugs enter widespread use. In addition, distinctive reactions may occur, as is the case with epidermal growth factor-receptor inhibitors. Careful observation and evaluation might result in a better understanding of "naturally" occurring skin disease.

  20. Cutaneous metastatic pigmented breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gaitan-Gaona, Francisco; Said, Mirra C; Valdes-Rodriguez, Rodrigo

    2016-03-16

    A 66-year-old woman presented with a 3 cm black, ulcerated nodule located on the skin of the upper abdomen, just below the breast. The lesion was painful to the touch, but the patient reported no other associated symptoms and was otherwise healthy. A 4-mm punch biopsy of the affected skin was obtained and the histological diagnosis was cutaneous metastatic pigmented breast carcinoma.

  1. Cutaneous adverse reactions to lenalidomide.

    PubMed

    Imbesi, S; Allegra, A; Calapai, G; Musolino, C; Gangemi, S

    2015-01-01

    Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory drug (IMiD) used principally in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), myelodysplastic syndromes (MS) and amyloidosis. Adverse reactions related to lenalidomide include myelosuppression (mainly neutropenia but also thrombocytopenia), gastrointestinal problems, skin eruption, atrial fibrillation and asthenia, decreased peripheral blood stem cell yield during stem cell collection, venous thromboembolism, and secondary malignances. In this review we focused our attention on the cutaneous adverse reactions to lenalidomide.

  2. Biology of Human Cutaneous Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Elias G.; Hasskamp, Joanne H.; Sharma, Bhuvnesh K.

    2010-01-01

    A review of the natural behavior of cutaneous melanoma, clinical and pathological factors, prognostic indicators, some basic research and the present and possible futuristic strategies in the management of this disease are presented. While surgery remains to be the most effective therapeutic approach in the management of early primary lesions, there is no standard adjuvant therapy after surgical resection, or for metastatic disease. PMID:24281039

  3. Impaired activation of the fibrinolytic system in children with Henoch-Schönlein purpura: beneficial effect of hydrocortisone plus Sigma-aminocaproic acid therapy on disappearance rate of cutaneous vasculitis and fibrinolysis.

    PubMed

    Prandota, J; Pankow-Prandota, L; Kotecki, L

    2001-01-01

    Systemic vasculitis is a predominant clinical symptom in Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP), and some studies suggested that decreased blood fibrinolytic activity, as well as blood platelets, is of importance in the development of cutaneous vasculitis. Although patients with HSP have normal blood coagulation, little is known about the fibrinolytic system. On the other hand, it is known that the focus of Sigma-aminocaproic acid (EACA) activity in vivo is probably the blood platelet-vessel wall interaction or a vascular component alone. The aim of this study was, therefore, to investigate blood coagulation and fibrinolytic system as well as the effect of hydrocortisone (H) plus EACA therapy (Group I) on plasma antithrombin-III (AT-III), alpha1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha1-PI), alpha2-antiplasmin (alpha2-A), alpha2-macroglobulin (alpha2-M) activity, fibrinogen and plasminogen concentrations in plasma, euglobulin clot lysis time (ELT), and disappearance rate of cutaneous vasculitis in 14 children with HSP aged 7.6 +/- 3.1 (SD) years. Ten patients (8.6 +/- 2.5 years old) were treated with H alone (Group II), and 8 healthy, age-matched children served as controls. Plasma proteinase inhibitor activity was estimated with the kinetic method using Boehringer chromozyme tests before administration of H (9.2 +/- 3.3 mg/kg/d, i.v.) plus EACA (140 +/- 52 mg/kg/d, p.o.) for 5.93 +/- 2.05 days, and 24 hours after the last dose of EACA, as well as before and after treatment with H alone (8.25 +/- 1.74 mg/kg/24 h, i.v.) for 7.1 +/- 1.2 days. It was found that patients with HSP had the initial fibrinogen and plasminogen plasma concentrations significantly increased compared with the controls (Group I: 3.93 +/- 1.3 g/L and 124 +/- 38%; Group II: 4.24 +/- 0.89 g/L and 134 +/- 42% vs. 2.96 +/- 0.34 g/L, and 90 +/- 14%, respectively). Also, there was a marked decrease of the initial plasma alpha2-A activity in Group II compared with the controls (0.69 +/- 0.29 vs. 0.94 +/- 0.11 IU

  4. Cutaneous Chromatophoromas in Captive Snakes.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Gutiérrez, J F; Garner, M M; Kiupel, M

    2016-11-01

    Chromatophoromas are neoplasms arising from pigment-bearing cells (chromatophores) of the dermis. While isolated cases have been reported in the literature, the prevalence and biological behavior of chromatophoromas in snakes are unknown. Forty-two chromatophoromas were identified among 4663 submissions (0.9%) to a private diagnostic laboratory in a 16-year period. The most commonly affected snakes were colubrids (23 cases, 55%) and vipers (8 cases, 19%). The San Francisco garter snake was the most commonly affected species (6 cases; 14% of all affected snake species and 3.7% of all garter snake submissions). No sex predilection was found. The age of 28 snakes ranged from 5 to 27 years. Single cutaneous chromatophoromas were most commonly observed and presented as pigmented cutaneous masses or plaques along any body segment. Euthanasia or death due to progressive neoplastic disease or metastasis was reported in 8 (19%) and 4 (10%) cases, respectively. The survival time of 4 animals ranged from 4 to 36 months. Microscopically, xanthophoromas, iridophoromas, melanocytic neoplasms, and mixed chromatophoromas were identified, with melanocytic neoplasms being most common. Microscopic examination alone was generally sufficient for the diagnosis of chromatophoroma, but immunohistochemistry for S-100 and PNL-2 may be helpful for diagnosing poorly pigmented cases. Moderate to marked nuclear atypia appears to be consistently present in cutaneous chromatophoromas with a high risk of metastasis, while mitotic count, lymphatic invasion, the level of infiltration, and the degree of pigmentation or ulceration were not reliable predictors of metastasis.

  5. Cutaneous Metastasis From Sacral Chordoma.

    PubMed

    Gleghorn, Kristyna; Goodwin, Brandon; Sanchez, Ramon

    2017-04-01

    Chordoma is a rare primary bone malignancy of notochord origin, representing 1-4% of malignant bone tumors., Typically, chordomas follow a slow progressive course with aggressive local extension, multiple recurrences, and metastases. Of particular interest to this case, cutaneous metastasis is exceedingly rare. Diagnosis of this entity can be a challenge due to the rarity of chordoma, as well as the infrequent presentation of distant cutaneous metastasis and non-specific clinical skin findings. We report a case of a 61-year-old male with a history of sacral chordoma treated by wide local excision 8 years prior to presentation developed a nodule on his scalp for 6 weeks. Physical examination revealed a 1 cm rubbery, pink, shiny dome-shaped nodule on his left occipital scalp. Hematoxylin and eosin sections revealed a lobular dermal proliferation of small ovoid cells and larger physaliferous cells with hyperchromatic, displaced nuclei and finely vacuolated "soap-bubble" cytoplasm in a myxoid stroma. Immunohistochemistry of tumor cells showed positivity for both S-100 protein and pancytokeratin (AE1/AE3), while smooth muscle actin (SMA), P63, and CK7 were negative. Additionally, tumor cells stained positive for brachyury. The medical history, clinical presentation, histopathological appearance and immunohistochemical profile are consistent with cutaneous metastasis from sacral chordoma, known as chordoma cutis. This case illustrates the integral role of dermatopathology in the diagnosis of a rare and critical condition.

  6. The effect of microdialysis needle trauma on cutaneous vascular responses in humans.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Gary J; Chiu, Caroline; Kosiba, Wojciech A; Zhao, Kun; Johnson, John M

    2009-04-01

    Microdialysis enables in-depth mechanistic study of the cutaneous circulation in humans. However, whether the insertion or presence of the microdialysis fiber (MDF) affects the skin circulation or its responses is unknown. We tested whether the cutaneous vascular response to whole body heating (WBH) was affected by MDF or by pretreatment with ice (part 1) or local anesthesia (LA; part 2). Eleven subjects participated, 9 in part 1 and 8 in part 2 (5 participated in both). In both parts, four sites on the forearm were selected, providing untreated control, MDF only, ice or LA only, and combined MDF plus ice or LA. A tube-lined suit controlled whole body skin temperature, which was raised to approximately 38 degrees C for WBH. Skin sites were instrumented with laser-Doppler flow probes. Data were expressed as cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC). Baseline levels were not different among sites (P > 0.05). In part 1, the internal temperature for the onset of vasodilation was higher (P > 0.05) with MDF with or without ice pretreatment than at untreated control sites (control 36.6 +/- 0.1 degrees C, Ice 36.5 +/- 0.1, MDF 36.8 +/- 0.1 degrees C, and Ice+MDF 36.8 +/- 0.1 degrees C). Peak CVC during WBH was decreased (P < 0.05) by MDF (control 73 +/- 7 vs. MDF 59 +/- 6% of maximal CVC). Ice (73 +/- 6% of maximal CVC) or Ice+MDF (69 +/- 6% of maximal CVC) did not affect (P > 0.05) peak CVC compared with control. In part 2, the temperature threshold for the onset of vasodilation was increased by MDF with or without LA treatment and by LA alone (P < 0.05; control 36.6 +/- 0.1 degrees C, MDF 36.7 +/- 0.1 degrees C, LA 36.8 +/- 0.1 degrees C, and LA+MDF 36.8 +/- 0.1 degrees C). Peak CVC was decreased by MDF (control 69 +/- 6% of maximal CVC vs. MDF 58 +/- 8% of maximal CVC; P < 0.05). LA only (65 +/- 10% of maximal CVC) or MDF in the presence of LA (73 +/- 12% of maximal CVC) did not affect (P > 0.05) peak CVC compared with control. Thus LA or MDF increases the temperature

  7. Thallium-201 myocardial imaging during coronary vasodilation induced by oral dipyridamole

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, K.L.; Sorenson, S.G.; Albro, P.; Caldwell, J.H.; Chaudhuri, T.; Hamilton, G.W.

    1986-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging of /sup 201/TI injected during maximum exercise has been an important diagnostic tool for coronary artery disease. Pharmacologic coronary vasodilation by i.v. infusion of dipyridamole may be used in lieu of exercise stress for purposes of diagnostic perfusion imaging. However, i.v. dipyridamole is not currently available from commercial sources for widespread routine use. Accordingly, this study was carried out in order to determine whether high dose, oral dipyridamole would be useful as a coronary vasodilator for purposes of diagnostic perfusion imaging. Fifty-eight patients undergoing diagnostic coronary arteriography also had myocardial perfusion imaging with 201TI under conditions of rest, maximum exercise stress, and high dose oral dipyridamole. Of those patients who had a defect on exercise thallium images, 75% also had a perfusion defect on thallium images after high dose oral dipyridamole. These results indicate that oral dipyridamole causes sufficient coronary arteriolar vasodilation and increase of coronary flow in nonstenotic arteries to identify perfusion defects comparable to those seen on maximum exercise stress in at least 75% of cases. In 25% of patients with exercise defects, no perfusion defect was seen after oral dipyridamole. Thus, oral dipyridamole is a potent coronary vasodilator, comparable to exercise stress in most cases, but in a minority of patients may not be comparable to exercise stress.

  8. Pharmacologic effects of a nitrate coronary vasodilator on cardiac perfusion and function, measured semiquantitatively

    SciTech Connect

    Winsor, D.W.; Winsor, T.; Krohn, B.G.; Bernett, J.R.

    1982-09-01

    Peritrate (pentaerythritol tetranitrate), a nitrate coronary vasodilator, was capable of significantly increasing perfusion and function in ischemic heart muscle. The A2 image-processing computer with software developed by Burow was used to evaluate regional perfusion and segmental wall motion in six patients with ischemic areas in the myocardium. These image-processing techniques were satisfactory for evaluation of ischemic heart muscle.

  9. Contribution of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor to exercise-induced vasodilation in health and hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Ozkor, Muhiddin A; Hayek, Salim S; Rahman, Ayaz M; Murrow, Jonathan R; Kavtaradze, Nino; Lin, Ji; Manatunga, Amita; Quyyumi, Arshed A

    2015-02-01

    The role of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) in either the healthy circulation or in those with hypercholesterolemia is unknown. In healthy and hypercholesterolemic subjects, we measured forearm blood flow (FBF) using strain-gauge plethysmography at rest, during graded handgrip exercise, and after sodium nitroprusside infusion. Measurements were repeated after l-NMMA, tetraethylammonium (TEA), and combined infusions. At rest, l-NMMA infusion reduced FBF in healthy but not hypercholesterolemic subjects. At peak exercise, vasodilation was lower in hypercholesterolemic compared to healthy subjects (274% vs 438% increase in FBF, p=0.017). TEA infusion reduced exercise-induced vasodilation in both healthy and hypercholesterolemic subjects (27%, p<0.0001 and -20%, p<0.0001, respectively). The addition of l-NMMA to TEA further reduced FBF in healthy (-14%, p=0.012) but not in hypercholesterolemic subjects, indicating a reduced nitric oxide and greater EDHF-mediated contribution to exercise-induced vasodilation in hypercholesterolemia. In conclusion, exercise-induced vasodilation is impaired and predominantly mediated by EDHF in hypercholesterolemic subjects. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION IDENTIFIER NCT00166166:

  10. The classification and diagnosis of cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Annegret; Landmann, Aysche

    2014-01-01

    Lupus erythematosus (LE) is an inflammatory connective tissue disease of generalized autoimmunity characterized by pathogenic autoantibodies and immune complexes, attributed to loss of immune tolerance. Cutaneous involvement, which appears in the majority of patients with the disease, can present as LE-specific or LE-nonspecific manifestations. The LE-nonspecific manifestations include e.g. vascular skin changes and may be associated with systemic organ manifestations or other autoimmune diseases. In contrast, the LE-specific manifestations encompass the various subtypes of cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE), which are classified as separate entities without or with less severe systemic organ involvement. In the "Duesseldorf Classification", CLE is subdivided into four different categories: acute CLE (ACLE), subacute CLE (SCLE), chronic CLE (CCLE), and intermittent CLE (ICLE). Differentiation between these subtypes is based on clinical features and average duration of the cutaneous lesions, but can also consider histological changes of skin biopsy specimens and laboratory abnormalities. In addition, direct immunofluorescence and photoprovocation may be applied to confirm the diagnosis in specific cases. Further investigations should be considered dependent on the clinical symptoms of the CLE patient and the results of the laboratory tests. A revised scoring system, the Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus Disease Area and Severity Index (RCLASI) has recently been validated to assess disease activity and damage in CLE. In this review, we focus on the classification of CLE and the diagnostic procedures to identify and confirm the different subtypes of the disease.

  11. Cutaneous colesional acquired immunodeficiency syndrome associated Kaposi sarcoma and cryptococcosis.

    PubMed

    Ramdial, Pratistadevi K; Sing, Yetish; Subrayan, Sumeshini; Calonje, Eduardo

    2010-12-01

    The clinicopathologic features of 4 AIDS patients with cutaneous colesional Kaposi sarcoma (KS) and cryptococcosis, a rare phenomenon, are described. Biopsies from 3 patients who were highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-naive demonstrated predominant KS with a conspicuous spindle cell component and small aggregates of cryptococcal yeasts in 2 biopsies and predominant gelatinous cryptococcosis with attenuated KS spindle cells in 1 biopsy. One patient was HAART exposed. He had childhood pulmonary tuberculosis, was treated for disseminated cutaneous cryptococcosis 18 months earlier and presented with cutaneous lesions, odynophagia and massive cervical lymphadenopathy in the eighth week of HAART, after achieving viral suppression and a CD4 cell increase from 28 to 184 cells/μL. His skin biopsy demonstrated a dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, neutrophils, and granulomas with admixed aggregates and single Cryptococcus neoformans and focal aggregation of human herpes virus 8-immunopositive spindle cells. Acid fast bacilli were not identified and mycobacterial molecular studies were negative. The features were compatible with cutaneous cryptococcal immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. His nodal and oropharyngeal biopsies demonstrated dense mixed, including granulomatous, inflammation with few cryptococcal yeasts and acid fast bacilli, confirmed to be Mycobacterium tuberculosis on polymerase chain reaction testing, without KS. These features were also compatible with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, but the exact role of each infection in the extracutaneous sites was unconfirmed. Colesional KS and cryptococcosis served as the sentinel lesion of AIDS in 3 patients and of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in 1 patient.

  12. Inhibiting TRPA1 ion channel reduces loss of cutaneous nerve fiber function in diabetic animals: sustained activation of the TRPA1 channel contributes to the pathogenesis of peripheral diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Koivisto, Ari; Hukkanen, Mika; Saarnilehto, Marja; Chapman, Hugh; Kuokkanen, Katja; Wei, Hong; Viisanen, Hanna; Akerman, Karl E; Lindstedt, Ken; Pertovaara, Antti

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is a devastating complication of diabetes mellitus (DM). Here we test the hypothesis that the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) ion channel on primary afferent nerve fibers is involved in the pathogenesis of PDN, due to sustained activation by reactive compounds generated in DM. DM was induced by streptozotocin in rats that were treated daily for 28 days with a TRPA1 channel antagonist (Chembridge-5861528) or vehicle. Laser Doppler flow method was used for assessing axon reflex induced by intraplantar injection of a TRPA1 channel agonist (cinnamaldehyde) and immunohistochemistry to assess substance P-like innervation of the skin. In vitro calcium imaging and patch clamp were used to assess whether endogenous TRPA1 agonists (4-hydroxynonenal and methylglyoxal) generated in DM induce sustained activation of the TRPA1 channel. Axon reflex induced by a TRPA1 channel agonist in the plantar skin was suppressed and the number of substance P-like immunoreactive nerve fibers was decreased 4 weeks after induction of DM. Prolonged treatment with Chembridge-5861528 reduced the DM-induced attenuation of the cutaneous axon reflex and loss of substance P-like immunoreactive nerve fibers. Moreover, in vitro calcium imaging and patch clamp results indicated that reactive compounds generated in DM (4-hydroxynonenal and methylglyoxal) produced sustained activations of the TRPA1 channel, a prerequisite for adverse long-term effects. The results indicate that the TRPA1 channel exerts an important role in the pathogenesis of PDN. Blocking the TRPA1 channel provides a selective disease-modifying treatment of PDN.

  13. In vitro antimicrobial activity of ozenoxacin against methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes isolated from clinical cutaneous specimens in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kanayama, Shoji; Ikeda, Fumiaki; Okamoto, Kazuaki; Nakajima, Akiko; Matsumoto, Tatsumi; Ishii, Ritsuko; Amano, Ayako; Matsuzaki, Kaoru; Matsumoto, Satoru

    2016-10-01

    Ozenoxacin, a novel non-fluorinated topical quinolone, was assessed for in vitro antimicrobial activity against each 50 isolates of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and Streptococcus pyogenes according to the broth microdilution method recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. The isolates used in this study were recovered from cutaneous specimens of Japanese adult and pediatric patients who visited hospitals in 2014. The MIC90s of ozenoxacin against MSSA, MRSA and S. pyogenes isolates from adult patients were ≤0.06, 4 and ≤0.06 μg/mL, respectively. The MIC90s of ozenoxacin against MSSA and S. pyogenes isolates from pediatric patients were equal to those against the adult isolates. On the other hand, the MIC90s of ozenoxacin against the pediatric MRSA isolates was 0.12 μg/mL, and was 32 times lower than that against the adult isolates. The antimicrobial activity of ozenoxacin against MSSA, MRSA and S. pyogenes was equal to or greater than those of 7 reference antimicrobial agents had been used for the treatment of skin infections. The MICs of ozenoxacin was highly correlated with those of nadifloxacin and levofloxacin in the 50 MRSA isolates (r(2) = 0.906 and 0.833, respectively). However, ozenoxacin kept the potent antimicrobial activity with the MIC ranging from 1 to 4 μg/mL even against MRSA low susceptible (MIC: >64 μg/mL) to nadifloxacin or levofloxacin. Ozenoxacin could represent the first-in-class non-fluorinated quinolone for the topical treatment of various superficial skin infections caused by MSSA, MRSA and S. pyogenes.

  14. Mechanisms of systemic vasodilation by lysozyme-c in septic shock.

    PubMed

    Gotes, Jose; Kasian, Krika; Jacobs, Hans; Cheng, Zhao-Qin; Mink, Steven N

    2012-02-01

    In septic shock (SS), cardiovascular collapse is caused by the release of inflammatory mediators. We previously found that lysozyme-c (Lzm-S), released from leukocytes, contributed to systemic vasodilation in a canine model of SS. We then delineated the pathway by which this occurs in a canine carotid artery organ bath preparation (CAP). We showed that Lzm-S could intrinsically generate hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and that H(2)O(2) subsequently reacted with endogenous catalase to form compound I, an oxidized form of catalase. In turn, compound I led to an increase in cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate to produce vasodilation. However, it was not clear from previous studies whether it is necessary for Lzm-S to bind to the vasculature to cause vasodilation or, alternatively, whether the generation of H(2)O(2) by Lzm-S in the surrounding medium is all that is required. We examined this question in the present study in which we used multiple preparations. In a partitioned CAP, we found that when we added Lzm-S to a partitioned space in which a semipermeable membrane prevented diffusion of Lzm-S to the carotid artery tissue, vasodilation still occurred because of diffusion of H(2)O(2). On the other hand, we found that Lzm-S could accumulate within the vascular smooth muscle layer (VSML) after 7 h of SS in a canine model. We also determined that when Lzm-S was located in close proximity to vascular smooth muscle cells, it could generate H(2)O(2) to produce lengthening in a human cell culture preparation. We conclude that there are two mechanisms by which Lzm-S can cause vasodilation in SS. In one instance, H(2)O(2) generated by Lzm-S in plasma diffuses to the VSML to cause vasodilation. In a second mechanism, Lzm-S directly binds to the VSML, where it generates H(2)O(2) to produce vasodilation.

  15. Cutaneous dermatomyositis in the era of biologicals.

    PubMed

    Wright, Natalie A; Vleugels, Ruth Ann; Callen, Jeffrey P

    2016-01-01

    Dermatomyositis (DM) is a systemic inflammatory condition characterized by cutaneous and muscle findings, in addition to potential involvement of other organ systems. A distinct subtype of DM exists that is categorized by cutaneous findings with absent or minimal muscle involvement, referred to as clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis or dermatomyositis sine myositis. A variety of topical, immunosuppressive, and immunomodulatory therapies have been utilized to treat cutaneous DM. The advent of biological agents including tumor necrosis factor-α antagonists, intravenous immunoglobulin, rituximab, and others has allowed for the use of these agents with varying degrees of success for the treatment of cutaneous DM.

  16. Cutaneous Larva Migrans in Early Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Siddalingappa, Karjigi; Murthy, Sambasiviah Chidambara; Herakal, Kallappa; Kusuma, Marganahalli Ramachandra

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous larva migrans or creeping eruptions is a cutaneous dermatosis caused by hookworm larvae, Ancylostoma braziliense. A 2-month-old female child presented with a progressive rash over the left buttock of 4 days duration. Cutaneous examination showed an urticarial papule progressing to erythematous, tortuous, thread-like tract extending a few centimeters from papule over the left gluteal region. A clinical diagnosis of cutaneous larva migrans was considered. Treatment with albendazole led to complete resolution, confirming the diagnosis. This is to the best of our knowledge, the youngest age at which this condition is being reported. PMID:26538729

  17. Cutaneous histoplasmosis in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Sun, N Z; Augustine, J J; Gerstenblith, M R

    2014-10-01

    Cutaneous histoplasmosis is a rare entity, although it can be seen in a substantial portion of renal transplant recipients with disseminated disease. The prognosis of disseminated disease is worse than isolated cutaneous involvement, and significant delays in diagnosis are reported. We reviewed reports of cutaneous histoplasmosis with and without dissemination in the setting of renal transplantation to examine incidence, timing of diagnosis, clinical features, and prognosis. Remarkable morphologic variability and the non-specific appearance of skin findings suggest that tissue culture is required for definitive diagnosis. Cutaneous lesions represent an easily accessible source for early diagnosis.

  18. Design and testing of diffuse reflectance sensor for continuous monitoring of cutaneous blood perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, P.; Talary, M. S.; Caduff, A.

    2009-07-01

    A dual-wavelength reflectance optical sensor for monitoring cutaneous blood perfusion is presented as a part of multisensor glucose monitoring system. A Monte-Carlo simulation of partial differential pathlengths has been used for the optimization of the distance from light source to detector. The simulation indicated that the light pathlength within the upper vascularised skin layers increases before reaching saturation at separation distances larger than 3 mm. Thus the sensor sensitivity does not benefit from larger source-detector distances. At the same time with a higher separation of the detector from the source, the intensity exponentially decreases while undesirable sensitivity to the muscle perfusion increases. The hardware prototype has been developed based on the simulation findings and tested in a laboratory setting and in a home use study by patients with diabetes. For both testing procedures the optical sensor demonstrated high sensitivity to perfusion changes. The effect of initial cutaneous blood increase under the sensor has been observed which can be associated with pressure-induced vasodilation as a response to the sensor application.

  19. A wearable diffuse reflectance sensor for continuous monitoring of cutaneous blood content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, P.; Talary, M. S.; Caduff, A.

    2009-09-01

    An optical diffuse reflectance sensor for characterization of cutaneous blood content and optimized for continuous monitoring has been developed as part of a non-invasive multisensor system for glucose monitoring. A Monte Carlo simulation of the light propagation in the multilayered skin model has been performed in order to estimate the optimal geometrical separation of the light source and detector for skin and underlying tissue. We have observed that the pathlength within the upper vascular plexus of the skin which defines the sensor sensitivity initially grows with increasing source-detector distance (SDD) before reaching a maximum at 3.5 mm and starts to decay with further increase. At the same time, for distances above 2.4 mm, the sensor becomes sensitive to muscle blood content, which decreases the specificity to skin perfusion monitoring. Thus, the SDDs in the range from 1.5 mm to 2.4 mm satisfy the requirements of sensor sensitivity and specificity. The hardware implementation of the system has been realized and tested in laboratory experiments with a venous occlusion procedure and in an outpatient clinical study in 16 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. For both testing procedures, the optical sensor demonstrated high sensitivity to perfusion change provoking events. The general build-up of cutaneous blood under the sensor has been observed which can be associated with pressure-induced vasodilation as a response to the sensor application.

  20. "Studying the cutaneous microcirculatory response during upper-limb exercise in healthy, older, sedentary people".

    PubMed

    Klonizakis, Markos

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated changes incurred in cutaneous skin blood flux (SKBF) in the superficial veins of the lower limb by upper limb exercise training in the form of arm-cranking in 14 healthy participants over the age of 50 years. Changes in cutaneous microvascular function of the lower leg were assessed using laser Doppler Flowmetry (LDF) during a 30-minute exercise session undertaken over 4-exercise periods. Both SKBF and Time to reach Peak Perfusion (Tmax) were improved significantly during the 2nd (e.g. 121 (± 107.2) vs 280 (± 269.1) and 171 (± 34.4) vs. 247 (± 38.3) respectively) when compared to the first exercise period, while values approaching initial levels in the following stages. The results indicate that the thermoregulatory and vasodilation mechanisms observed during exercise in middle-aged and older healthy people are different to the one appearing in younger age groups, suggesting a more extensive effect of the age-related structural changes than it was previously thought.

  1. Effect of Dietary Docosahexaenoic Acid Supplementation on the Participation of Vasodilator Factors in Aorta from Orchidectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Largo, Carlota; Muñoz, David; Tabernero, María; Baeza, Ramiro; Otero, Cristina; García, Hugo S.; Ferrer, Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    Benefits of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) against cardiovascular diseases have been reported. Vascular tone regulation is largely mediated by endothelial factors whose release is modulated by sex hormones. Since the incidence of cardiovascular pathologies has been correlated with decreased levels of sex hormones, the aim of this study was to analyze whether a diet supplemented with the specific PUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) could prevent vascular changes induced by an impaired gonadal function. For this purpose, control and orchidectomized rats were fed with a standard diet supplemented with 5% (w/w) sunflower oil or with 3% (w/w) sunflower oil plus 2% (w/w) DHA. The lipid profile, the blood pressure, the production of prostanoids and nitric oxide (NO), and the redox status of biological samples from control and orchidectomized rats, fed control or DHA-supplemented diet, were analyzed. The vasodilator response and the contribution of NO, prostanoids and hyperpolarizing mechanisms were also studied. The results showed that orchidectomy negatively affected the lipid profile, increased the production of prostanoids and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and decreased NO production and the antioxidant capacity, as well as the participation of hyperpolarizing mechanisms in the vasodilator responses. The DHA-supplemented diet of the orchidectomized rats decreased the release of prostanoids and ROS, while increasing NO production and the antioxidant capacity, and it also improved the lipid profile. Additionally, it restored the participation of hyperpolarizing mechanisms by activating potassium. Since the modifications induced by the DHA-supplemented diet were observed in the orchidectomized, but not in the healthy group, DHA seems to exert cardioprotective effects in physiopathological situations in which vascular dysfunction exists. PMID:26540339

  2. [Readjustment of the efferent activity of the scratching generator in response to stimulation of cutaneous afferents of the hindlimb of the decerebrate immobilized cat].

    PubMed

    Shimanskiĭ, Iu P; Baev, K V

    1987-01-01

    Rebuildings of the scratching generator efferent activity caused by the phasic electrical stimulation of ipsilateral hindlimb skin nerves during different hindlimb positions were studied in decerebrated immobilized cats. Stimulation was followed by short latency inhibition of the efferent activity. Stimulation did not cause correlation shifts in the common "aiming" and "scratching" activity. Changes in the efferent activity cycle duration and intensity depended on the stimulation phase. Inversion of intensity changes occurred with transition from the middle-force to strong stimulation. A functional role of the dependence of the efferent activity rebuilding on the stimulation phase is considered. The scratching generator is supposed to contain a model of the afferent inflow which enters the spinal cord during real scratching.

  3. Vasodilator responses to dopamine in rat perfused mesentery are age-dependent.

    PubMed Central

    Wanstall, J. C.; O'Donnell, S. R.

    1989-01-01

    1. Dose-dependent vasodilator responses to dopamine, isoprenaline, noradrenaline, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) and sodium nitroprusside were obtained in isolated perfused mesentery preparations, taken from reserpine-treated rats of different ages. The preparations were pretreated with phenoxybenzamine (1 microM) and perfused with physiological salt solution containing cocaine (10 microM), additional KCl (20 mM) and vasopressin (0.1 microM). 2. Vasodilator responses to dopamine were abolished by the dopamine1 (DA1)-selective antagonist SCH 23390 (10 nM) and those to isoprenaline by propranolol (1 microM), but the vasodilator responses to noradrenaline were abolished only when SCH 23390 and propranolol were used together. This indicated that dopamine was acting via DA1-receptors, isoprenaline via beta-adrenoceptors and that noradrenaline could act via DA1-receptors and beta-adrenoceptors in this preparation. 3. Responses to all the vasodilator drugs decreased in magnitude between the ages of 1 and 2 months. Responses to dopamine declined further in 4 month-old rats and were negligible at 6 or 22-24 months of age. Responses to isoprenaline were well maintained up to 6 months of age, but were negligible at 22-24 months. 4. It is concluded that, in the rat mesenteric vasculature, there is a non-specific decline in responses to vasodilator drugs during development (1 to 2 months). Subsequently there is a specific decline in DA1-receptor-mediated and beta-adrenoceptor-mediated responses; the former are lost at an earlier age than the latter. This different time course suggests that age influences receptor numbers, or their coupling to adenylate cyclase, rather than a post-receptor event in the adenylate cyclase/cyclic AMP pathway. PMID:2804550

  4. The role of nitric oxide in the regional vasodilator effects of endothelin-1 in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Fozard, J. R.; Part, M. L.

    1992-01-01

    1. The role of nitic oxide (NO) derived from L-arginine in the regional vasodilator effects of endothelin-1 has been investigated in anaesthetized, spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats in which autonomic reflexes were abolished by ganglion blockade. The experimental design incorporated animals infused with phenylephrine to mimic the peripheral vasconstrictor effects of the NO biosynthesis inhibitors and a single dose per animal paradigm to obviate problems of tachyphylaxis to the vasodilator effects of endothelin-1. 2. Infusion of the inhibitor of NO synthase, N-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) at a dose (5 mg kg-1 min-1) which maximally raised blood pressure did not influence either the fall in blood pressure or the vasodilator responses induced in the hindquarters and carotid vascular beds by endothelin-1 (1 nmol kg-1, i.v.) The duration (but not the initial magnitude) of the vasodepressor response to endothelin-1 was however significantly attenuated (by 49%) during infusion of the more potent inhibitor of NO synthase, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), 2 mg kg-1 min-1. 3. Increasing the dose of L-NAME to 10 and 25 mg kg-1min-1 significantly attenuated, but did not abolish, the falls in blood pressure and hindquarters vasodilator responses to acetylcholine, 1 microgram kg-1, and endothelin-1, 1 nmol kg-1 min-1. The effects were selective in that vasodepressor responses to the endothelium-independent vasodilator, sodium nitroprusside, 1-10 micrograms kg-1 min-1, were unaltered.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1628160

  5. Efferent pathways in sodium overload-induced renal vasodilation in rats.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Nathalia O; de Oliveira, Thiago S; Naves, Lara M; Filgueira, Fernando P; Ferreira-Neto, Marcos L; Schoorlemmer, Gerard H M; de Castro, Carlos H; Freiria-Oliveira, André H; Xavier, Carlos H; Colugnati, Diego B; Rosa, Daniel A; Blanch, Graziela T; Borges, Clayton L; Soares, Célia M A; Reis, Angela A S; Cravo, Sergio L; Pedrino, Gustavo R

    2014-01-01

    Hypernatremia stimulates the secretion of oxytocin (OT), but the physiological role of OT remains unclear. The present study sought to determine the involvement of OT and renal nerves in the renal responses to an intravenous infusion of hypertonic saline. Male Wistar rats (280-350 g) were anesthetized with sodium thiopental (40 mg. kg(-1), i.v.). A bladder cannula was implanted for collection of urine. Animals were also instrumented for measurement of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and renal blood flow (RBF). Renal vascular conductance (RVC) was calculated as the ratio of RBF by MAP. In anesthetized rats (n = 6), OT infusion (0.03 µg • kg(-1), i.v.) induced renal vasodilation. Consistent with this result, ex vivo experiments demonstrated that OT caused renal artery relaxation. Blockade of OT receptors (OXTR) reduced these responses to OT, indicating a direct effect of this peptide on OXTR on this artery. Hypertonic saline (3 M NaCl, 1.8 ml • kg(-1) b.wt., i.v.) was infused over 60 s. In sham rats (n = 6), hypertonic saline induced renal vasodilation. The OXTR antagonist (AT; atosiban, 40 µg • kg(-1) • h(-1), i.v.; n = 7) and renal denervation (RX) reduced the renal vasodilation induced by hypernatremia. The combination of atosiban and renal denervation (RX+AT; n = 7) completely abolished the renal vasodilation induced by sodium overload. Intact rats excreted 51% of the injected sodium within 90 min. Natriuresis was slightly blunted by atosiban and renal denervation (42% and 39% of load, respectively), whereas atosiban with renal denervation reduced sodium excretion to 16% of the load. These results suggest that OT and renal nerves are involved in renal vasodilation and natriuresis induced by acute plasma hypernatremia.

  6. Influence of habitual high dietary fat intake on endothelium-dependent vasodilation

    PubMed Central

    Dow, Caitlin A.; Stauffer, Brian L.; Greiner, Jared J.; DeSouza, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    High-fat diets are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. A potential underlying mechanism for the increased cardiovascular risk is endothelial dysfunction. Nitric oxide (NO)-mediated endothelium-dependent vasodilation is critical in the regulation of vascular tone and overall vascular health. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of dietary fat intake on endothelium-dependent vasodilation. Forty-four middle-aged and older sedentary, healthy adults were studied: 24 consumed a lower fat diet (LFD; 29% ± 1% calories from fat) and 20 consumed a high-fat diet (HFD; 41% ± 1% calories from fat). Four-day diet records were used to assess fat intake, and classifications were based on American Heart Association guidelines (<35% of total calories from fat). Forearm blood flow (FBF) responses to acetylcholine, in the absence and presence of the endothelial NO synthase inhibitor NG-monomethyl-l-arginine (L-NMMA), as well as responses to sodium nitroprusside were determined by plethysmography. The FBF response to acetylcholine was lower (~15%; P < 0.05) in the HFD group (4.5 ± 0.2 to 12.1 ± 0.8 mL/100 mL tissue/min) than in the LFD group (4.6 ± 0.2 to 14.4 ± 0.6 mL/100 mL tissue/min). L-NMMA significantly reduced the FBF response to acetylcholine in the LFD group (~25%) but not in the HFD group. There were no differences between groups in the vasodilator response to sodium nitroprusside. These data indicate that a high-fat diet is associated with endothelium-dependent vasodilator dysfunction due, in part, to diminished NO bioavailability. Impaired NO-mediated endothelium-dependent vasodilation may contribute to the increased cardiovascular risk with high dietary fat intake. PMID:26058441

  7. Influence of habitual high dietary fat intake on endothelium-dependent vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Dow, Caitlin A; Stauffer, Brian L; Greiner, Jared J; DeSouza, Christopher A

    2015-07-01

    High-fat diets are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. A potential underlying mechanism for the increased cardiovascular risk is endothelial dysfunction. Nitric oxide (NO)-mediated endothelium-dependent vasodilation is critical in the regulation of vascular tone and overall vascular health. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of dietary fat intake on endothelium-dependent vasodilation. Forty-four middle-aged and older sedentary, healthy adults were studied: 24 consumed a lower fat diet (LFD; 29% ± 1% calories from fat) and 20 consumed a high-fat diet (HFD; 41% ± 1% calories from fat). Four-day diet records were used to assess fat intake, and classifications were based on American Heart Association guidelines (<35% of total calories from fat). Forearm blood flow (FBF) responses to acetylcholine, in the absence and presence of the endothelial NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine (L-NMMA), as well as responses to sodium nitroprusside were determined by plethysmography. The FBF response to acetylcholine was lower (∼15%; P < 0.05) in the HFD group (4.5 ± 0.2 to 12.1 ± 0.8 mL/100 mL tissue/min) than in the LFD group (4.6 ± 0.2 to 14.4 ± 0.6 mL/100 mL tissue/min). L-NMMA significantly reduced the FBF response to acetylcholine in the LFD group (∼25%) but not in the HFD group. There were no differences between groups in the vasodilator response to sodium nitroprusside. These data indicate that a high-fat diet is associated with endothelium-dependent vasodilator dysfunction due, in part, to diminished NO bioavailability. Impaired NO-mediated endothelium-dependent vasodilation may contribute to the increased cardiovascular risk with high dietary fat intake.

  8. Effects of ageing and fitness on skin-microvessel vasodilator function in humans.

    PubMed

    Tew, Garry A; Klonizakis, Markos; Saxton, John M

    2010-05-01

    The impact of cardiopulmonary fitness (VO(2max)) on the age-related decline in skin-microvessel vasodilator function has not been fully established and the inter-relationships among different measures of microvascular vasodilator function are unknown. We used laser Doppler flowmetry to assess relative changes in forearm skin blood flow to various stimuli in three groups of adults: young (n = 15; 27 +/- 2 years), older sedentary (n = 14; 65 +/- 6 years) and older fit (n = 15; 61 +/- 5 years). Local-heating induced and post-occlusive hyperaemia responses were higher in the young and older fit groups compared to the older sedentary group (P < 0.05) and were moderately correlated with VO(2max) in the pooled cohort of older adults (r = 0.49-0.58; P < 0.05). Peak hyperaemia responses to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside were higher in young compared to older sedentary adults (P < 0.05) and were not associated with VO(2max) in older adults (P > 0.05). Associations among different measures of microvascular vasodilator function were generally moderate at best. In summary, the local heating and reactive hyperaemia data indicate that the age-related decline in skin-microvessel vasodilator function can be ameliorated through regular aerobic exercise training. As this is not supported by the iontophoresis data, we recommend that, when assessing microvascular function, the use of a single physiological or pharmacological stimulation coupled to laser Doppler flowmetry should be avoided. Finally, the moderate correlations between outcomes probably reflect the distinct mediators that are responsible for the vasodilator response to each test.

  9. Topical vasodilator response in skeletonized internal mammary artery: Is there really a difference?

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Syed Raza; Shah, Syed Arbab; Jangda, Muhammad Ahmed; Yaqub, Mohammad Danial; Jangda, Ayesha Altaf; Khan, Maham; Khan, Muhammad Asim; Tomkins, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Aim of the Study: Coronary artery bypass graft surgery is the gold standard for the treatment of multivessel and left main coronary artery disease. However, there is considerable debate that whether left internal mammary artery (IMA) should be taken as pedicled or skeletonized. This study was conducted to assess the difference in blood flow after the application of topical vasodilator in skeletonized and pedicled IMA. Materials and Methods: In this study, each patient underwent either skeletonized (n = 25) or pedicled IMA harvesting (n = 25). The type of graft on each individual patient was decided randomly. Intraoperative variables such as conduit length and blood flow were measured by the surgeon himself. The length of the grafted IMA was carefully determined in vivo, with the proximal and distal ends attached, from the first rib to IMA divergence. The IMA flow was measured on two separate occasions, before and after application of topical vasodilator. Known cases of subclavian artery stenosis and previous sternal radiation were excluded from the study. Results: The blood flow before the application of topical vasodilator was similar in both the groups (P = 0.227). However, the flow was significantly less in pedicled than skeletonized IMA after application of vasodilator (P < 0.0001). Similarly, the length of skeletonized graft was significantly higher than the length of pedicled graft (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Our study signifies that skeletonization of IMA results in increased graft length and blood flow after the application of topical vasodilator. However, we recommend that long-term clinical trials should be conducted to fully determine long-term patency rates of skeletonized IMA. PMID:28182034

  10. Simultaneous Disruption of Mouse ASIC1a, ASIC2 and ASIC3 Genes Enhances Cutaneous Mechanosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sinyoung; Jang, Jun Ho; Price, Margaret P.; Gautam, Mamta; Benson, Christopher J.; Gong, Huiyu; Welsh, Michael J.; Brennan, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    Three observations have suggested that acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) might be mammalian cutaneous mechanoreceptors; they are structurally related to Caenorhabditis elegans mechanoreceptors, they are localized in specialized cutaneous mechanosensory structures, and mechanical displacement generates an ASIC-dependent depolarization in some neurons. However, previous studies of mice bearing a single disrupted ASIC gene showed only subtle or no alterations in cutaneous mechanosensitivity. Because functional redundancy of ASIC subunits might explain limited phenotypic alterations, we hypothesized that disrupting multiple ASIC genes would markedly impair cutaneous mechanosensation. We found the opposite. In behavioral studies, mice with simultaneous disruptions of ASIC1a, -2 and -3 genes (triple-knockouts, TKOs) showed increased paw withdrawal frequencies when mechanically stimulated with von Frey filaments. Moreover, in single-fiber nerve recordings of cutaneous afferents, mechanical stimulation generated enhanced activity in A-mechanonociceptors of ASIC TKOs compared to wild-type mice. Responses of all other fiber types did not differ between the two genotypes. These data indicate that ASIC subunits influence cutaneous mechanosensitivity. However, it is unlikely that ASICs directly transduce mechanical stimuli. We speculate that physical and/or functional association of ASICs with other components of the mechanosensory transduction apparatus contributes to normal cutaneous mechanosensation. PMID:22506072

  11. Ayadualin, a novel RGD peptide with dual antihemostatic activities from the sand fly Lutzomyia ayacuchensis, a vector of Andean-type cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hirotomo; Gomez, Eduardo A; Fujita, Megumi; Ishimaru, Yuka; Uezato, Hiroshi; Mimori, Tatsuyuki; Iwata, Hiroyuki; Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa

    2015-05-01

    Sequence analysis of the Lutzomyia (Lu.) ayacuchensis salivary gland cDNA library identified a short peptide containing an RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) sequence flanked by two cysteine residues in the C-terminal end as the most abundant transcript. In the present study, a recombinant protein of the RGD-containing peptide, designated ayadualin, was expressed in Escherichia coli and its activity was characterized. Ayadualin inhibited both collagen and ADP-induced platelet aggregations by interfering with the binding of integrin αIIbβ3 to fibrinogen. The RGD sequence and cysteine residues located on both sides of the RGD sequence were essential for the inhibitory action. Moreover, ayadualin efficiently inhibited the intrinsic blood coagulation pathway irrespective of the RGD sequence. Measuring the enzymatic activity of coagulation factors using chromogenic substrates revealed that ayadualin efficiently inhibited factor XIIa (FXIIa) activity in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, pre-incubation of ayadualin with FXII inhibited FXIIa activity, while activated FXIIa was not affected by ayadualin, indicating that ayadualin inhibits the activation of FXII, but not enzymatic activity of FXIIa. These results indicated that ayadualin plays an important role in the blood feeding of Lu. ayacuchensis by inhibiting host hemostasis via dual mechanisms.

  12. [Cutaneous melanoma: a review of risk factors].

    PubMed

    Lacasaña Navarro, M; Morales Suárez-Varela, M M; Llopis González, A; Ferrer Caraco, E

    1993-10-01

    In Europe, mortality due to cutaneous malignant melanoma represents 5,000 deaths a year, during this period about 17,000 people develop this disease. The highest incidence rates are those of Northern Europe, where this neoplasm has always been a public health problem, nevertheless countries of southern Europe (Spain, Portugal, Greece, Italy ...) are showing important increments in their rates, during the last years. Because of all of this, it is becoming a public health problem in every white race populations. This increment in its incidence is mainly attributed to changes in lifestyle, with an increase of solar radiation exposure during holidays and leisure activities, increase of tobacco and alcohol consumption, exposure to different chemical substances, use of ultraviolet lamps, etc.

  13. Acute Cutaneous Microvascular Flow Responses to Whole-Body Tilting in Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breit, Gregory A.; Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Ballard, Richard E.; Hargens, Alan R.

    1993-01-01

    The transition from upright to head-down tilt (HDT) posture in humans increases blood pressure superior to the heart and decreases pressure inferior to the heart. Consequently, above heart level, myogenic arteriolar tone probably increases with HDT, in opposition to the withdrawal of baroreceptor-mediated sympathetic tone. We hypothesized that due to antagonism between central and local controls, the response of the facial cutaneous microcirculation to acute postural change will be weaker than that in the leg, where these two mechanisms reinforce each other. Cutaneous microvascular flow was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry simultaneously at the shin and the neck of 7 male and 3 female subjects. Subjects underwent a stepwise tilt protocol from standing control to 54 deg head-up tilt (HUT), 30 deg, 12 deg, O deg, -6 deg (HDT), -12 deg, -6 deg, O deg, 12 deg, 30 deg, 54 deg, and standing, for 30-sec periods with 10-sec transitions between postures. Flows at the shin and the neck increased significantly (P less than 0.05) from standing baseline to 12 deg HUT (252 +/- 55 and 126 +/- 9% (bar X +/- SE) of baseline, respectively). From 12 deg to -12 deg tilt, flows continued to increase at the shin (509 +/- 71% of baseline) but decreased at the neck to baseline levels (100 +/- 15% of baseline). Cutaneous microvascular flow recovered at both sites during the return to standing posture with significant hysteresis. Flow increases from standing to near-supine posture are attributed at both sites to baroreceptor-mediated vasodilation. The great dissimilarity in flow response magnitudes at the two measurement sites may be indicative of central/local regulatory antagonism above heart level and reinforcement below heart level.

  14. Acute Cutaneous Microvascular Flow Responses to Whole-Body Tilting in Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breit, Gregory A.; Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Ballard, Richard E.; Hargens, Alan R.

    1993-01-01

    The transition from upright to head-down tilt (HDT) posture in humans increases blood pressure superior to the heart and decreases pressure inferior to the heart. Consequently, above heart level, myogenic arteriolar tone probably increases with HDT, in opposition to the withdrawal of baroreceptor-mediated sympathetic tone. We hypothesized that due to antagonism between central and local controls, the response of the facial cutaneous micro- circulation to acute postural change will be weaker than that in the leg, where these two mechanisms reinforce each other. Cutaneous microvascular flow was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry simultaneously at the shin and the neck of 7 male and 3 female subjects. Subjects underwent a stepwise tilt protocol from standing control to 54 deg head-up tilt (HUT), 30 deg, 12 deg, 0 deg, -6 deg (HDT), -12 deg, -6 deg, 0 deg, 12 deg, 30 deg, 54 deg, and standing, for 30-sec periods with 10-sec transitions between postures. Flows at the shin and the neck increased significantly (P < 0.05) from standing baseline to 12 deg HUT (252 +/- 55 and 126 +/- 9% (bar-X +/- SE) of baseline, respectively). From 12 deg to -12 deg tilt, flows continued to increase at the shin (509 +/- 71% of baseline) but decreased at the neck to baseline levels (100 +/- 15% of baseline). Cutaneous microvascular flow recovered at both sites during the return to standing posture with significant hysteresis. Flow increases from standing to near-supine posture are attributed at both sites to baroreceptor-mediated vasodilation. The great dissimilarity in flow response magnitudes at the two measurement sites may be indicative of central/local regulatory antagonism above heart level and reinforcement below heart level.

  15. Cutaneous manifestations of chikungunya fever.

    PubMed

    Seetharam, K A; Sridevi, K; Vidyasagar, P

    2012-01-01

    Chikungunya fever, a re-emerging RNA viral infection produces different cutaneous manifestations in children compared to adults. 52 children with chikungunya fever, confirmed by positive IgM antibody test were seen during 2009-2010. Pigmentary lesions were common (27/52) followed by vesiculobullous lesions (16/52) and maculopapular lesions (14/52). Vesiculobullous lesions were most common in infants, although rarely reported in adults. Psoriasis was exacerbated in 4 children resulting in more severe forms. In 2 children, guttate psoriasis was observed for the first time.

  16. Cutaneous melanomas of the eyelid.

    PubMed

    Boulos, Patrick R; Rubin, Peter A D

    2006-01-01

    Cutaneous eyelid melanomas are very rare lesions. The lentiginous subtypes are the most frequent melanocytic lesions of the eyelid and can be likened to conjunctival melanocytic lesions like PAM, PAM with atypia and conjunctival melanoma. Compared to melanomas elsewhere on the body, eyelid melanomas have special considerations. Eyelid skin is very thin, the mucocutaneous junction at the lid margin can affect prognosis, the lymphatic drainage pattern is very variable and there is an inherent difficulty to excise wide margins without sacrificing important structures. A customized excision approach, using tissue-sparing "Slow-Mohs" technique, is suggested. Sentinel lymph node dissection has an evolving therapeutic role but remains controversial.

  17. Drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Callen, J P

    2010-08-01

    Subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) is a subset of cutaneous lupus erythematosus with unique immunologic and clinical features. The first description dates back to 1985 when a series of five patients were found to have hydrochlorothiazide-induced SCLE. Since that time, at least 40 other drugs have been implicated in the induction of SCLE.

  18. 21 CFR 882.1320 - Cutaneous electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cutaneous electrode. 882.1320 Section 882.1320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1320 Cutaneous electrode....

  19. 21 CFR 882.1320 - Cutaneous electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cutaneous electrode. 882.1320 Section 882.1320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1320 Cutaneous electrode....

  20. 21 CFR 882.1320 - Cutaneous electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cutaneous electrode. 882.1320 Section 882.1320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1320 Cutaneous electrode....

  1. 21 CFR 882.1320 - Cutaneous electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cutaneous electrode. 882.1320 Section 882.1320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1320 Cutaneous electrode....

  2. 21 CFR 882.1320 - Cutaneous electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cutaneous electrode. 882.1320 Section 882.1320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1320 Cutaneous electrode....

  3. Cutaneous malakoplakia: case report and review*

    PubMed Central

    Afonso, João Paulo Junqueira Magalhães; Ando, Patricia Naomi; Padilha, Maria Helena Valle de Queiroz; Michalany, Nilceo Schwery; Porro, Adriana Maria

    2013-01-01

    Malakoplakia is a rare acquired disease that can affect many systems but is more common in the urogenital tract. Cutaneous malakoplakia is even rarer. It is far more frequent in immunodeficient patients. We report a case of cutaneous malakoplakia in a kidney transplant patient who had recently stopped receiving immunosuppressive therapy to illustrate a review of the relevant recent literature. PMID:23793204

  4. [Cutaneous abscess due to Gemella morbillorum].

    PubMed

    Villamil, Iago; Villar, Alberto; Masa, Luis A

    2009-10-01

    We report a cutaneous abscess due to Gemella morbillorum, a Gram positive coccus found in oropharyngeal flora, that rarely causes disease in humans. Infections associated to this agent are similar to those related to viridans streptococci. There have been reports of endovascular infections (predominantly endocarditis) and also of acute invasive infections. Few previous reports are available of cutaneous infection.

  5. [Uncommon clinical manifestations of cutaneous leishmaniasis].

    PubMed

    Hayani, K; Dandashli, A; Weisshaar, E

    2014-10-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is one of the most common dermatoses of the tropics. A major focus of this disease is the Syrian city of Aleppo, after which it was named in many textbooks ("Aleppo boil"). The first cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis were reported from Aleppo particularly more than 100 years ago. Syria is one of the most affected countries worldwide. This disease used to be well documented until the onset of the war in Syria in 2012, which is also supported by the numbers of the World Health Organisation (WHO), and Aleppo used to be the most affected Syrian city. Since 2012, the documentation of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Syria is no longer possible. An outbreak of cutaneous leishmaniasis has been detected especially in the besieged regions due to missing prevention measures against the sandflies and a lack of medical care. A short summary of the epidemiologic situation in Syria as well as outstanding and uncommon clinical manifestations of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Aleppo are presented.

  6. Primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Steven T; Querfeld, Christiane

    2006-01-01

    Primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) encompass a clinically and biologically heterogeneous group of non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) defined by clonal proliferation of skin-homing malignant T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. They account for up to 75% to 80% of all cutaneous lymphomas. The current WHO-EORTC classification of cutaneous lymphomas with primary cutaneous manifestations lists 13 entities. The most common subtypes-mycosis fungoides, Sézary syndrome, primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma, and lymphomatoid papulosis-which represent approximately 95% of CTCLs, will be discussed in the following review. Each entity has unique biological characteristics and clinical course. Topical and/or systemic therapies are employed based on the stage of the disease and the tempo of progression.

  7. Soluble epoxide hydrolase contamination of specific catalase preparations inhibits epoxyeicosatrienoic acid vasodilation of rat renal arterioles

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Lauren; Harder, Adam; Isbell, Marilyn; Imig, John D.; Gutterman, David D.; Falck, J. R.; Campbell, William B.

    2011-01-01

    Cytochrome P-450 metabolites of arachidonic acid, the epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), are important signaling molecules in the kidney. In renal arteries, EETs cause vasodilation whereas H2O2 causes vasoconstriction. To determine the physiological contribution of H2O2, catalase is used to inactivate H2O2. However, the consequence of catalase action on EET vascular activity has not been determined. In rat renal afferent arterioles, 14,15-EET caused concentration-related dilations that were inhibited by Sigma bovine liver (SBL) catalase (1,000 U/ml) but not Calbiochem bovine liver (CBL) catalase (1,000 U/ml). SBL catalase inhibition was reversed by the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitor tAUCB (1 μM). In 14,15-EET incubations, SBL catalase caused a concentration-related increase in a polar metabolite. Using mass spectrometry, the metabolite was identified as 14,15-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid (14,15-DHET), the inactive sEH metabolite. 14,15-EET hydrolysis was not altered by the catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (3-ATZ; 10–50 mM), but was abolished by the sEH inhibitor BIRD-0826 (1–10 μM). SBL catalase EET hydrolysis showed a regioisomer preference with greatest hydrolysis of 14,15-EET followed by 11,12-, 8,9- and 5,6-EET (Vmax = 0.54 ± 0.07, 0.23 ± 0.06, 0.18 ± 0.01 and 0.08 ± 0.02 ng DHET·U catalase−1·min−1, respectively). Of five different catalase preparations assayed, EET hydrolysis was observed with two Sigma liver catalases. These preparations had low specific catalase activity and positive sEH expression. Mass spectrometric analysis of the SBL catalase identified peptide fragments matching bovine sEH. Collectively, these data indicate that catalase does not affect EET-mediated dilation of renal arterioles. However, some commercial catalase preparations are contaminated with sEH, and these contaminated preparations diminish the biological activity of H2O2 and EETs. PMID:21753077

  8. Cutaneous fistulization of the hydatid disease

    PubMed Central

    Bahce, Zeynep Sener; Akbulut, Sami; Aday, Ulas; Demircan, Firat; Senol, Ayhan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aim: To provide an overview of the medical literature on cutaneous fistulization in patients with hydatid disease (HD). Methods: According to PRISMA guidelines a literature search was made in PubMed, Medline, Google Scholar, and Google databases were searched using keywords to identify articles related to cutaneous fistulization of the HD. Keywords used were hydatid disease, hydatid cyst, cutaneous fistulization, cysto-cutaneous fistulization, external rupture, and external fistulization. The literature search included case reports, review articles, original articles, and meeting presentations published until July 2016 without restrictions on language, journal, or country. Articles and abstracts containing adequate information, such as age, sex, cyst size, cyst location, clinical presentation, fistula opening location, and management, were included in the study, whereas articles with insufficient clinical and demographic data were excluded. We also present a new case of cysto-cutaneous fistulization of a liver hydatid cyst. Results: The literature review included 38 articles (32 full text, 2 abstracts, and 4 unavailable) on cutaneous fistulization in patients with HD. Among the 38 articles included in the study, 22 were written in English, 13 in French, 1 in German, 1 in Italian, and 1 in Spanish. Forty patients (21 males and 19 females; mean age ± standard deviation, 54.0 ± 21.5 years; range, 7–93 years) were involved in the study. Twenty-four patients had cysto-cutaneous fistulization (Echinococcus granulosus); 10 had cutaneous fistulization (E multilocularis), 3 had cysto-cutaneo-bronchio-biliary fistulization, 2 had cysto-cutaneo-bronchial fistulization; and 1 had cutaneo-bronchial fistulization (E multilocularis). Twenty-nine patients were diagnosed with E granulosis and 11 had E multilocularis detected by clinical, radiological, and/or histopathological examinations. Conclusion: Cutaneous fistulization is a rare complication of HD

  9. Cutaneous signs of classical dermatomyositis.

    PubMed

    Auriemma, M; Capo, A; Meogrossi, G; Amerio, P

    2014-10-01

    Idiopathic immune myopathies (IIM) are an heterogeneous group of autoimmune muscle disorders characterized by progressive muscle involvement. Dermatomyositis (DM) is the most common form of IIM. It is a multisystem disorder characterized by symmetric proximal, extensor, inflammatory myopathy, vascular involvement and a characteristic cutaneous eruption. Six types of DM have been identified: idiopathic, juvenile (JDM), cancer-related other autoimmune diseases-related, iatrogenic DM and amyopathic DM. Cutaneous manifestations of DM are the most important aspect of this disease and can precede from several months to years muscle or systemic involvement. Three groups of signs have been described: pathognomonic, highly characteristic and compatible. Although differences exist among the different clinical presentation of skin lesions, they share common histological findings including the presence of interface dermatitis with epidermal atrophy, basement membrane degeneration, vacuolar alteration of basal keratinocytes, and dermal changes consisting of interstitial mucin deposition and a sparse lymphocytic infiltrate. DM is a serious disease; the correct evaluation of any skin lesion suggesting an early diagnosis is of utmost importance. Skin signs may, also, represent a marker of treatment efficacy even though systemic symptoms worsening may not always be followed by more severe skin lesions.

  10. Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNTA) decreases the mechanical sensitivity of nociceptors and inhibits neurogenic vasodilation in a craniofacial muscle targeted for migraine prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Gazerani, Parisa; Au, Sammy; Dong, Xudong; Kumar, Ujendra; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Cairns, Brian E

    2010-12-01

    The mechanism by which intramuscular injection of BoNTA into the craniofacial muscles decreases migraine headaches is not known. In a blinded study, the effect of BoNTA on the mechanical and chemical responsiveness of individual temporalis muscle nociceptors and muscle neurogenic vasodilation was investigated in female rats. Mechanical threshold was measured for 3h following intramuscular injection of BoNTA or vehicle, and for 10 min after a subsequent injection of the algogen glutamate. Injection of BoNTA significantly increased the mechanical threshold of muscle nociceptors without altering the muscle surface temperature and blocked glutamate-induced mechanical sensitization and neurogenic vasodilation. None of these effects were reproduced by pancuronium-induced muscle paralysis. Western blot analysis of temporalis muscles indicated that BoNTA significantly decreased SNAP-25. Measurement of interstitial glutamate concentration with a glutamate biosensor indicated that BoNTA significantly reduced glutamate concentrations. The mechanical sensitivity of muscle nociceptors is modulated by glutamate concentration through activation of peripheral NMDA receptors. Immunohistochemical experiments were conducted and they indicated that half of the NMDA-expressing temporalis nerve fibers co-expressed substance P or CGRP. Additional electrophysiology experiments examined the effect of antagonists for NMDA, CGRP and NK1 receptors on glutamate-induced effects. Glutamate-induced mechanical sensitization was only blocked by the NMDA receptor antagonist, but muscle neurogenic vasodilation was attenuated by NMDA or CGRP receptor antagonists. These data suggest that injection of BoNTA into craniofacial muscles acts to decrease migraine headaches by rapidly decreasing the mechanical sensitivity of temporalis muscle nociceptors through inhibition of glutamate release and by attenuating the provoked release of CGRP from muscle nociceptors.

  11. Acute ascorbic acid ingestion increases skeletal muscle blood flow and oxygen consumption via local vasodilation during graded handgrip exercise in older adults.

    PubMed

    Richards, Jennifer C; Crecelius, Anne R; Larson, Dennis G; Dinenno, Frank A

    2015-07-15

    Human aging is associated with reduced skeletal muscle perfusion during exercise, which may be a result of impaired endothelium-dependent dilation and/or attenuated ability to blunt sympathetically mediated vasoconstriction. Intra-arterial infusion of ascorbic acid (AA) increases nitric oxide-mediated vasodilation and forearm blood flow (FBF) during handgrip exercise in older adults, yet it remains unknown whether an acute oral dose can similarly improve FBF or enhance the ability to blunt sympathetic vasoconstriction during exercise. We hypothesized that 1) acute oral AA would improve FBF (Doppler ultrasound) and oxygen consumption (V̇o2) via local vasodilation during graded rhythmic handgrip exercise in older adults (protocol 1), and 2) AA ingestion would not enhance sympatholysis in older adults during handgrip exercise (protocol 2). In protocol 1 (n = 8; 65 ± 3 yr), AA did not influence FBF or V̇o2 during rest or 5% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) exercise, but increased FBF (199 ± 13 vs. 248 ± 16 ml/min and 343 ± 24 vs. 403 ± 33 ml/min; P < 0.05) and V̇o2 (26 ± 2 vs. 34 ± 3 ml/min and 43 ± 4 vs. 50 ± 5 ml/min; P < 0.05) at both 15 and 25% MVC, respectively. The increased FBF was due to elevations in forearm vascular conductance (FVC). In protocol 2 (n = 10; 63 ± 2 yr), following AA, FBF was similarly elevated during 15% MVC (∼ 20%); however, vasoconstriction to reflex increases in sympathetic activity during -40 mmHg lower-body negative pressure at rest (ΔFVC: -16 ± 3 vs. -16 ± 2%) or during 15% MVC (ΔFVC: -12 ± 2 vs. -11 ± 4%) was unchanged. Our collective results indicate that acute oral ingestion of AA improves muscle blood flow and V̇o2 during exercise in older adults via local vasodilation.

  12. Epigallocatechin gallate, a green tea polyphenol, mediates NO-dependent vasodilation using signaling pathways in vascular endothelium requiring reactive oxygen species and Fyn.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-A; Formoso, Gloria; Li, Yunhua; Potenza, Maria A; Marasciulo, Flora L; Montagnani, Monica; Quon, Michael J

    2007-05-04

    Green tea consumption is associated with reduced cardiovascular mortality in some epidemiological studies. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a bioactive polyphenol in green tea, mimics metabolic actions of insulin to inhibit gluconeogenesis in hepatocytes. Because signaling pathways regulating metabolic and vasodilator actions of insulin are shared in common, we hypothesized that EGCG may also have vasodilator actions to stimulate production of nitric oxide (NO) from endothelial cells. Acute intra-arterial administration of EGCG to mesenteric vascular beds isolated ex vivo from WKY rats caused dose-dependent vasorelaxation. This was inhibitable by L-NAME (NO synthase inhibitor), wortmannin (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor), or PP2 (Src family kinase inhibitor). Treatment of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) with EGCG (50 microm) acutely stimulated production of NO (assessed with NO-specific fluorescent dye DAF-2) that was inhibitable by l-NAME, wortmannin, or PP2. Stimulation of BAEC with EGCG also resulted in dose- and time-dependent phosphorylation of eNOS that was inhibitable by wortmannin or PP2 (but not by MEK inhibitor PD98059). Specific knockdown of Fyn (but not Src) with small interfering RNA inhibited both EGCG-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS as well as production of NO in BAEC. Treatment of BAEC with EGCG generated intracellular H(2)O(2) (assessed with H(2)O(2)-specific fluorescent dye CM-H(2)DCF-DA), whereas treatment with N-acetylcysteine inhibited EGCG-stimulated phosphorylation of Fyn, Akt, and eNOS. We conclude that EGCG has endothelial-dependent vasodilator actions mediated by intracellular signaling pathways requiring reactive oxygen species and Fyn that lead to activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Akt, and eNOS. This mechanism may explain, in part, beneficial vascular and metabolic health effects of green tea consumption.

  13. Myrica nagi attenuates cumene hydroperoxide-induced cutaneous oxidative stress and toxicity in Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Alam, A; Iqbal, M; Saleem, M; Ahmed, S; Sultana, S

    2000-05-01

    In recent years, considerable efforts have been made to identify new chemopreventive agents which could be useful for man. Myrica nagi, a subtropical shrub, has been shown to possess significant activity against hepatotoxicity and other pharmacological and physiological disorders. We have shown a chemopreventive effect of Myrica nagi on cumene hydroperoxide-induced cutaneous oxidative stress and toxicity in mice. Cumene hydroperoxide treatment at a dose level of 30 mg/animal/0.2 ml acetone enhances susceptibility of cutaneous microsomal membrane for iron-ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation and induction of xanthine oxidase activity which are accompanied by decrease in the activities of cutaneous antioxidant enzymes such as catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and depletion in the level of cutaneous glutathione. Parallel to these changes a sharp decrease in the activities of phase II metabolizing enzymes such as glutathione S-transferase and quinone reductase has been observed. Application of Myrica nagi at doses of 2.0 mg and 4.0 mg/kg body weight in acetone prior to that of cumene hydroperoxide (30 mg/animal/0.2 ml acetone) treatment resulted in significant inhibition of cumene hydroperoxide-induced cutaneous oxidative stress and toxicity in a dose-dependent manner. Enhanced susceptibility of cutaneous microsomal membrane for lipid peroxidation induced by iron ascorbate and xanthine oxidase activities were significantly reduced (P<0.05). In addition the depleted level of glutathione, the inhibited activities of antioxidants, and phase II metabolizing enzymes were recovered to a significant level (P<0.05). The protective effect of Myrica nagi was dose-dependent. In summary our data suggest that Myrica nagi is an effective chemopreventive agent in skin and capable of ameliorating cumene hydroperoxide-induced cutaneous oxidative stress and toxicity.

  14. Review of vasodilators in acute decompensated heart failure: the old and the new.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Michelle D; Eckman, Peter M

    2013-07-01

    Despite substantial improvements in treatment for chronic heart failure, morbidity and mortality for acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) remain high. Treatment of ADHF is focused on controlling symptoms rather than improving long-term outcomes. The vasodilators nitroglycerin (NTG) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) have been used in ADHF for decades, but, since the development of nesiritide 10 years ago, interest in new vasodilators has grown. Therapies that improve not only hemodynamics and symptoms but also long-term outcomes are in high demand, and numerous new vasodilatory agents have been investigated, including various natriuretic peptides, soluble guanylyl cyclase agents, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system-modifying agents, and others. A review of the literature shows that few of them rise to the challenge set by NTG and SNP.

  15. Add-on therapy with doxazosin in patients with hypertension influences arterial stiffness and albuterol-mediated arterial vasodilation

    PubMed Central

    Wykretowicz, Andrzej; Guzik, Przemyslaw; Krauze, Tomasz; Adamska, Karolina; Milewska, Agata; Wysocki, Henryk

    2007-01-01

    What is already known about this subject Hypertension is associated with increased arterial stiffness and impaired endothelial function. Arterial vasodilation depends on endothelial function and can be regulated by β2-adrenergic stimulation. Doxazosin is a known and potent antihypertensive agent. However, its effects on arterial stiffness and vasodilation have not been fully established. What this study adds Sixteen-week add-on antihypertensive therapy with 4 mg of doxazosin extended release daily: Reduces arterial stiffness. Improves albuterol-mediated, i.e. endothelium-dependent, arterial vasodilation. Does not influence nitroglycerin-mediated, i.e. endothelium-independent, arterial vasodilation. Aims Doxazosin is an antihypertensive agent with largely unknown effects on arterial stiffness and vasodilation. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the addition of doxazosin extended-release (ER) to the standard management of hypertension in patients with inadequately controlled blood pressure (BP) on arterial stiffness and arterial vasodilation. Methods Twenty patients with inadequately controlled hypertension were treated with 4 mg doxazosin ER daily for 16 weeks as an adjunct to their existing antihypertensive regimen. Results Doxazosin ER add-on therapy was associated with significantly reduced systolic (P < 0.0001) and diastolic (P = 0.0003) BP, improved arterial stiffness (determined by digital volume pulse analysis (P = 0.048) and albuterol-mediated arterial vasodilation (P = 0.030). Conclusions Add-on therapy with 4 mg of doxazosin ER daily reduces BP and arterial stiffness and improves arterial vasodilation in response to adrenergic stimulation. PMID:17635498

  16. Role of nitric oxide in adenosine-induced vasodilation in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, F.; Biaggioni, I.; Robertson, D. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Vasodilation is one of the most prominent effects of adenosine and one of the first to be recognized, but its mechanism of action is not completely understood. In particular, there is conflicting information about the potential contribution of endothelial factors. The purpose of this study was to explore the role of nitric oxide in the vasodilatory effect of adenosine. Forearm blood flow responses to intrabrachial adenosine infusion (125 microg/min) were assessed with venous occlusion plethysmography during intrabrachial infusion of saline or the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) (12.5 mg/min). Intrabrachial infusions of acetylcholine (50 microg/min) and nitroprusside (3 microg/min) were used as a positive and negative control, respectively. These doses were chosen to produce comparable levels of vasodilation. In a separate study, a second saline infusion was administered instead of L-NMMA to rule out time-related effects. As expected, pretreatment with L-NMMA reduced acetylcholine-induced vasodilation; 50 microg/min acetylcholine increased forearm blood flow by 150+/-43% and 51+/-12% during saline and L-NMMA infusion, respectively (P<.01, n=6). In contrast, L-NMMA did not affect the increase in forearm blood flow produced by 3 microg/min nitroprusside (165+/-30% and 248+/-41% during saline and L-NMMA, respectively) or adenosine (173+/-48% and 270+/-75% during saline and L-NMMA, respectively). On the basis of our observations, we conclude that adenosine-induced vasodilation is not mediated by nitric oxide in the human forearm.

  17. Exercise-mediated vasodilation in human obesity and metabolic syndrome: effect of acute ascorbic acid infusion.

    PubMed

    Limberg, Jacqueline K; Kellawan, J Mikhail; Harrell, John W; Johansson, Rebecca E; Eldridge, Marlowe W; Proctor, Lester T; Sebranek, Joshua J; Schrage, William G

    2014-09-15

    We tested the hypothesis that infusion of ascorbic acid (AA), a potent antioxidant, would alter vasodilator responses to exercise in human obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetSyn). Forearm blood flow (FBF, Doppler ultrasound) was measured in lean, obese, and MetSyn adults (n = 39, 32 ± 2 yr). A brachial artery catheter was inserted for blood pressure monitoring and local infusion of AA. FBF was measured during dynamic handgrip exercise (15% maximal effort) with and without AA infusion. To account for group differences in blood pressure and forearm size, and to assess vasodilation, forearm vascular conductance (FVC = FBF/mean arterial blood pressure/lean forearm mass) was calculated. We examined the time to achieve steady-state FVC (mean response time, MRT) and the rise in FVC from rest to steady-state exercise (Δ, exercise - rest) before and during acute AA infusion. The MRT (P = 0.26) and steady-state vasodilator responses to exercise (ΔFVC, P = 0.31) were not different between groups. Intra-arterial infusion of AA resulted in a significant increase in plasma total antioxidant capacity (174 ± 37%). AA infusion did not alter MRT or steady-state FVC in any group (P = 0.90 and P = 0.85, respectively). Interestingly, higher levels of C-reactive protein predicted longer MRT (r = 0.52, P < 0.01) and a greater reduction in MRT with AA infusion (r = -0.43, P = 0.02). We concluded that AA infusion during moderate-intensity, rhythmic forearm exercise does not alter the time course or magnitude of exercise-mediated vasodilation in groups of young lean, obese, or MetSyn adults. However, systemic inflammation may limit the MRT to exercise, which can be improved with AA.

  18. Crosstalk between nitrite, myoglobin and reactive oxygen species to regulate vasodilation under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Totzeck, Matthias; Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike B; Kelm, Malte; Rassaf, Tienush

    2014-01-01

    The systemic response to decreasing oxygen levels is hypoxic vasodilation. While this mechanism has been known for more than a century, the underlying cellular events have remained incompletely understood. Nitrite signaling is critically involved in vessel relaxation under hypoxia. This can be attributed to the presence of myoglobin in the vessel wall together with other potential nitrite reductases, which generate nitric oxide, one of the most potent vasodilatory signaling molecules. Questions remain relating to the precise concentration of nitrite and the exact dose-response relations between nitrite and myoglobin under hypoxia. It is furthermore unclear whether regulatory mechanisms exist which balance this interaction. Nitrite tissue levels were similar across all species investigated. We then investigated the exact fractional myoglobin desaturation in an ex vivo approach when gassing with 1% oxygen. Within a short time frame myoglobin desaturated to 58±12%. Given that myoglobin significantly contributes to nitrite reduction under hypoxia, dose-response experiments using physiological to pharmacological nitrite concentrations were conducted. Along all concentrations, abrogation of myoglobin in mice impaired vasodilation. As reactive oxygen species may counteract the vasodilatory response, we used superoxide dismutase and its mimic tempol as well as catalase and ebselen to reduce the levels of reactive oxygen species during hypoxic vasodilation. Incubation of tempol in conjunction with catalase alone and catalase/ebselen increased the vasodilatory response to nitrite. Our study shows that modest hypoxia leads to a significant nitrite-dependent vessel relaxation. This requires the presence of vascular myoglobin for both physiological and pharmacological nitrite levels. Reactive oxygen species, in turn, modulate this vasodilation response.

  19. Effect of the Forearm Tissue Temperature on the Cold Induced Vasodilation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    substantial role in reducing the risk of local cold injuries [ 2 ], and may be beneficial for improving dexterity and tactile sensitivity during exposure...collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 01 MAY 2005 2 . REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED...ANSI Std Z39-18 Effect of the Forearm Tissue Temperature on the Cold Induced Vasodilation 14 - 2 RTO-MP-HFM-126 skin and core temperatures on

  20. Vasodilator effects of L-arginine are stereospecific and augmented by insulin in humans.

    PubMed

    Dallinger, Susanne; Sieder, Anna; Strametz, Jeanette; Bayerle-Eder, Michaela; Wolzt, Michael; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2003-06-01

    The amino acid l-arginine, the precursor of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, induces vasodilation in vivo, but the mechanism behind this effect is unclear. There is, however, some evidence to assume that the l-arginine membrane transport capacity is dependent on insulin plasma levels. We hypothesized that vasodilator effects of l-arginine may be dependent on insulin plasma levels. Accordingly, we performed two randomized, double-blind crossover studies in healthy male subjects. In protocol 1 (n = 15), subjects received an infusion of insulin (6 mU x kg(-1) x min(-1) for 120 min) or placebo and, during the last 30 min, l-arginine or d-arginine (1 g/min for 30 min) x In protocol 2 (n = 8), subjects received l-arginine in stepwise increasing doses in the presence (1.5 mU x kg(-1) x min(-1)) or absence of insulin. Renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate were assessed by the para-aminohippurate and inulin plasma clearance methods, respectively. Pulsatile choroidal blood flow was assessed with laser interferometric measurement of fundus pulsation, and mean flow velocity in the ophthalmic artery was measured with Doppler sonography. l-arginine, but not d-arginine, significantly increased renal and ocular hemodynamic parameters. Coinfusion of l-arginine with insulin caused a dose-dependent leftward shift of the vasodilator effect of l-arginine. This stereospecific renal and ocular vasodilator potency of l-arginine is enhanced by insulin, which may result from facilitated l-arginine membrane transport, enhanced intracellular NO formation, or increased NO bioavailability.

  1. Pulmonary vasodilation in acute and chronic heart failure: empiricism and evidence.

    PubMed

    Guglin, Maya

    2011-09-01

    Pulmonary hypertension in heart failure is associated with exercise intolerance and adverse outcomes. With the availability of multiple drugs that cause pulmonary vasodilation and decrease pulmonary arterial pressure, pulmonary hypertension becomes an attractive therapeutic target. Out of several classes of medications, oral phosphodiesterase inhibitors emerge as the most promising in terms of symptomatic improvement, hemodynamic benefits, reverse cardiac remodeling, and functional capacity. Future trials will show whether the use of these drugs translates to decreased morbidity and mortality in heart failure.

  2. Detection of human collateral circulation by vasodilation-thallium-201 tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Nienaber, C.A.; Salge, D.; Spielmann, R.P.; Montz, R.; Bleifeld, W. )

    1990-04-15

    Coronary arteriolar vasodilation may provoke redistribution of flow to collateral-dependent jeopardized myocardium. To assess the physiologic significance of collaterals, 80 consecutive post-infarction patients (age 58 +/- 8 years) underwent vasodilation-redistribution thallium-201 tomographic imaging after administration of 0.56 mg of intravenous dipyridamole/kg body weight. Circumferential profile analysis of thallium-201 uptake and redistribution in representative left ventricular tomograms provided quantitative assessment of transient and fixed defects and separation between periinfarctional and distant inducible hypoperfusion. Tomographic perfusion data were correlated to wall motion and collateral circulation between distinct anatomic perfusion territories. Patients were grouped according to presence (59%) or absence (41%) of angiographically visible collateral channels to jeopardized myocardium. In the presence of collaterals, distant reversible defects were larger than in absence of collaterals (p less than 0.05); the extent of combined periinfarctional and distant redistribution was also larger in collateralized patients (p less than 0.025), whereas the size of the persistent perfusion defect was similar in both groups. By prospective analysis the tomographic perfusion pattern of combined periinfarctional and distant redistribution revealed a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 78% for the detection of significant collateral circulation in this group of patients. Thus, using the exhausted flow reserve as a diagnostic tool, vasodilation-thallium-201 tomography has the potential to identify and quantitate collateralized myocardium in post-infarction patients and may guide diagnostic and therapeutic decision-making.

  3. ADP is a vasodilator component from Lasiodora sp. mygalomorph spider venom.

    PubMed

    Horta, C C; Rezende, B A; Oliveira-Mendes, B B R; Carmo, A O; Capettini, L S A; Silva, J F; Gomes, M T; Chávez-Olórtegui, C; Bravo, C E S; Lemos, V S; Kalapothakis, E

    2013-09-01

    Members of the spider genus Lasiodora are widely distributed in Brazil, where they are commonly known as caranguejeiras. Lasiodora spider venom is slightly harmful to humans. The bite of this spider causes local pain, edema and erythema. However, Lasiodora sp. spider venom may be a source of important pharmacological tools. Our research group has described previously that Lasiodora sp. venom produces bradycardia in the isolated rat heart. In the present work, we sought to evaluate the vascular effect of Lasiodora sp. venom and to isolate the vasoactive compounds from the venom. The results showed that Lasiodora spider venom induced a concentration-dependent vasodilation in rat aortic rings, which was dependent on the presence of a functional endothelium and abolished by the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-NAME. Western blot experiments revealed that the venom also increased endothelial NOS function by increasing phosphorylation of the Ser¹¹⁷⁷ residue. Assay-directed fractionation isolated a vasoactive fraction from Lasiodora sp. venom. Mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) assays identified a mixture of two compounds: adenosine diphosphate (ADP, approximately 90%) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP, approximately 10%). The vasodilator effects of Lasiodora sp. whole venom, as well as ADP, were significantly inhibited by suramin, which is a purinergic P2-receptor antagonist. Therefore, the results of the present work indicate that ADP is a main vasodilator component of Lasiodora sp. spider venom.

  4. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) induce vasodilation in isolated rat aortic rings.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Hernández, J M; Ramirez-Lee, M A; Rosas-Hernandez, H; Salazar-García, S; Maldonado-Ortega, D A; González, F J; Gonzalez, C

    2015-06-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are used in biological systems with impact in biomedicine in order to improve diagnostics and treatment of diseases. However, their effects upon the vascular system, are not fully understood. Endothelium and smooth muscle cells (SMC) communicate through release of vasoactive factors as nitric oxide (NO) to maintain vascular tone. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of SWCNTs on vascular tone using isolated rat aortic rings, which were exposed to SWCNTs (0.1, 1 and 10 μg/mL) in presence and absence of endothelium. SWCNTs induced vasodilation in both conditions, indicating that this effect was independent on endothelium; moreover that vasodilation was NO-independent, since its blockage with L-NAME did not modify the observed effect. Together, these results indicate that SWCNTs induce vasodilation in the macrovasculature, may be through a direct interaction with SMC rather than endothelium independent of NO production. Further investigation is required to fully understand the mechanisms of action and mediators involved in the signaling pathway induced by SWCNTs on the vascular system.

  5. Prostacyclin and Oral Vasodilator Therapy in Sarcoidosis-Associated Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Oldham, Justin M.; Gomberg-Maitland, Mardi; Vij, Rekha

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is unclear whether recent advances in pulmonary arterial hypertension therapy can be safely applied to sarcoidosis-associated pulmonary hypertension (SAPH). Evidence for prostacyclin (PG) therapy in SAPH is limited. METHODS: We conducted a single-center, retrospective review of 46 patients with sarcoidosis, 26 of whom had SAPH. Thirteen received PG as monotherapy or in combination with oral vasodilators. RESULTS: Follow-up right-sided heart catheterization at a mean of 12.7 months revealed improved cardiac output, cardiac index, and pulmonary vascular resistance. Functional class and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels also improved in patients treated with PG. No significant change in oxygen requirement was seen with vasodilator therapy initiation. At 2 years, 15 patients with SAPH survived, including eight on PG, and at 5 years, seven survived, including five on PG. Survival was significantly reduced in patients with SAPH compared with patients who had sarcoidosis without pulmonary hypertension. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the use of PG therapy in SAPH is not associated with increased mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Many patients with severe SAPH showed significant hemodynamic and clinical improvement on long-term IV or subcutaneous PG therapy and had survival outcomes similar to patients with moderate SAPH on oral vasodilator therapy. PMID:26437815

  6. Differential time course of the vasodilator action of various calcium antagonists.

    PubMed

    van der Lee, R; Kam, K L; Pfaffendorf, M; van Zwieten, P A

    1998-01-01

    It is rather the rate of the vasodilator effect than its magnitude which determines the triggering of reflex tachycardia associated with dihydropyridine calcium antagonists (DHP-CA). We therefore compared the rate of the vasodilator effects of a series of CA (both DHP and non-DHP) in rat isolated mesenteric artery preparations (size 256 +/- 3 microns, length 2 mm) from male Wistar rats (weighing 300-350 g) in an isolated wire myograph according to Mulvany and Halpern [12]. The mean force of the KCl-induced contraction amounted to 2.3 +/- 0.1 mN/mm. Potency (given as IC50-values), differential time course of action and recovery of the contractile response of the vessels after wash-out were established. These three parameters adhere to the following sequences: (1. potency) barnidipine [corrected] > (S)-lercanidipine > barnidipine racemate [corrected]> amlodipine > nifedipine, lacidipine > (R)-lercanidipine > verapamil, mibefradil; (2. differential time course) lacidipine, amlodipine > (S)- and (R)-lercanidipine, barnidipine [corrected], barnidipine racemate [corrected] > mibefradil, verapamil, nifedipine; (3. recovery) nifedipine > verapamil, barnidipine [corrected], amlodipine > barnidipine, lacidipine > mibefradil, (R)-lercanidipine > (S)-lercanidipine. In conclusion, barnidipine [corrected] proved to be the most potent vasodilator agent; interestingly, barnidipine was 20 times less potent when applied as a racemic mixture. A slow onset of action in DHP is a very important mechanism in preventing reflex tachycardia. For non-DHP (verapamil, mibefradil) reflex tachycardia probably is prevented by a direct effect on the conductive tissue in the myocardium.

  7. Pseudolymphoma and cutaneous lymphoma: facts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Reuven

    2010-01-01

    Cutaneous pseudolymphoma refers to a heterogenous group of benign reactive T-cell or B-cell lymphoproliferative processes of diverse causes that simulate cutaneous lymphomas clinically and histologically. Pseudolymphomas may arise in response to a wide variety of foreign antigens, but most are idiopathic. Major advances have been made in the histologic classification, immunohistochemistry, and molecular studies of cutaneous pseudolymphoma. Although this enables a more precise differentiation from cutaneous lymphoma, a substantial number of patients still present in whom the differential diagnosis is difficult or impossible. Some evidence suggests that pseudolymphomas may progress to cutaneous lymphoma due to persistent antigenic stimulation. More compelling evidence is needed, especially when most cutaneous pseudolymphoma are not associated with known antigens and the differentiation from cutaneous lymphoma may be difficult; therefore, a careful approach should be used, and the antigenic stimulus should be removed whenever possible. A watchful follow-up is warranted in idiopathic cases, and consideration should always be given to surgical or medical therapy.

  8. MAPKAPK-2 signaling is critical for cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Thuraisingam, Thusanth; Xu, Yong Zhong; Eadie, Kalyn; Heravi, Mitra; Guiot, Marie-Cristine; Greemberg, Rony; Gaestel, Matthias; Radzioch, Danuta

    2010-01-01

    Cutaneous wound healing is a complex process, which is heavily dependent on successful inflammatory action. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-activated protein kinase-2 (MAPKAPK-2 or MK2), a major substrate of p38 MAPK, has been shown to be a major player in multiple inflammatory diseases, but its role in cutaneous wound healing has not yet been explored. In this study, by comparing excisional wounds made on the backs of MK2 knockout (KO) and MK2 wild-type (WT) mice, we found that the kinetics of wound healing are significantly affected by the absence of MK2 (P=0.010 to P<0.001). Histological examination showed a higher level of acanthosis of the migrating wound keratinocyte layer as well as a higher level of collagen deposition in the granulation tissue of the wounds from MK2 WT mice compared with those from MK2 KO mice. Interestingly, although MK2 did not influence macrophage and neutrophil infiltration of the wounds, the expression of many cytokines and chemokines was significantly affected at different days post wounding. Furthermore, the delayed healing rate of wounds in MK2 KO mice can be significantly improved by passive transfer of macrophages with intact MK2. Overall, these results show a critical role for MK2 gene expression in macrophages participating in the process of cutaneous wound healing.

  9. Endothelium-derived hyperpolarization and coronary vasodilation: diverse and integrated roles of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, hydrogen peroxide and gap junctions

    PubMed Central

    Ellinsworth, David C.; Sandow, Shaun L.; Shukla, Nilima; Liu, Yanping; Jeremy, Jamie Y.; Gutterman, David D.

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion and coronary vascular resistance are regulated by signalling metabolites released from the local myocardium that act either directly on the vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) or indirectly via stimulation of the endothelium. A prominent mechanism of vasodilation is endothelium-derived hyperpolarization (EDH) of the arteriolar smooth muscle, with epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) playing important roles in EDH in the coronary microcirculation. In some cases, EETs and H2O2 are released as transferable hyperpolarizing factors (EDHFs) that act directly on the VSMCs. By contrast, EETs and H2O2 can also promote endothelial Ca2+-activated K+ channel activity secondary to the amplification of extracellular Ca2+ influx and Ca2+ mobilization from intracellular stores, respectively. The resulting endothelial hyperpolarization may subsequently conduct to the media via myoendothelial gap junctions, or potentially lead to the release of a chemically-distinct factor(s). Furthermore, in human isolated coronary arterioles dilator signalling involving EETs and H2O2 may be integrated; being either complimentary or inhibitory depending on the stimulus. With an emphasis on the human coronary microcirculation, this review addresses the diverse and integrated mechanisms by which EETs and H2O2 regulate vessel tone, and also examines the hypothesis that myoendothelial microdomain signalling facilitates EDH activity in the human heart. PMID:26541094

  10. An overview of cutaneous T cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Bagherani, Nooshin; Smoller, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous T cell lymphomas (CTCLs) are a heterogeneous group of extranodal non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas that are characterized by a cutaneous infiltration of malignant monoclonal T lymphocytes. They typically afflict adults with a median age of 55 to 60 years, and the annual incidence is about 0.5 per 100,000. Mycosis fungoides, Sézary syndrome, and primary cutaneous peripheral T cell lymphomas not otherwise specified are the most important subtypes of CTCL. CTCL is a complicated concept in terms of etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, therapy, and prognosis. Herein, we summarize advances which have been achieved in these fields. PMID:27540476

  11. Cutaneous leishmaniasis: an increasing threat for travellers.

    PubMed

    Antinori, S; Gianelli, E; Calattini, S; Longhi, E; Gramiccia, M; Corbellino, M

    2005-05-01

    Analysis of the literature on cutaneous leishmaniasis in low-prevalence countries suggests an increase in imported cases that is attributable to the growing phenomenon of international tourism, migration and military operations in highly endemic regions. Cases of imported cutaneous leishmaniasis are often missed initially, but diagnosis can be made non-invasively by PCR using skin scrapings of lesions as starting material. Cutaneous leishmaniasis is an emerging threat for travellers and should be considered in all patients presenting with slow-to-heal ulcers.

  12. Cutaneous aspergillosis in patients with haematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    D'Antonio, D; Pagano, L; Girmenia, C; Parruti, G; Mele, L; Candoni, A; Ricci, P; Martino, P

    2000-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate skin infections caused by Aspergillus in patients with haematological malignancies. Fifteen cases of cutaneous aspergillosis are reported, 12 of which occurred among 4448 consecutive patients with acute leukaemia. Cutaneous involvement occurred in 4% of patients with documented Aspergillus infection. Primary cutaneous aspergillosis was diagnosed in five cases. Infection was fatal in 11 of 15 cases; the absence of additional sites of infection other than cutis at presentation appeared to be the only factor related to a favourable outcome.

  13. Cutaneous mucormycosis in advanced HIV disease.

    PubMed

    Moreira, José; Ridolfi, Felipe; Almeida-Paes, Rodrigo; Varon, Andrea; Lamas, Cristiane C

    Angionvasive mucormycosis is an emerging fungal disease known to affect mainly diabetics or subjects with profound neutropenia. Infection usually occurs through the inhalation route, but cutaneous inoculation may occur after trauma or burns. However, mucormycosis remains unusual in HIV infection. We report a fatal case of cutaneous mucormycosis due to Rhizopus arrhizus involving the scalp following herpes zoster infection. The patient was a 42-year-old man with advanced AIDS failing on salvage antiretroviral therapy. The fungus was diagnosed on the basis of histopathology and culture. Our case emphasizes the need to consider mucormycosis in the differential diagnosis of necrotic cutaneous lesions in patients with late-stage HIV disease.

  14. Occupationally Acquired American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Felinto de Brito, Maria Edileuza; Andrade, Maria Sandra; de Almeida, Éricka Lima; Medeiros, Ângela Cristina Rapela; Werkhäuser, Roberto Pereira; de Araújo, Ana Isabele Freitas; Brandão-Filho, Sinval Pinto; Paiva de Almeida, Alzira Maria; Gomes Rodrigues, Eduardo Henrique

    2012-01-01

    We report two occupationally acquired cases of American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL): one accidental laboratory autoinoculation by contaminated needlestick while handling an ACL lesion sample, and one acquired during field studies on bird biology. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays of patient lesions were positive for Leishmania, subgenus Viannia. One isolate was obtained by culture (from patient 2 biopsy samples) and characterized as Leishmania (Viannia) naiffi through an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) with species-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE). Patients were successfully treated with N-methyl-glucamine. These two cases highlight the potential risks of laboratory and field work and the need to comply with strict biosafety procedures in daily routines. The swab collection method, coupled with PCR detection, has greatly improved ACL laboratory diagnosis. PMID:23227369

  15. Cutaneous responses to environmental stressors

    PubMed Central

    Valacchi, Giuseppe; Sticozzi, Claudia; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Cervellati, Franco; Cervellati, Carlo; Maioli, Emanuela

    2012-01-01

    Living organisms are continuously exposed to environmental pollutants. Because of its critical location, the skin is a major interface between the body and the environment and provides a biological barrier against an array of chemical and physical environmental pollutants. The skin can be defined as our first defense against the environment because of its constant exposure to oxidants, including ultraviolet (UV) radiation and other environmental pollutants such as diesel fuel exhaust, cigarette smoke (CS), halogenated hydrocarbons, heavy metals, and ozone (O3). The exposure to environmental pro-oxidant agents leads to the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the generation of bioactive molecules that can damage skin cells. This short review provides an overview of the effects and mechanisms of action of CS, O3, and UV on cutanous tissues. PMID:23050967

  16. Vasorelaxant mechanism of the new vasodilator, FK409.

    PubMed

    Isono, T; Koibuchi, Y; Sato, N; Furuichi, A; Nishii, M; Yamamoto, T; Mori, J; Kohsaka, M; Ohtsuka, M

    1993-08-15

    To define the vasorelaxation mechanism of FK409, we examined the effect of the compound on vascular tension and cyclic nucleotide levels in isolated rat thoracic aorta contracted with norepinephrine, and on activities of guanylate cyclase and cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase prepared from rat or rabbit thoracic aorta. FK409 (1 x 10(-9) to 1 x 10(-6) M), like nitroglycerin (1 x 10(-9) to 1 x 10(-6) M), produced a potent vasorelaxant effect associated with an increase in cyclic GMP content of the tissue. There was no change in cyclic AMP levels. The vasorelaxant effect of FK409 was independent of the integrity of the endothelium, and was unaffected by L-NG-monomethylarginine (0.1 mM) or oxyhemoglobin (1 microM). On the other hand, FK409 (3.2 x 10(-7) M) activated soluble guanylate cyclase, and the activating effect was completely inhibited by oxyhemoglobin (10 nM). Cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase was unaffected by FK409 (1 x 10(-7) to 1 x 10(-5) M). Furthermore, in rat aortic soluble fraction FK409 (3 mM) was found to liberate nitric oxide (NO) which was evaluated spectrophotometrically after diazotization of sulfanilic acid and coupling with N-(1-naphthyl)-ethylenediamine. The liberation occurred even in the absence of L-cysteine (5 mM), in contrast to the case with nitroglycerin (3 mM). These results suggest that the vasorelaxant effect of FK409 is associated with an increase in intracellular cyclic GMP, and that the cyclic GMP accumulation is due to activation of soluble guanylate cyclase. The enzyme activation is probably due to NO released from the compound molecule in the vascular smooth muscle cells.

  17. Prior experience does not alter modulation of cutaneous reflexes during manual wheeling and symmetrical arm cycling.

    PubMed

    MacGillivray, Megan K; Klimstra, Marc; Sawatzky, Bonita; Zehr, E Paul; Lam, Tania

    2013-05-01

    Previous research has reported that training and experience influence H-reflex amplitude during rhythmic activity; however, little research has yet examined the influence of training on cutaneous reflexes. Manual wheelchair users (MWUs) depend on their arms for locomotion. We postulated that the daily dependence and high amount of use of the arms for mobility in MWUs would show differences in cutaneous reflex modulation during upper limb cyclic movements compared with able-bodied control subjects. We hypothesized that MWUs would demonstrate increased reflex response amplitudes for both manual wheeling and symmetrical arm cycling tasks. The superficial radial nerve was stimulated randomly at different points of the movement cycle of manual wheeling and symmetrical arm cycling in MWUs and able-bodied subjects naive to wheeling. Our results showed that there were no differences in amplitude modulation of early- or middle-latency cutaneous reflexes between the able-bodied group and the MWU group. However, there were several differences in amplitude modulation of cutaneous reflexes between tasks (manual wheeling and symmetrical arm cycling). Specifically, differences were observed in early-latency responses in the anterior and posterior deltoid muscles and biceps and triceps brachii as well as in middle-latency responses in the anterior and posterior deltoid. These data suggest that manual wheeling experience does not modify the pattern of cutaneous reflex amplitude modulation during manual wheeling. The differences in amplitude modulation of cutaneous reflexes between tasks may be a result of mechanical differences (i.e., hand contact) between tasks.

  18. TERT promoter mutations are frequent in cutaneous basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Griewank, Klaus G; Murali, Rajmohan; Schilling, Bastian; Schimming, Tobias; Möller, Inga; Moll, Iris; Schwamborn, Marion; Sucker, Antje; Zimmer, Lisa; Schadendorf, Dirk; Hillen, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    Activating mutations in the TERT promoter were recently identified in up to 71% of cutaneous melanoma. Subsequent studies found TERT promoter mutations in a wide array of other major human cancers. TERT promoter mutations lead to increased expression of telomerase, which maintains telomere length and genomic stability, thereby allowing cancer cells to continuously divide, avoiding senescence or apoptosis. TERT promoter mutations in cutaneous melanoma often show UV-signatures. Non-melanoma skin cancer, including basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, are very frequent malignancies in individuals of European descent. We investigated the presence of TERT promoter mutations in 32 basal cell carcinomas and 34 cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas using conventional Sanger sequencing. TERT promoter mutations were identified in 18 (56%) basal cell carcinomas and in 17 (50%) cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas. The recurrent mutations identified in our cohort were identical to those previously described in cutaneous melanoma, and showed a UV-signature (C>T or CC>TT) in line with a causative role for UV exposure in these common cutaneous malignancies. Our study shows that TERT promoter mutations with UV-signatures are frequent in non-melanoma skin cancer, being present in around 50% of basal and squamous cell carcinomas and suggests that increased expression of telomerase plays an important role in the pathogenesis of these tumors.

  19. Role of nitric oxide and adenosine in the onset of vasodilation during dynamic forearm exercise.

    PubMed

    Casey, Darren P; Mohamed, Essa A; Joyner, Michael J

    2013-02-01

    We tested the hypothesis that nitric oxide (NO) and adenosine contribute to the onset of vasodilation during dynamic forearm exercise. Twenty-two subjects performed rhythmic forearm exercise (20 % of maximum) during control and NO synthase (NOS) inhibition (N (G)-monomethyl-L-arginine; L-NMMA) trials. A subset of subjects performed a third trial of forearm exercise during combined inhibition of NOS and adenosine (aminophylline; n = 9). Additionally, a separate group of subjects (n = 7) performed rhythmic forearm exercise during control, inhibition of adenosine alone and combined inhibition of adenosine and NOS. Forearm vascular conductance (FVC; ml min(-1) · 100 mmHg(-1)) was calculated from blood flow and mean arterial pressure (mmHg). The onset of vasodilation was assessed by calculating the slope of the FVC response for every duty cycle between baseline and steady state, and the number of duty cycles (1-s contraction/2-s relaxation) to reach steady state. NOS inhibition blunted vasodilation at the onset of exercise (11.1 ± 0.8 vs. 8.5 ± 0.6 FVC units/duty cycle; P < 0.001 vs. control) and increased the time to reach steady state (25 ± 1 vs. 32 ± 1 duty cycles; P < 0.001 vs. control). Vasodilation was blunted further with combined inhibition of NOS and adenosine (7.5 ± 0.6 vs. 6.2 ± 0.8 FVC units/duty cycle; P < 0.05 vs. L-NMMA alone), but not with aminophylline alone (16.0 ± 2.2 vs. 14.7 ± 2.0 FVC units/duty cycle; P = 0.67 vs. control). Our data indicate that NO and adenosine (in the absence of NO) contribute to the onset of vasodilation during dynamic forearm exercise.

  20. Contribution of nitric oxide synthase isoforms to cholinergic vasodilation in murine retinal arterioles.

    PubMed

    Gericke, Adrian; Goloborodko, Evgeny; Sniatecki, Jan J; Steege, Andreas; Wojnowski, Leszek; Pfeiffer, Norbert

    2013-04-01

    Nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) are critically involved in regulation of ocular perfusion. However, the contribution of the individual NOS isoforms to vascular responses is unknown in the retina. Because some previous findings suggested an involvement of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the regulation of retinal vascular tone, a major goal of the present study was to examine the hypothesis that iNOS is involved in mediating cholinergic vasodilation responses of murine retinal arterioles. Another subject of this study was to test the contribution of the other two NOS isoforms, neuronal (nNOS) and endothelial NOS (eNOS), to cholinergic retinal arteriole responses. Expression of individual NOS isoforms was determined in murine retinal arterioles using real-time PCR. All three NOS isoforms were expressed in retinal arterioles. However, eNOS mRNA was found to be most, and iNOS mRNA least abundant. To examine the functional relevance of iNOS for mediating vascular responses, retinal vascular preparations from gene-targeted iNOS-deficient mice (iNOS-/-) and wild-type mice were studied in vitro. Changes in luminal vessel diameter in response to the thromboxane mimetic 9,11-dideoxy-9α,11α-methanoepoxy prostaglandin F2α (U-46619), the endothelium-dependent vasodilator acetylcholine, and the nitric oxide donor nitroprusside were measured by video microscopy. To determine the contribution of individual NOS isoforms to cholinergic vasodilation responses, retinas from iNOS-/- and wild-type mice were incubated with Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME), a non-isoform-selective inhibitor of NOS, 7-nitroindazole, a selective nNOS blocker and aminoguanidine, a selective iNOS inhibitor. U-46619 evoked concentration-dependent vasoconstriction that was similar in retinal arterioles from iNOS-/- and wild-type mice. In retinal arterioles preconstricted with U-46619, acetylcholine and nitroprusside produced dose-dependent dilation that did not differ between iNOS-/- and

  1. Delay in cutaneous melanoma diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Marcus H.S.B.; Drummond-Lage, Ana P.; Baeta, Cyntia; Rocha, Lorena; Almeida, Alessandra M.; Wainstein, Alberto J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Advanced melanoma is an incurable disease with complex and expensive treatments. The best approach to prevent melanoma at advanced stages is an early diagnosis. A knowledge of factors associated with the process of detecting cutaneous melanomas and the reasons for delays in diagnosis is essential for the improvement of the secondary prevention of the disease. Identify sociodemographic, individual, and medical aspects related to cutaneous melanoma diagnosis delay. Interviews evaluated the knowledge of melanoma, signals, symptoms, persons who were suspected, delays in seeking medical attention, physician's deferrals, and related factors of 211 patients. Melanomas were self-discovered in 41.7% of the patients; healthcare providers detected 29.9% of patients and others detected 27%. The main component in delay was patient-related. Only 31.3% of the patients knew that melanoma was a serious skin cancer, and most thought that the pigmented lesion was not important, causing a delay in seeking medical assistance. Patients (36.4%) reported a wait interval of more than 6 months from the onset of an observed change in a pigmented lesion to the first visit to a physician. The delay interval from the first physician visit to a histopathological diagnosis was shorter (<1 month) in 55.5% of patients. Improper treatments without a histopathological confirmation occurred in 14.7% of patients. A professional delay was related to both inappropriate treatments performed without histopathological confirmation (P = 0.003) and long requirements for medical referrals (P < 0.001). A deficient knowledge in the population regarding melanoma and physicians’ misdiagnoses regarding suspicious lesions contributed to delays in diagnosis. PMID:27495055

  2. Immunopathology of experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Z. A.; Reed, S. G.; Roters, S. B.; Sadigursky, M.

    1984-01-01

    Relatively susceptible BALB/c and relatively resistant A/J mice were infected subcutaneously in the right hind footpad with promastigotes of Leishmania mexicana amazonensis. A large localized lesion developed within 2 months after infection in the BALB/c mice, while A/J mice exhibited a small discrete fibrotic nodule. Sequential immunologic and histologic examination demonstrated that BALB/c mice developed a nodular foam-cell type of lesion and progressive depression of a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to leishmania antigen, while the A/J mice had a mixed cellular fibrosing and encapsulating reaction and developed and maintained positive DTH responses to leishmania antigen. Anti-leishmania antibody responses were positive at similar levels in both strains. The lesions in BALB/c mice were found in bone marrow, tendon, skin appendages, and regional lymph nodes, with a tendency toward cutaneous metastases. Lesions in A/J mice remained localized. Fibrosis, focal fibrinoid necrosis, and lymphocytic and macrophagic infiltration were the outstanding features. Light and transmission electron microscopic studies indicated that no outstanding destruction of leishmanias seemed to occur within macrophages of either mouse strain. In the more resistant A/J mice, however, parasitized macrophages were frequently necrotic, and degenerating leishmanias were often seen free in the interstitial tissue. These observations help the interpretation of the histologic features, as well as the pathogenesis, of cutaneous and mucocutaneous leishmaniasis in man. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:6691411

  3. Ferrofluid-associated Cutaneous Dyschromia

    PubMed Central

    Arfa, Kenneth S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ferrofluid is a colloidal suspension that usually consists of surfactant-coated nanoparticles of magnetite (Fe3O4) in a carrier liquid. Ferromagnetic fluid forms spikes when the liquid is exposed to a magnetic field. Purpose: The authors describe a man who developed temporary discoloration of his right palm and fingers after accidental cutaneous contact with ferrofluid and discuss some of the current and potential applications of this unique liquid. Methods: A 28-year-old man was evaluating the effects of magnetic fields using ferrofluid. He performed a modification of the “leaping ferrofluid” demonstration in which he held a superstrong (14,800 gauss magnetic field strength) N52 rare earth neodymium magnet in his palm and slowly lowered that hand over an open bowl that was filled with ferrofluid. Results: As the magnet approached the liquid, the ferrofluid became magnetized. The liquid leaped from the bowl and contacted not only the magnet, but also the palmar surface of his hand and fingers, resulting in a black-brown dyschromia of the affected skin. The discoloration completely resolved after two weeks without any adverse sequellae. Conclusion: Ferrofluid has numerous current and potential applications; in addition to being of value educationally and aesthetically (after being subjected to magnetic fields), it is also utilized for audio loudspeakers, medical innovations (such as a component of either a research tool, a diagnostic aid, or a treatment modality), and seals. Although the authors’ patient did not experience any acute or chronic toxicity from his cutaneous exposure to ferrofluid, conservative follow-up for individuals who experience skin contact with ferromagnetic fluid may be appropriate. PMID:27354890

  4. Lymphocytes infiltrating primary cutaneous neoplasms selectively express the cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen (CLA).

    PubMed Central

    Gelb, A. B.; Smoller, B. R.; Warnke, R. A.; Picker, L. J.

    1993-01-01

    The cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen (CLA) is the T-cell ligand for E-selectin and is involved in tissue selective migration of memory/effector T cells to chronic inflammatory sites in skin. Here, we examine the hypothesis that CLA is also involved in the local host immune response to cutaneous neoplasms. Eleven primary cutaneous melanomas, nine primary cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas, and 11 assorted neoplasms metastatic to cutaneous and noncutaneous sites were immunostained with anti-CLA (HECA-452), as well as antibodies directed against B cells (CD20), T/NK cells (CD43), and memory/effector T cells (CD45RO). Essentially all of the lymphocytes surrounding and infiltrating both the cutaneous and noncutaneous tumors were CD43+/CD20-, and most expressed the memory/effector marker CD45RO. CLA was expressed on 10 to 80% (mean: 50%) of T cells associated with primary cutaneous neoplasms (including both melanomas and squamous cell carcinomas) but was essentially absent from noncutaneous primaries (including those metastatic to dermis) and from cutaneous primaries metastatic to dermis or other sites. Overall, the results suggest that CLA+memory T cells are a major component of the local host immune response to cutaneous neoplasms and are likely recruited to the skin by site-specific rather than tumor-specific mechanisms. The lack of a CLA+T-cell response to dermal metastases suggests that epidermal involvement may be required to attract this subset. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7684198

  5. Cutaneous manifestations of systemic tropical parasitic diseases.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Neil F; Kovarik, Carrie L

    2009-01-01

    Tropical diseases continue to cause significant health problems in developing nations. An overview of illnesses with notable cutaneous findings caused by protozoans and helminthes is provided. The role of the health care provider in disease management is described.

  6. Cutaneous manifestations of dermatomyositis and their management.

    PubMed

    Callen, Jeffrey P

    2010-06-01

    Dermatomyositis is a condition with pathognomonic and characteristic cutaneous lesions. This article describes the skin manifestations observed in patients with dermatomyositis, their differential diagnosis, their relationship to internal disease (particularly malignancy), and their management.

  7. Cutaneous lupus erythematosus: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Okon, L G; Werth, V P

    2013-06-01

    Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) encompasses a wide range of dermatologic manifestations, which may or may not be associated with the development of systemic disease. Cutaneous lupus is divided into several sub-types, including acute CLE (ACLE), sub-acute CLE (SCLE) and chronic CLE (CCLE). CCLE includes discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE), LE profundus (LEP), chilblain cutaneous lupus and lupus tumidus. The diagnosis of these diseases requires proper classification of the sub-type, through a combination of physical examination, laboratory studies, histology, antibody serology and occasionally direct immunofluorescence, while ensuring to exclude systemic disease. The treatment of cutaneous lupus consists of patient education on proper sun protection along with appropriate topical and systemic agents. Systemic agents are indicated in cases of widespread, scarring or treatment-refractory disease. In this chapter, we discuss issues in classification and diagnosis of the various sub-types of CLE, as well as provide an update on therapeutic management.

  8. Cutaneous lupus erythematosus in skin of color.

    PubMed

    Nozile, Wallace; Adgerson, Cheri N; Cohen, George F

    2015-04-01

    Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus (CLE) is a common manifestation in patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. In a significant population of patients, CLE is the predominant feature and, in some cases, patients suffer from cutaneous disease alone. Chronic Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus (CCLE) is a scarring subtype, more prevalent in blacks. Patients with skin of color may pose a challenge to physicians due to exaggerated cutaneous findings and increased risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation and hypertrophic scarring. With the demographics of the United States rapidly shifting towards a greater population of non-Caucasian racial and ethnic groups, it is imperative that we expand on the limited research into molecular variation, clinical presentation, and therapeutic efficacy in CLE. The purpose of this review is to bring attention to the unique and severe aspects of CLE in persons of color, which calls for early and aggressive treatment.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: primary localized cutaneous amyloidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... AP, Hans-Filho G, Sakuma TH, Lai-Cheong J, Clements S, Odashiro M, Odashiro DN, Hans-Neto G, ... mutations underlie familial primary localized cutaneous amyloidosis. Am J Hum Genet. 2008 Jan;82(1):73-80. ...

  10. Objective evaluation of cutaneous thermal sensivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanbeaumont, W.

    1972-01-01

    The possibility of obtaining reliable and objective quantitative responses was investigated under conditions where only temperature changes in localized cutaneous areas evoked measurable changes in remote sudomotor activity. Both male and female subjects were studied to evaluate sex difference in thermal sensitivity. The results discussed include: sweat rate responses to contralateral cooling, comparison of sweat rate responses between men and women to contralateral cooling, influence of the menstrual cycle on the sweat rate responses to contralateral cooling, comparison of threshold of sweating responses between men and women, and correlation of latency to threshold for whole body sweating. It is concluded that the quantitative aspects of the reflex response is affected by both the density and activation of receptors as well as the rate of heat loss; men responded 8-10% more frequently than women to thermode cooling, the magnitude of responses being greater for men; and women responded 7-9% more frequently to thermode cooling on day 1 of menstruation, as compared to day 15.

  11. Sympathetic control of reflex cutaneous vasoconstriction in human aging

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Lacy M.; Kenney, W. Larry

    2015-01-01

    This Synthesis highlights a series of recent studies that has systematically interrogated age-related deficits in cold-induced skin vasoconstriction. In response to cold stress, a reflex increase in sympathetic nervous system activity mediates reductions in skin blood flow. Reflex vasoconstriction during cold exposure is markedly impaired in aged skin, contributing to the relative inability of healthy older adults to maintain core temperature during mild cold stress in the absence of appropriate behavioral thermoregulation. This compromised reflex cutaneous vasoconstriction in healthy aging can occur as a result of functional deficits at multiple points along the efferent sympathetic reflex axis, including blunted sympathetic outflow directed to the skin vasculature, reduced presynaptic neurotransmitter synthesis and/or release, and altered end-organ responsiveness at several loci, in addition to potential alterations in afferent thermoreceptor function. Arguments have been made that the relative inability of aged skin to appropriately constrict is due to the aging cutaneous arterioles themselves, whereas other data point to the neural circuitry controlling those vessels. The argument presented herein provides strong evidence for impaired efferent sympathetic control of the peripheral cutaneous vasculature during whole body cold exposure as the primary mechanism responsible for attenuated vasoconstriction. PMID:26272321

  12. POLE mutations in families predisposed to cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Aoude, Lauren G; Heitzer, Ellen; Johansson, Peter; Gartside, Michael; Wadt, Karin; Pritchard, Antonia L; Palmer, Jane M; Symmons, Judith; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Tomlinson, Ian; Kearsey, Stephen; Hayward, Nicholas K

    2015-12-01

    Germline mutations in the exonuclease domain of POLE have been shown to predispose to colorectal cancers and adenomas. POLE is an enzyme involved in DNA repair and chromosomal DNA replication. In order to assess whether such mutations might also predispose to cutaneous melanoma, we interrogated whole-genome and exome data from probands of 34 melanoma families lacking pathogenic mutations in known high penetrance melanoma susceptibility genes: CDKN2A, CDK4, BAP1, TERT, POT1, ACD and TERF2IP. We found a novel germline mutation, POLE p.(Trp347Cys), in a 7-case cutaneous melanoma family. Functional assays in S. pombe showed that this mutation led to an increased DNA mutation rate comparable to that seen with a Pol ε mutant with no exonuclease activity. We then performed targeted sequencing of POLE in 1243 cutaneous melanoma cases and found that a further ten probands had novel or rare variants in the exonuclease domain of POLE. Although this frequency is not significantly higher than that in unselected Caucasian controls, we observed multiple cancer types in the melanoma families, suggesting that some germline POLE mutations may predispose to a broad spectrum of cancers, including melanoma. In addition, we found the first mutation outside the exonuclease domain, p.(Gln520Arg), in a family with an extensive history of colorectal cancer.

  13. Sympathetic control of reflex cutaneous vasoconstriction in human aging.

    PubMed

    Greaney, Jody L; Alexander, Lacy M; Kenney, W Larry

    2015-10-01

    This Synthesis highlights a series of recent studies that has systematically interrogated age-related deficits in cold-induced skin vasoconstriction. In response to cold stress, a reflex increase in sympathetic nervous system activity mediates reductions in skin blood flow. Reflex vasoconstriction during cold exposure is markedly impaired in aged skin, contributing to the relative inability of healthy older adults to maintain core temperature during mild cold stress in the absence of appropriate behavioral thermoregulation. This compromised reflex cutaneous vasoconstriction in healthy aging can occur as a result of functional deficits at multiple points along the efferent sympathetic reflex axis, including blunted sympathetic outflow directed to the skin vasculature, reduced presynaptic neurotransmitter synthesis and/or release, and altered end-organ responsiveness at several loci, in addition to potential alterations in afferent thermoreceptor function. Arguments have been made that the relative inability of aged skin to appropriately constrict is due to the aging cutaneous arterioles themselves, whereas other data point to the neural circuitry controlling those vessels. The argument presented herein provides strong evidence for impaired efferent sympathetic control of the peripheral cutaneous vasculature during whole body cold exposure as the primary mechanism responsible for attenuated vasoconstriction.

  14. Cutaneous pseudovasculitis, antiphospholipid syndrome and obstetric misadventure.

    PubMed

    Thayaparan, A S; Lowe, S A

    2015-09-01

    We present two women with severe obstetric complications from antiphospholipid (aPL) syndrome associated with a rare dermatological manifestation, cutaneous pseudovasculitis. Both of these women developed a rash on the palmar aspect of the hands during the post partum period, with histology consiste